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Sample records for action potential signals

  1. The linear synchronization measures of uterine EMG signals: Evidence of synchronized action potentials during propagation.

    PubMed

    Domino, Malgorzata; Pawlinski, Bartosz; Gajewski, Zdzislaw

    2016-11-01

    Evaluation of synchronization between myoelectric signals can give new insights into the functioning of the complex system of porcine myometrium. We propose a model of uterine contractions according to the hypothesis of action potentials similarity which is possible to detect during propagation in the uterine wall. We introduce similarity measures based on the concept of synchronization as used in matching linear signals such as electromyographic (EMG) time series data. The aim was to present linear measures to assess synchronization between contractions in different topographic regions of the uterus. We use the cross-correlation function (ƒx,y[l], ƒy,z[l]) and the cross-coherence function (Cxy[ƒ], Cyz[ƒ]) to assess synchronization between three data series of a diestral uterine EMG bundles in porcine reproductive tract. Spontaneous uterine activity was recorded using telemetry method directly by three-channel transmitter and three silver bipolar needle electrodes sutured on different topographic regions of the reproductive tract in the sow. The results show the usefulness of the cross-coherence function in that synchronization between uterine horn and corpus uteri for multiple action potentials (bundles) could be observed. The EMG bundles synchronization may be used to investigate the direction and velocity of EMG signals propagation in porcine reproductive tract. PMID:27570104

  2. ER Stress-Mediated Signaling: Action Potential and Ca(2+) as Key Players.

    PubMed

    Bahar, Entaz; Kim, Hyongsuk; Yoon, Hyonok

    2016-01-01

    The proper functioning of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is crucial for multiple cellular activities and survival. Disturbances in the normal ER functions lead to the accumulation and aggregation of unfolded proteins, which initiates an adaptive response, the unfolded protein response (UPR), in order to regain normal ER functions. Failure to activate the adaptive response initiates the process of programmed cell death or apoptosis. Apoptosis plays an important role in cell elimination, which is essential for embryogenesis, development, and tissue homeostasis. Impaired apoptosis can lead to the development of various pathological conditions, such as neurodegenerative and autoimmune diseases, cancer, or acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Calcium (Ca(2+)) is one of the key regulators of cell survival and it can induce ER stress-mediated apoptosis in response to various conditions. Ca(2+) regulates cell death both at the early and late stages of apoptosis. Severe Ca(2+) dysregulation can promote cell death through apoptosis. Action potential, an electrical signal transmitted along the neurons and muscle fibers, is important for conveying information to, from, and within the brain. Upon the initiation of the action potential, increased levels of cytosolic Ca(2+) (depolarization) lead to the activation of the ER stress response involved in the initiation of apoptosis. In this review, we discuss the involvement of Ca(2+) and action potential in ER stress-mediated apoptosis. PMID:27649160

  3. ER Stress-Mediated Signaling: Action Potential and Ca2+ as Key Players

    PubMed Central

    Bahar, Entaz; Kim, Hyongsuk; Yoon, Hyonok

    2016-01-01

    The proper functioning of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is crucial for multiple cellular activities and survival. Disturbances in the normal ER functions lead to the accumulation and aggregation of unfolded proteins, which initiates an adaptive response, the unfolded protein response (UPR), in order to regain normal ER functions. Failure to activate the adaptive response initiates the process of programmed cell death or apoptosis. Apoptosis plays an important role in cell elimination, which is essential for embryogenesis, development, and tissue homeostasis. Impaired apoptosis can lead to the development of various pathological conditions, such as neurodegenerative and autoimmune diseases, cancer, or acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Calcium (Ca2+) is one of the key regulators of cell survival and it can induce ER stress-mediated apoptosis in response to various conditions. Ca2+ regulates cell death both at the early and late stages of apoptosis. Severe Ca2+ dysregulation can promote cell death through apoptosis. Action potential, an electrical signal transmitted along the neurons and muscle fibers, is important for conveying information to, from, and within the brain. Upon the initiation of the action potential, increased levels of cytosolic Ca2+ (depolarization) lead to the activation of the ER stress response involved in the initiation of apoptosis. In this review, we discuss the involvement of Ca2+ and action potential in ER stress-mediated apoptosis. PMID:27649160

  4. Wavelet Transform for Real-Time Detection of Action Potentials in Neural Signals

    PubMed Central

    Quotb, Adam; Bornat, Yannick; Renaud, Sylvie

    2011-01-01

    We present a study on wavelet detection methods of neuronal action potentials (APs). Our final goal is to implement the selected algorithms on custom integrated electronics for on-line processing of neural signals; therefore we take real-time computing as a hard specification and silicon area as a price to pay. Using simulated neural signals including APs, we characterize an efficient wavelet method for AP extraction by evaluating its detection rate and its implementation cost. We compare software implementation for three methods: adaptive threshold, discrete wavelet transform (DWT), and stationary wavelet transform (SWT). We evaluate detection rate and implementation cost for detection functions dynamically comparing a signal with an adaptive threshold proportional to its SD, where the signal is the raw neural signal, respectively: (i) non-processed; (ii) processed by a DWT; (iii) processed by a SWT. We also use different mother wavelets and test different data formats to set an optimal compromise between accuracy and silicon cost. Detection accuracy is evaluated together with false negative and false positive detections. Simulation results show that for on-line AP detection implemented on a configurable digital integrated circuit, APs underneath the noise level can be detected using SWT with a well-selected mother wavelet, combined to an adaptive threshold. PMID:21811455

  5. Wavelet transform for real-time detection of action potentials in neural signals.

    PubMed

    Quotb, Adam; Bornat, Yannick; Renaud, Sylvie

    2011-01-01

    We present a study on wavelet detection methods of neuronal action potentials (APs). Our final goal is to implement the selected algorithms on custom integrated electronics for on-line processing of neural signals; therefore we take real-time computing as a hard specification and silicon area as a price to pay. Using simulated neural signals including APs, we characterize an efficient wavelet method for AP extraction by evaluating its detection rate and its implementation cost. We compare software implementation for three methods: adaptive threshold, discrete wavelet transform (DWT), and stationary wavelet transform (SWT). We evaluate detection rate and implementation cost for detection functions dynamically comparing a signal with an adaptive threshold proportional to its SD, where the signal is the raw neural signal, respectively: (i) non-processed; (ii) processed by a DWT; (iii) processed by a SWT. We also use different mother wavelets and test different data formats to set an optimal compromise between accuracy and silicon cost. Detection accuracy is evaluated together with false negative and false positive detections. Simulation results show that for on-line AP detection implemented on a configurable digital integrated circuit, APs underneath the noise level can be detected using SWT with a well-selected mother wavelet, combined to an adaptive threshold.

  6. Analogue modulation of back-propagating action potentials enables dendritic hybrid signalling

    PubMed Central

    Brunner, János; Szabadics, János

    2016-01-01

    We report that back-propagating action potentials (bAPs) are not simply digital feedback signals in dendrites but also carry analogue information about the overall state of neurons. Analogue information about the somatic membrane potential within a physiological range (from −78 to −64 mV) is retained by bAPs of dentate gyrus granule cells as different repolarization speeds in proximal dendrites and as different peak amplitudes in distal regions. These location-dependent waveform changes are reflected by local calcium influx, leading to proximal enhancement and distal attenuation during somatic hyperpolarization. The functional link between these retention and readout mechanisms of the analogue content of bAPs critically depends on high-voltage-activated, inactivating calcium channels. The hybrid bAP and calcium mechanisms report the phase of physiological somatic voltage fluctuations and modulate long-term synaptic plasticity in distal dendrites. Thus, bAPs are hybrid signals that relay somatic analogue information, which is detected by the dendrites in a location-dependent manner. PMID:27703164

  7. A new method for the extraction and classification of single motor unit action potentials from surface EMG signals.

    PubMed

    Gazzoni, Marco; Farina, Dario; Merletti, Roberto

    2004-07-30

    It has been shown that multi-channel surface EMG allows assessment of anatomical and physiological single motor unit (MU) properties. To get this information, the action potentials of single MUs should be extracted from the interference EMG signals. This study describes an automatic system for the detection and classification of MU action potentials from multi-channel surface EMG signals. The methods for the identification and extraction of action potentials from the raw signals and for their clustering into the MUs to which they belong are described. The segmentation phase is based on the matched Continuous Wavelet Transform (CWT) while the classification is performed by a multi-channel neural network that is a modified version of the multi-channel Adaptive Resonance Theory networks. The neural network can adapt to slow changes in the shape of the MU action potentials. The method does not require any interaction of the operator. The technique proposed was validated on simulated signals, at different levels of force, generated by a structure based surface EMG model. The MUs identified from the simulated signals covered almost the entire recruitment curve. Thus, the proposed algorithm was able to identify a MU sample representative of the muscle. Results on experimental signals recorded from different muscles and conditions are reported, showing the possibility of investigating anatomical and physiological properties of the detected MUs in a variety of practical cases. The main limitation of the approach is that complete firing patterns can be obtained only in specific cases due to MU action potential superpositions.

  8. Cardiac action potential imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Qinghai; Lipp, Peter; Kaestner, Lars

    2013-06-01

    Action potentials in cardiac myocytes have durations in the order of magnitude of 100 milliseconds. In biomedical investigations the documentation of the occurrence of action potentials is often not sufficient, but a recording of the shape of an action potential allows a functional estimation of several molecular players. Therefore a temporal resolution of around 500 images per second is compulsory. In the past such measurements have been performed with photometric approaches limiting the measurement to one cell at a time. In contrast, imaging allows reading out several cells at a time with additional spatial information. Recent developments in camera technologies allow the acquisition with the required speed and sensitivity. We performed action potential imaging on isolated adult cardiomyocytes of guinea pigs utilizing the fluorescent membrane potential sensor di-8-ANEPPS and latest electron-multiplication CCD as well as scientific CMOS cameras of several manufacturers. Furthermore, we characterized the signal to noise ratio of action potential signals of varying sets of cameras, dye concentrations and objective lenses. We ensured that di-8-ANEPPS itself did not alter action potentials by avoiding concentrations above 5 μM. Based on these results we can conclude that imaging is a reliable method to read out action potentials. Compared to conventional current-clamp experiments, this optical approach allows a much higher throughput and due to its contact free concept leaving the cell to a much higher degree undisturbed. Action potential imaging based on isolated adult cardiomyocytes can be utilized in pharmacological cardiac safety screens bearing numerous advantages over approaches based on heterologous expression of hERG channels in cell lines.

  9. A simple circuit for producing vertical arrays of analogue signals and dot raster displays of nerve and muscle action potentials.

    PubMed

    Miles, T S; Woodland, M J

    1986-03-01

    It is often helpful to display analogue signals such as electromyograms, electroencephalograms, nerve action potentials, etc., in a regular vertical array. A special case of this display is the widely-used dot raster. This paper describes a simple circuit which enables up to 31 analogue signals to be thus displayed on an analogue storage oscilloscope screen or X-Y plotter. A modification permits up to 255 trials to be displayed. The same circuit produces a standard, dot raster display from standard pulses representing nerve or muscle cell action potentials.

  10. Disruption of action potential and calcium signaling properties in malformed myofibers from dystrophin-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Ochoa, Erick O; Pratt, Stephen J P; Garcia-Pelagio, Karla P; Schneider, Martin F; Lovering, Richard M

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), the most common and severe muscular dystrophy, is caused by the absence of dystrophin. Muscle weakness and fragility (i.e., increased susceptibility to damage) are presumably due to structural instability of the myofiber cytoskeleton, but recent studies suggest that the increased presence of malformed/branched myofibers in dystrophic muscle may also play a role. We have previously studied myofiber morphology in healthy wild-type (WT) and dystrophic (MDX) skeletal muscle. Here, we examined myofiber excitability using high-speed confocal microscopy and the voltage-sensitive indicator di-8-butyl-amino-naphthyl-ethylene-pyridinium-propyl-sulfonate (di-8-ANEPPS) to assess the action potential (AP) properties. We also examined AP-induced Ca2+ transients using high-speed confocal microscopy with rhod-2, and assessed sarcolemma fragility using elastimetry. AP recordings showed an increased width and time to peak in malformed MDX myofibers compared to normal myofibers from both WT and MDX, but no significant change in AP amplitude. Malformed MDX myofibers also exhibited reduced AP-induced Ca2+ transients, with a further Ca2+ transient reduction in the branches of malformed MDX myofibers. Mechanical studies indicated an increased sarcolemma deformability and instability in malformed MDX myofibers. The data suggest that malformed myofibers are functionally different from myofibers with normal morphology. The differences seen in AP properties and Ca2+ signals suggest changes in excitability and remodeling of the global Ca2+ signal, both of which could underlie reported weakness in dystrophic muscle. The biomechanical changes in the sarcolemma support the notion that malformed myofibers are more susceptible to damage. The high prevalence of malformed myofibers in dystrophic muscle may contribute to the progressive strength loss and fragility seen in dystrophic muscles. PMID:25907787

  11. Action potential in charophytes.

    PubMed

    Beilby, Mary Jane

    2007-01-01

    The plant action potential (AP) has been studied for more than half a century. The experimental system was provided mainly by the large charophyte cells, which allowed insertion of early large electrodes, manipulation of cell compartments, and inside and outside media. These early experiments were inspired by the Hodgkin and Huxley (HH) work on the squid axon and its voltage clamp techniques. Later, the patch clamping technique provided information about the ion transporters underlying the excitation transient. The initial models were also influenced by the HH picture of the animal AP. At the turn of the century, the paradigm of the charophyte AP shifted to include several chemical reactions, second messenger-activated channel, and calcium ion liberation from internal stores. Many aspects of this new model await further clarification. The role of the AP in plant movements, wound signaling, and turgor regulation is now well documented. Involvement in invasion by pathogens, chilling injury, light, and gravity sensing are under investigation.

  12. DCT domain feature extraction scheme based on motor unit action potential of EMG signal for neuromuscular disease classification.

    PubMed

    Doulah, Abul Barkat Mollah Sayeed Ud; Fattah, Shaikh Anowarul; Zhu, Wei-Ping; Ahmad, M Omair

    2014-01-01

    A feature extraction scheme based on discrete cosine transform (DCT) of electromyography (EMG) signals is proposed for the classification of normal event and a neuromuscular disease, namely the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Instead of employing DCT directly on EMG data, it is employed on the motor unit action potentials (MUAPs) extracted from the EMG signal via a template matching-based decomposition technique. Unlike conventional MUAP-based methods, only one MUAP with maximum dynamic range is selected for DCT-based feature extraction. Magnitude and frequency values of a few high-energy DCT coefficients corresponding to the selected MUAP are used as the desired feature which not only reduces computational burden, but also offers better feature quality with high within-class compactness and between-class separation. For the purpose of classification, the K-nearest neighbourhood classifier is employed. Extensive analysis is performed on clinical EMG database and it is found that the proposed method provides a very satisfactory performance in terms of specificity, sensitivity and overall classification accuracy.

  13. DCT domain feature extraction scheme based on motor unit action potential of EMG signal for neuromuscular disease classification

    PubMed Central

    Doulah, Abul Barkat Mollah Sayeed Ud; Zhu, Wei-Ping; Ahmad, M. Omair

    2014-01-01

    A feature extraction scheme based on discrete cosine transform (DCT) of electromyography (EMG) signals is proposed for the classification of normal event and a neuromuscular disease, namely the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Instead of employing DCT directly on EMG data, it is employed on the motor unit action potentials (MUAPs) extracted from the EMG signal via a template matching-based decomposition technique. Unlike conventional MUAP-based methods, only one MUAP with maximum dynamic range is selected for DCT-based feature extraction. Magnitude and frequency values of a few high-energy DCT coefficients corresponding to the selected MUAP are used as the desired feature which not only reduces computational burden, but also offers better feature quality with high within-class compactness and between-class separation. For the purpose of classification, the K-nearest neighbourhood classifier is employed. Extensive analysis is performed on clinical EMG database and it is found that the proposed method provides a very satisfactory performance in terms of specificity, sensitivity and overall classification accuracy. PMID:26609372

  14. Peripheral μ-opioid receptor mediated inhibition of calcium signaling and action potential-evoked calcium fluorescent transients in primary afferent CGRP nociceptive terminals.

    PubMed

    Baillie, Landon D; Schmidhammer, Helmut; Mulligan, Sean J

    2015-06-01

    While μ-opioid receptor (MOR) agonists remain the most powerful analgesics for the treatment of severe pain, serious adverse side effects that are secondary to their central nervous system actions pose substantial barriers to therapeutic use. Preclinical and clinical evidence suggest that peripheral MORs play an important role in opioid analgesia, particularly under inflammatory conditions. However, the mechanisms of peripheral MOR signaling in primary afferent pain fibres remain to be established. We have recently introduced a novel ex vivo optical imaging approach that, for the first time, allows the study of physiological functioning within individual peripheral nociceptive fibre free nerve endings in mice. In the present study, we found that MOR activation in selectively identified, primary afferent CGRP nociceptive terminals caused inhibition of N-type Ca(2+) channel signaling and suppression of action potential-evoked Ca(2+) fluorescent transients mediated by 'big conductance' Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels (BKCa). In the live animal, we showed that the peripherally acting MOR agonist HS-731 produced analgesia and that BKCa channels were the major effectors of the peripheral MOR signaling. We have identified two key molecular transducers of MOR activation that mediate significant inhibition of nociceptive signaling in primary afferent terminals. Understanding the mechanisms of peripheral MOR signaling may promote the development of pathway selective μ-opioid drugs that offer improved therapeutic profiles for achieving potent analgesia while avoiding serious adverse central side effects. PMID:25721395

  15. Wnt signaling potentiates nevogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Pawlikowski, Jeff S.; McBryan, Tony; van Tuyn, John; Drotar, Mark E.; Hewitt, Rachael N.; Maier, Andrea B.; King, Ayala; Blyth, Karen; Wu, Hong; Adams, Peter D.

    2013-01-01

    Cellular senescence is a stable proliferation arrest associated with an altered secretory pathway (senescence-associated secretory phenotype). Cellular senescence is also a tumor suppressor mechanism, to which both proliferation arrest and senescence-associated secretory phenotype are thought to contribute. The melanocytes within benign human nevi are a paradigm for tumor-suppressive senescent cells in a premalignant neoplasm. Here a comparison of proliferating and senescent melanocytes and melanoma cell lines by RNA sequencing emphasizes the importance of senescence-associated proliferation arrest in suppression of transformation. Previous studies showed that activation of the Wnt signaling pathway can delay or bypass senescence. Consistent with this, we present evidence that repression of Wnt signaling contributes to melanocyte senescence in vitro. Surprisingly, Wnt signaling is active in many senescent human melanocytes in nevi, and this is linked to histological indicators of higher proliferative and malignant potential. In a mouse, activated Wnt signaling delays senescence-associated proliferation arrest to expand the population of senescent oncogene-expressing melanocytes. These results suggest that Wnt signaling can potentiate nevogenesis in vivo by delaying senescence. Further, we suggest that activated Wnt signaling in human nevi undermines senescence-mediated tumor suppression and enhances the probability of malignancy. PMID:24043806

  16. The blockade of transient receptor potential ankirin 1 (TRPA1) signalling mediates antidepressant- and anxiolytic-like actions in mice

    PubMed Central

    de Moura, Juliana Cavalcante; Noroes, Maíra Macedo; Rachetti, Vanessa de Paula Soares; Soares, Bruno Lobão; Preti, Delia; Nassini, Romina; Materazzi, Serena; Marone, Ilaria Maddalena; Minocci, Daiana; Geppetti, Pierangelo; Gavioli, Elaine Cristina; André, Eunice

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) and TRP ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) are involved in many biological processes, including nociception and hyperalgesia. Whereas the involvement of TRPV1 in psychiatric disorders such as anxiety and depression has been reported, little is known regarding the role of TRPA1 in these conditions. Experimental Approach We investigated the role of TRPA1 in mice models of depression [forced swimming test (FST)] and anxiety [elevated plus maze (EPM) test]. Key Results Administration of the TRPA1 antagonist (HC030031, 30 nmol in 2 μL, i.c.v.) reduced immobility time in the FST. Similar results were obtained after oral administration of HC030031 (30–300 mg·kg−1). The reduction in immobility time in FST induced by HC030031 (100 mg·kg−1) was completely prevented by pretreatment with TRPA1 agonist, cinnamaldehyde (50 mg·kg−1, p.o.), which per se was inactive. In the EPM test, pretreatment with cinnamaldehyde (50 mg·kg−1, p.o.), which per se did not affect behaviour response, prevented the anxiolytic-like effect (increased open arm exploration) evoked by TRPA1 blockade (HC030031, 100 mg·kg−1, p.o.). Treatment with either cinnamaldehyde or HC030031 did not affect spontaneous ambulation. Furthermore, TRPA1-deficient mice showed anxiolytic- and antidepressant-like phenotypes in the FST and EPM test respectively. Conclusion and Implications The present findings indicate that genetic deletion or pharmacological blockade of TRPA1 produces inhibitory activity in mouse models of anxiety and depression. These results imply that TRPA1 exerts tonic control, promoting anxiety and depression, and that TRPA1 antagonism has potential as an innovative strategy for the treatment of anxiety and mood disorders. PMID:24846744

  17. Screening Action Potentials: The Power of Light

    PubMed Central

    Kaestner, Lars; Lipp, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Action potentials reflect the concerted activity of all electrogenic constituents in the plasma membrane during the excitation of a cell. Therefore, the action potential is an integrated read out and a promising parameter to detect electrophysiological failures or modifications thereof in diagnosis as well as in drug screens. Cellular action potentials can be recorded by optical approaches. To fulfill the pre-requirements to scale up for, e.g., pharmacological screens the following preparatory work has to be provided: (i) model cells under investigation need to represent target cells in the best possible manner; (ii) optical sensors that can be either small molecule dyes or genetically encoded potential probes need to provide a reliable read out with minimal interaction with the naive behavior of the cells and (iii) devices need to be capable to stimulate the cells, read out the signals with the appropriate speed as well as provide the capacity for a sufficient throughput. Here we discuss several scenarios for all three categories in the field of cardiac physiology and pharmacology and provide a perspective to use the power of light in screening cardiac action potentials. PMID:21847381

  18. Characteristics of cardiac action potentials in marsupials.

    PubMed

    Campbell, T J

    1989-01-01

    Standard microelectrode techniques were used to record action potentials from single atrial, ventricular and Purkinje fibers of hearts taken from three species of marsupial (Macropus rufus, Macropus robustus and Macropus eugenii) and from dogs, sheep and guinea-pigs. The major electrophysiological parameters of marsupial potentials were qualitatively similar to the values for placental mammals. The grouped data for ventricular action potentials from studies on 6 adult male red kangaroos (Macropus rufus) were (mean +/- SD): Resting potential -69.5 +/- 5.0 mV; action potential amplitude 92.7 +/- 5.7 mV; action potential duration (to 90% repolarization): 182.5 +/- 17.5 ms; maximum rate of depolarization: 196.5 +/- 80.1 V/s. The major point of difference was the short duration of the red kangaroo ventricular action potential compared to those of the placental mammals, and compared to atrial cells from the kangaroos. It is suggested that this explains the short QT interval reported by others for kangaroo electrocardiograms, and that it may also be implicated in the high frequency of sudden death previously noted in these animals.

  19. Propagation of Action Potentials: An Active Participation Exercise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felsten, Gary

    1998-01-01

    Describes an active participation exercise that demonstrates the propagation of action potentials (the ability to transmit information through the neural network, dependent upon chemical interactions in the brain). Students assume the structure and function of the network by lining up around the room and communicating through hand signals and…

  20. Voltage-dependent anion channel 2 modulates resting Ca²+ sparks, but not action potential-induced Ca²+ signaling in cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    Subedi, Krishna Prasad; Kim, Joon-Chul; Kang, Moonkyung; Son, Min-Jeong; Kim, Yeon-Soo; Woo, Sun-Hee

    2011-02-01

    Voltage-dependent anion channels (VDACs) are pore forming proteins predominantly found in the outer mitochondrial membrane and are thought to transport Ca(2+). In this study, we have investigated the possible role of type 2 VDAC (VDAC2) in cardiac Ca(2+) signaling and Ca(2+) sparks using a lentiviral knock-down (KD) technique and two-dimensional confocal Ca(2+) imaging in immortalized autorhythmic adult atrial cells, HL-1. We confirmed high expression of VDAC2 protein in ventricular, atrial, and HL-1 cells using Western blot analysis. Infection of HL-1 cells with VDAC2-targeting lentivirus reduced the level of VDAC2 protein to ∼10%. Comparisons of autorhythmic Ca(2+) transients between wild-type (WT) and VDAC2 KD cells showed no significant change in the magnitude, decay, and beating rate of the Ca(2+) transients. Caffeine (10mM)-induced Ca(2+) release, which indicates sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) content, was not altered by VDAC2 KD. Interestingly, however, the intensity, width, and duration of the individual Ca(2+) sparks were significantly increased by VDAC2 KD in resting conditions, with no change in the frequency of sparks. VDAC2 KD significantly delayed mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake during artificial Ca(2+) pulses in permeabilized HL-1 cells. These results suggest that VDAC2 may facilitate mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake and restrict Ca(2+) spark expansion without regulating activations of sparks under resting conditions, thereby providing evidence on the functional role of VDAC2 in cardiac local Ca(2+) signaling.

  1. Correlation of action potentials in adjacent neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shneider, M. N.; Pekker, M.

    2015-12-01

    A possible mechanism for the synchronization of action potential propagation along a bundle of neurons (ephaptic coupling) is considered. It is shown that this mechanism is similar to the salutatory conduction of the action potential between the nodes of Ranvier in myelinated axons. The proposed model allows us to estimate the scale of the correlation, i.e., the distance between neurons in the nervous tissue, wherein their synchronization becomes possible. The possibility for experimental verification of the proposed model of synchronization is discussed.

  2. Introducing the Action Potential to Psychology Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon-Dack, Stephanie L.

    2014-01-01

    For this simple active learning technique for teaching, students are assigned "roles" and act out the process of the action potential (AP), including the firing threshold, ion-specific channels for ions to enter and leave the cell, diffusion, and the refractory period. Pre-post test results indicated that students demonstrated increased…

  3. A physical action potential generator: design, implementation and evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Latorre, Malcolm A.; Chan, Adrian D. C.; Wårdell, Karin

    2015-01-01

    The objective was to develop a physical action potential generator (Paxon) with the ability to generate a stable, repeatable, programmable, and physiological-like action potential. The Paxon has an equivalent of 40 nodes of Ranvier that were mimicked using resin embedded gold wires (Ø = 20 μm). These nodes were software controlled and the action potentials were initiated by a start trigger. Clinically used Ag-AgCl electrodes were coupled to the Paxon for functional testing. The Paxon's action potential parameters were tunable using a second order mathematical equation to generate physiologically relevant output, which was accomplished by varying the number of nodes involved (1–40 in incremental steps of 1) and the node drive potential (0–2.8 V in 0.7 mV steps), while keeping a fixed inter-nodal timing and test electrode configuration. A system noise floor of 0.07 ± 0.01 μV was calculated over 50 runs. A differential test electrode recorded a peak positive amplitude of 1.5 ± 0.05 mV (gain of 40x) at time 196.4 ± 0.06 ms, including a post trigger delay. The Paxon's programmable action potential like signal has the possibility to be used as a validation test platform for medical surface electrodes and their attached systems. PMID:26539072

  4. The action potential of Dionaea muscipula Ellis.

    PubMed

    Hodick, D; Sievers, A

    1988-04-01

    The intention of this investigation was to acquire more concise information about the nature of the action potential of Dionaea muscipula Ellis and the different types of cells generating and conducting it. It is shown by microelectrode measurements that, besides the sensory cells, all the major tissues of the trap lobes are excitable, firing action potentials with pronounced after-hyperpolarizations. The action potentials are strictly dependent on Ca(2+). Their peak depolarizations are shifted 25-27 mV in a positive direction after a tenfold increase in external Ca(2+) concentration. Perfusions with 1 mM ethylene glycol-bis(β-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA) or 1 mM LaCl3 completely inhibit excitability. Magnesium ions only slightly affect the peak depolarizations but considerably prolong action potentials. Sodium azide and 2,4-dinitrophenol also abolish excitation, probably by reducing the intracellular ATP concentration. Furthermore, it is tested whether the sensory cells can be distinguished from the other cells of the trap by their electrical behaviour. The resting potentials of sensory cells (-161±7 mV) and mesophyll cells (-155±8 mV) are of the same magnitude. Changes in external ion concentrations affect resting and action potentials in both cell types in a similar way. Additional freeze-fracture studies of both cell types reveal similar numbers and distributions of intramembrane particles on the fracture faces of the plasma membrane, which is most likely the mechanosensor. These findings stress the view that the high mechanosensitivity of the sensory hair results from its anatomy and not from a specialized perception mechanism. It is proposed that trap closure is triggered by a rise in the cytoplasmic concentration of Ca(2+) or a Ca(2+)-activated regulatory complex, which must exceed a threshold concentration. Since the Ca(2+) influx during a single action potential does not suffice to reach this threshold, at least two stimulations

  5. Mechanical surface waves accompany action potential propagation.

    PubMed

    El Hady, Ahmed; Machta, Benjamin B

    2015-01-01

    Many diverse studies have shown that a mechanical displacement of the axonal membrane accompanies the electrical pulse defining the action potential (AP). We present a model for these mechanical displacements as arising from the driving of surface wave modes in which potential energy is stored in elastic properties of the neuronal membrane and cytoskeleton while kinetic energy is carried by the axoplasmic fluid. In our model, these surface waves are driven by the travelling wave of electrical depolarization characterizing the AP, altering compressive electrostatic forces across the membrane. This driving leads to co-propagating mechanical displacements, which we term Action Waves (AWs). Our model allows us to estimate the shape of the AW that accompanies any travelling wave of voltage, making predictions that are in agreement with results from several experimental systems. Our model can serve as a framework for understanding the physical origins and possible functional roles of these AWs. PMID:25819404

  6. Mechanical surface waves accompany action potential propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Hady, Ahmed; Machta, Benjamin B.

    2015-03-01

    Many diverse studies have shown that a mechanical displacement of the axonal membrane accompanies the electrical pulse defining the action potential (AP). We present a model for these mechanical displacements as arising from the driving of surface wave modes in which potential energy is stored in elastic properties of the neuronal membrane and cytoskeleton while kinetic energy is carried by the axoplasmic fluid. In our model, these surface waves are driven by the travelling wave of electrical depolarization characterizing the AP, altering compressive electrostatic forces across the membrane. This driving leads to co-propagating mechanical displacements, which we term Action Waves (AWs). Our model allows us to estimate the shape of the AW that accompanies any travelling wave of voltage, making predictions that are in agreement with results from several experimental systems. Our model can serve as a framework for understanding the physical origins and possible functional roles of these AWs.

  7. Action prediction based on anticipatory brain potentials during simulated driving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaliliardali, Zahra; Chavarriaga, Ricardo; Gheorghe, Lucian Andrei; Millán, José del R.

    2015-12-01

    Objective. The ability of an automobile to infer the driver’s upcoming actions directly from neural signals could enrich the interaction of the car with its driver. Intelligent vehicles fitted with an on-board brain-computer interface able to decode the driver’s intentions can use this information to improve the driving experience. In this study we investigate the neural signatures of anticipation of specific actions, namely braking and accelerating. Approach. We investigated anticipatory slow cortical potentials in electroencephalogram recorded from 18 healthy participants in a driving simulator using a variant of the contingent negative variation (CNV) paradigm with Go and No-go conditions: count-down numbers followed by ‘Start’/‘Stop’ cue. We report decoding performance before the action onset using a quadratic discriminant analysis classifier based on temporal features. Main results. (i) Despite the visual and driving related cognitive distractions, we show the presence of anticipatory event related potentials locked to the stimuli onset similar to the widely reported CNV signal (with an average peak value of -8 μV at electrode Cz). (ii) We demonstrate the discrimination between cases requiring to perform an action upon imperative subsequent stimulus (Go condition, e.g. a ‘Red’ traffic light) versus events that do not require such action (No-go condition; e.g. a ‘Yellow’ light); with an average single trial classification performance of 0.83 ± 0.13 for braking and 0.79 ± 0.12 for accelerating (area under the curve). (iii) We show that the centro-medial anticipatory potentials are observed as early as 320 ± 200 ms before the action with a detection rate of 0.77 ± 0.12 in offline analysis. Significance. We show for the first time the feasibility of predicting the driver’s intention through decoding anticipatory related potentials during simulated car driving with high recognition rates.

  8. Ca channel gating during cardiac action potentials.

    PubMed

    Mazzanti, M; DeFelice, L J

    1990-10-01

    How do Ca channels conduct Ca ions during the cardiac action potential? We attempt to answer this question by applying a two-microelectrode technique, previously used for Na and K currents, in which we record the patch current and the action potential at the same time (Mazzanti, M., and L. J. DeFelice. 1987. Biophys. J. 12:95-100, and 1988. Biophys. J. 54:1139-1148; Wellis, D., L. J. DeFelice, and M. Mazzanti. 1990. Biophys. J. 57:41-48). In this paper, we also compare the action currents obtained by the technique with the step-protocol currents obtained during standard voltage-clamp experiments. Individual Ca channels were measured in 10 mM Ca/1 Ba and 10 mM Ba. To describe part of our results, we use the nomenclature introduced by Hess, P., J. B. Lansman, and R. W. Tsien (1984. Nature (Lond.). 311:538-544). With Ba as the charge carrier, Ca channel kinetics convert rapidly from long to short open times as the patch voltage changes from 20 to -20 mV. This voltage-dependent conversion occurs during action potentials and in step-protocol experiments. With Ca as the charge carrier, the currents are brief at all voltages, and it is difficult to define either the number of channels in the patch or the conductance of the individual channels. Occasionally, however, Ca-conducting channels spontaneously convert to long-open-time kinetics (in Hess et al., 1984, notation, mode 2). When this happens, which is about once in every 100beats, there usually appears to be only one channel in the patch. In this rare configuration, the channel is open long enough to measure its conductance in 10 Ca/ 1 Ba. The value is 8-10 pS, which is about half the conductance in Ba. Because the long openings occur so infrequently with Ca as the charge carrier, they contribute negligibly to the average Ca current at any particular time during an action potential. However, the total number of Ca ions entering during these long openings may be significant when compared to the number entering by the

  9. Ca channel gating during cardiac action potentials.

    PubMed

    Mazzanti, M; DeFelice, L J

    1990-10-01

    How do Ca channels conduct Ca ions during the cardiac action potential? We attempt to answer this question by applying a two-microelectrode technique, previously used for Na and K currents, in which we record the patch current and the action potential at the same time (Mazzanti, M., and L. J. DeFelice. 1987. Biophys. J. 12:95-100, and 1988. Biophys. J. 54:1139-1148; Wellis, D., L. J. DeFelice, and M. Mazzanti. 1990. Biophys. J. 57:41-48). In this paper, we also compare the action currents obtained by the technique with the step-protocol currents obtained during standard voltage-clamp experiments. Individual Ca channels were measured in 10 mM Ca/1 Ba and 10 mM Ba. To describe part of our results, we use the nomenclature introduced by Hess, P., J. B. Lansman, and R. W. Tsien (1984. Nature (Lond.). 311:538-544). With Ba as the charge carrier, Ca channel kinetics convert rapidly from long to short open times as the patch voltage changes from 20 to -20 mV. This voltage-dependent conversion occurs during action potentials and in step-protocol experiments. With Ca as the charge carrier, the currents are brief at all voltages, and it is difficult to define either the number of channels in the patch or the conductance of the individual channels. Occasionally, however, Ca-conducting channels spontaneously convert to long-open-time kinetics (in Hess et al., 1984, notation, mode 2). When this happens, which is about once in every 100beats, there usually appears to be only one channel in the patch. In this rare configuration, the channel is open long enough to measure its conductance in 10 Ca/ 1 Ba. The value is 8-10 pS, which is about half the conductance in Ba. Because the long openings occur so infrequently with Ca as the charge carrier, they contribute negligibly to the average Ca current at any particular time during an action potential. However, the total number of Ca ions entering during these long openings may be significant when compared to the number entering by the

  10. Ionic requirements for arterial action potential

    PubMed Central

    Keatinge, W. R.

    1968-01-01

    1. Strips of smooth muscle from common carotid arteries of sheep were electrically quiescent in solution containing Na 148 mM and Ca 2·5 mM. 2. When Ca was removed they became electrically active. Addition of low concentrations of Ca (0·025-0·075 mM) or Mg (0·025-0·750 mM) stopped their activity while ethylenediamine tetra-acetate (EDTA) (1·25 mM) accelerated it. 3. Replacement of Na by Tris or choline stopped the activity in Ca-free solution. After partial replacement of Na electrical activity could be restored by lowering the resting potential but after complete replacement of Na it could not. 4. In the presence of Ca (2·5 mM) small spikes could sometimes be induced after 20 min in Na-free Tris solution by lowering the resting potential by an increase in the external K concentration. 5. The results indicate that the depolarizing current of action potentials in this smooth muscle was largely carried by Na, although a little may have been carried by Ca in Ca-containing solutions. 6. The arteries in general resembled striated muscle rather than intestinal smooth muscle in these respects, but unlike striated muscle their action potentials were not stopped by tetrodotoxin. ImagesFig. 2 PMID:5639765

  11. [Action of antibiotics as signalling molecules].

    PubMed

    Bulgakova, V G; Vinogradova, K A; Orlova, T I; Kozhevin, P A; Polin, A N

    2014-01-01

    It was thought that antibiotics should be produced by soil microorganisms to inhibit the growth of competitors in natural habitats. Yet it has been shown that antibiotics at subinhibitory concentrations may have a role as signalling molecules providing cell-to-cell communication in bacteria in the environment. Antibiotics modulate gene transcription and regulate gene expression in microbial populations. Subinhibitory concentrations of antibiotics may cause a number of phenotypic and genotypic changes in microorganisms. These transcription changes are dependent on the interaction of antibiotics with macromolecular receptors such as ribosome or RNA-polymerase. Antibiotic signalling and quorum-sensing system are important regulatory mechanisms in bacteria. It was demonstrated that antibiotics interfered with quorum-sensing system.

  12. Antithrombotic actions of statins involve PECAM-1 signaling.

    PubMed

    Moraes, Leonardo A; Vaiyapuri, Sakthivel; Sasikumar, Parvathy; Ali, Marfoua S; Kriek, Neline; Sage, Tanya; Gibbins, Jonathan M

    2013-10-31

    Statins are widely prescribed cholesterol-lowering drugs that are a first-line treatment of coronary artery disease and atherosclerosis, reducing the incidence of thrombotic events such as myocardial infarction and stroke. Statins have been shown to reduce platelet activation, although the mechanism(s) through which this occurs is unclear. Because several of the characteristic effects of statins on platelets are shared with those elicited by the inhibitory platelet adhesion receptor PECAM-1 (platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1), we investigated a potential connection between the influence of statins on platelet function and PECAM-1 signaling. Statins were found to inhibit a range of platelet functional responses and thrombus formation in vitro and in vivo. Notably, these effects of statins on platelet function in vitro and in vivo were diminished in PECAM-1(-/-) platelets. Activation of PECAM-1 signaling results in its tyrosine phosphorylation, the recruitment and activation of tyrosine phosphatase SHP-2, the subsequent binding of phosphoinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), and diminished PI3K signaling. Statins resulted in the stimulation of these events, leading to the inhibition of Akt activation. Together, these data provide evidence for a fundamental role of PECAM-1 in the inhibitory effects of statins on platelet activation, which may explain some of the pleiotropic actions of these drugs. PMID:24030383

  13. Warm Body Temperature Facilitates Energy Efficient Cortical Action Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yuguo; Hill, Adam P.; McCormick, David A.

    2012-01-01

    The energy efficiency of neural signal transmission is important not only as a limiting factor in brain architecture, but it also influences the interpretation of functional brain imaging signals. Action potential generation in mammalian, versus invertebrate, axons is remarkably energy efficient. Here we demonstrate that this increase in energy efficiency is due largely to a warmer body temperature. Increases in temperature result in an exponential increase in energy efficiency for single action potentials by increasing the rate of Na+ channel inactivation, resulting in a marked reduction in overlap of the inward Na+, and outward K+, currents and a shortening of action potential duration. This increase in single spike efficiency is, however, counterbalanced by a temperature-dependent decrease in the amplitude and duration of the spike afterhyperpolarization, resulting in a nonlinear increase in the spike firing rate, particularly at temperatures above approximately 35°C. Interestingly, the total energy cost, as measured by the multiplication of total Na+ entry per spike and average firing rate in response to a constant input, reaches a global minimum between 37–42°C. Our results indicate that increases in temperature result in an unexpected increase in energy efficiency, especially near normal body temperature, thus allowing the brain to utilize an energy efficient neural code. PMID:22511855

  14. The characteristics of action potentials in primo vessels and the effects of acetylcholine injection to the action potentials.

    PubMed

    Cho, Seong Jin; Lim, Jaekwan; Yeon, Sun Hee; Kwon, O Sang; Choi, Kwang-Ho; Choi, Sun-Mi; Ryu, Yeon-Hee

    2013-01-01

    In a previous study, we found that Primo vessels generate different action potentials in smooth muscles, but this study compared the pulse shape to distinguish the two tissues. Thus, a more sophisticated extracellular experiment was performed in this study using an acetylcholine injection; we then observed changes in the amplitude, FWHM (full width at half maximum), and period to explore Primo vessel function. A third type of pulse was recorded for Primo vessels. We observed fast depolarizing and repolarizing phases for this pulse. Further, its FWHM was 30 ms between smooth muscles and neurons. Acetylcholine affected only the period. The amplitude and FWHM were consistent after injection. Primo-vessels generated action potentials at twice the frequency after injection. From the results, we speculate that Primo-vessels perform a role in transferring signals in a different manner, which may be relevant for acupuncture treatment.

  15. Electrotonic and action potentials in the Venus flytrap.

    PubMed

    Volkov, Alexander G; Vilfranc, Chrystelle L; Murphy, Veronica A; Mitchell, Colee M; Volkova, Maia I; O'Neal, Lawrence; Markin, Vladislav S

    2013-06-15

    The electrical phenomena and morphing structures in the Venus flytrap have attracted researchers since the nineteenth century. We have observed that mechanical stimulation of trigger hairs on the lobes of the Venus flytrap induces electrotonic potentials in the lower leaf. Electrostimulation of electrical circuits in the Venus flytrap can induce electrotonic potentials propagating along the upper and lower leaves. The instantaneous increase or decrease in voltage of stimulating potential generates a nonlinear electrical response in plant tissues. Any electrostimulation that is not instantaneous, such as sinusoidal or triangular functions, results in linear responses in the form of small electrotonic potentials. The amplitude and sign of electrotonic potentials depend on the polarity and the amplitude of the applied voltage. Electrical stimulation of the lower leaf induces electrical signals, which resemble action potentials, in the trap between the lobes and the midrib. The trap closes if the stimulating voltage is above the threshold level of 4.4V. Electrical responses in the Venus flytrap were analyzed and reproduced in the discrete electrical circuit. The information gained from this study can be used to elucidate the coupling of intracellular and intercellular communications in the form of electrical signals within plants.

  16. Action potential broadening in a presynaptic channelopathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begum, Rahima; Bakiri, Yamina; Volynski, Kirill E.; Kullmann, Dimitri M.

    2016-07-01

    Brain development and interictal function are unaffected in many paroxysmal neurological channelopathies, possibly explained by homoeostatic plasticity of synaptic transmission. Episodic ataxia type 1 is caused by missense mutations of the potassium channel Kv1.1, which is abundantly expressed in the terminals of cerebellar basket cells. Presynaptic action potentials of small inhibitory terminals have not been characterized, and it is not known whether developmental plasticity compensates for the effects of Kv1.1 dysfunction. Here we use visually targeted patch-clamp recordings from basket cell terminals of mice harbouring an ataxia-associated mutation and their wild-type littermates. Presynaptic spikes are followed by a pronounced afterdepolarization, and are broadened by pharmacological blockade of Kv1.1 or by a dominant ataxia-associated mutation. Somatic recordings fail to detect such changes. Spike broadening leads to increased Ca2+ influx and GABA release, and decreased spontaneous Purkinje cell firing. We find no evidence for developmental compensation for inherited Kv1.1 dysfunction.

  17. Action potential broadening in a presynaptic channelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Begum, Rahima; Bakiri, Yamina; Volynski, Kirill E.; Kullmann, Dimitri M.

    2016-01-01

    Brain development and interictal function are unaffected in many paroxysmal neurological channelopathies, possibly explained by homoeostatic plasticity of synaptic transmission. Episodic ataxia type 1 is caused by missense mutations of the potassium channel Kv1.1, which is abundantly expressed in the terminals of cerebellar basket cells. Presynaptic action potentials of small inhibitory terminals have not been characterized, and it is not known whether developmental plasticity compensates for the effects of Kv1.1 dysfunction. Here we use visually targeted patch-clamp recordings from basket cell terminals of mice harbouring an ataxia-associated mutation and their wild-type littermates. Presynaptic spikes are followed by a pronounced afterdepolarization, and are broadened by pharmacological blockade of Kv1.1 or by a dominant ataxia-associated mutation. Somatic recordings fail to detect such changes. Spike broadening leads to increased Ca2+ influx and GABA release, and decreased spontaneous Purkinje cell firing. We find no evidence for developmental compensation for inherited Kv1.1 dysfunction. PMID:27381274

  18. Action potential broadening in a presynaptic channelopathy.

    PubMed

    Begum, Rahima; Bakiri, Yamina; Volynski, Kirill E; Kullmann, Dimitri M

    2016-01-01

    Brain development and interictal function are unaffected in many paroxysmal neurological channelopathies, possibly explained by homoeostatic plasticity of synaptic transmission. Episodic ataxia type 1 is caused by missense mutations of the potassium channel Kv1.1, which is abundantly expressed in the terminals of cerebellar basket cells. Presynaptic action potentials of small inhibitory terminals have not been characterized, and it is not known whether developmental plasticity compensates for the effects of Kv1.1 dysfunction. Here we use visually targeted patch-clamp recordings from basket cell terminals of mice harbouring an ataxia-associated mutation and their wild-type littermates. Presynaptic spikes are followed by a pronounced afterdepolarization, and are broadened by pharmacological blockade of Kv1.1 or by a dominant ataxia-associated mutation. Somatic recordings fail to detect such changes. Spike broadening leads to increased Ca(2+) influx and GABA release, and decreased spontaneous Purkinje cell firing. We find no evidence for developmental compensation for inherited Kv1.1 dysfunction. PMID:27381274

  19. Flexible graphene transistors for recording cell action potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaschke, Benno M.; Lottner, Martin; Drieschner, Simon; Bonaccini Calia, Andrea; Stoiber, Karolina; Rousseau, Lionel; Lissourges, Gaëlle; Garrido, Jose A.

    2016-06-01

    Graphene solution-gated field-effect transistors (SGFETs) are a promising platform for the recording of cell action potentials due to the intrinsic high signal amplification of graphene transistors. In addition, graphene technology fulfills important key requirements for in-vivo applications, such as biocompability, mechanical flexibility, as well as ease of high density integration. In this paper we demonstrate the fabrication of flexible arrays of graphene SGFETs on polyimide, a biocompatible polymeric substrate. We investigate the transistor’s transconductance and intrinsic electronic noise which are key parameters for the device sensitivity, confirming that the obtained values are comparable to those of rigid graphene SGFETs. Furthermore, we show that the devices do not degrade during repeated bending and the transconductance, governed by the electronic properties of graphene, is unaffected by bending. After cell culture, we demonstrate the recording of cell action potentials from cardiomyocyte-like cells with a high signal-to-noise ratio that is higher or comparable to competing state of the art technologies. Our results highlight the great capabilities of flexible graphene SGFETs in bioelectronics, providing a solid foundation for in-vivo experiments and, eventually, for graphene-based neuroprosthetics.

  20. Rapid Actions of Xenoestrogens Disrupt Normal Estrogenic Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Cheryl S.; Hu, Guangzhen; Paulucci-Holthauzen, Adriana A.

    2014-01-01

    Some chemicals used in consumer products or manufacturing (eg. plastics, surfactants, pesticides, resins) have estrogenic activities; these xenoestrogens (XEs) chemically resemble physiological estrogens and are one of the major categories of synthesized compounds that disrupt endocrine actions. Potent rapid actions of XEs via nongenomic mechanisms contribute significantly to their disruptive effects on functional endpoints (eg. cell proliferation/death, transport, peptide release). Membrane-initiated hormonal signaling in our pituitary cell model is predominantly driven by mERα with mERβ and GPR30 participation. We visualized ERα on plasma membranes using many techniques in the past (impeded ligands, antibodies to ERα ) and now add observations of epitope proximity with other membrane signaling proteins. We have demonstrated a range of rapid signals/protein activations by XEs including: calcium channels, cAMP/PKA, MAPKs, G proteins, caspases, and transcription factors. XEs can cause disruptions of the oscillating temporal patterns of nongenomic signaling elicited by endogenous estrogens. Concentration effects of XEs are nonmonotonic (a trait shared with natural hormones), making it difficult to design efficient (single concentration) toxicology tests to monitor their harmful effects. A plastics monomer, Bisphenol A, modified by waste treatment (chlorination) and other processes causes dephosphorylation of extracellular-regulated kinases, in contrast to having no effects as it does in genomic signaling. Mixtures of XEs, commonly found in contaminated environments, disrupt the signaling actions of physiological estrogens even more severely than do single XEs. Understanding the features of XEs that drive these disruptive mechanisms will allow us to redesign useful chemicals that exclude estrogenic or anti-estrogenic activities. PMID:24269739

  1. Estrogen action and cytoplasmic signaling cascades. Part I: membrane-associated signaling complexes

    PubMed Central

    Segars, James H.; Driggers, Paul H.

    2014-01-01

    Remarkable progress in recent years has suggested that estrogen action in vivo is complex and often involves activation of cytoplasmic signaling cascades in addition to genomic actions mediated directly through estrogen receptors α and β. Rather than a linear response mediated solely through estrogen-responsive DNA elements, in vivo estrogen might simultaneously activate distinct signaling cascades that function as networks to coordinate tissue responses to estrogen. This complex signaling system provides for exquisite control and plasticity of response to estrogen at the tissue level, and undoubtedly contributes to the remarkable tissue-specific responses to estrogens. In part I of this series, we summarize cytoplasmic signaling modules involving estrogen or estrogen receptors, with particular focus on recently described membrane-associated signaling complexes. PMID:12217492

  2. Action potential initiation and propagation in rat neocortical pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Stuart, G; Schiller, J; Sakmann, B

    1997-12-15

    1. Initiation and propagation of action potentials evoked by extracellular synaptic stimulation was studied using simultaneous dual and triple patch pipette recordings from different locations on neocortical layer 5 pyramidal neurons in brain slices from 4-week-old rats (P26-30) at physiological temperatures. 2. Simultaneous cell-attached and whole-cell voltage recordings from the apical trunk (up to 700 microns distal to the soma) and the soma indicated that proximal synaptic stimulation (layer 4) initiated action potentials first at the soma, whereas distal stimulation (upper layer 2/3) could initiate dendritic regenerative potentials prior to somatic action potentials following stimulation at higher intensity. 3. Somatic action potentials, once initiated, propagated back into the apical dendrites in a decremented manner which was frequency dependent. The half-width of back propagating action potentials increased and their maximum rate of rise decreased with distance from the soma, with the peak of these action potentials propagating with a conduction velocity of approximately 0.5 m s-1. 4. Back-propagation of action potentials into the dendritic tree was associated with dendritic calcium electrogenesis, which was particularly prominent during bursts of somatic action potentials. 5. When dendritic regenerative potentials were evoked prior to somatic action potentials, the more distal the dendritic recording was made from the soma the longer the time between the onset of the dendritic regenerative potential relative to somatic action potential. This suggested that dendritic regenerative potentials were initiated in the distal apical dendrites, possibly in the apical tuft. 6. At any one stimulus intensity, the initiation of dendritic regenerative potentials prior to somatic action potentials could fluctuate, and was modulated by depolarizing somatic or hyperpolarizing dendritic current injection. 7. Dendritic regenerative potentials could be initiated prior to

  3. Conduction velocity of antigravity muscle action potentials.

    PubMed

    Christova, L; Kosarov, D; Christova, P

    1992-01-01

    The conduction velocity of the impulses along the muscle fibers is one of the parameters of the extraterritorial potentials of the motor units allowing for the evaluation of the functional state of the muscles. There are no data about the conduction velocities of antigravity muscleaction potentials. In this paper we offer a method for measuring conduction velocity of potentials of single MUs and the averaged potentials of the interference electromiogram (IEMG) lead-off by surface electrodes from mm. sternocleidomastoideus, trapezius, deltoideus (caput laterale) and vastus medialis. The measured mean values of the conduction velocity of antigravity muscles potentials can be used for testing the functional state of the muscles.

  4. Signaling in the phytomicrobiome: breadth and potential

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Donald L.; Subramanian, Sowmyalakshmi; Lamont, John R.; Bywater-Ekegärd, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    Higher plants have evolved intimate, complex, subtle, and relatively constant relationships with a suite of microbes, the phytomicrobiome. Over the last few decades we have learned that plants and microbes can use molecular signals to communicate. This is well-established for the legume-rhizobia nitrogen-fixing symbiosis, and reasonably elucidated for mycorrhizal associations. Bacteria within the phytomircobiome communicate among themselves through quorum sensing and other mechanisms. Plants also detect materials produced by potential pathogens and activate pathogen-response systems. This intercommunication dictates aspects of plant development, architecture, and productivity. Understanding this signaling via biochemical, genomics, proteomics, and metabolomic studies has added valuable knowledge regarding development of effective, low-cost, eco-friendly crop inputs that reduce fossil fuel intense inputs. This knowledge underpins phytomicrobiome engineering: manipulating the beneficial consortia that manufacture signals/products that improve the ability of the plant-phytomicrobiome community to deal with various soil and climatic conditions, leading to enhanced overall crop plant productivity. PMID:26442023

  5. Selective effects of an octopus toxin on action potentials

    PubMed Central

    Dulhunty, Angela; Gage, Peter W.

    1971-01-01

    1. A lethal, water soluble toxin (Maculotoxin, MTX) with a molecular weight less than 540, can be extracted from the salivary glands of an octopus (Hapalochlaena maculosa). 2. MTX blocks action potentials in sartorius muscle fibres of toads without affecting the membrane potential. Delayed rectification is not inhibited by the toxin. 3. At low concentrations (10-6-10-5 g/ml.) MTX blocks action potentials only after a certain number have been elicited. The number of action potentials, which can be defined accurately, depends on the concentration of MTX and the concentration of sodium ions in the extracellular solution. 4. The toxin has no post-synaptic effect at the neuromuscular junction and it is concluded that it blocks neuromuscular transmission by inhibiting action potentials in motor nerve terminals. PMID:4330930

  6. Quadratic adaptive algorithm for solving cardiac action potential models.

    PubMed

    Chen, Min-Hung; Chen, Po-Yuan; Luo, Ching-Hsing

    2016-10-01

    An adaptive integration method is proposed for computing cardiac action potential models accurately and efficiently. Time steps are adaptively chosen by solving a quadratic formula involving the first and second derivatives of the membrane action potential. To improve the numerical accuracy, we devise an extremum-locator (el) function to predict the local extremum when approaching the peak amplitude of the action potential. In addition, the time step restriction (tsr) technique is designed to limit the increase in time steps, and thus prevent the membrane potential from changing abruptly. The performance of the proposed method is tested using the Luo-Rudy phase 1 (LR1), dynamic (LR2), and human O'Hara-Rudy dynamic (ORd) ventricular action potential models, and the Courtemanche atrial model incorporating a Markov sodium channel model. Numerical experiments demonstrate that the action potential generated using the proposed method is more accurate than that using the traditional Hybrid method, especially near the peak region. The traditional Hybrid method may choose large time steps near to the peak region, and sometimes causes the action potential to become distorted. In contrast, the proposed new method chooses very fine time steps in the peak region, but large time steps in the smooth region, and the profiles are smoother and closer to the reference solution. In the test on the stiff Markov ionic channel model, the Hybrid blows up if the allowable time step is set to be greater than 0.1ms. In contrast, our method can adjust the time step size automatically, and is stable. Overall, the proposed method is more accurate than and as efficient as the traditional Hybrid method, especially for the human ORd model. The proposed method shows improvement for action potentials with a non-smooth morphology, and it needs further investigation to determine whether the method is helpful during propagation of the action potential. PMID:27639239

  7. Naturalistic stimulation changes the dynamic response of action potential encoding in a mechanoreceptor

    PubMed Central

    Pfeiffer, Keram; French, Andrew S.

    2015-01-01

    Naturalistic signals were created from vibrations made by locusts walking on a Sansevieria plant. Both naturalistic and Gaussian noise signals were used to mechanically stimulate VS-3 slit-sense mechanoreceptor neurons of the spider, Cupiennius salei, with stimulus amplitudes adjusted to give similar firing rates for either stimulus. Intracellular microelectrodes recorded action potentials, receptor potential, and receptor current, using current clamp and voltage clamp. Frequency response analysis showed that naturalistic stimulation contained relatively more power at low frequencies, and caused increased neuronal sensitivity to higher frequencies. In contrast, varying the amplitude of Gaussian stimulation did not change neuronal dynamics. Naturalistic stimulation contained less entropy than Gaussian, but signal entropy was higher than stimulus in the resultant receptor current, indicating addition of uncorrelated noise during transduction. The presence of added noise was supported by measuring linear information capacity in the receptor current. Total entropy and information capacity in action potentials produced by either stimulus were much lower than in earlier stages, and limited to the maximum entropy of binary signals. We conclude that the dynamics of action potential encoding in VS-3 neurons are sensitive to the form of stimulation, but entropy and information capacity of action potentials are limited by firing rate. PMID:26578975

  8. Detection and classification of raw action potential patterns in human Muscle Sympathetic Nerve Activity.

    PubMed

    Salmanpour, Aryan; Brown, Lyndon J; Shoemaker, J K

    2008-01-01

    The Muscle Sympathetic Nerve Activity (MSNA) consists of synchronous neural discharges separated by periods of neural silence dominated by heavy background noise. During measurement with electrodes, the raw MSNA signal is amplified, band-pass filtered, rectified and integrated. This integration process removes much neurophysiological information. In this paper a method for detecting a raw action potential (before the pre-amplifier) and filtered action potential (after the band-pass filter) is presented. This method is based on stationary wavelet transform (SWT) and a peak detection algorithm. Also, the detected action potentials were clustered using the k-means method and the cluster averages were calculated. The action potential detector and classification algorithm are evaluated using real MSNA recorded from three healthy subjects.

  9. Calcium signalling in pancreatic stellate cells: Mechanisms and potential roles.

    PubMed

    Gryshchenko, Oleksiy; Gerasimenko, Julia V; Gerasimenko, Oleg V; Petersen, Ole H

    2016-03-01

    Hepatic and pancreatic stellate cells may or may not be regarded as stem cells, but they are capable of remarkable transformations. There is less information about stellate cells in the pancreas than in the liver, where they were discovered much earlier and therefore have been studied longer and more intensively than in the pancreas. Most of the work on pancreatic stellate cells has been carried out in studies on cell cultures, but in this review we focus attention on Ca(2+) signalling in stellate cells in their real pancreatic environment. We review current knowledge on patho-physiologically relevant Ca(2+) signalling events and their underlying mechanisms. We focus on the effects of bradykinin in the initial stages of acute pancreatitis, an often fatal disease in which the pancreas digests itself and its surroundings. Ca(2+) signals, elicited in the stellate cells by the action of bradykinin, may have a negative effect on the outcome of the acute disease process and promote the development of chronic pancreatitis. The bradykinin-elicited Ca(2+) signals can be inhibited by blockade of type 2 receptors and also by blockade of Ca(2+)-release activated Ca(2+) channels. The potential benefits of such pharmacological inhibition for the treatment of pancreatitis are reviewed. PMID:26960936

  10. Consequences of Converting Graded to Action Potentials upon Neural Information Coding and Energy Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Biswa; Laughlin, Simon Barry; Niven, Jeremy Edward

    2014-01-01

    Information is encoded in neural circuits using both graded and action potentials, converting between them within single neurons and successive processing layers. This conversion is accompanied by information loss and a drop in energy efficiency. We investigate the biophysical causes of this loss of information and efficiency by comparing spiking neuron models, containing stochastic voltage-gated Na+ and K+ channels, with generator potential and graded potential models lacking voltage-gated Na+ channels. We identify three causes of information loss in the generator potential that are the by-product of action potential generation: (1) the voltage-gated Na+ channels necessary for action potential generation increase intrinsic noise and (2) introduce non-linearities, and (3) the finite duration of the action potential creates a ‘footprint’ in the generator potential that obscures incoming signals. These three processes reduce information rates by ∼50% in generator potentials, to ∼3 times that of spike trains. Both generator potentials and graded potentials consume almost an order of magnitude less energy per second than spike trains. Because of the lower information rates of generator potentials they are substantially less energy efficient than graded potentials. However, both are an order of magnitude more efficient than spike trains due to the higher energy costs and low information content of spikes, emphasizing that there is a two-fold cost of converting analogue to digital; information loss and cost inflation. PMID:24465197

  11. Consequences of converting graded to action potentials upon neural information coding and energy efficiency.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Biswa; Laughlin, Simon Barry; Niven, Jeremy Edward

    2014-01-01

    Information is encoded in neural circuits using both graded and action potentials, converting between them within single neurons and successive processing layers. This conversion is accompanied by information loss and a drop in energy efficiency. We investigate the biophysical causes of this loss of information and efficiency by comparing spiking neuron models, containing stochastic voltage-gated Na(+) and K(+) channels, with generator potential and graded potential models lacking voltage-gated Na(+) channels. We identify three causes of information loss in the generator potential that are the by-product of action potential generation: (1) the voltage-gated Na(+) channels necessary for action potential generation increase intrinsic noise and (2) introduce non-linearities, and (3) the finite duration of the action potential creates a 'footprint' in the generator potential that obscures incoming signals. These three processes reduce information rates by ∼50% in generator potentials, to ∼3 times that of spike trains. Both generator potentials and graded potentials consume almost an order of magnitude less energy per second than spike trains. Because of the lower information rates of generator potentials they are substantially less energy efficient than graded potentials. However, both are an order of magnitude more efficient than spike trains due to the higher energy costs and low information content of spikes, emphasizing that there is a two-fold cost of converting analogue to digital; information loss and cost inflation.

  12. Modelling Action Potential Generation and Propagation in Fibroblastic Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, J. J.; Cornelisse, L. N.; Harks, E. G. A.; Theuvenet, A. P. R.; Ypey, D. L.

    2003-04-01

    Using a standard Hodgkin-Huxley (HH) formalism, we present a mathematical model for action potential (AP) generation and intercellular AP propagation in quiescent (serum-deprived) normal rat kidney (NRK) fibroblasts [1], based on the recent experimental identification of the ion channels involved [2]. The principal ion channels described are those of an inwardly rectifying K+ conductance (GKIR), an L-type calcium conductance (GCaL), an intracellular calcium activated Cl- conductance (GCl(Ca)), a residual leak conductance Gleak, and gap junctional channels between the cells (Ggj). The role of each one of these components in the particular shape of the AP wave-form has been analyzed and compared with experimental observations. In addition, we have studied the role of subcellular processes like intracellular calcium dynamics and calcium buffering in AP generation. AP propagation between cells was reconstructed in a hexagonal model of cells coupled by Ggj with physiological conductance values. The model revealed an excitability mechanism of quiescent NRK cells with a particular role of intracellular calcium dynamics. It allows further explorations of the mechanism of signal generation and transmission in NRK cell cultures and its dependence on growth conditions.

  13. Direct detection of a single evoked action potential with MRS in Lumbricus terrestris.

    PubMed

    Poplawsky, Alexander J; Dingledine, Raymond; Hu, Xiaoping P

    2012-01-01

    Functional MRI (fMRI) measures neural activity indirectly by detecting the signal change associated with the hemodynamic response following brain activation. In order to alleviate the temporal and spatial specificity problems associated with fMRI, a number of attempts have been made to detect neural magnetic fields (NMFs) with MRI directly, but have thus far provided conflicting results. In this study, we used MR to detect axonal NMFs in the median giant fiber of the earthworm, Lumbricus terrestris, by examining the free induction decay (FID) with a sampling interval of 0.32 ms. The earthworm nerve cords were isolated from the vasculature and stimulated at the threshold of action potential generation. FIDs were acquired shortly after the stimulation, and simultaneous field potential recordings identified the presence or absence of single evoked action potentials. FIDs acquired when the stimulus did not evoke an action potential were summed as background. The phase of the background-subtracted FID exhibited a systematic change, with a peak phase difference of (-1.2 ± 0.3) × 10(-5) radians occurring at a time corresponding to the timing of the action potential. In addition, we calculated the possible changes in the FID magnitude and phase caused by a simulated action potential using a volume conductor model. The measured phase difference matched the theoretical prediction well in both amplitude and temporal characteristics. This study provides the first evidence for the direct detection of a magnetic field from an evoked action potential using MR. PMID:21728204

  14. [On the theory of action potential propagation in plant cells].

    PubMed

    Sizonenko, V L; Kovalenko, N I

    2012-01-01

    The distribution of an electric field in plant cells and zooblasts has been investigated at propagation of the action potential. The behavior of ions in the cytoplasm and in the extracellular fluid has been described with the equations of electric charge motion in the electrolytes. It has been shown that the action potential causes an electric potential change not only in the depth of the cytoplasm but also in the extracellular area far from the lipidic bilayer. The biomembrane resistance has been expressed by physical parameters of a cell, such as ionic diffusion coefficient in fluid, Debye-Huckel radius, dielectric conductivity etc. The presence of breakings in the action potential diagrams has been explained as a result of insufficient resolving power of the measuring devices at the instant the sodium ionic canals of the bilayer opens. PMID:23035528

  15. Potential effects of intrinsic heart pacemaker cell mechanisms on dysrhythmic cardiac action potential firing

    PubMed Central

    Yaniv, Yael; Tsutsui, Kenta; Lakatta, Edward G.

    2015-01-01

    The heart's regular electrical activity is initiated by specialized cardiac pacemaker cells residing in the sinoatrial node. The rate and rhythm of spontaneous action potential firing of sinoatrial node cells are regulated by stochastic mechanisms that determine the level of coupling of chemical to electrical clocks within cardiac pacemaker cells. This coupled-clock system is modulated by autonomic signaling from the brain via neurotransmitter release from the vagus and sympathetic nerves. Abnormalities in brain-heart clock connections or in any molecular clock activity within pacemaker cells lead to abnormalities in the beating rate and rhythm of the pacemaker tissue that initiates the cardiac impulse. Dysfunction of pacemaker tissue can lead to tachy-brady heart rate alternation or exit block that leads to long atrial pauses and increases susceptibility to other cardiac arrhythmia. Here we review evidence for the idea that disturbances in the intrinsic components of pacemaker cells may be implemented in arrhythmia induction in the heart. PMID:25755643

  16. Calcium signaling in insulin action on striated muscle.

    PubMed

    Contreras-Ferrat, A; Lavandero, S; Jaimovich, E; Klip, A

    2014-11-01

    Striated muscles (skeletal and cardiac) are major physiological targets of insulin and this hormone triggers complex signaling pathways regulating cell growth and energy metabolism. Insulin increases glucose uptake into muscle cells by stimulating glucose transporter (GLUT4) translocation from intracellular compartments to the cell surface. The canonical insulin-triggered signaling cascade controlling this process is constituted by well-mapped tyrosine, lipid and serine/threonine phosphorylation reactions. In parallel to these signals, recent findings reveal insulin-dependent Ca(2+) mobilization in skeletal muscle cells and cardiomyocytes. Specifically, insulin activates the sarco-endoplasmic reticulum (SER) channels that release Ca(2+) into the cytosol i.e., the Ryanodine Receptor (RyR) and the inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptor (IP3R). In skeletal muscle cells, a rapid, insulin-triggered Ca(2+) release occurs through RyR, that is brought about upon S-glutathionylation of cysteine residues in the channel by reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by the early activation of the NADPH oxidase (NOX2). In cardiomyocytes insulin induces a fast and transient increase in cytoplasmic [Ca(2+)]i trough L-type Ca(2+) channels activation. In both cell types, a relatively slower Ca(2+) release also occurs through IP3R activation, and is required for GLUT4 translocation and glucose uptake. The insulin-dependent Ca(2+) released from IP3R of skeletal muscle also promotes mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake. We review here these actions of insulin on intracellular Ca(2+) channel activation and their impact on GLUT4 traffic in muscle cells, as well as other implications of insulin-dependent Ca(2+) release from the SER. PMID:25224502

  17. The metabolic energy cost of action potential velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crotty, Patrick; Sangrey, Thomas; Levy, William

    2006-03-01

    Voltage changes in neurons and other active cells are caused by the passage of ions across the cell membrane. These ionic currents depend on the transmembrane ion concentration gradients, which in unmyelinated axons are maintained during rest and restored after electrical activity by an ATPase sodium-potassium exchanger in the membrane. The amount of ATP consumed by this exchanger can be taken as the metabolic energy cost of any electrical activity in the axon. We use this measure, along with biophysical models of voltage-gated sodium and potassium ion channels, to quantify the energy cost of action potentials propagating in squid giant axons. We find that the energy of an action potential can be naturally divided into three separate components associated with different aspects of the action potential. We calculate these energy components as functions of the ion channel densities and axon diameters and find that the component associated with the rising phase and velocity of the action potential achieves a minimum near the biological values of these parameters. This result, which is robust with respect to other parameters such as temperature, suggests that evolution has optimized the axon for the energy of the action potential wavefront.

  18. Actionable pathways: interactive discovery of therapeutic targets using signaling pathway models

    PubMed Central

    Salavert, Francisco; Hidago, Marta R.; Amadoz, Alicia; Çubuk, Cankut; Medina, Ignacio; Crespo, Daniel; Carbonell-Caballero, Jose; Dopazo, Joaquín

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of actionable targets is crucial for targeted therapies and is also a constituent part of the drug discovery process. The success of an intervention over a target depends critically on its contribution, within the complex network of gene interactions, to the cellular processes responsible for disease progression or therapeutic response. Here we present PathAct, a web server that predicts the effect that interventions over genes (inhibitions or activations that simulate knock-outs, drug treatments or over-expressions) can have over signal transmission within signaling pathways and, ultimately, over the cell functionalities triggered by them. PathAct implements an advanced graphical interface that provides a unique interactive working environment in which the suitability of potentially actionable genes, that could eventually become drug targets for personalized or individualized therapies, can be easily tested. The PathAct tool can be found at: http://pathact.babelomics.org. PMID:27137885

  19. Real-time imaging of action potentials in nerves using changes in birefringence

    PubMed Central

    Badreddine, Ali H.; Jordan, Tomas; Bigio, Irving J.

    2016-01-01

    Polarized light can be used to measure the electrical activity associated with action potential propagation in nerves, as manifested in simultaneous dynamic changes in their intrinsic optical birefringence. These signals may serve as a tool for minimally invasive neuroimaging in various types of neuroscience research, including the study of neuronal activation patterns with high spatiotemporal resolution. A fast linear photodiode array was used to image propagating action potentials in an excised portion of the lobster walking leg nerve. We show that the crossed-polarized signal (XPS) can be reliably imaged over a ≥2 cm span in our custom nerve chamber, by averaging multiple-stimulation signals, and also in single-scan real-time “movies”. This demonstration paves the way toward utilizing changes in the optical birefringence to image more complex neuronal activity in nerve fibers and other organized neuronal tissue. PMID:27231635

  20. Real-time imaging of action potentials in nerves using changes in birefringence.

    PubMed

    Badreddine, Ali H; Jordan, Tomas; Bigio, Irving J

    2016-05-01

    Polarized light can be used to measure the electrical activity associated with action potential propagation in nerves, as manifested in simultaneous dynamic changes in their intrinsic optical birefringence. These signals may serve as a tool for minimally invasive neuroimaging in various types of neuroscience research, including the study of neuronal activation patterns with high spatiotemporal resolution. A fast linear photodiode array was used to image propagating action potentials in an excised portion of the lobster walking leg nerve. We show that the crossed-polarized signal (XPS) can be reliably imaged over a ≥2 cm span in our custom nerve chamber, by averaging multiple-stimulation signals, and also in single-scan real-time "movies". This demonstration paves the way toward utilizing changes in the optical birefringence to image more complex neuronal activity in nerve fibers and other organized neuronal tissue. PMID:27231635

  1. Primary cortical representation of sounds by the coordination of action-potential timing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decharms, R. Christopher; Merzenich, Michael M.

    1996-06-01

    CORTICAL population coding could in principle rely on either the mean rate of neuronal action potentials, or the relative timing of action potentials, or both. When a single sensory stimulus drives many neurons to fire at elevated rates, the spikes of these neurons become tightly synchronized1,2, which could be involved in 'binding' together individual firing-rate feature representations into a unified object percept3. Here we demonstrate that the relative timing of cortical action potentials can signal stimulus features themselves, a function even more basic than feature grouping. Populations of neurons in the primary auditory cortex can coordinate the relative timing of their action potentials such that spikes occur closer together in time during continuous stimuli. In this way cortical neurons can signal stimuli even when their firing rates do not change. Population coding based on relative spike timing can systematically signal stimulus features, it is topographically mapped, and it follows the stimulus time course even where mean firing rate does not.

  2. 49 CFR 236.568 - Difference between speeds authorized by roadway signal and cab signal; action required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Difference between speeds authorized by roadway... Systems Rules and Instructions; Locomotives § 236.568 Difference between speeds authorized by roadway signal and cab signal; action required. If for any reason a cab signal authorizes a speed different...

  3. 49 CFR 236.568 - Difference between speeds authorized by roadway signal and cab signal; action required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Difference between speeds authorized by roadway... Systems Rules and Instructions; Locomotives § 236.568 Difference between speeds authorized by roadway signal and cab signal; action required. If for any reason a cab signal authorizes a speed different...

  4. 49 CFR 236.568 - Difference between speeds authorized by roadway signal and cab signal; action required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Difference between speeds authorized by roadway... Systems Rules and Instructions; Locomotives § 236.568 Difference between speeds authorized by roadway signal and cab signal; action required. If for any reason a cab signal authorizes a speed different...

