Science.gov

Sample records for action spectra show

  1. Action spectra again?

    PubMed

    Coohill, T P

    1991-11-01

    Action spectroscopy has a long history and is of central importance to photobiological studies. Action spectra were among the first assays to point to chlorophyll as the molecule most responsible for plant growth and to DNA as the genetic material. It is useful to construct action spectra early in the investigation of new areas of photobiological research in an attempt to determine the wavelength limits of the radiation region causing the studied response. But due to the severe absorption of ultraviolet (UV) radiation by biological samples, UV action spectra were first limited to small cells (bacteria and fungi). Advances in techniques (e.g. single cell culture) and analysis allowed accurate action spectra to be reported even for mammalian cells. But precise analytical action spectra are often difficult to obtain when large, pigmented, or groups of cells are investigated. Here some action spectra are limited in interpretation and merely supply a wavelength vs effect curve. When polychromatic sources are employed, the interpretation of action spectra is even more complex and formidable. But such polychromatic action spectra can be more directly related to ambient responses. Since precise action spectra usually require the completion of a relatively large number of careful experiments using somewhat sophisticated equipment over a range of at least six wavelengths, they are often not pursued. But they remain central to the elucidation of the effect being studied. The worldwide community has agreed that stratospheric ozone is depleting, with the possibility of a consequent rise in the amount of UV-B (290-320 nm) reaching the earth's surface. It is therefore essential that new action spectra be completed for UV-B effects on a large variety of responses of human, animal, and aquatic plant systems. Combining these action spectra with the known amounts of UV-B reaching the biosphere can give rise to solar UV effectiveness spectra that, in turn, can give rise to estimates

  2. Retinal shows its true colours: photoisomerization action spectra of mobility-selected isomers of the retinal protonated Schiff base.

    PubMed

    Coughlan, N J A; Adamson, B D; Gamon, L; Catani, K; Bieske, E J

    2015-09-21

    Retinal is one of Nature's most important and widespread chromophores, exhibiting remarkable versatility in its function and spectral response, depending on its protein environment. Reliable spectroscopic and photochemical data for the isolated retinal molecule are essential for calibrating theoretical approaches that seek to model retinal's behaviour in complex protein environments. However, due to low densities and possible co-existence of multiple isomers, retinal is a challenging target for gas-phase investigations. Here, the photoisomerization behaviour of the trans isomer of the retinal protonated Schiff base (RPSB) is investigated in the gas phase by irradiating mobility-selected RPSB ions with tunable light in a tandem ion mobility spectrometer. trans RPSB ions are converted to single cis isomers and also more compact isomers through irradiation with visible light. The S1← S0 photoisomerization action spectrum of trans RPSB, obtained by monitoring production of cis isomers as a function of wavelength, exhibits a single well-defined peak with a maximum at 618 ± 5 nm. Corresponding action spectra of cis RPSB isomers exhibit broader peaks, conclusively demonstrating an isomeric dependence for the RPSB spectrum in the gas phase.

  3. Action spectra for photosynthetic inhibition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caldwell, M. M.; Flint, S.; Camp, L. B.

    1981-01-01

    The ultraviolet action spectrum for photosynthesis inhibition was determined to fall between that of the general DNA action spectrum and the generalized plant action spectrum. The characteristics of this action spectrum suggest that a combination of pronounced increase in effectiveness with decreasing wavelength, substantial specificity for the UV-B waveband, and very diminished response in the UV-A waveband result in large radiation amplification factors when the action spectra are used as weighting functions. Attempted determination of dose/response relationships for leaf disc inhibition provided inconclusive data from which to deconvolute an action spectrum.

  4. Time Will Show: Real Time Predictions during Interpersonal Action Perception

    PubMed Central

    Manera, Valeria; Schouten, Ben; Verfaillie, Karl; Becchio, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    Predictive processes are crucial not only for interpreting the actions of individual agents, but also to predict how, in the context of a social interaction between two agents, the actions of one agent relate to the actions of a second agent. In the present study we investigated whether, in the context of a communicative interaction between two agents, observers can use the actions of one agent to predict when the action of a second agent will take place. Participants observed point-light displays of two agents (A and B) performing separate actions. In the communicative condition, the action performed by agent B responded to a communicative gesture performed by agent A. In the individual condition, agent A's communicative action was substituted with a non-communicative action. For each condition, we manipulated the temporal coupling of the actions of the two agents, by varying the onset of agent A's action. Using a simultaneous masking detection task, we demonstrated that the timing manipulation had a critical effect on the communicative condition, with the visual discrimination of agent B increasing linearly while approaching the original interaction timing. No effect of the timing manipulation was found for the individual condition. Our finding complements and extends previous evidence for interpersonal predictive coding, suggesting that the communicative gestures of one agent can serve not only to predict what the second agent will do, but also when his/her action will take place. PMID:23349992

  5. Children Show Heightened Memory for Threatening Social Actions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baltazar, Nicole C.; Shutts, Kristin; Kinzler, Katherine D.

    2012-01-01

    Three experiments investigated whether a negativity bias in social perception extends to preschool-aged children's memory for the details of others' social actions and experiences. After learning about individuals who committed nice or mean social actions, children in Experiment 1 were more accurate at remembering who was mean compared with who…

  6. Photosynthetic action spectra and adaptation to spectral light distribution in a benthic cyanobacterial mat.

    PubMed Central

    Jorgensen, B B; Cohen, Y; Des Marais, D J

    1987-01-01

    We studied adaptation to spectral light distribution in undisturbed benthic communities of cyanobacterial mats growing in hypersaline ponds at Guerrero Negro, Baja California, Mexico. Microscale measurements of oxygen photosynthesis and action spectra were performed with microelectrodes; spectral radiance was measured with fiber-optic microprobes. The spatial resolution of all measurements was 0.1 mm, and the spectral resolution was 10 to 15 nm. Light attenuation spectra showed absorption predominantly by chlorophyll a (Chl a) (430 and 670 nm), phycocyanin (620 nm), and carotenoids (440 to 500 nm). Blue light (450 nm) was attenuated 10-fold more strongly than red light (600 nm). The action spectra of the surface film of diatoms accordingly showed activity over the whole spectrum, with maxima for Chl a and carotenoids. The underlying dense Microcoleus population showed almost exclusively activity dependent upon light harvesting by phycobilins at 550 to 660 nm. Maximum activity was at 580 and 650 nm, indicating absorption by phycoerythrin and phycocyanin as well as by allophycocyanin. Very little Chl a-dependent activity could be detected in the cyanobacterial action spectrum, even with additional 600-nm light to excite photosystem II. The depth distribution of photosynthesis showed detectable activity down to a depth of 0.8 to 2.5 mm, where the downwelling radiant flux at 600 nm was reduced to 0.2 to 0.6% of the surface flux. PMID:11536572

  7. Photosynthetic action spectra and adaptation to spectral light distribution in a benthic cyanobacterial mat.

    PubMed

    Jorgensen, B B; Cohen, Y; Des Marais, D J

    1987-04-01

    We studied adaptation to spectral light distribution in undisturbed benthic communities of cyanobacterial mats growing in hypersaline ponds at Guerrero Negro, Baja California, Mexico. Microscale measurements of oxygen photosynthesis and action spectra were performed with microelectrodes; spectral radiance was measured with fiber-optic microprobes. The spatial resolution of all measurements was 0.1 mm, and the spectral resolution was 10 to 15 nm. Light attenuation spectra showed absorption predominantly by chlorophyll a (Chl a) (430 and 670 nm), phycocyanin (620 nm), and carotenoids (440 to 500 nm). Blue light (450 nm) was attenuated 10-fold more strongly than red light (600 nm). The action spectra of the surface film of diatoms accordingly showed activity over the whole spectrum, with maxima for Chl a and carotenoids. The underlying dense Microcoleus population showed almost exclusively activity dependent upon light harvesting by phycobilins at 550 to 660 nm. Maximum activity was at 580 and 650 nm, indicating absorption by phycoerythrin and phycocyanin as well as by allophycocyanin. Very little Chl a-dependent activity could be detected in the cyanobacterial action spectrum, even with additional 600-nm light to excite photosystem II. The depth distribution of photosynthesis showed detectable activity down to a depth of 0.8 to 2.5 mm, where the downwelling radiant flux at 600 nm was reduced to 0.2 to 0.6% of the surface flux.

  8. Photosynthetic action spectra and adaptation to spectral light distribution in a benthic cyanobacterial mat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorgensen, B. B.; Cohen, Y.; Des Marais, D. J.

    1987-01-01

    We studied adaptation to spectral light distribution in undisturbed benthic communities of cyanobacterial mats growing in hypersaline ponds at Guerrero Negro, Baja California, Mexico. Microscale measurements of oxygen photosynthesis and action spectra were performed with microelectrodes; spectral radiance was measured with fiber-optic microprobes. The spatial resolution of all measurements was 0.1 mm, and the spectral resolution was 10 to 15 nm. Light attenuation spectra showed absorption predominantly by chlorophyll a (Chl a) (430 and 670 nm), phycocyanin (620 nm), and carotenoids (440 to 500 nm). Blue light (450 nm) was attenuated 10-fold more strongly than red light (600 nm). The action spectra of the surface film of diatoms accordingly showed activity over the whole spectrum, with maxima for Chl a and carotenoids. The underlying dense Microcoleus population showed almost exclusively activity dependent upon light harvesting by phycobilins at 550 to 660 nm. Maximum activity was at 580 and 650 nm, indicating absorption by phycoerythrin and phycocyanin as well as by allophycocyanin. Very little Chl a-dependent activity could be detected in the cyanobacterial action spectrum, even with additional 600-nm light to excite photosystem II. The depth distribution of photosynthesis showed detectable activity down to a depth of 0.8 to 2.5 mm, where the downwelling radiant flux at 600 nm was reduced to 0.2 to 0.6% of the surface flux.

  9. Instrumentation and action spectra in light-associated diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Cripps, D.J.

    1981-07-01

    Instrumentation for studying action spectra in controls and various light-associated diseases is described. This study summarizes tests performed with a prism grating monochromator during the last 10 yr. There were 68 photodermatoses studied: xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) (1), lupus erythematosus (LE) (12), polymorphous light eruption (PLE) (23), solar urticaria (4), actinic reticuloid (2), halogenated salicylanilide photosensitivity and persistent light reactors (11), psoralen photosensitivity (6), and porphyria (9). A normal minimal erythema dose in the UVB (below 320 nm) was generally observed in polymorphous light eruption and lupus erythematosus. The most exquisite photosensitivity for delayed erythema was observed in actinic reticuloid, which in one case was 25-35 times more sensitive in the UVB range which was also observed but to a lesser extent in XP and in persistent light reactors. Persistence of erythema and edema at test sites was observed in XP, PLE, LE, and actinic reticuloid. A delay in development of erythema reaching a maximum at 72 hr was observed in XP and psoralen phototoxicity. Maximum photosensitivity occurred in solar urticaria. Three patients had peak sensitivity in the range of 310-313 nm and the 4th at 460 nm. Photosensitivity in the visible range was detected in 2 patients with solar urticaria, one with actinic reticuloid, and confirmed in 9 patients with porphyria (405 nm). Photosensitivity in the UVA (above 320 nm) occurred to some degree in all groups.

  10. Comparative ultraviolet action spectra (254-320 nm) of five wild-type eukaryotic microorganisms and Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Calkins, J.; Wheeler, J.S.; Keller, C.I.; Colley, E.; Hazle, J.D.

    1988-05-01

    The action spectra of five eukaryotic organisms and the prokaryote, Escherichia coli, were examined over the wavelength range, 254-320 nm. Both the repair competent and three repair defective strains (E. coli, Caenorhabditis elegans, Saccharomyces) were examined. Tetrahymena pyriformis action spectra were performed with and without the excision repair inhibitor caffeine present. Others have observed that lethality, mutation, and the production of pyrimidine dimers show much the same wavelength dependence as DNA absorption. The results presented here demonstrate several action spectra which deviate from the DNA absorption spectra. Ultraviolet sensitization ratios (repair competent/repair defective) were also examined and were shown to change over the wavelength range. These findings suggest that DNA may not be the only important chromophore leading to cell death in the uv wavelength range studied. Since uv-B is of major importance in solar uv damage, these findings may also yield important implications for solar uv studies.

  11. Phytochrome Intermediates and Action Spectra for Light Perception by Dry Seeds 1

    PubMed Central

    Bartley, Michael R.; Frankland, Barry

    1984-01-01

    It has previously been demonstrated that far-red irradiation of dry Lactuca sativa L. seeds results in inhibition of subsequent germination. Although red has no effect on dry seeds, a red irradiation following a farred irradiation reverses the effect of far-red. This phenomenon is most noticeable in seeds with artificially raised levels of phytochrome in the far-red absorbing form. Qualitatively similar results have been found for the seeds of Plantago major L., Sinapis arvensis L., and Bromus sterilis L. Action spectra studies on Plantago seeds show that the action peaks for promotion and inhibition of germination of hydrated seeds are at 660 and 730 nanometers, respectively. The action spectrum for inhibition of subsequent germination following irradiation of dry seeds is qualitatively and quantitatively similar to that for hydrated seeds, with an action peak at 730 nanometers, indicating absorption by phytochrome in the far-red absorbing form. However, the action spectrum for the reversal of this far-red effect on dry seeds has a broad peak at 680 nanometers and subsidiary peaks at 650 and 600 nanometers. It is proposed that this effect is due to light absorption by the phytochrome intermediate complex meta-Fa, and that the action spectrum reflects the in vivo absorption properties of this intermediate. PMID:16663467

  12. Phytochrome intermediates and action spectra for light perception by dry seeds.

    PubMed

    Bartley, M R; Frankland, B

    1984-03-01

    It has previously been demonstrated that far-red irradiation of dry Lactuca sativa L. seeds results in inhibition of subsequent germination. Although red has no effect on dry seeds, a red irradiation following a farred irradiation reverses the effect of far-red. This phenomenon is most noticeable in seeds with artificially raised levels of phytochrome in the far-red absorbing form. Qualitatively similar results have been found for the seeds of Plantago major L., Sinapis arvensis L., and Bromus sterilis L. Action spectra studies on Plantago seeds show that the action peaks for promotion and inhibition of germination of hydrated seeds are at 660 and 730 nanometers, respectively. The action spectrum for inhibition of subsequent germination following irradiation of dry seeds is qualitatively and quantitatively similar to that for hydrated seeds, with an action peak at 730 nanometers, indicating absorption by phytochrome in the far-red absorbing form. However, the action spectrum for the reversal of this far-red effect on dry seeds has a broad peak at 680 nanometers and subsidiary peaks at 650 and 600 nanometers. It is proposed that this effect is due to light absorption by the phytochrome intermediate complex meta-Fa, and that the action spectrum reflects the in vivo absorption properties of this intermediate.

  13. Flare and CME onset: UV spectra show fast 3-D flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Innes, D. E.

    We present observations taken in the corona above a flare that occurred on the west limb of the Sun. SUMER spectra show large red (400 km/s) and blue (700 km/s) Dopplershifts in Fe XX (107 K), Cr XVI (5×106 K), Si IX (106 K) and O III (105 K) emission lines. These shifts are associated with a fast moving (500 km/s) optical emission front detected in high cadence images, taken with the coronagraph MICA. Yohkoh images, taken 8 min after the hard X-ray peak, show fast soft X-ray ejecta that can be extrapolated back to the position of pre-flare coronal arcade structure seen in EIT 195 images. The observations are interpreted as evidence of a blast wave propagating through the active region coronal loop structure very early in the flare evolution.

  14. Random mutagenesis of Luciola mingrelica firefly luciferase. Mutant enzymes with bioluminescence spectra showing low pH sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Koksharov, M I; Ugarova, N N

    2008-08-01

    Most firefly luciferases demonstrate a strong pH-dependence of bioluminescence spectra. Gene region encoding first 225 residues of Luciola mingrelica luciferase was subjected to random mutagenesis, and four mutants with altered pH-sensitivity of bioluminescence spectra were isolated. F16L substitution showed distinctly lower pH-dependence of bioluminescence spectra, and Y35N,H and F16L/A40S substitutions resulted in the enzymes with bioluminescence spectra virtually independent from pH in the range of 6.0-7.8. The structural explanation is proposed for the effect of mutations on pH-sensitivity of bioluminescence spectra.

  15. Measurement of action spectra of light-activated processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Justin; Zvyagin, Andrei V.; Heckenberg, Norman R.; Upcroft, Jacqui; Upcroft, Peter; Rubinsztein-Dunlop, Halina H.

    2006-01-01

    We report on a new experimental technique suitable for measurement of light-activated processes, such as fluorophore transport. The usefulness of this technique is derived from its capacity to decouple the imaging and activation processes, allowing fluorescent imaging of fluorophore transport at a convenient activation wavelength. We demonstrate the efficiency of this new technique in determination of the action spectrum of the light mediated transport of rhodamine 123 into the parasitic protozoan Giardia duodenalis.

  16. Composite spectra Paper 14: HR 1129, a long-period binary showing evidence of circumbinary material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, R. E. M.; Griffin, R. F.; Stickland, D. J.

    2006-12-01

    HR 1129 is a 4.8-mag star in the constellation Camelopardus, strangely (in view of its brightness) lacking a constellation designation. It has long been known to exhibit a composite spectrum consisting of a late-type primary and an early-type secondary. The radial velocity of the primary is easily measured, and was announced as variable nearly 100 years ago. A preliminary orbit with a period of 6150 d was given for it by one of the present authors in 1990; our new value is 6124 +/- 3 d. The system has been resolved by speckle interferometry, but has not been measured systematically by that technique. The spectrum of the primary is found to be very similar to that of α Aqr (G2Ib), although the parallax shows HR 1129 to be somewhat less luminous. The secondary spectrum has been isolated by subtraction and has proved to be that of a B7 star that is somewhat above the main sequence and may itself already be a giant. We present a comprehensive discussion of the spectra of both stars, and deduce that the system is considerably reddened: E(B - V) ~ 0.30, AV ~ 0.9 mag. By incorporating 25 measurements of the radial velocity of the secondary, we calculate a double-lined orbit solution which gives the mass ratio for the components as 1.109 +/- 0.022; we determine individual masses of 4.8-5.2 Msolar (primary) and 4.3-4.7 Msolar (secondary). The orbit is viewed at an inclination of ~ 87°, but there are no eclipses. However, around the phases of conjunction the MgII doublet near λ2800 Å, as seen in IUE spectra, exhibits evidence of two circumstellar absorption systems, which we interpret as a wind from the cool giant and a static shell around it. Substantial 100-μm emission recorded by IRAS points to the presence of warm circumbinary dust enveloping the system, and is likely to have originated in the stellar wind.

  17. Action spectra for validation of pathogen disinfection in medium-pressure ultraviolet (UV) systems.

    PubMed

    Beck, Sara E; Wright, Harold B; Hargy, Thomas M; Larason, Thomas C; Linden, Karl G

    2015-03-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) reactors used for disinfecting water and wastewater must be validated and monitored over time. The validation process requires understanding the photochemical properties of the pathogens of concern and the challenge microorganisms used to represent them. Specifically for polychromatic UV systems, the organisms' dose responses to UV light and their sensitivity across the UV spectrum must be known. This research measured the UV spectral sensitivity, called action spectra, of Cryptosporidium parvum, and MS2, T1UV, Q Beta, T7, and T7m Coliphages, as well as Bacillus pumilus spores. A tunable laser from the National Institute of Standards and Technology was used to isolate single UV wavelengths at 10 nm intervals between 210 and 290 nm. Above 240 nm, all bacteria and viruses tested exhibited a relative peak sensitivity between 260 and 270 nm. Of the coliphage, MS2 exhibited the highest relative sensitivity below 240 nm, relative to its sensitivity at 254 nm, followed by Q Beta, T1UV, T7m and T7 coliphage. B. pumilus spores were more sensitive to UV light at 220 nm than any of the coliphage. These spectra are required for calculating action spectra correction factors for medium pressure UV system validation, for matching appropriate challenge microorganisms to pathogens, and for improving UV dose monitoring. Additionally, understanding the dose response of these organisms at multiple wavelengths can improve polychromatic UV dose calculations and enable prediction of pathogen inactivation from wavelength-specific disinfection technologies such as UV light emitting diodes (LEDs).

  18. Action spectra for validation of pathogen disinfection in medium-pressure ultraviolet (UV) systems.

    PubMed

    Beck, Sara E; Wright, Harold B; Hargy, Thomas M; Larason, Thomas C; Linden, Karl G

    2015-03-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) reactors used for disinfecting water and wastewater must be validated and monitored over time. The validation process requires understanding the photochemical properties of the pathogens of concern and the challenge microorganisms used to represent them. Specifically for polychromatic UV systems, the organisms' dose responses to UV light and their sensitivity across the UV spectrum must be known. This research measured the UV spectral sensitivity, called action spectra, of Cryptosporidium parvum, and MS2, T1UV, Q Beta, T7, and T7m Coliphages, as well as Bacillus pumilus spores. A tunable laser from the National Institute of Standards and Technology was used to isolate single UV wavelengths at 10 nm intervals between 210 and 290 nm. Above 240 nm, all bacteria and viruses tested exhibited a relative peak sensitivity between 260 and 270 nm. Of the coliphage, MS2 exhibited the highest relative sensitivity below 240 nm, relative to its sensitivity at 254 nm, followed by Q Beta, T1UV, T7m and T7 coliphage. B. pumilus spores were more sensitive to UV light at 220 nm than any of the coliphage. These spectra are required for calculating action spectra correction factors for medium pressure UV system validation, for matching appropriate challenge microorganisms to pathogens, and for improving UV dose monitoring. Additionally, understanding the dose response of these organisms at multiple wavelengths can improve polychromatic UV dose calculations and enable prediction of pathogen inactivation from wavelength-specific disinfection technologies such as UV light emitting diodes (LEDs). PMID:25506761

  19. Network Analysis Shows Novel Molecular Mechanisms of Action for Copper-Based Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Espinal-Enríquez, Jesús; Hernández-Lemus, Enrique; Mejía, Carmen; Ruiz-Azuara, Lena

    2016-01-01

    The understanding of the mechanisms associated with the action of chemotherapeutic agents is fundamental to assess and account for possible side-effects of such treatments. Casiopeínas have demonstrated a cytotoxic effect by activation of pro-apoptotic processes in malignant cells. Such processes have been proved to activate the apoptotic intrinsic route, as well as cell cycle arrest. Despite this knowledge, the whole mechanism of action of Casiopeínas is yet to be completely understood. In this work we implement a systems biology approach based on two pathway analysis tools (Over-Representation Analysis and Causal Network Analysis) to observe changes in some hallmarks of cancer, induced by this copper-based chemotherapeutic agent in HeLa cell lines. We find that the metabolism of metal ions is exacerbated, as well as cell division processes being globally diminished. We also show that cellular migration and proliferation events are decreased. Moreover, the molecular mechanisms of liver protection are increased in the cell cultures under the actions of Casiopeínas, unlike the case in many other cytotoxic drugs. We argue that this chemotherapeutic agent may be promising, given its protective hepatic function, concomitant with its cytotoxic participation in the onset of apoptotic processes in malignant cells. PMID:26793116

  20. Structure, spectra and antioxidant action of ascorbic acid studied by density functional theory, Raman spectroscopic and nuclear magnetic resonance techniques.

    PubMed

    Singh, Gurpreet; Mohanty, B P; Saini, G S S

    2016-02-15

    Structure, vibrational and nuclear magnetic resonance spectra, and antioxidant action of ascorbic acid towards hydroxyl radicals have been studied computationally and in vitro by ultraviolet-visible, nuclear magnetic resonance and vibrational spectroscopic techniques. Time dependant density functional theory calculations have been employed to specify various electronic transitions in ultraviolet-visible spectra. Observed chemical shifts and vibrational bands in nuclear magnetic resonance and vibrational spectra, respectively have been assigned with the help of calculations. Changes in the structure of ascorbic acid in aqueous phase have been examined computationally and experimentally by recording Raman spectra in aqueous medium. Theoretical calculations of the interaction between ascorbic acid molecule and hydroxyl radical predicted the formation of dehydroascorbic acid as first product, which has been confirmed by comparing its simulated spectra with the corresponding spectra of ascorbic acid in presence of hydrogen peroxide.

  1. Structure, spectra and antioxidant action of ascorbic acid studied by density functional theory, Raman spectroscopic and nuclear magnetic resonance techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Gurpreet; Mohanty, B. P.; Saini, G. S. S.

    2016-02-01

    Structure, vibrational and nuclear magnetic resonance spectra, and antioxidant action of ascorbic acid towards hydroxyl radicals have been studied computationally and in vitro by ultraviolet-visible, nuclear magnetic resonance and vibrational spectroscopic techniques. Time dependant density functional theory calculations have been employed to specify various electronic transitions in ultraviolet-visible spectra. Observed chemical shifts and vibrational bands in nuclear magnetic resonance and vibrational spectra, respectively have been assigned with the help of calculations. Changes in the structure of ascorbic acid in aqueous phase have been examined computationally and experimentally by recording Raman spectra in aqueous medium. Theoretical calculations of the interaction between ascorbic acid molecule and hydroxyl radical predicted the formation of dehydroascorbic acid as first product, which has been confirmed by comparing its simulated spectra with the corresponding spectra of ascorbic acid in presence of hydrogen peroxide.

  2. Close correspondence between the action spectra for the blue light responses of the guard cell and coleoptile chloroplasts, and the spectra for blue light-dependent stomatal opening and coleoptile phototropism

    SciTech Connect

    Quinones, M.A.; Lu, Zhenmin; Zeiger, E.

    1996-03-05

    Fluorescence spectroscopy was used to characterize blue light responses from chloroplasts of adaxial guard cells from Pima cotton (Gossypium barbadense) and coleoptile tips from corn (Zea mays). The chloroplast response to blue light was quantified by measurements of the blue light-induced enhancement of a red light-stimulated quenching of chlorophyll a fluorescence. In adaxial (upper) guard cells, low fluence rates of blue light applied under saturating fluence rates of red light enhanced the red light-stimulated fluorescence quenching by up to 50%. In contrast, added blue light did not alter the red light-stimulated quenching from abaxial (lower) guard cells. This response pattern paralleled the blue light sensitivity of stomatal opening in the two leaf surfaces. An action spectrum for the blue light-induced enhancement of the red light-stimulated quenching showed a major peak at 450 nm and two minor peaks at 420 and 470 nm. This spectrum matched closely an action spectrum for blue light-stimulated stomatal opening. Coleoptile chloroplasts also showed an enhancement by blue light of red light-stimulated quenching. The action spectrum of this response, showing a major peak at 450 nm, a minor peak at 470 nm, and a shoulder at 430 nm, closely matched an action spectrum for blue light-stimulated coleoptile phototropism. Both action spectra match the absorption spectrum of zeaxanthin, a chloroplastic carotenoid recently implicated in blue light photoreception of both guard cells and coleoptiles. The remarkable similarity between the action spectra for the blue light responses of guard cells and coleoptile chloroplasts and the spectra for blue light-stimulated stomatal opening and phototropism, coupled to the recently reported evidence on a role of zeaxanthin in blue light photoreception, indicates that the guard cell and coleoptile chloroplasts specialize in sensory transduction. 28 refs. 4 figs.

  3. Comparison of the action spectra and relative DNA absorbance spectra of microorganisms: information important for the determination of germicidal fluence (UV dose) in an ultraviolet disinfection of water.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ren Zhuo; Craik, Stephen A; Bolton, James R

    2009-12-01

    The action spectra of Bacillus subtilis spores (ATCC6633) and Salmonella typhimurium LT2 were characterized using physical radiometry for irradiance measurements and a multiple target model to interpret the inactivation kinetics. The observed action spectrum of B. subtilis spores deviated significantly from the relative absorbance spectrum of the DNA purified from the spores, but matched quite well with the relative absorbance spectrum of decoated spores. The action spectrum of B. subtilis spores determined in this study was statistically different from those reported in previous studies. On the other hand, the action spectrum of S. typhimurium bacteria matched quite well with the relative absorbance spectrum of DNA extracted from vegetative cells, except in the region below 240nm. It is concluded that the common use of the relative DNA absorbance spectrum as a surrogate for the germicidal action spectrum can result in systematic errors when evaluating the performance of a polychromatic UV light reactors using bioassays. For example, if the weighted germicidal fluence (UV dose) calculated using the relative DNA absorbance spectrum as the germicidal weighting factor is found to be 40mJcm(-2) for a medium pressure lamp UV reactor, that calculated using the relative action spectrum of B. subtilis spores, as determined in this study, would be 66mJcm(-2). PMID:19762061

  4. Comparison of the action spectra and relative DNA absorbance spectra of microorganisms: information important for the determination of germicidal fluence (UV dose) in an ultraviolet disinfection of water.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ren Zhuo; Craik, Stephen A; Bolton, James R

    2009-12-01

    The action spectra of Bacillus subtilis spores (ATCC6633) and Salmonella typhimurium LT2 were characterized using physical radiometry for irradiance measurements and a multiple target model to interpret the inactivation kinetics. The observed action spectrum of B. subtilis spores deviated significantly from the relative absorbance spectrum of the DNA purified from the spores, but matched quite well with the relative absorbance spectrum of decoated spores. The action spectrum of B. subtilis spores determined in this study was statistically different from those reported in previous studies. On the other hand, the action spectrum of S. typhimurium bacteria matched quite well with the relative absorbance spectrum of DNA extracted from vegetative cells, except in the region below 240nm. It is concluded that the common use of the relative DNA absorbance spectrum as a surrogate for the germicidal action spectrum can result in systematic errors when evaluating the performance of a polychromatic UV light reactors using bioassays. For example, if the weighted germicidal fluence (UV dose) calculated using the relative DNA absorbance spectrum as the germicidal weighting factor is found to be 40mJcm(-2) for a medium pressure lamp UV reactor, that calculated using the relative action spectrum of B. subtilis spores, as determined in this study, would be 66mJcm(-2).

  5. Of-type stars HD 16691 and HD 190429 show WN-like spectra in infrared K band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conti, Peter S.; Hanson, Margaret Murray; Morris, Patrick W.

    1995-01-01

    We present 2 micrometer K-band spectra of two early-type Of stars that have infrared emission-line morphology similar to that of WN stars. Archival International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) spectra of these two stars indicate they appear to be Of type, rather than WN. Recently acquired optical spectra of these stars are quantitatively similar to that in the past, namely, Of attributes. We suggest that these two Of stars have stellar wind characteristics closer to WN type than other Of stars. We discuss the consequences for K-band classification of highly obscured hot stars that might not otherwise be visible in optical or UV wavelengths.

  6. How action selection can be embodied: intracranial gamma band recording shows response competition during the Eriksen flankers test

    PubMed Central

    Caruana, Fausto; Uithol, Sebo; Cantalupo, Gaetano; Sartori, Ivana; Lo Russo, Giorgio; Avanzini, Pietro

    2014-01-01

    Recent findings in monkeys suggest that action selection is based on a competition between various action options that are automatically planned by the motor system. Here we discuss data from intracranial EEG recordings in human premotor cortex (PMC) during a bimanual version of the Eriksen flankers test that suggest that the same principles apply to human action decisions. Recording sites in the dorsal PMC show an early but undifferentiated activation, a delayed response that depends on the experimental conditions and, finally, a movement related activation during action execution. Additionally, we found that the medial part of the PMC show a significant increase in response for ipsilateral trials, suggesting a role in inhibiting the wrong response. The ventral PMC seems to be involved in action execution, rather than action selection. Together these findings suggest that the human PMC is part of a network that specifies, selects, and executes actions. PMID:25206328

  7. Evidences from action spectra for a specific participation of chlorophyll b in photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    MYERS, J; FRENCH, C S

    1960-03-01

    Rate of oxygen evolution in photosynthesis was measured as the current from a polarized platinum electrode covered by a thin layer of Chlorella. The arrangement gave a reproducibly measurable rate of photosynthesis proportional to light intensity at the low levels used and gave rapid response to changes in illumination. Two phenomena have been explored. The Emerson effect was observed as an enhancement of photosynthesis in long wavelength red light (700 mmicro) when shorter wavelengths were added. Two light beams of wavelengths 653 and 700 mmicro when presented together gave a photosynthetic rate about 25 per cent higher than the sum of the rates obtained separately. Large and reproducible transients in rate of oxygen evolution were observed accompanying change in illumination between two wavelengths adjusted in intensity to support equal steady rates of photosynthesis. The transients were found not to be specifically related to long wavelength red light. Both enhancement and the transients have identical action spectra which are interpreted as demonstrating a specific photochemical participation of chlorophyll b.

  8. Fathers Show Modifications of Infant-Directed Action Similar to that of Mothers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutherford, M. D.; Przednowek, Malgorzata

    2012-01-01

    Mothers' actions are more enthusiastic, simple, and repetitive when demonstrating novel object properties to their infants than to adults, a behavioral modification called "infant-directed action" by Brand and colleagues (2002). The current study tested whether fathers also tailor their behavior when interacting with infants and whether this…

  9. The effect of magnesium ions on action spectra for reactions mediated by photosystems I and II in spinach chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Loos, E

    1976-08-13

    Action spectra were measured for positive changes in variable fluorescence (emission greater than 665 nm) excited by a beam of 485 nm chopped at 75 HZ. The action of two further beams were compared, one being variable, the other (reference) constant with respect to wavelength and intensity. Comparison was achieved by alternating the reference and the variable wavelength beams at 0.3 HZ and adjusting the intensity of the latter such as to cancel out any 0.3 HZ component in the 75 HZ fluorescence signal. The relative action then was obtained as the reciprocal of the intensity of the variable wavelength beam. Similarly, action spectra were measured for O2 evolution with ferricyanide/p-phenylenediamine as electron acceptor, and for O2 uptake mediated by methyl viologen with ascorbate 3-(p-chlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea as electron donor in the presence of 2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol. Addition of 5 mM MgCl2 increases the relative action around 480 nm for the change in variable fluorescence and p-phenylenediamine-dependent O2 evolution, and decreases it for methyl viologen-mediated O2 uptake with 2,6-dichlorophenolindo-phenol/ascorbate as electron donor in the presence of 3-(p-chlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea. The change in variable fluorescence and O2 evolution are stimulated by MgCl2, whereas O2 uptake is inhibited by it. The results are discussed in terms of a model assuming a tripartite organization of the photosynthetic pigments (Thornber, J. P. and Highkin, H. R. (1974) Eur. J. Biochem. 41, 109-116; Butler, W. L. and Kitajima, M. (1975) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 396, 72-85). MgCl2 is thought to promote energy transfer to Photosystem II from a light-harvesting pigment complex serving both photosystems.

  10. The fluorescence action spectra of some saturated hydrocarbon liquids for excitation energies above and below their ionization thresholds

    SciTech Connect

    Ostafin, A.E.; Lipsky, S. )

    1993-04-01

    Fluorescence action spectra have been obtained for the neat liquids, [ital cis]-decalin, [ital trans]-decalin, bicyclohexyl, cyclohexane, methylcyclohexane, isobutylcyclohexane, 2,3,4-trimethylpentane, 2,3-dimethylbutane, 3-methylhexane, 3-methylpentane, [ital n]-decane, [ital n]-dodecane, and [ital n]-pentadecane at excitation energies, [epsilon], ranging from their absorption onsets (at ca. 7 eV) to 10.3 eV. For all compounds, with the exception of [ital cis]-decalin, the fluorescence quantum yield is observed to monotonically decline with increasing [epsilon], reaching a minimum value at an energy, [epsilon][sub [ital m

  11. Dithiocarbamates strongly inhibit carbonic anhydrases and show antiglaucoma action in vivo.

    PubMed

    Carta, Fabrizio; Aggarwal, Mayank; Maresca, Alfonso; Scozzafava, Andrea; McKenna, Robert; Masini, Emanuela; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2012-02-23

    A series of dithiocarbamates were prepared by reaction of primary/secondary amines with carbon disulfide in the presence of bases. These compounds were tested for the inhibition of four human (h) isoforms of the zinc enzyme carbonic anhydrase, CA (EC 4.2.1.1), hCA I, II, IX, and XII, involved in pathologies such as glaucoma (CA II and XII) or cancer (CA IX). Several low nanomolar inhibitors targeting these CAs were detected. The X-ray crystal structure of the hCA II adduct with morpholine dithiocarbamate evidenced the inhibition mechanism of these compounds, which coordinate to the metal ion through a sulfur atom from the dithiocarbamate zinc-binding function. Some dithiocarbamates showed an effective intraocular pressure lowering activity in an animal model of glucoma. PMID:22276570

  12. Dithiocarbamates strongly inhibit carbonic anhydrases and show antiglaucoma action in vivo#

    PubMed Central

    Carta, Fabrizio; Aggarwal, Mayank; Maresca, Alfonso; Scozzafava, Andrea; McKenna, Robert; Masini, Emanuela; Supuran, Claudiu T.

    2012-01-01

    A series of dithiocarbamates was prepared by reaction of primary/secondary amines with carbon disulfide in the presence of bases. These compounds were tested for the inhibition of 4 human (h) isoforms of the zinc enzyme carbonic anhydrase, CA (EC 4.2.1.1), hCA I, II, IX and XII, involved in pathologies such as glaucoma (CA II and XII) or cancer (CA IX). Several low nanomolar inhibitors targeting these CAs were detected. X-ray crystal structure of hCA II adduct with morpholine dithiocarbamate evidenced the inhibition mechanism of these compounds, which coordinate to the metal ion through a sulfur atom from the dithiocarbamate zinc-binding function. Some dithiocarbamates showed effective intraocular pressure lowering activity in an animal model of glucoma. PMID:22276570

  13. Action spectra of oxygen production and chlorophyll a fluorescence in the green microalga Nannochloropsis oculata.

    PubMed

    Tamburic, Bojan; Szabó, Milán; Tran, Nhan-An T; Larkum, Anthony W D; Suggett, David J; Ralph, Peter J

    2014-10-01

    The first complete action spectrum of oxygen evolution and chlorophyll a fluorescence was measured for the biofuel candidate alga Nannochloropsis oculata. A novel analytical procedure was used to generate a representative and reproducible action spectrum for microalgal cultures. The action spectrum was measured at 14 discrete wavelengths across the visible spectrum, at an equivalent photon flux density of 60 μmol photon sm(-2) s(-1). Blue light (∼ 414 nm) was absorbed more efficiently and directed to photosystem II more effectively than red light (∼ 679 nm) at light intensities below the photosaturation limit. Conversion of absorbed photons into photosynthetic oxygen evolution was maximised at 625 nm; however, this maximum is unstable since neighbouring wavelengths (646 nm) resulted in the lowest photosystem II operating efficiency. Identifying the wavelength-dependence of photosynthesis has clear implications to optimising growth efficiency and hence important economic implications to the algal biofuels and bioproducts industries.

  14. Do monkey F5 mirror neurons show changes in firing rate during repeated observation of natural actions?

    PubMed Central

    Kraskov, A.; Lemon, R. N.

    2013-01-01

    Mirror neurons were first discovered in area F5 of macaque monkeys. In humans, noninvasive studies have demonstrated an increased blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal in homologous motor areas during action observation. One approach to demonstrating that this indicates the existence of mirror neurons in humans has been to employ functional (f)MRI adaptation to test whether the same population of neurons is active during both observation and execution conditions. Although a number of human studies have reported fMRI adaptation in these areas, a recent study has shown that macaque mirror neurons do not attenuate their firing rate with two repetitions. Here we investigated whether mirror neurons modulate their firing rate when monkeys observed the same repeated natural action multiple times. We recorded from 67 mirror neurons in area F5 of two macaque monkeys while they observed an experimenter perform a reach-to-grasp action on a small food reward using a precision grip. Although no changes were detectable for the first two repetitions, we show that both the firing rate and the latency at which mirror neurons discharged during observation were subtly modulated by the repetition of the observed action over 7–10 trials. Significant adaption was mostly found in the period immediately before the grasp was performed. We also found that the local field potential activity in F5 (beta-frequency range, 16–23 Hz), which is attenuated during action observation, also showed systematic changes with repeated observation. These LFP changes occurred well in advance of the mirror neuron adaptation. We conclude that macaque mirror neurons can show intra-modal adaptation, but whether this is related to fMRI adaptation of the BOLD signal requires further investigation. PMID:24371289

  15. Do monkey F5 mirror neurons show changes in firing rate during repeated observation of natural actions?

    PubMed

    Kilner, J M; Kraskov, A; Lemon, R N

    2014-03-01

    Mirror neurons were first discovered in area F5 of macaque monkeys. In humans, noninvasive studies have demonstrated an increased blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal in homologous motor areas during action observation. One approach to demonstrating that this indicates the existence of mirror neurons in humans has been to employ functional (f)MRI adaptation to test whether the same population of neurons is active during both observation and execution conditions. Although a number of human studies have reported fMRI adaptation in these areas, a recent study has shown that macaque mirror neurons do not attenuate their firing rate with two repetitions. Here we investigated whether mirror neurons modulate their firing rate when monkeys observed the same repeated natural action multiple times. We recorded from 67 mirror neurons in area F5 of two macaque monkeys while they observed an experimenter perform a reach-to-grasp action on a small food reward using a precision grip. Although no changes were detectable for the first two repetitions, we show that both the firing rate and the latency at which mirror neurons discharged during observation were subtly modulated by the repetition of the observed action over 7-10 trials. Significant adaption was mostly found in the period immediately before the grasp was performed. We also found that the local field potential activity in F5 (beta-frequency range, 16-23 Hz), which is attenuated during action observation, also showed systematic changes with repeated observation. These LFP changes occurred well in advance of the mirror neuron adaptation. We conclude that macaque mirror neurons can show intra-modal adaptation, but whether this is related to fMRI adaptation of the BOLD signal requires further investigation.

  16. Evidence from action and fluorescence spectra that UV-induced violet-blue-green fluorescence enhances leaf photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Mantha, S V; Johnson, G A; Day, T A

    2001-03-01

    We assessed the contribution of UV-induced violet-blue-green leaf fluorescence to photosynthesis in Poa annua, Sorghum halepense and Nerium oleander by measuring UV-induced fluorescence spectra (280-380 nm excitation, 400-550 nm emission) from leaf surfaces and determining the monochromatic UV action spectra for leaf photosynthetic O2-evolution. Peak fluorescence emission wavelengths from leaf surfaces ranged from violet (408 nm) to blue (448 nm), while excitation peaks for these maxima ranged from 333 to 344 nm. Action spectra were developed by supplementing monochromatic radiation from 280 to 440 nm, in 20 nm increments, to a visible nonsaturating background of 500 mumol m-2 s-1 photosynthetically active radiation and measuring photosynthetic O2-evolution rates. Photosynthetic rates tended to be higher with the 340 nm supplement than with higher or lower wavelength UV supplements. Comparing photosynthetic rates with the 340 nm supplement to those with the 400 nm supplement, the percentage enhancement in photosynthetic rates at 340 nm ranged from 7.8 to 9.8%. We suspect that 340 nm UV improves photosynthetic rates via fluorescence that provides violet-blue-green photons for photosynthetic energy conversion because (1) the peak excitation wavelength (340 nm) for violet-blue-green fluorescence from leaves was also the most effective UV wavelength at enhancing photosynthetic rates, and (2) the magnitude of photosynthetic enhancements attributable to supplemental 340 nm UV was well correlated (R2 = 0.90) with the apparent intensity of 340 nm UV-induced violet-blue-green fluorescence emission from leaves.

  17. Inhibitory spectra and modes of antimicrobial action of gallotannins from mango kernels (Mangifera indica L.).

    PubMed

    Engels, Christina; Schieber, Andreas; Gänzle, Michael G

    2011-04-01

    This study investigated the antimicrobial activities and modes of action of penta-, hexa-, hepta-, octa-, nona-, and deca-O-galloylglucose (gallotannins) isolated from mango kernels. The MICs and minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBCs) against food-borne bacteria and fungi were determined using a critical dilution assay. Gram-positive bacteria were generally more susceptible to gallotannins than were Gram-negative bacteria. The MICs of gallotannins against Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus cereus, Clostridium botulinum, Campylobacter jejuni, Listeria monocytogenes, and Staphylococcus aureus were 0.2 g liter(-1) or less; enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica were inhibited by 0.5 to 1 g liter(-1), and lactic acid bacteria were resistant. The use of lipopolysaccharide mutants of S. enterica indicated that the outer membrane confers resistance toward gallotannins. Supplementation of LB medium with iron eliminated the inhibitory activity of gallotannins against Staphylococcus aureus, and siderophore-deficient mutants of S. enterica were less resistant toward gallotannins than was the wild-type strain. Hepta-O-galloylglucose sensitized Lactobacillus plantarum TMW1.460 to hop extract, indicating inactivation of hop resistance mechanisms, e.g., the multidrug resistance (MDR) transporter HorA. Carbohydrate metabolism of Lactococcus lactis MG1363, a conditionally respiring organism, was influenced by hepta-O-galloylglucose when grown under aerobic conditions and in the presence of heme but not under anaerobic conditions, indicating that gallotannins influence the respiratory chain. In conclusion, the inhibitory activities of gallotannins are attributable to their strong affinity for iron and likely additionally relate to the inactivation of membrane-bound proteins.

  18. Resolution of DNA damage at the single-cell level shows largely different actions of X-rays and bleomycin.

    PubMed

    Affentranger, M I; Burkart, W

    1995-02-01

    Both X-rays and the radiomimetic agent bleomycin (BLM) induce DNA strand breaks, predominantly via reactive radicals. To compare the induction of breaks with the two agents in Chinese hamster (CHO-K1) cells, two different alkaline unwinding methods, a 3H tracer-based analysis of large cell populations and an optical adaption allowing measurement of single cells, were applied. Radiation and BLM show qualitatively similar dose responses when the average number of DNA strand breaks is measured in a large cell population. However, the breakage pattern at the single-cell level indicates large discrepancies between the actions of the two agents. Irradiated cells show a uniform distribution of DNA strand breaks over the cell population. Effects of treatment with 30 micrograms x ml-1 BLM for 2 hr vary from practically zero in some cells to high levels of DNA strand breakage in others. Unlike the repair of radiation-induced DNA breaks, the repair efficiency of BLM-induced DNA strand breaks, as measured at the single-cell level, varies strongly among cells of the same population. Such heterogeneity at the cellular level potentially reduces BLM's usefulness for tumor therapy because the appearance of BLM-resistant subpopulations may critically impair treatment outcome.

  19. Muscle-specific androgen receptor deletion shows limited actions in myoblasts but not in myofibers in different muscles in vivo.

    PubMed

    Rana, Kesha; Chiu, Maria W S; Russell, Patricia K; Skinner, Jarrod P; Lee, Nicole K L; Fam, Barbara C; Zajac, Jeffrey D; MacLean, Helen E

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the direct muscle cell-mediated actions of androgens by comparing two different mouse lines. The cre-loxP system was used to delete the DNA-binding activity of the androgen receptor (AR) in mature myofibers (MCK mAR(ΔZF2)) in one model and the DNA-binding activity of the AR in both proliferating myoblasts and myofibers (α-actin mAR(ΔZF2)) in another model. We found that hind-limb muscle mass was normal in MCK mAR(ΔZF2) mice and that relative mass of only some hind-limb muscles was reduced in α-actin mAR(ΔZF2) mice. This suggests that myoblasts and myofibers are not the major cellular targets mediating the anabolic actions of androgens on male muscle during growth and development. Levator ani muscle mass was decreased in both mouse lines, demonstrating that there is a myofiber-specific effect in this unique androgen-dependent muscle. We found that the pattern of expression of genes including c-myc, Fzd4 and Igf2 is associated with androgen-dependent changes in muscle mass; therefore, these genes are likely to be mediators of anabolic actions of androgens. Further research is required to identify the major targets of androgen actions in muscle, which are likely to include indirect actions via other tissues.

  20. Do human brain areas involved in visuomotor actions show a preference for real tools over visually similar non-tools?

    PubMed

    Macdonald, Scott N; Culham, Jody C

    2015-10-01

    Neuroimaging has revealed a left-lateralized network of brain areas implicated in understanding the conceptual and sensorimotor aspects of tool perception and tool use. Often this network of areas is identified by contrasting brain activity when participants view pictures of tools vs. pictures of non-tools (e.g., animals or buildings). It is unclear, however, what aspect of tools drive activity in the tool network as both tools and non-tools tend to differ in their low-level features. For instance, areas in the tool network may simply activate to elongated objects or to handheld objects over round or ungraspable objects irrespective of object category. To test whether tools indeed drive activity in tool-selective areas over non-tools, participants passively viewed real tools and non-tools matched on low-level features during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). To maximize the potential for action, participants saw real-tools as opposed to pictures of tools. The non-tools were created by chopping the business ends of tools into pieces and attaching the pieces to both ends of the original tool handles. In doing so, the tools and non-tools were matched for elongation and real-world size. Importantly, tools and non-tools were viewed directly without the use of mirrors and placed within the participants' reach. Stimuli were presented at two opposite horizontal orientations to investigate whether areas that are selective for tools also show greater activation when the tool's handle is directed towards the hand as opposed to away from it. Our results showed that, even after the low-level differences between tools and non-tools were controlled, tools evoked more activation in the tool network as well as in sensorimotor areas. The orientation of the tool handles did not mediate effects within these sensorimotor areas. In sum, when we passively view tools, even without an intent to act, functional associations are automatically evoked and these associations are not

  1. Action potential waveform voltage clamp shows significance of different Ca2+ channel types in developing ascidian muscle

    PubMed Central

    Dallman, Julia E; Dorman, Jennie B; Moody, William J

    2000-01-01

    Early in development, ascidian muscle cells generate spontaneous, long-duration action potentials that are mediated by a high-threshold, inactivating Ca2+ current. This spontaneous activity is required for appropriate physiological development.Mature muscle cells generate brief action potentials only in response to motor neuron input. The mature action potential is mediated by a high-threshold sustained Ca2+ current.Action potentials recorded from these two stages were imposed as voltage-clamp commands on cells of the same and different stages from which they were recorded. This strategy allowed us to study how immature and mature Ca2+ currents are optimized to their particular functions.Total Ca2+ entry during an action potential did not change during development. The developmental increase in Ca2+ current density exactly compensated for decreased spike duration. This compensation was a function purely of Ca2+ current density, not of the transition from immature to mature Ca2+ current types.In immature cells, Ca2+ entry was spread out over the entire waveform of spontaneous activity, including the interspike voltage trajectory. This almost continuous Ca2+ entry may be important in triggering Ca2+-dependent developmental programmes, and is a function of the slightly more negative voltage dependence of the immature Ca2+ current.In contrast, Ca2+ entry in mature cells was confined to the action potential itself, because of the slightly more positive voltage dependence of the mature Ca2+ current. This may be important in permitting rapid contraction-relaxation cycles during larval swimming.The inactivation of the immature Ca2+ current serves to limit the frequency and burst duration of spontaneous activity. The sustained kinetics of the mature Ca2+ current permit high-frequency firing during larval swimming. PMID:10766919

  2. Mode of action and variability in efficacy of plant essential oils showing toxicity against the poultry red mite, Dermanyssus gallinae.

    PubMed

    George, D R; Smith, T J; Shiel, R S; Sparagano, O A E; Guy, J H

    2009-05-12

    This paper describes a series of experiments to examine the mode of action and toxicity of three plant essential oils (thyme, manuka and pennyroyal) to the poultry red mite, Dermanyssus gallinae (De Geer), a serious ectoparasitic pest of laying hens. All three oils were found to be toxic to D. gallinae in laboratory tests with LC(50), LC(90) and LC(99) values below 0.05, 0.20 and 0.30mg/cm(3), respectively, suggesting that these products may make for effective acaricides against this pest. Further experiments demonstrated that when mites were exposed to only the vapour phase of the essential oil without contact with the oil itself, mortality was consistently higher in closed arenas than in arenas open to the surrounding environment, or in control arenas. This suggests that all three essential oils were toxic to D. gallinae by fumigant action. In addition, in an experiment where mites were allowed contact with the essential oil in either open or closed arenas, mortality was always reduced in the open arenas where this was comparable to control mortality for thyme and pennyroyal essential oil treatments. This supports the findings of the previous experiment and also suggests that, with the possible exception of manuka, the selected essential oils were not toxic to D. gallinae on contact. Statistical comparisons were made between the toxicity of the selected essential oils to D. gallinae in the current work and in a previous study conducted in the same laboratory. The results demonstrated considerable variation in LC(50), LC(90) and LC(99) values. Since both the essential oils and the mites were obtained from identical sources in the two studies, it is hypothesized that this variation resulted from the use of different 'batches' of essential oil, which could have varied in chemistry and hence acaricidal activity.

  3. Action!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Senese, Joseph

    1998-01-01

    A small group of teachers at one Illinois high school is helping to effect and promote change. Through the Action Research Laboratory (ARL), teams of teachers conduct collaborative action research to improve classroom practices. Data from the first two years of the ARL indicate that teachers are eager to participate in, and have thrived in, their…

  4. Action spectra of photosystems II and I and quantum yield of photosynthesis in leaves in State 1.

    PubMed

    Laisk, Agu; Oja, Vello; Eichelmann, Hillar; Dall'Osto, Luca

    2014-02-01

    The spectral global quantum yield (YII, electrons/photons absorbed) of photosystem II (PSII) was measured in sunflower leaves in State 1 using monochromatic light. The global quantum yield of PSI (YI) was measured using low-intensity monochromatic light flashes and the associated transmittance change at 810nm. The 810-nm signal change was calibrated based on the number of electrons generated by PSII during the flash (4·O2 evolution) which arrived at the PSI donor side after a delay of 2ms. The intrinsic quantum yield of PSI (yI, electrons per photon absorbed by PSI) was measured at 712nm, where photon absorption by PSII was small. The results were used to resolve the individual spectra of the excitation partitioning coefficients between PSI (aI) and PSII (aII) in leaves. For comparison, pigment-protein complexes for PSII and PSI were isolated, separated by sucrose density ultracentrifugation, and their optical density was measured. A good correlation was obtained for the spectral excitation partitioning coefficients measured by these different methods. The intrinsic yield of PSI was high (yI=0.88), but it absorbed only about 1/3 of quanta; consequently, about 2/3 of quanta were absorbed by PSII, but processed with the low intrinsic yield yII=0.63. In PSII, the quantum yield of charge separation was 0.89 as detected by variable fluorescence Fv/Fm, but 29% of separated charges recombined (Laisk A, Eichelmann H and Oja V, Photosynth. Res. 113, 145-155). At wavelengths less than 580nm about 30% of excitation is absorbed by pigments poorly connected to either photosystem, most likely carotenoids bound in pigment-protein complexes.

  5. Phenobarbital and propiconazole toxicogenomic profiles in mice show major similarities consistent with the key role that constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) activation plays in their mode of action

    PubMed Central

    Currie, Richard A.; Peffer, Richard C.; Goetz, Amber K.; Omiecinski, Curtis J.; Goodman, Jay I.

    2014-01-01

    Toxicogenomics (TGx) is employed frequently to investigate underlying molecular mechanisms of the compound of interest and, thus, has become an aid to mode of action determination. However, the results and interpretation of a TGx dataset are influenced by the experimental design and methods of analysis employed. This article describes an evaluation and reanalysis, by two independent laboratories, of previously published TGx mouse liver microarray data for a triazole fungicide, propiconazole (PPZ), and the anticonvulsant drug phenobarbital (PB). Propiconazole produced an increase incidence of liver tumors in male CD-1 mice only at a dose that exceeded the maximum tolerated dose (2500 ppm). Firstly, we illustrate how experimental design differences between two in vivo studies with PPZ and PB may impact the comparisons of TGx results. Secondly, we demonstrate that different researchers using different pathway analysis tools can come to different conclusions on specific mechanistic pathways, even when using the same datasets. Finally, despite these differences the results across three different analyses also show a striking degree of similarity observed for PPZ and PB treated livers when the expression data are viewed as major signaling pathways and cell processes affected. Additional studies described here show that the postulated key event of hepatocellular proliferation was observed in CD-1 mice for both PPZ and PB, and that PPZ is also a potent activator of the mouse CAR nuclear receptor. Thus, with regard to the events which are hallmarks of CAR-induced effects that are key events in the mode of action (MOA) of mouse liver carcinogenesis with PB, PPZ-induced tumors can be viewed as being promoted by a similar PB-like CAR-dependent MOA. PMID:24675475

  6. Phenobarbital and propiconazole toxicogenomic profiles in mice show major similarities consistent with the key role that constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) activation plays in their mode of action.

    PubMed

    Currie, Richard A; Peffer, Richard C; Goetz, Amber K; Omiecinski, Curtis J; Goodman, Jay I

    2014-07-01

    Toxicogenomics (TGx) is employed frequently to investigate underlying molecular mechanisms of the compound of interest and, thus, has become an aid to mode of action determination. However, the results and interpretation of a TGx dataset are influenced by the experimental design and methods of analysis employed. This article describes an evaluation and reanalysis, by two independent laboratories, of previously published TGx mouse liver microarray data for a triazole fungicide, propiconazole (PPZ), and the anticonvulsant drug phenobarbital (PB). Propiconazole produced an increase incidence of liver tumors in male CD-1 mice only at a dose that exceeded the maximum tolerated dose (2500 ppm). Firstly, we illustrate how experimental design differences between two in vivo studies with PPZ and PB may impact the comparisons of TGx results. Secondly, we demonstrate that different researchers using different pathway analysis tools can come to different conclusions on specific mechanistic pathways, even when using the same datasets. Finally, despite these differences the results across three different analyses also show a striking degree of similarity observed for PPZ and PB treated livers when the expression data are viewed as major signaling pathways and cell processes affected. Additional studies described here show that the postulated key event of hepatocellular proliferation was observed in CD-1 mice for both PPZ and PB, and that PPZ is also a potent activator of the mouse CAR nuclear receptor. Thus, with regard to the events which are hallmarks of CAR-induced effects that are key events in the mode of action (MOA) of mouse liver carcinogenesis with PB, PPZ-induced tumors can be viewed as being promoted by a similar PB-like CAR-dependent MOA.

  7. Efficiency of extrinsic and intrinsic charge-carrier photogeneration processes obtained from the steady-state photocurrent action spectra of poly( p-phenylene vinylene) derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazati, T.; Santos, L. F.; Reis, F. T.; Faria, R. M.

