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Sample records for action potential recorded

  1. Intracellular recording of action potentials by nanopillar electroporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Chong; Lin, Ziliang; Hanson, Lindsey; Cui, Yi; Cui, Bianxiao

    2012-03-01

    Action potentials have a central role in the nervous system and in many cellular processes, notably those involving ion channels. The accurate measurement of action potentials requires efficient coupling between the cell membrane and the measuring electrodes. Intracellular recording methods such as patch clamping involve measuring the voltage or current across the cell membrane by accessing the cell interior with an electrode, allowing both the amplitude and shape of the action potentials to be recorded faithfully with high signal-to-noise ratios. However, the invasive nature of intracellular methods usually limits the recording time to a few hours, and their complexity makes it difficult to simultaneously record more than a few cells. Extracellular recording methods, such as multielectrode arrays and multitransistor arrays, are non-invasive and allow long-term and multiplexed measurements. However, extracellular recording sacrifices the one-to-one correspondence between the cells and electrodes, and also suffers from significantly reduced signal strength and quality. Extracellular techniques are not, therefore, able to record action potentials with the accuracy needed to explore the properties of ion channels. As a result, the pharmacological screening of ion-channel drugs is usually performed by low-throughput intracellular recording methods. The use of nanowire transistors, nanotube-coupled transistors and micro gold-spine and related electrodes can significantly improve the signal strength of recorded action potentials. Here, we show that vertical nanopillar electrodes can record both the extracellular and intracellular action potentials of cultured cardiomyocytes over a long period of time with excellent signal strength and quality. Moreover, it is possible to repeatedly switch between extracellular and intracellular recording by nanoscale electroporation and resealing processes. Furthermore, vertical nanopillar electrodes can detect subtle changes in action

  2. Far-field potentials recorded from action potentials and from a tripole in a hemicylindrical volume.

    PubMed

    Jewett, D L; Deupree, D L

    1989-05-01

    There is growing evidence in support of the hypothesis that far-field potentials are recorded when action potentials encounter discontinuities in the surrounding volume. The present study found further support for this hypothesis using two methods of experimentation. The first method recorded potentials when the action potential from an isolated bullfrog sciatic nerve in a hemicylindrical volume (i) encountered a change in the shape of the surrounding volume, (ii) crossed a boundary between 2 volumes of differing resistivities, (iii) reached a bend in the nerve, or (iv) reached the functional end of the nerve. In the second method, potentials were recorded when an electrical tripole, constructed in a way to produce the electrical equivalent of an action potential, encountered the same discontinuities as well as when it was configured to simulate a curved nerve. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that dipole components of an action potential predominant in far-field recordings. PMID:2469568

  3. Flexible graphene transistors for recording cell action potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaschke, Benno M.; Lottner, Martin; Drieschner, Simon; Bonaccini Calia, Andrea; Stoiber, Karolina; Rousseau, Lionel; Lissourges, Gaëlle; Garrido, Jose A.

    2016-06-01

    Graphene solution-gated field-effect transistors (SGFETs) are a promising platform for the recording of cell action potentials due to the intrinsic high signal amplification of graphene transistors. In addition, graphene technology fulfills important key requirements for in-vivo applications, such as biocompability, mechanical flexibility, as well as ease of high density integration. In this paper we demonstrate the fabrication of flexible arrays of graphene SGFETs on polyimide, a biocompatible polymeric substrate. We investigate the transistor’s transconductance and intrinsic electronic noise which are key parameters for the device sensitivity, confirming that the obtained values are comparable to those of rigid graphene SGFETs. Furthermore, we show that the devices do not degrade during repeated bending and the transconductance, governed by the electronic properties of graphene, is unaffected by bending. After cell culture, we demonstrate the recording of cell action potentials from cardiomyocyte-like cells with a high signal-to-noise ratio that is higher or comparable to competing state of the art technologies. Our results highlight the great capabilities of flexible graphene SGFETs in bioelectronics, providing a solid foundation for in-vivo experiments and, eventually, for graphene-based neuroprosthetics.

  4. A digital programmable telemetric system for recording extracellular action potentials.

    PubMed

    Heredia-López, Francisco J; Bata-García, José L; Góngora-Alfaro, José L; Alvarez-Cervera, Fernando J; Azpiroz-Leehan, Joaquín

    2009-05-01

    This article describes the design and preliminary evaluation of a small-sized and low energy consumption wearable wireless telemetry system for the recording of extracellular neuronal activity, with the possibility of selecting one of four channels. The system comprises four radio frequency (RF) transceivers, three microcontrollers, and a digital amplifier and filter. This constitutes an innovative distributed processing approach. Gain, cutoff frequencies, and channel selection are remotely adjusted. Digital data transmission is used for both the bioelectrical signals and the control commands. This feature offers superior immunity to external RF interference. Real-time viewing of the acquired data allows the researcher to select only relevant data for storage. Simultaneous recordings of neuronal activity from the striatum of a freely moving rat, both with the wireless device and with a wired data acquisition system, are shown. PMID:19363175

  5. A device for emulating cuff recordings of action potentials propagating along peripheral nerves.

    PubMed

    Rieger, Robert; Schuettler, Martin; Chuang, Sheng-Chih

    2014-09-01

    This paper describes a device that emulates propagation of action potentials along a peripheral nerve, suitable for reproducible testing of bio-potential recording systems using nerve cuff electrodes. The system is a microcontroller-based stand-alone instrument which uses established nerve and electrode models to represent neural activity of real nerves recorded with a nerve cuff interface, taking into consideration electrode impedance, voltages picked up by the electrodes, and action potential propagation characteristics. The system emulates different scenarios including compound action potentials with selectable propagation velocities and naturally occurring nerve traffic from different velocity fiber populations. Measured results from a prototype implementation are reported and compared with in vitro recordings from Xenopus Laevis frog sciatic nerve, demonstrating that the electrophysiological setting is represented to a satisfactory degree, useful for the development, optimization and characterization of future recording systems. PMID:24760928

  6. Optical recording of action potentials with second-harmonic generation microscopy.

    PubMed

    Dombeck, Daniel A; Blanchard-Desce, Mireille; Webb, Watt W

    2004-01-28

    Nonlinear microscopy has proven to be essential for neuroscience investigations of thick tissue preparations. However, the optical recording of fast (approximately 1 msec) cellular electrical activity has never until now been successfully combined with this imaging modality. Through the use of second-harmonic generation microscopy of primary Aplysia neurons in culture labeled with 4-[4-(dihexylamino)phenyl][ethynyl]-1-(4-sulfobutyl)pyridinium (inner salt), we optically recorded action potentials with 0.833 msec temporal and 0.6 microm spatial resolution on soma and neurite membranes. Second-harmonic generation response as a function of change in membrane potential was found to be linear with a signal change of approximately 6%/100 mV. The signal-to-noise ratio was approximately 1 for single-trace action potential recordings but was readily increased to approximately 6-7 with temporal averaging of approximately 50 scans. Photodamage was determined to be negligible by observing action potential characteristics, cellular resting potential, and gross cellular morphology during and after laser illumination. High-resolution (micrometer scale) optical recording of membrane potential activity by previous techniques has been limited to imaging depths an order of magnitude less than nonlinear methods. Because second-harmonic generation is capable of imaging up to approximately 400 microm deep into intact tissue with submicron resolution and little out-of-focus photodamage or bleaching, its ability to record fast electrical activity should prove valuable to future electrophysiology studies. PMID:14749445

  7. A phantom axon setup for validating models of action potential recordings.

    PubMed

    Rossel, Olivier; Soulier, Fabien; Bernard, Serge; Guiraud, David; Cathébras, Guy

    2016-08-01

    Electrode designs and strategies for electroneurogram recordings are often tested first by computer simulations and then by animal models, but they are rarely implanted for long-term evaluation in humans. The models show that the amplitude of the potential at the surface of an axon is higher in front of the nodes of Ranvier than at the internodes; however, this has not been investigated through in vivo measurements. An original experimental method is presented to emulate a single fiber action potential in an infinite conductive volume, allowing the potential of an axon to be recorded at both the nodes of Ranvier and the internodes, for a wide range of electrode-to-fiber radial distances. The paper particularly investigates the differences in the action potential amplitude along the longitudinal axis of an axon. At a short radial distance, the action potential amplitude measured in front of a node of Ranvier is two times larger than in the middle of two nodes. Moreover, farther from the phantom axon, the measured action potential amplitude is almost constant along the longitudinal axis. The results of this new method confirm the computer simulations, with a correlation of 97.6 %. PMID:27016364

  8. In-vitro characterization of a cochlear implant system for recording of evoked compound action potentials

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Modern cochlear implants have integrated recording systems for measuring electrically evoked compound action potentials of the auditory nerve. The characterization of such recording systems is important for establishing a reliable basis for the interpretation of signals acquired in vivo. In this study we investigated the characteristics of the recording system integrated into the MED-EL PULSARCI100 cochlear implant, especially its linearity and resolution, in order to develop a mathematical model describing the recording system. Methods In-vitro setup: The cochlear implant, including all attached electrodes, was fixed in a tank of physiologic saline solution. Sinusoidal signals of the same frequency but with different amplitudes were delivered via a signal generator for measuring and recording on a single electrode. Computer simulations: A basic mathematical model including the main elements of the recording system, i.e. amplification and digitalization stage, was developed. For this, digital output for sinusoidal input signals of different amplitudes were calculated using in-vitro recordings as reference. Results Using an averaging of 100 measurements the recording system behaved linearly down to approximately -60 dB of the input signal range. Using the same method, a system resolution of 10 μV was determined for sinusoidal signals. The simulation results were in very good agreement with the results obtained from in-vitro experiments. Conclusions The recording system implemented in the MED-EL PULSARCI100 cochlear implant for measuring the evoked compound action potential of the auditory nerve operates reliably. The developed mathematical model provides a good approximation of the recording system. PMID:22531599

  9. NeuroGrid: recording action potentials from the surface of the brain

    PubMed Central

    Khodagholy, Dion; Gelinas, Jennifer N.; Thesen, Thomas; Doyle, Werner; Devinsky, Orrin; Malliaras, George G.; Buzsáki, György

    2014-01-01

    Recording from neural networks at the resolution of action potentials is critical for understanding how information is processed in the brain. Here, we address this challenge by developing an organic material-based, ultra-conformable, biocompatible and scalable neural interface array (the ‘NeuroGrid’) that can record both LFP and action potentials from superficial cortical neurons without penetrating the brain surface. Spikes with features of interneurons and pyramidal cells were simultaneously acquired by multiple neighboring electrodes of the NeuroGrid, allowing for isolation of putative single neurons in rats. Spiking activity demonstrated consistent phase modulation by ongoing brain oscillations and was stable in recordings exceeding one week. We also recorded LFP-modulated spiking activity intra-operatively in patients undergoing epilepsy surgery. The NeuroGrid constitutes an effective method for large-scale, stable recording of neuronal spikes in concert with local population synaptic activity, enhancing comprehension of neural processes across spatiotemporal scales and potentially facilitating diagnosis and therapy for brain disorders. PMID:25531570

  10. In vivo neuronal action potential recordings via three-dimensional microscale needle-electrode arrays

    PubMed Central

    Fujishiro, Akifumi; Kaneko, Hidekazu; Kawashima, Takahiro; Ishida, Makoto; Kawano, Takeshi

    2014-01-01

    Very fine needle-electrode arrays potentially offer both low invasiveness and high spatial resolution of electrophysiological neuronal recordings in vivo. Herein we report the penetrating and recording capabilities of silicon-growth-based three-dimensional microscale-diameter needle-electrodes arrays. The fabricated needles exhibit a circular-cone shape with a 3-μm-diameter tip and a 210-μm length. Due to the microscale diameter, our silicon needles are more flexible than other microfabricated silicon needles with larger diameters. Coating the microscale-needle-tip with platinum black results in an impedance of ~600 kΩ in saline with output/input signal amplitude ratios of more than 90% at 40 Hz–10 kHz. The needles can penetrate into the whisker barrel area of a rat's cerebral cortex, and the action potentials recorded from some neurons exhibit peak-to-peak amplitudes of ~300 μVpp. These results demonstrate the feasibility of in vivo neuronal action potential recordings with a microscale needle-electrode array fabricated using silicon growth technology. PMID:24785307

  11. In vivo neuronal action potential recordings via three-dimensional microscale needle-electrode arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujishiro, Akifumi; Kaneko, Hidekazu; Kawashima, Takahiro; Ishida, Makoto; Kawano, Takeshi

    2014-05-01

    Very fine needle-electrode arrays potentially offer both low invasiveness and high spatial resolution of electrophysiological neuronal recordings in vivo. Herein we report the penetrating and recording capabilities of silicon-growth-based three-dimensional microscale-diameter needle-electrodes arrays. The fabricated needles exhibit a circular-cone shape with a 3-μm-diameter tip and a 210-μm length. Due to the microscale diameter, our silicon needles are more flexible than other microfabricated silicon needles with larger diameters. Coating the microscale-needle-tip with platinum black results in an impedance of ~600 kΩ in saline with output/input signal amplitude ratios of more than 90% at 40 Hz-10 kHz. The needles can penetrate into the whisker barrel area of a rat's cerebral cortex, and the action potentials recorded from some neurons exhibit peak-to-peak amplitudes of ~300 μVpp. These results demonstrate the feasibility of in vivo neuronal action potential recordings with a microscale needle-electrode array fabricated using silicon growth technology.

  12. In vivo neuronal action potential recordings via three-dimensional microscale needle-electrode arrays.

    PubMed

    Fujishiro, Akifumi; Kaneko, Hidekazu; Kawashima, Takahiro; Ishida, Makoto; Kawano, Takeshi

    2014-01-01

    Very fine needle-electrode arrays potentially offer both low invasiveness and high spatial resolution of electrophysiological neuronal recordings in vivo. Herein we report the penetrating and recording capabilities of silicon-growth-based three-dimensional microscale-diameter needle-electrodes arrays. The fabricated needles exhibit a circular-cone shape with a 3-μm-diameter tip and a 210-μm length. Due to the microscale diameter, our silicon needles are more flexible than other microfabricated silicon needles with larger diameters. Coating the microscale-needle-tip with platinum black results in an impedance of ~600 kΩ in saline with output/input signal amplitude ratios of more than 90% at 40 Hz-10 kHz. The needles can penetrate into the whisker barrel area of a rat's cerebral cortex, and the action potentials recorded from some neurons exhibit peak-to-peak amplitudes of ~300 μVpp. These results demonstrate the feasibility of in vivo neuronal action potential recordings with a microscale needle-electrode array fabricated using silicon growth technology. PMID:24785307

  13. The effect of recording site on extracted features of motor unit action potential.

    PubMed

    Artuğ, N Tuğrul; Goker, Imran; Bolat, Bülent; Osman, Onur; Kocasoy Orhan, Elif; Baslo, M Baris

    2016-06-01

    Motor unit action potential (MUAP), which consists of individual muscle fiber action potentials (MFAPs), represents the electrical activity of the motor unit. The values of the MUAP features are changed by denervation and reinnervation in neurogenic involvement as well as muscle fiber loss with increased diameter variability in myopathic diseases. The present study is designed to investigate how increased muscle fiber diameter variability affects MUAP parameters in simulated motor units. In order to detect this variation, simulated MUAPs were calculated both at the innervation zone where the MFAPs are more synchronized, and near the tendon, where they show increased temporal dispersion. Reinnervation in neurogenic state increases MUAP amplitude for the recordings at both the innervation zone and near the tendon. However, MUAP duration and the number of peaks significantly increased in a case of myopathy for recordings near the tendon. Furthermore, of the new features, "number of peaks×spike duration" was found as the strongest indicator of MFAP dispersion in myopathy. MUAPs were also recorded from healthy participants in order to investigate the biological counterpart of the simulation data. MUAPs which were recorded near to tendon revealed significantly prolonged duration and decreased amplitude. Although the number of peaks was increased by moving the needle near to tendon, this was not significant. PMID:26817404

  14. Intracellular recordings of action potentials by an extracellular nanoscale field-effect transistor.

    PubMed

    Duan, Xiaojie; Gao, Ruixuan; Xie, Ping; Cohen-Karni, Tzahi; Qing, Quan; Choe, Hwan Sung; Tian, Bozhi; Jiang, Xiaocheng; Lieber, Charles M

    2012-03-01

    The ability to make electrical measurements inside cells has led to many important advances in electrophysiology. The patch clamp technique, in which a glass micropipette filled with electrolyte is inserted into a cell, offers both high signal-to-noise ratio and temporal resolution. Ideally, the micropipette should be as small as possible to increase the spatial resolution and reduce the invasiveness of the measurement, but the overall performance of the technique depends on the impedance of the interface between the micropipette and the cell interior, which limits how small the micropipette can be. Techniques that involve inserting metal or carbon microelectrodes into cells are subject to similar constraints. Field-effect transistors (FETs) can also record electric potentials inside cells, and because their performance does not depend on impedance, they can be made much smaller than micropipettes and microelectrodes. Moreover, FET arrays are better suited for multiplexed measurements. Previously, we have demonstrated FET-based intracellular recording with kinked nanowire structures, but the kink configuration and device design places limits on the probe size and the potential for multiplexing. Here, we report a new approach in which a SiO2 nanotube is synthetically integrated on top of a nanoscale FET. This nanotube penetrates the cell membrane, bringing the cell cytosol into contact with the FET, which is then able to record the intracellular transmembrane potential. Simulations show that the bandwidth of this branched intracellular nanotube FET (BIT-FET) is high enough for it to record fast action potentials even when the nanotube diameter is decreased to 3 nm, a length scale well below that accessible with other methods. Studies of cardiomyocyte cells demonstrate that when phospholipid-modified BIT-FETs are brought close to cells, the nanotubes can spontaneously penetrate the cell membrane to allow the full-amplitude intracellular action potential to be

  15. Intracellular recordings of action potentials by an extracellular nanoscale field-effect transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Xiaojie; Gao, Ruixuan; Xie, Ping; Cohen-Karni, Tzahi; Qing, Quan; Choe, Hwan Sung; Tian, Bozhi; Jiang, Xiaocheng; Lieber, Charles M.

    2012-03-01

    The ability to make electrical measurements inside cells has led to many important advances in electrophysiology. The patch clamp technique, in which a glass micropipette filled with electrolyte is inserted into a cell, offers both high signal-to-noise ratio and temporal resolution. Ideally, the micropipette should be as small as possible to increase the spatial resolution and reduce the invasiveness of the measurement, but the overall performance of the technique depends on the impedance of the interface between the micropipette and the cell interior, which limits how small the micropipette can be. Techniques that involve inserting metal or carbon microelectrodes into cells are subject to similar constraints. Field-effect transistors (FETs) can also record electric potentials inside cells, and because their performance does not depend on impedance, they can be made much smaller than micropipettes and microelectrodes. Moreover, FET arrays are better suited for multiplexed measurements. Previously, we have demonstrated FET-based intracellular recording with kinked nanowire structures, but the kink configuration and device design places limits on the probe size and the potential for multiplexing. Here, we report a new approach in which a SiO2 nanotube is synthetically integrated on top of a nanoscale FET. This nanotube penetrates the cell membrane, bringing the cell cytosol into contact with the FET, which is then able to record the intracellular transmembrane potential. Simulations show that the bandwidth of this branched intracellular nanotube FET (BIT-FET) is high enough for it to record fast action potentials even when the nanotube diameter is decreased to 3 nm, a length scale well below that accessible with other methods. Studies of cardiomyocyte cells demonstrate that when phospholipid-modified BIT-FETs are brought close to cells, the nanotubes can spontaneously penetrate the cell membrane to allow the full-amplitude intracellular action potential to be

  16. Monophasic action potential recordings during acute changes in ventricular loading induced by the Valsalva manoeuvre.

    PubMed Central

    Taggart, P; Sutton, P; John, R; Lab, M; Swanton, H

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--The strong association between ventricular arrhythmia and ventricular dysfunction is unexplained. This study was designed to investigate a mechanism by which a change in ventricular loading could alter the time course of repolarisation and hence refractoriness. A possible mechanism may be a direct effect of an altered pattern of contraction on ventricular repolarisation and hence refractoriness. This relation has been termed contraction-excitation feedback or mechano-electric feedback. METHODS--Monophasic action potentials were recorded from the left ventricular endocardium as a measure of the time course of local repolarisation. The Valsalva manoeuvre was used to change ventricular loading by increasing the intrathoracic pressure and impeding venous return, and hence reducing ventricular pressure and volume (ventricular unloading). PATIENTS--23 patients undergoing routine cardiac catheterisation procedures: seven with no angiographic evidence of abnormal wall motion or history of myocardial infarction (normal), five with a history of myocardial infarction but with normal wall motion, and 10 with angiographic evidence of abnormal wall motion--with or without previous infarction. One patient was a transplant recipient and was analysed separately. SETTING--Tertiary referral centre for cardiology. RESULTS--In patients with normal ventricles during the unloading phase of the Valsalva manoeuvre (mean (SD)) monophasic action potential duration shortened from 311 (47) ms to 295 (47) ms (p less than 0.001). After release of the forced expiration as venous return was restored the monophasic action potential duration lengthened from 285 (44) ms to 304 (44) ms (p less than 0.0001). In the group with evidence of abnormal wall motion the direction of change of action potential duration during the strain phase was normal in 7/21 observations, abnormal in 6/21, and showed no clear change in 8/21. During the release phase 11/20 observations were normal, five abnormal

  17. Multifocal fluorescence microscope for fast optical recordings of neuronal action potentials.

    PubMed

    Shtrahman, Matthew; Aharoni, Daniel B; Hardy, Nicholas F; Buonomano, Dean V; Arisaka, Katsushi; Otis, Thomas S

    2015-02-01

    In recent years, optical sensors for tracking neural activity have been developed and offer great utility. However, developing microscopy techniques that have several kHz bandwidth necessary to reliably capture optically reported action potentials (APs) at multiple locations in parallel remains a significant challenge. To our knowledge, we describe a novel microscope optimized to measure spatially distributed optical signals with submillisecond and near diffraction-limit resolution. Our design uses a spatial light modulator to generate patterned illumination to simultaneously excite multiple user-defined targets. A galvanometer driven mirror in the emission path streaks the fluorescence emanating from each excitation point during the camera exposure, using unused camera pixels to capture time varying fluorescence at rates that are ∼1000 times faster than the camera's native frame rate. We demonstrate that this approach is capable of recording Ca(2+) transients resulting from APs in neurons labeled with the Ca(2+) sensor Oregon Green Bapta-1 (OGB-1), and can localize the timing of these events with millisecond resolution. Furthermore, optically reported APs can be detected with the voltage sensitive dye DiO-DPA in multiple locations within a neuron with a signal/noise ratio up to ∼40, resolving delays in arrival time along dendrites. Thus, the microscope provides a powerful tool for photometric measurements of dynamics requiring submillisecond sampling at multiple locations. PMID:25650920

  18. Multifocal Fluorescence Microscope for Fast Optical Recordings of Neuronal Action Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Shtrahman, Matthew; Aharoni, Daniel B.; Hardy, Nicholas F.; Buonomano, Dean V.; Arisaka, Katsushi; Otis, Thomas S.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, optical sensors for tracking neural activity have been developed and offer great utility. However, developing microscopy techniques that have several kHz bandwidth necessary to reliably capture optically reported action potentials (APs) at multiple locations in parallel remains a significant challenge. To our knowledge, we describe a novel microscope optimized to measure spatially distributed optical signals with submillisecond and near diffraction-limit resolution. Our design uses a spatial light modulator to generate patterned illumination to simultaneously excite multiple user-defined targets. A galvanometer driven mirror in the emission path streaks the fluorescence emanating from each excitation point during the camera exposure, using unused camera pixels to capture time varying fluorescence at rates that are ∼1000 times faster than the camera’s native frame rate. We demonstrate that this approach is capable of recording Ca2+ transients resulting from APs in neurons labeled with the Ca2+ sensor Oregon Green Bapta-1 (OGB-1), and can localize the timing of these events with millisecond resolution. Furthermore, optically reported APs can be detected with the voltage sensitive dye DiO-DPA in multiple locations within a neuron with a signal/noise ratio up to ∼40, resolving delays in arrival time along dendrites. Thus, the microscope provides a powerful tool for photometric measurements of dynamics requiring submillisecond sampling at multiple locations. PMID:25650920

  19. Recording Single Neurons' Action Potentials from Freely Moving Pigeons Across Three Stages of Learning

    PubMed Central

    Güntürkün, Onur

    2014-01-01

    While the subject of learning has attracted immense interest from both behavioral and neural scientists, only relatively few investigators have observed single-neuron activity while animals are acquiring an operantly conditioned response, or when that response is extinguished. But even in these cases, observation periods usually encompass only a single stage of learning, i.e. acquisition or extinction, but not both (exceptions include protocols employing reversal learning; see Bingman et al.1 for an example). However, acquisition and extinction entail different learning mechanisms and are therefore expected to be accompanied by different types and/or loci of neural plasticity. Accordingly, we developed a behavioral paradigm which institutes three stages of learning in a single behavioral session and which is well suited for the simultaneous recording of single neurons' action potentials. Animals are trained on a single-interval forced choice task which requires mapping each of two possible choice responses to the presentation of different novel visual stimuli (acquisition). After having reached a predefined performance criterion, one of the two choice responses is no longer reinforced (extinction). Following a certain decrement in performance level, correct responses are reinforced again (reacquisition). By using a new set of stimuli in every session, animals can undergo the acquisition-extinction-reacquisition process repeatedly. Because all three stages of learning occur in a single behavioral session, the paradigm is ideal for the simultaneous observation of the spiking output of multiple single neurons. We use pigeons as model systems, but the task can easily be adapted to any other species capable of conditioned discrimination learning. PMID:24961391

  20. Optical recording of action potentials in mammalian neurons using a microbial rhodopsin

    PubMed Central

    Kralj, Joel M.; Douglass, Adam D.; Hochbaum, Daniel R.; Maclaurin, Dougal; Cohen, Adam E.

    2011-01-01

    Reliable optical detection of single action potentials in mammalian neurons has been one of the longest-standing challenges in neuroscience. Here we achieve this goal by using the endogenous fluorescence of a microbial rhodopsin protein, Archaerhodopsin 3 (Arch) from Halorubrum sodomense, expressed in cultured rat hippocampal neurons. This genetically encoded voltage indicator exhibited an approximately 10-fold improvement in sensitivity and speed over existing protein-based voltage indicators, with a roughly linear two-fold increase in brightness between −150 mV and +150 mV and a sub-millisecond response time. Arch detected single electrically triggered action potentials with an optical signal-to-noise ratio > 10. The mutant Arch(D95N) lacked endogenous proton pumping and showed 50% greater sensitivity than wild-type, but had a slower response (41 ms). Nonetheless, Arch(D95N) also resolved individual action potentials. Microbial rhodopsin-based voltage indicators promise to enable optical interrogation of complex neural circuits, and electrophysiology in systems for which electrode-based techniques are challenging. PMID:22120467

  1. Cardiac action potential imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Qinghai; Lipp, Peter; Kaestner, Lars

    2013-06-01

    Action potentials in cardiac myocytes have durations in the order of magnitude of 100 milliseconds. In biomedical investigations the documentation of the occurrence of action potentials is often not sufficient, but a recording of the shape of an action potential allows a functional estimation of several molecular players. Therefore a temporal resolution of around 500 images per second is compulsory. In the past such measurements have been performed with photometric approaches limiting the measurement to one cell at a time. In contrast, imaging allows reading out several cells at a time with additional spatial information. Recent developments in camera technologies allow the acquisition with the required speed and sensitivity. We performed action potential imaging on isolated adult cardiomyocytes of guinea pigs utilizing the fluorescent membrane potential sensor di-8-ANEPPS and latest electron-multiplication CCD as well as scientific CMOS cameras of several manufacturers. Furthermore, we characterized the signal to noise ratio of action potential signals of varying sets of cameras, dye concentrations and objective lenses. We ensured that di-8-ANEPPS itself did not alter action potentials by avoiding concentrations above 5 μM. Based on these results we can conclude that imaging is a reliable method to read out action potentials. Compared to conventional current-clamp experiments, this optical approach allows a much higher throughput and due to its contact free concept leaving the cell to a much higher degree undisturbed. Action potential imaging based on isolated adult cardiomyocytes can be utilized in pharmacological cardiac safety screens bearing numerous advantages over approaches based on heterologous expression of hERG channels in cell lines.

  2. Microelectrode array recordings of cardiac action potentials as a high throughput method to evaluate pesticide toxicity.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, A; Molnar, P; Sieverdes, K; Jamshidi, A; Hickman, J J

    2006-04-01

    The threat of environmental pollution, biological warfare agent dissemination and new diseases in recent decades has increased research into cell-based biosensors. The creation of this class of sensors could specifically aid the detection of toxic chemicals and their effects in the environment, such as pyrethroid pesticides. Pyrethroids are synthetic pesticides that have been used increasingly over the last decade to replace other pesticides like DDT. In this study we used a high-throughput method to detect pyrethroids by using multielectrode extracellular recordings from cardiac cells. The data from this cell-electrode hybrid system was compared to published results obtained with patch-clamp electrophysiology and also used as an alternative method to further understand pyrethroid effects. Our biosensor consisted of a confluent monolayer of cardiac myocytes cultured on microelectrode arrays (MEA) composed of 60 substrate-integrated electrodes. Spontaneous activity of these beating cells produced extracellular field potentials in the range of 100 microV to nearly 1200 microV with a beating frequency of 0.5-4 Hz. All of the tested pyrethroids; alpha-Cypermethrin, Tetramethrin and Tefluthrin, produced similar changes in the electrophysiological properties of the cardiac myocytes, namely reduced beating frequency and amplitude. The sensitivity of our toxin detection method was comparable to earlier patch-clamp studies, which indicates that, in specific applications, high-throughput extracellular methods can replace single-cell studies. Moreover, the similar effect of all three pyrethroids on the measured parameters suggests, that not only detection of the toxins but, their classification might also be possible with this method. Overall our results support the idea that whole cell biosensors might be viable alternatives when compared to current toxin detection methods. PMID:16198528

  3. Nanoelectronics-biology frontier: From nanoscopic probes for action potential recording in live cells to three-dimensional cyborg tissues

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Xiaojie; Fu, Tian-Ming; Liu, Jia; Lieber, Charles M.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Semiconductor nanowires configured as the active channels of field-effect transistors (FETs) have been used as detectors for high-resolution electrical recording from single live cells, cell networks, tissues and organs. Extracellular measurements with substrate supported silicon nanowire (SiNW) FETs, which have projected active areas orders of magnitude smaller than conventional microfabricated multielectrode arrays (MEAs) and planar FETs, recorded action potential and field potential signals with high signal-to-noise ratio and temporal resolution from cultured neurons, cultured cardiomyocytes, acute brain slices and whole animal hearts. Measurements made with modulation-doped nanoscale active channel SiNW FETs demonstrate that signals recorded from cardiomyocytes are highly localized and have improved time resolution compared to larger planar detectors. In addition, several novel three-dimensional (3D) transistor probes, which were realized using advanced nanowire synthesis methods, have been implemented for intracellular recording. These novel probes include (i) flexible 3D kinked nanowire FETs, (ii) branched intracellular nanotube SiNW FETs, and (iii) active silicon nanotube FETs. Following phospholipid modification of the probes to mimic the cell membrane, the kinked nanowire, branched intracellular nanotube and active silicon nanotube FET probes recorded full-amplitude intracellular action potentials from spontaneously firing cardiomyocytes. Moreover, these probes demonstrated the capability of reversible, stable, and long-term intracellular recording, thus indicating the minimal invasiveness of the new nanoscale structures and suggesting biomimetic internalization via the phospholipid modification. Simultaneous, multi-site intracellular recording from both single cells and cell networks were also readily achieved by interfacing independently addressable nanoprobe devices with cells. Finally, electronic and biological systems have been seamlessly

  4. On-Chip Multichannel Action Potential Recording System for Electrical Measurement of Single Neurites of Neuronal Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Ikurou; Hattori, Akihiro; Yasuda, Kenji

    2007-11-01

    We have developed a multielectrode array recording system for single-neurite-firing measurement using an artificially constructed neuronal network on a chip, which has a 10 μm diameter array with electrodes spaced at 50 μm, for noninvasive 64-channel 100 kHz multirecording and the stimulation of a plurality of neurites extending from a single neuron. To improve the signal/noise ratio, the ground plane was set on the multi-electrode-array plane and platinum black was set on each of the 10 μm electrodes. Using this system, we performed a multisite recording of neurites of a single neuron of a rat hippocampal network in cases of both spontaneous firing and evoked responses to electrical stimulations, and estimated the velocity of action potential propagation among neurites of a single neuron from six recording sites. This demonstrated the potential use of our low-noise chip and our high-speed measurement system for the analysis of neuronal network activities at the single-neuron level.

  5. Extracting Surface Activation Time from the Optically Recorded Action Potential in Three-Dimensional Myocardium

    PubMed Central

    Walton, Richard D.; Smith, Rebecca M.; Mitrea, Bogdan G.; White, Edward; Bernus, Olivier; Pertsov, Arkady M.

    2012-01-01

    Optical mapping has become an indispensible tool for studying cardiac electrical activity. However, due to the three-dimensional nature of the optical signal, the optical upstroke is significantly longer than the electrical upstroke. This raises the issue of how to accurately determine the activation time on the epicardial surface. The purpose of this study was to establish a link between the optical upstroke and exact surface activation time using computer simulations, with subsequent validation by a combination of microelectrode recordings and optical mapping experiments. To simulate wave propagation and associated optical signals, we used a hybrid electro-optical model. We found that the time of the surface electrical activation (tE) within the accuracy of our simulations coincided with the maximal slope of the optical upstroke (tF∗) for a broad range of optical attenuation lengths. This was not the case when the activation time was determined at 50% amplitude (tF50) of the optical upstroke. The validation experiments were conducted in isolated Langendorff-perfused rat hearts and coronary-perfused pig left ventricles stained with either di-4-ANEPPS or the near-infrared dye di-4-ANBDQBS. We found that tF∗ was a more accurate measure of tE than was tF50 in all experimental settings tested (P = 0.0002). Using tF∗ instead of tF50 produced the most significant improvement in measurements of the conduction anisotropy and the transmural conduction time in pig ventricles. PMID:22225795

  6. Novel description of ionic currents recorded with the action potential clamp technique: application to excitatory currents in suprachiasmatic nucleus neurons

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The traditional method of recording ionic currents in neurons has been with voltage-clamp steps. Other waveforms such as action potentials (APs) can be used. The AP clamp method reveals contributions of ionic currents that underlie excitability during an AP (Bean BP. Nat Rev Neurosci 8: 451–465, 2007). A novel usage of the method is described in this report. An experimental recording of an AP from the literature is digitized and applied computationally to models of ionic currents. These results are compared with experimental AP-clamp recordings for model verification or, if need be, alterations to the model. The method is applied to the tetrodotoxin-sensitive sodium ion current, INa, and the calcium ion current, ICa, from suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) neurons (Jackson AC, Yao GL, Bean BP. J Neurosci 24: 7985–7998, 2004). The latter group reported voltage-step and AP-clamp results for both components. A model of INa is constructed from their voltage-step results. The AP clamp computational methodology applied to that model compares favorably with experiment, other than a modest discrepancy close to the peak of the AP that has not yet been resolved. A model of ICa was constructed from both voltage-step and AP-clamp results of this component. The model employs the Goldman-Hodgkin-Katz equation for the current-voltage relation rather than the traditional linear dependence of this aspect of the model on the Ca2+ driving force. The long-term goal of this work is a mathematical model of the SCN AP. The method is general. It can be applied to any excitable cell. PMID:26041831

  7. High-precision recording of the action potential in isolated cardiomyocytes using the near-infrared fluorescent dye di-4-ANBDQBS

    PubMed Central

    Spitzer, Kenneth W.; Steadman, Bruce W.; Rees, Tyler D.; Venable, Paul; Taylor, Tyson; Shibayama, Junko; Yan, Ping; Wuskell, Joseph P.; Loew, Leslie M.; Zaitsev, Alexey V.

    2010-01-01

    The use of voltage-sensitive fluorescent dyes (VSD) for noninvasive measurement of the action potential (AP) in isolated cells has been hindered by low-photon yield of the preparation, dye toxicity, and photodynamic damage. Here we used a new red-shifted VSD, di-4-ANBDQBS, and a fast electron-multiplied charge-coupled device camera for optical AP (OAP) recording in guinea pig cardiac myocytes. Loading di-4-ANBDQBS did not alter APs recorded with micropipette. With short laser exposures (just enough to record one OAP every 1–5 min), di-4-ANBDQBS yielded fluorescent signals with very high signal-to-background ratios (change in fluorescence on depolarization/fluorescence at resting potential: 19.2 ± 4.1%) and signal-to-noise ratios (40 ± 13.2). Quantum chemical calculations comparing the ANBDQ chromophore to the conventional ANEP chromophore showed that the higher wavelength and the greater voltage sensitivity of the former have the same electro-optical origin: a longer path for electron redistribution in the excited state. OAP closely tracked simultaneously recorded electrical APs, permitting measurement of AP duration within 1% error. Prolonged laser exposure caused progressive AP duration prolongation and instability. However, these effects were alleviated or abolished by reducing the dye concentration and by perfusion with antioxidants. Thus the presented technique provides a unique opportunity for noninvasive AP recording in single cardiomyocytes. PMID:20601458

  8. Dual optical recordings for action potentials and calcium handling in induced pluripotent stem cell models of cardiac arrhythmias using genetically encoded fluorescent indicators.

    PubMed

    Song, LouJin; Awari, Daniel W; Han, Elizabeth Y; Uche-Anya, Eugenia; Park, Seon-Hye E; Yabe, Yoko A; Chung, Wendy K; Yazawa, Masayuki

    2015-05-01

    Reprogramming of human somatic cells to pluripotency has been used to investigate disease mechanisms and to identify potential therapeutics. However, the methods used for reprogramming, in vitro differentiation, and phenotyping are still complicated, expensive, and time-consuming. To address the limitations, we first optimized a protocol for reprogramming of human fibroblasts and keratinocytes into pluripotency using single lipofection and the episomal vectors in a 24-well plate format. This method allowed us to generate multiple lines of integration-free and feeder-free induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from seven patients with cardiac diseases and three controls. Second, we differentiated human iPSCs derived from patients with Timothy syndrome into cardiomyocytes using a monolayer differentiation method. We found that Timothy syndrome cardiomyocytes showed slower, irregular contractions and abnormal calcium handling compared with the controls. The results are consistent with previous reports using a retroviral method for reprogramming and an embryoid body-based method for cardiac differentiation. Third, we developed an efficient approach for recording the action potentials and calcium transients simultaneously in control and patient cardiomyocytes using genetically encoded fluorescent indicators, ArcLight and R-GECO1. The dual optical recordings enabled us to observe prolonged action potentials and abnormal calcium handling in Timothy syndrome cardiomyocytes. We confirmed that roscovitine rescued the phenotypes in Timothy syndrome cardiomyocytes and that these findings were consistent with previous studies using conventional electrophysiological recordings and calcium imaging with dyes. The approaches using our optimized methods and dual optical recordings will improve iPSC applicability for disease modeling to investigate mechanisms underlying cardiac arrhythmias and to test potential therapeutics. PMID:25769651

  9. A 64-channel ultra-low power system-on-chip for local field and action potentials recording

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Pérez, Alberto; Delgado-Restituto, Manuel; Darie, Angela; Soto-Sánchez, Cristina; Fernández-Jover, Eduardo; Rodríguez-Vázquez, Ángel

    2015-06-01

    This paper reports an integrated 64-channel neural recording sensor. Neural signals are acquired, filtered, digitized and compressed in the channels. Additionally, each channel implements an auto-calibration mechanism which configures the transfer characteristics of the recording site. The system has two transmission modes; in one case the information captured by the channels is sent as uncompressed raw data; in the other, feature vectors extracted from the detected neural spikes are released. Data streams coming from the channels are serialized by an embedded digital processor. Experimental results, including in vivo measurements, show that the power consumption of the complete system is lower than 330μW.

  10. Simultaneous recording of the action potential and its whole-cell associated ion current on NG108-15 cells cultured over a MWCNT electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales-Reyes, I.; Seseña-Rubfiaro, A.; Acosta-García, M. C.; Batina, N.; Godínez-Fernández, R.

    2016-08-01

    It is well known that, in excitable cells, the dynamics of the ion currents (I i) is extremely important to determine both the magnitude and time course of an action potential (A p). To observe these two processes simultaneously, we cultured NG108-15 cells over a multi-walled carbon nanotubes electrode (MWCNTe) surface and arranged a two independent Patch Clamp system configuration (Bi-Patch Clamp). The first system was used in the voltage or current clamp mode, using a glass micropipette as an electrode. The second system was modified to connect the MWCNTe to virtual ground. While the A p was recorded through the micropipette electrode, the MWCNTe was used to measure the underlying whole-cell current. This configuration allowed us to record both the membrane voltage (V m) and the current changes simultaneously. Images acquired by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) indicate that cultured cells developed a complex network of neurites, which served to establish the necessary close contact and strong adhesion to the MWCNTe surface. These features were a key factor to obtain the recording of the whole-cell I i with a high signal to noise ratio (SNR). The experimental results were satisfactorily reproduced by a theoretical model developed to simulate the proposed system. Besides the contribution to a better understanding of the fundamental mechanisms involved in cell communication, the developed method could be useful in cell physiology studies, pharmacology and diseases diagnosis.

  11. Action Planning and Recording Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Muriel

    This document examines strategies and procedures that British further education (FE) colleges can use to develop and enhance systems and structures for guiding and supporting learners and learning. It is based on the findings of a field test of the Managing Learning model for planning and recording the process of FE students. First, the importance…

  12. Screening Action Potentials: The Power of Light

    PubMed Central

    Kaestner, Lars; Lipp, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Action potentials reflect the concerted activity of all electrogenic constituents in the plasma membrane during the excitation of a cell. Therefore, the action potential is an integrated read out and a promising parameter to detect electrophysiological failures or modifications thereof in diagnosis as well as in drug screens. Cellular action potentials can be recorded by optical approaches. To fulfill the pre-requirements to scale up for, e.g., pharmacological screens the following preparatory work has to be provided: (i) model cells under investigation need to represent target cells in the best possible manner; (ii) optical sensors that can be either small molecule dyes or genetically encoded potential probes need to provide a reliable read out with minimal interaction with the naive behavior of the cells and (iii) devices need to be capable to stimulate the cells, read out the signals with the appropriate speed as well as provide the capacity for a sufficient throughput. Here we discuss several scenarios for all three categories in the field of cardiac physiology and pharmacology and provide a perspective to use the power of light in screening cardiac action potentials. PMID:21847381

  13. Micromolar 4-aminopyridine enhances invasion of a vertebrate neurosecretory terminal arborization: optical recording of action potential propagation using an ultrafast photodiode-MOSFET camera and a photodiode array

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Modulation of the amount of neuropeptide released from a neurosecretory tissue may be achieved by different means. These include alterations in the quantity secreted from each active nerve terminal or in the actual number of terminals activated. From the vertebrate hypothalamus, magnocellular neurons project their axons as bundles of fibers through the median eminence and infundibular stalk to arborize extensively and terminate in the neurohypophysis, where the neurohypophysial peptides and proteins are released into the circulation by a Ca-dependent mechanism. Elevating [Ca2+]o increases the magnitude of an intrinsic optical change in the neurohypophysial terminals that is intimately related to the quantity of neuropeptide released. Similarly, the addition of micromolar concentrations of 4-aminopyridine to the bathing solution enhances this change in large angle light scattering. However, we show here that, while these effects are superficially similar, they reflect different mechanisms of action. Evidence from intrinsic optical signals (light scattering) and extrinsic (potentiometric dye) absorption changes suggests that calcium increases the amount of neuropeptide released from each active terminal in the classical manner, while 4-aminopyridine exerts its secretagogue action by enhancing the invasion of action potentials into the magno-cellular neuron's terminal arborization, increasing the actual number of terminals activated. Physiologically, electrical invasion of the complex terminal arborization in the neurohypophysis may represent an extremely sensitive control point for modulation of peptide secretion. This would be especially effective in a neurohaemal organ like the posterior pituitary, where, in contrast with a collection of presynaptic terminals, the precise location of release is less important than the quantity released. PMID:8868047

  14. 47 CFR 0.347 - Record of actions taken.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Record of actions taken. 0.347 Section 0.347 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL COMMISSION ORGANIZATION Delegations of Authority Administrative Law Judges § 0.347 Record of actions taken. The official record of all actions taken by...

  15. 47 CFR 0.347 - Record of actions taken.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Record of actions taken. 0.347 Section 0.347 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL COMMISSION ORGANIZATION Delegations of Authority Administrative Law Judges § 0.347 Record of actions taken. The official record of all actions taken by...

  16. 47 CFR 0.347 - Record of actions taken.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Record of actions taken. 0.347 Section 0.347 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL COMMISSION ORGANIZATION Delegations of Authority Administrative Law Judges § 0.347 Record of actions taken. The official record of all actions taken by...

  17. 47 CFR 0.347 - Record of actions taken.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Record of actions taken. 0.347 Section 0.347 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL COMMISSION ORGANIZATION Delegations of Authority Administrative Law Judges § 0.347 Record of actions taken. The official record of all actions taken by...

  18. 47 CFR 0.347 - Record of actions taken.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Record of actions taken. 0.347 Section 0.347 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL COMMISSION ORGANIZATION Delegations of Authority Administrative Law Judges § 0.347 Record of actions taken. The official record of all actions taken by...

  19. Ca channel gating during cardiac action potentials.

    PubMed

    Mazzanti, M; DeFelice, L J

    1990-10-01

    How do Ca channels conduct Ca ions during the cardiac action potential? We attempt to answer this question by applying a two-microelectrode technique, previously used for Na and K currents, in which we record the patch current and the action potential at the same time (Mazzanti, M., and L. J. DeFelice. 1987. Biophys. J. 12:95-100, and 1988. Biophys. J. 54:1139-1148; Wellis, D., L. J. DeFelice, and M. Mazzanti. 1990. Biophys. J. 57:41-48). In this paper, we also compare the action currents obtained by the technique with the step-protocol currents obtained during standard voltage-clamp experiments. Individual Ca channels were measured in 10 mM Ca/1 Ba and 10 mM Ba. To describe part of our results, we use the nomenclature introduced by Hess, P., J. B. Lansman, and R. W. Tsien (1984. Nature (Lond.). 311:538-544). With Ba as the charge carrier, Ca channel kinetics convert rapidly from long to short open times as the patch voltage changes from 20 to -20 mV. This voltage-dependent conversion occurs during action potentials and in step-protocol experiments. With Ca as the charge carrier, the currents are brief at all voltages, and it is difficult to define either the number of channels in the patch or the conductance of the individual channels. Occasionally, however, Ca-conducting channels spontaneously convert to long-open-time kinetics (in Hess et al., 1984, notation, mode 2). When this happens, which is about once in every 100beats, there usually appears to be only one channel in the patch. In this rare configuration, the channel is open long enough to measure its conductance in 10 Ca/ 1 Ba. The value is 8-10 pS, which is about half the conductance in Ba. Because the long openings occur so infrequently with Ca as the charge carrier, they contribute negligibly to the average Ca current at any particular time during an action potential. However, the total number of Ca ions entering during these long openings may be significant when compared to the number entering by the

  20. 41 CFR 60-2.32 - Affirmative action records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Affirmative action records. 60-2.32 Section 60-2.32 Public Contracts and Property Management Other Provisions Relating to... OF LABOR 2-AFFIRMATIVE ACTION PROGRAMS Miscellaneous § 60-2.32 Affirmative action records....

  1. 41 CFR 60-2.32 - Affirmative action records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Affirmative action records. 60-2.32 Section 60-2.32 Public Contracts and Property Management Other Provisions Relating to... OF LABOR 2-AFFIRMATIVE ACTION PROGRAMS Miscellaneous § 60-2.32 Affirmative action records....

  2. 41 CFR 60-2.32 - Affirmative action records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Affirmative action records. 60-2.32 Section 60-2.32 Public Contracts and Property Management Other Provisions Relating to... OF LABOR 2-AFFIRMATIVE ACTION PROGRAMS Miscellaneous § 60-2.32 Affirmative action records....

  3. 41 CFR 60-2.32 - Affirmative action records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Affirmative action records. 60-2.32 Section 60-2.32 Public Contracts and Property Management Other Provisions Relating to... OF LABOR 2-AFFIRMATIVE ACTION PROGRAMS Miscellaneous § 60-2.32 Affirmative action records....

  4. 41 CFR 60-2.32 - Affirmative action records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2012-07-01 2009-07-01 true Affirmative action records. 60-2.32 Section 60-2.32 Public Contracts and Property Management Other Provisions Relating to... OF LABOR 2-AFFIRMATIVE ACTION PROGRAMS Miscellaneous § 60-2.32 Affirmative action records....

  5. A kinesiologic electromyography system for the computer-controlled analog and digital recording and processing of muscle action potentials of walking subjects.

    PubMed

    Bodem, F; Brussatis, F; Wunderlich, T; Mertin, B

    1981-01-01

    A computer-controlled electromyography (EMG) System has been developed for the kinesiologic examination of orthopedic patients. A major objective in the design of the system was its convenient operation in the daily clinical routine. The EMG signals are transduced by specially constructed electrode-preamplifier units and filtered and further amplified in a cable distribution box fixed to the subject's belt or back. The amplified signals are transmitted to the stationary signal conditioning, display, and recording units by an easily tractable trailing cable guided in a ceiling rail. The test gait sequence is performed on a level walkway 14 m in length. A functional partition into periodically recurring gait is achieved either by foot-floor contact sensors or by optional goniometric measurements in the lower extremity. Patient safety is provided by an opto-coupling interface. The EMG signals are displayed on specially constructed large screen oscilloscopes for convenient real-time monitoring by the examiner. An analog recording is carried out by a multi-channel strip chart recorder. The digital recording and processing of the EMG signals and the control of the analog recording unit are implemented by an on-line system. This paper describes the main constructional features of the system and its components, discusses the basic problems involved in the digital recording and processing of EMG signals, and gives an outline of the digital processing mode employed so far in our electromyographical examination of orthopedic patients with various gait disorders. PMID:7311941

  6. Action potential broadening in a presynaptic channelopathy.

    PubMed

    Begum, Rahima; Bakiri, Yamina; Volynski, Kirill E; Kullmann, Dimitri M

    2016-01-01

    Brain development and interictal function are unaffected in many paroxysmal neurological channelopathies, possibly explained by homoeostatic plasticity of synaptic transmission. Episodic ataxia type 1 is caused by missense mutations of the potassium channel Kv1.1, which is abundantly expressed in the terminals of cerebellar basket cells. Presynaptic action potentials of small inhibitory terminals have not been characterized, and it is not known whether developmental plasticity compensates for the effects of Kv1.1 dysfunction. Here we use visually targeted patch-clamp recordings from basket cell terminals of mice harbouring an ataxia-associated mutation and their wild-type littermates. Presynaptic spikes are followed by a pronounced afterdepolarization, and are broadened by pharmacological blockade of Kv1.1 or by a dominant ataxia-associated mutation. Somatic recordings fail to detect such changes. Spike broadening leads to increased Ca(2+) influx and GABA release, and decreased spontaneous Purkinje cell firing. We find no evidence for developmental compensation for inherited Kv1.1 dysfunction. PMID:27381274

  7. Action potential broadening in a presynaptic channelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Begum, Rahima; Bakiri, Yamina; Volynski, Kirill E.; Kullmann, Dimitri M.

    2016-01-01

    Brain development and interictal function are unaffected in many paroxysmal neurological channelopathies, possibly explained by homoeostatic plasticity of synaptic transmission. Episodic ataxia type 1 is caused by missense mutations of the potassium channel Kv1.1, which is abundantly expressed in the terminals of cerebellar basket cells. Presynaptic action potentials of small inhibitory terminals have not been characterized, and it is not known whether developmental plasticity compensates for the effects of Kv1.1 dysfunction. Here we use visually targeted patch-clamp recordings from basket cell terminals of mice harbouring an ataxia-associated mutation and their wild-type littermates. Presynaptic spikes are followed by a pronounced afterdepolarization, and are broadened by pharmacological blockade of Kv1.1 or by a dominant ataxia-associated mutation. Somatic recordings fail to detect such changes. Spike broadening leads to increased Ca2+ influx and GABA release, and decreased spontaneous Purkinje cell firing. We find no evidence for developmental compensation for inherited Kv1.1 dysfunction. PMID:27381274

  8. Action potential broadening in a presynaptic channelopathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begum, Rahima; Bakiri, Yamina; Volynski, Kirill E.; Kullmann, Dimitri M.

    2016-07-01

    Brain development and interictal function are unaffected in many paroxysmal neurological channelopathies, possibly explained by homoeostatic plasticity of synaptic transmission. Episodic ataxia type 1 is caused by missense mutations of the potassium channel Kv1.1, which is abundantly expressed in the terminals of cerebellar basket cells. Presynaptic action potentials of small inhibitory terminals have not been characterized, and it is not known whether developmental plasticity compensates for the effects of Kv1.1 dysfunction. Here we use visually targeted patch-clamp recordings from basket cell terminals of mice harbouring an ataxia-associated mutation and their wild-type littermates. Presynaptic spikes are followed by a pronounced afterdepolarization, and are broadened by pharmacological blockade of Kv1.1 or by a dominant ataxia-associated mutation. Somatic recordings fail to detect such changes. Spike broadening leads to increased Ca2+ influx and GABA release, and decreased spontaneous Purkinje cell firing. We find no evidence for developmental compensation for inherited Kv1.1 dysfunction.

  9. Synchronization of action potentials during low-magnesium-induced bursting

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Sarah E.; Hudson, John L.

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between mono- and polysynaptic strength and action potential synchronization was explored using a reduced external Mg2+ model. Single and dual whole cell patch-clamp recordings were performed in hippocampal cultures in three concentrations of external Mg2+. In decreased Mg2+ medium, the individual cells transitioned to spontaneous bursting behavior. In lowered Mg2+ media the larger excitatory synaptic events were observed more frequently and fewer transmission failures occurred, suggesting strengthened synaptic transmission. The event synchronization was calculated for the neural action potentials of the cell pairs, and it increased in media where Mg2+ concentration was lowered. Analysis of surrogate data where bursting was present, but no direct or indirect connections existed between the neurons, showed minimal action potential synchronization. This suggests the synchronization of action potentials is a product of the strengthening synaptic connections within neuronal networks. PMID:25609103

  10. 47 CFR 0.285 - Record of actions taken.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Record of actions taken. 0.285 Section 0.285 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL COMMISSION ORGANIZATION Delegations of Authority Chief, Media Bureau § 0.285 Record of actions taken. The history card, the station file, and other appropriate files are designated to be...

  11. Testing the potential of a virtual reality neurorehabilitation system during performance of observation, imagery and imitation of motor actions recorded by wireless functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    neurorehabilitation system can activate the action-observation system as described by the simulation hypothesis during performance of observation, motor imagery and imitation of hand actions elicited by a VR environment. Further, in accordance with previous studies, the findings of this study revealed that both inter-subject variability and handedness need to be taken into account when recording in untrained subjects. These findings are of relevance for demonstrating the potential of the VR-fNIRS instrument in neurofeedback applications. PMID:21122154

  12. Correlation of action potentials in adjacent neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shneider, M. N.; Pekker, M.

    2015-12-01

    A possible mechanism for the synchronization of action potential propagation along a bundle of neurons (ephaptic coupling) is considered. It is shown that this mechanism is similar to the salutatory conduction of the action potential between the nodes of Ranvier in myelinated axons. The proposed model allows us to estimate the scale of the correlation, i.e., the distance between neurons in the nervous tissue, wherein their synchronization becomes possible. The possibility for experimental verification of the proposed model of synchronization is discussed.

  13. A physical action potential generator: design, implementation and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Latorre, Malcolm A; Chan, Adrian D C; Wårdell, Karin

    2015-01-01

    The objective was to develop a physical action potential generator (Paxon) with the ability to generate a stable, repeatable, programmable, and physiological-like action potential. The Paxon has an equivalent of 40 nodes of Ranvier that were mimicked using resin embedded gold wires (Ø = 20 μm). These nodes were software controlled and the action potentials were initiated by a start trigger. Clinically used Ag-AgCl electrodes were coupled to the Paxon for functional testing. The Paxon's action potential parameters were tunable using a second order mathematical equation to generate physiologically relevant output, which was accomplished by varying the number of nodes involved (1-40 in incremental steps of 1) and the node drive potential (0-2.8 V in 0.7 mV steps), while keeping a fixed inter-nodal timing and test electrode configuration. A system noise floor of 0.07 ± 0.01 μV was calculated over 50 runs. A differential test electrode recorded a peak positive amplitude of 1.5 ± 0.05 mV (gain of 40x) at time 196.4 ± 0.06 ms, including a post trigger delay. The Paxon's programmable action potential like signal has the possibility to be used as a validation test platform for medical surface electrodes and their attached systems. PMID:26539072

  14. A physical action potential generator: design, implementation and evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Latorre, Malcolm A.; Chan, Adrian D. C.; Wårdell, Karin

    2015-01-01

    The objective was to develop a physical action potential generator (Paxon) with the ability to generate a stable, repeatable, programmable, and physiological-like action potential. The Paxon has an equivalent of 40 nodes of Ranvier that were mimicked using resin embedded gold wires (Ø = 20 μm). These nodes were software controlled and the action potentials were initiated by a start trigger. Clinically used Ag-AgCl electrodes were coupled to the Paxon for functional testing. The Paxon's action potential parameters were tunable using a second order mathematical equation to generate physiologically relevant output, which was accomplished by varying the number of nodes involved (1–40 in incremental steps of 1) and the node drive potential (0–2.8 V in 0.7 mV steps), while keeping a fixed inter-nodal timing and test electrode configuration. A system noise floor of 0.07 ± 0.01 μV was calculated over 50 runs. A differential test electrode recorded a peak positive amplitude of 1.5 ± 0.05 mV (gain of 40x) at time 196.4 ± 0.06 ms, including a post trigger delay. The Paxon's programmable action potential like signal has the possibility to be used as a validation test platform for medical surface electrodes and their attached systems. PMID:26539072

  15. Recording and assessment of evoked potentials with electrode arrays.

    PubMed

    Miljković, N; Malešević, N; Kojić, V; Bijelić, G; Keller, T; Popović, D B

    2015-09-01

    In order to optimize procedure for the assessment of evoked potentials and to provide visualization of the flow of action potentials along the motor systems, we introduced array electrodes for stimulation and recording and developed software for the analysis of the recordings. The system uses a stimulator connected to an electrode array for the generation of evoked potentials, an electrode array connected to the amplifier, A/D converter and computer for the recording of evoked potentials, and a dedicated software application. The method has been tested for the assessment of the H-reflex on the triceps surae muscle in six healthy humans. The electrode array with 16 pads was positioned over the posterior aspect of the thigh, while the recording electrode array with 16 pads was positioned over the triceps surae muscle. The stimulator activated all the pads of the stimulation electrode array asynchronously, while the signals were recorded continuously at all the recording sites. The results are topography maps (spatial distribution of evoked potentials) and matrices (spatial visualization of nerve excitability). The software allows the automatic selection of the lowest stimulation intensity to achieve maximal H-reflex amplitude and selection of the recording/stimulation pads according to predefined criteria. The analysis of results shows that the method provides rich information compared with the conventional recording of the H-reflex with regard the spatial distribution. PMID:25863691

  16. Introducing the Action Potential to Psychology Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon-Dack, Stephanie L.

    2014-01-01

    For this simple active learning technique for teaching, students are assigned "roles" and act out the process of the action potential (AP), including the firing threshold, ion-specific channels for ions to enter and leave the cell, diffusion, and the refractory period. Pre-post test results indicated that students demonstrated increased…

  17. Transferrin: structure, function and potential therapeutic actions.

    PubMed

    Gomme, Peter T; McCann, Karl B; Bertolini, Joseph

    2005-02-15

    There are many proteins that can multi-task. Transferrin, widely known as an iron-binding protein, is one such example of a multi-tasking protein. In this review, the multiple biological actions of transferrin, including its growth and cytoprotective activities, are discussed with the view of highlighting the potential therapeutic applications of this protein. PMID:15708745

  18. 12 CFR 24.7 - Examination, records, and remedial action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Examination, records, and remedial action. 24.7 Section 24.7 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY COMMUNITY AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ENTITIES, COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS, AND OTHER PUBLIC WELFARE INVESTMENTS § 24.7 Examination, records, and remedial...

  19. 12 CFR 24.7 - Examination, records, and remedial action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Examination, records, and remedial action. 24.7 Section 24.7 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY COMMUNITY AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ENTITIES, COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS, AND OTHER PUBLIC WELFARE INVESTMENTS § 24.7 Examination, records, and remedial...

  20. Mechanical surface waves accompany action potential propagation.

    PubMed

    El Hady, Ahmed; Machta, Benjamin B

    2015-01-01

    Many diverse studies have shown that a mechanical displacement of the axonal membrane accompanies the electrical pulse defining the action potential (AP). We present a model for these mechanical displacements as arising from the driving of surface wave modes in which potential energy is stored in elastic properties of the neuronal membrane and cytoskeleton while kinetic energy is carried by the axoplasmic fluid. In our model, these surface waves are driven by the travelling wave of electrical depolarization characterizing the AP, altering compressive electrostatic forces across the membrane. This driving leads to co-propagating mechanical displacements, which we term Action Waves (AWs). Our model allows us to estimate the shape of the AW that accompanies any travelling wave of voltage, making predictions that are in agreement with results from several experimental systems. Our model can serve as a framework for understanding the physical origins and possible functional roles of these AWs. PMID:25819404

  1. Mechanical surface waves accompany action potential propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Hady, Ahmed; Machta, Benjamin B.

    2015-03-01

    Many diverse studies have shown that a mechanical displacement of the axonal membrane accompanies the electrical pulse defining the action potential (AP). We present a model for these mechanical displacements as arising from the driving of surface wave modes in which potential energy is stored in elastic properties of the neuronal membrane and cytoskeleton while kinetic energy is carried by the axoplasmic fluid. In our model, these surface waves are driven by the travelling wave of electrical depolarization characterizing the AP, altering compressive electrostatic forces across the membrane. This driving leads to co-propagating mechanical displacements, which we term Action Waves (AWs). Our model allows us to estimate the shape of the AW that accompanies any travelling wave of voltage, making predictions that are in agreement with results from several experimental systems. Our model can serve as a framework for understanding the physical origins and possible functional roles of these AWs.

  2. Sodium and potassium conductance changes during a membrane action potential.

    PubMed

    Bezanilla, F; Rojas, E; Taylor, R E

    1970-12-01

    1. A method for turning a membrane potential control system on and off in less than 10 musec is described. This method was used to record membrane currents in perfused giant axons from Dosidicus gigas and Loligo forbesi after turning on the voltage clamp system at various times during the course of a membrane action potential.2. The membrane current measured just after the capacity charging transient was found to have an almost linear relation to the controlled membrane potential.3. The total membrane conductance taken from these current-voltage curves was found to have a time course during the action potential similar to that found by Cole & Curtis (1939).4. The instantaneous current voltage curves were linear enough to make it possible to obtain a good estimate of the individual sodium and potassium channel conductances, either algebraically or by clamping to the sodium, or potassium, reversal potentials. Good general agreement was obtained with the predictions of the Hodgkin-Huxley equations.5. We consider these results to constitute the first direct experimental demonstration of the conductance changes to sodium and potassium during the course of an action potential. PMID:5505231

  3. Action prediction based on anticipatory brain potentials during simulated driving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaliliardali, Zahra; Chavarriaga, Ricardo; Gheorghe, Lucian Andrei; Millán, José del R.

    2015-12-01

    Objective. The ability of an automobile to infer the driver’s upcoming actions directly from neural signals could enrich the interaction of the car with its driver. Intelligent vehicles fitted with an on-board brain-computer interface able to decode the driver’s intentions can use this information to improve the driving experience. In this study we investigate the neural signatures of anticipation of specific actions, namely braking and accelerating. Approach. We investigated anticipatory slow cortical potentials in electroencephalogram recorded from 18 healthy participants in a driving simulator using a variant of the contingent negative variation (CNV) paradigm with Go and No-go conditions: count-down numbers followed by ‘Start’/‘Stop’ cue. We report decoding performance before the action onset using a quadratic discriminant analysis classifier based on temporal features. Main results. (i) Despite the visual and driving related cognitive distractions, we show the presence of anticipatory event related potentials locked to the stimuli onset similar to the widely reported CNV signal (with an average peak value of -8 μV at electrode Cz). (ii) We demonstrate the discrimination between cases requiring to perform an action upon imperative subsequent stimulus (Go condition, e.g. a ‘Red’ traffic light) versus events that do not require such action (No-go condition; e.g. a ‘Yellow’ light); with an average single trial classification performance of 0.83 ± 0.13 for braking and 0.79 ± 0.12 for accelerating (area under the curve). (iii) We show that the centro-medial anticipatory potentials are observed as early as 320 ± 200 ms before the action with a detection rate of 0.77 ± 0.12 in offline analysis. Significance. We show for the first time the feasibility of predicting the driver’s intention through decoding anticipatory related potentials during simulated car driving with high recognition rates.

  4. Recording Action Research in a Classroom: Singing with Chickadees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beatty, Ramona; Bedford, Judy; Both, Peter; Eld, Jennifer; Goitom, Mary; Heinrichs, Lilli; Moran-Bonilla, Laura; Massoud, Mona; Van Ngo, Hieu; Pyrch, Timothy; Rogerson, Marianne; Sitter, Kathleen; Speaker, Casey Eagle; Unrau, Mike

    2008-01-01

    This is a collective interpretive record of a graduate course in Social Work on participatory action research (PAR) offered during the winter of 2007. It is written by 14 individuals including the instructor. It was inspired by the image of a chickadee bird borrowed from Jonathan Lear's (2006) book "Radical Hope." The chickadee is a powerful…

  5. Mechanical Surface Waves Accompany Action Potential Propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machta, Benjamin; El Hady, Ahmed

    2015-03-01

    The action potential (AP) is the basic mechanism by which information is transmitted along neuronal axons. Although the excitable nature of axons is understood to be primarily electrical, many experimental studies have shown that a mechanical displacement of the axonal membrane co-propagates with the electrical signal. While the experimental evidence for co-propagating mechanical waves is diverse and compelling, there is no consensus for their physical underpinnings. We present a model in which these mechanical displacements arise from the driving of mechanical surface waves, in which potential energy is stored in elastic deformations of the neuronal membrane and cytoskeleton while kinetic energy is stored in the movement of the axoplasmic fluid. In our model these surface waves are driven by the traveling wave of electrical depolarization that characterizes the AP, altering the electrostatic forces across the membrane as it passes. Our model allows us to predict the shape of the displacement that should accompany any traveling wave of voltage, including the well-characterized AP. We expect our model to serve as a framework for understanding the physical origins and possible functional roles of these AWs in neurobiology. See Arxiv/1407.7600

  6. Teachers in Action Research: Assumptions and Potentials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Yuen-Ling

    2008-01-01

    Research literature has long indicated that action research may stimulate practitioners themselves to actively evaluate the quality of their practice. This study is designed to report the use of action research for the development of early years professional practice by analyzing the pre-project and the post-project video-filmed teaching events.…

  7. Recording actions to prevent child morbidity in children's health cards.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Daniele de Souza; Santos, Nathanielly Cristina Carvalho de Brito; Costa, Dayse Kalyne Gomes da; Pereira, Mayara de Melo; Vaz, Elenice Maria Cecchetti; Reichert, Altamira Pereira da Silva

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the registering of preventative actions in relation to child morbidity using information regarding vaccinations, as well as iron and vitamin A supplements, which are recorded in children's health cards. This transversal study used a quantitative approach and was performed in Family Health Units in the city of João Pessoa, Paraíba; the sampling was by convenience and totaled 116 children's health cards. The data was collected by observing the cards and the analysis was simple, statistical. The highest percentage of children had their vaccination cards up to date (92.2%) and those that did not were aged between 6 and 12 months: 78.9% of the cards did not have records relating to iron and vitamin A supplements and others only had records of one of the supplements being administered. The vaccination status of children in the first year of life was found to be satisfactory; however, discrepancies were observed in the recordings of the administration of iron and vitamin A supplements, which complicates monitoring performed by child health care professionals. It is hoped that this study will contribute to discussions and strategies aimed at improving the monitoring and recording of micronutrients in children's health cards. PMID:27383363

  8. Recording Field Potentials From Zebrafish Larvae During Escape Responses

    PubMed Central

    Monesson-Olson, Bryan D.; Troconis, Eileen L.; Trapani, Josef G.

    2014-01-01

    Among vertebrates, startle responses are a ubiquitous method for alerting, and avoiding or escaping from alarming or dangerous stimuli. In zebrafish larvae, fast escape behavior is easily evoked through either acoustic or tactile stimuli. For example, a light touch to the head will excite trigeminal neurons that in turn excite a large reticulospinal neuron in the hindbrain called the Mauthner cell (M-cell). The M-cell action potential then travels down the contralateral trunk of the larva exciting motoneurons, which subsequently excite the entire axial musculature, producing a large amplitude body bend away from the source of the stimulus. This body conformation is known as the “C-bend” due to the shape of the larva during the behavior. As a result of the semi-synchronized activation of the M-cell, the population of motor neurons, and the axial trunk muscles, a large field potential is generated and can be recorded from free-swimming or fixed-position larvae. Undergraduate laboratories that record field potentials during escape responses in larval zebrafish are relatively simple to setup and allow students to observe and study the escape reflex circuit. Furthermore, by testing hypotheses, analyzing data and writing journal-style laboratory reports, students have multiple opportunities to learn about many neuroscience topics including vertebrate reflexes; sensory transduction; synaptic-, neuro-, and muscle-physiology; the M-cell mediated escape response; and the zebrafish as a model organism. Here, we detail the equipment, software, and recording setup necessary to observe field potentials in an undergraduate teaching lab. Additionally, we discuss potential advanced laboratory exercises and pedagogical outcomes. Finally, we note possible low-cost alternatives for recording field potentials. PMID:25565920

  9. Microcomputer program for automated action potential waveform analysis.

    PubMed

    Soto, E; Salceda, E; Cruz, R; Ortega, A; Vega, R

    2000-06-01

    A program for action potential waveform analysis based on a PC compatible computer is described. Single or averaged action potentials are analyzed by obtaining its first derivative and using criteria which allow automatic measurement of several action potential components, including: depolarization rate, repolarization rate, amplitude, duration, resting membrane potential and afterhyperpolarization amplitude and slope. Data can be imported from pClamp (Axon Instruments) and exported to other software such as Excel, Sigmaplot and MatLab for example. PMID:10764940

  10. Cortical Interneuron Subtypes Vary in Their Axonal Action Potential Properties

    PubMed Central

    Casale, Amanda E.; Foust, Amanda J.; Bal, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    The role of interneurons in cortical microcircuits is strongly influenced by their passive and active electrical properties. Although different types of interneurons exhibit unique electrophysiological properties recorded at the soma, it is not yet clear whether these differences are also manifested in other neuronal compartments. To address this question, we have used voltage-sensitive dye to image the propagation of action potentials into the fine collaterals of axons and dendrites in two of the largest cortical interneuron subtypes in the mouse: fast-spiking interneurons, which are typically basket or chandelier neurons; and somatostatin containing interneurons, which are typically regular spiking Martinotti cells. We found that fast-spiking and somatostatin-expressing interneurons differed in their electrophysiological characteristics along their entire dendrosomatoaxonal extent. The action potentials generated in the somata and axons, including axon collaterals, of somatostatin-expressing interneurons are significantly broader than those generated in the same compartments of fast-spiking inhibitory interneurons. In addition, action potentials back-propagated into the dendrites of somatostatin-expressing interneurons much more readily than fast-spiking interneurons. Pharmacological investigations suggested that axonal action potential repolarization in both cell types depends critically upon Kv1 channels, whereas the axonal and somatic action potentials of somatostatin-expressing interneurons also depend on BK Ca2+-activated K+ channels. These results indicate that the two broad classes of interneurons studied here have expressly different subcellular physiological properties, allowing them to perform unique computational roles in cortical circuit operations. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Neurons in the cerebral cortex are of two major types: excitatory and inhibitory. The proper balance of excitation and inhibition in the brain is critical for its operation. Neurons

  11. Report of the Tape Recorder Action Plan Committee, 21 March 1972

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    A NASA/AF Tape Recorder Action Plan Committee was formed in January 1972 to investigate tape recorder problems and to recommend an action plan to NASA management. The committee collected data on tape recorder failure history, pinpointed problem areas, discussed needed technical and management changes, and proposed an action plan for the recommended approaches.

