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Sample records for action possibly involving

  1. Memory improving actions of gabapentin in mice: possible involvement of central muscarinic cholinergic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Boccia, M M; Acosta, G B; Baratti, C M

    2001-10-01

    Male CF-1 mice were tested 48 h after training on a one trial step-through inhibitory avoidance task. Immediately post-training, intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections of the antiepileptic gabapentin (1-(aminomethyl) cyclohexaneacetic acid) (GBP, 10 mg/kg) enhanced retention performance. The effect was prevented by atropine, a central muscarinic cholinergic receptor antagonist (0.5 mg/kg, i.p.) administered after training but 10 min prior to GBP treatment. In contrast, neither methylatropine (0.5 mg/kg, i.p.), a peripherally acting muscarinic receptor blocker, nor mecamylamine (5 mg/kg, i.p.) or hexamethonium (5 mg/kg, i.p.), two cholinergic nicotinic receptor antagonists, prevented the effects of post-training GBP on retention performance. Low subeffective doses of the central acting anticholinesterase physostigmine (35 mg/kg, i.p.) administered immediately after training, and GBP (5 mg/kg, i.p.), given 10 min after training, significantly enhanced retention performance. The effects of GBP (5 mg/kg, i.p.) were not influenced by the peripherally acting anticholinesterase neostigmine (150 mg/kg, i.p.). Considered together, these findings suggest a disinhibitory action of GBP on the activity of central muscarinic cholinergic mechanisms that are involved in memory consolidation. PMID:11578817

  2. Memory improving actions of gabapentin in mice: possible involvement of central muscarinic cholinergic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Boccia, M M; Acosta, G B; Baratti, C M

    2001-10-01

    Male CF-1 mice were tested 48 h after training on a one trial step-through inhibitory avoidance task. Immediately post-training, intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections of the antiepileptic gabapentin (1-(aminomethyl) cyclohexaneacetic acid) (GBP, 10 mg/kg) enhanced retention performance. The effect was prevented by atropine, a central muscarinic cholinergic receptor antagonist (0.5 mg/kg, i.p.) administered after training but 10 min prior to GBP treatment. In contrast, neither methylatropine (0.5 mg/kg, i.p.), a peripherally acting muscarinic receptor blocker, nor mecamylamine (5 mg/kg, i.p.) or hexamethonium (5 mg/kg, i.p.), two cholinergic nicotinic receptor antagonists, prevented the effects of post-training GBP on retention performance. Low subeffective doses of the central acting anticholinesterase physostigmine (35 mg/kg, i.p.) administered immediately after training, and GBP (5 mg/kg, i.p.), given 10 min after training, significantly enhanced retention performance. The effects of GBP (5 mg/kg, i.p.) were not influenced by the peripherally acting anticholinesterase neostigmine (150 mg/kg, i.p.). Considered together, these findings suggest a disinhibitory action of GBP on the activity of central muscarinic cholinergic mechanisms that are involved in memory consolidation.

  3. Cardiac actions of phencyclidine in isolated guinea pig and rat heart: possible involvement of slow channels

    SciTech Connect

    Temma, K.; Akera, T.; Ng, Y.C.

    1985-03-01

    The mechanisms responsible for the positive inotropic effect of phencyclidine were studied in isolated preparations of guinea pig and rat heart. In electrically paced left atrial muscle preparations, phencyclidine increased the force of contraction; rat heart muscle preparations were more sensitive than guinea pig heart muscle preparations. The positive inotropic effect of phencyclidine was not significantly reduced by a combination of phentolamine and nadolol; however, the effect was competitively blocked by verapamil in the presence of phentolamine and nadolol. Inhibition of the outward K+ current by tetraethylammonium chloride also produced a positive inotropic effect; however, the effect of tetraethylammonium was reduced by phentolamine and nadolol, and was almost insensitive to verapamil. The inotropic effect of phencyclidine was associated with a marked prolongation of the action potential duration and a decrease in maximal upstroke velocity of the action potential, with no change in the resting membrane potential. The specific (/sup 3/H)phencyclidine binding observed with membrane preparations from guinea pig ventricular muscle was saturable with a single class of high-affinity binding site. This binding was inhibited by verapamil, diltiazem, or nitrendipine, but not by ryanodine or tetrodotoxin. These results suggest that the positive inotropic effect of phencyclidine results from enhanced Ca/sup 2 +/ influx via slow channels, either by stimulation of the channels or secondary to inhibition of outward K/sup +/ currents.

  4. Possible sources and sites of action of the nitric oxide involved in synaptic plasticity at spinal lamina I projection neurons.

    PubMed

    Ruscheweyh, R; Goralczyk, A; Wunderbaldinger, G; Schober, A; Sandkühler, J

    2006-08-25

    The synaptic long-term potentiation between primary afferent C-fibers and spinal lamina I projection neurons is a cellular model for hyperalgesia [Ikeda H, Heinke B, Ruscheweyh R, Sandkühler J (2003) Synaptic plasticity in spinal lamina I projection neurons that mediate hyperalgesia. Science 299:1237-1240]. In lamina I neurons with a projection to the periaqueductal gray, this long-term potentiation is dependent on nitric oxide. In the present study, we used immunohistochemistry to detect possible sources and sites of action of the nitric oxide necessary for the long-term potentiation at lamina I spino-periaqueductal gray neurons in rats. None of the three isoforms of the nitric oxide synthase was expressed in a significant number of lamina I spino-periaqueductal gray neurons or primary afferent C-fibers (as evaluated by staining of their cell bodies in the dorsal root ganglia). However, endothelial and inducible nitric oxide synthase were found throughout the spinal cord vasculature and neuronal nitric oxide synthase was present in a number of neurons in laminae II and III. The nitric oxide target soluble guanylyl cyclase was detected in most lamina I spino-periaqueductal gray neurons and in approximately 12% of the dorsal root ganglion neurons, all of them nociceptive as evaluated by coexpression of substance P. Synthesis of cyclic 3',5'-guanosine monophosphate upon stimulation by a nitric oxide donor confirmed the presence of active guanylyl cyclase in at least a portion of the spino-periaqueductal gray neuronal cell bodies. We therefore propose that nitric oxide generated in neighboring neurons or blood vessels acts on the spino-periaqueductal gray neuron and/or the primary afferent C-fiber to enable long-term potentiation. Lamina I spino-parabrachial neurons were stained for comparison and yielded similar results.

  5. Extraneuronal Monoamine Transporter Mediates the Permissive Action of Cortisol in the Guinea Pig Trachea: Possible Involvement of Tracheal Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chen; Qiu, Wenying; Zheng, Yiqing; Li, Hui; Li, Yijia; Feng, Bing; Guo, Shu; Yan, Li; Cao, Ji-Min

    2013-01-01

    Cortisol, a member of glucocorticoids, could potentiate the action of catecholamine by a non-genomic mechanism. Although this permissive effect has been well appreciated in the anti-asthmatic medication, the underlying signaling pathway has remained mysterious. Here, we show that extraneuronal monoamine transporter (EMT), a membraneous reuptake transporter for circulating catecholamine clearance, is the direct target of cortisol in its permissive effect. We found that BSA-conjugated cortisol, which functions as a cortisol but cannot penetrate cell membrane, enhanced the spasmolytic effect of β-adrenoceptor agonist (isoprenaline) in histamine-sensitized tracheal spirals of guinea pigs, and pharmacological inhibition of EMT with famotidine was powerful enough to imitate the permissive action of cortisol. To our surprise, EMT protein expression was high in the chondrocytes of tracheal cartilage, but was undetectable in tracheal smooth muscle cells. The functionality of EMT was further confirmed with measurement of catecholamine uptake by tracheal chondrocytes. Moreover, cortisol-initiated membrane signaling could activate protein kinase C (PKC), which phosphorylates EMT and induces its internalization via a lipid raft-dependent pathway. Both of the mechanisms slow down the reuptake process by chondrocytes, leading to extracellular catecholamine accumulation and results in a more profound adrenergic signaling activation in tracheal smooth muscle cells. Thus, an EMT-centered pathway was proposed to explain the permissive action of cortisol. Collectively, our results highlight the role of EMT in the crosstalk between glucocorticoid and catecholamine. EMT may represent a promising target for adrenergic signaling modulation. PMID:24098439

  6. Anti-obesity actions of green tea: possible involvements in modulation of the glucose uptake system and suppression of the adipogenesis-related transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Ashida, Hitoshi; Furuyashiki, Takashi; Nagayasu, Hironobu; Bessho, Hiroaki; Sakakibara, Hiroyuki; Hashimoto, Takashi; Kanazawa, Kazuki

    2004-01-01

    To investigate mechanisms of the anti-obesity actions of green tea in vivo, rats were given green tea instead of drinking water for 3 weeks. It was confirmed that green tea reduced adipose tissue weight without any change in body weight, other tissue weights, and food and water intakes. Green tea also significantly reduced the plasma levels of cholesterols and free fatty acids. Certain catechins existed in the plasma at 0.24 microM under our experimental conditions, though most of them existed as conjugated forms. For mechanisms of the anti-obesity actions, green tea significantly reduced glucose uptake accompanied by a decrease in translocation of glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) in adipose tissue, while it significantly stimulated the glucose uptake with GLUT4 translocation in skeletal muscle. Moreover, green tea suppressed the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma and the activation of sterol regulatory element binding protein-1 in adipose tissue. In conclusion, green tea modulates the glucose uptake system in adipose tissue and skeletal muscle and suppresses the expression and/or activation of adipogenesis-related transcription factors, as the possible mechanisms of its anti-obesity actions.

  7. In vitro screening of major neurotransmitter systems possibly involved in the mechanism of action of antibodies to S100 protein in released-active form

    PubMed Central

    Gorbunov, Evgeniy A; Ertuzun, Irina A; Kachaeva, Evgeniya V; Tarasov, Sergey A; Epstein, Oleg I

    2015-01-01

    Experimentally and clinically, it was shown that released-active form of antibodies to S100 protein (RAF of Abs to S100) exerts a wide range of pharmacological activities: anxiolytic, antiasthenic, antiaggressive, stress-protective, antihypoxic, antiischemic, neuroprotective, and nootropic. The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of RAF of Abs to S100 on major neurotransmitter systems (serotoninergic, GABAergic, dopaminergic, and on sigma receptors as well) which are possibly involved in its mechanism of pharmacological activity. Radioligand binding assays were used for assessment of the drug influence on ligand–receptor interaction. [35S]GTPγS binding assay, cyclic adenosine monophosphate HTRF™, cellular dielectric spectroscopy assays, and assays based on measurement of intracellular concentration of Ca2+ ions were used for assessment of agonist or antagonist properties of the drug toward receptors. RAF of Abs to S100 increased radioligand binding to 5-HT1F, 5-HT2B, 5-HT2Cedited, 5-HT3, and to D3 receptors by 142.0%, 131.9%, 149.3%, 120.7%, and 126.3%, respectively. Also, the drug significantly inhibited specific binding of radioligands to GABAB1A/B2 receptors by 25.8%, and to both native and recombinant human sigma1 receptors by 75.3% and 40.32%, respectively. In the functional assays, it was shown that the drug exerted antagonism at 5-HT1B, D3, and GABAB1A/B2 receptors inhibiting agonist-induced responses by 23.24%, 32.76%, and 30.2%, respectively. On the contrary, the drug exerted an agonist effect at 5-HT1A receptors enhancing receptor functional activity by 28.0%. The pharmacological profiling of RAF of Abs to S100 among 27 receptor provides evidence for drug-related modification of major neurotransmitter systems. PMID:26604768

  8. Parental Involvement in Education: Possibilities and Limitations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khan, Mir Baiz

    1996-01-01

    Examines parental involvement in school affairs as a means to forge school-community partnerships in education. Identifies fundamental barriers to meaningful parental involvement and suggests possible solutions, such as parent empowerment, administrators' support, home-school interdependency, awareness of current research, reorganized structures,…

  9. Possible Involvement of the Inhibition of NF-κB Factor in Anti-Inflammatory Actions That Melatonin Exerts on Mast Cells.

    PubMed

    Maldonado, M D; García-Moreno, H; González-Yanes, C; Calvo, J R

    2016-08-01

    Melatonin is a molecule endogenously produced in a wide variety of immune cells, including mast cells (RBL-2H3). It exhibits immunomodulatory, anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic properties. The physiologic mechanisms underlying these activities of melatonin have not been clarified in mast cells. This work is designed to determine the anti-inflammatory effect and mechanism of action of melatonin on activated mast cells. RBL-2H3 were pre-treated with exogenous melatonin (MELx) at physiological (100nM) and pharmacological (1 mM) doses for 30 min, washed and activated with PMACI (phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate plus calcium ionophore A23187) for 2 h and 12 h. The data shows that pre-treatment of MELx in stimulated mast cells, significantly reduced the levels of endogenous melatonin production (MELn), TNF-α and IL-6. These effects are directly related with the MELx concentration used. MELx also inhibited IKK/NF-κB signal transduction pathway in stimulated mast cells. These results indicate a molecular basis for the ability of melatonin to prevent inflammation and for the treatment of allergic inflammatory diseases through the down-regulation of mast cell activation. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 1926-1933, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Legislative Action: The Possibility of Instant Retrenchment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jedamus, Paul

    1980-01-01

    Planning models developed at the University of Colorado, Boulder and resulting strategies for coping with legislated retrenchment are presented. Several areas for course of action are examined: contingency planning, planning for flexibility and enhancing real productivity. (LC)

  11. [A doctor's action within possible crime scene].

    PubMed

    Sowizdraniuk, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    Every doctor regardless of specialization in his practice may meet the need to provide assistance to victims of crime-related action. In this article there were disscused the issues of informing the investigative authorities about the crime, ensuring the safety of themselves and the environment at the scene. It also shows the specific elements of necessary procedures and practice to deal with the victims designed to securing any evidence present of potential or committed crime in proper manner. Special attention has been given to medical operation and other, necessary in case of certain criminal groups, among the latter we need to underline: actions against sexual freedom and decency, bodily integrity, life and well-being of human, and specially homicide, infanticide and suicide.

  12. Comprehension of action negation involves inhibitory simulation.

    PubMed

    Foroni, Francesco; Semin, Gün R

    2013-01-01

    Previous research suggests that action language is comprehended by activating the motor system. We report a study, investigating a critical question in this research field: do negative sentences activate the motor system? Participants were exposed to sentences in the affirmation and negation forms while the zygomatic muscle activity on the left side of the face was continuously measured (Electromyography technique: EMG). Sentences were descriptions of emotional expressions that mapped either directly upon the zygomatic muscle (e.g., "I am smiling") or did not (e.g., "I am frowning"). Reading sentences involving the negation of the activity of a specific muscle (zygomatic major-"I am not smiling") is shown to lead to the inhibition of this muscle. Reading sentences involving the affirmative form instead ("I am smiling") leads to the activation of zygomatic mucle. In contrast, sentences describing an activity that is irrelevant to the zygomatic muscle (e.g., "I am frowning" or "I am not frowning") produce no muscle activity. These results extend the range of simulation models to negation and by implication to an abstract domain. We discuss how this research contributes to the grounding of abstract and concrete concepts. PMID:23754996

  13. Comprehension of action negation involves inhibitory simulation

    PubMed Central

    Foroni, Francesco; Semin, Gün R.

    2013-01-01

    Previous research suggests that action language is comprehended by activating the motor system. We report a study, investigating a critical question in this research field: do negative sentences activate the motor system? Participants were exposed to sentences in the affirmation and negation forms while the zygomatic muscle activity on the left side of the face was continuously measured (Electromyography technique: EMG). Sentences were descriptions of emotional expressions that mapped either directly upon the zygomatic muscle (e.g., “I am smiling”) or did not (e.g., “I am frowning”). Reading sentences involving the negation of the activity of a specific muscle (zygomatic major—“I am not smiling”) is shown to lead to the inhibition of this muscle. Reading sentences involving the affirmative form instead (“I am smiling”) leads to the activation of zygomatic mucle. In contrast, sentences describing an activity that is irrelevant to the zygomatic muscle (e.g., “I am frowning” or “I am not frowning”) produce no muscle activity. These results extend the range of simulation models to negation and by implication to an abstract domain. We discuss how this research contributes to the grounding of abstract and concrete concepts. PMID:23754996

  14. Principle of least action; some possible generalizations

    SciTech Connect

    Broucke, R.

    1982-08-01

    In this article we draw the attention to an important variational principle in dynamics: the Maupertuis-Jacobi Least Action Principle (MJLAP). This principle compares varied paths with the same energy h. We give two new proofs of the MJLAP (Sections 3 and 8) as well as a new unified variational principle which contains both Hamilton's Principle (HP) and the MJLAP as particular cases (Sections 4 and 9). The article also shows several new methods for the construction of a Lagrangian for a conservative dynamical system. As an example, we illustrate the theory with the classical Harmonic Oscillator Problem (Section 10). Our method is based on the theory of changes of independent variables in a dynamical system. It indirectly shows how a change of independent variable affects the self-adjointness of a dynamical system (Sections 5, 6, 7). Our new Lagrangians contain an arbitrary constant ..cap alpha.., whose meaning needs to be studied, eventually in relation to the concepts of quantification or gauge transformations. The two important values of the constant ..cap alpha.. are 1 (Hamilton's principle) and 1/2 (Maupertuis-Jacobi Least Action Principle).

  15. GHB for cataplexy: Possible mode of action.

    PubMed

    Szabadi, Elemer

    2015-06-01

    The sleep disorder narcolepsy is caused by the loss of orexinergic neurones in the lateral hypothalamus. A troublesome symptom of narcolepsy is cataplexy, the sudden loss of muscle tone in response to strong emotions. It can be alleviated by antidepressants and sodium oxybate (γ-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB)). It is likely that the noradrenergic nucleus locus coeruleus (LC) is involved since it is essential for the maintenance of muscle tone, and ceases to fire during cataplectic attacks. Furthermore, alpha-2 adrenoceptors proliferate in the LC in cataplexy, probably due to 'heterologous denervation supersensitivity' resulting from the loss/weakening of the orexinergic input to the LC. This would lead to the sensitization of the autoinhibition mechanism of LC neurones mediated by inhibitory alpha-2 adrenoceptors ('autoreceptors'). Thus the excitatory input from the amygdala to the LC, activated by an emotional stimulus, would lead to the 'switching off' of LC activity via the supersensitive auto-inhibition mechanism. GHB is an agonist at both γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) GABA (B) and GHB receptors that may be a subtype of an extrasynaptic GABA(A) receptor. GHB may prevent a cataplectic attack by dampening the tone of LC neurones via the stimulation of inhibitory extrasynaptic GABA receptors in the LC, and thus increasing the threshold for autoinhibition.

  16. School Success, Possible Selves, and Parent School Involvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oyserman, Daphna; Brickman, Daniel; Rhodes, Marjorie

    2007-01-01

    Increased parent school involvement is associated with better academic outcomes; yet, proximal contributors to this effect remain understudied. We focus on one potential proximal contributor, youth's positive and negative future self-images or "possible selves," reasoning that if parent school involvement fosters possible selves, then…

  17. The influence of action possibility and end-state comfort on motor imagery of manual action sequences.

    PubMed

    Seegelke, Christian; Hughes, Charmayne M L

    2015-12-01

    It has been proposed that the preparation of goal-direct actions involves internal movement simulation, or motor imagery. Evidence suggests that motor imagery is critically involved in the prediction of action consequences and contributes heavily to movement planning processes. The present study examined whether the sensitivity towards end-state comfort and the possibility/impossibility to perform an action sequence are considered during motor imagery. Participants performed a mental rotation task in which two images were simultaneously presented. The image on the left depicted the start posture of a right hand when grasping a bar, while the right image depicted the hand posture at the end of the action sequence. The right image displayed the bar in a vertical orientation with the hand in a comfortable (thumb-up) or in an uncomfortable (thumb-down) posture, while the bar in the left image was rotated in picture plane in steps of 45°. Crucially, the two images formed either a physically possible or physically impossible to perform action sequence. Results revealed strikingly different response time patterns for the two action sequence conditions. In general, response times increased almost monotonically with increasing angular disparity for the possible to perform action sequences. However, slight deviations from this monotonicity were apparent when the sequences contained an uncomfortable as opposed to a comfortable final posture. In contrast, for the impossible sequences, response times did not follow a typical mental rotation function, but instead were uniformly very slow. These findings suggest that both biomechanical constraints (i.e., end-state comfort) and the awareness of the possibility/impossibility to perform an action sequence are considered during motor imagery. We conclude that motor representations contain information about the spatiotemporal movement organization and the possibility of performing an action, which are crucially involved in

  18. Joint action modulates motor system involvement during action observation in 3-year-olds.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Marlene; Hunnius, Sabine; van Elk, Michiel; van Ede, Freek; Bekkering, Harold

    2011-06-01

    When we are engaged in a joint action, we need to integrate our partner's actions with our own actions. Previous research has shown that in adults the involvement of one's own motor system is enhanced during observation of an action partner as compared to during observation of an individual actor. The aim of this study was to investigate whether similar motor system involvement is present at early stages of joint action development and whether it is related to joint action performance. In an EEG experiment with 3-year-old children, we assessed the children's brain activity and performance during a joint game with an adult experimenter. We used a simple button-pressing game in which the two players acted in turns. Power in the mu- and beta-frequency bands was compared when children were not actively moving but observing the experimenter's actions when (1) they were engaged in the joint action game and (2) when they were not engaged. Enhanced motor involvement during action observation as indicated by attenuated sensorimotor mu- and beta-power was found when the 3-year-olds were engaged in the joint action. This enhanced motor activation during action observation was associated with better joint action performance. The findings suggest that already in early childhood the motor system is differentially activated during action observation depending on the involvement in a joint action. This motor system involvement might play an important role for children's joint action performance. PMID:21479943

  19. Collaborative Action Research Involving Fiji and Solomon Islands Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Gurmit

    2000-01-01

    Reviews the Basic Education and Life Skills program, which involves University of the South Pacific member countries, highlighting teacher involvement in collaborative action research to promote professional development at the school level. The paper describes the nature of teachers' involvement and shares insights from their experiences as…

  20. Environmental Volunteers: Factors Influencing Their Involvement in Environmental Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liarakou, Georgia; Kostelou, Eleni; Gavrilakis, Costas

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the factors that influence volunteers to become involved in environmental action. The research focused on volunteers undertaking action in summer camps organised by an environmental non-governmental organisation (NGO) in Greece. The results suggest that the environmental issues addressed in volunteer…

  1. 40 CFR 300.525 - State involvement in removal actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) SUPERFUND, EMERGENCY PLANNING, AND COMMUNITY RIGHT-TO-KNOW PROGRAMS NATIONAL OIL AND HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES POLLUTION CONTINGENCY PLAN State Involvement in Hazardous Substance Response § 300.525 State involvement in... accordance with § 300.415 on removal actions, and 40 CFR part 35, subpart O. (b) States are not...

  2. 40 CFR 300.525 - State involvement in removal actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) SUPERFUND, EMERGENCY PLANNING, AND COMMUNITY RIGHT-TO-KNOW PROGRAMS NATIONAL OIL AND HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES POLLUTION CONTINGENCY PLAN State Involvement in Hazardous Substance Response § 300.525 State involvement in... accordance with § 300.415 on removal actions, and 40 CFR part 35, subpart O. (b) States are not...

  3. 40 CFR 300.525 - State involvement in removal actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) SUPERFUND, EMERGENCY PLANNING, AND COMMUNITY RIGHT-TO-KNOW PROGRAMS NATIONAL OIL AND HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES POLLUTION CONTINGENCY PLAN State Involvement in Hazardous Substance Response § 300.525 State involvement in... accordance with § 300.415 on removal actions, and 40 CFR part 35, subpart O. (b) States are not...

  4. 40 CFR 300.525 - State involvement in removal actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) SUPERFUND, EMERGENCY PLANNING, AND COMMUNITY RIGHT-TO-KNOW PROGRAMS NATIONAL OIL AND HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES POLLUTION CONTINGENCY PLAN State Involvement in Hazardous Substance Response § 300.525 State involvement in... accordance with § 300.415 on removal actions, and 40 CFR part 35, subpart O. (b) States are not...

  5. Possible involvement of central pacemakers in clinical disorders of movement.

    PubMed

    DeLong, M R

    1978-06-01

    This review considers the evidence for possible involvement of central nervous system pacemaker neurons in several clinical disorders of movement. Two basic types of tremor are discussed from this point of view, i.e., 4--7/sec parkinsonian tremor, of possible thalamocortical origin, and 7--11/sec essential tremor of possible olivo-cerebellar origin. The importance of motor programs and abnormalities in their utilization are considered with reference to the loss of motor function in parkinsonism (? loss of motor programs), and the inappropriate release of such programs as a possible basis for the involuntary movements seen in other movement disorders, such as chorea, athetosis, dystonia, and hemiballismus. The possible role of pacemaker neurons controlling such programs is considered. Finally, the subject of locomotion and the pacemaker model of the spinal locomotor pattern generator for stepping are considered in relation to clinical disorders of gait. While critical evidence is lacking for pacemaker inovlvement in any of these disorders, their possible role is emphasized. PMID:350632

  6. Lipid rafts and their possible involvements in neuroimmunological disorders.

    PubMed

    Asakura, Kunihiko; Ueda, Akihiro; Mutoh, Tatsuro

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) and neuromyelitis optica (NMO) are presumed to be an autoimmune disease in the central nervous system (CNS). Although lipids are most abundant components in the nervous system, it has been believed that cellular and/or humoral immunity to various myelin proteins causes these neuroinflammatory diseases. Recent research advances enable us to study lipids in the membranes and some key molecules involved in various neurological disorders including Guillain-Barré syndrome, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and prion disease, are localized in lipid rafts. In MS and NMO, the key molecules for the pathogenesis or the target molecules for the treatments of MS and NMO are also localized in lipid rafts. Here in this article, we highlight on the possible involvement of lipid rafts in the pathogenesis and treatment of MS and NMO and introduce our recent observation of aquaporin 4 regarding NMO.

  7. Computations involving differential operators and their actions on functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crouch, Peter E.; Grossman, Robert; Larson, Richard

    1991-01-01

    The algorithms derived by Grossmann and Larson (1989) are further developed for rewriting expressions involving differential operators. The differential operators involved arise in the local analysis of nonlinear dynamical systems. These algorithms are extended in two different directions: the algorithms are generalized so that they apply to differential operators on groups and the data structures and algorithms are developed to compute symbolically the action of differential operators on functions. Both of these generalizations are needed for applications.

  8. Political involvement in nursing--politics, ethics, and strategic action.

    PubMed

    Des Jardin, K

    2001-11-01

    Political apathy in the nursing profession can be attributed to numerous factors, including a perceived ethical conflict between professional values and political involvement, as well as a lack of strategy for political action. Differences in personal and professional ethics, conflicting loyalties, and a negative image of politics create ethical tension for nurses. Political-ethical conflicts can mean choosing between job, patient care, and personal ideals. Many nurses never have considered it their place to challenge the structure of the health care system or the rules guiding that system. Supporting political action that demands change in the system, therefore, can cause tension among nurses. The political-ethical dilemma for nurses is related to outdated images of nursing, repression, fear of power, and lack of knowledge. Many guidelines exist to help nurses understand why they should get involved in the political process. By using these guidelines, nurses can evaluate issues and use a valid method to assess problems, plan for action, and evaluate the effectiveness and benefits of specific strategies. In the second of this two-part series on political involvement in nursing, political-ethical conflict is explored, along with strategies for political action.

  9. The biological effects and possible modes of action of nanosilver.

    PubMed

    Völker, Carolin; Oetken, Matthias; Oehlmann, Jörg

    2013-01-01

    Novel physicochemical and biological properties have led to a versatile spectrum of applications for nanosized silver particles. Silver nanoparticles are applied primarily for their antimicrobial effects, and may variety of commercially available products have emerged. To better predict and prevent possible environmental impacts from silver nanoparticles that are derived from increasing production volumes and environmental release, more data on the biological effects are needed on appropriate model organisms. We examined the literature that addressed the adverse effects of silver nanoparticles on different levels of biological integration, including in vitro and in vivo test systems. Results of in vitro studies indicate a dose-dependent programmed cell death included by oxidative stress as main possible pathway of toxicity. Furthermore, silver nanoparticles may affect cellular enzymes by interference with free thiol groups and mimicry of endogenous ions. Similar mechanisms may apply for antibacterial effects produced by nonasilver. These effects are primary from the interference nanosilver has with bacterial cell membranes. Few in vivo studies have been performed to evaluated the toxic mode of action of nanosilver or to provide evidence for oxidative stress as an important mechanism of nanosilver toxicity. Organisms that are most acutely sensitive to nanosilver toxicity are the freshwater filter-freeding organisms. Both in vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated tha silver ions released from nanoparticle surface contribute to the toxicity, and, indeed, some findings indicated a unique nanoparticles effect. For an adequate evaluation of the environmental impact of nanosilver, greater emphasis should be placed on combining mechanistic investigations that are performed in vitro, with results obtained in in vivo test systems. Future in vivo test system studies should emphasize long-term exposure scenarios. Moreover, the dietary uptake of silver nanoparticles and

  10. Action Learning: The Possibility of Differing Hierarchies in Learning Sets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeadon-Lee, Annie

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the proposition that a variety of differing hierarchies exist in an action learning set at any one time, and each hierarchy has the potential to affect an individual's behaviour within the set. An interpretivist philosophy underpins the research framework adopted in this paper. Data were captured by means of 11 in-depth…

  11. 10 CFR 26.77 - Management actions regarding possible impairment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Section 26.77 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Management Actions and... competently perform his or her duties. (b) If an individual appears to be impaired or the individual's fitness... perform drug and alcohol tests or implement the determination of fitness process otherwise required...

  12. Evidence suggesting possible SCA1 gene involvement in schizophrenia

    SciTech Connect

    Diehl, S.R.; Wange, S.; Sun, C.

    1994-09-01

    Several findings suggest a possible role for the SCA1 gene on chromosome 6p in some cases of schizophrenia. First, linkage analyses in Irish pedigrees provided LOD scores up to 3.0 for one model tested using microsatellites closely linked to SCA1. Reanalysis of these data using affected sibpair methods yielded a significant result (p = 0.01) for one marker. An attempt to replicate this linkage finding was made using 44 NIMH families (206 individuals, 80 affected) and 12 Utah families (120 individuals, 49 affected). LOD scores were negative in these new families, even allowing for heterogeneity, as were results using affected sibpair methods. However, one Utah family provided a LOD score of 1.3. We also screened the SCA1 trinucleotide repeat to search for expansions characteristic of this disorder in these families and in 38 additional unrelated schizophrenics. We found 1 schizophrenic with 41 repeats, which is substantially larger than the maximum size of 36 repeats observed in previous studies of several hundred controls. We are now assessing whether the distribution of SCA1 repeats differs significantly in schizophrenia versus controls. Recent reports suggest possible anticipation in schizophrenia (also characteristic of SCA1) and a few cases of psychiatric symptoms suggesting schizophrenia have been observed in the highly related disorder DRPLA (SCA2), which is also based on trinucleotide repeat expansion. These findings suggest that further investigations of this gene and chromosome region may be a priority.

  13. Various Possible Toxicants Involved in Thyroid Dysfunction: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Bajaj, Jagminder K.; Salwan, Poonam

    2016-01-01

    About 300 million people across the world suffer from thyroid gland dysfunction. Environmental factors play an important role in causation of autoimmune thyroid diseases in susceptible individuals. Genetics contributes to 70% of the risk. In order to reduce the risk, we need to understand the association of environmental agents with thyroid dysfunction. These factors are especially relevant for those at increased risk due to positive family history. The ideal study to see the impact of a thyroid toxicant consists of directly measuring the degree of exposure to toxicant in an individual with his thyroid status. Knowledge of various factors influencing thyroid dysfunction can help in interpreting the results of such studies in a better way. This article is an attempt to highlight the various possible toxicants affecting thyroid function so that adequate measures can be undertaken to control excessive exposure in future to reduce the prevalence of thyroid disorders. PMID:26894086

  14. 40 CFR 300.525 - State involvement in removal actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) SUPERFUND, EMERGENCY PLANNING, AND COMMUNITY RIGHT-TO-KNOW PROGRAMS NATIONAL OIL AND HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES... accordance with § 300.415 on removal actions, and 40 CFR part 35, subpart O. (b) States are not required... removal (including remedial planning) and remedial action costs at the time of the remedial action....

  15. Hepatoprotective actions of melatonin: Possible mediation by melatonin receptors

    PubMed Central

    Mathes, Alexander M

    2010-01-01

    Melatonin, the hormone of darkness and messenger of the photoperiod, is also well known to exhibit strong direct and indirect antioxidant properties. Melatonin has previously been demonstrated to be a powerful organ protective substance in numerous models of injury; these beneficial effects have been attributed to the hormone’s intense radical scavenging capacity. The present report reviews the hepatoprotective potential of the pineal hormone in various models of oxidative stress in vivo, and summarizes the extensive literature showing that melatonin may be a suitable experimental substance to reduce liver damage after sepsis, hemorrhagic shock, ischemia/reperfusion, and in numerous models of toxic liver injury. Melatonin’s influence on hepatic antioxidant enzymes and other potentially relevant pathways, such as nitric oxide signaling, hepatic cytokine and heat shock protein expression, are evaluated. Based on recent literature demonstrating the functional relevance of melatonin receptor activation for hepatic organ protection, this article finally suggests that melatonin receptors could mediate the hepatoprotective actions of melatonin therapy. PMID:21182223

  16. Melatonin in humans: Possible involvement in SIDS, and use in contraceptives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wurtman, Richard J.; Lynch, Harry J.; Sturner, William Q.

    1991-01-01

    Relatively few tools exist for assessing the possible involvement of melatonin in normal or abnormal physiologlcal and behavioral states. One cannot perform the classic ablation experiment of endocrinologists by cavalierly removing the human's pineal, nor derive the same effect pharmacologically by administering a drug which blocks the actions of the indole on its receptors (because no such drugs, demonstrated to work in humans, exist). About all that can be done is to administer the melatonin and see what happens, or measure its levels in a body fluid and determine whether its temporal patterns track those of the physiological or behavioral variable being examined. The clinical state of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) which apparently is associated with abnormalities in melatonin concentrations within body fluids obtained at autopsy is described. New data which suggest that exogenous melatonin has sufficient antigonadal potency to allow it to replace estrogen and, acting in combination with norethisterone, serve as a useful contraceptive agent is summarized.

  17. Possible role of Pi supply in mitochondrial actions of glucagon.

    PubMed

    Siess, E A; Kientsch-Engel, R I; Fahimi, F M; Wieland, O H

    1984-06-15

    Glucagon is able to diminish the net release of inorganic phosphate (Pi) occurring on incubation of isolated hepatocytes from 48-h-starved rats. Concomitantly the hormone increases the cellular Pi content. This is associated with a rise of Pi in the cytosolic fraction. Other hormonal effectors like phenylephrine, vasopressin and angiotensin II exert a smaller and transient effect as compared to glucagon. It is proposed that this increase in Pi availability to the mitochondria, by favouring substrate level phosphorylation at the succinyl-CoA synthetase step plays a role in the development of the metabolite pattern found in the mitochondrial matrix space after exposure of hepatocytes to glucagon or the above agents. With regard to the glutamate level this view is evidenced by the finding that its hormone-dependent decrease was inversely correlated to the respective increase in the cytosolic Pi concentration. Further evidence is provided by experiments with isolated mitochondria incubated under state-3 conditions at medium Pi concentrations corresponding to those metabolically active in the cytosolic compartment of control and glucagon-stimulated hepatocytes, being 2 mM and 3 mM, respectively. Increasing medium phosphate concentration from 2 mM to 3 mM caused a marked decrease in the level of succinyl-CoA and increased the rates of 2-oxoglutarate utilization and of malate and phosphoenolpyruvate production. Citrulline synthesis also was found to be stimulated at 3 mM Pi. Taken together our results suggest a role of Pi supply in mitochondrial actions of glucagon in intact hepatocytes. Moreover, they could contribute to a better interpretation of glucagon effects on isolated mitochondria from hormone-pretreated liver cells. PMID:6146521

  18. [Receptors involved in the mechanism of action of topical prostaglandines].

    PubMed

    Neacsu, Alina Mihaela

    2009-01-01

    Hypotensive effect to prostaglandins analogs (latanoprost, travoprost, tafluprost) means to increase uveoscleral outflow by action to FP receptors who generated extracellular matrix changes and intermuscular spaces changes. Syntetic prostamides analogs (bimatoprost) have a particulary action with a receptors most and intensive studied. The bimatoprost effect is the consequences to preferated stimulations on the specific receptors who have action only the tissue with prostaglandins activity is important to specify what the bimatoprost have dual effect: to uveoscleral outflow and classic outflow by increase hidraulic conductivity.

  19. [Receptors involved in the mechanism of action of topical prostaglandines].

    PubMed

    Neacsu, Alina Mihaela

    2009-01-01

    Hypotensive effect to prostaglandins analogs (latanoprost, travoprost, tafluprost) means to increase uveoscleral outflow by action to FP receptors who generated extracellular matrix changes and intermuscular spaces changes. Syntetic prostamides analogs (bimatoprost) have a particulary action with a receptors most and intensive studied. The bimatoprost effect is the consequences to preferated stimulations on the specific receptors who have action only the tissue with prostaglandins activity is important to specify what the bimatoprost have dual effect: to uveoscleral outflow and classic outflow by increase hidraulic conductivity. PMID:19697832

  20. 17 CFR 1.67 - Notification of final disciplinary action involving financial harm to a customer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... disciplinary action involving financial harm to a customer. 1.67 Section 1.67 Commodity and Securities... Miscellaneous § 1.67 Notification of final disciplinary action involving financial harm to a customer. (a) Definitions. For purposes of this section: (1) Final disciplinary action means any decision by or...

  1. Possible involvement of a tetrahydrobiopterin in photoreception for UV-B-induced anthocyanin synthesis in carrot.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Junko; Nakata, Rieko; Ueno, Hiroshi; Murakami, Akio; Iseki, Mineo; Watanabe, Masakatsu

    2014-01-01

    Our previous studies of action spectra for UV-B-induced anthocyanin accumulation in cultured carrot cells indicated that a reduced form of pterin, possibly tetrahydrobiopterin, contributes to UV-B photoreception. In this report, we provide additional evidence for the involvement of pterin in UV-B light sensing. UV-B-induced phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) activity was considerably suppressed by N-acetylserotonin (an inhibitor of tetrahydrobiopterin biosynthesis), and this suppression was partially recovered by adding biopterin or tetrahydrobiobiopterin. In addition, protein(s) specifically bound to biopterin were detected by radiolabeling experiments in N-acetylserotonin-treated cells. Furthermore, diphenyleneiodonium, a potent inhibitor of electron transfer, completely suppressed UV-B-induced PAL activity. These results suggest the occurrence of an unidentified UV-B photoreceptor (other than UVR8, the tryptophan-based UV-B sensor originally identified in Arabidopsis) with reduced pterin in carrot cells. After reexamining published action spectra, we suggest that anthocyanin synthesis is coordinately regulated by these two UV-B sensors.

  2. Radiation-induced increases in sensitivity of cataleptic behavior to haloperidol: possible involvement of prostaglandins

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph, J.A.; Kandasamy, S.B.; Hunt, W.A.; Dalton, T.K.; Stevens, S.

    1988-02-01

    The effects of radiation exposure on haloperidol-induced catalepsy were examined in order to determine whether elevated prostaglandins, through an action on dopaminergic autoreceptors, could be involved in the radiation-induced increase in the potency of this neuroleptic. Cataleptic behavior was examined in animals irradiated with various doses of gamma photons (1-150 Gy) and pretreated with a subthreshold dose of haloperidol (0.1 mg/kg). This approach was chosen to maximize any synergistic effects of radiation and haloperidol. After irradiation with doses less than or equal to 30 Gy, the combined treatment of haloperidol and radiation produced catalepsy, whereas neither treatment alone had an effect. This observed catalepsy could be blocked with prior administration of indomethacin, a prostaglandin synthesis inhibitor. Animals exposed to doses of radiation less than or equal to 50 Gy and no haloperidol, however, displayed apparent catalepsy. This effect was also antagonized by indomethacin. Prostaglandins can induce catalepsy and when administered in subthreshold doses along with subthreshold doses of haloperidol, catalepsy was observed. In order to assess a possible action of prostaglandins and radiation on dopaminergic activity, the functioning of striatal dopaminergic autoreceptors was examined by determining the effects of varying concentrations of haloperidol on the K+-evoked release of dopamine from striatal slices obtained from parallel groups of animals treated as above. Results indicated that sensitivity to haloperidol increased (higher K+-evoked dopamine release) in slices from irradiated or prostaglandin-treated animals and that this increase in sensitivity was blocked by indomethacin.

  3. Paralogous genes involved in juvenile hormone action in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Aaron; Barry, Joshua; Wang, Shaoli; Fujiwara, Yoshihiro; Wilson, Thomas G

    2010-08-01

    Juvenile hormone (JH) is critical for multiple aspects of insect development and physiology. Although roles for the hormone have received considerable study, an understanding of the molecules necessary for JH action in insects has been frustratingly slow to evolve. Methoprene-tolerant (Met) in Drosophila melanogaster fulfills many of the requirements for a hormone receptor gene. A paralogous gene, germ-cell expressed (gce), possesses homology and is a candidate as a Met partner in JH action. Expression of gce was found to occur at multiple times and in multiple tissues during development, similar to that previously found for Met. To probe roles of this gene in JH action, we carried out in vivo gce over- and underexpression studies. We show by overexpression studies that gce can substitute in vivo for Met, alleviating preadult but not adult phenotypic characters. We also demonstrate that RNA interference-driven knockdown of gce expression in transgenic flies results in preadult lethality in the absence of MET. These results show that (1) unlike Met, gce is a vital gene and shows functional flexibility and (2) both gene products appear to promote JH action in preadult but not adult development.

  4. Anxiolytic action of pterostilbene: involvement of hippocampal ERK phosphorylation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pterostilbene, a natural analog of resveratrol, has diverse health-beneficial properties. However, the neurological activities of this compound are largely unexplored. Here we report that pterostilbene shows anxiolytic action by downregulating phosphorylated levels of ERKs in the hippocampus of mice...

  5. Reduce Toxic Exposures: Get Involved and Take Action!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Exceptional Parent, 2006

    2006-01-01

    There is a growing concern about the connection between many chemical exposures and learning and other developmental disabilities (LDD). National and local groups are developing new programs around the country that are making this connection--and taking action with regard to policy, education and research efforts. They are working towards reducing…

  6. Current Issues Involving Affirmative Action and Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sterrett, William M.

    2005-01-01

    This article examines current issues regarding affirmative action in today's institutions of higher learning. It addresses the two recent cases decided before the U.S. Supreme Court concerning the University of Michigan's policy. Two other recent and related issues, the "Hopwood" case and California's Proposition 209 approach, are also examined.…

  7. Review of endocrine disorders associated with environmental toxicants and possible involved mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Maqbool, Faheem; Mostafalou, Sara; Bahadar, Haji; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2016-01-15

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDC) are released into environment from different sources. They are mainly used in packaging industries, pesticides and food constituents. Clinical evidence, experimental models, and epidemiological studies suggest that EDC have major risks for human by targeting different organs and systems in the body. Multiple mechanisms are involved in targeting the normal system, through estrogen receptors, nuclear receptors and steroidal receptors activation. In this review, different methods by which xenobiotics stimulate signaling pathways and genetic mutation or DNA methylation have been discussed. These methods help to understand the results of xenobiotic action on the endocrine system. Endocrine disturbances in the human body result in breast cancer, ovarian problems, thyroid eruptions, testicular carcinoma, Alzheimer disease, schizophrenia, nerve damage and obesity. EDC characterize a wide class of compounds such as organochlorinated pesticides, industrial wastes, plastics and plasticizers, fuels and numerous other elements that exist in the environment or are in high use during daily life. The interactions and mechanism of toxicity in relation to human general health problems, especially endocrine disturbances with particular reference to reproductive problems, diabetes, and breast, testicular and ovarian cancers should be deeply investigated. There should also be a focus on public awareness of these EDC risks and their use in routine life. Therefore, the aim of this review is to summarize all evidence regarding different physiological disruptions in the body and possible involved mechanisms, to prove the association between endocrine disruptions and human diseases. PMID:26497928

  8. Review of endocrine disorders associated with environmental toxicants and possible involved mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Maqbool, Faheem; Mostafalou, Sara; Bahadar, Haji; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2016-01-15

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDC) are released into environment from different sources. They are mainly used in packaging industries, pesticides and food constituents. Clinical evidence, experimental models, and epidemiological studies suggest that EDC have major risks for human by targeting different organs and systems in the body. Multiple mechanisms are involved in targeting the normal system, through estrogen receptors, nuclear receptors and steroidal receptors activation. In this review, different methods by which xenobiotics stimulate signaling pathways and genetic mutation or DNA methylation have been discussed. These methods help to understand the results of xenobiotic action on the endocrine system. Endocrine disturbances in the human body result in breast cancer, ovarian problems, thyroid eruptions, testicular carcinoma, Alzheimer disease, schizophrenia, nerve damage and obesity. EDC characterize a wide class of compounds such as organochlorinated pesticides, industrial wastes, plastics and plasticizers, fuels and numerous other elements that exist in the environment or are in high use during daily life. The interactions and mechanism of toxicity in relation to human general health problems, especially endocrine disturbances with particular reference to reproductive problems, diabetes, and breast, testicular and ovarian cancers should be deeply investigated. There should also be a focus on public awareness of these EDC risks and their use in routine life. Therefore, the aim of this review is to summarize all evidence regarding different physiological disruptions in the body and possible involved mechanisms, to prove the association between endocrine disruptions and human diseases.

  9. Candida mannan: chemistry, suppression of cell-mediated immunity, and possible mechanisms of action.

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, R D; Shibata, N; Podzorski, R P; Herron, M J

    1991-01-01

    The ability of Candida albicans to establish an infection involves multiple components of this fungal pathogen, but its ability to persist in host tissue may involve primarily the immunosuppressive property of a major cell wall glycoprotein, mannan. Mannan and oligosaccharide fragments of mannan are potent inhibitors of cell-mediated immunity and appear to reproduce the immune deficit of patients with the mucocutaneous form of candidiasis. However, neither the exact structures of these inhibitory species nor their mechanisms of action have yet been clearly defined. Different investigators have proposed that mannan or mannan catabolites act upon monocytes or suppressor T lymphocytes, but research from unrelated areas has provided still other possibilities for consideration. These include interference with cytokine activities, lymphocyte-monocyte interactions, and leukocyte homing. To stimulate further research of the immunosuppressive property of C. albicans mannan, we have reviewed (i) the relationship of mannan to other antigens and virulence factors of the fungus; (ii) the chemistry of mannan, together with methods for preparation of mannan and mannan fragments; and (iii) the historical evidence for immunosuppression by Candida mannan and the mechanisms currently proposed for this property; and (iv) we have speculated upon still other mechanisms by which mannan might influence host defense functions. It is possible that understanding the immunosuppressive effects of mannan will provide clues to novel therapies for candidiasis that will enhance the efficacy of both available and future anti-Candida agents. PMID:2004345

  10. Possible action mechanism of the electromagnetic fields in the liver cancer development: A mathematical proposal

    SciTech Connect

    Jiménez-García, Mónica Noemí; Godina-Nava, Juan José

    2012-02-08

    Currently it is known that electromagnetic field exposure can induce biological changes, although the precise effects and action mechanism of the interaction between the electromagnetic field and biological systems are not well understood. In this work we propose a possible action mechanism, concerning the effect that the extremely low frequency electromagnetic field exposure has on the early stage of liver cancer development. The model is developed studying the phenomena called oxidative stress that it appears after it is applied a carcinogenic agent used to induce hepatic cancer chemically in an experimental animal model. This physical-chemical process involves the movement of magnetic field dependent free charged particles, called free radicals. We will consider the use of the radical pairs theory as a framework, in which we will describe the spin density operator evolution by implementing the stochastic Liouville equation with hyperfine interaction. This describes how the selectivity of the interaction between spin states of the free radicals with the applied electromagnetic field, influences the development of pre-neoplastic lesions in the liver. AIP Publishing is retracting this article due to the substantial use of content in the Results and Conclusions section without proper citation of a previously published paper in Chemical Physics Letters 361 (2012) 219-225. This article is retracted from the scientific record with effect from 15 October 2015.

  11. Involving deprived communities in improving the quality of primary care services: does participatory action research work?

    PubMed Central

    Cawston, Peter G; Mercer, Stewart W; Barbour, Rosaline S

    2007-01-01

    Background Participation by communities in improving the quality of health services has become a feature of government policy in the United Kingdom. The aim of the study was to involve a deprived community in the UK in shaping quality improvements of local primary care services. The specific objectives were firstly to create participation by local people in evaluating the primary care services available in the area and secondly to bring about change as a result of this process. Methods The methods of participatory action research was used. The study was set in an area of high socio-economic deprivation served by a 'Local Health Care Co-operative' in a peripheral housing estate in Glasgow, Scotland. 72 local residents took part in 11 focus groups: eight of these were with community groups and three with other residents. 372 local residents completed questionnaires either by brief face-to-face interviews (114) or by self or carer completion (258). Results The study group produced recommendations on physical access to the health centre, time constraints in accessing services and problems encountered in individual relationships with health staff. They also highlighted the social gap between health service providers and the daily life of community residents. Action was taken to bring these recommendations to the attention of the Primary Care Organisation. Conclusion Participatory action research was used to involve a deprived community in the UK in a 'bottom-up' approach aimed at improving quality of local primary care services. Although successful in creating a partnership between academic researchers and lay researchers and participation by local people in evaluating the primary care services available in the area, the impact of the study in terms of immediate action taken over specific issues has been modest. The possible reasons for this are discussed. PMID:17572913

  12. Antithrombotic actions of statins involve PECAM-1 signaling.

    PubMed

    Moraes, Leonardo A; Vaiyapuri, Sakthivel; Sasikumar, Parvathy; Ali, Marfoua S; Kriek, Neline; Sage, Tanya; Gibbins, Jonathan M

    2013-10-31

    Statins are widely prescribed cholesterol-lowering drugs that are a first-line treatment of coronary artery disease and atherosclerosis, reducing the incidence of thrombotic events such as myocardial infarction and stroke. Statins have been shown to reduce platelet activation, although the mechanism(s) through which this occurs is unclear. Because several of the characteristic effects of statins on platelets are shared with those elicited by the inhibitory platelet adhesion receptor PECAM-1 (platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1), we investigated a potential connection between the influence of statins on platelet function and PECAM-1 signaling. Statins were found to inhibit a range of platelet functional responses and thrombus formation in vitro and in vivo. Notably, these effects of statins on platelet function in vitro and in vivo were diminished in PECAM-1(-/-) platelets. Activation of PECAM-1 signaling results in its tyrosine phosphorylation, the recruitment and activation of tyrosine phosphatase SHP-2, the subsequent binding of phosphoinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), and diminished PI3K signaling. Statins resulted in the stimulation of these events, leading to the inhibition of Akt activation. Together, these data provide evidence for a fundamental role of PECAM-1 in the inhibitory effects of statins on platelet activation, which may explain some of the pleiotropic actions of these drugs. PMID:24030383

  13. Factors that affect action possibility judgments: the assumed abilities of other people.

    PubMed

    Welsh, Timothy N; Wong, Lokman; Chandrasekharan, Sanjay

    2013-06-01

    Judging what actions are possible and impossible to complete is a skill that is critical for planning and executing movements in both individual and joint actions contexts. The present experiments explored the ability to adapt action possibility judgments to the assumed characteristics of another person. Participants watched alternating pictures of a person's hand moving at different speeds between targets of different indexes of difficulty (according to Fitts' Law) and judged whether or not it was possible for individuals with different characteristics to maintain movement accuracy at the presented speed. Across four studies, the person in the pictures and the background information about the person were manipulated to determine how and under what conditions participants adapted their judgments. Results revealed that participants adjusted their possibility judgments to the assumed motor capabilities of the individual they were judging. However, these adjustments only occurred when participants were instructed to take the other person into consideration suggesting that the adaption process is a voluntary process. Further, it was observed that the slopes of the regression equations relating movement time and index of difficulty did not differ across conditions. All differences between conditions were in the y-intercept of the regression lines. This pattern of findings suggests that participants formed the action possibility judgments by first simulating their own performance, and then adjusted the "possibility" threshold by adding or subtracting a correction factor to determine what is and is not possible for the other person to perform.

  14. Factors that affect action possibility judgments: the assumed abilities of other people.

    PubMed

    Welsh, Timothy N; Wong, Lokman; Chandrasekharan, Sanjay

    2013-06-01

    Judging what actions are possible and impossible to complete is a skill that is critical for planning and executing movements in both individual and joint actions contexts. The present experiments explored the ability to adapt action possibility judgments to the assumed characteristics of another person. Participants watched alternating pictures of a person's hand moving at different speeds between targets of different indexes of difficulty (according to Fitts' Law) and judged whether or not it was possible for individuals with different characteristics to maintain movement accuracy at the presented speed. Across four studies, the person in the pictures and the background information about the person were manipulated to determine how and under what conditions participants adapted their judgments. Results revealed that participants adjusted their possibility judgments to the assumed motor capabilities of the individual they were judging. However, these adjustments only occurred when participants were instructed to take the other person into consideration suggesting that the adaption process is a voluntary process. Further, it was observed that the slopes of the regression equations relating movement time and index of difficulty did not differ across conditions. All differences between conditions were in the y-intercept of the regression lines. This pattern of findings suggests that participants formed the action possibility judgments by first simulating their own performance, and then adjusted the "possibility" threshold by adding or subtracting a correction factor to determine what is and is not possible for the other person to perform. PMID:23644579

  15. 25 CFR 169.21 - Condemnation actions involving individually owned lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    .... 169.21 Section 169.21 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER RIGHTS-OF-WAY OVER INDIAN LANDS § 169.21 Condemnation actions involving individually owned lands. The facts relating to any condemnation action to obtain a right-of-way over individually owned lands...

  16. 25 CFR 169.21 - Condemnation actions involving individually owned lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    .... 169.21 Section 169.21 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER RIGHTS-OF-WAY OVER INDIAN LANDS § 169.21 Condemnation actions involving individually owned lands. The facts relating to any condemnation action to obtain a right-of-way over individually owned lands...

  17. Involvement of prolactin and somatostatin in depression and the mechanism of action of antidepressant drugs.

    PubMed

    Faron-Górecka, Agata; Kuśmider, Maciej; Solich, Joanna; Kolasa, Magdalena; Szafran, Kinga; Zurawek, Dariusz; Pabian, Paulina; Dziedzicka-Wasylewska, Marta

    2013-01-01

    Neuropeptides have been implicated in the physiology and pathophysiology of stress responses and therefore may play an important role in the pathogenesis of affective disorders such as Major Depression Disorder (MDD). The data presented in this mini-review demonstrate the role of prolactin (PRL) and somatostatin (STT) in the pathology and pharmacotherapy of MDD, focusing particularly on the response to antidepressant treatment, and compare the available data with the results obtained in our laboratory using the well-validated chronic mild stress (CMS) animal model of MDD. Despite the availability of many pharmacological therapies for depression, ca. 35% patients remain treatment resistant. This clinical situation is also true for rats subjected to CMS; some animals do not respond to antidepressant therapy and are considered treatment resistant. The most interesting results presented in this mini-review concern the changes in PRL and SST receptors in the brains of rats subjected to the full CMS procedure and IMI treatment and demonstrate the role of these receptors in the mechanisms of antidepressant action. The possible interaction between SST and PRL, the involvement of the D2 dopamine receptor, and their direct protein-protein interactions are also discussed, with the conclusion that these two neurohormones play an important role in the mechanism of resilience after stress as well as in the mechanism of action of antidepressant drugs.

  18. Possible Mechanism of Action of the Electromagnetic Fields of Ultralow Frequency on G-protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nava, J. J. Godina; Segura, M. A. Rodríguez; García, M. N. Jiménez; Cadena, M. S. Reyes

    2008-08-01

    Based in several clinical achievements and mathematical simulation of the immune sytem, previously studied, permit us to establish that a possible Mechanism of Action of ultralow frequency Electromagnetic Fields (ELF) is on G-protein as it has been proposed in specialized literature.

  19. 45 CFR 73.735-903 - Action if conflicts of interest or possible conflicts are noted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Action if conflicts of interest or possible conflicts are noted. 73.735-903 Section 73.735-903 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... and the date for taking it shall be determined by the nature of the financial interest or...

  20. Possible Mechanism of Action of the Electromagnetic Fields of Ultralow Frequency on G-protein

    SciTech Connect

    Nava, J. J. Godina; Segura, M. A. Rodriguez; Garcia, M. N. Jimenez; Cadena, M. S. Reyes

    2008-08-11

    Based in several clinical achievements and mathematical simulation of the immune sytem, previously studied, permit us to establish that a possible Mechanism of Action of ultralow frequency Electromagnetic Fields (ELF) is on G-protein as it has been proposed in specialized literature.

  1. Photosynthesis Is Not Involved in the Mechanism of Action of Acifluorfen in Cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.)

    PubMed Central

    Duke, Stephen O.; Kenyon, William H.

    1986-01-01

    The possible role of photosynthesis in the mechanism of action of the herbicide acifluorfen (2-chloro-4-(trifluoromethyl)phenoxy-2-nitrobenzoate; AF) was examined. The sensitivity to AF of cotyledons of cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) which had been grown under far red light (FR) and white light were compared. FR grown tissues which were photosynthetically imcompetent were hypersensitive to AF under white light and had approximately the same relative response to AF under blue and red light as green, white-light-grown tissues. Ultrastructural damage was apparent in FR-grown, AF-treated tissues within an hour after exposure to white light, with cytoplasmic and plastidic disorganization occurring simultaneously. In cucumber cotyledon tissue which had been greening for various time periods, there was no correlation between photosynthetic capacity and herbicidal efficacy of AF. PSII inhibitors (atrazine and DCMU) and the photophosphorylation inhibitor, tentoxin, had no effect on AF activity. Atrazine did not reduce AF activity at any concentration or light intensity tested, indicating that there is no second, photosynthetic-dependent mechanism of action operating at low AF concentrations or low fluence rates. Carbon dioxide-dependent O2 evolution of intact chloroplasts of spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) had an AF I50 of 125 micromolar compared to 1000 micromolar for cucumber, whereas AF was much more herbicidally active in tissues of cucumber than of spinach. Differences in activity could not be accounted for by differences in uptake of AF. Our results indicate that there is no photosynthetic involvement in the mechanism of action of AF in cucumber. Images Fig. 2 PMID:16664919

  2. Photosynthesis Is Not Involved in the Mechanism of Action of Acifluorfen in Cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.).

    PubMed

    Duke, S O; Kenyon, W H

    1986-07-01

    The possible role of photosynthesis in the mechanism of action of the herbicide acifluorfen (2-chloro-4-(trifluoromethyl)phenoxy-2-nitrobenzoate; AF) was examined. The sensitivity to AF of cotyledons of cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) which had been grown under far red light (FR) and white light were compared. FR grown tissues which were photosynthetically imcompetent were hypersensitive to AF under white light and had approximately the same relative response to AF under blue and red light as green, white-light-grown tissues. Ultrastructural damage was apparent in FR-grown, AF-treated tissues within an hour after exposure to white light, with cytoplasmic and plastidic disorganization occurring simultaneously. In cucumber cotyledon tissue which had been greening for various time periods, there was no correlation between photosynthetic capacity and herbicidal efficacy of AF. PSII inhibitors (atrazine and DCMU) and the photophosphorylation inhibitor, tentoxin, had no effect on AF activity. Atrazine did not reduce AF activity at any concentration or light intensity tested, indicating that there is no second, photosynthetic-dependent mechanism of action operating at low AF concentrations or low fluence rates. Carbon dioxide-dependent O(2) evolution of intact chloroplasts of spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) had an AF I(50) of 125 micromolar compared to 1000 micromolar for cucumber, whereas AF was much more herbicidally active in tissues of cucumber than of spinach. Differences in activity could not be accounted for by differences in uptake of AF. Our results indicate that there is no photosynthetic involvement in the mechanism of action of AF in cucumber.

  3. 16 CFR 1112.41 - What are the possible adverse actions the CPSC may take against a third party conformity...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... TO THIRD PARTY CONFORMITY ASSESSMENT BODIES Adverse Actions: Types, Grounds, Allegations, Procedural Requirements, and Publication § 1112.41 What are the possible adverse actions the CPSC may take against a third... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false What are the possible adverse actions...

  4. Exploring the possible mechanisms of action behind the antinociceptive activity of Bacopa monniera

    PubMed Central

    Bhaskar, Manju; Jagtap, A. G.

    2011-01-01

    Aim: Earlier studies have demonstrated that Bacopa monniera (BM), a plant described in Ayurveda for many CNS actions was found to exhibit antidepressant (methanolic extract at 20mg/kg and 40mg/kg p.o.) as well as antinociceptive activity (aqueous extract (AE) at 80 mg/kg, 120 mg/kg and 160 mg/kg p.o.). The present study sought to explore the possible mechanisms of antinociceptive effects of aqueous extract of Bacopa monniera (AEBM) at 80 mg/kg, 120 mg/kg and 160 mg/kg given orally. Materials and Methods: AEBM was given singly as well as with selective α2 receptor blocker Yohimbine, selective β1 receptor blocker Atenolol, serotonin receptor antagonist Cyproheptadine and a non-selective opioid receptor antagonist naloxone in experimental groups of mice and rats under strict protocols and conditions. Results: We observed that the antinociceptive effects of AEBM in the acetic acid writhing test was prevented by prior treatment with the selective Yohimbine (1 mg/kg, i.p; 14.50 ± 2.26 and 37.17 ± 2.14 writhes in the AEBM-treated and yohimbine pre-treated AEBM groups, respectively) and selective β1 Atenolol receptor blocker (1 mg/kg, i.p; 14.50 ± 2.26 and 31.00 ± 5.44 writhes in the AEBM-treated and yohimbine pre-treated AEBM groups, respectively). In the formalin test, the reduction in licking time with AEBM was found to be reversed by prior treatment with serotonin receptor antagonist Cyproheptadine (1 mg/kg, i.p; 47.33 ± 2.25s and 113.50 ± 3.83s (during phase I i.e. 0-5 min) and 26.67 ± 3.83s and 88.17 ± 7.27s (during phase II i.e. 20-30 min) in the AEBM-treated and Cyproheptadine pre-treated AEBM groups, respectively). The % increase in tail flick latency with AEBM was prevented by prior treatment with the non-selective opioid receptor antagonist naloxone (2mg/kg, i.p; 282.35 and 107.35 in the AEBM-treated and naloxone-treated groups, respectively). Conclusions: Our results indicate, that the endogenous adrenergic, serotonergic and opioidergic systems are

  5. Comparative investigations of manual action representations: evidence that chimpanzees represent the costs of potential future actions involving tools

    PubMed Central

    Frey, Scott H.; Povinelli, Daniel J.

    2012-01-01

    The ability to adjust one's ongoing actions in the anticipation of forthcoming task demands is considered as strong evidence for the existence of internal action representations. Studies of action selection in tool use reveal that the behaviours that we choose in the present moment differ depending on what we intend to do next. Further, they point to a specialized role for mechanisms within the human cerebellum and dominant left cerebral hemisphere in representing the likely sensory costs of intended future actions. Recently, the question of whether similar mechanisms exist in other primates has received growing, but still limited, attention. Here, we present data that bear on this issue from a species that is a natural user of tools, our nearest living relative, the chimpanzee. In experiment 1, a subset of chimpanzees showed a non-significant tendency for their grip preferences to be affected by anticipation of the demands associated with bringing a tool's baited end to their mouths. In experiment 2, chimpanzees' initial grip preferences were consistently affected by anticipation of the forthcoming movements in a task that involves using a tool to extract a food reward. The partial discrepancy between the results of these two studies is attributed to the ability to accurately represent differences between the motor costs associated with executing the two response alternatives available within each task. These findings suggest that chimpanzees are capable of accurately representing the costs of intended future actions, and using those predictions to select movements in the present even in the context of externally directed tool use. PMID:22106426

  6. Evaluation of genes involved in prostaglandin action in equine endometrium during estrous cycle and early pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Atli, Mehmet O; Kurar, Ercan; Kayis, Seyit A; Aslan, Selim; Semacan, Ahmet; Celik, Sefa; Guzeloglu, Aydin

    2010-10-01

    pregnancy along with PTGER2 while PTGFR expression was suppressed. These findings suggest that possible luteotrophic action of PGE₂ is required in early equine pregnancy. PTGS1 is only upregulated later in the early pregnancy suggesting that it is not involved in luteolysis, but could be the main PTGS enzyme at this time during early pregnancy. An increase in HPGD and SLCO2A1 levels on P22 indicates a tight regulation of PTG action by pregnancy. PMID:20832957

  7. Environmental Education in Action - III: Case Studies of Public Involvement in Environmental Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoenfeld, Clay, Comp.; Desinger, John F., Comp.

    Presented here are 27 case studies of public involvement in environmental policy. These are examples of environmental education or communications programs developed by local, state, regional or national environmental action groups. The reports tell how the groups have successfully, or unsuccessfully, mobilized public opinion in favor of beneficent…

  8. The Student Consultant Project (SCP): A Case Study of Student Involvement in Social Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pittsburgh Univ., PA. University Urban Interface Program.

    The Student Consultant Project (SCP) at the University of Pittsburgh is designed to bring technical assistance from the university to ghetto community businessmen. SCP represents a working model of student involvement with social action, an ongoing effort within the community emphasizing cooperation between the university and 1 of its…

  9. Additional Evidence of the Trypanocidal Action of (−)-Elatol on Amastigote Forms through the Involvement of Reactive Oxygen Species

    PubMed Central

    Desoti, Vânia Cristina; Lazarin-Bidóia, Danielle; Sudatti, Daniela Bueno; Pereira, Renato Crespo; Ueda-Nakamura, Tania; Nakamura, Celso Vataru; de Oliveira Silva, Sueli

    2014-01-01

    Chagas’ disease, a vector-transmitted infectious disease, is caused by the protozoa parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. Drugs that are currently available for the treatment of this disease are unsatisfactory, making the search for new chemotherapeutic agents a priority. We recently described the trypanocidal action of (−)-elatol, extracted from the macroalga Laurencia dendroidea. However, nothing has been described about the mechanism of action of this compound on amastigotes that are involved in the chronic phase of Chagas’ disease. The goal of the present study was to evaluate the effect of (−)-elatol on the formation of superoxide anions (O2•−), DNA fragmentation, and autophagy in amastigotes of T. cruzi to elucidate the possible mechanism of the trypanocidal action of (−)-elatol. Treatment of the amastigotes with (−)-elatol increased the formation of O2•− at all concentrations of (−)-elatol assayed compared with untreated parasites. Increased fluorescence was observed in parasites treated with (−)-elatol, indicating DNA fragmentation and the formation of autophagic compartments. The results suggest that the trypanocidal action of (−)-elatol might involve the induction of the autophagic and apoptotic death pathways triggered by an imbalance of the parasite’s redox metabolism. PMID:25257785

  10. Lack of involvement of glutamate-induced excitotoxicity in MPP+ toxicity in striatal dopaminergic terminals: possible involvement of ascorbate

    PubMed Central

    Matarredona, Esperanza R; Santiago, Marti; Machado, Alberto; Cano, Josefina

    1997-01-01

    The present study concerns the possible relationship between glutamate excitotoxicity and 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine/1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPTP/MPP+) neurotoxicity on striatal dopaminergic terminals. MPP+ neurotoxicity has been studied by means of two MPP+ perfusions separated by 24 h. After the second MPP+ 1 mM perfusion, dopamine extracellular output, measured by microdialysis, was considered to be an index of the dopaminergic neurone damage produced by the first MPP+ 1 mM perfusion. High concentration (10 mM) of glutamate uptake inhibitor L-trans-pyrrolidine-2,4-dicarboxylic acid (PDC) stimulated basal release of dopamine and protected against the neurotoxic effect of MPP+. PDC 10 mM perfusion produced an increase in the extracellular output of glutamate and aspartate, and a decrease in that of ascorbate. The protective effect against MPP+ toxicity observed with PDC 10 mM was completely abolished when this glutamate uptake inhibitor was co-perfused with ascorbate 0.5 mM. These results suggest that glutamate-induced neurotoxicity is not involved in MPP+ toxicity. The protective effect found with the glutamate uptake inhibitor could be due to a decrease in extracellular ascorbate levels. PMID:9222565

  11. Possible mechanism of action of 2-hydroxylated estradiol on the positive feedback control for LH release in the rat.

    PubMed

    Ladosky, W; Azambuja, H M; Schneider, H T

    1983-07-01

    Evidence was given to support a positive role of 2-hydroxyestradiol on the LH surge. The catecholestrogen may act by its catechol A ring on the nucleus arcuatus COMT, consequently leaving the noradrenaline free. The result may be a longer action on the peptidergic terminal in the median eminence and an increase in the LH secretion by the pituitary. This assumption is supported by the observations that the catecholestrogen effect can be mimicked by homocystein, an aminoacid able also to inhibit COMT activity, having neither a steroid nor a catechol structure. The fact that alpha-MIT is able to prevent homocystein-induced increase in LH suggests that it is acting by protecting the local increase of the catecholamine. After ten years of intensive effort to understand the possible physiological role of the catecholestrogens, attention was mostly paid to its structural similarity to estrogen and a great deal of effort was made to understand its function by acting upon the estrogen receptor in the cytosol. The evidence for catecholestrogen action upon COMT, an outside membrane enzyme involved in the process of catecholamine degradation, supports the idea of a catechol action for 2-OHE2. The present evidence strongly supports the physiological importance of the catechol group in the 2-OHE2 in its action mechanism. However, a true physiological role for the catecholestrogens remains to be solved. The evidence we bring confirms once more that catecholestrogens may have a function and explains a new mechanism of action. However, the basic question concerning the true amount of catecholestrogen existing in the hypothalamic nuclei, either brought by the blood stream or locally produced, still needs to be solved: we cannot say whether the mechanism we described is a functioning one, whether it is just brought about by the experimental increase of the catecholestrogen or the artificial blockage of COMT.

  12. Imitation and observational learning of hand actions: prefrontal involvement and connectivity.

    PubMed

    Higuchi, S; Holle, H; Roberts, N; Eickhoff, S B; Vogt, S

    2012-01-16

    The first aim of this event-related fMRI study was to identify the neural circuits involved in imitation learning. We used a rapid imitation task where participants directly imitated pictures of guitar chords. The results provide clear evidence for the involvement of dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, as well as the fronto-parietal mirror circuit (FPMC) during action imitation when the requirements for working memory are low. Connectivity analyses further indicated a robust connectivity between left prefrontal cortex and the components of the FPMC bilaterally. We conclude that a mechanism of automatic perception-action matching alone is insufficient to account for imitation learning. Rather, the motor representation of an observed, complex action, as provided by the FPMC, only serves as the 'raw material' for higher-order supervisory and monitoring operations associated with the prefrontal cortex. The second aim of this study was to assess whether these neural circuits are also recruited during observational practice (OP, without motor execution), or only during physical practice (PP). Whereas prefrontal cortex was not consistently activated in action observation across all participants, prefrontal activation intensities did predict the behavioural practice effects, thus indicating a crucial role of prefrontal cortex also in OP. In addition, whilst OP and PP produced similar activation intensities in the FPMC when assessed during action observation, during imitative execution, the practice-related activation decreases were significantly more pronounced for PP than for OP. This dissociation indicates a lack of execution-related resources in observationally practised actions. More specifically, we found neural efficiency effects in the right motor cingulate-basal ganglia circuit and the FPMC that were only observed after PP but not after OP. Finally, we confirmed that practice generally induced activation decreases in the FPMC during both action observation and

  13. The action of orexin B on passive avoidance learning. Involvement of neurotransmitters.

    PubMed

    Palotai, Miklós; Telegdy, Gyula; Ekwerike, Alphonsus; Jászberényi, Miklós

    2014-10-01

    The extensive projection of orexigenic neurons and the diffuse expression of orexin receptors suggest that endogenous orexins are involved in several physiological functions of the central nervous system, including learning and memory. Our previous study demonstrated that orexin A improves learning, consolidation and retrieval processes, which involves α- and β-adrenergic, cholinergic, dopaminergic, GABA-A-ergic, opiate and nitrergic neurotransmissions. However, we have little evidence about the action of orexin B on memory processes and the underlying neuromodulation. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the action of orexin B on passive avoidance learning and the involvement of neurotransmitters in this action in rats. Accordingly, rats were pretreated with the selective orexin 2 receptor (OX2R) antagonist, EMPA; the γ-aminobutyric acid subunit A (GABA-A) receptor antagonist, the bicuculline; a D2, D3, D4 dopamine receptor antagonist, haloperidol; the nonselective opioid receptor antagonist, naloxone; the non-specific nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor, nitro-l-arginine; the nonselective α-adrenergic receptor antagonist, phenoxybenzamine and the β-adrenergic receptor antagonist, propranolol. Our results demonstrate that orexin B can improve learning, consolidation of memory and retrieval. EMPA reversed completely the action of orexin B on memory consolidation. Bicuculline blocked fully; naloxone, nitro-l-arginine, phenoxybenzamine and propranolol attenuated the orexin B-induced memory consolidation, whereas haloperidol was ineffective. These data suggest that orexin B improves memory functions through OX2R and GABA-ergic, opiate, nitrergic, α- and β-adrenergic neurotransmissions are also involved in this action.

  14. Tourette syndrome associated with body temperature dysregulation: possible involvement of an idiopathic hypothalamic disorder.

    PubMed

    Kessler, Abraham R

    2002-10-01

    Tourette syndrome is a neuropsychiatric disorder that holds the potential to afflict the emotional, familial, social, or scholastic performances of patients with Tourette syndrome in day-to-day life functioning. The disorder is today characterized mainly and diagnosed by clinical observations, yet false-negative results obtained in the diagnosis of Tourette syndrome are numerous and well documented. There is still no laboratory or imaging technique available for the diagnosis of Tourette syndrome. This article reports on changes of the ambient thermal perception (38%) and a circadian dysregulation of the body-temperature profile present in Tourette syndrome probands, irrespective of their chronologic age, sex, or comorbid symptoms. An involvement of idiopathic hypothalamic dysfunctions associated with Tourette syndrome is proposed. Such a phenomenon, if substantiated, could lead to a better understanding of Tourette syndrome and the development of unbiased physical diagnostic criteria of Tourette syndrome and potentiate possible production of novel therapeutic possibilities.

  15. Motor control hierarchy in joint action that involves bimanual force production

    PubMed Central

    Masumoto, Junya

    2015-01-01

    The concept of hierarchical motor control has been viewed as a means of progressively decreasing the number of variables manipulated by each higher control level. We tested the hypothesis that turning an individual bimanual force-production task into a joint (two-participant) force-production task would lead to positive correlation between forces produced by the two hands of the individual participant (symmetric strategy) to enable negative correlation between forces produced by two participants (complementary strategy). The present study consisted of individual and joint tasks that involved both unimanual and bimanual conditions. In the joint task, 10 pairs of participants produced periodic isometric forces, such that the sum of forces that they produced matched a target force cycling between 5% and 10% of maximum voluntary contraction at 1 Hz. In the individual task, individuals attempted to match the same target force. In the joint bimanual condition, the two hands of each participant adopted a symmetric strategy of force, whereas the two participants adopted a complementary strategy of force, highlighting that the bimanual action behaved as a low level of a hierarchy, whereas the joint action behaved as an upper level. The complementary force production was greater interpersonally than intrapersonally. However, whereas the coherence was highest at 1 Hz in all conditions, the frequency synchrony was stronger intrapersonally than interpersonally. Moreover, whereas the bimanual action exhibited a smaller error and variability of force than the unimanual action, the joint action exhibited a less-variable interval and force than the individual action. PMID:25904710

  16. Possible involvement of the Sigma-1 receptor chaperone in chemotherapeutic-induced neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Tomohisa, Mori; Junpei, Ohya; Aki, Masumoto; Masato, Harumiya; Mika, Fukase; Kazumi, Yoshizawa; Teruo, Hayashi; Tsutomu, Suzuki

    2015-11-01

    Previous studies have shown that ligands of the sigma-1 receptor chaperone (Sig-1R) regulate pain-related behaviors. Clinical use of chemotherapeutics is often compromised due to their adverse side effects, particularly those related to neuropathy. Previous studies have shown that repeated administration of oxaliplatin and paclitaxel produces neuropathy in rodents. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to clarify the involvement of the Sig-1R in chemotherapeutic-induced neuropathy by examining the effects of oxaliplatin and paclitaxel on the Sig-1R levels in the spinal cord, and by examining the effects of Sig-1R agonist and antagonist on oxaliplatin- and paclitaxel-induced neuropathy in rats. Chemotherapeutic-induced neuropathic pain was accompanied by a significant reduction of the Sig-1R level in the spinal cord. Furthermore, the administration of paclitaxel to CHO cells that stably overexpressed Sig-1Rs induced the clustering of Sig-1Rs. We also found that the Sig-1R agonist SA4503 potently inhibited the neuropathy induced by oxaliplatin- and paclitaxel, whereas this action was abolished by the Sig-1R antagonist NE-100. These results suggest that the reduction of Sig-1R activity is involved in chemotherapeutic-induced neuropathy, and the Sig-1R agonist SA4503 could serve as a potential candidate for the treatment of chemotherapeutic-induced neuropathy. PMID:26234785

  17. Possible Involvement of Photoperiodic Regulation in Reproductive Endocrine System of Female Olive Flounder Paralichthys olivaceus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Chul; Lee, Chi Hoon; Hur, Sung Pyu; Kim, Byeong Hoon; Park, Jun Young; Lee, Young Don

    2015-03-01

    This study investigated possible involvement of photoperiodic regulation in reproductive endocrine system of female olive flounder. To investigate the influence on brain-pituitary axis in endocrine system by regulating photoperiod, compared expression level of Kisspeptin and sbGnRH mRNA in brain and FSH-β, LH-β and GH mRNA in pituitary before and after spawning. Photoperiod was treated natural photoperiod and long photoperiod (15L:9D) conditions from Aug. 2013 to Jun. 2014. Continuous long photoperiod treatment from Aug. (post-spawning phase) was inhibited gonadal development of female olive flounder. In natural photoperiod group, the Kiss2 expression level a significant declined in Mar. (spawning period). And also, FSH-β, LH-β and GH mRNA expression levels were increasing at this period. However, in long photoperiod group, hypothalamic Kiss2, FSH-β, LH-β and GH mRNA expression levels did not show any significant fluctuation. These results suggest that expression of hypothalamic Kiss2, GtH and GH in the pituitary would change in response to photoperiod and their possible involvement of photoperiodic regulation in reproductive endocrine system of the BPG axis.

  18. Possible Involvement of Photoperiodic Regulation in Reproductive Endocrine System of Female Olive Flounder Paralichthys olivaceus

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun Chul; Lee, Chi Hoon; Hur, Sung Pyu; Kim, Byeong Hoon; Park, Jun Young; Lee, Young Don

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated possible involvement of photoperiodic regulation in reproductive endocrine system of female olive flounder. To investigate the influence on brain-pituitary axis in endocrine system by regulating photoperiod, compared expression level of Kisspeptin and sbGnRH mRNA in brain and FSH-β, LH-β and GH mRNA in pituitary before and after spawning. Photoperiod was treated natural photoperiod and long photoperiod (15L:9D) conditions from Aug. 2013 to Jun. 2014. Continuous long photoperiod treatment from Aug. (post-spawning phase) was inhibited gonadal development of female olive flounder. In natural photoperiod group, the Kiss2 expression level a significant declined in Mar. (spawning period). And also, FSH-β, LH-β and GH mRNA expression levels were increasing at this period. However, in long photoperiod group, hypothalamic Kiss2, FSH-β, LH-β and GH mRNA expression levels did not show any significant fluctuation. These results suggest that expression of hypothalamic Kiss2, GtH and GH in the pituitary would change in response to photoperiod and their possible involvement of photoperiodic regulation in reproductive endocrine system of the BPG axis. PMID:25949205

  19. Anxiolytic-like effects of phytol: possible involvement of GABAergic transmission.

    PubMed

    Costa, Jéssica Pereira; de Oliveira, Guilherme Antônio L; de Almeida, Antônia Amanda C; Islam, Md Torequl; de Sousa, Damião Pergentino; de Freitas, Rivelilson Mendes

    2014-02-14

    Phytol, a branched chain unsaturated alcohol, is particularly interesting because it is an isolated compound from essential oils of different medicinal plants. The aim of this study was to evaluate the anxiolytic-like effects of phytol in animal models to clarify their possible action mechanism. After acute intraperitoneal treatment with phytol at doses of 25, 50 and 75 mg/kg behavioral models of open-field, elevated-plus-maze, rota-rod, light-dark, marble-burying and pentobarbital sleeping time tests were utilized. In open field test, phytol (25, 50 and 75 mg/kg) [p<0.01] increased the number of crossings and rearings. However, the number of groomings [p<0.01] was reduced. Likewise, the number of entries and the time spent in light space were increased [p<0.01] while the number of marble-burying was decreased [p<0.001], in elevated-plus-maze, light-dark and marble-burying tests, respectively. In motor activity test, phytol (75 mg/kg) impaired the rota-rod performance of mice [p<0.01]. In pentobarbital sleeping time test, phytol 75 mg/kg decreased for latency of sleeping and phytol (25, 50 and 75 mg/kg) increased the sleep time when compared to negative control [p<0.05]. All these effects were reversed by pre-treatment with flumazenil (2.5mg/kg, i.p.), similarly to those observed with diazepam (2mg/kg, i.p.; positive control) suggesting that the phytol presents mechanism of action by interaction with the GABAergic system. These findings suggest that acute administration of phytol exerts an anxiolytic-like effect on mice. Furthermore, suppose that phytol interacts with GABAA receptor, probably at the receptor subtypes that mediate benzodiazepines effects, to produce sedative and anxiolytic activities.

