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Sample records for action possibly involving

  1. Possible involvement of programmed cell death pathways in the neuroprotective action of polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Bastianetto, S; Krantic, S; Chabot, J-G; Quirion, R

    2011-08-01

    One of the hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease is the accumulation of senile plaques composed of extra-cellular aggregates of beta-amyloid (Aβ) peptides. It is well established that at least in vitro, Aβ triggers apoptotic cell death via the activation of caspase-dependent and -independent cell death effectors, namely caspase-3 and apoptosis inducing factor (AIF), respectively. Epidemiological studies have reported that elderly people have a lower risk (up to 50%) of developing dementia if they regularly eat fruits and vegetables and drink tea and red wine (in moderation). Numerous studies indicate that polyphenols derived from these foods and beverages account for the observed neuroprotective effects. In particular, we have reported that polyphenols extracted from green tea (i.e. epigallocatechin gallate or EGCG) and red wine (i.e. resveratrol) block Aβ-induced hippocampal cell death, by at least partially inhibiting Aβ fibrillisation. It has been shown that polyphenols may also modulate caspase-dependent and -independent programmed cell death (PCD) pathways. Indeed, polyphenols including resveratrol, EGCG and luteolin significantly inhibit the activation of the key apoptotic executioner, caspase-3 and are able to modulate mitogen-activated protein kinases known to play an important role in neuronal apoptosis. Moreover, it has been reported that polyphenols may exert their anti-apoptotic action by inhibiting AIF release from mitochondria, thus providing new mechanism of action for polyphenols. This review aims to update the current knowledge regarding the differential effects of polyphenols on PCD pathways and discuss their putative neuroprotective action resulting from their capacity to modulate these pathways.

  2. Possible involvement of sigma-1 receptors in the anti-immobility action of bupropion, a dopamine reuptake inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Dhir, Ashish; Kulkarni, S K

    2008-08-01

    Sigma receptors particularly, sigma-1 subtype is known to modulate the release of catecholamines in the brain and may participate in the mechanism of action of various antidepressants. The present study investigated the possible involvement of sigma receptors in modulating the anti-immobility-like effect of bupropion (a dopamine reuptake inhibitor) using the forced swim test (FST) in mice. Bupropion produced dose-dependent (10-40 mg/kg, i.p.) reduction in immobility period and the ED(50) value was found to be 18.5 (7.34-46.6) mg/kg, i.p. (+)-Pentazocine (2.5 mg/kg, i.p.), a high-affinity sigma-1 receptor agonist, produced synergistic response when it was co-administered with a subeffective dose of bupropion (10 mg/kg, i.p.). On the contrary, pretreatment with progesterone (10 mg/kg, s.c.), a sigma-1 receptor antagonist neurosteroid, rimcazole (5 mg/kg, i.p.), another sigma-1 receptor antagonist, or BD 1047 (1 mg/kg, i.p.), a novel sigma-1 receptor antagonist, reversed the anti-immobility effects of bupropion (20 mg/kg, i.p.). The various modulators used in the study did not show any effect per se on locomotor activity except bupropion which at a higher dose (15-40 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly increased the locomotor activity. The results for the first time demonstrated the involvement of sigma-1 receptors in the anti-immobility effects of bupropion.

  3. Adrenergic regulation of gluconeogenesis: possible involvement of two mechanisms of signal transduction in alpha 1-adrenergic action.

    PubMed Central

    García-Sáinz, J A; Hernández-Sotomayor, S M

    1985-01-01

    We have previously suggested that the effects of alpha 1-adrenergic agents on hepatocyte metabolism involve two mechanisms: (i) a calcium-independent insulin-sensitive process that is modulated by glucocorticoids and (ii) a calcium-dependent insulin-insensitive process that is modulated by thyroid hormones. We have studied the effect of epinephrine (plus propranolol) on gluconeogenesis from lactate and dihydroxyacetone. It was observed that the adrenergic stimulation of gluconeogenesis from lactate seemed to occur through both mechanisms, whereas when the substrate was dihydroxyacetone the action took place exclusively through the calcium-independent insulin-sensitive process. This effect was absent in hepatocytes from adrenalectomized rats, suggesting that it is modulated by glucocorticoids. PMID:2995981

  4. A possible action mechanism of HALS

    SciTech Connect

    Ohkatsu, Y.; Yamaguchi, K.

    1993-12-31

    The action mechanisms of HALS (hindered amine light stabilizers) proposed so far include several functions of HALS as radical scavenger, hydroperoxide decomposer, metal deactivator, etc., but don`t explain the photo-stabilizing action satisfactorily. The authors found that the action of HALS is demonstrated markably in the presence of phenolic antioxidants, and concluded that HALS work as hydrogen donor (reducing agent) and regenerate phenols from quinones derived from the phenolic antioxidants in which the quinone absorb and are activated by uv light. In this paper, a possible action mechanism of HALS including the photo-stabilizing action without any contradiction with functions reported will be presented on kinetic and spectroscopic studies.

  5. In vitro screening of major neurotransmitter systems possibly involved in the mechanism of action of antibodies to S100 protein in released-active form

    PubMed Central

    Gorbunov, Evgeniy A; Ertuzun, Irina A; Kachaeva, Evgeniya V; Tarasov, Sergey A; Epstein, Oleg I

    2015-01-01

    Experimentally and clinically, it was shown that released-active form of antibodies to S100 protein (RAF of Abs to S100) exerts a wide range of pharmacological activities: anxiolytic, antiasthenic, antiaggressive, stress-protective, antihypoxic, antiischemic, neuroprotective, and nootropic. The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of RAF of Abs to S100 on major neurotransmitter systems (serotoninergic, GABAergic, dopaminergic, and on sigma receptors as well) which are possibly involved in its mechanism of pharmacological activity. Radioligand binding assays were used for assessment of the drug influence on ligand–receptor interaction. [35S]GTPγS binding assay, cyclic adenosine monophosphate HTRF™, cellular dielectric spectroscopy assays, and assays based on measurement of intracellular concentration of Ca2+ ions were used for assessment of agonist or antagonist properties of the drug toward receptors. RAF of Abs to S100 increased radioligand binding to 5-HT1F, 5-HT2B, 5-HT2Cedited, 5-HT3, and to D3 receptors by 142.0%, 131.9%, 149.3%, 120.7%, and 126.3%, respectively. Also, the drug significantly inhibited specific binding of radioligands to GABAB1A/B2 receptors by 25.8%, and to both native and recombinant human sigma1 receptors by 75.3% and 40.32%, respectively. In the functional assays, it was shown that the drug exerted antagonism at 5-HT1B, D3, and GABAB1A/B2 receptors inhibiting agonist-induced responses by 23.24%, 32.76%, and 30.2%, respectively. On the contrary, the drug exerted an agonist effect at 5-HT1A receptors enhancing receptor functional activity by 28.0%. The pharmacological profiling of RAF of Abs to S100 among 27 receptor provides evidence for drug-related modification of major neurotransmitter systems. PMID:26604768

  6. Parental Involvement in Education: Possibilities and Limitations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khan, Mir Baiz

    1996-01-01

    Examines parental involvement in school affairs as a means to forge school-community partnerships in education. Identifies fundamental barriers to meaningful parental involvement and suggests possible solutions, such as parent empowerment, administrators' support, home-school interdependency, awareness of current research, reorganized structures,…

  7. Possible Involvement of the Inhibition of NF-κB Factor in Anti-Inflammatory Actions That Melatonin Exerts on Mast Cells.

    PubMed

    Maldonado, M D; García-Moreno, H; González-Yanes, C; Calvo, J R

    2016-08-01

    Melatonin is a molecule endogenously produced in a wide variety of immune cells, including mast cells (RBL-2H3). It exhibits immunomodulatory, anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic properties. The physiologic mechanisms underlying these activities of melatonin have not been clarified in mast cells. This work is designed to determine the anti-inflammatory effect and mechanism of action of melatonin on activated mast cells. RBL-2H3 were pre-treated with exogenous melatonin (MELx) at physiological (100nM) and pharmacological (1 mM) doses for 30 min, washed and activated with PMACI (phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate plus calcium ionophore A23187) for 2 h and 12 h. The data shows that pre-treatment of MELx in stimulated mast cells, significantly reduced the levels of endogenous melatonin production (MELn), TNF-α and IL-6. These effects are directly related with the MELx concentration used. MELx also inhibited IKK/NF-κB signal transduction pathway in stimulated mast cells. These results indicate a molecular basis for the ability of melatonin to prevent inflammation and for the treatment of allergic inflammatory diseases through the down-regulation of mast cell activation. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 1926-1933, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. GHB for cataplexy: Possible mode of action.

    PubMed

    Szabadi, Elemer

    2015-06-01

    The sleep disorder narcolepsy is caused by the loss of orexinergic neurones in the lateral hypothalamus. A troublesome symptom of narcolepsy is cataplexy, the sudden loss of muscle tone in response to strong emotions. It can be alleviated by antidepressants and sodium oxybate (γ-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB)). It is likely that the noradrenergic nucleus locus coeruleus (LC) is involved since it is essential for the maintenance of muscle tone, and ceases to fire during cataplectic attacks. Furthermore, alpha-2 adrenoceptors proliferate in the LC in cataplexy, probably due to 'heterologous denervation supersensitivity' resulting from the loss/weakening of the orexinergic input to the LC. This would lead to the sensitization of the autoinhibition mechanism of LC neurones mediated by inhibitory alpha-2 adrenoceptors ('autoreceptors'). Thus the excitatory input from the amygdala to the LC, activated by an emotional stimulus, would lead to the 'switching off' of LC activity via the supersensitive auto-inhibition mechanism. GHB is an agonist at both γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) GABA (B) and GHB receptors that may be a subtype of an extrasynaptic GABA(A) receptor. GHB may prevent a cataplectic attack by dampening the tone of LC neurones via the stimulation of inhibitory extrasynaptic GABA receptors in the LC, and thus increasing the threshold for autoinhibition.

  9. Joint action modulates motor system involvement during action observation in 3-year-olds.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Marlene; Hunnius, Sabine; van Elk, Michiel; van Ede, Freek; Bekkering, Harold

    2011-06-01

    When we are engaged in a joint action, we need to integrate our partner's actions with our own actions. Previous research has shown that in adults the involvement of one's own motor system is enhanced during observation of an action partner as compared to during observation of an individual actor. The aim of this study was to investigate whether similar motor system involvement is present at early stages of joint action development and whether it is related to joint action performance. In an EEG experiment with 3-year-old children, we assessed the children's brain activity and performance during a joint game with an adult experimenter. We used a simple button-pressing game in which the two players acted in turns. Power in the mu- and beta-frequency bands was compared when children were not actively moving but observing the experimenter's actions when (1) they were engaged in the joint action game and (2) when they were not engaged. Enhanced motor involvement during action observation as indicated by attenuated sensorimotor mu- and beta-power was found when the 3-year-olds were engaged in the joint action. This enhanced motor activation during action observation was associated with better joint action performance. The findings suggest that already in early childhood the motor system is differentially activated during action observation depending on the involvement in a joint action. This motor system involvement might play an important role for children's joint action performance.

  10. Environmental Volunteers: Factors Influencing Their Involvement in Environmental Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liarakou, Georgia; Kostelou, Eleni; Gavrilakis, Costas

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the factors that influence volunteers to become involved in environmental action. The research focused on volunteers undertaking action in summer camps organised by an environmental non-governmental organisation (NGO) in Greece. The results suggest that the environmental issues addressed in volunteer…

  11. Phytoestrogens and Breast Cancer Prevention: Possible Mechanisms of Action

    PubMed Central

    Mense, Sarah M.; Hei, Tom K.; Ganju, Ramesh K.; Bhat, Hari K.

    2008-01-01

    Objective Phytoestrogens display an array of pharmacologic properties, and in recent years investigation of their potential as anticancer agents has increased dramatically. In this article we review the published literature related to phytoestrogens and breast cancer as well as suggest the possible mechanisms that may underlie the relationship between phytoestrogens and breast cancer. Data sources Electronic searches on phytoestrogens and breast cancer were performed on MEDLINE and EMBASE in June 2007. No date restriction was placed on the electronic search. Data extraction We focused on experimental data from published studies that examined the characteristics of phytoestrogens using in vivo or in vitro models. We also include human intervention studies in this review. Data synthesis We evaluated evidence regarding the possible mechanisms of phytoestrogen action. Discussions of these mechanisms were organized into those activities related to the estrogen receptor, cell growth and proliferation, tumor development, signaling pathways, and estrogen-metabolizing enzymes. Conclusions We suggest that despite numerous investigations, the mechanisms of phytoestrogen action in breast cancer have yet to be elucidated. It remains uncertain whether these plant compounds are chemoprotective or whether they may produce adverse outcomes related to breast carcinogenesis. PMID:18414622

  12. Computations involving differential operators and their actions on functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crouch, Peter E.; Grossman, Robert; Larson, Richard

    1991-01-01

    The algorithms derived by Grossmann and Larson (1989) are further developed for rewriting expressions involving differential operators. The differential operators involved arise in the local analysis of nonlinear dynamical systems. These algorithms are extended in two different directions: the algorithms are generalized so that they apply to differential operators on groups and the data structures and algorithms are developed to compute symbolically the action of differential operators on functions. Both of these generalizations are needed for applications.

  13. Mode of Action of the Natural Insecticide, Decaleside Involves Sodium Pump Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Rajashekar, Yallappa; Shivanandappa, Thimmappa

    2017-01-01

    Decalesides are a new class of natural insecticides which are toxic to insects by contact via the tarsal gustatory chemosensilla. The symptoms of their toxicity to insects and the rapid knockdown effect suggest neurotoxic action, but the precise mode of action and the molecular targets for decaleside action are not known. We have presented experimental evidence for the involvement of sodium pump inhibition in the insecticidal action of decaleside in the cockroach and housefly. The knockdown effect of decaleside is concomitant with the in vivo inhibition of Na+, K+ -ATPase in the head and thorax. The lack of insecticidal action by experimental ablation of tarsi or blocking the tarsal sites with paraffin correlated with lack of inhibition of Na+- K+ ATPase in vivo. Maltotriose, a trisaccharide, partially rescued the toxic action of decaleside as well as inhibition of the enzyme, suggesting the possible involvement of gustatory sugar receptors. In vitro studies with crude insect enzyme preparation and purified porcine Na+, K+ -ATPase showed that decaleside competitively inhibited the enzyme involving the ATP binding site. Our study shows that the insecticidal action of decaleside via the tarsal gustatory sites is causally linked to the inhibition of sodium pump which represents a unique mode of action. The precise target(s) for decaleside in the tarsal chemosensilla and the pathway linked to inhibition of sodium pump and the insecticidal action remain to be understood. PMID:28125742

  14. Participatory action research: involving students in parent education.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Cathrine; Wu, Cynthia; Lam, Winsome

    2014-01-01

    Competition for scarce clinical placements has increased requiring new and innovative models to be developed to meet the growing need. A participatory action research project was used to provide a community nursing clinical experience of involvement in parent education. Nine Hong Kong nursing students self-selected to participate in the project to implement a parenting program called Parenting Young Children in a Digital World. Three project cycles were used: needs identification, skills development and program implementation. Students were fully involved in each cycle's planning, action and reflection phase. Qualitative and quantitative data were collected to inform the project. The overall outcome of the project was the provision of a rich and viable clinical placement experience that created significant learning opportunities for the students and researchers. This paper will explore the student's participation in this PAR project as an innovative clinical practice opportunity.

  15. Melatonin and melatonergic drugs on sleep: possible mechanisms of action.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Venkataramanujan; Pandi-Perumal, Seithikurippu R; Trahkt, Ilya; Spence, D Warren; Poeggeler, Burkhard; Hardeland, Ruediger; Cardinali, Daniel P

    2009-01-01

    Pineal melatonin is synthesized and secreted in close association with the light/dark cycle. The temporal relationship between the nocturnal rise in melatonin secretion and the "opening of the sleep gate" (i.e., the increase in sleep propensity at the beginning of the night), coupled with the sleep-promoting effects of exogenous melatonin, suggest that melatonin is involved in the regulation of sleep. The sleep-promoting and sleep/wake rhythm regulating effects of melatonin are attributed to its action on MT(1) and MT(2) melatonin receptors present in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus. Animal experiments carried out in rats, cats, and monkeys have revealed that melatonin has the ability to reduce sleep onset time and increase sleep duration. However, clinical studies reveal inconsistent findings, with some of them reporting beneficial effects of melatonin on sleep, whereas in others only marginal effects are documented. Recently a prolonged-release 2-mg melatonin preparation (Circadin(TM)) was approved by the European Medicines Agency as a monotherapy for the short-term treatment of primary insomnia in patients who are aged 55 or above. Several melatonin derivatives have been shown to increase nonrapid eye movement (NREM) in rats and are of potential pharmacological importance. So far only one of these melatonin derivatives, ramelteon, has received approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to be used as a sleep promoter. Ramelteon is a novel MT(1) and MT(2) melatonergic agonist that has specific effects on melatonin receptors in the SCN and is effective in promoting sleep in experimental animals such as cats and monkeys. In clinical trials, ramelteon reduced sleep onset latency and promoted sleep in patients with chronic insomnia, including an older adult population. Both melatonin and ramelteon promote sleep by regulating the sleep/wake rhythm through their actions on melatonin receptors in the SCN, a unique mechanism of action not

  16. The biological effects and possible modes of action of nanosilver.

    PubMed

    Völker, Carolin; Oetken, Matthias; Oehlmann, Jörg

    2013-01-01

    Novel physicochemical and biological properties have led to a versatile spectrum of applications for nanosized silver particles. Silver nanoparticles are applied primarily for their antimicrobial effects, and may variety of commercially available products have emerged. To better predict and prevent possible environmental impacts from silver nanoparticles that are derived from increasing production volumes and environmental release, more data on the biological effects are needed on appropriate model organisms. We examined the literature that addressed the adverse effects of silver nanoparticles on different levels of biological integration, including in vitro and in vivo test systems. Results of in vitro studies indicate a dose-dependent programmed cell death included by oxidative stress as main possible pathway of toxicity. Furthermore, silver nanoparticles may affect cellular enzymes by interference with free thiol groups and mimicry of endogenous ions. Similar mechanisms may apply for antibacterial effects produced by nonasilver. These effects are primary from the interference nanosilver has with bacterial cell membranes. Few in vivo studies have been performed to evaluated the toxic mode of action of nanosilver or to provide evidence for oxidative stress as an important mechanism of nanosilver toxicity. Organisms that are most acutely sensitive to nanosilver toxicity are the freshwater filter-freeding organisms. Both in vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated tha silver ions released from nanoparticle surface contribute to the toxicity, and, indeed, some findings indicated a unique nanoparticles effect. For an adequate evaluation of the environmental impact of nanosilver, greater emphasis should be placed on combining mechanistic investigations that are performed in vitro, with results obtained in in vivo test systems. Future in vivo test system studies should emphasize long-term exposure scenarios. Moreover, the dietary uptake of silver nanoparticles and

  17. Possible involvement of poly(A) in protein synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, A; Favreau, M

    1983-01-01

    The experiments of this paper have re-evaluated the possibility that poly(A) is involved in protein synthesis by testing whether purified poly(A) might competitively inhibit in vitro protein synthesis in rabbit reticulocyte extracts. We have found that poly(A) inhibits the rate of translation of many different poly(A)+ mRNAs and that comparable inhibition is not observed with other ribopolymers. Inhibition by poly(A) preferentially affects the translation of adenylated mRNAs and can be overcome by increased mRNA concentrations or by translating mRNPs instead of mRNA. The extent of inhibition is dependent on the size of the competitor poly(A) as well as on the translation activity which a lysate has for poly(A)+ RNA. In light of our results and numerous experiments in the literature, we propose that poly(A) has a function in protein synthesis and that any role in the determination of mRNA stability is indirect. Images PMID:6137807

  18. Exploring Other Practicum Possibilities: An Action Research Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Daniel B.; Walters, William

    2016-01-01

    This article summarizes an action research project undertaken at a teacher education institution in Canada. The action research was implemented in an effort to respond to initial observations related to some practicum limitations. In an effort to seek a "solution" to these limitations, a modified practicum model was piloted with a small…

  19. 10 CFR 26.77 - Management actions regarding possible impairment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Section 26.77 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Management Actions and... competently perform his or her duties. (b) If an individual appears to be impaired or the individual's fitness... perform drug and alcohol tests or implement the determination of fitness process otherwise required...

  20. 10 CFR 26.77 - Management actions regarding possible impairment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Section 26.77 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Management Actions and... competently perform his or her duties. (b) If an individual appears to be impaired or the individual's fitness... perform drug and alcohol tests or implement the determination of fitness process otherwise required...

  1. 10 CFR 26.77 - Management actions regarding possible impairment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Section 26.77 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Management Actions and... competently perform his or her duties. (b) If an individual appears to be impaired or the individual's fitness... perform drug and alcohol tests or implement the determination of fitness process otherwise required...

  2. 10 CFR 26.77 - Management actions regarding possible impairment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Section 26.77 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Management Actions and... competently perform his or her duties. (b) If an individual appears to be impaired or the individual's fitness... perform drug and alcohol tests or implement the determination of fitness process otherwise required...

  3. 10 CFR 26.77 - Management actions regarding possible impairment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Section 26.77 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Management Actions and... competently perform his or her duties. (b) If an individual appears to be impaired or the individual's fitness... perform drug and alcohol tests or implement the determination of fitness process otherwise required...

  4. Clonidine and Cortical Plasticity: Possible Evidence for Noradrenergic Involvement.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-10-31

    D 616 CLONIDINE AND CORTICAL PLASTICITY POSSIBLE EVIDENCE / FOR NORADRENERGIC IN..(U) BROWIN UNIV PROVIDENCE RICENTER FOR NEURAL SCIENCE S B NELSON...plasticity in kitten visual cortex, we monocularly deprived kittens while administering the at-2 adrenergic agonist clonidine (CLON). To avoid bias in...Distribution/ AvailabilitY Codes Avail and/or Dist Special I. S N 0102- LF. 014- 6601 SECuRITY CLASSIVrCATION OF TMIS PA*S St’e DOI@ MAIN Clonidine and Cortical

  5. Evidence suggesting possible SCA1 gene involvement in schizophrenia

    SciTech Connect

    Diehl, S.R.; Wange, S.; Sun, C.

    1994-09-01

    Several findings suggest a possible role for the SCA1 gene on chromosome 6p in some cases of schizophrenia. First, linkage analyses in Irish pedigrees provided LOD scores up to 3.0 for one model tested using microsatellites closely linked to SCA1. Reanalysis of these data using affected sibpair methods yielded a significant result (p = 0.01) for one marker. An attempt to replicate this linkage finding was made using 44 NIMH families (206 individuals, 80 affected) and 12 Utah families (120 individuals, 49 affected). LOD scores were negative in these new families, even allowing for heterogeneity, as were results using affected sibpair methods. However, one Utah family provided a LOD score of 1.3. We also screened the SCA1 trinucleotide repeat to search for expansions characteristic of this disorder in these families and in 38 additional unrelated schizophrenics. We found 1 schizophrenic with 41 repeats, which is substantially larger than the maximum size of 36 repeats observed in previous studies of several hundred controls. We are now assessing whether the distribution of SCA1 repeats differs significantly in schizophrenia versus controls. Recent reports suggest possible anticipation in schizophrenia (also characteristic of SCA1) and a few cases of psychiatric symptoms suggesting schizophrenia have been observed in the highly related disorder DRPLA (SCA2), which is also based on trinucleotide repeat expansion. These findings suggest that further investigations of this gene and chromosome region may be a priority.

  6. Various Possible Toxicants Involved in Thyroid Dysfunction: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Bajaj, Jagminder K.; Salwan, Poonam

    2016-01-01

    About 300 million people across the world suffer from thyroid gland dysfunction. Environmental factors play an important role in causation of autoimmune thyroid diseases in susceptible individuals. Genetics contributes to 70% of the risk. In order to reduce the risk, we need to understand the association of environmental agents with thyroid dysfunction. These factors are especially relevant for those at increased risk due to positive family history. The ideal study to see the impact of a thyroid toxicant consists of directly measuring the degree of exposure to toxicant in an individual with his thyroid status. Knowledge of various factors influencing thyroid dysfunction can help in interpreting the results of such studies in a better way. This article is an attempt to highlight the various possible toxicants affecting thyroid function so that adequate measures can be undertaken to control excessive exposure in future to reduce the prevalence of thyroid disorders. PMID:26894086

  7. Possible involvement of queuine in regulation of cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Chandramani; Jaiswal, Yogesh K; Vinayak, Manjula

    2007-01-01

    An increase in cell number is one of the most prominent characteristics of cancer cells. This may be caused by an increase in cell proliferation or decrease in cell death. Queuine is one of the modified base which is found at first anticodon position of specific tRNAs. It is ubiquitously present throughout the living system except mycoplasma and yeast. The tRNAs of Q-family are completely modified to Q-tRNAs in terminally differentiated somatic cells, however hypomodification of Q-tRNA is closely associated with cell proliferation and malignancy. Queuine participates at various cellular functions such as regulation of cell proliferation, cell signaling and alteration in the expression of growth associated proto-oncogenes. Like other proto-oncogenes bcl2 is known to involve in cell survival by inhibiting apoptosis. Queuine or Q-tRNA is suggested to inhibit cell proliferation but the mechanism of regulation of cell proliferation by queuine or Q-tRNA is not well understood. Therefore, in the present study regulation in cell proliferation by queuine in vivo and in vitro as well as the expression of cell death regulatory protein Bcl2 are investigated. For this DLAT cancerous mouse, U87 cell line and HepG2 cell line are treated with different concentrations of queuine and the effect of queuine on cell proliferation and apoptosis are studied. The results indicate that queuine down regulates cell proliferation and expression of Bcl2 protein, suggesting that queuine promotes cell death and participates in the regulation of cell proliferation.

  8. 40 CFR 300.525 - State involvement in removal actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) SUPERFUND, EMERGENCY PLANNING, AND COMMUNITY RIGHT-TO-KNOW PROGRAMS NATIONAL OIL AND HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES... removal actions. (a) States may undertake Fund-financed removal actions pursuant to a cooperative agreement with EPA. State-lead removal actions taken pursuant to cooperative agreements must be conducted...

  9. Possible involvement of ghrelin on pain threshold in obesity.

    PubMed

    Guneli, Ensari; Gumustekin, Mukaddes; Ates, Mehmet

    2010-03-01

    Pain threshold (or perception) can increase or decrease according to some factors like gender, depression or individual differences. Also, previous studies showed that pain threshold can change in obesity but, these studies on the effects of obesity on pain threshold have given controversial results. In the obese people who were exposed to pain stimulation to determined pain threshold, an increased pain threshold was observed. Contrarily, in the studies using electrophysiological test had lower pain threshold, which indicates a reverse correlation between degree of overweight and the threshold of the nociceptive reflex. These studies indicate possible interrelationships between the endogenous opioids, nociception and obesity or eating behavior. Nevertheless, its mechanism is still unclear. The endocrine changes that play an important role in obesity can lead an increase or decrease in pain threshold. There are a few researches about these hormonal factors which are related to pain pathways, that they are nociceptive (like leptin) or antinociceptive effect (like ghrelin, orexin A and B). Ghrelin is one of the hormones which is related to obesity. There are studies which prove the relationship between this hormone and the systems that play a role in pain modulation in the brain. However, there is no previous knowledge about the effects of ghrelin on pain threshold in obesity. But, many strong evidence are present to hypothesise that ghrelin may have effects on pain threshold. Obesity and fasting are the two main situations in which ghrelin secretion is mostly modified. Circulating ghrelin levels negatively correlate with BMI, meaning increased ghrelin secretion during fasting, malnutrition, cachexia, and in anorexia nervosa and reduced ghrelin secretion in obesity. Therefore, we have the opinion that ghrelin play an important role in obesity-pain relationship and/or regulate other systems that are related to pain pathway. Based on the above analyses, we propose a

  10. Cholecystokinin impact on rainbow trout glucose homeostasis: possible involvement of central glucosensors.

    PubMed

    Polakof, Sergio; Míguez, Jesus M; Soengas, José L

    2011-12-10

    Although the role of cholecystokinin (CCK) on fish appetite regulation has been widely studied, its involvement in the regulation of glucose metabolism had been little explored to date. In the present study we have carried out different experimental approaches to study CCK effects in rainbow trout (a so-called 'glucose intolerant' fish species) glucose homeostasis. We have found that for the first time in a vertebrate species, systemic or central CCK administration causes hyperglycemia, which is at least in part related to the presence of an ancestral gut-brain axis in which CCK is involved. By using capsaicin we have found that part of the action of CCK on glucose homeostasis is mediated by vagal and splanchnic afferents. Changes in hepatic metabolism after systemic CCK administration suggest that the effects are not directly taking place on the liver, but probably in other tissues, while after the central CCK administration, the glycogenolytic response observed in liver could be mediated by the activation of the sympathetic system. In hypothalamus and hindbrain changes elicited by CCK-8 treatment are likely related to the glucosensor response to the increased glycemia and/or vagal/splanchnic afferences whereas in hindbrain a possible action through specific CCK-1 receptors cannot be excluded. All these processes result in changes in metabolic parameters related with glucose homeostasis control. Further studies are needed to fully understand the role of this peptide on glucose homeostasis control in fish.

  11. Melatonin in humans: Possible involvement in SIDS, and use in contraceptives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wurtman, Richard J.; Lynch, Harry J.; Sturner, William Q.

    1991-01-01

    Relatively few tools exist for assessing the possible involvement of melatonin in normal or abnormal physiologlcal and behavioral states. One cannot perform the classic ablation experiment of endocrinologists by cavalierly removing the human's pineal, nor derive the same effect pharmacologically by administering a drug which blocks the actions of the indole on its receptors (because no such drugs, demonstrated to work in humans, exist). About all that can be done is to administer the melatonin and see what happens, or measure its levels in a body fluid and determine whether its temporal patterns track those of the physiological or behavioral variable being examined. The clinical state of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) which apparently is associated with abnormalities in melatonin concentrations within body fluids obtained at autopsy is described. New data which suggest that exogenous melatonin has sufficient antigonadal potency to allow it to replace estrogen and, acting in combination with norethisterone, serve as a useful contraceptive agent is summarized.

  12. Anxiolytic action of pterostilbene: involvement of hippocampal ERK phosphorylation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pterostilbene, a natural analog of resveratrol, has diverse health-beneficial properties. However, the neurological activities of this compound are largely unexplored. Here we report that pterostilbene shows anxiolytic action by downregulating phosphorylated levels of ERKs in the hippocampus of mice...

  13. Reduce Toxic Exposures: Get Involved and Take Action!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Exceptional Parent, 2006

    2006-01-01

    There is a growing concern about the connection between many chemical exposures and learning and other developmental disabilities (LDD). National and local groups are developing new programs around the country that are making this connection--and taking action with regard to policy, education and research efforts. They are working towards reducing…

  14. Possible action mechanism of the electromagnetic fields in the liver cancer development: A mathematical proposal

    SciTech Connect

    Jiménez-García, Mónica Noemí; Godina-Nava, Juan José

    2012-02-08

    Currently it is known that electromagnetic field exposure can induce biological changes, although the precise effects and action mechanism of the interaction between the electromagnetic field and biological systems are not well understood. In this work we propose a possible action mechanism, concerning the effect that the extremely low frequency electromagnetic field exposure has on the early stage of liver cancer development. The model is developed studying the phenomena called oxidative stress that it appears after it is applied a carcinogenic agent used to induce hepatic cancer chemically in an experimental animal model. This physical-chemical process involves the movement of magnetic field dependent free charged particles, called free radicals. We will consider the use of the radical pairs theory as a framework, in which we will describe the spin density operator evolution by implementing the stochastic Liouville equation with hyperfine interaction. This describes how the selectivity of the interaction between spin states of the free radicals with the applied electromagnetic field, influences the development of pre-neoplastic lesions in the liver. AIP Publishing is retracting this article due to the substantial use of content in the Results and Conclusions section without proper citation of a previously published paper in Chemical Physics Letters 361 (2012) 219-225. This article is retracted from the scientific record with effect from 15 October 2015.

  15. Possible action mechanism of the electromagnetic fields in the liver cancer development: A mathematical proposal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-García, Mónica Noemí; Godina-Nava, Juan José

    2012-02-01

    Currently it is known that electromagnetic field exposure can induce biological changes, although the precise effects and action mechanism of the interaction between the electromagnetic field and biological systems are not well understood. In this work we propose a possible action mechanism, concerning the effect that the extremely low frequency electromagnetic field exposure has on the early stage of liver cancer development. The model is developed studying the phenomena called oxidative stress that it appears after it is applied a carcinogenic agent used to induce hepatic cancer chemically in an experimental animal model. This physical-chemical process involves the movement of magnetic field dependent free charged particles, called free radicals. We will consider the use of the radical pairs theory as a framework, in which we will describe the spin density operator evolution by implementing the stochastic Liouville equation with hyperfine interaction. This describes how the selectivity of the interaction between spin states of the free radicals with the applied electromagnetic field, influences the development of pre-neoplastic lesions in the liver. AIP Publishing is retracting this article due to the substantial use of content in the Results and Conclusions section without proper citation of a previously published paper in Chemical Physics Letters 361 (2012) 219-225. This article is retracted from the scientific record with effect from 15 October 2015.

  16. A Piece of the Action: Student Involvement in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunlap, Robert L., Ed.

    1973-01-01

    This journal issue explores alternative ways to increase student involvement in the social studies classroom. Subject content remains a major stumbling block because of the knowledge explosion and the realization that half the students in school today will earn a living in an occupation not yet invented. The relationship between content and…

  17. THE BIOLOGICAL ACTIONS OF DEHYDROEPIANDROSTERONE INVOLVES MULTIPLE RECEPTORS

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Stephanie J.; Geoghegan, Thomas E.; Prough, Russell A.; Miller, Kristy K. Michael

    2008-01-01

    Dehydroepiandrosterone has been thought to have physiological functions other than as an androgen precursor. The previous studies performed have demonstrated a number of biological effects in rodents, such as amelioration of disease in diabetic, chemical carcinogenesis, and obesity models. To date, activation of the peroxisome proliferators activated receptor alpha, pregnane X receptor, and estrogen receptor by DHEA and its metabolites have been demonstrated. Several membrane-associated receptors have also been elucidated leading to additional mechanisms by which DHEA may exert its biological effects. This review will provide an overview of the receptor multiplicity involved in the biological activity of this sterol. PMID:16684650

  18. Taking Action: An Educator's Guide to Involving Students in Environmental Action Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoner, Darlene K.; And Others

    The goal of Project WILD, a K-12 interdisciplinary conservation and environmental education program emphasizing wildlife, is to assist learners of any age in developing awareness, knowledge, skills, and commitment resulting in informed decisions, responsible behavior, and constructive actions concerning wildlife and the environment. The purpose of…

  19. Motivations and possible actions of potential criminal adversaries of US nuclear programs

    SciTech Connect

    Bass, G.; Jenkins, B.; Kellen, K.; Krofcheek, J.; Petty, G.; Reinstedt, R.; Ronfeldt, D.

    1981-01-01

    The motivations that might impel individuals or groups to undertake criminal actions against US nuclear facilities or programs are explored in the report (R and R-2554-SL) from which this note is taken. The analysis involves examination of the motivations behind nuclear-related crimes that have already occurred and of those behind analogous nonnuclear crimes.

  20. Possible Mechanism of Action of the Electromagnetic Fields of Ultralow Frequency on G-protein

    SciTech Connect

    Nava, J. J. Godina; Segura, M. A. Rodriguez; Garcia, M. N. Jimenez; Cadena, M. S. Reyes

    2008-08-11

    Based in several clinical achievements and mathematical simulation of the immune sytem, previously studied, permit us to establish that a possible Mechanism of Action of ultralow frequency Electromagnetic Fields (ELF) is on G-protein as it has been proposed in specialized literature.

  1. A School Action Plan with Stakeholder Involvement: A Case Study of One Elementary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Getty, Jacob J., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    This case study focused on a school action plan, using a planning and implementation process that focused on improving stakeholder involvement and responsibility for student reading achievement at Eisenberg Elementary School. This study examined the impact of the school action process on the development of a new plan compared to other traditional…

  2. Parental involvement in the habilitation process following children's cochlear implantation: an action theory perspective.

    PubMed

    Zaidman-Zait, Anat; Young, Richard A

    2008-01-01

    Action theory and the qualitative action-project method are used in this study to address and illustrate the complexity of parenting children who have received cochlear implants (CIs) as well as the intentionality of parents engaged in that process. "Action" refers to individual and joint goal-directed and intentional behaviors. Action theory has the advantage of using the perspectives provided by manifest behavior, internal processes, and social meaning in the analysis of action. Two cases are used to describe the individual and joint actions and projects, as related to parents' involvement in the habilitation process of children's postcochlear implantation. These joint projects are described at the levels of meanings/goals, functional processes, behaviors, structural support, and resources. From the rich descriptions and analysis of the cases, we draw potentially illuminative implications for the "current thinking" in relation to parenting children with CIs.

  3. Liver tumor promoting effect of omeprazole in rats and its possible mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Hitomi; Shimamoto, Keisuke; Taniai, Eriko; Ishii, Yuji; Morita, Reiko; Suzuki, Kazuhiko; Shibutani, Makoto; Mitsumori, Kunitoshi

    2012-01-01

    Omeprazole (OPZ), a proton pump inhibitor, is a cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A1/2 inducer. Some CYP1A inducers are known to have liver tumor promoting effects in rats and the ability to enhance oxidative stress. In this study, we performed a two-stage liver carcinogenesis bioassay in rats to examine the tumor promoting effect of OPZ (Experiment 1) and to clarify a possible mechanism of action (Experiment 2). In Experiment 1, male F344 rats were subjected to a two-third partial hepatectomy, and treated with 0, 138 or 276 mg/kg OPZ by oral gavage once a day for six weeks after an intraperitoneal injection of N-diethylnitrosamine (DEN). Liver weights significantly increased in the DEN+OPZ groups, and the number and area of glutathione S-transferase placental form (GST-P) positive foci significantly increased in the DEN+276 mg/kg OPZ group. In Experiment 2, the same experiment as Experiment 1 was performed, but the dosage of OPZ was 0 or 276 mg/kg. The number and area of GST-P positive foci as well as liver weights significantly increased in the DEN+276 mg/kg OPZ group. The number of proliferative cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)-positive cells also significantly increased in the same group. Real-time RT-PCR showed that the expression of AhR battery genes including Cyp1a1, Cyp1a2, Ugt1a6 and Nqo1, and Nrf2 battery genes including Gpx2, Yc2, Akr7a3, Aldh1a1 Me1 and Ggt1 were significantly upregulated in this group. However, the production of microsomal reactive oxygen species (ROS) and formation of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) decreased, and 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) content remained unchanged in this group. These results indicate that OPZ, CYP1A inducer, is a liver tumor promoter in rats, but oxidative stress is not involved in the liver tumor promoting effect of OPZ.

  4. The possible involvement of NMDA glutamate receptor in the etiopathogenesis of bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Fountoulakis, Konstantinos N

    2012-01-01

    Glutamate is the most abundant excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain and the ionotropic NMDA receptor is one of the major classes of its receptors, thought to play an important role in schizophrenia and mood disorders. The current systematic review summarized the evidence concerning the involvement of NMDA receptors in the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder. Genetic studies point to the genes encoding the NMDA 1, 2A and 2B subunits while neuropathological studies suggest a possible region specific decrease in the density of NMDA receptor and more consistently a reduced NMDA-mediated glutamatergic activity in patients with bipolar disorder in the frame of slower NMDA kinetics because of lower contribution of NR2A subunits. However the literature is poor and incomplete; future research is necessary to elucidate the mechanisms underlying bipolar disorder and its specific relationship to a possible NMDA malfunction and to explore the possibility of developing novel therapeutic agents.

  5. Additional Evidence of the Trypanocidal Action of (−)-Elatol on Amastigote Forms through the Involvement of Reactive Oxygen Species

    PubMed Central

    Desoti, Vânia Cristina; Lazarin-Bidóia, Danielle; Sudatti, Daniela Bueno; Pereira, Renato Crespo; Ueda-Nakamura, Tania; Nakamura, Celso Vataru; de Oliveira Silva, Sueli

    2014-01-01

    Chagas’ disease, a vector-transmitted infectious disease, is caused by the protozoa parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. Drugs that are currently available for the treatment of this disease are unsatisfactory, making the search for new chemotherapeutic agents a priority. We recently described the trypanocidal action of (−)-elatol, extracted from the macroalga Laurencia dendroidea. However, nothing has been described about the mechanism of action of this compound on amastigotes that are involved in the chronic phase of Chagas’ disease. The goal of the present study was to evaluate the effect of (−)-elatol on the formation of superoxide anions (O2•−), DNA fragmentation, and autophagy in amastigotes of T. cruzi to elucidate the possible mechanism of the trypanocidal action of (−)-elatol. Treatment of the amastigotes with (−)-elatol increased the formation of O2•− at all concentrations of (−)-elatol assayed compared with untreated parasites. Increased fluorescence was observed in parasites treated with (−)-elatol, indicating DNA fragmentation and the formation of autophagic compartments. The results suggest that the trypanocidal action of (−)-elatol might involve the induction of the autophagic and apoptotic death pathways triggered by an imbalance of the parasite’s redox metabolism. PMID:25257785

  6. Possible involvement of infection with human coronavirus 229E, but not NL63, in Kawasaki disease.

    PubMed

    Shirato, Kazuya; Imada, Yoshio; Kawase, Miyuki; Nakagaki, Keiko; Matsuyama, Shutoku; Taguchi, Fumihiro

    2014-12-01

    Although human coronavirus (HCoV)-NL63 was once considered a possible causative agent of Kawasaki disease based on RT-PCR analyses, subsequent studies could not confirm the result. In this study, this possibility was explored using serological tests. To evaluate the role of HCoV infection in patients with Kawasaki disease, immunofluorescence assays and virus neutralizing tests were performed. Paired serum samples were obtained from patients with Kawasaki disease who had not been treated with γ-globulin. HCoV-NL63 and two antigenically different isolates of HCoV-229E (ATCC-VR740 and a new isolate, Sendai-H) were examined as controls. Immunofluorescence assays detected no difference in HCoV-NL63 antibody positivity between the patients with Kawasaki disease and controls, whereas the rate of HCoV-229E antibody positivity was higher in the patients with Kawasaki disease than that in controls. The neutralizing tests revealed no difference in seropositivity between the acute and recovery phases of patients with Kawasaki disease for the two HCoV-229Es. However, the Kawasaki disease specimens obtained from patients in recovery phase displayed significantly higher positivity for Sendai-H, but not for ATCC-VR740, as compared to the controls. The serological test supported no involvement of HCoV-NL63 but suggested the possible involvement of HCoV-229E in the development of Kawasaki disease.

  7. [A classification of foods by the amount of masticatory action involved].

    PubMed

    Yanagisawa, Y; Tamura, A; Teramoto, Y; Akasaka, M

    1989-01-01

    With a view to classifying foods on the basis of the amount of masticatory action required, an attempt was made to correlate the properties of different foods as shown by mechanical measurements with the amount of masticatory action involved as determined by means of an electromyogram. We obtained the following results: 1) We found an extremely high correlation (r = 0.924) between the amount of masticatory action involved and the mechanical properties of our samples when these were expressed as values given by the formula: log (firmness x cohesiveness x strainess x 10) We refer to this parameter as toughness. 2) We were then able to estimate the amount of activity necessary in actual mastication of various foods from out toughness values and other values obtained through texturometer readings, a procedure which we carried out for 144 types of foods. 3) We were thus able to classify foods into ten levels according to masticatory action. We further feel justified to add masticatory action to our list of classification criteria as set out in an earlier report by the present author and others entitled "A classification of foods by physical properties."

  8. Neural mirroring and social interaction: Motor system involvement during action observation relates to early peer cooperation.

    PubMed

    Endedijk, H M; Meyer, M; Bekkering, H; Cillessen, A H N; Hunnius, S

    2017-01-07

    Whether we hand over objects to someone, play a team sport, or make music together, social interaction often involves interpersonal action coordination, both during instances of cooperation and entrainment. Neural mirroring is thought to play a crucial role in processing other's actions and is therefore considered important for social interaction. Still, to date, it is unknown whether interindividual differences in neural mirroring play a role in interpersonal coordination during different instances of social interaction. A relation between neural mirroring and interpersonal coordination has particularly relevant implications for early childhood, since successful early interaction with peers is predictive of a more favorable social development. We examined the relation between neural mirroring and children's interpersonal coordination during peer interaction using EEG and longitudinal behavioral data. Results showed that 4-year-old children with higher levels of motor system involvement during action observation (as indicated by lower beta-power) were more successful in early peer cooperation. This is the first evidence for a relation between motor system involvement during action observation and interpersonal coordination during other instances of social interaction. The findings suggest that interindividual differences in neural mirroring are related to interpersonal coordination and thus successful social interaction.

  9. Endothelial Dysfunction in Diabetes Mellitus: Possible Involvement of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress?

    PubMed Central

    Basha, Basma; Samuel, Samson Mathews; Triggle, Chris R.; Ding, Hong

    2012-01-01

    The vascular complications of diabetes mellitus impose a huge burden on the management of this disease. The higher incidence of cardiovascular complications and the unfavorable prognosis among diabetic individuals who develop such complications have been correlated to the hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress and associated endothelial dysfunction. Although antioxidants may be considered as effective therapeutic agents to relieve oxidative stress and protect the endothelium, recent clinical trials involving these agents have shown limited therapeutic efficacy in this regard. In the recent past experimental evidence suggest that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in the endothelial cells might be an important contributor to diabetes-related vascular complications. The current paper contemplates the possibility of the involvement of ER stress in endothelial dysfunction and diabetes-associated vascular complications. PMID:22474423

  10. Endothelial dysfunction in diabetes mellitus: possible involvement of endoplasmic reticulum stress?

    PubMed

    Basha, Basma; Samuel, Samson Mathews; Triggle, Chris R; Ding, Hong

    2012-01-01

    The vascular complications of diabetes mellitus impose a huge burden on the management of this disease. The higher incidence of cardiovascular complications and the unfavorable prognosis among diabetic individuals who develop such complications have been correlated to the hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress and associated endothelial dysfunction. Although antioxidants may be considered as effective therapeutic agents to relieve oxidative stress and protect the endothelium, recent clinical trials involving these agents have shown limited therapeutic efficacy in this regard. In the recent past experimental evidence suggest that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in the endothelial cells might be an important contributor to diabetes-related vascular complications. The current paper contemplates the possibility of the involvement of ER stress in endothelial dysfunction and diabetes-associated vascular complications.

  11. The action of orexin B on passive avoidance learning. Involvement of neurotransmitters.

    PubMed

    Palotai, Miklós; Telegdy, Gyula; Ekwerike, Alphonsus; Jászberényi, Miklós

    2014-10-01

    The extensive projection of orexigenic neurons and the diffuse expression of orexin receptors suggest that endogenous orexins are involved in several physiological functions of the central nervous system, including learning and memory. Our previous study demonstrated that orexin A improves learning, consolidation and retrieval processes, which involves α- and β-adrenergic, cholinergic, dopaminergic, GABA-A-ergic, opiate and nitrergic neurotransmissions. However, we have little evidence about the action of orexin B on memory processes and the underlying neuromodulation. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the action of orexin B on passive avoidance learning and the involvement of neurotransmitters in this action in rats. Accordingly, rats were pretreated with the selective orexin 2 receptor (OX2R) antagonist, EMPA; the γ-aminobutyric acid subunit A (GABA-A) receptor antagonist, the bicuculline; a D2, D3, D4 dopamine receptor antagonist, haloperidol; the nonselective opioid receptor antagonist, naloxone; the non-specific nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor, nitro-l-arginine; the nonselective α-adrenergic receptor antagonist, phenoxybenzamine and the β-adrenergic receptor antagonist, propranolol. Our results demonstrate that orexin B can improve learning, consolidation of memory and retrieval. EMPA reversed completely the action of orexin B on memory consolidation. Bicuculline blocked fully; naloxone, nitro-l-arginine, phenoxybenzamine and propranolol attenuated the orexin B-induced memory consolidation, whereas haloperidol was ineffective. These data suggest that orexin B improves memory functions through OX2R and GABA-ergic, opiate, nitrergic, α- and β-adrenergic neurotransmissions are also involved in this action.

  12. Motor control hierarchy in joint action that involves bimanual force production

    PubMed Central

    Masumoto, Junya

    2015-01-01

    The concept of hierarchical motor control has been viewed as a means of progressively decreasing the number of variables manipulated by each higher control level. We tested the hypothesis that turning an individual bimanual force-production task into a joint (two-participant) force-production task would lead to positive correlation between forces produced by the two hands of the individual participant (symmetric strategy) to enable negative correlation between forces produced by two participants (complementary strategy). The present study consisted of individual and joint tasks that involved both unimanual and bimanual conditions. In the joint task, 10 pairs of participants produced periodic isometric forces, such that the sum of forces that they produced matched a target force cycling between 5% and 10% of maximum voluntary contraction at 1 Hz. In the individual task, individuals attempted to match the same target force. In the joint bimanual condition, the two hands of each participant adopted a symmetric strategy of force, whereas the two participants adopted a complementary strategy of force, highlighting that the bimanual action behaved as a low level of a hierarchy, whereas the joint action behaved as an upper level. The complementary force production was greater interpersonally than intrapersonally. However, whereas the coherence was highest at 1 Hz in all conditions, the frequency synchrony was stronger intrapersonally than interpersonally. Moreover, whereas the bimanual action exhibited a smaller error and variability of force than the unimanual action, the joint action exhibited a less-variable interval and force than the individual action. PMID:25904710

  13. Motor control hierarchy in joint action that involves bimanual force production.

    PubMed

    Masumoto, Junya; Inui, Nobuyuki

    2015-06-01

    The concept of hierarchical motor control has been viewed as a means of progressively decreasing the number of variables manipulated by each higher control level. We tested the hypothesis that turning an individual bimanual force-production task into a joint (two-participant) force-production task would lead to positive correlation between forces produced by the two hands of the individual participant (symmetric strategy) to enable negative correlation between forces produced by two participants (complementary strategy). The present study consisted of individual and joint tasks that involved both unimanual and bimanual conditions. In the joint task, 10 pairs of participants produced periodic isometric forces, such that the sum of forces that they produced matched a target force cycling between 5% and 10% of maximum voluntary contraction at 1 Hz. In the individual task, individuals attempted to match the same target force. In the joint bimanual condition, the two hands of each participant adopted a symmetric strategy of force, whereas the two participants adopted a complementary strategy of force, highlighting that the bimanual action behaved as a low level of a hierarchy, whereas the joint action behaved as an upper level. The complementary force production was greater interpersonally than intrapersonally. However, whereas the coherence was highest at 1 Hz in all conditions, the frequency synchrony was stronger intrapersonally than interpersonally. Moreover, whereas the bimanual action exhibited a smaller error and variability of force than the unimanual action, the joint action exhibited a less-variable interval and force than the individual action.

  14. Possible Involvement of Photoperiodic Regulation in Reproductive Endocrine System of Female Olive Flounder Paralichthys olivaceus

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun Chul; Lee, Chi Hoon; Hur, Sung Pyu; Kim, Byeong Hoon; Park, Jun Young; Lee, Young Don

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated possible involvement of photoperiodic regulation in reproductive endocrine system of female olive flounder. To investigate the influence on brain-pituitary axis in endocrine system by regulating photoperiod, compared expression level of Kisspeptin and sbGnRH mRNA in brain and FSH-β, LH-β and GH mRNA in pituitary before and after spawning. Photoperiod was treated natural photoperiod and long photoperiod (15L:9D) conditions from Aug. 2013 to Jun. 2014. Continuous long photoperiod treatment from Aug. (post-spawning phase) was inhibited gonadal development of female olive flounder. In natural photoperiod group, the Kiss2 expression level a significant declined in Mar. (spawning period). And also, FSH-β, LH-β and GH mRNA expression levels were increasing at this period. However, in long photoperiod group, hypothalamic Kiss2, FSH-β, LH-β and GH mRNA expression levels did not show any significant fluctuation. These results suggest that expression of hypothalamic Kiss2, GtH and GH in the pituitary would change in response to photoperiod and their possible involvement of photoperiodic regulation in reproductive endocrine system of the BPG axis. PMID:25949205

  15. Possible Involvement of Photoperiodic Regulation in Reproductive Endocrine System of Female Olive Flounder Paralichthys olivaceus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Chul; Lee, Chi Hoon; Hur, Sung Pyu; Kim, Byeong Hoon; Park, Jun Young; Lee, Young Don

    2015-03-01

    This study investigated possible involvement of photoperiodic regulation in reproductive endocrine system of female olive flounder. To investigate the influence on brain-pituitary axis in endocrine system by regulating photoperiod, compared expression level of Kisspeptin and sbGnRH mRNA in brain and FSH-β, LH-β and GH mRNA in pituitary before and after spawning. Photoperiod was treated natural photoperiod and long photoperiod (15L:9D) conditions from Aug. 2013 to Jun. 2014. Continuous long photoperiod treatment from Aug. (post-spawning phase) was inhibited gonadal development of female olive flounder. In natural photoperiod group, the Kiss2 expression level a significant declined in Mar. (spawning period). And also, FSH-β, LH-β and GH mRNA expression levels were increasing at this period. However, in long photoperiod group, hypothalamic Kiss2, FSH-β, LH-β and GH mRNA expression levels did not show any significant fluctuation. These results suggest that expression of hypothalamic Kiss2, GtH and GH in the pituitary would change in response to photoperiod and their possible involvement of photoperiodic regulation in reproductive endocrine system of the BPG axis.

  16. Beneficial effect of berberine on hepatic insulin resistance in diabetic hamsters possibly involves in SREBPs, LXRα and PPARα transcriptional programs.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuhan; Li, Guosheng; Zhu, Hua; Huang, Lan; Liu, Yali; Ma, Chunmei; Qin, Chuan

    2010-01-01

    The "lipotoxicity" hypothesis holds that fat-induced hepatic insulin resistance (FIHIR) may play a major role in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes. Berberine has been reported to have antidiabetic properties. However, the molecular mechanisms for this action are not fully clarified. Therefore, we will investigate the gene expression alterations involved in the therapeutic effect of berberine on FIHIR in diabetic hamsters and possible mechanisms. In this study, type 2 diabetic hamsters were induced by high-fat diet with streptozotocin injection. After 9 weeks of berberine-treatment, the gene expression alterations involved in the therapeutic molecular mechanisms of berberine on FIHIR will be studied by microarray technology and real time RT-PCR. Our study demonstrates berberine significantly improved fat-induced insulin resistance and diabetic phenotype in type 2 diabetic hamsters. The alterations of certain metabolism related genes and their main regulators: Liver X receptor (LXR) α, Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) α and Sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBPs) are observed in the liver of treated and untreated diabetic hamsters. Compared with diabetic hamsters, the increased mRNA levels of LXRα and PPARα and the decreased mRNA levels of SREBPs are observed in berberine-treated diabetic hamster. The statistical significance of the expression of hepatic LXRα, SREBPs and PPARα and their certain target genes is found between treated and untreated diabetic hamsters. These results suggest that altered hepatic SREBPs, LXRα and PPARα transcriptional programs possibly involve in the therapeutic mechanisms of berberine on FIHIR in type 2 diabetic hamsters.

  17. Involvement of the globus pallidus in behavioral goal determination and action specification.

    PubMed

    Arimura, Nariko; Nakayama, Yoshihisa; Yamagata, Tomoko; Tanji, Jun; Hoshi, Eiji

    2013-08-21

    Multiple loop circuits interconnect the basal ganglia and the frontal cortex, and each part of the cortico-basal ganglia loops plays an essential role in neuronal computational processes underlying motor behavior. To gain deeper insight into specific functions played by each component of the loops, we compared response properties of neurons in the globus pallidus (GP) with those in the dorsal premotor cortex (PMd) and the ventrolateral and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (vlPFC and dlPFC) while monkeys performed a behavioral task designed to include separate processes for behavioral goal determination and action selection. Initially, visual signals instructed an abstract behavioral goal, and seconds later, a choice cue to select an action was presented. When the instruction cue appeared, GP neurons started to reflect visual features as early as vlPFC neurons. Subsequently, GP neurons began to reflect goals informed by the visual signals no later than neurons in the PMd, vlPFC, and dlPFC, indicating that the GP is involved in the early determination of behavioral goals. In contrast, action specification occurred later in the GP than in the cortical areas, and the GP was not as involved in the process by which a behavioral goal was transformed into an action. Furthermore, the length of time representing behavioral goal and action was shorter in the GP than in the PMd and dlPFC, indicating that the GP may play an important role in detecting individual behavioral events. These observations elucidate the involvement of the GP in goal-directed behavior.

  18. [Collective health in the ecosystemic perspective: a possibility of actions of the nurse].

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Mateus Casanova; de Siqueira, Hedi Crecencia Heckler; Silva, Jose Richard de Sosa

    2009-12-01

    The understructure of the collective health as looking for strategies of protection to the environment also develops a practice of ecosystemic conscience. The ecological practices recognize the right of the human being of living in a healthy and appropriate environment, and being informed about the risks of the environment regarding the health and his welfare. The aim of this present work is to stimulate a reflexive-theoretically discussion on the adoption of the ecological urbane practices in communities and the relation with the collective health and to glimpse insertion possibilities of the actions of the nurse in this space. The conversations actions, a stimulative discussion and approximation of the nurse with the habitat of the human, are able to find reciprocity in the collective health and to the ecosystemic approach. The respect his beliefs and to his knowledge in relation his necessities in health, can come across, objectively, in the promotion of the ecological conscience and of the collective wish turned to the citizenship.

  19. Andrographolide: antibacterial activity against common bacteria of human health concern and possible mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Malabika; Parai, Debaprasad; Chattopadhyay, Subrata; Mukherjee, Samir Kumar

    2017-01-17

    Increasing bacterial resistance to common drugs is a major public health concern for the treatment of infectious diseases. Certain naturally occurring compounds of plant sources have long been reported to possess potential antimicrobial activity. This study was aimed to investigate the antibacterial activity and possible mechanism of action of andrographolide (Andro), a diterpenoid lactone from a traditional medicinal herb Andrographis paniculata. Extent of antibacterial action was assessed by minimal bactericidal concentration method. Radiolabeled N-acetyl glucosamine, leucine, thymidine, and uridine were used to determine the effect of Andro on the biosyntheses of cell wall, protein, DNA, and RNA, respectively. In addition, anti-biofilm potential of this compound was also tested. Andro showed potential antibacterial activity against most of the tested Gram-positive bacteria. Among those, Staphylococcus aureus was found to be most sensitive with a minimal inhibitory concentration value of 100 μg/mL. It was found to be bacteriostatic. Specific inhibition of intracellular DNA biosynthesis was observed in a dose-dependent manner in S. aureus. Andro mediated inhibition of biofilm formation by S. aureus was also found. Considering its antimicrobial potency, Andro might be accounted as a promising lead for new antibacterial drug development.

  20. Use of active extracts of poplar buds against Penicillium italicum and possible modes of action.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shuzhen; Liu, Limei; Li, Dongmei; Xia, Huan; Su, Xiaojun; Peng, Litao; Pan, Siyi

    2016-04-01

    Antifungal components, from poplar buds active fraction (PBAF) against Penicillium italicum, the causal agent of blue mold in citrus fruits, were identified and possible action modes were investigated. Pinocembrin, chrysin and galangin were determined as active components in PBAF, using HPLC and HPLC-MS analysis. The antifungal activity is stable at temperatures ranging from 4 °C to 100 °C and pH levels ranging from 4 to 8. In the presence of PBAF, the hyphae become shriveled, wrinkled and the cell membrane became seriously disrupted. Further investigation on cell permeability, nucleic acid content and alkaline phosphatase suggest that the cell membrane might be the target. Mycelial oxygen consumption and the respiration-related enzymatic activity of succinate dehydrogenase, malate dehydrogenase and ATPase were all inhibited by PBAF. We propose that PBAF is a potentially useful alternative for blue mold control and may act against P. italicum by interfering with respiration and disrupting the cell membrane.

  1. Computer prediction of possible toxic action from chemical structure; the DEREK system.

    PubMed

    Sanderson, D M; Earnshaw, C G

    1991-07-01

    1. The development of DEREK, a computer-based expert system (derived from the LHASA chemical synthesis design program) for the qualitative prediction of possible toxic action of compounds on the basis of their chemical structure is described. 2. The system is able to perceive chemical sub-structures within molecules and relate these to a rulebase linking the sub-structures with likely types of toxicity. 3. Structures can be drawn in directly at a computer graphics terminal or retrieved automatically from a suitable in-house database. 4. The system is intended to aid the selection of compounds based on toxicological considerations, or separately to indicate specific toxicological properties to be tested for early in the evaluation of a compound, so saving time, money and some laboratory animals and resources.

  2. Involvement of exon 11-associated variants of the mu opioid receptor MOR-1 in heroin, but not morphine, actions.

    PubMed

    Pan, Ying-Xian; Xu, Jin; Xu, Mingming; Rossi, Grace C; Matulonis, Joshua E; Pasternak, Gavril W

    2009-03-24

    Heroin remains a major drug of abuse and is preferred by addicts over morphine. Like morphine, heroin has high affinity and selectivity for mu-receptors, but its residual analgesia in exon 1 MOR-1 knockout mice that do not respond to morphine suggests a different mechanism of action. MOR-1 splice variants lacking exon 1 have been observed in mice, humans, and rats, raising the possibility that they might be responsible for the residual heroin and morphine-6beta-glucuronide (M6G) analgesia in the exon 1 knockout mice. To test this possibility, we disrupted exon 11 of MOR-1, which eliminates all of the variants that do not contain exon 1. Morphine and methadone analgesia in the exon 11 knockout mouse was normal, but the analgesic actions of heroin, M6G, and fentanyl were markedly diminished in the radiant heat tail-flick and hot-plate assays. Similarly, the ability of M6G to inhibit gastrointestinal transit was greatly diminished in these exon 11 knockout mice, whereas the ability of morphine was unchanged. These findings identify receptors selectively involved with heroin and M6G actions and confirm the relevance of the exon 11-associated variants and raise important issues regarding the importance of atypical truncated G-protein-coupled receptors.

  3. An inferentialist perspective on the coordination of actions and reasons involved in makinga statistical inference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakker, Arthur; Ben-Zvi, Dani; Makar, Katie

    2017-01-01

    To understand how statistical and other types of reasoning are coordinated with actions to reduce uncertainty, we conducted a case study in vocational education that involved statistical hypothesis testing. We analyzed an intern's research project in a hospital laboratory in which reducing uncertainties was crucial to make a valid statistical inference. In his project, the intern, Sam, investigated whether patients' blood could be sent through pneumatic post without influencing the measurement of particular blood components. We asked, in the process of making a statistical inference, how are reasons and actions coordinated to reduce uncertainty? For the analysis, we used the semantic theory of inferentialism, specifically, the concept of webs of reasons and actions—complexes of interconnected reasons for facts and actions; these reasons include premises and conclusions, inferential relations, implications, motives for action, and utility of tools for specific purposes in a particular context. Analysis of interviews with Sam, his supervisor and teacher as well as video data of Sam in the classroom showed that many of Sam's actions aimed to reduce variability, rule out errors, and thus reduce uncertainties so as to arrive at a valid inference. Interestingly, the decisive factor was not the outcome of a t test but of the reference change value, a clinical chemical measure of analytic and biological variability. With insights from this case study, we expect that students can be better supported in connecting statistics with context and in dealing with uncertainty.

  4. Initial study on the possible mechanisms involved in the effects of high doses of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) on prolactin secretion.

    PubMed

    Salgado, R; Pereiro, N; López-Doval, S; Lafuente, A

    2015-09-01

    Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) is a fluorinated organic compound. This chemical is neurotoxic and can alter the pituitary secretion. This is an initial study aimed at knowing the toxic effects of high doses of PFOS on prolactin secretion and the possible mechanisms involved in these alterations. For that, adult male rats were orally treated with 3.0 and 6.0 mg of PFOS/kg body weight (b.w.)/day for 28 days. At the end of the treatment, the serum levels of prolactin and estradiol as well as the concentration of dopamine, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), homovanillic acid (HVA) and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) were quantified in the anterior and in the mediobasal hypothalamus. PFOS, at the administered doses, reduced prolactin and estradiol secretion, increased the concentration of dopamine and GABA in the anterior hypothalamus, and decreased the ratios DOPAC/dopamine and HVA/dopamine in this same hypothalamic area. The outcomes reported in this study suggest that (1) high doses of PFOS inhibit prolactin secretion in adult male rats; (2) only the periventricular-hypophysial dopaminergic (PHDA) neurons seem to be involved in this inhibitory effect but not the tuberoinfundibular dopaminergic (TIDA) and the tuberohypophysial dopaminergic (THDA) systems; (3) GABAergic cells from the paraventricular and supraoptic nuclei could be partially responsible for the PFOS action on prolactin secretion; and finally (4) estradiol might take part in the inhibition exerted by elevated concentration of PFOS on prolactin release.

  5. Studies on Bronchodilator Activity of Salvia officinalis (Sage): Possible Involvement of K(+) Channel Activation and Phosphodiesterase Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Gilani, Anwarul-Hassan; Rehman, Najeeb-Ur; Khan, Aslam; Alkharfy, Khalid M

    2015-06-01

    The aqueous methanolic extract of the aerial parts of Salvia officinalis (So.Cr) was studied to provide possible underlying mechanism(s) for its medicinal use in asthma using the in vivo bronchodilatory assay and isolated tracheal preparations. S. officinalis (1-10 mg/kg) dose-dependently inhibited carbachol (CCh)-induced bronchospasm in anesthetized rats with three-fold greater potency than the positive control, aminophylline. In tracheal preparations, So.Cr inhibited the low K(+) (25 mM)-induced contractions. Pretreatment of the tissues with 4-aminopyridine reversed the inhibitory effect of the plant extract against low K(+) , whereas glibenclamide did not show any effect, thus showing the involvement of voltage-sensitive K(+) channels. When tested against the CCh-induced pre-contractions for the involvement of any additional mechanism, interestingly, the extract showed a dose-dependent (0.03-0.1 mg/mL) inhibitory effect and shifted the inhibitory concentration response curves of isoprenaline to the left, thus showing phosphodiesterase enzyme inhibitory-like action, similar to that of papaverine. These results indicate that the crude extract of S. officinalis possesses bronchodilatory activity mediated predominantly via activation of voltage-dependent K(+) channels and inhibition of phosphodiesterase enzyme; thus, this study provides sound pharmacological basis for its medicinal use in hyperactive airways disorders such as asthma and cough. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Renal allograft rejection: possible involvement of lymphokine-activated killer cells.

    PubMed Central

    Kirby, J A; Forsythe, J L; Proud, G; Taylor, R M

    1989-01-01

    Human renal allograft tissue was recovered at transplant nephrectomy from three patients with irreversible loss of graft function. This tissue was disaggregated and separated into two fractions on the basis of particle size. Fraction 1 contained glomeruli and developed a mixed outgrowth containing adherent epithelial and mesangial cells after a limited period of culture. Fraction 2 contained fragments of renal tubules and produced monolayers of tubular epithelial cells during culture. A population of lymphoid cells was observed to grow from the primary disaggregate into medium supplemented with recombinant human interleukin-2 (IL-2). After culture for 5 days these lymphoid cells were predominantly CD3-positive and carried both class II major histocompatibility antigens (MHC) and the CD25 IL-2 receptor. Culture of peripheral blood-derived mononuclear cells with IL-2 caused the generation of lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells; these cells were able to lyse both glomerular and tubular cells grown from nephrectomy tissue without showing MHC antigen restriction. The lymphoid cells grown from renal allograft tissue showed a similar lytic potential for both renal cells prepared from the same nephrectomy specimen and from third party renal tissue. It is possible that any LAK cells formed within a renal allograft by the action of IL-2 may contribute to the tissue destruction observed during graft rejection. Images Figure 2 PMID:2661417

  7. Genistein as an inducer of tumor cell differentiation : possible mechanisms of action.

    SciTech Connect

    Constantinou, A.; Huberman, E.; Center for Mechanistic Biology and Biotechnology; Univ. of Illinois at Chicago

    1995-01-01

    Decreased activity of either topoisomerases or tyrosine kinases has been implicated in the differentiation of a number of cell types. It is therefore conceivable that genistein, because of its reported ability to inhibit these activities in vitro, may be an inducer of cellular differentiation. We investigated this possibility in human promyelocytic HL-60 and erythroid K-562 leukemia cells and in human SK-MEL-131 melanoma cells. Our results indicated that genistein, in a dose-dependent manner, inhibited cell multiplication and induced cell differentiation. The maturing HL-60 cells acquired granulocytic and monocytic markers. The differentiating K-562 cells stained positively with benzidine, which indicates the production of hemoglobin, an erythroid marker. Following genistein treatment, maturing SK-MEL-131 melanoma cells formed dendrite-like structures and exhibited increased tyrosinase activity and melanin content. Experiments were designed to identify the molecular mechanism of genistein's action. Data from our laboratory suggest that this isoflavone triggers the pathway that leads to cellular differentiation by stabilizing protein-linked DNA strand breakage. Other possible mechanisms reported in the literature are discussed.

  8. It may be possible to construct a Chemical Synthesizing Computer based on Capillary Action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriske, Richard

    2013-03-01

    This author had previously proposed that Capillary Action has a Quantum Mechanical Model. This model can be easily constructed by noting that when a photon of the heat wavelength evaporates one molecule of water at the top of a capillary column, a ``hole'' is transmitted from the top of the column to the roots and into the water reservoir sustaining the capillary tube. This ``hole'' is a true hole (a true particle) in that it is transmitted as a quantized unit through the capillary tube. The mathematics of this process are the same as used in Quantum Field Theory, with the capillary acting as a perfect spring (like the spring used on a ``stack'' of dishes). When the external field using a force to pull the water molecule off the stack, an equal and opposite spring force (which is quantized), is transmitted down the column to the reservoir. When the water is not pure, this author proposes that each of the elements in the unpure water act linearly, each with its own quantized spring constant that does not interact with the other quantized spring constants, so it is possible to pull a single electron off the top of the water stack, yet the water in the stack is undisturbed (the reservoir is disturbed). Likewise it is possible to pull a sugar molecule off and balance chemical equations.

  9. The Possible Mechanisms Involved in Degradation of Patulin by Pichia caribbica

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiangfeng; Yang, Qiya; Zhang, Hongyin; Cao, Jing; Zhang, Xiaoyun; Apaliya, Maurice Tibiru

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we examined the mechanisms involved in the degradation of patulin by Pichia caribbica. Our results indicate that cell-free filtrate of P. caribbica reduced patutlin content. The heat-killed cells could not degrade patulin. However, the live cells significantly reduced the concentration of the patulin. In furtherance to this, it was observed that patulin was not detected in the broken yeast cells and cell wall. The addition of cycloheximide to the P. caribbica cells decreased the capacity of degradation of patulin. Proteomics analyses revealed that patulin treatment resulted in an upregulated protein which was involved in metabolism and stress response processes. Our results suggested that the mechanism of degradation of patulin by P. caribbica was not absorption; the presence of patulin can induce P. caribbica to produce associated intracellular and extracellular enzymes, both of which have the ability to degrade patulin. The result provides a new possible method that used the enzymes produced by yeast to detoxify patulin in food and feed. PMID:27735830

  10. Neurotoxicity of endocrine disruptors: possible involvement in brain development and neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Masuo, Yoshinori; Ishido, Masami

    2011-01-01

    Environmental chemicals that act as endocrine disruptors do not appear to pose a risk to human reproduction; however, their effects on the central nervous systems are less well understood. Animal studies suggested that maternal exposure to endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDC) produced changes in rearing behavior, locomotion, anxiety, and learning/memory in offspring, as well as neuronal abnormalities. Some investigations suggested that EDC exert effects on central monoaminergic neurons, especially dopaminergic neurons. Our data demonstrated that EDC attenuate the development of dopaminergic neurons, which might be involved in developmental disorders. Perinatal exposure to EDC might affect neuronal plasticity in the hippocampus, thereby potentially modulating neuronal development, leading to impaired cognitive and memory functions. Endocrine disruptors also attenuate gender differences in brain development. For example, the locus ceruleus is larger in female rats than in males, but treatments with bisphenol-A (BPA) enlarge this region in males. Some reports indicated that EDC induce hypothyroidism, which might be evidenced as abnormal brain development. Endocrine disruptors might also affect mature neurons, resulting in neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease. The current review focused on alterations in the brain induced by EDC, specifically on the possible involvement of EDC in brain development and neurodegeneration.

  11. Involvement of Renin-Angiotensin System in Retinopathy of Prematurity - A Possible Target for Therapeutic Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Madhu; Chandra, Parijat; Halder, Nabanita; Singh, Baskar; Deorari, Ashok Kumar; Kumar, Atul; Azad, Rajvardhan; Velpandian, Thirumurthy

    2016-01-01

    Objective Examining the Retinal Renin Angiotensin System (RRAS) in the ROP neonates and analyzing the possibility of modulating the RRAS to prevent the progression in Oxygen Induced Retinopathy (OIR) model. Method Vitreous of ROP patients (n = 44, median age 5.5 months) was quantified for RRAS components, VEGF, HIF-1α and compared with age matched control. The involvement of RRAS in ROP was tested in the rat model of OIR and compared with normoxia. Expressions of RAS components, VEGF and HIF-1α in retina were analyzed using qPCR and retinal structure and function was also analyzed. Effect of Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Inhibitor (ACEI) and Angiotensin Receptor Blocker (ARB) was evaluated and compared with Bevacizumab which served as a positive control. Drug penetration into retina was confirmed by liquid chromatography coupled ESI-tandem mass spectroscopy (LC-MS/MS). Results Multifold increase in the expression of RAS components in human vitreous and rat retina showed their involvement in ROP. ERG & fundus studies in OIR revealed the altered function of retina and were successfully prevented by ARB (telmisartan), ACEI (lisinopril) and bevacizumab. Retinal analysis revealed the presence of ACEI and ARB in their therapeutic levels. Conclusion This study for the first time demonstrates the upregulated level of RAS components in human ROP vitreous and further that the pharmacological intervention in RRAS can functionally and structurally preserve retina against the progression of ROP in the OIR model. PMID:28033392

  12. Differential effects of fluoxetine and venlafaxine on memory recognition: possible mechanisms of action.

    PubMed

    Carlini, Valeria Paola; Poretti, María Belén; Rask-Andersen, Mathias; Chavan, Rohit A; Ponzio, Marina F; Sawant, Rahul S; de Barioglio, Susana Rubiales; Schiöth, Helgi B; de Cuneo, Marta Fiol

    2012-08-07

    Serotonin-specific reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) and serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRI) are antidepressant drugs commonly used to treat a wide spectrum of mood disorders (Wong and Licinio, 2001). Although they have been clinically used for more than 50 years, the molecular and cellular basis for the action of SSRIs and SNRIs is not clear. Considering that the changes in gene expression involved in the action of antidepressant drugs on memory have not been identified, in this study we investigated the impact of chronic treatment with a SSRI (fluoxetine) and a SNRI (venlafaxine) on the mRNA expression of genes related to memory cascade in the mouse hippocampus, namely, α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA), nitric oxide synthase 1 (NOS1), neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor type 2 (TrKB), mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK/ERK) and serotonin transporter (SERT). Animals treated with fluoxetine 10 mg/Kg/day for 28 days showed a significant decrease in the percentage of time spent in the novel object recognition test (p≤0.005) and induced MAPK1/ERK2 down-regulation (p=0.005). Our results suggest that the effect on cognition could probably be explained by fluoxetine interference in the MAPK/ERK memory pathway. In contrast, chronic treatment with venlafaxine did not reduce MAPK1/ERK2 expression, suggesting that MAPK1/ERK2 down-regulation is not a common effect of all antidepressant drugs. Further studies are needed to examine the effect of chronic fluoxetine treatment on the ERK-CREB system, and to determine whether there is a causal relationship between the disruption of the ERK-CREB system and the effect of this antidepressant on memory performance.

  13. A phenomenographic analysis of first-year engineering students' experiences with problems involving multiple possible solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dringenberg, Emily A.