  12. Click- and chirp-evoked human compound action potentials.

    PubMed

    Chertoff, Mark; Lichtenhan, Jeffery; Willis, Marie

    2010-05-01

    In the experiments reported here, the amplitude and the latency of human compound action potentials (CAPs) evoked from a chirp stimulus are compared to those evoked from a traditional click stimulus. The chirp stimulus was created with a frequency sweep to compensate for basilar membrane traveling wave delay using the O-Chirp equations from Fobel and Dau [(2004). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 116, 2213-2222] derived from otoacoustic emission data. Human cochlear traveling wave delay estimates were obtained from derived compound band action potentials provided by Eggermont [(1979). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 65, 463-470]. CAPs were recorded from an electrode placed on the tympanic membrane (TM), and the acoustic signals were monitored with a probe tube microphone attached to the TM electrode. Results showed that the amplitude and latency of chirp-evoked N1 of the CAP differed from click-evoked CAPs in several regards. For the chirp-evoked CAP, the N1 amplitude was significantly larger than the click-evoked N1s. The latency-intensity function was significantly shallower for chirp-evoked CAPs as compared to click-evoked CAPs. This suggests that auditory nerve fibers respond with more unison to a chirp stimulus than to a click stimulus. PMID:21117748

  13. Dipole characterization of single neurons from their extracellular action potentials

    PubMed Central

    Victor, Jonathan D.

    2011-01-01

    The spatial variation of the extracellular action potentials (EAP) of a single neuron contains information about the size and location of the dominant current source of its action potential generator, which is typically in the vicinity of the soma. Using this dependence in reverse in a three-component realistic probe + brain + source model, we solved the inverse problem of characterizing the equivalent current source of an isolated neuron from the EAP data sampled by an extracellular probe at multiple independent recording locations. We used a dipole for the model source because there is extensive evidence it accurately captures the spatial roll-off of the EAP amplitude, and because, as we show, dipole localization, beyond a minimum cell-probe distance, is a more accurate alternative to approaches based on monopole source models. Dipole characterization is separable into a linear dipole moment optimization where the dipole location is fixed, and a second, nonlinear, global optimization of the source location. We solved the linear optimization on a discrete grid via the lead fields of the probe, which can be calculated for any realistic probe + brain model by the finite element method. The global source location was optimized by means of Tikhonov regularization that jointly minimizes model error and dipole size. The particular strategy chosen reflects the fact that the dipole model is used in the near field, in contrast to the typical prior applications of dipole models to EKG and EEG source analysis. We applied dipole localization to data collected with stepped tetrodes whose detailed geometry was measured via scanning electron microscopy. The optimal dipole could account for 96% of the power in the spatial variation of the EAP amplitude. Among various model error contributions to the residual, we address especially the error in probe geometry, and the extent to which it biases estimates of dipole parameters. This dipole characterization method can be applied to

  14. Noncontact subnanometer measurement of transient surface displacement during action potential propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akkin, Taner; Dave, Digant P.; Rylander, H. Grady, III; Milner, Thomas E.

    2005-04-01

    We have demonstrated non-contact, sub-nanometer optical measurement of neural surface displacement associated with action potential propagation without applying exogenous chemicals or reflection coatings. Signals recorded from crayfish leg nerve using a phase-sensitive optical low coherence reflectometer show that transient neural surface displacement due to action potential propagation is approximately 1 nm in amplitude and 1 ms in duration. Measured optical signals are coincident with electrical action potential arrival to the optical measurement site. Recent experiments indicate signals with similar amplitude and duration are observed in response to repetitive fast stimulation (200 stimuli/s).

  15. The propagation potential. An axonal response with implications for scalp-recorded EEG.

    PubMed Central

    Rudell, A P; Fox, S E

    1991-01-01

    An electrophysiological response of axons, referred to as the "propagation potential," was investigated. The propagation potential is a sustained voltage that lasts as long as an action potential propagates between two widely spaced electrodes. The sign of the potential depends on the direction of action potential propagation. The electrode towards which the action potential is propagating is positive with respect to the electrode from which it is receding. For normal frog sciatic nerves the magnitude of the propagation potential was 17% of the peak of the extracellular action potential; TEA increased it to 32%. For normal earthworm median or lateral giant fibers it was 30%. A ripple pattern on the propagation potential was attributed to variation in resistance along the length of the worm. Cooling increased the duration of the propagation potential and attenuated the higher frequency components of the ripple pattern. Differential records from two widely spaced intracellular microelectrodes in the same axon differed from the propagation potential. The amplitude of the plateau relative to the peak was smaller, it decreased as the action potential propagated from one electrode site to the other, and the potential did not return to zero as rapidly as for extracellular records. When propagation was blocked by heat, the propagation potential slowly decayed. There was no ripple pattern during the decay. In a volume conductor, electrodes contacting the worm did not show the typical propagation potential, but electrodes located a few centimeters away from the worm did. Simple core-conductor models based on classical action potential theory did not reproduce the propagation potential. More complex, modified core-conductor models were needed to accurately simulate it. The results suggest that long, slowly conducting fibers can contribute to the scalp-recorded EEG. PMID:1932547

  16. Uniform Action Potential Repolarization within the Sarcolemma of In Situ Ventricular Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Bu, Guixue; Adams, Heather; Berbari, Edward J.; Rubart, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have speculated, based on indirect evidence, that the action potential at the transverse (t)-tubules is longer than at the surface membrane in mammalian ventricular cardiomyocytes. To date, no technique has enabled recording of electrical activity selectively at the t-tubules to directly examine this hypothesis. We used confocal line-scan imaging in conjunction with the fast response voltage-sensitive dyes ANNINE-6 and ANNINE-6plus to resolve action potential-related changes in fractional dye fluorescence (ΔF/F) at the t-tubule and surface membranes of in situ mouse ventricular cardiomyocytes. Peak ΔF/F during action potential phase 0 depolarization averaged −21% for both dyes. The shape and time course of optical action potentials measured with the water-soluble ANNINE-6plus were indistinguishable from those of action potentials recorded with intracellular microelectrodes in the absence of the dye. In contrast, optical action potentials measured with the water-insoluble ANNINE-6 were significantly prolonged compared to the electrical recordings obtained from dye-free hearts, suggesting electrophysiological effects of ANNINE-6 and/or its solvents. With either dye, the kinetics of action potential-dependent changes in ΔF/F during repolarization were found to be similar at the t-tubular and surface membranes. This study provides what to our knowledge are the first direct measurements of t-tubule electrical activity in ventricular cardiomyocytes, which support the concept that action potential duration is uniform throughout the sarcolemma of individual cells. PMID:19289075

  17. [Individualised medicine - potentials and need for action].

    PubMed

    Hüsing, Bärbel

    2010-01-01

    Individualised medicine aims to classify seemingly homogenous patient groups into smaller clinically relevant subgroups (stratification) in order to be able to treat them differently, thus contributing to the improvement of health care services, to the prevention of inappropriate treatments and to the reduction of adverse effects. This article summarises a report to the Office of Technology Assessment at the German Bundestag and points out the need for action for transferring individualised medicine from research to clinical application: significant incentives are required in order to prove the clinical validity of newly identified biomarkers of complex diseases. Sustainable business models for the joint development of new applications by research institutions, biotechnology companies, pharmaceuticals and medical devices companies are required. Instruments for transferring knowledge from bench to bedside (translational research) and the existing regulatory framework should be further developed in order to strike an appropriate balance between incentives for accelerating the transfer of innovative technology to the health care sector while, at the same time, ensuring patient safety, high quality and clinical utility. PMID:21147435

  18. Selective effects of an octopus toxin on action potentials

    PubMed Central

    Dulhunty, Angela; Gage, Peter W.

    1971-01-01

    1. A lethal, water soluble toxin (Maculotoxin, MTX) with a molecular weight less than 540, can be extracted from the salivary glands of an octopus (Hapalochlaena maculosa). 2. MTX blocks action potentials in sartorius muscle fibres of toads without affecting the membrane potential. Delayed rectification is not inhibited by the toxin. 3. At low concentrations (10-6-10-5 g/ml.) MTX blocks action potentials only after a certain number have been elicited. The number of action potentials, which can be defined accurately, depends on the concentration of MTX and the concentration of sodium ions in the extracellular solution. 4. The toxin has no post-synaptic effect at the neuromuscular junction and it is concluded that it blocks neuromuscular transmission by inhibiting action potentials in motor nerve terminals. PMID:4330930

  19. The effects of temperature on human compound action potentials.

    PubMed Central

    Bolton, C F; Sawa, G M; Carter, K

    1981-01-01

    The upper limbs of 10 healthy subjects were cooled and then warmed over physiological temperature ranges. The compound action potentials of median digital nerves, median sensory nerve at the wrist, radial sensory nerve at the wrist, and median thenar muscle, all showed progressive reduction in latency, amplitude, duration and area during rising temperature. Our studies suggest that the sensory compound action potential changes occur predominantly because of the summated effects of reduction in the duration of the action potentials of single myelinated fibres, although disproportionate increase in the conduction velocity of larger myelinated fibres also plays a role. Images PMID:7264687

  20. 40 CFR 300.820 - Administrative record file for a removal action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Administrative record file for a... SUBSTANCES POLLUTION CONTINGENCY PLAN Administrative Record for Selection of Response Action § 300.820 Administrative record file for a removal action. (a) If, based on the site evaluation, the lead agency...

  1. Iridium Oxide Nanotube Electrodes for Highly Sensitive and Prolonged Intracellular Measurement of Action Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ziliang Carter; Xie, Chong; Osakada, Yasuko; Cui, Yi; Cui, Bianxiao

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular recording of action potentials is important to understand electrically-excitable cells. Recently, vertical nanoelectrodes have been developed to achieve highly sensitive, minimally invasive, and large scale intracellular recording. It has been demonstrated that the vertical geometry is crucial for the enhanced signal detection. Here we develop nanoelectrodes made up of nanotubes of iridium oxide. When cardiomyocytes are cultured upon those nanotubes, the cell membrane not only wraps around the vertical tubes but also protrudes deep into the hollow center. We show that this geometry enhances cell-electrode coupling and results in measuring much larger intracellular action potentials. The nanotube electrodes afford much longer intracellular access and are minimally invasive, making it possible to achieve stable recording up to an hour in a single session and more than 8 days of consecutive daily recording. This study suggests that the electrode performance can be significantly improved by optimizing the electrode geometry. PMID:24487777

  2. Pulsed magnetic stimulation modifies amplitude of action potentials in vitro via ionic channels-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Zaghloul; Wieraszko, Andrzej

    2015-07-01

    This paper investigates the influence of pulsed magnetic fields (PMFs) on amplitude of evoked, compound action potential (CAP) recorded from the segments of sciatic nerve in vitro. PMFs were applied for 30 min at frequency of 0.16 Hz and intensity of 15 mT. In confirmation of our previous reports, PMF exposure enhanced amplitude of CAPs. The effect persisted beyond PMF activation period. As expected, CAP amplitude was attenuated by antagonists of sodium channel, lidocaine, and tetrodotoxin. Depression of the potential by sodium channels antagonists was reversed by subsequent exposure to PMFs. The effect of elevated potassium concentration and veratridine on the action potential was modified by exposure to PMFs as well. Neither inhibitors of protein kinase C and protein kinase A, nor known free radicals scavengers had any effects on PMF action. Possible mechanisms of PMF action are discussed. PMID:25884360

  3. Cortical Action Potential Backpropagation Explains Spike Threshold Variability and Rapid-Onset Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yuguo; Shu, Yousheng; McCormick, David A.

    2008-01-01

    Neocortical action potential responses in vivo are characterized by considerable threshold variability, and thus timing and rate variability, even under seemingly identical conditions. This finding suggests that cortical ensembles are required for accurate sensorimotor integration and processing. Intracellularly, trial-to-trial variability results not only from variation in synaptic activities, but also in the transformation of these into patterns of action potentials. Through simultaneous axonal and somatic recordings and computational simulations, we demonstrate that the initiation of action potentials in the axon initial segment followed by backpropagation of these spikes throughout the neuron results in a distortion of the relationship between the timing of synaptic and action potential events. In addition, this backpropagation also results in an unusually high rate of rise of membrane potential at the foot of the action potential. The distortion of the relationship between the amplitude time course of synaptic inputs and action potential output caused by spike back-propagation results in the appearance of high spike threshold variability at the level of the soma. At the point of spike initiation, the axon initial segment, threshold variability is considerably less. Our results indicate that spike generation in cortical neurons is largely as expected by Hodgkin—Huxley theory and is more precise than previously thought. PMID:18632930

  4. Direct detection of a single evoked action potential with MRS in Lumbricus terrestris.

    PubMed

    Poplawsky, Alexander J; Dingledine, Raymond; Hu, Xiaoping P

    2012-01-01

    Functional MRI (fMRI) measures neural activity indirectly by detecting the signal change associated with the hemodynamic response following brain activation. In order to alleviate the temporal and spatial specificity problems associated with fMRI, a number of attempts have been made to detect neural magnetic fields (NMFs) with MRI directly, but have thus far provided conflicting results. In this study, we used MR to detect axonal NMFs in the median giant fiber of the earthworm, Lumbricus terrestris, by examining the free induction decay (FID) with a sampling interval of 0.32 ms. The earthworm nerve cords were isolated from the vasculature and stimulated at the threshold of action potential generation. FIDs were acquired shortly after the stimulation, and simultaneous field potential recordings identified the presence or absence of single evoked action potentials. FIDs acquired when the stimulus did not evoke an action potential were summed as background. The phase of the background-subtracted FID exhibited a systematic change, with a peak phase difference of (-1.2 ± 0.3) × 10(-5) radians occurring at a time corresponding to the timing of the action potential. In addition, we calculated the possible changes in the FID magnitude and phase caused by a simulated action potential using a volume conductor model. The measured phase difference matched the theoretical prediction well in both amplitude and temporal characteristics. This study provides the first evidence for the direct detection of a magnetic field from an evoked action potential using MR. PMID:21728204

  5. Action potentials in retinal ganglion cells are initiated at the site of maximal curvature of the extracellular potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eickenscheidt, Max; Zeck, Günther

    2014-06-01

    Objective. The initiation of an action potential by extracellular stimulation occurs after local depolarization of the neuronal membrane above threshold. Although the technique shows remarkable clinical success, the site of action and the relevant stimulation parameters are not completely understood. Approach. Here we identify the site of action potential initiation in rabbit retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) interfaced to an array of extracellular capacitive stimulation electrodes. We determine which feature of the extracellular potential governs action potential initiation by simultaneous stimulation and recording RGCs interfaced in epiretinal configuration. Stimulation electrodes were combined to areas of different size and were presented at different positions with respect to the RGC. Main results. Based on stimulation by electrodes beneath the RGC soma and simultaneous sub-millisecond latency measurement we infer axonal initiation at the site of maximal curvature of the extracellular potential. Stimulation by electrodes at different positions along the axon reveals a nearly constant threshold current density except for a narrow region close to the cell soma. These findings are explained by the concept of the activating function modified to consider a region of lower excitability close to the cell soma. Significance. We present a framework how to estimate the site of action potential initiation and the stimulus required to cross threshold in neurons tightly interfaced to capacitive stimulation electrodes. Our results underscore the necessity of rigorous electrical characterization of the stimulation electrodes and of the interfaced neural tissue.

  6. The impact of synaptic conductance on action potential waveform: evoking realistic action potentials with a simulated synaptic conductance.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Jamie; Postlethwaite, Michael; Forsythe, Ian D

    2009-10-15

    Most current clamp studies trigger action potentials (APs) by step current injection through the recording electrode and assume that the resulting APs are essentially identical to those triggered by orthodromic synaptic inputs. However this assumption is not always valid, particularly when the synaptic conductance is of large magnitude and of close proximity to the axon initial segment. We addressed this question of similarity using the Calyx of Held/MNTB synapse; we compared APs evoked by long duration step current injections, short step current injections and orthodromic synaptic stimuli. Neither injected current protocol evoked APs that matched the evoked orthodromic AP waveform, showing differences in AP height, half-width and after-hyperpolarization. We postulated that this 'error' could arise from changes in the instantaneous conductance during the combined synaptic and AP waveforms, since the driving forces for the respective ionic currents are integrating and continually evolving over this time-course. We demonstrate that a simple Ohm's law manipulation of the EPSC waveform, which accounts for the evolving driving force on the synaptic conductance during the AP, produces waveforms that closely mimic those generated by physiological synaptic stimulation. This stimulation paradigm allows supra-threshold physiological stimulation (single stimuli or trains) without the variability caused by quantal fluctuation in transmitter release, and can be implemented without a specialised dynamic clamp system. Combined with pharmacological tools this method provides a reliable means to assess the physiological roles of postsynaptic ion channels without confounding affects from the presynaptic input. PMID:19560491

  7. Developmental changes in the inward current of the action potential of Rohon-Beard neurones

    PubMed Central

    Baccaglini, Paola I.; Spitzer, Nicholas C.

    1977-01-01

    1. Rohon-Beard cells in the spinal cord of Xenopus tadpoles have been studied in animals from early neural tube to free-swimming larval stages. The onset and further development of electrical excitability of these neurones has been investigated in different ionic environments, to determine the ionic species carrying the inward current of the action potential. 2. The cells appear inexcitable at early stages (Nieuwkoop & Faber stages 18-20) and do not give action potentials to depolarizing current pulses. 3. The action potential is first recorded at stage 20. (A) The inward current is carried by Ca2+ at stages 20-25, since it is blocked by mm quantitites of La3+, Co2+ or Mn2+ and is unaffected by removal of Na+ or the addition of tetrodotoxin (TTX). (B) The action potential is an elevated plateau of long duration (mean 190 msec at stages 20-22). The duration decreases exponentially with repetitive stimulation. (C) The specific Ca2+ conductance (gCa) at the onset of the plateau of the action potential is 2·6 × 10-4 mho/cm2. Calculations show that a single action potential raises [Ca2+]1 by more than 100-fold. 4. At later times (stages 25-40), the inward current of the action potential is carried by both Na+ and Ca2+: the action potential has two components, an initial spike which is blocked by removal of Na+ or addition of TTX, followed by a plateau which is blocked by La3+, Co2+ or Mn2+. 5. Finally (stages 40-51), the inward current is primarily carried by Na+, since the action potential is blocked only by removal of Na+ or addition of TTX, and the overshoot agrees with the prediction of the Nernst equation for a Na-selective membrane. When the outward current channel is blocked and cells exposed to Na-free solutions, 67% of cells at the latest stages studied were incapable of producing action potentials in which the inward current is carried by divalent cations. 6. The duration of the action potential decreases from a maximum of about 1000 msec to about 1 msec

  8. Sodium-calcium exchange during the action potential in guinea-pig ventricular cells.

    PubMed Central

    Egan, T M; Noble, D; Noble, S J; Powell, T; Spindler, A J; Twist, V W

    1989-01-01

    1. Slow inward tail currents attributable to electrogenic sodium-calcium exchange can be recorded by imposing hyperpolarizing voltage clamp pulses during the normal action potential of isolated guinea-pig ventricular cells. The hyperpolarizations return the membrane to the resting potential (between -65 and -88 m V) allowing an inward current to be recorded. This current usually has peak amplitude when repolarization is imposed during the first 50 ms after the action potential upstroke, but becomes negligible once the final phase of repolarization is reached. The envelope of peak current tail amplitudes strongly resembles that of the intracellular calcium transient recorded in other studies. 2. Repetitive stimulation producing normal action potentials at a frequency of 2 Hz progressively augments the tail current recorded immediately after the stimulus train. Conversely, if each action potential is prematurely terminated at 0.1 Hz, repetitive stimulation produces a tail current much smaller than the control value. The control amplitude of inward current is only maintained if interrupted action potentials are separated by at least one full 'repriming' action potential. These effects mimic those on cell contraction (Arlock & Wohlfart, 1986) and suggest that progressive changes in tail current are controlled by variations in the amplitude and time course of the intracellular calcium transient. 3. When intracellular calcium is buffered sufficiently to abolish contraction, the tail current is abolished. Substitution of calcium with strontium greatly reduces the tail current. 4. The inward tail current can also be recorded at more positive membrane potentials using standard voltage clamp pulse protocols. In this way it was found that temperature has a large effect on the tail current, which can change from net inward at 22 degrees C to net outward at 37 degrees C. The largest inward currents are usually recorded at about 30 degrees C. It is shown that this effect is

  9. 5 CFR 2413.5 - Action necessary to close meeting; record of votes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Action necessary to close meeting; record of votes. 2413.5 Section 2413.5 Administrative Personnel FEDERAL LABOR RELATIONS AUTHORITY, GENERAL... OPEN MEETINGS § 2413.5 Action necessary to close meeting; record of votes. A meeting shall be closed...

  10. 5 CFR 2413.5 - Action necessary to close meeting; record of votes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Action necessary to close meeting; record of votes. 2413.5 Section 2413.5 Administrative Personnel FEDERAL LABOR RELATIONS AUTHORITY, GENERAL... OPEN MEETINGS § 2413.5 Action necessary to close meeting; record of votes. A meeting shall be closed...

  11. 5 CFR 2413.5 - Action necessary to close meeting; record of votes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Action necessary to close meeting; record of votes. 2413.5 Section 2413.5 Administrative Personnel FEDERAL LABOR RELATIONS AUTHORITY, GENERAL... OPEN MEETINGS § 2413.5 Action necessary to close meeting; record of votes. A meeting shall be closed...

  12. 5 CFR 2413.5 - Action necessary to close meeting; record of votes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Action necessary to close meeting; record of votes. 2413.5 Section 2413.5 Administrative Personnel FEDERAL LABOR RELATIONS AUTHORITY, GENERAL... OPEN MEETINGS § 2413.5 Action necessary to close meeting; record of votes. A meeting shall be closed...

  13. Membrane, action, and oscillatory potentials in simulated protocells.

    PubMed

    Przybylski, A T; Stratten, W P; Syren, R M; Fox, S W

    1982-12-01

    Electrical membrane potentials, oscillations, and action potentials are observed in proteinoid microspheres impaled with (3 M KC1) microelectrodes. Although effects are of greater magnitude when the vesicles contain glycerol and natural or synthetic lecithin, the results in the purely synthetic thermal protein structures are substantial, attaining 20 mV amplitude in some cases. The results add the property of electrical potential to the other known properties of proteinoid microspheres, in their role as models for protocells. PMID:7162535

  14. Membrane, action, and oscillatory potentials in simulated protocells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Przybylski, Aleksander T.; Stratten, Wilford P.; Syren, Robert M.; Fox, Sidney W.

    1982-12-01

    Electrical membrane potentials, oscillations, and action potentials are observed in proteinoid microspheres impaled with (3 M KCl) microelectrodes. Although effects are of greater magnitude when the vesicles contain glycerol and natural or synthetic lecithin, the results in the purely synthetic thermal protein structures are substantial, attaining 20 mV amplitude in some cases. The results add the property of electrical potential to the other known properties of proteinoid microspheres, in their role as models for protocells.

  15. Membrane, action, and oscillatory potentials in simulated protocells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Syren, R. M.; Fox, S. W.; Przybylski, A. T.; Stratten, W. P.

    1982-01-01

    Electrical membrane potentials, oscillations, and action potentials are observed in proteinoid microspheres impaled with (3 M KCl) microelectrodes. Although effects are of greater magnitude when the vesicles contain glycerol and natural or synthetic lecithin, the results in the purely synthetic thermal protein structures are substantial, attaining 20 mV amplitude in some cases. The results add the property of electrical potential to the other known properties of proteinoid microspheres, in their role as models for protocells.

  16. For the Record: It's Time to Spring into Action Research!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrett, Joyce Lynn

    2006-01-01

    Action research is a systematic approach used by practitioners to conceive questions and control methodologies, and to explore classroom or school-based problems. Action research is the perfect marriage of theory and practice. Recent trends in education, such as professional development schools, data-driven decision making, and undergraduate…

  17. Toward a system to measure action potential on mice brain slices with local magnetoresistive probes

    SciTech Connect

    Amaral, J.; Cardoso, S.; Freitas, P. P.; Sebastiao, A. M.

    2011-04-01

    This work combines an electrophysiological system with a magnetoresistive chip to measure the magnetic field created by the synaptic/action potential currents. The chip, with 15 spin valve sensors, was designed to be integrated in a recording chamber for submerged mice brain slices used for synaptic potential measurements. Under stimulation (rectangular pulses of 0.1 ms every 10 s) through a concentric electrode placed near the CA3/CA1 border of the hippocampus, the spin valve sensor readout signals with 20 {mu}V amplitude and a pulse length of 20 to 30 ms were recorded only in the pyramidal cell bodies region and can be interpreted as being derived from action potentials/currents.

  18. Propagation of Action Potentials: An Active Participation Exercise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felsten, Gary

    1998-01-01

    Describes an active participation exercise that demonstrates the propagation of action potentials (the ability to transmit information through the neural network, dependent upon chemical interactions in the brain). Students assume the structure and function of the network by lining up around the room and communicating through hand signals and…

  19. Passive Responses Resembling Action Potentials: A Device for the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Ian A.; Pickard, Barbara G.

    1975-01-01

    Describes the construction and operation of a network of entirely passive electrical components that gives a response to an electrical shock similar to an action potential. The network of resistors, capacitors, and diodes was developed to produce responses that would mimic those observed, for example, when a dark-grown pea epicotyl is shocked…

  20. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 516: Septic Systems and Discharge Points, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. 0, Including Record of Technical Change No. 1

    SciTech Connect

    2003-04-28

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Sites Office's (NNSA/NSO's) approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 516, Septic Systems and Discharge Points, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. CAU 516 consists of six Corrective Action Sites: 03-59-01, Building 3C-36 Septic System; 03-59-02, Building 3C-45 Septic System; 06-51-01, Sump Piping, 06-51-02, Clay Pipe and Debris; 06-51-03, Clean Out Box and Piping; and 22-19-04, Vehicle Decontamination Area. Located in Areas 3, 6, and 22 of the NTS, CAU 516 is being investigated because disposed waste may be present without appropriate controls, and hazardous and/or radioactive constituents may be present or migrating at concentrations and locations that could potentially pose a threat to human health and the environment. Existing information and process knowledge on the expected nature and extent of contamination of CAU 516 are insufficient to select preferred corrective action alternatives; therefore, additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document. Record of Technical Change No. 1 is dated 3/2004.

  1. Effect of nanomaterials on the compound action potential of the shore crab, Carcinus maenas.

    PubMed

    Windeatt, Kirsten M; Handy, Richard D

    2013-06-01

    Little is known about the effects of manufactured nanomaterials on the function of nerves. The experiment aimed to test the effects of three different nanomaterials (1 mg l⁻¹ of TiO₂ NPs, Ag NPs or SWCNT) on the compound action potential of the shore crab (Carcinus maenas) compared with an appropriate bulk powder or metal salt control (bulk TiO₂ powder, AgNO₃ and carbon black respectively). In single action potential recordings, there were no effects of any of the nanomaterials on the peak amplitude, duration, rate of rise (depolarisation), or rate of decrease (repolarisation) of the compound action potential in crab saline, despite settling of each nanomaterial directly onto the nerve preparation. The ability of the crab nerve to be stimulated to tetanus was also unaffected by exposure to the nanomaterials compared with the appropriate bulk powder or metal salt control. Solvent controls with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) also had no effect on action potentials. Overall, the study concludes that there were no effects of the materials at the concentrations tested on the compound action potential of the shore crab in physiological saline. PMID:22394242

  2. Effects of Acetylcholine and Noradrenalin on Action Potentials of Isolated Rabbit Sinoatrial and Atrial Myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Verkerk, Arie O.; Geuzebroek, Guillaume S. C.; Veldkamp, Marieke W.; Wilders, Ronald

    2012-01-01

    The autonomic nervous system controls heart rate and contractility through sympathetic and parasympathetic inputs to the cardiac tissue, with acetylcholine (ACh) and noradrenalin (NA) as the chemical transmitters. In recent years, it has become clear that specific Regulators of G protein Signaling proteins (RGS proteins) suppress muscarinic sensitivity and parasympathetic tone, identifying RGS proteins as intriguing potential therapeutic targets. In the present study, we have identified the effects of 1 μM ACh and 1 μM NA on the intrinsic action potentials of sinoatrial (SA) nodal and atrial myocytes. Single cells were enzymatically isolated from the SA node or from the left atrium of rabbit hearts. Action potentials were recorded using the amphotericin-perforated patch-clamp technique in the absence and presence of ACh, NA, or a combination of both. In SA nodal myocytes, ACh increased cycle length and decreased diastolic depolarization rate, whereas NA decreased cycle length and increased diastolic depolarization rate. Both ACh and NA increased maximum upstroke velocity. Furthermore, ACh hyperpolarized the maximum diastolic potential. In atrial myocytes stimulated at 2 Hz, both ACh and NA hyperpolarized the maximum diastolic potential, increased the action potential amplitude, and increased the maximum upstroke velocity. Action potential duration at 50 and 90% repolarization was decreased by ACh, but increased by NA. The effects of both ACh and NA on action potential duration showed a dose dependence in the range of 1–1000 nM, while a clear-cut frequency dependence in the range of 1–4 Hz was absent. Intermediate results were obtained in the combined presence of ACh and NA in both SA nodal and atrial myocytes. Our data uncover the extent to which SA nodal and atrial action potentials are intrinsically dependent on ACh, NA, or a combination of both and may thus guide further experiments with RGS proteins. PMID:22754533

  3. Action potentials of embryonic dorsal root ganglion neurones in Xenopus tadpoles.

    PubMed Central

    Baccaglini, P I

    1978-01-01

    1. Several classes of action potentials can be distinguished in dorsal root ganglion cells, studied by intracellular recording techniques in Xenopus laevis tadpoles 4.5--51 days old. The ionic basis of the action potential was investigated by changing the ionic environment of the cells and applying various blocking agents. 2. The Ca2+-dependent action potential is a plateau of relatively long duration (mean 8.7 msec). It is unaffected by removal of Na+ but blocked by mM quantities of Co2+. It is present only in small cells. 3. Ca2+/Na+-dependent action potentials. Type I is a spike followed by a plateau or hump of different durations (mean 8.1 msec). The spike is selectively blocked by removal of Na+, leaving the plateau which is in turn blocked by Co2+. It is present in cells of small and intermediate size. Type II is a spike of short duration (mean 2.0 msec) with only an inflection on the falling phase. The spike is blocked by removal of Na+ and no other components can be elicited. The inflection is blocked by Co2+. It is present in cells of all sizes. Type III is similar to type I but is seen only in solutions in which the outward current is blocked. It was observed only very infrequently. 4. Na+-dependent action potentials. Type I a is a short duration spike (mean 1.1 msec). It is abolished by removal of Na+ or addition of tetrodotoxin (TTX), but largely unaffected by Co2+ or La3+. It is present in cells of all sizes. When the outward current channels are blocked and cells exposed to Na+-free solutions, all cells are capable of producing an action potential in which the inward current is carried by divalent cations. Type I b is a spike with a smooth, more slowly falling phase. It has the same pharmacological properties as type I a action potential and is present in cells of small size. 5. Na+-dependent action potentials. Type II is a spike with an inflection on the falling phase (mean duration 3.4 msec). It is prolonged by Co2+ and La3+. Removal of Na

  4. Experimental determination of compound action potential direction and propagation velocity from multi-electrode nerve cuffs.

    PubMed

    Rieger, R; Taylor, J; Comi, E; Donaldson, N; Russold, M; Mahony, C M O; McLaughlin, J A; McAdams, E; Demosthenous, A; Jarvis, J C

    2004-07-01

    Information extracted from whole-nerve electroneurograms, recorded using electrode cuffs, can provide signals to neuroprostheses. However, the amount of information that can be extracted from a single tripole is limited. This communication demonstrates how previously unavailable information about the direction of action potential propagation and velocity can be obtained using a multi-electrode cuff and that the arrangement acts as a velocity-selective filter. Results from in vitro experiments on frog nerves are presented. PMID:15234689

  5. Fast and reliable identification of axons, axon initial segments and dendrites with local field potential recording

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Anders V.; Johansen, Emil Ø.; Perrier, Jean-François

    2015-01-01

    The axon initial segment (AIS) is an essential neuronal compartment. It is usually where action potentials are initiated. Recent studies demonstrated that the AIS is a plastic structure that can be regulated by neuronal activity and by the activation of metabotropic receptors. Studying the AIS in live tissue can be difficult because its identification is not always reliable. Here we provide a new technique allowing a fast and reliable identification of the AIS in live brain slice preparations. By simultaneous recording of extracellular local field potentials and whole-cell patch-clamp recording of neurons, we can detect sinks caused by inward currents flowing across the membrane. We determine the location of the AIS by comparing the timing of these events with the action potential. We demonstrate that this method allows the unequivocal identification of the AIS of different types of neurons from the brain. PMID:26578887

  6. Preserving Today's Records for Tomorrow's Use: A Mandate for Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma Historical Records Advisory Board, Oklahoma City.

    This report presents the findings of a year-long investigation of historical records conditions and needs conducted by the Oklahoma Historical Advisory Board (OHRAB), a 12-member board appointed by the Governor to provide leadership and planning for the protection and use of the state's documentary heritage. Viewing the Oklahoma project as one…

  7. The cytosolic calcium transient modulates the action potential of rat ventricular myocytes.

    PubMed Central

    duBell, W H; Boyett, M R; Spurgeon, H A; Talo, A; Stern, M D; Lakatta, E G

    1991-01-01

    1. The modulation of the action potential by the cytosolic Ca2+ (Cai2+) transient was studied in single isolated rat ventricular myocytes loaded with the acetoxymethyl ester form of the Ca(2+)-sensitive fluorescent dye Indo-1. Stimulation following rest and exposure to ryanodine were used to change the amount of Ca2+ released from the sarcoplasmic reticulum and thus the size of the Cai2+ transient. The Cai2+ transient was measured as the change, upon stimulation, in the ratio of Indo-1 fluorescence at 410 nm to that at 490 nm (410/490) and action potentials or membrane currents were recorded using patch-type microelectrodes. 2. When stimulation was initiated following rest, the magnitude of the Cai2+ transient decreased in a beat-dependent manner until a steady state was reached. The negative staircase in the Cai2+ transient was accompanied by a similar beat-dependent decrease in the duration of the action potential, manifested primarily as a gradual loss of the action potential plateau (approximately -45 mV). A slow terminal phase of repolarization of a few millivolts in amplitude was found to parallel the terminal decay of the Cai2+ transient. 3. The terminal portion of phase-plane loops of membrane potential (Vm) vs. Indo-1 ratio from all of the beats of a stimulus train followed a common linear trajectory even though the individual beats differed markedly in the duration and amplitude of the action potential and Cai2+ transient. 4. When the stimulation dependence of the Cai2+ transient was titrated away with submaximal exposure to ryanodine, the stimulation-dependent changes in the action potential plateau and terminal phase of repolarization were also eliminated. The same effect was noted in cells which, fortuitously, did not show a staircase in the Cai2+ transient following a period of rest. 5. When action potentials were triggered immediately following spontaneous release of Ca2+ from the sarcoplasmic reticulum, which results in a small depolarization at the

  8. [Ion channels and action potentials in olfactory receptor cells].

    PubMed

    Kawai, Fusao; Miyachi, Ei-ichi

    2007-11-01

    The first step in olfactory sensation involves the binding of odorant molecules to specific receptor proteins on the ciliary surface of olfactory receptor cells (ORCs). Odorant receptors coupled to G-proteins activate adenylyl cyclase leading to the generation of cAMP, which directly gates a cyclic nucleotide-gated cationic channel in the ciliary membrane. This initial excitation causes a slow and graded depolarizing voltage change, which is encoded into a train of action potentials. Action potentials of ORCs are generated by voltage-gated Na- currents and T-type Ca2- currents in the somatic membrane. Isolated ORCs that have lost their cilia during the dissociation procedure are known to exhibit spike frequency accommodation by injecting the steady current. This raises the possibility that somatic ionic channels in ORCs may serve for odor adaptation at the level of spike encoding, although odor adaptation is mainly accomplished by the ciliary transduction machinery. This review discusses current knowledge concerning the mechanisms of spike generation in ORCs. It also reviews how neurotransmitters and hormones modulate ionic currents and action potentials in ORCs. PMID:18154041

  9. Warm Body Temperature Facilitates Energy Efficient Cortical Action Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yuguo; Hill, Adam P.; McCormick, David A.

    2012-01-01

    The energy efficiency of neural signal transmission is important not only as a limiting factor in brain architecture, but it also influences the interpretation of functional brain imaging signals. Action potential generation in mammalian, versus invertebrate, axons is remarkably energy efficient. Here we demonstrate that this increase in energy efficiency is due largely to a warmer body temperature. Increases in temperature result in an exponential increase in energy efficiency for single action potentials by increasing the rate of Na+ channel inactivation, resulting in a marked reduction in overlap of the inward Na+, and outward K+, currents and a shortening of action potential duration. This increase in single spike efficiency is, however, counterbalanced by a temperature-dependent decrease in the amplitude and duration of the spike afterhyperpolarization, resulting in a nonlinear increase in the spike firing rate, particularly at temperatures above approximately 35°C. Interestingly, the total energy cost, as measured by the multiplication of total Na+ entry per spike and average firing rate in response to a constant input, reaches a global minimum between 37–42°C. Our results indicate that increases in temperature result in an unexpected increase in energy efficiency, especially near normal body temperature, thus allowing the brain to utilize an energy efficient neural code. PMID:22511855

  10. 29 CFR 1209.06 - Action necessary to close meetings; record of votes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ....06 Section 1209.06 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) NATIONAL MEDIATION BOARD PUBLIC OBSERVATION OF NATIONAL MEDIATION BOARD MEETINGS § 1209.06 Action necessary to close meetings; record of votes... of the Board who will participate in the meeting vote to take such action. (a) When the...

  11. Spatiotemporal pattern of action potential firing in developing inner hair cells of the mouse cochlea.

    PubMed

    Sendin, Gaston; Bourien, Jérôme; Rassendren, François; Puel, Jean-Luc; Nouvian, Régis

    2014-02-01

    Inner hair cells (IHCs) are the primary transducer for sound encoding in the cochlea. In contrast to the graded receptor potential of adult IHCs, immature hair cells fire spontaneous calcium action potentials during the first postnatal week. This spiking activity has been proposed to shape the tonotopic map along the ascending auditory pathway. Using perforated patch-clamp recordings, we show that developing IHCs fire spontaneous bursts of action potentials and that this pattern is indistinguishable along the basoapical gradient of the developing cochlea. In both apical and basal IHCs, the spiking behavior undergoes developmental changes, where the bursts of action potential tend to occur at a regular time interval and have a similar length toward the end of the first postnatal week. Although disruption of purinergic signaling does not interfere with the action potential firing pattern, pharmacological ablation of the α9α10 nicotinic receptor elicits an increase in the discharge rate. We therefore suggest that in addition to carrying place information to the ascending auditory nuclei, the IHCs firing pattern controlled by the α9α10 receptor conveys a temporal signature of the cochlear development. PMID:24429348

  12. Noise Enhances Action Potential Generation in Mouse Sensory Neurons via Stochastic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Onorato, Irene; D'Alessandro, Giuseppina; Di Castro, Maria Amalia; Renzi, Massimiliano; Dobrowolny, Gabriella; Musarò, Antonio; Salvetti, Marco; Limatola, Cristina; Crisanti, Andrea; Grassi, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    Noise can enhance perception of tactile and proprioceptive stimuli by stochastic resonance processes. However, the mechanisms underlying this general phenomenon remain to be characterized. Here we studied how externally applied noise influences action potential firing in mouse primary sensory neurons of dorsal root ganglia, modelling a basic process in sensory perception. Since noisy mechanical stimuli may cause stochastic fluctuations in receptor potential, we examined the effects of sub-threshold depolarizing current steps with superimposed random fluctuations. We performed whole cell patch clamp recordings in cultured neurons of mouse dorsal root ganglia. Noise was added either before and during the step, or during the depolarizing step only, to focus onto the specific effects of external noise on action potential generation. In both cases, step + noise stimuli triggered significantly more action potentials than steps alone. The normalized power norm had a clear peak at intermediate noise levels, demonstrating that the phenomenon is driven by stochastic resonance. Spikes evoked in step + noise trials occur earlier and show faster rise time as compared to the occasional ones elicited by steps alone. These data suggest that external noise enhances, via stochastic resonance, the recruitment of transient voltage-gated Na channels, responsible for action potential firing in response to rapid step-wise depolarizing currents. PMID:27525414

  13. Noise Enhances Action Potential Generation in Mouse Sensory Neurons via Stochastic Resonance.

    PubMed

    Onorato, Irene; D'Alessandro, Giuseppina; Di Castro, Maria Amalia; Renzi, Massimiliano; Dobrowolny, Gabriella; Musarò, Antonio; Salvetti, Marco; Limatola, Cristina; Crisanti, Andrea; Grassi, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    Noise can enhance perception of tactile and proprioceptive stimuli by stochastic resonance processes. However, the mechanisms underlying this general phenomenon remain to be characterized. Here we studied how externally applied noise influences action potential firing in mouse primary sensory neurons of dorsal root ganglia, modelling a basic process in sensory perception. Since noisy mechanical stimuli may cause stochastic fluctuations in receptor potential, we examined the effects of sub-threshold depolarizing current steps with superimposed random fluctuations. We performed whole cell patch clamp recordings in cultured neurons of mouse dorsal root ganglia. Noise was added either before and during the step, or during the depolarizing step only, to focus onto the specific effects of external noise on action potential generation. In both cases, step + noise stimuli triggered significantly more action potentials than steps alone. The normalized power norm had a clear peak at intermediate noise levels, demonstrating that the phenomenon is driven by stochastic resonance. Spikes evoked in step + noise trials occur earlier and show faster rise time as compared to the occasional ones elicited by steps alone. These data suggest that external noise enhances, via stochastic resonance, the recruitment of transient voltage-gated Na channels, responsible for action potential firing in response to rapid step-wise depolarizing currents. PMID:27525414

  14. Naturalistic stimulation changes the dynamic response of action potential encoding in a mechanoreceptor

    PubMed Central

    Pfeiffer, Keram; French, Andrew S.

    2015-01-01

    Naturalistic signals were created from vibrations made by locusts walking on a Sansevieria plant. Both naturalistic and Gaussian noise signals were used to mechanically stimulate VS-3 slit-sense mechanoreceptor neurons of the spider, Cupiennius salei, with stimulus amplitudes adjusted to give similar firing rates for either stimulus. Intracellular microelectrodes recorded action potentials, receptor potential, and receptor current, using current clamp and voltage clamp. Frequency response analysis showed that naturalistic stimulation contained relatively more power at low frequencies, and caused increased neuronal sensitivity to higher frequencies. In contrast, varying the amplitude of Gaussian stimulation did not change neuronal dynamics. Naturalistic stimulation contained less entropy than Gaussian, but signal entropy was higher than stimulus in the resultant receptor current, indicating addition of uncorrelated noise during transduction. The presence of added noise was supported by measuring linear information capacity in the receptor current. Total entropy and information capacity in action potentials produced by either stimulus were much lower than in earlier stages, and limited to the maximum entropy of binary signals. We conclude that the dynamics of action potential encoding in VS-3 neurons are sensitive to the form of stimulation, but entropy and information capacity of action potentials are limited by firing rate. PMID:26578975

  15. Action potential detection by non-linear microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sacconi, Leonardo; Lotti, Jacopo; O'Connor, Rodney P.; Mapelli, Jonathan; Gandolfi, Daniela; D'Angelo, Egidio; Pavone, Francesco S.

    2009-02-01

    In this work, we combined the advantages of second-harmonic generation (SHG) with a random access (RA) excitation scheme to realize a new microscope (RA-SHG) capable of optically recording fast membrane potential events occurring in a wide-field configuration. The RA-SHG microscope in combination with a bulk staining method with FM4-64 was used to simultaneously record electrical activity from clusters of Purkinje cells (PCs) in acute cerebellar slices. Spontaneous electrical activity was also monitored simultaneously in pairs of neurons, where APs were recorded in a single trial without averaging. These results show the strength of this technique to describe the temporal dynamics of neuronal assemblies.

  16. Action potentials of curved nerves in finite limbs.

    PubMed

    Xiao, S; McGill, K C; Hentz, V R

    1995-06-01

    Previous simulations of volume-conducted nerve-fiber action-potentials have modeled the limb as semi-infinite or circularly cylindrical, and the fibers as straight lines parallel to the limb surface. The geometry of actual nerves and limbs, however, can be considerably more complicated. This paper presents a general method for computing the potentials of fibers with arbitrary paths in arbitrary finite limbs. It involves computing the propagating point-source response (PPSR), which is the potential arising from a single point source (dipole or tripole) travelling along the fiber. The PPSR can be applied to fibers of different conduction velocities by simple dilation or compression. The method is illustrated for oblique and spiralling nerve fibers. Potentials from oblique fibers are shown to be different for orthodromic and antidromic propagation. Such results show that the straight-line models are not always adequate for nerves with anatomical amounts of curvature. PMID:7790016

  17. Reliability of directional information in unsorted spikes and local field potentials recorded in human motor cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perge, János A.; Zhang, Shaomin; Malik, Wasim Q.; Homer, Mark L.; Cash, Sydney; Friehs, Gerhard; Eskandar, Emad N.; Donoghue, John P.; Hochberg, Leigh R.

    2014-08-01

    Objective. Action potentials and local field potentials (LFPs) recorded in primary motor cortex contain information about the direction of movement. LFPs are assumed to be more robust to signal instabilities than action potentials, which makes LFPs, along with action potentials, a promising signal source for brain-computer interface applications. Still, relatively little research has directly compared the utility of LFPs to action potentials in decoding movement direction in human motor cortex. Approach. We conducted intracortical multi-electrode recordings in motor cortex of two persons (T2 and [S3]) as they performed a motor imagery task. We then compared the offline decoding performance of LFPs and spiking extracted from the same data recorded across a one-year period in each participant. Main results. We obtained offline prediction accuracy of movement direction and endpoint velocity in multiple LFP bands, with the best performance in the highest (200-400 Hz) LFP frequency band, presumably also containing low-pass filtered action potentials. Cross-frequency correlations of preferred directions and directional modulation index showed high similarity of directional information between action potential firing rates (spiking) and high frequency LFPs (70-400 Hz), and increasing disparity with lower frequency bands (0-7, 10-40 and 50-65 Hz). Spikes predicted the direction of intended movement more accurately than any individual LFP band, however combined decoding of all LFPs was statistically indistinguishable from spike-based performance. As the quality of spiking signals (i.e. signal amplitude) and the number of significantly modulated spiking units decreased, the offline decoding performance decreased 3.6[5.65]%/month (for T2 and [S3] respectively). The decrease in the number of significantly modulated LFP signals and their decoding accuracy followed a similar trend (2.4[2.85]%/month, ANCOVA, p = 0.27[0.03]). Significance. Field potentials provided comparable

  18. 43 CFR 30.273 - What action will the judge take to record title?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false What action will the judge take to record title? 30.273 Section 30.273 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior INDIAN... the judge take to record title? After receiving the certificate and supporting documents, the...

  19. Acute NMDA receptor antagonism disrupts synchronization of action potential firing in rat prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Molina, Leonardo A; Skelin, Ivan; Gruber, Aaron J

    2014-01-01

    Antagonists of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDAR) have psychotomimetic effects in humans and are used to model schizophrenia in animals. We used high-density electrophysiological recordings to assess the effects of acute systemic injection of an NMDAR antagonist (MK-801) on ensemble neural processing in the medial prefrontal cortex of freely moving rats. Although MK-801 increased neuron firing rates and the amplitude of gamma-frequency oscillations in field potentials, the synchronization of action potential firing decreased and spike trains became more Poisson-like. This disorganization of action potential firing following MK-801 administration is consistent with changes in simulated cortical networks as the functional connections among pyramidal neurons become less clustered. Such loss of functional heterogeneity of the cortical microcircuit may disrupt information processing dependent on spike timing or the activation of discrete cortical neural ensembles, and thereby contribute to hallucinations and other features of psychosis induced by NMDAR antagonists. PMID:24465743

  20. Inhibition by TRPA1 agonists of compound action potentials in the frog sciatic nerve

    SciTech Connect

    Matsushita, Akitomo; Ohtsubo, Sena; Fujita, Tsugumi; Kumamoto, Eiichi

    2013-04-26

    Highlights: •TRPA1 agonists inhibited compound action potentials in frog sciatic nerves. •This inhibition was not mediated by TRPA1 channels. •This efficacy was comparable to those of lidocaine and cocaine. •We found for the first time an ability of TRPA1 agonists to inhibit nerve conduction. -- Abstract: Although TRPV1 and TRPM8 agonists (vanilloid capsaicin and menthol, respectively) at high concentrations inhibit action potential conduction, it remains to be unknown whether TRPA1 agonists have a similar action. The present study examined the actions of TRPA1 agonists, cinnamaldehyde (CA) and allyl isothiocyanate (AITC), which differ in chemical structure from each other, on compound action potentials (CAPs) recorded from the frog sciatic nerve by using the air-gap method. CA and AITC concentration-dependently reduced the peak amplitude of the CAP with the IC{sub 50} values of 1.2 and 1.5 mM, respectively; these activities were resistant to a non-selective TRP antagonist ruthenium red or a selective TRPA1 antagonist HC-030031. The CA and AITC actions were distinct in property; the latter but not former action was delayed in onset and partially reversible, and CA but not AITC increased thresholds to elicit CAPs. A CAP inhibition was seen by hydroxy-α-sanshool (by 60% at 0.05 mM), which activates both TRPA1 and TRPV1 channels, a non-vanilloid TRPV1 agonist piperine (by 20% at 0.07 mM) and tetrahydrolavandulol (where the six-membered ring of menthol is opened; IC{sub 50} = 0.38 mM). It is suggested that TRPA1 agonists as well as TRPV1 and TRPM8 agonists have an ability to inhibit nerve conduction without TRP activation, although their agonists are quite different in chemical structure from each other.

  1. Electrotonic and action potentials in the Venus flytrap.

    PubMed

    Volkov, Alexander G; Vilfranc, Chrystelle L; Murphy, Veronica A; Mitchell, Colee M; Volkova, Maia I; O'Neal, Lawrence; Markin, Vladislav S

    2013-06-15

    The electrical phenomena and morphing structures in the Venus flytrap have attracted researchers since the nineteenth century. We have observed that mechanical stimulation of trigger hairs on the lobes of the Venus flytrap induces electrotonic potentials in the lower leaf. Electrostimulation of electrical circuits in the Venus flytrap can induce electrotonic potentials propagating along the upper and lower leaves. The instantaneous increase or decrease in voltage of stimulating potential generates a nonlinear electrical response in plant tissues. Any electrostimulation that is not instantaneous, such as sinusoidal or triangular functions, results in linear responses in the form of small electrotonic potentials. The amplitude and sign of electrotonic potentials depend on the polarity and the amplitude of the applied voltage. Electrical stimulation of the lower leaf induces electrical signals, which resemble action potentials, in the trap between the lobes and the midrib. The trap closes if the stimulating voltage is above the threshold level of 4.4V. Electrical responses in the Venus flytrap were analyzed and reproduced in the discrete electrical circuit. The information gained from this study can be used to elucidate the coupling of intracellular and intercellular communications in the form of electrical signals within plants. PMID:23422156

  2. Na+ current in presynaptic terminals of the crayfish opener cannot initiate action potentials.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jen-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Action potential (AP) propagation in presynaptic axons of the crayfish opener neuromuscular junction (NMJ) was investigated by simultaneously recording from a terminal varicosity and a proximal branch. Although orthodromically conducting APs could be recorded in terminals with amplitudes up to 70 mV, depolarizing steps in terminals to -20 mV or higher failed to fire APs. Patch-clamp recordings did detect Na(+) current (INa) in most terminals. The INa exhibited a high threshold and fast activation rate. Local perfusion of Na(+)-free saline showed that terminal INa contributed to AP waveform by slightly accelerating the rising phase and increasing the peak amplitude. These findings suggest that terminal INa functions to "touch up" but not to generate APs. PMID:26561611

  3. Tuning of Ranvier node and internode properties in myelinated axons to adjust action potential timing

    PubMed Central

    Ford, Marc C.; Alexandrova, Olga; Cossell, Lee; Stange-Marten, Annette; Sinclair, James; Kopp-Scheinpflug, Conny; Pecka, Michael; Attwell, David; Grothe, Benedikt

    2015-01-01

    Action potential timing is fundamental to information processing; however, its determinants are not fully understood. Here we report unexpected structural specializations in the Ranvier nodes and internodes of auditory brainstem axons involved in sound localization. Myelination properties deviated significantly from the traditionally assumed structure. Axons responding best to low-frequency sounds had a larger diameter than high-frequency axons but, surprisingly, shorter internodes. Simulations predicted that this geometry helps to adjust the conduction velocity and timing of action potentials within the circuit. Electrophysiological recordings in vitro and in vivo confirmed higher conduction velocities in low-frequency axons. Moreover, internode length decreased and Ranvier node diameter increased progressively along the distal axon segments, which simulations show was essential to ensure precisely timed depolarization of the giant calyx of Held presynaptic terminal. Thus, individual anatomical parameters of myelinated axons can be tuned to optimize pathways involved in temporal processing. PMID:26305015

  4. Tuning of Ranvier node and internode properties in myelinated axons to adjust action potential timing.

    PubMed

    Ford, Marc C; Alexandrova, Olga; Cossell, Lee; Stange-Marten, Annette; Sinclair, James; Kopp-Scheinpflug, Conny; Pecka, Michael; Attwell, David; Grothe, Benedikt

    2015-01-01

    Action potential timing is fundamental to information processing; however, its determinants are not fully understood. Here we report unexpected structural specializations in the Ranvier nodes and internodes of auditory brainstem axons involved in sound localization. Myelination properties deviated significantly from the traditionally assumed structure. Axons responding best to low-frequency sounds had a larger diameter than high-frequency axons but, surprisingly, shorter internodes. Simulations predicted that this geometry helps to adjust the conduction velocity and timing of action potentials within the circuit. Electrophysiological recordings in vitro and in vivo confirmed higher conduction velocities in low-frequency axons. Moreover, internode length decreased and Ranvier node diameter increased progressively along the distal axon segments, which simulations show was essential to ensure precisely timed depolarization of the giant calyx of Held presynaptic terminal. Thus, individual anatomical parameters of myelinated axons can be tuned to optimize pathways involved in temporal processing. PMID:26305015

  5. Uncertainty Propagation in Nerve Impulses Through the Action Potential Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Torres Valderrama, Aldemar; Witteveen, Jeroen; Navarro, Maria; Blom, Joke

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the propagation of probabilistic uncertainty through the action potential mechanism in nerve cells. Using the Hodgkin-Huxley (H-H) model and Stochastic Collocation on Sparse Grids, we obtain an accurate probabilistic interpretation of the deterministic dynamics of the transmembrane potential and gating variables. Using Sobol indices, out of the 11 uncertain parameters in the H-H model, we unravel two main uncertainty sources, which account for more than 90 % of the fluctuations in neuronal responses, and have a direct biophysical interpretation. We discuss how this interesting feature of the H-H model allows one to reduce greatly the probabilistic degrees of freedom in uncertainty quantification analyses, saving CPU time in numerical simulations and opening possibilities for probabilistic generalisation of other deterministic models of great importance in physiology and mathematical neuroscience. PMID:26458902

  6. The bioelectrical source in computing single muscle fiber action potentials.

    PubMed Central

    van Veen, B K; Wolters, H; Wallinga, W; Rutten, W L; Boom, H B

    1993-01-01

    Generally, single muscle fiber action potentials (SFAPs) are modeled as a convolution of the bioelectrical source (being the transmembrane current) with a weighting or transfer function, representing the electrical volume conduction. In practice, the intracellular action potential (IAP) rather than the transmembrane current is often used as the source, because the IAP is relatively easy to obtain under experimental conditions. Using a core conductor assumption, the transmembrane current equals the second derivative of the IAP. In previous articles, discrepancies were found between experimental and simulated SFAPs. Adaptations in the volume conductor slightly altered the simulation results. Another origin of discrepancy might be an erroneous description of the source. Therefore, in the present article, different sources were studied. First, an analytical description of the IAP was used. Furthermore, an experimental IAP, a special experimental SFAP, and a measured transmembrane current scaled to our experimental situation were applied. The results for the experimental IAP were comparable to those with the analytical IAP. The best agreement between experimental and simulated data was found for a measured transmembrane current as source, but differences are still apparent. PMID:8324186

  7. A web portal for in-silico action potential predictions

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Geoff; Mirams, Gary R.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Multiple cardiac ion channels are prone to block by pharmaceutical compounds, and this can have large implications for cardiac safety. The effect of a compound on individual ion currents can now be measured in automated patch clamp screening assays. In-silico action potential models are proposed as one way of predicting the integrated compound effects on whole-cell electrophysiology, to provide an improved indication of pro-arrhythmic risk. Methods We have developed open source software to run cardiac electrophysiology simulations to predict the overall effect of compounds that block IKr, ICaL, INa, IKs, IK1 and Ito to varying degrees, using a choice of mathematical electrophysiology models. To enable safety pharmacology teams to run and evaluate these simulations easily, we have also developed an open source web portal interface to this simulator. Results The web portal can be found at https://chaste.cs.ox.ac.uk/ActionPotential. Users can enter details of compound affinities for ion channels in the form of IC50 or pIC50 values, run simulations, store the results for later retrieval, view summary graphs of the results, and export data to a spreadsheet format. Discussion This web portal provides a simple interface to reference versions of mathematical models, and well-tested state-of-the-art equation solvers. It provides safety teams easy access to the emerging technology of cardiac electrophysiology simulations for use in the drug-discovery process. PMID:25963830

  8. A Quantitative Description of the Relationship between the Area of Rabbit Ventricular Action Potentials and the Pattern of Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Gibbs, C. L.; Johnson, E. A.; Tille, J.

    1963-01-01

    Intracellular microelectrodes were used to record action potentials from fibres of the isolated rabbit right ventricle and the areas of the action potentials were measured. The action potential area was found to depend in a reproducible way on the preceding pattern of stimulation. A mathematical model reproducing all the observed changes in the action potential area was developed. In the model the action potential area is taken as a linear function of the product of two time and stimulation dependent variables, M and N. The behaviour of each variable between action potentials is described by the solution of a second order differential equation. During each action potential the variables are assumed to change discontinuously, the magnitudes of the discontinuous changes being given by a set of subsidiary equations. It was found that the behaviour of all the fibres tested was described by the same set of equations, each single fibre being characterized by a set of ten independent constants. ImagesFigure 5 PMID:14070359

  9. Metabolic syndrome potentiates the cardiac action potential-prolonging action of drugs: a possible 'anti-proarrhythmic' role for amlodipine.

    PubMed

    Caillier, Bertrand; Pilote, Sylvie; Patoine, Dany; Levac, Xavier; Couture, Christian; Daleau, Pascal; Simard, Chantale; Drolet, Benoit

    2012-03-01

    Type II diabetes was shown to prolong the QT interval on the ECG and to promote cardiac arrhythmias. This is not so clear for metabolic syndrome, a precursor state of type II diabetes. The objectives of the present study were to generate a guinea pig model of metabolic syndrome by long-term exposure to diabetogenic diets, and to evaluate the monophasic action potential duration (MAPD)-modulating effects of drugs in these animals. Male Hartley guinea pigs were fed with either the control, the High Fat High Sucrose (HFHS) or the High Fat High Fructose (HFHF) diet for 150 days. Evolution of weight, blood cholesterol, triglycerides, urea and glucose tolerance were regularly monitored. Histopathological evolution was also evaluated in target organs such as pancreas, heart, liver and kidneys. Ex vivo experiments using the Langendorff retroperfusion technique, isolated hearts from guinea pigs either fed with the control, the HFHS or the HFHF diet were exposed to dofetilide 20 nM (D), chromanol 293B 10 μM (C) and amlodipine 100 nM (A) in different drug combinations and monophasic action potential duration was measured at 90% repolarization (MAPD₉₀). Our data show that it is possible to generate a guinea pig model of metabolic syndrome by chronic exposure to diabetogenic diets. Minor histopathological abnormalities were observed, mainly in the pancreas and the liver. Metabolic syndrome potentiates the MAPD-prolonging actions of I(Kr)-blocking (dofetilide) and I(Ks)-blocking (chromanol 293B) drugs, an effect that is reversible upon administration of the calcium channel blocker amlodipine. PMID:22154802

  10. Cellular electrophysiology of canine pulmonary vein cardiomyocytes: action potential and ionic current properties

    PubMed Central

    Ehrlich, Joachim R; Cha, Tae-Joon; Zhang, Liming; Chartier, Denis; Melnyk, Peter; Hohnloser, Stefan H; Nattel, Stanley

    2003-01-01

    Pulmonary vein (PV) cardiomyocytes play an important role in atrial fibrillation; however, little is known about their specific cellular electrophysiological properties. We applied standard microelectrode recording and whole-cell patch-clamp to evaluate action potentials and ionic currents in canine PVs and left atrium (LA) free wall. Resting membrane potential (RMP) averaged −66 ± 1 mV in PVs and −74 ± 1 mV in LA (P < 0.0001) and action potential amplitude averaged 76 ± 2 mV in PVs vs. 95 ± 2 mV in LA (P < 0.0001). PVs had smaller maximum phase 0 upstroke velocity (Vmax: 98 ± 9 vs. 259 ± 16 V s−1, P < 0.0001) and action potential duration (APD): e.g. at 2 Hz, APD to 90 % repolarization in PVs was 84 % of LA (P < 0.05). Na+ current density under voltage-clamp conditions was similar in PV and LA, suggesting that smaller Vmax in PVs was due to reduced RMP. Inward rectifier current density in the PV cardiomyocytes was ˜58 % that in the LA, potentially accounting for the less negative RMP in PVs. Slow and rapid delayed rectifier currents were greater in the PV (by ˜60 and ˜50 %, respectively), whereas transient outward K+ current and L-type Ca2+ current were significantly smaller (by ˜25 and ˜30 %, respectively). Na+-Ca2+-exchange (NCX) current and T-type Ca2+ current were not significantly different. In conclusion, PV cardiomyocytes have a discrete distribution of transmembrane ion currents associated with specific action potential properties, with potential implications for understanding PV electrical activity in cardiac arrhythmias. PMID:12847206

  11. Electrophysiological Motor Unit Number Estimation (MUNE) Measuring Compound Muscle Action Potential (CMAP) in Mouse Hindlimb Muscles.

    PubMed

    Arnold, W David; Sheth, Kajri A; Wier, Christopher G; Kissel, John T; Burghes, Arthur H; Kolb, Stephen J

    2015-01-01

    Compound muscle action potential (CMAP) and motor unit number estimation (MUNE) are electrophysiological techniques that can be used to monitor the functional status of a motor unit pool in vivo. These measures can provide insight into the normal development and degeneration of the neuromuscular system. These measures have clear translational potential because they are routinely applied in diagnostic and clinical human studies. We present electrophysiological techniques similar to those employed in humans to allow recordings of mouse sciatic nerve function. The CMAP response represents the electrophysiological output from a muscle or group of muscles following supramaximal stimulation of a peripheral nerve. MUNE is an electrophysiological technique that is based on modifications of the CMAP response. MUNE is a calculated value that represents the estimated number of motor neurons or axons (motor control input) supplying the muscle or group of muscles being tested. We present methods for recording CMAP responses from the proximal leg muscles using surface recording electrodes following the stimulation of the sciatic nerve in mice. An incremental MUNE technique is described using submaximal stimuli to determine the average single motor unit potential (SMUP) size. MUNE is calculated by dividing the CMAP amplitude (peak-to-peak) by the SMUP amplitude (peak-to-peak). These electrophysiological techniques allow repeated measures in both neonatal and adult mice in such a manner that facilitates rapid analysis and data collection while reducing the number of animals required for experimental testing. Furthermore, these measures are similar to those recorded in human studies allowing more direct comparisons. PMID:26436455

  12. The effect of stimulation frequency on the transmural ventricular monophasic action potential in yellowfin tuna Thunnus albacares.

    PubMed

    Patrick, S M; White, E; Brill, R W; Shiels, H A

    2011-02-01

    Monophasic action potentials (MAPs) were recorded from the spongy and compact layers of the yellowfin tuna Thunnus albacares ventricle as stimulation frequency was increased. MAP duration decreased with increase in stimulation frequency in both the spongy and compact myocardial layers, but no significant difference in MAP duration was observed between the layers. PMID:21284642

  13. The Potential of Deweyan-Inspired Action Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stark, Jody L.

    2014-01-01

    In its broadest sense, pragmatism could be said to be the philosophical orientation of all action research. Action research is characterized by research, action, and participation grounded in democratic principles and guided by the aim of social improvement. Furthermore, action research is an active process of inquiry that does not admit…

  14. Event-related potentials reveal early activation of body part representations in action concept comprehension.

    PubMed

    Lu, Aitao; Liu, Jing; Zhang, John X

    2012-03-01

    With tasks involving action concept comprehension, many fMRI studies have reported brain activations in sensori-motor regions specific to effectors of the referent action. There is relatively less evidence whether such activations reflect early semantic access or late conceptual re-processing. Here we recorded event-related potentials when participants recognized noun-verb pairs. For Congruent pairs, the verb was the one most commonly associated with the noun (e.g., football-kick). Compared with a control condition, verbs in Congruent pairs showed priming effects in the time windows of 100-150 ms and 210-260 ms. Such activation seems to be specific to body part but not other aspects of the action as similar priming effect was also found when the noun and verb involved different actions though sharing the same body part (e.g., football-jump), documenting for the first time the early activation of body part representations in action concept comprehension. PMID:22306088

  15. Cardiac dynamics: a simplified model for action potential propagation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    This paper analyzes a new semiphysiological ionic model, used recently to study reexitations and reentry in cardiac tissue [I.R. Cantalapiedra et al, PRE 82 011907 (2010)]. The aim of the model is to reproduce action potencial morphologies and restitution curves obtained, either from experimental data, or from more complex electrophysiological models. The model divides all ion currents into four groups according to their function, thus resulting into fast-slow and inward-outward currents. We show that this simplified model is flexible enough as to accurately capture the electrical properties of cardiac myocytes, having the advantage of being less computational demanding than detailed electrophysiological models. Under some conditions, it has been shown to be amenable to mathematical analysis. The model reproduces the action potential (AP) change with stimulation rate observed both experimentally and in realistic models of healthy human and guinea pig myocytes (TNNP and LRd models, respectively). When simulated in a cable it also gives the right dependence of the conduction velocity (CV) with stimulation rate. Besides reproducing correctly these restitution properties, it also gives a good fit for the morphology of the AP, including the notch typical of phase 1. Finally, we perform simulations in a realistic geometric model of the rabbit’s ventricles, finding a good qualitative agreement in AP propagation and the ECG. Thus, this simplified model represents an alternative to more complex models when studying instabilities in wave propagation. PMID:23194429

  16. Final record of decision/remedial action plan, nine sites, Sierra Army Depot, Lassen County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Arroyo, S.L.; Larson, A.M.; Parent, M.M.; Silvers, J.M.; Weaverling, P.H.

    1996-10-01

    This ROD/RAP presents the selected response actions for nine sites at SIAD. The response actions were selected by the US Department of the Army (Army) in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended by the Superfund Amendments Reauthorization Act of 1986 (SARA)(collectively referred to as CERCLA), the National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP), and Section 6.8 of the California Health and Safety Code. This ROD/RAP includes the factual and legal basis for selecting the response action at each of the nine sites listed above. The data used to support the selected response action are contained in the Administrative Record for each site. The State of California as represented by the Department of Toxic Substances Control (DTSC), and the Lahontan Regional Water Quality Control Board (RWQCB) concur with the selected response action at each site.

  17. Membrane potential synchrony of simultaneously recorded striatal spiny neurons in vivo.

    PubMed

    Stern, E A; Jaeger, D; Wilson, C J

    1998-07-30

    The basal ganglia are an interconnected set of subcortical regions whose established role in cognition and motor control remains poorly understood. An important nucleus within the basal ganglia, the striatum, receives cortical afferents that convey sensorimotor, limbic and cognitive information. The activity of medium-sized spiny neurons in the striatum seems to depend on convergent input within these information channels. To determine the degree of correlated input, both below and at threshold for the generation of action potentials, we recorded intracellularly from pairs of spiny neurons in vivo. Here we report that the transitions between depolarized and hyperpolarized states were highly correlated among neurons. Within individual depolarized states, some significant synchronous fluctuations in membrane potential occurred, but action potentials were not synchronized. Therefore, although the mean afferent signal across fibres is highly correlated among striatal neurons, the moment-to-moment variations around the mean, which determine the timing of action potentials, are not. We propose that the precisely timed, synchronous component of the membrane potential signals activation of cell assemblies and enables firing to occur. The asynchronous component, with low redundancy, determines the fine temporal pattern of spikes. PMID:9697769

  18. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 490: Station 44 Burn Area, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada (with Record of Technical Change No.1)

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office

    2000-06-09

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 490 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Active Unit 490 consists of four Corrective Action Sites (CASs): 03-56-001-03BA, Fire Training Area (FTA); RG-56-001-RGBA, Station 44 Burn Area; 03-58-001-03FN, Sandia Service Yard; and 09-54-001-09L2, Gun Propellant Burn Area. These CASs are located at the Tonopah Test Range near Areas 3 and 9. Historically, the FTA was used for training exercises where tires and wood were ignited with diesel fuel. Records indicate that water and carbon dioxide were the only extinguishing agents used during these training exercises. The Station 44 Burn Area was used for fire training exercises and consisted of two wooden structures. The two burn areas (ignition of tires, wood, and wooden structures with diesel fuel and water) were limited to the building footprints (10 ft by 10 ft each). The Sandia Service Yard was used for storage (i.e., wood, tires, metal, electronic and office equipment, construction debris, and drums of oil/grease) from approximately 1979 to 1993. The Gun Propellant Burn Area was used from the 1960s to 1980s to burn excess artillery gun propellant, solid-fuel rocket motors, black powder, and deteriorated explosives; additionally, the area was used for the disposal of experimental explosive items. Based on site history, the focus of the field investigation activities will be to: (1) determine the presence of contaminants of potential concern (COPCs) at each CAS, (2) determine if any COPCs exceed field-screening levels and/or preliminary action levels, and (3) determine the nature and extent of contamination with enough certainty to support selection of corrective action alternatives for each CAS. The scope of this CAIP is to resolve the

  19. Mechanisms of action potential propagation failure at sites of axon branching in the crayfish.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, D O

    1980-01-01

    1. The phenomena leading to action potential conduction block during repetitive stimulation of the excitor axon of the opener muscle in the crayfish walking leg were studied. 2. Action potentials, recorded extracellularly with micro-electrodes, failed to propagate past sites of axonal bifurcation following at least 3000 impulses; reduction of the rate or brief cessation of stimulation resulted in restored conduction. 3. Failure occurred initially at branch points located most peripherally and then more centrally as stimulation continued; this centripetal progression of the site of block resulted in a stepwise reduction of the number of synaptic terminals from which transmitter was released. 4. Prior to conduction failure, the conduction velocity and the sodium inward current of the action potentials decreased. 5. Local application of hyperpolarizing current or of physiological saline with low [K+] in the vicinity of a block can restore propagation; thus depolarization of the membrane most probably causes failure. 6. Soaking the preparation for as long as 2 hr in the metabolic inhibitor 2,4-dinitrophenol had no effect on the number of stimulus impulses before initial conduction block; however, the time required for recovery from the failure was prolonged. 7. The number of impulses prior to block was related directly to the temperature of the preparation; this had a Q10 calculated to be about 1 . 3. 8. It is suggested that during repetitive activity, the K+ gradient across the membrane is reduced, resulting in depolarization and eventually in conduction failure. PMID:7411430

  20. 5 CFR 2413.5 - Action necessary to close meeting; record of votes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 U.S.C. 552b(c)(5) (matters of alleged criminal conduct or formal censure), (c)(6) (personal... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Action necessary to close meeting; record of votes. 2413.5 Section 2413.5 Administrative Personnel FEDERAL LABOR RELATIONS AUTHORITY,...