  5. 49 CFR 236.568 - Difference between speeds authorized by roadway signal and cab signal; action required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Difference between speeds authorized by roadway... Systems Rules and Instructions; Locomotives § 236.568 Difference between speeds authorized by roadway signal and cab signal; action required. If for any reason a cab signal authorizes a speed different...

  6. 49 CFR 236.568 - Difference between speeds authorized by roadway signal and cab signal; action required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Difference between speeds authorized by roadway... Systems Rules and Instructions; Locomotives § 236.568 Difference between speeds authorized by roadway signal and cab signal; action required. If for any reason a cab signal authorizes a speed different...

  7. Identifying Potential Noise Sources within Acoustic Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holcomb, Victoria; Lewalle, Jacques

    2013-11-01

    We test a new algorithm for its ability to detect sources of noise within random background. The goal of these tests is to better understand how to identify sources within acoustic signals while simultaneously determining the strengths and weaknesses of the algorithm in question. Unlike previously published algorithms, the antenna method does not pinpoint events by looking for the most energetic portions of a signal. The algorithm searches for the ideal lag combinations between three signals by taking excerpts of possible events. The excerpt with the lowest calculated minimum distance between possible events is how the algorithm identifies sources. At the minimum distance, the events are close in time and frequency. This method can be compared to the cross correlation and denoising methods to better understand its effectiveness. This work is supported in part by Spectral Energies LLC, under an SBIR grant from AFRL, as well as the Syracuse University MAE department.

  8. Action potential and contraction of Dionaea muscipula (Venus flytrap).

    PubMed

    DI PALMA, J R; MOHL, R; BEST, W

    1961-03-24

    Observation of the action potential and contraction of the leaf of Dionaea muscipula Ellis revealed several interesting phenomena. Two successive stimuli are generally necessary to cause contraction. The first and ineffective stimulus is associated with slow depolarization. The second stimulus has much more rapid depolarization and initiates contraction.

  9. Passive Responses Resembling Action Potentials: A Device for the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Ian A.; Pickard, Barbara G.

    1975-01-01

    Describes the construction and operation of a network of entirely passive electrical components that gives a response to an electrical shock similar to an action potential. The network of resistors, capacitors, and diodes was developed to produce responses that would mimic those observed, for example, when a dark-grown pea epicotyl is shocked…

  10. Sodium and potassium conductance changes during a membrane action potential

    PubMed Central

    Bezanilla, Francisco; Rojas, Eduardo; Taylor, Robert E.

    1970-01-01

    1. A method for turning a membrane potential control system on and off in less than 10 μsec is described. This method was used to record membrane currents in perfused giant axons from Dosidicus gigas and Loligo forbesi after turning on the voltage clamp system at various times during the course of a membrane action potential. 2. The membrane current measured just after the capacity charging transient was found to have an almost linear relation to the controlled membrane potential. 3. The total membrane conductance taken from these current—voltage curves was found to have a time course during the action potential similar to that found by Cole & Curtis (1939). 4. The instantaneous current voltage curves were linear enough to make it possible to obtain a good estimate of the individual sodium and potassium channel conductances, either algebraically or by clamping to the sodium, or potassium, reversal potentials. Good general agreement was obtained with the predictions of the Hodgkin—Huxley equations. 5. We consider these results to constitute the first direct experimental demonstration of the conductance changes to sodium and potassium during the course of an action potential. PMID:5505231

  11. dachshund Potentiates Hedgehog Signaling during Drosophila Retinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Aerts, Stein; Casares, Fernando; Janody, Florence

    2016-01-01

    Proper organ patterning depends on a tight coordination between cell proliferation and differentiation. The patterning of Drosophila retina occurs both very fast and with high precision. This process is driven by the dynamic changes in signaling activity of the conserved Hedgehog (Hh) pathway, which coordinates cell fate determination, cell cycle and tissue morphogenesis. Here we show that during Drosophila retinogenesis, the retinal determination gene dachshund (dac) is not only a target of the Hh signaling pathway, but is also a modulator of its activity. Using developmental genetics techniques, we demonstrate that dac enhances Hh signaling by promoting the accumulation of the Gli transcription factor Cubitus interruptus (Ci) parallel to or downstream of fused. In the absence of dac, all Hh-mediated events associated to the morphogenetic furrow are delayed. One of the consequences is that, posterior to the furrow, dac- cells cannot activate a Roadkill-Cullin3 negative feedback loop that attenuates Hh signaling and which is necessary for retinal cells to continue normal differentiation. Therefore, dac is part of an essential positive feedback loop in the Hh pathway, guaranteeing the speed and the accuracy of Drosophila retinogenesis. PMID:27442438

  12. Focused ultrasound effects on nerve action potential in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Colucci, Vincent; Strichartz, Gary; Jolesz, Ferenc; Vykhodtseva, Natalia; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2009-01-01

    Minimally invasive applications of thermal and mechanical energy to selective areas of the human anatomy have led to significant advances in treatment of and recovery from typical surgical interventions. Image-guided focused ultrasound allows energy to be deposited deep into the tissue, completely noninvasively. There has long been interest in using this focal energy delivery to block nerve conduction for pain control and local anesthesia. In this study, we have performed an in vitro study to further extend our knowledge of this potential clinical application. The sciatic nerves from the bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana) were subjected to focused ultrasound (at frequencies of 0.661MHz and 1.986MHz) and to heated Ringer’s solution. The nerve action potential was shown to decrease in the experiments and correlated with temperature elevation measured in the nerve. The action potential recovered either completely, partially, or not at all, depending on the parameters of the ultrasound exposure. The reduction of the baseline nerve temperature by circulating cooling fluid through the sonication chamber did not prevent the collapse of the nerve action potential; but higher power was required to induce the same endpoint as without cooling. These results indicate that a thermal mechanism of focused ultrasound can be used to block nerve conduction, either temporarily or permanently. PMID:19647923

  13. On the Signals Underlying Conscious Awareness of Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Obhi, Sukhvinder S.; Planetta, Peggy J.; Scantlebury, Jordan

    2009-01-01

    To investigate whether conscious judgments of movement onset are based solely on pre-movement signals (i.e., premotor or efference copy signals) or whether sensory feedback (i.e., reafferent) signals also play a role, participants judged the onset of finger and toe movements that were either active (i.e., self initiated) or passive (i.e.,…

  14. Modelling in vivo action potential propagation along a giant axon.

    PubMed

    George, Stuart; Foster, Jamie M; Richardson, Giles

    2015-01-01

    A partial differential equation model for the three-dimensional current flow in an excitable, unmyelinated axon is considered. Where the axon radius is significantly below a critical value R(crit) (that depends upon intra- and extra-cellular conductivity and ion channel conductance) the resistance of the intracellular space is significantly higher than that of the extracellular space, such that the potential outside the axon is uniformly small whilst the intracellular potential is approximated by the transmembrane potential. In turn, since the current flow is predominantly axial, it can be shown that the transmembrane potential is approximated by a solution to the one-dimensional cable equation. It is noted that the radius of the squid giant axon, investigated by (Hodgkin and Huxley 1952e), lies close to R(crit). This motivates us to apply the three-dimensional model to the squid giant axon and compare the results thus found to those obtained using the cable equation. In the context of the in vitro experiments conducted in (Hodgkin and Huxley 1952e) we find only a small difference between the wave profiles determined using these two different approaches and little difference between the speeds of action potential propagation predicted. This suggests that the cable equation approximation is accurate in this scenario. However when applied to the it in vivo setting, in which the conductivity of the surrounding tissue is considerably lower than that of the axoplasm, there are marked differences in both wave profile and speed of action potential propagation calculated using the two approaches. In particular, the cable equation significantly over predicts the increase in the velocity of propagation as axon radius increases. The consequences of these results are discussed in terms of the evolutionary costs associated with increasing the speed of action potential propagation by increasing axon radius.

  15. Shockwave-induced compound action potentials in the peripheral nerve.

    PubMed

    Wehner, H D; Sellier, K

    1981-01-01

    To verify a presumed interaction between shockwaves arisen by impacts of high velocity projectiles and nervous tissue an electrophysiological experiment is performed with the following results: In peripheral nerves regular compound action potentials (CAPs) are provoked by shockwaves the amplitudes of which are increased corresponding to the pressure intensity of the shockwaves. The nerve shows no electrical activity below a certain pressure threshold (0.75 bar). Saturation of the CAP amplitude occurs beyond a pressure limit of 8 bar.

  16. Compound muscle action potential cartography of an accessory peroneal nerve.

    PubMed

    Van Dijk, J G; Van der Hoeven, B J

    1998-10-01

    In daily practice, accessory peroneal nerves (APNs) are detected in less than the 18-25% of legs, as revealed by systematic searches. In one APN case, compound muscle action potential cartography showed that the APN was only apparent when the recording electrode was placed over a small lateral region of the extensor digitorum brevis muscle. Effects of recording site can explain why many APNs go unrecognized.

  17. Possible Integrative Actions of Leptin and Insulin Signaling in the Hypothalamus Targeting Energy Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Thon, Mina; Hosoi, Toru; Ozawa, Koichiro

    2016-01-01

    Obesity has emerged as one of the most burdensome conditions in modern society. In this context, understanding the mechanisms controlling food intake is critical. At present, the adipocyte-derived hormone leptin and the pancreatic β-cell-derived hormone insulin are considered the principal anorexigenic hormones. Although leptin and insulin signal transduction pathways are distinct, their regulation of body weight maintenance is concerted. Resistance to the central actions of leptin or insulin is linked to the emergence of obesity and diabetes mellitus. A growing body of evidence suggests a convergence of leptin and insulin intracellular signaling at the insulin–receptor–substrate–phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase level. Moreover, numerous factors mediating the pathophysiology of leptin resistance, a hallmark of obesity, such as endoplasmic reticulum stress, protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B, and suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 also contribute to insulin resistance. Recent studies have also indicated that insulin potentiates leptin-induced signaling. Thus, a greater understanding of the overlapping functions of leptin and insulin in the central nervous system is vital to understand the associated physiological and pathophysiological states. This mini-review focuses on the cross talk and integrative signaling of leptin and insulin in the regulation of energy homeostasis in the brain. PMID:27812350

  18. Potentiation of antitumor drug action by centrophenoxine: specificity.

    PubMed

    Sladek, N E

    1977-05-01

    The cytotoxic action of certain antitumor agents is potentiated by centrophenoxine although centrophenoxine itself is not an antitumor agent. Previous investigations have suggested that centrophenoxine might potentiate the cytotoxicity produced by antitumor drugs that alkylate, and other modalities that damage, DNA, but that it would not potentiate the cytotoxicity produced by antitumor drugs that inflict cellular damage in other ways. To test this hypothesis, the antitumor effects of X-irradiation UV-irradiation, alkylating agents and antitumor drugs that are not ordinarily considered to be alkylating agents were determined in the presence and absence of centrophenoxine. Mouse P388 lymphoma cells growing in static suspension culture were used as the experimental tumor. The cytotoxic action of most alkylating agents was found to be potentiated by centrophenoxine; Included in this group were several difunctional nitrogen mustards, two ethylenimines, a nitrosourea and mitomycin C. Greatest enhancement, 7-fold, was of chlorambucil antitumor activity. Centrophenoxine did not potentiate the lethality of X- or UV-irradiation or the cytotoxicity of several antineoplastic drugs that are not alkylating agents.

  19. Cortical Interneuron Subtypes Vary in Their Axonal Action Potential Properties

    PubMed Central

    Casale, Amanda E.; Foust, Amanda J.; Bal, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    The role of interneurons in cortical microcircuits is strongly influenced by their passive and active electrical properties. Although different types of interneurons exhibit unique electrophysiological properties recorded at the soma, it is not yet clear whether these differences are also manifested in other neuronal compartments. To address this question, we have used voltage-sensitive dye to image the propagation of action potentials into the fine collaterals of axons and dendrites in two of the largest cortical interneuron subtypes in the mouse: fast-spiking interneurons, which are typically basket or chandelier neurons; and somatostatin containing interneurons, which are typically regular spiking Martinotti cells. We found that fast-spiking and somatostatin-expressing interneurons differed in their electrophysiological characteristics along their entire dendrosomatoaxonal extent. The action potentials generated in the somata and axons, including axon collaterals, of somatostatin-expressing interneurons are significantly broader than those generated in the same compartments of fast-spiking inhibitory interneurons. In addition, action potentials back-propagated into the dendrites of somatostatin-expressing interneurons much more readily than fast-spiking interneurons. Pharmacological investigations suggested that axonal action potential repolarization in both cell types depends critically upon Kv1 channels, whereas the axonal and somatic action potentials of somatostatin-expressing interneurons also depend on BK Ca2+-activated K+ channels. These results indicate that the two broad classes of interneurons studied here have expressly different subcellular physiological properties, allowing them to perform unique computational roles in cortical circuit operations. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Neurons in the cerebral cortex are of two major types: excitatory and inhibitory. The proper balance of excitation and inhibition in the brain is critical for its operation. Neurons

  20. Spatiotemporal pattern of action potential firing in developing inner hair cells of the mouse cochlea.

    PubMed

    Sendin, Gaston; Bourien, Jérôme; Rassendren, François; Puel, Jean-Luc; Nouvian, Régis

    2014-02-01

    Inner hair cells (IHCs) are the primary transducer for sound encoding in the cochlea. In contrast to the graded receptor potential of adult IHCs, immature hair cells fire spontaneous calcium action potentials during the first postnatal week. This spiking activity has been proposed to shape the tonotopic map along the ascending auditory pathway. Using perforated patch-clamp recordings, we show that developing IHCs fire spontaneous bursts of action potentials and that this pattern is indistinguishable along the basoapical gradient of the developing cochlea. In both apical and basal IHCs, the spiking behavior undergoes developmental changes, where the bursts of action potential tend to occur at a regular time interval and have a similar length toward the end of the first postnatal week. Although disruption of purinergic signaling does not interfere with the action potential firing pattern, pharmacological ablation of the α9α10 nicotinic receptor elicits an increase in the discharge rate. We therefore suggest that in addition to carrying place information to the ascending auditory nuclei, the IHCs firing pattern controlled by the α9α10 receptor conveys a temporal signature of the cochlear development. PMID:24429348

  1. MOLECULAR MECHANISMS OF RECEPTOR KINASE ACTION IN BRASSINOSTEROID SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) regulate multiple aspects of plant growth and development and require an active BRASSINOSTEROID INSENSITIVE 1 (BRI1) and BRI1-ASSOCIATED RECEPTOR KINASE 1 (BAK1) for hormone perception and signal transduction. To examine early events in BR signaling, we used co-immunoprecipita...

  2. Signal type and signal-to-noise ratio interact to affect cortical auditory evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Billings, Curtis J; Grush, Leslie D

    2016-08-01

    Use of speech signals and background noise is emerging in cortical auditory evoked potential (CAEP) studies; however, the interaction between signal type and noise level remains unclear. Two experiments determined the interaction between signal type and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) on CAEPs. Three signals (syllable /ba/, 1000-Hz tone, and the /ba/ envelope with 1000-Hz fine structure) with varying SNRs were used in two experiments, demonstrating signal-by-SNR interactions due to both envelope and spectral characteristics. When using real-world stimuli such as speech to evoke CAEPs, temporal and spectral complexity leads to differences with traditional tonal stimuli, especially when presented in background noise. PMID:27586784

  3. Toward a system to measure action potential on mice brain slices with local magnetoresistive probes

    SciTech Connect

    Amaral, J.; Cardoso, S.; Freitas, P. P.; Sebastiao, A. M.

    2011-04-01

    This work combines an electrophysiological system with a magnetoresistive chip to measure the magnetic field created by the synaptic/action potential currents. The chip, with 15 spin valve sensors, was designed to be integrated in a recording chamber for submerged mice brain slices used for synaptic potential measurements. Under stimulation (rectangular pulses of 0.1 ms every 10 s) through a concentric electrode placed near the CA3/CA1 border of the hippocampus, the spin valve sensor readout signals with 20 {mu}V amplitude and a pulse length of 20 to 30 ms were recorded only in the pyramidal cell bodies region and can be interpreted as being derived from action potentials/currents.

  4. Toward a system to measure action potential on mice brain slices with local magnetoresistive probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaral, J.; Cardoso, S.; Freitas, P. P.; Sebastião, A. M.

    2011-04-01

    This work combines an electrophysiological system with a magnetoresistive chip to measure the magnetic field created by the synaptic/action potential currents. The chip, with 15 spin valve sensors, was designed to be integrated in a recording chamber for submerged mice brain slices used for synaptic potential measurements. Under stimulation (rectangular pulses of 0.1 ms every 10 s) through a concentric electrode placed near the CA3/CA1 border of the hippocampus, the spin valve sensor readout signals with 20 μV amplitude and a pulse length of 20 to 30 ms were recorded only in the pyramidal cell bodies region and can be interpreted as being derived from action potentials/currents.

  5. Atrial action potential heterogeneity measured by unipolar electrograms.

    PubMed

    Vigmond, Edward J; Tsoi, Vincent; Pagé, Pierre

    2006-01-01

    Vagally-induced action potential duration (APD) heterogeneity can lead to the breakdown of atrial flutter into fibrillation. The exact distribution of vagal mediated effects in the atria is unknown, however. This study analyzed canine electrograms in order to determine changes in APD. Electrograms were recorded under control, and left and right vagal nerve stimulation. Simulations in a computer model were first performed in order to determine how local acetylcholine concentrations affect electrograms. Two measures were investigated to assess APD changes. Results indicate that APD is reduced nonuniformly, and contralateral effects were seen.

  6. A web portal for in-silico action potential predictions

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Geoff; Mirams, Gary R.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Multiple cardiac ion channels are prone to block by pharmaceutical compounds, and this can have large implications for cardiac safety. The effect of a compound on individual ion currents can now be measured in automated patch clamp screening assays. In-silico action potential models are proposed as one way of predicting the integrated compound effects on whole-cell electrophysiology, to provide an improved indication of pro-arrhythmic risk. Methods We have developed open source software to run cardiac electrophysiology simulations to predict the overall effect of compounds that block IKr, ICaL, INa, IKs, IK1 and Ito to varying degrees, using a choice of mathematical electrophysiology models. To enable safety pharmacology teams to run and evaluate these simulations easily, we have also developed an open source web portal interface to this simulator. Results The web portal can be found at https://chaste.cs.ox.ac.uk/ActionPotential. Users can enter details of compound affinities for ion channels in the form of IC50 or pIC50 values, run simulations, store the results for later retrieval, view summary graphs of the results, and export data to a spreadsheet format. Discussion This web portal provides a simple interface to reference versions of mathematical models, and well-tested state-of-the-art equation solvers. It provides safety teams easy access to the emerging technology of cardiac electrophysiology simulations for use in the drug-discovery process. PMID:25963830

  7. Shared motion signals for human perceptual decisions and oculomotor actions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, Leland S.; Krauzlis, Richard J.

    2003-01-01

    A fundamental question in primate neurobiology is to understand to what extent motor behaviors are driven by shared neural signals that also support conscious perception or by independent subconscious neural signals dedicated to motor control. Although it has clearly been established that cortical areas involved in processing visual motion support both perception and smooth pursuit eye movements, it remains unknown whether the same or different sets of neurons within these structures perform these two functions. Examination of the trial-by-trial variation in human perceptual and pursuit responses during a simultaneous psychophysical and oculomotor task reveals that the direction signals for pursuit and perception are not only similar on average but also co-vary on a trial-by-trial basis, even when performance is at or near chance and the decisions are determined largely by neural noise. We conclude that the neural signal encoding the direction of target motion that drives steady-state pursuit and supports concurrent perceptual judgments emanates from a shared ensemble of cortical neurons.

  8. Iridium Oxide Nanotube Electrodes for Highly Sensitive and Prolonged Intracellular Measurement of Action Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ziliang Carter; Xie, Chong; Osakada, Yasuko; Cui, Yi; Cui, Bianxiao

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular recording of action potentials is important to understand electrically-excitable cells. Recently, vertical nanoelectrodes have been developed to achieve highly sensitive, minimally invasive, and large scale intracellular recording. It has been demonstrated that the vertical geometry is crucial for the enhanced signal detection. Here we develop nanoelectrodes made up of nanotubes of iridium oxide. When cardiomyocytes are cultured upon those nanotubes, the cell membrane not only wraps around the vertical tubes but also protrudes deep into the hollow center. We show that this geometry enhances cell-electrode coupling and results in measuring much larger intracellular action potentials. The nanotube electrodes afford much longer intracellular access and are minimally invasive, making it possible to achieve stable recording up to an hour in a single session and more than 8 days of consecutive daily recording. This study suggests that the electrode performance can be significantly improved by optimizing the electrode geometry. PMID:24487777

  9. 'Catching the waves' - slow cortical potentials as moderator of voluntary action.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Stefan; Jo, Han-Gue; Wittmann, Marc; Hinterberger, Thilo

    2016-09-01

    The readiness potential is an ongoing negativity in the EEG preceding a self-initiated movement by approximately 1.5s. So far it has predominantly been interpreted as a preparatory signal with a causal link to the upcoming movement. Here a different hypothesis is suggested which we call the selective slow cortical potential sampling hypothesis. In this review of recent research results we argue that the initiation of a voluntary action is more likely during negative fluctuations of the slow cortical potential and that the sampling and averaging of many trials leads to the observed negativity. That is, empirical evidence indicates that the early readiness potential is not a neural correlate of preconscious motor preparation and thus a determinant of action. Our hypothesis thereafter challenges the classic interpretation of the Libet experiment which is often taken as proof that there is no free will. We furthermore suggest that slow cortical potentials are related to an urge to act but are not a neural indicator of the decision process of action initiation. PMID:27328786

  10. 'Catching the waves' - slow cortical potentials as moderator of voluntary action.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Stefan; Jo, Han-Gue; Wittmann, Marc; Hinterberger, Thilo

    2016-09-01

    The readiness potential is an ongoing negativity in the EEG preceding a self-initiated movement by approximately 1.5s. So far it has predominantly been interpreted as a preparatory signal with a causal link to the upcoming movement. Here a different hypothesis is suggested which we call the selective slow cortical potential sampling hypothesis. In this review of recent research results we argue that the initiation of a voluntary action is more likely during negative fluctuations of the slow cortical potential and that the sampling and averaging of many trials leads to the observed negativity. That is, empirical evidence indicates that the early readiness potential is not a neural correlate of preconscious motor preparation and thus a determinant of action. Our hypothesis thereafter challenges the classic interpretation of the Libet experiment which is often taken as proof that there is no free will. We furthermore suggest that slow cortical potentials are related to an urge to act but are not a neural indicator of the decision process of action initiation.

  11. In-vitro characterization of a cochlear implant system for recording of evoked compound action potentials

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Modern cochlear implants have integrated recording systems for measuring electrically evoked compound action potentials of the auditory nerve. The characterization of such recording systems is important for establishing a reliable basis for the interpretation of signals acquired in vivo. In this study we investigated the characteristics of the recording system integrated into the MED-EL PULSARCI100 cochlear implant, especially its linearity and resolution, in order to develop a mathematical model describing the recording system. Methods In-vitro setup: The cochlear implant, including all attached electrodes, was fixed in a tank of physiologic saline solution. Sinusoidal signals of the same frequency but with different amplitudes were delivered via a signal generator for measuring and recording on a single electrode. Computer simulations: A basic mathematical model including the main elements of the recording system, i.e. amplification and digitalization stage, was developed. For this, digital output for sinusoidal input signals of different amplitudes were calculated using in-vitro recordings as reference. Results Using an averaging of 100 measurements the recording system behaved linearly down to approximately -60 dB of the input signal range. Using the same method, a system resolution of 10 μV was determined for sinusoidal signals. The simulation results were in very good agreement with the results obtained from in-vitro experiments. Conclusions The recording system implemented in the MED-EL PULSARCI100 cochlear implant for measuring the evoked compound action potential of the auditory nerve operates reliably. The developed mathematical model provides a good approximation of the recording system. PMID:22531599

  12. The Potential of Deweyan-Inspired Action Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stark, Jody L.

    2014-01-01

    In its broadest sense, pragmatism could be said to be the philosophical orientation of all action research. Action research is characterized by research, action, and participation grounded in democratic principles and guided by the aim of social improvement. Furthermore, action research is an active process of inquiry that does not admit…

  13. Hypoxia converts the myogenic action of insulin-like growth factors into mitogenic action by differentially regulating multiple signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Hongxia; Accili, Domenico; Duan, Cunming

    2010-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) stimulate myoblast proliferation and differentiation. It remains elusive how these mutually exclusive cellular responses are elicited by the same growth factor. Here we report that whereas IGF promotes myoblast differentiation under normoxia, it stimulates proliferation under hypoxia. Hypoxia activates the HIF-1 transcriptional program and knockdown of HIF-1α changes the mitogenic action of IGF into myogenic action under hypoxia. Conversely, overexpression of HIF-1α abolishes the myogenic effect of IGF under normoxia. Under normoxia, IGF activates the Akt-mTOR, p38, and Erk1/2 MAPK pathways. Hypoxia suppresses basal and IGF-induced Akt-mTOR and p38 activity, whereas it enhances and prolongs IGF-induced Erk1/2 activation in a HIF-1–dependent fashion. Activation of Akt-mTOR and p38 promotes myogenesis, and p38 also inhibits proliferation. Activation of Erk stimulates myoblast proliferation but inhibits differentiation. These results suggest that hypoxia converts the myogenic action of IGFs into mitogenic action by differentially regulating multiple signaling pathways via HIF-1-dependent mechanisms. Our findings provide a mechanistic explanation for the paradoxical actions of IGFs during myogenesis and reveal a novel mechanism by which cells sense and integrate growth factor signals and oxygen availability in their microenvironments. PMID:20231451

  14. Cardiac dynamics: a simplified model for action potential propagation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    This paper analyzes a new semiphysiological ionic model, used recently to study reexitations and reentry in cardiac tissue [I.R. Cantalapiedra et al, PRE 82 011907 (2010)]. The aim of the model is to reproduce action potencial morphologies and restitution curves obtained, either from experimental data, or from more complex electrophysiological models. The model divides all ion currents into four groups according to their function, thus resulting into fast-slow and inward-outward currents. We show that this simplified model is flexible enough as to accurately capture the electrical properties of cardiac myocytes, having the advantage of being less computational demanding than detailed electrophysiological models. Under some conditions, it has been shown to be amenable to mathematical analysis. The model reproduces the action potential (AP) change with stimulation rate observed both experimentally and in realistic models of healthy human and guinea pig myocytes (TNNP and LRd models, respectively). When simulated in a cable it also gives the right dependence of the conduction velocity (CV) with stimulation rate. Besides reproducing correctly these restitution properties, it also gives a good fit for the morphology of the AP, including the notch typical of phase 1. Finally, we perform simulations in a realistic geometric model of the rabbit’s ventricles, finding a good qualitative agreement in AP propagation and the ECG. Thus, this simplified model represents an alternative to more complex models when studying instabilities in wave propagation. PMID:23194429

  15. Transforming echoes into pseudo-action potentials for classifying plants.

    PubMed

    Kuc, R

    2001-10-01

    Animals perceive their environment by converting sensory stimuli into action potentials, or temporal point processes, that are interpreted by the brain. This paper investigates the information content of point processes extracted from echoes from in situ plants in an effort to understand how bats recognize landmarks in the field. A mobile sonar converts echoes into biologically similar temporal point processes. termed pseudo-action potentials (PAPs), whose inter-PAP interval relates to echo amplitude. The sonar forms a sector scan of an object to produce a spatial-temporal PAP field. Classifier neurons apply delays and coincidence detection to the PAP field to identify three distinct echo types, glints, blobs, and fuzz, which characterize plant features. Glints are large amplitude echoes exhibiting coherence over successive echoes in the sector scan, typically produced by favorably oriented isolated specular reflectors. Blobs are large echoes lacking coherence, typically bordering glints or formed by collections of interfering reflectors. Fuzz represents weak echoes, typically produced by collection of weak scatterers or by reflectors on the beam periphery. A small mirror reflector models a flat leaf surface and motivates the glint criteria. Classifiers are applied to experimental data from two types of tree trunks, a glint-producing sycamore (Platanus occidenatalis) and a glint-absent Norway maple (Acer platanoides) and two plants, a glint-producing rhododendron (Rhododendron maximus) and a glint-absent yew (Taxus media). We speculate that our narrow-band sonar models the activity of a single frequency bin in the frequency-modulated (FM) sweep emitted by bats, and that one function of the frequency bins in the FM sweep is to form a sector scan of the environment.

  16. Dipole characterization of single neurons from their extracellular action potentials

    PubMed Central

    Victor, Jonathan D.

    2011-01-01

    The spatial variation of the extracellular action potentials (EAP) of a single neuron contains information about the size and location of the dominant current source of its action potential generator, which is typically in the vicinity of the soma. Using this dependence in reverse in a three-component realistic probe + brain + source model, we solved the inverse problem of characterizing the equivalent current source of an isolated neuron from the EAP data sampled by an extracellular probe at multiple independent recording locations. We used a dipole for the model source because there is extensive evidence it accurately captures the spatial roll-off of the EAP amplitude, and because, as we show, dipole localization, beyond a minimum cell-probe distance, is a more accurate alternative to approaches based on monopole source models. Dipole characterization is separable into a linear dipole moment optimization where the dipole location is fixed, and a second, nonlinear, global optimization of the source location. We solved the linear optimization on a discrete grid via the lead fields of the probe, which can be calculated for any realistic probe + brain model by the finite element method. The global source location was optimized by means of Tikhonov regularization that jointly minimizes model error and dipole size. The particular strategy chosen reflects the fact that the dipole model is used in the near field, in contrast to the typical prior applications of dipole models to EKG and EEG source analysis. We applied dipole localization to data collected with stepped tetrodes whose detailed geometry was measured via scanning electron microscopy. The optimal dipole could account for 96% of the power in the spatial variation of the EAP amplitude. Among various model error contributions to the residual, we address especially the error in probe geometry, and the extent to which it biases estimates of dipole parameters. This dipole characterization method can be applied to

  17. Root-Shoot Signaling crosstalk involved in the shoot growth promoting action of rhizospheric humic acids.

    PubMed

    Olaetxea, Maite; Mora, Verónica; García, Andrés Calderin; Santos, Leandro Azevedo; Baigorri, Roberto; Fuentes, Marta; Garnica, María; Berbara, Ricardo Luis Louro; Zamarreño, Angel Maria; Garcia-Mina, Jose M

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies have shown the ability of humic substances to improve plant development. This action is normally reflected in an enhancement of crop yields and quality. However, the mechanisms responsible for this action of humic substances remain rather unknown. Our studies have shown that the shoot promoting action of sedimentary humic acids is dependent of its ability to increase root hydraulic conductivity through signaling pathways related to ABA, which in turn is affected in roots by humic acids in an IAA-NO dependent way. Furthermore, these studies also indicate that the primary action of humic acids in roots might also be physical, resulting from a transient mild stress caused by humic acids associated with a fouling-cleaning cycle of wall cell pores. Finally the role of alternative signal molecules, such as ROS, and corresponding signaling pathways are also discussed and modeled in the context of the above-mentioned framework. PMID:26966789

  18. Root-Shoot Signaling crosstalk involved in the shoot growth promoting action of rhizospheric humic acids

    PubMed Central

    Olaetxea, Maite; Mora, Verónica; García, Andrés Calderin; Santos, Leandro Azevedo; Baigorri, Roberto; Fuentes, Marta; Garnica, María; Berbara, Ricardo Luis Louro; Zamarreño, Angel Maria; Garcia-Mina, Jose M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Numerous studies have shown the ability of humic substances to improve plant development. This action is normally reflected in an enhancement of crop yields and quality. However, the mechanisms responsible for this action of humic substances remain rather unknown. Our studies have shown that the shoot promoting action of sedimentary humic acids is dependent of its ability to increase root hydraulic conductivity through signaling pathways related to ABA, which in turn is affected in roots by humic acids in an IAA-NO dependent way. Furthermore, these studies also indicate that the primary action of humic acids in roots might also be physical, resulting from a transient mild stress caused by humic acids associated with a fouling-cleaning cycle of wall cell pores. Finally the role of alternative signal molecules, such as ROS, and corresponding signaling pathways are also discussed and modeled in the context of the above-mentioned framework. PMID:26966789

  19. Potential anti-inflammatory actions of the elmiric (lipoamino) acids

    PubMed Central

    Burstein, Sumner H.; Adams, Jeffrey K.; Bradshaw, Heather B.; Fraioli, Cristian; Rossetti, Ronald G.; Salmonsen, Rebecca A.; Shaw, John W.; Walker, J. Michael; Zipkin, Robert E.; Zurier, Robert B.

    2007-01-01

    A library of amino acid-fatty acid conjugates (elmiric acids) was synthesized and evaluated for activity as potential anti-inflammatory agents. The compounds were tested in vitro for their effects on cell proliferation and prostaglandin production and compared with their effects on in vivo models of inflammation. LPS stimulated RAW 267.4 mouse macrophage cells was the in vitro model and phorbol ester-induced mouse ear edema served as the principal in vivo model. The prostaglandin responses were found to be strongly dependent on the nature of the fatty acid part of the molecule. Polyunsaturated acid conjugates produced a marked increase in media levels of i15-deoxy-PGJ2 with minimal effects on PGE production. It is reported in the literature that prostaglandin ratios in which the J series predominates over the E series promote the resolution of inflammatory conditions. Several of the elmiric acids tested here produced such favorable ratios suggesting that their potential anti-inflammatory activity occurs via a novel mechanism of action. The ear edema assay results were generally in agreement with the prostaglandin assay findings indicating a connection between them. PMID:17383881

  20. Decision and action planning signals in human posterior parietal cortex during delayed perceptual choices.

    PubMed

    Tosoni, Annalisa; Corbetta, Maurizio; Calluso, Cinzia; Committeri, Giorgia; Pezzulo, Giovanni; Romani, G L; Galati, Gaspare

    2014-04-01

    During simple perceptual decisions, sensorimotor neurons in monkey fronto-parietal cortex represent a decision variable that guides the transformation of sensory evidence into a motor response, supporting the view that mechanisms for decision-making are closely embedded within sensorimotor structures. Within these structures, however, decision signals can be dissociated from motor signals, thus indicating that sensorimotor neurons can play multiple and independent roles in decision-making and action selection/planning. Here we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to examine whether response-selective human brain areas encode signals for decision-making or action planning during a task requiring an arbitrary association between face pictures (male vs. female) and specific actions (saccadic eye vs. hand pointing movements). The stimuli were gradually unmasked to stretch the time necessary for decision, thus maximising the temporal separation between decision and action planning. Decision-related signals were measured in parietal and motor/premotor regions showing a preference for the planning/execution of saccadic or pointing movements. In a parietal reach region, decision-related signals were specific for the stimulus category associated with its preferred pointing response. By contrast, a saccade-selective posterior intraparietal sulcus region carried decision-related signals even when the task required a pointing response. Consistent signals were observed in the motor/premotor cortex. Whole-brain analyses indicated that, in our task, the most reliable decision signals were found in the same neural regions involved in response selection. However, decision- and action-related signals within these regions can be dissociated. Differences between the parietal reach region and posterior intraparietal sulcus plausibly depend on their functional specificity rather than on the task structure.

  1. Distinct electrophysiological potentials for intention in action and prior intention for action.

    PubMed

    Vinding, Mikkel C; Jensen, Mads; Overgaard, Morten

    2014-01-01

    The role of conscious intention in relation to motoric movements has become a major topic of investigation in neuroscience. Traditionally, reports of conscious intention have been compared to various features of the readiness-potential (RP)--an electrophysiological signal that appears before voluntary movements. Experiments, however, tend to study intentions in immediate relation to movements (proximal intentions), thus ignoring other aspects of intentions such as planning or deciding in advance of movement (distal intentions). The current study examines the difference in electrophysiological activity between proximal intention and distal intention, using electroencephalography (EEG). Participants had to form an intention to move and then wait 2.5 sec before performing the actual movement. In this way, the electrophysiological activity related to forming a conscious intention was separated from any confounding activity related to automated motor activity. This was compared to conditions in which participants had to act as soon as they had the intention and a condition where participants acted upon an external cue 2.5 sec prior to movement. We examined the RP for the three conditions. No difference was found in early RP, but late RP differed significantly depending on the type of intention. In addition, we analysed signals during a longer time-interval starting before the time of distal intention formation until after the actual movement concluded. Results showed a slow negative electrophysiological "intention potential" above the mid-frontal areas at the time participants formed a distal intention. This potential was only found when the distal intention was self-paced and not when the intention was formed in response to an external cue.

  2. Converging actions of alcohol on liver and brain immune signaling.

    PubMed

    Szabo, Gyongyi; Lippai, Dora

    2014-01-01

    Chronic excessive alcohol consumption results in inflammation in multiple organs, including the brain. While the contribution of neuroinflammation to alcohol-related cognitive dysfunction and behavioral alterations is established, the mechanisms by which alcohol triggers inflammation in the brain are only partially understood. There are acute and long-term alterations in brain function due to intercellular and intracellular changes of different cell types as a result of alcohol consumption. This review focuses on the alcohol-induced proinflammatory cellular and molecular changes in the central nervous system. Alcohol passes through the blood-brain barrier and alters neurotransmission. Alcohol use activates microglia and astrocyte, contributing to neurodegeneration and impaired regeneration. Alcohol-induced cell injury in the brain results in release of damage-associated molecular patterns, such as high mobility group box 1, that trigger inflammatory changes through activation of pattern recognition receptors. In addition, alcohol consumption increases intestinal permeability and results in increased levels of pathogen-associated molecular pattern such as endotoxin in the systemic circulation that triggers PRRs and inflammation. The Toll-like receptor-4 pathway that activates nuclear factor-κB and secretion of proinflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1-beta, and chemokines, including monocyte chemotactic protein-1, has been suggested to contribute to alcohol-induced neuroinflammation. Alcohol-induced IL-1β secretion also requires Nod-like receptor-mediated inflammasome and caspase-1 activation, and, consistent with this, disruption of IL-1/IL-1-receptor signaling prevents alcohol-induced neuroinflammation. Delicate regulators of inflammatory gene expressions are micro-RNAs (miRs) that have recently been identified in alcohol-related neuroinflammation. Alcohol induces miR155, a regulator of inflammation in the brain, and deficiency in mi

  3. Dynamic mesolimbic dopamine signaling during action sequence learning and expectation violation

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Anne L.; Greenfield, Venuz Y.; Bye, Jeffrey K.; Linker, Kay E.; Wang, Alice S.; Wassum, Kate M.

    2016-01-01

    Prolonged mesolimbic dopamine concentration changes have been detected during spatial navigation, but little is known about the conditions that engender this signaling profile or how it develops with learning. To address this, we monitored dopamine concentration changes in the nucleus accumbens core of rats throughout acquisition and performance of an instrumental action sequence task. Prolonged dopamine concentration changes were detected that ramped up as rats executed each action sequence and declined after earned reward collection. With learning, dopamine concentration began to rise increasingly earlier in the execution of the sequence and ultimately backpropagated away from stereotyped sequence actions, becoming only transiently elevated by the most distal and unexpected reward predictor. Action sequence-related dopamine signaling was reactivated in well-trained rats if they became disengaged in the task and in response to an unexpected change in the value, but not identity of the earned reward. Throughout training and test, dopamine signaling correlated with sequence performance. These results suggest that action sequences can engender a prolonged mode of dopamine signaling in the nucleus accumbens core and that such signaling relates to elements of the motivation underlying sequence execution and is dynamic with learning, overtraining and violations in reward expectation. PMID:26869075

  4. A supervised multi-sensor matched filter for the detection of extracellular action potentials.

    PubMed

    Szymanska, Agnieszka F; Doty, Michael; Scannell, Kathryn V; Nenadic, Zoran

    2014-01-01

    Multi-sensor extracellular recording takes advantage of several electrode channels to record from multiple neurons at the same time. However, the resulting low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) combined with biological noise makes signal detection, the first step of any neurophysiological data analysis, difficult. A matched filter was therefore designed to better detect extracellular action potentials (EAPs) from multi-sensor extracellular recordings. The detector was tested on tetrode data from a locust antennal lobe and assessed against three trained analysts. 25 EAPs and noise samples were selected manually from the data and used for training. To reduce complexity, the filter assumed that the underlying noise in the data was spatially white. The detector performed with an average TP and FP rate of 84.62% and 16.63% respectively. This high level of performance indicates the algorithm is suitable for widespread use.

  5. Opposing actions of TGF{beta} and MAP kinase signaling in undifferentiated hen granulosa cells

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, Dori C.; Haugen, Morgan J.; Johnson, A.L. . E-mail: johnson.128@nd.edu

    2005-10-21

    The present studies were conducted to establish interactions between transforming growth factor (TGF)-{beta} and the epidermal growth factor (EGF) family members, TGF{alpha} and betacellulin (BTC), relative to proliferation and differentiation of granulosa cells in hen ovarian follicles. Results presented demonstrate expression of TGF{beta} isoforms, plus TGF{alpha}, BTC, and ErbB receptors in prehierarchal follicles, thus establishing the potential for autocrine/paracrine signaling and cross-talk within granulosa cells at the onset of differentiation. Treatment with TGF{alpha} or BTC increases levels of TGF{beta}1 mRNA in undifferentiated granulosa cells, while the selective inhibitor of mitogen activated protein kinase signaling, U0126, reverses these effects. Moreover, TGF{beta}1 attenuates c-myc mRNA expression and granulosa cell proliferation, while TGF{alpha} blocks both these inhibitory effects. Collectively, these data provide evidence that EGF family ligands regulate both the expression and biological actions of TGF{beta}1 in hen granulosa cells, and indicate that the timely interaction of these opposing factors is an important modulator of both granulosa cell proliferation and differentiation.

  6. Properties of Ca2+ sparks evoked by action potentials in mouse ventricular myocytes.

    PubMed

    Bridge, J H; Ershler, P R; Cannell, M B

    1999-07-15

    1. Calcium sparks were examined in enzymatically dissociated mouse cardiac ventricular cells using the calcium indicator fluo-3 and confocal microscopy. The properties of the mouse cardiac calcium spark are generally similar to those reported for other species. 2. Examination of the temporal relationship between the action potential and the time course of calcium spark production showed that calcium sparks are more likely to occur during the initial repolarization phase of the action potential. The latency of their occurrence varied by less than 1.4 ms (s.d.) and this low variability may be explained by the interaction of the gating of L-type calcium channels with the changes in driving force for calcium entry during the action potential. 3. When fixed sites within the cell are examined, calcium sparks have relatively constant amplitude but the amplitude of the sparks was variable among sites. The low variability of the amplitude of the calcium sparks suggests that more than one sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) release channel must be involved in their genesis. Noise analysis (with the assumption of independent gating) suggests that > 18 SR calcium release channels may be involved in the generation of the calcium spark. At a fixed site, the response is close to 'all-or-none' behaviour which suggests that calcium sparks are indeed elementary events underlying cardiac excitation-contraction coupling. 4. A method for selecting spark sites for signal averaging is presented which allows the time course of the spark to be examined with high temporal and spatial resolution. Using this method we show the development of the calcium spark at high signal-to-noise levels.

  7. Pharmacological actions of statins: potential utility in COPD.

    PubMed

    Young, R P; Hopkins, R; Eaton, T E

    2009-12-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterised by minimally reversible airflow limitation and features of systemic inflammation. Current therapies for COPD have been shown to reduce symptoms and infective exacerbations and to improve quality of life. However, these drugs have little effect on the natural history of the disease (progressive decline in lung function and exercise tolerance) and do not improve mortality. The anti-inflammatory effects of statins on both pulmonary and systemic inflammation through inhibition of guanosine triphosphatase and nuclear factor-κB mediated activation of inflammatory and matrix remodelling pathways could have substantial benefits in patients with COPD due to the following. 1) Inhibition of cytokine production (tumour necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8) and neutrophil infiltration into the lung; 2) inhibition of the fibrotic activity in the lung leading to small airways fibrosis and irreversible airflow limitation; 3) antioxidant and anti-inflammatory (IL-6 mediated) effects on skeletal muscle; 4) reduced inflammatory response to pulmonary infection; and 5) inhibition of the development (or reversal) of epithelial-mesenchymal transition, a precursor event to lung cancer. This review examines the pleiotropic pharmacological action of statins which inhibit key inflammatory and remodelling pathways in COPD and concludes that statins have considerable potential as adjunct therapy in COPD. PMID:20956147

  8. Short latency compound action potentials from mammalian gravity receptor organs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, T. A.; Jones, S. M.

    1999-01-01

    Gravity receptor function was characterized in four mammalian species using far-field vestibular evoked potentials (VsEPs). VsEPs are compound action potentials of the vestibular nerve and central relays that are elicited by linear acceleration ramps applied to the cranium. Rats, mice, guinea pigs, and gerbils were studied. In all species, response onset occurred within 1.5 ms of the stimulus onset. Responses persisted during intense (116 dBSPL) wide-band (50 to 50 inverted question mark omitted inverted question mark000 Hz) forward masking, whereas auditory responses to intense clicks (112 dBpeSPL) were eliminated under the same conditions. VsEPs remained after cochlear extirpation but were eliminated following bilateral labyrinthectomy. Responses included a series of positive and negative peaks that occurred within 8 ms of stimulus onset (range of means at +6 dBre: 1.0 g/ms: P1=908 to 1062 micros, N1=1342 to 1475 micros, P2=1632 to 1952 micros, N2=2038 to 2387 micros). Mean response amplitudes at +6 dBre: 1.0 g/ms ranged from 0.14 to 0.99 microV. VsEP input/output functions revealed latency slopes that varied across peaks and species ranging from -19 to -51 micros/dB. Amplitude-intensity slopes also varied ranging from 0.04 to 0.08 microV/dB for rats and mice. Latency values were comparable to those of birds although amplitudes were substantially smaller in mammals. VsEP threshold values were considerably higher in mammals compared to birds and ranged from -8.1 to -10.5 dBre 1.0 g/ms across species. These results support the hypothesis that mammalian gravity receptors are less sensitive to dynamic stimuli than are those of birds.

  9. A wavelet denoising approach for signal action isolation in the ear canal.

    PubMed

    Vaidyanathan, Ravi; Wang, Shouyan; Gupta, Lalit

    2008-01-01

    The goal of this work was to develop and implement a new filtering strategy to denoise acoustic signals in the ear canal resulting from voluntary movement of the tongue (as a method of generating control input), as well as from other active actions, (speech, eating, drinking, smoking), and passive actions (swallowing, adjusting the jaw, physiological activity). The strategy is based on a denoising wavelet shrinkage approach that separates rhythmic bursting activity and white noise representing sustained tonic activity. While past work has addressed the discrimination of voluntary TMEP signals from one-another, no work has addressed acoustic artefact rejection within the ear. The results described here, combined with our past work in isolating critical components of tongue movement ear pressure (TMEP) signals, provide a basis for discriminating voluntary and involuntary actions of the tongue by monitoring pressure in the ear. At this time, the system has worked in real-time for assistive device control.

  10. New mechanisms of signal transduction inhibitor action: receptor tyrosine kinase down-regulation and blockade of signal transactivation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Adrian V; Schiff, Rachel; Cui, Xiaojiang; Sachdev, Deepali; Yee, Douglas; Gilmore, Andrew P; Streuli, Charles H; Oesterreich, Steffi; Hadsell, Darryl L

    2003-01-01

    The explosion of signal transduction research over the last 10 years has provided a unique insight into the complexity of these intricate pathways. Whereas intermediates of multiple signaling pathways have been identified, understanding their function and, in particular, the interactions between them has become a daunting task. The increasing evidence that many of these pathways can cross-talk with each other via signal transactivation inevitably raises the question of how cells determine specificity in signaling. Despite the mind-numbing complexity of these pathways, progress has been made in developing highly specific and potent signal transduction inhibitors (STIs). STIs show promise in the treatment of cancer in preclinical studies and are currently in a number of clinical trials. Whereas many of these agents were "rationally designed," we barely understand their mechanisms of action. This review will highlight how recent studies using these STIs have elucidated novel mechanisms of STI action that may be used in the development of new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of cancer.

  11. Effects of troglitazone and pioglitazone on the action potentials and membrane currents of rabbit ventricular myocytes.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, S; Watanabe, T

    1998-09-18

    The effects of the antidiabetic thiazolidinediones troglitazone and pioglitazone on action potentials and membrane currents were studied in rabbit ventricular myocytes. Troglitazone (10 microM) reversibly reduced excitability of the myocytes and modified their action potential configuration. It significantly increased the stimulation threshold required to elicit action potentials and decreased action potential amplitude and the maximum upstroke velocity of the action potentials. The Inhibition of the maximum upstroke velocity by troglitazone was also significant at 1 microM. Voltage-clamp experiments revealed that troglitazone (10 microM) reversibly inhibited both the slow inward Ca2+ current and the steady-state K+ current. In contrast to troglitazone, pioglitazone (1-10 microM) had no significant effect on the excitability, action potential configuration, or membrane currents of myocytes. These results suggest that troglitazone, but not pioglitazone, modulates Na+, Ca2+ and K+ currents, leading to the changes in excitability and action potential configuration of ventricular myocytes. PMID:9797043

  12. Co-evolutionary dynamics of collective action with signaling for a quorum.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, Jorge M; Vasconcelos, Vítor V; Santos, Francisco C; Skyrms, Brian

    2015-02-01

    Collective signaling for a quorum is found in a wide range of organisms that face collective action problems whose successful solution requires the participation of some quorum of the individuals present. These range from humans, to social insects, to bacteria. The mechanisms involved, the quorum required, and the size of the group may vary. Here we address the general question of the evolution of collective signaling at a high level of abstraction. We investigate the evolutionary dynamics of a population engaging in a signaling N-person game theoretic model. Parameter settings allow for loners and cheaters, and for costly or costless signals. We find a rich dynamics, showing how natural selection, operating on a population of individuals endowed with the simplest strategies, is able to evolve a costly signaling system that allows individuals to respond appropriately to different states of Nature. Signaling robustly promotes cooperative collective action, in particular when coordinated action is most needed and difficult to achieve. Two different signaling systems may emerge depending on Nature's most prevalent states. PMID:25706984

  13. Co-evolutionary dynamics of collective action with signaling for a quorum.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, Jorge M; Vasconcelos, Vítor V; Santos, Francisco C; Skyrms, Brian

    2015-02-01

    Collective signaling for a quorum is found in a wide range of organisms that face collective action problems whose successful solution requires the participation of some quorum of the individuals present. These range from humans, to social insects, to bacteria. The mechanisms involved, the quorum required, and the size of the group may vary. Here we address the general question of the evolution of collective signaling at a high level of abstraction. We investigate the evolutionary dynamics of a population engaging in a signaling N-person game theoretic model. Parameter settings allow for loners and cheaters, and for costly or costless signals. We find a rich dynamics, showing how natural selection, operating on a population of individuals endowed with the simplest strategies, is able to evolve a costly signaling system that allows individuals to respond appropriately to different states of Nature. Signaling robustly promotes cooperative collective action, in particular when coordinated action is most needed and difficult to achieve. Two different signaling systems may emerge depending on Nature's most prevalent states.

  14. Notch signaling: its roles and therapeutic potential in hematological malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Yisu

    2016-01-01

    Notch is a highly conserved signaling system that allows neighboring cells to communicate, thereby controlling their differentiation, proliferation and apoptosis, with the outcome of its activation being highly dependent on signal strength and cell type. As such, there is growing evidence that disturbances in physiological Notch signaling contribute to cancer development and growth through various mechanisms. Notch was first reported to contribute to tumorigenesis in the early 90s, through identification of the involvement of the Notch1 gene in the chromosomal translocation t(7;9)(q34;q34.3), found in a small subset of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Since then, Notch mutations and aberrant Notch signaling have been reported in numerous other precursor and mature hematological malignancies, of both myeloid and lymphoid origin, as well as many epithelial tumor types. Of note, Notch has been reported to have both oncogenic and tumor suppressor roles, dependent on the cancer cell type. In this review, we will first give a general description of the Notch signaling pathway, and its physiologic role in hematopoiesis. Next, we will review the role of aberrant Notch signaling in several hematological malignancies. Finally, we will discuss current and potential future therapeutic approaches targeting this pathway. PMID:26934331

  15. Signaling mechanism underlying the histamine-modulated action of hypoglossal motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zi-Long; Wu, Xu; Luo, Yan-Jia; Wang, Lu; Qu, Wei-Min; Li, Shan-Qun; Huang, Zhi-Li

    2016-04-01

    Histamine, an important modulator of the arousal states of the central nervous system, has been reported to contribute an excitatory drive at the hypoglossal motor nucleus to the genioglossus (GG) muscle, which is involved in the pathogenesis of obstructive sleep apnea. However, the effect of histamine on hypoglossal motoneurons (HMNs) and the underlying signaling mechanisms have remained elusive. Here, whole-cell patch-clamp recordings were conducted using neonatal rat brain sections, which showed that histamine excited HMNs with an inward current under voltage-clamp and a depolarization membrane potential under current-clamp via histamine H1 receptors (H1Rs). The phospholipase C inhibitor U-73122 blocked H1Rs-mediated excitatory effects, but protein kinase A inhibitor and protein kinase C inhibitor did not, indicating that the signal transduction cascades underlying the excitatory action of histamine on HMNs were H1R/Gq/11 /phospholipase C/inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3). The effects of histamine were also dependent on extracellular Na(+) and intracellular Ca(2+), which took place via activation of Na(+)-Ca(2+) exchangers. These results identify the signaling molecules associated with the regulatory effect of histamine on HMNs. The findings of this study may provide new insights into therapeutic approaches in obstructive sleep apnea. We proposed the post-synaptic mechanisms underlying the modulation effect of histamine on hypoglossal motoneuron. Histamine activates the H1Rs via PLC and IP3, increases Ca(2+) releases from intracellular stores, promotes Na(+) influx and Ca(2+) efflux via the NCXs, and then produces an inward current and depolarizes the neurons. Histamine modulates the excitability of HMNs with other neuromodulators, such as noradrenaline, serotonin and orexin. We think that these findings should provide an important new direction for drug development for the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea.

  16. The fMRI signal, slow cortical potential and consciousness

    PubMed Central

    He, Biyu J.; Raichle, Marcus E.

    2010-01-01

    As functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has become a driving force in cognitive neuroscience, it is crucial to understand the neural basis of the fMRI signal. Here, we discuss a novel neurophysiological correlate of the fMRI signal, the slow cortical potential (SCP), which also seems to modulate the power of higher-frequency activity, the more established neurophysiological correlate of the fMRI signal. We further propose a hypothesis for the involvement of the SCP in the emergence of consciousness, and review existing data that lend support to our proposal. This hypothesis, unlike several previous theories of consciousness, is firmly rooted in physiology and as such is entirely amenable to empirical testing. PMID:19535283

  17. Do potential SETI signals need to be decontaminated?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrigan, Richard A., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    Biological contamination from space samples is a remote but accepted possibility. Signals received by searches for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI) could also contain harmful information in the spirit of a computer virus, the so-called "SETI Hacker" hypothesis. Over the last four decades extraterrestrial intelligence searches have given little consideration to this possibility. Some argue that information in an extraterrestrial signal could not attack a terrestrial computer because the computer logic and code is idiosyncratic and constitutes an impenetrable firewall. Suggestions are given on how to probe these arguments. Measures for decontaminating extraterrestrial intelligence signals (ETI) are discussed. Modifications to the current SETI detection protocol may be appropriate. Beyond that, the potential character of ETI message content requires much broader discussion.

  18. Mathematical model of the neonatal mouse ventricular action potential

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Linda J.; Sobie, Eric A.

    2008-01-01

    Therapies for heart disease are based largely on our understanding of the adult myocardium. The dramatic differences in action potential (AP) shape between neonatal and adult cardiac myocytes, however, indicate that a different set of molecular interactions in neonatal myocytes necessitates different treatment for newborns. Computational modeling is useful for synthesizing data to determine how interactions between components lead to systems-level behavior, but this technique has not been used extensively to study neonatal heart cell function. We created a mathematical model of the neonatal (day 1) mouse myocyte by modifying, based on experimental data, the densities and/or formulations of ion transport mechanisms in an adult cell model. The new model reproduces the characteristic AP shape of neonatal cells, with a brief plateau phase and longer duration than the adult (APD80=60.1 vs. 12.6 ms). The simulation results are consistent with experimental data, including: 1) decreased density, and altered inactivation, of transient outward K+ currents, 2) increased delayed rectifier K+ currents, 3) Ca2+ entry through T-type as well as L-type Ca2+ channels, 4) increased Ca2+ influx through Na+-Ca2+ exchange, and 5) Ca2+ transients resulting from transmembrane Ca2+ entry rather than release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). Simulations performed with the model generated novel predictions, including increased SR Ca2+ leak and elevated intracellular [Na+] in neonatal compared with adult myocytes. This new model can therefore be used for testing hypotheses and obtaining a better quantitative understanding of differences between neonatal and adult physiology. PMID:18408122

  19. Action potential propagation imaged with high temporal resolution near-infrared video microscopy and polarized light

    PubMed Central

    Schei, Jennifer L.; McCluskey, Matthew D.; Foust, Amanda J.; Yao, Xin-Cheng; Rector, David M.

    2008-01-01

    To identify the neural constituents responsible for generating polarized light changes, we created spatially resolved movies of propagating action potentials from stimulated lobster leg nerves using both reflection and transmission imaging modalities. Changes in light polarization are associated with membrane depolarization and provide sub-millisecond temporal resolution. Typically, signals are detected using light transmitted through tissue; however, because we eventually would like to apply polarization techniques in-vivo, reflected light is required. In transmission mode, the optical signal was largest throughout the center of the nerve, suggesting that most of the optical signal arose from the inner nerve bundle. In reflection mode, polarization changes were largest near the edges, suggesting that most of the optical signal arose from the outer sheath. In support of these observations, an optical model of the tissue showed that the outer sheath is more reflective while the inner nerve bundle is more transmissive. In order to apply these techniques in-vivo, we must consider that brain tissue does not have a regular orientation of processes as in the lobster nerve. We tested the effect of randomizing cell orientation by tying the nerve in an overhand knot prior to imaging, producing polarization changes that can be imaged even without regular cell orientations. PMID:18272402

  20. IGFBP2 potentiates nuclear EGFR-STAT3 signaling.

    PubMed

    Chua, C Y; Liu, Y; Granberg, K J; Hu, L; Haapasalo, H; Annala, M J; Cogdell, D E; Verploegen, M; Moore, L M; Fuller, G N; Nykter, M; Cavenee, W K; Zhang, W

    2016-02-11

    Insulin-like growth factor binding protein 2 (IGFBP2) is a pleiotropic oncogenic protein that has both extracellular and intracellular functions. Despite a clear causal role in cancer development, the tumor-promoting mechanisms of IGFBP2 are poorly understood. The contributions of intracellular IGFBP2 to tumor development and progression are also unclear. Here we present evidence that both exogenous IGFBP2 treatment and cellular IGFBP2 overexpression lead to aberrant activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), which subsequently activates signal transducer and activator of transcription factor 3 (STAT3) signaling. Furthermore, we demonstrate that IGFBP2 augments the nuclear accumulation of EGFR to potentiate STAT3 transactivation activities, via activation of the nuclear EGFR signaling pathway. Nuclear IGFBP2 directly influences the invasive and migratory capacities of human glioblastoma cells, providing a direct link between intracellular (and particularly nuclear) IGFBP2 and cancer hallmarks. These activities are also consistent with the strong association between IGFBP2 and STAT3-activated genes derived from The Cancer Genome Atlas database for human glioma. A high level of all three proteins (IGFBP2, EGFR and STAT3) was strongly correlated with poorer survival in an independent patient data set. These results identify a novel tumor-promoting function for IGFBP2 of activating EGFR/STAT3 signaling and facilitating EGFR accumulation in the nucleus, thereby deregulating EGFR signaling by two distinct mechanisms. As targeting EGFR in glioma has been relatively unsuccessful, this study suggests that IGFBP2 may be a novel therapeutic target.

  1. Floral colour change as a potential signal to pollinators.

    PubMed

    Ruxton, Graeme D; Schaefer, H Martin

    2016-08-01

    Colour change in flowers (with age and/or after pollination) is taxonomically widespread, has evolved repeatedly, and has a range of putative selective benefits linked to modifying pollinator behaviour; however, this phenomenon seems paradoxically uncommon. We explore this paradox by reviewing the empirical evidence and argue that the evolution and maintenance of floral colour change as a signal to modify pollinator behaviour require special ecological circumstances that will often not be met across a plant population for a sustained number of generations, which potentially explains the scarcity of this phenomenon. We discuss alternative explanations for floral colour change and potentially fruitful lines of future research. PMID:27428780

  2. Xenin-25 Potentiates Glucose-dependent Insulinotropic Polypeptide Action via a Novel Cholinergic Relay Mechanism*

    PubMed Central

    Wice, Burton M.; Wang, Songyan; Crimmins, Dan L.; Diggs-Andrews, Kelly A.; Althage, Matthew C.; Ford, Eric L.; Tran, Hung; Ohlendorf, Matthew; Griest, Terry A.; Wang, Qiuling; Fisher, Simon J.; Ladenson, Jack H.; Polonsky, Kenneth S.

    2010-01-01

    The intestinal peptides GLP-1 and GIP potentiate glucose-mediated insulin release. Agents that increase GLP-1 action are effective therapies in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). However, GIP action is blunted in T2DM, and GIP-based therapies have not been developed. Thus, it is important to increase our understanding of the mechanisms of GIP action. We developed mice lacking GIP-producing K cells. Like humans with T2DM, “GIP/DT” animals exhibited a normal insulin secretory response to exogenous GLP-1 but a blunted response to GIP. Pharmacologic doses of xenin-25, another peptide produced by K cells, restored the GIP-mediated insulin secretory response and reduced hyperglycemia in GIP/DT mice. Xenin-25 alone had no effect. Studies with islets, insulin-producing cell lines, and perfused pancreata indicated xenin-25 does not enhance GIP-mediated insulin release by acting directly on the β-cell. The in vivo effects of xenin-25 to potentiate insulin release were inhibited by atropine sulfate and atropine methyl bromide but not by hexamethonium. Consistent with this, carbachol potentiated GIP-mediated insulin release from in situ perfused pancreata of GIP/DT mice. In vivo, xenin-25 did not activate c-fos expression in the hind brain or paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus indicating that central nervous system activation is not required. These data suggest that xenin-25 potentiates GIP-mediated insulin release by activating non-ganglionic cholinergic neurons that innervate the islets, presumably part of an enteric-neuronal-pancreatic pathway. Xenin-25, or molecules that increase acetylcholine receptor signaling in β-cells, may represent a novel approach to overcome GIP resistance and therefore treat humans with T2DM. PMID:20421298

  3. Xenin-25 potentiates glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide action via a novel cholinergic relay mechanism.

    PubMed

    Wice, Burton M; Wang, Songyan; Crimmins, Dan L; Diggs-Andrews, Kelly A; Althage, Matthew C; Ford, Eric L; Tran, Hung; Ohlendorf, Matthew; Griest, Terry A; Wang, Qiuling; Fisher, Simon J; Ladenson, Jack H; Polonsky, Kenneth S

    2010-06-25

    The intestinal peptides GLP-1 and GIP potentiate glucose-mediated insulin release. Agents that increase GLP-1 action are effective therapies in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). However, GIP action is blunted in T2DM, and GIP-based therapies have not been developed. Thus, it is important to increase our understanding of the mechanisms of GIP action. We developed mice lacking GIP-producing K cells. Like humans with T2DM, "GIP/DT" animals exhibited a normal insulin secretory response to exogenous GLP-1 but a blunted response to GIP. Pharmacologic doses of xenin-25, another peptide produced by K cells, restored the GIP-mediated insulin secretory response and reduced hyperglycemia in GIP/DT mice. Xenin-25 alone had no effect. Studies with islets, insulin-producing cell lines, and perfused pancreata indicated xenin-25 does not enhance GIP-mediated insulin release by acting directly on the beta-cell. The in vivo effects of xenin-25 to potentiate insulin release were inhibited by atropine sulfate and atropine methyl bromide but not by hexamethonium. Consistent with this, carbachol potentiated GIP-mediated insulin release from in situ perfused pancreata of GIP/DT mice. In vivo, xenin-25 did not activate c-fos expression in the hind brain or paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus indicating that central nervous system activation is not required. These data suggest that xenin-25 potentiates GIP-mediated insulin release by activating non-ganglionic cholinergic neurons that innervate the islets, presumably part of an enteric-neuronal-pancreatic pathway. Xenin-25, or molecules that increase acetylcholine receptor signaling in beta-cells, may represent a novel approach to overcome GIP resistance and therefore treat humans with T2DM. PMID:20421298

  4. In vivo neuronal action potential recordings via three-dimensional microscale needle-electrode arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujishiro, Akifumi; Kaneko, Hidekazu; Kawashima, Takahiro; Ishida, Makoto; Kawano, Takeshi

    2014-05-01

    Very fine needle-electrode arrays potentially offer both low invasiveness and high spatial resolution of electrophysiological neuronal recordings in vivo. Herein we report the penetrating and recording capabilities of silicon-growth-based three-dimensional microscale-diameter needle-electrodes arrays. The fabricated needles exhibit a circular-cone shape with a 3-μm-diameter tip and a 210-μm length. Due to the microscale diameter, our silicon needles are more flexible than other microfabricated silicon needles with larger diameters. Coating the microscale-needle-tip with platinum black results in an impedance of ~600 kΩ in saline with output/input signal amplitude ratios of more than 90% at 40 Hz-10 kHz. The needles can penetrate into the whisker barrel area of a rat's cerebral cortex, and the action potentials recorded from some neurons exhibit peak-to-peak amplitudes of ~300 μVpp. These results demonstrate the feasibility of in vivo neuronal action potential recordings with a microscale needle-electrode array fabricated using silicon growth technology.

  5. Ontogeny of vestibular compound action potentials in the domestic chicken

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, S. M.; Jones, T. A.

    2000-01-01

    Compound action potentials of the vestibular nerve were measured from the surface of the scalp in 148 chickens (Gallus domesticus). Ages ranged from incubation day 18 (E18) to 22 days posthatch (P22). Responses were elicited using linear acceleration cranial pulses. Response thresholds decreased at an average rate of -0.45 dB/day. The decrease was best fit by an exponential model with half-maturity time constant of 5.1 days and asymptote of approximately -25.9 dB re:1.0 g/ms. Mean threshold approached within 3 dB of the asymptote by ages P6-P9. Similarly, response latencies decreased exponentially to within 3% of mature values at ages beyond P9. The half-maturity time constant for peripheral response peak latencies P1, N1, and P2 was comparable to thresholds and ranged from approximately 4.6 to 6.2 days, whereas central peaks (N2, P3, and N3) ranged from 2.9 to 3.4 days. Latency-intensity slopes for P1, N1, and P2 tended to decrease with age, reaching mature values within approximately 100 hours of hatching. Amplitudes increased as a function of age with average growth rates for response peaks ranging from 0.04 to 0.09 microV/day. There was no obvious asymptote to the growth of amplitudes over the ages studied. Amplitude-intensity slopes also increased modestly with age. The results show that gravity receptors are responsive to transient cranial stimuli as early as E19 in the chicken embryo. The functional response of gravity receptors continues to develop for many days after all major morphological structures are in place. Distinct maturational processes can be identified in central and peripheral neural relays. Functional improvements during maturation may result from refinements in the receptor epithelia, improvements in central and peripheral synaptic transmission, increased neural myelination, as well as changes in the mechanical coupling between the cranium and receptor organ.

  6. ATP oscillations mediate inductive action of FGF and Shh signalling on prechondrogenic condensation.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Hyuck Joon

    2013-01-01

    Skeletal patterns are prefigured by prechondrogenic condensation. Morphogens such as fibroblast growth factor (FGF) and sonic hedgehog (Shh) specify the skeletal patterns in limb development. However, how morphogens regulate prechondrogenic condensation has remained unclear. Recently, it was demonstrated that synchronized Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) oscillations play a critical role in prechondrogenic condensation. Thus, the present study has focused on whether ATP oscillations mediate the actions of major developmental morphogens such as FGF and Shh on prechondrogenic condensation. It has been shown that both FGF and Shh signalling promoted cellular condensation but not chondrogenic differentiation and also induced ATP oscillations. In addition, blockage of FGF and Shh signalling prevented both ATP oscillations and prechondrogenic condensation. Furthermore, it was found that inhibition of ATP oscillations suppressed FGF/Shh-induced prechondrogenic condensation. These results indicate that ATP oscillations mediate the actions of FGF and Shh signalling on prechondrogenic condensation. This study proposes that morphogens organize skeletal patterns via ATP oscillations.

  7. Understanding the Electrical Behavior of the Action Potential in Terms of Elementary Electrical Sources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez-Falces, Javier

    2015-01-01

    A concept of major importance in human electrophysiology studies is the process by which activation of an excitable cell results in a rapid rise and fall of the electrical membrane potential, the so-called action potential. Hodgkin and Huxley proposed a model to explain the ionic mechanisms underlying the formation of action potentials. However,…

  8. IGFBP2 potentiates nuclear EGFR-STAT3 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Chua, Corrine Yingxuan; Liu, Yuexin; Granberg, Kirsi J.; Hu, Limei; Haapasalo, Hannu; Annala, Matti J.; Cogdell, David E.; Verploegen, Maartje; Moore, Lynette M.; Fuller, Gregory N.; Nykter, Matti; Cavenee, Webster K.; Zhang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding protein 2 (IGFBP2) is a pleiotropic oncogenic protein that has both extracellular and intracellular functions. Despite a clear causal role in cancer development, the tumor-promoting mechanisms of IGFBP2 are poorly understood. The contributions of intracellular IGFBP2 to tumor development and progression are also unclear. Here we present evidence that both exogenous IGFBP2 treatment and cellular IGFBP2 overexpression lead to aberrant activation of EGFR, which subsequently activates STAT3 signaling. Furthermore, we demonstrate that IGFBP2 augments the nuclear accumulation of EGFR to potentiate STAT3 transactivation activities, via activation of the nuclear EGFR signaling pathway. Nuclear IGFBP2 directly influences the invasive and migratory capacities of human glioblastoma cells, providing a direct link between intracellular (and particularly nuclear) IGFBP2 and cancer hallmarks. These activities are also consistent with the strong association between IGFBP2 and STAT3-activated genes derived from the TCGA database for human glioma. A high level of all 3 proteins (IGFBP2, EGFR and STAT3) was strongly correlated with poorer survival in an independent patient dataset. These results identify a novel tumor-promoting function for IGFBP2 of activating EGFR/STAT3 signaling and facilitating EGFR accumulation in the nucleus, thereby deregulating EGFR signaling by 2 distinct mechanisms. As targeting EGFR in glioma has been relatively unsuccessful, this study suggests that IGFBP2 may be a novel therapeutic target. PMID:25893308

  9. Extraction and modeling of the Oscillatory Potential: signal conditioning to obtain minimally corrupted Oscillatory Potentials.

    PubMed

    Derr, Peter H; Meyer, Andrew U; Haupt, Edward J; Brigell, Mitchell G

    2002-01-01

    A method of extracting a temporally bounded component of a composite signal has been developed which minimizes data corruption in signal processing. The composite signal is windowed in the time domain, padding signals are attached, and finally, the conditioned signal is filtered to extract the component of interest. The method has been utilized to extract the Oscillatory Potential (OP) from the Electroretinogram (ERG). ERGs can contain impulse like transients, including flash artifacts and a-b wave transition, which may not be related to the Oscillatory Potential. Such transients will stimulate a filter, yielding its natural (filter) response and thus distort the actual OP signal. To avoid this effect, time-domain windowing and signal conditioning is used to extract the OP from the ERG. The extraction and modeling approach is applied to ERGs obtained from patients with recent monocular central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO). Model parameters clearly differentiate affected from fellow eyes and show subtle differences between eyes with benign and complicated outcomes.

  10. Modeling the Actions of β-Adrenergic Signaling on Excitation–Contraction Coupling Processes

    PubMed Central

    GREENSTEIN, JOSEPH L.; TANSKANEN, ANTTI J.; WINSLOW, RAIMOND L.

    2005-01-01

    Activation of the β-adrenergic (β-AR) signaling pathway enhances cardiac function through protein kinase A (PKA)–mediated phosphorylation of target proteins involved in the process of excitation–contraction (EC) coupling. Experimental studies of the effects of β-AR stimulation on EC coupling have yielded complex results, including increased, decreased, or unchanged EC coupling gain. In this study, we extend a previously developed model of the canine ventricular myocyte describing local control of sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) calcium (Ca2+) release to include the effects of β-AR stimulation. Incorporation of phosphorylation-dependent effects on model membrane currents and Ca2+-cycling proteins yields changes of action potential (AP) and Ca2+ transients in agreement with those measured experimentally in response to the nonspecific β-AR agonist isoproterenol (ISO). The model reproduces experimentally observed alterations in EC coupling gain in response to β-AR agonists and predicts the specific roles of L-type Ca2+ channel (LCC) and SR Ca2+ release channel phosphorylation in altering the amplitude and shape of the EC coupling gain function. The model also indicates that factors that promote mode 2 gating of LCCs, such as β-AR stimulation or activation of the Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), may increase the probability of occurrence of early after-depolarizations (EADs), due to the random, long-duration opening of LCC gating in mode 2. PMID:15201146

  11. Action potentials and amphetamine release antipsychotic drug from dopamine neuron synaptic VMAT vesicles.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Kristal R; Block, Ethan R; Levitan, Edwin S

    2015-08-11

    Based on lysotracker red imaging in cultured hippocampal neurons, antipsychotic drugs (APDs) were proposed to accumulate in synaptic vesicles by acidic trapping and to be released in response to action potentials. Because many APDs are dopamine (DA) D2 receptor (D2R) antagonists, such a mechanism would be particularly interesting if it operated in midbrain DA neurons. Here, the APD cyamemazine (CYAM) is visualized directly by two-photon microscopy in substantia nigra and striatum brain slices. CYAM accumulated slowly into puncta based on vacuolar H(+)-ATPase activity and dispersed rapidly upon dissipating organelle pH gradients. Thus, CYAM is subject to acidic trapping and released upon deprotonation. In the striatum, Ca(2+)-dependent reduction of the CYAM punctate signal was induced by depolarization or action potentials. Striatal CYAM overlapped with the dopamine transporter (DAT). Furthermore, parachloroamphetamine (pCA), acting via vesicular monoamine transporter (VMAT), and a charged VMAT, substrate 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP(+)), reduced striatal CYAM. In vivo CYAM administration and in vitro experiments confirmed that clinically relevant CYAM concentrations result in vesicular accumulation and pCA-dependent release. These results show that some CYAM is in DA neuron VMAT vesicles and suggests a new drug interaction in which amphetamine induces CYAM deprotonation and release as a consequence of the H(+) countertransport by VMAT that accompanies vesicular uptake, but not by inducing exchange or acting as a weak base. Therefore, in the striatum, APDs are released with DA in response to action potentials and an amphetamine. This synaptic corelease is expected to enhance APD antagonism of D2Rs where and when dopaminergic transmission occurs.