    Engineers are expected to solve problems that are ill-structured. These problems are presented with a lack of necessary information and allow for different ways of engaging with the problem; they are open-ended and involve multiple possible solutions with multiple means of evaluation. In order to allow maximum time for students to develop skills for solving such problems, undergraduate engineering programs can introduce such problems during the first year of students' education, in the form of cornerstone design tasks. This provides students with more opportunities to develop their ability to engage with ill-structured problems, which are characteristic of engineering work. Researchers have documented variation within both the behavior and perceptions of students' early experiences with design problems. General themes include novice-like design behavior, discomfort with lack of information, difficulty with problem scoping, and resistance to ambiguity. To build on these generalizations of students' experiences, a more thorough understanding of the variation in how students experience this phenomenon of engaging with ill-structured problems is needed to design effective learning environments. This work presents the qualitatively different ways that engineering students experience problems with multiple possible solutions during their first year of engineering studies. Using phenomenography as the methodological framework, data were collected through in-depth, semi-structured interviews with 27 first-year engineering students. The iterative, phenomenographic analysis resulted in seven descriptive categories for the ways participants experienced problems involving multiple possible solutions. The names of these categories represent the different foci of the students' experiences: completion, transition, iteration, organization, collaboration, reasoning, and growth. These categories are organized along two crucial dimensions of variation: reaction to ambiguity and role

  14. Ca2+ involvement in the action potential generation of myenteric neurones in the rat oesophagus.

    PubMed

    De Laet, A; Cornelissen, W; Adriaensen, D; Van Bogaert, P-P; Scheuermann, D W; Timmermans, J-P

    2002-04-01

    Intracellular recordings were used to study the physiological behaviour of rat oesophageal myenteric neurones, which are embedded in striated muscle. Injection of depolarizing pulses evoked action potentials with a clear 'shoulder' in all neurones. This shoulder disappeared under low Ca2+/high Mg2+ conditions. Tetrodotoxin (TTX; 1 micromol L-1) did not impede spike firing, whereas under combined TTX and low Ca2+/high Mg2+ conditions the action potentials were completely abolished, indicating that TTX- resistant action potentials are mediated by a Ca2+ current. Further experiments with omega-conotoxin GVIA (100 nmol L-1) revealed that these Ca2+ currents enter the cell via N-type voltage-activated Ca2+ channels (see also accompanying paper). Tetraethylammonium (10 mmol L-1) caused broadening of the action potentials, which probably resulted from prolonged Ca2+ influx due to blockade of the delayed rectifier K+ channel. Although Ca2+ appears to be involved in the spike generation of all rat oesophageal myenteric neurones, only a minority (14%) shows a slow afterhyperpolarization. Thus, no strict correlation exists between the presence of a shoulder and a slow afterhyperpolarization. Furthermore, morphological identification of 25 of the impaled neurones revealed that there was no strict correlation between morphology and electrophysiological behaviour. Consequently, rat oesophageal myenteric neurones appear to differ in several aspects from myenteric neurones in smooth muscle regions of the gastrointestinal tract.

  15. Trypanocidal Action of (−)-Elatol Involves an Oxidative Stress Triggered by Mitochondria Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Desoti, Vânia Cristina; Lazarin-Bidóia, Danielle; Sudatti, Daniela Bueno; Pereira, Renato Crespo; Alonso, Antonio; Ueda-Nakamura, Tania; Dias Filho, Benedito Prado; Nakamura, Celso Vataru; Silva, Sueli de Oliveira

    2012-01-01

    Natural compounds have shown good potential for the discovery of new chemotherapeutics for the treatment of Chagas’ disease. Recently, our group reported the effective trypanocidal activity of (−)-elatol, extracted from the red macroalgae Laurencia dendroidea present in the Brazilian coast against Trypanosoma cruzi. However, the mechanism of action of this compound has remained unclear. There are only hypotheses concerning its action on mitochondrial function. Here, we further investigated the mechanisms of action of (−)-elatol on trypomastigotes of T. cruzi. For this, we evaluated some biochemical alterations in trypomastigotes treated with (−)-elatol. Our results show that (−)-elatol induced depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane, an increase in the formation of mitochondrial superoxide anion and loss of cell membrane and DNA integrity. Additionally, (−)-elatol induced formation of autophagic vacuoles and a decrease in cell volume. All together, these results suggest that the trypanocidal action of (−)-elatol involves multiple events and mitochondria might be the initial target organelle. Our hypothesis is that the mitochondrial dysfunction leads to an increase of ROS production through the electron transport chain, which affects cell membrane and DNA integrity leading to different types of parasite death. PMID:23015766

  16. Bacopa monnieri ameliorates memory deficits in olfactory bulbectomized mice: possible involvement of glutamatergic and cholinergic systems.

    PubMed

    Le, Xoan Thi; Pham, Hang Thi Nguyet; Do, Phuong Thi; Fujiwara, Hironori; Tanaka, Ken; Li, Feng; Van Nguyen, Tai; Nguyen, Khoi Minh; Matsumoto, Kinzo

    2013-10-01

    This study investigated the effects of alcoholic extract of Bacopa monnieri (L.) Wettst. (BM) on cognitive deficits using olfactory bulbectomized (OBX) mice and the underlying molecular mechanisms of its action. OBX mice were treated daily with BM (50 mg/kg, p.o.) or a reference drug, tacrine (2.5 mg/kg, i.p.), 1 week before and continuously 3 days after OBX. Cognitive performance of the animals was analyzed by the novel object recognition test, modified Y maze test, and fear conditioning test. Brain tissues of OBX animals were used for neurochemical and immunohistochemical studies. OBX impaired non-spatial short-term memory, spatial working memory, and long-term fair memory. BM administration ameliorated these memory disturbances. The effect of BM on short-term memory deficits was abolished by a muscarinic receptor antagonist, scopolamine. OBX downregulated phosphorylation of synaptic plasticity-related signaling proteins: NR1 subunit of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor, glutamate receptor 1 (GluR1), and calmodulin-dependent kinase II but not cyclic AMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB), and reduced brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA in the hippocampus. OBX also reduced choline acetyltransferase in the hippocampus and cholinergic neurons in the medial septum, and enlarged the size of lateral ventricle. BM administration reversed these OBX-induced neurochemical and histological alterations, except the decrease of GluR1 phosphorylation, and enhanced CREB phosphorylation. Moreover, BM treatment inhibited ex vivo activity of acetylcholinesterase in the brain. These results indicate that BM treatment ameliorates OBX-induced cognition dysfunction via a mechanism involving enhancement of synaptic plasticity-related signaling and BDNF transcription and protection of cholinergic systems from OBX-induced neuronal damage.

  17. Possible involvement of polyphenols and polyamines in salt tolerance of almond rootstocks.

    PubMed

    Zrig, Ahlem; Tounekti, Taïeb; Vadel, Ahmedou Mohamed; Ben Mohamed, Hatem; Valero, Daniel; Serrano, María; Chtara, Chaker; Khemira, Habib

    2011-11-01

    Leaf physiological and biochemical adaptive strategies and more particularly the possible involvement of polyamines and polyphenols in salt stress tolerance were investigated. Three almond rootstocks (GN15, GF677 and bitter almond) were subjected to 0, 25, 50 and 75 mM NaCl for 30 days. The dry mass of leaves, stems and roots decreased with increasing salt concentration in the irrigation solution regardless of genotype. Photosynthetic assimilation rate decreased in the three almond rootstocks, but more so in GF677 and bitter almond. The accumulation of toxic ions was greater in the leaves than in the roots in all genotypes. GN15 accumulated less Na(+) and Cl(-) than GF677 and bitter almond. GF677 accumulated polyphenols, but had less anthocyanin and antioxidant activity in its leaves compared to bitter almond. It seems that GN15 was more able to tolerate the excess of toxic ions using anthocyanins which are abundant in its red leaves and free polyamines for a more efficient response to stress. However, most of the antioxidant activity was found in the leaves and was lower in the roots. Given that the upper part of the tree will be of a different cultivar after grafting, this advantage may not be relevant for the tree's survival. GF677 showed a different antioxidant strategy; it maintained a stable carotenoids content and accumulated polyphenols in its leaves. The three rootstocks used different strategies to deal with the excess of salt in the growth medium.

  18. Effect of Diazepam on Severity of Acute Pancreatitis: Possible Involvement of Peripheral Benzodiazepine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Abed, Alireza; Minaiyan, Mohsen; Safaei, Azadeh; Taheri, Diana

    2013-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a lethal inflammatory condition of pancreas with high mortality rate. There is a pressing need for research to explore active agents and novel mechanisms involving in the treatment of pancreatitis. Clinical studies have shown after the initial acinar cell injury plasma levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines are elevated in patients with acute pancreatitis and the degree of cytokine elevation correlates with disease severity. Diazepam may decrease interleukin release from macrophages, suppress neutrophil activities, and exhibit anti-inflammatory effects. So it is expected that in vivo pretreatment of acute pancreatitis with different doses of diazepam can attenuate its severity. Thus, we evaluated the effects of diazepam, intraperitoneally (5, 10, and 20 mg/kg i.p.), intracerebroventricularly (ICV 10 μg), and concurrently with flumazenil (1 mg/kg) on cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in mice. Interestingly, the pretreatment with diazepam (5 mg/kg i.p.) reduced significantly the inflammatory response of acute pancreatitis by ameliorating pancreatic edema, amylase and lipase serum levels, myeloperoxidase activity, pancreatic TNF-alpha, and pathological alteration compared to control group. Diazepam i.c.v. was ineffective, suggesting that central benzodiazepine receptors have no significant role in this property. These results demonstrate that pretreatment with diazepam exhibits anti-inflammatory property in cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis possibly through peripheral benzodiazepine receptors. PMID:23956866

  19. Ultraviolet-induced transformation of keratinocytes: possible involvement of long interspersed element-1 reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Gautam; Gupta, Nishma; Tiwari, Jyoti; Raman, Govindarajan

    2005-02-01

    The normal human keratinocyte cell line, HaCaT, was transformed using multiple doses of ultraviolet (UV)A+B (UVA, 150-200 mJ/cm(2) and UVB, 15-20 mJ/cm(2) x 6). Malignant transformation was confirmed by upregulation of Cyclin D1 (mRNA) and formation of colonies on soft agar. To identify the genes involved in this transformation process, we have done rapid amplification of polymorphic DNA using RNA from unexposed and multiple-exposed cells. Six percent PAGE showed several differentially regulated genes in exposed cells compared with unexposed cells. Total 19 genes were identified, cloned and sequenced. Three of these 19 cloned genes showed 99% homology at both DNA and protein levels to a stretch of 540 bp (180 aa) of long interspersed element (LINE)-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) open reading frame (ORF-2). Colonies from soft agar showed upregulation of this gene compared with non-colonized (lawn on soft agar) cells as detected by RT-PCR. This data implicates LINE-1 RT (ORF-2) in UV-induced malignancy and can possibly be used as a marker for the diagnosis of UV-induced skin cancer.

  20. Protein phosphatase and kinase activities possibly involved in exocytosis regulation in Paramecium tetraurelia.

    PubMed

    Kissmehl, R; Treptau, T; Hofer, H W; Plattner, H

    1996-07-01

    In Paramecium tetraurelia cells synchronous exocytosis induced by aminoethyldextran (AED) is accompanied by an equally rapid dephosphorylation of a 63 kDa phosphoprotein (PP63) within 80 ms. In vivo, rephosphorylation occurs within a few seconds after AED triggering. In homogenates (P)P63 can be solubilized in all three phosphorylation states (phosphorylated, dephosphorylated and rephosphorylated) and thus tested in vitro. By using chelators of different divalent cations, de- and rephosphorylation of PP63 and P63 respectively can be achieved by an endogenous protein phosphatase/kinase system. Dephosphorylation occurs in the presence of EDTA, whereas in the presence of EGTA this was concealed by phosphorylation by endogenous kinase(s), thus indicating that phosphorylation of P63 is calcium-independent. Results obtained with protein phosphatase inhibitors (okadaic acid, calyculin A) allowed us to exclude a protein serine/threonine phosphatase of type I (with selective sensitivity in Paramecium). Protein phosphatase 2C is also less likely to be a candidate because of its requirement for high Mg2+ concentrations. According to previous evidence a protein serine/threonine phosphatase of type 2B (calcineurin; CaN) is possibly involved. We have now found that bovine brain CaN dephosphorylates PP63 in vitro. Taking into account the specific requirements of this phosphatase in vitro, with p-nitrophenyl phosphate as a substrate, we have isolated a cytosolic phosphatase of similar characteristics by combined preparative gel electrophoresis and affinity-column chromatography. In Paramecium this phosphatase also dephosphorylates PP63 in vitro (after 32P labelling in vivo). Using various combinations of ion exchange, affinity and hydrophobic interaction chromatography we have also isolated three different protein kinases from the soluble fraction, i.e. a cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA), a cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) and a casein kinase. Among the kinases tested, PKA

  1. The action of kisspeptin-13 on passive avoidance learning in mice. Involvement of transmitters.

    PubMed

    Telegdy, Gyula; Adamik, Ágnes

    2013-04-15

    Kisspeptins are G protein-coupled receptor ligands originally identified as human metastasis suppressor gene products that have the ability to suppress melanoma and breast cancer metastasis and recently found to play an important role in initiating the secretion of gonadotropin-releasing hormone at puberty. Kisspeptin-13 is an endogenous isoform that consists of 13 amino acids. The action of kisspeptin in the regulation of gonadal function has been widely studied, but little is known as concerns its function in limbic brain structures. In the brain, the gene is transcribed within the hippocampal dentate gyrus. This paper reports on a study the effects of kisspeptin-13 on passive avoidance learning and the involvement of the adrenergic, serotonergic, cholinergic, dopaminergic and GABA-A-ergic, opiate receptors and nitric oxide in its action in mice. Mice were pretreated with a nonselective α-adrenergic receptor antagonist, phenoxybenzamine, an α2-adrenergic receptor antagonist, yohimbine, a β-adrenergic receptor antagonist, propranolol, a mixed 5-HT1/5-HT2 serotonergic receptor antagonist, methysergide, a nonselective 5-HT2 serotonergic receptor antagonist, cyproheptadine, a nonselective muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist, atropine, D2, D3, D4 dopamine receptor antagonist, haloperidol, a γ-aminobutyric acid subunit A (GABAA) receptor antagonist, bicuculline, naloxone, a nonselective opioid receptor antagonist and nitro-l-arginine, a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor. Kisspeptin-13 facilitated learning and memory consolidation in a passive avoidance paradigm. Phenoxybenzamine, yohimbine, propranolol, methysergide, cyproheptadine, atropine, bicuculline and nitro-l-arginine prevented the action of kisspeptin-13 on passive avoidance learning, but haloperidol and naloxone did not block the effects of kisspeptin-13. The results demonstrated that the action of kisspeptin-13 on the facilitation of passive avoidance learning and memory consolidation is mediated

  2. Achyranthes aspera Attenuates epilepsy in experimental animals: possible involvement of GABAergic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Viswanatha, Gollapalle Lakshminarayanashastry; Venkataranganna, Marikunte V; Prasad, Nunna Bheema Lingeswara; Godavarthi, Ashok

    2017-03-06

    The present study was aimed to examine the possible anticonvulsant property of aerial parts of Achyranthes aspera using various experimental models of epilepsy in mice. Petroleum ether extract of aerial parts of A. aspera (PeAA), methanolic eAA (MeAA) and aqueous eAA (AeAA) was initially evaluated against six-hertz seizure model in mice, based on the outcomes the effective extract was further evaluated against maximal electroshock (MES) and pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) models in mice. In addition, the potent extract was evaluated against the PTZ model by co-administering with flumazenil (FMZ), and also evaluated for its effect on GABA levels in brain and NMDA-induced lethality in mice. Furthermore, the probable locomotor deficit-inducing property of the extract was evaluated by actophotometer test in mice. In results, only MeAA showed protection against six-hertz-induced seizures in mice, based on these outcomes only MeAA was evaluated in MES and PTZ models. Notably, the MeAA (200, 400 and 800 mg/kg) has offered mild and dose dependent protection against MES and PTZ-induced seizures in mice. Alongside, the MeAA (400 mg/kg) showed a significant increase in GABA levels in the brain compared to control, and in line with these findings the anti-PTZ effect of MeAA (400 mg/kg, p.o.) was blocked when co-administered with flumazenil (5 mg/kg, i.p.). However, the MeAA has not shown significant protection against NMDA-induced mortality and also did not cause significant change in locomotor activity compared to before treatment. These findings suggest that MeAA possess mild anticonvulsant activity and the outcomes further confirmed the involvement of GABAergic mechanism behind the anticonvulsant activity of MeAA.

  3. The involvement and possible mechanism of NR4A1 in chondrocyte apoptosis during osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xinge; Ye, Hui; Yao, Xuedong; Gao, Yanzheng

    2017-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a joint disease caused by the breakdown of joint cartilage and underlying bone, and places great burdens to daily life of patients. Nuclear orphan receptor nuclear receptor subfamily 4, group A, member 1 (NR4A1) is vital for cell apoptosis, but little is known about its role in OA. This study aims to reveal the expression and function of NR4A1 during OA chondrocyte apoptosis. NR4A1 expression by qRT-PCR and western blot, and chondrocyte apoptosis by TUNEL assay were detected in normal and OA joint cartilage. NR4A1 was located in cartilage sections by immunohistofluorescence. Chondrocytes from normal joint cartilage were cultured in vitro for interleukin 6 (IL6) or tumor necrosis factor (TNF) treatment and si-NR4A1 transfection, after which the possible mechanism involving NR4A1 was analyzed. Results showed that NR4A1 expression and chondrocyte apoptosis were significantly elevated in OA cartilage (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01). NR4A1 was located in nuclei of normal cartilage chondrocytes, but was translocated to mitochondria and co-located with B-cell lymphoma 2 in OA chondrocytes. NR4A1 expression in cultured chondrocytes could be promoted by both IL6 and TNF treatment. si-NR4A1 partly reduced TNF-induced cell apoptosis. Inhibiting p38 by SB203580 could decrease TNF-induced NR4A1 to some extent, while inhibiting JNK could not. So NR4A1 is likely to facilitate OA chondrocyte apoptosis, which is associated with p38 MAPK and mitochondrial apoptosis pathway. This study provides a potential therapeutic target for OA treatment and offers information for regulatory mechanisms in OA. PMID:28337303

  4. Participation of citral in the bronchodilatory effect of ginger oil and possible mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Mangprayool, Thitiya; Kupittayanant, Sajeera; Chudapongse, Nuannoi

    2013-09-01

    The extract of ginger, the rhizomes of Zingiber officinale Roscoe (Zingiberaceae), has been reported to possess anti-hyperactivity and anti-inflammation on airway. The present study described brochodilatory activity of ginger oil and identified its active compound. Ginger oil was extracted by hydro-distillation. The compositions of ginger oil were analyzed by gas chromatography and mass spectrometer. Citral, eucalyptol and camphene were found to be the major components. Ginger oil and citral, but not camphene, suppressed rat tracheal contraction induced by carbachol (CCh). Consistent with previous report, eucalyptol showed a relaxing effect on rat airway. Since the content of eucalyptol in ginger oil was relatively low, the contribution of eucalyptol to the bronchodilatory effect of ginger oil was small. To elucidate the mechanisms responsible for the myorelaxing effect, propranolol (a β-adrenergic receptor antagonist), indomethacin (a COX inhibitor) and L-NAME (a NOS inhibitor) were used to block the inhibitory effects of ginger oil and citral. It was found that propranolol, but not indomethacin and L-NAME, reversed bronchodilatory effects of both ginger oil and citral, suggesting that a possible mechanism involved β-adrenergic receptor. This study provides the pharmacological basis supporting the therapeutic potential of Z. officinale rhizomes as a bronchodilator.

  5. Biocontrol of postharvest gray and blue mold decay of apples with Rhodotorula mucilaginosa and possible mechanisms of action.

    PubMed

    Li, Renping; Zhang, Hongyin; Liu, Weimin; Zheng, Xiaodong

    2011-03-30

    The efficacy of Rhodotorula mucilaginosa against postharvest gray mold, blue mold and natural decay development of apples and the possible mechanisms involved were investigated. The decay incidence and lesion diameter of gray mold and blue mold of apples treated by R. mucilaginosa were significantly reduced compared with the control fruits, and the higher concentration of R. mucilaginosa, the better the efficacy of the biocontrol. R. mucilaginosa also significantly reduced the natural decay development of apples following storage at 20°C for 35 days or at 4°C for 45 days followed by 20°C for 15 days. Germination and survival of spores of Penicillium expansum and Botrytis cinerea were markedly inhibited by R. mucilaginosa in an in vitro test. Rapid colonization of the yeast in apple wounds was observed whether stored at 20°C or 4°C. In apples, the activities of peroxidase (POD) and polyphenoloxidase (PPO) were significantly induced and lipid peroxidation (malondialdehyde (MDA) content) was highly inhibited by R. mucilaginosa treatment compared with those of the control fruits. All these results indicated that R. mucilaginosa has great potential for development of commercial formulations to control postharvest pathogens on fruits. Its modes of action were based on competition for space and nutrients with pathogens, inducement of activities of defense-related enzymes such as POD, PPO and inhibition of lipid peroxidation (MDA content) of apples, so as to enhance the resistance and delay the ripening and senescence of apples.

  6. Investigation of possible involvement of several genes related to development of hepatocarcinogenesis in rats.

    PubMed

    Todaka, N; Higashi, K; Yan, Y; Abe, T; Yamashiro, K; Hiai, H

    2000-06-01

    A comparative study on the possible involvement of several genes in the susceptibility of chemical carcinogenesis was carried out using carcinogen-resistant DRH rat and -sensitive Donryu and F344 rats. Previously, we observed that the induction of glutathione S-transferase placental form (GST-P) in the liver of Donryu rats by 3'-methyl-4-dimethylaminoazobenzene (3'-Me-DAB) was significantly greater than that of DRH rats. In the present study, we tentatively determined base sequences of the enhancer region including GPE-I and GPE-II (GST-P enhancers I and II) of GST-P genes of DRH, Donryu and F344 rats, but we did not observe any nucleotide polymorphism around these regions. Furthermore, the mRNA levels of silencer binding protein (NFA-1) for the GST-P promoter of rat liver were also similar in the DRH and Donryu rats. Since clonal expansion of putative preneoplastic GST-P-positive foci in the DRH rat liver was significantly suppressed during 3'-Me-DAB administration, we examined whether two opposite growth controlling factors, TGF-alpha and TGF-beta, may participate in such suppression of growth. It was supposed that mannose 6-phosphate/insulin-like growth factor 2 receptor (M6P/IGF2R), at least in part, activates TGF-beta preproprotein. However, we observed that the levels of M6P/IGF2R mRNA in the livers of DRH were not higher than those of Donryu rats after being fed 3'-Me-DAB for 8 weeks. Another important factor in the carcinogenesis is insulin-like growth factor II itself. Although liver tumors induced by 3'-Me-DAB in F344 had high levels of IGF-II mRNA, little IGF-II gene expression existed in normal adult livers of Donryu, F344 and DRH rats. High levels of IGF-II mRNA were detected similarly in the livers of neonates from all these three strains of rats. Finally, we detected a significant increase of AFP (alpha-fetoprotein) mRNA in the livers of Donryu rats around 6 to 8 weeks from the start of 3'-Me-DAB feeding, which is in parallel with detrimental effects

  7. [Intersectorial actions for health promotion in Family Health Strategy: experiences, challenges, and possibilities].

    PubMed

    Silva, Kênia Lara; Rodrigues, Andreza Trevenzoli

    2010-01-01

    Qualitative study with the purpose of analyzing intersectorial actions for health promotion in the context of the Family Health Strategy, identifying experiences, facilitating and restricting factors to the process of building partnerships. Subjects were health managers and informers from social equipment in the territory covered by a local health service in Belo Horizonte/Minas Gerais, Brazil. The results indicate the existence of a wide social network. However, intersectorial health promoting actions are still incipient. Intersectorial actions are faced with the challenge of creating communication spaces that allow the resolution of complex problems. It is concluded that intersectorial actions constitute an innovative strategy which is still under construction, and the paths of which are still being unraveled.

  8. 7 CFR 799.10 - Criteria and identification of FSA actions as to degree of involvement under the NEPA process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... § 799.10 Criteria and identification of FSA actions as to degree of involvement under the NEPA process... an environmental evaluation not to significantly affect the quality of the human environment. (c) FSA... 7 Agriculture 7 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Criteria and identification of FSA actions as...

  9. Immigrant Parent Involvement in U.S. Schools: Current Practices and Future Possibilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aleixo, Marina Bandeira

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation examines how parent involvement expectations are communicated and enacted in interactions at one small urban high school. Through detailed descriptions of school interactions between supporting staff and immigrant parents, this study examines how parent involvement expectations are understood and perceived. Although scholarly…

  10. Neuronal adaptation involves rapid expansion of the action potential initiation site

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Ricardo S.; Henneberger, Christian; Padmashri, Ragunathan; Anders, Stefanie; Jensen, Thomas P.; Rusakov, Dmitri A.

    2014-01-01

    Action potential (AP) generation is the key to information-processing in the brain. Although APs are normally initiated in the axonal initial segment, developmental adaptation or prolonged network activity may alter the initiation site geometry thus affecting cell excitability. Here we find that hippocampal dentate granule cells adapt their spiking threshold to the kinetics of the ongoing dendrosomatic excitatory input by expanding the AP-initiation area away from the soma while also decelerating local axonal spikes. Dual-patch soma–axon recordings combined with axonal Na+ and Ca2+ imaging and biophysical modelling show that the underlying mechanism involves distance-dependent inactivation of axonal Na+ channels due to somatic depolarization propagating into the axon. Thus, the ensuing changes in the AP-initiation zone and local AP propagation could provide activity-dependent control of cell excitability and spiking on a relatively rapid timescale. PMID:24851940

  11. Complying with Land Disposal Restrictions (LDR) for CERCLA remedial actions involving contaminated soil and debris

    SciTech Connect

    Bascietto, J.

    1991-01-01

    CERCLA Sect. 121(e) requires that remedial actions must comply with at least the minimum standards of all applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements'' (ARARs) of federal and state laws. EPA has determined that RCRA land disposal restrictions may be ARAR for certain CERCLA remedial actions involving soil and debris. This means that soil and debris contaminated with prohibited or restricted wastes cannot be land disposed if (1) these wastes have not attained the treatment standards set by EPA for a specified waste or (2) have been the subject of a case-by-case extension, national capacity variance, or successful no migration'' petition. RCRA LDR treatment standards are based on Best Demonstrated Available Technology'' (BDAT), not on health-based concentrations. Because the treatment of the soil and debris matrix presents technological difficulties not yet addressed by EPA (BDAT standards are generally set for industrial process wastes), compliance options such as obtaining a Treatability Variance, are available and will generally be necessary for soil and debris wastes. In the recently promulgated revisions to the National Contingency Plan (NCP) for CERCLA implementation, EPA provides important information for CERCLA project managers regarding LDR compliance, particularly for obtaining a treatability variance for land disposal of contaminated soil and debris.

  12. Diversity of mechanisms involved in aromatase regulation and estrogen action in the brain

    PubMed Central

    Charlier, Thierry D.; Cornil, Charlotte A.; Ball, Gregory F.; Balthazart, Jacques

    2010-01-01

    The mechanisms through which estrogens modulate neuronal physiology, brain morphology, and behavior in recent years have proven to be far more complex than previously thought. For example, a second nuclear estrogen receptor has been identified, a new family of coregulatory proteins regulating steroid-dependent gene transcriptions was discovered and, finally, it has become clear that estrogens have surprisingly rapid effects based on their actions on cell membranes, which in turn results in the modulation of intracellular signaling cascades. This paper presents a selective review of new findings in this area related to work in our laboratories, focusing on the role of estrogens in the activation of male sexual behavior. Two separate topics are considered. We first discuss functions of the steroid receptor coactivator-1 (SRC-1) that has emerged as a key limiting factor for behavioral effects of estradiol. Knocking-down its expression by antisense oligonucleotides drastically inhibits male-typical sexual behaviors. Secondly, we describe rapid regulations of brain estradiol production by calcium-dependent phosphorylations of the aromatase enzyme, themselves under the control of neurotransmitter activity. These rapid changes in estrogen bioavailability have clear behavioral consequences. Increases or decreases in estradiol concentrations respectively obtained by an acute injection of estradiol itself or of an aromatase inhibitor lead within 15-30 min to parallel changes in sexual behavior frequencies. These new controls of estrogens action offer a vast array of possibilities for discrete local controls of estrogen action. They also represent a formidable challenge for neuroendocrinologists trying to obtain an integrated view of brain function in relation to behavior. PMID:20060879

  13. One mechanism of glucocorticoid action in asthma may involve the inhibition of IL-25 expression

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Wei; Lu, Chao; Zhang, Chengming; Zhang, Chenghao

    2017-01-01

    While the mechanism of action of classic cytokines in asthma has received increased attention from researchers, certain non-classical cytokines, such as IL-25, also participate in this mechanism. The present study was performed to investigate the changes in IL-25 (IL-17E) mRNA and protein in bronchial asthma and to further characterize the mechanism underlying the action of glucocorticoids in asthma. A total of 96 specific pathogen-free BALB/c male mice were randomly divided into three normal groups (after the first allergization, after the second allergization and after excitation), three asthma groups (with the same three subgroups), a dexamethasone group and a budesonide group (n=12/group). An asthma model was established via the ovalbumin-sensitized excitation method. Mice in the dexamethasone group received intraperitoneal injections of dexamethasone 1 h prior to each excitation, the budesonide group received a budesonide suspension via inhalation 2 h before and after each provocation, and the normal group was sensitized and challenged with isotonic saline. IL-25 protein expression levels in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were measured by ELISA, and the relative IL-25 mRNA content in lung tissue was determined by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Compared with the normal groups, both the protein and mRNA levels of IL-25 were significantly increased (P<0.05) in the asthma groups. Dexamethasone and budesonide groups exhibited significant protein and mRNA reductions in IL-25, as compared with the asthma group after excitation (P<0.05), whereas these two groups significantly increased levels compared with the normal group after excitation (P<0.05). No significant differences in IL-25 mRNA expression levels were detected in the dexamethasone and budesonide groups when compared with the normal group after excitation. Therefore, we conclude that IL-25 is involved throughout the process of inflammation and inflammatory immune pathogenesis

  14. Parental Involvement in the Habilitation Process Following Children's Cochlear Implantation: An Action Theory Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaidman-Zait, Anat; Young, Richard A.

    2008-01-01

    Action theory and the qualitative action-project method are used in this study to address and illustrate the complexity of parenting children who have received cochlear implants (CIs) as well as the intentionality of parents engaged in that process. "Action" refers to individual and joint goal-directed and intentional behaviors. Action theory has…

  15. Involvement of the Motor System in Comprehension of Non-Literal Action Language: A Meta-Analysis Study.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie; Shu, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Although numerous studies have shown that the sensory-motor system is involved in semantic processing of language stimuli, it is still unclear whether comprehension of abstract concepts is embodied, and whether the involvement of the sensory-motor system is context-dependent. Investigation of how the motor system is activated during comprehension of non-literal action languages can help address these issues. So far several studies have reported brain activations during non-literal action language comprehension, but the findings are highly inconsistent because of different types of non-literal action language stimuli. To clarify how the motor system is involved in comprehension of different types of non-literal languages, the current study conducted quantitative meta-analyses on fMRI findings about comprehension of sentences describing fictive motions, metaphoric actions, and idiomatic actions. Results showed that fictive motion sentences elicited activation in the right parahippocampal gyrus, an area important for spatial processing. For metaphoric actions, the left precentral gyrus (BA 6) was strongly activated, suggesting a link between metaphoric and literal meanings. For idiomatic actions, activity was found in the left inferior frontal gyrus (BA 44/45), highlighting semantic selection and inhibition. No premotor or motor activity was found in idiom condition. These results together suggest that the involvement of the sensory-motor system in abstract concepts processing is flexible, depending on semantic features of the language stimuli and links between abstract and literal meanings.

  16. Action research methodology in clinical pharmacy: how to involve and change.

    PubMed

    Nørgaard, Lotte Stig; Sørensen, Ellen Westh

    2016-06-01

    Introduction The focus in clinical pharmacy practice is and has for the last 30-35 years been on changing the role of pharmacy staff into service orientation and patient counselling. One way of doing this is by involving staff in change process and as a researcher to take part in the change process by establishing partnerships with staff. On the background of the authors' widespread action research (AR)-based experiences, recommendations and comments for how to conduct an AR-study is described, and one of their AR-based studies illustrate the methodology and the research methods used. Methodology AR is defined as an approach to research which is based on a problem-solving relationship between researchers and clients, which aims at both solving a problem and at collaboratively generating new knowledge. Research questions relevant in AR-studies are: what was the working process in this change oriented study? What learning and/or changes took place? What challenges/pitfalls had to be overcome? What were the influence/consequences for the involved parts? When to use If you want to implement new services and want to involve staff and others in the process, an AR methodology is very suitable. The basic advantages of doing AR-based studies are grounded in their participatory and democratic basis and their starting point in problems experienced in practice. Limitations Some of the limitations in AR-studies are that neither of the participants in a project steering group are the only ones to decide. Furthermore, the collective process makes the decision-making procedures relatively complex.

  17. Problems Teachers Face When Doing Action Research and Finding Possible Solutions: Three Cases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhou, Jun

    2012-01-01

    Through case studies, this paper explores problems teachers face when doing action research: for instance, teachers may misunderstand the research, mistrust university researchers, lack the time or adequate library resources to conduct research, lack theoretical guidance or knowledge of research methodology, and feel pressure or frustration during…

  18. OXIDATIVE STRESS AS A POSSIBLE MODE OF ACTION FOR ARSENIC CARCINOGENESIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Many modes of action for arsenic carcinogenesis have been proposed, but few theories have a substantial mass of supporting data. Three stronger theories of arsenic carcinogenesis are production of chromosomal abnormalities, promotion of carcinogenesis and oxidati...

  19. Possible involvement of parotid beta-adrenergic receptors in the etiology of sialadenosis.

    PubMed

    Chilla, R; Witzemann, V; Opaitz, M; Arglebe, C

    1981-01-01

    The concentration of beta-adrenergic receptors was determined in rat and human parotid glands, in normal tissue as well as after sympathetic denervation of the rat, and in human sialadenosis. Receptor levels were clearly elevated after denervation of the rat and in sialadenosis. The possible implications of these findings for the etiology of human sialadenosis are discussed.

  20. Liver tumor promoting effect of orphenadrine in rats and its possible mechanism of action including CAR activation and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Morita, Reiko; Yafune, Atsunori; Shiraki, Ayako; Itahashi, Megu; Ishii, Yuji; Akane, Hirotoshi; Nakane, Fumiyuki; Suzuki, Kazuhiko; Shibutani, Makoto; Mitsumori, Kunitoshi

    2013-01-01

    Orphenadrine (ORPH), an anticholinergic agent, is a cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2B inducer. CYP2B inducers are known to have liver tumor-promoting effects in rats. In this study, we performed a rat two-stage liver carcinogenesis bioassay to examine the tumor-promoting effect of ORPH and to clarify its possible mechanism of action. Male rats were given a single intraperitoneal injection of N-diethylnitrosamine (DEN) as an initiation treatment. Two weeks after DEN administration, rats were fed a diet containing ORPH (0, 750, or 1,500 ppm) for 6 weeks. One week after the ORPH-administration rats were subjected to two-thirds partial hepatectomy for the acceleration of hepatocellular proliferation. The number and area of glutathione S-transferase placental form-positive foci significantly increased in the DEN-ORPH groups. Real-time RT-PCR revealed increased mRNA expression levels of Cyp2b1/2, Mrp2 and Cyclin D1 in the DEN-ORPH groups and of Gpx2 and Gstm3 in the DEN-High ORPH group. Microsomal reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and oxidative stress markers such as thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances and 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine were increased in the DEN-High ORPH group. Immunohistochemically, constitutively active/androstane receptor (CAR) were clearly localized in the nuclei of hepatocytes in the DEN-ORPH groups. These results suggest that ORPH causes nuclear translocation of CAR resulting in the induction of the liver tumor-promoting activity. Furthermore, oxidative stress resulting from ROS production is also involved in the liver tumor-promoting activity of ORPH.

  1. 46 CFR 1.03-45 - Appeals from decisions or actions involving documentation of vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... a formal appeal of that decision or action to the Director of Prevention Policy, Commandant (CG-54... Director of Prevention Policy, Commandant (CG-54), on such an appeal will constitute final agency action....

  2. Possible modes of action of extradural electrical stimulation on the spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Phillips, C G

    1981-01-01

    Analysis of the actions of electric currents on excitable membranes has contributed greatly to our biophysical understanding of the initiation and transmission of impulses in nerve and muscle. The use of electrical stimulation in trying to unravel the complex structure and to understand the integrative properties of the central nervous system (CNS), however, raises problems of a different order. This is true of the application of electrical stimuli to mixed populations of axons in peripheral nerves in attempts to discover the central actions of inputs from the different receptive fields, from skin, for example, or muscle or joint. But the most complex problems of all are those raised by the application of electrical stimuli to the CNS itself, whether to try to find out how it works, or to try to relieve a patient's disabilities. We would like to be able to specify, for any particular configuration of external electrodes, which populations of neurones and axons will be excited by virtue of appropriate orientation with respect to lines of current flowing cathodally within the non-isotropic conducting medium of the CNS. We would also like to know the quantities and locations of the brief excitatory and inhibitory synaptic actions, and the longer-term 'modulating' actions, which they exert at nearby and remote areas of the brain and spinal cord. In man, much could be accomplished by attentive neurological examinations, comparing sensory, motor and autonomic functions in the presence and absence of chronic stimulation, and correlating particular physiological effects with alterations of particular symptoms. Such examination would invoke all the technical resources of clinical neurophysiology. Direct evidence of the stimulation of particular spinal pathways and neurones, and of the distribution of remote excitatory and inhibitory effects, could be obtained only by multiple electrical recordings from brain and cord in animal experiments.

  3. The Regulation of Nucleolin Expression in Prostrate Epithelial Cells; Possible Involvement of MYC

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    physical state. Therefore it is possible that while a specific portion of Nucleolin can interact with H1 in such a way as to promote DNA condensation...phosphorylation is unnecessary in a cell like S cerevisiae in which no nuclear division accompanies cytokinesis (Ginisty et al 1999). The authors...the nucleolus dissipates and the nuclear envelope breaks down. Whether or not this localization function is related to the phosphorylation-dependent

  4. Oncogenic Actions of SKP2 Involves Deregulation of CDK1 Turnover Mediated by FOXM1.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Anand; K, Dhanya; Babu P S, Saneesh; Jagadeeshan, Sankar; Prasad, Manu; Nair, S Asha

    2017-04-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (cdks) are central catalytic units of cell division cycle. Among the cdk family members, cdk1 has critical roles in multiple phases of the cell cycle. Aberrant expression or hyper-actions of cdk1 are tumorigenic and yet the complex oncogenic network that regulates its turnover is poorly understood. We found a hitherto unexplored functional connection between skp2 and cdk1 turn over. In vitro knockdown or overexpression of skp2 in cultured cells reduced or induced cdk1 expression indicating skp2 as a positive driver for cdk1. A partial inhibitory role for p27 was identified in this context. Interestingly, concurrent overexpression of skp2 and p27 favored cdk1 upregulation in vitro, which correlated well with similar observations in clinical tumor samples. We found that the transcription factor FOXM1 may play a central role in the skp2-cdk1 loop. Additional molecular involvement in the skp2-cdk1 loop was also explored. In conclusion, our results revealed hitherto unexplored p27 independent molecular mechanisms for skp2 driven tumor progression. Our results support the previous findings that skp2 may be a potential therapeutic target for the management of tumors. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 797-807, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Social choice functions: A tool for ranking variables involved in action plans against road noise.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Padillo, Alejandro; de Oliveira, Thiago B F; Alves, Matheus; Bazzan, Ana L C; Ruiz, Diego P

    2016-08-01

    Traffic noise is gaining importance in planning and operation of roads in developing countries, and particularly in Europe and Latin America. Many variables with different degrees of importance influence the perception of noise from roads. Thus, the problem of prioritizing road stretches for action against such noise is an important issue in environmental noise management. For example, it can be addressed using multicriteria methods. However, these methodologies require criteria or suitable variables to be ranked according to their relative importance. In the present study, for this ranking, a list of nine variables involved in the decision-making process (called "road stretch priority variables") was presented in the form of questionnaires to high-level experts from Andalusia, southern Spain. These experts ranked the variables by relevance. Using the same data, seven social choice functions (Plurality, Raynaud, Kemeny-Young, Copeland, Simpson, Schulze, and Borda) were used in order to rank the variables. The results indicate that the most important variables were those that take into account the parameters of greatest exposure for the citizens, followed by variables related to the intensity of the problem analyzed. The results show that a combination of the use of social choice functions on aggregated information from expert panels can provide a consensus for ranking priority variables related to road stretches.

  6. Involvement of the endogenous opioid system in the psychopharmacological actions of ethanol: the role of acetaldehyde

    PubMed Central

    Font, Laura; Luján, Miguel Á.; Pastor, Raúl

    2013-01-01

    Significant evidence implicates the endogenous opioid system (EOS) (opioid peptides and receptors) in the mechanisms underlying the psychopharmacological effects of ethanol. Ethanol modulates opioidergic signaling and function at different levels, including biosynthesis, release, and degradation of opioid peptides, as well as binding of endogenous ligands to opioid receptors. The role of β-endorphin and µ-opioid receptors (OR) have been suggested to be of particular importance in mediating some of the behavioral effects of ethanol, including psychomotor stimulation and sensitization, consumption and conditioned place preference (CPP). Ethanol increases the release of β-endorphin from the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (NArc), which can modulate activity of other neurotransmitter systems such as mesolimbic dopamine (DA). The precise mechanism by which ethanol induces a release of β-endorphin, thereby inducing behavioral responses, remains to be elucidated. The present review summarizes accumulative data suggesting that the first metabolite of ethanol, the psychoactive compound acetaldehyde, could participate in such mechanism. Two lines of research involving acetaldehyde are reviewed: (1) implications of the formation of acetaldehyde in brain areas such as the NArc, with high expression of ethanol metabolizing enzymes and presence of cell bodies of endorphinic neurons and (2) the formation of condensation products between DA and acetaldehyde such as salsolinol, which exerts its actions via OR. PMID:23914161

  7. Mechanisms involved in the anti-inflammatory action of inhaled tea tree oil in mice.

    PubMed

    Golab, Mateusz; Skwarlo-Sonta, Krystyna

    2007-03-01

    Tea tree oil (TTO) is well known as an antimicrobial and immunomodulatory agent. In the present study we confirmed the anti-inflammatory properties of TTO and investigated the involvement of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis in the immunomodulatory action of TTO administered by inhalation. Sexually mature, 6-8-week-old, C(57)BI(10) x CBA/H (F(1)) male mice were used. One group of animals was injected intra-peritoneally (ip) with Zymosan to elicit peritoneal inflammation and was then submitted to four sessions of TTO inhalation (15 mins each). Some of the mice were simultaneously injected ip with Antalarmin, a CRH-1 receptor antagonist, to block HPA axis functions. Twenty-four hours after the injections the mice were killed by CO(2) asphyxia, and peritoneal leukocytes (PTLs) were isolated and counted. Levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cyclooxygenase (COX) activity in PTLs were assessed by fluorimetric and colorimetric assays, respectively. The results obtained show that sessions of TTO inhalation exert a strong anti-inflammatory influence on the immune system stimulated by Zymosan injection, while having no influence on PTL number, ROS level, and COX activity in mice without inflammation. The HPA axis was shown to mediate the anti-inflammatory effect of TTO; Antalarmin abolished the influence of inhaled TTO on PTL number and their ROS production in mice with experimental peritonitis, but it had no effect on these parameters in mice without inflammation.

  8. Possible mechanism of psoralen phototoxicity not involving direct interaction with DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Laskin, J.D.; Lee, E.; Yurkow, E.J.; Laskin, D.L.; Gallo, M.A.

    1985-09-01

    Psoralens in combination with ultraviolet light (UVA; 320-400 nm) are used in the photochemical treatment of a variety of skin diseases including vitiligo, a skin depigmentational disorder, and psoriasis, a disease of accelerated epidermal cell proliferation. Although it is generally assumed that the major site of action of the psoralens is DNA, the authors have obtained evidence that another site may be the primary target for these compounds. They have identified specific, saturable, high-affinity binding sites for 8-methoxypsoralen on HeLa cells and have detected specific binding of 8-methoxypsoralen to four other human cell lines and five mouse cell lines. In HeLa cells, specific binding is reversible and independent of the ability of the compound to intercalate into DNA. In addition, binding sites become covalently modified by the psoralen after UVA exposure. Specific binding of 8-(methyoxy-/sup 3/H)methoxypsoralen constitutes 79% of the label bound to the cells. Scatchard analysis indicated two classes of psoralen binding sites. Based on these findings, the authors hypothesize that specific binding sites for psoralens on mammalian cells mediate, at least in part, psoralen-induced phototoxicity.

  9. Evaluation of the analgesic effect of alkaloid extract of Peganum harmala L.: possible mechanisms involved.

    PubMed

    Farouk, Loubna; Laroubi, Amine; Aboufatima, Rachida; Benharref, Ahmed; Chait, Abderrahman

    2008-02-12

    The seeds of Peganum harmala L. (Pgh) (Zygophyllaceae) have been used in Moroccan traditional medicine for treatment of a various diseases and to relieve dolorous process. The major objective of this paper was to investigate the mechanism of the analgesia induced by alkaloid extract of Peganum harmala. In the present work, the antinociceptive action was assayed in several experimental models in mice: writhing, formalin, and hot plate tests. The alkaloid extract (12.5 and 25mg/kg) and in a dose-dependent manner significantly reduced the nociception by acetic acid intraperitoneal injection (p<0.001). In the formalin test, the extract also significantly reduced the painful stimulus in both phases of the test (p<0.001). Treatment with the extract when given by (i.p. or i.c.v.) or with morphine (10mg/kg, i.p.) produced a significant increase of the reaction time in hot plate test. These result showed that the alkaloid extract of Pgh contains active analgesic principles acting both centrally and peripherally. Furthermore, this antinociceptive effect has been avoided by naloxone at a dose of 1mg/kg in the first phase of formalin and hot plate tests indicating that this extract act partly through an opioid-mediated mechanism. In conclusion, the alkaloid extract of Peganum harmala seems to have both central and peripheral antinociceptive activities which may be mediated by opioid receptors.

  10. Estrogen receptor beta, a possible tumor suppressor involved in ovarian carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lazennec, Gwendal

    2006-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is one of the leading cause of death from gynecological tumors in women. Several lines of evidence suggest that estrogens may play an important role in ovarian carcinogenesis, through their receptors, ERα and ERβ. Interestingly, malignant ovarian tumors originating from epithelial surface constitute about 90% of ovarian cancers and expressed low levels of ERβ, compared to normal tissues. In addition, restoration of ERβ in ovarian cancer cells, leads to strong inhibition of their proliferation and invasion, while apoptosis is enhanced. In this manuscript, recent data suggesting a possible tumor-suppressor role for ERβ in ovarian carcinogenesis are discussed. PMID:16399219

  11. Biodegradation of ivory (natural apatite): possible involvement of fungal activity in biodeterioration of the Lewis Chessmen.

    PubMed

    Pinzari, Flavia; Tate, James; Bicchieri, Marina; Rhee, Young Joon; Gadd, Geoffrey Michael

    2013-04-01

    Fungal biodeterioration of ivory was investigated with in vitro inoculation of samples obtained from boar and walrus tusks with the fungi Aspergillus niger and Serpula himantioides, species of known geoactive abilities. A combination of light and scanning electron microscopy together with associated analytical techniques was used to characterize fungal interactions with the ivory, including changes in ivory composition, dissolution and tunnelling, and the formation of new biominerals. The research was aimed at providing further understanding of the potential roles of fungi in the colonization and deterioration of ivory in terrestrial environments, but also contributes to our knowledge regarding the possible origins of the surface damage observed on early medieval sculptures made largely from walrus tusks, referred to as 'the Lewis hoard of gaming pieces', that were presumably produced for playing chess. The experiments have shown that the possibility of damage to ivory being caused by fungi is realistic. Scanning electron microscopy revealed penetration of fungal hyphae within cracks in the walrus tusk that showed also widespread tunnelling by fungal hyphae as well as 'fungal footprints' where the surface was etched as a consequence of mycelial colonization. Similar phenomena were observed with boar tusk ivory, while production of metabolites could lead to complete dissolution of the sample. Colonization of ivory and/or exposure to fungal activity lead to extensive secondary biomineral formation, and this was identified as calcium oxalate, mainly as the monohydrate, whewellite.

  12. A Gene Island with Two Possible Configurations Is Involved in Chromatic Acclimation in Marine Synechococcus

    PubMed Central

    Humily, Florian; Partensky, Frédéric; Six, Christophe; Farrant, Gregory K.; Ratin, Morgane; Marie, Dominique; Garczarek, Laurence

    2013-01-01

    Synechococcus, the second most abundant oxygenic phototroph in the marine environment, harbors the largest pigment diversity known within a single genus of cyanobacteria, allowing it to exploit a wide range of light niches. Some strains are capable of Type IV chromatic acclimation (CA4), a process by which cells can match the phycobilin content of their phycobilisomes to the ambient light quality. Here, we performed extensive genomic comparisons to explore the diversity of this process within the marine Synechococcus radiation. A specific gene island was identified in all CA4-performing strains, containing two genes (fciA/b) coding for possible transcriptional regulators and one gene coding for a phycobilin lyase. However, two distinct configurations of this cluster were observed, depending on the lineage. CA4-A islands contain the mpeZ gene, encoding a recently characterized phycoerythrobilin lyase-isomerase, and a third, small, possible regulator called fciC. In CA4-B islands, the lyase gene encodes an uncharacterized relative of MpeZ, called MpeW. While mpeZ is expressed more in blue light than green light, this is the reverse for mpeW, although only small phenotypic differences were found among chromatic acclimaters possessing either CA4 island type. This study provides novel insights into understanding both diversity and evolution of the CA4 process. PMID:24391958

  13. Antifungal activity of salicylic acid against Penicillium expansum and its possible mechanisms of action.

    PubMed

    da Rocha Neto, Argus Cezar; Maraschin, Marcelo; Di Piero, Robson Marcelo

    2015-12-23

    Apple is a fruit widely produced and consumed around the world. Blue mold (Penicillium expansum) is one of the main postharvest diseases in apples, leading to a wide use of fungicides and the search for alternative products. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of salicylic acid (SA) against P. expansum, elucidating its mechanisms of action. The antimicrobial effect was determined by exposing conidia to a 2.5 mM SA solution for 0 to 120 min, followed by incubation. The effect of pH on the efficacy of SA against P. expansum was assessed both in vitro and in situ. The action mechanisms were investigated through fluorescence assays, measurement of protein leakage, lipid damage, and transmission electronic microscopy. SA was capable of inhibiting 90% of the fungal germination after 30 min, causing damage to the conidial plasma membrane and leading to protein leakage up to 3.2 μg of soluble protein per g of mycelium. The pH of the SA solution affected the antimicrobial activity of this secondary metabolite, which inhibited the germination of P. expansum and the blue mold incidence in apples in solutions with pH≤3 by 100%, gradually losing its activity at higher pH.

  14. Tetracycline compounds with non-antimicrobial organ protective properties: possible mechanisms of action

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, Michael O.; Ceballos, Guillermo; Villarreal, Francisco

    2010-01-01

    Tetracyclines were developed as a result of the screening of soil samples for antibiotics. The firstt of these compounds, chlortetracycline, was introduced in 1947. Tetracyclines were found to be highly effective against various pathogens including rickettsiae, as well as both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, thus becoming the first class of broad spectrum antibiotics. Many other interesting properties, unrelated to their antibiotic activity, have been identified for tetracyclines which have led to widely divergent experimental and clinical uses. For example, tetracyclines are also an effective anti-malarial drug. Minocycline, which can readily cross cell membranes, is known to be a potent anti-apoptotic agent. Another tetracycline, doxycycline is known to exert anti-protease activities. Doxycycline can inhibit matrix metalloproteinases which contribute to tissue destruction activities in diseases such as periodontitis. A large body of literature has provided additional evidence for the “beneficial” actions of tetracyclines, including their ability to act as reactive oxygen species scavengers and anti-inflammatory agents. This review provides a summary of tetracycline’s multiple mechanisms of action as a means to understand their beneficial effects. PMID:20951211

  15. Antinociceptive Activity of Methanol Extract of Muntingia calabura Leaves and the Mechanisms of Action Involved

    PubMed Central

    Sani, M. H. Mohd.; Zakaria, Z. A.; Balan, T.; Teh, L. K.; Salleh, M. Z.

    2012-01-01

    Muntingia calabura L. (family Elaeocarpaceae) has been traditionally used to relieve various pain-related ailments. The present study aimed to determine the antinociceptive activity of methanol extract of M. calabura leaves (MEMC) and to elucidate the possible mechanism of antinociception involved. The in vivo chemicals (acetic acid-induced abdominal constriction and formalin-, capsaicin-, glutamate-, serotonin-induced paw licking test) and thermal (hot plate test) models of nociception were used to evaluate the extract antinociceptive activity. The extract (100, 250, and 500 mg/kg) was administered orally 60 min prior to subjection to the respective test. The results obtained demonstrated that MEMC produced significant (P < 0.05) antinociceptive response in all the chemical- and thermal-induced nociception models, which was reversed after pretreatment with 5 mg/kg naloxone, a non-selective opioid antagonist. Furthermore, pretreatment with L-arginine (a nitric oxide (NO) donor), NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl esters (L-NAME; an inhibitor of NO synthase (NOS)), methylene blue (MB; an inhibitor of cyclic-guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) pathway), or their combination also caused significant (P < 0.05) change in the intensity of the MEMC antinociception. In conclusion, the MEMC antinociceptive activity involves activation of the peripheral and central mechanisms, and modulation via, partly, the opioid receptors and NO/cGMP pathway. PMID:22611437

  16. An Overview of Sub-Cellular Mechanisms Involved in the Action of TTFields

    PubMed Central

    Tuszynski, Jack A.; Wenger, Cornelia; Friesen, Douglas E.; Preto, Jordane

    2016-01-01

    Long-standing research on electric and electromagnetic field interactions with biological cells and their subcellular structures has mainly focused on the low- and high-frequency regimes. Biological effects at intermediate frequencies between 100 and 300 kHz have been recently discovered and applied to cancer cells as a therapeutic modality called Tumor Treating Fields (TTFields). TTFields are clinically applied to disrupt cell division, primarily for the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). In this review, we provide an assessment of possible physical interactions between 100 kHz range alternating electric fields and biological cells in general and their nano-scale subcellular structures in particular. This is intended to mechanistically elucidate the observed strong disruptive effects in cancer cells. Computational models of isolated cells subject to TTFields predict that for intermediate frequencies the intracellular electric field strength significantly increases and that peak dielectrophoretic forces develop in dividing cells. These findings are in agreement with in vitro observations of TTFields’ disruptive effects on cellular function. We conclude that the most likely candidates to provide a quantitative explanation of these effects are ionic condensation waves around microtubules as well as dielectrophoretic effects on the dipole moments of microtubules. A less likely possibility is the involvement of actin filaments or ion channels. PMID:27845746

  17. Osteopontin, a protein with cytokine-like properties: a possible involvement in pemphigus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Baroni, A; De Filippis, A; Buommino, E; Satriano, R A; Cozza, V

    2012-04-01

    Pemphigus is an autoimmune blistering disease characterized by severe and chronic course, histopathologically characterized by infiltration of a large quantity of eosinophils, neutrophils, and activated Th1 and Th2 cells around the blister. Polarization of Th cells to Th1 or Th2 phenotypes, a critical aspect of cell-mediated immunity, is influenced by production of early cytokines, including osteopontin. To determine the involvement of osteopontin in pemphigus vulgaris patients in active stage of the disease, auto-antibodies to desmoglein-1 and desmoglein-3 and plasmatic osteopontin levels were examined by ELISA tests. In this work, significant plasmatic level of osteopontin in PV patients with active stage of disease were found particularly in those patients with both skin and oral pemphigus. OPN might drive the immune responses playing an important role in pemphigus onset.

  18. Exercise Influence on Hippocampal Function: Possible Involvement of Orexin-A

    PubMed Central

    Chieffi, Sergio; Messina, Giovanni; Villano, Ines; Messina, Antonietta; Esposito, Maria; Monda, Vincenzo; Valenzano, Anna; Moscatelli, Fiorenzo; Esposito, Teresa; Carotenuto, Marco; Viggiano, Andrea; Cibelli, Giuseppe; Monda, Marcellino

    2017-01-01

    In the present article, we provide a brief review of current knowledge regarding the effects induced by physical exercise on hippocampus. Research involving animals and humans supports the view that physical exercise, enhancing hippocampal neurogenesis and function, improves cognition, and regulates mood. These beneficial effects depend on the contribute of more factors including the enhancement of vascularization and upregulation of growth factors. Among these, the BDNF seems to play a significant role. Another putative factor that might contribute to beneficial effects of exercise is the orexin-A. In support of this hypothesis there are the following observations: (1) orexin-A enhances hippocampal neurogenesis and function and (2) the levels of orexin-A increase with physical exercise. The beneficial effects of exercise may represent an important resource to hinder the cognitive decline associated with the aging-related hippocampal deterioration and ameliorate depressive symptoms. PMID:28261108

  19. Cholinergic deficiency involved in vascular dementia: possible mechanism and strategy of treatment

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Juan; Zhang, Hai-yan; Tang, Xi-can

    2009-01-01

    Vascular dementia (VaD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease with a high prevalence. Several studies have recently reported that VaD patients present cholinergic deficits in the brain and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) that may be closely related to the pathophysiology of cognitive impairment. Moreover, cholinergic therapies have shown promising effects on cognitive improvement in VaD patients. The precise mechanisms of these cholinergic agents are currently not fully understood; however, accumulating evidence indicates that these drugs may act through the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway, in which the efferent vagus nerve signals suppress pro-inflammatory cytokine release and inhibit inflammation, although regulation of oxidative stress and energy metabolism, alleviation of apoptosis may also be involved. In this paper, we provide a brief overview of the cholinergic treatment strategy for VaD and its relevant mechanisms of anti-inflammation. PMID:19574993

  20. Motivationally significant self-control: enhanced action withholding involves the right inferior frontal junction.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, David A; Upton, Daniel J; Moore, Jennifer; Hester, Robert

    2015-01-01

    In everyday life, people use self-control to withhold actions. This ability is particularly important when the consequences of action withholding have an impact on the individual's well-being. Despite its importance, it is unclear as to how the neural nodes implicated in action withholding contribute to this real-world type of self-control. By modifying an action withholding paradigm, the go/no-go task, we examined how the brain exerts self-control during a scenario in which the implications of withholding an action are meaningful and motivationally significant. A successfully withheld response contributed to long-term monetary rewards, whereas failure to withhold a response incurred an immediate monetary punishment. Compared with neutral action withholding, participants significantly improved their performance when these contingencies were applied. Crucially, although the right IFG and pre-SMA were found to promote overall action withholding, the enhancement in behavioral performance relative to a neutral condition was only reflected by a physiological change in a region encompassing the right inferior frontal junction and precentral gyrus. We speculate that the ability to flexibly modulate attention to goal-relevant stimuli is crucial to enhanced, motivationally driven action withholding and that this ability is subserved by the right inferior frontal junction. These findings suggest that control-modulating factors, rather than action withholding processes per se, can be critical to improving motivationally significant action withholding outcomes.

  1. Chronic alcohol exposure inhibits biotin uptake by pancreatic acinar cells: possible involvement of epigenetic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Padmanabhan; Kapadia, Rubina; Biswas, Arundhati; Said, Hamid M

    2014-11-01

    Chronic exposure to alcohol affects different physiological aspects of pancreatic acinar cells (PAC), but its effect on the uptake process of biotin is not known. We addressed this issue using mouse-derived pancreatic acinar 266-6 cells chronically exposed to alcohol and wild-type and transgenic mice (carrying the human SLC5A6 5'-promoter) fed alcohol chronically. First we established that biotin uptake by PAC is Na(+) dependent and carrier mediated and involves sodium-dependent multivitamin transporter (SMVT). Chronic exposure of 266-6 cells to alcohol led to a significant inhibition in biotin uptake, expression of SMVT protein, and mRNA as well as in the activity of the SLC5A6 promoter. Similarly, chronic alcohol feeding of wild-type and transgenic mice carrying the SLC5A6 promoter led to a significant inhibition in biotin uptake by PAC, as well as in the expression of SMVT protein and mRNA and the activity of the SLC5A6 promoters expressed in the transgenic mice. We also found that chronic alcohol feeding of mice is associated with a significant increase in the methylation status of CpG islands predicted to be in the mouse Slc5a6 promoters and a decrease in the level of expression of transcription factor KLF-4, which plays an important role in regulating SLC5A6 promoter activity. These results demonstrate, for the first time, that chronic alcohol exposure negatively impacts biotin uptake in PAC and that this effect is exerted (at least in part) at the level of transcription of the SLC5A6 gene and may involve epigenetic/molecular mechanisms.

  2. Possible involvement of miRNAs in tropism of Parvovirus B19.

    PubMed

    Anbarlou, Azadeh; AkhavanRahnama, Mahshid; Atashi, Amir; Soleimani, Masoud; Arefian, Ehsan; Gallinella, Giorgio

    2016-03-01

    Human Parvovirus B19 (PVB19) is one of the most important pathogens that targets erythroid lineage. Many factors were mentioned for restriction to erythroid progenitor cells (EPCs). Previous studies showed that in non-permissive cells VP1 and VP2 (structural proteins) mRNAs were detected but could not translate to proteins. A bioinformatics study showed that this inhibition might be due to specific microRNAs (miRNAs) present in non-permissive cells but not in permissive EPCs. To confirm the hypothesis, we evaluated the effect of miRNAs on VP expression. CD34(+) HSCs were separated from cord blood. Then, CD34(+) cells were treated with differentiation medium to obtain CD36(+) EPCs. To evaluate the effect of miRNAs on VP expression in MCF7 and HEK-293 cell lines (non-permissive cells) and CD36(+) EPCs, dual luciferase assay was performed in presence of shRNAs against Dicer and Drosha to disrupt miRNA biogenesis. QRT-PCR was performed to check down-regulation of Dicer and Drosha after transfection. All measurements were done in triplicate. Data means were compared using one-way ANOVAs. MicroRNA prediction was done by the online microRNA prediction tools. No significant difference was shown in luciferase activity of CD36(+) EPCs after co-transfection with shRNAs, while it was significant in non-permissive cells. Our study revealed that miRNAs may be involved in inhibition of VP expression in non-permissive cells, although further studies are required to demonstrate which miRNAs exactly are involved in regulation of PVB19 replication.

  3. Zuclopenthixol facilitates memory retrieval in rats: possible involvement of noradrenergic and serotonergic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Khalifa, Amani E

    2003-07-01

    Although disturbed memory function often coexists with psychosis, the cognitive effects of antipsychotic medications with diverse pharmacodynamic properties are rarely investigated. The neurocognitive profile of zuclopenthixol, a thioxanthene dopaminergic antagonist and a conventional neuroleptic agent, has yet to be investigated despite the effect of the drug on a variety of neurotransmitter systems involved in mediation of learning and memory processes. In this study, the effect of zuclopenthixol was tested on memory retrieval 24 h after training using an inhibitory avoidance task in rats. Acute administration of zuclopenthixol (0.7 and 1.4 mg/kg i.p.) before retrieval testing increased step-through latency during the test session. The same doses of zuclopenthixol did not affect the ambulatory activity of rats in the openfield test and therefore the facilitatory effect of the drug on memory function could not be confounded with any motoric properties. This study also investigated the effect of zuclopenthixol on cortical and hippocampal monoaminergic neurotransmitters' levels together with acetylcholinesterase enzyme (AChE) activity, both of which are known to be important in control of cognitive function. Administration of zuclopenthixol (0.7 and 1.4 mg/kg i.p.) neither affected dopamine (DA) level nor AChE activity in rat cortex and hippocampus. On the other hand, the lower dose of zuclopenthixol elevated cortical norepinephrine (NE) level, while the higher dose elevated both cortical and hippocampal NE level together with hippocampal serotonin (5-HT) level. These results may suggest the involvement of adrenergic and serotonergic mechanisms in the facilitatory effect of zuclopenthixol on retrieval memory. Zuclopenthixol may therefore be a better alternative than other commonly used antipsychotic medications reported to impair cognitive function of schizophrenic patients.

  4. Mechanisms of Action Involved in Ozone Therapy: Is healing induced via a mild oxidative stress?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    oxidative stress. Recently these concepts have become widely accepted. The versatility of ozone in treating vascular and degenerative diseases as well as skin lesions, hernial disc and primary root carious lesions in children is emphasized. Further researches able to elucidate whether the mechanisms of action of ozone therapy involve nuclear transcription factors, such as Nrf2, NFAT, AP-1, and HIF-1α are warranted. PMID:22185664

  5. Mechanisms of Action Involved in Ozone Therapy: Is healing induced via a mild oxidative stress?

    PubMed

    Sagai, Masaru; Bocci, Velio

    2011-12-20

    stress. Recently these concepts have become widely accepted. The versatility of ozone in treating vascular and degenerative diseases as well as skin lesions, hernial disc and primary root carious lesions in children is emphasized. Further researches able to elucidate whether the mechanisms of action of ozone therapy involve nuclear transcription factors, such as Nrf2, NFAT, AP-1, and HIF-1α are warranted.

  6. Exploring possible mechanisms of action for the nanotoxicity and protein binding of decorated nanotubes: interpretation of physicochemical properties from optimal QSAR models.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Emilio Xavier; Hopfinger, Anton J; Shao, Chi-Yu; Su, Bo-Han; Chen, Sing-Zuo; Tseng, Yufeng Jane

    2015-10-01

    Carbon nanotubes have become widely used in a variety of applications including biosensors and drug carriers. Therefore, the issue of carbon nanotube toxicity is increasingly an area of focus and concern. While previous studies have focused on the gross mechanisms of action relating to nanomaterials interacting with biological entities, this study proposes detailed mechanisms of action, relating to nanotoxicity, for a series of decorated (functionalized) carbon nanotube complexes based on previously reported QSAR models. Possible mechanisms of nanotoxicity for six endpoints (bovine serum albumin, carbonic anhydrase, chymotrypsin, hemoglobin along with cell viability and nitrogen oxide production) have been extracted from the corresponding optimized QSAR models. The molecular features relevant to each of the endpoint respective mechanism of action for the decorated nanotubes are also discussed. Based on the molecular information contained within the optimal QSAR models for each nanotoxicity endpoint, either the decorator attached to the nanotube is directly responsible for the expression of a particular activity, irrespective of the decorator's 3D-geometry and independent of the nanotube, or those decorators having structures that place the functional groups of the decorators as far as possible from the nanotube surface most strongly influence the biological activity. These molecular descriptors are further used to hypothesize specific interactions involved in the expression of each of the six biological endpoints.

  7. Investigating the Possibilities of Creating a Community of Practice. Action Research in Three Educational Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flogaitis, Evgenia; Nomikou, Christina; Naoum, Elli; Katsenou, Christina

    2012-01-01

    The educational approach views the community of practice as a community of teachers and students who share common rules and values, information and experiences through dialogue and collaboration. Three doctoral theses are in progress at the University of Athens which study the possibilities of creating a community of practice in three different…

  8. The sequential encoding of competing action goals involves dynamic restructuring of motor plans in working memory.

    PubMed

    Gallivan, Jason P; Bowman, Natasha A R; Chapman, Craig S; Wolpert, Daniel M; Flanagan, J Randall

    2016-06-01

    Recent neural and behavioral findings provide support for the influential idea that in situations in which multiple action options are presented simultaneously, we prepare action plans for each competing option before deciding between and executing one of those plans. However, in natural, everyday environments, our available action options frequently change from one moment to the next, and there is often uncertainty as to whether additional options will become available before having to select a particular course of action. Here, with the use of a target-directed reaching task, we show that in this situation, the brain specifies a competing action for each new, sequentially presented potential target and that recently formed action plans can be revisited and updated so as to conform with separate, more newly developed, plans. These findings indicate that the brain forms labile motor plans for sequentially arising target options that can be flexibly restructured to accommodate new motor plans.

  9. Dopaminergic agonists: possible neurorescue drugs endowed with independent and synergistic multisites of action.

    PubMed

    Uberti, Daniela; Bianchi, Irene; Olivari, Luca; Ferrari-Toninelli, Giulia; Bonini, Sara A; Memo, Maurizio

    2007-10-01

    Dopaminergic agonists have been usually used as adjunctive therapy for the cure of Parkinson's disease (PD). It is generally believed that treatment with these drugs is symptomatic rather then curative and does not stop or delay the progression of neuronal degeneration. However, several DA agonists of the DA D2-receptor family (including D2, D3 and D4-subtypes) have recently been shown to possess neuroprotective properties in different in vitro and in vivo experimental PD models. Here we summarize some recent data from our and other groups underlining the wide pharmacological spectrum of DA agonists currently used for treating PD patients. In particular, the mechanism of action of different DA agonists does not appear to be restricted to the stimulation of selective DA receptor subtypes being these drugs endowed with intrinsic, independent, and peculiar antioxidant effects. This activity may represent an additional pharmacological property contributing to their clinical efficacy in PD.

  10. Possible involvement of galectin-3 in microglial activation in the hippocampus with trimethyltin treatment.

    PubMed

    Yang, Miyoung; Kim, Juhwan; Kim, Taehyub; Kim, Sung-Ho; Kim, Jong-Choon; Kim, Jeongtae; Takayama, Chitoshi; Hayashi, Akinobu; Joo, Hong-Gu; Shin, Taekyun; Moon, Changjong

    2012-12-01

    Trimethyltin (TMT) is an organotin neurotoxicant with effects that are selectively localized to the limbic system (especially the hippocampus), which produces memory deficits and temporal lobe seizures. Galectin-3 (Gal-3) is a beta-galactoside-binding lectin that is important in cell proliferation and regulation of apoptosis. The present study evaluated the temporal expression of Gal-3 in the hippocampus of adult BALB/c mice after TMT treatment (i.p., 2.5mg/kg). Western blotting analyses showed that Gal-3 immunoreactivity began to increase days after treatment; the immunoreactivity peaked significantly within days after treatment but significantly declined between days 4 and 8. Immunohistochemical analysis indicated that Gal-3 expression was very rare in the hippocampi of vehicle-treated controls. However, Gal-3 immunoreactivity appeared between 2 and 8 days after TMT treatment and was primarily localized to the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG), in which neuronal degeneration occurred. The immunoreactivity was detected predominantly in most of the Iba1-positive microglia and in some GFAP-positive astrocytes of the hippocampal DG. Furthermore, Gal-3 expression co-localized with the pro-inflammatory enzymes cyclooxygenase-2 and inducible nitric oxide synthase in the hippocampal DG. Therefore, we suggest that Gal-3 is involved in the inflammatory process of neurodegenerative disorder induced by organotin intoxication.

  11. Oxytocin is involved in the proconvulsant effects of Sildenafil: Possible role of CREB.

    PubMed

    Khoshneviszadeh, Mahsima; Rahimian, Reza; Fakhfouri, Gohar; Payandemehr, Borna; Khodagholi, Fariba; Ejtemaei Mehr, Shahram; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza

    2016-08-10

    Sildenafil is a phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor mainly used for male erectile dysfunction. One of rare yet serious adverse effects of Sildenafil is its potential to decrease seizure threshold. Ample evidence suggests that Sildenafil exerts central effects through induction of Oxytocin (OT) secretion and CREB phosphorylation. The aim of the present study is to evaluate potential roles of OT and CREB in the proconvulsant effects of Sildenafil. The Pentylenetetrazole-induced seizure was used as a standard convulsion model in this study. OT release and pCREB expression were evaluated in the hippocampus of mice using ELISA and western blot assays, respectively. Our results showed that Sildenafil at the dose of 10mgkg(-1) or higher, significantly decreased seizure threshold. Pretreatment with a non-effective dose of OT, potentiated while OT receptor antagonist, Atosiban, reversed fully the proconvulsant effects of Sildenafil (5mgkg(-1)). At biochemical inspection, Sildenafil markedly increased CREB which was attenuated by coadministration of Atosiban. The present study shows for the first time that OT release and the subsequent CREB phosphorylation are involved in the proconvulsant effects of acute Sildenafil treatment in an experimental model of seizure.

  12. Possible involvement of P-glycoprotein in the biliary excretion of grepafloxacin.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ying Lan; Cai, Shao Hui; Wang, Li; Kitaichi, Kiyoyuki; Tatsumi, Yasuaki; Nadai, Masayuki; Yoshizumi, Hideo; Takagi, Kenji; Takagi, Kenzo; Hasegawa, Takaaki

    2002-03-01

    1. In the present study, we have examined the effects of the quinolones norfloxacin (NFLX), enoxacin (ENX), ofloxacin (OFLX), tosufloxacin (TFLX), lomefloxacin (LFLX), sparfloxacin (SPFX) and grepafloxacin (GPFX) on the efflux of doxorubicin from mouse leukaemia P388/ADR cells expressing P-glycoprotein. The relationship between their partition coefficients (hydrophobicity) and effluxing potencies was also elucidated. 2. Both TFLX and SPFX strongly increased the intracellular accumulation of doxorubicin (5 micromol/L) in P388/ADR cells, but had no effect on P388/S cells not expressing P-glycoprotein. The rank of order of the potency of the quinolones (TFLX > SPFX > GPFX > NFLX) was not related directly to their hydrophobicity. These results suggest that some quinolones can reverse anticancer drug resistance. 3. Because GPFX is more highly excreted into the bile than other known quinolones, the effects of doxorubicin (10 mg/kg) or the well-known inhibitors of P-glycoprotein, namely cyclosporine A (10 mg/kg) and erythromycin (100 mg/kg), on the biliary excretion of GPFX at steady state was studied in rats. 4. Doxorubicin, cyclosporine A and erythromycin significantly decreased the biliary clearance of GPFX. Cyclosporine A and erythromycin had a much stronger inhibitory effect on the biliary excretion of GPFX than doxorubicin. These results suggest the possibility that GPFX is, at least in part, excreted into the bile by a P-glycoprotein-mediated transport mechanism.

  13. Possible involvement of delta-6-desaturase in control of melanoma growth by gamma-linolenic acid.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, N S; Duncan, J R

    1991-03-01

    This study examined the effects of linoleic acid (LA) and gamma-linolenic acid (GLA) on BL6 melanoma growth in cell culture and of safflower oil (SFO) which contains LA and evening primrose oil (EPO) which contains GLA, on melanoma growth when grown in mice. The delta-6-desaturase activity of the melanoma cells in the two systems was also examined and an attempt made to relate the activity of the enzyme to the effects of GLA on cell and tumour growth. LA and GLA were found to be equipotent in inhibiting growth of the in vitro cultured BL6 cells which were found to contain an appreciable level of delta-6-desaturase activity. EPO was however found to be a more potent promoter of in vivo melanoma growth in mice than SFO. Melanomas grown in mice were found to lack delta-6-desaturase activity suggesting that the EPO diet, by providing GLA, was able to compensate for the loss of enzyme activity in the melanomas. The possibility that melanomas in mice have a requirement for GLA for growth while in in vitro cultured cells excess GLA inhibits the growth of the cells through an increase in lipid peroxidation is discussed.

  14. Possible involvement of leptin and leptin receptor in developing gastric adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Liang; Shen, Zhi-Xiang; Luo, He-Sheng; Shen, Lei

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the expression of leptin and leptin receptor (ob-R) in intestinal-type gastric cancer and precancerous lesions, and to explore the possible mechanism and role of the leptin system in developing intestinal-type gastric adenocarcinoma. METHODS: Immunohistochemistry was performed to examine the expression of leptin and leptin receptor in archival samples of gastric adenocarcinoma and preneoplastic lesions, including intestinal metaplasia and mild to severe gastric epithelial dysplasia. Positive staining was identified and percentage of positive staining was graded. RESULTS: Dual expression of leptin and leptin receptor were detected in 80% (16/20) intestinal metaplasia, 86.3% (25/30) mild gastric epithelial dysplasia, 86.7% (26/30) moderate gastric epithelial dysplasia, 93.3% (28/30) severe gastric epithelial dysplasia, 91.3% (55/60) intestinal-type gastric adenocarcinoma and 30.0% (9/30) diffuse-type gastric carcinoma. The percentage of dual expression of leptin and leptin receptor in intestinal-type gastric adenocarcinoma was significantly higher than that in diffuse-type gastric adenocarcinoma (χ2 = 37.022, P<0.01). CONCLUSION: Our results indicate the presence of an autocrine loop of leptin system in the development of intestinal-type gastric adenocarcinoma. PMID:16437696

  15. A Novel DBL-Domain of the P. falciparum 332 Molecule Possibly Involved in Erythrocyte Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Moll, Kirsten; Kaneko, Osamu; Nilsson, Sandra; Winter, Gerhard; Haeggström, Malin; Pan, Weiqing; Berzins, Klavs; Wahlgren, Mats; Chen, Qijun

    2007-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum malaria is brought about by the asexual stages of the parasite residing in human red blood cells (RBC). Contact between the erythrocyte surface and the merozoite is the first step for successful invasion and proliferation of the parasite. A number of different pathways utilised by the parasite to adhere and invade the host RBC have been characterized, but the complete biology of this process remains elusive. We here report the identification of an open reading frame (ORF) representing a hitherto unknown second exon of the Pf332 gene that encodes a cysteine-rich polypeptide with a high degree of similarity to the Duffy-binding-like (DBL) domain of the erythrocyte-binding-ligand (EBL) family. The sequence of this DBL-domain is conserved and expressed in all parasite clones/strains investigated. In addition, the expression level of Pf332 correlates with proliferation efficiency of the parasites in vitro. Antibodies raised against the DBL-domain are able to reduce the invasion efficiency of different parasite clones/strains. Analysis of the DBL-domain revealed its ability to bind to uninfected human RBC, and moreover demonstrated association with the iRBC surface. Thus, Pf332 is a molecule with a potential role to support merozoite invasion. Due to the high level of conservation in sequence, the novel DBL-domain of Pf332 is of possible importance for development of novel anti-malaria drugs and vaccines. PMID:17534427

  16. Brain Glycogen Decreases During Intense Exercise Without Hypoglycemia: The Possible Involvement of Serotonin.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Takashi; Soya, Shingo; Kawanaka, Kentaro; Soya, Hideaki

    2015-07-01

    Brain glycogen stored in astrocytes, a source of lactate as a neuronal energy source, decreases during prolonged exercise with hypoglycemia. However, brain glycogen dynamics during exercise without hypoglycemia remain unknown. Since intense exercise increases brain noradrenaline and serotonin as known inducers for brain glycogenolysis, we hypothesized that brain glycogen decreases with intense exercise not accompanied by hypoglycemia. To test this hypothesis, we employed a well-established acute intense exercise model of swimming in rats. Rats swam for fourteen 20 s bouts with a weight equal to 8 % of their body mass and were sacrificed using high-power (10 kW) microwave irradiation to inactivate brain enzymes for accurate detection of brain glycogen and monoamines. Intense exercise did not alter blood glucose, but did increase blood lactate levels. Immediately after exercise, brain glycogen decreased and brain lactate increased in the hippocampus, cerebellum, cortex, and brainstem. Simultaneously, serotonin turnover in the hippocampus and brainstem mutually increased and were associated with decreased brain glycogen. Intense swimming exercise that does not induce hypoglycemia decreases brain glycogen associated with increased brain lactate, implying an importance of glycogen in brain energetics during intense exercise even without hypoglycemia. Activated serotonergic regulation is a possible underlying mechanism for intense exercise-induced glycogenolysis at least in the hippocampus and brainstem.

