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Sample records for action spectra show

  1. Action spectra for photosynthetic inhibition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caldwell, M. M.; Flint, S.; Camp, L. B.

    1981-01-01

    The ultraviolet action spectrum for photosynthesis inhibition was determined to fall between that of the general DNA action spectrum and the generalized plant action spectrum. The characteristics of this action spectrum suggest that a combination of pronounced increase in effectiveness with decreasing wavelength, substantial specificity for the UV-B waveband, and very diminished response in the UV-A waveband result in large radiation amplification factors when the action spectra are used as weighting functions. Attempted determination of dose/response relationships for leaf disc inhibition provided inconclusive data from which to deconvolute an action spectrum.

  2. Atomistic modeling of IR action spectra under circularly polarized electromagnetic fields: toward action VCD spectra.

    PubMed

    Calvo, Florent

    2015-03-01

    The nonlinear response and dissociation propensity of an isolated chiral molecule, camphor, to a circularly polarized infrared laser pulse was simulated by molecular dynamics as a function of the excitation wavelength. The results indicate similarities with linear absorption spectra, but also differences that are ascribable to dynamical anharmonic effects. Comparing the responses between left- and right-circularly polarized pulses in terms of dissociation probabilities, or equivalently between R- and S-camphor to a similarly polarized pulse, we find significant differences for the fingerprint C = O amide mode, with a sensitivity that could be sufficient to possibly enable vibrational circular dichroism as an action technique for probing molecular chirality and absolute conformations in the gas phase.

  3. Time will show: real time predictions during interpersonal action perception.

    PubMed

    Manera, Valeria; Schouten, Ben; Verfaillie, Karl; Becchio, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    Predictive processes are crucial not only for interpreting the actions of individual agents, but also to predict how, in the context of a social interaction between two agents, the actions of one agent relate to the actions of a second agent. In the present study we investigated whether, in the context of a communicative interaction between two agents, observers can use the actions of one agent to predict when the action of a second agent will take place. Participants observed point-light displays of two agents (A and B) performing separate actions. In the communicative condition, the action performed by agent B responded to a communicative gesture performed by agent A. In the individual condition, agent A's communicative action was substituted with a non-communicative action. For each condition, we manipulated the temporal coupling of the actions of the two agents, by varying the onset of agent A's action. Using a simultaneous masking detection task, we demonstrated that the timing manipulation had a critical effect on the communicative condition, with the visual discrimination of agent B increasing linearly while approaching the original interaction timing. No effect of the timing manipulation was found for the individual condition. Our finding complements and extends previous evidence for interpersonal predictive coding, suggesting that the communicative gestures of one agent can serve not only to predict what the second agent will do, but also when his/her action will take place.

  4. Children Show Heightened Memory for Threatening Social Actions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baltazar, Nicole C.; Shutts, Kristin; Kinzler, Katherine D.

    2012-01-01

    Three experiments investigated whether a negativity bias in social perception extends to preschool-aged children's memory for the details of others' social actions and experiences. After learning about individuals who committed nice or mean social actions, children in Experiment 1 were more accurate at remembering who was mean compared with who…

  5. Photosynthetic action spectra and adaptation to spectral light distribution in a benthic cyanobacterial mat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorgensen, B. B.; Cohen, Y.; Des Marais, D. J.

    1987-01-01

    We studied adaptation to spectral light distribution in undisturbed benthic communities of cyanobacterial mats growing in hypersaline ponds at Guerrero Negro, Baja California, Mexico. Microscale measurements of oxygen photosynthesis and action spectra were performed with microelectrodes; spectral radiance was measured with fiber-optic microprobes. The spatial resolution of all measurements was 0.1 mm, and the spectral resolution was 10 to 15 nm. Light attenuation spectra showed absorption predominantly by chlorophyll a (Chl a) (430 and 670 nm), phycocyanin (620 nm), and carotenoids (440 to 500 nm). Blue light (450 nm) was attenuated 10-fold more strongly than red light (600 nm). The action spectra of the surface film of diatoms accordingly showed activity over the whole spectrum, with maxima for Chl a and carotenoids. The underlying dense Microcoleus population showed almost exclusively activity dependent upon light harvesting by phycobilins at 550 to 660 nm. Maximum activity was at 580 and 650 nm, indicating absorption by phycoerythrin and phycocyanin as well as by allophycocyanin. Very little Chl a-dependent activity could be detected in the cyanobacterial action spectrum, even with additional 600-nm light to excite photosystem II. The depth distribution of photosynthesis showed detectable activity down to a depth of 0.8 to 2.5 mm, where the downwelling radiant flux at 600 nm was reduced to 0.2 to 0.6% of the surface flux.

  6. Instrumentation and action spectra in light-associated diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Cripps, D.J.

    1981-07-01

    Instrumentation for studying action spectra in controls and various light-associated diseases is described. This study summarizes tests performed with a prism grating monochromator during the last 10 yr. There were 68 photodermatoses studied: xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) (1), lupus erythematosus (LE) (12), polymorphous light eruption (PLE) (23), solar urticaria (4), actinic reticuloid (2), halogenated salicylanilide photosensitivity and persistent light reactors (11), psoralen photosensitivity (6), and porphyria (9). A normal minimal erythema dose in the UVB (below 320 nm) was generally observed in polymorphous light eruption and lupus erythematosus. The most exquisite photosensitivity for delayed erythema was observed in actinic reticuloid, which in one case was 25-35 times more sensitive in the UVB range which was also observed but to a lesser extent in XP and in persistent light reactors. Persistence of erythema and edema at test sites was observed in XP, PLE, LE, and actinic reticuloid. A delay in development of erythema reaching a maximum at 72 hr was observed in XP and psoralen phototoxicity. Maximum photosensitivity occurred in solar urticaria. Three patients had peak sensitivity in the range of 310-313 nm and the 4th at 460 nm. Photosensitivity in the visible range was detected in 2 patients with solar urticaria, one with actinic reticuloid, and confirmed in 9 patients with porphyria (405 nm). Photosensitivity in the UVA (above 320 nm) occurred to some degree in all groups.

  7. Measurement of action spectra of light-activated processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Justin; Zvyagin, Andrei V.; Heckenberg, Norman R.; Upcroft, Jacqui; Upcroft, Peter; Rubinsztein-Dunlop, Halina H.

    2006-01-01

    We report on a new experimental technique suitable for measurement of light-activated processes, such as fluorophore transport. The usefulness of this technique is derived from its capacity to decouple the imaging and activation processes, allowing fluorescent imaging of fluorophore transport at a convenient activation wavelength. We demonstrate the efficiency of this new technique in determination of the action spectrum of the light mediated transport of rhodamine 123 into the parasitic protozoan Giardia duodenalis.

  8. FRIDAY: EPA Administrator on Bill Maher Show to Discuss Climate Action Plan

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Administrator McCarthy will discuss EPA's new report that shows global climate action has huge economic, environmental and public health benefits for the United States. With global action, we could prevent 57,000 premature American deaths every year

  9. Robots Show Us How to Teach Them: Feedback from Robots Shapes Tutoring Behavior during Action Learning

    PubMed Central

    Vollmer, Anna-Lisa; Mühlig, Manuel; Steil, Jochen J.; Pitsch, Karola; Fritsch, Jannik; Rohlfing, Katharina J.; Wrede, Britta

    2014-01-01

    Robot learning by imitation requires the detection of a tutor's action demonstration and its relevant parts. Current approaches implicitly assume a unidirectional transfer of knowledge from tutor to learner. The presented work challenges this predominant assumption based on an extensive user study with an autonomously interacting robot. We show that by providing feedback, a robot learner influences the human tutor's movement demonstrations in the process of action learning. We argue that the robot's feedback strongly shapes how tutors signal what is relevant to an action and thus advocate a paradigm shift in robot action learning research toward truly interactive systems learning in and benefiting from interaction. PMID:24646510

  10. Robots show us how to teach them: feedback from robots shapes tutoring behavior during action learning.

    PubMed

    Vollmer, Anna-Lisa; Mühlig, Manuel; Steil, Jochen J; Pitsch, Karola; Fritsch, Jannik; Rohlfing, Katharina J; Wrede, Britta

    2014-01-01

    Robot learning by imitation requires the detection of a tutor's action demonstration and its relevant parts. Current approaches implicitly assume a unidirectional transfer of knowledge from tutor to learner. The presented work challenges this predominant assumption based on an extensive user study with an autonomously interacting robot. We show that by providing feedback, a robot learner influences the human tutor's movement demonstrations in the process of action learning. We argue that the robot's feedback strongly shapes how tutors signal what is relevant to an action and thus advocate a paradigm shift in robot action learning research toward truly interactive systems learning in and benefiting from interaction.

  11. CD spectra show the relational style between Zic-, Gli-, Glis-zinc finger protein and DNA.

    PubMed

    Sakai-Kato, Kumiko; Ishiguro, Akira; Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko; Aruga, Jun; Utsunomiya-Tate, Naoko

    2008-01-01

    Zic family proteins have five C2H2-type zinc finger motifs. The Zic-zinc finger domains show high homology to the corresponding domains of the Gli and Glis families, which also contain five C2H2-type zinc finger motifs. The zinc finger motifs of the proteins of these three protein families form an alpha-helix conformation in solution. The addition of oligo DNA that included a Gli-binding sequence increased the alpha-helix content estimated by using circular dichroism spectroscopy. Comparison of the Zic-, Gli-, and Glis-zinc fingers indicated that the alpha-helix content after the addition of oligo DNA correlated well with the affinity of each zinc finger for the oligo DNA (correlation coefficient, 0.85). The importance of the zinc ion for protein folding was reflected in a reduction in the alpha-helix content upon removal of the zinc ion. Owing to the compact globular structure, the alpha-helix structure of the proteins of these three protein families is extremely thermally stable. These results suggest that the alpha-helix structure is important for DNA binding and profoundly related to functional and structural diversity among the three families.

  12. Children who stutter show reduced action-related activity in the rostral cingulate zone.

    PubMed

    Harrewijn, A; Schel, M A; Boelens, H; Nater, C M; Haggard, P; Crone, E A

    2017-02-01

    Previous studies have indicated that children who stutter show not only speech-related problems, but also wider difficulties in self-control. In this study we test the novel hypothesis that children who stutter may experience difficulties with inhibitory control over voluntary actions. We used functional MRI to compare brain activity between children who stutter and children who do not stutter in a task that captures key cognitive aspects of voluntary action control. Participants performed a rolling marble task, in which they were instructed to press a key to stop a rolling marble from crashing on some of the trials (instructed action condition). They were also asked to choose voluntarily whether to execute or inhibit this prepotent response in other trials (volition condition). Children who stutter reported less motor and cognitive impulsivity and had shorter stop-signal reaction times when controlled for IQ, consistent with greater inhibition, compared to children who do not stutter. At the neural level, children who stutter showed decreased activation in the rostral cingulate zone during voluntary action selection compared to children who do not stutter. This effect was more pronounced for children who were rated as showing more stuttered syllables in the stutter screening, and was furthermore correlated with stop-signal reaction times and impulsivity ratings. These findings suggest that stuttering in childhood could reflect wider difficulties in self-control, also in the non-verbal domain. Understanding these neural mechanisms could potentially lead to more focused treatments of stuttering.