  12. Carbon monoxide effects on human ventricle action potential assessed by mathematical simulations

    PubMed Central

    Trenor, Beatriz; Cardona, Karen; Saiz, Javier; Rajamani, Sridharan; Belardinelli, Luiz; Giles, Wayne R.

    2013-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) that is produced in a number of different mammalian tissues is now known to have significant effects on the cardiovascular system. These include: (i) vasodilation, (ii) changes in heart rate and strength of contractions, and (iii) modulation of autonomic nervous system input to both the primary pacemaker and the working myocardium. Excessive CO in the environment is toxic and can initiate or mediate life threatening cardiac rhythm disturbances. Recent reports link these ventricular arrhythmias to an increase in the slowly inactivating, or “late” component of the Na+ current in the mammalian heart. The main goal of this paper is to explore the basis of this pro-arrhythmic capability of CO by incorporating changes in CO-induced ion channel activity with intracellular signaling pathways in the mammalian heart. To do this, a quite well-documented mathematical model of the action potential and intracellular calcium transient in the human ventricular myocyte has been employed. In silico iterations based on this model provide a useful first step in illustrating the cellular electrophysiological consequences of CO that have been reported from mammalian heart experiments. Specifically, when the Grandi et al. model of the human ventricular action potential is utilized, and after the Na+ and Ca2+ currents in a single myocyte are modified based on the experimental literature, early after-depolarization (EAD) rhythm disturbances appear, and important elements of the underlying causes of these EADs are revealed/illustrated. Our modified mathematical model of the human ventricular action potential also provides a convenient digital platform for designing future experimental work and relating these changes in cellular cardiac electrophysiology to emerging clinical and epidemiological data on CO toxicity. PMID:24146650

  13. Action potentials and amphetamine release antipsychotic drug from dopamine neuron synaptic VMAT vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Kristal R.; Block, Ethan R.; Levitan, Edwin S.

    2015-01-01

    Based on lysotracker red imaging in cultured hippocampal neurons, antipsychotic drugs (APDs) were proposed to accumulate in synaptic vesicles by acidic trapping and to be released in response to action potentials. Because many APDs are dopamine (DA) D2 receptor (D2R) antagonists, such a mechanism would be particularly interesting if it operated in midbrain DA neurons. Here, the APD cyamemazine (CYAM) is visualized directly by two-photon microscopy in substantia nigra and striatum brain slices. CYAM accumulated slowly into puncta based on vacuolar H+-ATPase activity and dispersed rapidly upon dissipating organelle pH gradients. Thus, CYAM is subject to acidic trapping and released upon deprotonation. In the striatum, Ca2+-dependent reduction of the CYAM punctate signal was induced by depolarization or action potentials. Striatal CYAM overlapped with the dopamine transporter (DAT). Furthermore, parachloroamphetamine (pCA), acting via vesicular monoamine transporter (VMAT), and a charged VMAT, substrate 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+), reduced striatal CYAM. In vivo CYAM administration and in vitro experiments confirmed that clinically relevant CYAM concentrations result in vesicular accumulation and pCA-dependent release. These results show that some CYAM is in DA neuron VMAT vesicles and suggests a new drug interaction in which amphetamine induces CYAM deprotonation and release as a consequence of the H+ countertransport by VMAT that accompanies vesicular uptake, but not by inducing exchange or acting as a weak base. Therefore, in the striatum, APDs are released with DA in response to action potentials and an amphetamine. This synaptic corelease is expected to enhance APD antagonism of D2Rs where and when dopaminergic transmission occurs. PMID:26216995

  14. Amphetamine elevates nucleus accumbens dopamine via an action potential-dependent mechanism that is modulated by endocannabinoids.

    PubMed

    Covey, Dan P; Bunner, Kendra D; Schuweiler, Douglas R; Cheer, Joseph F; Garris, Paul A

    2016-06-01

    The reinforcing effects of abused drugs are mediated by their ability to elevate nucleus accumbens dopamine. Amphetamine (AMPH) was historically thought to increase dopamine by an action potential-independent, non-exocytotic type of release called efflux, involving reversal of dopamine transporter function and driven by vesicular dopamine depletion. Growing evidence suggests that AMPH also acts by an action potential-dependent mechanism. Indeed, fast-scan cyclic voltammetry demonstrates that AMPH activates dopamine transients, reward-related phasic signals generated by burst firing of dopamine neurons and dependent on intact vesicular dopamine. Not established for AMPH but indicating a shared mechanism, endocannabinoids facilitate this activation of dopamine transients by broad classes of abused drugs. Here, using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry coupled to pharmacological manipulations in awake rats, we investigated the action potential and endocannabinoid dependence of AMPH-induced elevations in nucleus accumbens dopamine. AMPH increased the frequency, amplitude and duration of transients, which were observed riding on top of slower dopamine increases. Surprisingly, silencing dopamine neuron firing abolished all AMPH-induced dopamine elevations, identifying an action potential-dependent origin. Blocking cannabinoid type 1 receptors prevented AMPH from increasing transient frequency, similar to reported effects on other abused drugs, but not from increasing transient duration and inhibiting dopamine uptake. Thus, AMPH elevates nucleus accumbens dopamine by eliciting transients via cannabinoid type 1 receptors and promoting the summation of temporally coincident transients, made more numerous, larger and wider by AMPH. Collectively, these findings are inconsistent with AMPH eliciting action potential-independent dopamine efflux and vesicular dopamine depletion, and support endocannabinoids facilitating phasic dopamine signalling as a common action in drug reinforcement.

  15. β-Adrenergic receptor signaling and modulation of long-term potentiation in the mammalian hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    O'Dell, Thomas J.; Connor, Steven A.; Guglietta, Ryan

    2015-01-01

    Encoding new information in the brain requires changes in synaptic strength. Neuromodulatory transmitters can facilitate synaptic plasticity by modifying the actions and expression of specific signaling cascades, transmitter receptors and their associated signaling complexes, genes, and effector proteins. One critical neuromodulator in the mammalian brain is norepinephrine (NE), which regulates multiple brain functions such as attention, perception, arousal, sleep, learning, and memory. The mammalian hippocampus receives noradrenergic innervation and hippocampal neurons express β-adrenergic receptors, which are known to play important roles in gating the induction of long-lasting forms of synaptic potentiation. These forms of long-term potentiation (LTP) are believed to importantly contribute to long-term storage of spatial and contextual memories in the brain. In this review, we highlight the contributions of noradrenergic signaling in general and β-adrenergic receptors in particular, toward modulating hippocampal LTP. We focus on the roles of NE and β-adrenergic receptors in altering the efficacies of specific signaling molecules such as NMDA and AMPA receptors, protein phosphatases, and translation initiation factors. Also, the roles of β-adrenergic receptors in regulating synaptic “tagging” and “capture” of LTP within synaptic networks of the hippocampus are reviewed. Understanding the molecular and cellular bases of noradrenergic signaling will enrich our grasp of how the brain makes new, enduring memories, and may shed light on credible strategies for improving mental health through treatment of specific disorders linked to perturbed memory processing and dysfunctional noradrenergic synaptic transmission. PMID:26286656

  16. Effect of a prenylamine analog (MG8926) on spontaneous action potentials in isolated rabbit sinoatrial node.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, H; Matsuoka, I; Ono, T; Yoshida, H; Uchibori, T; Kogi, K

    1996-12-01

    Effects of verapamil, prenylamine and a prenylamine analog, MG8926 on the intracellular spontaneous action potentials recorded from the isolated rabbit sinoatrial (SA) node were studied. Verapamil (1 microM), a selective inhibitor for slow Ca2+ channels, prolonged the cycle length, decreased the rate of diastolic depolarization, the rate of rise of action potential, the amplitude of action potential and the maximal diastolic potential, and usually arrested showing subthreshold fluctuation of the membrane potential within several ten min. Prenylamine (10 microM), a nonselective inhibitor for slow Ca2+ channels, tended to prolong the cycle length to decrease the diastolic depolarization, the rate of rise of action potential, the amplitude of action potential. However, these changes were statistically insignificant. Prenylamine at the concentration of 10 microM had no effect on the maximal diastolic potential. MG8926 (10 microM) prolonged the cycle length, decreased the rate of diastolic depolarization, the rate of rise of action potential and tended to decrease the amplitude of action potential. MG8926 at the concentration of 10 microM had almost no effect on the maximal diastolic potential. The present findings may indicate that replacement of phenyl residue of prenylamine by cyclohexyl residue increases the inhibitory action on the slow Ca2+ channels in rabbit SA node.

  17. Mechanisms of action and potential therapeutic uses of thalidomide.

    PubMed

    Mujagić, Hamza; Chabner, Bruce A; Mujagić, Zlata

    2002-06-01

    Thalidomide was first introduced to the market in Germany under the brand name of Contergan in 1956, as a non-barbiturate hypnotic, advocated to ensure a good nights sleep and to prevent morning sickness in pregnancy. It was advertised for its prompt action, lack of hangover, and apparent safety. It has been banned from the market since 1963 after it caused the worldwide teratogenic disaster: babies exposed to thalidomide in utero during the first 34-50 days of pregnancy were born with severe life-threatening birth defects. Despite its unfortunate history, thalidomide has attracted scientific interest again because of its recently discovered action against inflammatory diseases and cancer. Its broad range of biological activities stems from its ability to moderate cytokine action in cancer and inflammatory diseases. Early studies examined its anxiolytic, mild hypnotic, antiemetic, and adjuvant analgesic properties. Subsequently, thalidomide was found to be highly effective in managing the cutaneous manifestations of leprosy, being superior to Aspirin in controlling leprosy-associated fever. Recent research has shown promising results with thalidomide in patients with myeloma, myelodysplastic syndrome, a variety of infectious diseases, autoimmune diseases, cancer, and progressive body weight loss related to advanced cancer and AIDS. Here we review the history of its development, pharmacokinetics, metabolism, biologic effects, and the results of clinical trials conducted thus far. Further research in this field should be directed towards better understanding of thalidomide metabolism, its mechanism of action, and the development of less toxic and more active analogs. PMID:12035132

  18. Mechanisms of action and potential therapeutic uses of thalidomide.

    PubMed

    Mujagić, Hamza; Chabner, Bruce A; Mujagić, Zlata

    2002-06-01

    Thalidomide was first introduced to the market in Germany under the brand name of Contergan in 1956, as a non-barbiturate hypnotic, advocated to ensure a good nights sleep and to prevent morning sickness in pregnancy. It was advertised for its prompt action, lack of hangover, and apparent safety. It has been banned from the market since 1963 after it caused the worldwide teratogenic disaster: babies exposed to thalidomide in utero during the first 34-50 days of pregnancy were born with severe life-threatening birth defects. Despite its unfortunate history, thalidomide has attracted scientific interest again because of its recently discovered action against inflammatory diseases and cancer. Its broad range of biological activities stems from its ability to moderate cytokine action in cancer and inflammatory diseases. Early studies examined its anxiolytic, mild hypnotic, antiemetic, and adjuvant analgesic properties. Subsequently, thalidomide was found to be highly effective in managing the cutaneous manifestations of leprosy, being superior to Aspirin in controlling leprosy-associated fever. Recent research has shown promising results with thalidomide in patients with myeloma, myelodysplastic syndrome, a variety of infectious diseases, autoimmune diseases, cancer, and progressive body weight loss related to advanced cancer and AIDS. Here we review the history of its development, pharmacokinetics, metabolism, biologic effects, and the results of clinical trials conducted thus far. Further research in this field should be directed towards better understanding of thalidomide metabolism, its mechanism of action, and the development of less toxic and more active analogs.

  19. Gifted Potential and Poverty: A Call for Extraordinary Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kitano, Margie K.

    2003-01-01

    Dr. Robinson's proposed action plan will serve the needs of highly achieving gifted students. However, defining giftedness as high academic performance based on traditional assessment procedures could reverse the field's fledgling success in supporting culturally diverse gifted children and youth. Changing the focus of equity in gifted education…

  20. Boron-doped nanocrystalline diamond microelectrode arrays monitor cardiac action potentials.

    PubMed

    Maybeck, Vanessa; Edgington, Robert; Bongrain, Alexandre; Welch, Joseph O; Scorsone, Emanuel; Bergonzo, Philippe; Jackman, Richard B; Offenhäusser, Andreas

    2014-02-01

    The expansion of diamond-based electronics in the area of biological interfacing has not been as thoroughly explored as applications in electrochemical sensing. However, the biocompatibility of diamond, large safe electrochemical window, stability, and tunable electronic properties provide opportunities to develop new devices for interfacing with electrogenic cells. Here, the fabrication of microelectrode arrays (MEAs) with boron-doped nanocrystalline diamond (BNCD) electrodes and their interfacing with cardiomyocyte-like HL-1 cells to detect cardiac action potentials are presented. A nonreductive means of structuring doped and undoped diamond on the same substrate is shown. The resulting BNCD electrodes show high stability under mechanical stress generated by the cells. It is shown that by fabricating the entire surface of the MEA with NCD, in patterns of conductive doped, and isolating undoped regions, signal detection may be improved up to four-fold over BNCD electrodes passivated with traditional isolators.

  1. Mechanism of Action and Clinical Potential of Fingolimod for the Treatment of Stroke.

    PubMed

    Li, Wentao; Xu, Haoliang; Testai, Fernando D

    2016-01-01

    Fingolimod (FTY720) is an orally bio-available immunomodulatory drug currently approved by the FDA for the treatment of multiple sclerosis. Currently, there is a significant interest in the potential benefits of FTY720 on stroke outcomes. FTY720 and the sphingolipid signaling pathway it modulates has a ubiquitous presence in the central nervous system and both rodent models and pilot clinical trials seem to indicate that the drug may improve overall functional recovery in different stroke subtypes. Although the precise mechanisms behind these beneficial effects are yet unclear, there is evidence that FTY720 has a role in regulating cerebrovascular responses, blood-brain barrier permeability, and cell survival in the event of cerebrovascular insult. In this article, we critically review the data obtained from the latest laboratory findings and clinical trials involving both ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, and attempt to form a cohesive picture of FTY720's mechanisms of action in stroke. PMID:27617002

  2. Mechanism of Action and Clinical Potential of Fingolimod for the Treatment of Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wentao; Xu, Haoliang; Testai, Fernando D.

    2016-01-01

    Fingolimod (FTY720) is an orally bio-available immunomodulatory drug currently approved by the FDA for the treatment of multiple sclerosis. Currently, there is a significant interest in the potential benefits of FTY720 on stroke outcomes. FTY720 and the sphingolipid signaling pathway it modulates has a ubiquitous presence in the central nervous system and both rodent models and pilot clinical trials seem to indicate that the drug may improve overall functional recovery in different stroke subtypes. Although the precise mechanisms behind these beneficial effects are yet unclear, there is evidence that FTY720 has a role in regulating cerebrovascular responses, blood–brain barrier permeability, and cell survival in the event of cerebrovascular insult. In this article, we critically review the data obtained from the latest laboratory findings and clinical trials involving both ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, and attempt to form a cohesive picture of FTY720’s mechanisms of action in stroke.

  3. Mechanism of Action and Clinical Potential of Fingolimod for the Treatment of Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wentao; Xu, Haoliang; Testai, Fernando D.

    2016-01-01

    Fingolimod (FTY720) is an orally bio-available immunomodulatory drug currently approved by the FDA for the treatment of multiple sclerosis. Currently, there is a significant interest in the potential benefits of FTY720 on stroke outcomes. FTY720 and the sphingolipid signaling pathway it modulates has a ubiquitous presence in the central nervous system and both rodent models and pilot clinical trials seem to indicate that the drug may improve overall functional recovery in different stroke subtypes. Although the precise mechanisms behind these beneficial effects are yet unclear, there is evidence that FTY720 has a role in regulating cerebrovascular responses, blood–brain barrier permeability, and cell survival in the event of cerebrovascular insult. In this article, we critically review the data obtained from the latest laboratory findings and clinical trials involving both ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, and attempt to form a cohesive picture of FTY720’s mechanisms of action in stroke. PMID:27617002

  4. Synapse-Level Determination of Action Potential Duration by K(+) Channel Clustering in Axons.

    PubMed

    Rowan, Matthew J M; DelCanto, Gina; Yu, Jianqing J; Kamasawa, Naomi; Christie, Jason M

    2016-07-20

    In axons, an action potential (AP) is thought to be broadcast as an unwavering binary pulse over its arbor, driving neurotransmission uniformly at release sites. Yet by recording from axons of cerebellar stellate cell (SC) interneurons, we show that AP width varies between presynaptic bouton sites, even within the same axon branch. The varicose geometry of SC boutons alone does not impose differences in spike duration. Rather, axonal patching revealed heterogeneous peak conductance densities of currents mediated mainly by fast-activating Kv3-type potassium channels, with clustered hotspots at boutons and restricted expression at adjoining shafts. Blockade of Kv channels at individual boutons indicates that currents immediately local to a release site direct spike repolarization at that location. Thus, the clustered arrangement and variable expression density of Kv3 channels at boutons are key determinants underlying compartmentalized control of AP width in a near synapse-by-synapse manner, multiplying the signaling capacity of these structures. PMID:27346528

  5. Reconsidering the nature and mode of action of metabolite retrograde signals from the chloroplast

    PubMed Central

    Estavillo, Gonzalo M.; Chan, Kai Xun; Phua, Su Yin; Pogson, Barry J.

    2013-01-01

    Plant organelles produce retrograde signals to alter nuclear gene expression in order to coordinate their biogenesis, maintain homeostasis, or optimize their performance under adverse conditions. Many signals of different chemical nature have been described in the past decades, including chlorophyll intermediates, reactive oxygen species (ROS), and adenosine derivatives. While the effects of retrograde signaling on gene expression are well understood, the initiation and transport of the signals and their mode of action have either not been resolved, or are a matter of speculation. Moreover, retrograde signaling should be considered as part of a broader cellular network, instead of as separate pathways, required to adjust to changing physiologically relevant conditions. Here we summarize current plastid retrograde signaling models in plants, with a focus on new signaling pathways, SAL1-PAP, methylerythritol cyclodiphosphate (MEcPP), and β-cyclocitral (β-CC), and outline missing links or future areas of research that we believe need to be addressed to have a better understanding of plant intracellular signaling networks. PMID:23316207

  6. Oxidative shift in tissue redox potential increases beat-to-beat variability of action potential duration.

    PubMed

    Kistamás, Kornél; Hegyi, Bence; Váczi, Krisztina; Horváth, Balázs; Bányász, Tamás; Magyar, János; Szentandrássy, Norbert; Nánási, Péter P

    2015-07-01

    Profound changes in tissue redox potential occur in the heart under conditions of oxidative stress frequently associated with cardiac arrhythmias. Since beat-to-beat variability (short term variability, SV) of action potential duration (APD) is a good indicator of arrhythmia incidence, the aim of this work was to study the influence of redox changes on SV in isolated canine ventricular cardiomyocytes using a conventional microelectrode technique. The redox potential was shifted toward a reduced state using a reductive cocktail (containing dithiothreitol, glutathione, and ascorbic acid) while oxidative changes were initiated by superfusion with H2O2. Redox effects were evaluated as changes in "relative SV" determined by comparing SV changes with the concomitant APD changes. Exposure of myocytes to the reductive cocktail decreased SV significantly without any detectable effect on APD. Application of H2O2 increased both SV and APD, but the enhancement of SV was the greater, so relative SV increased. Longer exposure to H2O2 resulted in the development of early afterdepolarizations accompanied by tremendously increased SV. Pretreatment with the reductive cocktail prevented both elevation in relative SV and the development of afterdepolarizations. The results suggest that the increased beat-to-beat variability during an oxidative stress contributes to the generation of cardiac arrhythmias.

  7. Ionic differences between somatic and axonal action potentials in snail giant neurones

    PubMed Central

    Wald, Flora

    1972-01-01

    1. The ionic requirements of the somatic and axonal action potentials of `H' neurones of the snail Cryptomphallus aspersa were studied using intracellular micro-electrodes. 2. The overshoot of the somatic action potential increased by 10 mV for a tenfold increase in [Ca2+]o. In calcium-free media the action potential decreased gradually to values of 50 to 90% of the control and they could be completely eliminated with 2 mM-EGTA. The maximum rate of rise also varied with [Ca2+]o. 3. After 2 hr in sodium-free solution the somatic action potential decreased 6% in overshoot and 24% in rate of rise. 4. The somatic action potential was not affected by TTX, 5 × 10-6 g/ml. Procaine, 18 mM, reduced its rate of rise but did not eliminate it whereas 30 mM-CoCl2 did. 5. The size of the axonal action potential increased with increased [Na+]o, but decreased with an increase in [Ca2+]o. 6. Procaine, 18 mM, abolished the axonal action potential whereas it was not affected by TTX, 5 × 10-6 g/ml., nor, usually, by 30 mM-CoCl2. 7. The results obtained by studying the compound action potential of the nerves were similar to those from axonal action potentials. 8. The possibility that the somatic action potential is mainly calcium dependent while the axonal action potential is mainly produced by sodium is discussed. PMID:5014099

  8. Adaptive control of human action: the role of outcome representations and reward signals

    PubMed Central

    Marien, Hans; Aarts, Henk; Custers, Ruud

    2013-01-01

    The present paper aims to advance the understanding of the control of human behavior by integrating two lines of literature that so far have led separate lives. First, one line of literature is concerned with the ideomotor principle of human behavior, according to which actions are represented in terms of their outcomes. The second line of literature mainly considers the role of reward signals in adaptive control. Here, we offer a combined perspective on how outcome representations and reward signals work together to modulate adaptive control processes. We propose that reward signals signify the value of outcome representations and facilitate the recruitment of control resources in situations where behavior needs to be maintained or adapted to attain the represented outcome. We discuss recent research demonstrating how adaptive control of goal-directed behavior may emerge when outcome representations are co-activated with positive reward signals. PMID:24058352

  9. Novel electrostatic mechanism for mode of action by N-acetylated proteins: cell signaling and phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Kovacic, Peter

    2011-06-01

    Although extensive literature exists for N-acetylated proteins, scant knowledge is available concerning resultant mode of action. This review presents a novel mechanism based on electrostatics and cell signaling. There is substantial increase in the amide dipole and electrostatic field (EF) in contrast with the primary amino of the lysine precursor. The EF might serve as a bridge in electron transfer and cell signaling or energetics may play a role. The relationship between N-acetylation and phosphorylation is addressed. EFs may be important in the case of phosphates. Involvement of cell signaling is addressed including mechanistic aspects. As is the case for many aspects of bioaction, an integrated approach involving electrochemistry and cell signaling seems reasonable.

  10. Potentiation of the early visual response to learned danger signals in adults and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Levita, Liat; Howsley, Philippa; Jordan, Jeff; Johnston, Pat

    2015-02-01

    The reinforcing effects of aversive outcomes on avoidance behaviour are well established. However, their influence on perceptual processes is less well explored, especially during the transition from adolescence to adulthood. Using electroencephalography, we examined whether learning to actively or passively avoid harm can modulate early visual responses in adolescents and adults. The task included two avoidance conditions, active and passive, where two different warning stimuli predicted the imminent, but avoidable, presentation of an aversive tone. To avoid the aversive outcome, participants had to learn to emit an action (active avoidance) for one of the warning stimuli and omit an action for the other (passive avoidance). Both adults and adolescents performed the task with a high degree of accuracy. For both adolescents and adults, increased N170 event-related potential amplitudes were found for both the active and the passive warning stimuli compared with control conditions. Moreover, the potentiation of the N170 to the warning stimuli was stable and long lasting. Developmental differences were also observed; adolescents showed greater potentiation of the N170 component to danger signals. These findings demonstrate, for the first time, that learned danger signals in an instrumental avoidance task can influence early visual sensory processes in both adults and adolescents.

  11. Potentiation of the early visual response to learned danger signals in adults and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Howsley, Philippa; Jordan, Jeff; Johnston, Pat

    2015-01-01

    The reinforcing effects of aversive outcomes on avoidance behaviour are well established. However, their influence on perceptual processes is less well explored, especially during the transition from adolescence to adulthood. Using electroencephalography, we examined whether learning to actively or passively avoid harm can modulate early visual responses in adolescents and adults. The task included two avoidance conditions, active and passive, where two different warning stimuli predicted the imminent, but avoidable, presentation of an aversive tone. To avoid the aversive outcome, participants had to learn to emit an action (active avoidance) for one of the warning stimuli and omit an action for the other (passive avoidance). Both adults and adolescents performed the task with a high degree of accuracy. For both adolescents and adults, increased N170 event-related potential amplitudes were found for both the active and the passive warning stimuli compared with control conditions. Moreover, the potentiation of the N170 to the warning stimuli was stable and long lasting. Developmental differences were also observed; adolescents showed greater potentiation of the N170 component to danger signals. These findings demonstrate, for the first time, that learned danger signals in an instrumental avoidance task can influence early visual sensory processes in both adults and adolescents. PMID:24652856

  12. Task-dependent signal variations in EEG error-related potentials for brain-computer interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iturrate, I.; Montesano, L.; Minguez, J.

    2013-04-01

    Objective. A major difficulty of brain-computer interface (BCI) technology is dealing with the noise of EEG and its signal variations. Previous works studied time-dependent non-stationarities for BCIs in which the user’s mental task was independent of the device operation (e.g., the mental task was motor imagery and the operational task was a speller). However, there are some BCIs, such as those based on error-related potentials, where the mental and operational tasks are dependent (e.g., the mental task is to assess the device action and the operational task is the device action itself). The dependence between the mental task and the device operation could introduce a new source of signal variations when the operational task changes, which has not been studied yet. The aim of this study is to analyse task-dependent signal variations and their effect on EEG error-related potentials.Approach. The work analyses the EEG variations on the three design steps of BCIs: an electrophysiology study to characterize the existence of these variations, a feature distribution analysis and a single-trial classification analysis to measure the impact on the final BCI performance.Results and significance. The results demonstrate that a change in the operational task produces variations in the potentials, even when EEG activity exclusively originated in brain areas related to error processing is considered. Consequently, the extracted features from the signals vary, and a classifier trained with one operational task presents a significant loss of performance for other tasks, requiring calibration or adaptation for each new task. In addition, a new calibration for each of the studied tasks rapidly outperforms adaptive techniques designed in the literature to mitigate the EEG time-dependent non-stationarities.

  13. With you or against you: social orientation dependent learning signals guide actions made for others.

    PubMed

    Christopoulos, George I; King-Casas, Brooks

    2015-01-01

    In social environments, it is crucial that decision-makers take account of the impact of their actions not only for oneself, but also on other social agents. Previous work has identified neural signals in the striatum encoding value-based prediction errors for outcomes to oneself; also, recent work suggests that neural activity in prefrontal cortex may similarly encode value-based prediction errors related to outcomes to others. However, prior work also indicates that social valuations are not isomorphic, with social value orientations of decision-makers ranging on a cooperative to competitive continuum; this variation has not been examined within social learning environments. Here, we combine a computational model of learning with functional neuroimaging to examine how individual differences in orientation impact neural mechanisms underlying 'other-value' learning. Across four experimental conditions, reinforcement learning signals for other-value were identified in medial prefrontal cortex, and were distinct from self-value learning signals identified in striatum. Critically, the magnitude and direction of the other-value learning signal depended strongly on an individual's cooperative or competitive orientation toward others. These data indicate that social decisions are guided by a social orientation-dependent learning system that is computationally similar but anatomically distinct from self-value learning. The sensitivity of the medial prefrontal learning signal to social preferences suggests a mechanism linking such preferences to biases in social actions and highlights the importance of incorporating heterogeneous social predispositions in neurocomputational models of social behavior.

  14. With you or against you: Social orientation dependent learning signals guide actions made for others

    PubMed Central

    Christopoulos, George I.; King-Casas, Brooks

    2014-01-01

    In social environments, it is crucial that decision-makers take account of the impact of their actions not only for oneself, but also on other social agents. Previous work has identified neural signals in the striatum encoding value-based prediction errors for outcomes to oneself; also, recent work suggests neural activity in prefrontal cortex may similarly encode value-based prediction errors related to outcomes to others. However, prior work also indicates that social valuations are not isomorphic, with social value orientations of decision-makers ranging on a cooperative to competitive continuum; this variation has not been examined within social learning environments. Here, we combine a computational model of learning with functional neuroimaging to examine how individual differences in orientation impact neural mechanisms underlying ‘other-value’ learning. Across four experimental conditions, reinforcement learning signals for other-value were identified in medial prefrontal cortex, and were distinct from self-value learning signals identified in striatum. Critically, the magnitude and direction of the other-value learning signal depended strongly on an individual’s cooperative or competitive orientation towards others. These data indicate that social decisions are guided by a social orientation-dependent learning system that is computationally similar but anatomically distinct from self-value learning. The sensitivity of the medial prefrontal learning signal to social preferences suggests a mechanism linking such preferences to biases in social actions and highlights the importance of incorporating heterogeneous social predispositions in neurocomputational models of social behavior. PMID:25224998

  15. Reactive species modify NaV1.8 channels and affect action potentials in murine dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Schink, Martin; Leipold, Enrico; Schirmeyer, Jana; Schönherr, Roland; Hoshi, Toshinori; Heinemann, Stefan H

    2016-01-01

    Dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons are important relay stations between the periphery and the central nervous system and are essential for somatosensory signaling. Reactive species are produced in a variety of physiological and pathophysiological conditions and are known to alter electric signaling. Here we studied the influence of reactive species on the electrical properties of DRG neurons from mice with the whole-cell patch-clamp method. Even mild stress induced by either low concentrations of chloramine-T (10 μM) or low-intensity blue light irradiation profoundly diminished action potential frequency but prolonged single action potentials in wild-type neurons. The impact on evoked action potentials was much smaller in neurons deficient of the tetrodotoxin (TTX)-resistant voltage-gated sodium channel NaV1.8 (NaV1.8(-/-)), the channel most important for the action potential upstroke in DRG neurons. Low concentrations of chloramine-T caused a significant reduction of NaV1.8 peak current and, at higher concentrations, progressively slowed down inactivation. Blue light had a smaller effect on amplitude but slowed down NaV1.8 channel inactivation. The observed effects were less apparent for TTX-sensitive NaV channels. NaV1.8 is an important reactive-species-sensitive component in the electrical signaling of DRG neurons, potentially giving rise to loss-of-function and gain-of-function phenomena depending on the type of reactive species and their effective concentration and time of exposure. PMID:26383867

  16. Reactive species modify NaV1.8 channels and affect action potentials in murine dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Schink, Martin; Leipold, Enrico; Schirmeyer, Jana; Schönherr, Roland; Hoshi, Toshinori; Heinemann, Stefan H

    2016-01-01

    Dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons are important relay stations between the periphery and the central nervous system and are essential for somatosensory signaling. Reactive species are produced in a variety of physiological and pathophysiological conditions and are known to alter electric signaling. Here we studied the influence of reactive species on the electrical properties of DRG neurons from mice with the whole-cell patch-clamp method. Even mild stress induced by either low concentrations of chloramine-T (10 μM) or low-intensity blue light irradiation profoundly diminished action potential frequency but prolonged single action potentials in wild-type neurons. The impact on evoked action potentials was much smaller in neurons deficient of the tetrodotoxin (TTX)-resistant voltage-gated sodium channel NaV1.8 (NaV1.8(-/-)), the channel most important for the action potential upstroke in DRG neurons. Low concentrations of chloramine-T caused a significant reduction of NaV1.8 peak current and, at higher concentrations, progressively slowed down inactivation. Blue light had a smaller effect on amplitude but slowed down NaV1.8 channel inactivation. The observed effects were less apparent for TTX-sensitive NaV channels. NaV1.8 is an important reactive-species-sensitive component in the electrical signaling of DRG neurons, potentially giving rise to loss-of-function and gain-of-function phenomena depending on the type of reactive species and their effective concentration and time of exposure.

  17. Redox-Dependent Anti-Inflammatory Signaling Actions of Unsaturated Fatty Acids

    PubMed Central

    Delmastro-Greenwood, Meghan; Freeman, Bruce A.; Wendell, Stacy Gelhaus

    2014-01-01

    Unsaturated fatty acids are metabolized to reactive products that can act as pro- or anti-inflammatory signaling mediators. Electrophilic fatty acid species, including nitro- and oxo-containing fatty acids, display salutary anti-inflammatory and metabolic actions. Electrophilicity can be conferred by both enzymatic and oxidative reactions, via the homolytic addition of nitrogen dioxide to a double bond or via the formation of α,β-unsaturated carbonyl and epoxide substituents. The endogenous formation of electrophilic fatty acids is significant and influenced by diet, metabolic, and inflammatory reactions. Transcriptional regulatory proteins and enzymes can sense the redox status of the surrounding environment upon electrophilic fatty acid adduction of functionally significant, nucleophilic cysteines. Through this covalent and often reversible posttranslational modification, gene expression and metabolic responses are induced. At low concentrations, the pleiotropic signaling actions that are regulated by these protein targets suggest that some classes of electrophilic lipids may be useful for treating metabolic and inflammatory diseases. PMID:24161076

  18. Understanding the electrical behavior of the action potential in terms of elementary electrical sources.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Falces, Javier

    2015-03-01

    A concept of major importance in human electrophysiology studies is the process by which activation of an excitable cell results in a rapid rise and fall of the electrical membrane potential, the so-called action potential. Hodgkin and Huxley proposed a model to explain the ionic mechanisms underlying the formation of action potentials. However, this model is unsuitably complex for teaching purposes. In addition, the Hodgkin and Huxley approach describes the shape of the action potential only in terms of ionic currents, i.e., it is unable to explain the electrical significance of the action potential or describe the electrical field arising from this source using basic concepts of electromagnetic theory. The goal of the present report was to propose a new model to describe the electrical behaviour of the action potential in terms of elementary electrical sources (in particular, dipoles). The efficacy of this model was tested through a closed-book written exam. The proposed model increased the ability of students to appreciate the distributed character of the action potential and also to recognize that this source spreads out along the fiber as function of space. In addition, the new approach allowed students to realize that the amplitude and sign of the extracellular electrical potential arising from the action potential are determined by the spatial derivative of this intracellular source. The proposed model, which incorporates intuitive graphical representations, has improved students' understanding of the electrical potentials generated by bioelectrical sources and has heightened their interest in bioelectricity.

  19. Somatosensory effects of action inhibition: a study with the stop-signal paradigm.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Eamonn; Haggard, Patrick

    2010-07-01

    When a weak shock is delivered to the finger immediately before a voluntary movement, or during a delay interval where subjects are prepared to make the movement, shock detection rates worsen progressively as the movement approaches. Further, we previously showed that shock detection improves again if a NoGo signal produces inhibition of a prepared response. Here, we used a somatosensory version of the stop-signal paradigm to investigate inhibitory processing during the 'horserace' period when motor excitation and inhibition processes may be simultaneously active. When subjects made a rapid keypress response to a go-signal, shock detection deteriorated in a time-dependent manner, replicating sensory suppression. However, when go-signals were followed by adaptively delayed stop-signals so that subjects could not inhibit the prepared movement, and made errors of commission, we found a paradoxical brief increase in shock detection performance just after the stop-signal, as if in a NoGo trial. During this brief window, the somatosensory system showed a pattern consistent with motor inhibition, even though the motor system itself was too far advanced in movement execution for action to be inhibited. Most models of stop-signal processing propose a two-horse race between excitation and inhibition, with a winner-takes-all solution. We show that there may be distinct motor and somatosensory races. Moreover, inhibitory processes may lead in the somatosensory race, at least briefly, even when excitatory processes win the motor race.

  20. Intracellular recordings of action potentials by an extracellular nanoscale field-effect transistor

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Xiaojie; Gao, Ruixuan; Xie, Ping; Cohen-Karni, Tzahi; Qing, Quan; Choe, Hwan Sung; Tian, Bozhi; Jiang, Xiaocheng; Lieber, Charles M.

    2012-01-01

    The ability to make electrical measurements inside cells has led to many important advances in electrophysiology1-6. The patch clamp technique, in which a glass micropipette filled with electrolyte is inserted into a cell, offers both high signal-to-noise ratio and temporal resolution1,2. Ideally the micropipette should be as small as possible to increase the spatial resolution and reduce the invasiveness of the measurement, but the overall performance of the technique depends on the impedance of the interface between the micropipette and the cell interior1,2, which limits how small the micropipette can be. Techniques that involve inserting metal or carbon microelectrodes into cells are subject to similar constraints4,7-9. Field-effect transistors (FETs) can also record electric potentials inside cells10, and since their performance does not depend on impedance11,12, they can be made much smaller than micropipettes and microelectrodes. Moreover, FET arrays are better suited for multiplexed measurements. Previously we have demonstrated FET-based intracellular recording with kinked nanowire structures10, but the kink configuration and device design places limits on the probe size and the potential for multiplexing. Here we report a new approach where a SiO2 nanotube is synthetically integrated on top of a nanoscale FET. After penetrating the cell membrane, the SiO2 nanotube brings the cell cytosol into contact with the FET and enables the recording of intracellular transmembrane potential. Simulations show that the bandwidth of this branched intracellular nanotube FET (BIT-FET) is high enough for it to record fast action potentials even when the nanotube diameter is decreased to 3 nm, a length scale which is well below that accessible with other methods1,2,4. Studies of cardiomyocyte cells demonstrate that when brought close, the nanotubes of phospholipid-modified BIT-FETs spontaneously penetrate the cell membrane to yield stable, full-amplitude intracellular action

  1. Intracellular recordings of action potentials by an extracellular nanoscale field-effect transistor.

    PubMed

    Duan, Xiaojie; Gao, Ruixuan; Xie, Ping; Cohen-Karni, Tzahi; Qing, Quan; Choe, Hwan Sung; Tian, Bozhi; Jiang, Xiaocheng; Lieber, Charles M

    2012-03-01

    The ability to make electrical measurements inside cells has led to many important advances in electrophysiology. The patch clamp technique, in which a glass micropipette filled with electrolyte is inserted into a cell, offers both high signal-to-noise ratio and temporal resolution. Ideally, the micropipette should be as small as possible to increase the spatial resolution and reduce the invasiveness of the measurement, but the overall performance of the technique depends on the impedance of the interface between the micropipette and the cell interior, which limits how small the micropipette can be. Techniques that involve inserting metal or carbon microelectrodes into cells are subject to similar constraints. Field-effect transistors (FETs) can also record electric potentials inside cells, and because their performance does not depend on impedance, they can be made much smaller than micropipettes and microelectrodes. Moreover, FET arrays are better suited for multiplexed measurements. Previously, we have demonstrated FET-based intracellular recording with kinked nanowire structures, but the kink configuration and device design places limits on the probe size and the potential for multiplexing. Here, we report a new approach in which a SiO2 nanotube is synthetically integrated on top of a nanoscale FET. This nanotube penetrates the cell membrane, bringing the cell cytosol into contact with the FET, which is then able to record the intracellular transmembrane potential. Simulations show that the bandwidth of this branched intracellular nanotube FET (BIT-FET) is high enough for it to record fast action potentials even when the nanotube diameter is decreased to 3 nm, a length scale well below that accessible with other methods. Studies of cardiomyocyte cells demonstrate that when phospholipid-modified BIT-FETs are brought close to cells, the nanotubes can spontaneously penetrate the cell membrane to allow the full-amplitude intracellular action potential to be

  2. Identification of compounds that potentiate CREB signaling as possible enhancers of long-term memory

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Menghang; Huang, Ruili; Guo, Vicky; Southall, Noel; Cho, Ming-Hsuang; Inglese, James; Austin, Christopher P.; Nirenberg, Marshall

    2009-01-01

    Many studies have implicated the cAMP Response Element Binding (CREB) protein signaling pathway in long-term memory. To identify small molecule enhancers of CREB activation of gene expression, we screened ≈73,000 compounds, each at 7–15 concentrations in a quantitative high-throughput screening (qHTS) format, for activity in cells by assaying CREB mediated β-lactamase reporter gene expression. We identified 1,800 compounds that potentiated CREB mediated gene expression, with potencies as low as 16 nM, comprising 96 structural series. Mechanisms of action were systematically determined, and compounds that affect phosphodiesterase 4, protein kinase A, and cAMP production were identified, as well as compounds that affect CREB signaling via apparently unidentified mechanisms. qHTS folowed by interrogation of pathway targets is an efficient paradigm for lead generation for chemical genomics and drug development. PMID:19196967

  3. Epidermal laser stimulation of action potentials in the frog sciatic nerve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jindra, Nichole M.; Goddard, Douglas; Imholte, Michelle; Thomas, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Measurements of laser-stimulated action potentials in the sciatic nerve of leopard frogs (Rana pipiens) are made using two infrared lasers. The dorsal sides of the frog's hind limbs are exposed to short-pulsed 1540- and 1064-nm wavelengths at three separate spot sizes: 2, 3, and 4 mm. Energy density thresholds are determined for eliciting an action potential at each experimental condition. Results from these exposures show similar evoked potential thresholds for both wavelengths. The 2-mm-diam spot sizes yield action potentials at radiant exposure levels almost double that seen with larger beam sizes.

  4. Aripiprazole has functionally selective actions at dopamine D2 receptor-mediated signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Urban, Jonathan D; Vargas, Gabriel A; von Zastrow, Mark; Mailman, Richard B

    2007-01-01

    Aripiprazole is a unique atypical antipsychotic drug with an excellent side-effect profile presumed, in part, to be due to lack of typical D(2) dopamine receptor antagonist properties. Whether aripiprazole is a typical D(2) partial agonist, or a functionally selective D(2) ligand, remains controversial (eg D(2)-mediated inhibition of adenylate cyclase is system dependent; aripiprazole antagonizes D(2) receptor-mediated G-protein-coupled inwardly rectifying potassium channels and guanosine triphosphate nucleotide (GTP)gammaS coupling). The current study examined the D(2L) receptor binding properties of aripiprazole, as well as the effects of the drug on three downstream D(2) receptor-mediated functional effectors: mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation, potentiation of arachidonic acid (AA) release, and D(2) receptor internalization. Unlike quinpirole (a full D(2) agonist) or (-)3PPP (S(-)-3-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-N-propylpiperidine hydrochloride, a D(2) partial agonist), the apparent D(2) affinity of aripiprazole was not decreased significantly by GTP. Moreover, full or partial agonists are expected to have Hill slopes <1.0, yet that of aripiprazole was significantly >1.0. Whereas aripiprazole partially activated both the MAPK and AA pathways, its potency vs MAPK phosphorylation was much lower relative to potencies in assays either of AA release or inhibition of cyclic adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate accumulation. In addition, unlike typical agonists, neither aripiprazole nor (-)3PPP produced significant internalization of the D(2L) receptor. These data are clear evidence that aripiprazole affects D(2L)-mediated signaling pathways in a differential manner. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that aripiprazole is a functionally selective D(2) ligand rather than a simple partial agonist. Such data may be useful in understanding the novel clinical actions of this drug.

  5. Multifocal fluorescence microscope for fast optical recordings of neuronal action potentials.

    PubMed

    Shtrahman, Matthew; Aharoni, Daniel B; Hardy, Nicholas F; Buonomano, Dean V; Arisaka, Katsushi; Otis, Thomas S

    2015-02-01

    In recent years, optical sensors for tracking neural activity have been developed and offer great utility. However, developing microscopy techniques that have several kHz bandwidth necessary to reliably capture optically reported action potentials (APs) at multiple locations in parallel remains a significant challenge. To our knowledge, we describe a novel microscope optimized to measure spatially distributed optical signals with submillisecond and near diffraction-limit resolution. Our design uses a spatial light modulator to generate patterned illumination to simultaneously excite multiple user-defined targets. A galvanometer driven mirror in the emission path streaks the fluorescence emanating from each excitation point during the camera exposure, using unused camera pixels to capture time varying fluorescence at rates that are ∼1000 times faster than the camera's native frame rate. We demonstrate that this approach is capable of recording Ca(2+) transients resulting from APs in neurons labeled with the Ca(2+) sensor Oregon Green Bapta-1 (OGB-1), and can localize the timing of these events with millisecond resolution. Furthermore, optically reported APs can be detected with the voltage sensitive dye DiO-DPA in multiple locations within a neuron with a signal/noise ratio up to ∼40, resolving delays in arrival time along dendrites. Thus, the microscope provides a powerful tool for photometric measurements of dynamics requiring submillisecond sampling at multiple locations.

  6. Multifocal fluorescence microscope for fast optical recordings of neuronal action potentials.

    PubMed

    Shtrahman, Matthew; Aharoni, Daniel B; Hardy, Nicholas F; Buonomano, Dean V; Arisaka, Katsushi; Otis, Thomas S

    2015-02-01

    In recent years, optical sensors for tracking neural activity have been developed and offer great utility. However, developing microscopy techniques that have several kHz bandwidth necessary to reliably capture optically reported action potentials (APs) at multiple locations in parallel remains a significant challenge. To our knowledge, we describe a novel microscope optimized to measure spatially distributed optical signals with submillisecond and near diffraction-limit resolution. Our design uses a spatial light modulator to generate patterned illumination to simultaneously excite multiple user-defined targets. A galvanometer driven mirror in the emission path streaks the fluorescence emanating from each excitation point during the camera exposure, using unused camera pixels to capture time varying fluorescence at rates that are ∼1000 times faster than the camera's native frame rate. We demonstrate that this approach is capable of recording Ca(2+) transients resulting from APs in neurons labeled with the Ca(2+) sensor Oregon Green Bapta-1 (OGB-1), and can localize the timing of these events with millisecond resolution. Furthermore, optically reported APs can be detected with the voltage sensitive dye DiO-DPA in multiple locations within a neuron with a signal/noise ratio up to ∼40, resolving delays in arrival time along dendrites. Thus, the microscope provides a powerful tool for photometric measurements of dynamics requiring submillisecond sampling at multiple locations. PMID:25650920

  7. Alteration of neural action potential patterns by axonal stimulation: the importance of stimulus location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crago, Patrick E.; Makowski, Nathaniel S.

    2014-10-01

    Objective. Stimulation of peripheral nerves is often superimposed on ongoing motor and sensory activity in the same axons, without a quantitative model of the net action potential train at the axon endpoint. Approach. We develop a model of action potential patterns elicited by superimposing constant frequency axonal stimulation on the action potentials arriving from a physiologically activated neural source. The model includes interactions due to collision block, resetting of the neural impulse generator, and the refractory period of the axon at the point of stimulation. Main results. Both the mean endpoint firing rate and the probability distribution of the action potential firing periods depend strongly on the relative firing rates of the two sources and the intersite conduction time between them. When the stimulus rate exceeds the neural rate, neural action potentials do not reach the endpoint and the rate of endpoint action potentials is the same as the stimulus rate, regardless of the intersite conduction time. However, when the stimulus rate is less than the neural rate, and the intersite conduction time is short, the two rates partially sum. Increases in stimulus rate produce non-monotonic increases in endpoint rate and continuously increasing block of neurally generated action potentials. Rate summation is reduced and more neural action potentials are blocked as the intersite conduction time increases. At long intersite conduction times, the endpoint rate simplifies to being the maximum of either the neural or the stimulus rate. Significance. This study highlights the potential of increasing the endpoint action potential rate and preserving neural information transmission by low rate stimulation with short intersite conduction times. Intersite conduction times can be decreased with proximal stimulation sites for muscles and distal stimulation sites for sensory endings. The model provides a basis for optimizing experiments and designing neuroprosthetic

  8. Alteration of neural action potential patterns by axonal stimulation: the importance of stimulus location

    PubMed Central

    Crago, Patrick E; Makowski, Nathan S

    2014-01-01

    Objective Stimulation of peripheral nerves is often superimposed on ongoing motor and sensory activity in the same axons, without a quantitative model of the net action potential train at the axon endpoint. Approach We develop a model of action potential patterns elicited by superimposing constant frequency axonal stimulation on the action potentials arriving from a physiologically activated neural source. The model includes interactions due to collision block, resetting of the neural impulse generator, and the refractory period of the axon at the point of stimulation. Main Results Both the mean endpoint firing rate and the probability distribution of the action potential firing periods depend strongly on the relative firing rates of the two sources and the intersite conduction time between them. When the stimulus rate exceeds the neural rate, neural action potentials do not reach the endpoint and the rate of endpoint action potentials is the same as the stimulus rate, regardless of the intersite conduction time. However, when the stimulus rate is less than the neural rate, and the intersite conduction time is short, the two rates partially sum. Increases in stimulus rate produce non-monotonic increases in endpoint rate and continuously increasing block of neurally generated action potentials. Rate summation is reduced and more neural action potentials are blocked as the intersite conduction time increases.. At long intersite conduction times, the endpoint rate simplifies to being the maximum of either the neural or the stimulus rate. Significance This study highlights the potential of increasing the endpoint action potential rate and preserving neural information transmission by low rate stimulation with short intersite conduction times. Intersite conduction times can be decreased with proximal stimulation sites for muscles and distal stimulation sites for sensory endings. The model provides a basis for optimizing experiments and designing neuroprosthetic

  9. Analytic treatment of the compound action potential: Estimating the summed post-stimulus time histogram and unit response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chertoff, Mark E.

    2004-11-01

    The convolution of an equation representing a summed post-stimulus time histogram computed across auditory nerve fibers [P(t)] with an equation representing a single-unit wave form [U(t)], resulted in an analytic expression for the compound action potential (CAP). The solution was fit to CAPs recorded to low and high frequency stimuli at various signal levels. The correlation between the CAP and the analytic expression was generally greater than 0.90. At high levels the width of P(t) was broader for low frequency stimuli than for high frequency signals, but delays were comparable. This indicates that at high signal levels there is an overlap in the population of auditory nerve fibers contributing to the CAP for both low and high frequency stimuli but low frequencies include contributions from more apical regions. At low signal levels the width of P(t) decreased for most frequencies and delays increased. The frequency of oscillation of U(t) was largest for high frequency stimuli and decreased for low frequency stimuli. The decay of U(t) was largest at 8 kHz and smallest at 1 kHz. These results indicate that the hair cell or neural mechanisms involved in the generation of action potentials may differ along the cochlear partition. .

  10. Cell-type-dependent action potentials and voltage-gated currents in mouse fungiform taste buds.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Kenji; Ohtubo, Yoshitaka; Tateno, Katsumi; Takeuchi, Keita; Kumazawa, Takashi; Yoshii, Kiyonori

    2014-01-01

    Taste receptor cells fire action potentials in response to taste substances to trigger non-exocytotic neurotransmitter release in type II cells and exocytotic release in type III cells. We investigated possible differences between these action potentials fired by mouse taste receptor cells using in situ whole-cell recordings, and subsequently we identified their cell types immunologically with cell-type markers, an IP3 receptor (IP3 R3) for type II cells and a SNARE protein (SNAP-25) for type III cells. Cells not immunoreactive to these antibodies were examined as non-IRCs. Here, we show that type II cells and type III cells fire action potentials using different ionic mechanisms, and that non-IRCs also fire action potentials with either of the ionic mechanisms. The width of action potentials was significantly narrower and their afterhyperpolarization was deeper in type III cells than in type II cells. Na(+) current density was similar in type II cells and type III cells, but it was significantly smaller in non-IRCs than in the others. Although outwardly rectifying current density was similar between type II cells and type III cells, tetraethylammonium (TEA) preferentially suppressed the density in type III cells and the majority of non-IRCs. Our mathematical model revealed that the shape of action potentials depended on the ratio of TEA-sensitive current density and TEA-insensitive current one. The action potentials of type II cells and type III cells under physiological conditions are discussed.

  11. Potential synergy of phytochemicals in cancer prevention: mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui Hai

    2004-12-01

    Epidemiological studies have consistently shown that regular consumption of fruits and vegetables is strongly associated with reduced risk of developing chronic diseases, such as cancer and cardiovascular disease. It is now widely believed that the actions of the antioxidant nutrients alone do not explain the observed health benefits of diets rich in fruits and vegetables, because taken alone, the individual antioxidants studied in clinical trials do not appear to have consistent preventive effects. Work performed by our group and others has shown that fruits and vegetable phytochemical extracts exhibit strong antioxidant and antiproliferative activities and that the major part of total antioxidant activity is from the combination of phytochemicals. We proposed that the additive and synergistic effects of phytochemicals in fruits and vegetables are responsible for these potent antioxidant and anticancer activities and that the benefit of a diet rich in fruits and vegetables is attributed to the complex mixture of phytochemicals present in whole foods. This explains why no single antioxidant can replace the combination of natural phytochemicals in fruits and vegetables to achieve the health benefits. The evidence suggests that antioxidants or bioactive compounds are best acquired through whole-food consumption, not from expensive dietary supplements. We believe that a recommendation that consumers eat 5 to 10 servings of a wide variety of fruits and vegetables daily is an appropriate strategy for significantly reducing the risk of chronic diseases and to meet their nutrient requirements for optimum health.

  12. Developmental changes in the inward current of the action potential of Rohon-Beard neurones

    PubMed Central

    Baccaglini, Paola I.; Spitzer, Nicholas C.

    1977-01-01

    1. Rohon-Beard cells in the spinal cord of Xenopus tadpoles have been studied in animals from early neural tube to free-swimming larval stages. The onset and further development of electrical excitability of these neurones has been investigated in different ionic environments, to determine the ionic species carrying the inward current of the action potential. 2. The cells appear inexcitable at early stages (Nieuwkoop & Faber stages 18-20) and do not give action potentials to depolarizing current pulses. 3. The action potential is first recorded at stage 20. (A) The inward current is carried by Ca2+ at stages 20-25, since it is blocked by mm quantitites of La3+, Co2+ or Mn2+ and is unaffected by removal of Na+ or the addition of tetrodotoxin (TTX). (B) The action potential is an elevated plateau of long duration (mean 190 msec at stages 20-22). The duration decreases exponentially with repetitive stimulation. (C) The specific Ca2+ conductance (gCa) at the onset of the plateau of the action potential is 2·6 × 10-4 mho/cm2. Calculations show that a single action potential raises [Ca2+]1 by more than 100-fold. 4. At later times (stages 25-40), the inward current of the action potential is carried by both Na+ and Ca2+: the action potential has two components, an initial spike which is blocked by removal of Na+ or addition of TTX, followed by a plateau which is blocked by La3+, Co2+ or Mn2+. 5. Finally (stages 40-51), the inward current is primarily carried by Na+, since the action potential is blocked only by removal of Na+ or addition of TTX, and the overshoot agrees with the prediction of the Nernst equation for a Na-selective membrane. When the outward current channel is blocked and cells exposed to Na-free solutions, 67% of cells at the latest stages studied were incapable of producing action potentials in which the inward current is carried by divalent cations. 6. The duration of the action potential decreases from a maximum of about 1000 msec to about 1 msec

  13. Loss of Local Astrocyte Support Disrupts Action Potential Propagation and Glutamate Release Synchrony from Unmyelinated Hippocampal Axon Terminals In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Sobieski, Courtney; Jiang, Xiaoping; Crawford, Devon C.

    2015-01-01

    Neuron–astrocyte interactions are critical for proper CNS development and function. Astrocytes secrete factors that are pivotal for synaptic development and function, neuronal metabolism, and neuronal survival. Our understanding of this relationship, however, remains incomplete due to technical hurdles that have prevented the removal of astrocytes from neuronal circuits without changing other important conditions. Here we overcame this obstacle by growing solitary rat hippocampal neurons on microcultures that were comprised of either an astrocyte bed (+astrocyte) or a collagen bed (−astrocyte) within the same culture dish. −Astrocyte autaptic evoked EPSCs, but not IPSCs, displayed an altered temporal profile, which included increased synaptic delay, increased time to peak, and severe glutamate release asynchrony, distinct from previously described quantal asynchrony. Although we observed minimal alteration of the somatically recorded action potential waveform, action potential propagation was altered. We observed a longer latency between somatic initiation and arrival at distal locations, which likely explains asynchronous EPSC peaks, and we observed broadening of the axonal spike, which likely underlies changes to evoked EPSC onset. No apparent changes in axon structure were observed, suggesting altered axonal excitability. In conclusion, we propose that local astrocyte support has an unappreciated role in maintaining glutamate release synchrony by disturbing axonal signal propagation. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Certain glial cell types (oligodendrocytes, Schwann cells) facilitate the propagation of neuronal electrical signals, but a role for astrocytes has not been identified despite many other functions of astrocytes in supporting and modulating neuronal signaling. Under identical global conditions, we cultured neurons with or without local astrocyte support. Without local astrocytes, glutamate transmission was desynchronized by an alteration of the waveform

  14. Islet amyloid polypeptide exerts a novel autocrine action in β-cell signaling and proliferation.

    PubMed

    Visa, Montse; Alcarraz-Vizán, Gema; Montane, Joel; Cadavez, Lisa; Castaño, Carlos; Villanueva-Peñacarrillo, María Luisa; Servitja, Joan-Marc; Novials, Anna

    2015-07-01

    The toxic effects of human islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) on pancreatic islets have been widely studied. However, much less attention has been paid to the physiologic actions of IAPP on pancreatic β cells, which secrete this peptide together with insulin upon glucose stimulation. Here, we aimed to explore the signaling pathways and mitogenic actions of IAPP on β cells. We show that IAPP activated Erk1/2 and v-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog 1 (Akt) at the picomolar range (10-100 pM) in mouse pancreatic islets and MIN6 β cells cultured at low glucose concentrations. In contrast, IAPP decreased the induction of these pathways by high glucose levels. Consistently, IAPP induced a 1.7-fold increase of β-cell proliferation at low-glucose conditions, whereas it reduced β-cell proliferation at high glucose levels. Strikingly, the specific antagonist of the IAPP receptor AC187 (100 nM) decreased the activation of Erk1/2 and Akt and reduced β-cell proliferation by 24% in glucose-stimulated β cells, uncovering a key role of endogenously released IAPP in β-cell responses to glucose. We conclude that exogenously added IAPP exerts a dual effect on β-cell mitogenic signaling and proliferation, depending on the glucose concentration. Importantly, secreted IAPP contributes to the signaling and mitogenic response of β cells to glucose through an autocrine mechanism.

  15. Lactate promotes plasticity gene expression by potentiating NMDA signaling in neurons

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jiangyan; Ruchti, Evelyne; Petit, Jean-Marie; Jourdain, Pascal; Grenningloh, Gabriele; Allaman, Igor; Magistretti, Pierre J.

    2014-01-01

    l-lactate is a product of aerobic glycolysis that can be used by neurons as an energy substrate. Here we report that in neurons l-lactate stimulates the expression of synaptic plasticity-related genes such as Arc, c-Fos, and Zif268 through a mechanism involving NMDA receptor activity and its downstream signaling cascade Erk1/2. l-lactate potentiates NMDA receptor-mediated currents and the ensuing increase in intracellular calcium. In parallel to this, l-lactate increases intracellular levels of NADH, thereby modulating the redox state of neurons. NADH mimics all of the effects of l-lactate on NMDA signaling, pointing to NADH increase as a primary mediator of l-lactate effects. The induction of plasticity genes is observed both in mouse primary neurons in culture and in vivo in the mouse sensory-motor cortex. These results provide insights for the understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the critical role of astrocyte-derived l-lactate in long-term memory and long-term potentiation in vivo. This set of data reveals a previously unidentified action of l-lactate as a signaling molecule for neuronal plasticity. PMID:25071212

  16. Evaluating the noise in electrically evoked compound action potential measurements in cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Undurraga, Jaime A; Carlyon, Robert P; Wouters, Jan; van Wieringen, Astrid

    2012-07-01

    Electrically evoked compound action potentials (ECAPs) are widely used to study the excitability of the auditory nerve and stimulation properties in cochlear implant (CI) users. However, ECAP detection can be difficult and very subjective at near-threshold stimulation levels or in spread of excitation measurements. In this study, we evaluated the statistical properties of the background noise (BN) and the postaverage residual noise (RN) in ECAP measurements in order to determine an objective detection criterion. For the estimation of the BN and the RN, a method currently used in auditory brainstem response measurements was applied. The potential benefit of using weighted (Bayesian) averages was also examined. All estimations were performed with a set of approximately 360 ECAP measurements recorded from five human CI users of the CII or HiRes90K device (advanced bionics). Results demonstrated that the BN was normally distributed and the RN decreased according to the square root of the number of averages. No additional benefit was observed by using weighted averaging. The noise was not significantly different either at different stimulation intensities or across recording electrodes along the cochlea. The analysis of the statistical properties of the noise indicated that a signal-to-noise ratio of 1.7 dB as a detection criterion corresponds to a false positive detection rate of 1% with the used measurement setup.

  17. Is action potential duration of the intact dog heart related to contractility or stimulus rate?

    PubMed

    Drake, A J; Noble, M I; Schouten, V; Seed, A; Ter Keurs, H E; Wohlfart, B

    1982-10-01

    1. The contractility (maximum rate of rise of left ventricular pressure) and action potential duration were measured in intact closed-chest anaesthetized dogs with complete atrioventricular dissociation and beta-adrenergic blockade.2. Measurements were confined to test beats following a 1 sec interval. Prior to the test interval (priming period) a variety of potentiating stimulus trains were introduced.3. When the frequency of stimulation was increased in the priming period (frequency potentiation), there was an inverse relationship between action potential duration and contractility of the test beat.4. When the test beat was potentiated by a single beat terminating the priming period with one short interval (post-extrasystolic potentiation), there was no relationship between the action potential duration and contractility of the test beat.5. Paired pulse stimulation was used for any given frequency to vary contractility by short interval potentiation. For any given frequency of stimulation there was no relationship between action potential duration and contractility of the test beat. For any given value of contractility, action potential duration decreased with increased frequency of stimulation.6. The introduction of a high frequency train caused a step decrease in action potential duration on the first beat of the train. This was followed by a further slow decline in action potential duration with a time course of over 3 min. These two changes could be dissociated by the introduction during the train of one second interval test pulses, which only showed the slow shortening.7. The lack of a consistent relationship between action potential duration and contractility of the test beat disagrees with the hypothesis that repolarization is controlled by the activator calcium responsible for the contractility. The action potential shortening associated with increased frequency is related to the frequency change per se.8. The slow time course of change in action

  18. Encoding for computation: Recognizing brief dynamical patterns by exploiting effects of weak rhythms on action-potential timing

    PubMed Central

    Hopfield, J. J.

    2004-01-01

    Many stimuli have meaning only as patterns over time. Most auditory and many visual stimuli are of this nature and can be described as multidimensional, time-dependent vectors. A simple neuron can encode a single component of the vector in a firing rate. The addition of a small subthreshold oscillatory current perturbs the action-potential timing, encoding the signal also in a timing relationship, with little effect on the coexisting firing rate representation. When the subthreshold signal is common to a group of neurons, the timing-based information is significant to neurons receiving inputs from the group. This information encoding allows simple implementation of computations not readily done with rate coding. These ideas are examined by using speech to provide a realistic input signal to a biologically inspired model network of spiking neurons. The output neurons of the two-layer system are shown to specifically encode short linguistic elements of speech. PMID:15075391

  19. Molecular actions and therapeutic potential of lithium in preclinical and clinical studies of CNS disorders.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Chi-Tso; Chuang, De-Maw

    2010-11-01

    Lithium has been used clinically to treat bipolar disorder for over half a century, and remains a fundamental pharmacological therapy for patients with this illness. Although lithium's therapeutic mechanisms are not fully understood, substantial in vitro and in vivo evidence suggests that it has neuroprotective/neurotrophic properties against various insults, and considerable clinical potential for the treatment of several neurodegenerative conditions. Evidence from pharmacological and gene manipulation studies support the notion that glycogen synthase kinase-3 inhibition and induction of brain-derived neurotrophic factor-mediated signaling are lithium's main mechanisms of action, leading to enhanced cell survival pathways and alteration of a wide variety of downstream effectors. By inhibiting N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-mediated calcium influx, lithium also contributes to calcium homeostasis and suppresses calcium-dependent activation of pro-apoptotic signaling pathways. In addition, lithium decreases inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate by inhibiting phosphoinositol phosphatases, a process recently identified as a novel mechanism for inducing autophagy. Through these mechanisms, therapeutic doses of lithium have been demonstrated to defend neuronal cells against diverse forms of death insults and to improve behavioral as well as cognitive deficits in various animal models of neurodegenerative diseases, including stroke, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, fragile X syndrome, as well as Huntington's, Alzheimer's, and Parkinson's diseases, among others. Several clinical trials are also underway to assess the therapeutic effects of lithium for treating these disorders. This article reviews the most recent findings regarding the potential targets involved in lithium's neuroprotective effects, and the implication of these findings for the treatment of a variety of diseases.

  20. Molecular actions and therapeutic potential of lithium in preclinical and clinical studies of CNS disorders

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Chi-Tso; Chuang, De-Maw

    2011-01-01

    Lithium has been used clinically to treat bipolar disorder for over half a century, and remains a fundamental pharmacological therapy for patients with this illness. Although lithium’s therapeutic mechanisms are not fully understood, substantial in vitro and in vivo evidence suggests that it has neuroprotective/neurotrophic properties against various insults, and considerable clinical potential for the treatment of several neurodegenerative conditions. Evidence from pharmacological and gene manipulation studies support the notion that glycogen synthase kinase-3 inhibition and induction of brain-derived neurotrophic factor-mediated signaling are lithium’s main mechanisms of action, leading to enhanced cell survival pathways and alteration of a wide variety of downstream effectors. By inhibiting N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-mediated calcium influx, lithium also contributes to calcium homeostasis and suppresses calcium-dependent activation of pro-apoptotic signaling pathways. In addition, lithium decreases inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate by inhibiting phosphoinositol phosphatases, a process recently identified as a novel mechanism for inducing autophagy. Through these mechanisms, therapeutic doses of lithium have been demonstrated to defend neuronal cells against diverse forms of death insults and to improve behavioral as well as cognitive deficits in various animal models of neurodegenerative diseases, including stroke, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, fragile X syndrome, as well as Huntington’s, Alzheimer’s, and Parkinson’s diseases, among others. Several clinical trials are also underway to assess the therapeutic effects of lithium for treating these disorders. This article reviews the most recent findings regarding the potential targets involved in lithium’s neuroprotective effects, and the implication of these findings for the treatment of a variety of diseases. PMID:20705090

  1. Systematic identification of signaling pathways with potential to confer anticancer drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Martz, Colin A; Ottina, Kathleen A; Singleton, Katherine R; Jasper, Jeff S; Wardell, Suzanne E; Peraza-Penton, Ashley; Anderson, Grace R; Winter, Peter S; Wang, Tim; Alley, Holly M; Kwong, Lawrence N; Cooper, Zachary A; Tetzlaff, Michael; Chen, Pei-Ling; Rathmell, Jeffrey C; Flaherty, Keith T; Wargo, Jennifer A; McDonnell, Donald P; Sabatini, David M; Wood, Kris C

    2014-12-23

    Cancer cells can activate diverse signaling pathways to evade the cytotoxic action of drugs. We created and screened a library of barcoded pathway-activating mutant complementary DNAs to identify those that enhanced the survival of cancer cells in the presence of 13 clinically relevant, targeted therapies. We found that activation of the RAS-MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase), Notch1, PI3K (phosphoinositide 3-kinase)-mTOR (mechanistic target of rapamycin), and ER (estrogen receptor) signaling pathways often conferred resistance to this selection of drugs. Activation of the Notch1 pathway promoted acquired resistance to tamoxifen (an ER-targeted therapy) in serially passaged breast cancer xenografts in mice, and treating mice with a γ-secretase inhibitor to inhibit Notch signaling restored tamoxifen sensitivity. Markers of Notch1 activity in tumor tissue correlated with resistance to tamoxifen in breast cancer patients. Similarly, activation of Notch1 signaling promoted acquired resistance to MAPK inhibitors in BRAF(V600E) melanoma cells in culture, and the abundance of Notch1 pathway markers was increased in tumors from a subset of melanoma patients. Thus, Notch1 signaling may be a therapeutic target in some drug-resistant breast cancers and melanomas. Additionally, multiple resistance pathways were activated in melanoma cell lines with intrinsic resistance to MAPK inhibitors, and simultaneous inhibition of these pathways synergistically induced drug sensitivity. These data illustrate the potential for systematic identification of the signaling pathways controlling drug resistance that could inform clinical strategies and drug development for multiple types of cancer. This approach may also be used to advance clinical options in other disease contexts. PMID:25538079

  2. High-Bandwidth Atomic Force Microscopy Reveals A Mechanical spike Accompanying the Action Potential in mammalian Nerve Terminals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salzberg, Brian M.

    2008-03-01

    Information transfer from neuron to neuron within nervous systems occurs when the action potential arrives at a nerve terminal and initiates the release of a chemical messenger (neurotransmitter). In the mammalian neurohypophysis (posterior pituitary), large and rapid changes in light scattering accompany secretion of transmitter-like neuropeptides. In the mouse, these intrinsic optical signals are intimately related to the arrival of the action potential (E-wave) and the release of arginine vasopressin and oxytocin (S-wave). We have used a high bandwidth (20 kHz) atomic force microscope (AFM) to demonstrate that these light scattering signals are associated with changes in nerve terminal volume, detected as nanometer-scale movements of a cantilever positioned on top of the neurohypophysis. The most rapid mechanical response, the ``spike'', has duration comparable to that of the action potential (˜2 ms) and probably reflects an increase in terminal volume due to H2O movement associated with Na^+-influx. Elementary calculations suggest that two H2O molecules accompanying each Na^+-ion could account for the ˜0.5-1.0 å increase in the diameter of each terminal during the action potential. Distinguishable from the mechanical ``spike'', a slower mechanical event, the ``dip'', represents a decrease in nerve terminal volume, depends upon Ca^2+-entry, as well as on intra-terminal Ca^2+-transients, and appears to monitor events associated with secretion. A simple hypothesis is that this ``dip'' reflects the extrusion of the dense core granule that comprises the secretory products. These dynamic high bandwidth AFM recordings are the first to monitor mechanical events in nervous systems and may provide novel insights into the mechanism(s) by which excitation is coupled to secretion at nerve terminals.

  3. Chloride current in mammalian cardiac myocytes. Novel mechanism for autonomic regulation of action potential duration and resting membrane potential

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    The properties of the autonomically regulated chloride current (ICl) were studied in isolated guinea pig ventricular myocytes. This current was elicited upon exposure to isoproterenol (ISO) and reversed upon concurrent exposure to acetylcholine (ACh). ICl was time independent and exhibited outward rectification. The responses to ISO and ACh could be blocked by propranolol and atropine, respectively, and ICl was also elicited by forskolin, 8-bromoadenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate, and 3-isobutyl-l-methylxanthine, indicating that the current is regulated through a cAMP-dependent pathway. The reversal potential of the ISO- induced current followed the predicted chloride equilibrium potential, consistent with it being carried predominantly by Cl-. Activation of ICl produced changes in the resting membrane potential and action potential duration, which were Cl- gradient dependent. These results indicate that under physiological conditions ICl may play an important role in regulating action potential duration and resting membrane potential in mammalian cardiac myocytes. PMID:2165130

  4. Topiramate treatment improves hypothalamic insulin and leptin signaling and action and reduces obesity in mice.

    PubMed

    Caricilli, Andrea M; Penteado, Erica; de Abreu, Lélia L; Quaresma, Paula G F; Santos, Andressa C; Guadagnini, Dioze; Razolli, Daniella; Mittestainer, Francine C; Carvalheira, Jose B; Velloso, Licio A; Saad, Mario J A; Prada, Patricia O

    2012-09-01

    Topiramate (TPM) treatment has been shown to reduce adiposity in humans and rodents. The reduction in adiposity is related to decreased food intake and increased energy expenditure. However, the molecular mechanisms through which TPM induces weight loss are contradictory and remain to be clarified. Whether TPM treatment alters hypothalamic insulin, or leptin signaling and action, is not well established. Thus, we investigate herein whether short-term TPM treatment alters energy balance by affecting insulin and leptin signaling, action, or neuropeptide expression in the hypothalamus of mice fed with a high-fat diet. As expected, short-term treatment with TPM diminished adiposity in obese mice mainly due to reduced food intake. TPM increased anorexigenic signaling by enhancing the leptin-induced leptin receptor/Janus kinase 2/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 pathway and the insulin-induced insulin receptor substrate/Akt/forkhead box O1 pathway in parallel to reduced phosphatase protein expression in the hypothalamus of obese mice. These effects were independent of body weight. TPM also raised anorexigenic neuropeptides such as POMC, TRH, and CRH mRNA levels in obese mice. In addition, TPM increased the activation of the hypothalamic MAPK/ERK pathway induced by leptin, accompanied by an increase in peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-coactivator α and uncoupling protein 1 protein levels in brown adipose tissue. Furthermore, TPM increased AMP-activated protein kinase and acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase phosphorylation in peripheral tissues, which may help improve energy metabolism in these tissues. Together, these results provide novel insights into the molecular mechanisms through which TPM treatment reduces adiposity.

  5. Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder: Potential Role of Endocannabinoids Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Basavarajappa, Balapal S.

    2015-01-01

    One of the unique features of prenatal alcohol exposure in humans is impaired cognitive and behavioral function resulting from damage to the central nervous system (CNS), which leads to a spectrum of impairments referred to as fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD). Human FASD phenotypes can be reproduced in the rodent CNS following prenatal ethanol exposure. Several mechanisms are expected to contribute to the detrimental effects of prenatal alcohol exposure on the developing fetus, particularly in the developing CNS. These mechanisms may act simultaneously or consecutively and differ among a variety of cell types at specific developmental stages in particular brain regions. Studies have identified numerous potential mechanisms through which alcohol can act on the fetus. Among these mechanisms are increased oxidative stress, mitochondrial damage, interference with the activity of growth factors, glia cells, cell adhesion molecules, gene expression during CNS development and impaired function of signaling molecules involved in neuronal communication and circuit formation. These alcohol-induced deficits result in long-lasting abnormalities in neuronal plasticity and learning and memory and can explain many of the neurobehavioral abnormalities found in FASD. In this review, the author discusses the mechanisms that are associated with FASD and provides a current status on the endocannabinoid system in the development of FASD. PMID:26529026

  6. All optical experimental design for neuron excitation, inhibition, and action potential detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Alex J.; Tolstykh, Gleb; Martens, Stacey; Sedelnikova, Anna; Ibey, Bennett L.; Beier, Hope T.