    2012-09-01

    The efficiency of the charge-carrier photogeneration processes in poly(2,5-bis(3',7'-dimethyl-octyloxy)-1,4-phenylene vinylene) (OC1OC10-PPV) has been analyzed by the spectral response of the photocurrent of devices in ITO/polymer/Al structures. The symbatic response of the photocurrent action spectra of the OC1OC10-PPV devices, obtained for light-excitation through the ITO electrode and for forward bias, has been fitted using a phenomenological model which considers that the predominant transport mechanism under external applied electric field is the drift of photogenerated charge-carriers, neglecting charge-carrier diffusion. The proposed model takes into account that charge-carrier photogeneration occurs via intermediate stages of bounded pairs (excitonic states), followed by dissociation processes. Such processes result in two different contributions to the photoconductivity: The first one, associated to direct creation of unbound polaron pairs due to intrinsic photoionization; and the second one is associated to secondary processes like extrinsic photoinjection at the metallic electrodes. The results obtained from the model have shown that the intrinsic component of the photoconductivity at higher excitation energies has a considerably higher efficiency than the extrinsic one, suggesting a dependence on the photon energy for the efficiency of the photogeneration process.

  8. IR action spectroscopy shows competitive oxazolone and diketopiperazine formation in peptides depends on peptide length and identity of terminal residue in the departing fragment.

    PubMed

    Morrison, L J; Chamot-Rooke, J; Wysocki, V H

    2014-05-01

    The interplay between the entropically and enthalpically favored products of peptide fragmentation is probed using a combined experimental and theoretical approach. These b2 ion products can take either an oxazolone or diketopiperazine structure. Cleavage after the second amide bond is often a favorable process because the products are small ring structures that are particularly stable. These structures are structurally characterized by action IRMPD spectroscopy and semi-quantified using gas-phase hydrogen-deuterium exchange. The formation of the oxazolone and diketopiperazine has been thought to be largely governed by the identity of the first two residues at the N-terminus of the peptide. We show here that the length of the precursor peptide and identity of the third residue play a significant role in the formation of the diketopiperazine structure in peptides containing an N-terminal asparagine residue. This is additionally the first instance showing an N-terminal residue with an amide side chain can promote formation of the diketopiperazine b2 ion structure.

  9. Somatostatin receptor 2 knockout/lacZ knockin mice show impaired motor coordination and reveal sites of somatostatin action within the striatum.

    PubMed

    Allen, Jeremy P; Hathway, Gareth J; Clarke, Neil J; Jowett, Mike I; Topps, Stephanie; Kendrick, Keith M; Humphrey, Patrick P A; Wilkinson, Lawrence S; Emson, Piers C

    2003-05-01

    The peptide somatostatin can modulate the functional output of the basal ganglia. The exact sites and mechanisms of this action, however, are poorly understood, and the physiological context in which somatostatin acts is unknown. Somatostatin acts as a neuromodulator via a family of five 7-transmembrane G protein-coupled receptors, SSTR1-5, one of which, SSTR2, is known to be functional in the striatum. We have investigated the role of SSTR2 in basal ganglia function using mice in which Sstr2 has been inactivated and replaced by the lacZ reporter gene. Analysis of Sstr2lacZ expression in the brain by beta-galactosidase histochemistry demonstrated a widespread pattern of expression. By comparison to previously published in situ hybridization and immunohistochemical data, Sstr2lacZ expression was shown to accurately recapitulate that of Sstr2 and thus provided a highly sensitive model to investigate cell-type-specific expression of Sstr2. In the striatum, Sstr2 expression was identified in medium spiny projection neurons restricted to the matrix compartment and in cholinergic interneurons. Sstr2 expression was not detected in any other nuclei of the basal ganglia except for a sparse number of nondopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. Microdialysis in the striatum showed Sstr2-null mice were selectively refractory to somatostatin-induced dopamine and glutamate release. In behavioural tests, Sstr2-null mice showed normal levels of locomotor activity and normal coordination in undemanding tasks. However, in beam-walking, a test of fine motor control, Sstr2-null mice were severely impaired. Together these data implicate an important neuromodulatory role for SSTR2 in the striatum. PMID:12752788

  10. Photosynthetic Action Spectra of Trees: II. The Relationship of Cuticle Structure to the Visible and Ultraviolet Spectral Properties of Needles from Four Coniferous Species.

    PubMed

    Clark, J B; Lister, G R

    1975-02-01

    The relative reflectance spectra for control and treated (surface wiped) current-year foliage of Douglas fir, and Sitka, Colorado, and Blue spruce (Pseudotsuga menziesii [Mirb.] Franco, Picea sitchensis [Bong.] Carr., Picea pungens Engelm., and Picea pungens Engelm. var. hoopsii, respectively) were obtained from 220 to 700 nm. The green color of the control foliage of both Douglas fir and Sitka spruce was unaffected by the treatment whereas the blue-green and blue-white foliage of control Colorado and Blue spruce, respectively, became "green" as a result of the wiping. The relative reflectance curves for all green foliage, including the treated Colorado and Blue spruce, were all very similar with a peak in the green (540-560 nm), minima in the red (660-680 nm) and blue (450-500 nm), and very low reflectivities in the ultraviolet (lambda < 400 nm). In contrast, the control foliage for Colorado and Blue spruce both showed a generally higher relative reflectance over most of the visible spectrum (400-700 nm) with a marked increase in the blue region (400-500 nm). At wavelengths below 420 nm, their relative reflectances increased sharply with decreasing wavelength, the reflectance at 220 nm for Blue spruce being over four times that at 540 nm.Scanning electron microscope examination of the needles' surfaces revealed a system of wax filaments whose complexity correlated with the degree of ultraviolet and blue reflectance.It is concluded that both the bluish appearance (glaucous bloom) and the low relative efficiencies of blue light in photosynthesis of Colorado and Blue spruce result from the selectively enhanced reflection of blue light caused by the presence of the epicuticular wax deposits. The enhanced blue light reflection was shown to be the shoulder of a scattering effect which appeared to peak in the short ultraviolet region below 200 nm. The ecological implications of the results are discussed.

  11. Extracts from Vatica diospyroides type SS fruit show low dose activity against MDA-MB-468 breast cancer cell-line via apoptotic action.

    PubMed

    Srisawat, Theera; Sukpondma, Yaowapa; Chimplee, Siriphon; Kanokwiroon, Kanyanatt; Tedasen, Aman; Graidist, Potchanapond

    2014-01-01

    Very strong antiproliferative action of V. diospyroides type SS fruit extracts (IC50 range of 1.60-17.45 µg/mL) in MDA-MB-468 cell-line was observed in an MTT assay. After dosing of an extract concentration at half IC50 to cell line for 24 to 72 hours, treated cells were subjected to Annexin V-FITC/PI binding assay, followed by FACS and western blot analyses. Significant apoptotic death was observed with all extract treatments and both exposure times. Dosing with acetone extract of pericarp and cotyledon induced the highest apoptotic populations (33 and 32%, resp.), with the lowest populations of viable cells (65 and 67%, resp.). During 24 to 72 hours of dosing with methanolic extract of pericarp, the populations of viable and early apoptotic cells decreased significantly from 72.40 to 71.32% and from 12.00 to 6.36%, respectively, while the late apoptotic and nonviable cell populations continuously increased from 15.30 to 19.18% and from 0.30 to 3.14%, respectively. The expression of Bax increased within 12-48 hours of dosing, confirming apoptosis induced by time-dependent responses. The mutant p53 of MDA-MB-468 cells was expressed. Our results indicate that apoptosis and time-dependent therapeutic actions contribute to the cytotoxic effects of V. diospyroides type SS fruit on MDA-MB-468 cell.

  12. Spectra of stable sonoluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Stephen D.

    1992-12-01

    The continuous emission of picosecond pulses of light has been observed to originate from a bubble trapped at the pressure antinode of a resonant sound field in water and in water/glycerin mixtures. The spectra of this light in several solutions has been measured with a scanning monochrometer/photomultiplier detector system. The spectra are broadband and show strong emission in the UV region. A comparison of this measurement to two other independently produced spectra is made. The spectra are also modeled by a blackbody radiation distribution to determine an effective blackbody temperature and a size is deduced as if Sonoluminescence were characterized by blackbody radiation.

  13. Salts of 5-amino-2-sulfonamide-1,3,4-thiadiazole, a structural and analog of acetazolamide, show interesting carbonic anhydrase inhibitory properties, diuretic, and anticonvulsant action.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Jorge R A; Camí, Gerardo Enrique; Liu-González, Malva; Vega, Daniel R; Vullo, Daniela; Juárez, Américo; Pedregosa, José C; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2016-12-01

    Three salts of 5-amino-2-sulfonamide-1,3,4-thiadiazole (Hats) were prepared and characterized by physico-chemical methods. The p-toluensulfonate, the methylsulfonate, and the chlorhydrate monohydrate salts of Hats were evaluated as carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) inhibitors (CAIs) and as anticonvulsants and diuretics, since many CAIs are clinically used as pharmacological agents. The three Hats salts exhibited diuretic and anticonvulsant activities with little neurotoxicity. The human (h) isoforms hCA I, II, IV, VII, IX, and XII were inhibited in their micromolar range by these salts, whereas pathogenic beta and gamma CAs showed similar, weak inhibitory profiles.

  14. Lily Pad Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The color image on the lower left from the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows the 'Lily Pad' bounce-mark area at Meridiani Planum, Mars. This image was acquired on the 3rd sol, or martian day, of Opportunity's mission (Jan.26, 2004). The upper left image is a monochrome (single filter) image from the rover's panoramic camera, showing regions from which spectra were extracted from the 'Lily Pad' area. As noted by the line graph on the right, the green spectra is from the undisturbed surface and the red spectra is from the airbag bounce mark.

  15. "The Show"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gehring, John

    2004-01-01

    For the past 16 years, the blue-collar city of Huntington, West Virginia, has rolled out the red carpet to welcome young wrestlers and their families as old friends. They have come to town chasing the same dream for a spot in what many of them call "The Show". For three days, under the lights of an arena packed with 5,000 fans, the state's best…

  16. Storm Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    These images, taken with the LEISA infrared camera on the New Horizons Ralph instrument, show fine details in Jupiter's turbulent atmosphere using light that can only be seen using infrared sensors. These are 'false color' pictures made by assigning infrared wavelengths to the colors red, green and blue. LEISA (Linear Etalon Imaging Spectral Array) takes images across 250 IR wavelengths in the range from 1.25 to 2.5 microns, allowing scientists to obtain an infrared spectrum at every location on Jupiter. A micron is one millionth of a meter.

    These pictures were taken at 05:58 UT on February 27, 2007, from a distance of 2.9 million kilometers (1.6 million miles). They are centered at 8 degrees south, 32 degrees east in Jupiter 'System III' coordinates. The large oval-shaped feature is the well-known Great Red Spot. The resolution of each pixel in these images is about 175 kilometers (110 miles); Jupiter's diameter is approximately 145,000 kilometers (97,000 miles).

    The image on the left is an altitude map made by assigning the color red to 1.60 microns, green to 1.89 microns and blue to 2.04 microns. Because Jupiter's atmosphere absorbs light strongly at 2.04 microns, only clouds at very high altitude will reflect light at this wavelength. Light at 1.89 microns can go deeper in the atmosphere and light at 1.6 microns can go deeper still. In this map, bluish colors indicate high clouds and reddish colors indicate lower clouds. This picture shows, for example, that the Great Red Spot extends far up into the atmosphere.

    In the image at right, red equals 1.28 microns, green equals 1.30 microns and blue equals 1.36 microns, a range of wavelengths that similarly probes different altitudes in the atmosphere. This choice of wavelengths highlights Jupiter's high-altitude south polar hood of haze. The edge of Jupiter's disk at the bottom of the panel appears slightly non-circular because the left-hand portion is the true edge of the disk, while the right

  17. Action semantics modulate action prediction.

    PubMed

    Springer, Anne; Prinz, Wolfgang

    2010-11-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that action prediction involves an internal action simulation that runs time-locked to the real action. The present study replicates and extends these findings by indicating a real-time simulation process (Graf et al., 2007), which can be differentiated from a similarity-based evaluation of internal action representations. Moreover, results showed that action semantics modulate action prediction accuracy. The semantic effect was specified by the processing of action verbs and concrete nouns (Experiment 1) and, more specifically, by the dynamics described by action verbs (Experiment 2) and the speed described by the verbs (e.g., "to catch" vs. "to grasp" vs. "to stretch"; Experiment 3). These results propose a linkage between action simulation and action semantics as two yet unrelated domains, a view that coincides with a recent notion of a close link between motor processes and the understanding of action language.

  18. Spikes in Brewer spectroradiometer UV spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meinander, O.; Josefsson, W.; Kaurola, J.; Koskela, T.; Lakkala, K.

    2003-04-01

    The occurrence of spikes in Brewer UV spectra has been studied. By a spike we mean an anomalous number of counts recorded in one wavelength channel causing an abrupt upwards or downwards change in value that does not originate from the true radiation signal. We have recorded downward spikes in lamp scans measured in the darkroom, and spikes occur in sky measurements as well. We analyzed continuous measurement data over several years, with more than 90 000 spectra, from one single monochromator and two double monochromator Brewers. We found that especially the double monochromators may suffer from more than 200 spikes per ~5000 annual spectra. The spikes were not always randomly distributed over the wavelength range. The single monochromator was found to have a significant number of spikes at wavelengths below 300 nm, indicating possible bias in the stray light correction unless taken into consideration. The error caused by non-corrected spikes varied greatly from case to case. For example, the effect of one moderate-size spiked was found to be more than 5 % on a DNA action dose rate and close to 1 % on a DNA action daily dose. When high accuracy of the in situ UV measurements is required, our results suggest a need to remove spikes from the spectra. We used a simple statistical approach. Other slightly different approaches exist as well. Our data showed that ancillary radiation measurements may be necessary to interpret the data correctly. Under rapidly-changing cloudiness it can be difficult to distinguish between noise spikes and the variation in irradiance due to changes in the state of the sky.

  19. Rock Outcrop Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The color image on the lower left shows a rock outcrop at Meridiani Planum, Mars. This image was taken by the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity, looking north, and was acquired on the 4th sol, or martian day, of the rover's mission (Jan. 27, 2004). The yellow box outlines an area detailed in the top left image, which is a monochrome (single filter) image from the rover's panoramic camera. The top image uses solid colors to show several regions on or near the rock outcrop from which spectra were extracted: the dark soil above the outcrop (yellow), the distant horizon surface (aqua), a bright rock in the outcrop (green), a darker rock in the outcrop (red), and a small dark cobblestone (blue). Spectra from these regions are shown in the plot to the right.

  20. Haptically Guided Grasping. fMRI Shows Right-Hemisphere Parietal Stimulus Encoding, and Bilateral Dorso-Ventral Parietal Gradients of Object- and Action-Related Processing during Grasp Execution

    PubMed Central

    Marangon, Mattia; Kubiak, Agnieszka; Króliczak, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    The neural bases of haptically-guided grasp planning and execution are largely unknown, especially for stimuli having no visual representations. Therefore, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to monitor brain activity during haptic exploration of novel 3D complex objects, subsequent grasp planning, and the execution of the pre-planned grasps. Haptic object exploration, involving extraction of shape, orientation, and length of the to-be-grasped targets, was associated with the fronto-parietal, temporo-occipital, and insular cortex activity. Yet, only the anterior divisions of the posterior parietal cortex (PPC) of the right hemisphere were significantly more engaged in exploration of complex objects (vs. simple control disks). None of these regions were re-recruited during the planning phase. Even more surprisingly, the left-hemisphere intraparietal, temporal, and occipital areas that were significantly invoked for grasp planning did not show sensitivity to object features. Finally, grasp execution, involving the re-recruitment of the critical right-hemisphere PPC clusters, was also significantly associated with two kinds of bilateral parieto-frontal processes. The first represents transformations of grasp-relevant target features and is linked to the dorso-dorsal (lateral and medial) parieto-frontal networks. The second monitors grasp kinematics and belongs to the ventro-dorsal networks. Indeed, signal modulations associated with these distinct functions follow dorso-ventral gradients, with left aIPS showing significant sensitivity to both target features and the characteristics of the required grasp. Thus, our results from the haptic domain are consistent with the notion that the parietal processing for action guidance reflects primarily transformations from object-related to effector-related coding, and these mechanisms are rather independent of sensory input modality. PMID:26779002

  1. Barnacle Bill Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    These IMP spectra show the characteristics of the rock surface measured by the Alpha Proton X-Ray Spectrometer (blue), the soil trapped in pits on the rock surface (red), and the deposit of bright drift on the top of the rock. The area measured by the APXS has the properties expected for nearly unweathered igneous rock, and the soil trapped in the pits is intermediate to the unweathered rock and the highly weathered drift material.

  2. Magic Carpet Shows Its Colors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The upper left image in this display is from the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit, showing the 'Magic Carpet' region near the rover at Gusev Crater, Mars, on Sol 7, the seventh martian day of its journey (Jan. 10, 2004). The lower image, also from the panoramic camera, is a monochrome (single filter) image of a rock in the 'Magic Carpet' area. Note that colored portions of the rock correlate with extracted spectra shown in the plot to the side. Four different types of materials are shown: the rock itself, the soil in front of the rock, some brighter soil on top of the rock, and some dust that has collected in small recesses on the rock face ('spots'). Each color on the spectra matches a line on the graph, showing how the panoramic camera's different colored filters are used to broadly assess the varying mineral compositions of martian rocks and soils.

  3. Night Spectra Quest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Stephen

    1995-01-01

    Presents the Night Spectra Quest, a pocket-sized chart that identifies in color the spectra of all the common night lights and has an integrally mounted, holographic diffraction grating to look through. (JRH)

  4. Show Your Exemption Act

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. Vitter, David [R-LA

    2013-10-31

    10/31/2013 Read twice and referred to the Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  5. cloud supersaturations and CCN spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, James; Noble, Stephen

    2014-05-01

    Multiple regression analysis predictions of low altitude cloud droplet concentrations based on measured CCN spectra compared much better with measured low altitude droplet concentrations than various CCN concentrations at single supersaturations (S) in two aircraft cumulus cloud projects, RICO and ICE-T. The addition of vertical velocity (W) to the single and multiple regressions showed small improvements. For RICO the multiple regression correlations were also superior to previous adiabatic model predictions of droplet concentrations also based on CCN spectra and mean W. More adiabatic cloud parcels showed only slightly better correlations than flight-averaged droplet concentrations. Results show the value of more extensive CCN spectra and the relative unimportance of W variations for determining droplet concentrations in these Caribbean cumuli. The fact that flight-averaged droplet concentrations of all low cloud data was almost as well correlated with CCN spectra as were droplet concentrations of more adiabatic cloud parcels indicates that entrainment did not significantly perturb CCN-droplet concentration relationships. As should be expected higher cloud S were determined for the cumulus clouds than for stratus clouds. Suppression of cloud S by higher CCN concentrations that had previously been observed in stratus was observed in ICE-T but not in RICO where the CCN range may have been too low for cloud S suppression. But ICE-T and a stratus project, POST, even showed this S suppression over the same limited maritime CCN range as RICO.

  6. Photographic spectra of fireballs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borovička, J.

    2016-01-01

    Two methods of spectroscopy of meteors using image intensified video cameras and classical photographic film cameras are compared. Video cameras provide large number of low resolution spectra of meteors of normal brightness, which can be used for statistical studies. Large format film cameras have been used through the history and provide high resolution spectra, which can be used to derive temperature, density and absolute abundances of various elements in the radiating plasma. The sensitivity of films is, however, low and only spectra of bright meteors (fireballs) can be studied. Examples of photographic fireball spectra are provided.

  7. Crack spectra analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Tiernan, M.

    1980-09-01

    Crack spectra derived from velocity data have been shown to exhibit systematics which reflect microstructural and textural differences between samples (Warren and Tiernan, 1980). Further research into both properties and information content of crack spectra have yielded the following: Spectral features are reproducible even at low pressures; certain observed spectral features may correspond to non-in-situ crack populations created during sample retrieval; the functional form of a crack spectra may be diagnostic of the sample's grain texture; hysteresis is observed in crack spectra between up and down pressure runs - it may be due to friction between the faces of closed crack populations.

  8. Spectra of Baroclinic Inertia-Gravity Wave Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glazman, Roman E.

    1996-01-01

    Baroclinic inertia-gravity (IG) waves form a persistent background of thermocline depth and sea surface height oscillations. They also contribute to the kinetic energy of horizontal motions in the subsurface layer. Measured by the ratio of water particle velocity to wave phase speed, the wave nonlinearity may be rather high. Given a continuous supply of energy from external sources, nonlinear wave-wave interactions among IG waves would result in inertial cascades of energy, momentum, and wave action. Based on a recently developed theory of wave turbulence in scale-dependent systems, these cascades are investigated and IG wave spectra are derived for an arbitrary degree of wave nonlinearity. Comparisons with satellite-altimetry-based spectra of surface height variations and with energy spectra of horizontal velocity fluctuations show good agreement. The well-known spectral peak at the inertial frequency is thus explained as a result of the inverse cascade. Finally, we discuss a possibility of inferring the internal Rossby radius of deformation and other dynamical properties of the upper thermocline from the spectra of SSH (sea surface height) variations based on altimeter measurements.

  9. The Great Cometary Show

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-01-01

    its high spatial and spectral resolution, it was possible to zoom into the very heart of this very massive star. In this innermost region, the observations are dominated by the extremely dense stellar wind that totally obscures the underlying central star. The AMBER observations show that this dense stellar wind is not spherically symmetric, but exhibits a clearly elongated structure. Overall, the AMBER observations confirm that the extremely high mass loss of Eta Carinae's massive central star is non-spherical and much stronger along the poles than in the equatorial plane. This is in agreement with theoretical models that predict such an enhanced polar mass-loss in the case of rapidly rotating stars. ESO PR Photo 06c/07 ESO PR Photo 06c/07 RS Ophiuchi in Outburst Several papers from this special feature focus on the later stages in a star's life. One looks at the binary system Gamma 2 Velorum, which contains the closest example of a star known as a Wolf-Rayet. A single AMBER observation allowed the astronomers to separate the spectra of the two components, offering new insights in the modeling of Wolf-Rayet stars, but made it also possible to measure the separation between the two stars. This led to a new determination of the distance of the system, showing that previous estimates were incorrect. The observations also revealed information on the region where the winds from the two stars collide. The famous binary system RS Ophiuchi, an example of a recurrent nova, was observed just 5 days after it was discovered to be in outburst on 12 February 2006, an event that has been expected for 21 years. AMBER was able to detect the extension of the expanding nova emission. These observations show a complex geometry and kinematics, far from the simple interpretation of a spherical fireball in extension. AMBER has detected a high velocity jet probably perpendicular to the orbital plane of the binary system, and allowed a precise and careful study of the wind and the shockwave

  10. Infrared spectra of thyroid tumor tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolstorozhev, G. B.; Skornyakov, I. V.; Butra, V. A.

    2010-07-01

    We used infrared spectroscopy methods to study thyroid tumor tissues removed during surgery. The IR spectra of the surgical material are compared with data from histological examination. We show that in malignant neoplasms, the spectra of proteins in the region of C=O vibrations are different from the spectra of these substances in benign tumors and in tissues outside the pathological focus at a distance >1 cm from the margin of the tumor. The differences in the spectra are due to changes in the supermolecular structure of the proteins, resulting from rearrangement of the system of hydrogen bonds. We identify the spectral signs of malignant pathologies.

  11. [Raman spectra of monkey cerebral cortex tissue].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ji-chun; Guo, Jian-yu; Cai, Wei-ying; Wang, Zu-geng; Sun, Zhen-rong

    2010-01-01

    Monkey cerebral cortex, an important part in the brain to control action and thought activities, is mainly composed of grey matter and nerve cell. In the present paper, the in situ Raman spectra of the cerebral cortex of the birth, teenage and aged monkeys were achieved for the first time. The results show that the Raman spectra for the different age monkey cerebral cortex exhibit most obvious changes in the regions of 1000-1400 and 2800-3000 cm(-1). With monkey growing up, the relative intensities of the Raman bands at 1313 and 2885 cm(-1) mainly assigned to CH2 chain vibrational mode of lipid become stronger and stronger whereas the relative intensities of the Raman bands at 1338 and 2932 cm(-1) mainly assigned to CH3 chain vibrational mode of protein become weaker and weaker. In addition, the two new Raman bands at 1296 and 2850 cm(-1) are only observed in the aged monkey cerebral cortex, therefore, the two bands can be considered as a character or "marker" to differentiate the caducity degree with monkey growth In order to further explore the changes, the relative intensity ratios of the Raman band at 1313 cm(-1) to that at 1338 cm(-1) and the Raman band at 2885 cm(-1) to that at 2 932 cm(-1), I1313/I1338 and I2885/I2932, which are the lipid-to-protein ratios, are introduced to denote the degree of the lipid content. The results show that the relative intensity ratios increase significantly with monkey growth, namely, the lipid content in the cerebral cortex increases greatly with monkey growth. So, the authors can deduce that the overmuch lipid is an important cause to induce the caducity. Therefore, the results will be a powerful assistance and valuable parameter to study the order of life growth and diagnose diseases.

  12. Interpreting Chromosome Aberration Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, Dan; Reeder, Christopher; Loucas, Bradford; Hlatky, Lynn; Chen, Allen; Cornforth, Michael; Sachs, Rainer

    2007-01-01

    Ionizing radiation can damage cells by breaking both strands of DNA in multiple locations, essentially cutting chromosomes into pieces. The cell has enzymatic mechanisms to repair such breaks; however, these mechanisms are imperfect and, in an exchange process, may produce a large-scale rearrangement of the genome, called a chromosome aberration. Chromosome aberrations are important in killing cells, during carcinogenesis, in characterizing repair/misrepair pathways, in retrospective radiation biodosimetry, and in a number of other ways. DNA staining techniques such as mFISH ( multicolor fluorescent in situ hybridization) provide a means for analyzing aberration spectra by examining observed final patterns. Unfortunately, an mFISH observed final pattern often does not uniquely determine the underlying exchange process. Further, resolution limitations in the painting protocol sometimes lead to apparently incomplete final patterns. We here describe an algorithm for systematically finding exchange processes consistent with any observed final pattern. This algorithm uses aberration multigraphs, a mathematical formalism that links the various aspects of aberration formation. By applying a measure to the space of consistent multigraphs, we will show how to generate model-specific distributions of aberration processes from mFISH experimental data. The approach is implemented by software freely available over the internet. As a sample application, we apply these algorithms to an aberration data set, obtaining a distribution of exchange cycle sizes, which serves to measure aberration complexity. Estimating complexity, in turn, helps indicate how damaging the aberrations are and may facilitate identification of radiation type in retrospective biodosimetry.

  13. Source spectra of seismic hum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishida, Kiwamu

    2014-10-01

    The observation of seismic hum from 2 to 20 mHz, also known as Earth's background free oscillations, has been established. Recent observations by broad-band seismometers show simultaneous excitation of Love waves (fundamental toroidal modes) and Rayleigh waves (fundamental spheroidal modes). The excitation amplitudes above 10 mHz can be explained by random shear traction sources on Earth's surface. With estimated source distributions, the most likely excitation mechanism is a linear coupling between ocean infragravity waves and seismic surface waves through seafloor topography. Observed Love and Rayleigh wave amplitudes below 5 mHz suggest that surface pressure sources could also contribute to their excitations, although the amplitudes have large uncertainties due to the high noise levels of the horizontal components. To quantify the observation, we develop a new method for estimation of the source spectra of random tractions on Earth's surface by modelling cross-spectra between pairs of stations. The method is to calculate synthetic cross-spectra for spatially isotropic and homogeneous excitations by random shear traction and pressure sources, and invert them with the observed cross-spectra to obtain the source spectra. We applied this method to the IRIS, ORFEUS, and F-net records from 618 stations with three components of broad-band seismometers for 2004-2011. The results show the dominance of shear traction above 5 mHz, which is consistent with past studies. Below 5 mHz, however, the spectral amplitudes of the pressure sources are comparable to those of shear traction. Observed acoustic resonance between the atmosphere and the solid Earth at 3.7 and 4.4 mHz suggests that atmospheric disturbances are responsible for the surface pressure sources, although non-linear ocean wave processes are also candidates for the pressure sources. Excitation mechanisms of seismic hum should be considered as a superposition of the processes of the solid Earth, atmosphere and ocean

  14. Thermodynamic analysis of spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, G. E.; Shriner, J. F. Jr.

    2008-04-04

    Although random matrix theory had its initial application to neutron resonances, there is a relative scarcity of suitable nuclear data. The primary reason for this is the sensitivity of the standard measures used to evaluate spectra--the spectra must be essential pure (no state with a different symmetry) and complete (no states missing). Additional measures that are less sensitive to these experimental limitations are of significant value. The standard measure for long range order is the {delta}{sub 3} statistic. In the original paper that introduced this statistic, Dyson and Mehta also attempted to evaluate spectra with thermodynamic variables obtained from the circular orthogonal ensemble. We consider the thermodynamic 'internal energy' and evaluate its sensitivity to experimental limitations such as missing and spurious levels. Monte Carlo simulations suggest that the internal energy is less sensitive to mistakes than is {delta}{sub 3}, and thus the internal energy can serve as a addition to the tool kit for evaluating experimental spectra.

  15. Putting Action in Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lozano, Sandra C.; Hard, Bridgette Martin; Tversky, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    Embodied approaches to cognition propose that our own actions influence our understanding of the world. Do other people's actions also have this influence? The present studies show that perceiving another person's actions changes the way people think about objects in a scene. In Study 1, participants viewed a photograph and answered a question…

  16. Near infrared Raman spectra of Rhizoma dioscoreae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Wenshuo; Chen, Rong; Chen, Guannan; Feng, Sangyuan; Li, Yongzeng; Huang, Zufang; Li, Yongsen

    2008-03-01

    A novel and compact near-infrared (NIR) Raman system is developed using 785-nm diode laser, volume-phase technology holographic system, and NIR intensified charge-coupled device (CCD). Raman spectra and first derivative spectra of Rhizoma Dioscoreae are obtained. Raman spectra of Rhizoma Dioscoreae showed three strong characteristic peaks at 477.4cm -1, 863.9cm -1, and 936.0cm -1. The major ingredients are protein, amino acid, starch, polysaccharides and so on, matched with the known basic biochemical composition of Rhizoma Dioscoreae. In the first derivative spectra of Rhizoma Dioscoreae, distinguishing characteristic peaks appeared at 467.674cm -1, 484.603cm -1, 870.37cm -1, 943.368cm -1. Contrasted with Rhizoma Dioscoreae Raman spectra, in 600cm -1 to 800cm -1, 1000cm -1 to 1400cm -1 regions, changes in Rhizoma Dioscoreae Raman first derivative spectra are represented more clearly than Rhizoma Dioscoreae Raman spectra. So Rhizoma Dioscoreae raman first derivative spectra can be an accurate supplementary analysis method to Rhizoma Dioscoreae Raman spectra.

  17. Television Quiz Show Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Jonnie Lynn

    2007-01-01

    This article explores the simulation of four television quiz shows for students in China studying English as a foreign language (EFL). It discusses the adaptation and implementation of television quiz shows and how the students reacted to them.

  18. Choosing Actions

    PubMed Central

    Rosenbaum, David A.; Chapman, Kate M.; Coelho, Chase J.; Gong, Lanyun; Studenka, Breanna E.

    2013-01-01

    Actions that are chosen have properties that distinguish them from actions that are not. Of the nearly infinite possible actions that can achieve any given task, many of the unchosen actions are irrelevant, incorrect, or inappropriate. Others are relevant, correct, or appropriate but are disfavored for other reasons. Our research focuses on the question of what distinguishes actions that are chosen from actions that are possible but are not. We review studies that use simple preference methods to identify factors that contribute to action choices, especially for object-manipulation tasks. We can determine which factors are especially important through simple behavioral experiments. PMID:23761769

  19. A Holographic Road Show.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkpatrick, Larry D.; Rugheimer, Mac

    1979-01-01

    Describes the viewing sessions and the holograms of a holographic road show. The traveling exhibits, believed to stimulate interest in physics, include a wide variety of holograms and demonstrate several physical principles. (GA)

  20. Atomic Spectra Database (ASD)

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 78 NIST Atomic Spectra Database (ASD) (Web, free access)   This database provides access and search capability for NIST critically evaluated data on atomic energy levels, wavelengths, and transition probabilities that are reasonably up-to-date. The NIST Atomic Spectroscopy Data Center has carried out these critical compilations.

  1. Excitation Spectra and Brightness Optimization of Two-Photon Excited Probes

    PubMed Central

    Mütze, Jörg; Iyer, Vijay; Macklin, John J.; Colonell, Jennifer; Karsh, Bill; Petrášek, Zdeněk; Schwille, Petra; Looger, Loren L.; Lavis, Luke D.; Harris, Timothy D.

    2012-01-01

    Two-photon probe excitation data are commonly presented as absorption cross section or molecular brightness (the detected fluorescence rate per molecule). We report two-photon molecular brightness spectra for a diverse set of organic and genetically encoded probes with an automated spectroscopic system based on fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. The two-photon action cross section can be extracted from molecular brightness measurements at low excitation intensities, while peak molecular brightness (the maximum molecular brightness with increasing excitation intensity) is measured at higher intensities at which probe photophysical effects become significant. The spectral shape of these two parameters was similar across all dye families tested. Peak molecular brightness spectra, which can be obtained rapidly and with reduced experimental complexity, can thus serve as a first-order approximation to cross-section spectra in determining optimal wavelengths for two-photon excitation, while providing additional information pertaining to probe photostability. The data shown should assist in probe choice and experimental design for multiphoton microscopy studies. Further, we show that, by the addition of a passive pulse splitter, nonlinear bleaching can be reduced—resulting in an enhancement of the fluorescence signal in fluorescence correlation spectroscopy by a factor of two. This increase in fluorescence signal, together with the observed resemblance of action cross section and peak brightness spectra, suggests higher-order photobleaching pathways for two-photon excitation. PMID:22385865

  2. The Ozone Show.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathieu, Aaron

    2000-01-01

    Uses a talk show activity for a final assessment tool for students to debate about the ozone hole. Students are assessed on five areas: (1) cooperative learning; (2) the written component; (3) content; (4) self-evaluation; and (5) peer evaluation. (SAH)

  3. Show What You Know

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eccleston, Jeff

    2007-01-01

    Big things come in small packages. This saying came to the mind of the author after he created a simple math review activity for his fourth grade students. Though simple, it has proven to be extremely advantageous in reinforcing math concepts. He uses this activity, which he calls "Show What You Know," often. This activity provides the perfect…

  4. Showing What They Know

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cech, Scott J.

    2008-01-01

    Having students show their skills in three dimensions, known as performance-based assessment, dates back at least to Socrates. Individual schools such as Barrington High School--located just outside of Providence--have been requiring students to actively demonstrate their knowledge for years. The Rhode Island's high school graduating class became…

  5. Stage a Water Show

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frasier, Debra

    2008-01-01

    In the author's book titled "The Incredible Water Show," the characters from "Miss Alaineus: A Vocabulary Disaster" used an ocean of information to stage an inventive performance about the water cycle. In this article, the author relates how she turned the story into hands-on science teaching for real-life fifth-grade students. The author also…

  6. What Do Maps Show?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geological Survey (Dept. of Interior), Reston, VA.

    This curriculum packet, appropriate for grades 4-8, features a teaching poster which shows different types of maps (different views of Salt Lake City, Utah), as well as three reproducible maps and reproducible activity sheets which complement the maps. The poster provides teacher background, including step-by-step lesson plans for four geography…

  7. Obesity in show cats.

    PubMed

    Corbee, R J

    2014-12-01

    Obesity is an important disease with a high prevalence in cats. Because obesity is related to several other diseases, it is important to identify the population at risk. Several risk factors for obesity have been described in the literature. A higher incidence of obesity in certain cat breeds has been suggested. The aim of this study was to determine whether obesity occurs more often in certain breeds. The second aim was to relate the increased prevalence of obesity in certain breeds to the official standards of that breed. To this end, 268 cats of 22 different breeds investigated by determining their body condition score (BCS) on a nine-point scale by inspection and palpation, at two different cat shows. Overall, 45.5% of the show cats had a BCS > 5, and 4.5% of the show cats had a BCS > 7. There were significant differences between breeds, which could be related to the breed standards. Most overweight and obese cats were in the neutered group. It warrants firm discussions with breeders and cat show judges to come to different interpretations of the standards in order to prevent overweight conditions in certain breeds from being the standard of beauty. Neutering predisposes for obesity and requires early nutritional intervention to prevent obese conditions. PMID:24612018

  8. Show Me the Way

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dicks, Matthew J.

    2005-01-01

    Because today's students have grown up steeped in video games and the Internet, most of them expect feedback, and usually gratification, very soon after they expend effort on a task. Teachers can get quick feedback to students by showing them videotapes of their learning performances. The author, a 3rd grade teacher describes how the seemingly…

  9. The Art Show

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scolarici, Alicia

    2004-01-01

    This article describes what once was thought to be impossible--a formal art show extravaganza at an elementary school with 1,000 students, a Department of Defense Dependent School (DODDS) located overseas, on RAF Lakenheath, England. The dream of this this event involved the transformation of the school cafeteria into an elegant art show…

  10. Honored Teacher Shows Commitment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratte, Kathy

    1987-01-01

    Part of the acceptance speech of the 1985 National Council for the Social Studies Teacher of the Year, this article describes the censorship experience of this honored social studies teacher. The incident involved the showing of a videotape version of the feature film entitled "The Seduction of Joe Tynan." (JDH)

  11. Prediction of earthquake response spectra

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Joyner, W.B.; Boore, David M.

    1982-01-01

    We have developed empirical equations for predicting earthquake response spectra in terms of magnitude, distance, and site conditions, using a two-stage regression method similar to the one we used previously for peak horizontal acceleration and velocity. We analyzed horizontal pseudo-velocity response at 5 percent damping for 64 records of 12 shallow earthquakes in Western North America, including the recent Coyote Lake and Imperial Valley, California, earthquakes. We developed predictive equations for 12 different periods between 0.1 and 4.0 s, both for the larger of two horizontal components and for the random horizontal component. The resulting spectra show amplification at soil sites compared to rock sites for periods greater than or equal to 0.3 s, with maximum amplification exceeding a factor of 2 at 2.0 s. For periods less than 0.3 s there is slight deamplification at the soil sites. These results are generally consistent with those of several earlier studies. A particularly significant aspect of the predicted spectra is the change of shape with magnitude (confirming earlier results by McGuire and by Irifunac and Anderson). This result indicates that the conventional practice of scaling a constant spectral shape by peak acceleration will not give accurate answers. The Newmark and Hall method of spectral scaling, using both peak acceleration and peak velocity, largely avoids this error. Comparison of our spectra with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Regulatory Guide 1.60 spectrum anchored at the same value at 0.1 s shows that the Regulatory Guide 1.60 spectrum is exceeded at soil sites for a magnitude of 7.5 at all distances for periods greater than about 0.5 s. Comparison of our spectra for soil sites with the corresponding ATC-3 curve of lateral design force coefficient for the highest seismic zone indicates that the ATC-3 curve is exceeded within about 7 km of a magnitude 6.5 earthquake and within about 15 km of a magnitude 7.5 event. The amount by

  12. Dynamic radio spectra from two fireballs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obenberger, K. S.; Taylor, G. B.; Lin, C. S.; Dowell, J.; Schinzel, F. K.; Stovall, K.

    2015-11-01

    We present dynamic spectra from the Long Wavelength Array telescope of two large meteors (fireballs) observed to emit between 37 and 54 MHz. These spectra show the first ever recorded broadband measurements of this newly discovered VHF emission. The spectra show that the emission is smooth and steep, getting very bright at lower frequencies. We suggest that this signal is possibly emission of Langmuir waves and that these waves could be excited by a bump-on-tail instability within the trail. The spectra of one fireball display broadband temporal frequency sweeps. We suggest that these sweeps are evidence of individual expanding clumps of emitting plasma. While some of these proposed clumps may have formed at the very beginning of the fireball event, others must have formed seconds after the initial event.

  13. Parmeterization of spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornish, C. R.

    1983-01-01

    Following reception and analog to digital conversion (A/D) conversion, atmospheric radar backscatter echoes need to be processed so as to obtain desired information about atmospheric processes and to eliminate or minimize contaminating contributions from other sources. Various signal processing techniques have been implemented at mesosphere-stratosphere-troposphere (MST) radar facilities to estimate parameters of interest from received spectra. Such estimation techniques need to be both accurate and sufficiently efficient to be within the capabilities of the particular data-processing system. The various techniques used to parameterize the spectra of received signals are reviewed herein. Noise estimation, electromagnetic interference, data smoothing, correlation, and the Doppler effect are among the specific points addressed.

  14. Taking in a Show.

    PubMed

    Boden, Timothy W

    2016-01-01

    Many medical practices have cut back on education and staff development expenses, especially those costs associated with conventions and conferences. But there are hard-to-value returns on your investment in these live events--beyond the obvious benefits of acquired knowledge and skills. Major vendors still exhibit their services and wares at many events, and the exhibit hall is a treasure-house of information and resources for the savvy physician or administrator. Make and stick to a purposeful plan to exploit the trade show. You can compare products, gain new insights and ideas, and even negotiate better deals with representatives anxious to realize returns on their exhibition investments. PMID:27249887

  15. Taking in a Show.

    PubMed

    Boden, Timothy W

    2016-01-01

    Many medical practices have cut back on education and staff development expenses, especially those costs associated with conventions and conferences. But there are hard-to-value returns on your investment in these live events--beyond the obvious benefits of acquired knowledge and skills. Major vendors still exhibit their services and wares at many events, and the exhibit hall is a treasure-house of information and resources for the savvy physician or administrator. Make and stick to a purposeful plan to exploit the trade show. You can compare products, gain new insights and ideas, and even negotiate better deals with representatives anxious to realize returns on their exhibition investments.

  16. Action physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGinness, Lachlan P.; Savage, C. M.

    2016-09-01

    More than a decade ago, Edwin Taylor issued a "call to action" that presented the case for basing introductory university mechanics teaching around the principle of stationary action [E. F. Taylor, Am. J. Phys. 71, 423-425 (2003)]. We report on our response to that call in the form of an investigation of the teaching and learning of the stationary action formulation of physics in a first-year university course. Our action physics instruction proceeded from the many-paths approach to quantum physics to ray optics, classical mechanics, and relativity. Despite the challenges presented by action physics, students reported it to be accessible, interesting, motivational, and valuable.

  17. Obesity in show dogs.

    PubMed

    Corbee, R J

    2013-10-01

    Obesity is an important disease with a growing incidence. Because obesity is related to several other diseases, and decreases life span, it is important to identify the population at risk. Several risk factors for obesity have been described in the literature. A higher incidence of obesity in certain breeds is often suggested. The aim of this study was to determine whether obesity occurs more often in certain breeds. The second aim was to relate the increased prevalence of obesity in certain breeds to the official standards of that breed. To this end, we investigated 1379 dogs of 128 different breeds by determining their body condition score (BCS). Overall, 18.6% of the show dogs had a BCS >5, and 1.1% of the show dogs had a BCS>7. There were significant differences between breeds, which could be correlated to the breed standards. It warrants firm discussions with breeders and judges in order to come to different interpretations of the standards to prevent overweight conditions from being the standard of beauty. PMID:22882163

  18. Not a "reality" show.

    PubMed

    Wrong, Terence; Baumgart, Erica

    2013-01-01

    The authors of the preceding articles raise legitimate questions about patient and staff rights and the unintended consequences of allowing ABC News to film inside teaching hospitals. We explain why we regard their fears as baseless and not supported by what we heard from individuals portrayed in the filming, our decade-long experience making medical documentaries, and the full un-aired context of the scenes shown in the broadcast. The authors don't and can't know what conversations we had, what documents we reviewed, and what protections we put in place in each televised scene. Finally, we hope to correct several misleading examples cited by the authors as well as their offhand mischaracterization of our program as a "reality" show. PMID:23631336

  19. Not a "reality" show.

    PubMed

    Wrong, Terence; Baumgart, Erica

    2013-01-01

    The authors of the preceding articles raise legitimate questions about patient and staff rights and the unintended consequences of allowing ABC News to film inside teaching hospitals. We explain why we regard their fears as baseless and not supported by what we heard from individuals portrayed in the filming, our decade-long experience making medical documentaries, and the full un-aired context of the scenes shown in the broadcast. The authors don't and can't know what conversations we had, what documents we reviewed, and what protections we put in place in each televised scene. Finally, we hope to correct several misleading examples cited by the authors as well as their offhand mischaracterization of our program as a "reality" show.

  20. Solar urticaria. Determinations of action and inhibition spectra.

    PubMed

    Hasei, K; Ichihashi, M

    1982-05-01

    A 42-year-old woman acquired solar urticaria approximately ten minutes after exposure to sunlight. Urticaria developed from visible light emitted from a projector lamp after a similar time lag. Monochromatic rays between 400 and 500 nm induced immediate urticaria by irradiation, with four times the minimal urticarial dose. Urticaria that was induced by monochromatic rays of the projector lamp was completely inhibited by immediate reirradiation of test sites with light waves longer that 530 nm. Radiant heat exposure from an electric hair dryer at 50 degrees C had no suppressive effects on the development of urticarial lesions.

  1. Solar urticaria. Determinations of action and inhibition spectra.

    PubMed

    Hasei, K; Ichihashi, M

    1982-05-01

    A 42-year-old woman acquired solar urticaria approximately ten minutes after exposure to sunlight. Urticaria developed from visible light emitted from a projector lamp after a similar time lag. Monochromatic rays between 400 and 500 nm induced immediate urticaria by irradiation, with four times the minimal urticarial dose. Urticaria that was induced by monochromatic rays of the projector lamp was completely inhibited by immediate reirradiation of test sites with light waves longer that 530 nm. Radiant heat exposure from an electric hair dryer at 50 degrees C had no suppressive effects on the development of urticarial lesions. PMID:7082028

  2. Public medical shows.

    PubMed

    Walusinski, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    In the second half of the 19th century, Jean-Martin Charcot (1825-1893) became famous for the quality of his teaching and his innovative neurological discoveries, bringing many French and foreign students to Paris. A hunger for recognition, together with progressive and anticlerical ideals, led Charcot to invite writers, journalists, and politicians to his lessons, during which he presented the results of his work on hysteria. These events became public performances, for which physicians and patients were transformed into actors. Major newspapers ran accounts of these consultations, more like theatrical shows in some respects. The resultant enthusiasm prompted other physicians in Paris and throughout France to try and imitate them. We will compare the form and substance of Charcot's lessons with those given by Jules-Bernard Luys (1828-1897), Victor Dumontpallier (1826-1899), Ambroise-Auguste Liébault (1823-1904), Hippolyte Bernheim (1840-1919), Joseph Grasset (1849-1918), and Albert Pitres (1848-1928). We will also note their impact on contemporary cinema and theatre. PMID:25273491

  3. [Spectra of dark green jade from Myanmar].

    PubMed

    Mao, Jian; Chai, Lin-Tao; Guo, Shou-Guo; Fan, Jian-Liang; Bao, Feng

    2013-05-01

    Chemical compositions and spectral characteristics of one type of dark green jades assumed from omphacite jadeite from Myanmar jadeite mining area were studied by X-ray powder diffraction(XRD), X-ray fluorescence spectra(XRF), Raman spectra(RM) and UV-Vis Spectroscopy, etc. Based on testing by XRD and XRF, it was shown that it belongs to iron-enriched plagioclase, including albite and anorthite. The compositions range is between Ab0.731 An0.264 Or0.004 and Ab0.693 An0.303 Or0.004. Raman spectra of samples, albite jade and anorthite were collected and analyzed. Additionally, the distributions of Si, Al in the crystal structure were also discussed. UV-Vis spectra showed that dark green hue of this mineral is associated with d--d electronic transition of Fe3+ and Cr3+.

  4. Study on Raman spectra of synthetic celluloses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Na; Zhu, Changjun; Zhang, Yixin

    2015-02-01

    Raman spectrometry was employed to study the characteristics of Raman spectra of aliphatic polyamide fiber and polyethylene terephthalate (PET), which were treated with sodium hydroxide, sulfuric acid and copper sulfate, respectively. Raman spectra under different conditions were obtained and the characteristics of the Raman spectra were analyzed. The results show that Raman peaks beyond 1200 cm-1 appear for aliphatic polyamide fiber processed by sodium hydroxide, while the Raman peaks beyond 1000 cm-1 disappear for aliphatic polyamide fiber processed by sulfuric acid. Raman peaks beyond 1750 cm-1 decrease for polyethylene terephthalate processed by sodium hydroxide, while Raman peaks beyond 1000 cm-1 disappear, except weak peaks around 3000 cm-1 , for polyethylene terephthalate processed by sulfuric acid. The variations of the Raman spectra are primarily related to the changes of chemical bonds and molecular structures.

  5. Investigation of Raman spectra of polyethylene terephthalate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Changjun; Tong, Na; Song, Lixin; Zhang, Guoqing

    2015-08-01

    Raman spectrometry was employed to study the characteristics of Raman spectra of polyethylene terephthalate (PET), which were treated with sodium hydroxide, sulfuric acid and copper sulfate, respectively. Raman spectra under different conditions were obtained and the characteristics of the Raman spectra were analyzed. The morphology structures were observed under different conditions using Atomic Force Microscope. The results show that the spectral intensity of PET treated with sodium hydroxide is higher than that untreated between 200-1750 cm-1, while the intensity of PET treated with sodium hydroxide is lower than that untreated beyond 1750 cm-1 and the fluorescence background of Raman spectra is decreased. The spectral intensity of PET treated with sulfuric acid is remarkably reduced than that untreated, and the intensity of PET treated with copper sulphate is much higher than that untreated.

  6. Stretched View Showing 'Victoria'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Stretched View Showing 'Victoria'

    This pair of images from the panoramic camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity served as initial confirmation that the two-year-old rover is within sight of 'Victoria Crater,' which it has been approaching for more than a year. Engineers on the rover team were unsure whether Opportunity would make it as far as Victoria, but scientists hoped for the chance to study such a large crater with their roving geologist. Victoria Crater is 800 meters (nearly half a mile) in diameter, about six times wider than 'Endurance Crater,' where Opportunity spent several months in 2004 examining rock layers affected by ancient water.

    When scientists using orbital data calculated that they should be able to detect Victoria's rim in rover images, they scrutinized frames taken in the direction of the crater by the panoramic camera. To positively characterize the subtle horizon profile of the crater and some of the features leading up to it, researchers created a vertically-stretched image (top) from a mosaic of regular frames from the panoramic camera (bottom), taken on Opportunity's 804th Martian day (April 29, 2006).

    The stretched image makes mild nearby dunes look like more threatening peaks, but that is only a result of the exaggerated vertical dimension. This vertical stretch technique was first applied to Viking Lander 2 panoramas by Philip Stooke, of the University of Western Ontario, Canada, to help locate the lander with respect to orbiter images. Vertically stretching the image allows features to be more readily identified by the Mars Exploration Rover science team.

    The bright white dot near the horizon to the right of center (barely visible without labeling or zoom-in) is thought to be a light-toned outcrop on the far wall of the crater, suggesting that the rover can see over the low rim of Victoria. In figure 1, the northeast and southeast rims are labeled

  7. Photogeneration Action Spectroscopy of Neutral and Charged Excitations in Films of a Ladder-Type Poly(Para-Phenylene)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohlgenannt, M.; Graupner, W.; Leising, G.; Vardeny, Z. V.

    1999-04-01

    The photogeneration quantum efficiency action spectra of long-lived neutral and charged excitations in films of a ladder-type poly(para-phenylene) were measured. We found that both triplet and polaron action spectra show, in addition to a step function increase at the optical gap, a monotonic rise at higher energies. For triplets this rise is explained by singlet exciton fission into triplet pairs from which the triplet exciton energy in the gap was obtained; this energy was also confirmed by measuring the weak phosphorescence band. For polarons the photogeneration increase at high energies is modeled by a novel hot electron interchain tunneling process.

  8. IUE archived spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Edward C.; Bohlin, Ralph C.; Heap, Sara R.; West, Donald K.; Schmitz, Marion

    1988-01-01

    The International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) Satellite has been in continuous operation since January 26, 1978. To date, approximately 65,000 spectra have been stored in an archive at Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, MD. A number of procedures have been generated to facilitate access to the data in the IUE spectral archive. This document describes the procedures which include on-line quick look of the displays, search of an observation data base for selected observations, and several methods for ordering data from the archive.

  9. Stereoscopically Observing Manipulative Actions.

    PubMed

    Ferri, S; Pauwels, K; Rizzolatti, G; Orban, G A

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the contribution of stereopsis to the processing of observed manipulative actions. To this end, we first combined the factors "stimulus type" (action, static control, and dynamic control), "stereopsis" (present, absent) and "viewpoint" (frontal, lateral) into a single design. Four sites in premotor, retro-insular (2) and parietal cortex operated specifically when actions were viewed stereoscopically and frontally. A second experiment clarified that the stereo-action-specific regions were driven by actions moving out of the frontoparallel plane, an effect amplified by frontal viewing in premotor cortex. Analysis of single voxels and their discriminatory power showed that the representation of action in the stereo-action-specific areas was more accurate when stereopsis was active. Further analyses showed that the 4 stereo-action-specific sites form a closed network converging onto the premotor node, which connects to parietal and occipitotemporal regions outside the network. Several of the specific sites are known to process vestibular signals, suggesting that the network combines observed actions in peripersonal space with gravitational signals. These findings have wider implications for the function of premotor cortex and the role of stereopsis in human behavior. PMID:27252350

  10. Stereoscopically Observing Manipulative Actions

    PubMed Central

    Ferri, S.; Pauwels, K.; Rizzolatti, G.; Orban, G. A.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the contribution of stereopsis to the processing of observed manipulative actions. To this end, we first combined the factors “stimulus type” (action, static control, and dynamic control), “stereopsis” (present, absent) and “viewpoint” (frontal, lateral) into a single design. Four sites in premotor, retro-insular (2) and parietal cortex operated specifically when actions were viewed stereoscopically and frontally. A second experiment clarified that the stereo-action-specific regions were driven by actions moving out of the frontoparallel plane, an effect amplified by frontal viewing in premotor cortex. Analysis of single voxels and their discriminatory power showed that the representation of action in the stereo-action-specific areas was more accurate when stereopsis was active. Further analyses showed that the 4 stereo-action-specific sites form a closed network converging onto the premotor node, which connects to parietal and occipitotemporal regions outside the network. Several of the specific sites are known to process vestibular signals, suggesting that the network combines observed actions in peripersonal space with gravitational signals. These findings have wider implications for the function of premotor cortex and the role of stereopsis in human behavior. PMID:27252350

  11. Meteors and meteorites spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koukal, J.; Srba, J.; Gorková, S.; Lenža, L.; Ferus, M.; Civiš, S.; Knížek, A.; Kubelík, P.; Kaiserová, T.; Váňa, P.

    2016-01-01

    The main goal of our meteor spectroscopy project is to better understand the physical and chemical properties of meteoroids. Astrometric and spectral observations of real meteors are obtained via spectroscopic CCD video systems. Processed meteor data are inserted to the EDMOND database (European viDeo MeteOr Network Database) together with spectral information. The fully analyzed atmospheric trajectory, orbit and also spectra of a Leonid meteor/meteoroid captured in November 2015 are presented as an example. At the same time, our target is the systematization of spectroscopic emission lines for the comparative analysis of meteor spectra. Meteoroid plasma was simulated in a laboratory by laser ablation of meteorites samples using an (ArF) excimer laser and the LIDB (Laser Induced Dielectric Breakdown) in a low pressure atmosphere and various gases. The induced plasma emissions were simultaneously observed with the Echelle Spectrograph and the same CCD video spectral camera as used for real meteor registration. Measurements and analysis results for few selected meteorite samples are presented and discussed.

  12. Action Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1996

    These four papers were presented at a symposium on action learning moderated by Lex Dilworth at the 1996 conference of the Academy of Human Resource Development. "Developing an Infrastructure for Individual and Organizational Change: Transfer of Learning from an Action Reflection Learning (ARL) Program" (ARL Inquiry) reports findings from a study…

  13. Continuum Fitting HST QSO Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tytler, David; Oliversen, Ronald J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Principal Component Analysis (PCA) method which we are using to fit and describe QSO spectra relies upon the fact that QSO continuum are generally very smooth and simple except for emission and absorption lines. To see this we need high signal-to-noise (S/N) spectra of QSOs at low redshift which have relatively few absorption lines in the Lyman-a forest. We need a large number of such spectra to use as the basis set for the PCA analysis which will find the set of principal component spectra which describe the QSO family as a whole. We have found that too few HST spectra have the required S/N and hence we need to supplement them with ground based spectra of QSOs at higher redshift. We have many such spectra and we have been working to make them suitable for this analysis. We have concentrated on this topic since 12/15/01.

  14. Interstellar Electron Density Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Hendrick Clark

    This study concerns the investigation of the form of the wavenumber spectrum of the Galactic electron density fluctuations through an examination of the scattering of the radio pulses emitted by pulsars as they propagate through the diffuse ionized interstellar gas. A widely used model for the electron density spectrum is based on the simple power-law: Pne(q)∝ q-β, where β = 11/3 is usually assumed, corresponding to Kolmogorov's turbulence spectrum. The simple Kolmogorov model provides satisfactory agreement for observations along many lines of sight; however, major inconsistencies remain. The inconsistencies suggest that an increase in the ratio of the power between the high (10-8[ m]-1≤ q<=10-7[ m]-1) and low (10-13[ m]-1≤ q<=10-12[ m]-1) wavenumbers is needed. This enhancement in the ratio can in turn be achieved by either including an inner scale, corresponding to a dissipation scale for the turbulent cascade, in the Kolmogorov spectrum or by considering steeper spectra. Spectra with spectral exponents β > 4 have been in general rejected based on observations of pulsar refractive scintillations. The special case of β = 4 has been given little attention and is analyzed in detail. Physically, this 'β = 4' model corresponds to the random distribution, both in location and orientation, of discrete objects with relatively sharp boundaries across the line of sight. An outer scale is included in the model to account for the average size of such objects. We compare the predictions of the inner-scale and β = 4 models both with published observations and observations we made as part of this investigation. We conclude that the form of the wavenumber spectrum is dependent on the line of sight. We propose a composite spectrum featuring a uniform background turbulence in presence of randomly distributed discrete objects, as modeled by the β = model.