  20. Initial study on the possible mechanisms involved in the effects of high doses of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) on prolactin secretion.

    PubMed

    Salgado, R; Pereiro, N; López-Doval, S; Lafuente, A

    2015-09-01

    Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) is a fluorinated organic compound. This chemical is neurotoxic and can alter the pituitary secretion. This is an initial study aimed at knowing the toxic effects of high doses of PFOS on prolactin secretion and the possible mechanisms involved in these alterations. For that, adult male rats were orally treated with 3.0 and 6.0 mg of PFOS/kg body weight (b.w.)/day for 28 days. At the end of the treatment, the serum levels of prolactin and estradiol as well as the concentration of dopamine, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), homovanillic acid (HVA) and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) were quantified in the anterior and in the mediobasal hypothalamus. PFOS, at the administered doses, reduced prolactin and estradiol secretion, increased the concentration of dopamine and GABA in the anterior hypothalamus, and decreased the ratios DOPAC/dopamine and HVA/dopamine in this same hypothalamic area. The outcomes reported in this study suggest that (1) high doses of PFOS inhibit prolactin secretion in adult male rats; (2) only the periventricular-hypophysial dopaminergic (PHDA) neurons seem to be involved in this inhibitory effect but not the tuberoinfundibular dopaminergic (TIDA) and the tuberohypophysial dopaminergic (THDA) systems; (3) GABAergic cells from the paraventricular and supraoptic nuclei could be partially responsible for the PFOS action on prolactin secretion; and finally (4) estradiol might take part in the inhibition exerted by elevated concentration of PFOS on prolactin release. PMID:26032630

  1. Initial study on the possible mechanisms involved in the effects of high doses of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) on prolactin secretion.

    PubMed

    Salgado, R; Pereiro, N; López-Doval, S; Lafuente, A

    2015-09-01

    Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) is a fluorinated organic compound. This chemical is neurotoxic and can alter the pituitary secretion. This is an initial study aimed at knowing the toxic effects of high doses of PFOS on prolactin secretion and the possible mechanisms involved in these alterations. For that, adult male rats were orally treated with 3.0 and 6.0 mg of PFOS/kg body weight (b.w.)/day for 28 days. At the end of the treatment, the serum levels of prolactin and estradiol as well as the concentration of dopamine, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), homovanillic acid (HVA) and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) were quantified in the anterior and in the mediobasal hypothalamus. PFOS, at the administered doses, reduced prolactin and estradiol secretion, increased the concentration of dopamine and GABA in the anterior hypothalamus, and decreased the ratios DOPAC/dopamine and HVA/dopamine in this same hypothalamic area. The outcomes reported in this study suggest that (1) high doses of PFOS inhibit prolactin secretion in adult male rats; (2) only the periventricular-hypophysial dopaminergic (PHDA) neurons seem to be involved in this inhibitory effect but not the tuberoinfundibular dopaminergic (TIDA) and the tuberohypophysial dopaminergic (THDA) systems; (3) GABAergic cells from the paraventricular and supraoptic nuclei could be partially responsible for the PFOS action on prolactin secretion; and finally (4) estradiol might take part in the inhibition exerted by elevated concentration of PFOS on prolactin release.

  2. Possible involvement of eEF1A in Tomato spotted wilt virus RNA synthesis.

    PubMed

    Komoda, Keisuke; Ishibashi, Kazuhiro; Kawamura-Nagaya, Kazue; Ishikawa, Masayuki

    2014-11-01

    Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) is a negative-strand RNA virus in the family Bunyaviridae and propagates in both insects and plants. Although TSWV can infect a wide range of plant species, host factors involved in viral RNA synthesis of TSWV in plants have not been characterized. In this report, we demonstrate that the cell-free extract derived from one of the host plants can activate mRNA transcriptional activity of TSWV. Based on activity-guided fractionation of the cell-free extract, we identified eukaryotic elongation factor (eEF) 1A as a possible host factor facilitating TSWV transcription and replication. The RNA synthesis-supporting activity decreased in the presence of an eEF1A inhibitor, suggesting that eEF1A plays an important role in RNA synthesis of TSWV. PMID:25151062

  3. Serotonin Transporter Genotype and Action Monitoring Dysfunction: A Possible Substrate Underlying Increased Vulnerability to Depression

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Avram J; Bogdan, Ryan; Pizzagalli, Diego A

    2010-01-01

    A variable number of tandem repeats (short (S) vs long (L)) in the promoter region of the serotonin transporter gene (5-HTTLPR) and a functional variant of a single-nucleotide polymorphism (rs25531) in 5-HTTLPR have been recently associated with increased risk for major depressive disorder (MDD). In particular, relative to L/L or LA homozygotes (hereafter referred to as L′ participants), S carriers or Lg-allele carriers (S′ participants) have been found to have a higher probability of developing depression after stressful life events, although inconsistencies abound. Previous research indicates that patients with MDD are characterized by executive dysfunction and abnormal activation within the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), particularly in situations requiring adaptive behavioral adjustments following errors and response conflict (action monitoring). The goal of this study was to test whether psychiatrically healthy S′ participants would show abnormalities similar to those of MDD subjects. To this end, 19 S′ and 14 L′ participants performed a modified Flanker task known to induce errors, response conflict, and activations in various ACC subdivisions during functional magnetic resonance imaging. As hypothesized, relative to L′ participants, S′ participants showed (1) impaired post-error and post-conflict behavioral adjustments; (2) larger error-related rostral ACC activation; and (3) lower conflict-related dorsal ACC activation. As similar behavioral and neural dysfunctions have been recently described in MDD patient samples, the current results raise the possibility that impaired action monitoring and associated ACC dysregulation may represent risk factors increased vulnerability to depression. PMID:20090673

  4. Ledge and wedge: younger and older adults' perception of action possibilities

    PubMed Central

    Comalli, David; Franchak, John; Char, Angela

    2013-01-01

    The current study investigated whether younger (college-age) and older adults (60+ years) differ in their ability to perceive safe and unsafe motor actions. Participants decided whether to walk through openings varying in width in two penalty conditions: In the doorway condition, if participants attempted to squeeze through impossibly narrow openings, the penalty for error was entrapment. In the ledge condition, if participants attempted to inch along impossibly narrow ledges, the penalty for error was falling. Results showed that across the lifespan, people consider falling to be a more severe penalty than getting stuck: Both younger and older adults made more conservative decisions when the penalty for error was falling, and older women were especially leery of falling. In both age groups, abilities and decisions were based on dynamic properties of the body, such as compressed body size in the doorway condition and balance in the ledge condition. Findings indicate that failure to perceive possibilities for action is unlikely to be the cause of the increased prevalence of falling in older adults. PMID:23660744

  5. The Possible Mechanisms Involved in Degradation of Patulin by Pichia caribbica

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiangfeng; Yang, Qiya; Zhang, Hongyin; Cao, Jing; Zhang, Xiaoyun; Apaliya, Maurice Tibiru

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we examined the mechanisms involved in the degradation of patulin by Pichia caribbica. Our results indicate that cell-free filtrate of P. caribbica reduced patutlin content. The heat-killed cells could not degrade patulin. However, the live cells significantly reduced the concentration of the patulin. In furtherance to this, it was observed that patulin was not detected in the broken yeast cells and cell wall. The addition of cycloheximide to the P. caribbica cells decreased the capacity of degradation of patulin. Proteomics analyses revealed that patulin treatment resulted in an upregulated protein which was involved in metabolism and stress response processes. Our results suggested that the mechanism of degradation of patulin by P. caribbica was not absorption; the presence of patulin can induce P. caribbica to produce associated intracellular and extracellular enzymes, both of which have the ability to degrade patulin. The result provides a new possible method that used the enzymes produced by yeast to detoxify patulin in food and feed. PMID:27735830

  6. Possible involvement of Mycoplasma hominis in inhibiting the formation of biofilms by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC).

    PubMed

    Oh, Sangnam; Go, Gwang-Woong; Choi, Nag-Jin; Oh, Sejong; Kim, Younghoon

    2013-01-01

    Here we examined the involvement of Mycoplasma hominis in the formation of biofilms by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) strain CFT073. Initially, we thought that M. hominis does not affect the fitness of UPEC, including the growth and production of signaling molecules, such as autoinducer-2 and indole. We found, however, that the presence of M. hominis significantly decreased the degree of biofilm formation by UPEC CFT073 (approximately a 60% reduction for 10(5) ccu/mL of M. hominis as compared with UPEC alone). We also found that it had a slight effect in inhibiting the attachment and cytotoxicity of UPEC CFT073. These findings are specific to these UPEC strains rather than to enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) strains, found in normal intestinal flora. In addition, we performed whole-transcriptome profiling and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analysis. This indicated that the PhoPQ system and the anti-termination protein (encoded by ybcQ) were involved in the reduction of biofilm formation by M. hominis (corroborated by qRT-PCR). Furthermore, our results indicate that M. hominis raises the degree of transcription of toxin genes, including hha and pasT. Hence, we suggest a possible role of M. hominis in affecting the formation of biofilms by UPEC in the urinary tract.

  7. Formation routes of interstellar glycine involving carboxylic acids: possible favoritism between gas and solid phase.

    PubMed

    Pilling, Sergio; Baptista, Leonardo; Boechat-Roberty, Heloisa M; Andrade, Diana P P

    2011-11-01

    Despite the extensive search for glycine (NH₂CH₂COOH) and other amino acids in molecular clouds associated with star-forming regions, only upper limits have been derived from radio observations. Nevertheless, two of glycine's precursors, formic acid and acetic acid, have been abundantly detected. Although both precursors may lead to glycine formation, the efficiency of reaction depends on their abundance and survival in the presence of a radiation field. These facts could promote some favoritism in the reaction pathways in the gas phase and solid phase (ice). Glycine and these two simplest carboxylic acids are found in many meteorites. Recently, glycine was also observed in cometary samples returned by the Stardust space probe. The goal of this work was to perform theoretical calculations for several interstellar reactions involving the simplest carboxylic acids as well as the carboxyl radical (COOH) in both gas and solid (ice) phase to understand which reactions could be the most favorable to produce glycine in interstellar regions fully illuminated by soft X-rays and UV, such as star-forming regions. The calculations were performed at four different levels for the gas phase (B3LYP/6-31G*, B3LYP/6-31++G**, MP2/6-31G*, and MP2/6-31++G**) and at MP2/6-31++G** level for the solid phase (ice). The current two-body reactions (thermochemical calculation) were combined with previous experimental data on the photodissociation of carboxylic acids to promote possible favoritism for glycine formation in the scenario involving formic and acetic acid in both gas and solid phase. Given that formic acid is destroyed more in the gas phase by soft X-rays than acetic acid is, we suggest that in the gas phase the most favorable reactions are acetic acid with NH or NH₂OH. Another possible reaction involves NH₂CH₂ and COOH, one of the most-produced radicals from the photodissociation of acetic acid. In the solid phase, we suggest that the reactions of formic acid with NH

  8. A phenomenographic analysis of first-year engineering students' experiences with problems involving multiple possible solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dringenberg, Emily A.

    Engineers are expected to solve problems that are ill-structured. These problems are presented with a lack of necessary information and allow for different ways of engaging with the problem; they are open-ended and involve multiple possible solutions with multiple means of evaluation. In order to allow maximum time for students to develop skills for solving such problems, undergraduate engineering programs can introduce such problems during the first year of students' education, in the form of cornerstone design tasks. This provides students with more opportunities to develop their ability to engage with ill-structured problems, which are characteristic of engineering work. Researchers have documented variation within both the behavior and perceptions of students' early experiences with design problems. General themes include novice-like design behavior, discomfort with lack of information, difficulty with problem scoping, and resistance to ambiguity. To build on these generalizations of students' experiences, a more thorough understanding of the variation in how students experience this phenomenon of engaging with ill-structured problems is needed to design effective learning environments. This work presents the qualitatively different ways that engineering students experience problems with multiple possible solutions during their first year of engineering studies. Using phenomenography as the methodological framework, data were collected through in-depth, semi-structured interviews with 27 first-year engineering students. The iterative, phenomenographic analysis resulted in seven descriptive categories for the ways participants experienced problems involving multiple possible solutions. The names of these categories represent the different foci of the students' experiences: completion, transition, iteration, organization, collaboration, reasoning, and growth. These categories are organized along two crucial dimensions of variation: reaction to ambiguity and role

  9. Is patient involvement possible when decisions involve scarce resources? A qualitative study of decision-making in primary care.

    PubMed

    Jones, Ian Rees; Berney, Lee; Kelly, Moira; Doyal, Len; Griffiths, Chris; Feder, Gene; Hillier, Sheila; Rowlands, Gillian; Curtis, Sarah

    2004-07-01

    Greater patient involvement has become a key goal of health care provision. This study explored the way in which general practitioners (GPs) in the UK manage the dual responsibilities of treating individual patients and making the most equitable use of National Health Service (NHS) resources in the context of the policy of greater patient involvement in decision-making. We undertook a qualitative study incorporating a series of interviews and focus groups with a sample of 24 GPs. We analysed GP accounts of decision-making by relating these to substantive ethical principles and the key procedural principle of explicitness in decision-making. GPs saw patient involvement in positive terms but for some GPs involvement served an instrumental purpose, for instance improving patient 'compliance'. GPs identified strongly with the role of patient advocate but experienced role tensions particularly with respect to wider responsibilities for budgets, populations, and society in general. GPs had an implicit understanding of the key ethical principle of explicitness and of other substantive ethical principles but there was incongruence between these and their interpretation in practice. Limited availability of GP time played an important role in this theory/practice gap. GPs engaged in implicit categorisation of patients, legitimating this process by reference to the diversity and complexity of general practice. If patient involvement in health care decision-making is to be increased, then questions of scarcity of resources, including time, will need to be taken into account. If strategies for greater patient involvement are to be pursued then this will have significant implications for funding primary care, particularly in terms of addressing the demands made on consultation time. Good ethics and good professional practice cost money and must be budgeted for. More explicit decision-making in primary care will need to be accompanied by greater explicitness at the national level

  10. Gastroprotective activity of isopulegol on experimentally induced gastric lesions in mice: investigation of possible mechanisms of action.

    PubMed

    Silva, Maria Izabel Gomes; Moura, Brinell Arcanjo; Neto, Manuel Rufino de Aquino; Tomé, Adriana da Rocha; Rocha, Nayrton Flávio Moura; de Carvalho, Alyne Mara Rodrigues; Macêdo, Danielle Silveira; Vasconcelos, Silvânia Maria Mendes; de Sousa, Damião Pergentino; Viana, Glauce Socorro de Barros; de Sousa, Francisca Cléa Florenço

    2009-09-01

    The present study investigated whether isopulegol, a monoterpene present in essential oils of several aromatic plants, would be able to promote some gastroprotective effect and also verified the possible mechanisms involved in this action. For this study, ethanol- and indomethacin-induced gastric ulcer models in mice and histopathological assessment were used. The roles of NO, sulfhydryls (glutathione, GSH), ATP-sensitive K(+) channels (K(ATP) channels), and prostaglandins were also investigated. Isopulegol exhibited a dose-related gastroprotective effect against ethanol-induced lesions, while the pretreatment with glibenclamide and indomethacin [but not with N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester] were able to reverse this action. The pretreatment with isopulegol also restored GSH levels to normal levels and exhibited dose-related gastroprotective effect against indomethacin-induced ulcer. The results suggested that isopulegol presents significant gastroprotective effects in both ethanol- and indomethacin-induced ulcer models, which appear to be mediated, at least in part, by endogenous prostaglandins, K(ATP) channel opening, and antioxidant properties. PMID:19479241

  11. Genistein as an inducer of tumor cell differentiation : possible mechanisms of action.

    SciTech Connect

    Constantinou, A.; Huberman, E.; Center for Mechanistic Biology and Biotechnology; Univ. of Illinois at Chicago

    1995-01-01

    Decreased activity of either topoisomerases or tyrosine kinases has been implicated in the differentiation of a number of cell types. It is therefore conceivable that genistein, because of its reported ability to inhibit these activities in vitro, may be an inducer of cellular differentiation. We investigated this possibility in human promyelocytic HL-60 and erythroid K-562 leukemia cells and in human SK-MEL-131 melanoma cells. Our results indicated that genistein, in a dose-dependent manner, inhibited cell multiplication and induced cell differentiation. The maturing HL-60 cells acquired granulocytic and monocytic markers. The differentiating K-562 cells stained positively with benzidine, which indicates the production of hemoglobin, an erythroid marker. Following genistein treatment, maturing SK-MEL-131 melanoma cells formed dendrite-like structures and exhibited increased tyrosinase activity and melanin content. Experiments were designed to identify the molecular mechanism of genistein's action. Data from our laboratory suggest that this isoflavone triggers the pathway that leads to cellular differentiation by stabilizing protein-linked DNA strand breakage. Other possible mechanisms reported in the literature are discussed.

  12. Dioxin risk assessment: mechanisms of action and possible toxicity in human health.

    PubMed

    Tavakoly Sany, Seyedeh Belin; Hashim, Rosli; Salleh, Aishah; Rezayi, Majid; Karlen, David J; Razavizadeh, Bi Bi Marzieh; Abouzari-Lotf, Ebrahim

    2015-12-01

    Dioxin-like compounds (DLCs) have been classified by the World Health Organization (WHO) as one of the most persistent toxic chemical substances in the environment, and they are associated with several occupational activities and industrial accidents around the world. Since the end of the 1970s, these toxic chemicals have been banned because of their human toxicity potential, long half-life, wide dispersion, and they bioaccumulate in the food web. This review serves as a primer for environmental health professionals to provide guidance on short-term risk assessment of dioxin and to identify key findings for health and exposure assessment based on policies of different agencies. It also presents possible health effects of dioxins, mechanisms of action, toxic equivalency factors (TEFs), and dose-response characterization. Key studies related to toxicity values of dioxin-like compounds and their possible human health risk were identified through PubMed and supplemented with relevant studies characterized by reviewing the reference lists in the review articles and primary literature. Existing data decreases the scope of analyses and models in relevant studies to a manageable size by focusing on the set of important studies related to the perspective of developing toxicity values of DLCs. PMID:26514567

  13. Bacopa monnieri ameliorates memory deficits in olfactory bulbectomized mice: possible involvement of glutamatergic and cholinergic systems.

    PubMed

    Le, Xoan Thi; Pham, Hang Thi Nguyet; Do, Phuong Thi; Fujiwara, Hironori; Tanaka, Ken; Li, Feng; Van Nguyen, Tai; Nguyen, Khoi Minh; Matsumoto, Kinzo

    2013-10-01

    This study investigated the effects of alcoholic extract of Bacopa monnieri (L.) Wettst. (BM) on cognitive deficits using olfactory bulbectomized (OBX) mice and the underlying molecular mechanisms of its action. OBX mice were treated daily with BM (50 mg/kg, p.o.) or a reference drug, tacrine (2.5 mg/kg, i.p.), 1 week before and continuously 3 days after OBX. Cognitive performance of the animals was analyzed by the novel object recognition test, modified Y maze test, and fear conditioning test. Brain tissues of OBX animals were used for neurochemical and immunohistochemical studies. OBX impaired non-spatial short-term memory, spatial working memory, and long-term fair memory. BM administration ameliorated these memory disturbances. The effect of BM on short-term memory deficits was abolished by a muscarinic receptor antagonist, scopolamine. OBX downregulated phosphorylation of synaptic plasticity-related signaling proteins: NR1 subunit of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor, glutamate receptor 1 (GluR1), and calmodulin-dependent kinase II but not cyclic AMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB), and reduced brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA in the hippocampus. OBX also reduced choline acetyltransferase in the hippocampus and cholinergic neurons in the medial septum, and enlarged the size of lateral ventricle. BM administration reversed these OBX-induced neurochemical and histological alterations, except the decrease of GluR1 phosphorylation, and enhanced CREB phosphorylation. Moreover, BM treatment inhibited ex vivo activity of acetylcholinesterase in the brain. These results indicate that BM treatment ameliorates OBX-induced cognition dysfunction via a mechanism involving enhancement of synaptic plasticity-related signaling and BDNF transcription and protection of cholinergic systems from OBX-induced neuronal damage.

  14. The cognition-enhancing effects of psychostimulants involve direct action in the prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Robert C; Devilbiss, David M; Berridge, Craig W

    2015-06-01

    Psychostimulants are highly effective in the treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. The clinical efficacy of these drugs is strongly linked to their ability to improve cognition dependent on the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and extended frontostriatal circuit. The procognitive actions of psychostimulants are only associated with low doses. Surprisingly, despite nearly 80 years of clinical use, the neurobiology of the procognitive actions of psychostimulants has only recently been systematically investigated. Findings from this research unambiguously demonstrate that the cognition-enhancing effects of psychostimulants involve the preferential elevation of catecholamines in the PFC and the subsequent activation of norepinephrine α2 and dopamine D1 receptors. In contrast, while the striatum is a critical participant in PFC-dependent cognition, where examined, psychostimulant action within the striatum is not sufficient to enhance cognition. At doses that moderately exceed the clinical range, psychostimulants appear to improve PFC-dependent attentional processes at the expense of other PFC-dependent processes (e.g., working memory, response inhibition). This differential modulation of PFC-dependent processes across dose appears to be associated with the differential involvement of noradrenergic α2 versus α1 receptors. Collectively, this evidence indicates that at low, clinically relevant doses, psychostimulants are devoid of the behavioral and neurochemical actions that define this class of drugs and instead act largely as cognitive enhancers (improving PFC-dependent function). This information has potentially important clinical implications as well as relevance for public health policy regarding the widespread clinical use of psychostimulants and for the development of novel pharmacologic treatments for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and other conditions associated with PFC dysregulation.

  15. The cognition-enhancing effects of psychostimulants involve direct action in the prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Robert C; Devilbiss, David M; Berridge, Craig W

    2015-06-01

    Psychostimulants are highly effective in the treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. The clinical efficacy of these drugs is strongly linked to their ability to improve cognition dependent on the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and extended frontostriatal circuit. The procognitive actions of psychostimulants are only associated with low doses. Surprisingly, despite nearly 80 years of clinical use, the neurobiology of the procognitive actions of psychostimulants has only recently been systematically investigated. Findings from this research unambiguously demonstrate that the cognition-enhancing effects of psychostimulants involve the preferential elevation of catecholamines in the PFC and the subsequent activation of norepinephrine α2 and dopamine D1 receptors. In contrast, while the striatum is a critical participant in PFC-dependent cognition, where examined, psychostimulant action within the striatum is not sufficient to enhance cognition. At doses that moderately exceed the clinical range, psychostimulants appear to improve PFC-dependent attentional processes at the expense of other PFC-dependent processes (e.g., working memory, response inhibition). This differential modulation of PFC-dependent processes across dose appears to be associated with the differential involvement of noradrenergic α2 versus α1 receptors. Collectively, this evidence indicates that at low, clinically relevant doses, psychostimulants are devoid of the behavioral and neurochemical actions that define this class of drugs and instead act largely as cognitive enhancers (improving PFC-dependent function). This information has potentially important clinical implications as well as relevance for public health policy regarding the widespread clinical use of psychostimulants and for the development of novel pharmacologic treatments for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and other conditions associated with PFC dysregulation. PMID:25499957

  16. Differential effects of fluoxetine and venlafaxine on memory recognition: possible mechanisms of action.

    PubMed

    Carlini, Valeria Paola; Poretti, María Belén; Rask-Andersen, Mathias; Chavan, Rohit A; Ponzio, Marina F; Sawant, Rahul S; de Barioglio, Susana Rubiales; Schiöth, Helgi B; de Cuneo, Marta Fiol

    2012-08-01

    Serotonin-specific reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) and serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRI) are antidepressant drugs commonly used to treat a wide spectrum of mood disorders (Wong and Licinio, 2001). Although they have been clinically used for more than 50 years, the molecular and cellular basis for the action of SSRIs and SNRIs is not clear. Considering that the changes in gene expression involved in the action of antidepressant drugs on memory have not been identified, in this study we investigated the impact of chronic treatment with a SSRI (fluoxetine) and a SNRI (venlafaxine) on the mRNA expression of genes related to memory cascade in the mouse hippocampus, namely, α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA), nitric oxide synthase 1 (NOS1), neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor type 2 (TrKB), mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK/ERK) and serotonin transporter (SERT). Animals treated with fluoxetine 10 mg/Kg/day for 28 days showed a significant decrease in the percentage of time spent in the novel object recognition test (p≤0.005) and induced MAPK1/ERK2 down-regulation (p=0.005). Our results suggest that the effect on cognition could probably be explained by fluoxetine interference in the MAPK/ERK memory pathway. In contrast, chronic treatment with venlafaxine did not reduce MAPK1/ERK2 expression, suggesting that MAPK1/ERK2 down-regulation is not a common effect of all antidepressant drugs. Further studies are needed to examine the effect of chronic fluoxetine treatment on the ERK-CREB system, and to determine whether there is a causal relationship between the disruption of the ERK-CREB system and the effect of this antidepressant on memory performance. PMID:22449479

  17. Differential effects of fluoxetine and venlafaxine on memory recognition: possible mechanisms of action.

    PubMed

    Carlini, Valeria Paola; Poretti, María Belén; Rask-Andersen, Mathias; Chavan, Rohit A; Ponzio, Marina F; Sawant, Rahul S; de Barioglio, Susana Rubiales; Schiöth, Helgi B; de Cuneo, Marta Fiol

    2012-08-01

    Serotonin-specific reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) and serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRI) are antidepressant drugs commonly used to treat a wide spectrum of mood disorders (Wong and Licinio, 2001). Although they have been clinically used for more than 50 years, the molecular and cellular basis for the action of SSRIs and SNRIs is not clear. Considering that the changes in gene expression involved in the action of antidepressant drugs on memory have not been identified, in this study we investigated the impact of chronic treatment with a SSRI (fluoxetine) and a SNRI (venlafaxine) on the mRNA expression of genes related to memory cascade in the mouse hippocampus, namely, α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA), nitric oxide synthase 1 (NOS1), neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor type 2 (TrKB), mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK/ERK) and serotonin transporter (SERT). Animals treated with fluoxetine 10 mg/Kg/day for 28 days showed a significant decrease in the percentage of time spent in the novel object recognition test (p≤0.005) and induced MAPK1/ERK2 down-regulation (p=0.005). Our results suggest that the effect on cognition could probably be explained by fluoxetine interference in the MAPK/ERK memory pathway. In contrast, chronic treatment with venlafaxine did not reduce MAPK1/ERK2 expression, suggesting that MAPK1/ERK2 down-regulation is not a common effect of all antidepressant drugs. Further studies are needed to examine the effect of chronic fluoxetine treatment on the ERK-CREB system, and to determine whether there is a causal relationship between the disruption of the ERK-CREB system and the effect of this antidepressant on memory performance.

  18. Antipyretic and antinociceptive effects of Nauclea latifolia root decoction and possible mechanisms of action

    PubMed Central

    Taïwe, Germain Sotoing; Bum, Elisabeth Ngo; Talla, Emmanuel; Dimo, Théophile; Weiss, Norbert; Sidiki, Neteydji; Dawe, Amadou; Okomolo Moto, Fleur Clarisse; Dzeufiet, Paul Désiré; Waard, Michel De

    2011-01-01

    Context Nauclea latifolia Smith (Rubiacea) is a small tree, found in tropical areas in Africa. It is used in traditional medicine to treat malaria, epilepsy, anxiety, pain, fever etc. Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of Nauclea latifolia roots decoction on the peripheral and central nervous systems and its possible mechanisms of action. Materials and methods The analgesic investigation was carried out against acetic acid-induced writhing, formalin-induced pain, hot-plate and tail immersion tests. The antipyretic activity was studied in Brewer’s yeast-induced pyrexia in mice. Rota-rod test and bicuculline-induced hyperactivity were used for the assessment of locomotor activity. Results Nauclea latifolia induced hypothermia and had antipyretic effects in mice. The plant decoction produced significant antinociceptive activity in all analgesia animal models used. The antinociceptive effect exhibited by the decoction in the formalin test was reversed by the systemic administration of naloxone, Nω-L-nitro-arginine methyl ester or glibenclamide. In contrast, theophylline did not reverse this effect. Nauclea latifolia (antinociceptive doses) did not exhibit significant effect on motor coordination of the mice in rota-rod performance. Nauclea latifolia protected mice against bicuculline-induced behavioural excitation. Discussion and conclusion Overall, these results demonstrate that the central and peripheral effects of Nauclea latifolia roots decoction might partially or wholly be due to the stimulation of peripheric opioid receptors through the action of the nitric oxide-cyclic GMP-ATP-sensitive K+ (NO/cGMP/ATP)-channel pathway and/or facilitation of the GABAergic transmission. PMID:20822326

  19. Multifunctional receptor model for dioxin and related compound toxic action: possible thyroid hormone-responsive effector-linked site.

    PubMed Central

    McKinney, J D

    1989-01-01

    Molecular/theoretical modeling studies have revealed that thyroid hormones and toxic chlorinated aromatic hydrocarbons of environmental significance (for which dioxin or TCDD is the prototype) have similar structural properties that could be important in molecular recognition in biochemical systems. These molecular properties include a somewhat rigid, sterically accessible and polarizable aromatic ring and size-limited, hydrophobic lateral substituents, usually contained in opposite adjoining rings of a diphenyl compound. These molecular properties define the primary binding groups thought to be important in molecular recognition of both types of structures in biochemical systems. Similar molecular reactivities are supported by the demonstration of effective specific binding of thyroid hormones and chlorinated aromatic hydrocarbons with four different proteins, enzymes, or receptor preparations that are known or suspected to be involved in the expression of thyroid hormone activity. These binding interactions represent both aromatic-aromatic (stacking) and molecular cleft-type recognition processes. A multiple protein or multifunctional receptor-ligand binding mechanism model is proposed as a way of visualizing the details and possible role of both the stacking and cleft type molecular recognition factors in the expression of biological activity. The model suggests a means by which hormone-responsive effector-linked sites (possible protein-protein-DNA complexes) can maintain highly structurally specific control of hormone action. Finally, the model also provides a theoretical basis for the design and conduct of further biological experimentation on the molecular mechanism(s) of action of toxic chlorinated aromatic hydrocarbons and thyroid hormones. Images FIGURE 3. A FIGURE 3. B FIGURE 3. C FIGURE 3. D PMID:2551666

  20. Possible Involvement of Insulin Resistance in the Progression of Cancer Cachexia in Mice.

    PubMed

    Ohsawa, Masahiro; Murakami, Tomoyasu; Kume, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Malnutrition is a common problem among cancer patients, affecting up to 85% of patients with certain cancers. In severe cases, malnutrition can progress to cachexia, a specific form of malnutrition characterized by loss of lean body mass and muscle wasting. Although this muscle wasting might be a product of enhanced protein degradation, the precise mechanisms of cancer cachexia are not fully elucidated. Based on basic and clinical research, glucose intolerance and insulin resistance have been postulated to be associated with cancer cachexia. Since insulin in the skeletal muscle inhibits protein degradation and promotes protein synthesis, insulin resistance could be a possible cause of cancer cachexia. Therefore, we investigated the involvement of insulin resistance in the development of cancer cachexia in tumor-bearing mice. The signaling protein in the insulin cascade was attenuated in the skeletal muscle and hypothalamus from tumor-bearing mice. We identified Chrysanthemum morifolium RAMAT., known as Kikuka, as a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) ligand. Treatment with Kikuka attenuates the skeletal muscle changes in tumor-bearing mice. These results suggest that this natural PPARγ activator might be an attractive candidate for the treatment of cancer cachexia. In the symposium, we presented the PPARγ activator-induced improvement of cancer cachexia. PMID:27150920

  1. Ultraviolet-induced transformation of keratinocytes: possible involvement of long interspersed element-1 reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Gautam; Gupta, Nishma; Tiwari, Jyoti; Raman, Govindarajan

    2005-02-01

    The normal human keratinocyte cell line, HaCaT, was transformed using multiple doses of ultraviolet (UV)A+B (UVA, 150-200 mJ/cm(2) and UVB, 15-20 mJ/cm(2) x 6). Malignant transformation was confirmed by upregulation of Cyclin D1 (mRNA) and formation of colonies on soft agar. To identify the genes involved in this transformation process, we have done rapid amplification of polymorphic DNA using RNA from unexposed and multiple-exposed cells. Six percent PAGE showed several differentially regulated genes in exposed cells compared with unexposed cells. Total 19 genes were identified, cloned and sequenced. Three of these 19 cloned genes showed 99% homology at both DNA and protein levels to a stretch of 540 bp (180 aa) of long interspersed element (LINE)-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) open reading frame (ORF-2). Colonies from soft agar showed upregulation of this gene compared with non-colonized (lawn on soft agar) cells as detected by RT-PCR. This data implicates LINE-1 RT (ORF-2) in UV-induced malignancy and can possibly be used as a marker for the diagnosis of UV-induced skin cancer.

  2. Possible involvement of tetrodotoxin-resistant sodium channels in cough reflex.

    PubMed

    Kamei, Junzo; Nakanishi, Yuki; Ishikawa, Yoko; Hayashi, Shun-Suke; Asato, Megumi; Ohsawa, Masahiro

    2011-02-10

    We examined the involvement of tetrodotoxin (TTX)-resistant sodium channels in the peripheral mechanisms of the cough reflex in mice. We also examined the possibility of using ambroxol as an effective antitussive agent, and found that it produced antitussive effects through the inhibition of TTX-resistant sodium channels. The inhalation of fenvalerate, at concentrations of 0.3, 1 and 3μg/ml, for 5min produced coughs in a concentration-dependent manner. Pretreatment with tetrodotoxin, at a dose of 1μg/kg, s.c., slightly but significantly reduced the number of fenvalerate (3μg/ml)-induced coughs. However, the number of fenvalerate-induced coughs in tetorodotoxin-treated mice was still significantly greater than those in vehicle (0.4% DMSO) alone inhaled mice. On the other hand, pretreatment with tetrodotoxin, at a dose of 1μg/kg, s.c., almost completely reduced the number of citric acid (0.25M)-induced coughs to the level in vehicle (saline) alone inhaled mice. Pretreatment with ambroxol, at doses of 10, 30, 100 and 300mg/kg, p.o., dose-dependently and significantly reduced the number of fenvalerate (3μg/ml)-induced coughs. The present findings indicate that TTX-resistant sodium channels may play an important role in the enhancement of C-fiber-mediated cough pathways. Furthermore, ambroxol may prove to be a useful cough suppressant. PMID:21130084

  3. Possible involvement of polyphenols and polyamines in salt tolerance of almond rootstocks.

    PubMed

    Zrig, Ahlem; Tounekti, Taïeb; Vadel, Ahmedou Mohamed; Ben Mohamed, Hatem; Valero, Daniel; Serrano, María; Chtara, Chaker; Khemira, Habib

    2011-11-01

    Leaf physiological and biochemical adaptive strategies and more particularly the possible involvement of polyamines and polyphenols in salt stress tolerance were investigated. Three almond rootstocks (GN15, GF677 and bitter almond) were subjected to 0, 25, 50 and 75 mM NaCl for 30 days. The dry mass of leaves, stems and roots decreased with increasing salt concentration in the irrigation solution regardless of genotype. Photosynthetic assimilation rate decreased in the three almond rootstocks, but more so in GF677 and bitter almond. The accumulation of toxic ions was greater in the leaves than in the roots in all genotypes. GN15 accumulated less Na(+) and Cl(-) than GF677 and bitter almond. GF677 accumulated polyphenols, but had less anthocyanin and antioxidant activity in its leaves compared to bitter almond. It seems that GN15 was more able to tolerate the excess of toxic ions using anthocyanins which are abundant in its red leaves and free polyamines for a more efficient response to stress. However, most of the antioxidant activity was found in the leaves and was lower in the roots. Given that the upper part of the tree will be of a different cultivar after grafting, this advantage may not be relevant for the tree's survival. GF677 showed a different antioxidant strategy; it maintained a stable carotenoids content and accumulated polyphenols in its leaves. The three rootstocks used different strategies to deal with the excess of salt in the growth medium.

  4. Cannabidiol blocks long-lasting behavioral consequences of predator threat stress: possible involvement of 5HT1A receptors.

    PubMed

    Campos, Alline Cristina; Ferreira, Frederico Rogério; Guimarães, Francisco Silveira

    2012-11-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is an incapacitating syndrome that follows a traumatic experience. Predator exposure promotes long-lasting anxiogenic effect in rodents, an effect related to symptoms found in PTSD patients. Cannabidiol (CBD) is a non-psychotomimetic component of Cannabis sativa with anxiolytic effects. The present study investigated the anti-anxiety actions of CBD administration in a model of PTSD. Male Wistar rats exposed to a predator (cat) received, 1 h later, singled or repeated i.p. administration of vehicle or CBD. Seven days after the stress animals were submitted to the elevated plus maze. To investigate the involvement of 5HT1A receptors in CBD effects animals were pre-treated with WAY100635, a 5HT1A receptor antagonist. To explore possible neurobiological mechanisms involved in these effects, 5HT1A receptor mRNA and BDNF protein expression were measured in the hippocampus, frontal cortex, amygdaloid complex and dorsal periaqueductal gray. Repeated administration of CBD prevented long-lasting anxiogenic effects promoted by a single predator exposure. Pretreatment with WAY100635 attenuated CBD effects. Seven days after predator exposure 5HT1A mRNA expression was up regulated in the frontal cortex and hippocampus. CBD and paroxetine failed to prevent this effect. No change in BDNF expression was found. In conclusion, predator exposure promotes long-lasting up-regulation of 5HT1A receptor gene expression in the hippocampus and frontal cortex. Repeated CBD administration prevents the long-lasting anxiogenic effects observed after predator exposure probably by facilitating 5HT1A receptors neurotransmission. Our results suggest that CBD has beneficial potential for PTSD treatment and that 5HT1A receptors could be a therapeutic target in this disorder.

  5. Protein phosphatase and kinase activities possibly involved in exocytosis regulation in Paramecium tetraurelia.

    PubMed Central

    Kissmehl, R; Treptau, T; Hofer, H W; Plattner, H

    1996-01-01

    In Paramecium tetraurelia cells synchronous exocytosis induced by aminoethyldextran (AED) is accompanied by an equally rapid dephosphorylation of a 63 kDa phosphoprotein (PP63) within 80 ms. In vivo, rephosphorylation occurs within a few seconds after AED triggering. In homogenates (P)P63 can be solubilized in all three phosphorylation states (phosphorylated, dephosphorylated and rephosphorylated) and thus tested in vitro. By using chelators of different divalent cations, de- and rephosphorylation of PP63 and P63 respectively can be achieved by an endogenous protein phosphatase/kinase system. Dephosphorylation occurs in the presence of EDTA, whereas in the presence of EGTA this was concealed by phosphorylation by endogenous kinase(s), thus indicating that phosphorylation of P63 is calcium-independent. Results obtained with protein phosphatase inhibitors (okadaic acid, calyculin A) allowed us to exclude a protein serine/threonine phosphatase of type I (with selective sensitivity in Paramecium). Protein phosphatase 2C is also less likely to be a candidate because of its requirement for high Mg2+ concentrations. According to previous evidence a protein serine/threonine phosphatase of type 2B (calcineurin; CaN) is possibly involved. We have now found that bovine brain CaN dephosphorylates PP63 in vitro. Taking into account the specific requirements of this phosphatase in vitro, with p-nitrophenyl phosphate as a substrate, we have isolated a cytosolic phosphatase of similar characteristics by combined preparative gel electrophoresis and affinity-column chromatography. In Paramecium this phosphatase also dephosphorylates PP63 in vitro (after 32P labelling in vivo). Using various combinations of ion exchange, affinity and hydrophobic interaction chromatography we have also isolated three different protein kinases from the soluble fraction, i.e. a cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA), a cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) and a casein kinase. Among the kinases tested, PKA

  6. The enzymatic hydrolysis of pretreated pulp fibers predominantly involves “peeling/erosion” modes of action

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There is still considerable debate regarding the actual mechanism by which a “cellulase mixture” deconstructs cellulosic materials, with accessibility to the substrate at the microscopic level being one of the major restrictions that limits fast, complete cellulose hydrolysis. In the work reported here we tried to determine the predominant mode of action, at the fiber level, of how a cellulase mixture deconstructs pretreated softwood and hardwood pulp fibers. Quantitative changes in the pulp fibers derived from different pretreated biomass substrates were monitored throughout the course of enzymatic hydrolysis to see if the dominant mechanisms involved either the fragmentation/cutting of longer fibers to shorter fibers or their “peeling/delamination/erosion,” or if both cutting and peeling mechanisms occurred simultaneously. Results Regardless of the source of biomass, the type of pretreatment and the chemical composition of the substrate, under typical hydrolysis conditions (50°C, pH 4.8, mixing) longer pulp fibers (fiber length >200 μm) were rapidly broken down until a relatively constant fiber length of 130 to 160 μm was reached. In contrast, shorter fibers with an initial average fiber length of 130 to 160 μm showed no significant change in length despite their substantial hydrolysis. The fragmentation/cutting mode of deconstruction was only observed on longer fibers at early stages of hydrolysis. Although the fiber fragmentation mode of deconstruction was not greatly influenced by enzyme loading, it was significantly inhibited by glucose and was mainly observed during initial mixing of the enzyme and substrate. In contrast, significant changes in the fiber width occurred throughout the course of hydrolysis for all of the substrates, suggesting that fiber width may limit the rate and extent of cellulose hydrolysis. Conclusion It appears that, at the fiber level, pretreated pulp fibers are hydrolyzed through a two-step mode of action

  7. Modulation of penile erection in rabbits by Mondia whitei: possible mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Quasie, O; Martey, O N K; Nyarko, A K; Gbewonyo, W S K; Okine, L K N

    2010-04-03

    Mondia whitei root was evaluated to validate its anecdotal use and determine its possible mode of action in the management of erectile dysfunction. Rabbits were administered with daily oral doses of 100-400 mg kg(-1) crude ethanolic extract of M. whitei and sildenafil (50 mg kg(-1)) as positive control for 6 weeks. Cavernosal tissue NOS activity and levels of NO and cGMP, and NOS and PDE protein expressions were investigated. The effect of the crude extract, chloroform and petroleum ether fractions in vitro on cavernosal tissue NOS activity and levels of NO and cGMP at 0.01 and 0.10 mg g(-1) tissue were also investigated. Results indicate that the crude extract increased NOS activity by 7% at 200 mg kg(-1) with corresponding increases in NO (88%) and cGMP (480%) levels. No significant changes in these measurements were observed with the 100 and 400 mg kg(-1) doses whilst sildenafil slightly reduced them (15.9-37.5%). NOS and PDE protein expressions in test animals were not different from controls. Pre-incubation of cavernosal tissue in vitro with the crude extract of M. whitei and its chloroform fraction markedly increased NOS activity (26-132%) and levels of NO (25%) and cGMP (50-400%) at 0.01 mg g(-1) tissue but these were reduced to near control levels when their concentrations were increased to 0.10 mg g(-1) tissue whilst the petroleum ether fraction had no effect. These findings suggest that M. whitei may influence erectile function through activation/stimulation of NOS with corresponding increases in tissue NO and cGMP levels and that certain chemical constituents present in the chloroform fraction may be responsible for biological activity.

  8. Proinflammatory actions of visfatin/nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt) involve regulation of insulin signaling pathway and Nampt enzymatic activity.

    PubMed

    Jacques, Claire; Holzenberger, Martin; Mladenovic, Zvezdana; Salvat, Colette; Pecchi, Emilie; Berenbaum, Francis; Gosset, Marjolaine

    2012-04-27

    Visfatin (also termed pre-B-cell colony-enhancing factor (PBEF) or nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt)) is a pleiotropic mediator acting on many inflammatory processes including osteoarthritis. Visfatin exhibits both an intracellular enzymatic activity (nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase, Nampt) leading to NAD synthesis and a cytokine function via the binding to its hypothetical receptor. We recently reported the role of visfatin in prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) synthesis in chondrocytes. Here, our aim was to characterize the signaling pathways involved in this response in exploring both the insulin receptor (IR) signaling pathway and Nampt activity. IR was expressed in human and murine chondrocytes, and visfatin triggered Akt phosphorylation in murine chondrocytes. Blocking IR expression with siRNA or activity using the hydroxy-2-naphthalenyl methyl phosphonic acid tris acetoxymethyl ester (HNMPA-(AM)(3)) inhibitor diminished visfatin-induced PGE(2) release in chondrocytes. Moreover, visfatin-induced IGF-1R(-/-) chondrocytes released higher concentration of PGE(2) than IGF-1R(+/+) cells, a finding confirmed with an antibody that blocked IGF-1R. Using RT-PCR, we found that visfatin did not regulate IR expression and that an increased insulin release was also unlikely to be involved because insulin was unable to increase PGE(2) release. Inhibition of Nampt activity using the APO866 inhibitor gradually decreased PGE(2) release, whereas the addition of exogenous nicotinamide increased it. We conclude that the proinflammatory actions of visfatin in chondrocytes involve regulation of IR signaling pathways, possibly through the control of Nampt enzymatic activity.

  9. Immigrant Parent Involvement in U.S. Schools: Current Practices and Future Possibilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aleixo, Marina Bandeira

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation examines how parent involvement expectations are communicated and enacted in interactions at one small urban high school. Through detailed descriptions of school interactions between supporting staff and immigrant parents, this study examines how parent involvement expectations are understood and perceived. Although scholarly…

  10. True User Involvement by People Living With HIV is Possible: Description of a User-driven HIV Clinic in Norway.

    PubMed

    Berg, Rigmor C; Gamst, Are; Said, Maryan; Aas, Kristin Bårdsen; Songe, Solveig Helene; Fangen, Kim; Rysstad, Ole

    2015-01-01

    The Greater Involvement of People Living with or Affected by HIV principle highlights the various contributions HIV-infected people can make in HIV program development and implementation. We present a unique example of how service users' involvement led to a complete organizational redesign of an outpatient HIV clinic in Southern Norway. We applied a user-driven, case study method, which showed that establishing a user board laid the foundation for the redesign process, as the board provided a clear infrastructure of user involvement and developed a set of user-defined targets for services. The main targets-optimal health, holistic care and treatment, and empowerment-were operationalized as a set of action points, such as establishing HIV nurse coordinators. While there is no single method for user involvement, we offer useful ideas that can help others develop an involvement project that is effective and sustainable.

  11. GalNAc-T14 may be involved in regulating the apoptotic action of IGFBP-3.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chen; Shan, Yaojun; Liu, Xinxia; Song, Wenqian; Wang, Jiali; Zou, Minji; Wang, Min; Xu, Donggang

    2009-09-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) is known to induce apoptosis in an insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-dependent and IGF-independent manner, but the mechanism underlying the IGF-independent effects remains unclear. Polypeptide N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase 14 (GalNAc-T14) is a novel IGFBP-3 binding partner. In this paper, small interference RNA (siRNA) targeting GalNAc-T14 was used to examine whether GalNAc-T14 affects the apoptotic action of IGFBP-3. Using semi-quantitative reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and western blot analysis, we determined that GalNAc-T14 expression was downregulated by the siRNA directed against GalNAc-T14. Apoptosis analysis of IGFBP-3-overexpressing cells treated with siRNA against GalNAc-T14 was performed to determine if GalNAc-T14 was specifically involved in IGFBP-3 signalling. The results, as determined by flow cytometric analysis and caspase-3 assay, showed that the extent of apoptosis induced by IGFBP-increased with RNA interference (RNAi) knockdown of GalNAc-T14. Our data suggest that GalNAc-T14 influences the apoptotic action of IGFBP-3 and might mediate the signalling pathway of IGFBP-3. Experiments to determine the role of GalNAc-T14 in the regulation of apoptosis induced by IGFBP-3 are under way.

  12. Cholinergic involvement in vascular and glucoregulatory actions of insulin in rats.

    PubMed

    Lévesque, Martin; Santuré, Marta; Pitre, Maryse; Nadeau, André; Bachelard, Hélène

    2006-02-01

    This study was designed to test the glucose metabolic and vasodilator actions of insulin in rats and its relation to cholinergic system-dependent mechanisms. The first group of rats had pulsed Doppler flow probes and intravascular catheters implanted to determine blood pressure, heart rate, and regional blood flows. Insulin sensitivity was assessed by the euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp technique carried out in the absence or presence of atropine. The second group of rats was used to determine the cholinergic contribution to in vivo insulin-mediated glucose utilization in individual muscles. Glucose uptake was examined by using [(3)H]2-deoxy-D-glucose. Muscarinic cholinergic blockade was found to significantly (P = 0.002) reduce insulin sensitivity and to completely abrogate the renal (P = 0.008) and hindquarter (P = 0.02) vasodilator responses to euglycemic infusion of insulin. A significant reduction in insulin-stimulated in vivo glucose uptake was also noted in soleus (P = 0.006), quadriceps (P = 0.03), gastrocnemius (P = 0.02), and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) (P = 0.001) muscles, when insulin was infused at a rate of 4 mU . kg(-1) . min(-1), whereas at the rate of 16 mU . kg(-1) . min(-1), a significant reduction in glucose uptake was only observed in EDL (P = 0.03) and quadriceps (P = 0.01) muscles. Together, these results demonstrate a potential role for cholinergic involvement with physiological insulin actions in glucose clearance and blood flow regulation in rats.

  13. Neuroprotective action of cycloheximide involves induction of bcl-2 and antioxidant pathways.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, K; Estus, S; Fu, W; Mark, R J; Mattson, M P

    1997-03-10

    The ability of the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide (CHX) to prevent neuronal death in different paradigms has been interpreted to indicate that the cell death process requires synthesis of "killer" proteins. On the other hand, data indicate that neurotrophic factors protect neurons in the same death paradigms by inducing expression of neuroprotective gene products. We now provide evidence that in embryonic rat hippocampal cell cultures, CHX protects neurons against oxidative insults by a mechanism involving induction of neuroprotective gene products including the antiapoptotic gene bcl-2 and antioxidant enzymes. Neuronal survival after exposure to glutamate, FeSO4, and amyloid beta-peptide was increased in cultures pretreated with CHX at concentrations of 50-500 nM; higher and lower concentrations were ineffective. Neuroprotective concentrations of CHX caused only a moderate (20-40%) reduction in overall protein synthesis, and induced an increase in c-fos, c-jun, and bcl-2 mRNAs and protein levels as determined by reverse transcription-PCR analysis and immunocytochemistry, respectively. At neuroprotective CHX concentrations, levels of c-fos heteronuclear RNA increased in parallel with c-fos mRNA, indicating that CHX acts by inducing transcription. Neuroprotective concentrations of CHX suppressed accumulation of H2O2 induced by FeSO4, suggesting activation of antioxidant pathways. Treatment of cultures with an antisense oligodeoxynucleotide directed against bcl-2 mRNA decreased Bcl-2 protein levels and significantly reduced the neuroprotective action of CHX, suggesting that induction of Bcl-2 expression was mechanistically involved in the neuroprotective actions of CHX. In addition, activity levels of the antioxidant enzymes Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase, Mn-superoxide dismutase, and catalase were significantly increased in cultures exposed to neuroprotective levels of CHX. Our data suggest that low concentrations of CHX can promote neuron survival by

  14. Biocontrol of postharvest gray and blue mold decay of apples with Rhodotorula mucilaginosa and possible mechanisms of action.

    PubMed

    Li, Renping; Zhang, Hongyin; Liu, Weimin; Zheng, Xiaodong

    2011-03-30

    The efficacy of Rhodotorula mucilaginosa against postharvest gray mold, blue mold and natural decay development of apples and the possible mechanisms involved were investigated. The decay incidence and lesion diameter of gray mold and blue mold of apples treated by R. mucilaginosa were significantly reduced compared with the control fruits, and the higher concentration of R. mucilaginosa, the better the efficacy of the biocontrol. R. mucilaginosa also significantly reduced the natural decay development of apples following storage at 20°C for 35 days or at 4°C for 45 days followed by 20°C for 15 days. Germination and survival of spores of Penicillium expansum and Botrytis cinerea were markedly inhibited by R. mucilaginosa in an in vitro test. Rapid colonization of the yeast in apple wounds was observed whether stored at 20°C or 4°C. In apples, the activities of peroxidase (POD) and polyphenoloxidase (PPO) were significantly induced and lipid peroxidation (malondialdehyde (MDA) content) was highly inhibited by R. mucilaginosa treatment compared with those of the control fruits. All these results indicated that R. mucilaginosa has great potential for development of commercial formulations to control postharvest pathogens on fruits. Its modes of action were based on competition for space and nutrients with pathogens, inducement of activities of defense-related enzymes such as POD, PPO and inhibition of lipid peroxidation (MDA content) of apples, so as to enhance the resistance and delay the ripening and senescence of apples.

  15. Participation of citral in the bronchodilatory effect of ginger oil and possible mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Mangprayool, Thitiya; Kupittayanant, Sajeera; Chudapongse, Nuannoi

    2013-09-01

    The extract of ginger, the rhizomes of Zingiber officinale Roscoe (Zingiberaceae), has been reported to possess anti-hyperactivity and anti-inflammation on airway. The present study described brochodilatory activity of ginger oil and identified its active compound. Ginger oil was extracted by hydro-distillation. The compositions of ginger oil were analyzed by gas chromatography and mass spectrometer. Citral, eucalyptol and camphene were found to be the major components. Ginger oil and citral, but not camphene, suppressed rat tracheal contraction induced by carbachol (CCh). Consistent with previous report, eucalyptol showed a relaxing effect on rat airway. Since the content of eucalyptol in ginger oil was relatively low, the contribution of eucalyptol to the bronchodilatory effect of ginger oil was small. To elucidate the mechanisms responsible for the myorelaxing effect, propranolol (a β-adrenergic receptor antagonist), indomethacin (a COX inhibitor) and L-NAME (a NOS inhibitor) were used to block the inhibitory effects of ginger oil and citral. It was found that propranolol, but not indomethacin and L-NAME, reversed bronchodilatory effects of both ginger oil and citral, suggesting that a possible mechanism involved β-adrenergic receptor. This study provides the pharmacological basis supporting the therapeutic potential of Z. officinale rhizomes as a bronchodilator. PMID:23685048

  16. Participation of citral in the bronchodilatory effect of ginger oil and possible mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Mangprayool, Thitiya; Kupittayanant, Sajeera; Chudapongse, Nuannoi

    2013-09-01

    The extract of ginger, the rhizomes of Zingiber officinale Roscoe (Zingiberaceae), has been reported to possess anti-hyperactivity and anti-inflammation on airway. The present study described brochodilatory activity of ginger oil and identified its active compound. Ginger oil was extracted by hydro-distillation. The compositions of ginger oil were analyzed by gas chromatography and mass spectrometer. Citral, eucalyptol and camphene were found to be the major components. Ginger oil and citral, but not camphene, suppressed rat tracheal contraction induced by carbachol (CCh). Consistent with previous report, eucalyptol showed a relaxing effect on rat airway. Since the content of eucalyptol in ginger oil was relatively low, the contribution of eucalyptol to the bronchodilatory effect of ginger oil was small. To elucidate the mechanisms responsible for the myorelaxing effect, propranolol (a β-adrenergic receptor antagonist), indomethacin (a COX inhibitor) and L-NAME (a NOS inhibitor) were used to block the inhibitory effects of ginger oil and citral. It was found that propranolol, but not indomethacin and L-NAME, reversed bronchodilatory effects of both ginger oil and citral, suggesting that a possible mechanism involved β-adrenergic receptor. This study provides the pharmacological basis supporting the therapeutic potential of Z. officinale rhizomes as a bronchodilator.

  17. Involvement of the Motor System in Comprehension of Non-Literal Action Language: A Meta-Analysis Study.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie; Shu, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Although numerous studies have shown that the sensory-motor system is involved in semantic processing of language stimuli, it is still unclear whether comprehension of abstract concepts is embodied, and whether the involvement of the sensory-motor system is context-dependent. Investigation of how the motor system is activated during comprehension of non-literal action languages can help address these issues. So far several studies have reported brain activations during non-literal action language comprehension, but the findings are highly inconsistent because of different types of non-literal action language stimuli. To clarify how the motor system is involved in comprehension of different types of non-literal languages, the current study conducted quantitative meta-analyses on fMRI findings about comprehension of sentences describing fictive motions, metaphoric actions, and idiomatic actions. Results showed that fictive motion sentences elicited activation in the right parahippocampal gyrus, an area important for spatial processing. For metaphoric actions, the left precentral gyrus (BA 6) was strongly activated, suggesting a link between metaphoric and literal meanings. For idiomatic actions, activity was found in the left inferior frontal gyrus (BA 44/45), highlighting semantic selection and inhibition. No premotor or motor activity was found in idiom condition. These results together suggest that the involvement of the sensory-motor system in abstract concepts processing is flexible, depending on semantic features of the language stimuli and links between abstract and literal meanings.

  18. Action research methodology in clinical pharmacy: how to involve and change.

    PubMed

    Nørgaard, Lotte Stig; Sørensen, Ellen Westh

    2016-06-01

    Introduction The focus in clinical pharmacy practice is and has for the last 30-35 years been on changing the role of pharmacy staff into service orientation and patient counselling. One way of doing this is by involving staff in change process and as a researcher to take part in the change process by establishing partnerships with staff. On the background of the authors' widespread action research (AR)-based experiences, recommendations and comments for how to conduct an AR-study is described, and one of their AR-based studies illustrate the methodology and the research methods used. Methodology AR is defined as an approach to research which is based on a problem-solving relationship between researchers and clients, which aims at both solving a problem and at collaboratively generating new knowledge. Research questions relevant in AR-studies are: what was the working process in this change oriented study? What learning and/or changes took place? What challenges/pitfalls had to be overcome? What were the influence/consequences for the involved parts? When to use If you want to implement new services and want to involve staff and others in the process, an AR methodology is very suitable. The basic advantages of doing AR-based studies are grounded in their participatory and democratic basis and their starting point in problems experienced in practice. Limitations Some of the limitations in AR-studies are that neither of the participants in a project steering group are the only ones to decide. Furthermore, the collective process makes the decision-making procedures relatively complex.

  19. Quantitative Assessment of the Distributions of Membrane Conductances Involved in Action Potential Backpropagation Along Basal Dendrites

    PubMed Central

    Acker, Corey D.; Antic, Srdjan D.

    2009-01-01

    Basal dendrites of prefrontal cortical neurons receive strong synaptic drive from recurrent excitatory synaptic inputs. Synaptic integration within basal dendrites is therefore likely to play an important role in cortical information processing. Both synaptic integration and synaptic plasticity depend crucially on dendritic membrane excitability and the backpropagation of action potentials. We carried out multisite voltage-sensitive dye imaging of membrane potential transients from thin basal branches of prefrontal cortical pyramidal neurons before and after application of channel blockers. We found that backpropagating action potentials (bAPs) are predominantly controlled by voltage-gated sodium and A-type potassium channels. In contrast, pharmacologically blocking the delayed rectifier potassium, voltage-gated calcium, or Ih conductance had little effect on dendritic AP propagation. Optically recorded bAP waveforms were quantified and multicompartmental modeling was used to link the observed behavior with the underlying biophysical properties. The best-fit model included a nonuniform sodium channel distribution with decreasing conductance with distance from the soma, together with a nonuniform (increasing) A-type potassium conductance. AP amplitudes decline with distance in this model, but to a lesser extent than previously thought. We used this model to explore the mechanisms underlying two sets of published data involving high-frequency trains of APs and the local generation of sodium spikelets. We also explored the conditions under which IA down-regulation would produce branch strength potentiation in the proposed model. Finally, we discuss the hypothesis that a fraction of basal branches may have different membrane properties compared with sister branches in the same dendritic tree. PMID:19118105

  20. Melatonin enhances DNA repair capacity possibly by affecting genes involved in DNA damage responsive pathways

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Melatonin, a hormone-like substance involved in the regulation of the circadian rhythm, has been demonstrated to protect cells against oxidative DNA damage and to inhibit tumorigenesis. Results In the current study, we investigated the effect of melatonin on DNA strand breaks using the alkaline DNA comet assay in breast cancer (MCF-7) and colon cancer (HCT-15) cell lines. Our results demonstrated that cells pretreated with melatonin had significantly shorter Olive tail moments compared to non-melatonin treated cells upon mutagen (methyl methanesulfonate, MMS) exposure, indicating an increased DNA repair capacity after melatonin treatment. We further examined the genome-wide gene expression in melatonin pretreated MCF-7 cells upon carcinogen exposure and detected altered expression of many genes involved in multiple DNA damage responsive pathways. Genes exhibiting altered expression were further analyzed for functional interrelatedness using network- and pathway-based bioinformatics analysis. The top functional network was defined as having relevance for “DNA Replication, Recombination, and Repair, Gene Expression, [and] Cancer”. Conclusions These findings suggest that melatonin may enhance DNA repair capacity by affecting several key genes involved in DNA damage responsive pathways. PMID:23294620

  1. Problems Teachers Face When Doing Action Research and Finding Possible Solutions: Three Cases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhou, Jun

    2012-01-01

    Through case studies, this paper explores problems teachers face when doing action research: for instance, teachers may misunderstand the research, mistrust university researchers, lack the time or adequate library resources to conduct research, lack theoretical guidance or knowledge of research methodology, and feel pressure or frustration during…

  2. OXIDATIVE STRESS AS A POSSIBLE MODE OF ACTION FOR ARSENIC CARCINOGENESIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Many modes of action for arsenic carcinogenesis have been proposed, but few theories have a substantial mass of supporting data. Three stronger theories of arsenic carcinogenesis are production of chromosomal abnormalities, promotion of carcinogenesis and oxidati...

  3. Involvement of sigma (sigma) receptors in the acute actions of methamphetamine: receptor binding and behavioral studies.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Emily C; McCracken, Kari A; Liu, Yun; Pouw, Buddy; Matsumoto, Rae R

    2005-10-01

    Methamphetamine interacts with sigma (sigma) receptors, suggesting that the drug produces some of its physiological and behavioral effects through these sites. Therefore, in the present report, receptor binding and pharmacological studies were performed to characterize the interaction between methamphetamine and sigma receptors. Of the two major sigma receptor subtypes, sigma1 and sigma2, competition binding studies showed that methamphetamine has a 22-fold preferential affinity for the sigma1 subtype. Saturation binding studies using the sigma1 selective radioligand [3H]+-pentazocine showed that in the presence of methamphetamine, there was a significant change in Kd, but not Bmax, suggesting competitive interactions. In behavioral studies, pretreatment of Swiss Webster mice with the sigma1 receptor antagonists, BD1063 or BD1047, significantly attenuated the locomotor stimulatory effects of methamphetamine. Mice that were administered an antisense oligodeoxynucleotide to down-regulate brain sigma1 receptors also exhibited a reduced locomotor stimulatory response to methamphetamine, as compared to control mice receiving mismatch oligonucleotides. Together, the data suggest that sigma1 receptors are involved in the acute actions of methamphetamine and that antagonism of this subtype is sufficient to prevent the locomotor stimulatory effects of methamphetamine. PMID:15939443

  4. Involvement of the endogenous opioid system in the psychopharmacological actions of ethanol: the role of acetaldehyde

    PubMed Central

    Font, Laura; Luján, Miguel Á.; Pastor, Raúl

    2013-01-01

    Significant evidence implicates the endogenous opioid system (EOS) (opioid peptides and receptors) in the mechanisms underlying the psychopharmacological effects of ethanol. Ethanol modulates opioidergic signaling and function at different levels, including biosynthesis, release, and degradation of opioid peptides, as well as binding of endogenous ligands to opioid receptors. The role of β-endorphin and µ-opioid receptors (OR) have been suggested to be of particular importance in mediating some of the behavioral effects of ethanol, including psychomotor stimulation and sensitization, consumption and conditioned place preference (CPP). Ethanol increases the release of β-endorphin from the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (NArc), which can modulate activity of other neurotransmitter systems such as mesolimbic dopamine (DA). The precise mechanism by which ethanol induces a release of β-endorphin, thereby inducing behavioral responses, remains to be elucidated. The present review summarizes accumulative data suggesting that the first metabolite of ethanol, the psychoactive compound acetaldehyde, could participate in such mechanism. Two lines of research involving acetaldehyde are reviewed: (1) implications of the formation of acetaldehyde in brain areas such as the NArc, with high expression of ethanol metabolizing enzymes and presence of cell bodies of endorphinic neurons and (2) the formation of condensation products between DA and acetaldehyde such as salsolinol, which exerts its actions via OR. PMID:23914161

  5. Social choice functions: A tool for ranking variables involved in action plans against road noise.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Padillo, Alejandro; de Oliveira, Thiago B F; Alves, Matheus; Bazzan, Ana L C; Ruiz, Diego P

    2016-08-01

    Traffic noise is gaining importance in planning and operation of roads in developing countries, and particularly in Europe and Latin America. Many variables with different degrees of importance influence the perception of noise from roads. Thus, the problem of prioritizing road stretches for action against such noise is an important issue in environmental noise management. For example, it can be addressed using multicriteria methods. However, these methodologies require criteria or suitable variables to be ranked according to their relative importance. In the present study, for this ranking, a list of nine variables involved in the decision-making process (called "road stretch priority variables") was presented in the form of questionnaires to high-level experts from Andalusia, southern Spain. These experts ranked the variables by relevance. Using the same data, seven social choice functions (Plurality, Raynaud, Kemeny-Young, Copeland, Simpson, Schulze, and Borda) were used in order to rank the variables. The results indicate that the most important variables were those that take into account the parameters of greatest exposure for the citizens, followed by variables related to the intensity of the problem analyzed. The results show that a combination of the use of social choice functions on aggregated information from expert panels can provide a consensus for ranking priority variables related to road stretches.

  6. Possible mechanism of psoralen phototoxicity not involving direct interaction with DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Laskin, J.D.; Lee, E.; Yurkow, E.J.; Laskin, D.L.; Gallo, M.A.

    1985-09-01

    Psoralens in combination with ultraviolet light (UVA; 320-400 nm) are used in the photochemical treatment of a variety of skin diseases including vitiligo, a skin depigmentational disorder, and psoriasis, a disease of accelerated epidermal cell proliferation. Although it is generally assumed that the major site of action of the psoralens is DNA, the authors have obtained evidence that another site may be the primary target for these compounds. They have identified specific, saturable, high-affinity binding sites for 8-methoxypsoralen on HeLa cells and have detected specific binding of 8-methoxypsoralen to four other human cell lines and five mouse cell lines. In HeLa cells, specific binding is reversible and independent of the ability of the compound to intercalate into DNA. In addition, binding sites become covalently modified by the psoralen after UVA exposure. Specific binding of 8-(methyoxy-/sup 3/H)methoxypsoralen constitutes 79% of the label bound to the cells. Scatchard analysis indicated two classes of psoralen binding sites. Based on these findings, the authors hypothesize that specific binding sites for psoralens on mammalian cells mediate, at least in part, psoralen-induced phototoxicity.

  7. Estrogen receptor beta, a possible tumor suppressor involved in ovarian carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lazennec, Gwendal

    2006-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is one of the leading cause of death from gynecological tumors in women. Several lines of evidence suggest that estrogens may play an important role in ovarian carcinogenesis, through their receptors, ERα and ERβ. Interestingly, malignant ovarian tumors originating from epithelial surface constitute about 90% of ovarian cancers and expressed low levels of ERβ, compared to normal tissues. In addition, restoration of ERβ in ovarian cancer cells, leads to strong inhibition of their proliferation and invasion, while apoptosis is enhanced. In this manuscript, recent data suggesting a possible tumor-suppressor role for ERβ in ovarian carcinogenesis are discussed. PMID:16399219

  8. Possible involvement of thrombin/protease-activated receptor 1 system in the pathogenesis of endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Hirota, Yasushi; Osuga, Yutaka; Hirata, Tetsuya; Yoshino, Osamu; Koga, Kaori; Harada, Miyuki; Morimoto, Chieko; Nose, Emi; Yano, Tetsu; Tsutsumi, Osamu; Taketani, Yuji

    2005-06-01

    Endometriosis is known to be associated with local inflammatory reactions. Given the emerging concept of thrombin and its specific receptor, protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1), as important players in inflammation and cell proliferation, we investigated whether thrombin and PAR1 might be involved in the pathophysiology of the disease, using a primary cell culture system of endometriotic tissues. PAR1 mRNA was expressed in primary endometriotic stromal cells (ESCs). Thrombin and SFLLRN (Ser-Phe-Leu-Leu-Arg-Asp), a PAR1 agonist peptide, increased the mRNA expression of IL-8, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and the protein secretion of IL-8 nd MCP-1 in ESCs. The addition of thrombin inhibitor d-phenylalanyl-l-prolyl-l arginine chloromethyl ketone (PPACK) together with thrombin inhibited the thrombin-induced secretion of IL-8 and MCP-1. Thrombin, but not SFLLRN, activated matrix metalloproteinase-2 in ESCs, and the effect was inhibited by PPACK. Thrombin and SFLLRN increased proliferating cell nuclear antigen-positive ratio of ESCs, indicating their cell proliferation-stimulating effects. The thrombin-induced increase in proliferating cell nuclear antigen-positive ratio was diminished by PPACK. These findings imply that the thrombin system might be involved in the pathophysiology of endometriosis, stimulating inflammatory responses of endometriotic cells and their mitogenic activity. PMID:15755869

  9. Proinflammatory Actions of Visfatin/Nicotinamide Phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt) Involve Regulation of Insulin Signaling Pathway and Nampt Enzymatic Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Jacques, Claire; Holzenberger, Martin; Mladenovic, Zvezdana; Salvat, Colette; Pecchi, Emilie; Berenbaum, Francis; Gosset, Marjolaine

    2012-01-01

    Visfatin (also termed pre-B-cell colony-enhancing factor (PBEF) or nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt)) is a pleiotropic mediator acting on many inflammatory processes including osteoarthritis. Visfatin exhibits both an intracellular enzymatic activity (nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase, Nampt) leading to NAD synthesis and a cytokine function via the binding to its hypothetical receptor. We recently reported the role of visfatin in prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) synthesis in chondrocytes. Here, our aim was to characterize the signaling pathways involved in this response in exploring both the insulin receptor (IR) signaling pathway and Nampt activity. IR was expressed in human and murine chondrocytes, and visfatin triggered Akt phosphorylation in murine chondrocytes. Blocking IR expression with siRNA or activity using the hydroxy-2-naphthalenyl methyl phosphonic acid tris acetoxymethyl ester (HNMPA-(AM)3) inhibitor diminished visfatin-induced PGE2 release in chondrocytes. Moreover, visfatin-induced IGF-1R−/− chondrocytes released higher concentration of PGE2 than IGF-1R+/+ cells, a finding confirmed with an antibody that blocked IGF-1R. Using RT-PCR, we found that visfatin did not regulate IR expression and that an increased insulin release was also unlikely to be involved because insulin was unable to increase PGE2 release. Inhibition of Nampt activity using the APO866 inhibitor gradually decreased PGE2 release, whereas the addition of exogenous nicotinamide increased it. We conclude that the proinflammatory actions of visfatin in chondrocytes involve regulation of IR signaling pathways, possibly through the control of Nampt enzymatic activity. PMID:22399297

  10. Biodegradation of ivory (natural apatite): possible involvement of fungal activity in biodeterioration of the Lewis Chessmen.

    PubMed

    Pinzari, Flavia; Tate, James; Bicchieri, Marina; Rhee, Young Joon; Gadd, Geoffrey Michael

    2013-04-01

    Fungal biodeterioration of ivory was investigated with in vitro inoculation of samples obtained from boar and walrus tusks with the fungi Aspergillus niger and Serpula himantioides, species of known geoactive abilities. A combination of light and scanning electron microscopy together with associated analytical techniques was used to characterize fungal interactions with the ivory, including changes in ivory composition, dissolution and tunnelling, and the formation of new biominerals. The research was aimed at providing further understanding of the potential roles of fungi in the colonization and deterioration of ivory in terrestrial environments, but also contributes to our knowledge regarding the possible origins of the surface damage observed on early medieval sculptures made largely from walrus tusks, referred to as 'the Lewis hoard of gaming pieces', that were presumably produced for playing chess. The experiments have shown that the possibility of damage to ivory being caused by fungi is realistic. Scanning electron microscopy revealed penetration of fungal hyphae within cracks in the walrus tusk that showed also widespread tunnelling by fungal hyphae as well as 'fungal footprints' where the surface was etched as a consequence of mycelial colonization. Similar phenomena were observed with boar tusk ivory, while production of metabolites could lead to complete dissolution of the sample. Colonization of ivory and/or exposure to fungal activity lead to extensive secondary biomineral formation, and this was identified as calcium oxalate, mainly as the monohydrate, whewellite. PMID:23157656

  11. A Gene Island with Two Possible Configurations Is Involved in Chromatic Acclimation in Marine Synechococcus

    PubMed Central

    Humily, Florian; Partensky, Frédéric; Six, Christophe; Farrant, Gregory K.; Ratin, Morgane; Marie, Dominique; Garczarek, Laurence

    2013-01-01

    Synechococcus, the second most abundant oxygenic phototroph in the marine environment, harbors the largest pigment diversity known within a single genus of cyanobacteria, allowing it to exploit a wide range of light niches. Some strains are capable of Type IV chromatic acclimation (CA4), a process by which cells can match the phycobilin content of their phycobilisomes to the ambient light quality. Here, we performed extensive genomic comparisons to explore the diversity of this process within the marine Synechococcus radiation. A specific gene island was identified in all CA4-performing strains, containing two genes (fciA/b) coding for possible transcriptional regulators and one gene coding for a phycobilin lyase. However, two distinct configurations of this cluster were observed, depending on the lineage. CA4-A islands contain the mpeZ gene, encoding a recently characterized phycoerythrobilin lyase-isomerase, and a third, small, possible regulator called fciC. In CA4-B islands, the lyase gene encodes an uncharacterized relative of MpeZ, called MpeW. While mpeZ is expressed more in blue light than green light, this is the reverse for mpeW, although only small phenotypic differences were found among chromatic acclimaters possessing either CA4 island type. This study provides novel insights into understanding both diversity and evolution of the CA4 process. PMID:24391958

  12. Biodegradation of ivory (natural apatite): possible involvement of fungal activity in biodeterioration of the Lewis Chessmen.

    PubMed

    Pinzari, Flavia; Tate, James; Bicchieri, Marina; Rhee, Young Joon; Gadd, Geoffrey Michael

    2013-04-01

    Fungal biodeterioration of ivory was investigated with in vitro inoculation of samples obtained from boar and walrus tusks with the fungi Aspergillus niger and Serpula himantioides, species of known geoactive abilities. A combination of light and scanning electron microscopy together with associated analytical techniques was used to characterize fungal interactions with the ivory, including changes in ivory composition, dissolution and tunnelling, and the formation of new biominerals. The research was aimed at providing further understanding of the potential roles of fungi in the colonization and deterioration of ivory in terrestrial environments, but also contributes to our knowledge regarding the possible origins of the surface damage observed on early medieval sculptures made largely from walrus tusks, referred to as 'the Lewis hoard of gaming pieces', that were presumably produced for playing chess. The experiments have shown that the possibility of damage to ivory being caused by fungi is realistic. Scanning electron microscopy revealed penetration of fungal hyphae within cracks in the walrus tusk that showed also widespread tunnelling by fungal hyphae as well as 'fungal footprints' where the surface was etched as a consequence of mycelial colonization. Similar phenomena were observed with boar tusk ivory, while production of metabolites could lead to complete dissolution of the sample. Colonization of ivory and/or exposure to fungal activity lead to extensive secondary biomineral formation, and this was identified as calcium oxalate, mainly as the monohydrate, whewellite.

  13. Possible dopaminergic stimulation of locus coeruleus alpha1-adrenoceptors involved in behavioral activation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yan; Quartermain, David; Dunn, Adrian J; Weinshenker, David; Stone, Eric A

    2008-07-01

    alpha(1)-Adrenoceptors of the locus coeruleus (LC) have been implicated in behavioral activation in novel surroundings, but the endogenous agonist that activates these receptors has not been established. In addition to the canonical activation of alpha(1)-receptors by norepinephrine (NE), there is evidence that dopamine (DA) may also activate certain brain alpha(1)-receptors. This study examined the contribution of DA to exploratory activity in a novel cage by determining the effect of infusion of various dopaminergic and adrenergic drugs into the mouse LC. It was found that the D2/D3 agonist, quinpirole, which selectively blocks the release of CNS DA, produced a dose-dependent and virtually complete abolition of exploration and all movement in the novel cage test. The quinpirole-induced inactivity was significantly attenuated by coinfusion of DA but not by the D1 agonist, SKF38390. Furthermore, the DA attenuation of quinpirole inactivity was blocked by coinfusion of the alpha(1)-adrenergic receptor antagonist, terazosin, but not by the D1 receptor antagonist, SCH23390. LC infusions of either quinpirole or terazosin also produced profound inactivity in DA-beta-hydroxylase knockout (Dbh -/-) mice that lack NE, indicating that their behavioral effects were not due to an alteration of the release or action of LC NE. Measurement of endogenous DA, NE, and 5HT and their metabolites in the LC during exposure to the novel cage indicated an increase in the turnover of DA and NE but not 5HT. These results indicate that DA is a candidate as an endogenous agonist for behaviorally activating LC alpha(1)-receptors and may play a role in the activation of this nucleus by novel surroundings. PMID:18435418

  14. Vesicular trafficking in characean green algae and the possible involvement of a VAMP72-family protein.

    PubMed

    Hoepflinger, Marion; Hametner, Christina; Ueda, Takashi; Foissner, Ilse

    2014-01-01

    The RAB5 GTPase ARA6 (AtARA6) of Arabidopsis thaliana is known to be involved in endosomal trafficking by targeting vesicles to the plasma membrane. During this process AtARA6 is working in close relationship with the SNARE protein VAMP727 (vesicle associated membrane protein 727). Recently, ARA6 of the characean green algae Chara australis (CaARA6) was shown to have properties similar to AtARA6, pointing to similar trafficking pathways. In order to gain further insight into the vesicle trafficking machinery of characeae, C. australis was analyzed for homologous proteins of the VAMP72-family. A CaVAMP72 protein was detected and classified by protein sequence alignment and phylogenetic analyses.

  15. Vesicular trafficking in characean green algae and the possible involvement of a VAMP72-family protein.

    PubMed

    Hoepflinger, Marion C; Hametner, Christina; Ueda, Takashi; Foissner, Ilse

    2014-01-01

    The RAB5 GTPase ARA6 of Arabidopsis thaliana is known to be involved in endosomal trafficking by targeting vesicles to the plasma membrane. During this process AtARA6 is working in close relationship with the SNARE protein VAMP727 (vesicle associated membrane protein 727). Recently, ARA6 of the characean green algae Chara australis (CaARA6) was shown to have properties similar to AtARA6, pointing to similar trafficking pathways. In order to gain further insight into the vesicle trafficking machinery of Characeae, C. australis was analyzed for homologous proteins of the VAMP72-family. A CaVAMP72 protein was detected and classified by protein sequence alignment and phylogenetic analyses.

  16. Autonomic involvement in Parkinson's disease: pathology, pathophysiology, clinical features and possible peripheral biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Cersosimo, Maria G; Benarroch, Eduardo E

    2012-02-15

    Autonomic nervous system involvement occurs at early stages in both Parkinson's disease (PD) and incidental Lewy body disease (ILBD), and affects the sympathetic, parasympathetic, and enteric nervous systems (ENS). It has been proposed that alpha-synuclein (α-SYN) pathology in PD has a distal to proximal progression along autonomic pathways. The ENS is affected before the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (DMV), and distal axons of cardiac sympathetic nerves degenerate before there is loss of paravertebral sympathetic ganglion neurons. Consistent with neuropathological findings, some autonomic manifestations such as constipation or impaired cardiac uptake of norepinephrine precursors, occur at early stages of the disease even before the onset of motor symptoms. Biopsy of peripheral tissues may constitute a promising approach to detect α-SYN neuropathology in autonomic nerves and a useful early biomarker of PD.