    2016-03-01

    Recently, infrared light has been shown to both stimulate and inhibit excitatory cells. However, studies of infrared light for excitatory cell inhibition have been constrained by the use of invasive and cumbersome electrodes for cell excitation and action potential recording. Here, we present an all optical experimental design for neuronal excitation, inhibition, and action potential detection. Primary rat neurons were transfected with plasmids containing the light sensitive ion channel CheRiff. CheRiff has a peak excitation around 450 nm, allowing excitation of transfected neurons with pulsed blue light. Additionally, primary neurons were transfected with QuasAr2, a fast and sensitive fluorescent voltage indicator. QuasAr2 is excited with yellow or red light and therefore does not spectrally overlap CheRiff, enabling imaging and action potential activation, simultaneously. Using an optic fiber, neurons were exposed to blue light sequentially to generate controlled action potentials. A second optic fiber delivered a single pulse of 1869nm light to the neuron causing inhibition of the evoked action potentials (by the blue light). When used in concert, these optical techniques enable electrode free neuron excitation, inhibition, and action potential recording, allowing research into neuronal behaviors with high spatial fidelity.

  7. Deciphering Signaling Pathway Networks to Understand the Molecular Mechanisms of Metformin Action

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jingchun; Zhao, Min; Jia, Peilin; Wang, Lily; Wu, Yonghui; Iverson, Carissa; Zhou, Yubo; Bowton, Erica; Roden, Dan M.; Denny, Joshua C.; Aldrich, Melinda C.; Xu, Hua; Zhao, Zhongming

    2015-01-01

    A drug exerts its effects typically through a signal transduction cascade, which is non-linear and involves intertwined networks of multiple signaling pathways. Construction of such a signaling pathway network (SPNetwork) can enable identification of novel drug targets and deep understanding of drug action. However, it is challenging to synopsize critical components of these interwoven pathways into one network. To tackle this issue, we developed a novel computational framework, the Drug-specific Signaling Pathway Network (DSPathNet). The DSPathNet amalgamates the prior drug knowledge and drug-induced gene expression via random walk algorithms. Using the drug metformin, we illustrated this framework and obtained one metformin-specific SPNetwork containing 477 nodes and 1,366 edges. To evaluate this network, we performed the gene set enrichment analysis using the disease genes of type 2 diabetes (T2D) and cancer, one T2D genome-wide association study (GWAS) dataset, three cancer GWAS datasets, and one GWAS dataset of cancer patients with T2D on metformin. The results showed that the metformin network was significantly enriched with disease genes for both T2D and cancer, and that the network also included genes that may be associated with metformin-associated cancer survival. Furthermore, from the metformin SPNetwork and common genes to T2D and cancer, we generated a subnetwork to highlight the molecule crosstalk between T2D and cancer. The follow-up network analyses and literature mining revealed that seven genes (CDKN1A, ESR1, MAX, MYC, PPARGC1A, SP1, and STK11) and one novel MYC-centered pathway with CDKN1A, SP1, and STK11 might play important roles in metformin’s antidiabetic and anticancer effects. Some results are supported by previous studies. In summary, our study 1) develops a novel framework to construct drug-specific signal transduction networks; 2) provides insights into the molecular mode of metformin; 3) serves a model for exploring signaling pathways

  8. Phosphodiesterase-5 Inhibitors: Action on the Signaling Pathways of Neuroinflammation, Neurodegeneration, and Cognition

    PubMed Central

    Peixoto, Christina Alves; Nunes, Ana Karolina Santana; Garcia-Osta, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors (PDE5-Is) have recently emerged as a potential therapeutic strategy for neuroinflammatory, neurodegenerative, and memory loss diseases. Mechanistically, PDE5-Is produce an anti-inflammatory and neuroprotection effect by increasing expression of nitric oxide synthases and accumulation of cGMP and activating protein kinase G (PKG), the signaling pathway of which is thought to play an important role in the development of several neurodiseases, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), and multiple sclerosis (MS). The aim of this paper was to review present knowledge of the signaling pathways that underlie the use of PDE5-Is in neuroinflammation, neurogenesis, learning, and memory. PMID:26770022

  9. Transient outward currents and action potential alterations in rabbit ventricular myocytes.

    PubMed

    Kawano, S; Hiraoka, M

    1991-06-01

    To clarify ionic mechanisms underlying successive changes in action potential repolarization upon sudden increase in driving rate or initiation of rapid drive after a rest, membrane potentials and currents were recorded from isolated rabbit ventricular myocytes using the suction-pipette whole-cell clamp method. When 20 action potentials were elicited with a stimulus frequency of 2.0 Hz after a rest period of 20 s, the plateau and action potential duration showed complex changes in successive beats, whereas they were nearly constant with stimulation at 0.1 Hz. There were only weak correlations between changes in action potential parameters and preceding diastolic intervals. The changes were prominent in the first 10 beats but subsided gradually thereafter, attaining nearly steady configurations of action potentials. When depolarizing pulses were applied at a fast rate, under the voltage clamp, the amplitudes of the initial inward current in the presence of tetrodotoxin changed greatly depending on the pulse numbers and diastolic intervals, whereas the delayed outward K+ current changed little. Variations of the initial inward current in successive pulses were caused by different degrees of activation and recovery from inactivation in the Ca2+ current, the Ca(2+)-sensitive and -insensitive transient outward current. While inhibition of either one or two current components decreased the action potential alterations, blocking the three components completely abolished them. These results indicate that alterations of the Ca(2+)-sensitive and -insensitive transient outward current together with the Ca2+ current contribute to the action potential alterations after initiation of rapid drive or an increase in driving rates.

  10. Opposing actions of angiopoietin-2 on Tie2 signaling and FOXO1 activation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Minah; Allen, Breanna; Korhonen, Emilia A; Nitschké, Maximilian; Yang, Hee Won; Baluk, Peter; Saharinen, Pipsa; Alitalo, Kari; Daly, Christopher; Thurston, Gavin; McDonald, Donald M

    2016-09-01

    Angiopoietin-2 (ANG2) regulates blood vessel remodeling in many pathological conditions through differential effects on Tie2 signaling. While ANG2 competes with ANG1 to inhibit Tie2, it can paradoxically also promote Tie2 phosphorylation (p-Tie2). A related paradox is that both inactivation and overactivation of Tie2 can result in vascular remodeling. Here, we reconciled these opposing actions of ANG2 by manipulating conditions that govern its actions in the vasculature. ANG2 drove vascular remodeling during Mycoplasma pulmonis infection by acting as a Tie2 antagonist, which led to p-Tie2 suppression, forkhead box O1 (FOXO1) activation, increased ANG2 expression, and vessel leakiness. These changes were exaggerated by anti-Tie2 antibody, inhibition of PI3K signaling, or ANG2 overexpression and were reduced by anti-ANG2 antibody or exogenous ANG1. In contrast, under pathogen-free conditions, ANG2 drove vascular remodeling by acting as an agonist, promoting high p-Tie2, low FOXO1 activation, and no leakage. Tie1 activation was strong under pathogen-free conditions, but infection or TNF-α led to Tie1 inactivation by ectodomain cleavage and promoted the Tie2 antagonist action of ANG2. Together, these data indicate that ANG2 activation of Tie2 supports stable enlargement of normal nonleaky vessels, but reduction of Tie1 in inflammation leads to ANG2 antagonism of Tie2 and initiates a positive feedback loop wherein FOXO1-driven ANG2 expression promotes vascular remodeling and leakage. PMID:27548529

  11. FTO contributes to hepatic metabolism regulation through regulation of leptin action and STAT3 signalling in liver

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The fat mass and obesity associated (FTO) gene is related to obesity and type 2 diabetes, but its function is still largely unknown. A link between leptin receptor-signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 (LepR-STAT3) signalling pathway and FTO was recently suggested in the hypothalamus. Because of the presence of FTO in liver and the role of LepR-STAT3 in the control of hepatic metabolism, we investigated both in vitro and in vivo the potential interrelationship between FTO and LepR-STAT3 signalling pathway in liver and the impact of FTO overexpression on leptin action and glucose homeostasis in liver of mice. Results We found that FTO protein expression is regulated by both leptin and IL-6, concomitantly to an induction of STAT3 tyrosine phosphorylation, in leptin receptor (LepRb) expressing HuH7 cells. In addition, FTO overexpression in vitro altered both leptin-induced Y705 and S727 STAT3 phosphorylation, leading to dysregulation of glucose-6-phosphatase (G6P) expression and mitochondrial density, respectively. In vivo, liver specific FTO overexpression in mice induced a reducetion of Y705 phosphorylation of STAT3 in nuclear fraction, associated with reduced SOCS3 and LepR mRNA levels and with an increased G6P expression. Interestingly, FTO overexpression also induced S727 STAT3 phosphorylation in liver mitochondria, resulting in an increase of mitochondria function and density. Altogether, these data indicate that FTO promotes mitochondrial recruitment of STAT3 to the detriment of its nuclear localization, affecting in turn oxidative metabolism and the expression of leptin-targeted genes. Interestingly, these effects were associated in mice with alterations of leptin action and hyperleptinemia, as well as hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia and glucose intolerance. Conclusions Altogether, these data point a novel regulatory loop between FTO and leptin-STAT3 signalling pathways in liver cells, and highlight a new role of FTO in the regulation

  12. The role of action potentials in determining neuron-type-specific responses to nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Estes, Stephen; Zhong, Lei Ray; Artinian, Liana; Tornieri, Karine; Rehder, Vincent

    2015-05-01

    The electrical activity in developing and mature neurons determines the intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i), which in turn is translated into biochemical activities through various signaling cascades. Electrical activity is under control of neuromodulators, which can alter neuronal responses to incoming signals and increase the fidelity of neuronal communication. Conversely, the effects of neuromodulators can depend on the ongoing electrical activity within target neurons; however, these activity-dependent effects of neuromodulators are less well understood. Here, we present evidence that the neuronal firing frequency and intrinsic properties of the action potential (AP) waveform set the [Ca(2+)]i in growth cones and determine how neurons respond to the neuromodulator nitric oxide (NO). We used two well-characterized neurons from the freshwater snail Helisoma trivolvis that show different growth cone morphological responses to NO: B5 neurons elongate filopodia, while those of B19 neurons do not. Combining whole-cell patch clamp recordings with simultaneous calcium imaging, we show that the duration of an AP contributes to neuron-specific differences in [Ca(2+)]i, with shorter APs in B19 neurons yielding lower growth cone [Ca(2+)]i. Through the partial inhibition of voltage-gated K(+) channels, we increased the B19 AP duration resulting in a significant increase in [Ca(2+)]i that was then sufficient to cause filopodial elongation following NO treatment. Our results demonstrate a neuron-type specific correlation between AP shape, [Ca(2+)]i, and growth cone motility, providing an explanation to how growth cone responses to guidance cues depend on intrinsic electrical properties and helping explain the diverse effects of NO across neuronal populations.

  13. Notch Signaling: A Potential Therapeutic Target for Hematologic Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Gao, Lingbao; Yuan, Keyu; Ding, Wei; Lin, Mei

    2016-01-01

    Notch signaling is a well-conserved cell-fate determining factor in embryo development, and the dyregulation of this signaling is frequently observed in many types of cancers, including hematological malignancies. In this review, we briefly describe the Notch signaling pathway, and we primarily focus on the relationship between Notch and hematological malignancies. We also discuss the clinical development of promising agents including γ-secretase inhibitors (GSIs) and monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Complete response has been observed among patients with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) when treated with GSIs. Furthermore, a recent study has suggested that targeting Zmiz1, a direct, selective cofactor of Notch1, rather than targeting Notch directly, maybe helpful to reduce the current target-related toxicities. Taken together, we summarize the role of Notch signaling in hematological malignancies and discuss the treatment strategies for these diseases through targeting Notch signaling. PMID:27650987

  14. A new three-variable mathematical model of action potential propagation in cardiac tissue.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenton, Flavio; Karma, Alain

    1996-03-01

    Modeling the electrical activity of the heart, and the complex signaling patterns which underly dangerous arrhythmias such as tachycardia and fibrillation, requires a quantitative model of action potential (AP) propagation. At present, there exist detailed ionic models of the Hodgkin-Huxley form that accurately reproduce dynamical features of the AP at a single cell level (e.g. Luo-Rudy, 1994). However, such models are not computationally tractable to study propagation in two and three-dimensional tissues of many resistively coupled cells. At the other extreme, there exists generic models of excitable media, such as the well-known FitzHugh-Nagumo model, which are only qualitative and do not reproduce essential dynamical features of cardiac AP. A new three-variable model is introduced which bridges the gap between these two types of models. It reproduces quantitatively important `mesoscopic' dynamical properties which are specific to cardiac AP, namely restitution and dispersion. At the same time, it remains computationally tractable and makes it possible to study the effect of these properties on the initiation, dynamics, and stability of complex reentrant excitations in two and three dimensions. Preliminary numerical results of the effect of restitution and dispersion on two-dimensional reentry (i.e. spiral waves) are presented.

  15. An Improved Genetically Encoded Red Fluorescent Ca2+ Indicator for Detecting Optically Evoked Action Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Chiaki; Ikegaya, Yuji; Nakai, Junichi

    2012-01-01

    Genetically encoded Ca2+ indicators (GECIs) are powerful tools to image activities of defined cell populations. Here, we developed an improved red fluorescent GECI, termed R-CaMP1.07, by mutagenizing R-GECO1. In HeLa cell assays, R-CaMP1.07 exhibited a 1.5–2-fold greater fluorescence response compared to R-GECO1. In hippocampal pyramidal neurons, R-CaMP1.07 detected Ca2+ transients triggered by single action potentials (APs) with a probability of 95% and a signal-to-noise ratio >7 at a frame rate of 50 Hz. The amplitudes of Ca2+ transients linearly correlated with the number of APs. The expression of R-CaMP1.07 did not significantly alter the electrophysiological properties or synaptic activity patterns. The co-expression of R-CaMP1.07 and channelrhodpsin-2 (ChR2), a photosensitive cation channel, in pyramidal neurons demonstrated that R-CaMP1.07 was applicable for the monitoring of Ca2+ transients in response to optically evoked APs, because the excitation light for R-CaMP1.07 hardly activated ChR2. These technical advancements provide a novel strategy for monitoring and manipulating neuronal activity with single cell resolution. PMID:22808076

  16. Increased Event-Related Potentials and Alpha-, Beta-, and Gamma-Activity Associated with Intentional Actions

    PubMed Central

    Karch, Susanne; Loy, Fabian; Krause, Daniela; Schwarz, Sandra; Kiesewetter, Jan; Segmiller, Felix; Chrobok, Agnieszka I.; Keeser, Daniel; Pogarell, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Internally guided actions are defined as being purposeful, self-generated and offering choices between alternatives. Intentional actions are essential to reach individual goals. In previous empirical studies, internally guided actions were predominantly related to functional responses in frontal and parietal areas. The aim of the present study was to distinguish event-related potentials and oscillatory responses of intentional actions and externally guided actions. In addition, we compared neurobiological findings of the decision which action to perform with those referring to the decision whether or not to perform an action. Methods: Twenty-eight subjects participated in adapted go/nogo paradigms, including a voluntary selection condition allowing participants to (1) freely decide whether to press the response button or (2) to decide whether they wanted to press the response button with the right index finger or the left index finger. Results: The reaction times were increased when participants freely decided whether and how they wanted to respond compared to the go condition. Intentional processes were associated with a fronto-centrally located N2 and P3 potential. N2 and P3 amplitudes were increased during intentional actions compared to instructed responses (go). In addition, increased activity in the alpha-, beta- and gamma-frequency range was shown during voluntary behavior rather than during externally guided responses. Conclusion: These results may indicate that an additional cognitive process is needed for intentional actions compared to instructed behavior. However, the neural responses were comparatively independent of the kind of decision that was made (1) decision which action to perform; (2) decision whether or not to perform an action). Significance: The study demonstrates the importance of fronto-central alpha-, beta-, and gamma oscillations for voluntary behavior. PMID:26834680

  17. Potential Mechanisms Underlying Intercortical Signal Regulation via Cholinergic Neuromodulators

    PubMed Central

    Whittington, Miles A.; Kopell, Nancy J.

    2015-01-01

    The dynamical behavior of the cortex is extremely complex, with different areas and even different layers of a cortical column displaying different temporal patterns. A major open question is how the signals from different layers and different brain regions are coordinated in a flexible manner to support function. Here, we considered interactions between primary auditory cortex and adjacent association cortex. Using a biophysically based model, we show how top-down signals in the beta and gamma regimes can interact with a bottom-up gamma rhythm to provide regulation of signals between the cortical areas and among layers. The flow of signals depends on cholinergic modulation: with only glutamatergic drive, we show that top-down gamma rhythms may block sensory signals. In the presence of cholinergic drive, top-down beta rhythms can lift this blockade and allow signals to flow reciprocally between primary sensory and parietal cortex. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Flexible coordination of multiple cortical areas is critical for complex cognitive functions, but how this is accomplished is not understood. Using computational models, we studied the interactions between primary auditory cortex (A1) and association cortex (Par2). Our model is capable of replicating interaction patterns observed in vitro and the simulations predict that the coordination between top-down gamma and beta rhythms is central to the gating process regulating bottom-up sensory signaling projected from A1 to Par2 and that cholinergic modulation allows this coordination to occur. PMID:26558772

  18. ß-Adrenergic Receptor Signaling and Modulation of Long-Term Potentiation in the Mammalian Hippocampus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Dell, Thomas J.; Connor, Steven A.; Guglietta, Ryan; Nguyen, Peter V.

    2015-01-01

    Encoding new information in the brain requires changes in synaptic strength. Neuromodulatory transmitters can facilitate synaptic plasticity by modifying the actions and expression of specific signaling cascades, transmitter receptors and their associated signaling complexes, genes, and effector proteins. One critical neuromodulator in the…

  19. 16-Channel Organic Electrochemical Transistor Array for In Vitro Conduction Mapping of Cardiac Action Potential.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xi; Yao, Chunlei; Liu, Ying; Hsing, I-Ming

    2016-09-01

    16-Channel organic electrochemical transistor arrays (OECTs) are developed for mapping the propagation and studying the characteristics of action potentials of primary cardiomyocytes. The physiological activities of a rat cardiomyocyte monolayer during a long-term culturing is revealed by this biocompatible, low-cost, and high transconductance organic electronic device. OECT has great potential to be used in cardiac and neuronal drug screening.

  20. 7 CFR 1945.19 - Reporting potential natural disasters and initial actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 13 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Reporting potential natural disasters and initial... AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) PROGRAM REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) EMERGENCY Disaster Assistance-General § 1945.19 Reporting potential natural disasters and initial actions. (a) Purpose....

  1. 7 CFR 1945.19 - Reporting potential natural disasters and initial actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 13 2011-01-01 2009-01-01 true Reporting potential natural disasters and initial... AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) PROGRAM REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) EMERGENCY Disaster Assistance-General § 1945.19 Reporting potential natural disasters and initial actions. (a) Purpose....

  2. 7 CFR 1945.19 - Reporting potential natural disasters and initial actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 13 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Reporting potential natural disasters and initial... AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) PROGRAM REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) EMERGENCY Disaster Assistance-General § 1945.19 Reporting potential natural disasters and initial actions. (a) Purpose....

  3. Sodium and calcium currents shape action potentials in immature mouse inner hair cells.

    PubMed

    Marcotti, Walter; Johnson, Stuart L; Rusch, Alfons; Kros, Corne J

    2003-11-01

    Before the onset of hearing at postnatal day 12, mouse inner hair cells (IHCs) produce spontaneous and evoked action potentials. These spikes are likely to induce neurotransmitter release onto auditory nerve fibres. Since immature IHCs express both alpha1D (Cav1.3) Ca2+ and Na+ currents that activate near the resting potential, we examined whether these two conductances are involved in shaping the action potentials. Both had extremely rapid activation kinetics, followed by fast and complete voltage-dependent inactivation for the Na+ current, and slower, partially Ca2+-dependent inactivation for the Ca2+ current. Only the Ca2+ current is necessary for spontaneous and induced action potentials, and 29 % of cells lacked a Na+ current. The Na+ current does, however, shorten the time to reach the action-potential threshold, whereas the Ca2+ current is mainly involved, together with the K+ currents, in determining the speed and size of the spikes. Both currents increased in size up to the end of the first postnatal week. After this, the Ca2+ current reduced to about 30 % of its maximum size and persisted in mature IHCs. The Na+ current was downregulated around the onset of hearing, when the spiking is also known to disappear. Although the Na+ current was observed as early as embryonic day 16.5, its role in action-potential generation was only evident from just after birth, when the resting membrane potential became sufficiently negative to remove a sizeable fraction of the inactivation (half inactivation was at -71 mV). The size of both currents was positively correlated with the developmental change in action-potential frequency.

  4. Sodium and calcium currents shape action potentials in immature mouse inner hair cells

    PubMed Central

    Marcotti, Walter; Johnson, Stuart L; Rüsch, Alfons; Kros, Corné J

    2003-01-01

    Before the onset of hearing at postnatal day 12, mouse inner hair cells (IHCs) produce spontaneous and evoked action potentials. These spikes are likely to induce neurotransmitter release onto auditory nerve fibres. Since immature IHCs express both α1D (Cav1.3) Ca2+ and Na+ currents that activate near the resting potential, we examined whether these two conductances are involved in shaping the action potentials. Both had extremely rapid activation kinetics, followed by fast and complete voltage-dependent inactivation for the Na+ current, and slower, partially Ca2+-dependent inactivation for the Ca2+ current. Only the Ca2+ current is necessary for spontaneous and induced action potentials, and 29 % of cells lacked a Na+ current. The Na+ current does, however, shorten the time to reach the action-potential threshold, whereas the Ca2+ current is mainly involved, together with the K+ currents, in determining the speed and size of the spikes. Both currents increased in size up to the end of the first postnatal week. After this, the Ca2+ current reduced to about 30 % of its maximum size and persisted in mature IHCs. The Na+ current was downregulated around the onset of hearing, when the spiking is also known to disappear. Although the Na+ current was observed as early as embryonic day 16.5, its role in action-potential generation was only evident from just after birth, when the resting membrane potential became sufficiently negative to remove a sizeable fraction of the inactivation (half inactivation was at −71 mV). The size of both currents was positively correlated with the developmental change in action-potential frequency. PMID:12937295

  5. The Venus Flytrap Dionaea muscipula Counts Prey-Induced Action Potentials to Induce Sodium Uptake.

    PubMed

    Böhm, Jennifer; Scherzer, Sönke; Krol, Elzbieta; Kreuzer, Ines; von Meyer, Katharina; Lorey, Christian; Mueller, Thomas D; Shabala, Lana; Monte, Isabel; Solano, Roberto; Al-Rasheid, Khaled A S; Rennenberg, Heinz; Shabala, Sergey; Neher, Erwin; Hedrich, Rainer

    2016-02-01

    Carnivorous plants, such as the Venus flytrap (Dionaea muscipula), depend on an animal diet when grown in nutrient-poor soils. When an insect visits the trap and tilts the mechanosensors on the inner surface, action potentials (APs) are fired. After a moving object elicits two APs, the trap snaps shut, encaging the victim. Panicking preys repeatedly touch the trigger hairs over the subsequent hours, leading to a hermetically closed trap, which via the gland-based endocrine system is flooded by a prey-decomposing acidic enzyme cocktail. Here, we asked the question as to how many times trigger hairs have to be stimulated (e.g., now many APs are required) for the flytrap to recognize an encaged object as potential food, thus making it worthwhile activating the glands. By applying a series of trigger-hair stimulations, we found that the touch hormone jasmonic acid (JA) signaling pathway is activated after the second stimulus, while more than three APs are required to trigger an expression of genes encoding prey-degrading hydrolases, and that this expression is proportional to the number of mechanical stimulations. A decomposing animal contains a sodium load, and we have found that these sodium ions enter the capture organ via glands. We identified a flytrap sodium channel DmHKT1 as responsible for this sodium acquisition, with the number of transcripts expressed being dependent on the number of mechano-electric stimulations. Hence, the number of APs a victim triggers while trying to break out of the trap identifies the moving prey as a struggling Na(+)-rich animal and nutrition for the plant. PMID:26804557

  6. The Venus Flytrap Dionaea muscipula Counts Prey-Induced Action Potentials to Induce Sodium Uptake

    PubMed Central

    Böhm, Jennifer; Scherzer, Sönke; Krol, Elzbieta; Kreuzer, Ines; von Meyer, Katharina; Lorey, Christian; Mueller, Thomas D.; Shabala, Lana; Monte, Isabel; Solano, Roberto; Al-Rasheid, Khaled A.S.; Rennenberg, Heinz; Shabala, Sergey; Neher, Erwin; Hedrich, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    Summary Carnivorous plants, such as the Venus flytrap (Dionaea muscipula), depend on an animal diet when grown in nutrient-poor soils. When an insect visits the trap and tilts the mechanosensors on the inner surface, action potentials (APs) are fired. After a moving object elicits two APs, the trap snaps shut, encaging the victim. Panicking preys repeatedly touch the trigger hairs over the subsequent hours, leading to a hermetically closed trap, which via the gland-based endocrine system is flooded by a prey-decomposing acidic enzyme cocktail. Here, we asked the question as to how many times trigger hairs have to be stimulated (e.g., now many APs are required) for the flytrap to recognize an encaged object as potential food, thus making it worthwhile activating the glands. By applying a series of trigger-hair stimulations, we found that the touch hormone jasmonic acid (JA) signaling pathway is activated after the second stimulus, while more than three APs are required to trigger an expression of genes encoding prey-degrading hydrolases, and that this expression is proportional to the number of mechanical stimulations. A decomposing animal contains a sodium load, and we have found that these sodium ions enter the capture organ via glands. We identified a flytrap sodium channel DmHKT1 as responsible for this sodium acquisition, with the number of transcripts expressed being dependent on the number of mechano-electric stimulations. Hence, the number of APs a victim triggers while trying to break out of the trap identifies the moving prey as a struggling Na+-rich animal and nutrition for the plant. Video Abstract PMID:26804557

  7. The Venus Flytrap Dionaea muscipula Counts Prey-Induced Action Potentials to Induce Sodium Uptake.

    PubMed

    Böhm, Jennifer; Scherzer, Sönke; Krol, Elzbieta; Kreuzer, Ines; von Meyer, Katharina; Lorey, Christian; Mueller, Thomas D; Shabala, Lana; Monte, Isabel; Solano, Roberto; Al-Rasheid, Khaled A S; Rennenberg, Heinz; Shabala, Sergey; Neher, Erwin; Hedrich, Rainer

    2016-02-01

    Carnivorous plants, such as the Venus flytrap (Dionaea muscipula), depend on an animal diet when grown in nutrient-poor soils. When an insect visits the trap and tilts the mechanosensors on the inner surface, action potentials (APs) are fired. After a moving object elicits two APs, the trap snaps shut, encaging the victim. Panicking preys repeatedly touch the trigger hairs over the subsequent hours, leading to a hermetically closed trap, which via the gland-based endocrine system is flooded by a prey-decomposing acidic enzyme cocktail. Here, we asked the question as to how many times trigger hairs have to be stimulated (e.g., now many APs are required) for the flytrap to recognize an encaged object as potential food, thus making it worthwhile activating the glands. By applying a series of trigger-hair stimulations, we found that the touch hormone jasmonic acid (JA) signaling pathway is activated after the second stimulus, while more than three APs are required to trigger an expression of genes encoding prey-degrading hydrolases, and that this expression is proportional to the number of mechanical stimulations. A decomposing animal contains a sodium load, and we have found that these sodium ions enter the capture organ via glands. We identified a flytrap sodium channel DmHKT1 as responsible for this sodium acquisition, with the number of transcripts expressed being dependent on the number of mechano-electric stimulations. Hence, the number of APs a victim triggers while trying to break out of the trap identifies the moving prey as a struggling Na(+)-rich animal and nutrition for the plant.

  8. Effect of nanomaterials on the compound action potential of the shore crab, Carcinus maenas.

    PubMed

    Windeatt, Kirsten M; Handy, Richard D

    2013-06-01

    Little is known about the effects of manufactured nanomaterials on the function of nerves. The experiment aimed to test the effects of three different nanomaterials (1 mg l⁻¹ of TiO₂ NPs, Ag NPs or SWCNT) on the compound action potential of the shore crab (Carcinus maenas) compared with an appropriate bulk powder or metal salt control (bulk TiO₂ powder, AgNO₃ and carbon black respectively). In single action potential recordings, there were no effects of any of the nanomaterials on the peak amplitude, duration, rate of rise (depolarisation), or rate of decrease (repolarisation) of the compound action potential in crab saline, despite settling of each nanomaterial directly onto the nerve preparation. The ability of the crab nerve to be stimulated to tetanus was also unaffected by exposure to the nanomaterials compared with the appropriate bulk powder or metal salt control. Solvent controls with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) also had no effect on action potentials. Overall, the study concludes that there were no effects of the materials at the concentrations tested on the compound action potential of the shore crab in physiological saline. PMID:22394242

  9. ATP-sensitive potassium channel modulation of the guinea pig ventricular action potential and contraction.

    PubMed

    Nichols, C G; Ripoll, C; Lederer, W J

    1991-01-01

    The role of ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels in modulating the action potential and contraction of guinea pig ventricular myocytes was investigated. Under voltage clamp, the maximum whole-cell KATP channel conductance was estimated (195 +/- 10 nS, n = 6) by exposing the cells to complete metabolic blockade (2 mM cyanide in the presence of 10 mM 2-deoxy-glucose). In isolated inside-out membrane patches, the ATP dependence of KATP channel activity under relevant conditions was measured (half-maximal inhibition at 114 microM). Under current clamp (with intracellular ATP concentration = 5 mM), the effect of graded KATP channel activation on the action potential and the twitch was estimated by injection of a current (proportional to voltage) that simulated the KATP conductance. As this "conductance" was increased, the action potential was shortened, and contractile amplitude declined, as expected. From the results of these experiments, the quantitative dependence of the action potential duration on intracellular ATP concentration was estimated, without relying on a mathematical model of the cell membrane. The results imply that KATP-dependent action potential shortening is likely to occur if ATP concentration falls below normal levels (approximately 5 mM), as may happen regionally, or globally, during myocardial ischemia.

  10. Simultaneous identification of eye fixation related potentials and reaction related potentials from single-trial signals.

    PubMed

    Moriyama, Y; Tomita, Y; Honda, S; Matsuo, N; Hitoshi, U

    1997-11-01

    To obtain the effective components from event related potentials (ERPs), it has been necessary to average the waveforms of several trials. ERP data reflect the psychophysiological state of a subject. Time variation is an important feature in ERP analysis, and so the single-trial method is required. A method is proposed to identify simultaneously both eye fixation related potentials (EFRPs) and reaction related potentials (RRPs) using wavelength transforms. The EFRP is an ERP associated with saccadic eye movement. The RRP is defined as a component similar to P300 gained from the reaction signal. Six subjects participate in the oddball task. The task takes 30 min for each subject. Electroencephalograms (EEGs), electro-oculograms (EOGs) and electromyograms (EMGs) are simultaneously recorded. The EFRP is extracted for the offset of saccade from EOG, and the RRP is extracted for the onset of reaction from EMG. The results show that the estimated waveforms described well each of the components in the EFRP and RRP. Moreover, the simulation results show that the amplitudes of the lambda wave are estimated to within an error of 4%, and those of the latencies are within 0.4%, with an SNR of 4.5dB. Those of P300 were 11 and 4%, respectively. The reliability of the method is proved to be sufficient for estimating ERPs.

  11. Action!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Senese, Joseph

    1998-01-01

    A small group of teachers at one Illinois high school is helping to effect and promote change. Through the Action Research Laboratory (ARL), teams of teachers conduct collaborative action research to improve classroom practices. Data from the first two years of the ARL indicate that teachers are eager to participate in, and have thrived in, their…

  12. Initiation and blocking of the action potential in an axon in weak ultrasonic or microwave fields.

    PubMed

    Shneider, M N; Pekker, M

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, we analyze the effect of the redistribution of the transmembrane ion channels in an axon caused by longitudinal acoustic vibrations of the membrane. These oscillations can be excited by an external source of ultrasound and weak microwave radiation interacting with the charges sitting on the surface of the lipid membrane. It is shown, using the Hodgkin-Huxley model of the axon, that the density redistribution of transmembrane sodium channels may reduce the threshold of the action potential, up to its spontaneous initiation. At the significant redistribution of sodium channels in the membrane, the rarefaction zones of the transmembrane channel density are formed, blocking the propagation of the action potential. Blocking the action potential propagation along the axon is shown to cause anesthesia in the example case of a squid axon. Various approaches to experimental observation of the effects considered in this paper are discussed. PMID:25353835

  13. Initiation and blocking of the action potential in an axon in weak ultrasonic or microwave fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shneider, M. N.; Pekker, M.

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, we analyze the effect of the redistribution of the transmembrane ion channels in an axon caused by longitudinal acoustic vibrations of the membrane. These oscillations can be excited by an external source of ultrasound and weak microwave radiation interacting with the charges sitting on the surface of the lipid membrane. It is shown, using the Hodgkin-Huxley model of the axon, that the density redistribution of transmembrane sodium channels may reduce the threshold of the action potential, up to its spontaneous initiation. At the significant redistribution of sodium channels in the membrane, the rarefaction zones of the transmembrane channel density are formed, blocking the propagation of the action potential. Blocking the action potential propagation along the axon is shown to cause anesthesia in the example case of a squid axon. Various approaches to experimental observation of the effects considered in this paper are discussed.

  14. Optical magnetic detection of single-neuron action potentials using NV-diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Matthew; Barry, John; Schloss, Jennifer; Glenn, David; Walsworth, Ron

    2016-05-01

    A key challenge for neuroscience is noninvasive, label-free sensing of action potential dynamics in whole organisms with single-neuron resolution. Here, we report a new approach to this problem: using nitrogen-vacancy (NV) color centers in diamond to measure the time-dependent magnetic fields produced by single-neuron action potentials. We demonstrate our method using excised single neurons from two invertebrate species, marine worm and squid; and then by single-neuron action potential magnetic sensing exterior to whole, live, opaque marine worms for extended periods with no adverse effect. The results lay the groundwork for real-time, noninvasive 3D magnetic mapping of functional mammalian neuronal networks.

  15. A phantom axon setup for validating models of action potential recordings.

    PubMed

    Rossel, Olivier; Soulier, Fabien; Bernard, Serge; Guiraud, David; Cathébras, Guy

    2016-08-01

    Electrode designs and strategies for electroneurogram recordings are often tested first by computer simulations and then by animal models, but they are rarely implanted for long-term evaluation in humans. The models show that the amplitude of the potential at the surface of an axon is higher in front of the nodes of Ranvier than at the internodes; however, this has not been investigated through in vivo measurements. An original experimental method is presented to emulate a single fiber action potential in an infinite conductive volume, allowing the potential of an axon to be recorded at both the nodes of Ranvier and the internodes, for a wide range of electrode-to-fiber radial distances. The paper particularly investigates the differences in the action potential amplitude along the longitudinal axis of an axon. At a short radial distance, the action potential amplitude measured in front of a node of Ranvier is two times larger than in the middle of two nodes. Moreover, farther from the phantom axon, the measured action potential amplitude is almost constant along the longitudinal axis. The results of this new method confirm the computer simulations, with a correlation of 97.6 %.

  16. A phantom axon setup for validating models of action potential recordings.

    PubMed

    Rossel, Olivier; Soulier, Fabien; Bernard, Serge; Guiraud, David; Cathébras, Guy

    2016-08-01

    Electrode designs and strategies for electroneurogram recordings are often tested first by computer simulations and then by animal models, but they are rarely implanted for long-term evaluation in humans. The models show that the amplitude of the potential at the surface of an axon is higher in front of the nodes of Ranvier than at the internodes; however, this has not been investigated through in vivo measurements. An original experimental method is presented to emulate a single fiber action potential in an infinite conductive volume, allowing the potential of an axon to be recorded at both the nodes of Ranvier and the internodes, for a wide range of electrode-to-fiber radial distances. The paper particularly investigates the differences in the action potential amplitude along the longitudinal axis of an axon. At a short radial distance, the action potential amplitude measured in front of a node of Ranvier is two times larger than in the middle of two nodes. Moreover, farther from the phantom axon, the measured action potential amplitude is almost constant along the longitudinal axis. The results of this new method confirm the computer simulations, with a correlation of 97.6 %. PMID:27016364

  17. Memantine reduces repetitive action potential firing in spinal cord nerve cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Netzer, R; Bigalke, H

    1990-09-21

    (1) The anticonvulsant effects of memantine were examined and compared with those of baclofen in monolayer primary cultures of murine nerve cells using conventional intracellular recordings. (2) Memantine and baclofen (each 10-100 microM) decreased spontaneous synaptic activity when action potential frequencies exceeded 6 Hz. Neurons firing action potentials at frequencies below 6 Hz (about 90% of all impaled cells), however, were not affected by the drugs. (3) Memantine reduced the duration of strychnine-elicited bursts and the firing rate of action potentials within a burst. In contrast, baclofen lowered the frequency of the bursts without reducing intra-burst firing. The duration of the bursts was increased. (4) Memantine, but not baclofen, reduced the extent of sustained repetitive firing evoked by pulses of depolarizing current. (5) In the presence of memantine, the second of two electrically evoked action potentials increasingly failed to appear as the intervals between successive stimulating pulses were shortened. Such an effect was not seen when baclofen was applied. Thus, both antispastic agents, memantine and baclofen, reduce hyperactivity of spinal cord neurons in culture, although their mechanisms of action are different.

  18. Reelin and apoE actions on signal transduction, synaptic function and memory formation.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Justin T; Weeber, Edwin J

    2008-08-01

    Low-density-lipoprotein receptors (LDLRs) are an evolutionarily ancient surface protein family with the ability to activate a diversity of extracellular signals across the cellular membrane in the adult central nervous system (CNS). Their intimate roles in modulating synaptic plasticity and their necessity in hippocampal-dependent learning and memory have only recently come to light. Two known LDLR ligands, specifically apolipoprotein E (apoE) and reelin, have been the most widely investigated in this regard. Most of our understanding of synaptic plasticity comes from investigation of both pre- and postsynaptic alterations. Therefore, it is interesting to note that neurons and glia that do not contribute to the synaptic junction in question can secrete signaling molecules that affect synaptic plasticity. Notably, reelin and apoE have been shown to modulate hippocampal long-term potentiation in general, and affect NMDA receptor and AMPA receptor regulation specifically. Furthermore, these receptors and signaling molecules have significant roles in neuronal degenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. The recent production of recombinant proteins, knockout and transgenic mice for receptors and ligands and the development of human ApoE targeted replacement mice have significantly expanded our understanding of the roles LDLRs and their ligands have in certain disease states and the accompanying initiation of specific signaling pathways. This review describes the role LDLRs, apoE and reelin have in the regulation of hippocampal synaptic plasticity.

  19. Electro-cochlear potentials elicited by sinusoidally modulated signals.

    PubMed

    Verweij, C; Rodenburg, M

    1977-01-01

    Responses of the guinea pig cochlea to amplitude-modulated stimuli were measured with the aid of a gross electrode. The dynamic characteristics of this part of the auditory system was studied by varying several parameters of the applied signal. The signals used as carriers in our experiments were either white noise or pure tones of 1 and 4 kHz. The modulation frequency, dynamic and intensity characteristics were determined by varying the modulating frequency, the modulation depth and the intensity of the applied signal. To get an idea about possible non-linear aspects of the system under investigation, we always computed the Fourier transform of the response data and plotted the amplitude of the various harmonics and the phase of the fundamental separately as functions of the signal parameter in question. The greatest response was always found at a modulation frequency of about 200 Hz, with a relatively gradual rise up to this frequency and a sharper drop above 200 Hz. The phase of the fundamental changes very rapidly at frequencies above Hz. The distortion is mainly second-harmonic and has a maximum about 1 octave lower than the fundamental. The carrier frequency and the intensity of the stimulus were not found to have a great influence on the frequency characteristic. For small modulation depths, the system is nearly linear; at higher intensities and modulation depths saturation occurs, coinciding with a relative increase in the intensity of the second harmonic with respect to the fundamental. PMID:880128

  20. Potentiation of the cytotoxic action of melphalan and "activated" cyclophosphamide against cultured tumor cells by centrophenoxine.

    PubMed

    Sladek, N E

    1977-01-01

    Centrophenoxine, without antitumor activity itself, enhanced the cytotoxic action of melphalan and "activated" cyclophosphamide against mouse P388 lymphoma and rat W256 carcinosarcoma cells growing in static suspension culture. The concentration of alkylating agent required for 99% cell-kill was approximately halved when centrophenoxine was also present during exposure to the antitumor drug. Maximum potentiation by centrophenoxine of the cytotoxic action of melphalan occurred when cells were exposed to the two agents simultaneously; little or no potentiation was observed when cells were exposed to centrophenoxine before or after exposure to the alkylating agent.

  1. Overcoming photodamage in second-harmonic generation microscopy: real-time optical recording of neuronal action potentials.

    PubMed

    Sacconi, L; Dombeck, D A; Webb, W W

    2006-02-28

    Second-harmonic generation (SHG) has proven essential for the highest-resolution optical recording of membrane potential (Vm) in intact specimens. Here, we demonstrate single-trial SHG recordings of neuronal somatic action potentials and quantitative recordings of their decay with averaging at multiple sites during propagation along branched neurites at distances up to 350 mum from the soma. We realized these advances by quantifying, analyzing, and thereby minimizing the dynamics of photodamage (PD), a frequent limiting factor in the optical imaging of biological preparations. The optical signal and the PD during SHG imaging of stained cultured Aplysia neurons were examined with intracellular electrode recordings monitoring the resting Vm variations induced by laser-scanning illumination. We found that the PD increased linearly with the dye concentration but grew with the cube of illumination intensity, leading to unanticipated optimization procedures to minimize PD. The addition of appropriate antioxidants in conjunction with an observed Vm recovery after termination of laser scanning further refined the imaging criteria for minimization and control of PD during SHG recording of action potentials. With these advances, the potential of SHG as an effective optical tool for neuroscience investigations is being realized.

  2. A delayed action oscillator shared by biennial, interannual, and decadal signals in the Pacific Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, Warren B.; Tourre, Y.M.; Barlow, M.; Dettinger, M.

    2003-01-01

    Biennial, interannual, and decadal signals in the Pacific basin are observed to share patterns and evolution in covarying sea surface temperature (SST), 18??C isotherm depth (Z18), zonal surface wind (ZSW), and wind stress curl (WSC) anomalies from 1955 to 1999. Each signal has warm SST anomalies propagating slowly eastward along the equator, generating westerly ZSW anomalies in their wake. These westerly ZSW anomalies produce cyclonic WSC anomalies off the equator which pump baroclinic Rossby waves in the western/central tropical North Pacific Ocean. These Rossby waves propagate westward, taking ???6, ???12, and ???36 months to reach the western boundary near ???7??N, ???12??N, and ???18??N on biennial, interannual, and decadal period scales, respectively. There, they reflect as equatorial coupled waves, propagating slowly eastward in covarying SST, Z18, and ZSW anomalies, taking ???6, ???12, and ???24 months to reach the central/eastern equatorial ocean. These equatorial coupled waves produce a delayed-negative feedback to the warm SST anomalies there. The decrease in Rossby wave phase speed with latitude, the increase in meridional scale of equatorial SST anomalies with period scale, and the associated increase in latitude of Rossby wave forcing are consistent with the delayed action oscillator (DAO) model used to explain El Nin??o. However, this is not true of the western-boundary reflection of Rossby waves into slow equatorial coupled waves. This requires modification of the extant DAO model. We construct a modified DAO model, demonstrating how the various mechanisms and the size and sources of their delays yield the resulting frequency of each signal.

  3. Noise Enhances Action Potential Generation in Mouse Sensory Neurons via Stochastic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Onorato, Irene; D'Alessandro, Giuseppina; Di Castro, Maria Amalia; Renzi, Massimiliano; Dobrowolny, Gabriella; Musarò, Antonio; Salvetti, Marco; Limatola, Cristina; Crisanti, Andrea; Grassi, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    Noise can enhance perception of tactile and proprioceptive stimuli by stochastic resonance processes. However, the mechanisms underlying this general phenomenon remain to be characterized. Here we studied how externally applied noise influences action potential firing in mouse primary sensory neurons of dorsal root ganglia, modelling a basic process in sensory perception. Since noisy mechanical stimuli may cause stochastic fluctuations in receptor potential, we examined the effects of sub-threshold depolarizing current steps with superimposed random fluctuations. We performed whole cell patch clamp recordings in cultured neurons of mouse dorsal root ganglia. Noise was added either before and during the step, or during the depolarizing step only, to focus onto the specific effects of external noise on action potential generation. In both cases, step + noise stimuli triggered significantly more action potentials than steps alone. The normalized power norm had a clear peak at intermediate noise levels, demonstrating that the phenomenon is driven by stochastic resonance. Spikes evoked in step + noise trials occur earlier and show faster rise time as compared to the occasional ones elicited by steps alone. These data suggest that external noise enhances, via stochastic resonance, the recruitment of transient voltage-gated Na channels, responsible for action potential firing in response to rapid step-wise depolarizing currents. PMID:27525414

  4. Noise Enhances Action Potential Generation in Mouse Sensory Neurons via Stochastic Resonance.

    PubMed

    Onorato, Irene; D'Alessandro, Giuseppina; Di Castro, Maria Amalia; Renzi, Massimiliano; Dobrowolny, Gabriella; Musarò, Antonio; Salvetti, Marco; Limatola, Cristina; Crisanti, Andrea; Grassi, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    Noise can enhance perception of tactile and proprioceptive stimuli by stochastic resonance processes. However, the mechanisms underlying this general phenomenon remain to be characterized. Here we studied how externally applied noise influences action potential firing in mouse primary sensory neurons of dorsal root ganglia, modelling a basic process in sensory perception. Since noisy mechanical stimuli may cause stochastic fluctuations in receptor potential, we examined the effects of sub-threshold depolarizing current steps with superimposed random fluctuations. We performed whole cell patch clamp recordings in cultured neurons of mouse dorsal root ganglia. Noise was added either before and during the step, or during the depolarizing step only, to focus onto the specific effects of external noise on action potential generation. In both cases, step + noise stimuli triggered significantly more action potentials than steps alone. The normalized power norm had a clear peak at intermediate noise levels, demonstrating that the phenomenon is driven by stochastic resonance. Spikes evoked in step + noise trials occur earlier and show faster rise time as compared to the occasional ones elicited by steps alone. These data suggest that external noise enhances, via stochastic resonance, the recruitment of transient voltage-gated Na channels, responsible for action potential firing in response to rapid step-wise depolarizing currents. PMID:27525414

  5. Investigating a Potential Auxin-Related Mode of Hormetic/Inhibitory Action of the Phytotoxin Parthenin.

    PubMed

    Belz, Regina G

    2016-01-01

    Parthenin is a metabolite of Parthenium hysterophorus and is believed to contribute to the weed's invasiveness via allelopathy. Despite the potential of parthenin to suppress competitors, low doses stimulate plant growth. This biphasic action was hypothesized to be auxin-like and, therefore, an auxin-related mode of parthenin action was investigated using two approaches: joint action experiments with Lactuca sativa, and dose-response experiments with auxin/antiauxin-resistant Arabidopsis thaliana genotypes. The joint action approach comprised binary mixtures of subinhibitory doses of the auxin 3-indoleacetic acid (IAA) mixed with parthenin or one of three reference compounds [indole-3-butyric acid (IBA), 2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid (TIBA), 2-(p-chlorophenoxy)-2-methylpropionic acid (PCIB)]. The reference compounds significantly interacted with IAA at all doses, but parthenin interacted only at low doses indicating that parthenin hormesis may be auxin-related, in contrast to its inhibitory action. The genetic approach investigated the response of four auxin/antiauxin-resistant mutants and a wildtype to parthenin or two reference compounds (IAA, PCIB). The responses of mutant plants to the reference compounds confirmed previous reports, but differed from the responses observed for parthenin. Parthenin stimulated and inhibited all mutants independent of resistance. This provided no indication for an auxin-related action of parthenin. Therefore, the hypothesis of an auxin-related inhibitory action of parthenin was rejected in two independent experimental approaches, while the hypothesis of an auxin-related stimulatory effect could not be rejected.

  6. Investigating a Potential Auxin-Related Mode of Hormetic/Inhibitory Action of the Phytotoxin Parthenin.

    PubMed

    Belz, Regina G

    2016-01-01

    Parthenin is a metabolite of Parthenium hysterophorus and is believed to contribute to the weed's invasiveness via allelopathy. Despite the potential of parthenin to suppress competitors, low doses stimulate plant growth. This biphasic action was hypothesized to be auxin-like and, therefore, an auxin-related mode of parthenin action was investigated using two approaches: joint action experiments with Lactuca sativa, and dose-response experiments with auxin/antiauxin-resistant Arabidopsis thaliana genotypes. The joint action approach comprised binary mixtures of subinhibitory doses of the auxin 3-indoleacetic acid (IAA) mixed with parthenin or one of three reference compounds [indole-3-butyric acid (IBA), 2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid (TIBA), 2-(p-chlorophenoxy)-2-methylpropionic acid (PCIB)]. The reference compounds significantly interacted with IAA at all doses, but parthenin interacted only at low doses indicating that parthenin hormesis may be auxin-related, in contrast to its inhibitory action. The genetic approach investigated the response of four auxin/antiauxin-resistant mutants and a wildtype to parthenin or two reference compounds (IAA, PCIB). The responses of mutant plants to the reference compounds confirmed previous reports, but differed from the responses observed for parthenin. Parthenin stimulated and inhibited all mutants independent of resistance. This provided no indication for an auxin-related action of parthenin. Therefore, the hypothesis of an auxin-related inhibitory action of parthenin was rejected in two independent experimental approaches, while the hypothesis of an auxin-related stimulatory effect could not be rejected. PMID:26686984

  7. MAPK/JNK signalling: a potential autophagy regulation pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yuan-Yuan; Li, Ying; Jiang, Wei-Qin; Zhou, Lin-Fu

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy refers to a lysosomal degradative pathway or a process of self-cannibalization. This pathway maintains nutrients levels for vital cellular functions during periods of starvation and it provides cells with survival advantages under various stress situations. However, the mechanisms responsible for the induction and regulation of autophagy are poorly understood. The c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) signal transduction pathway functions to induce defence mechanisms that protect organisms against acute oxidative and xenobiotic insults. This pathway has also been repeatedly linked to the molecular events involved in autophagy regulation. The present review will focus on recent advances in understanding of the relationship between mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/JNK signalling and autophagic cell death. PMID:26182361

  8. Phylogenetic signals and ecotoxicological responses: potential implications for aquatic biomonitoring.

    PubMed

    Carew, Melissa E; Miller, Adam D; Hoffmann, Ary A

    2011-05-01

    Macroinvertebrates can be successfully used as biomonitors of pollutants and environmental health because some groups are sensitive whereas, others are relatively tolerant to pollutants. An issue of ongoing debate is what constitutes an appropriate group for biomonitoring; should the group represent species, genera or higher taxonomic levels? A phylogenetic framework can provide new insights into this issue. By developing phylogenies for chironomids and mayflies, this investigation shows that there is strong phylogenetic signal for pollution responses, and that phylogenetic nodes are common to tolerant and sensitive groups of species. A phylogenetic analysis of biotic indices developed for mayflies based on their response to organic pollution shows that mayfly families varied in pollution tolerance. In contrast, based on sediment zinc concentrations as an indicator of pollution tolerance, Australian chironomids tend to vary in tolerance at lower taxonomic levels. Published data on North American chironomids shows much of the signal for pollution responses is contained within genera rather than sub-families. Tools are now available to distinguish whether this signal reflects historical evolutionary constraints or environmental effects leading to common evolved responses. This suggests that ideally higher taxonomic levels should be used for biomonitoring when there are strong phylogenetic constraints at higher levels. Evolutionary considerations can therefore help to guide the development of macroinvertebrate biomonitors and provide insights into processes that produce sensitive and tolerant taxa.

  9. Signal transduction molecule patterns indicating potential glioblastoma therapy approaches

    PubMed Central

    Cruceru, Maria Linda; Enciu, Ana-Maria; Popa, Adrian Claudiu; Albulescu, Radu; Neagu, Monica; Tanase, Cristiana Pistol; Constantinescu, Stefan N

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The expression of an array of signaling molecules, along with the assessment of real-time cell proliferation, has been performed in U87 glioma cell line and in patients’ glioblastoma established cell cultures in order to provide a better understanding of cellular and molecular events involved in glioblastoma pathogenesis. Experimental therapy was performed using a phosphatidylinositol-3′-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor. Patients and methods xMAP technology was employed to assess expression levels of several signal transduction molecules and real-time xCELLigence platform for cell behavior. Results PI3K inhibition induced the most significant effects on global signaling pathways in patient-derived cell cultures, especially on members of the mitogen-activated protein-kinase family, P70S6 serine-threonine kinase, and cAMP response element-binding protein expression and further prevented tumor cell proliferation. Conclusion The PI3K pathway might be a prime target for glioblastoma treatment. PMID:24348050

  10. Inhibition by TRPA1 agonists of compound action potentials in the frog sciatic nerve

    SciTech Connect

    Matsushita, Akitomo; Ohtsubo, Sena; Fujita, Tsugumi; Kumamoto, Eiichi

    2013-04-26

    Highlights: •TRPA1 agonists inhibited compound action potentials in frog sciatic nerves. •This inhibition was not mediated by TRPA1 channels. •This efficacy was comparable to those of lidocaine and cocaine. •We found for the first time an ability of TRPA1 agonists to inhibit nerve conduction. -- Abstract: Although TRPV1 and TRPM8 agonists (vanilloid capsaicin and menthol, respectively) at high concentrations inhibit action potential conduction, it remains to be unknown whether TRPA1 agonists have a similar action. The present study examined the actions of TRPA1 agonists, cinnamaldehyde (CA) and allyl isothiocyanate (AITC), which differ in chemical structure from each other, on compound action potentials (CAPs) recorded from the frog sciatic nerve by using the air-gap method. CA and AITC concentration-dependently reduced the peak amplitude of the CAP with the IC{sub 50} values of 1.2 and 1.5 mM, respectively; these activities were resistant to a non-selective TRP antagonist ruthenium red or a selective TRPA1 antagonist HC-030031. The CA and AITC actions were distinct in property; the latter but not former action was delayed in onset and partially reversible, and CA but not AITC increased thresholds to elicit CAPs. A CAP inhibition was seen by hydroxy-α-sanshool (by 60% at 0.05 mM), which activates both TRPA1 and TRPV1 channels, a non-vanilloid TRPV1 agonist piperine (by 20% at 0.07 mM) and tetrahydrolavandulol (where the six-membered ring of menthol is opened; IC{sub 50} = 0.38 mM). It is suggested that TRPA1 agonists as well as TRPV1 and TRPM8 agonists have an ability to inhibit nerve conduction without TRP activation, although their agonists are quite different in chemical structure from each other.

  11. Viewing Objects and Planning Actions: On the Potentiation of Grasping Behaviours by Visual Objects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Makris, Stergios; Hadar, Aviad A.; Yarrow, Kielan

    2011-01-01

    How do humans interact with tools? Gibson (1979) suggested that humans perceive directly what tools afford in terms of meaningful actions. This "affordances" hypothesis implies that visual objects can potentiate motor responses even in the absence of an intention to act. Here we explore the temporal evolution of motor plans afforded by common…

  12. 76 FR 21938 - Potential Environmental Impacts of the Proposed Runway 13 Extension and Associated Actions for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-19

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Potential Environmental Impacts of the Proposed Runway 13 Extension and... extension and associated actions for Devils Lake Regional Airport in Devils Lake, North Dakota. SUMMARY: The FAA has issued the final EA and FONSI/ROD for the proposed Runway 13 extension and associated...

  13. Youth Participatory Action Research and Educational Transformation: The Potential of Intertextuality as a Methodological Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bertrand, Melanie

    2016-01-01

    In this article, Melanie Bertrand explores the potential of using the concept of intertextuality--which captures the way snippets of written or spoken text from one source become incorporated into other sources--in the study and practice of youth participatory action research (YPAR). Though this collective and youth-centered form of research…

  14. Wnt signaling in liver fibrosis: progress, challenges and potential directions.

    PubMed

    Miao, Cheng-gui; Yang, Ying-ying; He, Xu; Huang, Cheng; Huang, Yan; Zhang, Lei; Lv, Xiong-Wen; Jin, Yong; Li, Jun

    2013-12-01

    Liver fibrosis is a common wound-healing response to chronic liver injuries, including alcoholic or drug toxicity, persistent viral infection, and genetic factors. Myofibroblastic transdifferentiation (MTD) is the pivotal event during liver fibrogenesis, and research in the past few years has identified key mediators and molecular mechanisms responsible for MTD of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). HSCs are undifferentiated cells which play an important role in liver regeneration. Recent evidence demonstrates that HSCs derive from mesoderm and at least in part via septum transversum and mesothelium, and HSCs express markers for different cell types which derive from multipotent mesenchymal progenitors. There is a regulatory commonality between differentiation of adipocytes and that of HSC, and the shift from adipogenic to myogenic or neuronal phenotype characterizes HSC MTD. Central of this shift is a loss of expression of the master adipogenic regulator peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ (PPARγ). Restored expression of PPARγ and/or other adipogenic transcription genes can reverse myofibroblastic HSCs to differentiated cells. Vertebrate Wnt and Drosophila wingless are homologous genes, and their translated proteins have been shown to participate in the regulation of cell proliferation, cell polarity, cell differentiation, and other biological roles. More recently, Wnt signaling is implicated in human fibrosing diseases, such as pulmonary fibrosis, renal fibrosis, and liver fibrosis. Blocking the canonical Wnt signal pathway with the co-receptor antagonist Dickkopf-1 (DKK1) abrogates these epigenetic repressions and restores the gene PPARγ expression and HSC differentiation. The identified morphogen mediated epigenetic regulation of PPARγ and HSC differentiation also serves as novel therapeutic targets for liver fibrosis and liver regeneration. In conclusion, the Wnt signaling promotes liver fibrosis by enhancing HSC activation and survival, and we herein

  15. Action potentials of HL-1 cells recorded with silicon nanowire transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eschermann, Jan Felix; Stockmann, Regina; Hueske, Martin; Vu, Xuan Thang; Ingebrandt, Sven; Offenhäusser, Andreas

    2009-08-01

    Silicon nanowire (NW) transistors were fabricated in a top-down process. These devices were used to record the extracellular potential of the spontaneous activity of cardiac muscle HL-1 cells. Their signals were measured by direct dc sampling of the drain current. An improved signal-to-noise ratio compared to planar field-effect devices was observed. Furthermore the signal shape was evaluated and could be associated to different membrane currents. With these experiments, a qualitative description of the properties of the cell-NW contact was obtained and the suitability of these sensors for electrophysiological measurements in vitro was demonstrated.

  16. Pre & Postsynaptic Tuning of Action Potential Timing by Spontaneous GABAergic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Caillard, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    Frequency and timing of action potential discharge are key elements for coding and transfer of information between neurons. The nature and location of the synaptic contacts, the biophysical parameters of the receptor-operated channels and their kinetics of activation are major determinants of the firing behaviour of each individual neuron. Ultimately the intrinsic excitability of each neuron determines the input-output function. Here we evaluate the influence of spontaneous GABAergic synaptic activity on the timing of action potentials in Layer 2/3 pyramidal neurones in acute brain slices from the somatosensory cortex of young rats. Somatic dynamic current injection to mimic synaptic input events was employed, together with a simple computational model that reproduce subthreshold membrane properties. Besides the well-documented control of neuronal excitability, spontaneous background GABAergic activity has a major detrimental effect on spike timing. In fact, GABAA receptors tune the relationship between the excitability and fidelity of pyramidal neurons via a postsynaptic (the reversal potential for GABAA activity) and a presynaptic (the frequency of spontaneous activity) mechanism. GABAergic activity can decrease or increase the excitability of pyramidal neurones, depending on the difference between the reversal potential for GABAA receptors and the threshold for action potential. In contrast, spike time jitter can only be increased proportionally to the difference between these two membrane potentials. Changes in excitability by background GABAergic activity can therefore only be associated with deterioration of the reliability of spike timing. PMID:21789249

  17. Nerve-released acetylcholine contracts urinary bladder smooth muscle by inducing action potentials independently of IP3-mediated calcium release.

    PubMed

    Nausch, Bernhard; Heppner, Thomas J; Nelson, Mark T

    2010-09-01

    Nerve-released ACh is the main stimulus for contraction of urinary bladder smooth muscle (UBSM). Here, the mechanisms by which ACh contracts UBSM are explored by determining Ca(2+) and electrical signals induced by nerve-released ACh. Photolysis of caged inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP(3)) evoked Ca(2+) release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum. Electrical field stimulation (20 Hz) induced Ca(2+) waves within the smooth muscle that were present only during stimulus application. Ca(2+) waves were blocked by inhibition of muscarinic ACh receptors (mAChRs) with atropine and depletion of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) stores with cyclopiazonic acid (CPA), and therefore likely reflect activation of IP(3) receptors (IP(3)Rs). Electrical field stimulation also increased excitability to induce action potentials (APs) that were accompanied by Ca(2+) flashes, reflecting Ca(2+) entry through voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels (VDCCs) during the action potential. The evoked Ca(2+) flashes and APs occurred as a burst with a lag time of approximately 1.5 s after onset of stimulation. They were not inhibited by blocking IP(3)-mediated Ca(2+) waves, but by blockers of mAChRs (atropine) and VDCCs (diltiazem). Nerve-evoked contractions of UBSM strips were greatly reduced by blocking VDCCs, but not by preventing IP(3)-mediated Ca(2+) signaling with cyclopiazonic acid or inhibition of PLC with U73122. These results indicate that ACh released from nerve varicosities induces IP(3)-mediated Ca(2+) waves during stimulation; but contrary to expectations, these signals do not appear to participate in contraction. In addition, our data provide compelling evidence that UBSM contractions evoked by nerve-released ACh depend on increased excitability and the resultant Ca(2+) entry through VDCCs during APs.

  18. Comparison of genetically encoded calcium indicators for monitoring action potentials in mammalian brain by two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Podor, Borbala; Hu, Yi-ling; Ohkura, Masamichi; Nakai, Junichi; Croll, Roger; Fine, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Imaging calcium transients associated with neuronal activity has yielded important insights into neural physiology. Genetically encoded calcium indicators (GECIs) offer conspicuous potential advantages for this purpose, including exquisite targeting. While the catalogue of available GECIs is steadily growing, many newly developed sensors that appear promising in vitro or in model cells appear to be less useful when expressed in mammalian neurons. We have, therefore, evaluated the performance of GECIs from two of the most promising families of sensors, G-CaMPs [Nat. Biotechnol. 19(2), 137–141 (2001)11175727] and GECOs [Science 333(6051), 1888–1891 (2011)21903779], for monitoring action potentials in rat brain. Specifically, we used two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy to compare calcium transients detected by G-CaMP3; GCaMP6f; G-CaMP7; Green-GECO1.0, 1.1 and 1.2; Blue-GECO; Red-GECO; Rex-GECO0.9; Rex-GECO1; Carmine-GECO; Orange-GECO; and Yellow-GECO1s. After optimizing excitation wavelengths, we monitored fluorescence signals associated with increasing numbers of action potentials evoked by current injection in CA1 pyramidal neurons in rat organotypic hippocampal slices. Some GECIs, particularly Green-GECO1.2, GCaMP6f, and G-CaMP7, were able to detect single action potentials with high reliability. By virtue of greatest sensitivity and fast kinetics, G-CaMP7 may be the best currently available GECI for monitoring calcium transients in mammalian neurons. PMID:26158004

  19. Action and Signaling of Lysophosphatidylethanolamine in MDA-MB-231 Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Park, Soo-Jin; Lee, Kyoung-Pil; Im, Dong-Soon

    2014-01-01

    Previously, we reported that lysophosphatidylethanolamine (LPE), a lyso-type metabolite of phosphatidylethanolamine, can increase intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) via type 1 lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) receptor (LPA1) and CD97, an adhesion G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Furthermore, LPE signaling was suggested as like LPA1/CD97-Gi/o proteins-phospholipase C-IP3-Ca2+ increase in these cells. In the present study, we further investigated actions of LPE not only in the [Ca2+]i increasing effect but also in cell proliferation and migration in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. We utilized chemically different LPEs and a specific inhibitor of LPA1, AM-095 in comparison with responses in SK-OV3 ovarian cancer cells. It was found that LPE-induced Ca2+ response in MDA-MB-231 cells was evoked in a different manner to that in SK-OV3 cells in terms of structural requirements. AM-095 inhibited LPE-induced Ca2+ response and cell proliferation in MDA-MB-231 cells, but not in SK-OV3 cells, supporting LPA1 involvement only in MDA-MB-231 cells. LPA had significant effects on cell proliferation and migration in MDA-MB-231 cells, whereas LPE had less or no significant effect. However, LPE modulations of MAPKs (ERK1/2, JNK and p38 MAPK) was not different to those by LPA in the cells. These data support the involvement of LPA1 in LPE-induced Ca2+ response and cell proliferation in breast MDA-MB-231 cells but unknown GPCRs (not LPA1) in LPE-induced responses in SK-OV3 cells. Furthermore, although LPE and LPA utilized LPA1, LPA utilized more signaling cascades than LPE, resulting in stronger responses by LPA in proliferation and migration than LPE in MDA-MB-231 cells. PMID:24753818

  20. Opposing actions of endocannabinoids on cholangiocarcinoma growth is via the differential activation of Notch signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Frampton, Gabriel; Coufal, Monique; Li, Huang; Ramirez, Jonathan; DeMorrow, Sharon

    2010-05-15

    The endocannabinoids anandamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonylglycerol (2-AG) have opposing effects on cholangiocarcinoma growth. Implicated in cancer, Notch signaling requires the {gamma}-secretase complex for activation. The aims of this study were to determine if the opposing effects of endocannabinoids depend on the differential activation of the Notch receptors and to demonstrate that the differential activation of these receptors are due to presenilin 1 containing- and presenilin 2 containing-{gamma}-secretase complexes. Mz-ChA-1 cells were treated with AEA or 2-AG. Notch receptor expression, activation, and nuclear translocation were determined. Specific roles for Notch 1 and 2 on cannabinoid-induced effects were determined by transient transfection of Notch 1 or 2 shRNA vectors before stimulation with AEA or 2-AG. Expression of presenilin 1 and 2 was determined after AEA or 2-AG treatment, and the involvement of presenilin 1 and 2 in the cannabinoid-induced effects was demonstrated in cell lines with low presenilin 1 or 2 expression. Antiproliferative effects of AEA required increased Notch 1 mRNA, activation, and nuclear translocation, whereas the growth-promoting effects induced by 2-AG required increased Notch 2 mRNA expression, activation, and nuclear translocation. AEA increased presenilin 1 expression and recruitment into the {gamma}-secretase complex, whereas 2-AG increased expression and recruitment of presenilin 2. The development of novel therapeutic strategies aimed at modulating the endocannabinoid system or mimicking the mode of action of AEA on Notch signaling pathways would prove beneficial for cholangiocarcinoma management.

  1. Joint Maximum Likelihood Time Delay Estimation of Unknown Event-Related Potential Signals for EEG Sensor Signal Quality Enhancement.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyungsoo; Lim, Sung-Ho; Lee, Jaeseok; Kang, Won-Seok; Moon, Cheil; Choi, Ji-Woong

    2016-01-01

    Electroencephalograms (EEGs) measure a brain signal that contains abundant information about the human brain function and health. For this reason, recent clinical brain research and brain computer interface (BCI) studies use EEG signals in many applications. Due to the significant noise in EEG traces, signal processing to enhance the signal to noise power ratio (SNR) is necessary for EEG analysis, especially for non-invasive EEG. A typical method to improve the SNR is averaging many trials of event related potential (ERP) signal that represents a brain's response to a particular stimulus or a task. The averaging, however, is very sensitive to variable delays. In this study, we propose two time delay estimation (TDE) schemes based on a joint maximum likelihood (ML) criterion to compensate the uncertain delays which may be different in each trial. We evaluate the performance for different types of signals such as random, deterministic, and real EEG signals. The results show that the proposed schemes provide better performance than other conventional schemes employing averaged signal as a reference, e.g., up to 4 dB gain at the expected delay error of 10°. PMID:27322267

  2. Joint Maximum Likelihood Time Delay Estimation of Unknown Event-Related Potential Signals for EEG Sensor Signal Quality Enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyungsoo; Lim, Sung-Ho; Lee, Jaeseok; Kang, Won-Seok; Moon, Cheil; Choi, Ji-Woong

    2016-01-01

    Electroencephalograms (EEGs) measure a brain signal that contains abundant information about the human brain function and health. For this reason, recent clinical brain research and brain computer interface (BCI) studies use EEG signals in many applications. Due to the significant noise in EEG traces, signal processing to enhance the signal to noise power ratio (SNR) is necessary for EEG analysis, especially for non-invasive EEG. A typical method to improve the SNR is averaging many trials of event related potential (ERP) signal that represents a brain’s response to a particular stimulus or a task. The averaging, however, is very sensitive to variable delays. In this study, we propose two time delay estimation (TDE) schemes based on a joint maximum likelihood (ML) criterion to compensate the uncertain delays which may be different in each trial. We evaluate the performance for different types of signals such as random, deterministic, and real EEG signals. The results show that the proposed schemes provide better performance than other conventional schemes employing averaged signal as a reference, e.g., up to 4 dB gain at the expected delay error of 10°. PMID:27322267

  3. Complex Dynamic Thresholds and Generation of the Action Potentials in the Neural-Activity Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirillov, S. Yu.; Nekorkin, V. I.

    2016-05-01

    This work is devoted to studying the processes of activation of the neurons whose excitation thresholds are not constant and vary in time (the so-called dynamic thresholds). The neuron dynamics is described by the FitzHugh-Nagumo model with nonlinear behavior of the recovery variable. The neuron response to the external pulsed activating action in the presence of a slowly varying synaptic current is studied within the framework of this model. The structure of the dynamic threshold is studied and its properties depending on the external-action parameters are established. It is found that the formation of the "folds" in the separatrix threshold manifold in the model phase space is a typical feature of the complex dynamic threshold. High neuron sensitivity to the action of the comparatively weak slow control signals is established. This explains the capability of the neurons to perform flexible tuning of their selective properties for detecting various external signals in sufficiently short times (of the order of duration of several spikes).

  4. Endocannabinoid signaling in female reproductive events: a potential therapeutic target?

    PubMed

    Maccarrone, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    Nearly 30 years after the discovery in 1964 of the psychoactive ingredient of cannabis (Cannabis sativa), Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, its endogenous counterparts were discovered and collectively termed endocannabinoids (eCBs): N-arachidonoylethanolamine (anandamide) in 1992 and 2-arachidonoylglycerol in 1995. Since then, intense research has identified additional eCBs and an ensemble of proteins that bind, synthesize and degrade them, the so-called eCB system. Altogether, these new compounds have been recognized as key mediators of several aspects of human pathophysiology, and in particular of female fertility. Here, the main features of the eCB system are presented, in order to put in a better perspective the relevance of eCB signaling in virtually all steps of human reproduction and to highlight emerging hopes that elements of this system might indeed become novel targets to combat fertility problems. PMID:26126134

  5. The DBI action, higher-derivative supergravity, and flattening inflaton potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bielleman, Sjoerd; Ibáñez, Luis E.; Pedro, Francisco G.; Valenzuela, Irene; Wieck, Clemens

    2016-05-01

    In string theory compactifications it is common to find an effective Lagrangian for the scalar fields with a non-canonical kinetic term. We study the effective action of the scalar position moduli of Type II D p-branes. In many instances the kinetic terms are in fact modified by a term proportional to the scalar potential itself. This can be linked to the appearance of higher-dimensional supersymmetric operators correcting the Kähler potential. We identify the supersymmetric dimension-eight operators describing the α' corrections captured by the D-brane Dirac-Born-Infeld action. Our analysis then allows an embedding of the D-brane moduli effective action into an {N}=1 supergravity formulation. The effects of the potential-dependent kinetic terms may be very important if one of the scalars is the inflaton, since they lead to a flattening of the scalar potential. We analyze this flattening effect in detail and compute its impact on the CMB observables for single-field inflation with monomial potentials.

  6. Integrated action of pheromone signals in promoting courtship behavior in male mice.

    PubMed

    Haga-Yamanaka, Sachiko; Ma, Limei; He, Jie; Qiu, Qiang; Lavis, Luke D; Looger, Loren L; Yu, C Ron

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian vomeronasal organ encodes pheromone information about gender, reproductive status, genetic background and individual differences. It remains unknown how pheromone information interacts to trigger innate behaviors. In this study, we identify vomeronasal receptors responsible for detecting female pheromones. A sub-group of V1re clade members recognizes gender-identifying cues in female urine. Multiple members of the V1rj clade are cognate receptors for urinary estrus signals, as well as for sulfated estrogen (SE) compounds. In both cases, the same cue activates multiple homologous receptors, suggesting redundancy in encoding female pheromone cues. Neither gender-specific cues nor SEs alone are sufficient to promote courtship behavior in male mice, whereas robust courtship behavior can be induced when the two cues are applied together. Thus, integrated action of different female cues is required in pheromone-triggered mating behavior. These results suggest a gating mechanism in the vomeronasal circuit in promoting specific innate behavior.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03025.001.