  15. [Characteristics of Raman Spectra of Polyethylene Terephthalate].

    PubMed

    Tong, Na; Zhu, Chang-jun; Song, Li-xun; Zhang, Chong-hui; Zhang, Guo-qing; Zhang, Yi-xin

    2016-01-01

    Raman spectrometry was employed to study the characteristics of Raman spectra of polyethylene terephthalate (PET), which were treated with sodium hydroxide, sulfuric acid and copper sulfate, respectively. Raman spectra under different conditions were obtained and the characteristics of the Raman spectra were analyzed. The morphology structures were observed under different conditions using Atomic Force Microscope. The results show that the spectral intensity of PET treated with sodium hydroxide is higher than that untreated between 200-1 750 cm(-1), while the intensity of PET treated with sodium hydroxide is lower than that untreated beyond 1 750 cm(-1) and the fluorescence background of Raman spectra is decreased. The spectral intensity of PET treated with sulfuric acid is remarkably reduced than that untreated, and the intensity of PET treated with copper sulphate is much higher than that untreated. The research results obtained by Atomic Force Microscopy show that the variations of the Raman spectra of PET fibers are closely related to. the chemical bonds and molecular structures of PET fibers. The surface of the PET treated with sodium hydroxide is rougher than that untreated, the surface roughness of the PET treated with sulfuric acid is reduced as compared to that untreated, while the surface roughness of the PET treated with copper sulphate is increased. The results obtained by Raman spectroscopy are consistent with those by Atomic Force Microscopy, indicating that the combination of Raman spectroscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy is expected to be a promising characterization technology for polymer characteristics. PMID:27228752

  16. [Characteristics of Raman Spectra of Polyethylene Terephthalate].

    PubMed

    Tong, Na; Zhu, Chang-jun; Song, Li-xun; Zhang, Chong-hui; Zhang, Guo-qing; Zhang, Yi-xin

    2016-01-01

    Raman spectrometry was employed to study the characteristics of Raman spectra of polyethylene terephthalate (PET), which were treated with sodium hydroxide, sulfuric acid and copper sulfate, respectively. Raman spectra under different conditions were obtained and the characteristics of the Raman spectra were analyzed. The morphology structures were observed under different conditions using Atomic Force Microscope. The results show that the spectral intensity of PET treated with sodium hydroxide is higher than that untreated between 200-1 750 cm(-1), while the intensity of PET treated with sodium hydroxide is lower than that untreated beyond 1 750 cm(-1) and the fluorescence background of Raman spectra is decreased. The spectral intensity of PET treated with sulfuric acid is remarkably reduced than that untreated, and the intensity of PET treated with copper sulphate is much higher than that untreated. The research results obtained by Atomic Force Microscopy show that the variations of the Raman spectra of PET fibers are closely related to. the chemical bonds and molecular structures of PET fibers. The surface of the PET treated with sodium hydroxide is rougher than that untreated, the surface roughness of the PET treated with sulfuric acid is reduced as compared to that untreated, while the surface roughness of the PET treated with copper sulphate is increased. The results obtained by Raman spectroscopy are consistent with those by Atomic Force Microscopy, indicating that the combination of Raman spectroscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy is expected to be a promising characterization technology for polymer characteristics.

  17. Graviton spectra in string cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Galluccio, Massimo; Litterio, Marco; Occhionero, Franco

    1996-08-01

    We propose to uncover the signature of a stringy era in the primordial Universe by searching for a prominent peak in the relic graviton spectrum. This feature, which in our specific model terminates an ω³ increase and initiates an ω⁻⁷ decrease, is induced during the so far overlooked bounce of the scale factor between the collapsing deflationary era (or pre-Big Bang) and the expanding inflationary era (or post-Big Bang). We evaluate both analytically and numerically the frequency and the intensity of the peak and we show that they may likely fall in the realm of the new generation of interferometric detectors. The existence of a peak is at variance with ordinarily monotonic (either increasing or decreasing) graviton spectra of canonical cosmologies; its detection would therefore offer strong support to string cosmology.

  18. Discrimination of phytoplankton classes using characteristic spectra of 3D fluorescence spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qian-Qian; Lei, Shu-He; Wang, Xiu-Lin; Wang, Lei; Zhu, Chen-Jian

    2006-02-01

    The discrimination of phytoplankton classes using the characteristic fluorescence spectra extracted from three-dimensional fluorescence spectra was investigated. Single species cultures of 11 phytoplankton species, representing 5 major phytoplankton divisions, were used. The 3D fluorescence spectra of the cultures grown at different temperatures (20 and 15 °C) and illumination intensities (140, 80 and 30 μM m -2 s -1) were measured and their feature extraction methods were explored. Ordering Rayleigh and Raman scattering data as zero, the obtained excitation-emission matrices were processed by both singular value decomposition (SVD) and trilinear decomposition methods. The resulting first principal component can be regarded as the characteristic spectrum of the original 3D fluorescence spectrum. The analysis shows that such characteristic spectra have a discriminatory capability. At different temperatures, the characteristic spectra of Isochrysis galbana, Platymonas helgolanidica and Skeletonema costatuma have high degrees of similarity to their own species samples, while the spectra similarities of Alexandrium tamarense, Prorocentrum dentatum, Pseudo-nitzschia pungens, Chaetoceros curvisetus, Ch. Debilis, Ch. Didymus and Synechococcus sp. are not as significant as the other three species. C. curvisetus, Ch. Debilis and Ch. Didymus, belonging to genus Chaetoceros, have identical spectra and cannot be discriminated at all. Regarding all six diatom species as one class, the average discriminant error rate is below 9%. It is worth mentioning that the diatom class can be distinguished from A. tamarense and P. dentatum, which belong to Dinophyta.

  19. Action perception predicts action performance

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Heather R.; Kurby, Christopher A.; Giovannetti, Tania; Zacks, Jeffrey M.

    2013-01-01

    Everyday action impairments often are observed in demented older adults, and they are common potential barriers to functional independence. We evaluated whether the ability to segment and efficiently encode activities is related to the ability to execute activities. Further, we evaluated whether brain regions important for segmentation also were important for action performance. Cognitively healthy older adults and those with very mild or mild dementia of the Alzheimer's type watched and segmented movies of everyday activities and then completed the Naturalistic Action Test. Structural MRI was used to measure volume in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), medial temporal lobes (MTL), posterior cortex, and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). Dementia status and the ability to segment everyday activities strongly predicted naturalistic action performance, and MTL volume largely accounted for this relationship. In addition, the current results supported the Omission-Commission Model: Different cognitive and neurological mechanisms predicted different types of action error. Segmentation, dementia severity, and MTL volume predicted everyday omission errors, DLPFC volume predicted commission errors, and ACC volume predicted action additions. These findings suggest that event segmentation may be critical for effective action production, and that the segmentation and production of activities may recruit the same event representation system. PMID:23851113

  20. Action perception predicts action performance.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Heather R; Kurby, Christopher A; Giovannetti, Tania; Zacks, Jeffrey M

    2013-09-01

    Everyday action impairments often are observed in demented older adults, and they are common potential barriers to functional independence. We evaluated whether the ability to segment and efficiently encode activities is related to the ability to execute activities. Further, we evaluated whether brain regions important for segmentation also were important for action performance. Cognitively healthy older adults and those with very mild or mild dementia of the Alzheimer's type watched and segmented movies of everyday activities and then completed the Naturalistic Action Test. Structural MRI was used to measure volume in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), medial temporal lobes (MTL), posterior cortex, and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). Dementia status and the ability to segment everyday activities strongly predicted naturalistic action performance, and MTL volume largely accounted for this relationship. In addition, the current results supported the Omission-Commission Model: Different cognitive and neurological mechanisms predicted different types of action error. Segmentation, dementia severity, and MTL volume predicted everyday omission errors, DLPFC volume predicted commission errors, and ACC volume predicted action additions. These findings suggest that event segmentation may be critical for effective action production, and that the segmentation and production of activities may recruit the same event representation system.

  1. Conscious Vision in Action.

    PubMed

    Briscoe, Robert; Schwenkler, John

    2015-09-01

    It is natural to assume that the fine-grained and highly accurate spatial information present in visual experience is often used to guide our bodily actions. Yet this assumption has been challenged by proponents of the Two Visual Systems Hypothesis (TVSH), according to which visuomotor programming is the responsibility of a "zombie" processing stream whose sources of bottom-up spatial information are entirely non-conscious (Clark, 2007, 2009; Goodale & Milner, 1992, 2004a; Milner & Goodale, 1995/2006, 2008). In many formulations of TVSH, the role of conscious vision in action is limited to "recognizing objects, selecting targets for action, and determining what kinds of action, broadly speaking, to perform" (Clark, 2007, p. 570). Our aim in this study is to show that the available evidence not only fails to support this dichotomous view but actually reveals a significant role for conscious vision in motor programming, especially for actions that require deliberate attention. PMID:25845648

  2. Thermal Infrared Spectra of Experimentally Shocked Albitite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, J. R.; Horz, F.; Lucey, P.; Christensen, P.

    2002-12-01

    We have acquired thermal infrared (3-40 microns) hemispherical reflectance and emissivity spectra of shocked samples of a fine-grained (1-5 mm) albitite from Szklary, Poland to determine the spectral degradation effects of shocked albite as a function of increasing shock pressures (17-56 GPa). Reflectance data were acquired using a Nicolet 5SXC FTIR spectrometer at the HIGP, University of Hawaii, and emission spectra were acquired using a Nicolet Nexus 670 emission spectrometer at Arizona State University. These data complement similar previous measurements of experimentally shocked anorthosite relevant to interpreting spectra provided by the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) on Mars Global Surveyor. The samples were shocked using the 25-mm barrel gun at Johnson Space Center and provided ~400 mg per sample. Large (2-10 mm) chips of recovered material were separated from the samples and washed to remove clinging fines, and the residual was powdered to provide a consistent grain size (~20 microns). Spectra were obtained of both the chips and the powder samples. Results for the chips show a progressive loss of spectral features and contrast compared to unshocked samples, while results for the powders show a reduction in the depth of the transparency feature located near 855 wavenumbers (11.7 microns) with increasing pressure. The albite structure retains its crystalline state to higher pressures than anorthosites, consistent with previous transmission spectra. Additional visible/near-infrared (0.35-2.50 microns) measurements of the powdered albitite and anorthosite samples also were acquired at the RELAB facility. These spectra show a decrease in albedo and a loss of water bands near 1.4 and 1.9 microns with increasing pressure. The broad feldspar absorption near 1.25 microns was not present in the albitite sample (possibly due to its fine original grain size) but was present in the anorthosite sample, where its band depth decreased with increasing shock pressures.

  3. Sequencing BPS spectra

    DOE PAGES

    Gukov, Sergei; Nawata, Satoshi; Saberi, Ingmar; Stošić, Marko; Sułkowski, Piotr

    2016-03-02

    In this article, we provide both a detailed study of color-dependence of link homologies, as realized in physics as certain spaces of BPS states, and a broad study of the behavior of BPS states in general. We consider how the spectrum of BPS states varies as continuous parameters of a theory are perturbed. This question can be posed in a wide variety of physical contexts, and we answer it by proposing that the relationship between unperturbed and perturbed BPS spectra is described by a spectral sequence. These general considerations unify previous applications of spectral sequence techniques to physics, and explainmore » from a physical standpoint the appearance of many spectral sequences relating various link homology theories to one another. We also study structural properties of colored HOMFLY homology for links and evaluate Poincar e polynomials in numerous examples. Among these structural properties is a novel "sliding" property, which can be explained by using (re fined) modular S-matrix. This leads to the identi fication of modular transformations in Chern-Simons theory and 3d N = 2 theory via the 3d/3d correspondence. In conclusion, we introduce the notion of associated varieties as classical limits of recursion relations of colored superpolynomials of links, and study their properties.« less

  4. Sequencing BPS spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gukov, Sergei; Nawata, Satoshi; Saberi, Ingmar; Stošić, Marko; Sułkowski, Piotr

    2016-03-01

    This paper provides both a detailed study of color-dependence of link homologies, as realized in physics as certain spaces of BPS states, and a broad study of the behavior of BPS states in general. We consider how the spectrum of BPS states varies as continuous parameters of a theory are perturbed. This question can be posed in a wide variety of physical contexts, and we answer it by proposing that the relationship between unperturbed and perturbed BPS spectra is described by a spectral sequence. These general considerations unify previous applications of spectral sequence techniques to physics, and explain from a physical standpoint the appearance of many spectral sequences relating various link homology theories to one another. We also study structural properties of colored HOMFLY homology for links and evaluate Poincaré polynomials in numerous examples. Among these structural properties is a novel "sliding" property, which can be explained by using (refined) modular S-matrix. This leads to the identification of modular transformations in Chern-Simons theory and 3d {N}=2 theory via the 3d/3d correspondence. Lastly, we introduce the notion of associated varieties as classical limits of recursion relations of colored superpolynomials of links, and study their properties.

  5. Stability properties of wines by absorption spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larena, A.; Vega, J.

    1986-03-01

    The temporal evolution of absorption spectra (370-700 nm) of different spanish wines has been studied by us under the influence of air presence, and the light exposition. In particular, we have exposed the wines to a magenta light. Nevertheless, the color coordinates of wine show a little relative variation (0.1-1 %)

  6. EEG Power Spectra of Adolescent Poor Readers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ackerman, Peggy T.; McPherson, W. Brian; Oglesby, D. Michael; Dykman, Roscoe A.

    1998-01-01

    Electroencephalographic power spectra were studied in two poor-reading adolescent groups (n=38), dysphonetic and phonetic. Significant Group x Hemisphere effects were found in the alpha and beta bands, with the phonetic group showing right greater than left asymmetry. Results suggest more circumscribed and mature processing in the phonetically…

  7. [EPR spectra of silkworm eggs].

    PubMed

    Korkhova, E D; Chepel', L M; Nikolov, O T; Komar', I N; Shakhbazov, V G

    1976-01-01

    ESR spectra of the native grain of the silkworm have been studied in the course of embryo formation, during a diapause, and during embryo development after the diapause. It is shown that the nature of ESR spectra of the grain is not determined by the metabolic processes, but by the presence of pigments in it and other stationary biological structures having developed pi-systems and unpaired electrones. The latter are mainly found in the envelope and may give the ESR spectra, with various g-factors. A dependence of the ESR spectra integral intensity of the grain on the denotype is discovered.

  8. Gravitational effects on planetary neutron flux spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, W. C.; Drake, D. M.; O'dell, R. D.; Brinkley, F. W.; Anderson, R. C.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of gravity on the planetary neutron flux spectra for planet Mars, and the lifetime of the neutron, were investigated using a modified one-dimensional diffusion accelerated neutral-particle transport code, coupled with a multigroup cross-section library tailored specifically for Mars. The results showed the presence of a qualitatively new feature in planetary neutron leakage spectra in the form of a component of returning neutrons with kinetic energies less than the gravitational binding energy (0.132 eV for Mars). The net effect is an enhancement in flux at the lowest energies that is largest at and above the outermost layer of planetary matter.

  9. Cloud supersaturations from CCN spectra Hoppel minima

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, James G.; Noble, Stephen; Tabor, Samantha

    2015-04-01

    High-resolution cloud condensation nucleus (CCN) spectral measurements in two aircraft field projects, Marine Stratus/Stratocumulus Experiment (MASE) and Ice in Clouds Experiment-Tropical (ICE-T), often showed bimodality that had previously been observed in submicrometer aerosol size distributions obtained by differential mobility analyzers. However, a great deal of spectral shape variability from very bimodal to very monomodal was observed in close proximity. Cloud supersaturation (S) estimates based on critical S, Sc, at minimal CCN concentrations between two modes (Hoppel minima) were ascertained for 63% of 325 measured spectra. These cloud S were lower than effective S (Seff) determined by comparing ambient CCN spectra with nearby cloud droplet concentrations (Nc). Averages for the polluted MASE stratus were 0.15 and 0.23% and for the cumulus clouds of ICE-T 0.44 and 1.03%. This cloud S disagreement between the two methods might in part be due to the fact that Hoppel minima include the effects of cloud processing, which push CCN spectra toward lower S. Furthermore, there is less cloud processing by the smaller cloud droplets, which might be related to smaller droplets evaporating more readily. Significantly lower concentrations within the more bimodal spectra compared with the monomodal spectra indicated active physical processes: Brownian capture of interstitial CCN and droplet coalescence. Chemical cloud processing also contributed to bimodality, especially in MASE.

  10. Climatology of tropospheric vertical velocity spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ecklund, W. L.; Gage, K. S.; Balsley, B. B.; Carter, D. A.

    1986-01-01

    Vertical velocity power spectra obtained from Poker Flat, Alaska; Platteville, Colorado; Rhone Delta, France; and Ponape, East Caroline Islands using 50-MHz clear-air radars with vertical beams are given. The spectra were obtained by analyzing the quietest periods from the one-minute-resolution time series for each site. The lengths of available vertical records ranged from as long as 6 months at Poker Flat to about 1 month at Platteville. The quiet-time vertical velocity spectra are shown. Spectral period ranging from 2 minutes to 4 hours is shown on the abscissa and power spectral density is given on the ordinate. The Brunt-Vaisala (B-V) periods (determined from nearby sounding balloons) are indicated. All spectra (except the one from Platteville) exhibit a peak at periods slightly longer than the B-V period, are flat at longer periods, and fall rapidly at periods less than the B-V period. This behavior is expected for a spectrum of internal waves and is very similar to what is observed in the ocean (Eriksen, 1978). The spectral amplitudes vary by only a factor of 2 or 3 about the mean, and show that under quiet conditions vertical velocity spectra from the troposphere are very similar at widely different locations.

  11. Synthetic spectra: a tool for correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, M B; Butler, M A; Ricco, A J; Senturia, S D

    1997-05-20

    We show that computer-generated diffractive optical elements can be used to synthesize the infrared spectra of important compounds, and we describe a modified phase-retrieval algorithm useful for the design of elements of this type. In particular, we present the results of calculations of diffractive elements that are capable of synthesizing portions of the infrared spectra of gaseous hydrogen fluoride (HF) and trichloroethylene (TCE). Further, we propose a new type of correlation spectrometer that uses these diffractive elements rather than reference cells for the production of reference spectra. Storage of a large number of diffractive elements, each producing a synthetic spectrum corresponding to a different target compound, in compact-disk-like format will allow a spectrometer of this type to rapidly determine the composition of unknown samples. Other advantages of the proposed correlation spectrometer are also discussed.

  12. Soil emissivity and reflectance spectra measurements.

    PubMed

    Sobrino, José A; Mattar, Cristian; Pardo, Pablo; Jiménez-Muñoz, Juan C; Hook, Simon J; Baldridge, Alice; Ibañez, Rafael

    2009-07-01

    We present an analysis of the laboratory reflectance and emissivity spectra of 11 soil samples collected on different field campaigns carried out over a diverse suite of test sites in Europe, North Africa, and South America from 2002 to 2008. Hemispherical reflectance spectra were measured from 2.0 to 14 microm with a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer, and x-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) was used to determine the mineralogical phases of the soil samples. Emissivity spectra were obtained from the hemispherical reflectance measurements using Kirchhoff's law and compared with in situ radiance measurements obtained with a CIMEL Electronique CE312-2 thermal radiometer and converted to emissivity using the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) temperature and emissivity separation algorithm. The CIMEL has five narrow bands at approximately the same positions as the ASTER. Results show a root mean square error typically below 0.015 between laboratory emissivity measurements and emissivity measurements derived from the field radiometer.

  13. FAST INVERSION OF SOLAR Ca II SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, C.; Choudhary, D. P.; Rezaei, R.; Louis, R. E.

    2015-01-10

    We present a fast (<<1 s per profile) inversion code for solar Ca II lines. The code uses an archive of spectra that are synthesized prior to the inversion under the assumption of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). We show that it can be successfully applied to spectrograph data or more sparsely sampled spectra from two-dimensional spectrometers. From a comparison to a non-LTE inversion of the same set of spectra, we derive a first-order non-LTE correction to the temperature stratifications derived in the LTE approach. The correction factor is close to unity up to log τ ∼ –3 and increases to values of 2.5 and 4 at log τ = –6 in the quiet Sun and the umbra, respectively.

  14. [Vibrational spectra of Hetian nephrite from Xinjiang].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong-wang; Liu, Yan; Liu, Tao-tao; Muhetaer, Zari; Liu, Yuan-qing

    2012-02-01

    In previous studies, EMPA, PIXE and others were employed to study the chemical compositions of nephrite separately without a systematical measurement. In the present study, XRF, XRD, IR and LR were used together to examine chemical and spectra characteristics of white, green and black nephrite from Hetian, Xinjiang. XRD results indicate that all nephrite samples consist of tremolite. Then IR spectra of nephrite samples suggest that the M-OH stretching vibration bands show that the M1 and M3 sites are not only occupied by Mg2+ and Fe2+, but also by Fe3+, which is consistent with the chemical compositions of these samples. This information might be useful to understanding the variety of nephrite. Their Raman spectra are almost the same, while some differences exist because of different content of FeO/Fe2O3.

  15. Incongruent Imagery Interferes with Action Initiation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramsey, Richard; Cumming, Jennifer; Eastough, Daniel; Edwards, Martin G.

    2010-01-01

    It has been suggested that representing an action through observation and imagery share neural processes with action execution. In support of this view, motor-priming research has shown that observing an action can influence action initiation. However, there is little motor-priming research showing that imagining an action can modulate action…

  16. 32 CFR 552.78 - “Show cause” hearing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ....78 “Show cause” hearing. Before suspending the solicitation privilege, the company and the agent will have a chance to show cause why the action should not be taken. “Show cause” is an opportunity for...

  17. 32 CFR 552.78 - “Show cause” hearing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ....78 “Show cause” hearing. Before suspending the solicitation privilege, the company and the agent will have a chance to show cause why the action should not be taken. “Show cause” is an opportunity for...

  18. 32 CFR 552.78 - “Show cause” hearing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ....78 “Show cause” hearing. Before suspending the solicitation privilege, the company and the agent will have a chance to show cause why the action should not be taken. “Show cause” is an opportunity for...

  19. 32 CFR 552.78 - “Show cause” hearing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ....78 “Show cause” hearing. Before suspending the solicitation privilege, the company and the agent will have a chance to show cause why the action should not be taken. “Show cause” is an opportunity for...

  20. 32 CFR 552.78 - “Show cause” hearing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ....78 “Show cause” hearing. Before suspending the solicitation privilege, the company and the agent will have a chance to show cause why the action should not be taken. “Show cause” is an opportunity for...

  1. Near infrared reflection spectra of artificial cumulus clouds.

    PubMed

    Plummer, W T

    1969-10-01

    Reflection spectra are presented for artificial cumulus clouds with a progression of droplet sizes, including sizes common in natural clouds, over the wavelength range from 1.0 micro to 2.4 micro. A correction is made for gaseous absorption. The spectra show reflectivity minima at 1.16 micro, 1.41 micro, and 1.92micro which deepen as the droplets become larger and are in good agreement with reflection spectra of terrestrial clouds.

  2. Title: Near-UV behaviour of observed TNO reflectance spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seccull, Tom; Fraser, Wesley Cristopher; Izawa, Matthew; Brown, Michael E.

    2016-10-01

    Observed spectra provide the best diagnostics of the surface compositions of Trans-Neptunian Objects (TNOs). We have observed the spectra of 7 TNOs, from across almost the full range of dynamical classes, using the VLT's X-Shooter spectrograph. Compared to the 5 targets in our sample which exhibit linear spectra in the UV-optical range, two of of our targets show highly unusual spectral behaviour, whereby their reflectance decreases sharply at wavelengths below ~440nm. Those same objects exhibit typically unremarkable spectra in the optical and near-IR spectral regions. In these regions where available, our observed spectra of the targets are in agreement with spectra or photometry available in the literature. Using a different solar analogue to produce our reflectance spectra does not remove the UV decrease exhibited by the two targets. Further, it appears that neither reducing the spectra with different pipelines, nor using drastically different parameters in those pipelines changes this general behaviour. Based on laboratory spectra of complex hydrocarbons it is plausible that the near-UV behaviour is the result of a surface coating of organic substances on the TNOs which exhibit it. The spectra of organics are also consistent in having a general red slope similar to that observed in the spectra of many TNOs. While laboratory spectra of some silicate substances also show a decrease in reflectance in the near-UV spectral region that is in principle consistent with our observations, those silicates do not exhibit a red slope consistent with our optical spectra. Hence, the hypothesis that silicates are present seems less likely than the hypothesis that this UV decrease is due to the presence of organics on the surfaces of these objects.

  3. The action spectrum for vitamin D3: initial skin reaction and prolonged exposure.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, Arjan; den Outer, Peter; van Kranen, Henk; Slaper, Harry

    2016-07-01

    Vitamin D3 photosynthesis in the skin is formulated as a set of reaction equations, including side-reactions to lumisterol, tachysterol and toxisterols, and the accompanying reverse reactions, isomerisation of previtamin D3 to vitamin D3 and photodegradation of vitamin D3. The solution of this set is given for the stationary irradiance spectrum. The effective action spectrum for the instantaneous vitamin D3 production changes shape as a function of exposure, and therefore, no single action spectrum can be used. We assessed the action spectrum for unexposed skin and for skin that has been exposed to 7.5 Standard Erythemal Doses (SED). We constructed two new estimates: (1) the RIVM action spectrum, based on absorption spectra, quantum yields and skin transmission spectra, and (2) the modified QUT action spectrum, which is adjusted for self-absorption and skin transmission. For previously unexposed skin, the modified QUT action spectrum gives a qualitatively similar, but larger estimate than the RIVM action spectrum. We have not been able to solve the lack of quantitative agreement between the vitamin D production estimates from the three action spectrum estimates (RIVM, modified QUT and CIE). All new action spectra have stronger emphasis on the short wavelengths than the CIE action spectrum. We showed that, for wavelengths larger than 300 nm, the bandwidth that was used in the experiment that formed the basis of the CIE action spectrum, gives a red-shift of about 1 nm. Generally, with the formation of previtamin D3, the return reaction to provitamin D3 limits the production of vitamin D3. After some exposure, the new action spectrum has negative values for the longer wavelengths in the UVB. For the RIVM action spectrum, this happens after 7.5 SED, for the modified QUT action spectrum already after 1.25 SED, and after 7.5 SED the net production rate is largely cancelled. Thus prolonged exposure of previously unexposed skin saturates vitamin D3 formation. For maximum

  4. Catalogue of representative meteor spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vojáček, V.; Borovička, J.; Koten, P.; Spurný, P.; Štork, R.

    2016-01-01

    We present a library of low-resolution meteor spectra that includes sporadic meteors, members of minor meteor showers, and major meteor showers. These meteors are in the magnitude range from +2 to ‑3, corresponding to meteoroid sizes from 1 mm to10 mm. This catalogue is available online at the CDS for those interested in video meteor spectra.

  5. Projecting Spectra for Classroom Investigations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sadler, Philip

    1991-01-01

    Describes an inexpensive spectrum projector that makes high-dispersion, high-efficiency diffraction gratings using a holographic process. Discusses classroom applications such as transmission spectra, absorption spectra, reflection characteristics of materials, color mixing, florescence and phosphorescence, and break up spectral colors. (MDH)

  6. Catalogue of representative meteor spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vojáček, V.; Borovička, J.; Koten, P.; Spurný, P.; Štork, R.

    2016-01-01

    We present a library of low-resolution meteor spectra that includes sporadic meteors, members of minor meteor showers, and major meteor showers. These meteors are in the magnitude range from +2 to -3, corresponding to meteoroid sizes from 1 mm to10 mm. This catalogue is available online at the CDS for those interested in video meteor spectra.

  7. Refractory sea salt CCN spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noble, S.; Hudson, J. G.

    2012-12-01

    Hudson et al. (2011; H11) showed a substantial sea salt (NaCl) CCN contribution for low critical supersaturation (Sc) CCN (< 0.1%), which was a positive function of horizontal wind speed (U) at the ocean surface in the RICO project in the Caribbean. Somewhat similar results were found over the Pacific near California in spite of a factor of 3 higher average CCN concentrations. Results were obscured over the mid Pacific in PASE because of the lack of cloud scavenging (H11). The results were obtained by CCN spectral volatility measurements, which remove all but the refractory CCN that survive heating to 300 degrees C, which are only NaCl. Fig. 1 shows that ambient CCN concentrations were uncorrelated with U but that refractory CCN were correlated with U in RICO and POST. Fig. 2 compares low altitude average refractory CCN spectra during flights with various noted mean U. The two POST flights and the RICO flights displayed here show the same dependence on U that was quantified by H11. The higher concentrations for PASE in relation to U are due to the lack of cloud scavenging, which allowed higher concentrations to build up that are thus not related to the simultaneously measured U. The abundant clouds of RICO and POST provided enough removal of CCN that sea salt CCN were correlated with simultaneously measured U. These measurements have begun the quantification of this most definite natural CCN source. This is needed in order to assess the impact of anthropogenic CCN on clouds; i.e., the indirect aerosol effect. Hudson, J.G., S. Noble, and V. Jha, 2011: On the relative role of sea salt cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). J. Atmos. Chem. Volume 68, Number 1, Pages 71-88, DOI: 10.1007/s10874-011-9210-5. Fig. 1. Correlation coefficients (R) between CCN concentrations at various S and wind speed for ambient CCN (all) and refractory CCN. Fig. 2. Flight averaged refractory CCN spectra.

  8. Electronic spectra of astrophysically interesting cations

    SciTech Connect

    Maier, John P. Rice, Corey A. Mazzotti, Fabio J. Johnson, Anatoly

    2015-01-22

    The electronic spectra of polyacetylene cations were recorded at 20K in the laboratory in an ion trap instrument. These can then be compared with diffuse interstellar band (DIB) absorptions. Examination of recently published data shows that the attribution of a weak DIB at ∼506.9 nm to diacetylene cation is not justified. Study of the higher excited electronic states of polyacetylene cations shows that their widths can still be sufficiently narrow for consideration as DIB carriers.

  9. Action Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milton-Brkich, Katie Lynn; Shumbera, Kristen; Beran, Becky

    2010-01-01

    Defined as "any systemic inquiry conducted by teachers... for the purpose of gathering information about how their particular schools operate, how they teach, and how their students learn" (Mertler, 2009), "action research" is empowering and professional research done by teachers to inform and improves their own practices. Although there are many…

  10. Neutron Spectra and H*(10) in a 15 MV Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Benites, J.; Vega-Carrillo, H. R.; Hernandez-Davila, V. M.; Rivera, T.; Carrillo, A.; Mondragon, R.

    2010-12-07

    Neutron spectra and the ambient dose equivalent were calculated inside the bunker of a 15 MV Varian linac model CLINAC iX. Calculations were carried out using Monte Carlo methods. Neutron spectra in the vicinity of isocentre show the presence of evaporation and knock-on neutrons produced by the source term, while epithermal and thermal neutron remain constant regardless the distance respect to isocentre, due to room return. Along the maze neutron spectra becomes softer as the detector moves along the maze. The ambient dose equivalent is decreased but do not follow the 1/r{sup 2} rule due to changes in the neutron spectra.

  11. Neutron Spectra and H*(10) in a 15 MV Linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benites, J.; Vega-Carrillo, H. R.; Hernandez-Davila, V. M.; Rivera, T.; Carrillo, A.; Mondragon, R.

    2010-12-01

    Neutron spectra and the ambient dose equivalent were calculated inside the bunker of a 15 MV Varian linac model CLINAC iX. Calculations were carried out using Monte Carlo methods. Neutron spectra in the vicinity of isocentre show the presence of evaporation and knock-on neutrons produced by the source term, while epithermal and thermal neutron remain constant regardless the distance respect to isocentre, due to room return. Along the maze neutron spectra becomes softer as the detector moves along the maze. The ambient dose equivalent is decreased but do not follow the 1/r2 rule due to changes in the neutron spectra.

  12. Unmixing Space Object's Moderate Resolution Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dao, P.; Dentamaro, A.; Ryan, B.; Ryan, E.

    2013-09-01

    Many non-resolved techniques have been proposed and explored to infer space object's characteristics that may lend insight to object's identification and status. The latter attributes are hard to obtain in the absence of resolved imagery, as for objects not in Low Earth Orbit or for small-sized ones. Spectral unmixing is a non-resolved technique that derives an object's material composition from one or a series of spectra. While spectral unmixing techniques have been tested with space objects and spectrometric visible spectra, with spectral width smaller than 0.4 nanometers and over 100 spectral channels, its success against moderately resolved spectra has not been verified. An example of a moderate resolution sensor is that of a slit-less spectrograph which is desirable because of its simple implementation and arguably better temporal fidelity than systems with a slit. A moderate number of spectral bands are considered a challenge when the number of bands is much smaller than the number of material candidate spectra. We develop the Spectral Unmixing for Space Objects (SUSO) algorithm based on Sparse Recovery optimization techniques to deal with this challenge. Sparse recovery, a specialty area of Compressive Sensing, capitalizes on the knowledge that, while the number of candidate materials is expansive, the external surface of a satellite is effectively composed of a few representative materials. We discuss the technique and show the results of applying it on a number of simulated and measured spectra. Simulated signatures are in the Visible and reflective IR, and measured signatures were made with the Magdalena Ridge Observatory's slit-less spectrograph which is based on a CCD and grating combination mounted on a 2.4 m telescope. We studied the preservation of temporal information when a time series of spectra is analyzed by SUSO and the prospect of augmenting typical shape recovery with material attribution.

  13. Simulation of dielectric spectra of erythrocytes with various shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asami, Koji

    2009-07-01

    Dielectric spectra of erythrocyte suspensions were numerically simulated over a frequency range from 1 kHz to 100 MHz to study the effects of erythrocyte shape on the dielectric spectra. First, a biconcave-discoid model for normal erythrocytes or discocytes was compared with an equivalent oblate spheroid model. The two models showed similar dielectric spectra to each other, suggesting that the oblate spheroid model can be approximately used for discocytes. Second, dielectric spectra were simulated for discocytes deformed by osmotic cell swelling. The deformation resulted in the increase in relaxation intensity and the sharpening of spectrum shape. Finally, dielectric spectra were simulated for echinocytes, stomatocytes and sickle cells that are induced by chemical agents and diseases. The dielectric spectra of echinocytes and stomatocytes were similar to each other, being distinguishable from that of discocytes and quite different from that of sickle cells.

  14. Atomic lines in infrared spectra for ultracool dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyubchik, Y.; Jones, H. R. A.; Pavlenko, Y. V.; Viti, S.; Pickering, J. C.; Blackwell-Whitehead, R.

    2004-03-01

    We provide a set of atomic lines which are suitable for the description of ultracool dwarf spectra from 10 000 to 25 000 Å. This atomic linelist was made using both synthetic spectra calculations and existing atlases of infrared spectra of Arcturus and Sunspot umbra. We present plots which show the comparison of synthetic spectra and observed Arcturus and Sunspot umbral spectra for all atomic lines likely to be observable in high resolution infrared spectra. Figure 1 is only available in electronic form at http://www.edpsciences.org Tables 1 and 2 are only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/416/655

  15. Angels in Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stylianou, Xanthippi Cynthia

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the importance of the placement of action lines to show the direction of movement. The author shows some visuals of angels and discusses in details the texture of the wings, the hair and the clothing.

  16. Citizen's actions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The role played by individual citizens as consumers of energy was examined, with emphasis on studying ways in which their action could result in energy conservation. It was shown that there are ways that energy can be conserved in this way, with citizens acting either individually or in groups. The potential savings are significant, but the actual savings may be quite small. The citizens need to be motivated to save and to believe in a conservation ethic; developing such an ethic is difficult, and perhaps not responsive to the shotgun approach now being attempted. The true course of action may be to synthesize new societal structures that provide the maximum evolution of culture within the limitation of scarce energy resources.

  17. Actionable Nuggets

    PubMed Central

    McColl, Mary Ann; Aiken, Alice; Smith, Karen; McColl, Alexander; Green, Michael; Godwin, Marshall; Birtwhistle, Richard; Norman, Kathleen; Brankston, Gabrielle; Schaub, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To present the results of a pilot study of an innovative methodology for translating best evidence about spinal cord injury (SCI) for family practice. Design Review of Canadian and international peer-reviewed literature to develop SCI Actionable Nuggets, and a mixed qualitative-quantitative evaluation to determine Nuggets’ effect on physician knowledge of and attitudes toward patients with SCI, as well as practice accessibility. Setting Ontario, Newfoundland, and Australia. Participants Forty-nine primary care physicians. Methods Twenty Actionable Nuggets (pertaining to key health issues associated with long-term SCI) were developed. Nugget postcards were mailed weekly for 20 weeks to participating physicians. Prior knowledge of SCI was self-rated by participants; they also completed an online posttest to assess the information they gained from the Nugget postcards. Participants’ opinions about practice accessibility and accommodations for patients with SCI, as well as the acceptability and usefulness of Nuggets, were assessed in interviews. Main findings With Actionable Nuggets, participants’ knowledge of the health needs of patients with SCI improved, as knowledge increased from a self-rating of fair (58%) to very good (75%) based on posttest quiz results. The mean overall score for accessibility and accommodations in physicians’ practices was 72%. Participants’ awareness of the need for screening and disease prevention among this population also increased. The usefulness and acceptability of SCI Nugget postcards were rated as excellent. Conclusion Actionable Nuggets are a knowledge translation tool designed to provide family physicians with concise, practical information about the most prevalent and pressing primary care needs of patients with SCI. This evidence-based resource has been shown to be an excellent fit with information consumption processes in primary care. They were updated and adapted for distribution by the Canadian

  18. Relevance of Light Spectra to Growth of the Rearing Tiger Puffer Takifugu rubripes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Byeong-Hoon; Hur, Sung-Pyo; Hur, Sang-Woo; Lee, Chi-Hoon; Lee, Young-Don

    2016-01-01

    In fish, light (photoperiod, intensity and spectra) is main regulator in many physiological actions includinggrowth. We investigate the effect of light spectra on the somatic growth and growth-related gene expression in the rearing tiger puffer. Fish was reared under different light spectra (blue, green and red) for 8 weeks. Fish body weight and total length were promoted when reared under green light condition than red light condition. Expression of somatostatins (ss1 and ss2) in brain were showed higher expression under red light condition than green light condition. The ss3 mRNA was observed only higher expression in blue light condition. Expression of growth hormone (gh) in pituitary was detected no different levels between experimental groups. However, the fish of green light condition group was showed more high weight gain and feed efficiency than other light condition groups. Our present results suggest that somatic growth of tiger puffer is induced under green light condition because of inhibiting ss mRNA expression in brain by effect of green wavelength. PMID:27294208

  19. Relevance of Light Spectra to Growth of the Rearing Tiger Puffer Takifugu rubripes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byeong-Hoon; Hur, Sung-Pyo; Hur, Sang-Woo; Lee, Chi-Hoon; Lee, Young-Don

    2016-03-01

    In fish, light (photoperiod, intensity and spectra) is main regulator in many physiological actions includinggrowth. We investigate the effect of light spectra on the somatic growth and growth-related gene expression in the rearing tiger puffer. Fish was reared under different light spectra (blue, green and red) for 8 weeks. Fish body weight and total length were promoted when reared under green light condition than red light condition. Expression of somatostatins (ss1 and ss2) in brain were showed higher expression under red light condition than green light condition. The ss3 mRNA was observed only higher expression in blue light condition. Expression of growth hormone (gh) in pituitary was detected no different levels between experimental groups. However, the fish of green light condition group was showed more high weight gain and feed efficiency than other light condition groups. Our present results suggest that somatic growth of tiger puffer is induced under green light condition because of inhibiting ss mRNA expression in brain by effect of green wavelength. PMID:27294208

  20. Temporal Evolution of Solar Energetic Particle Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doran, Donald J.; Dalla, Silvia

    2016-08-01

    During solar flares and coronal mass ejections, Solar Energetic Particles (SEPs) may be released into the interplanetary medium and near-Earth locations. The energy spectra of SEP events at 1 AU are typically averaged over the entire event or studied in a few snapshots. In this article we analyze the time evolution of the energy spectra of four large selected SEP events using a large number of snapshots. We use a multi-spacecraft and multi-instrument approach for the observations, obtained over a wide SEP energy range. We find large differences in the spectra at the beginning of the events as measured by different instruments. We show that over time, a wave-like structure is observed traveling through the spectra from the highest energies to the lowest energies, creating an "arch" shape that then straightens into a power law later in the event, after times on the order of 10 hours. We discuss the processes that determine SEP intensities and their role in shaping the spectral time evolution.

  1. Plan Showing Cross Bracing Under Upper Stringers, Typical Section Showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Plan Showing Cross Bracing Under Upper Stringers, Typical Section Showing End Framing, Plan Showing Cross Bracing Under Lower Stringers, End Elevation - Covered Bridge, Spanning Contoocook River, Hopkinton, Merrimack County, NH

  2. Energy spectra in elasto-inertial turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valente, P. C.; da Silva, C. B.; Pinho, F. T.

    2016-07-01

    Direct numerical simulations of statistically steady homogeneous isotropic turbulence in viscoelastic fluids described by the FENE-P model are presented. Emphasis is given to large polymer relaxation times compared to the eddy turnover time, which is a regime recently termed elasto-inertial turbulence. In this regime the polymers are ineffective in dissipating kinetic energy but they play a lead role in transferring kinetic energy to the small solvent scales which turns out to be concomitant with the depletion of the usual non-linear energy cascade. However, we show that the non-linear interactions are still highly active, but they lead to no net downscale energy transfer because the forward and reversed energy cascades are nearly balanced. Finally, we show that the tendency for a steeper elasto-inertial power-law spectra is reversed for large polymer relaxation times and the spectra tend towards the usual k-5/3 functional form.

  3. First Infrared Predissociation Spectra of He-TAGGED Protonated Primary Alcohols at 4 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoffels, Alexander; Redlich, Britta; Oomens, J.; Asvany, Oskar; Brünken, Sandra; Jusko, Pavol; Thorwirth, Sven; Schlemmer, Stephan

    2015-06-01

    Cryogenic multipole ion traps have become popular devices in the development of sensitive action-spectroscopic techniques. The low ion temperature leads to enhanced spectral resolution, and less congested spectra. In the early 2000s, a 22-pole ion trap was coupled to the Free-Electron Laser for Infrared eXperiments (FELIX), yielding infrared Laser Induced Reaction (LIR) spectra of the molecular ions C_2H_2+ and CH_5+. This pioneering work showed the great opportunities combining cold mass-selected molecular ions with widely tunable broadband IR radiation. In the past year a cryogenic (T>3.9 K) 22-pole ion trap designed and built in Cologne (FELion) has been successfully coupled to FELIX, which in its current configuration provides continuously tunable infrared radiation from 3 μm to 150 μm, hence allowing to probe characteristic vibrational spectra in the so-called "fingerprint region" with a sufficient spectral energy density also allowing for multiple photon processes (IR-MPD). Here we present the first infrared predissociation spectra of He-tagged protonated methanol and ethanol (MeOH_2+/EtOH_2+) stored at 4 K. These vibrational spectra were recorded with both a commercial OPO and FELIX, covering a total spectral range from 3700 wn to 550 wn at a spectral resolution of a few wn. The H-O-H stretching and bending modes clearly distinguish the protonated alcohols from their neutral analoga. For EtOH_2+, also IR-MPD spectra of the bare ion could be recorded. The symmetric and antisymmetric H-O-H stretching bands at around 3 μm show no significant shift within the given spectral resolution in comparison to those recorded with He predissociation, indicating a rather small perturbation caused by the attached He. The vibrational bands were assigned using quantum-chemical calculations on different levels of theory. The computed frequencies correspond favorably to the experimental spectra. Subsequent high resolution measurements could lead to a better structural

  4. Action, agency and responsibility.

    PubMed

    Frith, Chris D

    2014-03-01

    In a series of experiments Marc Jeannerod revealed that we have very little awareness of the details and causes of our actions. We are, however, vividly aware of being in control of our actions and this gives us a sense of responsibility. These feelings arise, first, from intentional binding which creates a perception of agency, linking an intentional action to its outcome and, second, from the counterfactual reasoning that we could have chosen some other action. These feelings of responsibility play a critical role in creating social cohesion since they allow people to be held to account for deliberate antisocial behaviour. Jeannerod's studies also showed that we are unaware of how little we know about our actions and so are happy to make up stories about the nature and causes of our behaviour. These stories often do not correspond with the underlying cognitive and neural processes, but they can be changed through instructions and through discussion with others. Our experience of responsibility for action emerges during our upbringing through exposure to our culture. This creates consensus about the causes of behaviour, but not necessarily accuracy. PMID:24036357

  5. Conscious Action/Zombie Action

    PubMed Central

    Shepherd, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Abstract I argue that the neural realizers of experiences of trying (that is, experiences of directing effort towards the satisfaction of an intention) are not distinct from the neural realizers of actual trying (that is, actual effort directed towards the satisfaction of an intention). I then ask how experiences of trying might relate to the perceptual experiences one has while acting. First, I assess recent zombie action arguments regarding conscious visual experience, and I argue that contrary to what some have claimed, conscious visual experience plays a causal role for action control in some circumstances. Second, I propose a multimodal account of the experience of acting. According to this account, the experience of acting is (at the very least) a temporally extended, co‐conscious collection of agentive and perceptual experiences, functionally integrated and structured both by multimodal perceptual processing as well as by what an agent is, at the time, trying to do. PMID:27667859

  6. Conscious Action/Zombie Action

    PubMed Central

    Shepherd, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Abstract I argue that the neural realizers of experiences of trying (that is, experiences of directing effort towards the satisfaction of an intention) are not distinct from the neural realizers of actual trying (that is, actual effort directed towards the satisfaction of an intention). I then ask how experiences of trying might relate to the perceptual experiences one has while acting. First, I assess recent zombie action arguments regarding conscious visual experience, and I argue that contrary to what some have claimed, conscious visual experience plays a causal role for action control in some circumstances. Second, I propose a multimodal account of the experience of acting. According to this account, the experience of acting is (at the very least) a temporally extended, co‐conscious collection of agentive and perceptual experiences, functionally integrated and structured both by multimodal perceptual processing as well as by what an agent is, at the time, trying to do.

  7. Reanalysis of Tyrannosaurus rex Mass Spectra.

    PubMed

    Bern, Marshall; Phinney, Brett S; Goldberg, David

    2009-09-01

    Asara et al. reported the detection of collagen peptides in a 68-million-year-old Tyrannosaurus rex bone by shotgun proteomics. This finding has been called into question as a possible statistical artifact. We reanalyze Asara et al.'s tandem mass spectra using a different search engine and different statistical tools. Our reanalysis shows a sample containing common laboratory contaminants, soil bacteria, and bird-like hemoglobin and collagen.

  8. Learning to take actions

    SciTech Connect

    Khardon, R.

    1996-12-31

    We formalize a model for supervised learning of action strategies in dynamic stochastic domains, and show that pac-learning results on Occam algorithms hold in this model as well. We then identify a particularly useful bias for action strategies based on production rule systems. We show that a subset of production rule systems, including rules in predicate calculus style, small hidden state, and unobserved support predicates, is properly learnable. The bias we introduce enables the learning algorithm to invent the recursive support predicates which are used in the action strategy, and to reconstruct the internal state of the strategy. It is also shown that hierarchical strategies are learnable if a helpful teacher is available, but that otherwise the problem is computationally hard.

  9. The shape of action.

    PubMed

    Hard, Bridgette Martin; Recchia, Gabriel; Tversky, Barbara

    2011-11-01

    How do people understand the everyday, yet intricate, behaviors that unfold around them? In the present research, we explored this by presenting viewers with self-paced slideshows of everyday activities and recording looking times, subjective segmentation (breakpoints) into action units, and slide-to-slide physical change. A detailed comparison of the joint time courses of these variables showed that looking time and physical change were locally maximal at breakpoints and greater for higher level action units than for lower level units. Even when slideshows were scrambled, breakpoints were regarded longer and were more physically different from ordinary moments, showing that breakpoints are distinct even out of context. Breakpoints are bridges: from one action to another, from one level to another, and from perception to conception.

  10. An Interactive Gallery of Planetary Nebula Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwitter, K. B.; Henry, R. B. C.

    2002-12-01

    We have created a website containing high-quality moderate-resolution spectra of 88 planetary nebulae (PNe) from 3600 to 9600 Å, obtained at KPNO and CTIO. Spectra are displayed in a zoomable window, and there are templates available that show wavelength and ion identifications. In addition to the spectra themselves, the website also contains a brief discussion of PNe as astronomical objects and as contributors to our understanding of stellar evolution, and a table with atlas information for each object along with a link to an image. This table can be re-ordered by object name, galactic or equatorial coordinates, distance from the sun, the galactic center, or the galactic plane. We envision that this website, which concentrates a large amount of data in one place, will be of interest to a variety of users. PN researchers might need to check the spectrum of a particular object of interest; the non-specialist astronomer might simply be interested in perusing such a collection of spectra; and finally, teachers of introductory astronomy can use this database to illustrate basic principles of atomic physics and radiation. To encourage such use, we have written two simple exercises at a basic level to introduce beginning astronomy students to the wealth of information that PN spectra contain. We are grateful to Adam Wang of the Williams College OIT and to his summer student teams who worked on various apects of the implementation of this website. This work has been supported by NSF grant AST-9819123 and by Williams College and the University of Oklahoma.

  11. Savannah River Site disaggregated seismic spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Stephenson, D.E.

    1993-02-01

    The objective of this technical note is to characterize seismic ground motion at the Savannah River Site (SRS) by postulated earthquakes that may impact facilities at the site. This task is accomplished by reviewing the deterministic and probabilistic assessments of the seismic hazard to establish the earthquakes that control the hazard to establish the earthquakes that control the hazard at the site and then evaluate the associated seismic ground motions in terms of response spectra. For engineering design criteria of earthquake-resistant structures, response spectra serve the function of characterizing ground motions as a function of period or frequency. These motions then provide the input parameters that are used in the analysis of structural response. Because they use the maximum response, the response spectra are an inherently conservative design tool. Response spectra are described in terms of amplitude, duration, and frequency content, and these are related to source parameters, travel path, and site conditions. Studies by a number of investigators have shown by statistical analysis that for different magnitudes the response spectrum values are different for differing periods. These facts support Jennings' position that using different shapes of design spectra for earthquakes of different magnitudes and travel paths is a better practice than employing a single, general-purpose shape. All seismic ground motion characterization results indicate that the PGA is controlled by a local event with M[sub w] < 6 and R < 30km. The results also show that lower frequencies are controlled by a larger, more distant event, typically the Charleston source. The PGA of 0.2 g, based originally on the Blume study, is consistent with LLNL report UCRL-15910 (1990) and with the DOE position on LLNL/EPRI.

  12. Savannah River Site disaggregated seismic spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Stephenson, D.E.

    1993-02-01

    The objective of this technical note is to characterize seismic ground motion at the Savannah River Site (SRS) by postulated earthquakes that may impact facilities at the site. This task is accomplished by reviewing the deterministic and probabilistic assessments of the seismic hazard to establish the earthquakes that control the hazard to establish the earthquakes that control the hazard at the site and then evaluate the associated seismic ground motions in terms of response spectra. For engineering design criteria of earthquake-resistant structures, response spectra serve the function of characterizing ground motions as a function of period or frequency. These motions then provide the input parameters that are used in the analysis of structural response. Because they use the maximum response, the response spectra are an inherently conservative design tool. Response spectra are described in terms of amplitude, duration, and frequency content, and these are related to source parameters, travel path, and site conditions. Studies by a number of investigators have shown by statistical analysis that for different magnitudes the response spectrum values are different for differing periods. These facts support Jennings` position that using different shapes of design spectra for earthquakes of different magnitudes and travel paths is a better practice than employing a single, general-purpose shape. All seismic ground motion characterization results indicate that the PGA is controlled by a local event with M{sub w} < 6 and R < 30km. The results also show that lower frequencies are controlled by a larger, more distant event, typically the Charleston source. The PGA of 0.2 g, based originally on the Blume study, is consistent with LLNL report UCRL-15910 (1990) and with the DOE position on LLNL/EPRI.

  13. Improved predictions of reactor antineutrino spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Th. A.; Lhuillier, D.; Letourneau, A.

    2011-05-15

    Precise predictions of the antineutrino spectra emitted by nuclear reactors is a key ingredient in measurements of reactor neutrino oscillations as well as in recent applications to the surveillance of power plants in the context of nonproliferation of nuclear weapons. We report new calculations including the latest information from nuclear databases and a detailed error budget. The first part of this work is the so-called ab initio approach where the total antineutrino spectrum is built from the sum of all {beta} branches of all fission products predicted by an evolution code. Systematic effects and missing information in nuclear databases lead to final relative uncertainties in the 10-20% range. A prediction of the antineutrino spectrum associated with the fission of {sup 238}U is given based on this ab initio method. For the dominant isotopes we developed a more accurate approach combining information from nuclear databases and reference electron spectra associated with the fission of {sup 235}U, {sup 239}Pu, and {sup 241}Pu, measured at Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL) in the 1980s. We show how the anchor point of the measured total {beta} spectra can be used to suppress the uncertainty in nuclear databases while taking advantage of all the information they contain. We provide new reference antineutrino spectra for {sup 235}U, {sup 239}Pu, and {sup 241}Pu isotopes in the 2-8 MeV range. While the shapes of the spectra and their uncertainties are comparable to those of the previous analysis of the ILL data, the normalization is shifted by about +3% on average. In the perspective of the reanalysis of past experiments and direct use of these results by upcoming oscillation experiments, we discuss the various sources of errors and their correlations as well as the corrections induced by off-equilibrium effects.

  14. Raman spectra of carotenoids in natural products.

    PubMed

    Withnall, Robert; Chowdhry, Babur Z; Silver, Jack; Edwards, Howell G M; de Oliveira, Luiz F C

    2003-08-01

    Resonance Raman spectra of naturally occurring carotenoids have been obtained from nautilus, periwinkle (Littorina littorea) and clam shells under 514.5 nm excitation and these spectra are compared with the resonance Raman spectra obtained in situ from tomatoes, carrots, red peppers and saffron. The tomatoes, carrots and red peppers gave rise to resonance Raman spectra exhibiting a nu1 band at ca. 1520 cm(-1), in keeping with its assignment to carotenoids with ca. nine conjugated carbon-carbon double bonds in their main chains, whereas the resonance Raman spectrum of saffron showed a nu1 band at 1537 cm(-1) which can be assigned to crocetin, having seven conjugated carbon-carbon double bonds. A correlation between nu1 wavenumber location and effective conjugated chain length has been used to interpret the data obtained from the shells, and the wavenumber position (1522 cm(-1)) of the nu1 band of the carotenoid in the orange clam shell suggests that it contains nine conjugated double bonds in the main chain. However, the black periwinkle and nautilus shells exhibit nu1 bands at 1504 and 1496 cm(-1), respectively. On the basis of the correlation between nu1 wavenumber location and effective conjugated chain length, this indicates that they contain carotenoids with longer conjugated chains, the former having ca. 11 double bonds and the latter ca. 13 or even more. Raman spectra of the nautilus, periwinkle and clam shells also exhibited a strong band at 1085 cm(-1) and a doublet with components at 701 and 705 cm(-1), which can be assigned to biogenic calcium carbonate in the aragonite crystallographic form. PMID:12909134

  15. Raman spectra of carotenoids in natural products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Withnall, Robert; Chowdhry, Babur Z.; Silver, Jack; Edwards, Howell G. M.; de Oliveira, Luiz F. C.

    2003-08-01

    Resonance Raman spectra of naturally occurring carotenoids have been obtained from nautilus, periwinkle ( Littorina littorea) and clam shells under 514.5 nm excitation and these spectra are compared with the resonance Raman spectra obtained in situ from tomatoes, carrots, red peppers and saffron. The tomatoes, carrots and red peppers gave rise to resonance Raman spectra exhibiting a ν1 band at ca. 1520 cm -1, in keeping with its assignment to carotenoids with ca. nine conjugated carboncarbon double bonds in their main chains, whereas the resonance Raman spectrum of saffron showed a ν1 band at 1537 cm -1 which can be assigned to crocetin, having seven conjugated carboncarbon double bonds. A correlation between ν1 wavenumber location and effective conjugated chain length has been used to interpret the data obtained from the shells, and the wavenumber position (1522 cm -1) of the ν1 band of the carotenoid in the orange clam shell suggests that it contains nine conjugated double bonds in the main chain. However, the black periwinkle and nautilus shells exhibit ν1 bands at 1504 and 1496 cm -1, respectively. On the basis of the correlation between ν1 wavenumber location and effective conjugated chain length, this indicates that they contain carotenoids with longer conjugated chains, the former having ca. 11 double bonds and the latter ca. 13 or even more. Raman spectra of the nautilus, periwinkle and clam shells also exhibited a strong band at 1085 cm -1 and a doublet with components at 701 and 705 cm -1, which can be assigned to biogenic calcium carbonate in the aragonite crystallographic form.

  16. Improved predictions of reactor antineutrino spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Th. A.; Lhuillier, D.; Fallot, M.; Letourneau, A.; Cormon, S.; Fechner, M.; Giot, L.; Lasserre, T.; Martino, J.; Mention, G.; Porta, A.; Yermia, F.

    2011-05-01

    Precise predictions of the antineutrino spectra emitted by nuclear reactors is a key ingredient in measurements of reactor neutrino oscillations as well as in recent applications to the surveillance of power plants in the context of nonproliferation of nuclear weapons. We report new calculations including the latest information from nuclear databases and a detailed error budget. The first part of this work is the so-called ab initio approach where the total antineutrino spectrum is built from the sum of all β branches of all fission products predicted by an evolution code. Systematic effects and missing information in nuclear databases lead to final relative uncertainties in the 10-20% range. A prediction of the antineutrino spectrum associated with the fission of U238 is given based on this ab initio method. For the dominant isotopes we developed a more accurate approach combining information from nuclear databases and reference electron spectra associated with the fission of U235, Pu239, and Pu241, measured at Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL) in the 1980s. We show how the anchor point of the measured total β spectra can be used to suppress the uncertainty in nuclear databases while taking advantage of all the information they contain. We provide new reference antineutrino spectra for U235, Pu239, and Pu241 isotopes in the 2-8 MeV range. While the shapes of the spectra and their uncertainties are comparable to those of the previous analysis of the ILL data, the normalization is shifted by about +3% on average. In the perspective of the reanalysis of past experiments and direct use of these results by upcoming oscillation experiments, we discuss the various sources of errors and their correlations as well as the corrections induced by off-equilibrium effects.