  17. Vesicular trafficking in characean green algae and the possible involvement of a VAMP72-family protein.

    PubMed

    Hoepflinger, Marion; Hametner, Christina; Ueda, Takashi; Foissner, Ilse

    2014-01-01

    The RAB5 GTPase ARA6 (AtARA6) of Arabidopsis thaliana is known to be involved in endosomal trafficking by targeting vesicles to the plasma membrane. During this process AtARA6 is working in close relationship with the SNARE protein VAMP727 (vesicle associated membrane protein 727). Recently, ARA6 of the characean green algae Chara australis (CaARA6) was shown to have properties similar to AtARA6, pointing to similar trafficking pathways. In order to gain further insight into the vesicle trafficking machinery of characeae, C. australis was analyzed for homologous proteins of the VAMP72-family. A CaVAMP72 protein was detected and classified by protein sequence alignment and phylogenetic analyses. PMID:24614164

  18. Vesicular trafficking in characean green algae and the possible involvement of a VAMP72-family protein.

    PubMed

    Hoepflinger, Marion C; Hametner, Christina; Ueda, Takashi; Foissner, Ilse

    2014-01-01

    The RAB5 GTPase ARA6 of Arabidopsis thaliana is known to be involved in endosomal trafficking by targeting vesicles to the plasma membrane. During this process AtARA6 is working in close relationship with the SNARE protein VAMP727 (vesicle associated membrane protein 727). Recently, ARA6 of the characean green algae Chara australis (CaARA6) was shown to have properties similar to AtARA6, pointing to similar trafficking pathways. In order to gain further insight into the vesicle trafficking machinery of Characeae, C. australis was analyzed for homologous proteins of the VAMP72-family. A CaVAMP72 protein was detected and classified by protein sequence alignment and phylogenetic analyses. PMID:25764429

  19. Fastidian gum: the Xylella fastidiosa exopolysaccharide possibly involved in bacterial pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    da Silva, F R; Vettore, A L; Kemper, E L; Leite, A; Arruda, P

    2001-09-25

    The Gram-negative bacterium Xylella fastidiosa was the first plant pathogen to be completely sequenced. This species causes several economically important plant diseases, including citrus variegated chlorosis (CVC). Analysis of the genomic sequence of X. fastidiosa revealed a 12 kb DNA fragment containing an operon closely related to the gum operon of Xanthomonas campestris. The presence of all genes involved in the synthesis of sugar precursors, existence of exopolysaccharide (EPS) production regulators in the genome, and the absence of three of the X. campestris gum genes suggested that X. fastidiosa is able to synthesize an EPS different from that of xanthan gum. This novel EPS probably consists of polymerized tetrasaccharide repeating units assembled by the sequential addition of glucose-1-phosphate, glucose, mannose and glucuronic acid on a polyprenol phosphate carrier. PMID:11583843

  20. Motivationally significant self-control: enhanced action withholding involves the right inferior frontal junction.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, David A; Upton, Daniel J; Moore, Jennifer; Hester, Robert

    2015-01-01

    In everyday life, people use self-control to withhold actions. This ability is particularly important when the consequences of action withholding have an impact on the individual's well-being. Despite its importance, it is unclear as to how the neural nodes implicated in action withholding contribute to this real-world type of self-control. By modifying an action withholding paradigm, the go/no-go task, we examined how the brain exerts self-control during a scenario in which the implications of withholding an action are meaningful and motivationally significant. A successfully withheld response contributed to long-term monetary rewards, whereas failure to withhold a response incurred an immediate monetary punishment. Compared with neutral action withholding, participants significantly improved their performance when these contingencies were applied. Crucially, although the right IFG and pre-SMA were found to promote overall action withholding, the enhancement in behavioral performance relative to a neutral condition was only reflected by a physiological change in a region encompassing the right inferior frontal junction and precentral gyrus. We speculate that the ability to flexibly modulate attention to goal-relevant stimuli is crucial to enhanced, motivationally driven action withholding and that this ability is subserved by the right inferior frontal junction. These findings suggest that control-modulating factors, rather than action withholding processes per se, can be critical to improving motivationally significant action withholding outcomes. PMID:25115186

  1. Brachial Neuritis With Phrenic Nerve Involvement in a Patient With a Possible Connective Tissue Disease

    PubMed Central

    Subash, Meera; Patel, Gaurav; Welker, John

    2014-01-01

    Background. Brachial neuritis (BN) is a rare inflammatory condition of peripheral nerves, usually involving the cervicobrachial plexus. These patients present with sudden onset of shoulder and arm pain that evolves into muscle weakness and atrophy.. Case Report. A 33-year-old woman presented with a 1-month history of diffuse pain in her thorax. She had no trauma or inciting incident prior to the onset of this pain and was initially treated for muscle spasms. The patient was seen in the emergency room multiple times and was treated with several courses of antibiotics for pneumonia on the basis of clinical symptoms and abnormal x-rays. The pleuritic chest pain persisted for at least 4 months, and the patient was eventually admitted for worsening pain and dyspnea. On physical examination, crackles were heard at both lung bases, and chest inspection revealed increased expansion in the upper thorax but poor expansion of the lower thorax and mild paradoxical respiration. “Sniff” test revealed no motion of the left hemidiaphragm and reduced motion on the right hemidiaphragm. Her computed tomography scan revealed bilateral atelectasis, more severe at the left base. She reported no symptoms involving her joints or skin or abdomen. Her presentation and clinical course are best explained by BN with a bilateral diaphragmatic weakness. However, she had a positive ANA, RF, anti-RNP antibody, and anti SS-A. Conclusion. Patients with BN can present with diffuse thoracic pain, pleuritic chest pain, and diaphragmatic weakness. Our patient may represent a case of connective tissue disease presenting with brachial plexus neuritis. PMID:26425609

  2. Chronic alcohol exposure inhibits biotin uptake by pancreatic acinar cells: possible involvement of epigenetic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Padmanabhan; Kapadia, Rubina; Biswas, Arundhati; Said, Hamid M

    2014-11-01

    Chronic exposure to alcohol affects different physiological aspects of pancreatic acinar cells (PAC), but its effect on the uptake process of biotin is not known. We addressed this issue using mouse-derived pancreatic acinar 266-6 cells chronically exposed to alcohol and wild-type and transgenic mice (carrying the human SLC5A6 5'-promoter) fed alcohol chronically. First we established that biotin uptake by PAC is Na(+) dependent and carrier mediated and involves sodium-dependent multivitamin transporter (SMVT). Chronic exposure of 266-6 cells to alcohol led to a significant inhibition in biotin uptake, expression of SMVT protein, and mRNA as well as in the activity of the SLC5A6 promoter. Similarly, chronic alcohol feeding of wild-type and transgenic mice carrying the SLC5A6 promoter led to a significant inhibition in biotin uptake by PAC, as well as in the expression of SMVT protein and mRNA and the activity of the SLC5A6 promoters expressed in the transgenic mice. We also found that chronic alcohol feeding of mice is associated with a significant increase in the methylation status of CpG islands predicted to be in the mouse Slc5a6 promoters and a decrease in the level of expression of transcription factor KLF-4, which plays an important role in regulating SLC5A6 promoter activity. These results demonstrate, for the first time, that chronic alcohol exposure negatively impacts biotin uptake in PAC and that this effect is exerted (at least in part) at the level of transcription of the SLC5A6 gene and may involve epigenetic/molecular mechanisms.

  3. Possible involvement of miRNAs in tropism of Parvovirus B19.

    PubMed

    Anbarlou, Azadeh; AkhavanRahnama, Mahshid; Atashi, Amir; Soleimani, Masoud; Arefian, Ehsan; Gallinella, Giorgio

    2016-03-01

    Human Parvovirus B19 (PVB19) is one of the most important pathogens that targets erythroid lineage. Many factors were mentioned for restriction to erythroid progenitor cells (EPCs). Previous studies showed that in non-permissive cells VP1 and VP2 (structural proteins) mRNAs were detected but could not translate to proteins. A bioinformatics study showed that this inhibition might be due to specific microRNAs (miRNAs) present in non-permissive cells but not in permissive EPCs. To confirm the hypothesis, we evaluated the effect of miRNAs on VP expression. CD34(+) HSCs were separated from cord blood. Then, CD34(+) cells were treated with differentiation medium to obtain CD36(+) EPCs. To evaluate the effect of miRNAs on VP expression in MCF7 and HEK-293 cell lines (non-permissive cells) and CD36(+) EPCs, dual luciferase assay was performed in presence of shRNAs against Dicer and Drosha to disrupt miRNA biogenesis. QRT-PCR was performed to check down-regulation of Dicer and Drosha after transfection. All measurements were done in triplicate. Data means were compared using one-way ANOVAs. MicroRNA prediction was done by the online microRNA prediction tools. No significant difference was shown in luciferase activity of CD36(+) EPCs after co-transfection with shRNAs, while it was significant in non-permissive cells. Our study revealed that miRNAs may be involved in inhibition of VP expression in non-permissive cells, although further studies are required to demonstrate which miRNAs exactly are involved in regulation of PVB19 replication. PMID:26878856

  4. Mechanisms of Action Involved in Ozone Therapy: Is healing induced via a mild oxidative stress?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    oxidative stress. Recently these concepts have become widely accepted. The versatility of ozone in treating vascular and degenerative diseases as well as skin lesions, hernial disc and primary root carious lesions in children is emphasized. Further researches able to elucidate whether the mechanisms of action of ozone therapy involve nuclear transcription factors, such as Nrf2, NFAT, AP-1, and HIF-1α are warranted. PMID:22185664

  5. Cell signaling and estrogens in female rat osteoblasts: a possible involvement of unconventional nonnuclear receptors.

    PubMed

    Lieberherr, M; Grosse, B; Kachkache, M; Balsan, S

    1993-11-01

    Estrogen deficiency is associated with bone loss, and estrogen replacement is an effective treatment of this osteoporotic process. This study examines the early (5-120 s) effects of 17 beta-estradiol on the intracellular calcium and phospholipid metabolism in confluent female rat osteoblasts. The cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) was determined using fura-2/AM as Ca2+ probe. Cells were labeled with myo-[2-3H]inositol or [14C]arachidonic acid for inositol or lipid determination. Inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) and diacylglycerol (DAG) production were determined by either mass measurement or anion-exchange chromatography or by thin-layer chromatography, respectively. 17 beta-Estradiol (1 pM to 1 nM) increased [Ca2+]i in a biphasic manner within 10 s via Ca2+ influx from the extracellular milieu, as shown by the effects of the calcium chelator EGTA and the Ca2+ channel blockers nifedipine and verapamil, and via Ca2+ mobilization from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), as shown by the effects of thapsigargin. 17 beta-Estradiol (1 pM to 1 nM) induced a biphasic and concomitant increase in IP3 and DAG formation. Estradiol immobilized on bovine serum albumin (BSA) [E-(O-carboxymethyl)oxime BSA] and its derivative (O-carboxymethyl)oxime rapidly increased ([Ca2+]i, IP3, and DAG and were full agonists, although they were less potent than the free estradiol. They had the same action time course and acted via Ca2+ influx and Ca2+ mobilization from ER. Tamoxifen, a potent inhibitor of genomic steroid responses, did not block the rapid increase in Ca2+, IP3, and DAG induced by estradiol. Finally, inhibitor of phospholipase C (neomycin) and pertussis toxin abolished the effects of 17 beta-estradiol on IP3 and DAG formation. These results suggest that female rat osteoblasts bear non-genomic unconventional cell surface receptors for estradiol, belonging to the class of the membrane receptors coupled to a phospholipase C via a pertussis toxin-sensitive G protein.

  6. Do infants provide evidence that the mirror system is involved in action understanding?

    PubMed

    Southgate, Victoria

    2013-09-01

    The mirror neuron theory of action understanding makes predictions concerning how the limited motor repertoire of young infants should impact on their ability to interpret others' actions. In line with this theory, an increasing body of research has identified a correlation between infants' abilities to perform an action, and their ability to interpret that action as goal-directed when performed by others. In this paper, I will argue that the infant data does by no means unequivocally support the mirror neuron theory of action understanding and that alternative interpretations of the data should be considered. Furthermore, some of this data can be better interpreted in terms of an alternative view, which holds that the role of the motor system in action perception is more likely to be one of enabling the observer to predict, after a goal has been identified, how that goal will be attained.

  7. Possible involvement of oxidative stress in fenofibrate-induced hepatocarcinogenesis in rats.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Jihei; Dewa, Yasuaki; Okamura, Toshiya; Muguruma, Masako; Jin, Meilan; Saegusa, Yukie; Umemura, Takashi; Mitsumori, Kunitoshi

    2008-09-01

    To clarify whether oxidative stress is involved in the development of hepatocellular preneoplastic foci induced by fenofibrate (FF), a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha agonist, male F344/N rats were fed a diet containing 6,000, 3,000, or 0 ppm of FF for 13 weeks after N-diethylnitrosamine initiation. Two-third partial hepatectomy was performed 1 week after the FF treatment. Histopathologically, the number of hepatocellular altered foci significantly increased in the FF-treated groups with a concomitant increase in the number of hepatocytes positive for anti-Ki-67 antibody, but the number and area of glutathione S-transferase placental form (GST-P)-positive foci decreased in these groups, as compared to those in the controls. Microarray analysis or quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chine reaction demonstrated the significant up-regulations of Aco and Cyp4a1 (genes related to lipid metabolism); Gpx2, Yc2, Cat, Cyp2b15, and Ugt1a6 (metabolic oxidative stress-related genes); Apex1, Mgmt, Xrcc5, Nbn, and Gadd45a (DNA repair-related genes); and Ccnd1 (cell cycle-related genes) in the FF-treated groups, and the significant down-regulations of Cyp1a2, Gsta2, Gstm2, and Gstm3 (phase I or II metabolism-related genes); Mlh1 and Top1 (DNA repair-related genes); and Cdkn1a, Cdkn1b, Chek2, and Gadd45b (cell cycle/apoptosis-related genes) in these rats. FF-treatment increased the activity of enzymes such as carnitine acetyltransferase, carnitine palmitoyltransferase, fatty acyl-CoA oxidizing system, and catalase in the liver, but not superoxide dismutase in the liver. In addition, 8-OHdG level in liver DNA, lipofuscin deposition in hepatocytes, and in vitro reactive oxygen species production in microsomes significantly increased due to FF treatment. These results suggest that oxidative stress is involved in the development of FF-induced hepatocellular preneoplastic foci in rats.

  8. Oxytocin is involved in the proconvulsant effects of Sildenafil: Possible role of CREB.

    PubMed

    Khoshneviszadeh, Mahsima; Rahimian, Reza; Fakhfouri, Gohar; Payandemehr, Borna; Khodagholi, Fariba; Ejtemaei Mehr, Shahram; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza

    2016-08-10

    Sildenafil is a phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor mainly used for male erectile dysfunction. One of rare yet serious adverse effects of Sildenafil is its potential to decrease seizure threshold. Ample evidence suggests that Sildenafil exerts central effects through induction of Oxytocin (OT) secretion and CREB phosphorylation. The aim of the present study is to evaluate potential roles of OT and CREB in the proconvulsant effects of Sildenafil. The Pentylenetetrazole-induced seizure was used as a standard convulsion model in this study. OT release and pCREB expression were evaluated in the hippocampus of mice using ELISA and western blot assays, respectively. Our results showed that Sildenafil at the dose of 10mgkg(-1) or higher, significantly decreased seizure threshold. Pretreatment with a non-effective dose of OT, potentiated while OT receptor antagonist, Atosiban, reversed fully the proconvulsant effects of Sildenafil (5mgkg(-1)). At biochemical inspection, Sildenafil markedly increased CREB which was attenuated by coadministration of Atosiban. The present study shows for the first time that OT release and the subsequent CREB phosphorylation are involved in the proconvulsant effects of acute Sildenafil treatment in an experimental model of seizure. PMID:27220266

  9. Possible involvement of 12-lipoxygenase activation in glucose-deprivation/reload-treated neurons.

    PubMed

    Nagasawa, Kazuki; Kakuda, Taichi; Higashi, Youichirou; Fujimoto, Sadaki

    2007-12-18

    The aim of this study was to clarify whether 12-lipoxygenase (12-LOX) activation was involved in reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, extensive poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) activation and neuronal death induced by glucose-deprivation, followed by glucose-reload (GD/R). The decrease of neuronal viability and accumulation of poly(ADP-ribose) induced by GD/R were prevented 3-aminobenzamide, a representative PARP inhibitor, demonstrating this treatment protocol caused the same oxidative stress with the previously reported one. The PARP activation, ROS generation and decrease of neuron viability induced by GD/R treatment were almost completely abolished by an extracellular zinc chelator, CaEDTA. p47(phox), a cytosolic component of NADPH oxidase was translocated the membrane fraction by GD/R, indicating its activation, but it did not generate detectable ROS. Surprisingly, pharmacological inhibition of NADPH oxidase with apocynin and AEBSF further decreased the decreased neuron viability induced by GD/R. On the other hand, AA861, a 12-LOX inhibitor, prevented ROS generation and decrease of neuron viability caused by GD/R. Interestingly, an antioxidant, N-acetyl-l-cysteine rescued the neurons from GD/R-induced oxidative stress, implying effectiveness of antioxidant administration. These findings suggested that activation of 12-LOX, but not NADPH oxidase, following to zinc release might play an important role in ROS generation and decrease of viability in GD/R-treated neurons.

  10. Possible involvement of plasmin in long-term potentiation of rat hippocampal slices.

    PubMed

    Mizutani, A; Saito, H; Matsuki, N

    1996-11-11

    Effects of proteases and protease inhibitors on generation of long-term potentiation (LTP) were investigated in the CA1 and dentate regions of rat hippocampus. Plasmin, a serine protease, and its precursor plasminogen significantly enhanced short-term potentiation (STP) induced by a weak tetanic stimulation, without affecting basal responses. The STP-enhancing effect of plasmin disappeared by concomitant perfusion of alpha 2-antiplasmin, an endogenous plasmin inhibitor. Other proteases, such as thrombin, trypsin and cathepsin B, did not affect STP. On the other hand, alpha 2-antiplasmin and leupeptin significantly attenuated LTP induced by a strong tetanus though plasminogen or plasmin itself did not influence LTP. Furthermore, plasminogen and plasmin did not affect NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic responses in the absence of extracellular Mg2+. These results suggest that endogenous plasmin is involved in the mechanism of LTP in CA1 and dentate regions of rat hippocampus and that the STP-enhancing effect of plasmin is independent of NMDA receptors.

  11. Inhibition of hormone-stimulated lipolysis by clofibrate. A possible mechanism for its hypolipidemic action.

    PubMed Central

    D'Costa, M A; Angel, A

    1975-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the mechanism of the antilipolytic action of clofibrate (p-chlorophenoxyisobutyrate). Clofibrate, in the dose range of 10-80 mg/199 ml, inhibited the initial rate of norepinephrine-stimulated lipolysis 17-44 percent in isolated rat fat cells. At a dose corresponding to therapeutic levels in vivo (10 mg/100 ml) clofibrate also inhibited hormone-stimulated lipolysis by 20-30 percent in fragments of human subcutaneous fat. Inhibition of lipolysis by clofibrate occurred at all concentrations of norepinephrine and ACTH (0.02-0.1 mug/ml) but did not occur with equilipolytic concentrations of dibutyryl cyclic AMP, suggesting a proximal site of action on the lipolytic sequence. Clofibrate reduced by 60 percent (315plus or minus40 vs. 120plus or minus25 pmol/g lipid; meanplus or minusSEM) the norepinephrine-stimulated initial rise in cyclic AMP, measured 10 min after addition of hormone. Because the antilipolytic effect occurred in the presence of glucose and without altering cellular ATP levels, the reduction in intracellular cyclic AMP levels could not be attributed to uncoupling of oxidative metabolism or to secondary effects of free fatty acid accumulation. In the secondary effects of free fatty acid accumulation. In the presence of procaine-HC1, which blocks hormone-stimulated lipolysis without inhibiting cyclic AMP accumulation, addition of clofibrate prevented the hormone-stimulated rise in cyclic AMP. Clofibrate did not affect the activity of the low-Km 3',5'-cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase in norepinephrine-stimulated adipocytes. These data suggest that the antilipolytic effect of clofibrate is due to its suppression of cyclic AMP production by inhibition of adenylate cyclase. The drug's hypolipidemic action may in part be explained by its antilipolytic effect, which deprives the liver of free fatty acid substrate for lipoprotein synthesis. Images PMID:162783

  12. Toxic effects of fatty acids on yeast cells: possible mechanisms of action.

    PubMed

    Hunková, Z; Fencl, A

    1978-08-01

    As shown in a previous paper, threshold concentrations of lower and intermediate fatty acids inhibit the uptake of inorganic phosphate, growth, and cell division in yeast cells. This demonstrates that, apart from these effects, the acids cause an increase in the respiration quotient (RQ), inhibition of CO2 fixation, production of ethanol at the expense of anabolic processes, and inhibition of active amino acid transport in the yeast Candida utilis. On the other hand, the threshold concentrations have no effect on intracellular pH. The inhibition of the inorganic phosphate uptake cannot be the sole primary mode of action of fatty acids since the omission of inorganic phosphate in the incubation medium brings about an inhibition of anabolic processes that is lower than that brought about by fatty acids since the omission of inorganic phosphate in the incubation medium brings about an inhibition of anabolic processes that is lower than that brought by fatty acids at concentrations still premitting some phosphate uptake. Although 2,4-dinitrophenol and caproic acid at low concentrations cause an analogous decrease in biomass yield, their combination does not bring about any marked increase in the effect. Considering the physicochemical properties of fatty acids and their preferential action on energy-requiring processes, one of the key sites of action can be assumed to be the mitochondrial membrane. Fatty acids might inhibit the transport of anions, especially phosphate, across the membrane, and disturb the membrane potential by affecting the transport protons. The physiocochemical properties of fatty acids may also give rise to their binding to other intracellular membranes and to a subsequent interference with the function of the corresponding organelles.

  13. Brain Glycogen Decreases During Intense Exercise Without Hypoglycemia: The Possible Involvement of Serotonin.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Takashi; Soya, Shingo; Kawanaka, Kentaro; Soya, Hideaki

    2015-07-01

    Brain glycogen stored in astrocytes, a source of lactate as a neuronal energy source, decreases during prolonged exercise with hypoglycemia. However, brain glycogen dynamics during exercise without hypoglycemia remain unknown. Since intense exercise increases brain noradrenaline and serotonin as known inducers for brain glycogenolysis, we hypothesized that brain glycogen decreases with intense exercise not accompanied by hypoglycemia. To test this hypothesis, we employed a well-established acute intense exercise model of swimming in rats. Rats swam for fourteen 20 s bouts with a weight equal to 8 % of their body mass and were sacrificed using high-power (10 kW) microwave irradiation to inactivate brain enzymes for accurate detection of brain glycogen and monoamines. Intense exercise did not alter blood glucose, but did increase blood lactate levels. Immediately after exercise, brain glycogen decreased and brain lactate increased in the hippocampus, cerebellum, cortex, and brainstem. Simultaneously, serotonin turnover in the hippocampus and brainstem mutually increased and were associated with decreased brain glycogen. Intense swimming exercise that does not induce hypoglycemia decreases brain glycogen associated with increased brain lactate, implying an importance of glycogen in brain energetics during intense exercise even without hypoglycemia. Activated serotonergic regulation is a possible underlying mechanism for intense exercise-induced glycogenolysis at least in the hippocampus and brainstem.

  14. Involvement of ethylene in the action of the cotton defoliant thidiazuron.

    PubMed

    Suttle, J C

    1985-06-01

    The effect of the defoliant thidiazuron (N-phenyl-N'-1,2,3-thiadiazol-5-ylurea) on endogenous ethylene evolution and the role of endogenous ethylene in thidiazuron-mediated leaf abscission were examined in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L. cv Stoneville 519) seedlings. Treatment of 20- to 30-day-old seedlings with thidiazuron at concentrations equal to or greater than 10 micromolar resulted in leaf abscission. At a treatment concentration of 100 micromolar, nearly total abscission of the youngest leaves was observed. Following treatment, abscission of the younger leaves commenced within 48 hours and was complete by 120 hours. A large increase in ethylene evolution from leaf blades and abscission zone explants was readily detectable within 24 hours of treatment and persisted until leaf fall. Ethylene evolution from treated leaf blades was greatest 1 day posttreatment and reached levels in excess of 600 nanoliters per gram fresh weight per hour (26.7 nanomoles per gram fresh weight per hour). The increase in ethylene evolution occurred in the absence of increased ethane evolution, altered leaf water potential, or decreased chlorophyll levels. Treatment of seedlings with inhibitors of ethylene action (silver thiosulfate, hypobaric pressure) or ethylene synthesis (aminoethoxyvinylglycine) resulted in an inhibition of thidiazuron-induced defoliation. Application of exogenous ethylene or 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid largely restored the thidiazuron response. The results indicate that thidiazuron-induced leaf abscission is mediated, at least in part, by an increase in endogenous ethylene evolution. However, alterations of other phytohormone systems thought to be involved in regulating leaf abscission are not excluded by these studies. PMID:16664229

  15. Involvement of ethylene in the action of the cotton defoliant thidiazuron.

    PubMed

    Suttle, J C

    1985-06-01

    The effect of the defoliant thidiazuron (N-phenyl-N'-1,2,3-thiadiazol-5-ylurea) on endogenous ethylene evolution and the role of endogenous ethylene in thidiazuron-mediated leaf abscission were examined in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L. cv Stoneville 519) seedlings. Treatment of 20- to 30-day-old seedlings with thidiazuron at concentrations equal to or greater than 10 micromolar resulted in leaf abscission. At a treatment concentration of 100 micromolar, nearly total abscission of the youngest leaves was observed. Following treatment, abscission of the younger leaves commenced within 48 hours and was complete by 120 hours. A large increase in ethylene evolution from leaf blades and abscission zone explants was readily detectable within 24 hours of treatment and persisted until leaf fall. Ethylene evolution from treated leaf blades was greatest 1 day posttreatment and reached levels in excess of 600 nanoliters per gram fresh weight per hour (26.7 nanomoles per gram fresh weight per hour). The increase in ethylene evolution occurred in the absence of increased ethane evolution, altered leaf water potential, or decreased chlorophyll levels. Treatment of seedlings with inhibitors of ethylene action (silver thiosulfate, hypobaric pressure) or ethylene synthesis (aminoethoxyvinylglycine) resulted in an inhibition of thidiazuron-induced defoliation. Application of exogenous ethylene or 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid largely restored the thidiazuron response. The results indicate that thidiazuron-induced leaf abscission is mediated, at least in part, by an increase in endogenous ethylene evolution. However, alterations of other phytohormone systems thought to be involved in regulating leaf abscission are not excluded by these studies.

  16. Bothrops jararaca Peptide with Anti-Hypertensive Action Normalizes Endothelium Dysfunction Involved in Physiopathology of Preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Benedetti, Gabriel; Morais, Katia L. P.; Guerreiro, Juliano R.; de Oliveira, Eduardo Fontana; Hoshida, Mara Sandra; Oliveira, Leandro; Sass, Nelson; Lebrun, Ivo; Ulrich, Henning; Lameu, Claudiana; de Camargo, Antonio Carlos Martins

    2011-01-01

    Preeclampsia, a pregnancy-specific syndrome characterized by hypertension, proteinuria and edema, is a major cause of fetal and maternal morbidity and mortality especially in developing countries. Bj-PRO-10c, a proline-rich peptide isolated from Bothrops jararaca venom, has been attributed with potent anti-hypertensive effects. Recently, we have shown that Bj-PRO-10c-induced anti-hypertensive actions involved NO production in spontaneous hypertensive rats. Using in vitro studies we now show that Bj-PRO-10c was able to increase NO production in human umbilical vein endothelial cells from hypertensive pregnant women (HUVEC-PE) to levels observed in HUVEC of normotensive women. Moreover, in the presence of the peptide, eNOS expression as well as argininosuccinate synthase activity, the key rate-limiting enzyme of the citrulline-NO cycle, were enhanced. In addition, excessive superoxide production due to NO deficiency, one of the major deleterious effects of the disease, was inhibited by Bj-PRO-10c. Bj-PRO-10c induced intracellular calcium fluxes in both, HUVEC-PE and HUVEC, which, however, led to activation of eNOS expression only in HUVEC-PE. Since Bj-PRO-10c promoted biological effects in HUVEC from patients suffering from the disorder and not in normotensive pregnant women, we hypothesize that Bj-PRO-10c induces its anti-hypertensive effect in mothers with preeclampsia. Such properties may initiate the development of novel therapeutics for treating preeclampsia. PMID:21858206

  17. Possible involvement of inflammatory/reparative processes in the development of uterine fibroids.

    PubMed

    Protic, Olga; Toti, Paolo; Islam, Md Soriful; Occhini, Rossella; Giannubilo, Stefano Raffaele; Catherino, William H; Cinti, Saverio; Petraglia, Felice; Ciavattini, Andrea; Castellucci, Mario; Hinz, Boris; Ciarmela, Pasquapina

    2016-05-01

    Uterine leiomyomas are benign tumors in the smooth muscle layer of the uterus. The most common histological type is the "usual leiomyoma", characterized by overexpression of ECM proteins, whereas the "cellular type" has higher cellular content. Our objective is to investigate the involvement of inflammatory and reparative processes in leiomyoma pathobiology. Using a morphological approach, we investigate the presence of inflammatory cells. Next, we determine the localization of the ECM, the presence/absence of fibrotic cells via α-sma and desmin and the immunohistochemical profile of the mesenchymal cells with respect to CD34. Finally, we explore the effect of inflammatory mediators (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-15, GM-CSF and IFN-γ) on pro-fibrotic factor activin A mRNA expression in vitro. Higher numbers of macrophages were found inside and close to leiomyomas as compared to the more distant myometrium. Cellular leiomyomas showed more macrophages and mast cells than the "usual type". Inside the fibroid tissue, we found cells positive for α-sma, but negative for desmin and a large amount of collagen surrounding the nodule, suggestive of myofibroblasts producing ECM. In the myometrium and leiomyomas of the "usual type", we identified numerous CD34+ fibroblasts, which are known to give rise to myofibroblasts upon loss of CD34 expression. In leiomyomas of the "cellular type", stromal fibroblasts were CD34-negative. Finally, we found that TNF-α increased activin A mRNA in myometrial and leiomyoma cells. In conclusion, this study demonstrates the presence of inflammatory cells in uterine leiomyomas, which may contribute to excessive ECM production, tissue remodeling and leiomyoma growth. PMID:26613601

  18. Enzyme activity alteration by cadmium administration to rats: the possibility of iron involvement in lipid peroxidation.

    PubMed

    Casalino, E; Sblano, C; Landriscina, C

    1997-10-15

    The specific activities of D-3-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase (BDH) and glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) are reduced in the liver and kidney of rats intoxicated with 2.5 mg Cd/kg body wt and sacrificed after 24 h; conversely ketone-body concentration is strongly increased in both of these organs and blood. In the same animals a great stimulation of antioxidant enzymes glutathione reductase and glutathione peroxidase occurs. The prooxidant state induced by cadmium in liver mitochondria and microsomes is unaffected by superoxide dismutase, catalase, or mannitol, whereas it is completely blocked by vitamin E thus excluding the involvement of reactive oxygen species in this process. The mechanism by which cadmium induces lipid peroxidation has been investigated by measuring the effect of this metal on liposomes. Ninety-minute treatment of liposomes with CdCl2 does not induce any lipid peroxidation. In contrast, Fe2+ ions under the same conditions cause strong liposome peroxidation. It has also been observed that cadmium promotes a time-dependent iron release from biological membranes. When lipid peroxidation is induced by a low concentration (5 microM) of FeCl2, in place of CdCl2, the characteristics of this process and the sensitivity to the various antioxidants used are similar to those observed with Cd. From these results we conclude that the prooxidative effect of cadmium is an indirect one since it is mediated by iron. With regard to the inhibitory effect on BDH and GDH following cadmium intoxication, it does not appear to be imputable to lipid peroxidation since in vitro investigations indicate that the presence of vitamin E does not remove the inhibition at all. PMID:9343363

  19. Possible Segregated Ice at the Phoenix Landing Site: Was Liquid Water Involved?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoker, C.; Blaney, D.; Hecht, M.; Catling, D.; Pike, W. T.; Mellon, M.; Kounaves, S.; Lemmon, M.

    2008-12-01

    exposed in Goldilocks trench and left undisturbed for 79 sols. During this time, the brightness of the material slowly faded and, by sol 99, a sublimation lag covered the bright deposit with nearly the same spectral properties as soil. It was not possible to obtain a large enough sample of the lag to directly measure salt concentration with a wet chemistry cell. Instead, a small sample of the lag was examined with the Optical Microscope to look for morphological evidence of salts. The material was stickier and more cohesive than previous soil samples examined with the microscope, and a population of light colored particles up to 30 microns in diameter with evidence of angularity consistent with microcrystallinity was found. This observation is suggestive of possible salts more concentrated in this area. In conclusion, the microscopy results are consistent with a liquid water formation mechanism but inconclusive without a direct measurement of the composition of the material.

  20. Tetracycline compounds with non-antimicrobial organ protective properties: possible mechanisms of action

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, Michael O.; Ceballos, Guillermo; Villarreal, Francisco

    2010-01-01

    Tetracyclines were developed as a result of the screening of soil samples for antibiotics. The firstt of these compounds, chlortetracycline, was introduced in 1947. Tetracyclines were found to be highly effective against various pathogens including rickettsiae, as well as both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, thus becoming the first class of broad spectrum antibiotics. Many other interesting properties, unrelated to their antibiotic activity, have been identified for tetracyclines which have led to widely divergent experimental and clinical uses. For example, tetracyclines are also an effective anti-malarial drug. Minocycline, which can readily cross cell membranes, is known to be a potent anti-apoptotic agent. Another tetracycline, doxycycline is known to exert anti-protease activities. Doxycycline can inhibit matrix metalloproteinases which contribute to tissue destruction activities in diseases such as periodontitis. A large body of literature has provided additional evidence for the “beneficial” actions of tetracyclines, including their ability to act as reactive oxygen species scavengers and anti-inflammatory agents. This review provides a summary of tetracycline’s multiple mechanisms of action as a means to understand their beneficial effects. PMID:20951211

  1. Tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA): Possible modes of action of toxicity and carcinogenicity in rodents.

    PubMed

    Lai, David Y; Kacew, Sam; Dekant, Wolfgang

    2015-06-01

    Due to potential consumer exposures, the toxicity of tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) has been extensively studied. Reviews of TBBPA concluded no concerns regarding human health risks. The low toxicity of TBBPA is consistent with low bioavailability. However, some oral toxicity studies in rodents with TBBPA reported changes in thyroid hormone levels and a carcinogenicity study with TBBPA showed increased incidences of uterine tumors in rats. This review analyzes several modes of action (MoA) that may account for the observed thyroxine hormone changes and the uterine tumors. It concludes that the potential modes of action for thyroid changes induced by TBBPA are expected to exhibit a threshold for adverse effects due to the ability of the mammalian organism to compensate small changes in thyroid hormone levels. Regarding MoAs for the uterine tumors, TBBPA does not exert genotoxic or estrogenic effects. Available evidence suggests that TBBPA may increase levels of circulating estrogens by a competitive inhibition of estrogen conjugation and produce uterine tumors by promoting pre-existing Tp53-mutations due to increased estrogen levels resulting in increased cell proliferation. PMID:25818463

  2. Antifungal activity of salicylic acid against Penicillium expansum and its possible mechanisms of action.

    PubMed

    da Rocha Neto, Argus Cezar; Maraschin, Marcelo; Di Piero, Robson Marcelo

    2015-12-23

    Apple is a fruit widely produced and consumed around the world. Blue mold (Penicillium expansum) is one of the main postharvest diseases in apples, leading to a wide use of fungicides and the search for alternative products. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of salicylic acid (SA) against P. expansum, elucidating its mechanisms of action. The antimicrobial effect was determined by exposing conidia to a 2.5 mM SA solution for 0 to 120 min, followed by incubation. The effect of pH on the efficacy of SA against P. expansum was assessed both in vitro and in situ. The action mechanisms were investigated through fluorescence assays, measurement of protein leakage, lipid damage, and transmission electronic microscopy. SA was capable of inhibiting 90% of the fungal germination after 30 min, causing damage to the conidial plasma membrane and leading to protein leakage up to 3.2 μg of soluble protein per g of mycelium. The pH of the SA solution affected the antimicrobial activity of this secondary metabolite, which inhibited the germination of P. expansum and the blue mold incidence in apples in solutions with pH≤3 by 100%, gradually losing its activity at higher pH.

  3. Effects of hypergravity exposure on the developing central nervous system: possible involvement of thyroid hormone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sajdel-Sulkowska, E. M.; Li, G. H.; Ronca, A. E.; Baer, L. A.; Sulkowski, G. M.; Koibuchi, N.; Wade, C. E.

    2001-01-01

    The present study examined the effects of hypergravity exposure on the developing brain and specifically explored the possibility that these effects are mediated by altered thyroid status. Thirty-four timed-pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to continuous centrifugation at 1.5 G (HG) from gestational Day 11 until one of three key developmental points: postnatal Day (P) 6, P15, or P21 (10 pups/dam: 5 males/5 females). During the 32-day centrifugation, stationary controls (SC, n = 25 dams) were housed in the same room as HG animals. Neonatal body, forebrain, and cerebellum mass and neonatal and maternal thyroid status were assessed at each time point. The body mass of centrifuged neonates was comparatively lower at each time point. The mass of the forebrain and the mass of the cerebellum were maximally reduced in hypergravity-exposed neonates at P6 by 15.9% and 25.6%, respectively. Analysis of neonatal plasma suggested a transient hypothyroid status, as indicated by increased thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) level (38.6%) at P6, while maternal plasma TSH levels were maximally elevated at P15 (38.9%). Neither neonatal nor maternal plasma TH levels were altered, suggesting a moderate hypothyroid condition. Thus, continuous exposure of the developing rats to hypergravity during the embryonic and neonatal periods has a highly significant effect on the developing forebrain and cerebellum and neonatal thyroid status (P < 0.05, Bonferroni corrected). These data are consistent with the hypothesized role of the thyroid hormone in mediating the effect of hypergravity in the developing central nervous system and begin to define the role of TH in the overall response of the developing organism to altered gravity.

  4. Exploring possible mechanisms of action for the nanotoxicity and protein binding of decorated nanotubes: interpretation of physicochemical properties from optimal QSAR models.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Emilio Xavier; Hopfinger, Anton J; Shao, Chi-Yu; Su, Bo-Han; Chen, Sing-Zuo; Tseng, Yufeng Jane

    2015-10-01

    Carbon nanotubes have become widely used in a variety of applications including biosensors and drug carriers. Therefore, the issue of carbon nanotube toxicity is increasingly an area of focus and concern. While previous studies have focused on the gross mechanisms of action relating to nanomaterials interacting with biological entities, this study proposes detailed mechanisms of action, relating to nanotoxicity, for a series of decorated (functionalized) carbon nanotube complexes based on previously reported QSAR models. Possible mechanisms of nanotoxicity for six endpoints (bovine serum albumin, carbonic anhydrase, chymotrypsin, hemoglobin along with cell viability and nitrogen oxide production) have been extracted from the corresponding optimized QSAR models. The molecular features relevant to each of the endpoint respective mechanism of action for the decorated nanotubes are also discussed. Based on the molecular information contained within the optimal QSAR models for each nanotoxicity endpoint, either the decorator attached to the nanotube is directly responsible for the expression of a particular activity, irrespective of the decorator's 3D-geometry and independent of the nanotube, or those decorators having structures that place the functional groups of the decorators as far as possible from the nanotube surface most strongly influence the biological activity. These molecular descriptors are further used to hypothesize specific interactions involved in the expression of each of the six biological endpoints.

  5. Investigating the Possibilities of Creating a Community of Practice. Action Research in Three Educational Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flogaitis, Evgenia; Nomikou, Christina; Naoum, Elli; Katsenou, Christina

    2012-01-01

    The educational approach views the community of practice as a community of teachers and students who share common rules and values, information and experiences through dialogue and collaboration. Three doctoral theses are in progress at the University of Athens which study the possibilities of creating a community of practice in three different…

  6. Model-based action planning involves cortico-cerebellar and basal ganglia networks

    PubMed Central

    Fermin, Alan S. R.; Yoshida, Takehiko; Yoshimoto, Junichiro; Ito, Makoto; Tanaka, Saori C.; Doya, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Humans can select actions by learning, planning, or retrieving motor memories. Reinforcement Learning (RL) associates these processes with three major classes of strategies for action selection: exploratory RL learns state-action values by exploration, model-based RL uses internal models to simulate future states reached by hypothetical actions, and motor-memory RL selects past successful state-action mapping. In order to investigate the neural substrates that implement these strategies, we conducted a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiment while humans performed a sequential action selection task under conditions that promoted the use of a specific RL strategy. The ventromedial prefrontal cortex and ventral striatum increased activity in the exploratory condition; the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, dorsomedial striatum, and lateral cerebellum in the model-based condition; and the supplementary motor area, putamen, and anterior cerebellum in the motor-memory condition. These findings suggest that a distinct prefrontal-basal ganglia and cerebellar network implements the model-based RL action selection strategy. PMID:27539554

  7. Model-based action planning involves cortico-cerebellar and basal ganglia networks.

    PubMed

    Fermin, Alan S R; Yoshida, Takehiko; Yoshimoto, Junichiro; Ito, Makoto; Tanaka, Saori C; Doya, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Humans can select actions by learning, planning, or retrieving motor memories. Reinforcement Learning (RL) associates these processes with three major classes of strategies for action selection: exploratory RL learns state-action values by exploration, model-based RL uses internal models to simulate future states reached by hypothetical actions, and motor-memory RL selects past successful state-action mapping. In order to investigate the neural substrates that implement these strategies, we conducted a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiment while humans performed a sequential action selection task under conditions that promoted the use of a specific RL strategy. The ventromedial prefrontal cortex and ventral striatum increased activity in the exploratory condition; the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, dorsomedial striatum, and lateral cerebellum in the model-based condition; and the supplementary motor area, putamen, and anterior cerebellum in the motor-memory condition. These findings suggest that a distinct prefrontal-basal ganglia and cerebellar network implements the model-based RL action selection strategy. PMID:27539554

  8. 7 CFR 799.10 - Criteria and identification of FSA actions as to degree of involvement under the NEPA process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Criteria and identification of FSA actions as to degree of involvement under the NEPA process. 799.10 Section 799.10 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FARM SERVICE AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ENVIRONMENTAL...

  9. It takes the whole brain to make a cup of coffee: the neuropsychology of naturalistic actions involving technical devices.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Karoline; Goldenberg, Georg; Daumüller, Maike; Hermsdörfer, Joachim

    2005-01-01

    Left hemisphere dominance has been established for use of single familiar tools and tool/object pairs, but everyday action in natural environment frequently affords multi-step actions with more or less novel technical devices. One purpose of our study was to find out whether left hemisphere dominance extends to such naturalistic action. Another aim was to analyze the cognitive components contributing to success or failure. Patients with LBD and aphasia, patients with RBD, and healthy controls were examined on experimental tests assessing retrieval of functional knowledge from semantic memory, inference of function from structure, and solution of mechanical and non-mechanical multi-step problems, and were confronted with two naturalistic tasks involving technical devices: preparing coffee with a drip coffee maker and fixing a cassette recorder. Both patient groups were about equally impaired on both naturalistic actions. Analysis of the experimental tests and their correlations to naturalistic actions suggested that different cognitive deficits caused failure in both patient groups, and that in LBD patients there were also different causes for failure on both naturalistic actions. The main difficulty of RBD patients seemed to reside in the demand to keep track of multi-step actions. In aphasic LBD patients difficulties with making coffee but not the cassette recorder were correlated with aphasia and defective retrieval of functional knowledge from semantic memory, whereas the cassette recorder correlated more strongly with a test probing solution of multi-step mechanical problems. Inference of function from structure which had been shown to be important for use of single familiar tools or tool/objects pairs [Goldenberg, G., Hagmann, S. (1998). AT Tool use and mechanical problem solving in apraxia. Neuropsychologia, 36, 581-589] appeared to play only a subordinate role for naturalistic actions involving technical devices. PMID:15716152

  10. Root-Shoot Signaling crosstalk involved in the shoot growth promoting action of rhizospheric humic acids.

    PubMed

    Olaetxea, Maite; Mora, Verónica; García, Andrés Calderin; Santos, Leandro Azevedo; Baigorri, Roberto; Fuentes, Marta; Garnica, María; Berbara, Ricardo Luis Louro; Zamarreño, Angel Maria; Garcia-Mina, Jose M

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies have shown the ability of humic substances to improve plant development. This action is normally reflected in an enhancement of crop yields and quality. However, the mechanisms responsible for this action of humic substances remain rather unknown. Our studies have shown that the shoot promoting action of sedimentary humic acids is dependent of its ability to increase root hydraulic conductivity through signaling pathways related to ABA, which in turn is affected in roots by humic acids in an IAA-NO dependent way. Furthermore, these studies also indicate that the primary action of humic acids in roots might also be physical, resulting from a transient mild stress caused by humic acids associated with a fouling-cleaning cycle of wall cell pores. Finally the role of alternative signal molecules, such as ROS, and corresponding signaling pathways are also discussed and modeled in the context of the above-mentioned framework. PMID:26966789

  11. Root-Shoot Signaling crosstalk involved in the shoot growth promoting action of rhizospheric humic acids

    PubMed Central

    Olaetxea, Maite; Mora, Verónica; García, Andrés Calderin; Santos, Leandro Azevedo; Baigorri, Roberto; Fuentes, Marta; Garnica, María; Berbara, Ricardo Luis Louro; Zamarreño, Angel Maria; Garcia-Mina, Jose M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Numerous studies have shown the ability of humic substances to improve plant development. This action is normally reflected in an enhancement of crop yields and quality. However, the mechanisms responsible for this action of humic substances remain rather unknown. Our studies have shown that the shoot promoting action of sedimentary humic acids is dependent of its ability to increase root hydraulic conductivity through signaling pathways related to ABA, which in turn is affected in roots by humic acids in an IAA-NO dependent way. Furthermore, these studies also indicate that the primary action of humic acids in roots might also be physical, resulting from a transient mild stress caused by humic acids associated with a fouling-cleaning cycle of wall cell pores. Finally the role of alternative signal molecules, such as ROS, and corresponding signaling pathways are also discussed and modeled in the context of the above-mentioned framework. PMID:26966789

  12. Possible Integrative Actions of Leptin and Insulin Signaling in the Hypothalamus Targeting Energy Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Thon, Mina; Hosoi, Toru; Ozawa, Koichiro

    2016-01-01

    Obesity has emerged as one of the most burdensome conditions in modern society. In this context, understanding the mechanisms controlling food intake is critical. At present, the adipocyte-derived hormone leptin and the pancreatic β-cell-derived hormone insulin are considered the principal anorexigenic hormones. Although leptin and insulin signal transduction pathways are distinct, their regulation of body weight maintenance is concerted. Resistance to the central actions of leptin or insulin is linked to the emergence of obesity and diabetes mellitus. A growing body of evidence suggests a convergence of leptin and insulin intracellular signaling at the insulin–receptor–substrate–phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase level. Moreover, numerous factors mediating the pathophysiology of leptin resistance, a hallmark of obesity, such as endoplasmic reticulum stress, protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B, and suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 also contribute to insulin resistance. Recent studies have also indicated that insulin potentiates leptin-induced signaling. Thus, a greater understanding of the overlapping functions of leptin and insulin in the central nervous system is vital to understand the associated physiological and pathophysiological states. This mini-review focuses on the cross talk and integrative signaling of leptin and insulin in the regulation of energy homeostasis in the brain. PMID:27812350

  13. Young coconut water ameliorates depression via modulation of neurotransmitters: possible mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Rao, Sadia Saleem; Najam, Rahila

    2016-10-01

    In the current era, plants are frequently tested for its antidepressant potential. Therefore young coconut water, a commonly used plant based beverage, was selected to explore its antidepressant potential. Rodents were selected for this study and forced swim test was conducted to explore antidepressant activity. Analysis of brain biogenic amines using high performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrochemical detection and potentiation of noradrenaline toxicity model were also incorporated in this study to demonstrate probable antidepressant mechanism of action. Coconut water was administered orally at the dose of 4 ml/100 g. Young coconut water showed highly significant increase in struggling time (p < 0.001) in forced swim test. This suggests antidepressant effect of young coconut water. In noradrenaline toxicity model, it was observed that young coconut water is not a good adrenergic component as its lethality percentage in this test was observed 0 % unlike imipramine which showed lethality of 100 %. High performance liquid chromatography-electrochemical detection of rodent's brain revealed decline in 5-hydroxytryptamine, noradrenaline and dopamine, with concomitant decline in metabolites 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, homovanillic acid and increase in 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid/5-hydroxytryptamine ratio. Findings from the exploration of monoamines suggest antidepressant effect of young coconut water via homeostasis of monoamines synthesis.

  14. Young coconut water ameliorates depression via modulation of neurotransmitters: possible mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Rao, Sadia Saleem; Najam, Rahila

    2016-10-01

    In the current era, plants are frequently tested for its antidepressant potential. Therefore young coconut water, a commonly used plant based beverage, was selected to explore its antidepressant potential. Rodents were selected for this study and forced swim test was conducted to explore antidepressant activity. Analysis of brain biogenic amines using high performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrochemical detection and potentiation of noradrenaline toxicity model were also incorporated in this study to demonstrate probable antidepressant mechanism of action. Coconut water was administered orally at the dose of 4 ml/100 g. Young coconut water showed highly significant increase in struggling time (p < 0.001) in forced swim test. This suggests antidepressant effect of young coconut water. In noradrenaline toxicity model, it was observed that young coconut water is not a good adrenergic component as its lethality percentage in this test was observed 0 % unlike imipramine which showed lethality of 100 %. High performance liquid chromatography-electrochemical detection of rodent's brain revealed decline in 5-hydroxytryptamine, noradrenaline and dopamine, with concomitant decline in metabolites 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, homovanillic acid and increase in 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid/5-hydroxytryptamine ratio. Findings from the exploration of monoamines suggest antidepressant effect of young coconut water via homeostasis of monoamines synthesis. PMID:27377560

  15. Possibilities for achieving x-ray lasing action by use of high-order multiphoton processes. [lambda = 10 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, C.W.; Littman, M.G.; McIlrath, T.J.; Miles, R.; Skinner, C.H.; Suckewer, S.; Valeo, E.

    1985-12-01

    We consider some possible mechanisms for producing gain in the 10 nm spectral region. They involve the creation of a population inversion in a confined plasma column by selective excitation of multicharged ions via absorption of many (>10) ultraviolet photons. Specific treatment is made of Kr-like ions pumped by a KrF excimer laser. 27 refs., 5 figs.

  16. DEPTOR-related mTOR suppression is involved in metformin's anti-cancer action in human liver cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Obara, Akio; Fujita, Yoshihito; Abudukadier, Abulizi; Fukushima, Toru; Oguri, Yasuo; Ogura, Masahito; Harashima, Shin-ichi; Hosokawa, Masaya; Inagaki, Nobuya

    2015-05-15

    Metformin, one of the most commonly used drugs for patients with type 2 diabetes, recently has received much attention regarding its anti-cancer action. It is thought that the suppression of mTOR signaling is involved in metformin's anti-cancer action. Although liver cancer is one of the most responsive types of cancer for reduction of incidence by metformin, the molecular mechanism of the suppression of mTOR in liver remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of the suppressing effect of metformin on mTOR signaling and cell proliferation using human liver cancer cells. Metformin suppressed phosphorylation of p70-S6 kinase, and ribosome protein S6, downstream targets of mTOR, and suppressed cell proliferation. We found that DEPTOR, an endogenous substrate of mTOR suppression, is involved in the suppressing effect of metformin on mTOR signaling and cell proliferation in human liver cancer cells. Metformin increases the protein levels of DEPTOR, intensifies binding to mTOR, and exerts a suppressing effect on mTOR signaling. This increasing effect of DEPTOR by metformin is regulated by the proteasome degradation system; the suppressing effect of metformin on mTOR signaling and cell proliferation is in a DEPTOR-dependent manner. Furthermore, metformin exerts a suppressing effect on proteasome activity, DEPTOR-related mTOR signaling, and cell proliferation in an AMPK-dependent manner. We conclude that DEPTOR-related mTOR suppression is involved in metformin's anti-cancer action in liver, and could be a novel target for anti-cancer therapy. - Highlights: • We elucidated a novel pathway of metformin's anti-cancer action in HCC cells. • DEPTOR is involved in the suppressing effect of metformin on mTOR signaling. • Metformin increases DEPTOR protein levels via suppression of proteasome activity. • DEPTOR-related mTOR suppression is involved in metformin's anti-cancer action.

  17. [Pain perception, mechanisms of action of local anesthetics and possible causes of failure].

    PubMed

    Vandermeulen, E

    2000-01-01

    First, the fundamentals of impulse transmission and pain perception are revised. The role of the primary afferent nociceptors is explained. Dental pain is described as a form of acute pain and the mechanism of nociception is fundamental. Peripheral and central sensitization can evolve. The second part covers the pharmacological aspects. Local anesthetics reduce impulse transmission by interfering with the mechanism of normal depolarisation. Binding to specific receptors located at the nerve membrane, more specifically on the sodium channel, results in decreased or eliminated permeability to sodium ions and leads to interruption of nerve conduction. The different types of local anesthetics used in dentistry are discussed in more detail with respect to their physico-chemical characteristics and analgetic properties. The importance of factors such as lipophilicity, degree of protein binding and dissociation constant pKa are explained together with the clinical implications of pH and possible toxic effects. Failure of local anesthesia can be the result of problems with the administration of the product or can have a pharmacological basis. Injection of the anesthetic should take place in amounts large enough, with suitable volume and as close as possible to the nerve. When infection and inflammation are present, the intravascular resorption of the anesthetic will accelerate and the lowered pH influences diffusion negatively. Repetitive administration can induce the phenomenon of tachyfylaxis (decreased anesthetic effect).

  18. Antimicrobial Activity and Possible Mechanism of Action of Citral against Cronobacter sakazakii

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Chao; Song, Kaikuo; Zhang, Xiaorong; Sun, Yi; Sui, Yue; Chen, Yifei; Jia, Zhenyu; Sun, Huihui; Sun, Zheng; Xia, Xiaodong

    2016-01-01

    Citral is a flavor component that is commonly used in food, beverage and fragrance industries. Cronobacter sakazakii is a food-borne pathogen associated with severe illness and high mortality in neonates and infants. The objective of the present study was to evaluate antimicrobial effect of citral against C. sakazakii strains. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of citral against C. sakazakii was determined via agar dilution method, then Gompertz models were used to quantitate the effect of citral on microbial growth kinetics. Changes in intracellular pH (pHin), membrane potential, intracellular ATP concentration, and membrane integrity were measured to elucidate the possible antimicrobial mechanism. Cell morphology changes were also examined using a field emission scanning electron microscope. The MICs of citral against C. sakazakii strains ranged from 0.27 to 0.54 mg/mL, and citral resulted in a longer lag phase and lower growth rate of C. sakazakii compared to the control. Citral affected the cell membrane of C. sakazakii, as evidenced by decreased intracellular ATP concentration, reduced pHin, and cell membrane hyperpolarization. Scanning electron microscopy analysis further confirmed that C. sakazakii cell membranes were damaged by citral. These findings suggest that citral exhibits antimicrobial effect against C. sakazakii strains and could be potentially used to control C. sakazakii in foods. However, how it works in food systems where many other components may interfere with its efficacy should be tested in future research before its real application. PMID:27415761

  19. Unique pharmacological actions of atypical neuroleptic quetiapine: possible role in cell cycle/fate control

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, M A; Tajinda, K; Colantuoni, C; Hiyama, H; Seshadri, S; Huang, B; Pou, S; Furukori, K; Hookway, C; Jaaro-Peled, H; Kano, S-i; Matsuoka, N; Harada, K; Ni, K; Pevsner, J; Sawa, A

    2013-01-01

    Quetiapine is an atypical neuroleptic with a pharmacological profile distinct from classic neuroleptics that function primarily via blockade of dopamine D2 receptors. In the United States, quetiapine is currently approved for treating patients with schizophrenia, major depression and bipolar I disorder. Despite its widespread use, its cellular effects remain elusive. To address possible mechanisms, we chronically treated mice with quetiapine, haloperidol or vehicle and examined quetiapine-specific gene expression change in the frontal cortex. Through microarray analysis, we observed that several groups of genes were differentially expressed upon exposure to quetiapine compared with haloperidol or vehicle; among them, Cdkn1a, the gene encoding p21, exhibited the greatest fold change relative to haloperidol. The quetiapine-induced downregulation of p21/Cdkn1a was confirmed by real-time polymerase chain reaction and in situ hybridization. Consistent with single gene-level analyses, functional group analyses also indicated that gene sets associated with cell cycle/fate were differentially regulated in the quetiapine-treated group. In cortical cell cultures treated with quetiapine, p21/Cdkn1a was significantly downregulated in oligodendrocyte precursor cells and neurons, but not in astrocytes. We propose that cell cycle-associated intervention by quetiapine in the frontal cortex may underlie a unique efficacy of quetiapine compared with typical neuroleptics. PMID:23549417

  20. Taking Action: An Educator's Guide to Involving Students in Environmental Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council for Environmental Education, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Developed in cooperation with the World Wildlife Fund, "Taking Action" inspires ideas and provides models for conducting effective environmental projects--projects that dynamically engage students from start to finish. From adopting species to protecting habitats to saving energy and creating publications, this guide will help educators plan,…

  1. 24 CFR 248.145 - Criteria for approval of a plan of action involving incentives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... UNDER NATIONAL HOUSING ACT AND OTHER AUTHORITIES PREPAYMENT OF LOW INCOME HOUSING MORTGAGES Prepayments and Plans of Action Under the Low Income Housing Preservation and Resident Homeownership Act of 1990... low income housing project or for transfer of the housing to a qualified purchaser, other than...

  2. Human Securitability: A Participatory Action Research Study Involving Novice Teachers and Youngsters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kravale-Paulina, Marite; Olehnovica, Eridiana

    2015-01-01

    Civic participation, initiative and interest in current events can bridge the alienation felt towards national and municipal institutions, thereby enabling individuals to improve their quality of life and contribute to all-round sustainable development of their resident state. This paper reports on a participatory action research study into civic…

  3. Action!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Senese, Joseph

    1998-01-01

    A small group of teachers at one Illinois high school is helping to effect and promote change. Through the Action Research Laboratory (ARL), teams of teachers conduct collaborative action research to improve classroom practices. Data from the first two years of the ARL indicate that teachers are eager to participate in, and have thrived in, their…

  4. What Will Teachers Do to Involve Parents in Education?: Using a Theory of Reasoned Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pryor, Brandt W.; Pryor, Caroline R.

    2009-01-01

    Parents' involvement in their children's education is associated with a variety of benefits, including higher achievement, yet teachers are not uniformly supportive and encouraging. Teacher attitudes and beliefs about parental involvement are a predictive factor which schools, and preservice programs, could influence, yet little is known about how…

  5. Protective effect of dietary potassium against cardiovascular damage in salt-sensitive hypertension: possible role of its antioxidant action.

    PubMed

    Ando, Katsuyuki; Matsui, Hiromitsu; Fujita, Megumi; Fujita, Toshiro

    2010-01-01

    It is well known that high salt intake induces hypertension and cardiovascular damage, while dietary potassium supplementation counteracts these harmful effects. Actually, the protective effect of potassium is strengthened with excess salt as compared with salt depletion. Although the precise mechanisms have not been fully elucidated, in our previous reports, the antihypertensive effect of dietary potassium was accompanied by sympathetic nerve inhibition in salt-sensitive hypertension. Also, potassium supplement suppressed salt-induced insulin resistance. These effects of dietary potassium can explain its cardio- and vasculo-protective action in addition to the potassium supplementation induced decreased salt-induced rise in blood pressure. On the other hand, salt-sensitive hypertension is associated with reactive oxygen species (ROS) overproduction. Moreover, sympathoexcitation can be induced by central ROS upregulation and insulin resistance can be caused by ROS excess in the target organs of insulin, such as skeletal muscle. Conversely, the seemingly different actions of potassium can be explained by the antioxidant effect of dietary potassium; in our recent studies, potassium supplementation inhibits salt-induced progress of cardiac diastolic dysfunction and vascular neointima formation by cuff placement around arteries, associated with the inhibition of regional ROS overproduction, in salt-sensitive hypertension. Thus, it is possible that dietary potassium protects against salt-induced cardiovascular damage by the reduction of ROS generation and by central sympatholytic action and amelioration of insulin resistance induced through its antioxidant effect.

  6. Rat epileptic seizures evoked by BmK {alpha}IV and its possible mechanisms involved in sodium channels

    SciTech Connect

    Chai Zhifang; Bai Zhantao; Zhang Xuying; Liu Tong; Pang Xueyan; Ji Yonghua . E-mail: yhji@server.shcnc.ac.cn

    2007-05-01

    This study showed that rat unilateral intracerebroventricular injection of BmK {alpha}IV, a sodium channel modulator derived from scorpion Buthus martensi Karsch, induced clusters of spikes, epileptic discharges and convulsion-related behavioral changes. BmK {alpha}IV potently promoted the release of endogenous glutamate from rat cerebrocortical synaptosomes. In vitro examination of the effect of BmK {alpha}IV on intrasynaptosomal free calcium concentration [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} and sodium concentration [Na{sup +}]{sub i} revealed that BmK {alpha}IV-evoked glutamate release from synaptosomes was associated with an increase in Ca{sup 2+} and Na{sup +} influx. Moreover, BmK {alpha}IV-mediated glutamate release and ion influx was completely blocked by tetrodotoxin, a blocker of sodium channel. Together, these results suggest that the induction of BmK {alpha}IV-evoked epileptic seizures may be involved in the modulation of BmK {alpha}IV on tetrodotoxin-sensitive sodium channels located on the nerve terminal, which subsequently enhances the Ca{sup 2+} influx to cause an increase of glutamate release. These findings may provide some insight regarding the mechanism of neuronal action of BmK {alpha}IV in the central nervous system for understanding epileptogenesis involved in sodium channels.

  7. Action on AMD. Optimising patient management: act now to ensure current and continual delivery of best possible patient care

    PubMed Central

    Amoaku, W; Blakeney, S; Freeman, M; Gale, R; Johnston, R; Kelly, S P; McLaughlan, B; Sahu, D; Varma, D

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, there have been significant advances in the clinical management of patients with wet age-related macular degeneration (wet AMD)—a rapidly progressing and potentially blinding degenerative eye disease. Wet AMD is responsible for more than half of registered severe sight impairment (blindness) in the United Kingdom, and patients who are being treated for wet AMD require frequent and long-term follow-up for treatment to be most effective. The clinical workload associated with the frequent follow-up required is substantial. Furthermore, as more new patients are diagnosed and the population continues to age, the patient population will continue to increase. It is thus vital that clinical services continue to adapt so that they can provide a fast and efficient service for patients with wet AMD. This Action on AMDdocument has been developed by eye health-care professionals and patient representatives, the Action on AMDgroup. It is intended to highlight the urgent and continuing need for change within wet AMD services. This document also serves as a guide for eye health-care professionals, NHS commissioners, and providers to present possible solutions for improving NHS retinal and macular services. Examples of good practice and service development are considered and can be drawn upon to help services meet the recommended quality of care and achieve best possible outcomes. PMID:22302094

  8. Action on AMD. Optimising patient management: act now to ensure current and continual delivery of best possible patient care.

    PubMed

    Amoaku, W; Blakeney, S; Freeman, M; Gale, R; Johnston, R; Kelly, S P; McLaughlan, B; Sahu, D; Varma, D

    2012-02-01

    In recent years, there have been significant advances in the clinical management of patients with wet age-related macular degeneration (wet AMD)--a rapidly progressing and potentially blinding degenerative eye disease. Wet AMD is responsible for more than half of registered severe sight impairment (blindness) in the United Kingdom, and patients who are being treated for wet AMD require frequent and long-term follow-up for treatment to be most effective. The clinical workload associated with the frequent follow-up required is substantial. Furthermore, as more new patients are diagnosed and the population continues to age, the patient population will continue to increase. It is thus vital that clinical services continue to adapt so that they can provide a fast and efficient service for patients with wet AMD. This Action on AMD document has been developed by eye health-care professionals and patient representatives, the Action on AMD group. It is intended to highlight the urgent and continuing need for change within wet AMD services. This document also serves as a guide for eye health-care professionals, NHS commissioners, and providers to present possible solutions for improving NHS retinal and macular services. Examples of good practice and service development are considered and can be drawn upon to help services meet the recommended quality of care and achieve best possible outcomes.

  9. Involvement of the dopaminergic system in the central orexin-induced antinociceptive action against colonic distension in conscious rats.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Toshikatsu; Nozu, Tsukasa; Kumei, Shima; Takakusaki, Kaoru; Miyagishi, Saori; Ohhira, Masumi

    2015-09-25

    We have recently demonstrated that orexin acts centrally in the brain to induce antinociceptive action against colonic distension through orexin 1 receptors in conscious rats. Although the dopaminergic system can induce antinociceptive action for somatic pain, the association between changes in the dopaminergic system and visceral pain perception has not been investigated. In the present study, we hypothesized that the dopaminergic system may be involved in visceral nociception, and if so, the dopaminergic system may mediate the orexin-induced visceral antinociception. Visceral sensation was evaluated using the colonic distension-induced abdominal withdrawal reflex (AWR) in conscious rats. Intracisternal injection of D1 (SKF38398) or D2 (quinpirole) dopamine receptor agonist increased the threshold volume of colonic distension-induced AWR in a dose-dependent manner. Pretreatment with either the D1 or D2 dopamine receptor antagonist (SCH23390 or sulpiride, respectively) potently blocked the centrally injected orexin-A-induced antinociceptive action against colonic distension. These results suggest for the first time that dopaminergic signaling via D1 and D2 dopamine receptors in the brain may induce visceral antinociception and that the dopaminergic signaling may be involved in the central orexin-induced antinociceptive action against colonic distension.

  10. The hypothermic action of carbachol in the rat brain periaqueductal grey area may involve neurotensin.

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, E. C.; Slater, P.; Widdowson, P. S.

    1986-01-01

    Neurotensin (NT) and carbachol both caused hypothermia when injected into the periaqueductal grey area (PAG) of rat brain. Atropine prevented carbachol- but not NT-induced hypothermia. NT-induced hypothermia was unaffected by various neurotransmitter agonists and antagonists in the PAG. Both NT antibodies and thyrotrophin releasing hormone prevented carbachol hypothermia. It is concluded that the hypothermic action of carbachol in the PAG is mediated via endogenous NT. PMID:3742153

  11. Effects of isopulegol on pentylenetetrazol-induced convulsions in mice: possible involvement of GABAergic system and antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Silva, Maria Izabel Gomes; Silva, Maria Angélica Gomes; de Aquino Neto, Manuel Rufino; Moura, Brinell Arcanjo; de Sousa, Helenira Lourenço; de Lavor, Everton Paulo Homem; de Vasconcelos, Patrícia Freire; Macêdo, Danielle Silveira; de Sousa, Damião Pergentino; Vasconcelos, Silvânia Maria Mendes; de Sousa, Francisca Cléa Florenço

    2009-12-01

    The present study investigated the effects of isopulegol, a monoterpene alcohol, in PTZ-induced convulsions and verified possible involved mechanisms. Saline, isopulegol or diazepam were intraperitonealy injected 30 min before PTZ. The latency for development of convulsions and mortality, as well as the mortality protection percentage was recorded. For investigating the involvement of GABAergic system, flumazenil was utilized. The activity of antioxidant enzyme catalase as well as the levels of reduced glutathione and lipid peroxidation were measured in brain hippocampus. Similarly to diazepam, isopulegol significantly prolonged the latency for convulsions and mortality of mice. All animals were protected against mortality at higher dose of isopulegol. Flumazenil pretreatment decreased the prolongation of seizure latency induced by both diazepam and isopulegol, although it was not able to reverse the latency and protection percent for mortality. Isopulegol also significantly prevented PTZ-induced increase in lipid peroxidation, preserved catalase activity in normal levels, and prevented the PTZ-induced loss of GSH in hippocampus of mice. These results suggest that the anticonvulsant and bioprotective effects of isopulegol against PTZ-induced convulsions are possibly related to positive modulation of benzodiazepine-sensitive GABA(A) receptors and to antioxidant properties. PMID:19559770

  12. Anger fosters action. Fast responses in a motor task involving approach movements toward angry faces and bodies.

    PubMed

    de Valk, Josje M; Wijnen, Jasper G; Kret, Mariska E

    2015-01-01

    Efficiently responding to others' emotions, especially threatening expressions such as anger and fear, can have great survival value. Previous research has shown that humans have a bias toward threatening stimuli. Most of these studies focused on facial expressions, yet emotions are expressed by the whole body, and not just by the face. Body language contains a direct action component, and activates action preparation areas in the brain more than facial expressions. Hence, biases toward threat may be larger following threatening bodily expressions as compared to facial expressions. The current study investigated reaction times of movements directed toward emotional bodies and faces. For this purpose, a new task was developed where participants were standing in front of a computer screen on which angry, fearful, and neutral faces and bodies were presented which they had to touch as quickly as possible. Results show that participants responded faster to angry than to neutral stimuli, regardless of the source (face or body). No significant difference was observed between fearful and neutral stimuli, demonstrating that the threat bias was not related to the negativity of the stimulus, but likely to the directness of the threat in relation to the observer. Whereas fearful stimuli might signal an environmental threat that requires further exploration before action, angry expressions signal a direct threat to the observer, asking for immediate action. This study provides a novel and implicit method to directly test the speed of actions toward emotions from the whole body. PMID:26388793

  13. Constitutional Law--State Action--A Lesser Standard of State Action Is to Be Employed for Claims Involving Sex Discrimination. Weise v. Syracuse University (2d Cir. 1975)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ronan, James Michael

    1976-01-01

    The impact of Weise v. Syracuse University, involving alleged sex discrimination in university hiring practices, is unclear but the appeals court held that a less stringent state action standard should be employed in claims involving sex discrimination. (LBH)

  14. Baking together-the coordination of actions in activities involving people with dementia.

    PubMed

    Majlesi, Ali Reza; Ekström, Anna

    2016-08-01

    This study explores interaction and collaboration between people with dementia and their spouses in relation to the performance of household chores with the focus on instruction as an interactional context to engage the person with dementia in collaboration to accomplish joint activities. Dementia is generally associated with pathological changes in people's cognitive functions such as diminishing memory functions, communicative abilities and also diminishing abilities to take initiative as well as to plan and execute tasks. Using video recordings of everyday naturally occurring activities, we analyze the sequential organization of actions (see Schegloff, 2007) oriented toward the accomplishment of a joint multi-task activity of baking. The analysis shows the specific ways of collaboration through instructional activities in which the person with dementia exhibits his competence and skills in accomplishing the given tasks through negotiating the instructions with his partner and carrying out instructed actions. Although the driving force of the collaboration seems to be a series of directive sequences only initiated by the partner throughout the baking activity, our analyses highlight how the person with dementia can actively use the material environment-including collaborating partners-to compensate for challenges and difficulties encountered in achieving everyday tasks. The sequential organization of instructions and instructed actions are in this sense argued to provide an interactional environment wherein the person with dementia can make contributions to the joint activity in an efficient way. While a collaborator has been described as necessary for a person with dementia to be able to partake in activities, this study shows that people with dementia are not only guided by their collaborators in joint activities but they can also actively use their collaborators in intricate compensatory ways.

  15. Baking together-the coordination of actions in activities involving people with dementia.

    PubMed

    Majlesi, Ali Reza; Ekström, Anna

    2016-08-01

    This study explores interaction and collaboration between people with dementia and their spouses in relation to the performance of household chores with the focus on instruction as an interactional context to engage the person with dementia in collaboration to accomplish joint activities. Dementia is generally associated with pathological changes in people's cognitive functions such as diminishing memory functions, communicative abilities and also diminishing abilities to take initiative as well as to plan and execute tasks. Using video recordings of everyday naturally occurring activities, we analyze the sequential organization of actions (see Schegloff, 2007) oriented toward the accomplishment of a joint multi-task activity of baking. The analysis shows the specific ways of collaboration through instructional activities in which the person with dementia exhibits his competence and skills in accomplishing the given tasks through negotiating the instructions with his partner and carrying out instructed actions. Although the driving force of the collaboration seems to be a series of directive sequences only initiated by the partner throughout the baking activity, our analyses highlight how the person with dementia can actively use the material environment-including collaborating partners-to compensate for challenges and difficulties encountered in achieving everyday tasks. The sequential organization of instructions and instructed actions are in this sense argued to provide an interactional environment wherein the person with dementia can make contributions to the joint activity in an efficient way. While a collaborator has been described as necessary for a person with dementia to be able to partake in activities, this study shows that people with dementia are not only guided by their collaborators in joint activities but they can also actively use their collaborators in intricate compensatory ways. PMID:27531451

  16. Involvement of gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA) in the anticonvulsant action of methaqualone.

    PubMed

    Naik, S R; Naid, P R; Sheth, U K

    1978-04-14

    The effects of methaqualone on isonicotinic acid hydrazide, 6-mercapto propionic acid, picrotoxin, and strychnine-induced convulsion were studied in mice and the results compared with diazepam. Methaqualone, like diazepam, was found to be a selective antagonist of isoniazid-induced convulsion and a much less effective inhibitor of strychnine convulsion. Methaqualone elicits muscle-relaxant, sedative, and anticonvulsant effects at different dose levels. At low, nonsedative doses the drug produces anticonvulsant effects, and at higher doses, muscle-relaxant and sedative effects. It appears that the mechanism(s) of action of methaqualone in on GABA deficiency or receptor blockade, rather than on glycine receptors.

  17. Testing the Waters: Can You Involve Community Action in Your College Curriculum?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knapp, Elizabeth P.; Harbor, David J.; Ginwalla, Zenobia F.

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the Maury River Alliance (MRA), a cooperative program developed at the Washington and Lee University that involved local colleges, high schools, government agencies, and conservation groups. Addresses the connection between land use and water quality with a creative merging of technical, social, and educational aspects of local watershed…

  18. Participation As Relational Process: Unpacking Involvement in Social Action and Community Service

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Jeffrey N.; Bench, Joshua H.; Warnaar, Bethany L.; Stroup, John T.

    2013-01-01

    Educators, policymakers, and other concerned adults share an interest in promoting lifelong patterns of community service in youth. Practitioners and researchers alike highlight the importance of youth participation in afterschool service activities so the author's focus in this paper is on youth involved in PeaceJam, an innovative service…

  19. Children of Divorced Parents: Action Steps for the Counselor to Involve Fathers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frieman, Barry B.

    1994-01-01

    Notes that many school counseling programs designed to help children of divorce focus on child and custodial parent, usually mother. Contends that, to help child cope with divorce and maintain academic performance level in school, counselor needs to involve child's noncustodial father as well. Considers fathers in therapy, examines characteristics…

  20. Elemental and mineral inventory of tailing impoundments near Pezinok, Slovakia and possible courses of action for their remediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majzlan, Juraj; Brecht, Björn; Lalinská, Bronislava; Chovan, Martin; Moravanský, Daniel; Uhlík, Peter

    2010-01-01

    An effective remediation strategy for a polluted site should take the absolute amount of the pollutant(s) into account. Here, we present an elemental budget for As, Sb and Fe in two tailing impoundments of the former Sb-Au deposit near Pezinok, Slovakia. The two impoundments contain 5,740×103 kg As, 6,360×103 kg Sb and 50,105×103 kg Fe. An estimated total Au content in the impoundments is 132 kg. The most abundant minerals in the tailings are quartz, illite, and chlorite. The content of carbonates in the tailings is 3.5-10.5 wt% calcite equivalent and we estimate that the carbonates are sufficiently abundant to buffer the pH at circumneutral values, up to the point when all pyrite decomposes. The possible courses of action are i) do nothing, ii) build an active barrier to capture the released As and Sb, iii) isolate the impoundments from rain and ground water and iv) use the impoundments as a source of Sb and redeposit the waste in a safer form. The simplest approach is to do nothing, which seems to be the most likely course of events, given the current economic, political and societal state of the Slovak Republic. Although this action costs nothing in the short term, it may cause significant damage to the environment, especially to the alluvial sediments and associated water resources in the long term.

  1. Libidibia ferrea Mature Seeds Promote Antinociceptive Effect by Peripheral and Central Pathway: Possible Involvement of Opioid and Cholinergic Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Sawada, Luis Armando; Monteiro, Vanessa Sâmia da Conçeição; Rabelo, Guilherme Rodrigues; Dias, Germana Bueno; Da Cunha, Maura; do Nascimento, José Luiz Martins; Bastos, Gilmara de Nazareth Tavares

    2014-01-01

    Libidibia ferrea (LF) is a medicinal plant that holds many pharmacological properties. We evaluated the antinociceptive effect in the LF aqueous seed extract and Lipidic Portion of Libidibia ferrea (LPLF), partially elucidating their mechanisms. Histochemical tests and Gas chromatography of the LPLF were performed to characterize its fatty acids. Acetic acid-induced abdominal constriction, formalin-induced pain, and hot-plate test in mice were employed in the study. In all experiments, aqueous extract or LPLF was administered systemically at the doses of 1, 5, and 10 mg/kg. LF aqueous seed extract and LPLF demonstrated a dose-dependent antinociceptive effect in all tests indicating both peripheral anti-inflammatory and central analgesia properties. Also, the use of atropine (5 mg/kg), naloxone (5 mg/kg) in the abdominal writhing test was able to reverse the antinociceptive effect of the LPLF, indicating that at least one of LF lipids components is responsible for the dose related antinociceptive action in chemical and thermal models of nociception in mice. Together, the present results suggested that Libidibia ferrea induced antinociceptive activity is possibly related to its ability to inhibit opioid, cholinergic receptors, and cyclooxygenase-2 pathway, since its main component, linoleic acid, has been demonstrated to produce such effect in previous studies. PMID:24860820

  2. Adult-onset hyperthyroidism impairs spatial learning: possible involvement of mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Bitiktaş, Soner; Kandemir, Başak; Tan, Burak; Kavraal, Şehrazat; Liman, Narin; Dursun, Nurcan; Dönmez-Altuntaş, Hamiyet; Aksan-Kurnaz, Işil; Suer, Cem

    2016-08-01

    Given evidence that mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation is part of the nongenomic actions of thyroid hormones, we investigated the possible consequences of hyperthyroidism for the cognitive functioning of adult rats. Young adult rats were treated with L-thyroxine or saline. Twenty rats in each group were exposed to Morris water maze testing, measuring their performance in a hidden-platform spatial task. In a separate set of rats not exposed to Morris water maze testing (untrained rats), the expression and phosphorylated levels of p38-MAPK and of its two downstream effectors, Elk-1 and cAMP response element-binding protein, were evaluated using quantitative reverse transcriptase-PCR and western blotting. Rats with hyperthyroidism showed delayed acquisition of learning compared with their wild-type counterparts, as shown by increased escape latencies and distance moved on the last two trials of daily training in the water maze. The hyperthyroid rats, however, showed no difference during probe trials. Western blot analyses of the hippocampus showed that hyperthyroidism increased phosphorylated p38-MAPK levels in untrained rats. Although our study is correlative in nature and does not exclude the contribution of other molecular targets, our findings suggest that the observed impairments in acquisition during actual learning in rats with hyperthyroidism may result from the increased phosphorylation of p38-MAPK. PMID:27258653

  3. Possible involvement of P2X7 receptor activation in microglial neuroprotection against focal cerebral ischemia in rats.

    PubMed

    Yanagisawa, Daijiro; Kitamura, Yoshihisa; Takata, Kazuyuki; Hide, Izumi; Nakata, Yoshihiro; Taniguchi, Takashi

    2008-06-01

    Microglia play important roles in the pathogenic cascade following cerebral ischemia, since they express growth factors, chemokines and regulatory cytokines as well as free radicals and other toxic mediators. P2X7 receptor, a subtype of a family of P2 purinoceptors, is primarily expressed in microglia and macrophages, suggesting that it regulates immune function and inflammatory responses. However, the involvement of ATP in such microglial responses after cerebral ischemia is not yet understood. In this study, we investigated the possible involvement of ATP, especially through the P2X7 receptors, in a rat model of focal cerebral ischemia. In immunohistochemical analysis, P2X7 receptor-like immunoreactivity was predominantly detected in microglia, and then activated microglia accumulated in the ischemic region, in rats subjected to middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) and reperfusion. Intracerebroventricular injection with P2X7 receptor agonist 2'-3'-O-(4-benzoylbenzoyl)adenosine 5'-triphosphate (BzATP) improved behavioral dysfunction accessed by rota-rod test and ischemic neural injury induced by MCAO. In contrast, P2X7 receptor antagonist adenosine 5'-triphosphate-2',3'-dialdehyde (OxATP) exacerbated ischemic brain damage. These results suggest that microglia play an important role in neuroprotection against rat cerebral ischemia, which is regulated by a P2X7 receptor-mediated ATP signal.