  17. Involvement of ethylene in the action of the cotton defoliant thidiazuron.

    PubMed

    Suttle, J C

    1985-06-01

    The effect of the defoliant thidiazuron (N-phenyl-N'-1,2,3-thiadiazol-5-ylurea) on endogenous ethylene evolution and the role of endogenous ethylene in thidiazuron-mediated leaf abscission were examined in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L. cv Stoneville 519) seedlings. Treatment of 20- to 30-day-old seedlings with thidiazuron at concentrations equal to or greater than 10 micromolar resulted in leaf abscission. At a treatment concentration of 100 micromolar, nearly total abscission of the youngest leaves was observed. Following treatment, abscission of the younger leaves commenced within 48 hours and was complete by 120 hours. A large increase in ethylene evolution from leaf blades and abscission zone explants was readily detectable within 24 hours of treatment and persisted until leaf fall. Ethylene evolution from treated leaf blades was greatest 1 day posttreatment and reached levels in excess of 600 nanoliters per gram fresh weight per hour (26.7 nanomoles per gram fresh weight per hour). The increase in ethylene evolution occurred in the absence of increased ethane evolution, altered leaf water potential, or decreased chlorophyll levels. Treatment of seedlings with inhibitors of ethylene action (silver thiosulfate, hypobaric pressure) or ethylene synthesis (aminoethoxyvinylglycine) resulted in an inhibition of thidiazuron-induced defoliation. Application of exogenous ethylene or 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid largely restored the thidiazuron response. The results indicate that thidiazuron-induced leaf abscission is mediated, at least in part, by an increase in endogenous ethylene evolution. However, alterations of other phytohormone systems thought to be involved in regulating leaf abscission are not excluded by these studies.

  18. Melatonin nephroprotective action in Zucker diabetic fatty rats involves its inhibitory effect on NADPH oxidase.

    PubMed

    Winiarska, Katarzyna; Dzik, Jolanta M; Labudda, Mateusz; Focht, Dorota; Sierakowski, Bartosz; Owczarek, Aleksandra; Komorowski, Lukasz; Bielecki, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    Excessive activity of NADPH oxidase (Nox) is considered to be of importance for the progress of diabetic nephropathy. The aim of the study was to elucidate the effect of melatonin, known for its nephroprotective properties, on Nox activity under diabetic conditions. The experiments were performed on three groups of animals: (i) untreated lean (?/+) Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats; (ii) untreated obese diabetic (fa/fa) ZDF rats; and (iii) ZDF fa/fa rats treated with melatonin (20 mg/L) in drinking water. Urinary albumin excretion was measured weekly. After 4 wk of the treatment, the following parameters were determined in kidney cortex: Nox activity, expression of subunits of the enzyme, their phosphorylation and subcellular distribution. Histological studies were also performed. Compared to ?/+ controls, ZDF fa/fa rats exhibited increased renal Nox activity, augmented expression of Nox4 and p47(phox) subunits, elevated level of p47(phox) phosphorylation, and enlarged phospho-p47(phox) and p67(phox) content in membrane. Melatonin administration to ZDF fa/fa rats resulted in the improvement of renal functions, as manifested by considerable attenuation of albuminuria and some amelioration of structural abnormalities. The treatment turned out to nearly normalize Nox activity, which was accompanied by considerably lowered expression and diminished membrane distribution of regulatory subunits, that is, phospho-p47(phox) and p67(phox) . Thus, it is concluded that: (i) melatonin beneficial action against diabetic nephropathy involves attenuation of the excessive activity of Nox; and (ii) the mechanism of melatonin inhibitory effect on Nox is based on the mitigation of expression and membrane translocation of its regulatory subunits.

  19. Bothrops jararaca Peptide with Anti-Hypertensive Action Normalizes Endothelium Dysfunction Involved in Physiopathology of Preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Benedetti, Gabriel; Morais, Katia L. P.; Guerreiro, Juliano R.; de Oliveira, Eduardo Fontana; Hoshida, Mara Sandra; Oliveira, Leandro; Sass, Nelson; Lebrun, Ivo; Ulrich, Henning; Lameu, Claudiana; de Camargo, Antonio Carlos Martins

    2011-01-01

    Preeclampsia, a pregnancy-specific syndrome characterized by hypertension, proteinuria and edema, is a major cause of fetal and maternal morbidity and mortality especially in developing countries. Bj-PRO-10c, a proline-rich peptide isolated from Bothrops jararaca venom, has been attributed with potent anti-hypertensive effects. Recently, we have shown that Bj-PRO-10c-induced anti-hypertensive actions involved NO production in spontaneous hypertensive rats. Using in vitro studies we now show that Bj-PRO-10c was able to increase NO production in human umbilical vein endothelial cells from hypertensive pregnant women (HUVEC-PE) to levels observed in HUVEC of normotensive women. Moreover, in the presence of the peptide, eNOS expression as well as argininosuccinate synthase activity, the key rate-limiting enzyme of the citrulline-NO cycle, were enhanced. In addition, excessive superoxide production due to NO deficiency, one of the major deleterious effects of the disease, was inhibited by Bj-PRO-10c. Bj-PRO-10c induced intracellular calcium fluxes in both, HUVEC-PE and HUVEC, which, however, led to activation of eNOS expression only in HUVEC-PE. Since Bj-PRO-10c promoted biological effects in HUVEC from patients suffering from the disorder and not in normotensive pregnant women, we hypothesize that Bj-PRO-10c induces its anti-hypertensive effect in mothers with preeclampsia. Such properties may initiate the development of novel therapeutics for treating preeclampsia. PMID:21858206

  20. Regional intestinal absorption and biliary excretion of fluvastatin in the rat: possible involvement of mrp2.

    PubMed

    Lindahl, Anders; Sjöberg, Asa; Bredberg, Ulf; Toreson, Helena; Ungell, Anna-Lena; Lennernäs, Hans

    2004-01-01

    The first purpose of this study was to investigate the in vivo absorption, biliary secretion, and first-pass effect of fluvastatin following regional intestinal dosing in the rat. We also examined the membrane transport mechanisms and made in silico predictions of the relative importance of various intestinal regions to the human absorption of fluvastatin. Fluvastatin was administered intravenously (2, 10, and 20 micromol/kg) and into the duodenum (1.46, 2.92, 7.32, and 14.6 micromol/kg), jejunum (14.6 micromol/kg), ileum (1.46 and 14.6 mciromol/kg), and colon (1.46 and 14.6 micromol/kg) as a solution to conscious rats. In a separate group of rats, bile was collected after an i.v. dose of fluvastatin (2 micromol/kg). In the Caco-2 model the bidirectional transport of fluvastatin (16 microM) was investigated with and without various efflux inhibitors (verapamil, vinblastine, probenecid, and indomethacin, 160 microM). The human in vivo absorption of fluvastatin from an oral immediate release tablet and that from an oral extended release tablet (both 40 mg) were simulated in GastroPlus. Neither the dose nor the intestinal region influenced the bioavailability of fluvastatin significantly. The rate of absorption was, however, affected by both the dose and the site of administration; duodenum = jejunum > colon > ileum, and higher following the high dose. Increasing the i.v. dose from 2 to 20 micromol/kg decreased the clearance (26 +/- 3 to 12 +/- 1 mL/min/kg), the hepatic extraction (66 +/- 8 to 30 +/- 2%), and the volume of distribution (7.3 +/- 0.3 to 2.1 +/- 0.7 L/kg) for fluvastatin (p < 0.05). Neither bile cannulation nor bile sampling affected the pharmacokinetics. Fluvastatin was secreted into the bile, probably by active transport. The in vitro permeability for fluvastatin was high (>10 x 10(-6) cm/s). Indomethacin, but not the other inhibitors, affected the transport in both directions suggesting mrp2 to be involved. In silico, 93% of the dose was absorbed from

  1. Age-related differences in experimental stroke: possible involvement of mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Li, Nanlin; Kong, Xiangwei; Ye, Ruidong; Yang, Qianzi; Han, Junliang; Xiong, Lize

    2011-06-01

    Age is the single most important risk factor for cerebral stroke. Unfortunately, the effect of age on ischemic brain damage is less clear. In this study, we sought to examine the potential influence of aging on the histologic and functional outcomes after ischemia. Juvenile (4 weeks of age), young adult (4 months of age), mid-aged (11-12 months of age), and aged (18-19 months of age) mice were subjected to transient middle cerebral artery occlusion. There was no remarkable difference of infarct volume on postoperative days 1 and 3. However, on postoperative day 7, aged mice exhibited significantly worsened infarct volume compared with juvenile and young mice. Intriguingly, the increase of infarct volume was most prominent in the striatal area rather than in cortex. Accordingly, aged mice displayed a slower and incomplete functional recovery after stroke. We further evaluated the effects of aging on the oxidative damage and mitochondrial dysfunction following ischemia. Brain tissues were assayed for lipid, DNA, and protein peroxidation products, mitochondrial enzyme activities, mitochondrial membrane potential, production of reactive oxygen species, and antioxidant activities. Aging was associated with declined mitochondrial function and antioxidant detoxification following ischemia, thereby inducing a deteriorated oxidative damage. Regional subanalyses demonstrated that, in accordance with infarct area, the pro-oxidant/antioxidant imbalance occurred more prominently in subcortical areas. Collectively, these findings suggest mitochondria-mediated oxidative damage may be involved in the age-related aggravated injury in subcortical areas. Mitochondrial protection could be a promising target for neuroprotective therapy, especially in the aged population.

  2. Enzyme activity alteration by cadmium administration to rats: the possibility of iron involvement in lipid peroxidation.

    PubMed

    Casalino, E; Sblano, C; Landriscina, C

    1997-10-15

    The specific activities of D-3-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase (BDH) and glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) are reduced in the liver and kidney of rats intoxicated with 2.5 mg Cd/kg body wt and sacrificed after 24 h; conversely ketone-body concentration is strongly increased in both of these organs and blood. In the same animals a great stimulation of antioxidant enzymes glutathione reductase and glutathione peroxidase occurs. The prooxidant state induced by cadmium in liver mitochondria and microsomes is unaffected by superoxide dismutase, catalase, or mannitol, whereas it is completely blocked by vitamin E thus excluding the involvement of reactive oxygen species in this process. The mechanism by which cadmium induces lipid peroxidation has been investigated by measuring the effect of this metal on liposomes. Ninety-minute treatment of liposomes with CdCl2 does not induce any lipid peroxidation. In contrast, Fe2+ ions under the same conditions cause strong liposome peroxidation. It has also been observed that cadmium promotes a time-dependent iron release from biological membranes. When lipid peroxidation is induced by a low concentration (5 microM) of FeCl2, in place of CdCl2, the characteristics of this process and the sensitivity to the various antioxidants used are similar to those observed with Cd. From these results we conclude that the prooxidative effect of cadmium is an indirect one since it is mediated by iron. With regard to the inhibitory effect on BDH and GDH following cadmium intoxication, it does not appear to be imputable to lipid peroxidation since in vitro investigations indicate that the presence of vitamin E does not remove the inhibition at all.

  3. Botulinum Toxin: Non-cosmetic Indications and Possible Mechanisms of Action

    PubMed Central

    Wollina, Uwe

    2008-01-01

    Botulinum toxin (BTX) has gained a great interest in cosmetic dermatology for its effects on hyperkinetic facial lines. Understanding the basic research and analysis of effects of this potent drug can lead to other possible indications of interest for dermatologists. The use of BTX in focal hyperhidrosis is well established, but BTX has also effects on pain perception, itch and inflammation as discussed in this review. PMID:20300330

  4. Effects of hypergravity exposure on the developing central nervous system: possible involvement of thyroid hormone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sajdel-Sulkowska, E. M.; Li, G. H.; Ronca, A. E.; Baer, L. A.; Sulkowski, G. M.; Koibuchi, N.; Wade, C. E.

    2001-01-01

    The present study examined the effects of hypergravity exposure on the developing brain and specifically explored the possibility that these effects are mediated by altered thyroid status. Thirty-four timed-pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to continuous centrifugation at 1.5 G (HG) from gestational Day 11 until one of three key developmental points: postnatal Day (P) 6, P15, or P21 (10 pups/dam: 5 males/5 females). During the 32-day centrifugation, stationary controls (SC, n = 25 dams) were housed in the same room as HG animals. Neonatal body, forebrain, and cerebellum mass and neonatal and maternal thyroid status were assessed at each time point. The body mass of centrifuged neonates was comparatively lower at each time point. The mass of the forebrain and the mass of the cerebellum were maximally reduced in hypergravity-exposed neonates at P6 by 15.9% and 25.6%, respectively. Analysis of neonatal plasma suggested a transient hypothyroid status, as indicated by increased thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) level (38.6%) at P6, while maternal plasma TSH levels were maximally elevated at P15 (38.9%). Neither neonatal nor maternal plasma TH levels were altered, suggesting a moderate hypothyroid condition. Thus, continuous exposure of the developing rats to hypergravity during the embryonic and neonatal periods has a highly significant effect on the developing forebrain and cerebellum and neonatal thyroid status (P < 0.05, Bonferroni corrected). These data are consistent with the hypothesized role of the thyroid hormone in mediating the effect of hypergravity in the developing central nervous system and begin to define the role of TH in the overall response of the developing organism to altered gravity.

  5. Possible Integrative Actions of Leptin and Insulin Signaling in the Hypothalamus Targeting Energy Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Thon, Mina; Hosoi, Toru; Ozawa, Koichiro

    2016-01-01

    Obesity has emerged as one of the most burdensome conditions in modern society. In this context, understanding the mechanisms controlling food intake is critical. At present, the adipocyte-derived hormone leptin and the pancreatic β-cell-derived hormone insulin are considered the principal anorexigenic hormones. Although leptin and insulin signal transduction pathways are distinct, their regulation of body weight maintenance is concerted. Resistance to the central actions of leptin or insulin is linked to the emergence of obesity and diabetes mellitus. A growing body of evidence suggests a convergence of leptin and insulin intracellular signaling at the insulin–receptor–substrate–phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase level. Moreover, numerous factors mediating the pathophysiology of leptin resistance, a hallmark of obesity, such as endoplasmic reticulum stress, protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B, and suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 also contribute to insulin resistance. Recent studies have also indicated that insulin potentiates leptin-induced signaling. Thus, a greater understanding of the overlapping functions of leptin and insulin in the central nervous system is vital to understand the associated physiological and pathophysiological states. This mini-review focuses on the cross talk and integrative signaling of leptin and insulin in the regulation of energy homeostasis in the brain. PMID:27812350

  6. Avian circannual clocks: adaptive significance and possible involvement of energy turnover in their proximate control.

    PubMed

    Wikelski, Martin; Martin, Lynn B; Scheuerlein, Alex; Robinson, Maisha T; Robinson, Nuriya D; Helm, Barbara; Hau, Michaela; Gwinner, Eberhard

    2008-01-27

    Endogenous circannual clocks are found in many long-lived organisms, but are best studied in mammal and bird species. Circannual clocks are synchronized with the environment by changes in photoperiod, light intensity and possibly temperature and seasonal rainfall patterns. Annual timing mechanisms are presumed to have important ultimate functions in seasonally regulating reproduction, moult, hibernation, migration, body weight and fat deposition/stores. Birds that live in habitats where environmental cues such as photoperiod are poor predictors of seasons (e.g. equatorial residents, migrants to equatorial/tropical latitudes) rely more on their endogenous clocks than birds living in environments that show a tight correlation between photoperiod and seasonal events. Such population-specific/interspecific variation in reliance on endogenous clocks may indicate that annual timing mechanisms are adaptive. However, despite the apparent adaptive importance of circannual clocks, (i) what specific adaptive value they have in the wild and (ii) how they function are still largely untested. Whereas circadian clocks are hypothesized to be generated by molecular feedback loops, it has been suggested that circannual clocks are either based upon (i) a de-multiplication ('counting') of circadian days, (ii) a sequence of interdependent physiological states, or (iii) one or more endogenous oscillators, similar to circadian rhythms. We tested the de-multiplication of days (i) versus endogenous regulation hypotheses (ii) and (iii) in captive male and female house sparrows (Passer domesticus). We assessed the period of reproductive (testicular and follicular) cycles in four groups of birds kept either under photoperiods of LD 12L:12D (period length: 24h), 13.5L:13.5D (27 h), 10.5L:10.5D (23 h) or 12D:8L:3D:1L (24-h skeleton photoperiod), respectively, for 15 months. Contrary to predictions from the de-multiplication hypothesis, individuals experiencing 27-h days did not differ (i.e. did

  7. Regulatory heme and trichloroethylene intoxication: A possible explanation of the case of "A Civil Action".

    PubMed

    Fujita, Hiroyoshi; Nishitani, Chiaki; Ogawa, Kazuhiro

    2002-07-01

    In 1998, a amovie entitled "A Civil Action" was released. The movie described the Woburn case, begun in 1982 and concluded in 1990, one of the most famous cases of trichloroethylene pollution. In a small town near Boston, twelve children died of leukemia, which seemed attributable to trichloroethylene contamination of the drinking water. The victims, however, could not win the case, since evidence that the identified chemicals could cause leukemia and other human illnesses was rather sketchy. There have been many cases of trichloroethylene pollution in industrial nations including Japan, therefore, we reconsidered the missing link. Our conclusion is that the disease occurred not by a direct effect of the chemical hazard on biological macromolecules but by an indirect effect through the physiological system such as signal transduction and transcriptional regulation. In 1984, we reported a marked reduction in the regulatory heme pool by trichloroethylene exposure, however, the biological significance was not well understood. Recently, we found that the DNA binding activity of Bach1, a negative regulator of genes, is controlled by heme, the regulation of which seems to explain how leukemia develops. The heterodimer of Bach1 with MafK recognizes Maf recognition elements (MAREs) competing with the erythroid type positive regulator, a complex of NF-E2 with MafK. Bach1/MafK occupies MAREs under lower heme conditions, whereas MAREs are open to NF-E2/MafK along with increasing heme concentration. Since the NF-E2/MafK function is closely related to normal erythroid differentiation, of which disorders such as sideroblastic anemia are often related to neoplasia; i.e., a clonal disorder that can progress to leukemia. Thus, a marked decline in regulatory heme by trichloroethylene intoxication could be one of the pathways to leukemia.

  8. Model-based action planning involves cortico-cerebellar and basal ganglia networks

    PubMed Central

    Fermin, Alan S. R.; Yoshida, Takehiko; Yoshimoto, Junichiro; Ito, Makoto; Tanaka, Saori C.; Doya, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Humans can select actions by learning, planning, or retrieving motor memories. Reinforcement Learning (RL) associates these processes with three major classes of strategies for action selection: exploratory RL learns state-action values by exploration, model-based RL uses internal models to simulate future states reached by hypothetical actions, and motor-memory RL selects past successful state-action mapping. In order to investigate the neural substrates that implement these strategies, we conducted a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiment while humans performed a sequential action selection task under conditions that promoted the use of a specific RL strategy. The ventromedial prefrontal cortex and ventral striatum increased activity in the exploratory condition; the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, dorsomedial striatum, and lateral cerebellum in the model-based condition; and the supplementary motor area, putamen, and anterior cerebellum in the motor-memory condition. These findings suggest that a distinct prefrontal-basal ganglia and cerebellar network implements the model-based RL action selection strategy. PMID:27539554

  9. Puberty dysregulation and increased risk of disease in adult life: possible modes of action.

    PubMed

    Mantovani, Alberto; Fucic, Aleksandra

    2014-04-01

    Puberty is the developmental window when the final maturation of body systems is orchestrated by hormones; lifelong sex-related differences and capacity to interact with the environment are defined during this life stage. Increased incidence in a number of chronic, multifactorial diseases could be related to environmental exposures during puberty: however, insight on the susceptibility of the peripubertal period is still limited. The estrogen/androgen balance is a crucial axis in harmonizing the whole pubertal development, pointing out the significance of exposures to endocrine disruptors. Besides the reproductive system, endocrine-related perturbations may affect the maturation of skeleton, adipose tissues, brain, immune system, as well as cancer predisposition. Thus, risk assessment of environmental stressors should duly consider specific aspects of the pubertal window. Besides endocrine-related mechanisms, suggested research priorities include signaling molecules (e.g., kisspeptins, dopamine) as xenobiotic targets and disturbances of specific pubertal methylation processes potentially involved in neurobehavioral disorders and cancer risk in adulthood.

  10. 31 CFR 363.45 - What are the rules for judicial and administrative actions involving securities held in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... administrative actions involving securities held in TreasuryDirect ®? 363.45 Section 363.45 Money and Finance... BUREAU OF THE PUBLIC DEBT REGULATIONS GOVERNING SECURITIES HELD IN TREASURYDIRECT General Provisions Governing Securities Held in TreasuryDirect § 363.45 What are the rules for judicial and...

  11. 24 CFR 248.221 - Approval of a plan of action that involves termination of low income affordability restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... involves termination of low income affordability restrictions. 248.221 Section 248.221 Housing and Urban... LOAN INSURANCE PROGRAMS UNDER NATIONAL HOUSING ACT AND OTHER AUTHORITIES PREPAYMENT OF LOW INCOME HOUSING MORTGAGES Prepayment and Plans of Action Under the Emergency Low Income Preservation Act of...

  12. It takes the whole brain to make a cup of coffee: the neuropsychology of naturalistic actions involving technical devices.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Karoline; Goldenberg, Georg; Daumüller, Maike; Hermsdörfer, Joachim

    2005-01-01

    Left hemisphere dominance has been established for use of single familiar tools and tool/object pairs, but everyday action in natural environment frequently affords multi-step actions with more or less novel technical devices. One purpose of our study was to find out whether left hemisphere dominance extends to such naturalistic action. Another aim was to analyze the cognitive components contributing to success or failure. Patients with LBD and aphasia, patients with RBD, and healthy controls were examined on experimental tests assessing retrieval of functional knowledge from semantic memory, inference of function from structure, and solution of mechanical and non-mechanical multi-step problems, and were confronted with two naturalistic tasks involving technical devices: preparing coffee with a drip coffee maker and fixing a cassette recorder. Both patient groups were about equally impaired on both naturalistic actions. Analysis of the experimental tests and their correlations to naturalistic actions suggested that different cognitive deficits caused failure in both patient groups, and that in LBD patients there were also different causes for failure on both naturalistic actions. The main difficulty of RBD patients seemed to reside in the demand to keep track of multi-step actions. In aphasic LBD patients difficulties with making coffee but not the cassette recorder were correlated with aphasia and defective retrieval of functional knowledge from semantic memory, whereas the cassette recorder correlated more strongly with a test probing solution of multi-step mechanical problems. Inference of function from structure which had been shown to be important for use of single familiar tools or tool/objects pairs [Goldenberg, G., Hagmann, S. (1998). AT Tool use and mechanical problem solving in apraxia. Neuropsychologia, 36, 581-589] appeared to play only a subordinate role for naturalistic actions involving technical devices.

  13. Root-Shoot Signaling crosstalk involved in the shoot growth promoting action of rhizospheric humic acids

    PubMed Central

    Olaetxea, Maite; Mora, Verónica; García, Andrés Calderin; Santos, Leandro Azevedo; Baigorri, Roberto; Fuentes, Marta; Garnica, María; Berbara, Ricardo Luis Louro; Zamarreño, Angel Maria; Garcia-Mina, Jose M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Numerous studies have shown the ability of humic substances to improve plant development. This action is normally reflected in an enhancement of crop yields and quality. However, the mechanisms responsible for this action of humic substances remain rather unknown. Our studies have shown that the shoot promoting action of sedimentary humic acids is dependent of its ability to increase root hydraulic conductivity through signaling pathways related to ABA, which in turn is affected in roots by humic acids in an IAA-NO dependent way. Furthermore, these studies also indicate that the primary action of humic acids in roots might also be physical, resulting from a transient mild stress caused by humic acids associated with a fouling-cleaning cycle of wall cell pores. Finally the role of alternative signal molecules, such as ROS, and corresponding signaling pathways are also discussed and modeled in the context of the above-mentioned framework. PMID:26966789

  14. DEPTOR-related mTOR suppression is involved in metformin's anti-cancer action in human liver cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Obara, Akio; Fujita, Yoshihito; Abudukadier, Abulizi; Fukushima, Toru; Oguri, Yasuo; Ogura, Masahito; Harashima, Shin-ichi; Hosokawa, Masaya; Inagaki, Nobuya

    2015-05-15

    Metformin, one of the most commonly used drugs for patients with type 2 diabetes, recently has received much attention regarding its anti-cancer action. It is thought that the suppression of mTOR signaling is involved in metformin's anti-cancer action. Although liver cancer is one of the most responsive types of cancer for reduction of incidence by metformin, the molecular mechanism of the suppression of mTOR in liver remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of the suppressing effect of metformin on mTOR signaling and cell proliferation using human liver cancer cells. Metformin suppressed phosphorylation of p70-S6 kinase, and ribosome protein S6, downstream targets of mTOR, and suppressed cell proliferation. We found that DEPTOR, an endogenous substrate of mTOR suppression, is involved in the suppressing effect of metformin on mTOR signaling and cell proliferation in human liver cancer cells. Metformin increases the protein levels of DEPTOR, intensifies binding to mTOR, and exerts a suppressing effect on mTOR signaling. This increasing effect of DEPTOR by metformin is regulated by the proteasome degradation system; the suppressing effect of metformin on mTOR signaling and cell proliferation is in a DEPTOR-dependent manner. Furthermore, metformin exerts a suppressing effect on proteasome activity, DEPTOR-related mTOR signaling, and cell proliferation in an AMPK-dependent manner. We conclude that DEPTOR-related mTOR suppression is involved in metformin's anti-cancer action in liver, and could be a novel target for anti-cancer therapy. - Highlights: • We elucidated a novel pathway of metformin's anti-cancer action in HCC cells. • DEPTOR is involved in the suppressing effect of metformin on mTOR signaling. • Metformin increases DEPTOR protein levels via suppression of proteasome activity. • DEPTOR-related mTOR suppression is involved in metformin's anti-cancer action.

  15. It may be possible to use Capillary Action as a Cooling method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriske, Richard

    2011-10-01

    It is well known that it takes no work for water to rise in a Capillary tube. It only takes work for the water to be removed from the top of the tube. It may be possible for this water to be removed using individual photons of the size needed to break the water to water hydrogen bond. This bond is often broken in evaporation of water from surfaces. As this bond is broken at the top of the Capillary tube the water makes a phase transition and makes room for another water molecule to move up the column. The phase transition cools the column and another molecule moves up the column with no work being done. There is a net energy loss in this system, and the entire system is cooled. This may be one of the mechanisms that plants use to cool themselves and the soil around the plant. This mechanism may be used to explain the slight temperature regulating effect of plants and the areas around large plant populations. Photons of other sizes may also be used in this mechanism if there are the proper molecules (Chlorophyll for instance) in a chain reaction linked to this mechanism. This chimney like effect could also be used as a precise balancing method to transport materials based on mass and chemical composition, like a chromatograph. The ``Einstein Refrigerator'' can be viewed as a similar idea.

  16. Antimicrobial Activity and Possible Mechanism of Action of Citral against Cronobacter sakazakii

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Chao; Song, Kaikuo; Zhang, Xiaorong; Sun, Yi; Sui, Yue; Chen, Yifei; Jia, Zhenyu; Sun, Huihui; Sun, Zheng; Xia, Xiaodong

    2016-01-01

    Citral is a flavor component that is commonly used in food, beverage and fragrance industries. Cronobacter sakazakii is a food-borne pathogen associated with severe illness and high mortality in neonates and infants. The objective of the present study was to evaluate antimicrobial effect of citral against C. sakazakii strains. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of citral against C. sakazakii was determined via agar dilution method, then Gompertz models were used to quantitate the effect of citral on microbial growth kinetics. Changes in intracellular pH (pHin), membrane potential, intracellular ATP concentration, and membrane integrity were measured to elucidate the possible antimicrobial mechanism. Cell morphology changes were also examined using a field emission scanning electron microscope. The MICs of citral against C. sakazakii strains ranged from 0.27 to 0.54 mg/mL, and citral resulted in a longer lag phase and lower growth rate of C. sakazakii compared to the control. Citral affected the cell membrane of C. sakazakii, as evidenced by decreased intracellular ATP concentration, reduced pHin, and cell membrane hyperpolarization. Scanning electron microscopy analysis further confirmed that C. sakazakii cell membranes were damaged by citral. These findings suggest that citral exhibits antimicrobial effect against C. sakazakii strains and could be potentially used to control C. sakazakii in foods. However, how it works in food systems where many other components may interfere with its efficacy should be tested in future research before its real application. PMID:27415761

  17. Protective effect of dietary potassium against cardiovascular damage in salt-sensitive hypertension: possible role of its antioxidant action.

    PubMed

    Ando, Katsuyuki; Matsui, Hiromitsu; Fujita, Megumi; Fujita, Toshiro

    2010-01-01

    It is well known that high salt intake induces hypertension and cardiovascular damage, while dietary potassium supplementation counteracts these harmful effects. Actually, the protective effect of potassium is strengthened with excess salt as compared with salt depletion. Although the precise mechanisms have not been fully elucidated, in our previous reports, the antihypertensive effect of dietary potassium was accompanied by sympathetic nerve inhibition in salt-sensitive hypertension. Also, potassium supplement suppressed salt-induced insulin resistance. These effects of dietary potassium can explain its cardio- and vasculo-protective action in addition to the potassium supplementation induced decreased salt-induced rise in blood pressure. On the other hand, salt-sensitive hypertension is associated with reactive oxygen species (ROS) overproduction. Moreover, sympathoexcitation can be induced by central ROS upregulation and insulin resistance can be caused by ROS excess in the target organs of insulin, such as skeletal muscle. Conversely, the seemingly different actions of potassium can be explained by the antioxidant effect of dietary potassium; in our recent studies, potassium supplementation inhibits salt-induced progress of cardiac diastolic dysfunction and vascular neointima formation by cuff placement around arteries, associated with the inhibition of regional ROS overproduction, in salt-sensitive hypertension. Thus, it is possible that dietary potassium protects against salt-induced cardiovascular damage by the reduction of ROS generation and by central sympatholytic action and amelioration of insulin resistance induced through its antioxidant effect.

  18. The theory-practice gap in nurse education: its causes and possible solutions. Findings from an action research study.

    PubMed

    McCaugherty, D

    1991-09-01

    Kurt Lewin, the originator of action research, proposed that it was valuable not only for innovating change, but also the process of change could lead to new insights into the nature of the problem that was being tackled. This action research project developed and evaluated a teaching model that aimed to help RGN (registered general nurse) students to bridge the theory-practice gap. During the course of this work, the possible reasons for a theory-practice gap started to become clear. This paper provides a discussion of these factors. The viewpoint for this discussion is that of the student nurse. The student is assumed to 'own' the problem and it is from her perspective that the theory-practice gap is analysed. The paper includes a critical examination of books, lectures, the school curriculum and ward nursing practice. Finally, possible solutions to the theory-practice problem are discussed and it is hoped that these will provide a rational basis for tackling the problem.

  19. Action on AMD. Optimising patient management: act now to ensure current and continual delivery of best possible patient care.

    PubMed

    Amoaku, W; Blakeney, S; Freeman, M; Gale, R; Johnston, R; Kelly, S P; McLaughlan, B; Sahu, D; Varma, D

    2012-02-01

    In recent years, there have been significant advances in the clinical management of patients with wet age-related macular degeneration (wet AMD)--a rapidly progressing and potentially blinding degenerative eye disease. Wet AMD is responsible for more than half of registered severe sight impairment (blindness) in the United Kingdom, and patients who are being treated for wet AMD require frequent and long-term follow-up for treatment to be most effective. The clinical workload associated with the frequent follow-up required is substantial. Furthermore, as more new patients are diagnosed and the population continues to age, the patient population will continue to increase. It is thus vital that clinical services continue to adapt so that they can provide a fast and efficient service for patients with wet AMD. This Action on AMD document has been developed by eye health-care professionals and patient representatives, the Action on AMD group. It is intended to highlight the urgent and continuing need for change within wet AMD services. This document also serves as a guide for eye health-care professionals, NHS commissioners, and providers to present possible solutions for improving NHS retinal and macular services. Examples of good practice and service development are considered and can be drawn upon to help services meet the recommended quality of care and achieve best possible outcomes.

  20. Taking Action: An Educator's Guide to Involving Students in Environmental Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council for Environmental Education, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Developed in cooperation with the World Wildlife Fund, "Taking Action" inspires ideas and provides models for conducting effective environmental projects--projects that dynamically engage students from start to finish. From adopting species to protecting habitats to saving energy and creating publications, this guide will help educators plan,…

  1. 24 CFR 248.145 - Criteria for approval of a plan of action involving incentives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... may approve a plan of action for extension of the low income affordability restrictions on an eligible... section, for the remaining useful life of the project; (3) Throughout the remaining useful life of the...) Implementation. Any agreement to maintain the low income affordability restrictions for the remaining useful...

  2. 24 CFR 248.145 - Criteria for approval of a plan of action involving incentives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... may approve a plan of action for extension of the low income affordability restrictions on an eligible... section, for the remaining useful life of the project; (3) Throughout the remaining useful life of the...) Implementation. Any agreement to maintain the low income affordability restrictions for the remaining useful...

  3. 25 CFR 169.21 - Condemnation actions involving individually owned lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    .... 169.21 Section 169.21 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER... facts relating to any condemnation action to obtain a right-of-way over individually owned lands shall be reported immediately by officials of the Bureau of Indian Affairs having knowledge of such...

  4. Human Securitability: A Participatory Action Research Study Involving Novice Teachers and Youngsters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kravale-Paulina, Marite; Olehnovica, Eridiana

    2015-01-01

    Civic participation, initiative and interest in current events can bridge the alienation felt towards national and municipal institutions, thereby enabling individuals to improve their quality of life and contribute to all-round sustainable development of their resident state. This paper reports on a participatory action research study into civic…

  5. What Will Teachers Do to Involve Parents in Education?: Using a Theory of Reasoned Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pryor, Brandt W.; Pryor, Caroline R.

    2009-01-01

    Parents' involvement in their children's education is associated with a variety of benefits, including higher achievement, yet teachers are not uniformly supportive and encouraging. Teacher attitudes and beliefs about parental involvement are a predictive factor which schools, and preservice programs, could influence, yet little is known about how…

  6. Mechanisms involved in the relaxant action of testosterone in the renal artery from male normoglycemic and diabetic rabbits.

    PubMed

    Marrachelli, Vannina G; Miranda, Francisco J; Centeno, José M; Burguete, María C; Castelló-Ruiz, María; Jover-Mengual, Teresa; Pérez, Antonio M; Salom, Juan B; Torregrosa, Germán; Alborch, Enrique

    2010-02-01

    Kidney disease is a frequent complication in diabetes, and significant differences have been reported between male and female patients. Our working hypothesis was that diabetes might modify the vascular actions of testosterone in isolated rabbit renal arteries and the mechanisms involved in these actions. Testosterone (10(-8) to 10(-4)M) induced relaxation of precontracted arteries, without significant differences between control and diabetic rabbits. Both in control and diabetic rabbits endothelium removal inhibited testosterone relaxant action. In arteries with endothelium, incubation with indomethacin (10(-5)M), N(G)-nitro-l-arginine (10(-5)M) or tetraethylammonium (10(-5)M) did not modify relaxations to testosterone neither in control nor in diabetic rabbits. In endothelium-denuded arteries indomethacin enhanced the relaxant action of testosterone, both in control and diabetic rabbits. In arteries from diabetic rabbits, eNOS, iNOS and COX-1 expression and testosterone-induced release of thromboxane A(2) and prostacyclin were not significantly different from those observed in control rabbits. However, COX-2 expression was significantly lower in diabetic rabbits that in control rabbits. In nominally Ca(2+)-free medium, cumulative addition of CaCl2 (10(-5) to 3x10(-2)M) contracted previously depolarized arteries. Testosterone (10(-4)M) inhibited CaCl2 contractions of the renal artery both in control and diabetic rabbits. These results show that testosterone relaxes the renal artery both in control and diabetic rabbits. This relaxation is modulated by muscular thromboxane A(2), it is partially mediated by endothelial prostacyclin, and it involves the blocking of extracellular Ca2+ entry. Diabetes does not modify the mechanisms involved in the relaxant action of testosterone in the rabbit renal artery.

  7. Rat epileptic seizures evoked by BmK {alpha}IV and its possible mechanisms involved in sodium channels

    SciTech Connect

    Chai Zhifang; Bai Zhantao; Zhang Xuying; Liu Tong; Pang Xueyan; Ji Yonghua . E-mail: yhji@server.shcnc.ac.cn

    2007-05-01

    This study showed that rat unilateral intracerebroventricular injection of BmK {alpha}IV, a sodium channel modulator derived from scorpion Buthus martensi Karsch, induced clusters of spikes, epileptic discharges and convulsion-related behavioral changes. BmK {alpha}IV potently promoted the release of endogenous glutamate from rat cerebrocortical synaptosomes. In vitro examination of the effect of BmK {alpha}IV on intrasynaptosomal free calcium concentration [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} and sodium concentration [Na{sup +}]{sub i} revealed that BmK {alpha}IV-evoked glutamate release from synaptosomes was associated with an increase in Ca{sup 2+} and Na{sup +} influx. Moreover, BmK {alpha}IV-mediated glutamate release and ion influx was completely blocked by tetrodotoxin, a blocker of sodium channel. Together, these results suggest that the induction of BmK {alpha}IV-evoked epileptic seizures may be involved in the modulation of BmK {alpha}IV on tetrodotoxin-sensitive sodium channels located on the nerve terminal, which subsequently enhances the Ca{sup 2+} influx to cause an increase of glutamate release. These findings may provide some insight regarding the mechanism of neuronal action of BmK {alpha}IV in the central nervous system for understanding epileptogenesis involved in sodium channels.

  8. Involvement of the dopaminergic system in the central orexin-induced antinociceptive action against colonic distension in conscious rats.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Toshikatsu; Nozu, Tsukasa; Kumei, Shima; Takakusaki, Kaoru; Miyagishi, Saori; Ohhira, Masumi

    2015-09-25

    We have recently demonstrated that orexin acts centrally in the brain to induce antinociceptive action against colonic distension through orexin 1 receptors in conscious rats. Although the dopaminergic system can induce antinociceptive action for somatic pain, the association between changes in the dopaminergic system and visceral pain perception has not been investigated. In the present study, we hypothesized that the dopaminergic system may be involved in visceral nociception, and if so, the dopaminergic system may mediate the orexin-induced visceral antinociception. Visceral sensation was evaluated using the colonic distension-induced abdominal withdrawal reflex (AWR) in conscious rats. Intracisternal injection of D1 (SKF38398) or D2 (quinpirole) dopamine receptor agonist increased the threshold volume of colonic distension-induced AWR in a dose-dependent manner. Pretreatment with either the D1 or D2 dopamine receptor antagonist (SCH23390 or sulpiride, respectively) potently blocked the centrally injected orexin-A-induced antinociceptive action against colonic distension. These results suggest for the first time that dopaminergic signaling via D1 and D2 dopamine receptors in the brain may induce visceral antinociception and that the dopaminergic signaling may be involved in the central orexin-induced antinociceptive action against colonic distension.

  9. Waking action of ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) involves histamine and GABAA receptor block.

    PubMed

    Yanovsky, Yevgenij; Schubring, Stephan R; Yao, Quiaoling; Zhao, Yan; Li, Sha; May, Andrea; Haas, Helmut L; Lin, Jian-Sheng; Sergeeva, Olga A

    2012-01-01

    Since ancient times ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), a constituent of bile, is used against gallstone formation and cholestasis. A neuroprotective action of UDCA was demonstrated recently in models of Alzheimer's disease and retinal degeneration. The mechanisms of UDCA action in the nervous system are poorly understood. We show now that UDCA promotes wakefulness during the active period of the day, lacking this activity in histamine-deficient mice. In cultured hypothalamic neurons UDCA did not affect firing rate but synchronized the firing, an effect abolished by the GABA(A)R antagonist gabazine. In histaminergic neurons recorded in slices UDCA reduced amplitude and duration of spontaneous and evoked IPSCs. In acutely isolated histaminergic neurons UDCA inhibited GABA-evoked currents and sIPSCs starting at 10 µM (IC(50) = 70 µM) and did not affect NMDA- and AMPA-receptor mediated currents at 100 µM. Recombinant GABA(A) receptors composed of α1, β1-3 and γ2L subunits expressed in HEK293 cells displayed a sensitivity to UDCA similar to that of native GABA(A) receptors. The mutation α1V256S, known to reduce the inhibitory action of pregnenolone sulphate, reduced the potency of UDCA. The mutation α1Q241L, which abolishes GABA(A)R potentiation by several neurosteroids, had no effect on GABA(A)R inhibition by UDCA. In conclusion, UDCA enhances alertness through disinhibition, at least partially of the histaminergic system via GABA(A) receptors.

  10. Possible involvement of 15-deoxy-Δ(12,14) -prostaglandin J2 in the development of leptin resistance.

    PubMed

    Hosoi, Toru; Matsuzaki, Syu; Miyahara, Tsuyoshi; Shimizu, Kaori; Hasegawa, Yuki; Ozawa, Koichiro

    2015-05-01

    Obesity is a worldwide health problem that urgently needs to be solved. Leptin is an anti-obesity hormone that activates satiety signals to the brain. Evidence to suggest that leptin resistance is involved in the development of obesity is increasing; however, the molecular mechanisms involved remain unclear. We herein demonstrated that 15-deoxy-Δ(12,14) -prostaglandin J2 (15d-PGJ2 ) was involved in the development of leptin resistance. A treatment with 15d-PGJ2 inhibited the leptin-induced activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) in neuronal cells (SH-SY5Y-Ob-Rb cells). Furthermore, the intracerebroventricular administration of 15d-PGJ2 reversed the inhibitory effects of leptin on food intake in rats. The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR-γ) antagonist, GW9662, slightly reversed the inhibitory effects of 15d-PGJ2 on the leptin-induced activation of STAT3 in neuronal cells. The PPAR-γ agonist, rosiglitazone, also inhibited leptin-induced STAT3 phosphorylation. Therefore, the inhibitory effects of 15d-PGJ2 may be mediated through PPAR-γ. On the other hand, 15d-PGJ2 -induced leptin resistance may not be mediated by endoplasmic reticulum stress or suppressor of cytokine signaling 3. The results of the present study suggest that 15d-PGJ2 is a novel factor for the development of leptin resistance in obesity. Leptin resistance, an insensitivity to the actions of leptin, is involved in the development of obesity. Here, we found 15-deoxy-Δ(12,14) -prostaglandin J2 (15d-PGJ2 ) may be involved in the development of leptin resistance. The present results suggest that the 15d-PGJ2 may be a novel factor for the development of leptin resistance in obesity. 15d-PGJ2 , 15-Deoxy-Δ(12,14) -prostaglandin J2; STAT3, signal tranducer and activator of transcription 3.

  11. Anger fosters action. Fast responses in a motor task involving approach movements toward angry faces and bodies

    PubMed Central

    de Valk, Josje M.; Wijnen, Jasper G.; Kret, Mariska E.

    2015-01-01

    Efficiently responding to others’ emotions, especially threatening expressions such as anger and fear, can have great survival value. Previous research has shown that humans have a bias toward threatening stimuli. Most of these studies focused on facial expressions, yet emotions are expressed by the whole body, and not just by the face. Body language contains a direct action component, and activates action preparation areas in the brain more than facial expressions. Hence, biases toward threat may be larger following threatening bodily expressions as compared to facial expressions. The current study investigated reaction times of movements directed toward emotional bodies and faces. For this purpose, a new task was developed where participants were standing in front of a computer screen on which angry, fearful, and neutral faces and bodies were presented which they had to touch as quickly as possible. Results show that participants responded faster to angry than to neutral stimuli, regardless of the source (face or body). No significant difference was observed between fearful and neutral stimuli, demonstrating that the threat bias was not related to the negativity of the stimulus, but likely to the directness of the threat in relation to the observer. Whereas fearful stimuli might signal an environmental threat that requires further exploration before action, angry expressions signal a direct threat to the observer, asking for immediate action. This study provides a novel and implicit method to directly test the speed of actions toward emotions from the whole body. PMID:26388793

  12. Baking together-the coordination of actions in activities involving people with dementia.

    PubMed

    Majlesi, Ali Reza; Ekström, Anna

    2016-08-01

    This study explores interaction and collaboration between people with dementia and their spouses in relation to the performance of household chores with the focus on instruction as an interactional context to engage the person with dementia in collaboration to accomplish joint activities. Dementia is generally associated with pathological changes in people's cognitive functions such as diminishing memory functions, communicative abilities and also diminishing abilities to take initiative as well as to plan and execute tasks. Using video recordings of everyday naturally occurring activities, we analyze the sequential organization of actions (see Schegloff, 2007) oriented toward the accomplishment of a joint multi-task activity of baking. The analysis shows the specific ways of collaboration through instructional activities in which the person with dementia exhibits his competence and skills in accomplishing the given tasks through negotiating the instructions with his partner and carrying out instructed actions. Although the driving force of the collaboration seems to be a series of directive sequences only initiated by the partner throughout the baking activity, our analyses highlight how the person with dementia can actively use the material environment-including collaborating partners-to compensate for challenges and difficulties encountered in achieving everyday tasks. The sequential organization of instructions and instructed actions are in this sense argued to provide an interactional environment wherein the person with dementia can make contributions to the joint activity in an efficient way. While a collaborator has been described as necessary for a person with dementia to be able to partake in activities, this study shows that people with dementia are not only guided by their collaborators in joint activities but they can also actively use their collaborators in intricate compensatory ways.

  13. Measuring 3D-orthodontic actions to guide clinical treatments involving coil springs and miniscrews.

    PubMed

    Mencattelli, Margherita; Donati, Elisa; Spinelli, Pasqua; Cultrone, Massimo; Luzi, Cesare; Cantarella, Daniele; Stefanini, Cesare

    2017-03-01

    The understanding of the phenomena at the base of tooth movement, due to orthodontic therapy, is an ambitious topic especially with regard to the "optimal forces" able to move teeth without causing irreversible tissue damages. To this aim, a measuring platform for detecting 3D orthodontic actions has been developed. It consists of customized load cells and dedicated acquisition electronics. The force sensors are able to detect, simultaneously and independently of each other, the six orthodontic components which a tooth is affected by. They have been calibrated and then applied on a clinical case that required NiTi closed coil springs and miniscrews for the treatment of upper post-extraction spaces closure. The tests have been conducted on teeth stumps belonging to a plaster cast of the patient's mouth. The load cells characteristics (sensor linearity and repeatability) have been analyzed (0.97 < R (2) < 1; 6.3*10 (-6) % < STD < 8.8 %) and, on the basis of calibration data, the actions exerted on teeth have been determined. The biomechanical behavior of the frontal group and clinical interpretation of the results are discussed.

  14. Participation As Relational Process: Unpacking Involvement in Social Action and Community Service

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Jeffrey N.; Bench, Joshua H.; Warnaar, Bethany L.; Stroup, John T.

    2013-01-01

    Educators, policymakers, and other concerned adults share an interest in promoting lifelong patterns of community service in youth. Practitioners and researchers alike highlight the importance of youth participation in afterschool service activities so the author's focus in this paper is on youth involved in PeaceJam, an innovative…

  15. Functional heterogeneity of osteocytes in FGF23 production: the possible involvement of DMP1 as a direct negative regulator

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji-Won; Yamaguchi, Akira; Iimura, Tadahiro

    2014-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) and dentin matrix protein (DMP1) are hallmarks of osteocytes in bone. However, the mechanisms underlying the actions of DMP1 as a local factor regulating FGF23 and bone mineralization are not well understood. We first observed spatially distinct distributions of FGF23- and DMP1-positive osteocytic lacunae in rat femurs using immunohistochemistry. Three-dimensional immunofluorescence morphometry further demonstrated that the distribution and relative expression levels of these two proteins exhibited reciprocally reversed patterns especially in midshaft cortical bone. These in vivo findings suggest a direct role of DMP1 in FGF23 expression in osteocytes. We next observed that the inoculation of recombinant DMP1 in UMR-106 osteoblast/osteocyte-like cells and long-cultured MC3T3-E1 osteoblastic cells showed significant downregulation of FGF23 production. This effect was rescued by incubation with an focal adhesion kinase (FAK) inhibitor or MEK (mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK)) inhibitor but not inhibitors of phosphoinositide 3-kinase or Rho kinase. Consistently, the levels of phosphorylated FAK, ERK and p38 were significantly elevated, indicating that exogenous DMP1 is capable of activating FAK-mediated MAPK signaling. These findings suggest that DMP1 is a local, direct and negative regulator of FGF23 production in osteocytes involved in the FAK-mediated MAPK pathway, proposing a relevant pathway that coordinates the extracellular environment of osteocytic lacunae and bone metabolism. PMID:24991406

  16. Libidibia ferrea Mature Seeds Promote Antinociceptive Effect by Peripheral and Central Pathway: Possible Involvement of Opioid and Cholinergic Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Sawada, Luis Armando; Monteiro, Vanessa Sâmia da Conçeição; Rabelo, Guilherme Rodrigues; Dias, Germana Bueno; Da Cunha, Maura; do Nascimento, José Luiz Martins; Bastos, Gilmara de Nazareth Tavares

    2014-01-01

    Libidibia ferrea (LF) is a medicinal plant that holds many pharmacological properties. We evaluated the antinociceptive effect in the LF aqueous seed extract and Lipidic Portion of Libidibia ferrea (LPLF), partially elucidating their mechanisms. Histochemical tests and Gas chromatography of the LPLF were performed to characterize its fatty acids. Acetic acid-induced abdominal constriction, formalin-induced pain, and hot-plate test in mice were employed in the study. In all experiments, aqueous extract or LPLF was administered systemically at the doses of 1, 5, and 10 mg/kg. LF aqueous seed extract and LPLF demonstrated a dose-dependent antinociceptive effect in all tests indicating both peripheral anti-inflammatory and central analgesia properties. Also, the use of atropine (5 mg/kg), naloxone (5 mg/kg) in the abdominal writhing test was able to reverse the antinociceptive effect of the LPLF, indicating that at least one of LF lipids components is responsible for the dose related antinociceptive action in chemical and thermal models of nociception in mice. Together, the present results suggested that Libidibia ferrea induced antinociceptive activity is possibly related to its ability to inhibit opioid, cholinergic receptors, and cyclooxygenase-2 pathway, since its main component, linoleic acid, has been demonstrated to produce such effect in previous studies. PMID:24860820

  17. Estrogen involvement in social behavior in rodents: Rapid and long-term actions.

    PubMed

    Ervin, Kelsy S J; Lymer, Jennifer M; Matta, Richard; Clipperton-Allen, Amy E; Kavaliers, Martin; Choleris, Elena

    2015-08-01

    This article is part of a Special Issue ("Estradiol and cognition"). Estrogens have repeatedly been shown to influence a wide array of social behaviors, which in rodents are predominantly olfactory-mediated. Estrogens are involved in social behavior at multiple levels of processing, from the detection and integration of socially relevant olfactory information to more complex social behaviors, including social preferences, aggression and dominance, and learning and memory for social stimuli (e.g. social recognition and social learning). Three estrogen receptors (ERs), ERα, ERβ, and the G protein-coupled ER 1 (GPER1), differently affect these behaviors. Social recognition, territorial aggression, and sexual preferences and mate choice, all requiring the integration of socially related olfactory information, seem to primarily involve ERα, with ERβ playing a lesser, modulatory role. In contrast, social learning consistently responds differently to estrogen manipulations than other social behaviors. This suggests differential ER involvement in brain regions important for specific social behaviors, such as the ventromedial and medial preoptic nuclei of the hypothalamus in social preferences and aggression, the medial amygdala and hippocampus in social recognition, and the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus in social learning. While the long-term effects of ERα and ERβ on social behavior have been extensively investigated, our knowledge of the rapid, non-genomic, effects of estrogens is more limited and suggests that they may mediate some social behaviors (e.g. social learning) differently from long-term effects. Further research is required to compare ER involvement in regulating social behavior in male and female animals, and to further elucidate the roles of the more recently described G protein-coupled ERs, both the GPER1 and the Gq-mER.

  18. Transsynaptic modality codes in the brain: possible involvement of synchronized spike timing, microRNAs, exosomes and epigenetic processes

    PubMed Central

    Smythies, John; Edelstein, Lawrence

    2013-01-01

    This paper surveys two different mechanisms by which a presynaptic cell can modulate the structure and function of the postsynaptic cell. We first present the evidence that this occurs, and then discuss two mechanisms that could bring this about. The first hypothesis relates to the long lasting effects that the spike patterns of presynaptic axons may exert by modulating activity–inducible programs in postsynaptic cells. The second hypothesis is based on recently obtained evidence that, the afferent neuron at the neuromuscular junction buds off exosomes at its synapse and carries a cargo of Wg and Evi, which are large molecular transsynaptic signaling agents (LMTSAs). Further evidence indicates that many types of neurons bud off exosomes containing payloads of various lipids, proteins, and types of RNA. The evidence suggests that they are transmitted across the synapse and are taken up by the postsynaptic structure either by perisynaptic or exosynaptic mechanisms, thus mediating the transfer of information between neurons. To date, the molecular hypothesis has been limited to local interactions within the synapse of concern. In this paper, we explore the possibility that this represents a mechanism for information transfer involving the postsynaptic neuron as a whole. This entails a review of the known functions of these molecules in neuronal physiology, together with an estimate of the possible types of information they could carry and how they might affect neurocomputations. PMID:23316146

  19. Auxin Biosynthesis, Accumulation, Action and Transport are Involved in Stress-Induced Microspore Embryogenesis Initiation and Progression in Brassica napus.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Sanz, Héctor; Solís, María-Teresa; López, María-Fernanda; Gómez-Cadenas, Aurelio; Risueño, María C; Testillano, Pilar S

    2015-07-01

    Isolated microspores are reprogrammed in vitro by stress, becoming totipotent cells and producing embryos and plants via a process known as microspore embryogenesis. Despite the abundance of data on auxin involvement in plant development and embryogenesis, no data are available regarding the dynamics of auxin concentration, cellular localization and the expression of biosynthesis genes during microspore embryogenesis. This work involved the analysis of auxin concentration and cellular accumulation; expression of TAA1 and NIT2 encoding enzymes of two auxin biosynthetic pathways; expression of the PIN1-like efflux carrier; and the effects of inhibition of auxin transport and action by N-1-naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA) and α-(p-chlorophenoxy) isobutyric acid (PCIB) during Brassica napus microspore embryogenesis. The results indicated de novo auxin synthesis after stress-induced microspore reprogramming and embryogenesis initiation, accompanying the first cell divisions. The progressive increase of auxin concentration during progression of embryogenesis correlated with the expression patterns of TAA1 and NIT2 genes of auxin biosynthetic pathways. Auxin was evenly distributed in early embryos, whereas in heart/torpedo embryos auxin was accumulated in apical and basal embryo regions. Auxin efflux carrier PIN1-like gene expression was induced in early multicellular embryos and increased at the globular/torpedo embryo stages. Inhibition of polar auxin transport (PAT) and action, by NPA and PCIB, impaired embryo development, indicating that PAT and auxin action are required for microspore embryo progression. NPA also modified auxin embryo accumulation patterns. These findings indicate that endogenous auxin biosynthesis, action and polar transport are required in stress-induced microspore reprogramming, embryogenesis initiation and progression.

  20. Antimalarial action of artesunate involves DNA damage mediated by reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Gopalakrishnan, Anusha M; Kumar, Nirbhay

    2015-01-01

    Artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) is the recommended first-line treatment for Plasmodium falciparum malaria. It has been suggested that the cytotoxic effect of artemisinin is mediated by free radicals followed by the alkylation of P. falciparum proteins. The endoperoxide bridge, the active moiety of artemisinin derivatives, is cleaved in the presence of ferrous iron, generating reactive oxygen species (ROS) and other free radicals. However, the emergence of resistance to artemisinin in P. falciparum underscores the need for new insights into the molecular mechanisms of antimalarial activity of artemisinin. Here we show that artesunate (ART) induces DNA double-strand breaks in P. falciparum in a physiologically relevant dose- and time-dependent manner. DNA damage induced by ART was accompanied by an increase in the intracellular ROS level in the parasites. Mannitol, a ROS scavenger, reversed the cytotoxic effect of ART and reduced DNA damage, and modulation of glutathione (GSH) levels was found to impact ROS and DNA damage induced by ART. Accumulation of ROS, increased DNA damage, and the resulting antiparasite effect suggest a causal relationship between ROS, DNA damage, and parasite death. Finally, we also show that ART-induced ROS production involves a potential role for NADPH oxidase, an enzyme involved in the production of superoxide anions. Our results with P. falciparum provide novel insights into previously unknown molecular mechanisms underlying the antimalarial activity of artemisinin derivatives and may help in the design of next-generation antimalarial drugs against the most virulent Plasmodium species.

  1. 50-Hz extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields enhance cell proliferation and DNA damage: possible involvement of a redox mechanism.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Federica I; Torsello, Angela; Tedesco, Beatrice; Fasanella, Silvia; Boninsegna, Alma; D'Ascenzo, Marcello; Grassi, Claudio; Azzena, Gian Battista; Cittadini, Achille

    2005-03-22

    HL-60 leukemia cells, Rat-1 fibroblasts and WI-38 diploid fibroblasts were exposed for 24-72 h to 0.5-1.0-mT 50-Hz extremely low frequency electromagnetic field (ELF-EMF). This treatment induced a dose-dependent increase in the proliferation rate of all cell types, namely about 30% increase of cell proliferation after 72-h exposure to 1.0 mT. This was accompanied by increased percentage of cells in the S-phase after 12- and 48-h exposure. The ability of ELF-EMF to induce DNA damage was also investigated by measuring DNA strand breaks. A dose-dependent increase in DNA damage was observed in all cell lines, with two peaks occurring at 24 and 72 h. A similar pattern of DNA damage was observed by measuring formation of 8-OHdG adducts. The effects of ELF-EMF on cell proliferation and DNA damage were prevented by pretreatment of cells with an antioxidant like alpha-tocopherol, suggesting that redox reactions were involved. Accordingly, Rat-1 fibroblasts that had been exposed to ELF-EMF for 3 or 24 h exhibited a significant increase in dichlorofluorescein-detectable reactive oxygen species, which was blunted by alpha-tocopherol pretreatment. Cells exposed to ELF-EMF and examined as early as 6 h after treatment initiation also exhibited modifications of NF kappa B-related proteins (p65-p50 and I kappa B alpha), which were suggestive of increased formation of p65-p50 or p65-p65 active forms, a process usually attributed to redox reactions. These results suggest that ELF-EMF influence proliferation and DNA damage in both normal and tumor cells through the action of free radical species. This information may be of value for appraising the pathophysiologic consequences of an exposure to ELF-EMF.

  2. Community-Involved Learning to Expand Possibilities for Vulnerable Children: A Critical Communicative, Sen's Capability, and Action Research Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Kyung Hi

    2014-01-01

    This research, based on a case study of vulnerable children in Korea, used a mixed methods transformative approach to explore strategies to support and help disadvantaged children. The methodological approach includes three phases: a mixed methods contextual analysis, a qualitative dominant analysis based on Sen's capability approach and critical…

  3. Antihyperglycemic and hypolipidemic effects of Helicteres isora roots in alloxan-induced diabetic rats: a possible mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Venkatesh, Sama; Madhava Reddy, B; Dayanand Reddy, G; Mullangi, Ramesh; Lakshman, M

    2010-07-01

    The antihyperglycemic and hypolipidemic activities of Helicteres isora Linn. (Sterculiaceae) root extracts were investigated in alloxan-induced diabetic rats and a possible mechanism of the blood glucose lowering action was studied. Alloxan-induced diabetic rats experienced 69.13 and 51.14%, 22.60 and 21.89%, 30.12 and 19.96%, and 50.05 and 34.29% reduction in blood glucose, total cholesterol, triglycerides, and urea levels following oral administration of butanol and aqueous ethanol extracts of H. isora root, respectively, at 250 mg/kg for 10 days. The beneficial effects of these extracts were supported by evidence from histological examinations of the liver, pancreas, and kidney. Following the treatment with both extracts, the degenerative changes caused by alloxan in pancreatic cells were restored, particularly with the butanol extract. Histological examination convincingly showed the restoration of pancreatic islets, kidney glomeruli, and liver to its normal size. These results suggest that H. isora roots possess antidiabetic principles and can be useful for treatment of diabetes.

  4. Activation of octopaminergic receptors by essential oil constituents isolated from aromatic plants: possible mode of action against insect pests.

    PubMed

    Kostyukovsky, Moshe; Rafaeli, Ada; Gileadi, Carina; Demchenko, Nataly; Shaaya, Eli

    2002-11-01

    As a result of screening a large number of essential oils from Israeli aromatic plants and their biologically active constituents, we isolated two oils with high activity against several stored-product insects. In this study the effect of these compounds on the acetylcholinesterase and the octopamine systems in insects was studied in order to elucidate their mode of action. Inhibition of acetylcholinesterase activity in vitro was evident only at high concentrations (10(-3) M) and could not account effectively for the low-dose mortality for some stored-product insects observed in vivo. However, the essential oil constituents were found to cause a significant increase in the levels of the intracellular messenger, cyclic AMP of abdominal epidermal tissue in the model insect, Helicoverpa armigera Hübn. The effect was significant even at low, physiological concentrations (10(-8) M) when tested directly on abdominal epidermal tissue preparations in vitro. This intracellular response was found to resemble closely the significant increases in the levels of the cyclic AMP of abdominal epidermal tissue due to treatment with the neurotransmitter/neuromodulator, octopamine. Subsequent treatment with the octopaminergic antagonist, phentolamine, effectively inhibited the cyclic AMP levels induced by essential oil treatment, indicating possible competitive activation of octopaminergic receptors by essential oil constituents.

  5. Involvement of AMPA receptor phosphorylation in antidepressant actions with special reference to tianeptine.

    PubMed

    Svenningsson, Per; Bateup, Helen; Qi, Hongshi; Takamiya, Kogo; Huganir, Richard L; Spedding, Michael; Roth, Bryan L; McEwen, Bruce S; Greengard, Paul

    2007-12-01

    Depression is associated with abnormal neuronal plasticity. AMPA receptors mediate transmission and plasticity at excitatory synapses in a manner which is positively regulated by phosphorylation at Ser831-GluR1, a CaMKII/PKC site, and Ser845-GluR1, a PKA site. Treatment with the selective serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine increases P-Ser845-GluR1 but not P-Ser831-GluR1. Here, it was found that treatment with another antidepressant, tianeptine, increased P-Ser831-GluR1 in the frontal cortex and the CA3 region of hippocampus and P-Ser845-GluR1 in the CA3 region of hippocampus. A receptorome profile detected no affinity for tianeptine at any monaminergic receptors or transporters, confirming an atypical profile for this compound. Behavioural analyses showed that mice bearing point mutations at both Ser831- and Ser845-GluR1, treated with saline, exhibited increased latency to enter the centre of an open field and increased immobility in the tail-suspension test compared to their wild-type counterparts. Chronic tianeptine treatment increased open-field locomotion and reduced immobility in wild-type mice but not in phosphomutant GluR1 mice. P-Ser133-CREB was reduced in the CA3 region of hippocampus in phosphomutant mice, and tianeptine decreased P-Ser133-CREB in this region in wild-type, but not in phosphomutant, mice. Tianeptine increased P-Ser133-CREB in the CA1 region in wild-type mice but not in phosphomutant GluR1 mice. There were higher basal P-Ser133-CREB and c-fos levels in frontal and cingulate cortex in phosphomutant GluR1 mice; these changes in level were counteracted by tianeptine in a GluR1-independent manner. Using phosphorylation assays and phosphomutant GluR1 mice, this study provides evidence that AMPA receptor phosphorylation mediates certain explorative and antidepressant-like actions under basal conditions and following tianeptine treatment.

  6. Possible involvement of nitric oxide in morphine-induced miosis and reduction of intraocular pressure in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Bonfiglio, Vincenza; Bucolo, Claudio; Camillieri, Giovanni; Drago, Filippo

    2006-03-18

    The role of mu3 opioid receptors in morphine-induced intraocular pressure (IOP) lowering effect and miosis was evaluated in conscious, dark-adapted New Zealand white (NZW) rabbits using a masked-design study. IOP and pupil diameter (PD) measurements were taken at just before and 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 6 h after monolateral instillation of morphine (10, 50 and 100 microg/30 microl) as compared to vehicle administered in the contralateral eye. Morphine-induced ocular effects were challenged by a pre-treatment with the non-selective opioid receptor antagonist, naloxone (100 microg/30 microl), the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, 1%, 30 microl), or the non-selective mu3 opioid receptor inhibitor, reduced L-glutathione (GSH, 1%, 30 microl). Morphine induced a dose-dependent decrease in IOP and PD. Pre-treatment with naloxone totally prevented morphine-induced decrease in IOP and miosis. Ocular administration of L-NAME or GSH alone failed to affect IOP or PD of NZW rabbits. However, pre-treatment with either drugs significantly reduced, but not totally prevented ocular effects of morphine. These results suggest that biochemical mechanisms related to nitric oxide release are involved, at least in part, in morphine effects on the eye. Since the mu3 opioid receptor subtype is able to release nitric oxide and is sensitive to inactivation by GSH, it may be possible that mu3 opioid receptors are involved in morphine-induced miosis and reduction in IOP.

  7. Involvement of cytochrome P-450 enzyme activity in the selectivity and safening action of pyrazosulfuron-ethyl.

    PubMed

    Yun, M S; Shim, I S; Usui, K

    2001-03-01

    To investigate the selectivity and safening action of the sulfonylurea herbicide pyrazosulfuron-ethyl (PSE), pyrazosulfuron-ethyl O-demethylase (PSEOD) activity involving oxidative metabolism by cytochrome P-450 was studied in rice (Oryza sativa L cv Nipponbare) and Cyperus serotinus Rottb. Cytochrome P-450-dependent activity was demonstrated by the use of the inducers 1,8-naphthalic anhydride and ethanol, the herbicides PSE, bensulfuron-methyl, dimepiperate and dymron, or the inhibitor piperonyl butoxide (PBO). Growth inhibition in C serotinus seedlings was more severe than that in rice seedlings. O-Dealkylation activities of PSE were induced differently in rice and in C serotinus, with distinctly higher activity in rice seedlings. The induced PSEOD activities were slightly inhibited by PBO in rice seedlings, whereas they were strongly inhibited in C serotinus seedlings. Dimepiperate and dymron were effective safeners of rice against PSE treatment. Treatments with herbicide alone resulted in less induction of PSEOD activity compared with combined treatments of the herbicide and safener. PSEOD activity in rice seedlings induced with herbicide alone was strongly inhibited by PBO, whereas it was weakly inhibited in rice seedlings induced with combinations of PSE and two safeners. These results suggest that O-demethylation by cytochrome P-450 enzymes may be involved in the metabolism of PSE and may contribute to its selectivity and safening action. Furthermore, these results suggest the existence of a multiple form of cytochrome P-450 in plants.

  8. Rapid and reversible responses to IVIG in autoimmune neuromuscular diseases suggest mechanisms of action involving competition with functionally important autoantibodies

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Melvin; McCallus, Daniel E; Lin, Cindy Shin-Yi

    2013-01-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) is widely used in autoimmune neuromuscular diseases whose pathogenesis is undefined. Many different effects of IVIG have been demonstrated in vitro, but few studies actually identify the mechanism(s) most important in vivo. Doses and treatment intervals are generally chosen empirically. Recent studies in Guillain-Barré syndrome and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy show that some effects of IVIG are readily reversible and highly dependent on the serum IgG level. This suggests that in some autoantibody-mediated neuromuscular diseases, IVIG directly competes with autoantibodies that reversibly interfere with nerve conduction. Mechanisms of action of IVIG which most likely involve direct competition with autoantibodies include: neutralization of autoantibodies by anti-idiotypes, inhibition of complement deposition, and increasing catabolism of pathologic antibodies by saturating FcRn. Indirect immunomodulatory effects are not as likely to involve competition and may not have the same reversibility and dose-dependency. Pharmacodynamic analyses should be informative regarding most relevant mechanism(s) of action of IVIG as well as the role of autoantibodies in the immunopathogenesis of each disease. Better understanding of the role of autoantibodies and of the target(s) of IVIG could lead to more efficient use of this therapy and better patient outcomes. PMID:24200120

  9. Involvement of HCN Channel in Muscarinic Inhibitory Action on Tonic Firing of Dorsolateral Striatal Cholinergic Interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhe; Zhang, Kang; Liu, Xiaoyan; Yan, Haitao; Ma, Xiaoyun; Zhang, Shuzhuo; Zheng, Jianquan; Wang, Liyun; Wei, Xiaoli

    2016-01-01

    The striatum is the most prominent nucleus in the basal ganglia and plays an important role in motor movement regulation. The cholinergic interneurons (ChIs) in striatum are involved in the motion regulation by releasing acetylcholine (ACh) and modulating the output of striatal projection neurons. Here, we report that muscarinic ACh receptor (M receptor) agonists, ACh and Oxotremorine (OXO-M), decreased the firing frequency of ChIs by blocking the hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels. Scopolamine (SCO), a nonselective antagonist of M receptors, abolished the inhibition. OXO-M exerted its function by activating the Gi/o cAMP signaling cascade. The single-cell reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (scRT-PCR) revealed that all the five subtypes of M receptors and four subtypes of HCN channels were expressed on ChIs. Among them, M2 receptors and HCN2 channels were the most dominant ones and expressed in every single studied cholinergic interneuron (ChI).Our results suggest that ACh regulates not only the output of striatal projection neurons, but also the firing activity of ChIs themselves by activating presynaptic M receptors in the dorsal striatum. The activation of M2 receptors and blockage of HCN2 channels may play an important role in ACh inhibition on the excitability of ChIs. This finding adds a new G-protein coupled receptor mediated regulation on ChIs and provides a cellular mechanism for control of cholinergic activity and ACh release in the dorsal striatum. PMID:27047336

  10. Involvement of proton-sensing receptor TDAG8 in the anti-inflammatory actions of dexamethasone in peritoneal macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    He, Xiao-dong; Tobo, Masayuki; Mogi, Chihiro; Nakakura, Takashi; Komachi, Mayumi; Murata, Naoya; Takano, Mutsumi; Tomura, Hideaki; Sato, Koichi; Okajima, Fumikazu

    2011-12-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Glucocorticoid (GC) induced the expression of proton-sensing TDAG8 in macrophages. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer GC enhanced acidic pH-induced cAMP accumulation and inhibition of TNF-{alpha} production. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The enhancement of the GC-induced actions was lost by TDAG8 deficiency. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer GC-induced anti-inflammatory actions are partly mediated by TDAG8 expression. -- Abstract: Dexamethasone (DEX), a potent glucocorticoid, increased the expression of T-cell death associated gene 8 (TDAG8), a proton-sensing G protein-coupled receptor, which is associated with the enhancement of acidic pH-induced cAMP accumulation, in peritoneal macrophages. We explored the role of increased TDAG8 expression in the anti-inflammatory actions of DEX. The treatment of macrophages with either DEX or acidic pH induced the cell death of macrophages; however, the cell death was not affected by TDAG8 deficiency. While DEX inhibited lipopolysaccharide-induced production of tumor necrosis factor-{alpha}, an inflammatory cytokine, which was independent of TDAG8, at neutral pH, the glucocorticoid enhanced the acidic pH-induced inhibition of tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} production in a manner dependent on TDAG8. In conclusion, the DEX-induced increase in TDAG8 expression is in part involved in the glucocorticoid-induced anti-inflammatory actions through the inhibition of inflammatory cytokine production under the acidic pH environment. On the other hand, the role of TDAG8 in the DEX-induced cell death is questionable.

  11. Antiviral activity and possible mode of action of ellagic acid identified in Lagerstroemia speciosa leaves toward human rhinoviruses

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Human rhinoviruses (HRVs) are responsible for more than half of all cases of the common cold and cause billions of USD annually in medical visits and school and work absenteeism. An assessment was made of the cytotoxic and antiviral activities and possible mode of action of the tannin ellagic acid from the leaves of Lagerstroemia speciosa toward HeLa cells and three rhinoviruses, HRV-2, -3, and -4. Methods The antiviral property and mechanism of action of ellagic acid were evaluated using a sulforhodamine B assay and real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) with SYBR Green dye. Results were compared with those of the currently used broad-spectrum antiviral agent, ribavirin. Results As judged by 50% inhibitory concentration values, natural ellagic acid was 1.8, 2.3, and 2.2 times more toxic toward HRV-2 (38 μg/mL), HRV-3 (31 μg/mL), and HRV-4 (29 μg/mL) than ribavirin, respectively. The inhibition rate of preincubation with 50 μg/mL ellagic acid was 17%, whereas continuous presence of ellagic acid during infection led to a significant increase in the inhibition (70%). Treatment with 50 μg/mL ellagic acid considerably suppressed HRV-4 infection only when added just after the virus inoculation (0 h) (87% inhibition), but not before -1 h or after 1 h or later (<20% inhibition). These findings suggest that ellagic acid does not interact with the HRV-4 particles and may directly interact with the human cells in the early stage of HRV infections to protect the cells from the virus destruction. Furthermore, RT-PCR analysis revealed that 50 μg/mL ellagic acid strongly inhibited the RNA replication of HRV-4 in HeLa cells, suggesting that ellagic acid inhibits virus replication by targeting on cellular molecules, rather than virus molecules. Conclusions Global efforts to reduce the level of antibiotics justify further studies on L. speciosa leaf-derived materials containing ellagic acid as potential anti-HRV products or a lead molecule for the

  12. Molecular and biochemical evidence for the involvement of calcium/calmodulin in auxin action

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, T.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2000-01-01

    -dependent manner suggests that calcium/CaM regulate ZmSAUR1 at the post-translational level. Our data provide the first direct evidence for the involvement of calcium/CaM-mediated signaling in auxin-mediated signal transduction.

  13. Anti-inflammatory effects and possible mechanism of action of lupeol acetate isolated from Himatanthus drasticus (Mart.) Plumel

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The species Himatanthus drasticus is popularly known in Northeast Brazil as "janaguba" and belongs to the family Apocynaceae. The latex collected from its stem bark is used for several purposes including anti-inflammatory properties and presents among its bioactive constituents the pentacyclic triterpene lupeol. The objective of the present work was to study in vivo and in vitro the lupeol acetate (LA) isolated from the plant latex, in several models of inflammation. Methods Male Swiss mice (25-30 g, 6-24 animals per group) were administered with LA, 30 min before the test initiation. In the evaluation of analgesic activity the formalin test was used. The anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated by the following tests: paw edema induced by carrageenan and dextran, and the carrageenan-induced neutrophil migration into peritoneal cavities. Furthermore, the effect of LA on the myeloperoxidase release (MPO, an inflammation biomarker) from human neutrophils was also determined, as well as its antioxidant potential by the DPPH assay. Results In the formalin test, LA (10, 25 and 50 mg/kg, i.p.) inhibited both the 1st (neurogenic, 0-5 min) and mainly the 2nd (inflammatory, 20-25 min) phase. Naloxone completely reversed the LA effect, indicating the participation of the opioid system. LA also significantly inhibited carrageenan- and dextran-induced paw edemas, as well as the neutrophil migration to the peritoneal cavity evaluated by the carrageenan-induced pleurisia. In this model, the effect of a very low dose of LA (0.1 mg/kg) was potentiated by the same dose of pentoxifylline (PTX), a known TNF-alpha inhibitor. LA (25 and 50 μg/ml) was also very effective in inhibiting MPO released from stimulated human neutrophils, and significantly decreased the number of cells expressing iNOS activity in the paw of mice submitted to carrageenan-induced edema, suggesting a drug involvement with the NO system. Conclusions The anti-inflammatory effect of LA probably involves

  14. Contribution of acetaminophen-cysteine to acetaminophen nephrotoxicity II. Possible involvement of the gamma-glutamyl cycle.