  7. Estrogen Signalling and the Metabolic Syndrome: Targeting the Hepatic Estrogen Receptor Alpha Action

    PubMed Central

    Matic, Marko; Bryzgalova, Galyna; Gao, Hui; Antonson, Per; Humire, Patricia; Omoto, Yoko; Portwood, Neil; Pramfalk, Camilla; Efendic, Suad; Berggren, Per-Olof; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke; Dahlman-Wright, Karin

    2013-01-01

    An increasing body of evidence now links estrogenic signalling with the metabolic syndrome (MS). Despite the beneficial estrogenic effects in reversing some of the MS symptoms, the underlying mechanisms remain largely undiscovered. We have previously shown that total estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) knockout (KO) mice exhibit hepatic insulin resistance. To determine whether liver-selective ablation of ERα recapitulates metabolic phenotypes of ERKO mice we generated a liver-selective ERαKO mouse model, LERKO. We demonstrate that LERKO mice have efficient reduction of ERα selectively within the liver. However, LERKO and wild type control mice do not differ in body weight, and have a comparable hormone profile as well as insulin and glucose response, even when challenged with a high fat diet. Furthermore, LERKO mice display very minor changes in their hepatic transcript profile. Collectively, our findings indicate that hepatic ERα action may not be the responsible factor for the previously identified hepatic insulin resistance in ERαKO mice. PMID:23451233

  8. Divergent signaling via SUMO modification: potential for CFTR modulation.

    PubMed

    Ahner, Annette; Gong, Xiaoyan; Frizzell, Raymond A

    2016-02-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is generally responsible for the cAMP/PKA regulated anion conductance at the apical membranes of secretory epithelial cells. Mutations in CFTR underlie cystic fibrosis (CF), in which the most common variant, F508del, causes protein misfolding and its proteasome-mediated degradation. A new pathway that contributes to mutant CFTR degradation is mediated by the small heat shock protein, Hsp27, which cooperates with Ubc9, the E2 enzyme for SUMOylation, to selectively conjugate mutant CFTR with SUMO-2/3. This SUMO paralog can form polychains, which are recognized by the ubiquitin E3 enzyme, RNF4, leading to CFTR ubiquitylation and recognition by the proteasome. We found also that F508del CFTR could be modified by SUMO-1, a paralog that does not support SUMO polychain formation. The use of different SUMO paralogs to modify and target a single substrate for divergent purposes is not uncommon. In this short review we discuss the possibility that conjugation with SUMO-1 could protect mutant CFTR from disposal by RNF4 and similar ubiquitin ligases. We hypothesize that such a pathway could contribute to therapeutic efforts to stabilize immature mutant CFTR and thereby enhance the action of therapeutics that correct CFTR trafficking to the apical membranes.

  9. Vertex evoked potentials in a rating-scale detection task: Relation to signal probability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Squires, K. C.; Squires, N. K.; Hillyard, S. A.

    1974-01-01

    Vertex evoked potentials were recorded from human subjects performing in an auditory detection task with rating scale responses. Three values of a priori probability of signal presentation were tested. The amplitudes of the N1 and P3 components of the vertex potential associated with correct detections of the signal were found to be systematically related to the strictness of the response criterion and independent of variations in a priori signal probability. No similar evoked potential components were found associated with signal absent judgements (misses and correct rejections) regardless of the confidence level of the judgement or signal probability. These results strongly support the contention that the form of the vertex evoked response is closely correlated with the subject's psychophysical decision regarding the presence or absence of a threshold level signal.

  10. Accelerated Lactate Dehydrogenase Activity Potentiates Osteoclastogenesis via NFATc1 Signaling.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Heejin; Lee, Kyunghee; Kim, Jin Man; Kwon, So Hyun; Lee, Seoung Hoon; Lee, Soo Young; Jeong, Daewon

    2016-01-01

    Osteoclasts seem to be metabolic active during their differentiation and bone-resorptive activation. However, the functional role of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), a tetrameric enzyme consisting of an A and/or B subunit that catalyzes interconversion of pyruvate to lactate, in RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation is not known. In this study, RANKL treatment induced gradual gene expression and activation of the LDH A2B2 isotype during osteoclast differentiation as well as the LDH A1B3 and B4 isotypes during osteoclast maturation after pre-osteoclast formation. Glucose consumption and lactate production in growth media were accelerated during osteoclast differentiation, together with enhanced expression of H+-lactate co-transporter and increased extracellular acidification, demonstrating that glycolytic metabolism was stimulated during differentiation. Further, oxygen consumption via mitochondria was stimulated during osteoclast differentiation. On the contrary, depletion of LDH-A or LDH-B subunit suppressed both glycolytic and mitochondrial metabolism, resulting in reduced mature osteoclast formation via decreased osteoclast precursor fusion and down-regulation of the osteoclastogenic critical transcription factor NFATc1 and its target genes. Collectively, our findings suggest that RANKL-induced LDH activation stimulates glycolytic and mitochondrial respiratory metabolism, facilitating mature osteoclast formation via osteoclast precursor fusion and NFATc1 signaling. PMID:27077737

  11. Accelerated Lactate Dehydrogenase Activity Potentiates Osteoclastogenesis via NFATc1 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Man; Kwon, So Hyun; Lee, Seoung Hoon; Lee, Soo Young; Jeong, Daewon

    2016-01-01

    Osteoclasts seem to be metabolic active during their differentiation and bone-resorptive activation. However, the functional role of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), a tetrameric enzyme consisting of an A and/or B subunit that catalyzes interconversion of pyruvate to lactate, in RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation is not known. In this study, RANKL treatment induced gradual gene expression and activation of the LDH A2B2 isotype during osteoclast differentiation as well as the LDH A1B3 and B4 isotypes during osteoclast maturation after pre-osteoclast formation. Glucose consumption and lactate production in growth media were accelerated during osteoclast differentiation, together with enhanced expression of H+-lactate co-transporter and increased extracellular acidification, demonstrating that glycolytic metabolism was stimulated during differentiation. Further, oxygen consumption via mitochondria was stimulated during osteoclast differentiation. On the contrary, depletion of LDH-A or LDH-B subunit suppressed both glycolytic and mitochondrial metabolism, resulting in reduced mature osteoclast formation via decreased osteoclast precursor fusion and down-regulation of the osteoclastogenic critical transcription factor NFATc1 and its target genes. Collectively, our findings suggest that RANKL-induced LDH activation stimulates glycolytic and mitochondrial respiratory metabolism, facilitating mature osteoclast formation via osteoclast precursor fusion and NFATc1 signaling. PMID:27077737

  12. An experimental study on a function of the cupula. Effect of cupula removal on the ampullary nerve action potential.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, M; Harada, Y; Sugata, Y

    1984-01-01

    We used a posterior semicircular canal that had been isolated from a frog. From the utricular side the ampulla was cut open at a position one third of the way along the long axis. The cupula was removed through this opening using a glass micropipette. The action potential from the posterior ampullary nerve was recorded before and after removal of the cupula. After removal, the action potential disappeared almost completely. When the cupula was put back on the crista, the action potential was restored. When the cupula was put back upside down, the action potential recovered, but to a lesser extent.

  13. The mode of action of quinidine on isolated rabbit atria interpreted from intracellular potential records.

    PubMed

    VAUGHAN WILLIAMS, E M

    1958-09-01

    An attempt has been made to show why quinidine, which has long been known not to lengthen the duration of the cardiac action potential, measured with external electrodes, and also not to lengthen, and sometimes to shorten, the absolute refractory period, nevertheless reduces the maximum frequency at which atria can respond to a stimulus. Simultaneous measurements have been made in electrically driven isolated rabbit atria of contractions, conduction velocity and intracellular potentials before and during exposure to a wide range of concentrations of quinidine sulphate. The resting potential remained undiminished, in contrast to the effect of quinidine on Purkinje fibres. In the therapeutic range of doses, up to 10 mg./l., the half-time for repolarization was either shortened or unchanged, thus providing an explanation for the failure of quinidine to prolong the absolute refractory period. In contrast, even at low concentrations of quinidine, conduction velocity and the rate of rise of the action potential were greatly slowed, and the height of the overshoot was reduced. The terminal phase of the action potential was prolonged. It is known that the rate of rise of the action potential is a function of the level of repolarization at which an impulse takes off (the more negative the take-off point, the faster the rate of rise). Normally, a stimulus introduced when repolarization has proceeded to 2/3 of the resting potential evokes a response with a rate of rise fast enough for propagation, so that the duration of the terminal 1/3 of the phase of repolarization has no influence upon the length of the effective refractory period. In the presence of quinidine, however, the rate of rise itself was directly reduced, thus repolarization had to proceed further before the critical take-off point was reached at which the rate of rise was fast enough for propagation, and the duration of the terminal phase of repolarization thus became significant. It has been concluded that

  14. Direction of action potential propagation influences calcium increases in distal dendrites of the cricket giant interneurons.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Hiroto; Baba, Yoshichika; Oka, Kotaro

    2002-10-01

    To understand the relationship between the propagation direction of action potentials and dendritic Ca(2+) elevation, simultaneous measurements of intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) and intradendritic membrane potential were performed in the wind-sensitive giant interneurons of the cricket. The dendritic Ca(2+) transients induced by synaptically-evoked action potentials had larger amplitudes than those induced by backpropagating spikes evoked by antidromic stimulation. The amplitude of the [Ca(2+)](i) changes induced by antidromic stimuli combined with subthreshold synaptic stimulation was not different from that of the Ca(2+) increases evoked by the backpropagating spikes alone. This result means that the synaptically activated Ca(2+) release from intracellular stores does not contribute to enhancement of Ca(2+) elevation induced by backpropagating spikes. On the other hand, the synaptically evoked action potentials were also increased at distal dendrites in which the Ca(2+) elevation was enhanced. When the dendritic and axonal spikes were simultaneously recorded, the delay between dendritic spike and ascending axonal spike depended upon which side of the cercal nerves was stimulated. Further, dual intracellular recording at different dendritic branches illustrated that the dendritic spike at the branch arborizing on the stimulated side preceded the spike recorded at the other side of the dendrite. These results suggest that the spike-initiation site shifts depending on the location of the activated postsynaptic site. It is proposed that the difference of spike propagation manner could change the action potential waveform at the distal dendrite, and could produce synaptic activity-dependent Ca(2+) dynamics in the giant interneurons.

  15. Event-related potentials reveal early activation of body part representations in action concept comprehension.

    PubMed

    Lu, Aitao; Liu, Jing; Zhang, John X

    2012-03-01

    With tasks involving action concept comprehension, many fMRI studies have reported brain activations in sensori-motor regions specific to effectors of the referent action. There is relatively less evidence whether such activations reflect early semantic access or late conceptual re-processing. Here we recorded event-related potentials when participants recognized noun-verb pairs. For Congruent pairs, the verb was the one most commonly associated with the noun (e.g., football-kick). Compared with a control condition, verbs in Congruent pairs showed priming effects in the time windows of 100-150 ms and 210-260 ms. Such activation seems to be specific to body part but not other aspects of the action as similar priming effect was also found when the noun and verb involved different actions though sharing the same body part (e.g., football-jump), documenting for the first time the early activation of body part representations in action concept comprehension. PMID:22306088

  16. Event-related potentials reveal early activation of body part representations in action concept comprehension.

    PubMed

    Lu, Aitao; Liu, Jing; Zhang, John X

    2012-03-01

    With tasks involving action concept comprehension, many fMRI studies have reported brain activations in sensori-motor regions specific to effectors of the referent action. There is relatively less evidence whether such activations reflect early semantic access or late conceptual re-processing. Here we recorded event-related potentials when participants recognized noun-verb pairs. For Congruent pairs, the verb was the one most commonly associated with the noun (e.g., football-kick). Compared with a control condition, verbs in Congruent pairs showed priming effects in the time windows of 100-150 ms and 210-260 ms. Such activation seems to be specific to body part but not other aspects of the action as similar priming effect was also found when the noun and verb involved different actions though sharing the same body part (e.g., football-jump), documenting for the first time the early activation of body part representations in action concept comprehension.

  17. Dual action antifungal small molecule modulates multidrug efflux and TOR signaling.

    PubMed

    Shekhar-Guturja, Tanvi; Gunaherath, G M Kamal B; Wijeratne, E M Kithsiri; Lambert, Jean-Philippe; Averette, Anna F; Lee, Soo Chan; Kim, Taeyup; Bahn, Yong-Sun; Tripodi, Farida; Ammar, Ron; Döhl, Katja; Niewola-Staszkowska, Karolina; Schmitt, Lutz; Loewith, Robbie J; Roth, Frederick P; Sanglard, Dominique; Andes, David; Nislow, Corey; Coccetti, Paola; Gingras, Anne-Claude; Heitman, Joseph; Gunatilaka, A A Leslie; Cowen, Leah E

    2016-10-01

    There is an urgent need for new strategies to treat invasive fungal infections, which are a leading cause of human mortality. Here, we establish two activities of the natural product beauvericin, which potentiates the activity of the most widely deployed class of antifungal against the leading human fungal pathogens, blocks the emergence of drug resistance, and renders antifungal-resistant pathogens responsive to treatment in mammalian infection models. Harnessing genome sequencing of beauvericin-resistant mutants, affinity purification of a biotinylated beauvericin analog, and biochemical and genetic assays reveals that beauvericin blocks multidrug efflux and inhibits the global regulator TORC1 kinase, thereby activating the protein kinase CK2 and inhibiting the molecular chaperone Hsp90. Substitutions in the multidrug transporter Pdr5 that enable beauvericin efflux impair antifungal efflux, thereby impeding resistance to the drug combination. Thus, dual targeting of multidrug efflux and TOR signaling provides a powerful, broadly effective therapeutic strategy for treating fungal infectious disease that evades resistance.

  18. Dual action antifungal small molecule modulates multidrug efflux and TOR signaling.

    PubMed

    Shekhar-Guturja, Tanvi; Gunaherath, G M Kamal B; Wijeratne, E M Kithsiri; Lambert, Jean-Philippe; Averette, Anna F; Lee, Soo Chan; Kim, Taeyup; Bahn, Yong-Sun; Tripodi, Farida; Ammar, Ron; Döhl, Katja; Niewola-Staszkowska, Karolina; Schmitt, Lutz; Loewith, Robbie J; Roth, Frederick P; Sanglard, Dominique; Andes, David; Nislow, Corey; Coccetti, Paola; Gingras, Anne-Claude; Heitman, Joseph; Gunatilaka, A A Leslie; Cowen, Leah E

    2016-10-01

    There is an urgent need for new strategies to treat invasive fungal infections, which are a leading cause of human mortality. Here, we establish two activities of the natural product beauvericin, which potentiates the activity of the most widely deployed class of antifungal against the leading human fungal pathogens, blocks the emergence of drug resistance, and renders antifungal-resistant pathogens responsive to treatment in mammalian infection models. Harnessing genome sequencing of beauvericin-resistant mutants, affinity purification of a biotinylated beauvericin analog, and biochemical and genetic assays reveals that beauvericin blocks multidrug efflux and inhibits the global regulator TORC1 kinase, thereby activating the protein kinase CK2 and inhibiting the molecular chaperone Hsp90. Substitutions in the multidrug transporter Pdr5 that enable beauvericin efflux impair antifungal efflux, thereby impeding resistance to the drug combination. Thus, dual targeting of multidrug efflux and TOR signaling provides a powerful, broadly effective therapeutic strategy for treating fungal infectious disease that evades resistance. PMID:27571477

  19. Potentiators of Defective ΔF508-CFTR Gating that Do Not Interfere with Corrector Action.

    PubMed

    Phuan, Puay-Wah; Veit, Guido; Tan, Joseph A; Finkbeiner, Walter E; Lukacs, Gergely L; Verkman, A S

    2015-10-01

    Combination drug therapies under development for cystic fibrosis caused by the ∆F508 mutation in cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) include a "corrector" to improve its cellular processing and a "potentiator" to improve its chloride channel function. Recently, it was reported that the approved potentiator N-(2,4-di-tert-butyl-5-hydroxyphenyl)-4-oxo-1,4-dihydroquinoline-3-carboxamide (Ivacaftor) reduces ∆F508-CFTR cellular stability and the efficacy of investigational correctors, including 3-(6-[([1-(2,2-difluoro-1,3-benzodioxol-5-yl)cyclopropyl]carbonyl) amino]-3-methyl-2-pyridinyl)-benzoic acid and 1-(2,2-difluoro-1,3-benzodioxol-5-yl)-N-(1-[(2R)-2,3-dihydroxypropyl]-6-fluoro-2-(2-hydroxy-1,1-dimethylethyl)-1H-indol-5-yl), which might contribute to the modest reported efficacy of combination therapy in clinical trials. Here, we report the identification and characterization of potentiators that do not interfere with ∆F508-CFTR stability or corrector action. High-throughput screening and structure-activity analysis identified several classes of potentiators that do not impair corrector action, including tetrahydrobenzothiophenes, thiooxoaminothiazoles, and pyrazole-pyrrole-isoxazoles. The most potent compounds have an EC(50) for ∆F508-CFTR potentiation down to 18 nM and do not reduce corrector efficacy in heterologous ∆F508-CFTR-expressing cells or primary cultures of ∆F508/∆F508 human bronchial epithelia. The ΔF508-CFTR potentiators also activated wild-type and G551D CFTR, albeit weakly. The efficacy of combination therapy for cystic fibrosis caused by the ∆F508 mutation may be improved by replacement of Ivacaftor with a potentiator that does not interfere with corrector action. PMID:26245207

  20. Wnt signaling in bone formation and its therapeutic potential for bone diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeong Hwan; Liu, Xing; Wang, Jinhua; Chen, Xiang; Zhang, Hongyu; Kim, Stephanie H.; Cui, Jing; Li, Ruidong; Zhang, Wenwen; Kong, Yuhan; Zhang, Jiye; Shui, Wei; Lamplot, Joseph; Rogers, Mary Rose; Zhao, Chen; Wang, Ning; Rajan, Prashant; Tomal, Justin; Statz, Joseph; Wu, Ningning; Luu, Hue H.; Haydon, Rex C.

    2013-01-01

    The Wnt signaling pathway plays an important role not only in embryonic development but also in the maintenance and differentiation of the stem cells in adulthood. In particular, Wnt signaling has been shown as an important regulatory pathway in the osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells. Induction of the Wnt signaling pathway promotes bone formation while inactivation of the pathway leads to osteopenic states. Our current understanding of Wnt signaling in osteogenesis elucidates the molecular mechanisms of classic osteogenic pathologies. Activating and inactivating aberrations of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway in osteogenesis results in sclerosteosis and osteoporosis respectively. Recent studies have sought to target the Wnt signaling pathway to treat osteogenic disorders. Potential therapeutic approaches attempt to stimulate the Wnt signaling pathway by upregulating the intracellular mediators of the Wnt signaling cascade and inhibiting the endogenous antagonists of the pathway. Antibodies against endogenous antagonists, such as sclerostin and dickkopf-1, have demonstrated promising results in promoting bone formation and fracture healing. Lithium, an inhibitor of glycogen synthase kinase 3β, has also been reported to stimulate osteogenesis by stabilizing β catenin. Although manipulating the Wnt signaling pathway has abundant therapeutic potential, it requires cautious approach due to risks of tumorigenesis. The present review discusses the role of the Wnt signaling pathway in osteogenesis and examines its targeted therapeutic potential. PMID:23514963

  1. Assessment of TTX-s and TTX-r Action Potential Conduction along Neurites of NGF and GDNF Cultured Porcine DRG Somata

    PubMed Central

    Jonas, Robin; Klusch, Andreas; Schmelz, Martin; Petersen, Marlen; Carr, Richard W.

    2015-01-01

    Nine isoforms of voltage-gated sodium channels (NaV) have been characterized and in excitable tissues they are responsible for the initiation and conduction of action potentials. For primary afferent neurons residing in dorsal root ganglia (DRG), individual neurons may express multiple NaV isoforms extending the neuron’s functional capabilities. Since expression of NaV isoforms can be differentially regulated by neurotrophic factors we have examined the functional consequences of exposure to either nerve growth factor (NGF) or glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) on action potential conduction in outgrowing cultured porcine neurites of DRG neurons. Calcium signals were recorded using the exogenous intensity based calcium indicator Fluo-8®, AM. In 94 neurons, calcium signals were conducted along neurites in response to electrical stimulation of the soma. At an image acquisition rate of 25 Hz it was possible to discern calcium transients in response to individual electrical stimuli. The peak amplitude of electrically-evoked calcium signals was limited by the ability of the neuron to follow the stimulus frequency. The stimulus frequency required to evoke a half-maximal calcium response was approximately 3 Hz at room temperature. In 13 of 14 (93%) NGF-responsive neurites, TTX-r NaV isoforms alone were sufficient to support propagated signals. In contrast, calcium signals mediated by TTX-r NaVs were evident in only 4 of 11 (36%) neurites from somata cultured in GDNF. This establishes a basis for assessing action potential signaling using calcium imaging techniques in individual cultured neurites and suggests that, in the pig, afferent nociceptor classes relying on the functional properties of TTX-r NaV isoforms, such as cold-nociceptors, most probably derive from NGF-responsive DRG neurons. PMID:26407014

  2. Post-tetanic mechanical tension and evoked action potentials in McArdle's disease

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, N. J.; Buchthal, F.; Ebbesen, F.; Kamieniecka, Z.; Krarup, C.

    1977-01-01

    The tension produced by the cramp evoked in the adductor pollicis muscle by repetitive stimuli to the nerve (20/s for 50 s) and by full voluntary effort in the brachial biceps was measured in a patient with McArdle's disease. The contracture was 17% of the peaktetanic tension, and was not associated with action potentials. Twitches superimposed on the contracture were at most diminished to half, as were their action potentials. Both slow and fast muscle fibres participated in the contracture. The contraction time of the twitches elicited after the tetanus was prolonged more in the patient than in a normal subject of the same age. There was evidence of delayed firing, first observed 90 seconds after the peak of the contracture. The patient had electromyographic and histological signs of myopathy. PMID:271684

  3. FHF-independent conduction of action potentials along the leak-resistant cerebellar granule cell axon

    PubMed Central

    Dover, Katarzyna; Marra, Christopher; Solinas, Sergio; Popovic, Marko; Subramaniyam, Sathyaa; Zecevic, Dejan; D'Angelo, Egidio; Goldfarb, Mitchell

    2016-01-01

    Neurons in vertebrate central nervous systems initiate and conduct sodium action potentials in distinct subcellular compartments that differ architecturally and electrically. Here, we report several unanticipated passive and active properties of the cerebellar granule cell's unmyelinated axon. Whereas spike initiation at the axon initial segment relies on sodium channel (Nav)-associated fibroblast growth factor homologous factor (FHF) proteins to delay Nav inactivation, distal axonal Navs show little FHF association or FHF requirement for high-frequency transmission, velocity and waveforms of conducting action potentials. In addition, leak conductance density along the distal axon is estimated as <1% that of somatodendritic membrane. The faster inactivation rate of FHF-free Navs together with very low axonal leak conductance serves to minimize ionic fluxes and energetic demand during repetitive spike conduction and at rest. The absence of FHFs from Navs at nodes of Ranvier in the central nervous system suggests a similar mechanism of current flux minimization along myelinated axons. PMID:27666389

  4. Attention-dependent reductions in burstiness and action potential height in macaque area V4

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Emily B.; Mitchell, Jude F.; Reynolds, John H.

    2013-01-01

    Attention improves the encoding of visual stimuli. One mechanism that is implicated in facilitating sensory encoding is the firing of action potentials in bursts. We tested the hypothesis that when spatial attention is directed to a stimulus, this causes an increase in burst firing to the attended stimulus. To the contrary, we found an attention-dependent reduction in burstiness among putative pyramidal neurons in macaque area V4. We accounted for this using a conductance-based Hodgkin-Huxley style model in which attentional modulation stems from scaling excitation and inhibition. The model exhibited attention-dependent increases in firing rate and made the surprising and correct prediction that when attention is directed into a neuron’s receptive field, this reduces action potential height. The model thus provided a unified explanation for three distinct forms of attentional modulation, two of them novel, and implicates scaling of the responses of excitatory and inhibitory input populations in mediating attention. PMID:23852114

  5. Tuning of Ranvier node and internode properties in myelinated axons to adjust action potential timing

    PubMed Central

    Ford, Marc C.; Alexandrova, Olga; Cossell, Lee; Stange-Marten, Annette; Sinclair, James; Kopp-Scheinpflug, Conny; Pecka, Michael; Attwell, David; Grothe, Benedikt

    2015-01-01

    Action potential timing is fundamental to information processing; however, its determinants are not fully understood. Here we report unexpected structural specializations in the Ranvier nodes and internodes of auditory brainstem axons involved in sound localization. Myelination properties deviated significantly from the traditionally assumed structure. Axons responding best to low-frequency sounds had a larger diameter than high-frequency axons but, surprisingly, shorter internodes. Simulations predicted that this geometry helps to adjust the conduction velocity and timing of action potentials within the circuit. Electrophysiological recordings in vitro and in vivo confirmed higher conduction velocities in low-frequency axons. Moreover, internode length decreased and Ranvier node diameter increased progressively along the distal axon segments, which simulations show was essential to ensure precisely timed depolarization of the giant calyx of Held presynaptic terminal. Thus, individual anatomical parameters of myelinated axons can be tuned to optimize pathways involved in temporal processing. PMID:26305015

  6. Action potential wavelength restitution predicts alternans and arrhythmia in murine Scn5a+/− hearts

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Gareth D K; Guzadhur, Laila; Sabir, Ian N; Grace, Andrew A; Huang, Christopher L-H

    2013-01-01

    Reductions in cardiac action potential wavelength, and the consequent wavebreak, have been implicated in arrhythmogenesis. Tachyarrhythmias are more common in the Brugada syndrome, particularly following pharmacological challenge, previously modelled using Scn5a+/− murine hearts. Propagation latencies and action potential durations (APDs) from monophasic action potential recordings were used to assess wavelength changes with heart rate in Langendorff-perfused wild-type (WT) and Scn5a+/− hearts. Recordings were obtained from right (RV) and left (LV) ventricular, epicardial and endocardial surfaces during incremental pacing, before and following flecainide or quinidine challenge. Conduction velocities (θ′), action potential wavelengths (λ′= APD ×θ′), and their corresponding alternans depended non-linearly upon diastolic interval (DI). Maximum θ′ was lower in Scn5a+/− RV epicardium than endocardium. Flecainide further reduced θ′, accentuating this RV conduction block. Quinidine reduced maximum θ′ in WT and caused earlier conduction failure in the RV of both Scn5a+/− and WT. Use of recovery wavelengths (λ′0= DI ×θ′) rather than DI, provided novel λ restitution plots of λ′ against λ′0, which sum to a basic cycle distance permitting feedback analysis. λ′ restitution gradient better correlated with alternans magnitude than either APD or θ restitution gradient. The large differences in θ′ and APD restitution contrasted with minor differences in maximum λ′ between epi- and endocardia of untreated hearts, and quinidine-treated WT hearts. Strikingly, all regions and conditions converged to a common instability point, implying a conserved relationship. Flecainide or quinidine decreased the pacing rates at which this occurred, through reducing basic cycle distance, in the Scn5a+/− RV epicardium, directly predictive of its arrhythmic phenotype. PMID:23836691

  7. Compound action potentials recorded in the human spinal cord during neurostimulation for pain relief.

    PubMed

    Parker, John L; Karantonis, Dean M; Single, Peter S; Obradovic, Milan; Cousins, Michael J

    2012-03-01

    Electrical stimulation of the spinal cord provides effective pain relief to hundreds of thousands of chronic neuropathic pain sufferers. The therapy involves implantation of an electrode array into the epidural space of the subject and then stimulation of the dorsal column with electrical pulses. The stimulation depolarises axons and generates propagating action potentials that interfere with the perception of pain. Despite the long-term clinical experience with spinal cord stimulation, the mechanism of action is not understood, and no direct evidence of the properties of neurons being stimulated has been presented. Here we report novel measurements of evoked compound action potentials from the spinal cords of patients undergoing stimulation for pain relief. The results reveal that Aβ sensory nerve fibres are recruited at therapeutic stimulation levels and the Aβ potential amplitude correlates with the degree of coverage of the painful area. Aβ-evoked responses are not measurable below a threshold stimulation level, and their amplitude increases with increasing stimulation current. At high currents, additional late responses are observed. Our results contribute towards efforts to define the mechanism of spinal cord stimulation. The minimally invasive recording technique we have developed provides data previously obtained only through microelectrode techniques in spinal cords of animals. Our observations also allow the development of systems that use neuronal recording in a feedback loop to control neurostimulation on a continuous basis and deliver more effective pain relief. This is one of numerous benefits that in vivo electrophysiological recording can bring to a broad range of neuromodulation therapies. PMID:22188868

  8. Noisy unmaskers of multistability of periodic rhythms in a model of the ventricular cardiac action potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surovyatkina, Elena; Egorchenkov, Roman; Ivanov, Guennady

    2007-06-01

    The coexistence of different dynamical regimes of cardiac cell-model at a fixed set of stimulation parameters, i.e. multistability, revealed by noise is presented in this paper. Numerical simulations are performed using Luo-Rudy (LR1) action potential model. Numerical experiments with LR1 model conducted via noisy periodical stimulation showed the coexistence of several periodic rhythms. Weak noise in period of stimulation causes a hopping process between all the (meta-) stable rhythms of cell-model. This process is reflected in several parallel branches of the bifurcation diagram: noise unveils new, invisible before, stable rhythms which could appear in this model at different initial conditions. The phenomenon of multistability is directly evidenced by other numerical experiments: we have established the multistability property of a cell consisting in the fact that different initial conditions of stimulation (different extrasystole application times) lead to different stable periodic rhythms. We have obtained the shaping of attraction basins on the action potential curves. Such basins of attraction contain a set of initial conditions which determinate a stable periodic rhythm. We have found a close association between the attraction basins of the complex rhythms on the curves of action potential and the cardiac vulnerable windows on ECG record, during which extra stimuli can induce life threatening arrhythmias. Obtained results allow us to make a conclusion that multistability is very important for the electrical conduction system of the heart from the cell level to the integrated function of the heart.

  9. Seasonal variation in conduction velocity of action potentials in squid giant axons.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, J J; Bezanilla, F

    2000-10-01

    To determine whether the electrical properties of the squid giant axon are seasonally acclimated, action potentials, recorded at different temperatures, were compared between giant axons isolated from Loligo pealei caught in May, from relatively cold waters (approximately 10 degrees-12 degrees C), and in August, from relatively warm waters (approximately 20 degrees C). Parameters relating to the duration of the action potential (e.g., maximum rate of rise, maximum rate of fall, and duration at half-peak) did not change seasonally. The relationship between conduction velocity and temperature remained constant between seasons as well, in spite of the fact that May axons were significantly larger than August axons. When normalized to the fiber diameter, mean May conduction velocities were 83% of the August values at all temperatures tested, and analysis of the rise time of the action potential foot suggested that a change in the axoplasmic resistivity was responsible for this difference. Direct measurements of axoplasmic resistance further supported this hypothesis. Thus seasonal changes in the giant axon's size and resistivity are not consistent with compensatory thermal acclimation, but instead serve to maintain a constant relationship between conduction velocity and temperature.

  10. The electrogenic Na+/HCO3− cotransport modulates resting membrane potential and action potential duration in cat ventricular myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Villa-Abrille, María C; Petroff, Martín G Vila; Aiello, Ernesto A

    2007-01-01

    Perforated whole-cell configuration of patch clamp was used to determine the contribution of the electrogenic Na+/HCO3− cotransport (NBC) on the shape of the action potential in cat ventricular myocytes. Switching from Hepes to HCO3− buffer at constant extracellular pH (pHo) hyperpolarized resting membrane potential (RMP) by 2.67 ± 0.42 mV (n = 9, P < 0.05). The duration of action potential measured at 50% of repolarization time (APD50) was 35.8 ± 6.8% shorter in the presence of HCO3− than in its absence (n = 9, P < 0.05). The anion blocker SITS prevented and reversed the HCO3−-induced hyperpolarization and shortening of APD. In addition, no HCO3−-induced hyperpolarization and APD shortening was observed in the absence of extracellular Na+. Quasi-steady-state currents were evoked by 8 s duration voltage-clamped ramps ranging from −130 to +30 mV. A novel component of SITS-sensitive current was observed in the presence of HCO3−. The HCO3−-sensitive current reversed at −87 ± 5 mV (n = 7), a value close to the expected reversal potential of an electrogenic Na+/HCO3− cotransport with a HCO3−:Na+ stoichiometry ratio of 2: 1. The above results allow us to conclude that the cardiac electrogenic Na+/HCO3− cotransport has a relevant influence on RMP and APD of cat ventricular cells. PMID:17138608

  11. Carbon nanotube multi-electrode array chips for noninvasive real-time measurement of dopamine, action potentials, and postsynaptic potentials.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Ikuro; Fukuda, Mao; Shirakawa, Keiichi; Jiko, Hideyasu; Gotoh, Masao

    2013-11-15

    Multi-electrode arrays (MEAs) can be used for noninvasive, real-time, and long-term recording of electrophysiological activity and changes in the extracellular chemical microenvironment. Neural network organization, neuronal excitability, synaptic and phenotypic plasticity, and drug responses may be monitored by MEAs, but it is still difficult to measure presynaptic activity, such as neurotransmitter release, from the presynaptic bouton. In this study, we describe the development of planar carbon nanotube (CNT)-MEA chips that can measure both the release of the neurotransmitter dopamine as well as electrophysiological responses such as field postsynaptic potentials (fPSPs) and action potentials (APs). These CNT-MEA chips were fabricated by electroplating the indium-tin oxide (ITO) microelectrode surfaces. The CNT-plated ITO electrode exhibited electrochemical response, having much higher current density compared with the bare ITO electrode. Chronoamperometric measurements using these CNT-MEA chips detected dopamine at nanomolar concentrations. By placing mouse striatal brain slices on the CNT-MEA chip, we successfully measured synaptic dopamine release from spontaneous firings with a high S/N ratio of 62. Furthermore, APs and fPSPs were measured from cultured hippocampal neurons and slices with high temporal resolution and a 100-fold greater S/N ratio. Our CNT-MEA chips made it possible to measure neurotransmitter dopamine (presynaptic activities), postsynaptic potentials, and action potentials, which have a central role in information processing in the neuronal network. CNT-MEA chips could prove useful for in vitro studies of stem cell differentiation, drug screening and toxicity, synaptic plasticity, and pathogenic processes involved in epilepsy, stroke, and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:23774164

  12. Next-generation sequencing identifies high frequency of mutations in potentially clinically actionable genes in sebaceous carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Tetzlaff, Michael T; Singh, Rajesh R; Seviour, Elena G; Curry, Jonathan L; Hudgens, Courtney W; Bell, Diana; Wimmer, Daniel A; Ning, Jing; Czerniak, Bogdan A; Zhang, Li; Davies, Michael A; Prieto, Victor G; Broaddus, Russell R; Ram, Prahlad; Luthra, Rajyalakshmi; Esmaeli, Bita

    2016-09-01

    Sebaceous carcinoma (SC) is a rare but aggressive malignancy with frequent recurrence and metastases. Surgery is the mainstay of therapy, but effective systemic therapies are lacking because the molecular alterations driving SC remain poorly understood. To identify these, we performed whole-exome next-generation sequencing of 409 cancer-associated genes on 27 SCs (18 primary/locally recurrent ocular, 5 paired metastatic ocular, and 4 primary extraocular) from 20 patients. In ocular SC, we identified 139 non-synonymous somatic mutations (median/lesion 3; range 0-23). Twenty-five of 139 mutations (18%) occurred in potentially clinically actionable genes in 6 of 16 patients. The most common mutations were mutations in TP53 (n = 9), RB1 (n = 6), PIK3CA (n = 2), PTEN (n = 2), ERBB2 (n = 2), and NF1 (n = 2). TP53 and RB1 mutations were restricted to ocular SC and correlated with aberrant TP53 and RB protein expression. Systematic pathway analyses demonstrated convergence of these mutations to activation of the PI3K signalling cascade, and PI3K pathway activation was confirmed in tumours with PTEN and/or PIK3CA mutations. Considerable inter-tumoural heterogeneity was observed between paired primary and metastatic ocular SCs. In primary extraocular SC, we identified 77 non-synonymous somatic mutations (median/lesion 22.5; range 3-29). This overall higher mutational load was attributed to a microsatellite instability phenotype in three of four patients and somatically acquired mutations in mismatch repair genes in two of four patients. Eighteen of 77 mutations (23%) were in potentially clinically actionable genes in three of four patients, including BTK, FGFR2, PDGFRB, HRAS, and NF1 mutations. Identification of potentially clinically actionable mutations in 9 of 20 SC patients (45%) underscores the importance of next-generation sequencing to expand the spectrum of genotype-matched targeted therapies. Frequent activation of PI3K signalling pathways provides a strong

  13. ACTION-SPACE CLUSTERING OF TIDAL STREAMS TO INFER THE GALACTIC POTENTIAL

    SciTech Connect

    Sanderson, Robyn E.; Helmi, Amina; Hogg, David W.

    2015-03-10

    We present a new method for constraining the Milky Way halo gravitational potential by simultaneously fitting multiple tidal streams. This method requires three-dimensional positions and velocities for all stars to be fit, but does not require identification of any specific stream or determination of stream membership for any star. We exploit the principle that the action distribution of stream stars is most clustered when the potential used to calculate the actions is closest to the true potential. Clustering is quantified with the Kullback-Leibler Divergence (KLD), which also provides conditional uncertainties for our parameter estimates. We show, for toy Gaia-like data in a spherical isochrone potential, that maximizing the KLD of the action distribution relative to a smoother distribution recovers the input potential. The precision depends on the observational errors and number of streams; using K III giants as tracers, we measure the enclosed mass at the average radius of the sample stars accurate to 3% and precise to 20%-40%. Recovery of the scale radius is precise to 25%, biased 50% high by the small galactocentric distance range of stars in our mock sample (1-25 kpc, or about three scale radii, with mean 6.5 kpc). 20-25 streams with at least 100 stars each are required for a stable confidence interval. With radial velocities (RVs) to 100 kpc, all parameters are determined with ∼10% accuracy and 20% precision (1.3% accuracy for the enclosed mass), underlining the need to complete the RV catalog for faint halo stars observed by Gaia.

  14. Auditory object salience: human cortical processing of non-biological action sounds and their acoustic signal attributes

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, James W.; Talkington, William J.; Tallaksen, Katherine C.; Frum, Chris A.

    2012-01-01

    Whether viewed or heard, an object in action can be segmented as a distinct salient event based on a number of different sensory cues. In the visual system, several low-level attributes of an image are processed along parallel hierarchies, involving intermediate stages wherein gross-level object form and/or motion features are extracted prior to stages that show greater specificity for different object categories (e.g., people, buildings, or tools). In the auditory system, though relying on a rather different set of low-level signal attributes, meaningful real-world acoustic events and “auditory objects” can also be readily distinguished from background scenes. However, the nature of the acoustic signal attributes or gross-level perceptual features that may be explicitly processed along intermediate cortical processing stages remain poorly understood. Examining mechanical and environmental action sounds, representing two distinct non-biological categories of action sources, we had participants assess the degree to which each sound was perceived as object-like versus scene-like. We re-analyzed data from two of our earlier functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) task paradigms (Engel et al., 2009) and found that scene-like action sounds preferentially led to activation along several midline cortical structures, but with strong dependence on listening task demands. In contrast, bilateral foci along the superior temporal gyri (STG) showed parametrically increasing activation to action sounds rated as more “object-like,” independent of sound category or task demands. Moreover, these STG regions also showed parametric sensitivity to spectral structure variations (SSVs) of the action sounds—a quantitative measure of change in entropy of the acoustic signals over time—and the right STG additionally showed parametric sensitivity to measures of mean entropy and harmonic content of the environmental sounds. Analogous to the visual system, intermediate stages

  15. Antibacterial free fatty acids: activities, mechanisms of action and biotechnological potential.

    PubMed

    Desbois, Andrew P; Smith, Valerie J

    2010-02-01

    Amongst the diverse and potent biological activities of free fatty acids (FFAs) is the ability to kill or inhibit the growth of bacteria. The antibacterial properties of FFAs are used by many organisms to defend against parasitic or pathogenic bacteria. Whilst their antibacterial mode of action is still poorly understood, the prime target of FFA action is the cell membrane, where FFAs disrupt the electron transport chain and oxidative phosphorylation. Besides interfering with cellular energy production, FFA action may also result from the inhibition of enzyme activity, impairment of nutrient uptake, generation of peroxidation and auto-oxidation degradation products or direct lysis of bacterial cells. Their broad spectrum of activity, non-specific mode of action and safety makes them attractive as antibacterial agents for various applications in medicine, agriculture and food preservation, especially where the use of conventional antibiotics is undesirable or prohibited. Moreover, the evolution of inducible FFA-resistant phenotypes is less problematic than with conventional antibiotics. The potential for commercial or biomedical exploitation of antibacterial FFAs, especially for those from natural sources, is discussed.

  16. Monophasic action potential recordings during acute changes in ventricular loading induced by the Valsalva manoeuvre.

    PubMed Central

    Taggart, P; Sutton, P; John, R; Lab, M; Swanton, H

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--The strong association between ventricular arrhythmia and ventricular dysfunction is unexplained. This study was designed to investigate a mechanism by which a change in ventricular loading could alter the time course of repolarisation and hence refractoriness. A possible mechanism may be a direct effect of an altered pattern of contraction on ventricular repolarisation and hence refractoriness. This relation has been termed contraction-excitation feedback or mechano-electric feedback. METHODS--Monophasic action potentials were recorded from the left ventricular endocardium as a measure of the time course of local repolarisation. The Valsalva manoeuvre was used to change ventricular loading by increasing the intrathoracic pressure and impeding venous return, and hence reducing ventricular pressure and volume (ventricular unloading). PATIENTS--23 patients undergoing routine cardiac catheterisation procedures: seven with no angiographic evidence of abnormal wall motion or history of myocardial infarction (normal), five with a history of myocardial infarction but with normal wall motion, and 10 with angiographic evidence of abnormal wall motion--with or without previous infarction. One patient was a transplant recipient and was analysed separately. SETTING--Tertiary referral centre for cardiology. RESULTS--In patients with normal ventricles during the unloading phase of the Valsalva manoeuvre (mean (SD)) monophasic action potential duration shortened from 311 (47) ms to 295 (47) ms (p less than 0.001). After release of the forced expiration as venous return was restored the monophasic action potential duration lengthened from 285 (44) ms to 304 (44) ms (p less than 0.0001). In the group with evidence of abnormal wall motion the direction of change of action potential duration during the strain phase was normal in 7/21 observations, abnormal in 6/21, and showed no clear change in 8/21. During the release phase 11/20 observations were normal, five abnormal

  17. Action potential in a plant cell lowers the light requirement for non-photochemical energy-dependent quenching of chlorophyll fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Krupenina, Natalia A; Bulychev, Alexander A

    2007-06-01

    This study deals with effects of membrane excitation on photosynthesis and cell protection against excessive light, manifested in non-photochemical quenching (NPQ). In Chara corallina cells, NPQ and pericellular pH displayed coordinated spatial patterns along the length of the cell. The NPQ values were lower in H(+)-extruding cell regions (external pH approximately 6.5) than in high pH regions (pH approximately 9.5). Generation of an action potential by applying a pulse of electric current caused NPQ to increase within 30-60 s. This effect, manifested as a long-lived drop of maximum chlorophyll fluorescence (F(m)'), occurred at lower photosynthetic flux densities (PFD) in the alkaline as compared to acidic cell regions. The light response curve of NPQ shifted, after generation of an action potential, towards lower PFD. The release of NPQ by nigericin and the rapid reversal of action potential-triggered NPQ in darkness indicate its relation to thylakoid DeltapH. Generation of an action potential shortly after darkening converted the chloroplasts into a latent state with the F(m) identical to that of unexcited cells. This state transformed to the quenched state after turning on weak light that was insufficient for NPQ prior to membrane excitation of the cells. The ionophore, A23187, shifted NPQ plots similarly to the action potential effect, consistent with a likely role of a rise in the cytosolic Ca(2+) level in the action potential-induced quenching. The results suggest that a rapid electric signal, across the plasma membrane, might exert long-lived effects on photosynthesis and chlorophyll fluorescence through ion flux-mediated pathways.

  18. Methyl farnesoate action, and morphogenetic signaling through the ligand binding pocket of the ortholog of the retinoid X receptor, in higher dipter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most attention on metamorphic signaling by small terpenoids has focused action by juvenile hormone (JH) through bHLH-PAS proteins (e.g., MET and GCE), especially as that signaling axis intersects with ecdysteroid action through the receptor EcR. However, a long-standing series of endocrine and pharm...

  19. Potentiation of antimalarial drug action by chlorpheniramine against multidrug-resistant Plasmodium falciparum in vitro.

    PubMed

    Nakornchai, Sunan; Konthiang, Phattanapong

    2006-09-01

    Chlorpheniramine, a histamine H1 receptor antagonist, was assayed for in vitro antimalarial activity against multidrug-resistant Plasmodium falciparum K1 strain and chloroquine-resistant P. falciparum T9/94 clone, by measuring the 3H-hypoxanthine incorporation. Chlorphenirame inhibited P. falciparum K1 and T9/94 growth with IC50 values of 136.0+/-40.2 microM and 102.0+/-22.6 microM respectively. A combination of antimalarial drug and chlorpheniramine was tested against resistant P. falciparum in vitro. Isobologram analysis showed that chlorpheniramine exerts marked synergistic action on chloroquine against P. falciparum K1 and T9/94. Chlorpheniramine also potentiated antimalarial action of mefloquine, quinine or pyronaridine against both of the resistant strains of P. falciparum. However, chlorpheniramine antagonism with artesunate was obtained in both P. falciparum K1 and T9/94. The results in this study indicate that antihistaminic drugs may be promising candidates for potentiating antimalarial drug action against drug resistant malarial parasites.

  20. The conundrum of inhibitory signaling by ITAM-containing immunoreceptors: potential molecular mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Waterman, Paul M.; Cambier, John C.

    2010-01-01

    Immunoreceptor signals must be appropriately transduced and regulated to achieve effective immunity while controlling inflammation and autoimmunity. It is generally held that these processes are mediated by the interplay of distinct activating and inhibitory receptors via conserved activating (ITAM) and inhibitory (ITIM) signaling motifs. However, recent evidence indicates that under certain conditions incomplete phosphorylation of ITAM tyrosines leads to inhibitory signals. This new regulatory function of ITAMs has been termed ITAMi (inhibitory ITAM). Here we discuss the potential molecular mechanisms of inhibitory signaling by ITAM-containing receptors. PMID:20875413

  1. Phasic changes in intracellular pH during action potentials of sheep Purkinje fibres.

    PubMed

    Pressler, M L

    1988-01-01

    Regulation of intracellular pH (pHi) and the relationship between H+ and Ca2+ may vary during activity. Ion-selective microelectrodes were used to record pHi during action potentials of sheep Purkinje fibres prolonged by low temperature (21 degrees C) and elevated CO2 content. Intracellular pH also was measured during changes in extracellular calcium concentration, [Ca2+]o. Cytosolic alkalinization (peak pHi change, 0.03-0.05) was observed during the long action-potential plateau and transient acidification (0.01-0.02 units) upon repolarization. Potassium-induced depolarization to plateau potentials (i.e. to -15 +/- 2 mV) simulated the peak magnitude of the alkalinization. However, compensation for the alkalinization occurred at a faster rate during the action potential (8.9 +/- 4.3 nM/min) than during K+ depolarization (1.2 +/- 0.5 nM/min). In comparison, the cytoplasm acidified in resting fibres (0.06-0.07 log units) during changes of [Ca2+]o thought to increase intracellular calcium concentration. Alterations of pHi were translated into changes of proton concentration ([H+]i). Ten- to twenty-fold elevation of [Ca2+]o evoked a comparable change in [H+]i (mean increase, 5.7 nM) but oppositely directed from that during the plateau (mean decrease, 8.8 nM). The findings in resting fibres seem consistent with displacement of bound protons by Ca2+. In contrast, the initial change in pHi during the plateau is proposed to be consequent to Ca2+-release from sarcoplasmic reticulum and/or phosphocreatine hydrolysis coupled to ATP regeneration.

  2. Past Actions as Self-Signals: How Acting in a Self-Interested Way Influences Environmental Decision Making

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chang-Yuan; Hochman, Guy; Prince, Steven E.; Ariely, Dan

    2016-01-01

    In the last few decades, awareness of environmental issues has increased significantly. Little has changed, however, in human activities contributing to environmental damage. Why is it so difficult for us to change our behavior in a domain that is clearly so important to the future of humanity? Here we propose and test the possibility that self-signaling, the way we view ourselves based on our past behaviors, is one of the factors contributing to the difficulty of taking environmental action. In three experiments, we show that previous self-interested thoughts or behaviors serve as important signals that hinder the likelihood of acting in line with an individual’s reported concern for the environment. This study not only helps explain the gap between environmental awareness and action, but also suggests alternative strategies for policymakers and environmental agencies to promote proenvironmental behavior. PMID:27447822

  3. Past Actions as Self-Signals: How Acting in a Self-Interested Way Influences Environmental Decision Making.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang-Yuan; Hochman, Guy; Prince, Steven E; Ariely, Dan

    2016-01-01

    In the last few decades, awareness of environmental issues has increased significantly. Little has changed, however, in human activities contributing to environmental damage. Why is it so difficult for us to change our behavior in a domain that is clearly so important to the future of humanity? Here we propose and test the possibility that self-signaling, the way we view ourselves based on our past behaviors, is one of the factors contributing to the difficulty of taking environmental action. In three experiments, we show that previous self-interested thoughts or behaviors serve as important signals that hinder the likelihood of acting in line with an individual's reported concern for the environment. This study not only helps explain the gap between environmental awareness and action, but also suggests alternative strategies for policymakers and environmental agencies to promote proenvironmental behavior. PMID:27447822

  4. Effects of bath resistance on action potentials in the squid giant axon: myocardial implications.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, J; Wikswo, J P

    1997-01-01

    This study presents a simplified version of the quasi-one-dimensional theory (Wu, J., E. A. Johnson, and J. M. Kootsey. 1996. A quasi-one-dimensional theory for anisotropic propagation of excitation in cardiac muscle. Biophys. J. 71:2427-2439) with two components of the extracellular current, along and perpendicular to the axis, and a simulation and its experimental confirmation for the giant axon of the squid. By extending the one-dimensional core conductor cable equations, this theory predicts, as confirmed by the experiment, that the shapes of the intracellular and the extracellular action potentials are related to the resistance of the bath. Such a result was previously only expected by the field theories. The correlation between the shapes of the intracellular and the extracellular potentials of the giant axon of the squid resembles that observed during the anisotropic propagation of excitation in cardiac muscle. Therefore, this study not only develops a quasi-one-dimensional theory for a squid axon, but also provides one possible factor contributing to the anisotropic propagation of action potentials in cardiac muscle. PMID:9370430

  5. Effects of bath resistance on action potentials in the squid giant axon: myocardial implications.

    PubMed

    Wu, J; Wikswo, J P

    1997-11-01

    This study presents a simplified version of the quasi-one-dimensional theory (Wu, J., E. A. Johnson, and J. M. Kootsey. 1996. A quasi-one-dimensional theory for anisotropic propagation of excitation in cardiac muscle. Biophys. J. 71:2427-2439) with two components of the extracellular current, along and perpendicular to the axis, and a simulation and its experimental confirmation for the giant axon of the squid. By extending the one-dimensional core conductor cable equations, this theory predicts, as confirmed by the experiment, that the shapes of the intracellular and the extracellular action potentials are related to the resistance of the bath. Such a result was previously only expected by the field theories. The correlation between the shapes of the intracellular and the extracellular potentials of the giant axon of the squid resembles that observed during the anisotropic propagation of excitation in cardiac muscle. Therefore, this study not only develops a quasi-one-dimensional theory for a squid axon, but also provides one possible factor contributing to the anisotropic propagation of action potentials in cardiac muscle.

  6. An Excel-based implementation of the spectral method of action potential alternans analysis.

    PubMed

    Pearman, Charles M

    2014-12-01

    Action potential (AP) alternans has been well established as a mechanism of arrhythmogenesis and sudden cardiac death. Proper interpretation of AP alternans requires a robust method of alternans quantification. Traditional methods of alternans analysis neglect higher order periodicities that may have greater pro-arrhythmic potential than classical 2:1 alternans. The spectral method of alternans analysis, already widely used in the related study of microvolt T-wave alternans, has also been used to study AP alternans. Software to meet the specific needs of AP alternans analysis is not currently available in the public domain. An AP analysis tool is implemented here, written in Visual Basic for Applications and using Microsoft Excel as a shell. This performs a sophisticated analysis of alternans behavior allowing reliable distinction of alternans from random fluctuations, quantification of alternans magnitude, and identification of which phases of the AP are most affected. In addition, the spectral method has been adapted to allow detection and quantification of higher order regular oscillations. Analysis of action potential morphology is also performed. A simple user interface enables easy import, analysis, and export of collated results.

  7. Enhanced BDNF signalling following chronic hypoxia potentiates catecholamine release from cultured rat adrenal chromaffin cells

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Angela L; Zhang, Min; Nurse, Colin A

    2015-01-01

    Environmental stressors, including chronic hypoxia, enhance the ability of adrenomedullary chromaffin cells (AMCs) to secrete catecholamines; however, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we investigated the role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signalling in rat AMCs exposed to chronic hypoxia. In rat adrenal glands, BDNF and its tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) receptor are highly expressed in the cortex and medulla, respectively. Exposure of AMCs to chronic hypoxia (2% O2; 48 h) in vitro caused a significant increase to TrkB mRNA expression. A similar increase was observed in an immortalized chromaffin cell line (MAH cells); however, it was absent in MAH cells deficient in the transcription factor HIF-2α. A specific TrkB agonist, 7,8-dihydroxyflavone (7,8-DHF), stimulated quantal catecholamine secretion from chronically hypoxic (CHox; 2% O2) AMCs to a greater extent than normoxic (Nox; 21% O2) controls. Activation of TrkB by BDNF or 7,8-DHF increased intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i), an effect that was significantly larger in CHox cells. The 7,8-DHF-induced [Ca2+]i rise was sensitive to the tyrosine kinase inhibitor K252a and nickel (2 mm), but not the Ca2+ store-depleting agent cyclopiazonic acid. Blockade of T-type calcium channels with TTA-P2 (1 μm) or voltage-gated Na+ channels with TTX inhibited BDNF-induced [Ca2+]i increases. BDNF also induced a dose-dependent enhancement of action potential firing in CHox cells. These data demonstrate that during chronic hypoxia, enhancement of BDNF-TrkB signalling increases voltage-dependent Ca2+ influx and catecholamine secretion in chromaffin cells, and that T-type Ca2+ channels play a key role in the signalling pathway. Key points We investigated the role of the neurotrophin BDNF signalling via the TrkB receptor in rat adrenomedullary chromaffin cells (AMCs) exposed to normoxia (Nox; 21% O2) and chronic hypoxia (CHox; 2% O2) in vitro for ∼48 h. TrkB receptor expression was

  8. Dynamical speckles patterns of action potential transmission effects in squid giant axon membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llovera-González, Juan J.; Moreno-Yeras, Alfredo B.; Muramatsu, Mikiya; Soga, Diogo; Serra-Toledo, Rolando L.; Magalhães, Daniel S. F.

    2013-11-01

    Undoubtedly the most important result of the investigations in physiology and biophysics was the discovery of the electrochemical mechanism of propagation of the action potential in nerves that was made by Hodgkin and Huxley during the first half of the past century. Since some decades ago diverse experiments about the electro optical properties of the axon membrane there was published using the most diverse optical experimental procedures6-10. In this paper some results of a dynamical speckle technique applied for obtaining microscopic images of a section of a squid giant axon membrane during the activation by electrical impulses and his digital process are presented.

  9. Rapid local synchronization of action potentials: toward computation with coupled integrate-and-fire neurons.

    PubMed Central

    Hopfield, J J; Herz, A V

    1995-01-01

    The collective behavior of interconnected spiking nerve cells is investigated. It is shown that a variety of model systems exhibit the same short-time behavior and rapidly converge to (approximately) periodic firing patterns with locally synchronized action potentials. The dynamics of one model can be described by a downhill motion on an abstract energy landscape. Since an energy landscape makes it possible to understand and program computation done by an attractor network, the results will extend our understanding of collective computation from models based on a firing-rate description to biologically more realistic systems with integrate-and-fire neurons. Images Fig. 2 PMID:7624307

  10. Cardioprotective actions of Notch1 against myocardial infarction via LKB1-dependent AMPK signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hui; Sun, Wanqing; Quan, Nanhu; Wang, Lin; Chu, Dongyang; Cates, Courtney; Liu, Quan; Zheng, Yang; Li, Ji

    2016-05-15

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling pathway plays a pivotal role in intracellular adaptation to energy stress during myocardial ischemia. Notch1 signaling in the adult myocardium is also activated in response to ischemic stress. However, the relationship between Notch1 and AMPK signaling pathways during ischemia remains unclear. We hypothesize that Notch1 as an adaptive signaling pathway protects the heart from ischemic injury via modulating the cardioprotective AMPK signaling pathway. C57BL/6J mice were subjected to an in vivo ligation of left anterior descending coronary artery and the hearts from C57BL/6J mice were subjected to an ex vivo globe ischemia and reperfusion in the Langendorff perfusion system. The Notch1 signaling was activated during myocardial ischemia. A Notch1 γ-secretase inhibitor, dibenzazepine (DBZ), was intraperitoneally injected into mice to inhibit Notch1 signaling pathway by ischemia. The inhibition of Notch1 signaling by DBZ significantly augmented cardiac dysfunctions caused by myocardial infarction. Intriguingly, DBZ treatment also significantly blunted the activation of AMPK signaling pathway. The immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated that an interaction between Notch1 and liver kinase beta1 (LKB1) modulated AMPK activation during myocardial ischemia. Furthermore, a ligand of Notch1 Jagged1 can significantly reduce cardiac damage caused by ischemia via activation of AMPK signaling pathway and modulation of glucose oxidation and fatty acid oxidation during ischemia and reperfusion. But Jagged1 did not have any cardioprotections on AMPK kinase dead transgenic hearts. Taken together, the results indicate that the cardioprotective effect of Notch1 against ischemic damage is mediated by AMPK signaling via an interaction with upstream LKB1.

  11. DETECTION OF POTENTIAL TRANSIT SIGNALS IN 16 QUARTERS OF KEPLER MISSION DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Tenenbaum, Peter; Jenkins, Jon M.; Seader, Shawn; Burke, Christopher J.; Christiansen, Jessie L.; Rowe, Jason F.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Clarke, Bruce D.; Coughlin, Jeffrey L.; Li, Jie; Quintana, Elisa V.; Smith, Jeffrey C.; Thompson, Susan E.; Twicken, Joseph D.; Campbell, Jennifer R.; Girouard, Forrest R. [Orbital Sciences Corporation and others

    2014-03-01

    We present the results of a search for potential transit signals in 4 yr of photometry data acquired by the Kepler mission. The targets of the search include 111,800 stars which were observed for the entire interval and 85,522 stars which were observed for a subset of the interval. We found that 9743 targets contained at least one signal consistent with the signature of a transiting or eclipsing object where the criteria for detection are periodicity of the detected transits, adequate signal-to-noise ratio, and acceptance by a number of tests which reject false positive detections. When targets that had produced a signal were searched repeatedly, an additional 6542 signals were detected on 3223 target stars, for a total of 16,285 potential detections. Comparison of the set of detected signals with a set of known and vetted transit events in the Kepler field of view shows that the recovery rate for these signals is 96.9%. The ensemble properties of the detected signals are reviewed.

  12. DETECTION OF POTENTIAL TRANSIT SIGNALS IN THE FIRST 12 QUARTERS OF KEPLER MISSION DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Tenenbaum, Peter; Jenkins, Jon M.; Seader, Shawn; Burke, Christopher J.; Christiansen, Jessie L.; Rowe, Jason F.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Clarke, Bruce D.; Li, Jie; Quintana, Elisa V.; Smith, Jeffrey C.; Thompson, Susan E.; Twicken, Joseph D.; Girouard, Forrest R. [Orbital Sciences Corporation and others

    2013-05-01

    We present the results of a search for potential transit signals in the first three years of photometry data acquired by the Kepler mission. The targets of the search include 112,321 targets that were observed over the full interval and an additional 79,992 targets that were observed for a subset of the full interval. From this set of targets we find a total of 11,087 targets that contain at least one signal that meets the Kepler detection criteria: periodicity of the signal, an acceptable signal-to-noise ratio, and three tests that reject false positives. Each target containing at least one detected signal is then searched repeatedly for additional signals, which represent multi-planet systems of transiting planets. When targets with multiple detections are considered, a total of 18,406 potential transiting planet signals are found in the Kepler mission data set. The detected signals are dominated by events with relatively low signal-to-noise ratios and by events with relatively short periods. The distribution of estimated transit depths appears to peak in the range between 20 and 30 parts per million, with a few detections down to fewer than 10 parts per million. The detections exhibit signal-to-noise ratios from 7.1{sigma}, which is the lower cutoff for detections, to over 10,000{sigma}, and periods ranging from 0.5 days, which is the shortest period searched, to 525 days, which is the upper limit of achievable periods given the length of the data set and the requirement that all detections include at least three transits. The detected signals are compared to a set of known transit events in the Kepler field of view, many of which were identified by alternative methods; the comparison shows that the current search recovery rate for targets with known transit events is 98.3%.

  13. AHI-1: a novel signaling protein and potential therapeutic target in human leukemia and brain disorders

    PubMed Central

    Esmailzadeh, Sharmin; Jiang, Xiaoyan

    2011-01-01

    Progress in the understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms of human cancer, including human leukemia and lymphomas, has been spurred by cloning of fusion genes created by chromosomal translocations or by retroviral insertional mutagenesis; a number of oncogenes and tumor suppressors involved in development of a number of malignancies have been identified in this manner. The BCR-ABL fusion gene, originating in a multipotent hematopoietic stem cell, is the molecular signature of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Discovery of this fusion gene has led to the development of one of the first successful targeted molecular therapies for cancer (Imatinib). It illustrates the advances that can result from an understanding of the molecular basis of disease. However, there still remain many as yet unidentified mutations that may influence the initiation or progression of human diseases. Thus, identification and characterization of the mechanism of action of genes that contribute to human diseases is an important and opportune area of current research. One promising candidate as a potential therapeutic target is Abelson helper integration site-1(Ahi-1/AHI-1) that was identified by retroviral insertional mutagenesis in murine models of leukemia/lymphomas and is highly elevated in certain human lymphoma and leukemia stem/progenitor cells. It encodes a unique protein with a SH3 domain, multiple SH3 binding sites and a WD40-repeat domain, suggesting that the normal protein has novel signaling activities. A new AHI-1-BCR-ABL-JAK2 interaction complex has recently been identified and this complex regulates transforming activities and drug resistance in CML stem/progenitor cells. Importantly, AHI-1 has recently been identified as a susceptibility gene involved in a number of brain disorders, including Joubert syndrome. Therefore, understanding molecular functions of the AHI-1 gene could lead to important and novel insights into disease processes involved in specific types of

  14. Action potential energetics at the organismal level reveal a trade-off in efficiency at high firing rates.

    PubMed

    Lewis, John E; Gilmour, Kathleen M; Moorhead, Mayron J; Perry, Steve F; Markham, Michael R

    2014-01-01

    The energetic costs of action potential (AP) production constrain the evolution of neural codes and brain networks. Cellular-level estimates of AP-related costs are typically based on voltage-dependent Na(+) currents that drive active transport by the Na(+)/K(+) ATPase to maintain the Na(+) and K(+) ion concentration gradients necessary for AP production. However, these estimates of AP cost have not been verified at the organismal level. Electric signaling in the weakly electric fish Eigenmannia virescens requires that specialized cells in an electric organ generate APs with large Na(+) currents at high rates (200-600 Hz). We measured these currents using a voltage-clamp protocol and then estimated the energetic cost at the cellular level using standard methods. We then used this energy-intensive signaling behavior to measure changes in whole-animal energetics for small changes in electric discharge rate. At low rates, the whole-animal measure of AP cost was similar to our cellular-level estimates. However, AP cost increased nonlinearly with increasing firing rates. We show, with a biophysical model, that this nonlinearity can arise from the increasing cost of maintaining AP amplitude at high rates. Our results confirm that estimates of energetic costs based on Na(+) influx are appropriate for low baseline firing rates, but that extrapolating to high firing rates may underestimate true costs in cases in which AP amplitude does not decrease. Moreover, the trade-off between energetic cost and firing rate suggests an additional constraint on the evolution of high-frequency signaling in neuronal systems. PMID:24381281

  15. Actions taken in response to the potential for volatile organics in RLWTF influent tanks

    SciTech Connect

    DEL SIGNORE, JOHN C.

    2007-01-01

    Positive USQD-RL W -06.0729-JPS, titled "Potential for Volatile Organics in RLW" was signed Friday, 09-08-06, at 1600. It resulted from a Potentially Inadequate Safety Analysis (PISA) for the Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility (RLWTF) at Technical Area 50. The PISA posits that an unspecified accident occurs at a generator facility, and that said accident does not ignite the volatile organic liquid, but results instead in the release of a large volume of volatile organic liquid into an RLW drain. Once in the drain, the liquid flows unimpeded into the RLWTF influent tanks. After entering the influent tanks, a spark causes a deflagration or explosion. This report documents actions taken in response to the PISA.

  16. Three-dimensional mapping and regulation of action potential propagation in nanoelectronics-innervated tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Xiaochuan; Zhou, Wei; Gao, Teng; Liu, Jia; Lieber, Charles M.

    2016-09-01

    Real-time mapping and manipulation of electrophysiology in three-dimensional (3D) tissues could have important impacts on fundamental scientific and clinical studies, yet realization is hampered by a lack of effective methods. Here we introduce tissue-scaffold-mimicking 3D nanoelectronic arrays consisting of 64 addressable devices with subcellular dimensions and a submillisecond temporal resolution. Real-time extracellular action potential (AP) recordings reveal quantitative maps of AP propagation in 3D cardiac tissues, enable in situ tracing of the evolving topology of 3D conducting pathways in developing cardiac tissues and probe the dynamics of AP conduction characteristics in a transient arrhythmia disease model and subsequent tissue self-adaptation. We further demonstrate simultaneous multisite stimulation and mapping to actively manipulate the frequency and direction of AP propagation. These results establish new methodologies for 3D spatiotemporal tissue recording and control, and demonstrate the potential to impact regenerative medicine, pharmacology and electronic therapeutics.

  17. Excitable Membranes and Action Potentials in Paramecia: An Analysis of the Electrophysiology of Ciliates.

    PubMed

    Schlaepfer, Charles H; Wessel, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    The ciliate Paramecium caudatum possesses an excitable cell membrane whose action potentials (APs) modulate the trajectory of the cell swimming through its freshwater environment. While many stimuli affect the membrane potential and trajectory, students can use current injection and extracellular ionic concentration changes to explore how APs cause reversal of the cell's motion. Students examine these stimuli through intracellular recordings, also gaining insight into the practices of electrophysiology. Paramecium's large size of around 150 µm, simple care, and relative ease to penetrate make them ideal model organisms for undergraduate students' laboratory study. The direct link between behavior and excitable membranes has thought provoking evolutionary implications for the study of paramecia. Recording from the cell, students note a small resting potential around -30 mV, differing from animal resting potentials. By manipulating ion concentrations, APs of the relatively long length of 20-30 ms up to several minutes with depolarizations maxing over 0 mV are observed. Through comparative analysis of membrane potentials and the APs induced by either calcium or barium, students can deduce the causative ions for the APs as well as the mechanisms of paramecium APs. Current injection allows students to calculate quantitative electric characteristics of the membrane. Analysis will follow the literature's conclusion in a V-Gated Ca(++) influx and depolarization resulting in feedback from intracellular Ca(++) that inactivates V-Gated Ca(++) channels and activates Ca-Dependent K(+) channels through a secondary messenger cascade that results in the K(+) efflux and repolarization. PMID:26557800

  18. Biorealistic cardiac cell culture platforms with integrated monitoring of extracellular action potentials.

    PubMed

    Trantidou, Tatiana; Terracciano, Cesare M; Kontziampasis, Dimitrios; Humphrey, Eleanor J; Prodromakis, Themistoklis

    2015-01-01

    Current platforms for in vitro drug development utilize confluent, unorganized monolayers of heart cells to study the effect on action potential propagation. However, standard cell cultures are of limited use in cardiac research, as they do not preserve important structural and functional properties of the myocardium. Here we present a method to integrate a scaffolding technology with multi-electrode arrays and deliver a compact, off-the-shelf monitoring platform for growing biomimetic cardiac tissue. Our approach produces anisotropic cultures with conduction velocity (CV) profiles that closer resemble native heart tissue; the fastest impulse propagation is along the long axis of the aligned cardiomyocytes (CVL) and the slowest propagation is perpendicular (CVT), in contrast to standard cultures where action potential propagates isotropically (CVL ≈ CVT). The corresponding anisotropy velocity ratios (CVL/CVT = 1.38 - 2.22) are comparable with values for healthy adult rat ventricles (1.98 - 3.63). The main advantages of this approach are that (i) it provides ultimate pattern control, (ii) it is compatible with automated manufacturing steps and (iii) it is utilized through standard cell culturing protocols. Our platform is compatible with existing read-out equipment and comprises a prompt method for more reliable CV studies.

  19. From damage response to action potentials: early evolution of neural and contractile modules in stem eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Brunet, Thibaut; Arendt, Detlev

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells convert external stimuli into membrane depolarization, which in turn triggers effector responses such as secretion and contraction. Here, we put forward an evolutionary hypothesis for the origin of the depolarization-contraction-secretion (DCS) coupling, the functional core of animal neuromuscular circuits. We propose that DCS coupling evolved in unicellular stem eukaryotes as part of an 'emergency response' to calcium influx upon membrane rupture. We detail how this initial response was subsequently modified into an ancient mechanosensory-effector arc, present in the last eukaryotic common ancestor, which enabled contractile amoeboid movement that is widespread in extant eukaryotes. Elaborating on calcium-triggered membrane depolarization, we reason that the first action potentials evolved alongside the membrane of sensory-motile cilia, with the first voltage-sensitive sodium/calcium channels (Nav/Cav) enabling a fast and coordinated response of the entire cilium to mechanosensory stimuli. From the cilium, action potentials then spread across the entire cell, enabling global cellular responses such as concerted contraction in several independent eukaryote lineages. In animals, this process led to the invention of mechanosensory contractile cells. These gave rise to mechanosensory receptor cells, neurons and muscle cells by division of labour and can be regarded as the founder cell type of the nervous system.

  20. Biorealistic cardiac cell culture platforms with integrated monitoring of extracellular action potentials

    PubMed Central

    Trantidou, Tatiana; Terracciano, Cesare M.; Kontziampasis, Dimitrios; Humphrey, Eleanor J.; Prodromakis, Themistoklis

    2015-01-01

    Current platforms for in vitro drug development utilize confluent, unorganized monolayers of heart cells to study the effect on action potential propagation. However, standard cell cultures are of limited use in cardiac research, as they do not preserve important structural and functional properties of the myocardium. Here we present a method to integrate a scaffolding technology with multi-electrode arrays and deliver a compact, off-the-shelf monitoring platform for growing biomimetic cardiac tissue. Our approach produces anisotropic cultures with conduction velocity (CV) profiles that closer resemble native heart tissue; the fastest impulse propagation is along the long axis of the aligned cardiomyocytes (CVL) and the slowest propagation is perpendicular (CVT), in contrast to standard cultures where action potential propagates isotropically (CVL ≈ CVT). The corresponding anisotropy velocity ratios (CVL/CVT = 1.38 – 2.22) are comparable with values for healthy adult rat ventricles (1.98 – 3.63). The main advantages of this approach are that (i) it provides ultimate pattern control, (ii) it is compatible with automated manufacturing steps and (iii) it is utilized through standard cell culturing protocols. Our platform is compatible with existing read-out equipment and comprises a prompt method for more reliable CV studies. PMID:26053434

  1. From damage response to action potentials: early evolution of neural and contractile modules in stem eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Brunet, Thibaut; Arendt, Detlev

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells convert external stimuli into membrane depolarization, which in turn triggers effector responses such as secretion and contraction. Here, we put forward an evolutionary hypothesis for the origin of the depolarization–contraction–secretion (DCS) coupling, the functional core of animal neuromuscular circuits. We propose that DCS coupling evolved in unicellular stem eukaryotes as part of an ‘emergency response’ to calcium influx upon membrane rupture. We detail how this initial response was subsequently modified into an ancient mechanosensory–effector arc, present in the last eukaryotic common ancestor, which enabled contractile amoeboid movement that is widespread in extant eukaryotes. Elaborating on calcium-triggered membrane depolarization, we reason that the first action potentials evolved alongside the membrane of sensory-motile cilia, with the first voltage-sensitive sodium/calcium channels (Nav/Cav) enabling a fast and coordinated response of the entire cilium to mechanosensory stimuli. From the cilium, action potentials then spread across the entire cell, enabling global cellular responses such as concerted contraction in several independent eukaryote lineages. In animals, this process led to the invention of mechanosensory contractile cells. These gave rise to mechanosensory receptor cells, neurons and muscle cells by division of labour and can be regarded as the founder cell type of the nervous system. PMID:26598726

  2. Quantitative Assessment of the Distributions of Membrane Conductances Involved in Action Potential Backpropagation Along Basal Dendrites

    PubMed Central

    Acker, Corey D.; Antic, Srdjan D.

    2009-01-01

    Basal dendrites of prefrontal cortical neurons receive strong synaptic drive from recurrent excitatory synaptic inputs. Synaptic integration within basal dendrites is therefore likely to play an important role in cortical information processing. Both synaptic integration and synaptic plasticity depend crucially on dendritic membrane excitability and the backpropagation of action potentials. We carried out multisite voltage-sensitive dye imaging of membrane potential transients from thin basal branches of prefrontal cortical pyramidal neurons before and after application of channel blockers. We found that backpropagating action potentials (bAPs) are predominantly controlled by voltage-gated sodium and A-type potassium channels. In contrast, pharmacologically blocking the delayed rectifier potassium, voltage-gated calcium, or Ih conductance had little effect on dendritic AP propagation. Optically recorded bAP waveforms were quantified and multicompartmental modeling was used to link the observed behavior with the underlying biophysical properties. The best-fit model included a nonuniform sodium channel distribution with decreasing conductance with distance from the soma, together with a nonuniform (increasing) A-type potassium conductance. AP amplitudes decline with distance in this model, but to a lesser extent than previously thought. We used this model to explore the mechanisms underlying two sets of published data involving high-frequency trains of APs and the local generation of sodium spikelets. We also explored the conditions under which IA down-regulation would produce branch strength potentiation in the proposed model. Finally, we discuss the hypothesis that a fraction of basal branches may have different membrane properties compared with sister branches in the same dendritic tree. PMID:19118105

  3. Membrane potential modulates plasma membrane phospholipid dynamics and K-Ras signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yong; Wong, Ching-On; Cho, Kwang-jin; van der Hoeven, Dharini; Liang, Hong; Thakur, Dhananiay P.; Luo, Jialie; Babic, Milos; Zinsmaier, Konrad E.; Zhu, Michael X.; Hu, Hongzhen; Venkatachalam, Kartik; Hancock, John F.

