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Sample records for action potential stimulation

  1. Chronic network stimulation enhances evoked action potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ide, A. N.; Andruska, A.; Boehler, M.; Wheeler, B. C.; Brewer, G. J.

    2010-02-01

    Neurons cultured on multielectrode arrays almost always lack external stimulation except during the acute experimental phase. We have investigated the effects of chronic stimulation during the course of development in cultured hippocampal neural networks by applying paired pulses at half of the electrodes for 0, 1 or 3 r/day for 8 days. Spike latencies increased from 4 to 16 ms as the distance from the stimulus increased from 200 to 1700 µm, suggesting an average of four synapses over this distance. Compared to no chronic stimulation, our results indicate that chronic stimulation increased evoked spike counts per stimulus by 50% at recording sites near the stimulating electrode and increased the instantaneous firing rate. On trials where both pulses elicited responses, spike count was 40-80% higher than when only one of the pulses elicited a response. In attempts to identify spike amplitude plasticity, we found mainly amplitude variation with different latencies suggesting recordings from neurons with different identities. These data suggest plastic network changes induced by chronic stimulation that enhance the reliability of information transmission and the efficiency of multisynaptic network communication.

  2. Alteration of neural action potential patterns by axonal stimulation: the importance of stimulus location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crago, Patrick E.; Makowski, Nathaniel S.

    2014-10-01

    Objective. Stimulation of peripheral nerves is often superimposed on ongoing motor and sensory activity in the same axons, without a quantitative model of the net action potential train at the axon endpoint. Approach. We develop a model of action potential patterns elicited by superimposing constant frequency axonal stimulation on the action potentials arriving from a physiologically activated neural source. The model includes interactions due to collision block, resetting of the neural impulse generator, and the refractory period of the axon at the point of stimulation. Main results. Both the mean endpoint firing rate and the probability distribution of the action potential firing periods depend strongly on the relative firing rates of the two sources and the intersite conduction time between them. When the stimulus rate exceeds the neural rate, neural action potentials do not reach the endpoint and the rate of endpoint action potentials is the same as the stimulus rate, regardless of the intersite conduction time. However, when the stimulus rate is less than the neural rate, and the intersite conduction time is short, the two rates partially sum. Increases in stimulus rate produce non-monotonic increases in endpoint rate and continuously increasing block of neurally generated action potentials. Rate summation is reduced and more neural action potentials are blocked as the intersite conduction time increases. At long intersite conduction times, the endpoint rate simplifies to being the maximum of either the neural or the stimulus rate. Significance. This study highlights the potential of increasing the endpoint action potential rate and preserving neural information transmission by low rate stimulation with short intersite conduction times. Intersite conduction times can be decreased with proximal stimulation sites for muscles and distal stimulation sites for sensory endings. The model provides a basis for optimizing experiments and designing neuroprosthetic

  3. Alteration of neural action potential patterns by axonal stimulation: the importance of stimulus location

    PubMed Central

    Crago, Patrick E; Makowski, Nathan S

    2014-01-01

    Objective Stimulation of peripheral nerves is often superimposed on ongoing motor and sensory activity in the same axons, without a quantitative model of the net action potential train at the axon endpoint. Approach We develop a model of action potential patterns elicited by superimposing constant frequency axonal stimulation on the action potentials arriving from a physiologically activated neural source. The model includes interactions due to collision block, resetting of the neural impulse generator, and the refractory period of the axon at the point of stimulation. Main Results Both the mean endpoint firing rate and the probability distribution of the action potential firing periods depend strongly on the relative firing rates of the two sources and the intersite conduction time between them. When the stimulus rate exceeds the neural rate, neural action potentials do not reach the endpoint and the rate of endpoint action potentials is the same as the stimulus rate, regardless of the intersite conduction time. However, when the stimulus rate is less than the neural rate, and the intersite conduction time is short, the two rates partially sum. Increases in stimulus rate produce non-monotonic increases in endpoint rate and continuously increasing block of neurally generated action potentials. Rate summation is reduced and more neural action potentials are blocked as the intersite conduction time increases.. At long intersite conduction times, the endpoint rate simplifies to being the maximum of either the neural or the stimulus rate. Significance This study highlights the potential of increasing the endpoint action potential rate and preserving neural information transmission by low rate stimulation with short intersite conduction times. Intersite conduction times can be decreased with proximal stimulation sites for muscles and distal stimulation sites for sensory endings. The model provides a basis for optimizing experiments and designing neuroprosthetic

  4. Epidermal laser stimulation of action potentials in the frog sciatic nerve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jindra, Nichole M.; Goddard, Douglas; Imholte, Michelle; Thomas, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Measurements of laser-stimulated action potentials in the sciatic nerve of leopard frogs (Rana pipiens) are made using two infrared lasers. The dorsal sides of the frog's hind limbs are exposed to short-pulsed 1540- and 1064-nm wavelengths at three separate spot sizes: 2, 3, and 4 mm. Energy density thresholds are determined for eliciting an action potential at each experimental condition. Results from these exposures show similar evoked potential thresholds for both wavelengths. The 2-mm-diam spot sizes yield action potentials at radiant exposure levels almost double that seen with larger beam sizes.

  5. Naturalistic stimulation changes the dynamic response of action potential encoding in a mechanoreceptor

    PubMed Central

    Pfeiffer, Keram; French, Andrew S.

    2015-01-01

    Naturalistic signals were created from vibrations made by locusts walking on a Sansevieria plant. Both naturalistic and Gaussian noise signals were used to mechanically stimulate VS-3 slit-sense mechanoreceptor neurons of the spider, Cupiennius salei, with stimulus amplitudes adjusted to give similar firing rates for either stimulus. Intracellular microelectrodes recorded action potentials, receptor potential, and receptor current, using current clamp and voltage clamp. Frequency response analysis showed that naturalistic stimulation contained relatively more power at low frequencies, and caused increased neuronal sensitivity to higher frequencies. In contrast, varying the amplitude of Gaussian stimulation did not change neuronal dynamics. Naturalistic stimulation contained less entropy than Gaussian, but signal entropy was higher than stimulus in the resultant receptor current, indicating addition of uncorrelated noise during transduction. The presence of added noise was supported by measuring linear information capacity in the receptor current. Total entropy and information capacity in action potentials produced by either stimulus were much lower than in earlier stages, and limited to the maximum entropy of binary signals. We conclude that the dynamics of action potential encoding in VS-3 neurons are sensitive to the form of stimulation, but entropy and information capacity of action potentials are limited by firing rate. PMID:26578975

  6. Action potentials from ventricular mechanoreceptors stimulated by occlusion of the coronary sinus in the dog

    PubMed Central

    Muers, M. F.; Sleight, P.

    1972-01-01

    1. In experiments to determine the type of intra-cardiac receptors which cause the coronary sinus occlusion reflex, recordings were made from sixty-nine single and small multi-fibre preparations of cardiac vagal afferents in open-chest anaesthetized dogs. 2. Thirty-two fibres were stimulated by occlusion of the coronary sinus outflow through an indwelling Morawitz cannula. No receptors were stimulated during occlusions at peak systolic coronary venous pressures below the threshold for reflex cardiovascular depression. At higher pressures, fibre recruitment and further increases in stimulated discharge were demonstrated. 3. The afferent endings of twenty-nine of these fibres were mechanically localized to the epicardium and myocardium of the left ventricle. Three were in the right ventricle. Seventeen single fibres discharged spontaneously at an average of 0·9 impulses/sec. There was cardiac modulation of both resting and stimulated discharge, with most action potentials in systole. Seven of eight fibres conducted at less than 1·0 m/sec. 4. These ventricular receptors and a further twenty-two otherwise like them but not stimulated by occlusions were designated epi-myocardial receptors. 5. 73% of receptors were stimulated by intrapericardial nicotine (50-100 μg). Presumptively superficial receptors were more sensitive to this stimulus. 6. Epi-myocardial receptors were stimulated by intravenous or intracoronary catecholamines, by electrical stimulation of cardiac sympathetic nerves, and by eliciting the carotid sinus occlusion reflex. Aortic occlusion stimulated 66% of fibres tested, but was a less effective stimulus. After all these stimuli, there was a systolic modulation of discharge in more than 70% of fibres. 7. It was concluded that the epi-myocardial receptors are similar to those previously shown to cause the epicardial chemoreflex, and to participate in the coronary chemoreflex. It is suggested that they are responsive to systolic mechanical changes which

  7. The effect of stimulation frequency on the transmural ventricular monophasic action potential in yellowfin tuna Thunnus albacares.

    PubMed

    Patrick, S M; White, E; Brill, R W; Shiels, H A

    2011-02-01

    Monophasic action potentials (MAPs) were recorded from the spongy and compact layers of the yellowfin tuna Thunnus albacares ventricle as stimulation frequency was increased. MAP duration decreased with increase in stimulation frequency in both the spongy and compact myocardial layers, but no significant difference in MAP duration was observed between the layers. PMID:21284642

  8. Latencies in action potential stimulation in a two-dimensional bidomain: A numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barach, John Paul

    1991-05-01

    A numerical simulation is performed in which a uniform planar slab of idealized cardiac tissue is stimulated at the center. The cardiac slab is modeled as an anisotropic bidomain; within each domain current flow is determined by a forced diffusion equation in which the transmembrane current connecting the domains provides the forcing term. An action potential (AP) propagates outward after a time latency dependent upon the stimulus size and the physiological variables. Its isochrones are elliptical with an asymmetry that is a small fraction of the imposed asymmetry in resistivity. External voltages resemble the first derivative of those in the internal domain and tests with continuing stimuli exhibit a relaxation time of about 3 ms and space constants that agree with other work. The AP latency increases very strongly near threshold stimulus and decreases as the log (stimulus) for large stimuli in the ``virtual cathode'' range. Latencies in the longitudinal, transverse, and diagonal directions are found to be the same over a wide range of stimulus size and type.

  9. Beta-adrenergic stimulation reverses the I Kr-I Ks dominant pattern during cardiac action potential.

    PubMed

    Banyasz, Tamas; Jian, Zhong; Horvath, Balazs; Khabbaz, Shaden; Izu, Leighton T; Chen-Izu, Ye

    2014-11-01

    β-Adrenergic stimulation differentially modulates different K(+) channels and thus fine-tunes cardiac action potential (AP) repolarization. However, it remains unclear how the proportion of I Ks, I Kr, and I K1 currents in the same cell would be altered by β-adrenergic stimulation, which would change the relative contribution of individual K(+) current to the total repolarization reserve. In this study, we used an innovative AP-clamp sequential dissection technique to directly record the dynamic I Ks, I Kr, and I K1 currents during the AP in guinea pig ventricular myocytes under physiologically relevant conditions. Our data provide quantitative measures of the magnitude and time course of I Ks, I Kr, and I K1 currents in the same cell under its own steady-state AP, in a physiological milieu, and with preserved Ca(2+) homeostasis. We found that isoproterenol treatment significantly enhanced I Ks, moderately increased I K1, but slightly decreased I Kr in a dose-dependent manner. The dominance pattern of the K(+) currents was I Kr > I K1 > I Ks at the control condition, but reversed to I Kr < I K1 < I Ks following β-adrenergic stimulation. We systematically determined the changes in the relative contribution of I Ks, I Kr, and I K1 to cardiac repolarization during AP at different adrenergic states. In conclusion, the β-adrenergic stimulation fine-tunes the cardiac AP morphology by shifting the power of different K(+) currents in a dose-dependent manner. This knowledge is important for designing antiarrhythmic drug strategies to treat hearts exposed to various sympathetic tones.

  10. Low-intensity repetitive magnetic stimulation lowers action potential threshold and increases spike firing in layer 5 pyramidal neurons in vitro.

    PubMed

    Tang, Alexander D; Hong, Ivan; Boddington, Laura J; Garrett, Andrew R; Etherington, Sarah; Reynolds, John N J; Rodger, Jennifer

    2016-10-29

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) has become a popular method of modulating neural plasticity in humans. Clinically, rTMS is delivered at high intensities to modulate neuronal excitability. While the high-intensity magnetic field can be targeted to stimulate specific cortical regions, areas adjacent to the targeted area receive stimulation at a lower intensity and may contribute to the overall plasticity induced by rTMS. We have previously shown that low-intensity rTMS induces molecular and structural plasticity in vivo, but the effects on membrane properties and neural excitability have not been investigated. Here we investigated the acute effect of low-intensity repetitive magnetic stimulation (LI-rMS) on neuronal excitability and potential changes on the passive and active electrophysiological properties of layer 5 pyramidal neurons in vitro. Whole-cell current clamp recordings were made at baseline prior to subthreshold LI-rMS (600 pulses of iTBS, n=9 cells from 7 animals) or sham (n=10 cells from 9 animals), immediately after stimulation, as well as 10 and 20min post-stimulation. Our results show that LI-rMS does not alter passive membrane properties (resting membrane potential and input resistance) but hyperpolarises action potential threshold and increases evoked spike-firing frequency. Increases in spike firing frequency were present throughout the 20min post-stimulation whereas action potential (AP) threshold hyperpolarization was present immediately after stimulation and at 20min post-stimulation. These results provide evidence that LI-rMS alters neuronal excitability of excitatory neurons. We suggest that regions outside the targeted region of high-intensity rTMS are susceptible to neuromodulation and may contribute to rTMS-induced plasticity. PMID:27568058

  11. Sustained Exocytosis after Action Potential-Like Stimulation at Low Frequencies in Mouse Chromaffin Cells Depends on a Dynamin-Dependent Fast Endocytotic Process.

    PubMed

    Moya-Díaz, José; Álvarez, Yanina D; Montenegro, Mauricio; Bayonés, Lucas; Belingheri, Ana V; González-Jamett, Arlek M; Cárdenas, Ana M; Marengo, Fernando D

    2016-01-01

    Under basal conditions the action potential firing rate of adrenal chromaffin cells is lower than 0.5 Hz. The maintenance of the secretory response at such frequencies requires a continuous replenishment of releasable vesicles. However, the mechanism that allows such vesicle replenishment remains unclear. Here, using membrane capacitance measurements on mouse chromaffin cells, we studied the mechanism of replenishment of a group of vesicles released by a single action potential-like stimulus (APls). The exocytosis triggered by APls (ETAP) represents a fraction (40%) of the immediately releasable pool, a group of vesicles highly coupled to voltage dependent calcium channels. ETAP was replenished with a time constant of 0.73 ± 0.11 s, fast enough to maintain synchronous exocytosis at 0.2-0.5 Hz stimulation. Regarding the mechanism involved in rapid ETAP replenishment, we found that it depends on the ready releasable pool; indeed depletion of this vesicle pool significantly delays ETAP replenishment. On the other hand, ETAP replenishment also correlates with a dynamin-dependent fast endocytosis process (τ = 0.53 ± 0.01 s). In this regard, disruption of dynamin function markedly inhibits the fast endocytosis and delays ETAP replenishment, but also significantly decreases the synchronous exocytosis during repetitive APls stimulation at low frequencies (0.2 and 0.5 Hz). Considering these findings, we propose a model in where both the transfer of vesicles from ready releasable pool and fast endocytosis allow rapid ETAP replenishment during low stimulation frequencies.

  12. Sustained Exocytosis after Action Potential-Like Stimulation at Low Frequencies in Mouse Chromaffin Cells Depends on a Dynamin-Dependent Fast Endocytotic Process

    PubMed Central

    Moya-Díaz, José; Álvarez, Yanina D.; Montenegro, Mauricio; Bayonés, Lucas; Belingheri, Ana V.; González-Jamett, Arlek M.; Cárdenas, Ana M.; Marengo, Fernando D.

    2016-01-01

    Under basal conditions the action potential firing rate of adrenal chromaffin cells is lower than 0.5 Hz. The maintenance of the secretory response at such frequencies requires a continuous replenishment of releasable vesicles. However, the mechanism that allows such vesicle replenishment remains unclear. Here, using membrane capacitance measurements on mouse chromaffin cells, we studied the mechanism of replenishment of a group of vesicles released by a single action potential-like stimulus (APls). The exocytosis triggered by APls (ETAP) represents a fraction (40%) of the immediately releasable pool, a group of vesicles highly coupled to voltage dependent calcium channels. ETAP was replenished with a time constant of 0.73 ± 0.11 s, fast enough to maintain synchronous exocytosis at 0.2–0.5 Hz stimulation. Regarding the mechanism involved in rapid ETAP replenishment, we found that it depends on the ready releasable pool; indeed depletion of this vesicle pool significantly delays ETAP replenishment. On the other hand, ETAP replenishment also correlates with a dynamin-dependent fast endocytosis process (τ = 0.53 ± 0.01 s). In this regard, disruption of dynamin function markedly inhibits the fast endocytosis and delays ETAP replenishment, but also significantly decreases the synchronous exocytosis during repetitive APls stimulation at low frequencies (0.2 and 0.5 Hz). Considering these findings, we propose a model in where both the transfer of vesicles from ready releasable pool and fast endocytosis allow rapid ETAP replenishment during low stimulation frequencies. PMID:27507935

  13. Sustained Exocytosis after Action Potential-Like Stimulation at Low Frequencies in Mouse Chromaffin Cells Depends on a Dynamin-Dependent Fast Endocytotic Process.

    PubMed

    Moya-Díaz, José; Álvarez, Yanina D; Montenegro, Mauricio; Bayonés, Lucas; Belingheri, Ana V; González-Jamett, Arlek M; Cárdenas, Ana M; Marengo, Fernando D

    2016-01-01

    Under basal conditions the action potential firing rate of adrenal chromaffin cells is lower than 0.5 Hz. The maintenance of the secretory response at such frequencies requires a continuous replenishment of releasable vesicles. However, the mechanism that allows such vesicle replenishment remains unclear. Here, using membrane capacitance measurements on mouse chromaffin cells, we studied the mechanism of replenishment of a group of vesicles released by a single action potential-like stimulus (APls). The exocytosis triggered by APls (ETAP) represents a fraction (40%) of the immediately releasable pool, a group of vesicles highly coupled to voltage dependent calcium channels. ETAP was replenished with a time constant of 0.73 ± 0.11 s, fast enough to maintain synchronous exocytosis at 0.2-0.5 Hz stimulation. Regarding the mechanism involved in rapid ETAP replenishment, we found that it depends on the ready releasable pool; indeed depletion of this vesicle pool significantly delays ETAP replenishment. On the other hand, ETAP replenishment also correlates with a dynamin-dependent fast endocytosis process (τ = 0.53 ± 0.01 s). In this regard, disruption of dynamin function markedly inhibits the fast endocytosis and delays ETAP replenishment, but also significantly decreases the synchronous exocytosis during repetitive APls stimulation at low frequencies (0.2 and 0.5 Hz). Considering these findings, we propose a model in where both the transfer of vesicles from ready releasable pool and fast endocytosis allow rapid ETAP replenishment during low stimulation frequencies. PMID:27507935

  14. Cardiac action potential imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Qinghai; Lipp, Peter; Kaestner, Lars

    2013-06-01

    Action potentials in cardiac myocytes have durations in the order of magnitude of 100 milliseconds. In biomedical investigations the documentation of the occurrence of action potentials is often not sufficient, but a recording of the shape of an action potential allows a functional estimation of several molecular players. Therefore a temporal resolution of around 500 images per second is compulsory. In the past such measurements have been performed with photometric approaches limiting the measurement to one cell at a time. In contrast, imaging allows reading out several cells at a time with additional spatial information. Recent developments in camera technologies allow the acquisition with the required speed and sensitivity. We performed action potential imaging on isolated adult cardiomyocytes of guinea pigs utilizing the fluorescent membrane potential sensor di-8-ANEPPS and latest electron-multiplication CCD as well as scientific CMOS cameras of several manufacturers. Furthermore, we characterized the signal to noise ratio of action potential signals of varying sets of cameras, dye concentrations and objective lenses. We ensured that di-8-ANEPPS itself did not alter action potentials by avoiding concentrations above 5 μM. Based on these results we can conclude that imaging is a reliable method to read out action potentials. Compared to conventional current-clamp experiments, this optical approach allows a much higher throughput and due to its contact free concept leaving the cell to a much higher degree undisturbed. Action potential imaging based on isolated adult cardiomyocytes can be utilized in pharmacological cardiac safety screens bearing numerous advantages over approaches based on heterologous expression of hERG channels in cell lines.

  15. [Stimulation of gastric mucosa afferents by phenylephrine potentiates anticonvulsive and eliminates sedative action of sodium valproate in the pentylenetetrazol kindling model in rats].

    PubMed

    Serdiuk, S E; Gmiro, V E; Veselkina, O S

    2014-01-01

    Sodium valproate after chronic intragastric administration in the high dose of 100-200 mg/kg eliminates generalized clonic-tonic pentylenetetrazol seizures in 100 % of rats, but only in 33-57 % of rats it prevents local clonic kindling seizures. Strong sedation is induced by the specified doses of sodium valproate. The combined oral chronic administration of phenylephrine in threshold, noneffective alone dose of 0.2 mg/kg and sodium valproate in high doses of 100 mg/kg and 200 mg/kg potentiates anticonvulsive action of sodium valproate, because prevents both clonic-tonic kindling. seizures in 100 % of rats and clonic kindling seizures in 86-100 % of rats, and also it increases in 1.7-1.9 times anticonvulsive activity of valproate. The specified combinations of sodium valproate with phenylephrine do not produce the sedative side effect. The basis of the mechanism of potentiation of anticonvulsive action and elimination of sedative action of sodium valproate in high doses is the stimulation of gastric mucosa afferents by phenylephrine.

  16. Interactive effect of beta-adrenergic stimulation and mechanical stretch on low-frequency oscillations of ventricular action potential duration in humans.

    PubMed

    Pueyo, Esther; Orini, Michele; Rodríguez, José F; Taggart, Peter

    2016-08-01

    Ventricular repolarization dynamics are crucial to arrhythmogenesis. Low-frequency oscillations of repolarization have recently been reported in humans and the magnitude of these oscillations proposed to be a strong predictor of sudden cardiac death. Available evidence suggests a role of the sympathetic nervous system. We have used biophysically detailed models integrating ventricular electrophysiology, calcium dynamics, mechanics and β-adrenergic signaling to investigate the underlying mechanisms. The main results were: (1) Phasic beta-adrenergic stimulation (β-AS) at a Mayer wave frequency between 0.03 and 0.15Hz resulted in a gradual decrease of action potential (AP) duration (APD) with concomitant small APD oscillations. (2) After 3-4minutes of phasic β-AS, the mean APD adapted and oscillations of APD became apparent. (3) Phasic changes in haemodynamic loading at the same Mayer wave frequency (a known accompaniment of enhanced sympathetic nerve activity), simulated as variations in the sarcomere length, also induced APD oscillations. (4) The effect of phasic β-AS and haemodynamic loading on the magnitude of APD oscillations was synergistic. (5) The presence of calcium overload and reduced repolarization reserve further enhanced the magnitude of APD oscillations and was accompanied by afterdepolarizations and/or spontaneous APs. In conclusion, low-frequency oscillations of repolarization recently reported in humans were induced by phasic β-AS and phasic mechanical loading, which acted synergistically, and were greatly enhanced by disease-associated conditions, leading to arrhythmogenic events. PMID:27178727

  17. Action potential in charophytes.

    PubMed

    Beilby, Mary Jane

    2007-01-01

    The plant action potential (AP) has been studied for more than half a century. The experimental system was provided mainly by the large charophyte cells, which allowed insertion of early large electrodes, manipulation of cell compartments, and inside and outside media. These early experiments were inspired by the Hodgkin and Huxley (HH) work on the squid axon and its voltage clamp techniques. Later, the patch clamping technique provided information about the ion transporters underlying the excitation transient. The initial models were also influenced by the HH picture of the animal AP. At the turn of the century, the paradigm of the charophyte AP shifted to include several chemical reactions, second messenger-activated channel, and calcium ion liberation from internal stores. Many aspects of this new model await further clarification. The role of the AP in plant movements, wound signaling, and turgor regulation is now well documented. Involvement in invasion by pathogens, chilling injury, light, and gravity sensing are under investigation.

  18. Effects of mexiletine on transmembrane action potentials as affected by external potassium concentration and by rate of stimulation in guinea-pig papillary muscles.

    PubMed

    Sada, H; Ban, T; Oshita, S

    1980-11-01

    1. The effects of mexiletine and quinidine were compared on transmembrane potentials in guinea-pig papillary muscles, using conventional microelectrode techniques. 2. Mexiletine (23.1 mumol/l) decreased the maximum rate of rise of the action potential (Vmax) and increased the ratio of the effective refractory period to the action potential duration at 90% repolarization level (ERP/APD90); these effects were prominent with elevation of the external potassium concentration ([K]o) from 2.7 to 5.4, 8.1 and 10.0 mmol/l. 3. The percentage decrease in Vmax induced by 5 and 10 mumol/l of quinidine was approximately constant in 2.7, 5.4 and 10.0 mmol/l [K]o solutions. 4. The decrease in Vmax produced by mexiletine was progressively increased as the driving rate was raised from 0.25 to 5Hz. This rate-dependent change was pronounced when the concentration was raised from 23.1 to 46.2 and 92.4 mumol/l. 5. Mexiletine in concentrations of 23.1 and 92.4 mumol/l delayed the recovery of Vmax in a premature action potential to the level of Vmax in the conditioning action potentials at the driving rate of 0.25 Hz. 6. It appears that mexiletine exerts its anti-arrhythmic action by a selective depressant effect on depolarized cells (high [K]0) and cells with high frequency discharges, as is the case with lignocaine.

  19. Screening Action Potentials: The Power of Light

    PubMed Central

    Kaestner, Lars; Lipp, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Action potentials reflect the concerted activity of all electrogenic constituents in the plasma membrane during the excitation of a cell. Therefore, the action potential is an integrated read out and a promising parameter to detect electrophysiological failures or modifications thereof in diagnosis as well as in drug screens. Cellular action potentials can be recorded by optical approaches. To fulfill the pre-requirements to scale up for, e.g., pharmacological screens the following preparatory work has to be provided: (i) model cells under investigation need to represent target cells in the best possible manner; (ii) optical sensors that can be either small molecule dyes or genetically encoded potential probes need to provide a reliable read out with minimal interaction with the naive behavior of the cells and (iii) devices need to be capable to stimulate the cells, read out the signals with the appropriate speed as well as provide the capacity for a sufficient throughput. Here we discuss several scenarios for all three categories in the field of cardiac physiology and pharmacology and provide a perspective to use the power of light in screening cardiac action potentials. PMID:21847381

  20. Action potential initiation and propagation in rat neocortical pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Stuart, G; Schiller, J; Sakmann, B

    1997-12-15

    1. Initiation and propagation of action potentials evoked by extracellular synaptic stimulation was studied using simultaneous dual and triple patch pipette recordings from different locations on neocortical layer 5 pyramidal neurons in brain slices from 4-week-old rats (P26-30) at physiological temperatures. 2. Simultaneous cell-attached and whole-cell voltage recordings from the apical trunk (up to 700 microns distal to the soma) and the soma indicated that proximal synaptic stimulation (layer 4) initiated action potentials first at the soma, whereas distal stimulation (upper layer 2/3) could initiate dendritic regenerative potentials prior to somatic action potentials following stimulation at higher intensity. 3. Somatic action potentials, once initiated, propagated back into the apical dendrites in a decremented manner which was frequency dependent. The half-width of back propagating action potentials increased and their maximum rate of rise decreased with distance from the soma, with the peak of these action potentials propagating with a conduction velocity of approximately 0.5 m s-1. 4. Back-propagation of action potentials into the dendritic tree was associated with dendritic calcium electrogenesis, which was particularly prominent during bursts of somatic action potentials. 5. When dendritic regenerative potentials were evoked prior to somatic action potentials, the more distal the dendritic recording was made from the soma the longer the time between the onset of the dendritic regenerative potential relative to somatic action potential. This suggested that dendritic regenerative potentials were initiated in the distal apical dendrites, possibly in the apical tuft. 6. At any one stimulus intensity, the initiation of dendritic regenerative potentials prior to somatic action potentials could fluctuate, and was modulated by depolarizing somatic or hyperpolarizing dendritic current injection. 7. Dendritic regenerative potentials could be initiated prior to

  1. The action potential of Dionaea muscipula Ellis.

    PubMed

    Hodick, D; Sievers, A

    1988-04-01

    The intention of this investigation was to acquire more concise information about the nature of the action potential of Dionaea muscipula Ellis and the different types of cells generating and conducting it. It is shown by microelectrode measurements that, besides the sensory cells, all the major tissues of the trap lobes are excitable, firing action potentials with pronounced after-hyperpolarizations. The action potentials are strictly dependent on Ca(2+). Their peak depolarizations are shifted 25-27 mV in a positive direction after a tenfold increase in external Ca(2+) concentration. Perfusions with 1 mM ethylene glycol-bis(β-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA) or 1 mM LaCl3 completely inhibit excitability. Magnesium ions only slightly affect the peak depolarizations but considerably prolong action potentials. Sodium azide and 2,4-dinitrophenol also abolish excitation, probably by reducing the intracellular ATP concentration. Furthermore, it is tested whether the sensory cells can be distinguished from the other cells of the trap by their electrical behaviour. The resting potentials of sensory cells (-161±7 mV) and mesophyll cells (-155±8 mV) are of the same magnitude. Changes in external ion concentrations affect resting and action potentials in both cell types in a similar way. Additional freeze-fracture studies of both cell types reveal similar numbers and distributions of intramembrane particles on the fracture faces of the plasma membrane, which is most likely the mechanosensor. These findings stress the view that the high mechanosensitivity of the sensory hair results from its anatomy and not from a specialized perception mechanism. It is proposed that trap closure is triggered by a rise in the cytoplasmic concentration of Ca(2+) or a Ca(2+)-activated regulatory complex, which must exceed a threshold concentration. Since the Ca(2+) influx during a single action potential does not suffice to reach this threshold, at least two stimulations

  2. STIMULANT ACTIONS OF VOLATILE ANAESTHETICS ON SMOOTH MUSCLE.

    PubMed

    RANG, H P

    1964-04-01

    A number of volatile anaesthetics, and some compounds synthesized in the search for new anaesthetics, have been tested on guinea-pig intestinal smooth muscle in vitro. All the compounds produced a contractile response. This effect did not correlate well with convulsant activity in vivo among the compounds tested. Two kinds of stimulant effect were distinguishable: (1) Rapid, transient contractions, abolished by cocaine or lachesine; most of the anaesthetics in clinical use had this action. (2) Slow, sustained contractions, unaffected by cocaine or lachesine; this effect predominated among the fluorinated ring compounds. Hexamethonium and mepyramine did not affect the contractile response to any of the compounds. The first type of effect presumably represents excitation of postganglionic nerve cells, while the second type is a direct action on the muscle cell. The action of perfluorobenzene, which is of the latter kind, was studied further. Adrenaline and lack of calcium diminished the contraction in parallel with the contraction to histamine, which suggests that the cell membrane was the site of action; in contrast to the stimulant action of histamine or acetylcholine, the effect was highly temperature-sensitive, being almost abolished by cooling to 32 degrees C, and enhanced at 40 degrees C. The depressant action of anaesthetics on smooth muscle is affected very little by temperature changes. These findings are discussed in relation to other observations which suggest a stimulant action of volatile anaesthetics on excitable tissues. Protein denaturation is tentatively suggested as a mechanism of action.

  3. Caloric vestibular stimulation modulates nociceptive evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Ferrè, Elisa Raffaella; Haggard, Patrick; Bottini, Gabriella; Iannetti, Gian Domenico

    2015-12-01

    Vestibular stimulation has been reported to alleviate central pain. Clinical and physiological studies confirm pervasive interactions between vestibular signals and somatosensory circuits, including nociception. However, the neural mechanisms underlying vestibular-induced analgesia remain unclear, and previous clinical studies cannot rule out explanations based on alternative, non-specific effects such as distraction or placebo. To investigate how vestibular inputs influence nociception, we combined caloric vestibular stimulation (CVS) with psychophysical and electrocortical responses elicited by nociceptive-specific laser stimulation in humans (laser-evoked potentials, LEPs). Cold water CVS applied to the left ear resulted in significantly lower subjective pain intensity for experimental laser pain to the left hand immediately after CVS, relative both to before CVS and to 1 h after CVS. This transient reduction in pain perception was associated with reduced amplitude of all LEP components, including the early N1 wave reflecting the first arrival of nociceptive input to primary somatosensory cortex. We conclude that cold left ear CVS elicits a modulation of both nociceptive processing and pain perception. The analgesic effect induced by CVS could be mediated either by subcortical gating of the ascending nociceptive input, or by direct modulation of the primary somatosensory cortex.

  4. Stimulation of Tissue Healing by Ultrasound: Physical Mechanisms of Action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, O.; Chong, J.; Monreal, R.

    2004-09-01

    Even though the use of ultrasound in medicine is better known by its results in diagnostic procedures, the employ of this type of mechanical energy with therapeutic purposes is been used in new and impressive applications. To obtain or to improve tissue healing in many ailments it is used a lot of approaches, from the employ of antibiotics when it is considered by the presence of an infection in the wound, to several types of physical stimulation. One of them is ultrasound. This paper consider some of the most important mechanisms of action of ultrasound in tissue that can be related whit the repair processes and specifies levels of activation of many paths of action. Especial emphasis has received the stimulation of bone repair by ultrasound.

  5. Insulin antagonizes the phagocytosis stimulating action of histamine in Tetrahymena.

    PubMed

    Csaba, G; Darvas, Z

    1992-02-01

    Histamine increased specifically the phagocytic activity of the unicellular Tetrahymena, whereas insulin had no influence on it. Insulin antagonized the phagocytosis stimulating action of histamine after simultaneous exposure and after preexposure two days earlier as well, although in the latter case to a lesser degree. Double exposure to a combination of histamine+insulin didn't influence the phagocytic activity at all, demonstrating the histamine antagonizing effect of insulin in this model.

  6. Effect of tactile stimulation on primary motor cortex excitability during action observation combined with motor imagery.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Megumi; Kubota, Shinji; Onmyoji, Yusuke; Hirano, Masato; Uehara, Kazumasa; Morishita, Takuya; Funase, Kozo

    2015-07-23

    We aimed to investigate the effects of the tactile stimulation to an observer's fingertips at the moment that they saw an object being pinched by another person on the excitability of observer's primary motor cortex (M1) using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). In addition, the above effects were also examined during action observation combined with the motor imagery. Motor evoked potentials (MEP) were evoked from the subjects' right first dorsal interosseous (FDI) and abductor digiti minimi (ADM) muscles. Electrical stimulation (ES) inducing tactile sensation was delivered to the subjects' first and second fingertips at the moment of pinching action performed by another person. Although neither the ES nor action observation alone had significant effects on the MEP amplitude of the FDI or ADM, the FDI MEP amplitude which acts as the prime mover during pinching was reduced when ES and action observation were combined; however, no such changes were seen in the ADM. Conversely, that reduced FDI MEP amplitude was increased during the motor imagery. These results indicated that the M1 excitability during the action observation of pinching action combined with motor imagery could be enhanced by the tactile stimulation delivered to the observer's fingertips at the moment corresponding to the pinching being observed.

  7. The facilitation of motor actions by acoustic and electric stimulation.

    PubMed

    Marinovic, Welber; Milford, Magdalene; Carroll, Timothy; Riek, Stephan

    2015-12-01

    The presentation of a loud acoustic stimulus during the preparation of motor actions can both speed movement initiation and increase response vigor. Several recent studies have explored this phenomenon as a means to investigate the mechanisms and neural correlates of movement preparation. Here, we sought to determine the generality of this effect across sensory modalities, and in particular whether unexpected somatosensory stimulation can facilitate movements in a manner similar to loud sounds. We show that electric and acoustic stimuli can be similarly effective in inducing the early release of motor actions, in both reaction time and anticipatory timing tasks. Consistent with recent response activation models of motor preparation, we also demonstrate that increasing the intensity of electric stimuli induces both progressive decreases in reaction time and increases in response vigor. Additionally, we show that the early release of motor actions can be induced by electric stimuli targeting predominantly either muscle afferents or skin afferents. Finally, we show that simultaneous acoustic and electric stimulation leads to earlier releases of anticipatory actions than either unimodal stimulus. These findings may lead to new avenues for experimental and clinical exploitation of the effects of accessory sensory information on movement preparation and initiation. PMID:26338375

  8. Stimulation, Recording Potential and Antimicrobial Medical Catheter Coatings

    PubMed Central

    Beard, Richard B.; DeLaurent, Mark; Pourrezaei, Kambiz; Adrian, Sorin

    1994-01-01

    Biocompatibility of electrodes for stimulation are difficult to maintain homeostasis. Noble metal stimulating electrodes which are normally biocompatible on keratinized tissue become very non-biocompatible when they are interfaced with nonkeratinized tissue in an area such as the oral cavity. Composite electrodes have been made biocompatible in the oral cavity even at current densities larger than 1 μA/mm2. Electrodes used in potential readings require that the anodic and cathodic polarization remain minimal. Silver-silver chloride electrodes are minimal. Silver-silver chloride electrodes are not always reversible. The range of pH, voltages and current densities when silver-silver chloride are not reversible are presented. Recently at Drexel University reliable silver coatings inside and outside of medical catheters have been fabricated to act as antimicrobial to a variety of bacteria. Noble and nonnoble metals have been combined in coatings with silver to enhance the antimicrobial action. PMID:18476262

  9. Characteristics of cardiac action potentials in marsupials.

    PubMed

    Campbell, T J

    1989-01-01

    Standard microelectrode techniques were used to record action potentials from single atrial, ventricular and Purkinje fibers of hearts taken from three species of marsupial (Macropus rufus, Macropus robustus and Macropus eugenii) and from dogs, sheep and guinea-pigs. The major electrophysiological parameters of marsupial potentials were qualitatively similar to the values for placental mammals. The grouped data for ventricular action potentials from studies on 6 adult male red kangaroos (Macropus rufus) were (mean +/- SD): Resting potential -69.5 +/- 5.0 mV; action potential amplitude 92.7 +/- 5.7 mV; action potential duration (to 90% repolarization): 182.5 +/- 17.5 ms; maximum rate of depolarization: 196.5 +/- 80.1 V/s. The major point of difference was the short duration of the red kangaroo ventricular action potential compared to those of the placental mammals, and compared to atrial cells from the kangaroos. It is suggested that this explains the short QT interval reported by others for kangaroo electrocardiograms, and that it may also be implicated in the high frequency of sudden death previously noted in these animals.

  10. Electrotonic and action potentials in the Venus flytrap.

    PubMed

    Volkov, Alexander G; Vilfranc, Chrystelle L; Murphy, Veronica A; Mitchell, Colee M; Volkova, Maia I; O'Neal, Lawrence; Markin, Vladislav S

    2013-06-15

    The electrical phenomena and morphing structures in the Venus flytrap have attracted researchers since the nineteenth century. We have observed that mechanical stimulation of trigger hairs on the lobes of the Venus flytrap induces electrotonic potentials in the lower leaf. Electrostimulation of electrical circuits in the Venus flytrap can induce electrotonic potentials propagating along the upper and lower leaves. The instantaneous increase or decrease in voltage of stimulating potential generates a nonlinear electrical response in plant tissues. Any electrostimulation that is not instantaneous, such as sinusoidal or triangular functions, results in linear responses in the form of small electrotonic potentials. The amplitude and sign of electrotonic potentials depend on the polarity and the amplitude of the applied voltage. Electrical stimulation of the lower leaf induces electrical signals, which resemble action potentials, in the trap between the lobes and the midrib. The trap closes if the stimulating voltage is above the threshold level of 4.4V. Electrical responses in the Venus flytrap were analyzed and reproduced in the discrete electrical circuit. The information gained from this study can be used to elucidate the coupling of intracellular and intercellular communications in the form of electrical signals within plants.

  11. Responses of the human motor system to observing actions across species: A transcranial magnetic stimulation study.

    PubMed

    White, Nicole C; Reid, Connor; Welsh, Timothy N

    2014-10-22

    Ample evidence suggests that the role of the mirror neuron system (MNS) in monkeys is to represent the meaning of actions. The MNS becomes active in monkeys during execution, observation, and auditory experience of meaningful, object-oriented actions, suggesting that these cells represent the same action based on a variety of cues. The present study sought to determine whether the human motor system, part of the putative human MNS, similarly represents and reflects the meaning of actions rather than simply the mechanics of the actions. To this end, transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of primary motor cortex was used to generate motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) from muscles involved in grasping while participants viewed object-oriented grasping actions performed by either a human, an elephant, a rat, or a body-less robotic arm. The analysis of MEP amplitudes suggested that activity in primary motor cortex during action observation was greatest during observation of the grasping actions of the rat and elephant, and smallest for the human and robotic arm. Based on these data, we conclude that the human action observation system can represent actions executed by non-human animals and shows sensitivity to species-specific differences in action mechanics. PMID:25463135

  12. Measurement of evoked potentials during thalamic deep brain stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Kent, Alexander R.; Swan, Brandon D.; Brocker, David T.; Turner, Dennis A.; Gross, Robert E.; Grill, Warren M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Deep brain stimulation (DBS) treats the symptoms of several movement disorders, but optimal selection of stimulation parameters remains a challenge. The evoked compound action potential (ECAP) reflects synchronized neural activation near the DBS lead, and may be useful for feedback control and automatic adjustment of stimulation parameters in closed-loop DBS systems. Objectives Determine the feasibility of recording ECAPs in the clinical setting, understand the neural origin of the ECAP and sources of any stimulus artifact, and correlate ECAP characteristics with motor symptoms. Methods The ECAP and tremor response were measured simultaneously during intraoperative studies of thalamic DBS, conducted in patients who were either undergoing surgery for initial lead implantation or replacement of their internal pulse generator. Results There was large subject-to-subject variation in stimulus artifact amplitude, which model-based analysis suggested may have been caused by glial encapsulation of the lead, resulting in imbalances in the tissue impedance between the contacts. ECAP recordings obtained from both acute and chronically implanted electrodes revealed that specific phase characteristics of the signal varied systematically with stimulation parameters. Further, a trend was observed in some patients between the energy of the initial negative and positive ECAP phases, as well as secondary phases, and changes in tremor from baseline. A computational model of thalamic DBS indicated that direct cerebellothalamic fiber activation dominated the clinically measured ECAP, suggesting that excitation of these fibers is critical in DBS therapy. Conclusions This work demonstrated that ECAPs can be recorded in the clinical setting and may provide a surrogate feedback control signal for automatic adjustment of stimulation parameters to reduce tremor amplitude. PMID:25457213

  13. Correlation of action potentials in adjacent neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shneider, M. N.; Pekker, M.

    2015-12-01

    A possible mechanism for the synchronization of action potential propagation along a bundle of neurons (ephaptic coupling) is considered. It is shown that this mechanism is similar to the salutatory conduction of the action potential between the nodes of Ranvier in myelinated axons. The proposed model allows us to estimate the scale of the correlation, i.e., the distance between neurons in the nervous tissue, wherein their synchronization becomes possible. The possibility for experimental verification of the proposed model of synchronization is discussed.

  14. Introducing the Action Potential to Psychology Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon-Dack, Stephanie L.

    2014-01-01

    For this simple active learning technique for teaching, students are assigned "roles" and act out the process of the action potential (AP), including the firing threshold, ion-specific channels for ions to enter and leave the cell, diffusion, and the refractory period. Pre-post test results indicated that students demonstrated increased…

  15. Neural origin of evoked potentials during thalamic deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Kent, Alexander R; Grill, Warren M

    2013-08-01

    Closed-loop deep brain stimulation (DBS) systems could provide automatic adjustment of stimulation parameters and improve outcomes in the treatment of Parkinson's disease and essential tremor. The evoked compound action potential (ECAP), generated by activated neurons near the DBS electrode, may provide a suitable feedback control signal for closed-loop DBS. The objectives of this work were to characterize the ECAP across stimulation parameters and determine the neural elements contributing to the signal. We recorded ECAPs during thalamic DBS in anesthetized cats and conducted computer simulations to calculate the ECAP of a population of thalamic neurons. The experimental and computational ECAPs were similar in shape and had characteristics that were correlated across stimulation parameters (R(2) = 0.80-0.95, P < 0.002). The ECAP signal energy increased with larger DBS amplitudes (P < 0.0001) and pulse widths (P < 0.002), and the signal energy of secondary ECAP phases was larger at 10-Hz than at 100-Hz DBS (P < 0.002). The computational model indicated that these changes resulted from a greater extent of neural activation and an increased synchronization of postsynaptic thalamocortical activity, respectively. Administration of tetrodotoxin, lidocaine, or isoflurane abolished or reduced the magnitude of the experimental and computational ECAPs, glutamate receptor antagonists 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX) and D(-)-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (APV) reduced secondary ECAP phases by decreasing postsynaptic excitation, and the GABAA receptor agonist muscimol increased the latency of the secondary phases by augmenting postsynaptic hyperpolarization. This study demonstrates that the ECAP provides information about the type and extent of neural activation generated during DBS, and the ECAP may serve as a feedback control signal for closed-loop DBS.

  16. Dual actions of lysergic acid diethylamide tartrate (LSD), 2-bromo-D-lysergic acid diethylamide bitartrate (BOL) and methysergide on dorsal root potentials evoked by stimulation of raphe nuclei.

    PubMed

    Larson, A A; Chinn, C; Proudfit, H K; Anderson, E G

    1981-04-01

    A variety of drugs reported to antagonize serotonin were found to affect spinal cord potentials evoked by electrical stimulation of the caudal raphe nuclei of the cat. These brain stem-evoked dorsal root potentials (DRPs) consisted of a short latency depolarization (DRP-1), which was evoked by stimulation of a wide variety of sites in the medial brain stem and a long latency potential (DRP-2), which was elicited only when stimuli were applied near the raphe. The ability of serotonergic antagonists to increase or decrease these DRPs was dependent on the dose of the drug administered. High doses of lysergic acid diethylamide tartrate (LSD), 2-bromo-D-lysergic acid diethylamide bitartrate (BOL), methysergide and cinanserin each produced an immediate inhibition of DRP-2 and a simultaneous enhancement of DRP-1, both of which recovered by approximately 30 min. Each of the drugs produced a dose-related inhibition of DRP-2 at high doses, with LSD being the most potent and cinanserin the least potent. In contrast, low doses of LSD, BOL and methysergide elicited little or no immediate change in either DRP-2 or DRP-1, but produced an enhancement of DRP-2 which developed slowly over a period of 60 to 90 min. This increase in DRP-2 was most dramatic after administration of LSD and was not accompanied by changes in DRP-1. The inhibition of DRP-2 by high doses of LSD, BOL, methysergide and cinanserin may result primarily from inhibition of postsynaptic serotonergic receptors located on the primary afferent terminals. The increase in DRP-2 produced by low doses of LSD, BOL and methysergide is postulated to result from an interaction with receptors distinct from those which produced the inhibition of DRP-2 at higher doses.

  17. Evoked potentials and contingent negative variation during treatment of multiple sclerosis with spinal cord stimulation.

    PubMed Central

    Sedgwick, E M; Illis, L S; Tallis, R C; Thornton, A R; Abraham, P; El-Negamy, E; Docherty, T B; Soar, J S; Spencer, S C; Taylor, F M

    1980-01-01

    Cervical somatosensory evoked potentials, brainstem evoked potentials, visual evoked potentials, and the cerebral contingent negative variation were recorded in patients with definite multiple sclerosis before, during, and after spinal cord stimulation. Improvements were seen in the cervical somatosensory and brainstem evoked potentials but neither the visual evoked potential nor the contingent negative variation changed in association with spinal cord stimulation. The results indicate that spinal cord stimulation acts at spinal and brainstem levels and that the clinical improvements seen in patients are caused by an action at these levels rather than by any cerebral arousal or motivational effect. The evoked potentials were not useful in predicting which patients were likely to respond to stimulation. PMID:7354352

  18. Familiarity modulates motor activation while other species' actions are observed: a magnetic stimulation study.

    PubMed

    Amoruso, Lucia; Urgesi, Cosimo

    2016-03-01

    Observing other people's actions facilitates the observer's motor system as compared with observing the same individuals at rest. This motor activation is thought to result from mirror-like activity in fronto-parietal areas, which enhances the excitability of the primary motor cortex via cortico-cortical pathways. Although covert motor activation in response to observed actions has been widely investigated between conspecifics, how humans cope with other species' actions has received less attention. For example, it remains unclear whether the human motor system is activated by observing other species' actions, and whether prior familiarity with the non-conspecific agent modulates this activation. Here, we combined single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation and motor-evoked potential recording to explore the impact of familiarity on motor activation during the observation of non-conspecific actions. Videos displaying actions performed either by a conspecific (human) or by a non-conspecific (dog) were shown to individuals who had prior familiarity or no familiarity at all with the non-conspecific agent. We found that, whereas individuals with long-lasting familiarity showed similar levels of motor activation for human and canine actions, individuals who had no familiarity showed higher motor activation for human than for canine actions. These findings suggest that the human motor system is flexible enough to resonate with other species, and that familiarity plays a key role in tuning this ability. PMID:26666833

  19. Effects of troglitazone and pioglitazone on the action potentials and membrane currents of rabbit ventricular myocytes.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, S; Watanabe, T

    1998-09-18

    The effects of the antidiabetic thiazolidinediones troglitazone and pioglitazone on action potentials and membrane currents were studied in rabbit ventricular myocytes. Troglitazone (10 microM) reversibly reduced excitability of the myocytes and modified their action potential configuration. It significantly increased the stimulation threshold required to elicit action potentials and decreased action potential amplitude and the maximum upstroke velocity of the action potentials. The Inhibition of the maximum upstroke velocity by troglitazone was also significant at 1 microM. Voltage-clamp experiments revealed that troglitazone (10 microM) reversibly inhibited both the slow inward Ca2+ current and the steady-state K+ current. In contrast to troglitazone, pioglitazone (1-10 microM) had no significant effect on the excitability, action potential configuration, or membrane currents of myocytes. These results suggest that troglitazone, but not pioglitazone, modulates Na+, Ca2+ and K+ currents, leading to the changes in excitability and action potential configuration of ventricular myocytes. PMID:9797043

  20. Compound action potentials recorded in the human spinal cord during neurostimulation for pain relief.

    PubMed

    Parker, John L; Karantonis, Dean M; Single, Peter S; Obradovic, Milan; Cousins, Michael J

    2012-03-01

    Electrical stimulation of the spinal cord provides effective pain relief to hundreds of thousands of chronic neuropathic pain sufferers. The therapy involves implantation of an electrode array into the epidural space of the subject and then stimulation of the dorsal column with electrical pulses. The stimulation depolarises axons and generates propagating action potentials that interfere with the perception of pain. Despite the long-term clinical experience with spinal cord stimulation, the mechanism of action is not understood, and no direct evidence of the properties of neurons being stimulated has been presented. Here we report novel measurements of evoked compound action potentials from the spinal cords of patients undergoing stimulation for pain relief. The results reveal that Aβ sensory nerve fibres are recruited at therapeutic stimulation levels and the Aβ potential amplitude correlates with the degree of coverage of the painful area. Aβ-evoked responses are not measurable below a threshold stimulation level, and their amplitude increases with increasing stimulation current. At high currents, additional late responses are observed. Our results contribute towards efforts to define the mechanism of spinal cord stimulation. The minimally invasive recording technique we have developed provides data previously obtained only through microelectrode techniques in spinal cords of animals. Our observations also allow the development of systems that use neuronal recording in a feedback loop to control neurostimulation on a continuous basis and deliver more effective pain relief. This is one of numerous benefits that in vivo electrophysiological recording can bring to a broad range of neuromodulation therapies. PMID:22188868

  1. Mechanical surface waves accompany action potential propagation.

    PubMed

    El Hady, Ahmed; Machta, Benjamin B

    2015-01-01

    Many diverse studies have shown that a mechanical displacement of the axonal membrane accompanies the electrical pulse defining the action potential (AP). We present a model for these mechanical displacements as arising from the driving of surface wave modes in which potential energy is stored in elastic properties of the neuronal membrane and cytoskeleton while kinetic energy is carried by the axoplasmic fluid. In our model, these surface waves are driven by the travelling wave of electrical depolarization characterizing the AP, altering compressive electrostatic forces across the membrane. This driving leads to co-propagating mechanical displacements, which we term Action Waves (AWs). Our model allows us to estimate the shape of the AW that accompanies any travelling wave of voltage, making predictions that are in agreement with results from several experimental systems. Our model can serve as a framework for understanding the physical origins and possible functional roles of these AWs. PMID:25819404

  2. Mechanical surface waves accompany action potential propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Hady, Ahmed; Machta, Benjamin B.

    2015-03-01

    Many diverse studies have shown that a mechanical displacement of the axonal membrane accompanies the electrical pulse defining the action potential (AP). We present a model for these mechanical displacements as arising from the driving of surface wave modes in which potential energy is stored in elastic properties of the neuronal membrane and cytoskeleton while kinetic energy is carried by the axoplasmic fluid. In our model, these surface waves are driven by the travelling wave of electrical depolarization characterizing the AP, altering compressive electrostatic forces across the membrane. This driving leads to co-propagating mechanical displacements, which we term Action Waves (AWs). Our model allows us to estimate the shape of the AW that accompanies any travelling wave of voltage, making predictions that are in agreement with results from several experimental systems. Our model can serve as a framework for understanding the physical origins and possible functional roles of these AWs.

  3. Atrial action potential heterogeneity measured by unipolar electrograms.

    PubMed

    Vigmond, Edward J; Tsoi, Vincent; Pagé, Pierre

    2006-01-01

    Vagally-induced action potential duration (APD) heterogeneity can lead to the breakdown of atrial flutter into fibrillation. The exact distribution of vagal mediated effects in the atria is unknown, however. This study analyzed canine electrograms in order to determine changes in APD. Electrograms were recorded under control, and left and right vagal nerve stimulation. Simulations in a computer model were first performed in order to determine how local acetylcholine concentrations affect electrograms. Two measures were investigated to assess APD changes. Results indicate that APD is reduced nonuniformly, and contralateral effects were seen.

  4. Emotional stimuli modulate readiness for action: a transcranial magnetic stimulation study.

    PubMed

    van Loon, Anouk M; van den Wildenberg, Wery P M; van Stegeren, Anda H; Hajcak, Greg; Ridderinkhof, K Richard

    2010-05-01

    Emotional stimuli may prime the motor system and facilitate action readiness. Direct evidence for this effect has been shown by recent studies using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). When administered over the primary motor cortex involved in responding, TMS pulses elicit motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) in the represented muscles. The amplitudes of these MEPs reflect the state of corticospinal excitability. Here, we investigated the dynamic effects of induced emotions on action readiness, as reflected by corticospinal excitability. Subjects performed a choice task while viewing task-irrelevant emotional and neutral pictures. The pattern of MEP amplitudes showed a typical increase as the TMS pulse was presented closer in time to the imminent response. This dynamic pattern was amplified by both pleasant and unpleasant emotional stimuli, but more so when unpleasant pictures were viewed. These patterns present novel evidence in support of the notion that emotional stimuli modulate action readiness.

  5. Ca channel gating during cardiac action potentials.

    PubMed

    Mazzanti, M; DeFelice, L J

    1990-10-01

    How do Ca channels conduct Ca ions during the cardiac action potential? We attempt to answer this question by applying a two-microelectrode technique, previously used for Na and K currents, in which we record the patch current and the action potential at the same time (Mazzanti, M., and L. J. DeFelice. 1987. Biophys. J. 12:95-100, and 1988. Biophys. J. 54:1139-1148; Wellis, D., L. J. DeFelice, and M. Mazzanti. 1990. Biophys. J. 57:41-48). In this paper, we also compare the action currents obtained by the technique with the step-protocol currents obtained during standard voltage-clamp experiments. Individual Ca channels were measured in 10 mM Ca/1 Ba and 10 mM Ba. To describe part of our results, we use the nomenclature introduced by Hess, P., J. B. Lansman, and R. W. Tsien (1984. Nature (Lond.). 311:538-544). With Ba as the charge carrier, Ca channel kinetics convert rapidly from long to short open times as the patch voltage changes from 20 to -20 mV. This voltage-dependent conversion occurs during action potentials and in step-protocol experiments. With Ca as the charge carrier, the currents are brief at all voltages, and it is difficult to define either the number of channels in the patch or the conductance of the individual channels. Occasionally, however, Ca-conducting channels spontaneously convert to long-open-time kinetics (in Hess et al., 1984, notation, mode 2). When this happens, which is about once in every 100beats, there usually appears to be only one channel in the patch. In this rare configuration, the channel is open long enough to measure its conductance in 10 Ca/ 1 Ba. The value is 8-10 pS, which is about half the conductance in Ba. Because the long openings occur so infrequently with Ca as the charge carrier, they contribute negligibly to the average Ca current at any particular time during an action potential. However, the total number of Ca ions entering during these long openings may be significant when compared to the number entering by the

  6. Ca channel gating during cardiac action potentials.

    PubMed

    Mazzanti, M; DeFelice, L J

    1990-10-01

    How do Ca channels conduct Ca ions during the cardiac action potential? We attempt to answer this question by applying a two-microelectrode technique, previously used for Na and K currents, in which we record the patch current and the action potential at the same time (Mazzanti, M., and L. J. DeFelice. 1987. Biophys. J. 12:95-100, and 1988. Biophys. J. 54:1139-1148; Wellis, D., L. J. DeFelice, and M. Mazzanti. 1990. Biophys. J. 57:41-48). In this paper, we also compare the action currents obtained by the technique with the step-protocol currents obtained during standard voltage-clamp experiments. Individual Ca channels were measured in 10 mM Ca/1 Ba and 10 mM Ba. To describe part of our results, we use the nomenclature introduced by Hess, P., J. B. Lansman, and R. W. Tsien (1984. Nature (Lond.). 311:538-544). With Ba as the charge carrier, Ca channel kinetics convert rapidly from long to short open times as the patch voltage changes from 20 to -20 mV. This voltage-dependent conversion occurs during action potentials and in step-protocol experiments. With Ca as the charge carrier, the currents are brief at all voltages, and it is difficult to define either the number of channels in the patch or the conductance of the individual channels. Occasionally, however, Ca-conducting channels spontaneously convert to long-open-time kinetics (in Hess et al., 1984, notation, mode 2). When this happens, which is about once in every 100beats, there usually appears to be only one channel in the patch. In this rare configuration, the channel is open long enough to measure its conductance in 10 Ca/ 1 Ba. The value is 8-10 pS, which is about half the conductance in Ba. Because the long openings occur so infrequently with Ca as the charge carrier, they contribute negligibly to the average Ca current at any particular time during an action potential. However, the total number of Ca ions entering during these long openings may be significant when compared to the number entering by the

  7. Ionic requirements for arterial action potential

    PubMed Central

    Keatinge, W. R.

    1968-01-01

    1. Strips of smooth muscle from common carotid arteries of sheep were electrically quiescent in solution containing Na 148 mM and Ca 2·5 mM. 2. When Ca was removed they became electrically active. Addition of low concentrations of Ca (0·025-0·075 mM) or Mg (0·025-0·750 mM) stopped their activity while ethylenediamine tetra-acetate (EDTA) (1·25 mM) accelerated it. 3. Replacement of Na by Tris or choline stopped the activity in Ca-free solution. After partial replacement of Na electrical activity could be restored by lowering the resting potential but after complete replacement of Na it could not. 4. In the presence of Ca (2·5 mM) small spikes could sometimes be induced after 20 min in Na-free Tris solution by lowering the resting potential by an increase in the external K concentration. 5. The results indicate that the depolarizing current of action potentials in this smooth muscle was largely carried by Na, although a little may have been carried by Ca in Ca-containing solutions. 6. The arteries in general resembled striated muscle rather than intestinal smooth muscle in these respects, but unlike striated muscle their action potentials were not stopped by tetrodotoxin. ImagesFig. 2 PMID:5639765

  8. Cardiac dynamics: a simplified model for action potential propagation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    This paper analyzes a new semiphysiological ionic model, used recently to study reexitations and reentry in cardiac tissue [I.R. Cantalapiedra et al, PRE 82 011907 (2010)]. The aim of the model is to reproduce action potencial morphologies and restitution curves obtained, either from experimental data, or from more complex electrophysiological models. The model divides all ion currents into four groups according to their function, thus resulting into fast-slow and inward-outward currents. We show that this simplified model is flexible enough as to accurately capture the electrical properties of cardiac myocytes, having the advantage of being less computational demanding than detailed electrophysiological models. Under some conditions, it has been shown to be amenable to mathematical analysis. The model reproduces the action potential (AP) change with stimulation rate observed both experimentally and in realistic models of healthy human and guinea pig myocytes (TNNP and LRd models, respectively). When simulated in a cable it also gives the right dependence of the conduction velocity (CV) with stimulation rate. Besides reproducing correctly these restitution properties, it also gives a good fit for the morphology of the AP, including the notch typical of phase 1. Finally, we perform simulations in a realistic geometric model of the rabbit’s ventricles, finding a good qualitative agreement in AP propagation and the ECG. Thus, this simplified model represents an alternative to more complex models when studying instabilities in wave propagation. PMID:23194429

  9. [Chronic cervical vagal stimulation. Mechanisms of action and clinical relevance for heart failure].

    PubMed

    Kuschyk, J; Doesch, C; Akin, I; Borggrefe, M; Roeger, S

    2015-11-01

    Increased sympathetic nerve activity and reduced vagal activity are associated with increased mortality in patients after myocardial infarction and patients with chronic heart failure; furthermore, vagal withdrawal has been documented to precede acute decompensation. Experimental studies have indicated that increased parasympathetic activity by means of vagal stimulation may reduce mortality in animal models of postinfarction sudden cardiac death and of chronic heart failure. First clinical results have demonstrated that chronic vagus nerve stimulation in heart failure patients with severe systolic dysfunction appears to be safe and tolerable and may improve the quality of life and left ventricular (LV) function. Vagus nerve stimulation gives rise to these potential clinical benefits by multiple mechanisms of action, including reduced heart rate, restoration of heart rate variability and baroreflex sensitivity, suppression of proinflammatory cytokines and antiarrhythmic effects. First clinical results suggest that vagal nerve stimulation is safe and tolerable and could lead to a marked clinical improvement but discrepancies in the findings due to different study designs warrant further discussion. PMID:26555481

  10. Is action potential duration of the intact dog heart related to contractility or stimulus rate?

    PubMed

    Drake, A J; Noble, M I; Schouten, V; Seed, A; Ter Keurs, H E; Wohlfart, B

    1982-10-01

    1. The contractility (maximum rate of rise of left ventricular pressure) and action potential duration were measured in intact closed-chest anaesthetized dogs with complete atrioventricular dissociation and beta-adrenergic blockade.2. Measurements were confined to test beats following a 1 sec interval. Prior to the test interval (priming period) a variety of potentiating stimulus trains were introduced.3. When the frequency of stimulation was increased in the priming period (frequency potentiation), there was an inverse relationship between action potential duration and contractility of the test beat.4. When the test beat was potentiated by a single beat terminating the priming period with one short interval (post-extrasystolic potentiation), there was no relationship between the action potential duration and contractility of the test beat.5. Paired pulse stimulation was used for any given frequency to vary contractility by short interval potentiation. For any given frequency of stimulation there was no relationship between action potential duration and contractility of the test beat. For any given value of contractility, action potential duration decreased with increased frequency of stimulation.6. The introduction of a high frequency train caused a step decrease in action potential duration on the first beat of the train. This was followed by a further slow decline in action potential duration with a time course of over 3 min. These two changes could be dissociated by the introduction during the train of one second interval test pulses, which only showed the slow shortening.7. The lack of a consistent relationship between action potential duration and contractility of the test beat disagrees with the hypothesis that repolarization is controlled by the activator calcium responsible for the contractility. The action potential shortening associated with increased frequency is related to the frequency change per se.8. The slow time course of change in action

  11. Transcranial magnetic stimulation and potential cortical and trigeminothalamic mechanisms in migraine

    PubMed Central

    Andreou, Anna P.; Holland, Philip R.; Akerman, Simon; Summ, Oliver; Fredrick, Joe

    2016-01-01

    A single pulse of transcranial magnetic stimulation has been shown to be effective for the acute treatment of migraine with and without aura. Here we aimed to investigate the potential mechanisms of action of transcranial magnetic stimulation, using a transcortical approach, in preclinical migraine models. We tested the susceptibility of cortical spreading depression, the experimental correlate of migraine aura, and further evaluated the response of spontaneous and evoked trigeminovascular activity of second order trigemontothalamic and third order thalamocortical neurons in rats. Single pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation significantly inhibited both mechanical and chemically-induced cortical spreading depression when administered immediately post-induction in rats, but not when administered preinduction, and when controlled by a sham stimulation. Additionally transcranial magnetic stimulation significantly inhibited the spontaneous and evoked firing rate of third order thalamocortical projection neurons, but not second order neurons in the trigeminocervical complex, suggesting a potential modulatory effect that may underlie its utility in migraine. In gyrencephalic cat cortices, when administered post-cortical spreading depression, transcranial magnetic stimulation blocked the propagation of cortical spreading depression in two of eight animals. These results are the first to demonstrate that cortical spreading depression can be blocked in vivo using single pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation and further highlight a novel thalamocortical modulatory capacity that may explain the efficacy of magnetic stimulation in the treatment of migraine with and without aura. PMID:27246325

  12. Action potential broadening in a presynaptic channelopathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begum, Rahima; Bakiri, Yamina; Volynski, Kirill E.; Kullmann, Dimitri M.

    2016-07-01

    Brain development and interictal function are unaffected in many paroxysmal neurological channelopathies, possibly explained by homoeostatic plasticity of synaptic transmission. Episodic ataxia type 1 is caused by missense mutations of the potassium channel Kv1.1, which is abundantly expressed in the terminals of cerebellar basket cells. Presynaptic action potentials of small inhibitory terminals have not been characterized, and it is not known whether developmental plasticity compensates for the effects of Kv1.1 dysfunction. Here we use visually targeted patch-clamp recordings from basket cell terminals of mice harbouring an ataxia-associated mutation and their wild-type littermates. Presynaptic spikes are followed by a pronounced afterdepolarization, and are broadened by pharmacological blockade of Kv1.1 or by a dominant ataxia-associated mutation. Somatic recordings fail to detect such changes. Spike broadening leads to increased Ca2+ influx and GABA release, and decreased spontaneous Purkinje cell firing. We find no evidence for developmental compensation for inherited Kv1.1 dysfunction.

  13. Action potential broadening in a presynaptic channelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Begum, Rahima; Bakiri, Yamina; Volynski, Kirill E.; Kullmann, Dimitri M.

    2016-01-01

    Brain development and interictal function are unaffected in many paroxysmal neurological channelopathies, possibly explained by homoeostatic plasticity of synaptic transmission. Episodic ataxia type 1 is caused by missense mutations of the potassium channel Kv1.1, which is abundantly expressed in the terminals of cerebellar basket cells. Presynaptic action potentials of small inhibitory terminals have not been characterized, and it is not known whether developmental plasticity compensates for the effects of Kv1.1 dysfunction. Here we use visually targeted patch-clamp recordings from basket cell terminals of mice harbouring an ataxia-associated mutation and their wild-type littermates. Presynaptic spikes are followed by a pronounced afterdepolarization, and are broadened by pharmacological blockade of Kv1.1 or by a dominant ataxia-associated mutation. Somatic recordings fail to detect such changes. Spike broadening leads to increased Ca2+ influx and GABA release, and decreased spontaneous Purkinje cell firing. We find no evidence for developmental compensation for inherited Kv1.1 dysfunction. PMID:27381274

  14. Action potential broadening in a presynaptic channelopathy.

    PubMed

    Begum, Rahima; Bakiri, Yamina; Volynski, Kirill E; Kullmann, Dimitri M

    2016-01-01

    Brain development and interictal function are unaffected in many paroxysmal neurological channelopathies, possibly explained by homoeostatic plasticity of synaptic transmission. Episodic ataxia type 1 is caused by missense mutations of the potassium channel Kv1.1, which is abundantly expressed in the terminals of cerebellar basket cells. Presynaptic action potentials of small inhibitory terminals have not been characterized, and it is not known whether developmental plasticity compensates for the effects of Kv1.1 dysfunction. Here we use visually targeted patch-clamp recordings from basket cell terminals of mice harbouring an ataxia-associated mutation and their wild-type littermates. Presynaptic spikes are followed by a pronounced afterdepolarization, and are broadened by pharmacological blockade of Kv1.1 or by a dominant ataxia-associated mutation. Somatic recordings fail to detect such changes. Spike broadening leads to increased Ca(2+) influx and GABA release, and decreased spontaneous Purkinje cell firing. We find no evidence for developmental compensation for inherited Kv1.1 dysfunction. PMID:27381274

  15. Stimulation over primary motor cortex during action observation impairs effector recognition.

    PubMed

    Naish, Katherine R; Barnes, Brittany; Obhi, Sukhvinder S

    2016-04-01

    Recent work suggests that motor cortical processing during action observation plays a role in later recognition of the object involved in the action. Here, we investigated whether recognition of the effector making an action is also impaired when transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) - thought to interfere with normal cortical activity - is applied over the primary motor cortex (M1) during action observation. In two experiments, single-pulse TMS was delivered over the hand area of M1 while participants watched short clips of hand actions. Participants were then asked whether an image (experiment 1) or a video (experiment 2) of a hand presented later in the trial was the same or different to the hand in the preceding video. In Experiment 1, we found that participants' ability to recognise static images of hands was significantly impaired when TMS was delivered over M1 during action observation, compared to when no TMS was delivered, or when stimulation was applied over the vertex. Conversely, stimulation over M1 did not affect recognition of dot configurations, or recognition of hands that were previously presented as static images (rather than action movie clips) with no object. In Experiment 2, we found that effector recognition was impaired when stimulation was applied part way through (300ms) and at the end (500ms) of the action observation period, indicating that 200ms of action-viewing following stimulation was not long enough to form a new representation that could be used for later recognition. The findings of both experiments suggest that interfering with cortical motor activity during action observation impairs subsequent recognition of the effector involved in the action, which complements previous findings of motor system involvement in object memory. This work provides some of the first evidence that motor processing during action observation is involved in forming representations of the effector that are useful beyond the action observation period

  16. Effects of galvanic vestibular stimulation on event related potentials

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jeong-Woo; Park, Woong-Sik; Yoon, Se-Won

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of galvanic vestibular stimulation on event-related potentials. [Subjects and Methods] Forty normal female adult subjects were randomly distributed to a galvanic vestibular stimulation application group (20 subjects) and sham group (20 subjects). For galvanic vestibular stimulation application, a positive electrode was applied to the right mastoid process, and a negative electrode was applied to the left mastoid process; simulation was applied for 10 minutes. A test was conducted on the N100 and P300 components of the event-related potentials before and after galvanic vestibular stimulation. [Results] The N100 latency showed statistically significant differences in interaction effects between time and group in the F3, F4, Fz, and Pz areas. The P300 latency showed the same results in the Fp1 and Fp2 areas, the N100 amplitude showed the same results in the Fp2, Fz, and Pz areas; and the P300 amplitude showed the same results in the Pz area. [Conclusion] These results suggest that galvanic vestibular stimulation may play a positive role in the N100 and P300 components of the event-related potentials of the cerebral cortex related to decision-making in matching words with images. PMID:27799703

  17. Electrical stimulation of the hypoglossal nerve: a potential therapy.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Alan R; Smith, Philip L; Oliven, Arie

    2014-02-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea is characterized by recurrent episodes of pharyngeal collapse, which result from a decrease in pharyngeal dilator muscle tone. The genioglossus is a major pharyngeal dilator that maintains airway patency during sleep. Early studies in animal and humans have demonstrated that electrical stimulation of this muscle reduces pharyngeal collapsibility, increases airflow, and mitigates obstructive sleep apnea. These findings impelled the development of fully implantable hypoglossal nerve stimulating systems (HGNS), for which feasibility trial results are now available. These pilot studies have confirmed that hypoglossal nerve stimulation can prevent pharyngeal collapse without arousing patients from sleep. Potentially, a substantial segment of the patient population with obstructive sleep apnea can be treated with this novel approach. Furthermore, the feasibility trial findings suggest that the therapeutic potential of HGNS can be optimized by selecting patients judiciously, titrating the stimulus intensity optimally, and characterizing the underlying function and anatomy of the pharynx. These strategies are currently being examined in ongoing pivotal trials of HGNS.

  18. Corticospinal potentials after electrical and magnetic stimulation in man.

    PubMed

    Berardelli, A; Inghilleri, M; Cruccu, G; Manfredi, M

    1991-01-01

    The present report deals with our study of the descending volley evoked by both electrical and magnetic transcranial stimulation in man. We discuss the differences of these two techniques specifically as regards the latency and amplitude of evoked potentials. In both cases, electrodes were placed either in the epidural space or directly on the spinal cord. Following electrical stimulation, the descending volley consisted of an early wave which appeared at low stimulation intensity and increased in amplitude and decreased in latency when the strength of the stimulus was increased. At high stimulation intensities the early wave was followed by later waves which travel at the same speed as the initial wave. By delivering paired cortical stimuli, the early wave evoked by the test stimuli is present at 1-msec interval and progressively recovered with longer intervals. The recovery cycle of the later waves is also extremely short. Following magnetic stimulation, the descending volley also consisted of an initial wave followed by later waves. The initial wave has a slightly longer latency, a higher threshold and a smaller amplitude than the early wave evoked by electrical stimulation. The results are discussed with reference to the D and I waves recorded from the pyramidal tract in animals.

  19. Direct detection of a single evoked action potential with MRS in Lumbricus terrestris.

    PubMed

    Poplawsky, Alexander J; Dingledine, Raymond; Hu, Xiaoping P

    2012-01-01

    Functional MRI (fMRI) measures neural activity indirectly by detecting the signal change associated with the hemodynamic response following brain activation. In order to alleviate the temporal and spatial specificity problems associated with fMRI, a number of attempts have been made to detect neural magnetic fields (NMFs) with MRI directly, but have thus far provided conflicting results. In this study, we used MR to detect axonal NMFs in the median giant fiber of the earthworm, Lumbricus terrestris, by examining the free induction decay (FID) with a sampling interval of 0.32 ms. The earthworm nerve cords were isolated from the vasculature and stimulated at the threshold of action potential generation. FIDs were acquired shortly after the stimulation, and simultaneous field potential recordings identified the presence or absence of single evoked action potentials. FIDs acquired when the stimulus did not evoke an action potential were summed as background. The phase of the background-subtracted FID exhibited a systematic change, with a peak phase difference of (-1.2 ± 0.3) × 10(-5) radians occurring at a time corresponding to the timing of the action potential. In addition, we calculated the possible changes in the FID magnitude and phase caused by a simulated action potential using a volume conductor model. The measured phase difference matched the theoretical prediction well in both amplitude and temporal characteristics. This study provides the first evidence for the direct detection of a magnetic field from an evoked action potential using MR. PMID:21728204

  20. Intracranial Self-Stimulation to Evaluate Abuse Potential of Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Laurence L.