  17. Action Learning: Avoiding Conflict or Enabling Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corley, Aileen; Thorne, Ann

    2006-01-01

    Action learning is based on the premise that action and learning are inextricably entwined and it is this potential, to enable action, which has contributed to the growth of action learning within education and management development programmes. However has this growth in action learning lead to an evolution or a dilution of Revan's classical…

  18. Optimal construction of theoretical spectra for MS/MS spectra identification

    SciTech Connect

    Fridman, Tamah; Protopopescu, Vladimir A; Hurst, Gregory {Greg} B; Borziak, Andrei; Gorin, Andrey A

    2005-01-01

    We derive the optimal number of peaks (defined as the minimum number that provides the required efficiency of spectra identification) in the theoretical spectra as a function of: (i) the experimental accuracy, , of the measured ratio m/z; (ii) experimental spectrum density; (iii) size of the database; (iv) number of peaks in the theoretical spectra; and (v) types of ions that the peaks represent. We show that if theoretical spectra are constructed including b and y ions alone, then for =0.5, which is typical for high throughput data, peptide chains of 8 amino acids or longer can be identified based on the positions of peaks alone, at a rate of false identification below 1%. To discriminate between shorter peptides, additional (e.g., intensity-inferred) information is necessary. We derive the dependence of the probability of false identification on the number of peaks in the theoretical spectra and on the types of ions that the peaks represent. Our results suggest that the class of mass spectrum identification problems for which more elaborate development of fragmentation rules (such as intensity model, etc.) is required, can be reduced to the problems that involve homologous peptides.

  19. Complex Spectra in Fusion Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Hellermann, M. G.; Bertschinger, G.; Biel, W.; Giroud, C.; Jaspers, R.; Jupen, C.; Marchuk, O.; O'Mullane, M.; Summers, H. P.; Whiteford, A.; Zastrow, K.-D.

    2005-01-01

    The need for quantitative evaluation of complex line emission spectra as observed in hot fusion plasmas initiated a challenging development of sophisticated interpretation tools based on integrating advanced atomic modelling with detailed treatment of the plasma environment. The successful merging of the two worlds has led to routine diagnostic procedures which have contributed enormously to the understanding of underlying plasma processes and also to a wide acceptance of spectroscopy as a reliable diagnostic method. In this paper three characteristic types of spectra of current and continuing interest are presented. The first is that of medium/heavy species with many ionisation stages revealed in survey VUV and XUV spectra. Such species occur as control gases, as wall materials, as ablated heavy species and possible as layered wall dopants for monitoring erosion. The spectra are complex with line-like and quasi-continuum regions and are amenable to advanced `pattern recognition' methods. The second type is of few electron, highly ionised systems observed as line-of-sight integrated passive emission spectra in the soft x-ray region. They are analysed successfully in terms of plasma parameters through matching of observation with predicted synthetic spectra. Examples used here include highly resolved helium-like emission spectra of argon, iron and titanium observed on the tokamaks TEXTOR and Tore Supra. The third type, and the emphasis of this work, comprises spectra linked to active beam spectroscopy, that is, charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) and beam emission spectroscopy (BES). In this case, a complex spectrum is again composed of a (usually) dominating active spectrum and an underlying passive emission spectrum. Its analysis requires modelling of both active and passive features. Examples used here are from the CXRS diagnostic at JET and TEXTOR. They display characteristic features of the main light impurity ions (C+6, He+2, N+7, Ne+10 and Ar+18

  20. Analysis of photometric spectra of 17 meteors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millman, P. M.

    1982-01-01

    The initial phase of the photometry which involved 17 meteor spectra consisting of eight Geminid spectra, six Orionid spectra and three Eta Aquarid spectra is discussed. Among these 17 spectra it is found that the Geminid spectra are of the best quality and are used for the identification of the atomic lines and molecular bands that normally appear on video tape spectra. The data from the Geminid records are used for developing calibration techniques in photometry. The Orionid and Eta Aquarid spectra are chosen for early analysis because of the current interest in all physical and chemical data relating to Comet Halley.

  1. Thermal Infrared Spectra of Experimentally Shocked Basalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, J. R.; Horz, F.

    2003-12-01

    We acquired thermal infrared (3-40 microns) emissivity and hemispherical reflectance spectra of experimentally shocked samples of a fine-grained basalt from Grand Falls, AZ to document the spectral effects of shock as a function of increasing shock pressures (17-57 GPa). This sample contains 25% pyroxene, 20% olivine, and 45% feldspar, making it a suitable analog to the Surface Type 1 (basalt) observed in Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) data of Mars. Reflectance data (3-14 microns) were acquired using a Nexus 470 FTIR spectrometer at the HIGP, University of Hawaii, and emission spectra (5-40 microns) were acquired using a Nicolet Nexus 670 emission spectrometer at Arizona State University. These data complement similar previous measurements of experimentally shocked plagioclase and pyroxene relevant to interpreting spectra provided by TES. The samples were shocked using the 25-mm barrel gun at Johnson Space Center and provided ~400 mg per sample. Large (2-10 mm) chips of recovered material were separated from the samples and washed to remove clinging fines, and the residual was powdered to provide a consistent grain size ( ˜20 microns). Spectra were obtained of both the chips and the powder samples. Results for the chips show a shift in band positions in the 900-1200 wavenumber (wn) region compared to unshocked samples, consistent with the structural degradation of feldspar and subsequent formation of maskelynite and glass. The development of a band near 460 wn at high pressures is also consistent with glass formation in feldspars. Conversely, absorptions related to pyroxene remain present even at high pressures, consistent with previous work. Results for the powders show little variations with increasing pressure except for the loss of minor transparency features in the 800-900 wn region. Additional visible/near-infrared (0.35-2.50 microns) measurements of the powdered basalt samples also will be acquired at the RELAB facility. Future work will include

  2. The minimalist grammar of action

    PubMed Central

    Pastra, Katerina; Aloimonos, Yiannis

    2012-01-01

    Language and action have been found to share a common neural basis and in particular a common ‘syntax’, an analogous hierarchical and compositional organization. While language structure analysis has led to the formulation of different grammatical formalisms and associated discriminative or generative computational models, the structure of action is still elusive and so are the related computational models. However, structuring action has important implications on action learning and generalization, in both human cognition research and computation. In this study, we present a biologically inspired generative grammar of action, which employs the structure-building operations and principles of Chomsky's Minimalist Programme as a reference model. In this grammar, action terminals combine hierarchically into temporal sequences of actions of increasing complexity; the actions are bound with the involved tools and affected objects and are governed by certain goals. We show, how the tool role and the affected-object role of an entity within an action drives the derivation of the action syntax in this grammar and controls recursion, merge and move, the latter being mechanisms that manifest themselves not only in human language, but in human action too. PMID:22106430

  3. The minimalist grammar of action.

    PubMed

    Pastra, Katerina; Aloimonos, Yiannis

    2012-01-12

    Language and action have been found to share a common neural basis and in particular a common 'syntax', an analogous hierarchical and compositional organization. While language structure analysis has led to the formulation of different grammatical formalisms and associated discriminative or generative computational models, the structure of action is still elusive and so are the related computational models. However, structuring action has important implications on action learning and generalization, in both human cognition research and computation. In this study, we present a biologically inspired generative grammar of action, which employs the structure-building operations and principles of Chomsky's Minimalist Programme as a reference model. In this grammar, action terminals combine hierarchically into temporal sequences of actions of increasing complexity; the actions are bound with the involved tools and affected objects and are governed by certain goals. We show, how the tool role and the affected-object role of an entity within an action drives the derivation of the action syntax in this grammar and controls recursion, merge and move, the latter being mechanisms that manifest themselves not only in human language, but in human action too.

  4. [Variations of IR-spectra of three coating materials before and after spraying on urea fertilizer].

    PubMed

    Liu, Xing-bin; Chen, Li-jun; Wu, Zhi-jie; Zhang, Guang-na

    2009-09-01

    Coated fertilizer is a hot spot in the domain of fertilizer research. Related researches mainly focused on the action mechanisms of coating materials in controlling the nutrient release from coated fertilizers, but less information is available on the structural variation of the coating materials before and after spraying on fertilizers, which is the key to whether we can directly use coating materials to extrapolate its mechanisms in controlling coated fertilizers' nutrient release. With polylactic acid (PLA), poly (butynelenes succinate) (PBS), and polycarbonate (PC) as test materials, the variations of their IR spectra before and after spraying on urea fertilizer were determined, which was aimed to supply theoretical basis for further studying the action mechanisms of coating materials in controlling coated fertilizers nutrient release. The results showed that PLA and PC had less variation in their IR spectra before and after spraying on urea fertilizer, while PBS acted in reverse, suggesting that the former two coating materials could be directly used for studying the patterns of nutrient release from coated fertilizers. PMID:19950629

  5. [Variations of IR-spectra of three coating materials before and after spraying on urea fertilizer].

    PubMed

    Liu, Xing-bin; Chen, Li-jun; Wu, Zhi-jie; Zhang, Guang-na

    2009-09-01

    Coated fertilizer is a hot spot in the domain of fertilizer research. Related researches mainly focused on the action mechanisms of coating materials in controlling the nutrient release from coated fertilizers, but less information is available on the structural variation of the coating materials before and after spraying on fertilizers, which is the key to whether we can directly use coating materials to extrapolate its mechanisms in controlling coated fertilizers' nutrient release. With polylactic acid (PLA), poly (butynelenes succinate) (PBS), and polycarbonate (PC) as test materials, the variations of their IR spectra before and after spraying on urea fertilizer were determined, which was aimed to supply theoretical basis for further studying the action mechanisms of coating materials in controlling coated fertilizers nutrient release. The results showed that PLA and PC had less variation in their IR spectra before and after spraying on urea fertilizer, while PBS acted in reverse, suggesting that the former two coating materials could be directly used for studying the patterns of nutrient release from coated fertilizers.

  6. Haloes Seen In UVIS Reflectance Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, Larry W.; Bradley, E.; Colwell, J.; Sremcevic, M.

    2012-10-01

    UVIS SOI reflectance spectra show bright ‘haloes’ around the locations of some of the strongest resonances in Saturn’s A ring (Esposito etal 2005). UV spectra constrain the size and composition of the icy ring particles (Bradley etal 2010, 2012). We investigate the Janus 4:3, 5:3, 6:5 and Mimas 5:3 inner Lindblad resonances as well as at the Mimas 5:3 vertical resonance (bending wave location). Models of ring particle regolith evolution (Elliott and Esposito 2010) indicate the deeper regolith is made of older and purer ice. The strong resonances cause streamline crowding (Lewis and Stewart 2005) which damps the interparticle velocity, allowing temporary clumps to grow, which in turn increase the velocity, eroding the clumps and releasing smaller particles and regolith (see the predator-prey model of Esposito etal 2012). This cyclic behavior, driven by the resonant perturbation from the moon, can yield collision velocities greater than 1m/sec, sufficient to erode the aggregates (Blum 2006), exposing older, purer materials. Thus, the radial location of the strongest resonances can be where we find both large aggregates and disrupted fragments, in a balance maintained by the periodic moon forcing. If this stirring exposes older, and purer ice, the velocity threshold for eroding the aggregates can explain why only the strongest Lindblad resonances show haloes. UVIS spectra can determine the relative contributions of particle size and purity at these locations, for comparison to estimates from the regolith evolution models.

  7. Newmark design spectra considering earthquake magnitudes and site categories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bo; Xie, Wei-Chau; Pandey, M. D.

    2016-09-01

    Newmark design spectra have been implemented in many building codes, especially in building codes for critical structures. Previous studies show that Newmark design spectra exhibit lower amplitudes at high frequencies and larger amplitudes at low frequencies in comparison with spectra developed by statistical methods. To resolve this problem, this study considers three suites of ground motions recorded at three types of sites. Using these ground motions, influences of the shear-wave velocity, earthquake magnitudes, source-to-site distances on the ratios of ground motion parameters are studied, and spectrum amplification factors are statistically calculated. Spectral bounds for combinations of three site categories and two cases of earthquake magnitudes are estimated. Site design spectrum coefficients for the three site categories considering earthquake magnitudes are established. The problems of Newmark design spectra could be resolved by using the site design spectrum coefficients to modify the spectral values of Newmark design spectra in the acceleration sensitive, velocity sensitive, and displacement sensitive regions.

  8. Recovery of fluctuation spectrum evolution from tomographic shear spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Bonometto, Silvio A.; Mezzetti, Marino E-mail: mezzetti@oats.inaf.it

    2013-05-01

    Forthcoming large angle surveys are planned to obtain high precision tomographic shear data. In principle, they will allow us to recover the spectra of matter density fluctuation, at various redshift, through the inversion of the expressions yielding shear spectra from fluctuation spectra. This was discussed in previous work, where SVD techniques for matrix inversion were also shown to be the optimal tool to this aim. Here we show the significant improvements obtainable by using a 7 bin tomography, as allowed by future Euclid data, and discuss error propagation from shear to fluctuation spectra. We find that the technique is a promising tool, namely for the analysis of baryon physics through high–l shear spectra and to test the consistency between expansion rate and fluctuation growth.

  9. Observations of silicate reststrahlen bands in lunar infrared spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potter, A. E., Jr.; Morgan, T. H.

    1982-01-01

    Thermal emission spectra of three lunar sites (Apollo 11, Descartes Formation, and Tycho central peak) are measured in the 8-14 micron spectral range. Transmission and instrument effects are accounted for by forming ratios of the Descartes and Tycho spectra to the Apollo 11 spectrum. The ratio spectra are compared with ratios of published laboratory spectra of returned lunar samples and also with ratio spectra calculated using the Aronson-Emslie (1975) model. The comparisons show pyroxene bands in the Descartes ratio spectrum and plagioclase bands in the Tycho ratio spectrum. The Tycho spectrum is found to be consistent with the existence of fine plagioclase dust (approximately 1 micron) at the rock surface and a higher-than-usual sodium content of the plagioclase.

  10. Reduction of multielement mass spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Russ, G.P. III; Caffee, M.W.; Hudson, G.B.; Storch, N.A.

    1990-06-29

    Even though the spectra obtained by inductively coupled plasma source spectrometry (ICP-MS) are relatively simple, their interpretation can be complicated by the presence of molecular and isobaric interferants. To the extent that isotopic abundances are known and constant, one can treat observed spectra as sums of known components. A linear decomposition approach for determining the concentrations of the components in a spectrum and correctly propagating uncertainties is presented. This technique differs from linear regression in that an exact fit is made to a subset of isotopes and goodness-of-fit is evaluated from the deviations between the predicted and measured intensities of the other, unfit isotopes. This technique can be applied to a wide range of spectral fitting problems. In this paper, its applicability to ICP-MS spectra is used to demonstrate the use and utility of the technique. 2 refs., 9 figs.

  11. Photon spectra from WIMP annihilation

    SciTech Connect

    Cembranos, J. A. R.; Cruz-Dombriz, A. de la; Dobado, A.; Maroto, A. L.; Lineros, R. A.

    2011-04-15

    If the present dark matter in the Universe annihilates into standard model particles, it must contribute to the fluxes of cosmic rays that are detected on the Earth and, in particular, to the observed gamma-ray fluxes. The magnitude of such a contribution depends on the particular dark matter candidate, but certain features of the produced photon spectra may be analyzed in a rather model-independent fashion. In this work we provide the complete photon spectra coming from WIMP annihilation into standard model particle-antiparticle pairs obtained by extensive Monte Carlo simulations. We present results for each individual annihilation channel and provide analytical fitting formulas for the different spectra for a wide range of WIMP masses.

  12. Creating semiconductor metafilms with designer absorption spectra.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soo Jin; Fan, Pengyu; Kang, Ju-Hyung; Brongersma, Mark L

    2015-01-01

    The optical properties of semiconductors are typically considered intrinsic and fixed. Here we leverage the rapid developments in the field of optical metamaterials to create ultrathin semiconductor metafilms with designer absorption spectra. We show how such metafilms can be constructed by placing one or more types of high-index semiconductor antennas into a dense array with subwavelength spacings. It is argued that the large absorption cross-section of semiconductor antennas and their weak near-field coupling open a unique opportunity to create strongly absorbing metafilms whose spectral absorption properties directly reflect those of the individual antennas. Using experiments and simulations, we demonstrate that near-unity absorption at one or more target wavelengths of interest can be achieved in a sub-50-nm-thick metafilm using judiciously sized and spaced Ge nanobeams. The ability to create semiconductor metafilms with custom absorption spectra opens up new design strategies for planar optoelectronic devices and solar cells. PMID:26184335

  13. Creating semiconductor metafilms with designer absorption spectra

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soo Jin; Fan, Pengyu; Kang, Ju-Hyung; Brongersma, Mark L.

    2015-01-01

    The optical properties of semiconductors are typically considered intrinsic and fixed. Here we leverage the rapid developments in the field of optical metamaterials to create ultrathin semiconductor metafilms with designer absorption spectra. We show how such metafilms can be constructed by placing one or more types of high-index semiconductor antennas into a dense array with subwavelength spacings. It is argued that the large absorption cross-section of semiconductor antennas and their weak near-field coupling open a unique opportunity to create strongly absorbing metafilms whose spectral absorption properties directly reflect those of the individual antennas. Using experiments and simulations, we demonstrate that near-unity absorption at one or more target wavelengths of interest can be achieved in a sub-50-nm-thick metafilm using judiciously sized and spaced Ge nanobeams. The ability to create semiconductor metafilms with custom absorption spectra opens up new design strategies for planar optoelectronic devices and solar cells. PMID:26184335

  14. Neutron Spectra in a 15 MV LINAC

    SciTech Connect

    Vega-Carrillo, H. R.; Chu, Wei-Han; Tung, Chuan-Jong; Lan, Jen-Hong

    2010-12-07

    Neutron spectra were calculated inside the treatment hall of a 15 MV LINAC, calculations were carried out using Monte Carlo methods. With a Bonner sphere spectrometer with pairs of thermoluminiscent dosimeters the neutron spectrum at 100 cm from the isocenter was measured and compared with the calculated spectrum. All the spectra in the treatment hall show the presence of evaporation and knock-on neutrons; also the room-return due to the hall features is shown. In the maze the large contribution are due to epithermal and thermal neutrons. A good agreement between the calculated and measured spectrum at 100 cm was noticed, from this comparison the differences are attributed to the water content in the concrete of the hall.

  15. Creating semiconductor metafilms with designer absorption spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Soo Jin; Fan, Pengyu; Kang, Ju-Hyung; Brongersma, Mark L.

    2015-07-01

    The optical properties of semiconductors are typically considered intrinsic and fixed. Here we leverage the rapid developments in the field of optical metamaterials to create ultrathin semiconductor metafilms with designer absorption spectra. We show how such metafilms can be constructed by placing one or more types of high-index semiconductor antennas into a dense array with subwavelength spacings. It is argued that the large absorption cross-section of semiconductor antennas and their weak near-field coupling open a unique opportunity to create strongly absorbing metafilms whose spectral absorption properties directly reflect those of the individual antennas. Using experiments and simulations, we demonstrate that near-unity absorption at one or more target wavelengths of interest can be achieved in a sub-50-nm-thick metafilm using judiciously sized and spaced Ge nanobeams. The ability to create semiconductor metafilms with custom absorption spectra opens up new design strategies for planar optoelectronic devices and solar cells.

  16. High resolution derivative spectra in remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demetriades-Shah, Tanvir H.; Steven, Michael D.; Clark, Jeremy A.

    1990-01-01

    The use of derivative spectra is an established technique in analytical chemistry for the elimination of background signals and for resolving overlapping spectral features. Application of this technique for tackling analogous problems such as interference from soil background reflectance in the remote sensing of vegetation or for resolving complex spectra of several target species within individual pixels in remote sensing is proposed. Methods for generating derivatives of high spectral resolution data are reviewed. Results of experiments to test the use of derivatives for monitoring chlorosis in vegetation show that derivative spectral indices are superior to conventional broad-band spectral indices such as the near-infrared/red reflectance ratio. Conventional broad-band indices are sensitive to both leaf cover as well as leaf color. New derivative spectral indices which were able to monitor chlorosis unambiguously were identified. Potential areas for the application of this technique in remote sensing are considered.

  17. QUALITATIVE INTERPRETATION OF GALAXY SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez Almeida, J.; Morales-Luis, A. B.; Terlevich, R.; Terlevich, E.; Cid Fernandes, R. E-mail: abml@iac.es E-mail: eterlevi@inaoep.mx

    2012-09-10

    We describe a simple step-by-step guide to qualitative interpretation of galaxy spectra. Rather than an alternative to existing automated tools, it is put forward as an instrument for quick-look analysis and for gaining physical insight when interpreting the outputs provided by automated tools. Though the recipe is for general application, it was developed for understanding the nature of the Automatic Spectroscopic K-means-based (ASK) template spectra. They resulted from the classification of all the galaxy spectra in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey data release 7, thus being a comprehensive representation of the galaxy spectra in the local universe. Using the recipe, we give a description of the properties of the gas and the stars that characterize the ASK classes, from those corresponding to passively evolving galaxies, to H II galaxies undergoing a galaxy-wide starburst. The qualitative analysis is found to be in excellent agreement with quantitative analyses of the same spectra. We compare the mean ages of the stellar populations with those inferred using the code STARLIGHT. We also examine the estimated gas-phase metallicity with the metallicities obtained using electron-temperature-based methods. A number of byproducts follow from the analysis. There is a tight correlation between the age of the stellar population and the metallicity of the gas, which is stronger than the correlations between galaxy mass and stellar age, and galaxy mass and gas metallicity. The galaxy spectra are known to follow a one-dimensional sequence, and we identify the luminosity-weighted mean stellar age as the affine parameter that describes the sequence. All ASK classes happen to have a significant fraction of old stars, although spectrum-wise they are outshined by the youngest populations. Old stars are metal-rich or metal-poor depending on whether they reside in passive galaxies or in star-forming galaxies.

  18. AVIRIS spectra of California wetlands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, Michael F.; Ustin, Susan L.; Klemas, Vytautas

    1988-01-01

    Spectral data gathered by the AVIRIS from wetlands in the Suisun Bay area of California on 13 October 1987 were analyzed. Spectra representing stands of numerous vegetation types (including Sesuvium verrucosum, Scirpus acutus and Scirpus californicus, Xanthium strumarium, Cynadon dactylon, and Distichlis spicata) and soil were isolated. Despite some defects in the data, it was possible to detect vegetation features such as differences in the location of the chlorophyll red absorption maximum. Also, differences in cover type spectra were evident in other spectral regions. It was not possible to determine if the observed features represent noise, variability in canopy architecture, or chemical constituents of leaves.

  19. The structure of BPS spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longhi, Pietro

    In this thesis we develop and apply novel techniques for analyzing BPS spectra of supersymmetric quantum field theories of class S. By a combination of wall-crossing, spectral networks and quiver methods we explore the BPS spectra of higher rank four-dimensional N = 2 super Yang-Mills, uncovering surprising new phenomena. Focusing on the SU(3) case, we prove the existence of wild BPS spectra in field theory, featuring BPS states of higher spin whose degeneracies grow exponentially with the energy. The occurrence of wild BPS states is surprising because it appears to be in tension with physical expectations on the behavior of the entropy as a function of the energy scale. The solution to this puzzle comes from realizing that the size of wild BPS states grows rapidly with their mass, and carefully analyzing the volume-dependence of the entropy of BPS states. We also find some interesting structures underlying wild BPS spectra, such as a Regge-like relation between the maximal spin of a BPS multiplet and the square of its mass, and the existence of a universal asymptotic distribution of spin-j irreps within a multiplet of given charge. We also extend the spectral networks construction by introducing a refinement in the topological classification of 2d-4d BPS states, and identifying their spin with a topological invariant known as the "writhe of soliton paths". A careful analysis of the 2d-4d wall-crossing behavior of this refined data reveals that it is described by motivic Kontsevich-Soibelman transformations, controlled by the Protected Spin Character, a protected deformation of the BPS index encoding the spin of BPS states. Our construction opens the way for the systematic study of refined BPS spectra in class S theories. We apply it to several examples, including ones featuring wild BPS spectra, where we find an interesting relation between spectral networks and certain functional equations. For class S theories of A 1 type, we derive an alternative technique for

  20. Peptide identification by database search of mixture tandem mass spectra.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Bourne, Philip E; Bandeira, Nuno

    2011-12-01

    In high-throughput proteomics the development of computational methods and novel experimental strategies often rely on each other. In certain areas, mass spectrometry methods for data acquisition are ahead of computational methods to interpret the resulting tandem mass spectra. Particularly, although there are numerous situations in which a mixture tandem mass spectrum can contain fragment ions from two or more peptides, nearly all database search tools still make the assumption that each tandem mass spectrum comes from one peptide. Common examples include mixture spectra from co-eluting peptides in complex samples, spectra generated from data-independent acquisition methods, and spectra from peptides with complex post-translational modifications. We propose a new database search tool (MixDB) that is able to identify mixture tandem mass spectra from more than one peptide. We show that peptides can be reliably identified with up to 95% accuracy from mixture spectra while considering only a 0.01% of all possible peptide pairs (four orders of magnitude speedup). Comparison with current database search methods indicates that our approach has better or comparable sensitivity and precision at identifying single-peptide spectra while simultaneously being able to identify 38% more peptides from mixture spectra at significantly higher precision.

  1. 8. Detail showing concrete abutment, showing substructure of bridge, specifically ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Detail showing concrete abutment, showing substructure of bridge, specifically west side of arch and substructure. - Presumpscot Falls Bridge, Spanning Presumptscot River at Allen Avenue extension, 0.75 mile west of U.S. Interstate 95, Falmouth, Cumberland County, ME

  2. 28. MAP SHOWING LOCATION OF ARVFS FACILITY AS BUILT. SHOWS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. MAP SHOWING LOCATION OF ARVFS FACILITY AS BUILT. SHOWS LINCOLN BOULEVARD, BIG LOST RIVER, AND NAVAL REACTORS FACILITY. F.C. TORKELSON DRAWING NUMBER 842-ARVFS-101-2. DATED OCTOBER 12, 1965. INEL INDEX CODE NUMBER: 075 0101 851 151969. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Advanced Reentry Vehicle Fusing System, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  3. Classical Trajectories and Quantum Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mielnik, Bogdan; Reyes, Marco A.

    1996-01-01

    A classical model of the Schrodinger's wave packet is considered. The problem of finding the energy levels corresponds to a classical manipulation game. It leads to an approximate but non-perturbative method of finding the eigenvalues, exploring the bifurcations of classical trajectories. The role of squeezing turns out decisive in the generation of the discrete spectra.

  4. Shape effects on asteroid spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davalos, J.; Carvano, J.

    2014-07-01

    The objective of this work is to probe how the shape of a body like an asteroid could be modifying its observed spectra and the derived mineralogical interfaces based on spectral modeling. To model this effect, we construct an oblate ellipsoid with triangular facets, where each facet contributes to the overall reflectance. The synthetic spectra is generated by the isotropic multiple-scattering approximation (IMSA) reflectance model of Hapke (1993). First, we obtained optical constants by inverting the spectra of meteorites, obtained from the RELAB spectral database. These optical constants were found inverting the reflectance bidirectional equation of Hapke; this is made in two steps: (i) The first inversion is to find the single-scattering albedo π (ii) in the model of Hapke, this albedo is found under the regime of the geometric optics, where the particle size is much larger than the wavelength of the incident radiation. Here we assumed a constant value for the real part of the optical constant n=1.5. With these optical constants, we can construct synthetic spectra for any particle size. The phase function used is the double Henyey-Greenstein phase function and an accurate expression for the H-functions. We started with the ellipsoidal shape a=1.0, b=c=0.5 for two particle size 50 and 250 μ m, in this part, we found good differences in the BAR parameter between the two geometric models, this was done for 100 Eucrite meteorites spectra. In this first study, we found that the BAR parameter between the two models is bigger when the particle size increases. In the second part, we started with different ellipsoidal shapes and produced synthetic spectra for material with eucrite and diogenite composition with a phase angle of 20 degrees, incidence and emission angles of 10 degrees, and particle size at 250 μ m. All spectra was generated for four parameters of phase angle b=[0.2,0.4,0.6,0.8] taking the empirical relation between the phase constants of Hapke (2012

  5. Philosophy, Methodology and Action Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, Wilfred

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to examine the role of methodology in action research. It begins by showing how, as a form of inquiry concerned with the development of practice, action research is nothing other than a modern 20th century manifestation of the pre-modern tradition of practical philosophy. It then draws in Gadamer's powerful vindication of…

  6. Integrating CHAT and Action Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, Gordon

    2011-01-01

    The question as to how action research (AR) is related to cultural-historical activity theory (CHAT) is not answerable in categorical terms. Both CHAT and AR have been variously interpreted and much depends on the individual biographies of those who pronounce on their relationship. The aim of this paper is to show how action research, conducted…

  7. Optical spectra in Fibonacci photonic nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albuquerque, E. L.; de Medeiros, F. F.; da Silva, L. R.

    2007-03-01

    In this work, we have studied the transmission spectra of photonic band-gap Fibonacci quasiperiodic nanostructures composed of both positive (SiO2) and negative refractive index (n) materials, the so-called metamaterials. These left-handed materials has been receiving recently a lot of attention due to their novel properties, like the possibility of the construction of perfect lenses. Also, the mirror symmetry structure is very sensitive to the phase compensation effect, which is unique in the positive and negative refractive index stacked Fibonacci nanostructures. The transmission spectra of these Fibonacci nanostructures, for the case where both refractive index can be approximated as a constant, show a strike self-similarity behavior, and perfect transmission peaks are observed due to its internal coupling between localized modes and propagation modes, enabling the structure to be used as an ideal optical filter. For more realistic case, where the permittivity is modelled by a plasmonic dielectric function, there is no more a self-similar pattern, although keeping Bragg refraction gaps. In both cases, however, our transmission spectra unveil smooth structure due to the phase compensation effect, including the so-called zero-n gap case.

  8. 43 CFR 9185.4-2 - Showing required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... the extent of privately owned lands within the township is in excess of 50 percent of the total area... section or material error in the showing made, will not only result in delaying action upon the...

  9. What Do Blood Tests Show?

    MedlinePlus

    ... shows the ranges for blood glucose levels after 8 to 12 hours of fasting (not eating). It shows the normal range and the abnormal ranges that are a sign of prediabetes or diabetes. Plasma Glucose Results (mg/dL)* Diagnosis 70 to 99 ...

  10. EFFECTS OF FORSTERITE GRAIN SHAPE ON INFRARED SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Koike, C.; Imai, Y.; Chihara, H.; Murata, K.; Tsuchiyama, A.; Suto, H.; Tachibana, S.; Ohara, S.

    2010-02-01

    The Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) detected several sharp infrared features around young stars, comets, and evolved stars. These sharp features were identified as Mg-rich crystalline silicates of forsterite and enstatite by comparison with spectra from laboratory data. However, certain infrared emission bands in the observed spectra cannot be identified because they appear at slightly shorter wavelengths than the peaks in forsterite laboratory spectra, where the shapes of forsterite particles are irregular. To solve this problem, we measured infrared spectra of forsterite grains of various shapes (irregular, plate-like with no sharp edges, elliptical, cauliflower, and spherical) in the infrared spectral region between 5 and 100 mum. The spectra depend on particle shape. The spectra of the 11, 19, 23, and 33 mum bands, in particular, are extremely sensitive to particle shape, whereas some peaks such as the 11.9, 49, and 69 mum bands remained almost unchanged despite different particle shapes. This becomes most evident from the spectra of near-spherical particles produced by annealing an originally amorphous silicate sample at temperature from 600 to 1150 deg. C. The spectra of these samples differ strongly from those of other ones, showing peaks at much shorter wavelengths. At a higher annealing temperature of 1200 deg. C, the particle shapes changed drastically from spherical to irregular and the spectra became similar to those of forsterite particles with irregular shapes. Based on ISO data and other observational data, the spectra of outflow sources and disk sources may correspond to differences in forsterite shape, and further some unidentified peaks, such as those at 32.8 or 32.5 mum, may be due to spherical or spherical-like forsterite.

  11. Effects of Forsterite Grain Shape on Infrared Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koike, C.; Imai, Y.; Chihara, H.; Suto, H.; Murata, K.; Tsuchiyama, A.; Tachibana, S.; Ohara, S.

    2010-02-01

    The Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) detected several sharp infrared features around young stars, comets, and evolved stars. These sharp features were identified as Mg-rich crystalline silicates of forsterite and enstatite by comparison with spectra from laboratory data. However, certain infrared emission bands in the observed spectra cannot be identified because they appear at slightly shorter wavelengths than the peaks in forsterite laboratory spectra, where the shapes of forsterite particles are irregular. To solve this problem, we measured infrared spectra of forsterite grains of various shapes (irregular, plate-like with no sharp edges, elliptical, cauliflower, and spherical) in the infrared spectral region between 5 and 100 μm. The spectra depend on particle shape. The spectra of the 11, 19, 23, and 33 μm bands, in particular, are extremely sensitive to particle shape, whereas some peaks such as the 11.9, 49, and 69 μm bands remained almost unchanged despite different particle shapes. This becomes most evident from the spectra of near-spherical particles produced by annealing an originally amorphous silicate sample at temperature from 600 to 1150°C. The spectra of these samples differ strongly from those of other ones, showing peaks at much shorter wavelengths. At a higher annealing temperature of 1200°C, the particle shapes changed drastically from spherical to irregular and the spectra became similar to those of forsterite particles with irregular shapes. Based on ISO data and other observational data, the spectra of outflow sources and disk sources may correspond to differences in forsterite shape, and further some unidentified peaks, such as those at 32.8 or 32.5 μm, may be due to spherical or spherical-like forsterite.

  12. Reference solar spectra: how do they compare in the UV?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gueymard, C.

    Reference spectra covering all (or nearly all) the solar spectrum and integrating to at least 95% of the solar constant are needed in a variety of disciplines. Due to current experimental limitations these spectra are not monolithic but are rather composites that need to be assembled from a mix of space measurements, ground observatory measurements, and solar models. Depending on the sources of data used in each waveband and various scaling factors, these reference spectra may differ substantially. The focus is here on those historic spectra that have reached standard or pseudo-standard status [ASTM, Colina, Kurucz, Smith & Gottlieb, Thekaekara, and Wehrli]. The UV part of each of these spectra are compared to that of a recently published reference spectrum (Gueymard, 2004), to a UV spectrum measured at the Mauna Loa Observatory with a Brewer spectrophotometer (Gröbner and Kerr, 2001), and to the latest measured data from the SORCE satellite with the SIM and SOLSTICE instruments. In particular, it is found that the Gueymard and Gröbner spectra are in almost perfect agreement over the whole spectral range of the latter (295--355 nm), at their common resolution of 0.5 nm. In comparison, the older Wehrli spectrum shows noticeable differences. The relationship between the experimental wavelength accuracy and the absolute accuracy of these spectra is discussed in detail. In the UV, it is argued that wavelength accuracy is the dominant source of error in the most recent spectra, although absolute calibration generally becomes the dominant factor when considering relaxed resolutions (e.g., > 5 nm). The process of deriving reference spectra is now being standardized by ISO (Tobiska and Nusinov, 2000; ISO, 2002). This initiative opens the door to the development of more dependable and intercomparable spectra. In particular, the derivation of the recent Gueymard spectrum and how it respects the ISO guidelines are discussed in detail.

  13. The analysis of spectra of novae taken near maximum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stryker, L. L.; Hestand, J.; Starrfield, S.; Wehrse, R.; Hauschildt, P.; Spies, W.; Baschek, B.; Shaviv, G.

    1988-01-01

    A project to analyze ultraviolet spectra of novae obtained at or near maximum optical light is presented. These spectra are characterized by a relatively cool continuum with superimposed permitted emission lines from ions such as Fe II, Mg II, and Si II. Spectra obtained late in the outburst show only emission lines from highly ionized species and in many cases these are forbidden lines. The ultraviolet data will be used with calculations of spherical, expanding, stellar atmospheres for novae to determine elemental abundances by spectral line synthesis. This method is extremely sensitive to the abundances and completely independent of the nebular analyses usually used to obtain novae abundances.

  14. Photoemission spectra of charge density wave states in cuprates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Wei-Lin; Chen, Peng-Jen; Lee, Ting-Kuo

    Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy(ARPES) experiments have reported many exotic properties of cuprates, such as Fermi arc at normal state, two gaps at superconducting state and particle-hole asymmetry at the antinodal direction. On the other hand, a number of inhomogeneous states or so-called charge density waves(CDW) states have also been discovered in cuprates by many experimental groups. The relation between these CDW states and ARPES spectra is unclear. With the help of Gutzwiller projected mean-field theory, we can reproduce the quasiparticle spectra in momentum space. The spectra show strong correspondence to the experimental data with afore-mentioned exotic features in it.

  15. Copper(II) phthalocyanine: Electronic and vibrational tunneling spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Hipps, K.W. )

    1989-08-10

    Inelastic electron tunneling spectra (IETS) obtained from Al-AlO{sub x}-CuPc-M junctions (M = Pb or Tl) are presented and compared with previous reports. Improved experimental methods allow them to report the entire spectrum in the region below 16,000 cm{sup {minus}1} in both bias directions. In contrast to previous studies, they will show that (a) tunneling spectra are very dependent upon the AlO{sub x}/CuPc and CuPc/M imbedded interfaces, (b) spectra contain both temperature-dependent and temperature-independent features, and (c) certain electronic and the vibrational features depend on junction bias.

  16. Satellite Movie Shows Erika Dissipate

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation of visible and infrared imagery from NOAA's GOES-West satellite from Aug. 27 to 29 shows Tropical Storm Erika move through the Eastern Caribbean Sea and dissipate near eastern Cuba. ...

  17. High throughput absorbance spectra of cancerous cells: a microscopic investigation of spectral artifacts.

    PubMed

    Mignolet, A; Goormaghtigh, E

    2015-04-01

    FTIR spectroscopy was recently demonstrated to be a useful tool to obtain a unique fingerprint of the effects of several anticancer drugs on cells in culture. While FTIR spectroscopy appears to have a definite potential to sort anticancer drugs on the basis of the metabolic modifications they induced, the present challenge is to evaluate the drug-induced spectral changes in cancer cells on a larger scale. The coupling of FTIR spectroscopy with a high throughput screening extension could become a useful method to generate drug classifications based on their "modes of action". Practically, the robustness of this approach is jeopardized by the variability that can appear from one cell smear to the next. When a few cells are scattered on the support, strong scattering effects are observed and locally dense cell aggregates could result in non-linearity of the signal. A microscopic study using infrared imaging demonstrates that the mean HTS (96-well High Throughput Spectroscopy) spectra recorded on 96 well ZnSe plates are the averages of contributions characterized by a wide absorbance distribution and by Mie scattering effects which significantly vary from point to point. Spectrum quality is at its best at the highest cell concentrations, i.e. from 300 000 to 400 000 cells per well, which present the best S/N and a relatively smaller Mie scattering effect. When the breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 was treated with four different polyphenols, spectra showed quite similar variations with respect to control spectra, with more intense variations for the quercetin and EGCG compared to resveratrol and capsaicin. Correction of the spectra with the RMieS algorithm improved their clustering according to the polyphenolic treatment.

  18. Phobos surface spectra mineralogical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pajola, M.; Lazzarin, M.; Dalle Ore, C. M.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Roush, T. L.; Pendleton, Y.; Bertini, I.; Magrin, S.; Carli, C.; La Forgia, F.; Barbieri, C.

    2014-04-01

    A mineralogical model composed of a mixture of Tagish Lake meteorite (TL) and Pyroxene Glass (PM80) was presented in [1] to explain the surface reflectance of Phobos from 0.25 to 4.0 μm. The positive results we obtained, when comparing the OSIRIS data [2] extended in wavelength to include the [3,4] spectra, forced us to perform a wider comparison between our TL-PM80 model and the CRISM and OMEGA Phobos spectra presented in [5]. Such spectra cover three different regions of interest (ROIs) situated in the Phobos sub-Mars hemisphere: the interior of the Stickney crater, its eastern rim, and its proximity terrain southeast of the Reldresal crater. We decided to vary the percentage mixture of the components of our model (80% TL, 20% PM80), between pure TL and pure PM80, by means of the radiative transfer code based on the [6] formulation of the slab approximation. Once this spectral range was derived, see Fig. 1, we attempted to compare it with the [5] spectra between 0.4 and 2.6 μm, i.e. below the thermal emitted radiation, to see if any spectral match was possible. We observed that CRISM scaled spectra above 1.10 μm fall within pure Tagish Lake composition and the [1] model. The CRISM data below 1.10 μm present more discrepancies with our models, in particular for the Stickney's rim spectrum. Nevertheless the TL and PM80 components seem to be good mineralogical candidates on Phobos. We performed the same analysis with the OMEGA data and, again, we found out that the Stickney's rim spectrum lies out of our model range, while the two remaining spectra still lie between pure TL and 80% TL - 20% PM80, but indicating that a different, more complicated mixture is expected in order to explain properly both the spectral trend and the possible absorption bands located above 2.0 μm. Within this analysis, we point out that a big fraction of TL material (modeled pure or present with a minimum percentage of 80% mixed together with 20% PM80) seems to explain Phobos spectral

  19. Comparison between MAFAGS-OS spectra and Kurucz-ODF spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jiannan; Luo, Ali; Song, Yihan; Zuo, Fang

    2011-12-01

    Grids of theoretical stellar spectra are fundamental for estimating basic stellar parameters from photometric and spectroscopic data observed in large sky surveys such as SDSS, LAMOST, Gaia, etc. Do the different atmosphere models influence the parameters estimation? We compute the Lick indexes and uvby color indexes using the MAFAGS-OS grid of model atmospheres and fluxes provided by F. Grupp (personal comm.) and the Kurucz grids [1]. A spectrum comparison reveals the behavior of spectra from the MAFAGS and Kurucz grids. We find that using the (b-y) index, consistent effective temperatures can be determined from both the Kurucz and MAFAGS grids of theoretical spectra. The m1 index, together with color index, can be used to determine the metallicity of F- and G-type stars, but the measurements of the Kurucz and MAFAGS grids show systematic discrepancies for cool stars. The c1 indexes computed with both grids show small discrepancies for Teff < 6000 K, while for Teff > 6000 K, the c1 indexes agree well. The Lick indexes of the Kurucz grid and the MAFAGS grid tend to be in agreement for warm stars with temperatures above 5000 K, while for cool stars with temperatures ranging from 4000 K to 5000 K, the difference of Lick indexes for both models is apparently large. We also compare the MAFAGS spectrum and Kurucz spectrum of the same temperature, surface gravity, and metallicity using a correlation coefficient for the complete spectrum. For warm stars, the MAFAGS and Kurucz spectra are almost the same, while for cool stars below 5000 K, there are some discrepancies between the MAFAGS and Kurucz spectra that induce internal discrepancies in the parameters determination.

  20. Near-Infrared Spectra of Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerardy, C. L.; Fesen, R. A.; Hoflich, P.; Nomoto, K.; Garnavich, P. M.; Jha, S.; Challis, P. M.; Kirshner, R. P.; Wheeler, J. C.; Sakai, S.

    2001-12-01

    We present results from a survey of the near-infrared properties of all types of supernovae. Near-infrared spectra of the subluminous Type Ia SN 1999by taken 5 days before to two weeks after maximum light have been analysed using self-consistent SN Ia explosion models. The data generally agree with 1D delayed-detonation models, indicate a near Chandrasekhar-mass WD progenitor, and show low yield of iron-peak elements confined to the innermost layers of the ejecta. This puts strong constraints on the mixing of large iron blobs into the outer layers due to Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities during the deflagration phase. NIR spectra of Type IIP SNe are relatively line-free during the plateau phase, showing largely hydrogen emission with only a handful of other lines, mostly in the 1-1.2 micron region. After the plateau phase, Type IIP spectra become much richer, showing many overlapping emission features throughout the near-infrared. It appears that CO emission is a common feature of core-collapse supernovae, as several detections of first overtone CO emission near 2.3 microns have been made, including SN 1998S (IIn), SN 1999em, SN 1999gi (IIP) and SN 2000ew (Ic). Finally, we find that Type IIn supernovae often exhibit extraordinary infrared excesses at late times. This is probably thermal emission from hot dust, most likely in the dense circumstellar gas surrounding the progenitor star. The infrared luminosity can reach 1041-42 erg s-1, and can last for several years. A possible scenario is that the dust emission is an ``infrared echo'' powered not by the flash of the SN explosion, but rather by UV/X-ray emission from the strong shock interaction with the dense circumstellar material.

  1. Eigenvectors of optimal color spectra.

    PubMed

    Flinkman, Mika; Laamanen, Hannu; Tuomela, Jukka; Vahimaa, Pasi; Hauta-Kasari, Markku

    2013-09-01

    Principal component analysis (PCA) and weighted PCA were applied to spectra of optimal colors belonging to the outer surface of the object-color solid or to so-called MacAdam limits. The correlation matrix formed from this data is a circulant matrix whose biggest eigenvalue is simple and the corresponding eigenvector is constant. All other eigenvalues are double, and the eigenvectors can be expressed with trigonometric functions. Found trigonometric functions can be used as a general basis to reconstruct all possible smooth reflectance spectra. When the spectral data are weighted with an appropriate weight function, the essential part of the color information is compressed to the first three components and the shapes of the first three eigenvectors correspond to one achromatic response function and to two chromatic response functions, the latter corresponding approximately to Munsell opponent-hue directions 9YR-9B and 2BG-2R.

  2. Hierarchical analysis of molecular spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, M.J.

    1996-03-01

    A novel representation of molecular spectra in terms of hierarchical trees has proven to be an important aid for the study of many significant problems in gas-phase chemical dynamics. Trees are generated from molecular spectra by monitoring the changes that occur in a spectrum as resolution is changed in a continuous manner. A tree defines a genealogy among all lines of a spectrum. This allows for a detailed understanding of the assignment of features of a spectrum that may be difficult to obtain any other way as well as an understanding of intramolecular energy transfer time scales, mechanisms, and pathways. The methodology has been applied to several problems: transition state spectroscopy, intramolecular energy transfer in highly excited molecules, high-resolution overtone spectroscopy, and the nature of the classical-quantum correspondence when there is classical chaos (``quantum chaos``).

  3. National Orange Show Photovoltaic Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Dan Jimenez Sheri Raborn, CPA; Tom Baker

    2008-03-31

    National Orange Show Photovoltaic Demonstration created a 400KW Photovoltaic self-generation plant at the National Orange Show Events Center (NOS). The NOS owns a 120-acre state fairground where it operates an events center and produces an annual citrus fair known as the Orange Show. The NOS governing board wanted to employ cost-saving programs for annual energy expenses. It is hoped the Photovoltaic program will result in overall savings for the NOS, help reduce the State's energy demands as relating to electrical power consumption, improve quality of life within the affected grid area as well as increase the energy efficiency of buildings at our venue. In addition, the potential to reduce operational expenses would have a tremendous effect on the ability of the NOS to service its community.

  4. A Metadata Action Language

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, Keith; Clancy, Dan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The data management problem comprises data processing and data tracking. Data processing is the creation of new data based on existing data sources. Data tracking consists of storing metadata descriptions of available data. This paper addresses the data management problem by casting it as an AI planning problem. Actions are data-processing commands, plans are dataflow programs and goals are metadata descriptions of desired data products. Data manipulation is simply plan generation and execution, and a key component of data tracking is inferring the effects of an observed plan. We introduce a new action language for data management domains, called ADILM. We discuss the connection between data processing and information integration and show how a language for the latter must be modified to support the former. The paper also discusses information gathering within a data-processing framework, and show how ADILM metadata expressions are a generalization of Local Completeness.

  5. Video spectra of Leonids and other meteors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borovička, Jiří

    2001-11-01

    Video spectra of 33 meteors of medium brightness (+1 to -1 mag) were compared. The intensity of the main meteoric emissions of Mg, Na, Fe, and atmospheric emissions of N2, O, N were studied. The Na/Mg ratio is different in different meteors, showing variations in Na abundance. Moreover, much earlier ablation of Na during the atmospheric entry than of other elements observed in some Leonids and one Orionid, Quadrantid and Leo Minorid evidences fragile structure of those meteoroids. One sporadic meteor was completely deficient in sodium. The strength of atmospheric emission increases with increasing meteor velocity. Taurids are notable by the near-absence of O and N emissions.

  6. Catalogue of representative meteor spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vojáček, V.; Borovička, J.; Koten, P.; Spurný, P.; Štork, R.

    2015-08-01

    Aims: We present a library of low-resolution meteor spectra that includes sporadic meteors, members of minor meteor showers, and major meteor showers. These meteors are in the magnitude range from +2 to -3, corresponding to meteoroid sizes from 1 mm to 10 mm. Methods: Parallel double-station video observations allowed us to compute heliocentric orbits for all meteors. Most observations were performed during the periods of activity of major meteor showers in the years between 2006 and 2012. Spectra are classified according to relative intensities of the low-temperature emission lines of Mg, Na, and Fe. Results: Shower meteors were found to be of normal composition, except for Southern δ Aquariids and some members of the Geminid shower, neither of which have Na in the meteor spectra. Variations in Na content are typical for the Geminid shower. Three populations of Na-free mereoroids were identified. The first population are iron meteorites, which have an asteroidal-chondritic origin, but one meteoroid with low perihelion (0.11 AU) was found among the iron meteorites. The second population were Sun-approaching meteoroids in which sodium is depleted by thermal desorption. The third population were Na-free meteoroids of cometary origin. Long exposure to cosmic rays on the surface of comets in the Oort cloud and disintegration of this crust might be the origin of this population of meteoroids. Spectra (Figs. 17-30) are only, Tables 4-6 are also available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/580/A67

  7. Accelerated Fitting of Stellar Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting, Yuan-Sen; Conroy, Charlie; Rix, Hans-Walter

    2016-07-01

    Stellar spectra are often modeled and fitted by interpolating within a rectilinear grid of synthetic spectra to derive the stars’ labels: stellar parameters and elemental abundances. However, the number of synthetic spectra needed for a rectilinear grid grows exponentially with the label space dimensions, precluding the simultaneous and self-consistent fitting of more than a few elemental abundances. Shortcuts such as fitting subsets of labels separately can introduce unknown systematics and do not produce correct error covariances in the derived labels. In this paper we present a new approach—Convex Hull Adaptive Tessellation (chat)—which includes several new ideas for inexpensively generating a sufficient stellar synthetic library, using linear algebra and the concept of an adaptive, data-driven grid. A convex hull approximates the region where the data lie in the label space. A variety of tests with mock data sets demonstrate that chat can reduce the number of required synthetic model calculations by three orders of magnitude in an eight-dimensional label space. The reduction will be even larger for higher dimensional label spaces. In chat the computational effort increases only linearly with the number of labels that are fit simultaneously. Around each of these grid points in the label space an approximate synthetic spectrum can be generated through linear expansion using a set of “gradient spectra” that represent flux derivatives at every wavelength point with respect to all labels. These techniques provide new opportunities to fit the full stellar spectra from large surveys with 15–30 labels simultaneously.

  8. Accelerated Fitting of Stellar Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting, Yuan-Sen; Conroy, Charlie; Rix, Hans-Walter

    2016-07-01

    Stellar spectra are often modeled and fitted by interpolating within a rectilinear grid of synthetic spectra to derive the stars’ labels: stellar parameters and elemental abundances. However, the number of synthetic spectra needed for a rectilinear grid grows exponentially with the label space dimensions, precluding the simultaneous and self-consistent fitting of more than a few elemental abundances. Shortcuts such as fitting subsets of labels separately can introduce unknown systematics and do not produce correct error covariances in the derived labels. In this paper we present a new approach—Convex Hull Adaptive Tessellation (chat)—which includes several new ideas for inexpensively generating a sufficient stellar synthetic library, using linear algebra and the concept of an adaptive, data-driven grid. A convex hull approximates the region where the data lie in the label space. A variety of tests with mock data sets demonstrate that chat can reduce the number of required synthetic model calculations by three orders of magnitude in an eight-dimensional label space. The reduction will be even larger for higher dimensional label spaces. In chat the computational effort increases only linearly with the number of labels that are fit simultaneously. Around each of these grid points in the label space an approximate synthetic spectrum can be generated through linear expansion using a set of “gradient spectra” that represent flux derivatives at every wavelength point with respect to all labels. These techniques provide new opportunities to fit the full stellar spectra from large surveys with 15-30 labels simultaneously.

  9. Variable spectra of active galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, Jules P.

    1988-01-01

    The analysis of EXOSAT spectra of active galaxies are presented. The objects examined for X-ray spectral variability were MR 2251-178 and 3C 120. The results of these investigations are described, as well as additional results on X-ray spectral variability related to EXOSAT observations of active galaxies. Additionally, the dipping X-ray source 4U1624-49 was also investigated.

  10. Arches showing UV flaring activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fontenla, J. M.

    1988-01-01

    The UVSP data obtained in the previous maximum activity cycle show the frequent appearance of flaring events in the UV. In many cases these flaring events are characterized by at least two footpoints which show compact impulsive non-simultaneous brightenings and a fainter but clearly observed arch developes between the footpoints. These arches and footpoints are observed in line corresponding to different temperatures, as Lyman alpha, N V, and C IV, and when observed above the limb display large Doppler shifts at some stages. The size of the arches can be larger than 20 arcsec.

  11. Theoretical prediction of vibrational spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Zefu; Dunn, Kevin M.; Boggs, James E.

    The complete harmonic force field and the diagonal and first off-diagonal cubic constants of aniline have been calculated ab initio using a 4-21 basis set augmented by addition of d functions to the nitrogen atom. The force constants were then scaled using scale factors optimized previously to give the best fit to the similarly computed vibrational spectra of benzene and its deuterated isotopomers. The vibrational spectra of aniline, aniline-NHD, and aniline-ND2 were then calculated from this scaled quantum mechanical (SQM) force field and compared with experimentally observed spectra. Several corrections were made to previously proposed empirical spectral assignments. Because of computational difficulties, no definitive statement can be made about the torsion or inversion modes of the amino group. Aside from these and the C-H stretching frequencies for which the detailed assignment is still quite uncertain, the average deviation between the observed frequencies and those obtained entirely from the scaled computed force field is 9·1 cm-1. Dipole moment derivatives and infrared absorption intensities were also calculated, but these are of lower accuracy.

  12. Rogue wave spectra of the Kundu-Eckhaus equation.

    PubMed

    Bayındır, Cihan

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we analyze the rogue wave spectra of the Kundu-Eckhaus equation (KEE). We compare our findings with their nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLSE) analogs and show that the spectra of the individual rogue waves significantly differ from their NLSE analogs. A remarkable difference is the one-sided development of the triangular spectrum before the rogue wave becomes evident in time. Also we show that increasing the skewness of the rogue wave results in increased asymmetry in the triangular Fourier spectra. Additionally, the triangular spectra of the rogue waves of the KEE begin to develop at earlier stages of their development compared to their NLSE analogs, especially for larger skew angles. This feature may be used to enhance the early warning times of the rogue waves. However, we show that in a chaotic wave field with many spectral components the triangular spectra remain as the main attribute as a universal feature of the typical wave fields produced through modulation instability and characteristic features of the KEE's analytical rogue wave spectra may be suppressed in a realistic chaotic wave field. PMID:27415263

  13. Atoms in Action

    SciTech Connect

    2009-01-01

    This movie produced with Berkeley Lab's TEAM 0.5 microscope shows the growth of a hole and the atomic edge reconstruction in a graphene sheet. An electron beam focused to a spot on the sheet blows out the exposed carbon atoms to make the hole. The carbon atoms then reposition themselves to find a stable configuration. http://newscenter.lbl.gov/press-releases/2009/03/26/atoms-in-action/

  14. Create a Polarized Light Show.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conrad, William H.

    1992-01-01

    Presents a lesson that introduces students to polarized light using a problem-solving approach. After illustrating the concept using a slinky and poster board with a vertical slot, students solve the problem of creating a polarized light show using Polya's problem-solving methods. (MDH)

  15. Pembrolizumab Shows Promise for NSCLC.

    PubMed

    2015-06-01

    Data from the KEYNOTE-001 trial show that pembrolizumab improves clinical outcomes for patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer, and is well tolerated. PD-L1 expression in at least 50% of tumor cells correlated with improved efficacy.

  16. LET spectra measurements on LDEF: variations with shielding and location.

    PubMed

    Benton, E V; Frank, A L; Csige, I; Frigo, L A; Benton, E R

    1996-11-01

    LET spectra measurements made with passive plastic nuclear track detectors (PNTDs) were found to depend on detector orientation, shielding and experiment location. LET spectra were measured at several locations on LDEF as part of the P0006 LETSME experiment (Benton and Parnell, 1984), the P0004 Seeds in Space experiment (Parks and Alston, 1984), the A00l5 Free Flyer Biostacks and the M0004 Fiber Optics Data Link experiment (Taylor, 1984). Locations included the east, west and Earth sides of the LDEF satellite. The LET spectra measured with PNTDs deviated significantly from calculations, especially for high LET particles (LET infinity H2O > or = 100 keV/micrometer). At high LETs, short-range inelastic secondary particles produced by trapped proton interactions with the nuclei of the detector were found to be the principal contributor to LET spectra. At lower LETs, the spectra appeared to be due to short-range, inelastic and stopping primary protons, with primary GCR particles making a smaller contribution. The dependence of LET spectra on detector orientation and shielding was studied using the four orthogonal stacks in the P0006 experiment. Both measurements of total track density and LET spectra showed a greater number of particles arriving from the direction of space than from Earth. Measurements of LET spectra in CR-39 PNTD on the east (leading) and west (trailing) sides of LDEF showed a higher rate of production at the west side. This was caused by a larger flux of trapped protons on the west side as predicted by the east/west trapped proton anisotropy in the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA). Track density measured in CR-39 PNTDs increased as a function of shielding depth in the detector stack. A similar measurement made in a thick stack of CR-39 interspersed with layers of Al and exposed to 154 MeV protons at a ground-based accelerator showed a similar result, indicating that a significant fraction of the particle events counted were from secondaries and that the

  17. 25 CFR 141.56 - Show cause procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Show cause procedures. 141.56 Section 141.56 Indians... NAVAJO, HOPI AND ZUNI RESERVATIONS Enforcement Powers, Procedures and Remedies § 141.56 Show cause... from the date of receipt of notice in which to show cause why the contemplated remedial action...