    2015-01-01

    Plasma membrane depolarization can trigger cell proliferation, but how membrane potential influences mitogenic signaling is uncertain. Here, we show that plasma membrane depolarization induces nanoscale reorganization of phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate but not other anionic phospholipids. K-Ras, which is targeted to the plasma membrane by electrostatic interactions with phosphatidylserine, in turn undergoes enhanced nanoclustering. Depolarization-induced changes in phosphatidylserine and K-Ras plasma membrane organization occur in fibroblasts, excitable neuroblastoma cells, and Drosophila neurons in vivo and robustly amplify K-Ras–dependent mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling. Conversely, plasma membrane repolarization disrupts K-Ras nanoclustering and inhibits MAPK signaling. By responding to voltage-induced changes in phosphatidylserine spatiotemporal dynamics, K-Ras nanoclusters set up the plasma membrane as a biological field-effect transistor, allowing membrane potential to control the gain in mitogenic signaling circuits. PMID:26293964

  4. Generation Mechanism of Earth Potential Difference Signal during Seismic Wave Propagation and its Observation Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okubo, Kan; Yamamoto, Keisuke; Takayama, Masakazu; Takeuchi, Nobunao

    We have observed the co-seismic electromagnetic phenomena such as earth potential difference (EPD) variation in many observation sites of both Miyagi and Akita Prefectures. So far, in any earthquakes we observed clear signals of the EPD variation. However, the amplitude of observed EPD signals are very different at each site. To explain this difference, firstly we assumed the EPD generation mechanism to be the streaming potential. Secondarily, the underground circumstance is modeled as the composer of groundwater table, capillary tubes and fine tubes. The model how EPD variation signals appear is postulated to explain the observed data. The relative position of the ground water table against the buried electrodes is examined to explain the observed data. The groundwater table may be very sensitive to the appearance of the EPD variation. If electrodes were buried a few meters below the ground surface, we could observe the EPD signals in the case of shallow groundwater table.

  5. Coordinating Gene Expression and Axon Assembly to Control Axon Growth: Potential Role of GSK3 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chang-Mei; Hur, Eun-Mi; Zhou, Feng-Quan

    2012-01-01

    Axon growth requires the coordinated regulation of gene expression in the neuronal soma, local protein translation in the axon, anterograde transport of synthesized raw materials along the axon, and assembly of cytoskeleton and membranes in the nerve growth cone. Glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) signaling has recently been shown to play key roles in the regulation of axonal transport and cytoskeletal assembly during axon growth. GSK3 signaling is also known to regulate gene expression via controlling the functions of many transcription factors, suggesting that GSK3 may be an important regulator of gene transcription supporting axon growth. We review signaling pathways that control local axon assembly at the growth cone and gene expression in the soma during developmental or regenerative axon growth and discuss the potential involvement of GSK3 signaling in these processes, with a particular focus on how GSK3 signaling modulates the function of axon growth-associated transcription factors. PMID:22347166

  6. Comparative investigations of manual action representations: evidence that chimpanzees represent the costs of potential future actions involving tools

    PubMed Central

    Frey, Scott H.; Povinelli, Daniel J.

    2012-01-01

    The ability to adjust one's ongoing actions in the anticipation of forthcoming task demands is considered as strong evidence for the existence of internal action representations. Studies of action selection in tool use reveal that the behaviours that we choose in the present moment differ depending on what we intend to do next. Further, they point to a specialized role for mechanisms within the human cerebellum and dominant left cerebral hemisphere in representing the likely sensory costs of intended future actions. Recently, the question of whether similar mechanisms exist in other primates has received growing, but still limited, attention. Here, we present data that bear on this issue from a species that is a natural user of tools, our nearest living relative, the chimpanzee. In experiment 1, a subset of chimpanzees showed a non-significant tendency for their grip preferences to be affected by anticipation of the demands associated with bringing a tool's baited end to their mouths. In experiment 2, chimpanzees' initial grip preferences were consistently affected by anticipation of the forthcoming movements in a task that involves using a tool to extract a food reward. The partial discrepancy between the results of these two studies is attributed to the ability to accurately represent differences between the motor costs associated with executing the two response alternatives available within each task. These findings suggest that chimpanzees are capable of accurately representing the costs of intended future actions, and using those predictions to select movements in the present even in the context of externally directed tool use. PMID:22106426

  7. Urocortin2 prolongs action potential duration and modulates potassium currents in guinea pig myocytes and HEK293 cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Li-Zhen; Zhu, Yi-Chun

    2015-07-01

    We previously reported that activation of corticotropin releasing factor receptor type 2 by urocortin2 up-regulates both L-type Ca(2+) channels and intracellular Ca(2+) concentration in ventricular myocytes and plays an important role in cardiac contractility and arrhythmogenesis. This study goal was to further test the hypothesis that urocortin2 may modulate action potentials as well as rapidly and slowly activating delayed rectifier potassium currents. With whole cell patch-clamp techniques, action potentials and slowly activating delayed rectifier potassium currents were recorded in isolated guinea pig ventricular myocytes, respectively. And rapidly activating delayed rectifier potassium currents were tested in hERG-HEK293 cells. Urocortin2 produced a time- and concentration-dependent prolongation of action potential duration. The EC50 values of action potential duration and action potential duration at 90% of repolarization were 14.73 and 24.3nM respectively. The prolongation of action potential duration of urocortin2 was almost completely or partly abolished by H-89 (protein kinase A inhibitor) or KB-R7943 (Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchange inhibitor) pretreatment respectively. And urocortin2 caused reduction of rapidly activating delayed rectifier potassium currents in hERG-HEK293 cells. In addition, urocortin2 slowed the rate of slowly activating delayed rectifier potassium channel activation, and rightward shifted the threshold of slowly activating delayed rectifier potassium currents to more positive potentials. Urocortin2 prolonged action potential duration via activation of protein kinase A and Na(+)/ Ca(2+) exchange in isolated guinea pig ventricular myocytes in a time- and concentration- dependent manner. In hERG-HEK293 cells, urocortin2 reduced rapidly activating delayed rectifier potassium current density which may contribute to action potential duration prolongation.

  8. Population of Computational Rabbit-Specific Ventricular Action Potential Models for Investigating Sources of Variability in Cellular Repolarisation

    PubMed Central

    Gemmell, Philip; Burrage, Kevin; Rodriguez, Blanca; Quinn, T. Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Variability is observed at all levels of cardiac electrophysiology. Yet, the underlying causes and importance of this variability are generally unknown, and difficult to investigate with current experimental techniques. The aim of the present study was to generate populations of computational ventricular action potential models that reproduce experimentally observed intercellular variability of repolarisation (represented by action potential duration) and to identify its potential causes. A systematic exploration of the effects of simultaneously varying the magnitude of six transmembrane current conductances (transient outward, rapid and slow delayed rectifier K+, inward rectifying K+, L-type Ca2+, and Na+/K+ pump currents) in two rabbit-specific ventricular action potential models (Shannon et al. and Mahajan et al.) at multiple cycle lengths (400, 600, 1,000 ms) was performed. This was accomplished with distributed computing software specialised for multi-dimensional parameter sweeps and grid execution. An initial population of 15,625 parameter sets was generated for both models at each cycle length. Action potential durations of these populations were compared to experimentally derived ranges for rabbit ventricular myocytes. 1,352 parameter sets for the Shannon model and 779 parameter sets for the Mahajan model yielded action potential duration within the experimental range, demonstrating that a wide array of ionic conductance values can be used to simulate a physiological rabbit ventricular action potential. Furthermore, by using clutter-based dimension reordering, a technique that allows visualisation of multi-dimensional spaces in two dimensions, the interaction of current conductances and their relative importance to the ventricular action potential at different cycle lengths were revealed. Overall, this work represents an important step towards a better understanding of the role that variability in current conductances may play in experimentally observed

  9. The effects of heart rate on the action potential of guinea-pig and human ventricular muscle.

    PubMed

    Attwell, D; Cohen, I; Eisner, D A

    1981-01-01

    1. On increasing the stimulation frequency of isolated pieces of guinea-pig ventricular muscle, the resting potential depolarizes, and the action potential duration and amplitude are reduced. On termination of the high frequency train of action potentials, these changes are reversed. 2. The resting potential changes are roughly exponential, with a time constant of the order of 10 sec, and are attributable to K+ accumulation in the extracellular space. They are not explicable in terms of known gating variables. 3. The action potential duration and amplitude recover much more slowly than the resting potential, after a high frequency train (half-time approximately 5 min). The time course of these recoveries is not exponential, and is slower after trains which produce more shortening of the action potential. The slow time course suggests that K+ accumulation is not the main cause of the changes in action potential shape. Furthermore, when a certain depolarization of the resting potential is produced by a high frequency train, there is a greater reduction of the action potential duration than that which occurs when the bathing [K+] is raised to produce the same depolarization (Reiter & Stickel, 1968). This is so even when a gradient of extracellular [K+] is induced in the preparation, to mimic non-uniform K+ accumulation. 4. Similarly, the shortening of the action potential produced by toxic doses or cardiotonic steroids is probably not the result of K+ accumulation. 5. The slow changes of the action potential shape produced by a high frequency train are not attributable to the effects of gating variables, nor (solely) to a rise in the intracellular Na concentration stimulating the electrogenic Na/K pump. The dye 3,3'-diethylthiadicarbocyanine, which blocks the Ca2+-activated K conductance in the erythrocyte, has no significant effect on the shape changes. 6. After a sudden change in heart rate, the QT interval of the human electrocardiogram (e.c.g.) changes slowly to a

  10. Endocrine disrupting chemicals targeting estrogen receptor signaling: Identification and mechanisms of action

    PubMed Central

    Shanle, Erin K.; Xu, Wei

    2011-01-01

    Many endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) adversely impact estrogen signaling by interacting with two estrogen receptors (ERs): ERα and ERβ. Though the receptors have similar ligand binding and DNA binding domains, ERα and ERβ have some unique properties in terms of ligand selectivity and target gene regulation. EDCs that target ER signaling can modify genomic and non-genomic ER activity through direct interactions with ERs, indirectly through transcription factors like the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), or through modulation of metabolic enzymes that are critical for normal estrogen synthesis and metabolism. Many EDCs act through multiple mechanisms as exemplified by chemicals that bind both AhR and ER, such as 3-methylcholanthrene. Other EDCs that target ER signaling include phytoestrogens, bisphenolics, and organochlorine pesticides and many alter normal ER signaling through multiple mechanisms. EDCs can also display tissue-selective ER agonist and antagonist activities similar to selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) designed for pharmaceutical use. Thus, biological effects of EDCs need to be carefully interpreted because EDCs can act through complex tissue-selective modulation of ERs and other signaling pathways in vivo. Current requirements by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency require some in vitro and cell-based assays to identify EDCs that target ER signaling through direct and metabolic mechanisms. Additional assays may be useful screens for identifying EDCs that act through alternative mechanisms prior to further in vivo study. PMID:21053929

  11. Analysis of intramuscular electromyogram signals.

    PubMed

    Merletti, Roberto; Farina, Dario

    2009-01-28

    Intramuscular electromyographic (EMG) signals are detected with needles or wires inserted into muscles. With respect to non-invasive techniques, intramuscular electromyography has high selectivity for individual motor unit action potentials and is thus used to measure motor unit activity. Decomposition of intramuscular signals into individual motor unit action potentials consists in detection and classification, usually followed by separation of superimposed action potentials. Although intramuscular EMG signal decomposition is the primary tool for physiological investigations of motor unit properties, it is rarely applied in clinical routine, because of the need for human interaction and the difficulty in interpreting the quantitative data provided by EMG signal decomposition to support clinical decisions. The current clinical use of intramuscular EMG signals relates to the diagnosis of myopathies, of diseases of the alpha-motor neuron and of the neuromuscular junction through the analysis of the interference signal or of the shape of some motor unit action potentials, usually without a full decomposition of the signal.

  12. Sodium-dependent action potentials induced by brevetoxin-3 trigger both IP3 increase and intracellular Ca2+ release in rat skeletal myotubes.

    PubMed

    Liberona, José Luis; Cárdenas, J César; Reyes, Roberto; Hidalgo, Jorge; Molgó, Jordi; Jaimovich, Enrique

    2008-09-01

    Brevetoxin-3 (PbTx-3), described to increase the open probability of voltage-dependent sodium channels, caused trains of action potentials and fast oscillatory changes in fluorescence intensity of fluo-3-loaded rat skeletal muscle cells in primary culture, indicating that the toxin increased intracellular Ca2+ levels. PbTx-3 did not elicit calcium transients in dysgenic myotubes (GLT cell line), lacking the alpha1 subunit of the dihydropyridine receptor (DHPR), but after transfection of the alpha1DHPR cDNA to GLT cells, PbTx-3 induced slow calcium transients that were similar to those of normal cells. Ca2+ signals evoked by PbTx-3 were inhibited by blocking either IP3 receptors, with 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate, or phospholipase C with U73122. PbTx-3 caused a tetrodotoxin-sensitive increase in intracellular IP3 mass levels, dependent on extra-cellular Na+. A similar increase in IP3 mass was induced by high K+ depolarization but no action potential trains (nor calcium signals) were elicited by prolonged depolarization under current clamp conditions. The increase in IP3 mass induced by either PbTx-3 or K+ was also detected in Ca2+-free medium. These results establish that the effect of the toxin on both intracellular Ca2+ and IP3 levels occurs via a membrane potential sensor instead of directly by Na+ flux and supports the notion of a train of action potentials being more efficient as a stimulus than sustained depolarization, suggesting that tetanus is the physiological stimulus for the IP3-dependent calcium signal involved in regulation of gene expression. PMID:18276006

  13. Simplest relationship between local field potential and intracellular signals in layered neural tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chizhov, Anton V.; Sanchez-Aguilera, Alberto; Rodrigues, Serafim; de la Prida, Liset Menendez

    2015-12-01

    The relationship between the extracellularly measured electric field potential resulting from synaptic activity in an ensemble of neurons and intracellular signals in these neurons is an important but still open question. Based on a model neuron with a cylindrical dendrite and lumped soma, we derive a formula that substantiates a proportionality between the local field potential and the total somatic transmembrane current that emerges from the difference between the somatic and dendritic membrane potentials. The formula is tested by intra- and extracellular recordings of evoked synaptic responses in hippocampal slices. Additionally, the contribution of different membrane currents to the field potential is demonstrated in a two-population mean-field model. Our formalism, which allows for a simple estimation of unknown dendritic currents directly from somatic measurements, provides an interpretation of the local field potential in terms of intracellularly measurable synaptic signals. It is also applicable to the study of cortical activity using two-compartment neuronal population models.

  14. Simplest relationship between local field potential and intracellular signals in layered neural tissue.

    PubMed

    Chizhov, Anton V; Sanchez-Aguilera, Alberto; Rodrigues, Serafim; de la Prida, Liset Menendez

    2015-12-01

    The relationship between the extracellularly measured electric field potential resulting from synaptic activity in an ensemble of neurons and intracellular signals in these neurons is an important but still open question. Based on a model neuron with a cylindrical dendrite and lumped soma, we derive a formula that substantiates a proportionality between the local field potential and the total somatic transmembrane current that emerges from the difference between the somatic and dendritic membrane potentials. The formula is tested by intra- and extracellular recordings of evoked synaptic responses in hippocampal slices. Additionally, the contribution of different membrane currents to the field potential is demonstrated in a two-population mean-field model. Our formalism, which allows for a simple estimation of unknown dendritic currents directly from somatic measurements, provides an interpretation of the local field potential in terms of intracellularly measurable synaptic signals. It is also applicable to the study of cortical activity using two-compartment neuronal population models. PMID:26764724

  15. The Belem Framework for Action: Harnessing the Power and Potential of Adult Learning and Education for a Viable Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adult Learning, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the Belem Framework for Action. This framework focuses on harnessing the power and potential of adult learning and education for a viable future. This framework begins with a preamble on adult education and towards lifelong learning.

  16. Action potential-induced dendritic calcium dynamics correlated with synaptic plasticity in developing hippocampal pyramidal cells.

    PubMed

    Isomura, Y; Kato, N

    1999-10-01

    In hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells, intracellular calcium increases are required for induction of long-term potentiation (LTP), an activity-dependent synaptic plasticity. LTP is known to develop in magnitude during the second and third postnatal weeks in the rats. Little is known, however, about development of intracellular calcium dynamics during the same postnatal weeks. We investigated postnatal development of intracellular calcium dynamics in the proximal apical dendrites of CA1 pyramidal cells by whole cell patch-clamp recordings and calcium imaging with the Ca(2+) indicator fura-2. Dendritic calcium increases induced by intrasomatically evoked action potentials were slight during the first postnatal week but gradually became robust 3 to 6-fold during the second and third postnatal weeks. These calcium increases were blocked by application of 250 microM CdCl(2), a nonspecific blocker for high-threshold voltage-dependent calcium channels (VDCCs). Under the voltage-clamp condition, both calcium currents and dendritic calcium accumulations induced by depolarization were larger at the late developmental stage (P15-18) than the early stage (P4-7), indicating developmental enhancement of calcium influx mediated by high-threshold VDCCs. Moreover, theta-burst stimulation (TBS), a protocol for LTP induction, induced large intracellular calcium increases at the late developmental stage, in synchrony with maturation of TBS-induced LTP. These results suggest that developmental enhancement of intracellular calcium increases induced by action potentials may underlie maturation of calcium-dependent functions such as synaptic plasticity in hippocampal neurons.

  17. Mechanism of Breast Cancer Preventive Action of Pomegranate: Disruption of Estrogen Receptor and Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Animesh; Bishayee, Anupam

    2015-01-01

    A pomegranate emulsion (PE), containing various bioactive phytochemicals, has recently been found to exert substantial chemopreventive effect against 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA)-induced mammary tumorigenesis in rats via antiproliferative and proapoptotic actions. Nevertheless, the underlying mechanisms of action are not completely understood. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of PE treatment on intratumor expression of estrogen receptor (ER)-α, ER-β,β-catenin and cyclin D1 during DMBA rat mammary carcinogenesis. Mammary tumor sections were harvested from a chemopreventive study in which PE (0.2, 1.0 and 5.0 g/kg) exhibited inhibition of mammary tumorigenesis in a dose-response manner. The expressions of ER-α, ER-β, β-catenin and cyclin D1 were analyzed by immunohistochemical techniques. PE downregulated the expression of intratumor ER-α and ER-β and lowered ER-α:ER-β ratio. PE also decreased the expression, cytoplasmic accumulation, and nuclear translocation of β-catenin, an essential transcriptional cofactor for Wnt signaling. Moreover, PE suppressed the expression of cell growth regulatory protein cyclin D1, which is a downstream target for both ER and Wnt signaling. Our current results in conjunction with our previous findings indicate that concurrent disruption of ER and Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathways possibly contributes to antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects involved in PE-mediated chemoprevention of DMBA-inflicted rat mammary tumorigenesis. PMID:26703530

  18. Religion and action control: Faith-specific modulation of the Simon effect but not Stop-Signal performance.

    PubMed

    Hommel, Bernhard; Colzato, Lorenza S; Scorolli, Claudia; Borghi, Anna M; van den Wildenberg, Wery P M

    2011-08-01

    Previous findings suggest that religion has a specific impact on attentional processes. Here we show that religion also affects action control. Experiment 1 compared Dutch Calvinists and Dutch atheists, matched for age, sex, intelligence, education, and cultural and socio-economic background, and Experiment 2 compared Italian Catholics with matched Italian seculars. As expected, Calvinists showed a smaller and Catholics a larger Simon effect than nonbelievers, while performance of the groups was comparable in the Stop-Signal task. This pattern suggests that religions emphasizing individualism or collectivism affects action control in specific ways, presumably by inducing chronic biases towards a more "exclusive" or "inclusive" style of decision-making. Interestingly, there was no evidence that religious practice affects inhibitory skills.

  19. Smoke and Hormone Mirrors: Action and Evolution of Karrikin and Strigolactone Signaling.

    PubMed

    Morffy, Nicholas; Faure, Lionel; Nelson, David C

    2016-03-01

    Karrikins and strigolactones are two classes of butenolide molecules that have diverse effects on plant growth. Karrikins are found in smoke and strigolactones are plant hormones, yet both molecules are likely recognized through highly similar signaling mechanisms. Here we review the most recent discoveries of karrikin and strigolactone perception and signal transduction. Two paralogous α/β hydrolases, KAI2 and D14, are respectively karrikin and strigolactone receptors. D14 acts with an F-box protein, MAX2, to target SMXL/D53 family proteins for proteasomal degradation, and genetic data suggest that KAI2 acts similarly. There are striking parallels in the signaling mechanisms of karrikins, strigolactones, and other plant hormones, including auxins, jasmonates, and gibberellins. Recent investigations of host perception in parasitic plants have demonstrated that strigolactone recognition can evolve following gene duplication of KAI2.

  20. ARF6 Is an Actionable Node that Orchestrates Oncogenic GNAQ Signaling in Uveal Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jae Hyuk; Shi, Dallas S; Grossmann, Allie H; Sorensen, Lise K; Tong, ZongZhong; Mleynek, Tara M; Rogers, Aaron; Zhu, Weiquan; Richards, Jackson R; Winter, Jacob M; Zhu, Jie; Dunn, Christine; Bajji, Ashok; Shenderovich, Mark; Mueller, Alan L; Woodman, Scott E; Harbour, J William; Thomas, Kirk R; Odelberg, Shannon J; Ostanin, Kirill; Li, Dean Y

    2016-06-13

    Activating mutations in Gαq proteins, which form the α subunit of certain heterotrimeric G proteins, drive uveal melanoma oncogenesis by triggering multiple downstream signaling pathways, including PLC/PKC, Rho/Rac, and YAP. Here we show that the small GTPase ARF6 acts as a proximal node of oncogenic Gαq signaling to induce all of these downstream pathways as well as β-catenin signaling. ARF6 activates these diverse pathways through a common mechanism: the trafficking of GNAQ and β-catenin from the plasma membrane to cytoplasmic vesicles and the nucleus, respectively. Blocking ARF6 with a small-molecule inhibitor reduces uveal melanoma cell proliferation and tumorigenesis in a mouse model, confirming the functional relevance of this pathway and suggesting a therapeutic strategy for Gα-mediated diseases. PMID:27265506

  1. A 10-form gauge potential and an M-9-brane Wess-Zumino action in massive 11D theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, T.

    2000-03-01

    We discuss some properties of an M-9-brane in ``massive 11D theory'' proposed by Bergshoeff, Lozano and Ortin. A 10-form gauge potential is consistently introduced into the massive 11D supergravity, and an M-9-brane Wess-Zumino action is constructed as that of a gauged /σ-model. Using duality relations is crucial in deriving the action, which we learn from the study of a 9-form potential in 10D massive IIA theory. A target space solution of an M-9-brane with a non-vanishing 10-form gauge field is also obtained, whose source is shown to be the M-9-brane effective action.

  2. Potential Mechanisms of Action in the Treatment of Social Impairment and Disorganization in Adolescents with ADHD

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Steven W.; Schultz, Brandon K.; Zoromski, Allison K.

    2014-01-01

    Two important domains that can be impaired in adolescents with ADHD are organization and social functioning; however, the development of interventions to target these areas in adolescents is in the early stages. Currently, small efficacy trials are beginning to be used to conduct preliminary tests on the proposed mechanisms of action for these interventions. These two studies examined the efficacy of organization and social functioning interventions for adolescents with ADHD, as well as the potential mechanisms of action for each intervention. Results from the organization intervention provide support for a significant relationship between performance on the organization checklist and overall GPA; however, there was no meaningful pattern of relationships between achieving mastery of the organization tasks and grades within quarter. Further, results from the social functioning intervention support a moderate relationship between performance on process measures of response to the intervention and outcome measures of social functioning. Results of this study provide implications for modifications to the measures and intervention procedures in future research. PMID:24748901

  3. Eudragit E100® potentiates the bactericidal action of ofloxacin against fluoroquinolone-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Romero, Verónica L; Pons, Patricia; Bocco, José L; Manzo, Rubén H; Alovero, Fabiana L

    2012-09-01

    We report the enhanced bactericidal activity of ofloxacin in drug-containing Eudragit E100(®) dispersions (EuCl-OFX) against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the effect of the cationic polymer on bacterial membrane. Organisms treated with EuCl-OFX showed changes in cell morphology, altered outer membrane (OM) and cytoplasm with low electrodensity areas. Zeta potential of bacterial surface was shifted to positive. Sensitization to lytic agents was also observed. A profound effect on bacterial size, granularity and membrane depolarization was found by flow cytometry. Cultures exposed to drug-free polymer also showed some damaged bacterial membranes, but there was no significant cell death. Inhibition of P. aeruginosa by EuCl-OFX may involve surface effect and, to some extent, permeation effect. The cationic polymer act to mitigate the electronegativity of cell surface in the process of disorganizing the OM, rendering it more permeable to antibiotic. In addition, cytoplasmic membrane depolarization turns bacterial cell more vulnerable. The effects on membranes combined with the mechanism of action of quinolone explain the improved bactericidal action exhibited by EuCl-OFX. The behavior described for Eudragit E100(®) against P. aeruginosa may be a useful tool to broaden the spectrum of antibiotics whose clinical use is limited by the impermeability of the bacterial OM.

  4. A potential mode of action for Anakinra in patients with arthrofibrosis following total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, David; Coates, Jonathon; del Carpio Pons, Alicia; Horabin, Joanna; Walker, Andrew; Abdul, Nicole; Kalson, Nicholas S.; Brewster, Nigel T.; Weir, David J.; Deehan, David J.; Mann, Derek A.; Borthwick, Lee A.

    2015-01-01

    Arthrofibrosis is a fibroproliferative disease characterised by excessive deposition of extracellular matrix components intra-articularly leading to pain and restricted range of movement. Although frequently observed following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) no therapeutic options exist. A pilot study demonstrated that intra-articular injection of Anakinra, an IL-1R antagonist, improved range of movement and pain in patients with arthrofibrosis however the mechanism of action is unknown. We hypothesise that IL-1α/β will drive an inflammatory phenotype in fibroblasts isolated from the knee, therefore identifying a potential mechanism of action for Anakinra in arthrofibrosis following TKA. Fibroblasts isolated from synovial membranes and infra-patellar fat pad of patients undergoing TKA express high levels of IL-1R1. Stimulation with IL-1α/β induced a pro-inflammatory phenotype characterised by increased secretion of GMCSF, IL-6 and IL-8. No significant difference in the inflammatory response was observed between fibroblasts isolated from synovial membrane or infra-patellar fat pad. IL-1α/β treatments induced a pro-inflammatory phenotype in fibroblasts from both synovial membrane and infra-patellar fat pad and therefore Anakinra can likely have an inhibitory effect on fibroblasts present in both tissues in vivo. It is also likely that fibroblast responses in the tissues are controlled by IL-1α/β availability and not their ability to respond to it. PMID:26553966

  5. Stop-signal response inhibition in schizophrenia: behavioural, event-related potential and functional neuroimaging data.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Matthew Edward; Fulham, William Ross; Johnston, Patrick James; Michie, Patricia Therese

    2012-01-01

    Inhibitory control deficits are well documented in schizophrenia, supported by impairment in an established measure of response inhibition, the stop-signal reaction time (SSRT). We investigated the neural basis of this impairment by comparing schizophrenia patients and controls matched for age, sex and education on behavioural, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and event-related potential (ERP) indices of stop-signal task performance. Compared to controls, patients exhibited slower SSRT and reduced right inferior frontal gyrus (rIFG) activation, but rIFG activation correlated with SSRT in both groups. Go stimulus and stop-signal ERP components (N1/P3) were smaller in patients, but the peak latencies of stop-signal N1 and P3 were also delayed in patients, indicating impairment early in stop-signal processing. Additionally, response-locked lateralised readiness potentials indicated response preparation was prolonged in patients. An inability to engage rIFG may predicate slowed inhibition in patients, however multiple spatiotemporal irregularities in the networks underpinning stop-signal task performance may contribute to this deficit. PMID:22027085

  6. Stochastic Resonance in an Underdamped System with Pinning Potential for Weak Signal Detection

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haibin; He, Qingbo; Kong, Fanrang

    2015-01-01

    Stochastic resonance (SR) has been proved to be an effective approach for weak sensor signal detection. This study presents a new weak signal detection method based on a SR in an underdamped system, which consists of a pinning potential model. The model was firstly discovered from magnetic domain wall (DW) in ferromagnetic strips. We analyze the principle of the proposed underdamped pinning SR (UPSR) system, the detailed numerical simulation and system performance. We also propose the strategy of selecting the proper damping factor and other system parameters to match a weak signal, input noise and to generate the highest output signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Finally, we have verified its effectiveness with both simulated and experimental input signals. Results indicate that the UPSR performs better in weak signal detection than the conventional SR (CSR) with merits of higher output SNR, better anti-noise and frequency response capability. Besides, the system can be designed accurately and efficiently owing to the sensibility of parameters and potential diversity. The features also weaken the limitation of small parameters on SR system. PMID:26343662

  7. Stochastic Resonance in an Underdamped System with Pinning Potential for Weak Signal Detection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haibin; He, Qingbo; Kong, Fanrang

    2015-08-28

    Stochastic resonance (SR) has been proved to be an effective approach for weak sensor signal detection. This study presents a new weak signal detection method based on a SR in an underdamped system, which consists of a pinning potential model. The model was firstly discovered from magnetic domain wall (DW) in ferromagnetic strips. We analyze the principle of the proposed underdamped pinning SR (UPSR) system, the detailed numerical simulation and system performance. We also propose the strategy of selecting the proper damping factor and other system parameters to match a weak signal, input noise and to generate the highest output signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Finally, we have verified its effectiveness with both simulated and experimental input signals. Results indicate that the UPSR performs better in weak signal detection than the conventional SR (CSR) with merits of higher output SNR, better anti-noise and frequency response capability. Besides, the system can be designed accurately and efficiently owing to the sensibility of parameters and potential diversity. The features also weaken the limitation of small parameters on SR system.

  8. Contribution of Na(v)1.8 sodium channels to action potential electrogenesis in DRG neurons.

    PubMed

    Renganathan, M; Cummins, T R; Waxman, S G

    2001-08-01

    C-type dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons can generate tetrodotoxin-resistant (TTX-R) sodium-dependent action potentials. However, multiple sodium channels are expressed in these neurons, and the molecular identity of the TTX-R sodium channels that contribute to action potential production in these neurons has not been established. In this study, we used current-clamp recordings to compare action potential electrogenesis in Na(v)1.8 (+/+) and (-/-) small DRG neurons maintained for 2-8 h in vitro to examine the role of sodium channel Na(v)1.8 (alpha-SNS) in action potential electrogenesis. Although there was no significant difference in resting membrane potential, input resistance, current threshold, or voltage threshold in Na(v)1.8 (+/+) and (-/-) DRG neurons, there were significant differences in action potential electrogenesis. Most Na(v)1.8 (+/+) neurons generate all-or-none action potentials, whereas most of Na(v)1.8 (-/-) neurons produce smaller graded responses. The peak of the response was significantly reduced in Na(v)1.8 (-/-) neurons [31.5 +/- 2.2 (SE) mV] compared with Na(v)1.8 (+/+) neurons (55.0 +/- 4.3 mV). The maximum rise slope was 84.7 +/- 11.2 mV/ms in Na(v)1.8 (+/+) neurons, significantly faster than in Na(v)1.8 (-/-) neurons where it was 47.2 +/- 1.3 mV/ms. Calculations based on the action potential overshoot in Na(v)1.8 (+/+) and (-/-) neurons, following blockade of Ca(2+) currents, indicate that Na(v)1.8 contributes a substantial fraction (80-90%) of the inward membrane current that flows during the rising phase of the action potential. We found that fast TTX-sensitive Na(+) channels can produce all-or-none action potentials in some Na(v)1.8 (-/-) neurons but, presumably as a result of steady-state inactivation of these channels, electrogenesis in Na(v)1.8 (-/-) neurons is more sensitive to membrane depolarization than in Na(v)1.8 (+/+) neurons, and, in the absence of Na(v)1.8, is attenuated with even modest depolarization. These observations

  9. Electrophysiological Motor Unit Number Estimation (MUNE) Measuring Compound Muscle Action Potential (CMAP) in Mouse Hindlimb Muscles.

    PubMed

    Arnold, W David; Sheth, Kajri A; Wier, Christopher G; Kissel, John T; Burghes, Arthur H; Kolb, Stephen J

    2015-09-25

    Compound muscle action potential (CMAP) and motor unit number estimation (MUNE) are electrophysiological techniques that can be used to monitor the functional status of a motor unit pool in vivo. These measures can provide insight into the normal development and degeneration of the neuromuscular system. These measures have clear translational potential because they are routinely applied in diagnostic and clinical human studies. We present electrophysiological techniques similar to those employed in humans to allow recordings of mouse sciatic nerve function. The CMAP response represents the electrophysiological output from a muscle or group of muscles following supramaximal stimulation of a peripheral nerve. MUNE is an electrophysiological technique that is based on modifications of the CMAP response. MUNE is a calculated value that represents the estimated number of motor neurons or axons (motor control input) supplying the muscle or group of muscles being tested. We present methods for recording CMAP responses from the proximal leg muscles using surface recording electrodes following the stimulation of the sciatic nerve in mice. An incremental MUNE technique is described using submaximal stimuli to determine the average single motor unit potential (SMUP) size. MUNE is calculated by dividing the CMAP amplitude (peak-to-peak) by the SMUP amplitude (peak-to-peak). These electrophysiological techniques allow repeated measures in both neonatal and adult mice in such a manner that facilitates rapid analysis and data collection while reducing the number of animals required for experimental testing. Furthermore, these measures are similar to those recorded in human studies allowing more direct comparisons.

  10. Cancer Driver Log (CanDL): Catalog of Potentially Actionable Cancer Mutations.

    PubMed

    Damodaran, Senthilkumar; Miya, Jharna; Kautto, Esko; Zhu, Eliot; Samorodnitsky, Eric; Datta, Jharna; Reeser, Julie W; Roychowdhury, Sameek

    2015-09-01

    Massively parallel sequencing technologies have enabled characterization of genomic alterations across multiple tumor types. Efforts have focused on identifying driver mutations because they represent potential targets for therapy. However, because of the presence of driver and passenger mutations, it is often challenging to assign the clinical relevance of specific mutations observed in patients. Currently, there are multiple databases and tools that provide in silico assessment for potential drivers; however, there is no comprehensive resource for mutations with functional characterization. Therefore, we created an expert-curated database of potentially actionable driver mutations for molecular pathologists to facilitate annotation of cancer genomic testing. We reviewed scientific literature to identify variants that have been functionally characterized in vitro or in vivo as driver mutations. We obtained the chromosome location and all possible nucleotide positions for each amino acid change and uploaded them to the Cancer Driver Log (CanDL) database with associated literature reference indicating functional driver evidence. In addition to a simple interface, the database allows users to download all or selected genes as a comma-separated values file for incorporation into their own analysis pipeline. Furthermore, the database includes a mechanism for third-party contributions to support updates for novel driver mutations. Overall, this freely available database will facilitate rapid annotation of cancer genomic testing in molecular pathology laboratories for mutations.

  11. Electrophysiological Motor Unit Number Estimation (MUNE) Measuring Compound Muscle Action Potential (CMAP) in Mouse Hindlimb Muscles.

    PubMed

    Arnold, W David; Sheth, Kajri A; Wier, Christopher G; Kissel, John T; Burghes, Arthur H; Kolb, Stephen J

    2015-01-01

    Compound muscle action potential (CMAP) and motor unit number estimation (MUNE) are electrophysiological techniques that can be used to monitor the functional status of a motor unit pool in vivo. These measures can provide insight into the normal development and degeneration of the neuromuscular system. These measures have clear translational potential because they are routinely applied in diagnostic and clinical human studies. We present electrophysiological techniques similar to those employed in humans to allow recordings of mouse sciatic nerve function. The CMAP response represents the electrophysiological output from a muscle or group of muscles following supramaximal stimulation of a peripheral nerve. MUNE is an electrophysiological technique that is based on modifications of the CMAP response. MUNE is a calculated value that represents the estimated number of motor neurons or axons (motor control input) supplying the muscle or group of muscles being tested. We present methods for recording CMAP responses from the proximal leg muscles using surface recording electrodes following the stimulation of the sciatic nerve in mice. An incremental MUNE technique is described using submaximal stimuli to determine the average single motor unit potential (SMUP) size. MUNE is calculated by dividing the CMAP amplitude (peak-to-peak) by the SMUP amplitude (peak-to-peak). These electrophysiological techniques allow repeated measures in both neonatal and adult mice in such a manner that facilitates rapid analysis and data collection while reducing the number of animals required for experimental testing. Furthermore, these measures are similar to those recorded in human studies allowing more direct comparisons. PMID:26436455

  12. Electrophysiological Motor Unit Number Estimation (MUNE) Measuring Compound Muscle Action Potential (CMAP) in Mouse Hindlimb Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, W. David; Sheth, Kajri A.; Wier, Christopher G.; Kissel, John T.; Burghes, Arthur H.; Kolb, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Compound muscle action potential (CMAP) and motor unit number estimation (MUNE) are electrophysiological techniques that can be used to monitor the functional status of a motor unit pool in vivo. These measures can provide insight into the normal development and degeneration of the neuromuscular system. These measures have clear translational potential because they are routinely applied in diagnostic and clinical human studies. We present electrophysiological techniques similar to those employed in humans to allow recordings of mouse sciatic nerve function. The CMAP response represents the electrophysiological output from a muscle or group of muscles following supramaximal stimulation of a peripheral nerve. MUNE is an electrophysiological technique that is based on modifications of the CMAP response. MUNE is a calculated value that represents the estimated number of motor neurons or axons (motor control input) supplying the muscle or group of muscles being tested. We present methods for recording CMAP responses from the proximal leg muscles using surface recording electrodes following the stimulation of the sciatic nerve in mice. An incremental MUNE technique is described using submaximal stimuli to determine the average single motor unit potential (SMUP) size. MUNE is calculated by dividing the CMAP amplitude (peak-to-peak) by the SMUP amplitude (peak-to-peak). These electrophysiological techniques allow repeated measures in both neonatal and adult mice in such a manner that facilitates rapid analysis and data collection while reducing the number of animals required for experimental testing. Furthermore, these measures are similar to those recorded in human studies allowing more direct comparisons. PMID:26436455

  13. Dynamics of action potential firing in electrically connected striatal fast-spiking interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Giovanni; Nieus, Thierry R.; Maggi, Silvia; Taverna, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    Fast-spiking interneurons (FSIs) play a central role in organizing the output of striatal neural circuits, yet functional interactions between these cells are still largely unknown. Here we investigated the interplay of action potential (AP) firing between electrically connected pairs of identified FSIs in mouse striatal slices. In addition to a loose coordination of firing activity mediated by membrane potential coupling, gap junctions (GJ) induced a frequency-dependent inhibition of spike discharge in coupled cells. At relatively low firing rates (2–20 Hz), some APs were tightly synchronized whereas others were inhibited. However, burst firing at intermediate frequencies (25–60 Hz) mostly induced spike inhibition, while at frequencies >50–60 Hz FSI pairs tended to synchronize. Spike silencing occurred even in the absence of GABAergic synapses or persisted after a complete block of GABAA receptors. Pharmacological suppression of presynaptic spike afterhyperpolarization (AHP) caused postsynaptic spikelets to become more prone to trigger spikes at near-threshold potentials, leading to a mostly synchronous firing activity. The complex pattern of functional coordination mediated by GJ endows FSIs with peculiar dynamic properties that may be critical in controlling striatal-dependent behavior. PMID:24294191

  14. Reduced TCR signaling potential impairs negative selection but does not result in autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Sujin; Song, Ki-Duk; Lesourne, Renaud; Lee, Jan; Pinkhasov, Julia; Li, Liqi; El-Khoury, Dalal; Love, Paul E

    2012-09-24

    Negative selection and regulatory T (T reg) cell development are two thymus-dependent processes necessary for the enforcement of self-tolerance, and both require high-affinity interactions between the T cell receptor (TCR) and self-ligands. However, it remains unclear if they are similarly impacted by alterations in TCR signaling potential. We generated a knock-in allele (6F) of the TCR ζ chain gene encoding a mutant protein lacking signaling capability whose expression is controlled by endogenous ζ regulatory sequences. Although negative selection was defective in 6F/6F mice, leading to the survival of autoreactive T cells, 6F/6F mice did not develop autoimmune disease. We found that 6F/6F mice generated increased numbers of thymus-derived T reg cells. We show that attenuation of TCR signaling potential selectively impacts downstream signaling responses and that this differential effect favors Foxp3 expression and T reg cell lineage commitment. These results identify a potential compensatory pathway for the enforcement of immune tolerance in response to defective negative selection caused by reduced TCR signaling capability. PMID:22945921

  15. [Adrenaline potentiates antiepileptic but not sedative action of diazepam in rats].

    PubMed

    Serdiuk, S E; Gmiro, V E

    2012-02-01

    Intramuscular (i.m.) administration ofdiazepam in a dose of 10 mg/kg and adrenaline in a dose of 0.2 mg/kg prevents generalized clonic-tonic pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) seizures in 75-80 % of rats, but only in 35-40 % of rats it prevents local clonic PTZ seizures. In the above mentioned dose, diazepam causes a strong sedation, but adrenaline does not cause a sedative effects. The combined administration of diazepam and adrenaline in threshold independently ineffective doses prevents both clonic-tonic and clonic PTZ seizures in 80 % of rats without a sedation development. The basis for mechanism of potentiation of anticonvulsant action of diazepam is the stimulation of gastric mucosa afferents by adrenaline. PMID:22650067

  16. Effect of intense sound exposure on cochlear microphonics and whole nerve action potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamura, K.; Yamamoto, N.; Kohyama, A.; Sawada, Y.; Ohno, H.; Saitoh, Y.

    1989-06-01

    An investigation was carried out to determine whether or not the critical band with Temporary Threshold Shift (TTS) is affected by exposure to high frequency sound. The function of the cochlea and the 8th nerve in guinea pigs was estimated by the intensity function and maximum output voltage of cochlear microphonics (CM) and by whole nerve action potential (Ap). Our results showed that both the intensity function and the maximum output voltage of CM and Ap decreased. Ap obtained at the test frequency higher, by half an octave, than the center frequency of the exposure noise was especially lowered. These results suggest that the critical band with TTS of both Ap and CM may be affected in exposure to high frequency sound.

  17. Action potentials occur spontaneously in squid giant axons with moderately alkaline intracellular pH.

    PubMed

    Clay, J R; Shrier, A

    2001-10-01

    This report demonstrates a novel finding from the classic giant axon preparation of the squid. Namely, the axon can be made to fire autonomously (spontaneously occurring action potentials) when the intracellular pH (pH(i)) was increased to about 7.7, or higher. (Physiological pH(i) is 7.3.) The frequency of firing was 33 Hz (T = 5 degrees ). No changes in frequency or in the voltage waveform itself were observed when pH(i) was increased from 7.7 up to 8.5. In other words, the effect has a threshold at a pH(i) of about 7.7. A mathematical model that is sufficient to mimic these results is provided using a modified version of the Clay (1998) description of the axonal ionic currents.

  18. Control and Plasticity of the Presynaptic Action Potential Waveform at Small CNS Nerve Terminals

    PubMed Central

    Hoppa, Michael B.; Gouzer, Geraldine; Armbruster, Moritz; Ryan, Timothy A.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The steep dependence of exocytosis on Ca2+ entry at nerve terminals implies that voltage control of both Ca2+ channel opening and the driving force for Ca2+ entry are powerful levers in sculpting synaptic efficacy. Using fast, genetically encoded voltage indicators in dissociated primary neurons, we show that at small nerve terminals K+ channels constrain the peak voltage of the presynaptic action potential (APSYN) to values much lower than those at cell somas. This key APSYN property additionally shows adaptive plasticity: manipulations that increase presynaptic Ca2+ channel abundance and release probability result in a commensurate lowering of the APSYN peak and narrowing of the waveform, while manipulations that decrease presynaptic Ca2+ channel abundance do the opposite. This modulation is eliminated upon blockade of Kv3.1 and Kv1 channels. Our studies thus reveal that adaptive plasticity in the APSYN waveform serves as an important regulator of synaptic function. PMID:25447742

  19. Effect of Cardiac Tissue Anisotropy on Three-Dimensional Electrical Action Potential Propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zhi Zhu; Liu, Jing

    A three-dimensional (3D) electrical action potential propagation model is developed to characterize the integrated effect of cardiac tissue structure using a homogenous function with a spatial inhomogeneity. This method may be more effective for bridging the gap between computational models and experimental data for cardiac tissue anisotropy. A generalized 3D eikonal relation considering anisotropy and a self-similar evolution solution of such a relation are derived to identify the effect of anisotropy and predict the anisotropy-induced electrical wave propagation instabilities. Furthermore, the phase field equation is introduced to obtain the complex three-dimensional numerical solution of the new correlation. The present results are expected to be valuable for better understanding the physiological behavior of cardiac tissues.

  20. Anthropomorphizing the Mouse Cardiac Action Potential via a Novel Dynamic Clamp Method

    PubMed Central

    Ahrens-Nicklas, Rebecca C.; Christini, David J.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Interspecies differences can limit the translational value of excitable cells isolated from model organisms. It can be difficult to extrapolate from a drug- or mutation-induced phenotype in mice to human pathophysiology because mouse and human cardiac electrodynamics differ greatly. We present a hybrid computational-experimental technique, the cell-type transforming clamp, which is designed to overcome such differences by using a calculated compensatory current to convert the macroscopic electrical behavior of an isolated cell into that of a different cell type. We demonstrate the technique's utility by evaluating drug arrhythmogenicity in murine cardiomyocytes that are transformed to behave like human myocytes. Whereas we use the cell-type transforming clamp in this work to convert between mouse and human electrodynamics, the technique could be adapted to convert between the action potential morphologies of any two cell types of interest. PMID:19917221

  1. Enhanced Action Potential Passage Through the Node of Ranvier of Myelinated Axons via Proton Hopping.

    PubMed

    Kier, Lemont; Hall, Lowell; Tombes, Robert M

    2015-01-01

    Nerve impulses travel along myelinated axons as much as 300-fold faster than they do along unmyelinated axons. Myelination is essential for normal nervous system behavior in vertebrates as illustrated by leukodystrophies, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) or multiple sclerosis (MS), where myelin is degenerated or damaged. The increased conduction velocity that occurs in myelinated axons is dependent on gaps in the myelin called Nodes of Ranvier that are enriched in ion channels. These Nodes are separated by long stretches of myelin insulation where no transmembrane ion conductance occurs. It is believed that the action potential jumps or skips between nodes, conserving its information content, while maintaining its speed. In this study, a model is presented that implicates Nodes of Ranvier as responsible for regenerating the proton hopping that is responsible for nerve impulse conductance in myelinated axons.

  2. Effects of lead acetate on guinea pig - cochear microphonics, action potential, and motor nerve conduction velocity

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamura, K.; Maehara, N.; Terayama, K.; Ueno, N.; Kohyama, A.; Sawada, Y.; Kishi, R.

    1987-04-01

    Segmental demyelination and axonal degeneration of motor nerves induced by lead exposure is well known in man, and animals. The effect of lead acetate exposure to man may involve the cranial nerves, since vertigo and sensory neuronal deafness have been reported among lead workers. However, there are few reports concerning the dose-effects of lead acetate both to the peripheral nerve and the cranial VII nerve with measurement of blood lead concentration. The authors investigated the effects of lead acetate to the cochlea and the VIII nerve using CM (cochlear microphonics) and AP (action potential) of the guinea pigs. The effects of lead acetate to the sciatic nerve were measured by MCV of the sciatic nerve with measurement of blood lead concentration.

  3. Excitable Membranes and Action Potentials in Paramecia: An Analysis of the Electrophysiology of Ciliates

    PubMed Central

    Schlaepfer, Charles H.; Wessel, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    The ciliate Paramecium caudatum possesses an excitable cell membrane whose action potentials (APs) modulate the trajectory of the cell swimming through its freshwater environment. While many stimuli affect the membrane potential and trajectory, students can use current injection and extracellular ionic concentration changes to explore how APs cause reversal of the cell’s motion. Students examine these stimuli through intracellular recordings, also gaining insight into the practices of electrophysiology. Paramecium’s large size of around 150 µm, simple care, and relative ease to penetrate make them ideal model organisms for undergraduate students’ laboratory study. The direct link between behavior and excitable membranes has thought provoking evolutionary implications for the study of paramecia. Recording from the cell, students note a small resting potential around −30 mV, differing from animal resting potentials. By manipulating ion concentrations, APs of the relatively long length of 20–30 ms up to several minutes with depolarizations maxing over 0 mV are observed. Through comparative analysis of membrane potentials and the APs induced by either calcium or barium, students can deduce the causative ions for the APs as well as the mechanisms of paramecium APs. Current injection allows students to calculate quantitative electric characteristics of the membrane. Analysis will follow the literature’s conclusion in a V-Gated Ca++ influx and depolarization resulting in feedback from intracellular Ca++ that inactivates V-Gated Ca++ channels and activates Ca-Dependent K+ channels through a secondary messenger cascade that results in the K+ efflux and repolarization. PMID:26557800

  4. Mannan Oligosaccharides in Nursery Pig Nutrition and Their Potential Mode of Action

    PubMed Central

    Halas, Veronika; Nochta, Imre

    2012-01-01

    Simple Summary The aim of the paper is to provide a review of mannan oligosaccharide products in relation to their growth promoting effect and mode of action. Mannan oligosaccharide products maintain intestinal integrity and the digestive and absorptive function of the gut in the post-weaning period in pigs and enhance disease resistance by promoting antigen presentation. We find that dietary supplementation has growth promoting effects in pigs kept in a poor hygienic environment, while the positive effect of MOS is not observed in healthy pig herds with high hygienic standards. Abstract Mannan oligosaccharides (MOSs) are often referred to as one of the potential alternatives for antimicrobial growth promoters. The aim of the paper is to provide a review of mannan oligosaccharide products in relation to their growth promoting effect and mode of action based on the latest publications. We discuss the dietary impact of MOSs on (1) microbial changes, (2) morphological changes of gut tissue and digestibility of nutrients, and (3) immune response of pigs after weaning. Dietary MOSs maintain the intestinal integrity and the digestive and absorptive function of the gut in the post-weaning period. Recent results suggest that MOS enhances the disease resistance in swine by promoting antigen presentation facilitating thereby the shift from an innate to an adaptive immune response. Accordingly, dietary MOS supplementation has a potential growth promoting effect in pigs kept in a poor hygienic environment, while the positive effect of MOS is not observed in healthy pig herds with high hygienic standards that are able to maintain a high growth rate after weaning. PMID:26486920

  5. Glutamine and glutamate limit the shortening of action potential duration in anoxia-challenged rabbit hearts

    PubMed Central

    Drake, Kenneth J; Shotwell, Matthew S; Wikswo, John P; Sidorov, Veniamin Y

    2015-01-01

    In clinical conditions, amino acid supplementation is applied to improve contractile function, minimize ischemia/reperfusion injury, and facilitate postoperative recovery. It has been shown that glutamine enhances myocardial ATP/APD (action potential duration) and glutathione/oxidized glutathione ratios, and can increase hexosamine biosynthesis pathway flux, which is believed to play a role in cardioprotection. Here, we studied the effect of glutamine and glutamate on electrical activity in Langendorff-perfused rabbit hearts. The hearts were supplied by Tyrode's media with or without 2.5 mmol/L glutamine and 150 μmol/L glutamate, and exposed to two 6-min anoxias with 20-min recovery in between. Change in APD was detected using a monophasic action potential probe. A nonlinear mixed-effects regression technique was used to evaluate the effect of amino acids on APD over the experiment. Typically, the dynamic of APD change encompasses three phases: short transient increase (more prominent in the first episode), slow decrease, and fast increase (starting with the beginning of recovery). The effect of both anoxic challenge and glutamine/glutamate was cumulative, being more pronounced in the second anoxia. The amino acids' protective effect became largest by the end of anoxia – 20.0% (18.9, 95% CI: [2.6 ms, 35.1 ms]), during the first anoxia and 36.6% (27.1, 95% CI: [7.7 ms, 46.6 ms]), during the second. Following the second anoxia, APD difference between control and supplemented hearts progressively increased, attaining 10.8% (13.6, 95% CI: [4.1 ms, 23.1 ms]) at the experiments' end. Our data reveal APD stabilizing and suggest an antiarrhythmic capacity of amino acid supplementation in anoxic/ischemic conditions. PMID:26333831

  6. Correlation of repolarization of ventricular monophasic action potential with ECG in the murine heart.

    PubMed

    Danik, Stephan; Cabo, Candido; Chiello, Christine; Kang, Sacha; Wit, Andrew L; Coromilas, James

    2002-07-01

    Transgenic mice have become important experimental models in the investigation of mechanisms causing cardiac arrhythmias because of the ability to create strains with alterations in repolarizing membrane currents. It is important to relate alterations in membrane currents in cells to their phenotypic expression on the electrocardiogram (ECG). The murine ECG, however, has unusual characteristics that make interpretation of the phenotypic expression of changes in ventricular repolarization uncertain. The major deflection representing the QRS (referred to as "a") is often followed by a secondary slower deflection ("b") and sometimes a subtle third deflection ("c"). To determine whether the second or third deflections or both represent ventricular repolarization, we recorded the ventricular monophasic action potential (MAP) in open-chest mice and correlated repolarization with the ECG. There was no significant correlation by linear regression, between action potential duration to 50% or 90% repolarization (APD(50) or APD(90)), respectively, of the MAP and either the interval from onset of Q to onset of b (Qb interval) or onset of c (Qc interval). Administration of 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) significantly prolonged APD(50) and APD(90) and the Qb interval, indicating that this deflection on the ECG represents part of ventricular repolarization. After 4-AP, the c wave disappeared, also suggesting that it represents a component of ventricular repolarization. Although it appears that both the b and c waves that follow the Q wave on the ECG represent ventricular repolarization, neither correlates exactly with APD(90) of the MAP. Therefore, an accurate measurement of complete repolarization of the murine ventricle cannot be obtained from the surface ECG. PMID:12063311

  7. [Cell signaling pathways interaction in cellular proliferation: Potential target for therapeutic interventionism].

    PubMed

    Valdespino-Gómez, Víctor Manuel; Valdespino-Castillo, Patricia Margarita; Valdespino-Castillo, Víctor Edmundo

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, cellular physiology is best understood by analysing their interacting molecular components. Proteins are the major components of the cells. Different proteins are organised in the form of functional clusters, pathways or networks. These molecules are ordered in clusters of receptor molecules of extracellular signals, transducers, sensors and biological response effectors. The identification of these intracellular signaling pathways in different cellular types has required a long journey of experimental work. More than 300 intracellular signaling pathways have been identified in human cells. They participate in cell homeostasis processes for structural and functional maintenance. Some of them participate simultaneously or in a nearly-consecutive progression to generate a cellular phenotypic change. In this review, an analysis is performed on the main intracellular signaling pathways that take part in the cellular proliferation process, and the potential use of some components of these pathways as target for therapeutic interventionism are also underlined. PMID:25986976

  8. Lactate Transport and Receptor Actions in Retina: Potential Roles in Retinal Function and Disease.

    PubMed

    Kolko, Miriam; Vosborg, Fia; Henriksen, Ulrik L; Hasan-Olive, Md Mahdi; Diget, Elisabeth Holm; Vohra, Rupali; Gurubaran, Iswariya Raja Sridevi; Gjedde, Albert; Mariga, Shelton Tendai; Skytt, Dorte M; Utheim, Tor Paaske; Storm-Mathisen, Jon; Bergersen, Linda H

    2016-06-01

    In retina, like in brain, lactate equilibrates across cell membranes via monocarboxylate transporters and in the extracellular space by diffusion, forming a basis for the action of lactate as a transmitter of metabolic signals. In the present paper, we argue that the lactate receptor GPR81, also known as HCAR1, may contribute importantly to the control of retinal cell functions in health and disease. GPR81, a G-protein coupled receptor, is known to downregulate cAMP both in adipose and nervous tissue. The receptor also acts through other down-stream mechanisms to control functions, such as excitability, metabolism and inflammation. Recent publications predict effects of the lactate receptor on neurodegeneration. Neurodegenerative diseases in retina, where the retinal ganglion cells die, notably glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy, may be linked to disturbed lactate homeostasis. Pilot studies reveal high GPR81 mRNA in retina and indicate GPR81 localization in Müller cells and retinal ganglion cells. Moreover, monocarboxylate transporters are expressed in retinal cells. We envision that lactate receptors and transporters could be useful future targets of novel therapeutic strategies to protect neurons and prevent or counteract glaucoma as well as other retinal diseases. PMID:26677077

  9. Lactate Transport and Receptor Actions in Retina: Potential Roles in Retinal Function and Disease.

    PubMed

    Kolko, Miriam; Vosborg, Fia; Henriksen, Ulrik L; Hasan-Olive, Md Mahdi; Diget, Elisabeth Holm; Vohra, Rupali; Gurubaran, Iswariya Raja Sridevi; Gjedde, Albert; Mariga, Shelton Tendai; Skytt, Dorte M; Utheim, Tor Paaske; Storm-Mathisen, Jon; Bergersen, Linda H

    2016-06-01

    In retina, like in brain, lactate equilibrates across cell membranes via monocarboxylate transporters and in the extracellular space by diffusion, forming a basis for the action of lactate as a transmitter of metabolic signals. In the present paper, we argue that the lactate receptor GPR81, also known as HCAR1, may contribute importantly to the control of retinal cell functions in health and disease. GPR81, a G-protein coupled receptor, is known to downregulate cAMP both in adipose and nervous tissue. The receptor also acts through other down-stream mechanisms to control functions, such as excitability, metabolism and inflammation. Recent publications predict effects of the lactate receptor on neurodegeneration. Neurodegenerative diseases in retina, where the retinal ganglion cells die, notably glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy, may be linked to disturbed lactate homeostasis. Pilot studies reveal high GPR81 mRNA in retina and indicate GPR81 localization in Müller cells and retinal ganglion cells. Moreover, monocarboxylate transporters are expressed in retinal cells. We envision that lactate receptors and transporters could be useful future targets of novel therapeutic strategies to protect neurons and prevent or counteract glaucoma as well as other retinal diseases.

  10. Detection of Potential Transit Signals in 17 Quarters of Kepler Mission Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seader, Shawn; Jenkins, Jon M.; Tenenbaum, Peter; Twicken, Joseph D.; Smith, Jeffrey C.; Morris, Rob; Catanzarite, Joseph; Clarke, Bruce D.; Li, Jie; Cote, Miles T.; Burke, Christopher J.; McCauliff, Sean; Girouard, Forrest R.; Campbell, Jennifer R.; Kamal Uddin, Akm; Zamudio, Khadeejah A.; Sabale, Anima; Henze, Christopher E.; Thompson, Susan E.; Klaus, Todd C.

    2015-03-01

    We present the results of a search for potential transit signals in the full 17-quarter data set collected during Kepler's primary mission that ended on 2013 May 11, due to the on board failure of a second reaction wheel needed to maintain high precision, fixed, pointing. The search includes a total of 198,646 targets, of which 112,001 were observed in every quarter and 86,645 were observed in a subset of the 17 quarters. For the first time, this multi-quarter search is performed on data that have been fully and uniformly reprocessed through the newly released version of the Data Processing Pipeline. We find a total of 12,669 targets that contain at least one signal that meets our detection criteria: periodicity of the signal, a minimum of three transit events, an acceptable signal-to-noise ratio, and four consistency tests that suppress many false positives. Each target containing at least one transit-like pulse sequence is searched repeatedly for other signals that meet the detection criteria, indicating a multiple planet system. This multiple planet search adds an additional 7698 transit-like signatures for a total of 20,367. Comparison of this set of detected signals with a set of known and vetted transiting planet signatures in the Kepler field of view shows that the recovery rate of the search is 90.3%. We review ensemble properties of the detected signals and present various metrics useful in validating these potential planetary signals. We highlight previously undetected transit-like signatures, including several that may represent small objects in the habitable zone of their host stars.

  11. DETECTION OF POTENTIAL TRANSIT SIGNALS IN THE FIRST THREE QUARTERS OF Kepler MISSION DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Tenenbaum, Peter; Christiansen, Jessie L.; Jenkins, Jon M.; Rowe, Jason F.; Seader, Shawn; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Clarke, Bruce D.; Li, Jie; Quintana, Elisa V.; Smith, Jeffrey C.; Stumpe, Martin C.; Thompson, Susan E.; Twicken, Joseph D.; Van Cleve, Jeffrey; Girouard, Forrest R.; Klaus, Todd C. [Orbital Sciences Corporation and others

    2012-03-01

    We present the results of a search for potential transit signals in the first three quarters of photometry data acquired by the Kepler mission. The targets of the search include 151,722 stars which were observed over the full interval and an additional 19,132 stars which were observed for only one or two quarters. From this set of targets we find a total of 5392 detections which meet the Kepler detection criteria: those criteria are periodicity of signal, an acceptable signal-to-noise ratio, and a composition test which rejects spurious detections which contain non-physical combinations of events. The detected signals are dominated by events with relatively low signal-to-noise ratio and by events with relatively short periods. The distribution of estimated transit depths appears to peak in the range between 40 and 100 parts per million, with a few detections down to fewer than 10 parts per million. The detections exhibit signal-to-noise ratios from 7.1{sigma}, which is the lower cutoff for detections, to over 10,000{sigma}, and periods ranging from 0.5 days, which is the lower cutoff used in the procedure, to 109 days, which is the upper limit of achievable periods given the length of the data set and the criteria used for detections. The detected signals are compared to a set of known transit events in the Kepler field of view which were derived by a different method using a longer data interval; the comparison shows that the current search correctly identified 88.1% of the known events. A tabulation of the detected transit signals, examples which illustrate the analysis and detection process, a discussion of future plans and open, potentially fruitful, areas of further research are included.

  12. Celecoxib, but not indomethacin, ameliorates the hypertensive and perivascular fibrotic actions of cyclosporine in rats: Role of endothelin signaling

    SciTech Connect

    El-Mas, Mahmoud M.; Helmy, Maged W.; Ali, Rabab M.; El-Gowelli, Hanan M.

    2015-04-01

    The immunosuppressant drug cyclosporine (CSA) is used with nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in arthritic conditions. In this study, we investigated whether NSAIDs modify the deleterious hypertensive action of CSA and the role of endothelin (ET) receptors in this interaction. Pharmacologic, protein expression, and histopathologic studies were performed in rats to investigate the roles of endothelin receptors (ET{sub A}/ET{sub B}) in the hemodynamic interaction between CSA and two NSAIDs, indomethacin and celecoxib. Tail-cuff plethysmography measurements showed that CSA (20 mg kg{sup −1} day{sup −1}, 10 days) increased systolic blood pressure (SBP) and heart rate (HR). CSA hypertension was associated with renal perivascular fibrosis and divergent changes in immunohistochemical signals of renal arteriolar ET{sub A} (increases) and ET{sub B} (decreases) receptors. While these effects of CSA were preserved in rats treated concomitantly with indomethacin (5 mg kg{sup −1} day{sup −1}), celecoxib (10 mg kg{sup −1} day{sup −1}) abolished the pressor, tachycardic, and fibrotic effects of CSA and normalized the altered renal ET{sub A}/ET{sub B} receptor expressions. Selective blockade of ET{sub A} receptors by atrasentan (5 mg kg{sup −1} day{sup −1}) abolished the pressor response elicited by CSA or CSA plus indomethacin. Alternatively, BQ788 (ET{sub B} receptor blocker, 0.1 mg kg{sup −1} day{sup −1}) caused celecoxib-sensitive elevations in SBP and potentiated the pressor response evoked by CSA. Together, the improved renovascular fibrotic and endothelin receptor profile (ET{sub A} downregulation and ET{sub B} upregulation) mediate, at least partly, the protective effect of celecoxib against the hypertensive effect of CSA. Clinically, the use of celecoxib along with CSA in the management of arthritic conditions might provide hypertension-free regimen. - Highlights: • Chronic CSA causes hypertension and renal perivascular fibrosis in rats.

  13. The Potential Protective Action of Vitamin D in Hepatic Insulin Resistance and Pancreatic Islet Dysfunction in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Leung, Po Sing

    2016-03-01

    Vitamin D deficiency (i.e., hypovitaminosis D) is associated with increased insulin resistance, impaired insulin secretion, and poorly controlled glucose homeostasis, and thus is correlated with the risk of metabolic diseases, including type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The liver plays key roles in glucose and lipid metabolism, and its dysregulation leads to abnormalities in hepatic glucose output and triglyceride accumulation. Meanwhile, the pancreatic islets are constituted in large part by insulin-secreting β cells. Consequently, islet dysfunction, such as occurs in T2DM, produces hyperglycemia. In this review, we provide a critical appraisal of the modulatory actions of vitamin D in hepatic insulin sensitivity and islet insulin secretion, and we discuss the potential roles of a local vitamin D signaling in regulating hepatic and pancreatic islet functions. This information provides a scientific basis for establishing the benefits of the maintenance, or dietary manipulation, of adequate vitamin D status in the prevention and management of obesity-induced T2DM and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. PMID:26959059

  14. The Potential Protective Action of Vitamin D in Hepatic Insulin Resistance and Pancreatic Islet Dysfunction in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Leung, Po Sing

    2016-03-05

    Vitamin D deficiency (i.e., hypovitaminosis D) is associated with increased insulin resistance, impaired insulin secretion, and poorly controlled glucose homeostasis, and thus is correlated with the risk of metabolic diseases, including type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The liver plays key roles in glucose and lipid metabolism, and its dysregulation leads to abnormalities in hepatic glucose output and triglyceride accumulation. Meanwhile, the pancreatic islets are constituted in large part by insulin-secreting β cells. Consequently, islet dysfunction, such as occurs in T2DM, produces hyperglycemia. In this review, we provide a critical appraisal of the modulatory actions of vitamin D in hepatic insulin sensitivity and islet insulin secretion, and we discuss the potential roles of a local vitamin D signaling in regulating hepatic and pancreatic islet functions. This information provides a scientific basis for establishing the benefits of the maintenance, or dietary manipulation, of adequate vitamin D status in the prevention and management of obesity-induced T2DM and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

  15. The Potential Protective Action of Vitamin D in Hepatic Insulin Resistance and Pancreatic Islet Dysfunction in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Po Sing

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency (i.e., hypovitaminosis D) is associated with increased insulin resistance, impaired insulin secretion, and poorly controlled glucose homeostasis, and thus is correlated with the risk of metabolic diseases, including type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The liver plays key roles in glucose and lipid metabolism, and its dysregulation leads to abnormalities in hepatic glucose output and triglyceride accumulation. Meanwhile, the pancreatic islets are constituted in large part by insulin-secreting β cells. Consequently, islet dysfunction, such as occurs in T2DM, produces hyperglycemia. In this review, we provide a critical appraisal of the modulatory actions of vitamin D in hepatic insulin sensitivity and islet insulin secretion, and we discuss the potential roles of a local vitamin D signaling in regulating hepatic and pancreatic islet functions. This information provides a scientific basis for establishing the benefits of the maintenance, or dietary manipulation, of adequate vitamin D status in the prevention and management of obesity-induced T2DM and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. PMID:26959059

  16. 30 CFR 75.352 - Actions in response to AMS malfunction, alert, or alarm signals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., or alarm signal is received at the designated surface location, the sensor(s) that are activated must...), or (e) of this section. (c) If any sensor installed in accordance with §§ 75.340(a)(1)(ii), 75.340(a)(2)(ii), 75.350(b), or 75.350(d) indicates an alarm or if any two consecutive sensors indicate...

  17. 30 CFR 75.352 - Actions in response to AMS malfunction, alert, or alarm signals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., or alarm signal is received at the designated surface location, the sensor(s) that are activated must...), or (e) of this section. (c) If any sensor installed in accordance with §§ 75.340(a)(1)(ii), 75.340(a)(2)(ii), 75.350(b), or 75.350(d) indicates an alarm or if any two consecutive sensors indicate...

  18. 30 CFR 75.352 - Actions in response to AMS malfunction, alert, or alarm signals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., or alarm signal is received at the designated surface location, the sensor(s) that are activated must...), or (e) of this section. (c) If any sensor installed in accordance with §§ 75.340(a)(1)(ii), 75.340(a)(2)(ii), 75.350(b), or 75.350(d) indicates an alarm or if any two consecutive sensors indicate...

  19. 30 CFR 75.352 - Actions in response to AMS malfunction, alert, or alarm signals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., or alarm signal is received at the designated surface location, the sensor(s) that are activated must...), or (e) of this section. (c) If any sensor installed in accordance with §§ 75.340(a)(1)(ii), 75.340(a)(2)(ii), 75.350(b), or 75.350(d) indicates an alarm or if any two consecutive sensors indicate...

  20. 30 CFR 75.352 - Actions in response to AMS malfunction, alert, or alarm signals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., or alarm signal is received at the designated surface location, the sensor(s) that are activated must...), or (e) of this section. (c) If any sensor installed in accordance with §§ 75.340(a)(1)(ii), 75.340(a)(2)(ii), 75.350(b), or 75.350(d) indicates an alarm or if any two consecutive sensors indicate...

  1. The Potential for Signal Integration and Processing in Interacting Map Kinase Cascades

    PubMed Central

    Schwacke, John H.; Voit, Eberhard O.