    2014-01-01

    Intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) is a behavioral procedure in which operant responding is maintained by pulses of electrical brain stimulation. In research to study abuse-related drug effects, ICSS relies on electrode placements that target the medial forebrain bundle at the level of the lateral hypothalamus, and experimental sessions manipulate frequency or amplitude of stimulation to engender a wide range of baseline response rates or response probabilities. Under these conditions, drug-induced increases in low rates/probabilities of responding maintained by low frequencies/amplitudes of stimulation are interpreted as an abuse-related effect. Conversely, drug-induced decreases in high rates/probabilities of responding maintained by high frequencies/amplitudes of stimulation can be interpreted as an abuse-limiting effect. Overall abuse potential can be inferred from the relative expression of abuse-related and abuse-limiting effects. The sensitivity and selectivity of ICSS to detect abuse potential of many classes of abused drugs is similar to the sensitivity and selectivity of drug self-administration procedures. Moreover, similar to progressive-ratio drug self-administration procedures, ICSS data can be used to rank the relative abuse potential of different drugs. Strengths of ICSS in comparison with drug self-administration include 1) potential for simultaneous evaluation of both abuse-related and abuse-limiting effects, 2) flexibility for use with various routes of drug administration or drug vehicles, 3) utility for studies in drug-naive subjects as well as in subjects with controlled levels of prior drug exposure, and 4) utility for studies of drug time course. Taken together, these considerations suggest that ICSS can make significant contributions to the practice of abuse potential testing. PMID:24973197

  1. Potential anti-inflammatory actions of the elmiric (lipoamino) acids

    PubMed Central

    Burstein, Sumner H.; Adams, Jeffrey K.; Bradshaw, Heather B.; Fraioli, Cristian; Rossetti, Ronald G.; Salmonsen, Rebecca A.; Shaw, John W.; Walker, J. Michael; Zipkin, Robert E.; Zurier, Robert B.

    2007-01-01

    A library of amino acid-fatty acid conjugates (elmiric acids) was synthesized and evaluated for activity as potential anti-inflammatory agents. The compounds were tested in vitro for their effects on cell proliferation and prostaglandin production and compared with their effects on in vivo models of inflammation. LPS stimulated RAW 267.4 mouse macrophage cells was the in vitro model and phorbol ester-induced mouse ear edema served as the principal in vivo model. The prostaglandin responses were found to be strongly dependent on the nature of the fatty acid part of the molecule. Polyunsaturated acid conjugates produced a marked increase in media levels of i15-deoxy-PGJ2 with minimal effects on PGE production. It is reported in the literature that prostaglandin ratios in which the J series predominates over the E series promote the resolution of inflammatory conditions. Several of the elmiric acids tested here produced such favorable ratios suggesting that their potential anti-inflammatory activity occurs via a novel mechanism of action. The ear edema assay results were generally in agreement with the prostaglandin assay findings indicating a connection between them. PMID:17383881

  2. Conduction velocity of antigravity muscle action potentials.

    PubMed

    Christova, L; Kosarov, D; Christova, P

    1992-01-01

    The conduction velocity of the impulses along the muscle fibers is one of the parameters of the extraterritorial potentials of the motor units allowing for the evaluation of the functional state of the muscles. There are no data about the conduction velocities of antigravity muscleaction potentials. In this paper we offer a method for measuring conduction velocity of potentials of single MUs and the averaged potentials of the interference electromiogram (IEMG) lead-off by surface electrodes from mm. sternocleidomastoideus, trapezius, deltoideus (caput laterale) and vastus medialis. The measured mean values of the conduction velocity of antigravity muscles potentials can be used for testing the functional state of the muscles.

  3. Action of methotrexate and tofacitinib on directly stimulated and bystander-activated lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Piscianz, Elisa; Candilera, Vanessa; Valencic, Erica; Loganes, Claudia; Paron, Greta; De Iudicibus, Sara; Decorti, Giuliana; Tommasini, Alberto

    2016-07-01

    Chronic inflammation associated with autoimmune activation is characteristic of rheumatic diseases from childhood to adulthood. In recent decades, significant improvements in the treatment of these types of disease have been achieved using disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs), such as methotrexate (MTX) and, more recently, using biologic inhibitors. The recent introduction of kinase inhibitors (for example, tofacitinib; Tofa) further increases the available ARDs. However, there are patients that do not respond to any treatment strategies, for whom combination therapies are proposed. The data regarding the combined action of different drugs is lacking and the knowledge of the mechanisms of ARDs and their actions upon pathogenic lymphocytes, which are hypothesized to sustain disease, is poor. An in vitro model of inflammation was developed in the current study, in which stimulated and unstimulated lymphocytes were cultured together, but tracked separately, to investigate the action of MTX and Tofa on the two populations. By analysing lymphocyte proliferation and activation, and cytokine secretion in the culture supernatants, it was established that, due to the presence of activated cells, unstimulated cells underwent a bystander activation that was modulated by the ARDs. Additionally, varying administration schedules were demonstrated to affect lymphocytes differently in vitro, either directly or via bystander activation. Furthermore, MTX and Tofa exerted different effects; while MTX showed an antiproliferative effect, Tofa marginally effected activation, although only a slight antiproliferative action, which could be potentiated by sequential treatment with MTX. Thus, it was hypothesized that these differences may be exploited in sequential therapeutic strategies, to maximize the anti‑rheumatic effect. These findings are notable and must be accounted for, as bystander‑activated cells in vivo could contribute to the spread of autoimmune activation

  4. Double Stimulation in the Waiting Experiment with Collectives: Testing a Vygotskian Model of the Emergence of Volitional Action.

    PubMed

    Sannino, Annalisa

    2016-03-01

    This study explores what human conduct looks like when research embraces uncertainty and distance itself from the dominant methodological demands of control and predictability. The context is the waiting experiment originally designed in Kurt Lewin's research group, discussed by Vygotsky as an instance among a range of experiments related to his notion of double stimulation. Little attention has been paid to this experiment, despite its great heuristic potential for charting the terrain of uncertainty and agency in experimental settings. Behind the notion of double stimulation lays Vygotsky's distinctive view of human beings' ability to intentionally shape their actions. Accordingly, human beings in situations of uncertainty and cognitive incongruity can rely on artifacts which serve the function of auxiliary motives and which help them undertake volitional actions. A double stimulation model depicting how such actions emerge is tested in a waiting experiment conducted with collectives, in contrast with a previous waiting experiment conducted with individuals. The model, validated in the waiting experiment with individual participants, applies only to a limited extent to the collectives. The analysis shows the extent to which double stimulation takes place in the waiting experiment with collectives, the differences between the two experiments, and what implications can be drawn for an expanded view on experiments.

  5. Double Stimulation in the Waiting Experiment with Collectives: Testing a Vygotskian Model of the Emergence of Volitional Action.

    PubMed

    Sannino, Annalisa

    2016-03-01

    This study explores what human conduct looks like when research embraces uncertainty and distance itself from the dominant methodological demands of control and predictability. The context is the waiting experiment originally designed in Kurt Lewin's research group, discussed by Vygotsky as an instance among a range of experiments related to his notion of double stimulation. Little attention has been paid to this experiment, despite its great heuristic potential for charting the terrain of uncertainty and agency in experimental settings. Behind the notion of double stimulation lays Vygotsky's distinctive view of human beings' ability to intentionally shape their actions. Accordingly, human beings in situations of uncertainty and cognitive incongruity can rely on artifacts which serve the function of auxiliary motives and which help them undertake volitional actions. A double stimulation model depicting how such actions emerge is tested in a waiting experiment conducted with collectives, in contrast with a previous waiting experiment conducted with individuals. The model, validated in the waiting experiment with individual participants, applies only to a limited extent to the collectives. The analysis shows the extent to which double stimulation takes place in the waiting experiment with collectives, the differences between the two experiments, and what implications can be drawn for an expanded view on experiments. PMID:26318436

  6. Dopamine Regulation of Lateral Inhibition between Striatal Neurons Gates the Stimulant Actions of Cocaine.

    PubMed

    Dobbs, Lauren K; Kaplan, Alanna R; Lemos, Julia C; Matsui, Aya; Rubinstein, Marcelo; Alvarez, Veronica A

    2016-06-01

    Striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs) form inhibitory synapses on neighboring striatal neurons through axon collaterals. The functional relevance of this lateral inhibition and its regulation by dopamine remains elusive. We show that synchronized stimulation of collateral transmission from multiple indirect-pathway MSNs (iMSNs) potently inhibits action potentials in direct-pathway MSNs (dMSNs) in the nucleus accumbens. Dopamine D2 receptors (D2Rs) suppress lateral inhibition from iMSNs to disinhibit dMSNs, which are known to facilitate locomotion. Surprisingly, D2R inhibition of synaptic transmission was larger at axon collaterals from iMSNs than their projections to the ventral pallidum. Targeted deletion of D2Rs from iMSNs impaired cocaine's ability to suppress lateral inhibition and increase locomotion. These impairments were rescued by chemogenetic activation of Gi-signaling in iMSNs. These findings shed light on the functional significance of lateral inhibition between MSNs and offer a novel synaptic mechanism by which dopamine gates locomotion and cocaine exerts its canonical stimulant response. VIDEO ABSTRACT. PMID:27181061

  7. Dopamine Regulation of Lateral Inhibition between Striatal Neurons Gates the Stimulant Actions of Cocaine.

    PubMed

    Dobbs, Lauren K; Kaplan, Alanna R; Lemos, Julia C; Matsui, Aya; Rubinstein, Marcelo; Alvarez, Veronica A

    2016-06-01

    Striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs) form inhibitory synapses on neighboring striatal neurons through axon collaterals. The functional relevance of this lateral inhibition and its regulation by dopamine remains elusive. We show that synchronized stimulation of collateral transmission from multiple indirect-pathway MSNs (iMSNs) potently inhibits action potentials in direct-pathway MSNs (dMSNs) in the nucleus accumbens. Dopamine D2 receptors (D2Rs) suppress lateral inhibition from iMSNs to disinhibit dMSNs, which are known to facilitate locomotion. Surprisingly, D2R inhibition of synaptic transmission was larger at axon collaterals from iMSNs than their projections to the ventral pallidum. Targeted deletion of D2Rs from iMSNs impaired cocaine's ability to suppress lateral inhibition and increase locomotion. These impairments were rescued by chemogenetic activation of Gi-signaling in iMSNs. These findings shed light on the functional significance of lateral inhibition between MSNs and offer a novel synaptic mechanism by which dopamine gates locomotion and cocaine exerts its canonical stimulant response. VIDEO ABSTRACT.

  8. Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation of the Motor Cortex Biases Action Choice in a Perceptual Decision Task.

    PubMed

    Javadi, Amir-Homayoun; Beyko, Angeliki; Walsh, Vincent; Kanai, Ryota

    2015-11-01

    One of the multiple interacting systems involved in the selection and execution of voluntary actions is the primary motor cortex (PMC). We aimed to investigate whether the transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) of this area can modulate hand choice. A perceptual decision-making task was administered. Participants were asked to classify rectangles with different height-to-width ratios into horizontal and vertical rectangles using their right and left index fingers while their PMC was stimulated either bilaterally or unilaterally. Two experiments were conducted with different stimulation conditions: the first experiment (n = 12) had only one stimulation condition (bilateral stimulation), and the second experiment (n = 45) had three stimulation conditions (bilateral, anodal unilateral, and cathodal unilateral stimulations). The second experiment was designed to confirm the results of the first experiment and to further investigate the effects of anodal and cathodal stimulations alone in the observed effects. Each participant took part in two sessions. The laterality of stimulation was reversed over the two sessions. Our results showed that anodal stimulation of the PMC biases participants' responses toward using the contralateral hand whereas cathodal stimulation biases responses toward the ipsilateral hand. Brain stimulation also modulated the RT of the left hand in all stimulation conditions: Responses were faster when the response bias was in favor of the left hand and slower when the response bias was against it. We propose two possible explanations for these findings: the perceptual bias account (bottom-up effects of stimulation on perception) and the motor-choice bias account (top-down modulation of the decision-making system by facilitation of response in one hand over the other). We conclude that motor responses and the choice of hand can be modulated using tDCS. PMID:26151605

  9. Energy-Optimal Electrical-Stimulation Pulses Shaped by the Least-Action Principle

    PubMed Central

    Krouchev, Nedialko I.; Danner, Simon M.; Vinet, Alain; Rattay, Frank; Sawan, Mohamad

    2014-01-01

    Electrical stimulation (ES) devices interact with excitable neural tissue toward eliciting action potentials (AP’s) by specific current patterns. Low-energy ES prevents tissue damage and loss of specificity. Hence to identify optimal stimulation-current waveforms is a relevant problem, whose solution may have significant impact on the related medical (e.g. minimized side-effects) and engineering (e.g. maximized battery-life) efficiency. This has typically been addressed by simulation (of a given excitable-tissue model) and iterative numerical optimization with hard discontinuous constraints - e.g. AP’s are all-or-none phenomena. Such approach is computationally expensive, while the solution is uncertain - e.g. may converge to local-only energy-minima and be model-specific. We exploit the Least-Action Principle (LAP). First, we derive in closed form the general template of the membrane-potential’s temporal trajectory, which minimizes the ES energy integral over time and over any space-clamp ionic current model. From the given model we then obtain the specific energy-efficient current waveform, which is demonstrated to be globally optimal. The solution is model-independent by construction. We illustrate the approach by a broad set of example situations with some of the most popular ionic current models from the literature. The proposed approach may result in the significant improvement of solution efficiency: cumbersome and uncertain iteration is replaced by a single quadrature of a system of ordinary differential equations. The approach is further validated by enabling a general comparison to the conventional simulation and optimization results from the literature, including one of our own, based on finite-horizon optimal control. Applying the LAP also resulted in a number of general ES optimality principles. One such succinct observation is that ES with long pulse durations is much more sensitive to the pulse’s shape whereas a rectangular pulse is most

  10. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation decreases the kindling induced synaptic potentiation: effects of frequency and coil shape.

    PubMed

    Yadollahpour, Ali; Firouzabadi, Seyed Mohammad; Shahpari, Marzieh; Mirnajafi-Zadeh, Javad

    2014-02-01

    The present study was aimed to investigate the effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) on kindling-induced synaptic potentiation and to study the effect of frequency and coil shape on rTMS effectiveness. Seizures were induced in rats by perforant path stimulation in a rapid kindling manner (12 stimulations/day). rTMS was applied at different frequencies (0.5, 1 and 2 Hz), using either figure-8 shaped or circular coils at different times (during or before kindling stimulations). rTMS had antiepileptogenic effect at all frequencies and imposed inhibitory effects on enhancement of population excitatory postsynaptic potential slope and population spike amplitude when applied during kindling acquisition. Furthermore, it prevented the kindling-induced changes in paired pulse indices. The inhibitory effect of rTMS was higher at the frequency of 1 Hz compared to 0.5 and 2 Hz. Application of rTMS 1Hz by circular coil imposed a weaker inhibitory action compared with the figure-8 coil. In addition, the results showed that pretreatment of animals by both coils had similar preventing effect on kindling acquisition as well as kindling-induced synaptic potentiation. Obtained results demonstrated that the antiepileptogenic effect of low frequency rTMS is accompanied with the preventing of the kindling induced potentiation. This effect is dependent on rTMS frequency and slightly on coil-type.

  11. Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus modulates reward processing and action selection in Parkinson patients.

    PubMed

    Wagenbreth, Caroline; Zaehle, Tino; Galazky, Imke; Voges, Jürgen; Guitart-Masip, Marc; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Düzel, Emrah

    2015-06-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is an effective treatment for motor impairments in Parkinson's disease (PD) but its effect on the motivational regulation of action control is still not fully understood. We investigated whether DBS of the STN influences the ability of PD patients to act for anticipated reward or loss, or whether DBS improves action execution independent of motivational valence. 16 PD patients (12 male, mean age = 58.5 ± 10.17 years) treated with bilateral STN-DBS and an age- and gender-matched group of healthy controls (HC) performed a go/no-go task whose contingencies explicitly decouple valence and action. Patients were tested with (ON) and without (OFF) active STN stimulation. For HC, there was a benefit in performing rewarded actions when compared to actions that avoided punishment. PD patients showed such a benefit reliably only when STN stimulation was ON. In fact, the relative behavioral benefit for go for reward over go to avoid losing was stronger in the PD patients under DBS ON than in HC. In PD patients, rather than generally improving motor functions independent of motivational valence, modulation of the STN by DBS improves action execution specifically when rewards are anticipated. Thus, STN-DBS establishes a reliable congruency between action and reward ("Pavlovian congruency") and remarkably enhances it over the level observed in HC. PMID:25929662

  12. Effect of low-frequency electrical stimulation parameters on its anticonvulsant action during rapid perforant path kindling in rat.

    PubMed

    Shahpari, Marzieh; Mirnajafi-Zadeh, Javad; Firoozabadi, Seyed Mohammad P; Yadollahpour, Ali

    2012-03-01

    Low frequency stimulation (LFS) may be considered as a new potential therapy for drug-resistant epilepsy. However, the relation between LFS parameters and its anticonvulsant effects is not completely determined. In this study, the effect of some LFS parameters on its anticonvulsant action was investigated in rats. In all animals, stimulating and recording electrodes were implanted into the perforant path and dentate gyrus, respectively. In one group of animals, kindling stimulations were applied until rats achieved a fully kindled state. In other groups, different patterns of LFS were applied at the end of kindling stimulations during twenty consecutive days. In the first experiment the effect of LFS pulse numbers was investigated on its anticonvulsant action. Animals were divided randomly into three groups and 1, 4, and 8 packages of LFS (each pack contains 200 pulses, 0.1 ms pulse duration at 1 Hz) were applied five minutes after termination of kindling stimulations. Obtained results showed that 4 packages of LFS had the strongest anticonvulsant effects. Therefore, this pattern (4 packages) was used in the next experiment. In the second experiment, 4 packages of LFS were applied at intervals of 30 s and 30 min after termination of kindling stimulations. The strongest anticonvulsant effect was observed in the group received LFS at the interval of 30 s. Therefore, this pattern was selected for the third experiment. In the third experiment the effect of LFS at frequencies of 0.25 Hz and 5 Hz was investigated. The group of animals which received LFS at the frequency of 0.25 Hz showed somehow stronger anticonvulsant effect. The results indicate that different parameters of LFS have important role in induction of LFS anticonvulsant effects. Regarding this view, it seems that the slower LFS frequency and the shorter interval between LFS and kindling stimulations, the stronger anticonvulsant effect will be observed. But there is no direct relation between number of

  13. Noisy unmaskers of multistability of periodic rhythms in a model of the ventricular cardiac action potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surovyatkina, Elena; Egorchenkov, Roman; Ivanov, Guennady

    2007-06-01

    The coexistence of different dynamical regimes of cardiac cell-model at a fixed set of stimulation parameters, i.e. multistability, revealed by noise is presented in this paper. Numerical simulations are performed using Luo-Rudy (LR1) action potential model. Numerical experiments with LR1 model conducted via noisy periodical stimulation showed the coexistence of several periodic rhythms. Weak noise in period of stimulation causes a hopping process between all the (meta-) stable rhythms of cell-model. This process is reflected in several parallel branches of the bifurcation diagram: noise unveils new, invisible before, stable rhythms which could appear in this model at different initial conditions. The phenomenon of multistability is directly evidenced by other numerical experiments: we have established the multistability property of a cell consisting in the fact that different initial conditions of stimulation (different extrasystole application times) lead to different stable periodic rhythms. We have obtained the shaping of attraction basins on the action potential curves. Such basins of attraction contain a set of initial conditions which determinate a stable periodic rhythm. We have found a close association between the attraction basins of the complex rhythms on the curves of action potential and the cardiac vulnerable windows on ECG record, during which extra stimuli can induce life threatening arrhythmias. Obtained results allow us to make a conclusion that multistability is very important for the electrical conduction system of the heart from the cell level to the integrated function of the heart.

  14. Selective effects of an octopus toxin on action potentials

    PubMed Central

    Dulhunty, Angela; Gage, Peter W.

    1971-01-01

    1. A lethal, water soluble toxin (Maculotoxin, MTX) with a molecular weight less than 540, can be extracted from the salivary glands of an octopus (Hapalochlaena maculosa). 2. MTX blocks action potentials in sartorius muscle fibres of toads without affecting the membrane potential. Delayed rectification is not inhibited by the toxin. 3. At low concentrations (10-6-10-5 g/ml.) MTX blocks action potentials only after a certain number have been elicited. The number of action potentials, which can be defined accurately, depends on the concentration of MTX and the concentration of sodium ions in the extracellular solution. 4. The toxin has no post-synaptic effect at the neuromuscular junction and it is concluded that it blocks neuromuscular transmission by inhibiting action potentials in motor nerve terminals. PMID:4330930

  15. All optical experimental design for neuron excitation, inhibition, and action potential detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Alex J.; Tolstykh, Gleb; Martens, Stacey; Sedelnikova, Anna; Ibey, Bennett L.; Beier, Hope T.

    2016-03-01

    Recently, infrared light has been shown to both stimulate and inhibit excitatory cells. However, studies of infrared light for excitatory cell inhibition have been constrained by the use of invasive and cumbersome electrodes for cell excitation and action potential recording. Here, we present an all optical experimental design for neuronal excitation, inhibition, and action potential detection. Primary rat neurons were transfected with plasmids containing the light sensitive ion channel CheRiff. CheRiff has a peak excitation around 450 nm, allowing excitation of transfected neurons with pulsed blue light. Additionally, primary neurons were transfected with QuasAr2, a fast and sensitive fluorescent voltage indicator. QuasAr2 is excited with yellow or red light and therefore does not spectrally overlap CheRiff, enabling imaging and action potential activation, simultaneously. Using an optic fiber, neurons were exposed to blue light sequentially to generate controlled action potentials. A second optic fiber delivered a single pulse of 1869nm light to the neuron causing inhibition of the evoked action potentials (by the blue light). When used in concert, these optical techniques enable electrode free neuron excitation, inhibition, and action potential recording, allowing research into neuronal behaviors with high spatial fidelity.

  16. Oxytocin action at the lactotroph is required for prolactin surges in cervically stimulated ovariectomized rats

    PubMed Central

    McKee, De'Nise T.; Poletini, Maristela O.; Bertram, Richard; Freeman, Marc E.

    2007-01-01

    Cervical stimulation induces two daily rhythmic prolactin surges, nocturnal and diurnal, which persist for several days. We have shown that a bolus injection of oxytocin initiates a similar prolactin rhythm, which persists despite low levels of oxytocin following injection. This suggests that oxytocin may trigger the cervical stimulated-induced rhythmic prolactin surges. To investigate this hypothesis, we infused an oxytocin antagonist that does not cross the blood brain barrier for 24h before and after cervical stimulation and measured serum prolactin. We also measured dopaminergic neuronal activity, since mathematical modeling predicted that this activity would be low in the presence of the oxytocin antagonist. We thus tested this hypothesis by measuring dopaminergic neuronal activity in the tuberoinfundibular, periventricular hypophyseal, and tuberohypophyseal dopaminergic neurons. Infusion of oxytocin antagonist before cervical stimulation abolished prolactin surges and infusion of oxytocin antagonist after cervical stimulation abolished the diurnal and significantly decreased the nocturnal surges of prolactin. The rhythmic prolactin surges returned after the clearance of the oxytocin antagonist. Hypothalamic dopaminergic activity was elevated in anti-phase with prolactin surges and the anti-phase elevation was abolished by the oxytocin antagonist in the tuberoinfundibular and tuberohypophyseal dopaminergic neurons, consistent with the mathematical model. These findings suggest that oxytocin is a physiologically relevant prolactin-releasing factor. However, the cervical stimulated-induced prolactin surges are maintained even in the absence of oxytocin actions at the lactotroph which strongly suggests the maintenance of prolactin surges are not dependent upon oxytocin actions at the pituitary gland. PMID:17615142

  17. Continuous Theta-Burst Stimulation Demonstrates a Causal Role of Premotor Homunculus in Action Understanding

    PubMed Central

    Sandberg, Kristian; Skewes, Joshua; Wolf, Thomas; Blicher, Jakob; Overgaard, Morten; Frith, Chris D.

    2014-01-01

    Although it is well established that regions of premotor cortex (PMC) are active during action observation, it remains controversial whether they play a causal role in action understanding. In the experiment reported here, we used off-line continuous theta-burst stimulation (cTBS) to investigate this question. Participants received cTBS over the hand and lip areas of left PMC, in separate sessions, before completing a pantomime-recognition task in which half of the trials contained pantomimed hand actions, and half contained pantomimed mouth actions. The results reveal a double dissociation: Participants were less accurate in recognizing pantomimed hand actions after receiving cTBS over the hand area than over the lip area and less accurate in recognizing pantomimed mouth actions after receiving cTBS over the lip area than over the hand area. This finding constrains theories of action understanding by showing that somatotopically organized regions of PMC contribute causally to action understanding and, thus, that the mechanisms underpinning action understanding and action performance overlap. PMID:24549297

  18. Quadratic adaptive algorithm for solving cardiac action potential models.

    PubMed

    Chen, Min-Hung; Chen, Po-Yuan; Luo, Ching-Hsing

    2016-10-01

    An adaptive integration method is proposed for computing cardiac action potential models accurately and efficiently. Time steps are adaptively chosen by solving a quadratic formula involving the first and second derivatives of the membrane action potential. To improve the numerical accuracy, we devise an extremum-locator (el) function to predict the local extremum when approaching the peak amplitude of the action potential. In addition, the time step restriction (tsr) technique is designed to limit the increase in time steps, and thus prevent the membrane potential from changing abruptly. The performance of the proposed method is tested using the Luo-Rudy phase 1 (LR1), dynamic (LR2), and human O'Hara-Rudy dynamic (ORd) ventricular action potential models, and the Courtemanche atrial model incorporating a Markov sodium channel model. Numerical experiments demonstrate that the action potential generated using the proposed method is more accurate than that using the traditional Hybrid method, especially near the peak region. The traditional Hybrid method may choose large time steps near to the peak region, and sometimes causes the action potential to become distorted. In contrast, the proposed new method chooses very fine time steps in the peak region, but large time steps in the smooth region, and the profiles are smoother and closer to the reference solution. In the test on the stiff Markov ionic channel model, the Hybrid blows up if the allowable time step is set to be greater than 0.1ms. In contrast, our method can adjust the time step size automatically, and is stable. Overall, the proposed method is more accurate than and as efficient as the traditional Hybrid method, especially for the human ORd model. The proposed method shows improvement for action potentials with a non-smooth morphology, and it needs further investigation to determine whether the method is helpful during propagation of the action potential. PMID:27639239

  19. Direction of action potential propagation influences calcium increases in distal dendrites of the cricket giant interneurons.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Hiroto; Baba, Yoshichika; Oka, Kotaro

    2002-10-01

    To understand the relationship between the propagation direction of action potentials and dendritic Ca(2+) elevation, simultaneous measurements of intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) and intradendritic membrane potential were performed in the wind-sensitive giant interneurons of the cricket. The dendritic Ca(2+) transients induced by synaptically-evoked action potentials had larger amplitudes than those induced by backpropagating spikes evoked by antidromic stimulation. The amplitude of the [Ca(2+)](i) changes induced by antidromic stimuli combined with subthreshold synaptic stimulation was not different from that of the Ca(2+) increases evoked by the backpropagating spikes alone. This result means that the synaptically activated Ca(2+) release from intracellular stores does not contribute to enhancement of Ca(2+) elevation induced by backpropagating spikes. On the other hand, the synaptically evoked action potentials were also increased at distal dendrites in which the Ca(2+) elevation was enhanced. When the dendritic and axonal spikes were simultaneously recorded, the delay between dendritic spike and ascending axonal spike depended upon which side of the cercal nerves was stimulated. Further, dual intracellular recording at different dendritic branches illustrated that the dendritic spike at the branch arborizing on the stimulated side preceded the spike recorded at the other side of the dendrite. These results suggest that the spike-initiation site shifts depending on the location of the activated postsynaptic site. It is proposed that the difference of spike propagation manner could change the action potential waveform at the distal dendrite, and could produce synaptic activity-dependent Ca(2+) dynamics in the giant interneurons.

  20. Investigating a Potential Auxin-Related Mode of Hormetic/Inhibitory Action of the Phytotoxin Parthenin.

    PubMed

    Belz, Regina G

    2016-01-01

    Parthenin is a metabolite of Parthenium hysterophorus and is believed to contribute to the weed's invasiveness via allelopathy. Despite the potential of parthenin to suppress competitors, low doses stimulate plant growth. This biphasic action was hypothesized to be auxin-like and, therefore, an auxin-related mode of parthenin action was investigated using two approaches: joint action experiments with Lactuca sativa, and dose-response experiments with auxin/antiauxin-resistant Arabidopsis thaliana genotypes. The joint action approach comprised binary mixtures of subinhibitory doses of the auxin 3-indoleacetic acid (IAA) mixed with parthenin or one of three reference compounds [indole-3-butyric acid (IBA), 2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid (TIBA), 2-(p-chlorophenoxy)-2-methylpropionic acid (PCIB)]. The reference compounds significantly interacted with IAA at all doses, but parthenin interacted only at low doses indicating that parthenin hormesis may be auxin-related, in contrast to its inhibitory action. The genetic approach investigated the response of four auxin/antiauxin-resistant mutants and a wildtype to parthenin or two reference compounds (IAA, PCIB). The responses of mutant plants to the reference compounds confirmed previous reports, but differed from the responses observed for parthenin. Parthenin stimulated and inhibited all mutants independent of resistance. This provided no indication for an auxin-related action of parthenin. Therefore, the hypothesis of an auxin-related inhibitory action of parthenin was rejected in two independent experimental approaches, while the hypothesis of an auxin-related stimulatory effect could not be rejected.

  1. Investigating a Potential Auxin-Related Mode of Hormetic/Inhibitory Action of the Phytotoxin Parthenin.

    PubMed

    Belz, Regina G

    2016-01-01

    Parthenin is a metabolite of Parthenium hysterophorus and is believed to contribute to the weed's invasiveness via allelopathy. Despite the potential of parthenin to suppress competitors, low doses stimulate plant growth. This biphasic action was hypothesized to be auxin-like and, therefore, an auxin-related mode of parthenin action was investigated using two approaches: joint action experiments with Lactuca sativa, and dose-response experiments with auxin/antiauxin-resistant Arabidopsis thaliana genotypes. The joint action approach comprised binary mixtures of subinhibitory doses of the auxin 3-indoleacetic acid (IAA) mixed with parthenin or one of three reference compounds [indole-3-butyric acid (IBA), 2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid (TIBA), 2-(p-chlorophenoxy)-2-methylpropionic acid (PCIB)]. The reference compounds significantly interacted with IAA at all doses, but parthenin interacted only at low doses indicating that parthenin hormesis may be auxin-related, in contrast to its inhibitory action. The genetic approach investigated the response of four auxin/antiauxin-resistant mutants and a wildtype to parthenin or two reference compounds (IAA, PCIB). The responses of mutant plants to the reference compounds confirmed previous reports, but differed from the responses observed for parthenin. Parthenin stimulated and inhibited all mutants independent of resistance. This provided no indication for an auxin-related action of parthenin. Therefore, the hypothesis of an auxin-related inhibitory action of parthenin was rejected in two independent experimental approaches, while the hypothesis of an auxin-related stimulatory effect could not be rejected. PMID:26686984

  2. Optogenetic stimulation of infralimbic PFC reproduces ketamine’s rapid and sustained antidepressant actions

    PubMed Central

    Fuchikami, Manabu; Thomas, Alexandra; Liu, Rongjian; Wohleb, Eric S.; Land, Benjamin B.; DiLeone, Ralph J.; Aghajanian, George K.; Duman, Ronald S.

    2015-01-01

    Ketamine produces rapid and sustained antidepressant actions in depressed patients, but the precise cellular mechanisms underlying these effects have not been identified. Here we determined if modulation of neuronal activity in the infralimbic prefrontal cortex (IL-PFC) underlies the antidepressant and anxiolytic actions of ketamine. We found that neuronal inactivation of the IL-PFC completely blocked the antidepressant and anxiolytic effects of systemic ketamine in rodent models and that ketamine microinfusion into IL-PFC reproduced these behavioral actions of systemic ketamine. We also found that optogenetic stimulation of the IL-PFC produced rapid and long-lasting antidepressant and anxiolytic effects and that these effects are associated with increased number and function of spine synapses of layer V pyramidal neurons. The results demonstrate that ketamine infusions or optogenetic stimulation of IL-PFC are sufficient to produce long-lasting antidepressant behavioral and synaptic responses similar to the effects of systemic ketamine administration. PMID:26056286

  3. Time and Frequency-Dependent Modulation of Local Field Potential Synchronization by Deep Brain Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    McCracken, Clinton B.; Kiss, Zelma H. T.

    2014-01-01

    High-frequency electrical stimulation of specific brain structures, known as deep brain stimulation (DBS), is an effective treatment for movement disorders, but mechanisms of action remain unclear. We examined the time-dependent effects of DBS applied to the entopeduncular nucleus (EP), the rat homolog of the internal globus pallidus, a target used for treatment of both dystonia and Parkinson’s disease (PD). We performed simultaneous multi-site local field potential (LFP) recordings in urethane-anesthetized rats to assess the effects of high-frequency (HF, 130 Hz; clinically effective), low-frequency (LF, 15 Hz; ineffective) and sham DBS delivered to EP. LFP activity was recorded from dorsal striatum (STR), ventroanterior thalamus (VA), primary motor cortex (M1), and the stimulation site in EP. Spontaneous and acute stimulation-induced LFP oscillation power and functional connectivity were assessed at baseline, and after 30, 60, and 90 minutes of stimulation. HF EP DBS produced widespread alterations in spontaneous and stimulus-induced LFP oscillations, with some effects similar across regions and others occurring in a region- and frequency band-specific manner. Many of these changes evolved over time. HF EP DBS produced an initial transient reduction in power in the low beta band in M1 and STR; however, phase synchronization between these regions in the low beta band was markedly suppressed at all time points. DBS also enhanced low gamma synchronization throughout the circuit. With sustained stimulation, there were significant reductions in low beta synchronization between M1-VA and STR-VA, and increases in power within regions in the faster frequency bands. HF DBS also suppressed the ability of acute EP stimulation to induce beta oscillations in all regions along the circuit. This dynamic pattern of synchronizing and desynchronizing effects of EP DBS suggests a complex modulation of activity along cortico-BG-thalamic circuits underlying the therapeutic effects

  4. Developmental changes in the inward current of the action potential of Rohon-Beard neurones

    PubMed Central

    Baccaglini, Paola I.; Spitzer, Nicholas C.

    1977-01-01

    1. Rohon-Beard cells in the spinal cord of Xenopus tadpoles have been studied in animals from early neural tube to free-swimming larval stages. The onset and further development of electrical excitability of these neurones has been investigated in different ionic environments, to determine the ionic species carrying the inward current of the action potential. 2. The cells appear inexcitable at early stages (Nieuwkoop & Faber stages 18-20) and do not give action potentials to depolarizing current pulses. 3. The action potential is first recorded at stage 20. (A) The inward current is carried by Ca2+ at stages 20-25, since it is blocked by mm quantitites of La3+, Co2+ or Mn2+ and is unaffected by removal of Na+ or the addition of tetrodotoxin (TTX). (B) The action potential is an elevated plateau of long duration (mean 190 msec at stages 20-22). The duration decreases exponentially with repetitive stimulation. (C) The specific Ca2+ conductance (gCa) at the onset of the plateau of the action potential is 2·6 × 10-4 mho/cm2. Calculations show that a single action potential raises [Ca2+]1 by more than 100-fold. 4. At later times (stages 25-40), the inward current of the action potential is carried by both Na+ and Ca2+: the action potential has two components, an initial spike which is blocked by removal of Na+ or addition of TTX, followed by a plateau which is blocked by La3+, Co2+ or Mn2+. 5. Finally (stages 40-51), the inward current is primarily carried by Na+, since the action potential is blocked only by removal of Na+ or addition of TTX, and the overshoot agrees with the prediction of the Nernst equation for a Na-selective membrane. When the outward current channel is blocked and cells exposed to Na-free solutions, 67% of cells at the latest stages studied were incapable of producing action potentials in which the inward current is carried by divalent cations. 6. The duration of the action potential decreases from a maximum of about 1000 msec to about 1 msec

  5. Predicting abuse potential of stimulants and other dopaminergic drugs: overview and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Huskinson, Sally L; Naylor, Jennifer E; Rowlett, James K; Freeman, Kevin B

    2014-12-01

    Examination of a drug's abuse potential at multiple levels of analysis (molecular/cellular action, whole-organism behavior, epidemiological data) is an essential component to regulating controlled substances under the Controlled Substances Act (CSA). We reviewed studies that examined several central nervous system (CNS) stimulants, focusing on those with primarily dopaminergic actions, in drug self-administration, drug discrimination, and physical dependence. For drug self-administration and drug discrimination, we distinguished between experiments conducted with rats and nonhuman primates (NHP) to highlight the common and unique attributes of each model in the assessment of abuse potential. Our review of drug self-administration studies suggests that this procedure is important in predicting abuse potential of dopaminergic compounds, but there were many false positives. We recommended that tests to determine how reinforcing a drug is relative to a known drug of abuse may be more predictive of abuse potential than tests that yield a binary, yes-or-no classification. Several false positives also occurred with drug discrimination. With this procedure, we recommended that future research follow a standard decision-tree approach that may require examining the drug being tested for abuse potential as the training stimulus. This approach would also allow several known drugs of abuse to be tested for substitution, and this may reduce false positives. Finally, we reviewed evidence of physical dependence with stimulants and discussed the feasibility of modeling these phenomena in nonhuman animals in a rational and practical fashion. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'CNS Stimulants'.

  6. DNA secondary structure of the released strand stimulates WRN helicase action on forked duplexes without coordinate action of WRN exonuclease

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, Byungchan; Bohr, Vilhelm A.

    2011-08-12

    Highlights: {yields} In this study, we investigated the effect of a DNA secondary structure on the two WRN activities. {yields} We found that a DNA secondary structure of the displaced strand during unwinding stimulates WRN helicase without coordinate action of WRN exonuclease. {yields} These results imply that WRN helicase and exonuclease activities can act independently. -- Abstract: Werner syndrome (WS) is an autosomal recessive premature aging disorder characterized by aging-related phenotypes and genomic instability. WS is caused by mutations in a gene encoding a nuclear protein, Werner syndrome protein (WRN), a member of the RecQ helicase family, that interestingly possesses both helicase and exonuclease activities. Previous studies have shown that the two activities act in concert on a single substrate. We investigated the effect of a DNA secondary structure on the two WRN activities and found that a DNA secondary structure of the displaced strand during unwinding stimulates WRN helicase without coordinate action of WRN exonuclease. These results imply that WRN helicase and exonuclease activities can act independently, and we propose that the uncoordinated action may be relevant to the in vivo activity of WRN.

  7. Inhibition of hormone-stimulated lipolysis by clofibrate. A possible mechanism for its hypolipidemic action.

    PubMed Central

    D'Costa, M A; Angel, A

    1975-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the mechanism of the antilipolytic action of clofibrate (p-chlorophenoxyisobutyrate). Clofibrate, in the dose range of 10-80 mg/199 ml, inhibited the initial rate of norepinephrine-stimulated lipolysis 17-44 percent in isolated rat fat cells. At a dose corresponding to therapeutic levels in vivo (10 mg/100 ml) clofibrate also inhibited hormone-stimulated lipolysis by 20-30 percent in fragments of human subcutaneous fat. Inhibition of lipolysis by clofibrate occurred at all concentrations of norepinephrine and ACTH (0.02-0.1 mug/ml) but did not occur with equilipolytic concentrations of dibutyryl cyclic AMP, suggesting a proximal site of action on the lipolytic sequence. Clofibrate reduced by 60 percent (315plus or minus40 vs. 120plus or minus25 pmol/g lipid; meanplus or minusSEM) the norepinephrine-stimulated initial rise in cyclic AMP, measured 10 min after addition of hormone. Because the antilipolytic effect occurred in the presence of glucose and without altering cellular ATP levels, the reduction in intracellular cyclic AMP levels could not be attributed to uncoupling of oxidative metabolism or to secondary effects of free fatty acid accumulation. In the secondary effects of free fatty acid accumulation. In the presence of procaine-HC1, which blocks hormone-stimulated lipolysis without inhibiting cyclic AMP accumulation, addition of clofibrate prevented the hormone-stimulated rise in cyclic AMP. Clofibrate did not affect the activity of the low-Km 3',5'-cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase in norepinephrine-stimulated adipocytes. These data suggest that the antilipolytic effect of clofibrate is due to its suppression of cyclic AMP production by inhibition of adenylate cyclase. The drug's hypolipidemic action may in part be explained by its antilipolytic effect, which deprives the liver of free fatty acid substrate for lipoprotein synthesis. Images PMID:162783

  8. A Limb Action Detector Enabling People with Multiple Disabilities to Control Environmental Stimulation through Limb Action with a Nintendo Wii Remote Controller

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shih, Ching-Hsiang; Chang, Man-Ling; Shih, Ching-Tien

    2010-01-01

    This study assessed whether two persons with multiple disabilities would be able to control environmental stimulation using limb action with a Nintendo Wii Remote Controller and a newly developed limb action detection program (LADP, i.e., a new software program that turns a Wii Remote Controller into a precise limb action detector). This study was…

  9. A physical action potential generator: design, implementation and evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Latorre, Malcolm A.; Chan, Adrian D. C.; Wårdell, Karin

    2015-01-01

    The objective was to develop a physical action potential generator (Paxon) with the ability to generate a stable, repeatable, programmable, and physiological-like action potential. The Paxon has an equivalent of 40 nodes of Ranvier that were mimicked using resin embedded gold wires (Ø = 20 μm). These nodes were software controlled and the action potentials were initiated by a start trigger. Clinically used Ag-AgCl electrodes were coupled to the Paxon for functional testing. The Paxon's action potential parameters were tunable using a second order mathematical equation to generate physiologically relevant output, which was accomplished by varying the number of nodes involved (1–40 in incremental steps of 1) and the node drive potential (0–2.8 V in 0.7 mV steps), while keeping a fixed inter-nodal timing and test electrode configuration. A system noise floor of 0.07 ± 0.01 μV was calculated over 50 runs. A differential test electrode recorded a peak positive amplitude of 1.5 ± 0.05 mV (gain of 40x) at time 196.4 ± 0.06 ms, including a post trigger delay. The Paxon's programmable action potential like signal has the possibility to be used as a validation test platform for medical surface electrodes and their attached systems. PMID:26539072

  10. Transient outward currents and action potential alterations in rabbit ventricular myocytes.

    PubMed

    Kawano, S; Hiraoka, M

    1991-06-01

    To clarify ionic mechanisms underlying successive changes in action potential repolarization upon sudden increase in driving rate or initiation of rapid drive after a rest, membrane potentials and currents were recorded from isolated rabbit ventricular myocytes using the suction-pipette whole-cell clamp method. When 20 action potentials were elicited with a stimulus frequency of 2.0 Hz after a rest period of 20 s, the plateau and action potential duration showed complex changes in successive beats, whereas they were nearly constant with stimulation at 0.1 Hz. There were only weak correlations between changes in action potential parameters and preceding diastolic intervals. The changes were prominent in the first 10 beats but subsided gradually thereafter, attaining nearly steady configurations of action potentials. When depolarizing pulses were applied at a fast rate, under the voltage clamp, the amplitudes of the initial inward current in the presence of tetrodotoxin changed greatly depending on the pulse numbers and diastolic intervals, whereas the delayed outward K+ current changed little. Variations of the initial inward current in successive pulses were caused by different degrees of activation and recovery from inactivation in the Ca2+ current, the Ca(2+)-sensitive and -insensitive transient outward current. While inhibition of either one or two current components decreased the action potential alterations, blocking the three components completely abolished them. These results indicate that alterations of the Ca(2+)-sensitive and -insensitive transient outward current together with the Ca2+ current contribute to the action potential alterations after initiation of rapid drive or an increase in driving rates.

  11. [On the theory of action potential propagation in plant cells].

    PubMed

    Sizonenko, V L; Kovalenko, N I

    2012-01-01

    The distribution of an electric field in plant cells and zooblasts has been investigated at propagation of the action potential. The behavior of ions in the cytoplasm and in the extracellular fluid has been described with the equations of electric charge motion in the electrolytes. It has been shown that the action potential causes an electric potential change not only in the depth of the cytoplasm but also in the extracellular area far from the lipidic bilayer. The biomembrane resistance has been expressed by physical parameters of a cell, such as ionic diffusion coefficient in fluid, Debye-Huckel radius, dielectric conductivity etc. The presence of breakings in the action potential diagrams has been explained as a result of insufficient resolving power of the measuring devices at the instant the sodium ionic canals of the bilayer opens. PMID:23035528

  12. Effect of nanomaterials on the compound action potential of the shore crab, Carcinus maenas.

    PubMed

    Windeatt, Kirsten M; Handy, Richard D

    2013-06-01

    Little is known about the effects of manufactured nanomaterials on the function of nerves. The experiment aimed to test the effects of three different nanomaterials (1 mg l⁻¹ of TiO₂ NPs, Ag NPs or SWCNT) on the compound action potential of the shore crab (Carcinus maenas) compared with an appropriate bulk powder or metal salt control (bulk TiO₂ powder, AgNO₃ and carbon black respectively). In single action potential recordings, there were no effects of any of the nanomaterials on the peak amplitude, duration, rate of rise (depolarisation), or rate of decrease (repolarisation) of the compound action potential in crab saline, despite settling of each nanomaterial directly onto the nerve preparation. The ability of the crab nerve to be stimulated to tetanus was also unaffected by exposure to the nanomaterials compared with the appropriate bulk powder or metal salt control. Solvent controls with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) also had no effect on action potentials. Overall, the study concludes that there were no effects of the materials at the concentrations tested on the compound action potential of the shore crab in physiological saline. PMID:22394242

  13. The metabolic energy cost of action potential velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crotty, Patrick; Sangrey, Thomas; Levy, William

    2006-03-01

    Voltage changes in neurons and other active cells are caused by the passage of ions across the cell membrane. These ionic currents depend on the transmembrane ion concentration gradients, which in unmyelinated axons are maintained during rest and restored after electrical activity by an ATPase sodium-potassium exchanger in the membrane. The amount of ATP consumed by this exchanger can be taken as the metabolic energy cost of any electrical activity in the axon. We use this measure, along with biophysical models of voltage-gated sodium and potassium ion channels, to quantify the energy cost of action potentials propagating in squid giant axons. We find that the energy of an action potential can be naturally divided into three separate components associated with different aspects of the action potential. We calculate these energy components as functions of the ion channel densities and axon diameters and find that the component associated with the rising phase and velocity of the action potential achieves a minimum near the biological values of these parameters. This result, which is robust with respect to other parameters such as temperature, suggests that evolution has optimized the axon for the energy of the action potential wavefront.

  14. Memantine reduces repetitive action potential firing in spinal cord nerve cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Netzer, R; Bigalke, H

    1990-09-21

    (1) The anticonvulsant effects of memantine were examined and compared with those of baclofen in monolayer primary cultures of murine nerve cells using conventional intracellular recordings. (2) Memantine and baclofen (each 10-100 microM) decreased spontaneous synaptic activity when action potential frequencies exceeded 6 Hz. Neurons firing action potentials at frequencies below 6 Hz (about 90% of all impaled cells), however, were not affected by the drugs. (3) Memantine reduced the duration of strychnine-elicited bursts and the firing rate of action potentials within a burst. In contrast, baclofen lowered the frequency of the bursts without reducing intra-burst firing. The duration of the bursts was increased. (4) Memantine, but not baclofen, reduced the extent of sustained repetitive firing evoked by pulses of depolarizing current. (5) In the presence of memantine, the second of two electrically evoked action potentials increasingly failed to appear as the intervals between successive stimulating pulses were shortened. Such an effect was not seen when baclofen was applied. Thus, both antispastic agents, memantine and baclofen, reduce hyperactivity of spinal cord neurons in culture, although their mechanisms of action are different.

  15. Stimulants

    MedlinePlus

    Stimulants are drugs that increase your heart rate, breathing rate, and brain function. Some stimulants affect only a specific organ, such as the heart, lungs, brain, or nervous system. Epinephrine is a stimulant. It ...

  16. Analysis of the action of euxanthone, a plant-derived compound that stimulates neurite outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Naidu, M; Kuan, C-Y K; Lo, W-L; Raza, M; Tolkovsky, A; Mak, N-K; Wong, R N-S; Keynes, R

    2007-09-21

    We have investigated the neurite growth-stimulating properties of euxanthone, a xanthone derivative isolated from the Chinese medicinal plant Polygala caudata. Euxanthone was shown to exert a marked stimulatory action on neurite outgrowth from chick embryo dorsal root ganglia explanted in collagen gels, in the absence of added neurotrophins. It was also shown to promote cell survival in explanted chick embryo ganglia, and to stimulate neurite outgrowth from isolated adult rat primary sensory neurons in vitro. The further finding that euxanthone stimulates neurite outgrowth from explants of chick embryo retina and ventral spinal cord suggests an action on signaling pathways downstream of neuronal receptors for specific neurotrophic factors. Consistent with this, euxanthone did not promote neurite outgrowth from non-transfected PC12 cells, or from PC12 cells transfected with TrkB or TrkC, under conditions in which these cells extended neurites in response to, respectively, the neurotrophins nerve growth factor, brain-derived neurotrophic factor and neurotrophin 3. Western blot analysis of euxanthone-stimulated dorsal root ganglion explants showed that expression of phospho-mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase was up-regulated after 1 h of euxanthone-treatment. Inhibition of the MAP kinase pathway using PD98059, a specific inhibitor of MAP kinase kinase, blocked all euxanthone-stimulated neurite outgrowth. However, analysis of phospho-Akt expression indicated that the phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase-Akt pathway, another major signaling pathway engaged by neurotrophins, is not significantly activated by euxanthone. These results suggest that euxanthone promotes neurite outgrowth by selectively activating the MAP kinase pathway.

  17. Toward a system to measure action potential on mice brain slices with local magnetoresistive probes

    SciTech Connect

    Amaral, J.; Cardoso, S.; Freitas, P. P.; Sebastiao, A. M.

    2011-04-01

    This work combines an electrophysiological system with a magnetoresistive chip to measure the magnetic field created by the synaptic/action potential currents. The chip, with 15 spin valve sensors, was designed to be integrated in a recording chamber for submerged mice brain slices used for synaptic potential measurements. Under stimulation (rectangular pulses of 0.1 ms every 10 s) through a concentric electrode placed near the CA3/CA1 border of the hippocampus, the spin valve sensor readout signals with 20 {mu}V amplitude and a pulse length of 20 to 30 ms were recorded only in the pyramidal cell bodies region and can be interpreted as being derived from action potentials/currents.

  18. Toward a system to measure action potential on mice brain slices with local magnetoresistive probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaral, J.; Cardoso, S.; Freitas, P. P.; Sebastião, A. M.

    2011-04-01

    This work combines an electrophysiological system with a magnetoresistive chip to measure the magnetic field created by the synaptic/action potential currents. The chip, with 15 spin valve sensors, was designed to be integrated in a recording chamber for submerged mice brain slices used for synaptic potential measurements. Under stimulation (rectangular pulses of 0.1 ms every 10 s) through a concentric electrode placed near the CA3/CA1 border of the hippocampus, the spin valve sensor readout signals with 20 μV amplitude and a pulse length of 20 to 30 ms were recorded only in the pyramidal cell bodies region and can be interpreted as being derived from action potentials/currents.

  19. Somatosensory evoked potentials following proprioceptive stimulation of finger in man.

    PubMed

    Mima, T; Terada, K; Maekawa, M; Nagamine, T; Ikeda, A; Shibasaki, H

    1996-09-01

    Brisk passive flexion of the proximal interphalangeal joint of the middle finger, produced by using a newly devised instrument, elicited evoked potentials on the scalp. The present study carefully excluded the possible contribution of sensory modalities other than proprioception. The initial part of cortical response was a positive deflexion at the contralateral central area (P1 at 34.6 ms after the stimulus). This was followed by a midfrontal negative wave (N1 at 44.8 ms) and a clear positivity at the contralateral centroparietal area (P2 at 48.0 ms). The evoked responses persisted in spite of the abolition of cutaneous and joint afferents of the finger caused by ischemic anesthesia, but they were lost by ischemic anesthesia of the forearm. Thus, the cortical evoked responses obtained in this study most probably reflect muscle afferent inputs. The scalp distribution of P1 suggested that its cortical generator source was different from that of the N20-P20 components of evoked potentials to electrical median nerve stimulation. Brodmann areas 2 and 3a of human brain, which are known to receive deep receptor inputs, are the most plausible generator sites for the early components of the proprioception-related evoked responses. The amplitude of P2 was related to the velocity but not to the magnitude of movement. In conclusion, the present study established a method for recording the evoked responses to the brisk passive movement of the finger joint, which mainly reflect the dynamic aspects of proprioception mediated through muscle afferent. PMID:8891653

  20. Action prediction based on anticipatory brain potentials during simulated driving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaliliardali, Zahra; Chavarriaga, Ricardo; Gheorghe, Lucian Andrei; Millán, José del R.

    2015-12-01

    Objective. The ability of an automobile to infer the driver’s upcoming actions directly from neural signals could enrich the interaction of the car with its driver. Intelligent vehicles fitted with an on-board brain-computer interface able to decode the driver’s intentions can use this information to improve the driving experience. In this study we investigate the neural signatures of anticipation of specific actions, namely braking and accelerating. Approach. We investigated anticipatory slow cortical potentials in electroencephalogram recorded from 18 healthy participants in a driving simulator using a variant of the contingent negative variation (CNV) paradigm with Go and No-go conditions: count-down numbers followed by ‘Start’/‘Stop’ cue. We report decoding performance before the action onset using a quadratic discriminant analysis classifier based on temporal features. Main results. (i) Despite the visual and driving related cognitive distractions, we show the presence of anticipatory event related potentials locked to the stimuli onset similar to the widely reported CNV signal (with an average peak value of -8 μV at electrode Cz). (ii) We demonstrate the discrimination between cases requiring to perform an action upon imperative subsequent stimulus (Go condition, e.g. a ‘Red’ traffic light) versus events that do not require such action (No-go condition; e.g. a ‘Yellow’ light); with an average single trial classification performance of 0.83 ± 0.13 for braking and 0.79 ± 0.12 for accelerating (area under the curve). (iii) We show that the centro-medial anticipatory potentials are observed as early as 320 ± 200 ms before the action with a detection rate of 0.77 ± 0.12 in offline analysis. Significance. We show for the first time the feasibility of predicting the driver’s intention through decoding anticipatory related potentials during simulated car driving with high recognition rates.

  1. Action potential and contraction of Dionaea muscipula (Venus flytrap).

    PubMed

    DI PALMA, J R; MOHL, R; BEST, W

    1961-03-24

    Observation of the action potential and contraction of the leaf of Dionaea muscipula Ellis revealed several interesting phenomena. Two successive stimuli are generally necessary to cause contraction. The first and ineffective stimulus is associated with slow depolarization. The second stimulus has much more rapid depolarization and initiates contraction.

  2. Passive Responses Resembling Action Potentials: A Device for the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Ian A.; Pickard, Barbara G.

    1975-01-01

    Describes the construction and operation of a network of entirely passive electrical components that gives a response to an electrical shock similar to an action potential. The network of resistors, capacitors, and diodes was developed to produce responses that would mimic those observed, for example, when a dark-grown pea epicotyl is shocked…

  3. Propagation of Action Potentials: An Active Participation Exercise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felsten, Gary

    1998-01-01

    Describes an active participation exercise that demonstrates the propagation of action potentials (the ability to transmit information through the neural network, dependent upon chemical interactions in the brain). Students assume the structure and function of the network by lining up around the room and communicating through hand signals and…

  4. Cardiovascular stimulant actions of bupropion in comparison to cocaine in the rat.

    PubMed

    Killian, Lyndsey M; Docherty, James R

    2014-07-15

    Stimulants are banned in competition by the World Anti-Doping Agency, except for a small number of therapeutic agents subject to monitoring, including bupropion. We have examined the potency of bupropion in comparison with two agents banned in competition, adrafinil and modafinil, and with cocaine and desipramine as blockers of the noradrenaline re-uptake transporter in peripheral tissues of the rat. For studies in vivo, the pressor response to noradrenaline in the anaesthetized rat was studied. Cocaine, desipramine and bupropion at doses of 0.1, 0.3 and 1mg/kg, respectively, significantly increased the pressor response to noradrenaline. Overall, cocaine and desipramine were approximately 2-5 times more potent than bupropion in vivo in the rat. Adrafinil and modafinil (both 3mg/kg) did not significantly affect the pressor response. Bupropion was chosen for further study. In 1Hz paced rat right ventricular strips, bupropion (30μM) significantly increased the potency of noradrenaline at increasing the force of contraction. In rat vas deferens, bupropion and cocaine produced concentration-dependent increases in the contractile response to nerve stimulation, and cocaine was 11 times more potent than bupropion. Since bupropion is used clinically in doses of up to 300mg, it is likely that bupropion has actions at the noradrenaline transporter, and thus cardiovascular stimulant actions, in clinical doses. This may explain findings of increased exercise performance with bupropion.

  5. Cardiovascular stimulant actions of bupropion in comparison to cocaine in the rat.

    PubMed

    Killian, Lyndsey M; Docherty, James R

    2014-07-15

    Stimulants are banned in competition by the World Anti-Doping Agency, except for a small number of therapeutic agents subject to monitoring, including bupropion. We have examined the potency of bupropion in comparison with two agents banned in competition, adrafinil and modafinil, and with cocaine and desipramine as blockers of the noradrenaline re-uptake transporter in peripheral tissues of the rat. For studies in vivo, the pressor response to noradrenaline in the anaesthetized rat was studied. Cocaine, desipramine and bupropion at doses of 0.1, 0.3 and 1mg/kg, respectively, significantly increased the pressor response to noradrenaline. Overall, cocaine and desipramine were approximately 2-5 times more potent than bupropion in vivo in the rat. Adrafinil and modafinil (both 3mg/kg) did not significantly affect the pressor response. Bupropion was chosen for further study. In 1Hz paced rat right ventricular strips, bupropion (30μM) significantly increased the potency of noradrenaline at increasing the force of contraction. In rat vas deferens, bupropion and cocaine produced concentration-dependent increases in the contractile response to nerve stimulation, and cocaine was 11 times more potent than bupropion. Since bupropion is used clinically in doses of up to 300mg, it is likely that bupropion has actions at the noradrenaline transporter, and thus cardiovascular stimulant actions, in clinical doses. This may explain findings of increased exercise performance with bupropion. PMID:24755144

  6. Sodium and potassium conductance changes during a membrane action potential

    PubMed Central

    Bezanilla, Francisco; Rojas, Eduardo; Taylor, Robert E.

    1970-01-01

    1. A method for turning a membrane potential control system on and off in less than 10 μsec is described. This method was used to record membrane currents in perfused giant axons from Dosidicus gigas and Loligo forbesi after turning on the voltage clamp system at various times during the course of a membrane action potential. 2. The membrane current measured just after the capacity charging transient was found to have an almost linear relation to the controlled membrane potential. 3. The total membrane conductance taken from these current—voltage curves was found to have a time course during the action potential similar to that found by Cole & Curtis (1939). 4. The instantaneous current voltage curves were linear enough to make it possible to obtain a good estimate of the individual sodium and potassium channel conductances, either algebraically or by clamping to the sodium, or potassium, reversal potentials. Good general agreement was obtained with the predictions of the Hodgkin—Huxley equations. 5. We consider these results to constitute the first direct experimental demonstration of the conductance changes to sodium and potassium during the course of an action potential. PMID:5505231

  7. Instrumentation to record evoked potentials for closed-loop control of deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Kent, Alexander R; Grill, Warren M

    2011-01-01

    Closed-loop deep brain stimulation (DBS) systems offer promise in relieving the clinical burden of stimulus parameter selection and improving treatment outcomes. In such a system, a feedback signal is used to adjust automatically stimulation parameters and optimize the efficacy of stimulation. We explored the feasibility of recording electrically evoked compound action potentials (ECAPs) during DBS for use as a feedback control signal. A novel instrumentation system was developed to suppress the stimulus artifact and amplify the small magnitude, short latency ECAP response during DBS with clinically relevant parameters. In vitro testing demonstrated the capabilities to increase the gain by a factor of 1,000× over a conventional amplifier without saturation, reduce distortion of mock ECAP signals, and make high fidelity recordings of mock ECAPs at latencies of only 0.5 ms following DBS pulses of 50 to 100 μs duration. Subsequently, the instrumentation was used to make in vivo recordings of ECAPs during thalamic DBS in cats, without contamination by the stimulus artifact. The signal characteristics were similar across three experiments, suggesting common neural activation patterns. The ECAP recordings enabled with this novel instrumentation may provide insight into the type and spatial extent of neural elements activated during DBS, and could serve as feedback control signals for closed-loop systems. PMID:22255894

  8. Ocular Vestibular Evoked Myogenic Potentials Using Head Striker Stimulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Dios, Y. E.; Gadd, N. E.; Kofman, I. S.; Peters, B. T.; Reschke, M.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Wood, S. J.; Noohibezanjani, F.; Kinnaird, C.; Seidler, R. D.; Mulavara, A. P.

    2016-01-01

    100 MS was averaged over 24 trial repetitions for the vibrotactile VEMP. The typical oVEMP EMG response is an excitatory potential with first peak occurring at 11-12 ms and second peak at 18 ms. This requires a total recording time of approximately 29 seconds per trial which includes 5 seconds of no vibrotactile stimulation at the beginning of the protocol. The primary dependent measures consist of the latency and peak-to-peak amplitude from the EMG signals, which will be normalized to EMG levels at the beginning of the protocol. Data were collected for 3 repeated trials with striker stimulation on both the left and right side of the head Results: The oVEMP p1 range was observed at 3-14 ms and n1 at 7-19 ms. The striker system provided a consistent and rapid method for oVEMP testing. Discussion: Crew testing is in progress to determine changes in results between pre and post flight.

  9. Digestive stimulant action of three Indian spice mixes in experimental rats.

    PubMed

    Platel, Kalpana; Rao, Alkananda; Saraswathi, G; Srinivasan, K

    2002-12-01

    The present study examined the favourable influence of three spice mixes derived from a few commonly consumed spices of known digestive stimulant action on digestive enzymes of pancreas and small intestine, and on bile secretion and composition in experimental rats. The common ingredients of these mixes were coriander, turmeric, red chilli, black pepper and cumin, while the spice mix II additionally had ginger, and spice mix III contained onion. All the three spice mixes favourably enhanced the activities of pancreatic lipase, chymotrypsin and amylase when consumed during the diet. In addition, these spice mixes brought about a pronounced stimulation of bile flow and of bile acid secretion. Among the three spice mixes examined, spice mix III which is customized so as to include spices that are desirable from the point of view of stimulation of digestion, had the highest stimulatory influence particularly on bile secretion, bile acid output and the activities of pancreatic enzymes. While activities of pancreatic lipase, amylase and chymotrypsin were elevated by 40, 16 and 77%, respectively, the bile volume as well as the bile acid secretion were almost doubled in spice mix III treatment. The higher secretion of bile especially with an elevated level of bile acids and a beneficial stimulation of pancreatic digestive enzymes, particularly of lipase could probably be the two mechanisms by which these combinations of spices aid in digestion.

  10. The effects of heart rate on the action potential of guinea-pig and human ventricular muscle.

    PubMed

    Attwell, D; Cohen, I; Eisner, D A

    1981-01-01

    1. On increasing the stimulation frequency of isolated pieces of guinea-pig ventricular muscle, the resting potential depolarizes, and the action potential duration and amplitude are reduced. On termination of the high frequency train of action potentials, these changes are reversed. 2. The resting potential changes are roughly exponential, with a time constant of the order of 10 sec, and are attributable to K+ accumulation in the extracellular space. They are not explicable in terms of known gating variables. 3. The action potential duration and amplitude recover much more slowly than the resting potential, after a high frequency train (half-time approximately 5 min). The time course of these recoveries is not exponential, and is slower after trains which produce more shortening of the action potential. The slow time course suggests that K+ accumulation is not the main cause of the changes in action potential shape. Furthermore, when a certain depolarization of the resting potential is produced by a high frequency train, there is a greater reduction of the action potential duration than that which occurs when the bathing [K+] is raised to produce the same depolarization (Reiter & Stickel, 1968). This is so even when a gradient of extracellular [K+] is induced in the preparation, to mimic non-uniform K+ accumulation. 4. Similarly, the shortening of the action potential produced by toxic doses or cardiotonic steroids is probably not the result of K+ accumulation. 5. The slow changes of the action potential shape produced by a high frequency train are not attributable to the effects of gating variables, nor (solely) to a rise in the intracellular Na concentration stimulating the electrogenic Na/K pump. The dye 3,3'-diethylthiadicarbocyanine, which blocks the Ca2+-activated K conductance in the erythrocyte, has no significant effect on the shape changes. 6. After a sudden change in heart rate, the QT interval of the human electrocardiogram (e.c.g.) changes slowly to a

  11. Real-time imaging of action potentials in nerves using changes in birefringence

    PubMed Central

    Badreddine, Ali H.; Jordan, Tomas; Bigio, Irving J.

    2016-01-01

    Polarized light can be used to measure the electrical activity associated with action potential propagation in nerves, as manifested in simultaneous dynamic changes in their intrinsic optical birefringence. These signals may serve as a tool for minimally invasive neuroimaging in various types of neuroscience research, including the study of neuronal activation patterns with high spatiotemporal resolution. A fast linear photodiode array was used to image propagating action potentials in an excised portion of the lobster walking leg nerve. We show that the crossed-polarized signal (XPS) can be reliably imaged over a ≥2 cm span in our custom nerve chamber, by averaging multiple-stimulation signals, and also in single-scan real-time “movies”. This demonstration paves the way toward utilizing changes in the optical birefringence to image more complex neuronal activity in nerve fibers and other organized neuronal tissue. PMID:27231635

  12. Real-time imaging of action potentials in nerves using changes in birefringence.

    PubMed

    Badreddine, Ali H; Jordan, Tomas; Bigio, Irving J

    2016-05-01

    Polarized light can be used to measure the electrical activity associated with action potential propagation in nerves, as manifested in simultaneous dynamic changes in their intrinsic optical birefringence. These signals may serve as a tool for minimally invasive neuroimaging in various types of neuroscience research, including the study of neuronal activation patterns with high spatiotemporal resolution. A fast linear photodiode array was used to image propagating action potentials in an excised portion of the lobster walking leg nerve. We show that the crossed-polarized signal (XPS) can be reliably imaged over a ≥2 cm span in our custom nerve chamber, by averaging multiple-stimulation signals, and also in single-scan real-time "movies". This demonstration paves the way toward utilizing changes in the optical birefringence to image more complex neuronal activity in nerve fibers and other organized neuronal tissue. PMID:27231635

  13. Focused ultrasound effects on nerve action potential in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Colucci, Vincent; Strichartz, Gary; Jolesz, Ferenc; Vykhodtseva, Natalia; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2009-01-01

    Minimally invasive applications of thermal and mechanical energy to selective areas of the human anatomy have led to significant advances in treatment of and recovery from typical surgical interventions. Image-guided focused ultrasound allows energy to be deposited deep into the tissue, completely noninvasively. There has long been interest in using this focal energy delivery to block nerve conduction for pain control and local anesthesia. In this study, we have performed an in vitro study to further extend our knowledge of this potential clinical application. The sciatic nerves from the bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana) were subjected to focused ultrasound (at frequencies of 0.661MHz and 1.986MHz) and to heated Ringer’s solution. The nerve action potential was shown to decrease in the experiments and correlated with temperature elevation measured in the nerve. The action potential recovered either completely, partially, or not at all, depending on the parameters of the ultrasound exposure. The reduction of the baseline nerve temperature by circulating cooling fluid through the sonication chamber did not prevent the collapse of the nerve action potential; but higher power was required to induce the same endpoint as without cooling. These results indicate that a thermal mechanism of focused ultrasound can be used to block nerve conduction, either temporarily or permanently. PMID:19647923

  14. Electrical Identification and Selective Microstimulation of Neuronal Compartments Based on Features of Extracellular Action Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Radivojevic, Milos; Jäckel, David; Altermatt, Michael; Müller, Jan; Viswam, Vijay; Hierlemann, Andreas; Bakkum, Douglas J.

    2016-01-01

    A detailed, high-spatiotemporal-resolution characterization of neuronal responses to local electrical fields and the capability of precise extracellular microstimulation of selected neurons are pivotal for studying and manipulating neuronal activity and circuits in networks and for developing neural prosthetics. Here, we studied cultured neocortical neurons by using high-density microelectrode arrays and optical imaging, complemented by the patch-clamp technique, and with the aim to correlate morphological and electrical features of neuronal compartments with their responsiveness to extracellular stimulation. We developed strategies to electrically identify any neuron in the network, while subcellular spatial resolution recording of extracellular action potential (AP) traces enabled their assignment to the axon initial segment (AIS), axonal arbor and proximal somatodendritic compartments. Stimulation at the AIS required low voltages and provided immediate, selective and reliable neuronal activation, whereas stimulation at the soma required high voltages and produced delayed and unreliable responses. Subthreshold stimulation at the soma depolarized the somatic membrane potential without eliciting APs. PMID:27510732

  15. Electrical Identification and Selective Microstimulation of Neuronal Compartments Based on Features of Extracellular Action Potentials.

    PubMed

    Radivojevic, Milos; Jäckel, David; Altermatt, Michael; Müller, Jan; Viswam, Vijay; Hierlemann, Andreas; Bakkum, Douglas J

    2016-01-01

    A detailed, high-spatiotemporal-resolution characterization of neuronal responses to local electrical fields and the capability of precise extracellular microstimulation of selected neurons are pivotal for studying and manipulating neuronal activity and circuits in networks and for developing neural prosthetics. Here, we studied cultured neocortical neurons by using high-density microelectrode arrays and optical imaging, complemented by the patch-clamp technique, and with the aim to correlate morphological and electrical features of neuronal compartments with their responsiveness to extracellular stimulation. We developed strategies to electrically identify any neuron in the network, while subcellular spatial resolution recording of extracellular action potential (AP) traces enabled their assignment to the axon initial segment (AIS), axonal arbor and proximal somatodendritic compartments. Stimulation at the AIS required low voltages and provided immediate, selective and reliable neuronal activation, whereas stimulation at the soma required high voltages and produced delayed and unreliable responses. Subthreshold stimulation at the soma depolarized the somatic membrane potential without eliciting APs. PMID:27510732

  16. Modelling in vivo action potential propagation along a giant axon.

    PubMed

    George, Stuart; Foster, Jamie M; Richardson, Giles

    2015-01-01

    A partial differential equation model for the three-dimensional current flow in an excitable, unmyelinated axon is considered. Where the axon radius is significantly below a critical value R(crit) (that depends upon intra- and extra-cellular conductivity and ion channel conductance) the resistance of the intracellular space is significantly higher than that of the extracellular space, such that the potential outside the axon is uniformly small whilst the intracellular potential is approximated by the transmembrane potential. In turn, since the current flow is predominantly axial, it can be shown that the transmembrane potential is approximated by a solution to the one-dimensional cable equation. It is noted that the radius of the squid giant axon, investigated by (Hodgkin and Huxley 1952e), lies close to R(crit). This motivates us to apply the three-dimensional model to the squid giant axon and compare the results thus found to those obtained using the cable equation. In the context of the in vitro experiments conducted in (Hodgkin and Huxley 1952e) we find only a small difference between the wave profiles determined using these two different approaches and little difference between the speeds of action potential propagation predicted. This suggests that the cable equation approximation is accurate in this scenario. However when applied to the it in vivo setting, in which the conductivity of the surrounding tissue is considerably lower than that of the axoplasm, there are marked differences in both wave profile and speed of action potential propagation calculated using the two approaches. In particular, the cable equation significantly over predicts the increase in the velocity of propagation as axon radius increases. The consequences of these results are discussed in terms of the evolutionary costs associated with increasing the speed of action potential propagation by increasing axon radius.

  17. The Potential of Intralesional Rose Bengal to Stimulate T-Cell Mediated Anti-Tumor Responses

    PubMed Central

    Maker, Ajay V; Prabhakar, Bellur; Pardiwala, Krunal

    2015-01-01

    Rose Bengal (RB) is a red synthetic dye that was initially used in the garment industry and has been used safely for decades as a corneal stain by ophthalmologists. Antineoplastic properties of RB have also been observed, though the mechanism of action remained to be elucidated. Recently, interest in RB as a therapeutic cancer treatment has increased due to significant anti-tumor responses with direct tumor injection in human clinical trials for metastatic melanoma. In these patients, there has been the implication that RB may mount a T-cell mediated anti-tumor response and impart antigen-specific responses in distant bystander lesions. This article serves to evaluate the potential of intralesional rose bengal to stimulate T-cell mediated anti-tumor responses in in-vitro, pre-clinical, and clinical studies. PMID:26618054

  18. Shockwave-induced compound action potentials in the peripheral nerve.

    PubMed

    Wehner, H D; Sellier, K

    1981-01-01

    To verify a presumed interaction between shockwaves arisen by impacts of high velocity projectiles and nervous tissue an electrophysiological experiment is performed with the following results: In peripheral nerves regular compound action potentials (CAPs) are provoked by shockwaves the amplitudes of which are increased corresponding to the pressure intensity of the shockwaves. The nerve shows no electrical activity below a certain pressure threshold (0.75 bar). Saturation of the CAP amplitude occurs beyond a pressure limit of 8 bar.

  19. Compound muscle action potential cartography of an accessory peroneal nerve.

    PubMed

    Van Dijk, J G; Van der Hoeven, B J

    1998-10-01

    In daily practice, accessory peroneal nerves (APNs) are detected in less than the 18-25% of legs, as revealed by systematic searches. In one APN case, compound muscle action potential cartography showed that the APN was only apparent when the recording electrode was placed over a small lateral region of the extensor digitorum brevis muscle. Effects of recording site can explain why many APNs go unrecognized.

  20. Colony-stimulating factor 1 potentiates lung cancer bone metastasis.

    PubMed

    Hung, Jaclyn Y; Horn, Diane; Woodruff, Kathleen; Prihoda, Thomas; LeSaux, Claude; Peters, Jay; Tio, Fermin; Abboud-Werner, Sherry L

    2014-04-01

    Colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF1) is essential for osteoclastogenesis that mediates osteolysis in metastatic tumors. Patients with lung cancer have increased CSF1 in serum and high levels are associated with poor survival. Adenocarcinomas metastasize rapidly and many patients suffer from bone metastasis. Lung cancer stem-like cells sustain tumor growth and potentiate metastasis. The purpose of this study was to determine the role of CSF1 in lung cancer bone metastasis and whether inhibition of CSF1 ameliorates the disease. Human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells were examined in vitro for CSF1/CSF1R. A549-luc cells were injected intracardiac in NOD/SCID mice and metastasis was assessed. To determine the effect of CSF1 knockdown (KD) in A549 cells on bone metastasis, cells were stably transfected with a retroviral vector containing short-hairpin CSF1 (KD) or empty vector (CT). Results showed that A549 cells express CSF1/CSF1R; CSF1 increased their proliferation and invasion, whereas soluble CSF1R inhibited invasion. Mice injected with A549-luc cells showed osteolytic bone lesions 3.5 weeks after injection and lesions increased over 5 weeks. Tumors recapitulated adenocarcinoma morphology and showed osteoclasts along the tumor/bone interface, trabecular, and cortical bone loss. Analyses of KD cells showed decreased CSF1 protein levels, reduced colony formation in soft agar assay, and decreased fraction of stem-like cells. In CSF1KD mice, the incidence of tumor metastasis was similar to controls, although fewer CSF1KD mice had metastasis in both hind limbs. KD tumors showed reduced CSF1 expression, Ki-67+ cells, and osteoclasts. Importantly, there was a low incidence of large tumors >0.1 mm(2) in CSF1KD mice compared with control mice (10% vs 62.5%). This study established a lung osteolytic bone metastasis model that resembles human disease and suggests that CSF1 is a key determinant of cancer stem cell survival and tumor growth. Results may lead to novel strategies to

  1. Warm Body Temperature Facilitates Energy Efficient Cortical Action Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yuguo; Hill, Adam P.; McCormick, David A.