  1. 29 CFR 1209.06 - Action necessary to close meetings; record of votes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... OBSERVATION OF NATIONAL MEDIATION BOARD MEETINGS § 1209.06 Action necessary to close meetings; record of votes. A meeting shall be closed to public observation under § 1209.05, only when a majority of the members... meeting, or portion thereof, on whether to close such meeting, or portion thereof, to public...

  2. Simultaneous conduction mapping and intracellular membrane potential recording in isolated atria.

    PubMed

    Neo, Melissa; Morris, David G; Kuklik, Pawel; Lau, Dennis H; Dimitri, Hany; Lim, Wei-Wen; Sanders, Prashanthan; Saint, David A

    2016-05-01

    We describe a novel approach for simultaneously determining regional differences in action potential (AP) morphology and tissue electrophysiological properties in isolated atria. The epicardial surface of rat atrial preparations was placed in contact with a multi-electrode array (9 × 10 silver chloride electrodes, 0.1 mm diameter and 0.1 mm pitch). A glass microelectrode (100 MΩ) was simultaneously inserted into the endocardial surface to record intracellular AP from either of 2 regions (A, B) during pacing from 2 opposite corners of the tissue. AP duration at 80% of repolarisation and its restitution curve was significantly different only in region A (p < 0.01) when AP was initiated at different stimulation sites. Alternans in AP duration and AP amplitude, and in conduction velocity were observed during 2 separate arrhythmic episodes. This approach of combining microelectrode array and intracellular membrane potential recording may provide new insights into arrhythmogenic mechanisms in animal models of cardiovascular disease. PMID:26771118

  3. Acquiring local field potential information from amperometric neurochemical recordings

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hao; Lin, Shih-Chieh; Nicolelis, Miguel A.L.

    2009-01-01

    Simultaneous acquisition of in vivo electrophysiological and neurochemical information is essential for understanding how endogenous neurochemicals modulate the dynamics of brain activity. However, up to now such a task has rarely been accomplished due to the major technical challenge of operating two independent recording systems simultaneously in real-time. Here we propose a simpler solution for achieving this goal by using only a standard electrochemical technique - amperometry. To demonstrate its feasibility, we compared amperometric signals with simultaneously recorded local field potential (LFP) signals. We found that the high frequency component (HFC) of the amperometric signals did not reflect neurochemical fluctuations, but instead it resembled LFPs in several aspects, including: (1) coherent spectral fluctuations; (2) clear characterization of different brain states; (3) identical hippocampal theta depth profile. As such, our findings provide the first demonstration that both LFP and local neurochemical information can be simultaneously acquired from electrochemical sensors alone. PMID:19428527

  4. Excitable Membranes and Action Potentials in Paramecia: An Analysis of the Electrophysiology of Ciliates.

    PubMed

    Schlaepfer, Charles H; Wessel, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    The ciliate Paramecium caudatum possesses an excitable cell membrane whose action potentials (APs) modulate the trajectory of the cell swimming through its freshwater environment. While many stimuli affect the membrane potential and trajectory, students can use current injection and extracellular ionic concentration changes to explore how APs cause reversal of the cell's motion. Students examine these stimuli through intracellular recordings, also gaining insight into the practices of electrophysiology. Paramecium's large size of around 150 µm, simple care, and relative ease to penetrate make them ideal model organisms for undergraduate students' laboratory study. The direct link between behavior and excitable membranes has thought provoking evolutionary implications for the study of paramecia. Recording from the cell, students note a small resting potential around -30 mV, differing from animal resting potentials. By manipulating ion concentrations, APs of the relatively long length of 20-30 ms up to several minutes with depolarizations maxing over 0 mV are observed. Through comparative analysis of membrane potentials and the APs induced by either calcium or barium, students can deduce the causative ions for the APs as well as the mechanisms of paramecium APs. Current injection allows students to calculate quantitative electric characteristics of the membrane. Analysis will follow the literature's conclusion in a V-Gated Ca(++) influx and depolarization resulting in feedback from intracellular Ca(++) that inactivates V-Gated Ca(++) channels and activates Ca-Dependent K(+) channels through a secondary messenger cascade that results in the K(+) efflux and repolarization. PMID:26557800

  5. Short latency compound action potentials from mammalian gravity receptor organs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, T. A.; Jones, S. M.

    1999-01-01

    Gravity receptor function was characterized in four mammalian species using far-field vestibular evoked potentials (VsEPs). VsEPs are compound action potentials of the vestibular nerve and central relays that are elicited by linear acceleration ramps applied to the cranium. Rats, mice, guinea pigs, and gerbils were studied. In all species, response onset occurred within 1.5 ms of the stimulus onset. Responses persisted during intense (116 dBSPL) wide-band (50 to 50 inverted question mark omitted inverted question mark000 Hz) forward masking, whereas auditory responses to intense clicks (112 dBpeSPL) were eliminated under the same conditions. VsEPs remained after cochlear extirpation but were eliminated following bilateral labyrinthectomy. Responses included a series of positive and negative peaks that occurred within 8 ms of stimulus onset (range of means at +6 dBre: 1.0 g/ms: P1=908 to 1062 micros, N1=1342 to 1475 micros, P2=1632 to 1952 micros, N2=2038 to 2387 micros). Mean response amplitudes at +6 dBre: 1.0 g/ms ranged from 0.14 to 0.99 microV. VsEP input/output functions revealed latency slopes that varied across peaks and species ranging from -19 to -51 micros/dB. Amplitude-intensity slopes also varied ranging from 0.04 to 0.08 microV/dB for rats and mice. Latency values were comparable to those of birds although amplitudes were substantially smaller in mammals. VsEP threshold values were considerably higher in mammals compared to birds and ranged from -8.1 to -10.5 dBre 1.0 g/ms across species. These results support the hypothesis that mammalian gravity receptors are less sensitive to dynamic stimuli than are those of birds.

  6. Modelling Action Potential Generation and Propagation in Fibroblastic Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, J. J.; Cornelisse, L. N.; Harks, E. G. A.; Theuvenet, A. P. R.; Ypey, D. L.

    2003-04-01

    Using a standard Hodgkin-Huxley (HH) formalism, we present a mathematical model for action potential (AP) generation and intercellular AP propagation in quiescent (serum-deprived) normal rat kidney (NRK) fibroblasts [1], based on the recent experimental identification of the ion channels involved [2]. The principal ion channels described are those of an inwardly rectifying K+ conductance (GKIR), an L-type calcium conductance (GCaL), an intracellular calcium activated Cl- conductance (GCl(Ca)), a residual leak conductance Gleak, and gap junctional channels between the cells (Ggj). The role of each one of these components in the particular shape of the AP wave-form has been analyzed and compared with experimental observations. In addition, we have studied the role of subcellular processes like intracellular calcium dynamics and calcium buffering in AP generation. AP propagation between cells was reconstructed in a hexagonal model of cells coupled by Ggj with physiological conductance values. The model revealed an excitability mechanism of quiescent NRK cells with a particular role of intracellular calcium dynamics. It allows further explorations of the mechanism of signal generation and transmission in NRK cell cultures and its dependence on growth conditions.

  7. Aldehydes: occurrence, carcinogenic potential, mechanism of action and risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Feron, V J; Til, H P; de Vrijer, F; Woutersen, R A; Cassee, F R; van Bladeren, P J

    1991-01-01

    Aldehydes constitute a group of relatively reactive organic compounds. They occur as natural (flavoring) constituents in a wide variety of foods and food components, often in relatively small, but occasionally in very large concentrations, and are also widely used as food additives. Evidence of carcinogenic potential in experimental animals is convincing for formaldehyde and acetaldehyde, limited for crotonaldehyde, furfural and glycidaldehyde, doubtful for malondialdehyde, very weak for acrolein and absent for vanillin. Formaldehyde carcinogenesis is a high-dose phenomenon in which the cytotoxicity plays a crucial role. Cytotoxicity may also be of major importance in acetaldehyde carcinogenesis but further studies are needed to prove or disprove this assumption. For a large number of aldehydes (relevant) data on neither carcinogenicity nor genotoxicity are available. From epidemiological studies there is no convincing evidence of aldehyde exposure being related to cancer in humans. Overall assessment of the cancer risk of aldehydes in the diet leads to the conclusion that formaldehyde, acrolein, citral and vanillin are no dietary risk factors, and that the opposite may be true for acetaldehyde, crotonaldehyde and furfural. Malondialdehyde, glycidaldehyde, benzaldehyde, cinnamaldehyde and anisaldehyde cannot be evaluated on the basis of the available data. A series of aldehydes should be subjected to at least mutagenicity, cytogenicity and cytotoxicity tests. Priority setting for testing should be based on expected mechanism of action and degree of human exposure. PMID:2017217

  8. Pharmacological actions of statins: potential utility in COPD.

    PubMed

    Young, R P; Hopkins, R; Eaton, T E

    2009-12-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterised by minimally reversible airflow limitation and features of systemic inflammation. Current therapies for COPD have been shown to reduce symptoms and infective exacerbations and to improve quality of life. However, these drugs have little effect on the natural history of the disease (progressive decline in lung function and exercise tolerance) and do not improve mortality. The anti-inflammatory effects of statins on both pulmonary and systemic inflammation through inhibition of guanosine triphosphatase and nuclear factor-κB mediated activation of inflammatory and matrix remodelling pathways could have substantial benefits in patients with COPD due to the following. 1) Inhibition of cytokine production (tumour necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8) and neutrophil infiltration into the lung; 2) inhibition of the fibrotic activity in the lung leading to small airways fibrosis and irreversible airflow limitation; 3) antioxidant and anti-inflammatory (IL-6 mediated) effects on skeletal muscle; 4) reduced inflammatory response to pulmonary infection; and 5) inhibition of the development (or reversal) of epithelial-mesenchymal transition, a precursor event to lung cancer. This review examines the pleiotropic pharmacological action of statins which inhibit key inflammatory and remodelling pathways in COPD and concludes that statins have considerable potential as adjunct therapy in COPD. PMID:20956147

  9. Regulation of Action Potential Waveforms by Axonal GABAA Receptors in Cortical Pyramidal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Yang; Zhao, Yuan; Yang, Mingpo; Zeng, Shaoqun; Shu, Yousheng

    2014-01-01

    GABAA receptors distributed in somatodendritic compartments play critical roles in regulating neuronal activities, including spike timing and firing pattern; however, the properties and functions of GABAA receptors at the axon are still poorly understood. By recording from the cut end (bleb) of the main axon trunk of layer –5 pyramidal neurons in prefrontal cortical slices, we found that currents evoked by GABA iontophoresis could be blocked by picrotoxin, indicating the expression of GABAA receptors in axons. Stationary noise analysis revealed that single-channel properties of axonal GABAA receptors were similar to those of somatic receptors. Perforated patch recording with gramicidin revealed that the reversal potential of the GABA response was more negative than the resting membrane potential at the axon trunk, suggesting that GABA may hyperpolarize the axonal membrane potential. Further experiments demonstrated that the activation of axonal GABAA receptors regulated the amplitude and duration of action potentials (APs) and decreased the AP-induced Ca2+ transients at the axon. Together, our results indicate that the waveform of axonal APs and the downstream Ca2+ signals are modulated by axonal GABAA receptors. PMID:24971996

  10. 76 FR 20633 - Record of Decision (ROD) for the Base Closure and Realignment (BRAC) 2005 Actions at Fort...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-13

    ...@us.army.mil . An electronic version of the ROD can be viewed or downloaded at: http://www.hqda.army... Department of the Army Record of Decision (ROD) for the Base Closure and Realignment (BRAC) 2005 Actions at Fort McPherson, GA AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION: Record of decision. SUMMARY:...

  11. Carbon nanotube multi-electrode array chips for noninvasive real-time measurement of dopamine, action potentials, and postsynaptic potentials.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Ikuro; Fukuda, Mao; Shirakawa, Keiichi; Jiko, Hideyasu; Gotoh, Masao

    2013-11-15

    Multi-electrode arrays (MEAs) can be used for noninvasive, real-time, and long-term recording of electrophysiological activity and changes in the extracellular chemical microenvironment. Neural network organization, neuronal excitability, synaptic and phenotypic plasticity, and drug responses may be monitored by MEAs, but it is still difficult to measure presynaptic activity, such as neurotransmitter release, from the presynaptic bouton. In this study, we describe the development of planar carbon nanotube (CNT)-MEA chips that can measure both the release of the neurotransmitter dopamine as well as electrophysiological responses such as field postsynaptic potentials (fPSPs) and action potentials (APs). These CNT-MEA chips were fabricated by electroplating the indium-tin oxide (ITO) microelectrode surfaces. The CNT-plated ITO electrode exhibited electrochemical response, having much higher current density compared with the bare ITO electrode. Chronoamperometric measurements using these CNT-MEA chips detected dopamine at nanomolar concentrations. By placing mouse striatal brain slices on the CNT-MEA chip, we successfully measured synaptic dopamine release from spontaneous firings with a high S/N ratio of 62. Furthermore, APs and fPSPs were measured from cultured hippocampal neurons and slices with high temporal resolution and a 100-fold greater S/N ratio. Our CNT-MEA chips made it possible to measure neurotransmitter dopamine (presynaptic activities), postsynaptic potentials, and action potentials, which have a central role in information processing in the neuronal network. CNT-MEA chips could prove useful for in vitro studies of stem cell differentiation, drug screening and toxicity, synaptic plasticity, and pathogenic processes involved in epilepsy, stroke, and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:23774164

  12. Potential Application of Environmental Noise Recordings in Geoarchaeological Site Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Luzio, E.

    2015-12-01

    Environmental noise recordings are commonly applied in seismic microzonation studies. By calculating the H/V spectral ratio, the fundamental frequency of soft terrains overlying a rigid bedrock can be determined (Nakamura (1989). In such a simple two-layer system, equation f = n Vs/4H (1) links the resonance frequency "f" to the thickness "H" and shear waves velocity "Vs "of the resonating layer. In recent years, this methodology has been applied generally to obtain information on the seismostratigraphy of an investigated site in different environmental context. In this work, its potential application in the characterization of archaeological features hosted in shallow geological levels is discussed. Field cases are identified in the Appia Antica archaeological site which is placed in central Italy. Here, acknowledged targets correspond to: i) empty tanks carved by the Romans into Cretaceous limestone in the IV-III cen. BC and ii): the basaltic stone paving of the ancient road track which is locally buried beneath colluvial deposits. Narrowly-spaced recordings of environmental noise were carried using a portable digital seismograph equipped with three electrodynamic orthogonal sensors (velocimeters) responding in the band 0.1 ÷1024 Hz and adopting a sampling frequency of 256 Hz.. Results are discussed in terms of absolute H/V values and related distribution maps in the very high-frequency interval of 10-40Hz. In the tanks hosting area, interpolation of H/V maximum values around 13Hz matches caves location and alignment, which is also evidenced by clear inversions (H/V<1) at lower frequencies (10-1Hz). Correlation between H/V peaks and the top surface of the buried stone paving along the prosecution of the road track is even more straightforward. Finally, the depth variations of the tank roofs and the basaltic paving were reconstructed combining in equation (1) results of noise recordings with borehole data and geophysical surveys (SASW analysis).

  13. Phase Relationship between Alternans of Early and Late Phases of Ventricular Action Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Linyuan; Agarwal, Anuj; Chourasia, Sonam; Patwardhan, Abhijit

    2012-01-01

    Background: Alternans of early phase and of duration of action potential (AP) critically affect dispersion of refractoriness through their influence on conduction and repolarization. We investigated the phase relationship between the two alternans and its effect on conduction. Methods and Results: Transmembrane potentials recorded from ventricles of eight swine and three canines during paced activation intervals of ≤300 ms were used to quantify alternans of maximum rate of depolarization (|dv/dt|max) and of action potential duration (APD). Incidence of APD alternans was 62 and 76% in swine and canines. Alternans of APD was frequently accompanied with alternans of |dv/dt|max. Of these, 4 and 26% were out of phase in swine and canines, i.e., low |dv/dt|max preceded long APD. Computer simulations show that out of phase alternans attenuate variation of wavelength and thus minimize formation of spatially discordant alternans. Conclusion: The spontaneous switching of phase relationship between alternans of depolarization and repolarization suggests that mechanisms underlying these alternans may operate independent of each other. The phase between these alternans can critically impact spatial dispersion of refractoriness and thus stability of conduction, with the in phase relation promoting transition from concord to discord while out of phase preventing formation of discord. PMID:22701104

  14. Interim action record of decision remedial alternative selection: TNX area groundwater operable unit

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, E.R.

    1994-10-01

    This document presents the selected interim remedial action for the TNX Area Groundwater Operable Unit at the Savannah River Site (SRS), which was developed in accordance with CERCLA of 1980, as amended by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986, and to the extent practicable, the National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution contingency Plan (NCP). This decision is based on the Administrative Record File for this specific CERCLA unit.

  15. Electrophysiological properties of rat spinal dorsal horn neurones in vitro: calcium-dependent action potentials.

    PubMed Central

    Murase, K; Randić, M

    1983-01-01

    1. The electrophysiological properties of dorsal horn neurones have been investigated in the immature rat in vitro spinal cord slice preparation. 2. Intracellular recordings from dorsal horn neurones show that direct or orthodromic stimulation generates action potentials followed by a brief after-hyperpolarization. Synaptic potentials were elicited by the activation of primary afferent fibres in the dorsal root. 3. Input resistance for dorsal horn neurones ranged from 48 to 267 M omega, and the membrane time constant was in the range of 4-19 ms. 4. In response to strong depolarizing currents dorsal horn neurones perfused with TTX and TEA frequently exhibit a slow regenerative depolarizing potential followed by a slow after-hyperpolarization. The depolarizing potential probably results from an influx of Ca. It is blocked by low concentration Ca, Co or Mn, and enhanced by high levels of extracellular Ca. 5. There is, in addition, a low-threshold Ca-dependent response which is activated at membrane potentials more negative than -65 mV and has a maximum rate of rise at the polarization level of about -80 mV. 6. The addition of Ba or TEA to the perfusing medium provided support for the Ca-dependence of the low- and high-threshold responses, and the lack of fast inactivation of the high-threshold Ca potential. Images Plate 1 PMID:6306228

  16. Photometric recording of transmembrane potential in outer hair cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, Takashi; Oghalai, John S.; Saggau, Peter; Rabbitt, Richard D.; Brownell, William E.

    2006-06-01

    Cochlear outer hair cells (OHCs) are polarized epithelial cells that have mechanoelectrical transduction channels within their apical stereocilia and produce electromotile force along their lateral wall. Phase shifts, or time delays, in the transmembrane voltage occurring at different axial locations along the cell may contribute to our understanding of how these cells operate at auditory frequencies. We developed a method to optically measure the phase of the OHC transmembrane potential using the voltage-sensitive dye (VSD) di-8-ANEPPS. The exit aperture of a fibre-optic light source was driven in two dimensions so that a 24 µm spot of excitation light could be positioned along the length of the OHC. We used the whole-cell patch-clamp technique in the current-clamp mode to stimulate the OHC at the base. The photometric response and the voltage response were monitored with a photodetector and patch-clamp amplifier, respectively. The photometric response was used to measure the regional changes in the membrane potential in response to maintained (dc) and sinusoidal (ac) current stimuli applied at the base of the cell. We used a neutral density filter to lower the excitation light intensity and reduce phototoxicity. A sensitive detector and lock-in amplifier were used to measure the small ac VSD signal. This permitted measurements of the ac photometric response below the noise floor of the static fluorescence. The amplitude and phase components of the photometric response were recorded for stimuli up to 800 Hz. VSD data at 400-800 Hz show the presence of a small phase delay between the stimulus voltage at the base of the cell and the local membrane potential measured along the lateral wall. Results are consistent with the hypothesis that OHCs exhibit inhomogeneous membrane potentials that vary with position in analogy with the voltage in nerve axons.

  17. Photometric recording of transmembrane potential in outer hair cells

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Takashi; Oghalai, John S; Saggau, Peter; Rabbitt, Richard D; Brownell, William E

    2008-01-01

    Cochlear outer hair cells (OHCs) are polarized epithelial cells that have mechanoelectrical transduction channels within their apical stereocilia and produce electromotile force along their lateral wall. Phase shifts, or time delays, in the transmembrane voltage occurring at different axial locations along the cell may contribute to our understanding of how these cells operate at auditory frequencies. We developed a method to optically measure the phase of the OHC transmembrane potential using the voltage-sensitive dye (VSD) di-8-ANEPPS. The exit aperture of a fibre-optic light source was driven in two dimensions so that a 24 μm spot of excitation light could be positioned along the length of the OHC. We used the whole-cell patch-clamp technique in the current-clamp mode to stimulate the OHC at the base. The photometric response and the voltage response were monitored with a photodetector and patch-clamp amplifier, respectively. The photometric response was used to measure the regional changes in the membrane potential in response to maintained (dc) and sinusoidal (ac) current stimuli applied at the base of the cell. We used a neutral density filter to lower the excitation light intensity and reduce phototoxicity. A sensitive detector and lock-in amplifier were used to measure the small ac VSD signal. This permitted measurements of the ac photometric response below the noise floor of the static fluorescence. The amplitude and phase components of the photometric response were recorded for stimuli up to 800 Hz. VSD data at 400–800 Hz show the presence of a small phase delay between the stimulus voltage at the base of the cell and the local membrane potential measured along the lateral wall. Results are consistent with the hypothesis that OHCs exhibit inhomogeneous membrane potentials that vary with position in analogy with the voltage in nerve axons. PMID:16705263

  18. Understanding the Electrical Behavior of the Action Potential in Terms of Elementary Electrical Sources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez-Falces, Javier

    2015-01-01

    A concept of major importance in human electrophysiology studies is the process by which activation of an excitable cell results in a rapid rise and fall of the electrical membrane potential, the so-called action potential. Hodgkin and Huxley proposed a model to explain the ionic mechanisms underlying the formation of action potentials. However,…

  19. Ontogeny of vestibular compound action potentials in the domestic chicken

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, S. M.; Jones, T. A.

    2000-01-01

    Compound action potentials of the vestibular nerve were measured from the surface of the scalp in 148 chickens (Gallus domesticus). Ages ranged from incubation day 18 (E18) to 22 days posthatch (P22). Responses were elicited using linear acceleration cranial pulses. Response thresholds decreased at an average rate of -0.45 dB/day. The decrease was best fit by an exponential model with half-maturity time constant of 5.1 days and asymptote of approximately -25.9 dB re:1.0 g/ms. Mean threshold approached within 3 dB of the asymptote by ages P6-P9. Similarly, response latencies decreased exponentially to within 3% of mature values at ages beyond P9. The half-maturity time constant for peripheral response peak latencies P1, N1, and P2 was comparable to thresholds and ranged from approximately 4.6 to 6.2 days, whereas central peaks (N2, P3, and N3) ranged from 2.9 to 3.4 days. Latency-intensity slopes for P1, N1, and P2 tended to decrease with age, reaching mature values within approximately 100 hours of hatching. Amplitudes increased as a function of age with average growth rates for response peaks ranging from 0.04 to 0.09 microV/day. There was no obvious asymptote to the growth of amplitudes over the ages studied. Amplitude-intensity slopes also increased modestly with age. The results show that gravity receptors are responsive to transient cranial stimuli as early as E19 in the chicken embryo. The functional response of gravity receptors continues to develop for many days after all major morphological structures are in place. Distinct maturational processes can be identified in central and peripheral neural relays. Functional improvements during maturation may result from refinements in the receptor epithelia, improvements in central and peripheral synaptic transmission, increased neural myelination, as well as changes in the mechanical coupling between the cranium and receptor organ.

  20. A novel analysis of excitatory currents during an action potential from suprachiasmatic nucleus neurons

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A new application of the action potential (AP) voltage-clamp technique is described based on computational analysis. An experimentally recorded AP is digitized. The resulting Vi vs. ti data set is applied to mathematical models of the ionic conductances underlying excitability for the cell from which the AP was recorded to test model validity. The method is illustrated for APs from suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) neurons and the underlying tetrodotoxin-sensitive Na+ current, INa, and the Ca2+ current, ICa. Voltage-step recordings have been made for both components from SCN neurons (Jackson et al. 2004). The combination of voltage-step and AP clamp results provides richer constraints for mathematical models of voltage-gated ionic conductances than either set of results alone, in particular the voltage-step results. For SCN neurons the long-term goal of this work is a realistic mathematical model of the SCN AP in which the equations for INa and ICa obtained from this analysis will be a part. Moreover, the method described in this report is general. It can be applied to any excitable cell. PMID:24047903

  1. Cell discharge correlates of posterior hypothalamic theta rhythm. Recipe for success in recording stable field potential.

    PubMed

    Bocian, Renata; Kłos-Wojtczak, Paulina; Konopacki, Jan

    2016-09-01

    The theta rhythm discovered in the posterior hypothalamus area (PHa) differs from theta observed in the hippocampal formation. In comparison to hippocampal spontaneous theta, the theta recorded in the PHa is rarely registered, has lower amplitude, often disappears, and sometimes returns after a few minutes. These features indicate that spontaneous theta recorded in the PHa is not an appropriate experimental model to search for the correlation between PHa cell discharges and local field potential. In this paper we present standard experimental conditions necessary to record theta-related cells in the PHa in anesthetized rats. Three pharmacological agents were used in the experiments to induce PHa theta rhythm in urethanized rats: carbachol (CCH), carbenoxolone and kainic acid, which are potent enough to induce well-synchronized PHa theta. However, CCH was found to be the best pharmacological tool to induce PHa theta oscillations, due to its longest duration of action and lack of preliminary epileptogenic effects. It seems that CCH-induced theta can be the most suitable pharmacological model for experiments with the use of protocol of long-lasting recordings of PHa theta-related cell discharges. PMID:27353451

  2. Spike Sorting Paradigm for Classification of Multi-channel Recorded Fasciculation Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Jahanmiri-Nezhad, Faezeh; Barkhaus, Paul E; Rymer, William Zev; Zhou, Ping

    2014-01-01

    Background Fasciculation potentials (FPs) are important in supporting the electrodiagnosis of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS). If classified by shape, FPs can also be very informative for laboratory-based neurophysiological investigations of the motor units. Methods This study describes a Matlab program for classification of FPs recorded by multichannel surface electromyogram (EMG) electrodes. The program applies Principal Component Analysis on a set of features recorded from all channels. Then, it registers unsupervised and supervised classification algorithms to sort the FP samples. Qualitative and quantitative evaluation of the results is provided for the operator to assess the outcome. The algorithm facilitates manual interactive modification of the results. Classification accuracy can be improved progressively until the user is satisfied. The program makes no assumptions regarding the occurrence times of the action potentials, in keeping with the rather sporadic and irregular nature of FP firings. Results Ten sets of experimental data recorded from subjects with ALS using a 20-channel surface electrode array were tested. A total of 11891 FPs were detected and classified into a total of 235 prototype template waveforms. Evaluation and correction of classification outcome of such a dataset with over 6000 FPs can be achieved within 1–2 days. Facilitated interactive evaluation and modification could expedite the process of gaining accurate final results. Conclusion The developed Matlab program is an efficient toolbox for classification of FPs. PMID:25450215

  3. Neuronal adaptation involves rapid expansion of the action potential initiation site.

    PubMed

    Scott, Ricardo S; Henneberger, Christian; Padmashri, Ragunathan; Anders, Stefanie; Jensen, Thomas P; Rusakov, Dmitri A

    2014-01-01

    Action potential (AP) generation is the key to information-processing in the brain. Although APs are normally initiated in the axonal initial segment, developmental adaptation or prolonged network activity may alter the initiation site geometry thus affecting cell excitability. Here we find that hippocampal dentate granule cells adapt their spiking threshold to the kinetics of the ongoing dendrosomatic excitatory input by expanding the AP-initiation area away from the soma while also decelerating local axonal spikes. Dual-patch soma-axon recordings combined with axonal Na(+) and Ca(2+) imaging and biophysical modelling show that the underlying mechanism involves distance-dependent inactivation of axonal Na(+) channels due to somatic depolarization propagating into the axon. Thus, the ensuing changes in the AP-initiation zone and local AP propagation could provide activity-dependent control of cell excitability and spiking on a relatively rapid timescale. PMID:24851940

  4. Time course of Ca and Ca-dependent K currents during molluscan nerve cell action potentials.

    PubMed

    Gola, M; Hussy, N; Crest, M; Ducreux, C

    1986-10-20

    The time courses of Ca and Ca-dependent K currents during Ca-dependent action potentials were obtained by recording the membrane currents produced in response to spike-like voltage clamp pulses before and after selective blockade of channels. The Ca current had a biphasic waveform with a first surge and a late, large entry. The Ca-dependent K(Ca) current onset was relatively fast with a peak occurring at half spike repolarization. The fast activation of the K(Ca) current was consecutive to the first Ca entry. It is concluded that K(Ca) currents constitute a powerful spike repolarization mechanism in addition to the voltage-dependent K currents. PMID:2430243

  5. Synapse-Level Determination of Action Potential Duration by K(+) Channel Clustering in Axons.

    PubMed

    Rowan, Matthew J M; DelCanto, Gina; Yu, Jianqing J; Kamasawa, Naomi; Christie, Jason M

    2016-07-20

    In axons, an action potential (AP) is thought to be broadcast as an unwavering binary pulse over its arbor, driving neurotransmission uniformly at release sites. Yet by recording from axons of cerebellar stellate cell (SC) interneurons, we show that AP width varies between presynaptic bouton sites, even within the same axon branch. The varicose geometry of SC boutons alone does not impose differences in spike duration. Rather, axonal patching revealed heterogeneous peak conductance densities of currents mediated mainly by fast-activating Kv3-type potassium channels, with clustered hotspots at boutons and restricted expression at adjoining shafts. Blockade of Kv channels at individual boutons indicates that currents immediately local to a release site direct spike repolarization at that location. Thus, the clustered arrangement and variable expression density of Kv3 channels at boutons are key determinants underlying compartmentalized control of AP width in a near synapse-by-synapse manner, multiplying the signaling capacity of these structures. PMID:27346528

  6. Neuronal adaptation involves rapid expansion of the action potential initiation site

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Ricardo S.; Henneberger, Christian; Padmashri, Ragunathan; Anders, Stefanie; Jensen, Thomas P.; Rusakov, Dmitri A.

    2014-01-01

    Action potential (AP) generation is the key to information-processing in the brain. Although APs are normally initiated in the axonal initial segment, developmental adaptation or prolonged network activity may alter the initiation site geometry thus affecting cell excitability. Here we find that hippocampal dentate granule cells adapt their spiking threshold to the kinetics of the ongoing dendrosomatic excitatory input by expanding the AP-initiation area away from the soma while also decelerating local axonal spikes. Dual-patch soma–axon recordings combined with axonal Na+ and Ca2+ imaging and biophysical modelling show that the underlying mechanism involves distance-dependent inactivation of axonal Na+ channels due to somatic depolarization propagating into the axon. Thus, the ensuing changes in the AP-initiation zone and local AP propagation could provide activity-dependent control of cell excitability and spiking on a relatively rapid timescale. PMID:24851940

  7. Control of action potential propagation by intracellular Ca2+ in cultured rat dorsal root ganglion cells.

    PubMed Central

    Lüscher, C; Lipp, P; Lüscher, H R; Niggli, E

    1996-01-01

    1. To assess the role of intracellular Ca2+ in action potential (AP) propagation, whole-cell recordings of cultured dorsal root ganglion (DRG) cells were carried out while Ca2+ was simultaneously measured with a laser-scanning confocal microscope. 2. Flash photolytic liberation of a Ca2+ buffer during trains of APs which partly failed to invade the DRG cell body immediately lowered intracellular Ca2+ and restored safe AP propagation. Furthermore, the speed of the propagated AP was reduced considerably when intracellular Ca2+ was increased by flash photolysis of caged Ca2+. 3. Both results suggest that intracellular Ca2+ regulates the safety factor for AP propagation and may thus provide a control mechanism for synaptic integration, which acts pre- as well as postsynaptically. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 PMID:8821131

  8. Excitable Membranes and Action Potentials in Paramecia: An Analysis of the Electrophysiology of Ciliates

    PubMed Central

    Schlaepfer, Charles H.; Wessel, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    The ciliate Paramecium caudatum possesses an excitable cell membrane whose action potentials (APs) modulate the trajectory of the cell swimming through its freshwater environment. While many stimuli affect the membrane potential and trajectory, students can use current injection and extracellular ionic concentration changes to explore how APs cause reversal of the cell’s motion. Students examine these stimuli through intracellular recordings, also gaining insight into the practices of electrophysiology. Paramecium’s large size of around 150 µm, simple care, and relative ease to penetrate make them ideal model organisms for undergraduate students’ laboratory study. The direct link between behavior and excitable membranes has thought provoking evolutionary implications for the study of paramecia. Recording from the cell, students note a small resting potential around −30 mV, differing from animal resting potentials. By manipulating ion concentrations, APs of the relatively long length of 20–30 ms up to several minutes with depolarizations maxing over 0 mV are observed. Through comparative analysis of membrane potentials and the APs induced by either calcium or barium, students can deduce the causative ions for the APs as well as the mechanisms of paramecium APs. Current injection allows students to calculate quantitative electric characteristics of the membrane. Analysis will follow the literature’s conclusion in a V-Gated Ca++ influx and depolarization resulting in feedback from intracellular Ca++ that inactivates V-Gated Ca++ channels and activates Ca-Dependent K+ channels through a secondary messenger cascade that results in the K+ efflux and repolarization. PMID:26557800

  9. AppMonitor: a tool for recording user actions in unmodified Windows applications.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Jason; Cockburn, Andy; Lobb, Richard

    2008-05-01

    This article describes AppMonitor, a Microsoft Windows-based client-side logging tool that records user actions in unmodified Windows applications. AppMonitor allows researchers to gain insights into many facets of interface interaction such as command use frequency, behavioral patterns prior to or following command use, and methods of navigating through systems and data sets. AppMonitor uses the Windows SDK libraries to monitor both low-level interactions, such as "left mouse button pressed" and "Ctrl-F pressed," as well as high-level "logical" actions, such as menu selections and scrollbar manipulations. The events recorded are configurable, allowing researchers to perform broad or targeted studies. No user input is required to manage logging, allowing participants to seamlessly conduct everyday work while their actions are monitored. The system currently supports logging in Microsoft Word and Adobe Reader; however, it could be extended for use with any Microsoft Windows-based application. To support other researchers wishing to create multilevel event loggers, we describe AppMonitor's underlying architecture and implementation, and provide a brief example of the data generated during our 4-month trial with six users. PMID:18522050

  10. Gifted Potential and Poverty: A Call for Extraordinary Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kitano, Margie K.

    2003-01-01

    Dr. Robinson's proposed action plan will serve the needs of highly achieving gifted students. However, defining giftedness as high academic performance based on traditional assessment procedures could reverse the field's fledgling success in supporting culturally diverse gifted children and youth. Changing the focus of equity in gifted education…

  11. Novel Transabdominal Motor Action Potential (TaMAP) Neuromonitoring System for Spinal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Erica; Gabel, Brandon C; Taylor, Natalie; Gharib, James; Lee, Yu-Po; Taylor, William

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Minimally invasive lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) approaches to the lumbar spine reduce patient morbidity compared to anterior or posterior alternatives. This approach, however, decreases direct anatomical visualization, creating the need for highly sensitive and specific neurophysiological monitoring. We seek to determine feasibility in 'transabdominal motor action potential (TaMAP)' monitoring as an assessment for the integrity of the neural elements during lateral-approach surgeries to the lumbar spine.  Methods Cathode and anode leads were placed on the posterior and anterior surfaces of two porcine subjects. Currents of varying degrees were transmitted across, from front to back. Motor responses were monitored and recorded by needle electrodes in specific distal muscle groups of the lower extremity. Lastly, the cathode and anode were placed anterior and posterior to the chest wall and stimulated to the maximum of 1500 mA to determine any effect on cardiac rhythm. Results Responses were seen by measuring vertical height differences between peaks of corresponding evoked potentials. Recruitment began at 200 mA in the lower extremities. Stimulation at 450 mA recruited a reliable and distinguishable electrographic response from most muscle groups. Responses were recorded and reliably measured and increased in proportion to the graduation of transabdominal stimulation current; no responses were seen in the arms or face. 1500 mA across the chest wall failed to stimulate or induce cardiac arrhythmia on repeated stimulation, indicating safety of stimulation. Conclusion TaMAPs seen in the animal model provide a potential alternative to standard transcranial motor evoked potentials done in the lateral approach of LLIFs. TaMAP recordings in most muscle groups were recordable and reliable, though some muscle groups failed to stimulate. Safety of transabdominal motor evoked potentials was confirmed in this porcine study. Future studies

  12. How action selection can be embodied: intracranial gamma band recording shows response competition during the Eriksen flankers test

    PubMed Central

    Caruana, Fausto; Uithol, Sebo; Cantalupo, Gaetano; Sartori, Ivana; Lo Russo, Giorgio; Avanzini, Pietro

    2014-01-01

    Recent findings in monkeys suggest that action selection is based on a competition between various action options that are automatically planned by the motor system. Here we discuss data from intracranial EEG recordings in human premotor cortex (PMC) during a bimanual version of the Eriksen flankers test that suggest that the same principles apply to human action decisions. Recording sites in the dorsal PMC show an early but undifferentiated activation, a delayed response that depends on the experimental conditions and, finally, a movement related activation during action execution. Additionally, we found that the medial part of the PMC show a significant increase in response for ipsilateral trials, suggesting a role in inhibiting the wrong response. The ventral PMC seems to be involved in action execution, rather than action selection. Together these findings suggest that the human PMC is part of a network that specifies, selects, and executes actions. PMID:25206328

  13. Quantitative assessment of the distributions of membrane conductances involved in action potential backpropagation along basal dendrites.

    PubMed

    Acker, Corey D; Antic, Srdjan D

    2009-03-01

    Basal dendrites of prefrontal cortical neurons receive strong synaptic drive from recurrent excitatory synaptic inputs. Synaptic integration within basal dendrites is therefore likely to play an important role in cortical information processing. Both synaptic integration and synaptic plasticity depend crucially on dendritic membrane excitability and the backpropagation of action potentials. We carried out multisite voltage-sensitive dye imaging of membrane potential transients from thin basal branches of prefrontal cortical pyramidal neurons before and after application of channel blockers. We found that backpropagating action potentials (bAPs) are predominantly controlled by voltage-gated sodium and A-type potassium channels. In contrast, pharmacologically blocking the delayed rectifier potassium, voltage-gated calcium, or I(h) conductance had little effect on dendritic AP propagation. Optically recorded bAP waveforms were quantified and multicompartmental modeling was used to link the observed behavior with the underlying biophysical properties. The best-fit model included a nonuniform sodium channel distribution with decreasing conductance with distance from the soma, together with a nonuniform (increasing) A-type potassium conductance. AP amplitudes decline with distance in this model, but to a lesser extent than previously thought. We used this model to explore the mechanisms underlying two sets of published data involving high-frequency trains of APs and the local generation of sodium spikelets. We also explored the conditions under which I(A) down-regulation would produce branch strength potentiation in the proposed model. Finally, we discuss the hypothesis that a fraction of basal branches may have different membrane properties compared with sister branches in the same dendritic tree. PMID:19118105

  14. Determination of cable parameters in skeletal muscle fibres during repetitive firing of action potentials.

    PubMed

    Riisager, Anders; Duehmke, Rudy; Nielsen, Ole Bækgaard; Huang, Christopher L; Pedersen, Thomas Holm

    2014-10-15

    Recent studies in rat muscle fibres show that repetitive firing of action potentials causes changes in fibre resting membrane conductance (Gm) that reflect regulation of ClC-1 Cl(-) and KATP K(+) ion channels. Methodologically, these findings were obtained by inserting two microelectrodes at close proximity in the same fibres enabling measurements of fibre input resistance (Rin) in between action potential trains. Since the fibre length constant (λ) could not be determined, however, the calculation of Gm relied on the assumptions that the specific cytosolic resistivity (Ri) and muscle fibre volume remained constant during the repeated action potential firing. Here we present a three-microelectrode technique that enables determinations of multiple cable parameters in action potential-firing fibres including Rin and λ as well as waveform and conduction velocities of fully propagating action potentials. It is shown that in both rat and mouse extensor digitorum longus (EDL) fibres, action potential firing leads to substantial changes in both muscle fibre volume and Ri. The analysis also showed, however, that regardless of these changes, rat and mouse EDL fibres both exhibited initial decreases in Gm that were eventually followed by a ∼3-fold, fully reversible increase in Gm after the firing of 1450-1800 action potentials. Using this three-electrode method we further show that the latter rise in Gm was closely associated with excitation failures and loss of action potential signal above -20 mV. PMID:25128573

  15. Understanding the electrical behavior of the action potential in terms of elementary electrical sources.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Falces, Javier

    2015-03-01

    A concept of major importance in human electrophysiology studies is the process by which activation of an excitable cell results in a rapid rise and fall of the electrical membrane potential, the so-called action potential. Hodgkin and Huxley proposed a model to explain the ionic mechanisms underlying the formation of action potentials. However, this model is unsuitably complex for teaching purposes. In addition, the Hodgkin and Huxley approach describes the shape of the action potential only in terms of ionic currents, i.e., it is unable to explain the electrical significance of the action potential or describe the electrical field arising from this source using basic concepts of electromagnetic theory. The goal of the present report was to propose a new model to describe the electrical behaviour of the action potential in terms of elementary electrical sources (in particular, dipoles). The efficacy of this model was tested through a closed-book written exam. The proposed model increased the ability of students to appreciate the distributed character of the action potential and also to recognize that this source spreads out along the fiber as function of space. In addition, the new approach allowed students to realize that the amplitude and sign of the extracellular electrical potential arising from the action potential are determined by the spatial derivative of this intracellular source. The proposed model, which incorporates intuitive graphical representations, has improved students' understanding of the electrical potentials generated by bioelectrical sources and has heightened their interest in bioelectricity. PMID:25727465

  16. Epidermal laser stimulation of action potentials in the frog sciatic nerve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jindra, Nichole M.; Goddard, Douglas; Imholte, Michelle; Thomas, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Measurements of laser-stimulated action potentials in the sciatic nerve of leopard frogs (Rana pipiens) are made using two infrared lasers. The dorsal sides of the frog's hind limbs are exposed to short-pulsed 1540- and 1064-nm wavelengths at three separate spot sizes: 2, 3, and 4 mm. Energy density thresholds are determined for eliciting an action potential at each experimental condition. Results from these exposures show similar evoked potential thresholds for both wavelengths. The 2-mm-diam spot sizes yield action potentials at radiant exposure levels almost double that seen with larger beam sizes.

  17. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 536: Area 3 Release Site, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (Rev. 0 / June 2003), Including Record of Technical Change No. 1

    SciTech Connect

    2003-06-27

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives (CAAs) appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 536: Area 3 Release Site, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 536 consists of a single Corrective Action Site (CAS): 03-44-02, Steam Jenny Discharge. The CAU 536 site is being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of possible contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives for CAS 03-44-02. The additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation (CAI) prior to evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for this CAS. The results of this field investigation are to be used to support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document. Record of Technical Change No. 1 is dated 3-2004.

  18. Recording evoked potentials during deep brain stimulation: development and validation of instrumentation to suppress the stimulus artefact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kent, A. R.; Grill, W. M.

    2012-06-01

    The clinical efficacy of deep brain stimulation (DBS) for the treatment of movement disorders depends on the identification of appropriate stimulation parameters. Since the mechanisms of action of DBS remain unclear, programming sessions can be time consuming, costly and result in sub-optimal outcomes. Measurement of electrically evoked compound action potentials (ECAPs) during DBS, generated by activated neurons in the vicinity of the stimulating electrode, could offer insight into the type and spatial extent of neural element activation and provide a potential feedback signal for the rational selection of stimulation parameters and closed-loop DBS. However, recording ECAPs presents a significant technical challenge due to the large stimulus artefact, which can saturate recording amplifiers and distort short latency ECAP signals. We developed DBS-ECAP recording instrumentation combining commercial amplifiers and circuit elements in a serial configuration to reduce the stimulus artefact and enable high fidelity recording. We used an electrical circuit equivalent model of the instrumentation to understand better the sources of the stimulus artefact and the mechanisms of artefact reduction by the circuit elements. In vitro testing validated the capability of the instrumentation to suppress the stimulus artefact and increase gain by a factor of 1000 to 5000 compared to a conventional biopotential amplifier. The distortion of mock ECAP (mECAP) signals was measured across stimulation parameters, and the instrumentation enabled high fidelity recording of mECAPs with latencies of only 0.5 ms for DBS pulse widths of 50 to 100 µs/phase. Subsequently, the instrumentation was used to record in vivo ECAPs, without contamination by the stimulus artefact, during thalamic DBS in an anesthetized cat. The characteristics of the physiological ECAP were dependent on stimulation parameters. The novel instrumentation enables high fidelity ECAP recording and advances the potential use

  19. Recording evoked potentials during deep brain stimulation: development and validation of instrumentation to suppress the stimulus artefact.

    PubMed

    Kent, A R; Grill, W M

    2012-06-01

    The clinical efficacy of deep brain stimulation (DBS) for the treatment of movement disorders depends on the identification of appropriate stimulation parameters. Since the mechanisms of action of DBS remain unclear, programming sessions can be time consuming, costly and result in sub-optimal outcomes. Measurement of electrically evoked compound action potentials (ECAPs) during DBS, generated by activated neurons in the vicinity of the stimulating electrode, could offer insight into the type and spatial extent of neural element activation and provide a potential feedback signal for the rational selection of stimulation parameters and closed-loop DBS. However, recording ECAPs presents a significant technical challenge due to the large stimulus artefact, which can saturate recording amplifiers and distort short latency ECAP signals. We developed DBS-ECAP recording instrumentation combining commercial amplifiers and circuit elements in a serial configuration to reduce the stimulus artefact and enable high fidelity recording. We used an electrical circuit equivalent model of the instrumentation to understand better the sources of the stimulus artefact and the mechanisms of artefact reduction by the circuit elements. In vitro testing validated the capability of the instrumentation to suppress the stimulus artefact and increase gain by a factor of 1000 to 5000 compared to a conventional biopotential amplifier. The distortion of mock ECAP (mECAP) signals was measured across stimulation parameters, and the instrumentation enabled high fidelity recording of mECAPs with latencies of only 0.5 ms for DBS pulse widths of 50 to 100 µs/phase. Subsequently, the instrumentation was used to record in vivo ECAPs, without contamination by the stimulus artefact, during thalamic DBS in an anesthetized cat. The characteristics of the physiological ECAP were dependent on stimulation parameters. The novel instrumentation enables high fidelity ECAP recording and advances the potential use

  20. Alteration of neural action potential patterns by axonal stimulation: the importance of stimulus location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crago, Patrick E.; Makowski, Nathaniel S.

    2014-10-01

    Objective. Stimulation of peripheral nerves is often superimposed on ongoing motor and sensory activity in the same axons, without a quantitative model of the net action potential train at the axon endpoint. Approach. We develop a model of action potential patterns elicited by superimposing constant frequency axonal stimulation on the action potentials arriving from a physiologically activated neural source. The model includes interactions due to collision block, resetting of the neural impulse generator, and the refractory period of the axon at the point of stimulation. Main results. Both the mean endpoint firing rate and the probability distribution of the action potential firing periods depend strongly on the relative firing rates of the two sources and the intersite conduction time between them. When the stimulus rate exceeds the neural rate, neural action potentials do not reach the endpoint and the rate of endpoint action potentials is the same as the stimulus rate, regardless of the intersite conduction time. However, when the stimulus rate is less than the neural rate, and the intersite conduction time is short, the two rates partially sum. Increases in stimulus rate produce non-monotonic increases in endpoint rate and continuously increasing block of neurally generated action potentials. Rate summation is reduced and more neural action potentials are blocked as the intersite conduction time increases. At long intersite conduction times, the endpoint rate simplifies to being the maximum of either the neural or the stimulus rate. Significance. This study highlights the potential of increasing the endpoint action potential rate and preserving neural information transmission by low rate stimulation with short intersite conduction times. Intersite conduction times can be decreased with proximal stimulation sites for muscles and distal stimulation sites for sensory endings. The model provides a basis for optimizing experiments and designing neuroprosthetic

  1. Reconstruction of action potential of repolarization in patients with congenital long-QT syndrome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandori, Akihiko; Shimizu, Wataru; Yokokawa, Miki; Kamakura, Shiro; Miyatake, Kunio; Murakami, Masahiro; Miyashita, Tsuyoshi; Ogata, Kuniomi; Tsukada, Keiji

    2004-05-01

    A method for reconstructing an action potential during the repolarization period was developed. This method uses a current distribution—plotted as a current-arrow map (CAM)—calculated using magnetocardiogram (MCG) signals. The current arrows are summarized during the QRS complex period and subtracted during the ST-T wave period in order to reconstruct the action-potential waveform. To ensure the similarity between a real action potential and the reconstructed action potential using CAM, a monophasic action potential (MAP) and an MCG of the same patient with type-I long-QT syndrome were measured. Although the MAP had one notch that was associated with early afterdepolarization (EAD), the reconstructed action potential had two large and small notches. The small notch timing agreed with the occurrence of the EAD in the MAP. On the other hand, the initiation time of an abnormal current distribution coincides with the appearance timing of the first large notch, and its end time coincides with that of the second small notch. These results suggest that a simple reconstruction method using a CAM based on MCG data can provide a similar action-potential waveform to a MAP waveform without having to introduce a catheter.

  2. Inter-Subject Variability in Human Atrial Action Potential in Sinus Rhythm versus Chronic Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, Carlos; Bueno-Orovio, Alfonso; Wettwer, Erich; Loose, Simone; Simon, Jana; Ravens, Ursula; Pueyo, Esther; Rodriguez, Blanca

    2014-01-01

    Aims Human atrial electrophysiology exhibits high inter-subject variability in both sinus rhythm (SR) and chronic atrial fibrillation (cAF) patients. Variability is however rarely investigated in experimental and theoretical electrophysiological studies, thus hampering the understanding of its underlying causes but also its implications in explaining differences in the response to disease and treatment. In our study, we aim at investigating the ability of populations of human atrial cell models to capture the inter-subject variability in action potential (AP) recorded in 363 patients both under SR and cAF conditions. Methods and Results Human AP recordings in atrial trabeculae (n = 469) from SR and cAF patients were used to calibrate populations of computational SR and cAF atrial AP models. Three populations of over 2000 sampled models were generated, based on three different human atrial AP models. Experimental calibration selected populations of AP models yielding AP with morphology and duration in range with experimental recordings. Populations using the three original models can mimic variability in experimental AP in both SR and cAF, with median conductance values in SR for most ionic currents deviating less than 30% from their original peak values. All cAF populations show similar variations in GK1, GKur and Gto, consistent with AF-related remodeling as reported in experiments. In all SR and cAF model populations, inter-subject variability in IK1 and INaK underlies variability in APD90, variability in IKur, ICaL and INaK modulates variability in APD50 and combined variability in Ito and IKur determines variability in APD20. The large variability in human atrial AP triangulation is mostly determined by IK1 and either INaK or INaCa depending on the model. Conclusion Experimentally-calibrated human atrial AP models populations mimic AP variability in SR and cAF patient recordings, and identify potential ionic determinants of inter-subject variability in

  3. Human neural tuning estimated from compound action potentials in normal hearing human volunteers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verschooten, Eric; Desloovere, Christian; Joris, Philip X.

    2015-12-01

    The sharpness of cochlear frequency tuning in humans is debated. Evoked otoacoustic emissions and psychophysical measurements suggest sharper tuning in humans than in laboratory animals [15], but this is disputed based on comparisons of behavioral and electrophysiological measurements across species [14]. Here we used evoked mass potentials to electrophysiologically quantify tuning (Q10) in humans. We combined a notched noise forward masking paradigm [9] with the recording of trans tympanic compound action potentials (CAP) from masked probe tones in awake human and anesthetized monkey (Macaca mulatta). We compare our results to data obtained with the same paradigm in cat and chinchilla [16], and find that CAP-Q10values in human are ˜1.6x higher than in cat and chinchilla and ˜1.3x higher than in monkey. To estimate frequency tuning of single auditory nerve fibers (ANFs) in humans, we derive conversion functions from ANFs in cat, chinchilla, and monkey and apply these to the human CAP measurements. The data suggest that sharp cochlear tuning is a feature of old-world primates.

  4. Electrical Identification and Selective Microstimulation of Neuronal Compartments Based on Features of Extracellular Action Potentials.

    PubMed

    Radivojevic, Milos; Jäckel, David; Altermatt, Michael; Müller, Jan; Viswam, Vijay; Hierlemann, Andreas; Bakkum, Douglas J

    2016-01-01

    A detailed, high-spatiotemporal-resolution characterization of neuronal responses to local electrical fields and the capability of precise extracellular microstimulation of selected neurons are pivotal for studying and manipulating neuronal activity and circuits in networks and for developing neural prosthetics. Here, we studied cultured neocortical neurons by using high-density microelectrode arrays and optical imaging, complemented by the patch-clamp technique, and with the aim to correlate morphological and electrical features of neuronal compartments with their responsiveness to extracellular stimulation. We developed strategies to electrically identify any neuron in the network, while subcellular spatial resolution recording of extracellular action potential (AP) traces enabled their assignment to the axon initial segment (AIS), axonal arbor and proximal somatodendritic compartments. Stimulation at the AIS required low voltages and provided immediate, selective and reliable neuronal activation, whereas stimulation at the soma required high voltages and produced delayed and unreliable responses. Subthreshold stimulation at the soma depolarized the somatic membrane potential without eliciting APs. PMID:27510732

  5. Variability of Action Potentials Within and Among Cardiac Cell Clusters Derived from Human Embryonic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Renjun; Millrod, Michal A; Zambidis, Elias T; Tung, Leslie

    2016-01-01

    Electrophysiological variability in cardiomyocytes derived from pluripotent stem cells continues to be an impediment for their scientific and translational applications. We studied the variability of action potentials (APs) recorded from clusters of human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hESC-CMs) using high-resolution optical mapping. Over 23,000 APs were analyzed through four parameters: APD30, APD80, triangulation and fractional repolarization. Although measures were taken to reduce variability due to cell culture conditions and rate-dependency of APs, we still observed significant variability in APs among and within the clusters. However, similar APs were found in spatial locations with close proximity, and in some clusters formed distinct regions having different AP characteristics that were reflected as separate peaks in the AP parameter distributions, suggesting multiple electrophysiological phenotypes. Using a recently developed automated method to group cells based on their entire AP shape, we identified distinct regions of different phenotypes within single clusters and common phenotypes across different clusters when separating APs into 2 or 3 subpopulations. The systematic analysis of the heterogeneity and potential phenotypes of large populations of hESC-CMs can be used to evaluate strategies to improve the quality of pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes for use in diagnostic and therapeutic applications and in drug screening. PMID:26729331

  6. Electrical Identification and Selective Microstimulation of Neuronal Compartments Based on Features of Extracellular Action Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Radivojevic, Milos; Jäckel, David; Altermatt, Michael; Müller, Jan; Viswam, Vijay; Hierlemann, Andreas; Bakkum, Douglas J.

    2016-01-01

    A detailed, high-spatiotemporal-resolution characterization of neuronal responses to local electrical fields and the capability of precise extracellular microstimulation of selected neurons are pivotal for studying and manipulating neuronal activity and circuits in networks and for developing neural prosthetics. Here, we studied cultured neocortical neurons by using high-density microelectrode arrays and optical imaging, complemented by the patch-clamp technique, and with the aim to correlate morphological and electrical features of neuronal compartments with their responsiveness to extracellular stimulation. We developed strategies to electrically identify any neuron in the network, while subcellular spatial resolution recording of extracellular action potential (AP) traces enabled their assignment to the axon initial segment (AIS), axonal arbor and proximal somatodendritic compartments. Stimulation at the AIS required low voltages and provided immediate, selective and reliable neuronal activation, whereas stimulation at the soma required high voltages and produced delayed and unreliable responses. Subthreshold stimulation at the soma depolarized the somatic membrane potential without eliciting APs. PMID:27510732

  7. Spatial dynamics of action potentials estimated by dendritic Ca(2+) signals in insect projection neurons.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Hiroto; Mitani, Ruriko

    2015-11-13

    The spatial dynamics of action potentials, including their propagation and the location of spike initiation zone (SIZ), are crucial for the computation of a single neuron. Compared with mammalian central neurons, the spike dynamics of invertebrate neurons remain relatively unknown. Thus, we examined the spike dynamics based on single spike-induced Ca(2+) signals in the dendrites of cricket mechanosensory projection neurons, known as giant interneurons (GIs). The Ca(2+) transients induced by a synaptically evoked single spike were larger than those induced by an antidromic spike, whereas subthreshold synaptic potentials caused no elevation of Ca(2+). These results indicate that synaptic activity enhances the dendritic Ca(2+) influx through voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels. Stimulation of the presynaptic sensory afferents ipsilateral to the recording site evoked a dendritic spike with higher amplitude than contralateral stimulation, thereby suggesting that alteration of the spike waveform resulted in synaptic enhancement of the dendritic Ca(2+) transients. The SIZ estimated from the spatial distribution of the difference in the Ca(2+) amplitude was distributed throughout the right and left dendritic branches across the primary neurite connecting them in GIs. PMID:26456645

  8. Active C4 Electrodes for Local Field Potential Recording Applications.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu; Freedman, David; Sahin, Mesut; Ünlü, M Selim; Knepper, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular neural recording, with multi-electrode arrays (MEAs), is a powerful method used to study neural function at the network level. However, in a high density array, it can be costly and time consuming to integrate the active circuit with the expensive electrodes. In this paper, we present a 4 mm × 4 mm neural recording integrated circuit (IC) chip, utilizing IBM C4 bumps as recording electrodes, which enable a seamless active chip and electrode integration. The IC chip was designed and fabricated in a 0.13 μm BiCMOS process for both in vitro and in vivo applications. It has an input-referred noise of 4.6 μV rms for the bandwidth of 10 Hz to 10 kHz and a power dissipation of 11.25 mW at 2.5 V, or 43.9 μW per input channel. This prototype is scalable for implementing larger number and higher density electrode arrays. To validate the functionality of the chip, electrical testing results and acute in vivo recordings from a rat barrel cortex are presented. PMID:26861324

  9. Active C4 Electrodes for Local Field Potential Recording Applications

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lu; Freedman, David; Sahin, Mesut; Ünlü, M. Selim; Knepper, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular neural recording, with multi-electrode arrays (MEAs), is a powerful method used to study neural function at the network level. However, in a high density array, it can be costly and time consuming to integrate the active circuit with the expensive electrodes. In this paper, we present a 4 mm × 4 mm neural recording integrated circuit (IC) chip, utilizing IBM C4 bumps as recording electrodes, which enable a seamless active chip and electrode integration. The IC chip was designed and fabricated in a 0.13 μm BiCMOS process for both in vitro and in vivo applications. It has an input-referred noise of 4.6 μVrms for the bandwidth of 10 Hz to 10 kHz and a power dissipation of 11.25 mW at 2.5 V, or 43.9 μW per input channel. This prototype is scalable for implementing larger number and higher density electrode arrays. To validate the functionality of the chip, electrical testing results and acute in vivo recordings from a rat barrel cortex are presented. PMID:26861324

  10. The electrovomeronasogram: field potential recordings in the mouse vomeronasal organ.

    PubMed

    Leinders-Zufall, Trese; Zufall, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian vomeronasal neurons (VSNs) located in the sensory epithelium of the vomeronasal organ (VNO) detect and transduce molecular cues emitted by other individuals and send this information to the olfactory forebrain. The initial steps in the detection of pheromones and other chemosignals by VSNs involve interaction of a ligand with a G protein-coupled receptor and downstream activation of the primary signal transduction cascade, which includes activation of ion channels located in microvilli and the dendritic tip of a VSN. The electrovomeronasogram (EVG) recording technique provides a sensitive means through which ligand-induced activation of populations of VSNs can be recorded from the epithelial surface using an intact, ex vivo preparation of the mouse VNO. We describe methodological aspects of this preparation and the EVG recording technique which, together with single-cell recordings, contributed significantly to our understanding of mammalian vomeronasal function, the identification of pheromonal ligands, and the analysis of mice with targeted deletions in specific signal transduction molecules such as Trpc2, Gαo, V1R, or V2R receptors. PMID:24014365

  11. Consequences of Converting Graded to Action Potentials upon Neural Information Coding and Energy Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Biswa; Laughlin, Simon Barry; Niven, Jeremy Edward

    2014-01-01

    Information is encoded in neural circuits using both graded and action potentials, converting between them within single neurons and successive processing layers. This conversion is accompanied by information loss and a drop in energy efficiency. We investigate the biophysical causes of this loss of information and efficiency by comparing spiking neuron models, containing stochastic voltage-gated Na+ and K+ channels, with generator potential and graded potential models lacking voltage-gated Na+ channels. We identify three causes of information loss in the generator potential that are the by-product of action potential generation: (1) the voltage-gated Na+ channels necessary for action potential generation increase intrinsic noise and (2) introduce non-linearities, and (3) the finite duration of the action potential creates a ‘footprint’ in the generator potential that obscures incoming signals. These three processes reduce information rates by ∼50% in generator potentials, to ∼3 times that of spike trains. Both generator potentials and graded potentials consume almost an order of magnitude less energy per second than spike trains. Because of the lower information rates of generator potentials they are substantially less energy efficient than graded potentials. However, both are an order of magnitude more efficient than spike trains due to the higher energy costs and low information content of spikes, emphasizing that there is a two-fold cost of converting analogue to digital; information loss and cost inflation. PMID:24465197

  12. Consequences of converting graded to action potentials upon neural information coding and energy efficiency.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Biswa; Laughlin, Simon Barry; Niven, Jeremy Edward

    2014-01-01

    Information is encoded in neural circuits using both graded and action potentials, converting between them within single neurons and successive processing layers. This conversion is accompanied by information loss and a drop in energy efficiency. We investigate the biophysical causes of this loss of information and efficiency by comparing spiking neuron models, containing stochastic voltage-gated Na(+) and K(+) channels, with generator potential and graded potential models lacking voltage-gated Na(+) channels. We identify three causes of information loss in the generator potential that are the by-product of action potential generation: (1) the voltage-gated Na(+) channels necessary for action potential generation increase intrinsic noise and (2) introduce non-linearities, and (3) the finite duration of the action potential creates a 'footprint' in the generator potential that obscures incoming signals. These three processes reduce information rates by ∼50% in generator potentials, to ∼3 times that of spike trains. Both generator potentials and graded potentials consume almost an order of magnitude less energy per second than spike trains. Because of the lower information rates of generator potentials they are substantially less energy efficient than graded potentials. However, both are an order of magnitude more efficient than spike trains due to the higher energy costs and low information content of spikes, emphasizing that there is a two-fold cost of converting analogue to digital; information loss and cost inflation. PMID:24465197

  13. Quantification of Transmembrane Currents during Action Potential Propagation in the Heart

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Richard A.; Mashburn, David N.; Sidorov, Veniamin Y.; Wikswo, John P.

    2013-01-01

    The measurement, quantitative analysis, theory, and mathematical modeling of transmembrane potential and currents have been an integral part of the field of electrophysiology since its inception. Biophysical modeling of action potential propagation begins with detailed ionic current models for a patch of membrane within a distributed cable model. Voltage-clamp techniques have revolutionized clinical electrophysiology via the characterization of the transmembrane current gating variables; however, this kinetic information alone is insufficient to accurately represent propagation. Other factors, including channel density, membrane area, surface/volume ratio, axial conductivities, etc., are also crucial determinants of transmembrane currents in multicellular tissue but are extremely difficult to measure. Here, we provide, to our knowledge, a novel analytical approach to compute transmembrane currents directly from experimental data, which involves high-temporal (200 kHz) recordings of intra- and extracellular potential with glass microelectrodes from the epicardial surface of isolated rabbit hearts during propagation. We show for the first time, to our knowledge, that during stable planar propagation the biphasic total transmembrane current (Im) dipole density during depolarization was ∼0.25 ms in duration and asymmetric in amplitude (peak outward current was ∼95 μA/cm2 and peak inward current was ∼140 μA/cm2), and the peak inward ionic current (Iion) during depolarization was ∼260 μA/cm2 with duration of ∼1.0 ms. Simulations of stable propagation using the ionic current versus transmembrane potential relationship fit from the experimental data reproduced these values better than traditional ionic models. During ventricular fibrillation, peak Im was decreased by 50% and peak Iion was decreased by 70%. Our results provide, to our knowledge, novel quantitative information that complements voltage- and patch-clamp data. PMID:23332079

  14. 7 CFR 1945.19 - Reporting potential natural disasters and initial actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 13 2011-01-01 2009-01-01 true Reporting potential natural disasters and initial... Assistance-General § 1945.19 Reporting potential natural disasters and initial actions. (a) Purpose. The purpose of reporting potential natural disasters is to provide a systematic procedure for rapid...

  15. 7 CFR 1945.19 - Reporting potential natural disasters and initial actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 13 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Reporting potential natural disasters and initial... Assistance-General § 1945.19 Reporting potential natural disasters and initial actions. (a) Purpose. The purpose of reporting potential natural disasters is to provide a systematic procedure for rapid...

  16. Optical recording of fast neuronal membrane potential transients in acute mammalian brain slices by second-harmonic generation microscopy.

    PubMed

    Dombeck, Daniel A; Sacconi, Leonardo; Blanchard-Desce, Mireille; Webb, Watt W

    2005-11-01

    Although nonlinear microscopy and fast (approximately 1 ms) membrane potential (Vm) recording have proven valuable for neuroscience applications, their potentially powerful combination has not yet been shown for studies of Vm activity deep in intact tissue. We show that laser illumination of neurons in acute rat brain slices intracellularly filled with FM4-64 dye generates an intense second-harmonic generation (SHG) signal from somatic and dendritic plasma membranes with high contrast >125 microm below the slice surface. The SHG signal provides a linear response to DeltaVm of approximately 7.5%/100 mV. By averaging repeated line scans (approximately 50), we show the ability to record action potentials (APs) optically with a signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of approximately 7-8. We also show recording of fast Vm steps from the dendritic arbor at depths inaccessible with previous methods. The high membrane contrast and linear response of SHG to DeltaVm provides the advantage that signal changes are not degraded by background and can be directly quantified in terms of DeltaVm. Experimental comparison of SHG and two-photon fluorescence Vm recording with the best known probes for each showed that the SHG technique is superior for Vm recording in brain slice applications, with FM4-64 as the best tested SHG Vm probe. PMID:16093337

  17. Pharmacological actions and potential uses of Momordica charantia: a review.

    PubMed

    Grover, J K; Yadav, S P

    2004-07-01

    Since ancient times, plants and herbal preparations have been used as medicine. Research carried out in last few decades has certified several such claims of use of several plants of traditional medicine. Popularity of Momordica charantia (MC) in various systems of traditional medicine for several ailments (antidiabetic, abortifacient, anthelmintic, contraceptive, dysmenorrhea, eczema, emmenagogue, antimalarial, galactagogue, gout, jaundice, abdominal pain, kidney (stone), laxative, leprosy, leucorrhea, piles, pneumonia, psoriasis, purgative, rheumatism, fever and scabies) focused the investigator's attention on this plant. Over 100 studies using modern techniques have authenticated its use in diabetes and its complications (nephropathy, cataract, insulin resistance), as antibacterial as well as antiviral agent (including HIV infection), as anthelmintic and abortifacient. Traditionally it has also been used in treating peptic ulcers, interestingly in a recent experimental studies have exhibited its potential against Helicobacter pylori. Most importantly, the studies have shown its efficacy in various cancers (lymphoid leukemia, lymphoma, choriocarcinoma, melanoma, breast cancer, skin tumor, prostatic cancer, squamous carcinoma of tongue and larynx, human bladder carcinomas and Hodgkin's disease). There are few reports available on clinical use of MC in diabetes and cancer patients that have shown promising results. PMID:15182917

  18. Heteromeric Kv7.2/7.3 channels differentially regulate action potential initiation and conduction in neocortical myelinated axons.

    PubMed

    Battefeld, Arne; Tran, Baouyen T; Gavrilis, Jason; Cooper, Edward C; Kole, Maarten H P

    2014-03-01

    Rapid energy-efficient signaling along vertebrate axons is achieved through intricate subcellular arrangements of voltage-gated ion channels and myelination. One recently appreciated example is the tight colocalization of K(v)7 potassium channels and voltage-gated sodium (Na(v)) channels in the axonal initial segment and nodes of Ranvier. The local biophysical properties of these K(v)7 channels and the functional impact of colocalization with Na(v) channels remain poorly understood. Here, we quantitatively examined K(v)7 channels in myelinated axons of rat neocortical pyramidal neurons using high-resolution confocal imaging and patch-clamp recording. K(v)7.2 and 7.3 immunoreactivity steeply increased within the distal two-thirds of the axon initial segment and was mirrored by the conductance density estimates, which increased from ~12 (proximal) to 150 pS μm(-2) (distal). The axonal initial segment and nodal M-currents were similar in voltage dependence and kinetics, carried by K(v)7.2/7.3 heterotetramers, 4% activated at the resting membrane potential and rapidly activated with single-exponential time constants (~15 ms at 28 mV). Experiments and computational modeling showed that while somatodendritic K(v)7 channels are strongly activated by the backpropagating action potential to attenuate the afterdepolarization and repetitive firing, axonal K(v)7 channels are minimally recruited by the forward-propagating action potential. Instead, in nodal domains K(v)7.2/7.3 channels were found to increase Na(v) channel availability and action potential amplitude by stabilizing the resting membrane potential. Thus, K(v)7 clustering near axonal Na(v) channels serves specific and context-dependent roles, both restraining initiation and enhancing conduction of the action potential. PMID:24599470

  19. Heteromeric Kv7.2/7.3 Channels Differentially Regulate Action Potential Initiation and Conduction in Neocortical Myelinated Axons

    PubMed Central

    Battefeld, Arne; Tran, Baouyen T.; Gavrilis, Jason; Cooper, Edward C.

    2014-01-01

    Rapid energy-efficient signaling along vertebrate axons is achieved through intricate subcellular arrangements of voltage-gated ion channels and myelination. One recently appreciated example is the tight colocalization of Kv7 potassium channels and voltage-gated sodium (Nav) channels in the axonal initial segment and nodes of Ranvier. The local biophysical properties of these Kv7 channels and the functional impact of colocalization with Nav channels remain poorly understood. Here, we quantitatively examined Kv7 channels in myelinated axons of rat neocortical pyramidal neurons using high-resolution confocal imaging and patch-clamp recording. Kv7.2 and 7.3 immunoreactivity steeply increased within the distal two-thirds of the axon initial segment and was mirrored by the conductance density estimates, which increased from ∼12 (proximal) to 150 pS μm−2 (distal). The axonal initial segment and nodal M-currents were similar in voltage dependence and kinetics, carried by Kv7.2/7.3 heterotetramers, 4% activated at the resting membrane potential and rapidly activated with single-exponential time constants (∼15 ms at 28 mV). Experiments and computational modeling showed that while somatodendritic Kv7 channels are strongly activated by the backpropagating action potential to attenuate the afterdepolarization and repetitive firing, axonal Kv7 channels are minimally recruited by the forward-propagating action potential. Instead, in nodal domains Kv7.2/7.3 channels were found to increase Nav channel availability and action potential amplitude by stabilizing the resting membrane potential. Thus, Kv7 clustering near axonal Nav channels serves specific and context-dependent roles, both restraining initiation and enhancing conduction of the action potential. PMID:24599470

  20. Virtual Electrode Recording Tool for EXtracellular potentials (VERTEX): comparing multi-electrode recordings from simulated and biological mammalian cortical tissue.