  18. 25 CFR 141.56 - Show cause procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Show cause procedures. 141.56 Section 141.56 Indians... NAVAJO, HOPI AND ZUNI RESERVATIONS Enforcement Powers, Procedures and Remedies § 141.56 Show cause... from the date of receipt of notice in which to show cause why the contemplated remedial action...

  19. 25 CFR 141.56 - Show cause procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Show cause procedures. 141.56 Section 141.56 Indians... NAVAJO, HOPI AND ZUNI RESERVATIONS Enforcement Powers, Procedures and Remedies § 141.56 Show cause... from the date of receipt of notice in which to show cause why the contemplated remedial action...

  20. 25 CFR 141.56 - Show cause procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Show cause procedures. 141.56 Section 141.56 Indians... NAVAJO, HOPI AND ZUNI RESERVATIONS Enforcement Powers, Procedures and Remedies § 141.56 Show cause... from the date of receipt of notice in which to show cause why the contemplated remedial action...

  1. 25 CFR 141.56 - Show cause procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Show cause procedures. 141.56 Section 141.56 Indians... NAVAJO, HOPI AND ZUNI RESERVATIONS Enforcement Powers, Procedures and Remedies § 141.56 Show cause... from the date of receipt of notice in which to show cause why the contemplated remedial action...

  2. Bodily action penetrates affective perception

    PubMed Central

    Rigutti, Sara; Gerbino, Walter

    2016-01-01

    Fantoni & Gerbino (2014) showed that subtle postural shifts associated with reaching can have a strong hedonic impact and affect how actors experience facial expressions of emotion. Using a novel Motor Action Mood Induction Procedure (MAMIP), they found consistent congruency effects in participants who performed a facial emotion identification task after a sequence of visually-guided reaches: a face perceived as neutral in a baseline condition appeared slightly happy after comfortable actions and slightly angry after uncomfortable actions. However, skeptics about the penetrability of perception (Zeimbekis & Raftopoulos, 2015) would consider such evidence insufficient to demonstrate that observer’s internal states induced by action comfort/discomfort affect perception in a top-down fashion. The action-modulated mood might have produced a back-end memory effect capable of affecting post-perceptual and decision processing, but not front-end perception. Here, we present evidence that performing a facial emotion detection (not identification) task after MAMIP exhibits systematic mood-congruent sensitivity changes, rather than response bias changes attributable to cognitive set shifts; i.e., we show that observer’s internal states induced by bodily action can modulate affective perception. The detection threshold for happiness was lower after fifty comfortable than uncomfortable reaches; while the detection threshold for anger was lower after fifty uncomfortable than comfortable reaches. Action valence induced an overall sensitivity improvement in detecting subtle variations of congruent facial expressions (happiness after positive comfortable actions, anger after negative uncomfortable actions), in the absence of significant response bias shifts. Notably, both comfortable and uncomfortable reaches impact sensitivity in an approximately symmetric way relative to a baseline inaction condition. All of these constitute compelling evidence of a genuine top-down effect on

  3. CLASSIFICATION OF STELLAR SPECTRA WITH LOCAL LINEAR EMBEDDING

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, Scott F.; Connolly, Andrew; Vanderplas, Jake; Schneider, Jeff; Xiong Liang

    2011-12-15

    We investigate the use of dimensionality reduction techniques for the classification of stellar spectra selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Using local linear embedding (LLE), a technique that preserves the local (and possibly nonlinear) structure within high-dimensional data sets, we show that the majority of stellar spectra can be represented as a one-dimensional sequence within a three-dimensional space. The position along this sequence is highly correlated with spectral temperature. Deviations from this 'stellar locus' are indicative of spectra with strong emission lines (including misclassified galaxies) or broad absorption lines (e.g., carbon stars). Based on this analysis, we propose a hierarchical classification scheme using LLE that progressively identifies and classifies stellar spectra in a manner that requires no feature extraction and that can reproduce the classic MK classifications to an accuracy of one type.

  4. Predicting Infrared Spectra of Nerve Agents Using Density Functional Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.-P.; Wang, H.-T.; Zheng, W.-P.; Sun, C.; Bai, Y.; Guo, X.-D.; Sun, H.

    2016-09-01

    Vibration frequencies of four nerve agents and two simulators are calculated using B3LYP coupled with ten basis sets. To evaluate the accuracy of calculated spectra, root mean square error (RMSE) and weighted cross-correlation average (WCCA) are considered. The evaluation shows that B3LYP/6-311+g(d,p) performs best in predicting infrared spectra, and polarization functions are found to be more important than diffusion functions in spectra simulation. Moreover, B3LYP calculation underestimates frequencies related to the P atom. The WCCA metric derives 1.008 as a unique scaling factor for calculated frequencies. The results indicate that the WCCA metric can identify six agents based on calculated spectra.

  5. Coherent multidimensional optical spectra measured using incoherent light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Daniel B.; Arpin, Paul C.; McClure, Scott D.; Ulness, Darin J.; Scholes, Gregory D.

    2013-08-01

    Four-wave mixing measurements can reveal spectral and dynamics information that is hidden in linear spectra by the interactions among light-absorbing molecules and with their environment. Coherent multidimensional optical spectroscopy is an important variant of four-wave mixing because it resolves a map of interactions and correlations between absorption bands. Previous coherent multidimensional optical spectroscopy measurements have used femtosecond pulses with great success, and it may seem that femtosecond pulses are necessary for such measurements. Here we present coherent two-dimensional electronic spectra measured using incoherent light. The spectra of model molecular systems using broadband spectrally incoherent light are similar but not identical to those expected from measurements using femtosecond pulses. Specifically, the spectra show particular sensitivity to long-lived intermediates such as photoisomers. The results will motivate the design of similar experiments in spectral ranges where femtosecond pulses are difficult to produce.

  6. Power spectra at radio frequency of lightning return stroke waveforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanzerotti, L. J.; Thomson, D. J.; Maclennan, C. G.; Rinnert, K.; Krider, E. P.

    1989-01-01

    The power spectra of the wideband (10 Hz to 100 kHz) magnetic field signals in a number of lightning return strokes (primarily first return strokes) measured during a lightning storm which occurred in Lindau, West Germany in August, 1984 have been calculated. The RF magnetic field data were obtained with the engineering unit of the Galileo Jupiter Probe lightning experiment. The spectra of the magnetic field data definitely show fine structure, with two or three distinct peaks appearing in the spectra of many of the waveforms. An enhancement of power at frequencies of about 60-70 kHz is often seen in the spectra of the waveform time segments preceding and following the rise-to-peak amplitude of the return stroke.

  7. Holography in action

    SciTech Connect

    Kolekar, Sanved; Padmanabhan, T.

    2010-07-15

    The Einstein-Hilbert action and its natural generalizations to higher dimensions (like the Lanczos-Lovelock action) have certain peculiar features. All of them can be separated into a bulk and a surface term, with a specific (''holographic'') relationship between the two, so that either term can be used to extract information about the other. Further, the surface term leads to entropy of the horizons on shell. It has been argued in the past that these features are impossible to understand in the conventional approach but find a natural explanation if we consider gravity as an emergent phenomenon. We provide further support for this point of view in this paper. We describe an alternative decomposition of the Einstein-Hilbert action and the Lanczos-Lovelock action into a new pair of surface and bulk terms, such that the surface term becomes the Wald entropy on a horizon and the bulk term is the energy density (which is the Arnowitt-Deser-Misner Hamiltonian density for Einstein gravity). We show that this new pair also obeys a holographic relationship, and we give a thermodynamic interpretation of this relation in this context. Since the bulk and surface terms, in this decomposition, are related to the energy and entropy, the holographic condition can be thought of as analogous to inverting the expression for entropy given as a function of energy S=S(E,V) to obtain the energy E=E(S,V) in terms of the entropy in a normal thermodynamic system. Thus the holographic nature of the action allows us to relate the descriptions of the same system in terms of two different thermodynamic potentials. Some further possible generalizations and implications are discussed.

  8. The role of action prediction and inhibitory control for joint action coordination in toddlers.

    PubMed

    Meyer, M; Bekkering, H; Haartsen, R; Stapel, J C; Hunnius, S

    2015-11-01

    From early in life, young children eagerly engage in social interactions. Yet, they still have difficulties in performing well-coordinated joint actions with others. Adult literature suggests that two processes are important for smooth joint action coordination: action prediction and inhibitory control. The aim of the current study was to disentangle the potential role of these processes in the early development of joint action coordination. Using a simple turn-taking game, we assessed 2½-year-old toddlers' joint action coordination, focusing on timing variability and turn-taking accuracy. In two additional tasks, we examined their action prediction capabilities with an eye-tracking paradigm and examined their inhibitory control capabilities with a classic executive functioning task (gift delay task). We found that individual differences in action prediction and inhibitory action control were distinctly related to the two aspects of joint action coordination. Toddlers who showed more precision in their action predictions were less variable in their action timing during the joint play. Furthermore, toddlers who showed more inhibitory control in an individual context were more accurate in their turn-taking performance during the joint action. On the other hand, no relation between timing variability and inhibitory control or between turn-taking accuracy and action prediction was found. The current results highlight the distinct role of action prediction and inhibitory action control for the quality of joint action coordination in toddlers. Underlying neurocognitive mechanisms and implications for processes involved in joint action coordination in general are discussed. PMID:26150055

  9. Entropy/area spectra of the charged black hole from quasinormal modes

    SciTech Connect

    Wei Shaowen; Liu Yuxiao; Yang Ke; Zhong Yuan

    2010-05-15

    With the new physical interpretation of quasinormal modes proposed by Maggiore, the quantum area spectra of black holes have been investigated recently. Adopting the modified Hod's treatment, results show that the area spectra for black holes are equally spaced and the spacings are in a unified form, A=8{pi}({h_bar}/2{pi}), in Einstein gravity. On the other hand, following Kunstatter's method, the studies show that the area spectrum for a nonrotating black hole with no charge is equidistant. And for a rotating (or charged) black hole, it is also equidistant and independent of the angular momentum J (or charge q) when the black hole is far from the extremal case. In this paper, we mainly deal with the area spectrum of the stringy charged Garfinkle-Horowitz-Strominger black hole, originating from the effective action that emerges in low-energy string theory. We find that both methods give the same results--that the area spectrum is equally spaced and does not depend on the charge q. Our study may provide new insights into understanding the area spectrum and entropy spectrum for stringy black holes.

  10. The Take Action Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boudreau, Sue

    2010-01-01

    The Take Action Project (TAP) was created to help middle school students take informed and effective action on science-related issues. The seven steps of TAP ask students to (1) choose a science-related problem of interest to them, (2) research their problem, (3) select an action to take on the problem, (4) plan that action, (5) take action, (6)…

  11. Seasonal Variations of Stratospheric Age Spectra in GEOSCCM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Feng; Waugh, Darryn; Douglass, Anne R.; Newman, Paul A.; Pawson, Steven; Stolarski, Richard S.; Strahan, Susan E.; Nielsen, J. Eric

    2011-01-01

    There are many pathways for an air parcel to travel from the troposphere to the stratosphere, each of which takes different time. The distribution of all the possible transient times, i.e. the stratospheric age spectrum, contains important information on transport characteristics. However, it is computationally very expensive to compute seasonally varying age spectra, and previous studies have focused mainly on the annual mean properties of the age spectra. To date our knowledge of the seasonality of the stratospheric age spectra is very limited. In this study we investigate the seasonal variations of the stratospheric age spectra in the Goddard Earth Observing System Chemistry Climate Model (GEOSCCM). We introduce a method to significantly reduce the computational cost for calculating seasonally dependent age spectra. Our simulations show that stratospheric age spectra in GEOSCCM have strong seasonal cycles and the seasonal cycles change with latitude and height. In the lower stratosphere extratropics, the average transit times and the most probable transit times in the winter/early spring spectra are more than twice as old as those in the summer/early fall spectra. But the seasonal cycle in the subtropical lower stratosphere is nearly out of phase with that in the extratropics. In the middle and upper stratosphere, significant seasonal variations occur in the sUbtropics. The spectral shapes also show dramatic seasonal change, especially at high latitudes. These seasonal variations reflect the seasonal evolution of the slow Brewer-Dobson circulation (with timescale of years) and the fast isentropic mixing (with timescale of days to months).

  12. ShowMe3D

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, Michael B

    2012-01-05

    ShowMe3D is a data visualization graphical user interface specifically designed for use with hyperspectral image obtained from the Hyperspectral Confocal Microscope. The program allows the user to select and display any single image from a three dimensional hyperspectral image stack. By moving a slider control, the user can easily move between images of the stack. The user can zoom into any region of the image. The user can select any pixel or region from the displayed image and display the fluorescence spectrum associated with that pixel or region. The user can define up to 3 spectral filters to apply to the hyperspectral image and view the image as it would appear from a filter-based confocal microscope. The user can also obtain statistics such as intensity average and variance from selected regions.

  13. "Show me" bioethics and politics.

    PubMed

    Christopher, Myra J

    2007-10-01

    Missouri, the "Show Me State," has become the epicenter of several important national public policy debates, including abortion rights, the right to choose and refuse medical treatment, and, most recently, early stem cell research. In this environment, the Center for Practical Bioethics (formerly, Midwest Bioethics Center) emerged and grew. The Center's role in these "cultural wars" is not to advocate for a particular position but to provide well researched and objective information, perspective, and advocacy for the ethical justification of policy positions; and to serve as a neutral convener and provider of a public forum for discussion. In this article, the Center's work on early stem cell research is a case study through which to argue that not only the Center, but also the field of bioethics has a critical role in the politics of public health policy.

  14. ShowMe3D

    2012-01-05

    ShowMe3D is a data visualization graphical user interface specifically designed for use with hyperspectral image obtained from the Hyperspectral Confocal Microscope. The program allows the user to select and display any single image from a three dimensional hyperspectral image stack. By moving a slider control, the user can easily move between images of the stack. The user can zoom into any region of the image. The user can select any pixel or region from themore » displayed image and display the fluorescence spectrum associated with that pixel or region. The user can define up to 3 spectral filters to apply to the hyperspectral image and view the image as it would appear from a filter-based confocal microscope. The user can also obtain statistics such as intensity average and variance from selected regions.« less

  15. On the reality of spectra of U q (sl 2)-invariant XXZ Hamiltonians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morin-Duchesne, Alexi; Rasmussen, Jørgen; Ruelle, Philippe; Saint-Aubin, Yvan

    2016-05-01

    A new inner product is constructed on each standard module over the Temperley-Lieb algebra $\\mathsf{TL}_n(\\beta)$ for $\\beta\\in \\mathbb R$ and $n \\ge 2$. On these modules, the Hamiltonian $h = -\\sum_i e_i$ is shown to be self-adjoint with respect to this inner product. This implies that its action on these modules is diagonalisable with real eigenvalues. A representation theoretic argument shows that the reality of spectra of the Hamiltonian extends to all other Temperley-Lieb representations. In particular, this result applies to the celebrated $U_q(sl_2)$-invariant XXZ Hamiltonian, for all $q+q^{-1}\\in \\mathbb R$.

  16. DUO: Spectra of diatomic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurchenko, Sergei N.; Lodi, Lorenzo; Tennyson, Jonathan; Stolyarov, Andrey V.

    2016-05-01

    Duo computes rotational, rovibrational and rovibronic spectra of diatomic molecules. The software, written in Fortran 2003, solves the Schrödinger equation for the motion of the nuclei for the simple case of uncoupled, isolated electronic states and also for the general case of an arbitrary number and type of couplings between electronic states. Possible couplings include spin-orbit, angular momenta, spin-rotational and spin-spin. Introducing the relevant couplings using so-called Born-Oppenheimer breakdown curves can correct non-adiabatic effects.

  17. DUO: Spectra of diatomic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurchenko, Sergei N.; Lodi, Lorenzo; Tennyson, Jonathan; Stolyarov, Andrey V.

    2016-05-01

    Duo computes rotational, rovibrational and rovibronic spectra of diatomic molecules. The software, written in Fortran 2003, solves the Schrödinger equation for the motion of the nuclei for the simple case of uncoupled, isolated electronic states and also for the general case of an arbitrary number and type of couplings between electronic states. Possible couplings include spin–orbit, angular momenta, spin-rotational and spin–spin. Introducing the relevant couplings using so-called Born–Oppenheimer breakdown curves can correct non-adiabatic effects.

  18. Gamma-ray burst spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teegarden, B. J.

    1982-01-01

    A review of recent results in gamma-ray burst spectroscopy is given. Particular attention is paid to the recent discovery of emission and absorption features in the burst spectra. These lines represent the strongest evidence to date that gamma-ray bursts originate on or near neutron stars. Line parameters give information on the temperature, magnetic field and possibly the gravitational potential of the neutron star. The behavior of the continuum spectrum is also discussed. A remarkably good fit to nearly all bursts is obtained with a thermal-bremsstrahlung-like continuum. Significant evolution is observed of both the continuum and line features within most events.

  19. Effect of Temperature on Jet Velocity Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, James E.; Wernet, Mark P.

    2007-01-01

    Statistical jet noise prediction codes that accurately predict spectral directivity for both cold and hot jets are highly sought both in industry and academia. Their formulation, whether based upon manipulations of the Navier-Stokes equations or upon heuristic arguments, require substantial experimental observation of jet turbulence statistics. Unfortunately, the statistics of most interest involve the space-time correlation of flow quantities, especially velocity. Until the last 10 years, all turbulence statistics were made with single-point probes, such as hotwires or laser Doppler anemometry. Particle image velocimetry (PIV) brought many new insights with its ability to measure velocity fields over large regions of jets simultaneously; however, it could not measure velocity at rates higher than a few fields per second, making it unsuitable for obtaining temporal spectra and correlations. The development of time-resolved PIV, herein called TR-PIV, has removed this limitation, enabling measurement of velocity fields at high resolution in both space and time. In this paper, ground-breaking results from the application of TR-PIV to single-flow hot jets are used to explore the impact of heat on turbulent statistics of interest to jet noise models. First, a brief summary of validation studies is reported, undertaken to show that the new technique produces the same trusted results as hotwire at cold, low-speed jets. Second, velocity spectra from cold and hot jets are compared to see the effect of heat on the spectra. It is seen that heated jets possess 10 percent more turbulence intensity compared to the unheated jets with the same velocity. The spectral shapes, when normalized using Strouhal scaling, are insensitive to temperature if the stream-wise location is normalized relative to the potential core length. Similarly, second order velocity correlations, of interest in modeling of jet noise sources, are also insensitive to temperature as well.

  20. Pea Plants Show Risk Sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Dener, Efrat; Kacelnik, Alex; Shemesh, Hagai

    2016-07-11

    Sensitivity to variability in resources has been documented in humans, primates, birds, and social insects, but the fit between empirical results and the predictions of risk sensitivity theory (RST), which aims to explain this sensitivity in adaptive terms, is weak [1]. RST predicts that agents should switch between risk proneness and risk aversion depending on state and circumstances, especially according to the richness of the least variable option [2]. Unrealistic assumptions about agents' information processing mechanisms and poor knowledge of the extent to which variability imposes specific selection in nature are strong candidates to explain the gap between theory and data. RST's rationale also applies to plants, where it has not hitherto been tested. Given the differences between animals' and plants' information processing mechanisms, such tests should help unravel the conflicts between theory and data. Measuring root growth allocation by split-root pea plants, we show that they favor variability when mean nutrient levels are low and the opposite when they are high, supporting the most widespread RST prediction. However, the combination of non-linear effects of nitrogen availability at local and systemic levels may explain some of these effects as a consequence of mechanisms not necessarily evolved to cope with variance [3, 4]. This resembles animal examples in which properties of perception and learning cause risk sensitivity even though they are not risk adaptations [5]. PMID:27374342

  1. Casimir experiments showing saturation effects

    SciTech Connect

    Sernelius, Bo E.

    2009-10-15

    We address several different Casimir experiments where theory and experiment disagree. First out is the classical Casimir force measurement between two metal half spaces; here both in the form of the torsion pendulum experiment by Lamoreaux and in the form of the Casimir pressure measurement between a gold sphere and a gold plate as performed by Decca et al.; theory predicts a large negative thermal correction, absent in the high precision experiments. The third experiment is the measurement of the Casimir force between a metal plate and a laser irradiated semiconductor membrane as performed by Chen et al.; the change in force with laser intensity is larger than predicted by theory. The fourth experiment is the measurement of the Casimir force between an atom and a wall in the form of the measurement by Obrecht et al. of the change in oscillation frequency of a {sup 87}Rb Bose-Einstein condensate trapped to a fused silica wall; the change is smaller than predicted by theory. We show that saturation effects can explain the discrepancies between theory and experiment observed in all these cases.

  2. Spectra of particulate backscattering in natural waters.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Howard R; Lewis, Marlon R; McLean, Scott D; Twardowski, Michael S; Freeman, Scott A; Voss, Kenneth J; Boynton, G Chris

    2009-08-31

    Hyperspectral profiles of downwelling irradiance and upwelling radiance in natural waters (oligotrophic and mesotrophic) are combined with inverse radiative transfer to obtain high resolution spectra of the absorption coefficient (a) and the backscattering coefficient (b(b)) of the water and its constituents. The absorption coefficient at the mesotrophic station clearly shows spectral absorption features attributable to several phytoplankton pigments (Chlorophyll a, b, c, and Carotenoids). The backscattering shows only weak spectral features and can be well represented by a power-law variation with wavelength (lambda): b(b) approximately lambda(-n), where n is a constant between 0.4 and 1.0. However, the weak spectral features in b(b)b suggest that it is depressed in spectral regions of strong particle absorption. The applicability of the present inverse radiative transfer algorithm, which omits the influence of Raman scattering, is limited to lambda < 490 nm in oligotrophic waters and lambda < 575 nm in mesotrophic waters. PMID:19724619

  3. Spectra of Particulate Backscattering in Natural Waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Howard, R.; Lewis, Marlon R.; McLean, Scott D.; Twardowski, Michael S.; Freeman, Scott A.; Voss, Kenneth J.; Boynton, Chris G.

    2009-01-01

    Hyperspectral profiles of downwelling irradiance and upwelling radiance in natural waters (oligotrophic and mesotrophic) are combined with inverse radiative transfer to obtain high resolution spectra of the absorption coefficient (a) and the backscattering coefficient (bb) of the water and its constituents. The absorption coefficient at the mesotrophic station clearly shows spectral absorption features attributable to several phytoplankton pigments (Chlorophyll a, b, c, and Carotenoids). The backscattering shows only weak spectral features and can be well represented by a power-law variation with wavelength (lambda): b(sub b) approx. Lambda(sup -n), where n is a constant between 0.4 and 1.0. However, the weak spectral features in b(sub b), suggest that it is depressed in spectral regions of strong particle absorption. The applicability of the present inverse radiative transfer algorithm, which omits the influence of Raman scattering, is limited to lambda < 490 nm in oligotrophic waters and lambda < 575 nm in mesotrophic waters.

  4. [Study on the characters of phytoplankton chlorophyll fluorescence excitation spectra based on fourth-derivative].

    PubMed

    Lu, Lu; Su, Rong-Guo; Wang, Xiu-Lin; Zhu, Chen-Jian

    2007-11-01

    Chlorophyll fluorescence excitation spectra of six phytoplankton species, belonging to Bacillariophyta and Dinophyta, were dealt by fourth-derivative analysis with the Matlab program. The results show that between 350 nm and 550 nm six fluorescence peaks were found in the fourth-derivative spectra, which are representatives of non-pigments, chlorophylls and carotenoides respectively. The method makes Bacillariophyta and Dinophyta more distinguishable when the fourth-derivative spectra are compared with the chlorophyll fluorescence excitation spectra. It can be used not only to discriminate the two groups of algaes, but also to reduce the effect of noise. The fluorescence peaks in the fourth-derivative spectra are proved to be stable.

  5. 1/ fα spectra in elementary cellular automata and fractal signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagler, Jan; Claussen, Jens Christian

    2005-06-01

    We systematically compute the power spectra of the one-dimensional elementary cellular automata introduced by Wolfram. On the one hand our analysis reveals that one automaton displays 1/f spectra though considered as trivial, and on the other hand that various automata classified as chaotic or complex display no 1/f spectra. We model the results generalizing the recently investigated Sierpinski signal to a class of fractal signals that are tailored to produce 1/fα spectra. From the widespread occurrence of (elementary) cellular automata patterns in chemistry, physics, and computer sciences, there are various candidates to show spectra similar to our results.

  6. The development of action planning in a joint action context.

    PubMed

    Paulus, Markus

    2016-07-01

    The ability to act jointly with another person is a fundamental requirement for participation in social life. The current study examines the development of action planning in a joint action context. In 4 experiments, 3-, 5-, and 7-year-old children as well as a group of adults (n = 196) interacted with another person to operate a novel apparatus. Their task was to hand the experimenter a tool with which she could activate 1 of 2 different effects on the apparatus. The elicitation of each effect required participants to grasp and insert the tool in a particular orientation. We assessed whether participants planned their grasping and reaching action in such a way that it enabled the partner to efficiently handle the tool, that is, anticipating the final end state of the joint activity. We found that 3-year-old children did not adjust their behavior to accommodate the other's action and that they did not increase their performance over multiple trials. Five- and 7-year-old children initially showed a tendency to plan their action in an egocentric manner (i.e., showed a form of egocentrism), but improved their joint action performance over time. Adult participants demonstrated joint action planning from the beginning. Interestingly, 3- and 5-year-old children were able to plan their grasp efficiently when acting alone on the apparatus. Yet, having first-hand experience with the task before acting with a partner did not facilitate performance in the joint action task for younger children. Overall, the study informs current approaches on the psychological basis and ontogenetic origins of joint action in childhood. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27337512

  7. Mimas Showing False Colors #1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    False color images of Saturn's moon, Mimas, reveal variation in either the composition or texture across its surface.

    During its approach to Mimas on Aug. 2, 2005, the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera obtained multi-spectral views of the moon from a range of 228,000 kilometers (142,500 miles).

    The image at the left is a narrow angle clear-filter image, which was separately processed to enhance the contrast in brightness and sharpness of visible features. The image at the right is a color composite of narrow-angle ultraviolet, green, infrared and clear filter images, which have been specially processed to accentuate subtle changes in the spectral properties of Mimas' surface materials. To create this view, three color images (ultraviolet, green and infrared) were combined into a single black and white picture that isolates and maps regional color differences. This 'color map' was then superimposed over the clear-filter image at the left.

    The combination of color map and brightness image shows how the color differences across the Mimas surface materials are tied to geological features. Shades of blue and violet in the image at the right are used to identify surface materials that are bluer in color and have a weaker infrared brightness than average Mimas materials, which are represented by green.

    Herschel crater, a 140-kilometer-wide (88-mile) impact feature with a prominent central peak, is visible in the upper right of each image. The unusual bluer materials are seen to broadly surround Herschel crater. However, the bluer material is not uniformly distributed in and around the crater. Instead, it appears to be concentrated on the outside of the crater and more to the west than to the north or south. The origin of the color differences is not yet understood. It may represent ejecta material that was excavated from inside Mimas when the Herschel impact occurred. The bluer color of these materials may be caused by subtle differences in

  8. LSD-based analysis of high-resolution stellar spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsymbal, V.; Tkachenko, A.; Van, Reeth T.

    2014-11-01

    We present a generalization of the method of least-squares deconvolution (LSD), a powerful tool for extracting high S/N average line profiles from stellar spectra. The generalization of the method is effected by extending it towards the multiprofile LSD and by introducing the possibility to correct the line strengths from the initial mask. We illustrate the new approach by two examples: (a) the detection of astroseismic signatures from low S/N spectra of single stars, and (b) disentangling spectra of multiple stellar objects. The analysis is applied to spectra obtained with 2-m class telescopes in the course of spectroscopic ground-based support for space missions such as CoRoT and Kepler. Usually, rather high S/N is required, so smaller telescopes can only compete successfully with more advanced ones when one can apply a technique that enables a remarkable increase in the S/N of the spectra which they observe. Since the LSD profiles have a potential for reconstruction what is common in all the spectral profiles, it should have a particular practical application to faint stars observed with 2-m class telescopes and whose spectra show remarkable LPVs.

  9. 10 CFR 110.62 - Order to show cause.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Order to show cause. 110.62 Section 110.62 Energy NUCLEAR... Enforcement § 110.62 Order to show cause. (a) In response to an alleged violation, described in § 110.60, the... cause: (1) Stating the alleged violation and proposed enforcement action; and (2) Informing the...

  10. 10 CFR 110.62 - Order to show cause.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Order to show cause. 110.62 Section 110.62 Energy NUCLEAR... Enforcement § 110.62 Order to show cause. (a) In response to an alleged violation, described in § 110.60, the... cause: (1) Stating the alleged violation and proposed enforcement action; and (2) Informing the...

  11. 16 CFR 5.57 - Order to show cause.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Order to show cause. 5.57 Section 5.57... CONDUCT Disciplinary Actions Concerning Postemployment Conflict of Interest § 5.57 Order to show cause. (a) Upon a Commission determination that there exists reasonable cause to believe a former...

  12. 10 CFR 110.62 - Order to show cause.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Order to show cause. 110.62 Section 110.62 Energy NUCLEAR... Enforcement § 110.62 Order to show cause. (a) In response to an alleged violation, described in § 110.60, the... cause: (1) Stating the alleged violation and proposed enforcement action; and (2) Informing the...

  13. 16 CFR 5.57 - Order to show cause.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Order to show cause. 5.57 Section 5.57... CONDUCT Disciplinary Actions Concerning Postemployment Conflict of Interest § 5.57 Order to show cause. (a) Upon a Commission determination that there exists reasonable cause to believe a former...

  14. 16 CFR 5.57 - Order to show cause.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Order to show cause. 5.57 Section 5.57... CONDUCT Disciplinary Actions Concerning Postemployment Conflict of Interest § 5.57 Order to show cause. (a) Upon a Commission determination that there exists reasonable cause to believe a former...

  15. 10 CFR 110.62 - Order to show cause.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Order to show cause. 110.62 Section 110.62 Energy NUCLEAR... Enforcement § 110.62 Order to show cause. (a) In response to an alleged violation, described in § 110.60, the... cause: (1) Stating the alleged violation and proposed enforcement action; and (2) Informing the...

  16. 41 CFR 60-4.8 - Show cause notice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... cause which shall contain the items specified in paragraphs (i) through (iv) of 41 CFR 60-2.2(c)(1). If... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2012-07-01 2009-07-01 true Show cause notice. 60-4.8...-CONSTRUCTION CONTRACTORS-AFFIRMATIVE ACTION REQUIREMENTS § 60-4.8 Show cause notice. If an investigation...

  17. 41 CFR 60-4.8 - Show cause notice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... cause which shall contain the items specified in paragraphs (i) through (iv) of 41 CFR 60-2.2(c)(1). If... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Show cause notice. 60-4.8...-CONSTRUCTION CONTRACTORS-AFFIRMATIVE ACTION REQUIREMENTS § 60-4.8 Show cause notice. If an investigation...

  18. 18 CFR 808.15 - Show cause proceeding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Show cause proceeding... HEARINGS AND ENFORCEMENT ACTIONS Compliance and Enforcement § 808.15 Show cause proceeding. (a) The... cause why a penalty should not be assessed in accordance with the provisions of this chapter and...

  19. 18 CFR 808.15 - Show cause proceeding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Show cause proceeding... HEARINGS AND ENFORCEMENT ACTIONS Compliance and Enforcement § 808.15 Show cause proceeding. (a) The... cause why a penalty should not be assessed in accordance with the provisions of this chapter and...

  20. 16 CFR 5.57 - Order to show cause.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Order to show cause. 5.57 Section 5.57... CONDUCT Disciplinary Actions Concerning Postemployment Conflict of Interest § 5.57 Order to show cause. (a) Upon a Commission determination that there exists reasonable cause to believe a former...

  1. 41 CFR 60-4.8 - Show cause notice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... cause which shall contain the items specified in paragraphs (i) through (iv) of 41 CFR 60-2.2(c)(1). If... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Show cause notice. 60-4.8...-CONSTRUCTION CONTRACTORS-AFFIRMATIVE ACTION REQUIREMENTS § 60-4.8 Show cause notice. If an investigation...

  2. 18 CFR 808.15 - Show cause proceeding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Show cause proceeding... HEARINGS AND ENFORCEMENT ACTIONS Compliance and Enforcement § 808.15 Show cause proceeding. (a) The... cause why a penalty should not be assessed in accordance with the provisions of this chapter and...

  3. 16 CFR 5.57 - Order to show cause.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Order to show cause. 5.57 Section 5.57... CONDUCT Disciplinary Actions Concerning Postemployment Conflict of Interest § 5.57 Order to show cause. (a) Upon a Commission determination that there exists reasonable cause to believe a former...

  4. 10 CFR 110.62 - Order to show cause.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Order to show cause. 110.62 Section 110.62 Energy NUCLEAR... Enforcement § 110.62 Order to show cause. (a) In response to an alleged violation, described in § 110.60, the... cause: (1) Stating the alleged violation and proposed enforcement action; and (2) Informing the...

  5. 18 CFR 808.15 - Show cause proceeding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Show cause proceeding... HEARINGS AND ENFORCEMENT ACTIONS Compliance and Enforcement § 808.15 Show cause proceeding. (a) The... cause why a penalty should not be assessed in accordance with the provisions of this chapter and...

  6. 18 CFR 808.15 - Show cause proceeding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Show cause proceeding... HEARINGS AND ENFORCEMENT ACTIONS Compliance and Enforcement § 808.15 Show cause proceeding. (a) The... cause why a penalty should not be assessed in accordance with the provisions of this chapter and...

  7. Spectra of clinical CT scanners using a portable Compton spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Duisterwinkel, H. A.; Abbema, J. K. van; Kawachimaru, R.; Paganini, L.; Graaf, E. R. van der; Brandenburg, S.; Goethem, M. J. van

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: Spectral information of the output of x-ray tubes in (dual source) computer tomography (CT) scanners can be used to improve the conversion of CT numbers to proton stopping power and can be used to advantage in CT scanner quality assurance. The purpose of this study is to design, validate, and apply a compact portable Compton spectrometer that was constructed to accurately measure x-ray spectra of CT scanners. Methods: In the design of the Compton spectrometer, the shielding materials were carefully chosen and positioned to reduce background by x-ray fluorescence from the materials used. The spectrum of Compton scattered x-rays alters from the original source spectrum due to various physical processes. Reconstruction of the original x-ray spectrum from the Compton scattered spectrum is based on Monte Carlo simulations of the processes involved. This reconstruction is validated by comparing directly and indirectly measured spectra of a mobile x-ray tube. The Compton spectrometer is assessed in a clinical setting by measuring x-ray spectra at various tube voltages of three different medical CT scanner x-ray tubes. Results: The directly and indirectly measured spectra are in good agreement (their ratio being 0.99) thereby validating the reconstruction method. The measured spectra of the medical CT scanners are consistent with theoretical spectra and spectra obtained from the x-ray tube manufacturer. Conclusions: A Compton spectrometer has been successfully designed, constructed, validated, and applied in the measurement of x-ray spectra of CT scanners. These measurements show that our compact Compton spectrometer can be rapidly set-up using the alignment lasers of the CT scanner, thereby enabling its use in commissioning, troubleshooting, and, e.g., annual performance check-ups of CT scanners.

  8. SEC Vidicon spectra of Geminid meteors, 1972

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millman, P. M.; Clifton, K. S.

    1975-01-01

    The SEC Vidicon, a low light level closed circuit television system, was used to obtain 137 spectrographic records of meteors at Mt. Hopkins, Arizona, during the Geminid meteor shower in December 1972. Seven of the best Geminid meteor spectra are studied here in detail. The near infrared, out to wavelengths near 9000 A, is recorded for the first time for Geminids. The spectra, in general, exhibit the elements previously found in photographic records of this shower but show a surprising frequency of occurrence of the forbidden green line of O I at 5577 A. This line is normally absent from meteors moving as slowly as the Geminids (36 km/sec) and its presence in these records may be due to the added sensitivity available with the SEC Vidicon. The average green line duration in Geminid meteors with a luminosity near zero absolute visual magnitude is 0.73 sec at a mean height of 95 km, 11 km lower than the green line peak in Perseid meteors of the same luminosity.

  9. Fourier transform spectra of quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damian, V.; Ardelean, I.; Armăşelu, Anca; Apostol, D.

    2010-05-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots are nanometer-sized crystals with unique photochemical and photophysical properties that are not available from either isolated molecules or bulk solids. These nanocrystals absorb light over a very broad spectral range as compared to molecular fluorophores which have very narrow excitation spectra. High-quality QDs are proper to be use in different biological and medical applications (as fluorescent labels, the cancer treatment and the drug delivery). In this article, we discuss Fourier transform visible spectroscopy of commercial quantum dots. We reveal that QDs produced by Evident Technologies when are enlightened by laser or luminescent diode light provides a spectral shift of their fluorescence spectra correlated to exciting emission wavelengths, as shown by the ARCspectroNIR Fourier Transform Spectrometer. In the final part of this paper we show an important biological application of CdSe/ZnS core-shell ODs as microbial labeling both for pure cultures of cyanobacteria (Synechocystis PCC 6803) and for mixed cultures of phototrophic and heterotrophic microorganisms.

  10. Fourier transform spectra of quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damian, V.; Ardelean, I.; Armăşelu, Anca; Apostol, D.

    2009-09-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots are nanometer-sized crystals with unique photochemical and photophysical properties that are not available from either isolated molecules or bulk solids. These nanocrystals absorb light over a very broad spectral range as compared to molecular fluorophores which have very narrow excitation spectra. High-quality QDs are proper to be use in different biological and medical applications (as fluorescent labels, the cancer treatment and the drug delivery). In this article, we discuss Fourier transform visible spectroscopy of commercial quantum dots. We reveal that QDs produced by Evident Technologies when are enlightened by laser or luminescent diode light provides a spectral shift of their fluorescence spectra correlated to exciting emission wavelengths, as shown by the ARCspectroNIR Fourier Transform Spectrometer. In the final part of this paper we show an important biological application of CdSe/ZnS core-shell ODs as microbial labeling both for pure cultures of cyanobacteria (Synechocystis PCC 6803) and for mixed cultures of phototrophic and heterotrophic microorganisms.

  11. Serial FBG sensor network allowing overlapping spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbenseth, S.; Lochmann, S.; Ahrens, A.; Rehm, B.

    2016-05-01

    For structure or material monitoring low impact serial fiber Bragg grating (FBG) networks have attracted increasing research interest. Common sensor networks using wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) for FBG interrogation are limited in their efficiency by the spectral width of their light source, the FBG tuning range and the spectral guard bands. Overlapping spectra are strictly forbidden in this case. Applying time division multiplexing (TDM) or active resonator schemes may overcome these restrictions. However, they introduce other substantial disadvantages like signal roundtrip dependency or sophisticated control of active resonating structures. Code division multiplexing (CDM) as a means of FBG interrogation by simple autocorrelation of appropriate codes has been shown to be superior in this respect. However, it came at the cost of a second spectrometer introducing additional equalization efforts. We demonstrate a new serial FBG sensor network utilizing CDM signal processing for efficient sensor interrogation without the need of a second spectrometer and additional state of polarization (SOP) controlling components. It allows overlapping spectra even when all sensing FBGs are positioned at the same centre wavelength and it shows a high degree of insensitivity to SOP. Sequence inversed keyed (SIK) serial signal processing utilizing quasi-orthogonal balanced codes ensures simple and quick sensor interrogation with high signal-to-interference/noise ratio.

  12. Discriminating Dysarthria Type From Envelope Modulation Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Liss, Julie M.; LeGendre, Sue; Lotto, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Previous research demonstrated the ability of temporally based rhythm metrics to distinguish among dysarthrias with different prosodic deficit profiles (J. M. Liss et al., 2009). The authors examined whether comparable results could be obtained by an automated analysis of speech envelope modulation spectra (EMS), which quantifies the rhythmicity of speech within specified frequency bands. Method EMS was conducted on sentences produced by 43 speakers with 1 of 4 types of dysarthria and healthy controls. The EMS consisted of the spectra of the slow-rate (up to 10 Hz) amplitude modulations of the full signal and 7 octave bands ranging in center frequency from 125 to 8000 Hz. Six variables were calculated for each band relating to peak frequency and amplitude and relative energy above, below, and in the region of 4 Hz. Discriminant function analyses (DFA) determined which sets of predictor variables best discriminated between and among groups. Results Each of 6 DFAs identified 2–6 of the 48 predictor variables. These variables achieved 84%–100% classification accuracy for group membership. Conclusions Dysarthrias can be characterized by quantifiable temporal patterns in acoustic output. Because EMS analysis is automated and requires no editing or linguistic assumptions, it shows promise as a clinical and research tool. PMID:20643800

  13. Analysis on the spectra and synchronous radiated electric field observation of cloud-to-ground lightning discharge plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Cen Jianyong; Yuan Ping; Qu Haiyan; Zhang Tinglong

    2011-11-15

    According to the spectra of cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning discharge plasma captured by a slit-less spectrograph and the information of synchronous radiated electric field, the temperatures, the total intensity of spectra, the peak value of current and its action integral of discharge plasma channel have been calculated. Furthermore, the correlativity of these parameters has been analyzed for the first time. The results indicate that the total intensity of spectra has a positive correlation to the discharge current in different strokes of one CG lightning, and the temperature of discharge plasma is direct proportion to the action integral in the first return strokes of different lightning.

  14. An RGB approach to extraordinary spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grusche, Sascha; Theilmann, Florian

    2015-09-01

    After Newton had explained a series of ordinary spectra and Goethe had pointed out its complementary counterpart, Nussbaumer discovered a series of extraordinary spectra which are geometrically identical and colourwise analogous to Newton’s and Goethe’s spectra. To understand the geometry and colours of extraordinary spectra, the wavelength composition is explored with filters and spectroscopic setups. Visualized in a dispersion diagram, the wavelength composition is interpreted in terms of additive colour mixing. Finally, all spectra are simulated as the superposition of red, green, and blue images that are shifted apart. This RGB approach makes it easy to understand the complex relationship between wavelengths and colours.

  15. Brane Constructions and BPS Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastogi, Ashwin

    The object of this work is to exploit various constructions of string theory and M-theory to yield new insights into supersymmetric theories in both four and three dimensions. In 4d, we extend work on Seiberg-Witten theory to study and compute BPS spectra of the class of complete N = 2 theories. The approach we take is based on the program of geometric engineering, in which 4d theories are constructed from compactifications of type IIB strings on Calabi-Yau manifolds. In this setup, the natural candidates for BPS states are D3 branes wrapped on supersymmetric 3-cycles in the Calabi-Yau. Our study makes use of the mathematical structure of quivers, whose representation theory encodes the notion of stability of BPS particles. Except for 11 exceptional cases, all complete theories can be constructed by wrapping stacks of two M5 branes on Riemann surfaces. By exploring the connection between quivers and M5 brane theories, we develop a powerful algorithm for computing BPS spectra, and give an in-depth study of its applications. In particular, we compute BPS spectra for all asymptotically free complete theories, as well as an infinite set of conformal SU(2)k theories with certain matter content. From here, we go on to apply the insight gained from our 4d study to 3d gauge theories. We consider the analog of the M5 brane construction in the case of 3d N = 2 theories: pairs of M5 branes wrapped on a 3-manifold. Using the ansantz of R-flow, we study 3-manifolds consisting of Riemann surfaces fibered over R. When the construction is non-singular, the resulting IR physics is described by a free abelian Chern-Simons theory. The mathematical data of a tangle captures the data of the gauge theory, and the Reidemeister equivalances on tangles correspond to dualities of physical descriptions. To obtain interacting matter, we allow singularities in the construction. By extending the tangle description to these singular cases, we find a set of generalized Reidemeister moves that

  16. Ultraviolet Spectra of Two Magnetic White Dwarfs and Ultraviolet Spectra of Subluminous Objects Found in the Kiso Schmidt Survey and Ultraviolet Absorptions in the Spectra of DA White Dwarfds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wegner, Gary A.

    1988-01-01

    Research under NASA Grant NAG5-287 has carried out a number of projects in conjunction with the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) satellite. These include: (1) studies of the UV spectra of DA white dwarfs which show quasi-molecular bands of H2 and H2(+); (2) the peculiar star HR6560; (3) the UV spectra of two magnetic white dwarfs that also show the quasi-molecular features; (4) investigations of the UV spectra of subluminous stars, primarily identified from visual wavelength spectroscopy in the Kiso survey of UV excess stars, some of which show interesting metal lines in their UV spectra; and (5) completion of studies of UV spectra of DB stars. The main result of this research has been to further knowledge of the structure and compositions of subluminous stars which helps cast light on their formation and evolution.

  17. Submillimeter Spectra of Low Temperature Gases and Mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wishnow, E. H.; Gush, H. P.; Halpern, M.; Ozier, I.

    2002-01-01

    Submillimeter absorption spectra of nitrogen, nitrogen-argon mixtures, and methane have been measured using temperatures and pressures near to those found in the atmospheres of Titan and Saturn. The experiments show the spectral signature of dimers which will likely appear in far-infrared spectra of Titan that will be obtained by the Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIS) onboard the Cassini spacecraft. The recent CIRS spectrum of Jupiter shows far-infrared spectral lines of methane and the corresponding lines are observed in the laboratory. We are extending this work to lower frequencies using a new differential Michelson interferometer that operates over the frequency region 3-30 1/cm..

  18. Submillimeter Spectra of Low Temperature Gases and Mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Wishnow, E H; Gush, H P; Halpern M; Ozier, I

    2002-09-19

    Submillimeter absorption spectra of nitrogen, nitrogen-argon mixtures, and methane have been measured using temperatures and pressures near to those found in the atmospheres of Titan and Saturn. The experiments show the spectral signature of dimers which will likely appear in far-infrared spectra of Titan that will be obtained by the Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) onboard the Cassini spacecraft. The recent CIRS spectrum of Jupiter shows far-infrared spectral lines of methane and the corresponding lines are observed in the laboratory. We are extending this work to lower frequencies using a new differential Michelson interferometer that operates over the frequency region 3-30 cm{sup -1}.

  19. Ferromagnetic Resonance Spectra of Magnetosome Chains From first Micromagnetic Principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winklhofer, M.

    2015-12-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria show distinct ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) spectra due to the pronounced uniaxial anisotropy related to the magnetosome chain geometry. Simplified physical models are able to explain the key features of these FMR spectra in terms of effective shape anisotropy, but do not capture the details that are related to chain geometry as such. Here I will show what FMR modes can be expected for magnetosome chains, how these can be experimentally determined, and may be used for detecting fossil magnetosome chains in sediments.

  20. Following the mechanisms of bacteriostatic versus bactericidal action using Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bernatová, Silvie; Samek, Ota; Pilát, Zdeněk; Serý, Mojmír; Ježek, Jan; Jákl, Petr; Siler, Martin; Krzyžánek, Vladislav; Zemánek, Pavel; Holá, Veronika; Dvořáčková, Milada; Růžička, Filip

    2013-10-24

    Antibiotics cure infections by influencing bacterial growth or viability. Antibiotics can be divided to two groups on the basis of their effect on microbial cells through two main mechanisms, which are either bactericidal or bacteriostatic. Bactericidal antibiotics kill the bacteria and bacteriostatic antibiotics suppress the growth of bacteria (keep them in the stationary phase of growth). One of many factors to predict a favorable clinical outcome of the potential action of antimicrobial chemicals may be provided using in vitro bactericidal/bacteriostatic data (e.g., minimum inhibitory concentrations-MICs). Consequently, MICs are used in clinical situations mainly to confirm resistance, and to determine the in vitro activities of new antimicrobials. We report on the combination of data obtained from MICs with information on microorganisms' "fingerprint" (e.g., DNA/RNA, and proteins) provided by Raman spectroscopy. Thus, we could follow mechanisms of the bacteriostatic versus bactericidal action simply by detecting the Raman bands corresponding to DNA. The Raman spectra of Staphylococcus epidermidis treated with clindamycin (a bacteriostatic agent) indeed show little effect on DNA which is in contrast with the action of ciprofloxacin (a bactericidal agent), where the Raman spectra show a decrease in strength of the signal assigned to DNA, suggesting DNA fragmentation.

  1. Pressure spectra and cross spectra at an area contraction in a ducted combustion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, J. H.; Raftopoulos, D. D.

    1980-01-01

    Pressure spectra and cross-spectra at an area contraction in a liquid fuel, ducted, combustion noise test facility are analyzed. Measurements made over a range of air and fuel flows are discussed. Measured spectra are compared with spectra calculated using a simple analytical model.

  2. Reflectance spectra of primitive chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trigo-Rodríguez, J. M.; Moyano-Cambero, C. E.; Llorca, J.

    2013-05-01

    We are studying a wide sample of pristine carbonaceous chondrites from the NASA Antarctic collection in order to get clues on the physico-chemical processes occurred in the parent bodies of these meteorites. We are obtaining laboratory reflectance spectra of different groups of carbonaceous chondrites, but here we focus in CM and CI chondrites. We discuss the main spectral features that can be used to identify primitive carbonaceous asteroids by remote sensing techniques. Two different spectrometers were used covering the entire 0.3 to 30 μm electromagnetic window. Only a handful of Near Earth Objects (NEOs) exhibit bands or features clearly associated with aqueous alteration. Among them are the target asteroids of Osiris Rex and Marco Polo-R missions.

  3. Graviton Spectra in String Cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Galluccio, M.; Occhionero, F.; Litterio, M.

    1997-08-01

    We propose to uncover the signature of a stringy era in the primordial Universe by searching for a prominent peak in the relic graviton spectrum. This feature, which in our specific model terminates an {omega}{sup 3} increase and initiates an {omega}{sup {minus}7} decrease, is induced during the so far overlooked bounce of the scale factor between the collapsing deflationary era (or pre{endash}big bang) and the expanding inflationary era (or post{endash}big bang). The frequency and the intensity of the peak may likely fall in the realm of the new generation of interferometric detectors. The existence of a peak, at variance with ordinarily monotonic graviton spectra, would therefore offer strong support to string cosmology. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  4. Model Atmospheres and X-Ray Spectra of Bursting Neutron Stars: Hydrogen-Helium Comptonized Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madej, J.; Joss, P. C.; Różańska, A.

    2004-02-01

    Compton scattering plays a crucial role in determining the structure of the atmosphere of an X-ray burster and its theoretical spectrum. Our paper presents a description of the plane-parallel model atmosphere of a very hot neutron star and its theoretical flux spectrum of outgoing radiation. Our model equations take into account all bound-free and free-free monochromatic opacities relevant to hydrogen-helium chemical composition and take into account the effects of Compton scattering of radiation in thermal plasma with fully relativistic thermal velocities. We use Compton scattering terms in the equation of transfer, which precisely describe photon-electron energy and momentum exchange for photons with initial energies exceeding the electron rest mass of 511 keV. Model atmosphere equations are solved with the variable Eddington factors technique. The grid of H-He model atmospheres and flux spectra is computed on a dense mesh of 107K<=Teff<=3×107K and a surface gravity of logg. In many cases, the assumed logg approached the critical gravity loggcr, i.e., the Eddington limit. We confirm that H-He spectra of X-ray bursters deviate from blackbody spectra and discuss their shapes. The table of color to effective temperature ratios shows that theoretical values of Tc/Teff do not exceed 1.9 in H-He atmospheres in hydrostatic and radiative equilibrium.

  5. Line Coupling in Atmospheric Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tipping, R. H.

    1996-01-01

    The theoretical modeling of atmospheric spectra is important for a number of different applications: for instance, in the determination of minor atmospheric constituents such as ozone, carbon dioxide, CFC's etc.; in monitoring the temperature profile for climate studies; and in measuring the incoming and outgoing radiation to input into global climate models. In order to accomplish the above mentioned goal, one needs to know the spectral parameters characterizing the individual spectral lines (frequency, width, strength, and shape) as well as the physical parameters of the atmosphere (temperature, abundances, and pressure). When all these parameters are known, it is usually assumed that the resultant spectra and concomitant absorption coefficient can then be calculated by a superposition of individual profiles of appropriate frequency, strength and shape. However, this is not true if the lines are 'coupled'. Line coupling is a subtle effect that takes place when lines of a particular molecule overlap in frequency. In this case when the initial states and the final states of two transitions are connected by collisions, there is a quantum interference resulting in perturbed shapes. In general, this results in the narrowing of Q-branches (those in which the rotational quantum number does not change), and vibration-rotational R- and P branches (those in which the rotational quantum number changes by +/- 1), and in the spectral region beyond band heads (regions where the spectral lines pile up due to centrifugal distortion). Because these features and spectral regions are often those of interest in the determination of the abundances and pressure-temperature profiles, one must take this effect into account in atmospheric models.

  6. Spectra of small Koronis family members

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, C.; Rivkin, A.; Trilling, D.; Moskovitz, N.

    2014-07-01

    The space-weathering process and its implications for the relationships between S- and Q-type asteroids and ordinary chondrite meteorites are long-standing problems in asteroid science. Although the visible and near-infrared spectra of S- and Q-type objects qualitatively show the same absorption features and quantitatively show evidence of the same minerals, the S types display increased spectral slopes and muted absorption features compared to the Q types. This spectral mismatch is consistent with the effects of the space weathering process. Binzel et al. provided the missing link between Q- and S-type bodies in near-Earth space by showing a reddening of spectral slope in objects from 0.1 to 5 km that corresponded to the transition from Q- to S-type spectra. This result implied that size, and therefore age, is related to the relationship between Q- and S-type. The existence of Q-type objects in the main belt was not confirmed until Mothe-Diniz and Nesvorny (2008) found them in young S-type clusters. To investigate the trend from Q to S in the main belt, we examined space weathering within the old main-belt Koronis family using a spectrophotometric survey (Rivkin et al. 2011, Thomas et al. 2011). Rivkin et al. (2011) identified several potential Q-type objects within the Koronis family. Our Q-type candidates were identified using broad-band spectrophotometry and could not be taxonomically classified on that basis alone. We obtained follow-up visible and near-infrared spectral observations of our potential Q-type objects, (26970) Elias, (45610) 2000 DJ_{48}, and (37411) 2001 XF_{152}, using Gemini and Magellan. We will present the results of these spectral follow-up observations. Observations of (26970) Elias demonstrate that the object is more consistent with the average Q-type spectrum than the average S-type spectrum.

  7. [Predicting Spectra of Accretion Disks Around Galactic Black Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krolik, Julian H.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this grant was to construct detailed atmosphere solutions in order to predict the spectra of accretion disks around Galactic black holes. Our plan of action was to take an existing disk atmosphere code (TLUSTY, created by Ivan Hubeny) and introduce those additional physical processes necessary to make it applicable to disks of this variety. These modifications include: treating Comptonization; introducing continuous opacity due to heavy elements; incorporating line opacity due to heavy elements; adopting a disk structure that reflects readjustments due to radiation pressure effects; and injecting heat via a physically-plausible vertical distribution.

  8. Circadian-effect engineering of solid-state lighting spectra for beneficial and tunable lighting.

    PubMed

    Dai, Qi; Shan, Qifeng; Lam, Hien; Hao, Luoxi; Lin, Yi; Cui, Zhe

    2016-09-01

    Optimization of solid-state lighting spectra is performed to achieve beneficial and tunable circadian effects. First, the minimum spectral circadian action factor (CAF) of 2700 K white light-emitting diodes (LEDs) is studied for applications where biologically active illumination is undesirable. It is found that white-LEDs based on (i) RGB chips, (ii) blue & red chips plus green phosphor, and (iii) blue chip plus green & red phosphors are the corresponding minimum-CAF solutions at color-rendering index (CRI) requirements of 80, 90, and 95, respectively. Second, maximum CAF tunability of LED clusters is studied for dynamic daylighting applications. A dichromatic phosphor-converted blue-centered LED, a dichromatic phosphor-converted green-centered LED, and a monochromatic red LED are grouped to obtain white spectra between 2700 K and 6500 K. A maximum CAF tunability of 3.25 times is achieved with CRI above 90 and luminous efficacy of radiation of 313 - 373 lm/W. We show that our approaches have advantages over previously reported solutions on system simplicity, minimum achievable CAF value, CAF tunability range, and light source efficacy. PMID:27607613

  9. Circadian-effect engineering of solid-state lighting spectra for beneficial and tunable lighting.

    PubMed

    Dai, Qi; Shan, Qifeng; Lam, Hien; Hao, Luoxi; Lin, Yi; Cui, Zhe

    2016-09-01

    Optimization of solid-state lighting spectra is performed to achieve beneficial and tunable circadian effects. First, the minimum spectral circadian action factor (CAF) of 2700 K white light-emitting diodes (LEDs) is studied for applications where biologically active illumination is undesirable. It is found that white-LEDs based on (i) RGB chips, (ii) blue & red chips plus green phosphor, and (iii) blue chip plus green & red phosphors are the corresponding minimum-CAF solutions at color-rendering index (CRI) requirements of 80, 90, and 95, respectively. Second, maximum CAF tunability of LED clusters is studied for dynamic daylighting applications. A dichromatic phosphor-converted blue-centered LED, a dichromatic phosphor-converted green-centered LED, and a monochromatic red LED are grouped to obtain white spectra between 2700 K and 6500 K. A maximum CAF tunability of 3.25 times is achieved with CRI above 90 and luminous efficacy of radiation of 313 - 373 lm/W. We show that our approaches have advantages over previously reported solutions on system simplicity, minimum achievable CAF value, CAF tunability range, and light source efficacy.

  10. Change in the absorption spectra of blood exposed to a low-frequency magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalesskaya, G. A.; Mit'kovskaya, N. P.; Galai, O. A.; Kuchinskii, A. V.; Laskina, O. V.