  4. Possible involvement of tumor-producing VEGF-A in the recruitment of lymphatic endothelial progenitor cells from bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Tawada, Masahiro; Hayashi, Shin-Ichiro; Ikegame, Yuka; Nakashima, Shigeru; Yoshida, Kazuhiro

    2014-12-01

    Lymphatic metastasis of human malignant adenocarcinomas is a critical determinant of prognosis. Lymphangiogenesis, the growth of lymphatic vessels, is closely involved in lymphatic metastasis. However, the mechanisms of tumor lymphangiogenesis are not clearly understood. In a previous study, we showed that human gastric cancer MKN45 cells organize neighboring lymphatic vessels via recruitment of bone marrow-derived lymphatic endothelial progenitor cells in a nude mouse xenograft model. The present results also indicated that human colorectal cancer LS174T and breast cancer SK-BR-3 cells promoted lymphangiogenesis as well as the recruitment of lymphatic endothelial progenitor cells from bone marrow. Among growth factors, which are reported to be involved in lymphangiogenesis, only vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A was extensively secreted by these three types of adenocarcinoma cells in culture. The well-characterized lymphangiogenic factors VEGF-C and VEGF-D in the culture medium of these three types of adenocarcinoma cells were below the detectable levels in ELISA assay. Secretion of epidermal growth factor (EGF) and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) was not detected. In in vitro culture assay, VEGF-A directly induced the differentiation of bone marrow mononuclear cells into LYVE-1-positive lymphatic endothelial lineage cells. These data collectively suggest the possibility that VEGF-A-rich human adenocarcinomas induce tumor lymphangiogenesis via recruitment of lymphangiogenic endothelial progenitor cells from bone marrow. PMID:25242215

  5. Altered expression of genes involved in progesterone biosynthesis, metabolism and action in endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Sinreih, Maša; Hevir, Neli; Rižner, Tea Lanišnik

    2013-02-25

    Endometrial cancer (EC) is one of the most common gynecological malignancies worldwide. It is associated with prolonged exposure to estrogens that is unopposed by the protective effects of progesterone, which suggests that altered progesterone biosynthesis, metabolism and actions might be implicated in the development of EC. Our aim was to evaluate these processes through quantitative real-time PCR expression analysis in up to 47 pairs of EC tissue and adjacent control endometrium. First, we examined the expression of genes encoding proteins associated with progesterone biosynthesis: steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (STAR); a side chain cleavage enzyme (CYP11A1); and 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase/ketosteroid isomerase (HSD3B). There were 1.9- and 10.0-fold decreased expression of STAR and CYP11A1, respectively, in EC versus adjacent control endometrium, with no significant differences in the expression of HSD3B1 and HSD3B2. Next, we examined expression of genes encoding five progesterone metabolizing enzymes: the 3-keto and 20-ketosteroid reductases (AKR1C1-AKR1C3) and 5α-reductases (SRD5A1 and SRD5A2); and the opposing 20α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (HSD17B2). These genes are expressed in EC and adjacent control endometrium. No statistically significant differences were seen in mRNA levels of AKR1C1, AKR1C2, AKR1C3 and SRD5A1. Expression of HSD17B2 was 3.0-fold increased, and expression of SRD5A2 was 3.7-fold decreased, in EC versus adjacent control endometrium. We also examined mRNA levels of progesterone receptors A and B (PGR), and separately the expression of progesterone receptor B (PR-B). Here we saw 1.8- and 2.0-fold lower mRNA levels of PGR and PR-B, respectively, in EC versus adjacent control endometrium. This down-regulation of STAR, CYP11A1 and PGR in endometrial cancer may lead to decreased progesterone biosynthesis and actions although the effects on progesterone levels should be further studied.

  6. Auxin Biosynthesis, Accumulation, Action and Transport are Involved in Stress-Induced Microspore Embryogenesis Initiation and Progression in Brassica napus.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Sanz, Héctor; Solís, María-Teresa; López, María-Fernanda; Gómez-Cadenas, Aurelio; Risueño, María C; Testillano, Pilar S

    2015-07-01

    Isolated microspores are reprogrammed in vitro by stress, becoming totipotent cells and producing embryos and plants via a process known as microspore embryogenesis. Despite the abundance of data on auxin involvement in plant development and embryogenesis, no data are available regarding the dynamics of auxin concentration, cellular localization and the expression of biosynthesis genes during microspore embryogenesis. This work involved the analysis of auxin concentration and cellular accumulation; expression of TAA1 and NIT2 encoding enzymes of two auxin biosynthetic pathways; expression of the PIN1-like efflux carrier; and the effects of inhibition of auxin transport and action by N-1-naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA) and α-(p-chlorophenoxy) isobutyric acid (PCIB) during Brassica napus microspore embryogenesis. The results indicated de novo auxin synthesis after stress-induced microspore reprogramming and embryogenesis initiation, accompanying the first cell divisions. The progressive increase of auxin concentration during progression of embryogenesis correlated with the expression patterns of TAA1 and NIT2 genes of auxin biosynthetic pathways. Auxin was evenly distributed in early embryos, whereas in heart/torpedo embryos auxin was accumulated in apical and basal embryo regions. Auxin efflux carrier PIN1-like gene expression was induced in early multicellular embryos and increased at the globular/torpedo embryo stages. Inhibition of polar auxin transport (PAT) and action, by NPA and PCIB, impaired embryo development, indicating that PAT and auxin action are required for microspore embryo progression. NPA also modified auxin embryo accumulation patterns. These findings indicate that endogenous auxin biosynthesis, action and polar transport are required in stress-induced microspore reprogramming, embryogenesis initiation and progression.

  7. Auxin Biosynthesis, Accumulation, Action and Transport are Involved in Stress-Induced Microspore Embryogenesis Initiation and Progression in Brassica napus.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Sanz, Héctor; Solís, María-Teresa; López, María-Fernanda; Gómez-Cadenas, Aurelio; Risueño, María C; Testillano, Pilar S

    2015-07-01

    Isolated microspores are reprogrammed in vitro by stress, becoming totipotent cells and producing embryos and plants via a process known as microspore embryogenesis. Despite the abundance of data on auxin involvement in plant development and embryogenesis, no data are available regarding the dynamics of auxin concentration, cellular localization and the expression of biosynthesis genes during microspore embryogenesis. This work involved the analysis of auxin concentration and cellular accumulation; expression of TAA1 and NIT2 encoding enzymes of two auxin biosynthetic pathways; expression of the PIN1-like efflux carrier; and the effects of inhibition of auxin transport and action by N-1-naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA) and α-(p-chlorophenoxy) isobutyric acid (PCIB) during Brassica napus microspore embryogenesis. The results indicated de novo auxin synthesis after stress-induced microspore reprogramming and embryogenesis initiation, accompanying the first cell divisions. The progressive increase of auxin concentration during progression of embryogenesis correlated with the expression patterns of TAA1 and NIT2 genes of auxin biosynthetic pathways. Auxin was evenly distributed in early embryos, whereas in heart/torpedo embryos auxin was accumulated in apical and basal embryo regions. Auxin efflux carrier PIN1-like gene expression was induced in early multicellular embryos and increased at the globular/torpedo embryo stages. Inhibition of polar auxin transport (PAT) and action, by NPA and PCIB, impaired embryo development, indicating that PAT and auxin action are required for microspore embryo progression. NPA also modified auxin embryo accumulation patterns. These findings indicate that endogenous auxin biosynthesis, action and polar transport are required in stress-induced microspore reprogramming, embryogenesis initiation and progression. PMID:25907568

  8. Antimalarial action of artesunate involves DNA damage mediated by reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Gopalakrishnan, Anusha M; Kumar, Nirbhay

    2015-01-01

    Artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) is the recommended first-line treatment for Plasmodium falciparum malaria. It has been suggested that the cytotoxic effect of artemisinin is mediated by free radicals followed by the alkylation of P. falciparum proteins. The endoperoxide bridge, the active moiety of artemisinin derivatives, is cleaved in the presence of ferrous iron, generating reactive oxygen species (ROS) and other free radicals. However, the emergence of resistance to artemisinin in P. falciparum underscores the need for new insights into the molecular mechanisms of antimalarial activity of artemisinin. Here we show that artesunate (ART) induces DNA double-strand breaks in P. falciparum in a physiologically relevant dose- and time-dependent manner. DNA damage induced by ART was accompanied by an increase in the intracellular ROS level in the parasites. Mannitol, a ROS scavenger, reversed the cytotoxic effect of ART and reduced DNA damage, and modulation of glutathione (GSH) levels was found to impact ROS and DNA damage induced by ART. Accumulation of ROS, increased DNA damage, and the resulting antiparasite effect suggest a causal relationship between ROS, DNA damage, and parasite death. Finally, we also show that ART-induced ROS production involves a potential role for NADPH oxidase, an enzyme involved in the production of superoxide anions. Our results with P. falciparum provide novel insights into previously unknown molecular mechanisms underlying the antimalarial activity of artemisinin derivatives and may help in the design of next-generation antimalarial drugs against the most virulent Plasmodium species.

  9. [Gastroprotective action of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF): involvement of glucocorticoids and CRF receptors type 2].

    PubMed

    Filaretova, L P; Bagaeva, T R; Morozova, O Iu

    2012-12-01

    The stress response involves the activation of two corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) receptors types 1 and 2. The pituitary type 1 CRF receptors represent the primary receptors to activate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis and, consequently, glucocorticoid production. Exogenous CRF induces an increase in glucocorticoid production and may protect the gastric mucosa against stress-induced injury. Here we examined contribution of glucocorticoids and CRF receptors type 2 to gastroprotective effect of exogenous CRF. Gastric injury was induced by 3 him-mobilization (at 10 degrees C) in conscious rats or 3.5 h gastric ischemia-reperfusion in anaesthetized rats. Intraperitoneal administration of CRF at the doses of 1.25 or 2.5 Mg/kg increased plasma corticosterone levels and suppressed the occurrence of gastric erosion induced by each stimulus. Metyrapone injected before CRF caused an inhibition of CRF-induced corticosterone response and prevented the protective effect of CRF on the gastric mucosa against erosion caused by immobilization (at 10 degrees C). However, metyrapone injection did not influence the protective effect of CRF on the gastric mucosa against ischemia-reperfusion-induced lesion. The protective effect of CRF on the gastric mucosa against ischemia-reperfusion-induced lesion was prevented by the nonselective CRF receptor antagonist astressin and selective type 2 CRF receptor antagonist astressin2-B. The results obtained suggest that exogenous CRF may protect the gastric mucosa against injury through involvement of glucocorticoids and also through CRF receptors type 2.

  10. Possible action of vasohibin-1 as an inhibitor in the regulation of vascularization of the bovine corpus luteum.

    PubMed

    Shirasuna, Koumei; Kobayashi, Ayumi; Nitta, Akane; Nibuno, Sayo; Sasahara, Kiemi; Shimizu, Takashi; Bollwein, Heinrich; Miyamoto, Akio

    2012-04-01

    The development of the corpus luteum (CL), which secretes large amounts of progesterone to establish pregnancy, is accompanied by active angiogenesis, vascularization, and lymphangiogenesis. Negative feedback regulation is a critical physiological mechanism. Vasohibin-1 (VASH1) was recently discovered as a novel endothelium-derived negative feedback regulator of vascularization. We therefore investigated the expression of VASH1 in the bovine CL. Expression of VASH1 mRNA and protein was predominantly localized to luteal endothelial cells (LECs). VASH1 expression in the CL was constant through the early to late luteal phases and decreased during CL regression relating with the action of luteolytic prostaglandin F(2)(α) in vivo. To investigate the role of VASH1, we determined whether VASH1 treatment affects angiogenesis and/or lymphangiogenesis using LECs and lymphatic endothelial cells (LyECs) in vitro. Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA) stimulated the expression of VASH1 in LECs but not in LyECs, and VASH1 completely blocked VEGFA-induced formation of capillary-like tube structures of LECs and LyECs in vitro. In summary, VASH1 is predominantly located on LECs in the bovine CL and inhibits the angiogenic and lymphangiogenic actions of VEGFA. Bovine CL therefore has a VEGFA-VASH1 system that may be involved in regulation of luteal function, especially in the development of the CL. The results indicate that VASH1 has the potential to act as a negative feedback regulator of angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis in the CL in cows.

  11. Involvement of AMPA receptor phosphorylation in antidepressant actions with special reference to tianeptine.

    PubMed

    Svenningsson, Per; Bateup, Helen; Qi, Hongshi; Takamiya, Kogo; Huganir, Richard L; Spedding, Michael; Roth, Bryan L; McEwen, Bruce S; Greengard, Paul

    2007-12-01

    Depression is associated with abnormal neuronal plasticity. AMPA receptors mediate transmission and plasticity at excitatory synapses in a manner which is positively regulated by phosphorylation at Ser831-GluR1, a CaMKII/PKC site, and Ser845-GluR1, a PKA site. Treatment with the selective serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine increases P-Ser845-GluR1 but not P-Ser831-GluR1. Here, it was found that treatment with another antidepressant, tianeptine, increased P-Ser831-GluR1 in the frontal cortex and the CA3 region of hippocampus and P-Ser845-GluR1 in the CA3 region of hippocampus. A receptorome profile detected no affinity for tianeptine at any monaminergic receptors or transporters, confirming an atypical profile for this compound. Behavioural analyses showed that mice bearing point mutations at both Ser831- and Ser845-GluR1, treated with saline, exhibited increased latency to enter the centre of an open field and increased immobility in the tail-suspension test compared to their wild-type counterparts. Chronic tianeptine treatment increased open-field locomotion and reduced immobility in wild-type mice but not in phosphomutant GluR1 mice. P-Ser133-CREB was reduced in the CA3 region of hippocampus in phosphomutant mice, and tianeptine decreased P-Ser133-CREB in this region in wild-type, but not in phosphomutant, mice. Tianeptine increased P-Ser133-CREB in the CA1 region in wild-type mice but not in phosphomutant GluR1 mice. There were higher basal P-Ser133-CREB and c-fos levels in frontal and cingulate cortex in phosphomutant GluR1 mice; these changes in level were counteracted by tianeptine in a GluR1-independent manner. Using phosphorylation assays and phosphomutant GluR1 mice, this study provides evidence that AMPA receptor phosphorylation mediates certain explorative and antidepressant-like actions under basal conditions and following tianeptine treatment.

  12. A mannose-receptor is possibly involved in the phagocytosis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae by seabream (Sparus aurata L.) leucocytes.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, A; Esteban, M A; Meseguer, J

    2003-05-01

    In this paper the possible involvement of the mannose-receptor on the non-specific recognition and phagocytosis of heat killed yeast cells (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) by gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata L.) head-kidney leucocytes was established by studying the ability of different sugars to inhibit the uptake of the yeast cells by leucocytes. Leucocytes were preincubated for 30min with different concentrations of sugar (alpha-mannan, d-mannose, d-fucose, l-fucose, d-glucose, d-glucosamine and n-acetyl-glucosamine, all of them described as specific ligands of the vertebrate mannose-receptor) and afterwards incubated with FITC-labelled yeast cells for phagocytosis assays. The phagocytic ability (percentage of cells with one or more ingested yeast cells within the total cell population) and capacity (number of ingested yeast cells per cell) of leucocytes was analysed by flow cytometry. The results demonstrate the potential existence of a specific receptor-sugar or receptor-yeast cell binding process, which was saturable, specific and dose-dependent. More specifically, when leucocytes were preincubated with appropriate doses of d-mannose, d- or l-fucose, d-glucose or n-acetyl-glucosamine the phagocytosis of yeast cells by head-kidney leucocytes was partially blocked. Seabream leucocytes were also preincubated with chloroquine, a lysosomotropic drug which downregulates (in a nonspecific manner) the expression of mannose-receptors in mammals, before phagocytosis assays were performed. The results demonstrated that the phagocytosis of yeast was completely blocked by this substance. The overall results seem to corroborate the presence of the mannose-receptor in seabream phagocytes, which is involved in the non-specific binding and phagocytosis of yeast cells by head-kidney leucocytes. PMID:12711272

  13. Rapid and reversible responses to IVIG in autoimmune neuromuscular diseases suggest mechanisms of action involving competition with functionally important autoantibodies

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Melvin; McCallus, Daniel E; Lin, Cindy Shin-Yi

    2013-01-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) is widely used in autoimmune neuromuscular diseases whose pathogenesis is undefined. Many different effects of IVIG have been demonstrated in vitro, but few studies actually identify the mechanism(s) most important in vivo. Doses and treatment intervals are generally chosen empirically. Recent studies in Guillain-Barré syndrome and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy show that some effects of IVIG are readily reversible and highly dependent on the serum IgG level. This suggests that in some autoantibody-mediated neuromuscular diseases, IVIG directly competes with autoantibodies that reversibly interfere with nerve conduction. Mechanisms of action of IVIG which most likely involve direct competition with autoantibodies include: neutralization of autoantibodies by anti-idiotypes, inhibition of complement deposition, and increasing catabolism of pathologic antibodies by saturating FcRn. Indirect immunomodulatory effects are not as likely to involve competition and may not have the same reversibility and dose-dependency. Pharmacodynamic analyses should be informative regarding most relevant mechanism(s) of action of IVIG as well as the role of autoantibodies in the immunopathogenesis of each disease. Better understanding of the role of autoantibodies and of the target(s) of IVIG could lead to more efficient use of this therapy and better patient outcomes. PMID:24200120

  14. Memory-improving actions of glucose: involvement of a central cholinergic muscarinic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Kopf, S R; Baratti, C M

    1994-11-01

    Post-training intraperitoneal administration of alpha-D[+]-glucose (10-300 mg/kg) facilitated 24-h retention, in male Swiss mice, of a one-trial step-through inhibitory avoidance task. The dose-response curve was an inverted U. Glucose did not increase the retention latencies of mice that had not received a footshock during training. The effect of glucose (30 mg/kg, ip) on retention was time-dependent, which suggests that the drug facilitated memory storage. The memory facilitation induced by glucose (30 mg/kg, ip) was prevented by atropine (0.5 mg/kg, ip) administered after training, but 10 min prior to glucose treatment. In contrast, neither methylatropine (0.5 mg/kg, ip), a peripherally acting muscarinic receptor blocker, nor mecamylamine (5 mg/kg, ip) or hexamethonium (5 mg/kg, ip), two cholinergic nicotinic receptor antagonists, prevented the effects of post-training glucose on retention. Low subeffective doses of the central acting anticholinesterase physostigmine (35 micrograms/kg, ip), administered immediately after training, and glucose (10 mg/kg, ip), given 10 min after training, acted synergistically to improve retention. The effects of glucose (10 mg/kg, ip) were not influenced by the peripherally acting anticholinesterase neostigmine (35 micrograms/kg, ip). Considered together, these findings suggest that the memory facilitation induced by post-training administration of glucose could result from an enhancement of brain acetylcholine synthesis and/or its release that, in turn, might modulate the activity of muscarinic cholinergic mechanisms that are critically involved in memory storage. PMID:7857246

  15. Involvement of HCN Channel in Muscarinic Inhibitory Action on Tonic Firing of Dorsolateral Striatal Cholinergic Interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhe; Zhang, Kang; Liu, Xiaoyan; Yan, Haitao; Ma, Xiaoyun; Zhang, Shuzhuo; Zheng, Jianquan; Wang, Liyun; Wei, Xiaoli

    2016-01-01

    The striatum is the most prominent nucleus in the basal ganglia and plays an important role in motor movement regulation. The cholinergic interneurons (ChIs) in striatum are involved in the motion regulation by releasing acetylcholine (ACh) and modulating the output of striatal projection neurons. Here, we report that muscarinic ACh receptor (M receptor) agonists, ACh and Oxotremorine (OXO-M), decreased the firing frequency of ChIs by blocking the hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels. Scopolamine (SCO), a nonselective antagonist of M receptors, abolished the inhibition. OXO-M exerted its function by activating the Gi/o cAMP signaling cascade. The single-cell reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (scRT-PCR) revealed that all the five subtypes of M receptors and four subtypes of HCN channels were expressed on ChIs. Among them, M2 receptors and HCN2 channels were the most dominant ones and expressed in every single studied cholinergic interneuron (ChI).Our results suggest that ACh regulates not only the output of striatal projection neurons, but also the firing activity of ChIs themselves by activating presynaptic M receptors in the dorsal striatum. The activation of M2 receptors and blockage of HCN2 channels may play an important role in ACh inhibition on the excitability of ChIs. This finding adds a new G-protein coupled receptor mediated regulation on ChIs and provides a cellular mechanism for control of cholinergic activity and ACh release in the dorsal striatum. PMID:27047336

  16. Memory-improving actions of glucose: involvement of a central cholinergic muscarinic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Kopf, S R; Baratti, C M

    1994-11-01

    Post-training intraperitoneal administration of alpha-D[+]-glucose (10-300 mg/kg) facilitated 24-h retention, in male Swiss mice, of a one-trial step-through inhibitory avoidance task. The dose-response curve was an inverted U. Glucose did not increase the retention latencies of mice that had not received a footshock during training. The effect of glucose (30 mg/kg, ip) on retention was time-dependent, which suggests that the drug facilitated memory storage. The memory facilitation induced by glucose (30 mg/kg, ip) was prevented by atropine (0.5 mg/kg, ip) administered after training, but 10 min prior to glucose treatment. In contrast, neither methylatropine (0.5 mg/kg, ip), a peripherally acting muscarinic receptor blocker, nor mecamylamine (5 mg/kg, ip) or hexamethonium (5 mg/kg, ip), two cholinergic nicotinic receptor antagonists, prevented the effects of post-training glucose on retention. Low subeffective doses of the central acting anticholinesterase physostigmine (35 micrograms/kg, ip), administered immediately after training, and glucose (10 mg/kg, ip), given 10 min after training, acted synergistically to improve retention. The effects of glucose (10 mg/kg, ip) were not influenced by the peripherally acting anticholinesterase neostigmine (35 micrograms/kg, ip). Considered together, these findings suggest that the memory facilitation induced by post-training administration of glucose could result from an enhancement of brain acetylcholine synthesis and/or its release that, in turn, might modulate the activity of muscarinic cholinergic mechanisms that are critically involved in memory storage.

  17. Involvement of proton-sensing receptor TDAG8 in the anti-inflammatory actions of dexamethasone in peritoneal macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    He, Xiao-dong; Tobo, Masayuki; Mogi, Chihiro; Nakakura, Takashi; Komachi, Mayumi; Murata, Naoya; Takano, Mutsumi; Tomura, Hideaki; Sato, Koichi; Okajima, Fumikazu

    2011-12-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Glucocorticoid (GC) induced the expression of proton-sensing TDAG8 in macrophages. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer GC enhanced acidic pH-induced cAMP accumulation and inhibition of TNF-{alpha} production. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The enhancement of the GC-induced actions was lost by TDAG8 deficiency. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer GC-induced anti-inflammatory actions are partly mediated by TDAG8 expression. -- Abstract: Dexamethasone (DEX), a potent glucocorticoid, increased the expression of T-cell death associated gene 8 (TDAG8), a proton-sensing G protein-coupled receptor, which is associated with the enhancement of acidic pH-induced cAMP accumulation, in peritoneal macrophages. We explored the role of increased TDAG8 expression in the anti-inflammatory actions of DEX. The treatment of macrophages with either DEX or acidic pH induced the cell death of macrophages; however, the cell death was not affected by TDAG8 deficiency. While DEX inhibited lipopolysaccharide-induced production of tumor necrosis factor-{alpha}, an inflammatory cytokine, which was independent of TDAG8, at neutral pH, the glucocorticoid enhanced the acidic pH-induced inhibition of tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} production in a manner dependent on TDAG8. In conclusion, the DEX-induced increase in TDAG8 expression is in part involved in the glucocorticoid-induced anti-inflammatory actions through the inhibition of inflammatory cytokine production under the acidic pH environment. On the other hand, the role of TDAG8 in the DEX-induced cell death is questionable.

  18. Possible involvement of inefficient cleavage of preprovasopressin by signal peptidase as a cause for familial central diabetes insipidus.

    PubMed Central

    Ito, M; Oiso, Y; Murase, T; Kondo, K; Saito, H; Chinzei, T; Racchi, M; Lively, M O

    1993-01-01

    A transition of G to A at nucleotide position 279 in exon 1 of the vasopressin gene has been identified in patients with familial central diabetes insipidus. The mutation predicts an amino acid substitution of Thr (ACG) for Ala (GCG) at the COOH terminus of the signal peptide in preprovasopression (preproVP). Translation in vitro of wild-type and mutant mRNAs produced 19-kD preproVPs. When translated in the presence of canine pancreatic rough microsomes, wild-type preproVP was converted to a 21-kD protein, whereas the mutant mRNA produced proteins of 21 kD and 23 kD. NH2-terminal amino acid sequence analysis revealed that the 21-kD proteins from the wild-type and the mutants were proVPs generated by the proteolytic cleavage of the 19-residue signal peptide and the addition of carbohydrate. Accordingly, mutant preproVP was cleaved at the correct site after Thr-19, but the efficiency of cleavage by signal peptidase was < 25% that observed for the wild-type preproVP, resulting in the formation of a predominant glycosylated but uncleaved 23-kD product. These data suggest that inefficient processing of preproVP produced by the mutant allele is possibly involved in the pathogenesis of diabetes insipidus in the affected individuals. Images PMID:8514868

  19. Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) increases pain behavior and the blood glucose level: possible involvement of glucocorticoid system.

    PubMed

    Sim, Yun-Beom; Park, Soo-Hyun; Kang, Yu-Jung; Jung, Jun-Sub; Ryu, Ohk-Hyun; Choi, Moon-Gi; Choi, Seong-Soo; Suh, Hong-Won

    2013-10-01

    The possible involvement of glucocorticoid system in interleukin-1β (IL-1β)-induced nociception and the blood glucose level was studied in ICR mice. In the first experiment, mice were treated intrathecally (i.t.) with IL-1β (100 pg). Corticotrophin releasing hormone (CRH) mRNA (hypothalamus) and c-Fos mRNA (pituitary gland, spinal cord, and the adrenal gland) levels were measured at 30, 60 and 120 min after IL-1β administration. We found that i.t. injection with IL-1β increased CRH mRNA level in the hypothalamus. The IL-1β administered i.t. elevated c-Fos mRNA levels in the spinal cord, pituitary and adrenal glands. Furthermore, i.t. administration of IL-1β significantly increased the plasma corticosterone level up to 60 min. In addition, the adrenalectomy caused the reductions of the blood glucose level and pain behavior induced by IL-1β injected i.t. in normal and D-glucose-fed groups. Furthermore, intraperitoneal (i.p.) pretreatment with RU486 (100mg/kg) attenuated the blood glucose level and pain behavior induced by IL-1β administered i.t. in normal and D-glucose-fed groups. Our results suggest that IL-1β administered i.t. increases the blood glucose level and pain behavior via an activation of the glucocorticoid system. PMID:23773309

  20. Molecular and biochemical evidence for the involvement of calcium/calmodulin in auxin action

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, T.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2000-01-01

    -dependent manner suggests that calcium/CaM regulate ZmSAUR1 at the post-translational level. Our data provide the first direct evidence for the involvement of calcium/CaM-mediated signaling in auxin-mediated signal transduction.

  1. The mode of action of interferons in viral infections and their possible role in the control of hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Billiau, A

    1986-01-01

    Interferons can alter the course of virus infections by inhibiting virus replication at the intracellular level and by modifying the aspecific and specific immune response to viral antigens in body fluids and on cellular surfaces. Treatment of isolated cells with interferon renders them resistant to infections by viruses belonging to virtually any family. Knowledge of the mechanism of this effect is derived from studies employing both DNA (especially vaccinia virus and SV40) and RNA-viruses (especially picorna-, toga-, rhabdo-, reo- and retroviruses). Interferon induces multiple alterations in the level and state of intracellular regulatory molecules, leading to inhibition of virus replication at several possible steps. In the case of certain DNA viruses, transcription of viral DNA seems to be inhibited. In the case of RNA viruses the target for interferon action is mainly translation. The retroviridae constitute a special case and, in view of their analogy with the hepadnaviridae, are of particular relevance to the possible effects of interferon on the replication of HBV. Interferon inhibits one or more initial stages of primary infection of cells by transforming or nontransforming retroviruses, thereby preventing or delaying the synthesis and/or integration of viral DNA. In cells that already contain an integrated and fully expressed retrovirus genome, interferon treatment results in a reduced release of viral particles as well as a downward shift of the ratios between the numbers of infectious vs noninfectious particles. Immuno-modulatory properties of interferon which might alter the course of HBV-infection include: potentiation of cytotoxic activity of lymphocytes and macrophages; direct anti-inflammatory effects; enhancement or depression in antibody formation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2439572

  2. Does Branched-Chain Amino Acids Supplementation Modulate Skeletal Muscle Remodeling through Inflammation Modulation? Possible Mechanisms of Action

    PubMed Central

    Nicastro, Humberto; da Luz, Claudia Ribeiro; Chaves, Daniela Fojo Seixas; Bechara, Luiz Roberto Grassmann; Voltarelli, Vanessa Azevedo; Rogero, Marcelo Macedo; Lancha, Antonio Herbert

    2012-01-01

    Skeletal muscle protein turnover is modulated by intracellular signaling pathways involved in protein synthesis, degradation, and inflammation. The proinflammatory status of muscle cells, observed in pathological conditions such as cancer, aging, and sepsis, can directly modulate protein translation initiation and muscle proteolysis, contributing to negative protein turnover. In this context, branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs), especially leucine, have been described as a strong nutritional stimulus able to enhance protein translation initiation and attenuate proteolysis. Furthermore, under inflammatory conditions, BCAA can be transaminated to glutamate in order to increase glutamine synthesis, which is a substrate highly consumed by inflammatory cells such as macrophages. The present paper describes the role of inflammation on muscle remodeling and the possible metabolic and cellular effects of BCAA supplementation in the modulation of inflammatory status of skeletal muscle and the consequences on protein synthesis and degradation. PMID:22536489

  3. Involvement of KLF14 and egr-1 in the TGF-beta1 action on Leydig cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, C R; Vallcaneras, S S; Calandra, R S; Gonzalez Calvar, S I

    2013-02-01

    Transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) is a pleiotropic cytokine that modulates cell homeostasis. In Leydig cells, TGF-β1 exerts stimulatory and inhibitory effect depending on the type I receptor involved in the signaling pathway. The aim of the present work was to study the signaling mechanisms and the intermediates involved in the action of TGF-β1 on TM3 Leydig cell proliferation in the presence or absence of progesterone. The MTT assay showed that the presence of progesterone in the culture media lead to a proliferative effect that was blocked by Ru 486, an inhibitor of progesterone receptor; and ALK-5 did not participate in this effect. TGF-β1 (1 ng/ml) increased the expression of p15 (an inhibitor of cell cycle) in TM3 Leydig cells, and this effect was blocked by progesterone (1μM). The expression of PCNA presented a higher increase in the cell cultured with TGF-β1 plus progesterone than in cells cultured only with TGF-β1. Progesterone induced the gene expression of endoglin, a cofactor of TGF-β1 receptor that leads to a stimulatory signaling pathway, despite of the absence of progesterone response element in endoglin gene. In addition, the presence of progesterone induced the gene expression of egr-1 and also KLF14, indicating that this steroid channels the signaling pathway into a non-canonical mechanism. In conclusion, these findings suggest that the proliferative action of TGF-β1 involves endoglin. This co-receptor might be induced by KLF14 which is probably activated by progesterone. PMID:23317878

  4. Antiviral activity and possible mode of action of ellagic acid identified in Lagerstroemia speciosa leaves toward human rhinoviruses

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Human rhinoviruses (HRVs) are responsible for more than half of all cases of the common cold and cause billions of USD annually in medical visits and school and work absenteeism. An assessment was made of the cytotoxic and antiviral activities and possible mode of action of the tannin ellagic acid from the leaves of Lagerstroemia speciosa toward HeLa cells and three rhinoviruses, HRV-2, -3, and -4. Methods The antiviral property and mechanism of action of ellagic acid were evaluated using a sulforhodamine B assay and real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) with SYBR Green dye. Results were compared with those of the currently used broad-spectrum antiviral agent, ribavirin. Results As judged by 50% inhibitory concentration values, natural ellagic acid was 1.8, 2.3, and 2.2 times more toxic toward HRV-2 (38 μg/mL), HRV-3 (31 μg/mL), and HRV-4 (29 μg/mL) than ribavirin, respectively. The inhibition rate of preincubation with 50 μg/mL ellagic acid was 17%, whereas continuous presence of ellagic acid during infection led to a significant increase in the inhibition (70%). Treatment with 50 μg/mL ellagic acid considerably suppressed HRV-4 infection only when added just after the virus inoculation (0 h) (87% inhibition), but not before -1 h or after 1 h or later (<20% inhibition). These findings suggest that ellagic acid does not interact with the HRV-4 particles and may directly interact with the human cells in the early stage of HRV infections to protect the cells from the virus destruction. Furthermore, RT-PCR analysis revealed that 50 μg/mL ellagic acid strongly inhibited the RNA replication of HRV-4 in HeLa cells, suggesting that ellagic acid inhibits virus replication by targeting on cellular molecules, rather than virus molecules. Conclusions Global efforts to reduce the level of antibiotics justify further studies on L. speciosa leaf-derived materials containing ellagic acid as potential anti-HRV products or a lead molecule for the

  5. Morphological and molecular characterisation of fungal populations possibly involved in the biological alteration of stones in historical buildings.

    PubMed

    Scrano, L; Boccone, L Fraddosio; Bufo, S A; Carrieri, R; Lahoz, E; Crescenzi, A

    2012-01-01

    performed. Several genera and species of fungi, possibly, involved in degradation were found. The most frequent colonies belonged to Alternaria (A. infectoria, A. citri and Alternaria sp.), Coprinopsis sp., Penicillium piceum, Fusatrium equiseti and Scytalidium termophilus. PMID:23878973

  6. Contribution of acetaminophen-cysteine to acetaminophen nephrotoxicity II. Possible involvement of the {gamma}-glutamyl cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, Stephan T.; Bruno, Mary K.; Horton, Robert A.; Hill, Dennis W.; Roberts, Jeanette C.; Cohen, Steven D. . E-mail: scohen@mcp.edu

    2005-01-15

    Acetaminophen (APAP) nephrotoxicity has been observed both in humans and research animals. Our recent investigations have focused on the possible involvement of glutathione-derived APAP metabolites in APAP nephrotoxicity and have demonstrated that administration of acetaminophen-cysteine (APAP-CYS) potentiated APAP-induced renal injury with no effects on APAP-induced liver injury. Additionally, APAP-CYS treatment alone resulted in a dose-responsive renal GSH depletion. This APAP-CYS-induced renal GSH depletion could interfere with intrarenal detoxification of APAP or its toxic metabolite N-acetyl-p-benzoquinoneimine (NAPQI) and may be the mechanism responsible for the potentiation of APAP nephrotoxicity. Renal-specific GSH depletion has been demonstrated in mice and rats following administration of amino acid {gamma}-glutamyl acceptor substrates for {gamma}-glutamyl transpeptidase ({gamma}-GT). The present study sought to determine if APAP-CYS-induced renal glutathione depletion is the result of disruption of the {gamma}-glutamyl cycle through interaction with {gamma}-GT. The results confirmed that APAP-CYS-induced renal GSH depletion was antagonized by the {gamma}-glutamyl transpeptidase ({gamma}-GT) inhibitor acivicin. In vitro analysis demonstrated that APAP-CYS is a {gamma}-glutamyl acceptor for both murine and bovine renal {gamma}-GT. Analysis of urine from mice pretreated with acivicin and then treated with APAP, APAP-CYS, or acetaminophen-glutathione identified a {gamma}-glutamyl-cysteinyl-acetaminophen metabolite. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that APAP-CYS contributes to APAP nephrotoxicity by depletion of renal GSH stores through interaction with the {gamma}-glutamyl cycle.

  7. Alterations in left ventricular function during intermittent hypoxia: Possible involvement of O-GlcNAc protein and MAPK signaling.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xueling; Shang, Jin; Deng, Yan; Yuan, Xiao; Zhu, Die; Liu, Huiguo

    2015-07-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea, characterized by recurrent episodes of hypoxia [intermittent hypoxia (IH)], has been identified as a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. The O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) modification (O-GlcNAcylation) of proteins has important regulatory implications on the pathophysiology of cardiovascular disorders. In this study, we examined the role of O-GlcNAcylation in cardiac architecture and left ventricular function following IH. Rats were randomly assigned to a normoxia and IH group (2 min 21% O2; 2 min 6-8% O2). Left ventricular function, myocardial morphology and the levels of signaling molecules were then measured. IH induced a significant increase in blood pressure, associated with a gradually abnormal myocardial architecture. The rats exposed to 2 or 3 weeks of IH presented with augmented left ventricular systolic and diastolic function, which declined at week 4. Consistently, the O-GlcNAc protein and O-GlcNAcase (OGA) levels in the left ventricular tissues steadily increased following IH, reaching peak levels at week 3. The O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT), extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) phosphorylation levels were affected in an opposite manner. The phosphorylation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) remained unaltered. In parallel, compared with exposure to normoxia, 4 weeks of IH augmented the O-GlcNAc protein, OGT, phosphorylated ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK levels, accompanied by a decrease in OGA levels and an increase in the levels of myocardial nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), inflammatory cytokines, caspase-3 and cardiomyocyte apoptosis. Taken together, our suggest a possible involvement of O-GlcNAc protein and MAPK signaling in the alterations of left ventricular function and cardiac injury following IH.

  8. PPARβ/δ and γ in a rat model of Parkinson's disease: possible involvement in PD symptoms.

    PubMed

    Falcone, Roberta; Florio, Tiziana Marilena; Di Giacomo, Erica; Benedetti, Elisabetta; Cristiano, Loredana; Antonosante, Andrea; Fidoamore, Alessia; Massimi, Mara; Alecci, Marcello; Ippoliti, Rodolfo; Giordano, Antonio; Cimini, Annamaria

    2015-05-01

    Parkinson's disease is one of the most common neurologic disorder, affecting about 1-4% of persons older than 60 years. Among the proposed mechanisms of PD generation, free radical damage is believed to play a pivotal role in the development and/or progression of the disease. Recently, PPARs, a class of transcription factors involved in several pathways both in physiological and pathological conditions, have been linked by us and others to neurodegeneration. Particularly, PPARγ and its ligands have been indicated as potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of several pathological conditions associated with neuroinflammation within the CNS. The anti-inflammatory function of PPARγ has attracted attention since agonists exert a broad spectrum of protective effects in several animal models of neurological diseases, including psychiatric diseases. On the other hand a detrimental role for PPARβ/δ has been proposed in Alzheimer, being closely related to the decrease of BDNF and Trkfl. On these bases, in this work we used a 6-OHDA hemi-lesioned rat model, inducing loss of dopaminergic neurons, to study the effects of the lesion at three time points from the lesion (1, 2, and 3 weeks), in relevant areas of PD motor symptoms, such as substantia nigra and globus pallidus and in the area of reward and mood control, the nucleus accumbens. In particular, it was studied: (i) the expression of BDNF and its downstream signals; (ii) the modulation of PPARs levels. The results obtained indicate the possible use of a dual PPARβ/δ antagonist/PPARγ agonist to counteract primary and secondary signs of PD neurodegeneration. PMID:25530507

  9. Antimanic-like activity of candesartan in mice: Possible involvement of antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and neurotrophic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    de Souza Gomes, Júlia Ariana; de Souza, Greicy Coelho; Berk, Michael; Cavalcante, Lígia Menezes; de Sousa, Francisca Cléa F; Budni, Josiane; de Lucena, David Freitas; Quevedo, João; Carvalho, André F; Macêdo, Danielle

    2015-11-01

    Activation of the brain angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) triggers pro-oxidant and pro-inflammatory mechanisms which are involved in the neurobiology of bipolar disorder (BD). Candesartan (CDS) is an AT1 receptor antagonist with potential neuroprotective properties. Herein we investigated CDS effects against oxidative, neurotrophic inflammatory and cognitive effects of amphetamine (AMPH)-induced mania. In the reversal protocol adult mice were given AMPH 2 mg/kg i.p. or saline and between days 8 and 14 received CDS 0.1, 0.3 or 1 mg/kg orally, lithium (Li) 47.5 mg/kg i.p., or saline. In the prevention treatment, mice were pretreated with CDS, Li or saline prior to AMPH. Locomotor activity and working memory performance were assessed. Glutathione (GSH), thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance (TBARS) and TNF-α levels were evaluated in the hippocampus (HC) and cerebellar vermis (CV). Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and glycogen synthase kinase 3-beta (GSK-3beta) levels were measured in the HC. CDS and Li prevented and reversed the AMPH-induced increases in locomotor activity. Only CDS prevented and reversed AMPH-induced working memory deficits. CDS prevented AMPH-induced alterations in GSH (HC and CV), TBARS (HC and CV), TNF-α (HC and CV) and BDNF (HC) levels. Li prevented alterations in BDNF and phospho-Ser9-GSK3beta. CDS reversed AMPH-induced alterations in GSH (HC and CV), TBARS (HC), TNF-α (CV) and BDNF levels. Li reversed AMPH-induced alterations in TNF-α (HC and CV) and BDNF (HC) levels. CDS is effective in reversing and preventing AMPH-induced behavioral and biochemical alterations, providing a rationale for the design of clinical trials investigating CDS׳s possible therapeutic effects.

  10. Possible involvement of serotonin 5-HT2 receptor in the regulation of feeding behavior through the histaminergic system.

    PubMed

    Murotani, Tomotaka; Ishizuka, Tomoko; Isogawa, Yuka; Karashima, Michitaka; Yamatodani, Atsushi

    2011-01-01

    The central histaminergic system has been proven to be involved in several physiological functions including feeding behavior. Some atypical antipsychotics like risperidone and aripiprazole are known to affect feeding behavior and to antagonize the serotonin (5-HT) receptor subtypes. To examine the possible neural relationship between the serotonergic and histaminergic systems in the anorectic effect of the antipsychotics, we studied the effect of a single administration of these drugs on food intake and hypothalamic histamine release in mice using in vivo microdialysis. Single injection of risperidone (0.5mg/kg, i.p.) or aripiprazole (1mg/kg, i.p.), which have binding affinities to 5-HT(1A, 2A, 2B) and (2C) receptors decreased food intake in C57BL/6N mice with concomitant increase of hypothalamic histamine release. However, a selective D(2)-antagonist, haloperidol (0.5mg/kg, i.p.), did not have effects on food intake or histamine release. Furthermore, in histamine H(1) receptor-deficient mice, there was no reduction of food intake induced by atypical antipsychotics, although histamine release was increased. Moreover, selective 5-HT(2A)-antagonists, volinanserin (0.5, 1mg/kg, i.p.) and ketanserin (5, 10mg/kg, i.p.), significantly increased histamine release and 5-HT(2B/2C) -antagonist, SB206553 (2.5, 5mg/kg, i.p.), slightly increased it. On the contrary, 5-HT(1A) -selective antagonist, WAY100635 (1, 2mg/kg), did not affect the histaminergic tone. These findings suggest that serotonin tonically inhibits histamine release via 5-HT(2) receptors and that antipsychotics enhance the release of hypothalamic histamine by blockade of 5-HT(2) receptors resulting in anorexia via the H(1) receptor.

  11. Generation of slow wave type action potentials in the mouse small intestine involves a non-L-type calcium channel.

    PubMed

    Malysz, J; Richardson, D; Farraway, L; Christen, M O; Huizinga, J D

    1995-10-01

    Intrinsic electrical activities in various isolated segments of the mouse small intestine were recorded (i) to characterize action potential generation and (ii) to obtain a profile on the ion channels involved in initiating the slow wave type action potentials (slow waves). Gradients in slow wave frequency, resting membrane potential, and occurrence of spiking activity were found, with the proximal intestine exhibiting the highest frequency, the most hyperpolarized cell membrane, and the greatest occurrence of spikes. The slow waves were only partially sensitive to L-type calcium channel blockers. Nifedipine, verapamil, and pinaverium bromide abolished spikes that occurred on the plateau phase of the slow waves in all tissues. The activity that remained in the presence of L-type calcium channel blockers, the upstroke potential, retained a similar amplitude to the original slow wave and was of identical frequency. The upstroke potential was not sensitive to a reduction in extracellular chloride or to the sodium channel blockers tetrodotoxin and mexiletine. Abolishment of the Na+ gradient by removal of 120 mM extracellular Na+ reduced the upstroke potential frequency by 13 - 18% and its amplitude by 50 - 70% in the ileum. The amplitude was similarly reduced by Ni2+ (up to 5 mM), and by flufenamic acid (100 mu M), a nonspecific cation and chloride channel blocker. Gadolinium, a nonspecific blocker of cation and stretch-activated channels, had no effect. Throughout these pharmacological manipulations, a robust oscillation remained at 5 - 10 mV. This oscillation likely reflects pacemaker activity. It was rapidly abolished by removal of extracellular calcium but not affected by L-type calcium channel blockers. In summary, the mouse small intestine has been established as a model for research into slow wave generation and electrical pacemaker activity. The upstroke part of the slow wave has two components, the pacemaker component involves a non-L-type calcium channel

  12. Forum: Knowledge, Action, Involvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinberger, JoAnn

    2015-01-01

    St. Clair (EJ1072357) provides a summary and lays out some of the important issues inherent in the broad strategies articulated in "Making Skills Everyone's Business: A Call to Transform Adult Learning in the United States" (MSEB) (United States Department of Education [USDoE], 2015) (see ED558793). In this commentary, JoAnn Weinberger…

  13. Effects of magnolol on UVB-induced skin cancer development in mice and its possible mechanism of action

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Magnolol, a plant lignan isolated from the bark and seed cones of Magnolia officinalis, has been shown to have chemopreventive effects on chemically-induced skin cancer development. The objectives of this investigation are to study the anticarcinogenic effects of magnolol on UVB-induced skin tumor development in SKH-1 mice, a model relevant to humans, and determine the possible role of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest involved in the skin tumor development. Methods UVB-induced skin carcinogenesis model in SKH-1 mice was used for determining the preventive effects of magnolol on skin cancer development. Western blottings and flow cytometric analysis were used to study the effects of magnolol on apoptosis and cell cycle. Results Magnolol pretreated groups (30, 60 μ g) before UVB treatments (30 mJ/cm2, 5 days/week) resulted in 27-55% reduction in tumor multiplicity as compared to control group in SKH-1 mice. Magnolol pretreatment increased the cleavage of caspase-8 and poly-(-ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), increased the expression of p21, a cell cycle inhibitor, and decreased the expression of proteins involved in the G2/M phase of cell cycle in skin samples from SKH-1 mice. Treatment of A431 cells with magnolol decreased cell viability and cell proliferation in a concentration dependent manner. Magnolol induced G2/M phase cell cycle arrest in A431 cells at 12 h with a decreased expression of cell cycle proteins such as cyclin B1, cyclin A, CDK4, Cdc2 and simultaneous increase in the expression of Cip/p21, a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor. Magnolol induced apoptosis in vivo and in vitro with an increased cleavage of caspase-8 and PARP. Phospho-signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 (Tyr705), B-Raf, p-MEK, and p-AKT were down-regulated, whereas phosphorylation of ERK was induced by magnolol in A431 cells. Conclusions Magnolol pretreatments prevent UVB-induced skin cancer development by enhancing apoptosis, causing cell cycle arrest at G2/M

  14. A Reasoned Action Model of Male Client Involvement in Commercial Sex Work in Kibera, A Large Informal Settlement in Nairobi, Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Eric Abella; Ngugi, Elizabeth; Benoit, Cecilia; Jansson, Mikael; Hallgrimsdottir, Helga

    2015-01-01

    Male clients of female sex workers (FSWs) are epidemiologically important because they can form bridge groups linking high- and low-risk subpopulations. However, because male clients are hard to locate, they are not frequently studied. Recent research emphasizes searching for high-risk behavior groups in locales where new sexual partnerships form and the threat of HIV transmission is high. Sub-Saharan Africa public drinking venues satisfy these criteria. Accordingly, this study developed and implemented a rapid assessment methodology to survey men in bars throughout the large informal settlement of Kibera, Nairobi, Kenya, with the goal of delineating cultural and economic rationales associated with male participation in commercial sex. The study sample consisted of 220 male patrons of 110 bars located throughout Kibera’s 11 communities. Logistic regression analysis incorporating a modified Reasoned Action Model indicated that a social norm condoning commercial sex among male peers and the cultural belief that men should practice sex before marriage support commercial sex involvement. Conversely, lacking money to drink and/or pay for sexual services were barriers to male commercial sex involvement. Results are interpreted in light of possible harm reduction programs focusing on FSWs’ male clients. PMID:26778847

  15. Schistosoma mansoni: possible involvement of protein kinase C in linoleic acid-induced proteolytic enzyme release from cercariae.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, K; Mitsui, Y; Sato, K; Sakamoto, M; Aoki, Y

    1991-04-01

    The possible involvement of protein kinase C and Ca2+ metabolism in the proteolytic enzyme release from schistosome cercariae was studied. Cercariae were placed in dechlorinated tap water containing 0.37 mM calcium in the small glass petri dish and exposed to the stimuli (linoleic acid, phorbol esters, and Ca2+ ionophore) with or without inhibitors of protein kinase C or Ca2+ metabolism. The proteolytic activity of incubation medium of cercariae thus treated was measured by the azocoll assay. The penetration response of cercariae induced by linoleic acid, a physiological stimulus, was mimicked by phorbol esters. When exposed to phorbol esters, 0.02 to 2 microM of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) and 0.2 to 2 microM of phorbol-12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu), cercariae ceased the swimming movement, began a rhythmic thrusting of the anterior tip of the parasite, and released the proteolytic enzyme, but they did not shed the tails. Lowering Ca2+ in water by addition of 5 mM ethylene glycol-bis(beta-aminoethyl ether) N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA), phorbol ester-induced release of enzyme was completely inhibited. Phorbol ester-induced release of enzyme was partially inhibited by 1-(5-isoquinolinylsulfonyl)-2-methylpiperazine (H-7), an inhibitor of protein kinase C, at a concentration of 100 microM. H-7 alone, at a concentration of 100 microM, did not affect the swimming movement of cercariae. The cercariae were stimulated to release the enzyme by high concentrations (10 and 100 microM) of the Ca2+ ionophore, A23187, but enzyme was not released by low concentrations (0.5 and 1 microM) of this drug. Cercariae exposed to A23187 behaved differently from those exposed to phorbol esters. They ceased swimming, showed strong muscle contraction, and shed their tail. A23187 stimulated cercariae to release the enzyme in the water containing 5 mM EGTA. A23187-induced enzyme release was not inhibited by N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphthalenesulfonamide (W-7), a calmodulin

  16. Mechanism of action of peptidoglycan O-acetyltransferase B involves a Ser-His-Asp catalytic triad.

    PubMed

    Moynihan, Patrick J; Clarke, Anthony J

    2014-10-01

    The O-acetylation of the essential cell wall polymer peptidoglycan is essential in many bacteria for their integrity and survival, and it is catalyzed by peptidoglycan O-acetlytransferase B (PatB). Using PatB from Neisseria gonorrhoeae as the model, we have shown previously that the enzyme has specificity for polymeric muropeptides that possess tri- and tetrapeptide stems and that rates of reaction increase with increasing degrees of polymerization. Here, we present the catalytic mechanism of action of PatB, the first to be described for an O-acetyltransferase of any bacterial exopolysaccharide. The influence of pH on PatB activity was investigated, and pKa values of 6.4-6.45 and 6.25-6.35 for the enzyme-substrate complex (kcat vs pH) and the free enzyme (kcat·KM(-1) vs pH), respectively, were determined for the respective cosubstrates. The enzyme is partially inactivated by sulfonyl fluorides but not by EDTA, suggesting the participation of a serine residue in its catalytic mechanism. Alignment of the known and hypothetical PatB amino acid sequences identified Ser133, Asp302, and His305 as three invariant amino acid residues that could potentially serve as a catalytic triad. Replacement of Asp302 with Ala resulted in an enzyme with less than 20% residual activity, whereas activity was barely detectable with (His305 → Ala)PatB and (Ser133 → Ala)PatB was totally inactive. The reaction intermediate of the transferase reaction involving acetyl- and propionyl-acyl donors was trapped on both the wild-type and (Asp302 → Ala) enzymes and LC-MS/MS analysis of tryptic peptides identified Ser133 as the catalytic nucleophile. A transacetylase mechanism is proposed based on the mechanism of action of serine esterases. PMID:25215566

  17. Oral Efficacy of Apigenin against Cutaneous Leishmaniasis: Involvement of Reactive Oxygen Species and Autophagy as a Mechanism of Action

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca-Silva, Fernanda; Inacio, Job D. F.; Canto-Cavalheiro, Marilene M.; Menna-Barreto, Rubem F. S.; Almeida-Amaral, Elmo E.

    2016-01-01

    Background The treatment for leishmaniasis is currently based on pentavalent antimonials and amphotericin B; however, these drugs result in numerous adverse side effects. The lack of affordable therapy has necessitated the urgent development of new drugs that are efficacious, safe, and more accessible to patients. Natural products are a major source for the discovery of new and selective molecules for neglected diseases. In this paper, we evaluated the effect of apigenin on Leishmania amazonensis in vitro and in vivo and described the mechanism of action against intracellular amastigotes of L. amazonensis. Methodology/Principal Finding Apigenin reduced the infection index in a dose-dependent manner, with IC50 values of 4.3 μM and a selectivity index of 18.2. Apigenin induced ROS production in the L. amazonensis-infected macrophage, and the effects were reversed by NAC and GSH. Additionally, apigenin induced an increase in the number of macrophages autophagosomes after the infection, surrounding the parasitophorous vacuole, suggestive of the involvement of host autophagy probably due to ROS generation induced by apigenin. Furthermore, apigenin treatment was also effective in vivo, demonstrating oral bioavailability and reduced parasitic loads without altering serological toxicity markers. Conclusions/Significance In conclusion, our study suggests that apigenin exhibits leishmanicidal effects against L. amazonensis-infected macrophages. ROS production, as part of the mechanism of action, could occur through the increase in host autophagy and thereby promoting parasite death. Furthermore, our data suggest that apigenin is effective in the treatment of L. amazonensis-infected BALB/c mice by oral administration, without altering serological toxicity markers. The selective in vitro activity of apigenin, together with excellent theoretical predictions of oral availability, clear decreases in parasite load and lesion size, and no observed compromises to the overall health

  18. Identification of a novel pathway involving a GATA transcription factor in yeast and possibly in plant Zn uptake and homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Milner, Matthew J; Pence, Nicole S; Liu, Jiping; Kochian, Leon V

    2014-03-01

    To gain a better understanding of the regulation of Zn homeostasis in plants and the degree of conservation of Zn homeostasis between plants and yeast, a cDNA library from the Zn/Cd hyperaccumulating plant species, Noccaea caerulescens, was screened for its ability to restore growth under Zn limiting conditions in the yeast mutant zap1Δ. ZAP1 is a transcription factor that activates the Zn dependent transcription of yeast genes involved in Zn uptake, including ZRT1, the yeast high affinity Zn transporter. From this screen two members of the E2F family of transcription factors were found to activate ZRT1 expression in a Zn independent manner. The activation of ZRT1 by the plant E2F proteins involves E2F-mediated activation of a yeast GATA transcription factor which in turn activates ZRT1 expression. A ZRT1 promoter region necessary for activation by E2F and GATA proteins is upstream of two zinc responsive elements previously shown to bind ZAP1 in ZRT1. This activation may not involve direct binding of E2F to the ZRT1 promoter. The expression of E2F genes in yeast does not replace function of ZAP1; instead it appears to activate a novel GATA regulatory pathway involved in Zn uptake and homeostasis that is not Zn responsive.

  19. Vascular Endothelium-Dependent and Independent Actions of Oleanolic Acid and Its Synthetic Oleanane Derivatives as Possible Mechanisms for Hypotensive Effects

    PubMed Central

    Madlala, Hlengiwe P.; Metzinger, Thomas; van Heerden, Fanie R.; Mubagwa, Kanigula; Dessy, Chantal

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Plant-derived oleanolic acid (OA) and its related synthetic derivatives (Br-OA and Me-OA) possess antihypertensive effects in experimental animals. The present study investigated possible underlying mechanisms in rat isolated single ventricular myocytes and in vascular smooth muscles superfused at 37°C. Methods Cell shortening was assessed at 1 Hz using a video-based edge-detection system and the L-type Ca2+ current (ICaL) was measured using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique in single ventricular myocytes. Isometric tension was measured using force transducer in isolated aortic rings and in mesenteric arteries. Vascular effects were measured in endothelium-intact and denuded vessels in the presence of various enzyme or channel inhibitors. Results OA and its derivatives increased cell shortening in cardiomyocytes isolated from normotensive rats but had no effect in those isolated from hypertensive animals. These triterpenes also caused relaxation in aortic rings and in mesenteric arteries pre-contracted with either phenylephrine or KCl-enriched solution. The relaxation was only partially inhibited by endothelium denudation, and also partly inhibited by the cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitor indomethacin, with no additional inhibitory effect of the NO synthase inhibitor, N-ω-Nitro-L-arginine. A combination of both ATP-dependent channel inhibition by glibenclaminde and voltage-dependent K+ channel inhibition by 4-aminopyridine was necessary to fully inhibit the relaxation. Conclusion These data indicate that the effects of OA and its derivatives are mediated via both endothelium-dependent and independent mechanisms suggesting the involvement of COX in the endothelium-dependent effects and of vascular muscle K+ channels in the endothelium-independent effects. Finally, our results support the view that the antihypertensive action of OA and its derivatives is due to a decrease of vascular resistance with no negative inotropic effect on the heart. PMID:26799746

  20. Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1A toxins are versatile proteins with multiple modes of action: two distinct pre-pores are involved in toxicity.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Isabel; Sánchez, Jorge; Muñoz-Garay, Carlos; Matus, Violeta; Gill, Sarjeet S; Soberón, Mario; Bravo, Alejandra

    2014-04-15

    Cry proteins from Bacillus thuringiensis are insecticidal PFTs (pore-forming toxins). In the present study, we show that two distinct functional pre-pores of Cry1Ab are formed after binding of the protoxin or the protease-activated toxin to the cadherin receptor, but before membrane insertion. Both pre-pores actively induce pore formation, although with different characteristics, and contribute to the insecticidal activity. We also analysed the oligomerization of the mutant Cry1AbMod protein. This mutant kills different insect populations that are resistant to Cry toxins, but lost potency against susceptible insects. We found that the Cry1AbMod-protoxin efficiently induces oligomerization, but not the activated Cry1AbMod-toxin, explaining the loss of potency of Cry1AbMod against susceptible insects. These data are relevant for the future control of insects resistant to Cry proteins. Our data support the pore-formation model involving sequential interaction with different midgut proteins, leading to pore formation in the target membrane. We propose that not only different insect targets could have different receptors, but also different midgut proteases that would influence the rate of protoxin/toxin activation. It is possible that the two pre-pore structures could have been selected for in evolution, since they have differential roles in toxicity against selected targets, increasing their range of action. These data assign a functional role for the protoxin fragment of Cry PFTs that was not understood previously. Most PFTs produced by other bacteria are secreted as protoxins that require activation before oligomerization, to finally form a pore. Thus different pre-pores could be also part of the general mechanism of action of other PFTs.

  1. Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1A toxins are versatile proteins with multiple modes of action: two distinct pre-pores are involved in toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Gómez, Isabel; Sánchez, Jorge; Muñoz-Garay, Carlos; Matus, Violeta; Gill, Sarjeet S.; Soberón, Mario; Bravo, Alejandra

    2014-01-01

    Cry proteins from Bacillus thuringiensis are insecticidal PFTs (pore-forming toxins). In the present study, we show that two distinct functional pre-pores of Cry1Ab are formed after binding of the protoxin or the protease-activated toxin to the cadherin receptor, but before membrane insertion. Both pre-pores actively induce pore formation, although with different characteristics, and contribute to the insecticidal activity. We also analysed the oligomerization of the mutant Cry1AbMod protein. This mutant kills different insect populations that are resistant to Cry toxins, but lost potency against susceptible insects. We found that the Cry1AbMod-protoxin efficiently induces oligomerization, but not the activated Cry1AbMod-toxin, explaining the loss of potency of Cry1AbMod against susceptible insects. These data are relevant for the future control of insects resistant to Cry proteins. Our data support the pore-formation model involving sequential interaction with different midgut proteins, leading to pore formation in the target membrane. We propose that not only different insect targets could have different receptors, but also different midgut proteases that would influence the rate of protoxin/toxin activation. It is possible that the two pre-pore structures could have been selected for in evolution, since they have differential roles in toxicity against selected targets, increasing their range of action. These data assign a functional role for the protoxin fragment of Cry PFTs that was not understood previously. Most PFTs produced by other bacteria are secreted as protoxins that require activation before oligomerization, to finally form a pore. Thus different pre-pores could be also part of the general mechanism of action of other PFTs. PMID:24456341

  2. Inositolphosphoglycans are possible mediators of the glucagon-like peptide 1 (7-36)amide action in the liver.

    PubMed

    Trapote, M A; Clemente, F; Galera, C; Morales, M; Alcántara, A I; López-Delgado, M I; Villanueva-Peñacarrillo, M L; Valverde, I

    1996-02-01

    A potent glycogenic effect for GLP-1(7-36)amide has been found in rat hepatocytes and skeletal muscle, and the specific receptors detected for GLP-1(7-36)amide in these tissue membranes do not seem to be associated to adenylate cyclase. On the other hand, inositolphosphoglycan molecules (IPGs) have been implicated as second messengers in the action of insulin. In a human hepatoma cell line (HEP G-2), we have observed the presence of [125I]GLP-1(7-36)amide specific binding, and a stimulatory effect of the peptide upon glycogen synthesis, confirming the findings in isolated rat hepatocytes. Also, GLP-1(7-36)amide modulates the cell content of radiolabelled glycosylphosphatidylinositols (GPIs), in the same manner as insulin, indicating hydrolysis of GPIs and an immediate and short-lived generation of IPGs. Thus, IPGs could be mediators in the GLP-1(7-36)amide glycogenic action in the liver.

  3. Goshajinkigan reduces bortezomib-induced mechanical allodynia in rats: Possible involvement of kappa opioid receptor.

    PubMed

    Higuchi, Hitomi; Yamamoto, Shota; Ushio, Soichiro; Kawashiri, Takehiro; Egashira, Nobuaki

    2015-11-01

    In the present study, we investigated the effect of a Kampo medicine Goshajinkigan (GJG) on the bortezomib-induced mechanical allodynia in von Frey test in rats. The single administration of tramadol (10 mg/kg), GJG (1.0 g/kg) and its component processed Aconiti tuber (0.1 g/kg) significantly reversed the reduction in withdrawal threshold by bortezomib. These effects were abolished by the intrathecal injection of nor-binaltorphimine (10 μg/body), kappa opioid receptor antagonist. These findings suggest that kappa opioid receptor is involved in the effect of GJG on the bortezomib-induced mechanical allodynia.

  4. Combining sound science, legal action and stakeholder involvement to protect a vulnerable coastal aquifer on the island of St. Kitts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahely, H.; Nettles, S.; Burrowes, R.; Haas, G.

    2011-12-01

    Water resources in small island developing states (SIDS), especially those in the Caribbean are among the most vulnerable systems to human activities and climate change. This vulnerability is exacerbated by a fragmented approach to water resources management. The unconfined coastal aquifer underlying the Basseterre Valley is a significant asset for the people of St. Kitts-Nevis. The potable water extracted from this aquifer represents over 40% of the total water supply for St. Kitts. The area is subject to urban encroachment, inappropriate land use and threats from pollution. A project was implemented using an integrated approach to help government and communities take practical actions to protect this vulnerable aquifer by demonstrating proper management on three fronts: mitigation of threats from contaminants, protection of the aquifer and improved water resources management. The project is funded by the Global Environment Facility (GEF) as part of the Integrating Watershed and Coastal Areas Management (IWCAM) project for Caribbean Small Island States. A comprehensive hydrogeologic evaluation of the aquifer was undertaken in order to aid in the development of a water resources management strategy for the Basseterre Valley Aquifer. Multi-electrode electrical resistivity (MER), a novel surface geophysical technique, was used to delineate the thickness and distribution of sediments throughout the aquifer, zones of increased porosity, zones of possible contamination and the fresh/salt water interface. Together with slowly declining static water levels and elevated dissolved solids levels, the early stages of salt water intrusion have been documented. Groundwater modelling suggests that adjusting the pumping regime, redeveloping some of the existing wells and relocating other wells is a viable option for increasing efficiency and preventing long term dewatering. Overall, the study has provided a wealth of new information about the aquifer for a reasonable cost. A

  5. Involvement of opioid receptors in the systemic and peripheral antinociceptive actions of montelukast in the animal models of pain.

    PubMed

    Ghorbanzadeh, Behnam; Mansouri, Mohammad Taghi; Sahraei, Hedayat; Alboghobeish, Soheila

    2016-05-15

    This study aimed to investigate the involvement of opioid receptors in the systemic and peripheral antinociceptive activities of montelukast in different animal models of pain. Rats and mice were injected with montelukast to produce analgesia. The formalin and acetic acid-induced writhing tests were used to assess the nociceptive activity. The results showed that i.p. administration of montelukast (0.3-10mg/kg) dose-dependently reduced flinching behavior in both the first and second phases of formalin test with mean ED50 of 0.55 and 5.31mg/kg, respectively. Also, intraplantar administration of montelukast (3-30μg/paw) produced antinociception against the two phases of formalin assay in a dose-dependent way with mean ED30 of 2.92 and 8.11μg/paw, respectively. Furthermore, pre-treatment with naloxone (a non-selective opioid receptor antagonist) significantly inhibited both the systemic and also peripheral antinociceptive actions of montelukast in formalin test. In writhing test, the results showed that intraperitoneal administration of montelukast (3-10mg/kg) significantly reduced the writhe number induced by acetic acid in mice. Moreover, co-administration of non-effective doses of montelukast (0.3 and 1mg/kg; i.p.) and morphine (0.25mg/kg; i.p.) significantly decreased the writhes number induced by acetic acid. Also, this effect was naloxone-reversible. These findings suggest that the systemic and peripheral antinociception produced by montelukast were mediated through the opioid receptors in central and peripheral nervous systems. Moreover, combination of montelukast and morphine could be noted as a new strategy for pain relief. PMID:26948314

  6. Polymorphisms in the interleukin-10 gene cluster are possibly involved in the increased risk for major depressive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Traks, Tanel; Koido, Kati; Eller, Triin; Maron, Eduard; Kingo, Külli; Vasar, Veiko; Vasar, Eero; Kõks, Sulev

    2008-01-01

    Background Innate immune inflammatory response is suggested to have a role in the pathogenesis of major depressive disorder (MDD). Interleukin (IL)-10 family cytokines IL-10, IL-19, IL-20, and IL-24 are all implicated in the inflammatory processes and polymorphisms in respective genes have been associated with various immunopathological conditions. This study was carried out to investigate whether single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in these genes are also associated with MDD. Methods Case-control association study was performed with seven SNPs from the IL10 gene cluster. 153 patients with MDD and 277 healthy control individuals were recruited. Results None of the selected SNPs were individually associated with MDD. The linkage disequilibrium (LD) analysis indicated the existence of two recombination sites in the IL10 gene cluster, thus confirming the formerly established LD pattern of this genomic region. This also created two haplotype blocks, both consisting of three SNPs. Additionally, the haplotype analysis detected a significantly higher frequency of block 2 (IL20 and IL24 genes) haplotype TGC in the patients group compared to healthy control individuals (P = 0.0097). Conclusion Our study established increased risk for MDD related to the IL20 and IL24 haplotype and suggests that cytokines may contribute to the pathogenesis of MDD. Since none of the block 2 SNPs were individually associated with MDD, it is possible that other polymorphisms linked to them contribute to the disease susceptibility. Future studies are needed to confirm the results and to find the possible functional explanation. PMID:19087313

  7. Cloning and Expression Analysis of Vvlcc3, a Novel and Functional Laccase Gene Possibly Involved in Stipe Elongation

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yuanping; Wu, Guangmei; Lian, Lingdan; Guo, Lixian; Wang, Wei; Yang, Zhiyun; Miao, Juan; Chen, Bingzhi; Xie, Baogui

    2015-01-01

    Volvariella volvacea, usually harvested in its egg stage, is one of the most popular mushrooms in Asia. The rapid transition from the egg stage to elongation stage, during which the stipe stretches to almost full length leads to the opening of the cap and rupture of the universal veil, and is considered to be one of the main factors that negatively impacts the yield and value of V. volvacea. Stipe elongation is a common phenomenon in mushrooms; however, the mechanisms, genes and regulation involved in stipe elongation are still poorly understood. In order to study the genes related to the stipe elongation, we analyzed the transcription of laccase genes in stipe tissue of V. volvacea, as some laccases have been suggested to be involved in stipe elongation in Flammulina velutipes. Based on transcription patterns, the expression of Vvlcc3 was found to be the highest among the 11 laccase genes. Moreover, phylogenetic analysis showed that VvLCC3 has a high degree of identity with other basidiomycete laccases. Therefore, we selected and cloned a laccase gene, named Vvlcc3, a cDNA from V. volvacea, and expressed the cDNA in Pichia pastoris. The presence of the laccase signature L1-L4 on the deduced protein sequence indicates that the gene encodes a laccase. Phylogenetic analysis showed that VvLCC3 clusters with Coprinopsis cinerea laccases. The ability to catalyze ABTS (2,2’-Azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) oxidation proved that the product of the Vvlcc3 gene was a functional laccase. We also found that the expression of the Vvlcc3 gene in V. volvacea increased during button stage to the elongation stage; it reached its peak in the elongation stage, and then decreased in the maturation stage, which was similar to the trend in the expression of Fv-lac3 and Fv-lac5 in F. velutipes stipe tissue. The similar trend in expression level of these laccase genes of F. velutipes suggested that this gene could be involved in stipe elongation in V. volvacea. PMID

  8. Serotonin effects in the crab Neohelice granulata: Possible involvement of two types of receptors in peripheral tissues.

    PubMed

    Inohara, Elen Thegla Sander; Pinto, Charles Budazewsky; Model, Jorge Felipe Argenta; Trapp, Márcia; Kucharski, Luiz Carlos; Da Silva, Roselis Silveira Martins; Vinagre, Anapaula Sommer

    2015-07-01

    In crustaceans, serotonin (5-HT) controls various physiological processes, such as hormonal secretion, color changes, reproduction, and metabolism. Since 5-HT injections cause hyperglycemia, this study was designed to further investigate this action of 5-HT in the crab Neohelice granulate, fed with a high-carbohydrate (HC) or a high-protein (HP) diet. The effects of pre-treatment with mammalian 5-HT receptor antagonists, cyproheptadine and methiothepin, were also investigated. A series of in vivo experiments with (3)H-5-HT was carried out in order to investigate the presence of putative receptors in peripheral tissues. Since gills were the tissue with the highest labeling in in vivo experiments, in vitro studies with isolated anterior and posterior gills were also conducted. Cyproheptadine blocked the hyperglycemic effect of 5-HT in HP-fed crabs. Methiothepin reduced glycogen levels in the anterior gills of HP crabs and partially blocked the 5-HT-like posture. The injection of (3)H-5-HT identified specific binding sites in all the tissues studied and revealed that the binding can be influenced by the type of diet administered to the crabs. Incubation of the anterior and posterior gills with (3)H-5-HT and 5-HT confirmed the specificity of the binding sites. Both antagonists inhibited (3)H-5-HT binding. In conclusion, this study highlights the importance of serotonin in the control of glucose homeostasis in crustaceans and provides evidences of at least two types of 5-HT binding sites in peripheral tissues. Further studies are necessary to identify the structure of these receptors and their signaling pathways.

  9. Serotonin effects in the crab Neohelice granulata: Possible involvement of two types of receptors in peripheral tissues.

    PubMed

    Inohara, Elen Thegla Sander; Pinto, Charles Budazewsky; Model, Jorge Felipe Argenta; Trapp, Márcia; Kucharski, Luiz Carlos; Da Silva, Roselis Silveira Martins; Vinagre, Anapaula Sommer

    2015-07-01

    In crustaceans, serotonin (5-HT) controls various physiological processes, such as hormonal secretion, color changes, reproduction, and metabolism. Since 5-HT injections cause hyperglycemia, this study was designed to further investigate this action of 5-HT in the crab Neohelice granulate, fed with a high-carbohydrate (HC) or a high-protein (HP) diet. The effects of pre-treatment with mammalian 5-HT receptor antagonists, cyproheptadine and methiothepin, were also investigated. A series of in vivo experiments with (3)H-5-HT was carried out in order to investigate the presence of putative receptors in peripheral tissues. Since gills were the tissue with the highest labeling in in vivo experiments, in vitro studies with isolated anterior and posterior gills were also conducted. Cyproheptadine blocked the hyperglycemic effect of 5-HT in HP-fed crabs. Methiothepin reduced glycogen levels in the anterior gills of HP crabs and partially blocked the 5-HT-like posture. The injection of (3)H-5-HT identified specific binding sites in all the tissues studied and revealed that the binding can be influenced by the type of diet administered to the crabs. Incubation of the anterior and posterior gills with (3)H-5-HT and 5-HT confirmed the specificity of the binding sites. Both antagonists inhibited (3)H-5-HT binding. In conclusion, this study highlights the importance of serotonin in the control of glucose homeostasis in crustaceans and provides evidences of at least two types of 5-HT binding sites in peripheral tissues. Further studies are necessary to identify the structure of these receptors and their signaling pathways. PMID:25810362

  10. Possible Cis-acting signal that could be involved in the localization of different mRNAs in neuronal axons

    PubMed Central

    Aranda-Abreu, Gonzalo E; Hernández, Ma Elena; Soto, Abraham; Manzo, Jorge

    2005-01-01

    Background Messenger RNA (mRNA) comprises three major parts: a 5'-UTR (UnTranslated Region), a coding region, and a 3'-UTR. The 3'-UTR contains signal sequences involved in polyadenylation, degradation and localization/stabilization processes. Some sequences in the 3'-UTR are involved in the localization of mRNAs in (e.g.) neurons, epithelial cells, oocytes and early embryos, but such localization has been most thoroughly studied in neurons. Neuronal polarity is maintained by the microtubules (MTs) found along both dendrites and axon and is partially influenced by sub-cellular mRNA localization. A widely studied mRNA is that for Tau protein, which is located in the axon hillock and growth cone; its localization depends on the well-characterized cis-acting signal (U-rich region) in the 3'-UTR. Methods We compared the cis-acting signal of Tau with mRNAs in the axonal regions of neurons using the ClustalW program for alignment of sequences and the Mfold program for analysis of secondary structures. Results We found that at least 3 out of 12 mRNA analyzed (GRP75, cofilin and synuclein) have a sequence similar to the cis-acting signal of Tau in the 3'-UTR. This could indicate that these messengers are localized specifically in the axon. The Mfold program showed that these mRNAs have a similar "bubble" structure in the putative sequence signal. Conclusion Hence, we suggest that a U-rich sequence in the 3'-UTR region of the mRNA could act as a signal for its localization in the axon in neuronal cells. Sequences homologous to the DTE sequence of BC1 mRNA could direct the messenger to the dendrites. Messengers with homologues of both types of sequence, e.g. β-actin, might be located in both dendrites and axon. PMID:16120223

  11. Tooth-type specific expression of dHAND/Hand2: possible involvement in murine lower incisor morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Abe, Makoto; Tamamura, Yoshihiro; Yamagishi, Hiroyuki; Maeda, Takashi; Kato, Joji; Tabata, Makoto J; Srivastava, Deepak; Wakisaka, Satoshi; Kurisu, Kojiro

    2002-11-01

    dHAND/Hand2 is a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor required for the development of the heart, pharyngeal arches, and vasculature and is expressed during embryogenesis. However, there are no reports on the involvement of the dHAND gene in tooth development. In the present study, the expression of dHAND was examined in developing tooth germs of mice. The dHAND gene was expressed in the mesenchyme of the presumptive incisor region of the lower jaw at an early stage and in the mesenchyme of the lower incisor tooth germ at a later stage. However, the dHAND gene was not expressed in the upper incisor region or the upper and lower molar regions during jaw development. Treatment of tooth germ explants of lower incisors with antisense oligodeoxinucleotide (ODN) against dHAND prevented the differentiation of tooth germ cells, including ameloblasts and odontoblasts, the formation of dentin and enamel, and the proliferation of tooth germ cells and increased the apoptosis of tooth germ cells, suggesting that dHAND is essential for these cells during development. On the other hand, the treatment of tooth germ explants of upper incisor and upper or lower molars did not induce severe effects on their development. Treatment of the explants with basic fibroblast growth factor in association with antisense ODN partially rescued them from the effects of antisense ODN. The present results suggest that the dHAND gene plays important roles in type-specific development of lower incisors, and that basic fibroblast growth factor is involved downstream of the dHAND pathway in tooth germ cells. PMID:12397375

  12. An aqueous extract of Curcuma longa (turmeric) rhizomes stimulates insulin release and mimics insulin action on tissues involved in glucose homeostasis in vitro.

    PubMed

    Mohankumar, Sureshkumar; McFarlane, James R

    2011-03-01

    Curcuma longa (turmeric) has been used widely as a spice, particularly in Asian countries. It is also used in the Ayurvedic system of medicine as an antiinflammatory and antimicrobial agent and for numerous other curative properties. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of an aqueous extract of Curcuma longa (AEC) on tissues involved in glucose homeostasis. The extract was prepared by soaking 100 g of ground turmeric in 1 L of water, which was filtered and stored at -20°C prior to use. Pancreas and muscle tissues of adult mice were cultured in DMEM with 5 or 12 mmol/L glucose and varying doses of extract. The AEC stimulated insulin secretion from mouse pancreatic tissues under both basal and hyperglycaemic conditions, although the maximum effect was only 68% of that of tolbutamide. The AEC induced stepwise stimulation of glucose uptake from abdominal muscle tissues in the presence and absence of insulin, and the combination of AEC and insulin significantly potentiated the glucose uptake into abdominal muscle tissue. However, this effect was attenuated by wortmannin, suggesting that AEC possibly acts via the insulin-mediated glucose uptake pathway. In summary, water soluble compounds of turmeric exhibit insulin releasing and mimicking actions within in vitro tissue culture conditions.

  13. Comparing the sustainability of different action policy possibilities: application to the issue of both household survival and forest preservation in the corridor of Fianarantsoa.

    PubMed

    Bernard, C; Martin, S

    2013-10-01

    A sustainability issue for the rain forest in the corridor of Fianarantsoa (Madagascar) is to preserve the forest while ensuring the development of the local population. The aim of this paper is to determine whether the current situation is sustainable or not according to different action policy possibilities. We propose a general procedure based on viability analysis: Translation of sustainability issues into constraints on the system state; elaboration of a mathematical model of system evolution rules in the form of controlled dynamical system; computations of the viability kernels according to different action policy possibilities. Among control variables, we focus on monetary transfer. Without monetary transfer, we show that the current situation of the rain forest corridor is not sustainable in our mathematical modeling framework. We then estimate the minimal maximal amount per year necessary to make the current situation sustainable.

  14. Single Muscle Immobilization Decreases Single-Fibre Myosin Heavy Chain Polymorphism: Possible Involvement of p38 and JNK MAP Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Derbré, Frédéric; Droguet, Mickaël; Léon, Karelle; Troadec, Samuel; Pennec, Jean-Pierre; Giroux-Metges, Marie-Agnès; Rannou, Fabrice

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Muscle contractile phenotype is affected during immobilization. Myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms are the major determinant of the muscle contractile phenotype. We therefore sought to evaluate the effects of muscle immobilization on both the MHC composition at single-fibre level and the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK), a family of intracellular signaling pathways involved in the stress-induced muscle plasticity. Methods The distal tendon of female Wistar rat Peroneus Longus (PL) was cut and fixed to the adjacent bone at neutral muscle length. Four weeks after the surgery, immobilized and contralateral PL were dissociated and the isolated fibres were sampled to determine MHC composition. Protein kinase 38 (p38), extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK1/2), and c-Jun- NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) phosphorylations were measured in 6- and 15-day immobilized and contralateral PL. Results MHC distribution in immobilized PL was as follows: I = 0%, IIa = 11.8 ± 2.8%, IIx = 53.0 ± 6.1%, IIb = 35.3 ± 7.3% and I = 6.1 ± 3.9%, IIa = 22.1 ± 3.4%, IIx = 46.6 ± 4.5%, IIb = 25.2 ± 6.6% in contralateral muscle. The MHC composition in immobilized muscle is consistent with a faster contractile phenotype according to the Hill’s model of the force-velocity relationship. Immobilized and contralateral muscles displayed a polymorphism index of 31.1% (95% CI 26.1–36.0) and 39.3% (95% CI 37.0–41.5), respectively. Significant increases in p38 and JNK phosphorylation were observed following 6 and 15 days of immobilization. Conclusions Single muscle immobilization at neutral length induces a shift of MHC composition toward a faster contractile phenotype and decreases the polymorphic profile of single fibres. Activation of p38 and JNK could be a potential mechanism involved in these contractile phenotype modifications during muscle immobilization. PMID:27383612

  15. Possible involvement of the novel CPI-17 protein in protein kinase C signal transduction of rabbit arterial smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Li, L; Eto, M; Lee, M R; Morita, F; Yazawa, M; Kitazawa, T

    1998-01-01

    CPI-17 has recently been identified as a novel protein in vascular smooth muscle. In vitro, its phosphorylation and thiophosphorylation by protein kinase C (PKC) specifically inhibits the type 1 class of protein phosphatases, including myosin light chain (MLC) phosphatase. Both of the phosphorylated CPI-17 states dose-dependently potentiated submaximal contractions at constant [Ca2+] in β-escin-permeabilized and Triton X-100-demembranated arterial smooth muscle, but produced no effect in intact and less intensely permeabilized (α-toxin) tissue. Thiophosphorylated CPI-17 (tp-CPI) induced large contractions even under Ca2+-free conditions and decreased Ca2+ EC50 by more than an order of magnitude. Unphosphorylated CPI-17 produced minimal but significant effects. tp-CPI substantially increased the steady-state MLC phosphorylation to Ca2+ ratios in β-escin preparations. tp-CPI affected the kinetics of contraction and relaxation and of MLC phosphorylation and dephosphorylation in such a manner that indicates its major physiological effect is to inhibit MLC phosphatase. Results from use of specific inhibitors in concurrence with tp-CPI repudiate the involvement of general G proteins, rho A or PKC itself in the Ca2+ sensitization by tp-CPI. Our results indicate that phosphorylation of CPI-17 by PKC stimulates binding of CPI-17 to and subsequent inhibition of MLC phosphatase. This implies that CPI-17 accounts largely for the heretofore unknown signalling pathway between PKC and inhibited MLC phosphatase. PMID:9518739

  16. Macrophages in Langerhans cell histiocytosis are differentiated toward M2 phenotype: their possible involvement in pathological processes.