    2012-01-01

    The energy efficiency of neural signal transmission is important not only as a limiting factor in brain architecture, but it also influences the interpretation of functional brain imaging signals. Action potential generation in mammalian, versus invertebrate, axons is remarkably energy efficient. Here we demonstrate that this increase in energy efficiency is due largely to a warmer body temperature. Increases in temperature result in an exponential increase in energy efficiency for single action potentials by increasing the rate of Na+ channel inactivation, resulting in a marked reduction in overlap of the inward Na+, and outward K+, currents and a shortening of action potential duration. This increase in single spike efficiency is, however, counterbalanced by a temperature-dependent decrease in the amplitude and duration of the spike afterhyperpolarization, resulting in a nonlinear increase in the spike firing rate, particularly at temperatures above approximately 35°C. Interestingly, the total energy cost, as measured by the multiplication of total Na+ entry per spike and average firing rate in response to a constant input, reaches a global minimum between 37–42°C. Our results indicate that increases in temperature result in an unexpected increase in energy efficiency, especially near normal body temperature, thus allowing the brain to utilize an energy efficient neural code. PMID:22511855

  2. Recording evoked potentials during deep brain stimulation: development and validation of instrumentation to suppress the stimulus artefact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kent, A. R.; Grill, W. M.

    2012-06-01

    The clinical efficacy of deep brain stimulation (DBS) for the treatment of movement disorders depends on the identification of appropriate stimulation parameters. Since the mechanisms of action of DBS remain unclear, programming sessions can be time consuming, costly and result in sub-optimal outcomes. Measurement of electrically evoked compound action potentials (ECAPs) during DBS, generated by activated neurons in the vicinity of the stimulating electrode, could offer insight into the type and spatial extent of neural element activation and provide a potential feedback signal for the rational selection of stimulation parameters and closed-loop DBS. However, recording ECAPs presents a significant technical challenge due to the large stimulus artefact, which can saturate recording amplifiers and distort short latency ECAP signals. We developed DBS-ECAP recording instrumentation combining commercial amplifiers and circuit elements in a serial configuration to reduce the stimulus artefact and enable high fidelity recording. We used an electrical circuit equivalent model of the instrumentation to understand better the sources of the stimulus artefact and the mechanisms of artefact reduction by the circuit elements. In vitro testing validated the capability of the instrumentation to suppress the stimulus artefact and increase gain by a factor of 1000 to 5000 compared to a conventional biopotential amplifier. The distortion of mock ECAP (mECAP) signals was measured across stimulation parameters, and the instrumentation enabled high fidelity recording of mECAPs with latencies of only 0.5 ms for DBS pulse widths of 50 to 100 µs/phase. Subsequently, the instrumentation was used to record in vivo ECAPs, without contamination by the stimulus artefact, during thalamic DBS in an anesthetized cat. The characteristics of the physiological ECAP were dependent on stimulation parameters. The novel instrumentation enables high fidelity ECAP recording and advances the potential use

  3. Potentiation of antitumor drug action by centrophenoxine: specificity.

    PubMed

    Sladek, N E

    1977-05-01

    The cytotoxic action of certain antitumor agents is potentiated by centrophenoxine although centrophenoxine itself is not an antitumor agent. Previous investigations have suggested that centrophenoxine might potentiate the cytotoxicity produced by antitumor drugs that alkylate, and other modalities that damage, DNA, but that it would not potentiate the cytotoxicity produced by antitumor drugs that inflict cellular damage in other ways. To test this hypothesis, the antitumor effects of X-irradiation UV-irradiation, alkylating agents and antitumor drugs that are not ordinarily considered to be alkylating agents were determined in the presence and absence of centrophenoxine. Mouse P388 lymphoma cells growing in static suspension culture were used as the experimental tumor. The cytotoxic action of most alkylating agents was found to be potentiated by centrophenoxine; Included in this group were several difunctional nitrogen mustards, two ethylenimines, a nitrosourea and mitomycin C. Greatest enhancement, 7-fold, was of chlorambucil antitumor activity. Centrophenoxine did not potentiate the lethality of X- or UV-irradiation or the cytotoxicity of several antineoplastic drugs that are not alkylating agents.

  4. Reflecting on mirror mechanisms: motor resonance effects during action observation only present with low-intensity transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Loporto, Michela; Holmes, Paul S; Wright, David J; McAllister, Craig J

    2013-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) studies indicate that the observation of other people's actions influences the excitability of the observer's motor system. Motor evoked potential (MEP) amplitudes typically increase in muscles which would be active during the execution of the observed action. This 'motor resonance' effect is thought to result from activity in mirror neuron regions, which enhance the excitability of the primary motor cortex (M1) via cortico-cortical pathways. The importance of TMS intensity has not yet been recognised in this area of research. Low-intensity TMS predominately activates corticospinal neurons indirectly, whereas high-intensity TMS can directly activate corticospinal axons. This indicates that motor resonance effects should be more prominent when using low-intensity TMS. A related issue is that TMS is typically applied over a single optimal scalp position (OSP) to simultaneously elicit MEPs from several muscles. Whether this confounds results, due to differences in the manner that TMS activates spatially separate cortical representations, has not yet been explored. In the current study, MEP amplitudes, resulting from single-pulse TMS applied over M1, were recorded from the first dorsal interosseous (FDI) and abductor digiti minimi (ADM) muscles during the observation of simple finger abductions. We tested if the TMS intensity (110% vs. 130% resting motor threshold) or stimulating position (FDI-OSP vs. ADM-OSP) influenced the magnitude of the motor resonance effects. Results showed that the MEP facilitation recorded in the FDI muscle during the observation of index-finger abductions was only detected using low-intensity TMS. In contrast, changes in the OSP had a negligible effect on the presence of motor resonance effects in either the FDI or ADM muscles. These findings support the hypothesis that MN activity enhances M1 excitability via cortico-cortical pathways and highlight a methodological framework by which the neural

  5. Cortical Interneuron Subtypes Vary in Their Axonal Action Potential Properties

    PubMed Central

    Casale, Amanda E.; Foust, Amanda J.; Bal, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    The role of interneurons in cortical microcircuits is strongly influenced by their passive and active electrical properties. Although different types of interneurons exhibit unique electrophysiological properties recorded at the soma, it is not yet clear whether these differences are also manifested in other neuronal compartments. To address this question, we have used voltage-sensitive dye to image the propagation of action potentials into the fine collaterals of axons and dendrites in two of the largest cortical interneuron subtypes in the mouse: fast-spiking interneurons, which are typically basket or chandelier neurons; and somatostatin containing interneurons, which are typically regular spiking Martinotti cells. We found that fast-spiking and somatostatin-expressing interneurons differed in their electrophysiological characteristics along their entire dendrosomatoaxonal extent. The action potentials generated in the somata and axons, including axon collaterals, of somatostatin-expressing interneurons are significantly broader than those generated in the same compartments of fast-spiking inhibitory interneurons. In addition, action potentials back-propagated into the dendrites of somatostatin-expressing interneurons much more readily than fast-spiking interneurons. Pharmacological investigations suggested that axonal action potential repolarization in both cell types depends critically upon Kv1 channels, whereas the axonal and somatic action potentials of somatostatin-expressing interneurons also depend on BK Ca2+-activated K+ channels. These results indicate that the two broad classes of interneurons studied here have expressly different subcellular physiological properties, allowing them to perform unique computational roles in cortical circuit operations. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Neurons in the cerebral cortex are of two major types: excitatory and inhibitory. The proper balance of excitation and inhibition in the brain is critical for its operation. Neurons

  6. Novel Transabdominal Motor Action Potential (TaMAP) Neuromonitoring System for Spinal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Erica; Gabel, Brandon C; Taylor, Natalie; Gharib, James; Lee, Yu-Po; Taylor, William

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Minimally invasive lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) approaches to the lumbar spine reduce patient morbidity compared to anterior or posterior alternatives. This approach, however, decreases direct anatomical visualization, creating the need for highly sensitive and specific neurophysiological monitoring. We seek to determine feasibility in 'transabdominal motor action potential (TaMAP)' monitoring as an assessment for the integrity of the neural elements during lateral-approach surgeries to the lumbar spine.  Methods Cathode and anode leads were placed on the posterior and anterior surfaces of two porcine subjects. Currents of varying degrees were transmitted across, from front to back. Motor responses were monitored and recorded by needle electrodes in specific distal muscle groups of the lower extremity. Lastly, the cathode and anode were placed anterior and posterior to the chest wall and stimulated to the maximum of 1500 mA to determine any effect on cardiac rhythm. Results Responses were seen by measuring vertical height differences between peaks of corresponding evoked potentials. Recruitment began at 200 mA in the lower extremities. Stimulation at 450 mA recruited a reliable and distinguishable electrographic response from most muscle groups. Responses were recorded and reliably measured and increased in proportion to the graduation of transabdominal stimulation current; no responses were seen in the arms or face. 1500 mA across the chest wall failed to stimulate or induce cardiac arrhythmia on repeated stimulation, indicating safety of stimulation. Conclusion TaMAPs seen in the animal model provide a potential alternative to standard transcranial motor evoked potentials done in the lateral approach of LLIFs. TaMAP recordings in most muscle groups were recordable and reliable, though some muscle groups failed to stimulate. Safety of transabdominal motor evoked potentials was confirmed in this porcine study. Future studies

  7. The characteristics of action potentials in primo vessels and the effects of acetylcholine injection to the action potentials.

    PubMed

    Cho, Seong Jin; Lim, Jaekwan; Yeon, Sun Hee; Kwon, O Sang; Choi, Kwang-Ho; Choi, Sun-Mi; Ryu, Yeon-Hee

    2013-01-01

    In a previous study, we found that Primo vessels generate different action potentials in smooth muscles, but this study compared the pulse shape to distinguish the two tissues. Thus, a more sophisticated extracellular experiment was performed in this study using an acetylcholine injection; we then observed changes in the amplitude, FWHM (full width at half maximum), and period to explore Primo vessel function. A third type of pulse was recorded for Primo vessels. We observed fast depolarizing and repolarizing phases for this pulse. Further, its FWHM was 30 ms between smooth muscles and neurons. Acetylcholine affected only the period. The amplitude and FWHM were consistent after injection. Primo-vessels generated action potentials at twice the frequency after injection. From the results, we speculate that Primo-vessels perform a role in transferring signals in a different manner, which may be relevant for acupuncture treatment.

  8. Optical stimulation of the prostate nerves: A potential diagnostic technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tozburun, Serhat

    There is wide variability in sexual potency rates (9--86%) after nerve-sparing prostate cancer surgery due to limited knowledge of the location of the cavernous nerves (CN's) on the prostate surface, which are responsible for erectile function. Thus, preservation of the CN's is critical in preserving a man's ability to have spontaneous erections following surgery. Nerve-mapping devices, utilizing conventional Electrical Nerve Stimulation (ENS) techniques, have been used as intra-operative diagnostic tools to assist in preservation of the CN. However, these technologies have proven inconsistent and unreliable in identifying the CN's due to the need for physical contact, the lack of spatial selectivity, and the presence of electrical artifacts in measurements. Optical Nerve Stimulation (ONS), using pulsed infrared laser radiation, is studied as an alternative to ENS. The objective of this study is sevenfold: (1) to develop a laparoscopic laser probe for ONS of the CN's in a rat model, in vivo; (2) to demonstrate faster ONS using continuous-wave infrared laser radiation; (3) to describe and characterize the mechanism of successful ONS using alternative laser wavelengths; (4) to test a compact, inexpensive all-single-mode fiber configuration for optical stimulation of the rat CN studies; (5) to implement fiber optic beam shaping methods for comparison of Gaussian and flat-top spatial beam profiles during ONS; (6) to demonstrate successful ONS of CN's through a thin layer of fascia placed over the nerve and prostate gland; and (7) to verify the experimentally determined therapeutic window for safe and reliable ONS without thermal damage to the CN's by comparison with a computational model for thermal damage. A 5.5-Watt Thulium fiber laser operated at 1870 nm and two pigtailed, single mode, near-IR diode lasers (150-mW, 1455-nm laser and 500-mW, 1550-nm laser) were used for non-contact stimulation of the rat CN's. Successful laser stimulation, as measured by an

  9. Is transcranial direct current stimulation a potential method for improving response inhibition?

    PubMed

    Kwon, Yong Hyun; Kwon, Jung Won

    2013-04-15

    Inhibitory control of movement in motor learning requires the ability to suppress an inappropriate action, a skill needed to stop a planned or ongoing motor response in response to changes in a variety of environments. This study used a stop-signal task to determine whether transcranial direct-current stimulation over the pre-supplementary motor area alters the reaction time in motor inhibition. Forty healthy subjects were recruited for this study and were randomly assigned to either the transcranial direct-current stimulation condition or a sham-transcranial direct-current stimulation condition. All subjects consecutively performed the stop-signal task before, during, and after the delivery of anodal transcranial direct-current stimulation over the pre-supplementary motor area (pre-transcranial direct-current stimulation phase, transcranial direct-current stimulation phase, and post-transcranial direct-current stimulation phase). Compared to the sham condition, there were significant reductions in the stop-signal processing times during and after transcranial direct-current stimulation, and change times were significantly greater in the transcranial direct-current stimulation condition. There was no significant change in go processing-times during or after transcranial direct-current stimulation in either condition. Anodal transcranial direct-current stimulation was feasibly coupled to an interactive improvement in inhibitory control. This coupling led to a decrease in the stop-signal process time required for the appropriate responses between motor execution and inhibition. However, there was no transcranial direct-current stimulation effect on the no-signal reaction time during the stop-signal task. Transcranial direct-current stimulation can adjust certain behaviors, and it could be a useful clinical intervention for patients who have difficulties with response inhibition.

  10. Communicating climate change: alerting versus stimulating action, a few "philosophical" interrogations from a marine biogeochemist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragueneau, O.

    2009-04-01

    I'm a marine biogeochemist, working on diatoms and their role in the oceanic biological pump and climate. Since a few years, I'm placing a lot of time and energy in communicating science about climate change because I feel that, in addition to the remarkable work performed by the IPCC which has major implications on the political agenda, we also need to talk to each citizen to stimulate action towards mitigation. While doing so, many questions arise and I think it is very important that we share our experiences, so that each of us can continue the best he can. First, I try to experience different forms of communication. Science cafés, conferences, seminars with a group of adults to explore scientific controversies (e.g. carbon compensation, biofuels…), work with teachers to bring climate change in classes. My objectives are double: convey the most recent scientific information on climate change and stimulate action. And here arises the first question: what is the frontier between outreach and a more "political" engagement? Is there any difference between working with professionals towards integrated coastal zone management, and talking to citizens, which is an important scale, when addressing climate change? During these interventions, I have realized the need to communicate about "numbers". Global numbers, in terms of gigatons emitted by human activities. But also individual numbers, to address questions such as: how important are personal emissions compared to the industry for example? And what about my own emissions? Compared to those of my neighbour… The mean individual emissions in France compared to England or Germany. In Europe compared to the US or Africa… And if I want to do something, should I act on my transport, the energy I use at home, my food? In fact, do I even know there is CO2 in my plate? To help answering some of these questions, I have developed a calculator of personal CO2 emissions, that I use in a "conference-workshop" where people

  11. Evaluating the noise in electrically evoked compound action potential measurements in cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Undurraga, Jaime A; Carlyon, Robert P; Wouters, Jan; van Wieringen, Astrid

    2012-07-01

    Electrically evoked compound action potentials (ECAPs) are widely used to study the excitability of the auditory nerve and stimulation properties in cochlear implant (CI) users. However, ECAP detection can be difficult and very subjective at near-threshold stimulation levels or in spread of excitation measurements. In this study, we evaluated the statistical properties of the background noise (BN) and the postaverage residual noise (RN) in ECAP measurements in order to determine an objective detection criterion. For the estimation of the BN and the RN, a method currently used in auditory brainstem response measurements was applied. The potential benefit of using weighted (Bayesian) averages was also examined. All estimations were performed with a set of approximately 360 ECAP measurements recorded from five human CI users of the CII or HiRes90K device (advanced bionics). Results demonstrated that the BN was normally distributed and the RN decreased according to the square root of the number of averages. No additional benefit was observed by using weighted averaging. The noise was not significantly different either at different stimulation intensities or across recording electrodes along the cochlea. The analysis of the statistical properties of the noise indicated that a signal-to-noise ratio of 1.7 dB as a detection criterion corresponds to a false positive detection rate of 1% with the used measurement setup.

  12. Mechano-perception in Chara cells: the influence of salinity and calcium on touch-activated receptor potentials, action potentials and ion transport.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, Virginia A; Beilby, Mary J; Al Khazaaly, Sabah A S; Shimmen, Teruo

    2008-11-01

    This paper investigates the impact of increased salinity on touch-induced receptor and action potentials of Chara internodal cells. We resolved underlying changes in ion transport by current/voltage analysis. In a saline medium with a low Ca(2+) ion concentration [(Ca(2+))(ext)], the cell background conductance significantly increased and proton pump currents declined to negligible levels, depolarizing the membrane potential difference (PD) to the excitation threshold [action potential (AP)(threshold)]. The onset of spontaneous repetitive action potentials further depolarized the PD, activating K(+) outward rectifying (KOR) channels. K(+) efflux was then sustained and irrevocable, and cells were desensitized to touch. However, when [Ca(2+)](ext) was high, the background conductance increased to a lesser extent and proton pump currents were stimulated, establishing a PD narrowly negative to AP(threshold). Cells did not spontaneously fire, but became hypersensitive to touch. Even slight touch stimulus induced an action potential and further repetitive firing. The duration of each excitation was extended when [Ca(2+)](ext) was low. Cell viability was prolonged in the absence of touch stimulus. Chara cells eventually depolarize and die in the saline media, but touch-stimulated and spontaneous excitation accelerates the process in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. Our results have broad implications for understanding the interactions between mechano-perception and salinity stress in plants.

  13. Enhancement of the amplitude of somatosensory evoked potentials following magnetic pulse stimulation of the human brain.

    PubMed

    Seyal, M; Browne, J K; Masuoka, L K; Gabor, A J

    1993-01-01

    In this study we have demonstrated an enhancement of cortically generated wave forms of the somatosensory evoked potential (SEP) following magnetic pulse stimulation of the human brain. Subcortically generated activity was unaltered. The enhancement of SEP amplitude was greatest when the median nerve was stimulated 30-70 msec following magnetic pulse stimulation over the contralateral parietal scalp. We posit that the enhancement of the SEP is the result of synchronization of pyramidal cells in the sensorimotor cortex resulting from the magnetic pulse.

  14. A web portal for in-silico action potential predictions

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Geoff; Mirams, Gary R.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Multiple cardiac ion channels are prone to block by pharmaceutical compounds, and this can have large implications for cardiac safety. The effect of a compound on individual ion currents can now be measured in automated patch clamp screening assays. In-silico action potential models are proposed as one way of predicting the integrated compound effects on whole-cell electrophysiology, to provide an improved indication of pro-arrhythmic risk. Methods We have developed open source software to run cardiac electrophysiology simulations to predict the overall effect of compounds that block IKr, ICaL, INa, IKs, IK1 and Ito to varying degrees, using a choice of mathematical electrophysiology models. To enable safety pharmacology teams to run and evaluate these simulations easily, we have also developed an open source web portal interface to this simulator. Results The web portal can be found at https://chaste.cs.ox.ac.uk/ActionPotential. Users can enter details of compound affinities for ion channels in the form of IC50 or pIC50 values, run simulations, store the results for later retrieval, view summary graphs of the results, and export data to a spreadsheet format. Discussion This web portal provides a simple interface to reference versions of mathematical models, and well-tested state-of-the-art equation solvers. It provides safety teams easy access to the emerging technology of cardiac electrophysiology simulations for use in the drug-discovery process. PMID:25963830

  15. Flexible graphene transistors for recording cell action potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaschke, Benno M.; Lottner, Martin; Drieschner, Simon; Bonaccini Calia, Andrea; Stoiber, Karolina; Rousseau, Lionel; Lissourges, Gaëlle; Garrido, Jose A.

    2016-06-01

    Graphene solution-gated field-effect transistors (SGFETs) are a promising platform for the recording of cell action potentials due to the intrinsic high signal amplification of graphene transistors. In addition, graphene technology fulfills important key requirements for in-vivo applications, such as biocompability, mechanical flexibility, as well as ease of high density integration. In this paper we demonstrate the fabrication of flexible arrays of graphene SGFETs on polyimide, a biocompatible polymeric substrate. We investigate the transistor’s transconductance and intrinsic electronic noise which are key parameters for the device sensitivity, confirming that the obtained values are comparable to those of rigid graphene SGFETs. Furthermore, we show that the devices do not degrade during repeated bending and the transconductance, governed by the electronic properties of graphene, is unaffected by bending. After cell culture, we demonstrate the recording of cell action potentials from cardiomyocyte-like cells with a high signal-to-noise ratio that is higher or comparable to competing state of the art technologies. Our results highlight the great capabilities of flexible graphene SGFETs in bioelectronics, providing a solid foundation for in-vivo experiments and, eventually, for graphene-based neuroprosthetics.

  16. Continuous-wave infrared optical nerve stimulation for potential diagnostic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tozburun, Serhat; Cilip, Christopher M.; Lagoda, Gwen A.; Burnett, Arthur L.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2010-09-01

    Optical nerve stimulation using infrared laser radiation has recently been developed as a potential alternative to electrical nerve stimulation. However, recent studies have focused primarily on pulsed delivery of the laser radiation and at relatively low pulse rates. The objective of this study is to demonstrate faster optical stimulation of the prostate cavernous nerves using continuous-wave (cw) infrared laser radiation for potential diagnostic applications. A thulium fiber laser (λ=1870 nm) is used for noncontact optical stimulation of the rat prostate cavernous nerves in vivo. Optical nerve stimulation, as measured by an intracavernous pressure (ICP) response in the penis, is achieved with the laser operating in either cw mode, or with a 5-ms pulse duration at 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, and 100 Hz. Successful optical stimulation is observed to be primarily dependent on a threshold nerve temperature (42 to 45 °C), rather than an incident fluence, as previously reported. cw optical nerve stimulation provides a significantly faster ICP response time using a lower power (and also less expensive) laser than pulsed stimulation. cw optical nerve stimulation may therefore represent an alternative mode of stimulation for intraoperative diagnostic applications where a rapid response is critical, such as identification of the cavernous nerves during prostate cancer surgery.

  17. Simultaneously recorded retinal and cerebral potentials to windmill stimulation.

    PubMed

    Dodt, E; Kuba, M

    1995-01-01

    Visual evoked retinal and cerebral potentials were recorded to onset rotation of an isoluminant sectored disc. While the retinal potentials recorded to onset rotation closely resembled the electroretinogram to a checkerboard or stripe pattern of fixed element size, the visual evoked potential changed interindividually and intraindividually from a fast positive wave at high contrasts, velocities and number of windmill segments to a later negative component at low contrasts, velocities and windmill segments. With change in luminance, contrast, speed and extent of rotation field size and number of disc segments, the visual evoked potential was generally less affected than the electroretinogram.

  18. [Nutritional management of intestinal failure and potential stimulation mechanisms].

    PubMed

    Pérez de la Cruz, A J; Moreno-Torres Herrera, R; Pérez Roca, C

    2007-05-01

    Severe forms of intestinal failure represent one of the most complex pathologies to manage, in both children and adults. In adults, the most common causes are chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction and severe short bowel syndrome following large intestinal resections, particularly due to massive mesenteric ischemic, within the context of cardiopathies occurring with atrial fibrillation. The essential management after stabilizing the patient consists in nutritional support, either by parenteral or enteral routes, with tolerance to oral diet being the final goal of intestinal adaptation in these pathologies. Surgery may be indicated in some cases to increase the absorptive surface area. Parenteral nutrition is an essential support measure that sometimes has to be maintained for long time, even forever, except for technique-related complications or unfavorable clinical course that would lead to extreme surgical alternatives such as intestinal transplantation. Hormonal therapy with trophism-stimulating factors opens new alternatives that are already being tried in humans.

  19. Potentiating paired stimulation of cardiac muscle in vitro as positive inotropic reference standard.

    PubMed

    Scholtysik, G

    1986-07-01

    In rabbit papillary muscles, potentiating paired stimulation was used as a standard positive inotropic intervention. Pairs of depolarizing electrical stimuli were applied, equal in strength and with a coupling interval of the functional refractory period plus 10 msec. After five successive pairs at a basic driving rate of 0.5 Hz, maximum potentiation amounting to a two- to threefold increase in the contraction amplitude was reached. The potentiating paired stimulation was rapid in both onset and reversibility and was reproducible. Potentiating paired stimulation is sparing since internal Ca2+ pools are utilized to increase force. Using potentiating paired stimulation-induced increase in force of contraction as a new reference, the following order of potency of positive inotropic agents was obtained: ouabain greater than DPI 201-106 greater than IBMX greater than APP 201-533. Effects of these drugs on rested-state contractions and frequency-force relationship were also investigated.

  20. Three-dimensional mapping and regulation of action potential propagation in nanoelectronics-innervated tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Xiaochuan; Zhou, Wei; Gao, Teng; Liu, Jia; Lieber, Charles M.

    2016-09-01

    Real-time mapping and manipulation of electrophysiology in three-dimensional (3D) tissues could have important impacts on fundamental scientific and clinical studies, yet realization is hampered by a lack of effective methods. Here we introduce tissue-scaffold-mimicking 3D nanoelectronic arrays consisting of 64 addressable devices with subcellular dimensions and a submillisecond temporal resolution. Real-time extracellular action potential (AP) recordings reveal quantitative maps of AP propagation in 3D cardiac tissues, enable in situ tracing of the evolving topology of 3D conducting pathways in developing cardiac tissues and probe the dynamics of AP conduction characteristics in a transient arrhythmia disease model and subsequent tissue self-adaptation. We further demonstrate simultaneous multisite stimulation and mapping to actively manipulate the frequency and direction of AP propagation. These results establish new methodologies for 3D spatiotemporal tissue recording and control, and demonstrate the potential to impact regenerative medicine, pharmacology and electronic therapeutics.

  1. The Potential of Deweyan-Inspired Action Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stark, Jody L.

    2014-01-01

    In its broadest sense, pragmatism could be said to be the philosophical orientation of all action research. Action research is characterized by research, action, and participation grounded in democratic principles and guided by the aim of social improvement. Furthermore, action research is an active process of inquiry that does not admit…

  2. The Venus Flytrap Dionaea muscipula Counts Prey-Induced Action Potentials to Induce Sodium Uptake.

    PubMed

    Böhm, Jennifer; Scherzer, Sönke; Krol, Elzbieta; Kreuzer, Ines; von Meyer, Katharina; Lorey, Christian; Mueller, Thomas D; Shabala, Lana; Monte, Isabel; Solano, Roberto; Al-Rasheid, Khaled A S; Rennenberg, Heinz; Shabala, Sergey; Neher, Erwin; Hedrich, Rainer

    2016-02-01

    Carnivorous plants, such as the Venus flytrap (Dionaea muscipula), depend on an animal diet when grown in nutrient-poor soils. When an insect visits the trap and tilts the mechanosensors on the inner surface, action potentials (APs) are fired. After a moving object elicits two APs, the trap snaps shut, encaging the victim. Panicking preys repeatedly touch the trigger hairs over the subsequent hours, leading to a hermetically closed trap, which via the gland-based endocrine system is flooded by a prey-decomposing acidic enzyme cocktail. Here, we asked the question as to how many times trigger hairs have to be stimulated (e.g., now many APs are required) for the flytrap to recognize an encaged object as potential food, thus making it worthwhile activating the glands. By applying a series of trigger-hair stimulations, we found that the touch hormone jasmonic acid (JA) signaling pathway is activated after the second stimulus, while more than three APs are required to trigger an expression of genes encoding prey-degrading hydrolases, and that this expression is proportional to the number of mechanical stimulations. A decomposing animal contains a sodium load, and we have found that these sodium ions enter the capture organ via glands. We identified a flytrap sodium channel DmHKT1 as responsible for this sodium acquisition, with the number of transcripts expressed being dependent on the number of mechano-electric stimulations. Hence, the number of APs a victim triggers while trying to break out of the trap identifies the moving prey as a struggling Na(+)-rich animal and nutrition for the plant. PMID:26804557

  3. The Venus Flytrap Dionaea muscipula Counts Prey-Induced Action Potentials to Induce Sodium Uptake

    PubMed Central

    Böhm, Jennifer; Scherzer, Sönke; Krol, Elzbieta; Kreuzer, Ines; von Meyer, Katharina; Lorey, Christian; Mueller, Thomas D.; Shabala, Lana; Monte, Isabel; Solano, Roberto; Al-Rasheid, Khaled A.S.; Rennenberg, Heinz; Shabala, Sergey; Neher, Erwin; Hedrich, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    Summary Carnivorous plants, such as the Venus flytrap (Dionaea muscipula), depend on an animal diet when grown in nutrient-poor soils. When an insect visits the trap and tilts the mechanosensors on the inner surface, action potentials (APs) are fired. After a moving object elicits two APs, the trap snaps shut, encaging the victim. Panicking preys repeatedly touch the trigger hairs over the subsequent hours, leading to a hermetically closed trap, which via the gland-based endocrine system is flooded by a prey-decomposing acidic enzyme cocktail. Here, we asked the question as to how many times trigger hairs have to be stimulated (e.g., now many APs are required) for the flytrap to recognize an encaged object as potential food, thus making it worthwhile activating the glands. By applying a series of trigger-hair stimulations, we found that the touch hormone jasmonic acid (JA) signaling pathway is activated after the second stimulus, while more than three APs are required to trigger an expression of genes encoding prey-degrading hydrolases, and that this expression is proportional to the number of mechanical stimulations. A decomposing animal contains a sodium load, and we have found that these sodium ions enter the capture organ via glands. We identified a flytrap sodium channel DmHKT1 as responsible for this sodium acquisition, with the number of transcripts expressed being dependent on the number of mechano-electric stimulations. Hence, the number of APs a victim triggers while trying to break out of the trap identifies the moving prey as a struggling Na+-rich animal and nutrition for the plant. Video Abstract PMID:26804557

  4. The Venus Flytrap Dionaea muscipula Counts Prey-Induced Action Potentials to Induce Sodium Uptake.

    PubMed

    Böhm, Jennifer; Scherzer, Sönke; Krol, Elzbieta; Kreuzer, Ines; von Meyer, Katharina; Lorey, Christian; Mueller, Thomas D; Shabala, Lana; Monte, Isabel; Solano, Roberto; Al-Rasheid, Khaled A S; Rennenberg, Heinz; Shabala, Sergey; Neher, Erwin; Hedrich, Rainer

    2016-02-01

    Carnivorous plants, such as the Venus flytrap (Dionaea muscipula), depend on an animal diet when grown in nutrient-poor soils. When an insect visits the trap and tilts the mechanosensors on the inner surface, action potentials (APs) are fired. After a moving object elicits two APs, the trap snaps shut, encaging the victim. Panicking preys repeatedly touch the trigger hairs over the subsequent hours, leading to a hermetically closed trap, which via the gland-based endocrine system is flooded by a prey-decomposing acidic enzyme cocktail. Here, we asked the question as to how many times trigger hairs have to be stimulated (e.g., now many APs are required) for the flytrap to recognize an encaged object as potential food, thus making it worthwhile activating the glands. By applying a series of trigger-hair stimulations, we found that the touch hormone jasmonic acid (JA) signaling pathway is activated after the second stimulus, while more than three APs are required to trigger an expression of genes encoding prey-degrading hydrolases, and that this expression is proportional to the number of mechanical stimulations. A decomposing animal contains a sodium load, and we have found that these sodium ions enter the capture organ via glands. We identified a flytrap sodium channel DmHKT1 as responsible for this sodium acquisition, with the number of transcripts expressed being dependent on the number of mechano-electric stimulations. Hence, the number of APs a victim triggers while trying to break out of the trap identifies the moving prey as a struggling Na(+)-rich animal and nutrition for the plant.

  5. Electrophysiologic studies of cervical vagus nerve stimulation in humans: II. Evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Hammond, E J; Uthman, B M; Reid, S A; Wilder, B J

    1992-01-01

    Evidence from studies of experimental animals indicates that electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve not only can alter the EEG but evokes activity in specific brain areas. We report effects of electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve in 9 patients with medically intractable seizures as part of a clinical trial of chronic vagal stimulation for control of epilepsy. The left vagus nerve in the neck was stimulated with a programmable implanted stimulator. Effects of stimulus amplitude, duration, and rate were studied. Noncephalic reference recording of the vagus nerve evoked potential showed some unusual properties: a scalp negative component occurred with a latency of 12 ms, very high amplitude (< or = 60 microV), and widespread scalp distribution. Field distribution studies indicated that this potential was myogenic in origin and generated in the region of the stimulating electrodes in the neck area. Chemically induced muscle paralysis confirmed this observation. Bipolar scalp recording showed several small-amplitude topographically distinct potentials occurring in 30 ms. No effect, either acute or chronic, could be detected on pattern-reversal evoked potentials, auditory brainstem evoked potentials, auditory 40-Hz potentials, or cognitive evoked potentials. PMID:1464258

  6. Electrophysiological Motor Unit Number Estimation (MUNE) Measuring Compound Muscle Action Potential (CMAP) in Mouse Hindlimb Muscles.

    PubMed

    Arnold, W David; Sheth, Kajri A; Wier, Christopher G; Kissel, John T; Burghes, Arthur H; Kolb, Stephen J

    2015-09-25

    Compound muscle action potential (CMAP) and motor unit number estimation (MUNE) are electrophysiological techniques that can be used to monitor the functional status of a motor unit pool in vivo. These measures can provide insight into the normal development and degeneration of the neuromuscular system. These measures have clear translational potential because they are routinely applied in diagnostic and clinical human studies. We present electrophysiological techniques similar to those employed in humans to allow recordings of mouse sciatic nerve function. The CMAP response represents the electrophysiological output from a muscle or group of muscles following supramaximal stimulation of a peripheral nerve. MUNE is an electrophysiological technique that is based on modifications of the CMAP response. MUNE is a calculated value that represents the estimated number of motor neurons or axons (motor control input) supplying the muscle or group of muscles being tested. We present methods for recording CMAP responses from the proximal leg muscles using surface recording electrodes following the stimulation of the sciatic nerve in mice. An incremental MUNE technique is described using submaximal stimuli to determine the average single motor unit potential (SMUP) size. MUNE is calculated by dividing the CMAP amplitude (peak-to-peak) by the SMUP amplitude (peak-to-peak). These electrophysiological techniques allow repeated measures in both neonatal and adult mice in such a manner that facilitates rapid analysis and data collection while reducing the number of animals required for experimental testing. Furthermore, these measures are similar to those recorded in human studies allowing more direct comparisons.

  7. Electrophysiological Motor Unit Number Estimation (MUNE) Measuring Compound Muscle Action Potential (CMAP) in Mouse Hindlimb Muscles.

    PubMed

    Arnold, W David; Sheth, Kajri A; Wier, Christopher G; Kissel, John T; Burghes, Arthur H; Kolb, Stephen J

    2015-01-01

    Compound muscle action potential (CMAP) and motor unit number estimation (MUNE) are electrophysiological techniques that can be used to monitor the functional status of a motor unit pool in vivo. These measures can provide insight into the normal development and degeneration of the neuromuscular system. These measures have clear translational potential because they are routinely applied in diagnostic and clinical human studies. We present electrophysiological techniques similar to those employed in humans to allow recordings of mouse sciatic nerve function. The CMAP response represents the electrophysiological output from a muscle or group of muscles following supramaximal stimulation of a peripheral nerve. MUNE is an electrophysiological technique that is based on modifications of the CMAP response. MUNE is a calculated value that represents the estimated number of motor neurons or axons (motor control input) supplying the muscle or group of muscles being tested. We present methods for recording CMAP responses from the proximal leg muscles using surface recording electrodes following the stimulation of the sciatic nerve in mice. An incremental MUNE technique is described using submaximal stimuli to determine the average single motor unit potential (SMUP) size. MUNE is calculated by dividing the CMAP amplitude (peak-to-peak) by the SMUP amplitude (peak-to-peak). These electrophysiological techniques allow repeated measures in both neonatal and adult mice in such a manner that facilitates rapid analysis and data collection while reducing the number of animals required for experimental testing. Furthermore, these measures are similar to those recorded in human studies allowing more direct comparisons. PMID:26436455

  8. Electrophysiological Motor Unit Number Estimation (MUNE) Measuring Compound Muscle Action Potential (CMAP) in Mouse Hindlimb Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, W. David; Sheth, Kajri A.; Wier, Christopher G.; Kissel, John T.; Burghes, Arthur H.; Kolb, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Compound muscle action potential (CMAP) and motor unit number estimation (MUNE) are electrophysiological techniques that can be used to monitor the functional status of a motor unit pool in vivo. These measures can provide insight into the normal development and degeneration of the neuromuscular system. These measures have clear translational potential because they are routinely applied in diagnostic and clinical human studies. We present electrophysiological techniques similar to those employed in humans to allow recordings of mouse sciatic nerve function. The CMAP response represents the electrophysiological output from a muscle or group of muscles following supramaximal stimulation of a peripheral nerve. MUNE is an electrophysiological technique that is based on modifications of the CMAP response. MUNE is a calculated value that represents the estimated number of motor neurons or axons (motor control input) supplying the muscle or group of muscles being tested. We present methods for recording CMAP responses from the proximal leg muscles using surface recording electrodes following the stimulation of the sciatic nerve in mice. An incremental MUNE technique is described using submaximal stimuli to determine the average single motor unit potential (SMUP) size. MUNE is calculated by dividing the CMAP amplitude (peak-to-peak) by the SMUP amplitude (peak-to-peak). These electrophysiological techniques allow repeated measures in both neonatal and adult mice in such a manner that facilitates rapid analysis and data collection while reducing the number of animals required for experimental testing. Furthermore, these measures are similar to those recorded in human studies allowing more direct comparisons. PMID:26436455

  9. Transforming echoes into pseudo-action potentials for classifying plants.

    PubMed

    Kuc, R

    2001-10-01

    Animals perceive their environment by converting sensory stimuli into action potentials, or temporal point processes, that are interpreted by the brain. This paper investigates the information content of point processes extracted from echoes from in situ plants in an effort to understand how bats recognize landmarks in the field. A mobile sonar converts echoes into biologically similar temporal point processes. termed pseudo-action potentials (PAPs), whose inter-PAP interval relates to echo amplitude. The sonar forms a sector scan of an object to produce a spatial-temporal PAP field. Classifier neurons apply delays and coincidence detection to the PAP field to identify three distinct echo types, glints, blobs, and fuzz, which characterize plant features. Glints are large amplitude echoes exhibiting coherence over successive echoes in the sector scan, typically produced by favorably oriented isolated specular reflectors. Blobs are large echoes lacking coherence, typically bordering glints or formed by collections of interfering reflectors. Fuzz represents weak echoes, typically produced by collection of weak scatterers or by reflectors on the beam periphery. A small mirror reflector models a flat leaf surface and motivates the glint criteria. Classifiers are applied to experimental data from two types of tree trunks, a glint-producing sycamore (Platanus occidenatalis) and a glint-absent Norway maple (Acer platanoides) and two plants, a glint-producing rhododendron (Rhododendron maximus) and a glint-absent yew (Taxus media). We speculate that our narrow-band sonar models the activity of a single frequency bin in the frequency-modulated (FM) sweep emitted by bats, and that one function of the frequency bins in the FM sweep is to form a sector scan of the environment.

  10. Dipole characterization of single neurons from their extracellular action potentials

    PubMed Central

    Victor, Jonathan D.

    2011-01-01

    The spatial variation of the extracellular action potentials (EAP) of a single neuron contains information about the size and location of the dominant current source of its action potential generator, which is typically in the vicinity of the soma. Using this dependence in reverse in a three-component realistic probe + brain + source model, we solved the inverse problem of characterizing the equivalent current source of an isolated neuron from the EAP data sampled by an extracellular probe at multiple independent recording locations. We used a dipole for the model source because there is extensive evidence it accurately captures the spatial roll-off of the EAP amplitude, and because, as we show, dipole localization, beyond a minimum cell-probe distance, is a more accurate alternative to approaches based on monopole source models. Dipole characterization is separable into a linear dipole moment optimization where the dipole location is fixed, and a second, nonlinear, global optimization of the source location. We solved the linear optimization on a discrete grid via the lead fields of the probe, which can be calculated for any realistic probe + brain model by the finite element method. The global source location was optimized by means of Tikhonov regularization that jointly minimizes model error and dipole size. The particular strategy chosen reflects the fact that the dipole model is used in the near field, in contrast to the typical prior applications of dipole models to EKG and EEG source analysis. We applied dipole localization to data collected with stepped tetrodes whose detailed geometry was measured via scanning electron microscopy. The optimal dipole could account for 96% of the power in the spatial variation of the EAP amplitude. Among various model error contributions to the residual, we address especially the error in probe geometry, and the extent to which it biases estimates of dipole parameters. This dipole characterization method can be applied to

  11. Strict actions of the human wrist flexors: A study with an electrical neuromuscular stimulation method.

    PubMed

    Narita, Aya; Sagae, Masaaki; Suzuki, Katsuhiko; Fujita, Takaaki; Sotokawa, Tasuku; Nakano, Haruki; Naganuma, Makoto; Sato, Toshiaki; Fujii, Hiromi; Nito, Mitsuhiro; Hashizume, Wataru; Ogino, Toshihiko; Naito, Akira

    2015-08-01

    In order to elucidate strict actions of the human wrist flexors, motion and force produced by electrical neuromuscular stimulation (ENS) to each of musculus (m.) flexsor carpi radialis (FCR) and m. flexsor carpi ulnaris (FCU) with the prone, semiprone, and supine forearm were studied in ten healthy human subjects. Abduction, extension, adduction, and flexion directions were represented by, respectively, 0°, 90°, 180°, and 270°. ENS to FCR and FCU produced motion in direction of, respectively, 273° (mean) and 265° with the prone, 249° and 232° with the semiprone, and 242° and 229° with the supine forearm to the maximal range. Direction/strength (Nm) of force by ENS to FCR and FCU were, respectively, 298°/1.16 and 239°/1.70 with the prone, 279°/1.30 and 241°/1.62 with the semiprone, and 267°/1.24 and 227°/2.04 with the supine forearm. ENS to FCR exhibited force of 20-29% of maximal flexion and 7-15% of maximal abduction or 1-4% of maximal adduction and that to FCU force of 24-28% of maximal flexion and 15-25% of maximal adduction. The force study results suggest that FCU is a flexor rather than an adductor with every forearm position. FCR should be a flexor rather than an abductor with the prone and semiprone and a flexor with the supine forearm. The action of FCR as the abductor should diminish with supinating the forearm. PMID:25921817

  12. Site-specific PEGylation of human thyroid stimulating hormone to prolong duration of action.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Huawei; Boudanova, Ekaterina; Park, Anna; Bird, Julie J; Honey, Denise M; Zarazinski, Christine; Greene, Ben; Kingsbury, Jonathan S; Boucher, Susan; Pollock, Julie; McPherson, John M; Pan, Clark Q

    2013-03-20

    Recombinant human thyroid stimulating hormone (rhTSH or Thyrogen) has been approved for thyroid cancer diagnostics and treatment under a multidose regimen due to its short circulating half-life. To reduce dosing frequency, PEGylation strategies were explored to increase the duration of action of rhTSH. Lysine and N-terminal PEGylation resulted in heterogeneous product profiles with 40% or lower reaction yields of monoPEGylated products. Eleven cysteine mutants were designed based on a structure model of the TSH-TSH receptor (TSHR) complex to create unique conjugation sites on both α and β subunits for site-specific conjugation. Sequential screening of mutant expression level, oligomerization tendency, and conjugation efficiency resulted in the identification of the αG22C rhTSH mutant for stable expression and scale-up PEGylation. The introduced cysteine in the αG22C rhTSH mutant was partially blocked when isolated from conditioned media and could only be effectively PEGylated after mild reduction with cysteine. This produced a higher reaction yield, ~85%, for the monoPEGylated product. Although the mutation had no effect on receptor binding, PEGylation of αG22C rhTSH led to a PEG size-dependent decrease in receptor binding. Nevertheless, the 40 kDa PEG αG22C rhTSH showed a prolonged duration of action compared to rhTSH in a rat pharmacodynamics model. Reverse-phase HPLC and N-terminal sequencing experiments confirmed site-specific modification at the engineered Cys 22 position on the α-subunit. This work is another demonstration of successful PEGylation of a cysteine-knot protein by an engineered cysteine mutation.

  13. Brain and pineal 7α-hydroxypregnenolone stimulating locomotor activity: identification, mode of action and regulation of biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Tsutsui, Kazuyoshi; Haraguchi, Shogo; Fukada, Yoshitaka; Vaudry, Hubert

    2013-08-01

    Biologically active steroids synthesized in the central and peripheral nervous systems are termed neurosteroids. However, the biosynthetic pathways leading to the formation of neurosteroids are still incompletely elucidated. 7α-Hydroxypregnenolone, a novel bioactive neurosteroid stimulating locomotor activity, has been recently identified in the brain of newts and quail. Subsequently, the mode of action and regulation of biosynthesis of 7α-hydroxypregnenolone have been determined. Moreover, recent studies on birds have demonstrated that the pineal gland, an endocrine organ located close to the brain, is an important site of production of neurosteroids de novo from cholesterol. 7α-Hydroxypregnenolone is a major pineal neurosteroid that stimulates locomotor activity in juvenile chickens, connecting light-induced gene expression with locomotion. This review summarizes the advances in our understanding of the identification, mode of action and regulation of biosynthesis of brain and pineal 7α-hydroxypregnenolone, a potent stimulator of locomotor activity.

  14. Optogenetic stimulation in a computational model of the basal ganglia biases action selection and reward prediction error.

    PubMed

    Berthet, Pierre; Lansner, Anders

    2014-01-01

    Optogenetic stimulation of specific types of medium spiny neurons (MSNs) in the striatum has been shown to bias the selection of mice in a two choices task. This shift is dependent on the localisation and on the intensity of the stimulation but also on the recent reward history. We have implemented a way to simulate this increased activity produced by the optical flash in our computational model of the basal ganglia (BG). This abstract model features the direct and indirect pathways commonly described in biology, and a reward prediction pathway (RP). The framework is similar to Actor-Critic methods and to the ventral/dorsal distinction in the striatum. We thus investigated the impact on the selection caused by an added stimulation in each of the three pathways. We were able to reproduce in our model the bias in action selection observed in mice. Our results also showed that biasing the reward prediction is sufficient to create a modification in the action selection. However, we had to increase the percentage of trials with stimulation relative to that in experiments in order to impact the selection. We found that increasing only the reward prediction had a different effect if the stimulation in RP was action dependent (only for a specific action) or not. We further looked at the evolution of the change in the weights depending on the stage of learning within a block. A bias in RP impacts the plasticity differently depending on that stage but also on the outcome. It remains to experimentally test how the dopaminergic neurons are affected by specific stimulations of neurons in the striatum and to relate data to predictions of our model. PMID:24614169

  15. Optogenetic Stimulation in a Computational Model of the Basal Ganglia Biases Action Selection and Reward Prediction Error

    PubMed Central

    Berthet, Pierre; Lansner, Anders

    2014-01-01

    Optogenetic stimulation of specific types of medium spiny neurons (MSNs) in the striatum has been shown to bias the selection of mice in a two choices task. This shift is dependent on the localisation and on the intensity of the stimulation but also on the recent reward history. We have implemented a way to simulate this increased activity produced by the optical flash in our computational model of the basal ganglia (BG). This abstract model features the direct and indirect pathways commonly described in biology, and a reward prediction pathway (RP). The framework is similar to Actor-Critic methods and to the ventral/dorsal distinction in the striatum. We thus investigated the impact on the selection caused by an added stimulation in each of the three pathways. We were able to reproduce in our model the bias in action selection observed in mice. Our results also showed that biasing the reward prediction is sufficient to create a modification in the action selection. However, we had to increase the percentage of trials with stimulation relative to that in experiments in order to impact the selection. We found that increasing only the reward prediction had a different effect if the stimulation in RP was action dependent (only for a specific action) or not. We further looked at the evolution of the change in the weights depending on the stage of learning within a block. A bias in RP impacts the plasticity differently depending on that stage but also on the outcome. It remains to experimentally test how the dopaminergic neurons are affected by specific stimulations of neurons in the striatum and to relate data to predictions of our model. PMID:24614169

  16. Stimulation of raphe (obscurus) nucleus causes long-term potentiation of phrenic nerve activity in cat.

    PubMed

    Millhorn, D E

    1986-12-01

    1. The respiratory response, measured as integrated phrenic nerve activity, during and for up to an hour following 10 min of continuous electrical stimulation of raphe obscurus was quantitated in anaesthetized, artificially ventilated cats whose carotid sinus nerves and vagus nerves had been cut. End-tidal PCO2 and body temperature were kept constant with servocontrollers. 2. Stimulation of raphe obscurus caused a significant increase in both phrenic tidal activity and respiratory frequency that persisted following cessation of the stimulus. This persistent facilitation is referred to as 'long-term potentiation' of respiration. 3. Control stimulations in the parenchyma of the medulla oblongata failed to stimulate respiration and cause the long-term potentiation. 4. Both the direct facilitatory effects of raphe obscurus stimulation on phrenic nerve activity and the long-term potentiation of respiration following the stimulus were prevented by pre-treating cats with methysergide, a serotonin receptor antagonist. 5. The results are discussed in terms of the raphe obscurus being the potential source of the long-term potentiation of respiration that occurs following stimulation of carotid body afferents (Millhorn, Eldridge & Waldrop, 1980a, b). PMID:3114470

  17. Neuronostatin inhibits glucose-stimulated insulin secretion via direct action on the pancreatic α-cell

    PubMed Central

    Salvatori, Alison S.; Elrick, Mollisa M.; Samson, Willis K.; Corbett, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Neuronostatin is a recently described peptide hormone encoded by the somatostatin gene. We previously showed that intraperitoneal injection of neuronostatin into mice resulted in c-Jun accumulation in pancreatic islets in a pattern consistent with the activation of glucagon-producing α-cells. We therefore hypothesized that neuronostatin could influence glucose homeostasis via a direct effect on the α-cell. Neuronostatin enhanced low-glucose-induced glucagon release in isolated rat islets and in the immortalized α-cell line αTC1-9. Furthermore, incubation with neuronostatin led to an increase in transcription of glucagon mRNA, as determined by RT-PCR. Neuronostatin also inhibited glucose-stimulated insulin secretion from isolated islets. However, neuronostatin did not alter insulin release from the β-cell line INS 832/13, indicating that the effect of neuronostatin on insulin secretion may be secondary to a direct action on the α-cell. In agreement with our in vitro data, intra-arterial infusion of neuronostatin in male rats delayed glucose disposal and inhibited insulin release during a glucose challenge. These studies suggest that neuronostatin participates in maintaining glucose homeostasis through cell-cell interactions between α-cells and β-cells in the endocrine pancreas, leading to attenuation in insulin secretion. PMID:24735892

  18. Photodynamic therapy potentiates the paracrine endothelial stimulation by colorectal cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamberti, María Julia; Florencia Pansa, María; Emanuel Vera, Renzo; Belén Rumie Vittar, Natalia; Rivarola, Viviana Alicia

    2014-11-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer and the third leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Recurrence is a major problem and is often the ultimate cause of death. In this context, the tumor microenvironment influences tumor progression and is considered as a new essential feature that clearly impacts on treatment outcome, and must therefore be taken into consideration. Photodynamic therapy (PDT), oxygen, light and drug-dependent, is a novel treatment modality when CRC patients are inoperable. Tumor vasculature and parenchyma cells are both potential targets of PDT damage modulating tumor-stroma interactions. In biological activity assessment in photodynamic research, three-dimensional (3D) cultures are essential to integrate biomechanical, biochemical, and biophysical properties that better predict the outcome of oxygen- and drug-dependent medical therapies. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate the antitumor effect of methyl 5-aminolevulinic acid-PDT using a light emitting diode for the treatment of CRC cells in a scenario that mimics targeted tissue complexity, providing a potential bridge for the gap between 2D cultures and animal models. Since photodynamic intervention of the tumor microenvironment can effectively modulate the tumor-stroma interaction, it was proposed to characterize the endothelial response to CRC paracrine communication, if one of these two populations is photosensitized. In conclusion, we demonstrated that the dialogue between endothelial and tumor populations when subjected to lethal PDT conditions induces an increase in angiogenic phenotype, and we think that it should be carefully considered for the development of PDT therapeutic protocols.

  19. Methods of gastric electrical stimulation and pacing: a review of their benefits and mechanisms of action in gastroparesis and obesity.

    PubMed

    Hasler, W L

    2009-03-01

    Development of gastric electrical stimulation techniques for treatment of gastric dysmotility syndromes and obesity has been a long-standing goal of investigators and clinicians. Depending on stimulus parameters and sites of stimulation, such methods have a range of theoretical benefits including entrainment of intrinsic gastric electrical activity, eliciting propagating contractions and reducing symptomatology in patients with gastroparesis and reducing appetite and food intake in individuals with morbid obesity. Additionally, gastric stimulation parameters have extragastrointestinal effects including alteration of systemic hormonal and autonomic neural activity and modulation of afferent nerve pathways projecting to the central nervous system that may represent important mechanisms of action. Numerous case series and smaller numbers of controlled trials suggest clinical benefits in these two conditions, however better controlled trials are mandated to confirm their efficacy. Current research is focusing on novel stimulation methods to better control symptoms in gastroparesis and promote weight reduction in morbid obesity. PMID:19254353

  20. Differentiation of the action potential in the smooth muscle of canine gastric antrum using calcium-inhibitory drugs.

    PubMed

    Hohnsbein, J; Golenhofen, K

    1985-03-01

    Electrical and mechanical activity were recorded simultaneously in smooth muscle preparations from the antrum region of canine stomach by means of a single sucrose gap technique (SGT). The SGT was optimized to permit stable recording from multicellular smooth muscle preparations over several hours of electrical and mechanical activity with little disturbance of their normal properties. Acetylcholine (ACh, 10(-8) to 10(-6) M) induced or augmented dose-dependently the electrical and mechanical activity. The plateau of the action potential complex was elevated by ACh, while the contraction was increased in linear correlation to the magnitude of the plateau component. In spontaneously active (or in ACh-stimulated) preparations TEA (5 to 20 mM) magnified the plateau component, induced or strengthened spikes on the plateau ('secondary spikes'), and induced or strengthened phasic contractions. Nifedipine (10(-6) M) abolished secondary spikes, part of the plateau component of the action potential, and suppressed mechanical activity. The complex action potential of canine gastric antrum can be differentiated into (a) a basic action potential, consisting of an initial, primary spike and a plateau depolarization; this basic action potential is resistant to nifedipine and does not trigger any mechanical activity; and (b) a nifedipine-sensitive component (calcium component), which consists of an augmentation of the plateau depolarization and of secondary spikes, and which is responsible for the initiation of mechanical activity.

  1. [Adrenaline potentiates antiepileptic but not sedative action of diazepam in rats].

    PubMed

    Serdiuk, S E; Gmiro, V E

    2012-02-01

    Intramuscular (i.m.) administration ofdiazepam in a dose of 10 mg/kg and adrenaline in a dose of 0.2 mg/kg prevents generalized clonic-tonic pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) seizures in 75-80 % of rats, but only in 35-40 % of rats it prevents local clonic PTZ seizures. In the above mentioned dose, diazepam causes a strong sedation, but adrenaline does not cause a sedative effects. The combined administration of diazepam and adrenaline in threshold independently ineffective doses prevents both clonic-tonic and clonic PTZ seizures in 80 % of rats without a sedation development. The basis for mechanism of potentiation of anticonvulsant action of diazepam is the stimulation of gastric mucosa afferents by adrenaline. PMID:22650067

  2. Modelling Action Potential Generation and Propagation in Fibroblastic Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, J. J.; Cornelisse, L. N.; Harks, E. G. A.; Theuvenet, A. P. R.; Ypey, D. L.

    2003-04-01

    Using a standard Hodgkin-Huxley (HH) formalism, we present a mathematical model for action potential (AP) generation and intercellular AP propagation in quiescent (serum-deprived) normal rat kidney (NRK) fibroblasts [1], based on the recent experimental identification of the ion channels involved [2]. The principal ion channels described are those of an inwardly rectifying K+ conductance (GKIR), an L-type calcium conductance (GCaL), an intracellular calcium activated Cl- conductance (GCl(Ca)), a residual leak conductance Gleak, and gap junctional channels between the cells (Ggj). The role of each one of these components in the particular shape of the AP wave-form has been analyzed and compared with experimental observations. In addition, we have studied the role of subcellular processes like intracellular calcium dynamics and calcium buffering in AP generation. AP propagation between cells was reconstructed in a hexagonal model of cells coupled by Ggj with physiological conductance values. The model revealed an excitability mechanism of quiescent NRK cells with a particular role of intracellular calcium dynamics. It allows further explorations of the mechanism of signal generation and transmission in NRK cell cultures and its dependence on growth conditions.

  3. Pharmacological actions of statins: potential utility in COPD.

    PubMed

    Young, R P; Hopkins, R; Eaton, T E

    2009-12-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterised by minimally reversible airflow limitation and features of systemic inflammation. Current therapies for COPD have been shown to reduce symptoms and infective exacerbations and to improve quality of life. However, these drugs have little effect on the natural history of the disease (progressive decline in lung function and exercise tolerance) and do not improve mortality. The anti-inflammatory effects of statins on both pulmonary and systemic inflammation through inhibition of guanosine triphosphatase and nuclear factor-κB mediated activation of inflammatory and matrix remodelling pathways could have substantial benefits in patients with COPD due to the following. 1) Inhibition of cytokine production (tumour necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8) and neutrophil infiltration into the lung; 2) inhibition of the fibrotic activity in the lung leading to small airways fibrosis and irreversible airflow limitation; 3) antioxidant and anti-inflammatory (IL-6 mediated) effects on skeletal muscle; 4) reduced inflammatory response to pulmonary infection; and 5) inhibition of the development (or reversal) of epithelial-mesenchymal transition, a precursor event to lung cancer. This review examines the pleiotropic pharmacological action of statins which inhibit key inflammatory and remodelling pathways in COPD and concludes that statins have considerable potential as adjunct therapy in COPD. PMID:20956147

  4. Short latency compound action potentials from mammalian gravity receptor organs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, T. A.; Jones, S. M.

    1999-01-01

    Gravity receptor function was characterized in four mammalian species using far-field vestibular evoked potentials (VsEPs). VsEPs are compound action potentials of the vestibular nerve and central relays that are elicited by linear acceleration ramps applied to the cranium. Rats, mice, guinea pigs, and gerbils were studied. In all species, response onset occurred within 1.5 ms of the stimulus onset. Responses persisted during intense (116 dBSPL) wide-band (50 to 50 inverted question mark omitted inverted question mark000 Hz) forward masking, whereas auditory responses to intense clicks (112 dBpeSPL) were eliminated under the same conditions. VsEPs remained after cochlear extirpation but were eliminated following bilateral labyrinthectomy. Responses included a series of positive and negative peaks that occurred within 8 ms of stimulus onset (range of means at +6 dBre: 1.0 g/ms: P1=908 to 1062 micros, N1=1342 to 1475 micros, P2=1632 to 1952 micros, N2=2038 to 2387 micros). Mean response amplitudes at +6 dBre: 1.0 g/ms ranged from 0.14 to 0.99 microV. VsEP input/output functions revealed latency slopes that varied across peaks and species ranging from -19 to -51 micros/dB. Amplitude-intensity slopes also varied ranging from 0.04 to 0.08 microV/dB for rats and mice. Latency values were comparable to those of birds although amplitudes were substantially smaller in mammals. VsEP threshold values were considerably higher in mammals compared to birds and ranged from -8.1 to -10.5 dBre 1.0 g/ms across species. These results support the hypothesis that mammalian gravity receptors are less sensitive to dynamic stimuli than are those of birds.

  5. Thalamic field potentials in chronic central pain treated by periventricular gray stimulation -- a series of eight cases.

    PubMed

    Nandi, Dipankar; Aziz, Tipu; Carter, Helen; Stein, John

    2003-01-01

    Chronic deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the periventricular gray (PVG) has been used for the treatment of chronic central pain for decades. In recent years motor cortex stimulation (MCS) has largely supplanted DBS in the surgical management of intractable neuropathic pain of central origin. However, MCS provides satisfactory pain relief in about 50-75% of cases, a range comparable to that reported for DBS (none of the reports are in placebo-controlled studies and hence the further need for caution in evaluating and comparing these results). Our experience also suggests that there is still a role for DBS in the control of central pain. Here we present a series of eight consecutive cases of intractable chronic pain of central origin treated with PVG DBS with an average follow-up of 9 months. In each case, two electrodes were implanted in the PVG and the ventroposterolateral thalamic nucleus, respectively, under guidance of corneal topography/magnetic resonance imaging image fusion. The PVG was stimulated in the frequency range of 2-100 Hz in alert patients while pain was assessed using the McGill-Melzack visual analogue scale. In addition, local field potentials (FPs) were recorded from the sensory thalamus during PVG stimulation. Maximum pain relief was obtained with 5-35 Hz stimulation while 50-100 Hz made the pain worse. This suggests that pain suppression was frequency dependent. Interestingly, we detected low frequency thalamic FPs at 0.2-0.4 Hz closely associated with the pain. During 5-35 Hz PVG stimulation the amplitude of this potential was significantly reduced and this was associated with marked pain relief. At the higher frequencies (50-100 Hz), however, there was no reduction in the FPs and no pain suppression. We have found an interesting and consistent correlation between thalamic electrical activity and chronic pain. This low frequency potential may provide an objective index for quantifying chronic pain, and may hold further clues to the mechanism of

  6. Mathematical model of the neonatal mouse ventricular action potential

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Linda J.; Sobie, Eric A.

    2008-01-01

    Therapies for heart disease are based largely on our understanding of the adult myocardium. The dramatic differences in action potential (AP) shape between neonatal and adult cardiac myocytes, however, indicate that a different set of molecular interactions in neonatal myocytes necessitates different treatment for newborns. Computational modeling is useful for synthesizing data to determine how interactions between components lead to systems-level behavior, but this technique has not been used extensively to study neonatal heart cell function. We created a mathematical model of the neonatal (day 1) mouse myocyte by modifying, based on experimental data, the densities and/or formulations of ion transport mechanisms in an adult cell model. The new model reproduces the characteristic AP shape of neonatal cells, with a brief plateau phase and longer duration than the adult (APD80=60.1 vs. 12.6 ms). The simulation results are consistent with experimental data, including: 1) decreased density, and altered inactivation, of transient outward K+ currents, 2) increased delayed rectifier K+ currents, 3) Ca2+ entry through T-type as well as L-type Ca2+ channels, 4) increased Ca2+ influx through Na+-Ca2+ exchange, and 5) Ca2+ transients resulting from transmembrane Ca2+ entry rather than release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). Simulations performed with the model generated novel predictions, including increased SR Ca2+ leak and elevated intracellular [Na+] in neonatal compared with adult myocytes. This new model can therefore be used for testing hypotheses and obtaining a better quantitative understanding of differences between neonatal and adult physiology. PMID:18408122

  7. Transmembrane potential induced in a spherical cell model under low-frequency magnetic stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Hui; Cotic, Marija; Carlen, Peter L.

    2007-09-01

    Time-varying magnetic fields can induce electric fields in the neuronal tissue, a phenomenon that has been recently explored in clinical applications such as peripheral nerve stimulation and transcranial magnetic stimulation. Although the transmembrane potential induced during direct electric stimulation has already been the subject of a number of theoretical studies, an analytical solution for the magnetically induced transmembrane potential change is still unavailable. In addition, although several studies have analyzed the impact of stimulation parameters, including stimulation intensity and frequency, as well as coil design and position, on the amount of tissue polarization, the effects of tissue non-homogeneity on cell polarization have not been fully elucidated. In this study, we have derived an analytical expression for the transmembrane potential induced by a low-frequency magnetic field in a spherical neuronal structure. This model is representative of a spherical cell body or any neuronal structure of a similar shape. The model cell is located in an extracellular medium and possesses a low-conductive membrane and an internal cytoplasm. These three regions represent the basic tissue non-homogeneity of a neuron at a microscopic level. The sensitivity of the induced transmembrane potential to the coil position and to the geometrical and electrical parameters of the model structure was studied in a broad physiologically relevant range. Our results demonstrate that the structure is regionally polarized, with the pattern of polarization depending on the relative positioning between the model cell and the stimulation coil. In addition, both the geometrical and electrical parameters of the structure affect the amount of polarization. These results may be generalized to other neuronal tissues that possess similar non-homogenous properties, but different shapes, such as an axon. Our results support the idea that aside from coil design and position, tissue non

  8. Sural sensory nerve action potential: A study in healthy Indian subjects

    PubMed Central

    Sreenivasan, Aarthika; Mansukhani, Khushnuma A; Sharma, Alika; Balakrishnan, Lajita

    2016-01-01

    Background: The sural sensory nerve action potential (SNAP) is an important electrodiagnostic study for suspected peripheral neuropathies. Incorrect technique and unavailability of reference data can lead to erroneous conclusions. Objectives: To establish reference data for sural SNAP in age-stratified healthy subjects at three sites of stimulation. Materials and Methods: A prospective study was conducted in 146 nerves from healthy subjects aged between 18 years and 90 years, stratified into six age groups (a = 18-30 years, b = 31–40 years, c = 41–50 years, d = 51–60 years, e = 61–70 years, and f >71 years). Sural SNAP was recorded antidromically, stimulating at three sites at distances of 14 cm, 12 cm, and 10 cm from the recording electrode. Mean – 2 standard deviation (SD) of the transformed data was used to generate reference values for amplitudes. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) test was used for inter-group and between three sites comparisons of amplitudes. Results: The lower limits of amplitude at 14 cm were 12.4 μV, 10.4 μV, 6.5 μV, 5.3 μV, 2.9 μV, and 1.9 μV; at 12 cm were 13.5 μV, 13.6 μV, 8.5 μV, 7.8 μV, 3.5 μV, and 2.8 μV; and at 10 cm were 16.3 μV, 16.3 μV, 11.1 μV, 10.0 μV, 4.8 μV, and 3.7 μV for groups a, b, c, d, e, and f, respectively. A statistically significant difference in amplitudes was noted from the three different sites of stimulation (P < 0.001). The amplitude differed significantly above the age of 60 years (P < 0.01) but not between groups e and f (P > 0.05). Conclusion: This study provides reference data for sural SNAP in Indian population at three different sites of stimulation along the calf in six age groups. It also shows significant variation in amplitude from the three different sites of stimulation. PMID:27570380

  9. Effect of knockout of α2δ-1 on action potentials in mouse sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Margas, Wojciech; Ferron, Laurent; Nieto-Rostro, Manuela; Schwartz, Arnold; Dolphin, Annette C.

    2016-01-01

    Gene deletion of the voltage-gated calcium channel auxiliary subunit α2δ-1 has been shown previously to have a cardiovascular phenotype, and a reduction in mechano- and cold sensitivity, coupled with delayed development of neuropathic allodynia. We have also previously shown that dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neuron calcium channel currents were significantly reduced in α2δ-1 knockout mice. To extend our findings in these sensory neurons, we have examined here the properties of action potentials (APs) in DRG neurons from α2δ-1 knockout mice in comparison to their wild-type (WT) littermates, in order to dissect how the calcium channels that are affected by α2δ-1 knockout are involved in setting the duration of individual APs and their firing frequency. Our main findings are that there is reduced Ca2+ entry on single AP stimulation, particularly in the axon proximal segment, reduced AP duration and reduced firing frequency to a 400 ms stimulation in α2δ-1 knockout neurons, consistent with the expected role of voltage-gated calcium channels in these events. Furthermore, lower intracellular Ca2+ buffering also resulted in reduced AP duration, and a lower frequency of AP firing in WT neurons, mimicking the effect of α2δ-1 knockout. By contrast, we did not obtain any consistent evidence for the involvement of Ca2+-activation of large conductance calcium-activated potassium (BK) and small conductance calcium-activated potassium (SK) channels in these events. In conclusion, the reduced Ca2+ elevation as a result of single AP stimulation is likely to result from the reduced duration of the AP in α2δ-1 knockout sensory neurons. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Evolution brings Ca2+ and ATP together to control life and death’. PMID:27377724

  10. Spatial variation of compound muscle action potentials across human gastrocnemius medialis.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Taian M; Botter, Alberto; Minetto, Marco A; Hodson-Tole, Emma F

    2015-09-01

    The massed action potential (M wave) elicited through nerve stimulation underpins a wide range of physiological and mechanical understanding of skeletal muscle structure and function. Although systematic approaches have evaluated the effect of different factors on M waves, the effect of the location and distribution of activated fibers within the muscle remains unknown. By detecting M waves from the medial gastrocnemius (MG) of 12 participants with a grid of 128 electrodes, we investigated whether different populations of muscle units have different spatial organization within MG. If populations of muscle units occupy discrete MG regions, current pulses of progressively greater intensities applied to the MG nerve branch would be expected to lead to local changes in M-wave amplitudes. Electrical pulses were therefore delivered at 2 pps, with the current pulse amplitude increased every 10 stimuli to elicit different degrees of muscle activation. The localization of MG response to increases in current intensity was determined from the spatial distribution of M-wave amplitude. Key results revealed that increases in M-wave amplitude were detected somewhat locally, by 10-50% of the 128 electrodes. Most importantly, the electrodes detecting greatest increases in M-wave amplitude were localized at different regions in the grid, with a tendency for greater stimulation intensities to elicit M waves in the more distal MG region. The presented results indicate that M waves recorded locally may not provide a representative MG response, with major implications for the estimation of, e.g., the maximal stimulation levels, the number of motor units, and the onset and normalization in H-reflex studies.

  11. Effect of knockout of α2δ-1 on action potentials in mouse sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Margas, Wojciech; Ferron, Laurent; Nieto-Rostro, Manuela; Schwartz, Arnold; Dolphin, Annette C

    2016-08-01

    Gene deletion of the voltage-gated calcium channel auxiliary subunit α2δ-1 has been shown previously to have a cardiovascular phenotype, and a reduction in mechano- and cold sensitivity, coupled with delayed development of neuropathic allodynia. We have also previously shown that dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neuron calcium channel currents were significantly reduced in α2δ-1 knockout mice. To extend our findings in these sensory neurons, we have examined here the properties of action potentials (APs) in DRG neurons from α2δ-1 knockout mice in comparison to their wild-type (WT) littermates, in order to dissect how the calcium channels that are affected by α2δ-1 knockout are involved in setting the duration of individual APs and their firing frequency. Our main findings are that there is reduced Ca(2+) entry on single AP stimulation, particularly in the axon proximal segment, reduced AP duration and reduced firing frequency to a 400 ms stimulation in α2δ-1 knockout neurons, consistent with the expected role of voltage-gated calcium channels in these events. Furthermore, lower intracellular Ca(2+) buffering also resulted in reduced AP duration, and a lower frequency of AP firing in WT neurons, mimicking the effect of α2δ-1 knockout. By contrast, we did not obtain any consistent evidence for the involvement of Ca(2+)-activation of large conductance calcium-activated potassium (BK) and small conductance calcium-activated potassium (SK) channels in these events. In conclusion, the reduced Ca(2+) elevation as a result of single AP stimulation is likely to result from the reduced duration of the AP in α2δ-1 knockout sensory neurons.This article is part of the themed issue 'Evolution brings Ca(2+) and ATP together to control life and death'. PMID:27377724

  12. Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms of Action of Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation: Evidence from In Vitro and In Vivo Models

    PubMed Central

    Pelletier, Simon J.

    2015-01-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation is a noninvasive technique that has been experimentally tested for a number of psychiatric and neurological conditions. Preliminary observations suggest that this approach can indeed influence a number of cellular and molecular pathways that may be disease relevant. However, the mechanisms of action underlying its beneficial effects are largely unknown and need to be better understood to allow this therapy to be used optimally. In this review, we summarize the physiological responses observed in vitro and in vivo, with a particular emphasis on cellular and molecular cascades associated with inflammation, angiogenesis, neurogenesis, and neuroplasticity recruited by direct current stimulation, a topic that has been largely neglected in the literature. A better understanding of the neural responses to transcranial direct current stimulation is critical if this therapy is to be used in large-scale clinical trials with a view of being routinely offered to patients suffering from various conditions affecting the central nervous system. PMID:25522391

  13. Closing the Civic Engagement Gap: The Potential of Action Civics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pope, Alexander; Stolte, Laurel; Cohen, Alison K.

    2011-01-01

    When taught in an engaging manner, civic education can help stimulate and motivate students to excel in other academic areas, while simultaneously preparing them to be active citizens in the democracy. As an initial attempt to more systematically analyze civic education practice, this article presents four case studies of projects in one action…

  14. Action of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factors: studies using a human leukemia cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Lusis, A J; Koeffler, H P

    1980-01-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factors (CSFs) have previously been shown to stimulate colony formation in soft agar culture by a human myelogenous leukemia cell line known as KG-1. We have used KG-1 cells as a model system to investigate the interaction of CSF with myeloid cells. We now report that exposure of KG-1 cells to human CSFs in liquid culture results in a rapid (within 3 hr) burst of RNA synthesis and, after a lag of about 10 hr, a stimulation of DNA and protein synthesis. RNA and protein synthesis were maximally stimulated about 2-fold and DNA synthesis was stimulated about 2.5-fold. The stimulation was specific; various growth factors, hormones, and mouse CSFs had no effect on KG-1 macromolecular synthesis. Treatment with CSF did not discernibly alter the morphological appearance of the KG-1 cells (primarily myeloblasts) nor did it qualitatively affect the pattern of newly synthesized proteins separable by one- and two-dimensional electrophoresis. Several myeloid leukemia cell lines that were not responsive to CSF in agar culture, including a dedifferentiated variant of KG-1, showed little or no stimulation of macromolecular synthesis upon exposure to CSF. We have used the CSF-dependent stimulation of macromolecular synthesis of KG-1 to develop a rapid, sensitive microassay for human CSFs. The assay, involving thymidine incorporation by the cells, should be useful for characterization and purification of human CSFs. Images PMID:6159645

  15. A potential mode of action for Anakinra in patients with arthrofibrosis following total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, David; Coates, Jonathon; del Carpio Pons, Alicia; Horabin, Joanna; Walker, Andrew; Abdul, Nicole; Kalson, Nicholas S.; Brewster, Nigel T.; Weir, David J.; Deehan, David J.; Mann, Derek A.; Borthwick, Lee A.

    2015-01-01

    Arthrofibrosis is a fibroproliferative disease characterised by excessive deposition of extracellular matrix components intra-articularly leading to pain and restricted range of movement. Although frequently observed following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) no therapeutic options exist. A pilot study demonstrated that intra-articular injection of Anakinra, an IL-1R antagonist, improved range of movement and pain in patients with arthrofibrosis however the mechanism of action is unknown. We hypothesise that IL-1α/β will drive an inflammatory phenotype in fibroblasts isolated from the knee, therefore identifying a potential mechanism of action for Anakinra in arthrofibrosis following TKA. Fibroblasts isolated from synovial membranes and infra-patellar fat pad of patients undergoing TKA express high levels of IL-1R1. Stimulation with IL-1α/β induced a pro-inflammatory phenotype characterised by increased secretion of GMCSF, IL-6 and IL-8. No significant difference in the inflammatory response was observed between fibroblasts isolated from synovial membrane or infra-patellar fat pad. IL-1α/β treatments induced a pro-inflammatory phenotype in fibroblasts from both synovial membrane and infra-patellar fat pad and therefore Anakinra can likely have an inhibitory effect on fibroblasts present in both tissues in vivo. It is also likely that fibroblast responses in the tissues are controlled by IL-1α/β availability and not their ability to respond to it. PMID:26553966

  16. Short latency vestibular potentials evoked by electrical round window stimulation in the guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Bordure, P; Desmadryl, G; Uziel, A; Sans, A

    1989-11-01

    Short-latency potentials evoked by round window electrical stimulation were recorded in guinea pig by means of vertex-pinna skin electrodes using averaging techniques. Constant current shocks of 20 microseconds or 50 microseconds (25-300 microA) were used to evoke both auditory and vestibular brain-stem potentials. Pure auditory potentials, comparable to those evoked by acoustic clicks, were obtained by 20 microseconds electrical stimuli and disappeared during an auditory masking procedure made with a continuous white noise (110 dB SPL). Short latency potentials labeled V1, V2 and V3 were obtained by 50 microseconds electrical stimuli during an auditory masking procedure. This response disappeared after specific vestibular neurectomy, whereas the auditory response evoked by acoustic clicks or by electrical stimulation remained unchanged, suggesting that these latter potentials had a vestibular origin.