  13. Network Analysis Shows Novel Molecular Mechanisms of Action for Copper-Based Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Espinal-Enríquez, Jesús; Hernández-Lemus, Enrique; Mejía, Carmen; Ruiz-Azuara, Lena

    2016-01-01

    The understanding of the mechanisms associated with the action of chemotherapeutic agents is fundamental to assess and account for possible side-effects of such treatments. Casiopeínas have demonstrated a cytotoxic effect by activation of pro-apoptotic processes in malignant cells. Such processes have been proved to activate the apoptotic intrinsic route, as well as cell cycle arrest. Despite this knowledge, the whole mechanism of action of Casiopeínas is yet to be completely understood. In this work we implement a systems biology approach based on two pathway analysis tools (Over-Representation Analysis and Causal Network Analysis) to observe changes in some hallmarks of cancer, induced by this copper-based chemotherapeutic agent in HeLa cell lines. We find that the metabolism of metal ions is exacerbated, as well as cell division processes being globally diminished. We also show that cellular migration and proliferation events are decreased. Moreover, the molecular mechanisms of liver protection are increased in the cell cultures under the actions of Casiopeínas, unlike the case in many other cytotoxic drugs. We argue that this chemotherapeutic agent may be promising, given its protective hepatic function, concomitant with its cytotoxic participation in the onset of apoptotic processes in malignant cells. PMID:26793116

  14. Structure, spectra and antioxidant action of ascorbic acid studied by density functional theory, Raman spectroscopic and nuclear magnetic resonance techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Gurpreet; Mohanty, B. P.; Saini, G. S. S.

    2016-02-01

    Structure, vibrational and nuclear magnetic resonance spectra, and antioxidant action of ascorbic acid towards hydroxyl radicals have been studied computationally and in vitro by ultraviolet-visible, nuclear magnetic resonance and vibrational spectroscopic techniques. Time dependant density functional theory calculations have been employed to specify various electronic transitions in ultraviolet-visible spectra. Observed chemical shifts and vibrational bands in nuclear magnetic resonance and vibrational spectra, respectively have been assigned with the help of calculations. Changes in the structure of ascorbic acid in aqueous phase have been examined computationally and experimentally by recording Raman spectra in aqueous medium. Theoretical calculations of the interaction between ascorbic acid molecule and hydroxyl radical predicted the formation of dehydroascorbic acid as first product, which has been confirmed by comparing its simulated spectra with the corresponding spectra of ascorbic acid in presence of hydrogen peroxide.

  15. Structure, spectra and antioxidant action of ascorbic acid studied by density functional theory, Raman spectroscopic and nuclear magnetic resonance techniques.

    PubMed

    Singh, Gurpreet; Mohanty, B P; Saini, G S S

    2016-02-15

    Structure, vibrational and nuclear magnetic resonance spectra, and antioxidant action of ascorbic acid towards hydroxyl radicals have been studied computationally and in vitro by ultraviolet-visible, nuclear magnetic resonance and vibrational spectroscopic techniques. Time dependant density functional theory calculations have been employed to specify various electronic transitions in ultraviolet-visible spectra. Observed chemical shifts and vibrational bands in nuclear magnetic resonance and vibrational spectra, respectively have been assigned with the help of calculations. Changes in the structure of ascorbic acid in aqueous phase have been examined computationally and experimentally by recording Raman spectra in aqueous medium. Theoretical calculations of the interaction between ascorbic acid molecule and hydroxyl radical predicted the formation of dehydroascorbic acid as first product, which has been confirmed by comparing its simulated spectra with the corresponding spectra of ascorbic acid in presence of hydrogen peroxide.

  16. UV action spectra for mammalian systems: their implications for the predicted effects of ozone depletion on skin cancer incidence

    SciTech Connect

    Setlow, R.B.

    1982-01-01

    The predicted environmental effect of UV-B depend on the action spectrum for the response studied. Since such spectra change rapidly - usually decreasing with increasing wavelength - and since the biological effects depend on the product of the action spectrum and the sun's spectrum at the surface of the earth which decreases with decreasing wavelength, a slight change in action spectrum will markedly influence the predicted effects of ozone depletion on biological systems. Thus, the key, but by no means only step in the prediction, is a knowledge of the action spectrum. Unfortunately, it is rare that we know or even hope to know the spectrum for biological systems of interest such as skin cancer induction, nor is it possible to do experiments with solar simulators on many systems. Hence, we must base our predictions on the photobiological properties of simple systems and the knowledge of their action spectra and general biological theories connecting simple cells with higher organisms.

  17. Close correspondence between the action spectra for the blue light responses of the guard cell and coleoptile chloroplasts, and the spectra for blue light-dependent stomatal opening and coleoptile phototropism

    SciTech Connect

    Quinones, M.A.; Lu, Zhenmin; Zeiger, E.

    1996-03-05

    Fluorescence spectroscopy was used to characterize blue light responses from chloroplasts of adaxial guard cells from Pima cotton (Gossypium barbadense) and coleoptile tips from corn (Zea mays). The chloroplast response to blue light was quantified by measurements of the blue light-induced enhancement of a red light-stimulated quenching of chlorophyll a fluorescence. In adaxial (upper) guard cells, low fluence rates of blue light applied under saturating fluence rates of red light enhanced the red light-stimulated fluorescence quenching by up to 50%. In contrast, added blue light did not alter the red light-stimulated quenching from abaxial (lower) guard cells. This response pattern paralleled the blue light sensitivity of stomatal opening in the two leaf surfaces. An action spectrum for the blue light-induced enhancement of the red light-stimulated quenching showed a major peak at 450 nm and two minor peaks at 420 and 470 nm. This spectrum matched closely an action spectrum for blue light-stimulated stomatal opening. Coleoptile chloroplasts also showed an enhancement by blue light of red light-stimulated quenching. The action spectrum of this response, showing a major peak at 450 nm, a minor peak at 470 nm, and a shoulder at 430 nm, closely matched an action spectrum for blue light-stimulated coleoptile phototropism. Both action spectra match the absorption spectrum of zeaxanthin, a chloroplastic carotenoid recently implicated in blue light photoreception of both guard cells and coleoptiles. The remarkable similarity between the action spectra for the blue light responses of guard cells and coleoptile chloroplasts and the spectra for blue light-stimulated stomatal opening and phototropism, coupled to the recently reported evidence on a role of zeaxanthin in blue light photoreception, indicates that the guard cell and coleoptile chloroplasts specialize in sensory transduction. 28 refs. 4 figs.

  18. Action Spectra for Guard Cell Rb+ Uptake and Stomatal Opening in Vivia faba

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Theodore C.; Allaway, W. G.; Evans, L. T.

    1973-01-01

    Abaxial epidermal strips, containing guard cells as the only viable cells, were prepared from leaves of Vicia faba following a period in darkness, and floated, under CO2-free air, on 2 mm RbCl + 0.1 mm CaCl2 labeled with 86Rb+. Under white light (high pressure mercury vapor lamp), stomatal opening in these strips approached its maximum at less than 0.02 calorie per square centimeter per minute. Under light of different wavelengths, 20 nanometers apart, and at a low quantum flux density of 7 × 1014 quanta per square centimeter per second, Rb+ uptake and stomatal opening were activated only in the blue and long ultraviolet regions, with a peak at 420 to 460 nanometers. The action spectrum suggests that the underlying process is not photosynthesis. At higher quantum flux density (38 × 1014 quanta per square centimeter per second), uptake and opening also responded to red (600-680 nanometers) and somewhat to green light, with a minimum at 540 to 560 nanometers, indicating a possible involvement of the photosynthetic process. This light-induced opening appeared not to be mediated by a lowering of CO2 concentration, since CO2-free air was used in all treatments and controls. Stomatal opening paralleled Rb+ uptake in all cases. This constitutes further evidence for the potassium transport hypothesis of stomatal movement. In the abaxial surface of leaf discs under air of normal CO2 concentration, stomatal opening in white light approached its maximum at an intensity similar to that for epidermal strips. At both quantum flux densities, the action spectra for opening in leaf discs were very similar to those for epidermal strips. Thus, these light-linked processes for stomatal opening are likely to be the same in leaves as in epidermal strips. PMID:16658302

  19. How action selection can be embodied: intracranial gamma band recording shows response competition during the Eriksen flankers test

    PubMed Central

    Caruana, Fausto; Uithol, Sebo; Cantalupo, Gaetano; Sartori, Ivana; Lo Russo, Giorgio; Avanzini, Pietro

    2014-01-01

    Recent findings in monkeys suggest that action selection is based on a competition between various action options that are automatically planned by the motor system. Here we discuss data from intracranial EEG recordings in human premotor cortex (PMC) during a bimanual version of the Eriksen flankers test that suggest that the same principles apply to human action decisions. Recording sites in the dorsal PMC show an early but undifferentiated activation, a delayed response that depends on the experimental conditions and, finally, a movement related activation during action execution. Additionally, we found that the medial part of the PMC show a significant increase in response for ipsilateral trials, suggesting a role in inhibiting the wrong response. The ventral PMC seems to be involved in action execution, rather than action selection. Together these findings suggest that the human PMC is part of a network that specifies, selects, and executes actions. PMID:25206328

  20. Fathers Show Modifications of Infant-Directed Action Similar to that of Mothers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutherford, M. D.; Przednowek, Malgorzata

    2012-01-01

    Mothers' actions are more enthusiastic, simple, and repetitive when demonstrating novel object properties to their infants than to adults, a behavioral modification called "infant-directed action" by Brand and colleagues (2002). The current study tested whether fathers also tailor their behavior when interacting with infants and whether this…

  1. Diagrams Showing Actions for Reducing Exposures to Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs) in Indoor Building Environments

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This diagram compliments the document, PCBs in Building Materials: Q's & A's, on how exposure to PCBs can be assessed and reduced in school buildings. It describes actions for reducing exposures to PCBs in indoor school building environments.