    PubMed

    Ohnishi, Koji; Komohara, Yoshihiro; Sakashita, Naomi; Iyama, Ken-Ichi; Murayama, Toshihiko; Takeya, Motohiro

    2010-01-01

    Although numerous macrophages are found in the lesions of Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH), their activation phenotypes and their roles in the disease process have not been clarified. Paraffin-embedded LCH samples were examined on immunohistochemistry and it was found that CD163 can be used to distinguish infiltrated macrophages from neoplastic Langerhans cells (LC). The number of CD163-positve macrophages was positively correlated with the number of multinucleated giant cells (MGC), indicating that most MGC are derived from infiltrated macrophages. A significant number of CD163-positive macrophages were positive for interleukin (IL)-10 and phospho-signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (pSTAT3), an IL-10-induced signal transduction molecule. This indicates that these macrophages are polarized to anti-inflammatory macrophages of M2 phenotype. Tumor-derived macrophage-colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) was considered to responsible for inducing M2 differentiation of infiltrated macrophages. The number of CD163-positive macrophages in different cases of LCH varied, and interestingly the density of CD163-positive macrophages was inversely correlated with the Ki-67-positivity of LC. Although the underlying mechanism is not fully elucidated, macrophage-derived IL-10 was considered to be involved in the suppression of tumor cell proliferation via activation of STAT3. PMID:20055949

  17. Sucrose transport and phloem unloading in stem of Vicia faba: possible involvement of a sucrose carrier and osmotic regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Aloni, B.; Wyse, R.E.; Griffith, S.

    1986-06-01

    After pulse labeling of a source leaf with /sup 14/CO/sub 2/, stem sections of Vicia faba plants were cut and the efflux characteristics of /sup 14/C-labeled sugars into various buffered solutions were determined. Radiolabeled sucrose was shown to remain localized in the phloem and adjacent phloem parenchyma tissues after a 2-hour chase. Therefore, sucrose leakage from stem segments prepared following a 75-minute chase period was assumed to be characteristic of phloem unloading. The efflux of /sup 14/C assimilates from the phloem was enhanced by 1 millimolar p-chloromercuribenzene sulfonic acid (PCMBS) and by 5 micromolar carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenly hydrazone (CCCP). However, PCMBS inhibited and CCCP enhanced general leakage of nonradioactive sugars from the stem segments. Sucrose at concentrations of 50 millimolar in the free space increased efflux of (/sup 14/C)sucrose, presumably through an exchange mechanism. This exchange was inhibited by PCMBS and abolished by 0.2 molar mannitol. Increasing the osmotic concentration of the efflux medium with mannitol reduced (/sup 14/C)sucrose efflux. However, this inhibition seems not to be specific to sucrose unloading since leakage of total sugars, nonlabeled sucrose, glucose, and amino acids from the bulk of the tissue was reduced in a similar manner. The data suggest that phloem unloading in cut stem segments is consistent with passive efflux of sucrose from the phloem to the apoplast and that sucrose exchange via a membrane carrier may be involved.

  18. Ionizing radiations sustain glioblastoma cell dedifferentiation to a stem-like phenotype through survivin: possible involvement in radioresistance.

    PubMed

    Dahan, P; Martinez Gala, J; Delmas, C; Monferran, S; Malric, L; Zentkowski, D; Lubrano, V; Toulas, C; Cohen-Jonathan Moyal, E; Lemarie, A

    2014-11-27

    Glioblastomas (GBM) are some bad prognosis brain tumors despite a conventional treatment associating surgical resection and subsequent radio-chemotherapy. Among these heterogeneous tumors, a subpopulation of chemo- and radioresistant GBM stem-like cells appears to be involved in the systematic GBM recurrence. Moreover, recent studies showed that differentiated tumor cells may have the ability to dedifferentiate and acquire a stem-like phenotype, a phenomenon also called plasticity, in response to microenvironment stresses such as hypoxia. We hypothesized that GBM cells could be subjected to a similar dedifferentiation process after ionizing radiations (IRs), then supporting the GBM rapid recurrence after radiotherapy. In the present study we demonstrated that subtoxic IR exposure of differentiated GBM cells isolated from patient resections potentiated the long-term reacquisition of stem-associated properties such as the ability to generate primary and secondary neurospheres, the expression of stemness markers and an increased tumorigenicity. We also identified during this process an upregulation of the anti-apoptotic protein survivin and we showed that its specific downregulation led to the blockade of the IR-induced plasticity. Altogether, these results demonstrated that irradiation could regulate GBM cell dedifferentiation via a survivin-dependent pathway. Targeting the mechanisms associated with IR-induced plasticity will likely contribute to the development of some innovating pharmacological strategies for an improved radiosensitization of these aggressive brain cancers.

  19. The antidepressant-like effect of bacopaside I: possible involvement of the oxidative stress system and the noradrenergic system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaojun; Liu, Fang; Yue, Rongcai; Li, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Jigang; Wang, Shuping; Zhang, Shoude; Wang, Rui; Shan, Lei; Zhang, Weidong

    2013-09-01

    In the present study, the antidepressant-like effect of bacopaside I, a saponin compound present in the Bacopa monniera plant, was evaluated by behavioral and neurochemical methods. Bacopaside I (50, 15 and 5 mg/kg) was given to mice via oral gavage for 7 successive days. The treatment significantly decreased the immobility time in mouse models of despair tests, but it did not influence locomotor activity. Neurochemical assays suggested that treatment by bacopaside I (50, 15 and 5 mg/kg) improved brain antioxidant activity to varying degrees after the behavioral despair test. Bacopaside I (15 and 5 mg/kg) significantly reversed reserpine-induced depressive-like behaviors, including low temperature and ptosis. Conversely, bacopaside I did not affect either brain MAO-A or MAO-B activity after the behavioral despair test in mice. Additionally, 5-hydroxytryptophan (a precursor of 5-serotonin) was not involved in the antidepressant-like effect of bacopaside I. These findings indicated that the antidepressant-like effect of bacopaside I might be related to both antioxidant activation and noradrenergic activation, although the exact mechanism remains to be further elucidated.

  20. Antinociceptive effects of maprotiline in a rat model of peripheral neuropathic pain: possible involvement of opioid system

    PubMed Central

    Banafshe, Hamid Reza; Hajhashemi, Valiollah; Minaiyan, Mohsen; Mesdaghinia, Azam; Abed, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Neuropathic pain remains a clinical problem and is poorly relieved by conventional analgesics. This study was designed to determine whether maprotiline administration was effective in alleviating symptoms of neuropathic pain and whether the antinociceptive effect of maprotiline mediated through the opioid system. Materials and Methods: Neuropathic pain was induced by chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve in rats, which resulted in thermal hyperalgesia, and mechanical and cold allodynia. Maprotiline (10, 20 and 40 mg/kg, IP) was administered on the 7th and 14th days after surgery. To study the role of the opioid system in the antinociceptive effects of maprotiline, maprotiline (20 mg/kg, IP) was administered in combination with naloxone (1 mg/kg, SC) on the 7th post-surgery day. Behavioral tests were done at 45 min after drug injections on the 7th and 14th days after surgery. Results: Systemic administration of maprotiline blocked heat hyperalgesia, cold allodynia and reduced mechanical allodynia. Also antihyperalgesic effect of maprotiline was reversed by pretreatment with naloxone. Conclusion: Our results suggest that maprotiline can be considered a potential therapeutic for the treatment of neuropathic pain, and the opioid system may be involved in the antihyperalgesic effects of maprotiline. PMID:26557963

  1. Effects of UCP4 on the Proliferation and Apoptosis of Chondrocytes: Its Possible Involvement and Regulation in Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhongming; Li, Junhua; Du, Shaohua; Chen, Guangnan; Qi, Yiying; Huang, Ligang; Xiao, Luwei; Tong, Peijian

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced chondrocytes apoptosis plays a key role in osteoarthritis (OA) pathogenesis. Uncoupling protein 4 (UCP4) can protect cells against oxidative stress via reducing ROS production and cell apoptosis. Here, silencing of UCP4 in primary chondrocytes significantly inhibited cell survival, but induced ROS production and cell apoptosis. UCP4 mRNA of cartilage tissues was decreased in osteoarthritis patients, which was negatively correlated with synovial fluid (SF) leptin concentration. Moreover, leptin treatment (5, 10 and 20 ng/ml) of primary cultured chondrocytes significantly decreased mRNA and protein levels of UCP4, but increased ROS production and cell apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. The effects of leptin treatment (20 ng/ml) on chondrocytes was partially reversed by ectopic expression of UCP4. More importantly, intraarticularly injection of UCP4 adenovirus remarkably alleviate OA progression and cell apoptosis in a rat OA model induced by anterior cruciate ligament transection (ACLT). In conclusion, UCP4, whose expression was suppressed by leptin, may be involved in the ROS production and apoptosis of chondrocytes, thus contributing to the OA pathogenesis. PMID:26934480

  2. Effects of UCP4 on the Proliferation and Apoptosis of Chondrocytes: Its Possible Involvement and Regulation in Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zhongming; Li, Junhua; Du, Shaohua; Chen, Guangnan; Qi, Yiying; Huang, Ligang; Xiao, Luwei; Tong, Peijian

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced chondrocytes apoptosis plays a key role in osteoarthritis (OA) pathogenesis. Uncoupling protein 4 (UCP4) can protect cells against oxidative stress via reducing ROS production and cell apoptosis. Here, silencing of UCP4 in primary chondrocytes significantly inhibited cell survival, but induced ROS production and cell apoptosis. UCP4 mRNA of cartilage tissues was decreased in osteoarthritis patients, which was negatively correlated with synovial fluid (SF) leptin concentration. Moreover, leptin treatment (5, 10 and 20 ng/ml) of primary cultured chondrocytes significantly decreased mRNA and protein levels of UCP4, but increased ROS production and cell apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. The effects of leptin treatment (20 ng/ml) on chondrocytes was partially reversed by ectopic expression of UCP4. More importantly, intraarticularly injection of UCP4 adenovirus remarkably alleviate OA progression and cell apoptosis in a rat OA model induced by anterior cruciate ligament transection (ACLT). In conclusion, UCP4, whose expression was suppressed by leptin, may be involved in the ROS production and apoptosis of chondrocytes, thus contributing to the OA pathogenesis. PMID:26934480

  3. The antidepressant-like effect of bacopaside I: possible involvement of the oxidative stress system and the noradrenergic system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaojun; Liu, Fang; Yue, Rongcai; Li, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Jigang; Wang, Shuping; Zhang, Shoude; Wang, Rui; Shan, Lei; Zhang, Weidong

    2013-09-01

    In the present study, the antidepressant-like effect of bacopaside I, a saponin compound present in the Bacopa monniera plant, was evaluated by behavioral and neurochemical methods. Bacopaside I (50, 15 and 5 mg/kg) was given to mice via oral gavage for 7 successive days. The treatment significantly decreased the immobility time in mouse models of despair tests, but it did not influence locomotor activity. Neurochemical assays suggested that treatment by bacopaside I (50, 15 and 5 mg/kg) improved brain antioxidant activity to varying degrees after the behavioral despair test. Bacopaside I (15 and 5 mg/kg) significantly reversed reserpine-induced depressive-like behaviors, including low temperature and ptosis. Conversely, bacopaside I did not affect either brain MAO-A or MAO-B activity after the behavioral despair test in mice. Additionally, 5-hydroxytryptophan (a precursor of 5-serotonin) was not involved in the antidepressant-like effect of bacopaside I. These findings indicated that the antidepressant-like effect of bacopaside I might be related to both antioxidant activation and noradrenergic activation, although the exact mechanism remains to be further elucidated. PMID:23872136

  4. Possible involvement of convergent nociceptive input to medullary dorsal horn neurons in intraoral hyperalgesia following peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Terayama, Ryuji; Tsuchiya, Hiroki; Omura, Shinji; Maruhama, Kotaro; Mizutani, Masahide; Iida, Seiji; Sugimoto, Tomosada

    2015-04-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that the number of c-Fos protein-like immunoreactive (c-Fos-IR) neurons in the medullary dorsal horn (MDH) evoked by noxious stimulation was increased after peripheral nerve injury, and such increase has been proposed to reflect the development of neuropathic pain state. The aim of this study was to examine the MDH for convergent collateral primary afferent input to second order neurons deafferented by peripheral nerve injury, and to explore a possibility of its contribution to the c-Fos hyperinducibility. Double immunofluorescence labeling for c-Fos and phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (p-ERK) was performed to detect convergent synaptic input. c-Fos expression and the phosphorylation of ERK were induced by the intraoral application of capsaicin and by electrical stimulation of the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN), respectively. The number of c-Fos-IR neurons in the MDH induced by the intraoral application of capsaicin was increased after IAN injury, whereas the number of p-ERK immunoreactive neurons remained unchanged. The number of double-labeled neurons, that presumably received convergent primary afferent input from the lingual nerve and the IAN, was significantly increased after IAN injury. These results indicated that convergent primary nociceptive input through neighboring intact nerves may contribute to the c-Fos hyperinducibility in the MDH and the pathogenesis of neuropathic pain following trigeminal nerve injury. PMID:25407627

  5. Site-specific deletion in cauliflower mosaic virus DNA: possible involvement of RNA splicing and reverse transcription

    PubMed Central

    Hirochika, Hirohiko; Takatsuji, Hiroshi; Ubasawa, Aiko; Ikeda, Joh-E

    1985-01-01

    A frequent site-specific deletion was observed in the life cycle of cauliflower mosaic virus (S strain). Analysis of the sequence around the deletion site and the parental sequence implied that the deletion was promoted at sequences similar to the donor and acceptor consensus sequences of RNA splicing, designated as the deletion donor and acceptor sequences, respectively. To elucidate the mechanism of this site-specific deletion, point mutations were introduced into the deletion donor sequence (GT to GG or GA transversion). Deletion at the original deletion donor site did not occur in these mutants, instead, new (cryptic) donor sites were activated. All of these activated cryptic sites had sequences similar to the splicing consensus sequence. In all cases except one, the original deletion acceptor site was used. These results can be most readily explained by postulating that the site-specific deletion occurs by reverse transcription of spliced viral RNA. This frequent site-specific deletion was not observed in other strains. For a virus which replicates by reverse transcription, a mechanism to regulate the rate of splicing is required to ensure the intactness of the viral genome. We discuss the possibility that the S strain has a mutation in this regulatory mechanism. ImagesFig. 1.Fig. 3.Fig. 5.Fig. 7. PMID:16453624

  6. Hydroalcoholic extract of needles of Pinus eldarica enhances pentobarbital-induced sleep: possible involvement of GABAergic system

    PubMed Central

    Forouzanfar, Fatemeh; Ghorbani, Ahmad; Hosseini, Mahmoud; Rakhshandeh, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Insomnia is accompanied by several health complications and the currently used soporific drugs can induce several side effects such as psychomotor impairment, amnesia, and tolerance. The present study was planned to investigate the sleep prolonging effect of Pinus eldarica. Materials and Methods: Hydroalcoholic extract (HAE) of P. eldarica, its water fraction (WF), ethyl acetate fraction (EAF) and n-butanol fraction (NBF) were injected (intraperitoneally) to mice 30 min before administration of pentobarbital. Then, the latent period and continuous sleeping time were recorded. Also, LD50 of P. eldarica extract was determined and the possible neurotoxicity of the extract was tested on neural PC12 cells. Results: The HAE and NBF decreased the latency of sleep (p<0.05) and significantly increased duration of sleep (p<0.05) induced by pentobarbital. These effects of P. eldarica were reversed by flumazenil. The LD50 value for HAE was found to be 4.8 g/Kg. HAE and its fractions did not show neurotoxic effects in cultured PC12-cell line. Conclusion: The present data indicate that P. eldarica potentiated pentobarbital hypnosis without major toxic effect. Most probably, the main components responsible for this effect are non-polar agents which are found in NBF of this plant. PMID:27516986

  7. Possible involvement of enhanced prostaglandin E2 production in the photosensitivity in xeroderma pigmentosum group A model mice.

    PubMed

    Kuwamoto, K; Miyauchi-Hashimoto, H; Tanaka, K; Eguchi, N; Inui, T; Urade, Y; Horio, T

    2000-02-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum group A (XPA) gene-deficient mice cannot repair UV-induced DNA damage and easily develop skin cancers by UV irradiation. Therefore, XPA-deficient mice are a useful model of human XP and represent a promising tool for photobiologic studies of the disorder. Exposure to ultraviolet (UV) B (280-320 nm) radiation greatly enhanced inflammation and immunosuppression in these mice. To investigate the molecular mechanisms of enhanced UV inflammation and immunosuppression, we determined the amount of prostaglandin (PG) E2, an inflammatory mediator and immunomodulator, and analysed the expression of cyclooxygenase (COX) mRNA in the ear skin of XPA-deficient mice after UV irradiation. In XPA-deficient mice, the amount of PGE2 significantly increased at 48 and 72 h after UVB irradiation to the level that was 8- and 16-fold higher than those in wild-type mice, respectively. The expression level of COX-2 mRNA increased in a time-dependent manner, although COX-1 mRNA was constantly expressed. Treatment with indomethacin, a potent inhibitor of PG biosynthesis, inhibited UV-induced ear swelling, abrogated local immunosuppression, and decreased the amount of PGE2 in the ear skin of XPA-deficient mice. These results indicate that the excess DNA photoproducts remaining in XPA-deficient cells after UV radiation may induce COX-2 expression. The induced production of PGE2 may be involved in the enhanced inflammation and immunosuppression caused by UV radiation in XPA-deficient mice and XP patients. PMID:10651981

  8. The Apparent Involvement of ANMEs in Mineral Dependent Methane Oxidation, as an Analog for Possible Martian Methanotrophy.

    PubMed

    House, Christopher H; Beal, Emily J; Orphan, Victoria J

    2011-11-18

    On Earth, marine anaerobic methane oxidation (AOM) can be driven by the microbial reduction of sulfate, iron, and manganese. Here, we have further characterized marine sediment incubations to determine if the mineral dependent methane oxidation involves similar microorganisms to those found for sulfate-dependent methane oxidation. Through FISH and FISH-SIMS analyses using 13C and 15N labeled substrates, we find that the most active cells during manganese dependent AOM are primarily mixed and mixed-cluster aggregates of archaea and bacteria. Overall, our control experiment using sulfate showed two active bacterial clusters, two active shell aggregates, one active mixed aggregate, and an active archaeal sarcina, the last of which appeared to take up methane in the absence of a closely-associated bacterial partner. A single example of a shell aggregate appeared to be active in the manganese incubation, along with three mixed aggregates and an archaeal sarcina. These results suggest that the microorganisms (e.g., ANME-2) found active in the manganese-dependent incubations are likely capable of sulfate-dependent AOM. Similar metabolic flexibility for Martian methanotrophs would mean that the same microbial groups could inhabit a diverse set of Martian mineralogical crustal environments. The recently discovered seasonal Martian plumes of methane outgassing could be coupled to the reduction of abundant surface sulfates and extensive metal oxides, providing a feasible metabolism for present and past Mars. In an optimistic scenario Martian methanotrophy consumes much of the periodic methane released supporting on the order of 10,000 microbial cells per cm2 of Martian surface. Alternatively, most of the methane released each year could be oxidized through an abiotic process requiring biological methane oxidation to be more limited. If under this scenario, 1% of this methane flux were oxidized by biology in surface soils or in subsurface aquifers (prior to release), a total

  9. The Apparent Involvement of ANMEs in Mineral Dependent Methane Oxidation, as an Analog for Possible Martian Methanotrophy

    PubMed Central

    House, Christopher H.; Beal, Emily J.; Orphan, Victoria J.

    2011-01-01

    On Earth, marine anaerobic methane oxidation (AOM) can be driven by the microbial reduction of sulfate, iron, and manganese. Here, we have further characterized marine sediment incubations to determine if the mineral dependent methane oxidation involves similar microorganisms to those found for sulfate-dependent methane oxidation. Through FISH and FISH-SIMS analyses using 13C and 15N labeled substrates, we find that the most active cells during manganese dependent AOM are primarily mixed and mixed-cluster aggregates of archaea and bacteria. Overall, our control experiment using sulfate showed two active bacterial clusters, two active shell aggregates, one active mixed aggregate, and an active archaeal sarcina, the last of which appeared to take up methane in the absence of a closely-associated bacterial partner. A single example of a shell aggregate appeared to be active in the manganese incubation, along with three mixed aggregates and an archaeal sarcina. These results suggest that the microorganisms (e.g., ANME-2) found active in the manganese-dependent incubations are likely capable of sulfate-dependent AOM. Similar metabolic flexibility for Martian methanotrophs would mean that the same microbial groups could inhabit a diverse set of Martian mineralogical crustal environments. The recently discovered seasonal Martian plumes of methane outgassing could be coupled to the reduction of abundant surface sulfates and extensive metal oxides, providing a feasible metabolism for present and past Mars. In an optimistic scenario Martian methanotrophy consumes much of the periodic methane released supporting on the order of 10,000 microbial cells per cm2 of Martian surface. Alternatively, most of the methane released each year could be oxidized through an abiotic process requiring biological methane oxidation to be more limited. If under this scenario, 1% of this methane flux were oxidized by biology in surface soils or in subsurface aquifers (prior to release), a total

  10. The Apparent Involvement of ANMEs in Mineral Dependent Methane Oxidation, as an Analog for Possible Martian Methanotrophy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    House, Christopher H.; Beal, Emily J.; Orphan, Victoria J.

    2011-11-01

    On Earth, marine anaerobic methane oxidation (AOM) can be driven by the microbial reduction of sulfate, iron, and manganese. Here, we have further characterized marine sediment incubations to determine if the mineral dependent methane oxidation involves similar microorganisms to those found for sulfate-dependent methane oxidation. Through FISH and FISH-SIMS analyses using 13C and 15N labeled substrates, we find that the most active cells during manganese dependent AOM are primarily mixed and mixed-cluster aggregates of archaea and bacteria. Overall, our control experiment using sulfate showed two active bacterial clusters, two active shell aggregates, one active mixed aggregate, and an active archaeal sarcina, the last of which appeared to take up methane in the absence of a closely-associated bacterial partner. A single example of a shell aggregate appeared to be active in the manganese incubation, along with three mixed aggregates and an archaeal sarcina. These results suggest that the microorganisms (e.g., ANME-2) found active in the manganese-dependent incubations are likely capable of sulfate-dependent AOM. Similar metabolic flexibility for Martian methanotrophs would mean that the same microbial groups could inhabit a diverse set of Martian mineralogical crustal environments. The recently discovered seasonal Martian plumes of methane outgassing could be coupled to the reduction of abundant surface sulfates and extensive metal oxides, providing a feasible metabolism for present and past Mars. In an optimistic scenario Martian methanotrophy consumes much of the periodic methane released supporting on the order of 10,000 microbial cells per cm2 of Martian surface. Alternatively, most of the methane released each year could be oxidized through an abiotic process requiring biological methane oxidation to be more limited. If under this scenario, 1% of this methane flux were oxidized by biology in surface soils or in subsurface aquifers (prior to release), a total

  11. DNase I and II present in avian oocytes: a possible involvement in sperm degradation at polyspermic fertilisation.

    PubMed

    Stepińska, Urszula; Olszańska, Bozenna

    2003-02-01

    During polyspermic fertilisation in birds numerous spermatozoa enter the eggs, in contrast to the situation in mammals where fertilisation is monospermic. However, in birds only one of the spermatozoa which have entered an egg participates in zygote nucleus formation, while the supernumerary spermatozoa degenerate at early embryogenesis. Our previous work has demonstrated the presence in preovulatory quail oocytes of DNase I and II activities able to digest naked lambdaDNA/HindIII substrate in vitro. In the present studies, the activities of both DNases in quail oocytes at different stages of oogenesis and in ovulated mouse oocytes were assayed in vitro using the same substrate. Degradation of quail spermatozoa by quail oocyte extracts was also checked. Digestion of the DNA substrate was evaluated by electrophoresis on agarose gels. The activities of DNase I and II in quail oocytes increased during oogenesis and were the highest in mature oocytes. The activities were present not only in germinal discs but also in a thin layer of cytoplasm adhering to the perivitelline layer surrounding the yolk. At all stages of oogenesis the activity of DNase II was much higher than that of DNase I. DNA contained in spermatozoa was also degraded by the quail oocyte extracts under conditions optimal for both DNases. In contrast to what is observed in quail oocytes, no DNase activities were detected in ovulated mouse eggs; this is logical as they would be useless or even harmful in monospermic fertilisation. The possible role of DNase activities in avian oocytes, in degradation of accessory spermatozoa during polyspermic fertilisation, is discussed. PMID:12625527

  12. Possible involvement of hippocampal immediate-early genes in contextual fear memory deficit induced by cranial irradiation.

    PubMed

    Son, Yeonghoon; Kang, Sohi; Kim, Jinwook; Lee, Sueun; Kim, Jong-Choon; Kim, Sung-Ho; Kim, Joong-Sun; Jo, Sung-Kee; Jung, Uhee; Youn, BuHyun; Shin, Taekyun; Yang, Miyoung; Moon, Changjong

    2016-09-01

    Cranial irradiation can trigger adverse effects on brain functions, including cognitive ability. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying radiation-induced cognitive impairments remain still unknown. Immediate-early genes (IEGs) are implicated in neuronal plasticity and the related functions (i.e., memory formation) in the hippocampus. The present study quantitatively assessed changes in the mRNA and protein levels of the learning-induced IEGs, including Arc, c-fos, and zif268, in the mouse hippocampus after cranial irradiation using quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and immunohistochemistry, respectively. Mice (male, 8-week-old C57BL/6) received whole-brain irradiation with 0 or 10Gy of gamma-ray and, 2weeks later, contextual fear conditioning (CFC) was used to induce IEGs. In the CFC task, mice evaluated 2weeks after irradiation exhibited significant memory deficits compared with sham (0Gy)-irradiated controls. The levels of mRNA encoding IEGs were significantly upregulated in the hippocampus 10 and 30min after CFC training. The mRNA levels in the irradiated hippocampi were significantly lower than those in the sham-irradiated controls. The IEG protein levels were significantly increased in all hippocampal regions, including the hippocampal dentate gyrus, cornu ammonis (CA)1, and CA3, after CFC training. The CFC-induced upregulation of Arc and c-fos in 10Gy-irradiated hippocampi was significantly lower than that in sham-irradiated controls, although there were no significant differences in the protein levels of the learning-induced zif268 between sham-irradiated and 10Gy-irradiated hippocampi. Thus, cranial irradiation with 10Gy of gamma-ray impairs the induction of hippocampal IEGs (particularly Arc and c-fos) via behavioral contextual fear memory, and this disturbance may be associated with the memory deficits evident in mice after cranial irradiation, possibly through the dysregulation of neuronal

  13. Cilnidipine suppresses podocyte injury and proteinuria in metabolic syndrome rats: possible involvement of N-type calcium channel in podocyte

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yu-Yan; Kohno, Masakazu; Nakano, Daisuke; Ohsaki, Hiroyuki; Kobori, Hiroyuki; Diah, Suwarni; Ohashi, Naro; Hitomi, Hirofumi; Asanuma, Katsuhiko; Noma, Takahisa; Tomino, Yasuhiko; Fujita, Toshiro; Nishiyama, Akira

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Clinical studies have indicated the beneficial effect of an L/N-type calcium channel blocker (CCB), cilnidipine, on the progression of proteinuria in hypertensive patients compared with an L-type CCB, amlodipine. In the present study, we examined the effects of cilnidipine and amlodipine on the renal injury in spontaneously hypertensive rat/ND mcr-cp (SHR/ND) and their underlying mechanism. Methods and results SHR/ND were treated with vehicle (n = 10), cilnidipine [33 mg/kg per day, orally (p.o.); n = 11] or amlodipine (20 mg/kg per day, p.o.; n = 9) for 20 weeks. SHR/ND developed proteinuria in an age-dependent manner. Cilnidipine suppressed the proteinuria greater than amlodipine did. The immunohistochemical analysis showed that N-type calcium channel and Wilm’s tumor factor, a marker of podocyte, were co-expressed. SHR/ND had significantly greater desmin staining, an indicator of podocyte injury, with lower podocin and nephrin expression in the glomeruli than Wistar–Kyoto rat or SHR. Cilnidipine significantly prevented the increase in desmin staining and restored the glomerular podocin and nephrin expression compared with amlodipine. Cilnidipine also prevented the increase in renal angiotensin II content, the expression and membrane translocation of NADPH oxidase subunits and dihydroethidium staining in SHR/ND. In contrast, amlodipine failed to change these renal parameters. Conclusion These data suggest that cilnidipine suppressed the development of proteinuria greater than amlodipine possibly through inhibiting N-type calcium channel-dependent podocyte injury in SHR/ND. PMID:20411599

  14. Possible dual regulatory circuits involving AtS6K1 in the regulation of plant cell cycle and growth.

    PubMed

    Shin, Yun-jeong; Kim, Sunghan; Du, Hui; Choi, Soonyoung; Verma, Desh Pal S; Cheon, Choong-Ill

    2012-05-01

    The role of Arabidopsis S6 Kinase 1 (AtS6K1), a downstream target of TOR kinase, in controlling plant growth and ribosome biogenesis was characterized after generating transgenic plants expressing AtS6K1 under auxin-inducible promoter. Down regulation of selected cell cycle regulatory genes upon auxin treatment was observed in the transgenic plants, confirming the negative regulatory role of AtS6K1 in the plant cell cycle progression reported earlier. Callus tissues established from these transgenic plants grew to larger cell masses with more number of enlarged cells than untransformed control, demonstrating functional implication of AtS6K1 in the control of plant cell size. The observed negative correlation between the expression of AtS6K1 and the cell cycle regulatory genes, however, was completely reversed in protoplasts generated from the transgenic plants expressing AtS6K1, suggesting a possible existence of dual regulatory mechanism of the plant cell cycle regulation mediated by AtS6K1. An alternative method of kinase assay, termed "substrate-mediated kinase pull down", was employed to examine the additional phosphorylation on other domains of AtS6K1 and verified the phosphorylation of both amino- and carboxy-terminal domains, which is a novel finding regarding the phosphorylation target sites on plant S6Ks by upstream regulatory kinases. In addition, this kinase assay under the stress conditions revealed the salt- and sugar-dependencies of AtS6K1 phosphorylations.

  15. 76 FR 24901 - Request for Input To Inform a Possible Surgeon General Action on Prescription Drug Abuse in Youth

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-03

    ... stubbornly steady among persons 12 or older during recent years. Most abusers are between the ages of 18 and 25, but younger age groups are also a major concern. \\1\\ Prescription drug abuse is defined here as... media messages for a wide range of stakeholders; and possible roles for health care...

  16. CRF alters the infundibular LHRH secretory system from the medial preoptic area of female rats: possible involvement of opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Rivest, S; Plotsky, P M; Rivier, C

    1993-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) is a potent factor involved in the antireproductive effects of various stressors. However, the central mechanisms by which CRF modulates the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis are not well understood. In order to verify whether CRF is able to directly influence luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) secretory activity at the level of the medial preoptic area (MPOA), CRF was chronically or acutely injected bilaterally into this hypothalamic area. Ten days before the experiments, female rats were implanted with a permanent double-guide cannula which was stereotaxically positioned close to the MPOA. Chronic administration of rat CRF (rCRF) was accomplished by means of two miniosmotic pumps connected to double internal cannula. Acute bilateral infusion of rCRF into the MPOA was performed in unrestrained ovariectomized (OVX) rats and during the afternoon of proestrus. Ten minutes before rCRF treatment, antagonists of opioid receptors (mu, mu 1, or kappa) were infused bilaterally into the MPOA. Hypothalamic LHRH release as well as circulating gonadotropins were determined using a push-pull cannula implanted into the median eminence (ME), and a catheter connected to the jugular vein, respectively. Chronic rCRF treatment in the MPOA decreased (p < 0.05) plasma LH levels but did not modify follicle-stimulating hormone release in OVX rats. A significant inhibition of LH secretion was first observed 80 min after the acute rCRF infusion into the MPOA; pretreatment with nor-Binaltorphimine (antagonist of kappa-receptors) did not measurably attenuate this effect. In contrast, bilateral administration of beta-Funaltrexamine (antagonist of mu-opioid receptors) or naloxonazine (mu 1-antagonist) partially attenuated the inhibitory effect of rCRF on plasma LH levels. Similarly, injections of rCRF bilaterally into the MPOA suppressed hypothalamic LHRH release into the ME and this effect was partially reversed by a previous

  17. Impairment of the mitochondrial respiratory chain activity in diethylnitrosamine-induced rat hepatomas: possible involvement of oxygen free radicals.

    PubMed

    Boitier, E; Merad-Boudia, M; Guguen-Guillouzo, C; Defer, N; Ceballos-Picot, I; Leroux, J P; Marsac, C

    1995-07-15

    Alterations in the energy metabolism of cancer cells have been reported for many years. However, the deleterious mechanisms involved in these deficiencies have not yet been clearly proved. The main goal of this study was to decipher the harmful mechanisms responsible for the respiratory chain deficiencies in the course of diethylnitrosamine (DENA)-induced rat hepatocarcinogenesis, where mitochondrial DNA abnormalities had been previously reported. The respiratory activity of freshly isolated hepatoma mitochondria, assessed by oxygen consumption experiments and enzymatic assays, presented a severe complex I deficiency 19 months after DENA treatment, and later on, in addition, a defective complex III activity. Since respiratory complex subunits are encoded by both nuclear and mitochondrial genes, we checked whether the respiratory chain defects were due to impaired synthesis processes. The specific immunodetection of complex I failed to show any alterations in the steady-state levels of both nuclear and mitochondrial encoded subunits in the hepatomas. Moreover, in vitro protein synthesis experiments carried out on freshly isolated hepatoma mitochondria did not bring to light any modifications in the synthesis of the mitochondrial subunits of the respiratory complexes, whatever the degree of tumor progression. Finally, Southern blot analysis of mitochondrial DNA did not show any major mitochondrial DNA rearrangements in DENA-induced hepatomas. Because the synthetic processes of respiratory complexes did not seem to be implicated in the respiratory chain impairment, these deficiencies could be partly ascribed to a direct toxic impact of highly reactive molecules on these complexes, thus impairing their function. The mitochondrial respiratory chain is an important generator of noxious, reactive oxygen free radicals such as superoxide and H2O2, which are normally catabolized by powerful antioxidant scavengers. Nineteen months after DENA treatment, a general collapse of

  18. Induction of nerve growth factor expression and release by mechanical and inflammatory stimuli in chondrocytes: possible involvement in osteoarthritis pain

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Nerve growth factor (NGF) level is increased in osteoarthritis (OA) joints and is involved in pain associated with OA. Stimuli responsible for NGF stimulation in chondrocytes are unknown. We investigated whether mechanical stress and proinflammatory cytokines may influence NGF synthesis by chondrocytes. Methods Primary cultures of human OA chondrocytes, newborn mouse articular chondrocytes or cartilage explants were stimulated by increasing amounts of IL-1β, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), visfatin/nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) or by cyclic mechanical compression (0.5 Hz, 1 MPa). Before stimulation, chondrocytes were pretreated with indomethacin, Apo866, a specific inhibitor of NAMPT enzymatic activity, or transfected by siRNA targeting visfatin/NAMPT. mRNA NGF levels were assessed by real-time quantitative PCR and NGF released into media was determined by ELISA. Results Unstimulated human and mouse articular chondrocytes expressed low levels of NGF (19.2 ± 8.7 pg/mL, 13.5 ± 1.0 pg/mL and 4.4 ± 0.8 pg/mL/mg tissue for human and mouse articular chondrocytes and costal explants, respectively). Mechanical stress induced NGF release in conditioned media. When stimulated by IL-1β or visfatin/NAMPT, a proinflammatory adipokine produced by chondocytes in response to IL-1β, a dose-dependent increase in NGF mRNA expression and NGF release in both human and mouse chondrocyte conditioned media was observed. Visfatin/NAMPT is also an intracellular enzyme acting as the rate-limiting enzyme of the generation of NAD. The expression of NGF induced by visfatin/NAMPT was inhibited by Apo866, whereas IL-1β-mediated NGF expression was not modified by siRNA targeting visfatin/NAMPT. Interestingly, PGE2, which is produced by chondrocytes in response to IL-1β and visfatin/NAMPT, did not stimulate NGF production. Consistently, indomethacin, a cyclooxygenase inhibitor, did not counteract IL-1β-induced NGF production. Conclusions These

  19. A possible mechanism of action of danazol and an ethinylestradiol/norgestrel combination used as postcoital contraceptive agents.

    PubMed

    Rowlands, S; Kubba, A A; Guillebaud, J; Bounds, W

    1986-06-01

    Twenty-seven women requesting postcoital contraception were randomly allocated to take an ethinylestradiol/dl-norgestrel combination or danazol. Urine specimens were assayed for luteinising hormone (LH) and pregnanediol-3-glucuronide (P3G) levels from the day of the postcoital treatment to the next period. In addition, the urine samples of these recruits and 12 additional women were assayed for the Beta-subunit of human chorionic gonadotropin (B-hCG). A consistent pattern of alteration in urinary steroids was lacking, indicating a heterogeneous effect on ovarian function. There was no evidence of early pregnancy in successfully treated cases. We suggest that the main mechanism of action of these drugs is at the endometrial level. PMID:3533419

  20. [Possible mechanisms of the antitoxic action of calcium-containing derivatives of pantothenic acid in streptomycin poisoning].

    PubMed

    Dorofeev, B F; Chiger, V B; Moiseenok, A G

    1987-12-01

    Calcium salts of pantothenate (CPN), 4'-phosphopantothenate (CPP), S-sulfopantetheine (CSP), as well as pantetheine and panthenol were administered to mice by various routes and the influence of the administration route on acute toxicity of streptomycin (500 mg/kg, subcutaneously) was studied. It was shown that with subcutaneous, intramuscular, intraperitoneal and intravenous administration of CPN, CPP and CSP the acute toxicity of streptomycin was lower. The value of ED50 and the ranges of the antitoxic action (LD50/ED50) were indicative of high efficacy of CPP on its intravenous administration. In rats all the tested compounds normalized the liver excreting function (bromsulphalein test) impaired by exposure to streptomycin in subtoxic doses (200 mg/kg). The lowest levels of acetylation of the sulfacyl sodium test dose were observed in the animals treated with streptomycin in combination with CPN, CPP or CSP which could be explained by increased excretion and acetylation (detoxication) of the antibiotic. PMID:3439795

  1. Involvement of protein kinase C in the mechanism of action of Escherichia coli heat-stable enterotoxin (STa) in a human colonic carcinoma cell line, COLO-205

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Dyuti Datta; Saha, Subhrajit; Chakrabarti, Manoj K. . E-mail: mkc_niced@yahoo.co.in

    2005-08-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine the involvement of calcium-protein kinase C pathway in the mechanism of action of Escherichia coli heat stable enterotoxin (STa) apart from STa-induced activation of guanylate cyclase in human colonic carcinoma cell line COLO-205, which was used as a model cultured cell line to study the mechanism of action of E. coli STa. In response to E. coli STa, protein kinase C (PKC) activity was increased in a time-dependent manner with its physical translocation from cytosol to membrane. Inhibition of the PKC activity in membrane fraction and inhibition of its physical translocation in response to IP{sub 3}-mediated calcium release inhibitor dantrolene suggested the involvement of intracellular store depletion in the regulation of PKC activity. Among different PKC isoforms, predominant involvement of calcium-dependent protein kinase C (PKC{alpha}) was specified using isotype-specific pseudosubstrate, which showed pronounce enzyme activity. Inhibition of enzyme activity by PKC{alpha}-specific inhibitor Goe6976 and immunoblott study employing isotype-specific antibody further demonstrated the involvement of calcium-dependent isoform of PKC in the mechanism of action of E. coli STa. Moreover, inhibition of guanylate cyclase activity by PKC{alpha}-specific inhibitor Goe6976 suggested the involvement of PKC{alpha} in the regulation of guanylate cyclase activity.

  2. Correlation of the antimicrobial activity of salicylaldehydes with broadening of the NMR signal of the hydroxyl proton. Possible involvement of proton exchange processes in the antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Elo, Hannu; Kuure, Matti; Pelttari, Eila

    2015-03-01

    Certain substituted salicylaldehydes are potent antibacterial and antifungal agents and some of them merit consideration as potential chemotherapeutic agents against Candida infections, but their mechanism of action has remained obscure. We report here a distinct correlation between broadening of the NMR signal of the hydroxyl proton of salicylaldehydes and their activity against several types of bacteria and fungi. When proton NMR spectra of the compounds were determined using hexadeuterodimethylsulfoxide as solvent and the height of the OH proton signal was measured, using the signal of the aldehyde proton as an internal standard, it was discovered that a prerequisite of potent antimicrobial activity is that the proton signal is either unobservable or relatively very low, i.e. that it is extremely broadened. Thus, none of the congeners whose OH proton signal was high were potent antimicrobial agents. Some congeners that gave a very low OH signal were, however, essentially inactive against the microbes, indicating that although drastic broadening of the OH signal appears to be a prerequisite, also other (so far unknown) factors are needed for high antimicrobial activity. Because broadening of the hydroxyl proton signal is related to the speed of the proton exchange process(es) involving that proton, proton exchange may be involved in the mechanism of action of the compounds. Further studies are needed to analyze the relative importance of different factors (such as electronic effects, strength of the internal hydrogen bond, co-planarity of the ring and the formyl group) that determine the rates of those processes. PMID:25621992

  3. Effects and possible mechanisms of action of acacetin on the behavior and eye morphology of Drosophila models of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xue; Perumalsamy, Haribalan; Kwon, Hyung Wook; Na, Young-Eun; Ahn, Young-Joon

    2015-01-01

    The human β-amyloid (Aβ) cleaving enzyme (BACE-1) is a target for Alzheimer's disease (AD) treatments. This study was conducted to determine if acacetin extracted from the whole Agastache rugosa plant had anti-BACE-1 and behavioral activities in Drosophila melanogaster AD models and to determine acacetin's mechanism of action. Acacetin (100, 300, and 500 μM) rescued amyloid precursor protein (APP)/BACE1-expressing flies and kept them from developing both eye morphology (dark deposits, ommatidial collapse and fusion, and the absence of ommatidial bristles) and behavioral (motor abnormalities) defects. The reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed that acacetin reduced both the human APP and BACE-1 mRNA levels in the transgenic flies, suggesting that it plays an important role in the transcriptional regulation of human BACE-1 and APP. Western blot analysis revealed that acacetin reduced Aβ production by interfering with BACE-1 activity and APP synthesis, resulting in a decrease in the levels of the APP carboxy-terminal fragments and the APP intracellular domain. Therefore, the protective effect of acacetin on Aβ production is mediated by transcriptional regulation of BACE-1 and APP, resulting in decreased APP protein expression and BACE-1 activity. Acacetin also inhibited APP synthesis, resulting in a decrease in the number of amyloid plaques.

  4. SUR1 Receptor Interaction with Hesperidin and Linarin Predicts Possible Mechanisms of Action of Valeriana officinalis in Parkinson

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Gesivaldo; Giraldez-Alvarez, Lisandro Diego; Ávila-Rodriguez, Marco; Capani, Francisco; Galembeck, Eduardo; Neto, Aristóteles Gôes; Barreto, George E.; Andrade, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is one of the most common neurodegenerative disorders. A theoretical approach of our previous experiments reporting the cytoprotective effects of the Valeriana officinalis compounds extract for PD is suggested. In addiction to considering the PD as a result of mitochondrial metabolic imbalance and oxidative stress, such as in our previous in vitro model of rotenone, in the present manuscript we added a genomic approach to evaluate the possible underlying mechanisms of the effect of the plant extract. Microarray of substantia nigra (SN) genome obtained from Allen Brain Institute was analyzed using gene set enrichment analysis to build a network of hub genes implicated in PD. Proteins transcribed from hub genes and their ligands selected by search ensemble approach algorithm were subjected to molecular docking studies, as well as 20 ns Molecular Dynamics (MD) using a Molecular Mechanic Poison/Boltzman Surface Area (MMPBSA) protocol. Our results bring a new approach to Valeriana officinalis extract, and suggest that hesperidin, and probably linarin are able to relieve effects of oxidative stress during ATP depletion due to its ability to binding SUR1. In addition, the key role of valerenic acid and apigenin is possibly related to prevent cortical hyperexcitation by inducing neuronal cells from SN to release GABA on brain stem. Thus, under hyperexcitability, oxidative stress, asphyxia and/or ATP depletion, Valeriana officinalis may trigger different mechanisms to provide neuronal cell protection. PMID:27199743

  5. Effects of hecogenin and its possible mechanism of action on experimental models of gastric ulcer in mice.

    PubMed

    Santos Cerqueira, Gilberto; dos Santos e Silva, Gabriela; Rios Vasconcelos, Emiliano; Fragoso de Freitas, Ana Paula; Arcanjo Moura, Brinell; Silveira Macedo, Danielle; Lopes Souto, Augusto; Barbosa Filho, José Maria; de Almeida Leal, Luzia Kalyne; de Castro Brito, Gerly Anne; Souccar, Caden; de Barros Viana, Glauce Socorro

    2012-05-15

    This study investigates the gastroprotective effects of hecogenin, a steroid saponin isolated from Agave sisalana, on experimental models of gastric ulcer. Male Swiss mice were used in the models of ethanol- and indometacin-induced gastric ulcer. To clarify the hecogenin mechanism of action, the roles of nitric oxide (NO), sulfhydryls (GSH), K⁺(ATP) channels and prostaglandins were also investigated, and measurements of lipid peroxidation (TBARS assay) and nitrite levels in the stomach of hecogenin-treated and untreated animals were performed. Furthermore, the effects of hecogenin on myeloperoxidase (MPO) release from human neutrophils were assessed in vitro. Our results showed that hecogenin (3.1, 7.5, 15, 30, 60 and 90 mg/kg, p.o.) acutely administered, before ethanol or indomethacin, exhibited a potent gastroprotective effect. Although the pretreatments with L-NAME, an iNOS inhibitor, and capsazepine, a TRPV1 receptor agonist, were not able to reverse the hecogenin effect, this was reversed by glibenclamide, a K⁺(ATP) blocker, and indomethacin in the model of ethanol-induced gastric lesions. The hecogenin pretreatment normalized GSH levels and significantly reduced lipid peroxidation and nitrite levels in the stomach, as evaluated by the ethanol-induced gastric lesion model. The drug alone increased COX-2 expression and this effect was further enhanced in the presence of ethanol. It also decreased MPO release and significantly protected the gastric mucosa. In conclusion, we showed that hecogenin presents a significant gastroprotective effect that seems to be mediated by K⁺(ATP) channels opening and the COX-2/PG pathway. In addition, its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties may play a role in the gastroprotective drug effect. PMID:22426163

  6. Ground-water flow and the possible effects of remedial actions at J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hughes, W.B.

    1995-01-01

    J-Field, located in the Edgewood Area of Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md, has been used since World War II to test and dispose of explosives, chemical warfare agents, and industrial chemicals resulting in ground-water, surface-water, and soil contami- nation. The U.S. Geological Survey finite-difference model was used to better understand ground-water flow at the site and to simulate the effects of remedial actions. A surficial aquifer and a confined aquifer were simulated with the model. A confining unit separates these units and is represented by leakance between the layers. The area modeled is 3.65 mi2; the model was constructed with a variably spaced 40 X 38 grid. The horizontal and lower boundaries of the model are all no-flow boundaries. Steady-state conditions were used. Ground water at the areas under investigation flows from disposal pit areas toward discharge areas in adjacent estuaries or wetlands. Simulations indicate that capping disposal areas with an impermeable cover effectively slows advective ground water flow by 0.7 to 0.5 times. Barriers to lateral ground-water flow were simulated and effectively prevented the movement of ground water toward discharge areas. Extraction wells were simulated as a way to contain ground-water contamination and to extract ground water for treatment. Two wells pumping 5 gallons per minute each at the toxic-materials disposal area and a single well pumping 2.5 gallons per minute at the riot-control-agent disposal area effectively contained contamination at these sites. A combi- nation of barriers to horizontal flow east and south of the toxic-materials disposal area, and a single extraction well pumping at 5 gallons per minute can extract contaminated ground water and prevent pumpage of marsh water.

  7. Effects of hecogenin and its possible mechanism of action on experimental models of gastric ulcer in mice.

    PubMed

    Santos Cerqueira, Gilberto; dos Santos e Silva, Gabriela; Rios Vasconcelos, Emiliano; Fragoso de Freitas, Ana Paula; Arcanjo Moura, Brinell; Silveira Macedo, Danielle; Lopes Souto, Augusto; Barbosa Filho, José Maria; de Almeida Leal, Luzia Kalyne; de Castro Brito, Gerly Anne; Souccar, Caden; de Barros Viana, Glauce Socorro

    2012-05-15

    This study investigates the gastroprotective effects of hecogenin, a steroid saponin isolated from Agave sisalana, on experimental models of gastric ulcer. Male Swiss mice were used in the models of ethanol- and indometacin-induced gastric ulcer. To clarify the hecogenin mechanism of action, the roles of nitric oxide (NO), sulfhydryls (GSH), K⁺(ATP) channels and prostaglandins were also investigated, and measurements of lipid peroxidation (TBARS assay) and nitrite levels in the stomach of hecogenin-treated and untreated animals were performed. Furthermore, the effects of hecogenin on myeloperoxidase (MPO) release from human neutrophils were assessed in vitro. Our results showed that hecogenin (3.1, 7.5, 15, 30, 60 and 90 mg/kg, p.o.) acutely administered, before ethanol or indomethacin, exhibited a potent gastroprotective effect. Although the pretreatments with L-NAME, an iNOS inhibitor, and capsazepine, a TRPV1 receptor agonist, were not able to reverse the hecogenin effect, this was reversed by glibenclamide, a K⁺(ATP) blocker, and indomethacin in the model of ethanol-induced gastric lesions. The hecogenin pretreatment normalized GSH levels and significantly reduced lipid peroxidation and nitrite levels in the stomach, as evaluated by the ethanol-induced gastric lesion model. The drug alone increased COX-2 expression and this effect was further enhanced in the presence of ethanol. It also decreased MPO release and significantly protected the gastric mucosa. In conclusion, we showed that hecogenin presents a significant gastroprotective effect that seems to be mediated by K⁺(ATP) channels opening and the COX-2/PG pathway. In addition, its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties may play a role in the gastroprotective drug effect.

  8. Molecular Mechanism of Action of Triazolobenzodiazepinone Agonists of the Type 1 Cholecystokinin Receptor. Possible Cooperativity across the Receptor Homodimeric Complex.

    PubMed

    Desai, Aditya J; Lam, Polo C H; Orry, Andrew; Abagyan, Ruben; Christopoulos, Arthur; Sexton, Patrick M; Miller, Laurence J

    2015-12-24

    The type 1 cholecystokinin receptor (CCK1R) has multiple physiologic roles relating to nutrient homeostasis, including mediation of postcibal satiety. This effect has been central in efforts to develop agonists of this receptor as part of a program to manage and/or prevent obesity. While a number of small molecule CCK1R agonists have been developed, none have yet been approved for clinical use, based on inadequate efficacy, side effects, or the potential for toxicity. Understanding the molecular details of docking and mechanism of action of these ligands can be helpful in the rational refinement and enhancement of small molecule drug candidates. In the current work, we have defined the mechanism of binding and activity of two triazolobenzodiazepinones, CE-326597 and PF-04756956, which are reported to be full agonist ligands. To achieve this, we utilized receptor binding with a series of allosteric and orthosteric radioligands at structurally related CCK1R and CCK2R, as well as chimeric CCK1R/CCK2R constructs exchanging residues in the allosteric pocket, and assessment of biological activity. These triazolobenzodiazepinones docked within the intramembranous small molecule allosteric ligand pocket, with higher affinity binding to CCK2R than CCK1R, yet with biological activity exclusive to or greatly enhanced at CCK1R. These ligands exhibited cooperativity with benzodiazepine binding across the CCK1R homodimeric complex, resulting in their ability to inhibit only a fraction of the saturable binding of a benzodiazepine radioligand, unlike other small molecule antagonists and agonists of this receptor. This may contribute to the understanding of the unique short duration and reversible gallbladder contraction observed in vivo upon administration of these drugs.

  9. Possible involvement of nitric oxide (NO) signaling pathway in the antidepressant-like effect of MK-801(dizocilpine), a NMDA receptor antagonist in mouse forced swim test.

    PubMed

    Dhir, Ashish; Kulkarni, S K

    2008-03-01

    L-arginine-nitric oxide (NO)-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) is an important signaling pathway involved in depression. With this information, the present study aimed to study the involvement of this signaling pathway in the antidepressant-like action of MK-801 (dizocilpine; N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonist) in the mouse forced-swim test. Total immobility period was recorded in mouse forced swim test for 6 min. MK-801 (5-25 microg/kg., ip) produced a U-shaped curve in reducing the immobility period. The antidepressant-like effect of MK-801 (10 microg/kg, ip) was prevented by pretreatment with L-arginine (750 mg/kg, ip) [substrate for nitric oxide synthase (NOS)]. Pretreatment of mice with 7-nitroindazole (7-NI) (25 mg/kg, ip) [a specific neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitor] produced potentiation of the action of subeffective dose of MK-801 (5 microg/kg, ip). In addition, treatment of mice with methylene blue (10 mg/kg, ip) [direct inhibitor of both nitric oxide synthase and soluble guanylate cyclase] potentiated the effect of MK-801 (5 microg/kg, ip) in the forced-swim test. Further, the reduction in the immobility period elicited by MK-801 (10 microg/kg, ip) was also inhibited by pretreatment with sildenafil (5 mg/kg, ip) [phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitor]. The various modulators used in the study and their combination did not produce any changes in locomotor activity per se and in combination with MK-801. MK-801 however, at higher doses (25 microg/kg, ip) produced hyperlocomotion. The results demonstrated the involvement of nitric oxide signaling pathway in the antidepressant-like effect of MK-801 in mouse forced-swim test.

  10. The involvement of P2Y12 receptors, NADPH oxidase, and lipid rafts in the action of extracellular ATP on synaptic transmission at the frog neuromuscular junction.

    PubMed

    Giniatullin, A; Petrov, A; Giniatullin, R

    2015-01-29

    Adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) is the main co-transmitter accompanying the release of acetylcholine from motor nerve terminals. Previously, we revealed the direct inhibitory action of extracellular ATP on transmitter release via redox-dependent mechanism. However, the receptor mechanism of ATP action and ATP-induced sources of reactive oxygen sources (ROS) remained not fully understood. In the current study, using microelectrode recordings of synaptic currents from the frog neuromuscular junction, we analyzed the receptor subtype involved in synaptic action of ATP, receptor coupling to NADPH oxidase and potential location of ATP receptors within the lipid rafts. Using subtype-specific antagonists, we found that the P2Y13 blocker 2-[(2-chloro-5-nitrophenyl)azo]-5-hydroxy-6-methyl-3-[(phosphonooxy)methyl]-4-pyridinecarboxaldehyde did not prevent the depressant action of ATP. In contrast, the P2Y12 antagonist 2-methylthioadenosine 5'-monophosphate abolished the inhibitory action of ATP, suggesting the key role of P2Y12 receptors in ATP action. As the action of ATP is redox-dependent, we also tested potential involvement of the NADPH oxidase, known as a common inducer of ROS. The depressant action of extracellular ATP was significantly reduced by diphenyleneiodonium chloride and 4-(2-aminoethyl)-benzenesulfonyl fluoride hydrochloride, two structurally different inhibitors of NADPH oxidase, indicating that this enzyme indeed mediates the action of ATP. Since the location and activity of various receptors are often associated with lipid rafts, we next tested whether ATP-driven inhibition depends on lipid rafts. We found that the disruption of lipid rafts with methyl-beta-cyclodextrin reduced and largely delayed the action of ATP. Taken together, these data revealed key steps in the purinergic control of synaptic transmission via P2Y12 receptors associated with lipid rafts, and identified NADPH oxidase as the main source of ATP-induced inhibitory ROS at the neuromuscular

  11. Antiviral Activity and Possible Mechanism of Action of Constituents Identified in Paeonia lactiflora Root toward Human Rhinoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Ngan, Luong Thi My; Jang, Myeong Jin; Kwon, Min Jung; Ahn, Young Joon

    2015-01-01

    Human rhinoviruses (HRVs) are responsible for more than half of all cases of the common cold and cost billions of USD annually in medical visits and missed school and work. An assessment was made of the antiviral activities and mechanisms of action of paeonol (PA) and 1,2,3,4,6-penta-O-galloyl-β-D-glucopyranose (PGG) from Paeonia lactiflora root toward HRV-2 and HRV-4 in MRC5 cells using a tetrazolium method and real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results were compared with those of a reference control ribavirin. Based on 50% inhibitory concentration values, PGG was 13.4 and 18.0 times more active toward HRV-2 (17.89 μM) and HRV-4 (17.33 μM) in MRC5 cells, respectively, than ribavirin. The constituents had relatively high selective index values (3.3–>8.5). The 100 μg/mL PA and 20 μg/mL PGG did not interact with the HRV-4 particles. These constituents inhibited HRV-4 infection only when they were added during the virus inoculation (0 h), the adsorption period of HRVs, but not after 1 h or later. Moreover, the RNA replication levels of HRVs were remarkably reduced in the MRC5 cultures treated with these constituents. These findings suggest that PGG and PA may block or reduce the entry of the viruses into the cells to protect the cells from the virus destruction and abate virus replication, which may play an important role in interfering with expressions of rhinovirus receptors (intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and low-density lipoprotein receptor), inflammatory cytokines (interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, tumor necrosis factor, interferon beta, and IL-1β), and Toll-like receptor, which resulted in diminishing symptoms induced by HRV. Global efforts to reduce the level of synthetic drugs justify further studies on P. lactiflora root-derived materials as potential anti-HRV products or lead molecules for the prevention or treatment of HRV. PMID:25860871

  12. Antiviral activity and possible mechanism of action of constituents identified in Paeonia lactiflora root toward human rhinoviruses.

    PubMed

    Ngan, Luong Thi My; Jang, Myeong Jin; Kwon, Min Jung; Ahn, Young Joon

    2015-01-01

    Human rhinoviruses (HRVs) are responsible for more than half of all cases of the common cold and cost billions of USD annually in medical visits and missed school and work. An assessment was made of the antiviral activities and mechanisms of action of paeonol (PA) and 1,2,3,4,6-penta-O-galloyl-β-D-glucopyranose (PGG) from Paeonia lactiflora root toward HRV-2 and HRV-4 in MRC5 cells using a tetrazolium method and real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results were compared with those of a reference control ribavirin. Based on 50% inhibitory concentration values, PGG was 13.4 and 18.0 times more active toward HRV-2 (17.89 μM) and HRV-4 (17.33 μM) in MRC5 cells, respectively, than ribavirin. The constituents had relatively high selective index values (3.3->8.5). The 100 μg/mL PA and 20 μg/mL PGG did not interact with the HRV-4 particles. These constituents inhibited HRV-4 infection only when they were added during the virus inoculation (0 h), the adsorption period of HRVs, but not after 1 h or later. Moreover, the RNA replication levels of HRVs were remarkably reduced in the MRC5 cultures treated with these constituents. These findings suggest that PGG and PA may block or reduce the entry of the viruses into the cells to protect the cells from the virus destruction and abate virus replication, which may play an important role in interfering with expressions of rhinovirus receptors (intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and low-density lipoprotein receptor), inflammatory cytokines (interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, tumor necrosis factor, interferon beta, and IL-1β), and Toll-like receptor, which resulted in diminishing symptoms induced by HRV. Global efforts to reduce the level of synthetic drugs justify further studies on P. lactiflora root-derived materials as potential anti-HRV products or lead molecules for the prevention or treatment of HRV. PMID:25860871

  13. Involvement of GABAB Receptor Signaling in Antipsychotic-like Action of the Novel Orthosteric Agonist of the mGlu4 Receptor, LSP4-2022.

    PubMed

    Woźniak, Monika; Acher, Francine; Marciniak, Marcin; Lasoń-Tyburkiewicz, Magdalena; Gruca, Piotr; Papp, Mariusz; Pilc, Andrzej; Wierońska, Joanna M

    2016-01-01

    Considering that ligands of metabotropic glutamate and GABA receptors may exert beneficial effects on schizophrenia, we assessed the actions of the first mGlu4-selective orthosteric agonist, LSP4-2022, in several tests reflecting positive, negative, and cognitive symptoms of schizophrenia. Moreover, we investigated the possible involvement of GABAB receptors in LSP4-2022-induced actions. Hyperactivity induced by MK-801 or amphetamine and DOI-induced head twitches in mice were used as the models of positive symptoms. The social interaction test, modified forced swim test (FST), and novel object recognition (NOR) test were used as the models of negative and cognitive symptoms of schizophrenia. LSP4-2022 inhibited hyperactivity (in a dose-dependent manner, 0.5-2 mg/kg) induced by MK-801 or amphetamine and DOI-induced head twitches. In mGlu4 receptor knockout mice, LSP4-2022 was not effective. However, it reversed MK-801-induced impairment in the social interaction test and the MK-801-induced increase of immobility in the modified FST. In the NOR test, LSP4-2022 was active at a dose of 2 mg/kg. GABAB receptor antagonist, CGP55845 (10 mg/kg), reversed LSP4-2022-induced effects in hyperactivity and head twitch tests. At the same time, the simultaneous administration of subeffective doses of LSP4-2022 (0.1 mg/kg) and a positive allosteric modulator of GABAB receptor PAM, GS39783 (0.1 mg/kg), induced clear antipsychotic-like effects in those two tests. Such an interaction between mGlu4 and GABAB receptors was not observed in the social interaction and NOR tests. Therefore, we suggest that the activation of the mGlu4 receptor is a promising approach facilitating the discovery of novel antipsychotic drugs, and that the interplay between mGlu4 and GABAB receptors may become the basis for a novel therapy for schizophrenic patients with predomination of positive symptoms.

  14. 24 CFR 248.221 - Approval of a plan of action that involves termination of low income affordability restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... affordability restrictions only upon a written finding that— (a) Implementation of the plan of action will not... a State strategy approved by the Commissioner under § 248.223 of this part. (c) There are no open.... 2000d); the Fair Housing Act (42 U.S.C. 3601-3619); Executive Order 11063 (3 CFR 1959-1963 comp., p....

  15. Parents as Co-Researchers: A Participatory Action Research Initiative Involving Parents of People with Intellectual Disabilities in Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walmsley, Jan; Mannan, Hasheem

    2009-01-01

    This paper evaluates a participatory action research (PAR) approach to conducting family research in Ireland. Drawing on PAR methodology it describes how parents of people with intellectual disabilities were recruited and trained to facilitate focus groups of parents in Ireland, in order to create an evidence base to support improved dialogue…

  16. Action at an Attentional Distance: A Study of Children's Reasoning about Causes and Effects Involving Spatial and Attentional Discontinuity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grotzer, Tina A.; Solis, S. Lynneth

    2015-01-01

    Spatial discontinuity between causes and effects is a feature of many scientific concepts, particularly those in the environmental and ecological sciences. Causes can be spatially separated from their effects by great distances. Action at a distance, the idea that causes and effects can be separated in physical space, is a well-studied concept in…

  17. Prokinetic activity of Prunus persica (L.) Batsch flowers extract and its possible mechanism of action in rats.

    PubMed

    Han, Wei; Xu, Jing Dong; Wei, Feng Xian; Zheng, Yong Dong; Ma, Jian Zhong; Xu, Xiao Dong; Wei, Zhen Gang; Wang, Wen; Zhang, You Cheng

    2015-01-01

    The peach tree, Prunus persica (L.) Batsch, is widely cultivated in China, and its flowers have been used for centuries in traditional Chinese medicine to treat gut motility disorders. But few studies have explored the pharmacological effect of Prunus persica (L.) Batsch flowers on gastrointestinal motility. In this study, the activities of different extracts from Prunus persica (L.) Batsch flowers on the smooth muscle contractions were evaluated using isolated colon model, and the ethyl acetate extract (EAE) showed the strongest effects in vitro. EAE (10(-8)-10(-5) g/mL) caused a concentration-dependent stimulatory effect in rat colonic tissue. Additionally, ketotifen (100 µM), cimetidine (10 µM), and pyrilamine (1 µM) produced a significant inhibition of contractions caused by EAE. Furthermore, immunofluorescence and toluidine blue staining revealed increased numbers of mast cells in the EAE group, and EAE increased histamine release from the colonic tissues. These data indicate that EAE has significant prokinetic activity and acts by a mechanism that mainly involves mast cell degranulation. Our study provides a pharmacological basis for the use of an extract of Prunus persica (L.) Batsch flowers in the treatment of gut motility disorders.

  18. Involvement of adrenoceptors, dopamine receptors and AMPA receptors in antidepressant-like action of 7-O-ethylfangchinoline in mice

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Zhao-fu; Cui, Xiang-yu; Cui, Su-ying; Yu, Bin; Zhang, Xue-qiong; Li, Sheng-jie; Cao, Qing; Huang, Yuan-li; Xu, Ya-ping; Song, Jin-zhi; Ding, Hui; Lin, Zhi-ge; Yang, Guang; Zhang, Yong-he

    2015-01-01

    Aim: 7-O-ethylfangchinoline (YH-200) is a bisbenzylisoquinoline derivative. The aim of this study was to investigate the antidepressant-like action and underlying mechanisms of YH-200 in mice. Methods: Mice were treated with YH-200 (15, 30, and 60 mg/kg, ig) or tetrandrine (30 and 60 mg/kg, ig) before conducting forced swimming test (FST), tail suspension test (TST), or open field test (OFT). Results: YH-200 (60 mg/kg) significantly decreased the immobility time in both FST and TST, and prolonged the latency to immobility in FST. YH-200 (60 mg/kg) was more potent than the natural bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid tetrandrine (60 mg/kg) in FST. Pretreatment with α1-adrenoceptor antagonist prazosin (1 mg/kg), β-adrenoceptor antagonist propranolol (2 mg/kg), dopamine D1/D5 receptor antagonist SCH23390 (0.05 mg/kg), dopamine D2/D3 receptor antagonist haloperidol (0.2 mg/kg) or AMPA receptor antagonist NBQX (10 mg/kg) prevented the antidepressant-like action of YH-200 (60 mg/kg) in FST. In contrast, pretreatment with α2 adrenoceptor antagonist yohimbine (1 mg/kg) augmented the antidepressant-like action of YH-200 (30 mg/kg) in FST. Chronic administration of YH-200 (30 and 60 mg/kg for 14 d) did not produce drug tolerance; instead its antidepressant-like action was strengthened. Chronic administration of YH-200 did not affect the body weight of mice compared to control mice. Conclusion: YH-200 exerts its antidepressant-like action in mice via acting at multi-targets, including α1, α2 and β-adrenoceptors, D1/D5 and D2 /D3 receptors, as well as AMPA receptors. PMID:26238289

  19. The Actions of Headmasters and Headmistresses in Fostering Parent & Family Involvement in Low-Income Schools in Tamil Nadu, India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shekar, Anupama

    2013-01-01

    Decades of research has examined the contribution of parent involvement to children's educational outcomes. Research has also attempted to identify meaningful involvement practices, taking place at home or in school and, as a result, measuring its effects on school, school staff and parents themselves. Despite the extensive research base, very…

  20. Is Earth F**ked? Dynamical Futility of Global Environmental Management and Possibilities for Sustainability via Direct Action Activism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    wErnEr, B.

    2012-12-01

    Environmental challenges are dynamically generated within the dominant global culture principally by the mismatch between short-time-scale market and political forces driving resource extraction/use and longer-time-scale accommodations of the Earth system to these changes. Increasing resource demand is leading to the development of two-way, nonlinear interactions between human societies and environmental systems that are becoming global in extent, either through globalized markets and other institutions or through coupling to global environmental systems such as climate. These trends are further intensified by dissipation-reducing technological advances in transactions, communication and transport, which suppress emergence of longer-time-scale economic and political levels of description and facilitate long-distance connections, and by predictive environmental modeling, which strengthens human connections to a short-time-scale virtual Earth, and weakens connections to the longer time scales of the actual Earth. Environmental management seeks to steer fast scale economic and political interests of a coupled human-environmental system towards longer-time-scale consideration of benefits and costs by operating within the confines of the dominant culture using a linear, engineering-type connection to the system. Perhaps as evidenced by widespread inability to meaningfully address such global environmental challenges as climate change and soil degradation, nonlinear connections reduce the ability of managers to operate outside coupled human-environmental systems, decreasing their effectiveness in steering towards sustainable interactions and resulting in managers slaved to short-to-intermediate-term interests. In sum, the dynamics of the global coupled human-environmental system within the dominant culture precludes management for stable, sustainable pathways and promotes instability. Environmental direct action, resistance taken from outside the dominant culture, as in

  1. Understanding Obesity Perceptions in America: An Exploratory Study of Public Perceptions of the Problem and Possible Actions for Health Product Marketers.

    PubMed

    Emmett, Dennis; Chandra, Ashish

    2015-01-01

    Many healthcare professionals have stated that obesity is a major problem in the United States. The rate of obesity in young people has been rising until just recently, when it was reported to have leveled off. The authors examine the problem in terms of people's perception of how great a problem it is, along with examining their perception of the causes and possible remedies for the problem. If the general population does not believe that a problem exists, then corrective action will be hampered. Then, the authors examine what impact this has on marketing products to address this problem.

  2. Gene expression profiles following exposure to a developmental neurotoxicant, Aroclor 1254: Pathway analysis for possible mode(s) of action

    SciTech Connect

    Royland, Joyce E.; Kodavanti, Prasada Rao S.

    2008-09-01

    Epidemiological studies indicate that low levels of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) exposure can adversely affect neurocognitive development. In animal models, perturbations in calcium signaling, neurotransmitters, and thyroid hormones have been postulated as potential mechanisms for PCB-induced developmental neurotoxicity. In order to understand the role of these proposed mechanisms and to identify other mechanisms in PCB-induced neurotoxicity, we have chosen a global approach utilizing oligonucleotide microarrays to examine gene expression profiles in the brain following developmental exposure to Aroclor 1254 (0 or 6 mg/kg/day from gestation day 6 through postnatal day (PND) 21) in Long-Evans rats. Gene expression levels in the cerebellum and hippocampus from PNDs 7 and 14 animals were determined on Affymetrix rat 230A{sub 2}.0 chips. In the cerebellum, 87 transcripts were altered at PND7 compared to 27 transcripts at PND14 by Aroclor 1254 exposure, with only one transcript affected at both ages. In hippocampus, 175 transcripts and 50 transcripts were altered at PND7 and PND14, respectively, by Aroclor 1254 exposure with five genes commonly affected. Functional analysis suggests that pathways related to calcium homeostasis (Gng3, Ryr2, Trdn, Cacna1a), intracellular signaling (Camk2d, Stk17b, Pacsin2, Ryr2, Trio, Fert2, Ptk2b), axonal guidance (Lum, Mxd3, Akap11, Gucy1b3), aryl hydrocarbon receptor signaling (Nfia, Col1a2), and transcripts involved in cell proliferation (Gspt2, Cdkn1c, Ptk2b) and differentiation (Ifitm31, Hpca, Zfp260, Igsf4a, Hes5) leading to the development of nervous system were significantly altered by Aroclor 1254 exposure. Of the two brain regions examined, Aroclor 1254-induced genomic changes were greater in the hippocampus than the cerebellum. The genomic data suggests that PCB-induced neurotoxic effects were due to disruption of normal ontogenetic pattern of nervous system growth and development by altering intracellular signaling pathways

  3. Choosing Actions

    PubMed Central

    Rosenbaum, David A.; Chapman, Kate M.; Coelho, Chase J.; Gong, Lanyun; Studenka, Breanna E.

    2013-01-01

    Actions that are chosen have properties that distinguish them from actions that are not. Of the nearly infinite possible actions that can achieve any given task, many of the unchosen actions are irrelevant, incorrect, or inappropriate. Others are relevant, correct, or appropriate but are disfavored for other reasons. Our research focuses on the question of what distinguishes actions that are chosen from actions that are possible but are not. We review studies that use simple preference methods to identify factors that contribute to action choices, especially for object-manipulation tasks. We can determine which factors are especially important through simple behavioral experiments. PMID:23761769

  4. Investigations into the chemistry, toxicology, metabolism and possible mode of action of O-ethyl S-methyl ethylphosphonothioate

    SciTech Connect

    Hur, J.H.

    1989-01-01

    The chemical and metabolic oxidation of O-ethyl S-methyl ethylphosphonthioate (1) as a model compound was studied. This compound has the following toxicological properties: LD{sub 50} (rat) 4.6 mg/kg, LD{sub 50}(HF) 14.0 ug/g; k{sub i}(BAChE) {equals} 303, k{sub i}(HFAChE) {equals} 623. {sup 13} C- and {sup 31}P-NMR were mainly used in this study. The chemical oxidation of 1 with m-CPBA in CDCl{sub 3} resulted in the formation of O-ethyl ethylphosphonic acid (2), O-ethyl ethylphosphinyloxymethylsulfonate (3) and O-ethyl ethylphosphonic acid anhydride (4). However, oxidation reaction of the model compound 1 with MPPA in D{sub 2}O gave 2 and methylsulfonic acid. 1 was incubated in vitro with rat liver microsomal oxidase, and 2 and methylsulfenic acid were observed along with 1. For the in vivo study, a number of houseflies were treated with 14ug/g (LD{sub 50} level) of 1. Analysis of the extracts of metabolic products provided evidence of the formation of 2. The existence of 1 S-oxide was demonstrated by use of a trapping method and the observation of oxidation products. The S-oxide has been proposed as a possible active intermediate responsible for the high toxicity of 1 to animals. However, owing to its instability it is unlikely that the S-oxide intermediate would persist in an aqueous biological environment long enough to attack the target enzyme. 4 was shown to have high toxicity to the rat and housefly and was also a potent anticholinesterase against BAChE and HFAChE . The presence of 4 was observed directly by the monitoring experiments during the chemical oxidation in aqueous conditions. This provided evidence that this metabolite is stable enough to attack the target site in biological systems. The anhydride 4 is proposed as the active metabolite in in vivo systems, responsible for high toxicity of 1.

  5. Factors associated with regulatory action involving investigation of illnesses associated with Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli in products regulated by the Food Safety and Inspection Service.

    PubMed

    Green, Alice L; Seys, Scott; Douris, Aphrodite; Levine, Jeoff; Robertson, Kis

    2014-07-01

    We described characteristics of the Escherichia coli O157 and Escherichia coli non-O157 illness investigations conducted by the United States Department of Agriculture's Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) during the 5-year period from 2006 through 2010. We created a multivariable logistic regression model to determine characteristics of these investigations that were associated with FSIS regulatory action, which was defined as having occurred if a product recall occurred or if FSIS personnel performed an environmental health assessment (Food Safety Assessment) at the implicated establishment. During this period, FSIS took regulatory action in 38 of 88 (43%) investigations. Illness investigations in which FoodNet states were involved were more likely to result in regulatory action. Illness investigations in which state and local traceback, or FSIS traceback occurred were more likely to result in regulatory action. Reasons for lack of action included evidence of cross-contamination after the product left a regulated establishment, delayed notification, lack of epidemiological information, and insufficient product information. PMID:24826872

  6. Characterizing the associative content of brain structures involved in habitual and goal-directed actions in humans: a multivariate FMRI study.

    PubMed

    McNamee, Daniel; Liljeholm, Mimi; Zika, Ondrej; O'Doherty, John P

    2015-03-01

    While there is accumulating evidence for the existence of distinct neural systems supporting goal-directed and habitual action selection in the mammalian brain, much less is known about the nature of the information being processed in these different brain regions. Associative learning theory predicts that brain systems involved in habitual control, such as the dorsolateral striatum, should contain stimulus and response information only, but not outcome information, while regions involved in goal-directed action, such as ventromedial and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and dorsomedial striatum, should be involved in processing information about outcomes as well as stimuli and responses. To test this prediction, human participants underwent fMRI while engaging in a binary choice task designed to enable the separate identification of these different representations with a multivariate classification analysis approach. Consistent with our predictions, the dorsolateral striatum contained information about responses but not outcomes at the time of an initial stimulus, while the regions implicated in goal-directed action selection contained information about both responses and outcomes. These findings suggest that differential contributions of these regions to habitual and goal-directed behavioral control may depend in part on basic differences in the type of information that these regions have access to at the time of decision making. PMID:25740507

  7. Differential activation of brain regions involved with error-feedback and imitation based motor simulation when observing self and an expert's actions in pilots and non-pilots on a complex glider landing task.

    PubMed

    Callan, Daniel E; Terzibas, Cengiz; Cassel, Daniel B; Callan, Akiko; Kawato, Mitsuo; Sato, Masa-Aki

    2013-05-15

    In this fMRI study we investigate neural processes related to the action observation network using a complex perceptual-motor task in pilots and non-pilots. The task involved landing a glider (using aileron, elevator, rudder, and dive brake) as close to a target as possible, passively observing a replay of one's own previous trial, passively observing a replay of an expert's trial, and a baseline do nothing condition. The objective of this study is to investigate two types of motor simulation processes used during observation of action: imitation based motor simulation and error-feedback based motor simulation. It has been proposed that the computational neurocircuitry of the cortex is well suited for unsupervised imitation based learning, whereas, the cerebellum is well suited for error-feedback based learning. Consistent with predictions, pilots (to a greater extent than non-pilots) showed significant differential activity when observing an expert landing the glider in brain regions involved with imitation based motor simulation (including premotor cortex PMC, inferior frontal gyrus IFG, anterior insula, parietal cortex, superior temporal gyrus, and middle temporal MT area) than when observing one's own previous trial which showed significant differential activity in the cerebellum (only for pilots) thought to be concerned with error-feedback based motor simulation. While there was some differential brain activity for pilots in regions involved with both Execution and Observation of the flying task (potential Mirror System sites including IFG, PMC, superior parietal lobule) the majority was adjacent to these areas (Observation Only Sites) (predominantly in PMC, IFG, and inferior parietal loblule). These regions showing greater activity for observation than for action may be involved with processes related to motor-based representational transforms that are not necessary when actually carrying out the task.

  8. Histamine H1 receptor involvement in prepulse inhibition and memory function: Relevance for the antipsychotic actions of clozapine

    PubMed Central

    Roegge, Cindy S.; Perraut, Charles; Hao, Xin; Levin, Edward D.

    2009-01-01

    Histamine H1 blockade is one of the more prominent actions of the multi-receptor acting antipsychotic clozapine. It is currently not known how much this H1 antagonism of clozapine contributes to the therapeutic or adverse side effects of clozapine. The current studies with Sprague-Dawley rats were conducted to determine the participation of histaminergic H1 receptor subtype in sensorimotor plasticity and memory function affected by clozapine using tests of prepulse inhibition (PPI) and radial-arm maze choice accuracy. The PPI impairment caused by the glutamate antagonist dizocilpine (MK-801) was significantly attenuated by clozapine. In the current project, we found that the selective H1 antagonist pyrilamine also reversed the dizocilpine-induced impairment in PPI of tactile startle with an auditory prepulse. In the radial-arm maze (RAM), pyrilamine, like clozapine, impaired working memory and caused a significant dose-related slowing of response. Pyrilamine, however, decreased the number of reference memory errors. We have previously shown that nicotine effectively attenuates the clozapine-induced working memory impairment, but in the current study, nicotine did not significantly alter the effects of pyrilamine on the RAM. In summary, the therapeutic effect of clozapine in reversing PPI impairment was mimicked by the H1 antagonist pyrilamine, while pyrilamine had a mixed effect on cognition. Pyrilamine impaired working memory but improved reference memory in rats. Thus, H1 antagonism seems to play a role in part of the beneficial actions of antipsychotics, such as clozapine. PMID:17382376

  9. Antifungal Action of Methylene Blue Involves Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Disruption of Redox and Membrane Homeostasis in C. albicans

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, Moiz A.; Fatima, Zeeshan; Hameed, Saif

    2016-01-01

    Candida albicans is known to cause infections ranging from superficial and systemic in immunocompromised person. In this study, we explored that the antifungal action of Methylene blue (MB) is mediated through mitochondrial dysfunction and disruption of redox and membrane homeostasis against C. albicans. We demonstrated that MB displayed its antifungal potential against C. albicans and two clinical isolates tested. We also showed that MB is effective against two non- albicans species as well. Notably, the antifungal effect of MB seems to be independent of the major drug efflux pumps transporter activity. We explored that MB treated Candida cells were sensitive on non-fermentable carbon source leading us to propose that MB inhibits mitochondria. This sensitive phenotype was reinforced with the fact that sensitivity of Candida cells to MB could be rescued upon the supplementation of ascorbic acid, an antioxidant. This clearly suggests that disturbances in redox status are linked with MB action. We further demonstrated that Candida cells were susceptible to membrane perturbing agent viz. SDS which was additionally confirmed by transmission electron micrographs showing disruption of membrane integrity. Moreover, the ergosterol levels were significantly decreased by 66% suggesting lipid compositional changes due to MB. Furthermore, we could demonstrate that MB inhibits the yeast to hyphal transition in C. albicans which is one of the major virulence attribute in most of the hyphal inducing conditions. Taken together, the data generated from present study clearly establishes MB as promising antifungal agent that could be efficiently employed in strategies to treat Candida infections. PMID:27006725

  10. Where the Action Is; A Log of Successful Urban Programs Involving Businessmen, Chambers of Commerce or Associations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chamber of Commerce of the United States, Washington, DC.