  17. Short latency vestibular potentials evoked by electrical round window stimulation in the guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Bordure, P; Desmadryl, G; Uziel, A; Sans, A

    1989-11-01

    Short-latency potentials evoked by round window electrical stimulation were recorded in guinea pig by means of vertex-pinna skin electrodes using averaging techniques. Constant current shocks of 20 microseconds or 50 microseconds (25-300 microA) were used to evoke both auditory and vestibular brain-stem potentials. Pure auditory potentials, comparable to those evoked by acoustic clicks, were obtained by 20 microseconds electrical stimuli and disappeared during an auditory masking procedure made with a continuous white noise (110 dB SPL). Short latency potentials labeled V1, V2 and V3 were obtained by 50 microseconds electrical stimuli during an auditory masking procedure. This response disappeared after specific vestibular neurectomy, whereas the auditory response evoked by acoustic clicks or by electrical stimulation remained unchanged, suggesting that these latter potentials had a vestibular origin. PMID:2479525

  18. Cerebral chemosensory evoked potentials elicited by chemical stimulation of the human olfactory and respiratory nasal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Kobal, G; Hummel, C

    1988-01-01

    A stimulation method was employed by which chemosensory evoked potentials were recorded without tactile somatosensory contamination. The purpose of the study was to determine whether potential components evoked by stimulation of the chemoreceptors of the trigeminal nerve can be distinguished from those of the olfactory nerve. The stimulants (vanillin, phenylethyl alcohol, limonene, menthol, anethol, benzaldehyde, carbon dioxide and a mixture of vanillin and carbon dioxide) were presented in a randomized order to 13 volunteers. Chemosensory evoked potentials to substances which anosmics are unable to perceive (vanillin, phenylethyl alcohol) were termed olfactory evoked potentials; potentials to CO2, which effected no olfactory sensations were termed chemo-somatosensory potentials. Analysis of variance revealed that the different substances resulted in statistically significant changes in the amplitudes and latencies of the evoked potentials, and also in the subjective estimates of intensity. An increased excitation of the somatosensory system resulted in reduced latencies and enhanced amplitudes of the evoked potentials. Responses to the mixture of carbon dioxide and vanillin appeared significantly earlier (50-150 msec) than responses to either substance alone.

  19. Ontogeny of vestibular compound action potentials in the domestic chicken

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, S. M.; Jones, T. A.

    2000-01-01

    Compound action potentials of the vestibular nerve were measured from the surface of the scalp in 148 chickens (Gallus domesticus). Ages ranged from incubation day 18 (E18) to 22 days posthatch (P22). Responses were elicited using linear acceleration cranial pulses. Response thresholds decreased at an average rate of -0.45 dB/day. The decrease was best fit by an exponential model with half-maturity time constant of 5.1 days and asymptote of approximately -25.9 dB re:1.0 g/ms. Mean threshold approached within 3 dB of the asymptote by ages P6-P9. Similarly, response latencies decreased exponentially to within 3% of mature values at ages beyond P9. The half-maturity time constant for peripheral response peak latencies P1, N1, and P2 was comparable to thresholds and ranged from approximately 4.6 to 6.2 days, whereas central peaks (N2, P3, and N3) ranged from 2.9 to 3.4 days. Latency-intensity slopes for P1, N1, and P2 tended to decrease with age, reaching mature values within approximately 100 hours of hatching. Amplitudes increased as a function of age with average growth rates for response peaks ranging from 0.04 to 0.09 microV/day. There was no obvious asymptote to the growth of amplitudes over the ages studied. Amplitude-intensity slopes also increased modestly with age. The results show that gravity receptors are responsive to transient cranial stimuli as early as E19 in the chicken embryo. The functional response of gravity receptors continues to develop for many days after all major morphological structures are in place. Distinct maturational processes can be identified in central and peripheral neural relays. Functional improvements during maturation may result from refinements in the receptor epithelia, improvements in central and peripheral synaptic transmission, increased neural myelination, as well as changes in the mechanical coupling between the cranium and receptor organ.

  20. Long-term potentiation in the hippocampal slice: evidence for stimulated secretion of newly synthesized proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Duffy, C.; Teyler, T.J.; Shashoua, V.E.

    1981-06-01

    Long-term potentiation of the hippocampal slice preparation results in an increase in the incorporation of labeled valine into the proteins destined for secretion into the extracellular medium. Double-labeling methods established that the increased secretion of the labeled proteins was limited to the potentiated region of a slice; incorporation of labeled valine was increased in the hippocampus if potentiation was through the Schaffer collaterals and in the dentate if potentiation was through the perforant path. Controls for nonspecific stimulation showed no changes. There appears to be a link between long-term potentiation and the metabolic processes that lead to protein synthesis in the hippocampal slice system.

  1. Action potential-induced dendritic calcium dynamics correlated with synaptic plasticity in developing hippocampal pyramidal cells.

    PubMed

    Isomura, Y; Kato, N

    1999-10-01

    In hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells, intracellular calcium increases are required for induction of long-term potentiation (LTP), an activity-dependent synaptic plasticity. LTP is known to develop in magnitude during the second and third postnatal weeks in the rats. Little is known, however, about development of intracellular calcium dynamics during the same postnatal weeks. We investigated postnatal development of intracellular calcium dynamics in the proximal apical dendrites of CA1 pyramidal cells by whole cell patch-clamp recordings and calcium imaging with the Ca(2+) indicator fura-2. Dendritic calcium increases induced by intrasomatically evoked action potentials were slight during the first postnatal week but gradually became robust 3 to 6-fold during the second and third postnatal weeks. These calcium increases were blocked by application of 250 microM CdCl(2), a nonspecific blocker for high-threshold voltage-dependent calcium channels (VDCCs). Under the voltage-clamp condition, both calcium currents and dendritic calcium accumulations induced by depolarization were larger at the late developmental stage (P15-18) than the early stage (P4-7), indicating developmental enhancement of calcium influx mediated by high-threshold VDCCs. Moreover, theta-burst stimulation (TBS), a protocol for LTP induction, induced large intracellular calcium increases at the late developmental stage, in synchrony with maturation of TBS-induced LTP. These results suggest that developmental enhancement of intracellular calcium increases induced by action potentials may underlie maturation of calcium-dependent functions such as synaptic plasticity in hippocampal neurons.

  2. Effects of changes in frequency on guinea pig ventricular action potential duration and on QT interval under different experimental conditions.

    PubMed

    von Savigny, L; Hohnloser, S; Antoni, H

    1981-01-01

    Isolated perfused guinea pig hearts (Langendorff preparation) were arrested by carbachol (0.1-0.2 mg/l) and electrically stimulated in the region of the av-conducting system. The QT interval was determined by means of extracellular electrodes at different driving frequencies. Separate experiments were performed on papillary muscles from the right ventricle to measure the duration of the transmembrane action potential under comparable conditions. At 35 degrees C (Ke+ 5.4 mmol/l) increasing the frequency of stimulation (range 12-120/min) caused the action potential duration (APD) to decrease to a greater extent than the QT interval. Stepwise rising of the external K+ concentration up to 16.2 mmol/l produced a nearly parallel shift to the APD-frequency relation to lower values. Again, the QT interval was less affected by increasing the external K+ concentration than the APD. Stepwise reduction of the temperature down to 20 degrees C prolonged the APD as well as the QT interval, the effects being more pronounced at lower than at higher stimulation frequencies. Under all examined experimental conditions, the APD proved to be markedly shorter than the QT interval even when the latter is diminished by the duration of QRS. The results suggest that no close relation exists between the APD and the QT interval. The observed divergencies may be due to functional differences among various parts of the ventricles.

  3. Understanding the Electrical Behavior of the Action Potential in Terms of Elementary Electrical Sources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez-Falces, Javier

    2015-01-01

    A concept of major importance in human electrophysiology studies is the process by which activation of an excitable cell results in a rapid rise and fall of the electrical membrane potential, the so-called action potential. Hodgkin and Huxley proposed a model to explain the ionic mechanisms underlying the formation of action potentials. However,…

  4. [Hardware Implementation of Numerical Simulation Function of Hodgkin-Huxley Model Neurons Action Potential Based on Field Programmable Gate Array].

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinlong; Lu, Mai; Hu, Yanwen; Chen, Xiaoqiang; Pan, Qiangqiang

    2015-12-01

    Neuron is the basic unit of the biological neural system. The Hodgkin-Huxley (HH) model is one of the most realistic neuron models on the electrophysiological characteristic description of neuron. Hardware implementation of neuron could provide new research ideas to clinical treatment of spinal cord injury, bionics and artificial intelligence. Based on the HH model neuron and the DSP Builder technology, in the present study, a single HH model neuron hardware implementation was completed in Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA). The neuron implemented in FPGA was stimulated by different types of current, the action potential response characteristics were analyzed, and the correlation coefficient between numerical simulation result and hardware implementation result were calculated. The results showed that neuronal action potential response of FPGA was highly consistent with numerical simulation result. This work lays the foundation for hardware implementation of neural network. PMID:27079105

  5. Tactile Stimulation Evokes Long-Lasting Potentiation of Purkinje Cell Discharge In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishnan, K. B.; Voges, Kai; De Propris, Licia; De Zeeuw, Chris I.; D’Angelo, Egidio

    2016-01-01

    In the cerebellar network, a precise relationship between plasticity and neuronal discharge has been predicted. However, the potential generation of persistent changes in Purkinje cell (PC) spike discharge as a consequence of plasticity following natural stimulation patterns has not been clearly determined. Here, we show that facial tactile stimuli organized in theta-patterns can induce stereotyped N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA-A) receptor-dependent changes in PCs and molecular layer interneurons (MLIs) firing: invariably, all PCs showed a long-lasting increase (Spike-Related Potentiation or SR-P) and MLIs a long-lasting decrease (Spike-Related Suppression or SR-S) in baseline activity and spike response probability. These observations suggests that tactile sensory stimulation engages multiple long-term plastic changes that are distributed along the mossy fiber-parallel fiber (MF-PF) pathway and operate synergistically to potentiate spike generation in PCs. In contrast, theta-pattern electrical stimulation (ES) of PFs indistinctly induced SR-P and SR-S both in PCs and MLIs, suggesting that tactile sensory stimulation preordinates plasticity upstream of the PF-PC synapse. All these effects occurred in the absence of complex spike changes, supporting the theoretical prediction that PC activity is potentiated when the MF-PF system is activated in the absence of conjunctive climbing fiber (CF) activity. PMID:26924961

  6. A modified mirror projection visual evoked potential stimulator for presenting patterns in different orientations.

    PubMed

    Taylor, P K; Wynn-Williams, G M

    1986-07-01

    Modifications to a standard mirror projection visual evoked potential stimulator are described to enable projection of patterns in varying orientations. The galvanometer-mirror assembly is mounted on an arm which can be rotated through 90 degrees. This enables patterns in any orientation to be deflected perpendicular to their axes. PMID:2424725

  7. Effect of a prenylamine analog (MG8926) on spontaneous action potentials in isolated rabbit sinoatrial node.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, H; Matsuoka, I; Ono, T; Yoshida, H; Uchibori, T; Kogi, K

    1996-12-01

    Effects of verapamil, prenylamine and a prenylamine analog, MG8926 on the intracellular spontaneous action potentials recorded from the isolated rabbit sinoatrial (SA) node were studied. Verapamil (1 microM), a selective inhibitor for slow Ca2+ channels, prolonged the cycle length, decreased the rate of diastolic depolarization, the rate of rise of action potential, the amplitude of action potential and the maximal diastolic potential, and usually arrested showing subthreshold fluctuation of the membrane potential within several ten min. Prenylamine (10 microM), a nonselective inhibitor for slow Ca2+ channels, tended to prolong the cycle length to decrease the diastolic depolarization, the rate of rise of action potential, the amplitude of action potential. However, these changes were statistically insignificant. Prenylamine at the concentration of 10 microM had no effect on the maximal diastolic potential. MG8926 (10 microM) prolonged the cycle length, decreased the rate of diastolic depolarization, the rate of rise of action potential and tended to decrease the amplitude of action potential. MG8926 at the concentration of 10 microM had almost no effect on the maximal diastolic potential. The present findings may indicate that replacement of phenyl residue of prenylamine by cyclohexyl residue increases the inhibitory action on the slow Ca2+ channels in rabbit SA node.

  8. Cardiac action potential duration and contractility in the intact dog heart.

    PubMed

    Drake-Holland, A J; Noble, M I; Pieterse, M; Schouten, V J; Seed, W A; ter Keurs, H E; Wohlfart, B

    1983-12-01

    The maximum rate of rise of left ventricular pressure (DP) and action potential duration (a.p.d.) were measured in closed-chest anaesthetized dogs with atrioventricular dissociation and beta-adrenergic blockade. Right ventricular stimulation was carried out with protocols consisting of a conditioning 'priming' period and a test period. When a single test stimulus was introduced at varying intervals after the priming period, DP was found to be maximal at 800-1000 ms. With this single test stimulus fixed at the optimum, DP was found to be a variable inverse function of the a.p.d. of the same beat; no positive correlation could be found between DP and a.p.d. When a second test stimulus at the optimum interval was introduced after the first, the DP (DP2) was found to be strongly dependent on that elicited by the first test stimulus (DP1); the relationship was positive, linear, independent of the method used to vary DP, and independent of whether DP1 was depressed or potentiated. The slope of the relationship was less than 1.0 and the line passed through the point where DP2 = DP1; this is the point of continuous stimulation at the optimum interval in a steady state. This result is consistent with the hypothesis that the coefficient relating DP1 to DP2, at constant a.p.d. of the first test pulse (AP1), is an index of the proportion of the activator of contraction stored during relaxation of test beat 1 which is released again on beat 2. In order to test the hypothesis that the remaining contractility depended on the action potential of test beat 1, AP1 was varied by changing the intervals between the priming stimuli. In order to determine the relationship between DP2 and AP1 it was necessary to carry out multiple regression analysis because DP2 was already known to be strongly dependent on DP1 (point 3 above), i.e. DP2 = BDP(DP1) + BAP(AP1 - D). This analysis yielded highly significant positive values for the coefficients BDP and BAP. This result is compatible with the

  9. Motor potentials evoked by navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Säisänen, Laura; Julkunen, Petro; Niskanen, Eini; Danner, Nils; Hukkanen, Taina; Lohioja, Tarja; Nurkkala, Jouko; Mervaala, Esa; Karhu, Jari; Könönen, Mervi

    2008-12-01

    Navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a tool for targeted, noninvasive stimulation of cerebral cortex. Transcranial stimuli can depolarize neurons and evoke measurable effects which are unique in two ways: the effects are caused directly and without a consciousness of the subject, and, the responses from peripheral muscles provide a direct measure for the integrity of the whole motor pathway. The clinical relevance of the method has not always been fully exposed because localizing the optimal stimulation site and determining the optimal stimulation strength have been dependent on time-consuming experimentation and skill. Moreover, in many disorders it has been uncertain, whether the lack of motor responses is the result of true pathophysiological changes or merely because of unoptimal stimulation. We characterized the muscle responses from human primary motor cortex system by navigated TMS to provide normative values for the clinically relevant TMS parameters on 65 healthy volunteers aged 22 to 81 years. We delivered focal TMS pulses on the primary motor area (M1) and recorded muscle responses on thenar and anterior tibial muscles. Motor threshold, latencies and amplitudes of motor-evoked potentials, and silent period duration were measured. The correction of the motor-evoked potential latency for subjects' height is provided. In conclusion, we provide a modified baseline of TMS-related parameters for healthy subjects. Earlier such large-scale baseline material has not been available.

  10. Mechanisms of action and potential therapeutic uses of thalidomide.

    PubMed

    Mujagić, Hamza; Chabner, Bruce A; Mujagić, Zlata

    2002-06-01

    Thalidomide was first introduced to the market in Germany under the brand name of Contergan in 1956, as a non-barbiturate hypnotic, advocated to ensure a good nights sleep and to prevent morning sickness in pregnancy. It was advertised for its prompt action, lack of hangover, and apparent safety. It has been banned from the market since 1963 after it caused the worldwide teratogenic disaster: babies exposed to thalidomide in utero during the first 34-50 days of pregnancy were born with severe life-threatening birth defects. Despite its unfortunate history, thalidomide has attracted scientific interest again because of its recently discovered action against inflammatory diseases and cancer. Its broad range of biological activities stems from its ability to moderate cytokine action in cancer and inflammatory diseases. Early studies examined its anxiolytic, mild hypnotic, antiemetic, and adjuvant analgesic properties. Subsequently, thalidomide was found to be highly effective in managing the cutaneous manifestations of leprosy, being superior to Aspirin in controlling leprosy-associated fever. Recent research has shown promising results with thalidomide in patients with myeloma, myelodysplastic syndrome, a variety of infectious diseases, autoimmune diseases, cancer, and progressive body weight loss related to advanced cancer and AIDS. Here we review the history of its development, pharmacokinetics, metabolism, biologic effects, and the results of clinical trials conducted thus far. Further research in this field should be directed towards better understanding of thalidomide metabolism, its mechanism of action, and the development of less toxic and more active analogs. PMID:12035132

  11. Mechanisms of action and potential therapeutic uses of thalidomide.

    PubMed

    Mujagić, Hamza; Chabner, Bruce A; Mujagić, Zlata

    2002-06-01

    Thalidomide was first introduced to the market in Germany under the brand name of Contergan in 1956, as a non-barbiturate hypnotic, advocated to ensure a good nights sleep and to prevent morning sickness in pregnancy. It was advertised for its prompt action, lack of hangover, and apparent safety. It has been banned from the market since 1963 after it caused the worldwide teratogenic disaster: babies exposed to thalidomide in utero during the first 34-50 days of pregnancy were born with severe life-threatening birth defects. Despite its unfortunate history, thalidomide has attracted scientific interest again because of its recently discovered action against inflammatory diseases and cancer. Its broad range of biological activities stems from its ability to moderate cytokine action in cancer and inflammatory diseases. Early studies examined its anxiolytic, mild hypnotic, antiemetic, and adjuvant analgesic properties. Subsequently, thalidomide was found to be highly effective in managing the cutaneous manifestations of leprosy, being superior to Aspirin in controlling leprosy-associated fever. Recent research has shown promising results with thalidomide in patients with myeloma, myelodysplastic syndrome, a variety of infectious diseases, autoimmune diseases, cancer, and progressive body weight loss related to advanced cancer and AIDS. Here we review the history of its development, pharmacokinetics, metabolism, biologic effects, and the results of clinical trials conducted thus far. Further research in this field should be directed towards better understanding of thalidomide metabolism, its mechanism of action, and the development of less toxic and more active analogs.

  12. Gifted Potential and Poverty: A Call for Extraordinary Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kitano, Margie K.

    2003-01-01

    Dr. Robinson's proposed action plan will serve the needs of highly achieving gifted students. However, defining giftedness as high academic performance based on traditional assessment procedures could reverse the field's fledgling success in supporting culturally diverse gifted children and youth. Changing the focus of equity in gifted education…

  13. Analysis of the quasi-static approximation for calculating potentials generated by neural stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bossetti, Chad A.; Birdno, Merrill J.; Grill, Warren M.

    2008-03-01

    In models of electrical stimulation of the nervous system, the electric potential is typically calculated using the quasi-static approximation. The quasi-static approximation allows Maxwell's equations to be simplified by ignoring capacitive, inductive and wave propagation contributions to the potential. While this simplification has been validated for bioelectric sources, its application to rapid stimulation pulses, which contain more high-frequency power, may not be appropriate. We compared the potentials calculated using the quasi-static approximation with those calculated from the exact solution to the inhomogeneous Helmholtz equation. The mean absolute errors between the two potential calculations were limited to 5-13% for pulse widths commonly used for neural stimulation (25 µs-1 ms). We also quantified the excitation properties of extracellular point source stimulation of a myelinated nerve fiber model using potentials calculated from each method. Deviations between the strength-duration curves for potentials calculated using the quasi-static (σ = 0.105 S m-1) and Helmholtz approaches ranged from 3 to 16%, with the minimal error occurring for 100 µs pulses. Differences in the threshold-distance curves for the two calculations ranged from 0 to 9%, for the same value of quasi-static conductivity. A sensitivity analysis of the material parameters revealed that the potential was much more strongly dependent on the conductivity than on the permittivity. These results indicate that for commonly used stimulus pulse parameters, the exact solution for the potential can be approximated by quasi-static simplifications only for appropriate values of conductivity.

  14. Modulation of amplitude and latency of motor evoked potential by direction of transcranial magnetic stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Aya; Torii, Tetsuya; Iwahashi, Masakuni; Itoh, Yuji; Iramina, Keiji

    2014-05-01

    The present study analyzed the effects of monophasic magnetic stimulation to the motor cortex. The effects of magnetic stimulation were evaluated by analyzing the motor evoked potentials (MEPs). The amplitude and latency of MEPs on the abductor pollicis brevis muscle were used to evaluate the effects of repetitive magnetic stimulation. A figure eight-shaped flat coil was used to stimulate the region over the primary motor cortex. The intensity of magnetic stimulation was 120% of the resting motor threshold, and the frequency of magnetic stimulation was 0.1 Hz. In addition, the direction of the current in the brain was posterior-anterior (PA) or anterior-posterior (AP). The latency of MEP was compared with PA and AP on initial magnetic stimulation. The results demonstrated that a stimulus in the AP direction increased the latency of the MEP by approximately 2.5 ms. MEP amplitude was also compared with PA and AP during 60 magnetic stimulations. The results showed that a stimulus in the PA direction gradually increased the amplitude of the MEP. However, a stimulus in the AP direction did not modulate the MEP amplitude. The average MEP amplitude induced from every 10 magnetic pulses was normalized by the average amplitude of the first 10 stimuli. These results demonstrated that the normalized MEP amplitude increased up to approximately 150%. In terms of pyramidal neuron indirect waves (I waves), magnetic stimulation inducing current flowing backward to the anterior preferentially elicited an I1 wave, and current flowing forward to the posterior elicited an I3 wave. It has been reported that the latency of the I3 wave is approximately 2.5 ms longer than the I1 wave elicitation, so the resulting difference in latency may be caused by this phenomenon. It has also been reported that there is no alteration of MEP amplitude at a frequency of 0.1 Hz. However, this study suggested that the modulation of MEP amplitude depends on stimulation strength and stimulation direction.

  15. Activity-dependent potentiation and depression of visual cortical responses to optic nerve stimulation in kittens.

    PubMed

    Tamura, H; Tsumoto, T; Hata, Y

    1992-11-01

    1. To see whether long-lasting changes in synaptic efficacy are induced in the developing visual cortex (VC), field potentials evoked by test stimulation given alternatively to each of the optic nerves (ONs) were recorded from VC of kittens ranging in age from 4 to 8 wk. In some experiments, field potentials were recorded simultaneously from the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) in addition to VC. 2. Tetanic stimulation was applied to one of the ONs for 1-60 min at 5 Hz. Homosynaptic potentiation of cortical responses, defined as an increase lasting > 2.5 h in the cortical field potential evoked by test stimulation of the ON that was tetanized, was induced without any changes in LGN responses in 3 of the 12 kittens tested. Heterosynaptic depression, defined as a decrease lasting > 0.5 h in the field potential evoked by stimulation of the ON that was not tetanized, was also induced in two of those three kittens. 3. To elucidate a role of inputs originating from spontaneous activity of retinal ganglion cells in induction of potentiation and depression in the cortex, tetrodotoxin (TTX) was injected into both eyes of 11 kittens. After we confirmed the suppression of retinal activity by TTX, tetanic stimulation was applied to ON. Homosynaptic potentiation of cortical responses was induced in 6 of the 11 kittens, and the ratio of the mean amplitude of posttetanic responses to that of pretetanic responses for the 11 kittens was on average larger than that for the 12 control kittens. Heterosynaptic depression was not observed in any of the 11 kittens. 4. To see a role of postsynaptic activity in induction of potentiation and depression, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) was applied continuously to the VC by an infusion pump in 10 kittens. Tetanic stimulation was given to ON while cortical activities were suppressed by GABA. After recovery of cortical activities, homosynaptic depression was found to be induced in 3 of the 10 kittens, but homosynaptic potentiation was not

  16. Oxidative shift in tissue redox potential increases beat-to-beat variability of action potential duration.

    PubMed

    Kistamás, Kornél; Hegyi, Bence; Váczi, Krisztina; Horváth, Balázs; Bányász, Tamás; Magyar, János; Szentandrássy, Norbert; Nánási, Péter P

    2015-07-01

    Profound changes in tissue redox potential occur in the heart under conditions of oxidative stress frequently associated with cardiac arrhythmias. Since beat-to-beat variability (short term variability, SV) of action potential duration (APD) is a good indicator of arrhythmia incidence, the aim of this work was to study the influence of redox changes on SV in isolated canine ventricular cardiomyocytes using a conventional microelectrode technique. The redox potential was shifted toward a reduced state using a reductive cocktail (containing dithiothreitol, glutathione, and ascorbic acid) while oxidative changes were initiated by superfusion with H2O2. Redox effects were evaluated as changes in "relative SV" determined by comparing SV changes with the concomitant APD changes. Exposure of myocytes to the reductive cocktail decreased SV significantly without any detectable effect on APD. Application of H2O2 increased both SV and APD, but the enhancement of SV was the greater, so relative SV increased. Longer exposure to H2O2 resulted in the development of early afterdepolarizations accompanied by tremendously increased SV. Pretreatment with the reductive cocktail prevented both elevation in relative SV and the development of afterdepolarizations. The results suggest that the increased beat-to-beat variability during an oxidative stress contributes to the generation of cardiac arrhythmias.

  17. Potential effects of intrinsic heart pacemaker cell mechanisms on dysrhythmic cardiac action potential firing

    PubMed Central

    Yaniv, Yael; Tsutsui, Kenta; Lakatta, Edward G.

    2015-01-01

    The heart's regular electrical activity is initiated by specialized cardiac pacemaker cells residing in the sinoatrial node. The rate and rhythm of spontaneous action potential firing of sinoatrial node cells are regulated by stochastic mechanisms that determine the level of coupling of chemical to electrical clocks within cardiac pacemaker cells. This coupled-clock system is modulated by autonomic signaling from the brain via neurotransmitter release from the vagus and sympathetic nerves. Abnormalities in brain-heart clock connections or in any molecular clock activity within pacemaker cells lead to abnormalities in the beating rate and rhythm of the pacemaker tissue that initiates the cardiac impulse. Dysfunction of pacemaker tissue can lead to tachy-brady heart rate alternation or exit block that leads to long atrial pauses and increases susceptibility to other cardiac arrhythmia. Here we review evidence for the idea that disturbances in the intrinsic components of pacemaker cells may be implemented in arrhythmia induction in the heart. PMID:25755643

  18. Ionic differences between somatic and axonal action potentials in snail giant neurones

    PubMed Central

    Wald, Flora

    1972-01-01

    1. The ionic requirements of the somatic and axonal action potentials of `H' neurones of the snail Cryptomphallus aspersa were studied using intracellular micro-electrodes. 2. The overshoot of the somatic action potential increased by 10 mV for a tenfold increase in [Ca2+]o. In calcium-free media the action potential decreased gradually to values of 50 to 90% of the control and they could be completely eliminated with 2 mM-EGTA. The maximum rate of rise also varied with [Ca2+]o. 3. After 2 hr in sodium-free solution the somatic action potential decreased 6% in overshoot and 24% in rate of rise. 4. The somatic action potential was not affected by TTX, 5 × 10-6 g/ml. Procaine, 18 mM, reduced its rate of rise but did not eliminate it whereas 30 mM-CoCl2 did. 5. The size of the axonal action potential increased with increased [Na+]o, but decreased with an increase in [Ca2+]o. 6. Procaine, 18 mM, abolished the axonal action potential whereas it was not affected by TTX, 5 × 10-6 g/ml., nor, usually, by 30 mM-CoCl2. 7. The results obtained by studying the compound action potential of the nerves were similar to those from axonal action potentials. 8. The possibility that the somatic action potential is mainly calcium dependent while the axonal action potential is mainly produced by sodium is discussed. PMID:5014099

  19. Effects of low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on event-related potential P300

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torii, Tetsuya; Sato, Aya; Iwahashi, Masakuni; Iramina, Keiji

    2012-04-01

    The present study analyzed the effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) on brain activity. P300 latency of event-related potential (ERP) was used to evaluate the effects of low-frequency and short-term rTMS by stimulating the supramarginal gyrus (SMG), which is considered to be the related area of P300 origin. In addition, the prolonged stimulation effects on P300 latency were analyzed after applying rTMS. A figure-eight coil was used to stimulate left-right SMG, and intensity of magnetic stimulation was 80% of motor threshold. A total of 100 magnetic pulses were applied for rTMS. The effects of stimulus frequency at 0.5 or 1 Hz were determined. Following rTMS, an odd-ball task was performed and P300 latency of ERP was measured. The odd-ball task was performed at 5, 10, and 15 min post-rTMS. ERP was measured prior to magnetic stimulation as a control. Electroencephalograph (EEG) was measured at Fz, Cz, and Pz that were indicated by the international 10-20 electrode system. Results demonstrated that different effects on P300 latency occurred between 0.5-1 Hz rTMS. With 1 Hz low-frequency magnetic stimulation to the left SMG, P300 latency decreased. Compared to the control, the latency time difference was approximately 15 ms at Cz. This decrease continued for approximately 10 min post-rTMS. In contrast, 0.5 Hz rTMS resulted in delayed P300 latency. Compared to the control, the latency time difference was approximately 20 ms at Fz, and this delayed effect continued for approximately 15 min post-rTMS. Results demonstrated that P300 latency varied according to rTMS frequency. Furthermore, the duration of the effect was not similar for stimulus frequency of low-frequency rTMS.

  20. Stimulation artifact correction method for estimation of early cortico-cortical evoked potentials

    PubMed Central

    Trebaul, Lena; Rudrauf, David; Job, Anne-Sophie; Mălîia, Mihai Dragos; Popa, Irina; Barborica, Andrei; Minotti, Lorella; Mîndruţă, Ioana; Kahane, Philippe; David, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Background Effective connectivity can be explored using direct electrical stimulations in patients suffering from drug-resistant focal epilepsies and investigated with intracranial electrodes. Responses to brief electrical pulses mimic the physiological propagation of signals and manifest as cortico-cortical evoked potentials (CCEP). The first CCEP component is believed to reflect direct connectivity with the stimulated region but the stimulation artifact, a sharp deflection occurring during a few milliseconds, frequently contaminates it. New method In order to recover the characteristics of early CCEP responses, we developed an artifact correction method based on electrical modeling of the electrode–tissue interface. The biophysically motivated artifact templates are then regressed out of the recorded data as in any classical template-matching removal artifact methods. Results Our approach is able to make the distinction between the physiological responses time-locked to the stimulation pulses and the non-physiological component. We tested the correction on simulated CCEP data in order to quantify its efficiency for different stimulation and recording parameters. We demonstrated the efficiency of the new correction method on simulations of single trial recordings for early responses contaminated with the stimulation artifact. The results highlight the importance of sampling frequency for an accurate analysis of CCEP. We then applied the approach to experimental data. Comparison with existing method The model-based template removal was compared to a correction based on the subtraction of the averaged artifact. Conclusions This new correction method of stimulation artifact will enable investigators to better analyze early CCEP components and infer direct effective connectivity in future CCEP studies. PMID:26952846

  1. Clinical Outcome and Characterization of Local Field Potentials in Holmes Tremor Treated with Pallidal Deep Brain Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez-Zamora, Adolfo; Kaszuba, Brian C.; Gee, Lucy; Prusik, Julia; Danisi, Fabio; Shin, Damian; Pilitsis, Julie G

    2016-01-01

    Background Holmes tremor (HT) is an irregular, low-frequency rest tremor associated with prominent action and postural tremors. Currently, the most effective stereotactic target and neurophysiologic characterization of HT, specifically local field potentials (LFPs) are uncertain. We present the outcome, intraoperative neurophysiologic analysis with characterization of LFPs in a patient managed with left globus pallidus interna deep brain stimulation (Gpi DBS). Case Report A 24-year-old male underwent left Gpi DBS for medically refractory HT. LFPs demonstrated highest powers in the delta range in Gpi. At the 6-month follow-up, a 90% reduction in tremor was observed. Discussion Pallidal DBS should be considered as an alternative target for management of refractory HT. LFP demonstrated neuronal activity associated with higher power in the delta region, similarly seen in patients with generalized dystonia. PMID:27441097

  2. Investigation of gender differences in the cardiovascular actions of direct and indirect sympathomimetic stimulants including cathinone in the anaesthetized rat.

    PubMed

    Alsufyani, H A; Docherty, J R

    2016-01-01

    We have studied gender differences in the direct and indirect sympathomimetic cardiovascular effects of the stimulant cathinone (from Khat) (and for comparison methylenedioxymethamphetamine [MDMA]) and the archetypal indirect sympathomimetic agent tyramine, employing male and female Wistar rats. Animals were sympathectomized by treatment with 6-hydroxydopamine or treated with vehicle. In male and female vehicle-treated pentobarbitone-anaesthetized rats, all three agonists (0.001-1 mg/kg) produced significant tachycardia, tyramine produced large pressor, and in high doses small depressor responses, MDMA produced small pressor responses, and cathinone produced only minor pressor effects. In sympathectomized rats, pressor responses, even those to tyramine, were virtually abolished, and depressor responses to tyramine were abolished. In vehicle-treated rats, the tachycardia to tyramine, but not the tachycardia to cathinone or MDMA, was significantly greater in male than female rats. This may suggest that the mechanism of the tachycardia to tyramine differs from those of the stimulants cathinone and MDMA. Following sympathectomy, there were no differences between male and female rats in the tachycardia to any agent. Hence, there were gender differences in the tachycardia response for tyramine, but no gender differences in the cardiovascular responses to the widely used recreational stimulants cathinone and MDMA. Cardiac stimulant actions of cathinone and MDMA were similar in male and female rats. PMID:27534387

  3. Understanding the electrical behavior of the action potential in terms of elementary electrical sources.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Falces, Javier

    2015-03-01

    A concept of major importance in human electrophysiology studies is the process by which activation of an excitable cell results in a rapid rise and fall of the electrical membrane potential, the so-called action potential. Hodgkin and Huxley proposed a model to explain the ionic mechanisms underlying the formation of action potentials. However, this model is unsuitably complex for teaching purposes. In addition, the Hodgkin and Huxley approach describes the shape of the action potential only in terms of ionic currents, i.e., it is unable to explain the electrical significance of the action potential or describe the electrical field arising from this source using basic concepts of electromagnetic theory. The goal of the present report was to propose a new model to describe the electrical behaviour of the action potential in terms of elementary electrical sources (in particular, dipoles). The efficacy of this model was tested through a closed-book written exam. The proposed model increased the ability of students to appreciate the distributed character of the action potential and also to recognize that this source spreads out along the fiber as function of space. In addition, the new approach allowed students to realize that the amplitude and sign of the extracellular electrical potential arising from the action potential are determined by the spatial derivative of this intracellular source. The proposed model, which incorporates intuitive graphical representations, has improved students' understanding of the electrical potentials generated by bioelectrical sources and has heightened their interest in bioelectricity.

  4. Nerve-released acetylcholine contracts urinary bladder smooth muscle by inducing action potentials independently of IP3-mediated calcium release.

    PubMed

    Nausch, Bernhard; Heppner, Thomas J; Nelson, Mark T

    2010-09-01

    Nerve-released ACh is the main stimulus for contraction of urinary bladder smooth muscle (UBSM). Here, the mechanisms by which ACh contracts UBSM are explored by determining Ca(2+) and electrical signals induced by nerve-released ACh. Photolysis of caged inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP(3)) evoked Ca(2+) release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum. Electrical field stimulation (20 Hz) induced Ca(2+) waves within the smooth muscle that were present only during stimulus application. Ca(2+) waves were blocked by inhibition of muscarinic ACh receptors (mAChRs) with atropine and depletion of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) stores with cyclopiazonic acid (CPA), and therefore likely reflect activation of IP(3) receptors (IP(3)Rs). Electrical field stimulation also increased excitability to induce action potentials (APs) that were accompanied by Ca(2+) flashes, reflecting Ca(2+) entry through voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels (VDCCs) during the action potential. The evoked Ca(2+) flashes and APs occurred as a burst with a lag time of approximately 1.5 s after onset of stimulation. They were not inhibited by blocking IP(3)-mediated Ca(2+) waves, but by blockers of mAChRs (atropine) and VDCCs (diltiazem). Nerve-evoked contractions of UBSM strips were greatly reduced by blocking VDCCs, but not by preventing IP(3)-mediated Ca(2+) signaling with cyclopiazonic acid or inhibition of PLC with U73122. These results indicate that ACh released from nerve varicosities induces IP(3)-mediated Ca(2+) waves during stimulation; but contrary to expectations, these signals do not appear to participate in contraction. In addition, our data provide compelling evidence that UBSM contractions evoked by nerve-released ACh depend on increased excitability and the resultant Ca(2+) entry through VDCCs during APs.

  5. Impedance and electrically evoked compound action potential (ECAP) drop within 24 hours after cochlear implantation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Joshua Kuang-Chao; Chuang, Ann Yi-Chiun; Sprinzl, Georg Mathias; Tung, Tao-Hsin; Li, Lieber Po-Hung

    2013-01-01

    Previous animal study revealed that post-implantation electrical detection levels significantly declined within days. The impact of cochlear implant (CI) insertion on human auditory pathway in terms of impedance and electrically evoked compound action potential (ECAP) variation within hours after surgery remains unclear, since at this time frequency mapping can only commence weeks after implantation due to factors associated with wound conditions. The study presented our experiences with regards to initial switch-on within 24 hours, and thus the findings about the milieus inside cochlea within the first few hours after cochlear implantation in terms of impedance/ECAP fluctuations. The charts of fifty-four subjects with profound hearing impairment were studied. A minimal invasive approach was used for cochlear implantation, characterized by a small skin incision (≈ 2.5 cm) and soft techniques for cochleostomy. Impedance/ECAP was measured intro-operatively and within 24 hours post-operatively. Initial mapping within 24 hours post-operatively was performed in all patients without major complications. Impedance/ECAP became significantly lower measured within 24 hours post-operatively as compared with intra-operatively (p<0.001). There were no differences between pre-operative and post-operative threshold for air-conduction hearing. A significant drop of impedance/ECAP in one day after cochlear implantation was revealed for the first time in human beings. Mechanisms could be related to the restoration of neuronal sensitivity to the electrical stimulation, and/or the interaction between the matrix enveloping the electrodes and the electrical stimulation of the initial switch-on. Less wound pain/swelling and soft techniques both contributed to the success of immediate initial mapping, which implied a stable micro-environment inside the cochlea despite electrodes insertion. Our research invites further studies to correlate initial impedance/ECAP changes with long

  6. Impedance and Electrically Evoked Compound Action Potential (ECAP) Drop within 24 Hours after Cochlear Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Joshua Kuang-Chao; Chuang, Ann Yi-Chiun; Sprinzl, Georg Mathias; Tung, Tao-Hsin; Li, Lieber Po-Hung

    2013-01-01

    Previous animal study revealed that post-implantation electrical detection levels significantly declined within days. The impact of cochlear implant (CI) insertion on human auditory pathway in terms of impedance and electrically evoked compound action potential (ECAP) variation within hours after surgery remains unclear, since at this time frequency mapping can only commence weeks after implantation due to factors associated with wound conditions. The study presented our experiences with regards to initial switch-on within 24 hours, and thus the findings about the milieus inside cochlea within the first few hours after cochlear implantation in terms of impedance/ECAP fluctuations. The charts of fifty-four subjects with profound hearing impairment were studied. A minimal invasive approach was used for cochlear implantation, characterized by a small skin incision (≈2.5 cm) and soft techniques for cochleostomy. Impedance/ECAP was measured intro-operatively and within 24 hours post-operatively. Initial mapping within 24 hours post-operatively was performed in all patients without major complications. Impedance/ECAP became significantly lower measured within 24 hours post-operatively as compared with intra-operatively (p<0.001). There were no differences between pre-operative and post-operative threshold for air-conduction hearing. A significant drop of impedance/ECAP in one day after cochlear implantation was revealed for the first time in human beings. Mechanisms could be related to the restoration of neuronal sensitivity to the electrical stimulation, and/or the interaction between the matrix enveloping the electrodes and the electrical stimulation of the initial switch-on. Less wound pain/swelling and soft techniques both contributed to the success of immediate initial mapping, which implied a stable micro-environment inside the cochlea despite electrodes insertion. Our research invites further studies to correlate initial impedance/ECAP changes with long

  7. Adaptive deep brain stimulation (aDBS) controlled by local field potential oscillations.

    PubMed

    Priori, Alberto; Foffani, Guglielmo; Rossi, Lorenzo; Marceglia, Sara

    2013-07-01

    Despite their proven efficacy in treating neurological disorders, especially Parkinson's disease, deep brain stimulation (DBS) systems could be further optimized to maximize treatment benefits. In particular, because current open-loop DBS strategies based on fixed stimulation settings leave the typical parkinsonian motor fluctuations and rapid symptom variations partly uncontrolled, research has for several years focused on developing novel "closed-loop" or "adaptive" DBS (aDBS) systems. aDBS consists of a simple closed-loop model designed to measure and analyze a control variable reflecting the patient's clinical condition to elaborate new stimulation settings and send them to an "intelligent" implanted stimulator. The major problem in developing an aDBS system is choosing the ideal control variable for feedback. Here we review current evidence on the advantages of neurosignal-controlled aDBS that uses local field potentials (LFPs) as a control variable, and describe the technology already available to create new aDBS systems, and the potential benefits of aDBS for patients with Parkinson's disease. PMID:23022916

  8. Antitumor effects of combining tumor radiation with the antivascular action of ultrasound stimulated microbubbles

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Yanlei; Han, Zhen; Shao, Limei; Zhao, Yuehuan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: More and more evidence indicates tumor vasculature plays an important role in tumor radiation response. In this study, we investigated ultrasound stimulated microbubbles to enhance the effects of radiation. Methods: Human bladder cancer HT-1376 xenografts in severe combined immuno-deficient mice were used. High-frequency (25 MHz) ultrasound was used to image tumor responses caused by ultrasound-stimulated microbubbles in combination with radiation. Human bladder xenografts grown in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice were treated using microbubbles stimulated with ultrasound at 250, 570, or 750 kPa, and exposed to 0, 2, or 8 Gy of radiation. Tumors were imaged prior to treatment and 24 hours after treatment. Spectral analysis of images acquired from treated tumors revealed overall increases in ultrasound backscatter intensity and the spectral intercept parameter. Results: There existed a synergistic effect in vivo with combined single treatments of ultrasound-stimulated microbubble vascular perturbation and radiation inducing an over 10-fold greater cell kill with combined treatments. We further demonstrate that induction of ceramide-related endothelial cell apoptosis, leading to vascular disruption, is a causative mechanism. In vivo experiments with ultrasound and bubbles permit radiation doses to be decreased significantly for comparable effect. Conclusion: We envisage this unique combined ultrasound-based vascular perturbation and radiation treatment method being used to enhance the effects of radiation in a tumor, leading to greater tumor eradication. PMID:26617705

  9. [Stimulation of microsomal lipid peroxidation as the effect of combined action of xylene and ethanol].

    PubMed

    Jajte, J; Wiśniewska-Knypl, J M; Wrońska-Nofer, T

    1990-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate if in the case of combined exposure of rats to xylene and ethanol stimulation of lipid peroxidation in the liver microsomes (an index of interaction with lipids and derangements of integrity/fluidity of membranes) might occur. Experiments were carried out on male Wistar rats in the conditions of prolonged, inhalatory preexposure to m-xylene at concentration of 4000 mg/m3 for 6 and 12 weeks, and next joint 5-fold treatment with ethanol (2.5 g/kg oral doses in 12 hours intervals for 3 days). The degree of lipid peroxidation was assessed both in vivo and in vitro under chemical stimulation: enzymatically (NADPH, Fe2+) and nonenzymatically (ascorbic acid, Fe2+). The chemical stimulation permits to measure multiplied biological effects of chemicals acting in vivo. As a results of performed studies it was found that the highest increase of lipid peroxidation appeared in the case of prolonged, 12 weeks exposure to m-xylene (4000 mg/m3) and successively under subacute ethanol treatment and 6-week m-xylene exposure. Thus, it was evidenced that stimulation of lipid peroxidation depends on the duration of exposure to m-xylene. Stimulation of lipid peroxidation, revealed here, may arise from the processes of biotransformation of xylene in cyt. P-450 monooxygenase system where generated oxygen free radicals may attack the lipid components of microsomal membrane as well as from the mechanisms leading to decrease of antioxidant ability of the organism (decrease of glutathione-SH and vitamins E and C levels).

  10. Non-invasive brain stimulation (rTMS and tDCS) in patients with aphasia: mode of action at the cellular level.

    PubMed

    Málly, Judit

    2013-09-01

    A high proportion of patients who have suffered a stroke also suffer from aphasia. Approximately half of those affected will remain in this state despite intensive language therapy. Non-invasive brain stimulation allows us to directly and focally stimulate areas of the brain. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), methods used in the treatment of aphasia, are based on an imbalance of mutual interhemispheric inhibition. In open and sham-controlled studies, a low-frequency, 1Hz stimulation of the non-lesioned hemisphere (the homologue of Broca's area) for a week or more significantly improved spontaneous speech and anomia in patients with non-fluent aphasia. These positive outcomes from rTMS stimulation developed slowly, often over months following treatment, and persisted. Effects of intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS) developed faster than the low-frequency stimulation, and high-activity enhancement was detected in the left hemisphere after the stimulation of Broca's region. Both types of tDCS stimulation resulted in improved comprehension and reduced anomia, their primary modes of action are distinct, however, both share a common site of action with regard to the balance that occurs between inhibitory and excitatory neurotransmitters (synaptic and non-synaptic). Both types of non-invasive stimulation prepare the lesioned brain for better outcome. PMID:23872450

  11. Spectral distribution of local field potential responses to electrical stimulation of the retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Yan T.; Halupka, Kerry; Kameneva, Tatiana; Cloherty, Shaun L.; Grayden, David B.; Burkitt, Anthony N.; Meffin, Hamish; Shivdasani, Mohit N.

    2016-06-01

    Objective. Different frequency bands of the local field potential (LFP) have been shown to reflect neuronal activity occurring at varying cortical scales. As such, recordings of the LFP may offer a novel way to test the efficacy of neural prostheses and allow improvement of stimulation strategies via neural feedback. Here we use LFP measurements from visual cortex to characterize neural responses to electrical stimulation of the retina. We aim to show that the LFP is a viable signal that contains sufficient information to optimize the performance of sensory neural prostheses. Approach. Clinically relevant electrode arrays were implanted in the suprachoroidal space of one eye in four felines. LFPs were simultaneously recorded in response to stimulation of individual electrodes using penetrating microelectrode arrays from the visual cortex. The frequency response of each electrode was extracted using multi-taper spectral analysis and the uniqueness of the responses was determined via a linear decoder. Main results. We found that cortical LFPs are reliably modulated by electrical stimulation of the retina and that the responses are spatially localized. We further characterized the spectral distribution of responses, with maximum information being contained in the low and high gamma bands. Finally, we found that LFP responses are unique to a large range of stimulus parameters (∼40) with a maximum conveyable information rate of 6.1 bits. Significance. These results show that the LFP can be used to validate responses to electrical stimulation of the retina and we provide the first steps towards using these responses to provide more efficacious stimulation strategies.

  12. Acerogenin A, a natural compound isolated from Acer nikoense Maxim, stimulates osteoblast differentiation through bone morphogenetic protein action

    SciTech Connect

    Kihara, Tasuku; Ichikawa, Saki; Yonezawa, Takayuki; Lee, Ji-Won; Akihisa, Toshihiro; Woo, Je Tae; Michi, Yasuyuki; Amagasa, Teruo; Yamaguchi, Akira

    2011-03-11

    Research highlights: {yields} Acerogenin A stimulated osteoblast differentiation in osteogenic cells. {yields} Acerogenin A-induced osteoblast differentiation was inhibited by noggin. {yields} Acerogenin A increased Bmp-2, Bmp-4 and Bmp-7 mRNA expression in MC3T3-E1 cells. {yields} Acerogenin A is a candidate agent for stimulating bone formation. -- Abstract: We investigated the effects of acerogenin A, a natural compound isolated from Acer nikoense Maxim, on osteoblast differentiation by using osteoblastic cells. Acerogenin A stimulated the cell proliferation of MC3T3-E1 osteoblastic cells and RD-C6 osteoblastic cells (Runx2-deficient cell line). It also increased alkaline phosphatase activity in MC3T3-E1 and RD-C6 cells and calvarial osteoblastic cells isolated from the calvariae of newborn mice. Acerogenin A also increased the expression of mRNAs related to osteoblast differentiation, including Osteocalcin, Osterix and Runx2 in MC3T3-E1 cells and primary osteoblasts: it also stimulated Osteocalcin and Osterix mRNA expression in RD-C6 cells. The acerogenin A treatment for 3 days increased Bmp-2, Bmp-4, and Bmp-7 mRNA expression levels in MC3T3-E1 cells. Adding noggin, a BMP specific-antagonist, inhibited the acerogenin A-induced increase in the Osteocalcin, Osterix and Runx2 mRNA expression levels. These results indicated that acerogenin A stimulates osteoblast differentiation through BMP action, which is mediated by Runx2-dependent and Runx2-independent pathways.

  13. Action potential propagation imaged with high temporal resolution near-infrared video microscopy and polarized light

    PubMed Central

    Schei, Jennifer L.; McCluskey, Matthew D.; Foust, Amanda J.; Yao, Xin-Cheng; Rector, David M.

    2008-01-01

    To identify the neural constituents responsible for generating polarized light changes, we created spatially resolved movies of propagating action potentials from stimulated lobster leg nerves using both reflection and transmission imaging modalities. Changes in light polarization are associated with membrane depolarization and provide sub-millisecond temporal resolution. Typically, signals are detected using light transmitted through tissue; however, because we eventually would like to apply polarization techniques in-vivo, reflected light is required. In transmission mode, the optical signal was largest throughout the center of the nerve, suggesting that most of the optical signal arose from the inner nerve bundle. In reflection mode, polarization changes were largest near the edges, suggesting that most of the optical signal arose from the outer sheath. In support of these observations, an optical model of the tissue showed that the outer sheath is more reflective while the inner nerve bundle is more transmissive. In order to apply these techniques in-vivo, we must consider that brain tissue does not have a regular orientation of processes as in the lobster nerve. We tested the effect of randomizing cell orientation by tying the nerve in an overhand knot prior to imaging, producing polarization changes that can be imaged even without regular cell orientations. PMID:18272402

  14. Computer Simulations Support a Morphological Contribution to BDNF Enhancement of Action Potential Generation

    PubMed Central

    Hiester, Brian G.; Jones, Kevin R.

    2016-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) regulates both action potential (AP) generation and neuron morphology. However, whether BDNF-induced changes in neuron morphology directly impact AP generation is unclear. We quantified BDNF’s effect on cultured cortical neuron morphological parameters and found that BDNF stimulates dendrite growth and addition of dendrites while increasing both excitatory and inhibitory presynaptic inputs in a spatially restricted manner. To gain insight into how these combined changes in neuron structure and synaptic input impact AP generation, we used the morphological parameters we gathered to generate computational models. Simulations suggest that BDNF-induced neuron morphologies generate more APs under a wide variety of conditions. Synapse and dendrite addition have the greatest impact on AP generation. However, subtle alterations in excitatory/inhibitory synapse ratio and strength have a significant impact on AP generation when synaptic activity is low. Consistent with these simulations, BDNF rapidly enhances spontaneous activity in cortical cultures. We propose that BDNF promotes neuron morphologies that are intrinsically more efficient at translating barrages of synaptic activity into APs, which is a previously unexplored aspect of BDNF’s function. PMID:27683544

  15. Computer Simulations Support a Morphological Contribution to BDNF Enhancement of Action Potential Generation.

    PubMed

    Galati, Domenico F; Hiester, Brian G; Jones, Kevin R

    2016-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) regulates both action potential (AP) generation and neuron morphology. However, whether BDNF-induced changes in neuron morphology directly impact AP generation is unclear. We quantified BDNF's effect on cultured cortical neuron morphological parameters and found that BDNF stimulates dendrite growth and addition of dendrites while increasing both excitatory and inhibitory presynaptic inputs in a spatially restricted manner. To gain insight into how these combined changes in neuron structure and synaptic input impact AP generation, we used the morphological parameters we gathered to generate computational models. Simulations suggest that BDNF-induced neuron morphologies generate more APs under a wide variety of conditions. Synapse and dendrite addition have the greatest impact on AP generation. However, subtle alterations in excitatory/inhibitory synapse ratio and strength have a significant impact on AP generation when synaptic activity is low. Consistent with these simulations, BDNF rapidly enhances spontaneous activity in cortical cultures. We propose that BDNF promotes neuron morphologies that are intrinsically more efficient at translating barrages of synaptic activity into APs, which is a previously unexplored aspect of BDNF's function. PMID:27683544

  16. Computer Simulations Support a Morphological Contribution to BDNF Enhancement of Action Potential Generation

    PubMed Central

    Hiester, Brian G.; Jones, Kevin R.

    2016-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) regulates both action potential (AP) generation and neuron morphology. However, whether BDNF-induced changes in neuron morphology directly impact AP generation is unclear. We quantified BDNF’s effect on cultured cortical neuron morphological parameters and found that BDNF stimulates dendrite growth and addition of dendrites while increasing both excitatory and inhibitory presynaptic inputs in a spatially restricted manner. To gain insight into how these combined changes in neuron structure and synaptic input impact AP generation, we used the morphological parameters we gathered to generate computational models. Simulations suggest that BDNF-induced neuron morphologies generate more APs under a wide variety of conditions. Synapse and dendrite addition have the greatest impact on AP generation. However, subtle alterations in excitatory/inhibitory synapse ratio and strength have a significant impact on AP generation when synaptic activity is low. Consistent with these simulations, BDNF rapidly enhances spontaneous activity in cortical cultures. We propose that BDNF promotes neuron morphologies that are intrinsically more efficient at translating barrages of synaptic activity into APs, which is a previously unexplored aspect of BDNF’s function.

  17. Frequency decoding of periodically timed action potentials through distinct activity patterns in a random neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichenbach, Tobias; Hudspeth, A. J.

    2012-11-01

    Frequency discrimination is a fundamental task of the auditory system. The mammalian inner ear, or cochlea, provides a place code in which different frequencies are detected at different spatial locations. However, a temporal code based on spike timing is also available: action potentials evoked in an auditory-nerve fiber by a low-frequency tone occur at a preferred phase of the stimulus—they exhibit phase locking—and thus provide temporal information about the tone's frequency. Humans employ this temporal information for discrimination of low frequencies. How might such temporal information be read out in the brain? Here we employ statistical and numerical methods to demonstrate that recurrent random neural networks in which connections between neurons introduce characteristic time delays, and in which neurons require temporally coinciding inputs for spike initiation, can perform sharp frequency discrimination when stimulated with phase-locked inputs. Although the frequency resolution achieved by such networks is limited by the noise in phase locking, the resolution for realistic values reaches the tiny frequency difference of 0.2% that has been measured in humans.

  18. Improved health and growth of fish fed mannan oligosaccharides: potential mode of action.

    PubMed

    Torrecillas, Silvia; Montero, Daniel; Izquierdo, Marisol

    2014-02-01

    Nowadays, aquaculture industry still confronts several disease-related problems mainly caused by viruses, bacteria and parasites. In the last decade, the use of mannan oligosaccharides (MOS) in fish production has received increased attention due to its beneficial effects on fish performance and disease resistance. This review shows the MOS use in aquaculture with a specific emphasis on the effectiveness of the several MOS forms available in the market related to disease resistance, fish nutrition and the possible mechanisms involved. Among the main beneficial effects attributed to MOS dietary supplementation, enhanced fish performance, feed efficiency and pathogen protection by potentiation of the systemic and local immune system and the reinforcement of the epithelial barrier structure and functionality are some of the most commonly demonstrated benefits. These combined effects suggest that the reinforcement of the intestinal integrity and functionality, together with the stimulation of the innate immune system, are the primary mode of action of MOS in fish. However, the supplementation strategy related to the structure of the MOS added, the correct dose and duration, as well as fish species, size and culture conditions are determinant factors to achieve improvements in health status and growth performance.

  19. Spatio-temporal source modeling of evoked potentials to acoustic and cochlear implant stimulation.

    PubMed

    Ponton, C W; Don, M; Waring, M D; Eggermont, J J; Masuda, A

    1993-01-01

    Spatio-temporal source modeling (STSM) of event-related potentials was used to estimate the loci and characteristics of cortical activity evoked by acoustic stimulation in normal hearing subjects and by electrical stimulation in cochlear implant (CI) subjects. In both groups of subjects, source solutions obtained for the N1/P2 complex were located in the superior half of the temporal lobe in the head model. Results indicate that it may be possible to determine whether stimulation of different implant channels activates different regions of cochleotopically organized auditory cortex. Auditory system activation can be assessed further by examining the characteristics of the source wave forms. For example, subjects whose cochlear implants provided auditory sensations and normal hearing subjects had similar source activity. In contrast, a subject in whom implant activation evoked eyelid movements exhibited different source wave forms. STSM analysis may provide an electrophysiological technique for guiding rehabilitation programs based on the capabilities of the individual implant user and for disentangling the complex response patterns to electrical stimulation of the brain.

  20. Repetitive magnetic stimulation affects the microenvironment of nerve regeneration and evoked potentials after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jin-lan; Guo, Xu-dong; Zhang, Shu-quan; Wang, Xin-gang; Wu, Shi-feng

    2016-01-01

    Repetitive magnetic stimulation has been shown to alter local blood flow of the brain, excite the corticospinal tract and muscle, and induce motor function recovery. We established a rat model of acute spinal cord injury using the modified Allen's method. After 4 hours of injury, rat models received repetitive magnetic stimulation, with a stimulus intensity of 35% maximum output intensity, 5-Hz frequency, 5 seconds for each sequence, and an interval of 2 minutes. This was repeated for a total of 10 sequences, once a day, 5 days in a week, for 2 consecutive weeks. After repetitive magnetic stimulation, the number of apoptotic cells decreased, matrix metalloproteinase 9/2 gene and protein expression decreased, nestin expression increased, somatosensory and motor-evoked potentials recovered, and motor function recovered in the injured spinal cord. These findings confirm that repetitive magnetic stimulation of the spinal cord improved the microenvironment of neural regeneration, reduced neuronal apoptosis, and induced neuroprotective and repair effects on the injured spinal cord. PMID:27335567

  1. Cell-type-dependent action potentials and voltage-gated currents in mouse fungiform taste buds.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Kenji; Ohtubo, Yoshitaka; Tateno, Katsumi; Takeuchi, Keita; Kumazawa, Takashi; Yoshii, Kiyonori

    2014-01-01

    Taste receptor cells fire action potentials in response to taste substances to trigger non-exocytotic neurotransmitter release in type II cells and exocytotic release in type III cells. We investigated possible differences between these action potentials fired by mouse taste receptor cells using in situ whole-cell recordings, and subsequently we identified their cell types immunologically with cell-type markers, an IP3 receptor (IP3 R3) for type II cells and a SNARE protein (SNAP-25) for type III cells. Cells not immunoreactive to these antibodies were examined as non-IRCs. Here, we show that type II cells and type III cells fire action potentials using different ionic mechanisms, and that non-IRCs also fire action potentials with either of the ionic mechanisms. The width of action potentials was significantly narrower and their afterhyperpolarization was deeper in type III cells than in type II cells. Na(+) current density was similar in type II cells and type III cells, but it was significantly smaller in non-IRCs than in the others. Although outwardly rectifying current density was similar between type II cells and type III cells, tetraethylammonium (TEA) preferentially suppressed the density in type III cells and the majority of non-IRCs. Our mathematical model revealed that the shape of action potentials depended on the ratio of TEA-sensitive current density and TEA-insensitive current one. The action potentials of type II cells and type III cells under physiological conditions are discussed.

  2. Potential synergy of phytochemicals in cancer prevention: mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui Hai

    2004-12-01

    Epidemiological studies have consistently shown that regular consumption of fruits and vegetables is strongly associated with reduced risk of developing chronic diseases, such as cancer and cardiovascular disease. It is now widely believed that the actions of the antioxidant nutrients alone do not explain the observed health benefits of diets rich in fruits and vegetables, because taken alone, the individual antioxidants studied in clinical trials do not appear to have consistent preventive effects. Work performed by our group and others has shown that fruits and vegetable phytochemical extracts exhibit strong antioxidant and antiproliferative activities and that the major part of total antioxidant activity is from the combination of phytochemicals. We proposed that the additive and synergistic effects of phytochemicals in fruits and vegetables are responsible for these potent antioxidant and anticancer activities and that the benefit of a diet rich in fruits and vegetables is attributed to the complex mixture of phytochemicals present in whole foods. This explains why no single antioxidant can replace the combination of natural phytochemicals in fruits and vegetables to achieve the health benefits. The evidence suggests that antioxidants or bioactive compounds are best acquired through whole-food consumption, not from expensive dietary supplements. We believe that a recommendation that consumers eat 5 to 10 servings of a wide variety of fruits and vegetables daily is an appropriate strategy for significantly reducing the risk of chronic diseases and to meet their nutrient requirements for optimum health.

  3. Uterine stimulant action of some omega-chain modified (+)-11-deoxyprostaglandins.

    PubMed

    Broughton, B J; Caton, M P; Christmas, A J; Coffee, E C; Hambling, D J

    1981-07-01

    Rat uterine stimulant activity has been determined in vivo for a series of (+)-11-deoxyprostaglandins. The most active members of the series. 11-deoxy-15 methyl-PGE1, 11-deoxy-16,16-dimethyl - PGE1 and its 1-alcohol were 2-3 times more potent than PGE1. Gastrointestinal side effects assessed by the antagonism of morphine-induced constipation in the mouse, were generally relatively low with these compounds and consequently several members of the series had a more favourable relative selectivity than 16,16-dimethyl-PGE2 methyl ester.

  4. Neuropeptide Y potentiates beta-adrenergic stimulation of lipolysis in 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Li, Raymond; Guan, Haiyan; Yang, Kaiping

    2012-10-10

    Recently, we have shown that neuropeptide Y (NPY) is produced and upregulated in visceral adipose tissue of an early-life programmed rat model of central obesity. Moreover, we have demonstrated that NPY promotes proliferation of adipocyte precursor cells and contributes to the pathogenesis of obesity. However, the role of NPY in regulating adipocyte metabolism is poorly understood. The present study was designed to examine the effects of NPY on adipocyte metabolic function using 3T3-L1 adipocytes as an in vitro cell model system. We found that although it did not affect basal lipolysis, NPY potentiated isoproterenol (a β-adrenergic receptor agonist) stimulated lipolysis. Furthermore, this potentiation occurred upstream of adenylyl cyclase, since NPY did not enhance forskolin (an activator of adenylyl cyclase) stimulated lipolysis. In addition, NPY also augmented isoproterenol-stimulated phosphorylation of hormone sensitive lipase. In contrast, NPY did not alter the expression of several key lipolytic and lipogenic enzymes/proteins. Taken together, our results revealed a novel cross talk between the NPY and β-adrenergic signaling pathways in regulating lipolysis. Thus, the present findings add a new dimension to the dynamic role NPY plays in regulating energy balance.

  5. Changes in somatosensory-evoked potentials and high-frequency oscillations after paired-associative stimulation.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Takenobu; Sakuma, Kenji; Nomura, Takashi; Uemura, Yusuke; Hashimoto, Isao; Nakashima, Kenji

    2008-01-01

    Paired-associative stimulation (PAS), combining electrical median nerve stimulation with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) with a variable delay, causes long-term potentiation or depression (LTP/LTD)-like cortical plasticity. In the present study, we examined how PAS over the motor cortex affected a distant site, the somatosensory cortex. Furthermore, the influences of PAS on high-frequency oscillations (HFOs) were investigated to clarify the origin of HFOs. Interstimulus intervals between median nerve stimulation and TMS were 25 ms (PAS(25)) and 10 ms (PAS(10)). PAS was performed over the motor and somatosensory cortices. SEPs following median nerve stimulation were recorded before and after PAS. HFOs were isolated by 400-800 Hz band-pass filtering. PAS(25) over the motor cortex increased the N20-P25 and P25-N33 amplitudes and the HFOs significantly. The enhancement of the P25-N33 amplitude and the late HFOs lasted more than 60 min. After PAS(10) over the motor cortex, the N20-P25 and P25-N33 amplitudes decreased for 40 min, and the HFOs decreased for 60 min. Frontal SEPs were not affected after PAS over the motor cortex. PAS(25/10) over the somatosensory cortex did not affect SEPs and HFOs. PAS(25/10) over the motor cortex caused the LTP/LTD-like phenomena in a distant site, the somatosensory cortex. The PAS paradigms over the motor cortex can modify both the neural generators of SEPs and HFOs. HFOs may reflect the activation of GABAergic inhibitory interneurons regulating pyramidal neurons in the somatosensory cortex. PMID:17724581

  6. Hyperinsulinemia Potentiates Airway Responsiveness to Parasympathetic Nerve Stimulation in Obese Rats

    PubMed Central

    Jacoby, David B.; Fryer, Allison D.

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a substantial risk factor for developing asthma, but the molecular mechanisms underlying this relationship are unclear. We tested the role of insulin in airway responsiveness to nerve stimulation using rats genetically prone or resistant to diet-induced obesity. Airway response to vagus nerve stimulation and airway M2 and M3 muscarinic receptor function were measured in obese-prone and -resistant rats with high or low circulating insulin. The effects of insulin on nerve-mediated human airway smooth muscle contraction and human M2 muscarinic receptor function were tested in vitro. Our data show that increased vagally mediated bronchoconstriction in obesity is associated with hyperinsulinemia and loss of inhibitory M2 muscarinic receptor function on parasympathetic nerves. Obesity did not induce airway inflammation or increase airway wall thickness. Smooth muscle contraction to acetylcholine was not increased, indicating that hyperresponsiveness is mediated at the level of airway nerves. Reducing serum insulin with streptozotocin protected neuronal M2 receptor function and prevented airway hyperresponsiveness to vagus nerve stimulation in obese rats. Replacing insulin restored dysfunction of neuronal M2 receptors and airway hyperresponsiveness to vagus nerve stimulation in streptozotocin-treated obese rats. Treatment with insulin caused loss of M2 receptor function, resulting in airway hyperresponsiveness to vagus nerve stimulation in obese-resistant rats, and inhibited human neuronal M2 receptor function in vitro. This study shows that it is not obesity per se but hyperinsulinemia accompanying obesity that potentiates vagally induced bronchoconstriction by inhibiting neuronal M2 muscarinic receptors and increasing acetylcholine release from airway parasympathetic nerves. PMID:24605871

  7. Consequences of Converting Graded to Action Potentials upon Neural Information Coding and Energy Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Biswa; Laughlin, Simon Barry; Niven, Jeremy Edward

    2014-01-01

    Information is encoded in neural circuits using both graded and action potentials, converting between them within single neurons and successive processing layers. This conversion is accompanied by information loss and a drop in energy efficiency. We investigate the biophysical causes of this loss of information and efficiency by comparing spiking neuron models, containing stochastic voltage-gated Na+ and K+ channels, with generator potential and graded potential models lacking voltage-gated Na+ channels. We identify three causes of information loss in the generator potential that are the by-product of action potential generation: (1) the voltage-gated Na+ channels necessary for action potential generation increase intrinsic noise and (2) introduce non-linearities, and (3) the finite duration of the action potential creates a ‘footprint’ in the generator potential that obscures incoming signals. These three processes reduce information rates by ∼50% in generator potentials, to ∼3 times that of spike trains. Both generator potentials and graded potentials consume almost an order of magnitude less energy per second than spike trains. Because of the lower information rates of generator potentials they are substantially less energy efficient than graded potentials. However, both are an order of magnitude more efficient than spike trains due to the higher energy costs and low information content of spikes, emphasizing that there is a two-fold cost of converting analogue to digital; information loss and cost inflation. PMID:24465197

  8. Consequences of converting graded to action potentials upon neural information coding and energy efficiency.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Biswa; Laughlin, Simon Barry; Niven, Jeremy Edward

    2014-01-01

    Information is encoded in neural circuits using both graded and action potentials, converting between them within single neurons and successive processing layers. This conversion is accompanied by information loss and a drop in energy efficiency. We investigate the biophysical causes of this loss of information and efficiency by comparing spiking neuron models, containing stochastic voltage-gated Na(+) and K(+) channels, with generator potential and graded potential models lacking voltage-gated Na(+) channels. We identify three causes of information loss in the generator potential that are the by-product of action potential generation: (1) the voltage-gated Na(+) channels necessary for action potential generation increase intrinsic noise and (2) introduce non-linearities, and (3) the finite duration of the action potential creates a 'footprint' in the generator potential that obscures incoming signals. These three processes reduce information rates by ∼50% in generator potentials, to ∼3 times that of spike trains. Both generator potentials and graded potentials consume almost an order of magnitude less energy per second than spike trains. Because of the lower information rates of generator potentials they are substantially less energy efficient than graded potentials. However, both are an order of magnitude more efficient than spike trains due to the higher energy costs and low information content of spikes, emphasizing that there is a two-fold cost of converting analogue to digital; information loss and cost inflation.

  9. Identification of Stimulated Sites Using Artificial Neural Networks Based on Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation-Elicited Motor Evoked Potentials and Finger Forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, Hiroshi; Odagaki, Masato; Hiwaki, Osamu

    Motor evoked potentials (MEPs) elicited by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) over the primary motor cortex (M1) vary in their amplitude from trial to trial. To investigate the functions of motor cortex by TMS, it is necessary to confirm the causal relationship between stimulated sites and variable MEPs. We created artificial neural networks to classify sets of variable MEP signals and finger forces into the corresponding stimulated sites. We conducted TMS at three different positions over M1 and measured MEPs of hand and forearm muscles and forces of the index finger in four subjects. We estimated the sites within motor cortex stimulated by TMS based on cortical columnar structure and nerve excitation properties. Finally, we tried to classify the various MEPs and finger forces into three groups using artificial neural networks. MEPs and finger forces varied from trial to trial, even if the stimulating coil was fixed on the subject's head. Our proposed neural network was able to identify the MEPs and finger forces with the corresponding stimulated sites in M1. We proposed the artificial neural networks to confirm the TMS-stimulated sites using various MEPs and evoked finger forces.

  10. Ventricular filling slows epicardial conduction and increases action potential duration in an optical mapping study of the isolated rabbit heart

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sung, Derrick; Mills, Robert W.; Schettler, Jan; Narayan, Sanjiv M.; Omens, Jeffrey H.; McCulloch, Andrew D.; McCullough, A. D. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Mechanical stimulation can induce electrophysiologic changes in cardiac myocytes, but how mechanoelectric feedback in the intact heart affects action potential propagation remains unclear. METHODS AND RESULTS: Changes in action potential propagation and repolarization with increased left ventricular end-diastolic pressure from 0 to 30 mmHg were investigated using optical mapping in isolated perfused rabbit hearts. With respect to 0 mmHg, epicardial strain at 30 mmHg in the anterior left ventricle averaged 0.040 +/- 0.004 in the muscle fiber direction and 0.032 +/- 0.006 in the cross-fiber direction. An increase in ventricular loading increased average epicardial activation time by 25%+/- 3% (P < 0.0001) and correspondingly decreased average apparent surface conduction velocity by 16%+/- 7% (P = 0.007). Ventricular loading did not significantly alter action potential duration at 20% repolarization (APD20) but did at 80% repolarization (APD80), from 179 +/- 7 msec to 207 +/- 5 msec (P < 0.0001). The dispersion of APD20 was decreased with loading from 19 +/- 2 msec to 13 +/- 2 msec (P = 0.024), whereas the dispersion of APD80 was not significantly changed. These electrophysiologic changes with ventricular loading were not affected by the nonspecific stretch-activated channel blocker streptomycin (200 microM) and were not attributable to changes in myocardial perfusion or the presence of an electromechanical decoupling agent (butanedione monoxime) during optical mapping. CONCLUSION: Acute loading of the left ventricle of the isolated rabbit heart decreased apparent epicardial conduction velocity and increased action potential duration by a load-dependent mechanism that may not involve stretch-activated channels.

  11. Chloride current in mammalian cardiac myocytes. Novel mechanism for autonomic regulation of action potential duration and resting membrane potential

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    The properties of the autonomically regulated chloride current (ICl) were studied in isolated guinea pig ventricular myocytes. This current was elicited upon exposure to isoproterenol (ISO) and reversed upon concurrent exposure to acetylcholine (ACh). ICl was time independent and exhibited outward rectification. The responses to ISO and ACh could be blocked by propranolol and atropine, respectively, and ICl was also elicited by forskolin, 8-bromoadenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate, and 3-isobutyl-l-methylxanthine, indicating that the current is regulated through a cAMP-dependent pathway. The reversal potential of the ISO- induced current followed the predicted chloride equilibrium potential, consistent with it being carried predominantly by Cl-. Activation of ICl produced changes in the resting membrane potential and action potential duration, which were Cl- gradient dependent. These results indicate that under physiological conditions ICl may play an important role in regulating action potential duration and resting membrane potential in mammalian cardiac myocytes. PMID:2165130

  12. Detection and classification of raw action potential patterns in human Muscle Sympathetic Nerve Activity.

    PubMed

    Salmanpour, Aryan; Brown, Lyndon J; Shoemaker, J K

    2008-01-01

    The Muscle Sympathetic Nerve Activity (MSNA) consists of synchronous neural discharges separated by periods of neural silence dominated by heavy background noise. During measurement with electrodes, the raw MSNA signal is amplified, band-pass filtered, rectified and integrated. This integration process removes much neurophysiological information. In this paper a method for detecting a raw action potential (before the pre-amplifier) and filtered action potential (after the band-pass filter) is presented. This method is based on stationary wavelet transform (SWT) and a peak detection algorithm. Also, the detected action potentials were clustered using the k-means method and the cluster averages were calculated. The action potential detector and classification algorithm are evaluated using real MSNA recorded from three healthy subjects.

  13. Effects of methyllycaconitine (MLA), an alpha 7 nicotinic receptor antagonist, on nicotine- and cocaine-induced potentiation of brain stimulation reward.