    2009-01-01

    The cellular response to environmental stimuli requires biochemical information processing through which sensory inputs and cellular status are integrated and translated into appropriate responses by way of interacting networks of enzymes. One such network, the Mitogen Activated Protein (MAP) kinase cascade is a highly conserved signal transduction module that propagates signals from cell surface receptors to various cytosolic and nuclear targets by way of a phosphorylation cascade. We have investigated the potential for signal processing within a network of interacting feed-forward kinase cascades typified by the MAP kinase cascade. A genetic algorithm was used to search for sets of kinetic parameters demonstrating representative key input-output patterns of interest. We discuss two of the networks identified in our study, one implementing the exclusive-or function (XOR) and another implementing what we refer to as an in-band detector (IBD) or two-sided threshold. These examples confirm the potential for logic and amplitude-dependent signal processing in interacting MAP kinase cascades demonstrating limited cross-talk. Specifically, the XOR function allows the network to respond to either one, but not both signals simultaneously, while the IBD permits the network to respond exclusively to signals within a given range of strength, and to suppress signals below as well as above this range. The solution to the XOR problem is interesting in that it requires only two interacting pathways, crosstalk at only one layer, and no feedback or explicit inhibition. These types of responses are not only biologically relevant but constitute signal processing modules that can be combined to create other logical functions and that, in contrast to amplification, cannot be achieved with a single cascade or with two non-interacting cascades. Our computational results revealed surprising similarities between experimental data describing the JNK/MKK4/MKK7 pathway and the solution for

  2. Modulation of hERG potassium channel gating normalizes action potential duration prolonged by dysfunctional KCNQ1 potassium channel

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongkang; Zou, Beiyan; Yu, Haibo; Moretti, Alessandra; Wang, Xiaoying; Yan, Wei; Babcock, Joseph J.; Bellin, Milena; McManus, Owen B.; Tomaselli, Gordon; Nan, Fajun; Laugwitz, Karl-Ludwig; Li, Min

    2012-01-01

    Long QT syndrome (LQTS) is a genetic disease characterized by a prolonged QT interval in an electrocardiogram (ECG), leading to higher risk of sudden cardiac death. Among the 12 identified genes causal to heritable LQTS, ∼90% of affected individuals harbor mutations in either KCNQ1 or human ether-a-go-go related genes (hERG), which encode two repolarizing potassium currents known as IKs and IKr. The ability to quantitatively assess contributions of different current components is therefore important for investigating disease phenotypes and testing effectiveness of pharmacological modulation. Here we report a quantitative analysis by simulating cardiac action potentials of cultured human cardiomyocytes to match the experimental waveforms of both healthy control and LQT syndrome type 1 (LQT1) action potentials. The quantitative evaluation suggests that elevation of IKr by reducing voltage sensitivity of inactivation, not via slowing of deactivation, could more effectively restore normal QT duration if IKs is reduced. Using a unique specific chemical activator for IKr that has a primary effect of causing a right shift of V1/2 for inactivation, we then examined the duration changes of autonomous action potentials from differentiated human cardiomyocytes. Indeed, this activator causes dose-dependent shortening of the action potential durations and is able to normalize action potentials of cells of patients with LQT1. In contrast, an IKr chemical activator of primary effects in slowing channel deactivation was not effective in modulating action potential durations. Our studies provide both the theoretical basis and experimental support for compensatory normalization of action potential duration by a pharmacological agent. PMID:22745159

  3. A calcium-activated sodium conductance produces a long-duration action potential in the egg of a nemertean worm.

    PubMed Central

    Jaffe, L A; Kado, R T; Kline, D

    1986-01-01

    1. The egg of the nemertean worm Cerebratulus lacteus produced an action potential having a duration of about 9 min. We investigated the ionic conductances which accounted for this long-duration action potential. 2. The peak of the action potential was about +50 mV and depended on extracellular Ca2+, while the plateau potential was about +25 mV and depended on extracellular Na+. 3. Under voltage-clamp conditions, depolarization produced two temporally separate inward currents: a fast current which reached a peak at about 10 ms, and a slow current which took up to 1 min to reach its peak and lasted for several min. 4. The fast current was independent of extracellular Na+, but was blocked by removal of extracellular Ca2+. 5. The slow current was not seen when extracellular Na+ was replaced by choline+ or K+. 6. The slow current did not develop in Ca2+-free sea water, and was reduced to about half if Ca2+ was removed after the current had been initiated. 7. Microinjection of EGTA blocked the slow current, and reduced the action potential duration to about 1 min. 8. We concluded that a voltage-activated Ca2+ conductance produced the peak of the action potential, while a Ca2+-activated Na+ conductance produced its plateau. PMID:2442351

  4. Cardiac action potential duration and contractility in the intact dog heart.

    PubMed

    Drake-Holland, A J; Noble, M I; Pieterse, M; Schouten, V J; Seed, W A; ter Keurs, H E; Wohlfart, B

    1983-12-01

    The maximum rate of rise of left ventricular pressure (DP) and action potential duration (a.p.d.) were measured in closed-chest anaesthetized dogs with atrioventricular dissociation and beta-adrenergic blockade. Right ventricular stimulation was carried out with protocols consisting of a conditioning 'priming' period and a test period. When a single test stimulus was introduced at varying intervals after the priming period, DP was found to be maximal at 800-1000 ms. With this single test stimulus fixed at the optimum, DP was found to be a variable inverse function of the a.p.d. of the same beat; no positive correlation could be found between DP and a.p.d. When a second test stimulus at the optimum interval was introduced after the first, the DP (DP2) was found to be strongly dependent on that elicited by the first test stimulus (DP1); the relationship was positive, linear, independent of the method used to vary DP, and independent of whether DP1 was depressed or potentiated. The slope of the relationship was less than 1.0 and the line passed through the point where DP2 = DP1; this is the point of continuous stimulation at the optimum interval in a steady state. This result is consistent with the hypothesis that the coefficient relating DP1 to DP2, at constant a.p.d. of the first test pulse (AP1), is an index of the proportion of the activator of contraction stored during relaxation of test beat 1 which is released again on beat 2. In order to test the hypothesis that the remaining contractility depended on the action potential of test beat 1, AP1 was varied by changing the intervals between the priming stimuli. In order to determine the relationship between DP2 and AP1 it was necessary to carry out multiple regression analysis because DP2 was already known to be strongly dependent on DP1 (point 3 above), i.e. DP2 = BDP(DP1) + BAP(AP1 - D). This analysis yielded highly significant positive values for the coefficients BDP and BAP. This result is compatible with the

  5. Optimisation of Ionic Models to Fit Tissue Action Potentials: Application to 3D Atrial Modelling

    PubMed Central

    Lovell, Nigel H.; Dokos, Socrates

    2013-01-01

    A 3D model of atrial electrical activity has been developed with spatially heterogeneous electrophysiological properties. The atrial geometry, reconstructed from the male Visible Human dataset, included gross anatomical features such as the central and peripheral sinoatrial node (SAN), intra-atrial connections, pulmonary veins, inferior and superior vena cava, and the coronary sinus. Membrane potentials of myocytes from spontaneously active or electrically paced in vitro rabbit cardiac tissue preparations were recorded using intracellular glass microelectrodes. Action potentials of central and peripheral SAN, right and left atrial, and pulmonary vein myocytes were each fitted using a generic ionic model having three phenomenological ionic current components: one time-dependent inward, one time-dependent outward, and one leakage current. To bridge the gap between the single-cell ionic models and the gross electrical behaviour of the 3D whole-atrial model, a simplified 2D tissue disc with heterogeneous regions was optimised to arrive at parameters for each cell type under electrotonic load. Parameters were then incorporated into the 3D atrial model, which as a result exhibited a spontaneously active SAN able to rhythmically excite the atria. The tissue-based optimisation of ionic models and the modelling process outlined are generic and applicable to image-based computer reconstruction and simulation of excitable tissue. PMID:23935704

  6. Compound Muscle Action Potential and Motor Function in Children with Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Lewelt, Aga J.; Krosschell, Kristin J.; Scott, Charles; Sakonju, Ai; Kissel, John T.; Crawford, Thomas O.; Acsadi, Gyula; D'Anjou, Guy; Elsheikh, Bakri; Reyna, Sandra P.; Schroth, Mary K.; Maczulski, Jo Anne; Stoddard, Gregory J.; Elovic, Elie; Swoboda, Kathryn J.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Reliable outcome measures that reflect the underlying disease process and correlate with motor function in children with SMA are needed for clinical trials. Methods Maximum ulnar compound muscle action potential (CMAP) data were collected at 2 visits over a 4–6 week period in children with SMA types II and III, ages 2–17 years old, at 4 academic centers. Primary functional outcome measures included the Modified Hammersmith Functional Motor Scale (MHFMS) and MHFMS-Extend. Results CMAP negative peak amplitude and area showed excellent discrimination between the ambulatory and non-ambulatory SMA cohorts (ROC=0.88). CMAP had excellent test-retest reliability (ICC=0.96–0.97, n=64) and moderate to strong correlation with the MHFMS and MHFMS-Extend (r=0.61–0.73, n=68, p<0.001). Discussion Maximum ulnar CMAP amplitude and area is a feasible, valid and reliable outcome measure for use in pediatric multicenter clinical trials in SMA. CMAP correlates well with motor function and has potential value as a relevant surrogate for disease status. PMID:20737553

  7. Calcium Transients Closely Reflect Prolonged Action Potentials in iPSC Models of Inherited Cardiac Arrhythmia

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, C. Ian; Baba, Shiro; Nakamura, Kenta; Hua, Ethan A.; Sears, Marie A.F.; Fu, Chi-cheng; Zhang, Jianhua; Balijepalli, Sadguna; Tomoda, Kiichiro; Hayashi, Yohei; Lizarraga, Paweena; Wojciak, Julianne; Scheinman, Melvin M.; Aalto-Setälä, Katriina; Makielski, Jonathan C.; January, Craig T.; Healy, Kevin E.; Kamp, Timothy J.; Yamanaka, Shinya; Conklin, Bruce R.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Long-QT syndrome mutations can cause syncope and sudden death by prolonging the cardiac action potential (AP). Ion channels affected by mutations are various, and the influences of cellular calcium cycling on LQTS cardiac events are unknown. To better understand LQTS arrhythmias, we performed current-clamp and intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) measurements on cardiomyocytes differentiated from patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS-CM). In myocytes carrying an LQT2 mutation (HERG-A422T), APs and [Ca2+]i transients were prolonged in parallel. APs were abbreviated by nifedipine exposure and further lengthened upon releasing intracellularly stored Ca2+. Validating this model, control iPS-CM treated with HERG-blocking drugs recapitulated the LQT2 phenotype. In LQT3 iPS-CM, expressing NaV1.5-N406K, APs and [Ca2+]i transients were markedly prolonged. AP prolongation was sensitive to tetrodotoxin and to inhibiting Na+-Ca2+ exchange. These results suggest that LQTS mutations act partly on cytosolic Ca2+ cycling, potentially providing a basis for functionally targeted interventions regardless of the specific mutation site. PMID:25254341

  8. Electrical Identification and Selective Microstimulation of Neuronal Compartments Based on Features of Extracellular Action Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Radivojevic, Milos; Jäckel, David; Altermatt, Michael; Müller, Jan; Viswam, Vijay; Hierlemann, Andreas; Bakkum, Douglas J.

    2016-01-01

    A detailed, high-spatiotemporal-resolution characterization of neuronal responses to local electrical fields and the capability of precise extracellular microstimulation of selected neurons are pivotal for studying and manipulating neuronal activity and circuits in networks and for developing neural prosthetics. Here, we studied cultured neocortical neurons by using high-density microelectrode arrays and optical imaging, complemented by the patch-clamp technique, and with the aim to correlate morphological and electrical features of neuronal compartments with their responsiveness to extracellular stimulation. We developed strategies to electrically identify any neuron in the network, while subcellular spatial resolution recording of extracellular action potential (AP) traces enabled their assignment to the axon initial segment (AIS), axonal arbor and proximal somatodendritic compartments. Stimulation at the AIS required low voltages and provided immediate, selective and reliable neuronal activation, whereas stimulation at the soma required high voltages and produced delayed and unreliable responses. Subthreshold stimulation at the soma depolarized the somatic membrane potential without eliciting APs. PMID:27510732

  9. Electrical Identification and Selective Microstimulation of Neuronal Compartments Based on Features of Extracellular Action Potentials.

    PubMed

    Radivojevic, Milos; Jäckel, David; Altermatt, Michael; Müller, Jan; Viswam, Vijay; Hierlemann, Andreas; Bakkum, Douglas J

    2016-01-01

    A detailed, high-spatiotemporal-resolution characterization of neuronal responses to local electrical fields and the capability of precise extracellular microstimulation of selected neurons are pivotal for studying and manipulating neuronal activity and circuits in networks and for developing neural prosthetics. Here, we studied cultured neocortical neurons by using high-density microelectrode arrays and optical imaging, complemented by the patch-clamp technique, and with the aim to correlate morphological and electrical features of neuronal compartments with their responsiveness to extracellular stimulation. We developed strategies to electrically identify any neuron in the network, while subcellular spatial resolution recording of extracellular action potential (AP) traces enabled their assignment to the axon initial segment (AIS), axonal arbor and proximal somatodendritic compartments. Stimulation at the AIS required low voltages and provided immediate, selective and reliable neuronal activation, whereas stimulation at the soma required high voltages and produced delayed and unreliable responses. Subthreshold stimulation at the soma depolarized the somatic membrane potential without eliciting APs. PMID:27510732

  10. Human neural tuning estimated from compound action potentials in normal hearing human volunteers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verschooten, Eric; Desloovere, Christian; Joris, Philip X.

    2015-12-01

    The sharpness of cochlear frequency tuning in humans is debated. Evoked otoacoustic emissions and psychophysical measurements suggest sharper tuning in humans than in laboratory animals [15], but this is disputed based on comparisons of behavioral and electrophysiological measurements across species [14]. Here we used evoked mass potentials to electrophysiologically quantify tuning (Q10) in humans. We combined a notched noise forward masking paradigm [9] with the recording of trans tympanic compound action potentials (CAP) from masked probe tones in awake human and anesthetized monkey (Macaca mulatta). We compare our results to data obtained with the same paradigm in cat and chinchilla [16], and find that CAP-Q10values in human are ˜1.6x higher than in cat and chinchilla and ˜1.3x higher than in monkey. To estimate frequency tuning of single auditory nerve fibers (ANFs) in humans, we derive conversion functions from ANFs in cat, chinchilla, and monkey and apply these to the human CAP measurements. The data suggest that sharp cochlear tuning is a feature of old-world primates.

  11. Optophysiological Approach to Resolve Neuronal Action Potentials with High Spatial and Temporal Resolution in Cultured Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Pagès, Stéphane; Côté, Daniel; De Koninck, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Cell to cell communication in the central nervous system is encoded into transient and local membrane potential changes (ΔVm). Deciphering the rules that govern synaptic transmission and plasticity entails to be able to perform Vm recordings throughout the entire neuronal arborization. Classical electrophysiology is, in most cases, not able to do so within small and fragile neuronal subcompartments. Thus, optical techniques based on the use of fluorescent voltage-sensitive dyes (VSDs) have been developed. However, reporting spontaneous or small ΔVm from neuronal ramifications has been challenging, in part due to the limited sensitivity and phototoxicity of VSD-based optical measurements. Here we demonstrate the use of water soluble VSD, ANNINE-6plus, with laser-scanning microscopy to optically record ΔVm in cultured neurons. We show that the sensitivity (>10% of fluorescence change for 100 mV depolarization) and time response (sub millisecond) of the dye allows the robust detection of action potentials (APs) even without averaging, allowing the measurement of spontaneous neuronal firing patterns. In addition, we show that back-propagating APs can be recorded, along distinct dendritic sites and within dendritic spines. Importantly, our approach does not induce any detectable phototoxic effect on cultured neurons. This optophysiological approach provides a simple, minimally invasive, and versatile optical method to measure electrical activity in cultured neurons with high temporal (ms) resolution and high spatial (μm) resolution. PMID:22016723

  12. Potential Function of Exogenous Vimentin on the Activation of Wnt Signaling Pathway in Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Satelli, Arun; Hu, Jiemiao; Xia, Xueqing; Li, Shulin

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cell signaling, growth, morphology, proliferation and tumorigenic potential are largely depending on the signaling molecules present naturally in the tumor microenvironment and the identification of key molecules that drive the tumor progression is critical for the development of new modalities for the prevention of tumor progression. High concentrations of vimentin in the blood of cancer patients have been reported, however the function of blood circulating vimentin remains unknown. Here, we investigated the functional role of exogenously supplemented vimentin on colon cancer cells and examined the Wnt Signaling activation and cancer cell invasion. Vimentin when supplemented to the cancer cells remained bound to the surface of the cancer cells. Furthermore, bound vimentin activates Wnt signaling pathway as detectable by increased β-catenin accumulation in the nucleus with concomitant activation of β-catenin-dependent transcription of Wnt signaling downstream targets. Functionally, there was an increase in the rate of cellular invasion in these cancer cells upon binding with vimentin. Our results thus suggest that free vimentin in the tumor microenvironment acts as a positive regulator of the β-catenin signaling pathway, thus providing a basis for cancer invasive properties.

  13. Potential Function of Exogenous Vimentin on the Activation of Wnt Signaling Pathway in Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Satelli, Arun; Hu, Jiemiao; Xia, Xueqing; Li, Shulin

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cell signaling, growth, morphology, proliferation and tumorigenic potential are largely depending on the signaling molecules present naturally in the tumor microenvironment and the identification of key molecules that drive the tumor progression is critical for the development of new modalities for the prevention of tumor progression. High concentrations of vimentin in the blood of cancer patients have been reported, however the function of blood circulating vimentin remains unknown. Here, we investigated the functional role of exogenously supplemented vimentin on colon cancer cells and examined the Wnt Signaling activation and cancer cell invasion. Vimentin when supplemented to the cancer cells remained bound to the surface of the cancer cells. Furthermore, bound vimentin activates Wnt signaling pathway as detectable by increased β-catenin accumulation in the nucleus with concomitant activation of β-catenin-dependent transcription of Wnt signaling downstream targets. Functionally, there was an increase in the rate of cellular invasion in these cancer cells upon binding with vimentin. Our results thus suggest that free vimentin in the tumor microenvironment acts as a positive regulator of the β-catenin signaling pathway, thus providing a basis for cancer invasive properties. PMID:27698922

  14. The interactions between potassium and sodium currents in generating action potentials in the rat sympathetic neurone.

    PubMed Central

    Belluzzi, O; Sacchi, O

    1988-01-01

    V, indicating that at these membrane potentials the IA current mainly, if not exclusively, contributes to the action potential falling phase. 5. The basic features of the sympathetic neurone action potential were reconstructed by simulations based on present and previous voltage-clamp characterization of the IA, IK(V) and INa conductances.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:2457694

  15. Differential action potentials and firing patterns in injured and uninjured small dorsal root ganglion neurons after nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xu-Feng; Zhu, Chang Z; Thimmapaya, Rama; Choi, Won S; Honore, Prisca; Scott, Victoria E; Kroeger, Paul E; Sullivan, James P; Faltynek, Connie R; Gopalakrishnan, Murali; Shieh, Char-Chang

    2004-05-29

    The profile of tetrodotoxin sensitive (TTX-S) and resistant (TTX-R) Na(+) channels and their contribution to action potentials and firing patterns were studied in isolated small dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons after L5/L6 spinal nerve ligation (SNL). Total TTX-R Na(+) currents and Na(v) 1.8 mRNA were reduced in injured L5 DRG neurons 14 days after SNL. In contrast, TTX-R Na(+)currents and Na(v) 1.8 mRNA were upregulated in uninjured L4 DRG neurons after SNL. Voltage-dependent inactivation of TTX-R Na(+) channels in these neurons was shifted to hyperpolarized potentials by 4 mV. Two types of neurons were identified in injured L5 DRG neurons after SNL. Type I neurons (57%) had significantly lower threshold but exhibited normal resting membrane potential (RMP) and action potential amplitude. Type II neurons (43%) had significantly smaller action potential amplitude but retained similar RMP and threshold to those from sham rats. None of the injured neurons could generate repetitive firing. In the presence of TTX, only 26% of injured neurons could generate action potentials that had smaller amplitude, higher threshold, and higher rheobase compared with sham rats. In contrast, action potentials and firing patterns in uninjured L4 DRG neurons after SNL, in the presence or absence of TTX, were not affected. These results suggest that TTX-R Na(+) channels play important roles in regulating action potentials and firing patterns in small DRG neurons and that downregulation in injured neurons and upregulation in uninjured neurons confer differential roles in shaping electrogenesis, and perhaps pain transmission, in these neurons. PMID:15120592

  16. Differentiation of the action potential in the smooth muscle of canine gastric antrum using calcium-inhibitory drugs.

    PubMed

    Hohnsbein, J; Golenhofen, K

    1985-03-01

    Electrical and mechanical activity were recorded simultaneously in smooth muscle preparations from the antrum region of canine stomach by means of a single sucrose gap technique (SGT). The SGT was optimized to permit stable recording from multicellular smooth muscle preparations over several hours of electrical and mechanical activity with little disturbance of their normal properties. Acetylcholine (ACh, 10(-8) to 10(-6) M) induced or augmented dose-dependently the electrical and mechanical activity. The plateau of the action potential complex was elevated by ACh, while the contraction was increased in linear correlation to the magnitude of the plateau component. In spontaneously active (or in ACh-stimulated) preparations TEA (5 to 20 mM) magnified the plateau component, induced or strengthened spikes on the plateau ('secondary spikes'), and induced or strengthened phasic contractions. Nifedipine (10(-6) M) abolished secondary spikes, part of the plateau component of the action potential, and suppressed mechanical activity. The complex action potential of canine gastric antrum can be differentiated into (a) a basic action potential, consisting of an initial, primary spike and a plateau depolarization; this basic action potential is resistant to nifedipine and does not trigger any mechanical activity; and (b) a nifedipine-sensitive component (calcium component), which consists of an augmentation of the plateau depolarization and of secondary spikes, and which is responsible for the initiation of mechanical activity.

  17. An experimental study on the physical properties of the cupula. Effect of cupular sectioning on the ampullary nerve action potential.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, M; Harada, Y; Kishimoto, A

    1985-01-01

    The frog posterior semicircular canal (PSC) was isolated and a part of the ampullary wall was cut to allow removal of the cupula from the crista. The cupula was replaced on the crista and the PSC ampullary action potential was recorded. The cupula was again removed and was sectioned in half, either in the plane vertical to the crista (vertical sectioning), or in the plane parallel to the crista (horizontal sectioning). The sectioned half of the cupula was then replaced on the crista. The action potentials after replacement of the vertical or horizontal segments of the cupula were compared to those achieved when the entire cupula was replaced. After vertical sectioning, the action potentials were significantly reduced; they were 50.3% of the completely replaced cupula when a small stimulus was used and 79.1% when a large stimulus was used. A reduced attachment surface between the cupular base and the crista is possibly responsible for the decreased action potential in the vertically sectioned specimen. After horizontal sectioning, the action potentials were 64.5% for the small stimulus and 108.2% for the large stimulus. These results indicate that elicited responses are related to the height of the cupula and the deflection angle. This further suggests that the movement of the cupula is represented by that of the elastic system.

  18. Novel Transabdominal Motor Action Potential (TaMAP) Neuromonitoring System for Spinal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Erica; Gabel, Brandon C; Taylor, Natalie; Gharib, James; Lee, Yu-Po; Taylor, William

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Minimally invasive lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) approaches to the lumbar spine reduce patient morbidity compared to anterior or posterior alternatives. This approach, however, decreases direct anatomical visualization, creating the need for highly sensitive and specific neurophysiological monitoring. We seek to determine feasibility in 'transabdominal motor action potential (TaMAP)' monitoring as an assessment for the integrity of the neural elements during lateral-approach surgeries to the lumbar spine.  Methods Cathode and anode leads were placed on the posterior and anterior surfaces of two porcine subjects. Currents of varying degrees were transmitted across, from front to back. Motor responses were monitored and recorded by needle electrodes in specific distal muscle groups of the lower extremity. Lastly, the cathode and anode were placed anterior and posterior to the chest wall and stimulated to the maximum of 1500 mA to determine any effect on cardiac rhythm. Results Responses were seen by measuring vertical height differences between peaks of corresponding evoked potentials. Recruitment began at 200 mA in the lower extremities. Stimulation at 450 mA recruited a reliable and distinguishable electrographic response from most muscle groups. Responses were recorded and reliably measured and increased in proportion to the graduation of transabdominal stimulation current; no responses were seen in the arms or face. 1500 mA across the chest wall failed to stimulate or induce cardiac arrhythmia on repeated stimulation, indicating safety of stimulation. Conclusion TaMAPs seen in the animal model provide a potential alternative to standard transcranial motor evoked potentials done in the lateral approach of LLIFs. TaMAP recordings in most muscle groups were recordable and reliable, though some muscle groups failed to stimulate. Safety of transabdominal motor evoked potentials was confirmed in this porcine study. Future studies

  19. Bacteriocins: modes of action and potentials in food preservation and control of food poisoning.

    PubMed

    Abee, T; Krockel, L; Hill, C

    1995-12-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) play an essential role in the majority of food fermentations, and a wide variety of strains are routinely employed as starter cultures in the manufacture of dairy, meat, vegetable and bakery products. One of the most important contributions of these microorganisms is the extended shelf life of the fermented product by comparison to that of the raw substrate. Growth of spoilage and pathogenic bacteria in these foods is inhibited due to competition for nutrients and the presence of starter-derived inhibitors such as lactic acid, hydrogen peroxide and bacteriocins (Ray and Daeschel, 1992). Bacteriocins, are a heterogenous group of anti-bacterial proteins that vary in spectrum of activity, mode of action, molecular weight, genetic origin and biochemical properties. Currently, artificial chemical preservatives are employed to limit the number of microorganisms capable of growing within foods, but increasing consumer awareness of potential health risks associated with some of these substances has led researchers to examine the possibility of using bacteriocins produced by LAB as biopreservatives. The major classes of bacteriocins produced by LAB include: (I) lantibiotics, (II) small heat stable peptides, (III) large heat labile proteins, and (IV) complex proteins whose activity requires the association of carbohydrate or lipid moieties (Klaenhammer, 1993). Significantly however, the inhibitory activity of these substances is confined to Gram-positive bacteria and inhibition of Gram-negatives by these bacteriocins has not been demonstrated, an observation which can be explained by a detailed analysis and comparison of the composition of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial cell walls (Fig. 1). In both types the cytoplasmic membrane which forms the border between the cytoplasm and the external environment, is surrounded by a layer of peptidoglycan which is significantly thinner in Gram-negative bacteria than in Gram-positive bacteria. Gram

  20. Emotional expressions beyond facial muscle actions. A call for studying autonomic signals and their impact on social perception

    PubMed Central

    Kret, Mariska E.

    2015-01-01

    Humans are well adapted to quickly recognize and adequately respond to another’s emotions. Different theories propose that mimicry of emotional expressions (facial or otherwise) mechanistically underlies, or at least facilitates, these swift adaptive reactions. When people unconsciously mimic their interaction partner’s expressions of emotion, they come to feel reflections of those companions’ emotions, which in turn influence the observer’s own emotional and empathic behavior. The majority of research has focused on facial actions as expressions of emotion. However, the fact that emotions are not just expressed by facial muscles alone is often still ignored in emotion perception research. In this article, I therefore argue for a broader exploration of emotion signals from sources beyond the face muscles that are more automatic and difficult to control. Specifically, I will focus on the perception of implicit sources such as gaze and tears and autonomic responses such as pupil-dilation, eyeblinks and blushing that are subtle yet visible to observers and because they can hardly be controlled or regulated by the sender, provide important “veridical” information. Recently, more research is emerging about the mimicry of these subtle affective signals including pupil-mimicry. I will here review this literature and suggest avenues for future research that will eventually lead to a better comprehension of how these signals help in making social judgments and understand each other’s emotions. PMID:26074855

  1. Emotional expressions beyond facial muscle actions. A call for studying autonomic signals and their impact on social perception.

    PubMed

    Kret, Mariska E

    2015-01-01

    Humans are well adapted to quickly recognize and adequately respond to another's emotions. Different theories propose that mimicry of emotional expressions (facial or otherwise) mechanistically underlies, or at least facilitates, these swift adaptive reactions. When people unconsciously mimic their interaction partner's expressions of emotion, they come to feel reflections of those companions' emotions, which in turn influence the observer's own emotional and empathic behavior. The majority of research has focused on facial actions as expressions of emotion. However, the fact that emotions are not just expressed by facial muscles alone is often still ignored in emotion perception research. In this article, I therefore argue for a broader exploration of emotion signals from sources beyond the face muscles that are more automatic and difficult to control. Specifically, I will focus on the perception of implicit sources such as gaze and tears and autonomic responses such as pupil-dilation, eyeblinks and blushing that are subtle yet visible to observers and because they can hardly be controlled or regulated by the sender, provide important "veridical" information. Recently, more research is emerging about the mimicry of these subtle affective signals including pupil-mimicry. I will here review this literature and suggest avenues for future research that will eventually lead to a better comprehension of how these signals help in making social judgments and understand each other's emotions. PMID:26074855

  2. Proinflammatory actions of visfatin/nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt) involve regulation of insulin signaling pathway and Nampt enzymatic activity.

    PubMed

    Jacques, Claire; Holzenberger, Martin; Mladenovic, Zvezdana; Salvat, Colette; Pecchi, Emilie; Berenbaum, Francis; Gosset, Marjolaine

    2012-04-27

    Visfatin (also termed pre-B-cell colony-enhancing factor (PBEF) or nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt)) is a pleiotropic mediator acting on many inflammatory processes including osteoarthritis. Visfatin exhibits both an intracellular enzymatic activity (nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase, Nampt) leading to NAD synthesis and a cytokine function via the binding to its hypothetical receptor. We recently reported the role of visfatin in prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) synthesis in chondrocytes. Here, our aim was to characterize the signaling pathways involved in this response in exploring both the insulin receptor (IR) signaling pathway and Nampt activity. IR was expressed in human and murine chondrocytes, and visfatin triggered Akt phosphorylation in murine chondrocytes. Blocking IR expression with siRNA or activity using the hydroxy-2-naphthalenyl methyl phosphonic acid tris acetoxymethyl ester (HNMPA-(AM)(3)) inhibitor diminished visfatin-induced PGE(2) release in chondrocytes. Moreover, visfatin-induced IGF-1R(-/-) chondrocytes released higher concentration of PGE(2) than IGF-1R(+/+) cells, a finding confirmed with an antibody that blocked IGF-1R. Using RT-PCR, we found that visfatin did not regulate IR expression and that an increased insulin release was also unlikely to be involved because insulin was unable to increase PGE(2) release. Inhibition of Nampt activity using the APO866 inhibitor gradually decreased PGE(2) release, whereas the addition of exogenous nicotinamide increased it. We conclude that the proinflammatory actions of visfatin in chondrocytes involve regulation of IR signaling pathways, possibly through the control of Nampt enzymatic activity.

  3. Emotional expressions beyond facial muscle actions. A call for studying autonomic signals and their impact on social perception.

    PubMed

    Kret, Mariska E

    2015-01-01

    Humans are well adapted to quickly recognize and adequately respond to another's emotions. Different theories propose that mimicry of emotional expressions (facial or otherwise) mechanistically underlies, or at least facilitates, these swift adaptive reactions. When people unconsciously mimic their interaction partner's expressions of emotion, they come to feel reflections of those companions' emotions, which in turn influence the observer's own emotional and empathic behavior. The majority of research has focused on facial actions as expressions of emotion. However, the fact that emotions are not just expressed by facial muscles alone is often still ignored in emotion perception research. In this article, I therefore argue for a broader exploration of emotion signals from sources beyond the face muscles that are more automatic and difficult to control. Specifically, I will focus on the perception of implicit sources such as gaze and tears and autonomic responses such as pupil-dilation, eyeblinks and blushing that are subtle yet visible to observers and because they can hardly be controlled or regulated by the sender, provide important "veridical" information. Recently, more research is emerging about the mimicry of these subtle affective signals including pupil-mimicry. I will here review this literature and suggest avenues for future research that will eventually lead to a better comprehension of how these signals help in making social judgments and understand each other's emotions.

  4. Flavonoids and Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling: Potential Role in Colorectal Cancer Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Amado, Nathália G.; Predes, Danilo; Moreno, Marcela M.; Carvalho, Igor O.; Mendes, Fábio A.; Abreu, José G.

    2014-01-01

    It is now well documented that natural products have played an important role in anticancer therapy. Many studies focus on the ability of these natural compounds to modulate tumor-related signaling pathways and the relationship of these properties to an anticancer effect. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer and the fourth leading cause of cancer death among men and women. Therefore, finding strategies to fight against CRC is an emergent health problem. CRC has a strong association with deregulation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. As some types of natural compounds are capable of modulating the Wnt/β-catenin signaling, one important question is whether they could counteract CRC. In this review, we discuss the role of flavonoids, a class of natural compounds, on Wnt/β-catenin regulation and its possible potential for therapeutic usage on colorectal cancer. PMID:25007066

  5. Are unusually colored eggs a signal to potential conspecific brood parasites?

    PubMed

    Ruxton, G D; Broom, M; Colegrave, N

    2001-04-01

    It has previously been suggested that some species of birds make the last egg in their clutch pale as a signal to potential conspecific brood parasites that incubation has commenced. Here, we use game theory to show that the signaling function of pale eggs can be evolutionarily stable and resistant to cheating and to demonstrate that such a signal can only be maintained under strict conditions. The key conditions are, first, that there is a cost associated with the production of pale eggs (in particular, the cost of a pale egg produced early in the clutch must be more expensive than the cost of one produced later in the clutch) and, second, that the cost of making the last egg pale is not too great (relative to the costs of parasitism). We discuss the likelihood of these conditions being met in real systems and suggest empirical tests that would differentiate this theory from alternative nonadaptive explanations for pale eggs.

  6. Self-potential signals associated with preferential groundwater flow pathways in sinkholes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jardani, A.; Dupont, J. P.; Revil, A.

    2006-09-01

    Two self-potential (SP) surveys have been conducted at a test site located in Normandy, in the northwest of France, in a chalk karst in spring and summer 2005. The spring survey showed circular negative SP signals associated with the position of sinkholes and crypto-sinkholes, while the survey conducted during the summer showed fewer anomalies with lesser magnitudes. The negative SP anomalies observed in the spring survey were several tens of millivolts less than a reference located outside the ridge along which the sinkholes are located. In addition to the SP surveys, we also performed a DC electrical resistivity survey. The electrical resistivity tomogram shows the position of the interfaces between the chalk and the overlying clay with flint and loess covers and the position of the sinkholes. A linear relationship is observed between the SP signals and the thickness of the loess layer. In addition, large negative SP anomalies are associated with the sinkholes themselves. These SP signals are explained by solving the boundary value problem for the coupled hydroelectric problem. We fixed the boundary condition at the ground surface in terms of hydraulic flux associated with the infiltration of the meteoric water and a no-flow condition on the vertical boundaries. A finite element numerical simulation of this coupling is performed, and a fairly good agreement is obtained between the simulation and the observed SP signals. We show for the first time how the SP signals reflect mainly the topography of the clay with flint/loess interface and help to identify the location of sinkholes. Three-dimensional tomography algorithms are proposed to locate the source of these self-potential signals in the ground.

  7. Potentiation of μ–opioid receptor–mediated signaling by ketamine

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Achla; Devi, Lakshmi A.; Gomes, Ivone

    2013-01-01

    Ketamine, a clinically relevant drug, has been shown to enhance opioid-induced analgesia and prevent hyperalgesia. However, the molecular mechanisms involved are not clearly understood. As previous studies found that activation of opioid receptors leads to the phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases, we investigated whether ketamine could modulate μ-opioid receptor (μOR)-mediated ERK1/2 phosphorylation. We find that acute treatment with ketamine enhances (~2- to 3-fold) the levels of opioid-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation in recombinant as well as cells endogenously expressing μOR. Interestingly, we find that in the absence of ketamine ERK1/2 signaling is desensitized 10 min after opioid exposure whereas in its presence significant levels (~3-fold over basal) are detected. In addition, ketamine increases the rate of resensitization of opioid-mediated ERK1/2 signaling (15 min in its presence vs. 30 min in its absence). These results suggest that ketamine increases the effectiveness of opiate-induced signaling by affecting multiple mechanisms. In addition, these effects are observed in heterologous cells expressing μOR suggesting a non-NMDA receptor-mediated action of ketamine. Together this could, in part, account for the observed effects of ketamine on the enhancement of the analgesic effects of opiates as well as in the duration of opiate-induced analgesia. PMID:21692801

  8. FOXP1 Potentiates Wnt/β-catenin Signaling in Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Matthew P.; Stopford, Charles M.; Cederlund, Maria; Fang, Fang; Jahn, Christopher; Rabinowitz, Alex D.; Goldfarb, Dennis; Graham, David M.; Yan, Feng; Deal, Allison M.; Fedoriw, Yuri; Richards, Kristy L.; Davis, Ian J.; Weidinger, Gilbert; Damania, Blossom; Major, Michael B.

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor FOXP1 is a master regulator of stem and progenitor cell biology. In diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), copy number amplifications and chromosomal translocations result in overexpression of FOXP1. Increased FOXP1 protein abundance in DLBCL predicts poor prognosis and resistance to therapy. To connect gene overexpression with phenotype, we developed a genome-wide mass spectrometry-coupled gain-of-function genetic screen, revealing that FOXP1 potentiates β-catenin-dependent Wnt signal transduction. Gain-of-function and loss-of-function studies in cell models and zebrafish confirmed that FOXP1 was a general and conserved co-activator of Wnt signaling. In a Wnt-dependent fashion, FOXP1 co-complexed with β-catenin, TCF7L2, and the acetyltransferase CBP, and bound the promoters of Wnt target genes. FOXP1 promoted the acetylation of β-catenin by CBP, and acetylation was required for FOXP1-potentiation of β-catenin-dependent transcription. In DLBCL, we found that FOXP1 promoted sensitivity to Wnt pathway inhibitors and knockdown of FOXP1 or Wnt signaling slowed xenograft tumor growth. These data connect FOXP1 overexpression with β-catenin-dependent signal transduction, and provide a new molecular rationale for Wnt-directed therapy in DLBCL. PMID:25650440

  9. Cytodifferentiation potentiates aFGF-induced p21(ras)/Erk signaling pathway in rat cultured astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Asada, S; Kasuya, Y; Hama, H; Masaki, T; Goto, K

    1999-07-01

    MBP kinase detection assay revealed that acidic FGF (aFGF) augmented MBP kinase activity in a dose-dependent manner in astrocytes (AC). The molar potency of this action of aFGF in dibutyryl cyclic AMP (DBcAMP)-treated AC was significantly higher than that in quiescent AC. Consistently, the molar potency of accumulation of p21(ras)-GTP by aFGF was significantly higher in DBcAMP-treated AC than in quiescent AC. However, binding study showed that B(max) and K(D) for [(125)I]aFGF in DBcAMP-treated AC were quite similar to those in quiescent AC. Furthermore, the expression levels of Grb2, SOS, and p21(ras) were not changed by treatment of AC with DBcAMP. These results suggest that cytodifferentiation potentiates the p21(ras)/Erk signaling pathway in AC in response to aFGF without changing the expression levels of signaling molecules mediating from the FGF receptor to p21(ras).

  10. Mechano-perception in Chara cells: the influence of salinity and calcium on touch-activated receptor potentials, action potentials and ion transport.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, Virginia A; Beilby, Mary J; Al Khazaaly, Sabah A S; Shimmen, Teruo

    2008-11-01

    This paper investigates the impact of increased salinity on touch-induced receptor and action potentials of Chara internodal cells. We resolved underlying changes in ion transport by current/voltage analysis. In a saline medium with a low Ca(2+) ion concentration [(Ca(2+))(ext)], the cell background conductance significantly increased and proton pump currents declined to negligible levels, depolarizing the membrane potential difference (PD) to the excitation threshold [action potential (AP)(threshold)]. The onset of spontaneous repetitive action potentials further depolarized the PD, activating K(+) outward rectifying (KOR) channels. K(+) efflux was then sustained and irrevocable, and cells were desensitized to touch. However, when [Ca(2+)](ext) was high, the background conductance increased to a lesser extent and proton pump currents were stimulated, establishing a PD narrowly negative to AP(threshold). Cells did not spontaneously fire, but became hypersensitive to touch. Even slight touch stimulus induced an action potential and further repetitive firing. The duration of each excitation was extended when [Ca(2+)](ext) was low. Cell viability was prolonged in the absence of touch stimulus. Chara cells eventually depolarize and die in the saline media, but touch-stimulated and spontaneous excitation accelerates the process in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. Our results have broad implications for understanding the interactions between mechano-perception and salinity stress in plants.

  11. Variety of the Wave Change in Compound Muscle Action Potential in an Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Zenya; Ando, Kei; Muramoto, Akio; Kobayashi, Kazuyoshi; Hida, Tetsuro; Ito, Kenyu; Ishikawa, Yoshimoto; Tsushima, Mikito; Matsumoto, Akiyuki; Tanaka, Satoshi; Morozumi, Masayoshi; Matsuyama, Yukihiro; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Animal study. Purpose To review the present warning point criteria of the compound muscle action potential (CMAP) and investigate new criteria for spinal surgery safety using an animal model. Overview of Literature Little is known about correlation palesis and amplitude of spinal cord monitoring. Methods After laminectomy of the tenth thoracic spinal lamina, 2-140 g force was delivered to the spinal cord with a tension gage to create a bilateral contusion injury. The study morphology change of the CMAP wave and locomotor scale were evaluated for one month. Results Four different types of wave morphology changes were observed: no change, amplitude decrease only, morphology change only, and amplitude and morphology change. Amplitude and morphology changed simultaneously and significantly as the injury force increased (p<0.05) Locomotor scale in the amplitude and morphology group worsened more than the other groups. Conclusions Amplitude and morphology change of the CMAP wave exists and could be the key of the alarm point in CMAP. PMID:26713129

  12. Computer Simulations Support a Morphological Contribution to BDNF Enhancement of Action Potential Generation

    PubMed Central

    Hiester, Brian G.; Jones, Kevin R.

    2016-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) regulates both action potential (AP) generation and neuron morphology. However, whether BDNF-induced changes in neuron morphology directly impact AP generation is unclear. We quantified BDNF’s effect on cultured cortical neuron morphological parameters and found that BDNF stimulates dendrite growth and addition of dendrites while increasing both excitatory and inhibitory presynaptic inputs in a spatially restricted manner. To gain insight into how these combined changes in neuron structure and synaptic input impact AP generation, we used the morphological parameters we gathered to generate computational models. Simulations suggest that BDNF-induced neuron morphologies generate more APs under a wide variety of conditions. Synapse and dendrite addition have the greatest impact on AP generation. However, subtle alterations in excitatory/inhibitory synapse ratio and strength have a significant impact on AP generation when synaptic activity is low. Consistent with these simulations, BDNF rapidly enhances spontaneous activity in cortical cultures. We propose that BDNF promotes neuron morphologies that are intrinsically more efficient at translating barrages of synaptic activity into APs, which is a previously unexplored aspect of BDNF’s function. PMID:27683544

  13. Action Potential Energy Efficiency Varies Among Neuron Types in Vertebrates and Invertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Biswa; Stemmler, Martin; Laughlin, Simon B.; Niven, Jeremy E.

    2010-01-01

    The initiation and propagation of action potentials (APs) places high demands on the energetic resources of neural tissue. Each AP forces ATP-driven ion pumps to work harder to restore the ionic concentration gradients, thus consuming more energy. Here, we ask whether the ionic currents underlying the AP can be predicted theoretically from the principle of minimum energy consumption. A long-held supposition that APs are energetically wasteful, based on theoretical analysis of the squid giant axon AP, has recently been overturned by studies that measured the currents contributing to the AP in several mammalian neurons. In the single compartment models studied here, AP energy consumption varies greatly among vertebrate and invertebrate neurons, with several mammalian neuron models using close to the capacitive minimum of energy needed. Strikingly, energy consumption can increase by more than ten-fold simply by changing the overlap of the Na+ and K+ currents during the AP without changing the APs shape. As a consequence, the height and width of the AP are poor predictors of energy consumption. In the Hodgkin–Huxley model of the squid axon, optimizing the kinetics or number of Na+ and K+ channels can whittle down the number of ATP molecules needed for each AP by a factor of four. In contrast to the squid AP, the temporal profile of the currents underlying APs of some mammalian neurons are nearly perfectly matched to the optimized properties of ionic conductances so as to minimize the ATP cost. PMID:20617202

  14. Action potential-like’ ST elevation following pseudo-Wellens' electrocardiogram

    PubMed Central

    Oksuz, Fatih; Sensoy, Baris; Sen, Fatih; Celik, Ethem; Ozeke, Ozcan; Maden, Orhan

    2015-01-01

    Coronary artery vasospasm is an important cause of chest pain syndromes that can lead to myocardial infarction, ventricular arrhythmias, and sudden death. In 1959, Prinzmetal et al described a syndrome of nonexertional chest pain with ST-segment elevation on electrocardiography. Persistent angina is challenging, and repeated coronary angioplasty may be required in this syndrome. Calcium antagonists are extremely effective in treating and preventing coronary spasm, and may provide long-lasting relief for the patient. Whereas the Wellens' syndrome is characterized by symmetrically inverted T-waves with preserved R waves in the precordial leads suggestive of impending myocardial infarction due to a critical proximal left anterior descending stenosis, the pseudo-Wellens' syndrome caused by coronary artery spasm has also rarely been reported in literature. We present a pseudo-Wellens syndrome as a cause of vasospastic angina, and a diffuse ST segment elavation on electrocardiogram resembling the Greek letter lambda, called also 'action potential-like' ECG in a patient with vasospastic-type Printzmetal angina. PMID:26432739

  15. Efficacy of action potential simulation and interferential therapy in the rehabilitation of patients with knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Eftekharsadat, Bina; Habibzadeh, Afshin; Kolahi, Babak

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is the main cause of pain, physical impairment and chronic disability in older people. Electrotherapeutic modalities such as interferential therapy (IFT) and action potential simulation (APS) are used for the treatment of knee OA. In this study, we aim to evaluate the therapeutic effects of APS and IFT on knee OA. Methods: In this randomized clinical trial, 67 patients (94% female and 6% male with mean age of 52.80 ± 8.16 years) with mild and moderate knee OA were randomly assigned to be treated with APS (n = 34) or IFT (n = 33) for 10 sessions in 4 weeks. Baseline and post-treatment Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis (WOMAC) subscales, visual analogue scale (VAS) and timed up and go (TUG) test were measured in all patients. Results: VAS and WOMAC subscales were significantly improved after treatment in APS and IFT groups (p < 0.001 for all). TUG was also significantly improved after treatment in APS group (p < 0.001), but TUG changes in IFT was not significant (p = 0.09). There was no significant difference in VAS, TUG and WOMAC subscales values before and after treatment as well as the mean improvement in VAS, TUG and WOMAC subscales during study between groups. Conclusion: Short-term treatment with both APS and IFT could significantly reduce pain and improve physical function in patients with knee OA. PMID:26029268

  16. Action potential duration dispersion and alternans in simulated heterogeneous cardiac tissue with a structural barrier.

    PubMed

    Krogh-Madsen, Trine; Christini, David J

    2007-02-15

    Structural barriers to wave propagation in cardiac tissue are associated with a decreased threshold for repolarization alternans both experimentally and clinically. Using computer simulations, we investigated the effects of a structural barrier on the onset of spatially concordant and discordant alternans. We used two-dimensional tissue geometry with heterogeneity in selected potassium conductances to mimic known apex-base gradients. Although we found that the actual onset of alternans was similar with and without the structural barrier, the increase in alternans magnitude with faster pacing was steeper with the barrier--giving the appearance of an earlier alternans onset in its presence. This is consistent with both experimental structural barrier findings and the clinical observation of T-wave alternans occurring at slower pacing rates in patients with structural heart disease. In ionically homogeneous tissue, discordant alternans induced by the presence of the structural barrier arose at intermediate pacing rates due to a source-sink mismatch behind the barrier. In heterogeneous tissue, discordant alternans occurred during fast pacing due to a barrier-induced decoupling of tissue with different restitution properties. Our results demonstrate a causal relationship between the presence of a structural barrier and increased alternans magnitude and action potential duration dispersion, which may contribute to why patients with structural heart disease are at higher risk for ventricular tachyarrhythmias.

  17. Computer Simulations Support a Morphological Contribution to BDNF Enhancement of Action Potential Generation.

    PubMed

    Galati, Domenico F; Hiester, Brian G; Jones, Kevin R

    2016-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) regulates both action potential (AP) generation and neuron morphology. However, whether BDNF-induced changes in neuron morphology directly impact AP generation is unclear. We quantified BDNF's effect on cultured cortical neuron morphological parameters and found that BDNF stimulates dendrite growth and addition of dendrites while increasing both excitatory and inhibitory presynaptic inputs in a spatially restricted manner. To gain insight into how these combined changes in neuron structure and synaptic input impact AP generation, we used the morphological parameters we gathered to generate computational models. Simulations suggest that BDNF-induced neuron morphologies generate more APs under a wide variety of conditions. Synapse and dendrite addition have the greatest impact on AP generation. However, subtle alterations in excitatory/inhibitory synapse ratio and strength have a significant impact on AP generation when synaptic activity is low. Consistent with these simulations, BDNF rapidly enhances spontaneous activity in cortical cultures. We propose that BDNF promotes neuron morphologies that are intrinsically more efficient at translating barrages of synaptic activity into APs, which is a previously unexplored aspect of BDNF's function. PMID:27683544

  18. Modeling back propagating action potential in weakly excitable dendrites of neocortical pyramidal cells.

    PubMed Central

    Rapp, M; Yarom, Y; Segev, I

    1996-01-01

    Simultaneous recordings from the soma and apical dendrite of layer V neocortical pyramidal cells of young rats show that, for any location of current input, an evoked action potential (AP) always starts at the axon and then propagates actively, but decrementally, backward into the dendrites. This back-propagating AP is supported by a low density (-gNa = approximately 4 mS/cm2) of rapidly inactivating voltage-dependent Na+ channels in the soma and the apical dendrite. Investigation of detailed, biophysically constrained, models of reconstructed pyramidal cells shows the following. (i) The initiation of the AP first in the axon cannot be explained solely by morphological considerations; the axon must be more excitable than the soma and dendrites. (ii) The minimal Na+ channel density in the axon that fully accounts for the experimental results is about 20-times that of the soma. If -gNa in the axon hillock and initial segment is the same as in the soma [as recently suggested by Colbert and Johnston [Colbert, C. M. & Johnston, D. (1995) Soc. Neurosci. Abstr. 21, 684.2

  19. Modeling back propagating action potential in weakly excitable dendrites of neocortical pyramidal cells.

    PubMed

    Rapp, M; Yarom, Y; Segev, I

    1996-10-15

    Simultaneous recordings from the soma and apical dendrite of layer V neocortical pyramidal cells of young rats show that, for any location of current input, an evoked action potential (AP) always starts at the axon and then propagates actively, but decrementally, backward into the dendrites. This back-propagating AP is supported by a low density (-gNa = approximately 4 mS/cm2) of rapidly inactivating voltage-dependent Na+ channels in the soma and the apical dendrite. Investigation of detailed, biophysically constrained, models of reconstructed pyramidal cells shows the following. (i) The initiation of the AP first in the axon cannot be explained solely by morphological considerations; the axon must be more excitable than the soma and dendrites. (ii) The minimal Na+ channel density in the axon that fully accounts for the experimental results is about 20-times that of the soma. If -gNa in the axon hillock and initial segment is the same as in the soma [as recently suggested by Colbert and Johnston [Colbert, C. M. & Johnston, D. (1995) Soc. Neurosci. Abstr. 21, 684.2

  20. Computer Simulations Support a Morphological Contribution to BDNF Enhancement of Action Potential Generation

    PubMed Central

    Hiester, Brian G.; Jones, Kevin R.

    2016-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) regulates both action potential (AP) generation and neuron morphology. However, whether BDNF-induced changes in neuron morphology directly impact AP generation is unclear. We quantified BDNF’s effect on cultured cortical neuron morphological parameters and found that BDNF stimulates dendrite growth and addition of dendrites while increasing both excitatory and inhibitory presynaptic inputs in a spatially restricted manner. To gain insight into how these combined changes in neuron structure and synaptic input impact AP generation, we used the morphological parameters we gathered to generate computational models. Simulations suggest that BDNF-induced neuron morphologies generate more APs under a wide variety of conditions. Synapse and dendrite addition have the greatest impact on AP generation. However, subtle alterations in excitatory/inhibitory synapse ratio and strength have a significant impact on AP generation when synaptic activity is low. Consistent with these simulations, BDNF rapidly enhances spontaneous activity in cortical cultures. We propose that BDNF promotes neuron morphologies that are intrinsically more efficient at translating barrages of synaptic activity into APs, which is a previously unexplored aspect of BDNF’s function.

  1. Frequency decoding of periodically timed action potentials through distinct activity patterns in a random neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichenbach, Tobias; Hudspeth, A. J.

    2012-11-01

    Frequency discrimination is a fundamental task of the auditory system. The mammalian inner ear, or cochlea, provides a place code in which different frequencies are detected at different spatial locations. However, a temporal code based on spike timing is also available: action potentials evoked in an auditory-nerve fiber by a low-frequency tone occur at a preferred phase of the stimulus—they exhibit phase locking—and thus provide temporal information about the tone's frequency. Humans employ this temporal information for discrimination of low frequencies. How might such temporal information be read out in the brain? Here we employ statistical and numerical methods to demonstrate that recurrent random neural networks in which connections between neurons introduce characteristic time delays, and in which neurons require temporally coinciding inputs for spike initiation, can perform sharp frequency discrimination when stimulated with phase-locked inputs. Although the frequency resolution achieved by such networks is limited by the noise in phase locking, the resolution for realistic values reaches the tiny frequency difference of 0.2% that has been measured in humans.

  2. Adhesion to carbon nanotube conductive scaffolds forces action-potential appearance in immature rat spinal neurons.

    PubMed

    Fabbro, Alessandra; Sucapane, Antonietta; Toma, Francesca Maria; Calura, Enrica; Rizzetto, Lisa; Carrieri, Claudia; Roncaglia, Paola; Martinelli, Valentina; Scaini, Denis; Masten, Lara; Turco, Antonio; Gustincich, Stefano; Prato, Maurizio; Ballerini, Laura

    2013-01-01

    In the last decade, carbon nanotube growth substrates have been used to investigate neurons and neuronal networks formation in vitro when guided by artificial nano-scaled cues. Besides, nanotube-based interfaces are being developed, such as prosthesis for monitoring brain activity. We recently described how carbon nanotube substrates alter the electrophysiological and synaptic responses of hippocampal neurons in culture. This observation highlighted the exceptional ability of this material in interfering with nerve tissue growth. Here we test the hypothesis that carbon nanotube scaffolds promote the development of immature neurons isolated from the neonatal rat spinal cord, and maintained in vitro. To address this issue we performed electrophysiological studies associated to gene expression analysis. Our results indicate that spinal neurons plated on electro-conductive carbon nanotubes show a facilitated development. Spinal neurons anticipate the expression of functional markers of maturation, such as the generation of voltage dependent currents or action potentials. These changes are accompanied by a selective modulation of gene expression, involving neuronal and non-neuronal components. Our microarray experiments suggest that carbon nanotube platforms trigger reparative activities involving microglia, in the absence of reactive gliosis. Hence, future tissue scaffolds blended with conductive nanotubes may be exploited to promote cell differentiation and reparative pathways in neural regeneration strategies.

  3. Latencies in action potential stimulation in a two-dimensional bidomain: A numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barach, John Paul

    1991-05-01

    A numerical simulation is performed in which a uniform planar slab of idealized cardiac tissue is stimulated at the center. The cardiac slab is modeled as an anisotropic bidomain; within each domain current flow is determined by a forced diffusion equation in which the transmembrane current connecting the domains provides the forcing term. An action potential (AP) propagates outward after a time latency dependent upon the stimulus size and the physiological variables. Its isochrones are elliptical with an asymmetry that is a small fraction of the imposed asymmetry in resistivity. External voltages resemble the first derivative of those in the internal domain and tests with continuing stimuli exhibit a relaxation time of about 3 ms and space constants that agree with other work. The AP latency increases very strongly near threshold stimulus and decreases as the log (stimulus) for large stimuli in the ``virtual cathode'' range. Latencies in the longitudinal, transverse, and diagonal directions are found to be the same over a wide range of stimulus size and type.

  4. Improved health and growth of fish fed mannan oligosaccharides: potential mode of action.

    PubMed

    Torrecillas, Silvia; Montero, Daniel; Izquierdo, Marisol

    2014-02-01

    Nowadays, aquaculture industry still confronts several disease-related problems mainly caused by viruses, bacteria and parasites. In the last decade, the use of mannan oligosaccharides (MOS) in fish production has received increased attention due to its beneficial effects on fish performance and disease resistance. This review shows the MOS use in aquaculture with a specific emphasis on the effectiveness of the several MOS forms available in the market related to disease resistance, fish nutrition and the possible mechanisms involved. Among the main beneficial effects attributed to MOS dietary supplementation, enhanced fish performance, feed efficiency and pathogen protection by potentiation of the systemic and local immune system and the reinforcement of the epithelial barrier structure and functionality are some of the most commonly demonstrated benefits. These combined effects suggest that the reinforcement of the intestinal integrity and functionality, together with the stimulation of the innate immune system, are the primary mode of action of MOS in fish. However, the supplementation strategy related to the structure of the MOS added, the correct dose and duration, as well as fish species, size and culture conditions are determinant factors to achieve improvements in health status and growth performance.

  5. Ionic mechanisms maintaining action potential conduction velocity at high firing frequencies in an unmyelinated axon.

    PubMed

    Cross, Kevin P; Robertson, R Meldrum

    2016-05-01

    The descending contralateral movement detector (DCMD) is a high-performance interneuron in locusts with an axon capable of transmitting action potentials (AP) at more than 500 Hz. We investigated biophysical mechanisms for fidelity of high-frequency transmission in this axon. We measured conduction velocities (CVs) at room temperature during exposure to 10 mmol/L cadmium, a calcium current antagonist, and found significant reduction in CV with reduction at frequencies >200 Hz of ~10%. Higher temperatures induced greater CV reductions during exposure to cadmium across all frequencies of ~20-30%. Intracellular recordings during 15 min of exposure to cadmium or nickel, also a calcium current antagonist, revealed an increase in the magnitude of the afterhyperpolarization potential (AHP) and the time to recover to baseline after the AHP (Medians for Control: -19.8%; Nickel: 167.2%; Cadmium: 387.2%), that could be due to a T-type calcium current. However, the removal of extracellular calcium did not mimic divalent cation exposure suggesting calcium currents are not the cause of the AHP increase. Computational modeling showed that the effects of the divalent cations could be modeled with a persistent sodium current which could be blocked by high concentrations of divalent cations. Persistent sodium current shortened the AHP duration in our models and increased CV for high-frequency APs. We suggest that faithful, high-frequency axonal conduction in the DCMD is enabled by a mechanism that shortens the AHP duration like a persistent or resurgent sodium current. PMID:27225630

  6. Antifungal potential of Sideroxylon obtusifolium and Syzygium cumini and their mode of action against Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Jozinete Vieira; Freires, Irlan Almeida; Castilho, Aline Rogéria; da Cunha, Marcos Guilherme; Alves, Harley da Silva; Rosalen, Pedro Luiz

    2016-10-01

    Context The emergence of resistant pathogens and toxicity of antifungals have encouraged an active search for novel candidates to manage Candida biofilms. Objective In this study, the little known species Sideroxylon obtusifolium T.D. Penn (Sapotacea) and Syzygium cumini (L.) Skeels (Myrtaceae), from the Caatinga biome in Brazil were chemically characterized and explored for their antifungal potential against C. albicans. Materials and methods We determined the effects of hydroalcoholic extracts/fractions upon fungal growth (minimum inhibitory and fungicidal concentrations, MIC/MFC), biofilm morphology (scanning electron microscopy) and viability (confocal laser scanning microscopy), proposed their mode of action (sorbitol and ergosterol assays), and finally investigated their effects against macrophage and keratinocyte cells in a cell-based assay. Data were analysed using one-way analysis of variance with Tukey-Kramer post-test (α = 0.05). Results The n-butanol (Nb) fraction from S. obtusifolium and S. cumini extract (Sc) showed flavonoids (39.11 ± 6.62 mg/g) and saponins (820.35 ± 225.38 mg/g), respectively, in their chemical composition and demonstrated antifungal activity, with MICs of 62.5 and 125 μg/mL, respectively. Nb and Sc may complex with ergosterol as there was a 4-16-fold increase in MICs in the presence of exogenous ergosterol, leading to disrupted permeability of cell membrane. Deleterious effects were observed on morphology and viability of treated biofilms from concentrations as low as their MICs and higher. Sc was not toxic to macrophages and keratinocytes at these concentrations (p > 0.05), unlike Nb. Conclusions Nb and Sc demonstrated considerable antifungal activity and should be further investigated as potential alternative candidates to treat Candida biofilms. PMID:26987037

  7. Burst analysis tool for developing neuronal networks exhibiting highly varying action potential dynamics.

    PubMed

    Kapucu, Fikret E; Tanskanen, Jarno M A; Mikkonen, Jarno E; Ylä-Outinen, Laura; Narkilahti, Susanna; Hyttinen, Jari A K

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we propose a firing statistics based neuronal network burst detection algorithm for neuronal networks exhibiting highly variable action potential dynamics. Electrical activity of neuronal networks is generally analyzed by the occurrences of spikes and bursts both in time and space. Commonly accepted analysis tools employ burst detection algorithms based on predefined criteria. However, maturing neuronal networks, such as those originating from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), exhibit highly variable network structure and time-varying dynamics. To explore the developing burst/spike activities of such networks, we propose a burst detection algorithm which utilizes the firing statistics based on interspike interval (ISI) histograms. Moreover, the algorithm calculates ISI thresholds for burst spikes as well as for pre-burst spikes and burst tails by evaluating the cumulative moving average (CMA) and skewness of the ISI histogram. Because of the adaptive nature of the proposed algorithm, its analysis power is not limited by the type of neuronal cell network at hand. We demonstrate the functionality of our algorithm with two different types of microelectrode array (MEA) data recorded from spontaneously active hESC-derived neuronal cell networks. The same data was also analyzed by two commonly employed burst detection algorithms and the differences in burst detection results are illustrated. The results demonstrate that our method is both adaptive to the firing statistics of the network and yields successful burst detection from the data. In conclusion, the proposed method is a potential tool for analyzing of hESC-derived neuronal cell networks and thus can be utilized in studies aiming to understand the development and functioning of human neuronal networks and as an analysis tool for in vitro drug screening and neurotoxicity assays.

  8. Improving single-trial detection of event-related potentials through artificial deformed signals.

    PubMed

    Cecotti, H; Rivet, B

    2014-01-01

    To propose a reliable and robust Brain-Computer Interface (BCI), efficient machine learning and signal processing methods have to be used. However, it is often necessary to have a sufficient number of labeled brain responses to create a model. A large database that would represent all of the possible variabilities of the signal is not always possible to obtain, because calibration sessions have to be short. In the case of BCIs based on the detection of event-related potentials (ERPs), we propose to tackle this problem by including additional deformed patterns in the training database to increase the number of labeled brain responses. The creation of the additional deformed patterns is based on two approaches: (i) smooth deformation fields, and (ii) right and left shifted signals. The evaluation is performed with data from 10 healthy subjects participating in a P300 speller experiment. The results show that small shifts of the signal allow a better estimation of both spatial filters, and a linear classifier. The best performance, AUC=0.828 ± 0.061, is obtained by combining the smooth deformation fields and the shifts, after spatial filtering, compared to AUC=0.543 ± 0.025, without additional deformed patterns. The results support the conclusion that adding signals with small deformations can significantly improve the performance of single-trial detection when the amount of training data is limited.

  9. Macrophages block insulin action in adipocytes by altering expression of signaling and glucose transport proteins.

    PubMed

    Lumeng, Carey N; Deyoung, Stephanie M; Saltiel, Alan R

    2007-01-01

    Obesity leads to a proinflammatory state with immune responses that include infiltration of adipose tissue with macrophages. These macrophages are believed to alter insulin sensitivity in adipocytes, but the mechanisms that underlie this effect have not been characterized. We have explored the interaction between macrophages and adipocytes in the context of both indirect and direct coculture. Macrophage-secreted factors blocked insulin action in adipocytes via downregulation of GLUT4 and IRS-1, leading to a decrease in Akt phosphorylation and impaired insulin-stimulated GLUT4 translocation to the plasma membrane. GLUT1 was upregulated with a concomitant increase in basal glucose uptake. These changes recapitulate those seen in adipose tissue from insulin-resistant humans and animal models. TNF-alpha-neutralizing antibodies partially reversed the insulin resistance produced by macrophage-conditioned media. Peritoneal macrophages and macrophage-enriched stromal vascular cells from adipose tissue also attenuated responsiveness to insulin in a manner correlating with inflammatory cytokine secretion. Adipose tissue macrophages from obese mice have an F4/80(+)CD11b(+)CD68(+)CD14(-) phenotype and form long cellular extensions in culture. Peritoneal macrophages take on similar characteristics in direct coculture with adipocytes and induce proinflammatory cytokines, suggesting that macrophage activation state is influenced by contact with adipocytes. Thus both indirect/secreted and direct/cell contact-mediated factors derived from macrophages influence insulin sensitivity in adipocytes.

  10. Action potential waveform voltage clamp shows significance of different Ca2+ channel types in developing ascidian muscle

    PubMed Central

    Dallman, Julia E; Dorman, Jennie B; Moody, William J

    2000-01-01

    Early in development, ascidian muscle cells generate spontaneous, long-duration action potentials that are mediated by a high-threshold, inactivating Ca2+ current. This spontaneous activity is required for appropriate physiological development.Mature muscle cells generate brief action potentials only in response to motor neuron input. The mature action potential is mediated by a high-threshold sustained Ca2+ current.Action potentials recorded from these two stages were imposed as voltage-clamp commands on cells of the same and different stages from which they were recorded. This strategy allowed us to study how immature and mature Ca2+ currents are optimized to their particular functions.Total Ca2+ entry during an action potential did not change during development. The developmental increase in Ca2+ current density exactly compensated for decreased spike duration. This compensation was a function purely of Ca2+ current density, not of the transition from immature to mature Ca2+ current types.In immature cells, Ca2+ entry was spread out over the entire waveform of spontaneous activity, including the interspike voltage trajectory. This almost continuous Ca2+ entry may be important in triggering Ca2+-dependent developmental programmes, and is a function of the slightly more negative voltage dependence of the immature Ca2+ current.In contrast, Ca2+ entry in mature cells was confined to the action potential itself, because of the slightly more positive voltage dependence of the mature Ca2+ current. This may be important in permitting rapid contraction-relaxation cycles during larval swimming.The inactivation of the immature Ca2+ current serves to limit the frequency and burst duration of spontaneous activity. The sustained kinetics of the mature Ca2+ current permit high-frequency firing during larval swimming. PMID:10766919

  11. Modeling the action-potential-sensitive nonlinear-optical response of myelinated nerve fibers and short-term memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shneider, M. N.; Voronin, A. A.; Zheltikov, A. M.

    2011-11-01

    The Goldman-Albus treatment of the action-potential dynamics is combined with a phenomenological description of molecular hyperpolarizabilities into a closed-form model of the action-potential-sensitive second-harmonic response of myelinated nerve fibers with nodes of Ranvier. This response is shown to be sensitive to nerve demyelination, thus enabling an optical diagnosis of various demyelinating diseases, including multiple sclerosis. The model is applied to examine the nonlinear-optical response of a three-neuron reverberating circuit—the basic element of short-term memory.

  12. Toxicity, sublethal effects, and potential modes of action of select fungicides on freshwater fish and invertebrates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elskus, Adria A.

    2012-01-01

    Despite decades of agricultural and urban use of fungicides and widespread detection of these pesticides in surface waters, relatively few data are available on the effects of fungicides on fish and invertebrates in the aquatic environment. Nine fungicides are reviewed in this report: azoxystrobin, boscalid, chlorothalonil, fludioxonil, myclobutanil, fenarimol, pyraclostrobin, pyrimethanil, and zoxamide. These fungicides were identified as emerging chemicals of concern because of their high or increasing global use rates, detection frequency in surface waters, or likely persistence in the environment. A review of the literature revealed significant sublethal effects of fungicides on fish, aquatic invertebrates, and ecosystems, including zooplankton and fish reproduction, fish immune function, zooplankton community composition, metabolic enzymes, and ecosystem processes, such as leaf decomposition in streams, among other biological effects. Some of these effects can occur at fungicide concentrations well below single-species acute lethality values (48- or 96-hour concentration that effects a response in 50 percent of the organisms, that is, effective concentration killing 50 percent of the organisms in 48 or 96 hours) and chronic sublethal values (for example, 21-day no observed adverse effects concentration), indicating that single-species toxicity values may dramatically underestimate the toxic potency of some fungicides. Fungicide modes of toxic action in fungi can sometimes reflect the biochemical and (or) physiological effects of fungicides observed in vertebrates and invertebrates; however, far more studies are needed to explore the potential to predict effects in nontarget organisms based on specific fungicide modes of toxic action. Fungicides can also have additive and (or) synergistic effects when used with other fungicides and insecticides, highlighting the need to study pesticide mixtures that occur in surface waters. For fungicides that partition to

  13. Spontaneous miniature hyperpolarizations affect threshold for action potential generation in mudpuppy cardiac neurons.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Rodney L; Barstow, Karen L; Scornik, Fabiana S

    2002-09-01

    Mudpuppy parasympathetic neurons exhibit spontaneous miniature hyperpolarizations (SMHs) that are generated by potassium currents, which are spontaneous miniature outward currents (SMOCs), flowing through clusters of large conductance voltage- and calcium (Ca(2+))-activated potassium (BK) channels. The underlying SMOCs are initiated by a Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+) release (CICR) mechanism. Perforated-patch whole cell voltage recordings were used to determine whether activation of SMHs contributed to action potential (AP) repolarization or affected the latency to AP generation. Blockade of BK channels by iberiotoxin (IBX, 100 nM) slowed AP repolarization and increased AP duration. Treatment with omega-conotoxin GVIA (3 microM) or nifedipine (10 microM) to inhibit Ca(2+) influx through N- or L-type voltage-dependent calcium channels (VDCCs), respectively, also decreased the rate of AP repolarization and increased AP duration. Elimination of CICR by treatment with either thapsigargin (1 microM) or ryanodine (10 microM) produced no significant change in AP repolarization or duration. Blockade of BK channels with IBX and inhibition of N-type VDCCs with omega-conotoxin GVIA, but not inhibition of L-type VDCCs with nifedipine, decreased the latency of AP generation. A decrease in latency to AP generation occurred with elimination of SMHs by inhibition of CICR following treatment with thapsigargin. Ryanodine treatment decreased AP latency in three of six cells. Apamin (100 nM) had no affect on AP repolarization, duration, or latency to AP generation, but did decrease the hyperpolarizing afterpotential (HAP). Inhibition of L-type VDCCs by nifedipine also decreased HAP amplitude. Inhibition of CICR by either thapsigargin or ryanodine treatment increased the number of APs generated with long depolarizing current pulses, whereas exposure to IBX or omega-conotoxin GVIA depressed excitability. We conclude that CICR, the process responsible for SMH generation, represents a unique

  14. Facilitating Youth to Take Sustainability Actions: The Potential of Peer Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Vreede, Catherine; Warner, Alan; Pitter, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Peer education is an understudied yet valuable strategy for sustainability educators in shifting youth to take action for sustainability. This case study conceptualizes the change process in facilitating youth to take sustainability actions, and explores the benefits, dynamics, and challenges of peer education as a strategy in facilitating change.…

  15. Encoding of point of view during action observation in the local field potentials of macaque area F5.

    PubMed

    Caggiano, Vittorio; Giese, Martin; Thier, Peter; Casile, Antonino

    2015-02-01

    The discovery of mirror neurons compellingly shows that the monkey premotor area F5 is active not only during the execution but also during the observation of goal-directed motor acts. Previous studies have addressed the functioning of the mirror-neuron system at the single-unit level. Here, we tackled this research question at the network level by analysing local field potentials in area F5 while the monkey was presented with goal-directed actions executed by a human or monkey actor and observed either from a first-person or third-person perspective. Our analysis showed that rhythmic responses are not only present in area F5 during action observation, but are also modulated by the point of view. Observing an action from a subjective point of view produced significantly higher power in the low-frequency band (2-10 Hz) than observing the same action from a frontal view. Interestingly, an increase in power in the 2-10 Hz band was also produced by the execution of goal-directed motor acts. Independently of the point of view, action observation also produced a significant decrease in power in the 15-40 Hz band and an increase in the 60-100 Hz band. These results suggest that, depending on the point of view, action observation might activate different processes in area F5. Furthermore, they may provide information about the functional architecture of action perception in primates.

  16. Metformin Improves Insulin Signaling in Obese Rats via Reduced IKKbeta Action in a Fiber-Type Specific Manner.

    PubMed

    Bikman, Benjamin T; Zheng, Donghai; Kane, Daniel A; Anderson, Ethan J; Woodlief, Tracey L; Price, Jesse W; Dohm, G Lynis; Neufer, P Darrell; Cortright, Ronald N

    2010-01-01

    Metformin is a widely used insulin-sensitizing drug, though its mechanisms are not fully understood. Metformin has been shown to activate AMPK in skeletal muscle; however, its effects on the inhibitor of kappaB kinasebeta (IKKbeta) in this same tissue are unknown. The aim of this study was to (1) determine the ability of metformin to attenuate IKKbeta action, (2) determine whether changes in AMPK activity are associated with changes in IKKbeta action in skeletal muscle, and (3) examine whether changes in AMPK and IKKbeta function are consistent with improved insulin signaling. Lean and obese male Zuckers received either vehicle or metformin by oral gavage daily for four weeks (four groups of eight). Proteins were measured in white gastrocnemius (WG), red gastrocnemius (RG), and soleus. AMPK phosphorylation increased (P < .05) in WG in both lean (57%) and obese (106%), and this was supported by an increase in phospho-ACC in WG. Further, metformin increased IkappaBalpha levels in both WG (150%) and RG (67%) of obese rats, indicative of reduced IKKbeta activity (P < .05), and was associated with reduced IRS1-pSer(307) (30%) in the WG of obese rats (P < .02). From these data we conclude that metformin treatment appears to exert an inhibitory influence on skeletal muscle IKKbeta activity, as evidenced by elevated IkappaBalpha levels and reduced IRS1-Ser(307) phosphorylation in a fiber-type specific manner. PMID:20798864

  17. The rise of antioxidant signaling-The evolution and hormetic actions of Nrf2

    SciTech Connect

    Maher, Jonathan; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2010-04-01

    Organisms have evolved sophisticated and redundant mechanisms to manage oxidative and electrophilic challenges that arise from internal metabolism or xenobiotic challenge for survival. NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a transcription factor that has evolved over millennia from primitive origins, with homologues traceable back to invertebrate Caenorhabditis and Drosophila species. The ancestry of Nrf2 clearly has deep-seated roots in hematopoiesis, yet has diversified into a transcription factor that can mediate a multitude of antioxidant signaling and detoxification genes. In higher organisms, a more sophisticated means of tightly regulating Nrf2 activity was introduced via the cysteine-rich kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1), thus suggesting a need to modulate Nrf2 activity. This is evidenced in Keap1{sup -/-} mice, which succumb to juvenile mortality due to hyperkeratosis of the gastrointestinal tract. Although Nrf2 activation protects against acute toxicity and prevents or attenuates several disease states, constitutive activation in some tumors leads to poor clinical outcomes, suggesting Nrf2 has evolved in response to a multitude of selective pressures. The purpose of this review is to examine the origins of Nrf2, while highlighting the versatility and protective abilities elicited upon activation. Various model systems in which Nrf2 is normally beneficial but in which exaggerated pharmacology exacerbates a physiological or pathological condition will be addressed. Although Darwinian principles have selected Nrf2 activity for maximal beneficial effect based on environmental and oxidative challenge, both sub- or super-physiological effects have been noted to be detrimental. The functions of Nrf2 thus suggest a hormetic factor that has evolved empirically over time.

  18. Attractive action of FGF-signaling contributes to the postnatal developing hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Cuccioli, V; Bueno, C; Belvindrah, R; Lledo, P-M; Martinez, S

    2015-04-01

    During brain development neural cell migration is a crucial, well-orchestrated, process, which leads to the proper whole brain structural organization. As development proceeds, new neurons are continuously produced, and this protracted neurogenesis is maintained throughout life in specialized germinative areas inside the telencephalon: the subventricular zone (SVZ) and the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus. In the anterior SVZ, newly generated neurons migrate through long distances, along the rostral migratory stream (RMS), before reaching their final destinations in the olfactory bulb (OB). Intriguingly, recent observations pointed out the existence of other postnatal tangential routes of migration alternative to the RMS but still starting from the SVZ. The presence of such dynamic and heterogeneous cell movements contributes to important features in the postnatal brain such as neural cell replacement and plasticity in cortical regions. In this work, we asked whether a caudal migratory pathway starting from the caudal SVZ continues through life. Strikingly, in vivo analysis of this caudal migration revealed the presence of a postnatal contribution of SVZ to the hippocampus. In vitro studies of the caudal migratory stream revealed the role of FGF signaling in attracting caudally the migrating neuroblasts during postnatal stages. Our findings demonstrate a postnatal neuronal contribution from the caudal ganglionic eminence (CGE) CGE-SVZ to the hippocampus through an FGF-dependent migrating mechanism. All together our data emphasizes the emerging idea that a developmental program is still operating in discrete domains of the postnatal brain and may contribute to the regulation of neural cell replacement processes in physiological plasticity and/or pathological circumstances.

  19. Blocking Nerve Growth Factor Signaling Reduces the Neural Invasion Potential of Pancreatic Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bapat, Aditi A.; Munoz, Ruben M.; Von Hoff, Daniel D.