    This log cites about 150 successful programs, dealing with key urban problems, which involve businessmen either individually or through efforts of their companies, chambers of commerce, and trade and professional associations. The examples are listed alphabetically by location by city or state name for statewide programs. A few national programs…

  11. Labor and Career Education: Ideas for Action. Handbook of Ideas for Involving and Integrating Labor in Career Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Topougis, Nicholas J.

    This handbook provides specific examples of activities and procedures of labor-education collaboration within the context of the career education program. It is intended to help interested communities develop or expand labor's active involvement in the educational process. After an introduction, a section lists a number of concerns shared by…

  12. 31 CFR 363.45 - What are the rules for judicial and administrative actions involving securities held in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... judicial proceeding involving competing claims to a security held in TreasuryDirect. (c) Divorce decree. We will recognize a divorce decree that either disposes of a security held in TreasuryDirect or ratifies a... divorce decree does not set out the terms of the property settlement agreement, we will require...

  13. 31 CFR 363.45 - What are the rules for judicial and administrative actions involving securities held in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... judicial proceeding involving competing claims to a security held in TreasuryDirect. (c) Divorce decree. We will recognize a divorce decree that either disposes of a security held in TreasuryDirect or ratifies a... divorce decree does not set out the terms of the property settlement agreement, we will require...

  14. Neonatal androgenization increases vasoactive intestinal peptide levels in rat anterior pituitary: possible involvement of vasoactive intestinal peptide in the neonatal androgenization-induced hyperprolactinemia.

    PubMed

    Watanobe, H; Sasaki, S; Takebe, K

    1991-11-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) may be a physiological PRL-releasing factor. In the present study, we examined a possible involvement of VIP in the neonatal androgenization (NA)-induced hyperprolactinemia. Twenty-four hours after birth, newborn female rats were injected sc with 1,000 micrograms of testosterone (NA) or with oil vehicle only (control). Both groups were sacrificed at 8 weeks of age. Compared to controls, NA rats showed significantly higher plasma PRL levels (7.3 fold), anterior pituitary (AP) PRL content (2.1 fold) and plasma estradiol levels (2.1 fold). AP VIP content was extremely higher (61 fold) in NA rats than in controls. However, NA did not affect VIP content in the suprachiasmatic nucleus, paraventricular nucleus or median eminence. These results suggest that the NA-induced hyperprolactinemia may be mediated, at least in part, by paracrine and/or autocrine effects of the increased AP VIP on PRL secretion. However, since the potentiation by NA of the AP VIP content was extremely marked compared to those of the other parameters, the possibility was also raised that the increased AP VIP may be involved in other endocrine and/or nonendocrine events occurring in the AP. PMID:1802925

  15. Evaluating the Possibility of Defining Cut-Off Points for ΔFA% in Order to Differentiate Four Major Types of Peri-Tumoral White Matter Tract Involvement

    PubMed Central

    Deilami, Tourisa; Hadizadeh Kharrazi, Homayoun; Seddighi, Amir Saied; Tanzifi, Parin; Tayebivaljouzi, Reza; Zamani, Fatemeh; Chavoshzadeh Tafti, Atefeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and its different scalar values such as fractional anisotropy (FA) have recently been used for evaluation of peri-tumoral white matter (WM) involvement to help define safer surgical excision margins. Objectives: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the possibility of defining diagnostic cut-off points for differentiating four major types of peri-tumoral WM involvement using FA. Patients and Methods: DTI was performed in 12 patients with high presumption of having brain tumors, on a 1.5 T MRI scanner. DTI data was processed by MedINRIA software. Two-hundred region of interests (ROI) were evaluated: 100 in the lesion zone and the rest in the normal WM in the contralateral hemisphere. FA value related to each ROI was measured, and the percentage of FA decrement (ΔFAs%) was calculated. Results: Of the 100 ROIs on the lesion side, 74 were related to high-grade lesions, 23 to low-grade ones, and three to “gliosis”. There were 54 “infiltrated”, 22 “displaced”, 15 “disrupted”, and 9 “edematous” tracts. The major type of fiber involvement, both in low-grade and high-grade tumors was “infiltrated, whereas “edematous” fibers comprised the minority. ΔFA% was more than -35 for “displaced” and “edematous” fibers, and less than -35 for the majority of “disrupted” ones, but “infiltrated” fibers had scattered distribution. Mean ΔFA% was the least for “disrupted”, followed by “infiltrated”, “edematous” and “displaced” parts. Conclusion: Introducing definite diagnostic cut-points was not possible, due to overlap. Based on the fact that “disruption” is the most aggressive process, a sensitivity analysis was carried out for “disrupted” fibers for several presumptive cut-off points. PMID:26528388

  16. Promoting HIV Vaccine Research in African American Communities: Does the Theory of Reasoned Action Explain Potential Outcomes of Involvement?

    PubMed

    Frew, Paula M; Archibald, Matthew; Martinez, Nina; del Rio, Carlos; Mulligan, Mark J

    2007-01-01

    The HIV/AIDS pandemic continues to challenge the African American community with disproportionate rates of infection, particularly among young women ages 25 to 34 years. Development of a preventive HIV vaccine may bring a substantial turning point in this health crisis. Engagement of the African American community is necessary to improve awareness of the effort and favorably influence attitudes and referent norms. The Theory of Reasoned Action (TRA) may be a useful framework for exploration of community engagement outcomes including future attendance, community mobilization, and study participation. Within the context of HIV vaccine outreach, we conducted a cross-sectional survey in early 2007 with 175 African-American adults (>/= 18 years). Confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modeling were performed and the findings support the potential of the model in understanding behavioral intentions toward HIV vaccine research.

  17. Involvement of G Protein-Coupled Receptor 30 (GPR30) in Rapid Action of Estrogen in Primate LHRH Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Noel, Sekoni D.; Keen, Kim L.; Baumann, David I.; Filardo, Edward J.; Terasawa, Ei

    2009-01-01

    Previously, we have reported that 17β-estradiol (E2) induces an increase in firing activity of primate LH-releasing hormone (LHRH) neurons. The present study investigates whether E2 alters LHRH release as well as the pattern of intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) oscillations and whether G protein-coupled receptor 30 (GPR30) plays a role in mediating the rapid E2 action in primate LHRH neurons. Results are summarized: 1) E2, the nuclear membrane-impermeable estrogen, estrogen-dendrimer conjugate, and the plasma membrane-impermeable estrogen, E2-BSA conjugate, all stimulated LHRH release within 10 min of exposure; 2) whereas the estrogen receptor antagonist, ICI 182,780, did not block the E2-induced LHRH release, E2 application to cells treated with pertussis toxin failed to induce LHRH release; 3) GPR30 mRNA was expressed in olfactory placode cultures, and GPR30 protein was expressed in a subset of LHRH neurons; 4) pertussis toxin treatment blocked the E2-induced increase in [Ca2+]i oscillations; 5) knockdown of GPR30 in primate LHRH neurons by transfection with small interfering RNA (siRNA) for GPR30 completely abrogated the E2-induced changes in [Ca2+]i oscillations, whereas transfection with control siRNA did not; 6) the estrogen-dendrimer conjugate-induced increase in [Ca2+]i oscillations also did not occur in LHRH neurons transfected with GPR30 siRNA; and 7) G1, a GPR30 agonist, resulted in changes in [Ca2+]i oscillations, similar to those observed with E2. Collectively, E2 induces a rapid excitatory effect on primate LHRH neurons, and this rapid action of E2 appears to be mediated, in part, through GPR30. PMID:19131510

  18. The involvement of neuronal nitric oxide synthase in antiepileptic action of alpha-asarone on pentylenetetrazol molding rats.

    PubMed

    Su, Jing; Zhu, Wenting; Liu, Jing; Yin, Jian; Qin, Wei; Jiang, Changbin

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to research the role of nitric oxide (NO) as a mediator of alpha (α)-asarone effect at the pentylenetetrazol (PTZ)-induced epileptiform discharge in rat. α-Asarone that was injected intraperitoneally twenty minutes before PTZ injection suppressed the clonic discharge effectively and the significant actions lasted for 30 min with no change of clonic amplitude. Administration of α-asarone did not influence interictal discharge. Four kinds of NO regulators were administered, including non-selective NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), selective neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) inhibitor, 7-nitroindazole (7-NI), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) inhibitor, aminoguanidine (AG) and NO substrate, L-arginine (ARG) and their influence on the actions of α-asarone were studied, and all of the regulators were administered fifteen minutes before α-asarone injection. L-NAME and 7-NI reversed the anticlonic activity of α-asarone, and a significant increase of clonic activity was induced by L-NAME later in L-NAME +.α-asarone + PTZ group. There were no significant differences between AG + α-asarone + PTZ and α-asarone + PTZ group. L-ARG played a dual role in this study. It aggravated clonic discharge in the early stage but relieved interictal discharge in the late stage compared with PTZ group alone, and the beneficial effect of α-asarone was also reversed. All the above results suggest that nNOS/NO pathway mediates the anticonvulsant effect of α-asarone, and NO played a biphasic role in PTZ modeling process, while iNOS was unrelated to the inhibition effect of α-asarone on PTZ induced epileptiform activity. PMID:25227079

  19. Screening of the antidepressant-like effect of the traditional Chinese medicinal formula Si-Ni-San and their possible mechanism of action in mice

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Li-Tao; Li, Jing; Liu, Bin-Bin; Li, Cheng-Fu

    2013-01-01

    Background: The traditional Chinese medicine formula Si-Ni-San has well therapeutic applications in improvement of mental diseases including depression. However, the neuropharmacological and neuroendocrine mechanisms of the formula on antidepressant-like action have not been reported. Objective: Herein, we explored the antidepressant-like effect and its mechanism of Si-Ni-San. Materials and Methods: Acute effect of Si-Ni-San on the immobility time was assessed in the mouse forced swim test (FST) and tail suspension test (TST). Moreover, we investigated the neurochemical, neuroendocrine, and neurotrophin systems involved in the antidepressant-like effect of this formula. Results: Si-Ni-San significantly decreased the immobility time after acute treatment in the mouse TST (1300 mg/kg) but not in the FST compared with the control group. In addition, pretreatment of mice with PCPA or AMPT prevented the anti-immobility effect of Si-Ni-San (1300 mg/kg) in the TST. Moreover, acute Si-Ni-San (1300 mg/kg) decreased serum corticosterone levels, elevated serotonin (5-HT), norepinephrine (NE), and dopamine (DA) levels without affecting brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels in the whole brain exposed to TST. Conclusion: The acute antidepressant-like action of Si-Ni-San is mediated by the monoaminergic and neuroendocrine systems although underlying mechanism still remains to be further elucidated, and this formula should be further investigated as an alternative therapeutic approach for the treatment of depression. PMID:23598923

  20. A hypothesis on possible neurochemical mechanisms of action of cervical spinal cord stimulation in prevention and treatment of cerebral arterial vasospasm after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Yin, D; Slavin, K V

    2015-09-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is associated with the high incidence of development of cerebral vasospasm that results in morbidity and mortality due to delayed cerebral ischemia. So far there are no consistently effective therapies for treatment of vasospasm in patients suffering from SAH. It is well known that cervical spinal cord stimulation (SCS) can induce vasodilatation and increase cerebral blood flow (CBF). Based on the experiments in animals and the studies in humans, we have proposed the possibility to use SCS as a therapeutic strategy for prevention and treatment of cerebral vasospasm after SAH. However, the physiological mechanisms of action of SCS in this regard are poorly understood. Better understanding of the pathophysiology of vasospasm after SAH may provide insight into the role of SCS in such conditions. We hypothesize that effect of SCS on vasodilatation may be related to modulation of activity of phosphodiesterases 5 (PDE-5) and nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), resulting in enhancement of nitric oxide (NO)-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) pathway, which may help prevent and/or treat vasospasm after SAH. Further investigations on the physiological mechanisms of action of SCS would be necessary to support this hypothesis. PMID:26141634

  1. Nicotine blocks apomorphine-induced disruption of prepulse inhibition of the acoustic startle in rats: possible involvement of central nicotinic alpha7 receptors.

    PubMed

    Suemaru, Katsuya; Yasuda, Kayo; Umeda, Kenta; Araki, Hiroaki; Shibata, Kazuhiko; Choshi, Tominari; Hibino, Satoshi; Gomita, Yutaka

    2004-07-01

    Nicotine has been reported to normalize deficits in auditory sensory gating in the cases of schizophrenia, suggesting an involvement of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in attentional abnormalities. However, the mechanism remains unclear. The present study investigated the effects of nicotine on the disruption of prepulse inhibition (PPI) of the acoustic startle response induced by apomorphine or phencyclidine in rats. Over the dose range tested, nicotine (0.05-1 mg kg(-1), s.c.) did not disrupt PPI. Neither methyllycaconitine (0.5-5 mg kg(-1), s.c.), an alpha(7) nicotinic receptor antagonist, nor dihydro-beta-erythroidine (0.5-2 mg kg(-1), s.c.), an alpha(4)beta(2) nicotinic receptor antagonist, had any effect on PPI. Nicotine (0.01-0.2 mg kg(-1), s.c.) dose-dependently reversed the disruption of PPI induced by apomorphine (1 mg kg(-1), s.c.), but had no effect on the disruption of PPI induced by phencyclidine (2 mg kg(-1), s.c.). The reversal of apomorphine-induced PPI disruption by nicotine (0.2 mg kg(-1)) was eliminated by mecamylamine (1 mg kg(-1), i.p.), but not by hexamethonium (10 mg kg(-1), i.p.), indicating the involvement of central nicotinic receptors. The antagonistic action of nicotine on apomorphine-induced PPI disruption was dose-dependently blocked by methyllycaconitine (1 and 2 mg kg(-1), s.c.). However, dihydro-beta-erythroidine (1 and 2 mg kg(-1), s.c.) had no effect. These results suggest that nicotine reverses the disruption of apomorphine-induced PPI through central alpha(7) nicotinic receptors.

  2. Action semantics modulate action prediction.

    PubMed

    Springer, Anne; Prinz, Wolfgang

    2010-11-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that action prediction involves an internal action simulation that runs time-locked to the real action. The present study replicates and extends these findings by indicating a real-time simulation process (Graf et al., 2007), which can be differentiated from a similarity-based evaluation of internal action representations. Moreover, results showed that action semantics modulate action prediction accuracy. The semantic effect was specified by the processing of action verbs and concrete nouns (Experiment 1) and, more specifically, by the dynamics described by action verbs (Experiment 2) and the speed described by the verbs (e.g., "to catch" vs. "to grasp" vs. "to stretch"; Experiment 3). These results propose a linkage between action simulation and action semantics as two yet unrelated domains, a view that coincides with a recent notion of a close link between motor processes and the understanding of action language.

  3. The music of your emotions: neural substrates involved in detection of emotional correspondence between auditory and visual music actions.

    PubMed

    Petrini, Karin; Crabbe, Frances; Sheridan, Carol; Pollick, Frank E

    2011-04-29

    In humans, emotions from music serve important communicative roles. Despite a growing interest in the neural basis of music perception, action and emotion, the majority of previous studies in this area have focused on the auditory aspects of music performances. Here we investigate how the brain processes the emotions elicited by audiovisual music performances. We used event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging, and in Experiment 1 we defined the areas responding to audiovisual (musician's movements with music), visual (musician's movements only), and auditory emotional (music only) displays. Subsequently a region of interest analysis was performed to examine if any of the areas detected in Experiment 1 showed greater activation for emotionally mismatching performances (combining the musician's movements with mismatching emotional sound) than for emotionally matching music performances (combining the musician's movements with matching emotional sound) as presented in Experiment 2 to the same participants. The insula and the left thalamus were found to respond consistently to visual, auditory and audiovisual emotional information and to have increased activation for emotionally mismatching displays in comparison with emotionally matching displays. In contrast, the right thalamus was found to respond to audiovisual emotional displays and to have similar activation for emotionally matching and mismatching displays. These results suggest that the insula and left thalamus have an active role in detecting emotional correspondence between auditory and visual information during music performances, whereas the right thalamus has a different role.

  4. Possible Involvement of µ Opioid Receptor in the Antidepressant-Like Effect of Shuyu Formula in Restraint Stress-Induced Depression-Like Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fu-rong; Qiao, Ming-qi; Xue, Ling; Wei, Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Recently μ opioid receptor (MOR) has been shown to be closely associated with depression. Here we investigated the action of Shuyu, a Chinese herbal prescription, on repeated restraint stress induced depression-like rats, with specific attention to the role of MOR and the related signal cascade. Our results showed that repeated restraint stress caused significant depressive-like behaviors, as evidenced by reduced body weight gain, prolonged duration of immobility in forced swimming test, and decreased number of square-crossings and rearings in open field test. The stress-induced depression-like behaviors were relieved by Shuyu, which was accompanied by decreased expression of MOR in hippocampus. Furthermore, Shuyu upregulated BDNF protein expression, restored the activity of CREB, and stimulated MEK and ERK phosphorylation in hippocampus of stressed rats. More importantly, MOR is involved in the effects of Shuyu on these depression-related signals, as they can be strengthened by MOR antagonist CTAP. Collectively, these data indicated that the antidepressant-like properties of Shuyu are associated with MOR and the corresponding CREB, BDNF, MEK, and ERK signal pathway. Our study supports clinical use of Shuyu as an effective treatment of depression and also suggests that MOR might be a target for treatment of depression and developing novel antidepressants. PMID:25821488

  5. The involvement of neuronal nitric oxide synthase in the anti-epileptic action of curcumin on pentylenetetrazol-kindled rats.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wenting; Su, Jing; Liu, Jing; Jiang, Changbin

    2015-01-01

    In this study, it was investigated whether a NO signaling pathway is involved in the anti-epileptic effect of curcumin on pentylenetetrazol (PTZ)-kindled rats. PTZ-kindled rats received different doses of curcumin that were administered intraperitoneally for 24 days. Either a non-selective inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) (N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME)), a selective inhibitor of neuronal NOS (7-Nitroindazole (7-NI)), a selective inhibitor of inducible NOS (aminoguanidine (AG)), or a NO precursor (L-arginine (L-ARG)) was administered chronically to evaluate the role of NO in curcumin's anti-seizure effect. A chronic administration of curcumin (200 mg/kg) was most effective for decreasing the mean frequency of epileptiform discharge. Furthermore, a pretreatment with L-NAME or 7-NI augmented the anti-epileptic effect of curcumin. In contrast, AG failed to significantly alter the anti-epileptic effect of curcumin. A pretreatment with L-ARG temporally reversed the anti-epileptic effect of curcumin in the early stage, but in the late stage, it potentiated curcumin's anti-epileptic effect. These findings suggest that the L-arginine-nitric oxide pathway may be involved in the anti-epileptic properties of curcumin, and that the role of nNOS (and not iNOS) is prominent in this neuroprotective feature. PMID:26406082

  6. Comparative Analysis of Protocadherin-11 X-Linked Expression among Postnatal Rodents, Non-Human Primates, and Songbirds Suggests Its Possible Involvement in Brain Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Matsunaga, Eiji; Nambu, Sanae; Oka, Mariko; Okanoya, Kazuo; Iriki, Atsushi

    2013-01-01

    Background Protocadherin-11 is a cell adhesion molecule of the cadherin superfamily. Since, only in humans, its paralog is found on the Y chromosome, it is expected that protocadherin-11X/Y plays some role in human brain evolution or sex differences. Recently, a genetic mutation of protocadherin-11X/Y was reported to be associated with a language development disorder. Here, we compared the expression of protocadherin-11 X-linked in developing postnatal brains of mouse (rodent) and common marmoset (non-human primate) to explore its possible involvement in mammalian brain evolution. We also investigated its expression in the Bengalese finch (songbird) to explore a possible function in animal vocalization and human language faculties. Methodology/Principal Findings Protocadherin-11 X-linked was strongly expressed in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, amygdala and brainstem. Comparative analysis between mice and marmosets revealed that in certain areas of marmoset brain, the expression was clearly enriched. In Bengalese finches, protocadherin-11 X-linked was expressed not only in nuclei of regions of the vocal production pathway and the tracheosyringeal hypoglossal nucleus, but also in areas homologous to the mammalian amygdala and hippocampus. In both marmosets and Bengalese finches, its expression in pallial vocal control areas was developmentally regulated, and no clear expression was seen in the dorsal striatum, indicating a similarity between songbirds and non-human primates. Conclusions/Significance Our results suggest that the enriched expression of protocadherin-11 X-linked is involved in primate brain evolution and that some similarity exists between songbirds and primates regarding the neural basis for vocalization. PMID:23527036

  7. New enzymes involved in the mechanism of action of epidermal growth factor in a clonal strain of Leydig tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Castilla, Rocío; Gadaleta, Mariana; Castillo, Ana Fernanda; Duarte, Alejandra; Neuman, Isabel; Paz, Cristina; Cornejo Maciel, Fabiana; Podestá, Ernesto J

    2008-07-01

    The studies presented herein were designed to investigate the effect of mouse epidermal growth factor (mEGF) on arachidonic acid (AA) release in a clonal strain of cultured murine Leydig cells (designed MA-10). In MA-10 cells, mEGF promotes AA release and metabolism to lipoxygenated products to induce the steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein. However, the mechanism by which mEGF releases AA in these cells is not totally elucidated. We show that mEGF produces an increment in the mitochondrial AA content in a short-term incubation (30 min). This AA is released by the action of a mitochondrial acyl-CoA thioesterase (Acot2), as demonstrated in experiments in which Acot2 was down or overexpressed. This AA in turn regulates the StAR protein expression, indirect evidence of its metabolism to lipoxygenated products. We also show that mEGF induces the expression (mRNA and protein) of Acot2 and an acyl-CoA synthetase that provides the substrate, arachidonyl-CoA, to Acot2. This effect is also observed in another steroidogenic cell line, the adrenocortical Y1 cells. Taken together, our results show that: 1) mEGF can induce the generation of AA in a specific compartment of the cells, i.e. the mitochondria; 2) mEGF can up-regulate acyl-CoA synthetase and Acot2 mRNA and protein levels; and 3) mEGF-stimulated intramitochondrial AA release leads to StAR protein induction.

  8. Studies on the involvement of lysosomes in estrogen action, I. Isolation and enzymatic properties of pig endometrial lysosomes.

    PubMed

    Sierralta, W; Truitt, A J; Jungblut, P W

    1978-04-01

    Pig endometrium cells, collected by curettage and homogenized in an all-glass Potter Elvehjem homogenizer, gave a considerably higher yield of intact mitochondria and lysosomes than homogenates of whole uterus obtained with the Ultraturrax or the Parr bomb. After homogenization of the cells and subfractionation in the presence of Mg2, mitochondria and lysosomes equilibrated at the same modal density in isopycnic centrifugation. Homogenization and subfractionation in buffers devoid of divalent cations and containing EDTA resulted in a decrease in the buoyant density of mitochondria, allowing for a separation from lysosomes. The pH optima and the specific activities of two mitochondrial enzymes and eight hydrolyases used as marker enzymes were determined. The morphological characteristics of fractions were established by electron microscopy. Preliminary results indicate an involvement of lysosomes in steroid metabolism rather than in steroid and receptor translocation into the nucleus. PMID:25838

  9. Studies on the involvement of lysosomes in estrogen action, I. Isolation and enzymatic properties of pig endometrial lysosomes.

    PubMed

    Sierralta, W; Truitt, A J; Jungblut, P W

    1978-04-01

    Pig endometrium cells, collected by curettage and homogenized in an all-glass Potter Elvehjem homogenizer, gave a considerably higher yield of intact mitochondria and lysosomes than homogenates of whole uterus obtained with the Ultraturrax or the Parr bomb. After homogenization of the cells and subfractionation in the presence of Mg2, mitochondria and lysosomes equilibrated at the same modal density in isopycnic centrifugation. Homogenization and subfractionation in buffers devoid of divalent cations and containing EDTA resulted in a decrease in the buoyant density of mitochondria, allowing for a separation from lysosomes. The pH optima and the specific activities of two mitochondrial enzymes and eight hydrolyases used as marker enzymes were determined. The morphological characteristics of fractions were established by electron microscopy. Preliminary results indicate an involvement of lysosomes in steroid metabolism rather than in steroid and receptor translocation into the nucleus.

  10. Screening and modes of action of antagonistic bacteria to control the fungal pathogen Phaeomoniella chlamydospora involved in grapevine trunk diseases.

    PubMed

    Haidar, Rana; Roudet, Jean; Bonnard, Olivier; Dufour, Marie Cécile; Corio-Costet, Marie France; Fert, Mathieu; Gautier, Thomas; Deschamps, Alain; Fermaud, Marc

    2016-11-01

    The antagonistic activity of 46 bacterial strains isolated from Bordeaux vineyards were evaluated against Phaeomoniella chlamydospora, a major grapevine pathogen involved in Esca. The reduction of the necrosis length of stem cuttings ranged between 31.4% and 38.7% for the 8 most efficient strains. Two in planta trials allowed the selection of the two best strains, Bacillus pumilus (S32) and Paenibacillus sp. (S19). Their efficacy was not dependent on application method; co-inoculation, prevention in the wood and soil inoculation were tested. The involvement of antibiosis by the secretion of diffusible and/or volatile compounds in the antagonistic capacity of these two strains was assessed in vitro. Volatile compounds secreted by B. pumilus (S32) and Paenibacillus sp. (S19) were identified by gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy (GC/MS). The volatile compounds 1-octen-3-ol and 2,5-dimethyl pyrazine were obtained commercially and tested, and they showed strong antifungal activity against P. chlamydospora, which suggested that these compounds may play an important role in the bacterial antagonistic activity in planta. Furthermore, the expression of 10 major grapevine defense genes was quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction, which demonstrated that the two strains significantly affected the grapevine transcripts four days after their application on the plants. High expression levels of different genes associated with P. chlamydospora infection in B. pumilus pre-treated plants suggests that this strain induces systemic resistance in grapevine. For the first time, we demonstrated the ability of two bacterial strains, B. pumilus and Paenibacillus sp., isolated from grapevine wood, to control P. chlamydospora via direct and/or indirect mechanisms.

  11. Screening and modes of action of antagonistic bacteria to control the fungal pathogen Phaeomoniella chlamydospora involved in grapevine trunk diseases.

    PubMed

    Haidar, Rana; Roudet, Jean; Bonnard, Olivier; Dufour, Marie Cécile; Corio-Costet, Marie France; Fert, Mathieu; Gautier, Thomas; Deschamps, Alain; Fermaud, Marc

    2016-11-01

    The antagonistic activity of 46 bacterial strains isolated from Bordeaux vineyards were evaluated against Phaeomoniella chlamydospora, a major grapevine pathogen involved in Esca. The reduction of the necrosis length of stem cuttings ranged between 31.4% and 38.7% for the 8 most efficient strains. Two in planta trials allowed the selection of the two best strains, Bacillus pumilus (S32) and Paenibacillus sp. (S19). Their efficacy was not dependent on application method; co-inoculation, prevention in the wood and soil inoculation were tested. The involvement of antibiosis by the secretion of diffusible and/or volatile compounds in the antagonistic capacity of these two strains was assessed in vitro. Volatile compounds secreted by B. pumilus (S32) and Paenibacillus sp. (S19) were identified by gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy (GC/MS). The volatile compounds 1-octen-3-ol and 2,5-dimethyl pyrazine were obtained commercially and tested, and they showed strong antifungal activity against P. chlamydospora, which suggested that these compounds may play an important role in the bacterial antagonistic activity in planta. Furthermore, the expression of 10 major grapevine defense genes was quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction, which demonstrated that the two strains significantly affected the grapevine transcripts four days after their application on the plants. High expression levels of different genes associated with P. chlamydospora infection in B. pumilus pre-treated plants suggests that this strain induces systemic resistance in grapevine. For the first time, we demonstrated the ability of two bacterial strains, B. pumilus and Paenibacillus sp., isolated from grapevine wood, to control P. chlamydospora via direct and/or indirect mechanisms. PMID:27664735

  12. Genomic organization of the Neurospora crassa gsn gene: possible involvement of the STRE and HSE elements in the modulation of transcription during heat shock.

    PubMed

    Freitas, F Zanolli; Bertolini, M C

    2004-12-01

    Glycogen synthase, an enzyme involved in glycogen biosynthesis, is regulated by phosphorylation and by the allosteric ligand glucose-6-phosphate (G6P). In addition, enzyme levels can be regulated by changes in gene expression. We recently cloned a cDNA for glycogen synthase ( gsn) from Neurospora crassa, and showed that gsn transcription decreased when cells were exposed to heat shock (shifted from 30 degrees C to 45 degrees C). In order to understand the mechanisms that control gsn expression, we isolated the gene, including its 5' and 3' flanking regions, from the genome of N. crassa. An ORF of approximately 2.4 kb was identified, which is interrupted by four small introns (II-V). Intron I (482 bp) is located in the 5'UTR region. Three putative Transcription Initiation Sites (TISs) were mapped, one of which lies downstream of a canonical TATA-box sequence (5'-TGTATAAA-3'). Analysis of the 5'-flanking region revealed the presence of putative transcription factor-binding sites, including Heat Shock Elements (HSEs) and STress Responsive Elements (STREs). The possible involvement of these motifs in the negative regulation of gsn transcription was investigated using Electrophoretic Mobility Shift Assays (EMSA) with nuclear extracts of N. crassa mycelium obtained before and after heat shock, and DNA fragments encompassing HSE and STRE elements from the 5'-flanking region. While elements within the promoter region are involved in transcription under heat shock, elements in the 5'UTR intron may participate in transcription during vegetative growth. The results thus suggest that N. crassa possesses trans -acting elements that interact with the 5'-flanking region to regulate gsn transcription during heat shock and vegetative growth.

  13. The possible involvement of D-amino acids or their metabolites in Arabidopsis cysteine proteinase/cystatin N-dependent proteolytic pathway.

    PubMed

    Gholizadeh, A

    2015-01-01

    Cysteine proteinases and their inhibitors 'cystatins' play essential roles in plant growth and development. They are involved in various signaling pathways and in the response to wide ranges of biotic and abiotic environmental stresses. To investigate their possible influence from D-amino acids or their metabolism in vivo, Arabidopsis seedlings were allowed to grow under four physicochemically different D-amino acids including D-aspartate, D-serine, D-alanine and D-phenylalanine containing media. The reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (R T-PCR) analysis of cysteine proteinase and cystatin gene expressions showed that the addition of D-amino acid to the plant growth media considerably induce the expression of proteinase transcript while decrease the expression level of inhibitor gene in the leaf and root tissues of the test plant in overall. Based on the obtained results the potential impact of D-amino acids or their metabolism on the activity of cysteine proteinase/cystatin-dependent proteolytic apparatus as well as their possible cooperation were predicted and discussed in the plant system.

  14. Do human brain areas involved in visuomotor actions show a preference for real tools over visually similar non-tools?

    PubMed

    Macdonald, Scott N; Culham, Jody C

    2015-10-01

    Neuroimaging has revealed a left-lateralized network of brain areas implicated in understanding the conceptual and sensorimotor aspects of tool perception and tool use. Often this network of areas is identified by contrasting brain activity when participants view pictures of tools vs. pictures of non-tools (e.g., animals or buildings). It is unclear, however, what aspect of tools drive activity in the tool network as both tools and non-tools tend to differ in their low-level features. For instance, areas in the tool network may simply activate to elongated objects or to handheld objects over round or ungraspable objects irrespective of object category. To test whether tools indeed drive activity in tool-selective areas over non-tools, participants passively viewed real tools and non-tools matched on low-level features during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). To maximize the potential for action, participants saw real-tools as opposed to pictures of tools. The non-tools were created by chopping the business ends of tools into pieces and attaching the pieces to both ends of the original tool handles. In doing so, the tools and non-tools were matched for elongation and real-world size. Importantly, tools and non-tools were viewed directly without the use of mirrors and placed within the participants' reach. Stimuli were presented at two opposite horizontal orientations to investigate whether areas that are selective for tools also show greater activation when the tool's handle is directed towards the hand as opposed to away from it. Our results showed that, even after the low-level differences between tools and non-tools were controlled, tools evoked more activation in the tool network as well as in sensorimotor areas. The orientation of the tool handles did not mediate effects within these sensorimotor areas. In sum, when we passively view tools, even without an intent to act, functional associations are automatically evoked and these associations are not

  15. Stimulation by parathyroid hormone of sup 45 Ca sup 2+ uptake in osteoblast-like cells: Possible involvement of alkaline phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Fukayama, S.; Tashjian, A.H. Jr. )

    1990-04-01

    We have investigated the actions of human PTH (hPTH-(1-34)) on the association of 45Ca2+ with two human (SaOS-2 and MG-63) and two rat (ROS 17/2.8 and UMR-106) osteoblast-like cell types. In SaOS-2 cells, hPTH-(1-34) binds to specific membrane receptors to activate adenylate cyclase. Treatment of SaOS-2 cells with hPTH-(1-34) resulted in an increase in 45Ca2+ uptake, in a dose-dependent fashion, up to 2- to 4-fold above control values. The increase was first evident at 10 min and persisted for at least 30 min. Treatment with nimodipine, a calcium channel antagonist, was without effect on the stimulatory action of PTH. A similar enhancement of cell-associated 45Ca2+ was observed when the cells were incubated with vasoactive intestinal peptide, which acts via different receptors to activate adenylate cyclase in SaOS-2 cells. Treatment with (Bu)2cAMP also induced an increase in cell-associated 45Ca2+. Pretreatment of SaOS-2 cells with hPTH-(1-34) for 4 h, which induced homologous desensitization to a second challenge with the same peptide for stimulation of cAMP production, did not attenuate the further enhancement of cell-associated 45Ca2+ by a second treatment with hPTH-(1-34). We then examined a possible relationship between alkaline phosphatase (ALPase) and 45Ca2+ uptake. SaOS-2 cells contained high levels of alkaline phosphatase activity and continuously released the enzyme into the medium. Release was enhanced by treatment with hPTH-(1-34) for 10 min. Incubation of cells with levamisole (an inhibitor of the liver/bone/kidney type of ALPase) resulted in a rapid decrease in basal and PTH-stimulated 45Ca2+ uptake, while treatment with L-Phe-Gly-Gly was without effect. Treatment of the cells with ALPase (bovine kidney) enhanced 45Ca2+ uptake. In MG-63 cells, a stimulatory effect of hPTH-(1-34) on cell-associated 45Ca2+ was also observed; however, hPTH-(1-34) did not stimulate cAMP production in MG-63 cells.

  16. ROS Involves the Fungicidal Actions of Thymol against Spores of Aspergillus flavus via the Induction of Nitric Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Qingshan; Zhou, Wei; Li, Hongbo; Hu, Liangbin; Mo, Haizhen

    2016-01-01

    Aspergillus flavus is a well-known pathogenic fungus for both crops and human beings. The acquisition of resistance to azoles by A. flavus is leading to more failures occurring in the prevention of infection by A. flavus. In this study, we found that thymol, one of the major chemical constituents of the essential oil of Monarda punctate, had efficient fungicidal activity against A. flavus and led to sporular lysis. Further studies indicated that thymol treatment induced the generation of both ROS and NO in spores, whereas NO accumulation was far later than ROS accumulation in response to thymol. By blocking ROS production with the inhibitors of NADPH oxidase, NO generation was also significantly inhibited in the presence of thymol, which indicated that ROS induced NO generation in A. flavus in response to thymol treatment. Moreover, the removal of either ROS or NO attenuated lysis and death of spores exposed to thymol. The addition of SNP (exogenous NO donor) eliminated the protective effects of the inhibitors of NADPH oxidase on thymol-induced lysis and death of spores. Taken together, it could be concluded that ROS is involved in spore death induced by thymol via the induction of NO. PMID:27196096

  17. ROS Involves the Fungicidal Actions of Thymol against Spores of Aspergillus flavus via the Induction of Nitric Oxide.

    PubMed

    Shen, Qingshan; Zhou, Wei; Li, Hongbo; Hu, Liangbin; Mo, Haizhen

    2016-01-01

    Aspergillus flavus is a well-known pathogenic fungus for both crops and human beings. The acquisition of resistance to azoles by A. flavus is leading to more failures occurring in the prevention of infection by A. flavus. In this study, we found that thymol, one of the major chemical constituents of the essential oil of Monarda punctate, had efficient fungicidal activity against A. flavus and led to sporular lysis. Further studies indicated that thymol treatment induced the generation of both ROS and NO in spores, whereas NO accumulation was far later than ROS accumulation in response to thymol. By blocking ROS production with the inhibitors of NADPH oxidase, NO generation was also significantly inhibited in the presence of thymol, which indicated that ROS induced NO generation in A. flavus in response to thymol treatment. Moreover, the removal of either ROS or NO attenuated lysis and death of spores exposed to thymol. The addition of SNP (exogenous NO donor) eliminated the protective effects of the inhibitors of NADPH oxidase on thymol-induced lysis and death of spores. Taken together, it could be concluded that ROS is involved in spore death induced by thymol via the induction of NO. PMID:27196096

  18. Generation of slow-wave-type action potentials in canine colon smooth muscle involves a non-L-type Ca2+ conductance.

    PubMed Central

    Huizinga, J D; Farraway, L; Den Hertog, A

    1991-01-01

    1. The hypothesis was addressed that a non-L-type calcium conductance is involved in the generation of the initial part of the slow-wave-type action potential in the canine colon. 2. In the absence of a sodium and chloride gradient (NaCl replaced by glucamine), and in the presence of nitrendipine (in 'glucamine-nitrendipine' Krebs solution), a major portion of the upstroke potential of the slow wave persists at unchanged frequency. 3. In 'glucamine-nitrendipine' Krebs solution, the rate of rise and amplitude of the upstroke potential is reduced by removal of extracellular calcium in a concentration-dependent manner. 4. The rate of rise and the amplitude of the upstroke potential is in a concentration-dependent manner reduced by Ni2+ greater than Cd2+ greater than Co2+ greater than Mg2+. 5. In 'glucamine-nitrendipine' Krebs solution, Ba2+ cannot replace Ca2+ in the generation of the upstroke potential. 6. Positive evidence was obtained for the hypothesis that a non-L-type calcium conductance is involved in the initiation of the slow-wave-type action potential in colonic smooth muscle. PMID:1724671

  19. Mechanisms Involved in the Anti-Inflammatory Action of a Polysulfated Fraction from Gracilaria cornea in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Coura, Chistiane Oliveira; Souza, Ricardo Basto; Rodrigues, José Ariévilo Gurgel; Vanderlei, Edfranck de Sousa Oliveira; de Araújo, Ianna Wivianne Fernandes; Ribeiro, Natássia Albuquerque; Frota, Annyta Fernandes; Ribeiro, Kátia Alves; Chaves, Hellíada Vasconcelos; Pereira, Karuza Maria Alves; da Cunha, Rodrigo Maranguape Silva; Bezerra, Mirna Marques; Benevides, Norma Maria Barros

    2015-01-01

    The anti-inflammatory mechanisms of the sulfated polysaccharidic fraction obtained from red marine alga Gracilaria cornea (Gc-FI) were investigated using a paw edema model induced in rats by different inflammatory agents (carrageenan, dextran, serotonin, bradykinin, compound 48/80 or L-arginine). Gc-FI at the doses of 3, 9 or 27 mg/kg, subcutaneously - s.c., significantly inhibited rat paw edema induced by carrageenan and dextran, as confirmed by myeloperoxidase and Evans’ blue assessments, respectively. Gc-FI (9 mg/kg, s.c.) inhibited rat paw edema induced by histamine, compound 48/80 and L-arginine. Additionally, Gc-FI (9 mg/kg, s.c.) inhibited Cg-induced edema in animals with intact mast cells but did not inhibit that with degranulated mast cells by compound 48/80, revealing a protective role on mast cell membranes. Gc-FI down-regulated the IL-1β, TNF-α and COX-2 mRNA and protein levels compared with those of the carrageenan group, based on qRT-PCR and immunohistochemistry analyses. After inhibition with ZnPP IX, a specific heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) inhibitor, the anti-inflammatory effect of Gc-FI was not observed in Cg-induced paw edema, suggesting that the anti-inflammatory effect of Gc-FI is, in part, dependent on the integrity of the HO-1 pathway. Gc-FI can target a combination of multiple points involved in inflammatory phenomena. PMID:25807556

  20. Mechanisms involved in the anti-inflammatory action of a polysulfated fraction from Gracilaria cornea in rats.

    PubMed

    Coura, Chistiane Oliveira; Souza, Ricardo Basto; Rodrigues, José Ariévilo Gurgel; Vanderlei, Edfranck de Sousa Oliveira; de Araújo, Ianna Wivianne Fernandes; Ribeiro, Natássia Albuquerque; Frota, Annyta Fernandes; Ribeiro, Kátia Alves; Chaves, Hellíada Vasconcelos; Pereira, Karuza Maria Alves; da Cunha, Rodrigo Maranguape Silva; Bezerra, Mirna Marques; Benevides, Norma Maria Barros

    2015-01-01

    The anti-inflammatory mechanisms of the sulfated polysaccharidic fraction obtained from red marine alga Gracilaria cornea (Gc-FI) were investigated using a paw edema model induced in rats by different inflammatory agents (carrageenan, dextran, serotonin, bradykinin, compound 48/80 or L-arginine). Gc-FI at the doses of 3, 9 or 27 mg/kg, subcutaneously--s.c., significantly inhibited rat paw edema induced by carrageenan and dextran, as confirmed by myeloperoxidase and Evans' blue assessments, respectively. Gc-FI (9 mg/kg, s.c.) inhibited rat paw edema induced by histamine, compound 48/80 and L-arginine. Additionally, Gc-FI (9 mg/kg, s.c.) inhibited Cg-induced edema in animals with intact mast cells but did not inhibit that with degranulated mast cells by compound 48/80, revealing a protective role on mast cell membranes. Gc-FI down-regulated the IL-1β, TNF-α and COX-2 mRNA and protein levels compared with those of the carrageenan group, based on qRT-PCR and immunohistochemistry analyses. After inhibition with ZnPP IX, a specific heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) inhibitor, the anti-inflammatory effect of Gc-FI was not observed in Cg-induced paw edema, suggesting that the anti-inflammatory effect of Gc-FI is, in part, dependent on the integrity of the HO-1 pathway. Gc-FI can target a combination of multiple points involved in inflammatory phenomena.

  1. Involvement of 5-HT3 receptors in the action of vortioxetine in rat brain: Focus on glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission.

    PubMed

    Riga, Maurizio S; Sánchez, Connie; Celada, Pau; Artigas, Francesc

    2016-09-01

    The antidepressant vortioxetine is a 5-HT3-R, 5-HT7-R and 5-HT1D-R antagonist, 5-HT1B-R partial agonist, 5-HT1A-R agonist, and serotonin (5-HT) transporter (SERT) inhibitor. Vortioxetine occupies all targets at high therapeutic doses and only SERT and 5-HT3-R at low doses. Vortioxetine increases extracellular monoamine concentrations in rat forebrain more than selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) and shows pro-cognitive activity in preclinical models. Given its high affinity for 5-HT3-R (Ki = 3.7 nM), selectively expressed in GABA interneurons, we hypothesized that vortioxetine may disinhibit glutamatergic and monoaminergic neurotransmission following 5-HT3-R blockade. Here we assessed vortioxetine effect on pyramidal neuron activity and extracellular 5-HT concentration using in vivo extracellular recordings of rat medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) pyramidal neurons and microdialysis in mPFC and ventral hippocampus (vHPC). Vortioxetine, but not escitalopram, increased pyramidal neuron discharge in mPFC. This effect was prevented by SR57227A (5-HT3-R agonist) and was mimicked by ondansetron (5-HT3-R antagonist) and by escitalopram/ondansetron combinations. In microdialysis experiments, ondansetron augmented the 5-HT-enhancing effect of escitalopram in mPFC and vHPC. Local ondansetron in vHPC augmented escitalopram effect, indicating the participation of intrinsic mechanisms. Since 5-HT neurons express GABAB receptors, we examined their putative involvement in controlling 5-HT release after 5-HT3-R blockade. Co-perfusion of baclofen (but not muscimol) reversed the increased 5-HT levels produced by vortioxetine and escitalopram/ondansetron combinations in vHPC. The present results suggest that vortioxetine increases glutamatergic and serotonergic neurotransmission in rat forebrain by blocking 5-HT3 receptors in GABA interneurons. PMID:27106166

  2. HMGB1-Driven Inflammation and Intimal Hyperplasia After Arterial Injury Involves Cell-Specific Actions Mediated by TLR4

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Jingjing; Yuan, Hong; Wang, Qingde; Yang, Huan; Al-Abed, Yousef; Hua, Zhong; Wang, Jiemei; Chen, Dandan; Wu, Jinze; Lu, Ben; Pribis, John P.; Jiang, Weihong; Yang, Kan; Hackam, David J.; Tracey, Kevin J.; Billiar, Timothy R.; Chen, Alex F.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Endoluminal vascular interventions such as angioplasty initiate a sterile inflammatory response resulting from local tissue damage. This response drives the development of intimal hyperplasia (IH) that, in turn, can lead to arterial occlusion. We hypothesized that the ubiquitous nuclear protein and damage-associated molecular pattern molecule, high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), is one of the endogenous mediators that activates processes leading to IH after endoluminal injury to the arterial wall. The aim of this study is to investigate whether approaches that reduce the levels of HMGB1 or inhibit its activity suppresses IH after arterial injury. Approach and Results Here, we show that HMGB1 regulates IH in a mouse carotid wire injury model. Induced genetic deletion or neutralization of HMGB1 prevents IH, monocyte recruitment, and smooth muscle cell growth factor production after endoluminal carotid artery injury. A specific inhibitor of HMGB1 myeloid differentiation factor 2–toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) interaction, P5779, also significantly inhibits IH. HMGB1 deletion is mimicked in this model by global deletion of TLR4 and partially replicated by myeloid-specific deletion of TLR4 but not TLR2 or receptor for advanced glycation endproducts deletion. The specific HMGB1 isoform known to activate TLR4 signaling (disulfide HMGB1) stimulates smooth muscle cell to migrate and produce monocyte chemotactic protein 1/CCL2) via TLR4. Macrophages produce smooth muscle cell mitogens in response to disulfide HMGB1 also in a TLR4/myeloid differentiation primary response gene (88)/Trif-dependent manner. Conclusions These findings place HMGB1 and its receptor, TLR4 as critical regulators of the events that drive the inflammation leading to IH after endoluminal arterial injury and identify this pathway as a possible therapeutic target to limit IH to attenuate damage-associated molecular pattern molecule–mediated vascular inflammatory responses. PMID:26515416

  3. Cell cycle alterations induced by urban PM2.5 in bronchial epithelial cells: characterization of the process and possible mechanisms involved

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background This study explores and characterizes cell cycle alterations induced by urban PM2.5 in the human epithelial cell line BEAS-2B, and elucidates possible mechanisms involved. Methods The cells were exposed to a low dose (7.5 μg/cm2) of Milan winter PM2.5 for different time points, and the cell cycle progression was analyzed by fluorescent microscopy and flow cytometry. Activation of proteins involved in cell cycle control was investigated by Western blotting and DNA damage by 32P-postlabelling, immunostaining and comet assay. The formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was quantified by flow cytometry. The role of PM organic fraction versus washed PM on the cell cycle alterations was also examined. Finally, the molecular pathways activated were further examined using specific inhibitors. Results Winter PM2.5 induced marked cell cycle alteration already after 3 h of exposure, represented by an increased number of cells (transient arrest) in G2. This effect was associated with an increased phosphorylation of Chk2, while no changes in p53 phosphorylation were observed at this time point. The increase in G2 was followed by a transient arrest in the metaphase/anaphase transition point (10 h), which was associated with the presence of severe mitotic spindle aberrations. The metaphase/anaphase delay was apparently followed by mitotic slippage at 24 h, resulting in an increased number of tetraploid G1 cells and cells with micronuclei (MN), and by apoptosis at 40 h. Winter PM2.5 increased the level of ROS at 2 h and DNA damage (8-oxodG, single- and double stand breaks) was detected after 3 h of exposure. The PM organic fraction caused a similar G2/M arrest and augmented ROS formation, while washed PM had no such effects. DNA adducts were detected after 24 h. Both PM-induced DNA damage and G2 arrest were inhibited by the addition of antioxidants and α-naphthoflavone, suggesting the involvement of ROS and reactive electrophilic metabolites formed via a P

  4. Caffeine-induced effects on heart rate in zebrafish embryos and possible mechanisms of action: an effective system for experiments in chemical biology.

    PubMed

    Rana, Neha; Moond, Mamta; Marthi, Amarnath; Bapatla, Swetha; Sarvepalli, Tejasudha; Chatti, Kiranam; Challa, Anil Kumar

    2010-03-01

    Zebrafish embryos are well suited as a model system to perform chemical biology experiments effectively in educational settings. We studied the effect of caffeine on heart rate (HR) and other phenotypes of zebrafish embryos using visual microscopy and simple imaging. Acute treatment with millimolar concentrations of caffeine in embryo medium caused a dose-dependent decrease in HR in 2-3-day-old zebrafish embryos, ultimately resulting in complete HR cessation. A characteristic pattern of decrease in HR was observed, with an initial acute drop in HR and a period of stabilization followed by complete cessation. The effects of caffeine were not reversed by cotreatment with ruthenium red and adenosine, agents known to be antagonistic to caffeine, or by changes in calcium concentration in embryo medium. Apparent cardiac arrhythmia and a typical kinking effect in the trunk/tail region were also observed because of caffeine treatment. Our results, taken together with previous reports, raise the possibility that caffeine exerts its effects on embryonic HR of zebrafish by inhibition of ether-a-go-go potassium channels. However, further experimentation is required to dissect the molecular basis of caffeine action. We demonstrate that such experiments can be used to explore the effect of small molecules, such as caffeine, on cardiovascular phenotypes and to encourage experimental design in chemical biology.

  5. Evidence that glucose metabolism is decreased in the cerebrum of aged female senescence-accelerated mouse; possible involvement of a low hexokinase activity.

    PubMed

    Kurokawa, T; Sato, E; Inoue, A; Ishibashi, S

    1996-08-16

    d-Glucose metabolism in cerebral cells prepared from aged senescence-accelerated mouse (SAM), was investigated in consideration of a sex difference. The production of 14CO2 from 6-[14C]D-glucose was reduced in female senescence-accelerated-prone mouse (SAMP) 8, a prone substrain, in comparison with that in female senescence-accelerated-resistant mouse (SAMR) 2, a control substrain, whereas there was no difference in males. The 2-deoxy-D-glucose uptake into cerebral cells from female SAMP8 was also lower than that of control mice. But, the 3-O-methyl-D-glucose uptake in SAMP8 was higher than that of SAMR2, suggesting that the low hexokinase activity was involved in the decreased glucose metabolism in cerebrum of SAMP8 females irrespective of glucose transporter. This possibility was supported by the finding that the contents of glucose 6-phosphate produced from glucose added to cerebral cells from SAMP8 was lower than that in ICR mice. PMID:8873128

  6. Possible Involvement of Nitric Oxide Modulatory Mechanisms in the Neuroprotective Effect of Centella asiatica Against Sleep Deprivation Induced Anxiety Like Behaviour, Oxidative Damage and Neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Chanana, Priyanka; Kumar, Anil

    2016-04-01

    Sleep deprivation (SD) is an experience of inadequate or poor quality of sleep that may produce significant alterations in multiple neural systems. Centella asiatica (CA) is a psychoactive medicinal herb with immense therapeutic potential. The present study was designed to explore the possible nitric oxide (NO) modulatory mechanism in the neuroprotective effect of CA against SD induced anxiety like behaviour, oxidative damage and neuroinflammation. Male laca mice were sleep deprived for 72 h, and CA (150 and 300 mg/kg) was administered alone and in combination with NO modulators for 8 days, starting five days before 72-h SD exposure. Various behavioural (locomotor activity, elevated plus maze) and biochemical (lipid peroxidation, reduced glutathione, catalase, nitrite levels and superoxide dismutase activity), neuroinflammation marker (TNF-alpha) were assessed subsequently. CA (150 and 300 mg/kg) treatment for 8 days significantly improved locomotor activity, anti-anxiety like effect and attenuated oxidative damage and TNF α level as compared to sleep-deprived 72-h group. Also while the neuroprotective effect of CA was increased by NO antagonists, it was diminished by NO agonists. The present study suggests that NO modulatory mechanism could be involved in the protective effect of CA against SD-induced anxiety-like behaviour, oxidative damage and neuroinflammation in mice.

  7. Transcriptional profiling analysis of Spodoptera litura larvae challenged with Vip3Aa toxin and possible involvement of trypsin in the toxin activation

    PubMed Central

    Song, Feifei; Chen, Chen; Wu, Songqing; Shao, Ensi; Li, Mengnan; Guan, Xiong; Huang, Zhipeng

    2016-01-01

    Vip proteins, a new group of insecticidal toxins produced by Bacillus thuringiensis, are effective against specific pests including Spodoptera litura. Here, we report construction of a transcriptome database of S. litura by de novo assembly along with detection of the transcriptional response of S. litura larvae to Vip3Aa toxin. In total, 56,498 unigenes with an N50 value of 1,853 bp were obtained. Results of transcriptome abundance showed that Vip3Aa toxin provoked a wide transcriptional response of the S. litura midgut. The differentially expressed genes were enriched for immunity-related, metabolic-related and Bt-related genes. Twenty-nine immunity-related genes, 102 metabolic-related genes and 62 Bt-related genes with differential expression were found. On the basis of transcriptional profiling analysis, we focus on the functional validation of trypsin which potentially participated in the activation of Vip3Aa protoxin. Zymogram analysis indicated that the presence of many proteases, including trypsin, in S. litura larvae midgut. Results of enzymolysis in vitro of Vip3Aa by trypsin, and bioassay and histopathology of the trypsin-digested Vip3Aa toxin showed that trypsin was possibly involved in the Vip3Aa activation. This study provides a transcriptome foundation for the identification and functional validation of the differentially expressed genes in an agricultural important pest, S. litura. PMID:27025647

  8. Possible Involvement of Nitric Oxide Modulatory Mechanisms in the Neuroprotective Effect of Centella asiatica Against Sleep Deprivation Induced Anxiety Like Behaviour, Oxidative Damage and Neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Chanana, Priyanka; Kumar, Anil

    2016-04-01

    Sleep deprivation (SD) is an experience of inadequate or poor quality of sleep that may produce significant alterations in multiple neural systems. Centella asiatica (CA) is a psychoactive medicinal herb with immense therapeutic potential. The present study was designed to explore the possible nitric oxide (NO) modulatory mechanism in the neuroprotective effect of CA against SD induced anxiety like behaviour, oxidative damage and neuroinflammation. Male laca mice were sleep deprived for 72 h, and CA (150 and 300 mg/kg) was administered alone and in combination with NO modulators for 8 days, starting five days before 72-h SD exposure. Various behavioural (locomotor activity, elevated plus maze) and biochemical (lipid peroxidation, reduced glutathione, catalase, nitrite levels and superoxide dismutase activity), neuroinflammation marker (TNF-alpha) were assessed subsequently. CA (150 and 300 mg/kg) treatment for 8 days significantly improved locomotor activity, anti-anxiety like effect and attenuated oxidative damage and TNF α level as compared to sleep-deprived 72-h group. Also while the neuroprotective effect of CA was increased by NO antagonists, it was diminished by NO agonists. The present study suggests that NO modulatory mechanism could be involved in the protective effect of CA against SD-induced anxiety-like behaviour, oxidative damage and neuroinflammation in mice. PMID:26848139

  9. Anatomy of the antennal dorsal organ in female of Neodryinus typhlocybae (Hymenoptera: Dryinidae): A peculiar sensory structure possibly involved in perception of host vibration.

    PubMed

    Riolo, Paola; Isidoro, Nunzio; Ruschioni, Sara; Minuz, Roxana L; Bin, Ferdinando; Romani, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Neodryinus typhlocybae (Hymenoptera: Dryinidae) is a natural enemy of the planthopper Metcalfa pruinosa, which was introduced from North America into Europe and has become established in various regions as a pest species. Vibrational signals play a crucial role in the communication of M. pruinosa, which appears to be exploited by N. typhlocybae. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy have shown that the antennae of N. typhlocybae females have peculiar and complex sensory structures: deep longitudinal grooves that house long sensilla trichodea, termed here "Antennal Dorsal Organs." Such structures were not present on male antennae. These sensilla extend for the length of the grooves, without contact with the groove cuticle. Their hair shaft is empty and aporous, and inserted into a specialized socket, underneath which there is a cuticular ampulla-like chamber. Each sensillum is associated with two sensory neurons: one terminates at the proximal end of the dendritic sheath; the other continues into the sensillum sinus and is enclosed in the dendritic sheath. This second sensory neuron then enters the ampulla-like chamber through the circular opening, and then terminates with a conspicuous tubular body at the shaft base. The possible involvement of this peculiar structure in the context of host recognition mechanism is discussed.

  10. β-cyclodextrin complex containing Lippia grata leaf essential oil reduces orofacial nociception in mice - evidence of possible involvement of descending inhibitory pain modulation pathway.

    PubMed

    Siqueira-Lima, Pollyana S; Araújo, Adriano A S; Lucchese, Angélica M; Quintans, Jullyana S S; Menezes, Paula P; Alves, Péricles B; de Lucca Júnior, Waldecy; Santos, Marcio R V; Bonjardim, Leonardo R; Quintans-Júnior, Lucindo J

    2014-02-01

    The treatment of orofacial pain remains a major challenge for modern medicine. Thus, we prepared and physicochemically characterized a new β-cyclodextrin complex containing Lippia grata leaf essential oil (β-CD/EO) to investigate their possible antinociceptive activity in animal models of orofacial pain. The results of Differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) and Thermogravimetry/derivative thermogravimetry (TG/DTG) showed that the products prepared by Slurry complexation (SC) method were able to incorporate greater amounts of EO. In the X-ray diffractogram, it was shown that complex between EO and β-CD was formed. Male Swiss mice were pre-treated with β-CD/EO (6, 12 or 24 mg/kg, per os, gavage, p.o.), morphine (5 mg/kg, i.p.) or vehicle (distilled water, p.o.) 1 hr before treatment with formalin (20 μL, 2%), capsaicin (20 μL, 2.5 μg) or glutamate (40 μL, 25 μM) into the right upper lip. Our results demonstrated that p.o. treatment with β-CD/EO was significantly (p < 0.05 or p < 0.001) capable of reducing the nociceptive face-rubbing behaviour in both phases of the formalin test. β-CD/EO-treated mice were also significantly (p < 0.05 or p < 0.001) protected against nociception induced by capsaicin and glutamate. For the action in the central nervous system (CNS), ninety minutes after the treatment, the mice were perfused, the brains collected, crioprotected, cut in a criostate and submitted to an immunofluorescence protocol for Fos protein. The immunofluorescence protocol demonstrated that the β-CD/EO significantly activated (p < 0.05; p < 0.01 or p < 0.001) the motor cortex, the Locus ceruleus, the nucleus raphe magnus and the periaqueductal gray of the CNS. These effects apparently did not alter, in tested doses, the motor coordination of mice in the rota-rod test. Our results proposed that β-CD/EO might present an important draft of drug to the study of new compounds for the treatment of orofacial pain.

  11. Chromosomal locations and modes of action of genes of the retinoid (vitamin A) system support their involvement in the etiology of schizophrenia

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, A.B.

    1995-08-14

    Vitamin A (retinoid), an essential nutrient for fetal and subsequent mammalian development, is involved in gene expression, cell differentiation, proliferation, migration, and death. Retinoic acid (RA) the morphogenic derivative of vitamin A is highly teratogenic. In humans retinoid excess or deficit can result in brain anomalies and psychosis. This review discusses chromosomal loci of genes that control the retinoid cascade in relation to some candidate genes in schizophrenia. The paper relates the knowledge about the transport, delivery, and action of retinoids to what is presently known about the pathology of schizophrenia, with particular reference to the dopamine hypothesis, neurotransmitters, the glutamate hypothesis, neurotransmitters, the glutamate hypothesis, retinitis pigmentosa, dermatologic disorders, and craniofacial anomalies. 201 refs., 1 tab.

  12. Community-Involved Learning to Expand Possibilities for Vulnerable Children: A Critical Communicative, Sen's Capability, and Action Research Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Kyung Hi

    2014-01-01

    This research, based on a case study of vulnerable children in Korea, used a mixed methods transformative approach to explore strategies to support and help disadvantaged children. The methodological approach includes three phases: a mixed methods contextual analysis, a qualitative dominant analysis based on Sen's capability approach and…

  13. Profiling of microRNAs under wound treatment in Aquilaria sinensis to identify possible microRNAs involved in agarwood formation.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhi-Hui; Yang, Yun; Zhang, Zheng; Zhao, Wen-Ting; Meng, Hui; Jin, Yue; Huang, Jun-Qing; Xu, Yan-Hong; Zhao, Li-Zi; Liu, Juan; Wei, Jian-He

    2014-01-01

    Agarwood, a kind of highly valued non-timber product across Asia, is formed only when its resource trees--the endangered genus Aquilaria are wounded or infected by some microbes. To promote the efficiency of agarwood production and protect the wild resource of Aquilaria species, we urgently need to reveal the regulation mechanism of agarwood formation. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a group of gene expression regulators with overwhelming effects on a large spectrum of biological processes. However, their roles in agarwood formation remain unknown. This work aimed at identifying possible miRNAs involved in the wound induced agarwood formation. In this study, the high-throughput sequencing was adopted to identify miRNAs and monitor their expression under wound treatment in the stems of A. sinensis. The miR171, miR390, miR394, miR2111, and miR3954 families remained at the reduced level two days after the treatment. 131 homologous miRNAs in the 0.5 h library showed over three-fold variation of read number compared with the control library, of which 12 exhibiting strong expression alterations were further confirmed by real-time quantitative PCR. Target prediction and annotation of the miRNAs demonstrated that the binding, metabolic process, catalytic activity, and cellular process are the most common functions of the predicted targets of these newly identified miRNAs in A.sinensis. The cleaveage sites of three newly predicted targets were verified by 5'RACE. PMID:24795531

  14. Profiling of MicroRNAs under Wound Treatment in Aquilaria sinensis to Identify Possible MicroRNAs Involved in Agarwood Formation

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Zhi-Hui; Yang, Yun; Zhang, Zheng; Zhao, Wen-Ting; Meng, Hui; Jin, Yue; Huang, Jun-Qing; Xu, Yan-Hong; Zhao, Li-Zi; Liu, Juan; Wei, Jian-He

    2014-01-01

    Agarwood, a kind of highly valued non-timber product across Asia, is formed only when its resource trees -- the endangered genus Aquilaria are wounded or infected by some microbes. To promote the efficiency of agarwood production and protect the wild resource of Aquilaria species, we urgently need to reveal the regulation mechanism of agarwood formation. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a group of gene expression regulators with overwhelming effects on a large spectrum of biological processes. However, their roles in agarwood formation remain unknown. This work aimed at identifying possible miRNAs involved in the wound induced agarwood formation. In this study, the high-throughput sequencing was adopted to identify miRNAs and monitor their expression under wound treatment in the stems of A. sinensis. The miR171, miR390, miR394, miR2111, and miR3954 families remained at the reduced level two days after the treatment. 131 homologous miRNAs in the 0.5 h library showed over three-fold variation of read number compared with the control library, of which 12 exhibiting strong expression alterations were further confirmed by real-time quantitative PCR. Target prediction and annotation of the miRNAs demonstrated that the binding, metabolic process, catalytic activity, and cellular process are the most common functions of the predicted targets of these newly identified miRNAs in A.sinensis. The cleaveage sites of three newly predicted targets were verified by 5'RACE. PMID:24795531

  15. Losartan attenuates chronic cigarette smoke exposure-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension in rats: Possible involvement of angiotensin-converting enzyme-2

    SciTech Connect

    Han Suxia; He Guangming; Wang Tao; Chen Lei; Ning Yunye; Luo Feng; An Jin; Yang Ting; Dong Jiajia; Liao Zenglin; Xu Dan; Wen Fuqiang

    2010-05-15

    Chronic cigarette smoking induces pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) by largely unknown mechanisms. Renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is known to function in the development of PAH. Losartan, a specific angiotensin II receptor antagonist, is a well-known antihypertensive drug with a potential role in regulating angiotensin-converting enzyme-2 (ACE2), a recently found regulator of RAS. To determine the effect of losartan on smoke-induced PAH and its possible mechanism, rats were daily exposed to cigarette smoke for 6 months in the absence and in the presence of losartan. Elevated right ventricular systolic pressure (RVSP), thickened wall of pulmonary arteries with apparent medial hypertrophy along with increased angiotensin II (Ang II) and decreased ACE2 levels were observed in smoke-exposed-only rats. Losartan administration ameliorated pulmonary vascular remodeling, inhibited the smoke-induced RVSP and Ang II elevation and partially reversed the ACE2 decrease in rat lungs. In cultured primary pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) from 3- and 6-month smoke-exposed rats, ACE2 levels were significantly lower than in those from the control rats. Moreover, PASMCs from 6-month exposed rats proliferated more rapidly than those from 3-month exposed or control rats, and cells grew even more rapidly in the presence of DX600, an ACE2 inhibitor. Consistent with the in vivo study, in vitro losartan pretreatment also inhibited cigarette smoke extract (CSE)-induced cell proliferation and ACE2 reduction in rat PASMCs. The results suggest that losartan may be therapeutically useful in the chronic smoking-induced pulmonary vascular remodeling and PAH and ACE2 may be involved as part of its mechanism. Our study might provide insight into the development of new therapeutic interventions for PAH smokers.

  16. The possible involvement of salicylic acid and hydrogen peroxide in the systemic promotion of phenolic biosynthesis in clover roots colonized by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Honghui; Zhang, Ruiqin; Chen, Weili; Gu, Zhenhong; Xie, Xiaolin; Zhao, Haiquan; Yao, Qing

    2015-04-15

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal (AMF) colonization can induce both the local and the systemic increase in phenolic accumulation in hosts. However, the signaling molecules responsible for the systemic induction is still unclear. In this study, a split-root rhizobox system was designed to explore these molecules, with one half of clover (Trifolium repense) roots colonized by AMF, Funneliformis mosseae (formerly known as Glomus mosseae), and the other not (NM/M). Plants with two halves both (M/M) or neither (NM/NM) inoculated were also established for comparison. The contents of phenols and the accumulation of salicylic acid (SA), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and nitric oxide (NO) in roots were monitored, the activities of L-phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) and nitric oxide synthase (NOS) in roots were assayed, and the expressions of pal and chs (gene encoding chalcone synthase) genes in roots were also quantified using qRT-PCR. Results indicated that when phenolic content in NM/NM plants was lower than that in M/M plants, AMF colonization systemically induced the increase in phenolic content in NM/M plants. Similarly, the accumulations of SA and H2O2 were increased by AMF both locally and systemically, while that of NO was only increased locally. Moreover, enzyme assay and qRT-PCR were in accordance with these results. These data suggest that AMF colonization can systemically increase the phenolic biosynthesis, and SA and H2O2 are possibly the signaling molecules involved. The role of MeSA, a signaling molecule capable of long distance transport in this process, is also discussed.

  17. Screening of UV-B-induced genes from apple peels by SSH: possible involvement of MdCOP1-mediated signaling cascade genes in anthocyanin accumulation.

    PubMed

    Peng, Ting; Saito, Takanori; Honda, Chikako; Ban, Yusuke; Kondo, Satoru; Liu, Ji-Hong; Hatsuyama, Yoshimichi; Moriguchi, Takaya

    2013-07-01

    Suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) was employed to identify candidate genes involved in red coloration in apple peel with the ultraviolet (UV)-B-treated 'Mutsu'. After reverse Northern blotting verification, nearly 80 clones were successfully sequenced. Large portions of the expressed sequence tags (ESTs) are well characterized anthocyanin biosynthesis-related genes, such as chalcone synthase (11A5), flavonol synthase (12F3), anthocyanidin synthase (11H5) and UDP-glycosyl transferase (14A12) whose presence proved the success of SSH. Eight ESTs were selected for quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis and their expressions were all elevated in 'Induction', further confirming the reliability of the SSH library. One EST, 11F4 (CONSTITUTIVE PHOTOMORPHOGENIC 1: COP1) with putative function in light signal relay was further analyzed in 'Mutsu' and 'Tsugaru', along with MdHY5 (ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL 5: the downstream target of COP1), MdMYB22 (a possible flavonol-specific activator under the regulation of HY5, belonging to the SG7/PRODUCTION OF FLAVONOL GLYCOSIDES family) and MdMYBA. Results showed that MdCOP1, MdHY5, MdMYB22 and MdMYBA were all UV-B inducible genes and anthocyanin accumulation occurred after their increased expressions. Moreover, their expressions and anthocyanin content were enhanced under UV-B plus 17°C treatment. The presence of G box, a known consensus binding site of HY5, in the MdMYBA promoter region implicated that it could be regulated by MdHY5, which was verified by the result of the yeast one-hybrid analysis. Our data suggested that UV-B irradiation would induce the utmost upstream light signaling factor, MdCOP1, which activates MdHY5 signaling by binding to the promoter regions of MdMYBs, and finally leads to the red coloration of apple peels.

  18. Possible involvement of cytochrome c release and sequential activation of caspases in ceramide-induced apoptosis in SK-N-MC cells.

    PubMed

    Ito, A; Uehara, T; Tokumitsu, A; Okuma, Y; Nomura, Y

    1999-12-01

    Ceramide is characterized as a second messenger of apoptosis induced by various agents such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF-alpha), Fas ligand, hydrogen peroxide, heat shock and ionizing radiation. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of ceramide-induced apoptosis using a human neuroblastoma cell line, SK-N-MC. N-Acetyl-sphingosine (C2-ceramide), a cell-permeable ceramide analogue, was able to induce apoptosis in SK-N-MC cells as estimated by DNA fragmentation and chromatin condensation. C2-ceramide-induced DNA fragmentation was blocked by caspase inhibitor (Z-Asp-CH(2)-DCB). An increase in caspase-3 (CPP32)-like protease activity was evident during C2-ceramide-induced apoptosis, suggesting that caspases are involved in this apoptosis. Moreover, enzymatic cleavage of VDVAD-AFC and LEHD-AFC (specific substrates for caspase-2 and -9, respectively) was increased by treatment with C2-ceramide. To elucidate which types of caspase are activated in C2-ceramide-treated cells, we performed Western blot analysis using antibodies against each isoform. Both proforms of caspase-2 and -3 were decreased in response to C2-ceramide in a time-dependent manner. Mitochondrial cytochrome c is also time-dependently released into the cytosol in response to treatment with C2-ceramide. Addition of cytochrome c into the S-100 fractions prepared from SK-N-MC cells could activate caspase-2 in cell-free systems. These results suggest the possibility that cytochrome c released to the cytosol can activate caspases (caspase-9, -3, and -2) during C2-ceramide-induced apoptosis of SK-N-MC cells.

  19. Eugenia uniflora L. Essential Oil as a Potential Anti-Leishmania Agent: Effects on Leishmania amazonensis and Possible Mechanisms of Action

    PubMed Central

    Amorim, Layane Valéria; de Oliveira, Jamylla Mirck Guerra; Dias, Clarice Noleto; Moraes, Denise Fernandes Coutinho; Andrade, Eloisa Helena de Aguiar; Maia, Jose Guilherme Soares; Carneiro, Sabrina Maria Portela; Carvalho, Fernando Aécio de Amorim

    2013-01-01

    Eugenia uniflora L. is a member of the Myrtaceae family and is commonly known as Brazilian cherry tree. In this study, we evaluated the chemical composition of Eugenia uniflora L. essential oil (EuEO) by using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and assessed its anti-Leishmania activity. We also explored the potential mechanisms of action and cytotoxicity of EuEO. Thirty-two compounds were identified, which constituted 92.65% of the total oil composition. The most abundant components were sesquiterpenes (91.92%), with curzerene (47.3%), γ-elemene (14.25%), and trans-β-elemenone (10.4%) being the major constituents. The bioactivity shown by EuEO against promastigotes (IC50, 3.04 μg·mL−1) and amastigotes (IC50, 1.92 μg·mL−1) suggested significant anti-Leishmania activity. In the cytotoxicity determination, EuEO was 20 times more toxic to amastigotes than to macrophages. Hemolytic activity was 63.22% at the highest concentration tested (400 μg·mL−1); however, there appeared to be no toxicity at 50 μg·mL−1. While the data show that EuEO activity is not mediated by nitric oxide production, they do suggest that macrophage activation may be involved in EuEO anti-Leishmania activity, as evidenced by increases in both the phagocytic capacity and the lysosomal activity. More studies are needed to determine in vivo activity as well as additional mechanisms of the anti-Leishmania activity. PMID:23533469

  20. [Possible mechanism of the selective action of the inhibitors of glycolysis in the endothelial cells and the human carcinoma cells in the culture].

    PubMed

    Giliano, N Y; Bondarev, G N; Konevega, L V; Noskin, L A; Zhurishkina, E V; Alchinova, I B

    2014-01-01

    It is known that the production of energy and synthesis of macromolecules in cancer cells depend on the glucose metabolism to a greater extent than in non-tumor. In this paper we carry out a comparative study of the effectiveness of the two modifiers glycolysis 2 - D-deoxyglucose (2-DG) and dichloroacetate (DCA) in the induction of the cell death, changes in the cell cycle progression and in the alteration of the intracellular ROS levels in endothelial cells (line ECV304) and human carcinoma cells (line HeLa G-63) in order to identify cause-effect relations between these events. It has been shown that inhibition of the various stages of the glycolysis result in blocking cells in C2/M phase of the cell cycle and the induction of the cell death. This effect was record for HeLa G-63 cells only. DCA is inhibitor of the pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase and 2-DG is inhibitor of the glucose transport and glycosylation induced selective dose-dependent cytotoxic effect in HeLa G-63 cells. The increase of intracellular levels of the oxygen radicals induced by DCA in the cells HeLa G-63 suggests that the cytotoxic effect of the DCA is mediated by activation of the mitochondrial functions. The cytotoxic effect of 2-DG depend on the level of glucose in the culture medium, therefore we suggest that not only the oxidative stress, but and the energy depletion involved in selective response of the cancer cells on the actions of the inhibitors of glycolysis.

  1. A possible mechanism of action of plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) strain Bacillus pumilus WP8 via regulation of soil bacterial community structure.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yijun; Shen, Min; Wang, Huanli; Zhao, Qingxin

    2013-01-01

    According to the traditional view, establishment and maintenance of critical population densities in the rhizosphere was the premise of PGPR to exert growth-promoting effects. In light of the facts that soil bacterial community structures can be changed by some PGPR strains including Bacillus pumilus WP8, we hypothesize that regulation of soil bacterial community structure is one of the plant growth-promoting mechanisms of B. pumilus WP8, rather than depending on high-density cells in soil. In this study, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) was performed to evaluate the relationship between changes in soil bacterial community structure and growth-promoting effect on the seedling growth of fava beans (Vicia faba L.) during three successive cultivations. We found that B. pumilus WP8 lacks capacity to reproduce in large enough numbers to survive in bulk soil more than 40 days, yet the bacterial community structures were gradually influenced by inoculation of WP8, especially on dominant populations. Despite WP8 being short-lived, it confers the ability of steadily promoting fava bean seedling growth on soil during the whole growing period for at least 90 days. Pseudomonas chlororaphis RA6, another tested PGPR strain, exists in large numbers for at least 60 days but less than 90 days, whilst giving rise to slight influence on bacterial community structure. In addition, along with the extinction of RA6 cells in bulk soils, the effect of growth promotion disappeared simultaneously. Furthermore, the increment of soil catalase activity from WP8 treatment implied the ability to stimulate soil microbial activity, which may be the reason why the dominant population changed and increased as time passed. Our study suggests that regulation of treated soil bacterial community structure may be another possible action mechanism.

  2. A possible mechanism of action of plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) strain Bacillus pumilus WP8 via regulation of soil bacterial community structure.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yijun; Shen, Min; Wang, Huanli; Zhao, Qingxin

    2013-01-01

    According to the traditional view, establishment and maintenance of critical population densities in the rhizosphere was the premise of PGPR to exert growth-promoting effects. In light of the facts that soil bacterial community structures can be changed by some PGPR strains including Bacillus pumilus WP8, we hypothesize that regulation of soil bacterial community structure is one of the plant growth-promoting mechanisms of B. pumilus WP8, rather than depending on high-density cells in soil. In this study, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) was performed to evaluate the relationship between changes in soil bacterial community structure and growth-promoting effect on the seedling growth of fava beans (Vicia faba L.) during three successive cultivations. We found that B. pumilus WP8 lacks capacity to reproduce in large enough numbers to survive in bulk soil more than 40 days, yet the bacterial community structures were gradually influenced by inoculation of WP8, especially on dominant populations. Despite WP8 being short-lived, it confers the ability of steadily promoting fava bean seedling growth on soil during the whole growing period for at least 90 days. Pseudomonas chlororaphis RA6, another tested PGPR strain, exists in large numbers for at least 60 days but less than 90 days, whilst giving rise to slight influence on bacterial community structure. In addition, along with the extinction of RA6 cells in bulk soils, the effect of growth promotion disappeared simultaneously. Furthermore, the increment of soil catalase activity from WP8 treatment implied the ability to stimulate soil microbial activity, which may be the reason why the dominant population changed and increased as time passed. Our study suggests that regulation of treated soil bacterial community structure may be another possible action mechanism. PMID:24005176

  3. Possible Mechanism of Action of the Antiallergic Effect of an Aqueous Extract of Heliotropium indicum L. in Ovalbumin-Induced Allergic Conjunctivitis

    PubMed Central

    Kyei, Samuel; Koffuor, George Asumeng; Ramkissoon, Paul; Abokyi, Samuel; Wiredu, Eric Addo

    2015-01-01

    Heliotropium indicum is used traditionally as a remedy for conjunctivitis in Ghana. This study therefore evaluated the antiallergic potential of an aqueous whole plant extract of Heliotropium indicum (HIE) in ovalbumin-induced allergic conjunctivitis and attempted to predict its mode of action. Clinical scores for allergic conjunctivitis induced by intraperitoneal ovalbumin sensitization (100 : 10 μg OVA/Al(OH)3 in phosphate-buffered saline [PBS]) and topical conjunctival challenge (1.5 mg OVA in 10 μL PBS) in Dunkin-Hartley guinea pigs were estimated after a week's daily treatment with 30–300 mg kg−1 HIE, 30 mg kg−1 prednisolone, 10 mg kg−1 chlorpheniramine, or 10 mL kg−1 PBS. Ovalbumin-specific IgG and IgE and total IgE in serum were estimated using Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay. Histopathological assessment of the exenterated conjunctivae was also performed. The 30 and 300 mg kg−1 HIE treatment resulted in a significantly (p ≤ 0.001) low clinical score of allergic conjunctivitis. Ovalbumin-specific IgG and IgE as well as total serum IgE also decreased significantly (p ≤ 0.01–0.001). The conjunctival tissue in HIE treated guinea pigs had mild mononuclear infiltration compared to the PBS-treated ones, which had intense conjunctival tissue inflammatory infiltration. HIE exhibited antiallergic effect possibly by immunomodulation or immunosuppression. PMID:26681960

  4. Involving migrants in the development of guidelines for communication in cross-cultural general practice consultations: a participatory learning and action research project

    PubMed Central

    O'Reilly-de Brún, Mary; MacFarlane, Anne; de Brún, Tomas; Okonkwo, Ekaterina; Bonsenge Bokanga, Jean Samuel; Manuela De Almeida Silva, Maria; Ogbebor, Florence; Mierzejewska, Aga; Nnadi, Lovina; van den Muijsenbergh, Maria; van Weel-Baumgarten, Evelyn; van Weel, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this research was to involve migrants and other key stakeholders in a participatory dialogue to develop a guideline for enhancing communication in cross-cultural general practice consultations. In this paper, we focus on findings about the use of formal versus informal interpreters because dialogues about these issues emerged as central to the identification of recommendations for best practice. Design This qualitative case study involved a Participatory Learning and Action (PLA) research methodology. Participants The sample comprised 80 stakeholders: 51 from migrant communities; 15 general practitioners (GPs) and general practice staff; 7 established migrants as peer researchers; 5 formal, trained interpreters; and 2 service planners from the national health authority. Setting Galway, Ireland. Results There was 100% consensus across stakeholder groups that while informal interpreters have uses for migrants and general practice staff, they are not considered acceptable as best practice. There was also 100% consensus that formal interpreters who are trained and working as per a professional code of practice are acceptable as best practice. Conclusions Policymakers and service planners need to work in partnership with service providers and migrants to progress the implementation of professional, trained interpreters as a routine way of working in general practice. PMID:26391628

  5. Reducing effect of saikosaponin A, an active ingredient of Bupleurum falcatum, on alcohol self-administration in rats: Possible involvement of the GABAB receptor.