    PubMed

    Stern, Stephan T; Bruno, Mary K; Horton, Robert A; Hill, Dennis W; Roberts, Jeanette C; Cohen, Steven D

    2005-01-15

    Acetaminophen (APAP) nephrotoxicity has been observed both in humans and research animals. Our recent investigations have focused on the possible involvement of glutathione-derived APAP metabolites in APAP nephrotoxicity and have demonstrated that administration of acetaminophen-cysteine (APAP-CYS) potentiated APAP-induced renal injury with no effects on APAP-induced liver injury. Additionally, APAP-CYS treatment alone resulted in a dose-responsive renal GSH depletion. This APAP-CYS-induced renal GSH depletion could interfere with intrarenal detoxification of APAP or its toxic metabolite N-acetyl-p-benzoquinoneimine (NAPQI) and may be the mechanism responsible for the potentiation of APAP nephrotoxicity. Renal-specific GSH depletion has been demonstrated in mice and rats following administration of amino acid gamma-glutamyl acceptor substrates for gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (gamma-GT). The present study sought to determine if APAP-CYS-induced renal glutathione depletion is the result of disruption of the gamma-glutamyl cycle through interaction with gamma-GT. The results confirmed that APAP-CYS-induced renal GSH depletion was antagonized by the gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (gamma-GT) inhibitor acivicin. In vitro analysis demonstrated that APAP-CYS is a gamma-glutamyl acceptor for both murine and bovine renal gamma-GT. Analysis of urine from mice pretreated with acivicin and then treated with APAP, APAP-CYS, or acetaminophen-glutathione identified a gamma-glutamyl-cysteinyl-acetaminophen metabolite. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that APAP-CYS contributes to APAP nephrotoxicity by depletion of renal GSH stores through interaction with the gamma-glutamyl cycle.

  15. Alterations in left ventricular function during intermittent hypoxia: Possible involvement of O-GlcNAc protein and MAPK signaling.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xueling; Shang, Jin; Deng, Yan; Yuan, Xiao; Zhu, Die; Liu, Huiguo

    2015-07-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea, characterized by recurrent episodes of hypoxia [intermittent hypoxia (IH)], has been identified as a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. The O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) modification (O-GlcNAcylation) of proteins has important regulatory implications on the pathophysiology of cardiovascular disorders. In this study, we examined the role of O-GlcNAcylation in cardiac architecture and left ventricular function following IH. Rats were randomly assigned to a normoxia and IH group (2 min 21% O2; 2 min 6-8% O2). Left ventricular function, myocardial morphology and the levels of signaling molecules were then measured. IH induced a significant increase in blood pressure, associated with a gradually abnormal myocardial architecture. The rats exposed to 2 or 3 weeks of IH presented with augmented left ventricular systolic and diastolic function, which declined at week 4. Consistently, the O-GlcNAc protein and O-GlcNAcase (OGA) levels in the left ventricular tissues steadily increased following IH, reaching peak levels at week 3. The O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT), extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) phosphorylation levels were affected in an opposite manner. The phosphorylation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) remained unaltered. In parallel, compared with exposure to normoxia, 4 weeks of IH augmented the O-GlcNAc protein, OGT, phosphorylated ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK levels, accompanied by a decrease in OGA levels and an increase in the levels of myocardial nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), inflammatory cytokines, caspase-3 and cardiomyocyte apoptosis. Taken together, our suggest a possible involvement of O-GlcNAc protein and MAPK signaling in the alterations of left ventricular function and cardiac injury following IH.

  16. Mechanisms involved in vitamin D mediated intestinal calcium absorption and in non-classical actions of vitamin D.

    PubMed

    Christakos, Sylvia; Dhawan, Puneet; Ajibade, Dare; Benn, Bryan S; Feng, Jingjing; Joshi, Sneha S

    2010-07-01

    Recent studies in our laboratory using calbindin-D9k null mutant mice as well as mice lacking the 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3) inducible epithelial calcium channel TRPV6 provide evidence for calbindin-D9k and TRPV6 independent regulation of active intestinal calcium absorption. These findings suggest that in the knock out (KO) mice there is compensation by another calcium channel or protein and that other novel factors are involved in 1,25(OH)2D3 mediated active intestinal calcium absorption. In addition, 1,25(OH)2D3 mediated paracellular transport of calcium may have contributed to the normalization of serum calcium in the null mutant mice. 1,25(OH)2D3 downregulates cadherin-17 and upregulates claudin-2 and claudin-12 in the intestine, suggesting that 1,25(OH)2D3, by regulating these epithelial cell junction proteins, can route calcium through the paracellular path. With regard to non-classical actions, 1,25(OH)2D3 has been reported to inhibit the proliferation of a number of malignant cells and to regulate adaptive as well as innate immunity. This article will review new developments related to the function and regulation of vitamin D target proteins in classical and non-classical vitamin D target tissues that have provided novel insight into mechanisms of vitamin D action.

  17. Forum: Knowledge, Action, Involvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinberger, JoAnn

    2015-01-01

    St. Clair (EJ1072357) provides a summary and lays out some of the important issues inherent in the broad strategies articulated in "Making Skills Everyone's Business: A Call to Transform Adult Learning in the United States" (MSEB) (United States Department of Education [USDoE], 2015) (see ED558793). In this commentary, JoAnn Weinberger…

  18. Gene expression of transforming growth factor-beta 1 and its type II receptor in giant cell tumors of bone. Possible involvement in osteoclast-like cell migration.

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, M. H.; Fan, Y.; Wysocki, S. J.; Lau, A. T.; Robertson, T.; Beilharz, M.; Wood, D. J.; Papadimitriou, J. M.

    1994-01-01

    Giant cell tumor of bone (GCT) is a relatively rare skeletal neoplasm characterized by multinuclear giant cells (osteoclast-like cells) scattered in a mass of mononuclear cells. The currently favored hypothesis for the origin of cells within GCT is that the multinuclear giant cells are reactive osteoclasts, whereas the truly neoplastic cells are the major component of the mononuclear population. However, the pathological significance and the precise relationship of tumor cells and osteoclast-like cells in GCT have not been fully established. In this study, we evaluated two GCTs for the presence of transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta 1) and TGF-beta type II receptor gene transcripts and attempted to establish a possible role for TGF-beta 1 in the interaction between tumor cells and osteoclast-like cells. By using in situ hybridization and Northern blot analysis, we have demonstrated that TGF-beta 1 mRNA transcript is consistently detected in both tumor mononuclear cells and osteoclast-like cells, whereas TGF-beta type II receptor gene transcript is only present in osteoclast-like cells. Moreover, isolated rat osteoclasts were tested for their ability to migrate in response to GCT-conditioned medium (GCTCM) in an in vitro chemotactic assay. Our results showed that GCTCM stimulates the migration of osteoclasts in a dose-dependent manner. Interestingly, only osteoclasts containing less than three nuclei can migrate through 12-mu pore filters. Addition of monoclonal antibody against TGF-beta significantly reduced but did not abolish the chemotactic activity of GCTCM. Moreover, TGF-beta type II receptor mRNA has been demonstrated in the normal rat osteoclasts and may be involved in the chemotactic action of TGF-beta 1. We concluded that TGF-beta 1, possibly in concert with other cytokines, is involved in the recruitment of osteoclast-like cells in GCT by acting in an autocrine or paracrine fashion. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6

  19. Anti-Leishmania activity of essential oil of Myracrodruon urundeuva (Engl.) Fr. All.: Composition, cytotoxity and possible mechanisms of action.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, C E S; Sobrinho-Junior, E P C; Brito, L M; Nicolau, L A D; Carvalho, T P; Moura, A K S; Rodrigues, K A F; Carneiro, S M P; Arcanjo, D D R; Citó, A M G L; Carvalho, F A A

    2017-04-01

    Myracrodruon urundeuva (Engl.) Fr. All., commonly known as "aroeira-do-sertão", is a medicinal plant from Anacardiaceae family. In this study, the chemical composition of M. urundeuva essential oil (MuEO) was evaluated by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), as well as its anti-Leishmania potential, cytotoxicity, and macrophage activation capability as possible antiprotozoal mechanism of action were assessed. Fourteen compounds were identified, which constituted 94.87% of total oil composition. The most abundant components were monoterpenes (80.35%), with β-myrcene (42.46%), α-myrcene (37.23%), and caryophyllene (4.28%) as the major constituents. The MuEO inhibited the growth of promastigotes (IC50 205 ± 13.4 μg mL(-1)), axenic amastigotes (IC50 104.5 ± 11.82 μg mL(-1)) and decreased percentage of macrophage infection and number of amastigotes per macrophage (IC50 of 44.5 ± 4.37 μg⋅mL(-1)), suggesting significant anti-Leishmania activity. The cytotoxicity of MuEO was assessed by MTT test in Balb/c murine macrophages and by human erythrocytes lysis assay and low cytotoxicity for these cells was observed. The CC50 value against macrophages were 550 ± 29.21 μg mL(-1), while cytotoxicity for erythrocytes was around 20% at the highest concentration assessed, with HC50 > 800 μg mL(-1). While MuEO-induced anti-Leishmania activity is not mediated by increases in both lysosomal activity and nitric oxide production in macrophages, the results suggest the antiamastigote activity is associated with an immunomodulatory activity of macrophages due to an increase of phagocytic capability induced by MuEO. Thus, MuEO presented significant activity against Leishmania amazonensis, probably modulating the activation of macrophages, with low cytotoxicity to murine macrophages and human erythrocytes.

  20. Nicotine improves ethanol-induced impairment of memory: possible involvement of nitric oxide in the dorsal hippocampus of mice.

    PubMed

    Raoufi, N; Piri, M; Moshfegh, A; Shahin, M-S

    2012-09-06

    In the present study, the possible involvement of nitric oxide (NO) systems in the dorsal hippocampus in nicotine's effect on ethanol-induced amnesia and ethanol state-dependent memory was investigated. Adult male mice were cannulated in the CA1 regions of the dorsal hippocampus and trained on a passive avoidance learning task for memory assessment. We found that pre-training intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of ethanol (1 g/kg) decreased inhibitory avoidance memory when tested 24 h later. The response induced by pre-training ethanol was significantly reversed by pre-test administration of the drug. Similar to ethanol, pre-test administration of nicotine (0.4 and 0.8 μg/mouse, intra-CA1) alone and nicotine (0.2, 0.4 and 0.8 μg/mouse) plus an ineffective dose of ethanol also significantly reversed the amnesia induced by ethanol. Ethanol amnesia was also prevented by pre-test administration of L-arginine (1.2 μg/mouse, intra-CA1), a NO precursor. Interestingly, an ineffective dose of nicotine (0.2 μg/mouse) in combination with a low dose of L-arginine (0.8 μg/mouse) synergistically improved memory performance impaired by ethanol given before training. In contrast, pre-test intra-CA1 microinjection of L-NAME (NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester), a nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor (0.4 and 0.8 μg/mouse), which reduced memory retrieval in inhibitory avoidance task by itself, in combination with an effective dose of nicotine (0.4 μg/mouse) prevented the improving effect of nicotine on memory impaired by pre-training ethanol. Moreover, intra-CA1 microinjection of L-NAME reversed the L-arginine-induced potentiation of the nicotine response. The results suggest the importance of NO system(s) in the CA1 regions of the dorsal hippocampus for improving the effect of nicotine on the ethanol-induced amnesia.

  1. How do secretory products cross the plant cell wall to be released? A new hypothesis involving cyclic mechanical actions of the protoplast

    PubMed Central

    Paiva, Elder Antônio Sousa

    2016-01-01

    Background In plants, the products of secretory activity leave the protoplast and cross the plasma membrane by means of transporters, fusion with membranous vesicles or, less commonly, as result of disintegration of the cell. These mechanisms do not address an intriguing question: How do secretory products cross the cell wall? Furthermore, how do these substances reach the external surface of the plant body? Such diverse substances as oils, polysaccharides or nectar are forced to cross the cell wall and, in fact, do so. How are chemical materials that are repelled by the cell wall or that are sufficiently viscous to not cross passively released from plant cells? Scope and Conclusions I propose a cell-cycle model developed based on observations of different secreting systems, some unpublished results and an extensive literature review, aiming to understand the processes involved in both the secretory process and the release of secretion products. In the absence of facilitated diffusion, a mechanical action of the protoplast is necessary to ensure that some substances can cross the cell wall. The mechanical action of the protoplast, in the form of successive cycles of contraction and expansion, causes the material accumulated in the periplasmic space to cross the cell wall and the cuticle. This action is particularly relevant for the release of lipids, resins and highly viscous hydrophilic secretions. The proposed cell-cycle model and the statements regarding exudate release will also apply to secretory glands not elaborated upon here. Continuous secretion of several days, as observed in extrafloral nectaries, salt glands and some mucilage-producing glands, is only possible because the process is cyclical. PMID:26929201

  2. Frequency and topography in monkey electroencephalogram during action observation: possible neural correlates of the mirror neuron system

    PubMed Central

    Coudé, G.; Vanderwert, R. E.; Thorpe, S.; Festante, F.; Bimbi, M.; Fox, N. A.; Ferrari, P. F.

    2014-01-01

    The observation of actions executed by others results in desynchronization of electroencephalogram (EEG) in the alpha and beta frequency bands recorded from the central regions in humans. On the other hand, mirror neurons, which are thought to be responsible for this effect, have been studied only in macaque monkeys, using single-cell recordings. Here, as a first step in a research programme aimed at understanding the parallels between human and monkey mirror neuron systems (MNS), we recorded EEG from the scalp of two monkeys during action observation. The monkeys were trained to fixate on the face of a human agent and subsequently to fixate on a target upon which the agent performed a grasping action. We found that action observation produced desynchronization in the 19–25 Hz band that was strongest over anterior and central electrodes. These results are in line with human data showing that specific frequency bands within the power spectrum of the ongoing EEG may be modulated by observation of actions and therefore might be a specific marker of MNS activity. PMID:24778383

  3. Biphasic effects of baclofen on phrenic motoneurons: possible involvement of two types of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors.

    PubMed

    Lalley, P M

    1983-08-01

    Intravenous injections of baclofen have two general dose-dependent effects on phrenic motoneurons in anesthetized cats. Small doses (0.5-1.5 mg/kg) increase the frequency of action potentials recorded from single motoneurons and from the phrenic nerve, whereas large doses (2-10 mg/kg) reduce or abolish action potentials. The increase in frequency produced by small doses is accompanied by membrane depolarization and, in most experiments, by increased input resistance. Large doses hyperpolarize phrenic motoneurons and produce greater increases in input resistance. Extracellular recording during microelectrophoretic application of baclofen reveals only one effect, depression of cell firing, at all effective current strengths. The low dose stimulatory effect of i.v. baclofen is attributed to disinhibition, whereas the depression by large doses is attributed to disfacilitation. During incomplete inhibition by baclofen, CO2 administration further depresses phrenic nerve activity. Bicuculline (100-600 micrograms/kg i.v.) and picrotoxin (900 micrograms/kg i.v.) restore firing depressed by baclofen, whereas strychnine (80-1280 micrograms/kg) does not. 3-Aminopropanesulfonic acid (5-75 mg/kg i.v.) an agonist at gamma-aminobutyric acid-A receptor sites, depresses phrenic nerve activity. It is suggested that the low dose stimulatory effects are related to actions at gamma-aminobutyric acid-B receptors, whereas the high dose depressant effects are related, at least in part, to activation of gamma-aminobutyric acid-A receptors.

  4. Oral Efficacy of Apigenin against Cutaneous Leishmaniasis: Involvement of Reactive Oxygen Species and Autophagy as a Mechanism of Action

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca-Silva, Fernanda; Inacio, Job D. F.; Canto-Cavalheiro, Marilene M.; Menna-Barreto, Rubem F. S.; Almeida-Amaral, Elmo E.

    2016-01-01

    Background The treatment for leishmaniasis is currently based on pentavalent antimonials and amphotericin B; however, these drugs result in numerous adverse side effects. The lack of affordable therapy has necessitated the urgent development of new drugs that are efficacious, safe, and more accessible to patients. Natural products are a major source for the discovery of new and selective molecules for neglected diseases. In this paper, we evaluated the effect of apigenin on Leishmania amazonensis in vitro and in vivo and described the mechanism of action against intracellular amastigotes of L. amazonensis. Methodology/Principal Finding Apigenin reduced the infection index in a dose-dependent manner, with IC50 values of 4.3 μM and a selectivity index of 18.2. Apigenin induced ROS production in the L. amazonensis-infected macrophage, and the effects were reversed by NAC and GSH. Additionally, apigenin induced an increase in the number of macrophages autophagosomes after the infection, surrounding the parasitophorous vacuole, suggestive of the involvement of host autophagy probably due to ROS generation induced by apigenin. Furthermore, apigenin treatment was also effective in vivo, demonstrating oral bioavailability and reduced parasitic loads without altering serological toxicity markers. Conclusions/Significance In conclusion, our study suggests that apigenin exhibits leishmanicidal effects against L. amazonensis-infected macrophages. ROS production, as part of the mechanism of action, could occur through the increase in host autophagy and thereby promoting parasite death. Furthermore, our data suggest that apigenin is effective in the treatment of L. amazonensis-infected BALB/c mice by oral administration, without altering serological toxicity markers. The selective in vitro activity of apigenin, together with excellent theoretical predictions of oral availability, clear decreases in parasite load and lesion size, and no observed compromises to the overall health

  5. Mechanism of action of peptidoglycan O-acetyltransferase B involves a Ser-His-Asp catalytic triad.

    PubMed

    Moynihan, Patrick J; Clarke, Anthony J

    2014-10-07

    The O-acetylation of the essential cell wall polymer peptidoglycan is essential in many bacteria for their integrity and survival, and it is catalyzed by peptidoglycan O-acetlytransferase B (PatB). Using PatB from Neisseria gonorrhoeae as the model, we have shown previously that the enzyme has specificity for polymeric muropeptides that possess tri- and tetrapeptide stems and that rates of reaction increase with increasing degrees of polymerization. Here, we present the catalytic mechanism of action of PatB, the first to be described for an O-acetyltransferase of any bacterial exopolysaccharide. The influence of pH on PatB activity was investigated, and pKa values of 6.4-6.45 and 6.25-6.35 for the enzyme-substrate complex (kcat vs pH) and the free enzyme (kcat·KM(-1) vs pH), respectively, were determined for the respective cosubstrates. The enzyme is partially inactivated by sulfonyl fluorides but not by EDTA, suggesting the participation of a serine residue in its catalytic mechanism. Alignment of the known and hypothetical PatB amino acid sequences identified Ser133, Asp302, and His305 as three invariant amino acid residues that could potentially serve as a catalytic triad. Replacement of Asp302 with Ala resulted in an enzyme with less than 20% residual activity, whereas activity was barely detectable with (His305 → Ala)PatB and (Ser133 → Ala)PatB was totally inactive. The reaction intermediate of the transferase reaction involving acetyl- and propionyl-acyl donors was trapped on both the wild-type and (Asp302 → Ala) enzymes and LC-MS/MS analysis of tryptic peptides identified Ser133 as the catalytic nucleophile. A transacetylase mechanism is proposed based on the mechanism of action of serine esterases.

  6. 76 FR 24901 - Request for Input To Inform a Possible Surgeon General Action on Prescription Drug Abuse in Youth

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-03

    ... Action on Prescription Drug Abuse in Youth AGENCY: National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes...: The National Institute on Drug Abuse, a Research Institute of the National Institutes of Health, is... General response to the public health problem of prescription drug abuse among youth....

  7. Possible involvement of GABAergic mechanism in protective effect of melatonin against sleep deprivation-induced behaviour modification and oxidative damage in mice.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anil; Singh, Anant

    2009-08-01

    Sleep is an important physiological process responsible for the maintenance of physical, mental and emotional health of a living being. Sleep deprivation is considered risky for several pathological diseases such as anxiety and motor and cognitive dysfunctions. Sleep deprivation has recently been reported to cause oxidative damage. This study has been designed to explore the possible involvement of the GABAergic mechanism in protective effects of melatonin against 72-h sleep deprivation-induced behaviour modification and oxidative damage in mice. Mice were sleep-deprived for a period of 72 h using the grid over water suspended method. Animals were divided into groups of 6-8 animals each. Melatonin (5 and 10 mg/kg), flumazenil (0.5 mg/kg), picrotoxin (0.5 mg/kg) and muscimol (0.05 mg/kg) were administered for 5 days starting 2 days before 72-h sleep deprivation. Various behavioural tests (plus maze, zero maze, mirror chamber, actophotometer) and body weight assessment followed by oxidative stress parameters (malondialdehyde level, glutathione, catalase, nitrite and protein) were carried out. The 72-h sleep deprivation caused significant anxiety-like behaviour, weight loss, impaired locomotor activity and oxidative damage as compared with naïve (without sleep deprivation). Treatment with melatonin (5 mg/kg and 10 mg/kg, ip) significantly improved locomotor activity, weight loss and antianxiety effect as compared with control (sleep-deprived). Biochemically, melatonin treatment significantly restored reduced glutathione, catalase activity, attenuated lipid peroxidation and nitrite level as compared with control animals (72-h sleep-deprived). Flumazenil (0.5 mg/kg) and picrotoxin (0.5 mg/kg) pretreatments with a lower dose of melatonin (5 mg/kg) significantly antagonized the protective effect of melatonin. However, muscimol (0.05 mg/kg) pretreatment with melatonin (5 mg/kg, ip) potentiated the protective effect of melatonin which was significant as compared with their

  8. 7 CFR 799.10 - Criteria and identification of FSA actions as to degree of involvement under the NEPA process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... agencies to determine those typical classes of actions for treatment under NEPA. The typical classes of FSA actions for treatment under NEPA are set forth as follows: (1) Actions normally requiring an EIS are: (i) Production adjustment programs to balance supply and demand of specified commodities, through cropland...

  9. First intercomparison among laboratories involved in COST Action-TU1301 "NORM4Building": Determination of natural radionuclides in ceramics.

    PubMed

    Xhixha, Gerti; Trinidad, José Antonio; Gascó, Catalina; Mantovani, Fabio

    2017-03-01

    This work describes the outcomes of the COST Action-TU1301 "NORM4Building" intercomparison on the determination of natural radioactivity in ceramics. Twenty-two laboratories involved in the intercomparison are evaluated for their performance using robust statistics. The reference values of (226)Ra ((214)Bi and (214)Pb) are determined to be 122 ± 11 Bq kg(-1) and 124 ± 14 Bq kg(-1), respectively and in secular equilibrium in the uranium chain while the reference values of (232)Th ((228)Ac) is determined to be 61 ± 6 Bq kg(-1) and that of (40)K was determined to be 955 ± 40 Bq kg(-1). Although the aim of the exercise was to determine the activity concentration of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K and evaluation of the "Activity Concentration Index", laboratories were asked to report complete characterization of natural radionuclides. The results of this exercise pointed out a good performance among laboratories since the percentage of the acceptable results were above 90% for the radionuclides of interest. Based on these results, considering the systematic rejection of the results reported from a few laboratories we emphasize the need for quality control procedures.

  10. Vascular Endothelium-Dependent and Independent Actions of Oleanolic Acid and Its Synthetic Oleanane Derivatives as Possible Mechanisms for Hypotensive Effects

    PubMed Central

    Madlala, Hlengiwe P.; Metzinger, Thomas; van Heerden, Fanie R.; Mubagwa, Kanigula; Dessy, Chantal

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Plant-derived oleanolic acid (OA) and its related synthetic derivatives (Br-OA and Me-OA) possess antihypertensive effects in experimental animals. The present study investigated possible underlying mechanisms in rat isolated single ventricular myocytes and in vascular smooth muscles superfused at 37°C. Methods Cell shortening was assessed at 1 Hz using a video-based edge-detection system and the L-type Ca2+ current (ICaL) was measured using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique in single ventricular myocytes. Isometric tension was measured using force transducer in isolated aortic rings and in mesenteric arteries. Vascular effects were measured in endothelium-intact and denuded vessels in the presence of various enzyme or channel inhibitors. Results OA and its derivatives increased cell shortening in cardiomyocytes isolated from normotensive rats but had no effect in those isolated from hypertensive animals. These triterpenes also caused relaxation in aortic rings and in mesenteric arteries pre-contracted with either phenylephrine or KCl-enriched solution. The relaxation was only partially inhibited by endothelium denudation, and also partly inhibited by the cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitor indomethacin, with no additional inhibitory effect of the NO synthase inhibitor, N-ω-Nitro-L-arginine. A combination of both ATP-dependent channel inhibition by glibenclaminde and voltage-dependent K+ channel inhibition by 4-aminopyridine was necessary to fully inhibit the relaxation. Conclusion These data indicate that the effects of OA and its derivatives are mediated via both endothelium-dependent and independent mechanisms suggesting the involvement of COX in the endothelium-dependent effects and of vascular muscle K+ channels in the endothelium-independent effects. Finally, our results support the view that the antihypertensive action of OA and its derivatives is due to a decrease of vascular resistance with no negative inotropic effect on the heart. PMID:26799746

  11. Possible stakeholder concerns regarding volatile organic compound in arid soils integrated demonstration technologies not evaluated in the stakeholder involvement program

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, T.

    1995-12-01

    The Volatile Organic Compounds in Arid Soils Integrated Demonstration (VOC-Arid ID) supported the demonstration of a number of innovative technologies, not all of which were evaluated in the integrated demonstration`s stakeholder involvement program. These technologies have been organized into two categories and the first category ranked in order of priority according to interest in the evaluation of the technology. The purpose of this report is to present issues stakeholders would likely raise concerning each of the technologies in light of commentary, insights, data requirements, concerns, and recommendations offered during the VOC-Arid ID`s three-year stakeholder involvement, technology evaluation program. A secondary purpose is to provide a closeout status for each of the technologies associated with the VOC-Arid ID. This report concludes with a summary of concerns and requirements that stakeholders have for all innovative technologies.

  12. Comparing the sustainability of different action policy possibilities: application to the issue of both household survival and forest preservation in the corridor of Fianarantsoa.

    PubMed

    Bernard, C; Martin, S

    2013-10-01

    A sustainability issue for the rain forest in the corridor of Fianarantsoa (Madagascar) is to preserve the forest while ensuring the development of the local population. The aim of this paper is to determine whether the current situation is sustainable or not according to different action policy possibilities. We propose a general procedure based on viability analysis: Translation of sustainability issues into constraints on the system state; elaboration of a mathematical model of system evolution rules in the form of controlled dynamical system; computations of the viability kernels according to different action policy possibilities. Among control variables, we focus on monetary transfer. Without monetary transfer, we show that the current situation of the rain forest corridor is not sustainable in our mathematical modeling framework. We then estimate the minimal maximal amount per year necessary to make the current situation sustainable.

  13. Antibacterial Activities and Possible Modes of Action of Acacia nilotica (L.) Del. against Multidrug-Resistant Escherichia coli and Salmonella.

    PubMed

    Sadiq, Muhammad Bilal; Tarning, Joel; Aye Cho, Tay Zar; Anal, Anil Kumar

    2017-01-14

    Medicinal plants are frequently used for the treatment of various infectious diseases. The objective of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial activity and mode of action of Acacia nilotica and the antibiogram patterns of foodborne and clinical strains of Escherichia coli and Salmonella. The mechanism of action of acacia extracts against E. coli and Salmonella was elucidated by observing morphological damages including cell integrity and cell membrane permeability, as well as changes in cell structures and growth patterns in kill-time experiments. The clinical isolates of E. coli and Salmonella were found resistant to more of the tested antibiotics, compared to food isolates. Minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal concentration of acacia leaf extracts were in the ranges of 1.56-3.12 mg/mL and 3.12-6.25 mg/mL, respectively, whereas pods and bark extracts showed somewhat higher values of 3.12-6.25 mg/mL and 6.25-12.5 mg/mL, respectively, against all tested pathogens. The release of electrolytes and essential cellular constituents (proteins and nucleic acids) indicated that acacia extracts damaged the cellular membrane of the pathogens. These changes corresponded to simultaneous reduction in the growth of viable bacteria. This study indicates that A. nilotica can be a potential source of new antimicrobials, effective against antibiotic-resistant strains of pathogens.

  14. Combining sound science, legal action and stakeholder involvement to protect a vulnerable coastal aquifer on the island of St. Kitts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahely, H.; Nettles, S.; Burrowes, R.; Haas, G.

    2011-12-01

    Water resources in small island developing states (SIDS), especially those in the Caribbean are among the most vulnerable systems to human activities and climate change. This vulnerability is exacerbated by a fragmented approach to water resources management. The unconfined coastal aquifer underlying the Basseterre Valley is a significant asset for the people of St. Kitts-Nevis. The potable water extracted from this aquifer represents over 40% of the total water supply for St. Kitts. The area is subject to urban encroachment, inappropriate land use and threats from pollution. A project was implemented using an integrated approach to help government and communities take practical actions to protect this vulnerable aquifer by demonstrating proper management on three fronts: mitigation of threats from contaminants, protection of the aquifer and improved water resources management. The project is funded by the Global Environment Facility (GEF) as part of the Integrating Watershed and Coastal Areas Management (IWCAM) project for Caribbean Small Island States. A comprehensive hydrogeologic evaluation of the aquifer was undertaken in order to aid in the development of a water resources management strategy for the Basseterre Valley Aquifer. Multi-electrode electrical resistivity (MER), a novel surface geophysical technique, was used to delineate the thickness and distribution of sediments throughout the aquifer, zones of increased porosity, zones of possible contamination and the fresh/salt water interface. Together with slowly declining static water levels and elevated dissolved solids levels, the early stages of salt water intrusion have been documented. Groundwater modelling suggests that adjusting the pumping regime, redeveloping some of the existing wells and relocating other wells is a viable option for increasing efficiency and preventing long term dewatering. Overall, the study has provided a wealth of new information about the aquifer for a reasonable cost. A

  15. Polymorphisms in the interleukin-10 gene cluster are possibly involved in the increased risk for major depressive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Traks, Tanel; Koido, Kati; Eller, Triin; Maron, Eduard; Kingo, Külli; Vasar, Veiko; Vasar, Eero; Kõks, Sulev

    2008-01-01

    Background Innate immune inflammatory response is suggested to have a role in the pathogenesis of major depressive disorder (MDD). Interleukin (IL)-10 family cytokines IL-10, IL-19, IL-20, and IL-24 are all implicated in the inflammatory processes and polymorphisms in respective genes have been associated with various immunopathological conditions. This study was carried out to investigate whether single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in these genes are also associated with MDD. Methods Case-control association study was performed with seven SNPs from the IL10 gene cluster. 153 patients with MDD and 277 healthy control individuals were recruited. Results None of the selected SNPs were individually associated with MDD. The linkage disequilibrium (LD) analysis indicated the existence of two recombination sites in the IL10 gene cluster, thus confirming the formerly established LD pattern of this genomic region. This also created two haplotype blocks, both consisting of three SNPs. Additionally, the haplotype analysis detected a significantly higher frequency of block 2 (IL20 and IL24 genes) haplotype TGC in the patients group compared to healthy control individuals (P = 0.0097). Conclusion Our study established increased risk for MDD related to the IL20 and IL24 haplotype and suggests that cytokines may contribute to the pathogenesis of MDD. Since none of the block 2 SNPs were individually associated with MDD, it is possible that other polymorphisms linked to them contribute to the disease susceptibility. Future studies are needed to confirm the results and to find the possible functional explanation. PMID:19087313

  16. Sphingosine Kinase-1 Involves the Inhibitory Action of HIF-1α by Chlorogenic Acid in Hypoxic DU145 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Myoung-Sun; Lee, Seon-Ok; Kim, Kyu-Ri; Lee, Hyo-Jeong

    2017-01-01

    Hypoxia enhances cancer development in a solid tumor. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 α (HIF-1α) is a transcription factor that is dominantly expressed under hypoxia in solid tumor cells and is a key factor that regulates tumor. HIF-1α regulates several target genes involved in many aspects of cancer progression, including angiogenesis, metastasis, anti-apoptosis and cell proliferation as well as imparts resistance to cancer treatment. In this study, we assessed Crataegus Pinnatifida Bunge var. typical Schneider ethanol extract (CPE) for its anti-cancer effects in hypoxia-induced DU145 human prostate cancer cell line. CPE decreased the abundance of HIF-1α and sphingosine kinase-1 (SPHK-1) in hypoxia-induced prostate cancer DU145 cells. CPE decreased HIF-1α and SPHK-1 as well as SPHK-1 activity. Chlorogenic acid (CA) is one of four major compounds of CPE. Compared to CPE, CA significantly decreased the expression of HIF-1α and SPHK-1 as well as SPHK-1 activity in hypoxia-induced DU145 cells. Furthermore, CA decreased phosphorylation AKT and GSK-3β, which are associated with HIF-1α stabilization and affected SPHK-1 in a concentration-dependent manner. We confirmed the mechanism of CA-induced inhibition of HIF-1α by SPHK-1 signaling pathway using SPHK-1 siRNA and SPHK inhibitor (SKI). CA decreased the secretion and cellular expression of VEGF, thus inhibiting hypoxia-induced angiogenesis. Treatment of DU145cells with SPHK1 siRNA and CA for 48 h decreased cancer cell growth, and the inhibitory action of SPHK siRNA and CA on cell growth was confirmed by decrease in the abundance of Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). PMID:28165392

  17. 5-Hydroxytryptamine-induced tachycardia in the pig: possible involvement of a new type of 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Bom, A. H.; Duncker, D. J.; Saxena, P. R.; Verdouw, P. D.

    1988-01-01

    1. The mechanism of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)-induced tachycardia is species-dependent and is mediated directly or indirectly either by '5-HT1-like' (cat), 5-HT2 (rat, dog) or 5-HT3 (rabbit) receptors, or by an action similar to tyramine (guinea-pig). The present investigation is devoted to the analysis of the positive chronotropic effect of 5-HT in the pentobarbitone-anaesthetized pig. 2. Intravenous bolus injections of 5-HT (3, 10 and 30 micrograms kg-1) in pigs resulted in dose-dependent increases in heart rate of 24 +/- 2, 38 +/- 3 and 51 +/- 3 beats min-1, respectively (n = 39). Topical application of a high concentration of 5-HT (150 micrograms kg-1 in 5 ml) on the right atrium was also followed by tachycardia (38 +/- 6 beats min-1, n = 4). 3. A number of drugs which antagonize responses mediated by different 5-HT receptors--phenoxybenzamine, methiothepin, metergoline, methysergide and mesulergine ('5-HT1-like' and 5-HT2 receptors), ketanserin, cyproheptadine, pizotifen and mianserin (5-HT2 receptors), and MDL 72222 and ICS 205-930 (5-HT3 receptors)--did not attenuate the chronotropic responses to 5-HT. 4. The 5-HT-induced tachycardia was also not affected by antagonists at alpha- and beta-adrenoceptors, muscarinic, nicotinic, histamine and dopamine receptors, and calcium channels. 5. Selective inhibitors of 5-HT-uptake, indalpine and fluvoxamine, themselves increased porcine heart rate and facilitated 5-HT-induced tachycardia both in magnitude and in duration.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3370393

  18. Serotonin effects in the crab Neohelice granulata: Possible involvement of two types of receptors in peripheral tissues.

    PubMed

    Inohara, Elen Thegla Sander; Pinto, Charles Budazewsky; Model, Jorge Felipe Argenta; Trapp, Márcia; Kucharski, Luiz Carlos; Da Silva, Roselis Silveira Martins; Vinagre, Anapaula Sommer

    2015-07-01

    In crustaceans, serotonin (5-HT) controls various physiological processes, such as hormonal secretion, color changes, reproduction, and metabolism. Since 5-HT injections cause hyperglycemia, this study was designed to further investigate this action of 5-HT in the crab Neohelice granulate, fed with a high-carbohydrate (HC) or a high-protein (HP) diet. The effects of pre-treatment with mammalian 5-HT receptor antagonists, cyproheptadine and methiothepin, were also investigated. A series of in vivo experiments with (3)H-5-HT was carried out in order to investigate the presence of putative receptors in peripheral tissues. Since gills were the tissue with the highest labeling in in vivo experiments, in vitro studies with isolated anterior and posterior gills were also conducted. Cyproheptadine blocked the hyperglycemic effect of 5-HT in HP-fed crabs. Methiothepin reduced glycogen levels in the anterior gills of HP crabs and partially blocked the 5-HT-like posture. The injection of (3)H-5-HT identified specific binding sites in all the tissues studied and revealed that the binding can be influenced by the type of diet administered to the crabs. Incubation of the anterior and posterior gills with (3)H-5-HT and 5-HT confirmed the specificity of the binding sites. Both antagonists inhibited (3)H-5-HT binding. In conclusion, this study highlights the importance of serotonin in the control of glucose homeostasis in crustaceans and provides evidences of at least two types of 5-HT binding sites in peripheral tissues. Further studies are necessary to identify the structure of these receptors and their signaling pathways.

  19. Structure of lpg0406, a carboxymuconolactone decarboxylase family protein possibly involved in antioxidative response from Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaofang; Hu, Yanjin; Yang, Bo; Gong, Xiaojian; Zhang, Nannan; Niu, Liwen; Wu, Yun; Ge, Honghua

    2015-12-01

    Lpg0406, a hypothetical protein from Legionella pneumophila, belongs to carboxymuconolactone decarboxylase (CMD) family. We determined the crystal structure of lpg0406 both in its apo and reduced form. The structures reveal that lpg0406 forms a hexamer and have disulfide exchange properties. The protein has an all-helical fold with a conserved thioredoxin-like active site CXXC motif and a proton relay system similar to that of alkylhydroperoxidase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtAhpD), suggesting that lpg0406 might function as an enzyme with peroxidase activity and involved in antioxidant defense. A comparison of the size and the surface topology of the putative substrate-binding region between lpg0406 and MtAhpD indicates that the two enzymes accommodate the different substrate preferences. The structural findings will enhance understanding of the CMD family protein structure and its various functions.

  20. Possible involvement of ERK 1/2 in UVA-induced melanogenesis in cultured normal human epidermal melanocytes.

    PubMed

    Yanase, H; Ando, H; Horikawa, M; Watanabe, M; Mori, T; Matsuda, N

    2001-04-01

    UV-induced melanogenesis is a well known physiological response of human skin exposed to solar radiation; however, the signaling molecules involved in the stimulation of melanogenesis in melanocytes following UV exposure remain unclear. In this study we induced melanogenesis in vitro in normal human epidermal melanocytes using a single irradiation with UVA at 1 kJ/m2 and examined the potential involvement of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) as UVA-responsive signaling molecules in those cells. UVA irradiation did not affect the proliferation of melanocytes, but it did increase tyrosinase mRNA expression, which reached a maximum level 4 hr after UVA irradiation. The amount of tyrosinase protein, as quantitated by immunoblotting, was also increased at 24 hr following UVA irradiation. Among the MAPK examined, extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK) 1/2 was phosphorylated within 15 min of UVA irradiation, but no such phosphorylation was observed for c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK) or p38. Accordingly, the activity of ERK1/2 was also increased shortly after UVA irradiation. These responses of ERK1/2 to UVA irradiation were markedly inhibited when cells were pre-treated with N-acetyl-L-cysteine, an antioxidant, or with suramin, a tyrosine kinase receptor inhibitor. The formation of (6-4)photoproducts or cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers was not detected in cellular DNA after UVA irradiation. These findings suggest that a single UVA irradiation-induced melanogenesis is associated with the activation of ERK1/2 by upstream signals that originate from reactive oxygen species or from activated tyrosine kinase receptors, but not from damaged DNA.

  1. An aqueous extract of Curcuma longa (turmeric) rhizomes stimulates insulin release and mimics insulin action on tissues involved in glucose homeostasis in vitro.

    PubMed

    Mohankumar, Sureshkumar; McFarlane, James R

    2011-03-01

    Curcuma longa (turmeric) has been used widely as a spice, particularly in Asian countries. It is also used in the Ayurvedic system of medicine as an antiinflammatory and antimicrobial agent and for numerous other curative properties. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of an aqueous extract of Curcuma longa (AEC) on tissues involved in glucose homeostasis. The extract was prepared by soaking 100 g of ground turmeric in 1 L of water, which was filtered and stored at -20°C prior to use. Pancreas and muscle tissues of adult mice were cultured in DMEM with 5 or 12 mmol/L glucose and varying doses of extract. The AEC stimulated insulin secretion from mouse pancreatic tissues under both basal and hyperglycaemic conditions, although the maximum effect was only 68% of that of tolbutamide. The AEC induced stepwise stimulation of glucose uptake from abdominal muscle tissues in the presence and absence of insulin, and the combination of AEC and insulin significantly potentiated the glucose uptake into abdominal muscle tissue. However, this effect was attenuated by wortmannin, suggesting that AEC possibly acts via the insulin-mediated glucose uptake pathway. In summary, water soluble compounds of turmeric exhibit insulin releasing and mimicking actions within in vitro tissue culture conditions.

  2. Inhibitory effect of tamoxifen on diethylstilbestrol-promoted hepatic tumorigenesis in male rats and its possible mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Kohigashi, K; Fukuda, Y; Imura, H

    1988-12-01

    Male Sprague-Dawley rats were given a single intraperitoneal injection of diethylnitrosamine (DEN, 200 mg/kg body weight). Two weeks later the rats were divided into 4 groups; DEN-C group rats were given no further treatment; DEN-DES group rats were fed diethylstilbestrol (DES, 0.5 mg/day); DEN-TMX group rats were given tamoxifen (TMX, 1.0 mg/day) orally; DEN-DES TMX group rats were fed both DES and TMX for 8 months. Rats of the DEN-DES group developed grossly visible hepatic tumors. On the other hand, tumor development was significantly inhibited in rats of the DEN-DES TMX group. Total area of gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase-positive lesions and the mean area per lesion were significantly larger in rats of the DEN-DES group than those of the DEN-C, DEN-TMX or DEN-DES-TMX group. Estrogen receptor (ER) content of liver cytosol assayed by enzyme immunoassay (EIA) was significantly greater in rats of the DEN-DES group than in those of the DEN-C group and smaller in rats of the DEN-TMX and DEN-DES TMX group than in the DEN-C group. On the contrary, ER content of liver nuclei was significantly greater in rats of the DEN-TMX and DEN-DES TMX group than in those of the DEN-C or DEN-DES group. These results suggest that the promotive action of DES and the inhibitory action of TMX on DES-promoted hepatic tumorigenesis are, at least in part, mediated by ER in the rat.

  3. Establishment of an ovarian metastasis model and possible involvement of E-cadherin down-regulation in the metastasis.

    PubMed

    Kuwabara, Yoshiko; Yamada, Taketo; Yamazaki, Ken; Du, Wen-Lin; Banno, Kouji; Aoki, Daisuke; Sakamoto, Michiie

    2008-10-01

    Clinical observations of cases of ovarian metastasis suggest that there may be a unique mechanism underlying ovarian-specific metastasis. This study was undertaken to establish an in vivo model of metastasis to the ovary, and to investigate the mechanism of ovarian-specific metastasis. We examined the capacity for ovarian metastasis in eight different human carcinoma cell lines by implantation in female NOD/SCID mice transvenously and intraperitoneally. By transvenous inoculation, only RERF-LC-AI, a poorly differentiated carcinoma cell line, frequently demonstrated ovarian metastasis. By intraperitoneal inoculation, four of the eight cell lines (HGC27, MKN-45, KATO-III, and RERF-LC-AI) metastasized to the ovary. We compared E-cadherin expression among ovarian metastatic cell lines and others. All of these four ovarian metastatic cell lines and HSKTC, a Krukenberg tumor cell line, showed E-cadherin down-regulation and others did not. E-cadherin was then forcibly expressed in RERF-LC-AI, and inhibited ovarian metastasis completely. The capacity for metastasizing to the other organs was not affected by E-cadherin expression. We also performed histological investigation of clinical ovarian-metastatic tumor cases. About half of all ovarian-metastatic tumor cases showed loss or reduction of E-cadherin expression. These data suggest that E-cadherin down-regulation may be involved in ovarian-specific metastasis.

  4. The antidepressant-like effect of bacopaside I: possible involvement of the oxidative stress system and the noradrenergic system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaojun; Liu, Fang; Yue, Rongcai; Li, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Jigang; Wang, Shuping; Zhang, Shoude; Wang, Rui; Shan, Lei; Zhang, Weidong

    2013-09-01

    In the present study, the antidepressant-like effect of bacopaside I, a saponin compound present in the Bacopa monniera plant, was evaluated by behavioral and neurochemical methods. Bacopaside I (50, 15 and 5 mg/kg) was given to mice via oral gavage for 7 successive days. The treatment significantly decreased the immobility time in mouse models of despair tests, but it did not influence locomotor activity. Neurochemical assays suggested that treatment by bacopaside I (50, 15 and 5 mg/kg) improved brain antioxidant activity to varying degrees after the behavioral despair test. Bacopaside I (15 and 5 mg/kg) significantly reversed reserpine-induced depressive-like behaviors, including low temperature and ptosis. Conversely, bacopaside I did not affect either brain MAO-A or MAO-B activity after the behavioral despair test in mice. Additionally, 5-hydroxytryptophan (a precursor of 5-serotonin) was not involved in the antidepressant-like effect of bacopaside I. These findings indicated that the antidepressant-like effect of bacopaside I might be related to both antioxidant activation and noradrenergic activation, although the exact mechanism remains to be further elucidated.

  5. Increased non-rapid eye movement sleep by cocaine withdrawal: possible involvement of A2A receptors.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shu-Long; Han, Jin-Yi; Kim, Yun-Bae; Nam, Sang-Yoon; Song, Sukgil; Hong, Jin Tae; Oh, Ki-Wan

    2011-02-01

    This study attempted to clarify whether cocaine withdrawal altered sleep architecture and the role of adenosine receptors in this process. Cocaine (20 mg/kg) was administered subcutaneously once per day for 7 days to rat implanted with sleep/wake recording electrode. Polygraphic signs of undisturbed sleep/wake activities were recorded for 24 h before cocaine administration (basal recording as control); withdrawal-day 1 (after 1 day of repeated cocaine administration), withdrawal-day 8 (after 8 days of repeated cocaine administration), and withdrawal-day 14 (after 14 days of repeated cocaine administration), respectively. On cocaine withdrawal-day 1, wakefulness was significantly increased, total sleep was decreased, non-rapid eye movement sleep was markedly reduced, and rapid eye movement sleep was enhanced. Sleep/wake cycles were also increased on cocaine withdrawal day 1. However, non-rapid eye movement sleep was increased on withdrawal-day 8 and 14, whereas rapid eye movement sleep was decreased and no significant changes were observed in the total sleep and sleep/wake cycles during these periods. Adenosine A(2A) receptors expression was increased on withdrawal-day 8 and 14, whereas A(1) receptors levels were reduced after 14 days of withdrawal and the A(2B) receptors remained unchanged. Our findings suggest that alterations of sleep and sleep architecture during cocaine subacute and subchronic withdrawals after repeated cocaine administration may be partially involved in A(2A) receptors over-expression in the rat hypothalamus.

  6. Sucrose transport and phloem unloading in stem of Vicia faba: possible involvement of a sucrose carrier and osmotic regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Aloni, B.; Wyse, R.E.; Griffith, S.

    1986-06-01

    After pulse labeling of a source leaf with /sup 14/CO/sub 2/, stem sections of Vicia faba plants were cut and the efflux characteristics of /sup 14/C-labeled sugars into various buffered solutions were determined. Radiolabeled sucrose was shown to remain localized in the phloem and adjacent phloem parenchyma tissues after a 2-hour chase. Therefore, sucrose leakage from stem segments prepared following a 75-minute chase period was assumed to be characteristic of phloem unloading. The efflux of /sup 14/C assimilates from the phloem was enhanced by 1 millimolar p-chloromercuribenzene sulfonic acid (PCMBS) and by 5 micromolar carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenly hydrazone (CCCP). However, PCMBS inhibited and CCCP enhanced general leakage of nonradioactive sugars from the stem segments. Sucrose at concentrations of 50 millimolar in the free space increased efflux of (/sup 14/C)sucrose, presumably through an exchange mechanism. This exchange was inhibited by PCMBS and abolished by 0.2 molar mannitol. Increasing the osmotic concentration of the efflux medium with mannitol reduced (/sup 14/C)sucrose efflux. However, this inhibition seems not to be specific to sucrose unloading since leakage of total sugars, nonlabeled sucrose, glucose, and amino acids from the bulk of the tissue was reduced in a similar manner. The data suggest that phloem unloading in cut stem segments is consistent with passive efflux of sucrose from the phloem to the apoplast and that sucrose exchange via a membrane carrier may be involved.

  7. Possible Involvement of TLRs and Hemichannels in Stress-Induced CNS Dysfunction via Mastocytes, and Glia Activation

    PubMed Central

    Aguirre, Adam; Maturana, Carola J.; Harcha, Paloma A.; Sáez, Juan C.

    2013-01-01

    In the central nervous system (CNS), mastocytes and glial cells (microglia, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes) function as sensors of neuroinflammatory conditions, responding to stress triggers or becoming sensitized to subsequent proinflammatory challenges. The corticotropin-releasing hormone and glucocorticoids are critical players in stress-induced mastocyte degranulation and potentiation of glial inflammatory responses, respectively. Mastocytes and glial cells express different toll-like receptor (TLR) family members, and their activation via proinflammatory molecules can increase the expression of connexin hemichannels and pannexin channels in glial cells. These membrane pores are oligohexamers of the corresponding protein subunits located in the cell surface. They allow ATP release and Ca2+ influx, which are two important elements of inflammation. Consequently, activated microglia and astrocytes release ATP and glutamate, affecting myelinization, neuronal development, and survival. Binding of ligands to TLRs induces a cascade of intracellular events leading to activation of several transcription factors that regulate the expression of many genes involved in inflammation. During pregnancy, the previous responses promoted by viral infections and other proinflammatory conditions are common and might predispose the offspring to develop psychiatric disorders and neurological diseases. Such disorders could eventually be potentiated by stress and might be part of the etiopathogenesis of CNS dysfunctions including autism spectrum disorders and schizophrenia. PMID:23935250

  8. 5-HT7 receptor-mediated fear conditioning and possible involvement of extracellular signal-regulated kinase.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Kotaro; Tsuji, Minoru; Miyagawa, Kazuya; Takeda, Hiroshi

    2017-01-18

    Fear conditioning is a valuable behavioral paradigm for studying the neural basis of emotional learning and memory. The present study examined the involvement of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK) signaling on the serotonin (5-HT)7 receptor-mediated fear conditioning. Conditioning was performed in a trial in which a tone was followed by an electrical foot-shock. Context- and tone-dependent fear were examined in tests conducted 24 and 48h after conditioning, respectively. The selective 5-HT7 receptor antagonist 2a-[4-(4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridyl)butyl]-2a,3,4,-tetrahydrobenzo(c,d)indol-2-(1H)-one (DR4004) (5mg/kg), when administered intraperitoneally (i.p.) immediately after conditioning, caused a significant decrease in both context- and tone-dependent fear responses (freezing behavior). A significant increase in ERK activity was observed in the amygdala of mice that displayed context- or tone-dependent fear responses, and these changes were also inhibited by the administration of DR4004 (5mg/kg, i.p.) immediately after conditioning. In contrast, the increase in hippocampal ERK activity in mice that displayed context-dependent fear responses was further enhanced by the administration of DR4004 (5mg/kg, i.p.). These results suggest that 5-HT7 receptor-mediated ERK signaling may play a significant role in the processes of emotional learning and memory.

  9. Brain iron accumulation in unexplained fetal and infant death victims with smoker mothers-The possible involvement of maternal methemoglobinemia

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Iron is involved in important vital functions as an essential component of the oxygen-transporting heme mechanism. In this study we aimed to evaluate whether oxidative metabolites from maternal cigarette smoke could affect iron homeostasis in the brain of victims of sudden unexplained fetal and infant death, maybe through the induction of maternal hemoglobin damage, such as in case of methemoglobinemia. Methods Histochemical investigations by Prussian blue reaction were made on brain nonheme ferric iron deposits, gaining detailed data on their localization in the brainstem and cerebellum of victims of sudden death and controls. The Gless and Marsland's modification of Bielschowsky's was used to identify neuronal cell bodies and neurofilaments. Results Our approach highlighted accumulations of blue granulations, indicative of iron positive reactions, in the brainstem and cerebellum of 33% of victims of sudden death and in none of the control group. The modified Bielschowsky's method confirmed that the cells with iron accumulations were neuronal cells. Conclusions We propose that the free iron deposition in the brain of sudden fetal and infant death victims could be a catabolic product of maternal methemoglobinemia, a biomarker of oxidative stress likely due to nicotine absorption. PMID:21733167

  10. Hydroalcoholic extract of needles of Pinus eldarica enhances pentobarbital-induced sleep: possible involvement of GABAergic system

    PubMed Central

    Forouzanfar, Fatemeh; Ghorbani, Ahmad; Hosseini, Mahmoud; Rakhshandeh, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Insomnia is accompanied by several health complications and the currently used soporific drugs can induce several side effects such as psychomotor impairment, amnesia, and tolerance. The present study was planned to investigate the sleep prolonging effect of Pinus eldarica. Materials and Methods: Hydroalcoholic extract (HAE) of P. eldarica, its water fraction (WF), ethyl acetate fraction (EAF) and n-butanol fraction (NBF) were injected (intraperitoneally) to mice 30 min before administration of pentobarbital. Then, the latent period and continuous sleeping time were recorded. Also, LD50 of P. eldarica extract was determined and the possible neurotoxicity of the extract was tested on neural PC12 cells. Results: The HAE and NBF decreased the latency of sleep (p<0.05) and significantly increased duration of sleep (p<0.05) induced by pentobarbital. These effects of P. eldarica were reversed by flumazenil. The LD50 value for HAE was found to be 4.8 g/Kg. HAE and its fractions did not show neurotoxic effects in cultured PC12-cell line. Conclusion: The present data indicate that P. eldarica potentiated pentobarbital hypnosis without major toxic effect. Most probably, the main components responsible for this effect are non-polar agents which are found in NBF of this plant. PMID:27516986

  11. Possible Involvement of Avoidant Attachment Style in the Relations Between Adult IBS and Reported Separation Anxiety in Childhood.

    PubMed

    Ben-Israel, Yuval; Shadach, Eran; Levy, Sigal; Sperber, Ami; Aizenberg, Dov; Niv, Yaron; Dickman, Ram

    2016-12-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) in adults as well as separation anxiety disorder (SAD) and recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) in childhood are associated with anxiety and somatization. Our aim was to examine possible associations between IBS in adulthood and SAD in childhood. Patients with IBS and healthy subjects completed a demographic questionnaire, the Separation Anxiety Symptom Inventory (SASI), the Somatization Subscale of Symptom Checklist-90-R (SCL-90-R), the Attachment Style Questionnaire, and a retrospective self-report questionnaire regarding RAP. Compared with controls, patients with IBS were characterized by an avoidant attachment style and scored higher on the SCL-90-R scale regarding the tendency to somatization (25.35 ± 7.47 versus16.50 ± 4.40, p < 0.001). More patients with IBS (25% versus 7.5%) reported RAP in childhood, but contrary to prediction, also had significantly lower SASI scores. Adults with IBS were characterized by somatization, insecure attachment style and recalled higher rates of RAP and surprisingly less symptoms of SAD in childhood. Based on these results, an etiological model for IBS is suggested, in which an avoidant attachment style and a tendency to somatization play an important role in the development of IBS. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Possible involvement of β₁ receptors in various emetogen-induced increases in salivary amylase activity in rats.

    PubMed

    Fukui, Hideo; Suyama, Yoshimi; Iwachido, Takako; Miwa, Eri

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the inhibitory effects of β₁- or β₂-adrenoceptor (AR) antagonists on salivary amylase secretion produced by various emetic agents, such as cisplatin, apomorphine, and lithium chloride (LiCl), or the non-emetic agent β(½)-AR agonist isoprenaline in rats. We also determined the inhibitory effect of metoclopramide, a dopamine D₂-receptor antagonist, on increases in the salivary amylase activity induced by apomorphine or granisetron, a 5-HT(3)-receptor antagonist, on LiCl-induced increased salivary amylase activity. Isoprenaline (0.01 mg/kg, s.c.) produced an increase in salivary amylase and the increase was inhibited by the β(½)-AR antagonist propranolol (5 mg/kg, s.c.) and β₁-AR antagonist atenolol (2 mg/kg, s.c.) but not by the β₂-AR antagonist butoxamine (8 mg/kg, s.c.). The increased amylase activity induced by cisplatin (15 mg/kg, i.v.), apomorphine (3 mg/kg, s.c.), or LiCl (120 mg/kg, i.p.) was inhibited significantly by atenolol (2 mg/kg, s.c.) but not by butoxamine (8 mg/kg, s.c.). In addition, increases in amylase activities induced by apomorphine and LiCl were inhibited significantly by metoclopramide (10 mg/kg, i.v.) and granisetron (3 mg/kg, i.v.), respectively. These results suggest that salivary amylase secretion induced by various emetogens is involved in β₁-adrenoceptor activity and that salivary amylase activity is useful to detect emetogens with no direct β₁-AR activation in rats, a species that does not exhibit vomiting.

  13. Possible involvement of Helios in controlling the immature B cell functions via transcriptional regulation of protein kinase Cs.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Hidehiko; Nakayama, Masami; Takami, Yasunari; Kuribayashi, Futoshi; Nakayama, Tatsuo

    2011-01-01

    The transcription factor Ikaros family consists of five zinc-finger proteins: Ikaros, Aiolos, Helios, Eos and Pegasus; these proteins except Pegasus are essential for development and differentiation of lymphocytes. However, in B lymphocytes, the physiological role of Helios remains to be elucidated yet, because its expression level is very low. Here, we generated the Helios-deficient DT40 cells, Helios (-/-), and showed that the Helios-deficiency caused significant increases in transcriptions of four protein kinase Cs (PKCs); PKC-δ, PKC-ε, PKC-η and PKC-ζ, whereas their expressions were drastically down-regulated in the Aiolos-deficient DT40 cells, Aiolos (-/-). In addition, Helios (-/-) was remarkably resistant against phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)/ionomycin treatment, which mimics the B cell receptor (BCR)-mediated stimulation. In the presence of PMA/ionomycin, their viability was remarkably higher than that of DT40, and their DNA fragmentation was less severe than that of DT40 in the opposite manner for the Aiolos-deficiency. The resistance against the PMA/ionomycin-induced apoptosis of Helios (-/-) was sensitive to Rottlerin but not to Go6976. In addition, the Helios-deficiency caused remarkable up-regulation of the Rottlerin-sensitive superoxide (O2 (-))-generating activity. These data suggest that Helios may contribute to the regulation of the BCR-mediated apoptosis and O2 (-)-generating activity, via transcriptional regulation of these four PKCs (especially PKC-δ) in immature B lymphocytes. Together with previous data, our findings may significantly help in the understanding of the B lymphocyte-specific expressions of PKC genes and molecular mechanisms of both the BCR-mediated apoptosis involved in negative selection and the O2 (-)-generating system in immature B lymphocytes.

  14. Production of Macrophage Inhibitory Factor (MIF) by Primary Sertoli Cells; its Possible Involvement in Migration of Spermatogonial Cells.

    PubMed

    Huleihel, M; Abofoul-Azab, M; Abarbanel, Y; Einav, I; Levitas, E; Lunenfeld, E

    2016-12-07

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a multifunctional molecule. MIF was originally identified as a T-cell-derived factor responsible for the inhibition of macrophage migration. In testicular tissue of adult rats, MIF is constitutively expressed by Leydig cells under physiological conditions. The aim of this study was to examine MIF levels in testicular homogenates from different aged mice, and the capacity of Sertoli cells to produce it. We also examined MIF involvement in spermatogonial cell migration. Similar levels of MIF protein were detected in testicular homogenates of mice of different ages (1-8 weeks-old). However, the RNA expression levels of MIF were high in 1-week-old mice and significantly decreased with age compared to 1-week-old mice. MIF was stained in Sertoli, Leydig cells and developed germ cells in the seminiferous tubules. Isolated Sertoli cells from 1 week-old mice stained to MIF. Cultures of Sertoli cells from 1-week-old mice produced and expressed high levels of MIF which significantly decreased with age. MIF was localized in the cytoplasm and nucleus of Sertoli cell cultures isolated from 1-weeks-old mice; however it was localized only in the cytoplasm and branches of cultures isolated from 8-week-old mice. MIFR was detected in GFRα1 and Sertoli cells. MIF could induce migration of spermatogonial cells, and this effect was synergistic with glial cell-line neurotrophic factor. Our results show, for the first time, the capacity of Sertoli cells to produce MIF under normal conditions and that MIFR expressed in GFRα1 and Sertoli cells. We also showed that MIF induced spermatogonial cell migration. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  15. Sexually mature European eels (Anguilla anguilla L.) stimulate gonadal development of neighbouring males: possible involvement of chemical communication.

    PubMed

    Huertas, Mar; Scott, Alexander P; Hubbard, Peter C; Canário, Adelino V M; Cerdà, Joan

    2006-07-01

    This study was aimed to investigate whether sexual maturation of immature male eels could be stimulated indirectly by placing them in contact with either male (Minj) or female (Finj) eels in which sexual maturation had been stimulated directly by weekly injections of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) or salmon pituitary extract (SPE), respectively. Untreated males were placed either in the same tank or in a separate tank that was linked to the injected fish via a recirculation system. The hormonal treatments stimulated spermatogenesis and spermiation in Minj, and ovulation in Finj as well as an increase of the ocular (Io) and gonadosomatic (GSI) indices in both sexes. Plasma levels of testosterone (T) and 11-ketotestosterone (11-KT) increased in Minj and T and 17beta-estradiol (E2) in Finj. A small peak of plasma 17,20beta-dihydroxypregn-4-en-3-one (17,20betaP) occurred during ovulation, while the plasma levels of 17alpha-hydroxypregn-4-ene-3,20-dione (17P) were undetectable in both males and females. The water conditioned by Minj and Finj induced significant, though relatively minor, increases in Io and GSI in uninjected males. In addition, uninjected fish showed small changes in plasma T and 11-KT levels, apparently related to the timing of spermiation and ovulation of Minj and Finj, respectively, as well as an activation of spermatogenesis (but not spermiation). Injected fish released free and conjugated T, 11-KT and E2 into the water, although immature eels were unable to smell (by electro-olfactogram) any of these steroids or prostaglandin F2alpha. However, immature males were highly sensitive to water extracts conditioned by spermiating Minj and pre-ovulatory and ovulated Finj. These preliminary results suggest the existence of chemical communication between maturing eels and immature males that stimulates gonad development, although the putative pheromone(s) involved has/have not yet been identified.

  16. The Apparent Involvement of ANMEs in Mineral Dependent Methane Oxidation, as an Analog for Possible Martian Methanotrophy

    PubMed Central

    House, Christopher H.; Beal, Emily J.; Orphan, Victoria J.

    2011-01-01

    On Earth, marine anaerobic methane oxidation (AOM) can be driven by the microbial reduction of sulfate, iron, and manganese. Here, we have further characterized marine sediment incubations to determine if the mineral dependent methane oxidation involves similar microorganisms to those found for sulfate-dependent methane oxidation. Through FISH and FISH-SIMS analyses using 13C and 15N labeled substrates, we find that the most active cells during manganese dependent AOM are primarily mixed and mixed-cluster aggregates of archaea and bacteria. Overall, our control experiment using sulfate showed two active bacterial clusters, two active shell aggregates, one active mixed aggregate, and an active archaeal sarcina, the last of which appeared to take up methane in the absence of a closely-associated bacterial partner. A single example of a shell aggregate appeared to be active in the manganese incubation, along with three mixed aggregates and an archaeal sarcina. These results suggest that the microorganisms (e.g., ANME-2) found active in the manganese-dependent incubations are likely capable of sulfate-dependent AOM. Similar metabolic flexibility for Martian methanotrophs would mean that the same microbial groups could inhabit a diverse set of Martian mineralogical crustal environments. The recently discovered seasonal Martian plumes of methane outgassing could be coupled to the reduction of abundant surface sulfates and extensive metal oxides, providing a feasible metabolism for present and past Mars. In an optimistic scenario Martian methanotrophy consumes much of the periodic methane released supporting on the order of 10,000 microbial cells per cm2 of Martian surface. Alternatively, most of the methane released each year could be oxidized through an abiotic process requiring biological methane oxidation to be more limited. If under this scenario, 1% of this methane flux were oxidized by biology in surface soils or in subsurface aquifers (prior to release), a total

  17. Possible involvement of TRPV1 and TRPV4 in nociceptive stimulation- induced nocifensive behavior and neuroendocrine response in mice.

    PubMed

    Ishikura, Toru; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Shoguchi, Kanako; Koreeda, Yuki; Aritomi, Takafumi; Matsuura, Takanori; Yoshimura, Mitsuhiro; Ohkubo, Jun-ichi; Maruyama, Takashi; Kawasaki, Makoto; Ohnishi, Hideo; Sakai, Akinori; Mizuno, Atsuko; Suzuki, Makoto; Ueta, Yoichi

    2015-09-01

    Members of the transient receptor potential (TRP) family of ion channels play important roles in inflammation and pain. Here, we showed that both TRPV1 and TRPV4 might contribute to biphasic nocifensive behavior and neuroendocrine response following a formalin test. We subcutaneously injected saline, formalin, or the TRPV4 agonist, 4α-phorbol 12,13-didecanoate (4α-PDD) into one hindpaw of wild-type (WT), TRPV1-deficient (Trpv1(-/-)), and TRPV4-deficient (Trpv4(-/-)) mice to investigate nocifensive behaviors (phase I [0-10 min] and phase II [10-60 min]) and Fos expression in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord and other brain regions related to pain, in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN), paraventricular nucleus of the thalamus, the medial habenular nucleus, the medial nucleus of the amygdala and capsular part of the central amygdala. Subcutaneous (s.c.) injection of formalin caused less nocifensive behavior in Trpv1(-/-) and Trpv4(-/-) mice than in WT mice during phase I. In phase II, however, formalin induced less nocifensive behavior only in the Trpv1(-/-) mice, but not in the Trpv4(-/-) mice, relative to WT mice. The number of Fos-like immunoreactive (LI) neurons in laminae I-II of the dorsal horn increased in all types of mice 90 min after s.c. injection of formalin; however, there was no difference in the other regions between saline- and formalin-treated mice. Furthermore, s.c. injection of 4α-PDD did not induce nociceptive behavior nor influence the number of Fos-LI neurons in the all above mentioned regions in any of the mice. These results suggest that TRPV4-mediated nociceptive information from the peripheral tissue excluding the spinal pathway might be involved the formalin behavioral response during phase I. Only TRPV1 might regulate the formalin behavioral response in peripheral neuron.

  18. Hydroxy-α sanshool induces colonic motor activity in rat proximal colon: a possible involvement of KCNK9

    PubMed Central

    Kubota, Kunitsugu; Ohtake, Nobuhiro; Ohbuchi, Katsuya; Mase, Akihito; Imamura, Sachiko; Sudo, Yuka; Miyano, Kanako; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Kono, Toru

    2015-01-01

    Various colonic motor activities are thought to mediate propulsion and mixing/absorption of colonic content. The Japanese traditional medicine daikenchuto (TU-100), which is widely used for postoperative ileus in Japan, accelerates colonic emptying in healthy humans. Hydroxy-α sanshool (HAS), a readily absorbable active ingredient of TU-100 and a KCNK3/KCNK9/KCNK18 blocker as well as TRPV1/TRPA1 agonist, has been investigated for its effects on colonic motility. Motility was evaluated by intraluminal pressure and video imaging of rat proximal colons in an organ bath. Distribution of KCNKs was investigated by RT-PCR, in situ hybridization, and immunohistochemistry. Current and membrane potential were evaluated with use of recombinant KCNK3- or KCNK9-expressing Xenopus oocytes and Chinese hamster ovary cells. Defecation frequency in rats was measured. HAS dose dependently induced strong propulsive “squeezing” motility, presumably as long-distance contraction (LDC). TRPV1/TRPA1 agonists induced different motility patterns. The effect of HAS was unaltered by TRPV1/TRPA1 antagonists and desensitization. Lidocaine (a nonselective KCNK blocker) and hydroxy-β sanshool (a geometrical isomer of HAS and KCNK3 blocker) also induced colonic motility as a rhythmic propagating ripple (RPR) and a LDC-like motion, respectively. HAS-induced “LDC,” but not lidocaine-induced “RPR,” was abrogated by a neuroleptic agent tetrodotoxin. KCNK3 and KCNK9 were located mainly in longitudinal smooth muscle cells and in neural cells in the myenteric plexus, respectively. Administration of HAS or TU-100 increased defecation frequency in normal and laparotomy rats. HAS may evoke strong LDC possibly via blockage of the neural KCNK9 channel in the colonic myenteric plexus. PMID:25634809

  19. Hydroxy-α sanshool induces colonic motor activity in rat proximal colon: a possible involvement of KCNK9.

    PubMed

    Kubota, Kunitsugu; Ohtake, Nobuhiro; Ohbuchi, Katsuya; Mase, Akihito; Imamura, Sachiko; Sudo, Yuka; Miyano, Kanako; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Kono, Toru; Uezono, Yasuhito

    2015-04-01

    Various colonic motor activities are thought to mediate propulsion and mixing/absorption of colonic content. The Japanese traditional medicine daikenchuto (TU-100), which is widely used for postoperative ileus in Japan, accelerates colonic emptying in healthy humans. Hydroxy-α sanshool (HAS), a readily absorbable active ingredient of TU-100 and a KCNK3/KCNK9/KCNK18 blocker as well as TRPV1/TRPA1 agonist, has been investigated for its effects on colonic motility. Motility was evaluated by intraluminal pressure and video imaging of rat proximal colons in an organ bath. Distribution of KCNKs was investigated by RT-PCR, in situ hybridization, and immunohistochemistry. Current and membrane potential were evaluated with use of recombinant KCNK3- or KCNK9-expressing Xenopus oocytes and Chinese hamster ovary cells. Defecation frequency in rats was measured. HAS dose dependently induced strong propulsive "squeezing" motility, presumably as long-distance contraction (LDC). TRPV1/TRPA1 agonists induced different motility patterns. The effect of HAS was unaltered by TRPV1/TRPA1 antagonists and desensitization. Lidocaine (a nonselective KCNK blocker) and hydroxy-β sanshool (a geometrical isomer of HAS and KCNK3 blocker) also induced colonic motility as a rhythmic propagating ripple (RPR) and a LDC-like motion, respectively. HAS-induced "LDC," but not lidocaine-induced "RPR," was abrogated by a neuroleptic agent tetrodotoxin. KCNK3 and KCNK9 were located mainly in longitudinal smooth muscle cells and in neural cells in the myenteric plexus, respectively. Administration of HAS or TU-100 increased defecation frequency in normal and laparotomy rats. HAS may evoke strong LDC possibly via blockage of the neural KCNK9 channel in the colonic myenteric plexus.

  20. Wavelength dependence of ultraviolet-induced DNA damage distribution: involvement of direct or indirect mechanisms and possible artefacts.

    PubMed

    Kuluncsics, Z; Perdiz, D; Brulay, E; Muel, B; Sage, E

    1999-03-01

    DNA damage profiles have been established in plasmid DNA using purified DNA repair enzymes and a plasmid relaxation assay, following exposure to UVC, UVB, UVA or simulated sunlight (SSL). Cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) are revealed as T4 endonuclease V-sensitive sites, oxidation products at purine and pyrimidine as Fpg- and Nth-sensitive sites, and abasic sites are detected by Nfo protein from Escherichia coli. CPDs are readily detected after UVA exposure, though produced 10(3) and 10(5) times less efficiently than by UVB or UVC, respectively. We demonstrate that CPDs are induced by UVA radiation and not by contaminating UVB wavelengths. Furthermore, they are produced at doses compatible with human exposure and are likely to contribute to the mutagenic specificity of UVA [E. Sage et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 93 (1996) 176-180]. Oxidative damage is induced with a linear dose dependence, for each region of the solar spectrum, with the exception of oxidized pyrimidine and abasic sites, which are not detectable after UVB irradiation. The distribution of the different classes of photolesions varies markedly, depending on wavelengths. However, the unexpectedly high yield of oxidative lesions, as compared to CPDs, by UVA and SSL led us to investigate their production mechanism. An artificial formation of hydroxyl radicals is observed, which depends on the material of the sample holder used for UVA irradiation and is specific for long UV wavelengths. Our study sheds light on a possible artefact in the production of oxidative damage by UVA radiation. Meanwhile, after eliminating some potential sources of the artefact ratios of CPDs to oxidized purine of three and five upon irradiation with UVA and SSL, respectively, are still observed, whereas these ratios are about 140 and 200 after UVC and UVB irradiation.

  1. Possible involvement of self-defense mechanisms in the preferential vulnerability of the striatum in Huntington's disease

    PubMed Central

    Francelle, Laetitia; Galvan, Laurie; Brouillet, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    HD is caused by a mutation in the huntingtin gene that consists in a CAG repeat expansion translated into an abnormal poly-glutamine (polyQ) tract in the huntingtin (Htt) protein. The most striking neuropathological finding in HD is the atrophy of the striatum. The regional expression of mutant Htt (mHtt) is ubiquitous in the brain and cannot explain by itself the preferential vulnerability of the striatum in HD. mHtt has been shown to produce an early defect in transcription, through direct alteration of the function of key regulators of transcription and in addition, more indirectly, as a result of compensatory responses to cellular stress. In this review, we focus on gene products that are preferentially expressed in the striatum and have down- or up-regulated expression in HD and, as such, may play a crucial role in the susceptibility of the striatum to mHtt. Many of these striatal gene products are for a vast majority down-regulated and more rarely increased in HD. Recent research shows that some of these striatal markers have a pro-survival/neuroprotective role in neurons (e.g., MSK1, A2A, and CB1 receptors) whereas others enhance the susceptibility of striatal neurons to mHtt (e.g., Rhes, RGS2, D2 receptors). The down-regulation of these latter proteins may be considered as a potential self-defense mechanism to slow degeneration. For a majority of the striatal gene products that have been identified so far, their function in the striatum is unknown and their modifying effects on mHtt toxicity remain to be experimentally addressed. Focusing on these striatal markers may contribute to a better understanding of HD pathogenesis, and possibly the identification of novel therapeutic targets. PMID:25309327

  2. Glioblastoma-mesenchymal stem cell communication modulates expression patterns of kinin receptors: Possible involvement of bradykinin in information flow.

    PubMed

    Pillat, Micheli M; Oliveira, Mona N; Motaln, Helena; Breznik, Barbara; Glaser, Talita; Lah, Tamara T; Ulrich, Henning

    2016-04-01

    The most aggressive subtype of brain tumors is glioma WHO grade IV, the glioblastoma (GBM). The present work aims to elucidate the role of kinin receptors in interactions between GBM cells and mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). The GBM cell line U87-MG was stably transfected to express dsRed protein, single cell cloned, expanded, and cultured with MSC, both in the direct co-cultures (DC) and indirect co-cultures (IC) at equal cell number ratio for 72 h. Up- and down-regulation of matrix metalloproteases (MMP)-9 expression in U87-MG and MSC cells, respectively, in direct co-culture points to possible MSC participation in tumor invasion. MMP9 expression is in line with significantly increased expression of kinin B1 (B1R) and B2 receptor (B2R) in U87-MG cells and their decreased levels in MSC, as confirmed by quantitative assessment using flow cytometric analysis. Similarly, in indirect cultures (IC), lacking the contact between GBM and MSC cells, an increase of B1 and B2 receptor expression was again noted in U87-MG cells, and no significant changes in kinin receptors in MSC was observed. Functionality of kinin-B1 and B2 receptors was evidenced by stimulation of intracellular calcium fluxes by their respective agonists, des-Arg9-bradykinin (DBK) and bradykinin (BK). Moreover, BK showed a feedback control on kinin receptor expression in mono-cultures, direct and indirect co-cultures. The treatment with BK resulted in down-regulation of B1 and B2 receptors in MSC, with simultaneous up-regulation of these receptors in U87-MG cells, suggesting that functions of BK in information flow between these cells is important for tumor progression and invasion. © 2015 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  3. DNase I and II present in avian oocytes: a possible involvement in sperm degradation at polyspermic fertilisation.

    PubMed

    Stepińska, Urszula; Olszańska, Bozenna

    2003-02-01

    During polyspermic fertilisation in birds numerous spermatozoa enter the eggs, in contrast to the situation in mammals where fertilisation is monospermic. However, in birds only one of the spermatozoa which have entered an egg participates in zygote nucleus formation, while the supernumerary spermatozoa degenerate at early embryogenesis. Our previous work has demonstrated the presence in preovulatory quail oocytes of DNase I and II activities able to digest naked lambdaDNA/HindIII substrate in vitro. In the present studies, the activities of both DNases in quail oocytes at different stages of oogenesis and in ovulated mouse oocytes were assayed in vitro using the same substrate. Degradation of quail spermatozoa by quail oocyte extracts was also checked. Digestion of the DNA substrate was evaluated by electrophoresis on agarose gels. The activities of DNase I and II in quail oocytes increased during oogenesis and were the highest in mature oocytes. The activities were present not only in germinal discs but also in a thin layer of cytoplasm adhering to the perivitelline layer surrounding the yolk. At all stages of oogenesis the activity of DNase II was much higher than that of DNase I. DNA contained in spermatozoa was also degraded by the quail oocyte extracts under conditions optimal for both DNases. In contrast to what is observed in quail oocytes, no DNase activities were detected in ovulated mouse eggs; this is logical as they would be useless or even harmful in monospermic fertilisation. The possible role of DNase activities in avian oocytes, in degradation of accessory spermatozoa during polyspermic fertilisation, is discussed.

  4. Disruption of social cognition in the sub-chronic PCP rat model of schizophrenia: Possible involvement of the endocannabinoid system.