    PubMed

    Tomsett, Richard J; Ainsworth, Matt; Thiele, Alexander; Sanayei, Mehdi; Chen, Xing; Gieselmann, Marc A; Whittington, Miles A; Cunningham, Mark O; Kaiser, Marcus

    2015-07-01

    Local field potentials (LFPs) sampled with extracellular electrodes are frequently used as a measure of population neuronal activity. However, relating such measurements to underlying neuronal behaviour and connectivity is non-trivial. To help study this link, we developed the Virtual Electrode Recording Tool for EXtracellular potentials (VERTEX). We first identified a reduced neuron model that retained the spatial and frequency filtering characteristics of extracellular potentials from neocortical neurons. We then developed VERTEX as an easy-to-use Matlab tool for simulating LFPs from large populations (>100,000 neurons). A VERTEX-based simulation successfully reproduced features of the LFPs from an in vitro multi-electrode array recording of macaque neocortical tissue. Our model, with virtual electrodes placed anywhere in 3D, allows direct comparisons with the in vitro recording setup. We envisage that VERTEX will stimulate experimentalists, clinicians, and computational neuroscientists to use models to understand the mechanisms underlying measured brain dynamics in health and disease. PMID:24863422

  1. Long-Term Potentiation by Theta-Burst Stimulation Using Extracellular Field Potential Recordings in Acute Hippocampal Slices.

    PubMed

    Abrahamsson, Therese; Lalanne, Txomin; Watt, Alanna J; Sjöström, P Jesper

    2016-01-01

    This protocol describes how to carry out theta-burst long-term potentiation (LTP) with extracellular field recordings in acute rodent hippocampal slices. This method is relatively simple and noninvasive and provides a way to sample many neurons simultaneously, making it suitable for applications requiring higher throughput than whole-cell recording. PMID:27250947

  2. Dopaminergic modulation of axonal potassium channels and action potential waveform in pyramidal neurons of prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Ye, Mingyu; Tian, Cuiping; Yang, Mingpo; Wang, Yonghong; Shu, Yousheng

    2013-07-01

    Voltage-gated K(+) (KV) channels play critical roles in shaping neuronal signals. KV channels distributed in the perisomatic regions and thick dendrites of cortical pyramidal neurons have been extensively studied. However, the properties and regulation of KV channels distributed in the thin axons remain unknown. In this study, by performing somatic and axonal patch-clamp recordings from layer 5 pyramidal neurons of prefrontal cortical slices, we showed that the rapidly inactivating A-currents mediated the transient K(+) currents evoked by action potential (AP) waveform command (KAP) at the soma, whereas the rapidly activating but slowly inactivating KV1-mediated D-currents dominated the KAP at the axon. In addition, activation of D1-like receptors for dopamine decreased the axonal K(+) currents, as a result of an increase in the activity of cAMP-PKA pathway. In contrast, activation of D2-like receptors showed an opposite effect on the axonal K(+) currents. Further experiments demonstrated that functional D1-like receptors were expressed at the main axon trunk and their activation could broaden the waveforms of axonal APs. Together, these results show that axonal KV channels were subjected to dopamine modulation, and this modulation could regulate the waveforms of propagating APs at the axon, suggesting an important role of dopaminergic modulation of axonal KV channels in regulating neuronal signalling. PMID:23568892

  3. Correlates of a single cortical action potential in the epidural EEG

    PubMed Central

    Teleńczuk, Bartosz; Baker, Stuart N; Kempter, Richard; Curio, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    To identify the correlates of a single cortical action potential in surface EEG, we recorded simultaneously epidural EEG and single-unit activity in the primary somatosensory cortex of awake macaque monkeys. By averaging over EEG segments coincident with more than hundred thousand single spikes, we found short-lived (≈ 0.5 ms) triphasic EEG deflections dominated by high-frequency components > 800 Hz. The peak-to-peak amplitude of the grand-averaged spike correlate was 80 nV, which matched theoretical predictions, while single-neuron amplitudes ranged from 12 to 966 nV. Combining these estimates with post-stimulus-time histograms of single-unit responses to median-nerve stimulation allowed us to predict the shape of the evoked epidural EEG response and to estimate the number of contributing neurons. These findings establish spiking activity of cortical neurons as a primary building block of high-frequency epidural EEG, which thus can serve as a quantitative macroscopic marker of neuronal spikes. PMID:25554430

  4. Record of decision remedial alternative selection for the Grace Road site (631-22G) operable unit: Final action

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, E.

    1997-01-01

    This decision document presents the selected remedial action for the Grace Road Site located at the Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina. The selected action was developed in accordance with CERCLA, as amended, and to the extent practicable, the National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP). The selected remedy satisfies both CERCLA and RCRA 3004 requirements. This decision is based on the Administrative Record File for this specific RCRA/CERCLA unit.

  5. Record of Decision Remedial Alternative Selection for the Gunsite 113 Access Road (631-24G) Operable Unit: Final Action

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, E.

    1997-01-01

    This decision document presents the selected remedial action for the Gunsite 113 Access Road Unit located at the Savannah River Site near Aiken, SC. The selected action was developed in accordance with CERCLA, as amended, and to the extent practicable, the National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP). The selected remedy satisfies both CERCLA and RCRA 3004(U) requirements. This decision is based ont he Administrative Record File for this specific RCRA/CERCLA Unit.

  6. Somatic spikes regulate dendritic signaling in small neurons in the absence of backpropagating action potentials

    PubMed Central

    Myoga, Michael H.; Beierlein, Michael; Regehr, Wade G.

    2010-01-01

    Somatic spiking is known to regulate dendritic signaling and associative synaptic plasticity in many types of large neurons, but it is unclear whether somatic action potentials play similar roles in small neurons. Here we ask whether somatic action potentials can also influence dendritic signaling in an electrically compact neuron, the cerebellar stellate cell (SC). Experiments were conducted in rat brain slices using a combination of imaging and electrophysiology. We find that somatic action potentials elevate dendritic calcium levels in SCs. There was little attenuation of calcium signals with distance from the soma in SCs from P17-19 rats, which had dendrites that averaged 60 µm in length and in short SC dendrites from P30-33 rats. Somatic action potentials evoke dendritic calcium increases that are not affected by blocking dendritic sodium channels. This indicates that dendritic signals in SCs do not rely on dendritic sodium channels, which differs from many types of large neurons where dendritic sodium channels and backpropagating action potentials allow somatic spikes to control dendritic calcium signaling. Despite the lack of active backpropagating action potentials, we find that trains of somatic action potentials elevate dendritic calcium sufficiently to release endocannabinoids and retrogradely suppress parallel fiber to SC synapses in P17-19 rats. Prolonged SC firing at physiologically realistic frequencies produces retrograde suppression when combined with low-level group I metabotropic glutamate receptor activation. Somatic spiking also interacts with synaptic stimulation to promote associative plasticity. These findings indicate that in small neurons the passive spread of potential within dendrites can allow somatic spiking to regulate dendritic calcium signaling and synaptic plasticity. PMID:19535592

  7. Increased Event-Related Potentials and Alpha-, Beta-, and Gamma-Activity Associated with Intentional Actions

    PubMed Central

    Karch, Susanne; Loy, Fabian; Krause, Daniela; Schwarz, Sandra; Kiesewetter, Jan; Segmiller, Felix; Chrobok, Agnieszka I.; Keeser, Daniel; Pogarell, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Internally guided actions are defined as being purposeful, self-generated and offering choices between alternatives. Intentional actions are essential to reach individual goals. In previous empirical studies, internally guided actions were predominantly related to functional responses in frontal and parietal areas. The aim of the present study was to distinguish event-related potentials and oscillatory responses of intentional actions and externally guided actions. In addition, we compared neurobiological findings of the decision which action to perform with those referring to the decision whether or not to perform an action. Methods: Twenty-eight subjects participated in adapted go/nogo paradigms, including a voluntary selection condition allowing participants to (1) freely decide whether to press the response button or (2) to decide whether they wanted to press the response button with the right index finger or the left index finger. Results: The reaction times were increased when participants freely decided whether and how they wanted to respond compared to the go condition. Intentional processes were associated with a fronto-centrally located N2 and P3 potential. N2 and P3 amplitudes were increased during intentional actions compared to instructed responses (go). In addition, increased activity in the alpha-, beta- and gamma-frequency range was shown during voluntary behavior rather than during externally guided responses. Conclusion: These results may indicate that an additional cognitive process is needed for intentional actions compared to instructed behavior. However, the neural responses were comparatively independent of the kind of decision that was made (1) decision which action to perform; (2) decision whether or not to perform an action). Significance: The study demonstrates the importance of fronto-central alpha-, beta-, and gamma oscillations for voluntary behavior. PMID:26834680

  8. Record of Technical Change {number_sign}2 for ''Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 240: Area 25 Vehicle Washdown, Nevada Test Site, Nevada,'' Revision 0, DOE/NV--532

    SciTech Connect

    USDOE Nevada Operations Office

    2000-03-16

    This Record of Technical Change updates the technical informatioin provided in ''Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 240: Area 25 Vehicle Washdown, Nevada Test Site, Nevada,'' Revision 0, DOE/NV--532.

  9. Record of Technical Change {number_sign}1 to ''Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 261: Test Cell A Leachfield System, Nevada Test Site, Nevada,'' Revision 0, DOE/NV-519

    SciTech Connect

    US DOE Nevada Operations Office

    2000-02-25

    This Record of Technical Change provides updates to the technical information included in ''Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 261: Test Cell A Leachfield System, Nevada Test Site, Nevada,'' DOE/NV--519.

  10. Record of Technical Change {number_sign}2 for ''Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 261: Test Cell A Leachfield System, Nevada Test Site, Nevada,'' Revision 0

    SciTech Connect

    US DOE Nevada Operations Office

    2000-06-08

    This Record of Technical Change updates the technical information included in ''Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 261: Test Cell A Leachfield System, Nevada Test Site, Nevada,'' Revision 0, DOE/NV--515.

  11. Record of Technical Change {number_sign}1 to ''Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 135: Area 25 Underground Storage Tanks, Nevada Test Site, Nevada,'' Revision 0, DOE/NV--543

    SciTech Connect

    US DOE Nevada Operations Office

    1999-06-01

    This Record of Technical Change provides updates to the technical information in ''Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 135: Area 25 Underground Storage Tanks, Nevada Test Site, Nevada,'' Revision 0, DOE/NV--543

  12. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 204: Storage Bunkers, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (December 2002, Revision No.: 0), Including Record of Technical Change No. 1

    SciTech Connect

    NNSA /NSO

    2002-12-12

    The Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 204 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 204 is located on the Nevada Test Site approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. This CAU is comprised of six Corrective Action Sites (CASs) which include: 01-34-01, Underground Instrument House Bunker; 02-34-01, Instrument Bunker; 03-34-01, Underground Bunker; 05-18-02, Chemical Explosives Storage; 05-33-01, Kay Blockhouse; 05-99-02, Explosive Storage Bunker. Based on site history, process knowledge, and previous field efforts, contaminants of potential concern for Corrective Action Unit 204 collectively include radionuclides, beryllium, high explosives, lead, polychlorinated biphenyls, total petroleum hydrocarbons, silver, warfarin, and zinc phosphide. The primary question for the investigation is: ''Are existing data sufficient to evaluate appropriate corrective actions?'' To address this question, resolution of two decision statements is required. Decision I is to ''Define the nature of contamination'' by identifying any contamination above preliminary action levels (PALs); Decision II is to ''Determine the extent of contamination identified above PALs. If PALs are not exceeded, the investigation is completed. If PALs are exceeded, then Decision II must be resolved. In addition, data will be obtained to support waste management decisions. Field activities will include radiological land area surveys, geophysical surveys to identify any subsurface metallic and nonmetallic debris, field screening for applicable contaminants of potential concern, collection and analysis of surface and subsurface soil samples from biased locations, and step-out sampling to define the extent of

  13. 76 FR 21938 - Potential Environmental Impacts of the Proposed Runway 13 Extension and Associated Actions for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-19

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Potential Environmental Impacts of the Proposed Runway 13 Extension and... Administration (FAA), Department of Transportation (DOT). ACTION: Notice of availability of a final EA and FONSI/ROD for the evaluation of the potential environmental impacts associated with the proposed Runway...

  14. A 40-Hz Auditory Potential Recorded from the Human Scalp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galambos, Robert; Makeig, Scott; Talmachoff, Peter J.

    1981-04-01

    Computer techniques readily extract from the brainwaves an orderly sequence of brain potentials locked in time to sound stimuli. The potentials that appear 8 to 80 msec after the stimulus resemble 3 or 4 cycles of a 40-Hz sine wave; we show here that these waves combine to form a single, stable, composite wave when the sounds are repeated at rates around 40 per sec. This phenomenon, the 40-Hz event-related potential (ERP), displays several properties of theoretical and practical interest. First, it reportedly disappears with surgical anesthesia, and it resembles similar phenomena in the visual and olfactory system, facts which suggest that adequate processing of sensory information may require cyclical brain events in the 30- to 50-Hz range. Second, latency and amplitude measurements on the 40-Hz ERP indicate it may contain useful information on the number and basilar membrane location of the auditory nerve fibers a given tone excites. Third, the response is present at sound intensities very close to normal adult thresholds for the audiometric frequencies, a fact that could have application in clinical hearing testing.

  15. Action potential amplitude as a noninvasive indicator of motor unit-specific hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Pope, Zachary K; Hester, Garrett M; Benik, Franklin M; DeFreitas, Jason M

    2016-05-01

    Skeletal muscle fibers hypertrophy in response to strength training, with type II fibers generally demonstrating the greatest plasticity in regards to cross-sectional area (CSA). However, assessing fiber type-specific CSA in humans requires invasive muscle biopsies. With advancements in the decomposition of surface electromyographic (sEMG) signals recorded using multichannel electrode arrays, the firing properties of individual motor units (MUs) can now be detected noninvasively. Since action potential amplitude (APSIZE) has a documented relationship with muscle fiber size, as well as with its parent MU's recruitment threshold (RT) force, our purpose was to examine if MU APSIZE, as a function of its RT (i.e., the size principle), could potentially be used as a longitudinal indicator of MU-specific hypertrophy. By decomposing the sEMG signals from the vastus lateralis muscle of 10 subjects during maximal voluntary knee extensions, we noninvasively assessed the relationship between MU APSIZE and RT before and immediately after an 8-wk strength training intervention. In addition to significant increases in muscle size and strength (P < 0.02), our data show that training elicited an increase in MU APSIZE of high-threshold MUs. Additionally, a large portion of the variance (83.6%) in the change in each individual's relationship between MU APSIZE and RT was explained by training-induced changes in whole muscle CSA (obtained via ultrasonography). Our findings suggest that the noninvasive, electrophysiological assessment of longitudinal changes to MU APSIZE appears to reflect hypertrophy specific to MUs across the RT continuum. PMID:26936975

  16. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 2): Picatinny Arsenal, NJ. (First remedial action), September 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-09-28

    The Picatinny Arsenal is a munitions and weapons research and development installation covering 6,491 acres and containing 1,500 buildings in Morris County, near the city of Dover, New Jersey. Ground water contamination above State and Federal action levels was detected in the vicinity of Building 24, where past waste-water treatment practices resulted in the infiltration of metal-plating waste constituents (i.e., VOCs and heavy metals) into the ground water. Two unlined lagoons alongside Building 24, thought to be a source of contamination, were eliminated during a 1981 action during which the unlined lagoons were demolished, contaminated soil removed, and two concrete lagoons installed. Two additional potential sources of contamination are a dry well at Building 24 and a former drum storage area at Building 31, directly across the street from Building 24. The interim ground-water cleanup remedy is designed to prevent deterioration to Green Pond Brook, a major drainage artery onsite, while the Arsenal a a whole is evaluated. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the ground water are VOCs including TCE and metals.

  17. Sufentanil and nitrous oxide anaesthesia for the recording of transcranial magnetic motor evoked potentials in dogs.

    PubMed

    Van Ham, L M; Nijs, J; Mattheeuws, D R; Vanderstraeten, G G

    1996-06-29

    Transcranial magnetic motor evoked potentials were recorded from the extensor carpi radialis muscle of the forelimbs and from the cranial tibial muscle of the hindlimbs of anaesthetised dogs. The dogs were premedicated with droperidol and fentanyl and a light plane of anaesthesia was induced and maintained with sufentanil and nitrous oxide. The potentials recorded under sufentanil and nitrous oxide anaesthesia were suppressed in comparison with baseline recordings under droperidol and fentanyl sedation: their latencies were significantly increased and their amplitudes significantly decreased (P < 0.05). However, the potentials could be recorded reliably in all the dogs and with very good reproducibility. This narcotic anaesthesia also allowed sensory evoked potentials to be recorded reliably. PMID:8817859

  18. Contribution of BK channels to action potential repolarisation at minimal cytosolic Ca2+ concentration in chromaffin cells.

    PubMed

    Scott, Ricardo S; Bustillo, Diego; Olivos-Oré, Luis Alcides; Cuchillo-Ibañez, Inmaculada; Barahona, Maria Victoria; Carbone, Emilio; Artalejo, Antonio R

    2011-10-01

    BK channels modulate cell firing in excitable cells in a voltage-dependent manner regulated by fluctuations in free cytosolic Ca(2+) during action potentials. Indeed, Ca(2+)-independent BK channel activity has ordinarily been considered not relevant for the physiological behaviour of excitable cells. We employed the patch-clamp technique and selective BK channel blockers to record K(+) currents from bovine chromaffin cells at minimal intracellular (about 10 nM) and extracellular (free Ca(2+)) Ca(2+) concentrations. Despite their low open probability under these conditions (V(50) of +146.8 mV), BK channels were responsible for more than 25% of the total K(+) efflux during the first millisecond of a step depolarisation to +20 mV. Moreover, BK channels activated about 30% faster (τ = 0.55 ms) than the rest of available K(+) channels. The other main source of fast voltage-dependent K(+) efflux at such a low Ca(2+) was a transient K(+) (I(A)-type) current activating with V (50) = -14.2 mV. We also studied the activation of BK currents in response to action potential waveforms and their contribution to shaping action potentials both in the presence and the absence of extracellular Ca(2+). Our results show that BK channels activate during action potentials and accelerate cell repolarisation even at minimal Ca(2+) concentration, and suggest that they could do so also in the presence of extracellular Ca(2+), before Ca(2+) entering the cell facilitates their activity. PMID:21755285

  19. High-Bandwidth Atomic Force Microscopy Reveals A Mechanical spike Accompanying the Action Potential in mammalian Nerve Terminals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salzberg, Brian M.

    2008-03-01

    Information transfer from neuron to neuron within nervous systems occurs when the action potential arrives at a nerve terminal and initiates the release of a chemical messenger (neurotransmitter). In the mammalian neurohypophysis (posterior pituitary), large and rapid changes in light scattering accompany secretion of transmitter-like neuropeptides. In the mouse, these intrinsic optical signals are intimately related to the arrival of the action potential (E-wave) and the release of arginine vasopressin and oxytocin (S-wave). We have used a high bandwidth (20 kHz) atomic force microscope (AFM) to demonstrate that these light scattering signals are associated with changes in nerve terminal volume, detected as nanometer-scale movements of a cantilever positioned on top of the neurohypophysis. The most rapid mechanical response, the ``spike'', has duration comparable to that of the action potential (˜2 ms) and probably reflects an increase in terminal volume due to H2O movement associated with Na^+-influx. Elementary calculations suggest that two H2O molecules accompanying each Na^+-ion could account for the ˜0.5-1.0 å increase in the diameter of each terminal during the action potential. Distinguishable from the mechanical ``spike'', a slower mechanical event, the ``dip'', represents a decrease in nerve terminal volume, depends upon Ca^2+-entry, as well as on intra-terminal Ca^2+-transients, and appears to monitor events associated with secretion. A simple hypothesis is that this ``dip'' reflects the extrusion of the dense core granule that comprises the secretory products. These dynamic high bandwidth AFM recordings are the first to monitor mechanical events in nervous systems and may provide novel insights into the mechanism(s) by which excitation is coupled to secretion at nerve terminals.

  20. Prolonged action potential duration in cardiac ablation of PDK1 mice.

    PubMed

    Han, Zhonglin; Jiang, Yu; Yang, Zhongzhou; Cao, Kejiang; Wang, Dao W

    2015-01-01

    The involvement of the AGC protein kinase family in regulating arrhythmia has drawn considerable attention, but the underlying mechanisms are still not clear. The aim of this study is to explore the role of 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1 (PDK1), one of upstream protein kinases of the AGC protein kinase family, in the pathogenesis of dysregulated electrophysiological basis. PDK1(F/F) αMHC-Cre mice and PDK1(F/F) mice were divided into experiment group and control group. Using patch clamping technology, we explored action potential duration in both groups, and investigated the functions of transient outward potassium channel and L-type Ca(2+) channel to explain the abnormal action potential duration. Significant prolongation action potential duration was found in mice with PDK1 deletion. Further, the peak current of transient outward potassium current and L-type Ca(2+) current were decreased by 84% and 49% respectively. In addition, dysregulation of channel kinetics lead to action potential duration prolongation further. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that PDK1 participates in action potential prolongation in cardiac ablation of PDK1 mice. This effect is likely to be mediated largely through downregulation of transient outward potassium current. These findings indicate the modulation of the PDK1 pathway could provide a new mechanism for abnormal electrophysiological basis. PMID:26131127

  1. The role of inward Na(+)-Ca2+ exchange current in the ferret ventricular action potential.

    PubMed Central

    Janvier, N C; Harrison, S M; Boyett, M R

    1997-01-01

    1. Inward Na(+)-Ca2+ exchange current (iNaCa) was either blocked in ferret ventricular cells by replacing extracellular Na+ with Li+ or substantially reduced by the almost complete elimination of the Ca2+ transient by buffering intracellular Ca2+ with the acetoxymethyl ester form of BAPTA (BAPTA AM). 2. During square wave voltage clamp pulses to 0 mV, replacing extracellular Na+ with Li+ or buffering intracellular Ca2+ with BAPTA AM resulted in the loss of a transient inward current. This current was increased by the application of isoprenaline (expected to increase the underlying Ca2+ transient) and displayed the voltage-dependent characteristics of inward iNaCa. 3. Replacing extracellular Na+ with Li+ or buffering intracellular Ca2+ caused a significant shortening of the action potential (at -65 mV, 44 +/- 2% with Li+ and 20 +/- 2% with BAPTA AM). The shortening can be explained by changes in iNaCa. 4. The action potential clamp technique was used to measure the BAPTA-sensitive current (putative iNaCa) and the Ca2+ current (ica; measured using nifedipine) during the action potential. Under control conditions, the inward BAPTA-sensitive current makes approximately the same contribution as iCa during much of the action potential plateau. These results suggest an important role for inward iNaCa in the ferret ventricular action potential. PMID:9051574

  2. Visual Stimuli Evoked Action Potentials Trigger Rapidly Propagating Dendritic Calcium Transients in the Frog Optic Tectum Layer 6 Neurons.

    PubMed

    Svirskis, Gytis; Baranauskas, Gytis; Svirskiene, Natasa; Tkatch, Tatiana

    2015-01-01

    The superior colliculus in mammals or the optic tectum in amphibians is a major visual information processing center responsible for generation of orientating responses such as saccades in monkeys or prey catching avoidance behavior in frogs. The conserved structure function of the superior colliculus the optic tectum across distant species such as frogs, birds monkeys permits to draw rather general conclusions after studying a single species. We chose the frog optic tectum because we are able to perform whole-cell voltage-clamp recordings fluorescence imaging of tectal neurons while they respond to a visual stimulus. In the optic tectum of amphibians most visual information is processed by pear-shaped neurons possessing long dendritic branches, which receive the majority of synapses originating from the retinal ganglion cells. Since the first step of the retinal input integration is performed on these dendrites, it is important to know whether this integration is enhanced by active dendritic properties. We demonstrate that rapid calcium transients coinciding with the visual stimulus evoked action potentials in the somatic recordings can be readily detected up to the fine branches of these dendrites. These transients were blocked by calcium channel blockers nifedipine CdCl2 indicating that calcium entered dendrites via voltage-activated L-type calcium channels. The high speed of calcium transient propagation, >300 μm in <10 ms, is consistent with the notion that action potentials, actively propagating along dendrites, open voltage-gated L-type calcium channels causing rapid calcium concentration transients in the dendrites. We conclude that such activation by somatic action potentials of the dendritic voltage gated calcium channels in the close vicinity to the synapses formed by axons of the retinal ganglion cells may facilitate visual information processing in the principal neurons of the frog optic tectum. PMID:26414356

  3. Visual Stimuli Evoked Action Potentials Trigger Rapidly Propagating Dendritic Calcium Transients in the Frog Optic Tectum Layer 6 Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Svirskis, Gytis; Baranauskas, Gytis; Svirskiene, Natasa; Tkatch, Tatiana

    2015-01-01

    The superior colliculus in mammals or the optic tectum in amphibians is a major visual information processing center responsible for generation of orientating responses such as saccades in monkeys or prey catching avoidance behavior in frogs. The conserved structure function of the superior colliculus the optic tectum across distant species such as frogs, birds monkeys permits to draw rather general conclusions after studying a single species. We chose the frog optic tectum because we are able to perform whole-cell voltage-clamp recordings fluorescence imaging of tectal neurons while they respond to a visual stimulus. In the optic tectum of amphibians most visual information is processed by pear-shaped neurons possessing long dendritic branches, which receive the majority of synapses originating from the retinal ganglion cells. Since the first step of the retinal input integration is performed on these dendrites, it is important to know whether this integration is enhanced by active dendritic properties. We demonstrate that rapid calcium transients coinciding with the visual stimulus evoked action potentials in the somatic recordings can be readily detected up to the fine branches of these dendrites. These transients were blocked by calcium channel blockers nifedipine CdCl2 indicating that calcium entered dendrites via voltage-activated L-type calcium channels. The high speed of calcium transient propagation, >300 μm in <10 ms, is consistent with the notion that action potentials, actively propagating along dendrites, open voltage-gated L-type calcium channels causing rapid calcium concentration transients in the dendrites. We conclude that such activation by somatic action potentials of the dendritic voltage gated calcium channels in the close vicinity to the synapses formed by axons of the retinal ganglion cells may facilitate visual information processing in the principal neurons of the frog optic tectum. PMID:26414356

  4. 4-bromopropofol decreases action potential generation in spinal neurons by inducing a glycine receptor‐mediated tonic conductance

    PubMed Central

    Eckle, V S; Grasshoff, C; Mirakaj, V; O'Neill, P M; Berry, N G; Leuwer, M; Antkowiak, B

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Impaired function of spinal strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors gives rise to chronic pain states and movement disorders. Therefore, increased activity of glycine receptors should help to treat such disorders. Although compounds targeting glycine receptors with a high selectivity are lacking, halogenated analogues of propofol have recently been considered as potential candidates. Therefore we asked whether 4-bromopropofol attenuated the excitability of spinal neurons by promoting glycine receptor-dependent inhibition. Experimental Approach The actions of sub-anaesthetic concentrations of propofol and 4-bromopropofol were investigated in spinal tissue cultures prepared from mice. Drug-induced alterations in action potential firing were monitored by extracellular multi-unit recordings. The effects on GABAA and glycine receptor-mediated inhibition were quantified by whole-cell voltage-clamp recordings. Key Results Low concentrations of 4-bromopropofol (50 nM) reduced action potential activity of ventral horn neurons by about 30%, compared with sham-treated slices. This effect was completely abolished by strychnine (1 μM). In voltage-clamped neurons, 4-bromopropofol activated glycine receptors, generating a tonic current of 65 ± 10 pA, while GABAA- and glycine receptor-mediated synaptic transmission remained unaffected. Conclusions and Implications The highest glycine levels in the CNS are found in the ventral horn of the spinal cord, a region mediating pain-induced motor reflexes and participating in the control of muscle tone. 4-Bromopropofol may serve as a starting point for the development of non-sedative, non-addictive, muscle relaxants and analgesics to be used to treat low back pain. PMID:25131750

  5. Optical coherence tomography for detection of compound action potential in Xenopus Laevis sciatic nerve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troiani, Francesca; Nikolic, Konstantin; Constandinou, Timothy G.

    2016-03-01

    Due to optical coherence tomography (OCT) high spatial and temporal resolution, this technique could be used to observe the quick changes in the refractive index that accompany action potential. In this study we explore the use of time domain Optical Coherence Tomography (TD-OCT) for real time action potential detection in ex vivo Xenopus Laevis sciatic nerve. TD-OCT is the easiest and less expensive OCT technique and, if successful in detecting real time action potential, it could be used for low cost monitoring devices. A theoretical investigation into the order of magnitude of the signals detected by a TD-OCT setup is provided by this work. A linear dependence between the refractive index and the intensity changes is observed and the minimum SNR for which the setup could work is found to be SNR = 2 x 104.

  6. Initiation and blocking of the action potential in an axon in weak ultrasonic or microwave fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shneider, M. N.; Pekker, M.

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, we analyze the effect of the redistribution of the transmembrane ion channels in an axon caused by longitudinal acoustic vibrations of the membrane. These oscillations can be excited by an external source of ultrasound and weak microwave radiation interacting with the charges sitting on the surface of the lipid membrane. It is shown, using the Hodgkin-Huxley model of the axon, that the density redistribution of transmembrane sodium channels may reduce the threshold of the action potential, up to its spontaneous initiation. At the significant redistribution of sodium channels in the membrane, the rarefaction zones of the transmembrane channel density are formed, blocking the propagation of the action potential. Blocking the action potential propagation along the axon is shown to cause anesthesia in the example case of a squid axon. Various approaches to experimental observation of the effects considered in this paper are discussed.

  7. DBI potential, DBI inflation action and general Lagrangian relative to phantom, K-essence and quintessence

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Qing; Huang, Yong-Chang

    2011-11-01

    We derive a Dirac-Born-Infeld (DBI) potential and DBI inflation action by rescaling the metric. The determinant of the induced metric naturally includes the kinetic energy and the potential energy. In particular, the potential energy and kinetic energy can convert into each other in any order, which is in agreement with the limit of classical physics. This is quite different from the usual DBI action. We show that the Taylor expansion of the DBI action can be reduced into the form in the non-linear classical physics. These investigations are the support for the statement that the results of string theory are consistent with quantum mechanics and classical physics. We deduce the Phantom, K-essence, Quintessence and Generalized Klein-Gordon Equation from the DBI model.

  8. Optical magnetic detection of single-neuron action potentials using NV-diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Matthew; Barry, John; Schloss, Jennifer; Glenn, David; Walsworth, Ron

    2016-05-01

    A key challenge for neuroscience is noninvasive, label-free sensing of action potential dynamics in whole organisms with single-neuron resolution. Here, we report a new approach to this problem: using nitrogen-vacancy (NV) color centers in diamond to measure the time-dependent magnetic fields produced by single-neuron action potentials. We demonstrate our method using excised single neurons from two invertebrate species, marine worm and squid; and then by single-neuron action potential magnetic sensing exterior to whole, live, opaque marine worms for extended periods with no adverse effect. The results lay the groundwork for real-time, noninvasive 3D magnetic mapping of functional mammalian neuronal networks.

  9. Action potentials induce uniform calcium influx in mammalian myelinated optic nerves.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chuan-Li; Wilson, J Adam; Williams, Justin; Chiu, Shing Yan

    2006-08-01

    The myelin sheath enables saltatory conduction by demarcating the axon into a narrow nodal region for excitation and an extended, insulated internodal region for efficient spread of passive current. This anatomical demarcation produces a dramatic heterogeneity in ionic fluxes during excitation, a classical example being the restriction of Na influx at the node. Recent studies have revealed that action potentials also induce calcium influx into myelinated axons of mammalian optic nerves. Does calcium influx in myelinated axons show spatial heterogeneity during nerve excitation? To address this, we analyzed spatial profiles of axonal calcium transients during action potentials by selectively staining axons with calcium indicators and subjected the data to theoretical analysis with parameters for axial calcium diffusion empirically determined using photolysis of caged compounds. The results show surprisingly that during action potentials, calcium influx occurs uniformly along an axon of a fully myelinated mouse optic nerve. PMID:16835363

  10. A Fast Na+/Ca2+-Based Action Potential in a Marine Diatom

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Alison R.

    2009-01-01

    Background Electrical impulses in animals play essential roles in co-ordinating an array of physiological functions including movement, secretion, environmental sensing and development. Underpinning many of these electrical signals is a fast Na+-based action potential that has been fully characterised only in cells associated with the neuromuscular systems of multicellular animals. Such rapid action potentials are thought to have evolved with the first metazoans, with cnidarians being the earliest representatives. The present study demonstrates that a unicellular protist, the marine diatom Odontella sinensis, can also generate a fast Na+/Ca2+ based action potential that has remarkably similar biophysical and pharmacological properties to invertebrates and vertebrate cardiac and skeletal muscle cells. Methodology/Principal Findings The kinetic, ionic and pharmacological properties of the rapid diatom action potential were examined using single electrode current and voltage clamp techniques. Overall, the characteristics of the fast diatom currents most closely resemble those of vertebrate and invertebrate muscle Na+/Ca2+ currents. Conclusions/Significance This is the first demonstration of voltage-activated Na+ channels and the capacity to generate fast Na+-based action potentials in a unicellular photosynthetic organism. The biophysical and pharmacological characteristics together with the presence of a voltage activated Na+/Ca2+ channel homologue in the recently sequenced genome of the diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana, provides direct evidence supporting the hypothesis that this rapid signalling mechanism arose in ancestral unicellular eukaryotes and has been retained in at least two phylogenetically distant lineages of eukaryotes; opisthokonts and the stramenopiles. The functional role of the fast animal-like action potential in diatoms remains to be elucidated but is likely involved in rapid environmental sensing of these widespread and successful marine protists

  11. The neuroendocrine action potential. Winner of the 2008 Frank Beach Award in Behavioral Neuroendocrinology.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Hans A

    2010-09-01

    Animals are remarkably well equipped to respond to changes in their environment across different time scales and levels of biological organization. Here, I introduce a novel perspective that incorporates the three main processes the nervous system uses to integrate and process information: electrophysiological, genomic, and neuroendocrine action potentials. After discussing several examples of neuroendocrine action potentials, I lay out the commonalities of these temporally organized responses and how they might be interrelated with electrophysiological activity and genomic responses. This framework provides a novel outlook on longstanding questions in behavioral neuroendocrinology and suggests exciting new avenues for further research that will integrate across disciplines and levels of biological organization. PMID:20600047

  12. Effects of some heavy metals on the action potentials of an identified Helix pomatia photosensitive neuron.

    PubMed

    Kartelija, Gordana; Radenović, Lidija; Todorović, Natasa; Nedeljković, Miodrag

    2005-06-01

    In the photosensitive MB neuron in the left parietal ganglion of Helix pomatia, the onset of light prolongs significantly (by about 40%) the duration of the action potential. The broadening of the action potential after the onset of light was found to be due to its calcium component and could not be induced after blocking Ca(2+) channels by Cd(2+) and Pb(2+) and in absence of Ca(2+) in medium. The blocking effect of both compounds was reversible. It was found that CdCl(2) exhibited a more intense blocking effect than PbCl(2). PMID:16154952

  13. Halothane diminishes changes in cardiac fiber action potential duration induced by hypocarbia and hypercarbia.

    PubMed

    Stowe, D F; Bosnjak, Z J; Kampine, J P

    1984-09-01

    Both halothane (HAL) and acid-base changes produce cardiac arrhythmias in humans. The authors' aim was to determine if HAL alters the effects of hypercapnic acidosis and hypocapnic alkalosis on action potential (AP) properties of ventricular muscle fibers. They superfused the paced right ventricle of 15 guinea pig hearts with non-HCO3- buffered salt solution and recorded transmembrane APs with 3 M KCl microelectrodes in 35 subendocardial cells. Random changes in the fractions of HAL were made during low (12% CO2 in O2), normal (5% CO2 in O2), and high (0% CO2 in O2) pH. Compared with controls at pH 7.44, AP duration (APD) and effective refractory period (ERP) significantly decreased by 7 and 4% at pH 8.08 and increased by 7 and 9% at pH 7.09. At pH 7.44, 0.7-2.1% HAL produced no change in APD; but 2.1% increased ERP, while 3.5% HAL decreased ERP. At pH 8.08, the decrease in ERP induced with alkalosis alone was converted to an increase with 1.4 and 2.1% HAL. At pH 7.09, 0.7-1.4% HAL had no additional effect on the acidosis-induced increases in APD and ERP, but 2.1 and 2.8% HAL greatly reduced these responses. At HAL fractions greater than 1.4% the marked inverse changes in APD and ERP, induced alone by acidosis and alkalosis, were no longer significantly different from control. This study shows that the opposing effects of alkalosis to shorten and of acidosis to lengthen APD and ERP were attenuated at low levels and abolished at high levels of HAL.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:6433748

  14. Contribution of auditory nerve fibers to compound action potential of the auditory nerve.

    PubMed

    Bourien, Jérôme; Tang, Yong; Batrel, Charlène; Huet, Antoine; Lenoir, Marc; Ladrech, Sabine; Desmadryl, Gilles; Nouvian, Régis; Puel, Jean-Luc; Wang, Jing

    2014-09-01

    Sound-evoked compound action potential (CAP), which captures the synchronous activation of the auditory nerve fibers (ANFs), is commonly used to probe deafness in experimental and clinical settings. All ANFs are believed to contribute to CAP threshold and amplitude: low sound pressure levels activate the high-spontaneous rate (SR) fibers, and increasing levels gradually recruit medium- and then low-SR fibers. In this study, we quantitatively analyze the contribution of the ANFs to CAP 6 days after 30-min infusion of ouabain into the round window niche. Anatomic examination showed a progressive ablation of ANFs following increasing concentration of ouabain. CAP amplitude and threshold plotted against loss of ANFs revealed three ANF pools: 1) a highly ouabain-sensitive pool, which does not participate in either CAP threshold or amplitude, 2) a less sensitive pool, which only encoded CAP amplitude, and 3) a ouabain-resistant pool, required for CAP threshold and amplitude. Remarkably, distribution of the three pools was similar to the SR-based ANF distribution (low-, medium-, and high-SR fibers), suggesting that the low-SR fiber loss leaves the CAP unaffected. Single-unit recordings from the auditory nerve confirmed this hypothesis and further showed that it is due to the delayed and broad first spike latency distribution of low-SR fibers. In addition to unraveling the neural mechanisms that encode CAP, our computational simulation of an assembly of guinea pig ANFs generalizes and extends our experimental findings to different species of mammals. Altogether, our data demonstrate that substantial ANF loss can coexist with normal hearing threshold and even unchanged CAP amplitude. PMID:24848461

  15. Shade-Induced Action Potentials in Helianthus annuus L. Originate Primarily from the Epicotyl

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, Nicholas R; Cleland, Robert E; Van Volkenburgh, Elizabeth

    2006-01-01

    Repeated observations that shading (a drastic reduction in illumination rate) increased the generation of spikes (rapidly reversed depolarizations) in leaves and stems of many cucumber and sunflower plants suggests a phenomenon widespread among plant organs and species. Although shaded leaves occasionally generate spikes and have been suggested to trigger systemic action potentials (APs) in sunflower stems, we never found leaf-generated spikes to propagate out of the leaf and into the stem. On the contrary, our data consistently implicate the epicotyl as the location where most spikes and APs (propagating spikes) originate. Microelectrode studies of light and shading responses in mesophyll cells of leaf strips and in epidermis/cortex cells of epicotyl segments confirm this conclusion and show that spike induction is not confined to intact plants. 90% of the epicotyl-generated APs undergo basipetal propagation to the lower epicotyl, hypocotyl and root. They propagate with an average rate of 2 ± 0.3 mm s−1 and always undergo a large decrement from the hypocotyl to the root. The few epicotyl-derived APs that can be tracked to leaf blades (< 10%) undergo either a large decrement or fail to be transmitted at all. Occasionally (5% of the observations) spikes were be generated in hypocotyl and lower epicotyl that moved towards the upper epicotyl unaltered, decremented, or amplified. This study confirms that plant APs arise to natural, nontraumatic changes. In simultaneous recordings with epicotyl growth, AP generation was found to parallel the acceleration of stem growth under shade. The possible relatedness of both processes must be further investigated. PMID:19521471

  16. Disruption of action potential and calcium signaling properties in malformed myofibers from dystrophin-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Ochoa, Erick O; Pratt, Stephen J P; Garcia-Pelagio, Karla P; Schneider, Martin F; Lovering, Richard M

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), the most common and severe muscular dystrophy, is caused by the absence of dystrophin. Muscle weakness and fragility (i.e., increased susceptibility to damage) are presumably due to structural instability of the myofiber cytoskeleton, but recent studies suggest that the increased presence of malformed/branched myofibers in dystrophic muscle may also play a role. We have previously studied myofiber morphology in healthy wild-type (WT) and dystrophic (MDX) skeletal muscle. Here, we examined myofiber excitability using high-speed confocal microscopy and the voltage-sensitive indicator di-8-butyl-amino-naphthyl-ethylene-pyridinium-propyl-sulfonate (di-8-ANEPPS) to assess the action potential (AP) properties. We also examined AP-induced Ca2+ transients using high-speed confocal microscopy with rhod-2, and assessed sarcolemma fragility using elastimetry. AP recordings showed an increased width and time to peak in malformed MDX myofibers compared to normal myofibers from both WT and MDX, but no significant change in AP amplitude. Malformed MDX myofibers also exhibited reduced AP-induced Ca2+ transients, with a further Ca2+ transient reduction in the branches of malformed MDX myofibers. Mechanical studies indicated an increased sarcolemma deformability and instability in malformed MDX myofibers. The data suggest that malformed myofibers are functionally different from myofibers with normal morphology. The differences seen in AP properties and Ca2+ signals suggest changes in excitability and remodeling of the global Ca2+ signal, both of which could underlie reported weakness in dystrophic muscle. The biomechanical changes in the sarcolemma support the notion that malformed myofibers are more susceptible to damage. The high prevalence of malformed myofibers in dystrophic muscle may contribute to the progressive strength loss and fragility seen in dystrophic muscles. PMID:25907787

  17. CCA-1, EGL-19 and EXP-2 currents shape action potentials in the Caenorhabditis elegans pharynx

    PubMed Central

    Shtonda, Boris; Avery, Leon

    2005-01-01

    The pharynx of Caenorhabditis elegans is a tubular muscle controlled by its own set of neurons. We developed a technique to voltage clamp the pharyngeal muscle and demonstrate by analyzing mutants that the pharyngeal action potential is regulated by three major voltage-gated currents, conducted by a T-type calcium channel CCA-1, an L-type calcium channel EGL-19 and a potassium channel EXP-2. We show that CCA-1 exhibits T-type calcium channel properties: activation at −40 mV and rapid inactivation. Our results suggest that CCA-1’s role is to accelerate the action potential upstroke in the pharyngeal muscle in response to excitatory inputs. Similarly to other L-type channels, EGL-19 activates at high voltages and inactivates slowly; thus it may maintain the plateau phase of the action potential. EXP-2 is a potassium channel of the kV family that shows inward rectifier properties when expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. We show that endogenous EXP-2 is not a true inward rectifier – it conducts large outward currents at potentials up to +20 mV and is therefore well suited to trigger rapid repolarization at the end of the action potential plateau phase. Our results suggest that EXP-2 is a potassium channel with unusual properties that uses a hyperpolarization threshold to activate a regenerative hyperpolarizing current. PMID:15914661

  18. Wogonin potentiates the antitumor action of etoposide and ameliorates its adverse effects.

    PubMed

    Enomoto, Riyo; Koshiba, Chika; Suzuki, Chie; Lee, Eibai

    2011-05-01

    Wogonin, a flavone in the roots of Scutellaria baicalensis, reduced etoposide-induced apoptotic cell death in normal cells, such as bone marrow cells and thymocytes. On the other hand, wogonin potentiated the proapoptotic or cytotoxic action of etoposide in tumor cells, such as Jurkat, HL-60, A549, and NCI-H226. These contradictory actions of wogonin on apoptosis are distinguished by normal or cancer cell types. Wogonin had no effect on apoptosis induced by other anticancer agents in the tumor cells. Thus, the potentiation effect of wogonin was observed only in etoposide-induced apoptosis in tumor cells. In a functional assay for P-glycoprotein (P-gp), wogonin suppressed excretion of calcein, a substrate for P-gp, in these tumor cells. Moreover, wogonin decreased the excretion of radiolabeled etoposide and accordingly increased intracellular content of this agent in the cells. P-gp inhibitors showed a similar potentiation effect on etoposide-induced apoptosis in these tumor cells. Thus, wogonin is likely to potentiate the anticancer action of etoposide due to P-gp inhibition and accumulation of this agent. These findings suggest that wogonin may be a useful chemotherapeutic adjuvant to potentiate the pharmacological action of etoposide and ameliorate its adverse effects. PMID:20658136

  19. Investigating a Potential Auxin-Related Mode of Hormetic/Inhibitory Action of the Phytotoxin Parthenin.

    PubMed

    Belz, Regina G

    2016-01-01

    Parthenin is a metabolite of Parthenium hysterophorus and is believed to contribute to the weed's invasiveness via allelopathy. Despite the potential of parthenin to suppress competitors, low doses stimulate plant growth. This biphasic action was hypothesized to be auxin-like and, therefore, an auxin-related mode of parthenin action was investigated using two approaches: joint action experiments with Lactuca sativa, and dose-response experiments with auxin/antiauxin-resistant Arabidopsis thaliana genotypes. The joint action approach comprised binary mixtures of subinhibitory doses of the auxin 3-indoleacetic acid (IAA) mixed with parthenin or one of three reference compounds [indole-3-butyric acid (IBA), 2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid (TIBA), 2-(p-chlorophenoxy)-2-methylpropionic acid (PCIB)]. The reference compounds significantly interacted with IAA at all doses, but parthenin interacted only at low doses indicating that parthenin hormesis may be auxin-related, in contrast to its inhibitory action. The genetic approach investigated the response of four auxin/antiauxin-resistant mutants and a wildtype to parthenin or two reference compounds (IAA, PCIB). The responses of mutant plants to the reference compounds confirmed previous reports, but differed from the responses observed for parthenin. Parthenin stimulated and inhibited all mutants independent of resistance. This provided no indication for an auxin-related action of parthenin. Therefore, the hypothesis of an auxin-related inhibitory action of parthenin was rejected in two independent experimental approaches, while the hypothesis of an auxin-related stimulatory effect could not be rejected. PMID:26686984

  20. Records Management in the Formerly Used Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP)

    SciTech Connect

    Morekas, G.N.; Pape, M.B.

    2006-07-01

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' (USACE's) performance of site investigation and remediation under the Formerly Used Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) requires the use of a records management system in order to effectively capture and manage data, document the decision making process, and allow communication of project information to regulators, congress, and the public. The USACE faces many challenges in managing the vast amount of data, correspondence, and reports generated under this program, including: management of data and reports in a variety of paper, electronic, and microfilm formats; incorporation of records generated by the Department of Energy (DOE) prior to 1997; ensuring smooth flow of information among numerous internal Project Managers and regulators; and facilitating public access to information through the development of CERCLA Administrative Records and response to Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) requests. In 2004-2005, the USACE Buffalo District contracted with Dynamac Corporation to adapt the records management system developed for the Formerly Used Defense Sites (FUDS) Program to the records for the Luckey and Painesville FUSRAP sites. The system, known as the FUDS Information Improvement Plan (FIIP), was jointly developed by the USACE Hazardous, Toxic, and Radioactive Waste Center of Expertise (HTRW-CX), USACE Rock Island District, and several FUDS contractors (including Dynamac Corporation) in 2003. The primary components of the FIIP which address the challenges faced by the FUSRAP Program include: the development of a standardized document organization system; the standardization of electronic conversion processes; the standardization of file naming conventions; and the development of an automated data capture system to speed the process and reduce errors in indexing. The document organization system allows for the assignment of each individual document to one of approximately 150 categories. The categories are based upon a

  1. 75 FR 51112 - Notice of Realty Action: Application for Recordable Disclaimer of Interest; Oregon

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-18

    ..., Oregon. The nature of the cloud on the title the applicant wishes to resolve is a recorded Disclaimer... this recordable disclaimer of interest would remove a cloud on the title to the land. DATES: Interested... interest in the land described and issuance of a Recordable Disclaimer would remove a cloud on the title...

  2. 7 CFR 1945.19 - Reporting potential natural disasters and initial actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 13 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Reporting potential natural disasters and initial actions. 1945.19 Section 1945.19 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued... AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) PROGRAM REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) EMERGENCY...

  3. Viewing Objects and Planning Actions: On the Potentiation of Grasping Behaviours by Visual Objects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Makris, Stergios; Hadar, Aviad A.; Yarrow, Kielan

    2011-01-01

    How do humans interact with tools? Gibson (1979) suggested that humans perceive directly what tools afford in terms of meaningful actions. This "affordances" hypothesis implies that visual objects can potentiate motor responses even in the absence of an intention to act. Here we explore the temporal evolution of motor plans afforded by common…

  4. Primary cortical representation of sounds by the coordination of action-potential timing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decharms, R. Christopher; Merzenich, Michael M.

    1996-06-01

    CORTICAL population coding could in principle rely on either the mean rate of neuronal action potentials, or the relative timing of action potentials, or both. When a single sensory stimulus drives many neurons to fire at elevated rates, the spikes of these neurons become tightly synchronized1,2, which could be involved in 'binding' together individual firing-rate feature representations into a unified object percept3. Here we demonstrate that the relative timing of cortical action potentials can signal stimulus features themselves, a function even more basic than feature grouping. Populations of neurons in the primary auditory cortex can coordinate the relative timing of their action potentials such that spikes occur closer together in time during continuous stimuli. In this way cortical neurons can signal stimuli even when their firing rates do not change. Population coding based on relative spike timing can systematically signal stimulus features, it is topographically mapped, and it follows the stimulus time course even where mean firing rate does not.

  5. Youth Participatory Action Research and Educational Transformation: The Potential of Intertextuality as a Methodological Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bertrand, Melanie

    2016-01-01

    In this article, Melanie Bertrand explores the potential of using the concept of intertextuality--which captures the way snippets of written or spoken text from one source become incorporated into other sources--in the study and practice of youth participatory action research (YPAR). Though this collective and youth-centered form of research…

  6. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 4): American Creosote Works, TN. (First Remedial Action), December 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-05

    The American Creosote Works (ACW) site is located immediately southwest of Jackson, in central Madison County, Tennessee. ACW conducted wood-preserving operations using both creosote and PCP from the early 1930s until December 1981. Untreated process waste water and potential contaminated storm water runoff were discharged directly into Central Creek until 1973, at which time a levee was constructed to retain surface water runoff. The soil borrow pits used for the levee construction became sludge storage lagoons. A waste water treatment system was installed onsite during 1974 and 1975 and operated until 1981. The selected remedial action for the site includes consolidation and incineration of sludges in the vicinity of the buildings and tanks; on- or offsite incineration of the oils and sludges from the tanks; treatment of tanked process liquids onsite using a sand filter, filter press, and carbon adsorption unit, followed by discharge to a surface stream; decontamination and offsite disposal of site structures; construction of a flood-protection dike; deed restrictions and site fencing; and site stabilization including monitoring onsite water levels behind the dikes and pumping, treating (as needed), and discharging impounded water pending a final remedy.

  7. Cytoplasmic Ca2+, K+, Cl-, and NO3- Activities in the Liverwort Conocephalum conicum L. at Rest and during Action Potentials.

    PubMed Central

    Trebacz, K.; Simonis, W.; Schonknecht, G.

    1994-01-01

    Intracellular Ca2+, K+, Cl-, and NO3- activities were measured with ion-selective microelectrodes in the liverwort Conocephalum conicum L. at rest, during dark/light changes, and in the course of action potentials triggered by light or electrical stimuli. The average free cytosolic Ca2+ concentration was 231 [plus or minus] 65 nM. We did not observe any light-dependent changes of the free cytosolic Ca2+ concentration as long as no action potential was triggered. During action potentials, on average a 2-fold increase of the free cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration was recorded. Intracellular K+ activity was 76 [plus or minus] 10 mM. It did not depend on K+ concentration changes in the bath solution between 0.1 and 10 mM. The average equilibrium potential for K+ in the standard medium containing 1 mM K+ was -110 mV, which differed significantly from the resting potential of -151 [plus or minus] 2 mV. During action potentials, either a slight decrease or no changes in intracellular K+ activity were recorded. The average Cl- activity was 7.4 [plus or minus] 0.2 mM in the cytoplasm and 43.5 [plus or minus] 7 mM in the vacuole. The activities of NO3- were 0.63 [plus or minus] 0.05 mM in the cytoplasm and 3.0 [plus or minus] 0.3 mM in the vacuole. For both anions the vacuolar activity was 5 to 6 times higher than the cytoplasmic activity. After the light was switched off both the Cl- and the NO3- activity showed either no change or a slight increase. Illumination caused a gradual return to previous values or no change. During action potentials a slight decrease of intracellular Cl- activity was recorded. It was concluded that in Conocephalum, as in characean cells, chloride channels are involved in the depolarization phase of the action potentials. We discuss a model for the ion fluxes during an action potential in Conocephalum. PMID:12232388

  8. Generation of slow wave type action potentials in the mouse small intestine involves a non-L-type calcium channel.

    PubMed

    Malysz, J; Richardson, D; Farraway, L; Christen, M O; Huizinga, J D

    1995-10-01

    Intrinsic electrical activities in various isolated segments of the mouse small intestine were recorded (i) to characterize action potential generation and (ii) to obtain a profile on the ion channels involved in initiating the slow wave type action potentials (slow waves). Gradients in slow wave frequency, resting membrane potential, and occurrence of spiking activity were found, with the proximal intestine exhibiting the highest frequency, the most hyperpolarized cell membrane, and the greatest occurrence of spikes. The slow waves were only partially sensitive to L-type calcium channel blockers. Nifedipine, verapamil, and pinaverium bromide abolished spikes that occurred on the plateau phase of the slow waves in all tissues. The activity that remained in the presence of L-type calcium channel blockers, the upstroke potential, retained a similar amplitude to the original slow wave and was of identical frequency. The upstroke potential was not sensitive to a reduction in extracellular chloride or to the sodium channel blockers tetrodotoxin and mexiletine. Abolishment of the Na+ gradient by removal of 120 mM extracellular Na+ reduced the upstroke potential frequency by 13 - 18% and its amplitude by 50 - 70% in the ileum. The amplitude was similarly reduced by Ni2+ (up to 5 mM), and by flufenamic acid (100 mu M), a nonspecific cation and chloride channel blocker. Gadolinium, a nonspecific blocker of cation and stretch-activated channels, had no effect. Throughout these pharmacological manipulations, a robust oscillation remained at 5 - 10 mV. This oscillation likely reflects pacemaker activity. It was rapidly abolished by removal of extracellular calcium but not affected by L-type calcium channel blockers. In summary, the mouse small intestine has been established as a model for research into slow wave generation and electrical pacemaker activity. The upstroke part of the slow wave has two components, the pacemaker component involves a non-L-type calcium channel

  9. Some properties of spontaneous excitatory junction potentials recorded from arterioles of guinea-pigs.

    PubMed Central

    Hirst, G D; Neild, T O

    1980-01-01

    1. Spontaneous excitatory junction potentials were recorded from electrically short segments of arterioles taken from the intestinal submucosa of guinea-pigs. 2. Histograms of the amplitudes of these spontaneous potentials were unimodal; their amplitudes often corresponded with the amplitudes of the smallest evoked potentials recorded from the same preparation. 3. The time courses of both spontaneous and evoked potentials were very similar and it is suggested that evoked potentials are made up by the simultaneous occurrence of several spontaneous potentials. 4. The mean quantal content of evoked potentials was always far fewer than the number of varicosities present in the preparations. 5. It is suggested that during neuromuscular transmission, transmitter is released at relatively few sites throughout the ground plexus for each nerve impulse. PMID:6253622

  10. The DBI action, higher-derivative supergravity, and flattening inflaton potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bielleman, Sjoerd; Ibáñez, Luis E.; Pedro, Francisco G.; Valenzuela, Irene; Wieck, Clemens

    2016-05-01

    In string theory compactifications it is common to find an effective Lagrangian for the scalar fields with a non-canonical kinetic term. We study the effective action of the scalar position moduli of Type II D p-branes. In many instances the kinetic terms are in fact modified by a term proportional to the scalar potential itself. This can be linked to the appearance of higher-dimensional supersymmetric operators correcting the Kähler potential. We identify the supersymmetric dimension-eight operators describing the α' corrections captured by the D-brane Dirac-Born-Infeld action. Our analysis then allows an embedding of the D-brane moduli effective action into an {N}=1 supergravity formulation. The effects of the potential-dependent kinetic terms may be very important if one of the scalars is the inflaton, since they lead to a flattening of the scalar potential. We analyze this flattening effect in detail and compute its impact on the CMB observables for single-field inflation with monomial potentials.

  11. Loss of Local Astrocyte Support Disrupts Action Potential Propagation and Glutamate Release Synchrony from Unmyelinated Hippocampal Axon Terminals In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Sobieski, Courtney; Jiang, Xiaoping; Crawford, Devon C.

    2015-01-01

    Neuron–astrocyte interactions are critical for proper CNS development and function. Astrocytes secrete factors that are pivotal for synaptic development and function, neuronal metabolism, and neuronal survival. Our understanding of this relationship, however, remains incomplete due to technical hurdles that have prevented the removal of astrocytes from neuronal circuits without changing other important conditions. Here we overcame this obstacle by growing solitary rat hippocampal neurons on microcultures that were comprised of either an astrocyte bed (+astrocyte) or a collagen bed (−astrocyte) within the same culture dish. −Astrocyte autaptic evoked EPSCs, but not IPSCs, displayed an altered temporal profile, which included increased synaptic delay, increased time to peak, and severe glutamate release asynchrony, distinct from previously described quantal asynchrony. Although we observed minimal alteration of the somatically recorded action potential waveform, action potential propagation was altered. We observed a longer latency between somatic initiation and arrival at distal locations, which likely explains asynchronous EPSC peaks, and we observed broadening of the axonal spike, which likely underlies changes to evoked EPSC onset. No apparent changes in axon structure were observed, suggesting altered axonal excitability. In conclusion, we propose that local astrocyte support has an unappreciated role in maintaining glutamate release synchrony by disturbing axonal signal propagation. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Certain glial cell types (oligodendrocytes, Schwann cells) facilitate the propagation of neuronal electrical signals, but a role for astrocytes has not been identified despite many other functions of astrocytes in supporting and modulating neuronal signaling. Under identical global conditions, we cultured neurons with or without local astrocyte support. Without local astrocytes, glutamate transmission was desynchronized by an alteration of the waveform

  12. Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 5: Landfills, Nevada Test Site, Nevada: Revision No. 0 (with Record of Technical Change No. 1)

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

    2003-10-24

    This Corrective Action Decision Document identifies and rationalizes the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office's selection of a recommended corrective action alternative (CAA) appropriate to facilitate the closure of Corrective Action (CAU) 5: Landfills, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Located in Areas 5, 6, 12, 20, and 23 of the NTS, CAU 5 is comprised of eight corrective action sites (CASs). The corrective action investigation (CAI) of CAU 5 was conducted from October 7, 2002 through January 30, 2003, with geophysical surveys completed from March 6 through May 8, 2002, and topographic surveys conducted from March 11 through April 29, 2003. Contaminants of concern (COCs) were identified only at CAS 12-15-01. Those COCs included total petroleum hydrocarbons and volatile organic compounds. Based on the evaluation of analytical data from the CAI, review of future and current operations in Areas 5, 6, 12, 20, and 23 of the Nevada Test Site, and the detailed and comparative analysis of the potential CAAs, the following single alternative was developed for consideration. Close in Place with Administrative Controls is the recommended alternative for all of the CASs in CAU 5. This alternative was judged to meet all requirements for the technical components evaluated. Additionally, the alternative meets all applicable state and federal regulations for closure of the sites and will eliminate inadvertent intrusion into landfills at CAU 5.

  13. Changes in intracellular calcium concentration influence beat-to-beat variability of action potential duration in canine ventricular myocytes.

    PubMed

    Kistamas, K; Szentandrassy, N; Hegyi, B; Vaczi, K; Ruzsnavszky, F; Horvath, B; Banyasz, T; Nanasi, P P; Magyar, J

    2015-02-01

    The aim of the present work was to study the influence of changes in intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) on beat-to-beat variability (short term variability, SV) of action potential duration (APD) in isolated canine ventricular cardiomyocytes. Series of action potentials were recorded from enzymatically isolated canine ventricular cells using conventional microelectrode technique. Drug effects on SV were evaluated as relative SV changes determined by plotting the drug-induced changes in SV against corresponding changes in APD and comparing these data to the exponential SV-APD function obtained with inward and outward current injections. Exposure of myocytes to the Ca(2+) chelator BAPTA-AM (5 μM) decreased, while Ca(2+) ionophore A23187 (1 μM) increased the magnitude of relative SV. Both effects were primarily due to the concomitant changes in APD. Relative SV was reduced by BAPTA-AM under various experimental conditions including pretreatment with veratridine, BAY K8644, dofetilide or E-4031. Contribution of transient changes of [Ca(2+)]i due to Ca(2+) released from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) was studied using 10 μM ryanodine and 1 μM cyclopiazonic acid: relative SV was reduced by both agents. Inhibition of the Na(+)-Ca(2+) exchanger by 1 μM SEA0400 increased relative SV. It is concluded that elevation of [Ca(2+)]i increases relative SV significantly. More importantly, Ca(2+) released from the SR is an important component of this effect. PMID:25716967

  14. Understanding the cardiovascular actions of soy isoflavones: potential novel targets for antihypertensive drug development.

    PubMed

    Martin, Doug; Song, Jin; Mark, Connie; Eyster, Kathleen

    2008-12-01

    Interest in and use of "natural" remedies has grown exponentially in recent years. Compounds that have attracted considerable attention are the isoflavones, particular those found in soy. This review will provide a critical evaluation of our current understanding of the effects, mechanisms of action, and potential clinical applications of soy isoflavones in hypertension. Current data indicate that soy isoflavones, such as genistein and daidzein and equol, relax vascular smooth muscle both in vitro and in vivo via a combination of mechanisms including potentiation of endothelial-dependent and endothelial-independent vasodilator systems and inhibition of constrictor mechanisms. These effects involve both classical genomic as well non genomic actions. Isoflavone actions are mediated in part via interactions with estrogen receptors where soy isoflavones induce unique receptor conformations and exert tissue dependent effects similar to the selective estrogen receptor modulators. Signaling pathways such as ERK1/2, PI3-Kinase/Akt and cAMP contribute to isoflavone isoflavone activation of eNOS in the vasculature as well. Isoflavones also target the kidney to increase renal blood flow and sodium excretion. Finally, soy isoflavones interact with humoral systems such as the renin angiotensin. Data from animal studies show consistently that the aggregate effect of these actions is attenuation of hypertension. In contrast, studies in humans remain controversial. Recent data also suggest that analogues of isoflavones may possess unique vascular actions. Thus significant opportunity remains for study of the effects and mechanisms of action of soy isoflavones on hypertension in both animals and humans. PMID:19202595

  15. Spontaneous muscle action potentials fail to develop without fetal-type acetylcholine receptors

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Masazumi; Kubo, Tai; Mizoguchi, Akira; Carlson, C. George; Endo, Katsuaki; Ohnishi, Katsunori

    2002-01-01

    In mammals, two combinations of muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) are used: α2βγδ (γ-AChR) or α2βɛδ (ɛ-AChR). After birth, γ-AChRs are replaced by ɛ-AChRs (γ/ɛ-switch). The two receptors have different conductances and open times. During perinatal period, the long open time γ-AChRs generate random myofiber action potentials from uniquantal miniature end-plate potentials (mEPPs). ɛ-AChRs are suitable for strong adult muscle activities. Since the effect of the γ/ɛ-switch on neuromuscular development was unclear, despite the many differences in channel characteristics, we carried out this study to generate γ-subunit-deficient mice. Homozygotes born alive survived for 2 days in a stable condition, and were able to move their forelimbs. Endplate AChRs included ɛ-subunits, and muscle fibers had multiple neuromuscular junctions. Both pre- and postsynapses were abnormal and spontaneous action potentials generated from mEPPs were totally absent. Results suggest a requirement for γ-AChRs in mediating synaptically-induced action potential activity critical for neuromuscular development. PMID:12101101

  16. Effect of mental challenge induced by movie clips on action potential duration in normal human subjects independent of heart rate

    PubMed Central

    Child, Nicholas; Hanson, Ben; Bishop, Martin; Rinaldi, Christopher A; Bostock, Julian; Western, David; Cooklin, Michael; O’Neil, Mark; Wright, Matthew; Razavi, Reza; Gill, Jaswinder; Taggart, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Background Mental stress and emotion have long been associated with ventricular arrhythmias and sudden death in animal models and humans. The effect of mental challenge on ventricular action potential duration (APD) in conscious healthy humans has not been reported. Methods and Results Activation recovery intervals (ARI) measured from unipolar electrograms as a surrogate for APD (n=19) were recorded from right and left ventricular endocardium during steady state pacing while subjects watched an emotionally charged film clip. To assess the possible modulating role of altered respiration on APD, the subjects then repeated the same breathing pattern they had during the stress, but without the movie clip. Haemodynamic parameters (mean, systolic, and diastolic blood pressure, and rate of pressure increase) and respiration rate increased during the stressful part of the film clip (p=0.001). APD decreased during the stressful parts of the film clip, eg for global RV ARI at end of film clip 193.8ms (SD 14) vs 198.0ms (SD13) during the matched breathing control (end film LV 199.8ms (SD16) vs control 201.6ms (SD15), p=0.004. Respiration rate increased during the stressful part of the film clip (by 2 breaths/minute), and was well matched in the respective control period without any haemodynamic or ARI changes. Conclusions Our results document for the first time direct recordings of the effect of a mental challenge protocol on ventricular action potential duration in conscious humans. The effect of mental challenge on APD was not secondary to emotionally-induced altered respiration or heart rate. PMID:24833641

  17. Painful stimuli evoke potentials recorded from the medial temporal lobe in humans

    PubMed Central

    Liu, C.C.; Ohara, S.; Franaszczuk, P.; Zagzoog, N.; Gallagher, M.; Lenz, F.A.

    2009-01-01

    The role of human medial temporal structures in fear conditioning has led to the suggestion that neurons in these structures might respond to painful stimuli. We have now tested the hypothesis that recordings from these structures will demonstrate potentials related to the selective activation of cutaneous nociceptors by a painful laser stimulus (laser evoked potential, LEP)(Kenton et al., 1980). Recordings were carried out through electrodes implanted bilaterally in these structures for the investigation of intractable epilepsy. Reproducible LEPs were commonly recorded both bilaterally and unilaterally, while LEPs were recorded at contacts on the left (9/14, P=0.257) as commonly as on the right (5/14), independent of the hand stimulated. Along electrodes traversing the amygdala the majority of LEPs were recorded from dorsal contacts near the central nucleus of the amygdala and the nucleus basalis. Stimulus evoked changes in theta activity were observed at contacts on the right at which isolated early negative LEPs (N2*) responses could be recorded. Contacts at which LEPs could be recorded were as commonly located in medial temporal structures with evidence of seizure activity as on those without. These results demonstrate the presence of pain-related inputs to the medial temporal lobe where they may be involved in associative learning to produce anxiety and disability related to painful stimuli. PMID:19925853

  18. Potentiators of Defective ΔF508-CFTR Gating that Do Not Interfere with Corrector Action.

    PubMed

    Phuan, Puay-Wah; Veit, Guido; Tan, Joseph A; Finkbeiner, Walter E; Lukacs, Gergely L; Verkman, A S

    2015-10-01

    Combination drug therapies under development for cystic fibrosis caused by the ∆F508 mutation in cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) include a "corrector" to improve its cellular processing and a "potentiator" to improve its chloride channel function. Recently, it was reported that the approved potentiator N-(2,4-di-tert-butyl-5-hydroxyphenyl)-4-oxo-1,4-dihydroquinoline-3-carboxamide (Ivacaftor) reduces ∆F508-CFTR cellular stability and the efficacy of investigational correctors, including 3-(6-[([1-(2,2-difluoro-1,3-benzodioxol-5-yl)cyclopropyl]carbonyl) amino]-3-methyl-2-pyridinyl)-benzoic acid and 1-(2,2-difluoro-1,3-benzodioxol-5-yl)-N-(1-[(2R)-2,3-dihydroxypropyl]-6-fluoro-2-(2-hydroxy-1,1-dimethylethyl)-1H-indol-5-yl), which might contribute to the modest reported efficacy of combination therapy in clinical trials. Here, we report the identification and characterization of potentiators that do not interfere with ∆F508-CFTR stability or corrector action. High-throughput screening and structure-activity analysis identified several classes of potentiators that do not impair corrector action, including tetrahydrobenzothiophenes, thiooxoaminothiazoles, and pyrazole-pyrrole-isoxazoles. The most potent compounds have an EC(50) for ∆F508-CFTR potentiation down to 18 nM and do not reduce corrector efficacy in heterologous ∆F508-CFTR-expressing cells or primary cultures of ∆F508/∆F508 human bronchial epithelia. The ΔF508-CFTR potentiators also activated wild-type and G551D CFTR, albeit weakly. The efficacy of combination therapy for cystic fibrosis caused by the ∆F508 mutation may be improved by replacement of Ivacaftor with a potentiator that does not interfere with corrector action. PMID:26245207

  19. Simulation of the undiseased human cardiac ventricular action potential: model formulation and experimental validation.

    PubMed

    O'Hara, Thomas; Virág, László; Varró, András; Rudy, Yoram

    2011-05-01

    Cellular electrophysiology experiments, important for understanding cardiac arrhythmia mechanisms, are usually performed with channels expressed in non myocytes, or with non-human myocytes. Differences between cell types and species affect results. Thus, an accurate model for the undiseased human ventricular action potential (AP) which reproduces a broad range of physiological behaviors is needed. Such a model requires extensive experimental data, but essential elements have been unavailable. Here, we develop a human ventricular AP model using new undiseased human ventricular data: Ca(2+) versus voltage dependent inactivation of L-type Ca(2+) current (I(CaL)); kinetics for the transient outward, rapid delayed rectifier (I(Kr)), Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchange (I(NaCa)), and inward rectifier currents; AP recordings at all physiological cycle lengths; and rate dependence and restitution of AP duration (APD) with and without a variety of specific channel blockers. Simulated APs reproduced the experimental AP morphology, APD rate dependence, and restitution. Using undiseased human mRNA and protein data, models for different transmural cell types were developed. Experiments for rate dependence of Ca(2+) (including peak and decay) and intracellular sodium ([Na(+)](i)) in undiseased human myocytes were quantitatively reproduced by the model. Early afterdepolarizations were induced by I(Kr) block during slow pacing, and AP and Ca(2+) alternans appeared at rates >200 bpm, as observed in the nonfailing human ventricle. Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMK) modulated rate dependence of Ca(2+) cycling. I(NaCa) linked Ca(2+) alternation to AP alternans. CaMK suppression or SERCA upregulation eliminated alternans. Steady state APD rate dependence was caused primarily by changes in [Na(+)](i), via its modulation of the electrogenic Na(+)/K(+) ATPase current. At fast pacing rates, late Na(+) current and I(CaL) were also contributors. APD shortening during restitution was

  20. Impaired Action Potential Initiation in GABAergic Interneurons Causes Hyperexcitable Networks in an Epileptic Mouse Model Carrying a Human NaV1.1 Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Hedrich, Ulrike B.S.; Liautard, Camille; Kirschenbaum, Daniel; Pofahl, Martin; Lavigne, Jennifer; Liu, Yuanyuan; Theiss, Stephan; Slotta, Johannes; Escayg, Andrew; Dihné, Marcel; Beck, Heinz

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in SCN1A and other ion channel genes can cause different epileptic phenotypes, but the precise mechanisms underlying the development of hyperexcitable networks are largely unknown. Here, we present a multisystem analysis of an SCN1A mouse model carrying the NaV1.1-R1648H mutation, which causes febrile seizures and epilepsy in humans. We found a ubiquitous hypoexcitability of interneurons in thalamus, cortex, and hippocampus, without detectable changes in excitatory neurons. Interestingly, somatic Na+ channels in interneurons and persistent Na+ currents were not significantly changed. Instead, the key mechanism of interneuron dysfunction was a deficit of action potential initiation at the axon initial segment that was identified by analyzing action potential firing. This deficit increased with the duration of firing periods, suggesting that increased slow inactivation, as recorded for recombinant mutated channels, could play an important role. The deficit in interneuron firing caused reduced action potential-driven inhibition of excitatory neurons as revealed by less frequent spontaneous but not miniature IPSCs. Multiple approaches indicated increased spontaneous thalamocortical and hippocampal network activity in mutant mice, as follows: (1) more synchronous and higher-frequency firing was recorded in primary neuronal cultures plated on multielectrode arrays; (2) thalamocortical slices examined by field potential recordings revealed spontaneous activities and pathological high-frequency oscillations; and (3) multineuron Ca2+ imaging in hippocampal slices showed increased spontaneous neuronal activity. Thus, an interneuron-specific generalized defect in action potential initiation causes multisystem disinhibition and network hyperexcitability, which can well explain the occurrence of seizures in the studied mouse model and in patients carrying this mutation. PMID:25378155

  1. A reconstruction of charge movement during the action potential in frog skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, C. L.; Peachey, L. D.