  2. Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy shows significant differences between spectra of undifferentiated and polynucleated FLG 29.1 dried cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, Salvatore; Benvenuti, Susanna; Conti, Antonio; Benedetti, Enzo; Bramanti, Emilia; Rossi, Ilaria; Benedetti, Edoardo

    1994-02-01

    In a recent study made on cultures of human leukaemic cells (FLG 29.1 cell line) we were able to detect, by IR microspectroscopy, some significant IR spectroscopic variations following differentiation of cells towards osteoclastic-like behavior. The present study was undertaken on the same cell line in order to monitor biochemical structure variations following fusion induced by polyetilenglycole (PEG), using FTIR microspectroscopy. The finger-print region of all the spectra was retained and normalized according to a new regression procedure. Eleven bands were selected and total band power and mean power per unit frequency were compared with the corresponding reference session bands by a Dunnett's T test. Significant differences were found in both the tested variables only between treated and untreated cells, in 6 bands.

  3. Ultraviolet light action spectra for neoplastic transformation and lethality of Syrian hamster embryo cells correlate with spectrum for pyrimidine dimer formation in cellular DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Doniger, J; Jacobson, E D; Krell, K; DiPaolo, J A

    1981-01-01

    Action spectra were determined for neoplastic transformation, production of pyrimidine dimers, and lethality in Syrian hamster embryo cells. Of wavelengths between 240 and 313 nm, the most effective were 265 and 270. The relative sensitivities per quantum for transformation, pyrimidine dimer production, and lethality were essentially the same at each of the wavelengths tested. This action spectrum for transformation, which is relevant to carcinogenesis, is similar to spectra obtained previously by measuring other cellular responses in either microbial or mammalian systems. Because the action spectra for cytotoxicity and transformation are the same as the spectrum for dimer production, DNA is suggested as the target for all these processes. PMID:6941297

  4. Do monkey F5 mirror neurons show changes in firing rate during repeated observation of natural actions?

    PubMed

    Kilner, J M; Kraskov, A; Lemon, R N

    2014-03-01

    Mirror neurons were first discovered in area F5 of macaque monkeys. In humans, noninvasive studies have demonstrated an increased blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal in homologous motor areas during action observation. One approach to demonstrating that this indicates the existence of mirror neurons in humans has been to employ functional (f)MRI adaptation to test whether the same population of neurons is active during both observation and execution conditions. Although a number of human studies have reported fMRI adaptation in these areas, a recent study has shown that macaque mirror neurons do not attenuate their firing rate with two repetitions. Here we investigated whether mirror neurons modulate their firing rate when monkeys observed the same repeated natural action multiple times. We recorded from 67 mirror neurons in area F5 of two macaque monkeys while they observed an experimenter perform a reach-to-grasp action on a small food reward using a precision grip. Although no changes were detectable for the first two repetitions, we show that both the firing rate and the latency at which mirror neurons discharged during observation were subtly modulated by the repetition of the observed action over 7-10 trials. Significant adaption was mostly found in the period immediately before the grasp was performed. We also found that the local field potential activity in F5 (beta-frequency range, 16-23 Hz), which is attenuated during action observation, also showed systematic changes with repeated observation. These LFP changes occurred well in advance of the mirror neuron adaptation. We conclude that macaque mirror neurons can show intra-modal adaptation, but whether this is related to fMRI adaptation of the BOLD signal requires further investigation.

  5. Action Spectra for the Inhibition of Hypocotyl Growth by Continuous Irradiation in Light and Dark-Grown Sinapis alba L. Seedlings 1

    PubMed Central

    Beggs, Christopher J.; Holmes, M. Geoffrey; Jabben, Merten; Schäfer, Eberhard

    1980-01-01

    Action spectra for the inhibition by continuous (24-hour) irradiation of hypocotyl growth in 54-hour-old Sinapis alba L. seedlings were measured using seedlings which had had four different pretreatments. These seedlings were either (a) dark-grown with a high total phytochrome level, (b) dark-grown with a low total phytochrome level, (c) light-grown with chlorophyll, or (d) light-grown with no chlorophyll [treated with 4-chloro-5-(methylamino)-2-(α,α,α-trifluoro-m-tolyl)-3(2H) -pyridazinone (San 9789)]. The resulting action spectra show that the blue, red, and far-red (716 nm) wavebands are most inhibitory for dark-grown plants with high phytochrome content, whereas hypocotyl growth in dark-grown plants with a low phytochrome content are only slightly inhibited by blue and far-red radiation. In light-grown plants, the effectiveness of blue and far-red light almost disappears. The position of red light effectiveness in chlorophyll-containing plants is shifted to lower wavelengths compared with those containing no chlorophyll. PMID:16661489

  6. Cytochrome a620 in Tetrahymena pyriformis. Reactions with carbon monoxide and oxygen at subzero temperatures and photochemical action spectra.

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, D; Scott, R I; Edwards, S W; Edwards, C; Chance, B

    1982-01-01

    1. Mitochondria-enriched fractions of the ciliate protozoan Tetrahymena pyriformis ST contained CO-reacting cytochromes b560 and a620. 2. A non-photodissociable oxygen-containing compound of cytochrome a620 was formed in whole cell suspensions at -114 degrees C after photolysis of CO in the presence of 200 microM-O2. 3. Electron transport, indicated by the oxidation of cytochrome a620 and cytochrome c, occurred at temperatures higher than -72 degrees C. 4. Photochemical action spectra for the relief of respiratory inhibition of whole cells by CO obtained by using a liquid dye laser indicate that the only CO-reacting terminal oxidase detectable was cytochrome a620. 5. It is concluded that the alternative electron transport chains in this organism utilize non-cytochrome terminal oxidases. PMID:6816222

  7. Inhibitory spectra and modes of antimicrobial action of gallotannins from mango kernels (Mangifera indica L.).

    PubMed

    Engels, Christina; Schieber, Andreas; Gänzle, Michael G

    2011-04-01

    This study investigated the antimicrobial activities and modes of action of penta-, hexa-, hepta-, octa-, nona-, and deca-O-galloylglucose (gallotannins) isolated from mango kernels. The MICs and minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBCs) against food-borne bacteria and fungi were determined using a critical dilution assay. Gram-positive bacteria were generally more susceptible to gallotannins than were Gram-negative bacteria. The MICs of gallotannins against Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus cereus, Clostridium botulinum, Campylobacter jejuni, Listeria monocytogenes, and Staphylococcus aureus were 0.2 g liter(-1) or less; enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica were inhibited by 0.5 to 1 g liter(-1), and lactic acid bacteria were resistant. The use of lipopolysaccharide mutants of S. enterica indicated that the outer membrane confers resistance toward gallotannins. Supplementation of LB medium with iron eliminated the inhibitory activity of gallotannins against Staphylococcus aureus, and siderophore-deficient mutants of S. enterica were less resistant toward gallotannins than was the wild-type strain. Hepta-O-galloylglucose sensitized Lactobacillus plantarum TMW1.460 to hop extract, indicating inactivation of hop resistance mechanisms, e.g., the multidrug resistance (MDR) transporter HorA. Carbohydrate metabolism of Lactococcus lactis MG1363, a conditionally respiring organism, was influenced by hepta-O-galloylglucose when grown under aerobic conditions and in the presence of heme but not under anaerobic conditions, indicating that gallotannins influence the respiratory chain. In conclusion, the inhibitory activities of gallotannins are attributable to their strong affinity for iron and likely additionally relate to the inactivation of membrane-bound proteins.

  8. [Formation of maxima in the absorption spectrum of carotenoids in the region around 370 nm; consequences for the interpretation of certain action spectra].

    PubMed

    Hager, A

    1970-03-01

    similarity of some action spectra to certain 4-peak, carotenoid spectra is striking. This is true particularly for the action spectrum of the first positive curvature of Avena coleoptile (Fig. 10). On the basis of the described abilities of the carotenoids to form an absorption peak in the wave uv, the appearance of such a maximum in an action spectrum (in the region about 370 nm) can no longer be considered to be sufficient proof for the participation of a flavin as light-acceptor.

  9. Immobilized silver nanoparticles enhance contact killing and show highest efficacy: elucidation of the mechanism of bactericidal action of silver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agnihotri, Shekhar; Mukherji, Soumyo; Mukherji, Suparna

    2013-07-01

    Antimicrobial materials with immobilized/entrapped silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are of considerable interest. There is significant debate on the mode of bactericidal action of AgNPs, and both contact killing and/or ion mediated killing have been proposed. In this study, AgNPs were immobilized on an amine-functionalized silica surface and their bactericidal activity was studied concurrently with the silver release profile over time. This was compared with similar studies performed using colloidal AgNPs and AgCl surfaces that released Ag ions. We conclude that contact killing is the predominant bactericidal mechanism and surface immobilized nanoparticles show greater efficacy than colloidal AgNPs, as well as a higher concentration of silver ions in solution. In addition, the AgNP immobilized substrate was used multiple times with good efficacy, indicating this immobilization protocol is effective for retaining AgNPs while maintaining their disinfection potential. The antibacterial surface was found to be extremely stable in aqueous medium and no significant leaching (~1.15% of total silver deposited) of the AgNPs was observed. Thus, immobilization of AgNPs on a surface may promote reuse, reduce environmental risks associated with leaching of AgNPs and enhance cost effectiveness.Antimicrobial materials with immobilized/entrapped silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are of considerable interest. There is significant debate on the mode of bactericidal action of AgNPs, and both contact killing and/or ion mediated killing have been proposed. In this study, AgNPs were immobilized on an amine-functionalized silica surface and their bactericidal activity was studied concurrently with the silver release profile over time. This was compared with similar studies performed using colloidal AgNPs and AgCl surfaces that released Ag ions. We conclude that contact killing is the predominant bactericidal mechanism and surface immobilized nanoparticles show greater efficacy than colloidal Ag

  10. Neonicotinoids show selective and diverse actions on their nicotinic receptor targets: electrophysiology, molecular biology, and receptor modeling studies.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Kazuhiko; Shimomura, Masaru; Ihara, Makoto; Akamatsu, Miki; Sattelle, David B

    2005-08-01

    Neonicotinoid insecticides, which act selectively on insect nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), are used worldwide for insect pest management. Studies that span chemistry, biochemistry, molecular biology, and electrophysiology have contributed to our current understanding of the important physicochemical and structural properties essential for neonicotinoid actions as well as key receptor residues contributing to the high affinity of neonicotinoids for insect nAChRs. Research to date suggests that electrostatic interactions and possibly hydrogen bond formation between neonicotinoids and nAChRs contribute to the selectivity of these chemicals. A rich diversity of neonicotinoid-nAChR interactions has been demonstrated using voltage-clamp electrophysiology. Computational modeling of nAChR-imidacloprid interaction has assisted in the interpretation of these results.

  11. Mode of action and variability in efficacy of plant essential oils showing toxicity against the poultry red mite, Dermanyssus gallinae.