    PubMed

    Seillier, Alexandre; Giuffrida, Andrea

    2016-02-01

    Previous studies have shown that social withdrawal in the phencyclidine (PCP) rat model of schizophrenia results from deficient endocannabinoid-induced activation of CB1 receptors. To understand the underlying cognitive mechanisms of the social deficit in PCP-treated rats, we examined the impact of pharmacological manipulation of the endocannabinoid system on sociability (i.e. social approach) and social novelty preference (which relies on social recognition). Control rats showed a clear preference for a "social" cage (i.e. unfamiliar stimulus rat placed under a wire mesh cage) versus an "empty" cage, and spent more time exploring a "novel" cage (i.e. new stimulus rat) versus a "familiar" cage. In contrast, rats receiving PCP (5 mg/kg, b.i.d. for 7 days, followed by a 7 day-washout period) showed intact sociability, but lacked social novelty preference. This PCP-induced deficit was due to increased activity at CB1 receptors as it was reversed by systemic administration of the CB1 antagonist AM251 (1 mg/kg). In agreement with this hypothesis, the cannabinoid agonist CP55,940 (0.003-0.03 mg/kg) dose-dependently suppressed social novelty preference in control animals without affecting sociability. Taken together, these data suggest that PCP-treated rats have a deficit in social cognition, possibly induced by increased stimulation of CB1 receptors. This deficit, however, is distinct from the social withdrawal previously observed in these animals, as the latter is due to deficient, rather than increased, CB1 stimulation.

  5. Disruption of social cognition in the sub-chronic PCP rat model of schizophrenia: possible involvement of the endocannabinoid system

    PubMed Central

    Seillier, Alexandre; Giuffrida, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that social withdrawal in the phencyclidine (PCP) rat model of schizophrenia results from deficient endocannabinoid-induced activation of CB1 receptors. To understand the underlying cognitive mechanisms of the social deficit in PCP-treated rats, we examined the impact of pharmacological manipulation of the endocannabinoid system on sociability (i.e. social approach) and social novelty preference (which relies on social recognition). Control rats showed a clear preference for a “social” cage (i.e. unfamiliar stimulus rat placed under a wire mesh cage) versus an “empty” cage, and spent more time exploring a “novel” cage (i.e. new stimulus rat) versus a “familiar” cage. In contrast, rats receiving PCP (5 mg/kg, b.i.d. for 7 days, followed by a 7 day-washout period) showed intact sociability, but lacked social novelty preference. This PCP-induced deficit was due to increased activity at CB1 receptors as it was reversed by systemic administration of the CB1 antagonist AM251 (1 mg/kg). In agreement with this hypothesis, the cannabinoid agonist CP55,940 (0.003 – 0.03 mg/kg) dose-dependently suppressed social novelty preference in control animals without affecting sociability. Taken together, these data suggest that PCP-treated rats have a deficit in social cognition, possibly induced by increased stimulation of CB1 receptors. This deficit, however, is distinct from the social withdrawal previously observed in these animals, as the latter is due to deficient, rather than increased, CB1 stimulation. PMID:26706691

  6. Specificity of Auxin-binding Sites on Maize Coleoptile Membranes as Possible Receptor Sites for Auxin Action 1

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Peter M.; Dohrmann, Ulrike; Hertel, Rainer

    1977-01-01

    Dissociation coefficients of auxin-binding sites on maize (Zea mays L.) coleoptile membranes were measured, for 48 auxins and related ring compounds, by competitive displacement of 14C-naphthaleneacetic acid from the binding sites. The sites bind with high affinity several ring compounds with acidic side chains 2 to 4 carbons long, and much more weakly bind neutral ring compounds and phenols related to these active acids, most phenoxyalkylcarboxylic acids, and arylcarboxylic acids except benzoic acid, which scarcely binds, and triiodobenzoic acids, which bind strongly. Specificity of the binding is narrowed in the presence of a low molecular weight “supernatant factor” that occurs in maize and other tissues. Activity of many of the analogs as auxin agonists or antagonists in the cell elongation response was determined with maize coleoptiles. These activities on the whole roughly parallel the affinities of the binding sites for the same compounds, especially affinities measured in the presence of supernatant factor, but there are some quantitative discrepancies, especially among phenoxyalkylcarboxylic acids. In view of several factors that can cause receptor affinity and biological activity values to diverge quantitatively among analogs, the findings appear to support the presumption that the auxin-binding sites may be receptors for auxin action. PMID:16660143

  7. New action pattern of a maltose-forming alpha-amylase from Streptomyces sp. and its possible application in bakery.

    PubMed

    Ammar, Youssef Ben; Matsubara, Takayoshi; Ito, Kazuo; Iizuka, Masaru; Limpaseni, Tipaporn; Pongsawasdi, Piamsook; Minamiura, Noshi

    2002-11-30

    An a-Amylase (EC 3.2.1.1) was purified that catalyses the production of a high level of maltose from starch without the attendant production of glucose. The enzyme was produced extracellularly by thermophilic Streptomyces sp. that was isolated from Thailand's soil. Purification was achieved by alcohol precipitation, DEAE-Cellulose, and Gel filtration chromatographies. The purified enzyme exhibited maximum activity at pH 6-7 and 60 degrees C. It had a relative molecular mass of 45 kDa, as determined by SDS-PAGE. The hydrolysis products from starch had alpha-anomeric forms, as determined by 1H-NMR. This maltose-forming alpha-Amylase completely hydrolyzed the soluble starch to produce a high level of maltose, representing up to 90%. It hydrolyzed maltotetrose and maltotriose to primarily produce maltose (82% and 62% respectively) without the attendant production of glucose. The high maltose level as a final end-product from starch and maltooligosaccharides, and the unique action pattern of this enzyme, indicate an unusual maltose-forming system. After the addition of the enzyme in the bread-baking process, the bread's volume increased and kept its softness longer than when the bread had no enzyme.

  8. Control of Food Intake by Gastrointestinal Peptides: Mechanisms of Action and Possible Modulation in the Treatment of Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Prinz, Philip; Stengel, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    This review focuses on the control of appetite by food intake-regulatory peptides secreted from the gastrointestinal tract, namely cholecystokinin, glucagon-like peptide 1, peptide YY, ghrelin, and the recently discovered nesfatin-1 via the gut-brain axis. Additionally, we describe the impact of external factors such as intake of different nutrients or stress on the secretion of gastrointestinal peptides. Finally, we highlight possible conservative—physical activity and pharmacotherapy—treatment strategies for obesity as well as surgical techniques such as deep brain stimulation and bariatric surgery also altering these peptidergic pathways. PMID:28096522

  9. SUR1 Receptor Interaction with Hesperidin and Linarin Predicts Possible Mechanisms of Action of Valeriana officinalis in Parkinson

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Gesivaldo; Giraldez-Alvarez, Lisandro Diego; Ávila-Rodriguez, Marco; Capani, Francisco; Galembeck, Eduardo; Neto, Aristóteles Gôes; Barreto, George E.; Andrade, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is one of the most common neurodegenerative disorders. A theoretical approach of our previous experiments reporting the cytoprotective effects of the Valeriana officinalis compounds extract for PD is suggested. In addiction to considering the PD as a result of mitochondrial metabolic imbalance and oxidative stress, such as in our previous in vitro model of rotenone, in the present manuscript we added a genomic approach to evaluate the possible underlying mechanisms of the effect of the plant extract. Microarray of substantia nigra (SN) genome obtained from Allen Brain Institute was analyzed using gene set enrichment analysis to build a network of hub genes implicated in PD. Proteins transcribed from hub genes and their ligands selected by search ensemble approach algorithm were subjected to molecular docking studies, as well as 20 ns Molecular Dynamics (MD) using a Molecular Mechanic Poison/Boltzman Surface Area (MMPBSA) protocol. Our results bring a new approach to Valeriana officinalis extract, and suggest that hesperidin, and probably linarin are able to relieve effects of oxidative stress during ATP depletion due to its ability to binding SUR1. In addition, the key role of valerenic acid and apigenin is possibly related to prevent cortical hyperexcitation by inducing neuronal cells from SN to release GABA on brain stem. Thus, under hyperexcitability, oxidative stress, asphyxia and/or ATP depletion, Valeriana officinalis may trigger different mechanisms to provide neuronal cell protection. PMID:27199743

  10. Effects of hecogenin and its possible mechanism of action on experimental models of gastric ulcer in mice.

    PubMed

    Santos Cerqueira, Gilberto; dos Santos e Silva, Gabriela; Rios Vasconcelos, Emiliano; Fragoso de Freitas, Ana Paula; Arcanjo Moura, Brinell; Silveira Macedo, Danielle; Lopes Souto, Augusto; Barbosa Filho, José Maria; de Almeida Leal, Luzia Kalyne; de Castro Brito, Gerly Anne; Souccar, Caden; de Barros Viana, Glauce Socorro

    2012-05-15

    This study investigates the gastroprotective effects of hecogenin, a steroid saponin isolated from Agave sisalana, on experimental models of gastric ulcer. Male Swiss mice were used in the models of ethanol- and indometacin-induced gastric ulcer. To clarify the hecogenin mechanism of action, the roles of nitric oxide (NO), sulfhydryls (GSH), K⁺(ATP) channels and prostaglandins were also investigated, and measurements of lipid peroxidation (TBARS assay) and nitrite levels in the stomach of hecogenin-treated and untreated animals were performed. Furthermore, the effects of hecogenin on myeloperoxidase (MPO) release from human neutrophils were assessed in vitro. Our results showed that hecogenin (3.1, 7.5, 15, 30, 60 and 90 mg/kg, p.o.) acutely administered, before ethanol or indomethacin, exhibited a potent gastroprotective effect. Although the pretreatments with L-NAME, an iNOS inhibitor, and capsazepine, a TRPV1 receptor agonist, were not able to reverse the hecogenin effect, this was reversed by glibenclamide, a K⁺(ATP) blocker, and indomethacin in the model of ethanol-induced gastric lesions. The hecogenin pretreatment normalized GSH levels and significantly reduced lipid peroxidation and nitrite levels in the stomach, as evaluated by the ethanol-induced gastric lesion model. The drug alone increased COX-2 expression and this effect was further enhanced in the presence of ethanol. It also decreased MPO release and significantly protected the gastric mucosa. In conclusion, we showed that hecogenin presents a significant gastroprotective effect that seems to be mediated by K⁺(ATP) channels opening and the COX-2/PG pathway. In addition, its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties may play a role in the gastroprotective drug effect.

  11. Ground-water flow and the possible effects of remedial actions at J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hughes, W.B.

    1995-01-01

    J-Field, located in the Edgewood Area of Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md, has been used since World War II to test and dispose of explosives, chemical warfare agents, and industrial chemicals resulting in ground-water, surface-water, and soil contami- nation. The U.S. Geological Survey finite-difference model was used to better understand ground-water flow at the site and to simulate the effects of remedial actions. A surficial aquifer and a confined aquifer were simulated with the model. A confining unit separates these units and is represented by leakance between the layers. The area modeled is 3.65 mi2; the model was constructed with a variably spaced 40 X 38 grid. The horizontal and lower boundaries of the model are all no-flow boundaries. Steady-state conditions were used. Ground water at the areas under investigation flows from disposal pit areas toward discharge areas in adjacent estuaries or wetlands. Simulations indicate that capping disposal areas with an impermeable cover effectively slows advective ground water flow by 0.7 to 0.5 times. Barriers to lateral ground-water flow were simulated and effectively prevented the movement of ground water toward discharge areas. Extraction wells were simulated as a way to contain ground-water contamination and to extract ground water for treatment. Two wells pumping 5 gallons per minute each at the toxic-materials disposal area and a single well pumping 2.5 gallons per minute at the riot-control-agent disposal area effectively contained contamination at these sites. A combi- nation of barriers to horizontal flow east and south of the toxic-materials disposal area, and a single extraction well pumping at 5 gallons per minute can extract contaminated ground water and prevent pumpage of marsh water.

  12. Involvement of protein kinase C in the mechanism of action of Escherichia coli heat-stable enterotoxin (STa) in a human colonic carcinoma cell line, COLO-205

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Dyuti Datta; Saha, Subhrajit; Chakrabarti, Manoj K. . E-mail: mkc_niced@yahoo.co.in

    2005-08-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine the involvement of calcium-protein kinase C pathway in the mechanism of action of Escherichia coli heat stable enterotoxin (STa) apart from STa-induced activation of guanylate cyclase in human colonic carcinoma cell line COLO-205, which was used as a model cultured cell line to study the mechanism of action of E. coli STa. In response to E. coli STa, protein kinase C (PKC) activity was increased in a time-dependent manner with its physical translocation from cytosol to membrane. Inhibition of the PKC activity in membrane fraction and inhibition of its physical translocation in response to IP{sub 3}-mediated calcium release inhibitor dantrolene suggested the involvement of intracellular store depletion in the regulation of PKC activity. Among different PKC isoforms, predominant involvement of calcium-dependent protein kinase C (PKC{alpha}) was specified using isotype-specific pseudosubstrate, which showed pronounce enzyme activity. Inhibition of enzyme activity by PKC{alpha}-specific inhibitor Goe6976 and immunoblott study employing isotype-specific antibody further demonstrated the involvement of calcium-dependent isoform of PKC in the mechanism of action of E. coli STa. Moreover, inhibition of guanylate cyclase activity by PKC{alpha}-specific inhibitor Goe6976 suggested the involvement of PKC{alpha} in the regulation of guanylate cyclase activity.

  13. [The possible role of the elements of protein secondary structure in adaptation to the action of ionizing radiation].

    PubMed

    Kharchenko, L I; Pavlovskaia, T E

    1997-01-01

    Changes in the secondary structure of enzymes induced by gamma-rays 60Co at doses not exceeding one ionization per macromolecule were studied to elucidate a possible role of radiation-chemical processes in the evolution of proteins. The data on the comparative radioresistance of various types of secondary protein structures, alpha-helix, parallel and anti-parallel beta-structures, and beta-turn, were obtained by the method of circular dichroism. It was shown that beta-turns were resistant against radiation, alpha-helix was relatively stable, and beta-layer underwent significant changes. The importance of these structural types in the evolution of proteins is discussed. A special role of beta-turn as structural elements fixing the confirmation of macromolecules and therefore responsible for adaptation of the protein structure against a constant radiation background is proposed.

  14. Antiviral Activity and Possible Mechanism of Action of Constituents Identified in Paeonia lactiflora Root toward Human Rhinoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Ngan, Luong Thi My; Jang, Myeong Jin; Kwon, Min Jung; Ahn, Young Joon

    2015-01-01

    Human rhinoviruses (HRVs) are responsible for more than half of all cases of the common cold and cost billions of USD annually in medical visits and missed school and work. An assessment was made of the antiviral activities and mechanisms of action of paeonol (PA) and 1,2,3,4,6-penta-O-galloyl-β-D-glucopyranose (PGG) from Paeonia lactiflora root toward HRV-2 and HRV-4 in MRC5 cells using a tetrazolium method and real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results were compared with those of a reference control ribavirin. Based on 50% inhibitory concentration values, PGG was 13.4 and 18.0 times more active toward HRV-2 (17.89 μM) and HRV-4 (17.33 μM) in MRC5 cells, respectively, than ribavirin. The constituents had relatively high selective index values (3.3–>8.5). The 100 μg/mL PA and 20 μg/mL PGG did not interact with the HRV-4 particles. These constituents inhibited HRV-4 infection only when they were added during the virus inoculation (0 h), the adsorption period of HRVs, but not after 1 h or later. Moreover, the RNA replication levels of HRVs were remarkably reduced in the MRC5 cultures treated with these constituents. These findings suggest that PGG and PA may block or reduce the entry of the viruses into the cells to protect the cells from the virus destruction and abate virus replication, which may play an important role in interfering with expressions of rhinovirus receptors (intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and low-density lipoprotein receptor), inflammatory cytokines (interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, tumor necrosis factor, interferon beta, and IL-1β), and Toll-like receptor, which resulted in diminishing symptoms induced by HRV. Global efforts to reduce the level of synthetic drugs justify further studies on P. lactiflora root-derived materials as potential anti-HRV products or lead molecules for the prevention or treatment of HRV. PMID:25860871

  15. Prokinetic activity of Prunus persica (L.) Batsch flowers extract and its possible mechanism of action in rats.

    PubMed

    Han, Wei; Xu, Jing Dong; Wei, Feng Xian; Zheng, Yong Dong; Ma, Jian Zhong; Xu, Xiao Dong; Wei, Zhen Gang; Wang, Wen; Zhang, You Cheng

    2015-01-01

    The peach tree, Prunus persica (L.) Batsch, is widely cultivated in China, and its flowers have been used for centuries in traditional Chinese medicine to treat gut motility disorders. But few studies have explored the pharmacological effect of Prunus persica (L.) Batsch flowers on gastrointestinal motility. In this study, the activities of different extracts from Prunus persica (L.) Batsch flowers on the smooth muscle contractions were evaluated using isolated colon model, and the ethyl acetate extract (EAE) showed the strongest effects in vitro. EAE (10(-8)-10(-5) g/mL) caused a concentration-dependent stimulatory effect in rat colonic tissue. Additionally, ketotifen (100 µM), cimetidine (10 µM), and pyrilamine (1 µM) produced a significant inhibition of contractions caused by EAE. Furthermore, immunofluorescence and toluidine blue staining revealed increased numbers of mast cells in the EAE group, and EAE increased histamine release from the colonic tissues. These data indicate that EAE has significant prokinetic activity and acts by a mechanism that mainly involves mast cell degranulation. Our study provides a pharmacological basis for the use of an extract of Prunus persica (L.) Batsch flowers in the treatment of gut motility disorders.

  16. Prokinetic Activity of Prunus persica (L.) Batsch Flowers Extract and Its Possible Mechanism of Action in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Han, Wei; Xu, Jing Dong; Wei, Feng Xian; Zheng, Yong Dong; Ma, Jian Zhong; Xu, Xiao Dong; Wei, Zhen Gang; Wang, Wen; Zhang, You Cheng

    2015-01-01

    The peach tree, Prunus persica (L.) Batsch, is widely cultivated in China, and its flowers have been used for centuries in traditional Chinese medicine to treat gut motility disorders. But few studies have explored the pharmacological effect of Prunus persica (L.) Batsch flowers on gastrointestinal motility. In this study, the activities of different extracts from Prunus persica (L.) Batsch flowers on the smooth muscle contractions were evaluated using isolated colon model, and the ethyl acetate extract (EAE) showed the strongest effects in vitro. EAE (10−8–10−5 g/mL) caused a concentration-dependent stimulatory effect in rat colonic tissue. Additionally, ketotifen (100 µM), cimetidine (10 µM), and pyrilamine (1 µM) produced a significant inhibition of contractions caused by EAE. Furthermore, immunofluorescence and toluidine blue staining revealed increased numbers of mast cells in the EAE group, and EAE increased histamine release from the colonic tissues. These data indicate that EAE has significant prokinetic activity and acts by a mechanism that mainly involves mast cell degranulation. Our study provides a pharmacological basis for the use of an extract of Prunus persica (L.) Batsch flowers in the treatment of gut motility disorders. PMID:25821812

  17. Potent drugs that attenuate anti-Candida albicans activity of fluconazole and their possible mechanisms of action.

    PubMed

    Urai, Makoto; Kaneko, Yukihiro; Niki, Mamiko; Inoue, Manabu; Tanabe, Koichi; Umeyama, Takashi; Fukazawa, Hidesuke; Ohno, Hideaki; Miyazaki, Yoshitsugu

    2014-10-01

    Fluconazole (FLCZ) is a first-line drug for treating Candida albicans infections, but clinical failure due to reduced sensitivity is a growing concern. Our previous study suggested that certain drug combinations pose a particular challenge in potently reducing FLCZ's anti-C. albicans activity, and cyclooxygenase inhibitors formed the major group of these attenuating drugs in combination with FLCZ. In this study, we examined the effects of diclofenac sodium (DFNa) and related compounds in combination with FLCZ against C. albicans, and investigated their possible mechanisms of interaction. DFNa, ibuprofen, and omeprazole elevated the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of FLCZ by 8-, 4-, and 4-fold, respectively; however, loxoprofen sodium and celecoxib did not. An analogue of DFNa, 2,6-dichlorodiphenylamine, also elevated the MIC by 4-fold. Gene expression analysis revealed that diclofenac sodium induced CDR1 efflux pump activity, but not CDR2 activity. In addition, an efflux pump CDR1 mutant, which was manipulated to not be induced by DFNa, showed less elevation of MIC compared to that shown by the wild type. Therefore, DFNa and related compounds are potent factors for reducing the sensitivity of C. albicans to FLCZ partly via induction of an efflux pump. Although it is not known whether such antagonism is relevant to the clinical treatment failure observed, further investigation of the molecular mechanisms underlying the reduction of FLCZ's anti-C. albicans activity is expected to promote safer and more effective use of the drug.

  18. Is Earth F**ked? Dynamical Futility of Global Environmental Management and Possibilities for Sustainability via Direct Action Activism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    wErnEr, B.

    2012-12-01

    Environmental challenges are dynamically generated within the dominant global culture principally by the mismatch between short-time-scale market and political forces driving resource extraction/use and longer-time-scale accommodations of the Earth system to these changes. Increasing resource demand is leading to the development of two-way, nonlinear interactions between human societies and environmental systems that are becoming global in extent, either through globalized markets and other institutions or through coupling to global environmental systems such as climate. These trends are further intensified by dissipation-reducing technological advances in transactions, communication and transport, which suppress emergence of longer-time-scale economic and political levels of description and facilitate long-distance connections, and by predictive environmental modeling, which strengthens human connections to a short-time-scale virtual Earth, and weakens connections to the longer time scales of the actual Earth. Environmental management seeks to steer fast scale economic and political interests of a coupled human-environmental system towards longer-time-scale consideration of benefits and costs by operating within the confines of the dominant culture using a linear, engineering-type connection to the system. Perhaps as evidenced by widespread inability to meaningfully address such global environmental challenges as climate change and soil degradation, nonlinear connections reduce the ability of managers to operate outside coupled human-environmental systems, decreasing their effectiveness in steering towards sustainable interactions and resulting in managers slaved to short-to-intermediate-term interests. In sum, the dynamics of the global coupled human-environmental system within the dominant culture precludes management for stable, sustainable pathways and promotes instability. Environmental direct action, resistance taken from outside the dominant culture, as in

  19. Understanding Obesity Perceptions in America: An Exploratory Study of Public Perceptions of the Problem and Possible Actions for Health Product Marketers.

    PubMed

    Emmett, Dennis; Chandra, Ashish

    2015-01-01

    Many healthcare professionals have stated that obesity is a major problem in the United States. The rate of obesity in young people has been rising until just recently, when it was reported to have leveled off. The authors examine the problem in terms of people's perception of how great a problem it is, along with examining their perception of the causes and possible remedies for the problem. If the general population does not believe that a problem exists, then corrective action will be hampered. Then, the authors examine what impact this has on marketing products to address this problem.

  20. Possible involvement of nitric oxide (NO) signaling pathway in the antidepressant-like effect of MK-801(dizocilpine), a NMDA receptor antagonist in mouse forced swim test.

    PubMed

    Dhir, Ashish; Kulkarni, S K

    2008-03-01

    L-arginine-nitric oxide (NO)-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) is an important signaling pathway involved in depression. With this information, the present study aimed to study the involvement of this signaling pathway in the antidepressant-like action of MK-801 (dizocilpine; N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonist) in the mouse forced-swim test. Total immobility period was recorded in mouse forced swim test for 6 min. MK-801 (5-25 microg/kg., ip) produced a U-shaped curve in reducing the immobility period. The antidepressant-like effect of MK-801 (10 microg/kg, ip) was prevented by pretreatment with L-arginine (750 mg/kg, ip) [substrate for nitric oxide synthase (NOS)]. Pretreatment of mice with 7-nitroindazole (7-NI) (25 mg/kg, ip) [a specific neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitor] produced potentiation of the action of subeffective dose of MK-801 (5 microg/kg, ip). In addition, treatment of mice with methylene blue (10 mg/kg, ip) [direct inhibitor of both nitric oxide synthase and soluble guanylate cyclase] potentiated the effect of MK-801 (5 microg/kg, ip) in the forced-swim test. Further, the reduction in the immobility period elicited by MK-801 (10 microg/kg, ip) was also inhibited by pretreatment with sildenafil (5 mg/kg, ip) [phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitor]. The various modulators used in the study and their combination did not produce any changes in locomotor activity per se and in combination with MK-801. MK-801 however, at higher doses (25 microg/kg, ip) produced hyperlocomotion. The results demonstrated the involvement of nitric oxide signaling pathway in the antidepressant-like effect of MK-801 in mouse forced-swim test.

  1. Lactobacillus farciminis treatment suppresses stress induced visceral hypersensitivity: a possible action through interaction with epithelial cell cytoskeleton contraction

    PubMed Central

    Ait‐Belgnaoui, A; Han, W; Lamine, F; Eutamene, H; Fioramonti, J; Bueno, L; Theodorou, V

    2006-01-01

    Background Stress induced increase in colonic paracellular permeability results from epithelial cell cytoskeleton contraction and is responsible for stress induced hypersensitivity to colorectal distension (CRD). The probiotic Lactobacillus farciminis releases spontaneously nitric oxide (NO) in the colonic lumen in vivo and exerts anti‐inflammatory effects. This study aimed: (i) to evaluate the effects of L farciminis on stress induced hypersensitivity to CRD and increase in colonic paracellular permeability; and (ii) to ascertain whether these effects are NO mediated and related to changes in colonocyte myosin light chain phosphorylation (p‐MLC). Methods Female Wistar rats received either 1011 CFU/day of L farciminis or saline orally over 15 days before partial restraint stress (PRS) or sham‐PRS application. Visceral sensitivity to CRD and colonic paracellular permeability was assessed after PRS or sham‐PRS. Haemoglobin was used as an NO scavenger. Western blotting for MLC kinase, MLC, and p‐MLC were performed in colonic mucosa from L farciminis treated and control rats after PRS or sham‐PRS. Results PRS significantly increased the number of spike bursts for CRD pressures of 30–60 mm Hg as well as colonic paracellular permeability. L farciminis treatment prevented both effects, while haemoglobin reversed the protective effects of L farciminis. p‐MLC expression increased significantly from 15 to 45 minutes after PRS, and L farciminis treatment prevented this increase. Conclusion L farciminis treatment prevents stress induced hypersensitivity, increase in colonic paracellular permeability, and colonocyte MLC phosphorylation. This antinociceptive effect occurs via inhibition of contraction of colonic epithelial cell cytoskeleton and the subsequent tight junction opening, and may also involve direct or indirect effects of NO produced by this probiotic. PMID:16507583

  2. Gene expression profiles following exposure to a developmental neurotoxicant, Aroclor 1254: Pathway analysis for possible mode(s) of action

    SciTech Connect

    Royland, Joyce E.; Kodavanti, Prasada Rao S.

    2008-09-01

    Epidemiological studies indicate that low levels of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) exposure can adversely affect neurocognitive development. In animal models, perturbations in calcium signaling, neurotransmitters, and thyroid hormones have been postulated as potential mechanisms for PCB-induced developmental neurotoxicity. In order to understand the role of these proposed mechanisms and to identify other mechanisms in PCB-induced neurotoxicity, we have chosen a global approach utilizing oligonucleotide microarrays to examine gene expression profiles in the brain following developmental exposure to Aroclor 1254 (0 or 6 mg/kg/day from gestation day 6 through postnatal day (PND) 21) in Long-Evans rats. Gene expression levels in the cerebellum and hippocampus from PNDs 7 and 14 animals were determined on Affymetrix rat 230A{sub 2}.0 chips. In the cerebellum, 87 transcripts were altered at PND7 compared to 27 transcripts at PND14 by Aroclor 1254 exposure, with only one transcript affected at both ages. In hippocampus, 175 transcripts and 50 transcripts were altered at PND7 and PND14, respectively, by Aroclor 1254 exposure with five genes commonly affected. Functional analysis suggests that pathways related to calcium homeostasis (Gng3, Ryr2, Trdn, Cacna1a), intracellular signaling (Camk2d, Stk17b, Pacsin2, Ryr2, Trio, Fert2, Ptk2b), axonal guidance (Lum, Mxd3, Akap11, Gucy1b3), aryl hydrocarbon receptor signaling (Nfia, Col1a2), and transcripts involved in cell proliferation (Gspt2, Cdkn1c, Ptk2b) and differentiation (Ifitm31, Hpca, Zfp260, Igsf4a, Hes5) leading to the development of nervous system were significantly altered by Aroclor 1254 exposure. Of the two brain regions examined, Aroclor 1254-induced genomic changes were greater in the hippocampus than the cerebellum. The genomic data suggests that PCB-induced neurotoxic effects were due to disruption of normal ontogenetic pattern of nervous system growth and development by altering intracellular signaling pathways

  3. Choosing Actions

    PubMed Central

    Rosenbaum, David A.; Chapman, Kate M.; Coelho, Chase J.; Gong, Lanyun; Studenka, Breanna E.

    2013-01-01

    Actions that are chosen have properties that distinguish them from actions that are not. Of the nearly infinite possible actions that can achieve any given task, many of the unchosen actions are irrelevant, incorrect, or inappropriate. Others are relevant, correct, or appropriate but are disfavored for other reasons. Our research focuses on the question of what distinguishes actions that are chosen from actions that are possible but are not. We review studies that use simple preference methods to identify factors that contribute to action choices, especially for object-manipulation tasks. We can determine which factors are especially important through simple behavioral experiments. PMID:23761769

  4. The involvement of P2Y12 receptors, NADPH oxidase, and lipid rafts in the action of extracellular ATP on synaptic transmission at the frog neuromuscular junction.

    PubMed

    Giniatullin, A; Petrov, A; Giniatullin, R

    2015-01-29

    Adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) is the main co-transmitter accompanying the release of acetylcholine from motor nerve terminals. Previously, we revealed the direct inhibitory action of extracellular ATP on transmitter release via redox-dependent mechanism. However, the receptor mechanism of ATP action and ATP-induced sources of reactive oxygen sources (ROS) remained not fully understood. In the current study, using microelectrode recordings of synaptic currents from the frog neuromuscular junction, we analyzed the receptor subtype involved in synaptic action of ATP, receptor coupling to NADPH oxidase and potential location of ATP receptors within the lipid rafts. Using subtype-specific antagonists, we found that the P2Y13 blocker 2-[(2-chloro-5-nitrophenyl)azo]-5-hydroxy-6-methyl-3-[(phosphonooxy)methyl]-4-pyridinecarboxaldehyde did not prevent the depressant action of ATP. In contrast, the P2Y12 antagonist 2-methylthioadenosine 5'-monophosphate abolished the inhibitory action of ATP, suggesting the key role of P2Y12 receptors in ATP action. As the action of ATP is redox-dependent, we also tested potential involvement of the NADPH oxidase, known as a common inducer of ROS. The depressant action of extracellular ATP was significantly reduced by diphenyleneiodonium chloride and 4-(2-aminoethyl)-benzenesulfonyl fluoride hydrochloride, two structurally different inhibitors of NADPH oxidase, indicating that this enzyme indeed mediates the action of ATP. Since the location and activity of various receptors are often associated with lipid rafts, we next tested whether ATP-driven inhibition depends on lipid rafts. We found that the disruption of lipid rafts with methyl-beta-cyclodextrin reduced and largely delayed the action of ATP. Taken together, these data revealed key steps in the purinergic control of synaptic transmission via P2Y12 receptors associated with lipid rafts, and identified NADPH oxidase as the main source of ATP-induced inhibitory ROS at the neuromuscular

  5. Involvement of GABAB Receptor Signaling in Antipsychotic-like Action of the Novel Orthosteric Agonist of the mGlu4 Receptor, LSP4-2022

    PubMed Central

    Woźniak, Monika; Acher, Francine; Marciniak, Marcin; Łasoń-Tyburkiewicz, Magdalena; Gruca, Piotr; Papp, Mariusz; Pilc, Andrzej; Wierońska, Joanna M.

    2016-01-01

    Considering that ligands of metabotropic glutamate and GABA receptors may exert beneficial effects on schizophrenia, we assessed the actions of the first mGlu4-selective orthosteric agonist, LSP4-2022, in several tests reflecting positive, negative, and cognitive symptoms of schizophrenia. Moreover, we investigated the possible involvement of GABAB receptors in LSP4-2022-induced actions. Hyperactivity induced by MK-801 or amphetamine and DOI-induced head twitches in mice were used as the models of positive symptoms. The social interaction test, modified forced swim test (FST), and novel object recognition (NOR) test were used as the models of negative and cognitive symptoms of schizophrenia. LSP4-2022 inhibited hyperactivity (in a dose-dependent manner, 0.5-2 mg/kg) induced by MK-801 or amphetamine and DOI-induced head twitches. In mGlu4 receptor knockout mice, LSP4-2022 was not effective. However, it reversed MK-801-induced impairment in the social interaction test and the MK-801-induced increase of immobility in the modified FST. In the NOR test, LSP4-2022 was active at a dose of 2 mg/kg. GABAB receptor antagonist, CGP55845 (10 mg/kg), reversed LSP4-2022-induced effects in hyperactivity and head twitch tests. At the same time, the simultaneous administration of subeffective doses of LSP4-2022 (0.1 mg/kg) and a positive allosteric modulator of GABAB receptor PAM, GS39783 (0.1 mg/kg), induced clear antipsychotic-like effects in those two tests. Such an interaction between mGlu4 and GABAB receptors was not observed in the social interaction and NOR tests. Therefore, we suggest that the activation of the mGlu4 receptor is a promising approach facilitating the discovery of novel antipsychotic drugs, and that the interplay between mGlu4 and GABAB receptors may become the basis for a novel therapy for schizophrenic patients with predomination of positive symptoms. PMID:26769224

  6. 24 CFR 248.141 - Criteria for approval of a plan of action involving prepayment and voluntary termination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... of action will not— (i) Materially increase economic hardship for current tenants, and will not in... most recent available local data concerning changes in population, households, employment, the housing inventory, residential construction activity, and the current and anticipated supply/demand...

  7. 24 CFR 248.141 - Criteria for approval of a plan of action involving prepayment and voluntary termination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... of action will not— (i) Materially increase economic hardship for current tenants, and will not in... most recent available local data concerning changes in population, households, employment, the housing inventory, residential construction activity, and the current and anticipated supply/demand...

  8. Action at an Attentional Distance: A Study of Children's Reasoning about Causes and Effects Involving Spatial and Attentional Discontinuity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grotzer, Tina A.; Solis, S. Lynneth

    2015-01-01

    Spatial discontinuity between causes and effects is a feature of many scientific concepts, particularly those in the environmental and ecological sciences. Causes can be spatially separated from their effects by great distances. Action at a distance, the idea that causes and effects can be separated in physical space, is a well-studied concept in…

  9. Parents as Co-Researchers: A Participatory Action Research Initiative Involving Parents of People with Intellectual Disabilities in Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walmsley, Jan; Mannan, Hasheem

    2009-01-01

    This paper evaluates a participatory action research (PAR) approach to conducting family research in Ireland. Drawing on PAR methodology it describes how parents of people with intellectual disabilities were recruited and trained to facilitate focus groups of parents in Ireland, in order to create an evidence base to support improved dialogue…

  10. The Actions of Headmasters and Headmistresses in Fostering Parent & Family Involvement in Low-Income Schools in Tamil Nadu, India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shekar, Anupama

    2013-01-01

    Decades of research has examined the contribution of parent involvement to children's educational outcomes. Research has also attempted to identify meaningful involvement practices, taking place at home or in school and, as a result, measuring its effects on school, school staff and parents themselves. Despite the extensive research base, very…

  11. Factors associated with regulatory action involving investigation of illnesses associated with Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli in products regulated by the Food Safety and Inspection Service.

    PubMed

    Green, Alice L; Seys, Scott; Douris, Aphrodite; Levine, Jeoff; Robertson, Kis

    2014-07-01

    We described characteristics of the Escherichia coli O157 and Escherichia coli non-O157 illness investigations conducted by the United States Department of Agriculture's Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) during the 5-year period from 2006 through 2010. We created a multivariable logistic regression model to determine characteristics of these investigations that were associated with FSIS regulatory action, which was defined as having occurred if a product recall occurred or if FSIS personnel performed an environmental health assessment (Food Safety Assessment) at the implicated establishment. During this period, FSIS took regulatory action in 38 of 88 (43%) investigations. Illness investigations in which FoodNet states were involved were more likely to result in regulatory action. Illness investigations in which state and local traceback, or FSIS traceback occurred were more likely to result in regulatory action. Reasons for lack of action included evidence of cross-contamination after the product left a regulated establishment, delayed notification, lack of epidemiological information, and insufficient product information.

  12. Characterizing the associative content of brain structures involved in habitual and goal-directed actions in humans: a multivariate FMRI study.

    PubMed

    McNamee, Daniel; Liljeholm, Mimi; Zika, Ondrej; O'Doherty, John P

    2015-03-04

    While there is accumulating evidence for the existence of distinct neural systems supporting goal-directed and habitual action selection in the mammalian brain, much less is known about the nature of the information being processed in these different brain regions. Associative learning theory predicts that brain systems involved in habitual control, such as the dorsolateral striatum, should contain stimulus and response information only, but not outcome information, while regions involved in goal-directed action, such as ventromedial and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and dorsomedial striatum, should be involved in processing information about outcomes as well as stimuli and responses. To test this prediction, human participants underwent fMRI while engaging in a binary choice task designed to enable the separate identification of these different representations with a multivariate classification analysis approach. Consistent with our predictions, the dorsolateral striatum contained information about responses but not outcomes at the time of an initial stimulus, while the regions implicated in goal-directed action selection contained information about both responses and outcomes. These findings suggest that differential contributions of these regions to habitual and goal-directed behavioral control may depend in part on basic differences in the type of information that these regions have access to at the time of decision making.

  13. Structures of the first representatives of Pfam family PF06938 (DUF1285) reveal a new fold with repeated structural motifs and possible involvement in signal transduction

    PubMed Central

    Han, Gye Won; Bakolitsa, Constantina; Miller, Mitchell D.; Kumar, Abhinav; Carlton, Dennis; Najmanovich, Rafael J.; Abdubek, Polat; Astakhova, Tamara; Axelrod, Herbert L.; Chen, Connie; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Clayton, Thomas; Das, Debanu; Deller, Marc C.; Duan, Lian; Ernst, Dustin; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grant, Joanna C.; Grzechnik, Anna; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Jin, Kevin K.; Johnson, Hope A.; Klock, Heath E.; Knuth, Mark W.; Kozbial, Piotr; Krishna, S. Sri; Marciano, David; McMullan, Daniel; Morse, Andrew T.; Nigoghossian, Edward; Okach, Linda; Reyes, Ron; Rife, Christopher L.; Sefcovic, Natasha; Tien, Henry J.; Trame, Christine B.; van den Bedem, Henry; Weekes, Dana; Xu, Qingping; Hodgson, Keith O.; Wooley, John; Elsliger, Marc-André; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2010-01-01

    The crystal structures of SPO0140 and Sbal_2486 were determined using the semiautomated high-throughput pipeline of the Joint Center for Structural Genomics (JCSG) as part of the NIGMS Protein Structure Initiative (PSI). The structures revealed a conserved core with domain duplication and a superficial similarity of the C-terminal domain to pleckstrin homology-like folds. The conservation of the domain interface indicates a potential binding site that is likely to involve a nucleotide-based ligand, with genome-context and gene-fusion analyses additionally supporting a role for this family in signal transduction, possibly during oxidative stress. PMID:20944214

  14. [Study of possible involvement of MEK mitogen-activated protein kinase and TGF-β receptor in planarian regeneration processes using pharmacological inhibition analysis].

    PubMed

    Ermakov, A M; Ermakova, O N; Ermolaeva, S A

    2014-01-01

    Possible involvement of MEK mitogen-activated protein kinase and TGF-β receptor in the processes of regeneration and morphogenesis in freshwater planarian flatworms Schmidtea mediterranea was studied using a pharmacological inhibitor analysis. It was found that pharmacological inhibitors of these kinases significantly inhibit the regeneration of the head end of the animals and that this effect is realized due to inhibition of proliferative activity of neoblasts, planarian stem cells. It is shown that that the inhibition of the studied protein kinases in regenerating planarians markedly disturbs stem cell differentiation and morphogenesis.

  15. New perspectives on the involvement of mTOR in depression as well as in the action of antidepressant drugs.

    PubMed

    Ignácio, Zuleide M; Réus, Gislaine Z; Arent, Camila O; Abelaira, Helena M; Pitcher, Meagan R; Quevedo, João

    2016-11-01

    Despite the revolution in recent decades regarding monoamine involvement in the management of major depressive disorder (MDD), the biological mechanisms underlying this psychiatric disorder are still poorly understood. Currently available treatments require long time courses to establish antidepressant response and a significant percentage of people are refractory to single drug or combination drug treatment. These issues, and recent findings demonstrating the involvement of synaptic plasticity in the pathophysiological mechanisms of MDD, are encouraging researchers to explore the molecular mechanisms underlying psychiatric disease in more depth. The discovery of the rapid antidepressant effect exerted by glutamatergic and cholinergic agents highlights the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway as a critical pathway that contributes to the efficacy of these pharmacological agents in clinical and pre-clinical research. The mTOR pathway is a downstream intracellular signal that transmits information after the direct activation of α-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate (AMPA) and neurotrophic factor receptors. Activation of these receptors is hypothesized to be one of the major axes involved in the synthesis of synaptogenic proteins underlying synaptic plasticity and critical to both the rapid and delayed effects exerted by classic antidepressants. This review focuses on the involvement of mTOR in the pathophysiology of depression and on molecular mechanisms involved in the activity of emerging and classic antidepressant agents.

  16. Antifungal Action of Methylene Blue Involves Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Disruption of Redox and Membrane Homeostasis in C. albicans

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, Moiz A.; Fatima, Zeeshan; Hameed, Saif

    2016-01-01

    Candida albicans is known to cause infections ranging from superficial and systemic in immunocompromised person. In this study, we explored that the antifungal action of Methylene blue (MB) is mediated through mitochondrial dysfunction and disruption of redox and membrane homeostasis against C. albicans. We demonstrated that MB displayed its antifungal potential against C. albicans and two clinical isolates tested. We also showed that MB is effective against two non- albicans species as well. Notably, the antifungal effect of MB seems to be independent of the major drug efflux pumps transporter activity. We explored that MB treated Candida cells were sensitive on non-fermentable carbon source leading us to propose that MB inhibits mitochondria. This sensitive phenotype was reinforced with the fact that sensitivity of Candida cells to MB could be rescued upon the supplementation of ascorbic acid, an antioxidant. This clearly suggests that disturbances in redox status are linked with MB action. We further demonstrated that Candida cells were susceptible to membrane perturbing agent viz. SDS which was additionally confirmed by transmission electron micrographs showing disruption of membrane integrity. Moreover, the ergosterol levels were significantly decreased by 66% suggesting lipid compositional changes due to MB. Furthermore, we could demonstrate that MB inhibits the yeast to hyphal transition in C. albicans which is one of the major virulence attribute in most of the hyphal inducing conditions. Taken together, the data generated from present study clearly establishes MB as promising antifungal agent that could be efficiently employed in strategies to treat Candida infections. PMID:27006725

  17. Possible involvement of phosphorylated heat-shock factor-1 in changes in heat shock protein 72 induction in the failing rat heart following myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Marunouchi, Tetsuro; Murata, Mao; Takagi, Norio; Tanonaka, Kouichi

    2013-01-01

    It is supposed that an increase in the level of heat shock protein 72 (HSP72) in the failing heart would be beneficial for reducing the myocardial damage. However, the induction of HSP72 after an exposure to heat shock is blunted in the failing rat heart following myocardial infarction. In this study, to clarify the possible mechanisms underlying this reduction in the ability for HSP72 induction in the failing heart, the possible involvement of heat-shock factor-1 (HSF1), an HSP transcription factor, in this reduction was examined. When hemodynamic parameters of rats with myocardial infarction 8 weeks after coronary artery ligation were measured, the animals showed the signs of chronic heart failure. The HSF1 content was increased in the viable myocardium in the failing heart. The ability to induce cardiac HSP72 was reduced after an exposure to hyperthermia. The level of HSF1 in the cytosolic fraction from the failing heart with or without exposure to hyperthermia was increased, whereas that of HSF1 in the nuclear fraction was reduced. In the failing heart, the level of HSF1 on its serine 303 (Ser303) residue, which phosphorylation represses HSF1, was increased. These findings suggest that HSF1 translocation from the cytosol into the nucleus was attenuated after an exposure to hyperthermia and that an increase in the phosphorylation of HSF1 Ser303 was involved in the impairment of heat shock-induced HSP72 induction in the failing heart following myocardial infarction.

  18. 31 CFR 363.45 - What are the rules for judicial and administrative actions involving securities held in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... judicial proceeding involving competing claims to a security held in TreasuryDirect. (c) Divorce decree. We will recognize a divorce decree that either disposes of a security held in TreasuryDirect or ratifies a... divorce decree does not set out the terms of the property settlement agreement, we will require...

  19. 31 CFR 363.45 - What are the rules for judicial and administrative actions involving securities held in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... judicial proceeding involving competing claims to a security held in TreasuryDirect. (c) Divorce decree. We will recognize a divorce decree that either disposes of a security held in TreasuryDirect or ratifies a... divorce decree does not set out the terms of the property settlement agreement, we will require...

  20. 7 CFR 799.10 - Criteria and identification of FSA actions as to degree of involvement under the NEPA process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... an environmental evaluation not to significantly affect the quality of the human environment. (c) FSA... degree of involvement under the NEPA process. 799.10 Section 799.10 Agriculture Regulations of the... ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY AND RELATED ENVIRONMENTAL CONCERNS-COMPLIANCE WITH THE NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY...

  1. 7 CFR 799.10 - Criteria and identification of FSA actions as to degree of involvement under the NEPA process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... an environmental evaluation not to significantly affect the quality of the human environment. (c) FSA... degree of involvement under the NEPA process. 799.10 Section 799.10 Agriculture Regulations of the... ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY AND RELATED ENVIRONMENTAL CONCERNS-COMPLIANCE WITH THE NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY...

  2. Where the Action Is; A Log of Successful Urban Programs Involving Businessmen, Chambers of Commerce or Associations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chamber of Commerce of the United States, Washington, DC.

    This log cites about 150 successful programs, dealing with key urban problems, which involve businessmen either individually or through efforts of their companies, chambers of commerce, and trade and professional associations. The examples are listed alphabetically by location by city or state name for statewide programs. A few national programs…

  3. Promoting HIV Vaccine Research in African American Communities: Does the Theory of Reasoned Action Explain Potential Outcomes of Involvement?

    PubMed

    Frew, Paula M; Archibald, Matthew; Martinez, Nina; del Rio, Carlos; Mulligan, Mark J

    2007-01-01

    The HIV/AIDS pandemic continues to challenge the African American community with disproportionate rates of infection, particularly among young women ages 25 to 34 years. Development of a preventive HIV vaccine may bring a substantial turning point in this health crisis. Engagement of the African American community is necessary to improve awareness of the effort and favorably influence attitudes and referent norms. The Theory of Reasoned Action (TRA) may be a useful framework for exploration of community engagement outcomes including future attendance, community mobilization, and study participation. Within the context of HIV vaccine outreach, we conducted a cross-sectional survey in early 2007 with 175 African-American adults (>/= 18 years). Confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modeling were performed and the findings support the potential of the model in understanding behavioral intentions toward HIV vaccine research.

  4. Promoting HIV Vaccine Research in African American Communities: Does the Theory of Reasoned Action Explain Potential Outcomes of Involvement?

    PubMed Central

    Frew, Paula M.; Archibald, Matthew; Martinez, Nina; del Rio, Carlos; Mulligan, Mark J.

    2009-01-01

    The HIV/AIDS pandemic continues to challenge the African American community with disproportionate rates of infection, particularly among young women ages 25 to 34 years. Development of a preventive HIV vaccine may bring a substantial turning point in this health crisis. Engagement of the African American community is necessary to improve awareness of the effort and favorably influence attitudes and referent norms. The Theory of Reasoned Action (TRA) may be a useful framework for exploration of community engagement outcomes including future attendance, community mobilization, and study participation. Within the context of HIV vaccine outreach, we conducted a cross-sectional survey in early 2007 with 175 African-American adults (≥ 18 years). Confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modeling were performed and the findings support the potential of the model in understanding behavioral intentions toward HIV vaccine research. PMID:20686675

  5. Action semantics modulate action prediction.

    PubMed

    Springer, Anne; Prinz, Wolfgang

    2010-11-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that action prediction involves an internal action simulation that runs time-locked to the real action. The present study replicates and extends these findings by indicating a real-time simulation process (Graf et al., 2007), which can be differentiated from a similarity-based evaluation of internal action representations. Moreover, results showed that action semantics modulate action prediction accuracy. The semantic effect was specified by the processing of action verbs and concrete nouns (Experiment 1) and, more specifically, by the dynamics described by action verbs (Experiment 2) and the speed described by the verbs (e.g., "to catch" vs. "to grasp" vs. "to stretch"; Experiment 3). These results propose a linkage between action simulation and action semantics as two yet unrelated domains, a view that coincides with a recent notion of a close link between motor processes and the understanding of action language.

  6. Involvement of G Protein-Coupled Receptor 30 (GPR30) in Rapid Action of Estrogen in Primate LHRH Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Noel, Sekoni D.; Keen, Kim L.; Baumann, David I.; Filardo, Edward J.; Terasawa, Ei

    2009-01-01

    Previously, we have reported that 17β-estradiol (E2) induces an increase in firing activity of primate LH-releasing hormone (LHRH) neurons. The present study investigates whether E2 alters LHRH release as well as the pattern of intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) oscillations and whether G protein-coupled receptor 30 (GPR30) plays a role in mediating the rapid E2 action in primate LHRH neurons. Results are summarized: 1) E2, the nuclear membrane-impermeable estrogen, estrogen-dendrimer conjugate, and the plasma membrane-impermeable estrogen, E2-BSA conjugate, all stimulated LHRH release within 10 min of exposure; 2) whereas the estrogen receptor antagonist, ICI 182,780, did not block the E2-induced LHRH release, E2 application to cells treated with pertussis toxin failed to induce LHRH release; 3) GPR30 mRNA was expressed in olfactory placode cultures, and GPR30 protein was expressed in a subset of LHRH neurons; 4) pertussis toxin treatment blocked the E2-induced increase in [Ca2+]i oscillations; 5) knockdown of GPR30 in primate LHRH neurons by transfection with small interfering RNA (siRNA) for GPR30 completely abrogated the E2-induced changes in [Ca2+]i oscillations, whereas transfection with control siRNA did not; 6) the estrogen-dendrimer conjugate-induced increase in [Ca2+]i oscillations also did not occur in LHRH neurons transfected with GPR30 siRNA; and 7) G1, a GPR30 agonist, resulted in changes in [Ca2+]i oscillations, similar to those observed with E2. Collectively, E2 induces a rapid excitatory effect on primate LHRH neurons, and this rapid action of E2 appears to be mediated, in part, through GPR30. PMID:19131510

  7. Mode of action of nifurtimox and N-oxide-containing heterocycles against Trypanosoma cruzi: is oxidative stress involved?

    PubMed

    Boiani, Mariana; Piacenza, Lucia; Hernández, Paola; Boiani, Lucia; Cerecetto, Hugo; González, Mercedes; Denicola, Ana

    2010-06-15

    Chagas disease is caused by the trypanosomatid parasite Trypanosoma cruzi and threatens millions of lives in South America. As other neglected diseases there is almost no research and development effort by the pharmaceutical industry and the treatment relies on two drugs, Nifurtimox and Benznidazole, discovered empirically more than three decades ago. Nifurtimox, a nitrofurane derivative, is believed to exert its biological activity through the bioreduction of the nitro-group to a nitro-anion radical which undergoes redox-cycling with molecular oxygen. This hypothesis is generally accepted, although arguments against it have been presented. In the present work we studied the ability of Nifurtimox and five N-oxide-containing heterocycles to induce oxidative stress in T. cruzi. N-Oxide-containing heterocycles represent a promising group of new trypanosomicidal agents and their mode of action is not completely elucidated. The results here obtained argue against the oxidative stress hypothesis almost for all the studied compounds, including Nifurtimox. A significant reduction in the level of parasitic low-molecular-weight thiols was observed after Nifurtimox treatment; however, it was not linked to the production of reactive oxidant species. Besides, redox-cycling is only observed at high Nifurtimox concentrations (>400microM), two orders of magnitude higher than the concentration required for anti-proliferative activity (5microM). Our results indicate that an increase in oxidative stress is not the main mechanism of action of Nifurtimox. Among the studied N-oxide-containing heterocycles, benzofuroxan derivatives strongly inhibited parasite dehydrogenase activity and affected mitochondrial membrane potential. The indazole derivative raised intracellular oxidants production, but it was the least effective as anti-T. cruzi.

  8. Possible involvement of nitric oxide mechanism in the neuroprotective effect of rutin against immobilization stress induced anxiety like behaviour, oxidative damage in mice.

    PubMed

    Machawal, Lalit; Kumar, Anil

    2014-02-01

    Dietary supplements are widely used to manage stress and related consequences. However, the exact pathological mechanism and cellular cascades involved in the action of these supplements are not properly understood so far. Therefore, the present study has been designed to explore the neuroprotective mechanism of rutin against immobilization stress-induced anxiety-like behavioural and oxidative damage in mice. Laboratory Animal Centre A-strain (laca) mice were used in the present study. Rutin (20, 40, and 80 mg/kg), l-arginine (100 mg/kg), l-nitroarginine methyl ester (l-NAME) (5 mg/kg) and vitamin-E (50 mg/kg) were administered for 5 days before 6h immobilization stress on 6th day. Various behavioural parameters (mirror chamber test, locomotor activity) followed by biochemical parameters (lipid peroxidation, nitrite concentration, reduced glutathione and catalase) in brain and then serum corticosterone level were assessed. 6 h immobilization stress produced anxiety-like behavioural in mirror chamber test, raised corticosterone level and oxidative stress (as evidenced by rise in lipid peroxidation, nitrite concentration, depletion of reduced glutathione and catalase activity) significantly as compared to naive group. 5 days pre-treatment with rutin (40 and 80 mg/kg) causes a significant attenuation of locomotor activity, corticosterone level, oxidative stress as compared to control. Further, l-arginine (100 mg/kg) pre-treatment significantly reversed the protective effect of rutin (40 mg/kg) in 6 h immobilized animals. However, l-NAME (5 mg/kg) pre-treatment with rutin (40 mg/kg) potentiated their protective effect which was significant as compared to their effect per se. The present study suggests the involvement of nitric oxide mechanism in the neuroprotective effect of rutin against immobilization stress-induced anxiety-like behaviour and oxidative damage in mice.

  9. Cytotoxic action of Ganoderma lucidum on interleukin-3 dependent lymphoma DA-1 cells: involvement of apoptosis proteins.

    PubMed

    Calviño, Eva; Pajuelo, Lucía; Casas, Jon A Ochoa de Eribe; Manjón, José Luis; Tejedor, M Cristina; Herráez, Angel; Alonso, Manuel Díez; Diez, José C

    2011-01-01

    Aqueous extracts and a semipurified fraction obtained by methanol extraction and column chromatography were isolated from Ganoderma lucidum [Ganoderma lucidum (Curtis) P. Karst.; Ganodermataceae Donk] and their effects on interleukin 3-dependent lymphoma cells (DA-1) were studied. Cell viability was reduced by the action of unboiled aqueous extract and by the methanol-extracted column-chromatography semipurified fraction, producing DNA fragmentation in DA-1 cells. Treatments with aqueous extracts showed increments of Bax after 13 h, increments of p53 and Mdm2 after 19 h and a reduction of these three proteins after 24 h. The methanol-extracted semipurified fraction also induced increments of p53 and Mdm2 factors at 19 h with a reduction after 24 h. The methanol-extracted column-chromatography semipurified fraction from Ganoderma lucidum produced minor changes in the level of Akt after treatments for 19 h in DA-1 cells with a slight reduction in the levels of NFkB-p65 factor. Both the unboiled aqueous extract and the methanol-extracted column-chromatography semipurified fraction produced cleavage of inactive caspase 3, as a clear indication of induction of apoptosis by compounds present in Ganoderma lucidum.

  10. The music of your emotions: neural substrates involved in detection of emotional correspondence between auditory and visual music actions.

    PubMed

    Petrini, Karin; Crabbe, Frances; Sheridan, Carol; Pollick, Frank E

    2011-04-29

    In humans, emotions from music serve important communicative roles. Despite a growing interest in the neural basis of music perception, action and emotion, the majority of previous studies in this area have focused on the auditory aspects of music performances. Here we investigate how the brain processes the emotions elicited by audiovisual music performances. We used event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging, and in Experiment 1 we defined the areas responding to audiovisual (musician's movements with music), visual (musician's movements only), and auditory emotional (music only) displays. Subsequently a region of interest analysis was performed to examine if any of the areas detected in Experiment 1 showed greater activation for emotionally mismatching performances (combining the musician's movements with mismatching emotional sound) than for emotionally matching music performances (combining the musician's movements with matching emotional sound) as presented in Experiment 2 to the same participants. The insula and the left thalamus were found to respond consistently to visual, auditory and audiovisual emotional information and to have increased activation for emotionally mismatching displays in comparison with emotionally matching displays. In contrast, the right thalamus was found to respond to audiovisual emotional displays and to have similar activation for emotionally matching and mismatching displays. These results suggest that the insula and left thalamus have an active role in detecting emotional correspondence between auditory and visual information during music performances, whereas the right thalamus has a different role.

  11. Antidepressant-like effects of curcumin in chronic mild stress of rats: involvement of its anti-inflammatory action.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hong; Wang, Zhen; Wang, Yihe; Xie, Kai; Zhang, Qingrui; Luan, Qinsong; Chen, Wenqiang; Liu, Dexiang

    2013-12-02

    Mounting evidence suggests that inflammation may contribute to the pathophysiology of depression. Curcumin, a polyphenol extracted from the plant Curcuma longa, exhibits a number of pharmacological properties, including potent anti-inflammatory action. Hence, the current study aimed to explore the immunomodulatory effects of curcumin in an animal model of chronic mild stress (CMS). Rats were subjected to CMS protocol for a period of 21 days to induce depressive-like behavior. The body weight, sucrose preference and locomotor activity were evaluated. Both RT-PCR and ELISA were used to determine the expression of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus. Modulation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation was assessed by western blotting. Chronic treatment with curcumin significantly reversed the CMS-induced behavioral abnormalities (reduced sucrose preference and decreased locomotor activity) in stressed rats. Additionally, curcumin effectively inhibited cytokine gene expression at both the mRNA and the protein level and reduced the activation of NF-κB. The study revealed that curcumin exerted antidepressant-like effects in CMS rats, partially due to its anti-inflammatory aptitude.

  12. Possible Involvement of µ Opioid Receptor in the Antidepressant-Like Effect of Shuyu Formula in Restraint Stress-Induced Depression-Like Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fu-rong; Qiao, Ming-qi; Xue, Ling; Wei, Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Recently μ opioid receptor (MOR) has been shown to be closely associated with depression. Here we investigated the action of Shuyu, a Chinese herbal prescription, on repeated restraint stress induced depression-like rats, with specific attention to the role of MOR and the related signal cascade. Our results showed that repeated restraint stress caused significant depressive-like behaviors, as evidenced by reduced body weight gain, prolonged duration of immobility in forced swimming test, and decreased number of square-crossings and rearings in open field test. The stress-induced depression-like behaviors were relieved by Shuyu, which was accompanied by decreased expression of MOR in hippocampus. Furthermore, Shuyu upregulated BDNF protein expression, restored the activity of CREB, and stimulated MEK and ERK phosphorylation in hippocampus of stressed rats. More importantly, MOR is involved in the effects of Shuyu on these depression-related signals, as they can be strengthened by MOR antagonist CTAP. Collectively, these data indicated that the antidepressant-like properties of Shuyu are associated with MOR and the corresponding CREB, BDNF, MEK, and ERK signal pathway. Our study supports clinical use of Shuyu as an effective treatment of depression and also suggests that MOR might be a target for treatment of depression and developing novel antidepressants. PMID:25821488

  13. Metabolic response in liver and Brockmann bodies of rainbow trout to inhibition of lipolysis; possible involvement of the hypothalamus-pituitary-interrenal (HPI) axis.

    PubMed

    Librán-Pérez, Marta; Velasco, Cristina; Otero-Rodiño, Cristina; López-Patiño, Marcos A; Míguez, Jesús M; Soengas, José L

    2015-05-01

    We previously demonstrated in rainbow trout that the decrease in circulating levels of fatty acid (FA) induced by treating fish with SDZ WAG 994 (SDZ) induced a counter-regulatory response in which the activation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-interrenal (HPI, equivalent to mammalian hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal) axis was likely involved. This activation, probably not related to the control of food intake through FA sensor systems but to the modulation of lipolysis in peripheral tissues, liver and Brockmann bodies (BB, the main site of pancreatic endocrine cells in fish), would target the restoration of FA levels in plasma. To assess this hypothesis, we lowered circulating FA levels by treating fish with SDZ alone, or SDZ in the presence of metyrapone (an inhibitor of cortisol synthesis). In liver, the changes observed were not compatible with a direct FA-sensing response but with a stress response, which allows us to suggest that the detection of a FA decrease in the hypothalamus elicits a counter-regulatory response in liver, resulting in an activation of lipolysis to restore FA levels in plasma. The activation of these metabolic changes in liver could be attributable to the activation of the HPI axis and/or to the action of sympathetic pathways. In contrast, in BB, changes in circulating FA levels induce changes in several parameters compatible with the function of FA-sensing systems informing about the decrease in circulating FA levels.

  14. Study the Antinociceptive Effect of Intracerebroventricular Injection of Aqueous Extract of Origanum Vulgare Leaves in Rat: Possible Involvement of Opioid System

    PubMed Central

    Pahlavan, Yasaman; Sepehri, Gholamreza; Sheibani, Vahid; Afarinesh khaki, Mohammadreza; Gojazadeh, Morteza; Pahlavan, Bahare; Pahlavan, Fereshteh

    2013-01-01

    Objective(s): The aim of study was to investigate the antinociceptive effect of intracerebroventricular (ICV) microinjection of Origanum vulgare (ORG) extract and possible involvement of opioid receptors. Materials and Methods: Cannula was inserted into left ventricle of male rats. Five days after surgery Tail Flick Latency (TFL) was measured after ICV microinjection of, ORG (1, 3 and 6 µg / rat). Effective dose of ORG was injected ICV in concomitant with morphine (2 mg/kg, IP), naloxone (2 mg / kg, IP) and saline (0.5 µl/rat) and TFL was recorded. Results: The co- administration of ORG extract with morphine showed a significant increase in TFL and naloxone, pretreatment significantly inhibited the antinociceptive activity of ORG and morphine. Conclusion: The aqueous extract of ORG possesses antinociceptive activities in the tail-flick test in a dose dependent manner. ORG - induced antinociception may have been mediated by opioid systems. PMID:24379969

  15. The structure of the first representative of Pfam family PF06475 reveals a new fold with possible involvement in glycolipid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Bakolitsa, Constantina; Kumar, Abhinav; McMullan, Daniel; Krishna, S. Sri; Miller, Mitchell D.; Carlton, Dennis; Najmanovich, Rafael; Abdubek, Polat; Astakhova, Tamara; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Clayton, Thomas; Deller, Marc C.; Duan, Lian; Elias, Ylva; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grant, Joanna C.; Grzechnik, Slawomir K.; Han, Gye Won; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Jin, Kevin K.; Klock, Heath E.; Knuth, Mark W.; Kozbial, Piotr; Marciano, David; Morse, Andrew T.; Nigoghossian, Edward; Okach, Linda; Oommachen, Silvya; Paulsen, Jessica; Reyes, Ron; Rife, Christopher L.; Trout, Christina V.; van den Bedem, Henry; Weekes, Dana; White, Aprilfawn; Xu, Qingping; Hodgson, Keith O.; Wooley, John; Elsliger, Marc-André; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2010-01-01

    The crystal structure of PA1994 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a member of the Pfam PF06475 family classified as a domain of unknown function (DUF1089), reveals a novel fold comprising a 15-stranded β-sheet wrapped around a single α-helix that assembles into a tight dimeric arrangement. The remote structural similarity to lipoprotein localization factors, in addition to the presence of an acidic pocket that is conserved in DUF1089 homologs, phospholipid-binding and sugar-binding proteins, indicate a role for PA1994 and the DUF1089 family in glycolipid metabolism. Genome-context analysis lends further support to the involvement of this family of proteins in glycolipid metabolism and indicates possible activation of DUF1089 homologs under conditions of bacterial cell-wall stress or host–pathogen interactions. PMID:20944213

  16. Differential response of regulatory and conventional CD4⁺ lymphocytes to CD3 engagement: clues to a possible mechanism of anti-CD3 action?

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Nishio, Junko; van Maurik, André; Mathis, Diane; Benoist, Christophe

    2013-10-01

    Several clinical trials have shown anti-CD3 treatment to be a promising therapy for autoimmune diabetes, but its mechanism of action remains unclear. Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) are likely to be involved, but through unknown mechanistic pathways. We profiled the transcriptional consequences in CD4(+) Tregs and conventional T cells (Tconvs) in the first hours and days after anti-CD3 treatment of NOD mice. Anti-CD3 treatment led to a transient transcriptional response, terminating faster than most Ag-induced responses. Most transcripts were similarly induced in Tregs and Tconvs, but several were differential, in particular, those encoding the IL-7R and transcription factors Id2/3 and Gfi1, upregulated in Tregs but repressed in Tconvs. Because IL-7R was a plausible candidate for driving the homeostatic response of Tregs to anti-CD3, we tested its relevance by supplementation of anti-CD3 treatment with IL-7/anti-IL-7 complexes. Although ineffective alone, IL-7 significantly improved the rate of remission induced by anti-CD3. Four anti-human CD3 mAbs exhibited the same differential effect on IL-7R expression in human as in mouse cells, suggesting that the mechanism also underlies therapeutic effect in human cells, and perhaps a rationale for testing a combination of anti-CD3 and IL-7 for the treatment of recent-onset human type 1 diabetes. Thus, systems-level analysis of the response to anti-CD3 in the early phase of the treatment demonstrates different responses in Tregs and Tconvs, and provides new leads to a mechanistic understanding of its mechanism of action in reverting recent-onset diabetes.

  17. New enzymes involved in the mechanism of action of epidermal growth factor in a clonal strain of Leydig tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Castilla, Rocío; Gadaleta, Mariana; Castillo, Ana Fernanda; Duarte, Alejandra; Neuman, Isabel; Paz, Cristina; Cornejo Maciel, Fabiana; Podestá, Ernesto J

    2008-07-01

    The studies presented herein were designed to investigate the effect of mouse epidermal growth factor (mEGF) on arachidonic acid (AA) release in a clonal strain of cultured murine Leydig cells (designed MA-10). In MA-10 cells, mEGF promotes AA release and metabolism to lipoxygenated products to induce the steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein. However, the mechanism by which mEGF releases AA in these cells is not totally elucidated. We show that mEGF produces an increment in the mitochondrial AA content in a short-term incubation (30 min). This AA is released by the action of a mitochondrial acyl-CoA thioesterase (Acot2), as demonstrated in experiments in which Acot2 was down or overexpressed. This AA in turn regulates the StAR protein expression, indirect evidence of its metabolism to lipoxygenated products. We also show that mEGF induces the expression (mRNA and protein) of Acot2 and an acyl-CoA synthetase that provides the substrate, arachidonyl-CoA, to Acot2. This effect is also observed in another steroidogenic cell line, the adrenocortical Y1 cells. Taken together, our results show that: 1) mEGF can induce the generation of AA in a specific compartment of the cells, i.e. the mitochondria; 2) mEGF can up-regulate acyl-CoA synthetase and Acot2 mRNA and protein levels; and 3) mEGF-stimulated intramitochondrial AA release leads to StAR protein induction.

  18. Studies on the involvement of lysosomes in estrogen action, I. Isolation and enzymatic properties of pig endometrial lysosomes.

    PubMed

    Sierralta, W; Truitt, A J; Jungblut, P W

    1978-04-01

    Pig endometrium cells, collected by curettage and homogenized in an all-glass Potter Elvehjem homogenizer, gave a considerably higher yield of intact mitochondria and lysosomes than homogenates of whole uterus obtained with the Ultraturrax or the Parr bomb. After homogenization of the cells and subfractionation in the presence of Mg2, mitochondria and lysosomes equilibrated at the same modal density in isopycnic centrifugation. Homogenization and subfractionation in buffers devoid of divalent cations and containing EDTA resulted in a decrease in the buoyant density of mitochondria, allowing for a separation from lysosomes. The pH optima and the specific activities of two mitochondrial enzymes and eight hydrolyases used as marker enzymes were determined. The morphological characteristics of fractions were established by electron microscopy. Preliminary results indicate an involvement of lysosomes in steroid metabolism rather than in steroid and receptor translocation into the nucleus.

  19. ROS Involves the Fungicidal Actions of Thymol against Spores of Aspergillus flavus via the Induction of Nitric Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Qingshan; Zhou, Wei; Li, Hongbo; Hu, Liangbin; Mo, Haizhen

    2016-01-01

    Aspergillus flavus is a well-known pathogenic fungus for both crops and human beings. The acquisition of resistance to azoles by A. flavus is leading to more failures occurring in the prevention of infection by A. flavus. In this study, we found that thymol, one of the major chemical constituents of the essential oil of Monarda punctate, had efficient fungicidal activity against A. flavus and led to sporular lysis. Further studies indicated that thymol treatment induced the generation of both ROS and NO in spores, whereas NO accumulation was far later than ROS accumulation in response to thymol. By blocking ROS production with the inhibitors of NADPH oxidase, NO generation was also significantly inhibited in the presence of thymol, which indicated that ROS induced NO generation in A. flavus in response to thymol treatment. Moreover, the removal of either ROS or NO attenuated lysis and death of spores exposed to thymol. The addition of SNP (exogenous NO donor) eliminated the protective effects of the inhibitors of NADPH oxidase on thymol-induced lysis and death of spores. Taken together, it could be concluded that ROS is involved in spore death induced by thymol via the induction of NO. PMID:27196096

  20. Mammalian oocyte activation by the synergistic action of discrete sperm head components: induction of calcium transients and involvement of proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Perry, A C; Wakayama, T; Cooke, I M; Yanagimachi, R

    2000-01-15

    Sperm-borne oocyte-activating factor (SOAF) elicits activation sufficient for full development and originates from sperm head submembrane matrices. SOAF comprises discrete, heat-sensitive and -stable components (referred to here respectively as SOAF-I and -II) which are each necessary but not sufficient to activate oocytes. The heat-sensitive SOAF component, SOAF-I(m), becomes solubilized from the perinuclear matrix under reducing conditions (the SOAF transition) to generate SOAF-I(s). Although calcium transients likely play an important role in oocyte activation at fertilization, the question is open as to whether demembranated heads or SOAF-I(s) and/or SOAF-II can induce calcium transients. We now report that injection of demembranated sperm heads into mouse oocytes efficiently induced Ca(2+) oscillations. When injected independently, SOAF-I(s) and demembranated heads heated to 48 degrees C failed to generate Ca(2+) oscillations. However, co-injection of SOAF-I(s) and 48 degrees C-heated heads induced oscillations, mirroring their synergistic ability to activate oocytes. This suggests that SOAF-mediated activation proceeds via pathways resembling those at fertilization and provides the first direct evidence that multiple sperm components are required to induce Ca(2+) oscillations. We probed the SOAF-I(s) liberation at the center of this activation and show that in vitro it was sensitive to a profile of serine protease inhibitors. These findings support a model in which mammalian oocyte activation, including the induction of calcium transients, involves proteolytic processing of SOAF from sperm head submembrane compartments.

  1. Involvement of 5-HT3 receptors in the action of vortioxetine in rat brain: Focus on glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission.

    PubMed

    Riga, Maurizio S; Sánchez, Connie; Celada, Pau; Artigas, Francesc

    2016-09-01

    The antidepressant vortioxetine is a 5-HT3-R, 5-HT7-R and 5-HT1D-R antagonist, 5-HT1B-R partial agonist, 5-HT1A-R agonist, and serotonin (5-HT) transporter (SERT) inhibitor. Vortioxetine occupies all targets at high therapeutic doses and only SERT and 5-HT3-R at low doses. Vortioxetine increases extracellular monoamine concentrations in rat forebrain more than selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) and shows pro-cognitive activity in preclinical models. Given its high affinity for 5-HT3-R (Ki = 3.7 nM), selectively expressed in GABA interneurons, we hypothesized that vortioxetine may disinhibit glutamatergic and monoaminergic neurotransmission following 5-HT3-R blockade. Here we assessed vortioxetine effect on pyramidal neuron activity and extracellular 5-HT concentration using in vivo extracellular recordings of rat medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) pyramidal neurons and microdialysis in mPFC and ventral hippocampus (vHPC). Vortioxetine, but not escitalopram, increased pyramidal neuron discharge in mPFC. This effect was prevented by SR57227A (5-HT3-R agonist) and was mimicked by ondansetron (5-HT3-R antagonist) and by escitalopram/ondansetron combinations. In microdialysis experiments, ondansetron augmented the 5-HT-enhancing effect of escitalopram in mPFC and vHPC. Local ondansetron in vHPC augmented escitalopram effect, indicating the participation of intrinsic mechanisms. Since 5-HT neurons express GABAB receptors, we examined their putative involvement in controlling 5-HT release after 5-HT3-R blockade. Co-perfusion of baclofen (but not muscimol) reversed the increased 5-HT levels produced by vortioxetine and escitalopram/ondansetron combinations in vHPC. The present results suggest that vortioxetine increases glutamatergic and serotonergic neurotransmission in rat forebrain by blocking 5-HT3 receptors in GABA interneurons.

  2. Mechanisms involved in the anti-inflammatory action of a polysulfated fraction from Gracilaria cornea in rats.

    PubMed

    Coura, Chistiane Oliveira; Souza, Ricardo Basto; Rodrigues, José Ariévilo Gurgel; Vanderlei, Edfranck de Sousa Oliveira; de Araújo, Ianna Wivianne Fernandes; Ribeiro, Natássia Albuquerque; Frota, Annyta Fernandes; Ribeiro, Kátia Alves; Chaves, Hellíada Vasconcelos; Pereira, Karuza Maria Alves; da Cunha, Rodrigo Maranguape Silva; Bezerra, Mirna Marques; Benevides, Norma Maria Barros

    2015-01-01

    The anti-inflammatory mechanisms of the sulfated polysaccharidic fraction obtained from red marine alga Gracilaria cornea (Gc-FI) were investigated using a paw edema model induced in rats by different inflammatory agents (carrageenan, dextran, serotonin, bradykinin, compound 48/80 or L-arginine). Gc-FI at the doses of 3, 9 or 27 mg/kg, subcutaneously--s.c., significantly inhibited rat paw edema induced by carrageenan and dextran, as confirmed by myeloperoxidase and Evans' blue assessments, respectively. Gc-FI (9 mg/kg, s.c.) inhibited rat paw edema induced by histamine, compound 48/80 and L-arginine. Additionally, Gc-FI (9 mg/kg, s.c.) inhibited Cg-induced edema in animals with intact mast cells but did not inhibit that with degranulated mast cells by compound 48/80, revealing a protective role on mast cell membranes. Gc-FI down-regulated the IL-1β, TNF-α and COX-2 mRNA and protein levels compared with those of the carrageenan group, based on qRT-PCR and immunohistochemistry analyses. After inhibition with ZnPP IX, a specific heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) inhibitor, the anti-inflammatory effect of Gc-FI was not observed in Cg-induced paw edema, suggesting that the anti-inflammatory effect of Gc-FI is, in part, dependent on the integrity of the HO-1 pathway. Gc-FI can target a combination of multiple points involved in inflammatory phenomena.