    1992-01-01

    The transfer of intramembrane charge during an action potential at 4 degrees C was reconstructed for a model representing the electrical properties of frog skeletal muscle by a cylindrical surface membrane and 16 concentric annuli ("shells") of transverse tubular membrane of equal radial thickness. The lumina of the transverse tubules were separated from extracellular fluid by a fixed series resistance. The quantity, geometrical distribution and steady-state and kinetic properties of charge movement components were described by equations incorporating earlier experimental results. Introducing such nonlinear charge into the distributed model for muscle membrane diminished the maximum amplitude of the action potential within the transverse tubules by 2 mV but increased the maximum size of the after-depolarization by 3-5 mV and also its duration. However, these changes were small in comparison to the 135-mV deflection represented by the action potential. They therefore did not justify altering the values of the electrical parameters adopted by Adrian R.H., and L.D. Peachey (1973. J. Physiol. [Lond.]. 235:103-131.) and used in the present calculations. Cable properties significantly affected the time course and extent of charge movement in each shell during action potential propagation into the tubular system. Q beta charge moved relatively rapidly in all annuli, and did so without significant latency (approximately 0.3 ms) after the surface action potential upstroke. Its peak displacement varied between 53 and 58% (the range representing the difference fiber edge/fiber axis) of the total Q beta charge. This was attained at 5.4-7.3 ms after the stimulus, depending on depth within the tubules. In contrast, q gamma moved after a 1.7-2.9 ms latency and achieved a peak displacement of up to 22-34% of available charge. Both charge movement species could be driven by repetitive (47.7 Hz) action potentials without buildup of charge transfer. Such stimulus frequencies would

  2. Real-time imaging of action potentials in nerves using changes in birefringence

    PubMed Central

    Badreddine, Ali H.; Jordan, Tomas; Bigio, Irving J.

    2016-01-01

    Polarized light can be used to measure the electrical activity associated with action potential propagation in nerves, as manifested in simultaneous dynamic changes in their intrinsic optical birefringence. These signals may serve as a tool for minimally invasive neuroimaging in various types of neuroscience research, including the study of neuronal activation patterns with high spatiotemporal resolution. A fast linear photodiode array was used to image propagating action potentials in an excised portion of the lobster walking leg nerve. We show that the crossed-polarized signal (XPS) can be reliably imaged over a ≥2 cm span in our custom nerve chamber, by averaging multiple-stimulation signals, and also in single-scan real-time “movies”. This demonstration paves the way toward utilizing changes in the optical birefringence to image more complex neuronal activity in nerve fibers and other organized neuronal tissue. PMID:27231635

  3. Real-time imaging of action potentials in nerves using changes in birefringence.

    PubMed

    Badreddine, Ali H; Jordan, Tomas; Bigio, Irving J

    2016-05-01

    Polarized light can be used to measure the electrical activity associated with action potential propagation in nerves, as manifested in simultaneous dynamic changes in their intrinsic optical birefringence. These signals may serve as a tool for minimally invasive neuroimaging in various types of neuroscience research, including the study of neuronal activation patterns with high spatiotemporal resolution. A fast linear photodiode array was used to image propagating action potentials in an excised portion of the lobster walking leg nerve. We show that the crossed-polarized signal (XPS) can be reliably imaged over a ≥2 cm span in our custom nerve chamber, by averaging multiple-stimulation signals, and also in single-scan real-time "movies". This demonstration paves the way toward utilizing changes in the optical birefringence to image more complex neuronal activity in nerve fibers and other organized neuronal tissue. PMID:27231635

  4. Contribution of ion currents to beat-to-beat variability of action potential duration in canine ventricular myocytes.

    PubMed

    Szentandrássy, Norbert; Kistamás, Kornél; Hegyi, Bence; Horváth, Balázs; Ruzsnavszky, Ferenc; Váczi, Krisztina; Magyar, János; Bányász, Tamás; Varró, András; Nánási, Péter P

    2015-07-01

    Although beat-to-beat variability (short-term variability, SV) of action potential duration (APD) is considered as a predictor of imminent cardiac arrhythmias, the underlying mechanisms are still not clear. In the present study, therefore, we aimed to determine the role of the major cardiac ion currents, APD, stimulation frequency, and changes in the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) on the magnitude of SV. Action potentials were recorded from isolated canine ventricular cardiomyocytes using conventional microelectrode techniques. SV was an exponential function of APD, when APD was modified by current injections. Drug effects were characterized as relative SV changes by comparing the drug-induced changes in SV to those in APD according to the exponential function obtained with current pulses. Relative SV was increased by dofetilide, HMR 1556, nisoldipine, and veratridine, while it was reduced by BAY K8644, tetrodotoxin, lidocaine, and isoproterenol. Relative SV was also increased by increasing the stimulation frequency and [Ca(2+)]i. In summary, relative SV is decreased by ion currents involved in the negative feedback regulation of APD (I Ca, I Ks, and I Kr), while it is increased by I Na and I to. We conclude that drug-induced effects on SV should be evaluated in relation with the concomitant changes in APD. Since relative SV was decreased by ion currents playing critical role in the negative feedback regulation of APD, blockade of these currents, or the beta-adrenergic pathway, may carry also some additional proarrhythmic risk in addition to their well-known antiarrhythmic action. PMID:25081243

  5. An indirect component in the evoked compound action potential of the vagal nerve.

    PubMed

    Ordelman, Simone C M A; Kornet, Lilian; Cornelussen, Richard; Buschman, Hendrik P J; Veltink, Peter H

    2010-12-01

    The vagal nerve plays a vital role in the regulation of the cardiovascular system. It not only regulates the heart but also sends sensory information from the heart back to the brain. We hypothesize that the evoked vagal nerve compound action potential contains components that are indirect via the brain stem or coming via the neural network on the heart. In an experimental study of 15 pigs, we identified four components in the evoked compound action potentials. The fourth component was found to be an indirect component, which came from the periphery. The latency of the indirect component increased when heart rate and contractility were decreased by burst stimulation (P = 0.01; n = 7). When heart rate and contractility were increased by dobutamine administration, the latency of the indirect component decreased (P = 0.01; n = 9). This showed that the latency of the indirect component of the evoked compound action potentials may relate to the state of the cardiovascular system. PMID:20966537

  6. Concept of relative variability of cardiac action potential duration and its test under various experimental conditions.

    PubMed

    Magyar, János; Kistamás, Kornél; Váczi, Krisztina; Hegyi, Bence; Horváth, Balázs; Bányász, Tamás; Nánási, Péter P; Szentandrássy, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    Beat-to-beat variability of action potential duration (short-term variability, SV) is an intrinsic property of mammalian myocardium. Since the majority of agents and interventions affecting SV may modify also action potential duration (APD), we propose here the concept of relative SV (RSV), where changes in SV are normalized to changes in APD and these data are compared to the control SV-APD relationship obtained by lengthening or shortening of action potentials by inward and outward current injections. Based on this concept the influence of the several experimental conditions like stimulation frequency, temperature, pH, redox-state and osmolarity were examined on RSV in canine ventricular myocytes using sharp microelectrodes. RSV was increased by high stimulation frequency (cycle lengths <0.7 s), high temperature (above 37ºC), oxidative agents (H2O2), while it was decreased by reductive environment. RSV was not affected by changes in pH (within the range of 6.4-8.4) and osmolarity of the solution (between 250-350 mOsm). The results indicate that changes in beat-to-beat variability of APD must be evaluated exclusively in terms of RSV; furthermore, some experimental conditions, including the stimulation frequency, redox-state and temperature have to be controlled strictly when analyzing alterations in the short-term variability of APD. PMID:26492070

  7. Shensong Yangxin capsules prevent ischemic arrhythmias by prolonging action potentials and alleviating Ca2+ overload.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yixiu; Gao, Feng; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Hongtao; Zhu, Jiuxin; Chang, Liping; Du, Zhimin; Zhang, Yan

    2016-06-01

    Shensong Yangxin capsules (SSYX) are an effective traditional Chinese medicine that has been used to treat coronary heart disease clinically. The present study aimed to establish whether SSYX prevent ischemic arrhythmias in rats, and to explore the underlying mechanisms. Male rats were pretreated with distilled water, SSYX and amiodarone for one week. Acute myocardial ischemia (AMI) was performed to induce ischemic arrhythmias. The incidence and severity of ischemic arrhythmias were evaluated. The action potential, transient outward K+ current (Ito) and inward rectifier K+ current (IK1) of rat cardiomyocytes were measured using the patch‑clamp technique. The intracellular Ca2+ concentration of the cardiomyocytes was measured using a laser scanning confocal microscope. The results revealed that SSYX lowered the incidence of arrhythmia markedly during AMI. Furthermore, SSYX delayed the appearance, and reduced the severity, of ischemic arrhythmias compared with the control. In addition, SSYX markedly decreased the ratio of the myocardial infarction region to the whole heart. In an in vitro study, SSYX prolonged the action potential duration of rat cardiomyocytes, and inhibited Ito and IK1 markedly. Additionally, SSYX inhibited Ca2+ elevation induced by KCl in cardiomyocytes. These results suggested that SSYX prevents ischemic arrhythmia, and the underlying mechanism responsible for this process may include prolonging the action potential and alleviating Ca2+ overload. PMID:27122298

  8. Heart rate variability effect on the myocyte action potential duration restitution: insights from switched systems theory.

    PubMed

    Dvir, Hila; Zlochiver, Sharon

    2011-01-01

    The physiological heart rate presents a stochastic behavior known as heart rate variability (HRV). In this framework the influence of HRV on the action potential duration (APD) of the atrial myocyte is analyzed in a computer model. We have found that introducing HRV into the myocyte action potential model decreases the APD of the extra beat S2 in an S1-S2 protocol compared to constant heart rate. A possible theoretical explanation for this is also presented and is derived from switched systems theory. It is suggested to consider the myocyte action potential phase 4 and phase 2 as two operation modes of a switching system and analyze the stability of switching between them. Since random switching is known to have a stabilization effect on a switching system, this might explain why HRV has a stabilization effect on the myocyte APD restitution. Implications of this finding include reduced system stability for conditions with low HRV. A possible application for this phenomenon regards artificial pacemakers, where a preset added HRV is predicted to reduce susceptibility to arrhythmias. PMID:22254402

  9. Axon initial segment Ca2+ channels influence action potential generation and timing

    PubMed Central

    Bender, Kevin J.; Trussell, Laurence O.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Although action potentials are typically generated in the axon initial segment (AIS), the timing and pattern of action potentials is thought to depend on inward current originating in somatodendritic compartments. Using 2-photon imaging, we show that T- and R-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channels are co-localized with Na+ channels in the AIS of dorsal cochlear nucleus interneurons, and that activation of these Ca2+ channels is essential to the generation and timing of action potential bursts known as complex spikes. During complex spikes, where Na+-mediated spikelets fire atop slower depolarizing conductances, selective block of AIS Ca2+ channels delays spike timing and raises spike threshold. Furthermore, AIS Ca2+ channel block can decrease the number of spikelets within a complex spike, and even block single, simple spikes. Similar results were found in cortex and cerebellum. Thus, voltage-gated Ca2+ channels at the site of spike initiation play a key role in generating and shaping spike bursts. PMID:19186168

  10. 76 FR 10889 - Record of Decision (ROD) for Grow the Army (GTA) Actions at Fort Lewis and the Yakima Training...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-28

    ... 1,000 additional combat service support (CSS) Soldiers, and the potential stationing of a Combat... and sustaining the environment. The stationing of CSS units and/or a CAB are actions that the Army may... Fort Lewis, and the decision about where the facilities for the CSS and CAB units could be located...

  11. Measuring Spinal Presynaptic Inhibition in Mice By Dorsal Root Potential Recording In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Grünewald, Benedikt; Geis, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Presynaptic inhibition is one of the most powerful inhibitory mechanisms in the spinal cord. The underlying physiological mechanism is a depolarization of primary afferent fibers mediated by GABAergic axo-axonal synapses (primary afferent depolarization). The strength of primary afferent depolarization can be measured by recording of volume-conducted potentials at the dorsal root (dorsal root potentials, DRP). Pathological changes of presynaptic inhibition are crucial in the abnormal central processing of certain pain conditions and in some disorders of motor hyperexcitability. Here, we describe a method of recording DRP in vivo in mice. The preparation of spinal cord dorsal roots in the anesthetized animal and the recording procedure using suction electrodes are explained. This method allows measuring GABAergic DRP and thereby estimating spinal presynaptic inhibition in the living mouse. In combination with transgenic mouse models, DRP recording may serve as a powerful tool to investigate disease-associated spinal pathophysiology. In vivo recording has several advantages compared to ex vivo isolated spinal cord preparations, e.g. the possibility of simultaneous recording or manipulation of supraspinal networks and induction of DRP by stimulation of peripheral nerves. PMID:24747664

  12. Action-space Clustering of Tidal Streams to Infer the Galactic Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanderson, Robyn E.; Helmi, Amina; Hogg, David W.

    2015-03-01

    We present a new method for constraining the Milky Way halo gravitational potential by simultaneously fitting multiple tidal streams. This method requires three-dimensional positions and velocities for all stars to be fit, but does not require identification of any specific stream or determination of stream membership for any star. We exploit the principle that the action distribution of stream stars is most clustered when the potential used to calculate the actions is closest to the true potential. Clustering is quantified with the Kullback-Leibler Divergence (KLD), which also provides conditional uncertainties for our parameter estimates. We show, for toy Gaia-like data in a spherical isochrone potential, that maximizing the KLD of the action distribution relative to a smoother distribution recovers the input potential. The precision depends on the observational errors and number of streams; using K III giants as tracers, we measure the enclosed mass at the average radius of the sample stars accurate to 3% and precise to 20%-40%. Recovery of the scale radius is precise to 25%, biased 50% high by the small galactocentric distance range of stars in our mock sample (1-25 kpc, or about three scale radii, with mean 6.5 kpc). 20-25 streams with at least 100 stars each are required for a stable confidence interval. With radial velocities (RVs) to 100 kpc, all parameters are determined with ~10% accuracy and 20% precision (1.3% accuracy for the enclosed mass), underlining the need to complete the RV catalog for faint halo stars observed by Gaia.

  13. A portable device for recording evoked potentials, optimized for pattern ERG.

    PubMed

    McInturff, Stephen P; Buchser, William J

    2016-02-01

    Recording evoked potentials in un-anesthetized animals and people is a powerful technique to non-invasively measure the function of neurons. As such, the primary output neurons of the eye can be assessed by the pattern electroretinogram (PERG). Currently, electro-physiologic setups to perform PERG or related recordings are costly, complicated, and non-portable. Here, we design a simple steady-state PERG system, based off an Arduino board. The amplifier is built on a shield that fits over a microcontroller board, an Arduino, which digitizes the signal and sends it to a computer that presents stimuli then records and analyzes the evoked potentials. We used the device to record PERG accurately with a sensitivity as low as half a microvolt. The device has also been designed to implement other evoked potential recordings. This simple device can be quickly constructed and used for experiments in moving systems. Additionally, this device can be used to expose students in underserved areas to research technology that they would otherwise not have access to. PMID:26536572

  14. Environmental Asthma Reduction Potential Estimates for Selected Mitigation Actions in Finland Using a Life Table Approach

    PubMed Central

    Rumrich, Isabell Katharina; Hänninen, Otto

    2015-01-01

    Aims: To quantify the reduction potential of asthma in Finland achievable by adjusting exposures to selected environmental factors. Methods: A life table model for the Finnish population for 1986–2040 was developed and Years Lived with Disability caused by asthma and attributable to the following selected exposures were estimated: tobacco smoke (smoking and second hand tobacco smoke), ambient fine particles, indoor dampness and mould, and pets. Results: At baseline (2011) about 25% of the total asthma burden was attributable to the selected exposures. Banning tobacco was the most efficient mitigation action, leading to 6% reduction of the asthma burden. A 50% reduction in exposure to dampness and mould as well as a doubling in exposure to pets lead each to a 2% reduction. Ban of urban small scale wood combustion, chosen as a mitigation action to reduce exposure to fine particles, leads to a reduction of less than 1% of the total asthma burden. Combination of the most efficient mitigation actions reduces the total asthma burden by 10%. A more feasible combination of mitigation actions leads to 6% reduction of the asthma burden. Conclusions: The adjustment of environmental exposures can reduce the asthma burden in Finland by up to 10%. PMID:26067987

  15. Evoked potential recording during echolocation in a false killer whale Pseudorca crassidens (L)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Supin, Alexander Ya.; Nachtigall, Paul E.; Pawloski, Jeffrey; Au, Whitlow W. L.

    2003-05-01

    Auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) were recorded in a false killer whale while the animal echolocated a target. The ABR collection was triggered by echolocation clicks of the animal. In these conditions, the recorded ABR pattern contained a duplicate set of waves. A comparison of ABR wave delays recorded during echolocation with those recorded during regular external stimulation with experimenter generated clicks showed that the first set of waves may be a response to the emitted click whereas the second one may be a response to the echo. Both responses, to the emitted click and to the echo, were of comparable amplitude in spite of the intensity difference of these two sounds that may differ by more than 40 dB near the animal's head. This finding indicates the presence of some mechanism of releasing responses to echoes from masking by loud emitted clicks. The evoked-potential method may be productive to investigate these mechanisms.

  16. 22 CFR 1413.5 - Action necessary to close meeting; record of votes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... votes. 1413.5 Section 1413.5 Foreign Relations FOREIGN SERVICE LABOR RELATIONS BOARD; FEDERAL LABOR... members of the Board who will participate in the meeting vote to take such action. (a) When the meeting deliberations concern matters specified in § 1413.4(a), the Board members shall vote at the beginning of...

  17. A Record of Experience. Catalogue of FFHC/Action for Development Documents, 1971-1976.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freedom from Hunger Campaign, Rome (Italy).

    The FFHC/AD (Freedom From Hunger Campaign/Action for Development) is the Food and Agriculture Organization's (FAO) link with peoples' organizations in the world's poor and rich countries. During its 18 years of activities, FFHC/AD has channelled additional funds collected by private financing agencies in the industrialized countries to rural…

  18. LINEAR RELATIONS BETWEEN STIMULUS AMPLITUDES AND AMPLITUDES OF RETINAL ACTION POTENTIALS FROM THE EYE OF THE WOLF SPIDER.

    PubMed

    DEVOE, R D

    1963-09-01

    Incremental photic stimuli have been used to elicit small amplitude retinal action potentials from light-adapted ocelli of the wolf spider, Lycosa baltimoriana (Keyserling) in order to see whether or not the amplitudes of these potentials are linearly related to the stimulus amplitudes. Sine wave variations of light intensity around a mean elicit sine wave variations in potential which contain inappreciable harmonics of the stimulus frequency and whose amplitudes are linearly related to the stimulus amplitudes. Likewise, the responses to the first two periodic Fourier components of incremental rectangular wave stimuli of variable duty cycle are directly proportional to the amplitudes of these components and have phases dependent only on the frequencies and phases of these components. Thirdly, a linear transfer function can be found which describes the amplitudes and phases of responses recorded at different frequencies of sine wave stimulation and this transfer function is sufficient to predict the responses to incremental step stimuli. Finally, it is shown that flash response amplitudes are linearly related to incremental flash intensities at all levels of adaptation. The relations of these linear responses to non-linear responses and to physiological mechanisms of the eye are discussed. PMID:14060442

  19. Actions of arginine polyamine on voltage and ligand-activated whole cell currents recorded from cultured neurones.

    PubMed Central

    Scott, R. H.; Sweeney, M. I.; Kobrinsky, E. M.; Pearson, H. A.; Timms, G. H.; Pullar, I. A.; Wedley, S.; Dolphin, A. C.

    1992-01-01

    1. Toxins from invertebrates have proved useful tools for investigation of the properties of ion channels. In this study we describe the actions of arginine polyamine which is believed to be a close analogue of FTX, a polyamine isolated from the American funnel web spider, Agelenopsis aperta. 2. Voltage-activated Ca2+ currents and Ca(2+)-dependent Cl- currents recorded from rat cultured dorsal root ganglion neurones were reversibly inhibited by arginine polyamine (AP; 0.001 to 100 microM). Low voltage-activated T-type Ca2+ currents were significantly more sensitive to AP than high voltage-activated Ca2+ currents. The IC50 values for the actions of AP on low and high voltage-activated Ca2+ currents were 10 nM and 3 microM respectively. AP was equally effective in inhibiting high voltage-activated currents carried by Ba2+, Sr2+ or Ca2+. However, AP-induced inhibition of Ca2+ currents was attenuated by increasing the extracellular Ca2+ concentration from 2 mM to 10 mM. 3. The actions of AP on a Ca(2+)-independent K+ current were more complex, 1 microM AP enhanced this current but 10 microM AP had a dual action, initially enhancing but then inhibiting the K+ current. 4. gamma-Aminobutyric acid-activated Cl- currents were also reversibly inhibited by 1 to 10 microM AP. In contrast N-methyl-D-aspartate currents recorded from rat cultured cerebellar neurones were greatly enhanced by 10 microM AP. 5. We conclude that at a concentration of 10 nM, AP is a selective inhibitor of low threshold T-type voltage-activated Ca2+ currents.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1380382

  20. Action potential characterization of human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes using automated patch-clamp technology.

    PubMed

    Scheel, Olaf; Frech, Stefanie; Amuzescu, Bogdan; Eisfeld, Jörg; Lin, Kun-Han; Knott, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    Recent progress in embryonic stem cell (ESC) and induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) research led to high-purity preparations of human cardiomyocytes (CMs) differentiated from these two sources-suitable for tissue regeneration, in vitro models of disease, and cardiac safety pharmacology screening. We performed a detailed characterization of the effects of nifedipine, cisapride, and tetrodotoxin (TTX) on Cor.4U(®) human iPSC-CM, using automated whole-cell patch-clamp recordings with the CytoPatch™ 2 equipment, within a complex assay combining multiple voltage-clamp and current-clamp protocols in a well-defined sequence, and quantitative analysis of several action potential (AP) parameters. We retrieved three electrical phenotypes based on AP shape: ventricular, atrial/nodal, and S-type (with ventricular-like depolarization and lack of plateau). To suppress spontaneous firing, present in many cells, we injected continuously faint hyperpolarizing currents of -10 or -20 pA. We defined quality criteria (both seal and membrane resistance over 1 GΩ), and focused our study on cells with ventricular-like AP. Nifedipine induced marked decreases in AP duration (APD): APD90 (49.8% and 40.8% of control values at 1 and 10 μM, respectively), APD50 (16.1% and 12%); cisapride 0.1 μM increased APD90 to 176.2%; and tetrodotoxin 10 μM decreased maximum slope of phase to 33.3% of control, peak depolarization potential to 76.3% of control, and shortened APD90 on average to 80.4%. These results prove feasibility of automated voltage- and current-clamp recordings on human iPSC-CM and their potential use for in-depth drug evaluation and proarrhythmic liability assessment, as well as for diagnosis and pharmacology tests for cardiac channelopathy patients. PMID:25353059

  1. [Indicators of local actions for reporting and recording cases of domestic violence and sexual exploitation of children and adolescents].

    PubMed

    Deslandes, Suely; Mendes, Corina Helena Figueira; Lima, Jeanne de Souza; Campos, Daniel de Souza

    2011-08-01

    Information is essential for combating violence against children and adolescents and reclaiming their rights. This study presents indicators for the evaluation of local government actions for reporting and recording cases of domestic violence and sexual exploitation of children and adolescents, based on participatory, consensus-based methodologies: the nominal group technique (NGT) and the Delphi method. The frame of reference was the set of Brazilian policies focusing on the issue of violence against children and adolescence. Experts from Brazil's five major regions participated in the study. The consensus produced two different analytical scenarios, with three and 20 indicators, respectively. PMID:21877011

  2. Auditory steady-state evoked potentials vs. compound action potentials for the measurement of suppression tuning curves in the sedated dog puppy.

    PubMed

    Markessis, Emily; Poncelet, Luc; Colin, Cécile; Hoonhorst, Ingrid; Collet, Grégory; Deltenre, Paul; Moore, Brian C J

    2010-06-01

    Auditory steady-state evoked potential (ASSEP) tuning curves were compared to compound action potential (CAP) tuning curves, both measured at 2 Hz, using sedated beagle puppies. The effect of two types of masker (narrowband noise and sinusoidal) on the tuning curve parameters was assessed. Whatever the masker type, CAP tuning curve parameters were qualitatively and quantitatively similar to the ASSEP ones, with a similar inter-subject variability, but with a greater incidence of upward tip displacement. Whatever the procedure, sinusoidal maskers produced sharper tuning curves than narrow-band maskers. Although these differences are not likely to have significant implications for clinical work, from a fundamental point of view, their origin requires further investigations. The same amount of time was needed to record a CAP and an ASSEP 13-point tuning curve. The data further validate the ASSEP technique, which has the advantages of having a smaller tendency to produce upward tip shifts than the CAP technique. Moreover, being non invasive, ASSEP tuning curves can be easily repeated over time in the same subject for clinical and research purposes. PMID:20482293

  3. Noninvasive scalp recording of cortical auditory evoked potentials in the alert macaque monkey.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Kosuke; Nejime, Masafumi; Konoike, Naho; Nakada, Tsutomu; Nakamura, Katsuki

    2015-09-01

    Scalp-recorded evoked potentials (EP) provide researchers and clinicians with irreplaceable means for recording stimulus-related neural activities in the human brain, due to its high temporal resolution, handiness, and, perhaps more importantly, non-invasiveness. This work recorded the scalp cortical auditory EP (CAEP) in unanesthetized monkeys by using methods that are essentially identical to those applied to humans. Young adult rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta, 5-7 years old) were seated in a monkey chair, and their head movements were partially restricted by polystyrene blocks and tension poles placed around their head. Individual electrodes were fixated on their scalp using collodion according to the 10-20 system. Pure tone stimuli were presented while electroencephalograms were recorded from up to nineteen channels, including an electrooculogram channel. In all monkeys (n = 3), the recorded CAEP comprised a series of positive and negative deflections, labeled here as macaque P1 (mP1), macaque N1 (mN1), macaque P2 (mP2), and macaque N2 (mN2), and these transient responses to sound onset were followed by a sustained potential that continued for the duration of the sound, labeled the macaque sustained potential (mSP). mP1, mN2 and mSP were the prominent responses, and they had maximal amplitudes over frontal/central midline electrode sites, consistent with generators in auditory cortices. The study represents the first noninvasive scalp recording of CAEP in alert rhesus monkeys, to our knowledge. PMID:26031378

  4. Effects of bath resistance on action potentials in the squid giant axon: myocardial implications.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, J; Wikswo, J P

    1997-01-01

    This study presents a simplified version of the quasi-one-dimensional theory (Wu, J., E. A. Johnson, and J. M. Kootsey. 1996. A quasi-one-dimensional theory for anisotropic propagation of excitation in cardiac muscle. Biophys. J. 71:2427-2439) with two components of the extracellular current, along and perpendicular to the axis, and a simulation and its experimental confirmation for the giant axon of the squid. By extending the one-dimensional core conductor cable equations, this theory predicts, as confirmed by the experiment, that the shapes of the intracellular and the extracellular action potentials are related to the resistance of the bath. Such a result was previously only expected by the field theories. The correlation between the shapes of the intracellular and the extracellular potentials of the giant axon of the squid resembles that observed during the anisotropic propagation of excitation in cardiac muscle. Therefore, this study not only develops a quasi-one-dimensional theory for a squid axon, but also provides one possible factor contributing to the anisotropic propagation of action potentials in cardiac muscle. PMID:9370430

  5. An Excel‐based implementation of the spectral method of action potential alternans analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pearman, Charles M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Action potential (AP) alternans has been well established as a mechanism of arrhythmogenesis and sudden cardiac death. Proper interpretation of AP alternans requires a robust method of alternans quantification. Traditional methods of alternans analysis neglect higher order periodicities that may have greater pro‐arrhythmic potential than classical 2:1 alternans. The spectral method of alternans analysis, already widely used in the related study of microvolt T‐wave alternans, has also been used to study AP alternans. Software to meet the specific needs of AP alternans analysis is not currently available in the public domain. An AP analysis tool is implemented here, written in Visual Basic for Applications and using Microsoft Excel as a shell. This performs a sophisticated analysis of alternans behavior allowing reliable distinction of alternans from random fluctuations, quantification of alternans magnitude, and identification of which phases of the AP are most affected. In addition, the spectral method has been adapted to allow detection and quantification of higher order regular oscillations. Analysis of action potential morphology is also performed. A simple user interface enables easy import, analysis, and export of collated results. PMID:25501439

  6. Distinguishing hair cell from neural potentials recorded at the round window

    PubMed Central

    Forgues, Mathieu; Koehn, Heather A.; Dunnon, Askia K.; Pulver, Stephen H.; Buchman, Craig A.; Adunka, Oliver F.

    2013-01-01

    Almost all patients who receive cochlear implants have some acoustic hearing prior to surgery. Electrocochleography (ECoG), or electrophysiological measures of cochlear response to sound, can identify remaining auditory nerve activity that is the basis for this residual hearing and can record potentials from hair cells that are no longer functionally connected to nerve fibers. The ECoG signal is therefore complex, being composed of both hair cell and neural signals. To identify signatures of different sources in the recorded potentials, we collected ECoG data across frequency and intensity from the round window of gerbils before and after treatment with kainic acid, a neurotoxin. Distortions in the recorded waveforms were produced by different sources over different ranges of frequency and intensity. In response to tones at low frequencies and low-to-moderate intensities, the major source of distortion was from neural phase-locking that was sensitive to kainic acid. At high intensities at all frequencies, the distortion was not sensitive to kainic acid and was consistent with asymmetric saturation of the hair cell transducer current. In addition to loss of phase-locking, changes in the envelope after kainic acid treatment indicate that sustained neural firing combines with receptor potentials from hair cells to produce the envelope of the response to tones. These results provide baseline data to interpret comparable recordings from human cochlear implant recipients. PMID:24133227

  7. Inferior frontal oscillations reveal visuo-motor matching for actions and speech: evidence from human intracranial recordings.

    PubMed

    Halje, Pär; Seeck, Margitta; Blanke, Olaf; Ionta, Silvio

    2015-12-01

    The neural correspondence between the systems responsible for the execution and recognition of actions has been suggested both in humans and non-human primates. Apart from being a key region of this visuo-motor observation-execution matching (OEM) system, the human inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) is also important for speech production. The functional overlap of visuo-motor OEM and speech, together with the phylogenetic history of the IFG as a motor area, has led to the idea that speech function has evolved from pre-existing motor systems and to the hypothesis that an OEM system may exist also for speech. However, visuo-motor OEM and speech OEM have never been compared directly. We used electrocorticography to analyze oscillations recorded from intracranial electrodes in human fronto-parieto-temporal cortex during visuo-motor (executing or visually observing an action) and speech OEM tasks (verbally describing an action using the first or third person pronoun). The results show that neural activity related to visuo-motor OEM is widespread in the frontal, parietal, and temporal regions. Speech OEM also elicited widespread responses partly overlapping with visuo-motor OEM sites (bilaterally), including frontal, parietal, and temporal regions. Interestingly a more focal region, the inferior frontal gyrus (bilaterally), showed both visuo-motor OEM and speech OEM properties independent of orolingual speech-unrelated movements. Building on the methodological advantages in human invasive electrocorticography, the present findings provide highly precise spatial and temporal information to support the existence of a modality-independent action representation system in the human brain that is shared between systems for performing, interpreting and describing actions. PMID:26282276

  8. Carbon monoxide effects on human ventricle action potential assessed by mathematical simulations

    PubMed Central

    Trenor, Beatriz; Cardona, Karen; Saiz, Javier; Rajamani, Sridharan; Belardinelli, Luiz; Giles, Wayne R.

    2013-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) that is produced in a number of different mammalian tissues is now known to have significant effects on the cardiovascular system. These include: (i) vasodilation, (ii) changes in heart rate and strength of contractions, and (iii) modulation of autonomic nervous system input to both the primary pacemaker and the working myocardium. Excessive CO in the environment is toxic and can initiate or mediate life threatening cardiac rhythm disturbances. Recent reports link these ventricular arrhythmias to an increase in the slowly inactivating, or “late” component of the Na+ current in the mammalian heart. The main goal of this paper is to explore the basis of this pro-arrhythmic capability of CO by incorporating changes in CO-induced ion channel activity with intracellular signaling pathways in the mammalian heart. To do this, a quite well-documented mathematical model of the action potential and intracellular calcium transient in the human ventricular myocyte has been employed. In silico iterations based on this model provide a useful first step in illustrating the cellular electrophysiological consequences of CO that have been reported from mammalian heart experiments. Specifically, when the Grandi et al. model of the human ventricular action potential is utilized, and after the Na+ and Ca2+ currents in a single myocyte are modified based on the experimental literature, early after-depolarization (EAD) rhythm disturbances appear, and important elements of the underlying causes of these EADs are revealed/illustrated. Our modified mathematical model of the human ventricular action potential also provides a convenient digital platform for designing future experimental work and relating these changes in cellular cardiac electrophysiology to emerging clinical and epidemiological data on CO toxicity. PMID:24146650

  9. Monophasic action potentials and Ca2+ transients in ischaemically preconditioned rabbit ventricular muscle

    PubMed Central

    Dekker, L.R.C.; van Bavel, E.; Opthof, T.; Coronel, R.; Janse, M.J.

    2003-01-01

    Background ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP) channels play an important role in the protective mechanism underlying ischaemic preconditioning. Ample evidence indicates, however, that action potential shortening is not a prerequisite for the cardioprotective effect of preconditioning. Methods Monophasic action potential duration (MAPD), tissue resistance, intracellular Ca2+ (Indo-1) and mechanical activity were simultaneously assessed in arterially perfused rabbit papillary muscles. We studied four experimental protocols preceding sustained ischaemia: 1. control perfusion (n=6), 2. ischaemic preconditioning (PC; n=4), 3. pretreatment with a KATP channel blocker, glibenclamide (15 μmol/1), prior to ischaemic preconditioning (PC+glib; n=3), 4. glibenclamide pretreatment only (Glib; n=2). Results In the PC group an increase in the diastolic Ca2+ level and a prolongation of the Ca2+ transient just prior to the induction of sustained ischaemia correlate to the postponement of the onset of irreversible ischaemic damage, as established by a rise in [Ca2+]i, electrical uncoupling and contracture. Glibenclamide antagonised these changes in the Ca2+ transient and the cardioprotection induced by preconditioning. MAPD was equal in all experimental groups. Conclusions Prolongation of the Ca2+ transient and increase of diastolic [Ca2+]i just prior to the induction of sustained ischaemia and not action potential shortening are involved in the cardioprotective effect of ischaemic preconditioning. Therefore, a glibenclamide-sensitive mechanism, other than the sarcolemmal KATP channels, is involved in the protective effect of ischaemic preconditioning. Changes in Ca2+ metabolism may play a crucial role in ischaemic preconditioning. ImagesFigure 1 PMID:25696182

  10. Dynamical speckles patterns of action potential transmission effects in squid giant axon membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llovera-González, Juan J.; Moreno-Yeras, Alfredo B.; Muramatsu, Mikiya; Soga, Diogo; Serra-Toledo, Rolando L.; Magalhães, Daniel S. F.

    2013-11-01

    Undoubtedly the most important result of the investigations in physiology and biophysics was the discovery of the electrochemical mechanism of propagation of the action potential in nerves that was made by Hodgkin and Huxley during the first half of the past century. Since some decades ago diverse experiments about the electro optical properties of the axon membrane there was published using the most diverse optical experimental procedures6-10. In this paper some results of a dynamical speckle technique applied for obtaining microscopic images of a section of a squid giant axon membrane during the activation by electrical impulses and his digital process are presented.

  11. Simulation of ECG Repolarization Phase with Improved Model of Cell Action Potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trobec, Roman; Depolli, Matjaž; Avbelj, Viktor

    An improved model of action potentials (AP) is proposed to increase the accuracy of simulated electrocardiograms (ECGs). ECG simulator is based on a spatial model of a left ventricle, composed of cubic cells. Three distinct APs, modeled with functions proposed by Wohlfard, have been assigned to the cells, forming epicardial, mid, and endocardial layers. Identification of exact parameter values for AP models has been done through optimization of the simulated ECGs. Results have shown that only through an introduction of a minor extension to the AP model, simulator is able to produce more realistic ECGs. The same extension also proves essential for achieving a better fit between the measured and modeled APs.

  12. Frequency Analysis of Atrial Action Potential Alternans: A Sensitive Clinical Index of Individual Propensity to Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Lalani, Gautam G.; Schricker, Amir A.; Clopton, Paul; Krummen, David E.; Narayan, Sanjiv M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Few clinical indices identify the propensity of patients to atrial fibrillation (AF) when not in AF. Repolarization alternans has been shown to indicate AF vulnerability, but is limited in its sensitivity to detect changes in action potential duration (APD), that may be subtle. We hypothesized that spectral analysis would be a more sensitive and robust marker of action potential (AP) alternans and thus a better clinical index of individual propensity to AF than APD alternans. Methods and Results In 31 patients (12 persistent AF, 15 paroxysmal AF, 4 controls with no AF), we recorded left (n=27) and right (n=6) atrial monophasic APs during incremental pacing from cycle length (CL) 500 ms (120 bpm) to AF onset. Alternans was measured by APD and spectral analysis. At baseline pacing [median CL 500 (IQR 500,500) ms], APD alternans was detected in only 7/27 AF patients (no controls), while spectral AP alternans was detected in 18/27 AF patients (no controls; p=0.003); AP alternans was more prevalent in persistent than paroxysmal AF, and absent in controls (p=0.018 APD, p=0.042 spectral). Spectral AP alternans magnitude at baseline was highest in persistent AF, with modest rate-dependent amplification, then in paroxysmal AF, with marked rate-dependence, and was undetectable in controls until just before induced AF. Conclusions Spectral AP alternans near baseline rates can identify patients with, versus those without, clinical histories and pathophysiological substrates for AF. Future studies should examine whether the presence of spectral AP alternans during sinus rhythm may obviate the need to actually demonstrate AF, such as on ambulatory ECG monitoring. PMID:23995250

  13. COST Action “EuroTelepath”: digital pathology integration in electronic health record, including primary care centres

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Digital pathology includes the information technology that allows for the management of information, including data and images, generated in an anatomic pathology department. COST Action IC0604 The integration of digital slides in the electronic health record is one of the main objectives of COST Action IC0604 “Telepathology Network in Europe” (EURO-TELEPATH). Fostering use of medical informatics standards and adapting them to current needs is needed to manage efficiently extremely large medical images, like digital slide files. Digital slides in Pathology Digital slides can play a role in disease prevention, primary diagnosis, and second opinion. In all these tasks, automated image analysis can also be a most valuable tool. Interoperability in pathology information systems In order to achieve an efficient interoperability between pathology information systems with other clinical information systems, obtaining a seamless integration of pathology images (gross pictures and digital slides) with LIS-Pathology Information system in a web environment is an important task. Primary care information systems should also be included in the integration, since primary care centres play an essential role in the generation of clinical information and specimen collection. A common terminology, based in SNOMED CT is also needed. Conclusions Main barrier in the integration of digital slides in pathology workflow and eHealth record is the cost of current digital slide scanners. Pathology information system vendors should participate in standardization bodies. PMID:21489201

  14. Effect of DSPE-PEG on compound action potential, injury potential and ion concentration following compression in ex vivo spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Wang, Aihua; Huo, Xiaolin; Zhang, Guanghao; Wang, Xiaochen; Zhang, Cheng; Wu, Changzhe; Rong, Wei; Xu, Jing; Song, Tao

    2016-05-01

    It has been shown that polyethylene glycol (PEG) can reseal membrane disruption on the spinal cord, but only high concentrations of PEG have been shown to have this effect. Therefore, the effect of PEG is somewhat limited, and it is necessary to investigate a new approach to repair spinal cord injury. This study assesses the ability of 1, 2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-[methoxy(poly (ethylene glycol)) 2000] (DSPE-PEG) to recover physiological function and attenuate the injury-induced influx of extracellular ions in ex vivo spinal cord injury. Isolated spinal cords were subjected to compression injury and treated with PEG or DSPE-PEG immediately after injury. The compound action potential (CAP) was recorded before and after injury to assess the functional recovery. Furthermore, injury potential, the difference in gap potentials before and after compression, and the concentration of intracellular ions were used to evaluate the effect of DSPE-PEG on reducing ion influx. Data showed that the injury potential and ion concentration of the untreated, PEG and DSPE-PEG group, without significant difference among them, are remarkably higher than those of the intact group. Moreover, the CAP recovery of the DSPE-PEG and PEG treated spinal cords was significantly greater than that of the untreated spinal cords. The level of CAP recovery in the DSPE-PEG and PEG treated groups was the same, but the concentration of DSPE-PEG used was much lower than the concentration of PEG. These results suggest that instant application of DSPE-PEG could effectively repair functional disturbance in SCI at a much lower concentration than PEG. PMID:27021025

  15. [The new technologies for the intraoperative registration of the electrically evoked compound action potentials of the acoustical nerve by means of the neural response telemetry method].

    PubMed

    Bakhshinian, V V; Fedoseev, V I; Tavartkiladze, G A

    2015-01-01

    The present article reports the results of a clinical study of the new wireless device CR120 designed for the intraoperative registration of electrode resistance and the electrically evoked compound action potential (EAP) of the acoustical nerve by means of neural response telemetry. The study has demonstrated the high effectiveness of the application of the new wireless device in clinical practice. It was shown that the registration of electrically evoked compound action potential with the help of the CR120 Intraoperative Remote Assistant took 22% less time than by the conventional method (p<0.001). Moreover, the trial revealed the strong correlation between the threshold EAP values recorded with the use of the new device and by the classical method. PMID:26288202

  16. Mode of action of a surgical electronic lithoclast--high speed pressure, cinematographic and schlieren recordings following an ultrashort underwater electronic discharge.

    PubMed

    Tidd, M J; Webster, J; Wright, H C; Harrison, I R

    1976-01-01

    In order to investigate the mode of action of the electrical discharges from a surgical electronic lithoclast in shattering bladder stones high speed pressure-time recordings were made. The results indicated effects similar to those following an underwater detonation of high explosive. Subsequent high speed photographic analysis confirmed this. Calculations based on the results suggested that the shock waves and pressure pulses generated were of a potentially hazardous magnitude and that gas-containing bowel close to the bladder might be at particular risk as well as solid tissue as the bladder wall. Photographic data also suggested that danger might be incurred by the use of similar devices in a small enclosed space such as the ureter or renal pelvis. PMID:1244885

  17. Flavonoids: a review of probable mechanisms of action and potential applications.

    PubMed

    Nijveldt, R J; van Nood, E; van Hoorn, D E; Boelens, P G; van Norren, K; van Leeuwen, P A

    2001-10-01

    The aim of this review, a summary of the putative biological actions of flavonoids, was to obtain a further understanding of the reported beneficial health effects of these substances. Flavonoids occur naturally in fruit, vegetables, and beverages such as tea and wine. Research in the field of flavonoids has increased since the discovery of the French paradox,ie, the low cardiovascular mortality rate observed in Mediterranean populations in association with red wine consumption and a high saturated fat intake. Several other potential beneficial properties of flavonoids have since been ascertained. We review the different groups of known flavonoids, the probable mechanisms by which they act, and the potential clinical applications of these fascinating natural substances. PMID:11566638

  18. Action of hallucinogens on raphe-evoked dorsal root potentials (DRPs) in the cat.

    PubMed

    Larson, A A; Anderson, E G

    1986-02-01

    The dorsal root potential (DRP) evoked by stimulation of the inferior central nucleus (ICN) of the cat is affected by administration of a variety of hallucinogenic agents. It has been previously shown that a single low dose of LSD is unique in that it potentiates this DRP, while injections of 5-methoxy-N,N- dimethyltryptamine (5-MeODMT), ketamine or phencyclidine (PCP) inhibit its production. Tolerance develops to the facilitatory effect of low doses of LSD on the DRP, but not to the inhibitory action of 5-MeODMT. Repeated injections of ketamine every 30 minutes also fail to produce tachyphylaxis to the inhibitory effect of this dissociative anesthetic. The raphe-evoked DRP is a long latency potential that is inhibited by a wide variety of putative serotonin antagonists and has therefore been traditionally thought to be mediated by serotonin. However, in light of the inability of either tryptophan or fluoxetine to potentiate this DRP, and the resistance of this DRP to blockade by parachlorophenylalanine, reserpine or intrathecally administered 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine, it appears that this potential may in fact be mediated, at least in part, by a non-serotonergic transmitter. PMID:3952125

  19. Interactions of ethanol and quinidine on contractility and myocyte action potential in the rat ventricle.

    PubMed

    Guthrie, S K; Wilde, D W; Brown, R A; Savage, A O; Bleske, B

    1995-01-01

    The combined effects of ethanol and quinidine on cardiac electromechanical coupling are unknown, but both drugs affect cardiac conduction and can cause myocardial depression. Isolated left ventricular papillary and ventricular myocytes were used to assess the combined effects of quinidine and ethanol on the electrophysiologic and mechanical properties of rat myocardium. The combination of quinidine (1-300 microM) and ethanol (120-240 mg/dL) depressed active papillary muscle tension within the clinically useful concentration range. In electrophysiologic studies of isolated ventricular myocytes, quinidine prolonged the action potential duration at 50% (APD50) and 90% (APD90) repolarization, the absolute refractory period, and the relative refractory period, but decreased the maximum rate of change of depolarization in phase 0 (Vmax). When cells were exposed to ethanol (240 mg/dL) and quinidine (1.5 microM) together, a significant decrease in the quinidine-induced prolongation of the absolute refractory and relative refractory periods was seen. Additional changes in action potential parameters from the quinidine values included slight reductions in Vmax and in APD50 and APD90, but these reductions were not consistently displayed, nor were they statistically significant. PMID:7897336

  20. Applications of Control Theory to the Dynamics and Propagation of Cardiac Action Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, Laura M.; Stockton, Jonathan F.; Otani, Niels F.

    2011-01-01

    Sudden cardiac arrest is a widespread cause of death in the industrialized world. Most cases of sudden cardiac arrest are due to ventricular fibrillation (VF), a lethal cardiac arrhythmia. Electrophysiological abnormalities such as alternans (a beat-to-beat alternation in action potential duration) and conduction block have been suspected to contribute to the onset of VF. This study focuses on the use of control-systems techniques to analyze and design methods for suppressing these precursor factors. Control-systems tools, specifically controllability analysis and Lyapunov stability methods, were applied to a two-variable Karma model of the action-potential (AP) dynamics of a single cell, to analyze the effectiveness of strategies for suppressing AP abnormalities. State-feedback-integral (SFI) control was then applied to a Purkinje fiber simulated with the Karma model, where only one stimulating electrode was used to affect the system. SFI control converted both discordant alternans and 2:1 conduction block back toward more normal patterns, over a wider range of fiber lengths and pacing intervals compared with a Pyragas-type chaos controller. The advantages conferred by using feedback from multiple locations in the fiber, and using integral (i.e., memory) terms in the controller, are discussed. PMID:20407833

  1. Biorealistic cardiac cell culture platforms with integrated monitoring of extracellular action potentials

    PubMed Central

    Trantidou, Tatiana; Terracciano, Cesare M.; Kontziampasis, Dimitrios; Humphrey, Eleanor J.; Prodromakis, Themistoklis

    2015-01-01

    Current platforms for in vitro drug development utilize confluent, unorganized monolayers of heart cells to study the effect on action potential propagation. However, standard cell cultures are of limited use in cardiac research, as they do not preserve important structural and functional properties of the myocardium. Here we present a method to integrate a scaffolding technology with multi-electrode arrays and deliver a compact, off-the-shelf monitoring platform for growing biomimetic cardiac tissue. Our approach produces anisotropic cultures with conduction velocity (CV) profiles that closer resemble native heart tissue; the fastest impulse propagation is along the long axis of the aligned cardiomyocytes (CVL) and the slowest propagation is perpendicular (CVT), in contrast to standard cultures where action potential propagates isotropically (CVL ≈ CVT). The corresponding anisotropy velocity ratios (CVL/CVT = 1.38 – 2.22) are comparable with values for healthy adult rat ventricles (1.98 – 3.63). The main advantages of this approach are that (i) it provides ultimate pattern control, (ii) it is compatible with automated manufacturing steps and (iii) it is utilized through standard cell culturing protocols. Our platform is compatible with existing read-out equipment and comprises a prompt method for more reliable CV studies. PMID:26053434

  2. Supernormal Conduction and Suppression of Spatially Discordant Alternans of Cardiac Action Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Linyuan; Agarwal, Anuj; Patwardhan, Abhijit

    2016-01-01

    Spatially discordant alternans (DA) of action potential durations (APD) is thought to be more pro-arrhythmic than concordant alternans. Super normal conduction (SNC) has been reported to suppress formation of DA. An increase in conduction velocity (CV) as activation rate increases, i.e., a negative CV restitution, is widely considered as hallmark of SNC. Our aim in this study is to show that it is not an increase in CV for faster rates that prevents formation of DA, rather, it is the ratio of the CV for the short relative to the long activation that is critical in DA suppression. To illustrate this subtlety, we simulated this phenomenon using two approaches; (1) by using the standard, i.e., S1S2 protocol to quantify restitution and disabling the slow inactivation gate j of the sodium current (INa), and (2) by using the dynamic, i.e., S1S1 protocol for quantification of restitution and increasing INa at different cycle lengths (CL). Even though both approaches produced similar CV restitution curves, DA was suppressed only during the first approach, where the CV of the short of the long-short action potential (AP) pattern was selectively increased. These results show that negative CV restitution, which is considered characteristic of SNC, per se, is not causal in suppressing DA, rather, the critical factor is a change in the ratio of the velocities of the short and the long APs. PMID:26779035

  3. Computational and Electronic Analog Implementation of the Hodgkin-Huxley Model of Action Potentials in Neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Peter; Link, Justin

    2012-02-01

    Alan Loyd Hodgkin and Andrew Huxley's mathematical model of action potential initiation and propagation in neurons is one of the greatest hallmarks of biophysics. Two techniques for implementing the Hodgkin-Huxley model were explored: computational and electronic analog. Computational modeling was done using NEURON 7.1. NEURON is a free, robust, and relatively user friendly simulation environment that enables quantitatively accurate computational modeling of neurons and neural networks. An analog electronic circuit was built using field-effect transistors (FETs) to simulate the non-linear, voltage-dependent (sodium and potassium) conductances that are responsible for membrane excitability. While the electronic analog qualitatively reproduces many of the key features of the action potential including overall shape, inactivation period, and propagation, it was difficult to quantitatively reproduce the Hodgkin-Huxley model. In addition, while the relative cost to build circuits equivalent to small membrane patches is minimal (˜50), implementation of larger cells or networks would prove uneconomical. Still, both techniques are viable avenues toward introducing interdisciplinary research into either a computational or electronics lab setting at the undergraduate level.

  4. Peripheral Hot Spots for Local Ca2+ Release after Single Action Potentials in Sympathetic Ganglion Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Cseresnyés, Zoltán; Schneider, Martin F.

    2004-01-01

    Ca2+ release from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) contributes to Ca2+ transients in frog sympathetic ganglion neurons. Here we use video-rate confocal fluo-4 fluorescence imaging to show that single action potentials reproducibly trigger rapidly rising Ca2+ transients at 1–3 local hot spots within the peripheral ER-rich layer in intact neurons in fresh ganglia and in the majority (74%) of cultured neurons. Hot spots were located near the nucleus or the axon hillock region. Other regions exhibited either slower and smaller signals or no response. Ca2+ signals spread into the cell at constant velocity across the ER in nonnuclear regions, indicating active propagation, but spread with a (time)1/2 dependence within the nucleus, consistent with diffusion. 26% of cultured cells exhibited uniform Ca2+ signals around the periphery, but hot spots were produced by loading the cytosol with EGTA or by bathing such cells in low-Ca2+ Ringer's solution. Peripheral hot spots for Ca2+ release within the perinuclear and axon hillock regions provide a mechanism for preferential initiation of nuclear and axonal Ca2+ signals by single action potentials in sympathetic ganglion neurons. PMID:14695260

  5. From damage response to action potentials: early evolution of neural and contractile modules in stem eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Brunet, Thibaut; Arendt, Detlev

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells convert external stimuli into membrane depolarization, which in turn triggers effector responses such as secretion and contraction. Here, we put forward an evolutionary hypothesis for the origin of the depolarization–contraction–secretion (DCS) coupling, the functional core of animal neuromuscular circuits. We propose that DCS coupling evolved in unicellular stem eukaryotes as part of an ‘emergency response’ to calcium influx upon membrane rupture. We detail how this initial response was subsequently modified into an ancient mechanosensory–effector arc, present in the last eukaryotic common ancestor, which enabled contractile amoeboid movement that is widespread in extant eukaryotes. Elaborating on calcium-triggered membrane depolarization, we reason that the first action potentials evolved alongside the membrane of sensory-motile cilia, with the first voltage-sensitive sodium/calcium channels (Nav/Cav) enabling a fast and coordinated response of the entire cilium to mechanosensory stimuli. From the cilium, action potentials then spread across the entire cell, enabling global cellular responses such as concerted contraction in several independent eukaryote lineages. In animals, this process led to the invention of mechanosensory contractile cells. These gave rise to mechanosensory receptor cells, neurons and muscle cells by division of labour and can be regarded as the founder cell type of the nervous system. PMID:26598726

  6. Relationship between microelectrode array impedance and chronic recording quality of single units and local field potentials.

    PubMed

    Jiang, JingLe; Willett, Francis R; Taylor, Dawn M

    2014-01-01

    Practical application of intracortical microelectrode technology is currently hindered by the inability to reliably record neuronal signals chronically. The precise mechanism of device failure is still under debate, but most likely includes some combination of tissue reaction, mechanical failure, and chronic material degradation. Impedance is a measure of the ease with which current flows through a working electrode under a driving voltage. Impedance has been hypothesized to provide information about an electrode's surrounding tissue reaction as well as chronic insulation degradation. In this study, we investigated the relationship between an electrode's impedance and its chronic recording performance as measured by the number of isolatable single units and the quality of local field potential recordings. Two 64-channel electrode arrays implanted in separate monkeys were assessed. We found no simple relationship between impedance and recording quality that held for both animals across all time periods. This suggests that future investigations on the topic should adopt a more fine-grained within-day and within-animal analysis. We also found new evidence from local field potential spatial correlation supporting the theory that insulation degradation is an important contributor to electrode failure. PMID:25570633

  7. Early detection of hepatic encephalopathy by recording visual evoked potential (VEP).

    PubMed

    Zamir, Doron; Storch, Shimon; Kovach, Ivan; Storch, Rita; Zamir, Chen

    2002-01-01

    The visual evoked potential (VEP) record in response to a pattern stimulus is a non invasive and reliable method of detecting central and peripheral nerve system abnormalities. VEP recording have been used in animals with fulminant hepatic failure, and also in-patients with hepatic encephalopathy and acute severe hepatitis. Our aims were: a. to evaluate the potency of PVEP in assessing hepatic encephalopathy. b. to find the rate of pathologic PVEP in patients with advanced liver cirrhosis. VEP was recorded in 14 chronic liver cirrhotic patients (6 alcoholic, 6 HCV-related, 2 cryptogenic) and 14 controls. Patients with any neurologic abnormalities were excluded from the study. All patients were subjected to the Mental State Score (MSS) test, and venous blood ammonia was measured on the same day of VEP recording. In 10/14 (71%) patients some VEP recording abnormality was detected. In the cirrhotic patients, P100 latency was significantly longer (P < 0.05) than in controls. Low amplitude was observed in 8 patients compared to controls. Marked increase of N75 (3 patients) and marked increase of N145 (2 patients) were observed. Mean blood ammonia and MSS score were normal in all patients. No correlation was found between both MSS score and blood ammonia levels and the P100 delay. Five out of 10 patients with pathologic VEP developed hepatic encephalpathy during a follow-up of one year, compared to one out of 4 patients with no pathology on VEP recording. VEP recording may be a valuable tool in assessing patients with early hepatic encephalopathy and in predicting encephalopathy. PMID:12533959

  8. Stimulus and recording variables and their effects on mammalian vestibular evoked potentials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Sherri M.; Subramanian, Geetha; Avniel, Wilma; Guo, Yuqing; Burkard, Robert F.; Jones, Timothy A.

    2002-01-01

    Linear vestibular evoked potentials (VsEPs) measure the collective neural activity of the gravity receptor organs in the inner ear that respond to linear acceleration transients. The present study examined the effects of electrode placement, analog filtering, stimulus polarity and stimulus rate on linear VsEP thresholds, latencies and amplitudes recorded from mice. Two electrode-recording montages were evaluated, rostral (forebrain) to 'mastoid' and caudal (cerebellum) to 'mastoid'. VsEP thresholds and peak latencies were identical between the two recording sites; however, peak amplitudes were larger for the caudal recording montage. VsEPs were also affected by filtering. Results suggest optimum high pass filter cutoff at 100-300 Hz, and low pass filter cutoff at 10,000 Hz. To evaluate stimulus rate, linear jerk pulses were presented at 9.2, 16, 25, 40 and 80 Hz. At 80 Hz, mean latencies were longer (0.350-0.450 ms) and mean amplitudes reduced (0.8-1.8 microV) for all response peaks. In 50% of animals, late peaks (P3, N3) disappeared at 80 Hz. The results offer options for VsEP recording protocols. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science B.V.

  9. Microbially-induced sedimentary structures (MISS) as record of storm action in supratidal modern estuarine setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuadrado, Diana G.; Bournod, Constanza N.; Pan, Jerónimo; Carmona, Noelia B.

    2013-10-01

    One of the aims of tidal sedimentology in recent years is to find signatures in the stratigraphic record that help in recognizing basic ancient tidal processes. The present study was carried out on the supratidal zone of the middle Bahía Blanca estuary which is colonized by extensive microbial mats. The purpose of the study was to relate the tidal and wave energy with the microbially-induced sedimentary structures (MISS) present in the tidal flat. The energy reaching the area was quantified by tidal and wave records, while MISS were simultaneously recognized and described after a strong storm event. The MISS and the microsequences of sediments in vertical cross-sections of the tidal flat were considered as tidal signatures over a supratidal zone, when high-tide in severe energy conditions can reach the zone. This paper contributes to the understanding of physical sedimentary parameters that control the modification of microbial structures in modern siliciclastic regimes and that, in turn, can aid in the reconstruction of ancient hydraulic settings.

  10. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 8): East Helena, MT. (First remedial action), November 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-11-22

    The 80-acre East Helena site, in East Helena, Lewis and Clark County, Montana, is a primary lead smelting facility that has been in operation since 1888. Prickly Pear Creek flows near the site and has been found to contain elevated levels of arsenic and lead. A 1984 remedial investigation identified elevated levels of metal contamination in soil, livestock, plants, and ground and surface waters with the sources of onsite contamination being primary and fugitive emissions and seepage from process ponds and process fluid circuitry. The primary contaminants of concern in the process ponds are metals including arsenic and lead. The selected remedial action for this site includes excavating and smelting 55,150 cubic yards of soil and/or sediment from all four process ponds and multi-media monitoring after individual remedial activities are implemented at three of the process pond areas.

  11. New records with examples of potential host colonization events for hypopi (Acari: Hypoderatidae) from birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pence, Danny B.; Spalding, M.G.; Bergan, J.F.; Cole, R.A.

    1997-01-01

    New host, geographic records, or both are established for 14 species of hypoderatid deutonymphs from 14 species of birds in North America. Ten of these records are regarded as examples of a potential host colonization event where these hypopi have become established in hosts other than those with which they are normally associated. Herein, potential host colonization events by hypoderatid deutonymphs are regarded as more of an ecologically determined than physiologically specific phenomenon, often specifically related to sharing of nesting sites in the same rookeries by different host taxa. Neottialges ibisicola Young & Pence is placed as a junior synonym of Neottialges plegadicola Fain. The taxonomic status of Hypodectes propus from columbid versus ardeid hosts needs further study.

  12. Comparative investigations of manual action representations: evidence that chimpanzees represent the costs of potential future actions involving tools

    PubMed Central

    Frey, Scott H.; Povinelli, Daniel J.

    2012-01-01

    The ability to adjust one's ongoing actions in the anticipation of forthcoming task demands is considered as strong evidence for the existence of internal action representations. Studies of action selection in tool use reveal that the behaviours that we choose in the present moment differ depending on what we intend to do next. Further, they point to a specialized role for mechanisms within the human cerebellum and dominant left cerebral hemisphere in representing the likely sensory costs of intended future actions. Recently, the question of whether similar mechanisms exist in other primates has received growing, but still limited, attention. Here, we present data that bear on this issue from a species that is a natural user of tools, our nearest living relative, the chimpanzee. In experiment 1, a subset of chimpanzees showed a non-significant tendency for their grip preferences to be affected by anticipation of the demands associated with bringing a tool's baited end to their mouths. In experiment 2, chimpanzees' initial grip preferences were consistently affected by anticipation of the forthcoming movements in a task that involves using a tool to extract a food reward. The partial discrepancy between the results of these two studies is attributed to the ability to accurately represent differences between the motor costs associated with executing the two response alternatives available within each task. These findings suggest that chimpanzees are capable of accurately representing the costs of intended future actions, and using those predictions to select movements in the present even in the context of externally directed tool use. PMID:22106426

  13. Population of Computational Rabbit-Specific Ventricular Action Potential Models for Investigating Sources of Variability in Cellular Repolarisation

    PubMed Central

    Gemmell, Philip; Burrage, Kevin; Rodriguez, Blanca; Quinn, T. Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Variability is observed at all levels of cardiac electrophysiology. Yet, the underlying causes and importance of this variability are generally unknown, and difficult to investigate with current experimental techniques. The aim of the present study was to generate populations of computational ventricular action potential models that reproduce experimentally observed intercellular variability of repolarisation (represented by action potential duration) and to identify its potential causes. A systematic exploration of the effects of simultaneously varying the magnitude of six transmembrane current conductances (transient outward, rapid and slow delayed rectifier K+, inward rectifying K+, L-type Ca2+, and Na+/K+ pump currents) in two rabbit-specific ventricular action potential models (Shannon et al. and Mahajan et al.) at multiple cycle lengths (400, 600, 1,000 ms) was performed. This was accomplished with distributed computing software specialised for multi-dimensional parameter sweeps and grid execution. An initial population of 15,625 parameter sets was generated for both models at each cycle length. Action potential durations of these populations were compared to experimentally derived ranges for rabbit ventricular myocytes. 1,352 parameter sets for the Shannon model and 779 parameter sets for the Mahajan model yielded action potential duration within the experimental range, demonstrating that a wide array of ionic conductance values can be used to simulate a physiological rabbit ventricular action potential. Furthermore, by using clutter-based dimension reordering, a technique that allows visualisation of multi-dimensional spaces in two dimensions, the interaction of current conductances and their relative importance to the ventricular action potential at different cycle lengths were revealed. Overall, this work represents an important step towards a better understanding of the role that variability in current conductances may play in experimentally observed

  14. INTegrating Ice core, MArine, and TErrestrial records (COST Action ES0907)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoek, Wim; Rasmussen, Sune; Renssen, Hans; Hajdas, Irka; Brauer, Achim; Blockley, Simon; Svensson, Anders; Moreno, Ana; Roche, Didier; Valdes, Paul; Birks, Hilary; Solveig Seidenkrantz, Marit; Evelpidou, Niki

    2013-04-01

    The objective of INTIMATE is to reconstruct past abrupt and extreme climate changes over the period 60,000 to 8000 years ago, by facilitating INTegration of Ice core, MArine, and TErrestrial palaeoclimate records and using the combined data in climate models to better understand the mechanisms and impact of change, thereby reducing the uncertainty of future prediction. The project is organized in four working groups: WG-1 Dating and Chronological Modelling A reliable chronological framework is the basis of all studies of the past climate. WG1 is dedicated to developing and improving dating methods over the last 60,000 years and bringing scientists together to develop a coherent dating framework in which records can be compared at unprecedented detail. WG-2 Quantification of Past Climate The aim of WG-2 is to collect and quantify information of past climate from e.g. ice cores, tree rings, corals, stalagmites, and marine and lake sediments in order to draw a detailed picture of the highly variable climate evolution in the North Atlantic region. WG-3 Modelling Mechanisms of Past Change Our ability to forecast the rates and magnitudes of future change depends on numerical models. By using combined ice core, terrestrial, and marine data sets as targets, WG-3 will optimize methodologies to evaluate model simulations and make data-model comparisons. WG-4 Climate Impacts The aim of WG-4 is to gain insights into the impacts of past climatic changes on animal and human populations and the ecosystems of which they are part. WG-4 will quantify the magnitudes and rates of population, species, and ecosystem responses to climate events of different magnitudes in space and through time. The INTIMATE network and the workshops and meetings are open to all interested scientists. INTIMATE also supports research exchange visits. More information can be found at http://cost-es0907.geoenvi.org/

  15. The Belem Framework for Action: Harnessing the Power and Potential of Adult Learning and Education for a Viable Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adult Learning, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the Belem Framework for Action. This framework focuses on harnessing the power and potential of adult learning and education for a viable future. This framework begins with a preamble on adult education and towards lifelong learning.

  16. External potassium and action potential propagation in rat fast and slow twitch muscles.

    PubMed

    Kössler, F; Lange, F; Caffier, G; Küchler, G

    1991-10-01

    The role of extracellular K+ concentration in the propagation velocity of action potential was tested in isolated rat skeletal muscles. Different K+ concentrations were produced by KCl additions to extracellular solution. Action potentials were measured extracellularly by means of two annular platinum electrodes. Fibre bundles of m. soleus (SOL), m. extensor digitorum longus (EDL), red (SMR) and white (SMW) part of m. sternomastoideus were maximum stimulated. The conduction velocity (c.v.) was calculated from the distance between the electrodes and the time delay of the potentials measured at 22 degrees C. In Tyrode solution containing 5 mmol/l K+, the c.v. was close to 1 m.s-1. Bundles of the fast muscle type seemed to have a somewhat higher c.v. The differences observed in these studies were not significant. At higher temperatures, the c.v. increased (Q10 of approx. 2) and a dissociation between SMR and SMW muscles appeared. An elevation of K+ concentration to 10 mmol/l induced a drop of the c.v. by approx. 25% and 15% in EDL and SOL muscles, respectively. After return to normal solution, the recovery was not complete within 30 min. In K+ free solution the c.v. of EDL and SM muscles rose by a factor of 1.5, but less in SOL muscles. The weaker response of SOL to K+ modification was related to the higher resistance of this muscle to fatigue. This suggestion was supported by experiments on fatigued fibre bundles. Immediately after a tetanic stimulation producing fatigue, the c.v. of EDL and SOL muscles dropped similarly as in 10 mmol/l K+; again, the drop was less for SOL muscles. Adrenaline (0.5-10.0 mumol/l) enhanced both the c.v. and the twitch amplitude. The results support the suggestion that extracellular K+ accumulation during activity is an essential factor of muscle fatigue. PMID:1816028

  17. A multi-slice recording system for stable late phase hippocampal long-term potentiation experiments.

    PubMed

    Kroker, Katja Sabine; Rosenbrock, Holger; Rast, Georg

    2011-01-15

    A major challenge in neuroscience is identifying the cellular and molecular processes underlying learning and memory formation. In the past decades, significant progress has been made in understanding cellular and synaptic mechanisms underlying hippocampal learning and memory using long-term potentiation (LTP) experiments in brain slices as a model system. To expedite LTP measurements it is helpful to further optimize such recording systems. Here, we describe a modification of a multi-slice recording system (SliceMaster, Scientifica Limited, East Sussex, UK) that allows absolutely stable measurements of field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs) for up to 8 h in up to eight slices simultaneously. The software Notocord(®) was used for on-line data acquisition and to control the digital pattern generator which can generate different patterns for slice stimulation, inducing different types of LTP. Moreover, in contrast to common gravity-driven perfusion systems, a Pumped Perfusion System was employed to recycle drug solutions applied to the hippocampal slice. In addition, slices were positioned on two stacked grids for optimal recording of fEPSPs. These two stacked grids were placed in the measuring chambers allowing recordings for several hours without any perturbances. In summary, this modified slice-recording system improves throughput and allows for better statistical design, increases number of used slices per animal and enables very robust LTP measurements for up to 7 h. Hence, this system is suitable not only to investigate molecular mechanisms underlying the late phase of LTP, but also to screen candidate compounds in the context of drug discovery. PMID:21087635

  18. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 5): Forest Waste Disposal, MI. (Second remedial action), March 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-03-31

    The Forest Waste Disposal site consists of an 11-acre, abandoned municipal and industrial waste landfill and 9 surface impoundments. It is located in Genesee County, Michigan, 20 miles northeast of Flint, and is surrounded by agricultural land and undeveloped woodlands and wetlands. Forest Waste Disposal conducted landfill operations from 1972-1978, receiving limited types of liquid industrial waste, general household refuse, and drummed waste until 1978. Specific waste material found within the landfill includes PBB-contaminated feed, septic sludge, and drums containing primarily solid and liquid VOCs in high concentrations. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the soil and ground water are VOCs including toluene and TCE; other organics including pesticides, PAHs and PBBs; and metals including arsenic and lead. The selected remedial action for the site includes: removal and incineration of contaminated soil; installation of a containment system including a RCRA cap, slurry wall, dewatering system and a leachate collection system; and treatment and disposal of collected leachate; deed restrictions to prevent use of the ground water as a drinking water source; access restrictions; and ground water monitoring.

  19. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 3): Croyden TCE Spill, PA. (First Remedial Action), December 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-12-28

    The Croyden TCE Spill site is located in Bristol Township, Buck County, Pennsylvania. VOC contamination in the ground water was detected over a 3.5-square mile area, predominantly residential, with an estimated 3,000 residents. The study area is bordered on the south by the Delaware River. Neshaminy Creek, which borders the study area to the west, and Hog Run Creek which flows through the focused area of investigation, both discharge to the river. Although the source of contamination has not been identified, the contaminant plume appears to be flowing south-southeast into the East Branch of Hog Run Creek and probably into the Delaware River. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the ground water are TCE and PCE. The selected remedial action for the site includes connecting approximately 13 residences to the public water supply system via the construction of new water services lines, mains, hydrants, and valves; and ground water monitoring to ensure that homes located outside of the TCE-contaminated zone will not be at risk from the migrating plume.