    PubMed

    George, D R; Smith, T J; Shiel, R S; Sparagano, O A E; Guy, J H

    2009-05-12

    This paper describes a series of experiments to examine the mode of action and toxicity of three plant essential oils (thyme, manuka and pennyroyal) to the poultry red mite, Dermanyssus gallinae (De Geer), a serious ectoparasitic pest of laying hens. All three oils were found to be toxic to D. gallinae in laboratory tests with LC(50), LC(90) and LC(99) values below 0.05, 0.20 and 0.30mg/cm(3), respectively, suggesting that these products may make for effective acaricides against this pest. Further experiments demonstrated that when mites were exposed to only the vapour phase of the essential oil without contact with the oil itself, mortality was consistently higher in closed arenas than in arenas open to the surrounding environment, or in control arenas. This suggests that all three essential oils were toxic to D. gallinae by fumigant action. In addition, in an experiment where mites were allowed contact with the essential oil in either open or closed arenas, mortality was always reduced in the open arenas where this was comparable to control mortality for thyme and pennyroyal essential oil treatments. This supports the findings of the previous experiment and also suggests that, with the possible exception of manuka, the selected essential oils were not toxic to D. gallinae on contact. Statistical comparisons were made between the toxicity of the selected essential oils to D. gallinae in the current work and in a previous study conducted in the same laboratory. The results demonstrated considerable variation in LC(50), LC(90) and LC(99) values. Since both the essential oils and the mites were obtained from identical sources in the two studies, it is hypothesized that this variation resulted from the use of different 'batches' of essential oil, which could have varied in chemistry and hence acaricidal activity.

  12. Transmembrane domain Nrg1 mutant mice show altered susceptibility to the neurobehavioural actions of repeated THC exposure in adolescence.

    PubMed

    Long, Leonora E; Chesworth, Rose; Huang, Xu-Feng; McGregor, Iain S; Arnold, Jonathon C; Karl, Tim

    2013-02-01

    Heavy cannabis abuse increases the risk of developing schizophrenia. Adolescents appear particularly vulnerable to the development of psychosis-like symptoms after cannabis use. To test whether the schizophrenia candidate gene neuregulin 1 (NRG1) modulates the effects of cannabinoids in adolescence, we tested male adolescent heterozygous transmembrane domain Nrg1 mutant (Nrg1 TM HET) mice and wild type-like littermates (WT) for their neurobehavioural response to repeated Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC, 10 mg/kg i.p. for 21 d starting on post-natal day 31). During treatment and 48 h after treatment withdrawal, we assessed several behavioural parameters relevant to schizophrenia. After behavioural testing we measured autoradiographic CB(1), 5-HT(2A) and NMDA receptor binding. The hyperlocomotor phenotype typical of Nrg1 mutants emerged after drug withdrawal and was more pronounced in vehicle than THC-treated Nrg1 TM HET mice. All mice were equally sensitive to THC-induced suppression of locomotion. However, mutant mice appeared protected against inhibiting effects of repeated THC on investigative social behaviours. Neither THC nor Nrg1 genotype altered prepulse inhibition. Repeated adolescent THC promoted differential effects on CB(1) and 5-HT(2A) receptor binding in the substantia nigra and insular cortex respectively, decreasing binding in WT while increasing it in Nrg1 TM HET mice. THC also selectively affected 5-HT(2A) receptor binding in several other regions in WT mice, whereas NMDA receptor binding was only affected in mutant mice. Overall, Nrg1 mutation does not appear to increase the induction of psychotomimetic symptoms by repeated adolescent THC exposure but may attenuate some of its actions on social behaviour and schizophrenia-relevant neurotransmitter receptor profiles.

  13. The action of oxygen on chlorophyll fluorescence quenching and absorption spectra in pea thylakoid membranes under the steady-state conditions.

    PubMed

    Garstka, Maciej; Nejman, Patrycja; Rosiak, Małgorzata

    2004-12-02

    The effect of oxygen concentration on both absorption and chlorophyll fluorescence spectra was investigated in isolated pea thylakoids at weak actinic light under the steady-state conditions. Upon the rise of oxygen concentration from anaerobiosis up to 412 microM a gradual absorbance increase around both 437 and 670 nm was observed, suggesting the disaggregation of LHCII and destacking of thylakoids. Simultaneously, an increase in oxygen concentration resulted in a decline in the Chl fluorescence at 680 nm to about 60% of the initial value. The plot of normalized Chl fluorescence quenching, F(-O(2))/F(+O(2)), showed discontinuity above 275 microM O(2), revealing two phases of quenching, at both lower and higher oxygen concentrations. The inhibition of photosystem II by DCMU or atrazine as well as that of cyt b(6)f by myxothiazol attenuated the oxygen-induced quenching events observed above 275 microM O(2), but did not modify the first phase of oxygen action. These data imply that the oxygen mediated Chl fluorescence quenching is partially independent on non-cyclic electron flow. The second phase of oxygen-induced decline in Chl fluorescence is diminished in thylakoids with poisoned PSII and cyt b(6)f activities and treated with rotenone or N-ethylmaleimide to inhibit NAD(P)H-plastoquinone dehydrogenase. The data suggest that under weak light and high oxygen concentration the Chl fluorescence quenching results from interactions between oxygen and PSI, cyt b(6)f and Ndh. On the contrary, inhibition of non-cyclic electron flow by antimycin A or uncoupling of thylakoids by carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenyl hydrazone did not modify the steady-state oxygen effect on Chl fluorescence quenching. The addition of NADH protected thylakoids against oxygen-induced Chl fluorescence quenching, whereas in the presence of exogenic duroquinone the decrease in Chl fluorescence to one half of the initial level did not result from the oxygen effect, probably due to oxygen action as a

  14. Action spectra of photosystems II and I and quantum yield of photosynthesis in leaves in State 1.

    PubMed

    Laisk, Agu; Oja, Vello; Eichelmann, Hillar; Dall'Osto, Luca

    2014-02-01

    The spectral global quantum yield (YII, electrons/photons absorbed) of photosystem II (PSII) was measured in sunflower leaves in State 1 using monochromatic light. The global quantum yield of PSI (YI) was measured using low-intensity monochromatic light flashes and the associated transmittance change at 810nm. The 810-nm signal change was calibrated based on the number of electrons generated by PSII during the flash (4·O2 evolution) which arrived at the PSI donor side after a delay of 2ms. The intrinsic quantum yield of PSI (yI, electrons per photon absorbed by PSI) was measured at 712nm, where photon absorption by PSII was small. The results were used to resolve the individual spectra of the excitation partitioning coefficients between PSI (aI) and PSII (aII) in leaves. For comparison, pigment-protein complexes for PSII and PSI were isolated, separated by sucrose density ultracentrifugation, and their optical density was measured. A good correlation was obtained for the spectral excitation partitioning coefficients measured by these different methods. The intrinsic yield of PSI was high (yI=0.88), but it absorbed only about 1/3 of quanta; consequently, about 2/3 of quanta were absorbed by PSII, but processed with the low intrinsic yield yII=0.63. In PSII, the quantum yield of charge separation was 0.89 as detected by variable fluorescence Fv/Fm, but 29% of separated charges recombined (Laisk A, Eichelmann H and Oja V, Photosynth. Res. 113, 145-155). At wavelengths less than 580nm about 30% of excitation is absorbed by pigments poorly connected to either photosystem, most likely carotenoids bound in pigment-protein complexes.

  15. Inequality spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliazar, Iddo

    2017-03-01

    Inequality indices are widely applied in economics and in the social sciences as quantitative measures of the socioeconomic inequality of human societies. The application of inequality indices extends to size-distributions at large, where these indices can be used as general gauges of statistical heterogeneity. Moreover, as inequality indices are plentiful, arrays of such indices facilitate high-detail quantification of statistical heterogeneity. In this paper we elevate from arrays of inequality indices to inequality spectra: continuums of inequality indices that are parameterized by a single control parameter. We present a general methodology of constructing Lorenz-based inequality spectra, apply the general methodology to establish four sets of inequality spectra, investigate the properties of these sets, and show how these sets generalize known inequality gauges such as: the Gini index, the extended Gini index, the Rényi index, and hill curves.

  16. The infrared and Raman spectra of the duplex of d(GGTATACC) in the crystal show bands due to both the A-form and the B-form of DNA.

    PubMed

    Liquiers, J; Taillandier, E; Peticolas, W L; Thomas, G A

    1990-10-01

    The deoxyoligonucleotide, d(GGTATACC), forms a duplex structure that crystallizes in the DNA A form. This has been shown by both X-ray diffraction studies and Raman spectroscopy (1,2). The presence of the DNA B form has been reported using diffuse X-ray scattering from a crystal of the closely related sequence d(GGBrUABrUACC)(3). In this paper the infrared spectrum of the d(GGTATACC) crystal is presented and curve resolution of both the Raman and IR spectra have been carried out. The percentage of A and B forms have been estimated. The %B form in the crystal has been estimated from the IR spectra to be about 15% and from Raman to be about 20%. Moreover the IR spectrum of the A conformation in the crystal is slightly different from the IR spectrum of the A conformation in polynucleotide fibers in particular in the region of the phosphate stretching vibrations and of the in-plane double bond vibrations of the bases. We show that it is feasible to obtain IR as well as Raman spectra of small crystals of oligonucleotides and that this is a good method of identifying all of the different conformations that may be in the crystal.

  17. Phenobarbital and propiconazole toxicogenomic profiles in mice show major similarities consistent with the key role that constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) activation plays in their mode of action.

    PubMed

    Currie, Richard A; Peffer, Richard C; Goetz, Amber K; Omiecinski, Curtis J; Goodman, Jay I

    2014-07-03

    Toxicogenomics (TGx) is employed frequently to investigate underlying molecular mechanisms of the compound of interest and, thus, has become an aid to mode of action determination. However, the results and interpretation of a TGx dataset are influenced by the experimental design and methods of analysis employed. This article describes an evaluation and reanalysis, by two independent laboratories, of previously published TGx mouse liver microarray data for a triazole fungicide, propiconazole (PPZ), and the anticonvulsant drug phenobarbital (PB). Propiconazole produced an increase incidence of liver tumors in male CD-1 mice only at a dose that exceeded the maximum tolerated dose (2500 ppm). Firstly, we illustrate how experimental design differences between two in vivo studies with PPZ and PB may impact the comparisons of TGx results. Secondly, we demonstrate that different researchers using different pathway analysis tools can come to different conclusions on specific mechanistic pathways, even when using the same datasets. Finally, despite these differences the results across three different analyses also show a striking degree of similarity observed for PPZ and PB treated livers when the expression data are viewed as major signaling pathways and cell processes affected. Additional studies described here show that the postulated key event of hepatocellular proliferation was observed in CD-1 mice for both PPZ and PB, and that PPZ is also a potent activator of the mouse CAR nuclear receptor. Thus, with regard to the events which are hallmarks of CAR-induced effects that are key events in the mode of action (MOA) of mouse liver carcinogenesis with PB, PPZ-induced tumors can be viewed as being promoted by a similar PB-like CAR-dependent MOA.