  3. Mechanisms Involved in the Anti-Inflammatory Action of a Polysulfated Fraction from Gracilaria cornea in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Coura, Chistiane Oliveira; Souza, Ricardo Basto; Rodrigues, José Ariévilo Gurgel; Vanderlei, Edfranck de Sousa Oliveira; de Araújo, Ianna Wivianne Fernandes; Ribeiro, Natássia Albuquerque; Frota, Annyta Fernandes; Ribeiro, Kátia Alves; Chaves, Hellíada Vasconcelos; Pereira, Karuza Maria Alves; da Cunha, Rodrigo Maranguape Silva; Bezerra, Mirna Marques; Benevides, Norma Maria Barros

    2015-01-01

    The anti-inflammatory mechanisms of the sulfated polysaccharidic fraction obtained from red marine alga Gracilaria cornea (Gc-FI) were investigated using a paw edema model induced in rats by different inflammatory agents (carrageenan, dextran, serotonin, bradykinin, compound 48/80 or L-arginine). Gc-FI at the doses of 3, 9 or 27 mg/kg, subcutaneously - s.c., significantly inhibited rat paw edema induced by carrageenan and dextran, as confirmed by myeloperoxidase and Evans’ blue assessments, respectively. Gc-FI (9 mg/kg, s.c.) inhibited rat paw edema induced by histamine, compound 48/80 and L-arginine. Additionally, Gc-FI (9 mg/kg, s.c.) inhibited Cg-induced edema in animals with intact mast cells but did not inhibit that with degranulated mast cells by compound 48/80, revealing a protective role on mast cell membranes. Gc-FI down-regulated the IL-1β, TNF-α and COX-2 mRNA and protein levels compared with those of the carrageenan group, based on qRT-PCR and immunohistochemistry analyses. After inhibition with ZnPP IX, a specific heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) inhibitor, the anti-inflammatory effect of Gc-FI was not observed in Cg-induced paw edema, suggesting that the anti-inflammatory effect of Gc-FI is, in part, dependent on the integrity of the HO-1 pathway. Gc-FI can target a combination of multiple points involved in inflammatory phenomena. PMID:25807556

  4. Anti-Diabetic Effects of an Ethanol Extract of Cassia Abbreviata Stem Bark on Diabetic Rats and Possible Mechanism of Its Action

    PubMed Central

    Kwape, Tebogo Elvis; Chaturvedi, Padmaja

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to evaluate the hypoglycemic effects of an ethanol extract of Cassia abbreviata (ECA) bark and the possible mechanisms of its action in diabetic albino rats. Methods: ECA was prepared by soaking the powdered plant material in 70% ethanol. It was filtered and made solvent-free by evaporation on a rotary evaporator. Type 2 diabetes was induced in albino rats by injecting 35 mg/kg body weight (bw) of streptozotocin after having fed the rats a high-fat diet for 2 weeks. Diabetic rats were divided into ECA-150, ECA-300 and Metformin (MET)-180 groups, where the numbers are the doses in mg.kg.bw administered to the groups. Normal (NC) and diabetic (DC) controls were given distilled water. The animals had their fasting blood glucose levels and body weights determined every 7 days for 21 days. Oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTTs) were carried out in all animals at the beginning and the end of the experiment. Liver and kidney samples were harvested for glucose 6 phosphatase (G6Pase) and hexokinase activity analyses. Small intestines and diaphragms from normal rats were used for α-glucosidase and glucose uptake studies against the extract. Results: Two doses, 150 and 300 mg/kg bw, significantly reduced the fasting blood glucose levels in diabetic rats and helped them maintain normal body weights. The glucose level in DC rats significantly increased while their body weights decreased. The 150 mg/kg bw dose significantly increased hexokinase and decreased G6Pase activities in the liver and the kidneys. ECA inhibited α-glucosidase activity and promoted glucose uptake in the rats’ hemi-diaphragms. Conclusion: This study revealed that ECA normalized blood glucose levels and body weights in type 2 diabetic rats. The normalization of the glucose levels may possibly be due to inhibition of α-glucosidase, decreased G6Pase activity, increased hexokinase activity and improved glucose uptake by muscle tissues.

  5. Caffeine-induced effects on heart rate in zebrafish embryos and possible mechanisms of action: an effective system for experiments in chemical biology.

    PubMed

    Rana, Neha; Moond, Mamta; Marthi, Amarnath; Bapatla, Swetha; Sarvepalli, Tejasudha; Chatti, Kiranam; Challa, Anil Kumar

    2010-03-01

    Zebrafish embryos are well suited as a model system to perform chemical biology experiments effectively in educational settings. We studied the effect of caffeine on heart rate (HR) and other phenotypes of zebrafish embryos using visual microscopy and simple imaging. Acute treatment with millimolar concentrations of caffeine in embryo medium caused a dose-dependent decrease in HR in 2-3-day-old zebrafish embryos, ultimately resulting in complete HR cessation. A characteristic pattern of decrease in HR was observed, with an initial acute drop in HR and a period of stabilization followed by complete cessation. The effects of caffeine were not reversed by cotreatment with ruthenium red and adenosine, agents known to be antagonistic to caffeine, or by changes in calcium concentration in embryo medium. Apparent cardiac arrhythmia and a typical kinking effect in the trunk/tail region were also observed because of caffeine treatment. Our results, taken together with previous reports, raise the possibility that caffeine exerts its effects on embryonic HR of zebrafish by inhibition of ether-a-go-go potassium channels. However, further experimentation is required to dissect the molecular basis of caffeine action. We demonstrate that such experiments can be used to explore the effect of small molecules, such as caffeine, on cardiovascular phenotypes and to encourage experimental design in chemical biology.

  6. All possible modes of gene action are observed in a global comparison of gene expression in a maize F1 hybrid and its inbred parents

    PubMed Central

    Swanson-Wagner, Ruth A.; Jia, Yi; DeCook, Rhonda; Borsuk, Lisa A.; Nettleton, Dan; Schnable, Patrick S.

    2006-01-01

    Heterosis is the phenomenon whereby the progeny of particular inbred lines have enhanced agronomic performance relative to both parents. Although several hypotheses have been proposed to explain this fundamental biological phenomenon, the responsible molecular mechanisms have not been determined. The maize inbred lines B73 and Mo17 produce a heterotic F1 hybrid. Global patterns of gene expression were compared in seedlings of these three genotypes by using a microarray that contains 13,999 cDNAs. Using an estimated 15% false discovery rate as a cutoff, 1,367 ESTs (9.8%) were identified as being significantly differentially expressed among genotypes. All possible modes of gene action were observed, including additivity, high- and low-parent dominance, underdominance, and overdominance. The largest proportion of the ESTs (78%; 1,062 of 1,367) exhibited expression patterns that are not statistically distinguishable from additivity. Even so, 22% of the differentially regulated ESTs exhibited nonadditive modes of gene expression. Classified on the basis of significant pairwise comparisons of genotype means, 181 of these 305 nonadditive ESTs exhibited high-parent dominance and 23 exhibited low-parent dominance. In addition, 44 ESTs exhibited underdominance or overdominance. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that multiple molecular mechanisms, including overdominance, contribute to heterosis. PMID:16641103

  7. Possible involvement of iNOS and TNF-α in nutritional intervention against nicotine-induced pancreatic islet cell damage.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharjee, Ankita; Prasad, Shilpi Kumari; Pal, Swagata; Maji, Bithin; Banerjee, Arnab; Das, Debasmita; Bose, Ananya; Chatterjee, Nabanita; Mukherjee, Sandip

    2016-12-01

    Nicotine is the more abundant and most significant components of cigarette smoke. Epidemiological evidence strongly suggests an association between cigarette smoking and pancreatic injury. Although effects of smoking on endocrine pancreas are still controversial Here, we examined the impact and underlying mechanisms of action of folic acid and vitamin B12 on nicotine induced damage in pancreatic islets of rats. Male Wistar rats were treated with nicotine (3mg/kg body weight/day, intraperitonealy) with or without folic acid (36μg/kg body weight/day, orally) and vitamin B12 (0.63μg/kg body weight/day, orally) for 21days. Supplementation with folic acid and vitamin B12 suppressed the nicotine induced changes in HbA1c, insulin, TNF-α, IL-6, generation of reactive oxygen species, and attenuated the changes in markers of oxidative stress. Moreover, folic acid and vitamin B12 also counteracted the increased expression of protein and mRNA contents of TNF-α and iNOS produced by nicotine. Further, folic acid and vitamin B12 in combination limits the nicotine induced changes in cell cycle and excessive apoptosis of the pancreatic β-cells and also successfully blunted the nicotine induced alteration in loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. In conclusion, data demonstrate that folic acid and vitamin B12 may be possible nutritional intervention against cellular oxidative stress, which is a critical step in nicotine-mediated islet injury, and improves islet cell functional status by scavenging free radicals and by inhibiting the generation of pro-inflammatory mediators.

  8. Cell cycle alterations induced by urban PM2.5 in bronchial epithelial cells: characterization of the process and possible mechanisms involved

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background This study explores and characterizes cell cycle alterations induced by urban PM2.5 in the human epithelial cell line BEAS-2B, and elucidates possible mechanisms involved. Methods The cells were exposed to a low dose (7.5 μg/cm2) of Milan winter PM2.5 for different time points, and the cell cycle progression was analyzed by fluorescent microscopy and flow cytometry. Activation of proteins involved in cell cycle control was investigated by Western blotting and DNA damage by 32P-postlabelling, immunostaining and comet assay. The formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was quantified by flow cytometry. The role of PM organic fraction versus washed PM on the cell cycle alterations was also examined. Finally, the molecular pathways activated were further examined using specific inhibitors. Results Winter PM2.5 induced marked cell cycle alteration already after 3 h of exposure, represented by an increased number of cells (transient arrest) in G2. This effect was associated with an increased phosphorylation of Chk2, while no changes in p53 phosphorylation were observed at this time point. The increase in G2 was followed by a transient arrest in the metaphase/anaphase transition point (10 h), which was associated with the presence of severe mitotic spindle aberrations. The metaphase/anaphase delay was apparently followed by mitotic slippage at 24 h, resulting in an increased number of tetraploid G1 cells and cells with micronuclei (MN), and by apoptosis at 40 h. Winter PM2.5 increased the level of ROS at 2 h and DNA damage (8-oxodG, single- and double stand breaks) was detected after 3 h of exposure. The PM organic fraction caused a similar G2/M arrest and augmented ROS formation, while washed PM had no such effects. DNA adducts were detected after 24 h. Both PM-induced DNA damage and G2 arrest were inhibited by the addition of antioxidants and α-naphthoflavone, suggesting the involvement of ROS and reactive electrophilic metabolites formed via a P

  9. Anatomy of the antennal dorsal organ in female of Neodryinus typhlocybae (Hymenoptera: Dryinidae): A peculiar sensory structure possibly involved in perception of host vibration.

    PubMed

    Riolo, Paola; Isidoro, Nunzio; Ruschioni, Sara; Minuz, Roxana L; Bin, Ferdinando; Romani, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Neodryinus typhlocybae (Hymenoptera: Dryinidae) is a natural enemy of the planthopper Metcalfa pruinosa, which was introduced from North America into Europe and has become established in various regions as a pest species. Vibrational signals play a crucial role in the communication of M. pruinosa, which appears to be exploited by N. typhlocybae. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy have shown that the antennae of N. typhlocybae females have peculiar and complex sensory structures: deep longitudinal grooves that house long sensilla trichodea, termed here "Antennal Dorsal Organs." Such structures were not present on male antennae. These sensilla extend for the length of the grooves, without contact with the groove cuticle. Their hair shaft is empty and aporous, and inserted into a specialized socket, underneath which there is a cuticular ampulla-like chamber. Each sensillum is associated with two sensory neurons: one terminates at the proximal end of the dendritic sheath; the other continues into the sensillum sinus and is enclosed in the dendritic sheath. This second sensory neuron then enters the ampulla-like chamber through the circular opening, and then terminates with a conspicuous tubular body at the shaft base. The possible involvement of this peculiar structure in the context of host recognition mechanism is discussed.

  10. Transcriptional profiling analysis of Spodoptera litura larvae challenged with Vip3Aa toxin and possible involvement of trypsin in the toxin activation

    PubMed Central

    Song, Feifei; Chen, Chen; Wu, Songqing; Shao, Ensi; Li, Mengnan; Guan, Xiong; Huang, Zhipeng

    2016-01-01

    Vip proteins, a new group of insecticidal toxins produced by Bacillus thuringiensis, are effective against specific pests including Spodoptera litura. Here, we report construction of a transcriptome database of S. litura by de novo assembly along with detection of the transcriptional response of S. litura larvae to Vip3Aa toxin. In total, 56,498 unigenes with an N50 value of 1,853 bp were obtained. Results of transcriptome abundance showed that Vip3Aa toxin provoked a wide transcriptional response of the S. litura midgut. The differentially expressed genes were enriched for immunity-related, metabolic-related and Bt-related genes. Twenty-nine immunity-related genes, 102 metabolic-related genes and 62 Bt-related genes with differential expression were found. On the basis of transcriptional profiling analysis, we focus on the functional validation of trypsin which potentially participated in the activation of Vip3Aa protoxin. Zymogram analysis indicated that the presence of many proteases, including trypsin, in S. litura larvae midgut. Results of enzymolysis in vitro of Vip3Aa by trypsin, and bioassay and histopathology of the trypsin-digested Vip3Aa toxin showed that trypsin was possibly involved in the Vip3Aa activation. This study provides a transcriptome foundation for the identification and functional validation of the differentially expressed genes in an agricultural important pest, S. litura. PMID:27025647

  11. Transcriptional profiling analysis of Spodoptera litura larvae challenged with Vip3Aa toxin and possible involvement of trypsin in the toxin activation.

    PubMed

    Song, Feifei; Chen, Chen; Wu, Songqing; Shao, Ensi; Li, Mengnan; Guan, Xiong; Huang, Zhipeng

    2016-03-30

    Vip proteins, a new group of insecticidal toxins produced by Bacillus thuringiensis, are effective against specific pests including Spodoptera litura. Here, we report construction of a transcriptome database of S. litura by de novo assembly along with detection of the transcriptional response of S. litura larvae to Vip3Aa toxin. In total, 56,498 unigenes with an N50 value of 1,853 bp were obtained. Results of transcriptome abundance showed that Vip3Aa toxin provoked a wide transcriptional response of the S. litura midgut. The differentially expressed genes were enriched for immunity-related, metabolic-related and Bt-related genes. Twenty-nine immunity-related genes, 102 metabolic-related genes and 62 Bt-related genes with differential expression were found. On the basis of transcriptional profiling analysis, we focus on the functional validation of trypsin which potentially participated in the activation of Vip3Aa protoxin. Zymogram analysis indicated that the presence of many proteases, including trypsin, in S. litura larvae midgut. Results of enzymolysis in vitro of Vip3Aa by trypsin, and bioassay and histopathology of the trypsin-digested Vip3Aa toxin showed that trypsin was possibly involved in the Vip3Aa activation. This study provides a transcriptome foundation for the identification and functional validation of the differentially expressed genes in an agricultural important pest, S. litura.

  12. Human factors involved in perception and action in a natural stereoscopic world: an up-to-date review with guidelines for stereoscopic displays and stereoscopic virtual reality (VR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Bayas, Luis

    2001-06-01

    In stereoscopic perception of a three-dimensional world, binocular disparity might be thought of as the most important cue to 3D depth perception. Nevertheless, in reality there are many other factors involved before the 'final' conscious and subconscious stereoscopic perception, such as luminance, contrast, orientation, color, motion, and figure-ground extraction (pop-out phenomenon). In addition, more complex perceptual factors exist, such as attention and its duration (an equivalent of 'brain zooming') in relation to physiological central vision, In opposition to attention to peripheral vision and the brain 'top-down' information in relation to psychological factors like memory of previous experiences and present emotions. The brain's internal mapping of a pure perceptual world might be different from the internal mapping of a visual-motor space, which represents an 'action-directed perceptual world.' In addition, psychological factors (emotions and fine adjustments) are much more involved in a stereoscopic world than in a flat 2D-world, as well as in a world using peripheral vision (like VR, using a curved perspective representation, and displays, as natural vision does) as opposed to presenting only central vision (bi-macular stereoscopic vision) as in the majority of typical stereoscopic displays. Here is presented the most recent and precise information available about the psycho-neuro- physiological factors involved in the perception of stereoscopic three-dimensional world, with an attempt to give practical, functional, and pertinent guidelines for building more 'natural' stereoscopic displays.

  13. Homocysteine stimulates the expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 receptor (CCR2) in human monocytes: possible involvement of oxygen free radicals.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, G; O, K

    2001-01-01

    Homocysteinaemia is an independent risk factor for atherosclerosis. The development of atherosclerosis involves monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1)-mediated monocyte recruitment to the lesion site. The action of MCP-1 is mostly via its interaction with MCP-1 receptor (CCR2), which is the major receptor for MCP-1 on the surface of monocytes. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effect of homocysteine on CCR2 expression in human THP-1 monocytes. Cells were incubated with various concentrations of homocysteine for 6, 12, 24 and 48 h. The expression of CCR2 mRNA was determined by nuclease protection assay and the CCR2 protein was measured by Western immunoblotting analysis. The binding of MCP-1 to CCR2 as a functional receptor on the monocyte surface was determined by flow cytometry. Homocysteine (0.05-0.2 mM) significantly enhanced the expression of CCR2 mRNA (129-209% of the control) and CCR2 protein (up to 183% of control) in these cells after 24 h of incubation. Stimulation of CCR2 expression was associated with a parallel increase in the binding activity of CCR2 (129-191% of control) as well as an enhanced chemotactic response of homocysteine-treated monocytes. Further investigation revealed that the levels of superoxide were significantly elevated in cells incubated with homocysteine for 12-48 h. The addition of superoxide dismutase, a scavenger of superoxide, to the culture medium abolished the stimulatory effect of homocysteine on CCR2 expression as well as the binding activity of the receptor. The stimulatory effect of homocysteine on the expression of CCR2 mRNA and the levels of CCR2 protein was also observed in human peripheral blood monocytes. In conclusion, the present study has clearly demonstrated that homocysteine stimulates CCR2 expression in monocytes, leading to an enhanced binding activity and chemotatic response. Homocysteine-induced superoxide formation might serve as one of the underlying mechanisms for this effect

  14. A possible mechanism of action of plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) strain Bacillus pumilus WP8 via regulation of soil bacterial community structure.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yijun; Shen, Min; Wang, Huanli; Zhao, Qingxin

    2013-01-01

    According to the traditional view, establishment and maintenance of critical population densities in the rhizosphere was the premise of PGPR to exert growth-promoting effects. In light of the facts that soil bacterial community structures can be changed by some PGPR strains including Bacillus pumilus WP8, we hypothesize that regulation of soil bacterial community structure is one of the plant growth-promoting mechanisms of B. pumilus WP8, rather than depending on high-density cells in soil. In this study, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) was performed to evaluate the relationship between changes in soil bacterial community structure and growth-promoting effect on the seedling growth of fava beans (Vicia faba L.) during three successive cultivations. We found that B. pumilus WP8 lacks capacity to reproduce in large enough numbers to survive in bulk soil more than 40 days, yet the bacterial community structures were gradually influenced by inoculation of WP8, especially on dominant populations. Despite WP8 being short-lived, it confers the ability of steadily promoting fava bean seedling growth on soil during the whole growing period for at least 90 days. Pseudomonas chlororaphis RA6, another tested PGPR strain, exists in large numbers for at least 60 days but less than 90 days, whilst giving rise to slight influence on bacterial community structure. In addition, along with the extinction of RA6 cells in bulk soils, the effect of growth promotion disappeared simultaneously. Furthermore, the increment of soil catalase activity from WP8 treatment implied the ability to stimulate soil microbial activity, which may be the reason why the dominant population changed and increased as time passed. Our study suggests that regulation of treated soil bacterial community structure may be another possible action mechanism.

  15. Possible Mechanism of Action of the Antiallergic Effect of an Aqueous Extract of Heliotropium indicum L. in Ovalbumin-Induced Allergic Conjunctivitis

    PubMed Central

    Kyei, Samuel; Koffuor, George Asumeng; Ramkissoon, Paul; Abokyi, Samuel; Wiredu, Eric Addo

    2015-01-01

    Heliotropium indicum is used traditionally as a remedy for conjunctivitis in Ghana. This study therefore evaluated the antiallergic potential of an aqueous whole plant extract of Heliotropium indicum (HIE) in ovalbumin-induced allergic conjunctivitis and attempted to predict its mode of action. Clinical scores for allergic conjunctivitis induced by intraperitoneal ovalbumin sensitization (100 : 10 μg OVA/Al(OH)3 in phosphate-buffered saline [PBS]) and topical conjunctival challenge (1.5 mg OVA in 10 μL PBS) in Dunkin-Hartley guinea pigs were estimated after a week's daily treatment with 30–300 mg kg−1 HIE, 30 mg kg−1 prednisolone, 10 mg kg−1 chlorpheniramine, or 10 mL kg−1 PBS. Ovalbumin-specific IgG and IgE and total IgE in serum were estimated using Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay. Histopathological assessment of the exenterated conjunctivae was also performed. The 30 and 300 mg kg−1 HIE treatment resulted in a significantly (p ≤ 0.001) low clinical score of allergic conjunctivitis. Ovalbumin-specific IgG and IgE as well as total serum IgE also decreased significantly (p ≤ 0.01–0.001). The conjunctival tissue in HIE treated guinea pigs had mild mononuclear infiltration compared to the PBS-treated ones, which had intense conjunctival tissue inflammatory infiltration. HIE exhibited antiallergic effect possibly by immunomodulation or immunosuppression. PMID:26681960

  16. A brain site for the antigonadal action of melatonin in the white-footed mouse (Peromyscus leucopus): involvement of the immunoreactive GnRH neuronal system.

    PubMed

    Glass, J D; Knotts, L K

    1987-06-01

    Quantitative assessment of immunocytochemical staining for gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) was undertaken to determine the effects of an intracranial implant of melatonin on the GnRH neuronal system in the male white-footed mouse (Peromyscus leucopus). Melatonin-containing pellets stereotaxically placed in the anterior hypothalamic area (AH) caused a 60% reduction in testes weight relative to control mice with melatonin-free pellets in the AH (p less than 0.01). Subcutaneous melatonin-containing implants had little effect on reproductive state (p less than 0.8). Melatonin pellets in the AH increased significantly both the optical density (OD) for immunostaining of cell bodies in the medial preoptic area and AH (p less than 0.04), and the percentage of area covered by GnRH fibers and beads in the median eminence (p less than 0.01). The melatonin-induced increase in OD of the GnRH cell bodies was independent of the distance of the cells from the melatonin implant, and there was little apparent effect of melatonin on the size and morphology of the GnRH cell bodies, or the trajectories of their fiber pathways. These results support the hypothesis that the antigonadal action of melatonin in the brain involves suppression of the release, rather than the synthesis of GnRH. Also, this effect may not be mediated via a direct action of melatonin on GnRH neurons. The finding that the brain site and time course for melatonin's antigonadal action in male. P. leucopus is similar to that found previously in the female is evidence that melatonin may induce gonadal regression, in part, by helping to suppress the tonic secretion of gonadotropins.

  17. β-cyclodextrin complex containing Lippia grata leaf essential oil reduces orofacial nociception in mice - evidence of possible involvement of descending inhibitory pain modulation pathway.

    PubMed

    Siqueira-Lima, Pollyana S; Araújo, Adriano A S; Lucchese, Angélica M; Quintans, Jullyana S S; Menezes, Paula P; Alves, Péricles B; de Lucca Júnior, Waldecy; Santos, Marcio R V; Bonjardim, Leonardo R; Quintans-Júnior, Lucindo J

    2014-02-01

    The treatment of orofacial pain remains a major challenge for modern medicine. Thus, we prepared and physicochemically characterized a new β-cyclodextrin complex containing Lippia grata leaf essential oil (β-CD/EO) to investigate their possible antinociceptive activity in animal models of orofacial pain. The results of Differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) and Thermogravimetry/derivative thermogravimetry (TG/DTG) showed that the products prepared by Slurry complexation (SC) method were able to incorporate greater amounts of EO. In the X-ray diffractogram, it was shown that complex between EO and β-CD was formed. Male Swiss mice were pre-treated with β-CD/EO (6, 12 or 24 mg/kg, per os, gavage, p.o.), morphine (5 mg/kg, i.p.) or vehicle (distilled water, p.o.) 1 hr before treatment with formalin (20 μL, 2%), capsaicin (20 μL, 2.5 μg) or glutamate (40 μL, 25 μM) into the right upper lip. Our results demonstrated that p.o. treatment with β-CD/EO was significantly (p < 0.05 or p < 0.001) capable of reducing the nociceptive face-rubbing behaviour in both phases of the formalin test. β-CD/EO-treated mice were also significantly (p < 0.05 or p < 0.001) protected against nociception induced by capsaicin and glutamate. For the action in the central nervous system (CNS), ninety minutes after the treatment, the mice were perfused, the brains collected, crioprotected, cut in a criostate and submitted to an immunofluorescence protocol for Fos protein. The immunofluorescence protocol demonstrated that the β-CD/EO significantly activated (p < 0.05; p < 0.01 or p < 0.001) the motor cortex, the Locus ceruleus, the nucleus raphe magnus and the periaqueductal gray of the CNS. These effects apparently did not alter, in tested doses, the motor coordination of mice in the rota-rod test. Our results proposed that β-CD/EO might present an important draft of drug to the study of new compounds for the treatment of orofacial pain.

  18. Chromosomal locations and modes of action of genes of the retinoid (vitamin A) system support their involvement in the etiology of schizophrenia

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, A.B.

    1995-08-14

    Vitamin A (retinoid), an essential nutrient for fetal and subsequent mammalian development, is involved in gene expression, cell differentiation, proliferation, migration, and death. Retinoic acid (RA) the morphogenic derivative of vitamin A is highly teratogenic. In humans retinoid excess or deficit can result in brain anomalies and psychosis. This review discusses chromosomal loci of genes that control the retinoid cascade in relation to some candidate genes in schizophrenia. The paper relates the knowledge about the transport, delivery, and action of retinoids to what is presently known about the pathology of schizophrenia, with particular reference to the dopamine hypothesis, neurotransmitters, the glutamate hypothesis, neurotransmitters, the glutamate hypothesis, retinitis pigmentosa, dermatologic disorders, and craniofacial anomalies. 201 refs., 1 tab.

  19. Losartan attenuates chronic cigarette smoke exposure-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension in rats: Possible involvement of angiotensin-converting enzyme-2

    SciTech Connect

    Han Suxia; He Guangming; Wang Tao; Chen Lei; Ning Yunye; Luo Feng; An Jin; Yang Ting; Dong Jiajia; Liao Zenglin; Xu Dan; Wen Fuqiang

    2010-05-15

    Chronic cigarette smoking induces pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) by largely unknown mechanisms. Renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is known to function in the development of PAH. Losartan, a specific angiotensin II receptor antagonist, is a well-known antihypertensive drug with a potential role in regulating angiotensin-converting enzyme-2 (ACE2), a recently found regulator of RAS. To determine the effect of losartan on smoke-induced PAH and its possible mechanism, rats were daily exposed to cigarette smoke for 6 months in the absence and in the presence of losartan. Elevated right ventricular systolic pressure (RVSP), thickened wall of pulmonary arteries with apparent medial hypertrophy along with increased angiotensin II (Ang II) and decreased ACE2 levels were observed in smoke-exposed-only rats. Losartan administration ameliorated pulmonary vascular remodeling, inhibited the smoke-induced RVSP and Ang II elevation and partially reversed the ACE2 decrease in rat lungs. In cultured primary pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) from 3- and 6-month smoke-exposed rats, ACE2 levels were significantly lower than in those from the control rats. Moreover, PASMCs from 6-month exposed rats proliferated more rapidly than those from 3-month exposed or control rats, and cells grew even more rapidly in the presence of DX600, an ACE2 inhibitor. Consistent with the in vivo study, in vitro losartan pretreatment also inhibited cigarette smoke extract (CSE)-induced cell proliferation and ACE2 reduction in rat PASMCs. The results suggest that losartan may be therapeutically useful in the chronic smoking-induced pulmonary vascular remodeling and PAH and ACE2 may be involved as part of its mechanism. Our study might provide insight into the development of new therapeutic interventions for PAH smokers.

  20. Profiling of MicroRNAs under Wound Treatment in Aquilaria sinensis to Identify Possible MicroRNAs Involved in Agarwood Formation

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Zhi-Hui; Yang, Yun; Zhang, Zheng; Zhao, Wen-Ting; Meng, Hui; Jin, Yue; Huang, Jun-Qing; Xu, Yan-Hong; Zhao, Li-Zi; Liu, Juan; Wei, Jian-He

    2014-01-01

    Agarwood, a kind of highly valued non-timber product across Asia, is formed only when its resource trees -- the endangered genus Aquilaria are wounded or infected by some microbes. To promote the efficiency of agarwood production and protect the wild resource of Aquilaria species, we urgently need to reveal the regulation mechanism of agarwood formation. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a group of gene expression regulators with overwhelming effects on a large spectrum of biological processes. However, their roles in agarwood formation remain unknown. This work aimed at identifying possible miRNAs involved in the wound induced agarwood formation. In this study, the high-throughput sequencing was adopted to identify miRNAs and monitor their expression under wound treatment in the stems of A. sinensis. The miR171, miR390, miR394, miR2111, and miR3954 families remained at the reduced level two days after the treatment. 131 homologous miRNAs in the 0.5 h library showed over three-fold variation of read number compared with the control library, of which 12 exhibiting strong expression alterations were further confirmed by real-time quantitative PCR. Target prediction and annotation of the miRNAs demonstrated that the binding, metabolic process, catalytic activity, and cellular process are the most common functions of the predicted targets of these newly identified miRNAs in A.sinensis. The cleaveage sites of three newly predicted targets were verified by 5'RACE. PMID:24795531

  1. Profiling of microRNAs under wound treatment in Aquilaria sinensis to identify possible microRNAs involved in agarwood formation.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhi-Hui; Yang, Yun; Zhang, Zheng; Zhao, Wen-Ting; Meng, Hui; Jin, Yue; Huang, Jun-Qing; Xu, Yan-Hong; Zhao, Li-Zi; Liu, Juan; Wei, Jian-He

    2014-01-01

    Agarwood, a kind of highly valued non-timber product across Asia, is formed only when its resource trees--the endangered genus Aquilaria are wounded or infected by some microbes. To promote the efficiency of agarwood production and protect the wild resource of Aquilaria species, we urgently need to reveal the regulation mechanism of agarwood formation. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a group of gene expression regulators with overwhelming effects on a large spectrum of biological processes. However, their roles in agarwood formation remain unknown. This work aimed at identifying possible miRNAs involved in the wound induced agarwood formation. In this study, the high-throughput sequencing was adopted to identify miRNAs and monitor their expression under wound treatment in the stems of A. sinensis. The miR171, miR390, miR394, miR2111, and miR3954 families remained at the reduced level two days after the treatment. 131 homologous miRNAs in the 0.5 h library showed over three-fold variation of read number compared with the control library, of which 12 exhibiting strong expression alterations were further confirmed by real-time quantitative PCR. Target prediction and annotation of the miRNAs demonstrated that the binding, metabolic process, catalytic activity, and cellular process are the most common functions of the predicted targets of these newly identified miRNAs in A.sinensis. The cleaveage sites of three newly predicted targets were verified by 5'RACE.

  2. Possible involvement of brain prostaglandin E2 and prostanoid EP3 receptors in prostaglandin E2 glycerol ester-induced activation of central sympathetic outflow in the rat.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Takahiro; Tanaka, Kenjiro; Nakamura, Kumiko; Taniuchi, Keisuke; Yawata, Toshio; Higashi, Youichirou; Ueba, Tetsuya; Dimitriadis, Fotios; Shimizu, Shogo; Yokotani, Kunihiko; Saito, Motoaki

    2014-07-01

    We recently reported that intracerebroventricularly administered 2-arachidonoylglycerol elevated plasma noradrenaline and adrenaline by brain monoacylglycerol lipase- (MGL) and cyclooxygenase-mediated mechanisms in the rat. These results suggest that 2-arachidonoylglycerol is hydrolyzed by MGL to free arachidonic acid, which is further metabolized to prostaglandins (PGs) by cyclooxygenase in the brain, thereby elevating plasma noradrenaline and adrenaline. On the other hand, 2-arachidonoylglycerol can be also metabolized by cyclooxygenase to PG glycerol esters (PG-Gs), which seems to be hydrolyzed by MGL to free PGs. Here, we examined the involvement of brain PG-Gs in the elevation of plasma noradrenaline and adrenaline regarding PGE2-G and prostanoid EP receptors using anesthetized male Wistar rats. Intracerebroventricularly administered PGE2-G (1.5 and 3 nmol/animal) dose-dependently elevated plasma noradrenaline but not adrenaline. PGE2-G also elevated systolic, mean and diastolic blood pressure and heart rate. The PGE2-G-induced elevation of plasma noradrenaline was attenuated by JZL184 (MGL inhibitor). Intracerebroventricularly administered PGE2 (0.3 and 1.5 nmol/animal) and sulprostone (0.1 and 0.3 nmol/animal) (EP1/EP3 agonist) also elevated plasma noradrenaline but not adrenaline in a dose-dependent manner. The sulprostone-induced elevation was attenuated by L-798,106 (EP3 antagonist), but not by SC-51322 (EP1 antagonist). L-798,106 also attenuated the PGE2-G- and PGE2-induced elevation of plasma noradrenaline, while PF-04418948 (EP2 antagonist) and L-161,982 (EP4 antagonist) had no effect on the PGE2-G-induced response. These results suggest a possibility that brain PGE2-G produced from 2-arachidonoylglycerol can be hydrolyzed to free PGE2, thereby activating central sympathetic outflow by brain prostanoid EP3 receptor-mediated mechanisms in the rat.

  3. Screening of UV-B-induced genes from apple peels by SSH: possible involvement of MdCOP1-mediated signaling cascade genes in anthocyanin accumulation.

    PubMed

    Peng, Ting; Saito, Takanori; Honda, Chikako; Ban, Yusuke; Kondo, Satoru; Liu, Ji-Hong; Hatsuyama, Yoshimichi; Moriguchi, Takaya

    2013-07-01

    Suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) was employed to identify candidate genes involved in red coloration in apple peel with the ultraviolet (UV)-B-treated 'Mutsu'. After reverse Northern blotting verification, nearly 80 clones were successfully sequenced. Large portions of the expressed sequence tags (ESTs) are well characterized anthocyanin biosynthesis-related genes, such as chalcone synthase (11A5), flavonol synthase (12F3), anthocyanidin synthase (11H5) and UDP-glycosyl transferase (14A12) whose presence proved the success of SSH. Eight ESTs were selected for quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis and their expressions were all elevated in 'Induction', further confirming the reliability of the SSH library. One EST, 11F4 (CONSTITUTIVE PHOTOMORPHOGENIC 1: COP1) with putative function in light signal relay was further analyzed in 'Mutsu' and 'Tsugaru', along with MdHY5 (ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL 5: the downstream target of COP1), MdMYB22 (a possible flavonol-specific activator under the regulation of HY5, belonging to the SG7/PRODUCTION OF FLAVONOL GLYCOSIDES family) and MdMYBA. Results showed that MdCOP1, MdHY5, MdMYB22 and MdMYBA were all UV-B inducible genes and anthocyanin accumulation occurred after their increased expressions. Moreover, their expressions and anthocyanin content were enhanced under UV-B plus 17°C treatment. The presence of G box, a known consensus binding site of HY5, in the MdMYBA promoter region implicated that it could be regulated by MdHY5, which was verified by the result of the yeast one-hybrid analysis. Our data suggested that UV-B irradiation would induce the utmost upstream light signaling factor, MdCOP1, which activates MdHY5 signaling by binding to the promoter regions of MdMYBs, and finally leads to the red coloration of apple peels.

  4. Mechanism of action of the breast cancer-promoter hormone, 5α-dihydroprogesterone (5αP), involves plasma membrane-associated receptors and MAPK activation.

    PubMed

    Wiebe, John P; Pawlak, Kevin J; Kwok, Arthur

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that breast tissues and breast cell lines can convert progesterone to 5α-pregnane-3,20-dione (5aP), and that 5αP stimulates breast cell proliferation and detachment in vitro, and tumor formation in vivo, regardless of presence or absence of receptors for progesterone (PR) or estrogen (ER). Recently it was demonstrated, both in vitro and in vivo, that pro-cancer actions attributed to administered progesterone are due to the in situ produced 5αP. Because of the significant role of 5αP in breast cancers, it is important to understand its molecular mechanisms of action. The aims of the current studies were to identify 5αP binding sites and to determine if the mechanisms of action of 5αP involve the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases (ERK1/2) pathway. Binding studies, using tritium-labeled 5αP ([(3)H]5αP), carried out on membrane, cytosol and nuclear fractions from human breast cells (MCF-7, PR/ER-positive; MDA-MB-231, PR/ER-negative) and on highly enriched membrane fractions, identified the plasma membrane as the site of ligand specific 5αP receptors. Localization of 5αP receptors to the cell membrane was confirmed visually with fluorescently labeled conjugate (5αP-BSA-FITC). Treatment of cells with either 5αP or membrane-impermeable 5αP-BSA resulted in significant increases in cell proliferation and detachment. 5αP and 5αP-BSA equally activated the MAPK/ERK1/2 pathway as evidenced by phosphorylation of ERK1/2. Inhibitors (PD98059, mevastatin and genistein) of specific sites along the Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK signaling pathway, blocked the phosphorylation and concomitantly inhibited 5αP-induced stimulation of cell proliferation and detachment. The study has identified high affinity, stereo-specific binding sites for 5αP that have the characteristics of a functional membrane 5αP receptor, and has shown that the cancer-promoter actions of 5αP are mediated from the liganded receptor

  5. Involving migrants in the development of guidelines for communication in cross-cultural general practice consultations: a participatory learning and action research project

    PubMed Central

    O'Reilly-de Brún, Mary; MacFarlane, Anne; de Brún, Tomas; Okonkwo, Ekaterina; Bonsenge Bokanga, Jean Samuel; Manuela De Almeida Silva, Maria; Ogbebor, Florence; Mierzejewska, Aga; Nnadi, Lovina; van den Muijsenbergh, Maria; van Weel-Baumgarten, Evelyn; van Weel, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this research was to involve migrants and other key stakeholders in a participatory dialogue to develop a guideline for enhancing communication in cross-cultural general practice consultations. In this paper, we focus on findings about the use of formal versus informal interpreters because dialogues about these issues emerged as central to the identification of recommendations for best practice. Design This qualitative case study involved a Participatory Learning and Action (PLA) research methodology. Participants The sample comprised 80 stakeholders: 51 from migrant communities; 15 general practitioners (GPs) and general practice staff; 7 established migrants as peer researchers; 5 formal, trained interpreters; and 2 service planners from the national health authority. Setting Galway, Ireland. Results There was 100% consensus across stakeholder groups that while informal interpreters have uses for migrants and general practice staff, they are not considered acceptable as best practice. There was also 100% consensus that formal interpreters who are trained and working as per a professional code of practice are acceptable as best practice. Conclusions Policymakers and service planners need to work in partnership with service providers and migrants to progress the implementation of professional, trained interpreters as a routine way of working in general practice. PMID:26391628

  6. Signal transduction of receptor-mediated antiproliferative action of melatonin on human prostate epithelial cells involves dual activation of Gα(s) and Gα(q) proteins.

    PubMed

    Shiu, Stephen Y W; Pang, Bo; Tam, Chun W; Yao, Kwok-Ming

    2010-10-01

    Melatonin has been shown to inhibit the proliferation of malignant and transformed human prostate epithelial cells by transcriptional up-regulation of p27(Kip1) expression via MTNR1A receptor-mediated activation of protein kinase A (PKA) and protein kinase C (PKC) in parallel. Given that melatonin MTNR1A receptor is a G protein-coupled receptor, this study was conducted to identify the specific G proteins that mediate the antiproliferative action of melatonin on human prostate epithelial cells. In 22Rv1 and RWPE-1 cells, knockdown of either Gα(s) or Gα(q) , but not Gα(i2) expression by RNA interference, abrogated the effects of melatonin on p27(Kip1) and cell proliferation. Conversely, cellular overexpression of activated mutants of Gα(s) and Gα(q) in 22Rv1 and RWPE-1 cells mimicked the effects of melatonin on prostate epithelial cell antiproliferation by increasing p27(Kip1) expression through downstream activation of PKA and PKC in parallel. Moreover, melatonin or 2-iodomelatonin induced elevation of adenosine-3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) in 22Rv1 and RWPE-1 cells. The effects of 2-iodomelatonin on cAMP were blocked by the nonselective MTNR1A/MTNR1B receptor antagonist luzindole but were not affected by the selective MTNR1B receptor antagonist 4-phenyl-2-propionamidotetraline (4-P-PDOT). Furthermore, knockdown of Gα(s) mitigated the stimulatory effects of 2-iodomelatonin on cAMP. Collectively, the data demonstrated, for the first time, functional coupling of MTNR1A receptor to Gα(s) in cancerous or transformed human cells expressing endogenous melatonin receptors. Our results also showed that dual activation of Gα(s) and Gα(q) proteins is involved in the signal transduction of MTNR1A receptor-mediated antiproliferative action of melatonin on human prostate epithelial cells.

  7. Involvement of ERK1/2 signaling pathway in atrazine action on FSH-stimulated LHR and CYP19A1 expression in rat granulosa cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fa, Svetlana; Pogrmic-Majkic, Kristina; Samardzija, Dragana; Glisic, Branka; Kaisarevic, Sonja; Kovacevic, Radmila; Andric, Nebojsa

    2013-07-01

    Worldwide used herbicide atrazine is linked to reproductive dysfunction in females. In this study, we investigated the effects and the mechanism of atrazine action in the ovary using a primary culture of immature granulosa cells. In granulosa cells, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) activates both cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and extracellular-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) cascades, with cAMP pathway being more important for luteinizing hormone receptor (LHR) and aromatase (CYP19A1) mRNA expression. We report that 48 h after atrazine exposure the FSH-stimulated LHR and CYP19A1 mRNA expression and estradiol synthesis were decreased, with LHR mRNA being more sensitive to atrazine than CYP19A1 mRNA. Inadequate acquisition of LHR in the FSH-stimulated and atrazine-exposed granulosa cells renders human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) ineffective to stimulate amphiregulin (Areg), epiregulin (Ereg), and progesterone receptor (Pgr) mRNA expression, suggesting anti-ovulatory effect of atrazine. To dissect the signaling cascade involved in atrazine action in granulosa cells, we used U0126, a pharmacological inhibitor of ERK1/2. U0126 prevents atrazine-induced decrease in LHR and CYP19A1 mRNA levels and estradiol production in the FSH-stimulated granulosa cells. ERK1/2 inactivation restores the ability of hCG to induce expression of the ovulatory genes in atrazine-exposed granulosa cells. Cell-based ELISA assay revealed that atrazine does not change the FSH-stimulated ERK1/2 phosphorylation in granulosa cells. The results from this study reveal that atrazine does not affect but requires ERK1/2 phosphorylation to cause decrease in the FSH-induced LHR and CYP19A1 mRNA levels and estradiol production in immature granulosa cells, thus compromising ovulation and female fertility. - Highlights: • Atrazine inhibits estradiol production in FSH-stimulated granulosa cells. • Atrazine inhibits LHR and Cyp19a1 mRNA expression in FSH-stimulated granulosa cells. • Atrazine

  8. Anti-apoptotic action of API2-MALT1 fusion protein involved in t(11;18)(q21;q21) MALT lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Hosokawa, Y

    2005-01-01

    At least three distinct chromosomal translocations, t(11;18)(q21;q21), t(1;14)(p22;q32) and t(14;18)(q32;q21) involving the API2 (also known as c-IAP2)-MALT1 fusion protein, BCL10, and MALT1, respectively, have been implicated in the molecular pathogenesis of mucosa associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma. Our findings showed that several variants of the API2-MALT1 fusion protein can occur in patients with t(11;18)(q21;q21), and that API2-MALT1 can potently enfance activation of nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB signaling, which may be relevant to the pathogenesis of MALT lymphomas. We also found that MALT1 is rapidly degraded via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway, as is the case with API2, but upon the synthesis of fusion, API2-MALT1 becomes stable against this pathway. This stability of API2-MALT1 may thus result in inappropriate nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB activation, thereby contributing to the pathogenesis of MALT lymphoma. Recent biochemical and genetic studies have clearly shown that BCL10 and MALT1 form a physical and functional complex and are both required for NF-kappaB activation by antigen receptor stimulation in T and B lymphocytes. It has also been shown that CARMA1, a newly discovered member of the membrane-associated guanylate kinase (MAGUK) families, is critical for antigen receptor-stimulated NF-kappaB activation. It can be assumed that API2-MALT1 can bypass this normal BCL10/MALT1 cellular signaling pathway linked to NF-kappaB activation, thereby inducing antigen receptor-independent proliferation of lymphocytes. Furthermore, BCL10/MALT1- and API2-MALT1-induced NF-kappaB activation may contribute to anti-apoptotic action probably through NF-kappaB-mediated upregulation of apoptotic inhibitor genes. We recently provided direct evidence that API2-MALT1 indeed exerts anti-apoptotic action, in part, through its direct interaction with apoptotic regulators including Smac. Taken together, these findings prompt us to hypothesize that the anti-apoptotic action

  9. Nodes-and-connections RNAi knockdown screening: identification of a signaling molecule network involved in fulvestrant action and breast cancer prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Miyoshi, N; Wittner, B S; Shioda, K; Hitora, T; Ito, T; Ramaswamy, S; Isselbacher, K J; Sgroi, D C; Shioda, T

    2015-01-01

    Although RNA interference (RNAi) knockdown screening of cancer cell cultures is an effective approach to predict drug targets or therapeutic/prognostic biomarkers, interactions among identified targets often remain obscure. Here, we introduce the nodes-and-connections RNAi knockdown screening that generates a map of target interactions through systematic iterations of in silico prediction of targets and their experimental validation. An initial RNAi knockdown screening of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells targeting 6560 proteins identified four signaling molecules required for their fulvestrant-induced apoptosis. Signaling molecules physically or functionally interacting with these four primary node targets were computationally predicted and experimentally validated, resulting in identification of four second-generation nodes. Three rounds of further iterations of the prediction–validation cycle generated third, fourth and fifth generation of nodes, completing a 19-node interaction map that contained three predicted nodes but without experimental validation because of technical limitations. The interaction map involved all three members of the death-associated protein kinases (DAPKs) as well as their upstream and downstream signaling molecules (calmodulins and myosin light chain kinases), suggesting that DAPKs play critical roles in the cytocidal action of fulvestrant. The in silico Kaplan–Meier analysis of previously reported human breast cancer cohorts demonstrated significant prognostic predictive power for five of the experimentally validated nodes and for three of the prediction-only nodes. Immunohistochemical studies on the expression of 10 nodal proteins in human breast cancer tissues not only supported their prognostic prediction power but also provided statistically significant evidence of their synchronized expression, implying functional interactions among these nodal proteins. Thus, the Nodes-and-Connections approach to RNAi knockdown screening yields

  10. Cellular transport of microcystin-LR in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) across the intestinal wall: possible involvement of multidrug resistance-associated proteins.

    PubMed

    Bieczynski, Flavia; De Anna, Julieta S; Pirez, Macarena; Brena, Beatríz M; Villanueva, Silvina S M; Luquet, Carlos M

    2014-09-01

    We studied Abcc mediated-transport in middle and posterior intestine of the rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss. Luminal and serosal transport were evaluated in everted and non-everted intestinal sacs, respectively, incubated with 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB; 200 μM). CDNB enters the cells and is conjugated with glutathione via glutathione S-transferase (GST) to form 2,4-dinitrophenyl-S-glutathione (DNP-SG), a known Abcc substrate. DNP-SG concentration in the bath was recorded every 10 min, in order to calculate the mass-specific transport rate. For evaluating the possible involvement of Abcc proteins in microcystin-LR (MCLR) transport, 1.135 μM MCLR was added to the bath or inside the sacs, in everted or non-everted preparations, respectively. Both luminal and serosal DNP-SG efflux were significantly inhibited by MCLR. A concentration-response curve obtained using strips from middle intestine yielded an IC50 value of 1.33 μM MCLR. The Abcc inhibitor, MK571 produced concentration-dependent inhibition of DNP-SG similar to that produced by MCLR. Since competition of MCLR and CDNB as GST substrates could bias the DNP-SG transport results, we evaluated the effects of MCLR on calcein efflux, which does not depend on GST activity. We applied the non-fluorescent, cell-permeant compound calcein-AM (0.25 μM) to middle intestinal strips and recorded the efflux of its hydrolysis product, the fluorescent Abcc substrate calcein. 2.27 μM MCLR and 3 μM MK571 inhibited calcein efflux (17.39 and 20.2%, respectively). Finally, MCLR interaction with Abcc transporters was evaluated by measuring its toxic intracellular effects. Middle intestinal segments were incubated in saline solution with 1.135 μM MCLR (MC1), 2.27 μM MCLR (MC2), 3 μM MK571 (MK) or 1.135 μM MCLR+3 μM MK571 (MC1/MK). After 1h, GSH concentration, protein phosphatase 1 and 2A (PP1, PP2A) and GST activities were measured in each segment. MC1did not produce significant effect while MC1/MK and MC2

  11. Antidepressant-like activity of aroxyalkyl derivatives of 2-methoxyphenylpiperazine and evidence for the involvement of serotonin receptor subtypes in their mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Kubacka, Monika; Mogilski, Szczepan; Bednarski, Marek; Nowiński, Leszek; Dudek, Magdalena; Żmudzka, Elżbieta; Siwek, Agata; Waszkielewicz, Anna M; Marona, Henryk; Satała, Grzegorz; Bojarski, Andrzej; Filipek, Barbara; Pytka, Karolina

    2016-02-01

    Since serotonin (5-HT) is strongly involved in the etiology and pathophysiology of depression, the development of new antidepressants is still based on the serotonergic system. The complexity of serotonergic system provides an opportunity for the development of compounds with multiple and complementary mechanism of action. This study describes serotonin receptor profile, functional characterization, and pharmacological in vivo evaluation of new aroxyalkyl derivatives of 2-methoxyphenylpiperazine. The obtained results allowed for the identification of compound 3, (1-[3-(2,6-dimethylphenoxy)propyl]-4-(2-methoxyphenyl)piperazine hydrochloride), a partial 5-HT1A receptor agonist, and 5-HT2A receptor antagonist, with high affinity toward 5-HT7 receptors, showing antidepressant- and anxiolytic-like properties. Moreover, 5-HT1A receptor activation is crucial for the antidepressant-like activity of compound 3. The rest of the compounds (except compounds 1 and 9) showed antidepressant but not anxiolytic-like properties, which did not result from 5-HT1A receptors activation. Furthermore, the compounds are 5-HT1A and weak 5-HT3 receptors antagonists, and some of them 5-HT2A antagonists. Moreover, none of the studied compounds impaired motor coordination at antidepressant-like doses. Since the studied compounds exhibited activity in behavioral assays and interacted with various receptors, the results of our experiments are very promising and require further studies.

  12. The Global Possible: Resources, Development, and the New Century. The Statement and Action Agenda of an International Conference (Washington, D.C., May 2-5, 1984).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World Resources Inst., Washington, DC.

    The relationships between earth's resources and the human future and the challenges of maintaining a sustainable environment were probed at an international conference sponsored by the World Resources Institute. A synthesis of the conference's reports, perspectives, and plans for action are presented in this document. The position supported by the…

  13. Systems analysis of immune responses in Marek's disease virus-infected chickens identifies a gene involved in susceptibility and highlights a possible novel pathogenicity mechanism.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jacqueline; Sadeyen, Jean-Remy; Paton, Ian R; Hocking, Paul M; Salmon, Nigel; Fife, Mark; Nair, Venugopal; Burt, David W; Kaiser, Pete

    2011-11-01

    Marek's disease virus (MDV) is a highly contagious oncogenic alphaherpesvirus that causes disease that is both a cancer model and a continuing threat to the world's poultry industry. This comprehensive gene expression study analyzes the host response to infection in both resistant and susceptible lines of chickens and inherent expression differences between the two lines following the infection of the host. A novel pathogenicity mechanism, involving the downregulation of genes containing HIC1 transcription factor binding sites as early as 4 days postinfection, was suggested from this analysis. HIC1 drives antitumor mechanisms, suggesting that MDV infection switches off genes involved in antitumor regulation several days before the expression of the MDV oncogene meq. The comparison of the gene expression data to previous QTL data identified several genes as candidates for involvement in resistance to MD. One of these genes, IRG1, was confirmed by single nucleotide polymorphism analysis to be involved in susceptibility. Its precise mechanism remains to be elucidated, although the analysis of gene expression data suggests it has a role in apoptosis. Understanding which genes are involved in susceptibility/resistance to MD and defining the pathological mechanisms of the disease gives us a much greater ability to try to reduce the incidence of this virus, which is costly to the poultry industry in terms of both animal welfare and economics.

  14. IgG4-related epididymo-orchitis associated with bladder cancer: possible involvement of BAFF/BAFF-R interaction in IgG4-related urogenital disease.

    PubMed

    Migita, Kiyoshi; Miyashita, Taiichiro; Mizuno, Aya; Jiuchi, Yuka; Ito, Masahiro; Matsuo, Manabu; Izumi, Yasumori; Takeoka, Atsushi; Nishino, Ayako; Hayashi, Mikio

    2014-01-01

    We describe herein a patient who presented with immunoglobulin G4-related disease (IgG4-RD) involving the testis and prostate as well as the submandibular glands. Massive infiltration of IgG4-expressing plasma cells was observed in testis and prostate tissues. Serum concentrations of B cell activating factor belonging to the tumor necrosis factor family (BAFF) were elevated in parallel with serum IgG4 concentrations, and infiltration of BAFF-receptor (BAFF-R)-expressing B cells and BAFF-expressing lymphoid cells was observed around the ectopic lymphoid foci in the affected urogenital tissues. To date, testicular involvement in a patient diagnosed with IgG4-RD had not been reported, making this the first reported case of IgG4-related epididymo-orchitis. These findings suggest that the immune mechanism underlying ectopic lymphoneogenesis in IgG4-RD may involve enhanced BAFF/BAFF-R interactions among lymphoid cells.

  15. Activating transcription factor-3 induction is involved in the anti-inflammatory action of berberine in RAW264.7 murine macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Young-An

    2016-01-01

    Berberine is an isoquinoline alkaloid found in Rhizoma coptidis, and elicits anti-inflammatory effects through diverse mechanisms. Based on previous reports that activating transcription factor-3 (ATF-3) acts as a negative regulator of LPS signaling, the authors investigated the possible involvement of ATF-3 in the anti-inflammatory effects of berberine. It was found berberine concentration-dependently induced the expressions of ATF-3 at the mRNA and protein levels and concomitantly suppressed the LPS-induced productions of proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β). In addition, ATF-3 knockdown abolished the inhibitory effects of berberine on LPS-induced proinflammatory cytokine production, and prevented the berberine-induced suppression of MAPK phosphorylation, but had little effect on AMPK phosphorylation. On the other hand, the effects of berberine, that is, ATF-3 induction, proinflammatory cytokine inhibition, and MAPK inactivation, were prevented by AMPK knockdown, suggesting ATF-3 induction occurs downstream of AMPK activation. The in vivo administration of berberine to mice with LPS-induced endotoxemia increased ATF-3 expression and AMPK phosphorylation in spleen and lung tissues, and concomitantly reduced the plasma and tissue levels of proinflammatory cytokines. These results suggest berberine has an anti-inflammatory effect on macrophages and that this effect is attributable, at least in part, to pathways involving AMPK activation and ATF-3 induction. PMID:27382358

  16. The involvement of oxidative stress in the mechanisms of damaging cadmium action in bone tissue: A study in a rat model of moderate and relatively high human exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Brzoska, Malgorzata M. Rogalska, Joanna; Kupraszewicz, Elzbieta

    2011-02-01

    It was investigated whether cadmium (Cd) may induce oxidative stress in the bone tissue in vivo and in this way contribute to skeleton damage. Total antioxidative status (TAS), antioxidative enzymes (glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase, catalase), total oxidative status (TOS), hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}), lipid peroxides (LPO), total thiol groups (TSH) and protein carbonyl groups (PC) as well as Cd in the bone tissue at the distal femoral epiphysis and femoral diaphysis of the male rats that received drinking water containing 0, 5, or 50 mg Cd/l for 6 months were measured. Cd, depending on the level of exposure and bone location, decreased the bone antioxidative capacity and enhanced its oxidative status resulting in oxidative stress and oxidative protein and/or lipid modification. The treatment with 5 and 50 mg Cd/l decreased TAS and activities of antioxidative enzymes as well as increased TOS and concentrations of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and PC at the distal femur. Moreover, at the higher exposure, the concentration of LPO increased and that of TSH decreased. The Cd-induced changes in the oxidative/antioxidative balance of the femoral diaphysis, abundant in cortical bone, were less advanced than at the distal femur, where trabecular bone predominates. The results provide evidence that, even moderate, exposure to Cd induces oxidative stress and oxidative modifications in the bone tissue. Numerous correlations noted between the indices of oxidative/antioxidative bone status, and Cd accumulation in the bone tissue as well as indices of bone turnover and bone mineral status, recently reported by us (Toxicology 2007, 237, 89-103) in these rats, allow for the hypothesis that oxidative stress is involved in the mechanisms of damaging Cd action in the skeleton. The paper is the first report from an in vivo study indicating that Cd may affect bone tissue through disorders in its oxidative/antioxidative balance resulting in oxidative stress.

  17. On the Numerical Discretization in Space and Time: Part 1 - Hamilton's Law of Varying Action Involving Lagrangian/Hamiltonian/Total Energy Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Har, Jason; Tamma, K. K.

    2010-08-01

    The focus in Part 1 of this exposition is strictly restricted to holonomic-sceleronomic systems, and the applications of interest are elastodynamics, which are routinely encountered in a wide class of structural dynamics problems in engineering. Restricting attention to these considerations, new and different perspectives and equivalences are described which deal with finite element space discretization aspects employing three distinctly different frameworks with scalar formalism. It encompasses the Lagrangian mechanics, the Hamiltonian mechanics, and as an alternative, the framework with a built-in measurable quantity based on the Total Energy. Historically, traditional practices routinely employ the weighted residual method or equivalently the principle of virtual work in dynamics for developing finite element formulations. In contrast, the present developments stem from Hamilton's law of varying action (HLVA) as a starting point and involve distinctly different scalar descriptive functions (the Lagrangian [ℒ( q , [qdot] ) : TQ →ℝ], the Hamiltonian [ℋ( p , q ) : T* Q →ℝ], or the Total Energy [ℰ( q , [qdot] ):TQ →ℝ]). These developments naturally embody the weak form in space and the statement of the weighted residual in time. Complicated structural dynamical systems such as a rotating bar and the Timoshenko beam are particularly shown here simply for illustration. In Part 2, we describe the satisfaction of conservation properties of the fully discretized equations of motion in space and time with particular attention to the Total Energy framework (in contrast to the Lagrangian and the Hamiltonian), primarily because it is very natural and is computationally attractive and meaningful to conducting the time discretization [1] process. Instead of starting from the continuous form of representations, the particular focus is upon directly employing the discrete formulations for enabling algorithmic designs for the class of LMS methods for linear

  18. Inhibition of spoilage mould conidia by acetic acid and sorbic acid involves different modes of action, requiring modification of the classical weak-acid theory.

    PubMed

    Stratford, Malcolm; Plumridge, Andrew; Nebe-von-Caron, Gerhardt; Archer, David B

    2009-11-30

    Fungal spoilage of many foods is prevented by weak-acid preservatives such as sorbic acid or acetic acid. We show that sorbic and acetic acids do not both inhibit cells by lowering of internal pH alone and that the "classical weak-acid theory" must be revised. The "classical weak-acid theory" suggests that all lipophilic acids with identical pK(a) values are equally effective as preservatives, causing inhibition by diffusion of molecular acids into the cell, dissociation, and subsequent acidification of the cytoplasm. Using a number of spoilage fungi from different genera, we have shown that sorbic acid was far more toxic than acetic acid, and no correlation existed between resistance to acetic acid and resistance to sorbic acid. The molar ratio of minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) (acetic: sorbic) was 58 for Paecilomyces variotii and 14 for Aspergillus phoenicis. Using flow cytometry on germinating conidia of Aspergillusniger, acetic acid at pH 4.0 caused an immediate decline in the mean cytoplasmic pH (pH(i)) falling from neutrality to approximately pH 4.7 at the MIC (80 mM). Sorbic acid also caused a rapid but far smaller drop in pH(i), at the MIC (4.5 mM); the pH remained above pH 6.3. Over 0-5 mM, a number of other weak acids caused a similar fall in cytoplasmic pH. It was concluded that while acetic acid inhibition of A. niger conidia was due to cytoplasmic acidification, inhibition by sorbic acid was not. A possible membrane-mediated mode of action of sorbic acid is discussed.

  19. Lack of functional evidence for the involvement of sigma opiate receptors in the actions of the 3-PPP enantiomers on central dopaminergic systems: discrepancies between in vitro and in vivo observations.

    PubMed

    Hjorth, S; Clark, D; Carlsson, A

    1985-08-19

    In vitro radioligand binding and autoradiographic distribution studies have suggested the possible involvement of central sigma-opiate sites in the effects of several purportedly dopaminergic agents. Specifically, Largent et al. (Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. 81, 4983, 1984) proposed that "actions of 3-PPP at sigma receptors may account for the effect of the drug on behavior and dopaminergic nerve function". Using the sigma-opiate- and dopamine (DA)-preferring (-)- and (+)-enantiomer, respectively, of butaclamol, and the two enantiomers of 3-PPP, the present study was undertaken to address the in vivo functional significance of this proposal. To this end we investigated various biological responses considered to reflect drug interactions with DA cell body and terminal autoreceptors and with presumed non-synaptic and postsynaptic DA receptors in the rat CNS. (+)- but not (-)-butaclamol antagonized the 3-PPP (either enantiomer)-induced DA synthesis and prolactin decreases in GBL-treated rats, the (+)-3-PPP-induced inhibition of substantia nigra DA cell firing and the (+)-3-PPP-induced reversal of reserpine akinesia. Taken together with previous findings available data suggest that DA rather than sigma-opiate receptors mediate the neurochemical, electrophysiological, behavioral and other physiological (prolactin, body temperature) effects of 3-PPP and its enantiomers. The in vivo pharmacological relevance of the claimed non-dopaminergic, proposedly sigma-opiatergic, radioligand binding demonstrated in vitro (with e.g. (+)-3-PPP) thus remains to be established.

  20. The idea of the absurd and the moral decision. Possibilities and limits of a physician's actions in the view of the absurd.

    PubMed

    Lengers, F P

    1994-01-01

    In reference to two central concepts of Albert Camus' philosophy, that is, the absurd and the rebellion, this article examines to what extent his The Plague is of interest to medical ethics. The interpretation of this novel put forward in this article focuses on the main character of the novel, the physician Dr. Rieux. For Rieux, the plague epidemic, as it is described in the novel, implies an unquestioning commitment to his patients and fellow men. According to Camus this epidemic has to be understood as a symbol of the absurd. Unable to base his actions on a Christian, metaphysical value system, Rieux sees his commitment as a continuous rebellion against the fact of the absurd, which opposes him in the form of evil, suffering and death. As a physician, Rieux is therefore forced to adjust his actions to life in its immediacy, that is, the suffering of his patients. In this article, it will be shown that Rieux's attention to the "immediate" is of particular interest to medical ethics: The other person in need, rather than my moral convictions, sets the norm.

  1. Prevention and reversal of ketamine-induced schizophrenia related behavior by minocycline in mice: Possible involvement of antioxidant and nitrergic pathways.

    PubMed

    Monte, Aline Santos; de Souza, Greicy Coelho; McIntyre, Roger S; Soczynska, Joanna K; dos Santos, Júnia Vieira; Cordeiro, Rafaela Carneiro; Ribeiro, Bruna Mara Machado; de Lucena, David Freitas; Vasconcelos, Silvânia Maria Mendes; de Sousa, Francisca Cléa Florenço; Carvalho, André Férrer; Macêdo, Danielle S

    2013-11-01

    It has been hypothesized that oxidative imbalance and alterations in nitrergic signaling play a role in the neurobiology of schizophrenia. Preliminary evidence suggests that adjunctive minocycline treatment is efficacious for cognitive and negative symptoms of schizophrenia. This study investigated the effects of minocycline in the prevention and reversal of ketamine-induced schizophrenia-like behaviors in mice. In the reversal protocol, animals received ketamine (20 mg/kg per day intraperitoneally or saline for 14 days, and minocycline (25 or 50 mg/kg daily), risperidone or vehicle treatment from days 8 to 14. In the prevention protocol, mice were pretreated with minocycline, risperidone or vehicle prior to ketamine. Behaviors related to positive (locomotor activity and prepulse inhibition of startle), negative (social interaction) and cognitive (Y maze) symptoms of schizophrenia were also assessed. Glutathione (GSH), thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) and nitrite levels were measured in the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus and striatum. Minocycline and risperidone prevented and reversed ketamine-induced alterations in behavioral paradigms, oxidative markers (i.e. ketamine-induced decrease and increase in GSH levels and TBARS content, respectively) as well as nitrite levels in the striatum. These data provide a rationale for evaluating minocycline as a novel psychotropic agent and suggest that its mechanism of action includes antioxidant and nitrergic systems.

  2. Identification and functional analysis of the BIM interactome; new clues on its possible involvement in Epstein-Barr Virus-associated diseases.

    PubMed

    Rouka, Erasmia; Kyriakou, Despoina

    2015-12-01

    Epigenetic deregulation is a common feature in the pathogenesis of Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV)-related lymphomas and carcinomas. Previous studies have demonstrated a strong association between EBV latency in B-cells and epigenetic silencing of the tumor suppressor gene BIM. This study aimed to the construction and functional analysis of the BIM interactome in order to identify novel host genes that may be targeted by EBV. Fifty-nine unique interactors were found to compose the BIM gene network. Ontological analysis at the pathway level highlighted infectious diseases along with neuropathologies. These results underline the possible interplay between the BIM interactome and EBV-associated disorders.

  3. Estimation of the ozone decrease possibility in the lower part of the D region under the action of a powerful radiowave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekker, S. Z.; Kozlov, S. I.; Tasenko, S. V.

    2016-11-01

    The possibility of the influence of a powerful radiowave on the ozone concentration in the lower part of the ionospheric D region is discussed on the basis of experiments at the Sura heating facility in March 2009, the results of which were published relatively recently by a group of authors. The results, which were obtained with the use of exact equations of the mesospheric ozone photochemistry, substantially disagree with some conclusions derived by the authors but do not completely deny their hypothesis on the possible influence on the ozone of internal gravity waves formed at heights of the ionospheric E region.

  4. Possible involvement of HSP90-HSF1 multichaperone complex in impairment of HSP72 induction in the failing heart following myocardial infarction in rats.

    PubMed

    Marunouchi, Tetsuro; Araki, Masato; Murata, Mao; Takagi, Norio; Tanonaka, Kouichi

    2013-01-01

    It is generally accepted that an increase in the myocardial level of heat-shock protein 72 (HSP72) protects viable cardiac tissue against myocardial infarction (MI)-induced stress. However, the induction of HSP72 after exposure to heat shock (HS) is blunted in the failing rat heart following MI. The mechanisms underlying this impairment in the HSP72 induction ability of the failing heart are not yet clearly defined. In the present study, we examined the involvement in heat-shock factor 1 (HSF1), a transcription factor of HSPs, in decreased ability for HSP72 induction in the failing rat heart following MI. In the failing heart, nuclear translocation of the HSF1 after exposure to hyperthermia was markedly reduced, whereas HSF1 in the cytosolic fraction and the HSP90 chaperone complex containing HSF1, a repressor of HSF1, were increased. Treatment with an HSP90 inhibitor, 17-allylamino-17-demethoxygel-danamycin, appeared to dissociate the interaction of HSF1 with HSP90, and then induced HSP72 in the failing heart after exposure to hyperthermia. These results suggest that an increase in the multichaperone complex, especially the HSF1-HSP90 interaction, associated with attenuation of HSF1 translocation into the nucleus, was involved in the impairment of HS-induced HSP72 induction in the failing heart following MI.

  5. Possible involvement of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 in the gene expression of Cyp2b10 and Cyp2a5.

    PubMed

    Ashino, Takashi; Ohkubo-Morita, Haruyo; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Yoshida, Takemi; Numazawa, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 gene expression is altered by various chemical compounds. In this study, we used nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-deficient (Nrf2(-⧸-)) mice to investigate the involvement of Nrf2 in Cyp2b10 and Cyp2a5 gene expression. Phorone, an Nrf2 activator, strongly increased Cyp2b10 and Cyp2a5 mRNA as well as Nrf2 target genes, including NAD(P)H-quinone oxidoreductase-1 and heme oxygenase-1, in wild-type mouse livers 8 h after treatment. The phorone-induced mRNA levels in Nrf2(-⧸-) mouse livers were lower than that in wild-type mouse livers. Nrf2(-⧸-) mice showed attenuated Cyp2b10 and Cyp2a5 induction by phenobarbital, a classical Cyp2b inducer. These findings suggest that the Nrf2 pathway is involved in Cyp2b10 and Cyp2a5 gene expression.

  6. Molecular approaches to the treatment, prophylaxis, and diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease: possible involvement of HRD1, a novel molecule related to endoplasmic reticulum stress, in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Masayuki; Okuma, Yasunobu; Nomura, Yasuyuki

    2012-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated degradation (ERAD) is a protective mechanism against ER stress in which unfolded proteins accumulated in the ER are selectively transported to the cytosol for degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome system. We cloned the novel ubiquitin ligase HRD1, which is involved in ERAD, and showed that HRD1 promoted amyloid precursor protein (APP) ubiquitination and degradation, resulting in decreased generation of amyloid β (Aβ). In addition, suppression of HRD1 expression caused APP accumulation and promoted Aβ generation associated with ER stress and apoptosis. Interestingly, HRD1 levels were significantly decreased in the cerebral cortex of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), and the brains of these patients experienced ER stress. Our recent study revealed that this decrease in HRD1 was due to its insolubilization; however, controversy persists about whether the decrease in HRD1 protein promotes Aβ generation or whether Aβ neurotoxicity causes the decrease in HRD1 protein levels. Here, we review current findings on the mechanism of HRD1 protein loss in the AD brain and the involvement of HRD1 in the pathogenesis of AD. Furthermore, we propose that HRD1 may be a target for novel AD therapeutics.

  7. Hydrogen sulfide alleviates toxic effects of arsenate in pea seedlings through up-regulation of the ascorbate-glutathione cycle: Possible involvement of nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vijay Pratap; Singh, Samiksha; Kumar, Jitendra; Prasad, Sheo Mohan

    2015-06-01

    In plants, hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an emerging novel signaling molecule that is involved in growth regulation and abiotic stress responses. However, little is known about its role in the regulation of arsenate (As(V)) toxicity. Therefore, hydroponic experiments were conducted to investigate whether sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS; a source of H2S) is involved in the regulation of As(V) toxicity in pea seedlings. Results showed that As(V) caused decreases in growth, photosynthesis (measured as chlorophyll fluorescence) and nitrogen content, which was accompanied by the accumulation of As. As(V) treatment also reduced the activities of cysteine desulfhydrase and nitrate reductase, and contents of H2S and nitric oxide (NO). However, addition of NaHS ameliorated As(V) toxicity in pea seedlings, which coincided with the increased contents of H2S and NO. The cysteine level was higher under As(V) treatment in comparison to all other treatments (As-free; NaHS; As(V)+NaHS). The content of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and damage to lipids, proteins and membranes increased by As(V) while NaHS alleviated these effects. Enzymes of the ascorbate-glutathione cycle (AsA-GSH cycle) showed inhibition of their activities following As(V) treatment while their activities were increased by application of NaHS. The redox status of ascorbate and glutathione was disturbed by As(V) as indicated by a steep decline in their reduced/oxidized ratios. However, simultaneous NaHS application restored the redox status of the ascorbate and glutathione pools. The results of this study demonstrated that H2S and NO might both be involved in reducing the accumulation of As and triggering up-regulation of the AsA-GSH cycle to counterbalance ROS-mediated damage to macromolecules. Furthermore, the results suggest a crucial role of H2S in plant priming, and in particular for pea seedlings in mitigating As(V) stress.

  8. recA mutations that reduce the constitutive coprotease activity of the RecA1202(Prtc) protein: possible involvement of interfilament association in proteolytic and recombination activities.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, S K; Eisen, J A; Hanawalt, P C; Tessman, I

    1993-01-01

    Twenty-eight recA mutants, isolated after spontaneous mutagenesis generated by the combined action of RecA1202(Prtc) and UmuDC proteins, were characterized and sequenced. The mutations are intragenic suppressors of the recA1202 allele and were detected by the reduced coprotease activity of the gene product. Twenty distinct mutation sites were found, among which two mutations, recA1620 (V-275-->D) and recA1631 (I-284-->N), were mapped in the C-terminal portion of the interfilament contact region (IFCR) in the RecA crystal. An interaction of this region with the part of the IFCR in which the recA1202 mutation (Q-184-->K) is mapped could occur only intermolecularly. Thus, altered IFCR and the likely resulting change in interfilament association appear to be important aspects of the formation of a constitutively active RecA coprotease. This observation is consistent with the filament-bundle theory (R. M. Story, I. T. Weber, and T. A. Steitz, Nature (London) 335:318-325, 1992). Furthermore, we found that among the 20 suppressor mutations, 3 missense mutations that lead to recombination-defective (Rec-) phenotypes also mapped in the IFCR, suggesting that the IFCR, with its putative function in interfilament association, is required for the recombinase activity of RecA. We propose that RecA-DNA complexes may form bundles analogous to the RecA bundles (lacking DNA) described by Story et al. and that these RecA-DNA bundles play a role in homologous recombination. Images PMID:8407828

  9. Problems and results in testing the possible mode of anti-inflammatory glucocorticoid action in carrageenin rat paw oedema: advantages of local substance injection.

    PubMed

    Hirschelmann, R; Bekemeier, H

    1984-01-01

    The anti-inflammatory effect of dexamethasone in carrageenin rat paw oedema was significantly reduced or abolished by local injection of 0.5-2.5 mg of the antiglucocorticoid progesterone, or of 5 micrograms cycloheximide, or of 2.5 micrograms actinomycin D, into the oedematous area. The results point to indirect dexamethasone action via receptor occupation and de novo protein synthesis, but this view could not be undoubtedly confirmed by systemic administration of essentially higher doses of the substances. The advantages of local low dose antagonist administration versus systemic injection of higher doses are mainly the production of effective tissue levels, as well as avoidance of toxic and other side-effects.

  10. Involvement of endothelial progenitor cells in the formation of plexiform lesions in broiler chickens: possible role of local immune/inflammatory response*

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Xun; Juan, Fan-guo; Shah, Ali Q.

    2017-01-01

    Plexiform lesions (PLs), which are often accompanied by perivascular infiltrates of mononuclear cells, represent the hallmark lesions of pulmonary arteries in humans suffering from severe pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) have been recently implicated in the formation of PLs in human patients. PLs rarely develop in rodent animal models of PAH but can develop spontaneously in broiler chickens. The aim of the present study was to confirm the presence of EPCs in the PLs in broilers. The immune mechanisms involved in EPC dysfunction were also evaluated. Lungs were collected from commercial broilers at 1 to 4 weeks of age. The right/total ventricle ratios indicated normal pulmonary arterial pressures for all sampled birds. Immunohistochemistry was performed to determine the expressions of EPC markers (CD133 and VEGFR-2) and proangiogenic molecule hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) in the lung samples. An EPC/lymphocyte co-culture system was used to investigate the functional changes of EPCs under the challenge of immune cells. PLs with different cellular composition were detected in the lungs of broilers regardless of age, and they were commonly surrounded by moderate to dense perivascular mononuclear cell infiltrates. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed the presence of CD133+ and VEGFR-2+ cells in PLs. These structures also exhibited a strong expression of HGF. Lymphocyte co-culture enhanced EPC apoptosis and completely blocked HGF-stimulated EPC survival and in vitro tube formation. Taken together, this work provides evidence for the involvement of EPCs in the development of PLs in broilers. It is suggested that the local immune cell infiltrate might serve as a contributor to EPC dysfunction by inducing EPC death and limiting their response to angiogenic stimuli. Broiler chickens may be valuable for investigating reversibility of plexogenic arteriopathy using gene-modified inflammation-resistant EPCs. PMID:28070997

  11. Possible involvement of the long terminal repeat of transposable element 17.6 in regulating expression of an insecticide resistance-associated P450 gene in Drosophila.

    PubMed Central

    Waters, L C; Zelhof, A C; Shaw, B J; Ch'ang, L Y

    1992-01-01

    P450-A and P450-B are electrophoretically defined subsets of cytochrome P450 enzymes in Drosophila melanogaster. P450-A is present among all strains tested, whereas expression of P450-B is associated with resistance to insecticides. Monoclonal antibodies were used to obtain cDNA clones for an enzyme from each P450 subset (i.e., P450-A1 and P450-B1). The P450-B1 cDNA was sequenced and shown to code for a P450 of 507 amino acids. Its gene has been named CYP6A2. Comparative molecular analyses of a pair of susceptible, 91-C, and resistant, 91-R, Drosophila strains were made. There was 20-30 times more P450-B1 mRNA in 91-R than in 91-C, and the small amount of P450-B1 mRNA in 91-C was significantly larger in size than that in 91-R. The P450-B1 gene in 91-R was structurally different from that in 91-C but was not amplified. The P450-B1 gene in 91-C contained a solitary long terminal repeat of transposable element 17.6 in its 3' untranslated region. It was absent in the P450-B1 gene of 91-R. On the basis of features of the long terminal repeat and its location in the gene of the susceptible fly, we propose that a posttranscriptional mechanism involving mRNA stability could be involved in regulating P450-B1 gene expression. Images PMID:1317576

  12. Involvement of endothelial progenitor cells in the formation of plexiform lesions in broiler chickens: possible role of local immune/inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xun; Juan, Fan-Guo; Shah, Ali Q

    Plexiform lesions (PLs), which are often accompanied by perivascular infiltrates of mononuclear cells, represent the hallmark lesions of pulmonary arteries in humans suffering from severe pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) have been recently implicated in the formation of PLs in human patients. PLs rarely develop in rodent animal models of PAH but can develop spontaneously in broiler chickens. The aim of the present study was to confirm the presence of EPCs in the PLs in broilers. The immune mechanisms involved in EPC dysfunction were also evaluated. Lungs were collected from commercial broilers at 1 to 4 weeks of age. The right/total ventricle ratios indicated normal pulmonary arterial pressures for all sampled birds. Immunohistochemistry was performed to determine the expressions of EPC markers (CD133 and VEGFR-2) and proangiogenic molecule hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) in the lung samples. An EPC/lymphocyte co-culture system was used to investigate the functional changes of EPCs under the challenge of immune cells. PLs with different cellular composition were detected in the lungs of broilers regardless of age, and they were commonly surrounded by moderate to dense perivascular mononuclear cell infiltrates. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed the presence of CD133(+) and VEGFR-2(+) cells in PLs. These structures also exhibited a strong expression of HGF. Lymphocyte co-culture enhanced EPC apoptosis and completely blocked HGF-stimulated EPC survival and in vitro tube formation. Taken together, this work provides evidence for the involvement of EPCs in the development of PLs in broilers. It is suggested that the local immune cell infiltrate might serve as a contributor to EPC dysfunction by inducing EPC death and limiting their response to angiogenic stimuli. Broiler chickens may be valuable for investigating reversibility of plexogenic arteriopathy using gene-modified inflammation-resistant EPCs.