  20. Self-augmentation of the lengthening of repolarization is related to the shape of the cardiac action potential: implications for reverse rate dependency

    PubMed Central

    Virág, László; Acsai, Károly; Hála, Ottó; Zaza, Antonio; Bitay, Miklós; Bogáts, Gábor; Papp, Julius Gy; Varró, András

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: The aims of the present work were to study the mechanism of the reverse rate dependency of different interventions prolonging cardiac action potential duration (APD). Experimental approach: The reverse rate-dependent lengthening effect of APD-prolonging interventions and the possible involvement of IKr (rapid component of the delayed rectifier potassium current) and IK1 (inward rectifier potassium current) were studied by using the standard microelectrode and the whole-cell patch-clamp techniques in dog multicellular ventricular preparations and in myocytes isolated from undiseased human and dog hearts. Key results: All applied drugs – dofetilide (1 µmol·L−1), BaCl2 (10 µmol·L−1), BAY-K-8644 (1 µmol·L−1), veratrine (1 µg·mL−1) – lengthened APD in a reverse rate-dependent manner regardless of their mode of action, suggesting that reverse rate dependency may not represent a specific mechanism of APD prolongation. The E-4031-sensitive current (IKr) and the Ba2+-sensitive current (IK1) were recorded during repolarizing voltage ramps having various steepness and also during action potential waveforms with progressively prolonged APD. Gradually delaying repolarization results in smaller magnitude of IKr and IK1 currents at an isochronal phase of the pulses. This represents a positive feedback mechanism, which appears to contribute to the reverse rate-dependent prolongation of action potentials. Conclusions and implications: Action potential configuration may influence the reverse rate-dependent APD prolongation due to the intrinsic properties of IKr and IK1 currents. Drugs lengthening repolarization by decreasing repolarizing outward, or increasing depolarizing inward, currents are expected to cause reverse rate-dependent APD lengthening with high probability, regardless of which current they modify. PMID:19226285

  1. Action potentials in parasympathetic and sympathetic efferent fibres to the trachea and lungs of dogs and cats

    PubMed Central

    Widdicombe, J. G.

    1966-01-01

    1. Action potentials were recorded from seventy-four single and twenty-nine small multifibre nerve strands efferent to the trachea and lungs of cats and dogs. From the pathway (vagal or sympathetic), spontaneous activity, conduction velocity and responses to various interventions the efferent fibres were classified in the following way. 2. Group I, vagal. These had a mean conduction velocity of 9·7 m/sec, and had a respiratory but seldom a cardiac rhythm. Their discharge was inhibited during hypertension caused by injections of adrenaline and during inflation of the lungs, but was increased during tracheal occlusion, stimulation of peripheral chemoreceptors and irritation of the larynx. The fibres are thought to be constrictor to the airways. 3. Group II, sympathetic. These had a mean conduction velocity of 0·85 m/sec and usually had inspiratory and cardiac rhythms. Their discharge usually responded qualitatively as that of group I fibres to the various interventions, but with clear quantitative differences. They are divided into three subgroups on the basis of their responses to injections of adrenaline and to asphyxial stimuli. 4. Group III, vagal and sympathetic. These had a mean conduction velocity of 9·0 m/sec, very slow discharge rates and often an expiratory and cardiac modulation. They were activated during hypertension due to adrenaline and often by tracheal occlusion, chemoreceptor stimulation, laryngeal irritation and lung inflation. Their motor action is unknown. 5. Group IV, vagal and sympathetic. These had conspicuous cardiac rhythms resembling those of vascular baroreceptors, but their discharge could not be correlated with arterial blood pressure. Their mean conduction velocity was 6·6 m/sec. Some were active after combined vagotomy and sympathectomy. Together with some unclassified fibres, those of group IV are thought to be aberrant afferent nerves or collateral afferent branches, and possibly to subserve local reflexes. 6. The results are

  2. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 6): Vertac, Inc. , Jacksonville, AR. (First remedial action), September 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-27

    The Vertac site, a former herbicide and pesticide manufacturing facility in Jacksonville, Arkansas, is comprised of an onsite and offsite area. Production of herbicides and pesticides, including Agent Orange, began in 1948 and resulted in extensive onsite contamination. The offsite contamination, which is the focus of the Record of Decision (ROD), resulted from improper discharge of wastewater generated during onsite operations. Prior to 1960, untreated wastewater was discharged directly into Rocky Branch Creek, which flows into Bayou Metro a few miles south of the site. Beginning in the 1960s, wastewater was discharged to the city's Old Sewage Treatment Plant, which had been upgraded with a pretreatment facility that included an aerated lagoon and oxidation ponds (West Wastewater Treatment Plant). A solvent treatment process was later added to remove dioxin from the product. The process, however, created contaminated liquid and solid waste residues that were drummed and buried or stored onsite until 1987, when pesticide production ceased. The primary contaminant of concern affecting the soil, sediment, and sludge is 2,3,7,8-tetra-chlordibenzo-p-dioxin.

  3. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 1): Stamina Mills site, North Smithfield, RI. (First remedial action), September 1990. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-28

    The five-acre Stamina Mills site is a former textile weaving and finishing facility in North Smithfield, Providence County, Rhode Island. A portion of the site is within the 100-year floodplain and wetland area of the Branch River. The manufacturing process used cleaning solvents, acids, bases and dyes for coloring, pesticides for moth proofing, and plasticizers to coat fabrics. Mill process wastes were placed in a landfill onsite. EPA initiated three removal actions from 1984 to 1990, including an extension of the municipal water supply to residents obtaining water from the affected aquifer; and treatment of two underground and one above-ground storage tanks, followed by offsite disposal. The Record of Decision (ROD) provides a final remedy and addresses both source control and management of contaminated ground water migration at the site. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the soil, debris, sediment, and ground water are VOCs including TCE and PCE; other organics including pesticides; and metals including chromium.

  4. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA region 4): National Starch and Chemical Corporation site, Salisbury, NC. (Second remedial action), September 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-28

    The 465-acre National Starch and Chemical site is a manufacturing facility for textile finishing and custom speciality chemicals in Rowan County, North Carolina. A portion of the site is heavily wooded, and surrounding land use is mixed industrial and residential. From 1971 to 1978, approximately 350,000 gallons of reaction vessel washwater containing salt brines, sulfuric acid solutions, and solvents were disposed of onsite in unlined trenches. A 1988 Record of Decision (ROD) addressed Operable Unit 1 (OU1), which called for onsite ground water pumping and treatment, and further investigation of soil contamination in the trench area, continued surface water and sediment monitoring and a supplemental remedial investigation (RI). The ROD addresses OU2, and identifies no further action as the remedy for the trench area soil based on the supplemental RI. A subsequent ROD will address OU3.

  5. Modelling and Analysis of Electrical Potentials Recorded in Microelectrode Arrays (MEAs).

    PubMed

    Ness, Torbjørn V; Chintaluri, Chaitanya; Potworowski, Jan; Łęski, Szymon; Głąbska, Helena; Wójcik, Daniel K; Einevoll, Gaute T

    2015-10-01

    Microelectrode arrays (MEAs), substrate-integrated planar arrays of up to thousands of closely spaced metal electrode contacts, have long been used to record neuronal activity in in vitro brain slices with high spatial and temporal resolution. However, the analysis of the MEA potentials has generally been mainly qualitative. Here we use a biophysical forward-modelling formalism based on the finite element method (FEM) to establish quantitatively accurate links between neural activity in the slice and potentials recorded in the MEA set-up. Then we develop a simpler approach based on the method of images (MoI) from electrostatics, which allows for computation of MEA potentials by simple formulas similar to what is used for homogeneous volume conductors. As we find MoI to give accurate results in most situations of practical interest, including anisotropic slices covered with highly conductive saline and MEA-electrode contacts of sizable physical extensions, a Python software package (ViMEAPy) has been developed to facilitate forward-modelling of MEA potentials generated by biophysically detailed multicompartmental neurons. We apply our scheme to investigate the influence of the MEA set-up on single-neuron spikes as well as on potentials generated by a cortical network comprising more than 3000 model neurons. The generated MEA potentials are substantially affected by both the saline bath covering the brain slice and a (putative) inadvertent saline layer at the interface between the MEA chip and the brain slice. We further explore methods for estimation of current-source density (CSD) from MEA potentials, and find the results to be much less sensitive to the experimental set-up. PMID:25822810

  6. Potential Mechanisms of Action in the Treatment of Social Impairment and Disorganization in Adolescents with ADHD

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Steven W.; Schultz, Brandon K.; Zoromski, Allison K.

    2014-01-01

    Two important domains that can be impaired in adolescents with ADHD are organization and social functioning; however, the development of interventions to target these areas in adolescents is in the early stages. Currently, small efficacy trials are beginning to be used to conduct preliminary tests on the proposed mechanisms of action for these interventions. These two studies examined the efficacy of organization and social functioning interventions for adolescents with ADHD, as well as the potential mechanisms of action for each intervention. Results from the organization intervention provide support for a significant relationship between performance on the organization checklist and overall GPA; however, there was no meaningful pattern of relationships between achieving mastery of the organization tasks and grades within quarter. Further, results from the social functioning intervention support a moderate relationship between performance on process measures of response to the intervention and outcome measures of social functioning. Results of this study provide implications for modifications to the measures and intervention procedures in future research. PMID:24748901

  7. A potential mode of action for Anakinra in patients with arthrofibrosis following total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, David; Coates, Jonathon; del Carpio Pons, Alicia; Horabin, Joanna; Walker, Andrew; Abdul, Nicole; Kalson, Nicholas S.; Brewster, Nigel T.; Weir, David J.; Deehan, David J.; Mann, Derek A.; Borthwick, Lee A.

    2015-01-01

    Arthrofibrosis is a fibroproliferative disease characterised by excessive deposition of extracellular matrix components intra-articularly leading to pain and restricted range of movement. Although frequently observed following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) no therapeutic options exist. A pilot study demonstrated that intra-articular injection of Anakinra, an IL-1R antagonist, improved range of movement and pain in patients with arthrofibrosis however the mechanism of action is unknown. We hypothesise that IL-1α/β will drive an inflammatory phenotype in fibroblasts isolated from the knee, therefore identifying a potential mechanism of action for Anakinra in arthrofibrosis following TKA. Fibroblasts isolated from synovial membranes and infra-patellar fat pad of patients undergoing TKA express high levels of IL-1R1. Stimulation with IL-1α/β induced a pro-inflammatory phenotype characterised by increased secretion of GMCSF, IL-6 and IL-8. No significant difference in the inflammatory response was observed between fibroblasts isolated from synovial membrane or infra-patellar fat pad. IL-1α/β treatments induced a pro-inflammatory phenotype in fibroblasts from both synovial membrane and infra-patellar fat pad and therefore Anakinra can likely have an inhibitory effect on fibroblasts present in both tissues in vivo. It is also likely that fibroblast responses in the tissues are controlled by IL-1α/β availability and not their ability to respond to it. PMID:26553966

  8. An apparatus for recording synaptic potentials from neuronal cultures using voltage-sensitive fluorescent dyes.

    PubMed

    Chien, C B; Pine, J

    1991-07-01

    Voltage-sensitive dyes offer the promise of noninvasive multicell recording of electrical activity, and should therefore be useful for studying the synaptic interactions of small networks of cultured neurons. We have designed and built a system for recording from microcultures of 1-15 neurons from the rat superior cervical ganglion (SCG), using voltage-sensitive fluorescent dyes of the styryl class. The apparatus comprises a standard inverted epifluorescence microscope; a mercury arc lamp with an optical feedback regulator; a 256-pixel fiber-optic camera with individual photodiode detectors and very low-noise amplifiers; and a personal computer-based data acquisition system. Its dark noise and illumination fluctuations are low enough that at typical fluorescence levels for these cells, it is limited by shot noise (the inherent physical limit of detection). Recording from SCG neurons, the signal-to-noise ratio is high enough to see large subthreshold synaptic potentials without signal averaging. This apparatus should be useful for studying long-term synaptic plasticity in cultures of vertebrate neurons, and several of its features should apply to optical recording from other preparations. PMID:1784131

  9. Record of Technical Change {number_sign}1 for ''Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 406: Area 3 Building 03-74 and Building 03-58 Underground Discharge Points and Corrective Action Unit 429: Area 3 Building 03-55 and Area 9 Building 09-52 Underground Discharge Points, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada'' Revision 0

    SciTech Connect

    US DOE Nevada Operations Office

    1999-06-30

    This Record of Technical Change provides updates to the technical information included in ''Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 406: Area 3 Building 03-74 and Building 03-58 Underground Discharge Points and Corrective Action Unit 429: Area 3 Building 03-55 and Area 9 Building 09-52 Underground Discharge Points, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada'' Revision 0

  10. Dynamics of action potential firing in electrically connected striatal fast-spiking interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Giovanni; Nieus, Thierry R.; Maggi, Silvia; Taverna, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    Fast-spiking interneurons (FSIs) play a central role in organizing the output of striatal neural circuits, yet functional interactions between these cells are still largely unknown. Here we investigated the interplay of action potential (AP) firing between electrically connected pairs of identified FSIs in mouse striatal slices. In addition to a loose coordination of firing activity mediated by membrane potential coupling, gap junctions (GJ) induced a frequency-dependent inhibition of spike discharge in coupled cells. At relatively low firing rates (2–20 Hz), some APs were tightly synchronized whereas others were inhibited. However, burst firing at intermediate frequencies (25–60 Hz) mostly induced spike inhibition, while at frequencies >50–60 Hz FSI pairs tended to synchronize. Spike silencing occurred even in the absence of GABAergic synapses or persisted after a complete block of GABAA receptors. Pharmacological suppression of presynaptic spike afterhyperpolarization (AHP) caused postsynaptic spikelets to become more prone to trigger spikes at near-threshold potentials, leading to a mostly synchronous firing activity. The complex pattern of functional coordination mediated by GJ endows FSIs with peculiar dynamic properties that may be critical in controlling striatal-dependent behavior. PMID:24294191

  11. Cancer Driver Log (CanDL): Catalog of Potentially Actionable Cancer Mutations.

    PubMed

    Damodaran, Senthilkumar; Miya, Jharna; Kautto, Esko; Zhu, Eliot; Samorodnitsky, Eric; Datta, Jharna; Reeser, Julie W; Roychowdhury, Sameek

    2015-09-01

    Massively parallel sequencing technologies have enabled characterization of genomic alterations across multiple tumor types. Efforts have focused on identifying driver mutations because they represent potential targets for therapy. However, because of the presence of driver and passenger mutations, it is often challenging to assign the clinical relevance of specific mutations observed in patients. Currently, there are multiple databases and tools that provide in silico assessment for potential drivers; however, there is no comprehensive resource for mutations with functional characterization. Therefore, we created an expert-curated database of potentially actionable driver mutations for molecular pathologists to facilitate annotation of cancer genomic testing. We reviewed scientific literature to identify variants that have been functionally characterized in vitro or in vivo as driver mutations. We obtained the chromosome location and all possible nucleotide positions for each amino acid change and uploaded them to the Cancer Driver Log (CanDL) database with associated literature reference indicating functional driver evidence. In addition to a simple interface, the database allows users to download all or selected genes as a comma-separated values file for incorporation into their own analysis pipeline. Furthermore, the database includes a mechanism for third-party contributions to support updates for novel driver mutations. Overall, this freely available database will facilitate rapid annotation of cancer genomic testing in molecular pathology laboratories for mutations. PMID:26320871

  12. Mechanism of Action and Clinical Potential of Fingolimod for the Treatment of Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wentao; Xu, Haoliang; Testai, Fernando D.

    2016-01-01

    Fingolimod (FTY720) is an orally bio-available immunomodulatory drug currently approved by the FDA for the treatment of multiple sclerosis. Currently, there is a significant interest in the potential benefits of FTY720 on stroke outcomes. FTY720 and the sphingolipid signaling pathway it modulates has a ubiquitous presence in the central nervous system and both rodent models and pilot clinical trials seem to indicate that the drug may improve overall functional recovery in different stroke subtypes. Although the precise mechanisms behind these beneficial effects are yet unclear, there is evidence that FTY720 has a role in regulating cerebrovascular responses, blood–brain barrier permeability, and cell survival in the event of cerebrovascular insult. In this article, we critically review the data obtained from the latest laboratory findings and clinical trials involving both ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, and attempt to form a cohesive picture of FTY720’s mechanisms of action in stroke. PMID:27617002

  13. Effects of lead acetate on guinea pig - cochear microphonics, action potential, and motor nerve conduction velocity

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamura, K.; Maehara, N.; Terayama, K.; Ueno, N.; Kohyama, A.; Sawada, Y.; Kishi, R.

    1987-04-01

    Segmental demyelination and axonal degeneration of motor nerves induced by lead exposure is well known in man, and animals. The effect of lead acetate exposure to man may involve the cranial nerves, since vertigo and sensory neuronal deafness have been reported among lead workers. However, there are few reports concerning the dose-effects of lead acetate both to the peripheral nerve and the cranial VII nerve with measurement of blood lead concentration. The authors investigated the effects of lead acetate to the cochlea and the VIII nerve using CM (cochlear microphonics) and AP (action potential) of the guinea pigs. The effects of lead acetate to the sciatic nerve were measured by MCV of the sciatic nerve with measurement of blood lead concentration.

  14. Mechanism of Action and Clinical Potential of Fingolimod for the Treatment of Stroke.

    PubMed

    Li, Wentao; Xu, Haoliang; Testai, Fernando D

    2016-01-01

    Fingolimod (FTY720) is an orally bio-available immunomodulatory drug currently approved by the FDA for the treatment of multiple sclerosis. Currently, there is a significant interest in the potential benefits of FTY720 on stroke outcomes. FTY720 and the sphingolipid signaling pathway it modulates has a ubiquitous presence in the central nervous system and both rodent models and pilot clinical trials seem to indicate that the drug may improve overall functional recovery in different stroke subtypes. Although the precise mechanisms behind these beneficial effects are yet unclear, there is evidence that FTY720 has a role in regulating cerebrovascular responses, blood-brain barrier permeability, and cell survival in the event of cerebrovascular insult. In this article, we critically review the data obtained from the latest laboratory findings and clinical trials involving both ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, and attempt to form a cohesive picture of FTY720's mechanisms of action in stroke. PMID:27617002

  15. Anthropomorphizing the Mouse Cardiac Action Potential via a Novel Dynamic Clamp Method

    PubMed Central

    Ahrens-Nicklas, Rebecca C.; Christini, David J.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Interspecies differences can limit the translational value of excitable cells isolated from model organisms. It can be difficult to extrapolate from a drug- or mutation-induced phenotype in mice to human pathophysiology because mouse and human cardiac electrodynamics differ greatly. We present a hybrid computational-experimental technique, the cell-type transforming clamp, which is designed to overcome such differences by using a calculated compensatory current to convert the macroscopic electrical behavior of an isolated cell into that of a different cell type. We demonstrate the technique's utility by evaluating drug arrhythmogenicity in murine cardiomyocytes that are transformed to behave like human myocytes. Whereas we use the cell-type transforming clamp in this work to convert between mouse and human electrodynamics, the technique could be adapted to convert between the action potential morphologies of any two cell types of interest. PMID:19917221

  16. Experimental and theoretical description of higher order periods in cardiac tissue action potential duration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herndon, Conner; Fenton, Flavio; Uzelac, Ilija

    Much theoretical, experimental, and clinical research has been devoted to investigating the initiation of cardiac arrhythmias by alternans, the first period doubling bifurcation in the duration of cardiac action potentials. Although period doubling above alternans has been shown to exist in many mammalian hearts, little is understood about their emergence or behavior. There currently exists no physiologically correct theory or model that adequately describes and predicts their emergence in stimulated tissue. In this talk we present experimental data of period 2, 4, and 8 dynamics and a mathematical model that describes these bifurcations. This model extends current cell models through the addition of memory and includes spatiotemporal nonlinearities arising from cellular coupling by tissue heterogeneity.

  17. Trichloroethanol alters action potentials in a subgroup of primary sensory neurones.

    PubMed

    Gruss, Marco; Hempelmann, Gunter; Scholz, Andreas

    2002-05-01

    We investigated the effects of 2,2,2-trichloroethanol (TCE), the active metabolite of chloral hydrate, on large-conductance calcium-activated K+ channels (BKCa channels) of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurones. In outside-out patches, 2 and 5 mM TCE increased the open probability of BKCa channels to 1.7-fold and 2.8-fold of control, respectively. In 50% of the cells investigated (group A) the action potential (AP) was shortened reversibly by TCE by 20% and the whole-cell outward-current was increased by 44%. Both effects could be antagonized by iberiotoxin. In a second group of neurone (group B), TCE prolonged the AP duration. The effects of TCE in group A, which was 20-fold more potent than ethanol on BKCa channels and AP might contribute to the described analgesic effect of chloral hydrate. PMID:11997700

  18. Effect of Cardiac Tissue Anisotropy on Three-Dimensional Electrical Action Potential Propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zhi Zhu; Liu, Jing

    A three-dimensional (3D) electrical action potential propagation model is developed to characterize the integrated effect of cardiac tissue structure using a homogenous function with a spatial inhomogeneity. This method may be more effective for bridging the gap between computational models and experimental data for cardiac tissue anisotropy. A generalized 3D eikonal relation considering anisotropy and a self-similar evolution solution of such a relation are derived to identify the effect of anisotropy and predict the anisotropy-induced electrical wave propagation instabilities. Furthermore, the phase field equation is introduced to obtain the complex three-dimensional numerical solution of the new correlation. The present results are expected to be valuable for better understanding the physiological behavior of cardiac tissues.

  19. Single unit action potentials in humans and the effect of seizure activity

    PubMed Central

    Merricks, Edward M.; Smith, Elliot H.; McKhann, Guy M.; Goodman, Robert R.; Bateman, Lisa M.; Emerson, Ronald G.

    2015-01-01

    Spike-sorting algorithms have been used to identify the firing patterns of isolated neurons (‘single units’) from implanted electrode recordings in patients undergoing assessment for epilepsy surgery, but we do not know their potential for providing helpful clinical information. It is important therefore to characterize both the stability of these recordings and also their context. A critical consideration is where the units are located with respect to the focus of the pathology. Recent analyses of neuronal spiking activity, recorded over extended spatial areas using microelectrode arrays, have demonstrated the importance of considering seizure activity in terms of two distinct spatial territories: the ictal core and penumbral territories. The pathological information in these two areas, however, is likely to be very different. We investigated, therefore, whether units could be followed reliably over prolonged periods of times in these two areas, including during seizure epochs. We isolated unit recordings from several hundred neurons from four patients undergoing video-telemetry monitoring for surgical evaluation of focal neocortical epilepsies. Unit stability could last in excess of 40 h, and across multiple seizures. A key finding was that in the penumbra, spike stereotypy was maintained even during the seizure. There was a net tendency towards increased penumbral firing during the seizure, although only a minority of units (10–20%) showed significant changes over the baseline period, and notably, these also included neurons showing significant reductions in firing. In contrast, within the ictal core territories, regions characterized by intense hypersynchronous multi-unit firing, our spike sorting algorithms failed as the units were incorporated into the seizure activity. No spike sorting was possible from that moment until the end of the seizure, but recovery of the spike shape was rapid following seizure termination: some units reappeared within tens of

  20. Effects of 4-aminopyridine on action potentials generation in mouse sinoauricular node strips

    PubMed Central

    Golovko, Vladimir; Gonotkov, Mikhail; Lebedeva, Elena

    2015-01-01

    The physiological role of Ito has yet to be clarified. The goal of this study is to investigate the possible contribution of the transient outward current (Ito) on the generation of transmembrane action potentials (APs) and the sensitivity of mouse sinoauricular node (SAN) cells to a 4-aminopyridine (4AP) as Ito blocker. The electrophysiological identification of cells was performed in the sinoauricular node artery area (nstrips = 38) of the subendocardial surface using microelectrode technique. In this study, for the first time, it was observed that dependence duration of action potential at the level of 20% repolarization (APD20) level under a 4AP concentration in the pacemaker SAN and auricular cells corresponds to a curve predicted by Hill’s equation. APD20 raised by 70% and spike duration of AP increased by 15–25%, when 4AP concentration was increased from 0.1 to 5.0 mmol/L. Auricular cells were found to be more sensitive to 4AP than true pacemaker cells. This was accompanied by a decrease in the upstroke velocity as compared to the control. Our data and previous findings in the literature lead us to hypothesize that the 4AP-sensitive current participates in the repolarization formation of pacemaker and auricular type cells. Thus, study concerning the inhibitory effects of lidocaine and TTX on APD20 can explain the phenomenon of the decrease in upstroke velocity, which, for the first time, was observed after exposure to 4AP. Duration of AP at the level of 20% repolarization (APD20) under a 4-AP concentration 0.5 mmol/L in the true pacemaker cells lengthen by 60–70% with a control. PMID:26156968

  1. Effects of 4-aminopyridine on action potentials generation in mouse sinoauricular node strips.

    PubMed

    Golovko, Vladimir; Gonotkov, Mikhail; Lebedeva, Elena

    2015-07-01

    The physiological role of Ito has yet to be clarified. The goal of this study is to investigate the possible contribution of the transient outward current (Ito) on the generation of transmembrane action potentials (APs) and the sensitivity of mouse sinoauricular node (SAN) cells to a 4-aminopyridine (4AP) as Ito blocker. The electrophysiological identification of cells was performed in the sinoauricular node artery area (nstrips = 38) of the subendocardial surface using microelectrode technique. In this study, for the first time, it was observed that dependence duration of action potential at the level of 20% repolarization (APD20) level under a 4AP concentration in the pacemaker SAN and auricular cells corresponds to a curve predicted by Hill's equation. APD20 raised by 70% and spike duration of AP increased by 15-25%, when 4AP concentration was increased from 0.1 to 5.0 mmol/L. Auricular cells were found to be more sensitive to 4AP than true pacemaker cells. This was accompanied by a decrease in the upstroke velocity as compared to the control. Our data and previous findings in the literature lead us to hypothesize that the 4AP-sensitive current participates in the repolarization formation of pacemaker and auricular type cells. Thus, study concerning the inhibitory effects of lidocaine and TTX on APD20 can explain the phenomenon of the decrease in upstroke velocity, which, for the first time, was observed after exposure to 4AP. Duration of AP at the level of 20% repolarization (APD20) under a 4-AP concentration 0.5 mmol/L in the true pacemaker cells lengthen by 60-70% with a control. PMID:26156968

  2. Mannan Oligosaccharides in Nursery Pig Nutrition and Their Potential Mode of Action

    PubMed Central

    Halas, Veronika; Nochta, Imre

    2012-01-01

    Simple Summary The aim of the paper is to provide a review of mannan oligosaccharide products in relation to their growth promoting effect and mode of action. Mannan oligosaccharide products maintain intestinal integrity and the digestive and absorptive function of the gut in the post-weaning period in pigs and enhance disease resistance by promoting antigen presentation. We find that dietary supplementation has growth promoting effects in pigs kept in a poor hygienic environment, while the positive effect of MOS is not observed in healthy pig herds with high hygienic standards. Abstract Mannan oligosaccharides (MOSs) are often referred to as one of the potential alternatives for antimicrobial growth promoters. The aim of the paper is to provide a review of mannan oligosaccharide products in relation to their growth promoting effect and mode of action based on the latest publications. We discuss the dietary impact of MOSs on (1) microbial changes, (2) morphological changes of gut tissue and digestibility of nutrients, and (3) immune response of pigs after weaning. Dietary MOSs maintain the intestinal integrity and the digestive and absorptive function of the gut in the post-weaning period. Recent results suggest that MOS enhances the disease resistance in swine by promoting antigen presentation facilitating thereby the shift from an innate to an adaptive immune response. Accordingly, dietary MOS supplementation has a potential growth promoting effect in pigs kept in a poor hygienic environment, while the positive effect of MOS is not observed in healthy pig herds with high hygienic standards that are able to maintain a high growth rate after weaning. PMID:26486920

  3. Glutamine and glutamate limit the shortening of action potential duration in anoxia-challenged rabbit hearts

    PubMed Central

    Drake, Kenneth J; Shotwell, Matthew S; Wikswo, John P; Sidorov, Veniamin Y

    2015-01-01

    In clinical conditions, amino acid supplementation is applied to improve contractile function, minimize ischemia/reperfusion injury, and facilitate postoperative recovery. It has been shown that glutamine enhances myocardial ATP/APD (action potential duration) and glutathione/oxidized glutathione ratios, and can increase hexosamine biosynthesis pathway flux, which is believed to play a role in cardioprotection. Here, we studied the effect of glutamine and glutamate on electrical activity in Langendorff-perfused rabbit hearts. The hearts were supplied by Tyrode's media with or without 2.5 mmol/L glutamine and 150 μmol/L glutamate, and exposed to two 6-min anoxias with 20-min recovery in between. Change in APD was detected using a monophasic action potential probe. A nonlinear mixed-effects regression technique was used to evaluate the effect of amino acids on APD over the experiment. Typically, the dynamic of APD change encompasses three phases: short transient increase (more prominent in the first episode), slow decrease, and fast increase (starting with the beginning of recovery). The effect of both anoxic challenge and glutamine/glutamate was cumulative, being more pronounced in the second anoxia. The amino acids' protective effect became largest by the end of anoxia – 20.0% (18.9, 95% CI: [2.6 ms, 35.1 ms]), during the first anoxia and 36.6% (27.1, 95% CI: [7.7 ms, 46.6 ms]), during the second. Following the second anoxia, APD difference between control and supplemented hearts progressively increased, attaining 10.8% (13.6, 95% CI: [4.1 ms, 23.1 ms]) at the experiments' end. Our data reveal APD stabilizing and suggest an antiarrhythmic capacity of amino acid supplementation in anoxic/ischemic conditions. PMID:26333831

  4. Branch specific and spike-order specific action potential invasion in basal, oblique, and apical dendrites of cortical pyramidal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Wen-Liang; Short, Shaina M.; Rich, Matthew T.; Oikonomou, Katerina D.; Singh, Mandakini B.; Sterjanaj, Enas V.; Antic, Srdjan D.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. In neocortical pyramidal neurons, action potentials (APs) propagate from the axon into the dendritic tree to influence distal synapses. Traditionally, AP backpropagation was studied in the thick apical trunk. Here, we used the principles of optical imaging developed by Cohen to investigate AP invasion into thin dendritic branches (basal, oblique, and tuft) of prefrontal cortical L5 pyramidal neurons. Multisite optical recordings from neighboring dendrites revealed a clear dichotomy between two seemingly equal dendritic branches belonging to the same cell (“sister branches”). We documented the variable efficacy of AP invasion in basal and oblique branches by revealing their AP voltage waveforms. Using fast multisite calcium imaging, we found that trains of APs are filtered differently between two apical tuft branches. Although one dendritic branch passes all spikes in an AP train, another branch belonging to the same neuron, same cortical layer, and same path distance from the cell body, experiences only one spike. Our data indicate that the vast differences in dendritic voltage and calcium transients, detected in dendrites of pyramidal neurons, arise from a nonuniform distribution of A-type K+ conductance, an aggregate number of branch points in the path of the AP propagation and minute differences in dendritic diameter. PMID:26157997

  5. Electrophysiological evaluation of nerve function in inferior alveolar nerve injury: relationship between nerve action potentials and histomorphometric observations.

    PubMed

    Murayama, M; Sasaki, K; Shibahara, T

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study was to improve the accuracy of diagnosis of inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) injury by determining degrees of nerve disturbance using the sensory nerve action potential (SNAP) and sensory nerve conduction velocity (SCV). Crush and partial and complete nerve amputation injuries were applied to the IAN of rabbits, then SNAPs and histomorphometric observations were recorded at 1, 5, and 10 weeks. For crush injury, most nerves were smaller in diameter at 5 weeks than at 1 week, however after 10 weeks, extensive nerve regeneration was observed. The SNAP showed a decrease in SCV at weeks 1 and 5, followed by an increase at week 10. For partial nerve amputation, small to medium-sized nerve fibres were observed at weeks 1 and 5, then larger nerves were seen at week 10. Minimal changes in SCV were observed at weeks 1 and 5, however SCV increased at week 10. For complete nerve amputation, nerve fibres were sparse at week 1, but gradual nerve regeneration was observed at weeks 5 and 10. SNAPs were detectable from week 10, however the SCV was extremely low. This study showed SCV to be an effective factor in the evaluation of nerve injury and regeneration. PMID:26433750

  6. Linking acknowledgement to action: closing the loop on non-urgent, clinically significant test results in the electronic health record.

    PubMed

    Dalal, Anuj K; Pesterev, Bailey M; Eibensteiner, Katyuska; Newmark, Lisa P; Samal, Lipika; Rothschild, Jeffrey M

    2015-07-01

    Failure to follow-up nonurgent, clinically significant test results (CSTRs) is an ambulatory patient safety concern. Tools within electronic health records (EHRs) may facilitate test result acknowledgment, but their utility with regard to nonurgent CSTRs is unclear. We measured use of an acknowledgment tool by 146 primary care physicians (PCPs) at 13 network-affiliated practices that use the same EHR. We then surveyed PCPs to assess use of, satisfaction with, and desired enhancements to the acknowledgment tool. The rate of acknowledgment of non-urgent CSTRs by PCPs was 78%. Of 73 survey respondents, 72 reported taking one or more actions after reviewing a CSTR; fewer (40-75%) reported that using the acknowledgment tool was helpful for a specific purpose. Forty-six (64%) were satisfied with the tool. Both satisfied and nonsatisfied PCPs reported that enhancements linking acknowledgment to routine actions would be useful. EHR vendors should consider enhancements to acknowledgment functionality to ensure follow-up of nonurgent CSTRs. PMID:25796594

  7. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 5): Acme Solvent Reclaiming, Winnebago County, IL. (Second remedial action), December 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-31

    The 20-acre Acme Solvent Reclaiming site is a former industrial disposal site in Winnebago County, Illinois. Land use in the area is mixed agricultural and residential. From 1960 to 1973, Acme Solvent Reclaiming disposed of paints, oils, and still bottoms onsite from its solvent reclamation plant. Wastes were dumped into depressions created from previous quarrying and landscaping operations, and empty drums also were stored onsite. State investigations in 1981 identified elevated levels of chlorinated organic compounds in ground water. A 1985 Record of Decision (ROD) provided for excavation and onsite incineration of 26,000 cubic yards of contaminated soil and sludge, supplying home carbon treatment units to affected residences, and further study of ground water and bedrock. During illegal removal actions taken by PRPs in 1986, 40,000 tons of soil and sludge were removed from the site. The selected remedial action for the site includes excavating and treating 6,000 tons of soil and sludge from two waste areas, using low-temperature thermal stripping; treating residuals using solidification, if necessary, followed by onsite or offsite disposal; treating the remaining contaminated soil and possibly bedrock using soil/bedrock vapor extraction; consolidating the remaining contaminated soil onsite with any treatment residuals, followed by capping; incinerating offsite 8,000 gallons of liquids and sludge from two remaining tanks, and disposing of the tanks offsite; providing an alternate water supply to residents with contaminated wells; pumping and onsite treatment of VOC-contaminated ground water.

  8. Modulatory effects of oligodendrocytes on the conduction velocity of action potentials along axons in the alveus of the rat hippocampal CA1 region.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Yoshihiko; Hozumi, Yasukazu; Kaneko, Kenya; Sugihara, Toshimichi; Fujii, Satoshi; Goto, Kaoru; Kato, Hiroshi

    2007-11-01

    Like neurons and astrocytes, oligodendrocytes have a variety of neurotransmitter receptors and ion channels. However, except for facilitating the rapid conduction of action potentials by forming myelin and buffering extracellular K(+), little is known about the direct involvement of oligodendrocytes in neuronal activities. To investigate their physiological roles, we focused on oligodendrocytes in the alveus of the rat hippocampal CA1 region. These cells were found to respond to exogenously applied glutamate by depolarization through N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors and non-NMDA receptors. Electrical stimulation of the border between the alveus and stratum oriens evoked inward currents through several routes involving glutamate receptors and inward rectifier K(+) channels. Moreover, electrical stimulation resembling in vivo activity evoked long-lasting depolarization. To examine the modulatory effects of oligodendrocytes on neuronal activities, we performed dual, whole-cell recording on CA1 pyramidal neurons and oligodendrocytes. Direct depolarization of oligodendrocytes shortened the latencies of action potentials evoked by antidromic stimulation. These results indicate that oligodendrocytes increase the conduction velocity of action potentials by a mechanism additional to saltatory conduction, and that they have active roles in information processing in the brain. PMID:18634564

  9. Decoding spoken words using local field potentials recorded from the cortical surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellis, Spencer; Miller, Kai; Thomson, Kyle; Brown, Richard; House, Paul; Greger, Bradley

    2010-10-01

    Pathological conditions such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis or damage to the brainstem can leave patients severely paralyzed but fully aware, in a condition known as 'locked-in syndrome'. Communication in this state is often reduced to selecting individual letters or words by arduous residual movements. More intuitive and rapid communication may be restored by directly interfacing with language areas of the cerebral cortex. We used a grid of closely spaced, nonpenetrating micro-electrodes to record local field potentials (LFPs) from the surface of face motor cortex and Wernicke's area. From these LFPs we were successful in classifying a small set of words on a trial-by-trial basis at levels well above chance. We found that the pattern of electrodes with the highest accuracy changed for each word, which supports the idea that closely spaced micro-electrodes are capable of capturing neural signals from independent neural processing assemblies. These results further support using cortical surface potentials (electrocorticography) in brain-computer interfaces. These results also show that LFPs recorded from the cortical surface (micro-electrocorticography) of language areas can be used to classify speech-related cortical rhythms and potentially restore communication to locked-in patients.

  10. Modulation of hERG potassium channel gating normalizes action potential duration prolonged by dysfunctional KCNQ1 potassium channel

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongkang; Zou, Beiyan; Yu, Haibo; Moretti, Alessandra; Wang, Xiaoying; Yan, Wei; Babcock, Joseph J.; Bellin, Milena; McManus, Owen B.; Tomaselli, Gordon; Nan, Fajun; Laugwitz, Karl-Ludwig; Li, Min

    2012-01-01

    Long QT syndrome (LQTS) is a genetic disease characterized by a prolonged QT interval in an electrocardiogram (ECG), leading to higher risk of sudden cardiac death. Among the 12 identified genes causal to heritable LQTS, ∼90% of affected individuals harbor mutations in either KCNQ1 or human ether-a-go-go related genes (hERG), which encode two repolarizing potassium currents known as IKs and IKr. The ability to quantitatively assess contributions of different current components is therefore important for investigating disease phenotypes and testing effectiveness of pharmacological modulation. Here we report a quantitative analysis by simulating cardiac action potentials of cultured human cardiomyocytes to match the experimental waveforms of both healthy control and LQT syndrome type 1 (LQT1) action potentials. The quantitative evaluation suggests that elevation of IKr by reducing voltage sensitivity of inactivation, not via slowing of deactivation, could more effectively restore normal QT duration if IKs is reduced. Using a unique specific chemical activator for IKr that has a primary effect of causing a right shift of V1/2 for inactivation, we then examined the duration changes of autonomous action potentials from differentiated human cardiomyocytes. Indeed, this activator causes dose-dependent shortening of the action potential durations and is able to normalize action potentials of cells of patients with LQT1. In contrast, an IKr chemical activator of primary effects in slowing channel deactivation was not effective in modulating action potential durations. Our studies provide both the theoretical basis and experimental support for compensatory normalization of action potential duration by a pharmacological agent. PMID:22745159

  11. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 529: Area 25 Contaminated Materials, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. 0, Including Record of Technical Change No. 1

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

    2003-02-26

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 529, Area 25 Contaminated Materials, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. CAU 529 consists of one Corrective Action Site (25-23-17). For the purpose of this investigation, the Corrective Action Site has been divided into nine parcels based on the separate and distinct releases. A conceptual site model was developed for each parcel to address the translocation of contaminants from each release. The results of this investigation will be used to support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

  12. [Methodology and normal values in recording evoked motor potentials following transcranial stimulation in the human].

    PubMed

    Ludolph, A C; Elger, C E; Gössling, J H; Hugon, J

    1987-03-01

    Electric non-invasive stimulation of the motor cortex was performed in 19 healthy subjects. Muscle responses were recorded with surface electrodes from the abductor, pollicis brevis and anterior tibial muscle. The mean central motor latencies for pathways regulating the function of the upper limbs was 4.5 msec (standard deviation 0.5 msec), the corresponding latency for the lower limbs was 9.6 msec (standard deviation 1.2 msec). The reproducibility of latencies and configuration of the potentials obtained indicates that the method described can be used as a reliable method in the diagnosis of affections of the motor system. PMID:3106003

  13. Simultaneous Optical Mapping of Intracellular Free Calcium and Action Potentials from Langendorff Perfused Hearts

    PubMed Central

    Salama, Guy; Hwang, Seong-min

    2015-01-01

    The cardiac action potential (AP) controls the rise and fall of intracellular free Ca2+ (Cai), and thus the amplitude and kinetics of force generation. Besides excitation-contraction coupling, the reverse process where Cai influences the AP through Cai-dependent ionic currents has been implicated as the mechanism underlying QT alternans and cardiac arrhythmias in heart failure, ischemia/reperfusion, cardiac myopathy, myocardial infarction, congenital and drug-induced long QT syndrome, and ventricular fibrillation. The development of dual optical mapping at high spatial and temporal resolution provides a powerful tool to investigate the role of Cai anomalies in eliciting cardiac arrhythmias. This unit describes experimental protocols to map APs and Cai transients from perfused hearts by labeling the heart with two fluorescent dyes, one to measure transmembrane potential (Vm), the other Cai transients. High spatial and temporal resolution is achieved by selecting Vm and Cai probes with the same excitation but different emission wavelengths, to avoid cross-talk and mechanical components. PMID:19575468

  14. Calcium Transients Closely Reflect Prolonged Action Potentials in iPSC Models of Inherited Cardiac Arrhythmia

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, C. Ian; Baba, Shiro; Nakamura, Kenta; Hua, Ethan A.; Sears, Marie A.F.; Fu, Chi-cheng; Zhang, Jianhua; Balijepalli, Sadguna; Tomoda, Kiichiro; Hayashi, Yohei; Lizarraga, Paweena; Wojciak, Julianne; Scheinman, Melvin M.; Aalto-Setälä, Katriina; Makielski, Jonathan C.; January, Craig T.; Healy, Kevin E.; Kamp, Timothy J.; Yamanaka, Shinya; Conklin, Bruce R.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Long-QT syndrome mutations can cause syncope and sudden death by prolonging the cardiac action potential (AP). Ion channels affected by mutations are various, and the influences of cellular calcium cycling on LQTS cardiac events are unknown. To better understand LQTS arrhythmias, we performed current-clamp and intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) measurements on cardiomyocytes differentiated from patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS-CM). In myocytes carrying an LQT2 mutation (HERG-A422T), APs and [Ca2+]i transients were prolonged in parallel. APs were abbreviated by nifedipine exposure and further lengthened upon releasing intracellularly stored Ca2+. Validating this model, control iPS-CM treated with HERG-blocking drugs recapitulated the LQT2 phenotype. In LQT3 iPS-CM, expressing NaV1.5-N406K, APs and [Ca2+]i transients were markedly prolonged. AP prolongation was sensitive to tetrodotoxin and to inhibiting Na+-Ca2+ exchange. These results suggest that LQTS mutations act partly on cytosolic Ca2+ cycling, potentially providing a basis for functionally targeted interventions regardless of the specific mutation site. PMID:25254341

  15. Inhibition of the compound action potentials of frog sciatic nerves by aroma oil compounds having various chemical structures

    PubMed Central

    Ohtsubo, Sena; Fujita, Tsugumi; Matsushita, Akitomo; Kumamoto, Eiichi

    2015-01-01

    Plant-derived chemicals including aroma oil compounds have an ability to inhibit nerve conduction and modulate transient receptor potential (TRP) channels. Although applying aroma oils to the skin produces a local anesthetic effect, this has not been yet examined throughly. The aim of the present study was to know how nerve conduction inhibitions by aroma oil compounds are related to their chemical structures and whether these activities are mediated by TRP activation. Compound action potentials (CAPs) were recorded from the frog sciatic nerve by using the air-gap method. Citral (aldehyde), which activates various types of TRP channels, attenuated the peak amplitude of CAP with the half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) value of 0.46 mmol/L. Another aldehyde (citronellal), alcohol (citronellol, geraniol, (±)-linalool, (−)-linalool, (+)-borneol, (−)-borneol, α-terpineol), ester (geranyl acetate, linalyl acetate, bornyl acetate), and oxide (rose oxide) compounds also reduced CAP peak amplitudes (IC50: 0.50, 0.35, 0.53, 1.7, 2.0, 1.5, 2.3, 2.7, 0.51, 0.71, 0.44, and 2.6 mmol/L, respectively). On the other hand, the amplitudes were reduced by a small extent by hydrocarbons (myrcene and p-cymene) and ketone (camphor) at high concentrations (2–5 mmol/L). The activities of citral and other TRP agonists ((+)-borneol and camphor) were resistant to TRP antagonist ruthenium red. An efficacy sequence for the CAP inhibitions was generally aldehydes ≥ esters ≥ alcohols > oxides >> hydrocarbons. The CAP inhibition by the aroma oil compound was not related to its octanol–water partition coefficient. It is suggested that aroma oil compounds inhibit nerve conduction in a manner specific to their chemical structures without TRP activation. PMID:26038703

  16. Effects of calcium channel antagonists on action potential conduction and transmitter release in the guinea-pig vas deferens.

    PubMed Central

    Beattie, D. T.; Cunnane, T. C.; Muir, T. C.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of the Ca2+ channel antagonists amlodipine, cobalt, diltiazem, nifedipine and verapamil and the local anaesthetic lignocaine were investigated on action potential conduction in and on evoked transmitter release from sympathetic nerves in the guinea-pig isolated vas deferens. Transmitter release was investigated by measurement of evoked (trains of pulses at 1 and 2 Hz, 0.1-0.5 ms supramaximal voltage) excitatory junction potentials (e.j.ps) using microelectrodes; tension was recorded simultaneously; tritium [3H] overflow from vasa preincubated (37 degrees C, 30 min) in Krebs solution containing either [3H]-noradrenaline (NA, 25 microCi ml-1, 2 X 10(-6) M NA) or [3H]-adenosine (50 microCi ml-1, 1 X 10(-6) M adenosine). Amlodipine (0.5-2 X 10(-4) M), verapamil (0.5-2 X 10(-4) M), diltiazem (1-8 X 10(-4) M), lignocaine (0.1-2 X 10(-3) M) and cobalt (2-6 X 10(-2) M) in descending order of potency, but not nifedipine (1-5 X 10(-3) M), increased the latency and inhibited, then abolished, the amplitude and number of action potentials in a concentration-dependent manner. Amlodipine (0.5-1 X 10(-4) M), verapamil (1-2 X 10(-4) M), diltiazem (1-5 X 10(-4) M) and cobalt (1 X 10(-3) M), in descending order of potency, but not nifedipine (5 X 10(-4) M), inhibited then abolished evoked e.j.ps in a concentration-dependent manner. Cobalt inhibited e.j.ps at a lower concentration than that (2-6 X 10(-2) M) required to block action potential conduction. In unstimulated tissues, the resting [3H] overflow following preincubation with [3H]-NA consisted largely of 4-hydroxy 3-methoxymandelic acid (VMA), 4-hydroxy 3-methoxy phenylglycol (MOPEG), 3,4 dihydroxyphenylglycol (DOPEG) and NA; stimulated tissues (300 pulses at 20 Hz, 0.5 ms supramaximal voltage) released mainly NA. Verapamil (0.1-1 X 10(-4) M), amlodipine (0.05-1 X 10(-4) M) and nifedipine (1-5 X 10(-4) M), but not cobalt (2 X 10(-3) M), increased, significantly, the resting overflow of 3H comprising mainly DOPEG

  17. Potential involvement of serotonergic signaling in ketamine's antidepressant actions: A critical review.

    PubMed

    du Jardin, Kristian Gaarn; Müller, Heidi Kaastrup; Elfving, Betina; Dale, Elena; Wegener, Gregers; Sanchez, Connie

    2016-11-01

    A single i.v. infusion of ketamine, classified as an N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist, may alleviate depressive symptoms within hours of administration in treatment resistant depressed patients, and the antidepressant effect may last for several weeks. These unique therapeutic properties have prompted researchers to explore the mechanisms mediating the antidepressant effects of ketamine, but despite many efforts, no consensus on its antidepressant mechanism of action has been reached. Recent preclinical reports have associated the neurotransmitter serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) with the antidepressant-like action of ketamine. Here, we review the current evidence for a serotonergic role in ketamine's antidepressant effects. The pharmacological profile of ketamine may include equipotent activity on several non-NMDA targets, and the current hypotheses for the mechanisms responsible for ketamine's antidepressant activity do not appear to preclude the possibility that non-glutamate neurotransmitters are involved in the antidepressant effects. At multiple levels, the serotonergic and glutamatergic systems interact, and such crosstalk could support the notion that changes in serotonergic neurotransmission may impact ketamine's antidepressant potential. In line with these prospects, ketamine may increase 5-HT levels in the prefrontal cortex of rats, plausibly via hippocampal NMDA receptor inhibition and activation of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA) receptors. In addition, a number of preclinical studies suggest that the antidepressant-like effects of ketamine may depend on endogenous activation of 5-HT receptors. Recent imaging and behavioral data predominantly support a role for 5-HT1A or 5-HT1B receptors, but the full range of 5-HT receptors has currently not been systematically investigated in this context. Furthermore, the nature of any 5-HT dependent mechanism in ketamine's antidepressant effect is currently not

  18. Potential Bryde's whale (Balaenoptera edeni) calls recorded in the northern Gulf of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Rice, Aaron N; Palmer, K J; Tielens, Jamey T; Muirhead, Charles A; Clark, Christopher W

    2014-05-01

    Several marine autonomous recording units (MARUs) were deployed in northeastern Gulf of Mexico from 2010–2012 to study the acoustic ecology of Bryde's whales (Balaenoptera edeni) following the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. However, the acoustic repertoire of this sub-population is poorly documented, presently limiting the efficacy of acoustic monitoring applications. Numerous stereotyped, low-frequency signals from a putative biological sound source were found throughout the recordings. Sounds fell into three categories distinguished by spectral and temporal properties. Multiple calls overlapped temporally on individual MARUs, suggesting that multiple sources produced these sounds. The basic features are similar to those from other mysticetes, but they differ from any previously published sounds. Since Bryde's whales are the most common mysticete in the Gulf and have previously been observed within the recording area on multiple occasions, it is likely that Bryde's whales are the most probable source of these sounds. These results potentially identify a suite of previously undocumented calls from Bryde's whales, which could facilitate future passive acoustic monitoring efforts to better understand the population dynamics and status of this sub-population. PMID:24926502

  19. New easy-to-use hybrid system for extracellular potential and impedance recordings.

    PubMed

    Doerr, Leo; Thomas, Ulrich; Guinot, David R; Bot, Corina T; Stoelzle-Feix, Sonja; Beckler, Matthias; George, Michael; Fertig, Niels

    2015-04-01

    The need for predictive, in vitro cardiac safety screening drives further development of automated, high-throughput-compatible drug evaluation based on cardiac cell preparations. Recently, pluripotent stem cells are evaluated as a new, more predictive model for cardiovascular risk assessment pertaining to in vitro assays. We present a new screening platform, the CardioExcyte 96, a hybrid instrument that combines impedance (cell contractility) with extracellular field potential (EFP) recordings. The electrophysiological measurements are noninvasive, label free and have a temporal resolution of 1 ms. This hybrid technology addresses the lack of easy-to-use high-throughput screening for in vitro assays and permits the reliable investigation of short- and long-term pharmacological effects. Several models of cardiomyocyte preparations were successfully validated for use with the CardioExcyte96. Furthermore, the pharmacological effects of a number of reference compounds were evaluated. Compound effects on cell monolayers of human-induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes are evaluated using a quasi-simultaneous hybrid recording mode that combines impedance and EFP readouts. A specialized software package for rapid data handling and real-time analysis was developed, which allows for comprehensive investigation of the cellular beat signal. Combining impedance readouts of cell contractility and EFP (microelectrode array-like) recordings, the system opens up new possibilities in the field of in vitro cardiac safety assessment. PMID:25532527

  20. Recording long-term potentiation of synaptic transmission by three-dimensional multi-electrode arrays

    PubMed Central

    Kopanitsa, Maksym V; Afinowi, Nurudeen O; Grant, Seth GN

    2006-01-01

    Background Multi-electrode arrays (MEAs) have become popular tools for recording spontaneous and evoked electrical activity of excitable tissues. The majority of previous studies of synaptic transmission in brain slices employed MEAs with planar electrodes that had limited ability to detect signals coming from deeper, healthier layers of the slice. To overcome this limitation, we used three-dimensional (3D) MEAs with tip-shaped electrodes to probe plasticity of field excitatory synaptic potentials (fEPSPs) in the CA1 area of hippocampal slices of 129S5/SvEvBrd and C57BL/6J-TyrC-Brd mice. Results Using 3D MEAs, we were able to record larger fEPSPs compared to signals measured by planar MEAs. Several stimulation protocols were used to induce long-term potentiation (LTP) of synaptic responses in the CA1 area recorded following excitation of Schäffer collateral/commissural fibres. Either two trains of high frequency tetanic stimulation or three trains of theta-burst stimulation caused a persistent, pathway specific enhancement of fEPSPs that remained significantly elevated for at least 60 min. A third LTP induction protocol that comprised 150 pulses delivered at 5 Hz, evoked moderate LTP if excitation strength was increased to 1.5× of the baseline stimulus. In all cases, we observed a clear spatial plasticity gradient with maximum LTP levels detected in proximal apical dendrites of pyramidal neurones. No significant differences in the manifestation of LTP were observed between 129S5/SvEvBrd and C57BL/6J-TyrC-Brd mice with the three protocols used. All forms of plasticity were sensitive to inhibition of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors. Conclusion Principal features of LTP (magnitude, pathway specificity, NMDA receptor dependence) recorded in the hippocampal slices using MEAs were very similar to those seen in conventional glass electrode experiments. Advantages of using MEAs are the ability to record from different regions of the slice and the ease of conducting

  1. Averaging methods for extracting representative waveforms from motor unit action potential trains.

    PubMed

    Malanda, Armando; Navallas, Javier; Rodriguez-Falces, Javier; Rodriguez-Carreño, Ignacio; Gila, Luis

    2015-08-01

    In the context of quantitative electromyography (EMG), it is of major interest to obtain a waveform that faithfully represents the set of potentials that constitute a motor unit action potential (MUAP) train. From this waveform, various parameters can be determined in order to characterize the MUAP for diagnostic analysis. The aim of this work was to conduct a thorough, in-depth review, evaluation and comparison of state-of-the-art methods for composing waveforms representative of MUAP trains. We evaluated nine averaging methods: Ensemble (EA), Median (MA), Weighted (WA), Five-closest (FCA), MultiMUP (MMA), Split-sweep median (SSMA), Sorted (SA), Trimmed (TA) and Robust (RA) in terms of three general-purpose signal processing figures of merit (SPMF) and seven clinically-used MUAP waveform parameters (MWP). The convergence rate of the methods was assessed as the number of potentials per MUAP train (NPM) required to reach a level of performance that was not significantly improved by increasing this number. Test material comprised 78 MUAP trains obtained from the tibialis anterioris of seven healthy subjects. Error measurements related to all SPMF and MWP parameters except MUAP amplitude descended asymptotically with increasing NPM for all methods. MUAP amplitude showed a consistent bias (around 4% for EA and SA and 1-2% for the rest). MA, TA and SSMA had the lowest SPMF and MWP error figures. Therefore, these methods most accurately preserve and represent MUAP physiological information of utility in clinical medical practice. The other methods, particularly WA, performed noticeably worse. Convergence rate was similar for all methods, with NPM values averaged among the nine methods, which ranged from 10 to 40, depending on the waveform parameter evaluated. PMID:25962870

  2. Direct inhibition of arcuate proopiomelanocortin neurons: a potential mechanism for the orexigenic actions of dynorphin

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaobing; van den Pol, Anthony N

    2013-01-01

    Dynorphin, an endogenous ligand of kappa (κ) opioid receptors, has multiple roles in the brain, and plays a positive role in energy balance and food intake. However, the mechanism for this is unclear. With immunocytochemistry, we find that axonal dynorphin immunoreactivity in the arcuate nucleus is strong, and that a large number of dynorphin-immunoreactive boutons terminate on or near anorexigenic proopiomelanocortin (POMC) cells. Here we provide evidence from whole-cell patch-clamp recording that dynorphin-A (Dyn-A) directly and dose-dependently inhibits arcuate nucleus POMC neurons. Dyn-A inhibition was eliminated by the κ opioid receptor antagonist nor-BNI, but not by the μ receptor antagonist CTAP. The inhibitory effect was mimicked by the κ2 receptor agonist GR89696, but not by the κ1 receptor agonist U69593. No presynaptic effect of κ2 agonists was found. These results suggest that Dyn-A inhibits POMC neurons through activation of the κ2 opioid receptor. In whole-cell voltage clamp, Dyn-A opened G-protein-coupled inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK)-like channels on POMC neurons. Dynorphin attenuated glutamate and GABA neurotransmission to POMC neurons. In contrast to the strong inhibition of POMC neurons by Dyn-A, we found a weaker direct inhibitory effect of Dyn-A on arcuate nucleus neuropeptide Y (NPY) neurons mediated by both κ1 and κ2 receptors. Taken together, these results indicate a direct inhibitory effect of Dyn-A on POMC neurons through activation of the κ2 opioid receptor and GIRK channels. A number of orexigenic hypothalamic neurons release dynorphin along with other neuropeptides. The inhibition of anorexigenic POMC neurons may be one mechanism underlying the orexigenic actions of dynorphin. PMID:23318874

  3. Signal averaging technique for noninvasive recording of late potentials in patients with coronary artery disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abboud, S.; Blatt, C. M.; Lown, B.; Graboys, T. B.; Sadeh, D.; Cohen, R. J.

    1987-01-01

    An advanced non invasive signal averaging technique was used to detect late potentials in two groups of patients: Group A (24 patients) with coronary artery disease (CAD) and without sustained ventricular tachycardia (VT) and Group B (8 patients) with CAD and sustained VT. Recorded analog data were digitized and aligned using a cross correlation function with fast Fourier transform schema, averaged and band pass filtered between 60 and 200 Hz with a non-recursive digital filter. Averaged filtered waveforms were analyzed by computer program for 3 parameters: (1) filtered QRS (fQRS) duration (2) interval between the peak of the R wave peak and the end of fQRS (R-LP) (3) RMS value of last 40 msec of fQRS (RMS). Significant change was found between Groups A and B in fQRS (101 -/+ 13 msec vs 123 -/+ 15 msec; p < .0005) and in R-LP vs 52 -/+ 11 msec vs 71-/+18 msec, p <.002). We conclude that (1) the use of a cross correlation triggering method and non-recursive digital filter enables a reliable recording of late potentials from the body surface; (2) fQRS and R-LP durations are sensitive indicators of CAD patients susceptible to VT.

  4. The late Holocene kauri chronology: assessing the potential of a 4500-year record for palaeoclimate reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boswijk, G.; Fowler, A. M.; Palmer, J. G.; Fenwick, P.; Hogg, A.; Lorrey, A.; Wunder, J.

    2014-04-01

    Millennial and multi-millennial tree-ring chronologies can provide useful proxy records of past climate, giving insight into a more complete range of natural climate variability prior to the 20th century. Since the 1980s a multi-millennial tree-ring chronology has been developed from kauri (Agathis australis) from the upper North Island, New Zealand. Previous work has demonstrated the sensitivity of kauri to the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO). Here we present recent additions and extensions to the late Holocene kauri chronology (LHKC), and assess the potential of a composite master chronology, AGAUc13, for palaeoclimate reconstruction. The updated composite kauri chronology now spans 4491 years (2488 BCE-2002 CE) and includes data from 18 modern sites, 25 archaeological sites, and 18 sub-fossil (swamp) kauri sites. Consideration of the composition and statistical quality of AGAUc13 suggests the LHKC has utility for palaeoclimate reconstruction but there are caveats. These include: (a) differences in character between the three assemblages including growth rate and sensitivity; (b) low sample depth and low statistical quality in the 10th-13th century CE, when the record transitions from modern and archaeological material to the swamp kauri; (c) a potential difference in amplitude of the signal in the swamp kauri; (d) a westerly bias in site distribution prior to 911 CE; (e) variable statistical quality across the entire record associated with variable replication; and (f) complex changes in sample depth and tree age and size which may influence centennial scale trends in the data. Further tree ring data are required to improve statistical quality, particularly in the first half of the second millennium CE.

  5. Onset Dynamics of Action Potentials in Rat Neocortical Neurons and Identified Snail Neurons: Quantification of the Difference

    PubMed Central

    Volgushev, Maxim; Malyshev, Aleksey; Balaban, Pavel; Chistiakova, Marina; Volgushev, Stanislav; Wolf, Fred

    2008-01-01

    The generation of action potentials (APs) is a key process in the operation of nerve cells and the communication between neurons. Action potentials in mammalian central neurons are characterized by an exceptionally fast onset dynamics, which differs from the typically slow and gradual onset dynamics seen in identified snail neurons. Here we describe a novel method of analysis which provides a quantitative measure of the onset dynamics of action potentials. This method captures the difference between the fast, step-like onset of APs in rat neocortical neurons and the gradual, exponential-like AP onset in identified snail neurons. The quantitative measure of the AP onset dynamics, provided by the method, allows us to perform quantitative analyses of factors influencing the dynamics. PMID:18398478

  6. 48 CFR 1852.245-79 - Records and disposition reports for Government property with potential historic or significant...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... reports for Government property with potential historic or significant real value. 1852.245-79 Section... Records and disposition reports for Government property with potential historic or significant real value... Government Property With Potential Historic or Significant Real Value (JAN 2011) (a) In addition to...

  7. 48 CFR 1852.245-79 - Records and disposition reports for Government property with potential historic or significant...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... reports for Government property with potential historic or significant real value. 1852.245-79 Section... Records and disposition reports for Government property with potential historic or significant real value... Government Property With Potential Historic or Significant Real Value (JAN 2011) (a) In addition to...

  8. Antifungal potential of Sideroxylon obtusifolium and Syzygium cumini and their mode of action against Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Jozinete Vieira; Freires, Irlan Almeida; Castilho, Aline Rogéria; da Cunha, Marcos Guilherme; Alves, Harley da Silva; Rosalen, Pedro Luiz

    2016-10-01

    Context The emergence of resistant pathogens and toxicity of antifungals have encouraged an active search for novel candidates to manage Candida biofilms. Objective In this study, the little known species Sideroxylon obtusifolium T.D. Penn (Sapotacea) and Syzygium cumini (L.) Skeels (Myrtaceae), from the Caatinga biome in Brazil were chemically characterized and explored for their antifungal potential against C. albicans. Materials and methods We determined the effects of hydroalcoholic extracts/fractions upon fungal growth (minimum inhibitory and fungicidal concentrations, MIC/MFC), biofilm morphology (scanning electron microscopy) and viability (confocal laser scanning microscopy), proposed their mode of action (sorbitol and ergosterol assays), and finally investigated their effects against macrophage and keratinocyte cells in a cell-based assay. Data were analysed using one-way analysis of variance with Tukey-Kramer post-test (α = 0.05). Results The n-butanol (Nb) fraction from S. obtusifolium and S. cumini extract (Sc) showed flavonoids (39.11 ± 6.62 mg/g) and saponins (820.35 ± 225.38 mg/g), respectively, in their chemical composition and demonstrated antifungal activity, with MICs of 62.5 and 125 μg/mL, respectively. Nb and Sc may complex with ergosterol as there was a 4-16-fold increase in MICs in the presence of exogenous ergosterol, leading to disrupted permeability of cell membrane. Deleterious effects were observed on morphology and viability of treated biofilms from concentrations as low as their MICs and higher. Sc was not toxic to macrophages and keratinocytes at these concentrations (p > 0.05), unlike Nb. Conclusions Nb and Sc demonstrated considerable antifungal activity and should be further investigated as potential alternative candidates to treat Candida biofilms. PMID:26987037

  9. The Venus Flytrap Dionaea muscipula Counts Prey-Induced Action Potentials to Induce Sodium Uptake.

    PubMed

    Böhm, Jennifer; Scherzer, Sönke; Krol, Elzbieta; Kreuzer, Ines; von Meyer, Katharina; Lorey, Christian; Mueller, Thomas D; Shabala, Lana; Monte, Isabel; Solano, Roberto; Al-Rasheid, Khaled A S; Rennenberg, Heinz; Shabala, Sergey; Neher, Erwin; Hedrich, Rainer

    2016-02-01

    Carnivorous plants, such as the Venus flytrap (Dionaea muscipula), depend on an animal diet when grown in nutrient-poor soils. When an insect visits the trap and tilts the mechanosensors on the inner surface, action potentials (APs) are fired. After a moving object elicits two APs, the trap snaps shut, encaging the victim. Panicking preys repeatedly touch the trigger hairs over the subsequent hours, leading to a hermetically closed trap, which via the gland-based endocrine system is flooded by a prey-decomposing acidic enzyme cocktail. Here, we asked the question as to how many times trigger hairs have to be stimulated (e.g., now many APs are required) for the flytrap to recognize an encaged object as potential food, thus making it worthwhile activating the glands. By applying a series of trigger-hair stimulations, we found that the touch hormone jasmonic acid (JA) signaling pathway is activated after the second stimulus, while more than three APs are required to trigger an expression of genes encoding prey-degrading hydrolases, and that this expression is proportional to the number of mechanical stimulations. A decomposing animal contains a sodium load, and we have found that these sodium ions enter the capture organ via glands. We identified a flytrap sodium channel DmHKT1 as responsible for this sodium acquisition, with the number of transcripts expressed being dependent on the number of mechano-electric stimulations. Hence, the number of APs a victim triggers while trying to break out of the trap identifies the moving prey as a struggling Na(+)-rich animal and nutrition for the plant. PMID:26804557

  10. The Venus Flytrap Dionaea muscipula Counts Prey-Induced Action Potentials to Induce Sodium Uptake

    PubMed Central

    Böhm, Jennifer; Scherzer, Sönke; Krol, Elzbieta; Kreuzer, Ines; von Meyer, Katharina; Lorey, Christian; Mueller, Thomas D.; Shabala, Lana; Monte, Isabel; Solano, Roberto; Al-Rasheid, Khaled A.S.; Rennenberg, Heinz; Shabala, Sergey; Neher, Erwin; Hedrich, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    Summary Carnivorous plants, such as the Venus flytrap (Dionaea muscipula), depend on an animal diet when grown in nutrient-poor soils. When an insect visits the trap and tilts the mechanosensors on the inner surface, action potentials (APs) are fired. After a moving object elicits two APs, the trap snaps shut, encaging the victim. Panicking preys repeatedly touch the trigger hairs over the subsequent hours, leading to a hermetically closed trap, which via the gland-based endocrine system is flooded by a prey-decomposing acidic enzyme cocktail. Here, we asked the question as to how many times trigger hairs have to be stimulated (e.g., now many APs are required) for the flytrap to recognize an encaged object as potential food, thus making it worthwhile activating the glands. By applying a series of trigger-hair stimulations, we found that the touch hormone jasmonic acid (JA) signaling pathway is activated after the second stimulus, while more than three APs are required to trigger an expression of genes encoding prey-degrading hydrolases, and that this expression is proportional to the number of mechanical stimulations. A decomposing animal contains a sodium load, and we have found that these sodium ions enter the capture organ via glands. We identified a flytrap sodium channel DmHKT1 as responsible for this sodium acquisition, with the number of transcripts expressed being dependent on the number of mechano-electric stimulations. Hence, the number of APs a victim triggers while trying to break out of the trap identifies the moving prey as a struggling Na+-rich animal and nutrition for the plant. Video Abstract PMID:26804557

  11. Wavelet Transform for Real-Time Detection of Action Potentials in Neural Signals

    PubMed Central

    Quotb, Adam; Bornat, Yannick; Renaud, Sylvie

    2011-01-01

    We present a study on wavelet detection methods of neuronal action potentials (APs). Our final goal is to implement the selected algorithms on custom integrated electronics for on-line processing of neural signals; therefore we take real-time computing as a hard specification and silicon area as a price to pay. Using simulated neural signals including APs, we characterize an efficient wavelet method for AP extraction by evaluating its detection rate and its implementation cost. We compare software implementation for three methods: adaptive threshold, discrete wavelet transform (DWT), and stationary wavelet transform (SWT). We evaluate detection rate and implementation cost for detection functions dynamically comparing a signal with an adaptive threshold proportional to its SD, where the signal is the raw neural signal, respectively: (i) non-processed; (ii) processed by a DWT; (iii) processed by a SWT. We also use different mother wavelets and test different data formats to set an optimal compromise between accuracy and silicon cost. Detection accuracy is evaluated together with false negative and false positive detections. Simulation results show that for on-line AP detection implemented on a configurable digital integrated circuit, APs underneath the noise level can be detected using SWT with a well-selected mother wavelet, combined to an adaptive threshold. PMID:21811455

  12. Skeletal muscle atrophy: Potential therapeutic agents and their mechanisms of action.

    PubMed

    Dutt, Vikas; Gupta, Sanjeev; Dabur, Rajesh; Injeti, Elisha; Mittal, Ashwani

    2015-09-01

    Over the last two decades, new insights into the etiology of skeletal muscle wasting/atrophy under diverse clinical settings including denervation, AIDS, cancer, diabetes, and chronic heart failure have been reported in the literature. However, the treatment of skeletal muscle wasting remains an unresolved challenge to this day. About nineteen potential drugs that can regulate loss of muscle mass have been reported in the literature. This paper reviews the mechanisms of action of all these drugs by broadly classifying them into six different categories. Mechanistic data of these drugs illustrate that they regulate skeletal muscle loss either by down-regulating myostatin, cyclooxygenase2, pro-inflammatory cytokines mediated catabolic wasting or by up-regulating cyclic AMP, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1α, growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor1, phosphatidylinositide 3-kinases/protein kinase B(Akt) mediated anabolic pathways. So far, five major proteolytic systems that regulate loss of muscle mass have been identified, but the majority of these drugs control only two or three proteolytic systems. In addition to their beneficial effect on restoring the muscle loss, many of these drugs show some level of toxicity and unwanted side effects such as dizziness, hypertension, and constipation. Therefore, further research is needed to understand and develop treatment strategies for muscle wasting. For successful management of skeletal muscle wasting either therapeutic agent which regulates all five known proteolytic systems or new molecular targets/proteolytic systems must be identified. PMID:26048279

  13. Kv3.1 uses a timely resurgent K+ current to secure action potential repolarization

    PubMed Central

    Labro, Alain J.; Priest, Michael F.; Lacroix, Jérôme J.; Snyders, Dirk J.; Bezanilla, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    High-frequency action potential (AP) transmission is essential for rapid information processing in the central nervous system. Voltage-dependent Kv3 channels play an important role in this process thanks to their high activation threshold and fast closure kinetics, which reduce the neuron's refractory period. However, premature Kv3 channel closure leads to incomplete membrane repolarization, preventing sustainable AP propagation. Here, we demonstrate that Kv3.1b channels solve this problem by producing resurgent K+ currents during repolarization, thus ensuring enough repolarizing power to terminate each AP. Unlike previously described resurgent Na+ and K+ currents, Kv3.1b's resurgent current does not originate from recovery of channel block or inactivation but results from a unique combination of steep voltage-dependent gating kinetics and ultra-fast voltage-sensor relaxation. These distinct properties are readily transferrable onto an orthologue Kv channel by transplanting the voltage-sensor's S3–S4 loop, providing molecular insights into the mechanism by which Kv3 channels contribute to high-frequency AP transmission. PMID:26673941

  14. Glucocorticoids: mechanisms of action and anti-inflammatory potential in asthma.

    PubMed Central

    van der Velden, V H

    1998-01-01

    GLUCOCORTICOIDS are potent inhibitors of inflammatory processes and are widely used in the treatment of asthma. The anti-inflammatory effects are mediated either by direct binding of the glucocorticoid/glucocorticoid receptor complex to glucocorticoid responsive elements in the promoter region of genes, or by an interaction of this complex with other transcription factors, in particular activating protein-1 or nuclear factor-kappaB. Glucocorticoids inhibit many inflammation-associated molecules such as cytokines, chemokines, arachidonic acid metabolites, and adhesion molecules. In contrast, anti-inflammatory mediators often are up-regulated by glucocorticoids. In vivo studies have shown that treatment of asthmatic patients with inhaled glucocorticoids inhibits the bronchial inflammation and simultaneously improves their lung function. In this review, our current knowledge of the mechanism of action of glucocorticoids and their anti-inflammatory potential in asthma is described. Since bronchial epithelial cells may be important targets for glucocorticoid therapy in asthma, the effects of glucocorticoids on epithelial expressed inflammatory genes will be emphasized. PMID:9792333

  15. Do Resin Cements Alter Action Potentials of Isolated Rat Sciatic Nerve?

    PubMed Central

    Ertan, Ahmet Atila; Beriat, Nilufer Celebi; Onur, Mehmet Ali; Tan, Gamze; Cehreli, Murat Cavit

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to explore the effects dual-cure resin cements on nerve conduction. Methods: Panavia F, RelyX ARC, and Variolink II polymerized either by light-emitting diode (LED) or quartz tungsten halogen (QTH) were used in the study (n=10). The conductance of sciatic nerves of 50 rats were measured before and after contact with the specimens for 1 h. Results: The time-dependent change in nerve conductance and the comparison of LED versus QTH showed that differences between groups are significant (P<.05). For both polymerization techniques, pair-wise comparisons of resin cements showed that the nerve conductance between groups is different (P<.05). RelyX ARC elicited irreversible inhibition of compound action potentials (more than 50% change) and Panavia F and Variolink II polymerized by LED and QTH did not alter nerve conduction beyond physiologic limits. Conclusions: Resin cements may alter nerve conductance and even lead to neurotoxic effects. PMID:21494389

  16. Sensitivity analysis of potential events affecting the double-shell tank system and fallback actions

    SciTech Connect

    Knutson, B.J.