    2007-03-01

    We have used the absorption spectra of whole blood in the UV-visible and IR regions of the spectrum to study changes in the structure of the molecular components of blood when exposed to a low-frequency pulsed magnetic field used to treat ischemic heart disease. We show that pronounced changes in the spectra when the blood is directly exposed in vivo to a magnetic field may be due to breaking of the bond between the heme group and the protein of the hemoglobin, as a consequence of changes in the intermolecular interactions in the polypeptide chains of the hemoglobin and also the spin states of the paramagnetic heme components. Exposure to a magnetic field results in changes in the conformations of the polypeptide chains of hemoglobin and the rate of dissociation of oxyhemoglobin. The structural changes in the hemoglobin molecule are considered as one of the possible primary mechanisms of action on blood in vivo for a low-frequency pulsed magnetic field.

  11. Action goals influence action-specific perception.

    PubMed

    Cañal-Bruland, Rouwen; van der Kamp, John

    2009-12-01

    We examined the processes that mediate the emergence of action-specific influences on perception that have recently been reported for baseball batting and golf putting (Witt, Linkenauger, Bakdash, & Proffitt, 2008; Witt & Proffitt, 2005). To this end, we used a Schokokusswurfmaschine: Children threw a ball at a target, which, if hit successfully, launched a ball that the children then had to catch. In two experiments, children performed either a throwing-and-catching task or a throwing-only task, in which no ball was launched. After each task, the size of the target or of the ball was estimated. Results indicate that action-specific influences on perceived size occur for objects that are related to the end goal of the action, but not for objects that are related to intermediate action goals. These results suggest that action-specific influences on perception are contingent upon the primary action goals to be achieved.

  12. A simple model for strong ground motions and response spectra

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Safak, Erdal; Mueller, Charles; Boatwright, John

    1988-01-01

    A simple model for the description of strong ground motions is introduced. The model shows that response spectra can be estimated by using only four parameters of the ground motion, the RMS acceleration, effective duration and two corner frequencies that characterize the effective frequency band of the motion. The model is windowed band-limited white noise, and is developed by studying the properties of two functions, cumulative squared acceleration in the time domain, and cumulative squared amplitude spectrum in the frequency domain. Applying the methods of random vibration theory, the model leads to a simple analytical expression for the response spectra. The accuracy of the model is checked by using the ground motion recordings from the aftershock sequences of two different earthquakes and simulated accelerograms. The results show that the model gives a satisfactory estimate of the response spectra.

  13. Action Research: Rethinking Lewin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickens, Linda; Watkins, Karen

    1999-01-01

    Explores both historical and contemporary definitions of action research. Describes the process and goals of action research in the tradition of Lewin. Presents a case study of an action-research project involving two teams in a high-technology corporation that depicts the process in action. (Author/CCM)

  14. Action Learning at Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mumford, Alan, Ed.

    This book contains 34 papers examining the theory, process, and outcomes of action learning at work. The following papers are included: "An Introduction to the Text" (Alan Mumford); "The Learning Equation" (Reg Revans); "Action Learning as a Vehicle for Learning" (Alan Mumford); "Placing Action Learning and Action Research in Context" (Cliff…

  15. Vibrationally high-resolved electronic spectra of MCl2 (M = C, Si, Ge, Sn, Pb) and photoelectron spectra of MCl2-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ran, Yibin; Pang, Min; Shen, Wei; Li, Ming; He, Rongxing

    2016-10-01

    We systematically studied the vibrational-resolved electronic spectra of group IV dichlorides using the Franck-Condon approximation combined with the Duschinsky and Herzberg-Teller effects in harmonic and anharmonic frameworks (only the simulation of absorption spectra includes the anharmonicity). Calculated results showed that the band shapes of simulated spectra are in accordance with those of the corresponding experimental or theoretical ones. We found that the symmetric bend mode in progression of absorption is the most active one, whereas the main contributor in photoelectron spectra is the symmetric stretching mode. Moreover, the Duschinsky and anharmonic effects exert weak influence on the absorption spectra, except for PbCl2 molecule. The theoretical insights presented in this work are significant in understanding the photophysical properties of MCl2 (M = C, Si, Ge, Sn, Pb) and studying the Herzberg-Teller and the anharmonic effects on the absorption spectra of new dichlorides of this main group.

  16. Use of thin ionization calorimeters for measurements of cosmic ray energy spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. V.; Ormes, J. S.; Schmidt, W. K. H.

    1976-01-01

    The reliability of performing measurements of cosmic ray energy spectra with a thin ionization calorimeter was investigated. Monte Carlo simulations were used to determine whether energy response fluctuations would cause measured spectra to be different from the primary spectra. First, Gaussian distributions were assumed for the calorimeter energy resolutions. The second method employed a detailed Monte Carlo simulation of cascades from an isotropic flux of protons. The results show that as long as the energy resolution does not change significantly with energy, the spectral indices can be reliably determined even for sigma sub e/e = 50%. However, if the energy resolution is strongly energy dependent, the measured spectra do not reproduce the true spectra. Energy resolutions greatly improving with energy result in measured spectra that are too steep, while resolutions getting much worse with energy cause the measured spectra to be too flat.

  17. The mid-infrared transmission spectra of Antarctic ureilites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandford, Scott A.

    1993-01-01

    The mid-IR (4000-450/cm; 2.5-22.2 microns) transmission spectra of seven Antarctic ureilites and 10 Antarctic H-5 ordinary chondrites are presented. The ureilite spectra show a number of absorption bands, the strongest of which is a wide, complex feature centered near 1000/cm (10 microns) due to Si-O stretching vibrations in silicates. The profiles and positions of the substructure in this feature indicate that Mg-rich olivines and pyroxenes are the main silicates responsible. The relative abundances of these two minerals, as inferred from the spectra, show substantial variation from meteorite to meteorite, but generally indicate olivine is the most abundant (olivine:pyroxene = 60:40 to 95:5). Both the predominance of olivine and the variable olivine-to-pyroxene ratio are consistent with the known composition and heterogeneity of ureilites. The H-5 ordinary chondrites spanned a range of weathering classes and were used to provide a means of addressing the extent to which the ureilite spectra may have been altered by weathering processes. It was found that, while weathering of these meteorites produces some weak bands due to the formation of small amounts of carbonates and hydrates, the profile of the main silicate feature has been little affected by Antarctic exposure in the meteorites studied here. The mid-IR ureilite spectra provide an additional means of testing potential asteroidal parent bodies for the ureilites.

  18. X ray spectra of cataclysmic variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Joseph; Halpern, Jules

    1990-01-01

    X ray spectral parameters of cataclysmic variables observed with the 'Einstein' imaging proportional counter were determined by fitting an optically thin, thermal bremsstrahlung spectrum to the raw data. Most of the sources show temperatures of order a few keV, while a few sources exhibit harder spectra with temperatures in excess of 10 keV. Estimated 0.1 to 3.5 keV luminosities are generally in the range from 10(exp 30) to 10(exp 32) erg/sec. The results are consistent with the x rays originating in a disk/white dwarf boundary layer of non-magnetic systems, or in a hot, post-shock region in the accretion column of DQ Her stars, with a negligible contribution from the corona of the companion. In a few objects column densities were found that are unusually high for interstellar material. It was suggested that the absorption occurs in the system itself.

  19. Optical absorption spectra of dications of carotenoids

    SciTech Connect

    Jeevarajan, J.A.; Wei, C.C.; Jeevarajan, A.S.; Kispert, L.D.

    1996-04-04

    Quantitative optical absorption spectra of the cation radicals and the dications of canthaxanthin (I), {beta}carotene (II), 7`-cyano-7`-ethoxycarbonyl-7`-apo-{beta}-carotene (III), and 7`,7`-dimethyl-7`-apo-{beta}-carotene (IV) in dichloromethane solution are reported. Exclusive formation of dications occurs when the carotenoids are oxidized with ferric chloride. Addition of neutral carotenoid to the dications results in equilibrium formation of cation radicals. Oxidation with iodine in dichloromethane affords only cation radicals; electrochemical oxidation under suitable conditions yields both dications and cation radicals. Values of the optical parameters depend on the nature of the oxidative medium. The oscillator strengths calculated for gas phase cation radicals and dications of I-IV using the INDO/S method show the same trend as the experimental values. 31 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Attention, biological motion, and action recognition.

    PubMed

    Thompson, James; Parasuraman, Raja

    2012-01-01

    Interacting with others in the environment requires that we perceive and recognize their movements and actions. Neuroimaging and neuropsychological studies have indicated that a number of brain regions, particularly the superior temporal sulcus, are involved in a number of processes essential for action recognition, including the processing of biological motion and processing the intentions of actions. We review the behavioral and neuroimaging evidence suggesting that while some aspects of action recognition might be rapid and effective, they are not necessarily automatic. Attention is particularly important when visual information about actions is degraded or ambiguous, or if competing information is present. We present evidence indicating that neural responses associated with the processing of biological motion are strongly modulated by attention. In addition, behavioral and neuroimaging evidence shows that drawing inferences from the actions of others is attentionally demanding. The role of attention in action observation has implications for everyday social interactions and workplace applications that depend on observing, understanding and interpreting actions. PMID:21640836

  1. Stellar parametrization from Gaia RVS spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Recio-Blanco, A.; de Laverny, P.; Allende Prieto, C.; Fustes, D.; Manteiga, M.; Arcay, B.; Bijaoui, A.; Dafonte, C.; Ordenovic, C.; Ordoñez Blanco, D.

    2016-01-01

    found for A-type stars, while the log(g) derivation is more accurate (errors of 0.07 and 0.12 dex at GRVS = 12.6 and 13.4, respectively). For the faintest stars, with GRVS≳ 13-14, a Teff input from the spectrophotometric-derived parameters will allow the final GSP-Spec parametrization to be improved. Conclusions: The reported results, while neglecting possible mismatches between synthetic and real spectra, show that the contribution of the RVS-based stellar parameters will be unique in the brighter part of the Gaia survey, which allows for crucial age estimations and accurate chemical abundances. This will constitute a unique and precious sample, providing many pieces of the Milky Way history puzzle with unprecedented precision and statistical relevance.

  2. Blind extraction of exoplanetary spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morello, Giuseppe; Waldmann, Ingo P.; Tinetti, Giovanna

    2016-06-01

    In the last decade, remote sensing spectroscopy enabled characterization of the atmospheres of extrasolar planets. Transmission and emission spectra of tens of transiting exoplanets have been measured with multiple instruments aboard Spitzer and Hubble Space Telescopes as well as ground-based facilities, revealing the presence of atomic, ionic and molecular species in their atmospheres, and constraining their temperature and pressure profiles.Early analyses were somehow heuristic both in measuring the spectra and in their interpretation, leading to some controversies in the literature.A photometric precision of 0.01% is necessary to detect the atmospheric spectral modulations. Current observatories, except Kepler, were not designed to achieve this precision. Data reduction is necessary to minimize the effect of instrument systematics in order to achieve the target precision. In the past, parametric models have extensively been used by most teams to remove correlated noise with the aid of auxiliary information of the instrument, the so-called optical state vectors (OSVs). Such OSVs can include inter- and intra-pixel position of the star or its spectrum, instrument temperatures and inclinations, and/or other parameters. In some cases, different parameterizations led to discrepant results.We recommend the use of blind non-parametric data detrending techniques to overcome those issues. In particular, we adopt Independent Component Analysis (ICA), i.e. a blind source separation (BSS) technique to disentangle the multiple instrument systematics and astrophysical signals in transit/eclipse light curves. ICA does not require a model for the systematics, and for this reason, it can be applied to any instrument with little changes, if any. ICA-based algorithms have been applied to Spitzer/IRAC and synthetic observations in photometry (Morello et al. 2014, 2015, 2016; Morello 2015) and to Hubble/NICMOS and Spitzer/IRS in spectroscopy (Waldmann 2012, 2014, Waldmann et al. 2013

  3. Inferences about Action Engage Action Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Lawrence J.; Lev-Ari, Shiri; Zwaan, Rolf A.

    2008-01-01

    Verbal descriptions of actions activate compatible motor responses [Glenberg, A. M., & Kaschak, M. P. (2002). Grounding language in action. "Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 9", 558-565]. Previous studies have found that the motor processes for manual rotation are engaged in a direction-specific manner when a verb disambiguates the direction of…

  4. Modelling asteroid spectra: few examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birlan, M.; Popescu, M.

    2011-10-01

    Asteroidal population comprises now more than 500,000 objects. Several observational techniques (spectroscopy, adaptive optics, photometry, polarimetry, radar,..) are used in order to obtain a mature understanding of an overall knowledge of this population. Spectroscopy can play a key role in determining the chemical composition and physical process that took place and modified the surface of asteroids. The development of telescopic instruments and the possibility to access them remotely allowed an increasing number of asteroid spectral measurements. The exploitation of spectral measurements is one of the important items to enlarge our science of surfaces of atmosphereless bodies. Spectral data of asteroids are in continuing growth. To exploit these spectral data we must account the global science of this population as well as the knowledge derived by studies of comparative planetology. The project M4AST (Modeling for Asteroids) consists in a database containing the results of these telescopic measurements and a set of applications for spectral analysis (Fig. 1). M4AST cover several aspects related to statistics of asteroids (taxonomy), mineralogical solutions using laboratory spectra from RELAB, and mineralogical modeling using space weathering effects corroborated with radiative transfer laws. M4AST was conceived to be available via a web interface and will be available for the scientific community. The abilities of these routines will be highlighted by few examples. Science derived via M4AST obtained for (222) Lucia, (809) Lundia, (810) Atossa, (1005) Arago, (1220) Crocus, and (4486) Mithra will be presented.

  5. Reflectance spectra of subarctic lichens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petzold, Donald E.; Goward, Samuel N.

    1988-01-01

    Lichens constitute a major portion of the ground cover of high latitude environments, but little has been reported concerning their in situ solar spectral reflectance properties. Knowledge of these properties is important for the interpretation of remotely sensed observations from high latitude regions, as well as in studies of high latitude ecology and energy balance climatology. The spectral reflectance of common boreal vascular plants is similar to that of vascular plants of the midlatitudes. The dominant lichens, in contrast, display variable reflectance patterns in visible wavelengths. The relative reflectance peak at 0.55 microns, common to green vegetation, is absent or indistinct in spectra of pervasive boreal forest and tundra lichens, despite the presence of chlorophyll in the inner algal cells. Lichens of the dominant genus, Cladina, display strong absorption of ultraviolet energy and short-wavelength blue light relative to their absorption in other visible wavelengths. Since the Cladinae dominate both the surface vegetation in open woodlands of the boreal forest and the low arctic tundra, their unusual spectral reflectance patterns will enable accurate monitoring of the boreal forest-tundra ecotone and detection of its vigor and movement in the future.

  6. Band Spectra and Molecular Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kronig, R. De L.

    2011-06-01

    Introduction; Part I. The Energy Levels of Diatomic Molecules and their Classification by Means of Quantum Numbers: 1. General foundations; 2. Wave mechanics of diatomic molecules; 3. Electronic levels; 4. Vibrational levels; 5. Rotational levels; 6. Stark and Zeeman effect; 7. Energy levels of polyatomic molecules; Part II. Fine Structure and Wave Mechanical Properties of the Energy Levels of Diatomic Molecules: 8. The perturbation function; 9. Rotational distortion of spin multiplets; 10. Fine structure; 11. Perturbations and predissociation; 12. Even and odd levels; 13. Symmetrical and antisymmetrical levels; Part III. Selection Rules and Intensities in Diatomic Molecules: 14. General foundations; 15. Electronic bands; 16. Vibrational bands; 17. Rotational bands; 18. Band spectra and nuclear structure; 19. Transitions in the Stark and Zeeman effect; Part IV. Macroscopic Properties of Molecular Gases: 20. Scattering; 21. Dispersion; 22. Kerr and Faraday effect; 23. Dielectric constants; 24. Magnetic susceptibilities; 25. Specific heats; Part V. Molecule Formation and Chemical Binding: 26. Heteropolar molecules; 27. Homopolar molecules. Chemical forces between two H-atoms and two He-atoms; 28. The general theory of homopolar compounds; Bibliography; Subject index.

  7. Interpretation of Nitroindolinospirobenzothiopyran Vibrational Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladkov, L. L.; Khamchukov, Yu. D.; Lyubimov, A. V.

    2016-05-01

    The structures of four possible stereoisomers of the closed form of photochromic nitroindolinospirobenzothiopyran (NISTP) {1',3'-dihydro-1',3',3'-trimethyl-6-nitrospiro[2H-1-benzothiopyran-2,2'-(2H)-indoline]} were determined by the DFT method. The geometry of the most stable isomer was defined. Nitro-substitution changes mainly the lengths of bonds formed by S and N with spiro-atom Cs. According to the calculations, the CsS bond changes most and lengthens by 0.019 Å. It is shown that the S atom has large displacement amplitudes in normal modes assigned to Raman lines at 230, 285, 360, and 575 cm-1 and weak IR bands at 467 and 577 cm-1. Oscillations involving the nitro group are very active in Raman and IR spectra. Their frequencies are slightly lower than similar frequencies of nitrobenzene and nitroindolinospirobenzopyran, indicating a higher degree of vibrational coupling of the NO2 group with the NISTP molecular skeleton.

  8. Identification of the nu-2 vibration-rotation band of ammonia in ground level solar spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murcray, D. G.; Goldman, A.; Bradford, C. M.; Cook, G. R.; Van Allen, J. W.; Bonomo, F. S.; Murcray, F. H.

    1978-01-01

    Comparison of infrared solar spectra in the 750 to 950 kayser region obtained during sunrise and sunset shows that a number of features due to the nu-2 NH3 band are present on the sunset spectra but are indicated by only a trace on the sunrise spectra. The sunset path shows approximately 0.007 atm-cm NH3, and the reason for the discrepancy between sunrise and sunset spectra is not known. The ground-based measurements at Denver were obtained with a 0.06 kayser resolution.

  9. X-ray spectra of supernova remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szymkowiak, A. E.

    1985-01-01

    X-ray spectra were obtained from fields in three supernova remnants with the solid state spectrometer of the HEAO 2 satellite. These spectra, which contain lines from K-shell transitions of several abundant elements with atomic numbers between 10 and 22, were compared with various models, including some of spectra that would be produced by adiabatic phase remnants when the time-dependence of the ionization is considered.

  10. The role of action effects in 12-month-olds' action control: a comparison of televised model and live model.

    PubMed

    Klein, Annette M; Hauf, Petra; Aschersleben, Gisa

    2006-12-01

    The present study investigated differences in infant imitation after watching a televised model and a live model and addressed the issue of whether action effects influence infants' action control in both cases. In a 2x2 design, 12-month-old infants observed a live or a televised model performing a three-step action sequence, in which either the 2nd or the 3rd action step was combined with an acoustical action effect. We assumed that infants would use the observed action-effect relations for their own action control in the test phase afterwards. Even though results exhibited differences in the absolute amount of imitation between the two demonstration groups, both groups showed similar result patterns regarding the action effect manipulation: infants imitated the action step that was followed by a salient action effect more often and mostly as the first target action, emphasizing the important role of action effects in infants' action control. PMID:17138306

  11. Numerical Tests of the Improved Fermilab Action

    SciTech Connect

    Detar, C.; Kronfeld, A.S.; Oktay, M.B.

    2010-11-01

    Recently, the Fermilab heavy-quark action was extended to include dimension-six and -seven operators in order to reduce the discretization errors. In this talk, we present results of the first numerical simulations with this action (the OK action), where we study the masses of the quarkonium and heavy-light systems. We calculate combinations of masses designed to test improvement and compare results obtained with the OK action to their counterparts obtained with the clover action. Our preliminary results show a clear improvement.

  12. Consistent cosmic microwave background spectra from quantum depletion

    SciTech Connect

    Casadio, Roberto; Orlandi, Alessio; Kühnel, Florian E-mail: florian.kuhnel@fysik.su.se

    2015-09-01

    Following a new quantum cosmological model proposed by Dvali and Gomez, we quantitatively investigate possible modifications to the Hubble parameter and following corrections to the cosmic microwave background spectrum. In this model, scalar and tensor perturbations are generated by the quantum depletion of the background inflaton and graviton condensate respectively. We show how the inflaton mass affects the power spectra and the tensor-to-scalar ratio. Masses approaching the Planck scale would lead to strong deviations, while standard spectra are recovered for an inflaton mass much smaller than the Planck mass.

  13. Comparative Modelling of the Spectra of Cool Giants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lebzelter, T.; Heiter, U.; Abia, C.; Eriksson, K.; Ireland, M.; Neilson, H.; Nowotny, W; Maldonado, J; Merle, T.; Peterson, R.; Plez, B.; Short, C. I.; Wahlgren, G. M.; Worley, C.; Aringer, B.; Bladh, S.; de Laverny, P.; Goswami, A.; Mora, A.; Norris, R. P.; Recio-Blanco, A.; Scholz, M.; Thevenin, F.; Tsuji, T.; Kordopatis, G.

    2012-01-01

    Our ability to extract information from the spectra of stars depends on reliable models of stellar atmospheres and appropriate techniques for spectral synthesis. Various model codes and strategies for the analysis of stellar spectra are available today. Aims. We aim to compare the results of deriving stellar parameters using different atmosphere models and different analysis strategies. The focus is set on high-resolution spectroscopy of cool giant stars. Methods. Spectra representing four cool giant stars were made available to various groups and individuals working in the area of spectral synthesis, asking them to derive stellar parameters from the data provided. The results were discussed at a workshop in Vienna in 2010. Most of the major codes currently used in the astronomical community for analyses of stellar spectra were included in this experiment. Results. We present the results from the different groups, as well as an additional experiment comparing the synthetic spectra produced by various codes for a given set of stellar parameters. Similarities and differences of the results are discussed. Conclusions. Several valid approaches to analyze a given spectrum of a star result in quite a wide range of solutions. The main causes for the differences in parameters derived by different groups seem to lie in the physical input data and in the details of the analysis method. This clearly shows how far from a definitive abundance analysis we still are.

  14. High-latitude irregularity spectra deduced from scintillation measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Wernik, A.W.; Gola, M.; Liu, C.H.; Franke, S.J. Illinois Univ., Urbana )

    1990-10-01

    High-latitude scintillation data show that the strength and spectral index of intensity scintillation are dependent on the propagation geometry. It is shown here that anisotropic irregularity spectra, with different indices along and across the magnetic field, lead to geometrical effects similar to those observed. In general, the spectrum along the magnetic field is steeper than that across the field, and the difference is more pronounced for nighttime conditions. Spectral anisotropy can be interpreted as a size-dependent irregularity anisotropy. It is found that large-scale irregularities in the daytime and nighttime ionosphere are almost isotropic, while small-scale irregularities are anisotropic and considerably more so at night than during the day. It is shown that anisotropic irregularity spectra could account for the observed scintillation and in situ temporal spectra with frequency-dependent slope. 26 refs.

  15. Fluorescence spectra of blood and urine for cervical cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masilamani, Vadivel; AlSalhi, Mohamad Saleh; Vijmasi, Trinka; Govindarajan, Kanaganaj; Rathan Rai, Ram; Atif, Muhammad; Prasad, Saradh; Aldwayyan, Abdullah S.

    2012-09-01

    In the current study, the fluorescence emission spectra (FES) and Stokes shift spectra (SSS) of blood and urine samples of cervical cancer patients were obtained and compared to those of normal controls. Both spectra showed that the relative intensity of biomolecules such as porphyrin, collagen, Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, and flavin were quite out of proportion in cervical cancer patients. The biochemical mechanism for the elevation of these fluorophores is not yet definitive; nevertheless, these biomolecules could serve as tumor markers for diagnosis, screening, and follow-up of cervical cancers. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on FES and SSS of blood and urine of cervical cancer patients to give a sensitivity of 80% and specificity of 78%.

  16. Sequencing by hybridization by cooperating direct and reverse spectra.

    PubMed

    Heath, Samuel A; Preparata, Franco P; Young, Joel

    2003-01-01

    DNA sequencing by hybridization, potentially a powerful alternative to standard wet lab techniques, has received renewed interest after a novel probing scheme has been recently proposed whose performance for the first time asymptotically meets the information theory bound. After settlement of the question of asymptotic performance, there remains the issue of algorithmic fine tunings aimed at improving the performance "constants," with substantial practical implications. In this paper, we show that a probing scheme based on the joint use of direct and reverse spectra (tandem spectra) for a given gapped probing pattern achieves a performance improvement per unit of microarray area of about 5/4 and does not appear to be susceptible to further improvement by increasing the number of cooperating spectra. In other words, tandem-spectrum reconstruction is the best known technique for sequencing by hybridization.

  17. [Research on clouds affecting the spectra of solar ultraviolet radiation].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiao-Yan; Yan, Hai-Tao; Zhen, Zhi-Qiang; Tang, Zheng-Xin; Wang, Hui

    2011-01-01

    In the present paper, using UV CCD optical multi-channel analyzer, the solar ultraviolet radiation spectra under the conditions of cloud cover were measured, and the impact of clouds on the solar ultraviolet radiation spectra were studied mostly. The results of spectral analysis showed that the intensity of solar ultraviolet radiation spectra was weakened by the clouds. The solar ultraviolet radiation spectral intensity attenuation depended on the wavelength and decreased with decreasing wavelength. The greater the cloud cover, the stronger the attenuation, The solar ultraviolet radiation spectral intensity at wavelengths below 315 nm was affected relatively less by the cloud cover. These results have more important practical applications. When we use solar ultraviolet radiation spectrum to study the atmospheric composition, we should choose the spectral band that is less affected by the atmospheric environment.

  18. An atlas of ultraviolet spectra of star-forming galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinney, A. L.; Bohlin, R. C.; Calzetti, D.; Panagia, N.; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.

    1993-01-01

    A systematic study is presented of the UV spectra of star-forming galaxies of different morphological type and activity class using a sample drawn from a uniformly reduced IUE data set. The spectra for a wide variety of galaxies, including normal spiral, LINER, starburst, blue compact, blue compact dwarf, and Seyfert 2 galaxies, are presented in the form of spectral energy distributions to demonstrate the overall characteristics according to morphology and activity class and in the form of absolute flux distributions to better show the absorption and emission features of individual objects. The data support the picture based on UV spectra of the Orbiting Astronomical Observatory and of the Astronautical Netherlands Satellite that spiral galaxies of later Hubble class have more flux at the shortest UV wavelengths than do spiral galaxies of earlier Hubble class.

  19. Properties of artificial networks evolved to contend with natural spectra.

    PubMed

    Morgenstern, Yaniv; Rostami, Mohammad; Purves, Dale

    2014-07-22

    Understanding why spectra that are physically the same appear different in different contexts (color contrast), whereas spectra that are physically different appear similar (color constancy) presents a major challenge in vision research. Here, we show that the responses of biologically inspired neural networks evolved on the basis of accumulated experience with spectral stimuli automatically generate contrast and constancy. The results imply that these phenomena are signatures of a strategy that biological vision uses to circumvent the inverse optics problem as it pertains to light spectra, and that double-opponent neurons in early-level vision evolve to serve this purpose. This strategy provides a way of understanding the peculiar relationship between the objective world and subjective color experience, as well as rationalizing the relevant visual circuitry without invoking feature detection or image representation.

  20. Vibrational spectra of ammine sulfito complexes of rhodium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breitinger, D. K.; Meinberg, H.; Bogner, A.

    1999-05-01

    Ambient and low temperature vibrational spectra of the known complex trans-Na[Rh(SO 3) 2(NH 3) 4]·2H 2O ( 1) and the newly prepared fac-Na 3[Rh(SO 3) 3(NH 3) 3]·2H 2O ( 2) (both also in the deuterated form ( 1D) and ( 2D)) were measured and discussed. In both cases the spectra clearly show the effects of the real crystallographic symmetry of the complex entities. In accordance with the results of X-ray structure analyses of 1 and 2 the spectra reveal S-coordination of the sulfite ligands and consequently their trans-influence on the Rh-N bonds, also in terms of both valence vibration v(RhN 4) and v(RhN 3), respectively, and force constants f(Rh-N) derived from them.

  1. Quantum optimal control of photoelectron spectra and angular distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goetz, R. Esteban; Karamatskou, Antonia; Santra, Robin; Koch, Christiane P.

    2016-01-01

    Photoelectron spectra and photoelectron angular distributions obtained in photoionization reveal important information on, e.g., charge transfer or hole coherence in the parent ion. Here we show that optimal control of the underlying quantum dynamics can be used to enhance desired features in the photoelectron spectra and angular distributions. To this end, we combine Krotov's method for optimal control theory with the time-dependent configuration interaction singles formalism and a splitting approach to calculate photoelectron spectra and angular distributions. The optimization target can account for specific desired properties in the photoelectron angular distribution alone, in the photoelectron spectrum, or in both. We demonstrate the method for hydrogen and then apply it to argon under strong XUV radiation, maximizing the difference of emission into the upper and lower hemispheres, in order to realize directed electron emission in the XUV regime.

  2. Characteristics of the Brillouin spectra in Erbium-Ytterbium fibers.

    PubMed

    Canat, G; Durécu, A; Lesueur, G; Lombard, L; Bourdon, P; Jolivet, V; Jaouën, Y

    2008-03-01

    This paper reports the main characteristics of the Stokes spectra for typical pumped and unpumped Erbium-Ytterbium doped fibers. Doped fibers show shorter Brillouin shifts and their spectra are up to 1.6 times broader than undoped fibers. Those spectra are composed of several peaks originating from several longitudinal acoustic modes. The effective Brillouin gain of the secondary modes can be as large as 20% of the main peak gain. They can merge into a more complex structure for the largest cores. Simulations allow to relate these characteristics to the influence of codoping and index profile inhomogeneity. An additional broadening of the Stokes spectrum in pumped fibers is reported and attributed to thermal effects.

  3. Exact results for amplitude spectra of fitness landscapes.

    PubMed

    Neidhart, Johannes; Szendro, Ivan G; Krug, Joachim

    2013-09-01

    Starting from fitness correlation functions, we calculate exact expressions for the amplitude spectra of fitness landscapes as defined by Stadler [1996. Landscapes and their correlation functions. J. Math. Chem. 20, 1] for common landscape models, including Kauffman's NK-model, rough Mount Fuji landscapes and general linear superpositions of such landscapes. We further show that correlations decaying exponentially with the Hamming distance yield exponentially decaying spectra similar to those reported recently for a model of molecular signal transduction. Finally, we compare our results for the model systems to the spectra of various experimentally measured fitness landscapes. We claim that our analytical results should be helpful when trying to interpret empirical data and guide the search for improved fitness landscape models.

  4. HF Accelerated Electron Fluxes, Spectra, and Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, Herbert C.; Jensen, Joseph B.

    2015-10-01

    Wave particle interactions, an essential aspect of laboratory, terrestrial, and astrophysical plasmas, have been studied for decades by transmitting high power HF radio waves into Earth's weakly ionized space plasma, to use it as a laboratory without walls. Application to HF electron acceleration remains an active area of research (Gurevich in Usp Fizicheskikh Nauk 177(11):1145-1177, 2007) today. HF electron acceleration studies began when plasma line observations proved (Carlson et al. in J Atmos Terr Phys 44:1089-1100, 1982) that high power HF radio wave-excited processes accelerated electrons not to ~eV, but instead to -100 times thermal energy (10 s of eV), as a consequence of inelastic collision effects on electron transport. Gurevich et al (J Atmos Terr Phys 47:1057-1070, 1985) quantified the theory of this transport effect. Merging experiment with theory in plasma physics and aeronomy, enabled prediction (Carlson in Adv Space Res 13:1015-1024, 1993) of creating artificial ionospheres once ~GW HF effective radiated power could be achieved. Eventual confirmation of this prediction (Pedersen et al. in Geophys Res Lett 36:L18107, 2009; Pedersen et al. in Geophys Res Lett 37:L02106, 2010; Blagoveshchenskaya et al. in Ann Geophys 27:131-145, 2009) sparked renewed interest in optical inversion to estimate electron spectra in terrestrial (Hysell et al. in J Geophys Res Space Phys 119:2038-2045, 2014) and planetary (Simon et al. in Ann Geophys 29:187-195, 2011) atmospheres. Here we present our unpublished optical data, which combined with our modeling, lead to conclusions that should meaningfully improve future estimates of the spectrum of HF accelerated electron fluxes. Photometric imaging data can significantly improve detection of emissions near ionization threshold, and confirm depth of penetration of accelerated electrons many km below the excitation altitude. Comparing observed to modeled emission altitude shows future experiments need electron density profiles

  5. Universality of vibrational spectra of globular proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Na, Hyuntae; Song, Guang; ben-Avraham, Daniel

    2016-02-01

    It is shown that the density of modes of the vibrational spectrum of globular proteins is universal, i.e. regardless of the protein in question, it closely follows one universal curve. The present study, including 135 proteins analyzed with a full atomic empirical potential (CHARMM22) and using the full complement of all atoms Cartesian degrees of freedom, goes far beyond previous claims of universality, confirming that universality holds even in the frequency range that is well above 100 cm-1 (300-4000 cm-1), where peaks and turns in the density of states are faithfully reproduced from one protein to the next. We also characterize fluctuations of the spectral density from the average, paving the way to a meaningful discussion of rare, unusual spectra and the structural reasons for the deviations in such ‘outlier’ proteins. Since the method used for the derivation of the vibrational modes (potential energy formulation, set of degrees of freedom employed, etc) has a dramatic effect on the spectral density, another significant implication of our findings is that the universality can provide an exquisite tool for assessing and improving the quality of potential functions and the quality of various models used for NMA computations. Finally, we show that the input configuration also affects the density of modes, thus emphasizing the importance of simplified potential energy formulations that are minimized at the outset. In summary, our findings call for a serious two-way dialogue between theory and experiment: experimental spectra of proteins could now guide the fine tuning of theoretical empirical potentials, and the various features and peaks observed in theoretical studies—being universal, and hence now rising in importance—would hopefully spur experimental confirmation.

  6. Universality of vibrational spectra of globular proteins.

    PubMed

    Na, Hyuntae; Song, Guang; ben-Avraham, Daniel

    2016-02-23

    It is shown that the density of modes of the vibrational spectrum of globular proteins is universal, i.e. regardless of the protein in question, it closely follows one universal curve. The present study, including 135 proteins analyzed with a full atomic empirical potential (CHARMM22) and using the full complement of all atoms Cartesian degrees of freedom, goes far beyond previous claims of universality, confirming that universality holds even in the frequency range that is well above 100 cm(-1) (300-4000 cm(-1)), where peaks and turns in the density of states are faithfully reproduced from one protein to the next. We also characterize fluctuations of the spectral density from the average, paving the way to a meaningful discussion of rare, unusual spectra and the structural reasons for the deviations in such 'outlier' proteins. Since the method used for the derivation of the vibrational modes (potential energy formulation, set of degrees of freedom employed, etc) has a dramatic effect on the spectral density, another significant implication of our findings is that the universality can provide an exquisite tool for assessing and improving the quality of potential functions and the quality of various models used for NMA computations. Finally, we show that the input configuration also affects the density of modes, thus emphasizing the importance of simplified potential energy formulations that are minimized at the outset. In summary, our findings call for a serious two-way dialogue between theory and experiment: experimental spectra of proteins could now guide the fine tuning of theoretical empirical potentials, and the various features and peaks observed in theoretical studies--being universal, and hence now rising in importance--would hopefully spur experimental confirmation.

  7. Prediction of electroencephalographic spectra from neurophysiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, P. A.; Rennie, C. J.; Wright, J. J.; Bahramali, H.; Gordon, E.; Rowe, D. L.

    2001-02-01

    A recent neurophysical model of propagation of electrical waves in the cortex is extended to include a physiologically motivated subcortical feedback loop via the thalamus. The electroencephalographic spectrum when the system is driven by white noise is then calculated analytically in terms of physiological parameters, including the effects of filtering of signals by the cerebrospinal fluid, skull, and scalp. The spectral power at low frequencies is found to vary as f-1 when awake and f-3 when asleep, with a breakpoint to a steeper power-law tail at frequencies above about 20 Hz in both cases; the f-1 range concurs with recent magnetoencephalographic observations of such a regime. Parameter sensitivities are explored, enabling a model with fewer free parameters to be proposed, and showing that spectra predicted for physiologically reasonable parameter values strongly resemble those observed in the laboratory. Alpha and beta peaks seen near 10 Hz and twice that frequency, respectively, in the relaxed wakeful state are generated via subcortical feedback in this model, thereby leading to predictions of their frequencies in terms of physiological parameters, and of correlations in their occurrence. Subcortical feedback is also predicted to be responsible for production of anticorrelated peaks in deep sleep states that correspond to the occurrence of theta rhythm at around half the alpha frequency and sleep spindles at 3/2 times the alpha frequency. An additional positively correlated waking peak near three times the alpha frequency is also predicted and tentatively observed, as are two new types of sleep spindle near 5/2 and 7/2 times the alpha frequency, and anticorrelated with alpha. These results provide a theoretical basis for the conventional division of EEG spectra into frequency bands, but imply that the exact bounds of these bands depend on the individual. Three types of potential instability are found: one at zero frequency, another in the theta band at around

  8. Gun Show Loophole Closing Act of 2013

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Rep. McCarthy, Carolyn [D-NY-4

    2013-01-03

    01/25/2013 Referred to the Subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism, Homeland Security, And Investigations. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  9. Stratospheric ozone loss, ultraviolet effects and action spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coohill, Thomas P.

    The major effect of stratospheric ozone loss will be an increase in the amount of ultraviolet radiation reaching the ground. This increase will be entirely contained within the UV-B (290-320nm). How this will impact life on Earth will be determined by the UV-B photobiology of exposed organisms, including humans. One of the analytical methods useful in estimating these effects is Action Spectroscopy (biological effect as a function of wavelength). Carefully constructed action spectra will allow us to partially predict the increase in bio-effect due to additional UV exposure. What effect this has on the organism and the system in which the organism resides is of paramount importance. Suitable action spectra already exist for human skin cancer, human cell mutation and killing, and for one immune response. Comprehensive and widely applicable action spectra for terrestrial and aquatic plant responses are being generated but are not yet suitable for extensive analysis. There is little data available for animals, other than those experiments completed in the laboratory as model systems for human studies. Some polychromatic action spectra have proven useful in determining the possible impact of ozone loss on biological systems. The pitfalls and limits of this approach will be addressed.

  10. Star Shows It Has The Right Stuff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-01-01

    Astronomers have used an observation by NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory to make the best case yet that a star can be engulfed by its companion star and survive. This discovery will help astronomers better understand how closely coupled stars, and perhaps even stars and planets, evolve when one of the stars expands enormously in its red giant phase. The binary star system known as V471 Tauri comprises a white dwarf star (the primary) in a close orbit -- one thirtieth of the distance between Mercury and the Sun -- with a normal Sun-like star (the secondary). Chandra's data showed that the hot upper atmosphere of the secondary star has a deficit of carbon atoms relative to nitrogen atoms. "This deficit of carbon atoms is the first clear observational evidence that the normal star was engulfed by its companion in the past," according to Jeremy Drake of the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory in Cambridge, MA, who coauthored an article on V471 in The Astrophysical Journal Letters with Marek Sarna of the N. Copernicus Astronomical Center in Poland. The white dwarf star was once a star several times as massive as the Sun. Nuclear fusion reactions in the core of such a star convert carbon into nitrogen over a period of about a billion years. When the fuel in the core of the star is exhausted, the core collapses, triggering more energetic nuclear reactions that cause the star to expand and transform into a red giant before eventually collapsing to become a white dwarf. The carbon-poor material in the core of the red giant is mixed with outer part of the star, so its atmosphere shows a deficit of carbon, as compared with Sun-like stars. The X-ray spectra of a red giant star (top panel) and a Sun-like star (bottom panel) show the large difference in the peaks due to carbon atoms in the two stars. Theoretical calculations indicate that a red giant in a binary system can completely envelop its companion star and dramatically affect its evolution. During this common envelope

  11. Radio spectra of High Frequency Peakers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dallacasa, D.; Orienti, M.

    2016-02-01

    New radio spectra of High Frequency Peakers (HFP) obtained from the Jansky Very Large Array (JVLA) show that variability is common among this class of sources. A subsample of sources have been observed with a nearly continuous spectral sampling between 1 and 10 GHz. The observed HFP sources were previously classified as F (flat), H (HFP profile with little or no flux density variability) and V (variable, but preserving a peaked spectrum). In general, sources classified as V and H show a decrease of the flux density measured in the optically thin part of the spectrum, while there is a moderate increment in the optically thick region, resulting into a progressive shift of the spectral peak to lower frequencies. This is consistent with the idea of an expanding bubble of radio plasma. The sources with an F classification instead show substantial variability, both in spectral shape and in time evolution. In these HFP sources an irregular production of energy is best observed since the radio emission is dominated by recently generated relativistic plasma, and the contribution of mini lobes, in which old plasma accumulates, is marginal if not absent at all, given the short radiative life of electrons in strong magnetic fields (tens of mG) found in these objects.

  12. Trion spectra of semiconductor nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esser, Axel; Runge, Erich; Zimmermann, Roland

    2001-03-01

    The linear optical properties of quantum wells and quantum wires in the presence of a moderate background carrier density nB are investigated theoretically and compared with recent experiments. At low n_B, excitons and trions (charged excitons) are the relevant excitations. We present a density-matrix approach, which starts from the interband polarization and couples directly to higher order correlation functions which are related to three-particle excitations. It allows to describe both trionic and excitonic states. A generalized dynamical truncation scheme is applied and yields an expression for the absorption coefficient of trions in terms of trion eigenstates. Then, in combination with a numerical solution of the three-particle Schrödinger equation we sucessfully model (i) experimental photoluminescence lineshapes (their asymmetry towards lower photon energy and temperature-dependence is related to carrier recoil) [1], (ii) radiative trion lifetime (shown to depend linearly on temperature for a thermalized trion distribution) [2], and (iii) the influence of an electrical field (quantum-confined Stark effect) [3]. The optical response of excitons and trions can be studied alternatively by the solution of the time-dependent trion Schrödinger equation yielding information about (i) the appearance of trion triplet states (shown to be optically inactice at vanishing center-of-mass momentum), and (ii) exciton-electron scattering states (which give rise to a broadening of the high-energy side of the exciton). Altogether, a consistent and thorough picture of exciton related absorption spectra in the presence of additional carriers can be derived either from density matrix theory or the solution of the time-dependent three-particle Schrödinger equation. [1] A. Esser et al., Phys. Rev. B 62, 8232 (2000); [2] V. Ciulin et al., Phys. Rev. B (2000); [3] A. Esser et al., Phys. Status Solidi B 221, 281 (2000).

  13. Incorporating Spectra Into Periodic Timing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connors, Alanna; Hong, J.; Protopapas, P.; Kashyap, V.

    2011-09-01

    The Chandra surveys have resulted in a wealth of data on low-luminosity X-ray sources (Lx 1030-34 erg/s) of Galactic scales beyond the local solar neighborhood. Many of these are compact binaries, in particular, cataclysmic variables, often identified by their periodic X-ray variability and spectra. Hong et al. (2009, 2011) have used energy quantiles (Hong, Schlegel & Grindlay, 2004) as a fast, robust indicator of spectral hardness and absorption of the X-ray sources. Energy quantiles also enable a simple but effective illustration of spectral changes with phase in these periodic systems: e.g. absorption by the accreting material is understood to drive the periodic light-curves. An interesting question is how to best make use of the information encapsulated in the periodic change in energy spectrum, along with the periodic change in intensity, especially for cases of ambiguous period determination? And, how to do it computationally efficiently? A first approach is to do the period search in intensity, as is standard; and then use a criterion of spectral variation to verify possible periods. Huijse, Zegers & Protopapas (2011) recently demonstrated a powerful period estimation technique using information potential and correntropy embedded in the light curve. Similar quantities based on energies (or energy quantiles) of X-ray photons can serve as criteria of spectral variation. A different approach treats the spectrum variations and intensity variations completely independently, searching through period-space in each, and then combining the results. A more general method would include both at the same time, looking for statistically significant variations above what is expected for a constant (in intensity and spectrum).

  14. Representing the consequences of intentionally inhibited actions.

    PubMed

    Haggard, Patrick; Poonian, Simmy; Walsh, Eamonn

    2009-08-25

    The experience of planning an action but then changing our minds and cancelling the action at the last instant is a common one. Here, we instructed participants to prepare voluntary (keypress) actions and sometimes intentionally inhibit them at the last possible moment. Participants could freely choose between left and right hand actions. Keypresses produced either a congruent (80% probability) or an incongruent (20% probability) tone after a short delay. If no voluntary action was made within a defined response window, one of the tones was nevertheless presented a short time later. At the end of the trial, participants judged the time of tone onset. We used an established marker to measure the experience of control, namely the intentional binding of the tone backwards in time towards the action that caused it. Results showed that voluntary actions produced the expected temporal binding of tones back towards the preceding action. In contrast, we found an opposite trend towards repulsion of the tone in intentional inhibition trials. When people intentionally inhibit a planned action, their experience of a subsequent event that was associated with the action is severely affected. Our results suggest that intentional inhibition is a specific cognitive process that strongly influences action prediction and action experience. PMID:19524558

  15. Online Action Monitoring and Memory for Self-Performed Actions in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grainger, Catherine; Williams, David M.; Lind, Sophie E.

    2014-01-01

    This study explored whether individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) experience difficulties with action monitoring. Two experimental tasks examined whether adults with ASD are able to monitor their own actions online, and whether they also show a typical enactment effects in memory (enhanced memory for actions they have performed compared…

  16. Spectra of geometric operators in three-dimensional loop quantum gravity: From discrete to continuous

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achour, Jibril Ben; Geiller, Marc; Noui, Karim; Yu, Chao

    2014-03-01

    We study and compare the spectra of geometric operators (length and area) in the quantum kinematics of two formulations of three-dimensional Lorentzian loop quantum gravity. In the SU(2) Ashtekar-Barbero framework, the spectra are discrete and depend on the Barbero-Immirzi parameter γ exactly like in the four-dimensional case. However, we show that when working with the self-dual variables and imposing the reality conditions the spectra become continuous and γ independent.

  17. Action spectrum for phototherapy of psoriasis

    SciTech Connect

    Parrish, J.A.; Jaenicke, K.F.

    1981-05-01

    Using a monochromator the action spectrum for ultraviolet phototherapy of psoriasis was determined for radiation between 254 and 313 nm and compared to the action spectrum for erythema of uninvolved adjacent skin. Daily exposures of different doses of 254, 280, 290, 296, 300, 304 and 313 nm radiation were observed. Wavelengths of 254, 280, 290 nm were erythemogenic but not therapeutic even at 10 to 50 times the minimal erythema dose. At the other wavelengths studied, the 2 action spectra were similar. In general, fixed daily doses cleared at lower cumulative dose than did incrementally increased daily doses. The small number of suberythemogenic exposure doses required suggests that monochromatic radiation may have advantages over broadband sources.

  18. The sharpness of gamma-ray burst prompt emission spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hoi-Fung; van Eerten, Hendrik J.; Greiner, Jochen; Sari, Re'em; Narayana Bhat, P.; von Kienlin, Andreas; Paciesas, William S.; Preece, Robert D.

    2015-11-01

    Context. We study the sharpness of the time-resolved prompt emission spectra of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) observed by the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. Aims: We aim to obtain a measure of the curvature of time-resolved spectra that can be compared directly to theory. This tests the ability of models such as synchrotron emission to explain the peaks or breaks of GBM prompt emission spectra. Methods: We take the burst sample from the official Fermi GBM GRB time-resolved spectral catalog. We re-fit all spectra with a measured peak or break energy in the catalog best-fit models in various energy ranges, which cover the curvature around the spectral peak or break, resulting in a total of 1113 spectra being analyzed. We compute the sharpness angles under the peak or break of the triangle constructed under the model fit curves and compare them to the values obtained from various representative emission models: blackbody, single-electron synchrotron, synchrotron emission from a Maxwellian or power-law electron distribution. Results: We find that 35% of the time-resolved spectra are inconsistent with the single-electron synchrotron function, and 91% are inconsistent with the Maxwellian synchrotron function. The single temperature, single emission time, and location blackbody function is found to be sharper than all the spectra. No general evolutionary trend of the sharpness angle is observed, neither per burst nor for the whole population. It is found that the limiting case, a single temperature Maxwellian synchrotron function, can only contribute up to % of the peak flux. Conclusions: Our results show that even the sharpest but non-realistic case, the single-electron synchrotron function, cannot explain a large fraction of the observed GRB prompt spectra. Because any combination of physically possible synchrotron spectra added together will always further broaden the spectrum, emission mechanisms other than optically thin

  19. Faster optical-spectra recording and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richmond, R. G.

    1977-01-01

    Optical spectra are recorded and rapidly analyzed by system that links multichannel analyzer and desk-top programable calculator. Cassette-memory storage is provided. System can be programed to automate background subtraction, axis expansion, and other data-analysis techniques and can store several hundred spectra for immediate or delayed analysis and comparisons.

  20. (abstract) Spectra of Comet Hale-Bopp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanner, M. S.; Hayward, T. L.; Lynch, D. K.; Russell, R. W.

    1996-01-01

    The spectra of Hale-Bopp were acquired in mid-1996 at R > 3.5 AU. Strong silicate emission is present in all the spectra. The shape of the feature is very similar to that seen in comet P/Halley. This is the first time that a strong silicate feature has been detected in a comet beyond 2 AU.

  1. Doppler-shifting effects on frequency spectra of gravity waves observed near the summer mesopause at high latitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fritts, David C.; Wang, Ding-Yi

    1991-01-01

    Results are presented of radar observations of horizontal and vertical velocities near the summer mesopause at Poker Flat (Alaska), showing that the observed vertical velocity spectra were influenced strongly by Doppler-shifting effects. The horizontal velocity spectra, however, were relatively insensitive to horizontal wind speed. The observed spectra are compared with predicted spectra for various models of the intrinsic motion spectrum and degrees of Doppler shifting.

  2. Conservation Action Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Rifle Association, Washington, DC.

    Conservation problems are identified, with some suggestions for action. General areas covered are: Wildlife Conservation, Soil Conservation, Clean Water, Air Pollution Action, and Outdoor Recreation Action. Appendices list private organizations or agencies concerned with natural resource use and/or management, congressional committees considering…

  3. Action in Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Hofsten, Claes

    2007-01-01

    It is argued that cognitive development has to be understood in the functional perspective provided by actions. Actions reflect all aspects of cognitive development including the motives of the child, the problems to be solved, and the constraints and possibilities of the child's body and sensorimotor system. Actions are directed into the future…

  4. Participatory Action Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Martha Lentz

    1993-01-01

    Describes aspects of participatory action research and considers advantages of using participatory action research in research by disabilities and rehabilitation researchers. Notes that participatory action research can be built into any rehabilitation research design but that it rests upon the recognition of persons with disabilities as integral…

  5. Planning as Action Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Gonzalez, Carmen Beatriz; Hernandez, Teresa; Kusch, Jim; Ryan, Charly

    2004-01-01

    Planning contains so much more than the written plan. Early in 2000, an invitation came from the Collaborative Action Research Network (CARN), to people experienced in action research who might want to help plan and present an action research event for elementary school science teachers in Venezuela, South America, in Autumn 2000. This article…

  6. Voluntary action and causality in temporal binding.

    PubMed

    Cravo, Andre M; Claessens, Peter M E; Baldo, Marcus V C

    2009-10-01

    Previous studies have documented temporal attraction in perceived times of actions and their effects. While some authors argue that voluntary action is a necessary condition for this phenomenon, others claim that the causal relationship between action and effect is the crucial ingredient. In the present study, we investigate voluntary action and causality as the necessary and sufficient conditions for temporal binding. We used a variation of the launching effect proposed by Michotte, in which participants controlled the launch stimulus in some blocks. Volunteers reported causality ratings and estimated the interval between the two events. Our results show dissociations between causality ratings and temporal estimation. While causality ratings are not affected by voluntary action, temporal bindings were only found in the presence of both voluntary action and high causality. Our results indicate that voluntary action and causality are both necessary for the emergence of temporal binding.

  7. Isotope shifts in spectra of molecular liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubrovskaya, E. V.; Kolomiitsova, T. D.; Shurukhina, A. V.; Shchepkin, D. N.

    2016-02-01

    In the IR absorption spectra of low-temperature molecular liquids, we have observed anomalously large isotope shifts of frequencies of vibrational bands that are strong in the dipole absorption. The same effect has also been observed in their Raman spectra. At the same time, in the spectra of cryosolutions, the isotope shifts of the same bands coincide with a high accuracy (±(0.1-0.5) cm-1) with the shifts that are observed in the spectra of the gas phase. The difference between the spectra of examined low-temperature systems is caused by the occurrence of resonant dipole-dipole interactions between spectrally active identical molecules. The calculation of the band contour in the spectrum of liquid freon that we have performed in this work taking into account the resonant interaction between states of simultaneous transitions in isotopically substituted molecules can explain this effect.

  8. PCA: Principal Component Analysis for spectra modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurley, Peter D.; Oliver, Seb; Farrah, Duncan; Wang, Lingyu; Efstathiou, Andreas

    2012-07-01

    The mid-infrared spectra of ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) contain a variety of spectral features that can be used as diagnostics to characterize the spectra. However, such diagnostics are biased by our prior prejudices on the origin of the features. Moreover, by using only part of the spectrum they do not utilize the full information content of the spectra. Blind statistical techniques such as principal component analysis (PCA) consider the whole spectrum, find correlated features and separate them out into distinct components. This code, written in IDL, classifies principal components of IRS spectra to define a new classification scheme using 5D Gaussian mixtures modelling. The five PCs and average spectra for the four classifications to classify objects are made available with the code.

  9. Blind extraction of exoplanetary spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morello, Giuseppe; Waldmann, Ingo; Damiano, Mario; Tinetti, Giovanna

    2016-10-01

    In the last decade, remote sensing spectroscopy enabled characterization of the atmospheres of extrasolar planets. Transmission and emission spectra of tens of transiting exoplanets have been measured with multiple instruments aboard Spitzer and Hubble Space Telescopes as well as ground-based facilities, revealing the presence of chemical species in their atmospheres, and constraining their temperature and pressure profiles.Early analyses were somehow heuristic, leading to some controversies in the literature.A photometric precision of 0.01% is necessary to detect the atmospheric spectral modulations. Current observatories, except Kepler, were not designed to achieve this precision. Data reduction is necessary to minimize the effect of instrument systematics in order to achieve the target precision. In the past, parametric models have extensively been used by most teams to remove correlated noise with the aid of auxiliary information of the instrument, the so-called optical state vectors (OSVs). Such OSVs can include inter- and intra-pixel position of the star or its spectrum, instrument temperatures and inclinations, and/or other parameters. In some cases, different parameterizations led to discrepant results.We recommend the use of blind non-parametric data detrending techniques to overcome those issues. In particular, we adopt Independent Component Analysis (ICA), i.e. a powerful blind source separation (BSS) technique to disentangle the multiple instrument systematics and astrophysical signals in transit/eclipse light curves. ICA does not require a model for the systematics, thence it can be applied to any instrument with little changes, if any. ICA-based algorithms have been applied to Spitzer/IRAC and synthetic observations in photometry (Morello et al. 2014, 2015, 2016; Morello 2015) and to Hubble/WFC3, Hubble/NICMOS and Spitzer/IRS and Hubble/WFC3 in spectroscopy (Damiano, Morello et al., in prep., Waldmann 2012, 2014, Waldmann et al. 2013) with excellent

  10. Dust Spectra from Above and Below

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Spectra of martian dust taken by the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit's mini-thermal emission spectrometer are compared to that of the orbital Mars Global Surveyor's thermal emission spectrometer. The graph shows that the two instruments are in excellent agreement.

    Rover Senses Carbon Dioxide [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for larger view

    This graph, consisting of data acquired on Mars from the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit's mini-thermal emission spectrometer, shows the light, or spectral, signature of carbon dioxide. Carbon dioxide makes up the bulk of the thin martian atmosphere.

    Rover Senses Silicates [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for larger view

    This graph, consisting of data acquired on Mars by the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit's mini-thermal emission spectrometer, shows the light, or spectral, signature of silicates - a group of minerals that form the majority of Earth's crust. Minerals called feldspars and zeolites are likely candidates responsible for this feature.

    Rover Senses Bound Water [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for larger view

    This graph, consisting of data acquired on Mars from the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit's mini-thermal emission spectrometer, shows the light, or spectral, signature of an as-of-yet unidentified mineral that contains bound water in its crystal structure. Minerals such as gypsum and zeolites are possible candidates.

    Rover Senses Carbonates [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for larger view

    This graph, consisting of data from the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit's mini-thermal emission spectrometer, shows the light, or spectral, signatures of carbonates - minerals common to Earth that form only in water. The detection of trace amounts of carbonates on Mars may be due to an interaction between the water vapor in the atmosphere and minerals on the surface.

  11. Energy of hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic waves with point and continuous spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Hirota, M.; Fukumoto, Y.

    2008-08-15

    Energy of waves (or eigenmodes) in an ideal fluid and plasma is formulated in the noncanonical Hamiltonian context. By imposing the kinematical constraint on perturbations, the linearized Hamiltonian equation provides a formal definition of wave energy not only for eigenmodes corresponding to point spectra but also for singular ones corresponding to a continuous spectrum. The latter becomes dominant when mean fields have inhomogeneity originating from shear or gradient of the fields. The energy of each wave is represented by the eigenfrequency multiplied by the wave action, which is nothing but the action variable and, moreover, is associated with a derivative of a suitably defined dispersion relation. The sign of the action variable is crucial to the occurrence of Hopf bifurcation in Hamiltonian systems of finite degrees of freedom [M. G. Krein, Dokl. Akad. Nauk SSSR, Ser. A 73, 445 (1950)]. Krein's idea is extended to the case of coalescence between point and continuous spectra.