  13. An investigation into possible xenobiotic-endobiotic inter-relationships involving the amino acid analogue drug, S-carboxymethyl-L-cysteine and plasma amino acids in humans.

    PubMed

    Steventon, Glyn B; Mitchell, Stephen C; Angulo, Santigo; Barbas, Coral

    2012-05-01

    The amino acid derivative, S-carboxymethyl-L-cysteine, is an anti-oxidant agent extensively employed as adjunctive therapy in the treatment of human pulmonary conditions. A major biotransformation route of this drug, which displays considerable variation in capacity in man, involves the oxidation of the sulfide moiety to the inactive S-oxide metabolite. Previous observations have indicated that fasted plasma L-cysteine concentrations and fasted plasma L-cysteine/free inorganic sulfate ratios were correlated with the degree of sulfoxidation of this drug and that these particular parameters may be used as endobiotic biomarkers for this xenobiotic metabolism. It has been proposed also that the enzyme, cysteine dioxygenase, was responsible for the drug sulfoxidation. Further in this theme, the degree of S-oxidation of S-carboxymethyl-L-cysteine in 100 human volunteers was investigated with respect to it potential correlation with fasted plasma amino acid concentrations. Extensive statistical analyses showed no significant associations or relationships between the degree of drug S-oxidation and fasted plasma amino acid concentrations, especially with respect to the sulfur-containing compounds, methionine, L-cysteine, L-cysteine sulfinic acid, taurine and free inorganic sulfate, also the derived ratios of L-cysteine/L-cysteine sulfinic acid and L-cysteine/free inorganic sulfate. It was concluded that plasma amino acid levels or derived ratios cannot be employed to predict the degree of S-oxidation of S-carboxymethyl-L-cysteine (or vice versa) and that it is doubtful if the enzyme, cysteine dioxygenase, has any involvement in the metabolism of this drug.

  14. In Vivo Anti-Influenza Virus Activity of Japanese Herbal (Kampo) Medicine, “Shahakusan,” and Its Possible Mode of Action

    PubMed Central

    Hokari, Rei; Nagai, Takayuki

    2012-01-01

    Background. A Kampo medicine, Shahakusan (SHS), has been prescribed in late phase of infection that causes inflammations in the lung. But effect of SHS on viral infection in respiratory tract has never been reported. Objectives. To evaluate anti-influenza virus activity of SHS and its mode of actions through immune systems. Methods. SHS (0.3 g/kg/day) was orally administered to BALB/c miceforupper (URI) or lower respiratory tract infection (LRI) of influenza virus A/PR/8/34. The virus titer of nasal lavage fluid (NLF) at 5 or 2 day postinfection (p.i.) and cytokine mRNA expressions in mandibular lymph node or lung at 5 or 4 day p.i. were evaluated for URI or LRI, respectively. The histopathological examinations of lung tissue and NK cell activity in the splenocytes were also evaluated at 4 day p.i. on LRI. Results. When SHS was administered from 7 days before to 4 days p.i. for URI, the virus titer was significantly decreased in comparison with water-treated control, and IL-4, IL-1β, and IL-10 mRNA expression was decreased, but IL-12A mRNA expression was increased. Administration of SHS from one day before to one day p.i. for LRI significantly decreased the virus titer. SHS also decreased infiltration of inflammatory cells in the bronchoalveolar spaces and damage of desquamated mucosal epithelia of bronchiole, decreased IP-10 mRNA expression, and increased NK cell activity. Conclusion. SHS has no direct effect on influenza virus infection but exerts antiviral effect in mice by its immunomodulating activity through action of NK cells and anti-inflammatory activity in the lung. PMID:23346216

  15. Possible involvement of CD10 in the development of endometriosis due to its inhibitory effects on CD44-dependent cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Iwase, Akira; Kotani, Tomomi; Goto, Maki; Kobayashi, Hiroharu; Takikawa, Sachiko; Nakahara, Tatsuo; Nakamura, Tomoko; Kondo, Mika; Bayasula; Nagatomo, Yoshinari; Kikkawa, Fumitaka

    2014-01-01

    A reduced response to progesterone in the eutopic endometrium with endometriosis and in endometriotic tissues is considered to be the underlying factor for endometriosis. CD10 is known to be expressed by endometrial and endometriotic stromal cells and may be induced by progestins, although the function of CD10 is not fully revealed in endometrial or endometriotic tissues. In the current study, the expression of CD10 was significantly increased by treatment of the cells with progesterone, 17β-estradiol, and dibutyryl cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) in the endometrial stromal cells. On the other hand, the expression of CD10 following treatment with progesterone, 17β-estradiol, and dibutyryl cAMP was not significantly increased in endometriotic stromal cells. The adhesion assay for endometrial and endometriotic stromal cells to hyaluronan using 5- or 6-(N-succinimidyloxycarbonyl)-fluorescein 3', 6'-diacetate-labeled cells demonstrated that the CD44-dependent adhesion of stromal cells was inhibited by CD10. As far as the induction of CD10 is concerned, the effect of progesterone was different between endometrial stromal cells and endometriotic stromal cells. CD10 might be involved in the development of endometriosis due to its influence on CD44-dependent cell adhesion.

  16. Endo-β-N-acetylglucosamidases (ENGases) in the fungus Trichoderma atroviride: possible involvement of the filamentous fungi-specific cytosolic ENGase in the ERAD process.

    PubMed

    Tzelepis, Georgios; Hosomi, Akira; Hossain, Tanim Jabid; Hirayama, Hiroto; Dubey, Mukesh; Jensen, Dan Funck; Suzuki, Tadashi; Karlsson, Magnus

    2014-06-27

    N-Glycosylation is an important post-translational modification of proteins, which mainly occurs in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Glycoproteins that are unable to fold properly are exported to the cytosol for degradation by a cellular system called ER-associated degradation (ERAD). Once misfolded glycoproteins are exported to the cytosol, they are subjected to deglycosylation by peptide:N-glycanase (PNGase) to facilitate the efficient degradation of misfolded proteins by the proteasome. Interestingly, the ortholog of PNGase in some filamentous fungi was found to be an inactive deglycosylating enzyme. On the other hand, it has been shown that in filamentous fungi genomes, usually two different fungi-specific endo-β-N-acetylglucosamidases (ENGases) can be found; one is predicted to be localized in the cytosol and the other to have a signal sequence, while the functional importance of these enzymes remains to be clarified. In this study the ENGases of the filamentous fungus Trichoderma atroviride was characterized. By heterologous expression of the ENGases Eng18A and Eng18B in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, it was found that both ENGases are active deglycosylating enzymes. Interestingly, only Eng18B was able to enhance the efficient degradation of the RTL protein, a PNGase-dependent ERAD substrate, implying the involvement of this enzyme in the ERAD process. These results indicate that T. atroviride Eng18B may deglycosylate misfolded glycoproteins, substituting the function of the cytoplasmic PNGase in the ERAD process.

  17. Possible involvement of NO/NOS signaling in hippocampal amyloid-beta production induced by transient focal cerebral ischemia in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Song; Wang, Wei; Wang, Che; Tang, Yi-Yuan

    2010-02-12

    In the present study, to define the roles of nitric oxide (NO) signaling in amyloid-beta (A beta) production after transient cerebral ischemia, extracellular levels of NO and A beta were monitored by intracerebral microdialysis in the hippocampus of aged rats exposed to transient middle cerebral artery occlusion and reperfusion (MCAO/R). The results indicated that 1-h MCAO significantly upregulated hippocampal NO and A beta levels. In addition, the NO elevation preceded the A beta changes. The Western blotting suggested that acute hypoperfusion could increase the expression of beta-secretase 1 (BACE1) but not BACE2. The enhanced NO concentration in acute stage of MCAO/R was coincident with increased eNOS expression, while in subacute stage was coincident with increased iNOS and nNOS. Our results also indicated that pretreatment of L-NAME, one non-selective NOS inhibitor could decrease the BACE1 expression, reverse both NO and A beta changes and rescue the delayed neuronal death. These preliminary findings indicated that activation of NOS/NO signaling system could trigger A beta production through BACE1 pathway during acute ischemic episode. The present data may be important in understanding, at least in part, the pathological role of NO/NOS system involved in hippocampal A beta production and neuronal damage induced by transient cerebral ischemia.

  18. The accumulation mechanism of the hypoxia imaging probe “FMISO” by imaging mass spectrometry: possible involvement of low-molecular metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Masaki, Yukiko; Shimizu, Yoichi; Yoshioka, Takeshi; Tanaka, Yukari; Nishijima, Ken-ichi; Zhao, Songji; Higashino, Kenichi; Sakamoto, Shingo; Numata, Yoshito; Yamaguchi, Yoshitaka; Tamaki, Nagara; Kuge, Yuji

    2015-01-01

    18F-fluoromisonidazole (FMISO) has been widely used as a hypoxia imaging probe for diagnostic positron emission tomography (PET). FMISO is believed to accumulate in hypoxic cells via covalent binding with macromolecules after reduction of its nitro group. However, its detailed accumulation mechanism remains unknown. Therefore, we investigated the chemical forms of FMISO and their distributions in tumours using imaging mass spectrometry (IMS), which visualises spatial distribution of chemical compositions based on molecular masses in tissue sections. Our radiochemical analysis revealed that most of the radioactivity in tumours existed as low-molecular-weight compounds with unknown chemical formulas, unlike observations made with conventional views, suggesting that the radioactivity distribution primarily reflected that of these unknown substances. The IMS analysis indicated that FMISO and its reductive metabolites were nonspecifically distributed in the tumour in patterns not corresponding to the radioactivity distribution. Our IMS search found an unknown low-molecular-weight metabolite whose distribution pattern corresponded to that of both the radioactivity and the hypoxia marker pimonidazole. This metabolite was identified as the glutathione conjugate of amino-FMISO. We showed that the glutathione conjugate of amino-FMISO is involved in FMISO accumulation in hypoxic tumour tissues, in addition to the conventional mechanism of FMISO covalent binding to macromolecules. PMID:26582591

  19. The anxiogenic-like effects of dehydration in a semi-desert rodent Meriones shawi indicating the possible involvement of the serotoninergic system.

    PubMed

    Elgot, Abdeljalil; El hiba, Omar; Gamrani, Halima

    2012-10-01

    Dehydration is a powerful stimulus causing disequilibrium in homeostasis of water and electrolytes resulting from depletion in total body water. Most studies have focused on domestic and laboratory animals; however, the study of desert animals allows improved understanding about water balance and resistance to dehydration and associated behavioral changes, including those related to mood disorders. Meriones shawi (Shaw's Jird) is a desert rodent characterized by its resistance to long periods of thirst that can extend for several months. In the present study, M. shawi were subjected to water deprivation for 1 and 3 months. We used 5-HT immunohistochemistry to evaluate the effects of prolonged dehydration on the serotoninergic system in both dorsal and median raphe nuclei (DRN, MRN), which are the main sources of 5-HT input to several brain areas. In addition, a dark/light box was used to evaluate the anxiolytic-like or anxiogenic-like effects of dehydration on M. shawi. The results showed a reduction in the 5-HT immunolabelling in both DRN and MRN following 1 and 3 months of dehydration. This diminution of serotonin immunoreactivity was accompanied by noticeable changes in anxiety behavior of Meriones, with animals spending more time in the light box, suggesting anxiogenic-like effects caused by dehydration. Overall, the results indicate that dehydration is able to reduce serotoninergic neurotransmission, which might be involved in generating anxiety behavior in this desert animal.

  20. Aging decreases collagen IV expression in vivo in the dermo-epidermal junction and in vitro in dermal fibroblasts: possible involvement of TGF-β1.

    PubMed

    Feru, Jezabel; Delobbe, Etienne; Ramont, Laurent; Brassart, Bertrand; Terryn, Christine; Dupont-Deshorgue, Aurelie; Garbar, Christian; Monboisse, Jean-Claude; Maquart, Francois-Xavier; Brassart-Pasco, Sylvie

    2016-08-01

    Collagen IV is a major component of the dermo-epidermal junction (DEJ). To study expression of collagen IV upon aging in the DEJ and dermal fibroblasts isolated from the same patients. A model of senescent fibroblasts was developed in order to identify biological compounds that might restore the level of collagen IV. Skin fragments of women (30 to 70 years old) were collected. Localisation of collagen IV expression in the DEJ was studied by immunofluorescence. Fibroblast collagen IV expression was studied by real-time PCR, ELISA, and western blotting. Premature senescence was simulated by exposing fibroblasts to subcytotoxic H2O2 concentrations. Collagen IV decreased in the DEJ and fibroblasts relative to age. TGF-β1 treatment significantly increased collagen IV gene and protein expression in fibroblasts and restored expression in the model of senescence. Addition of TGF-β1-neutralizing antibody to fibroblast cultures decreased collagen IV expression. Taken together, the results suggest that the decrease in collagen IV in the DEJ, relative to age, could be due to a decrease in collagen IV expression by senescent dermal fibroblasts and may involve TGF-β1 signalling.

  1. Mitofusin 2 expression dominates over mitofusin 1 exclusively in mouse dorsal root ganglia - a possible explanation for peripheral nervous system involvement in Charcot-Marie-Tooth 2A.

    PubMed

    Kawalec, Maria; Zabłocka, Barbara; Kabzińska, Dagmara; Neska, Jacek; Beręsewicz, Małgorzata

    2014-01-01

    Mitofusin 2 (Mfn2), a protein of the mitochondrial outer membrane, is essential for mitochondrial fusion and contributes to the maintenance and operation of the mitochondrial network. Mutations in the mitofusin 2 gene cause axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 2A (CMT2A), an inherited disease affecting peripheral nerve axons. The precise mechanism by which mutations in MFN2 selectively cause the degeneration of long peripheral axons is not known. There is a hypothesis suggesting the involvement of reduced expression of a homologous protein, mitofusin 1 (Mfn1), in the peripheral nervous system, and less effective compensation of defective mitofusin 2 by mitofusin 1. We therefore aimed to perform an analysis of the mitofusin 1 and mitofusin 2 mRNA and protein expression profiles in different mouse tissues, with special attention paid to dorsal root ganglia (DRGs), as parts of the peripheral nervous system. Quantitative measurement relating to mRNA revealed that expression of the Mfn2 gene dominates over Mfn1 mainly in mouse DRG, as opposed to other nervous system samples and other tissues studied. This result was further supported by Western blot evaluation. Both these sets of data confirm the hypothesis that the cellular consequences of mutations in the mitofusin 2 gene can mostly be manifested in the peripheral nervous system.

  2. Cell cycle arrest induced by inhibitors of epigenetic modifications in maize (Zea mays) seedling leaves: characterization of the process and possible mechanisms involved.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pu; Zhang, Hao; Hou, Haoli; Wang, Qing; Li, Yingnan; Huang, Yan; Xie, Liangfu; Gao, Fei; He, Shibin; Li, Lijia

    2016-07-01

    Epigenetic modifications play crucial roles in the regulation of chromatin architecture and are involved in cell cycle progression, including mitosis and meiosis. To explore the relationship between epigenetic modifications and the cell cycle, we treated maize (Zea mays) seedlings with six different epigenetic modification-related inhibitors and identified the postsynthetic phase (G2 ) arrest via flow cytometry analysis. Total H4K5ac levels were significantly increased and the distribution of H3S10ph signalling was obviously changed in mitosis under various treatments. Further statistics of the cells in different periods of mitosis confirmed that the cell cycle was arrested at preprophase. Concentrations of hydrogen peroxide were relatively higher in the treated plants and the antioxidant thiourea could negate the influence of the inhibitors. Moreover, all of the treated plants displayed negative results in the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate nick end labelling (TUNEL) and γ-H2AX immunostaining assays after exposure for 3 d. Additionally, the expression level of topoisomerase genes in the treated plants was relatively lower than that in the untreated plants. These results suggest that these inhibitors of epigenetic modifications could cause preprophase arrest via reactive oxygen species formation inhibiting the expression of DNA topoisomerase genes, accompanied by changes in the H4K5ac and H3S10ph histone modifications.

  3. Inhibitory Effects of Scolopendra Pharmacopuncture on the Development and Maintenance of Neuropathic Pain in Rats: Possible Involvement of Spinal Glial Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Chengjin; Ji, Byeong Uk; Lee, Ji Eun; Park, Min Young; Kim, Sungchul; Kim, Seung Tae; Koo, Sungtae

    2015-10-01

    Scolopendra extracts were used for pharmacopuncture at the Kidney 1 acupoint to investigate the role of Scolopendra pharmacopuncture (SPP) in both the development and maintenance of neuropathic pain induced by L5 spinal nerve ligation in rats and the contribution of spinal glial cells. A single treatment and five once-daily treatments with SPP were given to evaluate its effects on the development and maintenance stages of neuropathic pain, respectively, which was followed by behavioral tests. Immunohistochemistry and Western blotting tests were also carried out. A single treatment of SPP delayed spinal nerve ligation-induced mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia and induced a profound decrease in the expression of ionized calcium binding adaptor protein in the lumbar spinal cord. Repeated SPP treatments reliably suppressed mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia at later time points, and these results correlated mainly with decreases in glial fibrillary acidic protein. Intriguingly, ionized calcium binding adaptor protein expression was also reduced after repeated SPP. These results illustrate that neuropathic pain in the development and maintenance stages is alleviated by SPP treatment, which may be ascribed principally to deactivations of microglia and astroglia, respectively. Additionally, microglial inactivation seems to be partially involved in preventing neuropathic pain in the maintenance stage.

  4. Possible involvement of GABAergic mechanism in protective effect of melatonin against sleep deprivation-induced behavior modification and oxidative damage in mice.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anil; Singh, Anant; Kumar, Puneet

    2011-03-01

    Sleep deprivation for 72 h caused anxiety like behavior, weight loss, impaired locomotor activity and oxidative damage as indicated by increase in lipid peroxidation, nitrite level and depletion of reduced glutathione and catalase activity in sleep deprived mice brain. Treatment with melatonin (5 and 10 mg/kg, ip) significantly improved locomotor activity, weight loss and antianxiety effect as compared to control (sleep deprived). Biochemically, melatonin treatment significantly restored depleted reduced glutathione, catalase activity, attenuated lipid peroxidation and nitrite level as compared to control (72 h sleep-deprived) animals. A combination of flumazenil (0.5 mg/kg, ip) and picrotoxin (0.5 mg/kg, ip) with lower dose of melatonin (5 mg/kg, ip) significantly antagonized the protective effect of melatonin. However, combination of muscimol (0.05 mg/kg, ip) with melatonin (5 mg/kg, ip) potentiated protective effect of melatonin as compared to their effect per se. The results suggest that melatonin may produce its protective effect by involving GABAergic system against sleep deprivation-induced anxiety like behavior and related oxidative damage.

  5. Similar chemokine receptor profiles in lymphomas with central nervous system involvement - possible biomarkers for patient selection for central nervous system prophylaxis, a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Lemma, Siria A; Pasanen, Anna Kaisa; Haapasaari, Kirsi-Maria; Sippola, Antti; Sormunen, Raija; Soini, Ylermi; Jantunen, Esa; Koivunen, Petri; Salokorpi, Niina; Bloigu, Risto; Turpeenniemi-Hujanen, Taina; Kuittinen, Outi

    2016-05-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) relapse occurs in around 5% of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) cases. No biomarkers to identify high-risk patients have been discovered. We evaluated the expression of lymphocyte-guiding chemokine receptors in systemic and CNS lymphomas. Immunohistochemical staining for CXCR4, CXCR5, CCR7, CXCL12, and CXCL13 was performed on 89 tissue samples, including cases of primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL), secondary CNS lymphoma (sCNSL), and systemic DLBCL. Also, 10 reactive lymph node samples were included. Immunoelectron microscopy was performed on two PCNSLs, one sCNSL, one systemic DLBCL, and one reactive lymph node samples, and staining was performed for CXCR4, CXCR5, CXCL12, and CXCL13. Chi-square test was used to determine correlations between clinical parameters, diagnostic groups, and chemokine receptor expression. Strong nuclear CXCR4 positivity correlated with systemic DLBCL, whereas strong cytoplasmic CXCR5 positivity correlated with CNS involvement (P = 0.003 and P = 0.039). Immunoelectron microscopy revealed a nuclear CXCR4 staining in reactive lymph node, compared with cytoplasmic and membranous localization seen in CNS lymphomas. We found that CNS lymphoma presented a chemokine receptor profile different from systemic disease. Our findings give new information on the CNS tropism of DLBCL and, if confirmed, may contribute to more effective targeting of CNS prophylaxis among patients with DLBCL.

  6. Possible Involvement of F1F0-ATP synthase and Intracellular ATP in Keratinocyte Differentiation in normal skin and skin lesions

    PubMed Central

    Xiaoyun, Xie; Chaofei, Han; Weiqi, Zeng; Chen, Chen; Lixia, Lu; Queping, Liu; Cong, Peng; Shuang, Zhao; Juan, Su; Xiang, Chen

    2017-01-01

    The F1F0-ATP synthase, an enzyme complex, is mainly located on the mitochondrial inner membrane or sometimes cytomembrane to generate or hydrolyze ATP, play a role in cell proliferation. This study focused on the role of F1F0-ATP synthase in keratinocyte differentiation, and its relationship with intracellular and extracellular ATP (InATP and ExATP). The F1F0-ATP synthase β subunit (ATP5B) expression in various skin tissues and confluence-dependent HaCaT differentiation models was detected. ATP5B expression increased with keratinocyte and HaCaT cell differentiation in normal skin, some epidermis hyper-proliferative diseases, squamous cell carcinoma, and the HaCaT cell differentiation model. The impact of InATP and ExATP content on HaCaT differentiation was reflected by the expression of the differentiation marker involucrin. Inhibition of F1F0-ATP synthase blocked HaCaT cell differentiation, which was associated with a decrease of InATP content, but not with changes of ExATP. Our results revealed that F1F0-ATP synthase expression is associated with the process of keratinocyte differentiation which may possibly be related to InATP synthesis. PMID:28209970

  7. Troxerutin exerts neuroprotection in 6-hydroxydopamine lesion rat model of Parkinson's disease: Possible involvement of PI3K/ERβ signaling.

    PubMed

    Baluchnejadmojarad, Tourandokht; Jamali-Raeufy, Nida; Zabihnejad, Sedigheh; Rabiee, Nafiseh; Roghani, Mehrdad

    2017-04-15

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disease with progressive loss of mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra and with multiple incapacitating motor and non-motor symptoms. Troxerutin is a natural bioflavonoid with nephro- and hepato-protective, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory properties. In this study, we evaluated its possible neuroprotective effect in 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) rat model of PD. Intrastriatal 6-OHDA-lesioned rats were pretreated with troxerutin at a dose of 150mg/kg/day for 1 week. Results showed that troxerutin mitigates apomorphine-induced motor asymmetry and lowered the latency to initiate and the total time in the narrow beam task and this beneficial effect was lost following central application of estrogen receptor β (ERβ) antagonist or phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor. In addition, troxerutin reduced striatal malondialdehyde (MDA) as an index of lipid peroxidation, reactive oxygen species, glial fibrillary acid protein (GFAP) as a marker of astrogliosis, and DNA fragmentation as an apoptotic marker with no significant alteration of catalase activity and nitrite level. Meanwhile, troxerutin was capable to prevent loss of nigral tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive neurons. These findings indicate neuroprotective potential of troxerutin in 6-OHDA rat model of PD through mitigation of apoptosis, astrogliosis, and oxidative stress and part of its effect is dependent on PI3K/ERβ signaling.

  8. Increase in telencephalic dopamine and cerebellar norepinephrine contents by hydrostatic pressure in goldfish: the possible involvement in hydrostatic pressure-related locomotion.

    PubMed

    Ikegami, Taro; Takemura, Akihiro; Choi, Eunjung; Suda, Atsushi; Tomonaga, Shozo; Badruzzaman, Muhammad; Furuse, Mitsuhiro

    2015-10-01

    Fish are faced with a wide range of hydrostatic pressure (HP) in their natural habitats. Additionally, freshwater fish are occasionally exposed to rapid changes in HP due to heavy rainfall, flood and/or dam release. Accordingly, variations in HP are one of the most important environmental cues for fish. However, little information is available on how HP information is perceived and transmitted in the central nervous system of fish. The present study examined the effect of HP (water depth of 1.3 m) on the quantities of monoamines and their metabolites in the telencephalon, optic tectum, diencephalon, cerebellum (including partial mesencephalon) and vagal lobe (including medulla oblongata) of the goldfish, Carassius auratus, using high-performance liquid chromatography. HP affected monoamine and metabolite contents in restricted brain regions, including the telencephalon, cerebellum and vagal lobe. In particular, HP significantly increased the levels of dopamine (DA) in the telencephalon at 15 min and that of norepinephrine (NE) in the cerebellum at 30 min. In addition, HP also significantly increased locomotor activity at 15 and 30 min after HP treatment. It is possible that HP indirectly induces locomotion in goldfish via telencephalic DA and cerebellar NE neuronal activity.

  9. Possible Involvement of the Double-Stranded RNA-Binding Core Protein ςA in the Resistance of Avian Reovirus to Interferon

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Costas, José; González-López, Claudia; Vakharia, Vikram N.; Benavente, Javier

    2000-01-01

    Treatment of primary cultures of chicken embryo fibroblasts with a recombinant chicken alpha/beta interferon (rcIFN) induces an antiviral state that causes a strong inhibition of vaccinia virus and vesicular stomatitis virus replication but has no effect on avian reovirus S1133 replication. The fact that avian reovirus polypeptides are synthesized normally in rcIFN-treated cells prompted us to investigate whether this virus expresses factors that interfere with the activation and/or the activity of the IFN-induced, double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-dependent enzymes. Our results demonstrate that extracts of avian-reovirus-infected cells, but not those of uninfected cells, are able to relieve the translation-inhibitory activity of dsRNA in reticulocyte lysates, by blocking the activation of the dsRNA-dependent enzymes. In addition, our results show that protein ςA, an S1133 core polypeptide, binds to dsRNA in an irreversible manner and that clearing this protein from extracts of infected cells abolishes their protranslational capacity. Taken together, our results raise the interesting possibility that protein ςA antagonizes the IFN-induced cellular response against avian reovirus by blocking the intracellular activation of enzyme pathways dependent on dsRNA, as has been suggested for several other viral dsRNA-binding proteins. PMID:10627522

  10. Neurotrophin-3 promotes cell death induced in cerebral ischemia, oxygen-glucose deprivation, and oxidative stress: possible involvement of oxygen free radicals.

    PubMed

    Bates, Brian; Hirt, Lorenz; Thomas, Sunu S; Akbarian, Schahram; Le, Dean; Amin-Hanjani, Sepideh; Whalen, Michael; Jaenisch, Rudolf; Moskowitz, Michael A

    2002-02-01

    To explore the role of neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) during cerebral ischemia, NT-3-deficient brains were subjected to transient focal ischemia. Conditional mutant brains produced undetectable amounts of NT-3 mRNA, whereas the expression of the neurotrophin, BDNF, the NT-3 receptor, TrkC, and the nonselective, low-affinity neurotrophin receptor p75NTR, were comparable to wild-type. Baseline absolute blood flow, vascular and neuroanatomical features, as well as physiological measurements were also indistinguishable from wild-type. Interestingly, the absence of NT-3 led to a significantly decreased infarct volume 23 h after middle cerebral artery occlusion. Consistent with this, the addition of NT-3 to primary cortical cell cultures exacerbated neuronal death caused by oxygen-glucose deprivation. Coincubation with the oxygen free radical chelator, trolox, diminished potentiation of neuronal death. NT-3 also enhanced neuronal cell death and the production of reactive oxygen species caused by oxidative damage inducing agents. We conclude that endogenous NT-3 enhanced neuronal injury during acute stroke, possible by increasing oxygen-radical mediated cell death.

  11. Ellagic acid exerts protective effect in intrastriatal 6-hydroxydopamine rat model of Parkinson's disease: Possible involvement of ERβ/Nrf2/HO-1 signaling.

    PubMed

    Baluchnejadmojarad, Tourandokht; Rabiee, Nafiseh; Zabihnejad, Sedigheh; Roghani, Mehrdad

    2017-02-23

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a prevalent movement disorder in the elderly with progressive loss of mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons and incapacitating motor and non-motor complications. Ellagic acid is a natural phenolic compound with potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. In this study, we investigated its possible neuroprotective effect in 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) rat model of PD. Intrastriatal 6-OHDA-lesioned rats were pretreated with ellagic acid at a dose of 50 mg/kg/day for 1 week. Results showed that ellagic acid attenuates apomorphine-induced rotational bias and lowers the latency to initiate and the total time in the narrow beam task and this beneficial effect was partially abrogated following intracerebroventricular microinjection of estrogen receptor β (ERβ) antagonist. Furthermore, ellagic acid reduced striatal malondialdehyde (MDA), reactive oxygen species (ROS), and DNA fragmentation, and improved monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B), nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2), and heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1). Meanwhile, ellagic acid prevented loss of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive neurons within substantia nigra pars compacta (SNC). These findings indicate neuroprotective potential of ellagic acid in 6-OHDA rat model of PD via amelioration of apoptosis and oxidative stress, suppression of MAO-B, and its favorable influence is partly reliant on ERβ/Nrf2/HO-1 signaling cascade.

  12. Increased production of 4 kDa amyloid beta peptide in serum deprived human primary neuron cultures: possible involvement of apoptosis.

    PubMed

    LeBlanc, A

    1995-12-01

    The etiology of the amyloid beta peptide in sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD) is not known. Amyloid beta peptide (A beta), a proteolytic product of the amyloid precursor protein (APP), is deposited in the senile plaques and cerebrovascular tissues of individuals with either sporadic or familial AD (FAD). Increased A beta production from mutant APPs in FAD fosters the hypothesis that overexpression of A beta plays a primary role in the pathogenesis of AD. The absence of APP mutations in sporadic AD which displays identical pathological features than FAD such as synapse and neuronal loss, senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles, suggests other causes for overexpression and/or deposition of A beta. To investigate the effect of neuronal death on APP metabolism and A beta secretion, human primary neuron cultures were induced to undergo apoptosis by serum deprivation. Serum deprived neurons display shrunken and rounded morphology, contain condensed chromatine and fragmented DNA, which are characteristic of apoptosis. In serum deprived neurons, metabolism of APP through the nonamyloidogenic secretory pathway is decreased to 20% from 40% in control cultures whereas 4kDa A beta is increased three- to fourfold. The results suggest that human neurons undergoing apoptosis generate excess A beta and indicates a possible mechanism for increased A beta in the absence of APP mutations.

  13. Molecular composition of drusen and possible involvement of anti-retinal autoimmunity in two different forms of macular degeneration in cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fascicularis).

    PubMed

    Umeda, Shinsuke; Suzuki, Michihiro T; Okamoto, Haru; Ono, Fumiko; Mizota, Atsushi; Terao, Keiji; Yoshikawa, Yasuhiro; Tanaka, Yasuhiko; Iwata, Takeshi

    2005-10-01

    We have previously reported a cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fascicularis) pedigree with early onset macular degeneration that develops drusen at 2 yr after birth. In this study, the molecular composition of drusen in monkeys affected with late onset and early onset macular degeneration was both characterized. Involvement of anti-retinalautoimmunity in the deposition of drusen and the pathogenesis of the disease was also evaluated. Funduscopic and histological examinations were performed on 278 adult monkeys (mean age=16.94 yr) for late onset macular degeneration. The molecular composition of drusen was analyzed by immunohistochemistry and/or direct proteome analysis using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectroscopy (LC-MS/MS). Anti-retinal autoantibodies in sera were screened in 20 affected and 10 age-matched control monkeys by Western blot techniques. Immunogenic molecules were identified by 2D electrophoresis and LC-MS/MS. Relative antibody titer against each antigen was determined by ELISA in sera from 42 affected (late onset) and 41 normal monkeys. Yellowish-white spots in the macular region were observed in 90 (32%) of the late onset monkeys that were examined. Histological examination demonstrated that drusen or degenerative retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells were associated with the pigmentary abnormalities. Drusen in both late and early onset monkeys showed immunoreactivities for apolipoprotein E, amyloid P component, complement component C5, the terminal C5b-9 complement complex, vitronectin, and membrane cofactor protein. LC-MS/MS analyses identified 60 proteins as constituents of drusen, including a number of common components in drusen of human age-related macular degeneration (AMD), such as annexins, crystallins, immunoglobulins, and complement components. Half of the affected monkeys had single or multiple autoantibodies against 38, 40, 50, and 60 kDa retinal proteins. The reacting antigens of 38 and 40 kDa were identified as annexin II and mu

  14. Tissue responses to hexyl 5-aminolevulinate-induced photodynamic treatment in syngeneic orthotopic rat bladder cancer model: possible pathways of action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arum, Carl-Jørgen; Gederaas, Odrun A.; Larsen, Eivind L. P.; Randeberg, Lise L.; Hjelde, Astrid; Krokan, Hans E.; Svaasand, Lars O.; Chen, Duan; Zhao, Chun-Mei

    2011-02-01

    Orthotopic bladder cancer model in rats mimics human bladder cancer with respect to urothelial tumorigenesis and progression. Utilizing this model at pT1 (superficial stage), we analyze the tissue responses to hexyl 5-aminolevulinate-induced photodynamic therapy (HAL-PDT). In comparison to untreated rats, HAL-PDT causes little change in tumor-free rat bladder but induces inflammatory changes with increased lymphocytes and mononuclear cell infiltration in rat bladders with tumor. Immunohistochemistry reveals that HAL-PDT is without effect on proliferating cell nuclear antigen expression within the tumor and increases caspase-3 expression in both normal urothelium and the tumor. Transmission electron microscopy reveals severe mitochondrial damage, formations of apoptotic bodies, vacuoles, and lipofuscin bodies, but no microvillus-formed niches in HAL-PDT-treated bladder cancer rats. Bioinformatics analysis of the gene expression profile indicates an activation of T-cell receptor signaling pathway in bladder cancer rats without PDT. HAL-PDT increases the expression of CD3 and CD45RA in the tumor (determined by immunohistochemistry). We suggest that pathways of action of HAL-PDT may include, at least, activations of mitochondrial apoptosis and autophagy, breakdown of cancer stem cell niches, and importantly, enhancement of T-cell activation.

  15. Effects and possible mechanisms of action of acacetin on the behavior and eye morphology of Drosophila models of Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xue; Perumalsamy, Haribalan; Kwon, Hyung Wook; Na, Young-Eun; Ahn, Young-Joon

    2015-01-01

    The human β-amyloid (Aβ) cleaving enzyme (BACE-1) is a target for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) treatments. This study was conducted to determine if acacetin extracted from the whole Agastache rugosa plant had anti-BACE-1 and behavioral activities in Drosophila melanogaster AD models and to determine acacetin’s mechanism of action. Acacetin (100, 300, and 500 μM) rescued amyloid precursor protein (APP)/BACE1-expressing flies and kept them from developing both eye morphology (dark deposits, ommatidial collapse and fusion, and the absence of ommatidial bristles) and behavioral (motor abnormalities) defects. The reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed that acacetin reduced both the human APP and BACE-1 mRNA levels in the transgenic flies, suggesting that it plays an important role in the transcriptional regulation of human BACE-1 and APP. Western blot analysis revealed that acacetin reduced Aβ production by interfering with BACE-1 activity and APP synthesis, resulting in a decrease in the levels of the APP carboxy-terminal fragments and the APP intracellular domain. Therefore, the protective effect of acacetin on Aβ production is mediated by transcriptional regulation of BACE-1 and APP, resulting in decreased APP protein expression and BACE-1 activity. Acacetin also inhibited APP synthesis, resulting in a decrease in the number of amyloid plaques. PMID:26530776

  16. The Ca(2+) -binding protein PCaP2 located on the plasma membrane is involved in root hair development as a possible signal transducer.

    PubMed

    Kato, Mariko; Aoyama, Takashi; Maeshima, Masayoshi

    2013-05-01

    Plasma membrane-associated Ca(2+) -binding protein-2 (PCaP2) of Arabidopsis thaliana is a novel-type protein that binds to the Ca(2+) /calmodulin complex and phosphatidylinositol phosphates (PtdInsPs) as well as free Ca(2+) . Although the PCaP2 gene is predominantly expressed in root hair cells, it remains unknown how PCaP2 functions in root hair cells via binding to ligands. From biochemical analyses using purified PCaP2 and its variants, we found that the N-terminal basic domain with 23 amino acids (N23) is necessary and sufficient for binding to PtdInsPs and the Ca(2+) /calmodulin complex, and that the residual domain of PCaP2 binds to free Ca(2+) . In mutant analysis, a pcap2 knockdown line displayed longer root hairs than the wild-type. To examine the function of each domain in root hair cells, we over-expressed PCaP2 and its variants using the root hair cell-specific EXPANSIN A7 promoter. Transgenic lines over-expressing PCaP2, PCaP2(G2A) (second glycine substituted by alanine) and ∆23PCaP2 (lacking the N23 domain) exhibited abnormal branched and bulbous root hair cells, while over-expression of the N23 domain suppressed root hair emergence and elongation. The N23 domain was necessary and sufficient for the plasma membrane localization of GFP-tagged PCaP2. These results suggest that the N23 domain of PCaP2 negatively regulates root hair tip growth via processing Ca(2+) and PtdInsP signals on the plasma membrane, while the residual domain is involved in the polarization of cell expansion.

  17. Possible involvement of suppression of Th2 differentiation in the anti-allergic effect of Sho-seiryu-to in mice.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Yoshiki; Kaneko, Atsushi; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Ishige, Atsushi; Sasaki, Hiroshi

    2002-12-01

    The clinical effectiveness of the Kampo medicine Sho-seiryu-to (SST) has recently been demonstrated in a double-blind randomized study of allergic asthma and rhinitis. We investigated the effect of SST on a type 1 allergic model in mice. Ovalbumin (OVA)-induced sneezing and the total and OVA-specific IgE levels were significantly suppressed with SST at 1.0 g/kg, but that of OVA-specific IgG(2a) was not. In the splenocytes isolated from SST-administered mice, OVA-induced interleukin (IL)-4 production decreased while interferon (IFN)-gamma production was not. The co-culture experiments using purified CD4(+)T cells and antigen-presenting cells (APCs) suggested that SST influenced both cell types. Flow-cytometric analysis showed that SST suppressed the number of IL-4 producing CD4(+)T cells but not the number of IFN-gamma producing CD4(+)T cells. The CD86(+) major histocompatibility complex class II(+) (MHC II)(+) cells and CD28(+)CD4(+)T cells were decreased by SST treatment, while CD80(+)MHC II(+) cells, CD40(+)MHC II(+) cells and CD154(+)CD4(+)T cells showed no change. These data suggested that SST may suppress IL-4 production in CD4(+)T cells via influencing CD28-CD86 interaction. In addition to the previously reported inhibitory activity on histamine release, suppression of Th2 differentiation at the stage of APC-CD4(+)T cell interaction may be involved in the anti-allergic effects of SST.

  18. Reduction in traumatic brain injury-induced oxidative stress, apoptosis, and calcium entry in rat hippocampus by melatonin: Possible involvement of TRPM2 channels.

    PubMed

    Yürüker, Vehbi; Nazıroğlu, Mustafa; Şenol, Nilgün

    2015-02-01

    Melatonin, which is a very effective reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger, acts through a direct reaction with free radicals. Ca(2+) entry induced by traumatic brain injury (TBI) has deleterious effects on human hippocampal function. TRPM2 is a Ca(2+) permeable non-selective channel in hippocampal neurons, and its activation of during oxidative stress has been linked to cell death. Despite the importance of oxidative stress in TBI, its role in apoptosis and Ca(2+) entry in TBI is poorly understood. Therefore, we tested the effects of melatonin on apoptosis, oxidative stress, and Ca(2+) entry through the TRPM2 channel in the hippocampal neurons of TBI-induced rats. Thirty-two rats were divided into the following four groups: control, melatonin, TBI, and TBI + melatonin groups. Melatonin (5 mg/kg body weight) was intraperitoneally given to animals in the melatonin group and the TBI + melatonin group after 1 h of brain trauma. Hippocampal neurons were freshly isolated from the four groups, incubated with a nonspecific TRPM2 blocker (2-aminoethyl diphenylborinate, 2-APB), and then stimulated with cumene hydroperoxide. Apoptosis, caspase-3, caspase-9, intracellular ROS production, mitochondrial membrane depolarization and intracellular free Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]i) values were high in the TBI group, and low in the TBI + melatonin group. The [Ca(2+)]i concentration was decreased in the four groups by 2-APB. In our TBI experimental model, TRPM2 channels were involved in Ca(2+) entry-induced neuronal death, and the negative modulation of the activity of this channel by melatonin pretreatment may account for the neuroprotective activity of TRPM2 channels against oxidative stress, apoptosis, and Ca(2+) entry.

  19. Histamine H3-receptor signaling in the heart: possible involvement of Gi/Go proteins and N-type Ca++ channels.

    PubMed

    Endou, M; Poli, E; Levi, R

    1994-04-01

    Discovered as inhibitory autoreceptors in central histaminergic pathways, histamine H3-receptors may also modulate peripheral cholinergic and central adrenergic function. Recently, H3-receptors were reported to inhibit adrenergic inotropic responses in guinea pig atria, possibly at prejunctional sites. We have assessed whether the H3-mediated modulation of cardiac adrenergic activities results from a reduction in norepinephrine release. We have found that (R) alpha-methylhistamine, the selective histamine H3-receptor agonist, attenuates the inotropic and chronotropic response of isolated guinea pig atria to transmural stimulation of adrenergic nerve endings. This attenuation was associated with a marked reduction in endogenous norepinephrine release. In contrast (R) alpha-methylhistamine did not modify the chronotropic effect of exogenous norepinephrine. The attenuation of adrenergic responses by (R) alpha-methylhistamine was 1) prevented by thioperamide, the selective H3-receptor antagonist; 2) attenuated by pertussis-toxin pretreatment and 3) potentiated by the N-type Ca(++)-channel blocker omega-conotoxin, which also potentiated the sympathetic modulatory effects of adrenergic-alpha 2 and adenosine-A1 receptor agonists. Our findings indicate that prejunctional histamine H3-receptors modulate the depolarization-dependent norepinephrine release from sympathetic nerve endings in the guinea pig myocardium. These receptors are probably coupled to a pertussis-toxin-sensitive Gi/Go protein and probably effect a reduction in Ca++ current. We have previously reported that sympathetic stimulation elicits a frequency-dependent release of cardiac histamine, whereas others had found that adrenergic activity regulates histamine's rapid turnover pool. Accordingly, presynaptic H3-receptors are likely to serve a modulatory role in cardiac adrenergic function.

  20. Hypoglycaemic activity of culinary Pleurotus ostreatus and P. cystidiosus mushrooms in healthy volunteers and type 2 diabetic patients on diet control and the possible mechanisms of action.

    PubMed

    Jayasuriya, W J A Banukie N; Wanigatunge, Chandanie A; Fernando, Gita H; Abeytunga, D Thusitha U; Suresh, T Sugandhika

    2015-02-01

    This study determined the oral hypoglycaemic effect of suspensions of freeze dried and powdered (SFDP) Pleurotus ostreatus (P.o) and Pleurotus cystidiosus (P.c), using healthy human volunteers and Type 2 diabetic patients on diet control at a dose of 50 mg/kg/body weight, followed by a glucose load. The possible hypoglycaemic mechanisms were evaluated using rats, by examining intestinal glucose absorption and serum levels of insulin, glucokinase (GK) and glycogen synthase kinase (GSK). The P.o and P.c showed a significant reduction (P < 0.05) in fasting and postprandial serum glucose levels of healthy volunteers and reduced the postprandial serum glucose levels and increased the serum insulin levels (P < 0.05) of Type 2 diabetic patients. The P.o and P.c increased the intestinal absorption of glucose but simultaneously reduced the serum glucose levels (P < 0.05) in rats. Both mushrooms reduced the serum GSK and promoted insulin secretion while P.c increased serum GK (P < 0.05). The hypoglycaemic activity of P.o and P.c makes mushrooms beneficial functional foods in diabetes mellitus. The mechanism of hypoglycaemic activity of P.o and P.c is possibly by increasing GK activity and promoting insulin secretion and thereby increasing the utilization of glucose by peripheral tissues, inhibiting GSK and promoting glycogen synthesis.

  1. Action Research: Rethinking Lewin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickens, Linda; Watkins, Karen

    1999-01-01

    Explores both historical and contemporary definitions of action research. Describes the process and goals of action research in the tradition of Lewin. Presents a case study of an action-research project involving two teams in a high-technology corporation that depicts the process in action. (Author/CCM)

  2. Beetroot juice reduces infarct size and improves cardiac function following ischemia-reperfusion injury: Possible involvement of endogenous H2S.

    PubMed

    Salloum, Fadi N; Sturz, Gregory R; Yin, Chang; Rehman, Shabina; Hoke, Nicholas N; Kukreja, Rakesh C; Xi, Lei

    2015-05-01

    Ingestion of high dietary nitrate in the form of beetroot juice (BRJ) has been shown to exert antihypertensive effects in humans through increasing cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) levels. Since enhanced cGMP protects against myocardial ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury through upregulation of hydrogen sulfide (H2S), we tested the hypothesis that BRJ protects against I/R injury via H2S. Adult male CD-1 mice received either regular drinking water or those dissolved with BRJ powder (10 g/L, containing ∼ 0.7 mM nitrate). Seven days later, the hearts were explanted for molecular analyses. Subsets of mice were subjected to I/R injury by occlusion of the left coronary artery for 30 min and reperfusion for 24 h. A specific inhibitor of H2S producing enzyme--cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE), DL-propargylglycine (PAG, 50 mg/kg) was given i.p. 30 min before ischemia. Myocardial infarct size was significantly reduced in BRJ-fed mice (15.8 ± 3.2%) versus controls (46.5 ± 3.5%, mean ± standard error [SE], n = 6/group, P < .05). PAG completely blocked the infarct-limiting effect of BRJ. Moreover, BRJ significantly preserved ventricular function following I/R. Myocardial levels of H2S and its putative protein target--vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) were significantly increased by BRJ intake, whereas CSE mRNA and protein content did not change. Interestingly, the BRJ-induced cardioprotection was not associated with elevated blood nitrate-nitrite levels following I/R nor induction of cardiac peroxiredoxin 5, a mitochondrial antioxidant enzyme previously linked to nitrate-induced cardioprotection. We conclude that BRJ ingestion protects against post-I/R myocardial infarction and ventricular dysfunction possibly through CSE-mediated endogenous H2S generation. BRJ could be a promising natural and inexpensive nutraceutical supplement to reduce cardiac I/R injury in patients.

  3. Ethanol Extract of Peanut Sprout Lowers Blood Triglyceride Levels, Possibly Through a Pathway Involving SREBP-1c in Rats Fed a High-Fat Diet.

    PubMed

    Ha, Ae Wha; Kang, Nam E; Kim, Woo Kyoung

    2015-08-01

    The hypothesis of this study was that peanut sprout extracts (PSE) could reduce fat accumulation through activating the transcription of SREBP-1c genes. Sprague-Dawley (SD) were randomly assigned into two groups and fed the following diet for 4 weeks; 10 normal fat (NF, 7 g of fat/100 g diet) and 30 high fat (HF, 20 g of fat/100 g diet). After 4 weeks, the HF group was divided into three groups; HF, HF with 15 mg of PSE/kg diet (HF+low PSE, 0.025% resveratrol), and HF with 30 mg of PSE/kg diet (HF+high PSE, 0.05% resveratrol) and fed for an additional 5 weeks. The HF+high PSE group had significantly lower weight gain than the HF group. Plasma triglyceride (TG) level and the hepatic total lipid level were significantly lower in the HF+high PSE group compared to the HF group. Fecal excretions of total lipids, cholesterol, and TG in the HF+high PSE group tended to be higher than in the HF group, but these differences were not significant. The mRNA expressions of fatty acid synthase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, and sterol regulatory element binding protein-c (SREBP-1c) were significantly lower in the HF+high PSE group than in the HF group. The mRNA expressions of hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase and acyl-CoA cholesterol acyltransferase were significantly lower in the HF+high PSE groups compared to the HF group. The mRNA expression of cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase1 was significantly higher than the HF group in both the HF+low PSE and HF+high PSE groups, with much greater increase observed in the HF+high PSE group. In conclusion, consumption of PSE was effective for improving blood lipid levels, possibly by suppressing the expression of SREBP-1c, in rats fed a high-fat diet.

  4. β-D-Glucoside utilization by Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides SC: possible involvement in the control of cytotoxicity towards bovine lung cells

    PubMed Central

    Vilei, Edy M; Correia, Ivone; Ferronha, M Helena; Bischof, Daniela F; Frey, Joachim

    2007-01-01

    Background Contagious bovine pleuropneumonia (CBPP) caused by Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides small-colony type (SC) is among the most serious threats for livestock producers in Africa. Glycerol metabolism-associated H2O2 production seems to play a crucial role in virulence of this mycoplasma. A wide number of attenuated strains of M. mycoides subsp. mycoides SC are currently used in Africa as live vaccines. Glycerol metabolism is not affected in these vaccine strains and therefore it does not seem to be the determinant of their attenuation. A non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the bgl gene coding for the 6-phospho-β-glucosidase (Bgl) has been described recently. The SNP differentiates virulent African strains isolated from outbreaks with severe CBPP, which express the Bgl isoform Val204, from strains to be considered less virulent isolated from CBPP outbreaks with low mortality and vaccine strains, which express the Bgl isoform Ala204. Results Strains of M. mycoides subsp. mycoides SC considered virulent and possessing the Bgl isoform Val204, but not strains with the Bgl isoform Ala204, do trigger elevated levels of damage to embryonic bovine lung (EBL) cells upon incubation with the disaccharides (i.e., β-D-glucosides) sucrose and lactose. However, strains expressing the Bgl isoform Val204 show a lower hydrolysing activity on the chromogenic substrate p-nitrophenyl-β-D-glucopyranoside (pNPbG) when compared to strains that possess the Bgl isoform Ala204. Defective activity of Bgl in M. mycoides subsp. mycoides SC does not lead to H2O2 production. Rather, the viability during addition of β-D-glucosides in medium-free buffers is higher for strains harbouring the Bgl isoform Val204 than for those with the isoform Ala204. Conclusion Our results indicate that the studied SNP in the bgl gene is one possible cause of the difference in bacterial virulence among strains of M. mycoides subsp. mycoides SC. Bgl does not act as a direct virulence

  5. Somatosensory Psychophysical Losses in Inhabitants of Riverside Communities of the Tapajós River Basin, Amazon, Brazil: Exposure to Methylmercury Is Possibly Involved

    PubMed Central

    Khoury, Eliana Dirce Torres; Souza, Givago da Silva; da Costa, Carlos Araújo; de Araújo, Amélia Ayako Kamogari; de Oliveira, Cláudia Simone Baltazar; Silveira, Luiz Carlos de Lima; Pinheiro, Maria da Conceição Nascimento

    2015-01-01

    . There was a weak linear correlation between tactile sensation threshold and mercury concentration in the head hair samples. No correlation was found for the other two measurements. Mercury-exposed subjects had impaired somatosensory function compared with non-exposed control subjects. Long-term mercury exposure of riverside communities in the Tapajós river basin is a possible but not a definitely proven cause for psychophysical somatosensory losses observed in their population. Additionally, the relatively simple psychophysical measures used in this work should be followed by more rigorous measures of the same population. PMID:26658153

  6. Resveratrol Ameliorates the Anxiety- and Depression-Like Behavior of Subclinical Hypothyroidism Rat: Possible Involvement of the HPT Axis, HPA Axis, and Wnt/β-Catenin Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Jin-Fang; Xu, Ya-Yun; Qin, Gan; Cheng, Jiang-Qun; Chen, Fei-Hu

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic disease subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH) is closely associated with depression-like behavior both in human and animal studies, and our previous studies have identified the antidepressant effect of resveratrol (RES) in stressed rat model. The aim of this study was to investigate whether RES would manifest an antidepressant effect in SCH rat model and explore the possible mechanism. A SCH rat model was induced by hemi-thyroid electrocauterization, after which the model rats in the RES and LT4 groups received a daily intragastric injection of RES at the dose of 15 mg/kg or LT4 at the dose of 60 μg/kg for 16 days. The rats’ plasma concentrations of thyroid hormones were measured. Behavioral performance and hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) activity were evaluated. The protein expression levels of the Wnt/β-catenin in the hippocampus were detected by western blot. The results showed that RES treatment downregulated the elevated plasma thyroid-stimulating hormone concentration and the hypothalamic mRNA expression of thyrotropin-releasing hormone in the SCH rats. RES-treated rats showed increased rearing frequency and distance in the open-field test, increased sucrose preference in the sucrose preference test, and decreased immobility in the forced swimming test compared with SCH rats. The ratio of the adrenal gland weight to body weight, the plasma corticosterone levels, and the hypothalamic corticotrophin-releasing hormone mRNA expression were reduced in the RES-treated rats. Moreover, RES treatment upregulated the relative ratio of phosphorylated-GSK3β (p-GSK3β)/GSK3β and protein levels of p-GSK3β, cyclin D1, and c-myc, while downregulating the relative ratio of phosphorylated-β-catenin (p-β-catenin)/β-catenin and expression of GSK3β in the hippocampus. These findings suggest that RES exerts anxiolytic- and antidepressant-like effect in SCH rats by downregulating hyperactivity of the HPA axis and regulating both the HPT axis and the

  7. Antidepressant-like effects of the cannabinoid receptor ligands in the forced swimming test in mice: mechanism of action and possible interactions with cholinergic system.

    PubMed

    Kruk-Slomka, Marta; Michalak, Agnieszka; Biala, Grazyna

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of the experiments was to explore the role of the endocannabinoid system, through cannabinoid (CB) receptor ligands, nicotine and scopolamine, in the depression-related responses using the forced swimming test (FST) in mice. Our results revealed that acute injection of oleamide (10 and 20 mg/kg), a CB1 receptor agonist, caused antidepressant-like effect in the FST, while AM 251 (0.25-3 mg/kg), a CB1 receptor antagonist, did not provoke any effect in this test. Moreover, acute administration of both CB2 receptor agonist, JWH 133 (0.5 and 1 mg/kg) and CB2 receptor antagonist, AM 630 (0.5 mg/kg), exhibited antidepressant action. Antidepressant effects of oleamide and JWH 133 were attenuated by acute injection of both non-effective dose of AM 251, as well as AM 630. Among the all CB compounds used, only the combination of non-effective dose of oleamide (2.5 mg/kg) with non-effective dose of nicotine (0.5 mg/kg) caused an antidepressant effect. However, none of the CB receptor ligands, had influence on the antidepressant effects provoked by nicotine (0.2 mg/kg) injection. In turn, the combination of non-effective dose of oleamide (2.5 mg/kg); JWH (2 mg/kg) or AM 630 (2 mg/kg), but not of AM 251 (0.25 mg/kg), with non-effective dose of scopolamine (0.1 mg/kg), exhibited antidepressant properties. Indeed, all of the CB compounds used, intensified the antidepressant-like effects induced by an acute injection of scopolamine (0.3 mg/kg). Our results provide clear evidence that the endocannabinoid system participates in the depression-related behavior and through interactions with cholinergic system modulate these kind of responses.

  8. Molecular mechanism of action of triazolobenzodiazepinone agonists of the type 1 cholecystokinin receptor. Possible cooperativity across the receptor homo-dimeric complex

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Aditya J.; Lam, Polo C.H.; Orry, Andrew; Abagyan, Ruben; Christopoulos, Arthur; Sexton, Patrick M.; Miller, Laurence J.

    2016-01-01

    The type 1 cholecystokinin receptor (CCK1R) has multiple physiologic roles relating to nutrient homeostasis, including mediation of post-cibal satiety. This effect has been central in efforts to develop agonists of this receptor as part of a program to manage and/or prevent obesity. While a number of small molecule CCK1R agonists have been developed, none has yet been approved for clinical use, based on inadequate efficacy, side effects, or the potential for toxicity. Understanding the molecular details of docking and mechanism of action of these ligands can be helpful in the rational refinement and enhancement of small molecule drug candidates. In the current work, we have defined the mechanism of binding and activity of two triazolobenzodiazepinones, CE-326597 and PF-04756956, which are reported to be full agonist ligands. To achieve this, we utilized receptor binding with a series of allosteric and orthosteric radioligands at structurally-related CCK1R and CCK2R, as well as chimeric CCK1R/CCK2R constructs exchanging residues in the allosteric pocket, and assessment of biological activity. These triazolobenzodiazepinones docked within the intramembranous small molecule allosteric ligand pocket, with higher affinity binding to CCK2R than CCK1R, yet with biological activity exclusive to or greatly enhanced at CCK1R. These ligands exhibited cooperativity with benzodiazepine binding across the CCK1R homodimeric complex, resulting in their ability to inhibit only a fraction of the saturable binding of a benzodiazepine radioligand, unlike other small molecule antagonists and agonists of this receptor. This may contribute to the understanding of the unique short duration and reversible gallbladder contraction observed in vivo upon administration of these drugs. PMID:26654202

  9. Antifungal activity of 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) against anthracnose (Colletotrichum gloeosporioides) in postharvest mango fruit and its possible mechanisms of action.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiangbin; Lei, Huanhuan; Ma, Xiuyan; Lai, Tongfei; Song, Hongmiao; Shi, Xuequn; Li, Jiangkuo

    2017-01-16

    Anthracnose caused by Colletotrichum gloeosporioides is one of the most important postharvest diseases in mango fruit, often causing huge economic losses. In this study, the effect of 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) against anthracnose in postharvest mango fruit and the mechanisms involved were investigated. 1-MCP induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, damaged the mitochondria and destroyed the integrity of plasma membrane of spores of C. gloeosporioides, significantly suppressing spore germination and mycelial growth of C. gloeosporioides. 1-MCP also decreased the decay incidence and lesion expansion of mango fruit caused by C. gloeosporioides. For the first time this study demonstrated that 1-MCP suppressed anthracnose of postharvest mango fruit by directly inhibiting spore germination and mycelial growth of C. gloeosporioides, thus providing a promising strategy for disease control.

  10. The neuroprotective effects and possible mechanism of action of a methanol extract from Asparagus cochinchinensis: In vitro and in vivo studies.

    PubMed

    Jalsrai, A; Numakawa, T; Kunugi, H; Dieterich, D C; Becker, A

    2016-05-13

    Extracts of Asparagus cochinchinensis (AC) have antitumor, anti-inflammatory, and immunostimulant effects. The neurobiological mechanisms underlying the effects of AC have not been sufficiently explored. Thus we performed in vivo and in vitro experiments to further characterize potential therapeutic effects and to clarify the underlying mechanisms. In the tail suspension test immobility time was significantly reduced after administration of AC which suggests antidepressant-like activity without effect on body core temperature. Moreover, in animals pretreated with AC infarct size after occlusion of the middle cerebral artery was reduced. In vitro experiments confirmed neuroprotective effects. Total saponin obtained from AC significantly inhibited H2O2-induced cell death in cultured cortical neurons. The survival-promoting effect by AC saponins was partially blocked by inhibitors for extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ErK) and phosphoinositide 3-kinase Akt (PI3K/Akt) cascades, both of which are known as survival-promoting signaling molecules. Furthermore, phosphorylation of Scr homology-2 (SH2) domain-containing phosphatase 2 (Shp-2) was induced by AC, and the protective effect of AC was abolished by NSC87877, an inhibitor for Shp-2, suggesting an involvement of Shp-2 mediated intracellular signaling in AC saponins. Moreover, AC-induced activation of pShp-2 and ErK1/2 were blocked by NSC87877 indicating that activation of these signaling pathways was mediated by the Shp-2 signaling pathway. These effects appear to be associated with activation of the Shp-2, ErK1/2 and Akt signaling pathways. Our results suggest that AC has antidepressant-like and neuroprotective (reducing infarct size) effects and that activation of pShp-2 and pErK1/2 pathways may be involved in the effects.

  11. Opto-acoustic diagnostics of the thermal action of high-intensity focused ultrasound on biological tissues: the possibility of its applications and model experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Khokhlova, Tanya D; Pelivanov, Ivan M; Solomatin, Vladimir S; Karabutov, Aleksander A; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A

    2006-12-31

    The possibility of using the opto-acoustic (OA) method for monitoring high-intensity ultrasonic therapy is studied. The optical properties of raw and boiled liver samples used as the undamaged model tissue and tissue destroyed by ultrasound, respectively, are measured. Experiments are performed with samples consisting of several alternating layers of raw and boiled liver of different thickness. The position and transverse size of the thermal lesion were determined from the temporal shape of the OA signals. The results of measurements are compared with the real size and position of the thermal lesion determined from the subsequent cuts of the sample. It is shown that the OA method permits the diagnostics of variations in biological tissues upon ultrasonic therapy. (special issue devoted to multiple radiation scattering in random media)

  12. Effects of clove oil-phospholipid mixtures on rheology of gum tragacanth - possible application for surfactant action on mucus gel simulants.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, R; Puniyani, R R

    2000-01-01

    The present study evaluates the effectiveness of specialised biomaterials consisting of clove oil- phospholipid mixtures as possible substitute surfactants in diseases of altered mucus viscosity by studying their effect on the viscosity of mucus gel simulants in vitro. Test surfactants consisting of phospholipid-clove oil mixtures in the ratio of 1 part of oil to 9 parts of phospholipid were prepared. The phospholipids used were dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and phosphatidylglycerol (PG) and binary mixtures of PC: PE and PC: PG in the ratio of 2 parts of PC to 3 parts of PE or PG. The effects of the phospholipid-clove oil mixtures on the viscosity of mucus gel simulant (MGS: a polymeric gel consisting predominantly of gum tragacanth and simulating respiratory mucus), was studied by application of steady shear rates ranging from 0.512 to 51.2/s in a concentric cylinder viscometer at 37 degrees C. The change in MGS viscosity, after incubation with surfactants, was found to have a non-Newtonian character and to follow the power law model with R2 values >0.8. The addition of clove oil-phospholipid mixtures caused a decrease in the MGS viscosity when compared with the effect of the phospholipid alone at low shear rates in case of PC, PG and PCPG. The combination of PC : PG with clove oil caused ratios of change in MGS viscosity < 1 i.e., caused a decrease in the MGS viscosity. PC: PG with clove oil was capable of lowering MGS viscosity and should be further researched as possible therapies for diseases of altered mucus rheology.

  13. The effect of condensed tannins from Lotus pedunculatus and Lotus corniculatus on the growth of proteolytic rumen bacteria in vitro and their possible mode of action.

    PubMed

    Molan, A L; Attwood, G T; Min, B R; McNabb, W C

    2001-07-01

    Five strains of proteolytic rumen bacteria were treated with condensed tannins (CT) purified from Lotus pedunculatus and Lotus corniculatus to investigate their effect on the growth of these bacteria in vitro. Streptococcus bovis NCFB 2476, Eubacterium sp. C124b, Prevotella bryantii B14, Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens H17c, and Clostridium proteoclasticum B316T were tested against 200, 400, and 600 microg CT x mL(-1) extracted from L. pedunculatus and L. corniculatus. In the absence of CT, all bacterial strains showed typical growth and reached maximum optical density (OD) after 6-8 h of incubation in a plant protein medium. Growth of Eubacterium sp., P. bryantii, and B. fibrisolvens was inhibited (P < 0.01-0.001) more by the CT from L. pedunculatus than by the CT from L. corniculatus. All strains continued to grow in the presence of 200 microg x mL(-1) of the CT from L. pedunculatus, but attained significantly (P < 0.05-0.01) lower maximum OD600 values than (minus CT) controls, except for S. bovis. At 400 and 600 microg x mL(-1), the addition of CT from L. pedunculatus inhibited (P < 0.05-0.001) the growth of all bacterial strains tested compared with controls. The growth of Eubacterium sp. and P. bryantii was stimulated for the first 4-6 h of incubation (P < 0.001) by 200 microg x mL(-1) of CT from L. corniculatus, but then declined leading to a significant difference in OD values compared with the controls. At 400 microg x mL(-1), the CT from L. corniculatus reduced (P < 0.05-0.01) the growth of all strains except S. bovis, while 600 microg x mL(-1) inhibited (P < 0.01-0.001) the growth of all strains. To study the mechanism of CT action, the degradation of the large subunit (LSU) of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco; Fraction 1 Leaf protein) was followed after bacterial cells or Rubisco were preincubated with CT extracted from L. corniculatus and L. pedunculatus. Both preincubations decreased LSU degradation, but they differed in their

  14. Radiation protection following nuclear power accidents: a survey of putative mechanisms involved in the radioprotective actions of taurine during and after radiation exposure

    PubMed Central

    Christophersen, Olav Albert

    2012-01-01

    tissues, especially in the intestines, and (4) by functioning as an antifibrogenic agent. A detailed discussion is given of possible mechanisms involved both in the antioxidant effects of taurine, in its anti-inflammatory effects and in its role as a growth factor for leukocytes and nerve cells, which might be closely related to its role as an osmolyte important for cellular volume regulation because of the close connection between cell volume regulation and the regulation of protein synthesis as well as cellular protein degradation. While taurine supplementation alone would be expected to exert a therapeutic effect far better than negligible in patients that have been exposed to high doses of ionizing radiation, it may on theoretical grounds be expected that much better results may be obtained by using taurine as part of a multifactorial treatment strategy, where it may interact synergistically with several other nutrients, hormones or other drugs for optimizing antioxidant protection and minimizing harmful posttraumatic inflammatory reactions, while using other nutrients to optimize DNA and tissue repair processes, and using a combination of good diet, immunostimulatory hormones and perhaps other nontoxic immunostimulants (such as beta-glucans) for optimizing the recovery of antiviral and antibacterial immune functions. Similar multifactorial treatment strategies may presumably be helpful in several other disease situations (including severe infectious diseases and severe asthma) as well as for treatment of acute intoxications or acute injuries (both mechanical ones and severe burns) where severely enhanced oxidative and/or nitrative stress and/or too much secretion of vasodilatory neuropeptides from C-fibres are important parts of the pathogenetic mechanisms that may lead to the death of the patient. Some case histories (with discussion of some of those mechanisms that may have been responsible for the observed therapeutic outcome) are given for illustration of the

  15. Differential modulatory actions of GABAA agonists on susceptibility to GABAA antagonists-induced seizures in morphine dependent rats: possible mechanisms in seizure propensity.

    PubMed

    Joukar, Siyavash; Atapour, Nafiseh; Kalantaripour, Tajpari; Bashiri, Hamideh; Shahidi, Alireza

    2011-07-01

    In order to clarify the mechanisms involved in the susceptibility to GABA(A) antagonists-induced seizures in morphine dependent rats, we investigated how GABA(A) agonists modulate this vulnerability. Seizures were induced to animals by infusion of GABA(A) antagonists: pentylenetetrazole (PTZ), picrotoxin (PIC) and bicuculline (BIC). GABA(A) agonists, muscimol (MUS) and 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo [5,4-c]pyridin-3-ol (THIP), were administered intravenous (i.v.) before antagonists. Morphine-dependence significantly decreased the PTZ threshold dose (19.16±1.89 versus 25.74±1.25mg/kg) while, it had no effect on PIC induced seizures. BIC doses for both threshold and tonic-clonic seizures induction were significantly lower in morphine dependent rats (0.10±0.01 and 0.12±0.02 versus 0.25±0.02 and 0.39±0.07mg/kg respectively). In morphine-dependence, although pre-treatment with MUS significantly increased the required dose of PTZ for seizures threshold, THIP significantly decreased the required dose of PTZ for tonic-clonic convulsion. Moreover, MUS pretreatment completely recovered the effect of morphine dependency on BIC seizure activity. The results suggest that the capability of GABA(A) agonists on modulation of propensity to seizures induced by different antagonists in morphine-dependence is dissimilar. Therefore, it seems that long-term morphine alters some properties of GABA system so that the responsive rate of GABA(A) receptors not only to its antagonists, but also to its agonists will change differently.

  16. Connections of the macaque Granular Frontal Opercular (GrFO) area: a possible neural substrate for the contribution of limbic inputs for controlling hand and face/mouth actions.

    PubMed

    Gerbella, Marzio; Borra, Elena; Rozzi, Stefano; Luppino, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    We traced the connections of the macaque Granular Frontal Opercular (GrFO) area, located in the rostralmost part of the frontal opercular margin, and compared them with those of the caudally adjacent dorsal opercular (DO) and precentral opercular (PrCO) areas. Area GrFO displays strong connections with areas DO, PrCO, and ventrolateral prefrontal (VLPF) area 12l, and even more with the mostly hand-related ventral premotor (PMv) area F5a. Other connections involve the mostly face/mouth-related PMv area F5c, the arm-related area F6/pre-SMA, the hand-related fields of VLPF areas 46v and 12r, and area SII, mostly the hand representation. Furthermore, area GrFO shows rich connectivity with several components of the limbic system including orbitofrontal areas 12o, 12m, and 11, the agranular and dysgranular insula, the agranular cingulate area 24, and the amygdala. Thalamic afferents originate primarily from the parvocellular and the magnocellular subdivisions of the mediodorsal nucleus and from midline and intralaminar nuclei. This connectivity pattern clearly distinguishes area GrFO from areas DO and PrCO, characterized by a connectivity mostly involving oral sensorimotor and gustatory areas/subcortical structures. The present data suggest, based on connectivity patterns, an involvement of area GrFO in the cortical circuits for controlling goal-directed hand and face/mouth actions. In this context, area GrFO could represent a gateway for the access of limbic inputs, for example about subjective values, emotional significance of stimuli or internal states, to the PMv areas involved in selecting appropriate goal-directed hand and mouth/face actions.

  17. Differentiating enantioselective actions of GABOB: a possible role for threonine 244 in the binding site of GABA(C) ρ(1) receptors.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Izumi; Absalom, Nathan; Carland, Jane E; Doddareddy, Munikumar R; Gavande, Navnath; Johnston, Graham A R; Hanrahan, Jane R; Chebib, Mary

    2012-09-19

    Designing potent and subtype-selective ligands with therapeutic value requires knowledge about how endogenous ligands interact with their binding site. 4-Amino-3-hydroxybutanoic acid (GABOB) is an endogenous ligand found in the central nervous system in mammals. It is a metabolic product of GABA, the major inhibitory neurotransmitter. Homology modeling of the GABA(C) ρ(1) receptor revealed a potential H-bond interaction between the hydroxyl group of GABOB and threonine 244 (T244) located on loop C of the ligand binding site of the ρ(1) subunit. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we examined the effect of mutating T244 on the efficacy and pharmacology of GABOB and various ligands. It was found that mutating T244 to amino acids that lacked a hydroxyl group in their side chains produced GABA insensitive receptors. Only by mutating ρ(1)T244 to serine (ρ(1)T244S) produced a GABA responsive receptor, albeit 39-fold less sensitive to GABA than ρ(1)wild-type. We also observed changes in the activities of the GABA(C) receptor partial agonists, muscimol and imidazole-4-acetic acid (I4AA). At the concentrations we tested, the partial agonists antagonized GABA-induced currents at ρ(1)T244S mutant receptors (Muscimol: ρ(1)wild-type, EC(50) = 1.4 μM; ρ(1)T244S, IC(50) = 32.8 μM. I4AA: ρ(1)wild-type, EC(50) = 8.6 μM; ρ(1)T244S, IC(50) = 21.4 μM). This indicates that T244 is predominantly involved in channel gating. R-(-)-GABOB and S-(+)-GABOB are full agonists at ρ(1)wild-type receptors. In contrast, R-(-)-GABOB was a weak partial agonist at ρ(1)T244S (1 mM activates 26% of the current produced by GABA EC(50) versus ρ(1)wild-type, EC(50) = 19 μM; I(max) 100%), and S-(+)-GABOB was a competitive antagonist at ρ(1)T244S receptors (ρ(1)wild-type, EC(50) = 45 μM versus ρ(1)T244S, IC(50) = 417.4 μM, K(B) = 204 μM). This highlights that the interaction of GABOB with T244 is enantioselective. In contrast, the potencies of a range of antagonists tested, 3-aminopropyl

  18. Possible involvement of serotonin in extinction.

    PubMed

    Beninger, R J; Phillips, A G

    1979-01-01

    In Experiment 1, rats were trained to leverpress for continuous reinforcement with food; half were then intubated with the serotonin synthesis inhibitor parachlorophenylalanine (PCPA: 400 mg/kg) and half with water. In extinction the PCPA-treated rats responded at a higher rate. In Experiment 2, rats were trained on a random interval schedule and then assigned to two groups, treated as in Experiment 1, and tested in extinction. There was no significant difference in the resistance to extinction of the two groups. In Experiment 3, the responding of rats trained in a punished stepdown response paradigm and then given an intragastric injection of PCPA took longer to recover than the responding of water-injected controls. These observations suggest that serotonergic neurons might play a role in extinction processes.

  19. Involvement of Gαs-proteins in the action of relaxin-like gonad-stimulating substance on starfish ovarian follicle cells.

    PubMed

    Mita, Masatoshi; Haraguchi, Shogo; Watanabe, Miho; Takeshige, Yuki; Yamamoto, Kazutoshi; Tsutsui, Kazuyoshi

    2014-09-01

    Gonad-stimulating substance (GSS) in starfish is the only known invertebrate peptide hormone responsible for final gamete maturation, rendering it functionally analogous to gonadotropins in vertebrates. In breeding season (stage V), GSS stimulates oocyte maturation to induce 1-methyladenine (1-MeAde) by ovarian follicle cells. The hormonal action of GSS is mediated through the activation of its receptor, G-proteins and adenylyl cyclase. It has been reported that GSS fails to induce 1-MeAde and cyclic AMP (cAMP) production in follicle cells of ovaries during oogenesis (stage IV). This study examined the regulatory mechanism how ovarian follicle cells acquire the potential to respond to GSS by producing 1-MeAde and cAMP. Because the failure of GSS action was due to G-proteins of follicle cells, the molecular structures of Gαs, Gαi, Gαq and Gβ were identified in follicle cells of starfish Asterina pectinifera. The cDNA sequences of Gαs, Gαi, Gαq and Gβ consisted of ORFs encoding 379, 354, 353 and 353 amino acids. The expression levels of Gαs were extremely low in follicle cells at stage IV, whereas the mRNA levels increased markedly in stage V. On contrary, the mRNA levels of Gαi were almost constant regardless of stage IV and V. These findings strongly suggest that de novo synthesis of Gαs-proteins is contributed to the action of GSS on follicle cells to produce 1-MeAde and cAMP.

  20. Involvement of Hormone- and ROS-Signaling Pathways in the Beneficial Action of Humic Substances on Plants Growing under Normal and Stressing Conditions

    PubMed Central

    García, Andrés Calderín; Olaetxea, Maite; Santos, Leandro Azevedo; Mora, Verónica; Baigorri, Roberto; Fuentes, Marta; Zamarreño, Angel Maria; Berbara, Ricardo Luis Louro; Garcia-Mina, José María

    2016-01-01

    The importance of soil humus in soil fertility has been well established many years ago. However, the knowledge about the whole mechanisms by which humic molecules in the rhizosphere improve plant growth remains partial and rather fragmentary. In this review we discuss the relationships between two main signaling pathway families that are affected by humic substances within the plant: one directly related to hormonal action and the other related to reactive oxygen species (ROS). In this sense, our aims are to try the integration of all these events in a more comprehensive model and underline some points in the model that remain unclear and deserve further research. PMID:27366744

  1. The Effect of (-)-Epigallocatechin 3-O - Gallate In Vitro and In Vivo in Leishmania braziliensis: Involvement of Reactive Oxygen Species as a Mechanism of Action

    PubMed Central

    Inacio, Job D. F.; Gervazoni, Luiza; Canto-Cavalheiro, Marilene M.; Almeida-Amaral, Elmo E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Leishmaniasis is a parasitic disease associated with extensive mortality and morbidity. The treatment for leishmaniasis is currently based on pentavalent antimonials and amphotericin B; however, these drugs result in numerous adverse side effects. Natural compounds have been used as novel treatments for parasitic diseases. In this paper, we evaluated the effect of (-)-epigallocatechin 3-O-gallate (EGCG) on Leishmania braziliensis in vitro and in vivo and described the mechanism of EGCG action against L. braziliensis promastigotes and intracellular amastigotes. Methodology/Principal Finding In vitro activity and reactive oxygen species (ROS) measurements were determined during the promastigote and intracellular amastigote life stages. The effect of EGCG on mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) was assayed using JC-1, and intracellular ATP concentrations were measured using a luciferin-luciferase system. The in vivo experiments were performed in infected BALB/c mice orally treated with EGCG. EGCG reduced promastigote viability and the infection index in a time- and dose-dependent manner, with IC50 values of 278.8 µM and 3.4 µM, respectively, at 72 h and a selectivity index of 149.5. In addition, EGCG induced ROS production in the promastigote and intracellular amastigote, and the effects were reversed by polyethylene glycol (PEG)-catalase. Additionally, EGCG reduced ΔΨm, thereby decreasing intracellular ATP concentrations in promastigotes. Furthermore, EGCG treatment was also effective in vivo, demonstrating oral bioavailability and reduced parasitic loads without altering serological toxicity markers. Conclusions/Significance In conclusion, our study demonstrates the leishmanicidal effects of EGCG against the two forms of L. braziliensis, the promastigote and amastigote. In addition, EGCG promotes ROS production as a part of its mechanism of action, resulting in decreased ΔΨm and reduced intracellular ATP concentrations. These actions ultimately

  2. Action mechanisms involved in the bioprotective effect of Lactobacillus harbinensis K.V9.3.1.Np against Yarrowia lipolytica in fermented milk.