    PubMed

    Maccioni, Paola; Lorrai, Irene; Carai, Mauro A M; Riva, Antonella; Morazzoni, Paolo; Mugnaini, Claudia; Corelli, Federico; Gessa, Gian Luigi; Colombo, Giancarlo

    2016-05-16

    Recent studies demonstrated that treatment with saikosaponin A (SSA) - an active ingredient of the medicinal herb, Bupleurum falcatum L. - selectively suppressed, likely via a GABAB receptor-mediated mechanism, intravenous self-administration of morphine and cocaine in rats [Yoon et al., 2012; 2013]. The present study was designed to investigate whether the capacity of SSA to suppress morphine and cocaine self-administration extends to oral alcohol self-administration. To this end, selectively bred Sardinian alcohol-preferring (sP) rats were trained to lever-respond on a Fixed Ratio (FR) 4 (FR4) schedule of reinforcement for alcohol (15%, v/v) in daily 30-min sessions. Once responding had stabilized, rats were tested under the FR4 (measure of alcohol reinforcing properties) and Progressive Ratio (PR; measure of alcohol motivational properties) schedules of reinforcement. The possible involvement of the GABAB receptor system was investigated testing the effect of (a) pretreatment with the GABAB receptor antagonist, SCH50911, and (b) combined treatment with the positive allosteric modulator of the GABAB receptor, GS39783. Treatment with SSA (0, 0.25, 0.5, and 1mg/kg, i.p.) markedly reduced lever-responding for alcohol, amount of self-administered alcohol, and breakpoint for alcohol (defined as the lowest response requirement not achieved in the PR experiment). Pretreatment with 2mg/kg SCH50911 (i.p.) resulted in a partial blockade of the reducing effect of 0.5mg/kg SSA on lever-responding for alcohol and amount of self-administered alcohol. Combination of per se ineffective doses of GS39783 (5mg/kg, i.g.) and SSA (0.1mg/kg, i.p.) reduced lever-responding for alcohol and amount of self-administered alcohol. These results (a) extend to alcohol self-administration the capacity of SSA to suppress morphine and cocaine self-administration in rats and (b) suggest that the GABAB receptor system is likely part of the neural substrate underlying the reducing effect of SSA on

  6. Involvement of ERK1/2 signaling pathway in atrazine action on FSH-stimulated LHR and CYP19A1 expression in rat granulosa cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fa, Svetlana; Pogrmic-Majkic, Kristina; Samardzija, Dragana; Glisic, Branka; Kaisarevic, Sonja; Kovacevic, Radmila; Andric, Nebojsa

    2013-07-01

    Worldwide used herbicide atrazine is linked to reproductive dysfunction in females. In this study, we investigated the effects and the mechanism of atrazine action in the ovary using a primary culture of immature granulosa cells. In granulosa cells, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) activates both cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and extracellular-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) cascades, with cAMP pathway being more important for luteinizing hormone receptor (LHR) and aromatase (CYP19A1) mRNA expression. We report that 48 h after atrazine exposure the FSH-stimulated LHR and CYP19A1 mRNA expression and estradiol synthesis were decreased, with LHR mRNA being more sensitive to atrazine than CYP19A1 mRNA. Inadequate acquisition of LHR in the FSH-stimulated and atrazine-exposed granulosa cells renders human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) ineffective to stimulate amphiregulin (Areg), epiregulin (Ereg), and progesterone receptor (Pgr) mRNA expression, suggesting anti-ovulatory effect of atrazine. To dissect the signaling cascade involved in atrazine action in granulosa cells, we used U0126, a pharmacological inhibitor of ERK1/2. U0126 prevents atrazine-induced decrease in LHR and CYP19A1 mRNA levels and estradiol production in the FSH-stimulated granulosa cells. ERK1/2 inactivation restores the ability of hCG to induce expression of the ovulatory genes in atrazine-exposed granulosa cells. Cell-based ELISA assay revealed that atrazine does not change the FSH-stimulated ERK1/2 phosphorylation in granulosa cells. The results from this study reveal that atrazine does not affect but requires ERK1/2 phosphorylation to cause decrease in the FSH-induced LHR and CYP19A1 mRNA levels and estradiol production in immature granulosa cells, thus compromising ovulation and female fertility. - Highlights: • Atrazine inhibits estradiol production in FSH-stimulated granulosa cells. • Atrazine inhibits LHR and Cyp19a1 mRNA expression in FSH-stimulated granulosa cells. • Atrazine

  7. Nodes-and-connections RNAi knockdown screening: identification of a signaling molecule network involved in fulvestrant action and breast cancer prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Miyoshi, N; Wittner, B S; Shioda, K; Hitora, T; Ito, T; Ramaswamy, S; Isselbacher, K J; Sgroi, D C; Shioda, T

    2015-01-01

    Although RNA interference (RNAi) knockdown screening of cancer cell cultures is an effective approach to predict drug targets or therapeutic/prognostic biomarkers, interactions among identified targets often remain obscure. Here, we introduce the nodes-and-connections RNAi knockdown screening that generates a map of target interactions through systematic iterations of in silico prediction of targets and their experimental validation. An initial RNAi knockdown screening of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells targeting 6560 proteins identified four signaling molecules required for their fulvestrant-induced apoptosis. Signaling molecules physically or functionally interacting with these four primary node targets were computationally predicted and experimentally validated, resulting in identification of four second-generation nodes. Three rounds of further iterations of the prediction–validation cycle generated third, fourth and fifth generation of nodes, completing a 19-node interaction map that contained three predicted nodes but without experimental validation because of technical limitations. The interaction map involved all three members of the death-associated protein kinases (DAPKs) as well as their upstream and downstream signaling molecules (calmodulins and myosin light chain kinases), suggesting that DAPKs play critical roles in the cytocidal action of fulvestrant. The in silico Kaplan–Meier analysis of previously reported human breast cancer cohorts demonstrated significant prognostic predictive power for five of the experimentally validated nodes and for three of the prediction-only nodes. Immunohistochemical studies on the expression of 10 nodal proteins in human breast cancer tissues not only supported their prognostic prediction power but also provided statistically significant evidence of their synchronized expression, implying functional interactions among these nodal proteins. Thus, the Nodes-and-Connections approach to RNAi knockdown screening yields

  8. General anesthetic action at an internal protein site involving the S4-S5 cytoplasmic loop of a neuronal K(+) channel.

    PubMed

    Harris, T; Shahidullah, M; Ellingson, J S; Covarrubias, M

    2000-02-18

    The structural bases of general anesthetic action on a neuronal K(+) channel were investigated using the series of homologous 1-alkanols, electrophysiology, and mutational analysis. Domain swapping between dShaw2 (alkanol-sensitive) and hKv3.4 (alkanol-resistant) and site-directed mutagenesis demonstrated that a 13-amino acid cytoplasmic loop (S4-S5) determines the selective inhibition of native dShaw2 channels by 1-alkanols. The S4-S5 loop may contribute to a receptor for both 1-alkanols and the inactivation particle, because the enhanced 1-alkanol sensitivity of hKv3.4 channels hosting S4-S5 mutations correlates directly with disrupted channel inactivation. Evidence of a discrete protein site was also obtained from the analysis of the relationship between potency and alkyl chain length, which begins to level off after 1-hexanol. Rapid application to the cytoplasmic side of inside-out membrane patches shows that the interaction between dShaw2 channels and 1-alkanols equilibrates in <200 ms. By contrast, the equilibration time is >1000-fold slower when the drug is applied externally to outside-out membrane patches. The data strongly favor a mechanism of inhibition involving a discrete internal site for 1-alkanols in dShaw2 K(+) channels. A new working hypothesis proposes that 1-alkanols lock dShaw2 channels in their closed conformation by a direct interaction at a crevice formed by the S4-S5 loop.

  9. Activating transcription factor-3 induction is involved in the anti-inflammatory action of berberine in RAW264.7 murine macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Young-An

    2016-01-01

    Berberine is an isoquinoline alkaloid found in Rhizoma coptidis, and elicits anti-inflammatory effects through diverse mechanisms. Based on previous reports that activating transcription factor-3 (ATF-3) acts as a negative regulator of LPS signaling, the authors investigated the possible involvement of ATF-3 in the anti-inflammatory effects of berberine. It was found berberine concentration-dependently induced the expressions of ATF-3 at the mRNA and protein levels and concomitantly suppressed the LPS-induced productions of proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β). In addition, ATF-3 knockdown abolished the inhibitory effects of berberine on LPS-induced proinflammatory cytokine production, and prevented the berberine-induced suppression of MAPK phosphorylation, but had little effect on AMPK phosphorylation. On the other hand, the effects of berberine, that is, ATF-3 induction, proinflammatory cytokine inhibition, and MAPK inactivation, were prevented by AMPK knockdown, suggesting ATF-3 induction occurs downstream of AMPK activation. The in vivo administration of berberine to mice with LPS-induced endotoxemia increased ATF-3 expression and AMPK phosphorylation in spleen and lung tissues, and concomitantly reduced the plasma and tissue levels of proinflammatory cytokines. These results suggest berberine has an anti-inflammatory effect on macrophages and that this effect is attributable, at least in part, to pathways involving AMPK activation and ATF-3 induction. PMID:27382358

  10. Activating transcription factor-3 induction is involved in the anti-inflammatory action of berberine in RAW264.7 murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Bae, Young-An; Cheon, Hyae Gyeong

    2016-07-01

    Berberine is an isoquinoline alkaloid found in Rhizoma coptidis, and elicits anti-inflammatory effects through diverse mechanisms. Based on previous reports that activating transcription factor-3 (ATF-3) acts as a negative regulator of LPS signaling, the authors investigated the possible involvement of ATF-3 in the anti-inflammatory effects of berberine. It was found berberine concentration-dependently induced the expressions of ATF-3 at the mRNA and protein levels and concomitantly suppressed the LPS-induced productions of proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β). In addition, ATF-3 knockdown abolished the inhibitory effects of berberine on LPS-induced proinflammatory cytokine production, and prevented the berberine-induced suppression of MAPK phosphorylation, but had little effect on AMPK phosphorylation. On the other hand, the effects of berberine, that is, ATF-3 induction, proinflammatory cytokine inhibition, and MAPK inactivation, were prevented by AMPK knockdown, suggesting ATF-3 induction occurs downstream of AMPK activation. The in vivo administration of berberine to mice with LPS-induced endotoxemia increased ATF-3 expression and AMPK phosphorylation in spleen and lung tissues, and concomitantly reduced the plasma and tissue levels of proinflammatory cytokines. These results suggest berberine has an anti-inflammatory effect on macrophages and that this effect is attributable, at least in part, to pathways involving AMPK activation and ATF-3 induction. PMID:27382358

  11. The Global Possible: Resources, Development, and the New Century. The Statement and Action Agenda of an International Conference (Washington, D.C., May 2-5, 1984).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World Resources Inst., Washington, DC.

    The relationships between earth's resources and the human future and the challenges of maintaining a sustainable environment were probed at an international conference sponsored by the World Resources Institute. A synthesis of the conference's reports, perspectives, and plans for action are presented in this document. The position supported by the…

  12. The involvement of oxidative stress in the mechanisms of damaging cadmium action in bone tissue: A study in a rat model of moderate and relatively high human exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Brzoska, Malgorzata M. Rogalska, Joanna; Kupraszewicz, Elzbieta

    2011-02-01

    It was investigated whether cadmium (Cd) may induce oxidative stress in the bone tissue in vivo and in this way contribute to skeleton damage. Total antioxidative status (TAS), antioxidative enzymes (glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase, catalase), total oxidative status (TOS), hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}), lipid peroxides (LPO), total thiol groups (TSH) and protein carbonyl groups (PC) as well as Cd in the bone tissue at the distal femoral epiphysis and femoral diaphysis of the male rats that received drinking water containing 0, 5, or 50 mg Cd/l for 6 months were measured. Cd, depending on the level of exposure and bone location, decreased the bone antioxidative capacity and enhanced its oxidative status resulting in oxidative stress and oxidative protein and/or lipid modification. The treatment with 5 and 50 mg Cd/l decreased TAS and activities of antioxidative enzymes as well as increased TOS and concentrations of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and PC at the distal femur. Moreover, at the higher exposure, the concentration of LPO increased and that of TSH decreased. The Cd-induced changes in the oxidative/antioxidative balance of the femoral diaphysis, abundant in cortical bone, were less advanced than at the distal femur, where trabecular bone predominates. The results provide evidence that, even moderate, exposure to Cd induces oxidative stress and oxidative modifications in the bone tissue. Numerous correlations noted between the indices of oxidative/antioxidative bone status, and Cd accumulation in the bone tissue as well as indices of bone turnover and bone mineral status, recently reported by us (Toxicology 2007, 237, 89-103) in these rats, allow for the hypothesis that oxidative stress is involved in the mechanisms of damaging Cd action in the skeleton. The paper is the first report from an in vivo study indicating that Cd may affect bone tissue through disorders in its oxidative/antioxidative balance resulting in oxidative stress.

  13. Antitumor action of curcumin in human papillomavirus associated cells involves downregulation of viral oncogenes, prevention of NFkB and AP-1 translocation, and modulation of apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Divya, Chandrasekhar S; Pillai, M Radhakrishna

    2006-05-01

    Curcumin (diferuloyl methane), the major yellow pigment from the rhizomes of turmeric (Curcuma longa Linn), has anticancer properties. Infection with high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPV) leads to development of cervical carcinoma, predominantly through the action of viral oncoproteins E6 and E7. The present study aims at analyzing the antitumor and antiviral properties of curcumin, on HPV associated cervical cancer cells. Our findings indicate curcumin to be cytotoxic to cervical cancer cells in a concentration-dependent and time-dependent manner. The cytotoxic activity was selectively more in HPV16 and HPV18 infected cells compared to non-HPV infected cells. Balance between tumor cell proliferation and spontaneous cell death via apoptosis had an important role in regulation of tumor cell growth. Curcumin-induced apoptosis in cervical cancer cells. Morphological hallmarks of apoptosis such as nuclear fragmentation and internucleosomal fragmentation of DNA were observed. Curcumin also selectively inhibited expression of viral oncogenes E6 and E7, evident from RT-PCR and Western blotting data. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay revealed that activation of NFkappaB-induced by TNFalpha is down regulated by curcumin. Curcumin blocked IkBalpha phosphorylation and degradation, leading to abrogation of NFkappaB activation. Curcumin also down regulated the expression of COX-2, a gene regulated by NFkappaB. Binding of AP-1, an indispensable component for efficient epithelial tissue-specific gene expression of HPV was also selectively down regulated by curcumin. These results provide attractive data for the possible use of curcumin in the management of HPV associated tumors. PMID:16526022

  14. Identification of functional FKB protein in Echinococcus granulosus: its involvement in the protoscolicidal action of rapamycin derivates and in calcium homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Cumino, Andrea C; Lamenza, Pamela; Denegri, Guillermo M

    2010-05-01

    FK506 (tacrolimus) and polyketide macrolides such as rapamycin and its derivates bind to FK506-binding proteins (FKBPs). These proteins display a peptidyl-prolyl rotamase function that is believed to catalyze protein folding and they are well-validated anti-proliferative drug targets in certain pathogenic microorganisms, and their functions have been characterized in parasitic protozoa. However, much less is known in helminths and trials with rapalogs on cestoda have not yet been reported. Due to a growing need for new treatment options for human cystic echinococcosis, the in vitro efficacy of rapalogs in Echinococcus granulosus was investigated. We determined the effect of ramapycin, FK506 and everolimus against this cestode, demonstrating their protoscolicidal ability. Also, we observed synergic scolicidal actions during combined therapy with rapalogs plus cyclosporine A, proposing dual administration of drugs to improve pharmacological effects in vivo. We have identified an E. granulosus (Eg)-fkb1 gene that encodes Eg-FKBP, an archetypal protein of the FKBP family, which includes all residues implicated in the binding of pharmacological ligands, in the enzymatic activity and in interactions with possible target proteins. Levels of Eg-fkb1 mRNA are over-expressed by acid but not rapalog treatment. We also described the presence of receptor-operated calcium channels in the larval stage, suggesting that exogenous ligands may dissociate the interaction of Eg-FKBP from these intracellular channels, enhancing the activity of the Ca(2+) release and interfering with their normal regulatory functions. As rapamycin sensitivity is the major criterion used to detect targets of rapamycin kinase, we identified and analyzed in silico critical residues of putative homologs in the Echinococcus genome. These preliminary results will allow us to continue subsequent studies that could reveal the precise intracellular functions of Eg-FKBP, providing greater knowledge for further

  15. Molecular characterisation and chromosomal mapping of transcripts having tissue-specific expression in the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae: possible involvement in visual or olfactory processes.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Irene; Santolamazza, Federica; Costantini, Carlo; Favia, Guido

    2002-01-01

    We have compared the transcriptional activity of heads, antennae + palps, and carcasses in the mosquito Anopheles gambiae by means of differential display PCR (DD-PCR). Three transcripts specifically or preferentially expressed in the heads and in the antennae + palps have been selected. All are very similar to genes related to visual and olfactory mechanisms of several different organisms. They have been named Ag arrestin, Ag rLDL, and Ag dynamin. The potential of the DD-PCR technique in identifying genes involved in mosquito behaviour and the usefulness of the molecular characterisation of these transcripts are discussed. PMID:11822731

  16. Possible involvement of toluene-2,3-dioxygenase in defluorination of 3-fluoro-substituted benzenes by toluene-degrading Pseudomonas sp. strain T-12

    SciTech Connect

    Renganathan, V. )

    1989-02-01

    Pseudomonas sp. strain T-12 cells in which the toluene-degradative pathway enzymes have been induced can transform many 3-fluoro-substituted benzenes to the corresponding 2,3-catechols with simultaneous elimination of the fluorine substituent as inorganic fluoride. Substrates for this transformation included 3-fluorotoluen, 3-fluorotrifluorotuluene, 3-fluorohalobenzenes, 3-fluoroanisole, and 3-fluorobenzonitrile. While 3-fluorotoluene and 3-fluoroaniole produced only defluorinated catechols, other substrates generated catechol products with and without the fluorine substituent. The steric size of the C-1 substituent affected the ratio of defluorinated to fluorinated catechols formed from a substrate. A mechanism for the defluorination reaction involving toluene-2,3-dioxygenase is proposed.

  17. Early post implantation contraceptive effects of a purified fraction of neem (Azadirachta indica) seeds, given orally in rats: possible mechanisms involved.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, S; Garg, S; Talwar, G P

    1999-11-30

    Neem seed and leaf extracts have immunomodulators that induce cellular immune reactions. These aspects of neem were exploited in earlier studies, where the oral administration of the neem seed extracts in rodents and primates could completely abrogate pregnancy at an early post implantation stage. Complete restoration of fertility was observed in the animals treated in the subsequent cycles. For the purpose of using neem as a long term contraceptive, an activity guided fractionation, followed by identification and characterization of the biologically active fraction from neem seeds was carried out. Sequentially extracted fractions of neem seeds were tested orally at an early post implantation stage in rats. The hexane extract of the neem seeds was found to be biologically active and was the precursor for the final active fraction. The active fraction, identified as a mixture of six components, could completely abrogate pregnancy in rodents up to a concentration of 10%. No apparent toxic effects could be seen following treatment with the fraction. The treatment with the active fraction caused a specific activation of T lymphocyte cells of CD8+ subtype as well as phagocytic cells followed by elevation in cytokines gamma-interferon and TNF. The results of the present study show that a pure active fraction of neem seeds could be obtained for the purpose of early post implantation contraception when given orally, and its mechanism of action seems to be by activating cell mediated immune reactions. PMID:10617063

  18. Identification and functional analysis of the BIM interactome; new clues on its possible involvement in Epstein-Barr Virus-associated diseases.

    PubMed

    Rouka, Erasmia; Kyriakou, Despoina

    2015-12-01

    Epigenetic deregulation is a common feature in the pathogenesis of Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV)-related lymphomas and carcinomas. Previous studies have demonstrated a strong association between EBV latency in B-cells and epigenetic silencing of the tumor suppressor gene BIM. This study aimed to the construction and functional analysis of the BIM interactome in order to identify novel host genes that may be targeted by EBV. Fifty-nine unique interactors were found to compose the BIM gene network. Ontological analysis at the pathway level highlighted infectious diseases along with neuropathologies. These results underline the possible interplay between the BIM interactome and EBV-associated disorders.

  19. Increased feeding in fatty Zucker rats by the thiazolidinedione BRL 49653 (rosiglitazone) and the possible involvement of leptin and hypothalamic neuropeptide Y

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qiong; Dryden, Simon; Frankish, Helen M; Bing, Chen; Pickavance, Lucy; Hopkins, David; Buckingham, Robin; Williams, Gareth

    1997-01-01

    The thiazolidinedione BRL 49653 (rosiglitazone) induces hyperphagia and weight gain in obese, insulin-resistant fatty Zucker rats but not in lean insulin-sensitive rats. We investigated whether these responses might involve neuropeptide Y (NPY), leptin and insulin.BRL 49653 (1 mg kg−1 day−1, orally) was given for 7 or 20 days to fatty and lean Zucker and Wistar rats.In lean rats of either strain, BRL 49653 had no effect on food intake, body weight, plasma insulin and corticosterone, NPY or NPY mRNA levels.Fatty rats given BRL 49653 showed a 30% increase in food intake and accelerated body weight gain (both P<0.01) after 7 and 20 days, but without significant changes in regional hypothalamic NPY or NPY mRNA levels.Plasma leptin levels were twice as high in untreated fatty Zucker rats as in lean rats (P<0.01), but were unaffected by BRL 49653 given for 20 days. However, BRL 49653 reduced insulin levels by 42% and increased corticosterone levels by 124% in fatty rats (both P<0.01).Hyperphagia induced in fatty Zucker rats by BRL 49653 does not appear to be mediated by either a fall in circulating leptin levels or increased activity of hypothalamic NPYergic neurones. The fall in plasma insulin and/or rise in corticosterone levels during BRL 49653 treatment may be involved, consistent with the postulated role of these hormones in the control of food intake. PMID:9421288

  20. Regulation mechanism of ERM (ezrin/radixin/moesin) protein/plasma membrane association: possible involvement of phosphatidylinositol turnover and Rho-dependent signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    The ERM proteins, ezrin, radixin, and moesin, are involved in the actin filament/plasma membrane interaction as cross-linkers. CD44 has been identified as one of the major membrane binding partners for ERM proteins. To examine the CD44/ERM protein interaction in vitro, we produced mouse ezrin, radixin, moesin, and the glutathione-S- transferase (GST)/CD44 cytoplasmic domain fusion protein (GST-CD44cyt) by means of recombinant baculovirus infection, and constructed an in vitro assay for the binding between ERM proteins and the cytoplasmic domain of CD44. In this system, ERM proteins bound to GST-CD44cyt with high affinity (Kd of moesin was 9.3 +/- 1.6nM) at a low ionic strength, but with low affinity at a physiological ionic strength. However, in the presence of phosphoinositides (phosphatidylinositol [PI], phosphatidylinositol 4-monophosphate [4-PIP], and phosphatidylinositol 4.5-bisphosphate [4,5-PIP2]), ERM proteins bound with a relatively high affinity to GST-CD44cyt even at a physiological ionic strength: 4,5- PIP2 showed a marked effect (Kd of moesin in the presence of 4,5-PIP2 was 9.3 +/- 4.8 nM). Next, to examine the regulation mechanism of CD44/ERM interaction in vivo, we reexamined the immunoprecipitated CD44/ERM complex from BHK cells and found that it contains Rho-GDP dissociation inhibitor (GDI), a regulator of Rho GTPase. We then evaluated the involvement of Rho in the regulation of the CD44/ERM complex formation. When recombinant ERM proteins were added and incubated with lysates of cultured BHK cells followed by centrifugation, a portion of the recombinant ERM proteins was recovered in the insoluble fraction. This binding was enhanced by GTP gamma S and markedly suppressed by C3 toxin, a specific inhibitor of Rho, indicating that the GTP form of Rho in the lysate is required for this binding. A mAb specific for the cytoplasmic domain of CD44 also markedly suppressed this binding, identifying most of the binding partners for exogenous ERM proteins in

  1. Hydrogen sulfide alleviates toxic effects of arsenate in pea seedlings through up-regulation of the ascorbate-glutathione cycle: Possible involvement of nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vijay Pratap; Singh, Samiksha; Kumar, Jitendra; Prasad, Sheo Mohan

    2015-06-01

    In plants, hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an emerging novel signaling molecule that is involved in growth regulation and abiotic stress responses. However, little is known about its role in the regulation of arsenate (As(V)) toxicity. Therefore, hydroponic experiments were conducted to investigate whether sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS; a source of H2S) is involved in the regulation of As(V) toxicity in pea seedlings. Results showed that As(V) caused decreases in growth, photosynthesis (measured as chlorophyll fluorescence) and nitrogen content, which was accompanied by the accumulation of As. As(V) treatment also reduced the activities of cysteine desulfhydrase and nitrate reductase, and contents of H2S and nitric oxide (NO). However, addition of NaHS ameliorated As(V) toxicity in pea seedlings, which coincided with the increased contents of H2S and NO. The cysteine level was higher under As(V) treatment in comparison to all other treatments (As-free; NaHS; As(V)+NaHS). The content of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and damage to lipids, proteins and membranes increased by As(V) while NaHS alleviated these effects. Enzymes of the ascorbate-glutathione cycle (AsA-GSH cycle) showed inhibition of their activities following As(V) treatment while their activities were increased by application of NaHS. The redox status of ascorbate and glutathione was disturbed by As(V) as indicated by a steep decline in their reduced/oxidized ratios. However, simultaneous NaHS application restored the redox status of the ascorbate and glutathione pools. The results of this study demonstrated that H2S and NO might both be involved in reducing the accumulation of As and triggering up-regulation of the AsA-GSH cycle to counterbalance ROS-mediated damage to macromolecules. Furthermore, the results suggest a crucial role of H2S in plant priming, and in particular for pea seedlings in mitigating As(V) stress.

  2. Antihyperglycemic effect of Annona squamosa hexane extract in type 2 diabetes animal model: PTP1B inhibition, a possible mechanism of action?

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Joseph Alex; Sharma, Suchitra; Mittra, Shivani; Sujatha, S.; Kanaujia, Anil; Shukla, Gyanesh; Katiyar, Chandrakant; Lakshmi, B.S.; Bansal, Vinay Sheel; Bhatnagar, Pradip Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The mechanism of action of Annona squamosa hexane extract in mediating antihyperglycemic and antitriglyceridimic effect were investigated in this study. Materials and Methods: The effects of extract on glucose uptake, insulin receptor-β (IR-β), insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) phosphorylation and glucose transporter type 4 (GLUT4) and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3 kinase) mRNA expression were studied in L6 myotubes. The in vitro mechanism of action was tested in protein-tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B), G-protein-coupled receptor 40 (GPR40), silent mating type information regulation 2 homolog 1 (SIRT1) and dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-IV) assays. The in vivo efficacy was characterized in ob/ob mice after an oral administration of the extract for 21 days. Results: The effect of extract promoted glucose uptake, IR-β and IRS-1 phosphorylation and GLUT4 and PI3 kinase mRNA upregulation in L6 myotubes. The extract inhibited PTP1B with an IC50 17.4 μg/ml and did not modulate GPR40, SIRT1 or DPP-IV activities. An oral administration of extract in ob/ob mice for 21 days improved random blood glucose, triglyceride and oral glucose tolerance. Further, the extract did not result in body weight gain before and after treatment (29.3 vs. 33.6 g) compared to rosiglitazone where significant body weight gain was observed (28.4 vs. 44.5 g; *P<0.05 after treatment compared to before treatment). Conclusion: The results suggest that Annona squamosa hexane extract exerts its action by modulating insulin signaling through inhibition of PTP1B. PMID:22701240

  3. H. R. 3124: A bill to require the Secretary of Transportation to take actions to protect against railroad accidents involving hazardous materials, introduced in the US House of Representatives, One Hundred Second Congress, First Session, July 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    This bill was introduced into the US House of Representatives on July 31, 1991 to require the Secretary of Transportation to take actions to protect against railroad accidents involving hazardous materials. One of the main aspects of this legislation is to identify railroad routes which present the greatest danger of accidents and to find alternative routes.

  4. Exome sequencing in a patient with Catel-Manzke-like syndrome excludes the involvement of the known genes and reveals a possible candidate.

    PubMed

    Stanghellini, Ilaria; Dassi, Erik; Bertorelli, Roberto; De Sanctis, Veronica; Caleffi, Angela; Landi, Antonio; Percesepe, Antonio

    2015-11-01

    In the present study we describe the exome sequencing and analysis of a patient with Catel-Manzke-like phenotype showing bilateral hyperphalangism of the second finger and thumb clinodactyly due to a unilateral delta phalanx, associated with growth, cardiac and vertebral defects. The exome sequencing analysis excluded pathogenetic mutations in the genes known to cause syndromes with hyperphalangism and did not identify any alteration in the X-chromosome or de novo mutations in likely candidate genes. Under the assumption of an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance and based on the frequency of the single nucleotide variants found in homozygous or double heterozygous states and the results of computer prediction programs, only one gene, DNAH10, emerged as a candidate in the pathogenesis of the disease in our patient. However, the differences among the known biological functions of DNAH10 and the genes involved in the other syndromes with hyperphalangism, suggest caution in the interpretation of the results. PMID:26420031

  5. An investigation into possible xenobiotic-endobiotic inter-relationships involving the amino acid analogue drug, S-carboxymethyl-L-cysteine and plasma amino acids in humans.

    PubMed

    Steventon, Glyn B; Mitchell, Stephen C; Angulo, Santigo; Barbas, Coral

    2012-05-01

    The amino acid derivative, S-carboxymethyl-L-cysteine, is an anti-oxidant agent extensively employed as adjunctive therapy in the treatment of human pulmonary conditions. A major biotransformation route of this drug, which displays considerable variation in capacity in man, involves the oxidation of the sulfide moiety to the inactive S-oxide metabolite. Previous observations have indicated that fasted plasma L-cysteine concentrations and fasted plasma L-cysteine/free inorganic sulfate ratios were correlated with the degree of sulfoxidation of this drug and that these particular parameters may be used as endobiotic biomarkers for this xenobiotic metabolism. It has been proposed also that the enzyme, cysteine dioxygenase, was responsible for the drug sulfoxidation. Further in this theme, the degree of S-oxidation of S-carboxymethyl-L-cysteine in 100 human volunteers was investigated with respect to it potential correlation with fasted plasma amino acid concentrations. Extensive statistical analyses showed no significant associations or relationships between the degree of drug S-oxidation and fasted plasma amino acid concentrations, especially with respect to the sulfur-containing compounds, methionine, L-cysteine, L-cysteine sulfinic acid, taurine and free inorganic sulfate, also the derived ratios of L-cysteine/L-cysteine sulfinic acid and L-cysteine/free inorganic sulfate. It was concluded that plasma amino acid levels or derived ratios cannot be employed to predict the degree of S-oxidation of S-carboxymethyl-L-cysteine (or vice versa) and that it is doubtful if the enzyme, cysteine dioxygenase, has any involvement in the metabolism of this drug.

  6. The idea of the absurd and the moral decision. Possibilities and limits of a physician's actions in the view of the absurd.

    PubMed

    Lengers, F P

    1994-01-01

    In reference to two central concepts of Albert Camus' philosophy, that is, the absurd and the rebellion, this article examines to what extent his The Plague is of interest to medical ethics. The interpretation of this novel put forward in this article focuses on the main character of the novel, the physician Dr. Rieux. For Rieux, the plague epidemic, as it is described in the novel, implies an unquestioning commitment to his patients and fellow men. According to Camus this epidemic has to be understood as a symbol of the absurd. Unable to base his actions on a Christian, metaphysical value system, Rieux sees his commitment as a continuous rebellion against the fact of the absurd, which opposes him in the form of evil, suffering and death. As a physician, Rieux is therefore forced to adjust his actions to life in its immediacy, that is, the suffering of his patients. In this article, it will be shown that Rieux's attention to the "immediate" is of particular interest to medical ethics: The other person in need, rather than my moral convictions, sets the norm.

  7. Involvement of medial prefrontal cortex alpha-2 adrenoceptors on memory acquisition deficit induced by arachidonylcyclopropylamide, a cannabinoid CB1 receptor agonist, in rats; possible involvement of Ca2+ channels.

    PubMed

    Beiranvand, Afsaneh; Nasehi, Mohammad; Zarrindast, Mohammad-Reza; Moghaddasi, Mehrnoush

    2016-09-01

    Functional interactions between cannabinoid and alpha-2 adrenergic systems in cognitive control in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) seem possible. The present study evaluated the possible role of alpha-2 adrenoceptors of the prefrontal cortex on effect of arachidonylcyclopropylamide (ACPA), a cannabinoid CB1 receptor (CB1R) agonist, in adult male Wistar rats. The animals were bilaterally implanted with chronic cannulae in the mPFC, trained in a step-through task, and tested 24 h after training to measure step-through latency. Results indicate that pre-training microinjection of ACPA (0.05 and 0.5 μg/rat) and clonidine (alpha-2 adrenoceptor agonist; 1 and 2 μg/rat) reduce memory acquisition. Pre-training subthreshold dose of clonidine (0.5 µg/rat) restored memory-impairing effect of ACPA (0.05 and 0.5 µg/rat). On the other hand, pre-training administration of the alpha-2 adrenoceptor antagonist yohimbine in all doses used (0.5, 1, and 2 μg/rat) did not affect memory acquisition by itself, while a subthreshold dose of yohimbine (2 µg/rat) potentiated memory impairment induced by ACPA (0.005 µg/rat). Finally, a subthreshold dose of SKF96365 (a Ca(2+) channel blocker) blocked clonidine and yohimbine effect of memory responses induced by ACPA. In conclusion, these data indicate that mPFC alpha-2 adrenoceptors play an important role in ACPA-induced amnesia and Ca(2+) channels have a critical role this phenomenon. PMID:27317021

  8. Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) are involved in early phase of memory formation: possible role of modulation of glutamate release.

    PubMed

    Salinska, Elzbieta; Stafiej, Aleksandra

    2003-01-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) groups I and II are involved in the cellular processes of long-term potentiation (LTP) and learning and memory formation. I.c.v. injection of the mGluRs agonist 1-aminocyclopentane-1,3-dicarboxylic acid (ACPD) can impair memory formation in some types of learning task. The role of mGluRs in neurotransmitters release and production of second messengers has been suggested. The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of i.c.v. administration of the new potent mGluRs agonist ABHxD-I and compare its effect with that of ACPD. We studied the effect of both agonists on acquisition and memory for a one-trial passive avoidance learning task in day-old chicks and on the training related glutamate (Glu) release. ACPD or ABHxD-I (50 nmole per chick, i.c.v. injection) were administered at different times before or after training and chicks were tested at various times after training. Chicks injected with ABHxD-I 30 min before training showed amnesia when tested 30 min or 3h after training. The amnestic effect of ACPD was significant only 30 min after training. Glu release evoked by 70 mM KCl was measured in slices prepared from the IMHV of chick brain isolated from animals injected with either ACPD or ABHxD-I 30 min before training and tested 30 min after training. Glu concentration was measured using HPLC. Both ACPD and ABHxD-I significantly increased Glu release in slices isolated from untrained chicks (30 and 48% compare to control, respectively, P<0.05). Training itself increased Glu release (41% compared to control, P<0.01) and no additional effect of either ACPD or ABHxD-I was observed. These results suggest that mGluRs groups I and II are involved in the early stages of memory formation and that application of either of the studied mGluRs agonists may interfere with that process. The amnestic effect of ABHxD-I seems to be stronger and longer lasting. Although the mechanism of this effect still remains unclear, our

  9. Identification of a novel aminopeptidase P-like gene (OnAPP) possibly involved in Bt toxicity and resistance in a major corn pest (Ostrinia nubilalis).

    PubMed

    Khajuria, Chitvan; Buschman, Lawrent L; Chen, Ming-Shun; Siegfried, Blair D; Zhu, Kun Yan

    2011-01-01

    Studies to understand the Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) resistance mechanism in European corn borer (ECB, Ostrinia nubilalis) suggest that resistance may be due to changes in the midgut-specific Bt toxin receptor. In this study, we identified 10 aminopeptidase-like genes, which have previously been identified as putative Bt toxin receptors in other insects and examined their expression in relation to Cry1Ab toxicity and resistance. Expression analysis for the 10 aminopeptidase-like genes revealed that most of these genes were expressed predominantly in the larval midgut, but there was no difference in the expression of these genes in Cry1Ab resistant and susceptible strains. This suggested that altered expression of these genes was unlikely to be responsible for resistance in these ECB strains. However, we found that there were changes in two amino acid residues of the aminopeptidase-P like gene (OnAPP) involving Glu(305) to Lys(305) and Arg(307) to Leu(307) in the two Cry1Ab-resistant strains as compared with three Cry1Ab-susceptible strains. The mature OnAPP contains 682 amino acid residues and has a putative signal peptide at the N-terminus, a predicted glycosylphosphatidyl-inositol (GPI)-anchor signal at the C-terminal, three predicted N-glycosylation sites at residues N178, N278 and N417, and an O-glycosylation site at residue T653. We used a feeding based-RNA interference assay to examine the role of the OnAPP gene in Cry1Ab toxicity and resistance. Bioassays of Cry1Ab in larvae fed diet containing OnAPP dsRNA resulted in a 38% reduction in the transcript level of OnAPP and a 25% reduction in the susceptibility to Cry1Ab as compared with larvae fed GFP dsRNA or water. These results strongly suggest that the OnAPP gene could be involved in binding the Cry1Ab toxin in the ECB larval midgut and that mutations in this gene may be associated with Bt resistance in these two ECB strains. PMID:21887358

  10. Radical routes to interstellar glycolaldehyde. The possibility of stereoselectivity in gas-phase polymerization reactions involving CH(2)O and ˙CH(2)OH.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tianfang; Bowie, John H

    2010-10-21

    A previous report that the interstellar molecule glycolaldehyde (HOCH(2)CHO) can be made from hydroxymethylene (HOCH:) and formaldehyde has been revisited at the CCSD(T)/6-311++G(3df,2p)//MP2/6-311++G(3df,2p) level of theory. This reaction competes with the formation of acetic acid and methylformate, molecules which have also been detected in interstellar clouds. Other possible modes of formation of glycolaldehyde by radical/radical reactions have been shown to be viable theoretically as follows: HO˙+˙CH2CHO -->HOCH2CHO [ΔG(Γ)(298K)=-303kJ mol⁻¹] HOCH2˙+˙CHO-->HOCH2CHO (-259kJ mol⁻¹). The species in these two processes are known interstellar molecules. Key radicals ˙CH(2)CHO and ˙CH(2)OH in these sequences have been shown to be stable for the microsecond duration of neutralization/reionization experiments in the dual collision cells of a VG ZAB 2HF mass spectrometer. The polymerization reaction HOCH(2)CH˙OH + nCH(2)O → HOCH(2)[CH(OH)](n)˙CHOH (n = 1 to 3) has been studied theoretically and shown to be energetically feasible, as is the cyclization reaction of HOCH(2)[(CH(2)OH)(4)]˙CHOH (in the presence of one molecule of water at the reacting centre) to form glucose. The probability of such a reaction sequence is small even if polymerization were to occur in interstellar ice containing a significant concentration of CH(2)O. The large number of stereoisomers produced by such a reaction sequence makes the formation of a particular sugar, again for example glucose, an inefficient synthesis. The possibility of stereoselectivity occurring during the polymerization was investigated for two diastereoisomers of HOCH(2)[(CHOH)](2)˙CHOH. No significant difference was found in the transition state energies for addition of CH(2)O to these two diastereoisomers, but a barrier difference of 12 kJ mol(-1) was found for the H transfer reactions ˙OCH(2)[(CHOH)](2)CH(2)OH → HOCH(2)[(CHOH)(2)˙CHOH of the two diastereoisomers.

  11. Mitofusin 2 expression dominates over mitofusin 1 exclusively in mouse dorsal root ganglia - a possible explanation for peripheral nervous system involvement in Charcot-Marie-Tooth 2A.

    PubMed

    Kawalec, Maria; Zabłocka, Barbara; Kabzińska, Dagmara; Neska, Jacek; Beręsewicz, Małgorzata

    2014-01-01

    Mitofusin 2 (Mfn2), a protein of the mitochondrial outer membrane, is essential for mitochondrial fusion and contributes to the maintenance and operation of the mitochondrial network. Mutations in the mitofusin 2 gene cause axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 2A (CMT2A), an inherited disease affecting peripheral nerve axons. The precise mechanism by which mutations in MFN2 selectively cause the degeneration of long peripheral axons is not known. There is a hypothesis suggesting the involvement of reduced expression of a homologous protein, mitofusin 1 (Mfn1), in the peripheral nervous system, and less effective compensation of defective mitofusin 2 by mitofusin 1. We therefore aimed to perform an analysis of the mitofusin 1 and mitofusin 2 mRNA and protein expression profiles in different mouse tissues, with special attention paid to dorsal root ganglia (DRGs), as parts of the peripheral nervous system. Quantitative measurement relating to mRNA revealed that expression of the Mfn2 gene dominates over Mfn1 mainly in mouse DRG, as opposed to other nervous system samples and other tissues studied. This result was further supported by Western blot evaluation. Both these sets of data confirm the hypothesis that the cellular consequences of mutations in the mitofusin 2 gene can mostly be manifested in the peripheral nervous system. PMID:25574749

  12. Similar chemokine receptor profiles in lymphomas with central nervous system involvement - possible biomarkers for patient selection for central nervous system prophylaxis, a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Lemma, Siria A; Pasanen, Anna Kaisa; Haapasaari, Kirsi-Maria; Sippola, Antti; Sormunen, Raija; Soini, Ylermi; Jantunen, Esa; Koivunen, Petri; Salokorpi, Niina; Bloigu, Risto; Turpeenniemi-Hujanen, Taina; Kuittinen, Outi

    2016-05-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) relapse occurs in around 5% of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) cases. No biomarkers to identify high-risk patients have been discovered. We evaluated the expression of lymphocyte-guiding chemokine receptors in systemic and CNS lymphomas. Immunohistochemical staining for CXCR4, CXCR5, CCR7, CXCL12, and CXCL13 was performed on 89 tissue samples, including cases of primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL), secondary CNS lymphoma (sCNSL), and systemic DLBCL. Also, 10 reactive lymph node samples were included. Immunoelectron microscopy was performed on two PCNSLs, one sCNSL, one systemic DLBCL, and one reactive lymph node samples, and staining was performed for CXCR4, CXCR5, CXCL12, and CXCL13. Chi-square test was used to determine correlations between clinical parameters, diagnostic groups, and chemokine receptor expression. Strong nuclear CXCR4 positivity correlated with systemic DLBCL, whereas strong cytoplasmic CXCR5 positivity correlated with CNS involvement (P = 0.003 and P = 0.039). Immunoelectron microscopy revealed a nuclear CXCR4 staining in reactive lymph node, compared with cytoplasmic and membranous localization seen in CNS lymphomas. We found that CNS lymphoma presented a chemokine receptor profile different from systemic disease. Our findings give new information on the CNS tropism of DLBCL and, if confirmed, may contribute to more effective targeting of CNS prophylaxis among patients with DLBCL.

  13. Nicotine-induced contraction in the rat coronary artery: possible involvement of the endothelium, reactive oxygen species and COX-1 metabolites.

    PubMed

    Kurahashi, K; Shirahase, H; Nakamura, S; Tarumi, T; Koshino, Y; Wang, A M; Nishihashi, T; Shimizu, Y

    2001-10-01

    Nicotine caused a contraction of the rat coronary artery in the presence of Nomega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) and arachidonic acid, and did not in the absence of these agents. The present experiments were undertaken to pharmacologically characterize the nicotine-induced contraction in ring preparations of the rat coronary artery. The contraction was abolished by chemical removal of endothelium saponin. Oxygen radical scavengers, superoxide dismutase and catalase, significantly attenuated the contraction. Cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) inhibitors (flurbiprofen, ketoprofen and ketrolack) attenuated the nicotine-induced contraction in a concentration-dependent manner, and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors at high concentrations (nimesulide and NS-389) slightly attenuated the contraction. A TXA2 synthetase inhibitor (OKY-046) attenuated the contraction to a small extent only at high concentrations. A TXA2 receptor antagonist (S-1452) attenuated the contraction in a concentration-dependent manner. A nicotinic receptor antagonist (hexamethonium) attenuated the contraction in part and an alpha-adrenoceptor antagonist (prazosin) nearly abolished the contraction. From these results, it was suggested that the contraction induced by nicotine in the rat coronary artery in the presence of L-NAME and arachidonic acid is endothelium dependent, and involves reactive oxygen species and endothelial COX-1 metabolites of arachidonic acid. Part of the contraction is probably due to release of norepinephrine. PMID:11811354

  14. Cysteine dioxygenase and cysteine sulfinate decarboxylase genes of the deep-sea mussel Bathymodiolus septemdierum: possible involvement in hypotaurine synthesis and adaptation to hydrogen sulfide.

    PubMed

    Nagasaki, Toshihiro; Hongo, Yuki; Koito, Tomoko; Nakamura-Kusakabe, Ikumi; Shimamura, Shigeru; Takaki, Yoshihiro; Yoshida, Takao; Maruyama, Tadashi; Inoue, Koji

    2015-03-01

    It has been suggested that invertebrates inhabiting deep-sea hydrothermal vent areas use the sulfinic acid hypotaurine, a precursor of taurine, to protect against the toxicity of hydrogen sulfide contained in the seawater from the vent. In this protective system, hypotaurine is accumulated in the gill, the primary site of sulfide exposure. However, the pathway for hypotaurine synthesis in mollusks has not been identified. In this study, we screened for the mRNAs of enzymes involved in hypotaurine synthesis in the deep-sea mussel Bathymodiolus septemdierum and cloned cDNAs encoding cysteine dioxygenase and cysteine sulfinate decarboxylase. As mRNAs encoding cysteamine dioxygenase and cysteine lyase were not detected, the cysteine sulfinate pathway is suggested to be the major pathway of hypotaurine and taurine synthesis. The two genes were found to be expressed in all the tissues examined, but the gill exhibited the highest expression. The mRNA level in the gill was not significantly changed by exposure to sulfides or thiosulfate. These results suggests that the gill of B. septemdierum maintains high levels of expression of the two genes regardless of ambient sulfide level and accumulates hypotaurine continuously to protect against sudden exposure to high level of sulfide. PMID:25501502

  15. Genes differentially regulated by NKX2-3 in B cells between ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease patients and possible involvement of EGR1.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wei; Lin, Zhenwu; Hegarty, John P; Chen, Xi; Kelly, Ashley A; Wang, Yunhua; Poritz, Lisa S; Koltun, Walter A

    2012-06-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD) are two related yet different forms of chronic intestinal inflammation. We investigated the genes regulated by NKX2-3 in B cells from a UC patient by cDNA microarray and compared the results to those genes regulated by NKX2-3 in B cells from a CD patient. Genes regulated by NKX2-3 in B cells from UC were mainly involved in cell growth, inflammation, and immune response. Among the genes regulated by NKX2-3 in both UC and CD, expression of 145 genes was similarly altered and 34 genes was differentially affected by NKX2-3 knockdown. EGR1 was up-regulated in NKX2-3 knockdown B cells from UC while down-regulated in NKX2-3 knockdown B cells from CD. mRNA expressions of NKX2-3 and EGR1 were increased in diseased intestinal tissues from 19 CD patients. NKX2-3 may play different roles in UC and CD pathogenesis by differential regulation of EGR1.

  16. Inhibitory Effects of Scolopendra Pharmacopuncture on the Development and Maintenance of Neuropathic Pain in Rats: Possible Involvement of Spinal Glial Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Chengjin; Ji, Byeong Uk; Lee, Ji Eun; Park, Min Young; Kim, Sungchul; Kim, Seung Tae; Koo, Sungtae

    2015-10-01

    Scolopendra extracts were used for pharmacopuncture at the Kidney 1 acupoint to investigate the role of Scolopendra pharmacopuncture (SPP) in both the development and maintenance of neuropathic pain induced by L5 spinal nerve ligation in rats and the contribution of spinal glial cells. A single treatment and five once-daily treatments with SPP were given to evaluate its effects on the development and maintenance stages of neuropathic pain, respectively, which was followed by behavioral tests. Immunohistochemistry and Western blotting tests were also carried out. A single treatment of SPP delayed spinal nerve ligation-induced mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia and induced a profound decrease in the expression of ionized calcium binding adaptor protein in the lumbar spinal cord. Repeated SPP treatments reliably suppressed mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia at later time points, and these results correlated mainly with decreases in glial fibrillary acidic protein. Intriguingly, ionized calcium binding adaptor protein expression was also reduced after repeated SPP. These results illustrate that neuropathic pain in the development and maintenance stages is alleviated by SPP treatment, which may be ascribed principally to deactivations of microglia and astroglia, respectively. Additionally, microglial inactivation seems to be partially involved in preventing neuropathic pain in the maintenance stage. PMID:26433800

  17. Aging decreases collagen IV expression in vivo in the dermo-epidermal junction and in vitro in dermal fibroblasts: possible involvement of TGF-β1.

    PubMed

    Feru, Jezabel; Delobbe, Etienne; Ramont, Laurent; Brassart, Bertrand; Terryn, Christine; Dupont-Deshorgue, Aurelie; Garbar, Christian; Monboisse, Jean-Claude; Maquart, Francois-Xavier; Brassart-Pasco, Sylvie

    2016-08-01

    Collagen IV is a major component of the dermo-epidermal junction (DEJ). To study expression of collagen IV upon aging in the DEJ and dermal fibroblasts isolated from the same patients. A model of senescent fibroblasts was developed in order to identify biological compounds that might restore the level of collagen IV. Skin fragments of women (30 to 70 years old) were collected. Localisation of collagen IV expression in the DEJ was studied by immunofluorescence. Fibroblast collagen IV expression was studied by real-time PCR, ELISA, and western blotting. Premature senescence was simulated by exposing fibroblasts to subcytotoxic H2O2 concentrations. Collagen IV decreased in the DEJ and fibroblasts relative to age. TGF-β1 treatment significantly increased collagen IV gene and protein expression in fibroblasts and restored expression in the model of senescence. Addition of TGF-β1-neutralizing antibody to fibroblast cultures decreased collagen IV expression. Taken together, the results suggest that the decrease in collagen IV in the DEJ, relative to age, could be due to a decrease in collagen IV expression by senescent dermal fibroblasts and may involve TGF-β1 signalling. PMID:27124123

  18. Localization of a carboxylic residue possibly involved in the inhibition of vacuolar H+-pyrophosphatase by N, N'-dicyclohexylcarbodi-imide.

    PubMed Central

    Yang, S J; Jiang, S S; Kuo, S Y; Hung, S H; Tam, M F; Pan, R L

    1999-01-01

    A vacuolar H(+)-pyrophosphatase (EC 3.6.1.1) that catalyses PP(i) hydrolysis and the electrogenic translocation of protons from the cytosol to the vacuole lumen, was purified from etiolated hypocotyls of mung bean seedlings (Vigna radiata L.). Group-specific modification was used to identify a carboxylic residue involved in the inhibition of vacuolar H(+)-pyrophosphatase. Carbodi-imides, such as N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodi-imide (DCCD) and 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylamino-propyl)carbodi-imide, and Woodward's reagent K caused a progressive decline in the enzymic activity of vacuolar H(+)-pyrophosphatase in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. The stoichiometry of labelling of the vacuolar H(+)-pyrophosphatase by [(14)C]DCCD determined that DCCD modifies one carboxylic residue per subunit of the enzyme. Protection studies suggest that the DCCD-reactive carboxylic residue resides at or near the substrate-binding site. Furthermore, peptide mapping analysis reveals that Asp(283), located in the putative loop V of a tentative topological model of vacuolar H(+)-pyrophosphatase on the cytosolic side, was labelled by radioactive [(14)C]DCCD. Cytosolic loop V contains both DCCD-sensitive Asp(283) and a conserved motif sequence, rendering it a candidate for the catalytic site of vacuolar H(+)-pyrophosphatase. A topological picture of the active domain of vacuolar H(+)-pyrophosphatase is tentatively proposed. PMID:10477275

  19. Direct visualization of a vast cortical calcium compartment in Paramecium by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) microscopy: possible involvement in exocytosis.

    PubMed

    Stelly, N; Halpern, S; Nicolas, G; Fragu, P; Adoutte, A

    1995-05-01

    The plasma membrane of ciliates is underlaid by a vast continuous array of membrane vesicles known as cortical alveoli. Previous work had shown that a purified fraction of these vesicles actively pumps calcium, suggesting that alveoli may constitute a calcium-storage compartment. Here we provide direct confirmation of this hypothesis using in situ visualization of total cell calcium on sections of cryofixed and cryosubstituted cells analyzed by SIMS (secondary ion mass spectrometry) microscopy a method never previously applied to protists. A narrow, continuous, Ca-emitting zone located all along the cell periphery was observed on sections including the cortex. In contrast, Na and K were evenly distributed throughout the cell. Various controls confirmed that emission was from the alveoli, in particular, the emitting zone was still seen in mutants totally lacking trichocysts, the large exocytotic organelles docked at the cell surface, indicating that they make no major direct contribution to the emission. Calcium concentration within alveoli was quantified for the first time in SIMS microscopy using an external reference and was found to be in the range of 3 to 5 mM, a value similar to that for sarcoplasmic reticulum. After massive induction of trichocyst discharge, this concentration was found to decrease by about 50%, suggesting that the alveoli are the main source of the calcium involved in exocytosis.

  20. Cysteine dioxygenase and cysteine sulfinate decarboxylase genes of the deep-sea mussel Bathymodiolus septemdierum: possible involvement in hypotaurine synthesis and adaptation to hydrogen sulfide.

    PubMed

    Nagasaki, Toshihiro; Hongo, Yuki; Koito, Tomoko; Nakamura-Kusakabe, Ikumi; Shimamura, Shigeru; Takaki, Yoshihiro; Yoshida, Takao; Maruyama, Tadashi; Inoue, Koji

    2015-03-01

    It has been suggested that invertebrates inhabiting deep-sea hydrothermal vent areas use the sulfinic acid hypotaurine, a precursor of taurine, to protect against the toxicity of hydrogen sulfide contained in the seawater from the vent. In this protective system, hypotaurine is accumulated in the gill, the primary site of sulfide exposure. However, the pathway for hypotaurine synthesis in mollusks has not been identified. In this study, we screened for the mRNAs of enzymes involved in hypotaurine synthesis in the deep-sea mussel Bathymodiolus septemdierum and cloned cDNAs encoding cysteine dioxygenase and cysteine sulfinate decarboxylase. As mRNAs encoding cysteamine dioxygenase and cysteine lyase were not detected, the cysteine sulfinate pathway is suggested to be the major pathway of hypotaurine and taurine synthesis. The two genes were found to be expressed in all the tissues examined, but the gill exhibited the highest expression. The mRNA level in the gill was not significantly changed by exposure to sulfides or thiosulfate. These results suggests that the gill of B. septemdierum maintains high levels of expression of the two genes regardless of ambient sulfide level and accumulates hypotaurine continuously to protect against sudden exposure to high level of sulfide.

  1. Possible involvement of central C-type natriuretic polypeptide receptor on water intake in spontaneously hypertensive rats, but not in normotensive Wistar-Kyoto rats.

    PubMed

    Shibata, K; Makino, I; Goto, E; Katsuragi, T; Furukawa, T

    1999-12-01

    The present study was designed to examine the possible role of brain C-type natriuretic polypeptide receptor (GC-B) in spontaneously hypertensive (SHR) and normotensive Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKY). The level of GC-B mRNA in various regions of the brain in both SHR and WKY was examined in the present study. The GC-B mRNA was unevenly distributed in rat brain, the transcript being expressed predominantly in the hypothalamus and cerebellum but comparatively at low level in the striatum and septum. However, the level in the septum was 3-fold higher in SHR than than in age-matched WKY, while no differences were observed in other regions of the brain. Intracerebroventricular administration of antisense oligonucleotide to GC-B mRNA inhibits the night-time water intake in SHR, but not in WKY. However, the daily food intake was not significantly altered by the injection of antisense oligonucleotide in both strains. These results demonstrate that the brain GC-B mRNA, particularly in septum, is increased in SHR and this increase may be closely related to the regulation of water-drinking behaviour in SHR.

  2. Possible Involvement of the Double-Stranded RNA-Binding Core Protein ςA in the Resistance of Avian Reovirus to Interferon

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Costas, José; González-López, Claudia; Vakharia, Vikram N.; Benavente, Javier

    2000-01-01

    Treatment of primary cultures of chicken embryo fibroblasts with a recombinant chicken alpha/beta interferon (rcIFN) induces an antiviral state that causes a strong inhibition of vaccinia virus and vesicular stomatitis virus replication but has no effect on avian reovirus S1133 replication. The fact that avian reovirus polypeptides are synthesized normally in rcIFN-treated cells prompted us to investigate whether this virus expresses factors that interfere with the activation and/or the activity of the IFN-induced, double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-dependent enzymes. Our results demonstrate that extracts of avian-reovirus-infected cells, but not those of uninfected cells, are able to relieve the translation-inhibitory activity of dsRNA in reticulocyte lysates, by blocking the activation of the dsRNA-dependent enzymes. In addition, our results show that protein ςA, an S1133 core polypeptide, binds to dsRNA in an irreversible manner and that clearing this protein from extracts of infected cells abolishes their protranslational capacity. Taken together, our results raise the interesting possibility that protein ςA antagonizes the IFN-induced cellular response against avian reovirus by blocking the intracellular activation of enzyme pathways dependent on dsRNA, as has been suggested for several other viral dsRNA-binding proteins. PMID:10627522

  3. Purification and some properties of reovirus-like particles from leafhoppers and their possible involvement in wallaby ear disease of maize.

    PubMed

    Boccardo, G; Hatta, T; Francki, R I; Grivell, C J

    1980-01-30

    Reovirus-like particles, occurring in association with viroplasms, crystalline arrays and tubules, in the cytoplasm of Cicadulina bimaculata capable of inducing wallaby ear disease in maize, were purified from the insects by differential centrifugation, treatment with the nonionic detergent, Nonidet P-40, and sucrose density gradient centrifugation. The purified particles have a double-shelled icosahedral structure about 70 nm in diameter with external projections (A spikes) about 10 nm long located at the 12 vertices. These intact particles (IPs) are morphologically similar to those of Fiji disease virus (FDV), but are more stable. Cores were produced by enzymatic digestion of IPs with alpha-chymotrypsin. The cores are icosahedra about 57 nm in diameter with projections (B spikes) located at the 12 vertices, resembling those of FDV and cytoplasmic polyhedrosis virus. Immunization of a rabbit with purified IPs resulted in the production of antibodies specific to IPs, cores, and dsRNA. Immunoelectron microscopic investigations revealed that there is no relationship between this virus and FDV, maize rough dwarf, oat sterile dwarf, pangola stunt, and rice ragged stunt viruses, all members of the genus Fijivirus in the family Reoviridae. The nucleic acid extracted from partially purified virus was resolved into 10 segments by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Reovirus-like particles or viroplasms could not be detected in thin sections of maize seedlings colonized by C. bimaculata showing wallaby ear symptoms. In the light of these data the possible etiology of wallaby ear disease is discussed. PMID:18631635

  4. Inhibition of gastrointestinal release of acetylcholine by quercetin as a possible mode of action of Psidium guajava leaf extracts in the treatment of acute diarrhoeal disease.

    PubMed

    Lutterodt, G D

    1989-05-01

    The electrically stimulated guinea-pig ileum and spontaneously contracting guinea-pig ileum preparations were employed in studies on the effects of an alcoholic extract and two flavonoid compounds, quercetin and quercetin-3-arabinoside, extracted from the leaves of Psidium guajava. The extract showed a morphine-like inhibition of acetylcholine release in the coaxially stimulated ileum, together with an initial increase in muscular tone, followed by a gradual decrease. The morphine-like inhibition was found to be due to quercetin, starting at concentrations of 1.6 micrograms/ml. The glycoside did not show any such action at concentrations of up to 1.28 mg/ml. The extract inhibited spontaneous contractions in the unstimulated ileum with a concentration-response relationship.

  5. 5-Hydroxytryptamine2A serotonin receptors in the primate cerebral cortex: possible site of action of hallucinogenic and antipsychotic drugs in pyramidal cell apical dendrites.

    PubMed

    Jakab, R L; Goldman-Rakic, P S

    1998-01-20

    To identify the cortical sites where 5-hydroxytryptamine2A (5-HT2A) serotonin receptors respond to the action of hallucinogens and atypical antipsychotic drugs, we have examined the cellular and subcellular distribution of these receptors in the cerebral cortex of macaque monkeys (with a focus on prefrontal areas) by using light and electron microscopic immunocytochemical techniques. 5-HT2A receptor immunoreactivity was detected in all cortical layers, among which layers II and III and layers V and VI were intensely stained, and layer IV was weakly labeled. The majority of the receptor-labeled cells were pyramidal neurons and the most intense immunolabeling was consistently confined to their parallelly aligned proximal apical dendrites that formed two intensely stained bands above and below layer IV. In double-label experiments, 5-HT2A label was found in calbindin D28k-positive, nonphosphorylated-neurofilament-positive, and immuno-negative pyramidal cells, suggesting that probably all pyramidal cells express 5-HT2A receptors. 5-HT2A label was also found in large- and medium-size interneurons, some of which were immuno-positive for calbindin. 5-HT2A receptor label was also associated with axon terminals. These findings reconcile the data on the receptor's cortical physiology and localization by (i) establishing that 5-HT2A receptors are located postsynaptically and presynaptically, (ii) demonstrating that pyramidal neurons constitute the major 5-HT2A-receptor-expressing cells in the cortex, and (iii) supporting the view that the apical dendritic field proximal to the pyramidal cell soma is the "hot spot" for 5-HT2A-receptor-mediated physiological actions relevant to normal and "psychotic" functional states of the cerebral cortex.

  6. Disruption and overexpression of auxin response factor 8 gene of Arabidopsis affect hypocotyl elongation and root growth habit, indicating its possible involvement in auxin homeostasis in light condition.

    PubMed

    Tian, Chang-En; Muto, Hideki; Higuchi, Kanako; Matamura, Tomoyuki; Tatematsu, Kiyoshi; Koshiba, Tomokazu; Yamamoto, Kotaro T

    2004-11-01

    Auxin response factor (ARF) family genes play a central role in controlling sensitivity to the plant hormone auxin. We characterized the function of ARF8 in Arabidopsis by investigating a T-DNA insertion line (arf8-1) and overexpression lines (ARF8 OX) of ARF8. arf8-1 showed a long-hypocotyl phenotype in either white, blue, red or far-red light conditions, in contrast to ARF8 OX that displayed short hypocotyls in the light. Stronger and weaker apical dominance, and promotion and inhibition of lateral root formation were observed in arf8-1 and ARF8 OX respectively. Sensitivity to auxin was unaltered in arf8-1 hypocotyls with respect to growth inhibition caused by exogenously applied auxin and growth promotion induced by higher temperatures. ARF8 expression was observed constitutively in shoot and root apexes, and was induced in the light condition in hypocotyls. Free IAA contents were approximately 30% reduced in light-grown hypocotyls of ARF8 OX, but were similar between those of arf8-1 and wild type. Expression of the three GH3 genes was reduced in arf8-1 and increased in ARF8 OX, indicating that they are targets of ARF8 transcriptional control. Because the three GH3 proteins may be involved in the conjugation of IAA as suggested by Staswick et al. (2002), and because two of the three GH3 genes are auxin inducible, ARF8 may control the free IAA level in a negative feedback fashion by regulating GH3 gene expression. ARF family genes seem to control both auxin sensitivity and homeostasis in Arabidopsis.

  7. Possible involvement of IGF-1 signaling on compensatory growth of the infraspinatus muscle induced by the supraspinatus tendon detachment of rat shoulder.

    PubMed

    Ichinose, Tsuyoshi; Lesmana, Ronny; Yamamoto, Atsushi; Kobayashi, Tsutomu; Shitara, Hitoshi; Shimoyama, Daisuke; Takatsuru, Yusuke; Iwasaki, Toshiharu; Shimokawa, Noriaki; Takagishi, Kenji; Koibuchi, Noriyuki

    2014-01-01

    A rotator cuff tear (RCT) is a common musculoskeletal disorder among elderly people. RCT is often treated conservatively for functional compensation by the remaining muscles. However, the mode of such compensation after RCT has not yet been fully understood. Here, we used the RCT rat model to investigate the compensatory process in the remaining muscles. The involvement of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1)/Akt signaling which potentially contributes to the muscle growth was also examined. The RCT made by transecting the supraspinatus (SSP) tendon resulted in atrophy of the SSP muscle. The remaining infraspinatus (ISP) muscle weight increased rapidly after a transient decrease (3 days), which could be induced by posttraumatic immobilization. The IGF-1 mRNA levels increased transiently at 7 days followed by a gradual increase thereafter in the ISP muscle, and those of IGF-1 receptor mRNA significantly increased after 3 days. IGF-1 protein levels biphasically increased (3 and 14 days), then gradually decreased thereafter. The IGF-1 protein levels tended to show a negative correlation with IGF-1 mRNA levels. These levels also showed a negative correlation with the ISP muscle weight, indicating that the increase in IGF-1 secretion may contribute to the ISP muscle growth. The pAkt/Akt protein ratio decreased transiently by 14 days, but recovered later. The IGF-1 protein levels were negatively correlated with the pAkt/Akt ratio. These results indicate that transection of the SSP tendon activates IGF-1/Akt signaling in the remaining ISP muscle for structural compensation. Thus, the remaining muscles after RCT can be a target for rehabilitation through the activation of IGF-1/Akt signaling. PMID:24744876

  8. In vivo chronic and in vitro acute effects of di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate on pseudopregnant rabbit corpora lutea: possible involvement of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma.

    PubMed

    Parillo, Francesco; Maranesi, Margherita; Brecchia, Gabriele; Gobbetti, Anna; Boiti, Cristiano; Zerani, Massimo

    2014-02-01

    The in vivo chronic and in vitro acute effects of di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) on the reproductive function of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARG) were studied in rabbit corpora lutea (CL) at early stage (Day 4), midstage (Day 9), and late stage (Day 13) of pseudopregnancy. The rabbits were in vivo treated with DEHP for 15 days before induction of pseudopregnancy. Immunohistochemistry provided evidence for the presence of PPARG, prostaglandin endoperoxide synthase 1 (PTGS1), PTGS2, prostaglandin E2-9-ketoreductase (PGE2-9-K), and 3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3beta-HSD) in all the luteal cells during pseudopregnancy. DEHP decreased progesterone plasma levels and CL production in all the luteal stages and PPARG protein and gene expressions in early and mid-CL. DEHP in vivo treatment reduced PTGS2 protein expression at the late stage and that of PGE2-9-K at all the stages, whereas PTGS1 and 3beta-HSD were not affected. In in vitro cultured CL, DEHP alone, the PPARG antagonist T0070907 alone, or DEHP plus T0070907 diminished progesterone production and 3beta-HSD activity and increased PGF2alpha and PTGS2 in early and mid-CL, whereas DEHP plus the PPARG agonist 15d-PGJ2 did not affect these hormones and enzymes. All the in vitro treatments did not affect PGE2 secretion as well as PTGS1 and PGE2-9-K enzymatic activities in all the luteal stages. These results provided evidence that DEHP favors functional luteolysis of pseudopregnant rabbit CL, with a mechanism that seems to involve PPARG expression down-regulation, an increase of PTGS2 activity and prostaglandin F2alpha secretion, 3beta-HSD down-regulation, and decrease in progesterone.

  9. Interleukin-17A correlates with interleukin-6 production in human cystic echinococcosis: a possible involvement of IL-17A in immunoprotection against Echinococcus granulosus infection.

    PubMed

    Mezioug, Dalila; Touil-Boukoffa, Chafia

    2012-01-01

    Hydatidosis is a parasitic disease caused by the development, in humans and other mammals, of the larval form of Taenia, Echinococcus granulosus. It is one of the world's major zoonotic infections. This study aimed to examine interleukin-6 (IL-6), interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and interleukin-17A (IL-17A) production in patients with cystic echinococcosis (CE), and the role of IL-17A in the modulation of the immune response against the extracellular parasite, E. granulosus. A relationship between IL-6, IL-17A production and C reactive Protein (CRP) levels was also assessed. IL-6, IFN-γ, IL-17A and CRP production were determined in serum from Algerian hydatid patients. Cytokine production was also measured in supernatants from cultures of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from hydatid patients stimulated by a major parasitic antigen (antigen-5). The increased activity of IL-6, IFN-γ and IL-17A were observed in most serum samples from patients. In contrast, healthy controls showed only minor levels. Similarly, high levels of CRP were detected. Our in vitro results indicate a positive correlation between IL-6, IFN-γ and IL-17A production in PBMC culture supernatants. However, IL-6, IFN-γ and IL-17A activity was low in serum and supernatants of PBMC cultures from relapsing patients, and there was no evidence of an immune response against parasitic antigen. Collectively, our results show that IL-17A was produced during human cystic echinococcosis, and was involved in the host defense mechanisms against the extracellular parasite E. granulosus. Our data suggest that IL-17A plays an immunoprotective role in this parasitic, helminth infection.

  10. Interaction of Phospholipase A/Acyltransferase-3 with Pex19p: A POSSIBLE INVOLVEMENT IN THE DOWN-REGULATION OF PEROXISOMES.

    PubMed

    Uyama, Toru; Kawai, Katsuhisa; Kono, Nozomu; Watanabe, Masahiro; Tsuboi, Kazuhito; Inoue, Tomohito; Araki, Nobukazu; Arai, Hiroyuki; Ueda, Natsuo

    2015-07-10

    Phospholipase A/acyltransferase (PLA/AT)-3 (also known as H-rev107 or AdPLA) was originally isolated as a tumor suppressor and was later shown to have phospholipase A1/A2 activity. We have also found that the overexpression of PLA/AT-3 in mammalian cells results in specific disappearance of peroxisomes. However, its molecular mechanism remained unclear. In the present study, we first established a HEK293 cell line, which stably expresses a fluorescent peroxisome marker protein (DsRed2-Peroxi) and expresses PLA/AT-3 in a tetracycline-dependent manner. The treatment with tetracycline, as expected, caused disappearance of peroxisomes within 24 h, as revealed by diffuse signals of DsRed2-Peroxi and a remarkable decrease in a peroxisomal membrane protein, PMP70. A time-dependent decrease in ether-type lipid levels was also seen. Because the activation of LC3, a marker of autophagy, was not observed, the involvement of autophagy was unlikely. Among various peroxins responsible for peroxisome biogenesis, Pex19p functions as a chaperone protein for the transportation of peroxisomal membrane proteins. Immunoprecipitation analysis showed that PLA/AT-3 binds to Pex19p through its N-terminal proline-rich and C-terminal hydrophobic domains. The protein level and enzyme activity of PLA/AT-3 were increased by its coexpression with Pex19p. Moreover, PLA/AT-3 inhibited the binding of Pex19 to peroxisomal membrane proteins, such as Pex3p and Pex11βp. A catalytically inactive point mutant of PLA/AT-3 could bind to Pex19p but did not inhibit the chaperone activity of Pex19p. Altogether, these results suggest a novel regulatory mechanism for peroxisome biogenesis through the interaction between Pex19p and PLA/AT-3.

  11. Possible involvement of the OKT4 molecule in T cell recognition of class II HLA antigens. Evidence from studies of cytotoxic T lymphocytes specific for SB antigens.

    PubMed

    Biddison, W E; Rao, P E; Talle, M A; Goldstein, G; Shaw, S

    1982-10-01

    A recently described HLA gene, SB, which maps between GLO and HLA-DR, codes for Ia-like molecules that are similar to but distinct from HLA-DR molecules. Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) specific for SB1, SB2, SB3, and SB4 were compared with HLA-A2-specific CTL with respect to their surface expression of the T cell differentiation antigens OKT3, OKT4, and OKT8. All CTL activity was eliminated by treatment with OKT3 and C'. The SB-specific cytotoxicity was eliminated by OKT4 plus C' but not by OKT8 plus C'. In contrast, HLA-A2-specific killing was completely susceptible to treatment with OKT8 plus C' but not with OKT4 plus C'. Cytotoxicity was analyzed in the presence of OKT8 and a series of monoclonal antibodies (OKT4A, 4B, 4C, and 4D) that react with distinct epitopes on the OKT4 molecule. SB1-, SB3-, and SB4-specific CTL were partially inhibited by OKT4A and 4B (45-75%), whereas HLA-A2-specific CTL were partially inhibited by OKT8 (48-63%) but not by OKT4. SB2-specific CTL were not inhibited (less than 26%) by OKT8 or by any of the OKT4-related antibodies. These results suggest that the OKT4 marker may be expressed on most T cells that recognize allogeneic Ia or self Ia plus foreign antigens; OKT4+ cells do not appear to be functionally homogeneous in that they can act both as helper/inducer and cytotoxic cells. Models are proposed for the functional involvement of the OKT4 molecule in T cell-Ia antigen interactions. PMID:6984061

  12. Beneficial effects of EGb761 and vitamin E on haloperidol-induced vacuous chewing movements in rats: Possible involvement of S100B mechanisms.

    PubMed

    An, Hui Mei; Tan, Yun Long; Shi, Jing; Wang, Zhi Ren; Li, Jia; Wang, Yue Chan; Lv, Meng Han; Zhou, Dong Feng; Soares, Jair C; Kosten, Thoams R; Yang, Fu De; Zhang, Xiang Yang

    2016-01-15

    Tardive dyskinesia (TD) is a serious side effect induced by the long-term administration of typical antipsychotics. The pathophysiology of TD remains unclear, but experimental evidence suggests that neurodegeneration caused by free radicals may play an important role in TD development. S100B is considered a potential biomarker of structural neural and glial damage. This study investigated S100B expression in TD-related brain regions and assessed the effect of antioxidants Gingko biloba leaf extract (EGb761) and vitamin E (VE) on S100B in TD rats. A total of 32 rats were randomly divided into 4 study groups: saline control (saline), haloperidol alone group (Hal), EGb761-haloperidol (EGb-Hal), and vitamin E-haloperidol (VE-Hal). Rats were treated with haloperidol intraperitoneal injections (2mg/kg/day) each day for 5 weeks. EGb761 (50mg/kg/day) and VE (20mg/kg/day) were then administered during a 5-week withdrawal period. We performed behavioral assessments and immunohistochemically analyzed S100B expression in four TD-related brain regions. Our findings demonstrated that haloperidol administration led to a progressive increase in VCMs and in S100B expression in all four brain regions. Both EGb761 and VE reversed these changes, and there were no group differences between the EGb761 and VE groups. Our results indicated that long-term administration of haloperidol may induce VCMs and increase S100B expression in TD-related brain regions, and S100B may be a significant biomarker related to TD pathophysiology. Moreover, the antioxidant capacity of EGb761 and VE coupled with the possible neuroprotective effects of S100B may account for their success in improving the symptoms of haloperidol-induced TD. PMID:26455874

  13. Resveratrol Ameliorates the Anxiety- and Depression-Like Behavior of Subclinical Hypothyroidism Rat: Possible Involvement of the HPT Axis, HPA Axis, and Wnt/β-Catenin Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Jin-Fang; Xu, Ya-Yun; Qin, Gan; Cheng, Jiang-Qun; Chen, Fei-Hu

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic disease subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH) is closely associated with depression-like behavior both in human and animal studies, and our previous studies have identified the antidepressant effect of resveratrol (RES) in stressed rat model. The aim of this study was to investigate whether RES would manifest an antidepressant effect in SCH rat model and explore the possible mechanism. A SCH rat model was induced by hemi-thyroid electrocauterization, after which the model rats in the RES and LT4 groups received a daily intragastric injection of RES at the dose of 15 mg/kg or LT4 at the dose of 60 μg/kg for 16 days. The rats’ plasma concentrations of thyroid hormones were measured. Behavioral performance and hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) activity were evaluated. The protein expression levels of the Wnt/β-catenin in the hippocampus were detected by western blot. The results showed that RES treatment downregulated the elevated plasma thyroid-stimulating hormone concentration and the hypothalamic mRNA expression of thyrotropin-releasing hormone in the SCH rats. RES-treated rats showed increased rearing frequency and distance in the open-field test, increased sucrose preference in the sucrose preference test, and decreased immobility in the forced swimming test compared with SCH rats. The ratio of the adrenal gland weight to body weight, the plasma corticosterone levels, and the hypothalamic corticotrophin-releasing hormone mRNA expression were reduced in the RES-treated rats. Moreover, RES treatment upregulated the relative ratio of phosphorylated-GSK3β (p-GSK3β)/GSK3β and protein levels of p-GSK3β, cyclin D1, and c-myc, while downregulating the relative ratio of phosphorylated-β-catenin (p-β-catenin)/β-catenin and expression of GSK3β in the hippocampus. These findings suggest that RES exerts anxiolytic- and antidepressant-like effect in SCH rats by downregulating hyperactivity of the HPA axis and regulating both the HPT axis and the

  14. Ethanol Extract of Peanut Sprout Lowers Blood Triglyceride Levels, Possibly Through a Pathway Involving SREBP-1c in Rats Fed a High-Fat Diet.

    PubMed

    Ha, Ae Wha; Kang, Nam E; Kim, Woo Kyoung

    2015-08-01

    The hypothesis of this study was that peanut sprout extracts (PSE) could reduce fat accumulation through activating the transcription of SREBP-1c genes. Sprague-Dawley (SD) were randomly assigned into two groups and fed the following diet for 4 weeks; 10 normal fat (NF, 7 g of fat/100 g diet) and 30 high fat (HF, 20 g of fat/100 g diet). After 4 weeks, the HF group was divided into three groups; HF, HF with 15 mg of PSE/kg diet (HF+low PSE, 0.025% resveratrol), and HF with 30 mg of PSE/kg diet (HF+high PSE, 0.05% resveratrol) and fed for an additional 5 weeks. The HF+high PSE group had significantly lower weight gain than the HF group. Plasma triglyceride (TG) level and the hepatic total lipid level were significantly lower in the HF+high PSE group compared to the HF group. Fecal excretions of total lipids, cholesterol, and TG in the HF+high PSE group tended to be higher than in the HF group, but these differences were not significant. The mRNA expressions of fatty acid synthase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, and sterol regulatory element binding protein-c (SREBP-1c) were significantly lower in the HF+high PSE group than in the HF group. The mRNA expressions of hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase and acyl-CoA cholesterol acyltransferase were significantly lower in the HF+high PSE groups compared to the HF group. The mRNA expression of cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase1 was significantly higher than the HF group in both the HF+low PSE and HF+high PSE groups, with much greater increase observed in the HF+high PSE group. In conclusion, consumption of PSE was effective for improving blood lipid levels, possibly by suppressing the expression of SREBP-1c, in rats fed a high-fat diet.

  15. Resveratrol Ameliorates the Anxiety- and Depression-Like Behavior of Subclinical Hypothyroidism Rat: Possible Involvement of the HPT Axis, HPA Axis, and Wnt/β-Catenin Pathway.

    PubMed

    Ge, Jin-Fang; Xu, Ya-Yun; Qin, Gan; Cheng, Jiang-Qun; Chen, Fei-Hu

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic disease subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH) is closely associated with depression-like behavior both in human and animal studies, and our previous studies have identified the antidepressant effect of resveratrol (RES) in stressed rat model. The aim of this study was to investigate whether RES would manifest an antidepressant effect in SCH rat model and explore the possible mechanism. A SCH rat model was induced by hemi-thyroid electrocauterization, after which the model rats in the RES and LT4 groups received a daily intragastric injection of RES at the dose of 15 mg/kg or LT4 at the dose of 60 μg/kg for 16 days. The rats' plasma concentrations of thyroid hormones were measured. Behavioral performance and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) activity were evaluated. The protein expression levels of the Wnt/β-catenin in the hippocampus were detected by western blot. The results showed that RES treatment downregulated the elevated plasma thyroid-stimulating hormone concentration and the hypothalamic mRNA expression of thyrotropin-releasing hormone in the SCH rats. RES-treated rats showed increased rearing frequency and distance in the open-field test, increased sucrose preference in the sucrose preference test, and decreased immobility in the forced swimming test compared with SCH rats. The ratio of the adrenal gland weight to body weight, the plasma corticosterone levels, and the hypothalamic corticotrophin-releasing hormone mRNA expression were reduced in the RES-treated rats. Moreover, RES treatment upregulated the relative ratio of phosphorylated-GSK3β (p-GSK3β)/GSK3β and protein levels of p-GSK3β, cyclin D1, and c-myc, while downregulating the relative ratio of phosphorylated-β-catenin (p-β-catenin)/β-catenin and expression of GSK3β in the hippocampus. These findings suggest that RES exerts anxiolytic- and antidepressant-like effect in SCH rats by downregulating hyperactivity of the HPA axis and regulating both the HPT axis and the Wnt

  16. Somatosensory Psychophysical Losses in Inhabitants of Riverside Communities of the Tapajós River Basin, Amazon, Brazil: Exposure to Methylmercury Is Possibly Involved.