  18. IR action spectroscopy shows competitive oxazolone and diketopiperazine formation in peptides depends on peptide length and identity of terminal residue in the departing fragment.

    PubMed

    Morrison, L J; Chamot-Rooke, J; Wysocki, V H

    2014-05-07

    The interplay between the entropically and enthalpically favored products of peptide fragmentation is probed using a combined experimental and theoretical approach. These b2 ion products can take either an oxazolone or diketopiperazine structure. Cleavage after the second amide bond is often a favorable process because the products are small ring structures that are particularly stable. These structures are structurally characterized by action IRMPD spectroscopy and semi-quantified using gas-phase hydrogen-deuterium exchange. The formation of the oxazolone and diketopiperazine has been thought to be largely governed by the identity of the first two residues at the N-terminus of the peptide. We show here that the length of the precursor peptide and identity of the third residue play a significant role in the formation of the diketopiperazine structure in peptides containing an N-terminal asparagine residue. This is additionally the first instance showing an N-terminal residue with an amide side chain can promote formation of the diketopiperazine b2 ion structure.

  19. Novel dual agonist peptide analogues derived from dogfish glucagon show promising in vitro insulin releasing actions and antihyperglycaemic activity in mice.

    PubMed

    O'Harte, F P M; Ng, M T; Lynch, A M; Conlon, J M; Flatt, P R

    2016-08-15

    The antidiabetic potential of thirteen novel dogfish glucagon derived analogues were assessed in vitro and in acute in vivo studies. Stable peptide analogues enhanced insulin secretion from BRIN-BD11 β-cells (p < 0.001) and reduced acute glycaemic responses following intraperitoneal glucose (25 nmol/kg) in healthy NIH Swiss mice (p < 0.05-p<0.001). The in vitro insulinotropic actions of [S2a]dogfish glucagon, [S2a]dogfish glucagon-exendin-4(31-39) and [S2a]dogfish glucagon-Lys(30)-γ-glutamyl-PAL, were blocked (p < 0.05-p<0.001) by the specific GLP-1 and glucagon receptor antagonists, exendin-4(9-39) and (desHis(1)Pro(4)Glu(9))glucagon amide but not by (Pro(3))GIP, indicating lack of GIP receptor involvement. These analogues dose-dependently stimulated cAMP production in GLP-1 and glucagon (p < 0.05-p<0.001) but not GIP-receptor transfected cells. They improved acute glycaemic and insulinotropic responses in high-fat fed diabetic mice and in wild-type C57BL/6J and GIPR-KO mice (p < 0.05-p<0.001), but not GLP-1R-KO mice, confirming action on GLP-1 but not GIP receptors. Overall, dogfish glucagon analogues have potential for diabetes therapy, exerting beneficial metabolic effects via GLP-1 and glucagon receptors.

  20. Lily Pad Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The color image on the lower left from the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows the 'Lily Pad' bounce-mark area at Meridiani Planum, Mars. This image was acquired on the 3rd sol, or martian day, of Opportunity's mission (Jan.26, 2004). The upper left image is a monochrome (single filter) image from the rover's panoramic camera, showing regions from which spectra were extracted from the 'Lily Pad' area. As noted by the line graph on the right, the green spectra is from the undisturbed surface and the red spectra is from the airbag bounce mark.

  1. "The Show"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gehring, John

    2004-01-01

    For the past 16 years, the blue-collar city of Huntington, West Virginia, has rolled out the red carpet to welcome young wrestlers and their families as old friends. They have come to town chasing the same dream for a spot in what many of them call "The Show". For three days, under the lights of an arena packed with 5,000 fans, the…

  2. Storm Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    These images, taken with the LEISA infrared camera on the New Horizons Ralph instrument, show fine details in Jupiter's turbulent atmosphere using light that can only be seen using infrared sensors. These are 'false color' pictures made by assigning infrared wavelengths to the colors red, green and blue. LEISA (Linear Etalon Imaging Spectral Array) takes images across 250 IR wavelengths in the range from 1.25 to 2.5 microns, allowing scientists to obtain an infrared spectrum at every location on Jupiter. A micron is one millionth of a meter.

    These pictures were taken at 05:58 UT on February 27, 2007, from a distance of 2.9 million kilometers (1.6 million miles). They are centered at 8 degrees south, 32 degrees east in Jupiter 'System III' coordinates. The large oval-shaped feature is the well-known Great Red Spot. The resolution of each pixel in these images is about 175 kilometers (110 miles); Jupiter's diameter is approximately 145,000 kilometers (97,000 miles).

    The image on the left is an altitude map made by assigning the color red to 1.60 microns, green to 1.89 microns and blue to 2.04 microns. Because Jupiter's atmosphere absorbs light strongly at 2.04 microns, only clouds at very high altitude will reflect light at this wavelength. Light at 1.89 microns can go deeper in the atmosphere and light at 1.6 microns can go deeper still. In this map, bluish colors indicate high clouds and reddish colors indicate lower clouds. This picture shows, for example, that the Great Red Spot extends far up into the atmosphere.

    In the image at right, red equals 1.28 microns, green equals 1.30 microns and blue equals 1.36 microns, a range of wavelengths that similarly probes different altitudes in the atmosphere. This choice of wavelengths highlights Jupiter's high-altitude south polar hood of haze. The edge of Jupiter's disk at the bottom of the panel appears slightly non-circular because the left-hand portion is the true edge of the disk, while the right

  3. Action semantics modulate action prediction.

    PubMed

    Springer, Anne; Prinz, Wolfgang

    2010-11-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that action prediction involves an internal action simulation that runs time-locked to the real action. The present study replicates and extends these findings by indicating a real-time simulation process (Graf et al., 2007), which can be differentiated from a similarity-based evaluation of internal action representations. Moreover, results showed that action semantics modulate action prediction accuracy. The semantic effect was specified by the processing of action verbs and concrete nouns (Experiment 1) and, more specifically, by the dynamics described by action verbs (Experiment 2) and the speed described by the verbs (e.g., "to catch" vs. "to grasp" vs. "to stretch"; Experiment 3). These results propose a linkage between action simulation and action semantics as two yet unrelated domains, a view that coincides with a recent notion of a close link between motor processes and the understanding of action language.

  4. Moving in on the Action: An Experimental Comparison of Fluorescence Excitation and Photodissociation Action Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wellman, Sydney M J; Jockusch, Rebecca A

    2015-06-18

    Photodissociation action spectroscopy is often used as a proxy for measuring gas-phase absorption spectra of ions in a mass spectrometer. Although the potential discrepancy between linear optical and photodissociation spectra is generally acknowledged, direct experimental comparisons are lacking. In this work, we use a quadrupole ion trap that has been modified to enable both photodissociation and laser-induced fluorescence to assess how closely the visible photodissociation action spectrum of a fluorescent dye reflects its fluorescence excitation spectrum. Our results show the photodissociation action spectrum of gaseous rhodamine 110 is both substantially narrower and slightly red-shifted (∼120 cm(-1)) compared to its fluorescence excitation spectrum. Power dependence measurements reveal that the photodissociation of rhodamine 110 requires, on average, the absorption of three photons whereas fluorescence is a single-photon process. These differing power dependences are the key to interpreting the differences in the measured spectra. The experimental results provide much-needed quantification and insight into the differences between action spectra and linear optical spectra, and emphasize the utility of fluorescence excitation spectra to provide a more reliable benchmark for comparison with theory.

  5. Crystal structure of [Ag(NH3)3]2[Ag(NH3)2]2[SnF6]F2, a compound showing argentophilic inter­actions

    PubMed Central

    Kraus, Florian; Fichtl, Matthias; Baer, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Bis[triamminesilver(I)] bis­[diamminesilver(I)] hexa­fluorido­stannate(IV) difluoride, [Ag(NH3)3]2[Ag(NH3)2]2[SnF6]F2, was obtained in the form of colourless crystals from the reaction of CsAgSnF7 in anhydrous ammonia. Two different ammine complexes of silver(I) are present in the structure, i.e. a linear diammine and a T-shaped triammine complex. The ammine silver(I) complexes show Ag⋯Ag distances in the range of argentophilic inter­actions. In the crystal, several N—H⋯F hydrogen bonds are present between the complex cations and the SbF6 − and F− anions, leading to the formation of a three-dimensional network. PMID:27980850

  6. Haptically Guided Grasping. fMRI Shows Right-Hemisphere Parietal Stimulus Encoding, and Bilateral Dorso-Ventral Parietal Gradients of Object- and Action-Related Processing during Grasp Execution

    PubMed Central

    Marangon, Mattia; Kubiak, Agnieszka; Króliczak, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    The neural bases of haptically-guided grasp planning and execution are largely unknown, especially for stimuli having no visual representations. Therefore, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to monitor brain activity during haptic exploration of novel 3D complex objects, subsequent grasp planning, and the execution of the pre-planned grasps. Haptic object exploration, involving extraction of shape, orientation, and length of the to-be-grasped targets, was associated with the fronto-parietal, temporo-occipital, and insular cortex activity. Yet, only the anterior divisions of the posterior parietal cortex (PPC) of the right hemisphere were significantly more engaged in exploration of complex objects (vs. simple control disks). None of these regions were re-recruited during the planning phase. Even more surprisingly, the left-hemisphere intraparietal, temporal, and occipital areas that were significantly invoked for grasp planning did not show sensitivity to object features. Finally, grasp execution, involving the re-recruitment of the critical right-hemisphere PPC clusters, was also significantly associated with two kinds of bilateral parieto-frontal processes. The first represents transformations of grasp-relevant target features and is linked to the dorso-dorsal (lateral and medial) parieto-frontal networks. The second monitors grasp kinematics and belongs to the ventro-dorsal networks. Indeed, signal modulations associated with these distinct functions follow dorso-ventral gradients, with left aIPS showing significant sensitivity to both target features and the characteristics of the required grasp. Thus, our results from the haptic domain are consistent with the notion that the parietal processing for action guidance reflects primarily transformations from object-related to effector-related coding, and these mechanisms are rather independent of sensory input modality. PMID:26779002

  7. Rock Outcrop Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The color image on the lower left shows a rock outcrop at Meridiani Planum, Mars. This image was taken by the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity, looking north, and was acquired on the 4th sol, or martian day, of the rover's mission (Jan. 27, 2004). The yellow box outlines an area detailed in the top left image, which is a monochrome (single filter) image from the rover's panoramic camera. The top image uses solid colors to show several regions on or near the rock outcrop from which spectra were extracted: the dark soil above the outcrop (yellow), the distant horizon surface (aqua), a bright rock in the outcrop (green), a darker rock in the outcrop (red), and a small dark cobblestone (blue). Spectra from these regions are shown in the plot to the right.