    PubMed

    Panagis, G; Kastellakis, A; Spyraki, C; Nomikos, G

    2000-05-01

    It has been shown that nicotine facilitates intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) reward and that nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) are of primary importance for its reinforcing and dependence-producing actions. Recently, we have shown that alpha 7 nicotinic receptors in the VTA contribute to both the acute effects of nicotine on the mesolimbic dopamine system, as well as to nicotine withdrawal reactions. However, it is not yet known whether the same receptor conformation is directly involved in the reinforcing actions of nicotine. Here, using the curve-shift method we studied the effects of methyllycaconitine (MLA), a selective alpha 7 receptor antagonist, microinjected (graded doses: 1, 3, 9 micrograms/microliter per side) into the VTA on the rewarding efficacy of lateral hypothalamic self-stimulation and on the systemic nicotine-induced potentiation of brain stimulation reward. MLA did not affect baseline self-stimulation. Nicotine produced a significant reduction in ICSS threshold, without altering maximal rates of responding, while MLA attenuated the effect of nicotine at the two lower doses. Given the reported interaction between nicotine and cocaine at both the neuronal and the behavioral level, we also examined whether alpha 7 receptor antagonism within the VTA can affect the reinforcing action of cocaine, as measured with ICSS. Interestingly, MLA attenuated the reinforcing effect of cocaine in all doses tested, without altering the maximal rate of responding, i.e. the performance of the animals. These results suggest that alpha 7 nAChRs in the VTA are involved in mediating the reinforcing actions of drugs of abuse, such as nicotine and cocaine, and provide evidence that alpha 7 nAChR antagonists may be clinically useful in attenuating the rewarding effects of addictive drugs.

  14. Short-latency cortical potentials evoked by tactile air-jet stimulation of body and face in man.

    PubMed

    Schieppati, M; Ducati, A

    1984-11-01

    Natural cutaneous stimulation was performed in 10 healthy volunteers by means of a brief, localized air jet directed to the glabrous skin of the face, finger or toe. Neurograms (from finger stimulation) and somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) were recorded and, in the case of finger and toe stimulation, compared with the SEPs obtained by low intensity electrical stimulation. Comparing the latencies at wrist and elbow of the respective neurograms, it appears that a 2 msec period accounts for skin indentation and build-up of the generator potential in the receptors activated by the air jet. A slightly lower conduction velocity was obtained on natural than on electrical stimulation, and the cortical SEPs accordingly had a longer latency. In spite of the much smaller amplitude of the air-jet evoked neurograms, the amplitudes of the SEPs from finger and toe were similar to the amplitudes of the SEPs on electrical stimulation of the same regions. Natural stimulation in the regions innervated by the 3 branches of the trigeminal nerve (tongue included) yielded consistent SEPs, comparable with those reported in the literature to electrical stimulation. These potentials were distinguishable from the electrical activity due to the blink reflex, which invariably takes place on air-jet stimulation of the first trigeminal branch.

  15. Distinct electrophysiological potentials for intention in action and prior intention for action.

    PubMed

    Vinding, Mikkel C; Jensen, Mads; Overgaard, Morten

    2014-01-01

    The role of conscious intention in relation to motoric movements has become a major topic of investigation in neuroscience. Traditionally, reports of conscious intention have been compared to various features of the readiness-potential (RP)--an electrophysiological signal that appears before voluntary movements. Experiments, however, tend to study intentions in immediate relation to movements (proximal intentions), thus ignoring other aspects of intentions such as planning or deciding in advance of movement (distal intentions). The current study examines the difference in electrophysiological activity between proximal intention and distal intention, using electroencephalography (EEG). Participants had to form an intention to move and then wait 2.5 sec before performing the actual movement. In this way, the electrophysiological activity related to forming a conscious intention was separated from any confounding activity related to automated motor activity. This was compared to conditions in which participants had to act as soon as they had the intention and a condition where participants acted upon an external cue 2.5 sec prior to movement. We examined the RP for the three conditions. No difference was found in early RP, but late RP differed significantly depending on the type of intention. In addition, we analysed signals during a longer time-interval starting before the time of distal intention formation until after the actual movement concluded. Results showed a slow negative electrophysiological "intention potential" above the mid-frontal areas at the time participants formed a distal intention. This potential was only found when the distal intention was self-paced and not when the intention was formed in response to an external cue.

  16. Stimulation of superoxide production increases fungicidal action of miconazole against Candida albicans biofilms

    PubMed Central

    De Cremer, Kaat; De Brucker, Katrijn; Staes, Ines; Peeters, Annelies; Van den Driessche, Freija; Coenye, Tom; Cammue, Bruno P. A.; Thevissen, Karin

    2016-01-01

    We performed a whole-transcriptome analysis of miconazole-treated Candida albicans biofilms, using RNA-sequencing. Our aim was to identify molecular pathways employed by biofilm cells of this pathogen to resist action of the commonly used antifungal miconazole. As expected, genes involved in sterol biosynthesis and genes encoding drug efflux pumps were highly induced in biofilm cells upon miconazole treatment. Other processes were affected as well, including the electron transport chain (ETC), of which eight components were transcriptionally downregulated. Within a diverse set of 17 inhibitors/inducers of the transcriptionally affected pathways, the ETC inhibitors acted most synergistically with miconazole against C. albicans biofilm cells. Synergy was not observed for planktonically growing C. albicans cultures or when biofilms were treated in oxygen-deprived conditions, pointing to a biofilm-specific oxygen-dependent tolerance mechanism. In line, a correlation between miconazole’s fungicidal action against C. albicans biofilm cells and the levels of superoxide radicals was observed, and confirmed both genetically and pharmacologically using a triple superoxide dismutase mutant and a superoxide dismutase inhibitor N-N′-diethyldithiocarbamate, respectively. Consequently, ETC inhibitors that result in mitochondrial dysfunction and affect production of reactive oxygen species can increase miconazole’s fungicidal activity against C. albicans biofilm cells. PMID:27272719

  17. Action of adenosine receptor antagonists on the cardiovascular response to defence area stimulation in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    St Lambert, J H; Dawid-Milner, M S; Silva-Carvalho, L; Spyer, K M

    1994-01-01

    1. The action of adenosine in the mediation of the cardiovascular changes associated with the defence reaction has been investigated in the rat using two A1 receptor antagonists. 2. Cumulative doses of 1,3 dipropyl-cyclopentylxanthine (DPCPX) (0.3-3 mg kg-1) and ethanol (0.03-0.25 ml) and bolus doses of DPCPX (3 mg kg-1) and 8-sulphophenyltheophylline (8-SPT) (20 mg kg-1) were given into alpha-chloralose, paralysed and artificially ventilated rats. Recordings were made of arterial blood pressure and heart rate. 3. Ethanol, the vehicle for DPCPX, failed to modify the magnitude of the defence response; however, cumulative doses of DPCPX produced a dose-dependent decrease in the HDA (hypothalamic defence area)-evoked increase in arterial blood pressure, accompanied by a similar fall in the magnitude of the evoked heart rate response. 4. The evoked rise in arterial blood pressure was reduced significantly by intravenous injection of DPCPX (3 mg kg-1) but not 8-SPT (20 mg kg-1), a purely peripherally acting adenosine antagonist. 5. These results suggest that adenosine acting at A1 receptors located in the central nervous system, is involved in the HDA-evoked pressor response. Whilst the site of action of the A1 receptors is not known, possible locations are discussed. PMID:7812606

  18. Eating tools in hand activate the brain systems for eating action: a transcranial magnetic stimulation study.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Kaori; Nakamura, Kimihiro; Oga, Tatsuhide; Nakajima, Yasoichi

    2014-07-01

    There is increasing neuroimaging evidence suggesting that visually presented tools automatically activate the human sensorimotor system coding learned motor actions relevant to the visual stimuli. Such crossmodal activation may reflect a general functional property of the human motor memory and thus can be operating in other, non-limb effector organs, such as the orofacial system involved in eating. In the present study, we predicted that somatosensory signals produced by eating tools in hand covertly activate the neuromuscular systems involved in eating action. In Experiments 1 and 2, we measured motor evoked response (MEP) of the masseter muscle in normal humans to examine the possible impact of tools in hand (chopsticks and scissors) on the neuromuscular systems during the observation of food stimuli. We found that eating tools (chopsticks) enhanced the masseter MEPs more greatly than other tools (scissors) during the visual recognition of food, although this covert change in motor excitability was not detectable at the behavioral level. In Experiment 3, we further observed that chopsticks overall increased MEPs more greatly than scissors and this tool-driven increase of MEPs was greater when participants viewed food stimuli than when they viewed non-food stimuli. A joint analysis of the three experiments confirmed a significant impact of eating tools on the masseter MEPs during food recognition. Taken together, these results suggest that eating tools in hand exert a category-specific impact on the neuromuscular system for eating.

  19. Chemotherapy stimulates syndecan-1 shedding: A potentially negative effect of treatment that may promote tumor relapse

    PubMed Central

    Ramani, Vishnu C.; Sanderson, Ralph D.

    2015-01-01

    In patients with multiple myeloma, the heparan sulfate proteoglycan syndecan-1 (CD138) is shed from the surface of tumor cells and accumulates in the serum and within the extracellular matrix of the bone marrow where it promotes tumor growth and metastasis. In the present study we discovered that commonly used anti-myeloma drugs stimulate syndecan-1 shedding both in vitro and in animals bearing myeloma tumors. Enhanced shedding is accompanied by increased syndecan-1 synthesis prior to drug induced tumor cell death. Addition of a caspase inhibitor blocks the drug-induced shedding of syndecan-1 in vitro indicating that shedding is linked to the onset of apoptosis. ADAMs inhibitors or siRNA targeting ADAMs blocked drug-induced shedding suggesting that up regulation or activation of ADAMs is responsible for cleaving syndecan-1 from the tumor cell surface. These results reveal that myeloma chemotherapy stimulates synthesis and shedding of syndecan-1, a potentially negative side effect that may lead to accumulation of high levels of syndecan-1 to establish a microenvironment that nurtures relapse and promotes tumor progression. Interestingly, we also found that chemotherapeutic drugs stimulated syndecan-1 shedding from pancreatic cancer cells as well, indicating that drug-induced shedding of syndecan-1 may occur in many cancer types. Overall, our results indicate that use of metalloproteinase inhibitors (to inhibit syndecan-1 shedding) in combination with chemotherapy may represent a novel therapeutic strategy to prevent re-establishment of a microenvironment conducive for tumor relapse. PMID:24145151

  20. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound therapy: a potential strategy to stimulate tendon-bone junction healing.

    PubMed

    Ying, Zhi-min; Lin, Tiao; Yan, Shi-gui

    2012-12-01

    Incorporation of a tendon graft within the bone tunnel represents a challenging clinical problem. Successful anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction requires solid healing of the tendon graft in the bone tunnel. Enhancement of graft healing to bone is important to facilitate early aggressive rehabilitation and a rapid return to pre-injury activity levels. No convenient, effective or inexpensive procedures exist to enhance tendon-bone (T-B) healing after surgery. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) improves local blood perfusion and angiogenesis, stimulates cartilage maturation, enhances differentiation and proliferation of osteoblasts, and motivates osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), and therefore, appears to be a potential non-invasive tool for T-B healing in early stage of rehabilitation of ACL reconstruction. It is conceivable that LIPUS could be used to stimulate T-B tunnel healing in the home, with the aim of accelerating rehabilitation and an earlier return to normal activities in the near future. The purpose of this review is to demonstrate how LIPUS stimulates T-B healing at the cellular and molecular levels, describe studies in animal models, and provide a future direction for research.

  1. No Impact of Deep Brain Stimulation on Fear-Potentiated Startle in Obsessive–Compulsive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Baas, Johanna M. P.; Klumpers, Floris; Mantione, Mariska H.; Figee, Martijn; Vulink, Nienke C.; Schuurman, P. Richard; Mazaheri, Ali; Denys, Damiaan

    2014-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the ventral internal capsule is effective in treating therapy refractory obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD). Given the close proximity of the stimulation site to the stria terminalis (BNST), we hypothesized that the striking decrease in anxiety symptoms following DBS could be the result of the modulation of contextual anxiety. However, the effect of DBS in this region on contextual anxiety is as of yet unknown. Thus, the current study investigated the effect of DBS on contextual anxiety in an experimental threat of shock paradigm. Eight patients with DBS treatment for severe OCD were tested in a double-blind crossover design with randomly assigned 2-week periods of active and sham stimulation. DBS resulted in significant decrease of obsessive–compulsive symptoms, anxiety, and depression. However, even though the threat manipulation resulted in a clear context-potentiated startle effect, none of the parameters derived from the startle recordings was modulated by the DBS. This suggests that DBS in the ventral internal capsule is effective in treating anxiety symptoms of OCD without modulating the startle circuitry. We hypothesize that the anxiety symptoms present in OCD are likely distinct from the pathological brain circuits in defensive states of other anxiety disorders. PMID:25249953

  2. No impact of deep brain stimulation on fear-potentiated startle in obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Baas, Johanna M P; Klumpers, Floris; Mantione, Mariska H; Figee, Martijn; Vulink, Nienke C; Schuurman, P Richard; Mazaheri, Ali; Denys, Damiaan

    2014-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the ventral internal capsule is effective in treating therapy refractory obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Given the close proximity of the stimulation site to the stria terminalis (BNST), we hypothesized that the striking decrease in anxiety symptoms following DBS could be the result of the modulation of contextual anxiety. However, the effect of DBS in this region on contextual anxiety is as of yet unknown. Thus, the current study investigated the effect of DBS on contextual anxiety in an experimental threat of shock paradigm. Eight patients with DBS treatment for severe OCD were tested in a double-blind crossover design with randomly assigned 2-week periods of active and sham stimulation. DBS resulted in significant decrease of obsessive-compulsive symptoms, anxiety, and depression. However, even though the threat manipulation resulted in a clear context-potentiated startle effect, none of the parameters derived from the startle recordings was modulated by the DBS. This suggests that DBS in the ventral internal capsule is effective in treating anxiety symptoms of OCD without modulating the startle circuitry. We hypothesize that the anxiety symptoms present in OCD are likely distinct from the pathological brain circuits in defensive states of other anxiety disorders. PMID:25249953

  3. The stimulative effect of diffusion potential on enoxacin uptake across rat intestinal brush-border membranes.

    PubMed

    Hirano, T; Iseki, K; Miyazaki, S; Takada, M; Kobayashi, M; Sugawara, M; Miyazaki, K

    1994-08-01

    Evidence of a membrane potential dependence for enoxacin uptake by rat intestinal brush-border membrane vesicles has been found. The transient overshooting uptake of enoxacin disappeared in the voltage-clamped brush-border membrane vesicles in the presence of an outward H(+)-gradient. Momentary dissipation of the H(+)-gradient itself by carbonyl cyanide p-(trifluoromethoxy)phenylhydrazone (FCCP) did not affect the uptake of enoxacin. In contrast, enoxacin uptake was depressed by an interior positive K(+)-diffusion potential induced by valinomycin. Furthermore, not only the outward H(+)-gradient but also an inward Cl(-)-gradient caused a stimulating effect on enoxacin uptake, and the stimulation by the Cl(-)-gradient was dissipated by using voltage-clamped membrane vesicles. These results indicate that enoxacin transportation across the brush-border membrane is dependent on the ionic diffusion potential. On the other hand, neither Gly-Gly nor guanidine had any effect on enoxacin uptake by the membrane vesicles in the presence of an inward (for Gly-Gly) or outward (for guanidine) H(+)-gradient as a driving force for each transport system. Therefore, it seems that enoxacin transport through the intestinal epithelia does not participate in the carrier-mediated transport systems for Gly-Gly and guanidine.

  4. Repetitive propagation of action potentials destabilizes the structure of the myelin sheath. A dynamic x-ray diffraction study.

    PubMed Central

    Padrón, R; Mateu, L

    1982-01-01

    Time courses of myelin lattice swelling in toad sciatic nerves preexposed to different treatments were determined by x-ray diffraction using a one-dimensional position-sensitive detector. In the nerves supramaximally stimulated for 1 h at 200 Hz, the subsequent process of myelin swelling occurred 45.0 +/- 7.3 min (n = 24) sooner than in resting controls. Sciatic nerves incubated for 1 h in a Ringer's solution deprived of divalent cations (Ca++ and Mg++) exhibited a kinetics of swelling similar to that shown by the stimulated nerves, that is, 52.5 +/- 14.2 min (n = 6) sooner than controls preincubated for the same time in normal Ringer's solution (with divalent cations). The fact that both pretreatments supramaximal stimulation and removal of divalent cations from the perfusion solution produced a similar effect; namely, a decrease of the myelin lattice stability against swelling in distilled water, suggests that the repetitive propagation of action potentials could modify the ionic composition at either the intraperiod channel or the paranodal axoglial junction complexes. PMID:6810970

  5. Potential Mechanisms Supporting the Value of Motor Cortex Stimulation to Treat Chronic Pain Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    DosSantos, Marcos F.; Ferreira, Natália; Toback, Rebecca L.; Carvalho, Antônio C.; DaSilva, Alexandre F.

    2016-01-01

    Throughout the first years of the twenty-first century, neurotechnologies such as motor cortex stimulation (MCS), transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) have attracted scientific attention and been considered as potential tools to centrally modulate chronic pain, especially for those conditions more difficult to manage and refractory to all types of available pharmacological therapies. Interestingly, although the role of the motor cortex in pain has not been fully clarified, it is one of the cortical areas most commonly targeted by invasive and non-invasive neuromodulation technologies. Recent studies have provided significant advances concerning the establishment of the clinical effectiveness of primary MCS to treat different chronic pain syndromes. Concurrently, the neuromechanisms related to each method of primary motor cortex (M1) modulation have been unveiled. In this respect, the most consistent scientific evidence originates from MCS studies, which indicate the activation of top-down controls driven by M1 stimulation. This concept has also been applied to explain M1-TMS mechanisms. Nevertheless, activation of remote areas in the brain, including cortical and subcortical structures, has been reported with both invasive and non-invasive methods and the participation of major neurotransmitters (e.g., glutamate, GABA, and serotonin) as well as the release of endogenous opioids has been demonstrated. In this critical review, the putative mechanisms underlying the use of MCS to provide relief from chronic migraine and other types of chronic pain are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the most recent scientific evidence obtained from chronic pain research studies involving MCS and non-invasive neuromodulation methods (e.g., tDCS and TMS), which are analyzed comparatively. PMID:26903788

  6. Effects of the imidazobenzodiazepine R015-4513 on the stimulant and depressant actions of ethanol on spontaneous locomotor activity

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, H.C.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of the imidazobenzodiazepine R015-4513, a partial inverse agonist at benzodiazepine (BDZ) receptors, on the stimulant and depressant actions of ethanol in mice. For comparative purposes, another BDZ inverse agonist, FG-7142, was examined as well. Neither R015-4513 nor FG-7142 influenced the low-dose excitatory effects of ethanol on spontaneous locomotor activity. However, both R015-4513 and FG-7142 significantly antagonized the depressant effects of ethanol, and this antagonism was completely reversed by pretreatment with the BDZ receptor antagonist, R015-1788. These data suggest that R015-4513 is capable of antagonizing only some of the behavioral effects of ethanol, and in particular, those responses to ethanol that are mediated by modulation of the GABA/BDZ-chloride channel receptor complex.

  7. Subthreshold Dynamics in Periodically Stimulated Squid Giant Axons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, Daniel T.; Clay, John R.; Manning, Timothy; Glass, Leon; Guevara, Michael R.; Shrier, Alvin

    1996-05-01

    Action potentials resulting from periodic stimulation of nerve axons occur at intervals that are irregular at moderate stimulation frequencies. Histograms of the intervals are multimodal, as seen in stochastic resonance. At higher stimulation frequencies, the action potentials are suppressed entirely, leaving only subthreshold dynamics. Return maps constructed from data show that both types of response are governed by the same deterministic one-dimensional description, with an unstable subthreshold fixed point largely accounting for the irregular intervals at moderate stimulation frequencies.

  8. An aqueous extract of Curcuma longa (turmeric) rhizomes stimulates insulin release and mimics insulin action on tissues involved in glucose homeostasis in vitro.

    PubMed

    Mohankumar, Sureshkumar; McFarlane, James R

    2011-03-01

    Curcuma longa (turmeric) has been used widely as a spice, particularly in Asian countries. It is also used in the Ayurvedic system of medicine as an antiinflammatory and antimicrobial agent and for numerous other curative properties. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of an aqueous extract of Curcuma longa (AEC) on tissues involved in glucose homeostasis. The extract was prepared by soaking 100 g of ground turmeric in 1 L of water, which was filtered and stored at -20°C prior to use. Pancreas and muscle tissues of adult mice were cultured in DMEM with 5 or 12 mmol/L glucose and varying doses of extract. The AEC stimulated insulin secretion from mouse pancreatic tissues under both basal and hyperglycaemic conditions, although the maximum effect was only 68% of that of tolbutamide. The AEC induced stepwise stimulation of glucose uptake from abdominal muscle tissues in the presence and absence of insulin, and the combination of AEC and insulin significantly potentiated the glucose uptake into abdominal muscle tissue. However, this effect was attenuated by wortmannin, suggesting that AEC possibly acts via the insulin-mediated glucose uptake pathway. In summary, water soluble compounds of turmeric exhibit insulin releasing and mimicking actions within in vitro tissue culture conditions.

  9. Activation of AMPA Receptors Mediates the Antidepressant Action of Deep Brain Stimulation of the Infralimbic Prefrontal Cortex.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Sánchez, Laura; Castañé, Anna; Pérez-Caballero, Laura; Grifoll-Escoda, Marc; López-Gil, Xavier; Campa, Leticia; Galofré, Mireia; Berrocoso, Esther; Adell, Albert

    2016-06-01

    Although deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been used with success in treatment-resistant depression, little is known about its mechanism of action. We examined the antidepressant-like activity of short (1 h) DBS applied to the infralimbic prefrontal cortex in the forced swim test (FST) and the novelty-suppressed feeding test (NSFT). We also used in vivo microdialysis to evaluate the release of glutamate, γ-aminobutyric acid, serotonin, dopamine, and noradrenaline in the prefrontal cortex and c-Fos immunohistochemistry to determine the brain regions activated by DBS. One hour of DBS of the infralimbic prefrontal cortex has antidepressant-like effects in FST and NSFT, and increases prefrontal efflux of glutamate, which would activate AMPA receptors (AMPARs). This effect is specific of the infralimbic area since it is not observed after DBS of the prelimbic subregion. The activation of prefrontal AMPARs would result in a stimulation of prefrontal output to the brainstem, thus increasing serotonin, dopamine, and noradrenaline in the prefrontal cortex. Further, the activation of prefrontal AMPARs is necessary and sufficient condition for the antidepressant response of 1 h DBS.

  10. Anti-inflammatory mechanism of action of azithromycin in LPS-stimulated J774A.1 cells.

    PubMed

    Banjanac, Mihailo; Munić Kos, Vesna; Nujić, Krunoslav; Vrančić, Mila; Belamarić, Daniela; Crnković, Slaven; Hlevnjak, Mario; Eraković Haber, Vesna

    2012-10-01

    Azithromycin is a macrolide antibiotic with well-described anti-inflammatory properties which can be attributed, at least partially, to its action on macrophages. We have previously shown, with 18 different macrolide molecules, that IL-6 and PGE₂ inhibition correlates with macrolide accumulation, as well as with their binding to phospholipids in J774A.1 cells. The present study was performed in order to substantiate the hypothesis that biological membranes are a target for macrolide anti-inflammatory activity. By analyzing the effect of azithromycin on overall eicosanoid production, we found that in LPS-stimulated J774A.1 cells, azithromycin, like indomethacin, inhibited the synthesis of all eicosanoids produced downstream of COX. Upstream of COX, azithromycin inhibited arachidonic acid release in the same way as a cPLA₂ inhibitor, while indomethacin had no effect. Further comparison revealed that in LPS-stimulated J774A.1 cells, the cPLA₂ inhibitor showed the same profile of inhibition as azithromycin in inhibiting PGE₂, IL-6, IL-12p40 and arachidonic acid release. Therefore, we propose that the anti-inflammatory activity of azithromycin in this model may be due to interactions with cPLA₂, causing inadequate translocation of the enzyme or disturbing physical interactions with its substrates.

  11. Strict actions of the human wrist extensors: A study with an electrical neuromuscular stimulation method.

    PubMed

    Sagae, Masaaki; Suzuki, Katsuhiko; Fujita, Takaaki; Sotokawa, Tasuku; Nakano, Haruki; Naganuma, Makoto; Narita, Aya; Sato, Toshiaki; Fujii, Hiromi; Ogino, Toshihiko; Naito, Akira

    2010-12-01

    Motion and force produced by electrical neuromuscular stimulation (ENS) to each of the extensor carpi radialis longus (ECRL) and brevis (ECRB), and extensor carpi ulnaris (ECU) with the prone (P), semiprone (SP), and supine forearm (S) were studied in ten normal human subjects. Abduction (AB), extension (E), adduction (AD), and flexion (F) directions were represented by, respectively, 0°, 90°, 180°, and 270°. ENS to ECRL, ECRB, and ECU produced motion in direction of, respectively, 60° (mean), 87°, and 205° with P, 66°, 83°, and 166° with SP, and 47°, 66°, and 116° with S to maximal range. Direction/strength (Nm) of force by ENS to ECRL, ECRB, and ECU were, respectively, 54°/1.75, 74°/1.78, and 184°/1.49 with P, 34°/1.65, 63°/1.66, and 152°/1.43 with SP, and 32°/1.66, 70°/1.49, and 147°/1.25 with S. ENS to ECRL exhibited force of 15-20% of maximal E (15-20%Max-E) and 19-29%Max-AB, that to ECRB 24-32%Max-E, and that to ECU 17-30%Max-AD. The force study results suggest that ECRL is an abductor and extensor and ECRB is an extensor rather than an abductor. ECU should be an adductor rather than an extensor with SP and S and an adductor with P. The data must contribute to reconstruct motor functions of paralyzed hands. PMID:20638861

  12. Novel experimental results in human cardiac electrophysiology: measurement of the Purkinje fibre action potential from the undiseased human heart.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Norbert; Szél, Tamás; Jost, Norbert; Tóth, András; Gy Papp, Julius; Varró, András

    2015-09-01

    Data obtained from canine cardiac electrophysiology studies are often extrapolated to the human heart. However, it has been previously demonstrated that because of the lower density of its K(+) currents, the human ventricular action potential has a less extensive repolarization reserve. Since the relevance of canine data to the human heart has not yet been fully clarified, the aim of the present study was to determine for the first time the action potentials of undiseased human Purkinje fibres (PFs) and to compare them directly with those of dog PFs. All measurements were performed at 37 °C using the conventional microelectrode technique. At a stimulation rate of 1 Hz, the plateau potential of human PFs is more positive (8.0 ± 1.8 vs 8.6 ± 3.4 mV, n = 7), while the amplitude of the spike is less pronounced. The maximal rate of depolarization is significantly lower in human PKs than in canine PFs (406.7 ± 62 vs 643 ± 36 V/s, respectively, n = 7). We assume that the appreciable difference in the protein expression profiles of the 2 species may underlie these important disparities. Therefore, caution is advised when canine PF data are extrapolated to humans, and further experiments are required to investigate the characteristics of human PF repolarization and its possible role in arrhythmogenesis.

  13. Increased Event-Related Potentials and Alpha-, Beta-, and Gamma-Activity Associated with Intentional Actions

    PubMed Central

    Karch, Susanne; Loy, Fabian; Krause, Daniela; Schwarz, Sandra; Kiesewetter, Jan; Segmiller, Felix; Chrobok, Agnieszka I.; Keeser, Daniel; Pogarell, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Internally guided actions are defined as being purposeful, self-generated and offering choices between alternatives. Intentional actions are essential to reach individual goals. In previous empirical studies, internally guided actions were predominantly related to functional responses in frontal and parietal areas. The aim of the present study was to distinguish event-related potentials and oscillatory responses of intentional actions and externally guided actions. In addition, we compared neurobiological findings of the decision which action to perform with those referring to the decision whether or not to perform an action. Methods: Twenty-eight subjects participated in adapted go/nogo paradigms, including a voluntary selection condition allowing participants to (1) freely decide whether to press the response button or (2) to decide whether they wanted to press the response button with the right index finger or the left index finger. Results: The reaction times were increased when participants freely decided whether and how they wanted to respond compared to the go condition. Intentional processes were associated with a fronto-centrally located N2 and P3 potential. N2 and P3 amplitudes were increased during intentional actions compared to instructed responses (go). In addition, increased activity in the alpha-, beta- and gamma-frequency range was shown during voluntary behavior rather than during externally guided responses. Conclusion: These results may indicate that an additional cognitive process is needed for intentional actions compared to instructed behavior. However, the neural responses were comparatively independent of the kind of decision that was made (1) decision which action to perform; (2) decision whether or not to perform an action). Significance: The study demonstrates the importance of fronto-central alpha-, beta-, and gamma oscillations for voluntary behavior. PMID:26834680

  14. Assessing the Electrode-Neuron Interface with the Electrically Evoked Compound Action Potential, Electrode Position, and Behavioral Thresholds.

    PubMed

    DeVries, Lindsay; Scheperle, Rachel; Bierer, Julie Arenberg

    2016-06-01

    Variability in speech perception scores among cochlear implant listeners may largely reflect the variable efficacy of implant electrodes to convey stimulus information to the auditory nerve. In the present study, three metrics were applied to assess the quality of the electrode-neuron interface of individual cochlear implant channels: the electrically evoked compound action potential (ECAP), the estimation of electrode position using computerized tomography (CT), and behavioral thresholds using focused stimulation. The primary motivation of this approach is to evaluate the ECAP as a site-specific measure of the electrode-neuron interface in the context of two peripheral factors that likely contribute to degraded perception: large electrode-to-modiolus distance and reduced neural density. Ten unilaterally implanted adults with Advanced Bionics HiRes90k devices participated. ECAPs were elicited with monopolar stimulation within a forward-masking paradigm to construct channel interaction functions (CIF), behavioral thresholds were obtained with quadrupolar (sQP) stimulation, and data from imaging provided estimates of electrode-to-modiolus distance and scalar location (scala tympani (ST), intermediate, or scala vestibuli (SV)) for each electrode. The width of the ECAP CIF was positively correlated with electrode-to-modiolus distance; both of these measures were also influenced by scalar position. The ECAP peak amplitude was negatively correlated with behavioral thresholds. Moreover, subjects with low behavioral thresholds and large ECAP amplitudes, averaged across electrodes, tended to have higher speech perception scores. These results suggest a potential clinical role for the ECAP in the objective assessment of individual cochlear implant channels, with the potential to improve speech perception outcomes. PMID:26926152

  15. 16-Channel Organic Electrochemical Transistor Array for In Vitro Conduction Mapping of Cardiac Action Potential.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xi; Yao, Chunlei; Liu, Ying; Hsing, I-Ming

    2016-09-01

    16-Channel organic electrochemical transistor arrays (OECTs) are developed for mapping the propagation and studying the characteristics of action potentials of primary cardiomyocytes. The physiological activities of a rat cardiomyocyte monolayer during a long-term culturing is revealed by this biocompatible, low-cost, and high transconductance organic electronic device. OECT has great potential to be used in cardiac and neuronal drug screening.

  16. 7 CFR 1945.19 - Reporting potential natural disasters and initial actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 13 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Reporting potential natural disasters and initial... AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) PROGRAM REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) EMERGENCY Disaster Assistance-General § 1945.19 Reporting potential natural disasters and initial actions. (a) Purpose....

  17. 7 CFR 1945.19 - Reporting potential natural disasters and initial actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 13 2011-01-01 2009-01-01 true Reporting potential natural disasters and initial... AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) PROGRAM REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) EMERGENCY Disaster Assistance-General § 1945.19 Reporting potential natural disasters and initial actions. (a) Purpose....

  18. 7 CFR 1945.19 - Reporting potential natural disasters and initial actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 13 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Reporting potential natural disasters and initial... AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) PROGRAM REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) EMERGENCY Disaster Assistance-General § 1945.19 Reporting potential natural disasters and initial actions. (a) Purpose....

  19. No inotropic action of enkephalins or enkephalin derivatives on electrically-stimulated atria isolated from lean and obese rats.

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, W. S.; Thornhill, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    Inotropic actions of the endogenous enkephalins, leucine enkephalin [( Leu] enkephalin) and methionine enkephalin [( Met] enkephalin), and derivatives, [D-Ala2-methionine] enkephalinamide (DAMEA) and [D Ala2-leucine]enkephalinamide (DALEA) were tested, alone or in combination with noradrenaline (NA), (+/-)-isoprenaline or carbachol, on electrically-stimulated atria excised from Sprague-Dawley, fatty, Zucker (fa/fa) and lean, hooded heterozygous (Fa/fa) rats. [Met] enkephalin, [Leu] enkephalin, DAMEA and DALEA (4 X 10(-7)M to 4 X 10(-4)M) caused no significant changes in atrial tension in any group compared to pre-injection control values or those following the infusion of Krebs-Henseleit control solution. NA and isoprenaline (10(-7) to 10(-6)M) caused significant, dose-related increases in atrial tension in each of the three strains of rats tested with the Fa/fa group showing the greatest change and fastest rate of tension development. [Met] enkephalin, [Leu] enkephalin, DAMEA or DALEA (4 X 10(-6)M) infused concurrently with NA or isoprenaline (10(-6)M) evoked atrial tension changes within each group that were not different from those observed when NA or isoprenaline was administered alone. Carbachol (10(-9) and 10(-8)M) caused a dose-related decrease (10% and 30-40%, respectively, from pre-injection control values) in atrial tension in auricles excised from all three groups. Again, infusion of [Met] enkephalin, [Leu] enkephalin, DAMEA or DALEA (4 X 10(-6)M) together with carbachol (10(-8)M) did not affect atrial tension changes of auricles isolated from any group compared to when carbachol was given alone. The results indicate that the endogenous pentapeptides, [( Met] or [Leu] enkephalin), or derivatives (DAMEA and DALEA) do not affect atrial tension of electrically-stimulated auricles isolated from Sprague-Dawley, fa/fa or Fa/fa rats. In addition, these pentapeptides do not modify the positive inotropic actions of NA or isoprenaline or the negative inotropic

  20. Nociception-related somatosensory evoked potentials in awake dogs recorded after intra epidermal electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    van Oostrom, Hugo; Stienen, Peter J; Doornenbal, Arie; Hellebrekers, Ludo J

    2009-02-01

    At present, the specific neurophysiologic methodology of recording pain-related evoked potentials is considered a most promising approach to objectively quantify pain in man. This study was designed to characterise and evaluate the use of somatosensory evoked potentials to study nociception in a canine model. To this aim, somatosensory evoked potentials were evoked by intra-epidermal electrical stimulation and recorded from the scalp in 8 beagle dogs. Characteristics determined were: (1) the conduction velocities of the peripheral nerve fibres involved, (2) the stimulus intensity response characteristics and (3) the evaluation of possible disturbance of the signals by muscular activity from the hind paw withdrawal reflex (EMG artefact). The results showed (1) the conduction velocities to be in the A-delta fibre range (i.e. fibres involved in nociception), (2) an increase in amplitude and a decrease in latency of the evoked potential following increasing stimulus intensities and (3) the absence of EMG artefact in the signals. These data indicate that the evoked potentials recorded, are related to nociception and thus are suited to quantitatively characterise the perception of noxious stimuli making this model useful for pain- and analgesia-related research.

  1. Sodium and calcium currents shape action potentials in immature mouse inner hair cells.

    PubMed

    Marcotti, Walter; Johnson, Stuart L; Rusch, Alfons; Kros, Corne J

    2003-11-01

    Before the onset of hearing at postnatal day 12, mouse inner hair cells (IHCs) produce spontaneous and evoked action potentials. These spikes are likely to induce neurotransmitter release onto auditory nerve fibres. Since immature IHCs express both alpha1D (Cav1.3) Ca2+ and Na+ currents that activate near the resting potential, we examined whether these two conductances are involved in shaping the action potentials. Both had extremely rapid activation kinetics, followed by fast and complete voltage-dependent inactivation for the Na+ current, and slower, partially Ca2+-dependent inactivation for the Ca2+ current. Only the Ca2+ current is necessary for spontaneous and induced action potentials, and 29 % of cells lacked a Na+ current. The Na+ current does, however, shorten the time to reach the action-potential threshold, whereas the Ca2+ current is mainly involved, together with the K+ currents, in determining the speed and size of the spikes. Both currents increased in size up to the end of the first postnatal week. After this, the Ca2+ current reduced to about 30 % of its maximum size and persisted in mature IHCs. The Na+ current was downregulated around the onset of hearing, when the spiking is also known to disappear. Although the Na+ current was observed as early as embryonic day 16.5, its role in action-potential generation was only evident from just after birth, when the resting membrane potential became sufficiently negative to remove a sizeable fraction of the inactivation (half inactivation was at -71 mV). The size of both currents was positively correlated with the developmental change in action-potential frequency.

  2. Sodium and calcium currents shape action potentials in immature mouse inner hair cells

    PubMed Central

    Marcotti, Walter; Johnson, Stuart L; Rüsch, Alfons; Kros, Corné J

    2003-01-01

    Before the onset of hearing at postnatal day 12, mouse inner hair cells (IHCs) produce spontaneous and evoked action potentials. These spikes are likely to induce neurotransmitter release onto auditory nerve fibres. Since immature IHCs express both α1D (Cav1.3) Ca2+ and Na+ currents that activate near the resting potential, we examined whether these two conductances are involved in shaping the action potentials. Both had extremely rapid activation kinetics, followed by fast and complete voltage-dependent inactivation for the Na+ current, and slower, partially Ca2+-dependent inactivation for the Ca2+ current. Only the Ca2+ current is necessary for spontaneous and induced action potentials, and 29 % of cells lacked a Na+ current. The Na+ current does, however, shorten the time to reach the action-potential threshold, whereas the Ca2+ current is mainly involved, together with the K+ currents, in determining the speed and size of the spikes. Both currents increased in size up to the end of the first postnatal week. After this, the Ca2+ current reduced to about 30 % of its maximum size and persisted in mature IHCs. The Na+ current was downregulated around the onset of hearing, when the spiking is also known to disappear. Although the Na+ current was observed as early as embryonic day 16.5, its role in action-potential generation was only evident from just after birth, when the resting membrane potential became sufficiently negative to remove a sizeable fraction of the inactivation (half inactivation was at −71 mV). The size of both currents was positively correlated with the developmental change in action-potential frequency. PMID:12937295

  3. Potentiation of sulfonylurea action by an EPAC-selective cAMP analog in INS-1 cells: comparison of tolbutamide and gliclazide and a potential role for EPAC activation of a 2-APB-sensitive Ca2+ influx.

    PubMed

    Jarrard, Rachel E; Wang, Yuchen; Salyer, Amy E; Pratt, Evan P S; Soderling, Ian M; Guerra, Marcy L; Lange, Allison M; Broderick, Hilary J; Hockerman, Gregory H

    2013-01-01

    Tolbutamide and gliclazide block the K(ATP) channel K(ir)6.2/Sur1, causing membrane depolarization and stimulating insulin secretion in pancreatic beta cells. We examined the ability of the EPAC-selective cAMP analog 8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cAMP-AM to potentiate the action of these drugs and the mechanism that might account for it. Insulin secretion stimulated by both 200 μM tolbutamide and 20 μM gliclazide, concentrations that had equivalent effects on membrane potential, was inhibited by thapsigargin (1 μM) or the L-type Ca(2+) channel blocker nicardipine (2 μM) and was potentiated by 8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cAMP-AM at concentrations ≥2 μM in INS-1 cells. Ca(2+) transients stimulated by either tolbutamide or gliclazide were inhibited by thapsigargin or nicardipine and were significantly potentiated by 8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cAMP-AM at 5 μM but not 1 μM. Both tolbutamide and gliclazide stimulated phospholipase C activity; however, only gliclazide did so independently of its activity at K(ATP) channels, and this activity was partially inhibited by pertussis toxin. 8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cAMP-AM alone (5 μM) did not stimulate insulin secretion, but did increase intracellular Ca(2+) concentration significantly, and this activity was inhibited by 25 μM 2-aminoethoxydiphenylborate (2-APB) or the removal of extracellular Ca(2+). 8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cAMP-AM potentiation of insulin secretion stimulated by tolbutamide was markedly inhibited by 2-APB (25 μM) and enhanced by the PKC inhibitor bisindolylmaleimide I (1 μM). Our data demonstrate that the actions of both tolbutamide and gliclazide are strongly potentiated by 8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cAMP-AM, that gliclazide can stimulate phospholipase C activity via a partially pertussis toxin-sensitive mechanism, and that 8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cAMP-AM potentiation of tolbutamide action may involve activation of a 2-APB-sensitive Ca(2+) influx. PMID:23071106

  4. ATP-sensitive potassium channel modulation of the guinea pig ventricular action potential and contraction.

    PubMed

    Nichols, C G; Ripoll, C; Lederer, W J

    1991-01-01

    The role of ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels in modulating the action potential and contraction of guinea pig ventricular myocytes was investigated. Under voltage clamp, the maximum whole-cell KATP channel conductance was estimated (195 +/- 10 nS, n = 6) by exposing the cells to complete metabolic blockade (2 mM cyanide in the presence of 10 mM 2-deoxy-glucose). In isolated inside-out membrane patches, the ATP dependence of KATP channel activity under relevant conditions was measured (half-maximal inhibition at 114 microM). Under current clamp (with intracellular ATP concentration = 5 mM), the effect of graded KATP channel activation on the action potential and the twitch was estimated by injection of a current (proportional to voltage) that simulated the KATP conductance. As this "conductance" was increased, the action potential was shortened, and contractile amplitude declined, as expected. From the results of these experiments, the quantitative dependence of the action potential duration on intracellular ATP concentration was estimated, without relying on a mathematical model of the cell membrane. The results imply that KATP-dependent action potential shortening is likely to occur if ATP concentration falls below normal levels (approximately 5 mM), as may happen regionally, or globally, during myocardial ischemia.

  5. Giant early components of somatosensory evoked potentials to tibial nerve stimulation in cortical myoclonus.

    PubMed

    Anzellotti, Francesca; Onofrj, Marco; Bonanni, Laura; Saracino, Antonio; Franciotti, Raffaella

    2016-01-01

    Enlarged cortical components of somatosensory evoked potentials (giant SEPs) recorded by electroencephalography (EEG) and abnormal somatosensory evoked magnetic fields (SEFs) recorded by magnetoencephalography (MEG) are observed in the majority of patients with cortical myoclonus (CM). Studies on simultaneous recordings of SEPs and SEFs showed that generator mechanism of giant SEPs involves both primary sensory and motor cortices. However the generator sources of giant SEPs have not been fully understood as only one report describes clearly giant SEPs following lower limb stimulation. In our study we performed a combined EEG-MEG recording on responses elicited by electric median and tibial nerve stimulation in a patient who developed consequently to methyl bromide intoxication CM with giant SEPs to median and tibial nerve stimuli. SEPs wave shapes were identified on the basis of polarity-latency components (e.g. P15-N20-P25) as defined by earlier studies and guidelines. At EEG recording, the SEP giant component did not appear in the latency range of the first cortical component for median nerve SEP (N20), but appeared instead in the range of the P37 tibial nerve SEP, which is currently identified as the first cortical component elicited by tibial nerve stimuli. Our MEG and EEG SEPs recordings also showed that components in the latency range of P37 were preceded by other cortical components. These findings suggest that lower limb P37 does not correspond to upper limb N20. MEG results confirmed that giant SEFs are the second component from both tibial (N43m-P43m) and median (N27m-P27m) nerve stimulation. MEG dipolar sources of these giant components were located in the primary sensory and motor area. PMID:27489768

  6. Action!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Senese, Joseph

    1998-01-01

    A small group of teachers at one Illinois high school is helping to effect and promote change. Through the Action Research Laboratory (ARL), teams of teachers conduct collaborative action research to improve classroom practices. Data from the first two years of the ARL indicate that teachers are eager to participate in, and have thrived in, their…

  7. Integrated effect of stimulation at fixation points on EFRP (eye-fixation related brain potentials).

    PubMed

    Kazai, K; Yagi, A

    1999-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the integrated effect of stimulation at the fixation points just before and just after saccadic eye-movement (saccade) on eye-fixation related brain potentials (EFRP: P75 and N105). Checkerboard patterns were used as stimuli. In Experiment 1, changes in check sizes between two fixation points enhanced the amplitude of P75, while changes in the phases of patterns between the two points did not affect EFRP. This result showed that EFRP was affected by two fixation points, and that changes in the retinal image between the two points did not necessarily affect EFRP. In Experiment 2, the relationship between EFRP and check size was investigated in detail. A second order relationship between logarithm of check size and the latency of P75, and a linear relationship between logarithm of check size and the amplitude of N105 were found. The effect of check size on the amplitude of P75 which might explain the increased amplitude of P75 observed in Experiment 1 did not appear. These results suggest that EFRP might reflect relative higher processing than peripheral stimulation at one fixation point.

  8. The membrane potential modulates thrombin-stimulated Ca²⁺ mobilization and platelet aggregation.

    PubMed

    Albarrán, Letizia; Dionisio, Natalia; López, Esther; Salido, Ginés M; Rosado, Juan A

    2013-10-15

    G protein-coupled receptors can be directly modulated by changes in transmembrane voltage in a variety of cell types. Here we show that, while changes in the membrane voltage itself do not induce detectable modifications in the cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration, platelet stimulation with thrombin or the PAR-1 and PAR-4 agonist peptides SFLLRN and AYPGKF, respectively, results in Ca(2+) release from intracellular stores that is sensitive to the membrane depolarisation. Direct activation of G proteins or phospholipase C by AlF4(-) and m-3M3FBS, respectively, leads to Ca(2+) release that is insensitive to changes in the membrane potential. Thapsigargin-, as well as OAG-induced Ca(2+) entry are affected by the membrane voltage, probably as a result of the modification in the driving force for Ca(2+) influx; however, hyperpolarisation does not enhance thrombin- or OAG-evoked Ca(2+) entry probably revealing the presence of a voltage-sensitive regulatory mechanism. Transmembrane voltage also modulates the activity of the plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase (PMCA) most likely due to a decrease in the phosphotyrosine content of the pump. Thrombin-stimulated platelet aggregation is modulated by membrane depolarisation by a mechanism that is, at least partially, independent of Ca(2+). These observations indicate that PAR-1 and PAR-4 receptors are modulated by the membrane voltage in human platelets. PMID:23988350

  9. Reduced postactivation depression of soleus H reflex and root evoked potential after transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Jennifer C; Stein, Richard B; Roy, François D

    2015-07-01

    Postactivation depression of the Hoffmann (H) reflex is associated with a transient period of suppression following activation of the reflex pathway. In soleus, the depression lasts for 100-200 ms during voluntary contraction and up to 10 s at rest. A reflex root evoked potential (REP), elicited after a single pulse of transcutaneous stimulation to the thoracolumbar spine, has been shown to exhibit similar suppression. The present study systematically characterized the effect of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) on postactivation depression using double-pulse H reflexes and REPs. A TMS pulse reduced the period of depression to 10-15 ms for both reflexes. TMS could even produce postactivation facilitation of the H reflex, as the second reflex response was increased to 243 ± 51% of control values at the 75-ms interval. The time course was qualitatively similar for the REP, yet the overall increase was less. While recovery of the H reflex was slower in the relaxed muscle, the profile exhibited a distinct bimodal shape characterized by an early peak at the 25-ms interval, reaching 72 ± 23% of control values, followed by a trough at 50 ms, and then a gradual recovery at intervals > 50 ms. The rapid recovery of two successively depressed H reflexes, ∼ 25 ms apart, was also possible with double-pulse TMS. The effect of the TMS-induced corticospinal excitation on postactivation depression may be explained by a combination of pre- and postsynaptic mechanisms, although further investigation is required to distinguish between them.

  10. Initiation and blocking of the action potential in an axon in weak ultrasonic or microwave fields.

    PubMed

    Shneider, M N; Pekker, M

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, we analyze the effect of the redistribution of the transmembrane ion channels in an axon caused by longitudinal acoustic vibrations of the membrane. These oscillations can be excited by an external source of ultrasound and weak microwave radiation interacting with the charges sitting on the surface of the lipid membrane. It is shown, using the Hodgkin-Huxley model of the axon, that the density redistribution of transmembrane sodium channels may reduce the threshold of the action potential, up to its spontaneous initiation. At the significant redistribution of sodium channels in the membrane, the rarefaction zones of the transmembrane channel density are formed, blocking the propagation of the action potential. Blocking the action potential propagation along the axon is shown to cause anesthesia in the example case of a squid axon. Various approaches to experimental observation of the effects considered in this paper are discussed. PMID:25353835

  11. Initiation and blocking of the action potential in an axon in weak ultrasonic or microwave fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shneider, M. N.; Pekker, M.

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, we analyze the effect of the redistribution of the transmembrane ion channels in an axon caused by longitudinal acoustic vibrations of the membrane. These oscillations can be excited by an external source of ultrasound and weak microwave radiation interacting with the charges sitting on the surface of the lipid membrane. It is shown, using the Hodgkin-Huxley model of the axon, that the density redistribution of transmembrane sodium channels may reduce the threshold of the action potential, up to its spontaneous initiation. At the significant redistribution of sodium channels in the membrane, the rarefaction zones of the transmembrane channel density are formed, blocking the propagation of the action potential. Blocking the action potential propagation along the axon is shown to cause anesthesia in the example case of a squid axon. Various approaches to experimental observation of the effects considered in this paper are discussed.

  12. Optical magnetic detection of single-neuron action potentials using NV-diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Matthew; Barry, John; Schloss, Jennifer; Glenn, David; Walsworth, Ron

    2016-05-01

    A key challenge for neuroscience is noninvasive, label-free sensing of action potential dynamics in whole organisms with single-neuron resolution. Here, we report a new approach to this problem: using nitrogen-vacancy (NV) color centers in diamond to measure the time-dependent magnetic fields produced by single-neuron action potentials. We demonstrate our method using excised single neurons from two invertebrate species, marine worm and squid; and then by single-neuron action potential magnetic sensing exterior to whole, live, opaque marine worms for extended periods with no adverse effect. The results lay the groundwork for real-time, noninvasive 3D magnetic mapping of functional mammalian neuronal networks.

  13. A phantom axon setup for validating models of action potential recordings.

    PubMed

    Rossel, Olivier; Soulier, Fabien; Bernard, Serge; Guiraud, David; Cathébras, Guy

    2016-08-01

    Electrode designs and strategies for electroneurogram recordings are often tested first by computer simulations and then by animal models, but they are rarely implanted for long-term evaluation in humans. The models show that the amplitude of the potential at the surface of an axon is higher in front of the nodes of Ranvier than at the internodes; however, this has not been investigated through in vivo measurements. An original experimental method is presented to emulate a single fiber action potential in an infinite conductive volume, allowing the potential of an axon to be recorded at both the nodes of Ranvier and the internodes, for a wide range of electrode-to-fiber radial distances. The paper particularly investigates the differences in the action potential amplitude along the longitudinal axis of an axon. At a short radial distance, the action potential amplitude measured in front of a node of Ranvier is two times larger than in the middle of two nodes. Moreover, farther from the phantom axon, the measured action potential amplitude is almost constant along the longitudinal axis. The results of this new method confirm the computer simulations, with a correlation of 97.6 %.

  14. A phantom axon setup for validating models of action potential recordings.

    PubMed

    Rossel, Olivier; Soulier, Fabien; Bernard, Serge; Guiraud, David; Cathébras, Guy

    2016-08-01

    Electrode designs and strategies for electroneurogram recordings are often tested first by computer simulations and then by animal models, but they are rarely implanted for long-term evaluation in humans. The models show that the amplitude of the potential at the surface of an axon is higher in front of the nodes of Ranvier than at the internodes; however, this has not been investigated through in vivo measurements. An original experimental method is presented to emulate a single fiber action potential in an infinite conductive volume, allowing the potential of an axon to be recorded at both the nodes of Ranvier and the internodes, for a wide range of electrode-to-fiber radial distances. The paper particularly investigates the differences in the action potential amplitude along the longitudinal axis of an axon. At a short radial distance, the action potential amplitude measured in front of a node of Ranvier is two times larger than in the middle of two nodes. Moreover, farther from the phantom axon, the measured action potential amplitude is almost constant along the longitudinal axis. The results of this new method confirm the computer simulations, with a correlation of 97.6 %. PMID:27016364

  15. Effect of refractive error on visual evoked potentials with pattern stimulation in dogs

    PubMed Central

    ITO, Yosuke; MAEHARA, Seiya; ITOH, Yoshiki; MATSUI, Ai; HAYASHI, Miri; KUBO, Akira; UCHIDE, Tsuyoshi

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of refractive error on canine visual evoked potentials with pattern stimulation (P-VEP). Six normal beagle dogs were used. The refractive power of the recorded eyes was measured by skiascopy. The refractive power was corrected to −4 diopters (D) to +2 D using contact lens. P-VEP was recorded at each refractive power. The stimulus pattern size and distance were 50.3 arc-min and 50 cm. The P100 appeared at almost 100 msec at −2 D (at which the stimulus monitor was in focus). There was significant prolongation of the P100 implicit time at −4, −3, 0 and +1 D compared with −2 D, respectively. We concluded that the refractive power of the eye affected the P100 implicit time in canine P-VEP recording. PMID:26655769

  16. Low luminance/eyes closed and monochromatic stimulations reduce variability of flash visual evoked potential latency

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Senthil Kumar; Gaur, Giriwar Singh; Narayan, Sunil K.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Visual evoked potentials are useful in investigating the physiology and pathophysiology of the human visual system. Flash visual evoked potential (FVEP), though technically easier, has less clinical utility because it shows great variations in both latency and amplitude for normal subjects. Aim: To study the effect of eye closure, low luminance, and monochromatic stimulation on the variability of FVEPs. Subjects and Methods: Subjects in self-reported good health in the age group of 18-30 years were divided into three groups. All participants underwent FVEP recording with eyes open and with white light at 0.6 J luminance (standard technique). Next recording was done in group 1 with closed eyes, group 2 with 1.2 and 20 J luminance, and group 3 with red and blue lights, while keeping all the other parameters constant. Two trials were given for each eye, for each technique. The same procedure was repeated at the same clock time on the following day. Statistical Analysis: Variation in FVEP latencies between the individuals (interindividual variability) and the variations within the same individual for four trials (intraindividual variability) were assessed using coefficient of variance (COV). The technique with lower COV was considered the better method. Results: Recording done with closed eyes, 0.6 J luminance, and monochromatic light (blue > red) showed lower interindividual and intraindividual variability in P2 and N2 as compared to standard techniques. Conclusions: Low luminance flash stimulations and monochromatic light will reduce FVEP latency variability and may be clinically useful modifications of FVEP recording technique. PMID:24339591

  17. What is the maximum potential for CO2 sequestration by "stimulated" weathering on the global scale?

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Jens; Kempe, Stephan

    2008-12-01

    Natural chemical weathering of silicate rocks is a significant sink for soil and atmospheric CO(2). Previous work suggested that natural chemical weathering may be stimulated by applying finely ground silicate rocks to agricultural areas or forests [stimulated weathering (SW)]. However, it remained unknown if this technique is practical to sequester globally significant amounts of CO(2) under realistic conditions. Applying first estimates of "normal treatment" amounts from a literature review, we report here a theoretical global maximum potential of 65 10(6) t sequestered C a(-1) if SW would be applied homogenously on all agricultural and forested areas of the world. This is equivalent to 0.9% of anthropogenic CO(2) emissions (reference period 2000-2005). First, however, the assumed application of SW on most of the considered areas is not economically feasible because of logistic issues, and second the net-CO(2) sequestration is expected to amount to only a fraction of consumed CO(2) due to the energy demand of the application itself (currently ~11%). Unless progress in application procedures is provided, the recent realistic maximum net-CO(2)-consumption potential is expected to be much smaller than 0.1% of anthropogenic emissions, and the SW would thus not be one of the key techniques to reduce atmospheric CO(2) concentration. However, literature suggests that for some agricultural areas (croplands) and specifically for rice production areas in humid climates, this SW may be a feasible tool to support international efforts to sequester CO(2). SW may be cost effective for those areas if linked to the CO(2)-emission certificate trade in the future, and increases in crop production are taken into account.

  18. What is the maximum potential for CO2 sequestration by ``stimulated'' weathering on the global scale?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, Jens; Kempe, Stephan

    2008-12-01

    Natural chemical weathering of silicate rocks is a significant sink for soil and atmospheric CO2. Previous work suggested that natural chemical weathering may be stimulated by applying finely ground silicate rocks to agricultural areas or forests [stimulated weathering (SW)]. However, it remained unknown if this technique is practical to sequester globally significant amounts of CO2 under realistic conditions. Applying first estimates of “normal treatment” amounts from a literature review, we report here a theoretical global maximum potential of 65 106 t sequestered C a-1 if SW would be applied homogenously on all agricultural and forested areas of the world. This is equivalent to 0.9% of anthropogenic CO2 emissions (reference period 2000 2005). First, however, the assumed application of SW on most of the considered areas is not economically feasible because of logistic issues, and second the net-CO2 sequestration is expected to amount to only a fraction of consumed CO2 due to the energy demand of the application itself (currently ~11%). Unless progress in application procedures is provided, the recent realistic maximum net-CO2-consumption potential is expected to be much smaller than 0.1% of anthropogenic emissions, and the SW would thus not be one of the key techniques to reduce atmospheric CO2 concentration. However, literature suggests that for some agricultural areas (croplands) and specifically for rice production areas in humid climates, this SW may be a feasible tool to support international efforts to sequester CO2. SW may be cost effective for those areas if linked to the CO2-emission certificate trade in the future, and increases in crop production are taken into account.

  19. Potentiation of the cytotoxic action of melphalan and "activated" cyclophosphamide against cultured tumor cells by centrophenoxine.

    PubMed

    Sladek, N E

    1977-01-01

    Centrophenoxine, without antitumor activity itself, enhanced the cytotoxic action of melphalan and "activated" cyclophosphamide against mouse P388 lymphoma and rat W256 carcinosarcoma cells growing in static suspension culture. The concentration of alkylating agent required for 99% cell-kill was approximately halved when centrophenoxine was also present during exposure to the antitumor drug. Maximum potentiation by centrophenoxine of the cytotoxic action of melphalan occurred when cells were exposed to the two agents simultaneously; little or no potentiation was observed when cells were exposed to centrophenoxine before or after exposure to the alkylating agent.

  20. [Variations in the configuration of somatosensory evoked potentials following stimulation of the median nerve].

    PubMed

    Strenge, H

    1989-09-01

    The variants of waveform patterns of cervical and cortical somatosensory evoked potentials to median nerve stimulation at the wrist were analysed in 86 normal subjects aged 15 to 71 years. In cervical SEP recordings the components N13, N14 and the trough-shaped variant of P17 showed the highest short-term stability. Immediate changes of the amplitude proportions of subcomponents within the potential, i.e. a lack of uniformity in waveforms, have to be considered normal. Significant associations were found between the occurrence of components N14 and an arm length of more than 68 cm and between the appearance of a plateau configuration of P17 and an age of at least 40 years. Considering definite criteria the latency of P17 can be used as an additional reliable parameter. In cortical SEP recordings the combination of an initial V-shaped pattern and a following bifid W-configuration appeared as the most frequent waveform profile. All parts of the potential but the positive waves of the primary complex revealed a high intraindividual stability. PMID:2507276

  1. Assessing the Use of YouTube Videos and Interactive Activities as a Critical Thinking Stimulator for Tertiary Students: An Action Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    June, Sethela; Yaacob, Aizan; Kheng, Yeoh Khar

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this action research was to investigate the use of YouTube videos and interactive activities in stimulating critical thinking among students from a public university in Malaysia. There were 50 students of mixed background, comprised of local and foreign students who participated in this study which lasted for one semester. Data was…

  2. Spatiotemporal pattern of action potential firing in developing inner hair cells of the mouse cochlea.

    PubMed

    Sendin, Gaston; Bourien, Jérôme; Rassendren, François; Puel, Jean-Luc; Nouvian, Régis

    2014-02-01

    Inner hair cells (IHCs) are the primary transducer for sound encoding in the cochlea. In contrast to the graded receptor potential of adult IHCs, immature hair cells fire spontaneous calcium action potentials during the first postnatal week. This spiking activity has been proposed to shape the tonotopic map along the ascending auditory pathway. Using perforated patch-clamp recordings, we show that developing IHCs fire spontaneous bursts of action potentials and that this pattern is indistinguishable along the basoapical gradient of the developing cochlea. In both apical and basal IHCs, the spiking behavior undergoes developmental changes, where the bursts of action potential tend to occur at a regular time interval and have a similar length toward the end of the first postnatal week. Although disruption of purinergic signaling does not interfere with the action potential firing pattern, pharmacological ablation of the α9α10 nicotinic receptor elicits an increase in the discharge rate. We therefore suggest that in addition to carrying place information to the ascending auditory nuclei, the IHCs firing pattern controlled by the α9α10 receptor conveys a temporal signature of the cochlear development. PMID:24429348

  3. Noise Enhances Action Potential Generation in Mouse Sensory Neurons via Stochastic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Onorato, Irene; D'Alessandro, Giuseppina; Di Castro, Maria Amalia; Renzi, Massimiliano; Dobrowolny, Gabriella; Musarò, Antonio; Salvetti, Marco; Limatola, Cristina; Crisanti, Andrea; Grassi, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    Noise can enhance perception of tactile and proprioceptive stimuli by stochastic resonance processes. However, the mechanisms underlying this general phenomenon remain to be characterized. Here we studied how externally applied noise influences action potential firing in mouse primary sensory neurons of dorsal root ganglia, modelling a basic process in sensory perception. Since noisy mechanical stimuli may cause stochastic fluctuations in receptor potential, we examined the effects of sub-threshold depolarizing current steps with superimposed random fluctuations. We performed whole cell patch clamp recordings in cultured neurons of mouse dorsal root ganglia. Noise was added either before and during the step, or during the depolarizing step only, to focus onto the specific effects of external noise on action potential generation. In both cases, step + noise stimuli triggered significantly more action potentials than steps alone. The normalized power norm had a clear peak at intermediate noise levels, demonstrating that the phenomenon is driven by stochastic resonance. Spikes evoked in step + noise trials occur earlier and show faster rise time as compared to the occasional ones elicited by steps alone. These data suggest that external noise enhances, via stochastic resonance, the recruitment of transient voltage-gated Na channels, responsible for action potential firing in response to rapid step-wise depolarizing currents. PMID:27525414

  4. Noise Enhances Action Potential Generation in Mouse Sensory Neurons via Stochastic Resonance.

    PubMed

    Onorato, Irene; D'Alessandro, Giuseppina; Di Castro, Maria Amalia; Renzi, Massimiliano; Dobrowolny, Gabriella; Musarò, Antonio; Salvetti, Marco; Limatola, Cristina; Crisanti, Andrea; Grassi, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    Noise can enhance perception of tactile and proprioceptive stimuli by stochastic resonance processes. However, the mechanisms underlying this general phenomenon remain to be characterized. Here we studied how externally applied noise influences action potential firing in mouse primary sensory neurons of dorsal root ganglia, modelling a basic process in sensory perception. Since noisy mechanical stimuli may cause stochastic fluctuations in receptor potential, we examined the effects of sub-threshold depolarizing current steps with superimposed random fluctuations. We performed whole cell patch clamp recordings in cultured neurons of mouse dorsal root ganglia. Noise was added either before and during the step, or during the depolarizing step only, to focus onto the specific effects of external noise on action potential generation. In both cases, step + noise stimuli triggered significantly more action potentials than steps alone. The normalized power norm had a clear peak at intermediate noise levels, demonstrating that the phenomenon is driven by stochastic resonance. Spikes evoked in step + noise trials occur earlier and show faster rise time as compared to the occasional ones elicited by steps alone. These data suggest that external noise enhances, via stochastic resonance, the recruitment of transient voltage-gated Na channels, responsible for action potential firing in response to rapid step-wise depolarizing currents. PMID:27525414

  5. Emerging cardiovascular actions of the incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide-1: potential therapeutic benefits beyond glycaemic control?

    PubMed Central

    Grieve, David J; Cassidy, Roslyn S; Green, Brian D

    2009-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an incretin hormone secreted by the small intestine in response to nutrient ingestion. It has wide-ranging effects on glucose metabolism, including stimulation of insulin release, inhibition of glucagon secretion, reduction of gastric emptying and augmentation of satiety. Importantly, the insulinotropic actions of GLP-1 are uniquely dependent on ambient glucose concentrations, and it is this particular characteristic which has led to its recent emergence as a treatment for type 2 diabetes. Although the major physiological function of GLP-1 appears to be in relation to glycaemic control, there is growing evidence to suggest that it may also play an important role in the cardiovascular system. GLP-1 receptors (GLP-1Rs) are expressed in the heart and vasculature of both rodents and humans, and recent studies have demonstrated that GLP-1R agonists have wide-ranging cardiovascular actions, such as modulation of heart rate, blood pressure, vascular tone and myocardial contractility. Importantly, it appears that these agents may also have beneficial effects in the setting of cardiovascular disease (CVD). For example, GLP-1 has been found to exert cardioprotective actions in experimental models of dilated cardiomyopathy, hypertensive heart failure and myocardial infarction (MI). Preliminary clinical studies also indicate that GLP-1 infusion may improve cardiac contractile function in chronic heart failure patients with and without diabetes, and in MI patients after successful angioplasty. This review will discuss the current understanding of GLP-1 biology, examine its emerging cardiovascular actions in both health and disease and explore the potential use of GLP-1 as a novel treatment for CVD. PMID:19681866

  6. The observation of manual grasp actions affects the control of speech: a combined behavioral and Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation study.

    PubMed

    Gentilucci, Maurizio; Campione, Giovanna Cristina; Dalla Volta, Riccardo; Bernardis, Paolo

    2009-12-01

    Does the mirror system affect the control of speech? This issue was addressed in behavioral and Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) experiments. In behavioral experiment 1, participants pronounced the syllable /da/ while observing (1) a hand grasping large and small objects with power and precision grasps, respectively, (2) a foot interacting with large and small objects and (3) differently sized objects presented alone. Voice formant 1 was higher when observing power as compared to precision grasp, whereas it remained unaffected by observation of the different types of foot interaction and objects alone. In TMS experiment 2, we stimulated hand motor cortex, while participants observed the two types of grasp. Motor Evoked Potentials (MEPs) of hand muscles active during the two types of grasp were greater when observing power than precision grasp. In experiments 3-5, TMS was applied to tongue motor cortex of participants silently pronouncing the syllable /da/ and simultaneously observing power and precision grasps, pantomimes of the two types of grasps, and differently sized objects presented alone. Tongue MEPs were greater when observing power than precision grasp either executed or pantomimed. Finally, in TMS experiment 6, the observation of foot interaction with large and small objects did not modulate tongue MEPs. We hypothesized that grasp observation activated motor commands to the mouth as well as to the hand that were congruent with the hand kinematics implemented in the observed type of grasp. The commands to the mouth selectively affected postures of phonation organs and consequently basic features of phonological units.

  7. Inhibition by TRPA1 agonists of compound action potentials in the frog sciatic nerve

    SciTech Connect

    Matsushita, Akitomo; Ohtsubo, Sena; Fujita, Tsugumi; Kumamoto, Eiichi

    2013-04-26

    Highlights: •TRPA1 agonists inhibited compound action potentials in frog sciatic nerves. •This inhibition was not mediated by TRPA1 channels. •This efficacy was comparable to those of lidocaine and cocaine. •We found for the first time an ability of TRPA1 agonists to inhibit nerve conduction. -- Abstract: Although TRPV1 and TRPM8 agonists (vanilloid capsaicin and menthol, respectively) at high concentrations inhibit action potential conduction, it remains to be unknown whether TRPA1 agonists have a similar action. The present study examined the actions of TRPA1 agonists, cinnamaldehyde (CA) and allyl isothiocyanate (AITC), which differ in chemical structure from each other, on compound action potentials (CAPs) recorded from the frog sciatic nerve by using the air-gap method. CA and AITC concentration-dependently reduced the peak amplitude of the CAP with the IC{sub 50} values of 1.2 and 1.5 mM, respectively; these activities were resistant to a non-selective TRP antagonist ruthenium red or a selective TRPA1 antagonist HC-030031. The CA and AITC actions were distinct in property; the latter but not former action was delayed in onset and partially reversible, and CA but not AITC increased thresholds to elicit CAPs. A CAP inhibition was seen by hydroxy-α-sanshool (by 60% at 0.05 mM), which activates both TRPA1 and TRPV1 channels, a non-vanilloid TRPV1 agonist piperine (by 20% at 0.07 mM) and tetrahydrolavandulol (where the six-membered ring of menthol is opened; IC{sub 50} = 0.38 mM). It is suggested that TRPA1 agonists as well as TRPV1 and TRPM8 agonists have an ability to inhibit nerve conduction without TRP activation, although their agonists are quite different in chemical structure from each other.

  8. Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Effects on Single and Paired Flash Visual Evoked Potentials.

    PubMed

    Strigaro, Gionata; Mayer, Isabella; Chen, Jui-Cheng; Cantello, Roberto; Rothwell, John C

    2015-07-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) applied over the occipital cortex has a controversial effect on the visual cortex excitability. Paired flash visual evoked potentials (paired F-VEPs) offer a unique method to express neural inhibition within the visual system. However, no studies have explored the effects of tDCS on F-VEPs in humans. The aim of this study was to evaluate the changes of single- and paired-F-VEPs during and after tDCS in healthy humans. Twenty-six healthy volunteers participated. F-VEPs were recorded from occipital electrodes with closed eyes. Stimuli were single flashes, intermingled to flash pairs at the interstimulus interval of 125, 62.5, 50, 33.3, 16.6, and 11.1 ms (internal frequency of 8, 16, 20, 30, 60, and 90 Hz). The single F-VEP was split into a "main complex" and a "late response." As to paired stimuli, the "test" F-VEP emerged from electronic subtraction of the single-F-VEP to the paired-F-VEP. In experiment 1, the return electrode was located on the scalp and we studied changes in F-VEPs after anodal, cathodal (1 mA, 15 min) and sham stimulation. A second experiment was performed in which F-VEPs were recorded before, during and after tDCS stimulation (anodal and cathodal) with the return electrode on the neck. F-VEPs recorded in experiment 1 did not detect any significant change after tDCS. In experiment 2 anodal polarization significantly increased the P2 latency (P = .031) and reduced the amplitude of the "late response" of the single F-VEP (P = .008). As for the paired F-VEPs, no significant changes were detected. In conclusion, low-intensity anodal tDCS has weak inhibitory aftereffects on the single F-VEP and no effects on the paired F-VEPs. Further methodological studies are needed to improve polarization efficacy.

  9. Viewing Objects and Planning Actions: On the Potentiation of Grasping Behaviours by Visual Objects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Makris, Stergios; Hadar, Aviad A.; Yarrow, Kielan

    2011-01-01

    How do humans interact with tools? Gibson (1979) suggested that humans perceive directly what tools afford in terms of meaningful actions. This "affordances" hypothesis implies that visual objects can potentiate motor responses even in the absence of an intention to act. Here we explore the temporal evolution of motor plans afforded by common…

  10. 76 FR 21938 - Potential Environmental Impacts of the Proposed Runway 13 Extension and Associated Actions for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-19

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Potential Environmental Impacts of the Proposed Runway 13 Extension and... extension and associated actions for Devils Lake Regional Airport in Devils Lake, North Dakota. SUMMARY: The FAA has issued the final EA and FONSI/ROD for the proposed Runway 13 extension and associated...

  11. Youth Participatory Action Research and Educational Transformation: The Potential of Intertextuality as a Methodological Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bertrand, Melanie

    2016-01-01

    In this article, Melanie Bertrand explores the potential of using the concept of intertextuality--which captures the way snippets of written or spoken text from one source become incorporated into other sources--in the study and practice of youth participatory action research (YPAR). Though this collective and youth-centered form of research…

  12. Primary cortical representation of sounds by the coordination of action-potential timing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decharms, R. Christopher; Merzenich, Michael M.

    1996-06-01

    CORTICAL population coding could in principle rely on either the mean rate of neuronal action potentials, or the relative timing of action potentials, or both. When a single sensory stimulus drives many neurons to fire at elevated rates, the spikes of these neurons become tightly synchronized1,2, which could be involved in 'binding' together individual firing-rate feature representations into a unified object percept3. Here we demonstrate that the relative timing of cortical action potentials can signal stimulus features themselves, a function even more basic than feature grouping. Populations of neurons in the primary auditory cortex can coordinate the relative timing of their action potentials such that spikes occur closer together in time during continuous stimuli. In this way cortical neurons can signal stimuli even when their firing rates do not change. Population coding based on relative spike timing can systematically signal stimulus features, it is topographically mapped, and it follows the stimulus time course even where mean firing rate does not.

  13. Assessment of Potential Targets for Deep Brain Stimulation in Patients With Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Mayur; Deogaonkar, Milind; Rezai, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder affecting 36 million people worldwide and 5.2 million in the United States. The pathogenesis of AD is still elusive. Accumulations of abnormal proteins (beta amyloid and tau protein), inflammatory cascades, abnormal responses to oxidative stress and alteration in oxidative metabolism have been implicated in AD. There are few effective therapeutic options available for this disorder at present. Neuromodulation offers a novel treatment modality for patients with AD. The databases of Medline and PubMed were searched for various studies in English literature describing the deep brain stimulation (DBS) in patients with AD. Various animal and human clinical studies have shown promising initial results with bilateral DBS targeting various anatomical nodes. In this review, we attempt to highlight the pathophysiology, neural circuitry and potential neuromodulation options in patients with AD. In appropriately selected patients, DBS can potentially delay the cognitive decline, enhance memory functions and can improve the overall quality of life. However, further randomized controlled trials are required to validate the efficacy of neuromodulation and to determine the most optimal target for AD. PMID:26015813

  14. Noninvasive brain stimulation: the potential for use in the rehabilitation of pediatric acquired brain injury.

    PubMed

    Chung, Melissa G; Lo, Warren D

    2015-04-01

    Noninvasive brain stimulation (NIBS) offers the potential to modulate neural activity and recovery after acquired brain injury. There are few studies of NIBS in children, but a survey of those studies might provide insight into the potential for NIBS to modulate motor rehabilitation, seizures, and behavior in children. We surveyed the published literature prior to July 2014 for articles pertaining to children and NIBS with a focus on case series or trials. We also reviewed selected articles involving adults to illustrate specific points where the literature in children is lacking. A limited number of articles suggest that NIBS can transiently improve motor function. The evidence for an effect on seizures is mixed. Two open-label studies reported improvement of mood in adolescents with depression. NIBS may serve as a tool for pediatric neurorehabilitation, but many gaps in our knowledge must be filled before NIBS can be adopted as a clinical intervention. To move forward, the field needs adequately powered trials that can answer these questions. Such trials will be challenging to perform, will likely require multicenter collaboration, and may need to adopt novel trial designs that have been used with rare disorders.