    PubMed

    Khoury, Eliana Dirce Torres; Souza, Givago da Silva; da Costa, Carlos Araújo; de Araújo, Amélia Ayako Kamogari; de Oliveira, Cláudia Simone Baltazar; Silveira, Luiz Carlos de Lima; Pinheiro, Maria da Conceição Nascimento

    2015-01-01

    a weak linear correlation between tactile sensation threshold and mercury concentration in the head hair samples. No correlation was found for the other two measurements. Mercury-exposed subjects had impaired somatosensory function compared with non-exposed control subjects. Long-term mercury exposure of riverside communities in the Tapajós river basin is a possible but not a definitely proven cause for psychophysical somatosensory losses observed in their population. Additionally, the relatively simple psychophysical measures used in this work should be followed by more rigorous measures of the same population.

  17. Beetroot juice reduces infarct size and improves cardiac function following ischemia–reperfusion injury: Possible involvement of endogenous H2S

    PubMed Central

    Salloum, Fadi N; Sturz, Gregory R; Yin, Chang; Rehman, Shabina; Hoke, Nicholas N; Kukreja, Rakesh C

    2015-01-01

    Ingestion of high dietary nitrate in the form of beetroot juice (BRJ) has been shown to exert antihypertensive effects in humans through increasing cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) levels. Since enhanced cGMP protects against myocardial ischemia–reperfusion (I/R) injury through upregulation of hydrogen sulfide (H2S), we tested the hypothesis that BRJ protects against I/R injury via H2S. Adult male CD-1 mice received either regular drinking water or those dissolved with BRJ powder (10 g/L, containing ∼0.7 mM nitrate). Seven days later, the hearts were explanted for molecular analyses. Subsets of mice were subjected to I/R injury by occlusion of the left coronary artery for 30 min and reperfusion for 24 h. A specific inhibitor of H2S producing enzyme – cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE), dl-propargylglycine (PAG, 50 mg/kg) was given i.p. 30 min before ischemia. Myocardial infarct size was significantly reduced in BRJ-fed mice (15.8 ± 3.2%) versus controls (46.5 ± 3.5%, mean ± standard error [SE], n = 6/group, P < .05). PAG completely blocked the infarct-limiting effect of BRJ. Moreover, BRJ significantly preserved ventricular function following I/R. Myocardial levels of H2S and its putative protein target – vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) were significantly increased by BRJ intake, whereas CSE mRNA and protein content did not change. Interestingly, the BRJ-induced cardioprotection was not associated with elevated blood nitrate–nitrite levels following I/R nor induction of cardiac peroxiredoxin 5, a mitochondrial antioxidant enzyme previously linked to nitrate-induced cardioprotection. We conclude that BRJ ingestion protects against post-I/R myocardial infarction and ventricular dysfunction possibly through CSE-mediated endogenous H2S generation. BRJ could be a promising natural and inexpensive nutraceutical supplement to reduce cardiac I/R injury in patients. PMID:25361774

  18. Somatosensory Psychophysical Losses in Inhabitants of Riverside Communities of the Tapajós River Basin, Amazon, Brazil: Exposure to Methylmercury Is Possibly Involved

    PubMed Central

    Khoury, Eliana Dirce Torres; Souza, Givago da Silva; da Costa, Carlos Araújo; de Araújo, Amélia Ayako Kamogari; de Oliveira, Cláudia Simone Baltazar; Silveira, Luiz Carlos de Lima; Pinheiro, Maria da Conceição Nascimento

    2015-01-01

    . There was a weak linear correlation between tactile sensation threshold and mercury concentration in the head hair samples. No correlation was found for the other two measurements. Mercury-exposed subjects had impaired somatosensory function compared with non-exposed control subjects. Long-term mercury exposure of riverside communities in the Tapajós river basin is a possible but not a definitely proven cause for psychophysical somatosensory losses observed in their population. Additionally, the relatively simple psychophysical measures used in this work should be followed by more rigorous measures of the same population. PMID:26658153

  19. Resveratrol Ameliorates the Anxiety- and Depression-Like Behavior of Subclinical Hypothyroidism Rat: Possible Involvement of the HPT Axis, HPA Axis, and Wnt/β-Catenin Pathway.

    PubMed

    Ge, Jin-Fang; Xu, Ya-Yun; Qin, Gan; Cheng, Jiang-Qun; Chen, Fei-Hu

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic disease subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH) is closely associated with depression-like behavior both in human and animal studies, and our previous studies have identified the antidepressant effect of resveratrol (RES) in stressed rat model. The aim of this study was to investigate whether RES would manifest an antidepressant effect in SCH rat model and explore the possible mechanism. A SCH rat model was induced by hemi-thyroid electrocauterization, after which the model rats in the RES and LT4 groups received a daily intragastric injection of RES at the dose of 15 mg/kg or LT4 at the dose of 60 μg/kg for 16 days. The rats' plasma concentrations of thyroid hormones were measured. Behavioral performance and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) activity were evaluated. The protein expression levels of the Wnt/β-catenin in the hippocampus were detected by western blot. The results showed that RES treatment downregulated the elevated plasma thyroid-stimulating hormone concentration and the hypothalamic mRNA expression of thyrotropin-releasing hormone in the SCH rats. RES-treated rats showed increased rearing frequency and distance in the open-field test, increased sucrose preference in the sucrose preference test, and decreased immobility in the forced swimming test compared with SCH rats. The ratio of the adrenal gland weight to body weight, the plasma corticosterone levels, and the hypothalamic corticotrophin-releasing hormone mRNA expression were reduced in the RES-treated rats. Moreover, RES treatment upregulated the relative ratio of phosphorylated-GSK3β (p-GSK3β)/GSK3β and protein levels of p-GSK3β, cyclin D1, and c-myc, while downregulating the relative ratio of phosphorylated-β-catenin (p-β-catenin)/β-catenin and expression of GSK3β in the hippocampus. These findings suggest that RES exerts anxiolytic- and antidepressant-like effect in SCH rats by downregulating hyperactivity of the HPA axis and regulating both the HPT axis and the Wnt

  20. Somatosensory Psychophysical Losses in Inhabitants of Riverside Communities of the Tapajós River Basin, Amazon, Brazil: Exposure to Methylmercury Is Possibly Involved.

    PubMed

    Khoury, Eliana Dirce Torres; Souza, Givago da Silva; da Costa, Carlos Araújo; de Araújo, Amélia Ayako Kamogari; de Oliveira, Cláudia Simone Baltazar; Silveira, Luiz Carlos de Lima; Pinheiro, Maria da Conceição Nascimento

    2015-01-01

    a weak linear correlation between tactile sensation threshold and mercury concentration in the head hair samples. No correlation was found for the other two measurements. Mercury-exposed subjects had impaired somatosensory function compared with non-exposed control subjects. Long-term mercury exposure of riverside communities in the Tapajós river basin is a possible but not a definitely proven cause for psychophysical somatosensory losses observed in their population. Additionally, the relatively simple psychophysical measures used in this work should be followed by more rigorous measures of the same population. PMID:26658153

  1. Effects and possible mechanisms of action of acacetin on the behavior and eye morphology of Drosophila models of Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xue; Perumalsamy, Haribalan; Kwon, Hyung Wook; Na, Young-Eun; Ahn, Young-Joon

    2015-01-01

    The human β-amyloid (Aβ) cleaving enzyme (BACE-1) is a target for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) treatments. This study was conducted to determine if acacetin extracted from the whole Agastache rugosa plant had anti-BACE-1 and behavioral activities in Drosophila melanogaster AD models and to determine acacetin’s mechanism of action. Acacetin (100, 300, and 500 μM) rescued amyloid precursor protein (APP)/BACE1-expressing flies and kept them from developing both eye morphology (dark deposits, ommatidial collapse and fusion, and the absence of ommatidial bristles) and behavioral (motor abnormalities) defects. The reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed that acacetin reduced both the human APP and BACE-1 mRNA levels in the transgenic flies, suggesting that it plays an important role in the transcriptional regulation of human BACE-1 and APP. Western blot analysis revealed that acacetin reduced Aβ production by interfering with BACE-1 activity and APP synthesis, resulting in a decrease in the levels of the APP carboxy-terminal fragments and the APP intracellular domain. Therefore, the protective effect of acacetin on Aβ production is mediated by transcriptional regulation of BACE-1 and APP, resulting in decreased APP protein expression and BACE-1 activity. Acacetin also inhibited APP synthesis, resulting in a decrease in the number of amyloid plaques. PMID:26530776

  2. Dual effects of zinc sulphate on ethanol-induced gastric injury in rats: possibly mediated by an action on mucosal blood flow.

    PubMed

    Cho, C H; Chen, B W; Poon, Y K; Ng, M M; Hui, W M; Lam, S K; Ogle, C W

    1989-10-01

    The present study examines the protective effect of zinc sulphate against ethanol-induced gastric mucosal ulcers in rats. Absolute ethanol decreased the gastric mucosal blood flow and produced haemorrhagic lesions in the glandular mucosa. Zinc sulphate preincubation in an ex-vivo stomach chamber preparation prevented the formation of ethanol-induced lesions and attenuated the decrease of blood flow produced by ethanol. Subcutaneous injection of the same doses of the drug at 15 and 30 min before ethanol exposure, markedly reduced the blood flow and also aggravated ethanol-induced gastric injury; however, when injected at 23 and 24 h before ethanol administration, zinc sulphate protected against lesion formation but had no effect on the vascular changes induced by ethanol in the gastric glandular mucosa. These findings show that the antiulcer effect of zinc sulphate occurs only when the drug is given orally, or injected s.c. 23 and 24 h before ethanol challenge. Furthermore, this protective action is probably not entirely mediated by preservation of the gastric mucosal blood flow.

  3. Tissue responses to hexyl 5-aminolevulinate-induced photodynamic treatment in syngeneic orthotopic rat bladder cancer model: possible pathways of action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arum, Carl-Jørgen; Gederaas, Odrun A.; Larsen, Eivind L. P.; Randeberg, Lise L.; Hjelde, Astrid; Krokan, Hans E.; Svaasand, Lars O.; Chen, Duan; Zhao, Chun-Mei

    2011-02-01

    Orthotopic bladder cancer model in rats mimics human bladder cancer with respect to urothelial tumorigenesis and progression. Utilizing this model at pT1 (superficial stage), we analyze the tissue responses to hexyl 5-aminolevulinate-induced photodynamic therapy (HAL-PDT). In comparison to untreated rats, HAL-PDT causes little change in tumor-free rat bladder but induces inflammatory changes with increased lymphocytes and mononuclear cell infiltration in rat bladders with tumor. Immunohistochemistry reveals that HAL-PDT is without effect on proliferating cell nuclear antigen expression within the tumor and increases caspase-3 expression in both normal urothelium and the tumor. Transmission electron microscopy reveals severe mitochondrial damage, formations of apoptotic bodies, vacuoles, and lipofuscin bodies, but no microvillus-formed niches in HAL-PDT-treated bladder cancer rats. Bioinformatics analysis of the gene expression profile indicates an activation of T-cell receptor signaling pathway in bladder cancer rats without PDT. HAL-PDT increases the expression of CD3 and CD45RA in the tumor (determined by immunohistochemistry). We suggest that pathways of action of HAL-PDT may include, at least, activations of mitochondrial apoptosis and autophagy, breakdown of cancer stem cell niches, and importantly, enhancement of T-cell activation.

  4. N,N-diethyl-4-aminoazobenzene (DEAB): acute actions with respect to possible carcinogenicity as well as the role of solvents. Morphological and pharmacological investigations.

    PubMed

    Danz, M; Klinger, W; Müller, D; Kleeberg, U; Glöckner, R; Ziebarth, D; Urban, H

    1978-01-01

    The acute action of the azo dye DEAB was investigated in Sprague-Dawley (SD) and Wistar (Wi) rats. The substance was dissolved both in DMSO and sunflower oil and was administered once by stomach tube. Cytochrome P-450-DEPENDENT N-demethylation of ethylmorphine and dimethylnitrosamine are differentially altered depending on the solvent used. The excretion of DEAB as well as of N,N-dimethyl-4-amino-azobenzene (DAB) is delayed and diminished if the substances are dissolved in DMSO. Beside these effects the mitotic number in the adrenal cortex is significantly elevated in both strains of rats. But, in SD rats only DMSO-solution of DEAB is effective. In Wi rats both are effective, the oily solution more than that in DMSO. In this respect DEAB resembles DAB and various other carcinogens which are efficient in stimulating adrenocortical cell division. Considering the positive short-term assay after three other substances which revealed carcinogenic properties in long-term experiments we conclude that also DEAB may be carcinogenic in adequate long-term examination.

  5. Action Research: Rethinking Lewin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickens, Linda; Watkins, Karen

    1999-01-01

    Explores both historical and contemporary definitions of action research. Describes the process and goals of action research in the tradition of Lewin. Presents a case study of an action-research project involving two teams in a high-technology corporation that depicts the process in action. (Author/CCM)

  6. Hypoglycaemic activity of culinary Pleurotus ostreatus and P. cystidiosus mushrooms in healthy volunteers and type 2 diabetic patients on diet control and the possible mechanisms of action.

    PubMed

    Jayasuriya, W J A Banukie N; Wanigatunge, Chandanie A; Fernando, Gita H; Abeytunga, D Thusitha U; Suresh, T Sugandhika

    2015-02-01

    This study determined the oral hypoglycaemic effect of suspensions of freeze dried and powdered (SFDP) Pleurotus ostreatus (P.o) and Pleurotus cystidiosus (P.c), using healthy human volunteers and Type 2 diabetic patients on diet control at a dose of 50 mg/kg/body weight, followed by a glucose load. The possible hypoglycaemic mechanisms were evaluated using rats, by examining intestinal glucose absorption and serum levels of insulin, glucokinase (GK) and glycogen synthase kinase (GSK). The P.o and P.c showed a significant reduction (P < 0.05) in fasting and postprandial serum glucose levels of healthy volunteers and reduced the postprandial serum glucose levels and increased the serum insulin levels (P < 0.05) of Type 2 diabetic patients. The P.o and P.c increased the intestinal absorption of glucose but simultaneously reduced the serum glucose levels (P < 0.05) in rats. Both mushrooms reduced the serum GSK and promoted insulin secretion while P.c increased serum GK (P < 0.05). The hypoglycaemic activity of P.o and P.c makes mushrooms beneficial functional foods in diabetes mellitus. The mechanism of hypoglycaemic activity of P.o and P.c is possibly by increasing GK activity and promoting insulin secretion and thereby increasing the utilization of glucose by peripheral tissues, inhibiting GSK and promoting glycogen synthesis.

  7. Radiation protection following nuclear power accidents: a survey of putative mechanisms involved in the radioprotective actions of taurine during and after radiation exposure

    PubMed Central

    Christophersen, Olav Albert

    2012-01-01

    tissues, especially in the intestines, and (4) by functioning as an antifibrogenic agent. A detailed discussion is given of possible mechanisms involved both in the antioxidant effects of taurine, in its anti-inflammatory effects and in its role as a growth factor for leukocytes and nerve cells, which might be closely related to its role as an osmolyte important for cellular volume regulation because of the close connection between cell volume regulation and the regulation of protein synthesis as well as cellular protein degradation. While taurine supplementation alone would be expected to exert a therapeutic effect far better than negligible in patients that have been exposed to high doses of ionizing radiation, it may on theoretical grounds be expected that much better results may be obtained by using taurine as part of a multifactorial treatment strategy, where it may interact synergistically with several other nutrients, hormones or other drugs for optimizing antioxidant protection and minimizing harmful posttraumatic inflammatory reactions, while using other nutrients to optimize DNA and tissue repair processes, and using a combination of good diet, immunostimulatory hormones and perhaps other nontoxic immunostimulants (such as beta-glucans) for optimizing the recovery of antiviral and antibacterial immune functions. Similar multifactorial treatment strategies may presumably be helpful in several other disease situations (including severe infectious diseases and severe asthma) as well as for treatment of acute intoxications or acute injuries (both mechanical ones and severe burns) where severely enhanced oxidative and/or nitrative stress and/or too much secretion of vasodilatory neuropeptides from C-fibres are important parts of the pathogenetic mechanisms that may lead to the death of the patient. Some case histories (with discussion of some of those mechanisms that may have been responsible for the observed therapeutic outcome) are given for illustration of the

  8. Radiation protection following nuclear power accidents: a survey of putative mechanisms involved in the radioprotective actions of taurine during and after radiation exposure

    PubMed Central

    Christophersen, Olav Albert

    2012-01-01

    tissues, especially in the intestines, and (4) by functioning as an antifibrogenic agent. A detailed discussion is given of possible mechanisms involved both in the antioxidant effects of taurine, in its anti-inflammatory effects and in its role as a growth factor for leukocytes and nerve cells, which might be closely related to its role as an osmolyte important for cellular volume regulation because of the close connection between cell volume regulation and the regulation of protein synthesis as well as cellular protein degradation. While taurine supplementation alone would be expected to exert a therapeutic effect far better than negligible in patients that have been exposed to high doses of ionizing radiation, it may on theoretical grounds be expected that much better results may be obtained by using taurine as part of a multifactorial treatment strategy, where it may interact synergistically with several other nutrients, hormones or other drugs for optimizing antioxidant protection and minimizing harmful posttraumatic inflammatory reactions, while using other nutrients to optimize DNA and tissue repair processes, and using a combination of good diet, immunostimulatory hormones and perhaps other nontoxic immunostimulants (such as beta-glucans) for optimizing the recovery of antiviral and antibacterial immune functions. Similar multifactorial treatment strategies may presumably be helpful in several other disease situations (including severe infectious diseases and severe asthma) as well as for treatment of acute intoxications or acute injuries (both mechanical ones and severe burns) where severely enhanced oxidative and/or nitrative stress and/or too much secretion of vasodilatory neuropeptides from C-fibres are important parts of the pathogenetic mechanisms that may lead to the death of the patient. Some case histories (with discussion of some of those mechanisms that may have been responsible for the observed therapeutic outcome) are given for illustration of the

  9. An Examination of Attitudes and Actions of Regular Classroom and Gifted Teachers toward Differentiating for Gifted Learners Involved in a Pullout Gifted Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logan, Melissa N.

    2011-01-01

    Bridging the gap in student performance has changed the teaching practice in classrooms across America. Educators have the responsibility to teach all learners. There is a need for instruction to be tailored to boost the higher-level achievers and balance the gaps. This study examined the attitudes and actions of regular and gifted teachers…

  10. Molecular mechanism of action of triazolobenzodiazepinone agonists of the type 1 cholecystokinin receptor. Possible cooperativity across the receptor homo-dimeric complex

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Aditya J.; Lam, Polo C.H.; Orry, Andrew; Abagyan, Ruben; Christopoulos, Arthur; Sexton, Patrick M.; Miller, Laurence J.

    2016-01-01

    The type 1 cholecystokinin receptor (CCK1R) has multiple physiologic roles relating to nutrient homeostasis, including mediation of post-cibal satiety. This effect has been central in efforts to develop agonists of this receptor as part of a program to manage and/or prevent obesity. While a number of small molecule CCK1R agonists have been developed, none has yet been approved for clinical use, based on inadequate efficacy, side effects, or the potential for toxicity. Understanding the molecular details of docking and mechanism of action of these ligands can be helpful in the rational refinement and enhancement of small molecule drug candidates. In the current work, we have defined the mechanism of binding and activity of two triazolobenzodiazepinones, CE-326597 and PF-04756956, which are reported to be full agonist ligands. To achieve this, we utilized receptor binding with a series of allosteric and orthosteric radioligands at structurally-related CCK1R and CCK2R, as well as chimeric CCK1R/CCK2R constructs exchanging residues in the allosteric pocket, and assessment of biological activity. These triazolobenzodiazepinones docked within the intramembranous small molecule allosteric ligand pocket, with higher affinity binding to CCK2R than CCK1R, yet with biological activity exclusive to or greatly enhanced at CCK1R. These ligands exhibited cooperativity with benzodiazepine binding across the CCK1R homodimeric complex, resulting in their ability to inhibit only a fraction of the saturable binding of a benzodiazepine radioligand, unlike other small molecule antagonists and agonists of this receptor. This may contribute to the understanding of the unique short duration and reversible gallbladder contraction observed in vivo upon administration of these drugs. PMID:26654202

  11. The neuroprotective effects and possible mechanism of action of a methanol extract from Asparagus cochinchinensis: In vitro and in vivo studies.

    PubMed

    Jalsrai, A; Numakawa, T; Kunugi, H; Dieterich, D C; Becker, A

    2016-05-13

    Extracts of Asparagus cochinchinensis (AC) have antitumor, anti-inflammatory, and immunostimulant effects. The neurobiological mechanisms underlying the effects of AC have not been sufficiently explored. Thus we performed in vivo and in vitro experiments to further characterize potential therapeutic effects and to clarify the underlying mechanisms. In the tail suspension test immobility time was significantly reduced after administration of AC which suggests antidepressant-like activity without effect on body core temperature. Moreover, in animals pretreated with AC infarct size after occlusion of the middle cerebral artery was reduced. In vitro experiments confirmed neuroprotective effects. Total saponin obtained from AC significantly inhibited H2O2-induced cell death in cultured cortical neurons. The survival-promoting effect by AC saponins was partially blocked by inhibitors for extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ErK) and phosphoinositide 3-kinase Akt (PI3K/Akt) cascades, both of which are known as survival-promoting signaling molecules. Furthermore, phosphorylation of Scr homology-2 (SH2) domain-containing phosphatase 2 (Shp-2) was induced by AC, and the protective effect of AC was abolished by NSC87877, an inhibitor for Shp-2, suggesting an involvement of Shp-2 mediated intracellular signaling in AC saponins. Moreover, AC-induced activation of pShp-2 and ErK1/2 were blocked by NSC87877 indicating that activation of these signaling pathways was mediated by the Shp-2 signaling pathway. These effects appear to be associated with activation of the Shp-2, ErK1/2 and Akt signaling pathways. Our results suggest that AC has antidepressant-like and neuroprotective (reducing infarct size) effects and that activation of pShp-2 and pErK1/2 pathways may be involved in the effects. PMID:26947129

  12. Opto-acoustic diagnostics of the thermal action of high-intensity focused ultrasound on biological tissues: the possibility of its applications and model experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Khokhlova, Tanya D; Pelivanov, Ivan M; Solomatin, Vladimir S; Karabutov, Aleksander A; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A

    2006-12-31

    The possibility of using the opto-acoustic (OA) method for monitoring high-intensity ultrasonic therapy is studied. The optical properties of raw and boiled liver samples used as the undamaged model tissue and tissue destroyed by ultrasound, respectively, are measured. Experiments are performed with samples consisting of several alternating layers of raw and boiled liver of different thickness. The position and transverse size of the thermal lesion were determined from the temporal shape of the OA signals. The results of measurements are compared with the real size and position of the thermal lesion determined from the subsequent cuts of the sample. It is shown that the OA method permits the diagnostics of variations in biological tissues upon ultrasonic therapy. (special issue devoted to multiple radiation scattering in random media)

  13. Effects of clove oil-phospholipid mixtures on rheology of gum tragacanth - possible application for surfactant action on mucus gel simulants.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, R; Puniyani, R R

    2000-01-01

    The present study evaluates the effectiveness of specialised biomaterials consisting of clove oil- phospholipid mixtures as possible substitute surfactants in diseases of altered mucus viscosity by studying their effect on the viscosity of mucus gel simulants in vitro. Test surfactants consisting of phospholipid-clove oil mixtures in the ratio of 1 part of oil to 9 parts of phospholipid were prepared. The phospholipids used were dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and phosphatidylglycerol (PG) and binary mixtures of PC: PE and PC: PG in the ratio of 2 parts of PC to 3 parts of PE or PG. The effects of the phospholipid-clove oil mixtures on the viscosity of mucus gel simulant (MGS: a polymeric gel consisting predominantly of gum tragacanth and simulating respiratory mucus), was studied by application of steady shear rates ranging from 0.512 to 51.2/s in a concentric cylinder viscometer at 37 degrees C. The change in MGS viscosity, after incubation with surfactants, was found to have a non-Newtonian character and to follow the power law model with R2 values >0.8. The addition of clove oil-phospholipid mixtures caused a decrease in the MGS viscosity when compared with the effect of the phospholipid alone at low shear rates in case of PC, PG and PCPG. The combination of PC : PG with clove oil caused ratios of change in MGS viscosity < 1 i.e., caused a decrease in the MGS viscosity. PC: PG with clove oil was capable of lowering MGS viscosity and should be further researched as possible therapies for diseases of altered mucus rheology.

  14. Effects of clove oil-phospholipid mixtures on rheology of gum tragacanth - possible application for surfactant action on mucus gel simulants.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, R; Puniyani, R R

    2000-01-01

    The present study evaluates the effectiveness of specialised biomaterials consisting of clove oil- phospholipid mixtures as possible substitute surfactants in diseases of altered mucus viscosity by studying their effect on the viscosity of mucus gel simulants in vitro. Test surfactants consisting of phospholipid-clove oil mixtures in the ratio of 1 part of oil to 9 parts of phospholipid were prepared. The phospholipids used were dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and phosphatidylglycerol (PG) and binary mixtures of PC: PE and PC: PG in the ratio of 2 parts of PC to 3 parts of PE or PG. The effects of the phospholipid-clove oil mixtures on the viscosity of mucus gel simulant (MGS: a polymeric gel consisting predominantly of gum tragacanth and simulating respiratory mucus), was studied by application of steady shear rates ranging from 0.512 to 51.2/s in a concentric cylinder viscometer at 37 degrees C. The change in MGS viscosity, after incubation with surfactants, was found to have a non-Newtonian character and to follow the power law model with R2 values >0.8. The addition of clove oil-phospholipid mixtures caused a decrease in the MGS viscosity when compared with the effect of the phospholipid alone at low shear rates in case of PC, PG and PCPG. The combination of PC : PG with clove oil caused ratios of change in MGS viscosity < 1 i.e., caused a decrease in the MGS viscosity. PC: PG with clove oil was capable of lowering MGS viscosity and should be further researched as possible therapies for diseases of altered mucus rheology. PMID:11202146

  15. Studies on the possible contribution of a peripheral presynaptic action of clonidine and dopamine to their vascular effects under in vivo conditions.

    PubMed

    Haeusler, G

    1976-12-01

    The functional consequences of drug-induced stimulation under in vivo conditions of alpha-adrenoceptors and dopamine receptors at vascular adrenergic nerve endings (presynaptic receptors) was studied in the autoperfused hindquarters or hindlegs of cats anaesthetized with urethane. The changes in perfusion pressure in response to electrical stimulation of the lumbar sympathetic chain were taken as a measure of noradrenaline release from the vascular adrenergic nerves. Presynaptic inhibitory alpha-adrenoceptors and dopamine receptors were activated by clonidine and dopamine, respectively. According to in vitro experiments these two drugs are more potent stimulants of peripheral presynaptic than postsynaptic receptors. The lowest frequency of stimulation of the lumbar sympathetic chain which yielded a reproducible pressor response was 4 HZ for the autoperfused hindquarters and 1 HZ for the hindlegs; Clonidine was tested over a wide dose range (1-100 mug/kg i;v). A reduction of the stimulation-induced pressor response in the autoperfused hindquarters or hindlegs was observed only after the rather high dose of 100 mug/kg of clonidine. The inhibition was marked at low frequencies of stimulation (1-4 HZ) and weak or absent at high frequencies (16 and 32 HZ). The dose of clonidine (100 mug/kg) which proved to be effective at presynaptic receptors produced a transient increase in blood pressure and in perfusion pressure of the hindquarters and hindlegs and virtually abolished spontaneous sympathetic nervous activity. In spinal cats, the clonidine-induced increases in blood pressure and perfusion pressure were very pronounced and of rather long duration. Thus, under in vivo conditions clonidine showed no selectivity for presynaptic alpha-adrenoceptors in a blood-perfused vascular bed, and its presynaptic action was negligible as compared to its powerful central sympatho-inhibitory effect. Dopamine was constantly infused into the auto-perfused hindquarters or hindlegs at

  16. Possible involvement of serotonin in extinction.

    PubMed

    Beninger, R J; Phillips, A G

    1979-01-01

    In Experiment 1, rats were trained to leverpress for continuous reinforcement with food; half were then intubated with the serotonin synthesis inhibitor parachlorophenylalanine (PCPA: 400 mg/kg) and half with water. In extinction the PCPA-treated rats responded at a higher rate. In Experiment 2, rats were trained on a random interval schedule and then assigned to two groups, treated as in Experiment 1, and tested in extinction. There was no significant difference in the resistance to extinction of the two groups. In Experiment 3, the responding of rats trained in a punished stepdown response paradigm and then given an intragastric injection of PCPA took longer to recover than the responding of water-injected controls. These observations suggest that serotonergic neurons might play a role in extinction processes. PMID:155820

  17. Involvement of Hormone- and ROS-Signaling Pathways in the Beneficial Action of Humic Substances on Plants Growing under Normal and Stressing Conditions.

    PubMed

    García, Andrés Calderín; Olaetxea, Maite; Santos, Leandro Azevedo; Mora, Verónica; Baigorri, Roberto; Fuentes, Marta; Zamarreño, Angel Maria; Berbara, Ricardo Luis Louro; Garcia-Mina, José María

    2016-01-01

    The importance of soil humus in soil fertility has been well established many years ago. However, the knowledge about the whole mechanisms by which humic molecules in the rhizosphere improve plant growth remains partial and rather fragmentary. In this review we discuss the relationships between two main signaling pathway families that are affected by humic substances within the plant: one directly related to hormonal action and the other related to reactive oxygen species (ROS). In this sense, our aims are to try the integration of all these events in a more comprehensive model and underline some points in the model that remain unclear and deserve further research. PMID:27366744

  18. Involvement of Hormone- and ROS-Signaling Pathways in the Beneficial Action of Humic Substances on Plants Growing under Normal and Stressing Conditions

    PubMed Central

    García, Andrés Calderín; Olaetxea, Maite; Santos, Leandro Azevedo; Mora, Verónica; Baigorri, Roberto; Fuentes, Marta; Zamarreño, Angel Maria; Berbara, Ricardo Luis Louro; Garcia-Mina, José María

    2016-01-01

    The importance of soil humus in soil fertility has been well established many years ago. However, the knowledge about the whole mechanisms by which humic molecules in the rhizosphere improve plant growth remains partial and rather fragmentary. In this review we discuss the relationships between two main signaling pathway families that are affected by humic substances within the plant: one directly related to hormonal action and the other related to reactive oxygen species (ROS). In this sense, our aims are to try the integration of all these events in a more comprehensive model and underline some points in the model that remain unclear and deserve further research. PMID:27366744

  19. Two groups of amino acids interact with GABA-A receptors coupled to t-[35S]butylbicyclophosphorothionate binding sites: possible involvement with seizures associated with hereditary amino acidemias.

    PubMed

    Squires, R F; Saederup, E; Lajtha, A

    1988-09-01

    Seven L-amino acids (Trp, Arg, Lys, Met, Ile, Val, and Phe) partially (28-81%) reversed the inhibitory action of 1 microM gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) on t-[35S]butylbicyclophosphorothionate ([35S]TBPS) binding to rat brain membranes, with EC50 values ranging from 5 to 120 mM. D-Trp, D-Arg, D-Lys, D-Met, D-Val, and D-Phe were approximately equipotent with their L-isomers. Tyramine, phenethylamine, and tryptamine, the decarboxylation products of the aromatic amino acids (Tyr, Phe, and Trp, respectively), reversed the inhibitory action of 1 microM GABA on [35S]TBPS binding more potently than the parent amino acids (EC50 values = 1.5-3.0 mM). Human hereditary amino acidemias involving Arg, Lys, Ile, Val, and Phe are associated with seizures, and these amino acids and/or their metabolites may block GABA-A receptors. Five other L-amino acids (ornithine, His, Glu, Pro, and Ala) as well as Gly and beta-Ala inhibited [35S]TBPS binding with IC50 values ranging from 0.1 to 37 mM, and these inhibitions were reversed by the GABA-A receptor blocker R 5135 in all cases. The inhibitory effects of L-ornithine, L-Ala, L-Glu, and L-Pro were stereospecific, because the corresponding D-isomers were considerably less inhibitory. L-His, D-His, and L-Glu gave incomplete (plateau) inhibitions. Human hereditary amino acidemias involving L-ornithine, His, Pro, Gly, and beta-Ala are also associated with seizures, and we speculate that these GABA-mimetic amino acids may desensitize GABA-A receptors.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Involvement of the Receptor for Formylated Peptides in the in Vivo Anti-Migratory Actions of Annexin 1 and its Mimetics

    PubMed Central

    Perretti, Mauro; Getting, Stephen J.; Solito, Egle; Murphy, Philip M.; Gao, Ji-Liang

    2001-01-01

    An innovative avenue for anti-inflammatory therapy is inhibition of neutrophil extravasation by potentiating the action of endogenous anti-inflammatory mediators. The glucocorticoid-inducible protein annexin 1 and derived peptides are effective in inhibiting neutrophil extravasation. Here we tested the hypothesis that an interaction with the receptor for formylated peptide (FPR), so far reported only in vitro, could be the mechanism for this in vivo action. In a model of mouse peritonitis, FPR antagonists abrogated the anti-migratory effects of peptides Ac2-26 and Ac2-12, with a partial reduction in annexin 1 effects. A similar result was obtained in FPR (knock-out) KO mice. Binding of annexin 1 to circulating leukocytes was reduced (>50%) in FPR KO mice. In vitro, annexin binding to peritoneal macrophages was also markedly reduced in FPR KO mice. Finally, evidence of direct annexin 1 binding to murine FPR was obtained with HEK-293 cells transfected with the receptor. Overall, these results indicate a functional role for FPR in the anti-migratory effect of annexin 1 and derived peptides. PMID:11395373

  1. Application of the U.S. EPA Mode of Action Framework for Purposes of Guiding Future Research: A Case Study Involving the Oral Carcinogenicity of Hexavalent Chromium

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Chad M.; Haws, Laurie C.; Harris, Mark A.; Gatto, Nicole M.; Proctor, Deborah M.

    2011-01-01

    Mode of action (MOA) analysis provides a systematic description of key events leading to adverse health effects in animal bioassays for the purpose of informing human health risk assessment. Uncertainties and data gaps identified in the MOA analysis may also be used to guide future research to improve understanding of the MOAs underlying a specific toxic response and foster development of toxicokinetic and toxicodynamic models. An MOA analysis, consistent with approaches outlined in the MOA Framework as described in the Guidelines for Carcinogen Risk Assessment, was conducted to evaluate small intestinal tumors observed in mice chronically exposed to relatively high concentrations of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) in drinking water. Based on review of the literature, key events in the MOA are hypothesized to include saturation of the reductive capacity of the upper gastrointestinal tract, absorption of Cr(VI) into the intestinal epithelium, oxidative stress and inflammation, cell proliferation, direct and/or indirect DNA modification, and mutagenesis. Although available data generally support the plausibility of these key events, several unresolved questions and data gaps were identified, highlighting the need for obtaining critical toxicokinetic and toxicodynamic data in the target tissue and in the low-dose range. Experimental assays that can address these data gaps are discussed along with strategies for comparisons between responsive and nonresponsive tissues and species. This analysis provides a practical application of MOA Framework guidance and is instructive for the design of studies to improve upon the information available for quantitative risk assessment. PMID:20947717

  2. Molecular mechanisms of 6-hydroxydopamine-induced cytotoxicity in PC12 cells: involvement of hydrogen peroxide-dependent and -independent action.

    PubMed

    Saito, Yoshiro; Nishio, Keiko; Ogawa, Yoko; Kinumi, Tomoya; Yoshida, Yasukazu; Masuo, Yoshinori; Niki, Etsuo

    2007-03-01

    The neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) has been widely used to generate an experimental model of Parkinson's disease. It has been reported that reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as the superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), generated from 6-OHDA are involved in its cytotoxicity; however, the contribution and role of ROS in 6-OHDA-induced cell death have not been fully elucidated. In the present study using PC12 cells, we observed the generation of 50 microM H2O2 from a lethal concentration of 100 microM 6-OHDA within a few minutes, and compared the sole effect of H2O2 with 6-OHDA. Catalase, an H2O2-removing enzyme, completely abolished the cytotoxic effect of H2O2, while a significant but partial protective effect was observed against 6-OHDA. 6-OHDA induced peroxiredoxin oxidation, cytochrome c release, and caspase-3 activation. Catalase exhibited a strong inhibitory effect against the peroxiredoxin oxidation, and cytochrome c release induced by 6-OHDA; however, caspase-3 activation was not effectively inhibited by catalase. On the other hand, 6-OHDA-induced caspase-3 activation was inhibited in the presence of caspase-8, caspase-9, and calpain inhibitors. These results suggest that the H2O2 generated from 6-OHDA plays a pivotal role in 6-OHDA-induced peroxiredoxin oxidation, and cytochrome c release, while H2O2- and cytochrome c-independent caspase activation pathways are involved in 6-OHDA-induced neurotoxicity. These findings may contribute to explain the importance of generated H2O2 and secondary products as a second messenger of 6-OHDA-induced cell death signal linked to Parkinson's disease.

  3. From plans to actions in patient and public involvement: qualitative study of documented plans and the accounts of researchers and patients sampled from a cohort of clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Buck, Deborah; Gamble, Carrol; Dudley, Louise; Preston, Jennifer; Hanley, Bec; Williamson, Paula R; Young, Bridget

    2014-01-01

    Patient and public involvement (PPI) in research is increasingly required, although evidence to inform its implementation is limited. Objective Inform the evidence base by describing how plans for PPI were implemented within clinical trials and identifying the challenges and lessons learnt by research teams. Methods We compared PPI plans extracted from clinical trial grant applications (funded by the National Institute for Health Research Health Technology Assessment Programme between 2006 and 2010) with researchers’ and PPI contributors’ interview accounts of PPI implementation. Analysis of PPI plans and transcribed qualitative interviews drew on the Framework technique. Results Of 28 trials, 25 documented plans for PPI in funding applications and half described implementing PPI before applying for funding. Plans varied from minimal to extensive, although almost all anticipated multiple modes of PPI. Interview accounts indicated that PPI plans had been fully implemented in 20/25 trials and even expanded in some. Nevertheless, some researchers described PPI within their trials as tokenistic. Researchers and contributors noted that late or minimal PPI engagement diminished its value. Both groups perceived uncertainty about roles in relation to PPI, and noted contributors’ lack of confidence and difficulties attending meetings. PPI contributors experienced problems in interacting with researchers and understanding technical language. Researchers reported difficulties finding ‘the right’ PPI contributors, and advised caution when involving investigators’ current patients. Conclusions Engaging PPI contributors early and ensuring ongoing clarity about their activities, roles and goals, is crucial to PPI's success. Funders, reviewers and regulators should recognise the value of preapplication PPI and allocate further resources to it. They should also consider whether PPI plans in grant applications match a trial's distinct needs. Monitoring and reporting PPI

  4. Action in Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Hofsten, Claes

    2007-01-01

    It is argued that cognitive development has to be understood in the functional perspective provided by actions. Actions reflect all aspects of cognitive development including the motives of the child, the problems to be solved, and the constraints and possibilities of the child's body and sensorimotor system. Actions are directed into the future…

  5. Involvement of Raft Aggregates Enriched in Fas/CD95 Death-Inducing Signaling Complex in the Antileukemic Action of Edelfosine in Jurkat Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gajate, Consuelo; Gonzalez-Camacho, Fernando; Mollinedo, Faustino

    2009-01-01

    Background Recent evidence suggests that co-clustering of Fas/CD95 death receptor and lipid rafts plays a major role in death receptor-mediated apoptosis. Methodology/Principal Findings By a combination of genetic, biochemical, and ultrastructural approaches, we provide here compelling evidence for the involvement of lipid raft aggregates containing recruited Fas/CD95 death receptor, Fas-associated death domain-containing protein (FADD), and procaspase-8 in the induction of apoptosis in human T-cell leukemia Jurkat cells by the antitumor drug edelfosine, the prototype compound of a promising family of synthetic antitumor lipids named as synthetic alkyl-lysophospholipid analogues. Co-immunoprecipitation assays revealed that edelfosine induced the generation of the so-called death-inducing signaling complex (DISC), made up of Fas/CD95, FADD, and procaspase-8, in lipid rafts. Electron microscopy analyses allowed to visualize the formation of raft clusters and their co-localization with DISC components Fas/CD95, FADD, and procaspase-8 following edelfosine treatment of Jurkat cells. Silencing of Fas/CD95 by RNA interference, transfection with a FADD dominant-negative mutant that blocks Fas/CD95 signaling, and specific inhibition of caspase-8 prevented the apoptotic response triggered by edelfosine, hence demonstrating the functional role of DISC in drug-induced apoptosis. By using radioactive labeled edelfosine and a fluorescent analogue, we found that edelfosine accumulated in lipid rafts, forming edelfosine-rich membrane raft clusters in Jurkat leukemic T-cells. Disruption of these membrane raft domains abrogated drug uptake and drug-induced DISC assembly and apoptosis. Thus, edelfosine uptake into lipid rafts was critical for the onset of both co-aggregation of DISC in membrane rafts and subsequent apoptotic cell death. Conclusions/Significance This work shows the involvement of DISC clusters in lipid raft aggregates as a supramolecular and physical entity

  6. Regional involvement of an endothelium-derived contractile factor in the vasoactive actions of neuropeptide Y in bovine isolated retinal arteries.

    PubMed

    Prieto, D; Simonsen, U; Nyborg, N C

    1995-11-01

    1. In vitro experiments in a microvascular myograph were designed in order to investigate the effects of human neuropeptide Y (NPY), its receptor subtype and the mechanisms underlying NPY actions in bovine isolated retinal proximal (PRA) and distal (DRA) arteries. 2. A single concentration of NPY (10 nM) induced a prompt and reproducible contraction which reached a plateau within 1-4 min, after which the response returned to baseline over the next 2-10 min. Cumulative addition of NPY induced concentration-dependent contractions of bovine retinal arteries, with an EC50[M] of 1.7 nM and a maximal response equal to 54 +/- 8% of Emax (absolute maximal contractile levels of vessels) and not different from that obtained by a single addition of the peptide. There were no significant differences in either sensitivity or maximal response to NPY between PRA and DRA. 3. Porcine NPY and the selective Y1-receptor agonist, [Pro34]NPY, also induced concentration-dependent contractions of the retinal arteries with a potency and maximal response not significantly different from those of human NPY; in contrast, the selective Y2-receptor agonist, NPY(13-36), caused only a 5% contraction at the highest concentration used. 4. Removal of extracellular Ca2+ or pretreatment with the 1,4-dihydropyridine Ca(2+)-channel blocker, nifedipine (1 microM), reduced the contractile response of 10 nM NPY to 18.4 +/- 3.3% (n = 6) and 18.6 +/- 3.9% (n = 6); respectively, of the controls. 5. Mechanical removal of the endothelium depressed the maximal contraction elicited by NPY in PRA but did not affect either sensitivity or maximal response to the peptide in DRA. In endothelium-intact arteries, blockade of the cyclo-oxygenase pathway with 3 microM indomethacin increased resting tension in both PRA and DRA and significantly inhibited sensitivity and maximal contraction to NPY of PRA and DRA, respectively. The thromboxane A2 (TXA2)/prostaglandin H2 (PGH2) receptor antagonist, SQ30741, reduced both

  7. Regional involvement of an endothelium-derived contractile factor in the vasoactive actions of neuropeptide Y in bovine isolated retinal arteries.

    PubMed Central

    Prieto, D.; Simonsen, U.; Nyborg, N. C.

    1995-01-01

    1. In vitro experiments in a microvascular myograph were designed in order to investigate the effects of human neuropeptide Y (NPY), its receptor subtype and the mechanisms underlying NPY actions in bovine isolated retinal proximal (PRA) and distal (DRA) arteries. 2. A single concentration of NPY (10 nM) induced a prompt and reproducible contraction which reached a plateau within 1-4 min, after which the response returned to baseline over the next 2-10 min. Cumulative addition of NPY induced concentration-dependent contractions of bovine retinal arteries, with an EC50[M] of 1.7 nM and a maximal response equal to 54 +/- 8% of Emax (absolute maximal contractile levels of vessels) and not different from that obtained by a single addition of the peptide. There were no significant differences in either sensitivity or maximal response to NPY between PRA and DRA. 3. Porcine NPY and the selective Y1-receptor agonist, [Pro34]NPY, also induced concentration-dependent contractions of the retinal arteries with a potency and maximal response not significantly different from those of human NPY; in contrast, the selective Y2-receptor agonist, NPY(13-36), caused only a 5% contraction at the highest concentration used. 4. Removal of extracellular Ca2+ or pretreatment with the 1,4-dihydropyridine Ca(2+)-channel blocker, nifedipine (1 microM), reduced the contractile response of 10 nM NPY to 18.4 +/- 3.3% (n = 6) and 18.6 +/- 3.9% (n = 6); respectively, of the controls. 5. Mechanical removal of the endothelium depressed the maximal contraction elicited by NPY in PRA but did not affect either sensitivity or maximal response to the peptide in DRA. In endothelium-intact arteries, blockade of the cyclo-oxygenase pathway with 3 microM indomethacin increased resting tension in both PRA and DRA and significantly inhibited sensitivity and maximal contraction to NPY of PRA and DRA, respectively. The thromboxane A2 (TXA2)/prostaglandin H2 (PGH2) receptor antagonist, SQ30741, reduced both

  8. Leaf-specific thionins of barley—a novel class of cell wall proteins toxic to plant-pathogenic fungi and possibly involved in the defence mechanism of plants

    PubMed Central

    Bohlmann, Holger; Clausen, Susanne; Behnke, Susanna; Giese, Henriette; Hiller, Claudia; Reimann-Philipp, Ulrich; Schrader, Gesine; Barkholt, Vibeke; Apel, Klaus

    1988-01-01

    A novel class of highly abundant polypeptides with antifungal activity has been detected in cell walls of barley leaves. Similar polypeptides known as thionins occur not only in monocotyledonous but also in various dictoyledonous plants. The leaf-specific thionins of barley are encoded by a complex multigene family, which consists of at least 50-100 members per haploid genome. All of these genes are confined to chromosome 6. The toxicity of these thionins for plant pathogenic fungi and the fact that their synthesis can also be triggered by pathogens strongly suggest that thionins are a naturally occurring, inducible plant protein possibly involved in the mechanism of plant defence against microbial infections. Images PMID:16453847

  9. Molecular cloning and characterization of Vigna mungo processing enzyme 1 (VmPE-1), an asparaginyl endopeptidase possibly involved in post-translational processing of a vacuolar cysteine endopeptidase (SH-EP).

    PubMed

    Okamoto, T; Minamikawa, T

    1999-01-01

    Asparaginyl endopeptidase is a cysteine endopeptidase that has strict substrate specificity toward the carboxy side of asparagine residues. Vigna mungo processing enzyme 1, termed VmPE-1, occurs in the cotyledons of germinated seeds of V. mungo, and is possibly involved in the post-translational processing of a vacuolar cysteine endopeptidase, designated SH-EP, which degrades seed storage protein. VmPE-1 also showed a substrate specificity to asparagine residues, and its enzymatic activity was inhibited by NEM but not E-64. In addition, purified VmPE-1 had a potential to process the recombinant SH-EP precursor to its intermediate in vitro. cDNA clones for VmPE-1 and its homologue, named VmPE-1A, were identified and sequenced, and their expressions in the cotyledons of V. mungo seedlings and other organs were investigated. VmPE-1 mRNA and SH-EP mRNA were expressed in germinated seeds at the same stage of germination although the enzymatic activity of VmPE-1 rose prior to that of SH-EP. The level of VmPE-1A mRNA continued increasing as germination proceeded. In roots, stems and leaves of fully grown plants, and in hypocotyls, VmPE-1 and VmPE-1A were little expressed. We discuss possible functions of VmPE-1 and VmPE-1A in the cotyledons of germinated seeds.

  10. Possible involvement of cationic-drug sensitive transport systems in the blood-to-brain influx and brain-to-blood efflux of amantadine across the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Toyofumi; Fukami, Toshiro; Tomono, Kazuo

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the brain-to-blood efflux transport of amantadine across the blood-brain barrier (BBB). The apparent in vivo efflux rate constant for [(3) H]amantadine from the rat brain (keff ) was found to be 1.53 × 10(-2) min(-1) after intracerebral microinjection using the brain efflux index method. The efflux of [(3) H]amantadine was inhibited by 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP(+) ), a cationic neurotoxin, suggesting that amantadine transport from the brain to the blood across the BBB potentially involves the rat plasma membrane monoamine transporter (rPMAT). On the other hand, other selected substrates for organic cation transporters (OCTs) and organic anion transporters (OATs), as well as inhibitors of P-glycoprotein (P-gp), did not affect the efflux transport of [(3) H]amantadine. In addition, in vitro studies using an immortalized rat brain endothelial cell line (GPNT) showed that the uptake and retention of [(3) H]amantadine by the cells was not changed by the addition of cyclosporin, which is an inhibitor of P-gp. However, cyclosporin affected the uptake and retention of rhodamine123. Finally, the initial brain uptake of [(3) H]amantadine was determined using an in situ mouse brain perfusion technique. Notably, the brain uptake clearance for [(3) H]amantadine was significantly decreased with the co-perfusion of quinidine or verapamil, which are cationic P-gp inhibitors, while MPP(+) did not have a significant effect. It is thus concluded that while P-gp is not involved, it is possible that rPMAT and the cationic drug-sensitive transport system participate in the brain-to-blood efflux and the blood-to-brain influx of amantadine across the BBB, respectively.

  11. Low-dose etoposide-treatment induces endoreplication and cell death accompanied by cytoskeletal alterations in A549 cells: Does the response involve senescence? The possible role of vimentin

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Senescence in the population of cells is often described as a program of restricted proliferative capacity, which is manifested by broad morphological and biochemical changes including a metabolic shift towards an autophagic-like response and a genotoxic-stress related induction of polyploidy. Concomitantly, the cell cycle progression of a senescent cell is believed to be irreversibly arrested. Recent reports suggest that this phenomenon may have an influence on the therapeutic outcome of anticancer treatment. The aim of this study was to verify the possible involvement of this program in the response to the treatment of the A549 cell population with low doses of etoposide, as well as to describe accompanying cytoskeletal alterations. Methods After treatment with etoposide, selected biochemical and morphological parameters were examined, including: the activity of senescence-associated ß-galactosidase, SAHF formation, cell cycle progression, the induction of p21Cip1/Waf1/Sdi1 and cyclin D1, DNA strand breaks, the disruption of cell membrane asymmetry/integrity and ultrastructural alterations. Vimentin and G-actin cytoskeleton was evaluated both cytometrically and microscopically. Results and conclusions Etoposide induced a senescence-like phenotype in the population of A549 cells. Morphological alterations were nevertheless not directly coupled with other senescence markers including a stable cell cycle arrest, SAHF formation or p21Cip1/Waf1/Sdi1 induction. Instead, a polyploid, TUNEL-positive fraction of cells visibly grew in number. Also upregulation of cyclin D1 was observed. Here we present preliminary evidence, based on microscopic analyses, that suggest a possible role of vimentin in nuclear alterations accompanying polyploidization-depolyploidization events following genotoxic insults. PMID:23383739

  12. Community Involvement Activities: Research into Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattox, Beverly; Rich, Dorothy

    1977-01-01

    The Home and School Institute operates to develop specific, easy, low cost, practical ways to share educational accountability between home and school, and to develop ways in which schools can enhance school-community interaction. (MB)

  13. Experimental study of possible involvement of some apoptosis mechanisms in pathogenesis of the HIV infection: 2. The CD4+ T lymphocytes depletion in the HIV infection occurs through activation-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Topârceanu, F; Bârnaure, F; Iucu, C T; Spulbăr, E; Pătru, C

    1999-01-01

    The present work is a part of a complex experimental study aimed at the demonstration of the two previously published hypotheses regarding the involvement of apoptosis in general in the viral infection and especially in HIV infection (1). Our researches have shown that the significant lowering of the number of peripheral CD4+ T lymphocytes in HIV-infected children is associated with a marked increase of the soluble interleukin 2-receptor (sIL2-R)# concentration, in comparison with HIV-negative, healthy or acute infections exhibiting controls. As sIL-2R is a circulating marker of cell activation, we investigated the role of monocytes (antigen-presenting cells) in the viability of peripheral lymphocytes isolated from HIV-infected children in comparison with the controls. Lymphocytes cultivation in the absence and in the presence of autologous monocytes led to the following conclusions: 1) freshly isolated lymphocytes from HIV-positive individuals undergo an accelerated spontaneous apoptosis in comparison with that of lymphocytes isolated from HIV-negative individuals: 2) the normal antiapoptotic effect of monocytes on lymphocytes diminishes gradually in the HIV infection, changing into a proapoptotic effect, corresponding to the sIL-2R augmentation to increasingly higher values. Our results show that peripheral CD4+ T-lymphocyte depletion in HIV infection occurs through apoptosis and the activation-induced cell death is one of the possible apoptosis mechanisms.

  14. Epidermal growth factor stimulates the disruption of gap junctional communication and connexin43 phosphorylation independent of 12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate-sensitive protein kinase C: the possible involvement of mitogen-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Kanemitsu, M Y; Lau, A F

    1993-08-01

    We previously reported that epidermal growth factor (EGF) induced the disruption of gap junctional communication (gjc) and serine phosphorylation of connexin43 (Cx43) in T51B rat liver epithelial cells. However, the cascade of events linking EGF receptor activation to these particular responses have not been fully characterized. Furthermore, the serine kinase(s) acting directly on Cx43 remain unidentified. In the current study, we demonstrate that downmodulation of 12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA)-sensitive protein kinase C (PKC) activity does not affect EGF's ability to reduce junctional permeability or phosphorylate Cx43 in T51B cells. EGF in the presence or absence of chronic TPA treatment stimulated marked increases in Cx43 phosphorylation on numerous sites as determined by two-dimensional tryptic phosphopeptide mapping. Computer-assisted sequence analysis of Cx43 identified several protein kinase phosphorylation consensus sites including two sites for mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase. EGF stimulated activation of MAP kinase in a time- and dose-dependent manner where the kinetics of kinase activity corroborated its possible involvement in mediating EGF's effects. Moreover, purified MAP kinase directly phosphorylated Cx43 on serine residues in vitro. Two-dimensional tryptic and chymotryptic phosphopeptide mapping demonstrated that the in vitro phosphopeptides represented a specific subset of the in vivo phosphopeptides produced in response to EGF after chronic TPA treatment. Therefore, EGF-induced disruption of gjc and phosphorylation of Cx43 may be mediated in part by MAP kinase in vivo.

  15. Evidence that protein kinase C may not be involved in the insulin action on cAMP phosphodiesterase: studies with electroporated rat adipocytes that were highly responsive to insulin.

    PubMed

    Shibata, H; Robinson, F W; Benzing, C F; Kono, T

    1991-02-15

    Partially permeabilized rat adipocytes with a high responsiveness to insulin were prepared by electroporation and used to study the effect of 1-(5-isoquinolinylsulfonyl)-2-methylpiperazine (H-7) on insulin actions in adipocytes. H-7 is a well-documented inhibitor of several protein kinases, including protein kinase C; however, it does not rapidly enter adipocytes protected with the intact plasma membrane. The cells were suspended in Buffer X [4.74 mM NaCl, 118.0 mM KCl, 0.38 mM CaCl2, 1.00 mM EGTA, 1.19 mM Mg2SO4, 1.19 mM KH2PO4, 25.0 mM Hepes/K, 20 mg/ml bovine serum albumin, and 3 mM pyruvate/Na, pH 7.4] and electroporated six times with a Gene-Pulser (from Bio-Rad) set at 25 microF and 2 kV/cm. In cells electroporated as above, insulin stimulated (a) membrane-bound, cAMP phosphodiesterase approximately 2.6-fold when the hormone concentration was 10 nM and (b) glucose transport activity approximately 4.5-fold when the hormone concentration was raised to 100 nM. H-7 strongly inhibited the actions of insulin on both glucose transport (apparent Ki = 0.3 mM) and cAMP phosphodiesterase (apparent Ki = 1.2 mM) in electroporated adipocytes. H-7 also inhibited lipolysis in adipocytes; the apparent Ki value for the reaction in intact cells was 0.45 mM, and that in electroporated cells was 0.075 mM. It is suggested that a certain protein kinase or kinases that are significantly sensitive to H-7 may be involved in the insulin-dependent stimulation of glucose transport and that of phosphodiesterase. However, protein kinase C (or Ca2+/phospholipid-dependent protein kinase) may not be involved, at least, in the hormonal action on phosphodiesterase since the apparent Ki value of H-7 for the reaction is too high. PMID:1846737

  16. Human lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells: III. Effect of L-phenylalanine methyl ester on LAK cell activation from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells: possible protease involvement of monocytes, natural killer cells and LAK cells.

    PubMed

    Leung, K H

    1991-01-01

    We have shown that depletion of monocytes from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) by L-phenylalanine methyl ester (PheOMe) enhanced lymphokine-activated killer cell (LAK) generation by recombinant interleukin-2 (rIL-2) at high cell density. In this study, we have investigated the mechanism of action of PheOMe on LAK activation by using trypsin, chymotrypsin, tosylphenylalaninechloromethanol (TPCK, a chymotrypsin inhibitor), tosyl-L-lysinechloromethane (TLCK, a trypsin inhibitor), phenylalaninol (PheOH), and benzamidine. PBMC were treated with 1-5 mM PheOMe for 40 min at room temperature in combination with the various agents, washed and assessed for their effects on natural killer (NK) activity against K562 cells and monocyte depletion. The treated cells were then cultured with or without rIL-2 for 3 days. LAK cytotoxicity was assayed against 51Cr-labeled K562 and Raji tumor target cells. TPCK at 10 micrograms/ml partially inhibited depletion of monocytes by PheOMe. TLCK did not prevent depletion of monocytes nor inhibition of NK activity induced by PheOMe. TPCK and TLCK inhibited NK activity by themselves. TPCK but not TLCK inhibited rIL-2 induction of LAK cells. On the other hand, PheOH and benzamidine (analogs of PheOMe) lacked any effect on monocyte depletion but abrogated the inhibitory effect of PheOMe on NK activity. They had no effect on rIL-2 activation of LAK activity enhanced by PheOMe. Trypsin potentiated the inhibitory effect of PheOMe on NK activity and monocyte depletion. Trypsin partially inhibited IL-2 activation of LAK activity enhanced by PheOMe. Chymotrypsin had little effect on NK activity but prevented the inhibitory effect of PheOMe on NK activity. It had little effect on monocyte depletion induced by PheOMe. PheOMe was hydrolysed by monocytes and chymotrypsin to Phe and methanol as determined by HPLC. TPCK inhibited hydrolysis of PheOMe by monocytes. Our data suggest that the effects of PheOMe on monocytes, NK cells and LAK

  17. Expression of factors associated with apoptosis in the porcine corpus luteum throughout the luteal phase of the estrous cycle and early pregnancy: their possible involvement in acquisition of luteolytic sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Przygrodzka, E; Witek, K J; Kaczmarek, M M; Andronowska, A; Ziecik, A J

    2015-03-01

    CL, while level of TP53 increased (P < 0.05) on Day 12 of the estrous cycle versus Day 8. The level of FOS and JUN mRNA increased (P < 0.05) on Day 14 of the estrous cycle versus the remaining days. The level of FOS and JUN mRNA was significantly higher (P < 0.001 and P < 0.05, respectively) on Day 14 of the estrous cycle than that on the corresponding day of pregnancy. In summary, the simultaneous increase of TNFA and IFNG transcript in cyclic CL suggests the crucial role of both cytokines in sensitization of porcine CL to further luteolytic action of PGF2α. The upregulated expression of FAS, FOS, and JUN mRNA in the late luteal phase in cyclic CL can indicate their involvement in structural luteolysis. The increased viability of luteal cells and elevated P4 concentrations in pregnant CL confirm the protective role of luteal P4 against apoptosis.

  18. Handbook for Ecology Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eber, Ronald

    This handbook has been compiled to aid concerned individuals and ecology groups more adequately define their goals, initiate good programs, and take effective action. It examines the ways a group of working individuals can become involved in action programs for ecological change. Part 1 deals with organization, preliminary organizing, structuring,…

  19. Renormalized action improvements

    SciTech Connect

    Zachos, C.

    1984-01-01

    Finite lattice spacing artifacts are suppressed on the renormalized actions. The renormalized action trajectories of SU(N) lattice gauge theories are considered from the standpoint of the Migdal-Kadanoff approximation. The minor renormalized trajectories which involve representations invariant under the center are discussed and quantified. 17 references.

  20. The generalized anomeric effect in the 1,3-thiazolidines: Evidence for both sulphur and nitrogen as electron donors. Crystal structures of various N-acylthiazolidines including mercury(II) complexes. Possible relevance to penicillin action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandrasekhar, Sosale; Chopra, Deepak; Gopalaiah, Kovuru; Guru Row, Tayur N.

    2007-06-01

    Evidence for the generalized anomeric effect (GAE) in the N-acyl-1,3-thiazolidines, an important structural motif in the penicillins, was sought in the crystal structures of N-(4-nitrobenzoyl)-1,3-thiazolidine and its (2:1) complex with mercuric chloride, N-acetyl-2-phenyl-1,3-thiazolidine, and the (2:1) complex of N-benzoyl-1,3-thiazolidine with mercuric bromide. An inverse relationship was generally observed between the C2- N and C2- S bond lengths of the thiazolidine ring, supporting the existence of the GAE. (Maximal bond length changes were ˜0.04 Å for C2- N3, S1- C2, and ˜0.08 Å for N3- C6.) Comparison with N-acylpyrrolidines and tetrahydrothiophenes indicates that both the nitrogen-to-sulphur and sulphur-to-nitrogen GAE's operate simultaneously in the 1,3-thiazolidines, the former being dominant. (This is analogous to the normal and exo-anomeric effects in pyranoses, and also leads to an interesting application of Baldwin's rules.) The nitrogen-to-sulphur GAE is generally enhanced in the mercury(II) complexes (presumably via coordination at the sulphur); a 'competition' between the GAE and the amide resonance of the N-acyl moiety is apparent. There is evidence for a 'push-pull' charge transfer between the thiazolidine moieties in the mercury(II) complexes, and for a 'back-donation' of charge from the bromine atoms to the thiazolidine moieties in the HgBr 2 complex. (The sulphur atom appears to be sp 2 hybridised in the mercury(II) complexes, possibly for stereoelectronic reasons.) These results are apparently relevant to the mode of action of the penicillins.

  1. The Action Lawyers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lubenow, Gerald C.

    1972-01-01

    A description of the Serrano vs. Priest class action suit in California, challenging the system of financing education through property taxes; author touches upon the possibilities for the courts becoming change agents in the struggle for social reform. (SP)

  2. A neural network model of causative actions.

    PubMed

    Lee-Hand, Jeremy; Knott, Alistair

    2015-01-01

    A common idea in models of action representation is that actions are represented in terms of their perceptual effects (see e.g., Prinz, 1997; Hommel et al., 2001; Sahin et al., 2007; Umiltà et al., 2008; Hommel, 2013). In this paper we extend existing models of effect-based action representations to account for a novel distinction. Some actions bring about effects that are independent events in their own right: for instance, if John smashes a cup, he brings about the event of the cup smashing. Other actions do not bring about such effects. For instance, if John grabs a cup, this action does not cause the cup to "do" anything: a grab action has well-defined perceptual effects, but these are not registered by the perceptual system that detects independent events involving external objects in the world. In our model, effect-based actions are implemented in several distinct neural circuits, which are organized into a hierarchy based on the complexity of their associated perceptual effects. The circuit at the top of this hierarchy is responsible for actions that bring about independently perceivable events. This circuit receives input from the perceptual module that recognizes arbitrary events taking place in the world, and learns movements that reliably cause such events. We assess our model against existing experimental observations about effect-based motor representations, and make some novel experimental predictions. We also consider the possibility that the "causative actions" circuit in our model can be identified with a motor pathway reported in other work, specializing in "functional" actions on manipulable tools (Bub et al., 2008; Binkofski and Buxbaum, 2013). PMID:26175685

  3. Ground-water, surface-water, and bottom-sediment contamination in the O-field area, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, and the possible effects of selected remedial actions on ground water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vroblesky, Don A.; Lorah, Michelle M.; Oliveros, James P.

    1995-01-01

    Disposal of munitions and chemical-warfare substances has introduced inorganic and organic contaminants to the ground water, surface water, and bottom sediment at O-Field, in the Edgewood area of Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. Contaminants include chloride, arsenic, transition metals, chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons, aromatic compounds, and organosulfur and organophosphorus compounds. The hydrologic effects of several remedial actions were estimated by use of a ground-water-flow model. The remedial actions examined were an impermeable covering, encapsulation, subsurface barriers, a ground-water drain, pumping of wells to manage water levels or to remove contaminated ground water for treatment, and no action.

  4. The Logic of Action: From a Teacher's Notebook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkins, Frances Pockman

    Photographs and anecdotal narratives tell stories of concept and language learning by six deaf four-year-old children. Through the misfortune of deafness it was possible to study some matters of learning and communication which involve only the language of action. The author also makes observations about the principle of choice as it contributes…

  5. Possible people.

    PubMed

    Hare, R M

    1988-10-01

    Where we have a choice between bringing someone into existence and not doing so, the interests of the possible person must be considered. The implications of this view for population policy are explored, concluding with a version of utilitarianism that proposes increasing the population of a society while increasing the total utility, without altering its proportionate distribution, until the lowest segment of the population comes below the break-even point at which life is just worth living. Questions of whether poverty is the chief cause of misery and how great an obligation is owed to reducing social and economic inequalities are examined.

  6. A neural network model of causative actions

    PubMed Central

    Lee-Hand, Jeremy; Knott, Alistair

    2015-01-01

    A common idea in models of action representation is that actions are represented in terms of their perceptual effects (see e.g., Prinz, 1997; Hommel et al., 2001; Sahin et al., 2007; Umiltà et al., 2008; Hommel, 2013). In this paper we extend existing models of effect-based action representations to account for a novel distinction. Some actions bring about effects that are independent events in their own right: for instance, if John smashes a cup, he brings about the event of the cup smashing. Other actions do not bring about such effects. For instance, if John grabs a cup, this action does not cause the cup to “do” anything: a grab action has well-defined perceptual effects, but these are not registered by the perceptual system that detects independent events involving external objects in the world. In our model, effect-based actions are implemented in several distinct neural circuits, which are organized into a hierarchy based on the complexity of their associated perceptual effects. The circuit at the top of this hierarchy is responsible for actions that bring about independently perceivable events. This circuit receives input from the perceptual module that recognizes arbitrary events taking place in the world, and learns movements that reliably cause such events. We assess our model against existing experimental observations about effect-based motor representations, and make some novel experimental predictions. We also consider the possibility that the “causative actions” circuit in our model can be identified with a motor pathway reported in other work, specializing in “functional” actions on manipulable tools (Bub et al., 2008; Binkofski and Buxbaum, 2013). PMID:26175685

  7. Action and representation of action during childhood and adolescence: a functional approach.

    PubMed

    Assaiante, C

    2012-01-01

    Our scientific activity is focused on the field of action and representation of action from various adaptative situations during the life span, including pathology and extreme environment such as microgravity. The early action/perception matching, subserving the motor simulation network, is probably a major milestone for the building of action and representation of action during the course of ontogenesis. We have developed a functional approach of motor development based on a gradual mastering of coordination, adaptation and anticipation in postural control in the course of ontogenesis from babies to adolescents. This functional approach is recently associated with studies of brain structures involved in action and representation of action in children and adolescents with typical or atypical neurodevelopment. From our developmental studies, it was possible to put in light two turning points during motor development, such as 6/7 years of age and adolescence. The first step for children consists in building a repertoire of postural strategies. The second step consists in learning to select postural strategy depending on the characteristics of the task and the environmental requirements. An appropriate selection means to anticipate the consequence of the movement in order to maintain balance control and efficiency of the task. Taking into account the complexity of the parameters to control and the late maturation of anticipation and representation of action, it is not surprising that the development of postural control continues up to late periods during childhood and adolescence. PMID:22200341

  8. [Care in Heidegger: an ontological possibility for nursing].

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Marília de Fátima Vieira; Carraro, Telma Elisa

    2011-01-01

    Given the dimensions involving human care, this study aimed at providing a reflection on nursing care as an ontological possibility. In Heidegger we consider the concepts that underlie the foundation of his thought. These reflections offer theoretical resource that allows the recognition that live in the everyday actions of nursing is a challenge that leads us to a new look at the magnitude of care. However, the actions of care should not target only the perspective of a philosopher, but live with that thought in search of reflection, and find, scrutinizing everything you contribute to a nursing care committed to the right, with ethics, and with respect for others.

  9. Motor Execution Affects Action Prediction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Springer, Anne; Brandstadter, Simone; Liepelt, Roman; Birngruber, Teresa; Giese, Martin; Mechsner, Franz; Prinz, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies provided evidence of the claim that the prediction of occluded action involves real-time simulation. We report two experiments that aimed to study how real-time simulation is affected by simultaneous action execution under conditions of full, partial or no overlap between observed and executed actions. This overlap was analysed by…

  10. On Involvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, Michael B.

    Involvement Ratings In Settings (IRIS), a multi-dimensional non-verbal scale of involvement adaptable to a time-sampling method of data collection, was constructed with the aid of the videotapes of second-grade Follow Through classrooms made by CCEP. Scales were defined through observations of involved and alienated behavior, and the IRIS was…

  11. Action physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGinness, Lachlan P.; Savage, C. M.

    2016-09-01

    More than a decade ago, Edwin Taylor issued a "call to action" that presented the case for basing introductory university mechanics teaching around the principle of stationary action [E. F. Taylor, Am. J. Phys. 71, 423-425 (2003)]. We report on our response to that call in the form of an investigation of the teaching and learning of the stationary action formulation of physics in a first-year university course. Our action physics instruction proceeded from the many-paths approach to quantum physics to ray optics, classical mechanics, and relativity. Despite the challenges presented by action physics, students reported it to be accessible, interesting, motivational, and valuable.

  12. Conscious Control over Action

    PubMed Central

    Shepherd, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    The extensive involvement of nonconscious processes in human behaviour has led some to suggest that consciousness is much less important for the control of action than we might think. In this article I push against this trend, developing an understanding of conscious control that is sensitive to our best models of overt (that is, bodily) action control. Further, I assess the cogency of various zombie challenges—challenges that seek to demote the importance of conscious control for human agency. I argue that though nonconscious contributions to action control are evidently robust, these challenges are overblown. PMID:26113753

  13. Antistress Effects of Rosa rugosa Thunb. on Total Sleep Deprivation-Induced Anxiety-Like Behavior and Cognitive Dysfunction in Rat: Possible Mechanism of Action of 5-HT6 Receptor Antagonist.

    PubMed

    Na, Ju-Ryun; Oh, Dool-Ri; Han, SeulHee; Kim, Yu-Jin; Choi, EunJin; Bae, Donghyuck; Oh, Dong Hwan; Lee, Yoo-Hyun; Kim, Sunoh; Jun, Woojin

    2016-09-01

    Our previous results suggest that the Rosa rugosa Thunb. (family Rosaceae) alleviates endurance exercise-induced stress by decreasing oxidative stress levels. This study aimed to screen and identify the physiological antistress effects of an extract of R. rugosa (RO) on sleep deprivation-induced anxiety-like behavior and cognitive tests (in vivo) and tested for hippocampal CORT and monoamine levels (ex vivo), corticosterone (CORT)-induced injury, N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor, and serotonin 6 (5-hydroxytryptamine 6, 5-HT6) receptor activities (in vitro) in search of active principles and underlying mechanisms of action. We confirmed the antistress effects of RO in a sleep-deprived stress model in rat and explored the underlying mechanisms of its action. In conclusion, an R. rugosa extract showed efficacy and potential for use as an antistress therapy to treat sleep deprivation through its antagonism of the 5-HT6 receptor and resulting inhibition of cAMP activity. PMID:27331439

  14. Possible involvement of membrane lipids peroxidation and oxidation of catalytically essential thiols of the cerebral transmembrane sodium pump as component mechanisms of iron-mediated oxidative stress-linked dysfunction of the pump's activity

    PubMed Central

    Omotayo, T.I.; Akinyemi, G.S.; Omololu, P.A.; Ajayi, B.O.; Akindahunsi, A.A.; Rocha, J.B.T.; Kade, I.J.

    2014-01-01

    The precise molecular events defining the complex role of oxidative stress in the inactivation of the cerebral sodium pump in radical-induced neurodegenerative diseases is yet to be fully clarified and thus still open. Herein we investigated the modulation of the activity of the cerebral transmembrane electrogenic enzyme in Fe2+-mediated in vitro oxidative stress model. The results show that Fe2+ inhibited the transmembrane enzyme in a concentration dependent manner and this effect was accompanied by a biphasic generation of aldehydic product of lipid peroxidation. While dithiothreitol prevented both Fe2+ inhibitory effect on the pump and lipid peroxidation, vitamin E prevented only lipid peroxidation but not inhibition of the pump. Besides, malondialdehyde (MDA) inhibited the pump by a mechanism not related to oxidation of its critical thiols. Apparently, the low activity of the pump in degenerative diseases mediated by Fe2+ may involve complex multi-component mechanisms which may partly involve an initial oxidation of the critical thiols of the enzyme directly mediated by Fe2+ and during severe progression of such diseases; aldehydic products of lipid peroxidation such as MDA may further exacerbate this inhibitory effect by a mechanism that is likely not related to the oxidation of the catalytically essential thiols of the ouabain-sensitive cerebral electrogenic pump. PMID:25618580

  15. Stochastic and nonstochastic post-transcriptional silencing of chitinase and beta-1,3-glucanase genes involves increased RNA turnover-possible role for ribosome-independent RNA degradation.

    PubMed Central

    Holtorf, H; Schöb, H; Kunz, C; Waldvogel, R; Meins, F

    1999-01-01

    Stochastic and nonstochastic post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS) in Nicotiana sylvestris plants carrying tobacco class I chitinase (CHN) and beta-1,3-glucanase transgenes differs in incidence, stability, and pattern of expression. Measurements with inhibitors of RNA synthesis (cordycepin, actinomycin D, and alpha-amanitin) showed that both forms of PTGS are associated with increased sequence-specific degradation of transcripts, suggesting that increased RNA turnover may be a general feature of PTGS. The protein synthesis inhibitors cycloheximide and verrucarin A did not inhibit degradation of CHN RNA targeted for PTGS, confirming that PTGS-related RNA degradation does not depend on ongoing protein synthesis. Because verrucarin A, unlike cycloheximide, dissociates mRNA from ribosomes, our results also suggest that ribosome-associated RNA degradation pathways may not be involved in CHN PTGS. PMID:10072405

  16. Action Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1996

    These four papers were presented at a symposium on action learning moderated by Lex Dilworth at the 1996 conference of the Academy of Human Resource Development. "Developing an Infrastructure for Individual and Organizational Change: Transfer of Learning from an Action Reflection Learning (ARL) Program" (ARL Inquiry) reports findings from a study…

  17. Δ(9)-THC modulation of fatty acid 2-hydroxylase (FA2H) gene expression: possible involvement of induced levels of PPARα in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Shuso; Ikeda, Eriko; Su, Shengzhong; Harada, Mari; Okazaki, Hiroyuki; Yoshioka, Yasushi; Nishimura, Hajime; Ishii, Hiroyuki; Kakizoe, Kazuhiro; Taniguchi, Aya; Tokuyasu, Miki; Himeno, Taichi; Watanabe, Kazuhito; Omiecinski, Curtis J; Aramaki, Hironori

    2014-12-01

    We recently reported that Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC), a major cannabinoid component in Cannabis Sativa (marijuana), significantly stimulated the expression of fatty acid 2-hydroxylase (FA2H) in human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) was previously implicated in this induction. However, the mechanisms mediating this induction have not been elucidated in detail. We performed a DNA microarray analysis of Δ(9)-THC-treated samples and showed the selective up-regulation of the PPARα isoform coupled with the induction of FA2H over the other isoforms (β and γ). Δ(9)-THC itself had no binding/activation potential to/on PPARα, and palmitic acid (PA), a PPARα ligand, exhibited no stimulatory effects on FA2H in MDA-MB-231 cells; thus, we hypothesized that the levels of PPARα induced were involved in the Δ(9)-THC-mediated increase in FA2H. In support of this hypothesis, we herein demonstrated that; (i) Δ(9)-THC activated the basal transcriptional activity of PPARα in a concentration-dependent manner, (ii) the concomitant up-regulation of PPARα/FA2H was caused by Δ(9)-THC, (iii) PA could activate PPARα after the PPARα expression plasmid was introduced, and (iv) the Δ(9)-THC-induced up-regulation of FA2H was further stimulated by the co-treatment with L-663,536 (a known PPARα inducer). Taken together, these results support the concept that the induced levels of PPARα may be involved in the Δ(9)-THC up-regulation of FA2H in MDA-MB-231 cells.

  18. Citrus nobiletin suppresses bone loss in ovariectomized ddY mice and collagen-induced arthritis in DBA/1J mice: possible involvement of receptor activator of NF-kappaB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclastogenesis regulation.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Akira; Song, Meiyu; Katsumata, Shin-Ichi; Uehara, Mariko; Suzuki, Kazuharu; Ohigashi, Hajime

    2007-01-01

    OP and RA, with reasonable action mechanisms.

  19. From Awareness to Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Micklos, John, Jr.

    2012-01-01

    What inspires young people to become activists? Events such as wars or regime changes obviously raise high emotions. But some choose to get involved because they saw a need and felt compelled to take action. Young Americans have a long track record as activists. Among other things, they played a key role in the civil rights movement of the 1950s…

  20. Instructional Rounds in Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, John E.

    2012-01-01

    "Instructional Rounds in Action" is an invaluable guide for those involved in implementing instructional rounds as the foundation and framework for systemic improvement in schools. Over the past few years, districts across the United States, Canada, and Australia have begun implementing "instructional rounds," a set of ideas and practices for…

  1. Programs for Urban Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Board of Young Men's Christian Associations, New York, NY.

    This booklet contains descriptions of 150 urban action programs being conducted by Young Men's Christian Associations throughout the United States. Planning principles are included to assist those who wish to adapt the programs to local situations: involvement of people in planning; use of local indigenous leadership; planning in collaboration…

  2. Garcinone D, a natural xanthone promotes C17.2 neural stem cell proliferation: Possible involvement of STAT3/Cyclin D1 pathway and Nrf2/HO-1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaohong; Wang, Shengnan; Ouyang, Ying; Tu, Yaling; Liu, Anmin; Tian, Yinghong; He, Mingliang; Pi, Rongbiao

    2016-07-28

    Garcinia mangostana L. (Mangosteen) has been used to treat various pathological conditions, including inflammation and urinary tract infections. Here, we observed that garcinone D, a natural xanthone from mangosteen, promoted the proliferation of C17.2 neural progenitor cells and also resulted in a larger percentage of cells in S phase compared with the control group. Moreover, garcinone D increased the protein levels of phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (p-STAT3) and Cyclin D1 in concentration- and time- dependent manners. Garcinone D also increased the protein levels of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor (Nrf2) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in concentration- and time- dependent manners, and inhibiting Nrf2 activation by brusatol could partly reverse garcinone D-induced C17.2 cell proliferation. Taken together, it is the first time to show that garcinone D promotes the proliferation of C17.2 neural stem cells, which may involve the STAT3/Cyclin D1 pathway and Nrf2/HO-1 pathway. It would provide new inspiration to develop garcinone D as a lead compound to promote the proliferation of endogenous neural stem cells (NSCs). PMID:27177723

  3. Involvement of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor β/δ (PPAR β/δ) in BDNF signaling during aging and in Alzheimer disease: possible role of 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE).

    PubMed

    Benedetti, Elisabetta; D'Angelo, Barbara; Cristiano, Loredana; Di Giacomo, Erica; Fanelli, Francesca; Moreno, Sandra; Cecconi, Francesco; Fidoamore, Alessia; Antonosante, Andrea; Falcone, Roberta; Ippoliti, Rodolfo; Giordano, Antonio; Cimini, Annamaria

    2014-01-01

    Aging and many neurological disorders, such as AD, are linked to oxidative stress, which is considered the common effector of the cascade of degenerative events. In this phenomenon, reactive oxygen species play a fundamental role in the oxidative decomposition of polyunsaturated fatty acids, resulting in the formation of a complex mixture of aldehydic end products, such as malondialdehyde, 4-hydroxynonenal, and other alkenals. Interestingly, 4-HNE has been indicated as an intracellular agonist of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor β/δ. In this study, we examined, at early and advanced AD stages (3, 9, and 18 months), the pattern of 4-HNE and its catabolic enzyme glutathione S-transferase P1 in relation to the expression of PPARβ/δ, BDNF signaling, as mRNA and protein, as well as on their pathological forms (i.e., precursors or truncated forms). The data obtained indicate a novel detrimental age-dependent role of PPAR β/δ in AD by increasing pro-BDNF and decreasing BDNF/TrkB survival pathways, thus pointing toward the possibility that a specific PPARβ/δ antagonist may be used to counteract the disease progression. PMID:24621497