    2016-01-01

    Perineural invasion (PNI) is thought to be one of the factors responsible for the high rate of tumor recurrence after surgery and the pain generation associated with pancreatic cancer. Signaling via the nerve growth factor (NGF) pathway between pancreatic cancer cells and the surrounding nerves has been implicated in PNI, and increased levels of these proteins have been correlated to poor prognosis. In this study, we examine the molecular mechanism of the NGF signaling pathway in PNI in pancreatic cancer. We show that knocking down NGF or its receptors, TRKA and p75NTR, or treatment with GW441756, a TRKA kinase inhibitor, reduces the proliferation and migration of pancreatic cancer cells in vitro. Furthermore, pancreatic cancer cells migrate towards dorsal root ganglia (DRG) in a co-culture assay, indicating a paracrine NGF signaling between the DRGs and pancreatic cancer cells. Knocking down the expression of NGF pathway proteins or inhibiting the activity of TRKA by GW441756 reduced the migratory ability of Mia PaCa2 towards the DRGs. Finally, blocking NGF signaling by NGF neutralizing antibodies or GW441756 inhibited the neurite formation in PC-12 cells in response to conditioned media from pancreatic cancer cells, indicating a reciprocal signaling pathway between the pancreatic cancer cells and nerves. Our results indicate that NGF signaling pathway provides a potential target for developing molecularly targeted therapies to decrease PNI and reduce pain generation. Since there are several TRKA antagonists currently in early clinical trials they could now be tested in the clinical situation of pancreatic cancer induced pain. PMID:27792755

  20. Bacteriocins: modes of action and potentials in food preservation and control of food poisoning.

    PubMed

    Abee, T; Krockel, L; Hill, C

    1995-12-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) play an essential role in the majority of food fermentations, and a wide variety of strains are routinely employed as starter cultures in the manufacture of dairy, meat, vegetable and bakery products. One of the most important contributions of these microorganisms is the extended shelf life of the fermented product by comparison to that of the raw substrate. Growth of spoilage and pathogenic bacteria in these foods is inhibited due to competition for nutrients and the presence of starter-derived inhibitors such as lactic acid, hydrogen peroxide and bacteriocins (Ray and Daeschel, 1992). Bacteriocins, are a heterogenous group of anti-bacterial proteins that vary in spectrum of activity, mode of action, molecular weight, genetic origin and biochemical properties. Currently, artificial chemical preservatives are employed to limit the number of microorganisms capable of growing within foods, but increasing consumer awareness of potential health risks associated with some of these substances has led researchers to examine the possibility of using bacteriocins produced by LAB as biopreservatives. The major classes of bacteriocins produced by LAB include: (I) lantibiotics, (II) small heat stable peptides, (III) large heat labile proteins, and (IV) complex proteins whose activity requires the association of carbohydrate or lipid moieties (Klaenhammer, 1993). Significantly however, the inhibitory activity of these substances is confined to Gram-positive bacteria and inhibition of Gram-negatives by these bacteriocins has not been demonstrated, an observation which can be explained by a detailed analysis and comparison of the composition of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial cell walls (Fig. 1). In both types the cytoplasmic membrane which forms the border between the cytoplasm and the external environment, is surrounded by a layer of peptidoglycan which is significantly thinner in Gram-negative bacteria than in Gram-positive bacteria. Gram

  1. Decision-related cortical potentials during an auditory signal detection task with cued observation intervals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Squires, K. C.; Squires, N. K.; Hillyard, S. A.

    1975-01-01

    Cortical-evoked potentials were recorded from human subjects performing an auditory detection task with confidence rating responses. Unlike earlier studies that used similar procedures, the observation interval during which the auditory signal could occur was clearly marked by a visual cue light. By precisely defining the observation interval and, hence, synchronizing all perceptual decisions to the evoked potential averaging epoch, it was possible to demonstrate that high-confidence false alarms are accompanied by late-positive P3 components equivalent to those for equally confident hits. Moreover the hit and false alarm evoked potentials were found to covary similarly with variations in confidence rating and to have similar amplitude distributions over the scalp. In a second experiment, it was demonstrated that correct rejections can be associated with a P3 component larger than that for hits. Thus it was possible to show, within the signal detection paradigm, how the two major factors of decision confidence and expectancy are reflected in the P3 component of the cortical-evoked potential.

  2. Effect of knockout of α2δ-1 on action potentials in mouse sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Margas, Wojciech; Ferron, Laurent; Nieto-Rostro, Manuela; Schwartz, Arnold; Dolphin, Annette C.

    2016-01-01

    Gene deletion of the voltage-gated calcium channel auxiliary subunit α2δ-1 has been shown previously to have a cardiovascular phenotype, and a reduction in mechano- and cold sensitivity, coupled with delayed development of neuropathic allodynia. We have also previously shown that dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neuron calcium channel currents were significantly reduced in α2δ-1 knockout mice. To extend our findings in these sensory neurons, we have examined here the properties of action potentials (APs) in DRG neurons from α2δ-1 knockout mice in comparison to their wild-type (WT) littermates, in order to dissect how the calcium channels that are affected by α2δ-1 knockout are involved in setting the duration of individual APs and their firing frequency. Our main findings are that there is reduced Ca2+ entry on single AP stimulation, particularly in the axon proximal segment, reduced AP duration and reduced firing frequency to a 400 ms stimulation in α2δ-1 knockout neurons, consistent with the expected role of voltage-gated calcium channels in these events. Furthermore, lower intracellular Ca2+ buffering also resulted in reduced AP duration, and a lower frequency of AP firing in WT neurons, mimicking the effect of α2δ-1 knockout. By contrast, we did not obtain any consistent evidence for the involvement of Ca2+-activation of large conductance calcium-activated potassium (BK) and small conductance calcium-activated potassium (SK) channels in these events. In conclusion, the reduced Ca2+ elevation as a result of single AP stimulation is likely to result from the reduced duration of the AP in α2δ-1 knockout sensory neurons. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Evolution brings Ca2+ and ATP together to control life and death’. PMID:27377724

  3. Contribution of auditory nerve fibers to compound action potential of the auditory nerve.

    PubMed

    Bourien, Jérôme; Tang, Yong; Batrel, Charlène; Huet, Antoine; Lenoir, Marc; Ladrech, Sabine; Desmadryl, Gilles; Nouvian, Régis; Puel, Jean-Luc; Wang, Jing

    2014-09-01

    Sound-evoked compound action potential (CAP), which captures the synchronous activation of the auditory nerve fibers (ANFs), is commonly used to probe deafness in experimental and clinical settings. All ANFs are believed to contribute to CAP threshold and amplitude: low sound pressure levels activate the high-spontaneous rate (SR) fibers, and increasing levels gradually recruit medium- and then low-SR fibers. In this study, we quantitatively analyze the contribution of the ANFs to CAP 6 days after 30-min infusion of ouabain into the round window niche. Anatomic examination showed a progressive ablation of ANFs following increasing concentration of ouabain. CAP amplitude and threshold plotted against loss of ANFs revealed three ANF pools: 1) a highly ouabain-sensitive pool, which does not participate in either CAP threshold or amplitude, 2) a less sensitive pool, which only encoded CAP amplitude, and 3) a ouabain-resistant pool, required for CAP threshold and amplitude. Remarkably, distribution of the three pools was similar to the SR-based ANF distribution (low-, medium-, and high-SR fibers), suggesting that the low-SR fiber loss leaves the CAP unaffected. Single-unit recordings from the auditory nerve confirmed this hypothesis and further showed that it is due to the delayed and broad first spike latency distribution of low-SR fibers. In addition to unraveling the neural mechanisms that encode CAP, our computational simulation of an assembly of guinea pig ANFs generalizes and extends our experimental findings to different species of mammals. Altogether, our data demonstrate that substantial ANF loss can coexist with normal hearing threshold and even unchanged CAP amplitude. PMID:24848461

  4. RXP-E: A CX43-BINDING PEPTIDE THAT PREVENTS ACTION POTENTIAL PROPAGATION BLOCK

    PubMed Central

    Lewandowski, Rebecca; Procida, Kristina; Vaidyanathan, Ravi; Coombs, Wanda; Jalife, Jose; Nielsen, Morten S.; Taffet, Steven M.; Delmar, Mario

    2009-01-01

    Gap junctions (GJs) provide a low-resistance pathway for cardiac electrical propagation. The role of GJ regulation in arrhythmia is unclear, partly due to limited availability of pharmacological tools. Recently, we showed that a peptide called “RXP-E” binds to the carboxyl terminal of connexin43 (Cx43) and prevents chemically-induced uncoupling in Cx43-expressing N2a cells. Here, pull-down experiments show RXP-E binding to adult cardiac Cx43. Patch-clamp studies revealed that RXP-E prevented heptanol-induced and acidification-induced uncoupling in pairs of neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (NRVM’s). Separately, RXP-E was concatenated to a cytoplasmic transduction peptide for cytoplasmic translocation (CTP-RXP-E). The effect of RXP-E on action potential (AP) propagation was assessed by high resolution optical mapping in monolayers of NRVM’s, containing ~20% of randomly distributed myofibroblasts. In contrast to control experiments, when heptanol (2 mmol/L) was added to the superfusate of monolayers loaded with CTP-RXP-E, AP propagation was maintained, albeit at a slower velocity. Similarly, intracellular acidification (pHi=6.2) caused a loss of AP propagation in control monolayers; however, propagation was maintained in CTP-RXP-E treated cells, though at a slower rate. Patch clamp experiments revealed that RXP-E did not prevent heptanol-induced block of sodium currents, nor did it alter voltage dependence or amplitude of Kir2.1/Kir2.3 currents. RXP-E is the first synthetic molecule known to: (1) bind cardiac Cx43; (2) prevent heptanol and acidification-induced uncoupling of cardiac GJ’s and 3) preserve AP propagation among cardiac myocytes. RXP-E can be used to characterize the role of GJs in the function of multicellular systems, including the heart. PMID:18669919

  5. Impedance and electrically evoked compound action potential (ECAP) drop within 24 hours after cochlear implantation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Joshua Kuang-Chao; Chuang, Ann Yi-Chiun; Sprinzl, Georg Mathias; Tung, Tao-Hsin; Li, Lieber Po-Hung

    2013-01-01

    Previous animal study revealed that post-implantation electrical detection levels significantly declined within days. The impact of cochlear implant (CI) insertion on human auditory pathway in terms of impedance and electrically evoked compound action potential (ECAP) variation within hours after surgery remains unclear, since at this time frequency mapping can only commence weeks after implantation due to factors associated with wound conditions. The study presented our experiences with regards to initial switch-on within 24 hours, and thus the findings about the milieus inside cochlea within the first few hours after cochlear implantation in terms of impedance/ECAP fluctuations. The charts of fifty-four subjects with profound hearing impairment were studied. A minimal invasive approach was used for cochlear implantation, characterized by a small skin incision (≈ 2.5 cm) and soft techniques for cochleostomy. Impedance/ECAP was measured intro-operatively and within 24 hours post-operatively. Initial mapping within 24 hours post-operatively was performed in all patients without major complications. Impedance/ECAP became significantly lower measured within 24 hours post-operatively as compared with intra-operatively (p<0.001). There were no differences between pre-operative and post-operative threshold for air-conduction hearing. A significant drop of impedance/ECAP in one day after cochlear implantation was revealed for the first time in human beings. Mechanisms could be related to the restoration of neuronal sensitivity to the electrical stimulation, and/or the interaction between the matrix enveloping the electrodes and the electrical stimulation of the initial switch-on. Less wound pain/swelling and soft techniques both contributed to the success of immediate initial mapping, which implied a stable micro-environment inside the cochlea despite electrodes insertion. Our research invites further studies to correlate initial impedance/ECAP changes with long

  6. Impedance and Electrically Evoked Compound Action Potential (ECAP) Drop within 24 Hours after Cochlear Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Joshua Kuang-Chao; Chuang, Ann Yi-Chiun; Sprinzl, Georg Mathias; Tung, Tao-Hsin; Li, Lieber Po-Hung

    2013-01-01

    Previous animal study revealed that post-implantation electrical detection levels significantly declined within days. The impact of cochlear implant (CI) insertion on human auditory pathway in terms of impedance and electrically evoked compound action potential (ECAP) variation within hours after surgery remains unclear, since at this time frequency mapping can only commence weeks after implantation due to factors associated with wound conditions. The study presented our experiences with regards to initial switch-on within 24 hours, and thus the findings about the milieus inside cochlea within the first few hours after cochlear implantation in terms of impedance/ECAP fluctuations. The charts of fifty-four subjects with profound hearing impairment were studied. A minimal invasive approach was used for cochlear implantation, characterized by a small skin incision (≈2.5 cm) and soft techniques for cochleostomy. Impedance/ECAP was measured intro-operatively and within 24 hours post-operatively. Initial mapping within 24 hours post-operatively was performed in all patients without major complications. Impedance/ECAP became significantly lower measured within 24 hours post-operatively as compared with intra-operatively (p<0.001). There were no differences between pre-operative and post-operative threshold for air-conduction hearing. A significant drop of impedance/ECAP in one day after cochlear implantation was revealed for the first time in human beings. Mechanisms could be related to the restoration of neuronal sensitivity to the electrical stimulation, and/or the interaction between the matrix enveloping the electrodes and the electrical stimulation of the initial switch-on. Less wound pain/swelling and soft techniques both contributed to the success of immediate initial mapping, which implied a stable micro-environment inside the cochlea despite electrodes insertion. Our research invites further studies to correlate initial impedance/ECAP changes with long

  7. Action potential processing in a detailed Purkinje cell model reveals a critical role for axonal compartmentalization

    PubMed Central

    Masoli, Stefano; Solinas, Sergio; D'Angelo, Egidio

    2015-01-01

    The Purkinje cell (PC) is among the most complex neurons in the brain and plays a critical role for cerebellar functioning. PCs operate as fast pacemakers modulated by synaptic inputs but can switch from simple spikes to complex bursts and, in some conditions, show bistability. In contrast to original works emphasizing dendritic Ca-dependent mechanisms, recent experiments have supported a primary role for axonal Na-dependent processing, which could effectively regulate spike generation and transmission to deep cerebellar nuclei (DCN). In order to account for the numerous ionic mechanisms involved (at present including Nav1.6, Cav2.1, Cav3.1, Cav3.2, Cav3.3, Kv1.1, Kv1.5, Kv3.3, Kv3.4, Kv4.3, KCa1.1, KCa2.2, KCa3.1, Kir2.x, HCN1), we have elaborated a multicompartmental model incorporating available knowledge on localization and gating of PC ionic channels. The axon, including initial segment (AIS) and Ranvier nodes (RNs), proved critical to obtain appropriate pacemaking and firing frequency modulation. Simple spikes initiated in the AIS and protracted discharges were stabilized in the soma through Na-dependent mechanisms, while somato-dendritic Ca channels contributed to sustain pacemaking and to generate complex bursting at high discharge regimes. Bistability occurred only following Na and Ca channel down-regulation. In addition, specific properties in RNs K currents were required to limit spike transmission frequency along the axon. The model showed how organized electroresponsive functions could emerge from the molecular complexity of PCs and showed that the axon is fundamental to complement ionic channel compartmentalization enabling action potential processing and transmission of specific spike patterns to DCN. PMID:25759640

  8. Spatial variation of compound muscle action potentials across human gastrocnemius medialis.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Taian M; Botter, Alberto; Minetto, Marco A; Hodson-Tole, Emma F

    2015-09-01

    The massed action potential (M wave) elicited through nerve stimulation underpins a wide range of physiological and mechanical understanding of skeletal muscle structure and function. Although systematic approaches have evaluated the effect of different factors on M waves, the effect of the location and distribution of activated fibers within the muscle remains unknown. By detecting M waves from the medial gastrocnemius (MG) of 12 participants with a grid of 128 electrodes, we investigated whether different populations of muscle units have different spatial organization within MG. If populations of muscle units occupy discrete MG regions, current pulses of progressively greater intensities applied to the MG nerve branch would be expected to lead to local changes in M-wave amplitudes. Electrical pulses were therefore delivered at 2 pps, with the current pulse amplitude increased every 10 stimuli to elicit different degrees of muscle activation. The localization of MG response to increases in current intensity was determined from the spatial distribution of M-wave amplitude. Key results revealed that increases in M-wave amplitude were detected somewhat locally, by 10-50% of the 128 electrodes. Most importantly, the electrodes detecting greatest increases in M-wave amplitude were localized at different regions in the grid, with a tendency for greater stimulation intensities to elicit M waves in the more distal MG region. The presented results indicate that M waves recorded locally may not provide a representative MG response, with major implications for the estimation of, e.g., the maximal stimulation levels, the number of motor units, and the onset and normalization in H-reflex studies.

  9. Effect of knockout of α2δ-1 on action potentials in mouse sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Margas, Wojciech; Ferron, Laurent; Nieto-Rostro, Manuela; Schwartz, Arnold; Dolphin, Annette C

    2016-08-01

    Gene deletion of the voltage-gated calcium channel auxiliary subunit α2δ-1 has been shown previously to have a cardiovascular phenotype, and a reduction in mechano- and cold sensitivity, coupled with delayed development of neuropathic allodynia. We have also previously shown that dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neuron calcium channel currents were significantly reduced in α2δ-1 knockout mice. To extend our findings in these sensory neurons, we have examined here the properties of action potentials (APs) in DRG neurons from α2δ-1 knockout mice in comparison to their wild-type (WT) littermates, in order to dissect how the calcium channels that are affected by α2δ-1 knockout are involved in setting the duration of individual APs and their firing frequency. Our main findings are that there is reduced Ca(2+) entry on single AP stimulation, particularly in the axon proximal segment, reduced AP duration and reduced firing frequency to a 400 ms stimulation in α2δ-1 knockout neurons, consistent with the expected role of voltage-gated calcium channels in these events. Furthermore, lower intracellular Ca(2+) buffering also resulted in reduced AP duration, and a lower frequency of AP firing in WT neurons, mimicking the effect of α2δ-1 knockout. By contrast, we did not obtain any consistent evidence for the involvement of Ca(2+)-activation of large conductance calcium-activated potassium (BK) and small conductance calcium-activated potassium (SK) channels in these events. In conclusion, the reduced Ca(2+) elevation as a result of single AP stimulation is likely to result from the reduced duration of the AP in α2δ-1 knockout sensory neurons.This article is part of the themed issue 'Evolution brings Ca(2+) and ATP together to control life and death'. PMID:27377724

  10. Natural cures for type 1 diabetes: a review of phytochemicals, biological actions, and clinical potential.

    PubMed

    Chang, C L T; Chen, Yi-Ching; Chen, Hui-Ming; Yang, Ning-Sun; Yang, Wen-Chin

    2013-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases are the third largest category of illness in the industrialized world, following cardiovascular diseases and cancers. Among them, type 1 diabetes, also named autoimmune diabetes, afflicts 10 million people worldwide. This disease is caused by autoimmunity-mediated destruction of pancreatic β-cells, leading to insulin deficiency, hyperglycemia and complications. Currently, there is no cure for type 1 diabetes. Insulin injection is the only medication; however, it accompanies serious medical complications. Current strategies to cure type 1 diabetes include immunotherapy, replacement therapy, and combination therapy. Despite recent advances in anti-diabetic strategies, no strategy is clinically successful. How to cure type 1 diabetes without undesirable side effects still remains a formidable challenge in drug research and development. Plants provide an extraordinary source of natural medicines for different diseases. Moreover, secondary metabolites of plant origin serve as an invaluable chemical library for drug discovery and current medicinal chemistry in the pharmaceutical industry. Over the past 25 years, 50% of prescription drugs have been developed from natural products and their derivatives. In this article, we review more than 20 plant compounds and extracts reported in the literature to prevent and treat type-1 diabetes. Emphasis is placed on their chemistry and biology in terms of regulation of immune cells and pancreatic β-cells. We summarize recent progress in understanding the biological actions, mechanisms and therapeutic potential of the compounds and extracts of plant origin in type 1 diabetes. New views on phytocompound-based strategies for prevention and treatment of type 1 diabetes are also discussed. PMID:23210779

  11. A Novel Computational Model of the Human Ventricular Action Potential and Ca Transient

    PubMed Central

    Grandi, Eleonora; Pasqualini, Francesco S.; Bers, Donald M.

    2009-01-01

    We have developed a detailed mathematical model for Ca handling and ionic currents in the human ventricular myocyte. Our aims were to: 1) simulate basic excitation-contraction coupling phenomena; 2) use realistic repolarizing K current densities; 3) reach steady-state. The model relies on the framework of the rabbit myocyte model previously developed by our group, with subsarcolemmal and junctional compartments where ion channels sense higher [Ca] vs. bulk cytosol. Ion channels and transporters have been modeled on the basis of the most recent experimental data from human ventricular myocytes. Rapidly and slowly inactivating components of Ito have been formulated to differentiate between endocardial and epicardial myocytes. Transmural gradients of Ca handling proteins and Na pump were also simulated. The model has been validated against a wide set of experimental data including action potential duration (APD) adaptation and restitution, frequency-dependent increase in Ca transient peak and [Na]i. Interestingly, Na accumulation at fast heart rate is a major determinant of APD shortening, via outward shifts in Na pump and Na-Ca exchange currents. We investigated the effects of blocking K currents on APD and repolarization reserve: IKs block does not affect the former and slightly reduces the latter; IK1 blockade modestly increases APD and more strongly reduces repolarization reserve; IKr blockers significantly prolong APD, an effect exacerbated as pacing frequency is decreased, in good agreement with experimental results in human myocytes. We conclude that this model provides a useful framework to explore excitation-contraction coupling mechanisms and repolarization abnormalities at the single myocyte level. PMID:19835882

  12. Integrated Akt/PKB signaling in immunomodulation and its potential role in cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Xue, Gongda; Zippelius, Alfred; Wicki, Andreas; Mandalà, Mario; Tang, Fengyuan; Massi, Daniela; Hemmings, Brian A

    2015-07-01

    T cell development and maturation involve a variety of defined and coordinated developmental stages under the control of a variety of signaling networks. They function as the major mediator in cell-based immunity that defends against pathogen infections and executes immune surveillance against tumor cells. Protein kinase B (PKB, also called Akt) is central to multiple signaling pathways and transduces extracellular signals to dictate cellular responses towards proliferation, migration, anti-apoptosis, and maintenance of metabolic homeostasis. Although the prosurvival function of PKB was thought to be responsible for most of the functions regulated by PKB, emerging evidence has started to dissect its role in immunomodulation. More importantly, hyperactivation of PKB in cancer stroma frequently occurs in patients treated clinically with targeted cancer therapies, where it acts as a key mediator involved in the trapping of host immune cells in the vicinity of tumors, which supports cancer cell invasion and the escape of cancer cells from host immune surveillance. Encouragingly, recent studies have shown that inhibition of PKB improves the recognition of cancer cells by the host immune system, indicating a potential clinical strategy to rekindle the suppressed host immune response through the specific targeting of PKB. In this review, we explore how PKB signaling contributes to T cell development and cellular immune responses and discuss the mechanistic roles that PKB plays in the creation of immunosuppressive conditions and the escaping of immune recognition in the microenvironment of cancer.

  13. The potential influence of morphology on the evolutionary divergence of an acoustic signal

    PubMed Central

    Pitchers, W. R.; Klingenberg, C.P.; Tregenza, Tom; Hunt, J.; Dworkin, I.

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of acoustic behaviour and that of the morphological traits mediating its production are often coupled. Lack of variation in the underlying morphology of signalling traits has the potential to constrain signal evolution. This relationship is particularly likely in field crickets, where males produce acoustic advertisement signals to attract females by stridulating with specialized structures on their forewings. In this study, we characterise the size and geometric shape of the forewings of males from six allopatric populations of the black field cricket (Teleogryllus commodus) known to have divergent advertisement calls. We sample from each of these populations using both wild-caught and common-garden reared cohorts, allowing us to test for multivariate relationships between wing morphology and call structure. We show that the allometry of shape has diverged across populations. However, there was a surprisingly small amount of covariation between wing shape and call structure within populations. Given the importance of male size for sexual selection in crickets, the divergence we observe among populations has the potential to influence the evolution of advertisement calls in this species. PMID:25223712

  14. Top-Down Control of Visual Alpha Oscillations: Sources of Control Signals and Their Mechanisms of Action.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Rajagovindan, Rajasimhan; Han, Sahng-Min; Ding, Mingzhou

    2016-01-01

    Alpha oscillations (8-12 Hz) are thought to inversely correlate with cortical excitability. Goal-oriented modulation of alpha has been studied extensively. In visual spatial attention, alpha over the region of visual cortex corresponding to the attended location decreases, signifying increased excitability to facilitate the processing of impending stimuli. In contrast, in retention of verbal working memory, alpha over visual cortex increases, signifying decreased excitability to gate out stimulus input to protect the information held online from sensory interference. According to the prevailing model, this goal-oriented biasing of sensory cortex is effected by top-down control signals from frontal and parietal cortices. The present study tests and substantiates this hypothesis by (a) identifying the signals that mediate the top-down biasing influence, (b) examining whether the cortical areas issuing these signals are task-specific or task-independent, and (c) establishing the possible mechanism of the biasing action. High-density human EEG data were recorded in two experimental paradigms: a trial-by-trial cued visual spatial attention task and a modified Sternberg working memory task. Applying Granger causality to both sensor-level and source-level data we report the following findings. In covert visual spatial attention, the regions exerting top-down control over visual activity are lateralized to the right hemisphere, with the dipoles located at the right frontal eye field (FEF) and the right inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) being the main sources of top-down influences. During retention of verbal working memory, the regions exerting top-down control over visual activity are lateralized to the left hemisphere, with the dipoles located at the left middle frontal gyrus (MFG) being the main source of top-down influences. In both experiments, top-down influences are mediated by alpha oscillations, and the biasing effect is likely achieved via an inhibition

  15. Proinflammatory Actions of Visfatin/Nicotinamide Phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt) Involve Regulation of Insulin Signaling Pathway and Nampt Enzymatic Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Jacques, Claire; Holzenberger, Martin; Mladenovic, Zvezdana; Salvat, Colette; Pecchi, Emilie; Berenbaum, Francis; Gosset, Marjolaine

    2012-01-01

    Visfatin (also termed pre-B-cell colony-enhancing factor (PBEF) or nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt)) is a pleiotropic mediator acting on many inflammatory processes including osteoarthritis. Visfatin exhibits both an intracellular enzymatic activity (nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase, Nampt) leading to NAD synthesis and a cytokine function via the binding to its hypothetical receptor. We recently reported the role of visfatin in prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) synthesis in chondrocytes. Here, our aim was to characterize the signaling pathways involved in this response in exploring both the insulin receptor (IR) signaling pathway and Nampt activity. IR was expressed in human and murine chondrocytes, and visfatin triggered Akt phosphorylation in murine chondrocytes. Blocking IR expression with siRNA or activity using the hydroxy-2-naphthalenyl methyl phosphonic acid tris acetoxymethyl ester (HNMPA-(AM)3) inhibitor diminished visfatin-induced PGE2 release in chondrocytes. Moreover, visfatin-induced IGF-1R−/− chondrocytes released higher concentration of PGE2 than IGF-1R+/+ cells, a finding confirmed with an antibody that blocked IGF-1R. Using RT-PCR, we found that visfatin did not regulate IR expression and that an increased insulin release was also unlikely to be involved because insulin was unable to increase PGE2 release. Inhibition of Nampt activity using the APO866 inhibitor gradually decreased PGE2 release, whereas the addition of exogenous nicotinamide increased it. We conclude that the proinflammatory actions of visfatin in chondrocytes involve regulation of IR signaling pathways, possibly through the control of Nampt enzymatic activity. PMID:22399297

  16. Dopamine Modulates Spike Timing-Dependent Plasticity and Action Potential Properties in CA1 Pyramidal Neurons of Acute Rat Hippocampal Slices

    PubMed Central

    Edelmann, Elke; Lessmann, Volkmar

    2011-01-01

    Spike timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) is a cellular model of Hebbian synaptic plasticity which is believed to underlie memory formation. In an attempt to establish a STDP paradigm in CA1 of acute hippocampal slices from juvenile rats (P15–20), we found that changes in excitability resulting from different slice preparation protocols correlate with the success of STDP induction. Slice preparation with sucrose containing ACSF prolonged rise time, reduced frequency adaptation, and decreased latency of action potentials in CA1 pyramidal neurons compared to preparation in conventional ASCF, while other basal electrophysiological parameters remained unaffected. Whereas we observed prominent timing-dependent long-term potentiation (t-LTP) to 171 ± 10% of controls in conventional ACSF, STDP was absent in sucrose prepared slices. This sucrose-induced STDP deficit could not be rescued by stronger STDP paradigms, applying either more pre- and/or postsynaptic stimuli, or by a higher stimulation frequency. Importantly, slice preparation with sucrose containing ACSF did not eliminate theta-burst stimulation induced LTP in CA1 in field potential recordings in our rat hippocampal slices. Application of dopamine (for 10–20 min) to sucrose prepared slices completely rescued t-LTP and recovered action potential properties back to levels observed in ACSF prepared slices. Conversely, acute inhibition of D1 receptor signaling impaired t-LTP in ACSF prepared slices. No similar restoring effect for STDP as seen with dopamine was observed in response to the β-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol. ELISA measurements demonstrated a significant reduction of endogenous dopamine levels (to 61.9 ± 6.9% of ACSF values) in sucrose prepared slices. These results suggest that dopamine signaling is involved in regulating the efficiency to elicit STDP in CA1 pyramidal neurons. PMID:22065958

  17. The effect of stimulation frequency on the transmural ventricular monophasic action potential in yellowfin tuna Thunnus albacares.

    PubMed

    Patrick, S M; White, E; Brill, R W; Shiels, H A

    2011-02-01

    Monophasic action potentials (MAPs) were recorded from the spongy and compact layers of the yellowfin tuna Thunnus albacares ventricle as stimulation frequency was increased. MAP duration decreased with increase in stimulation frequency in both the spongy and compact myocardial layers, but no significant difference in MAP duration was observed between the layers. PMID:21284642

  18. Vertex potentials evoked during auditory signal detection - Relation to decision criteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Squires, K. C.; Hillyard, S. A.; Lindsay, P. H.

    1973-01-01

    Vertex potentials were recorded from eight subjects performing in an auditory threshold detection task with rating scale responses. The amplitudes and latencies of both the N1 and the late positive (P3) components were found to vary systematically with the criterion level of the decision. These changes in the waveshape of the N1 component were comparable to those produced by varying the signal intensity in a passive condition, but the late positive component in the active task was not similarly related to the passively evoked P2 component. It was suggested that the N1 and P3 components represent distinctive aspects of the decision process, with N1 signifying the quantity of signal information received and P3 reflecting the certainty of the decision based upon that information.

  19. The role and therapeutic potential of the autotaxin-lysophosphatidate signalling axis in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Teo, Katy; Brunton, Valerie G

    2014-10-01

    ATX (autotaxin) is a secreted lysophospholipase capable of catalysing the formation of the bioactive lipid mediator LPA (lysophosphatidate) from LPC (lysophosphatidylcholine). The ATX-LPA signalling axis plays an important role in both normal physiology and disease pathogenesis, including cancer. In a number of different human cancers, expression of ATX and the G-protein-coupled LPARs (lysophosphatidic acid receptors) have been shown to be elevated and their activation regulates many processes central to tumorigenesis, including proliferation, invasion, migration and angiogenesis. The present review provides an overview of the ATX-LPA signalling axis and collates current knowledge regarding its specific role in breast cancer. The potential manipulation of this pathway to facilitate diagnosis and treatment is also discussed. PMID:25195735

  20. Immune response and insulin signalling alter mosquito feeding behaviour to enhance malaria transmission potential.

    PubMed

    Cator, Lauren J; Pietri, Jose E; Murdock, Courtney C; Ohm, Johanna R; Lewis, Edwin E; Read, Andrew F; Luckhart, Shirley; Thomas, Matthew B

    2015-01-01

    Malaria parasites alter mosquito feeding behaviour in a way that enhances parasite transmission. This is widely considered a prime example of manipulation of host behaviour to increase onward transmission, but transient immune challenge in the absence of parasites can induce the same behavioural phenotype. Here, we show that alterations in feeding behaviour depend on the timing and dose of immune challenge relative to blood ingestion and that these changes are functionally linked to changes in insulin signalling in the mosquito gut. These results suggest that altered phenotypes derive from insulin signalling-dependent host resource allocation among immunity, blood feeding, and reproduction in a manner that is not specific to malaria parasite infection. We measured large increases in mosquito survival and subsequent transmission potential when feeding patterns are altered. Leveraging these changes in physiology, behaviour and life history could promote effective and sustainable control of female mosquitoes responsible for transmission.

  1. ERK 1/2 and PI-3 kinase pathways as a potential mechanism of ghrelin action on cell proliferation and apoptosis in the porcine ovarian follicular cells.

    PubMed

    Rak-Mardyla, A; Gregoraszczuk, E L

    2010-08-01

    Recently, we reported the stimulatory effect of ghrelin on ovarian cell proliferation in parallel with the inhibitory action of ghrelin on cell apoptosis. The aim of the presented data propose local activation of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 1 and 2 (ERK 1/2) and phosphoinositide-3 (PI-3) kinase pathways as a mechanism of ghrelin effect in the porcine ovary. To test this hypothesis, action of ghrelin on levels of ERK 1/2 with PI-3 kinase activity and protein expression using ELISA and western blot analysis, respectively, was examined. Additionally, to determine which pathways (ERK 1/2 or PI-3 kinase) are the potential signals of ghrelin-mediated cell proliferation and apoptosis in ovarian cells, we used PD098059 (50 microM) and wortmannin (200 microM), well-known inhibitors of these kinases. Treatment of ovarian coculture cells with ghrelin (100, 250, 500 and 1000 pg/ml) showed stimulation of phospho-ERK 1/2 levels and PI-3 kinase activity, with the maximum effect observed after 15 min of cell incubation. Additionally, western blot analysis indicated that ghrelin increased expression of both kinases. Moreover, ghrelin used in combination with PD098059 or wortmannin significantly decreased cell proliferation, which was measured by the Alamar Blue assay and increased apoptosis, which was measured by caspase - 3 activity and DNA fragmentation. In conclusion, these results suggest that the ERK 1/2 and PI-3 kinase pathways may be potential signals of ghrelin mediate the cell proliferation and apoptosis of ovary cells.

  2. The afterhyperpolarizing potential following a train of action potentials is suppressed in an acute epilepsy model in the rat Cornu Ammonis 1 area.

    PubMed

    Kernig, K; Kirschstein, T; Würdemann, T; Rohde, M; Köhling, R

    2012-01-10

    In hippocampal Cornu Ammonis 1 (CA1) neurons, a prolonged depolarization evokes a train of action potentials followed by a prominent afterhyperpolarizing potential (AHP), which critically dampens neuronal excitability. Because it is not known whether epileptiform activity alters the AHP and whether any alteration of the AHP is independent of inhibition, we acutely induced epileptiform activity by bath application of the GABA(A) receptor blocker gabazine (5 μM) in the rat hippocampal slice preparation and studied its impact on the AHP using intracellular recordings. Following 10 min of gabazine wash-in, slices started to develop spontaneous epileptiform discharges. This disinhibition was accompanied by a significant shift of the resting membrane potential of CA1 neurons to more depolarized values. Prolonged depolarizations (600 ms) elicited a train of action potentials, the number of which was not different between baseline and gabazine treatment. However, the AHP following the train of action potentials was significantly reduced after 20 min of gabazine treatment. When the induction of epileptiform activity was prevented by co-application of 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione disodium (CNQX, 10 μM) and D-(-)-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (D-AP5, 50 μM) to block α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazolepropionate (AMPA) and N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, respectively, the AHP was preserved despite of GABA(A) receptor inhibition suggesting that the epileptiform activity was required to suppress the AHP. Moreover, the AHP was also preserved when the slices were treated with the protein kinase blockers H-9 (100 μM) and H-89 (1 μM). These results demonstrate that the AHP following a train of action potentials is rapidly suppressed by acutely induced epileptiform activity due to a phosphorylation process-presumably involving protein kinase A.

  3. Potential use of potassium efflux-deficient yeast for studying trafficking signals and potassium channel functions.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Joshua D; Okamoto, Yukari; Kim, Minjee; Shikano, Sojin

    2013-01-01

    The activity of potassium (K(+)) channels critically depends on their density on the cell surface membrane, which is regulated by dynamic protein-protein interactions that often involve distinct trafficking signals on the cargo proteins. In this paper we explored the possibility of utilizing the Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain B31 for identification of the signal motifs that regulate surface expression of membrane proteins and for studying structure-function relationships of K(+) channels. B31 cells lack the K(+) efflux system and were reported to show overloaded K(+)-mediated growth inhibition in high K(+) media upon heterologous expression of a mammalian inwardly rectifying K(+) channel (Kir2.1). We show that while the expression of wild-type Kir2.1 channel inhibits the growth of B31 cells in high K(+) media, the human disease-causing mutations of Kir2.1 that abolish K(+) conduction (V302M) or surface trafficking (Δ314/315) fully restores the growth. The expression of two-pore-domain K(+) channel KCNK3 or KCNK9 also inhibited the growth of B31 in high K(+) media while C-terminal mutations that reduce their 14-3-3 protein-dependent cell surface trafficking restored the growth of B31. Finally, the expression of Kir2.1 channels that were C-terminally fused with known sequence motifs including ER retention/retrieval signals and an endocytosis signal allowed the growth of B31 in high K(+) media. These results demonstrate the potential of B31 yeast strain as a unique biological tool to screen the random peptide libraries for novel sequence signals that down-regulate surface expression of membrane proteins, as well as to systematically identify the structural determinants for cell surface trafficking and/or ion conductance of K(+) channels.

  4. Cortical membrane potential signature of optimal states for sensory signal detection

    PubMed Central

    McGinley, Matthew J.; David, Stephen V.; McCormick, David A.

    2015-01-01

    The neural correlates of optimal states for signal detection task performance are largely unknown. One hypothesis holds that optimal states exhibit tonically depolarized cortical neurons with enhanced spiking activity, such as occur during movement. We recorded membrane potentials of auditory cortical neurons in mice trained on a challenging tone-in-noise detection task while assessing arousal with simultaneous pupillometry and hippocampal recordings. Arousal measures accurately predicted multiple modes of membrane potential activity, including: rhythmic slow oscillations at low arousal, stable hyperpolarization at intermediate arousal, and depolarization during phasic or tonic periods of hyper-arousal. Walking always occurred during hyper-arousal. Optimal signal detection behavior and sound-evoked responses, at both sub-threshold and spiking levels, occurred at intermediate arousal when pre-decision membrane potentials were stably hyperpolarized. These results reveal a cortical physiological signature of the classically-observed inverted-U relationship between task performance and arousal, and that optimal detection exhibits enhanced sensory-evoked responses and reduced background synaptic activity. PMID:26074005

  5. Electrical signaling and photosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Mancuso, Stefano

    2011-01-01

    Mechanical irritation of trigger hairs and subsequent generation of action potentials have significant impact on photosynthesis and respiration in carnivorous Venus flytrap (Dionaea muscipula). Action potential-mediated inhibition of photosynthesis and stimulation of respiration is confined only to the trap and was not recorded in adjacent photosynthetic lamina. We showed that the main primary target of electrical signals on assimilation is in the dark enzymatic reaction of photosynthesis. Without doubt, the electrical signaling is costly, and the possible co-existence of such type of signals and photosynthesis in plant cell is discussed. PMID:21558815

  6. [Music-Acoustic Signals Controlled by Subject's Brain Potentials in the Correction of Unfavorable Functional States].

    PubMed

    Fedotchev, A I; Bondar, A T; Bakhchina, A V; Parin, S B; Polevaya, S A; Radchenko, G S

    2016-01-01

    Literature review and the results of own studies on the development and experimental testing of musical EEG neurofeedback technology are presented. The technology is based on exposure of subjects to music or music-like signals that are organized in strict accordance with the current values of brain potentials of the patient. The main attention is paid to the analysis of the effectiveness of several versions of the technology, using specific and meaningful for the individual narrow-frequency EEG oscillators during the correction of unfavorable changes of the functional state. PMID:27149824

  7. [Music-Acoustic Signals Controlled by Subject's Brain Potentials in the Correction of Unfavorable Functional States].

    PubMed

    Fedotchev, A I; Bondar, A T; Bakhchina, A V; Parin, S B; Polevaya, S A; Radchenko, G S

    2016-01-01

    Literature review and the results of own studies on the development and experimental testing of musical EEG neurofeedback technology are presented. The technology is based on exposure of subjects to music or music-like signals that are organized in strict accordance with the current values of brain potentials of the patient. The main attention is paid to the analysis of the effectiveness of several versions of the technology, using specific and meaningful for the individual narrow-frequency EEG oscillators during the correction of unfavorable changes of the functional state.

  8. Sural sensory nerve action potential: A study in healthy Indian subjects

    PubMed Central

    Sreenivasan, Aarthika; Mansukhani, Khushnuma A; Sharma, Alika; Balakrishnan, Lajita

    2016-01-01

    Background: The sural sensory nerve action potential (SNAP) is an important electrodiagnostic study for suspected peripheral neuropathies. Incorrect technique and unavailability of reference data can lead to erroneous conclusions. Objectives: To establish reference data for sural SNAP in age-stratified healthy subjects at three sites of stimulation. Materials and Methods: A prospective study was conducted in 146 nerves from healthy subjects aged between 18 years and 90 years, stratified into six age groups (a = 18-30 years, b = 31–40 years, c = 41–50 years, d = 51–60 years, e = 61–70 years, and f >71 years). Sural SNAP was recorded antidromically, stimulating at three sites at distances of 14 cm, 12 cm, and 10 cm from the recording electrode. Mean – 2 standard deviation (SD) of the transformed data was used to generate reference values for amplitudes. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) test was used for inter-group and between three sites comparisons of amplitudes. Results: The lower limits of amplitude at 14 cm were 12.4 μV, 10.4 μV, 6.5 μV, 5.3 μV, 2.9 μV, and 1.9 μV; at 12 cm were 13.5 μV, 13.6 μV, 8.5 μV, 7.8 μV, 3.5 μV, and 2.8 μV; and at 10 cm were 16.3 μV, 16.3 μV, 11.1 μV, 10.0 μV, 4.8 μV, and 3.7 μV for groups a, b, c, d, e, and f, respectively. A statistically significant difference in amplitudes was noted from the three different sites of stimulation (P < 0.001). The amplitude differed significantly above the age of 60 years (P < 0.01) but not between groups e and f (P > 0.05). Conclusion: This study provides reference data for sural SNAP in Indian population at three different sites of stimulation along the calf in six age groups. It also shows significant variation in amplitude from the three different sites of stimulation. PMID:27570380

  9. Action potentials from ventricular mechanoreceptors stimulated by occlusion of the coronary sinus in the dog

    PubMed Central

    Muers, M. F.; Sleight, P.

    1972-01-01

    1. In experiments to determine the type of intra-cardiac receptors which cause the coronary sinus occlusion reflex, recordings were made from sixty-nine single and small multi-fibre preparations of cardiac vagal afferents in open-chest anaesthetized dogs. 2. Thirty-two fibres were stimulated by occlusion of the coronary sinus outflow through an indwelling Morawitz cannula. No receptors were stimulated during occlusions at peak systolic coronary venous pressures below the threshold for reflex cardiovascular depression. At higher pressures, fibre recruitment and further increases in stimulated discharge were demonstrated. 3. The afferent endings of twenty-nine of these fibres were mechanically localized to the epicardium and myocardium of the left ventricle. Three were in the right ventricle. Seventeen single fibres discharged spontaneously at an average of 0·9 impulses/sec. There was cardiac modulation of both resting and stimulated discharge, with most action potentials in systole. Seven of eight fibres conducted at less than 1·0 m/sec. 4. These ventricular receptors and a further twenty-two otherwise like them but not stimulated by occlusions were designated epi-myocardial receptors. 5. 73% of receptors were stimulated by intrapericardial nicotine (50-100 μg). Presumptively superficial receptors were more sensitive to this stimulus. 6. Epi-myocardial receptors were stimulated by intravenous or intracoronary catecholamines, by electrical stimulation of cardiac sympathetic nerves, and by eliciting the carotid sinus occlusion reflex. Aortic occlusion stimulated 66% of fibres tested, but was a less effective stimulus. After all these stimuli, there was a systolic modulation of discharge in more than 70% of fibres. 7. It was concluded that the epi-myocardial receptors are similar to those previously shown to cause the epicardial chemoreflex, and to participate in the coronary chemoreflex. It is suggested that they are responsive to systolic mechanical changes which

  10. Compilation of mRNA Polyadenylation Signals in Arabidopsis Revealed a New Signal Element and Potential Secondary Structures1[w

    PubMed Central

    Loke, Johnny C.; Stahlberg, Eric A.; Strenski, David G.; Haas, Brian J.; Wood, Paul Chris; Li, Qingshun Quinn

    2005-01-01

    Using a novel program, SignalSleuth, and a database containing authenticated polyadenylation [poly(A)] sites, we analyzed the composition of mRNA poly(A) signals in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), and reevaluated previously described cis-elements within the 3′-untranslated (UTR) regions, including near upstream elements and far upstream elements. As predicted, there are absences of high-consensus signal patterns. The AAUAAA signal topped the near upstream elements patterns and was found within the predicted location to only approximately 10% of 3′-UTRs. More importantly, we identified a new set, named cleavage elements, of poly(A) signals flanking both sides of the cleavage site. These cis-elements were not previously revealed by conventional mutagenesis and are contemplated as a cluster of signals for cleavage site recognition. Moreover, a single-nucleotide profile scan on the 3′-UTR regions unveiled a distinct arrangement of alternate stretches of U and A nucleotides, which led to a prediction of the formation of secondary structures. Using an RNA secondary structure prediction program, mFold, we identified three main types of secondary structures on the sequences analyzed. Surprisingly, these observed secondary structures were all interrupted in previously constructed mutations in these regions. These results will enable us to revise the current model of plant poly(A) signals and to develop tools to predict 3′-ends for gene annotation. PMID:15965016

  11. Evaluating potential changes in salmonid rearing capacity from alternative sets of rehabilitation actions in the Trinity River, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beechie, T. J.; Pess, G. R.; Imaki, H.; Martin, A.; Alvarez, J.; Goodman, D.

    2013-12-01

    River restoration plans often propose numerous rehabilitation actions to address key habitat impairments for salmonids. However, restoration plans rarely propose alternative sets of actions or attempt to quantify the potential benefits to targeted biota. In this paper we use geomorphic and biological analyses to estimate restoration potential for each of 37 reaches in a 64-km section of Trinity River, California from the North Fork Trinity River to Lewiston Dam (the focus of habitat rehabilitation efforts under the Trinity River Restoration Program). We first predicted the channel pattern that might develop based in each reach on slope-discharge criteria, and then used these potential patterns along with floodplain width to estimate the maximum sinuosity that restoration actions could likely achieve, as well as a maximum side-channel length that might be created in each reach. For each scenario, we then used existing stream habitat and juvenile salmonid data from previous studies in the Trinity River and other watersheds to determine current and restored carrying capacity. Potential increases in Chinook and steelhead carrying capacity range from 39% for a relatively realistic estimate of increasing habitat quality (more low velocity areas with cover) to 67% for a more optimistic scenario that increases both sinuosity and habitat quality. Only the most optimistic scenario that increases habitat quality, increases sinuosity, and constructs tens of kilometers of side channels more than doubles potential juvenile salmonid production (140% increase). These quantitative predictions provide a frame of reference for evaluating alternative restoration options, and for setting measurable restoration goals.

  12. A new feature extraction method for signal classification applied to cord dorsum potential detection.

    PubMed

    Vidaurre, D; Rodríguez, E E; Bielza, C; Larrañaga, P; Rudomin, P

    2012-10-01

    In the spinal cord of the anesthetized cat, spontaneous cord dorsum potentials (CDPs) appear synchronously along the lumbo-sacral segments. These CDPs have different shapes and magnitudes. Previous work has indicated that some CDPs appear to be specially associated with the activation of spinal pathways that lead to primary afferent depolarization and presynaptic inhibition. Visual detection and classification of these CDPs provides relevant information on the functional organization of the neural networks involved in the control of sensory information and allows the characterization of the changes produced by acute nerve and spinal lesions. We now present a novel feature extraction approach for signal classification, applied to CDP detection. The method is based on an intuitive procedure. We first remove by convolution the noise from the CDPs recorded in each given spinal segment. Then, we assign a coefficient for each main local maximum of the signal using its amplitude and distance to the most important maximum of the signal. These coefficients will be the input for the subsequent classification algorithm. In particular, we employ gradient boosting classification trees. This combination of approaches allows a faster and more accurate discrimination of CDPs than is obtained by other methods.

  13. Hippo signaling pathway in liver and pancreas: the potential drug target for tumor therapy.

    PubMed

    Kong, Delin; Zhao, Yicheng; Men, Tong; Teng, Chun-Bo

    2015-02-01

    Cell behaviors, including proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis, are intricately controlled during organ development and tissue regeneration. In the past 9 years, the Hippo signaling pathway has been delineated to play critical roles in organ size control, tissue regeneration and tumorigenesis through regulating cell behaviors. In mammals, the core modules of the Hippo signaling pathway include the MST1/2-LATS1/2 kinase cascade and the transcriptional co-activators YAP/TAZ. The activity of YAP/TAZ is suppressed by cytoplasmic retention due to phosphorylation in the canonical MST1/2-LATS1/2 kinase cascade-dependent manner or the non-canonical MST1/2- and/or LATS1/2-independent manner. Hippo signaling pathway, which can be activated or inactivated by cell polarity, contact inhibition, mechanical stretch and extracellular factors, has been demonstrated to be involved in development and tumorigenesis of liver and pancreas. In addition, we have summarized several small molecules currently available that can target Hippo-YAP pathway for potential treatment of hepatic and pancreatic cancers, providing clues for other YAP initiated cancers therapy as well.

  14. Human scalp potentials reflect a mixture of decision-related signals during perceptual choices.

    PubMed

    Philiastides, Marios G; Heekeren, Hauke R; Sajda, Paul

    2014-12-10

    Single-unit animal studies have consistently reported decision-related activity mirroring a process of temporal accumulation of sensory evidence to a fixed internal decision boundary. To date, our understanding of how response patterns seen in single-unit data manifest themselves at the macroscopic level of brain activity obtained from human neuroimaging data remains limited. Here, we use single-trial analysis of human electroencephalography data to show that population responses on the scalp can capture choice-predictive activity that builds up gradually over time with a rate proportional to the amount of sensory evidence, consistent with the properties of a drift-diffusion-like process as characterized by computational modeling. Interestingly, at time of choice, scalp potentials continue to appear parametrically modulated by the amount of sensory evidence rather than converging to a fixed decision boundary as predicted by our model. We show that trial-to-trial fluctuations in these response-locked signals exert independent leverage on behavior compared with the rate of evidence accumulation earlier in the trial. These results suggest that in addition to accumulator signals, population responses on the scalp reflect the influence of other decision-related signals that continue to covary with the amount of evidence at time of choice.

  15. A new feature extraction method for signal classification applied to cord dorsum potential detection.

    PubMed

    Vidaurre, D; Rodríguez, E E; Bielza, C; Larrañaga, P; Rudomin, P

    2012-10-01

    In the spinal cord of the anesthetized cat, spontaneous cord dorsum potentials (CDPs) appear synchronously along the lumbo-sacral segments. These CDPs have different shapes and magnitudes. Previous work has indicated that some CDPs appear to be specially associated with the activation of spinal pathways that lead to primary afferent depolarization and presynaptic inhibition. Visual detection and classification of these CDPs provides relevant information on the functional organization of the neural networks involved in the control of sensory information and allows the characterization of the changes produced by acute nerve and spinal lesions. We now present a novel feature extraction approach for signal classification, applied to CDP detection. The method is based on an intuitive procedure. We first remove by convolution the noise from the CDPs recorded in each given spinal segment. Then, we assign a coefficient for each main local maximum of the signal using its amplitude and distance to the most important maximum of the signal. These coefficients will be the input for the subsequent classification algorithm. In particular, we employ gradient boosting classification trees. This combination of approaches allows a faster and more accurate discrimination of CDPs than is obtained by other methods. PMID:22929924

  16. A new feature extraction method for signal classification applied to cord dorsum potentials detection

    PubMed Central

    Vidaurre, D.; Rodríguez, E. E.; Bielza, C.; Larrañaga, P.; Rudomin, P.

    2012-01-01

    In the spinal cord of the anesthetized cat, spontaneous cord dorsum potentials (CDPs) appear synchronously along the lumbo-sacral segments. These CDPs have different shapes and magnitudes. Previous work has indicated that some CDPs appear to be specially associated with the activation of spinal pathways that lead to primary afferent depolarization and presynaptic inhibition. Visual detection and classification of these CDPs provides relevant information on the functional organization of the neural networks involved in the control of sensory information and allows the characterization of the changes produced by acute nerve and spinal lesions. We now present a novel feature extraction approach for signal classification, applied to CDP detection. The method is based on an intuitive procedure. We first remove by convolution the noise from the CDPs recorded in each given spinal segment. Then, we assign a coefficient for each main local maximum of the signal using its amplitude and distance to the most important maximum of the signal. These coefficients will be the input for the subsequent classification algorithm. In particular, we employ gradient boosting classification trees. This combination of approaches allows a faster and more accurate discrimination of CDPs than is obtained by other methods. PMID:22929924

  17. Elastic resistance change and action potential generation of non-faradaic Pt/TiO2/Pt capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Hyungkwang; Jang, Ho Won; Lee, Doh-Kwon; Kim, Inho; Hwang, Cheol Seong; Jeong, Doo Seok

    2013-06-01

    Electric current in the mixed ionic-electronic conductor TiO2 is hysteretic, i.e. history-dependent, and its use is versatile in electronic devices. Nowadays, biologically inspired, analogue-type computing systems, known as neuromorphic systems, are being actively investigated owing to their new and intriguing physical concepts. The realization of artificial synapses is important for constructing neuromorphic systems. In mammalians' brains, the plasticity of synapses between neighbouring nerve cells arises from action potential firing. Emulating action potential firing via inorganic systems has therefore become important in neuromorphic engineering. In this work, the current-voltage hysteresis of TiO2-based non-faradaic capacitors is investigated to primarily focus on the correlation between the blocking contact and the elasticity, i.e. non-plasticity, of the capacitors' resistance change, in experimental and theoretical methods. The similarity between the action potential firing behaviour in nerve cells and the elasticity of the non-faradaic capacitors is addressed.Electric current in the mixed ionic-electronic conductor TiO2 is hysteretic, i.e. history-dependent, and its use is versatile in electronic devices. Nowadays, biologically inspired, analogue-type computing systems, known as neuromorphic systems, are being actively investigated owing to their new and intriguing physical concepts. The realization of artificial synapses is important for constructing neuromorphic systems. In mammalians' brains, the plasticity of synapses between neighbouring nerve cells arises from action potential firing. Emulating action potential firing via inorganic systems has therefore become important in neuromorphic engineering. In this work, the current-voltage hysteresis of TiO2-based non-faradaic capacitors is investigated to primarily focus on the correlation between the blocking contact and the elasticity, i.e. non-plasticity, of the capacitors' resistance change, in

  18. FOXP1 potentiates Wnt/β-catenin signaling in diffuse large B cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Walker, Matthew P; Stopford, Charles M; Cederlund, Maria; Fang, Fang; Jahn, Christopher; Rabinowitz, Alex D; Goldfarb, Dennis; Graham, David M; Yan, Feng; Deal, Allison M; Fedoriw, Yuri; Richards, Kristy L; Davis, Ian J; Weidinger, Gilbert; Damania, Blossom; Major, Michael B

    2015-02-03

    The transcription factor FOXP1 (forkhead box protein P1) is a master regulator of stem and progenitor cell biology. In diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL), copy number amplifications and chromosomal translocations result in overexpression of FOXP1. Increased abundance of FOXP1 in DLBCL is a predictor of poor prognosis and resistance to therapy. We developed a genome-wide, mass spectrometry-coupled, gain-of-function genetic screen, which revealed that FOXP1 potentiates β-catenin-dependent, Wnt-dependent gene expression. Gain- and loss-of-function studies in cell models and zebrafish confirmed that FOXP1 was a general and conserved enhancer of Wnt signaling. In a Wnt-dependent fashion, FOXP1 formed a complex with β-catenin, TCF7L2 (transcription factor 7-like 2), and the acetyltransferase CBP [CREB (adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate response element-binding protein)-binding protein], and this complex bound the promoters of Wnt target genes. FOXP1 promoted the acetylation of β-catenin by CBP, and acetylation was required for FOXP1-mediated potentiation of β-catenin-dependent transcription. In DLBCL, we found that FOXP1 promoted sensitivity to Wnt pathway inhibitors, and knockdown of FOXP1 or blocking β-catenin transcriptional activity slowed xenograft tumor growth. These data connect excessive FOXP1 with β-catenin-dependent signal transduction and provide a molecular rationale for Wnt-directed therapy in DLBCL.

  19. Potentiation of ghrelin signaling attenuates cancer anorexia-cachexia and prolongs survival.

    PubMed

    Fujitsuka, N; Asakawa, A; Uezono, Y; Minami, K; Yamaguchi, T; Niijima, A; Yada, T; Maejima, Y; Sedbazar, U; Sakai, T; Hattori, T; Kase, Y; Inui, A

    2011-07-26

    Cancer anorexia-cachexia syndrome is characterized by decreased food intake, weight loss, muscle tissue wasting and psychological distress, and this syndrome is a major source of increased morbidity and mortality in cancer patients. This study aimed to clarify the gut-brain peptides involved in the pathogenesis of the syndrome and determine effective treatment for cancer anorexia-cachexia. We show that both ghrelin insufficiency and resistance were observed in tumor-bearing rats. Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) decreased the plasma level of acyl ghrelin, and its receptor antagonist, α-helical CRF, increased food intake of these rats. The serotonin 2c receptor (5-HT2cR) antagonist SB242084 decreased hypothalamic CRF level and improved anorexia, gastrointestinal (GI) dysmotility and body weight loss. The ghrelin receptor antagonist (D-Lys3)-GHRP-6 worsened anorexia and hastened death in tumor-bearing rats. Ghrelin attenuated anorexia-cachexia in the short term, but failed to prolong survival, as did SB242084 administration. In addition, the herbal medicine rikkunshito improved anorexia, GI dysmotility, muscle wasting, and anxiety-related behavior and prolonged survival in animals and patients with cancer. The appetite-stimulating effect of rikkunshito was blocked by (D-Lys3)-GHRP-6. Active components of rikkunshito, hesperidin and atractylodin, potentiated ghrelin secretion and receptor signaling, respectively, and atractylodin prolonged survival in tumor-bearing rats. Our study demonstrates that the integrated mechanism underlying cancer anorexia-cachexia involves lowered ghrelin signaling due to excessive hypothalamic interactions of 5-HT with CRF through the 5-HT2cR. Potentiation of ghrelin receptor signaling may be an attractive treatment for anorexia, muscle wasting and prolong survival in patients with cancer anorexia-cachexia.

  20. The Potential of General Classroom Observation: Turkish EFL Teachers' Perceptions, Sentiments, and Readiness for Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merç, Ali

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine Turkish EFL teachers' attitudes towards classroom observation. 204 teachers from different school settings responded to an online questionnaire. Data were analyzed according to three types of attitudes towards classroom observation: perceptions, sentiments, and readiness for action. The findings revealed…

  1. Action Learning in Higher Education: An Investigation of Its Potential to Develop Professional Capability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lizzio, Alf; Wilson, Keithia

    2004-01-01

    This study investigated the extent to which a course, designed using peer and action learning principles to function as an 'on campus practicum', can develop the professional capabilities of students. As part of their formal coursework, third year behavioural science students, functioning as 'student consultants', entered into a…

  2. Mode of action of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry and Cyt toxins and their potential for insect control.

    PubMed

    Bravo, Alejandra; Gill, Sarjeet S; Soberón, Mario

    2007-03-15

    Bacillus thuringiensis Crystal (Cry) and Cytolitic (Cyt) protein families are a diverse group of proteins with activity against insects of different orders--Lepidoptera, Coleoptera, Diptera and also against other invertebrates such as nematodes. Their primary action is to lyse midgut epithelial cells by inserting into the target membrane and forming pores. Among this group of proteins, members of the 3-Domain Cry family are used worldwide for insect control, and their mode of action has been characterized in some detail. Phylogenetic analyses established that the diversity of the 3-Domain Cry family evolved by the independent evolution of the three domains and by swapping of domain III among toxins. Like other pore-forming toxins (PFT) that affect mammals, Cry toxins interact with specific receptors located on the host cell surface and are activated by host proteases following receptor binding resulting in the formation of a pre-pore oligomeric structure that is insertion competent. In contrast, Cyt toxins directly interact with membrane lipids and insert into the membrane. Recent evidence suggests that Cyt synergize or overcome resistance to mosquitocidal-Cry proteins by functioning as a Cry-membrane bound receptor. In this review we summarize recent findings on the mode of action of Cry and Cyt toxins, and compare them to the mode of action of other bacterial PFT. Also, we discuss their use in the control of agricultural insect pests and insect vectors of human diseases. PMID:17198720

  3. Probing the spatiotemporal relationship between intracellular Ca2+ release and action potential propagation in cardiomyocytes by ultrafast multi-photon random access microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sacconi, L.; Crocini, C.; Coppini, R.; Ferrantini, C.; Tesi, C.; Yan, P.; Loew, L.; Cerbai, E.; Poggesi, C.; Pavone, F. S.

    2013-02-01

    Action potential, via the transverse axial tubular system (TATS), synchronously triggers uniform Ca2+ release throughout the cardiomyocyte. Cardiac diseases associated with TATS structural remodeling preclude a uniform Ca2+ release across the myocyte, contributing to contractile dysfunction. A simultaneous recording of intracellular local Ca2+ release and action potential in tubular network can be useful to unravel the link between TATS abnormality and dysfunctional EC coupling. Here we combine the advantage of an ultrafast random access multi-photon (RAMP) microscope with a double staining approach to optically record AP in several TATS elements and, simultaneously, the corresponding local Ca2+ transient. Isolated rat cardiomyocytes were labeled with a novel voltage sensitive dye (VSD) and a calcium indicator. RAMP microscope rapidly scans between lines drawn across the TATS of the cardiomyocyte to perform a multiplexed measurement of the two fluorescence signals. Although the calcium and voltage indicators can be excited at the same wavelength, the large Stokes shift of the VSD emission allows us to use spectral unmixing to resolve the voltage and calcium responses. In healthy cardiomyocytes, we found uniform AP propagation within the TATS and homogeneous Ca2+ release throughout the whole cell. The capability of our technique in probing spatiotemporal relationship between Ca2+ and electrical activity was then explored in a model of acute detubulation in which failure to conduct AP in disconnected TATS may cause local delay of Ca2+ transient rise leading to non-homogenous Ca2+ release.

  4. Anti-diabetic effect of citrus pectin in diabetic rats and potential mechanism via PI3K/Akt signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanlong; Dong, Man; Yang, Ziyu; Pan, Siyi

    2016-08-01

    This study was performed to investigate the anti-diabetic effect of citrus pectin in type 2 diabetic rats and its potential mechanism of action. The results showed that fasting blood glucose levels were significantly decreased after 4 weeks of citrus pectin administration. Citrus pectin improved glucose tolerance, hepatic glycogen content and blood lipid levels (TG, TC, LDL-c and HDL-c) in diabetic rats. Citrus pectin also significantly reduced insulin resistance, which played an important role in the resulting anti-diabetic effect. Moreover, after the pectin treatment, phosphorylated Akt expression was upregulated and GSK3β expression was downregulated, indicating that the potential anti-diabetic mechanism of citrus pectin might occur through regulation of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. Together, these results suggested that citrus pectin could ameliorate type 2 diabetes and potentially be used as an adjuvant treatment.

  5. Potential for small scale added value of RCM's downscaled climate change signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Luca, Alejandro; de Elía, Ramón; Laprise, René

    2013-02-01

    In recent decades, the need of future climate information at local scales have pushed the climate modelling community to perform increasingly higher resolution simulations and to develop alternative approaches to obtain fine-scale climatic information. In this article, various nested regional climate model (RCM) simulations have been used to try to identify regions across North America where high-resolution downscaling generates fine-scale details in the climate projection derived using the "delta method". Two necessary conditions were identified for an RCM to produce added value (AV) over lower resolution atmosphere-ocean general circulation models in the fine-scale component of the climate change (CC) signal. First, the RCM-derived CC signal must contain some non-negligible fine-scale information—independently of the RCM ability to produce AV in the present climate. Second, the uncertainty related with the estimation of this fine-scale information should be relatively small compared with the information itself in order to suggest that RCMs are able to simulate robust fine-scale features in the CC signal. Clearly, considering necessary (but not sufficient) conditions means that we are studying the "potential" of RCMs to add value instead of the AV, which preempts and avoids any discussion of the actual skill and hence the need for hindcast comparisons. The analysis concentrates on the CC signal obtained from the seasonal-averaged temperature and precipitation fields and shows that the fine-scale variability of the CC signal is generally small compared to its large-scale component, suggesting that little AV can be expected for the time-averaged fields. For the temperature variable, the largest potential for fine-scale added value appears in coastal regions mainly related with differential warming in land and oceanic surfaces. Fine-scale features can account for nearly 60 % of the total CC signal in some coastal regions although for most regions the fine scale

  6. Determining electrically evoked compound action potential thresholds: A comparison of computer versus human analysis methods

    PubMed Central

    Glassman, E. Katelyn; Hughes, Michelle L.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Current cochlear implants (CIs) have telemetry capabilities for measuring the electrically evoked compound action potential (ECAP). Neural Response Telemetry (NRT™; Cochlear) and Neural Response Imaging (NRI; Advanced Bionics [AB]) can measure ECAP responses across a range of stimulus levels to obtain an amplitude growth function. Software-specific algorithms automatically mark the leading negative peak, N1, and the following positive peak/plateau, P2, and apply linear regression to estimate ECAP threshold. Alternatively, clinicians may apply expert judgments to modify the peak markers placed by the software algorithms, and/or use visual detection to identify the lowest level yielding a measurable ECAP response. The goals of this study were to: (1) assess the variability between human and computer decisions for (a) marking N1 and P2, and (b) determination of linear regression threshold (LRT) and visual detection threshold (VDT); and (2) compare LRT and VDT methods within and across human and computer decision methods. Design ECAP amplitude growth functions were measured for three electrodes in each of 20 ears (10 Cochlear Nucleus® 24RE/CI512, and 10 AB CII/90K). LRT, defined as the current level yielding an ECAP with zero amplitude, was calculated for both computer- (C-LRT) and human-picked peaks (H-LRT). VDT, defined as the lowest level resulting in a measurable ECAP response, was also calculated for both computer- (C-VDT) and human-picked peaks (H-VDT). Because NRI assigns peak markers to all waveforms but does not include waveforms with amplitudes less than 20 μV in its regression calculation, C-VDT for AB subjects was defined as the lowest current level yielding an amplitude ≥20 μV. Results Overall, there were significant correlations between human and computer decisions for peak-marker placement, LRT, and VDT for both manufacturers (r = 0.78 to 1.00, p < 0.001). For Cochlear devices, LRT and VDT correlated equally well for both computer- and

  7. A Potential Role for Integrin Signaling in Mechanoelectrical Feedback Progress in Biophysics and Molecular Biology

    PubMed Central

    Dabiri, Borna E.; Lee, Hyungsuk; Parker, Kevin Kit

    2016-01-01

    Certain forms of heart disease involve gross morphological changes to the myocardium that alter its hemodynamic loading conditions. These changes can ultimately lead to the increased deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, such as collagen and fibronectin, which together work to pathologically alter the myocardium’s bulk tissue mechanics. In addition to changing the mechanical properties of the heart, this maladaptive remodeling gives rise to changes in myocardium electrical conductivity and synchrony since the tissue’s mechanical properties are intimately tied to its electrical characteristics. This phenomenon, called mechanoelectrical coupling (MEC), can render individuals affected by heart disease arrhythmogenic and susceptible to sudden cardiac death (SCD). The underlying mechanisms of MEC have been attributed to various processes, including the action of stretch activated channels and changes in troponin C-Ca2+ binding affinity. However, changes in the heart post infarction or due to congenital myopathies are also accompanied by shifts in the expression of various molecular components of cardiomyocytes, including the mechanosensitive family of integrin proteins. As transmembrane proteins, integrins mechanically couple the ECM with the intracellular cytoskeleton and have been implicated in mediating ion homeostasis in various cell types, including neurons and smooth muscle. Given evidence of altered integrin expression in the setting of heart disease coupled with the associated increased risk for arrhythmia, we argue in this review that integrin signaling contributes to MEC. In light of the significant mortality associated with arrhythmia and SCD, close examination of all culpable mechanisms, including integrin-mediated MEC, is necessary. PMID:22819851

  8. A Critical Role for Neurofascin in Regulating Action Potential Initiation through Maintenance of the Axon Initial Segment

    PubMed Central

    Zonta, Barbara; Desmazieres, Anne; Rinaldi, Arianna; Tait, Steven; Sherman, Diane L.; Nolan, Matthew F.; Brophy, Peter J.

    2011-01-01

    Summary The axon initial segment (AIS) is critical for the initiation and propagation of action potentials. Assembly of the AIS requires interactions between scaffolding molecules and voltage-gated sodium channels, but the molecular mechanisms that stabilize the AIS are poorly understood. The neuronal isoform of Neurofascin, Nfasc186, clusters voltage-gated sodium channels at nodes of Ranvier in myelinated nerves: here, we investigate its role in AIS assembly and stabilization. Inactivation of the Nfasc gene in cerebellar Purkinje cells of adult mice causes rapid loss of Nfasc186 from the AIS but not from nodes of Ranvier. This causes AIS disintegration, impairment of motor learning and the abolition of the spontaneous tonic discharge typical of Purkinje cells. Nevertheless, action potentials with a modified waveform can still be evoked and basic motor abilities remain intact. We propose that Nfasc186 optimizes communication between mature neurons by anchoring the key elements of the adult AIS complex. PMID:21382554

  9. [Hardware Implementation of Numerical Simulation Function of Hodgkin-Huxley Model Neurons Action Potential Based on Field Programmable Gate Array].

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinlong; Lu, Mai; Hu, Yanwen; Chen, Xiaoqiang; Pan, Qiangqiang

    2015-12-01

    Neuron is the basic unit of the biological neural system. The Hodgkin-Huxley (HH) model is one of the most realistic neuron models on the electrophysiological characteristic description of neuron. Hardware implementation of neuron could provide new research ideas to clinical treatment of spinal cord injury, bionics and artificial intelligence. Based on the HH model neuron and the DSP Builder technology, in the present study, a single HH model neuron hardware implementation was completed in Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA). The neuron implemented in FPGA was stimulated by different types of current, the action potential response characteristics were analyzed, and the correlation coefficient between numerical simulation result and hardware implementation result were calculated. The results showed that neuronal action potential response of FPGA was highly consistent with numerical simulation result. This work lays the foundation for hardware implementation of neural network. PMID:27079105

  10. Ventricular filling slows epicardial conduction and increases action potential duration in an optical mapping study of the isolated rabbit heart

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sung, Derrick; Mills, Robert W.; Schettler, Jan; Narayan, Sanjiv M.; Omens, Jeffrey H.; McCulloch, Andrew D.; McCullough, A. D. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Mechanical stimulation can induce electrophysiologic changes in cardiac myocytes, but how mechanoelectric feedback in the intact heart affects action potential propagation remains unclear. METHODS AND RESULTS: Changes in action potential propagation and repolarization with increased left ventricular end-diastolic pressure from 0 to 30 mmHg were investigated using optical mapping in isolated perfused rabbit hearts. With respect to 0 mmHg, epicardial strain at 30 mmHg in the anterior left ventricle averaged 0.040 +/- 0.004 in the muscle fiber direction and 0.032 +/- 0.006 in the cross-fiber direction. An increase in ventricular loading increased average epicardial activation time by 25%+/- 3% (P < 0.0001) and correspondingly decreased average apparent surface conduction velocity by 16%+/- 7% (P = 0.007). Ventricular loading did not significantly alter action potential duration at 20% repolarization (APD20) but did at 80% repolarization (APD80), from 179 +/- 7 msec to 207 +/- 5 msec (P < 0.0001). The dispersion of APD20 was decreased with loading from 19 +/- 2 msec to 13 +/- 2 msec (P = 0.024), whereas the dispersion of APD80 was not significantly changed. These electrophysiologic changes with ventricular loading were not affected by the nonspecific stretch-activated channel blocker streptomycin (200 microM) and were not attributable to changes in myocardial perfusion or the presence of an electromechanical decoupling agent (butanedione monoxime) during optical mapping. CONCLUSION: Acute loading of the left ventricle of the isolated rabbit heart decreased apparent epicardial conduction velocity and increased action potential duration by a load-dependent mechanism that may not involve stretch-activated channels.

  11. Morphological Characterization of the Action Potential Initiation Segment in GnRH Neuron Dendrites and Axons of Male Mice.

    PubMed

    Herde, Michel K; Herbison, Allan E

    2015-11-01

    GnRH neurons are the final output neurons of the hypothalamic network controlling fertility in mammals. In the present study, we used ankyrin G immunohistochemistry and neurobiotin filling of live GnRH neurons in brain slices from GnRH-green fluorescent protein transgenic male mice to examine in detail the location of action potential initiation in GnRH neurons with somata residing at different locations in the basal forebrain. We found that the vast majority of GnRH neurons are bipolar in morphology, elaborating a thick (primary) and thinner (secondary) dendrite from opposite poles of the soma. In addition, an axon-like process arising predominantly from a proximal dendrite was observed in a subpopulation of GnRH neurons. Ankyrin G immunohistochemistry revealed the presence of a single action potential initiation zone ∼27 μm in length primarily in the secondary dendrite of GnRH neurons and located 30 to 140 μm distant from the cell soma, depending on the type of process and location of the cell body. In addition to dendrites, the GnRH neurons with cell bodies located close to hypothalamic circumventricular organs often elaborated ankyrin G-positive axon-like structures. Almost all GnRH neurons (>90%) had their action potential initiation site in a process that initially, or ultimately after a hairpin loop, was coursing in the direction of the median eminence. These studies indicate that action potentials are initiated in different dendritic and axonal compartments of the GnRH neuron in a manner that is dependent partly on the neuroanatomical location of the cell body.