  8. Barnacle Bill Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    These IMP spectra show the characteristics of the rock surface measured by the Alpha Proton X-Ray Spectrometer (blue), the soil trapped in pits on the rock surface (red), and the deposit of bright drift on the top of the rock. The area measured by the APXS has the properties expected for nearly unweathered igneous rock, and the soil trapped in the pits is intermediate to the unweathered rock and the highly weathered drift material.

  9. Magic Carpet Shows Its Colors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The upper left image in this display is from the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit, showing the 'Magic Carpet' region near the rover at Gusev Crater, Mars, on Sol 7, the seventh martian day of its journey (Jan. 10, 2004). The lower image, also from the panoramic camera, is a monochrome (single filter) image of a rock in the 'Magic Carpet' area. Note that colored portions of the rock correlate with extracted spectra shown in the plot to the side. Four different types of materials are shown: the rock itself, the soil in front of the rock, some brighter soil on top of the rock, and some dust that has collected in small recesses on the rock face ('spots'). Each color on the spectra matches a line on the graph, showing how the panoramic camera's different colored filters are used to broadly assess the varying mineral compositions of martian rocks and soils.

  10. Reactor Neutrino Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, Anna C.; Vogel, Petr

    2016-10-01

    We present a review of the antineutrino spectra emitted from reactors. Knowledge of these spectra and their associated uncertainties is crucial for neutrino oscillation studies. The spectra used to date have been determined either by converting measured electron spectra to antineutrino spectra or by summing over all of the thousands of transitions that make up the spectra, using modern databases as input. The uncertainties in the subdominant corrections to β-decay plague both methods, and we provide estimates of these uncertainties. Improving on current knowledge of the antineutrino spectra from reactors will require new experiments. Such experiments would also address the so-called reactor neutrino anomaly and the possible origin of the shoulder observed in the antineutrino spectra measured in recent high-statistics reactor neutrino experiments.

  11. Neutron and photon spectra in LINACs.

    PubMed

    Vega-Carrillo, H R; Martínez-Ovalle, S A; Lallena, A M; Mercado, G A; Benites-Rengifo, J L

    2012-12-01

    A Monte Carlo calculation, using the MCNPX code, was carried out in order to estimate the photon and neutron spectra in two locations of two linacs operating at 15 and 18 MV. Detailed models of both linac heads were used in the calculations. Spectra were estimated below the flattening filter and at the isocenter. Neutron spectra show two components due to evaporation and knock-on neutrons. Lethargy spectra under the filter were compared to the spectra calculated from the function quoted by Tosi et al. that describes reasonably well neutron spectra beyond 1 MeV, though tends to underestimate the energy region between 10(-6) and 1 MeV. Neutron and the Bremsstrahlung spectra show the same features regardless of the linac voltage.

  12. Show Your Exemption Act

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. Vitter, David [R-LA

    2013-10-31

    10/31/2013 Read twice and referred to the Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  13. Crack spectra analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Tiernan, M.

    1980-09-01

    Crack spectra derived from velocity data have been shown to exhibit systematics which reflect microstructural and textural differences between samples (Warren and Tiernan, 1980). Further research into both properties and information content of crack spectra have yielded the following: Spectral features are reproducible even at low pressures; certain observed spectral features may correspond to non-in-situ crack populations created during sample retrieval; the functional form of a crack spectra may be diagnostic of the sample's grain texture; hysteresis is observed in crack spectra between up and down pressure runs - it may be due to friction between the faces of closed crack populations.

  14. Photographic spectra of fireballs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borovička, J.

    2016-01-01

    Two methods of spectroscopy of meteors using image intensified video cameras and classical photographic film cameras are compared. Video cameras provide large number of low resolution spectra of meteors of normal brightness, which can be used for statistical studies. Large format film cameras have been used through the history and provide high resolution spectra, which can be used to derive temperature, density and absolute abundances of various elements in the radiating plasma. The sensitivity of films is, however, low and only spectra of bright meteors (fireballs) can be studied. Examples of photographic fireball spectra are provided.

  15. Spectra of Baroclinic Inertia-Gravity Wave Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glazman, Roman E.

    1996-01-01

    Baroclinic inertia-gravity (IG) waves form a persistent background of thermocline depth and sea surface height oscillations. They also contribute to the kinetic energy of horizontal motions in the subsurface layer. Measured by the ratio of water particle velocity to wave phase speed, the wave nonlinearity may be rather high. Given a continuous supply of energy from external sources, nonlinear wave-wave interactions among IG waves would result in inertial cascades of energy, momentum, and wave action. Based on a recently developed theory of wave turbulence in scale-dependent systems, these cascades are investigated and IG wave spectra are derived for an arbitrary degree of wave nonlinearity. Comparisons with satellite-altimetry-based spectra of surface height variations and with energy spectra of horizontal velocity fluctuations show good agreement. The well-known spectral peak at the inertial frequency is thus explained as a result of the inverse cascade. Finally, we discuss a possibility of inferring the internal Rossby radius of deformation and other dynamical properties of the upper thermocline from the spectra of SSH (sea surface height) variations based on altimeter measurements.

  16. The Great Cometary Show

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-01-01

    its high spatial and spectral resolution, it was possible to zoom into the very heart of this very massive star. In this innermost region, the observations are dominated by the extremely dense stellar wind that totally obscures the underlying central star. The AMBER observations show that this dense stellar wind is not spherically symmetric, but exhibits a clearly elongated structure. Overall, the AMBER observations confirm that the extremely high mass loss of Eta Carinae's massive central star is non-spherical and much stronger along the poles than in the equatorial plane. This is in agreement with theoretical models that predict such an enhanced polar mass-loss in the case of rapidly rotating stars. ESO PR Photo 06c/07 ESO PR Photo 06c/07 RS Ophiuchi in Outburst Several papers from this special feature focus on the later stages in a star's life. One looks at the binary system Gamma 2 Velorum, which contains the closest example of a star known as a Wolf-Rayet. A single AMBER observation allowed the astronomers to separate the spectra of the two components, offering new insights in the modeling of Wolf-Rayet stars, but made it also possible to measure the separation between the two stars. This led to a new determination of the distance of the system, showing that previous estimates were incorrect. The observations also revealed information on the region where the winds from the two stars collide. The famous binary system RS Ophiuchi, an example of a recurrent nova, was observed just 5 days after it was discovered to be in outburst on 12 February 2006, an event that has been expected for 21 years. AMBER was able to detect the extension of the expanding nova emission. These observations show a complex geometry and kinematics, far from the simple interpretation of a spherical fireball in extension. AMBER has detected a high velocity jet probably perpendicular to the orbital plane of the binary system, and allowed a precise and careful study of the wind and the shockwave

  17. Synthesis and structural characterization of silver(I), aluminium(III) and cobalt(II) complexes with 4-isopropyltropolone (hinokitiol) showing noteworthy biological activities. Action of silver(I)-oxygen bonding complexes on the antimicrobial activities.

    PubMed

    Nomiya, Kenji; Yoshizawa, Akira; Tsukagoshi, Ken; Kasuga, Noriko Chikaraishi; Hirakawa, Shoko; Watanabe, Jun

    2004-01-01

    Through two unequivalent oxygen donor atoms of the hinokitiol (Hhino; C10H12O2; 4-isopropyltropolone) ligand that showed noteworthy biological activities, the dimeric, silver(I)-oxygen bonding complex [Ag(hino)]2 1, the monomeric aluminium(III) complex [Al(hino)3].0.5H2O 4 and the cobalt(II) complex "[Co(hino)2]2.H2O" 6 were synthesized and characterized with elemental analysis, thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis (TG/DTA), FTIR and solution (1H and 13C) NMR spectroscopy. The crystal structure of 1 was determined by Rietveld analysis based on X-ray powder diffraction (XPD) data and those of [Al(hino)3].MeOH 4a and [Co(hino)2(EtOH)]2 6a, being obtained as yellow block crystals and red platelet crystals, respectively, by crystallization of 4 and 6, were determined by single-crystal X-ray analysis. The antimicrobial activities of 1, 4 and 6, evaluated with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC; microg ml(-1)), were compared with those of other metal complexes (M=Na, Li, Cs, Ca, V, Zn) with the hino- ligand. The antimicrobial activities observed in the alkali-metal salts strongly suggested that they were attributed to the effect of the anionic hino- species. The antimicrobial activities of 1 were significantly enhanced, whereas those of other metal complexes were suppressed, compared with those of the neutral Hhino and anionic hino- molecules. The antimicrobial activities observed in 1 were comparable with those of other recently found silver(I)-oxygen bonding complexes, the ligands of which had no activity. Thus, it is proposed that the antimicrobial activities of the silver(I)-oxygen bonding complexes are due to a direct interaction or complexation of the silver(I) ion with biological ligands such as protein, enzyme and membrane, and the coordinating ligands of the silver(I) complexes play the role of a carrier of the silver(I) ion to the biological system.

  18. A Bayesian method for analysing relaxation spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciocci Brazzano, L.; Pellizza, L. J.; Matteo, C. L.; Sorichetti, P. A.

    2016-01-01

    The knowledge of electrical and mechanical properties of material, relies on a precise analysis of the relaxation spectra. We explore the ability of a Bayesian method to achieve an accurate estimation of spectral parameters. We implemented a parallel-tempering Markov-chain Monte Carlo algorithm and used it to fit simulated and measured spectra. An exhaustive testing of the code shows that it presents an extremely good performance, accurately fitting complex spectra under strong noise and overlapping components. We conclude that this technique is quite suitable for relaxation spectra analysis, complementing classical methods.