    PubMed

    Mieszkin, Sophie; Hymery, Nolwenn; Debaets, Stella; Coton, Emmanuel; Le Blay, Gwenaelle; Valence, Florence; Mounier, Jérôme

    2017-02-21

    The use of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) as bioprotective cultures can be an alternative to chemical preservatives or antibiotic to prevent fungal spoilage in dairy products. Among antifungal LAB, Lactobacillus harbinensis K.V9.3.1Np showed a remarkable antifungal activity for the bioprotection of fermented milk without modifying their organoleptic properties (Delavenne et al., 2015). The aim of the present study was to elucidate the action mechanism of this bioprotective strain against the spoilage yeast Yarrowia lipolytica. To do so, yeast viability, membrane potential, intracellular pH (pHi) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production were assessed using flow cytometry analyses after 3, 6 and 10days incubation in cell-free supernatants. The tested supernatants were obtained after milk fermentation with yogurt starter cultures either in co-culture with L. harbinensis K.V9.3.1Np (active supernatant) or not (control supernatant). Scanning-electron microscopy (SEM) was used to monitor yeast cell morphology and 9 known antifungal organic acids were quantified in both yogurt supernatants using high-performance liquid chromatograph (HPLC). Yeast growth occurred within 3days incubation in control supernatant, while it was prevented for up to 10days by the active supernatant. Interestingly, between 66 and 99% of yeast cells were under a viable but non-cultivable (VNC) state despite an absence of membrane integrity loss. While ROS production was not increased in active supernatant, cell physiological changes including membrane depolarization and pHi decrease were highlighted. Moreover, morphological changes including membrane collapsing and cell lysis were observed. These effects could be attributed to the synergistic action of organic acids. Indeed, among the 8 organic acids quantified in active supernatant, five of them (acetic, lactic, 2-pyrrolidone-5-carboxylic, hexanoic and 2-hydroxybenzoic acids) were at significantly higher concentrations in the active supernatant

  3. Action in Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Hofsten, Claes

    2007-01-01

    It is argued that cognitive development has to be understood in the functional perspective provided by actions. Actions reflect all aspects of cognitive development including the motives of the child, the problems to be solved, and the constraints and possibilities of the child's body and sensorimotor system. Actions are directed into the future…

  4. The involvement of NMDA and AMPA receptors in the mechanism of antidepressant-like action of zinc in the forced swim test.

    PubMed

    Szewczyk, B; Poleszak, E; Sowa-Kućma, M; Wróbel, A; Słotwiński, S; Listos, J; Wlaź, P; Cichy, A; Siwek, A; Dybała, M; Gołembiowska, K; Pilc, A; Nowak, Gabriel

    2010-06-01

    Antidepressant-like activity of zinc in the forced swim test (FST) was demonstrated previously. Enhancement of such activity by joint administration of zinc and antidepressants was also shown. However, mechanisms involved in this activity have not yet been established. The present study examined the involvement of the NMDA and AMPA receptors in zinc activity in the FST in mice and rats. Additionally, the influence of zinc on both glutamate and aspartate release in the rat brain was also determined. Zinc-induced antidepressant-like activity in the FST in both mice and rats was antagonized by N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA, 75 mg/kg, i.p.) administration. Moreover, low and ineffective doses of NMDA antagonists (CGP 37849, L-701,324, D-cycloserine, and MK-801) administered together with ineffective doses of zinc exhibit a significant reduction of immobility time in the FST. Additionally, we have demonstrated the reduction of immobility time by AMPA receptor potentiator, CX 614. The antidepressant-like activity of both CX 614 and zinc in the FST was abolished by NBQX (an antagonist of AMPA receptor, 10 mg/kg, i.p.), while the combined treatment of sub-effective doses of zinc and CX 614 significantly reduces the immobility time in the FST. The present study also demonstrated that zinc administration potentiated a veratridine-evoked glutamate and aspartate release in the rat's prefrontal cortex and hippocampus. The present study further suggests the antidepressant properties of zinc and indicates the involvement of the NMDA and AMPA glutamatergic receptors in this activity.

  5. Application of the U.S. EPA Mode of Action Framework for Purposes of Guiding Future Research: A Case Study Involving the Oral Carcinogenicity of Hexavalent Chromium

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Chad M.; Haws, Laurie C.; Harris, Mark A.; Gatto, Nicole M.; Proctor, Deborah M.

    2011-01-01

    Mode of action (MOA) analysis provides a systematic description of key events leading to adverse health effects in animal bioassays for the purpose of informing human health risk assessment. Uncertainties and data gaps identified in the MOA analysis may also be used to guide future research to improve understanding of the MOAs underlying a specific toxic response and foster development of toxicokinetic and toxicodynamic models. An MOA analysis, consistent with approaches outlined in the MOA Framework as described in the Guidelines for Carcinogen Risk Assessment, was conducted to evaluate small intestinal tumors observed in mice chronically exposed to relatively high concentrations of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) in drinking water. Based on review of the literature, key events in the MOA are hypothesized to include saturation of the reductive capacity of the upper gastrointestinal tract, absorption of Cr(VI) into the intestinal epithelium, oxidative stress and inflammation, cell proliferation, direct and/or indirect DNA modification, and mutagenesis. Although available data generally support the plausibility of these key events, several unresolved questions and data gaps were identified, highlighting the need for obtaining critical toxicokinetic and toxicodynamic data in the target tissue and in the low-dose range. Experimental assays that can address these data gaps are discussed along with strategies for comparisons between responsive and nonresponsive tissues and species. This analysis provides a practical application of MOA Framework guidance and is instructive for the design of studies to improve upon the information available for quantitative risk assessment. PMID:20947717

  6. Involvement of nitric oxide and ATP-sensitive potassium channels in the peripheral antinoceptive action of a tramadol-dexketoprofen combination in the formalin test.

    PubMed

    Isiordia-Espinoza, Mario A; Pozos-Guillén, Amaury; Pérez-Urizar, José; Chavarría-Bolaños, Daniel

    2014-11-01

    Systemic coadministration of tramadol and dexketoprofen can produce antinociceptive synergism in animals. There has been only limited evaluation of this drug combination in the peripheral nervous system in terms of the antinociceptive interaction and its mechanisms. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the peripheral antinociceptive interaction between tramadol and dexketoprofen in the formalin test and the involvement of the nitric oxide (NO)-cyclic guanosine monophosphate pathway and ATP-sensitive K(+) channels. Different doses of tramadol or dexketoprofen were administered locally to the formalin-injured mouse paw and the antinociceptive effect evaluated. ED50 values were calculated for both drugs alone and in combination. Coadministration of tramadol and dexketoprofen produced an antinociceptive synergistic interaction during the second phase of the formalin test. Pretreatment with NO antagonists, including l-NG-nitroarginine methyl ester and 1H-[1,2,4]-oxadiazolo-[4,3-a]-quinoxalin-1-one, or the ATP-sensitive K(+) channel antagonist glibenclamide reversed the antinociceptive synergistic effect of the tramadol-dexketoprofen combination, suggesting that NO and ATP-sensitive K(+) channels were involved.

  7. Neuroprotective effects of R,R-tetrahydrochrysene against glutamate-induced cell death through anti-excitotoxic and antioxidant actions involving estrogen receptor-dependent and -independent pathways.

    PubMed

    Xia, Y; Xing, J Z; Krukoff, T L

    2009-08-18

    Glutamate-induced neural cell death is mediated by excitotoxicity and oxidative stress. Treatment of glutamate toxicity with estrogen and its related compounds for neuroprotection remains controversial. In this study, we examined the effects of selective estrogen receptor (ER) ligands on glutamate toxicity and found that R,R-tetrahydrochrysene (R,R-THC), an antagonist of ERbeta and agonist of ERalpha, has neuroprotective effects against glutamate-induced death in primary rat cortical cells and mouse N29/4 hypothalamic cells. The protective effect of R,R-THC was dose-dependent and was maintained even when added several hours after the initial glutamate exposure. R,R-THC blocked glutamate-induced depletion of intracellular glutathione, increased superoxide dismutase activity, and protected cells from hydrogen peroxide-induced death. R,R-THC also prevented glutamate-induced nuclear translocation of apoptotic inducing factor and release of mitochondrial cytochrome c. The protective effect of R,R-THC was blocked by methyl-piperidino-pyrazole (MPP; an ERalpha antagonist) in glutamate-treated cortical cells, and pretreatment with MK-801 (an NMDA receptor antagonist) but not CNQX (an AMPA/kainate receptor antagonist) increased cell survival. On the other hand, MPP did not block the protective effect of R,R-THC in glutamate-treated N29/4 cells, and neither MK-801 nor CNQX conferred protection. Activation of ERalpha and/or ERbeta with 17beta-estradiol (E2), propyl-pyrazole-triol or diarylpropionitrile did not provide effective neuroprotection, and pretreatment with ICI 182,780 did not inhibit the protective effect of R,R-THC in either type of cell. These results suggest that the use of ER agonists (including E2) has limited beneficial effects when both excitotoxicity and oxidative stress occur. In contrast to agonists of ERs, R,R-THC, which possesses anti-excitotoxic and antioxidant actions via ER-dependent and -independent pathways, provides significant neuroprotection.

  8. Regional involvement of an endothelium-derived contractile factor in the vasoactive actions of neuropeptide Y in bovine isolated retinal arteries.

    PubMed Central

    Prieto, D.; Simonsen, U.; Nyborg, N. C.

    1995-01-01

    1. In vitro experiments in a microvascular myograph were designed in order to investigate the effects of human neuropeptide Y (NPY), its receptor subtype and the mechanisms underlying NPY actions in bovine isolated retinal proximal (PRA) and distal (DRA) arteries. 2. A single concentration of NPY (10 nM) induced a prompt and reproducible contraction which reached a plateau within 1-4 min, after which the response returned to baseline over the next 2-10 min. Cumulative addition of NPY induced concentration-dependent contractions of bovine retinal arteries, with an EC50[M] of 1.7 nM and a maximal response equal to 54 +/- 8% of Emax (absolute maximal contractile levels of vessels) and not different from that obtained by a single addition of the peptide. There were no significant differences in either sensitivity or maximal response to NPY between PRA and DRA. 3. Porcine NPY and the selective Y1-receptor agonist, [Pro34]NPY, also induced concentration-dependent contractions of the retinal arteries with a potency and maximal response not significantly different from those of human NPY; in contrast, the selective Y2-receptor agonist, NPY(13-36), caused only a 5% contraction at the highest concentration used. 4. Removal of extracellular Ca2+ or pretreatment with the 1,4-dihydropyridine Ca(2+)-channel blocker, nifedipine (1 microM), reduced the contractile response of 10 nM NPY to 18.4 +/- 3.3% (n = 6) and 18.6 +/- 3.9% (n = 6); respectively, of the controls. 5. Mechanical removal of the endothelium depressed the maximal contraction elicited by NPY in PRA but did not affect either sensitivity or maximal response to the peptide in DRA. In endothelium-intact arteries, blockade of the cyclo-oxygenase pathway with 3 microM indomethacin increased resting tension in both PRA and DRA and significantly inhibited sensitivity and maximal contraction to NPY of PRA and DRA, respectively. The thromboxane A2 (TXA2)/prostaglandin H2 (PGH2) receptor antagonist, SQ30741, reduced both

  9. Suppression of Transglutaminase-2 is Involved in Anti-Inflammatory Actions of Glucosamine in 12-O-Tetradecanoylphorbol-13-Acetate-Induced Skin Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sun A; Lee, Hye Ja; Lee, Eun Ji; Kang, June Hee; Kim, You Lee; Kim, Hyun Ji; Oh, Seung Hyun; Choi, Changsun; Lee, Ho; Kim, Soo Youl

    2012-01-01

    Glucosamine (GS) is well known for the treatment of inflam-mation. However, the mechanism and efficacy of GS for skin inflammation are unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects and mechanism of GS in the mouse 12-O-tetradecanoyl 13-acetate (TPA)-induced ear edema model. TPA-induced ear edema was evoked in ICR or transglutaminase 2 (Tgase-2) (-/-) mice. GS was administered orally (10-100 mg/kg) or topically (0.5-2.0 w/v %) prior to TPA treatment. Orally administered GS at 10 mg/kg showed a 76 or 57% reduction in ear weight or myeloperoxidase, respectively, and a decreased expression of cyclooxy-genase-2 (COX-2), NF-κB and Tgase-2 in TPA-induced ear edema by western blot and immunohistochemistry. Role of Tgase-2 in TPA ear edema is examined using Tgase-2 (-/-) mice and TPA did not induce COX-2 expression in ear of Tgase-2 (-/-) mice. These observations suggested that Tgase-2 is involved in TPA-induced COX-2 expression in the inflamed ear of mice and anti-inflammatory effects of glucosamine is mediated through suppression of Tgase-2 in TPA ear edema. PMID:24009824

  10. A possible involvement of Nrf2-mediated heme oxygenase-1 up-regulation in protective effect of the proton pump inhibitor pantoprazole against indomethacin-induced gastric damage in rats

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Proton pump is an integral membrane protein that is ubiquitous ATP binding cassette (ABC) involved in many transport processes in all living organisms, among which a specialized form of pump, so called p-type proton pump, exists in the parietal cells of stomach. Though proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are frequently prescribed to prevent nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs)-induced gastric damage, the acid suppressive actions do not suffice to explain. Methods In order to document the effects of pantoprazole, one of PPIs, on the NSAIDs-induced gastric damage, in vitro and in vivo studies were performed. Immunocytochemistry, Western blot analysis, electrophoretic mobility shift assay and RT-PCR were conducted to evaluate the induction of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) through Nrf2 activation in normal gastric mucosal RGM-1 cells or in vivo stomach tissues from rats treated with indomethacin and/or pantoprazole. Results Pantoprazole activated Nrf2 through inactivation of Keap1, after which the expression of HO-1 was significantly increased in a dose-dependent manner in RGM-1 cells. Increased ARE-DNA binding activity was observed maximally at 1 h with 300 μM of pantoprazole. The expression of HO-1 induced by pantoprazole was significantly associated with the increased in vitro tube formation (P < 0.05) and angiogenic factors including VEGF, bFGF, and HIF-1α. Indomethacin markedly increased the expressions of TNF-α, IL-1ß, IL-8, NOX-1, ICAM-1 and VCAM, whereas pantoprazole significantly decreased the expressions of indomethacin-induced these inflammatory mediators in accord with pantoprazole-induced HO-1 (P < 0.05) as documented with HO-1 inhibitor. In vivo model of indomethacin-induced gastric damage could validate in vitro-drawn results that pantoprazole remarkably protected against indomethacin-induced gastric damage, in which zinc protoporphyrin (5 mg/kg, ip) significantly abolished the protective efficacy of pantoprazole. Conclusion These results

  11. Acylated and unacylated ghrelin protect MC3T3-E1 cells against tert-butyl hydroperoxide-induced oxidative injury: pharmacological characterization of ghrelin receptor and possible epigenetic involvement.

    PubMed

    Dieci, Elisa; Casati, Lavinia; Pagani, Francesca; Celotti, Fabio; Sibilia, Valeria

    2014-07-01

    Increasing evidence suggests a role for oxidative stress in age-related decrease in osteoblast number and function leading to the development of osteoporosis. This study was undertaken to investigate whether ghrelin, previously reported to stimulate osteoblast proliferation, counteracts tert-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BHP)-induced oxidative damage in MC3T3-E1 osteoblastic cells as well as to characterize the ghrelin receptor (GHS-R) involved in such activity. Pretreatment with ghrelin (10(-7)-10(-11)M) significantly increased viability and reduced apoptosis of MC3T3-E1 cells cultured with t-BHP (250 μM) for three hours at the low concentration of 10(-9)M as shown by MTT assay and Hoechst-33258 staining. Furthermore, ghrelin prevented t-BHP-induced osteoblastic dysfunction and changes in the cytoskeleton organization evidenced by the staining of the actin fibers with Phalloidin-FITC by reducing reactive oxygen species generation. The GHS-R type 1a agonist, EP1572 (10(-7)-10(-11)M), had no effect against t-BHP-induced cytotoxicity and pretreatment with the selective GHS-R1a antagonist, D-Lys(3)-GHRP-6 (10(-7)M), failed to remove ghrelin (10(-9) M)-protective effects against oxidative injury, indicating that GHS-R1a is not involved in such ghrelin activity. Accordingly, unacylated ghrelin (DAG), not binding GHS-R1a, displays the same protective actions of ghrelin against t-BHP-induced cytotoxicity. Preliminary observations indicate that ghrelin increased the trimethylation of lys4 on histones H3, a known epigenetic mark activator, which may regulate the expression of some genes limiting oxidative damage. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that ghrelin and DAG promote survival of MC3T3-E1 cell exposed to t-BHP-induced oxidative damage. Such effect is independent of GHS-R1a and is likely mediated by a common ghrelin/DAG binding site.

  12. Possible involvement of cationic-drug sensitive transport systems in the blood-to-brain influx and brain-to-blood efflux of amantadine across the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Toyofumi; Fukami, Toshiro; Tomono, Kazuo

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the brain-to-blood efflux transport of amantadine across the blood-brain barrier (BBB). The apparent in vivo efflux rate constant for [(3) H]amantadine from the rat brain (keff ) was found to be 1.53 × 10(-2) min(-1) after intracerebral microinjection using the brain efflux index method. The efflux of [(3) H]amantadine was inhibited by 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP(+) ), a cationic neurotoxin, suggesting that amantadine transport from the brain to the blood across the BBB potentially involves the rat plasma membrane monoamine transporter (rPMAT). On the other hand, other selected substrates for organic cation transporters (OCTs) and organic anion transporters (OATs), as well as inhibitors of P-glycoprotein (P-gp), did not affect the efflux transport of [(3) H]amantadine. In addition, in vitro studies using an immortalized rat brain endothelial cell line (GPNT) showed that the uptake and retention of [(3) H]amantadine by the cells was not changed by the addition of cyclosporin, which is an inhibitor of P-gp. However, cyclosporin affected the uptake and retention of rhodamine123. Finally, the initial brain uptake of [(3) H]amantadine was determined using an in situ mouse brain perfusion technique. Notably, the brain uptake clearance for [(3) H]amantadine was significantly decreased with the co-perfusion of quinidine or verapamil, which are cationic P-gp inhibitors, while MPP(+) did not have a significant effect. It is thus concluded that while P-gp is not involved, it is possible that rPMAT and the cationic drug-sensitive transport system participate in the brain-to-blood efflux and the blood-to-brain influx of amantadine across the BBB, respectively.

  13. Low-dose etoposide-treatment induces endoreplication and cell death accompanied by cytoskeletal alterations in A549 cells: Does the response involve senescence? The possible role of vimentin

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Senescence in the population of cells is often described as a program of restricted proliferative capacity, which is manifested by broad morphological and biochemical changes including a metabolic shift towards an autophagic-like response and a genotoxic-stress related induction of polyploidy. Concomitantly, the cell cycle progression of a senescent cell is believed to be irreversibly arrested. Recent reports suggest that this phenomenon may have an influence on the therapeutic outcome of anticancer treatment. The aim of this study was to verify the possible involvement of this program in the response to the treatment of the A549 cell population with low doses of etoposide, as well as to describe accompanying cytoskeletal alterations. Methods After treatment with etoposide, selected biochemical and morphological parameters were examined, including: the activity of senescence-associated ß-galactosidase, SAHF formation, cell cycle progression, the induction of p21Cip1/Waf1/Sdi1 and cyclin D1, DNA strand breaks, the disruption of cell membrane asymmetry/integrity and ultrastructural alterations. Vimentin and G-actin cytoskeleton was evaluated both cytometrically and microscopically. Results and conclusions Etoposide induced a senescence-like phenotype in the population of A549 cells. Morphological alterations were nevertheless not directly coupled with other senescence markers including a stable cell cycle arrest, SAHF formation or p21Cip1/Waf1/Sdi1 induction. Instead, a polyploid, TUNEL-positive fraction of cells visibly grew in number. Also upregulation of cyclin D1 was observed. Here we present preliminary evidence, based on microscopic analyses, that suggest a possible role of vimentin in nuclear alterations accompanying polyploidization-depolyploidization events following genotoxic insults. PMID:23383739

  14. Community Involvement Activities: Research into Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattox, Beverly; Rich, Dorothy

    1977-01-01

    The Home and School Institute operates to develop specific, easy, low cost, practical ways to share educational accountability between home and school, and to develop ways in which schools can enhance school-community interaction. (MB)

  15. Possible involvement of type 1 inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors up-regulated by dopamine D1 and D2 receptors in mouse nucleus accumbens neurons in the development of methamphetamine-induced place preference.

    PubMed

    Kurokawa, K; Mizuno, K; Ohkuma, S

    2012-12-27

    Little is known about regulatory mechanisms of type 1 inositol-1,4,5-triphosphate receptor (IP(3)R-1) expression in conditioned place preference by methamphetamine (METH), though significant enhancement of IP(3)R-1 expression in the mouse frontal cortex and limbic forebrain by intermittent administration of cocaine is reported. The present study investigated the role and regulation of IP(3)R-1 in mice with METH-induced place preference. Injection of IP(3)R antagonists with different chemical structures, 2-aminophenoxyethane-borate and xestospongin C, into the mouse nucleus accumbens (NAcc) dose-dependently inhibited METH-induced place preference. The levels of IP(3)R-1 protein in the NAcc of METH-conditioned mice significantly increased, which was completely abolished by microinjection of SCH23390 and raclopride, selective dopamine D1-like and D2-like receptor (D1 and D2DR) antagonists respectively, into the mouse NAcc. Immunohistochemical assessment revealed co-localization of immunoreactivity for IP(3)R-1 and those for D1 and D2DRs in the NAcc. These findings suggest that IP(3)R-1 could be involved in the development of METH-induced place preference and that D1 and D2DRs in the NAcc of mice showing METH-induced place preference play possible regulatory roles in IP(3)R-1 expression.

  16. The generalized anomeric effect in the 1,3-thiazolidines: Evidence for both sulphur and nitrogen as electron donors. Crystal structures of various N-acylthiazolidines including mercury(II) complexes. Possible relevance to penicillin action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandrasekhar, Sosale; Chopra, Deepak; Gopalaiah, Kovuru; Guru Row, Tayur N.

    2007-06-01

    Evidence for the generalized anomeric effect (GAE) in the N-acyl-1,3-thiazolidines, an important structural motif in the penicillins, was sought in the crystal structures of N-(4-nitrobenzoyl)-1,3-thiazolidine and its (2:1) complex with mercuric chloride, N-acetyl-2-phenyl-1,3-thiazolidine, and the (2:1) complex of N-benzoyl-1,3-thiazolidine with mercuric bromide. An inverse relationship was generally observed between the C2- N and C2- S bond lengths of the thiazolidine ring, supporting the existence of the GAE. (Maximal bond length changes were ˜0.04 Å for C2- N3, S1- C2, and ˜0.08 Å for N3- C6.) Comparison with N-acylpyrrolidines and tetrahydrothiophenes indicates that both the nitrogen-to-sulphur and sulphur-to-nitrogen GAE's operate simultaneously in the 1,3-thiazolidines, the former being dominant. (This is analogous to the normal and exo-anomeric effects in pyranoses, and also leads to an interesting application of Baldwin's rules.) The nitrogen-to-sulphur GAE is generally enhanced in the mercury(II) complexes (presumably via coordination at the sulphur); a 'competition' between the GAE and the amide resonance of the N-acyl moiety is apparent. There is evidence for a 'push-pull' charge transfer between the thiazolidine moieties in the mercury(II) complexes, and for a 'back-donation' of charge from the bromine atoms to the thiazolidine moieties in the HgBr 2 complex. (The sulphur atom appears to be sp 2 hybridised in the mercury(II) complexes, possibly for stereoelectronic reasons.) These results are apparently relevant to the mode of action of the penicillins.

  17. Renormalized action improvements

    SciTech Connect

    Zachos, C.

    1984-01-01

    Finite lattice spacing artifacts are suppressed on the renormalized actions. The renormalized action trajectories of SU(N) lattice gauge theories are considered from the standpoint of the Migdal-Kadanoff approximation. The minor renormalized trajectories which involve representations invariant under the center are discussed and quantified. 17 references.

  18. Handbook for Ecology Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eber, Ronald

    This handbook has been compiled to aid concerned individuals and ecology groups more adequately define their goals, initiate good programs, and take effective action. It examines the ways a group of working individuals can become involved in action programs for ecological change. Part 1 deals with organization, preliminary organizing, structuring,…

  19. The Neural Basis of Predicting the Outcomes of Imagined Actions

    PubMed Central

    Jahn, Andrew; Nee, Derek Evan; Brown, Joshua W.

    2011-01-01

    A key feature of human intelligence is the ability to predict the outcomes of one’s own actions prior to executing them. Action values are thought to be represented in part in the dorsal and ventral medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), yet current studies have focused on the value of executed actions rather than the anticipated value of a planned action. Thus, little is known about the neural basis of how individuals think (or fail to think) about their actions and the potential consequences before they act. We scanned individuals with fMRI while they thought about performing actions that they knew would likely be rewarded or unrewarded. Here we show that merely imagining an unrewarded action, as opposed to imagining a rewarded action, increases activity in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, independently of subsequent actions. This activity overlaps with regions that respond to actual unrewarded actions. The findings show a distinct network that signals the prospective outcomes of one’s possible actions. A number of clinical disorders such as schizophrenia and drug abuse involve a failure to take the potential consequences of an action into account prior to acting. Our results thus suggest how dysfunctions of the mPFC may contribute to such failures. PMID:22131965

  20. Hierarchical and multiple hand action representation using temporal postural synergies.

    PubMed

    Tessitore, G; Sinigaglia, C; Prevete, R

    2013-03-01

    The notion of synergy enables one to provide simplified descriptions of hand actions. It has been used in a number of different meanings ranging from kinematic and dynamic synergies to postural and temporal postural synergies. However, relatively little is known about how representing an action by synergies might take into account the possibility to have a hierarchical and multiple action representation. This is a key aspect for action representation as it has been characterized by action theorists and cognitive neuroscientists. Thus, the aim of the present paper is to investigate whether and to what extent a hierarchical and multiple action representation can be obtained by a synergy approach. To this purpose, we took advantage of representing hand action as a linear combination of temporal postural synergies (TPSs), but on the assumption that TPSs have a tree-structured organization. In a tree-structured organization, a hand action representation can involve a TPS only if the ancestors of the synergy in the tree are themselves involved in the action representation. The results showed that this organization is enough to force a multiple representation of hand actions in terms of synergies which are hierarchically organized.

  1. Ground-water, surface-water, and bottom-sediment contamination in the O-field area, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, and the possible effects of selected remedial actions on ground water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vroblesky, Don A.; Lorah, Michelle M.; Oliveros, James P.

    1995-01-01

    Disposal of munitions and chemical-warfare substances has introduced inorganic and organic contaminants to the ground water, surface water, and bottom sediment at O-Field, in the Edgewood area of Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. Contaminants include chloride, arsenic, transition metals, chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons, aromatic compounds, and organosulfur and organophosphorus compounds. The hydrologic effects of several remedial actions were estimated by use of a ground-water-flow model. The remedial actions examined were an impermeable covering, encapsulation, subsurface barriers, a ground-water drain, pumping of wells to manage water levels or to remove contaminated ground water for treatment, and no action.

  2. Action principles in nature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrow, John D.; Tipler, Frank J.

    1988-01-01

    Physical theories have their most fundamental expression as action integrals. This suggests that the total action of the universe is the most fundamental physical quantity, and hence finite. In this article it is argued that finite universal action implies that the universe is spatially closed. Further, the possible spatial topologies, the types of matter that can dominate the early universe dynamics, and the form of any quadratic additions to the lagrangian of general relativity are constrained. Initial and final cosmological curvature singularities are required to avoid a universal action singularity.

  3. Youth Engaged for Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Post, Margaret; Little, Priscilla

    2005-01-01

    This article examines how out-of-school time programs can promote youth involvement in civic action by focusing on four interrelated programmatic strategies: establishing organizational readiness that fosters engagement; promoting youth-adult partnerships; engaging youth as leaders and decision makers; and involving youth in research and…

  4. A neural network model of causative actions

    PubMed Central

    Lee-Hand, Jeremy; Knott, Alistair

    2015-01-01

    A common idea in models of action representation is that actions are represented in terms of their perceptual effects (see e.g., Prinz, 1997; Hommel et al., 2001; Sahin et al., 2007; Umiltà et al., 2008; Hommel, 2013). In this paper we extend existing models of effect-based action representations to account for a novel distinction. Some actions bring about effects that are independent events in their own right: for instance, if John smashes a cup, he brings about the event of the cup smashing. Other actions do not bring about such effects. For instance, if John grabs a cup, this action does not cause the cup to “do” anything: a grab action has well-defined perceptual effects, but these are not registered by the perceptual system that detects independent events involving external objects in the world. In our model, effect-based actions are implemented in several distinct neural circuits, which are organized into a hierarchy based on the complexity of their associated perceptual effects. The circuit at the top of this hierarchy is responsible for actions that bring about independently perceivable events. This circuit receives input from the perceptual module that recognizes arbitrary events taking place in the world, and learns movements that reliably cause such events. We assess our model against existing experimental observations about effect-based motor representations, and make some novel experimental predictions. We also consider the possibility that the “causative actions” circuit in our model can be identified with a motor pathway reported in other work, specializing in “functional” actions on manipulable tools (Bub et al., 2008; Binkofski and Buxbaum, 2013). PMID:26175685

  5. [Care in Heidegger: an ontological possibility for nursing].

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Marília de Fátima Vieira; Carraro, Telma Elisa

    2011-01-01

    Given the dimensions involving human care, this study aimed at providing a reflection on nursing care as an ontological possibility. In Heidegger we consider the concepts that underlie the foundation of his thought. These reflections offer theoretical resource that allows the recognition that live in the everyday actions of nursing is a challenge that leads us to a new look at the magnitude of care. However, the actions of care should not target only the perspective of a philosopher, but live with that thought in search of reflection, and find, scrutinizing everything you contribute to a nursing care committed to the right, with ethics, and with respect for others.

  6. Motor Execution Affects Action Prediction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Springer, Anne; Brandstadter, Simone; Liepelt, Roman; Birngruber, Teresa; Giese, Martin; Mechsner, Franz; Prinz, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies provided evidence of the claim that the prediction of occluded action involves real-time simulation. We report two experiments that aimed to study how real-time simulation is affected by simultaneous action execution under conditions of full, partial or no overlap between observed and executed actions. This overlap was analysed by…

  7. Action physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGinness, Lachlan P.; Savage, C. M.

    2016-09-01

    More than a decade ago, Edwin Taylor issued a "call to action" that presented the case for basing introductory university mechanics teaching around the principle of stationary action [E. F. Taylor, Am. J. Phys. 71, 423-425 (2003)]. We report on our response to that call in the form of an investigation of the teaching and learning of the stationary action formulation of physics in a first-year university course. Our action physics instruction proceeded from the many-paths approach to quantum physics to ray optics, classical mechanics, and relativity. Despite the challenges presented by action physics, students reported it to be accessible, interesting, motivational, and valuable.

  8. Complementary actions.

    PubMed

    Sartori, Luisa; Betti, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    Complementary colors are color pairs which, when combined in the right proportions, produce white or black. Complementary actions refer here to forms of social interaction wherein individuals adapt their joint actions according to a common aim. Notably, complementary actions are incongruent actions. But being incongruent is not sufficient to be complementary (i.e., to complete the action of another person). Successful complementary interactions are founded on the abilities: (i) to simulate another person's movements, (ii) to predict another person's future action/s, (iii) to produce an appropriate incongruent response which differ, while interacting, with observed ones, and (iv) to complete the social interaction by integrating the predicted effects of one's own action with those of another person. This definition clearly alludes to the functional importance of complementary actions in the perception-action cycle and prompts us to scrutinize what is taking place behind the scenes. Preliminary data on this topic have been provided by recent cutting-edge studies utilizing different research methods. This mini-review aims to provide an up-to-date overview of the processes and the specific activations underlying complementary actions.

  9. Complementary actions

    PubMed Central

    Sartori, Luisa; Betti, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    Complementary colors are color pairs which, when combined in the right proportions, produce white or black. Complementary actions refer here to forms of social interaction wherein individuals adapt their joint actions according to a common aim. Notably, complementary actions are incongruent actions. But being incongruent is not sufficient to be complementary (i.e., to complete the action of another person). Successful complementary interactions are founded on the abilities: (i) to simulate another person’s movements, (ii) to predict another person’s future action/s, (iii) to produce an appropriate incongruent response which differ, while interacting, with observed ones, and (iv) to complete the social interaction by integrating the predicted effects of one’s own action with those of another person. This definition clearly alludes to the functional importance of complementary actions in the perception–action cycle and prompts us to scrutinize what is taking place behind the scenes. Preliminary data on this topic have been provided by recent cutting-edge studies utilizing different research methods. This mini-review aims to provide an up-to-date overview of the processes and the specific activations underlying complementary actions. PMID:25983717

  10. Median raphe serotonergic innervation of medial septum/diagonal band of broca (MSDB) parvalbumin-containing neurons: possible involvement of the MSDB in the desynchronization of the hippocampal EEG.

    PubMed

    Leranth, C; Vertes, R P

    1999-08-09

    Activation of median raphe serotonergic neurons results in the desynchronization of hippocampal electroencephalographic (EEG) activity. This could be a direct effect, because serotonin (5-HT) fibers terminate on a specific population of hippocampal interneurons. On the other hand, it could be an indirect action through the medial septum/diagonal band of Broca (MSDB) pacemaker cells, because, in addition to previously described inhibitory effects, excitatory actions of 5-HT have been demonstrated on MSDB gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-containing neurons through 5-HT2A receptors. Electron microscopic double immunostaining for Phaseolus vulgaris-leucoagglutinin (PHA-L) injected into the median raphe (MR) and parvalbumin, choline acetyltransferase, or calretinin as well as double immunostaining for 5-HT and parvalbumin, and colocalization for parvalbumin and 5-HT2A receptors were done in rats. The results demonstrated that: 1) MR axons form perisomatic and peridendritic baskets and asymmetric synaptic contacts on MSDB parvalbumin neurons; 2) these fibers do not terminate on septal cholinergic and calretinin neurons; 3) 5-HT fibers form synapses identical to those formed by PHA-L-immunolabeled axons with parvalbumin neurons; and 4) MSDB parvalbumin cells contain 5-HT2A receptors. These observations indicate that 5-HT has a dual action on the activity of hippocampal principal cells: 1) an inhibition of the input sector by activation of hippocampal GABA neurons that terminate exclusively on apical dendrites of pyramidal cells, and 2) a disinhibition of the output sector of principal neurons. MSDB parvalbumin-containing GABAergic neurons specifically innervate hippocampal basket and chandelier cells. Thus, 5-HT-elicited activation of MSDB GABAergic neurons will result in a powerful inhibition of these GABA neurons.

  11. Consumer Involvement in Rehabilitation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thursz, Daniel

    A new approach to rehabilitation of the disabled and disadvantaged is necessary, but the problem of how to involve consumers and how to organize groups for community action is a big one. Moreover, citizen participation cannot be a substitute for basic improvement in the quality of service. Service agencies need to be decentralized and staff…

  12. Conscious Control over Action.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, Joshua

    2015-06-01

    The extensive involvement of nonconscious processes in human behaviour has led some to suggest that consciousness is much less important for the control of action than we might think. In this article I push against this trend, developing an understanding of conscious control that is sensitive to our best models of overt (that is, bodily) action control. Further, I assess the cogency of various zombie challenges-challenges that seek to demote the importance of conscious control for human agency. I argue that though nonconscious contributions to action control are evidently robust, these challenges are overblown.

  13. Conscious Control over Action

    PubMed Central

    Shepherd, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    The extensive involvement of nonconscious processes in human behaviour has led some to suggest that consciousness is much less important for the control of action than we might think. In this article I push against this trend, developing an understanding of conscious control that is sensitive to our best models of overt (that is, bodily) action control. Further, I assess the cogency of various zombie challenges—challenges that seek to demote the importance of conscious control for human agency. I argue that though nonconscious contributions to action control are evidently robust, these challenges are overblown. PMID:26113753

  14. On Involvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, Michael B.

    Involvement Ratings In Settings (IRIS), a multi-dimensional non-verbal scale of involvement adaptable to a time-sampling method of data collection, was constructed with the aid of the videotapes of second-grade Follow Through classrooms made by CCEP. Scales were defined through observations of involved and alienated behavior, and the IRIS was…

  15. Loss of the effects of clonidine on the growth hormone release and hypotensive action in long-term castrated rats: the possible role of testosterone on alpha-2-adrenergic mechanisms of clonidine.

    PubMed

    Kiem, D T; Stark, E; Fekete, M I

    1990-02-01

    The effect of testosterone on the growth hormone (GH)-releasing and hypotensive actions of clonidine was evaluated in vivo using male Wistar rats. Clonidine at various doses and by various routes (5 micrograms/kg, i.c.v.; 15 micrograms/kg, i.v., and 7, 15, 31, 125 and 250 micrograms/kg, i.p.) induced a significant increase in plasma GH levels in rats. Intracerebroventricular (5 micrograms/kg) injection of clonidine significantly decreased blood pressure. The effects of clonidine on the GH release and blood pressure were lost in long-term castrated rats, but were restored by testosterone replacement in the castrates. In addition, the hypotensive response to clonidine in testosterone-replaced castrated rats lasted longer than in the sham-operated rats. The injection of yohimbine (3 mg/kg, i.p.) strongly inhibited the secretion of GH induced by clonidine treatment in sham-operated animals, and its inhibitory action was significantly attenuated in castrates. In long-term castrated rats, basal blood pressure decreased significantly compared with that of sham-operated rats. This was also restored after testosterone administration to castrates. The results of the present study indicate that the alpha 2-adrenergic receptor-mediated effects of clonidine on the GH release and blood pressure might be dependent on the endogenous testosterone secretion.

  16. Action Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1996

    These four papers were presented at a symposium on action learning moderated by Lex Dilworth at the 1996 conference of the Academy of Human Resource Development. "Developing an Infrastructure for Individual and Organizational Change: Transfer of Learning from an Action Reflection Learning (ARL) Program" (ARL Inquiry) reports findings…

  17. Induction of GST-P-positive proliferative lesions facilitating lipid peroxidation with possible involvement of transferrin receptor up-regulation and ceruloplasmin down-regulation from the early stage of liver tumor promotion in rats.

    PubMed

    Mizukami, Sayaka; Ichimura, Ryohei; Kemmochi, Sayaka; Taniai, Eriko; Shimamoto, Keisuke; Ohishi, Takumi; Takahashi, Miwa; Mitsumori, Kunitoshi; Shibutani, Makoto

    2010-04-01

    To elucidate the role of metal-related molecules in hepatocarcinogenesis, we examined immunolocalization of transferrin receptor (Tfrc), ceruloplasmin (Cp) and metallothionein (MT)-1/2 in relation to liver cell foci positive for glutathione-S-transferase placental form (GST-P) in the early stage of tumor promotion by fenbendazole (FB), phenobarbital, piperonyl butoxide or thioacetamide in a rat two-stage hepatocarcinogenesis model. To estimate the involvement of oxidative stress responses to the promotion, immunolocalization of 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal, malondialdehyde and acrolein was similarly examined. Our findings showed that MT-1/2 immunoreactivity was not associated with the cellular distribution of GST-P and proliferating cell nuclear antigen, suggesting no role of MT-1/2 in hepatocarcinogenesis. We also found enhanced expression of Tfrc after treatment with strong tumor-promoting chemicals. With regard to Cp, the population showing down-regulation was increased in the GST-P-positive foci in relation to tumor promotion. Up-regulation of Tfrc and down-regulation of Cp was maintained in GST-P-positive neoplastic lesions induced after long-term promotion with FB, suggesting the expression changes occurring downstream of the signaling pathway involved in the formation of GST-P-positive lesions. Furthermore, enhanced accumulation of lipid peroxidation end products was observed in the GST-P-positive foci by promotion. Post-initiation treatment with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha agonists did not enhance any such distribution changes in GST-P-negative foci. The results thus suggest that facilitation of lipid peroxidation is involved in the induction of GST-P-positive lesions by tumor promotion from an early stage, and up-regulation of Tfrc and down-regulation of Cp may be a signature of enhanced oxidative cellular stress in these lesions.

  18. Actions and mode of actions of FGF19 subfamily members.

    PubMed

    Fukumoto, Seiji

    2008-03-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) are humoral factors with diverse biological functions. While most FGFs were shown to work as local factors regulating cell growth and differentiation, recent investigations indicated that FGF19 subfamily members, FGF15/19, FGF21 and FGF23 work as systemic factors. FGF15/19 produced by intestine inhibits bile acid synthesis and FGF21from liver is involved in carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. In addition, FGF23 was shown to be produced by bone and regulate phosphate and vitamin D metabolism. Furthermore, these FGFs require klotho or betaklotho for their actions in addition to canonical FGF receptors. It is possible that these FGFs together with their receptor systems might be targets for novel therapeutic measures in the future.

  19. [Addictions and action systems].

    PubMed

    Loonis, E; Apter, M J

    2000-01-01

    Generalizing from some previous analyses of addiction, and introducing the concept of an action system which governs all actions which are focussed on what Brown (1988) calls "hedonic management", we argue that addictions of every kind involve an action system that displays high salience, low variety and low vicariance. Addictions also involve what Apter (1982) calls the "paratelic state". A study was carried out comparing 31 drug addicts with 29 control subjects in terms of action system variables. To measure these variables, we constructed a new instrument, the Activity-System Drawing Test, and also used the Telic Dominance Scale to measure frequency of paratelic states. Dysphoria was measured by means of the BATE (anxiety), IDA-13 (depression), SEI (self-esteem), and TAS-20 (alexithymia) instruments. Strongly significant differences were found between groups for both action system variables and dysphoria, and there were also strong correlations between both groups of variables. This supports the idea that addictions emerge from systemic properties of the action system.

  20. Possible involvement of membrane lipids peroxidation and oxidation of catalytically essential thiols of the cerebral transmembrane sodium pump as component mechanisms of iron-mediated oxidative stress-linked dysfunction of the pump's activity.

    PubMed

    Omotayo, T I; Akinyemi, G S; Omololu, P A; Ajayi, B O; Akindahunsi, A A; Rocha, J B T; Kade, I J

    2015-01-01

    The precise molecular events defining the complex role of oxidative stress in the inactivation of the cerebral sodium pump in radical-induced neurodegenerative diseases is yet to be fully clarified and thus still open. Herein we investigated the modulation of the activity of the cerebral transmembrane electrogenic enzyme in Fe(2+)-mediated in vitro oxidative stress model. The results show that Fe(2+) inhibited the transmembrane enzyme in a concentration dependent manner and this effect was accompanied by a biphasic generation of aldehydic product of lipid peroxidation. While dithiothreitol prevented both Fe(2+) inhibitory effect on the pump and lipid peroxidation, vitamin E prevented only lipid peroxidation but not inhibition of the pump. Besides, malondialdehyde (MDA) inhibited the pump by a mechanism not related to oxidation of its critical thiols. Apparently, the low activity of the pump in degenerative diseases mediated by Fe(2+) may involve complex multi-component mechanisms which may partly involve an initial oxidation of the critical thiols of the enzyme directly mediated by Fe(2+) and during severe progression of such diseases; aldehydic products of lipid peroxidation such as MDA may further exacerbate this inhibitory effect by a mechanism that is likely not related to the oxidation of the catalytically essential thiols of the ouabain-sensitive cerebral electrogenic pump.

  1. Expert Teacher Action Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington, Eva

    The expert teacher action program is to improve classroom teaching performance. The program has been tested in workshop sessions involving more than 1,200 educators representing 50 school districts. A set of standards, consisting of 25 variables, lead to the definition of expert teaching. Each variable deals with a major aspect of the duties of…

  2. From Awareness to Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Micklos, John, Jr.

    2012-01-01

    What inspires young people to become activists? Events such as wars or regime changes obviously raise high emotions. But some choose to get involved because they saw a need and felt compelled to take action. Young Americans have a long track record as activists. Among other things, they played a key role in the civil rights movement of the 1950s…

  3. Target: Development Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Freedom from Hunger Foundation, Washington, DC. Young World Development.

    This handbook, suggestive rather than prescriptive, is written for Young World Development and/or similar groups committed to active involvement in community, national, and world improvement. Emphasis is upon organizing high school, college, and adult courses and action programs in the community which will help sensitize participants and make them…

  4. Stochastic and nonstochastic post-transcriptional silencing of chitinase and beta-1,3-glucanase genes involves increased RNA turnover-possible role for ribosome-independent RNA degradation.

    PubMed Central

    Holtorf, H; Schöb, H; Kunz, C; Waldvogel, R; Meins, F

    1999-01-01

    Stochastic and nonstochastic post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS) in Nicotiana sylvestris plants carrying tobacco class I chitinase (CHN) and beta-1,3-glucanase transgenes differs in incidence, stability, and pattern of expression. Measurements with inhibitors of RNA synthesis (cordycepin, actinomycin D, and alpha-amanitin) showed that both forms of PTGS are associated with increased sequence-specific degradation of transcripts, suggesting that increased RNA turnover may be a general feature of PTGS. The protein synthesis inhibitors cycloheximide and verrucarin A did not inhibit degradation of CHN RNA targeted for PTGS, confirming that PTGS-related RNA degradation does not depend on ongoing protein synthesis. Because verrucarin A, unlike cycloheximide, dissociates mRNA from ribosomes, our results also suggest that ribosome-associated RNA degradation pathways may not be involved in CHN PTGS. PMID:10072405

  5. Δ(9)-THC modulation of fatty acid 2-hydroxylase (FA2H) gene expression: possible involvement of induced levels of PPARα in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Shuso; Ikeda, Eriko; Su, Shengzhong; Harada, Mari; Okazaki, Hiroyuki; Yoshioka, Yasushi; Nishimura, Hajime; Ishii, Hiroyuki; Kakizoe, Kazuhiro; Taniguchi, Aya; Tokuyasu, Miki; Himeno, Taichi; Watanabe, Kazuhito; Omiecinski, Curtis J; Aramaki, Hironori

    2014-12-04

    We recently reported that Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC), a major cannabinoid component in Cannabis Sativa (marijuana), significantly stimulated the expression of fatty acid 2-hydroxylase (FA2H) in human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) was previously implicated in this induction. However, the mechanisms mediating this induction have not been elucidated in detail. We performed a DNA microarray analysis of Δ(9)-THC-treated samples and showed the selective up-regulation of the PPARα isoform coupled with the induction of FA2H over the other isoforms (β and γ). Δ(9)-THC itself had no binding/activation potential to/on PPARα, and palmitic acid (PA), a PPARα ligand, exhibited no stimulatory effects on FA2H in MDA-MB-231 cells; thus, we hypothesized that the levels of PPARα induced were involved in the Δ(9)-THC-mediated increase in FA2H. In support of this hypothesis, we herein demonstrated that; (i) Δ(9)-THC activated the basal transcriptional activity of PPARα in a concentration-dependent manner, (ii) the concomitant up-regulation of PPARα/FA2H was caused by Δ(9)-THC, (iii) PA could activate PPARα after the PPARα expression plasmid was introduced, and (iv) the Δ(9)-THC-induced up-regulation of FA2H was further stimulated by the co-treatment with L-663,536 (a known PPARα inducer). Taken together, these results support the concept that the induced levels of PPARα may be involved in the Δ(9)-THC up-regulation of FA2H in MDA-MB-231 cells.

  6. Involvement of outer membrane protein TolC, a possible member of the mar-sox regulon, in maintenance and improvement of organic solvent tolerance of Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Aono, R; Tsukagoshi, N; Yamamoto, M

    1998-02-01

    Escherichia coli mutants with improved organic solvent tolerance levels showed high levels of outer membrane protein TolC and inner membrane protein AcrA. The TolC level was regulated positively by MarA, Rob, or SoxS. A possible mar-rob-sox box sequence was found upstream of the tolC gene. These findings suggest that tolC is a member of the mar-sox regulon responsive to stress conditions. When a defective tolC gene was transferred to n-hexane- or cyclohexane-tolerant strains by P1 transduction, the organic solvent tolerance level was lowered dramatically to the decane-tolerant and nonane-sensitive level. The tolerance level was restored by transformation of the transductants with a wild-type tolC gene. Therefore, it is evident that TolC is essential for E. coli to maintain organic solvent tolerance.

  7. Family Involvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liontos, Lynn Balster

    1992-01-01

    Family involvement in schools will work only when perceived as an enlarged concept focusing on all children, including those from at-risk families. Each publication reviewed here is specifically concerned with family involvement strategies concerned with all children or targeted at primarily high risk students. Susan McAllister Swap looks at three…

  8. Environmental Education: Practice and Possibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robottom, Ian, Ed.

    This collection of essays describes practices in environmental education and points to possibilities in the field. The intention is to appraise selected practices in order to prepare the ground for a consideration of alternative images of environmental education that may shape future action. The following articles are included: (1) "A…

  9. Analysis of the surface proteins of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans strain SP5/1 and the new, pyrite-oxidizing Acidithiobacillus isolate HV2/2, and their possible involvement in pyrite oxidation.

    PubMed

    Klingl, Andreas; Moissl-Eichinger, Christine; Wanner, Gerhard; Zweck, Josef; Huber, Harald; Thomm, Michael; Rachel, Reinhard

    2011-12-01

    Two strains of rod-shaped, pyrite-oxidizing acidithiobacilli, their cell envelope structure and their interaction with pyrite were investigated in this study. Cells of both strains, Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans strain SP5/1 and the moderately thermophilic Acidithiobacillus sp. strain HV2/2, were similar in size, with slight variations in length and diameter. Two kinds of cell appendages were observed: flagella and pili. Besides a typical Gram-negative cell architecture with inner and outer membrane, enclosing a periplasm, both strains were covered by a hitherto undescribed, regularly arranged 2-D protein crystal with p2-symmetry. In A. ferrooxidans, this protein forms a stripe-like structure on the surface. A similar surface pattern with almost identical lattice vectors was also seen on the cells of strain HV2/2. For the surface layer of both bacteria, a direct contact to pyrite crystals was observed in ultrathin sections, indicating that the S-layer is involved in maintaining this contact site. Observations on an S-layer-deficient strain show, however, that cell adhesion does not strictly depend on the presence of the S-layer and that this surface protein has an influence on cell shape. Furthermore, the presented data suggest the ability of the S-layer protein to complex Fe3+ ions, suggesting a role in the physiology of the microorganisms.

  10. Involvement of serotoninergic 5-HT1A/2A, alpha-adrenergic and dopaminergic D1 receptors in St. John's wort-induced prepulse inhibition deficit: a possible role of hyperforin.

    PubMed

    Tadros, Mariane G; Mohamed, Mohamed R; Youssef, Amal M; Sabry, Gilane M; Sabry, Nagwa A; Khalifa, Amani E

    2009-05-16

    Prepulse inhibition (PPI) of acoustic startle response is a valuable paradigm for sensorimotor gating processes. Previous research showed that acute administration of St. John's wort extract (500 mg/kg, p.o.) to rats caused significant disruption of PPI while elevating monoamines levels in some brain areas. The cause-effect relationship between extract-induced PPI disruption and augmented monoaminergic transmission was studied using different serotoninergic, adrenergic and dopaminergic antagonists. The effects of hypericin and hyperforin, as the main active constituents of the extract, on PPI response were also tested. PPI disruption was prevented after blocking the serotoninergic 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A, alpha-adrenergic and dopaminergic D1 receptors. Results also demonstrated a significant PPI deficit after acute treatment of rats with hyperforin, and not hypericin. In some conditions manifesting disrupted PPI response, apoptosis coexists. Electrophoresis of DNA isolated from brains of hyperforin-treated animals revealed absence of any abnormal DNA fragmentation patterns. It is concluded that serotoninergic 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A, alpha-adrenergic and dopaminergic D1 receptors are involved in the disruptive effect of St. John's wort extract on PPI response in rats. We can also conclude that hyperforin, and not hypericin, is one of the active ingredients responsible for St. John's wort-induced PPI disruption with no relation to apoptotic processes.

  11. Action perception predicts action performance

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Heather R.; Kurby, Christopher A.; Giovannetti, Tania; Zacks, Jeffrey M.

    2013-01-01

    Everyday action impairments often are observed in demented older adults, and they are common potential barriers to functional independence. We evaluated whether the ability to segment and efficiently encode activities is related to the ability to execute activities. Further, we evaluated whether brain regions important for segmentation also were important for action performance. Cognitively healthy older adults and those with very mild or mild dementia of the Alzheimer's type watched and segmented movies of everyday activities and then completed the Naturalistic Action Test. Structural MRI was used to measure volume in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), medial temporal lobes (MTL), posterior cortex, and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). Dementia status and the ability to segment everyday activities strongly predicted naturalistic action performance, and MTL volume largely accounted for this relationship. In addition, the current results supported the Omission-Commission Model: Different cognitive and neurological mechanisms predicted different types of action error. Segmentation, dementia severity, and MTL volume predicted everyday omission errors, DLPFC volume predicted commission errors, and ACC volume predicted action additions. These findings suggest that event segmentation may be critical for effective action production, and that the segmentation and production of activities may recruit the same event representation system. PMID:23851113

  12. Action perception predicts action performance.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Heather R; Kurby, Christopher A; Giovannetti, Tania; Zacks, Jeffrey M

    2013-09-01

    Everyday action impairments often are observed in demented older adults, and they are common potential barriers to functional independence. We evaluated whether the ability to segment and efficiently encode activities is related to the ability to execute activities. Further, we evaluated whether brain regions important for segmentation also were important for action performance. Cognitively healthy older adults and those with very mild or mild dementia of the Alzheimer's type watched and segmented movies of everyday activities and then completed the Naturalistic Action Test. Structural MRI was used to measure volume in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), medial temporal lobes (MTL), posterior cortex, and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). Dementia status and the ability to segment everyday activities strongly predicted naturalistic action performance, and MTL volume largely accounted for this relationship. In addition, the current results supported the Omission-Commission Model: Different cognitive and neurological mechanisms predicted different types of action error. Segmentation, dementia severity, and MTL volume predicted everyday omission errors, DLPFC volume predicted commission errors, and ACC volume predicted action additions. These findings suggest that event segmentation may be critical for effective action production, and that the segmentation and production of activities may recruit the same event representation system.

  13. The mechanism of action of ribonuclease.

    PubMed

    Roberts, G C; Dennis, E A; Meadows, D H; Cohen, J S; Jardetzky, O

    1969-04-01

    The possible mechanisms of action of bovine pancreatic ribonuclease are discussed in the light of the detailed knowledge of the geometry of the active site that has been derived from studies of inhibitor binding by X-ray diffraction and nuclear magnetic resonance. When combined with a knowledge of the mechanism of phosphate ester hydrolysis, this information imposes severe geometric constraints on possible mechanisms of action of the enzyme. Two types of mechanism can be distinguished, the linear and the pseudorotation. The linear mechanism includes a catalytic role for both histidine residues at the active site and does not involve pseudorotation of the intermediate. In contrast, in the pseudorotation mechanism one histidine residue performs all the catalytic functions, while the other serves only to bind the phosphate anion; this necessarily involves pseudorotation of the intermediate and specific protonation of the leaving group by the enzyme. The mode of binding of the product of the reaction, cytidine-3'-monophosphate, has been elucidated by X-ray diffraction and nuclear magnetic resonance. If the substrate binds in an analogous way, only the linear mechanism is possible. This mechanism is described in detail.

  14. Colitis elicits differential changes in the expression levels of receptor tyrosine kinase TrkA and TrkB in colonic afferent neurons: A possible involvement of axonal transport

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Li-Ya; Grider, John R

    2010-01-01

    The role of nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in colitis-induced hypersensitivity has been suggested. NGF and BDNF facilitate cellular physiology through binding to receptor tyrosine kinase TrkA and TrkB respectively. The present study by examining the mRNA and/or protein levels of TrkA and TrkB in the distal colon and in colonic primary afferent neurons in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) during colitis demonstrated that colitis elicited location-specific changes in the mRNA and protein levels of TrkA and TrkB in colonic primary sensory pathways. In colitis both the TrkA and TrkB protein levels were increased in the L1 and S1 DRGs in a time-dependent manner; however, the level of TrkB mRNA but not TrkA mRNA was increased in these DRGs. Further experiments showed that colitis facilitated a retrograde transport of TrkA protein toward and an anterograde transport of TrkA mRNA away from the DRG, which may contribute to the increased TrkA mRNA level in the distal colon during colitis. Colitis also increased the level of NGF mRNA but not BDNF mRNA in the distal colon. Double staining showed that the expression of TrkA but not TrkB was increased in the specifically labeled colonic afferent neurons in the L1 and S1 DRGs during colitis; this increase in TrkA level was attenuated by pretreatment with resiniferatoxin. These results suggested that colitis-induced primary afferent activation involved retrograde transport of TrkA but not TrkB from the distal colon to primary afferent neurons in DRG. PMID:20638179

  15. Organization of a Clostridium thermocellum gene cluster encoding the cellulosomal scaffolding protein CipA and a protein possibly involved in attachment of the cellulosome to the cell surface.

    PubMed Central

    Fujino, T; Béguin, P; Aubert, J P

    1993-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence was determined for a 9.4-kb region of Clostridium thermocellum DNA extending from the 3' end of the gene (now termed cipA), encoding the S1/SL component of the cellulosome. Three open reading frames (ORFs) belonging to two operons were detected. They encoded polypeptides of 1,664, 688, and 447 residues, termed ORF1p, ORF2p, and ORF3p, respectively. The COOH-terminal regions of the three polypeptides were highly similar and contained three reiterated segments of 60 to 70 residues each. Similar segments have been found at the NH2 terminus of the S-layer proteins of Bacillus brevis and Acetogenium kivui, suggesting that ORF1p, ORF2p, and ORF3p might also be located on the cell surface. Otherwise, the sequence of ORF1p and ORF2p gave little clue concerning their potential function. However, the NH2-terminal region of ORF3p was similar to the reiterated domains previously identified in CipA as receptors involved in binding the duplicated segment of 22 amino acids present in catalytic subunits of the cellulosome. Indeed, it was found previously that ORF3p binds 125I-labeled endoglucanase CelD containing the duplicated segment (T. Fujino, P. Béguin, and J.-P. Aubert, FEMS Microbiol. Lett. 94:165-170, 1992). These findings suggest that ORF3p might serve as an anchoring factor for the cellulosome on the cell surface by binding the duplicated segment that is present at the COOH end of CipA. Images PMID:8458832

  16. Impairments in brain-derived neurotrophic factor-induced glutamate release in cultured cortical neurons derived from rats with intrauterine growth retardation: possible involvement of suppression of TrkB/phospholipase C-γ activation.

    PubMed

    Numakawa, Tadahiro; Matsumoto, Tomoya; Ooshima, Yoshiko; Chiba, Shuichi; Furuta, Miyako; Izumi, Aiko; Ninomiya-Baba, Midori; Odaka, Haruki; Hashido, Kazuo; Adachi, Naoki; Kunugi, Hiroshi

    2014-04-01

    Low birth weight due to intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) is suggested to be a risk factor for various psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia. It has been reported that developmental cortical dysfunction and neurocognitive deficits are observed in individuals with IUGR, however, the underlying molecular mechanisms have yet to be elucidated. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its receptor TrkB are associated with schizophrenia and play a role in cortical development. We previously demonstrated that BDNF induced glutamate release through activation of the TrkB/phospholipase C-γ (PLC-γ) pathway in developing cultured cortical neurons, and that, using a rat model for IUGR caused by maternal administration of thromboxane A2, cortical levels of TrkB were significantly reduced in IUGR rats at birth. These studies prompted us to hypothesize that TrkB reduction in IUGR cortex led to impairment of BDNF-dependent glutamatergic neurotransmission. In the present study, we found that BDNF-induced glutamate release was strongly impaired in cultured IUGR cortical neurons where TrkB reduction was maintained. Impairment of BDNF-induced glutamate release in IUGR neurons was ameliorated by transfection of human TrkB (hTrkB). Although BDNF-stimulated phosphorylation of TrkB and of PLC-γ was decreased in IUGR neurons, the hTrkB transfection recovered the deficits in their phosphorylation. These results suggest that TrkB reduction causes impairment of BDNF-stimulated glutamatergic function via suppression of TrkB/PLC-γ activation in IUGR cortical neurons. Our findings provide molecular insights into how IUGR links to downregulation of BDNF function in the cortex, which might be involved in the development of IUGR-related diseases such as schizophrenia.

  17. Action selection in multi-effector decision making

    PubMed Central

    Madlon-Kay, Seth; Pesaran, Bijan; Daw, Nathaniel D.

    2012-01-01

    Decision making and reinforcement learning over movements suffer from the curse of dimensionality: the space of possible movements is too vast to search or even represent in its entirety. When actions involve only a single effector, this problem can be ameliorated by considering that effector separately; accordingly, the brain’s sensorimotor systems can subdivide choice by representing values and actions separately for each effector. However, for many actions, such as playing the piano, the value of an action by an effector (e.g., a hand) depends inseparably on the actions of other effectors. By definition, the values of such coordinated multi-effector actions cannot be represented by effector-specific action values, such as those that have been most extensively investigated in parietal and premotor regions. For such actions, one possible solution is to choose according to more abstract valuations over different goods or options, which can then be mapped onto the necessary motor actions. Such an approach separates the learning and decision problem, which will often be lower-dimensional than the space of possible movements, from the multi-effector movement planning problem. The ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) is thought to contain goods-based value signals, so we hypothesized that this region might preferentially drive multi-effector action selection. To examine how the brain solves this problem, we used fMRI to compare patterns of BOLD activity in humans during reward learning tasks in which options were selected through either unimanual or bimanual actions, and in which the response requirements in the latter condition inseparably coupled valuation across both hands. We found value signals in the bilateral medial motor cortex and vmPFC, and consistent with previous studies, the medial motor value signals contained contra-lateral biases indicating effector-specificity, while the vmPFC value signals did not exhibit detectable effector specificity. Although

  18. Modeling the Value of Strategic Actions in the Superior Colliculus

    PubMed Central

    Thevarajah, Dhushan; Webb, Ryan; Ferrall, Christopher; Dorris, Michael C.

    2009-01-01

    In learning models of strategic game play, an agent constructs a valuation (action value) over possible future choices as a function of past actions and rewards. Choices are then stochastic functions of these action values. Our goal is to uncover a neural signal that correlates with the action value posited by behavioral learning models. We measured activity from neurons in the superior colliculus (SC), a midbrain region involved in planning saccadic eye movements, while monkeys performed two saccade tasks. In the strategic task, monkeys competed against a computer in a saccade version of the mixed-strategy game ”matching-pennies”. In the instructed task, saccades were elicited through explicit instruction rather than free choices. In both tasks neuronal activity and behavior were shaped by past actions and rewards with more recent events exerting a larger influence. Further, SC activity predicted upcoming choices during the strategic task and upcoming reaction times during the instructed task. Finally, we found that neuronal activity in both tasks correlated with an established learning model, the Experience Weighted Attraction model of action valuation (Camerer and Ho, 1999). Collectively, our results provide evidence that action values hypothesized by learning models are represented in the motor planning regions of the brain in a manner that could be used to select strategic actions. PMID:20161807

  19. Alleviative Effects of a Kampo (a Japanese Herbal) Medicine “Maoto (Ma-Huang-Tang)” on the Early Phase of Influenza Virus Infection and Its Possible Mode of Action

    PubMed Central

    Kataoka, Erika; Aoki, Yuka; Hokari, Rei

    2014-01-01

    A Kampo medicine, maoto, has been prescribed in an early phase of influenza-like illness and used for a treatment of influenza clinically in Japan these days. However, the efficacy of maoto against the virus infection remains to be elucidated. This study was conducted to evaluate the alleviative effects of maoto against early phase of influenza virus infection and its preliminary mode of actions through immune systems. When maoto (0.9 and 1.6 g/kg/day) was orally administered to A/J mice on upper respiratory tract infection of influenza virus A/PR/8/34 from 4 hours to 52 hours postinfection (p.i.) significant antipyretic effect was shown in comparison with water-treated control. Administration of maoto (0.8 and 1.3 g/kg/day) significantly decreased the virus titers in both nasal (NLF) and bronchoalveolar lavage fluids (BALF) at 52 hours p.i., and significantly increased the anti-influenza virus IgM, IgA, and IgG1 antibody titers in NLF, BALF, and serum, respectively. Maoto also increased significantly the influenza virus-bound IgG1 and IgM antibody titers in serum and the virus-bound IgM antibody titer in even the BALF of uninfected A/J mice. These results indicate that maoto exerts antipyretic activity in influenza virus-infected mice and virus reducing effect at an early phase of the infection through probably augmentation of the virus-bound natural antibodies. PMID:24778699

  20. Community Action for Environmental Quality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Citizens Advisory Committee on Environmental Quality.

    For citizens who want to participate in practical action to make their communities better places for living, this guide considers numerous approaches for community involvement. It stresses not only comprehensive planning but also the importance of getting action started. A rough order of business is suggested. First, considered are the various…

  1. The left inferior parietal lobe represents stored hand-postures for object use and action prediction.

    PubMed

    van Elk, Michiel

    2014-01-01

    Action semantics enables us to plan actions with objects and to predict others' object-directed actions as well. Previous studies have suggested that action semantics are represented in a fronto-parietal action network that has also been implicated to play a role in action observation. In the present fMRI study it was investigated how activity within this network changes as a function of the predictability of an action involving multiple objects and requiring the use of action semantics. Participants performed an action prediction task in which they were required to anticipate the use of a centrally presented object that could be moved to an associated target object (e.g., hammer-nail). The availability of actor information (i.e., presenting a hand grasping the central object) and the number of possible target objects (i.e., 0, 1, or 2 target objects) were independently manipulated, resulting in different levels of predictability. It was found that making an action prediction based on actor information resulted in an increased activation in the extrastriate body area (EBA) and the fronto-parietal action observation network (AON). Predicting actions involving a target object resulted in increased activation in the bilateral IPL and frontal motor areas. Within the AON, activity in the left inferior parietal lobe (IPL) and the left premotor cortex (PMC) increased as a function of the level of action predictability. Together these findings suggest that the left IPL represents stored hand-postures that can be used for planning object-directed actions and for predicting other's actions as well.

  2. Rethinking Actions: Implementation and Association

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Anjan

    2015-01-01

    Action processing allows us to move through and interact with the world, as well as understand the movements performed by other people. In recent years, there has been increasing interest in the semantics of actions as differentiated from the semantics of objects. However, as the understanding of action semantics has evolved, it is evident that the existing literature conflates two senses of the word “action”—one that stems from studies of tool use and the other from event representation. In this paper, we suggest that this issue can be clarified by closely examining differences in how the human parietal and temporal cortices of the brain process action-related stimuli. By contrasting the posterior parietal cortex to the posterolateral temporal cortex, we characterize two complementary action systems in the human brain, each with its own specialization of function. We suggest that these two systems be referred to as the parietal Action Implementation System, and the posterolateral temporal Action Association System. While the fronto-parietal system is concerned primarily with how we perform actions, and simulate others’ actions, the temporal action system is more involved with processing actions from a third-person, conceptual standpoint. Recent work in cognitive neuroscience of perception and language, as well as the neuroanatomical organization of these brain regions support this distinction. We will discuss the implications of this work for cognition-, language-, and neuroscience-based action research. PMID:26352170

  3. Conversion of 5(10)-oestrene-3 beta,17 beta-diol to 19-nor-4-ene-3-ketosteroids by luteal cells in vitro: possible involvement of the 3 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase/isomerase.

    PubMed

    Lee, C M; Tekpetey, F R; Armstrong, D T; Khalil, M W

    1991-05-01

    We have previously suggested that in porcine granulosa cells, a putative intermediate, 5(10)-oestrene-3,17-dione is involved in 4-oestrene-3,17-dione (19-norandrostenedione; 19-norA) and 4-oestren-17 beta-ol-3-one (19-nortestosterone: 19-norT) formation from C19 aromatizable androgens. In this study, luteal cells prepared from porcine, bovine and rat corpora lutea by centrifugal elutriation were used as a source of 3 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase/isomerase in order to investigate the role of this enzyme in the biosynthesis of 19-norsteroids. Small porcine luteal cells made mainly 19-norT and large porcine luteal cells 19-norA from 5(10)-oestrene-3 beta,17 beta-diol, the reduced product of the putative intermediate 5(10)-oestrene-3,17-dione. However, neither small nor large cells metabolized androstenedione to 19-norsteroids. Serum and serum plus LH significantly stimulated formation of both 19-norA and 19-norT from 5(10)-oestrene-3 beta,17 beta-diol, compared with controls. Inhibitors of the 3 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase/isomerase (trilostane and cyanoketone) significantly reduced formation of 19-norT in small porcine luteal cells and 19-norA in large porcine luteal cells, although they were effective at different concentrations in each cell type. In parallel incubations, formation of [4-14C]androstenedione from added [4-14C]dehydroepiandrosterone was also inhibited by cyanoketone in both small and large porcine luteal cells in a dose-dependent manner; however, trilostane (up to 100 mumol/l) did not inhibit androstenedione formation in large porcine luteal cells. In addition, the decrease in progesterone synthesis induced by trilostane and cyanoketone (100 mumol/l each) was accompanied by a parallel accumulation of pregnenolone in both cell types. These results suggest that 3 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase/isomerase, or a closely related enzyme, present in small and large porcine luteal cells can convert added 5(10)-3 beta-hydroxysteroids into 19-nor-4

  4. Action understanding: how low can you go?

    PubMed

    Hutto, Daniel D

    2013-09-01

    This paper begins by reminding the reader of the standard arguments that sceptics offer for doubting that mirror neurons could constitute any kind of action understanding (Section 2). It then outlines the usual response to these sceptical worries made by believers (Section 3). An attempt to put flesh on this idea in terms of what brains understand is critically examined and found wanting (Section 4). The ensuing analysis shows that it is prima facie possible to develop a more tenable account of enactive understanding that would fit the bill (Section 5). However, a second look raises further questions about (A) what mirror neurons target and (B) what such targeting involves (Section 6). Finally it is concluded that while mirror neurons may play a central role in enabling non-mentalistic forms of intersubjective engagement this falls short of action understanding (Section 7).

  5. Regulation of the expression of key genes involved in HDL metabolism by unsaturated fatty acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects, and possible mechanisms of action, of unsaturated fatty acids on the expression of genes involved in HDL metabolism in HepG2 cells. The mRNA concentration of target genes was assessed by real time PCR. Protein concentrations were determined by wes...

  6. "Wuwei" (Non-Action) Philosophy and Actions: Rethinking "Actions" in School Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moon, Seungho

    2015-01-01

    This inquiry aims to enrich conversation regarding school reform. The author asks about what other discourses are possible when the action-oriented question of how to "act" is a major approach to "fix" current educational problems. Drawing from Taoist philosophy of "wuwei" (non-action), the author provides a frame to…

  7. The minimalist grammar of action

    PubMed Central

    Pastra, Katerina; Aloimonos, Yiannis

    2012-01-01

    Language and action have been found to share a common neural basis and in particular a common ‘syntax’, an analogous hierarchical and compositional organization. While language structure analysis has led to the formulation of different grammatical formalisms and associated discriminative or generative computational models, the structure of action is still elusive and so are the related computational models. However, structuring action has important implications on action learning and generalization, in both human cognition research and computation. In this study, we present a biologically inspired generative grammar of action, which employs the structure-building operations and principles of Chomsky's Minimalist Programme as a reference model. In this grammar, action terminals combine hierarchically into temporal sequences of actions of increasing complexity; the actions are bound with the involved tools and affected objects and are governed by certain goals. We show, how the tool role and the affected-object role of an entity within an action drives the derivation of the action syntax in this grammar and controls recursion, merge and move, the latter being mechanisms that manifest themselves not only in human language, but in human action too. PMID:22106430

  8. Action languages: Dimensions, effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes, Daniel G.; Streeter, Gordon

    1989-01-01

    Dimensions of action languages are discussed for communication between humans and machines, and the message handling capabilities of object oriented programming systems are examined. Design of action languages is seen to be very contextual. Economical and effective design will depend on features of situations, the tasks intended to be accomplished, and the nature of the devices themselves. Current object oriented systems turn out to have fairly simple and straightforward message handling facilities, which in themselves do little to buffer action or even in some cases to handle competing messages. Even so, it is possible to program a certain amount of discretion about how they react to messages. Such thoughtfulness and perhaps relative autonomy of program modules seems prerequisite to future systems to handle complex interactions in changing situations.

  9. Counterfactuals in Action: An fMRI Study of Counterfactual Sentences Describing Physical Effort

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urrutia, Mabel; Gennari, Silvia P.; de Vega, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Counterfactual statements such as "if Mary had cleaned the room, she would have moved the sofa" convey both actual and hypothetical actions, namely, that Mary did not clean the room or move the sofa, but she would have done so in some possible past situation. Such statements are ubiquitous in daily life and are involved in critical cognitive…

  10. Spindle function in Xenopus oocytes involves possible nanodomain calcium signaling

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ruizhen; Leblanc, Julie; He, Kevin; Liu, X. Johné

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular calcium transients are a universal phenomenon at fertilization and are required for egg activation, but the exact role of Ca2+ in second-polar-body emission remains unknown. On the other hand, similar calcium transients have not been demonstrated during oocyte maturation, and yet, manipulating intracellular calcium levels interferes with first-polar-body emission in mice and frogs. To determine the precise role of calcium signaling in polar body formation, we used live-cell imaging coupled with temporally precise intracellular calcium buffering. We found that BAPTA-based calcium chelators cause immediate depolymerization of spindle microtubules in meiosis I and meiosis II. Surprisingly, EGTA at similar or higher intracellular concentrations had no effect on spindle function or polar body emission. Using two calcium probes containing permutated GFP and the calcium sensor calmodulin (Lck-GCaMP3 and GCaMP3), we demonstrated enrichment of the probes at the spindle but failed to detect calcium increase during oocyte maturation at the spindle or elsewhere. Finally, endogenous calmodulin was found to colocalize with spindle microtubules throughout all stages of meiosis. Our results—most important, the different sensitivities of the spindle to BAPTA and EGTA—suggest that meiotic spindle function in frog oocytes requires highly localized, or nanodomain, calcium signaling. PMID:27582389

  11. Space sickness predictors suggest fluid shift involvement and possible countermeasures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simanonok, K. E.; Moseley, E. C.; Charles, J. B.

    1992-01-01

    Preflight data from 64 first time Shuttle crew members were examined retrospectively to predict space sickness severity (NONE, MILD, MODERATE, or SEVERE) by discriminant analysis. From 9 input variables relating to fluid, electrolyte, and cardiovascular status, 8 variables were chosen by discriminant analysis that correctly predicted space sickness severity with 59 pct. success by one method of cross validation on the original sample and 67 pct. by another method. The 8 variables in order of their importance for predicting space sickness severity are sitting systolic blood pressure, serum uric acid, calculated blood volume, serum phosphate, urine osmolality, environmental temperature at the launch site, red cell count, and serum chloride. These results suggest the presence of predisposing physiologic factors to space sickness that implicate a fluid shift etiology. Addition of a 10th input variable, hours spent in the Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF), improved the prediction of space sickness severity to 66 pct. success by the first method of cross validation on the original sample and to 71 pct. by the second method. The data suggest that WETF training may reduce space sickness severity.

  12. Citizen's actions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The role played by individual citizens as consumers of energy was examined, with emphasis on studying ways in which their action could result in energy conservation. It was shown that there are ways that energy can be conserved in this way, with citizens acting either individually or in groups. The potential savings are significant, but the actual savings may be quite small. The citizens need to be motivated to save and to believe in a conservation ethic; developing such an ethic is difficult, and perhaps not responsive to the shotgun approach now being attempted. The true course of action may be to synthesize new societal structures that provide the maximum evolution of culture within the limitation of scarce energy resources.

  13. Mechanism of metformin action in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells involves oxidative stress generation, DNA damage, and transforming growth factor β1 induction.

    PubMed

    Marinello, Poliana Camila; da Silva, Thamara Nishida Xavier; Panis, Carolina; Neves, Amanda Fouto; Machado, Kaliana Larissa; Borges, Fernando Henrique; Guarnier, Flávia Alessandra; Bernardes, Sara Santos; de-Freitas-Junior, Júlio Cesar Madureira; Morgado-Díaz, José Andrés; Luiz, Rodrigo Cabral; Cecchini, Rubens; Cecchini, Alessandra Lourenço

    2016-04-01

    The participation of oxidative stress in the mechanism of metformin action in breast cancer remains unclear. We investigated the effects of clinical (6 and 30 μM) and experimental concentrations of metformin (1000 and 5000 μM) in MCF-7 and in MDA-MB-231 cells, verifying cytotoxicity, oxidative stress, DNA damage, and intracellular pathways related to cell growth and survival after 24 h of drug exposure. Clinical concentrations of metformin decreased metabolic activity of MCF-7 cells in the MTT assay, which showed increased oxidative stress and DNA damage, although cell death and impairment in the proliferative capacity were observed only at higher conce