  15. Pre & Postsynaptic Tuning of Action Potential Timing by Spontaneous GABAergic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Caillard, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    Frequency and timing of action potential discharge are key elements for coding and transfer of information between neurons. The nature and location of the synaptic contacts, the biophysical parameters of the receptor-operated channels and their kinetics of activation are major determinants of the firing behaviour of each individual neuron. Ultimately the intrinsic excitability of each neuron determines the input-output function. Here we evaluate the influence of spontaneous GABAergic synaptic activity on the timing of action potentials in Layer 2/3 pyramidal neurones in acute brain slices from the somatosensory cortex of young rats. Somatic dynamic current injection to mimic synaptic input events was employed, together with a simple computational model that reproduce subthreshold membrane properties. Besides the well-documented control of neuronal excitability, spontaneous background GABAergic activity has a major detrimental effect on spike timing. In fact, GABAA receptors tune the relationship between the excitability and fidelity of pyramidal neurons via a postsynaptic (the reversal potential for GABAA activity) and a presynaptic (the frequency of spontaneous activity) mechanism. GABAergic activity can decrease or increase the excitability of pyramidal neurones, depending on the difference between the reversal potential for GABAA receptors and the threshold for action potential. In contrast, spike time jitter can only be increased proportionally to the difference between these two membrane potentials. Changes in excitability by background GABAergic activity can therefore only be associated with deterioration of the reliability of spike timing. PMID:21789249

  16. Mechanisms of CaMKII action in long-term potentiation

    PubMed Central

    Lisman, John; Yasuda, Ryohei; Raghavachari, Sridhar

    2014-01-01

    Long-term potentiation (LTP) of synaptic strength occurs during learning and can last for long periods, making it a probable mechanism for memory storage. LTP induction results in calcium entry, which activates calcium–calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII). CaMKII subsequently translocates to the synapse, where it binds to the NMDA-type glutamate receptors and produces potentiation by phosphorylating principal and auxiliary subunits of AMPA-type glutamate receptors. These processes all are localized to stimulated spines and account for the synapse specificity of LTP. In the later stages of LTP, CaMKII has a structural role in enlarging and strengthening the synapse. PMID:22334212

  17. 'Catching the waves' - slow cortical potentials as moderator of voluntary action.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Stefan; Jo, Han-Gue; Wittmann, Marc; Hinterberger, Thilo

    2016-09-01

    The readiness potential is an ongoing negativity in the EEG preceding a self-initiated movement by approximately 1.5s. So far it has predominantly been interpreted as a preparatory signal with a causal link to the upcoming movement. Here a different hypothesis is suggested which we call the selective slow cortical potential sampling hypothesis. In this review of recent research results we argue that the initiation of a voluntary action is more likely during negative fluctuations of the slow cortical potential and that the sampling and averaging of many trials leads to the observed negativity. That is, empirical evidence indicates that the early readiness potential is not a neural correlate of preconscious motor preparation and thus a determinant of action. Our hypothesis thereafter challenges the classic interpretation of the Libet experiment which is often taken as proof that there is no free will. We furthermore suggest that slow cortical potentials are related to an urge to act but are not a neural indicator of the decision process of action initiation. PMID:27328786

  18. The DBI action, higher-derivative supergravity, and flattening inflaton potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bielleman, Sjoerd; Ibáñez, Luis E.; Pedro, Francisco G.; Valenzuela, Irene; Wieck, Clemens

    2016-05-01

    In string theory compactifications it is common to find an effective Lagrangian for the scalar fields with a non-canonical kinetic term. We study the effective action of the scalar position moduli of Type II D p-branes. In many instances the kinetic terms are in fact modified by a term proportional to the scalar potential itself. This can be linked to the appearance of higher-dimensional supersymmetric operators correcting the Kähler potential. We identify the supersymmetric dimension-eight operators describing the α' corrections captured by the D-brane Dirac-Born-Infeld action. Our analysis then allows an embedding of the D-brane moduli effective action into an {N}=1 supergravity formulation. The effects of the potential-dependent kinetic terms may be very important if one of the scalars is the inflaton, since they lead to a flattening of the scalar potential. We analyze this flattening effect in detail and compute its impact on the CMB observables for single-field inflation with monomial potentials.

  19. 'Catching the waves' - slow cortical potentials as moderator of voluntary action.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Stefan; Jo, Han-Gue; Wittmann, Marc; Hinterberger, Thilo

    2016-09-01

    The readiness potential is an ongoing negativity in the EEG preceding a self-initiated movement by approximately 1.5s. So far it has predominantly been interpreted as a preparatory signal with a causal link to the upcoming movement. Here a different hypothesis is suggested which we call the selective slow cortical potential sampling hypothesis. In this review of recent research results we argue that the initiation of a voluntary action is more likely during negative fluctuations of the slow cortical potential and that the sampling and averaging of many trials leads to the observed negativity. That is, empirical evidence indicates that the early readiness potential is not a neural correlate of preconscious motor preparation and thus a determinant of action. Our hypothesis thereafter challenges the classic interpretation of the Libet experiment which is often taken as proof that there is no free will. We furthermore suggest that slow cortical potentials are related to an urge to act but are not a neural indicator of the decision process of action initiation.

  20. K+ accumulation and K+ conductance inactivation during action potential trains in giant axons of the squid Sepioteuthis.

    PubMed

    Inoue, I; Tsutsui, I; Brown, E R

    1997-04-15

    1. During action potential trains in giant axons from the squid Sepioteuthis, decline of the peak level of the undershoot potential was observed. The time course of the decline of the undershoot could be fitted with a three-exponential function with time constants of approximately 25, approximately 400 and approximately 7,000 ms, respectively. 2. When the osmolarity of the external solution was doubled by adding glucose (1.2 M), the fast component of undershoot decline, but not the medium and slow components, was significantly reduced. 3. Under voltage clamp in high osmolarity solutions where K+ accumulation was completely removed, repeated depolarizing pulses at 40 Hz (designed to mimic a train of action potentials) elicited K+ currents whose peak value declined. The decline is consistent with inactivation of the K+ conductance (gK). The decline of gK was fitted by a two-exponential function with time constants of approximately 400 and approximately 7,000 ms, respectively. 4. Interventions designed to modify Schwann cell physiology, such as high frequency stimulation (100 Hz, 2 min), externally applied ouabain (100-500 microM), L-glutamate (100 microM), ACh (100 microM), Co2+ (5mM), Ba2+ (2mM), or removal of external Ca2+ by EGTA, had no significant effects on the fast, medium or slow components of undershoot decline. 5. The results suggest that the fast component of undershoot decline represents K+ accumulation in the space between Schwann cell and axolemma. The medium and slow components are the result of axonal gK inactivation. Schwann cells appear to be involved in K+ clearance only to the extent that they provide an efficient physical pathway for the clearance of K+ by extracellular diffusion.

  1. K+ accumulation and K+ conductance inactivation during action potential trains in giant axons of the squid Sepioteuthis.

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, I; Tsutsui, I; Brown, E R

    1997-01-01

    1. During action potential trains in giant axons from the squid Sepioteuthis, decline of the peak level of the undershoot potential was observed. The time course of the decline of the undershoot could be fitted with a three-exponential function with time constants of approximately 25, approximately 400 and approximately 7,000 ms, respectively. 2. When the osmolarity of the external solution was doubled by adding glucose (1.2 M), the fast component of undershoot decline, but not the medium and slow components, was significantly reduced. 3. Under voltage clamp in high osmolarity solutions where K+ accumulation was completely removed, repeated depolarizing pulses at 40 Hz (designed to mimic a train of action potentials) elicited K+ currents whose peak value declined. The decline is consistent with inactivation of the K+ conductance (gK). The decline of gK was fitted by a two-exponential function with time constants of approximately 400 and approximately 7,000 ms, respectively. 4. Interventions designed to modify Schwann cell physiology, such as high frequency stimulation (100 Hz, 2 min), externally applied ouabain (100-500 microM), L-glutamate (100 microM), ACh (100 microM), Co2+ (5mM), Ba2+ (2mM), or removal of external Ca2+ by EGTA, had no significant effects on the fast, medium or slow components of undershoot decline. 5. The results suggest that the fast component of undershoot decline represents K+ accumulation in the space between Schwann cell and axolemma. The medium and slow components are the result of axonal gK inactivation. Schwann cells appear to be involved in K+ clearance only to the extent that they provide an efficient physical pathway for the clearance of K+ by extracellular diffusion. PMID:9147323

  2. The respiratory cycle modulates brain potentials, sympathetic activity, and subjective pain sensation induced by noxious stimulation.

    PubMed

    Iwabe, Tatsuya; Ozaki, Isamu; Hashizume, Akira

    2014-07-01

    To test the hypothesis that a respiratory cycle influences pain processing, we conducted an experimental pain study in 10 healthy volunteers. Intraepidermal electrical stimulation (IES) with a concentric bipolar needle electrode was applied to the hand dorsum at pain perceptual threshold or four times the perceptual threshold to produce first pain during expiration or inspiration either of which was determined by the abrupt change in an exhaled CO2 level. IES-evoked potentials (IESEPs), sympathetic skin response (SSR), digital plethysmogram (DPG), and subjective pain intensity rating scale were simultaneously recorded. With either stimulus intensity, IES during expiration produced weaker pain feeling compared to IES during inspiration. The mean amplitude of N200/P400 in IESEPs and that of SSR were smaller when IES was applied during expiration. The magnitude of DPG wave gradually decreased after IES, but a decrease in the magnitude of DPG wave was less evident when IES was delivered during expiration. Regardless of stimulus timing or stimulus intensity, pain perception was always concomitant with appearance of IESEPs and SSR, and changes in DPG. Our findings suggest that pain processing fluctuates during normal breathing and that pain is gated within the central nervous system during expiration. PMID:24667456

  3. Potentiation of quantitative electroencephalograms following prefrontal repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in patients with major depression.

    PubMed

    Noda, Yoshihiro; Nakamura, Motoaki; Saeki, Takashi; Inoue, Misa; Iwanari, Hideo; Kasai, Kiyoto

    2013-01-01

    The long-lasting effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) on electroencephalogram (EEG) activity are not clear. We aimed to investigate the cumulative rTMS effects on EEG and clinical outcomes in patients with major depression. Twenty-five patients with medication-resistant depression underwent 10 daily rTMS sessions over the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. We measured resting EEG and spectrum-power before and after the rTMS course. Clinical efficacy was evaluated with the Hamilton's Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D) and Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST). In an ANOVA model, including all prefrontal electrodes, post hoc analyses revealed significant time effects on the theta (F1,24 = 7.89, P = 0.010; +43%), delta (F1,24 = 6.58, P = 0.017; +26%), and alpha (F1,24 = 4.64, P = 0.042; 31%) bands without site specificity. Clinical correlations were observed between F4 alpha power increases and improvements in HAM-D retardation, F3 alpha power increases and improvements of the absolute changes in perseveration and error number on the WCST, and C3 and C4 theta power increases and improvements of the percent change in perseveration and error number on the WCST following rTMS. Consecutive prefrontal rTMS could induce long-lasting EEG potentiations beyond the aftereffects, resulting in improved cognitive and depressive symptoms.

  4. Potentiation of quantitative electroencephalograms following prefrontal repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in patients with major depression.

    PubMed

    Noda, Yoshihiro; Nakamura, Motoaki; Saeki, Takashi; Inoue, Misa; Iwanari, Hideo; Kasai, Kiyoto

    2013-01-01

    The long-lasting effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) on electroencephalogram (EEG) activity are not clear. We aimed to investigate the cumulative rTMS effects on EEG and clinical outcomes in patients with major depression. Twenty-five patients with medication-resistant depression underwent 10 daily rTMS sessions over the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. We measured resting EEG and spectrum-power before and after the rTMS course. Clinical efficacy was evaluated with the Hamilton's Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D) and Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST). In an ANOVA model, including all prefrontal electrodes, post hoc analyses revealed significant time effects on the theta (F1,24 = 7.89, P = 0.010; +43%), delta (F1,24 = 6.58, P = 0.017; +26%), and alpha (F1,24 = 4.64, P = 0.042; 31%) bands without site specificity. Clinical correlations were observed between F4 alpha power increases and improvements in HAM-D retardation, F3 alpha power increases and improvements of the absolute changes in perseveration and error number on the WCST, and C3 and C4 theta power increases and improvements of the percent change in perseveration and error number on the WCST following rTMS. Consecutive prefrontal rTMS could induce long-lasting EEG potentiations beyond the aftereffects, resulting in improved cognitive and depressive symptoms. PMID:23827366

  5. The respiratory cycle modulates brain potentials, sympathetic activity, and subjective pain sensation induced by noxious stimulation.

    PubMed

    Iwabe, Tatsuya; Ozaki, Isamu; Hashizume, Akira

    2014-07-01

    To test the hypothesis that a respiratory cycle influences pain processing, we conducted an experimental pain study in 10 healthy volunteers. Intraepidermal electrical stimulation (IES) with a concentric bipolar needle electrode was applied to the hand dorsum at pain perceptual threshold or four times the perceptual threshold to produce first pain during expiration or inspiration either of which was determined by the abrupt change in an exhaled CO2 level. IES-evoked potentials (IESEPs), sympathetic skin response (SSR), digital plethysmogram (DPG), and subjective pain intensity rating scale were simultaneously recorded. With either stimulus intensity, IES during expiration produced weaker pain feeling compared to IES during inspiration. The mean amplitude of N200/P400 in IESEPs and that of SSR were smaller when IES was applied during expiration. The magnitude of DPG wave gradually decreased after IES, but a decrease in the magnitude of DPG wave was less evident when IES was delivered during expiration. Regardless of stimulus timing or stimulus intensity, pain perception was always concomitant with appearance of IESEPs and SSR, and changes in DPG. Our findings suggest that pain processing fluctuates during normal breathing and that pain is gated within the central nervous system during expiration.

  6. MIF-1 potentiates the action of tricyclic antidepressants in an animal model of depression.

    PubMed

    Kostowski, W; Danysz, W; Dyr, W; Jankowska, E; Krzaścik, P; Pałejko, W; Stefański, R; Płaźnik, A

    1991-01-01

    In the present paper, the effect of simultaneous treatment of rats with low doses of MIF-1 and tricyclic antidepressants on rat behavior in the forced swim test was studied. It was found that MIF-1 stimulated in a dose-dependent manner "active" behavior of animals in this paradigm. The effect of MIF-1 appeared to be independent of changes in rats' locomotion in the open field test. The combined treatment of rats with MIF-1 (0.01 mg/kg IP) and amitriptyline (5 mg/kg IP) or desipramine (1.25 mg/kg) IP) significantly stimulated active behavior in the forced swim test above the level obtained with each of the drugs given separately. The present data suggest the potential clinical efficacy of a combined therapy of depressive patients with MIF-1 and small doses of tricyclic antidepressants.

  7. An experimental study on a function of the cupula. Effect of cupula removal on the ampullary nerve action potential.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, M; Harada, Y; Sugata, Y

    1984-01-01

    We used a posterior semicircular canal that had been isolated from a frog. From the utricular side the ampulla was cut open at a position one third of the way along the long axis. The cupula was removed through this opening using a glass micropipette. The action potential from the posterior ampullary nerve was recorded before and after removal of the cupula. After removal, the action potential disappeared almost completely. When the cupula was put back on the crista, the action potential was restored. When the cupula was put back upside down, the action potential recovered, but to a lesser extent.

  8. Scalp-recorded oscillatory potentials evoked by transient pattern-reversal visual stimulation in man.

    PubMed

    Sannita, W G; Lopez, L; Piras, C; Di Bon, G

    1995-05-01

    Replicable oscillatory potentials, time-locked to pattern stimuli (9.0 degrees central; counterphase reversal at 2.13 Hz) were dissociated from conventional, broad-band VEPs recorded in healthy volunteers at occipital scalp locations by high-pass digital filtering at 17.0-20.0 Hz. Nine consecutive wavelets were identified with a 56.4 +/- 8.4 msec mean latency of the first replicable wavelet and mean peak-to-peak amplitude varying between 0.9 and 2.0 muV. The first 2 wavelets had significantly shorter latencies than wave N70 of unfiltered VEP, whereas the last 2 wavelets had longer latencies than N145. Latency and amplitude values varied as a function of contrast and spatial frequency of the stimulus, with shorter latencies and larger amplitudes at 60-90% contrast level and tuning of amplitude at 5.0 c/deg. All wavelets were correlated with wave P100 of unfiltered VEP, while a correlation with N70 of VEP was observed only for those wavelets with latencies in the range of wave P100. Two patients with documented brain lesions involving the visual system are described as examples of oscillatory responses occurring irrespective of filter bandpass and instead of the expected conventional VEP when the generation of these is interfered with by brain pathology. A substantial cortical contribution to the origin of the oscillatory response is conceivable. It is suggested that the oscillatory response to pattern-reversal stimulation reflects events in the visual system that are parallel to, and partly independent of, the conventional VEP, with potential application in research or for clinical purposes. PMID:7750446

  9. Topography of Synchronization of Somatosensory Evoked Potentials Elicited by Stimulation of the Sciatic Nerve in Rat

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Xuefeng; Yan, Jiaqing; Li, Xiaoli; Zhang, Peixun; Liu, Xianzeng

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Traditionally, the topography of somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) is generated based on amplitude and latency. However, this operation focuses on the physical morphology and field potential-power, so it suffers from difficulties in performing identification in an objective manner. In this study, measurement of the synchronization of SEPs is proposed as a method to explore brain functional networks as well as the plasticity after peripheral nerve injury. Method: SEPs elicited by unilateral sciatic nerve stimulation in twelve adult male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats in the normal group were compared with SEPs evoked after unilateral sciatic nerve hemisection in four peripheral nerve injured SD rats. The characterization of synchronized networks from SEPs was conducted using equal-time correlation, correlation matrix analysis, and comparison to randomized surrogate data. Eigenvalues of the correlation matrix were used to identify the clusters of functionally synchronized neuronal activity, and the participation index (PI) was calculated to indicate the involvement of each channel in the cluster. The PI value at the knee point of the PI histogram was used as a threshold to demarcate the cortical boundary. Results: Ten out of the twelve normal rats showed only one synchronized brain network. The remaining two normal rats showed one strong and one weak network. In the peripheral nerve injured group, only one synchronized brain network was found in each rat. In the normal group, all network shapes appear regular and the network is largely contained in the posterior cortex. In the injured group, the network shapes appear irregular, the network extends anteriorly and posteriorly, and the network area is significantly larger. There are considerable individual variations in the shape and location of the network after peripheral nerve injury. Conclusion: The proposed method can detect functional brain networks. Compared to the results of the traditional SEP

  10. The mode of action of quinidine on isolated rabbit atria interpreted from intracellular potential records.

    PubMed

    VAUGHAN WILLIAMS, E M

    1958-09-01

    An attempt has been made to show why quinidine, which has long been known not to lengthen the duration of the cardiac action potential, measured with external electrodes, and also not to lengthen, and sometimes to shorten, the absolute refractory period, nevertheless reduces the maximum frequency at which atria can respond to a stimulus. Simultaneous measurements have been made in electrically driven isolated rabbit atria of contractions, conduction velocity and intracellular potentials before and during exposure to a wide range of concentrations of quinidine sulphate. The resting potential remained undiminished, in contrast to the effect of quinidine on Purkinje fibres. In the therapeutic range of doses, up to 10 mg./l., the half-time for repolarization was either shortened or unchanged, thus providing an explanation for the failure of quinidine to prolong the absolute refractory period. In contrast, even at low concentrations of quinidine, conduction velocity and the rate of rise of the action potential were greatly slowed, and the height of the overshoot was reduced. The terminal phase of the action potential was prolonged. It is known that the rate of rise of the action potential is a function of the level of repolarization at which an impulse takes off (the more negative the take-off point, the faster the rate of rise). Normally, a stimulus introduced when repolarization has proceeded to 2/3 of the resting potential evokes a response with a rate of rise fast enough for propagation, so that the duration of the terminal 1/3 of the phase of repolarization has no influence upon the length of the effective refractory period. In the presence of quinidine, however, the rate of rise itself was directly reduced, thus repolarization had to proceed further before the critical take-off point was reached at which the rate of rise was fast enough for propagation, and the duration of the terminal phase of repolarization thus became significant. It has been concluded that

  11. 9-Anthracene carboxylic acid is more suitable than DIDS for characterization of calcium-activated chloride current during canine ventricular action potential.

    PubMed

    Váczi, Krisztina; Hegyi, Bence; Ruzsnavszky, Ferenc; Kistamás, Kornél; Horváth, Balázs; Bányász, Tamás; Nánási, Péter P; Szentandrássy, Norbert; Magyar, János

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the role of ionic currents in shaping the cardiac action potential (AP) has great importance as channel malfunctions can lead to sudden cardiac death by inducing arrhythmias. Therefore, researchers frequently use inhibitors to selectively block a certain ion channel like 4,4'-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid (DIDS) and 9-anthracene carboxylic acid (9-AC) for calcium-activated chloride current (ICl(Ca)). This study aims to explore which blocker is preferable to study ICl(Ca). Whole-cell voltage-clamp technique was used to record ICa,L, IKs, IKr and IK1, while action potentials were measured using sharp microelectrodes. DIDS- (0.2 mM) and 9-AC-sensitive (0.5 mM) currents were identical in voltage-clamp conditions, regardless of intracellular Ca(2+) buffering. DIDS-sensitive current amplitude was larger with the increase of stimulation rate and correlated well with the rate-induced increase of calcium transients. Both drugs increased action potential duration (APD) to the same extent, but the elevation of the plateau potential was more pronounced with 9-AC at fast stimulation rates. On the contrary, 9-AC did not influence either the AP amplitude or the maximal rate of depolarization (V max), but DIDS caused marked reduction of V max. Both inhibitors reduced the magnitude of phase-1, but, at slow stimulation rates, this effect of DIDS was larger. All of these actions on APs were reversible upon washout of the drugs. Increasing concentrations of 9-AC between 0.1 and 0.5 mM in a cumulative manner gradually reduced phase-1 and increased APD. 9-AC at 1 mM had no additional actions upon perfusion after 0.5 mM. The half-effective concentration of 9-AC was approximately 160 μM with a Hill coefficient of 2. The amplitudes of ICa,L, IKs, IKr and IK1 were not changed by 0.5 mM 9-AC. These results suggest that DIDS is equally useful to study ICl(Ca) during voltage-clamp but 9-AC is superior in AP measurements for studying the physiological role of

  12. Involvement of ERK1/2 signaling pathway in atrazine action on FSH-stimulated LHR and CYP19A1 expression in rat granulosa cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fa, Svetlana; Pogrmic-Majkic, Kristina; Samardzija, Dragana; Glisic, Branka; Kaisarevic, Sonja; Kovacevic, Radmila; Andric, Nebojsa

    2013-07-01

    Worldwide used herbicide atrazine is linked to reproductive dysfunction in females. In this study, we investigated the effects and the mechanism of atrazine action in the ovary using a primary culture of immature granulosa cells. In granulosa cells, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) activates both cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and extracellular-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) cascades, with cAMP pathway being more important for luteinizing hormone receptor (LHR) and aromatase (CYP19A1) mRNA expression. We report that 48 h after atrazine exposure the FSH-stimulated LHR and CYP19A1 mRNA expression and estradiol synthesis were decreased, with LHR mRNA being more sensitive to atrazine than CYP19A1 mRNA. Inadequate acquisition of LHR in the FSH-stimulated and atrazine-exposed granulosa cells renders human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) ineffective to stimulate amphiregulin (Areg), epiregulin (Ereg), and progesterone receptor (Pgr) mRNA expression, suggesting anti-ovulatory effect of atrazine. To dissect the signaling cascade involved in atrazine action in granulosa cells, we used U0126, a pharmacological inhibitor of ERK1/2. U0126 prevents atrazine-induced decrease in LHR and CYP19A1 mRNA levels and estradiol production in the FSH-stimulated granulosa cells. ERK1/2 inactivation restores the ability of hCG to induce expression of the ovulatory genes in atrazine-exposed granulosa cells. Cell-based ELISA assay revealed that atrazine does not change the FSH-stimulated ERK1/2 phosphorylation in granulosa cells. The results from this study reveal that atrazine does not affect but requires ERK1/2 phosphorylation to cause decrease in the FSH-induced LHR and CYP19A1 mRNA levels and estradiol production in immature granulosa cells, thus compromising ovulation and female fertility. - Highlights: • Atrazine inhibits estradiol production in FSH-stimulated granulosa cells. • Atrazine inhibits LHR and Cyp19a1 mRNA expression in FSH-stimulated granulosa cells. • Atrazine

  13. What are the stimulation parameters that affect the extent of twitch force potentiation in the adductor pollicis muscle?

    PubMed

    Mettler, Joni A; Griffin, Lisa

    2010-12-01

    Muscle force potentiation affects force output during electrical stimulation. Few studies have examined stimulation train parameters that influence potentiation such as pulse number, stimulation frequency, train duration, and force-time integral and peak force produced during the train. Pulse-matched trains (100 pulses) at 7.5, 15, 25, 30, 50, and 100 Hz, and trains of varying pulse number (50, 100, and 200 pulses) at 30 and 50 Hz were delivered to the ulnar nerve of 10 (5 male, 5 female; 23.4 ± 0.9 years), healthy individuals in random order. Single twitches of the adductor pollicis muscle were elicited before and after each train with a rest interval of at least 5 min between each train. No differences in potentiation occurred across the pulse-matched trains at frequencies of 15-50 Hz (38.9 ± 5.4-44.6 ± 5.5%). Twitch force potentiation following the highest (100 Hz) and lowest (7.5 Hz) frequency trains were not significantly different and were lower than the other 100 pulse-matched trains. As pulse number increased, potentiation increased for both the 30 and 50-Hz trains. There was a significant positive correlation between force potentiation and force-time integral produced by the stimulation train, r = 0.70. The results indicate that potentiation magnitude is dependent on the force-time integral produced during the test train and the number of pulses delivered, independent of stimulation frequency. PMID:20737164

  14. Stronger efferent suppression of cochlear neural potentials by contralateral acoustic stimulation in awake than in anesthetized chinchilla

    PubMed Central

    Aedo, Cristian; Tapia, Eduardo; Pavez, Elizabeth; Elgueda, Diego; Delano, Paul H.; Robles, Luis

    2015-01-01

    There are two types of sensory cells in the mammalian cochlea, inner hair cells, which make synaptic contact with auditory-nerve afferent fibers, and outer hair cells that are innervated by crossed and uncrossed medial olivocochlear (MOC) efferent fibers. Contralateral acoustic stimulation activates the uncrossed efferent MOC fibers reducing cochlear neural responses, thus modifying the input to the central auditory system. The chinchilla, among all studied mammals, displays the lowest percentage of uncrossed MOC fibers raising questions about the strength and frequency distribution of the contralateral-sound effect in this species. On the other hand, MOC effects on cochlear sensitivity have been mainly studied in anesthetized animals and since the MOC-neuron activity depends on the level of anesthesia, it is important to assess the influence of anesthesia in the strength of efferent effects. Seven adult chinchillas (Chinchilla laniger) were chronically implanted with round-window electrodes in both cochleae. We compared the effect of contralateral sound in awake and anesthetized condition. Compound action potentials (CAP) and cochlear microphonics (CM) were measured in the ipsilateral cochlea in response to tones in absence and presence of contralateral sound. Control measurements performed after middle-ear muscles section in one animal discarded any possible middle-ear reflex activation. Contralateral sound produced CAP amplitude reductions in all chinchillas, with suppression effects greater by about 1–3 dB in awake than in anesthetized animals. In contrast, CM amplitude increases of up to 1.9 dB were found in only three awake chinchillas. In both conditions the strongest efferent effects were produced by contralateral tones at frequencies equal or close to those of ipsilateral tones. Contralateral CAP suppressions for 1–6 kHz ipsilateral tones corresponded to a span of uncrossed MOC fiber innervation reaching at least the central third of the chinchilla

  15. Stronger efferent suppression of cochlear neural potentials by contralateral acoustic stimulation in awake than in anesthetized chinchilla.

    PubMed

    Aedo, Cristian; Tapia, Eduardo; Pavez, Elizabeth; Elgueda, Diego; Delano, Paul H; Robles, Luis

    2015-01-01

    There are two types of sensory cells in the mammalian cochlea, inner hair cells, which make synaptic contact with auditory-nerve afferent fibers, and outer hair cells that are innervated by crossed and uncrossed medial olivocochlear (MOC) efferent fibers. Contralateral acoustic stimulation activates the uncrossed efferent MOC fibers reducing cochlear neural responses, thus modifying the input to the central auditory system. The chinchilla, among all studied mammals, displays the lowest percentage of uncrossed MOC fibers raising questions about the strength and frequency distribution of the contralateral-sound effect in this species. On the other hand, MOC effects on cochlear sensitivity have been mainly studied in anesthetized animals and since the MOC-neuron activity depends on the level of anesthesia, it is important to assess the influence of anesthesia in the strength of efferent effects. Seven adult chinchillas (Chinchilla laniger) were chronically implanted with round-window electrodes in both cochleae. We compared the effect of contralateral sound in awake and anesthetized condition. Compound action potentials (CAP) and cochlear microphonics (CM) were measured in the ipsilateral cochlea in response to tones in absence and presence of contralateral sound. Control measurements performed after middle-ear muscles section in one animal discarded any possible middle-ear reflex activation. Contralateral sound produced CAP amplitude reductions in all chinchillas, with suppression effects greater by about 1-3 dB in awake than in anesthetized animals. In contrast, CM amplitude increases of up to 1.9 dB were found in only three awake chinchillas. In both conditions the strongest efferent effects were produced by contralateral tones at frequencies equal or close to those of ipsilateral tones. Contralateral CAP suppressions for 1-6 kHz ipsilateral tones corresponded to a span of uncrossed MOC fiber innervation reaching at least the central third of the chinchilla cochlea.

  16. Stronger efferent suppression of cochlear neural potentials by contralateral acoustic stimulation in awake than in anesthetized chinchilla.

    PubMed

    Aedo, Cristian; Tapia, Eduardo; Pavez, Elizabeth; Elgueda, Diego; Delano, Paul H; Robles, Luis

    2015-01-01

    There are two types of sensory cells in the mammalian cochlea, inner hair cells, which make synaptic contact with auditory-nerve afferent fibers, and outer hair cells that are innervated by crossed and uncrossed medial olivocochlear (MOC) efferent fibers. Contralateral acoustic stimulation activates the uncrossed efferent MOC fibers reducing cochlear neural responses, thus modifying the input to the central auditory system. The chinchilla, among all studied mammals, displays the lowest percentage of uncrossed MOC fibers raising questions about the strength and frequency distribution of the contralateral-sound effect in this species. On the other hand, MOC effects on cochlear sensitivity have been mainly studied in anesthetized animals and since the MOC-neuron activity depends on the level of anesthesia, it is important to assess the influence of anesthesia in the strength of efferent effects. Seven adult chinchillas (Chinchilla laniger) were chronically implanted with round-window electrodes in both cochleae. We compared the effect of contralateral sound in awake and anesthetized condition. Compound action potentials (CAP) and cochlear microphonics (CM) were measured in the ipsilateral cochlea in response to tones in absence and presence of contralateral sound. Control measurements performed after middle-ear muscles section in one animal discarded any possible middle-ear reflex activation. Contralateral sound produced CAP amplitude reductions in all chinchillas, with suppression effects greater by about 1-3 dB in awake than in anesthetized animals. In contrast, CM amplitude increases of up to 1.9 dB were found in only three awake chinchillas. In both conditions the strongest efferent effects were produced by contralateral tones at frequencies equal or close to those of ipsilateral tones. Contralateral CAP suppressions for 1-6 kHz ipsilateral tones corresponded to a span of uncrossed MOC fiber innervation reaching at least the central third of the chinchilla cochlea

  17. Motor evoked potentials in standing and recumbent calves induced by magnetic stimulation at the foramen magnum.

    PubMed

    Rijckaert, J; Pardon, B; Verryken, K; Van Ham, L; van Loon, G; Deprez, P

    2016-10-01

    The aims of this study were to determine reference values for magnetic motor evoked potentials (mMEPs) in calves and the influence of position during examination (standing or lateral recumbency). Reference values were determined using 41 healthy Holstein Friesian bull calves aged 1-10 months; standing and lateral recumbency were examined in 11 calves. Maximal magnetic stimulation was performed at the level of the foramen magnum with a magnetic field of 4 T at the coil surface. In standing position, distinct, reproducible mMEPs were obtained in all calves. Onset latency (LAT) (mean ± standard deviation) was significantly shorter in the thoracic limbs (34.4 ± 3.1 ms) than in the pelvic limbs (44.6 ± 3.0 ms). Amplitude (AMPL) was significantly higher in the thoracic limbs (3.7 ± 1.7 mV) than in the pelvic limbs (3.3 ± 1.7 mV) and significantly increased with body length. Age, body weight, height at the withers and rectal temperature had no significant association with LAT or AMPL, and no differences between left and right were noted. In the lateral position, only 64% of the calves showed responses in the four limbs; in these calves, LAT (29.7 ± 4.7 ms) and AMPL (3.0 ± 1.8 mV) in the thoracic limbs were significantly different from AMPL (47.0 ± 7.4 ms) and LAT (2.1 ± 2.1 mV) in the pelvic limbs. In conclusion, mMEPs in limb muscles can be evoked in calves by stimulation at the level of the foramen magnum. mMEPs are more difficult to obtain in lateral recumbency than in standing calves.

  18. Motor evoked potentials in standing and recumbent calves induced by magnetic stimulation at the foramen magnum.

    PubMed

    Rijckaert, J; Pardon, B; Verryken, K; Van Ham, L; van Loon, G; Deprez, P

    2016-10-01

    The aims of this study were to determine reference values for magnetic motor evoked potentials (mMEPs) in calves and the influence of position during examination (standing or lateral recumbency). Reference values were determined using 41 healthy Holstein Friesian bull calves aged 1-10 months; standing and lateral recumbency were examined in 11 calves. Maximal magnetic stimulation was performed at the level of the foramen magnum with a magnetic field of 4 T at the coil surface. In standing position, distinct, reproducible mMEPs were obtained in all calves. Onset latency (LAT) (mean ± standard deviation) was significantly shorter in the thoracic limbs (34.4 ± 3.1 ms) than in the pelvic limbs (44.6 ± 3.0 ms). Amplitude (AMPL) was significantly higher in the thoracic limbs (3.7 ± 1.7 mV) than in the pelvic limbs (3.3 ± 1.7 mV) and significantly increased with body length. Age, body weight, height at the withers and rectal temperature had no significant association with LAT or AMPL, and no differences between left and right were noted. In the lateral position, only 64% of the calves showed responses in the four limbs; in these calves, LAT (29.7 ± 4.7 ms) and AMPL (3.0 ± 1.8 mV) in the thoracic limbs were significantly different from AMPL (47.0 ± 7.4 ms) and LAT (2.1 ± 2.1 mV) in the pelvic limbs. In conclusion, mMEPs in limb muscles can be evoked in calves by stimulation at the level of the foramen magnum. mMEPs are more difficult to obtain in lateral recumbency than in standing calves. PMID:27687949

  19. Event-related potentials reveal early activation of body part representations in action concept comprehension.

    PubMed

    Lu, Aitao; Liu, Jing; Zhang, John X

    2012-03-01

    With tasks involving action concept comprehension, many fMRI studies have reported brain activations in sensori-motor regions specific to effectors of the referent action. There is relatively less evidence whether such activations reflect early semantic access or late conceptual re-processing. Here we recorded event-related potentials when participants recognized noun-verb pairs. For Congruent pairs, the verb was the one most commonly associated with the noun (e.g., football-kick). Compared with a control condition, verbs in Congruent pairs showed priming effects in the time windows of 100-150 ms and 210-260 ms. Such activation seems to be specific to body part but not other aspects of the action as similar priming effect was also found when the noun and verb involved different actions though sharing the same body part (e.g., football-jump), documenting for the first time the early activation of body part representations in action concept comprehension. PMID:22306088

  20. Event-related potentials reveal early activation of body part representations in action concept comprehension.

    PubMed

    Lu, Aitao; Liu, Jing; Zhang, John X

    2012-03-01

    With tasks involving action concept comprehension, many fMRI studies have reported brain activations in sensori-motor regions specific to effectors of the referent action. There is relatively less evidence whether such activations reflect early semantic access or late conceptual re-processing. Here we recorded event-related potentials when participants recognized noun-verb pairs. For Congruent pairs, the verb was the one most commonly associated with the noun (e.g., football-kick). Compared with a control condition, verbs in Congruent pairs showed priming effects in the time windows of 100-150 ms and 210-260 ms. Such activation seems to be specific to body part but not other aspects of the action as similar priming effect was also found when the noun and verb involved different actions though sharing the same body part (e.g., football-jump), documenting for the first time the early activation of body part representations in action concept comprehension.

  1. Potentiators of Defective ΔF508-CFTR Gating that Do Not Interfere with Corrector Action.

    PubMed

    Phuan, Puay-Wah; Veit, Guido; Tan, Joseph A; Finkbeiner, Walter E; Lukacs, Gergely L; Verkman, A S

    2015-10-01

    Combination drug therapies under development for cystic fibrosis caused by the ∆F508 mutation in cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) include a "corrector" to improve its cellular processing and a "potentiator" to improve its chloride channel function. Recently, it was reported that the approved potentiator N-(2,4-di-tert-butyl-5-hydroxyphenyl)-4-oxo-1,4-dihydroquinoline-3-carboxamide (Ivacaftor) reduces ∆F508-CFTR cellular stability and the efficacy of investigational correctors, including 3-(6-[([1-(2,2-difluoro-1,3-benzodioxol-5-yl)cyclopropyl]carbonyl) amino]-3-methyl-2-pyridinyl)-benzoic acid and 1-(2,2-difluoro-1,3-benzodioxol-5-yl)-N-(1-[(2R)-2,3-dihydroxypropyl]-6-fluoro-2-(2-hydroxy-1,1-dimethylethyl)-1H-indol-5-yl), which might contribute to the modest reported efficacy of combination therapy in clinical trials. Here, we report the identification and characterization of potentiators that do not interfere with ∆F508-CFTR stability or corrector action. High-throughput screening and structure-activity analysis identified several classes of potentiators that do not impair corrector action, including tetrahydrobenzothiophenes, thiooxoaminothiazoles, and pyrazole-pyrrole-isoxazoles. The most potent compounds have an EC(50) for ∆F508-CFTR potentiation down to 18 nM and do not reduce corrector efficacy in heterologous ∆F508-CFTR-expressing cells or primary cultures of ∆F508/∆F508 human bronchial epithelia. The ΔF508-CFTR potentiators also activated wild-type and G551D CFTR, albeit weakly. The efficacy of combination therapy for cystic fibrosis caused by the ∆F508 mutation may be improved by replacement of Ivacaftor with a potentiator that does not interfere with corrector action. PMID:26245207

  2. Iridium Oxide Nanotube Electrodes for Highly Sensitive and Prolonged Intracellular Measurement of Action Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ziliang Carter; Xie, Chong; Osakada, Yasuko; Cui, Yi; Cui, Bianxiao

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular recording of action potentials is important to understand electrically-excitable cells. Recently, vertical nanoelectrodes have been developed to achieve highly sensitive, minimally invasive, and large scale intracellular recording. It has been demonstrated that the vertical geometry is crucial for the enhanced signal detection. Here we develop nanoelectrodes made up of nanotubes of iridium oxide. When cardiomyocytes are cultured upon those nanotubes, the cell membrane not only wraps around the vertical tubes but also protrudes deep into the hollow center. We show that this geometry enhances cell-electrode coupling and results in measuring much larger intracellular action potentials. The nanotube electrodes afford much longer intracellular access and are minimally invasive, making it possible to achieve stable recording up to an hour in a single session and more than 8 days of consecutive daily recording. This study suggests that the electrode performance can be significantly improved by optimizing the electrode geometry. PMID:24487777

  3. Post-tetanic mechanical tension and evoked action potentials in McArdle's disease

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, N. J.; Buchthal, F.; Ebbesen, F.; Kamieniecka, Z.; Krarup, C.

    1977-01-01

    The tension produced by the cramp evoked in the adductor pollicis muscle by repetitive stimuli to the nerve (20/s for 50 s) and by full voluntary effort in the brachial biceps was measured in a patient with McArdle's disease. The contracture was 17% of the peaktetanic tension, and was not associated with action potentials. Twitches superimposed on the contracture were at most diminished to half, as were their action potentials. Both slow and fast muscle fibres participated in the contracture. The contraction time of the twitches elicited after the tetanus was prolonged more in the patient than in a normal subject of the same age. There was evidence of delayed firing, first observed 90 seconds after the peak of the contracture. The patient had electromyographic and histological signs of myopathy. PMID:271684

  4. FHF-independent conduction of action potentials along the leak-resistant cerebellar granule cell axon

    PubMed Central

    Dover, Katarzyna; Marra, Christopher; Solinas, Sergio; Popovic, Marko; Subramaniyam, Sathyaa; Zecevic, Dejan; D'Angelo, Egidio; Goldfarb, Mitchell

    2016-01-01

    Neurons in vertebrate central nervous systems initiate and conduct sodium action potentials in distinct subcellular compartments that differ architecturally and electrically. Here, we report several unanticipated passive and active properties of the cerebellar granule cell's unmyelinated axon. Whereas spike initiation at the axon initial segment relies on sodium channel (Nav)-associated fibroblast growth factor homologous factor (FHF) proteins to delay Nav inactivation, distal axonal Navs show little FHF association or FHF requirement for high-frequency transmission, velocity and waveforms of conducting action potentials. In addition, leak conductance density along the distal axon is estimated as <1% that of somatodendritic membrane. The faster inactivation rate of FHF-free Navs together with very low axonal leak conductance serves to minimize ionic fluxes and energetic demand during repetitive spike conduction and at rest. The absence of FHFs from Navs at nodes of Ranvier in the central nervous system suggests a similar mechanism of current flux minimization along myelinated axons. PMID:27666389

  5. Attention-dependent reductions in burstiness and action potential height in macaque area V4

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Emily B.; Mitchell, Jude F.; Reynolds, John H.

    2013-01-01

    Attention improves the encoding of visual stimuli. One mechanism that is implicated in facilitating sensory encoding is the firing of action potentials in bursts. We tested the hypothesis that when spatial attention is directed to a stimulus, this causes an increase in burst firing to the attended stimulus. To the contrary, we found an attention-dependent reduction in burstiness among putative pyramidal neurons in macaque area V4. We accounted for this using a conductance-based Hodgkin-Huxley style model in which attentional modulation stems from scaling excitation and inhibition. The model exhibited attention-dependent increases in firing rate and made the surprising and correct prediction that when attention is directed into a neuron’s receptive field, this reduces action potential height. The model thus provided a unified explanation for three distinct forms of attentional modulation, two of them novel, and implicates scaling of the responses of excitatory and inhibitory input populations in mediating attention. PMID:23852114

  6. Tuning of Ranvier node and internode properties in myelinated axons to adjust action potential timing

    PubMed Central

    Ford, Marc C.; Alexandrova, Olga; Cossell, Lee; Stange-Marten, Annette; Sinclair, James; Kopp-Scheinpflug, Conny; Pecka, Michael; Attwell, David; Grothe, Benedikt

    2015-01-01

    Action potential timing is fundamental to information processing; however, its determinants are not fully understood. Here we report unexpected structural specializations in the Ranvier nodes and internodes of auditory brainstem axons involved in sound localization. Myelination properties deviated significantly from the traditionally assumed structure. Axons responding best to low-frequency sounds had a larger diameter than high-frequency axons but, surprisingly, shorter internodes. Simulations predicted that this geometry helps to adjust the conduction velocity and timing of action potentials within the circuit. Electrophysiological recordings in vitro and in vivo confirmed higher conduction velocities in low-frequency axons. Moreover, internode length decreased and Ranvier node diameter increased progressively along the distal axon segments, which simulations show was essential to ensure precisely timed depolarization of the giant calyx of Held presynaptic terminal. Thus, individual anatomical parameters of myelinated axons can be tuned to optimize pathways involved in temporal processing. PMID:26305015

  7. Improvement of Electrical Stimulation Protocol for Simultaneous Measurement of Extracellular Potential with On-Chip Multi-Electrode Array System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, Tomoyuki; Nomura, Fumimasa; Hattori, Akihiro; Yasuda, Kenji

    2012-06-01

    Cardiotoxicity testing with a multi-electrode array (MEA) system requires the stable beating of cardiomyocytes for the measurement of the field potential duration (FPD), because different spontaneous beating rates cause different responses of FPD prolongation induced by drugs, and the beating rate change effected by drugs complicates the FPD prolongation assessment. We have developed an on-chip MEA system with electrical stimulation for the measurement of the FPD during the stable beating of human embryonic stem (ES) cell-derived cardiomyocyte clusters. Using a conventional bipolar stimulation protocol, we observed such large artifacts in electrical stimulation that we could not estimate the FPD quantitatively. Therefore, we improved the stimulation protocol by using sequential rectangular pulses in which the positive and negative stimulation voltages and number of pulses could be changed flexibly. The balanced voltages and number of pulses for sequential rectangular pulses enabled the recording of small negative artifacts only, which hardly affected the FPD measurement of human-ES-cell-derived cardiomyocyte clusters. These conditions of electrical stimulation are expected to find applications for the control of constant beating for cardiotoxicity testing.

  8. Intracellular mechanism of the action of inhibin on the secretion of follicular stimulating hormone and of luteinizing hormone induced by LH-RH in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lecomte-Yerna, M. J.; Hazee-Hagelstein, M. T.; Charlet-Renard, C.; Franchimont, P.

    1982-01-01

    The FSH secretion-inhibiting action of inhibin in vitro under basal conditions and also in the presence of LH-RH is suppressed by the addition of MIX, a phosphodiesterase inhibitor. In the presence of LH-RH, inhibin reduces significantly the intracellular level of cAMP in isolated pituitary cells. In contrast, the simultaneous addition of MIX and inhibin raises the cAMP level, and this stimulation is comparable to the increase observed when MIX is added alone. These observations suggest that one mode of action of inhibin could be mediated by a reduction in cAMP within the pituitary gonadotropic cell.

  9. Effects of muscle potential depression and muscle stimulation caused by different insulation coating configurations on cardiac pacemakers.

    PubMed

    Yajima, Toshimi; Yamada, Kenichi; Okubo, Naoko; Nitta, Takashi; Ochi, Masami; Shimizu, Kazuo

    2005-01-01

    Insulation coating was added to the external pacemaker surface to prevent unnecessary electric current leakage to the periphery because the pulse generator body is used as an anode in unipolar pacing. However, a model without insulation coating has recently been used, so we studied the effects on muscle potential inhibition and muscle stimulation of pacemakers in unipolar pacing with different parts of the pacemaker body coated with insulation. Case comparisons were made for the following models: insulated except for the center of one side (33, group C), insulated except for the peripheral zone (10, group E), and noncoated models (11, group N). The muscle detection threshold voltage, muscle detection threshold pulse duration, muscle potential sensing threshold (MP), and lead resistance were measured. A comparison was made of the amount of energy (En) needed to reach the muscle stimulation threshold. For MP values, there was no significant statistical difference between group C and E, whereas a significant difference was present between group C and N and between group E and N. For En values, there was a significant difference between group C and E and between group C and N, but there was no significant difference between group E and N. The muscle potential sensing threshold dose not have a change in group E and much muscle stimulation energy is needed. The muscle potential sensing threshold was low in group N, requiring much muscle stimulation energy. Based on these results, it is usually not necessary to coat the pacemaker with insulation for unipolar pacing.

  10. Action potential wavelength restitution predicts alternans and arrhythmia in murine Scn5a+/− hearts

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Gareth D K; Guzadhur, Laila; Sabir, Ian N; Grace, Andrew A; Huang, Christopher L-H

    2013-01-01

    Reductions in cardiac action potential wavelength, and the consequent wavebreak, have been implicated in arrhythmogenesis. Tachyarrhythmias are more common in the Brugada syndrome, particularly following pharmacological challenge, previously modelled using Scn5a+/− murine hearts. Propagation latencies and action potential durations (APDs) from monophasic action potential recordings were used to assess wavelength changes with heart rate in Langendorff-perfused wild-type (WT) and Scn5a+/− hearts. Recordings were obtained from right (RV) and left (LV) ventricular, epicardial and endocardial surfaces during incremental pacing, before and following flecainide or quinidine challenge. Conduction velocities (θ′), action potential wavelengths (λ′= APD ×θ′), and their corresponding alternans depended non-linearly upon diastolic interval (DI). Maximum θ′ was lower in Scn5a+/− RV epicardium than endocardium. Flecainide further reduced θ′, accentuating this RV conduction block. Quinidine reduced maximum θ′ in WT and caused earlier conduction failure in the RV of both Scn5a+/− and WT. Use of recovery wavelengths (λ′0= DI ×θ′) rather than DI, provided novel λ restitution plots of λ′ against λ′0, which sum to a basic cycle distance permitting feedback analysis. λ′ restitution gradient better correlated with alternans magnitude than either APD or θ restitution gradient. The large differences in θ′ and APD restitution contrasted with minor differences in maximum λ′ between epi- and endocardia of untreated hearts, and quinidine-treated WT hearts. Strikingly, all regions and conditions converged to a common instability point, implying a conserved relationship. Flecainide or quinidine decreased the pacing rates at which this occurred, through reducing basic cycle distance, in the Scn5a+/− RV epicardium, directly predictive of its arrhythmic phenotype. PMID:23836691

  11. Observation of pressure stimulated voltages in rocks using an electric potential sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Aydin, A.; Prance, R. J.; Prance, H.; Harland, C. J.

    2009-09-21

    Recent interest in the electrical activity in rock and the use of electric field transients as candidates for earthquake precursors has led to studies of pressure stimulated currents in laboratory samples. In this paper, an electric field sensor is used to measure directly the voltages associated with these currents. Stress was applied as uniaxial compression to marble and granite at an approximately constant rate. In contrast with the small pressure stimulated currents previously measured, large voltage signals are reported. Polarity reversal of the signal was observed immediately before fracture for the marble, in agreement with previous pressure stimulated current studies.

  12. Anion-selective channelrhodopsin expressed in neuronal cell culture and in vivo in murine brain: Light-induced inhibition of generation of action potentials.

    PubMed

    Dolgikh, D A; Malyshev, A Yu; Salozhin, S V; Nekrasova, O V; Petrovskaya, L E; Roshchin, M V; Borodinova, A A; Feldman, T B; Balaban, P M; Kirpichnikov, M P; Ostrovsky, M A

    2015-01-01

    Anionic channelrhodopsin slow ChloC was expressed in the culture of nerve cells and in vivo in mouse brain. We demonstrated ability of slow ChloC to suppress effectively the activity of the neuron in response to the illumination with the visible light. It has been shown for a first time that slow ChloC works equally efficiently in both neuronal culture and in the whole brain being expressed in vivo. Thus, slow ChloC could be considered as an effective optogenetic tool capable in response to light stimulation to inhibit the generation of action potentials in the neuron.

  13. Seasonal variation in conduction velocity of action potentials in squid giant axons.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, J J; Bezanilla, F

    2000-10-01

    To determine whether the electrical properties of the squid giant axon are seasonally acclimated, action potentials, recorded at different temperatures, were compared between giant axons isolated from Loligo pealei caught in May, from relatively cold waters (approximately 10 degrees-12 degrees C), and in August, from relatively warm waters (approximately 20 degrees C). Parameters relating to the duration of the action potential (e.g., maximum rate of rise, maximum rate of fall, and duration at half-peak) did not change seasonally. The relationship between conduction velocity and temperature remained constant between seasons as well, in spite of the fact that May axons were significantly larger than August axons. When normalized to the fiber diameter, mean May conduction velocities were 83% of the August values at all temperatures tested, and analysis of the rise time of the action potential foot suggested that a change in the axoplasmic resistivity was responsible for this difference. Direct measurements of axoplasmic resistance further supported this hypothesis. Thus seasonal changes in the giant axon's size and resistivity are not consistent with compensatory thermal acclimation, but instead serve to maintain a constant relationship between conduction velocity and temperature.

  14. ER Stress-Mediated Signaling: Action Potential and Ca(2+) as Key Players.

    PubMed

    Bahar, Entaz; Kim, Hyongsuk; Yoon, Hyonok

    2016-01-01

    The proper functioning of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is crucial for multiple cellular activities and survival. Disturbances in the normal ER functions lead to the accumulation and aggregation of unfolded proteins, which initiates an adaptive response, the unfolded protein response (UPR), in order to regain normal ER functions. Failure to activate the adaptive response initiates the process of programmed cell death or apoptosis. Apoptosis plays an important role in cell elimination, which is essential for embryogenesis, development, and tissue homeostasis. Impaired apoptosis can lead to the development of various pathological conditions, such as neurodegenerative and autoimmune diseases, cancer, or acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Calcium (Ca(2+)) is one of the key regulators of cell survival and it can induce ER stress-mediated apoptosis in response to various conditions. Ca(2+) regulates cell death both at the early and late stages of apoptosis. Severe Ca(2+) dysregulation can promote cell death through apoptosis. Action potential, an electrical signal transmitted along the neurons and muscle fibers, is important for conveying information to, from, and within the brain. Upon the initiation of the action potential, increased levels of cytosolic Ca(2+) (depolarization) lead to the activation of the ER stress response involved in the initiation of apoptosis. In this review, we discuss the involvement of Ca(2+) and action potential in ER stress-mediated apoptosis. PMID:27649160

  15. ER Stress-Mediated Signaling: Action Potential and Ca2+ as Key Players

    PubMed Central

    Bahar, Entaz; Kim, Hyongsuk; Yoon, Hyonok

    2016-01-01

    The proper functioning of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is crucial for multiple cellular activities and survival. Disturbances in the normal ER functions lead to the accumulation and aggregation of unfolded proteins, which initiates an adaptive response, the unfolded protein response (UPR), in order to regain normal ER functions. Failure to activate the adaptive response initiates the process of programmed cell death or apoptosis. Apoptosis plays an important role in cell elimination, which is essential for embryogenesis, development, and tissue homeostasis. Impaired apoptosis can lead to the development of various pathological conditions, such as neurodegenerative and autoimmune diseases, cancer, or acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Calcium (Ca2+) is one of the key regulators of cell survival and it can induce ER stress-mediated apoptosis in response to various conditions. Ca2+ regulates cell death both at the early and late stages of apoptosis. Severe Ca2+ dysregulation can promote cell death through apoptosis. Action potential, an electrical signal transmitted along the neurons and muscle fibers, is important for conveying information to, from, and within the brain. Upon the initiation of the action potential, increased levels of cytosolic Ca2+ (depolarization) lead to the activation of the ER stress response involved in the initiation of apoptosis. In this review, we discuss the involvement of Ca2+ and action potential in ER stress-mediated apoptosis. PMID:27649160

  16. Effect of stimulation of the nucleus reticularis gigantocellularis on the membrane potential of cat lumbar motoneurons during sleep and wakefulness.

    PubMed

    Chase, M H; Morales, F R; Boxer, P A; Fung, S J; Soja, P J

    1986-10-29

    The present study was performed in order to determine the effect of electrical stimulation of the medullary nucleus reticularis gigantocellularis (NRGc) on the membrane potential of spinal cord motoneurons during sleep and wakefulness. Accordingly, intracellular recordings were obtained from lumbar motoneurons in unanesthetized normally respiring cats during naturally occurring states of wakefulness, quiet sleep and active sleep. Electrical stimuli applied to the NRGc evoked synaptic potentials which occurred at short latency (less than 10 ms) and did not exhibit consistent changes in their waveforms during any states of sleep or wakefulness. During wakefulness and quiet sleep, longer latency (greater than 20 ms) low-amplitude hyperpolarizing potentials occasionally followed NRGc stimulation. However, during active sleep, NRGc stimulation produced, in all motoneurons, relatively large hyperpolarizing potentials that were characterized by a mean amplitude of 3.5 +/- 0.4 mV (mean +/- S.E.M.), a mean latency-to-peak of 43.0 +/- 0.8 ms, and an average duration of 34.4 +/- 1.7 ms. These potentials were capable of blocking the generation of orthodromic spikes elicited by sciatic nerve stimulation. When anodal current or chloride was passed through the recording electrode, the hyperpolarizing potentials decreased in amplitude, and in some cases their polarity was reversed. These results indicate that the active sleep-specific hyperpolarizing potentials were inhibitory postsynaptic potentials. Thus, the NRGc possesses the capability of providing a postsynaptic inhibitory drive that is directed toward lumbar motoneurons which is dependent on the occurrence of the behavioral state of active sleep.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3779411

  17. Population synaptic potentials evoked in lumbar motoneurons following stimulation of the nucleus reticularis gigantocellularis during carbachol-induced atonia.

    PubMed

    Yamuy, J; Jiménez, I; Morales, F; Rudomin, P; Chase, M

    1994-03-14

    The effect of electrical stimulation of the medullary nucleus reticularis gigantocellularis (NRGc) on lumbar spinal cord motoneurons was studied in the decerebrate cat using sucrose-gap recordings from ventral roots. The NRGc was stimulated ipsi- and contralaterally before and during atonia elicited by the microinjection of carbachol into the pontine reticular formation. Prior to carbachol administration, the NRGc-induced response recorded from the sucrose-gap consisted of two consecutive excitatory population synaptic potentials followed by a long-lasting, small amplitude inhibitory population synaptic potential. Following carbachol injection, the same NRGc stimulus evoked a distinct, large amplitude inhibitory population synaptic potential, whereas the excitatory population synaptic potentials decreased in amplitude. In addition, after carbachol administration, the amplitude of the monosynaptic excitatory population synaptic potential, which was evoked by stimulation of group Ia afferents in hindlimb nerves, was reduced by 18 to 43%. When evoked at the peak of the NRGc-induced inhibitory response, this potential was further decreased in amplitude. Systemic strychnine administration (0.07-0.1 mg/kg, i.v.) blocked the NRGc-induced inhibitory population synaptic potential and promoted an increase in the amplitude of the excitatory population synaptic potentials induced by stimulation of the NRGc and group Ia afferents. These data indicate that during the state of carbachol-induced atonia, the NRGc effects on ipsi- and contralateral spinal cord motoneurons are predominantly inhibitory and that glycine is likely to be involved in this inhibitory process. These results support the hypothesis that the nucleus reticularis gigantocellularis is part of the system responsible for state-dependent somatomotor inhibition that occurs during active sleep. PMID:8205484

  18. Effect of sevoflurane concentration on visual evoked potentials with pattern stimulation in dogs

    PubMed Central

    ITO, Yosuke; MAEHARA, Seiya; ITOH, Yoshiki; HAYASHI, Miri; KUBO, Akira; ITAMI, Takaharu; ISHIZUKA, Tomohito; TAMURA, Jun; YAMASHITA, Kazuto

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of sevoflurane concentration on canine visual evoked potentials with pattern stimulation (P-VEPs). Six clinically normal laboratory-beagle dogs were used. The minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of sevoflurane was detected from all subjects by tail clamp method. The refractive power of the right eyes of all subjects was corrected to −2 diopters after skiascopy. For P-VEP recording, the recording and reference electrode were positioned at inion and nasion, respectively, and the earth electrode was positioned on the inner surface. To grasp the state of CNS suppression objectively, the bispectral index (BIS) value was used. The stimulus pattern size and distance for VEP recording were constant, 50.3 arc-min and 50 cm, respectively. P-VEPs and BIS values were recorded under sevoflurane in oxygen inhalational anesthesia at 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5 and 2.75 sevoflurane MAC. For analysis of P-VEP, the P100 implicit time and N75-P100 amplitude were estimated. P-VEPs were detected at 0.5 to 1.5 MAC in all dogs, and disappeared at 2.0 MAC in four dogs and at 2.5 and 2.75 MAC in one dog each. The BIS value decreased with increasing sevoflurane MAC, and burst suppression began to appear from 1.5 MAC. There was no significant change in P100 implicit time and N75-P100 amplitude with any concentration of sevoflurane. At concentrations around 1.5 MAC, which are used routinely to immobilize dogs, sevoflurane showed no effect on P-VEP. PMID:25373729

  19. The use of contact heat evoked potential stimulator (CHEPS) in magnetoencephalography for pain research

    PubMed Central

    Gopalakrishnan, Raghavan; Machado, Andre G.; Burgess, Richard C.; Mosher, John C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Contact heat evoked potentials (CHEP) is a thermal stimulus modality used in pain research. We examine a commercial CHEP stimulator (CHEPS) that is designed to work in an fMRI environment, but poorly understood in the MEG environment. The CHEPS attains target temperatures rapidly using sophisticated control signals that unfortunately induce artifacts in the MEG. In this paper, we summarize our experiences using the CHEPS in MEG to study pain using an experimental paradigm, and propose a novel method for managing its artifact. New method We introduce a novel damped sinusoid modeling (DSM) technique to remove the CHEPS artifact based on estimates of the underlying sinusoids and damping factors. We show comparisons to signal space projection (SSP) and temporal signal space separation (tSSS) methods. Results The CHEPS artifact is highly dynamic, yet deterministic, switching rapidly from one frequency to another, with different spatial components. The galvanic connection between the subject and the CHEPS probe alters its performance, making pre-characterization difficult. Comparison with existing methods SSP methods failed to remove the artifact completely. TSSS performed better than SSP; however, tSSS requires the use of a multipolar head model that decreases the dimensionality and possibly the information content of the data. In contrast, DSM offers a strictly temporal modeling approach in which the artifact is estimated as a sum of damped sinusoids which is subtracted from the data. Conclusion Though the CHEPS increases the noise floor and introduces artifacts to the data, we believe the device can be successfully used in MEG if appropriate artifact removal techniques are followed. PMID:23994044

  20. Brain stimulation: Neuromodulation as a potential treatment for motor recovery following traumatic brain injury☆

    PubMed Central

    Clayton, E.; Kinley-Cooper, S.K.; Weber, R.A.; Adkins, D.L.

    2016-01-01

    There is growing evidence that electrical and magnetic brain stimulation can improve motor function and motor learning following brain damage. Rodent and primate studies have strongly demonstrated that combining cortical stimulation (CS) with skilled motor rehabilitative training enhances functional motor recovery following stroke. Brain stimulation following traumatic brain injury (TBI) is less well studied, but early pre-clinical and human pilot studies suggest that it is a promising treatment for TBI-induced motor impairments as well. This review will first discuss the evidence supporting brain stimulation efficacy derived from the stroke research field as proof of principle and then will review the few studies exploring neuromodulation in experimental TBI studies. PMID:26855256

  1. The electrogenic Na+/HCO3− cotransport modulates resting membrane potential and action potential duration in cat ventricular myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Villa-Abrille, María C; Petroff, Martín G Vila; Aiello, Ernesto A

    2007-01-01

    Perforated whole-cell configuration of patch clamp was used to determine the contribution of the electrogenic Na+/HCO3− cotransport (NBC) on the shape of the action potential in cat ventricular myocytes. Switching from Hepes to HCO3− buffer at constant extracellular pH (pHo) hyperpolarized resting membrane potential (RMP) by 2.67 ± 0.42 mV (n = 9, P < 0.05). The duration of action potential measured at 50% of repolarization time (APD50) was 35.8 ± 6.8% shorter in the presence of HCO3− than in its absence (n = 9, P < 0.05). The anion blocker SITS prevented and reversed the HCO3−-induced hyperpolarization and shortening of APD. In addition, no HCO3−-induced hyperpolarization and APD shortening was observed in the absence of extracellular Na+. Quasi-steady-state currents were evoked by 8 s duration voltage-clamped ramps ranging from −130 to +30 mV. A novel component of SITS-sensitive current was observed in the presence of HCO3−. The HCO3−-sensitive current reversed at −87 ± 5 mV (n = 7), a value close to the expected reversal potential of an electrogenic Na+/HCO3− cotransport with a HCO3−:Na+ stoichiometry ratio of 2: 1. The above results allow us to conclude that the cardiac electrogenic Na+/HCO3− cotransport has a relevant influence on RMP and APD of cat ventricular cells. PMID:17138608

  2. Carbon nanotube multi-electrode array chips for noninvasive real-time measurement of dopamine, action potentials, and postsynaptic potentials.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Ikuro; Fukuda, Mao; Shirakawa, Keiichi; Jiko, Hideyasu; Gotoh, Masao

    2013-11-15

    Multi-electrode arrays (MEAs) can be used for noninvasive, real-time, and long-term recording of electrophysiological activity and changes in the extracellular chemical microenvironment. Neural network organization, neuronal excitability, synaptic and phenotypic plasticity, and drug responses may be monitored by MEAs, but it is still difficult to measure presynaptic activity, such as neurotransmitter release, from the presynaptic bouton. In this study, we describe the development of planar carbon nanotube (CNT)-MEA chips that can measure both the release of the neurotransmitter dopamine as well as electrophysiological responses such as field postsynaptic potentials (fPSPs) and action potentials (APs). These CNT-MEA chips were fabricated by electroplating the indium-tin oxide (ITO) microelectrode surfaces. The CNT-plated ITO electrode exhibited electrochemical response, having much higher current density compared with the bare ITO electrode. Chronoamperometric measurements using these CNT-MEA chips detected dopamine at nanomolar concentrations. By placing mouse striatal brain slices on the CNT-MEA chip, we successfully measured synaptic dopamine release from spontaneous firings with a high S/N ratio of 62. Furthermore, APs and fPSPs were measured from cultured hippocampal neurons and slices with high temporal resolution and a 100-fold greater S/N ratio. Our CNT-MEA chips made it possible to measure neurotransmitter dopamine (presynaptic activities), postsynaptic potentials, and action potentials, which have a central role in information processing in the neuronal network. CNT-MEA chips could prove useful for in vitro studies of stem cell differentiation, drug screening and toxicity, synaptic plasticity, and pathogenic processes involved in epilepsy, stroke, and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:23774164

  3. Potential of rapid adjustment of brief interceptive action using predicted information.

    PubMed

    Ikudome, Sachi; Nakamoto, Hiroki; Yotani, Kengo; Unenaka, Satoshi; Mori, Shiro

    2015-07-01

    Interceptive actions, such as hitting a ball in baseball or tennis, feature a moving target whose parameters (i.e., velocity or trajectory) differ across trials. This means that players are required to make rapid trial-by-trial adjustments. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a brief interceptive action could be adjusted using predicted sensory consequence of movement (pSCM) information, even under severe time constraints where the participants could not adjust their movement using only visual feedback. Participants performed an interceptive action for targets with two different velocities with different occurrence probabilities (20%, 50%, and 80%). Prior to movement onset, we applied transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to the supplementary motor area (SMA), as TMS of the SMA is known to disrupt pSCM activity. We hypothesized that if pSCM information were used to adjust the motor parameters of a brief interception, then TMS would significantly increase the constant temporal error (i.e., the difference between the sum of reaction time and movement time and the total target visible time) for a target velocity with a low probability (20%). This hypothesis is based on the previous findings that the pSCM plays an important role in the adjustment of relatively brief interception. We found that while interceptions that lasted about 250 ms after movement onset were unaffected, interceptions that lasted about 350 ms after movement onset could be influenced by TMS. However, TMS interfered with performance provided that the delivery of the pulse occurred 100 ms before movement onset. This finding suggests that pSCM information that is used for a rapid adjustment is generated only in that specific time interval. PMID:26010202

  4. Potential of rapid adjustment of brief interceptive action using predicted information.

    PubMed

    Ikudome, Sachi; Nakamoto, Hiroki; Yotani, Kengo; Unenaka, Satoshi; Mori, Shiro

    2015-07-01

    Interceptive actions, such as hitting a ball in baseball or tennis, feature a moving target whose parameters (i.e., velocity or trajectory) differ across trials. This means that players are required to make rapid trial-by-trial adjustments. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a brief interceptive action could be adjusted using predicted sensory consequence of movement (pSCM) information, even under severe time constraints where the participants could not adjust their movement using only visual feedback. Participants performed an interceptive action for targets with two different velocities with different occurrence probabilities (20%, 50%, and 80%). Prior to movement onset, we applied transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to the supplementary motor area (SMA), as TMS of the SMA is known to disrupt pSCM activity. We hypothesized that if pSCM information were used to adjust the motor parameters of a brief interception, then TMS would significantly increase the constant temporal error (i.e., the difference between the sum of reaction time and movement time and the total target visible time) for a target velocity with a low probability (20%). This hypothesis is based on the previous findings that the pSCM plays an important role in the adjustment of relatively brief interception. We found that while interceptions that lasted about 250 ms after movement onset were unaffected, interceptions that lasted about 350 ms after movement onset could be influenced by TMS. However, TMS interfered with performance provided that the delivery of the pulse occurred 100 ms before movement onset. This finding suggests that pSCM information that is used for a rapid adjustment is generated only in that specific time interval.

  5. [Transcranial magnetic electro-stimulation with alternate action on brain hemispheres in the correction of cerebral disturbances in children with diabetes mellitus type 1].

    PubMed

    Filina, N Iu; Bolotova, N V; Raĭgorodskiĭ, Iu M; Nikolaeva, N V

    2012-01-01

    Correction of psychoemotional and autonomic disturbances in children 7-17 years old with diabetes mellitus type 1 was conducted using transcranial magnetic electro-stimulation with alternate action on brain hemispheres (main group, 42 patients). The method includes the combined action of magnetic field pulses and series of electric impulses; magnetic and electric stimulation were performed synchronously - at first, on one brain hemisphere, then on another hemisphere with alternation frequency 9.5-10.5 Hz. A comparison group consisted of 44 patients with diabetes mellitus type 1 who received physiotherapeutic treatment as a combination of transcranial magnetic therapy and electro-stimulation with simultaneous action on both brain hemispheres. Treatment duration was 10 sessions. Treatment efficacy was assessed by the decrease in frequency and intensity of complaints, improvement of patient's health status measured (a scale for assessment of activity, health perception and mood) and improvement of the status of the autonomic nervous system (Vein's questionnaire), mental sphere (the Luscher color test) and cognitive traits (The Concentrated Attention Test of the Toulouse-Pierron Factorial Battery). The status of the autonomic nervous system was evaluated before and after the treatment using cardiointervalography. Brain bioelectrical activity was assessed using encephalography. Significant reduction of autonomic, psychoemotional and cognitive disturbances, normalization of brain bioelectrical activity due to the α-rhythm organization and arrhythmia removal were identified in the main group after the treatment. No adverse effects of this physiotherapeutic treatment was found.

  6. Modeling transcranial magnetic stimulation from the induced electric fields to the membrane potentials along tractography-based white matter fiber tracts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Geeter, Nele; Dupré, Luc; Crevecoeur, Guillaume

    2016-04-01

    Objective. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a promising non-invasive tool for modulating the brain activity. Despite the widespread therapeutic and diagnostic use of TMS in neurology and psychiatry, its observed response remains hard to predict, limiting its further development and applications. Although the stimulation intensity is always maximum at the cortical surface near the coil, experiments reveal that TMS can affect deeper brain regions as well. Approach. The explanation of this spread might be found in the white matter fiber tracts, connecting cortical and subcortical structures. When applying an electric field on neurons, their membrane potential is altered. If this change is significant, more likely near the TMS coil, action potentials might be initiated and propagated along the fiber tracts towards deeper regions. In order to understand and apply TMS more effectively, it is important to capture and account for this interaction as accurately as possible. Therefore, we compute, next to the induced electric fields in the brain, the spatial distribution of the membrane potentials along the fiber tracts and its temporal dynamics. Main results. This paper introduces a computational TMS model in which electromagnetism and neurophysiology are combined. Realistic geometry and tissue anisotropy are included using magnetic resonance imaging and targeted white matter fiber tracts are traced using tractography based on diffusion tensor imaging. The position and orientation of the coil can directly be retrieved from the neuronavigation system. Incorporating these features warrants both patient- and case-specific results. Significance. The presented model gives insight in the activity propagation through the brain and can therefore explain the observed clinical responses to TMS and their inter- and/or intra-subject variability. We aspire to advance towards an accurate, flexible and personalized TMS model that helps to understand stimulation in the connected

  7. Potential for Microbial Stimulation in Deep Vadose Zone Sediments by Gas-Phase Nutrients

    SciTech Connect

    Li, S.W.; Plymale, A. E.; Brockman, F.J.

    2006-04-05

    Viable microbial populations are low, typically 10{sup 4} cells per gram, in deep vadose zones in arid climates. There is evidence that microbial distribution in these environments is patchy. In addition, infiltration or injection of nutrient-laden water has the potential to spread and drive contaminants downward to the saturated zone. For these reasons, there are uncertainties regarding the feasibility of bioremediation of recalcitrant contaminants in deep vadose zones. The objectives of this study were to investigate the occurrence of denitrifying activity and gaseous carbon-utilizing activity in arid-climate deep vadose zone sediments contaminated with, and/or affected by past exposure to, carbon tetrachloride (CT). These metabolisms are known to degrade CT and/or its breakdown product chloroform under anoxic conditions. A second objective was to determine if CT would be degraded in these sediments under unsaturated, bulk-phase aerobic incubation conditions. Both denitrifier population (determined by MPN) and microbial heterotrophic activity (measured by mineralization of 14-C labeled glucose and acetate) were relatively low and the sediments with greater in situ moisture (10-21% versus 2-7%) tended to have higher activities. When sediments were amended with gaseous nutrients (nitrous oxide and triethyl/tributyl phosphate) and gaseous C sources (a mixture of methane, ethane, propylene, propane, and butane) and incubated for 6 months, approximately 50% of the samples showed removal of one or more gaseous C sources, with butane most commonly used (44% of samples), followed by propylene (42%), propane (31%), ethane (22%), and methane (4%). Gaseous N and gaseous P did not stimulate removal of gaseous C substrates compared to no addition of N and P. CT and gaseous C sources were spiked into the sediments that removed gaseous C sources to determine if hydrocarbon-degraders have the potential to degrade CT under unsaturated conditions. In summary, gaseous C sources

  8. ACTION-SPACE CLUSTERING OF TIDAL STREAMS TO INFER THE GALACTIC POTENTIAL

    SciTech Connect

    Sanderson, Robyn E.; Helmi, Amina; Hogg, David W.

    2015-03-10

    We present a new method for constraining the Milky Way halo gravitational potential by simultaneously fitting multiple tidal streams. This method requires three-dimensional positions and velocities for all stars to be fit, but does not require identification of any specific stream or determination of stream membership for any star. We exploit the principle that the action distribution of stream stars is most clustered when the potential used to calculate the actions is closest to the true potential. Clustering is quantified with the Kullback-Leibler Divergence (KLD), which also provides conditional uncertainties for our parameter estimates. We show, for toy Gaia-like data in a spherical isochrone potential, that maximizing the KLD of the action distribution relative to a smoother distribution recovers the input potential. The precision depends on the observational errors and number of streams; using K III giants as tracers, we measure the enclosed mass at the average radius of the sample stars accurate to 3% and precise to 20%-40%. Recovery of the scale radius is precise to 25%, biased 50% high by the small galactocentric distance range of stars in our mock sample (1-25 kpc, or about three scale radii, with mean 6.5 kpc). 20-25 streams with at least 100 stars each are required for a stable confidence interval. With radial velocities (RVs) to 100 kpc, all parameters are determined with ∼10% accuracy and 20% precision (1.3% accuracy for the enclosed mass), underlining the need to complete the RV catalog for faint halo stars observed by Gaia.

  9. Antibacterial free fatty acids: activities, mechanisms of action and biotechnological potential.

    PubMed

    Desbois, Andrew P; Smith, Valerie J

    2010-02-01

    Amongst the diverse and potent biological activities of free fatty acids (FFAs) is the ability to kill or inhibit the growth of bacteria. The antibacterial properties of FFAs are used by many organisms to defend against parasitic or pathogenic bacteria. Whilst their antibacterial mode of action is still poorly understood, the prime target of FFA action is the cell membrane, where FFAs disrupt the electron transport chain and oxidative phosphorylation. Besides interfering with cellular energy production, FFA action may also result from the inhibition of enzyme activity, impairment of nutrient uptake, generation of peroxidation and auto-oxidation degradation products or direct lysis of bacterial cells. Their broad spectrum of activity, non-specific mode of action and safety makes them attractive as antibacterial agents for various applications in medicine, agriculture and food preservation, especially where the use of conventional antibiotics is undesirable or prohibited. Moreover, the evolution of inducible FFA-resistant phenotypes is less problematic than with conventional antibiotics. The potential for commercial or biomedical exploitation of antibacterial FFAs, especially for those from natural sources, is discussed.

  10. Monophasic action potential recordings during acute changes in ventricular loading induced by the Valsalva manoeuvre.