    1996-09-27

    Sensitivity analyses were performed for fall-back positions (i.e., management actions) to accommodate potential off-normal and programmatic change events overlaid on the waste volume projections and their uncertainties. These sensitivity analyses allowed determining and ranking tank system high-risk parameters and fall- back positions that will accommodate the respective impacts. This quantification of tank system impacts shows periods where tank capacity is sensitive to certain variables that must be carefully managed and/or evaluated. Identifying these sensitive variables and quantifying their impact will allow decision makers to prepare fall-back positions and focus available resources on the highest impact parameters where technical data are needed to reduce waste projection uncertainties. For noncomplexed waste, the period of capacity vulnerability occurs during the years of single-shell tank (SST) retrieval (after approximately 2009) due to the sensitivity to several variables. Ranked by importance these variables include the pretreatment rate and 200-East SST solids transfer volume. For complexed waste, the period of capacity vulnerability occurs during the period after approximately 2005 due to the sensitivity to several variables. Ranked by importance these variables include the pretreatment rate. 200-East SST solids transfer volume. complexed waste reduction factor using evaporation, and 200-west saltwell liquid porosity.

  17. Action potential energy efficiency varies among neuron types in vertebrates and invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Biswa; Stemmler, Martin; Laughlin, Simon B; Niven, Jeremy E

    2010-01-01

    The initiation and propagation of action potentials (APs) places high demands on the energetic resources of neural tissue. Each AP forces ATP-driven ion pumps to work harder to restore the ionic concentration gradients, thus consuming more energy. Here, we ask whether the ionic currents underlying the AP can be predicted theoretically from the principle of minimum energy consumption. A long-held supposition that APs are energetically wasteful, based on theoretical analysis of the squid giant axon AP, has recently been overturned by studies that measured the currents contributing to the AP in several mammalian neurons. In the single compartment models studied here, AP energy consumption varies greatly among vertebrate and invertebrate neurons, with several mammalian neuron models using close to the capacitive minimum of energy needed. Strikingly, energy consumption can increase by more than ten-fold simply by changing the overlap of the Na(+) and K(+) currents during the AP without changing the APs shape. As a consequence, the height and width of the AP are poor predictors of energy consumption. In the Hodgkin-Huxley model of the squid axon, optimizing the kinetics or number of Na(+) and K(+) channels can whittle down the number of ATP molecules needed for each AP by a factor of four. In contrast to the squid AP, the temporal profile of the currents underlying APs of some mammalian neurons are nearly perfectly matched to the optimized properties of ionic conductances so as to minimize the ATP cost. PMID:20617202

  18. Motor Unit Number Estimation and Motor Unit Action Potential Analysis in Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Min Kyun; Jee, Sung Ju; Kim, Young-Jae; Shin, Hyun-Dae

    2011-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the clinical significance of motor unit number estimation (MUNE) and quantitative analysis of motor unit action potential (MUAP) in carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) according to electrophysiologic severity, ultrasonographic measurement and clinical symptoms. Method We evaluated 78 wrists of 45 patients, who had been diagnosed with CTS and 42 wrists of 21 healthy controls. Median nerve conduction studies, amplitude and duration of MUAP, and the MUNE of the abductor pollicis brevis were measured. The cross sectional area (CSA) of the median nerve at the pisiform and distal radioulnar joint level was determined by high resolution ultrasonography. Clinical symptom of CTS was assessed using the Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire (BCTQ). Results The MUNE, the amplitude and the duration of MUAP of the CTS group were significantly different from those found in the control group. The area under the ROC curve was 0.944 for MUNE, 0.923 for MUAP amplitude and 0.953 for MUAP duration. MUNE had a negative correlation with electrophysiologic stage of CTS, amplitude and duration of MUAP, CSA at pisiform level, and the score of BCTQ. The amplitude and duration of MUAP had a positive correlation with the score of BCTQ. The electrophysiologic stage was correlated with amplitude but not with the duration of MUAP. Conclusion MUNE, amplitude and duration of MUAP are useful tests for diagnosis of CTS. In addition, the MUNE serves as a good indicator of CTS severity. PMID:22506210

  19. Efficacy of action potential simulation and interferential therapy in the rehabilitation of patients with knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Eftekharsadat, Bina; Habibzadeh, Afshin; Kolahi, Babak

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is the main cause of pain, physical impairment and chronic disability in older people. Electrotherapeutic modalities such as interferential therapy (IFT) and action potential simulation (APS) are used for the treatment of knee OA. In this study, we aim to evaluate the therapeutic effects of APS and IFT on knee OA. Methods: In this randomized clinical trial, 67 patients (94% female and 6% male with mean age of 52.80 ± 8.16 years) with mild and moderate knee OA were randomly assigned to be treated with APS (n = 34) or IFT (n = 33) for 10 sessions in 4 weeks. Baseline and post-treatment Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis (WOMAC) subscales, visual analogue scale (VAS) and timed up and go (TUG) test were measured in all patients. Results: VAS and WOMAC subscales were significantly improved after treatment in APS and IFT groups (p < 0.001 for all). TUG was also significantly improved after treatment in APS group (p < 0.001), but TUG changes in IFT was not significant (p = 0.09). There was no significant difference in VAS, TUG and WOMAC subscales values before and after treatment as well as the mean improvement in VAS, TUG and WOMAC subscales during study between groups. Conclusion: Short-term treatment with both APS and IFT could significantly reduce pain and improve physical function in patients with knee OA. PMID:26029268

  20. Variety of the Wave Change in Compound Muscle Action Potential in an Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Zenya; Ando, Kei; Muramoto, Akio; Kobayashi, Kazuyoshi; Hida, Tetsuro; Ito, Kenyu; Ishikawa, Yoshimoto; Tsushima, Mikito; Matsumoto, Akiyuki; Tanaka, Satoshi; Morozumi, Masayoshi; Matsuyama, Yukihiro; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Animal study. Purpose To review the present warning point criteria of the compound muscle action potential (CMAP) and investigate new criteria for spinal surgery safety using an animal model. Overview of Literature Little is known about correlation palesis and amplitude of spinal cord monitoring. Methods After laminectomy of the tenth thoracic spinal lamina, 2-140 g force was delivered to the spinal cord with a tension gage to create a bilateral contusion injury. The study morphology change of the CMAP wave and locomotor scale were evaluated for one month. Results Four different types of wave morphology changes were observed: no change, amplitude decrease only, morphology change only, and amplitude and morphology change. Amplitude and morphology changed simultaneously and significantly as the injury force increased (p<0.05) Locomotor scale in the amplitude and morphology group worsened more than the other groups. Conclusions Amplitude and morphology change of the CMAP wave exists and could be the key of the alarm point in CMAP. PMID:26713129

  1. Action potential generation in an anatomically constrained model of medial superior olive axons.

    PubMed

    Lehnert, Simon; Ford, Marc C; Alexandrova, Olga; Hellmundt, Franziska; Felmy, Felix; Grothe, Benedikt; Leibold, Christian

    2014-04-01

    Neurons in the medial superior olive (MSO) encode interaural time differences (ITDs) with sustained firing rates of >100 Hz. They are able to generate such high firing rates for several hundred milliseconds despite their extremely low-input resistances of only few megaohms and high synaptic conductances in vivo. The biophysical mechanisms by which these leaky neurons maintain their excitability are not understood. Since action potentials (APs) are usually assumed to be generated in the axon initial segment (AIS), we analyzed anatomical data of proximal MSO axons in Mongolian gerbils and found that the axon diameter is <1 μm and the internode length is ∼100 μm. Using a morphologically constrained computational model of the MSO axon, we show that these thin axons facilitate the excitability of the AIS. However, for ongoing high rates of synaptic inputs the model generates a substantial fraction of APs in its nodes of Ranvier. These distally initiated APs are mediated by a spatial gradient of sodium channel inactivation and a strong somatic current sink. The model also predicts that distal AP initiation increases the dynamic range of the rate code for ITDs. PMID:24719114

  2. Mechanism of Action of IL-7 and Its Potential Applications and Limitations in Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jianbao; Zhao, Lintao; Wan, Yisong Y.; Zhu, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Interleukin-7 (IL-7) is a non-hematopoietic cell-derived cytokine with a central role in the adaptive immune system. It promotes lymphocyte development in the thymus and maintains survival of naive and memory T cell homeostasis in the periphery. Moreover, it is important for the organogenesis of lymph nodes (LN) and for the maintenance of activated T cells recruited into the secondary lymphoid organs (SLOs). The immune capacity of cancer patients is suppressed that is characterized by lower T cell counts, less effector immune cells infiltration, higher levels of exhausted effector cells and higher levels of immunosuppressive cytokines, such as transforming growth factor β (TGF-β). Recombinant human IL-7 (rhIL-7) is an ideal solution for the immune reconstitution of lymphopenia patients by promoting peripheral T cell expansion. Furthermore, it can antagonize the immunosuppressive network. In animal models, IL-7 has been proven to prolong the survival of tumor-bearing hosts. In this review, we will focus on the mechanism of action and applications of IL-7 in cancer immunotherapy and the potential restrictions for its usage. PMID:25955647

  3. 'Action potential-like' ST elevation following pseudo-Wellens' electrocardiogram.

    PubMed

    Oksuz, Fatih; Sensoy, Baris; Sen, Fatih; Celik, Ethem; Ozeke, Ozcan; Maden, Orhan

    2015-01-01

    Coronary artery vasospasm is an important cause of chest pain syndromes that can lead to myocardial infarction, ventricular arrhythmias, and sudden death. In 1959, Prinzmetal et al described a syndrome of nonexertional chest pain with ST-segment elevation on electrocardiography. Persistent angina is challenging, and repeated coronary angioplasty may be required in this syndrome. Calcium antagonists are extremely effective in treating and preventing coronary spasm, and may provide long-lasting relief for the patient. Whereas the Wellens' syndrome is characterized by symmetrically inverted T-waves with preserved R waves in the precordial leads suggestive of impending myocardial infarction due to a critical proximal left anterior descending stenosis, the pseudo-Wellens' syndrome caused by coronary artery spasm has also rarely been reported in literature. We present a pseudo-Wellens syndrome as a cause of vasospastic angina, and a diffuse ST segment elavation on electrocardiogram resembling the Greek letter lambda, called also 'action potential-like' ECG in a patient with vasospastic-type Printzmetal angina. PMID:26432739

  4. A Hybrid Classifier for Characterizing Motor Unit Action Potentials in Diagnosing Neuromuscular Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Kamali, T; Boostani, R; Parsaei, H

    2013-01-01

    Background: The time and frequency features of motor unit action potentials (MUAPs) extracted from electromyographic (EMG) signal provide discriminative information for diagnosis and treatment of neuromuscular disorders. However, the results of conventional automatic diagnosis methods using MUAP features is not convincing yet. Objective: The main goal in designing a MUAP characterization system is obtaining high classification accuracy to be used in clinical decision system. For this aim, in this study, a robust classifier is proposed to improve MUAP classification performance in estimating the class label (myopathic, neuropathic and normal) of a given MUAP. Method: The proposed scheme employs both time and time–frequency features of a MUAP along with an ensemble of support vector machines (SVMs) classifiers in hybrid serial/parallel architecture. Time domain features includes phase, turn, peak to peak amplitude, area, and duration of the MUAP. Time–frequency features are discrete wavelet transform coefficients of the MUAP. Results: Evaluation results of the developed system using EMG signals of 23 subjects (7 with myopathic, 8 with neuropathic and 8 with no diseases)  showed that the system estimated the class label of MUAPs extracted from these signals with average of accuracy of 91% which is at least 5% higher than the accuracy of two previously presented methods. Conclusion: Using different optimized subsets of features along with the presented hybrid classifier results in a classification accuracy that is encouraging to be used in clinical applications for MUAP characterization.  PMID:25505761

  5. Motor unit action potential conduction velocity estimated from surface electromyographic signals using image processing techniques.

    PubMed

    Soares, Fabiano Araujo; Carvalho, João Luiz Azevedo; Miosso, Cristiano Jacques; de Andrade, Marcelino Monteiro; da Rocha, Adson Ferreira

    2015-01-01

    In surface electromyography (surface EMG, or S-EMG), conduction velocity (CV) refers to the velocity at which the motor unit action potentials (MUAPs) propagate along the muscle fibers, during contractions. The CV is related to the type and diameter of the muscle fibers, ion concentration, pH, and firing rate of the motor units (MUs). The CV can be used in the evaluation of contractile properties of MUs, and of muscle fatigue. The most popular methods for CV estimation are those based on maximum likelihood estimation (MLE). This work proposes an algorithm for estimating CV from S-EMG signals, using digital image processing techniques. The proposed approach is demonstrated and evaluated, using both simulated and experimentally-acquired multichannel S-EMG signals. We show that the proposed algorithm is as precise and accurate as the MLE method in typical conditions of noise and CV. The proposed method is not susceptible to errors associated with MUAP propagation direction or inadequate initialization parameters, which are common with the MLE algorithm. Image processing -based approaches may be useful in S-EMG analysis to extract different physiological parameters from multichannel S-EMG signals. Other new methods based on image processing could also be developed to help solving other tasks in EMG analysis, such as estimation of the CV for individual MUs, localization and tracking of innervation zones, and study of MU recruitment strategies. PMID:26384112

  6. Adhesion to Carbon Nanotube Conductive Scaffolds Forces Action-Potential Appearance in Immature Rat Spinal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Toma, Francesca Maria; Calura, Enrica; Rizzetto, Lisa; Carrieri, Claudia; Roncaglia, Paola; Martinelli, Valentina; Scaini, Denis; Masten, Lara; Turco, Antonio; Gustincich, Stefano; Prato, Maurizio; Ballerini, Laura

    2013-01-01

    In the last decade, carbon nanotube growth substrates have been used to investigate neurons and neuronal networks formation in vitro when guided by artificial nano-scaled cues. Besides, nanotube-based interfaces are being developed, such as prosthesis for monitoring brain activity. We recently described how carbon nanotube substrates alter the electrophysiological and synaptic responses of hippocampal neurons in culture. This observation highlighted the exceptional ability of this material in interfering with nerve tissue growth. Here we test the hypothesis that carbon nanotube scaffolds promote the development of immature neurons isolated from the neonatal rat spinal cord, and maintained in vitro. To address this issue we performed electrophysiological studies associated to gene expression analysis. Our results indicate that spinal neurons plated on electro-conductive carbon nanotubes show a facilitated development. Spinal neurons anticipate the expression of functional markers of maturation, such as the generation of voltage dependent currents or action potentials. These changes are accompanied by a selective modulation of gene expression, involving neuronal and non-neuronal components. Our microarray experiments suggest that carbon nanotube platforms trigger reparative activities involving microglia, in the absence of reactive gliosis. Hence, future tissue scaffolds blended with conductive nanotubes may be exploited to promote cell differentiation and reparative pathways in neural regeneration strategies. PMID:23951361

  7. Kv3.1 uses a timely resurgent K(+) current to secure action potential repolarization.

    PubMed

    Labro, Alain J; Priest, Michael F; Lacroix, Jérôme J; Snyders, Dirk J; Bezanilla, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    High-frequency action potential (AP) transmission is essential for rapid information processing in the central nervous system. Voltage-dependent Kv3 channels play an important role in this process thanks to their high activation threshold and fast closure kinetics, which reduce the neuron's refractory period. However, premature Kv3 channel closure leads to incomplete membrane repolarization, preventing sustainable AP propagation. Here, we demonstrate that Kv3.1b channels solve this problem by producing resurgent K(+) currents during repolarization, thus ensuring enough repolarizing power to terminate each AP. Unlike previously described resurgent Na(+) and K(+) currents, Kv3.1b's resurgent current does not originate from recovery of channel block or inactivation but results from a unique combination of steep voltage-dependent gating kinetics and ultra-fast voltage-sensor relaxation. These distinct properties are readily transferrable onto an orthologue Kv channel by transplanting the voltage-sensor's S3-S4 loop, providing molecular insights into the mechanism by which Kv3 channels contribute to high-frequency AP transmission. PMID:26673941

  8. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 322: Areas 1 and 3 Release Sites and Injection Wells, Nevada Test Site, Nevada: Revision 0, Including Record of Technical Change No. 1

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

    2003-07-16

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives (CAAs) appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 322, Areas 1 and 3 Release Sites and Injection Wells, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 322 consists of three Corrective Action Sites (CASs): 01-25-01, AST Release (Area 1); 03-25-03, Mud Plant AST Diesel Release (Area 3); 03-20-05, Injection Wells (Area 3). Corrective Action Unit 322 is being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. The investigation of three CASs in CAU 322 will determine if hazardous and/or radioactive constituents are present at concentrations and locations that could potentially pose a threat to human health and the environment. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

  9. Modeling the action-potential-sensitive nonlinear-optical response of myelinated nerve fibers and short-term memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shneider, M. N.; Voronin, A. A.; Zheltikov, A. M.

    2011-11-01

    The Goldman-Albus treatment of the action-potential dynamics is combined with a phenomenological description of molecular hyperpolarizabilities into a closed-form model of the action-potential-sensitive second-harmonic response of myelinated nerve fibers with nodes of Ranvier. This response is shown to be sensitive to nerve demyelination, thus enabling an optical diagnosis of various demyelinating diseases, including multiple sclerosis. The model is applied to examine the nonlinear-optical response of a three-neuron reverberating circuit—the basic element of short-term memory.

  10. Rapid Ca2+ flux through the transverse tubular membrane, activated by individual action potentials in mammalian skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Launikonis, Bradley S; Stephenson, D George; Friedrich, Oliver

    2009-01-01

    Periods of low frequency stimulation are known to increase the net Ca2+ uptake in skeletal muscle but the mechanism responsible for this Ca2+ entry is not known. In this study a novel high-resolution fluorescence microscopy approach allowed the detection of an action potential-induced Ca2+ flux across the tubular (t-) system of rat extensor digitorum longus muscle fibres that appears to be responsible for the net uptake of Ca2+ in working muscle. Action potentials were triggered in the t-system of mechanically skinned fibres from rat by brief field stimulation and t-system [Ca2+] ([Ca2+]t-sys) and cytoplasmic [Ca2+] ([Ca2+]cyto) were simultaneously resolved on a confocal microscope. When initial [Ca2+]t-sys was ≥ 0.2 mm a Ca2+ flux from t-system to the cytoplasm was observed following a single action potential. The action potential-induced Ca2+ flux and associated t-system Ca2+ permeability decayed exponentially and displayed inactivation characteristics such that further Ca2+ entry across the t-system could not be observed after 2–3 action potentials at 10 Hz stimulation rate. When [Ca2+]t-sys was closer to 0.1 mm, a transient rise in [Ca2+]t-sys was observed almost concurrently with the increase in [Ca2+]cyto following the action potential. The change in direction of Ca2+ flux was consistent with changes in the direction of the driving force for Ca2+. This is the first demonstration of a rapid t-system Ca2+ flux associated with a single action potential in mammalian skeletal muscle. The properties of this channel are inconsistent with a flux through the L-type Ca2+ channel suggesting that an as yet unidentified t-system protein is conducting this current. This action potential-activated Ca2+ flux provides an explanation for the previously described Ca2+ entry and accumulation observed with prolonged, intermittent muscle activity. PMID:19332499

  11. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 7): Vogel Paint and Wax, Maurice, IA. (First remedial action), September 1989. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-09-20

    The Vogel Paint and Wax (VPW) site is an approximately two-acre disposal area two miles southwest of the town of Maurice, in Sioux County, Iowa. Adjacent land uses are primarily agricultural; however, several private residences are within one-quarter mile of the site. A surficial sand and gravel aquifer underlies the site and supplies nearby private wells and the Southern Sioux County Rural Water System, located a mile and one half southeast of the site. Paint sludge, resins, solvents, and other paint-manufacturing wastes were disposed of at the site between 1971 and 1979. VPW records indicate that approximately 43,000 gallons of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons and 6,000 pounds of metals waste were buried at the site. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the soil and ground water are VOCs including benzene, toluene, and xylenes; and metals including chromium and lead. The selected remedial action for this site includes excavation of contaminated soil and separation of solid and liquid wastes; onsite bioremediation of 3,000 cubic yards of the contaminated soil in a fully contained surface impoundment unit, or onsite thermal treatment if soil contains high metal content; and stabilization of treated soil, if necessary to prevent leaching of metals, followed by disposal in the excavated area.

  12. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 6): Arkwood, Inc. , Omaha, AR. (First remedial action), September 1990. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-28

    The 15-acre Arkwood site is a former wood treatment facility in Boone County, Arkansas. Land use in the vicinity of the site is primarily agricultural and light industrial. Ground water on, or near the site is highly susceptible to contamination as a result of underground cavities, enlarged fractures and conduits which hinder monitoring and pumping. State investigations conducted during the 1980s documented PCP and creosote contamination in surface water, soil, debris, and buildings throughout the site. Contaminated surface features at the site include the wood treatment facility, a sinkhole area contaminated with oily waste, a ditch area, a wood storage area, and an ash pile. In 1987, EPA ordered the site owner to perform an immediate removal action, which included implementing site access including fencing and sign postings. The Record of Decision (ROD) addresses remediation of all affected media, and provides the final remedy for the site. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the soil, sludge, debris, ground water and surface water are organics including pentachlorophenol (PCP), PAHs, and dioxin; and oils.

  13. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 5): Charlevoix Site, Michigan (second remedial action), September 1985. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-09-30

    The City of Charlevoix is located on the shores of Lake Michigan in Charlevoix County. The City's single municipal well supplies potable water to a year-round population of 3500 which increases to approximately 5,000 during the summer tourist season. In September 1981, while conducting tests for trihalogenated methane compounds, the Michigan Department of Public Health (MDPH) detected trichloroethylene (TCE) ranging in concentrations from 13 to 30 ppb in the Charlevoix water supply. Data from the monitoring program showed gradually rising levels of TCE and perchloroethylene (PCE) in the raw water. In June 1984, a Record of Decision was signed which approved an initial remedial measure (IRM) for an alternative water supply to replace the contaminated municipal well. The selected IRM consisted of a Lake Michigan water intake structure and a water filtration/flocculation treatment plant. The selected remedial action involves discharging the TCE and PCE plumes, under natural flow conditions, to Lake Michigan. The aquifer would be useable after 50 years. During that 50-year purging period, institutional restrictions on the installation of private wells in the contaminated aquifer will be enforced by local health officials. In addition, long-term monitoring of the plumes will continue. The estimated annual OandM costs for monitoring are $17,000.

  14. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 9): Coalinga Asbestos Mine, Fresno County, CA. (Second remedial action), September 1990. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-21

    The 557-acre Coalinga Asbestos Mine site, a former asbestos processing area and chromite mine, comprises part of the Johns Manville Coalinga Asbestos Mill site in western Fresno County, California. This rural mountainous area is used primarily for recreational purposes. From 1962 to 1974, asbestos ore from several local mines was processed and sorted onsite, and the resulting asbestos mill tailings were periodically bulldozed into an intermittent stream channel. Subsequently, from 1975 to 1977, a chromite milling operation was conducted onsite. Tailings were often washed downstream during periods of stream flow, and the resuspension of asbestos fibers from the tailings into the air produced a significant inhalation hazard. As a result of these activities, approximately 450,000 cubic yards of mill tailings and asbestos ore remain onsite within a large tailing pile. In 1980 and 1987, State investigations indicated that the site was contributing a significant amount of asbestos into the surface water. The site will be remediated as two Operable Units (OU). The Record of Decision (ROD) addresses the remedial action for OU2, the Johns Manville Coalinga Asbestos Mill Area. The primary contaminant of concern affecting the surface water is asbestos.

  15. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 9): Atlas Asbestos Mine, Fresno County, California (First remedial action), July 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-07-19

    The Atlas Asbestos Mine site is in Fresno County, California, and is being remediated concurrently with the Coalinga Asbestos Mine site. The Record of Decision (ROD) does not address the mines, but rather a separate area in the city of Coalinga, where asbestos, from the Atlas-Coalinga mines, was deposited to await handling and shipment. The site consists of four distinct areas: the warehouse which was once a mining waste distribution center and which currently houses 1,600 cubic yards of mining waste; a storage yard which contains asbestos-contaminated stacked pipes; a shipping yard which was used as an asbestos distribution center by the Atlas Asbestos Company; and the U.S. Asbestos Company which currently stores piles of asbestos-contaminated mining waste. Subsequent sampling programs, conducted between 1983 and 1987, revealed that surface water and air also contained elevated levels of asbestos. As a result of these finding, EPA issued an Administrative Order to a major landowner, Southern Pacific Transportation Company (SPTC), requiring SPTC to conduct an additional remedial investigation and a feasibility study and to perform interim measures to stabilize the site. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the soil and debris are metals including nickel, and other inorganics including asbestos and mining wastes. The selected remedial action for this site are included.

  16. Toxicity, sublethal effects, and potential modes of action of select fungicides on freshwater fish and invertebrates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elskus, Adria A.

    2012-01-01

    Despite decades of agricultural and urban use of fungicides and widespread detection of these pesticides in surface waters, relatively few data are available on the effects of fungicides on fish and invertebrates in the aquatic environment. Nine fungicides are reviewed in this report: azoxystrobin, boscalid, chlorothalonil, fludioxonil, myclobutanil, fenarimol, pyraclostrobin, pyrimethanil, and zoxamide. These fungicides were identified as emerging chemicals of concern because of their high or increasing global use rates, detection frequency in surface waters, or likely persistence in the environment. A review of the literature revealed significant sublethal effects of fungicides on fish, aquatic invertebrates, and ecosystems, including zooplankton and fish reproduction, fish immune function, zooplankton community composition, metabolic enzymes, and ecosystem processes, such as leaf decomposition in streams, among other biological effects. Some of these effects can occur at fungicide concentrations well below single-species acute lethality values (48- or 96-hour concentration that effects a response in 50 percent of the organisms, that is, effective concentration killing 50 percent of the organisms in 48 or 96 hours) and chronic sublethal values (for example, 21-day no observed adverse effects concentration), indicating that single-species toxicity values may dramatically underestimate the toxic potency of some fungicides. Fungicide modes of toxic action in fungi can sometimes reflect the biochemical and (or) physiological effects of fungicides observed in vertebrates and invertebrates; however, far more studies are needed to explore the potential to predict effects in nontarget organisms based on specific fungicide modes of toxic action. Fungicides can also have additive and (or) synergistic effects when used with other fungicides and insecticides, highlighting the need to study pesticide mixtures that occur in surface waters. For fungicides that partition to

  17. Simultaneous measurement and recording of gastric potential difference and intragastric pH in man.

    PubMed

    Scarpignato, C; Galmiche, J P

    1990-01-01

    Gastric potential difference (GPD) is used increasingly as an index of mucosal integrity. The technique for GPD measurement currently employed is however laborious due to the preparation and check of KCl-agarose bridges prior to each experiment. In addition, calculations - usually handmade - are time-consuming and inaccurate. Therefore, a new apparatus allowing continuous recording of basal and drug-induced changes in GPD values was developed. A commercially available 24-hour pH monitor (Proxima Light, Synectics Medical) was modified in order to allow GPD measurement and recording with subsequent elaboration of data. Furthermore, simultaneous measurement of GPD and intragastric pH through the use of a single stomach probe was made possible. The new method was checked towards the classical PD measuring system employing KCl-agarose bridges. The readings obtained with both systems, either in basal conditions or after aspirin, correlated in a highly significant way. Readings proved to be quite stable with a variation, for 150 consecutive values, of less than 2 mV. With this system the effect of pH modifications, obtained through H2 receptor stimulation and inhibition, on the behaviour of GPD values was investigated in healthy volunteers. Analysis of paired data obtained from these experiments showed an inverse relationship between these two parameters. This suggests that GPD and pH should be measured together, especially during experiments aiming to study drug effects on gastric mucosa. Although the apparatus described was developed for PD measurement and recording in the stomach, it can be used easily for PD measurement across the mucosa of the entire digestive tract, for example in the esophagus, colon or rectum. PMID:2225521

  18. Alluvial Fans as Recorders of Landscape Development: Potential for Determining Depositional Chronologies Using Luminescence Dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, M. J.; Rhodes, E. J.; Roder, B. J.; Antinao, J.; McDonald, E.

    2011-12-01

    Alluvial fans in both arid and humid environments provide a record of depositional events at the transition between mountain and lowland environments. Though complex in the detail of their depositional and erosional characteristics, they undoubtedly provide a valuable record of the highest erosion rate events in their upland catchments. Alluvial fans often also record tectonic activity; their mountain-front location is ideal to intersect bounding faults, and their characteristic geometry renders offsets easily recognisable. Dating of Quaternary alluvial fans can be accomplished using a number of techniques. These include radiocarbon dating where suitable organic materials are preserved; uranium series methods may be applied to provide a minimum age by dating carbonate inter-clast cements in some arid or semi-arid environments; terrestrial cosmogenic nuclide (TCN) methods work well in many dryland contexts though issues of inheritance in some catchments are significant. Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) and infrared stimulated luminescence (IRSL) rely on light sensitive charge populations trapped at meta-stable centers associated with impurities in quartz and feldspar grains. When grains are exposed to light, charge is evicted from these traps, and is slowly re-tapped by interaction with environmental ionizing radiaton. These signals have the potential to date a range of Quaternary sediments including alluvial fans on timescales of one year to several hundred thousand years. The specific issues relating to alluvial fans are problems of incomplete signal zeroing caused by rapid deposition, as well as low sensitivity and poor signal characteristics for quartz OSL. In this presentation, we explore the relative importance of these issues in determining luminescence chronologies for alluvial fans in different locations, and the ways in which these chronologies may be used to help inform models of landscape evolution, both numerical and conceptual.

  19. Effects of Sleep Deprivation on Action Potential and Transient Outward Potassium Current in Ventricular Myocytes in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Zhou; Ren, Yi-Peng; Lu, Cai-Yi; Li, Yang; Xu, Qiang; Peng, Li; Fan, Yong-Yan

    2015-01-01

    Background Sleep deprivation contributes to the development and recurrence of ventricular arrhythmias. However, the electrophysiological changes in ventricular myocytes in sleep deprivation are still unknown. Material/Methods Sleep deprivation was induced by modified multiple platform technique. Fifty rats were assigned to control and sleep deprivation 1, 3, 5, and 7 days groups, and single ventricular myocytes were enzymatically dissociated from rat hearts. Action potential duration (APD) and transient outward current (Ito) were recorded using whole-cell patch clamp technique. Results Compared with the control group, the phases of APD of ventricular myocytes in 3, 5, and 7 days groups were prolonged and APD at 20% and 50% level of repolarization (APD20 and APD50) was significantly elongated (The APD20 values of control, 1, 3, 5, and 7 days groups: 5.66±0.16 ms, 5.77±0.20 ms, 8.28±0.30 ms, 11.56±0.32 ms, 13.24±0.56 ms. The APD50 values: 50.66±2.16 ms, 52.77±3.20 ms, 65.28±5.30 ms, 83.56±7.32 ms, 89.24±5.56 ms. P<0.01, n=18). The current densities of Ito significantly decreased. The current density-voltage (I–V) curve of Ito was vitally suppressed downward. The steady-state inactivation curve and steady-state activation curve of Ito were shifted to left and right, respectively, in sleep deprivation rats. The inactivation recovery time of Ito was markedly retarded and the time of closed-state inactivation was markedly accelerated in 3, 5, and 7 days groups. Conclusions APD of ventricular myocytes in sleep deprivation rats was significantly prolonged, which could be attributed to decreased activation and accelerated inactivation of Ito. PMID:25694200

  20. Effect of activation sequence on transmural patterns of repolarization and action potential duration in rabbit ventricular myocardium

    PubMed Central

    Myles, Rachel C.; Bernus, Olivier; Burton, Francis L.; Cobbe, Stuart M.

    2010-01-01

    Although transmural heterogeneity of action potential duration (APD) is established in single cells isolated from different tissue layers, the extent to which it produces transmural gradients of repolarization in electrotonically coupled ventricular myocardium remains controversial. The purpose of this study was to examine the relative contribution of intrinsic cellular gradients of APD and electrotonic influences to transmural repolarization in rabbit ventricular myocardium. Transmural optical mapping was performed in left ventricular wedge preparations from eight rabbits. Transmural patterns of activation, repolarization, and APD were recorded during endocardial and epicardial stimulation. Experimental results were compared with modeled data during variations in electrotonic coupling. A transmural gradient of APD was evident during endocardial stimulation, which reflected differences previously seen in isolated cells, with the longest APD at the endocardium and the shortest at the epicardium (endo: 165 ± 5 vs. epi: 147 ± 4 ms; P < 0.05). During epicardial stimulation, this gradient reversed (epi: 162 ± 4 vs. endo: 148 ± 6 ms; P < 0.05). In both activation sequences, transmural repolarization followed activation and APD shortened along the activation path such that significant transmural gradients of repolarization did not occur. This correlation between transmural activation time and APD was recapitulated in simulations and varied with changes in intercellular coupling, confirming that it is mediated by electrotonic current flow between cells. These data suggest that electrotonic influences are important in determining the transmural repolarization sequence in rabbit ventricular myocardium and that they are sufficient to overcome intrinsic differences in the electrophysiological properties of the cells across the ventricular wall. PMID:20889843

  1. Continuous Time Level Crossing Sampling ADC for Bio-Potential Recording Systems

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Wei; Osman, Ahmad; Kim, Dongsoo; Goldstein, Brian; Huang, Chenxi; Martini, Berin; Pieribone, Vincent A.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present a fixed window level crossing sampling analog to digital convertor for bio-potential recording sensors. This is the first proposed and fully implemented fixed window level crossing ADC without local DACs and clocks. The circuit is designed to reduce data size, power, and silicon area in future wireless neurophysiological sensor systems. We built a testing system to measure bio-potential signals and used it to evaluate the performance of the circuit. The bio-potential amplifier offers a gain of 53 dB within a bandwidth of 200 Hz-20 kHz. The input-referred rms noise is 2.8 µV. In the asynchronous level crossing ADC, the minimum delta resolution is 4 mV. The input signal frequency of the ADC is up to 5 kHz. The system was fabricated using the AMI 0.5 µm CMOS process. The chip size is 1.5 mm by 1.5 mm. The power consumption of the 4-channel system from a 3.3 V supply is 118.8 µW in the static state and 501.6 µW with a 240 kS/s sampling rate. The conversion efficiency is 1.6 nJ/conversion. PMID:24163640

  2. Continuous Time Level Crossing Sampling ADC for Bio-Potential Recording Systems.

    PubMed

    Tang, Wei; Osman, Ahmad; Kim, Dongsoo; Goldstein, Brian; Huang, Chenxi; Martini, Berin; Pieribone, Vincent A; Culurciello, Eugenio

    2013-06-01

    In this paper we present a fixed window level crossing sampling analog to digital convertor for bio-potential recording sensors. This is the first proposed and fully implemented fixed window level crossing ADC without local DACs and clocks. The circuit is designed to reduce data size, power, and silicon area in future wireless neurophysiological sensor systems. We built a testing system to measure bio-potential signals and used it to evaluate the performance of the circuit. The bio-potential amplifier offers a gain of 53 dB within a bandwidth of 200 Hz-20 kHz. The input-referred rms noise is 2.8 µV. In the asynchronous level crossing ADC, the minimum delta resolution is 4 mV. The input signal frequency of the ADC is up to 5 kHz. The system was fabricated using the AMI 0.5 µm CMOS process. The chip size is 1.5 mm by 1.5 mm. The power consumption of the 4-channel system from a 3.3 V supply is 118.8 µW in the static state and 501.6 µW with a 240 kS/s sampling rate. The conversion efficiency is 1.6 nJ/conversion. PMID:24163640

  3. Amphetamine elevates nucleus accumbens dopamine via an action potential-dependent mechanism that is modulated by endocannabinoids.

    PubMed

    Covey, Dan P; Bunner, Kendra D; Schuweiler, Douglas R; Cheer, Joseph F; Garris, Paul A

    2016-06-01

    The reinforcing effects of abused drugs are mediated by their ability to elevate nucleus accumbens dopamine. Amphetamine (AMPH) was historically thought to increase dopamine by an action potential-independent, non-exocytotic type of release called efflux, involving reversal of dopamine transporter function and driven by vesicular dopamine depletion. Growing evidence suggests that AMPH also acts by an action potential-dependent mechanism. Indeed, fast-scan cyclic voltammetry demonstrates that AMPH activates dopamine transients, reward-related phasic signals generated by burst firing of dopamine neurons and dependent on intact vesicular dopamine. Not established for AMPH but indicating a shared mechanism, endocannabinoids facilitate this activation of dopamine transients by broad classes of abused drugs. Here, using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry coupled to pharmacological manipulations in awake rats, we investigated the action potential and endocannabinoid dependence of AMPH-induced elevations in nucleus accumbens dopamine. AMPH increased the frequency, amplitude and duration of transients, which were observed riding on top of slower dopamine increases. Surprisingly, silencing dopamine neuron firing abolished all AMPH-induced dopamine elevations, identifying an action potential-dependent origin. Blocking cannabinoid type 1 receptors prevented AMPH from increasing transient frequency, similar to reported effects on other abused drugs, but not from increasing transient duration and inhibiting dopamine uptake. Thus, AMPH elevates nucleus accumbens dopamine by eliciting transients via cannabinoid type 1 receptors and promoting the summation of temporally coincident transients, made more numerous, larger and wider by AMPH. Collectively, these findings are inconsistent with AMPH eliciting action potential-independent dopamine efflux and vesicular dopamine depletion, and support endocannabinoids facilitating phasic dopamine signalling as a common action in drug reinforcement

  4. Facilitating Youth to Take Sustainability Actions: The Potential of Peer Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Vreede, Catherine; Warner, Alan; Pitter, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Peer education is an understudied yet valuable strategy for sustainability educators in shifting youth to take action for sustainability. This case study conceptualizes the change process in facilitating youth to take sustainability actions, and explores the benefits, dynamics, and challenges of peer education as a strategy in facilitating change.…

  5. Arm and wrist surface potential mapping for wearable ECG rhythm recording devices: a pilot clinical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynn, W. D.; Escalona, O. J.; McEneaney, D. J.

    2013-06-01

    This study addresses an important question in the development of a ECG device that enables long term monitoring of cardiac rhythm. This device would utilise edge sensor technologies for dry, non-irritant skin contact suitable for distal limb application and would be supported by embedded ECG denoising processes. Contemporary ECG databases including those provided by MIT-BIH and Physionet are focused on interpretation of cardiac disease and rhythm tracking. The data is recorded using chest leads as in standard clinical practise. For the development of a peripherally located heart rhythm monitor, such data would be of limited use. To provide a useful database adequate for the development of the above mentioned cardiac monitoring device a unipolar body surface potential map from the left arm and wrist was gathered in 37 volunteer patients and characterized in this study. For this, the reference electrode was placed at the wrist. Bipolar far-field electrogram leads were derived and analysed. Factors such as skin variability, 50Hz noise interference, electrode contact noise, motion artifacts and electromyographic noise, presented a challenge. The objective was quantify the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) at the far-field locations. Preliminary results reveal that an electrogram indicative of the QRS complex can be recorded on the distal portion of the left arm when denoised using signal averaging techniques.

  6. A MEMS fabricated flexible electrode array for recording surface field potentials.

    PubMed

    Hollenberg, Brian A; Richards, Cecilia D; Richards, Robert; Bahr, David F; Rector, David M

    2006-05-15

    We developed a method to microfabricate flexible electrode arrays on a thin Kapton substrate, which was engineered to minimize trauma when inserted between the dura and skull to obtain surface EEG recordings. The array consisted of 64 gold electrodes, each 150microm in diameter on a 750microm spaced 8x8 grid. Using photolithographic procedures, any arrangement of electrodes can be implemented. We used the electrode array to record evoked response signals to create topographical maps of the whisker barrels on the cortical surface with excellent signal stability over a period of 8h. The materials used for this fabrication are potentially biologically inert and, with some additional modifications to the design, can be chronically implanted with minimal side effects. Retinal prosthesis, human neurosurgery, and neurological research are all limited to some degree by the resolution and biological compatibility of the implants used. This type of array could greatly enhance the spatial resolution, signal quality, and stability of implantable surface electrode arrays. PMID:16352343

  7. A convenient method for detecting electrolyte bridges in multichannel electroencephalogram and event-related potential recordings.

    PubMed

    Tenke, C E; Kayser, J

    2001-03-01

    Dense electrode arrays offer numerous advantages over single channel electroencephalogram/event-related potential (EEG/ERP) recordings, but also exaggerate the influence of common error sources arising from the preparation of scalp placements. Even with conventional low density recordings (e.g. 30-channel Electro-Cap), over-application of electrode gel may result in electrolyte leakage and create low impedance bridges, particularly at vertically-aligned sites (e.g. inferior-lateral). The ensuing electrical short produces an artificial similarity of ERPs at neighboring sites that distorts the ERP topography. This artifact is not immediately apparent in group averages, and may even go undetected after visual inspection of the individual ERP waveforms. Besides adding noise variance to the topography, this error source also has the capacity to introduce systematic, localized artifacts (e.g. add or remove evidence of lateralized activity). Electrolyte bridges causing these artifacts can be easily detected by a simple variant of the Hjorth algorithm (intrinsic Hjorth), in which spatial interelectrode distances are replaced by an electrical analog of distance (i.e. the variances of the difference waveforms for all pairwise combinations of electrodes). When a low impedance bridge exists, the Hjorth algorithm identifies all affected sites as flat lines that are readily distinguishable from Hjorth waveforms at unbridged electrodes. PMID:11222978

  8. Benefits negotiation: three Swedish hospitals pursuit of potential electronic health record benefits.

    PubMed

    Jeansson, John S

    2013-01-01

    At the very heart of Swedish healthcare digitalisation are large investments in electronic health records (EHRs). These integrated information systems (ISs) carry promises of great benefits and value for organisations. However, realising IS benefits and value has, in general, proven to be a challenging task, and as organisations strive to formalise their realisation efforts a misconception of rationality threatens to emerge. This misconception manifests itself when the formality of analysis threatens to underrate the impact of social processes in deciding which potential benefits to pursue. This paper suggests that these decisions are the result of a social process of negotiation. The purpose of this paper is to observe three benefits analysis projects of three Swedish hospitals to better understand the character and management of proposed benefits negotiations. Findings depict several different categories of benefits negotiations, as well as key factors to consider during the benefits negotiation process. PMID:24191344

  9. Simultaneous Recording of Electroretinography and Visual Evoked Potentials in Anesthetized Rats.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Christine T; Tsai, Tina I; He, Zheng; Vingrys, Algis J; Lee, Pei Y; Bui, Bang V

    2016-01-01

    The electroretinogram (ERG) and visual evoked potential (VEP) are commonly used to assess the integrity of the visual pathway. The ERG measures the electrical responses of the retina to light stimulation, while the VEP measures the corresponding functional integrity of the visual pathways from the retina to the primary visual cortex following the same light event. The ERG waveform can be broken down into components that reflect responses from different retinal neuronal and glial cell classes. The early components of the VEP waveform represent the integrity of the optic nerve and higher cortical centers. These recordings can be conducted in isolation or together, depending on the application. The methodology described in this paper allows simultaneous assessment of retinal and cortical visual evoked electrophysiology from both eyes and both hemispheres. This is a useful way to more comprehensively assess retinal function and the upstream effects that changes in retinal function can have on visual evoked cortical function. PMID:27404129

  10. Spatio-temporal activity patterns of odor-induced synchronized potentials revealed by voltage-sensitive dye imaging and intracellular recording in the antennal lobe of the cockroach.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Hidehiro; Ai, Hiroyuki; Yokohari, Fumio

    2012-01-01

    In animals, odor qualities are represented as both spatial activity patterns of glomeruli and temporal patterns of synchronized oscillatory signals in the primary olfactory centers. By optical imaging of a voltage-sensitive dye (VSD) and intracellular recording from secondary olfactory interneurons, we examined possible neural correlates of the spatial and temporal odor representations in the primary olfactory center, the antennal lobe (AL), of the cockroach Periplaneta americana. Voltage-sensitive dye imaging revealed that all used odorants induced odor-specific temporal patterns of depolarizing potentials in specific combinations of anterior glomeruli of the AL. The depolarizing potentials evoked by different odorants were temporally synchronized across glomeruli and were termed "synchronized potentials." These observations suggest that odor qualities are represented by spatio-temporal activity patterns of the synchronized potentials across glomeruli. We also performed intracellular recordings and stainings from secondary olfactory interneurons, namely projection neurons and local interneurons. We analyzed the temporal structures of enanthic acid-induced action potentials of secondary olfactory interneurons using simultaneous paired intracellular recording from two given neurons. Our results indicated that the multiple local interneurons synchronously fired in response to the olfactory stimulus. In addition, all stained enanthic acid-responsive projection neurons exhibited dendritic arborizations within the glomeruli where the synchronized potentials were evoked. Since multiple local interneurons are known to synapse to a projection neuron in each glomerulus in the cockroach AL, converging inputs from local interneurons to the projection neurons appear to contribute the odorant specific spatio-temporal activity patterns of the synchronized potentials. PMID:22848191

  11. Comprehensive Chronic Laminar Single-Unit, Multi-Unit, and Local Field Potential Recording Performance With Planar Single Shank Electrode Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Kozai, Takashi D. Y.; Du, Zhanhong; Gugel, Zhannetta V.; Smith, Matthew A.; Chase, Steven M.; Bodily, Lance M; Caparosa, Ellen M.; Friedlander, Robert M.; Cui, X. Tracy

    2015-01-01

    Background Intracortical electrode arrays that can record extracellular action potentials from small, targeted groups of neurons are critical for basic neuroscience research and emerging clinical applications. In general, these electrode devices suffer from reliability and variability issues, which have led to comparative studies of existing and emerging electrode designs to optimize performance. Comparisons of different chronic recording devices have been limited to single-unit (SU) activity and employed a bulk averaging approach treating brain architecture as homogeneous with respect to electrode distribution. New Method In this study, we optimize the methods and parameters to quantify evoked multi-unit (MU) and local field potential (LFP) recordings in 8 mice visual cortices. Results These findings quantify the large recording differences stemming from anatomical differences in depth and the layer dependent relative changes to SU and MU recording performance over 6-months. For example, performance metrics in Layer V and stratum pyramidale were initially higher than Layer II/III, but decrease more rapidly. On the other hand, Layer II/III maintained recording metrics longer. In addition, chronic changes at the level of layer IV are evaluated using visually evoked current source density. Comparison with Existing Method(s) The use of MU and LFP activity for evaluation and tracking biological depth provides a more comprehensive characterization of the electrophysiological performance landscape of microelectrodes. Conclusions A more extensive spatial and temporal insight into the chronic electrophysiological performance over time will help uncover the biological and mechanical failure mechanisms of the neural electrodes and direct future research toward the elucidation of design optimization for specific applications. PMID:25542351

  12. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 5): Bofors-Nobel site, Muskegon, MI. (First remedial action), September 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-17

    The 85-acre Bofors Nobel site is an active specialty chemical production plant in Edelston Township, Muskegon County, Michigan. An inactive landfill is also located in the eastern portion of the site. Onsite wetlands lie within the floodplain of Big Black Creek, which runs through the southern portion of the site. The site overlies a lacustrine aquifer, a potential drinking water source, which has been contaminated as a result of site activities. During the 1960s and early 1970s, sludge, wastewater, and waste liquids from plant operations were discharged into 10 onsite lagoons. The Record of Decision (ROD) addresses remediation of the lagoons, as well as upgrading the current ground water treatment system. A subsequent final ROD will address other contaminated soil and complete restoration of the aquifer. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the soil, sludge, and ground water are VOCs including benzene.

  13. Late-Quaternary Speleothem Records from the Balkan Peninsula - Potential, Objectives and First Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, I.; McCoy, W. D.; Markovic, S.; Endlicher, W.

    2010-12-01

    Mid-latitude speleothems often contain detailed, high-resolution records of local and regional interglacial climate changes. Many speleothem records of Holocene (MIS 1) and Eemian (MIS 5e) climate evolution have been investigated, but there is very little work being done in the Balkan region, despite the fact that the area is very rich in limestone caves with speleothems. Situated at the interface between temperate-continental and Mediterranean climates, present-day climate on the Balkan Peninsula is determined by two major upper-level jet streams, the polarfront jet (PFJ) and the subtropical jet (STJ). On a seasonal scale, both features exert varying influence and determine frontogenesis processes, cyclonic activity and precipitation. On decadal to millennial time-scales, changes and fluctuations in the position and permanency of these atmospheric circulation features influence the isotope signature in rainfall and ultimately in cave drip waters and related speleothems. We are investigating speleothems from Serbia, Montenegro and Bosnia-Herzegovina to study Late Quaternary climatic changes and to learn how both synoptic-scale systems were linked during the Holocene and previous interglacial periods. By example of a stalagmite collected in Vernjikica Cave, Serbia (Carpatho-Balkans), the project's potential to address important aspects of paleoclimatic research in the Mediterranean realm is discussed. The first studied, fine-laminated calcite stalagmite is about 50 cm tall and extends conically from the base to the top, presenting at least two visible growth discontinuities. Four preliminary uranium-series ages (234U/230Th) constrain the general period of growth to MIS 5d to MIS 5b. Preliminary results suggest that the stable oxygen isotope profile obtained from the axial zone largely reflects the unaltered isotopic composition of the cave drip water. The observed shifts in the isotope records display long-term changing climate conditions from temperate warm and

  14. Bacteriocins: modes of action and potentials in food preservation and control of food poisoning.

    PubMed

    Abee, T; Krockel, L; Hill, C

    1995-12-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) play an essential role in the majority of food fermentations, and a wide variety of strains are routinely employed as starter cultures in the manufacture of dairy, meat, vegetable and bakery products. One of the most important contributions of these microorganisms is the extended shelf life of the fermented product by comparison to that of the raw substrate. Growth of spoilage and pathogenic bacteria in these foods is inhibited due to competition for nutrients and the presence of starter-derived inhibitors such as lactic acid, hydrogen peroxide and bacteriocins (Ray and Daeschel, 1992). Bacteriocins, are a heterogenous group of anti-bacterial proteins that vary in spectrum of activity, mode of action, molecular weight, genetic origin and biochemical properties. Currently, artificial chemical preservatives are employed to limit the number of microorganisms capable of growing within foods, but increasing consumer awareness of potential health risks associated with some of these substances has led researchers to examine the possibility of using bacteriocins produced by LAB as biopreservatives. The major classes of bacteriocins produced by LAB include: (I) lantibiotics, (II) small heat stable peptides, (III) large heat labile proteins, and (IV) complex proteins whose activity requires the association of carbohydrate or lipid moieties (Klaenhammer, 1993). Significantly however, the inhibitory activity of these substances is confined to Gram-positive bacteria and inhibition of Gram-negatives by these bacteriocins has not been demonstrated, an observation which can be explained by a detailed analysis and comparison of the composition of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial cell walls (Fig. 1). In both types the cytoplasmic membrane which forms the border between the cytoplasm and the external environment, is surrounded by a layer of peptidoglycan which is significantly thinner in Gram-negative bacteria than in Gram-positive bacteria. Gram

  15. Effect of temperature on isoprenaline- and barium-induced slow action potentials in guinea-pig ventricular strips.

    PubMed

    Manzini, S; Parlani, M; Martucci, E; Maggi, C A; Meli, A

    1986-01-01

    The effect of variation in temperature (37-32 and 27 degrees C) on electrical and mechanical activity of depolarized and isoprenaline- or barium-reactivated guinea pig ventricular strips was studied. Lowering the temperature brings a marked prolongation of isoprenaline-induced slow action potentials. In addition the maximal rate of depolarization was strongly reduced at lower temperatures. These effects were observed at an extracellular Ca2+ concentration of either 0.9 or 2.5 mM. The accompanying mechanical activities was significantly increased by reduction in temperature. Barium-induced slow action potentials were similarly affected by temperature variations. These observations suggest that hypothermia exert a sort of calcium antagonistic action probably coupled to a reduction of repolarizing outward potassium currents. PMID:2430855

  16. Effect of knockout of α2δ-1 on action potentials in mouse sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Margas, Wojciech; Ferron, Laurent; Nieto-Rostro, Manuela; Schwartz, Arnold; Dolphin, Annette C

    2016-08-01

    Gene deletion of the voltage-gated calcium channel auxiliary subunit α2δ-1 has been shown previously to have a cardiovascular phenotype, and a reduction in mechano- and cold sensitivity, coupled with delayed development of neuropathic allodynia. We have also previously shown that dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neuron calcium channel currents were significantly reduced in α2δ-1 knockout mice. To extend our findings in these sensory neurons, we have examined here the properties of action potentials (APs) in DRG neurons from α2δ-1 knockout mice in comparison to their wild-type (WT) littermates, in order to dissect how the calcium channels that are affected by α2δ-1 knockout are involved in setting the duration of individual APs and their firing frequency. Our main findings are that there is reduced Ca(2+) entry on single AP stimulation, particularly in the axon proximal segment, reduced AP duration and reduced firing frequency to a 400 ms stimulation in α2δ-1 knockout neurons, consistent with the expected role of voltage-gated calcium channels in these events. Furthermore, lower intracellular Ca(2+) buffering also resulted in reduced AP duration, and a lower frequency of AP firing in WT neurons, mimicking the effect of α2δ-1 knockout. By contrast, we did not obtain any consistent evidence for the involvement of Ca(2+)-activation of large conductance calcium-activated potassium (BK) and small conductance calcium-activated potassium (SK) channels in these events. In conclusion, the reduced Ca(2+) elevation as a result of single AP stimulation is likely to result from the reduced duration of the AP in α2δ-1 knockout sensory neurons.This article is part of the themed issue 'Evolution brings Ca(2+) and ATP together to control life and death'. PMID:27377724

  17. Effect of knockout of α2δ-1 on action potentials in mouse sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Margas, Wojciech; Ferron, Laurent; Nieto-Rostro, Manuela; Schwartz, Arnold; Dolphin, Annette C.

    2016-01-01

    Gene deletion of the voltage-gated calcium channel auxiliary subunit α2δ-1 has been shown previously to have a cardiovascular phenotype, and a reduction in mechano- and cold sensitivity, coupled with delayed development of neuropathic allodynia. We have also previously shown that dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neuron calcium channel currents were significantly reduced in α2δ-1 knockout mice. To extend our findings in these sensory neurons, we have examined here the properties of action potentials (APs) in DRG neurons from α2δ-1 knockout mice in comparison to their wild-type (WT) littermates, in order to dissect how the calcium channels that are affected by α2δ-1 knockout are involved in setting the duration of individual APs and their firing frequency. Our main findings are that there is reduced Ca2+ entry on single AP stimulation, particularly in the axon proximal segment, reduced AP duration and reduced firing frequency to a 400 ms stimulation in α2δ-1 knockout neurons, consistent with the expected role of voltage-gated calcium channels in these events. Furthermore, lower intracellular Ca2+ buffering also resulted in reduced AP duration, and a lower frequency of AP firing in WT neurons, mimicking the effect of α2δ-1 knockout. By contrast, we did not obtain any consistent evidence for the involvement of Ca2+-activation of large conductance calcium-activated potassium (BK) and small conductance calcium-activated potassium (SK) channels in these events. In conclusion, the reduced Ca2+ elevation as a result of single AP stimulation is likely to result from the reduced duration of the AP in α2δ-1 knockout sensory neurons. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Evolution brings Ca2+ and ATP together to control life and death’. PMID:27377724

  18. Action potential processing in a detailed Purkinje cell model reveals a critical role for axonal compartmentalization

    PubMed Central

    Masoli, Stefano; Solinas, Sergio; D'Angelo, Egidio

    2015-01-01

    The Purkinje cell (PC) is among the most complex neurons in the brain and plays a critical role for cerebellar functioning. PCs operate as fast pacemakers modulated by synaptic inputs but can switch from simple spikes to complex bursts and, in some conditions, show bistability. In contrast to original works emphasizing dendritic Ca-dependent mechanisms, recent experiments have supported a primary role for axonal Na-dependent processing, which could effectively regulate spike generation and transmission to deep cerebellar nuclei (DCN). In order to account for the numerous ionic mechanisms involved (at present including Nav1.6, Cav2.1, Cav3.1, Cav3.2, Cav3.3, Kv1.1, Kv1.5, Kv3.3, Kv3.4, Kv4.3, KCa1.1, KCa2.2, KCa3.1, Kir2.x, HCN1), we have elaborated a multicompartmental model incorporating available knowledge on localization and gating of PC ionic channels. The axon, including initial segment (AIS) and Ranvier nodes (RNs), proved critical to obtain appropriate pacemaking and firing frequency modulation. Simple spikes initiated in the AIS and protracted discharges were stabilized in the soma through Na-dependent mechanisms, while somato-dendritic Ca channels contributed to sustain pacemaking and to generate complex bursting at high discharge regimes. Bistability occurred only following Na and Ca channel down-regulation. In addition, specific properties in RNs K currents were required to limit spike transmission frequency along the axon. The model showed how organized electroresponsive functions could emerge from the molecular complexity of PCs and showed that the axon is fundamental to complement ionic channel compartmentalization enabling action potential processing and transmission of specific spike patterns to DCN. PMID:25759640

  19. Natural cures for type 1 diabetes: a review of phytochemicals, biological actions, and clinical potential.

    PubMed

    Chang, C L T; Chen, Yi-Ching; Chen, Hui-Ming; Yang, Ning-Sun; Yang, Wen-Chin

    2013-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases are the third largest category of illness in the industrialized world, following cardiovascular diseases and cancers. Among them, type 1 diabetes, also named autoimmune diabetes, afflicts 10 million people worldwide. This disease is caused by autoimmunity-mediated destruction of pancreatic β-cells, leading to insulin deficiency, hyperglycemia and complications. Currently, there is no cure for type 1 diabetes. Insulin injection is the only medication; however, it accompanies serious medical complications. Current strategies to cure type 1 diabetes include immunotherapy, replacement therapy, and combination therapy. Despite recent advances in anti-diabetic strategies, no strategy is clinically successful. How to cure type 1 diabetes without undesirable side effects still remains a formidable challenge in drug research and development. Plants provide an extraordinary source of natural medicines for different diseases. Moreover, secondary metabolites of plant origin serve as an invaluable chemical library for drug discovery and current medicinal chemistry in the pharmaceutical industry. Over the past 25 years, 50% of prescription drugs have been developed from natural products and their derivatives. In this article, we review more than 20 plant compounds and extracts reported in the literature to prevent and treat type-1 diabetes. Emphasis is placed on their chemistry and biology in terms of regulation of immune cells and pancreatic β-cells. We summarize recent progress in understanding the biological actions, mechanisms and therapeutic potential of the compounds and extracts of plant origin in type 1 diabetes. New views on phytocompound-based strategies for prevention and treatment of type 1 diabetes are also discussed. PMID:23210779

  20. A potential role for cannabinoid receptors in the therapeutic action of fenofibrate.

    PubMed

    Priestley, Richard S; Nickolls, Sarah A; Alexander, Stephen P H; Kendall, David A

    2015-04-01

    Cannabinoids are reported to have actions through peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), which led us to investigate PPAR agonists for activity at the cannabinoid receptors. Radio-ligand binding and functional assays were conducted using human recombinant cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) or cannabinoid type 2 (CB2) receptors, as well as the guinea pig isolated ileum, using the full agonist CP55940 as a positive control. The PPAR-α agonist fenofibrate exhibited submicromolar affinity for both receptors (pKi CB1, 6.3 ± 0.1; CB2, 7.7 ± 0.1). Functionally, fenofibrate acted as an agonist at the CB2 receptor (pEC50, 7.7 ± 0.1) and a partial agonist at the CB1 receptor, although with a decrease in functional response at higher concentrations, producing bell-shaped concentration-response curves. High concentrations of fenofibrate were able to increase the dissociation rate constant for [(3)H]-CP55940 at the CB1 receptor, (kfast without: 1.2 ± 0.2/min; with: 3.8 ± 0.1 × 10(-2)/min) and decrease the maximal response to CP55940 (Rmax, 86 ± 2%), which is consistent with a negative allosteric modulator. Fenofibrate also reduced electrically induced contractions in isolated guinea pig ileum via CB1 receptors (pEC50, 6.0 ± 0.4). Fenofibrate is thus identified as an example of a new class of cannabinoid receptor ligand and allosteric modulator, with the potential to interact therapeutically with cannabinoid receptors in addition to its primary PPAR target. PMID:25550466

  1. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 9): Selma Pressure Treating Company, California (first remedial action), September 88

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-09-24

    The Selma Pressure Treating Company is located in Selma, California, 15 miles south of the City of Fresno. The site encompasses approximately 18 acres, including a 3- to 4-acre wood-treatment facility and 14 acres of adjacent vineyards that were used for site drainage. Wood-preserving activities using pentachlorophenol (PCP) were conducted at the site from 1942 until 1965 under a series of owners. In 1965, a new facility was constructed converting operations to a pressure treating process using chemical preservatives. Prior to 1982, wastes generated from spent retort fluids and sludges were discharged to drainage and percolation ditches, dry wells, and an unlined pond and sludge pit, as well as onto open ground and the adjacent vineyards. An inspection conducted by EPA in 1981 raised concerns about the potential for ground-water contamination, and as a result the company was required to modify its operations to minimize the potential for contamination. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the ground water and soil are organics including dioxin and phenols, and metals including arsenic and chromium. The selected remedial action for the site is included.

  2. Mathematical simulations of ligand-gated and cell-type specific effects on the action potential of human atrium

    PubMed Central

    Maleckar, Mary M.; Greenstein, Joseph L.; Trayanova, Natalia A.; Giles, Wayne R.

    2010-01-01

    In the mammalian heart, myocytes and fibroblasts can communicate via gap junction, or connexin-mediated current flow. Some of the effects of this electrotonic coupling on the action potential waveform of the human ventricular myocyte have been analyzed in detail. The present study employs a recently developed mathematical model of the human atrial myocyte to investigate the consequences of this heterogeneous cell–cell interaction on the action potential of the human atrium. Two independent physiological processes which alter the physiology of the human atrium have been studied. i) The effects of the autonomic transmitter acetylcholine on the atrial action potential have been investigated by inclusion of a time-independent, acetylcholine-activated K+ current in this mathematical model of the atrial myocyte. ii) A non-selective cation current which is activated by natriuretic peptides has been incorporated into a previously published mathematical model of the cardiac fibroblast. These results identify subtle effects of acetylcholine, which arise from the nonlinear interactions between ionic currents in the human atrial myocyte. They also illustrate marked alterations in the action potential waveform arising from fibroblast–myocyte source–sink principles when the natriuretic peptide-mediated cation conductance is activated. Additional calculations also illustrate the effects of simultaneous activation of both of these cell-type specific conductances within the atrial myocardium. This study provides a basis for beginning to assess the utility of mathematical modeling in understanding detailed cell–cell interactions within the complex paracrine environment of the human atrial myocardium. PMID:19186188

  3. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 7): People's Natural Gas Coal-gasification site, Dubuque, IA. (First remedial action), September 1991. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-16

    The 5-acre People's Natural Gas site is a former coal gasification plant in Dubuque County, Iowa. The city of Dubuque maintains a public works garage on the eastern portion of the site, and the Iowa Department of Transportation owns the western portion. In addition, the site overlies a silty sand unit and an alluvial aquifer, which has been determined to be a potential source of drinking water. In 1986, EPA investigations identified extensive contamination of onsite soil and ground water at the site. The Record of Decision (ROD) addresses both soil and ground water contamination, as a final remedy. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the soil and ground water are VOCs including benzene, toluene, and xylenes; and other organics including PAHs. The selected remedial action for the site includes excavating and incinerating an estimated 18,500 cubic yards of contaminated soil offsite; treating the soil and ground water within the silty sand unit, which are contaminated with coal tar wastes using in-situ bioremediation; pumping and onsite treatment of contaminated ground water using air stripping.

  4. Postnatal maturation of rat hypothalamoneurohypophysial neurons: evidence for a developmental decrease in calcium entry during action potentials.

    PubMed

    Widmer, H; Amerdeil, H; Fontanaud, P; Desarménien, M G

    1997-01-01

    Action potentials and voltage-gated currents were studied in acutely dissociated neurosecretory cells from the rat supraoptic nucleus during the first three postnatal weeks (PW1-PW3), a period corresponding to the final establishment of neuroendocrine relationships. Action potential duration (at half maximum) decreased from 2.7 to 1.8 ms; this was attributable to a decrease in decay time. Application of cadmium (250 microM) reduced the decay time by 43% at PW1 and 21% at PW3, indicating that the contribution of calcium currents to action potentials decreased during postnatal development. The density of high-voltage-activated calcium currents increased from 4.4 to 10.1 pA/pF at postnatal days 1-5 and 11-14, respectively. The conductance density of sustained potassium current, measured at +20 mV, increased from 0.35 (PW1) to 0.53 (PW3) nS/pF. The time to half-maximal amplitude did not change. Conductance density and time- and voltage-dependent inactivation of the transient potassium current were stable from birth. At PW1, the density and time constant of decay (measured at 0 mV) were 0.29 nS/pF (n = 12) and 17.9 ms (n = 10), respectively. Voltage-dependent properties and density (1.1 nS/pF) of the sodium current did not change postnatally. During PW1, fitting the mean activation data with a Boltzmann function gave a half-activation potential of -25 mV. A double Boltzman equation was necessary to adequately fit the inactivation data, suggesting the presence of two populations of sodium channels. One population accounted for approximately 14% of the channels, with a half-inactivation potential of -86 mV; the remaining population showed a half-inactivation potential of -51 mV. A mathematical model, based on Hodgkin-Huxley equations, was used to assess the respective contributions of individual currents to the action potential. When the densities of calcium and sustained potassium currents were changed from immature to mature values, the decay time of the action

  5. Neurophysiological Effects of Meditation Based on Evoked and Event Related Potential Recordings

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Nilkamal; Telles, Shirley

    2015-01-01

    Evoked potentials (EPs) are a relatively noninvasive method to assess the integrity of sensory pathways. As the neural generators for most of the components are relatively well worked out, EPs have been used to understand the changes occurring during meditation. Event-related potentials (ERPs) yield useful information about the response to tasks, usually assessing attention. A brief review of the literature yielded eleven studies on EPs and seventeen on ERPs from 1978 to 2014. The EP studies covered short, mid, and long latency EPs, using both auditory and visual modalities. ERP studies reported the effects of meditation on tasks such as the auditory oddball paradigm, the attentional blink task, mismatched negativity, and affective picture viewing among others. Both EP and ERPs were recorded in several meditations detailed in the review. Maximum changes occurred in mid latency (auditory) EPs suggesting that maximum changes occur in the corresponding neural generators in the thalamus, thalamic radiations, and primary auditory cortical areas. ERP studies showed meditation can increase attention and enhance efficiency of brain resource allocation with greater emotional control. PMID:26137479

  6. Pharmacological and biochemical actions of simple coumarins: natural products with therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Hoult, J R; Payá, M

    1996-06-01

    1. More than 300 coumarins have been identified from natural sources, especially green plants. The pharmacological and biochemical properties and therapeutic applications of simple coumarins depend upon the pattern of substitution. More complex related compounds based on the coumarin nucleus include the dicoumarol/warfarin anticoagulants, aflatoxins and the psoralens (photosensitizing agents). 2. Coumarin itself (1,2-benzopyrone) has long-established efficacy in slow-onset long-term reduction of lymphoedema in man, as confirmed in recent double-blind trials against elephantiasis and postmastectomy swelling of the arm. The mechanism of action is uncertain, but may involve macrophage-induced proteolysis of oedema protein. However, coumarin has low absolute bioavailability in man (< 5%), due to extensive first-pass hepatic conversion to 7-hydroxycoumarin followed by glucuronidation. It may, therefore, be a prodrug. 3. Scoparone (6,7-dimethoxycoumarin) has been purified from the hypolipidaemic Chinese herb Artemisia scoparia and shown to reduce the proliferative responses of human peripheral mononuclear cells, to relax smooth muscle, to reduce total cholesterol and triglycerides and to retard the characteristic pathomorphological changes in hypercholesterolaemic diabetic rabbits. Various properties of scoparone were suggested to account for these findings, including ability to scavenge reactive oxygen species, inhibition of tyrosine kinases and potentiation of prostaglandin generation. 4. Osthole (7-methoxy-8-[3-methylpent-2-enyl]coumarin) from Angelica pubescens, used also in Chinese medicine, causes hypotension in vivo, and inhibits platelet aggregation and smooth muscle contraction in vitro. It may interfere with calcium influx and with cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases. 5. Cloricromene, a synthetic coumarin derivative, also possesses antithrombotic antiplatelet actions, inhibits PMN neutrophil function and causes vasodilatation. Some of these properties of

  7. Explanation of Significant Differences for the Record of Decision for Interim Actions in Zone 1, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Bechtel Jacobs

    2011-02-01

    Zone 1 is a 1400-acre area outside the fence of the main plant at The East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The Record of Decision for Interim Actions in Zone, ETTP (Zone 1 Interim ROD) (DOE 2002) identifies the remedial actions for contaminated soil, buried waste, and subsurface infrastructure necessary to protect human health and to limit further contamination of groundwater. Since the Zone 1 Interim Record of Decision (ROD) was signed, new information has been obtained that requires the remedy to be modified as follows: (1) Change the end use in Contractor's Spoil Area (CSA) from unrestricted industrial to recreational; (2) Remove Exposure Units (EU5) ZI-50, 51, and 52 from the scope of the Zone I Interim ROD; (3) Change the end use of the duct bank corridor from unrestricted industrial to restricted industrial; and (4) Remove restriction for the disturbance of soils below 10 feet in Exposure Unit (EU) Z1-04. In accordance with 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 300.435, these scope modifications are a 'significant' change to the Zone 1 Interim ROD. In accordance with CERCLA Sect. 117 (c) and 40 CFR 300.435 (c)(2)(i), such a significant change is documented with an Explanation of Significant Differences (ESD). The purpose of this ESD is to make the changes listed above. This ESD is part of the Administrative Record file, and it, and other information supporting the selected remedy, can be found at the DOE Information Center, 475 Oak Ridge Turnpike, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830, from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday. The ORR is located in Roane and Anderson counties, within and adjacent to the corporate city limits of Oak Ridge, Tennessee. ETTP is located in Roane County near the northwest corner of the ORR. ETTP began operation during World War II as part of the Manhattan Project. The original mission of ETTP was to produce enriched uranium for use in atomic weapons. The plant produced enriched uranium from 1945 until 1985

  8. Stalagmite growth perturbations from the Kumaun Himalaya as potential earthquake recorders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajendran, C. P.; Sanwal, Jaishri; Morell, Kristin D.; Sandiford, Mike; Kotlia, B. S.; Hellstrom, John; Rajendran, Kusala

    2016-04-01

    The central part of the Himalaya (Kumaun and Garhwal Provinces of India) is noted for its prolonged seismic quiescence, and therefore, developing a longer-term time series of past earthquakes to understand their recurrence pattern in this segment assumes importance. In addition to direct observations of offsets in stratigraphic exposures or other proxies like paleoliquefaction, deformation preserved within stalagmites (speleothems) in karst system can be analyzed to obtain continuous millennial scale time series of earthquakes. The Central Indian Himalaya hosts natural caves between major active thrusts forming potential storehouses for paleoseismological records. Here, we present results from the limestone caves in the Kumaun Himalaya and discuss the implications of growth perturbations identified in the stalagmites as possible earthquake recorders. This article focuses on three stalagmites from the Dharamjali Cave located in the eastern Kumaun Himalaya, although two other caves, one of them located in the foothills, were also examined for their suitability. The growth anomalies in stalagmites include abrupt tilting or rotation of growth axes, growth termination, and breakage followed by regrowth. The U-Th age data from three specimens allow us to constrain the intervals of growth anomalies, and these were dated at 4273 ± 410 years BP (2673-1853 BC), 2782 ± 79 years BP (851-693 BC), 2498 ± 117 years BP (605-371 BC), 1503 ± 245 years BP (262-752 AD), 1346 ± 101 years BP (563-765 AD), and 687 ± 147 years BP (1176-1470 AD). The dates may correspond to the timings of major/great earthquakes in the region and the youngest event (1176-1470 AD) shows chronological correspondence with either one of the great medieval earthquakes (1050-1250 and 1259-1433 AD) evident from trench excavations across the Himalayan Frontal Thrust.