  19. [Raman spectra of monkey cerebral cortex tissue].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ji-chun; Guo, Jian-yu; Cai, Wei-ying; Wang, Zu-geng; Sun, Zhen-rong

    2010-01-01

    Monkey cerebral cortex, an important part in the brain to control action and thought activities, is mainly composed of grey matter and nerve cell. In the present paper, the in situ Raman spectra of the cerebral cortex of the birth, teenage and aged monkeys were achieved for the first time. The results show that the Raman spectra for the different age monkey cerebral cortex exhibit most obvious changes in the regions of 1000-1400 and 2800-3000 cm(-1). With monkey growing up, the relative intensities of the Raman bands at 1313 and 2885 cm(-1) mainly assigned to CH2 chain vibrational mode of lipid become stronger and stronger whereas the relative intensities of the Raman bands at 1338 and 2932 cm(-1) mainly assigned to CH3 chain vibrational mode of protein become weaker and weaker. In addition, the two new Raman bands at 1296 and 2850 cm(-1) are only observed in the aged monkey cerebral cortex, therefore, the two bands can be considered as a character or "marker" to differentiate the caducity degree with monkey growth In order to further explore the changes, the relative intensity ratios of the Raman band at 1313 cm(-1) to that at 1338 cm(-1) and the Raman band at 2885 cm(-1) to that at 2 932 cm(-1), I1313/I1338 and I2885/I2932, which are the lipid-to-protein ratios, are introduced to denote the degree of the lipid content. The results show that the relative intensity ratios increase significantly with monkey growth, namely, the lipid content in the cerebral cortex increases greatly with monkey growth. So, the authors can deduce that the overmuch lipid is an important cause to induce the caducity. Therefore, the results will be a powerful assistance and valuable parameter to study the order of life growth and diagnose diseases.

  20. Interpreting Chromosome Aberration Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, Dan; Reeder, Christopher; Loucas, Bradford; Hlatky, Lynn; Chen, Allen; Cornforth, Michael; Sachs, Rainer

    2007-01-01

    Ionizing radiation can damage cells by breaking both strands of DNA in multiple locations, essentially cutting chromosomes into pieces. The cell has enzymatic mechanisms to repair such breaks; however, these mechanisms are imperfect and, in an exchange process, may produce a large-scale rearrangement of the genome, called a chromosome aberration. Chromosome aberrations are important in killing cells, during carcinogenesis, in characterizing repair/misrepair pathways, in retrospective radiation biodosimetry, and in a number of other ways. DNA staining techniques such as mFISH ( multicolor fluorescent in situ hybridization) provide a means for analyzing aberration spectra by examining observed final patterns. Unfortunately, an mFISH observed final pattern often does not uniquely determine the underlying exchange process. Further, resolution limitations in the painting protocol sometimes lead to apparently incomplete final patterns. We here describe an algorithm for systematically finding exchange processes consistent with any observed final pattern. This algorithm uses aberration multigraphs, a mathematical formalism that links the various aspects of aberration formation. By applying a measure to the space of consistent multigraphs, we will show how to generate model-specific distributions of aberration processes from mFISH experimental data. The approach is implemented by software freely available over the internet. As a sample application, we apply these algorithms to an aberration data set, obtaining a distribution of exchange cycle sizes, which serves to measure aberration complexity. Estimating complexity, in turn, helps indicate how damaging the aberrations are and may facilitate identification of radiation type in retrospective biodosimetry.

  1. Putting Action in Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lozano, Sandra C.; Hard, Bridgette Martin; Tversky, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    Embodied approaches to cognition propose that our own actions influence our understanding of the world. Do other people's actions also have this influence? The present studies show that perceiving another person's actions changes the way people think about objects in a scene. In Study 1, participants viewed a photograph and answered a question…

  2. Television Quiz Show Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Jonnie Lynn

    2007-01-01

    This article explores the simulation of four television quiz shows for students in China studying English as a foreign language (EFL). It discusses the adaptation and implementation of television quiz shows and how the students reacted to them.

  3. Choosing Actions

    PubMed Central

    Rosenbaum, David A.; Chapman, Kate M.; Coelho, Chase J.; Gong, Lanyun; Studenka, Breanna E.

    2013-01-01

    Actions that are chosen have properties that distinguish them from actions that are not. Of the nearly infinite possible actions that can achieve any given task, many of the unchosen actions are irrelevant, incorrect, or inappropriate. Others are relevant, correct, or appropriate but are disfavored for other reasons. Our research focuses on the question of what distinguishes actions that are chosen from actions that are possible but are not. We review studies that use simple preference methods to identify factors that contribute to action choices, especially for object-manipulation tasks. We can determine which factors are especially important through simple behavioral experiments. PMID:23761769

  4. Optical Spectra of Triggered Lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, T. D.; Biagi, C. J.; Hill, J. D.; Jordan, D. M.; Uman, M. A.; Christian, H. J., Jr.

    2009-12-01

    In August 2009, the first optical spectra of triggered lightning flashes were acquired. Data from two triggered lightning flashes were obtained at the International Center for Lightning Research and Testing in north-central Florida. The spectrometer that was used has an average dispersion of 260 Å/mm resulting in an average resolution of 5 Å when mated to a Photron (SA1.1) high-speed camera. The spectra captured with this system had a free spectral range of 3800-8000 Å. The spectra were captured at 300,000 frames per second. The spectrometer's vertical field of view was 3 m at an altitude 50 m above the launch tower, intended to view the middle of the triggering wire. Preliminary results show that the copper spectrum dominated the earliest part of the flash and copper lines persisted during the total lifetime of the detectable spectrum. Animations over the lifetime of the stroke from the initial wire illumination to multiple return strokes show the evolution of the spectrum. In addition, coordinated high speed channel base current, electric field and imagery measurements of the exploding wire, downward leaders, and return strokes were recorded. Quantitative analysis of the spectral evolution will be discussed in the context of the overall flash development.

  5. Mid-Infrared Spectra of Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, B.; Potter, A. E.; Killen, R. M.; Morgan, T. H.

    2001-01-01

    Mid-infrared (8-13 microns) spectra of radiation emitted from the surface of solar system objects can be interpreted in terms of surface composition. However, the spectral features are weak, and require exceptionally high signal-to-noise ratio spectra to detect them. Ground-based observations of spectra in this region are plagued by strong atmospheric absorptions from water and ozone. High-altitude balloon measurements that avoid atmospheric absorptions can be affected by contamination of the optics by dust. We have developed a technique to obtain mid-infrared spectra of Mercury that minimizes these problems. The resulting spectra show evidence of transparency features that can be used to qualitatively characterize the surface composition. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  6. Spectra of Surface Waves

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-03-22

    with a wave follower during Marsen. J. Gophysical Res. 88, 9844-9849. 11. Hughes, B.A., 1978. The effects on internal waves on surface waves : 2...Spectra of Surface Waves K. Watson March 1989 JSR-88-130 Approved for public release; distribution unlimited. DTIC SELECTE JUN0 11989 0 JASONE The...Arlington, VA 22209 8503Z 11. TITLE (hlde Secvfty Cof.kaftn) SPECTRA OF SURFACE WAVES (U) 12. PERSONAL AUTHOfRS) K. Watson 13a. TYPE OF REPORT 13b. TIME

  7. Resolution enhancement in second-derivative spectra.

    PubMed

    Czarnecki, Mirosław A

    2015-01-01

    Derivative spectroscopy is a powerful tool for the resolution enhancement in infrared, near-infrared, Raman, ultraviolet-visible, nuclear magnetic resonance, electron paramagnetic resonance, and fluorescence spectroscopy. Despite its great significance in analytical chemistry, not all aspects of the applications of this method have been explored as yet. This is the first systematic study of the parameters that influence the resolution enhancement in the second derivative spectra. The derivative spectra were calculated with the Savitzky-Golay method with different window size (5, 15, 25) and polynomial order (2, 4). The results obtained in this work show that the resolution enhancement in the second derivative spectra strongly depends on the data spacing in the original spectra, window size, polynomial order, and peak profile. As shown, the resolution enhancement is related to variations in the width of the peaks upon the differentiation. The present study reveals that in order to maximize the separation of the peaks in the second derivative spectra, the original spectra should be recorded at high resolution and differentiated using a small window size and high polynomial order. However, working with the real spectra one has to compromise between the noise reduction and optimization of the resolution enhancement in the second derivative spectra.

  8. Quantum spectra and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arce, Julio Cesar

    This work focuses on time-dependent quantum theory and methods for the study of the spectra and dynamics of atomic and molecular systems. Specifically, we have addressed the following two problems: (1) Development of a time-dependent spectral method for the construction of spectra of simple quantum systems. This includes the calculation of eigenenergies, the construction of bound and continuum eigenfunctions, and the calculation of photo cross-sections. Computational applications include the quadrupole photoabsorption spectra and dissociation cross-sections of molecular hydrogen from various vibrational states in its ground electronic potential-energy curve. This method is seen to provide an advantageous alternative, both from the computational and conceptual point of view, to existing standard methods. (2) Explicit time-dependent formulation of photoabsorption processes -- Analytical solutions of the time-dependent Schrodinger equation are constructed and employed for the calculation of probability densities, momentum distributions, fluxes, transition rates, expectation values and correlation functions. These quantities are seen to establish the link between the dynamics and the calculated, or measured, spectra and cross-sections, and to clarify the dynamical nature of the excitation, transition and ejection processes. Numerical calculations on atomic and molecular hydrogen corroborate and complement the previous results, allowing the identification of different regimes during the photoabsorption process.

  9. Quantum Spectra and Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arce, Julio Cesar

    1992-01-01

    This work focuses on time-dependent quantum theory and methods for the study of the spectra and dynamics of atomic and molecular systems. Specifically, we have addressed the following two problems: (i) Development of a time-dependent spectral method for the construction of spectra of simple quantum systems--This includes the calculation of eigenenergies, the construction of bound and continuum eigenfunctions, and the calculation of photo cross-sections. Computational applications include the quadrupole photoabsorption spectra and dissociation cross-sections of molecular hydrogen from various vibrational states in its ground electronic potential -energy curve. This method is seen to provide an advantageous alternative, both from the computational and conceptual point of view, to existing standard methods. (ii) Explicit time-dependent formulation of photoabsorption processes --Analytical solutions of the time-dependent Schrodinger equation are constructed and employed for the calculation of probability densities, momentum distributions, fluxes, transition rates, expectation values and correlation functions. These quantities are seen to establish the link between the dynamics and the calculated, or measured, spectra and cross-sections, and to clarify the dynamical nature of the excitation, transition and ejection processes. Numerical calculations on atomic and molecular hydrogen corroborate and complement the previous results, allowing the identification of different regimes during the photoabsorption process.

  10. Atomic Spectra Database (ASD)

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 78 NIST Atomic Spectra Database (ASD) (Web, free access)   This database provides access and search capability for NIST critically evaluated data on atomic energy levels, wavelengths, and transition probabilities that are reasonably up-to-date. The NIST Atomic Spectroscopy Data Center has carried out these critical compilations.

  11. Showing What They Know

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cech, Scott J.

    2008-01-01

    Having students show their skills in three dimensions, known as performance-based assessment, dates back at least to Socrates. Individual schools such as Barrington High School--located just outside of Providence--have been requiring students to actively demonstrate their knowledge for years. The Rhode Island's high school graduating class became…

  12. The Ozone Show.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathieu, Aaron

    2000-01-01

    Uses a talk show activity for a final assessment tool for students to debate about the ozone hole. Students are assessed on five areas: (1) cooperative learning; (2) the written component; (3) content; (4) self-evaluation; and (5) peer evaluation. (SAH)

  13. What Do Maps Show?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geological Survey (Dept. of Interior), Reston, VA.