  12. Show Me What You Know: Pre-Service City Teachers and Social Justice in Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marquez-Zenkov, Kristien; Corrigan, Diane; Brockett, Christina; Lehrian, Sarah

    2008-01-01

    Few current definitions and assessments of teacher "quality" have considered the social justice-oriented characteristics the authors consider most important in their work with future city teachers. This paper describes the masters licensure program with which the authors are involved, the portfolio assessment system this program utilizes to…

  13. Inflationary power spectra with quantum holonomy corrections

    SciTech Connect

    Mielczarek, Jakub

    2014-03-01

    In this paper we study slow-roll inflation with holonomy corrections from loop quantum cosmology. It was previously shown that, in the Planck epoch, these corrections lead to such effects as singularity avoidance, metric signature change and a state of silence. Here, we consider holonomy corrections affecting the phase of cosmic inflation, which takes place away from the Planck epoch. Both tensor and scalar power spectra of primordial inflationary perturbations are computed up to the first order in slow-roll parameters and V/ρ{sub c}, where V is a potential of the scalar field and ρ{sub c} is a critical energy density (expected to be of the order of the Planck energy density). Possible normalizations of modes at short scales are discussed. In case the normalization is performed with use of the Wronskian condition applied to adiabatic vacuum, the tensor and scalar spectral indices are not quantum corrected in the leading order. However, by choosing an alternative method of normalization one can obtain quantum corrections in the leading order. Furthermore, we show that the holonomy-corrected equations of motion for tensor and scalar modes can be derived based on effective background metrics. This allows us to show that the classical Wronskian normalization condition is well defined for the cosmological perturbations with holonomy corrections.

  14. Action-Sentence Compatibility: The Role of Action Effects and Timing

    PubMed Central

    Diefenbach, Christiane; Rieger, Martina; Massen, Cristina; Prinz, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Research on embodied approaches to language comprehension suggests that we understand linguistic descriptions of actions by mentally simulating these actions. Evidence is provided by the action-sentence compatibility effect (ACE) which shows that sensibility judgments for sentences are faster when the direction of the described action matches the response direction. In two experiments, we investigated whether the ACE relies on actions or on intended action effects. Participants gave sensibility judgments of auditorily presented sentences by producing an action effect on a screen at a location near the body or far from the body. These action effects were achieved by pressing a response button that was located in either the same spatial direction as the action effect, or in the opposite direction. We used a go/no-go task in which the direction of the to-be-produced action effect was either cued at the onset of each sentence (Experiment 1) or at different points in time before and after sentence onset (Experiment 2). Overall, results showed a relationship between the direction of the described action and the direction of the action effect. Furthermore, Experiment 2 indicated that depending on the timing between cue presentation and sentence onset, participants responded either faster when the direction of the described action matched the direction of the action effect (positive ACE), or slower (negative ACE). These results provide evidence that the comprehension of action sentences involves the activation of representations of action effects. Concurrently activated representations in sentence comprehension and action planning can lead to both priming and interference, which is discussed in the context of the theory of event coding. PMID:23734134

  15. Understanding affirmative action.

    PubMed

    Crosby, Faye J; Iyer, Aarti; Sincharoen, Sirinda

    2006-01-01

    Affirmative action is a controversial and often poorly understood policy. It is also a policy that has been widely studied by social scientists. In this review, we outline how affirmative action operates in employment and education settings and consider the major points of controversy. In addition, we detail the contributions of psychologists and other social scientists in helping to demonstrate why affirmative action is needed; how it can have unintended negative consequences; and how affirmative action programs can be most successful. We also review how psychologists have examined variations in people's attitudes toward affirmative action, in part as a means for testing different theories of social behavior. PMID:16318608

  16. Preparation of Spectra for Surface Mapping with Doppler Imaging of a Peculiar Star V776 Her

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gürsoytrak, Hande; Gürol, Birol

    2016-04-01

    Our Sun is the only star that we can see thoroughly the surface of it. Chemically peculiar stars show anomalous abundances of some elements such as silicium, chromium and strontium. Doppler imaging is a useful technique for reconstructing the several structures on the surfaces of peculiar stars. We analyze our spectral observations as a preparation to Doppler imaging and compare V776 Her’s observational spectra with the synthetic spectra that we produce with using the SPECTRUM code. The differences between the observational spectra and the synthetic spectra is discussed in this work.

  17. Multibubble sonoluminescence spectra of water which resemble single-bubble sonoluminescence

    PubMed

    Didenko; Gordeychuk

    2000-06-12

    Multibubble sonoluminescence (MBSL) spectra of water from cavitation clouds were collected in the presence of different noble gases and at different acoustic intensities. Results show that at high acoustic intensity and with xenon as a dissolved gas the emission of the OH* radical becomes indiscernible from the continuum. These spectra resemble single-bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) spectra. It is concluded that the source of emission in MBSL and SBSL can be the same, the difference in spectra is due to the higher temperature inside the bubble during SBSL.

  18. Development of site-specific earthquake response spectra for eastern US sites

    SciTech Connect

    Beavers, J.E.; Brock, W.R.; Hunt, R.J.; Shaffer, K.E.

    1993-08-01

    Site-specific earthquake, uniform-hazard response spectra have been defined for the Department of Energy Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and Portsmouth, Ohio, sites for use in evaluating existing facilities and designing new facilities. The site-specific response spectra were defined from probabilistic and deterministic seismic hazard studies following the requirements in DOE-STD-1024-92, ``Guidelines for Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Curves at DOE Sites.` For these two sites, the results show that site-specific uniform-hazard response spectra are slightly higher in the high-frequency range and considerably lower in the low-frequency range compared with response spectra defined for these sites in the past.

  19. IUE spectra of F and late A stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linsky, J. L.; Marstad, N. C.

    1981-01-01

    The International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) spectra of alpha CMi (F5 IV-V), beta Cas (F2 IV), alpha Car (F0 Ib), and gamma Boo (A7 III) in the context of the question as to whether chromospheres disappear in the early F late A portions of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram. Both alpha CMi (Procyon) and beta Cas show bright emission line spectra indicative of chromospheres and transition regions, but neither alpha Car (Canopus) nor gamma Boo show any evidence of emission in their SWP spectra or at the Mg II lines, despite very deep exposures. Alpha CMi has emission line fluxes roughly 6 times those of the quiet Sun, but the rapidly rotating delta Scuti type variable beta Cas has surface fluxes 10 to 50 times those of the quiet Sun. Upper limits on emission line fluxes for alpha Car are 4 to 20 and for gamma Boo 15 to 80 times the quiet Sun. It is concluded that the apparent absence of emission lines in the spectra of alpha Car and gamma Boo should not be interpreted as due to the absence of nonradiatively heated outer atmospheres in stars hotter than spectral type F0, but rather to the inability to see emission lines with IUE against a background of scattered light and a bright photospheric absorption line spectrum either in low or high dispersion.

  20. Know your standard: clarifying the CIE erythema action spectrum.

    PubMed

    Webb, Ann R; Slaper, Harry; Koepke, Peter; Schmalwieser, Alois W

    2011-01-01

    The standard erythema action spectrum provides an internationally accepted representation of the erythema-inducing effectiveness of wavelengths in the UV part of the spectrum. The action spectrum forms the basis of the UV index used for public health information, defines the standard erythema dose unit and the minimum erythema dose and is the default response spectrum aspired to by a range of UV radiometer manufacturers. However, there are several versions of this erythema action spectrum in use, and only one of them has been endorsed as a standard. While the differences in erythemally weighted radiation incurred by choice of action spectrum will be no more than a few percent, this uncertainty is unnecessary. Here we detail the differences in the different versions of erythema action spectra, illustrate the resulting effects in quantifying UV doses and encourage readers to use only the standard version of the action spectrum in the future.

  1. Estimations of model parameters for gravity wave spectra observed by MST radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheffler, A. O.; Liu, C. H.; Franke, S. J.

    1989-01-01

    The general theory of MST radar observations of gravity wave spectra is developed. This effort extends the previous results to include anisotropy and Doppler effects for the spectra, as well as the consequences for the multibeam configuration. The relationships between the observed one- or two-dimensional spectra for the line-of-sight velocity in the gravity wave spectra are derived. Expressions for cross spectra, as well as covariances between velocities observed on different beams, are computed. Using these results, studies are carried out to show how model parameters for gravity wave spectra can be estimated from the observed quantities. Model parameters include the variance, power law indices, anisotropy parameters, Doppler parameters, mean scale sizes, etc. Cases with different numbers of beams are investigated.

  2. Simulations of Two-dimensional Infrared and Stimulated Resonance Raman Spectra of Photoactive Yellow Protein

    PubMed Central

    Preketes, Nicholas K; Biggs, Jason D; Ren, Hao; Andricioaei, Ioan; Mukamel, Shaul

    2012-01-01

    We present simulations of one and two-dimensional infrared (2DIR) and stimulated resonance Raman (SRR) spectra of the dark state (pG) and early red-shifted intermediate (pR) of photoactive yellow protein (PYP). Shifts in the amide I and Glu46 COOH stretching bands distinguish between pG and pR in the IR absorption and 2DIR spectra. The one-dimensional SRR spectra are similar to the spontaneous RR spectra. The two-dimensional SRR spectra show large changes in cross peaks involving the C=O stretch of the two species and are more sensitive to the chromophore structure than 2DIR spectra. PMID:24244064

  3. Impulsive action: emotional impulses and their control

    PubMed Central

    Frijda, Nico H.; Ridderinkhof, K. Richard; Rietveld, Erik

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a novel theoretical view on impulsive action, integrating thus far separate perspectives on non-reflective action, motivation, emotion regulation, and impulse control. We frame impulsive action in terms of directedness of the individual organism toward, away, or against other givens – toward future states and away from one’s present state. First, appraisal of a perceived or thought-of event or object on occasion, rapidly and without premonition or conscious deliberation, triggers a motive to modify one’s relation to that event or object. Situational specifics of the event as perceived and appraised motivate and guide selection of readiness for a particular kind of purposive action. Second, perception of complex situations can give rise to multiple appraisals, multiple motives, and multiple simultaneous changes in action readiness. Multiple states of action readiness may interact in generating action, by reinforcing or attenuating each other, thereby yielding impulse control. We show how emotion control can itself result from a motive state or state of action readiness. Our view links impulsive action mechanistically to states of action readiness, which is the central feature of what distinguishes one kind of emotion from another. It thus provides a novel theoretical perspective to the somewhat fragmented literature on impulsive action. PMID:24917835

  4. Binding Action and Emotion in Social Understanding

    PubMed Central

    Ferri, Francesca; Ebisch, Sjoerd J. H.; Costantini, Marcello; Salone, Anatolia; Arciero, Giampiero; Mazzola, Viridiana; Ferro, Filippo Maria; Romani, Gian Luca; Gallese, Vittorio

    2013-01-01

    In social life actions are tightly linked with emotions. The integration of affective- and action-related information has to be considered as a fundamental component of appropriate social understanding. The present functional magnetic resonance imaging study aimed at investigating whether an emotion (Happiness, Anger or Neutral) dynamically expressed by an observed agent modulates brain activity underlying the perception of his grasping action. As control stimuli, participants observed the same agent either only expressing an emotion or only performing a grasping action. Our results showed that the observation of an action embedded in an emotional context (agent’s facial expression), compared with the observation of the same action embedded in a neutral context, elicits higher neural response at the level of motor frontal cortices, temporal and occipital cortices, bilaterally. Particularly, the dynamic facial expression of anger modulates the re-enactment of a motor representation of the observed action. This is supported by the evidence that observing actions embedded in the context of anger, but not happiness, compared with a neutral context, elicits stronger activity in the bilateral pre-central gyrus and inferior frontal gyrus, besides the pre-supplementary motor area, a region playing a central role in motor control. Angry faces not only seem to modulate the simulation of actions, but may also trigger motor reaction. These findings suggest that emotions exert a modulatory role on action observation in different cortical areas involved in action processing. PMID:23349792

  5. Characteristics of energetic solar flare electron spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moses, Dan; Droege, Wolfgang; Meyer, Peter; Evenson, Paul

    1989-01-01

    A 55 event survey of energy spectra of 0.1-100 MeV interplanetary electrons originating from solar flares as measured by two spectrometers onboard the ISEE 3 (ICE) spacecraft for the years 1978-1982 has been completed. Spectra generated using the maximum flux of a given event in each energy channel were restricted to events with a well-defined flux rise time. Two broad groups of electron spectra are considered. In one group, the spectra are well represented by a single power law in rigidity with spectral index in the range 3-4.5. The spectra in the other group deviate from a power law in rigidity systematically in that they harden with increasing rigidity. Events with near power-law spectra are found to be correlated with long-duration soft X-ray events, whereas those with hardening spectra are correlated with short-duration events. The possible variation of acceleration and propagation processes with the properties of the flare site is discussed, using the duration of the soft X-ray flare emission as an indicator of the physical parameters of the flare site (flare volume, density, coronal height, and magnetic field geometry).

  6. Raman spectra of organic (myo-inositol hexakis phosphate) and inorganic P sepctra show pH dependence

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Understanding phosphorous fate and transport is in part limited by technical difficulties and/or access to expensive equipment associated with differentiating ortho-phosphate (P) from organic phosphate in complex environmental samples. Myo-inositol hexakis phosphate (IHP) is the most prevalent form...

  7. DFT studies of the vibrational spectra of salicylic acid and related compounds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Compounds that exhibit intra- and intermolecular hydrogen bonds can have infrared and Raman spectra that show evidences of these hydrogen bonds. In modeling the vibrational spectra of such compounds, the addition of explicit hydrogen bonding species (e.g. solvent molecules) can often improve agreeme...

  8. Negative Ion Photoelectron Spectra of Halomethyl Anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogelhuber, Kristen M.; Wren, Scott W.; McCoy, Anne B.; Ervin, Kent M.; Lineberger, W. Carl

    2009-06-01

    Halomethyl anions undergo a significant geometry change upon electron photodetachment, resulting in multiple extended vibrational progressions in the photoelectron spectra. The normal mode analysis that successfully models photoelectron spectra when geometry changes are modest is unable to reproduce the experimental data using physically reasonable parameters. A three-dimensional anharmonic coupled-mode analysis was employed to accurately reproduce the observed vibrational structure. We present the 364 nm negative ion photoelectron spectra of the halomethyl anions CHX_2^- and CDX_2^- (X = Cl, Br, I) and report electron affinities, vibrational frequencies, and geometries.

  9. Analysis of atmospheric spectra for trace gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinsland, Curtis P.; Seals, Robert K., Jr.; Smith, Mary Ann H.; Goldman, Aaron; Murcray, David G.; Murcray, Frank J.

    1990-01-01

    The objective is the comprehensive analysis of high resolution atmospheric spectra recorded in the middle-infrared region to obtain simultaneous measurements of coupled parameters (gas concentrations of key trace constituents, total column amounts, pressure, and temperature) in the stratosphere and upper troposphere. Solar absorption spectra recorded at 0.002 and 0.02 cm exp -1 resolutions with the University of Denver group's balloon-borne, aircraft borne, and ground-based interferometers and 0.005 to 0.01 cm exp -1 resolution solar spectra from Kitt Peak are used in the analyses.

  10. Tetrahdroxysqualene from Rhus taitensis Shows Antimycobacterial Activity Against Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Noro, Jeffrey C.; Barrows, Louis R.; Gideon, Osia G.; Ireland, Chris M.; Koch, Michael; Matainaho, Teatulohi; Piskaut, Pius; Pond, Christopher D.; Bugni, Tim S.

    2010-01-01

    Tuberculosis has become a major health problem, in particular with the emergence of extremely drug resistant tuberculosis (XDRTB). In our search for new therapeutic leads against TB, we isolated a new triterpene (1) from the plant Rhus taitensis collected in Papua New Guinea. Tetrahydroxysqualene (1) was isolated using bioassay-guided fractionation of the methanolic extract of R. taitensis leaves and twigs. The structure of tetrahydroxysqualene (1) was elucidated on the basis of HRESIMS and 1D and 2D NMR spectra. Tetrahydroxysqualene (1) exhibited anti–tuberculosis activity with an MIC of 10.0 μg/mL while showing only modest cytotoxicity. PMID:18710283

  11. Action spectrum of photoinhibition in leaves of wild type and npq1-2 and npq4-1 mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Sarvikas, Päivi; Hakala, Marja; Pätsikkä, Eija; Tyystjärvi, Taina; Tyystjärvi, Esa

    2006-03-01

    Photoinhibition is light-induced inactivation of PSII. Hypotheses about the photoreceptor(s) of photoinhibition include the Chl antenna of PSII, manganese of the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC), uncoupled Chl and iron-sulfur centres. We measured the action spectrum of photoinhibition in vivo from wild-type Arabidopsis thaliana L. and from the npq1-2 and npq4-1 mutants defective in non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) of excitations of the PSII antenna. The in vivo action spectrum was found to resemble closely the in vitro action spectra published for photoinhibition. We compared the action spectrum with absorbance spectra of model compounds of the OEC complex and other potential photoreceptors of photoinhibition. The comparison suggests that both manganese and Chl function as photoreceptors in photoinhibition. In accordance with the function of two types of photoreceptors in photoinhibition, NPQ was found to offer only partial protection against photoinhibition at visible wavelengths. The low protective efficiency of NPQ supports the conclusion that the Chl antenna of PSII is not the only photoreceptor of photoinhibition. Comparison of the action spectrum of photoinhibition with the emission spectrum of sunlight shows that the UV part of sunlight is responsible for the major part of photoinhibition under natural conditions.

  12. Use of an Improved Radiation Amplification Factor to Estimate the Effect of Total Ozone Changes on Action Spectrum Weighted Irradiances and an Instrument Response Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, Jay R.

    2010-01-01

    Multiple scattering radiative transfer results are used to calculate action spectrum weighted irradiances and fractional irradiance changes in terms of a power law in ozone OMEGA, U(OMEGA/200)(sup -RAF), where the new radiation amplification factor (RAF) is just a function of solar zenith angle. Including Rayleigh scattering caused small differences in the estimated 30 year changes in action spectrum-weighted irradiances compared to estimates that neglect multiple scattering. The radiative transfer results are applied to several action spectra and to an instrument response function corresponding to the Solar Light 501 meter. The effect of changing ozone on two plant damage action spectra are shown for plants with high sensitivity to UVB (280-315 run) and those with lower sensitivity, showing that the probability for plant damage for the latter has increased since 1979, especially at middle to high latitudes in the Southern Hemisphere. Similarly, there has been an increase in rates of erythemal skin damage and pre-vitamin D3 production corresponding to measured ozone decreases. An example conversion function is derived to obtain erythemal irradiances and the UV index from measurements with the Solar Light 501 instrument response function. An analytic expressions is given to convert changes in erythemal irradiances to changes in CIE vitamin-D action spectrum weighted irradiances.

  13. Use of an improved radiation amplification factor to estimate the effect of total ozone changes on action spectrum weighted irradiances and an instrument response function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, Jay R.

    2010-12-01

    Multiple scattering radiative transfer results are used to calculate action spectrum weighted irradiances and fractional irradiance changes in terms of a power law in ozone Ω, U(Ω/200)-RAF, where the new radiation amplification factor (RAF) is just a function of solar zenith angle. Including Rayleigh scattering caused small differences in the estimated 30 year changes in action spectrum-weighted irradiances compared to estimates that neglect multiple scattering. The radiative transfer results are applied to several action spectra and to an instrument response function corresponding to the Solar Light 501 meter. The effect of changing ozone on two plant damage action spectra are shown for plants with high sensitivity to UVB (280-315 nm) and those with lower sensitivity, showing that the probability for plant damage for the latter has increased since 1979, especially at middle to high latitudes in the Southern Hemisphere. Similarly, there has been an increase in rates of erythemal skin damage and pre-vitamin D3 production corresponding to measured ozone decreases. An example conversion function is derived to obtain erythemal irradiances and the UV index from measurements with the Solar Light 501 instrument response function. An analytic expressions is given to convert changes in erythemal irradiances to changes in CIE vitamin-D action spectrum weighted irradiances.

  14. Emergence of Cognition from Action.

    PubMed

    Buzsáki, György; Peyrache, Adrien; Kubie, John

    2014-01-01

    Theories of brain function have evolved through multiple stages. The first proposition was that brain networks support a set of reflex responses, with current sensory inputs producing immediate motor outputs. The behaviorist paradigm suggested that actions can always be explained as a response to immediate external cues. In response to these views, the cognitive paradigm argued that behavior cannot be understood simply as input-output functions because the hidden layers of brain generate unpredictability. The central processing was termed "cognition." Here we propose a neuroscience-based model of cognition. Our core hypothesis is that cognition depends on internal models of the animal and its world, where internally generated sequences can serve to perform "what if" scenarios and anticipate the possible consequences of alternative actions without actually testing them, and aid in the decisions of overt actions. We support our hypotheses by several examples of recent experimental findings and show how externally guided cell assembly sequences become internalized to support cognitive functions.

  15. Electronic spectra of semiconductor nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Alivisatos, A.P.

    1993-12-31

    Semiconductor nanocrystals smaller than the bulk exciton show substantial quantum confinement effects. Recent experiments including Stark effect, resonance Raman, valence band photoemission, and near edge X-ray adsorption will be used to put together a picture of the nanocrystal electronic states.

  16. Near-infrared spectra of ferrous mineral mixtures and methods for their identification in planetary surface spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horgan, Briony H. N.; Cloutis, Edward A.; Mann, Paul; Bell, James F.

    2014-05-01

    Iron-bearing minerals are a major component of planetary surfaces, and many can be identified by their characteristic absorption bands in the near-infrared (NIR). Here we present laboratory NIR spectra of a wide range of common Fe-bearing minerals (e.g., olivines, pyroxenes), glasses, and mineral/glass mixtures. We then use this suite of spectra to evaluate the effects of mixtures on mineral detection methods, including olivine and pyroxene spectral indices developed for the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) onboard Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. We find that although these indices can be compromised by minerals with atypical compositions, mineral mixtures, and the presence of other ferrous minerals, these issues can generally be mitigated by visual inspection of the spectra. However, a special case occurs when the mineral or mixture in question is spectrally indistinguishable from a more common mineral. In particular, we show that spectra of high-calcium pyroxene mixed with Fe-bearing glass can be virtually indistinguishable from common Fe-bearing olivine compositions. This effect, combined with the fact that Fe-bearing glass is generally much more difficult to detect than other ferrous minerals, may be causing glass occurrences on planetary surfaces to be underreported. In support of this hypothesis, we use Mars Express OMEGA observations to show that previous olivine detections in the north polar sand sea on Mars are actually more consistent with local mixing of glass and pyroxene. To address these issues, we present an alternative ferrous mineral identification method based on the position and shape of the 1 and 2 μm iron absorption bands, which are sensitive to mineralogy, composition, and mineral mixtures in planetary surface spectra, including glass and mixtures with glass. Using Chandrayaan-1 Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3) observations of Aristarchus Crater on the Moon, we show that these band parameters can reveal subtle spectral

  17. From Magic Show to Meaningful Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford, Teresa

    2003-01-01

    As science teachers, they understand the importance of gaining student interest to promote learning. They know how challenging it is to spark the curiosity to truly engage students in the processes of "doing science." One often-used method of motivation is the demonstration of science in action. Demonstrations such as "discrepant events". They are…

  18. Pentacene Derivatives: Electronic Structure and Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Netusil, Ross; Ilie, Carolina; Kane, Thorin; Damkaci, Fehmi

    2013-03-01

    The variation in composition and structure of the substituent groups of pentacene compounds promises a broad range of electronic structures and behaviors and provides a vast and alluring field of inquiry with avenues of exploration. These include the development of synthetic schema, the process of design for novel derivatives and, in order to identify those hypothesized compounds which demonstrate the desired behavior, the identification and refinement of computational tools that make accurate predictions about the electronic behavior of theoretical compounds. Two computational techniques and six pentacene derivatives are here examined. One technique was used to predict the vibrational spectra of the compounds, in order to both acquire data about the optical conductivity of the compounds and to establish a pool of theoretical data against which experimental data will be compared. The molecular orbital energy level diagram of the same six compounds was derived using a second approach, with the same goals of discerning between valid and invalid predictive schema by comparison with pending experimental data and between hypothesized compounds which show promise and those which present little potential for use in organic semiconductor technology.

  19. Ultraviolet Synthetic Spectra for Three Lambda Bootis Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Kwang-Ping; Neff, James E.; Gray, Richard O.; Corbally, Christopher J.; Johnson, Dustin; Tarbell, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Lambda Boo-type stars are a group of late B to early F-type Population I dwarfs that show mild to extreme deficiencies of iron-peak elements (up to 2 dex), but their C, N, O, and S abundances are near solar. We show that the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) spectra (1280-3200 A) of Lambda Bootis, 29 Cygni (a "confirmed" Lambda Boo star), and Vega (a "mild" Lambda Boo star) can be fit remarkably well by single-temperature synthetic spectra. We computed the full resolution synthetic ultraviolet (UV) spectrum covering the IUE wavelength range using Gray's Stellar Spectral Synthesis Program SPECTRUM. To improve the synthetic spectra, we generated a grid of LTE atmosphere models with the appropriate stellar parameters using ATLAS9 and the existing Castelli and Kurucz 2004 models. One of the improvements of their opacity distribution functions (ODFs) is the addition to the line blanketing near 1400 A and 1600 A by the quasi-molecular absorptions of atomic hydrogen undergoing collisions with protons and other neutral hydrogen atoms. New-ODF fluxes reproduce the ultraviolet observations of Lambda Boo stars in a more realistic way than previous computations. We also constructed our own UV line list for the relevant set of absorption features. Modeling the UV line spectra of Lambda Boo stars allows us to confirm their published surface abundances, including CNO and the iron group elements. It also provides further insight into their photospheric conditions (e.g., Teff, log g, [M/H], micro turbulent velocity, etc.). About 40 percent of the published Lambda Boo candidates have existing IUE spectra. We plan to follow this pilot study and perform UV spectral synthesis for all of them.

  20. The mid-infrared transmission spectra of Antarctic ureilites.

    PubMed

    Sandford, S A

    1993-01-01

    The mid-infrared (4000-450 cm-1; 2.5-22.2 micrometers) transmission spectra of seven Antarctic ureilites and 10 Antarctic H-5 ordinary chondrites are presented. The ureilite spectra show a number of absorption bands, the strongest of which is a wide, complex feature centered near 1000 cm-1 (10 micrometers) due to Si-O stretching vibrations in silicates. The profiles and positions of the substructure in this feature indicate that Mg-rich olivines and pyroxenes are the main silicates responsible. The relative abundances of these two minerals, as inferred from the spectra, show substantial variation from meteorite to meteorite, but generally indicate olivine is the most abundant (olivine:pyroxene = 60:40 to 95:5). Both the predominance of olivine and the variable olivine-to-pyroxene ratio are consistent with the known composition and heterogeneity of ureilites. The H-5 ordinary chondrites spanned a range of weathering classes and were used to provide a means of addressing the extent to which the ureilite spectra may have been altered by weathering processes. It was found that, while weathering of these meteorites produces some weak bands due to the formation of small amounts of carbonates and hydrates, the profile of the main silicate feature has been little affected by Antarctic exposure in the meteorites studied here. The mid-infrared ureilite spectra provide an additional means of testing potential asteroidal parent bodies for the ureilites. At present, the best candidates include the subset of S-type asteroids having low albedos and weak absorption features in the near infrared.

  1. The Mid-Infrared Transmission Spectra of Antarctic Ureilites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandford, Scott A.

    1993-01-01

    The mid-infrared (4000-450 1/cm; 2.5-22.2 micron) transmission spectra of seven Antarctic ureilites and 10 Antarctic H-5 ordinary chondrites are presented. The ureilite spectra show a number of absorption bands, the strongest of which is a wide, complex feature centered near 1000 1/cm (10 micron) due to Si-O stretching vibrations in silicates. The profiles and positions of the substructure in this feature indicate that Mg-rich olivines and pyroxenes are the main silicates responsible. The relative abundances of these two minerals, as inferred from the spectra, show substantial variation from meteorite to meteorite, but generally indicate olivine is the most abundant (olivine:pyroxene = 60:40 to 95:5). Both the predominance of olivine and the variable olivine-to-pyroxene ratio are consistent with the known composition and heterogeneity of ureilites. The H-5 ordinary chondrites spanned a range of weathering classes and were used to provide a means of addressing the extent to which the ureilite spectra may have been altered by weathering processes. It was found that, while weathering of these meteorites produces some weak bands due to the formation of small amounts of carbonates and hydrates, the profile of the main silicate feature has been little affected by Antarctic exposure in the meteorites studied here. The mid-infrared ureilite spectra provide an additional means of testing potential asteroidal parent bodies for the ureilites. At present, the best candidates include the subset of S-type asteroids having low albedos and weak absorption features in the near infrared.

  2. Ultraviolet Spectra of Globular Clusters in Andromeda

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, R. C.

    1999-05-01

    As part of a NASA-funded effort with Ben Dorman of Goddard Space Flight Center, I am engaged in calculating spectra from first principles of solar-type stars of a wide range of metallicity. This paper reports on an extension of this work funded by the Hubble Space Telescope archival program, the derivation of fundamental parameters for several globular clusters in Andromeda (M31). Properties of the underlying stellar population are derived by matching archival HST spectra with composite spectra constructed by weighted coaddition of the calculated spectra for stars of appropriate spectral types. Armed with these ab initio calculations, this work explores the degeneracy in age and metallicity in the ultraviolet, and the affect of unknowns such as the relative abundance of light elements versus iron and the possible presence of blue stragglers or blue horizontal branch stars.

  3. Synthesis and Spectra of Vanadium Complexes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ophardt, Charles E.; Stupgia, Sean

    1984-01-01

    Describes an experiment which illustrates simple synthetic techniques, redox principles in synthesis reactions, interpretation of visible spectra using Orgel diagrams, and the spectrochemical series. The experiment is suitable for the advanced undergraduate inorganic chemistry laboratory. (JN)

  4. Vibrational and vibronic spectra of tryptamine conformers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayorkas, Nitzan; Bernat, Amir; Izbitski, Shay; Bar, Ilana

    2013-03-01

    Conformation-specific ionization-detected stimulated Raman spectra, including both Raman loss and Raman gain lines, along with visible-visible-ultraviolet hole-burning spectra of tryptamine (TRA) conformers have been measured simultaneously, with the aim of obtaining new data for identifying them. The slightly different orientations of the ethylamine side chain relative to the indole lead to unique spectral signatures, pointing to the presence of seven TRA conformers in the molecular beam. Comparison of ionization-loss stimulated Raman spectra to computationally scaled harmonic Raman spectra, especially in the alkyl C-H and amine N-H stretch regions together with the retrieved information on the stabilities of the TRA conformers assisted their characterization and structural identification. The prospects and limitations of using these spectroscopic methods as potential conformational probes of flexible molecules are discussed.

  5. Contribution to the study of turbulence spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dumas, R.

    1979-01-01

    An apparatus suitable for turbulence measurement between ranges of 1 to 5000 cps and from 6 to 16,000 cps was developed and is described. Turbulence spectra downstream of the grills were examined with reference to their general characteristics, their LF qualities, and the effects of periodic turbulence. Medium and HF are discussed. Turbulence spectra in the boundary layers are similarly examined, with reference to their fluctuations at right angles to the wall, and to lateral fluctuations. Turbulence spectra in a boundary layer with suction to the wall is discussed. Induced turbulence, and turbulence spectra at high Reynolds numbers. Calculations are presented relating to the effect of filtering on the value of the correlations in time and space.

  6. Microwave spectra of some volatile organic compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, W. F.

    1975-01-01

    A computer-controlled microwave (MRR) spectrometer was used to catalog reference spectra for chemical analysis. Tables of absorption frequency, peak absorption intensity, and integrated intensity are included for 26 volatile organic compounds, all but one of which contain oxygen.

  7. Frequency Spectra of Magnetoacoustic Emission in Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanchenko, S. V.; Grokhovsky, V. I.; Kolchanov, N. N.

    2016-08-01

    We analyzed the magnetoacoustic emission spectra of iron meteorites and their industrial analogs. The revealed differences in signal amplitude, position and width of the peaks are associated with the features of structure and the magnetic texture.

  8. Cooperative Interaction Within RNA Virus Mutant Spectra.

    PubMed

    Shirogane, Yuta; Watanabe, Shumpei; Yanagi, Yusuke

    2016-01-01

    RNA viruses usually consist of mutant spectra because of high error rates of viral RNA polymerases. Growth competition occurs among different viral variants, and the fittest clones predominate under given conditions. Individual variants, however, may not be entirely independent of each other, and internal interactions within mutant spectra can occur. Examples of cooperative and interfering interactions that exert enhancing and suppressing effects on replication of the wild-type virus, respectively, have been described, but their underlying mechanisms have not been well defined. It was recently found that the cooperation between wild-type and variant measles virus genomes produces a new phenotype through the heterooligomer formation of a viral protein. This observation provides a molecular mechanism underlying cooperative interactions within mutant spectra. Careful attention to individual sequences, in addition to consensus sequences, may disclose further examples of internal interactions within mutant spectra. PMID:26162566

  9. Handbook of mass spectra of environmental contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    Hites, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    This handbook is a collection of the electron impact mass spectra of 394 commonly encountered environmental pollutants. Each page is devoted to the examination of a single pollutant, which is presented as a bar graph always starting at M/z = 40. Each spectra is determined by analyses of data in EPA data bases. The major fragment ions are correlated with their respective structure. The mass and intensity of the four most intense ions in the spectrum are given. Each spectrum is marked to indicate the origin of the selected fragment ions. For each spectra, also given are the approved name of the chemical Abstract Service, the common name of the compound, the article number (if any) given to the Merck Index, the CAS Registry Number, the molecular formula, and the nominal molecular weight of the compound. Each spectra is indexed by common chemical name, CAS Registry Number, exact molecular weight, and intense peaks.

  10. Comparing Ultraviolet Spectra Against Calculations: First Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Ruth C.

    2003-01-01

    The five-year goal of this effort is to calculate high fidelity mid-UV spectra for individual stars and stellar systems for a wide range of ages, abundances, and abundance ratios. In this first year, the emphasis was placed on revising the list of atomic line parameters used to calculate mid-UV spectra. First, new identifications of atomic lines and measurements of their transition probabilities were obtained for lines of the first and second ionization stages of iron-peak elements. Second, observed mid-UV and optical spectra for standard stars were re-analyzed and compared to new calculations, to refine the determination of transition probabilities and to estimate the identity of lines still missing from the laboratory lists. As evidenced by the figures, a dramatic improvement has resulted in the reproduction of the spectra of standard stars by the calculations.

  11. Improved peak shape fitting in alpha spectra.

    PubMed

    Pommé, S; Caro Marroyo, B

    2015-02-01

    Peak overlap is a recurrent issue in alpha-particle spectrometry, not only in routine analyses but also in the high-resolution spectra from which reference values for alpha emission probabilities are derived. In this work, improved peak shape formulae are presented for the deconvolution of alpha-particle spectra. They have been implemented as fit functions in a spreadsheet application and optimum fit parameters were searched with built-in optimisation routines. Deconvolution results are shown for a few challenging spectra with high statistical precision. The algorithm outperforms the best available routines for high-resolution spectrometry, which may facilitate a more reliable determination of alpha emission probabilities in the future. It is also applicable to alpha spectra with inferior energy resolution. PMID:25497323

  12. PIA update: Correlation analyses of mass spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, L. W.; Clark, B. C.

    1988-01-01

    The PIA instrument aboard the Giotto spacecraft (a time of flight spectrometer) has been presented elsewhere. The mass spectra used in this analysis were decoded and mass numbers assigned according to the presence of carbon and silver, using the global values for these elements in their spectral absence. The results presented here were obtained using a frequency of occurrence based on analysis which correlated how often mass numbers appear in the mass spectra and which mass numbers tend to occur together in the same spectra; no amplitude information is utilized. The data are presented as plots of mass vs coincident mass for different subsets of the PIA data set, with both axes having units of atomic mass. Frequency contours are plotted at approximately five percent contour intervals, relative to the maximum AMU occurrence in that plot. The plots presented are symmetrical about the matrix diagonal, i.e., every mass is coincident with itself in a given spectra.

  13. Properties of Martian Hematite at Meridiani Planum by Simultaneous Fitting of Mars Mossbauer Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agresti, D. G.; Fleischer, I.; Klingelhoefer, G.; Morris, R. V.

    2010-01-01

    temperature dependence of certain parameters. By examining different fitting models, we demonstrate an improved fit for martian hematite modeled with two sextets rather than as a single sextet, and show that outcrop and spherule hematite are distinct. For outcrop, the weaker sextet indicates a Morin transition typical of well-crystallized and chemically pure hematite, while most of the outcrop hematite remains in a weakly ferromagnetic state at all temperatures. For spherule spectra, both sextets are consistent with weakly ferromagnetic hematite with no Morin transition. For both hematites, there is evidence for a range of particle sizes.

  14. Standardization of near infrared spectra measured on multi-instrument.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Cai, Wensheng; Shao, Xueguang

    2014-07-11

    Calibration model transfer is essential for practical applications of near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy because the measurements of the spectra may be performed on different instruments and the difference between the instruments must be corrected. An approach for calibration transfer based on alternating trilinear decomposition (ATLD) algorithm is proposed in this work. From the three-way spectral matrix measured on different instruments, the relative intensity of concentration, spectrum and instrument is obtained using trilinear decomposition. Because the relative intensity of instrument is a reflection of the spectral difference between instruments, the spectra measured on different instruments can be standardized by a correction of the coefficients in the relative intensity. Two NIR datasets of corn and tobacco leaf samples measured with three instruments are used to test the performance of the method. The results show that, for both the datasets, the spectra measured on one instrument can be correctly predicted using the partial least squares (PLS) models built with the spectra measured on the other instruments.

  15. Polarized Raman spectra and intensities of aliphatic amino acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Himmler, Hans J.; Eysel, Hans H.

    1989-01-01

    Raman spectra of aliphatic α- L-amino acids, glycine, alanine, and valine were re-investigated both in aqueous solution and deuterium oxide solution. The spectra were taken of the zwitterionic and of the completely deprotonated form of the amino acids. Spectra of leucine and isoleucine were studied in water at the isoelectric point. Spectra were recorded both with parallel and perpendicular polarization and the isotropic and anisotropic scattering components were isolated. The integrated intensities of CH stretch, CC stretch and carboxylate bend vibrations are discussed. Linear relations between the number of CC and CH bonds and the total scattered intensity in the appropriate spectral regions are observed. The sum over the carboxylate modes shows characteristic intensities for the first three members of the aliphatic amino acids. An increase of isotropic scattering of ϱ co 2 near 510 cm -1 with increasing chain length of the amino acid (or with increasing concentration) is interpreted as the result of micelle formation.

  16. Quantitative Comparison of Tandem Mass Spectra Obtained on Various Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazsó, Fanni Laura; Ozohanics, Oliver; Schlosser, Gitta; Ludányi, Krisztina; Vékey, Károly; Drahos, László

    2016-08-01

    The similarity between two tandem mass spectra, which were measured on different instruments, was compared quantitatively using the similarity index (SI), defined as the dot product of the square root of peak intensities in the respective spectra. This function was found to be useful for comparing energy-dependent tandem mass spectra obtained on various instruments. Spectral comparisons show the similarity index in a 2D "heat map", indicating which collision energy combinations result in similar spectra, and how good this agreement is. The results and methodology can be used in the pharma industry to design experiments and equipment well suited for good reproducibility. We suggest that to get good long-term reproducibility, it is best to adjust the collision energy to yield a spectrum very similar to a reference spectrum. It is likely to yield better results than using the same tuning file, which, for example, does not take into account that contamination of the ion source due to extended use may influence instrument tuning. The methodology may be used to characterize energy dependence on various instrument types, to optimize instrumentation, and to study the influence or correlation between various experimental parameters.

  17. Molecular dynamics in cytochrome c oxidase Moessbauer spectra deconvolution

    SciTech Connect

    Bossis, Fabrizio; Palese, Luigi L.

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} Cytochrome c oxidase molecular dynamics serve to predict Moessbauer lineshape widths. {yields} Half height widths are used in modeling of Lorentzian doublets. {yields} Such spectral deconvolutions are useful in detecting the enzyme intermediates. -- Abstract: In this work low temperature molecular dynamics simulations of cytochrome c oxidase are used to predict an experimentally observable, namely Moessbauer spectra width. Predicted lineshapes are used to model Lorentzian doublets, with which published cytochrome c oxidase Moessbauer spectra were simulated. Molecular dynamics imposed constraints to spectral lineshapes permit to obtain useful information, like the presence of multiple chemical species in the binuclear center of cytochrome c oxidase. Moreover, a benchmark of quality for molecular dynamic simulations can be obtained. Despite the overwhelming importance of dynamics in electron-proton transfer systems, limited work has been devoted to unravel how much realistic are molecular dynamics simulations results. In this work, molecular dynamics based predictions are found to be in good agreement with published experimental spectra, showing that we can confidently rely on actual simulations. Molecular dynamics based deconvolution of Moessbauer spectra will lead to a renewed interest for application of this approach in bioenergetics.

  18. Theoretical study on absorption and emission spectra of adenine analogues.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongxia; Song, Qixia; Yang, Yan; Li, Yan; Wang, Haijun

    2014-04-01

    Fluorescent nucleoside analogues have attracted much attention in studying the structure and dynamics of nucleic acids in recent years. In the present work, we use theoretical calculations to investigate the structural and optical properties of four adenine analogues (termed as A1, A2, A3, and A4), and also consider the effects of aqueous solution and base pairing. The results show that the fluorescent adenine analogues can pair with thymine to form stable H-bonded WC base pairs. The excited geometries of both adenine analogues and WC base pairs are similar to the ground geometries. The absorption and emission maxima of adenine analogues are greatly red shifted compared with nature adenine, the oscillator strengths of A1 and A2 are stronger than A3 and A4 in both absorption and emission spectra. The calculated low-energy peaks in the absorption spectra are in good agreement with the experimental data. In general, the aqueous solution and base pairing can slightly red-shift both the absorption and emission maxima, and can increase the oscillator strengths of absorption spectra, but significantly decrease the oscillator strengths of A3 in emission spectra.

  19. Calculation of ground vibration spectra from heavy military vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krylov, V. V.; Pickup, S.; McNuff, J.

    2010-07-01

    The demand for reliable autonomous systems capable to detect and identify heavy military vehicles becomes an important issue for UN peacekeeping forces in the current delicate political climate. A promising method of detection and identification is the one using the information extracted from ground vibration spectra generated by heavy military vehicles, often termed as their seismic signatures. This paper presents the results of the theoretical investigation of ground vibration spectra generated by heavy military vehicles, such as tanks and armed personnel carriers. A simple quarter car model is considered to identify the resulting dynamic forces applied from a vehicle to the ground. Then the obtained analytical expressions for vehicle dynamic forces are used for calculations of generated ground vibrations, predominantly Rayleigh surface waves, using Green's function method. A comparison of the obtained theoretical results with the published experimental data shows that analytical techniques based on the simplified quarter car vehicle model are capable of producing ground vibration spectra of heavy military vehicles that reproduce basic properties of experimental spectra.

  20. Novel retrieval of volcanic SO 2 abundance from ultraviolet spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salerno, G. G.; Burton, M. R.; Oppenheimer, C.; Caltabiano, T.; Tsanev, V. I.; Bruno, N.

    2009-03-01

    The recent development of fixed networks of scanning ultraviolet spectrometers for automatic determination of volcanic SO 2 fluxes has created tremendous opportunities for monitoring volcanoes but has brought new challenges in processing (and interpreting) the copious data flow they produce. A particular difficulty in standard implantation of differential optical absorption (DOAS) methods is the requirement for a clear-sky (plume-free) background spectrum. Our experience after four years of measurements with two UV scanner networks on Etna and Stromboli shows that wide plumes are frequently observed, precluding simple selection of clear-sky spectra. We have therefore developed a retrieval approach based on simulation of the background spectrum. We describe the method here and tune it empirically by collecting clear, zenith sky spectra using calibration cells containing known amounts of SO 2. We then test the performance of this optimised retrieval using clear-sky spectra collected with the same calibration cells but for variable scan angles, time of day, and season (through the course of 1 year), finding acceptable results (~ 12% error) for SO 2 column amounts. We further illustrate the analytical approach using spectra recorded at Mt. Etna during its July 2006 eruption. We demonstrate the reliability of the method for tracking volcano dynamics on different time scales, and suggest it is widely suited to automated SO 2-plume monitoring.

  1. Experimental access to HSQC spectra decoupled in all frequency dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakhaii, Peyman; Haase, Burkhard; Bermel, Wolfgang

    2009-08-01

    A new operator called RESET "Reducing nuclEar Spin multiplicitiEs to singuleTs" is presented to acquire broadband proton decoupled proton spectra in one and two dimensions. Basically, the homonuclear decoupling is achieved through the application of bilinear rotation pulses and delays. A [BIRD] r,x pulse building block is used to selectively invert all proton magnetization remotely attached to 13C isotopes, which is equivalent to a scalar J decoupling of the protons directly attached to 13C from all other protons in the spin system. In conjunction with an appropriate data processing technique pure shift proton spectra are obtained. For this purpose, the concept of constant time acquisition in the observe dimension is exploited. Both ideas were merged together producing superior HSQC based pseudo 3D pulse sequences. The resulting HSQC spectra show cross peaks with collapsed multiplet structures and singlet responses for the proton chemical shift frequencies. An unambiguous assignment of signals from overcrowded spectra becomes much easier. Finally, the recently introduced SHARC technique is exploited to enhance the capability of the scalar J decoupling method. A significant reduction of the total measurement time is achieved. The time is saved by reducing the number of 13C chemical shift evolution increments and working with superimposed narrow spectral bandwidths in the 13C indirect domain.

  2. Trigonometric Polynomials For Estimation Of Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenhall, Charles A.

    1990-01-01

    Orthogonal sets of trigonometric polynomials used as suboptimal substitutes for discrete prolate-spheroidal "windows" of Thomson method of estimation of spectra. As used here, "windows" denotes weighting functions used in sampling time series to obtain their power spectra within specified frequency bands. Simplified windows designed to require less computation than do discrete prolate-spheroidal windows, albeit at price of some loss of accuracy.

  3. New atlas of IR solar spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, A.; Blatherwick, R. D.; Murcray, F. H.; Vanallen, J. W.; Bradford, C. M.; Cook, G. R.; Murcray, D. G.

    1980-01-01

    Over 4500 absorption lines have been marked on the spectra and the corresponding line positions tabulated. The associated absorbing telluric or solar species for more than 90% of these lines have been identified and only a fraction of the unidentified lines have peak absorptions greater than a few percent. The high resolution and the low Sun spectra greatly enhance the sensitivity limits for identification of trace constituents.

  4. Establishment of the spectra of kinetic turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolshov, L. A.; Dykhne, A. M.; Kiselev, V. P.; Pergament, A. K.

    1979-01-01

    An analysis of kinetic equations describing the establishment of Langmuir turbulence spectra is presented. Secondary turbulence occurs where stationary distribution consists of many peaks. The position of peaks is established and their amplitudes complete undamped oscillations. It is pointed out that establishing spectra can occur only during adiabatic inclusion of pumping. It is significant here that the adiabiatic condition is more rigid than the ordinary by several hundred times.

  5. Diffuse emission and pathological Seyfert spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, Jules P.

    1995-01-01

    In this annual ROSAT status report, the diffuse emission and spectra from Seyfert galaxies are examined. Three papers are presented and their contents include the soft x-ray properties and spectra of a binary millisecond pulsar, the PSPC and HRI observations of a Starburst/Seyfert 2 Galaxy, and an analysis of the possibility of x-ray luminous starbursts in the Einstein Medium Sensitivity Survey.

  6. Tilted cranking classification of multiband spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frauendorf, S.; May, F. R.

    1992-06-01

    The existence of TDHF-solutions rotating uniformly about a nonprincipal axis of the deformed axial potential is demonstrated. The solutions represent Delta(I) = 1 bands. Self consistency and symmetry are discussed. The transformation of experimental spectra to the rotating frame of reference is introduced. Excitation spectra at high spin are calculated and found to agree well with recent data on Er-163 and Hf-174.

  7. Children's Actions when Experiencing Domestic Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Overlien, Carolina; Hyden, Margareta

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this article is, by analysing children's discourses, to investigate their actions or absence of actions during a domestic violence episode. The empirical data are recorded group therapy sessions and individual interviews with children who have grown up experiencing their fathers' violence against their mothers. The analysis shows that…

  8. Conformal symmetry of brane world effective actions

    SciTech Connect

    McFadden, Paul L.; Turok, Neil

    2005-01-15

    A simple derivation of the low-energy effective action for brane worlds is given, highlighting the role of conformal invariance. We show how to improve the effective action for a positive- and negative-tension brane pair using the AdS/CFT correspondence.

  9. Detecting Emotions from Connected Action Sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhardt, Daniel; Robinson, Peter

    In this paper we deal with the problem of detecting emotions from the body movements produced by naturally connected action sequences. Although action sequences are one of the most common forms of body motions in everyday scenarios their potential for emotion recognition has not been explored in the past. We show that there are fundamental differences between actions recorded in isolation and in natural sequences and demonstrate a number of techniques which allow us to correctly label action sequences with one of four emotions up to 86% of the time. Our results bring us an important step closer to recognizing emotions from body movements in natural scenarios.

  10. IUE and Optical Spectra of AL Comae Berenices During a Rare Superoutburst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szkody, Paula; Silber, Andrew; Sion, Ed; Downes, Ronald A.; Howell, Steve B.; Costa, Edgardo; Moreno, H.

    1996-06-01

    We present optical spectra from 3 to 21 days and lUE spectra at 10 and 19 days following the outburst of the extreme amplitude, very short orbital period cataclysmic variable AL Corn after a 20 yr quiescent interval. The lUE spectra have no evidence of P Cyg profiles and show an early presence of Lyα absorption, which may be indicative of a 25,000 K white dwarf. The optical spectra show only weak Balmer absorption throughout this interval, with no dramatic changes within the 3 weeks. The spectra are compared to those available for the few other systems that had similar long outbursts following a long quiescence (WZ Sge, WX Cet, SW UMa).

  11. Playing Action Video Games Improves Visuomotor Control.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Chen, Rongrong; Chen, Jing

    2016-08-01

    Can playing action video games improve visuomotor control? If so, can these games be used in training people to perform daily visuomotor-control tasks, such as driving? We found that action gamers have better lane-keeping and visuomotor-control skills than do non-action gamers. We then trained non-action gamers with action or nonaction video games. After they played a driving or first-person-shooter video game for 5 or 10 hr, their visuomotor control improved significantly. In contrast, non-action gamers showed no such improvement after they played a nonaction video game. Our model-driven analysis revealed that although different action video games have different effects on the sensorimotor system underlying visuomotor control, action gaming in general improves the responsiveness of the sensorimotor system to input error signals. The findings support a causal link between action gaming (for as little as 5 hr) and enhancement in visuomotor control, and suggest that action video games can be beneficial training tools for driving. PMID:27485132

  12. Negation in the brain: modulating action representations.

    PubMed

    Tettamanti, Marco; Manenti, Rosa; Della Rosa, Pasquale A; Falini, Andrea; Perani, Daniela; Cappa, Stefano F; Moro, Andrea

    2008-11-01

    Sentential negation is a universal syntactic feature of human languages that reverses the truth value expressed by a sentence. An intriguing question concerns what brain mechanisms underlie our ability to represent and understand the meaning of negative sentences. We approach this issue by investigating action-related language processing and the associated neural representations. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging we measured brain activity in 18 healthy subjects during passive listening of sentences characterized by a factorial combination of polarity (affirmative vs. negative) and concreteness (action-related vs. abstract). Negation deactivated cortical areas and the left pallidum. Compared to abstract sentences, action-related sentences activated the left-hemispheric action-representation system. Crucially, the polarity by concreteness interactions showed that the activity within the action-representation system was specifically reduced for negative action-related vs. affirmative action-related sentences (compared to abstract sentences). Accordingly, functional integration within this system as measured by Dynamic Causal Modeling was specifically weaker for negative action-related than for affirmative action-related sentences. This modulation of action representations indicates that sentential negation transiently reduces the access to mental representations of the negated information. PMID:18771737

  13. Playing Action Video Games Improves Visuomotor Control.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Chen, Rongrong; Chen, Jing

    2016-08-01

    Can playing action video games improve visuomotor control? If so, can these games be used in training people to perform daily visuomotor-control tasks, such as driving? We found that action gamers have better lane-keeping and visuomotor-control skills than do non-action gamers. We then trained non-action gamers with action or nonaction video games. After they played a driving or first-person-shooter video game for 5 or 10 hr, their visuomotor control improved significantly. In contrast, non-action gamers showed no such improvement after they played a nonaction video game. Our model-driven analysis revealed that although different action video games have different effects on the sensorimotor system underlying visuomotor control, action gaming in general improves the responsiveness of the sensorimotor system to input error signals. The findings support a causal link between action gaming (for as little as 5 hr) and enhancement in visuomotor control, and suggest that action video games can be beneficial training tools for driving.

  14. An Inverse Modeling Approach to Estimating Phytoplankton Pigment Concentrations from Phytoplankton Absorption Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moisan, John R.; Moisan, Tiffany A. H.; Linkswiler, Matthew A.

    2011-01-01

    Phytoplankton absorption spectra and High-Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) pigment observations from the Eastern U.S. and global observations from NASA's SeaBASS archive are used in a linear inverse calculation to extract pigment-specific absorption spectra. Using these pigment-specific absorption spectra to reconstruct the phytoplankton absorption spectra results in high correlations at all visible wavelengths (r(sup 2) from 0.83 to 0.98), and linear regressions (slopes ranging from 0.8 to 1.1). Higher correlations (r(sup 2) from 0.75 to 1.00) are obtained in the visible portion of the spectra when the total phytoplankton absorption spectra are unpackaged by multiplying the entire spectra by a factor that sets the total absorption at 675 nm to that expected from absorption spectra reconstruction using measured pigment concentrations and laboratory-derived pigment-specific absorption spectra. The derived pigment-specific absorption spectra were further used with the total phytoplankton absorption spectra in a second linear inverse calculation to estimate the various phytoplankton HPLC pigments. A comparison between the estimated and measured pigment concentrations for the 18 pigment fields showed good correlations (r(sup 2) greater than 0.5) for 7 pigments and very good correlations (r(sup 2) greater than 0.7) for chlorophyll a and fucoxanthin. Higher correlations result when the analysis is carried out at more local geographic scales. The ability to estimate phytoplankton pigments using pigment-specific absorption spectra is critical for using hyperspectral inverse models to retrieve phytoplankton pigment concentrations and other Inherent Optical Properties (IOPs) from passive remote sensing observations.

  15. Energy spectra of ions from impulsive solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reames, D. V.; Richardson, I. G.; Wenzel, K.-P.

    1991-01-01

    A study of the energy spectra of ions from impulsive solar flares in the 0.1 to 100 MeV region is reported with data from the combined observations of experiments on the ISEE 3 and IMP 8 spacecraft. Most of the events studied are dominated by He, and these He spectra show a persistent steepening or break above about 10 MeV resulting in an increase in the power-law spectral indices from about 2 to about 3.5 or more. One event, dominated by protons, shows a clear maximum in the spectrum near 1 MeV. If the rollover in the spectrum below 1 MeV is interpreted as a consequence of matter traversal in the solar atmosphere, then the source of the acceleration would lie only about 800 km above the photosphere, well below the corona. An alternative interpretation is that trapping in the acceleration region directly causes a peak in the spectrum.

  16. Action controls dopaminergic enhancement of reward representations

    PubMed Central

    Guitart-Masip, Marc; Chowdhury, Rumana; Sharot, Tali; Dayan, Peter; Duzel, Emrah; Dolan, Raymond J.

    2012-01-01

    Dopamine is widely observed to signal anticipation of future rewards and thus thought to be a key contributor to affectively charged decision making. However, the experiments supporting this view have not dissociated rewards from the actions that lead to, or are occasioned by, them. Here, we manipulated dopamine pharmacologically and examined the effect on a task that explicitly dissociates action and reward value. We show that dopamine enhanced the neural representation of rewarding actions, without significantly affecting the representation of reward value as such. Thus, increasing dopamine levels with levodopa selectively boosted striatal and substantia nigra/ventral tegmental representations associated with actions leading to reward, but not with actions leading to the avoidance of punishment. These findings highlight a key role for dopamine in the generation of appetitively motivated actions. PMID:22529363

  17. The voluntary control of facial action units in adults.

    PubMed

    Gosselin, Pierre; Perron, Mélanie; Beaupré, Martin

    2010-04-01

    We investigated adults' voluntary control of 20 facial action units theoretically associated with 6 basic emotions (happiness, fear, anger, surprise, sadness, and disgust). Twenty young adults were shown video excerpts of facial action units and asked to reproduce them as accurately as possible. Facial Action Coding System (FACS; Ekman & Friesen, 1978a) coding of the facial productions showed that young adults succeeded in activating 18 of the 20 target actions units, although they often coactivated other action units. Voluntary control was clearly better for some action units than for others, with a pattern of differences between action units consistent with previous work in children and adolescents.

  18. [Neuroprotective actions of lithium].

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Ryota; Fujimaki, Koichiro; Jeong, Mi Ra; Senatorov, Vladimir V; Christ, Lori; Leeds, Peter; Chuang, De-Maw; Takeda, Masatoshi

    2003-01-01

    neuroprotective effects of this mood-stabilizer. Finally, long-term lithium treatment of cortical neurons stimulates the proliferation of their progenitor cells detected by co-labeling with BrdU and nestin. Lithium pretreatment also blocks the decrease in progenitor proliferation induced by glutamate, glucocorticoids and haloperidol, suggesting a role in CNS neuroplasticity. We used animal models to investigate further therapeutic potentials for lithium. In the MCAO/reperfusion model of stroke, we found that post-insult treatment with lithium robustly reduced infarct volume and neurological deficits. These beneficial effects were evident when therapeutic concentrations of lithium were injected at least up to 3 h after ischemic onset. The neuroprotection was associated with activation of heat-shock factor-1 and induction of heat-shock protein-70, a cytoprotective protein. In a rat excitotoxic model of Huntington's disease, the excitotoxin-induced loss of striatal medium-sized neurons was markedly reduced by lithium. This lithium protection was correlated with up-regulation of cytoprotective Bcl-2 and down-regulation of apoptotic proteins p53 and Bax, and neurons showing DNA damage and caspase-3 activation. Taken together, our results provide a new insight into the molecular mechanisms involved in lithium neuroprotection against glutamate excitotoxicity. Moreover, these novel molecular and cellular actions might contribute to the neurotrophic and neuroprotective actions of this mood-stabilizer in patients, and could be related to its clinical efficacy for treating mood disorder patients. Clearly, mood-stabilizers may have expanded use for treating excitotoxin-related neurodegenerative diseases.