  9. Topography and homogeneity of monkey V1 studied through subdurally recorded pattern-evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Dagnelie, G; Spekreijse, H; van Dijk, B

    1989-12-01

    Using small checkerboard stimulus fields, we have recorded visually evoked potentials (VEPs) in an alert rhesus monkey from an array of 35 electrodes chronically implanted between dura and arachnoid to study mass neuronal activity in striate and peristriate visual cortex. Although the principal purpose of this work was to study in detail cortical mapping in this particular animal for future intracortical recordings, we report here the usefulness of our approach for the non-invasive study of cortical processing, in particular of cortical magnification and receptive-field properties over the central 6 degrees of the visual field. The striate and extrastriate components in the pattern onset VEP both have a double negative-going waveform, with N-P-N peak latencies of 75-100-135 ms and 90-115-160 ms, respectively, for small element sizes and moderate contrasts; latencies may be 5 ms shorter for large element sizes and high contrast. We found little activity at electrode locations over visual areas beyond V2. The waveforms and timing permit some careful speculation concerning intracortical processing and VEP generation. The complex logarithmic form of the retinotopical projection provides a satisfactory model for our data, if a value of 1-1.2 degrees is used for the offset parameter a. Our data suggest that the most abundant receptive-field size in foveal striate cortex has a center diameter of 12'. This size remains constant up to 2 degrees eccentricity, and increases only slowly up to 4 degrees. The smallest receptive-field sizes seem to be independent of eccentricity throughout the central 4 degrees of V1, with a value of 4-8', in agreement with single-cell data reported by Dow et al. (1981) and Van Essen et al. (1984). PMID:2487121

  10. Evaluating potential changes in salmonid rearing capacity from alternative sets of rehabilitation actions in the Trinity River, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beechie, T. J.; Pess, G. R.; Imaki, H.; Martin, A.; Alvarez, J.; Goodman, D.

    2013-12-01

    River restoration plans often propose numerous rehabilitation actions to address key habitat impairments for salmonids. However, restoration plans rarely propose alternative sets of actions or attempt to quantify the potential benefits to targeted biota. In this paper we use geomorphic and biological analyses to estimate restoration potential for each of 37 reaches in a 64-km section of Trinity River, California from the North Fork Trinity River to Lewiston Dam (the focus of habitat rehabilitation efforts under the Trinity River Restoration Program). We first predicted the channel pattern that might develop based in each reach on slope-discharge criteria, and then used these potential patterns along with floodplain width to estimate the maximum sinuosity that restoration actions could likely achieve, as well as a maximum side-channel length that might be created in each reach. For each scenario, we then used existing stream habitat and juvenile salmonid data from previous studies in the Trinity River and other watersheds to determine current and restored carrying capacity. Potential increases in Chinook and steelhead carrying capacity range from 39% for a relatively realistic estimate of increasing habitat quality (more low velocity areas with cover) to 67% for a more optimistic scenario that increases both sinuosity and habitat quality. Only the most optimistic scenario that increases habitat quality, increases sinuosity, and constructs tens of kilometers of side channels more than doubles potential juvenile salmonid production (140% increase). These quantitative predictions provide a frame of reference for evaluating alternative restoration options, and for setting measurable restoration goals.

  11. Assessment of TTX-s and TTX-r Action Potential Conduction along Neurites of NGF and GDNF Cultured Porcine DRG Somata

    PubMed Central

    Jonas, Robin; Klusch, Andreas; Schmelz, Martin; Petersen, Marlen; Carr, Richard W.

    2015-01-01

    Nine isoforms of voltage-gated sodium channels (NaV) have been characterized and in excitable tissues they are responsible for the initiation and conduction of action potentials. For primary afferent neurons residing in dorsal root ganglia (DRG), individual neurons may express multiple NaV isoforms extending the neuron’s functional capabilities. Since expression of NaV isoforms can be differentially regulated by neurotrophic factors we have examined the functional consequences of exposure to either nerve growth factor (NGF) or glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) on action potential conduction in outgrowing cultured porcine neurites of DRG neurons. Calcium signals were recorded using the exogenous intensity based calcium indicator Fluo-8®, AM. In 94 neurons, calcium signals were conducted along neurites in response to electrical stimulation of the soma. At an image acquisition rate of 25 Hz it was possible to discern calcium transients in response to individual electrical stimuli. The peak amplitude of electrically-evoked calcium signals was limited by the ability of the neuron to follow the stimulus frequency. The stimulus frequency required to evoke a half-maximal calcium response was approximately 3 Hz at room temperature. In 13 of 14 (93%) NGF-responsive neurites, TTX-r NaV isoforms alone were sufficient to support propagated signals. In contrast, calcium signals mediated by TTX-r NaVs were evident in only 4 of 11 (36%) neurites from somata cultured in GDNF. This establishes a basis for assessing action potential signaling using calcium imaging techniques in individual cultured neurites and suggests that, in the pig, afferent nociceptor classes relying on the functional properties of TTX-r NaV isoforms, such as cold-nociceptors, most probably derive from NGF-responsive DRG neurons. PMID:26407014

  12. μ-Conotoxins that differentially block sodium channels NaV1.1 through 1.8 identify those responsible for action potentials in sciatic nerve

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Michael J.; Yoshikami, Doju; Azam, Layla; Gajewiak, Joanna; Olivera, Baldomero M.; Bulaj, Grzegorz; Zhang, Min-Min

    2011-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) are important for action potentials. There are seven major isoforms of the pore-forming and gate-bearing α-subunit (NaV1) of VGSCs in mammalian neurons, and a given neuron can express more than one isoform. Five of the neuronal isoforms, NaV1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.6, and 1.7, are exquisitely sensitive to tetrodotoxin (TTX), and a functional differentiation of these presents a serious challenge. Here, we examined a panel of 11 μ-conopeptides for their ability to block rodent NaV1.1 through 1.8 expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Although none blocked NaV1.8, a TTX-resistant isoform, the resulting “activity matrix” revealed that the panel could readily discriminate between the members of all pair-wise combinations of the tested isoforms. To examine the identities of endogenous VGSCs, a subset of the panel was tested on A- and C-compound action potentials recorded from isolated preparations of rat sciatic nerve. The results show that the major subtypes in the corresponding A- and C-fibers were NaV1.6 and 1.7, respectively. Ruled out as major players in both fiber types were NaV1.1, 1.2, and 1.3. These results are consistent with immunohistochemical findings of others. To our awareness this is the first report describing a qualitative pharmacological survey of TTX-sensitive NaV1 isoforms responsible for propagating action potentials in peripheral nerve. The panel of μ-conopeptides should be useful in identifying the functional contributions of NaV1 isoforms in other preparations. PMID:21652775

  13. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 527: Horn Silver Mine, Nevada Test Site, Nevada: Revision 1 (Including Records of Technical Change No.1, 2, 3, and 4)

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office

    2002-12-06

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 527, Horn Silver Mine, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 527 consists of one Corrective Action Site (CAS): 26-20-01, Contaminated Waste Dump No.1. The site is located in an abandoned mine site in Area 26 (which is the most arid part of the NTS) approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas. Historical documents may refer to this site as CAU 168, CWD-1, the Wingfield mine (or shaft), and the Wahmonie mine (or shaft). Historical documentation indicates that between 1959 and the 1970s, nonliquid classified material and unclassified waste was placed in the Horn Silver Mine's shaft. Some of the waste is known to be radioactive. Documentation indicates that the waste is present from 150 feet to the bottom of the mine (500 ft below ground surface). This CAU is being investigated because hazardous constituents migrating from materials and/or wastes disposed of in the Horn Silver Mine may pose a threat to human health and the environment as well as to assess the potential impacts associated with any potential releases from the waste. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

  14. A Novel Method for the Description of Voltage-Gated Ionic Currents Based on Action Potential Clamp Results—Application to Hippocampal Mossy Fiber Boutons

    PubMed Central

    Clay, John R.

    2016-01-01

    Action potential clamp (AP-clamp) recordings of the delayed rectifier K+ current IK and the fast-activated Na+ current INa in rat hippocampal mossy fiber boutons (MFBs) are analyzed using a computational technique recently reported. The method is implemented using a digitized AP from an MFB and computationally applying that data set to published models of IK and INa. These numerical results are compared with experimental AP-clamp recordings. The INa result is consistent with experiment; the IK result is not. The difficulty with the IK model concerns the fully activated current-voltage relation, which is described here by the Goldman-Hodgkin-Katz dependence on the driving force (V-EK) rather than (V-EK) itself, the standard model for this aspect of ion permeation. That revision leads to the second—a much steeper voltage dependent activation curve for IK than the one obtained from normalization of a family of IK records by (V-EK). The revised model provides an improved description of the AP-clamp measurement of IK in MFBs compared with the standard approach. The method described here is general. It can be used to test models of ionic currents in any excitable cell. In this way it provides a novel approach to the relationship between ionic current and membrane excitability in neurons. PMID:26793065

  15. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 263: Area 25 Building 4839 Leachfields, Nevada Test Site, Revision 0, DOE/NV--535 UPDATED WITH RECORD OF TECHNICAL CHANGE No.1

    SciTech Connect

    US DOE Nevada Operations Office

    1999-04-12

    The Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 263, the Area 25 Building 4839 Leachfield, has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order that was agreed to by the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office; the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; and the US Department of Defense. Corrective Action Unit 263 is comprised of the Corrective Action Site 25-05-04 sanitary leachfield and associated collection system. This Corrective Action Investigation Plan is used in combination with the Work Plan for Leachfield Corrective Action Units: Nevada Test Site and Tonopah Test Range, Nevada (DOE/NV, 1998d). The Leachfield Work Plan was developed to streamline investigations at Leachfield Corrective Action Units by incorporating management, technical, quality assurance, health and safety, public involvement, field sampling, and waste management information common to a set of Corrective Action Units with similar site histories and characteristics into a single document that can be referenced. This Corrective Action Investigation Plan provides investigative details specific to Corrective Action Unit 263. Corrective Action Unit 263 is located southwest of Building 4839, in the Central Propellant Storage Area. Operations in Building 4839 from 1968 to 1996 resulted in effluent releases to the leachfield and associated collection system. In general, effluent released to the leachfield consisted of sanitary wastewater from a toilet, urinal, lavatory, and drinking fountain located within Building 4839. The subsurface soils in the vicinity of the collection system and leachfield may have been impacted by effluent containing contaminants of potential concern generated by support activities associated with the Building 4839 operations.

  16. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 7): Todtz, Lawrence Farm, IA. (First Remedial Action), November 1988. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-11-04

    The 2.7-acre Dupont Impoundment of the Todtz Farm site is located on a 120-acre farm 1.25 miles west of Camanche, Iowa. Originally a sand and gravel mine, the landfill received municipal waste from 1969 to 1975. Dupont disposed of an estimated 4,300 tons of wet end cellophane process wastes from 1971 until its closure in 1975. Impoundment wastes are periodically in direct contact with the ground water beneath the site, which flows southeasterly toward the Mississippi River. Domestic wells and the municipal water-supply wells for Camanche located downgradient of the site may be affected by contamination from the site. In addition, several ponds and lakes in the vicinity are potential receptors for contaminated runoff and recharge. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the ground water are VOCs including toluene and benzene, and metals including arsenic, lead, and chromium. The selected remedial action for the site includes installation of a soil cover over the Dupont Impoundment; implementation of institutional controls including deed and land-use restrictions; provision of an alternate water supply for an affected residence by relocating an existing well; and ground-water monitoring.

  17. From snowball earth to the cambrian explosion: the interpretative potential of the isotope record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shields, G.

    2003-04-01

    The interval in Earth history between 750 Ma and 530 Ma represents the erratic transition between the distinctly different "Earth systems" of the Proterozoic and the Phanerozoic. Geologists have developed several indirect methods to study this key interval but perhaps none with as much wanton enthusiasm as isotope geochemistry. Here I attempt a review of the isotope record across this key transition period, with special emphasis on the interpretative role that isotopes can play in understanding events such as the "Snowball Earth" glaciations and the "Cambrian Explosion". The marine isotope record reveals the Proterozoic-Phanerozoic transition to have been a unique period in Earth history with first-order features in all three of the major isotope proxies: 87Sr/86Sr, 34S/32S and 13C/12C ratios. Seawater 87Sr/86Sr, increased sharply between about 900 Ma and 500 Ma from 0.704 to 0.709, the largest rise ever. Although attributed to increasing rates of continental erosion, this remains only the most plausible explanation because few aspects of the rise have been satisfactorily linked to particular tectonic events. Much of the uncertainty surrounding the Proterozoic 87Sr/86Sr record is due to poor age dating and discrepancies in stratigraphic correlation schemes, which together with diagenetic alteration have led to the current inability to realise the potential of the 87Sr/86Sr record for global stratigraphic correlation. Carbon isotopes have played a key role in recent palaeoenvironmental interpretations of the Proterozoic-Phanerozoic transition, most of which have already been discarded or merely forgotten. Nevertheless, it is clear that the extraordinary δ13C values of the later Neoproterozoic (and the earliest Cambrian) demand extraordinary explanations, for which there is still much scope for future invention. Carbon isotopes may also play an important supporting role in correlation, however, the role that δ13C may play in global stratigraphic correlation has

  18. A potential record of Late Holocene natural environmental changes in a cultural landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Søe, Niels Emil; Vad Odgaard, Bent; Olsen, Jesper; Munch Kristiansen, Søren

    2014-05-01

    The Late Holocene period is in most of Europe characterised by fast developing culture and agricultural techniques with associated changes in land-use, land-cover and landscape processes. Therefore, European Late Holocene natural environmental changes are often difficult to document. A core from Lake Ilsø, Denmark, was obtained to investigate environmental changes in the lake and its catchment during the Late Holocene. This record suggests an environment little disturbed by humans during the Iron Age. Lake Ilsø, situated in the central Jutland, is a small (0.005km2) and wind-protected lake in an east-west directed tunnel valley. The lake has an outlet, now channelised, and its topographical catchment area is 0.2km2. The morphology and size of Lake Ilsø gives it the potential of recording local-scale hydrological, environmental and climatic changes. Five radiocarbon dates on terrestrial material constitute an age-depth model of the 7m core, which was obtained in the central part of Lake Ilsø at maximum water depth (2.5m). The core covers the time interval from 2750 cal yr BP until the present. The core was analysed on an Itrax XRF-core scanner and sampled in 5cm increments for analysis of pollen and isotopes. The XRF-counts of titanium are expected to reflect the amount of detrital material entering the lake and thereby a proxy of the erosion from the catchment. This interpretation is supported by a high correlation between titanium and potassium. The titanium counts indicate a significant and rapid increase in erosion at 1000 cal yr BP, which continues to be high towards the present. Prior to 1000 cal yr BP organic rich sediment was deposited in the lake with short intervals of minor detrital input. The sedimentation rate was approximately 2.3mm/yr, which increased slightly to approximately 2.9mm/yr after 1000 cal yr BP. The marked change in the lake sediment is interpreted to be caused by human induced changes in the catchment during the early medieval period

  19. Comparison of electrically evoked whole-nerve action potential and electrically evoked auditory brainstem response thresholds in nucleus CI24R cochlear implant recipients.

    PubMed

    Hay-McCutcheon, Marcia J; Brown, Carolyn J; Clay, Kelly Schmidt; Seyle, Keely

    2002-09-01

    In this study, differences between electrically evoked whole-nerve action potential (EAP) and electrically evoked auditory brainstem response (EABR) measurements within Nucleus CI24R cochlear implant recipients were evaluated. Precurved modiolus-hugging internal electrode arrays, such as the CI24R, are designed to provide more direct stimulation of neural elements of the modiolus. If the electrode array is closer to the modiolus, electrically evoked and behavioral levels might be lower than were previously recorded for the straight electrode array, the CI24M. EAP and EABR growth functions and behavioral levels were obtained for 10 postlingually deafened adults. Results revealed no significant differences between EAP and EABR threshold levels, and these levels were not significantly lower than those obtained using the CI24M. PMID:12371659

  20. The Cassava Mealybug (Phenacoccus manihoti) in Asia: First Records, Potential Distribution, and an Identification Key

    PubMed Central

    Parsa, Soroush; Kondo, Takumasa; Winotai, Amporn

    2012-01-01

    Phenacoccus manihoti Matile-Ferrero (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae), one of the most serious pests of cassava worldwide, has recently reached Asia, raising significant concern over its potential spread throughout the region. To support management decisions, this article reports recent distribution records, and estimates the climatic suitability for its regional spread using a CLIMEX distribution model. The article also presents a taxonomic key that separates P. manihoti from all other mealybug species associated with the genus Manihot. Model predictions suggest P. manihoti imposes an important, yet differential, threat to cassava production in Asia. Predicted risk is most acute in the southern end of Karnataka in India, the eastern end of the Ninh Thuan province in Vietnam, and in most of West Timor in Indonesia. The model also suggests P. manihoti is likely to be limited by cold stress across Vietnam's northern regions and in the entire Guangxi province in China, and by high rainfall across the wet tropics in Indonesia and the Philippines. Predictions should be particularly important to guide management decisions for high risk areas where P. manihoti is absent (e.g., India), or where it has established but populations remain small and localized (e.g., South Vietnam). Results from this article should help decision-makers assess site-specific risk of invasion, and develop proportional prevention and surveillance programs for early detection and rapid response. PMID:23077659

  1. Hidden plastics of Lake Ontario, Canada and their potential preservation in the sediment record.

    PubMed

    Corcoran, Patricia L; Norris, Todd; Ceccanese, Trevor; Walzak, Mary Jane; Helm, Paul A; Marvin, Chris H

    2015-09-01

    Microplastics are a source of environmental pollution resulting from degradation of plastic products and spillage of resin pellets. We report the amounts of microplastics from various sites of Lake Ontario and evaluate their potential for preservation in the sediment record. A total of 4635 pellets were sampled from the Humber Bay shoreline on three sampling dates. Pellet colours were similar to those from the Humber River bank, suggesting that the river is a pathway for plastics transport into Lake Ontario. Once in the lake, high density microplastics, including mineral-polyethylene and mineral-polypropylene mixtures, sink to the bottom. The minerals may be fillers that were combined with plastics during production, or may have adsorbed to the surfaces of the polymers in the water column or on the lake bottom. Based on sediment depths and accumulation rates, microplastics have accumulated in the offshore region for less than 38 years. Their burial increases the chance of microplastics preservation. Shoreline pellets may not be preserved because they are mingled with organic debris that is reworked during storm events. PMID:25898233

  2. Blueback herring (Alosa aestivalis) in Lake Ontario: First record, entry route, and colonization potential

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Owens, Randall W.; O'Gorman, Robert; Mills, Edward L.; Rudstam, Lars G.; Hasse, John J.; Kulik, Brandon H.; MacNeill, David B.

    1998-01-01

    Two juvenile blueback herring (Alosa aestivalis) were caught in Lake Ontario in October 1995, the first record of this anadromous marine clupeid in the Great Lakes. Blueback herring most likely gained entry to Lake Ontario via the Erie Barge Canal, a navigation canal that links the Mohawk-Hudson rivers, which drain to the Atlantic Ocean, to Oneida Lake, which drains to Lake Ontario through the Oneida-Oswego rivers. Blueback herring ascend the Hudson River to spawn and were first reported from the upper Mohawk River in 1978. They currently spawn in several of the upper Mohawk's tributaries, including one about 430 km from the ocean but only 25 km from Oneida Lake. They were first found in Oneida Lake in 1982 and, in fall 1994, large numbers of juvenile blueback herring were found moving down the Oswego River. In the southern United States, blueback herring established self-reproducing populations in several reservoirs, and thus they have the potential to colonize Lake Ontario. If blueback herring became established in Lake Ontario, they could spread to other Great Lakes and impede recovery of depressed populations of indigenous fishes, like lake herring (Coregonus artedi) and lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush), through competition with, or predation on, their larvae.

  3. The Potential for High-Resolution Palaeoclimate Records of the Pliocene from Speleothems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drysdale, R.; Woodhead, J. D.; Hellstrom, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    The Pliocene is widely regarded as a useful analogue for future greenhouse warming and is thus an important interval for palaeoclimate study. Much of what we know about climate through the Pliocene comes from marine sediments. However, we know relatively little about interannual to interdecadal variability, yet reconstructing Pliocene climate at such resolution has the potential to yield important information for testing climate models. Recent advances in uranium-lead (U-Pb) dating have paved the way for investigating Pliocene (and older) high-resolution palaeoclimate records from speleothems. We present such an example from the Nullarbor Plain, Australia. The Nullabor is an emerged, karstified platform of Eocene to Miocene limestones situated on the arid southern fringe of the Australian continent. Caves developed in the karst preserve a large archive of ancient calcite speleothems, in stark contrast to the virtual lack of calcite speleothems today. U-Pb radiometric dating of these speleothems reveals that most the growth occurred during the Pliocene. The geochemistry of these speleothems suggests that the Nullarbor was a wetter and more-vegetated environment at the time. High-resolution geochemical analyses and fluorescence microscopy show that some of the speleothems are almost certainly annually laminated, and contain multi-proxy signatures similar to Holocene speleothems that are commonly associated with hydrological processes. We present a series of encouraging preliminary results from several specimens.

  4. Nociceptive Local Field Potentials Recorded from the Human Insula Are Not Specific for Nociception

    PubMed Central

    Liberati, Giulia; Klöcker, Anne; Safronova, Marta M.; Ferrão Santos, Susana; Ribeiro Vaz, Jose-Geraldo; Raftopoulos, Christian; Mouraux, André

    2016-01-01

    The insula, particularly its posterior portion, is often regarded as a primary cortex for pain. However, this interpretation is largely based on reverse inference, and a specific involvement of the insula in pain has never been demonstrated. Taking advantage of the high spatiotemporal resolution of direct intracerebral recordings, we investigated whether the human insula exhibits local field potentials (LFPs) specific for pain. Forty-seven insular sites were investigated. Participants received brief stimuli belonging to four different modalities (nociceptive, vibrotactile, auditory, and visual). Both nociceptive stimuli and non-nociceptive vibrotactile, auditory, and visual stimuli elicited consistent LFPs in the posterior and anterior insula, with matching spatial distributions. Furthermore, a blind source separation procedure showed that nociceptive LFPs are largely explained by multimodal neural activity also contributing to non-nociceptive LFPs. By revealing that LFPs elicited by nociceptive stimuli reflect activity unrelated to nociception and pain, our results confute the widespread assumption that these brain responses are a signature for pain perception and its modulation. PMID:26734726

  5. Mode of action of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry and Cyt toxins and their potential for insect control.

    PubMed

    Bravo, Alejandra; Gill, Sarjeet S; Soberón, Mario

    2007-03-15

    Bacillus thuringiensis Crystal (Cry) and Cytolitic (Cyt) protein families are a diverse group of proteins with activity against insects of different orders--Lepidoptera, Coleoptera, Diptera and also against other invertebrates such as nematodes. Their primary action is to lyse midgut epithelial cells by inserting into the target membrane and forming pores. Among this group of proteins, members of the 3-Domain Cry family are used worldwide for insect control, and their mode of action has been characterized in some detail. Phylogenetic analyses established that the diversity of the 3-Domain Cry family evolved by the independent evolution of the three domains and by swapping of domain III among toxins. Like other pore-forming toxins (PFT) that affect mammals, Cry toxins interact with specific receptors located on the host cell surface and are activated by host proteases following receptor binding resulting in the formation of a pre-pore oligomeric structure that is insertion competent. In contrast, Cyt toxins directly interact with membrane lipids and insert into the membrane. Recent evidence suggests that Cyt synergize or overcome resistance to mosquitocidal-Cry proteins by functioning as a Cry-membrane bound receptor. In this review we summarize recent findings on the mode of action of Cry and Cyt toxins, and compare them to the mode of action of other bacterial PFT. Also, we discuss their use in the control of agricultural insect pests and insect vectors of human diseases. PMID:17198720

  6. Preparing Social Justice Oriented Teachers: The Potential Role of Action Research in the PDS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodman, Stephanie L.; Lai, Kerri; Campet, Melissa; Cavallero-Lotocki, Renee; Hopkins, Aaron; Onidi, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Deliberate investigation into practice is an essential of the National Association for Professional Development Schools' defining elements of a Professional Development School (PDS). This article reports on the pilot efforts of one PDS as it initiated deliberate investigation through action research with a small group of teacher candidates.…

  7. The Potential of General Classroom Observation: Turkish EFL Teachers' Perceptions, Sentiments, and Readiness for Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merç, Ali

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine Turkish EFL teachers' attitudes towards classroom observation. 204 teachers from different school settings responded to an online questionnaire. Data were analyzed according to three types of attitudes towards classroom observation: perceptions, sentiments, and readiness for action. The findings revealed…

  8. Record of Technical Change No.2 for ``Corrective Action Investigation Plan for CAU 486: Double Tracks RADSAFE Area, Nellis Air Force Range,'' Rev. 0, DOE/NV--523

    SciTech Connect

    1998-11-18

    This Record of Technical Change provides technical updates to the information provided in ``Corrective Action Investigation Plan for CAU 486: Double Tracks RADSAFE Area, Nellis Air Force Range, Nevada,'' Revision 0, DOE/NV--523. Changes are specified for Section 4.2, Par. 3 and 8; Section 5.3, Par.1; and Section 7.0 (added reference) found on pages 25, 27, 34, 35, and 41.

  9. [Hardware Implementation of Numerical Simulation Function of Hodgkin-Huxley Model Neurons Action Potential Based on Field Programmable Gate Array].

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinlong; Lu, Mai; Hu, Yanwen; Chen, Xiaoqiang; Pan, Qiangqiang

    2015-12-01

    Neuron is the basic unit of the biological neural system. The Hodgkin-Huxley (HH) model is one of the most realistic neuron models on the electrophysiological characteristic description of neuron. Hardware implementation of neuron could provide new research ideas to clinical treatment of spinal cord injury, bionics and artificial intelligence. Based on the HH model neuron and the DSP Builder technology, in the present study, a single HH model neuron hardware implementation was completed in Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA). The neuron implemented in FPGA was stimulated by different types of current, the action potential response characteristics were analyzed, and the correlation coefficient between numerical simulation result and hardware implementation result were calculated. The results showed that neuronal action potential response of FPGA was highly consistent with numerical simulation result. This work lays the foundation for hardware implementation of neural network. PMID:27079105

  10. The invasive New Guinea flatworm Platydemus manokwari in France, the first record for Europe: time for action is now

    PubMed Central

    Winsor, Leigh; Gey, Delphine; Gros, Pierre; Thévenot, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    Non-indigenous terrestrial flatworms (Platyhelminthes) have been recorded in thirteen European countries. They include Bipalium kewense and Dolichoplana striata that are largely restricted to hothouses and may be regarded as non-invasive species. In addition there are species from the southern hemisphere such as the invasive New Zealand flatworm Arthurdendyus triangulatus in the United Kingdom, Eire and the Faroe Islands, the Australian flatworm Australoplana sanguinea alba in Eire and the United Kingdom, and the Australian Blue Garden flatworm Caenoplana coerulea in France, Menorca and the United Kingdom. The United Kingdom has some twelve or more non-indigenous species most of which are Australian and New Zealand species. These species may move to an invasive stage when optimum environmental and other conditions occur, and the flatworms then have the potential to cause economic or environmental harm. In this paper, we report the identification (from morphology and molecular analysis of COI sequences) of non-indigenous terrestrial flatworms found in a hothouse in Caen (France) as the New Guinea flatworm Platydemus manokwari de Beauchamp, 1963 (Platyhelminthes, Continenticola, Geoplanidae, Rhynchodeminae). Platydemus manokwari is among the “100 World’s Worst Invader Alien Species”. Lists of World geographic records, prey in the field and prey in laboratories of P. manokwari are provided. This species is considered a threat to native snails wherever it is introduced. The recent discovery of P. manokwari in France represents a significant extension of distribution of this Invasive Alien Species from the Indo-Pacific region to Europe. If it escaped the hothouse, the flatworm might survive winters and become established in temperate countries. The existence of this species in France requires an early warning of this incursion to State and European Union authorities, followed by the eradication of the flatworm in its locality, tightening of internal quarantine

  11. Ventricular filling slows epicardial conduction and increases action potential duration in an optical mapping study of the isolated rabbit heart

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sung, Derrick; Mills, Robert W.; Schettler, Jan; Narayan, Sanjiv M.; Omens, Jeffrey H.; McCulloch, Andrew D.; McCullough, A. D. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Mechanical stimulation can induce electrophysiologic changes in cardiac myocytes, but how mechanoelectric feedback in the intact heart affects action potential propagation remains unclear. METHODS AND RESULTS: Changes in action potential propagation and repolarization with increased left ventricular end-diastolic pressure from 0 to 30 mmHg were investigated using optical mapping in isolated perfused rabbit hearts. With respect to 0 mmHg, epicardial strain at 30 mmHg in the anterior left ventricle averaged 0.040 +/- 0.004 in the muscle fiber direction and 0.032 +/- 0.006 in the cross-fiber direction. An increase in ventricular loading increased average epicardial activation time by 25%+/- 3% (P < 0.0001) and correspondingly decreased average apparent surface conduction velocity by 16%+/- 7% (P = 0.007). Ventricular loading did not significantly alter action potential duration at 20% repolarization (APD20) but did at 80% repolarization (APD80), from 179 +/- 7 msec to 207 +/- 5 msec (P < 0.0001). The dispersion of APD20 was decreased with loading from 19 +/- 2 msec to 13 +/- 2 msec (P = 0.024), whereas the dispersion of APD80 was not significantly changed. These electrophysiologic changes with ventricular loading were not affected by the nonspecific stretch-activated channel blocker streptomycin (200 microM) and were not attributable to changes in myocardial perfusion or the presence of an electromechanical decoupling agent (butanedione monoxime) during optical mapping. CONCLUSION: Acute loading of the left ventricle of the isolated rabbit heart decreased apparent epicardial conduction velocity and increased action potential duration by a load-dependent mechanism that may not involve stretch-activated channels.

  12. Dopamine Modulates Spike Timing-Dependent Plasticity and Action Potential Properties in CA1 Pyramidal Neurons of Acute Rat Hippocampal Slices

    PubMed Central

    Edelmann, Elke; Lessmann, Volkmar

    2011-01-01

    Spike timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) is a cellular model of Hebbian synaptic plasticity which is believed to underlie memory formation. In an attempt to establish a STDP paradigm in CA1 of acute hippocampal slices from juvenile rats (P15–20), we found that changes in excitability resulting from different slice preparation protocols correlate with the success of STDP induction. Slice preparation with sucrose containing ACSF prolonged rise time, reduced frequency adaptation, and decreased latency of action potentials in CA1 pyramidal neurons compared to preparation in conventional ASCF, while other basal electrophysiological parameters remained unaffected. Whereas we observed prominent timing-dependent long-term potentiation (t-LTP) to 171 ± 10% of controls in conventional ACSF, STDP was absent in sucrose prepared slices. This sucrose-induced STDP deficit could not be rescued by stronger STDP paradigms, applying either more pre- and/or postsynaptic stimuli, or by a higher stimulation frequency. Importantly, slice preparation with sucrose containing ACSF did not eliminate theta-burst stimulation induced LTP in CA1 in field potential recordings in our rat hippocampal slices. Application of dopamine (for 10–20 min) to sucrose prepared slices completely rescued t-LTP and recovered action potential properties back to levels observed in ACSF prepared slices. Conversely, acute inhibition of D1 receptor signaling impaired t-LTP in ACSF prepared slices. No similar restoring effect for STDP as seen with dopamine was observed in response to the β-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol. ELISA measurements demonstrated a significant reduction of endogenous dopamine levels (to 61.9 ± 6.9% of ACSF values) in sucrose prepared slices. These results suggest that dopamine signaling is involved in regulating the efficiency to elicit STDP in CA1 pyramidal neurons. PMID:22065958

  13. Flash memory: photochemical imprinting of neuronal action potentials onto a microbial rhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Venkatachalam, Veena; Brinks, Daan; Maclaurin, Dougal; Hochbaum, Daniel; Kralj, Joel; Cohen, Adam E

    2014-02-12

    We developed a technique, "flash memory", to record a photochemical imprint of the activity state--firing or not firing--of a neuron at a user-selected moment in time. The key element is an engineered microbial rhodopsin protein with three states. Two nonfluorescent states, D1 and D2, exist in a voltage-dependent equilibrium. A stable fluorescent state, F, is reached by a photochemical conversion from D2. When exposed to light of a wavelength λ(write), population transfers from D2 to F, at a rate determined by the D1 ⇌ D2 equilibrium. The population of F maintains a record of membrane voltage which persists in the dark. Illumination at a later time at a wavelength λ(read) excites fluorescence of F, probing this record. An optional third flash at a wavelength λ(reset) converts F back to D2, for a subsequent write-read cycle. The flash memory method offers the promise to decouple the recording of neural activity from its readout. In principle, the technique may enable one to generate snapshots of neural activity in a large volume of neural tissue, e.g., a complete mouse brain, by circumventing the challenge of imaging a large volume with simultaneous high spatial and high temporal resolution. The proof-of-principle flash memory sensors presented here will need improvements in sensitivity, speed, brightness, and membrane trafficking before this goal can be realized. PMID:24428326

  14. Flash Memory: Photochemical Imprinting of Neuronal Action Potentials onto a Microbial Rhodopsin

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We developed a technique, “flash memory”, to record a photochemical imprint of the activity state—firing or not firing—of a neuron at a user-selected moment in time. The key element is an engineered microbial rhodopsin protein with three states. Two nonfluorescent states, D1 and D2, exist in a voltage-dependent equilibrium. A stable fluorescent state, F, is reached by a photochemical conversion from D2. When exposed to light of a wavelength λwrite, population transfers from D2 to F, at a rate determined by the D1 ⇌ D2 equilibrium. The population of F maintains a record of membrane voltage which persists in the dark. Illumination at a later time at a wavelength λread excites fluorescence of F, probing this record. An optional third flash at a wavelength λreset converts F back to D2, for a subsequent write–read cycle. The flash memory method offers the promise to decouple the recording of neural activity from its readout. In principle, the technique may enable one to generate snapshots of neural activity in a large volume of neural tissue, e.g., a complete mouse brain, by circumventing the challenge of imaging a large volume with simultaneous high spatial and high temporal resolution. The proof-of-principle flash memory sensors presented here will need improvements in sensitivity, speed, brightness, and membrane trafficking before this goal can be realized. PMID:24428326

  15. Effect of depth of general anesthesia on the threshold of electrically evoked compound action potential in cochlear implantation.

    PubMed

    Eftekharian, Ali; Amizadeh, Maryam; Mottaghi, Kamran; Safari, Farhad; Mahani, Mozhgan Hosseinerezai; Ranjbar, Leila Azadeh; Abdi, Ali; Mokari, Nooshin

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate effect of depth of general anesthesia on the threshold of electrically evoked compound action potential in cochlear implantation. A prospective clinical study in a single-subject design was conducted in the cochlear implant center of a tertiary care University-based hospital. Sixty-one cochlear-implanted children with bilateral, severe to profound sensory neural hearing loss were enrolled in the study. During the operation electrically evoked compound action potentials (e-ECAP) were measured in two phase of general anesthesia; in deep and in light anesthesia. Thresholds of e-ECAP in these two phases of anesthesia were compared. Thirty-one children received HiRes90k1j prosthesis and 30 children received CI24RE prosthesis. Thresholds difference of electrically evoked compound action potential between light and deep anesthesia in all tested electrodes in either group were statistically significant (P < 0.001). Non-measurable e-ECAP in some electrodes at deep anesthesia was measurable in light phase of anesthesia. Depth of anesthesia can have significant influence on e-ECAP threshold and it is important to reduce the depth of anesthesia to achieve better results. PMID:25145642

  16. Action Potentials Initiate in the Axon Initial Segment and Propagate Through Axon Collaterals Reliably in Cerebellar Purkinje Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Foust, Amanda; Popovic, Marko; Zecevic, Dejan; McCormick, David A.

    2010-01-01

    Purkinje neurons are the output cells of the cerebellar cortex and generate spikes in two distinct modes, known as simple and complex spikes. Revealing the point of origin of these action potentials, and how they conduct into local axon collaterals, is important for understanding local and distal neuronal processing and communication. By utilizing a recent improvement in voltage sensitive dye imaging technique that provided exceptional spatial and temporal resolution, we were able to resolve the region of spike initiation as well as follow spike propagation into axon collaterals for each action potential initiated on single trials. All fast action potentials, for both simple and complex spikes, whether occurring spontaneously or in response to a somatic current pulse or synaptic input, initiated in the axon initial segment. At discharge frequencies of less than approximately 250 Hz, spikes propagated faithfully through the axon and axon collaterals, in a saltatory manner. Propagation failures were only observed for very high frequencies or for the spikelets associated with complex spikes. These results demonstrate that the axon initial segment is a critical decision point in Purkinje cell processing and that the properties of axon branch points are adjusted to maintain faithful transmission. PMID:20484631

  17. Diosgenin, 4-hydroxyisoleucine, and fiber from fenugreek: mechanisms of actions and potential effects on metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Scott; Stephens, Jacqueline M

    2015-03-01

    Metabolic syndrome and its complications continue to rise in prevalence and show no signs of abating in the immediate future. Therefore, the search for effective treatments is a high priority in biomedical research. Products derived from botanicals have a time-honored history of use in the treatment of metabolic diseases including type 2 diabetes. Trigonella foenum-graecum, commonly known as fenugreek, is an annual herbaceous plant that has been a staple of traditional herbal medicine in many cultures. Although fenugreek has been studied in both clinical and basic research settings, questions remain about its efficacy and biologic mechanisms of action. Diosgenin, 4-hydroxyisoleucine, and the fiber component of the plant are the most intensively studied bioactive constituents present in fenugreek. These compounds have been demonstrated to exert beneficial effects on several physiologic markers including glucose tolerance, inflammation, insulin action, liver function, blood lipids, and cardiovascular health. Although insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying the favorable effects of fenugreek have been gained, we still do not have definitive evidence establishing its role as a therapeutic agent in metabolic disease. This review aims to summarize the currently available evidence on the physiologic effects of the 3 best-characterized bioactive compounds of fenugreek, with particular emphasis on biologic mechanisms of action relevant in the context of metabolic syndrome. PMID:25770257

  18. Complex Dynamic Thresholds and Generation of the Action Potentials in the Neural-Activity Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirillov, S. Yu.; Nekorkin, V. I.

    2016-05-01

    This work is devoted to studying the processes of activation of the neurons whose excitation thresholds are not constant and vary in time (the so-called dynamic thresholds). The neuron dynamics is described by the FitzHugh-Nagumo model with nonlinear behavior of the recovery variable. The neuron response to the external pulsed activating action in the presence of a slowly varying synaptic current is studied within the framework of this model. The structure of the dynamic threshold is studied and its properties depending on the external-action parameters are established. It is found that the formation of the "folds" in the separatrix threshold manifold in the model phase space is a typical feature of the complex dynamic threshold. High neuron sensitivity to the action of the comparatively weak slow control signals is established. This explains the capability of the neurons to perform flexible tuning of their selective properties for detecting various external signals in sufficiently short times (of the order of duration of several spikes).

  19. Complex Dynamic Thresholds and Generation of the Action Potentials in the Neural-Activity Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirillov, S. Yu.; Nekorkin, V. I.

    2016-06-01

    This work is devoted to studying the processes of activation of the neurons whose excitation thresholds are not constant and vary in time (the so-called dynamic thresholds). The neuron dynamics is described by the FitzHugh-Nagumo model with nonlinear behavior of the recovery variable. The neuron response to the external pulsed activating action in the presence of a slowly varying synaptic current is studied within the framework of this model. The structure of the dynamic threshold is studied and its properties depending on the external-action parameters are established. It is found that the formation of the "folds" in the separatrix threshold manifold in the model phase space is a typical feature of the complex dynamic threshold. High neuron sensitivity to the action of the comparatively weak slow control signals is established. This explains the capability of the neurons to perform flexible tuning of their selective properties for detecting various external signals in sufficiently short times (of the order of duration of several spikes).

  20. Stable Isotopes in Fish Eye Lenses as Potential Recorders of Trophic and Geographic History

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Amy A.; Hollander, David J.; Peebles, Ernst B.

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated eye lenses as potential recorders of stable isotope histories in fish because they consist of metabolically inert optical proteins that are deposited in successive, concentric circles (laminae) much like otolith circuli and tree rings. We conducted four different tests on lenses from red snapper, red grouper, gag, and white grunt. The first test was a low-resolution screening of multiple individuals (4–5 radial groups of laminae per lens, all species except white grunt). Along the radial axis, all individuals exhibited substantial isotopic variability. Red snapper individuals separated into two groups based on δ15N and gag separated into two groups based on δ13C. Two gag with the greatest variation were chosen for high-resolution temporal analysis using individual laminae from their second eye lenses. The first-order patterns from the high-resolution analysis generally mimicked patterns from the low-resolution screening of grouped laminae, yet the high-resolution plots revealed early-life details that were not apparent in the low-resolution screenings. For the third test, left- versus right-eye variation was compared using high-resolution methods. White grunt left- and right-eye radial isotopic patterns were almost identical for both δ13C and δ15N, suggesting the variations observed among individual fish were not artifacts. The final test evaluated intra-laminar variation; multiple samples were analyzed from different parts of the same lamina. Seven laminae from three individuals of two species were analyzed in this manner; variations among laminae were found to be much higher than variations within laminae. However, nominal intra-laminar variations were comparable to nominal differences between left and right lenses, suggesting intra-laminar variation established measurement precision. Eye lens isotopes appear to be useful for reconstructing the isotopic histories of individual fish; these histories can be compared with spatially

  1. A method to measure the strength of multi-unit bursts of action potentials.

    PubMed

    Mulloney, Brian

    2005-07-15

    Both the numbers of neurons that are active during multi-unit bursts of spikes and the frequencies with which individual neurons fire in these bursts can vary in response to changes in excitation. Here is a digital-filtering method that measures the strength of a burst of spikes by calculating the area of a polygon derived from the squared voltages that record the burst, and dividing this area by the burst's duration. The method was developed in the SigmaPlot environment, and makes use of the Fast-Fourier Transform functions provided in the SigmaPlot transform language. To test the method's performance, I constructed multi-unit bursts of spikes with known structure and calculated the strengths of these known bursts. To demonstrate the method's usefulness, I applied it to a train of 23 bursts of spikes in motor axons recorded during a spontaneous bout of patterned motor output. The measured strengths of these bursts varied 30-fold, and were well-correlated with the differences in the original recording. The results demonstrate that the method effectively measures burst strength independent of burst duration. PMID:15935226

  2. The potential of stalagmites from the Patagonian Andes as sub-annually-resolved paleoclimate records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilian, Rolf; Schimpf, Daniel; Mangini, Augusto; Kronz, Andreas; Wörner, Gerhard; Simon, Klaus; Spötl, Christoph; Arz, Helge

    2010-05-01

    and to lower Mg/Ca ratios during more humid phases. The amount of such calcite compatible elements was measured in drill-hole samples (40 year resolution) and by electron microprobe (20μm spot) with a time resolution of ~0.3 years. The element concentrations reflect especially dilution by rain water. The highly resolved electron microprobe records indicate short scale (a few months) extreme weather periods and also typical sun cyclicities. Annual averages of the Mg/Ca ratios were calibrated by using 100 years of weather station data, indicating variations in the precipitation between 2500 and 6000 mm/yr for the last 5 ka at the climate divide of the southern Andes at 53° S. Stable carbon and oxygen isotopes of the three different stalagmites (2-3 year time resolution) suggest a non-linear evaporation-controlled kinetic effect (especially drip rate dependent) on the isotopic fractionation, which is slightly superimposed by a temperature controlled fractionation. The isotope values of the three stalagmites show a bad correlation and only the record of the stalagmite with the highest drip rate range can be correlated with the above presented drip rate dependent chemical proxies. The other two stalagmites represent overall lower drip rates and reflect non-climatically induced fractionation. Changes in the water pathways at the cave roof probably resulted in distinct and individual residence times of the drip water. Altogether, we conclude that our records from 53° S represent the core of the Southern hemispheric westerlies and show that the Neoglacial cold phases between 2.5 and 3.5 kyrs B.P. (sun spot minima) and from 0.6 to 0.1 Kyrs (Little Ice Age) are characterised by relatively low precipitation. In contrast, the periods between 2.0 and 1.5 kyrs and especially the Medieval Warm Period (1.2 - 0.8 Kyrs) were extremely humid, indicating stronger westerlies. The southern Andes stalagmites have a very good potential for climate sensitive high resolution records.

  3. Potential of rapid adjustment of brief interceptive action using predicted information.

    PubMed

    Ikudome, Sachi; Nakamoto, Hiroki; Yotani, Kengo; Unenaka, Satoshi; Mori, Shiro

    2015-07-01

    Interceptive actions, such as hitting a ball in baseball or tennis, feature a moving target whose parameters (i.e., velocity or trajectory) differ across trials. This means that players are required to make rapid trial-by-trial adjustments. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a brief interceptive action could be adjusted using predicted sensory consequence of movement (pSCM) information, even under severe time constraints where the participants could not adjust their movement using only visual feedback. Participants performed an interceptive action for targets with two different velocities with different occurrence probabilities (20%, 50%, and 80%). Prior to movement onset, we applied transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to the supplementary motor area (SMA), as TMS of the SMA is known to disrupt pSCM activity. We hypothesized that if pSCM information were used to adjust the motor parameters of a brief interception, then TMS would significantly increase the constant temporal error (i.e., the difference between the sum of reaction time and movement time and the total target visible time) for a target velocity with a low probability (20%). This hypothesis is based on the previous findings that the pSCM plays an important role in the adjustment of relatively brief interception. We found that while interceptions that lasted about 250 ms after movement onset were unaffected, interceptions that lasted about 350 ms after movement onset could be influenced by TMS. However, TMS interfered with performance provided that the delivery of the pulse occurred 100 ms before movement onset. This finding suggests that pSCM information that is used for a rapid adjustment is generated only in that specific time interval. PMID:26010202

  4. Conservation laws of wave action and potential enstrophy for Rossby waves in a stratified atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Straus, D. M.

    1983-01-01

    The evolution of wave energy, enstrophy, and wave motion for atmospheric Rossby waves in a variable mean flow are discussed from a theoretical and pedagogic standpoint. In the absence of mean flow gradients, the wave energy density satisfies a local conservation law, with the appropriate flow velocity being the group velocity. In the presence of mean flow variations, wave energy is not conserved, but wave action is, provided the mean flow is independent of longitude. Wave enstrophy is conserved for arbitrary variations of the mean flow. Connections with Eiiassen-Palm flux are also discussed.

  5. Conservation laws of wave action and potential enstrophy for Rossby waves in a stratified atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Straus, D. M.

    1983-01-01

    The evolution of wave energy, enstrophy, and wave motion for atmospheric Rossby waves in a variable mean flow are discussed from a theoretical and pedagogic standpoint. In the absence of mean flow gradients, the wave energy density satisfies a local conservation law, with the appropriate flow velocity being the group velocity. In the presence of mean flow variations, wave energy is not conserved, but wave action is, provided the mean flow is independent of longitude. Wave enstrophy is conserved for arbitrary variations of the mean flow. Connections with Eliassen-Palm flux are also discussed.

  6. Local field potential recordings in a non-human primate model of Parkinsons disease using the Activa PC + S neurostimulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connolly, Allison T.; Muralidharan, Abirami; Hendrix, Claudia; Johnson, Luke; Gupta, Rahul; Stanslaski, Scott; Denison, Tim; Baker, Kenneth B.; Vitek, Jerrold L.; Johnson, Matthew D.

    2015-12-01

    Objective. Using the Medtronic Activa® PC + S system, this study investigated how passive joint manipulation, reaching behavior, and deep brain stimulation (DBS) modulate local field potential (LFP) activity in the subthalamic nucleus (STN) and globus pallidus (GP). Approach. Five non-human primates were implanted unilaterally with one or more DBS leads. LFPs were collected in montage recordings during resting state conditions and during motor tasks that facilitate the expression of parkinsonian motor signs. These recordings were made in the naïve state in one subject, in the parkinsonian state in two subjects, and in both naïve and parkinsonian states in two subjects. Main results. LFPs measured at rest were consistent over time for a given recording location and parkinsonian state in a given subject; however, LFPs were highly variable between subjects, between and within recording locations, and across parkinsonian states. LFPs in both naïve and parkinsonian states across all recorded nuclei contained a spectral peak in the beta band (10-30 Hz). Moreover, the spectral content of recorded LFPs was modulated by passive and active movement of the subjects’ limbs. LFPs recorded during a cued-reaching task displayed task-related beta desynchronization in STN and GP. The bidirectional capabilities of the Activa® PC + S also allowed for recording LFPs while delivering DBS. The therapeutic effect of STN DBS on parkinsonian rigidity outlasted stimulation for 30-60 s, but there was no correlation with beta band power. Significance. This study emphasizes (1) the variability in spontaneous LFPs amongst subjects and (2) the value of using the Activa® PC + S system to record neural data in the context of behavioral tasks that allow one to evaluate a subject’s symptomatology.

  7. Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 168: Areas 25 and 26 Contaminated Materials and Waste Dumps, Nevada Test Site, Nevada: Revision 0, Including Record of Technical Change No. 1

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

    2003-08-08

    This Corrective Action Decision Document identifies and rationalizes the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office's selection of recommended corrective action alternatives (CAAs) to facilitate the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU)168: Areas 25 and 26 Contaminated Materials and Waste Dumps, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Located in Areas 25 and 26 at the NTS in Nevada, CAU 168 is comprised of twelve Corrective Action Sites (CASs). Review of data collected during the corrective action investigation, as well as consideration of current and future operations in Areas 25 and 26 of the NTS, led the way to the development of three CAAs for consideration: Alternative 1 - No Further Action; Alternative 2 - Clean Closure; and Alternative 3 - Close in Place with Administrative Controls. As a result of this evaluation, a combination of all three CAAs is recommended for this CAU. Alternative 1 was the preferred CAA for three CASs, Alternative 2 was the preferred CAA for six CASs (and nearly all of one other CAS), and Alternative 3 was the preferred CAA for two CASs (and a portion of one other CAS) to complete the closure at the CAU 168 sites. These alternatives were judged to meet all requirements for the technical components evaluated as well as all applicable state and federal regulations for closure of the sites and elimination of potential future exposure pathways to the contaminated soils at CAU 168.

  8. Comparison of genetically encoded calcium indicators for monitoring action potentials in mammalian brain by two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Podor, Borbala; Hu, Yi-ling; Ohkura, Masamichi; Nakai, Junichi; Croll, Roger; Fine, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Imaging calcium transients associated with neuronal activity has yielded important insights into neural physiology. Genetically encoded calcium indicators (GECIs) offer conspicuous potential advantages for this purpose, including exquisite targeting. While the catalogue of available GECIs is steadily growing, many newly developed sensors that appear promising in vitro or in model cells appear to be less useful when expressed in mammalian neurons. We have, therefore, evaluated the performance of GECIs from two of the most promising families of sensors, G-CaMPs [Nat. Biotechnol. 19(2), 137–141 (2001)11175727] and GECOs [Science 333(6051), 1888–1891 (2011)21903779], for monitoring action potentials in rat brain. Specifically, we used two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy to compare calcium transients detected by G-CaMP3; GCaMP6f; G-CaMP7; Green-GECO1.0, 1.1 and 1.2; Blue-GECO; Red-GECO; Rex-GECO0.9; Rex-GECO1; Carmine-GECO; Orange-GECO; and Yellow-GECO1s. After optimizing excitation wavelengths, we monitored fluorescence signals associated with increasing numbers of action potentials evoked by current injection in CA1 pyramidal neurons in rat organotypic hippocampal slices. Some GECIs, particularly Green-GECO1.2, GCaMP6f, and G-CaMP7, were able to detect single action potentials with high reliability. By virtue of greatest sensitivity and fast kinetics, G-CaMP7 may be the best currently available GECI for monitoring calcium transients in mammalian neurons. PMID:26158004

  9. A model of the magnetic fields created by single motor unit compound action potentials in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Parker, K K; Wikswo, J P

    1997-10-01

    We have developed a computationally simple model for calculating the magnetic-field strength at a point due to a single motor unit compound action potential (SMUCAP). The motor unit is defined only in terms of its anatomical features, and the SMUCAP is approximated using the tripole model. The distributed current density J is calculated within the volume defined by the motor unit. The law of Biot and Savart can then be cast in a form necessitating that J be integrated only over the region containing current sources or conductivity boundaries. The magnetic-field strength is defined as the summation of the contributions to the field made by every muscle fiber in the motor unit. Applying this model to SMUCAP measurements obtained using a high-resolution SUper Conducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) magnetometer may yield information regarding the distribution of action currents (AC's) and the anatomical properties of single motor units within a muscle bundle. PMID:9311164

  10. The potential for multi-disciplinary primary health care services to take action on the social determinants of health: actions and constraints

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Commission on the Social Determinants of Health and the World Health Organization have called for action to address the social determinants of health. This paper considers the extent to which primary health care services in Australia are able to respond to this call. We report on interview data from an empirical study of primary health care centres in Adelaide and Alice Springs, Australia. Methods Sixty-eight interviews were held with staff and managers at six case study primary health care services, regional health executives, and departmental funders to explore how their work responded to the social determinants of health and the dilemmas in doing so. The six case study sites included an Aboriginal Community Controlled Organisation, a sexual health non-government organisation, and four services funded and managed by the South Australian government. Results While respondents varied in the extent to which they exhibited an understanding of social determinants most were reflexive about the constraints on their ability to take action. Services’ responses to social determinants included delivering services in a way that takes account of the limitations individuals face from their life circumstances, and physical spaces in the primary health care services being designed to do more than simply deliver services to individuals. The services also undertake advocacy for policies that create healthier communities but note barriers to them doing this work. Our findings suggest that primary health care workers are required to transverse “dilemmatic space” in their work. Conclusions The absence of systematic supportive policy, frameworks and structure means that it is hard for PHC services to act on the Commission on the Social Determinants of Health’s recommendations. Our study does, however, provide evidence of the potential for PHC services to be more responsive to social determinants given more support and by building alliances with communities and

  11. Computational modeling of inhibition of voltage-gated Ca channels: identification of different effects on uterine and cardiac action potentials

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Wing-Chiu; Ghouri, Iffath; Taggart, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    The uterus and heart share the important physiological feature whereby contractile activation of the muscle tissue is regulated by the generation of periodic, spontaneous electrical action potentials (APs). Preterm birth arising from premature uterine contractions is a major complication of pregnancy and there remains a need to pursue avenues of research that facilitate the use of drugs, tocolytics, to limit these inappropriate contractions without deleterious actions on cardiac electrical excitation. A novel approach is to make use of mathematical models of uterine and cardiac APs, which incorporate many ionic currents contributing to the AP forms, and test the cell-specific responses to interventions. We have used three such models—of uterine smooth muscle cells (USMC), cardiac sinoatrial node cells (SAN), and ventricular cells—to investigate the relative effects of reducing two important voltage-gated Ca currents—the L-type (ICaL) and T-type (ICaT) Ca currents. Reduction of ICaL (10%) alone, or ICaT (40%) alone, blunted USMC APs with little effect on ventricular APs and only mild effects on SAN activity. Larger reductions in either current further attenuated the USMC APs but with also greater effects on SAN APs. Encouragingly, a combination of ICaL and ICaT reduction did blunt USMC APs as intended with little detriment to APs of either cardiac cell type. Subsequent overlapping maps of ICaL and ICaT inhibition profiles from each model revealed a range of combined reductions of ICaL and ICaT over which an appreciable diminution of USMC APs could be achieved with no deleterious action on cardiac SAN or ventricular APs. This novel approach illustrates the potential for computational biology to inform us of possible uterine and cardiac cell-specific mechanisms. Incorporating such computational approaches in future studies directed at designing new, or repurposing existing, tocolytics will be beneficial for establishing a desired uterine specificity of action

  12. Potential mechanisms of action of lithium in bipolar disorder. Current understanding.

    PubMed

    Malhi, Gin S; Tanious, Michelle; Das, Pritha; Coulston, Carissa M; Berk, Michael

    2013-02-01

    Lithium has been used for over half a century for the treatment of bipolar disorder as the archetypal mood stabilizer, and has a wealth of empirical evidence supporting its efficacy in this role. Despite this, the specific mechanisms by which lithium exerts its mood-stabilizing effects are not well understood. Given the inherently complex nature of the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder, this paper aims to capture what is known about the actions of lithium ranging from macroscopic changes in mood, cognition and brain structure, to its effects at the microscopic level on neurotransmission and intracellular and molecular pathways. A comprehensive literature search of databases including MEDLINE, EMBASE and PsycINFO was conducted using relevant keywords and the findings from the literature were then reviewed and synthesized. Numerous studies report that lithium is effective in the treatment of acute mania and for the long-term maintenance of mood and prophylaxis; in comparison, evidence for its efficacy in depression is modest. However, lithium possesses unique anti-suicidal properties that set it apart from other agents. With respect to cognition, studies suggest that lithium may reduce cognitive decline in patients; however, these findings require further investigation using both neuropsychological and functional neuroimaging probes. Interestingly, lithium appears to preserve or increase the volume of brain structures involved in emotional regulation such as the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus and amygdala, possibly reflecting its neuroprotective effects. At a neuronal level, lithium reduces excitatory (dopamine and glutamate) but increases inhibitory (GABA) neurotransmission; however, these broad effects are underpinned by complex neurotransmitter systems that strive to achieve homeostasis by way of compensatory changes. For example, at an intracellular and molecular level, lithium targets second-messenger systems that further modulate neurotransmission. For

  13. Analytical solutions of the Frankenhaeuser-Huxley equations I: minimal model for backpropagation of action potentials in sparsely excitable dendrites.

    PubMed

    Poznanski, Roman R

    2004-09-01

    Hodgkin and Huxley's ionic theory of the nerve impulse embodies principles, applicable also to the impulses in vertebrate nerve fibers, as demonstrated by Bernhard Frankenhaeuser and Andrew Huxley 40 years ago. Frankenhaeuser and Huxley reformulated the classical Hodgkin-Huxley equations, in terms of electrodiffusion theory, and computed action potentials specifically for saltatory conduction in myelinated axons. In this paper, we obtain analytical solutions to the most difficult nonlinear partial differential equations in classical neurophysiology. We solve analytically the Frankenhaeuser-Huxley equations pertaining to a model of sparsely excitable, nonlinear dendrites with clusters of transiently activating, TTX-sensitive Na(+) channels, discretely distributed as point sources of inward current along a continuous (non-segmented) leaky cable structure. Each cluster or hot-spot, corresponding to a mesoscopic level description of Na(+) ion channels, includes known cumulative inactivation kinetics observed at the microscopic level. In such a third-order system, the 'recovery' variable is an electrogenic sodium-pump imbedded in the passive membrane, and the system is stabilized by the presence of a large leak conductance mediated by a composite number of ligand-gated channels permeable to monovalent cations Na(+) and K(+). In order to reproduce antidromic propagation and attenuation of action potentials, a nonlinear integral equation must be solved (in the presence of suprathreshold input, and a constant-field equation of electrodiffusion at each hot-spot with membrane gates controlling the flow of current). A perturbative expansion of the non-dimensional membrane potential (Phi) is used to obtain time-dependent analytical solutions, involving a voltage-dependent Na(+) activation (micro) and a state-dependent inactivation (eta) gating variables. It is shown that action potentials attenuate in amplitude in accordance with experimental findings, and that the spatial

  14. Cardiovascular Actions and Therapeutic Potential of Tetramethylpyrazine (Active Component Isolated from Rhizoma Chuanxiong): Roles and Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Ming; Liu, Yue; Shi, Dazhuo

    2016-01-01

    Tetramethylpyrazine (TMP), a pharmacologically active component isolated from the rhizome of the Chinese herb Rhizoma Chuanxiong (Chuanxiong), has been clinically used in China and Southeast Asian countries for the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) for about fifty years. The pharmacological effects of TMP on the cardiovascular system have attracted great interest. Emerging experimental studies and clinical trials have demonstrated that TMP prevents atherosclerosis as well as ischemia-reperfusion injury. The cardioprotective effects of TMP are mainly related to its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, or calcium-homeostasis effects. This review focuses on the roles and mechanisms of action of TMP in the cardiovascular system and provides a novel perspective on TMP's clinical use. PMID:27314011

  15. Larval therapy from antiquity to the present day: mechanisms of action, clinical applications and future potential

    PubMed Central

    Whitaker, Iain S; Twine, Christopher; Whitaker, Michael J; Welck, Mathew; Brown, Charles S; Shandall, Ahmed

    2007-01-01

    When modern medicine fails, it is often useful to draw ideas from ancient treatments. The therapeutic use of fly larvae to debride necrotic tissue, also known as larval therapy, maggot debridement therapy or biosurgery, dates back to the beginnings of civilisation. Despite repeatedly falling out of favour largely because of patient intolerance to the treatment, the practice of larval therapy is increasing around the world because of its efficacy, safety and simplicity. Clinical indications for larval treatment are varied, but, in particular, are wounds infected with multidrug‐resistant bacteria and the presence of significant co‐morbidities precluding surgical intervention. The flies most often used in larval therapy are the facultative calliphorids, with the greenbottle blowfly (Lucilia sericata) being the most widely used species. This review summarises the fascinating and turbulent history of larval therapy from its origin to the present day, including mechanisms of action and evidence for its clinical applications. It also explores future research directions. PMID:17551073

  16. Assessing potential targets of calcium action in light-modulated gravitropism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roux, S. J.

    1995-01-01

    Light, through the mediation of the pigment phytochrome, modulates the gravitropic response of the shoots and roots of many plants. The transduction of both light and gravity stimuli appears to involve Ca(2+)-regulated steps, one or more of which may represent points of intersection between the two transduction chains. To be confident that Ca2+ plays a critical role in stimulus-response coupling for gravitropism, it will be important to identify specific targets of Ca2+ action whose function can be clearly linked to the regulation of growth. Calcium typically exerts its influence on cell metabolism through binding to and activating key regulatory proteins. The three best characterized of these proteins in plants are the calmodulins, calcium-dependent protein kinases, and annexins. In this review we summarize what is known about the structure and function of these proteins and speculate on how their activation by Ca2+ could influence the differential growth response of gravitropism.

  17. Metal-organic frameworks: mechanisms of antibacterial action and potential applications.

    PubMed

    Wyszogrodzka, Gabriela; Marszałek, Bartosz; Gil, Barbara; Dorożyński, Przemysław

    2016-06-01

    The growing resistance of pathogens to conventional antibiotics has become a public health problem and raises the need to seek new effective solutions. Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are porous, hybrid materials comprising metal ions linked by organic binding ligands. The possibility of using a variety of chemical building components in MOFs enables the formation of structures with desired properties. They can act as a reservoir of metal ions, providing their gradual release and resulting in a sustained antibacterial action analogous to that proposed for metal/metal oxide nanoparticles (NPs) but different to that of antibiotics. These features make MOFs promising candidates for pharmaceutical and biomedical applications, as illustrated by examples discussed in this review. PMID:27091434

  18. Nuclear Targeting with an Auger Electron Emitter Potentiates the Action of a Widely Used Antineoplastic Drug.

    PubMed

    Imstepf, Sebastian; Pierroz, Vanessa; Raposinho, Paula; Bauwens, Matthias; Felber, Michael; Fox, Thomas; Shapiro, Adam B; Freudenberg, Robert; Fernandes, Célia; Gama, Sofia; Gasser, Gilles; Motthagy, Felix; Santos, Isabel R; Alberto, Roger

    2015-12-16

    We present the combination of the clinically well-proven chemotherapeutic agent, Doxorubicin, and (99m)Tc, an Auger and internal conversion electron emitter, into a dual-action agent for therapy. Chemical conjugation of Doxorubicin to (99m)Tc afforded a construct which autonomously ferries a radioactive payload into the cell nucleus. At this site, damage is exerted by dose deposition from Auger radiation. The (99m)Tc-conjugate exhibited a dose-dependent inhibition of survival in a selected panel of cancer cells and an in vivo study in healthy mice evidenced a biodistribution which is comparable to that of the parent drug. The homologous Rhenium conjugate was found to effectively bind to DNA, inhibited human Topoisomerase II, and exhibited cytotoxicity in vitro. The collective in vitro and in vivo data demonstrate that the presented metallo-conjugates closely mimic native Doxorubicin. PMID:26473388

  19. Lake sediments as systematic recorders of seismic shaking: potential and limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moernaut, Jasper; Van Daele, Maarten; Strasser, Michael; De Batist, Marc

    2013-04-01

    Instrumental and written records of past earthquakes generally do not extend further back in time than a few hundred years. This is often insufficient to provide reliable information on earthquake recurrence patterns, information that is indispensable for a reliable seismic hazard assessment. Seismically-induced sedimentary features have been found in many lake records worldwide. This encompasses features created during and shortly after the earthquake such as in-situ deformations, liquefaction features, sublacustrine landslides, turbidites and subaerial landslides which propagated into the lake. Also, sedimentary imprints of long-term postseismic effects can be present, such as increased sedimentation rates, outburst floods, changes in water level and chemistry, etc. Up to now, only few comparative studies have been conducted to determine in which ways and how reliably lacustrine sediment sequences can register strong seismic shaking. Therefore, effectively quantifing paleo-earthquake parameters such as magnitude, rupture type and location based on lacustrine sedimentary archives remains a challenging task. Here, we present a comparative overview of relatively recent studies on earthquake-induced sedimentary features in different types of modern lakes in different tectonic settings and discuss the criteria used to single out earthquake shaking as their causative mechanism. Landslide records in Switzerland and turbidite records in Chile and Japan pointed out that the occurrence and/or scale of subaquatic slope failures can correlate with seismic intensity. It also seems that the continuity and type of the paleoseismic record is strongly dependent on lithology, sedimentation rate and slope morphology within the lake basins. Especially in settings with high frequency of strong earthquakes, this can lead to an underrepresentation of paleoseismic events in the records. However, for lake systems which exhibit ideal characteristics, a single coring site can be sufficient

  20. Mosquito larvicidal and pupaecidal potential of prodigiosin from Serratia marcescens and understanding its mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Suryawanshi, Rahul K; Patil, Chandrashekhar D; Borase, Hemant P; Narkhede, Chandrakant P; Salunke, Bipinchandra K; Patil, Satish V

    2015-09-01

    Mosquitoes spread lethal diseases like malaria and dengue fever to humans. Considering mosquito vector control as one of the best alternatives to reduce new infections, here we have analyzed the effect of purified pigment prodigiosin extracted from Serratia marcescens (NMCC 75) against larval and pupal stages of Aedes aegypti and Anopheles stephensi mosquitoes. Mosquito larvicidal activities of purified prodigiosin revealed LC50 values of 14 ± 1.2, 15.6 ± 1.48, 18 ± 1.3, 21 ± 0.87 µg/ml against early IInd, IIIrd, IVth instar and pupal stages of Ae. aegypti, respectively. LC50 values for An. stephensi were found to be 19.7 ± 1.12, 24.7 ± 1.47, 26.6 ± 1.67, 32.2 ± 1.79 µg/ml against early IInd, IIIrd, IVth instar and pupae of An. stephensi, respectively. Further investigations toward understanding modes of action revealed variations in the activities of esterases, acetylcholine esterases, phosphatases, proteases and total proteins in the fourth instar larvae of Ae. aegypti indicating intrinsic difference in biochemical features due to prodigiosin treatment. Although there was no inhibition of enzymes like catalase and oxidase but may have profound inhibitory effect on carbonic anhydrase or H(+)-V-ATPase which is indicated by change in the pH of midgut and caeca of mosquito larvae. This reduced pH may be possibly due to the proton pump inhibitory activity of prodigiosin. Pure prodigiosin can prove to be an important molecule for mosquito control at larval and pupal stages of Ae. aegypti and An. stephensi. This is the first report on the mosquito pupaecidal activity of prodigiosin and its possible mechanism of action. PMID:26267052

  1. HMGB1 Inhibition During Zymosan-Induced Inflammation: The Potential Therapeutic Action of Riboflavin.

    PubMed

    Mazur-Bialy, Agnieszka Irena; Pocheć, Ewa

    2016-04-01

    Sepsis, also known as systemic inflammatory response syndrome, is a life-threatening condition caused by a pathogenic agent and leading to multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. One of the factors responsible for the excessive intensification of the inflammatory response in the course of inflammation is high-mobility group protein B1 (HMGB1). HMG-1 is a nuclear protein which, after being released to the intercellular space, has a highly pro-inflammatory effect and acts as a late mediator of lethal damage. The purpose of this study was to examine whether the anti-inflammatory action of riboflavin is accompanied by inhibition of HMGB1 release during peritoneal inflammation and zymosan stimulation of macrophages. Peritonitis was induced in male BALB/c and C57BL/6J mice via intraperitoneal injection of zymosan (40 mg/kg). RAW 264.7 macrophages were activated with zymosan (250 µg/ml). Riboflavin (mice, 50 mg/kg; RAW 264.7, 25 µg/ml) was administered 30 min before zymosan, simultaneously with, or 2, 4, 6 h after zymosan. Additionally, mRNA expression of HMGB1 and its intracellular and serum levels were evaluated. The research showed that riboflavin significantly reduces both the expression and the release of HMGB1; however, the effect of riboflavin was time-dependent. The greatest efficacy was found when riboflavin was given 30 min prior to zymosan, and also 2 and 4 h (C57BL/6J; RAW 264.7) or 4 and 6 h (BALB/c) after zymosan. Research showed that riboflavin influences the level of HMGB1 released in the course of inflammation; however, further study is necessary to determine its mechanisms of action. PMID:26445809