    PubMed Central

    Taggart, P; Sutton, P; John, R; Lab, M; Swanton, H

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--The strong association between ventricular arrhythmia and ventricular dysfunction is unexplained. This study was designed to investigate a mechanism by which a change in ventricular loading could alter the time course of repolarisation and hence refractoriness. A possible mechanism may be a direct effect of an altered pattern of contraction on ventricular repolarisation and hence refractoriness. This relation has been termed contraction-excitation feedback or mechano-electric feedback. METHODS--Monophasic action potentials were recorded from the left ventricular endocardium as a measure of the time course of local repolarisation. The Valsalva manoeuvre was used to change ventricular loading by increasing the intrathoracic pressure and impeding venous return, and hence reducing ventricular pressure and volume (ventricular unloading). PATIENTS--23 patients undergoing routine cardiac catheterisation procedures: seven with no angiographic evidence of abnormal wall motion or history of myocardial infarction (normal), five with a history of myocardial infarction but with normal wall motion, and 10 with angiographic evidence of abnormal wall motion--with or without previous infarction. One patient was a transplant recipient and was analysed separately. SETTING--Tertiary referral centre for cardiology. RESULTS--In patients with normal ventricles during the unloading phase of the Valsalva manoeuvre (mean (SD)) monophasic action potential duration shortened from 311 (47) ms to 295 (47) ms (p less than 0.001). After release of the forced expiration as venous return was restored the monophasic action potential duration lengthened from 285 (44) ms to 304 (44) ms (p less than 0.0001). In the group with evidence of abnormal wall motion the direction of change of action potential duration during the strain phase was normal in 7/21 observations, abnormal in 6/21, and showed no clear change in 8/21. During the release phase 11/20 observations were normal, five abnormal

  11. Serotonin spillover onto the axon initial segment of motoneurons induces central fatigue by inhibiting action potential initiation

    PubMed Central

    Cotel, Florence; Exley, Richard; Cragg, Stephanie J.; Perrier, Jean-François

    2013-01-01

    Motor fatigue induced by physical activity is an everyday experience characterized by a decreased capacity to generate motor force. Factors in both muscles and the central nervous system are involved. The central component of fatigue modulates the ability of motoneurons to activate muscle adequately independently of the muscle physiology. Indirect evidence indicates that central fatigue is caused by serotonin (5-HT), but the cellular mechanisms are unknown. In a slice preparation from the spinal cord of the adult turtle, we found that prolonged stimulation of the raphe-spinal pathway—as during motor exercise—activated 5-HT1A receptors that decreased motoneuronal excitability. Electrophysiological tests combined with pharmacology showed that focal activation of 5-HT1A receptors at the axon initial segment (AIS), but not on other motoneuronal compartments, inhibited the action potential initiation by modulating a Na+ current. Immunohistochemical staining against 5-HT revealed a high-density innervation of 5-HT terminals on the somatodendritic membrane and a complete absence on the AIS. This observation raised the hypothesis that a 5-HT spillover activates receptors at this latter compartment. We tested it by measuring the level of extracellular 5-HT with cyclic voltammetry and found that prolonged stimulations of the raphe-spinal pathway increased the level of 5-HT to a concentration sufficient to activate 5-HT1A receptors. Together our results demonstrate that prolonged release of 5-HT during motor activity spills over from its release sites to the AIS of motoneurons. Here, activated 5-HT1A receptors inhibit firing and, thereby, muscle contraction. Hence, this is a cellular mechanism for central fatigue. PMID:23487756

  12. Surface Potential Control on Thin Oxide Films with Respect to Electron Stimulated Desorption Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernheim, Marc; Rousse, Gilles

    1995-09-01

    These experiments deal with the study of desorption of negative ions stimulated by low energy electron collisions on insulating surfaces covered with various adsorbates. For such investigation a careful control of the sample surface potential is required to set the incident electron energy accurately as well as to identify the desorbed species by mass spectrometry. Most of the reported experiments concern this surface potential control. We show that, for very thin SiO2 films thermally grown on silicon substrates, a tunnel conduction might set the surface potential accurately. This assertion mainly relies on recording the intensity of electrons transmitted through thin oxides as well as the intensity of backscattered and secondary electrons re-emitted from the surface. A direct comparison of the O^- ion energy distributions confirms the correct control of the surface potential for a large range of incident electron energies. In such condition we noticed that the O^- desorption yields just swiftly varied with incident electron energy. In particular no modification could be detected as the incident electron energy passed the various Auger excitation levels. The discrepancy between this last result and the published data is discussed in the last part of this paper. Des collisions électroniques sur des surfaces peuvent provoquer une éjection d'ions négatifs formés à partir des molécules adsorbées suivant un processus résonnant à très basse énergie. Pour étendre ces études expérimentales aux surfaces isolantes, un contrôle précis du potentiel superficiel devient indispensable tant pour fixer l'énergie finale des électrons sur la surface que pour effectuer la spectrométrie des ions désorbés. L'examen de surfaces de silice en couche mince montre comment une conduction tunnel intervient pour fixer le potentiel des surfaces examinées. Ces travaux expérimentaux effectués dans une configuration de miroir électrostatique reposent principalement sur l

  13. Potentiation of antimalarial drug action by chlorpheniramine against multidrug-resistant Plasmodium falciparum in vitro.

    PubMed

    Nakornchai, Sunan; Konthiang, Phattanapong

    2006-09-01

    Chlorpheniramine, a histamine H1 receptor antagonist, was assayed for in vitro antimalarial activity against multidrug-resistant Plasmodium falciparum K1 strain and chloroquine-resistant P. falciparum T9/94 clone, by measuring the 3H-hypoxanthine incorporation. Chlorphenirame inhibited P. falciparum K1 and T9/94 growth with IC50 values of 136.0+/-40.2 microM and 102.0+/-22.6 microM respectively. A combination of antimalarial drug and chlorpheniramine was tested against resistant P. falciparum in vitro. Isobologram analysis showed that chlorpheniramine exerts marked synergistic action on chloroquine against P. falciparum K1 and T9/94. Chlorpheniramine also potentiated antimalarial action of mefloquine, quinine or pyronaridine against both of the resistant strains of P. falciparum. However, chlorpheniramine antagonism with artesunate was obtained in both P. falciparum K1 and T9/94. The results in this study indicate that antihistaminic drugs may be promising candidates for potentiating antimalarial drug action against drug resistant malarial parasites.

  14. Effects of calcium channel antagonists on action potential conduction and transmitter release in the guinea-pig vas deferens.

    PubMed Central

    Beattie, D. T.; Cunnane, T. C.; Muir, T. C.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of the Ca2+ channel antagonists amlodipine, cobalt, diltiazem, nifedipine and verapamil and the local anaesthetic lignocaine were investigated on action potential conduction in and on evoked transmitter release from sympathetic nerves in the guinea-pig isolated vas deferens. Transmitter release was investigated by measurement of evoked (trains of pulses at 1 and 2 Hz, 0.1-0.5 ms supramaximal voltage) excitatory junction potentials (e.j.ps) using microelectrodes; tension was recorded simultaneously; tritium [3H] overflow from vasa preincubated (37 degrees C, 30 min) in Krebs solution containing either [3H]-noradrenaline (NA, 25 microCi ml-1, 2 X 10(-6) M NA) or [3H]-adenosine (50 microCi ml-1, 1 X 10(-6) M adenosine). Amlodipine (0.5-2 X 10(-4) M), verapamil (0.5-2 X 10(-4) M), diltiazem (1-8 X 10(-4) M), lignocaine (0.1-2 X 10(-3) M) and cobalt (2-6 X 10(-2) M) in descending order of potency, but not nifedipine (1-5 X 10(-3) M), increased the latency and inhibited, then abolished, the amplitude and number of action potentials in a concentration-dependent manner. Amlodipine (0.5-1 X 10(-4) M), verapamil (1-2 X 10(-4) M), diltiazem (1-5 X 10(-4) M) and cobalt (1 X 10(-3) M), in descending order of potency, but not nifedipine (5 X 10(-4) M), inhibited then abolished evoked e.j.ps in a concentration-dependent manner. Cobalt inhibited e.j.ps at a lower concentration than that (2-6 X 10(-2) M) required to block action potential conduction. In unstimulated tissues, the resting [3H] overflow following preincubation with [3H]-NA consisted largely of 4-hydroxy 3-methoxymandelic acid (VMA), 4-hydroxy 3-methoxy phenylglycol (MOPEG), 3,4 dihydroxyphenylglycol (DOPEG) and NA; stimulated tissues (300 pulses at 20 Hz, 0.5 ms supramaximal voltage) released mainly NA. Verapamil (0.1-1 X 10(-4) M), amlodipine (0.05-1 X 10(-4) M) and nifedipine (1-5 X 10(-4) M), but not cobalt (2 X 10(-3) M), increased, significantly, the resting overflow of 3H comprising mainly DOPEG

  15. Xenin-25 Potentiates Glucose-dependent Insulinotropic Polypeptide Action via a Novel Cholinergic Relay Mechanism*

    PubMed Central

    Wice, Burton M.; Wang, Songyan; Crimmins, Dan L.; Diggs-Andrews, Kelly A.; Althage, Matthew C.; Ford, Eric L.; Tran, Hung; Ohlendorf, Matthew; Griest, Terry A.; Wang, Qiuling; Fisher, Simon J.; Ladenson, Jack H.; Polonsky, Kenneth S.

    2010-01-01

    The intestinal peptides GLP-1 and GIP potentiate glucose-mediated insulin release. Agents that increase GLP-1 action are effective therapies in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). However, GIP action is blunted in T2DM, and GIP-based therapies have not been developed. Thus, it is important to increase our understanding of the mechanisms of GIP action. We developed mice lacking GIP-producing K cells. Like humans with T2DM, “GIP/DT” animals exhibited a normal insulin secretory response to exogenous GLP-1 but a blunted response to GIP. Pharmacologic doses of xenin-25, another peptide produced by K cells, restored the GIP-mediated insulin secretory response and reduced hyperglycemia in GIP/DT mice. Xenin-25 alone had no effect. Studies with islets, insulin-producing cell lines, and perfused pancreata indicated xenin-25 does not enhance GIP-mediated insulin release by acting directly on the β-cell. The in vivo effects of xenin-25 to potentiate insulin release were inhibited by atropine sulfate and atropine methyl bromide but not by hexamethonium. Consistent with this, carbachol potentiated GIP-mediated insulin release from in situ perfused pancreata of GIP/DT mice. In vivo, xenin-25 did not activate c-fos expression in the hind brain or paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus indicating that central nervous system activation is not required. These data suggest that xenin-25 potentiates GIP-mediated insulin release by activating non-ganglionic cholinergic neurons that innervate the islets, presumably part of an enteric-neuronal-pancreatic pathway. Xenin-25, or molecules that increase acetylcholine receptor signaling in β-cells, may represent a novel approach to overcome GIP resistance and therefore treat humans with T2DM. PMID:20421298

  16. Xenin-25 potentiates glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide action via a novel cholinergic relay mechanism.

    PubMed

    Wice, Burton M; Wang, Songyan; Crimmins, Dan L; Diggs-Andrews, Kelly A; Althage, Matthew C; Ford, Eric L; Tran, Hung; Ohlendorf, Matthew; Griest, Terry A; Wang, Qiuling; Fisher, Simon J; Ladenson, Jack H; Polonsky, Kenneth S

    2010-06-25

    The intestinal peptides GLP-1 and GIP potentiate glucose-mediated insulin release. Agents that increase GLP-1 action are effective therapies in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). However, GIP action is blunted in T2DM, and GIP-based therapies have not been developed. Thus, it is important to increase our understanding of the mechanisms of GIP action. We developed mice lacking GIP-producing K cells. Like humans with T2DM, "GIP/DT" animals exhibited a normal insulin secretory response to exogenous GLP-1 but a blunted response to GIP. Pharmacologic doses of xenin-25, another peptide produced by K cells, restored the GIP-mediated insulin secretory response and reduced hyperglycemia in GIP/DT mice. Xenin-25 alone had no effect. Studies with islets, insulin-producing cell lines, and perfused pancreata indicated xenin-25 does not enhance GIP-mediated insulin release by acting directly on the beta-cell. The in vivo effects of xenin-25 to potentiate insulin release were inhibited by atropine sulfate and atropine methyl bromide but not by hexamethonium. Consistent with this, carbachol potentiated GIP-mediated insulin release from in situ perfused pancreata of GIP/DT mice. In vivo, xenin-25 did not activate c-fos expression in the hind brain or paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus indicating that central nervous system activation is not required. These data suggest that xenin-25 potentiates GIP-mediated insulin release by activating non-ganglionic cholinergic neurons that innervate the islets, presumably part of an enteric-neuronal-pancreatic pathway. Xenin-25, or molecules that increase acetylcholine receptor signaling in beta-cells, may represent a novel approach to overcome GIP resistance and therefore treat humans with T2DM. PMID:20421298

  17. Phasic changes in intracellular pH during action potentials of sheep Purkinje fibres.

    PubMed

    Pressler, M L

    1988-01-01

    Regulation of intracellular pH (pHi) and the relationship between H+ and Ca2+ may vary during activity. Ion-selective microelectrodes were used to record pHi during action potentials of sheep Purkinje fibres prolonged by low temperature (21 degrees C) and elevated CO2 content. Intracellular pH also was measured during changes in extracellular calcium concentration, [Ca2+]o. Cytosolic alkalinization (peak pHi change, 0.03-0.05) was observed during the long action-potential plateau and transient acidification (0.01-0.02 units) upon repolarization. Potassium-induced depolarization to plateau potentials (i.e. to -15 +/- 2 mV) simulated the peak magnitude of the alkalinization. However, compensation for the alkalinization occurred at a faster rate during the action potential (8.9 +/- 4.3 nM/min) than during K+ depolarization (1.2 +/- 0.5 nM/min). In comparison, the cytoplasm acidified in resting fibres (0.06-0.07 log units) during changes of [Ca2+]o thought to increase intracellular calcium concentration. Alterations of pHi were translated into changes of proton concentration ([H+]i). Ten- to twenty-fold elevation of [Ca2+]o evoked a comparable change in [H+]i (mean increase, 5.7 nM) but oppositely directed from that during the plateau (mean decrease, 8.8 nM). The findings in resting fibres seem consistent with displacement of bound protons by Ca2+. In contrast, the initial change in pHi during the plateau is proposed to be consequent to Ca2+-release from sarcoplasmic reticulum and/or phosphocreatine hydrolysis coupled to ATP regeneration.

  18. Different Stimulation Frequencies Alter Synchronous Fluctuations in Motor Evoked Potential Amplitude of Intrinsic Hand Muscles-a TMS Study.

    PubMed

    Sale, Martin V; Rogasch, Nigel C; Nordstrom, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    The amplitude of motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) elicited with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) varies from trial-to-trial. Synchronous oscillations in cortical neuronal excitability contribute to this variability, however it is not known how different frequencies of stimulation influence MEP variability, and whether these oscillations are rhythmic or aperiodic. We stimulated the motor cortex with TMS at different regular (i.e., rhythmic) rates, and compared this with pseudo-random (aperiodic) timing. In 18 subjects, TMS was applied at three regular frequencies (0.05 Hz, 0.2 Hz, 1 Hz) and one aperiodic frequency (mean 0.2 Hz). MEPs (n = 50) were recorded from three intrinsic hand muscles of the left hand with different functional and anatomical relations. MEP amplitude correlation was highest for the functionally related muscle pair, less for the anatomically related muscle pair and least for the functionally- and anatomically-unrelated muscle pair. MEP correlations were greatest with 1 Hz, and least for stimulation at 0.05 Hz. Corticospinal neuron synchrony is higher with shorter TMS intervals. Further, corticospinal neuron synchrony is similar irrespective of whether the stimulation is periodic or aperiodic. These findings suggest TMS frequency is a crucial consideration for studies using TMS to probe correlated activity between muscle pairs.

  19. Synergistic action of the benzene metabolite hydroquinone on myelopoietic stimulating activity of granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Irons, R D; Stillman, W S; Colagiovanni, D B; Henry, V A

    1992-01-01

    The effects of in vitro pretreatment with benzene metabolites on colony-forming response of murine bone marrow cells stimulated with recombinant granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rGM-CSF) were examined. Pretreatment with hydroquinone (HQ) at concentrations ranging from picomolar to micromolar for 30 min resulted in a 1.5- to 4.6-fold enhancement in colonies formed in response to rGM-CSF that was due to an increase in granulocyte/macrophage colonies. The synergism equaled or exceeded that reported for the effects of interleukin 1, interleukin 3, or interleukin 6 with GM-CSF. Optimal enhancement was obtained with 1 microM HQ and was largely independent of the concentration of rGM-CSF. Pretreatment with other authentic benzene metabolites, phenol and catechol, and the putative metabolite trans, trans-muconaldehyde did not enhance growth factor response. Coadministration of phenol and HQ did not enhance the maximal rGM-CSF response obtained with HQ alone but shifted the optimal concentration to 100 pM. Synergism between HQ and rGM-CSF was observed with nonadherent bone marrow cells and lineage-depleted bone marrow cells, suggesting an intrinsic effect on recruitment of myeloid progenitor cells not normally responsive to rGM-CSF. Alterations in differentiation in a myeloid progenitor cell population may be of relevance in the pathogenesis of acute myelogenous leukemia secondary to drug or chemical exposure. PMID:1570288

  20. Synergistic action of the benzene metabolite hydroquinone on myelopoietic stimulating activity of granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irons, R. D.; Stillman, W. S.; Colagiovanni, D. B.; Henry, V. A.; Clarkson, T. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    The effects of in vitro pretreatment with benzene metabolites on colony-forming response of murine bone marrow cells stimulated with recombinant granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rGM-CSF) were examined. Pretreatment with hydroquinone (HQ) at concentrations ranging from picomolar to micromolar for 30 min resulted in a 1.5- to 4.6-fold enhancement in colonies formed in response to rGM-CSF that was due to an increase in granulocyte/macrophage colonies. The synergism equaled or exceeded that reported for the effects of interleukin 1, interleukin 3, or interleukin 6 with GM-CSF. Optimal enhancement was obtained with 1 microM HQ and was largely independent of the concentration of rGM-CSF. Pretreatment with other authentic benzene metabolites, phenol and catechol, and the putative metabolite trans, trans-muconaldehyde did not enhance growth factor response. Coadministration of phenol and HQ did not enhance the maximal rGM-CSF response obtained with HQ alone but shifted the optimal concentration to 100 pM. Synergism between HQ and rGM-CSF was observed with nonadherent bone marrow cells and lineage-depleted bone marrow cells, suggesting an intrinsic effect on recruitment of myeloid progenitor cells not normally responsive to rGM-CSF. Alterations in differentiation in a myeloid progenitor cell population may be of relevance in the pathogenesis of acute myelogenous leukemia secondary to drug or chemical exposure.

  1. Recording and analysis of electrically evoked compound action potentials (ECAPs) with MED-EL cochlear implants and different artifact reduction strategies in Matlab.

    PubMed

    Bahmer, Andreas; Peter, Otto; Baumann, Uwe

    2010-08-15

    Electrically evoked compound action potentials (ECAPs) are used in auditory research to evaluate the response of the auditory nerve to electrical stimulation. Animal preparations are typically used for the recording. With the introduction of a new generation of cochlear implants, however it is possible to record the response of the auditory nerve to electrical stimulation in humans as well, which is used in the clinic to test whether the implant works properly and whether the auditory nerve is responsive. Currently, ECAPs are used to estimate thresholds for speech processor programs. In addition, ECAPs recordings allow new research to be addressed, e.g., to evaluate enhanced electrical stimulation patterns. Research platforms are required to test user-defined stimuli and algorithms for the ECAPs analysis. Clinical fitting software that records ECAPs is not flexible enough for this purpose. To enable a larger group of scientists to pursue research in this field, we introduce a flexible setup that allows to change stimulation and recording parameters. ECAP recording and analysis software was developed in Matlab (The Mathworks, Inc.) for standard PC, using a National instruments (PCI-6533, National Instruments, Austin, TX) card and a Research Interface Box 2 (RIB2, Department of Ion Physics and Applied Physics at the University of Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria) for MED-EL cochlear implants. ECAP recordings of a human subject with three different artifact reduction methods (alternating, Miller modified masker-probe, triphasic pulses) are presented and compared.

  2. Effect of phentolamine, alprenolol and prenylamine on maximum rate of rise of action potential in guinea-pig papillary muscles.

    PubMed

    Sada, H

    1978-10-01

    Effects of phentolamine (13.3, 26.5 and 53.0 micron), alprenolol (3.5, 7.0 and 17.5 micron) and prenylamine (2.4, 4.8 and 11.9 micron) on the transmembrane potential were studied in isolated guinea-pig papillary muscles, superfused with Tyrode's solution. 1. Phentolamine, alprenolol and prenylamine reduced the maximum rate of rise of action potential (.Vmax) dose-dependently. Higher concentrations of phentolamine and prenylamine caused a loss of plateau in a majority of the preparations. Resting potential was not altered by any of the drugs. Readmittance of drug-free Tyrode's solution reversed these changes induced by 13.3 micron of phentolamine and all conconcentrations of alprenolol almost completely but those induced by higher concentrations of phentolamine and all concentrations of prenylamine only slightly. 2. .Vmax at steady state was increased with decreasing driving frequencies (0.5 and 0.25 Hz) and was decreased with increasing ones (2--5 Hz) in comparison with that at 1 Hz. Such changes were all exaggerated by the above drugs, particularly by prenylamine. 3. Prenylamine and, to a lesser degree, phentolamine and alprenolol delayed dose-dependently the recovery process of .Vmax in premature responses. 4. .Vmax in the first response after interruption of stimulation recovered toward the predrug value in the presence of the above three drugs. The time constants of recovery process ranged between 10.5 and 15.0s for phentolamine, between 4.5 and 15.5s for alprenolol. The time constant of the main component was estimated to be approximately 2s for the recovery process with prenylamine. 5. On the basis of the model recently proposed by Hondeghem and Katzung (1977), it is suggested that the drug molecules associate with the open sodium channels and dissociated slowly from the closed channels and that the inactivation parameter in the drug-associated channels is shifted in the hyperpolarizing direction.

  3. Effects of bath resistance on action potentials in the squid giant axon: myocardial implications.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, J; Wikswo, J P

    1997-01-01

    This study presents a simplified version of the quasi-one-dimensional theory (Wu, J., E. A. Johnson, and J. M. Kootsey. 1996. A quasi-one-dimensional theory for anisotropic propagation of excitation in cardiac muscle. Biophys. J. 71:2427-2439) with two components of the extracellular current, along and perpendicular to the axis, and a simulation and its experimental confirmation for the giant axon of the squid. By extending the one-dimensional core conductor cable equations, this theory predicts, as confirmed by the experiment, that the shapes of the intracellular and the extracellular action potentials are related to the resistance of the bath. Such a result was previously only expected by the field theories. The correlation between the shapes of the intracellular and the extracellular potentials of the giant axon of the squid resembles that observed during the anisotropic propagation of excitation in cardiac muscle. Therefore, this study not only develops a quasi-one-dimensional theory for a squid axon, but also provides one possible factor contributing to the anisotropic propagation of action potentials in cardiac muscle. PMID:9370430

  4. Effects of bath resistance on action potentials in the squid giant axon: myocardial implications.

    PubMed

    Wu, J; Wikswo, J P

    1997-11-01

    This study presents a simplified version of the quasi-one-dimensional theory (Wu, J., E. A. Johnson, and J. M. Kootsey. 1996. A quasi-one-dimensional theory for anisotropic propagation of excitation in cardiac muscle. Biophys. J. 71:2427-2439) with two components of the extracellular current, along and perpendicular to the axis, and a simulation and its experimental confirmation for the giant axon of the squid. By extending the one-dimensional core conductor cable equations, this theory predicts, as confirmed by the experiment, that the shapes of the intracellular and the extracellular action potentials are related to the resistance of the bath. Such a result was previously only expected by the field theories. The correlation between the shapes of the intracellular and the extracellular potentials of the giant axon of the squid resembles that observed during the anisotropic propagation of excitation in cardiac muscle. Therefore, this study not only develops a quasi-one-dimensional theory for a squid axon, but also provides one possible factor contributing to the anisotropic propagation of action potentials in cardiac muscle.

  5. In vivo neuronal action potential recordings via three-dimensional microscale needle-electrode arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujishiro, Akifumi; Kaneko, Hidekazu; Kawashima, Takahiro; Ishida, Makoto; Kawano, Takeshi

    2014-05-01

    Very fine needle-electrode arrays potentially offer both low invasiveness and high spatial resolution of electrophysiological neuronal recordings in vivo. Herein we report the penetrating and recording capabilities of silicon-growth-based three-dimensional microscale-diameter needle-electrodes arrays. The fabricated needles exhibit a circular-cone shape with a 3-μm-diameter tip and a 210-μm length. Due to the microscale diameter, our silicon needles are more flexible than other microfabricated silicon needles with larger diameters. Coating the microscale-needle-tip with platinum black results in an impedance of ~600 kΩ in saline with output/input signal amplitude ratios of more than 90% at 40 Hz-10 kHz. The needles can penetrate into the whisker barrel area of a rat's cerebral cortex, and the action potentials recorded from some neurons exhibit peak-to-peak amplitudes of ~300 μVpp. These results demonstrate the feasibility of in vivo neuronal action potential recordings with a microscale needle-electrode array fabricated using silicon growth technology.

  6. An Excel-based implementation of the spectral method of action potential alternans analysis.

    PubMed

    Pearman, Charles M

    2014-12-01

    Action potential (AP) alternans has been well established as a mechanism of arrhythmogenesis and sudden cardiac death. Proper interpretation of AP alternans requires a robust method of alternans quantification. Traditional methods of alternans analysis neglect higher order periodicities that may have greater pro-arrhythmic potential than classical 2:1 alternans. The spectral method of alternans analysis, already widely used in the related study of microvolt T-wave alternans, has also been used to study AP alternans. Software to meet the specific needs of AP alternans analysis is not currently available in the public domain. An AP analysis tool is implemented here, written in Visual Basic for Applications and using Microsoft Excel as a shell. This performs a sophisticated analysis of alternans behavior allowing reliable distinction of alternans from random fluctuations, quantification of alternans magnitude, and identification of which phases of the AP are most affected. In addition, the spectral method has been adapted to allow detection and quantification of higher order regular oscillations. Analysis of action potential morphology is also performed. A simple user interface enables easy import, analysis, and export of collated results.

  7. Properties of Ca2+ sparks evoked by action potentials in mouse ventricular myocytes.

    PubMed

    Bridge, J H; Ershler, P R; Cannell, M B

    1999-07-15

    1. Calcium sparks were examined in enzymatically dissociated mouse cardiac ventricular cells using the calcium indicator fluo-3 and confocal microscopy. The properties of the mouse cardiac calcium spark are generally similar to those reported for other species. 2. Examination of the temporal relationship between the action potential and the time course of calcium spark production showed that calcium sparks are more likely to occur during the initial repolarization phase of the action potential. The latency of their occurrence varied by less than 1.4 ms (s.d.) and this low variability may be explained by the interaction of the gating of L-type calcium channels with the changes in driving force for calcium entry during the action potential. 3. When fixed sites within the cell are examined, calcium sparks have relatively constant amplitude but the amplitude of the sparks was variable among sites. The low variability of the amplitude of the calcium sparks suggests that more than one sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) release channel must be involved in their genesis. Noise analysis (with the assumption of independent gating) suggests that > 18 SR calcium release channels may be involved in the generation of the calcium spark. At a fixed site, the response is close to 'all-or-none' behaviour which suggests that calcium sparks are indeed elementary events underlying cardiac excitation-contraction coupling. 4. A method for selecting spark sites for signal averaging is presented which allows the time course of the spark to be examined with high temporal and spatial resolution. Using this method we show the development of the calcium spark at high signal-to-noise levels.

  8. Action potentials and amphetamine release antipsychotic drug from dopamine neuron synaptic VMAT vesicles.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Kristal R; Block, Ethan R; Levitan, Edwin S

    2015-08-11

    Based on lysotracker red imaging in cultured hippocampal neurons, antipsychotic drugs (APDs) were proposed to accumulate in synaptic vesicles by acidic trapping and to be released in response to action potentials. Because many APDs are dopamine (DA) D2 receptor (D2R) antagonists, such a mechanism would be particularly interesting if it operated in midbrain DA neurons. Here, the APD cyamemazine (CYAM) is visualized directly by two-photon microscopy in substantia nigra and striatum brain slices. CYAM accumulated slowly into puncta based on vacuolar H(+)-ATPase activity and dispersed rapidly upon dissipating organelle pH gradients. Thus, CYAM is subject to acidic trapping and released upon deprotonation. In the striatum, Ca(2+)-dependent reduction of the CYAM punctate signal was induced by depolarization or action potentials. Striatal CYAM overlapped with the dopamine transporter (DAT). Furthermore, parachloroamphetamine (pCA), acting via vesicular monoamine transporter (VMAT), and a charged VMAT, substrate 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP(+)), reduced striatal CYAM. In vivo CYAM administration and in vitro experiments confirmed that clinically relevant CYAM concentrations result in vesicular accumulation and pCA-dependent release. These results show that some CYAM is in DA neuron VMAT vesicles and suggests a new drug interaction in which amphetamine induces CYAM deprotonation and release as a consequence of the H(+) countertransport by VMAT that accompanies vesicular uptake, but not by inducing exchange or acting as a weak base. Therefore, in the striatum, APDs are released with DA in response to action potentials and an amphetamine. This synaptic corelease is expected to enhance APD antagonism of D2Rs where and when dopaminergic transmission occurs.

  9. Carbon monoxide effects on human ventricle action potential assessed by mathematical simulations

    PubMed Central

    Trenor, Beatriz; Cardona, Karen; Saiz, Javier; Rajamani, Sridharan; Belardinelli, Luiz; Giles, Wayne R.

    2013-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) that is produced in a number of different mammalian tissues is now known to have significant effects on the cardiovascular system. These include: (i) vasodilation, (ii) changes in heart rate and strength of contractions, and (iii) modulation of autonomic nervous system input to both the primary pacemaker and the working myocardium. Excessive CO in the environment is toxic and can initiate or mediate life threatening cardiac rhythm disturbances. Recent reports link these ventricular arrhythmias to an increase in the slowly inactivating, or “late” component of the Na+ current in the mammalian heart. The main goal of this paper is to explore the basis of this pro-arrhythmic capability of CO by incorporating changes in CO-induced ion channel activity with intracellular signaling pathways in the mammalian heart. To do this, a quite well-documented mathematical model of the action potential and intracellular calcium transient in the human ventricular myocyte has been employed. In silico iterations based on this model provide a useful first step in illustrating the cellular electrophysiological consequences of CO that have been reported from mammalian heart experiments. Specifically, when the Grandi et al. model of the human ventricular action potential is utilized, and after the Na+ and Ca2+ currents in a single myocyte are modified based on the experimental literature, early after-depolarization (EAD) rhythm disturbances appear, and important elements of the underlying causes of these EADs are revealed/illustrated. Our modified mathematical model of the human ventricular action potential also provides a convenient digital platform for designing future experimental work and relating these changes in cellular cardiac electrophysiology to emerging clinical and epidemiological data on CO toxicity. PMID:24146650

  10. Action potentials and amphetamine release antipsychotic drug from dopamine neuron synaptic VMAT vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Kristal R.; Block, Ethan R.; Levitan, Edwin S.

    2015-01-01

    Based on lysotracker red imaging in cultured hippocampal neurons, antipsychotic drugs (APDs) were proposed to accumulate in synaptic vesicles by acidic trapping and to be released in response to action potentials. Because many APDs are dopamine (DA) D2 receptor (D2R) antagonists, such a mechanism would be particularly interesting if it operated in midbrain DA neurons. Here, the APD cyamemazine (CYAM) is visualized directly by two-photon microscopy in substantia nigra and striatum brain slices. CYAM accumulated slowly into puncta based on vacuolar H+-ATPase activity and dispersed rapidly upon dissipating organelle pH gradients. Thus, CYAM is subject to acidic trapping and released upon deprotonation. In the striatum, Ca2+-dependent reduction of the CYAM punctate signal was induced by depolarization or action potentials. Striatal CYAM overlapped with the dopamine transporter (DAT). Furthermore, parachloroamphetamine (pCA), acting via vesicular monoamine transporter (VMAT), and a charged VMAT, substrate 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+), reduced striatal CYAM. In vivo CYAM administration and in vitro experiments confirmed that clinically relevant CYAM concentrations result in vesicular accumulation and pCA-dependent release. These results show that some CYAM is in DA neuron VMAT vesicles and suggests a new drug interaction in which amphetamine induces CYAM deprotonation and release as a consequence of the H+ countertransport by VMAT that accompanies vesicular uptake, but not by inducing exchange or acting as a weak base. Therefore, in the striatum, APDs are released with DA in response to action potentials and an amphetamine. This synaptic corelease is expected to enhance APD antagonism of D2Rs where and when dopaminergic transmission occurs. PMID:26216995

  11. HMGB1 Inhibition During Zymosan-Induced Inflammation: The Potential Therapeutic Action of Riboflavin.

    PubMed

    Mazur-Bialy, Agnieszka Irena; Pocheć, Ewa

    2016-04-01

    Sepsis, also known as systemic inflammatory response syndrome, is a life-threatening condition caused by a pathogenic agent and leading to multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. One of the factors responsible for the excessive intensification of the inflammatory response in the course of inflammation is high-mobility group protein B1 (HMGB1). HMG-1 is a nuclear protein which, after being released to the intercellular space, has a highly pro-inflammatory effect and acts as a late mediator of lethal damage. The purpose of this study was to examine whether the anti-inflammatory action of riboflavin is accompanied by inhibition of HMGB1 release during peritoneal inflammation and zymosan stimulation of macrophages. Peritonitis was induced in male BALB/c and C57BL/6J mice via intraperitoneal injection of zymosan (40 mg/kg). RAW 264.7 macrophages were activated with zymosan (250 µg/ml). Riboflavin (mice, 50 mg/kg; RAW 264.7, 25 µg/ml) was administered 30 min before zymosan, simultaneously with, or 2, 4, 6 h after zymosan. Additionally, mRNA expression of HMGB1 and its intracellular and serum levels were evaluated. The research showed that riboflavin significantly reduces both the expression and the release of HMGB1; however, the effect of riboflavin was time-dependent. The greatest efficacy was found when riboflavin was given 30 min prior to zymosan, and also 2 and 4 h (C57BL/6J; RAW 264.7) or 4 and 6 h (BALB/c) after zymosan. Research showed that riboflavin influences the level of HMGB1 released in the course of inflammation; however, further study is necessary to determine its mechanisms of action. PMID:26445809

  12. A novel combinational approach of microstimulation and bioluminescence imaging to study the mechanisms of action of cerebral electrical stimulation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Arsenault, Dany; Drouin-Ouellet, Janelle; Saint-Pierre, Martine; Petrou, Petros; Dubois, Marilyn; Kriz, Jasna; Barker, Roger A; Cicchetti, Antonio; Cicchetti, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    Key points We have developed a unique prototype to perform brain stimulation in mice. This system presents a number of advantages and new developments: 1) all stimulation parameters can be adjusted, 2) both positive and negative current pulses can be generated, guaranteeing electrically balanced stimulation regimen, 3) which can be produced with both low and high impedance electrodes, 4) the developed electrodes ensure localized stimulation and 5) can be used to stimulate and/or record brain potential and 6) in vivo recording of electric pulses allows the detection of defective electrodes (wire breakage or short circuits). This new micro-stimulator device further allows simultaneous live bioluminescence imaging of the mouse brain, enabling real time assessment of the impact of stimulation on cerebral tissue. The use of this novel tool in various transgenic mouse models of disease opens up a whole new range of possibilities in better understanding brain stimulation. Abstract Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is used to treat a number of neurological conditions and is currently being tested to intervene in neuropsychiatric conditions. However, a better understanding of how it works would ensure that side effects could be minimized and benefits optimized. We have thus developed a unique device to perform brain stimulation (BS) in mice and to address fundamental issues related to this methodology in the pre-clinical setting. This new microstimulator prototype was specifically designed to allow simultaneous live bioluminescence imaging of the mouse brain, allowing real time assessment of the impact of stimulation on cerebral tissue. We validated the authenticity of this tool in vivo by analysing the expression of toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2), corresponding to the microglial response, in the stimulated brain regions of TLR2-fluc-GFP transgenic mice, which we further corroborated with post-mortem analyses in these animals as well as in human brains of patients who underwent DBS

  13. Acceptability and Potential Effectiveness of a Foot Drop Stimulator in Children and Adolescents with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prosser, Laura A.; Curatalo, Lindsey A.; Alter, Katharine E.; Damiano, Diane L.

    2012-01-01

    Aim: Ankle-foot orthoses are the standard of care for foot drop in cerebral palsy (CP), but may overly constrain ankle movement and limit function in those with mild CP. Functional electrical stimulation (FES) may be a less restrictive and more effective alternative, but has rarely been used in CP. The primary objective of this study was to…

  14. Insulin stimulates movement of sorting nexin 9 between cellular compartments: a putative role mediating cell surface receptor expression and insulin action.

    PubMed Central

    MaCaulay, S Lance; Stoichevska, Violet; Grusovin, Julian; Gough, Keith H; Castelli, Laura A; Ward, Colin W

    2003-01-01

    SNX9 (sorting nexin 9) is one member of a family of proteins implicated in protein trafficking. This family is characterized by a unique PX (Phox homology) domain that includes a proline-rich sequence and an upstream phospholipid binding domain. Many sorting nexins, including SNX9, also have a C-terminal coiled region. SNX9 additionally has an N-terminal SH3 (Src homology 3) domain. Here we have investigated the cellular localization of SNX9 and the potential role it plays in insulin action. SNX9 had a cytosolic and punctate distribution, consistent with endosomal and cytosolic localization, in 3T3L1 adipocytes. It was excluded from the nucleus. The SH3 domain was responsible, at least in part, for the membrane localization of SNX9, since expression of an SH3-domain-deleted GFP (green fluorescent protein)-SNX9 fusion protein in HEK293T cells rendered the protein cytosolic. Membrane localization may also be attributed in part to the PX domain, since in vitro phospholipid binding studies demonstrated SNX9 binding to polyphosphoinositides. Insulin induced movement of SNX9 to membrane fractions from the cytosol. A GST (glutathione S-transferase)-SNX9 fusion protein was associated with IGF1 (insulin-like growth factor 1) and insulin receptors in vitro. A GFP-SNX9 fusion protein, overexpressed in 3T3L1 adipocytes, co-immunoprecipitated with insulin receptors. Furthermore, overexpression of this GFP-SNX9 fusion protein in CHOT cells decreased insulin binding, consistent with a role for SNX9 in the trafficking of insulin receptors. Microinjection of 3T3L1 cells with an antibody against SNX9 inhibited stimulation by insulin of GLUT4 translocation. These results support the involvement of SNX9 in insulin action, via an influence on the processing/trafficking of insulin receptors. A secondary role in regulation of the cellular processing, transport and/or subcellular localization of GLUT4 is also suggested. PMID:12917015

  15. Dynamical speckles patterns of action potential transmission effects in squid giant axon membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llovera-González, Juan J.; Moreno-Yeras, Alfredo B.; Muramatsu, Mikiya; Soga, Diogo; Serra-Toledo, Rolando L.; Magalhães, Daniel S. F.

    2013-11-01

    Undoubtedly the most important result of the investigations in physiology and biophysics was the discovery of the electrochemical mechanism of propagation of the action potential in nerves that was made by Hodgkin and Huxley during the first half of the past century. Since some decades ago diverse experiments about the electro optical properties of the axon membrane there was published using the most diverse optical experimental procedures6-10. In this paper some results of a dynamical speckle technique applied for obtaining microscopic images of a section of a squid giant axon membrane during the activation by electrical impulses and his digital process are presented.

  16. Rapid local synchronization of action potentials: toward computation with coupled integrate-and-fire neurons.

    PubMed Central

    Hopfield, J J; Herz, A V

    1995-01-01

    The collective behavior of interconnected spiking nerve cells is investigated. It is shown that a variety of model systems exhibit the same short-time behavior and rapidly converge to (approximately) periodic firing patterns with locally synchronized action potentials. The dynamics of one model can be described by a downhill motion on an abstract energy landscape. Since an energy landscape makes it possible to understand and program computation done by an attractor network, the results will extend our understanding of collective computation from models based on a firing-rate description to biologically more realistic systems with integrate-and-fire neurons. Images Fig. 2 PMID:7624307

  17. Different sensitivity of pain-related chemosensory potentials evoked by stimulation with CO2, tooth pulp event-related potentials, and acoustic event-related potentials to the tranquilizer diazepam.

    PubMed

    Thürauf, N; Ditterich, W; Kobal, G

    1994-12-01

    1. The aim of this study was to investigate the sensitivity of pain-related potentials used in experimental pain models to the non-specific effects of the tranquilizer diazepam. Pain-related potentials were recorded after painful stimulation of the nasal mucosa with CO2 and after painful stimulation of the tooth pulp. Acoustically evoked potentials were measured in order to compare their sensitivity to the tranquilizer diazepam with the sensitivity of the pain-related potentials. 2. Twenty volunteers participated in this randomised, double-blind, three-fold crossover study. Measurements were obtained before and 20 min after the administration of the drug. Event-related potentials were recorded after painful stimulation of the nasal mucosa with CO2 (two stimulus intensities: 60% v/v and 70% v/v CO2), after painful stimulation of the tooth pulp (two stimulus intensities: 2.2 x and 3.3 x detection threshold), and after non-painful acoustical stimulation of the right ear. The subjects rated the perceived intensity of the painful stimuli by means of a visual analogue scale. In addition the spontaneous EEG was analysed in the frequency domain and the vigilance of the subjects was assessed in a tracking task. 3. Diazepam reduced significantly the amplitudes of the event-related potentials after painful stimulation of the tooth pulp and after acoustical stimulation. In contrast only a small, statistically non-significant reduction could be found after painful stimulation with CO2. The pain ratings of the painful stimuli were not affected by diazepam. Diazepam reduced the performance of the tracking task. A decrease of arousal could be found in the alpha 2-range, whereas in the beta 2 and the theta-range the power density increased under diazepam. 4. We demonstrated that event-related potentials after painful stimulation of the nasal mucosa with CO2 are less affected by the nonspecific effects of the tranquilizer diazepam than event-related potentials after painful

  18. A ligand-specific action of chelated copper on hypothalamic neurons: stimulation of the release of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone from median eminence explants.

    PubMed Central

    Barnea, A; Colombani-Vidal, M

    1984-01-01

    We have previously shown that chelated copper stimulates the release of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) from isolated hypothalamic granules. In this study, we wished to ascertain if chelated copper acts on hypothalamic neurons to stimulate LHRH release and, if so, what is the ligand specificity of this interaction. An in vitro system of explants of the median eminence area (MEA) was established and characterized. MEA explants were exposed for 15 min to 50 microM copper, and then they were incubated for 75 min in copper-free medium. Copper led to a transient increase in the rate of LHRH release; the maximal rate was attained 15 min after transfer of the MEA to copper-free medium. In addition, we found that copper complexed to histidine (Cu-His), but not ionic copper, stimulated LHRH release, the magnitude of which was dependent on the dose of Cu-His. The chelator specificity for Cu complex action was such that Cu-His stimulated LHRH release 4.9-fold and Cu-Cys stimulated release 2.5-fold, whereas neither Cu-Thr, Cu-Gly-His-Lys, Cu-bovine serum albumin, nor ceruloplasmin stimulated LHRH release. Based on these results and those of others indicating that the concentration of copper in hypothalamic axonal terminals is 1-2 orders of magnitude greater than plasma, we propose that copper released in the vicinity of the LHRH neurons interacts with specific sites on the LHRH axonal terminals, which leads to release of the peptide. PMID:6390443

  19. Controlling the Emotional Bias: Performance, Late Positive Potentials, and the Effect of Anodal Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS)

    PubMed Central

    Faehling, Florian; Plewnia, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive control of emotional processing is essential for adaptive human behavior. Biased attention toward emotionally salient information is critically linked with affective disorders and is discussed as a promising treatment target. Anodal (activity enhancing) transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) has been shown to increase healthy and impaired cognitive control over emotional distraction and is therefore widely used for the investigation and experimental treatment of this disorder. In this study, event-related potential (ERP) were recorded parallel to tDCS to track its online effects. Healthy volunteers (n = 87) performed a delayed working memory paradigm with emotional salient and neutral distractors during stimulation with different intensities (sham, 0.5, 1, 1.5 mA). Measuring the late positive potential (LPP), an ERP that indexes attention allocation, we found that a valence-specific increase of the early portion of the LPP (eLPP, 250–500 ms) was associated with less emotional distraction in the sham group. Of note, stimulation with tDCS exerted an intensity related effect on this correlation. The later part of the LPP (lLPP, 500–1000 ms) was found to be correlated with reaction time, regardless of valence. General effect of tDCS on LPPs and task performance were not observed. These findings demonstrate that ERP recordings parallel to tDCS are feasible to investigate the neuronal underpinnings of stimulation effects on executive functions. Furthermore, they support the notion that the LPP induced by a distractive stimulus during a working memory task mirrors the additional allocation of neuronal resources with a specific sensitivity of the early LPP for highly arousing negative stimuli. Finally, together with the variable magnitude and direction of the emotional bias, the lack of systematic modulations of LPPs and behavior by tDCS further underlines the important influence of the individual brain activity patterns on stimulation effects both on

  20. Subthreshold α₂-adrenergic activation counteracts glucagon-like peptide-1 potentiation of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Pan, Minglin; Yang, Guang; Cui, Xiuli; Yang, Shao-Nian

    2011-01-01

    The pancreatic β cell harbors α₂-adrenergic and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptors on its plasma membrane to sense the corresponding ligands adrenaline/noradrenaline and GLP-1 to govern glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. However, it is not known whether these two signaling systems interact to gain the adequate and timely control of insulin release in response to glucose. The present work shows that the α₂-adrenergic agonist clonidine concentration-dependently depresses glucose-stimulated insulin secretion from INS-1 cells. On the contrary, GLP-1 concentration-dependently potentiates insulin secretory response to glucose. Importantly, the present work reveals that subthreshold α₂-adrenergic activation with clonidine counteracts GLP-1 potentiation of glucose-induced insulin secretion. This counteractory process relies on pertussis toxin- (PTX-) sensitive Gi proteins since it no longer occurs following PTX-mediated inactivation of Gi proteins. The counteraction of GLP-1 potentiation of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion by subthreshold α₂-adrenergic activation is likely to serve as a molecular mechanism for the delicate regulation of insulin release.

  1. Actions taken in response to the potential for volatile organics in RLWTF influent tanks

    SciTech Connect

    DEL SIGNORE, JOHN C.

    2007-01-01

    Positive USQD-RL W -06.0729-JPS, titled "Potential for Volatile Organics in RLW" was signed Friday, 09-08-06, at 1600. It resulted from a Potentially Inadequate Safety Analysis (PISA) for the Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility (RLWTF) at Technical Area 50. The PISA posits that an unspecified accident occurs at a generator facility, and that said accident does not ignite the volatile organic liquid, but results instead in the release of a large volume of volatile organic liquid into an RLW drain. Once in the drain, the liquid flows unimpeded into the RLWTF influent tanks. After entering the influent tanks, a spark causes a deflagration or explosion. This report documents actions taken in response to the PISA.

  2. Excitable Membranes and Action Potentials in Paramecia: An Analysis of the Electrophysiology of Ciliates.

    PubMed

    Schlaepfer, Charles H; Wessel, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    The ciliate Paramecium caudatum possesses an excitable cell membrane whose action potentials (APs) modulate the trajectory of the cell swimming through its freshwater environment. While many stimuli affect the membrane potential and trajectory, students can use current injection and extracellular ionic concentration changes to explore how APs cause reversal of the cell's motion. Students examine these stimuli through intracellular recordings, also gaining insight into the practices of electrophysiology. Paramecium's large size of around 150 µm, simple care, and relative ease to penetrate make them ideal model organisms for undergraduate students' laboratory study. The direct link between behavior and excitable membranes has thought provoking evolutionary implications for the study of paramecia. Recording from the cell, students note a small resting potential around -30 mV, differing from animal resting potentials. By manipulating ion concentrations, APs of the relatively long length of 20-30 ms up to several minutes with depolarizations maxing over 0 mV are observed. Through comparative analysis of membrane potentials and the APs induced by either calcium or barium, students can deduce the causative ions for the APs as well as the mechanisms of paramecium APs. Current injection allows students to calculate quantitative electric characteristics of the membrane. Analysis will follow the literature's conclusion in a V-Gated Ca(++) influx and depolarization resulting in feedback from intracellular Ca(++) that inactivates V-Gated Ca(++) channels and activates Ca-Dependent K(+) channels through a secondary messenger cascade that results in the K(+) efflux and repolarization. PMID:26557800

  3. Biorealistic cardiac cell culture platforms with integrated monitoring of extracellular action potentials.

    PubMed

    Trantidou, Tatiana; Terracciano, Cesare M; Kontziampasis, Dimitrios; Humphrey, Eleanor J; Prodromakis, Themistoklis

    2015-01-01

    Current platforms for in vitro drug development utilize confluent, unorganized monolayers of heart cells to study the effect on action potential propagation. However, standard cell cultures are of limited use in cardiac research, as they do not preserve important structural and functional properties of the myocardium. Here we present a method to integrate a scaffolding technology with multi-electrode arrays and deliver a compact, off-the-shelf monitoring platform for growing biomimetic cardiac tissue. Our approach produces anisotropic cultures with conduction velocity (CV) profiles that closer resemble native heart tissue; the fastest impulse propagation is along the long axis of the aligned cardiomyocytes (CVL) and the slowest propagation is perpendicular (CVT), in contrast to standard cultures where action potential propagates isotropically (CVL ≈ CVT). The corresponding anisotropy velocity ratios (CVL/CVT = 1.38 - 2.22) are comparable with values for healthy adult rat ventricles (1.98 - 3.63). The main advantages of this approach are that (i) it provides ultimate pattern control, (ii) it is compatible with automated manufacturing steps and (iii) it is utilized through standard cell culturing protocols. Our platform is compatible with existing read-out equipment and comprises a prompt method for more reliable CV studies.

  4. The linear synchronization measures of uterine EMG signals: Evidence of synchronized action potentials during propagation.

    PubMed

    Domino, Malgorzata; Pawlinski, Bartosz; Gajewski, Zdzislaw

    2016-11-01

    Evaluation of synchronization between myoelectric signals can give new insights into the functioning of the complex system of porcine myometrium. We propose a model of uterine contractions according to the hypothesis of action potentials similarity which is possible to detect during propagation in the uterine wall. We introduce similarity measures based on the concept of synchronization as used in matching linear signals such as electromyographic (EMG) time series data. The aim was to present linear measures to assess synchronization between contractions in different topographic regions of the uterus. We use the cross-correlation function (ƒx,y[l], ƒy,z[l]) and the cross-coherence function (Cxy[ƒ], Cyz[ƒ]) to assess synchronization between three data series of a diestral uterine EMG bundles in porcine reproductive tract. Spontaneous uterine activity was recorded using telemetry method directly by three-channel transmitter and three silver bipolar needle electrodes sutured on different topographic regions of the reproductive tract in the sow. The results show the usefulness of the cross-coherence function in that synchronization between uterine horn and corpus uteri for multiple action potentials (bundles) could be observed. The EMG bundles synchronization may be used to investigate the direction and velocity of EMG signals propagation in porcine reproductive tract. PMID:27570104

  5. From damage response to action potentials: early evolution of neural and contractile modules in stem eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Brunet, Thibaut; Arendt, Detlev

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells convert external stimuli into membrane depolarization, which in turn triggers effector responses such as secretion and contraction. Here, we put forward an evolutionary hypothesis for the origin of the depolarization-contraction-secretion (DCS) coupling, the functional core of animal neuromuscular circuits. We propose that DCS coupling evolved in unicellular stem eukaryotes as part of an 'emergency response' to calcium influx upon membrane rupture. We detail how this initial response was subsequently modified into an ancient mechanosensory-effector arc, present in the last eukaryotic common ancestor, which enabled contractile amoeboid movement that is widespread in extant eukaryotes. Elaborating on calcium-triggered membrane depolarization, we reason that the first action potentials evolved alongside the membrane of sensory-motile cilia, with the first voltage-sensitive sodium/calcium channels (Nav/Cav) enabling a fast and coordinated response of the entire cilium to mechanosensory stimuli. From the cilium, action potentials then spread across the entire cell, enabling global cellular responses such as concerted contraction in several independent eukaryote lineages. In animals, this process led to the invention of mechanosensory contractile cells. These gave rise to mechanosensory receptor cells, neurons and muscle cells by division of labour and can be regarded as the founder cell type of the nervous system.

  6. Biorealistic cardiac cell culture platforms with integrated monitoring of extracellular action potentials

    PubMed Central

    Trantidou, Tatiana; Terracciano, Cesare M.; Kontziampasis, Dimitrios; Humphrey, Eleanor J.; Prodromakis, Themistoklis

    2015-01-01

    Current platforms for in vitro drug development utilize confluent, unorganized monolayers of heart cells to study the effect on action potential propagation. However, standard cell cultures are of limited use in cardiac research, as they do not preserve important structural and functional properties of the myocardium. Here we present a method to integrate a scaffolding technology with multi-electrode arrays and deliver a compact, off-the-shelf monitoring platform for growing biomimetic cardiac tissue. Our approach produces anisotropic cultures with conduction velocity (CV) profiles that closer resemble native heart tissue; the fastest impulse propagation is along the long axis of the aligned cardiomyocytes (CVL) and the slowest propagation is perpendicular (CVT), in contrast to standard cultures where action potential propagates isotropically (CVL ≈ CVT). The corresponding anisotropy velocity ratios (CVL/CVT = 1.38 – 2.22) are comparable with values for healthy adult rat ventricles (1.98 – 3.63). The main advantages of this approach are that (i) it provides ultimate pattern control, (ii) it is compatible with automated manufacturing steps and (iii) it is utilized through standard cell culturing protocols. Our platform is compatible with existing read-out equipment and comprises a prompt method for more reliable CV studies. PMID:26053434

  7. From damage response to action potentials: early evolution of neural and contractile modules in stem eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Brunet, Thibaut; Arendt, Detlev

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells convert external stimuli into membrane depolarization, which in turn triggers effector responses such as secretion and contraction. Here, we put forward an evolutionary hypothesis for the origin of the depolarization–contraction–secretion (DCS) coupling, the functional core of animal neuromuscular circuits. We propose that DCS coupling evolved in unicellular stem eukaryotes as part of an ‘emergency response’ to calcium influx upon membrane rupture. We detail how this initial response was subsequently modified into an ancient mechanosensory–effector arc, present in the last eukaryotic common ancestor, which enabled contractile amoeboid movement that is widespread in extant eukaryotes. Elaborating on calcium-triggered membrane depolarization, we reason that the first action potentials evolved alongside the membrane of sensory-motile cilia, with the first voltage-sensitive sodium/calcium channels (Nav/Cav) enabling a fast and coordinated response of the entire cilium to mechanosensory stimuli. From the cilium, action potentials then spread across the entire cell, enabling global cellular responses such as concerted contraction in several independent eukaryote lineages. In animals, this process led to the invention of mechanosensory contractile cells. These gave rise to mechanosensory receptor cells, neurons and muscle cells by division of labour and can be regarded as the founder cell type of the nervous system. PMID:26598726

  8. Quantitative Assessment of the Distributions of Membrane Conductances Involved in Action Potential Backpropagation Along Basal Dendrites

    PubMed Central

    Acker, Corey D.; Antic, Srdjan D.

    2009-01-01

    Basal dendrites of prefrontal cortical neurons receive strong synaptic drive from recurrent excitatory synaptic inputs. Synaptic integration within basal dendrites is therefore likely to play an important role in cortical information processing. Both synaptic integration and synaptic plasticity depend crucially on dendritic membrane excitability and the backpropagation of action potentials. We carried out multisite voltage-sensitive dye imaging of membrane potential transients from thin basal branches of prefrontal cortical pyramidal neurons before and after application of channel blockers. We found that backpropagating action potentials (bAPs) are predominantly controlled by voltage-gated sodium and A-type potassium channels. In contrast, pharmacologically blocking the delayed rectifier potassium, voltage-gated calcium, or Ih conductance had little effect on dendritic AP propagation. Optically recorded bAP waveforms were quantified and multicompartmental modeling was used to link the observed behavior with the underlying biophysical properties. The best-fit model included a nonuniform sodium channel distribution with decreasing conductance with distance from the soma, together with a nonuniform (increasing) A-type potassium conductance. AP amplitudes decline with distance in this model, but to a lesser extent than previously thought. We used this model to explore the mechanisms underlying two sets of published data involving high-frequency trains of APs and the local generation of sodium spikelets. We also explored the conditions under which IA down-regulation would produce branch strength potentiation in the proposed model. Finally, we discuss the hypothesis that a fraction of basal branches may have different membrane properties compared with sister branches in the same dendritic tree. PMID:19118105

  9. Demonstrating the Potential for Dynamic Auditory Stimulation to Contribute to Motion Sickness

    PubMed Central

    Keshavarz, Behrang; Hettinger, Lawrence J.; Kennedy, Robert S.; Campos, Jennifer L.

    2014-01-01

    Auditory cues can create the illusion of self-motion (vection) in the absence of visual or physical stimulation. The present study aimed to determine whether auditory cues alone can also elicit motion sickness and how auditory cues contribute to motion sickness when added to visual motion stimuli. Twenty participants were seated in front of a curved projection display and were exposed to a virtual scene that constantly rotated around the participant's vertical axis. The virtual scene contained either visual-only, auditory-only, or a combination of corresponding visual and auditory cues. All participants performed all three conditions in a counterbalanced order. Participants tilted their heads alternately towards the right or left shoulder in all conditions during stimulus exposure in order to create pseudo-Coriolis effects and to maximize the likelihood for motion sickness. Measurements of motion sickness (onset, severity), vection (latency, strength, duration), and postural steadiness (center of pressure) were recorded. Results showed that adding auditory cues to the visual stimuli did not, on average, affect motion sickness and postural steadiness, but it did reduce vection onset times and increased vection strength compared to pure visual or pure auditory stimulation. Eighteen of the 20 participants reported at least slight motion sickness in the two conditions including visual stimuli. More interestingly, six participants also reported slight motion sickness during pure auditory stimulation and two of the six participants stopped the pure auditory test session due to motion sickness. The present study is the first to demonstrate that motion sickness may be caused by pure auditory stimulation, which we refer to as “auditorily induced motion sickness”. PMID:24983752

  10. Electrical stimulation alleviates depressive-like behaviors of rats: investigation of brain targets and potential mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Lim, L W; Prickaerts, J; Huguet, G; Kadar, E; Hartung, H; Sharp, T; Temel, Y

    2015-03-31

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a promising therapy for patients with refractory depression. However, key questions remain with regard to which brain target(s) should be used for stimulation, and which mechanisms underlie the therapeutic effects. Here, we investigated the effect of DBS, with low- and high-frequency stimulation (LFS, HFS), in different brain regions (ventromedial prefrontal cortex, vmPFC; cingulate cortex, Cg; nucleus accumbens (NAc) core or shell; lateral habenula, LHb; and ventral tegmental area) on a variety of depressive-like behaviors using rat models. In the naive animal study, we found that HFS of the Cg, vmPFC, NAc core and LHb reduced anxiety levels and increased motivation for food. In the chronic unpredictable stress model, there was a robust depressive-like behavioral phenotype. Moreover, vmPFC HFS, in a comparison of all stimulated targets, produced the most profound antidepressant effects with enhanced hedonia, reduced anxiety and decreased forced-swim immobility. In the following set of electrophysiological and histochemical experiments designed to unravel some of the underlying mechanisms, we found that vmPFC HFS evoked a specific modulation of the serotonergic neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN), which have long been linked to mood. Finally, using a neuronal mapping approach by means of c-Fos expression, we found that vmPFC HFS modulated a brain circuit linked to the DRN and known to be involved in affect. In conclusion, HFS of the vmPFC produced the most potent antidepressant effects in naive rats and rats subjected to stress by mechanisms also including the DRN.

  11. Amygdala kindling potentiates seizure-stimulated immediate-early gene expression in rat cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Duman, R S; Craig, J S; Winston, S M; Deutch, A Y; Hernandez, T D

    1992-11-01

    Kindling induces long-term adaptations in neuronal function that lead to a decreased threshold for induction of seizures. In the present study, the influence of amygdala kindling on levels of mRNA for the immediate-early genes (IEGs) c-fos, c-jun, and NGF1-A were examined both before and after an acute electroconvulsive seizure (ECS). Although amygdala kindling did not significantly influence resting levels of c-fos mRNA in cerebral cortex, ECS-stimulated levels of c-fos mRNA (examined 45 min after ECS) were approximately twofold greater in the cerebral cortex of kindled rats relative to sham-treated controls. The influence of kindling on IEG expression was dependent on the time course of kindling, as ECS-stimulated levels of c-fos mRNA were not significantly increased in stage 2 kindled animals. ECS-stimulated levels of c-jun and NGF1-A mRNA were also significantly increased in cerebral cortex of kindled rats relative to sham-treated controls. The influence of kindling on IEG expression was long-lasting because an acute ECS stimulus significantly elevated levels of c-fos and c-jun mRNA in the cerebral cortex of animals that were kindled 5 months previously. In contrast to these effects in cerebral cortex, kindling did not influence ECS-stimulated levels of c-fos mRNA in hippocampus. Finally, immunohistochemical studies revealed lamina-specific changes in the cerebral cortex.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Electrical stimulation alleviates depressive-like behaviors of rats: investigation of brain targets and potential mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Lim, L W; Prickaerts, J; Huguet, G; Kadar, E; Hartung, H; Sharp, T; Temel, Y

    2015-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a promising therapy for patients with refractory depression. However, key questions remain with regard to which brain target(s) should be used for stimulation, and which mechanisms underlie the therapeutic effects. Here, we investigated the effect of DBS, with low- and high-frequency stimulation (LFS, HFS), in different brain regions (ventromedial prefrontal cortex, vmPFC; cingulate cortex, Cg; nucleus accumbens (NAc) core or shell; lateral habenula, LHb; and ventral tegmental area) on a variety of depressive-like behaviors using rat models. In the naive animal study, we found that HFS of the Cg, vmPFC, NAc core and LHb reduced anxiety levels and increased motivation for food. In the chronic unpredictable stress model, there was a robust depressive-like behavioral phenotype. Moreover, vmPFC HFS, in a comparison of all stimulated targets, produced the most profound antidepressant effects with enhanced hedonia, reduced anxiety and decreased forced-swim immobility. In the following set of electrophysiological and histochemical experiments designed to unravel some of the underlying mechanisms, we found that vmPFC HFS evoked a specific modulation of the serotonergic neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN), which have long been linked to mood. Finally, using a neuronal mapping approach by means of c-Fos expression, we found that vmPFC HFS modulated a brain circuit linked to the DRN and known to be involved in affect. In conclusion, HFS of the vmPFC produced the most potent antidepressant effects in naive rats and rats subjected to stress by mechanisms also including the DRN. PMID:25826110

  13. Amoxapine inhibition of GABA-stimulated chloride conductance: Investigations of potential sites of activity

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, M.; Knapp, R.J.; Yamamura, H.I. ); Malatynska, E. )

    1989-01-01

    Amoxapine inhibits GABA-stimulated chloride conductance by acting on the GABA{sub A}-receptor chloride-ionophore complex which can be studied using membrane vesicles prepared from rat cerebral cortex. Amoxapine produces a right shift in the GABA concentration-response curve for the stimulation of {sup 36}Cl{sup {minus}} uptake into these vesicles with no apparent change in the maximum response. Schild analysis of these data gave a pA{sub 2} value of 5.52 with a slope of 0.79. Amoxapine inhibits the binding of the GABA{sub A} receptor selective antagonist ({sup 3}H)SR 95531 with an IC{sub 50} value of 3.45 {mu}M and a pseudo Hill coefficient of 0.83. In contrast, 10 {mu}M amoxapine inhibits ({sup 3}H) flunitrazepam binding by less than 25% while the benzodiazepine antagonist Ro 15-1788 reduces the amoxapine inhibition of GABA-stimulated chloride conductance only at high concentrations.

  14. Fibroblast Response to Lanthanoid Metal Ion Stimulation: Potential Contribution to Fibrotic Tissue Injury

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, William; Perone, Patricia; Walker, Kyle; Bhagavathula, Narasimharao; Aslam, Muhammad Nadeem; DaSilva, Marissa; Dame, Michael K.; Varani, James

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare each of the 14 naturally occurring lanthanoid metal ions for ability to stimulate pro-fibrotic responses in human dermal fibroblasts. When fibroblasts were exposed to individual lanthanoids over the concentration range of 1–100 μM, increased proliferation was observed with each of the agents as compared with control cells that were already proliferating rapidly in a growth factor-enriched culture medium. Dose-response differences were observed among the individual metal ions. Matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 levels were also increased in response to lanthanoid exposure but type I procollagen production was not. A dose–response relationship between induction of proliferation and increased MMP-1 was observed. Non-lanthanoid transition metal ions (aluminum, copper, cobalt, iron, magnesium, manganese, nickel, and zinc) were examined in the same assays; there was little stimulation with any of these metals. When epidermal keratinocytes were examined in place of dermal fibroblasts, there was no growth stimulation with any of the lanthanoids. Several of the lanthanoid metals inhibited keratinocyte proliferation at higher concentrations (50–100 μM). PMID:21484406

  15. Comparative investigations of manual action representations: evidence that chimpanzees represent the costs of potential future actions involving tools

    PubMed Central

    Frey, Scott H.; Povinelli, Daniel J.

    2012-01-01

    The ability to adjust one's ongoing actions in the anticipation of forthcoming task demands is considered as strong evidence for the existence of internal action representations. Studies of action selection in tool use reveal that the behaviours that we choose in the present moment differ depending on what we intend to do next. Further, they point to a specialized role for mechanisms within the human cerebellum and dominant left cerebral hemisphere in representing the likely sensory costs of intended future actions. Recently, the question of whether similar mechanisms exist in other primates has received growing, but still limited, attention. Here, we present data that bear on this issue from a species that is a natural user of tools, our nearest living relative, the chimpanzee. In experiment 1, a subset of chimpanzees showed a non-significant tendency for their grip preferences to be affected by anticipation of the demands associated with bringing a tool's baited end to their mouths. In experiment 2, chimpanzees' initial grip preferences were consistently affected by anticipation of the forthcoming movements in a task that involves using a tool to extract a food reward. The partial discrepancy between the results of these two studies is attributed to the ability to accurately represent differences between the motor costs associated with executing the two response alternatives available within each task. These findings suggest that chimpanzees are capable of accurately representing the costs of intended future actions, and using those predictions to select movements in the present even in the context of externally directed tool use. PMID:22106426

  16. The Observation of Manual Grasp Actions Affects the Control of Speech: A Combined Behavioral and Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gentilucci, Maurizio; Campione, Giovanna Cristina; Volta, Riccardo Dalla; Bernardis, Paolo

    2009-01-01

    Does the mirror system affect the control of speech? This issue was addressed in behavioral and Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) experiments. In behavioral experiment 1, participants pronounced the syllable /da/ while observing (1) a hand grasping large and small objects with power and precision grasps, respectively, (2) a foot interacting…

  17. Urocortin2 prolongs action potential duration and modulates potassium currents in guinea pig myocytes and HEK293 cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Li-Zhen; Zhu, Yi-Chun

    2015-07-01

    We previously reported that activation of corticotropin releasing factor receptor type 2 by urocortin2 up-regulates both L-type Ca(2+) channels and intracellular Ca(2+) concentration in ventricular myocytes and plays an important role in cardiac contractility and arrhythmogenesis. This study goal was to further test the hypothesis that urocortin2 may modulate action potentials as well as rapidly and slowly activating delayed rectifier potassium currents. With whole cell patch-clamp techniques, action potentials and slowly activating delayed rectifier potassium currents were recorded in isolated guinea pig ventricular myocytes, respectively. And rapidly activating delayed rectifier potassium currents were tested in hERG-HEK293 cells. Urocortin2 produced a time- and concentration-dependent prolongation of action potential duration. The EC50 values of action potential duration and action potential duration at 90% of repolarization were 14.73 and 24.3nM respectively. The prolongation of action potential duration of urocortin2 was almost completely or partly abolished by H-89 (protein kinase A inhibitor) or KB-R7943 (Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchange inhibitor) pretreatment respectively. And urocortin2 caused reduction of rapidly activating delayed rectifier potassium currents in hERG-HEK293 cells. In addition, urocortin2 slowed the rate of slowly activating delayed rectifier potassium channel activation, and rightward shifted the threshold of slowly activating delayed rectifier potassium currents to more positive potentials. Urocortin2 prolonged action potential duration via activation of protein kinase A and Na(+)/ Ca(2+) exchange in isolated guinea pig ventricular myocytes in a time- and concentration- dependent manner. In hERG-HEK293 cells, urocortin2 reduced rapidly activating delayed rectifier potassium current density which may contribute to action potential duration prolongation.

  18. Population of Computational Rabbit-Specific Ventricular Action Potential Models for Investigating Sources of Variability in Cellular Repolarisation

    PubMed Central

    Gemmell, Philip; Burrage, Kevin; Rodriguez, Blanca; Quinn, T. Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Variability is observed at all levels of cardiac electrophysiology. Yet, the underlying causes and importance of this variability are generally unknown, and difficult to investigate with current experimental techniques. The aim of the present study was to generate populations of computational ventricular action potential models that reproduce experimentally observed intercellular variability of repolarisation (represented by action potential duration) and to identify its potential causes. A systematic exploration of the effects of simultaneously varying the magnitude of six transmembrane current conductances (transient outward, rapid and slow delayed rectifier K+, inward rectifying K+, L-type Ca2+, and Na+/K+ pump currents) in two rabbit-specific ventricular action potential models (Shannon et al. and Mahajan et al.) at multiple cycle lengths (400, 600, 1,000 ms) was performed. This was accomplished with distributed computing software specialised for multi-dimensional parameter sweeps and grid execution. An initial population of 15,625 parameter sets was generated for both models at each cycle length. Action potential durations of these populations were compared to experimentally derived ranges for rabbit ventricular myocytes. 1,352 parameter sets for the Shannon model and 779 parameter sets for the Mahajan model yielded action potential duration within the experimental range, demonstrating that a wide array of ionic conductance values can be used to simulate a physiological rabbit ventricular action potential. Furthermore, by using clutter-based dimension reordering, a technique that allows visualisation of multi-dimensional spaces in two dimensions, the interaction of current conductances and their relative importance to the ventricular action potential at different cycle lengths were revealed. Overall, this work represents an important step towards a better understanding of the role that variability in current conductances may play in experimentally observed

  19. Jak/Stat Signaling Stimulates Zebrafish Optic Nerve Regeneration and Overcomes the Inhibitory Actions of Socs3 and Sfpq

    PubMed Central

    Elsaeidi, Fairouz; Bemben, Michael A.; Zhao, Xiao-Feng

    2014-01-01

    The regenerative failure of mammalian optic axons is partly mediated by Socs3-dependent inhibition of Jak/Stat signaling (Smith et al., 2009, 2011). Whether Jak/Stat signaling is part of the normal regenerative response observed in animals that exhibit an intrinsic capacity for optic nerve regeneration, such as zebrafish, remains unknown. Nor is it known whether the repression of regenerative inhibitors, such as Socs3, contributes to the robust regenerative response of zebrafish to optic nerve damage. Here we report that Jak/Stat signaling stimulates optic nerve regeneration in zebrafish. We found that IL-6 family cytokines, acting via Gp130-coupled receptors, stimulate Jak/Stat3 signaling in retinal ganglion cells after optic nerve injury. Among these cytokines, we found that CNTF, IL-11, and Clcf1/Crlf1a can stimulate optic axon regrowth. Surprisingly, optic nerve injury stimulated the expression of Socs3 and Sfpq (splicing factor, proline/glutamine rich) that attenuate optic nerve regeneration. These proteins were induced in a Jak/Stat-dependent manner, stimulated each other's expression and suppressed the expression of regeneration-associated genes. In vivo, the injury-dependent induction of Socs3 and Sfpq inhibits optic nerve regeneration but does not block it. We identified a robust induction of multiple cytokine genes in zebrafish retinal ganglion cells that may contribute to their ability to overcome these inhibitory factors. These studies not only identified mechanisms underlying optic nerve regeneration in fish but also suggest new molecular targets for enhancing optic nerve regeneration in mammals. PMID:24523552

  20. The Belem Framework for Action: Harnessing the Power and Potential of Adult Learning and Education for a Viable Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adult Learning, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the Belem Framework for Action. This framework focuses on harnessing the power and potential of adult learning and education for a viable future. This framework begins with a preamble on adult education and towards lifelong learning.

  1. Noxious mechanical heterotopic stimulation induces inhibition of the spinal dorsal horn neuronal network: analysis of spinal somatosensory-evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Meléndez-Gallardo, J; Eblen-Zajjur, A

    2016-09-01

    Most of the endogenous pain modulation (EPM) involves the spinal dorsal horn (SDH). EPM including diffuse noxious inhibitory controls have been extensively described in oligoneuronal electrophysiological recordings but less attention had been paid to responses of the SDH neuronal population to heterotopic noxious stimulation (HNS). Spinal somatosensory-evoked potentials (SEP) offer the possibility to evaluate the neuronal network behavior, reflecting the incoming afferent volleys along the entry root, SDH interneuron activities and the primary afferent depolarization. SEP from de lumbar cord dorsum were evaluated during mechanical heterotopic noxious stimuli. Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 12) were Laminectomized (T10-L3). The sural nerve of the left hind paw was electrically stimulated (5 mA, 0.5 ms, 0.05 Hz) to induce lumbar SEP. The HNS (mechanic clamp) was applied sequentially to the tail, right hind paw, right forepaw, muzzle and left forepaw during sural stimulation. N wave amplitude decreases (-16.6 %) compared to control conditions when HNS was applied to all areas of stimulation. This effect was more intense for muzzle stimulation (-23.5 %). N wave duration also decreased by -23.6 %. HNS did not change neither the amplitude nor the duration of the P wave but dramatically increases the dispersion of these two parameters. The results of the present study strongly suggest that a HNS applied to different parts of the body is able to reduce the integrated electrical response of the SDH, suggesting that not only wide dynamic range neurons but many others in the SDH are modulated by the EPM. PMID:27207681

  2. Dopamine Modulates Spike Timing-Dependent Plasticity and Action Potential Properties in CA1 Pyramidal Neurons of Acute Rat Hippocampal Slices

    PubMed Central

    Edelmann, Elke; Lessmann, Volkmar

    2011-01-01

    Spike timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) is a cellular model of Hebbian synaptic plasticity which is believed to underlie memory formation. In an attempt to establish a STDP paradigm in CA1 of acute hippocampal slices from juvenile rats (P15–20), we found that changes in excitability resulting from different slice preparation protocols correlate with the success of STDP induction. Slice preparation with sucrose containing ACSF prolonged rise time, reduced frequency adaptation, and decreased latency of action potentials in CA1 pyramidal neurons compared to preparation in conventional ASCF, while other basal electrophysiological parameters remained unaffected. Whereas we observed prominent timing-dependent long-term potentiation (t-LTP) to 171 ± 10% of controls in conventional ACSF, STDP was absent in sucrose prepared slices. This sucrose-induced STDP deficit could not be rescued by stronger STDP paradigms, applying either more pre- and/or postsynaptic stimuli, or by a higher stimulation frequency. Importantly, slice preparation with sucrose containing ACSF did not eliminate theta-burst stimulation induced LTP in CA1 in field potential recordings in our rat hippocampal slices. Application of dopamine (for 10–20 min) to sucrose prepared slices completely rescued t-LTP and recovered action potential properties back to levels observed in ACSF prepared slices. Conversely, acute inhibition of D1 receptor signaling impaired t-LTP in ACSF prepared slices. No similar restoring effect for STDP as seen with dopamine was observed in response to the β-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol. ELISA measurements demonstrated a significant reduction of endogenous dopamine levels (to 61.9 ± 6.9% of ACSF values) in sucrose prepared slices. These results suggest that dopamine signaling is involved in regulating the efficiency to elicit STDP in CA1 pyramidal neurons. PMID:22065958

  3. The repair of sub-lethal damage and the stimulated repair of potentially lethal damage in Saintpaulia.

    PubMed

    Leenhouts, H P; Sijsma, M J; Litwiniszyn, M; Chadwick, K H

    1981-10-01

    The repair of sublethal and potentially lethal damage in stationary resting epidermal cells of Saintpaulia has been investigated. Fractionation experiments reveal an efficient repair of sublethal damage with a half-life of 1.9 hours. No repair of potentially lethal damage was noted when cultivation of the leaves was delayed for 24 hours after irradiation. At delay times of 2, 3 and 4 days some repair of potentially lethal damage has been found. A small pre-dose given 24 hours before a challenging dose improved the cells' chance to regenerate and the improvement has been shown to be compatible with an improved repair of potentially lethal damage induced by X-rays and fast neutrons. It hs been shown that the stimulated repair process takes 12 to 24 hours to develop, is dependent on the size of the pre-dose, has single-hit dose kinetics, and an r.b.e. of 1 for neutrons. With delayed cultivation of 2 days the stimulated repair process leads to an alteration in the shape of the regeneration (survival)-dose relationship which increases the low dose r.b.e. for neutrons from 10 to 35. PMID:6975252

  4. A 10-form gauge potential and an M-9-brane Wess-Zumino action in massive 11D theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, T.