  19. Infrared absorption spectra of human malignant tumor tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skornyakov, I. V.; Tolstorozhev, G. B.; Butra, V. A.

    2008-05-01

    We used infrared spectroscopy methods to study the molecular structure of tissues from human organs removed during surgery. The IR spectra of the surgical material from breast, thyroid, and lung are compared with data from histological examination. We show that in malignant neoplasms, a change occurs in the hydrogen bonds of protein macromolecules found in the tissue of the studied organs. We identify the spectral signs of malignant pathology.

  20. K-inflationary power spectra at second order

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Jérôme; Vennin, Vincent; Ringeval, Christophe E-mail: christophe.ringeval@uclouvain.be

    2013-06-01

    Within the class of inflationary models, k-inflation represents the most general single field framework that can be associated with an effective quadratic action for the curvature perturbations and a varying speed of sound. The incoming flow of high-precision cosmological data, such as those from the Planck satellite and small scale Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) experiments, calls for greater accuracy in the inflationary predictions. In this work, we calculate for the first time the next-to-next-to-leading order scalar and tensor primordial power spectra in k-inflation needed in order to obtain robust constraints on the inflationary theory. The method used is the uniform approximation together with a second order expansion in the Hubble and sound flow functions. Our result is checked in various limits in which it reduces to already known situations.

  1. Representation of action in Parkinson's disease: imagining, observing, and naming actions.

    PubMed

    Poliakoff, Ellen

    2013-09-01

    People with Parkinson's disease (PD) exhibit slowed movements and difficulty in initiating movements. This review addresses the issue of whether or not cognitive representations of actions in PD are affected, alongside these motor problems. In healthy people, the motor system can be involved in tasks such as observing a graspable object or another person's action, or imagining and naming actions, in the absence of overt movement. As described in this review, the fact that the slowed real movements exhibited by PD patients are coupled with slower motor imagery and verb processing provides additional evidence for the involvement of the motor system in these processes. On the other hand, PD patients can still engage in motor imagery and action observation to some extent, which is encouraging for the use of these processes in rehabilitation. Findings across the different domains of action-representation reveal several important factors. First, the nature of action is critical: patients' performance in observation and naming tasks is influenced by whether or not the action is in their repertoire and by the extent of motion required to execute the action. Second, people with PD may use alternative or compensatory mechanisms to represent actions, such as relying more on a third-person perspective or a visual strategy. Third, people with PD show a lack of specificity, responding as strongly to stimuli related and unrelated to actions. Investigating action-representation in PD has implications for our understanding of both the symptoms of PD and the cognitive representation of actions in the healthy system.

  2. Lamplighter groups, de Brujin graphs, spider-web graphs and their spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigorchuk, R.; Leemann, P.-H.; Nagnibeda, T.

    2016-05-01

    We study the infinite family of spider-web graphs \\{{{ S }}k,N,M\\}, k≥slant 2, N≥slant 0 and M≥slant 1, initiated in the 50s in the context of network theory. It was later shown in physical literature that these graphs have remarkable percolation and spectral properties. We provide a mathematical explanation of these properties by putting the spider-web graphs in the context of group theory and algebraic graph theory. Namely, we realize them as tensor products of the well-known de Bruijn graphs \\{{{ B }}k,N\\} with cyclic graphs \\{{C}M\\} and show that these graphs are described by the action of the lamplighter group {{ L }}k={Z}/k{Z}\\wr {Z} on the infinite binary tree. Our main result is the identification of the infinite limit of \\{{{ S }}k,N,M\\}, as N,M\\to ∞ , with the Cayley graph of the lamplighter group {{ L }}k which, in turn, is one of the famous Diestel–Leader graphs {{DL}}k,k. As an application we compute the spectra of all spider-web graphs and show their convergence to the discrete spectral distribution associated with the Laplacian on the lamplighter group.

  3. Lamplighter groups, de Brujin graphs, spider-web graphs and their spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigorchuk, R.; Leemann, P.-H.; Nagnibeda, T.

    2016-05-01

    We study the infinite family of spider-web graphs \\{{{ S }}k,N,M\\}, k≥slant 2, N≥slant 0 and M≥slant 1, initiated in the 50s in the context of network theory. It was later shown in physical literature that these graphs have remarkable percolation and spectral properties. We provide a mathematical explanation of these properties by putting the spider-web graphs in the context of group theory and algebraic graph theory. Namely, we realize them as tensor products of the well-known de Bruijn graphs \\{{{ B }}k,N\\} with cyclic graphs \\{{C}M\\} and show that these graphs are described by the action of the lamplighter group {{ L }}k={Z}/k{Z}\\wr {Z} on the infinite binary tree. Our main result is the identification of the infinite limit of \\{{{ S }}k,N,M\\}, as N,M\\to ∞ , with the Cayley graph of the lamplighter group {{ L }}k which, in turn, is one of the famous Diestel-Leader graphs {{DL}}k,k. As an application we compute the spectra of all spider-web graphs and show their convergence to the discrete spectral distribution associated with the Laplacian on the lamplighter group.

  4. DETERMINING REFLECTANCE SPECTRA OF SURFACES AND CLOUDS ON EXOPLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, Nicolas B.; Strait, Talia E.

    2013-03-01

    Planned missions will spatially resolve temperate terrestrial planets from their host star. Although reflected light from such a planet encodes information about its surface, it has not been shown how to establish surface characteristics of a planet without assuming known surfaces to begin with. We present a reanalysis of disk-integrated, time-resolved, multiband photometry of Earth obtained by the Deep Impact spacecraft as part of the EPOXI Mission of Opportunity. We extract reflectance spectra of clouds, ocean, and land without a priori knowledge of the numbers or colors of these surfaces. We show that the inverse problem of extracting surface spectra from such data is a novel and extreme instance of spectral unmixing, a well-studied problem in remote sensing. Principal component analysis is used to determine an appropriate number of model surfaces with which to interpret the data. Shrink-wrapping a simplex to the color excursions of the planet yields a conservative estimate of the planet's endmember spectra. The resulting surface maps are unphysical, however, requiring negative or larger-than-unity surface coverage at certain locations. Our ''rotational unmixing'' supersedes the endmember analysis by simultaneously solving for the surface spectra and their geographical distributions on the planet, under the assumption of diffuse reflection and known viewing geometry. We use a Markov Chain Monte Carlo to determine best-fit parameters and their uncertainties. The resulting albedo spectra are similar to clouds, ocean, and land seen through a Rayleigh-scattering atmosphere. This study suggests that future direct-imaging efforts could identify and map unknown surfaces and clouds on exoplanets.

  5. Ultraviolet spectra of minerals and rocks relevant to airless bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenspon, A.; Hibbitts, C.; Klima, R. L.; Izenberg, N. R.

    2011-12-01

    Reflectance spectroscopy from the ultraviolet (UV) through infrared is used to determine the composition of solar system objects from asteroids to gas giants. Ultraviolet spectroscopy is often used to characterize small amounts of dispersed media, for example during probing tenuous atmospheres and characterizing aurora as well as exploring atmospheric chemistry. It has also been used to characterize the compositions of solid surfaces of airless bodies such as the icy Galilean and Saturnian satellites [1,2], Mercury [3], and the Moon [3,4]. Spacecraft have obtained reflectance spectra of solid-surfaced airless bodies throughout the ultraviolet through visible (~ 100 to 750nm) that show absorption features indicative of mineral composition and processes such as space weathering. We are obtaining vacuum UV - infrared (~ 130 - 5000 nm) bidirectional reflectance spectra of minerals and rocks under vacuum and at different temperatures to increase the library of available UV reflectance spectra and to assist in the interpretation of these types of observations. Reflectance spectra of olivine and montmorillonite are consistent with those measured previously [5]. We are expanding our results to minerals relevant to Mercury, where understanding UV reflectance may prove critical for mineralogical interpretation of surface spectroscopy [6], as well as exploring the effect of hydration and temperature on UV spectra. [1] Hendrix, A.R. et al., Icarus, 135, 79-84, 1998. [2] Hendrix, A.R., and C.J. Hansen, Icarus 193, 323-333, 2008. [3] Holsclaw, G.M. et al., Icarus, 209, 179-194, 2010. [4] Gladstone, G.R. et al., Science, 330, 472-476, 2010. [5] Cloutis, E. A., Icarus, 197, 321-347, 2008. [6] Izenberg et al., AGU Fall 2011 Abstract ID: 119846

  6. A metric space for Type Ia supernova spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasdelli, Michele; Hillebrandt, W.; Aldering, G.; Antilogus, P.; Aragon, C.; Bailey, S.; Baltay, C.; Benitez-Herrera, S.; Bongard, S.; Buton, C.; Canto, A.; Cellier-Holzem, F.; Chen, J.; Childress, M.; Chotard, N.; Copin, Y.; Fakhouri, H. K.; Feindt, U.; Fink, M.; Fleury, M.; Fouchez, D.; Gangler, E.; Guy, J.; Ishida, E. E. O.; Kim, A. G.; Kowalski, M.; Kromer, M.; Lombardo, S.; Mazzali, P. A.; Nordin, J.; Pain, R.; Pécontal, E.; Pereira, R.; Perlmutter, S.; Rabinowitz, D.; Rigault, M.; Runge, K.; Saunders, C.; Scalzo, R.; Smadja, G.; Suzuki, N.; Tao, C.; Taubenberger, S.; Thomas, R. C.; Tilquin, A.; Weaver, B. A.

    2015-02-01

    We develop a new framework for use in exploring Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) spectra. Combining principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least square (PLS) analysis we are able to establish correlations between the principal components (PCs) and spectroscopic/photometric SNe Ia features. The technique was applied to ˜120 SN and ˜800 spectra from the Nearby Supernova Factory. The ability of PCA to group together SNe Ia with similar spectral features, already explored in previous studies, is greatly enhanced by two important modifications: (1) the initial data matrix is built using derivatives of spectra over the wavelength, which increases the weight of weak lines and discards extinction, and (2) we extract time evolution information through the use of entire spectral sequences concatenated in each line of the input data matrix. These allow us to define a stable PC parameter space which can be used to characterize synthetic SN Ia spectra by means of real SN features. Using PLS, we demonstrate that the information from important previously known spectral indicators (namely the pseudo-equivalent width of Si II 5972 Å/Si II 6355 Å and the line velocity of S II 5640 Å/Si II 6355 Å) at a given epoch is contained within the PC space and can be determined through a linear combination of the most important PCs. We also show that the PC space encompasses photometric features like B/V magnitudes, B - V colours and SALT2 parameters c and x1. The observed colours and magnitudes, which are heavily affected by extinction, cannot be reconstructed using this technique alone. All the above-mentioned applications allowed us to construct a metric space for comparing synthetic SN Ia spectra with observations.

  7. Can We Infer Ocean Dynamics from Altimeter Wavenumber Spectra?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richman, James; Shriver, Jay; Arbic, Brian

    2012-01-01

    The wavenumber spectra of sea surface height (SSH) and kinetic energy (KE) have been used to infer the dynamics of the ocean. When quasi-geostrophic dynamics (QG) or surface quasi-geostrophic (SQG) turbulence dominate and an inertial subrange exists, a steep SSH wavenumber spectrum is expected with k-5 for QG turbulence and a flatter k-11/3 for SQG turbulence. However, inspection of the spectral slopes in the mesoscale band of 70 to 250 km shows that the altimeter wavenumber slopes typically are much flatter than the QG or SQG predictions over most of the ocean. Comparison of the altimeter wavenumber spectra with the spectra estimated from the output of an eddy resolving global ocean circulation model (the Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model, HYCOM, at 1/25 resolution), which is forced by high frequency winds and includes the astronomical forcing of the sun and the moon, suggests that the flatter slopes of the altimeter may arise from three possible sources, the presence of internal waves, the lack of an inertial subrange in the 70 to 250 km band and noise or submesoscales at small scales. When the wavenumber spectra of SSH and KE are estimated near the internal tide generating regions, the resulting spectra are much flatter than the expectations of QG or SQG theory. If the height and velocity variability are separated into low frequency (periods greater than 2 days) and high frequency (periods less than a day), then a different pattern emerges with a relatively flat wavenumber spectrum at high frequency and a steeper wavenumber spectrum at low frequency. The stationary internal tides can be removed from the altimeter spectrum, which steepens the spectral slopes in the energetic internal wave regions. Away from generating regions where the internal waves

  8. Embracing causality in specifying the indeterminate effects of actions

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, F.

    1996-12-31

    This paper makes the following two contributions to formal theories of actions: Showing that a causal minimization framework can be used effectively to specify the effects of indeterminate actions; and showing that for certain classes of such actions, regression, an effective computational mechanism, can be used to reason about them.

  9. About efficiency of identification of materials using spectrum dynamics of medium response under the action of THz radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trofimov, Vyacheslav A.; Varentsova, Svetlana A.

    2009-05-01

    A method, suggested by us earlier for identification of materials with close spectra in terahertz range of frequencies and based on the analysis of medium response spectral lines dynamics, is verified experimentally. The temporal dynamics of spectral lines allows to determine relaxation time of rotational transitions as well. A question about measurement time, that is sufficient for determining of material response characteristic time, is discussed. To demonstrate the efficiency of proposed method, we treat the response of soap and chocolate under the action of terahertz pulse with a few cycles. Our investigation shows that it is possible to identify these materials with high probability.

  10. Who Needs Affirmative Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ginger, Ann Fagan

    1979-01-01

    Affirmative action and reverse discrimination are discussed. Facts that were omitted from the court record on the Bakke case are examined. The need for encouraging minority students and women to continue to press for school admission and for lawyers to continue to press affirmative action suits is stressed. (MC)

  11. Community-Action Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Sarah; Mattern, Mark; Telin, Mike

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes and analyzes an undergraduate course entitled Public Interest Research in which students learn research methods by conducting research on behalf of one or more community organizations. Students' work is conceived of as community action learning, a combination of participatory action research and service learning, emphasizing…

  12. Preferential Affirmative Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Derrick A., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses the philosophical rationale for preferential affirmative action presented by Daniel C. Maguire in "A New American Justice." Maintains that self-interest bars present society's acceptance of Maguire's theories of justice, as demonstrated in negative reactions to the Harvard Law Review's affirmative action plan. (MJL)

  13. Action Learning in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marquardt, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Action learning was introduced into China less than 20 years ago, but has rapidly become a valuable tool for organizations seeking to solve problems, develop their leaders, and become learning organizations. This article provides an historical overview of action learning in China, its cultural underpinnings, and five case studies. It concludes…

  14. Handbook for Ecology Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eber, Ronald

    This handbook has been compiled to aid concerned individuals and ecology groups more adequately define their goals, initiate good programs, and take effective action. It examines the ways a group of working individuals can become involved in action programs for ecological change. Part 1 deals with organization, preliminary organizing, structuring,…

  15. Renormalized action improvements

    SciTech Connect

    Zachos, C.

    1984-01-01

    Finite lattice spacing artifacts are suppressed on the renormalized actions. The renormalized action trajectories of SU(N) lattice gauge theories are considered from the standpoint of the Migdal-Kadanoff approximation. The minor renormalized trajectories which involve representations invariant under the center are discussed and quantified. 17 references.

  16. Action Research and Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foreman-Peck, Lorraine; Murray, Jane

    2008-01-01

    This article examines the relationship between action research and policy and the kind of confidence teachers, policy makers and other potential users may have in such research. Many published teacher action research accounts are criticised on the grounds that they do not fully meet the conventional standards for reporting social scientific…

  17. ACTION. Annual Report 1974.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ACTION, Washington, DC.

    In this report are described projects and activities undertaken by ACTION's volunteer programs in 1974. After an introduction that notes accomplishments of the past year, a review of domestic operations discusses such programs as VISTA, University Year for ACTION, National Student Volunteer Program, Foster Grandparent Program, and others according…

  18. Gravitational spectra from direct measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, C. A.; Colombo, O. L.

    1978-01-01

    A simple rapid method is described for determining the spectrum of a surface field from harmonic analysis of direct measurements along great circle arcs. The method is shown to give excellent overall trends to very high degree from even a few short arcs of satellite data. Three examples are taken with perfect measurements of satellite tracking over a planet made up of hundreds of point-masses using (1) altimetric heights from a low orbiting spacecraft, (2) velocity residuals between a low and a high satellite in circular orbits, and (3) range-rate data between a station at infinity and a satellite in highly eccentric orbit. In particular, the smoothed spectrum of the Earth's gravitational field is determined to about degree 400(50 km half wavelength) from 1 D x 1 D gravimetry and the equivalent of 11 revolutions of Geos 3 and Skylab altimetry. This measurement shows there is about 46 cm of geoid height remaining in the field beyond degree 180.

  19. Resonant spectra of quadrupolar anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fossez, K.; Mao, Xingze; Nazarewicz, W.; Michel, N.; Garrett, W. R.; Płoszajczak, M.

    2016-09-01

    In quadrupole-bound anions, an extra electron is attached at a sufficiently large quadrupole moment of a neutral molecule, which is lacking a permanent dipole moment. The nature of the bound states and low-lying resonances of such anions is of interest for understanding the threshold behavior of open quantum systems in general. In this work, we investigate the properties of quadrupolar anions as halo systems, the formation of rotational bands, and the transition from a subcritical to supercritical electric quadrupole moment. We solve the electron-plus-rotor problem using a nonadiabatic coupled-channel formalism by employing the Berggren ensemble, which explicitly contains bound states, narrow resonances, and the scattering continuum. The rotor is treated as a linear triad of point charges with zero monopole and dipole moments and nonzero quadrupole moment. We demonstrate that binding energies and radii of quadrupolar anions strictly follow the scaling laws for two-body halo systems. Contrary to the case of dipolar anions, ground-state band of quadrupolar anions smoothly extend into the continuum, and many rotational bands could be identified above the detachment threshold. We study the evolution of a bound state of an anion as it dives into the continuum at a critical quadrupole moment and we show that the associated critical exponent is α =2 . Everything considered, quadrupolar anions represent a perfect laboratory for the studies of marginally bound open quantum systems.

  20. Pythagorean quantization, action(s) and the arrow of time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuch, Dieter

    2010-06-01

    Searching for the first well-documented attempts of introducing some kind of "quantization" into the description of nature inevitably leads to the ancient Greeks, in particular Plato and Pythagoras. The question of finding the so-called Pythagorean triples, i.e., right-angled triangles with integer length of all three sides, is, surprisingly, connected with complex nonlinear Riccati equations that occur in time-dependent quantum mechanics. The complex Riccati equation together with the usual Newtonian equation of the system, leads to a dynamical invariant with the dimension of an action. The relation between this invariant and a conserved "angular momentum" for the motion in the complex plane will be determined. The "Pythagorean quantization" shows similarities with the quantum Hall effect and leads to an interpretation of Sommerfeld's fine structure constant that involves another quantum of action, the "least Coulombic action" e2/c. Since natural evolution is characterized by irreversibility and dissipation, the question of how these aspects can be incorporated into a quantum mechanical description arises. Two effective approaches that also both possess a dynamical invariant (like the one mentioned above) will be discussed. One uses an explicitly time-dependent (linear) Hamiltonian, whereas the other leads to a nonlinear Schrödinger equation with complex logarithmic nonlinearity. Both approaches can be transformed into each other via a non-unitary transformation that involves Schrödinger's original definition of a (complex) action via the wave function.

  1. Theoretical spectra of floppy molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hua

    2000-09-01

    Detailed studies of the vibrational dynamics of floppy molecules are presented. Six-D bound-state calculations of the vibrations of rigid water dimer based on several anisotropic site potentials (ASP) are presented. A new sequential diagonalization truncation approach was used to diagonalize the angular part of the Hamiltonian. Symmetrized angular basis and a potential optimized discrete variable representation for intermonomer distance coordinate were used in the calculations. The converged results differ significantly from the results presented by Leforestier et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 106 , 8527 (1997)]. It was demonstrated that ASP-S potential yields more accurate tunneling splittings than other ASP potentials used. Fully coupled 4D quantum mechanical calculations were performed for carbon dioxide dimer using the potential energy surface given by Bukowski et al [J. Chem. Phys., 110, 3785 (1999)]. The intermolecular vibrational frequencies and symmetry adapted force constants were estimated and compared with experiments. The inter-conversion tunneling dynamics was studied using the calculated virtual tunneling splittings. Symmetrized Radau coordinates and the sequential diagonalization truncation approach were formulated for acetylene. A 6D calculation was performed with 5 DVR points for each stretch coordinate, and an angular basis that is capable of converging the angular part of the Hamiltonian to 30 cm-1 for internal energies up to 14000 cm-1. The probability at vinylidene configuration were evaluated. It was found that the eigenstates begin to extend to vinylidene configuration from about 10000 cm-1, and the ra, coordinate is closely related to the vibrational dynamics at high energy. Finally, a direct product DVR was defined for coupled angular momentum operators, and the SDT approach were formulated. They were applied in solving the angular part of the Hamiltonian for carbon dioxide dimer problem. The results show the method is capable of giving very accurate

  2. Your own actions influence how you perceive other people: A misattribution of action appraisals

    PubMed Central

    Tipper, Steven P.; Bach, Patric

    2008-01-01

    The attribution of personal traits to other persons depends on the actions the observer performs at the same time (Bach & Tipper, 2007). Here, we show that the effect reflects a misattribution of appraisals of the observers’ own actions to the actions of others. We exploited spatial compatibility effects to manipulate how fluently—how fast and how accurately—participants identified two individuals performing sporty or academic actions. The traits attributed to each person in a subsequent rating task depended on the fluency of participants’ responses in a specific manner. An individual more fluently identified while performing the academic action appeared more academic and less sporty. An individual more fluently identified while performing the sporty action appeared sportier. Thus, social perception is—at least partially—embodied. The ease of our own responses can be misattributed to the actions of others, affecting which personal traits are attributed to them. PMID:21633518

  3. Following the Action in Action Learning: Towards Ethnomethodological Studies of (Critical) Action Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Steve

    2009-01-01

    Action learning is a pedagogical practice that helps participants learn by talking about their workplace action with fellow participants ("comrades in adversity") in their action learning set. This paper raises questions about the action in action learning, such as: how do members of an action learning set learn from and through each other? How do…

  4. On the continuity of spectra for families of magnetic pseudodifferential operators

    SciTech Connect

    Athmouni, Nassim; Mantoiu, Marius; Purice, Radu

    2010-08-15

    For families of magnetic pseudodifferential operators defined by symbols and magnetic fields depending continuously on a real parameter {epsilon}, we show that the corresponding family of spectra also varies continuously with {epsilon}.

  5. FLUORESCENCE CHARACTERIZATION OF IHSS HUMIC SUBSTANCES: TOTAL LUMINESCENCE SPECTRA WITH ABSORBANCE CORRECTION. (R822251)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Total luminescence spectroscopy was applied to the fluorescence characterization of humic substances obtained from the International Humic Substances Society (IHSS). Results show that total luminescence spectra, represented as excitation-emission matrices (EEMs), may be used to d...

  6. Disk-averaged synthetic spectra of Mars.

    PubMed

    Tinetti, Giovanna; Meadows, Victoria S; Crisp, David; Fong, William; Velusamy, Thangasamy; Snively, Heather

    2005-08-01

    The principal goal of the NASA Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) and European Space Agency's Darwin mission concepts is to directly detect and characterize extrasolar terrestrial (Earthsized) planets. This first generation of instruments is expected to provide disk-averaged spectra with modest spectral resolution and signal-to-noise. Here we use a spatially and spectrally resolved model of a Mars-like planet to study the detectability of a planet's surface and atmospheric properties from disk-averaged spectra. We explore the detectability as a function of spectral resolution and wavelength range, for both the proposed visible coronograph (TPFC) and mid-infrared interferometer (TPF-I/Darwin) architectures. At the core of our model is a spectrum-resolving (line-by-line) atmospheric/surface radiative transfer model. This model uses observational data as input to generate a database of spatially resolved synthetic spectra for a range of illumination conditions and viewing geometries. The model was validated against spectra recorded by the Mars Global Surveyor-Thermal Emission Spectrometer and the Mariner 9-Infrared Interferometer Spectrometer. Results presented here include disk-averaged synthetic spectra, light curves, and the spectral variability at visible and mid-infrared wavelengths for Mars as a function of viewing angle, illumination, and season. We also considered the differences in the spectral appearance of an increasingly ice-covered Mars, as a function of spectral resolution, signal-to-noise and integration time for both TPF-C and TPFI/ Darwin.

  7. H. N. Russell and Atomic Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devorkin, David

    2001-04-01

    “I would rather analyze spectra than do cross-word puzzles or do almost anything else” Henry Norris Russell wrote to William F. Meggers in 1927. Meggers, chief of the spectroscopy division at the NBS, had been surprised that an astrophysicist could be so keen about the analysis of complex spectra. But Russell was a new type of astrophysicist, one who made physics the core of his research. Spectra, for Russell, held the "master key" to knowledge about the universe, and of the atom. He was first attracted by the challenge of detecting and explaining anomalies, which he hoped would lead to new knowledge about the structure of matter. Then, influenced by physicists such as Meggers, he devoted himself to filling in the picture of the structure of atoms from their characteristic spectra as completely as possible. In this talk I will review how Russell worked with Meggers and became the nucleus of an ever-widening circle of spectroscopists devoted to the analysis of complex spectra.

  8. Cleaning HI Spectra Contaminated by GPS RFI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sylvia, Kamin; Hallenbeck, Gregory L.; Undergraduate ALFALFA Team

    2016-01-01

    The NUDET systems aboard GPS satellites utilize radio waves to communicate information regarding surface nuclear events. The system tests appear in spectra as RFI (radio frequency interference) at 1381MHz, which contaminates observations of extragalactic HI (atomic hydrogen) signals at 50-150 Mpc. Test durations last roughly 20-120 seconds and can occur upwards of 30 times during a single night of observing. The disruption essentially renders the corresponding HI spectra useless.We present a method that automatically removes RFI in HI spectra caused by these tests. By capitalizing on the GPS system's short test durations and predictable frequency appearance we are able to devise a method of identifying times containing compromised data records. By reevaluating the remaining data, we are able to recover clean spectra while sacrificing little in terms of sensitivity to extragalactic signals. This method has been tested on 500+ spectra taken by the Undergraduate ALFALFA Team (UAT), in which it successfully identified and removed all sources of GPS RFI. It will also be used to eliminate RFI in the upcoming Arecibo Pisces-Perseus Supercluster Survey (APPSS).This work has been supported by NSF grant AST-1211005.

  9. Background noise spectra of global seismic stations

    SciTech Connect

    Wada, M.M.; Claassen, J.P.

    1996-08-01

    Over an extended period of time station noise spectra were collected from various sources for use in estimating the detection and location performance of global networks of seismic stations. As the database of noise spectra enlarged and duplicate entries became available, an effort was mounted to more carefully select station noise spectra while discarding others. This report discusses the methodology and criteria by which the noise spectra were selected. It also identifies and illustrates the station noise spectra which survived the selection process and which currently contribute to the modeling efforts. The resulting catalog of noise statistics not only benefits those who model network performance but also those who wish to select stations on the basis of their noise level as may occur in designing networks or in selecting seismological data for analysis on the basis of station noise level. In view of the various ways by which station noise were estimated by the different contributors, it is advisable that future efforts which predict network performance have available station noise data and spectral estimation methods which are compatible with the statistics underlying seismic noise. This appropriately requires (1) averaging noise over seasonal and/or diurnal cycles, (2) averaging noise over time intervals comparable to those employed by actual detectors, and (3) using logarithmic measures of the noise.

  10. Spectra from nuclear-excited plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Young, R. J.; Weaver, W. R.

    1980-01-01

    The paper discusses the spectra taken from He-3(n,p)H-3 nuclear-induced plasmas under high thermal neutron flux, lasing conditions. Also, initial spectra are presented for U-235F6 generated plasmas. From an evaluation of these spectra, important atomic and molecular processes that occur in the plasma can be inferred. The spectra presented are the first to be generated by He-3 and U-235F6 nuclear reactions under high neutron flux, lasing conditions. The U-235(n,ff)FF reaction, which liberates 165 MeV of fission-fragment kinetic energy, creates plasmas that are of great interest, since at sufficiently high densities of U-235F6 the gas becomes self-critical; thus, there is no need for an external driving reactor (source of neutrons). The spectra from mixtures of He-3 and Ar, Xe, Kr, Ne, Cl2, F2 and N2 indicate little difference between high-pressure nuclear-induced plasmas and high-pressure electrically pulsed afterglow plasmas for noble-gas systems

  11. Disk-averaged synthetic spectra of Mars.

    PubMed

    Tinetti, Giovanna; Meadows, Victoria S; Crisp, David; Fong, William; Velusamy, Thangasamy; Snively, Heather

    2005-08-01

    The principal goal of the NASA Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) and European Space Agency's Darwin mission concepts is to directly detect and characterize extrasolar terrestrial (Earthsized) planets. This first generation of instruments is expected to provide disk-averaged spectra with modest spectral resolution and signal-to-noise. Here we use a spatially and spectrally resolved model of a Mars-like planet to study the detectability of a planet's surface and atmospheric properties from disk-averaged spectra. We explore the detectability as a function of spectral resolution and wavelength range, for both the proposed visible coronograph (TPFC) and mid-infrared interferometer (TPF-I/Darwin) architectures. At the core of our model is a spectrum-resolving (line-by-line) atmospheric/surface radiative transfer model. This model uses observational data as input to generate a database of spatially resolved synthetic spectra for a range of illumination conditions and viewing geometries. The model was validated against spectra recorded by the Mars Global Surveyor-Thermal Emission Spectrometer and the Mariner 9-Infrared Interferometer Spectrometer. Results presented here include disk-averaged synthetic spectra, light curves, and the spectral variability at visible and mid-infrared wavelengths for Mars as a function of viewing angle, illumination, and season. We also considered the differences in the spectral appearance of an increasingly ice-covered Mars, as a function of spectral resolution, signal-to-noise and integration time for both TPF-C and TPFI/ Darwin. PMID:16078866

  12. Quantum confinement in metal nanofilms: Optical spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khmelinskii, Igor; Makarov, Vladimir I.

    2016-05-01

    We report optical absorption and photoluminescence spectra of Au, Fe, Co and Ni polycrystalline nanofilms in the UV-vis-NIR range, featuring discrete bands resulting from transverse quantum confinement. The film thickness ranged from 1.1 to 15.6 nm, depending on the material. The films were deposited on fused silica substrates by sputtering/thermo-evaporation, with Fe, Co and Ni protected by a SiO2 film deposited on top. The results are interpreted within the particle-in-a-box model, with the box width equal to the mass thickness of the nanofilm. The transverse-quantized energy levels and transition energies scale as the inverse square of the film thickness. The calculated values of the effective electron mass are 0.93 (Au), 0.027 (Fe), 0.21 (Co) and 0.16 (Ni), in units of mo - the mass of the free electron, being independent on the film thickness. The uncertainties in the effective mass values are ca. 2.5%, determined by the film thickness calibration. The second calculated model parameter, the quantum number n of the HOMO, was thickness-independent in Au (5.00) and Fe (6.00), and increased with the film thickness in Co (from 7 to 9) and Ni (from 7 to 11). The transitions observed in the absorbance all start at the level n and correspond to Δn=+1, +2, +3, etc. The photoluminescence bands exhibit large Stokes shifts, shifting to higher energies with the increased excitation energy. The photoluminescence quantum yields grow linearly with the excitation energy, showing evidence of multiple exciton generation. A prototype Fe-SnO2 nanofilm photovoltaic cell demonstrated at least 90% quantum yield of photoelectrons at 77 K.

  13. Numbers in Action

    PubMed Central

    Rugani, Rosa; Sartori, Luisa

    2016-01-01

    Humans show a remarkable tendency to describe and think of numbers as being placed on a mental number line (MNL), with smaller numbers located on the left and larger ones on the right. Faster responses to small numbers are indeed performed on the left side of space, while responses to large numbers are facilitated on the right side of space (spatial-numerical association of response codes, SNARC effect). This phenomenon is considered the experimental demonstration of the MNL and has been extensively replicated throughout a variety of paradigms. Nevertheless, the majority of previous literature has mainly investigated this effect by means of response times and accuracy, whereas studies considering more subtle and automatic measures such as kinematic parameters are rare (e.g., in a reaching-to-grasp movement, the grip aperture is enlarged in responding to larger numbers than in responding to small numbers). In this brief review we suggest that numerical magnitude can also affect the what and how of action execution (i.e., temporal and spatial components of movement). This evidence could have large implications in the strongly debated issue concerning the effect of experience and culture on the orientation of MNL. PMID:27524965

  14. Less chalk more action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitriceski Andelkovic, Bojana; Jovic, Sladjana

    2016-04-01

    Less chalk more action Education should not be a mechanical system that operates according to the principles of the orders and implementation. Education should respect the basic laws of the develop and progress. Curiosity is the engine of achievement and children spontaneously and happily learn only if they get interested, if teacher wake up and stimulate their creativity and individuality. We would like to present classes that are realized as thematic teaching with several subjects involved: chemistry, geography, math, art and biology. Classes were organized for students at age from 10 to 13 years, every month during autumn and winter 2015. Better students identified themselves as teachers and presented peer education .Teachers were monitoring the process of teaching and help to develop links between younger and older students, where older students were educators to younger students. Also one student with special needs was involved in this activities and was supported by other students during the workshops The benefit from this project will be represented with evaluation marks. Evaluation table shows that group of ten students(age 10 to13 years) which are selected in October as children with lack of motivation for learning, got better marks, at the end of January , then they had it in the beginning of the semester.

  15. Reduced attentional capture in action video game players.

    PubMed

    Chisholm, Joseph D; Hickey, Clayton; Theeuwes, Jan; Kingstone, Alan

    2010-04-01

    Recent studies indicate that playing action video games improves performance on a number of attention-based tasks. However, it remains unclear whether action video game experience primarily affects endogenous or exogenous forms of spatial orienting. To examine this issue, action video game players and non-action video game players performed an attentional capture task. The results show that action video game players responded quicker than non-action video game players, both when a target appeared in isolation and when a salient, task-irrelevant distractor was present in the display. Action video game players additionally showed a smaller capture effect than did non-action video game players. When coupled with the findings of previous studies, the collective evidence indicates that extensive experience with action video games may enhance players' top-down attentional control, which, in turn, can modulate the negative effects of bottom-up attentional capture.

  16. Absorption spectra of crystalline limestones experimentally deformed or tectonised

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cervelle, B.; ChayéD'Albissin, M.; Gouet, G.; Visocekas, R.

    1982-11-01

    Diffuse-reflectance spectra have been measured for a series of samples of Carrara marble experimentally deformed under different cylindrical stress ( P = 0, 100, 250, 500, 980 bars). The creation of point defects that results has been shown up classically by irradiation with β rays (40 krads), thus producing a typical blue coloration linked with the formation of colour centres. The diffuse-reflectance spectra, measured on powders with a microscope-spectrometer in the visible range (400-800 nm), allow the determination of the absorption spectra by means of the Kubelka-Munk function. These absorption spectra have been measured for each of the deformed samples, as well as for different fractions of a very deformed specimen subsequently heated at temperatures between 100 and 500° C for a fixed time. In the same way, tectonised crystalline limestones, of various origins, were studied without any other treatment than the irradiation with β rays. From this study the following preliminary conclusions have been drawn: (1) The absorption spectrum of an undeformed but merely irradiated specimen of crystalline limestone is practically monotonous, but in the deformed specimens a broad band of absorption appears, having a maximum at 620 nm with several shoulders, the chief of which is at 520 nm. (2) This absorption band shows the existence of colour centres, the density of which can be estimated relatively by means of the chromaticity coordinates x and y of the C.I.E. obtained from the diffuse-reflectance spectra (C.I.E. = Commission Internationale de l'Éclairage). (3) An overgrinding of calcite generates defects that have the same spectra as those produced during the experimental deformation. Consequently, in obtaining the powders of grain size 50-80 μm needed for the diffuse spectrometry, great care must be exercised. (4) For a given confining pressure, the defect density is proportional to the deformation rate. (5) One can calibrate the effect of the annealing of

  17. MEASUREMENTS OF STELLAR MAGNETIC FIELDS USING AUTOCORRELATION OF SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Borra, E. F.; Deschatelets, D.

    2015-11-15

    We present a novel technique that uses the autocorrelation of the spectrum of a star to measure the line broadening caused by the modulus of its average surface magnetic field. The advantage of the autocorrelation comes from the fact that it can detect very small spectral line broadening effects because it averages over many spectral lines and therefore gives an average with a very high signal-to-noise ratio. We validate the technique with the spectra of known magnetic stars and obtain autocorrelation curves that are in full agreement with published magnetic curves obtained with Zeeman splitting. The autocorrelation also gives less noisy curves so that it can be used to obtain very accurate curves. We degrade the resolution of the spectra of these magnetic stars to lower spectral resolutions where the Zeeman splitting is undetectable. At these resolutions, the autocorrelation still gives good quality curves, thereby showing that it can be used to measure magnetic fields in spectra where the Zeeman splitting is significantly smaller than the width of the spectral line. This would therefore allow observing magnetic fields in very faint Ap stars with low-resolution spectrographs, thereby greatly increasing the number of known magnetic stars. It also demonstrates that the autocorrelation can measure magnetic fields in rapidly rotating stars as well as weak magnetic fields that give a Zeeman splitting smaller than the intrinsic width of the spectral lines. Finally, it shows that the autocorrelation can be used to find unknown magnetic stars in low-resolution spectroscopic surveys.

  18. Fluorescence spectra of benign and malignant prostate tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AlSalhi, M. S.; Masilamani, V.; Atif, M.; Farhat, K.; Rabah, D.; Turki, M. R. Al

    2012-09-01

    In this study, fluorescence emission spectrum (FES), Stokes' shift spectrum (SSS), and reflectance spectrum (RS) of benign (N = 12) and malignant prostate tissues (N = 8) were investigated to discriminate the two types of tissues. The FES was done with the excitation at 325 nm only; SSS with Δλ = 70 and Δλ = 0, the latter being equivalent to reflectance spectra. Of the three modes of spectra, SSS with Δλ = 70 nm showed the best discrimination. There were four important bands, one at 280 nm (due to tryptophan); 320 nm (due to elastin & tryptophan); 355 and 385 (due to NADH) and 440 nm (due to flavin). From the relative intensities of these bands, three ratios were evaluated. Similarly another two ratios were obtained from reflectance spectra and one more from FES. Thus, there are 6 ratio parameters which represent the relative concentration of tryptophan, elastin, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH), and flavin. A statistical analysis showed that benign and malignant tissues could be classified with accuracy greater than 90%. This report is only for in vitro analysis; but employing optical fiber, this can be extended to in vivo analysis too, so that benign tumor could be distinguished without surgery.

  19. Energy spectra of ions from impulsive solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reames, D. V.; Richardson, I. G.; Wenzel, K.-P.

    1992-01-01

    A study of the energy spectra of ions from impulsive solar flares in the 0.1-100 MeV region is reported. Most of the events studied are dominated by He and these He spectra show a persistent steepening or break above about 10 MeV resulting in an increase in the power-law spectral indices from about 2 to about 3.5 or more. Spectra of H, He-3, O, and Fe have spectral indices that are consistent with a value of about 3.5 above about 2 MeV/amu. One event, dominated by protons, shows a clear maximum in the spectrum near 1 MeV. If the rollover in the spectrum below 1 MeV is interpreted as a consequence of matter traversal in the solar atmosphere, then the source of the acceleration would lie only about 800 km above the photosphere, well below the corona. Alternative interpretations are that trapping in the acceleration region directly causes a peak in the resulting ion spectrum or that low-energy particles encounter significant additional scattering during transport from the flare.

  20. Automatic classification of spectra from the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheeseman, Peter; Stutz, John; Self, Matthew; Taylor, William; Goebel, John; Volk, Kevin; Walker, Helen

    1989-01-01

    A new classification of Infrared spectra collected by the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) is presented. The spectral classes were discovered automatically by a program called Auto Class 2. This program is a method for discovering (inducing) classes from a data base, utilizing a Bayesian probability approach. These classes can be used to give insight into the patterns that occur in the particular domain, in this case, infrared astronomical spectroscopy. The classified spectra are the entire Low Resolution Spectra (LRS) Atlas of 5,425 sources. There are seventy-seven classes in this classification and these in turn were meta-classified to produce nine meta-classes. The classification is presented as spectral plots, IRAS color-color plots, galactic distribution plots and class commentaries. Cross-reference tables, listing the sources by IRAS name and by Auto Class class, are also given. These classes show some of the well known classes, such as the black-body class, and silicate emission classes, but many other classes were unsuspected, while others show important subtle differences within the well known classes.

  1. Chemical Sensitivity of the Sulfur K-Edge X-ray Absorption Spectra of Organic Disulfides.

    PubMed

    Pickering, Ingrid J; Barney, Monica; Cotelesage, Julien J H; Vogt, Linda; Pushie, M Jake; Nissan, Andrew; Prince, Roger C; George, Graham N

    2016-09-22

    Sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy increasingly is used as a tool to provide speciation information about the sulfur chemical form in complex samples, with applications ranging from fossil fuels to soil science to health research. As part of an ongoing program of systematic investigations of the factors that affect the variability of sulfur K near-edge spectra, we have examined the X-ray absorption spectra of a series of organic symmetric disulfide compounds. We have used polarized sulfur K-edge spectra of single crystals of dibenzyl disulfide to confirm the assignments of the major transitions in the spectrum as 1s → (S-S)σ* and 1s → (S-C)σ*. We also have examined the solution spectra of an extended series of disulfides and show that the spectra change in a systematic and predictable manner with the nature of the external group. PMID:27571342

  2. Consistency analysis of plastic samples based on similarity calculation from limited range of the Raman spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, B. W.; Wu, Z. X.; Dong, X. P.; Lu, D.; Tao, S. C.

    2016-07-01

    We proposed a novel method to calculate the similarity between samples with only small differences at unknown and specific positions in their Raman spectra, using a moving interval window scanning across the whole Raman spectra. Two ABS plastic samples, one with and the other without flame retardant, were tested in the experiment. Unlike the traditional method in which the similarity is calculated based on the whole spectrum, we do the calculation by using a window to cut out a certain segment from Raman spectra, each at a time as the window moves across the entire spectrum range. By our method, a curve of similarity versus wave number is obtained. And the curve shows a large change where the partial spectra of the two samples is different. Thus, the new similarity calculation method identifies samples with tiny difference in their Raman spectra better.

  3. Kinetic energy and scalar spectra in high Rayleigh number axially homogeneous buoyancy driven turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawar, Shashikant S.; Arakeri, Jaywant H.

    2016-06-01

    Kinetic energy and scalar spectra from the measurements in high Rayleigh number axially homogeneous buoyancy driven turbulent flow are presented. Kinetic energy and concentration (scalar) spectra are obtained from the experiments wherein density difference is created using brine and fresh water and temperature spectra are obtained from the experiments in which heat is used. Scaling of the frequency spectra of lateral and longitudinal velocity near the tube axis is closer to the Kolmogorov-Obukhov scaling, while the scalar spectra show some evidence of dual scaling, Bolgiano-Obukhov scaling followed by Obukhov-Corrsin scaling. These scalings are also observed in the corresponding second order spatial structure functions of velocity and concentration fluctuations.

  4. Numerical calculations of wall pressure spectra for equilibrium turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momii, K.; Jinno, K.; Ueda, T.; Koike, T.

    1983-08-01

    The streamwise wavenumber spectra of wall pressure fluctuations are numerically calculated by using the profiles of mean velocity gradient, vertical turbulent intensity, and vertical velocity correlation which have already been obtained by various investigators. The formulations of convective velocities obtained by Panton and Linebarger (1974) are employed in the transformations of wavenumber spectra into frequency spectra. The transformed frequency spectra show good agreement with the experimental results by Willmarth and Wooldridge (1962) for a zero pressure gradient and by Bradshaw (1967) for an adverse pressure gradient. It is found that the streamwise anisotropy of velocity correlation in turbulent boundary layer increases the level of the spectra in low wavenumbers. Moreover, the effect of downstream pressure gradient is found to be equivalent to that of the anisotropy of the turbulence.

  5. Raman and infrared spectra and theoretical calculations of dipicolinic acid, dinicotinic acid, and their dianions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCann, Kathleen; Laane, Jaan

    2008-11-01

    The Raman and infrared spectra of dipicolinic acid (DPA) and dinicotinic acid (DNic) and their salts (CaDPA, Na 2DPA, and CaDNic) have been recorded and the spectra have been assigned. Ab initio and DFT calculations were carried out to predict the structures and vibrational spectra and were compared to the experimental results. Because of extensive intermolecular hydrogen bonding in the crystals of these molecules, the calculated structures and spectra for the individual molecules agree only moderately well with the experimental values. Theoretical calculations were also carried out for DPA dimers and DPA·2H 2O to better understand the intermolecular interactions. The spectra do show that DPA and its calcium salt, which are present in anthrax spores, can be distinguished from the very similar DNic and CaDNic.

  6. Temperature measurement of wood flame based on the double line method of atomic emission spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Xiaojian; Liu, Zhenhua; Sang, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Aimed at the testing requirement of the transient high temperature in explosion field and the bore of barrel weapon, the temperature measurement system of double line of atomic emission spectrum was designed, the method of flame spectrum testing system were used for experimental analysis. The experimental study of wood burning spectra was done with flame spectrum testing system. The measured spectra contained atomic emission spectra of the elements K, Na, and the excitation ease of two kinds atomic emission spectra was analyzed. The temperature was calculated with two spectral lines of K I 766.5nm and 769.9nm. The results show that, compared with Na, the excitation temperature of K atomic emission spectra is lower. By double line method, the temperature of wood burning is 1040K, and error is 3.7%.

  7. Crustal geomagnetic field - Two-dimensional intermediate-wavelength spatial power spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLeod, M. G.

    1983-02-01

    Two-dimensional Fourier spatial power spectra of equivalent magnetization values are presented for a region that includes a large portion of the western United States. The magnetization values were determined by inversion of POGO satellite data, assuming a magnetic crust 40 km thick, and were located on an 11 x 10 array with 300 km grid spacing. The spectra appear to be in good agreement with values of the crustal geomagnetic field spatial power spectra given by McLeod and Coleman (1980) and with the crustal field model given by Serson and Hannaford (1957). The spectra show evidence of noise at low frequencies in the direction along the satellite orbital track (N-S). indicating that for this particular data set additional filtering would probably be desirable. These findings illustrate the value of two-dimensional spatial power spectra both for describing the geomagnetic field statistically and as a guide for diagnosing possible noise sources.

  8. X-ray Photoemission Spectra and Electronic Structure of Coumarin and its Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Wickrama Arachchilage, Anoja P; Wang, Feng; Feyer, Vitaliy; Plekan, Oksana; Acres, Robert G; Prince, Kevin C

    2016-09-15

    The electronic structures of coumarin and three of its derivatives (7-amino-4-methylcoumarin, 7-amino-4-(trifluoro)methylcoumarin, and 4-hydroxycoumarin) have been studied by theoretical calculations, and compared with experimental valence and core photoelectron spectra to benchmark the predicted spectra. The outer valence band spectra of the first three compounds showed good agreement with theoretical calculations for a single isomer, whereas the spectrum of 4-hydroxycoumarin indicated the presence of more than one tautomer, consistent with published results. Calculations of core level spectra of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and fluorine of the first three compounds are also in satisfactory agreement with our measurements. The carbon and oxygen 1s spectra of 4-hydroxycoumarin allow us to identify and quantify the populations of the principle tautomers present. The 4-hydroxy enol form is the most stable isomer at 348 K, followed by the diketo form, with 1.3 kJ·mol(-1) lower energy. PMID:27545582

  9. Janus Spectra in Two-Dimensional Flows.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chien-Chia; Cerbus, Rory T; Chakraborty, Pinaki

    2016-09-01

    In large-scale atmospheric flows, soap-film flows, and other two-dimensional flows, the exponent of the turbulent energy spectra, α, may theoretically take either of two distinct values, 3 or 5/3, but measurements downstream of obstacles have invariably revealed α=3. Here we report experiments on soap-film flows where downstream of obstacles there exists a sizable interval in which α transitions from 3 to 5/3 for the streamwise fluctuations but remains equal to 3 for the transverse fluctuations, as if two mutually independent turbulent fields of disparate dynamics were concurrently active within the flow. This species of turbulent energy spectra, which we term the Janus spectra, has never been observed or predicted theoretically. Our results may open up new vistas in the study of turbulence and geophysical flows. PMID:27661693

  10. Multifrequency spectra of BL Lac objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urry, C. M.; Kondo, Y.; Mufson, S. L.; Wandel, A.

    1988-01-01

    A program to obtain simultaneous multifrequency spectra of BL Lacertae objects that are known X-ray sources is discussed. The IUE spectra are generally featureless and well-fitted by power law models. For the faintest exposures, Gaussian extraction of the spectrum can greatly impove the signal-to-noise. Most program objects vary in the ultraviolet, although the time scales are not known because of limited observing time. The broadband spectra of BL Lacs exhibit a range of characteristics but the curvature is always downward and the shape is generally smooth. This can be interpreted as synchrotron emission from a relativistic jet; different jet models are possible, and each allows a range of values for the bulk velocity, magnetic field strength, and electron density. Synchrotron models are not required, however an accretion disk model also gives a good fit to the ultraviolet-through-X-ray continuum.

  11. Janus Spectra in Two-Dimensional Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chien-Chia; Cerbus, Rory T.; Chakraborty, Pinaki

    2016-09-01

    In large-scale atmospheric flows, soap-film flows, and other two-dimensional flows, the exponent of the turbulent energy spectra, α , may theoretically take either of two distinct values, 3 or 5 /3 , but measurements downstream of obstacles have invariably revealed α =3 . Here we report experiments on soap-film flows where downstream of obstacles there exists a sizable interval in which α transitions from 3 to 5 /3 for the streamwise fluctuations but remains equal to 3 for the transverse fluctuations, as if two mutually independent turbulent fields of disparate dynamics were concurrently active within the flow. This species of turbulent energy spectra, which we term the Janus spectra, has never been observed or predicted theoretically. Our results may open up new vistas in the study of turbulence and geophysical flows.

  12. Fermi GRB Spectra and the Crisis of the Band Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vianello, G.

    2015-01-01

    The Fermi/LAT gamma-ray telescope has observed 36 GRBs in 4 years of operations. Among them, the bursts with the largest number of LAT-detected photons have spectra which are not well described by the widely used Band model, independently of their energy fluences. High-energy and low-energy excesses have been detected and modeled by an additional power law component and/or by an additional thermal component; high-energy cutoffs have been observed as well. These results point towards a "Band model crisis": the unprecedented spectral coverage of Fermi (8 keV - 100 GeV) shows the need for an improved modeling of GRB spectra, opening new exciting perspectives and challenges for interpretation and theoretical development. I will review these results, with particular regard to the connected data-analysis challenges.

  13. Variable interstellar lines in spectra of HD 73882

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galazutdinov, G.; Krełowski, J.; Beletsky, Y.; Valyavin, G.

    2013-11-01

    We report a detection of variability in interstellar absorption lines of Cai at 4227 Å and Fei at 3860 Å in very high signal-to-noise ratio (>1000) UVES and MIKE spectra of HD 73882 (NX Vel) carried out with the aid of 8-m telescope UT2 at Paranal and 6.5-m Magellan Telescope Clay at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile. The spectra, acquired in 2006 January and 2012 January, respectively, clearly show that the intensity and profile shapes of the Cai and Fei lines had dramatically changed within the 6 year period. Other interstellar features, observed along the same line of sight, do not demonstrate strong changes. It is likely that a high velocity CaFe cloud obscured the star between the two observations.

  14. Nonexistence results for relaxation spectra with compact support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas, R. J.; Whittle Gruffudd, H. R.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we consider the problem of recovering the (transformed) relaxation spectrum h from the (transformed) loss modulus g by inverting the integral equation g={{sech}}\\ast h, where \\ast denotes convolution, using Fourier transforms. We are particularly interested in establishing properties of h, having assumed that the Fourier transform of g has entire extension to the complex plane. In the setting of square integrable functions, we demonstrate that the Paley-Wiener theorem cannot be used to show the existence of non-trivial relaxation spectra with compact support. We prove a stronger result for tempered distributions: there are no non-trivial relaxation spectra with compact support. Finally we establish necessary and sufficient conditions for the relaxation spectrum h to be strictly positive definite.

  15. Uncertainty in measurement of protein circular dichroism spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Maurice G.; Ravi, Jascindra; Rakowska, Paulina D.; Knight, Alex E.

    2014-02-01

    Circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy of proteins is widely used to measure protein secondary structure, and to detect changes in secondary and higher orders of structure, for applications in research and in the quality control of protein products such as biopharmaceuticals. However, objective comparison of spectra is challenging because of a limited quantitative understanding of the sources of error in the measurement. Statistical methods can be used for comparisons, but do not provide a mechanism for dealing with systematic, as well as random, errors. Here we present a measurement model for CD spectroscopy of proteins, incorporating the principal sources of uncertainty, and use the model in conjunction with experimental data to derive an uncertainty budget. We show how this approach could be used in practice for the objective comparison of spectra, and discuss the benefits and limitations of this strategy.

  16. Raman spectra of semiconductor nanoparticles: Disorder-activated phonons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingale, Alka; Rustagi, K. C.

    1998-09-01

    We present Raman spectra of four semiconductor doped glasses and a single crystal of CdS0.55Se0.45 in the range 30-800 cm-1 in the backscattering geometry. This includes the first-order Raman scattering from the disorder-activated zone-edge phonons and the LO phonons. TO phonon modes are not observed, as in bulk CdS, for the excitation well above the lowest gap. We show that the asymmetric line profile of the LO phonon structure can be understood as a composite of two phonon modes: the zone center and the zone edge phonons. Disorder-activated modes in the (30-130)-cm-1 range and the higher-order Raman spectra are also observed and found to be consistent with this assignment.

  17. Galactic cosmic ray abundances and spectra behind defined shielding.

    PubMed

    Heinrich, W; Benton, E V; Wiegel, B; Zens, R; Rusch, G

    1994-10-01

    LET spectra have been measured for lunar missions and for several near Earth orbits ranging from 28 degrees to 83 degrees inclination. In some of the experiments the flux of GCR was determined separately from contributions caused by interactions in the detector material. Results of these experiments are compared to model calculations. The general agreement justifies the use of the model to calculate GCR fluxes. The magnitude of variations caused by solar modulation, geomagnetic shielding, and shielding by matter determined from calculated LET spectra is generally in agreement with experimental data. However, more detailed investigations show that there are some weak points in modeling solar modulation and shielding by material. These points are discussed in more detail. PMID:11540030

  18. Detectability of minerals on desert alluvial fans using reflectance spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shipman, Hugh; Adams, John B.

    1987-01-01

    The visible and near-infrared reflectance spectra of soil samples collected from desert alluvial and colluvial surfaces in the Cuprite mining district, Nevada, were analyzed. These surfaces are downslope from hydrothermally altered volcanic rocks that contain spectrally characteristic minerals such as alunite and kaolinite. Coarse fractions of the soils on the alluvial fans are mineralogically variable and express the upslope lithologies; fine fractions are remarkably similar mineralogically and spectrally in all samples because of dilution of local mineral components by regionally derived windblown dust. Theoretical models for spectral mixing and for particle-size effects were used to model the observed spectral variations. Diagnostic mineral absorption bands in the spectra of fan materials were enhanced by computationally removing the spectrum of the homogeneous fine-soil component. Results show that spectral mixing models are useful for analyzing data with high spectral resolution obtained by field and aircraft spectrometers.

  19. Planning my actions to accommodate yours: joint action development during early childhood.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Marlene; van der Wel, Robrecht P R D; Hunnius, Sabine

    2016-05-01

    The planning and adjusting of one's actions in relation to an action partner is fundamental to smooth joint action. During their first years of life, children gradually become more engaged in joint actions. Here, we investigated whether and at what age children take their partner into account in their action plans to accommodate the other's actions. We focused on children's proactive planning (without prior experience) and flexible adjustment of action plans over time. In a behavioural study, we tested 96 children from four age groups (2½, 3, 3½ and 5 years) in a joint cup-stacking task. Children passed cups to their partner who had only one hand available (alternating over time) to build a tower. Children's response choices were assessed (i.e. passing the cup on the free or occupied side to their partner). The study yielded two major findings. At all ages, children proactively planned their actions in a way that accommodated their partner's actions. However, only by 3½ years did children start to flexibly integrate their partner into their action plans. Even at age 5, children only showed minimal adjustments to their action partner. Candidate processes underlying these developmental changes (e.g. inhibitory control, cognitive flexibility, perspective taking) are discussed. PMID:27069048

  20. Binding space and time through action.

    PubMed

    Binetti, N; Hagura, N; Fadipe, C; Tomassini, A; Walsh, V; Bestmann, S

    2015-04-22

    Space and time are intimately coupled dimensions in the human brain. Several lines of evidence suggest that space and time are processed by a shared analogue magnitude system. It has been proposed that actions are instrumental in establishing this shared magnitude system. Here we provide evidence in support of this hypothesis, by showing that the interaction between space and time is enhanced when magnitude information is acquired through action. Participants observed increases or decreases in the height of a visual bar (spatial magnitude) while judging whether a simultaneously presented sequence of acoustic tones had accelerated or decelerated (temporal magnitude). In one condition (Action), participants directly controlled the changes in bar height with a hand grip device, whereas in the other (No Action), changes in bar height were externally controlled but matched the spatial/temporal profile of the Action condition. The sign of changes in bar height biased the perceived rate of the tone sequences, where increases in bar height produced apparent increases in tone rate. This effect was amplified when the visual bar was actively controlled in the Action condition, and the strength of the interaction was scaled by the magnitude of the action. Subsequent experiments ruled out that this was simply explained by attentional factors, and additionally showed that a monotonic mapping is also required between grip force and bar height in order to bias the perception of the tones. These data provide support for an instrumental role of action in interfacing spatial and temporal quantities in the brain.