    2000-03-01

    We discuss some properties of an M-9-brane in ``massive 11D theory'' proposed by Bergshoeff, Lozano and Ortin. A 10-form gauge potential is consistently introduced into the massive 11D supergravity, and an M-9-brane Wess-Zumino action is constructed as that of a gauged /σ-model. Using duality relations is crucial in deriving the action, which we learn from the study of a 9-form potential in 10D massive IIA theory. A target space solution of an M-9-brane with a non-vanishing 10-form gauge field is also obtained, whose source is shown to be the M-9-brane effective action.

  5. Intracellular recordings of action potentials by an extracellular nanoscale field-effect transistor

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Xiaojie; Gao, Ruixuan; Xie, Ping; Cohen-Karni, Tzahi; Qing, Quan; Choe, Hwan Sung; Tian, Bozhi; Jiang, Xiaocheng; Lieber, Charles M.

    2012-01-01

    The ability to make electrical measurements inside cells has led to many important advances in electrophysiology1-6. The patch clamp technique, in which a glass micropipette filled with electrolyte is inserted into a cell, offers both high signal-to-noise ratio and temporal resolution1,2. Ideally the micropipette should be as small as possible to increase the spatial resolution and reduce the invasiveness of the measurement, but the overall performance of the technique depends on the impedance of the interface between the micropipette and the cell interior1,2, which limits how small the micropipette can be. Techniques that involve inserting metal or carbon microelectrodes into cells are subject to similar constraints4,7-9. Field-effect transistors (FETs) can also record electric potentials inside cells10, and since their performance does not depend on impedance11,12, they can be made much smaller than micropipettes and microelectrodes. Moreover, FET arrays are better suited for multiplexed measurements. Previously we have demonstrated FET-based intracellular recording with kinked nanowire structures10, but the kink configuration and device design places limits on the probe size and the potential for multiplexing. Here we report a new approach where a SiO2 nanotube is synthetically integrated on top of a nanoscale FET. After penetrating the cell membrane, the SiO2 nanotube brings the cell cytosol into contact with the FET and enables the recording of intracellular transmembrane potential. Simulations show that the bandwidth of this branched intracellular nanotube FET (BIT-FET) is high enough for it to record fast action potentials even when the nanotube diameter is decreased to 3 nm, a length scale which is well below that accessible with other methods1,2,4. Studies of cardiomyocyte cells demonstrate that when brought close, the nanotubes of phospholipid-modified BIT-FETs spontaneously penetrate the cell membrane to yield stable, full-amplitude intracellular action

  6. Intracellular recordings of action potentials by an extracellular nanoscale field-effect transistor.

    PubMed

    Duan, Xiaojie; Gao, Ruixuan; Xie, Ping; Cohen-Karni, Tzahi; Qing, Quan; Choe, Hwan Sung; Tian, Bozhi; Jiang, Xiaocheng; Lieber, Charles M

    2012-03-01

    The ability to make electrical measurements inside cells has led to many important advances in electrophysiology. The patch clamp technique, in which a glass micropipette filled with electrolyte is inserted into a cell, offers both high signal-to-noise ratio and temporal resolution. Ideally, the micropipette should be as small as possible to increase the spatial resolution and reduce the invasiveness of the measurement, but the overall performance of the technique depends on the impedance of the interface between the micropipette and the cell interior, which limits how small the micropipette can be. Techniques that involve inserting metal or carbon microelectrodes into cells are subject to similar constraints. Field-effect transistors (FETs) can also record electric potentials inside cells, and because their performance does not depend on impedance, they can be made much smaller than micropipettes and microelectrodes. Moreover, FET arrays are better suited for multiplexed measurements. Previously, we have demonstrated FET-based intracellular recording with kinked nanowire structures, but the kink configuration and device design places limits on the probe size and the potential for multiplexing. Here, we report a new approach in which a SiO2 nanotube is synthetically integrated on top of a nanoscale FET. This nanotube penetrates the cell membrane, bringing the cell cytosol into contact with the FET, which is then able to record the intracellular transmembrane potential. Simulations show that the bandwidth of this branched intracellular nanotube FET (BIT-FET) is high enough for it to record fast action potentials even when the nanotube diameter is decreased to 3 nm, a length scale well below that accessible with other methods. Studies of cardiomyocyte cells demonstrate that when phospholipid-modified BIT-FETs are brought close to cells, the nanotubes can spontaneously penetrate the cell membrane to allow the full-amplitude intracellular action potential to be

  7. Potential Mechanisms of Action in the Treatment of Social Impairment and Disorganization in Adolescents with ADHD

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Steven W.; Schultz, Brandon K.; Zoromski, Allison K.

    2014-01-01

    Two important domains that can be impaired in adolescents with ADHD are organization and social functioning; however, the development of interventions to target these areas in adolescents is in the early stages. Currently, small efficacy trials are beginning to be used to conduct preliminary tests on the proposed mechanisms of action for these interventions. These two studies examined the efficacy of organization and social functioning interventions for adolescents with ADHD, as well as the potential mechanisms of action for each intervention. Results from the organization intervention provide support for a significant relationship between performance on the organization checklist and overall GPA; however, there was no meaningful pattern of relationships between achieving mastery of the organization tasks and grades within quarter. Further, results from the social functioning intervention support a moderate relationship between performance on process measures of response to the intervention and outcome measures of social functioning. Results of this study provide implications for modifications to the measures and intervention procedures in future research. PMID:24748901

  8. Eudragit E100® potentiates the bactericidal action of ofloxacin against fluoroquinolone-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Romero, Verónica L; Pons, Patricia; Bocco, José L; Manzo, Rubén H; Alovero, Fabiana L

    2012-09-01

    We report the enhanced bactericidal activity of ofloxacin in drug-containing Eudragit E100(®) dispersions (EuCl-OFX) against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the effect of the cationic polymer on bacterial membrane. Organisms treated with EuCl-OFX showed changes in cell morphology, altered outer membrane (OM) and cytoplasm with low electrodensity areas. Zeta potential of bacterial surface was shifted to positive. Sensitization to lytic agents was also observed. A profound effect on bacterial size, granularity and membrane depolarization was found by flow cytometry. Cultures exposed to drug-free polymer also showed some damaged bacterial membranes, but there was no significant cell death. Inhibition of P. aeruginosa by EuCl-OFX may involve surface effect and, to some extent, permeation effect. The cationic polymer act to mitigate the electronegativity of cell surface in the process of disorganizing the OM, rendering it more permeable to antibiotic. In addition, cytoplasmic membrane depolarization turns bacterial cell more vulnerable. The effects on membranes combined with the mechanism of action of quinolone explain the improved bactericidal action exhibited by EuCl-OFX. The behavior described for Eudragit E100(®) against P. aeruginosa may be a useful tool to broaden the spectrum of antibiotics whose clinical use is limited by the impermeability of the bacterial OM.

  9. Contribution of Na(v)1.8 sodium channels to action potential electrogenesis in DRG neurons.

    PubMed

    Renganathan, M; Cummins, T R; Waxman, S G

    2001-08-01

    C-type dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons can generate tetrodotoxin-resistant (TTX-R) sodium-dependent action potentials. However, multiple sodium channels are expressed in these neurons, and the molecular identity of the TTX-R sodium channels that contribute to action potential production in these neurons has not been established. In this study, we used current-clamp recordings to compare action potential electrogenesis in Na(v)1.8 (+/+) and (-/-) small DRG neurons maintained for 2-8 h in vitro to examine the role of sodium channel Na(v)1.8 (alpha-SNS) in action potential electrogenesis. Although there was no significant difference in resting membrane potential, input resistance, current threshold, or voltage threshold in Na(v)1.8 (+/+) and (-/-) DRG neurons, there were significant differences in action potential electrogenesis. Most Na(v)1.8 (+/+) neurons generate all-or-none action potentials, whereas most of Na(v)1.8 (-/-) neurons produce smaller graded responses. The peak of the response was significantly reduced in Na(v)1.8 (-/-) neurons [31.5 +/- 2.2 (SE) mV] compared with Na(v)1.8 (+/+) neurons (55.0 +/- 4.3 mV). The maximum rise slope was 84.7 +/- 11.2 mV/ms in Na(v)1.8 (+/+) neurons, significantly faster than in Na(v)1.8 (-/-) neurons where it was 47.2 +/- 1.3 mV/ms. Calculations based on the action potential overshoot in Na(v)1.8 (+/+) and (-/-) neurons, following blockade of Ca(2+) currents, indicate that Na(v)1.8 contributes a substantial fraction (80-90%) of the inward membrane current that flows during the rising phase of the action potential. We found that fast TTX-sensitive Na(+) channels can produce all-or-none action potentials in some Na(v)1.8 (-/-) neurons but, presumably as a result of steady-state inactivation of these channels, electrogenesis in Na(v)1.8 (-/-) neurons is more sensitive to membrane depolarization than in Na(v)1.8 (+/+) neurons, and, in the absence of Na(v)1.8, is attenuated with even modest depolarization. These observations

  10. Cancer Driver Log (CanDL): Catalog of Potentially Actionable Cancer Mutations.

    PubMed

    Damodaran, Senthilkumar; Miya, Jharna; Kautto, Esko; Zhu, Eliot; Samorodnitsky, Eric; Datta, Jharna; Reeser, Julie W; Roychowdhury, Sameek

    2015-09-01

    Massively parallel sequencing technologies have enabled characterization of genomic alterations across multiple tumor types. Efforts have focused on identifying driver mutations because they represent potential targets for therapy. However, because of the presence of driver and passenger mutations, it is often challenging to assign the clinical relevance of specific mutations observed in patients. Currently, there are multiple databases and tools that provide in silico assessment for potential drivers; however, there is no comprehensive resource for mutations with functional characterization. Therefore, we created an expert-curated database of potentially actionable driver mutations for molecular pathologists to facilitate annotation of cancer genomic testing. We reviewed scientific literature to identify variants that have been functionally characterized in vitro or in vivo as driver mutations. We obtained the chromosome location and all possible nucleotide positions for each amino acid change and uploaded them to the Cancer Driver Log (CanDL) database with associated literature reference indicating functional driver evidence. In addition to a simple interface, the database allows users to download all or selected genes as a comma-separated values file for incorporation into their own analysis pipeline. Furthermore, the database includes a mechanism for third-party contributions to support updates for novel driver mutations. Overall, this freely available database will facilitate rapid annotation of cancer genomic testing in molecular pathology laboratories for mutations.

  11. Dynamics of action potential firing in electrically connected striatal fast-spiking interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Giovanni; Nieus, Thierry R.; Maggi, Silvia; Taverna, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    Fast-spiking interneurons (FSIs) play a central role in organizing the output of striatal neural circuits, yet functional interactions between these cells are still largely unknown. Here we investigated the interplay of action potential (AP) firing between electrically connected pairs of identified FSIs in mouse striatal slices. In addition to a loose coordination of firing activity mediated by membrane potential coupling, gap junctions (GJ) induced a frequency-dependent inhibition of spike discharge in coupled cells. At relatively low firing rates (2–20 Hz), some APs were tightly synchronized whereas others were inhibited. However, burst firing at intermediate frequencies (25–60 Hz) mostly induced spike inhibition, while at frequencies >50–60 Hz FSI pairs tended to synchronize. Spike silencing occurred even in the absence of GABAergic synapses or persisted after a complete block of GABAA receptors. Pharmacological suppression of presynaptic spike afterhyperpolarization (AHP) caused postsynaptic spikelets to become more prone to trigger spikes at near-threshold potentials, leading to a mostly synchronous firing activity. The complex pattern of functional coordination mediated by GJ endows FSIs with peculiar dynamic properties that may be critical in controlling striatal-dependent behavior. PMID:24294191

  12. Boron-doped nanocrystalline diamond microelectrode arrays monitor cardiac action potentials.

    PubMed

    Maybeck, Vanessa; Edgington, Robert; Bongrain, Alexandre; Welch, Joseph O; Scorsone, Emanuel; Bergonzo, Philippe; Jackman, Richard B; Offenhäusser, Andreas

    2014-02-01

    The expansion of diamond-based electronics in the area of biological interfacing has not been as thoroughly explored as applications in electrochemical sensing. However, the biocompatibility of diamond, large safe electrochemical window, stability, and tunable electronic properties provide opportunities to develop new devices for interfacing with electrogenic cells. Here, the fabrication of microelectrode arrays (MEAs) with boron-doped nanocrystalline diamond (BNCD) electrodes and their interfacing with cardiomyocyte-like HL-1 cells to detect cardiac action potentials are presented. A nonreductive means of structuring doped and undoped diamond on the same substrate is shown. The resulting BNCD electrodes show high stability under mechanical stress generated by the cells. It is shown that by fabricating the entire surface of the MEA with NCD, in patterns of conductive doped, and isolating undoped regions, signal detection may be improved up to four-fold over BNCD electrodes passivated with traditional isolators.

  13. Effect of intense sound exposure on cochlear microphonics and whole nerve action potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamura, K.; Yamamoto, N.; Kohyama, A.; Sawada, Y.; Ohno, H.; Saitoh, Y.

    1989-06-01

    An investigation was carried out to determine whether or not the critical band with Temporary Threshold Shift (TTS) is affected by exposure to high frequency sound. The function of the cochlea and the 8th nerve in guinea pigs was estimated by the intensity function and maximum output voltage of cochlear microphonics (CM) and by whole nerve action potential (Ap). Our results showed that both the intensity function and the maximum output voltage of CM and Ap decreased. Ap obtained at the test frequency higher, by half an octave, than the center frequency of the exposure noise was especially lowered. These results suggest that the critical band with TTS of both Ap and CM may be affected in exposure to high frequency sound.

  14. Action potentials occur spontaneously in squid giant axons with moderately alkaline intracellular pH.

    PubMed

    Clay, J R; Shrier, A

    2001-10-01

    This report demonstrates a novel finding from the classic giant axon preparation of the squid. Namely, the axon can be made to fire autonomously (spontaneously occurring action potentials) when the intracellular pH (pH(i)) was increased to about 7.7, or higher. (Physiological pH(i) is 7.3.) The frequency of firing was 33 Hz (T = 5 degrees ). No changes in frequency or in the voltage waveform itself were observed when pH(i) was increased from 7.7 up to 8.5. In other words, the effect has a threshold at a pH(i) of about 7.7. A mathematical model that is sufficient to mimic these results is provided using a modified version of the Clay (1998) description of the axonal ionic currents.

  15. Control and Plasticity of the Presynaptic Action Potential Waveform at Small CNS Nerve Terminals

    PubMed Central

    Hoppa, Michael B.; Gouzer, Geraldine; Armbruster, Moritz; Ryan, Timothy A.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The steep dependence of exocytosis on Ca2+ entry at nerve terminals implies that voltage control of both Ca2+ channel opening and the driving force for Ca2+ entry are powerful levers in sculpting synaptic efficacy. Using fast, genetically encoded voltage indicators in dissociated primary neurons, we show that at small nerve terminals K+ channels constrain the peak voltage of the presynaptic action potential (APSYN) to values much lower than those at cell somas. This key APSYN property additionally shows adaptive plasticity: manipulations that increase presynaptic Ca2+ channel abundance and release probability result in a commensurate lowering of the APSYN peak and narrowing of the waveform, while manipulations that decrease presynaptic Ca2+ channel abundance do the opposite. This modulation is eliminated upon blockade of Kv3.1 and Kv1 channels. Our studies thus reveal that adaptive plasticity in the APSYN waveform serves as an important regulator of synaptic function. PMID:25447742

  16. Mechanism of Action and Clinical Potential of Fingolimod for the Treatment of Stroke.

    PubMed

    Li, Wentao; Xu, Haoliang; Testai, Fernando D

    2016-01-01

    Fingolimod (FTY720) is an orally bio-available immunomodulatory drug currently approved by the FDA for the treatment of multiple sclerosis. Currently, there is a significant interest in the potential benefits of FTY720 on stroke outcomes. FTY720 and the sphingolipid signaling pathway it modulates has a ubiquitous presence in the central nervous system and both rodent models and pilot clinical trials seem to indicate that the drug may improve overall functional recovery in different stroke subtypes. Although the precise mechanisms behind these beneficial effects are yet unclear, there is evidence that FTY720 has a role in regulating cerebrovascular responses, blood-brain barrier permeability, and cell survival in the event of cerebrovascular insult. In this article, we critically review the data obtained from the latest laboratory findings and clinical trials involving both ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, and attempt to form a cohesive picture of FTY720's mechanisms of action in stroke. PMID:27617002

  17. Effect of Cardiac Tissue Anisotropy on Three-Dimensional Electrical Action Potential Propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zhi Zhu; Liu, Jing

    A three-dimensional (3D) electrical action potential propagation model is developed to characterize the integrated effect of cardiac tissue structure using a homogenous function with a spatial inhomogeneity. This method may be more effective for bridging the gap between computational models and experimental data for cardiac tissue anisotropy. A generalized 3D eikonal relation considering anisotropy and a self-similar evolution solution of such a relation are derived to identify the effect of anisotropy and predict the anisotropy-induced electrical wave propagation instabilities. Furthermore, the phase field equation is introduced to obtain the complex three-dimensional numerical solution of the new correlation. The present results are expected to be valuable for better understanding the physiological behavior of cardiac tissues.

  18. A supervised multi-sensor matched filter for the detection of extracellular action potentials.

    PubMed

    Szymanska, Agnieszka F; Doty, Michael; Scannell, Kathryn V; Nenadic, Zoran

    2014-01-01

    Multi-sensor extracellular recording takes advantage of several electrode channels to record from multiple neurons at the same time. However, the resulting low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) combined with biological noise makes signal detection, the first step of any neurophysiological data analysis, difficult. A matched filter was therefore designed to better detect extracellular action potentials (EAPs) from multi-sensor extracellular recordings. The detector was tested on tetrode data from a locust antennal lobe and assessed against three trained analysts. 25 EAPs and noise samples were selected manually from the data and used for training. To reduce complexity, the filter assumed that the underlying noise in the data was spatially white. The detector performed with an average TP and FP rate of 84.62% and 16.63% respectively. This high level of performance indicates the algorithm is suitable for widespread use.

  19. Mechanism of Action and Clinical Potential of Fingolimod for the Treatment of Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wentao; Xu, Haoliang; Testai, Fernando D.

    2016-01-01

    Fingolimod (FTY720) is an orally bio-available immunomodulatory drug currently approved by the FDA for the treatment of multiple sclerosis. Currently, there is a significant interest in the potential benefits of FTY720 on stroke outcomes. FTY720 and the sphingolipid signaling pathway it modulates has a ubiquitous presence in the central nervous system and both rodent models and pilot clinical trials seem to indicate that the drug may improve overall functional recovery in different stroke subtypes. Although the precise mechanisms behind these beneficial effects are yet unclear, there is evidence that FTY720 has a role in regulating cerebrovascular responses, blood–brain barrier permeability, and cell survival in the event of cerebrovascular insult. In this article, we critically review the data obtained from the latest laboratory findings and clinical trials involving both ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, and attempt to form a cohesive picture of FTY720’s mechanisms of action in stroke.

  20. Anthropomorphizing the Mouse Cardiac Action Potential via a Novel Dynamic Clamp Method

    PubMed Central

    Ahrens-Nicklas, Rebecca C.; Christini, David J.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Interspecies differences can limit the translational value of excitable cells isolated from model organisms. It can be difficult to extrapolate from a drug- or mutation-induced phenotype in mice to human pathophysiology because mouse and human cardiac electrodynamics differ greatly. We present a hybrid computational-experimental technique, the cell-type transforming clamp, which is designed to overcome such differences by using a calculated compensatory current to convert the macroscopic electrical behavior of an isolated cell into that of a different cell type. We demonstrate the technique's utility by evaluating drug arrhythmogenicity in murine cardiomyocytes that are transformed to behave like human myocytes. Whereas we use the cell-type transforming clamp in this work to convert between mouse and human electrodynamics, the technique could be adapted to convert between the action potential morphologies of any two cell types of interest. PMID:19917221

  1. Enhanced Action Potential Passage Through the Node of Ranvier of Myelinated Axons via Proton Hopping.

    PubMed

    Kier, Lemont; Hall, Lowell; Tombes, Robert M

    2015-01-01

    Nerve impulses travel along myelinated axons as much as 300-fold faster than they do along unmyelinated axons. Myelination is essential for normal nervous system behavior in vertebrates as illustrated by leukodystrophies, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) or multiple sclerosis (MS), where myelin is degenerated or damaged. The increased conduction velocity that occurs in myelinated axons is dependent on gaps in the myelin called Nodes of Ranvier that are enriched in ion channels. These Nodes are separated by long stretches of myelin insulation where no transmembrane ion conductance occurs. It is believed that the action potential jumps or skips between nodes, conserving its information content, while maintaining its speed. In this study, a model is presented that implicates Nodes of Ranvier as responsible for regenerating the proton hopping that is responsible for nerve impulse conductance in myelinated axons.

  2. Mechanism of Action and Clinical Potential of Fingolimod for the Treatment of Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wentao; Xu, Haoliang; Testai, Fernando D.

    2016-01-01

    Fingolimod (FTY720) is an orally bio-available immunomodulatory drug currently approved by the FDA for the treatment of multiple sclerosis. Currently, there is a significant interest in the potential benefits of FTY720 on stroke outcomes. FTY720 and the sphingolipid signaling pathway it modulates has a ubiquitous presence in the central nervous system and both rodent models and pilot clinical trials seem to indicate that the drug may improve overall functional recovery in different stroke subtypes. Although the precise mechanisms behind these beneficial effects are yet unclear, there is evidence that FTY720 has a role in regulating cerebrovascular responses, blood–brain barrier permeability, and cell survival in the event of cerebrovascular insult. In this article, we critically review the data obtained from the latest laboratory findings and clinical trials involving both ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, and attempt to form a cohesive picture of FTY720’s mechanisms of action in stroke. PMID:27617002

  3. Effects of lead acetate on guinea pig - cochear microphonics, action potential, and motor nerve conduction velocity

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamura, K.; Maehara, N.; Terayama, K.; Ueno, N.; Kohyama, A.; Sawada, Y.; Kishi, R.

    1987-04-01

    Segmental demyelination and axonal degeneration of motor nerves induced by lead exposure is well known in man, and animals. The effect of lead acetate exposure to man may involve the cranial nerves, since vertigo and sensory neuronal deafness have been reported among lead workers. However, there are few reports concerning the dose-effects of lead acetate both to the peripheral nerve and the cranial VII nerve with measurement of blood lead concentration. The authors investigated the effects of lead acetate to the cochlea and the VIII nerve using CM (cochlear microphonics) and AP (action potential) of the guinea pigs. The effects of lead acetate to the sciatic nerve were measured by MCV of the sciatic nerve with measurement of blood lead concentration.

  4. Synapse-Level Determination of Action Potential Duration by K(+) Channel Clustering in Axons.

    PubMed

    Rowan, Matthew J M; DelCanto, Gina; Yu, Jianqing J; Kamasawa, Naomi; Christie, Jason M

    2016-07-20

    In axons, an action potential (AP) is thought to be broadcast as an unwavering binary pulse over its arbor, driving neurotransmission uniformly at release sites. Yet by recording from axons of cerebellar stellate cell (SC) interneurons, we show that AP width varies between presynaptic bouton sites, even within the same axon branch. The varicose geometry of SC boutons alone does not impose differences in spike duration. Rather, axonal patching revealed heterogeneous peak conductance densities of currents mediated mainly by fast-activating Kv3-type potassium channels, with clustered hotspots at boutons and restricted expression at adjoining shafts. Blockade of Kv channels at individual boutons indicates that currents immediately local to a release site direct spike repolarization at that location. Thus, the clustered arrangement and variable expression density of Kv3 channels at boutons are key determinants underlying compartmentalized control of AP width in a near synapse-by-synapse manner, multiplying the signaling capacity of these structures. PMID:27346528

  5. Long-Term Potentiation by Theta-Burst Stimulation Using Extracellular Field Potential Recordings in Acute Hippocampal Slices.

    PubMed

    Abrahamsson, Therese; Lalanne, Txomin; Watt, Alanna J; Sjöström, P Jesper

    2016-01-01

    This protocol describes how to carry out theta-burst long-term potentiation (LTP) with extracellular field recordings in acute rodent hippocampal slices. This method is relatively simple and noninvasive and provides a way to sample many neurons simultaneously, making it suitable for applications requiring higher throughput than whole-cell recording. PMID:27250947

  6. Excitable Membranes and Action Potentials in Paramecia: An Analysis of the Electrophysiology of Ciliates

    PubMed Central

    Schlaepfer, Charles H.; Wessel, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    The ciliate Paramecium caudatum possesses an excitable cell membrane whose action potentials (APs) modulate the trajectory of the cell swimming through its freshwater environment. While many stimuli affect the membrane potential and trajectory, students can use current injection and extracellular ionic concentration changes to explore how APs cause reversal of the cell’s motion. Students examine these stimuli through intracellular recordings, also gaining insight into the practices of electrophysiology. Paramecium’s large size of around 150 µm, simple care, and relative ease to penetrate make them ideal model organisms for undergraduate students’ laboratory study. The direct link between behavior and excitable membranes has thought provoking evolutionary implications for the study of paramecia. Recording from the cell, students note a small resting potential around −30 mV, differing from animal resting potentials. By manipulating ion concentrations, APs of the relatively long length of 20–30 ms up to several minutes with depolarizations maxing over 0 mV are observed. Through comparative analysis of membrane potentials and the APs induced by either calcium or barium, students can deduce the causative ions for the APs as well as the mechanisms of paramecium APs. Current injection allows students to calculate quantitative electric characteristics of the membrane. Analysis will follow the literature’s conclusion in a V-Gated Ca++ influx and depolarization resulting in feedback from intracellular Ca++ that inactivates V-Gated Ca++ channels and activates Ca-Dependent K+ channels through a secondary messenger cascade that results in the K+ efflux and repolarization. PMID:26557800

  7. CXCL10/CXCR3 signaling mediates inhibitory action by interferon-gamma on CRF-stimulated adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) release.

    PubMed

    Horiguchi, Kotaro; Fujiwara, Ken; Tsukada, Takehiro; Yoshida, Saishu; Higuchi, Masashi; Tateno, Kozue; Hasegawa, Rumi; Takigami, Shu; Ohsako, Shunji; Yashiro, Takashi; Kato, Takako; Kato, Yukio

    2016-05-01

    Secretion of hormones by the anterior pituitary gland can be stimulated or inhibited by paracrine factors that are produced during inflammatory reactions. The inflammation cytokine interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) is known to inhibit corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF)-stimulated adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) release but its signaling mechanism is not yet known. Using rat anterior pituitary, we previously demonstrated that the CXC chemokine ligand 10 (CXCL10), known as interferon-γ (IFN-γ) inducible protein 10 kDa, is expressed in dendritic cell-like S100β protein-positive (DC-like S100β-positive) cells and that its receptor CXCR3 is expressed in ACTH-producing cells. DC-like S100β-positive cells are a subpopulation of folliculo-stellate cells in the anterior pituitary. In the present study, we examine whether CXCL10/CXCR3 signaling between DC-like S100β-positive cells and ACTH-producing cells mediates inhibition of CRF-activated ACTH-release by IFN-γ, using a CXCR3 antagonist in the primary pituitary cell culture. We found that IFN-γ up-regulated Cxcl10 expression via JAK/STAT signaling and proopiomelanocortin (Pomc) expression, while we reconfirmed that IFN-γ inhibits CRF-stimulated ACTH-release. Next, we used a CXCR3 agonist in primary culture to analyze whether CXCL10 induces Pomc-expression and ACTH-release using a CXCR3 agonist in the primary culture. The CXCR3 agonist significantly stimulated Pomc-expression and inhibited CRF-induced ACTH-release, while ACTH-release in the absence of CRF did not change. Thus, the present study leads us to an assumption that CXCL10/CXCR3 signaling mediates inhibition of the CRF-stimulated ACTH-release by IFN-γ. Our findings bring us to an assumption that CXCL10 from DC-like S100β-positive cells acts as a local modulator of ACTH-release during inflammation.

  8. Mannan Oligosaccharides in Nursery Pig Nutrition and Their Potential Mode of Action

    PubMed Central

    Halas, Veronika; Nochta, Imre

    2012-01-01

    Simple Summary The aim of the paper is to provide a review of mannan oligosaccharide products in relation to their growth promoting effect and mode of action. Mannan oligosaccharide products maintain intestinal integrity and the digestive and absorptive function of the gut in the post-weaning period in pigs and enhance disease resistance by promoting antigen presentation. We find that dietary supplementation has growth promoting effects in pigs kept in a poor hygienic environment, while the positive effect of MOS is not observed in healthy pig herds with high hygienic standards. Abstract Mannan oligosaccharides (MOSs) are often referred to as one of the potential alternatives for antimicrobial growth promoters. The aim of the paper is to provide a review of mannan oligosaccharide products in relation to their growth promoting effect and mode of action based on the latest publications. We discuss the dietary impact of MOSs on (1) microbial changes, (2) morphological changes of gut tissue and digestibility of nutrients, and (3) immune response of pigs after weaning. Dietary MOSs maintain the intestinal integrity and the digestive and absorptive function of the gut in the post-weaning period. Recent results suggest that MOS enhances the disease resistance in swine by promoting antigen presentation facilitating thereby the shift from an innate to an adaptive immune response. Accordingly, dietary MOS supplementation has a potential growth promoting effect in pigs kept in a poor hygienic environment, while the positive effect of MOS is not observed in healthy pig herds with high hygienic standards that are able to maintain a high growth rate after weaning. PMID:26486920

  9. Glutamine and glutamate limit the shortening of action potential duration in anoxia-challenged rabbit hearts

    PubMed Central

    Drake, Kenneth J; Shotwell, Matthew S; Wikswo, John P; Sidorov, Veniamin Y

    2015-01-01

    In clinical conditions, amino acid supplementation is applied to improve contractile function, minimize ischemia/reperfusion injury, and facilitate postoperative recovery. It has been shown that glutamine enhances myocardial ATP/APD (action potential duration) and glutathione/oxidized glutathione ratios, and can increase hexosamine biosynthesis pathway flux, which is believed to play a role in cardioprotection. Here, we studied the effect of glutamine and glutamate on electrical activity in Langendorff-perfused rabbit hearts. The hearts were supplied by Tyrode's media with or without 2.5 mmol/L glutamine and 150 μmol/L glutamate, and exposed to two 6-min anoxias with 20-min recovery in between. Change in APD was detected using a monophasic action potential probe. A nonlinear mixed-effects regression technique was used to evaluate the effect of amino acids on APD over the experiment. Typically, the dynamic of APD change encompasses three phases: short transient increase (more prominent in the first episode), slow decrease, and fast increase (starting with the beginning of recovery). The effect of both anoxic challenge and glutamine/glutamate was cumulative, being more pronounced in the second anoxia. The amino acids' protective effect became largest by the end of anoxia – 20.0% (18.9, 95% CI: [2.6 ms, 35.1 ms]), during the first anoxia and 36.6% (27.1, 95% CI: [7.7 ms, 46.6 ms]), during the second. Following the second anoxia, APD difference between control and supplemented hearts progressively increased, attaining 10.8% (13.6, 95% CI: [4.1 ms, 23.1 ms]) at the experiments' end. Our data reveal APD stabilizing and suggest an antiarrhythmic capacity of amino acid supplementation in anoxic/ischemic conditions. PMID:26333831

  10. Correlation of repolarization of ventricular monophasic action potential with ECG in the murine heart.

    PubMed

    Danik, Stephan; Cabo, Candido; Chiello, Christine; Kang, Sacha; Wit, Andrew L; Coromilas, James

    2002-07-01

    Transgenic mice have become important experimental models in the investigation of mechanisms causing cardiac arrhythmias because of the ability to create strains with alterations in repolarizing membrane currents. It is important to relate alterations in membrane currents in cells to their phenotypic expression on the electrocardiogram (ECG). The murine ECG, however, has unusual characteristics that make interpretation of the phenotypic expression of changes in ventricular repolarization uncertain. The major deflection representing the QRS (referred to as "a") is often followed by a secondary slower deflection ("b") and sometimes a subtle third deflection ("c"). To determine whether the second or third deflections or both represent ventricular repolarization, we recorded the ventricular monophasic action potential (MAP) in open-chest mice and correlated repolarization with the ECG. There was no significant correlation by linear regression, between action potential duration to 50% or 90% repolarization (APD(50) or APD(90)), respectively, of the MAP and either the interval from onset of Q to onset of b (Qb interval) or onset of c (Qc interval). Administration of 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) significantly prolonged APD(50) and APD(90) and the Qb interval, indicating that this deflection on the ECG represents part of ventricular repolarization. After 4-AP, the c wave disappeared, also suggesting that it represents a component of ventricular repolarization. Although it appears that both the b and c waves that follow the Q wave on the ECG represent ventricular repolarization, neither correlates exactly with APD(90) of the MAP. Therefore, an accurate measurement of complete repolarization of the murine ventricle cannot be obtained from the surface ECG. PMID:12063311

  11. In-vitro characterization of a cochlear implant system for recording of evoked compound action potentials

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Modern cochlear implants have integrated recording systems for measuring electrically evoked compound action potentials of the auditory nerve. The characterization of such recording systems is important for establishing a reliable basis for the interpretation of signals acquired in vivo. In this study we investigated the characteristics of the recording system integrated into the MED-EL PULSARCI100 cochlear implant, especially its linearity and resolution, in order to develop a mathematical model describing the recording system. Methods In-vitro setup: The cochlear implant, including all attached electrodes, was fixed in a tank of physiologic saline solution. Sinusoidal signals of the same frequency but with different amplitudes were delivered via a signal generator for measuring and recording on a single electrode. Computer simulations: A basic mathematical model including the main elements of the recording system, i.e. amplification and digitalization stage, was developed. For this, digital output for sinusoidal input signals of different amplitudes were calculated using in-vitro recordings as reference. Results Using an averaging of 100 measurements the recording system behaved linearly down to approximately -60 dB of the input signal range. Using the same method, a system resolution of 10 μV was determined for sinusoidal signals. The simulation results were in very good agreement with the results obtained from in-vitro experiments. Conclusions The recording system implemented in the MED-EL PULSARCI100 cochlear implant for measuring the evoked compound action potential of the auditory nerve operates reliably. The developed mathematical model provides a good approximation of the recording system. PMID:22531599

  12. Regulation on RhoA in vascular smooth muscle cells under inflammatory stimulation proposes a novel mechanism mediating the multiple-beneficial action of acetylsalicylic acid.

    PubMed

    Li, Dong-Bo; Yang, Guo-Jie; Xu, Hong-Wei; Fu, Zhi-Xuan; Wang, Shan-Wei; Hu, Shen-Jiang

    2013-12-01

    Recent studies have revealed the additional beneficial effects of acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) in the medication of cardiovascular diseases. The small GTPase RhoA as an important signaling factor is implicated in a wide range of cell functions. This study aimed to investigate the regulatory effect of acetylsalicylic acid on RhoA in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). We found that aspirin at 300 μM suppressed VSMCs proliferation stimulated by LPS, and this inhibitory effect was partially mediated by inhibiting the iNOS/NO pathway. RhoA overexpression was downregulated by aspirin (both 30 and 300 μM) because of enhanced degradation of RhoA protein. The effect of LPS on increasing active RhoA level was significantly attenuated by aspirin (300 μM), which exerted no effect on RhoA translocation. The promoted RhoA phosphorylation under LPS stimulation, coupled with RhoA protein expression, was greatly decreased by aspirin treatment. No effect of aspirin was found on the expression, activation, and phosphorylation of RhoA in VSMCs devoid of inflammatory stimulation. Our investigation indicates that the regulation of RhoA by aspirin in VSMCs under inflammatory stimulus could be a novel mechanism via which aspirin, apart from the COX-dependent action, exerted the multiple beneficial effects.

  13. Nitrous oxide directly inhibits action potential-dependent neurotransmission from single presynaptic boutons adhering to rat hippocampal CA3 neurons.

    PubMed

    Wakita, Masahito; Kotani, Naoki; Yamaga, Toshitaka; Akaike, Norio

    2015-09-01

    We evaluated the effects of N2O on synaptic transmission using a preparation of mechanically dissociated rat hippocampal CA3 neurons that allowed assays of single bouton responses evoked from native functional nerve endings. We studied the effects of N2O on GABAA, glutamate, AMPA and NMDA receptor-mediated currents (IGABA, IGlu, IAMPA and INMDA) elicited by exogenous application of GABA, glutamate, (S)-AMPA, and NMDA and spontaneous, miniature, and evoked GABAergic inhibitory and glutamatergic excitatory postsynaptic current (sIPSC, mIPSC, eIPSC, sEPSC, mEPSC and eEPSC) in mechanically dissociated CA3 neurons. eIPSC and eEPSC were evoked by focal electrical stimulation of a single bouton. Administration of 70% N2O altered neither IGABA nor the frequency and amplitude of both sIPSCs and mIPSCs. In contrast, N2O decreased the amplitude of eIPSCs, while increasing failure rates (Rf) and paired-pulse ratios (PPR) in a concentration-dependent manner. On the other hand, N2O decreased IGlu, IAMPA and INMDA. Again N2O did not change the frequency and amplitude of either sEPSCs of mEPSCs. N2O also decreased amplitudes of eEPSCs with increased Rf and PPR. The decay phases of all synaptic responses were unchanged. The present results indicated that N2O inhibits the activation of AMPA/KA and NMDA receptors and also that N2O preferentially depress the action potential-dependent GABA and glutamate releases but had little effects on spontaneous and miniature releases. PMID:26343381

  14. Comparing the abuse potential of methylphenidate versus other stimulants: a review of available evidence and relevance to the ADHD patient.

    PubMed

    Kollins, Scott H

    2003-01-01

    The use of psychostimulants to treat attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has been controversial for a number of reasons. In an effort to clarify the extent to which the psychostimulant methylphenidate has abuse potential, the existing published evidence has been reviewed and is summarized here, with an emphasis on delineating a number of related but independent issues that are often confused. Methylphenidate produces behavioral effects associated with abuse potential as assessed by traditional assays, but the relevance of this literature to the clinical use of the drug in the treatment of ADHD is ambiguous at best. Existing neuropharmacologic data suggest that methylphenidate has pharmacokinetic properties that reduce its abuse potential as compared with other stimulant drugs of abuse, such as cocaine.

  15. Can poisons stimulate bees? Appreciating the potential of hormesis in bee-pesticide research.

    PubMed

    Cutler, G Christopher; Rix, Rachel R

    2015-10-01

    Hormesis, a biphasic dose response whereby exposure to low doses of a stressor can stimulate biological processes, has been reported in many organisms, including pest insects when they are exposed to low doses of a pesticide. However, awareness of the hormesis phenomenon seems to be limited among bee researchers, in spite of the increased emphasis of late on pollinator toxicology and risk assessment. In this commentary, we show that there are several examples in the literature of substances that are toxic to bees at high doses but stimulatory at low doses. Appreciation of the hormetic dose response by bee researchers will improve our fundamental understanding of how bees respond to low doses of chemical stressors, and may be useful in pollinator risk assessment.

  16. Stimulation of immune systems by conjugated polymers and their potential as an alternative vaccine adjuvant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Hua; Xiang, Jian; Xu, Ligeng; Song, Xuejiao; Dong, Ziliang; Peng, Rui; Liu, Zhuang

    2015-11-01

    Recently, conjugated polymers have been widely explored in the field of nanomedicine. Careful evaluations of their biological effects are thus urgently needed. Hereby, we systematically evaluated the biological effects of different types of conjugated polymers on macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs), which play critical roles in the innate and adaptive immune systems, respectively. While naked poly-(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(4-styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) exhibits a high level of cytotoxicity, polyethylene glycol (PEG) modified PEDOT:PSS (PEDOT:PSS-PEG) shows greatly reduced toxicity to various types of cells. To our surprise, PEGylation of PEDOT:PSS could obviously enhance the cellular uptake of these nanoparticles, leading to subsequent immune stimulations of both macrophages and DCs. In contrast, another type of conjugated polymer, polypyrrole (PPy), is found to be an inert material with neither significant cytotoxicity nor noticeable immune-stimulation activity. Interestingly, utilizing ovalbumin (OVA) as a model antigen, it is further uncovered in our ex vivo experiment that PEDOT:PSS-PEG may serve as an adjuvant to greatly enhance the immunogenicity of OVA upon simple mixing. Our study on the one hand suggests the promise of developing novel nano-adjuvants based on conjugated polymers, and on the other hand highlights the importance of careful evaluations of the impacts of any new nanomaterials developed for nanomedicine on the immune systems.Recently, conjugated polymers have been widely explored in the field of nanomedicine. Careful evaluations of their biological effects are thus urgently needed. Hereby, we systematically evaluated the biological effects of different types of conjugated polymers on macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs), which play critical roles in the innate and adaptive immune systems, respectively. While naked poly-(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(4-styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) exhibits a high level of cytotoxicity

  17. Therapeutic potential of synchronized gastric electrical stimulation for gastroparesis: enhanced gastric motility in dogs.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hongbing; Sallam, Hanaa; Chen, Dennis D; Chen, Jiande D Z

    2007-11-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects and mechanism of synchronized gastric electrical stimulation (SGES) on gastric contractions and gastric emptying. The first experiment was designed to study the effects of SGES on antral contractions in four randomized sessions. Sessions 1 (control) and 2 (atropine) were performed in the fasting state, composed of three 30-min periods (baseline, stimulation, and recovery). Sessions 3 (control) and 4 (SGES performed during 2nd 20-min period) were performed in the fed state, consisting of two 20-min periods; glucagon was injected after the first 20-min recording. The second experiment was designed to study the effect of SGES on gastric emptying and consisted of two sessions (control and SGES). SGES was delivered with train duration of 0.5-0.8s, pulse frequency of 40 Hz, width of 2 ms, and amplitude of 4 mA. We found that 1) SGES induced gastric antral contractions in the fasting state. The motility index was 1.3 +/- 0.5 at baseline and 6.1 +/- 0.7 (P = 0.001) during SGES. This excitatory effect was completely blocked by atropine. 2) SGES enhanced postprandial antral contractions impaired by glucagon. 3) SGES significantly accelerated glucagon-induced delayed gastric emptying. Gastric emptying was 25.5 +/- 11.3% without SGES and 38.3 +/- 10.7% with SGES (P = 0.006 vs. control). This novel method of SGES induces gastric antral contractions in the fasting state, enhances glucagon-induced antral hypomotility in the fed state, and accelerates glucagon-induced delayed gastric emptying. The effect of SGES on antral contractions is mediated via the cholinergic pathway. PMID:17881615

  18. Electrical high-frequency stimulation of the human thoracolumbar fascia evokes long-term potentiation-like pain amplification.

    PubMed

    Schilder, Andreas; Magerl, Walter; Hoheisel, Ulrich; Klein, Thomas; Treede, Rolf-Detlef

    2016-10-01

    Nociceptive long-term potentiation, a use dependent increase in synaptic efficacy in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord is thought to contribute to the development of persistent pain states. So far, no study has analyzed the effects of high-frequency stimulation (HFS) of afferents from deep tissues (muscle and fascia) on pain perception in the back in humans. In 16 healthy volunteers, the multifidus muscle and the overlying thoracolumbar fascia were stimulated with electrical high-frequency pulses (5 × 100 pulses at 100 Hz) through bipolar concentric needle electrodes placed at lumbar level (L3/L4). Electrical pain thresholds were lower (P < 0.001) and pain ratings were higher for fascia compared with muscle stimulation (P < 0.05). For both tissues, pain ratings increased significantly across the five 100 Hz trains (from 15 to 22 numerical rating scale for fascia, from 8 to 12 numerical rating scale for muscle; both P < 0.01). Fascia HFS increased fascia pain ratings 2.17 times compared with the unconditioned control site (P < 0.001), but had no significant effect on pain sensitivity of the muscle. The HFS in muscle had no significant effect on muscle pain, but decreased pain sensitivity of the overlying fascia by 20% (P < 0.05). In additional experiments using the same electrodes and followed over >60 minutes post-HFS, potentiation by fascia HFS was similar to that of skin HFS. These findings show that the spinal input from the fascia can induce long-term changes in pain sensitivity for at least 60 minutes making it a candidate potentially contributing to nonspecific low back pain. PMID:27322440

  19. Electrical high-frequency stimulation of the human thoracolumbar fascia evokes long-term potentiation-like pain amplification.

    PubMed

    Schilder, Andreas; Magerl, Walter; Hoheisel, Ulrich; Klein, Thomas; Treede, Rolf-Detlef

    2016-10-01

    Nociceptive long-term potentiation, a use dependent increase in synaptic efficacy in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord is thought to contribute to the development of persistent pain states. So far, no study has analyzed the effects of high-frequency stimulation (HFS) of afferents from deep tissues (muscle and fascia) on pain perception in the back in humans. In 16 healthy volunteers, the multifidus muscle and the overlying thoracolumbar fascia were stimulated with electrical high-frequency pulses (5 × 100 pulses at 100 Hz) through bipolar concentric needle electrodes placed at lumbar level (L3/L4). Electrical pain thresholds were lower (P < 0.001) and pain ratings were higher for fascia compared with muscle stimulation (P < 0.05). For both tissues, pain ratings increased significantly across the five 100 Hz trains (from 15 to 22 numerical rating scale for fascia, from 8 to 12 numerical rating scale for muscle; both P < 0.01). Fascia HFS increased fascia pain ratings 2.17 times compared with the unconditioned control site (P < 0.001), but had no significant effect on pain sensitivity of the muscle. The HFS in muscle had no significant effect on muscle pain, but decreased pain sensitivity of the overlying fascia by 20% (P < 0.05). In additional experiments using the same electrodes and followed over >60 minutes post-HFS, potentiation by fascia HFS was similar to that of skin HFS. These findings show that the spinal input from the fascia can induce long-term changes in pain sensitivity for at least 60 minutes making it a candidate potentially contributing to nonspecific low back pain.

  20. Electrical potentials from the eye and optic nerve of Strombus: effects of electrical stimulation of the optic nerve.

    PubMed

    Gillary, H L

    1977-02-01

    1. Photic stimulation of the mature eye of Strombus can evoke in the optic nerve 'on' activity in numerous small afferent fibres and repetitive 'off' bursts of afferent impulses in a smaller number of larger fibres. 2. Synchronous invasion of the eye by electrically evoked impulses in small optic nerve fibres (apparently the 'on' afferents, antidromically activated) can evoke a burst of impulses in the larger 'off' fibres which propagate away from the eye. Invasion of the eye via one branch of optic nerve can evoke an answering burst in another branch. 3. Such electrically evoked bursts are similar to light-evoked 'off' bursts with respect to their impulse composition, their ability to be inhibited by illumination of the eye, and their susceptibility to MgCl2 anaesthesia. 4. Invasion of the eye by a train of repetitive electrically evoked impulses in the absence of photic stimulation can give rise to repetitive 'off' bursts as well as concomitant oscillatory potentials in the eye which are similar to those normally evoked by cessation of a photic stimulus. 5. The electrically evoked 'off' bursts appear to be caused by an excitatory rebound following the cessation of inhibitory synaptic input from photoreceptors which can be antidromically activated by electrical stimulation of the optic nerve. 6. The experimental results suggest that the rhythmic discharge of the 'off' fibres evoked by the cessation of a photic stimulus is mediated by the abrupt decrease of inhibitory synaptic input from the receptors. PMID:192827

  1. Voluntary running depreciates the requirement of Ca2+-stimulated cAMP signaling in synaptic potentiation and memory formation.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Fei; Zhang, Ming; Ding, Qi; Sethna, Ferzin; Yan, Lily; Moon, Changjong; Yang, Miyoung; Wang, Hongbing

    2016-08-01

    Mental health and cognitive functions are influenced by both genetic and environmental factors. Although having active lifestyle with physical exercise improves learning and memory, how it interacts with the specific key molecular regulators of synaptic plasticity is largely unknown. Here, we examined the effects of voluntary running on long-term potentiation (LTP) and memory formation in mice lacking type 1 adenylyl cyclase (AC1), a neurospecific synaptic enzyme that contributes to Ca(2+)-stimulated cAMP production. Following 1 mo of voluntary running-wheel exercise, the impaired LTP and object recognition memory in AC1 knockout (KO) mice were significantly attenuated. Running up-regulated exon II mRNA level of BDNF (brain-derived neurotrophic factor), though it failed to increase exon I and IV mRNAs in the hippocampus of AC1 KO mice. Intrahippocampal infusion of recombinant BDNF was sufficient to rescue LTP and object recognition memory defects in AC1 KO mice. Therefore, voluntary running and exogenous BDNF application overcome the defective Ca(2+)-stimulated cAMP signaling. Our results also demonstrate that alteration in Ca(2+)-stimulated cAMP can affect the molecular outcome of physical exercise.

  2. Voluntary running depreciates the requirement of Ca2+-stimulated cAMP signaling in synaptic potentiation and memory formation.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Fei; Zhang, Ming; Ding, Qi; Sethna, Ferzin; Yan, Lily; Moon, Changjong; Yang, Miyoung; Wang, Hongbing

    2016-08-01

    Mental health and cognitive functions are influenced by both genetic and environmental factors. Although having active lifestyle with physical exercise improves learning and memory, how it interacts with the specific key molecular regulators of synaptic plasticity is largely unknown. Here, we examined the effects of voluntary running on long-term potentiation (LTP) and memory formation in mice lacking type 1 adenylyl cyclase (AC1), a neurospecific synaptic enzyme that contributes to Ca(2+)-stimulated cAMP production. Following 1 mo of voluntary running-wheel exercise, the impaired LTP and object recognition memory in AC1 knockout (KO) mice were significantly attenuated. Running up-regulated exon II mRNA level of BDNF (brain-derived neurotrophic factor), though it failed to increase exon I and IV mRNAs in the hippocampus of AC1 KO mice. Intrahippocampal infusion of recombinant BDNF was sufficient to rescue LTP and object recognition memory defects in AC1 KO mice. Therefore, voluntary running and exogenous BDNF application overcome the defective Ca(2+)-stimulated cAMP signaling. Our results also demonstrate that alteration in Ca(2+)-stimulated cAMP can affect the molecular outcome of physical exercise. PMID:27421897

  3. Inhibition of long-term potentiation in the schaffer-CA1 pathway by repetitive high-intensity sound stimulation.

    PubMed

    Cunha, A O S; de Oliveira, J A C; Almeida, S S; Garcia-Cairasco, N; Leão, R M

    2015-12-01

    High-intensity sound can induce seizures in susceptible animals. After repeated acoustic stimuli changes in behavioural seizure repertoire and epileptic EEG activity might be seen in recruited limbic and forebrain structures, a phenomenon known as audiogenic kindling. It is postulated that audiogenic kindling can produce synaptic plasticity events leading to the spread of epileptogenic activity to the limbic system. In order to test this hypothesis, we investigated if long-term potentiation (LTP) of hippocampal Schaffer-CA1 synapses and spatial navigation memory are altered by a repeated high-intensity sound stimulation (HISS) protocol, consisting of one-minute 120 dB broadband noise applied twice a day for 10 days, in normal Wistar rats and in audiogenic seizure-prone rats (Wistar Audiogenic Rats - WARs). After HISS all WARs exhibited midbrain seizures and 50% of these animals developed limbic recruitment, while only 26% of Wistar rats presented midbrain seizures and none of them had limbic recruitment. In naïve animals, LTP in hippocampal CA1 neurons was induced by 50- or 100-Hz high-frequency stimulation of Schaffer fibres in slices from both Wistar and WAR animals similarly. Surprisingly, HISS suppressed LTP in CA1 neurons in slices from Wistar rats that did not present any seizure, and inhibited LTP in slices from Wistar rats with only midbrain seizures. However HISS had no effect on LTP in CA1 neurons from slices of WARs. Interestingly HISS did not alter spatial navigation and memory in both strains. These findings show that repeated high-intensity sound stimulation prevent LTP of Schaffer-CA1 synapses from Wistar rats, without affecting spatial memory. This effect was not seen in hippocampi from audiogenic seizure-prone WARs. In WARs the link between auditory stimulation and hippocampal LTP seems to be disrupted which could be relevant for the susceptibility to seizures in this strain.

  4. Anti-inflammatory potential of ursolic acid in Mycobacterium tuberculosis-sensitized and concanavalin A-stimulated cells.

    PubMed

    Zerin, Tamanna; Lee, Minjung; Jang, Woong Sik; Nam, Kung-Woo; Song, Ho-Yeon

    2016-03-01

    Ursolic acid (3-β-3-hydroxy-urs-12-ene-28-oic-acid; UA) is a triterpenoid carboxylic acid with various pharmaceutical properties. It is commonly found in apples, basil, berries, rosemary, peppermint, lavender, oregano, thyme, hawthorn and prunes. In the present study, the activities of UA against the Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv‑induced release of a panel of inflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6 from RAW 264.7 murine macrophages, A549 alveolar epithelial cells and in concanavalin A (Con A)-stimulated rat splenocytes were investigated. In addition, the present study examined the ability of UA to reduce the expression levels of the inflammatory mediators, cyclooxygenase‑2 (COX‑2) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in the stimulated cells. The reduction of nitric oxide (NO) release by UA was also examined in the stimulated cells. UA significantly inhibited the mRNA expression levels of TNF‑α, IL‑1β and IL‑6 in the stimulated cells. The expression levels of COX‑2 and iNOS were also suppressed by UA, as was the release of NO at a significant level. The data indicated the potency of UA on different cell types, which may assist in the development of anti‑inflammatory drugs. In the case of adjunct host‑directed immune therapy for tuberculosis, UA may be used, in addition to established antibiotic therapies, to improve treatment efficacy and outcome due to their anti‑inflammatory potential. Further detailed investigations are required to establish its use as an anti-inflammatory. PMID:26847129

  5. Differences in Motor Evoked Potentials Induced in Rats by Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation under Two Separate Anesthetics: Implications for Plasticity Studies

    PubMed Central

    Sykes, Matthew; Matheson, Natalie A.; Brownjohn, Philip W.; Tang, Alexander D.; Rodger, Jennifer; Shemmell, Jonathan B. H.; Reynolds, John N. J.

    2016-01-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is primarily used in humans to change the state of corticospinal excitability. To assess the efficacy of different rTMS stimulation protocols, motor evoked potentials (MEPs) are used as a readout due to their non-invasive nature. Stimulation of the motor cortex produces a response in a targeted muscle, and the amplitude of this twitch provides an indirect measure of the current state of the cortex. When applied to the motor cortex, rTMS can alter MEP amplitude, however, results are variable between participants and across studies. In addition, the mechanisms underlying any change and its locus are poorly understood. In order to better understand these effects, MEPs have been investigated in vivo in animal models, primarily in rats. One major difference in protocols between rats and humans is the use of general anesthesia in animal experiments. Anesthetics are known to affect plasticity-like mechanisms and so may contaminate the effects of an rTMS protocol. In the present study, we explored the effect of anesthetic on MEP amplitude, recorded before and after intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS), a patterned rTMS protocol with reported facilitatory effects. MEPs were assessed in the brachioradialis muscle of the upper forelimb under two anesthetics: a xylazine/zoletil combination and urethane. We found MEPs could be induced under both anesthetics, with no differences in the resting motor threshold or the average baseline amplitudes. However, MEPs were highly variable between animals under both anesthetics, with the xylazine/zoletil combination showing higher variability and most prominently a rise in amplitude across the baseline recording period. Interestingly, application of iTBS did not facilitate MEP amplitude under either anesthetic condition. Although it is important to underpin human application of TMS with mechanistic examination of effects in animals, caution must be taken when selecting an

  6. Modulation of hERG potassium channel gating normalizes action potential duration prolonged by dysfunctional KCNQ1 potassium channel

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongkang; Zou, Beiyan; Yu, Haibo; Moretti, Alessandra; Wang, Xiaoying; Yan, Wei; Babcock, Joseph J.; Bellin, Milena; McManus, Owen B.; Tomaselli, Gordon; Nan, Fajun; Laugwitz, Karl-Ludwig; Li, Min

    2012-01-01

    Long QT syndrome (LQTS) is a genetic disease characterized by a prolonged QT interval in an electrocardiogram (ECG), leading to higher risk of sudden cardiac death. Among the 12 identified genes causal to heritable LQTS, ∼90% of affected individuals harbor mutations in either KCNQ1 or human ether-a-go-go related genes (hERG), which encode two repolarizing potassium currents known as IKs and IKr. The ability to quantitatively assess contributions of different current components is therefore important for investigating disease phenotypes and testing effectiveness of pharmacological modulation. Here we report a quantitative analysis by simulating cardiac action potentials of cultured human cardiomyocytes to match the experimental waveforms of both healthy control and LQT syndrome type 1 (LQT1) action potentials. The quantitative evaluation suggests that elevation of IKr by reducing voltage sensitivity of inactivation, not via slowing of deactivation, could more effectively restore normal QT duration if IKs is reduced. Using a unique specific chemical activator for IKr that has a primary effect of causing a right shift of V1/2 for inactivation, we then examined the duration changes of autonomous action potentials from differentiated human cardiomyocytes. Indeed, this activator causes dose-dependent shortening of the action potential durations and is able to normalize action potentials of cells of patients with LQT1. In contrast, an IKr chemical activator of primary effects in slowing channel deactivation was not effective in modulating action potential durations. Our studies provide both the theoretical basis and experimental support for compensatory normalization of action potential duration by a pharmacological agent. PMID:22745159

  7. Acute stress increases the synthesis of 7α-hydroxypregnenolone, a new key neurosteroid stimulating locomotor activity, through corticosterone action in newts.

    PubMed

    Haraguchi, Shogo; Koyama, Teppei; Hasunuma, Itaru; Okuyama, Shin-ichiro; Ubuka, Takayoshi; Kikuyama, Sakae; Do Rego, Jean-Luc; Vaudry, Hubert; Tsutsui, Kazuyoshi

    2012-02-01

    7α-Hydroxypregnenolone (7α-OH PREG) is a newly identified bioactive neurosteroid stimulating locomotor activity in the brain of newt, a wild animal, which serves as an excellent model to investigate the biosynthesis and biological action of neurosteroids. Here, we show that acute stress increases 7α-OH PREG synthesis in the dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH) through corticosterone (CORT) action in newts. A 30-min restraint stress increased 7α-OH PREG synthesis in the brain tissue concomitant with the increase in plasma CORT concentrations. A 30-min restraint stress also increased the expression of cytochrome P450(7α) (CYP7B), the steroidogenic enzyme of 7α-OH PREG formation, in the DMH. Decreasing plasma CORT concentrations by hypophysectomy or trilostane administration decreased 7α-OH PREG synthesis in the diencephalon, whereas administration of CORT to these animals increased 7α-OH PREG synthesis. Glucocorticoid receptor was present in DMH neurons expressing CYP7B. Thus, CORT appears to act directly on DMH neurons to increase 7α-OH PREG synthesis. We further investigated the biological action of 7α-OH PREG in the brain under stress. A 30-min restraint stress or central administration of 7α-OH PREG increased serotonin concentrations in the diencephalon. Double immunolabeling further showed colocalization of CYP7B and serotonin in the DMH. These results indicate that acute stress increases the synthesis of 7α-OH PREG via CORT action in the DMH, and 7α-OH PREG activates serotonergic neurons in the DMH that may coordinate behavioral responses to stress. This is the first demonstration of neurosteroid biosynthesis regulated by peripheral steroid hormone and of neurosteroid action in the brain under stress in any vertebrate class.

  8. A calcium-activated sodium conductance produces a long-duration action potential in the egg of a nemertean worm.

    PubMed Central

    Jaffe, L A; Kado, R T; Kline, D

    1986-01-01

    1. The egg of the nemertean worm Cerebratulus lacteus produced an action potential having a duration of about 9 min. We investigated the ionic conductances which accounted for this long-duration action potential. 2. The peak of the action potential was about +50 mV and depended on extracellular Ca2+, while the plateau potential was about +25 mV and depended on extracellular Na+. 3. Under voltage-clamp conditions, depolarization produced two temporally separate inward currents: a fast current which reached a peak at about 10 ms, and a slow current which took up to 1 min to reach its peak and lasted for several min. 4. The fast current was independent of extracellular Na+, but was blocked by removal of extracellular Ca2+. 5. The slow current was not seen when extracellular Na+ was replaced by choline+ or K+. 6. The slow current did not develop in Ca2+-free sea water, and was reduced to about half if Ca2+ was removed after the current had been initiated. 7. Microinjection of EGTA blocked the slow current, and reduced the action potential duration to about 1 min. 8. We concluded that a voltage-activated Ca2+ conductance produced the peak of the action potential, while a Ca2+-activated Na+ conductance produced its plateau. PMID:2442351

  9. Analogue modulation of back-propagating action potentials enables dendritic hybrid signalling

    PubMed Central

    Brunner, János; Szabadics, János

    2016-01-01

    We report that back-propagating action potentials (bAPs) are not simply digital feedback signals in dendrites but also carry analogue information about the overall state of neurons. Analogue information about the somatic membrane potential within a physiological range (from −78 to −64 mV) is retained by bAPs of dentate gyrus granule cells as different repolarization speeds in proximal dendrites and as different peak amplitudes in distal regions. These location-dependent waveform changes are reflected by local calcium influx, leading to proximal enhancement and distal attenuation during somatic hyperpolarization. The functional link between these retention and readout mechanisms of the analogue content of bAPs critically depends on high-voltage-activated, inactivating calcium channels. The hybrid bAP and calcium mechanisms report the phase of physiological somatic voltage fluctuations and modulate long-term synaptic plasticity in distal dendrites. Thus, bAPs are hybrid signals that relay somatic analogue information, which is detected by the dendrites in a location-dependent manner. PMID:27703164

  10. Optimisation of Ionic Models to Fit Tissue Action Potentials: Application to 3D Atrial Modelling

    PubMed Central

    Lovell, Nigel H.; Dokos, Socrates

    2013-01-01

    A 3D model of atrial electrical activity has been developed with spatially heterogeneous electrophysiological properties. The atrial geometry, reconstructed from the male Visible Human dataset, included gross anatomical features such as the central and peripheral sinoatrial node (SAN), intra-atrial connections, pulmonary veins, inferior and superior vena cava, and the coronary sinus. Membrane potentials of myocytes from spontaneously active or electrically paced in vitro rabbit cardiac tissue preparations were recorded using intracellular glass microelectrodes. Action potentials of central and peripheral SAN, right and left atrial, and pulmonary vein myocytes were each fitted using a generic ionic model having three phenomenological ionic current components: one time-dependent inward, one time-dependent outward, and one leakage current. To bridge the gap between the single-cell ionic models and the gross electrical behaviour of the 3D whole-atrial model, a simplified 2D tissue disc with heterogeneous regions was optimised to arrive at parameters for each cell type under electrotonic load. Parameters were then incorporated into the 3D atrial model, which as a result exhibited a spontaneously active SAN able to rhythmically excite the atria. The tissue-based optimisation of ionic models and the modelling process outlined are generic and applicable to image-based computer reconstruction and simulation of excitable tissue. PMID:23935704

  11. Compound Muscle Action Potential and Motor Function in Children with Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Lewelt, Aga J.; Krosschell, Kristin J.; Scott, Charles; Sakonju, Ai; Kissel, John T.; Crawford, Thomas O.; Acsadi, Gyula; D'Anjou, Guy; Elsheikh, Bakri; Reyna, Sandra P.; Schroth, Mary K.; Maczulski, Jo Anne; Stoddard, Gregory J.; Elovic, Elie; Swoboda, Kathryn J.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Reliable outcome measures that reflect the underlying disease process and correlate with motor function in children with SMA are needed for clinical trials. Methods Maximum ulnar compound muscle action potential (CMAP) data were collected at 2 visits over a 4–6 week period in children with SMA types II and III, ages 2–17 years old, at 4 academic centers. Primary functional outcome measures included the Modified Hammersmith Functional Motor Scale (MHFMS) and MHFMS-Extend. Results CMAP negative peak amplitude and area showed excellent discrimination between the ambulatory and non-ambulatory SMA cohorts (ROC=0.88). CMAP had excellent test-retest reliability (ICC=0.96–0.97, n=64) and moderate to strong correlation with the MHFMS and MHFMS-Extend (r=0.61–0.73, n=68, p<0.001). Discussion Maximum ulnar CMAP amplitude and area is a feasible, valid and reliable outcome measure for use in pediatric multicenter clinical trials in SMA. CMAP correlates well with motor function and has potential value as a relevant surrogate for disease status. PMID:20737553

  12. Calcium Transients Closely Reflect Prolonged Action Potentials in iPSC Models of Inherited Cardiac Arrhythmia

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, C. Ian; Baba, Shiro; Nakamura, Kenta; Hua, Ethan A.; Sears, Marie A.F.; Fu, Chi-cheng; Zhang, Jianhua; Balijepalli, Sadguna; Tomoda, Kiichiro; Hayashi, Yohei; Lizarraga, Paweena; Wojciak, Julianne; Scheinman, Melvin M.; Aalto-Setälä, Katriina; Makielski, Jonathan C.; January, Craig T.; Healy, Kevin E.; Kamp, Timothy J.; Yamanaka, Shinya; Conklin, Bruce R.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Long-QT syndrome mutations can cause syncope and sudden death by prolonging the cardiac action potential (AP). Ion channels affected by mutations are various, and the influences of cellular calcium cycling on LQTS cardiac events are unknown. To better understand LQTS arrhythmias, we performed current-clamp and intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) measurements on cardiomyocytes differentiated from patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS-CM). In myocytes carrying an LQT2 mutation (HERG-A422T), APs and [Ca2+]i transients were prolonged in parallel. APs were abbreviated by nifedipine exposure and further lengthened upon releasing intracellularly stored Ca2+. Validating this model, control iPS-CM treated with HERG-blocking drugs recapitulated the LQT2 phenotype. In LQT3 iPS-CM, expressing NaV1.5-N406K, APs and [Ca2+]i transients were markedly prolonged. AP prolongation was sensitive to tetrodotoxin and to inhibiting Na+-Ca2+ exchange. These results suggest that LQTS mutations act partly on cytosolic Ca2+ cycling, potentially providing a basis for functionally targeted interventions regardless of the specific mutation site. PMID:25254341

  13. Human neural tuning estimated from compound action potentials in normal hearing human volunteers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verschooten, Eric; Desloovere, Christian; Joris, Philip X.

    2015-12-01

    The sharpness of cochlear frequency tuning in humans is debated. Evoked otoacoustic emissions and psychophysical measurements suggest sharper tuning in humans than in laboratory animals [15], but this is disputed based on comparisons of behavioral and electrophysiological measurements across species [14]. Here we used evoked mass potentials to electrophysiologically quantify tuning (Q10) in humans. We combined a notched noise forward masking paradigm [9] with the recording of trans tympanic compound action potentials (CAP) from masked probe tones in awake human and anesthetized monkey (Macaca mulatta). We compare our results to data obtained with the same paradigm in cat and chinchilla [16], and find that CAP-Q10values in human are ˜1.6x higher than in cat and chinchilla and ˜1.3x higher than in monkey. To estimate frequency tuning of single auditory nerve fibers (ANFs) in humans, we derive conversion functions from ANFs in cat, chinchilla, and monkey and apply these to the human CAP measurements. The data suggest that sharp cochlear tuning is a feature of old-world primates.

  14. Optophysiological Approach to Resolve Neuronal Action Potentials with High Spatial and Temporal Resolution in Cultured Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Pagès, Stéphane; Côté, Daniel; De Koninck, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Cell to cell communication in the central nervous system is encoded into transient and local membrane potential changes (ΔVm). Deciphering the rules that govern synaptic transmission and plasticity entails to be able to perform Vm recordings throughout the entire neuronal arborization. Classical electrophysiology is, in most cases, not able to do so within small and fragile neuronal subcompartments. Thus, optical techniques based on the use of fluorescent voltage-sensitive dyes (VSDs) have been developed. However, reporting spontaneous or small ΔVm from neuronal ramifications has been challenging, in part due to the limited sensitivity and phototoxicity of VSD-based optical measurements. Here we demonstrate the use of water soluble VSD, ANNINE-6plus, with laser-scanning microscopy to optically record ΔVm in cultured neurons. We show that the sensitivity (>10% of fluorescence change for 100 mV depolarization) and time response (sub millisecond) of the dye allows the robust detection of action potentials (APs) even without averaging, allowing the measurement of spontaneous neuronal firing patterns. In addition, we show that back-propagating APs can be recorded, along distinct dendritic sites and within dendritic spines. Importantly, our approach does not induce any detectable phototoxic effect on cultured neurons. This optophysiological approach provides a simple, minimally invasive, and versatile optical method to measure electrical activity in cultured neurons with high temporal (ms) resolution and high spatial (μm) resolution. PMID:22016723

  15. The interactions between potassium and sodium currents in generating action potentials in the rat sympathetic neurone.

    PubMed Central

    Belluzzi, O; Sacchi, O

    1988-01-01

    V, indicating that at these membrane potentials the IA current mainly, if not exclusively, contributes to the action potential falling phase. 5. The basic features of the sympathetic neurone action potential were reconstructed by simulations based on present and previous voltage-clamp characterization of the IA, IK(V) and INa conductances.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:2457694

  16. Deep brain stimulation in addiction: a review of potential brain targets.

    PubMed

    Luigjes, J; van den Brink, W; Feenstra, M; van den Munckhof, P; Schuurman, P R; Schippers, R; Mazaheri, A; De Vries, T J; Denys, D

    2012-06-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an adjustable, reversible, non-destructive neurosurgical intervention using implanted electrodes to deliver electrical pulses to areas in the brain. DBS is currently investigated in psychiatry for the treatment of refractory obsessive-compulsive disorder, Tourette syndrome and depressive disorder. Although recent research in both animals and humans has indicated that DBS may be an effective intervention for patients with treatment-refractory addiction, it is not yet entirely clear which brain areas should be targeted. The objective of this review is to provide a systematic overview of the published literature on DBS and addiction and outline the most promising target areas using efficacy and adverse event data from both preclinical and clinical studies. We found 7 animal studies targeting six different brain areas: nucleus accumbens (NAc), subthalamic nucleus (STN), dorsal striatum, lateral habenula, medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and hypothalamus, and 11 human studies targeting two different target areas: NAc and STN. Our analysis of the literature suggests that the NAc is currently the most promising DBS target area for patients with treatment-refractory addiction. The mPFC is another promising target, but needs further exploration to establish its suitability for clinical purposes. We conclude the review with a discussion on translational issues in DBS research, medical ethical considerations and recommendations for clinical trials with DBS in patients with addiction.

  17. Radiofrequency stimulation for potential healing of meniscal injuries in the avascular zone.

    PubMed

    Lee, Christopher S; Tasto, James P; Healey, Robert M; Sano, Sakae; Amiel, David

    2014-12-01

    We conducted this study to evaluate the effect of radiofrequency (RF) stimulation with suture repair on the healing of tears in the meniscal white-white zone. Fifty-four New Zealand white rabbits underwent surgically induced meniscal injuries within the white-white region. RF was applied using a 0.8-mm TOPAZ MicroDebrider RF wand (ArthroCare) at level 4 for 500 milliseconds. Rabbits were sacrificed at 28 and 84 days for gross and histologic analysis by 3 blinded observers and at 9, 28, and 84 days for biochemical examination. Biochemical analyses included evaluation of cell proliferation (3H-thymidine), as well as mitogenic (IGF-1, bFGF) and angiogenic (VEGF, αV) factors. Of specimens repaired with RF combined with suture, 19 (58%) showed a degree of gross morphologic and histologic healing. No significant healing was seen in specimens with either no repair or repair with suture alone. We observed a 40% increase in cellular proliferation when RF supplementation was used (P<.05). With regards to mitogenic and angiogenic markers (IGF-1, bFGF, VEGF, and αV), there was a significant increase in groups treated with RF at 9 and 28 days (P>0.05). RF supplementation of avascular zone meniscal repairs may lead to an increased healing response. PMID:25490015

  18. Role of testosterone in stimulating seasonal changes in a potential avian chemosignal.

    PubMed

    Whittaker, Danielle J; Soini, Helena A; Gerlach, Nicole M; Posto, Amanda L; Novotny, Milos V; Ketterson, Ellen D

    2011-12-01

    Songbird preen oil contains volatile and semivolatile compounds that may contain information about species, sex, individual identity, and season. We examined the relationship between testosterone (T) and the amounts of preen oil volatile and semivolatile compounds in wild and captive dark-eyed juncos (Junco hyemalis). In wild males and females, we observed an increase in volatile compound relative concentration early in the breeding season. This increase mirrored previously described seasonal elevation in T levels in wild males and females, suggesting a positive relationship between hormone levels and preen gland secretions, and a possible role for these secretions in signaling receptivity. In females, the greatest relative concentrations of most compounds were observed close to egg laying, a time when steroid hormones are high and also the only time that females respond to an injection of gonadotropin-releasing hormone with a short-term increase in T. In a study of captive juncos held on short days, we asked whether the seasonal increases observed in the wild could be induced with experimental elevation of T alone. We found that exogenous T stimulated the production of some volatile compounds in non-breeding individuals of both sexes. However, of the 15 compounds known to increase during the breeding season, only four showed an increase in relative concentration in birds that received T implants. Our results suggest that testosterone levels likely interact with other seasonally induced physiological changes to affect volatile compound amounts in preen oil.

  19. Differential action potentials and firing patterns in injured and uninjured small dorsal root ganglion neurons after nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xu-Feng; Zhu, Chang Z; Thimmapaya, Rama; Choi, Won S; Honore, Prisca; Scott, Victoria E; Kroeger, Paul E; Sullivan, James P; Faltynek, Connie R; Gopalakrishnan, Murali; Shieh, Char-Chang

    2004-05-29

    The profile of tetrodotoxin sensitive (TTX-S) and resistant (TTX-R) Na(+) channels and their contribution to