    This curriculum packet, appropriate for grades 4-8, features a teaching poster which shows different types of maps (different views of Salt Lake City, Utah), as well as three reproducible maps and reproducible activity sheets which complement the maps. The poster provides teacher background, including step-by-step lesson plans for four geography…

  14. Show Me the Way

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dicks, Matthew J.

    2005-01-01

    Because today's students have grown up steeped in video games and the Internet, most of them expect feedback, and usually gratification, very soon after they expend effort on a task. Teachers can get quick feedback to students by showing them videotapes of their learning performances. The author, a 3rd grade teacher describes how the seemingly…

  15. Chemistry Game Shows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Susan; Muzyka, Jennifer

    2002-04-01

    We present a technological improvement to the use of game shows to help students review for tests. Our approach uses HTML files interpreted with a browser on a computer attached to an LCD projector. The HTML files can be easily modified for use of the game in a variety of courses.

  16. Honored Teacher Shows Commitment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratte, Kathy

    1987-01-01

    Part of the acceptance speech of the 1985 National Council for the Social Studies Teacher of the Year, this article describes the censorship experience of this honored social studies teacher. The incident involved the showing of a videotape version of the feature film entitled "The Seduction of Joe Tynan." (JDH)

  17. Talk Show Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Mitzi Ruth

    1992-01-01

    Proposes having students perform skits in which they play the roles of the science concepts they are trying to understand. Provides the dialog for a skit in which hot and cold gas molecules are interviewed on a talk show to study how these properties affect wind, rain, and other weather phenomena. (MDH)

  18. Stage a Water Show

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frasier, Debra

    2008-01-01

    In the author's book titled "The Incredible Water Show," the characters from "Miss Alaineus: A Vocabulary Disaster" used an ocean of information to stage an inventive performance about the water cycle. In this article, the author relates how she turned the story into hands-on science teaching for real-life fifth-grade students. The author also…

  19. Velocity, scalar and transfer spectra in numerical turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerr, Robert M.

    1990-02-01

    Velocity and passive-scalar spectra for turbulent fields generated by a forced three-dimensional simulation with 128-cubed grid points and Taylor-microscale Reynolds numbers up to 83 are shown to have convective and diffusive spectral regimes. One- and three-dimensional spectra are compared with experiment and theory. If normalized by the Kolmogorov dissipation scales and scalar dissipation, velocity spectra and scalar spectra for given Prandtl numbers collapse to single curves in the dissipation regime with exponentail tails. If multiplied by k exp 5/3, the velocity spectra show an anomalously high Kolmogorov constant that is consistent with low Reynolds number experiments. When normalized by the Batchelor scales, the scalar spectra show a universal dissipation regime that is independent of Prandtl numbers from 0.1 to 1.0. The time development of velocity spectra is illustrated by energy-transfer spectra in which distinct pulses propagate to high wavenumbers.

  20. Action physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGinness, Lachlan P.; Savage, C. M.

    2016-09-01

    More than a decade ago, Edwin Taylor issued a "call to action" that presented the case for basing introductory university mechanics teaching around the principle of stationary action [E. F. Taylor, Am. J. Phys. 71, 423-425 (2003)]. We report on our response to that call in the form of an investigation of the teaching and learning of the stationary action formulation of physics in a first-year university course. Our action physics instruction proceeded from the many-paths approach to quantum physics to ray optics, classical mechanics, and relativity. Despite the challenges presented by action physics, students reported it to be accessible, interesting, motivational, and valuable.

  1. Complementary actions.

    PubMed

    Sartori, Luisa; Betti, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    Complementary colors are color pairs which, when combined in the right proportions, produce white or black. Complementary actions refer here to forms of social interaction wherein individuals adapt their joint actions according to a common aim. Notably, complementary actions are incongruent actions. But being incongruent is not sufficient to be complementary (i.e., to complete the action of another person). Successful complementary interactions are founded on the abilities: (i) to simulate another person's movements, (ii) to predict another person's future action/s, (iii) to produce an appropriate incongruent response which differ, while interacting, with observed ones, and (iv) to complete the social interaction by integrating the predicted effects of one's own action with those of another person. This definition clearly alludes to the functional importance of complementary actions in the perception-action cycle and prompts us to scrutinize what is taking place behind the scenes. Preliminary data on this topic have been provided by recent cutting-edge studies utilizing different research methods. This mini-review aims to provide an up-to-date overview of the processes and the specific activations underlying complementary actions.

  2. Complementary actions

    PubMed Central

    Sartori, Luisa; Betti, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    Complementary colors are color pairs which, when combined in the right proportions, produce white or black. Complementary actions refer here to forms of social interaction wherein individuals adapt their joint actions according to a common aim. Notably, complementary actions are incongruent actions. But being incongruent is not sufficient to be complementary (i.e., to complete the action of another person). Successful complementary interactions are founded on the abilities: (i) to simulate another person’s movements, (ii) to predict another person’s future action/s, (iii) to produce an appropriate incongruent response which differ, while interacting, with observed ones, and (iv) to complete the social interaction by integrating the predicted effects of one’s own action with those of another person. This definition clearly alludes to the functional importance of complementary actions in the perception–action cycle and prompts us to scrutinize what is taking place behind the scenes. Preliminary data on this topic have been provided by recent cutting-edge studies utilizing different research methods. This mini-review aims to provide an up-to-date overview of the processes and the specific activations underlying complementary actions. PMID:25983717

  3. Analytical calculation of two-dimensional spectra.

    PubMed

    Bell, Joshua D; Conrad, Rebecca; Siemens, Mark E

    2015-04-01

    We demonstrate an analytical calculation of two-dimensional (2D) coherent spectra of electronic or vibrational resonances. Starting with the solution to the optical Bloch equations for a two-level system in the 2D time domain, we show that a fully analytical 2D Fourier transform can be performed if the projection-slice and Fourier-shift theorems of Fourier transforms are applied. Results can be fit to experimental 2D coherent spectra of resonances with arbitrary inhomogeneity.

  4. Two slow meteors with spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubs, Martin; Sposetti, Stefano; Spinner, Roger; Booz, Beat

    2017-01-01

    On January 2, 2017 two peculiar meteors (M20170102_001216 and M20170102_015202) were observed by several stations in Switzerland. Both had a long duration, slow velocity, similar brightness and a very similar radiant. As they appeared in a time interval of 100 minutes, a satellite was suspected as a possible origin of these two observations. A closer inspection however showed that this interpretation was incorrect. The two objects were slow meteors. Spectra were taken from both objects, which were nearly identical. Together this points to a common origin of the two meteors.

  5. Not a "reality" show.

    PubMed

    Wrong, Terence; Baumgart, Erica

    2013-01-01

    The authors of the preceding articles raise legitimate questions about patient and staff rights and the unintended consequences of allowing ABC News to film inside teaching hospitals. We explain why we regard their fears as baseless and not supported by what we heard from individuals portrayed in the filming, our decade-long experience making medical documentaries, and the full un-aired context of the scenes shown in the broadcast. The authors don't and can't know what conversations we had, what documents we reviewed, and what protections we put in place in each televised scene. Finally, we hope to correct several misleading examples cited by the authors as well as their offhand mischaracterization of our program as a "reality" show.

  6. Solar urticaria. Determinations of action and inhibition spectra.

    PubMed

    Hasei, K; Ichihashi, M

    1982-05-01

    A 42-year-old woman acquired solar urticaria approximately ten minutes after exposure to sunlight. Urticaria developed from visible light emitted from a projector lamp after a similar time lag. Monochromatic rays between 400 and 500 nm induced immediate urticaria by irradiation, with four times the minimal urticarial dose. Urticaria that was induced by monochromatic rays of the projector lamp was completely inhibited by immediate reirradiation of test sites with light waves longer that 530 nm. Radiant heat exposure from an electric hair dryer at 50 degrees C had no suppressive effects on the development of urticarial lesions.

  7. Public medical shows.

    PubMed

    Walusinski, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    In the second half of the 19th century, Jean-Martin Charcot (1825-1893) became famous for the quality of his teaching and his innovative neurological discoveries, bringing many French and foreign students to Paris. A hunger for recognition, together with progressive and anticlerical ideals, led Charcot to invite writers, journalists, and politicians to his lessons, during which he presented the results of his work on hysteria. These events became public performances, for which physicians and patients were transformed into actors. Major newspapers ran accounts of these consultations, more like theatrical shows in some respects. The resultant enthusiasm prompted other physicians in Paris and throughout France to try and imitate them. We will compare the form and substance of Charcot's lessons with those given by Jules-Bernard Luys (1828-1897), Victor Dumontpallier (1826-1899), Ambroise-Auguste Liébault (1823-1904), Hippolyte Bernheim (1840-1919), Joseph Grasset (1849-1918), and Albert Pitres (1848-1928). We will also note their impact on contemporary cinema and theatre.

  8. THE SPITZER ATLAS OF STELLAR SPECTRA (SASS)

    SciTech Connect

    Ardila, David R.; Van Dyk, Schuyler D.; Makowiecki, Wojciech; Stauffer, John; Rho, Jeonghee; Fajardo-Acosta, Sergio; Hoard, D. W.; Wachter, Stefanie; Song, Inseok

    2010-12-15

    We present the Spitzer Atlas of Stellar Spectra, which includes 159 stellar spectra (5-32 {mu}m; R {approx} 100) taken with the Infrared Spectrograph on the Spitzer Space Telescope. This Atlas gathers representative spectra of a broad section of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram, intended to serve as a general stellar spectral reference in the mid-infrared. It includes stars from all luminosity classes, as well as Wolf-Rayet (WR) objects. Furthermore, it includes some objects of intrinsic interest, such as blue stragglers and certain pulsating variables. All of the spectra have been uniformly reduced, and all are available online. For dwarfs and giants, the spectra of early-type objects are relatively featureless, characterized by the presence of hydrogen lines in A spectral types. Besides these, the most noticeable photospheric features correspond to water vapor and silicon monoxide in late-type objects and methane and ammonia features at the latest spectral types. Most supergiant spectra in the Atlas present evidence of circumstellar gas and/or dust. The sample includes five M supergiant spectra, which show strong dust excesses and in some cases polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon features. Sequences of WR stars present the well-known pattern of lines of He I and He II, as well as forbidden lines of ionized metals. The characteristic flat-top shape of the [Ne III] line is evident even at these low spectral resolutions. Several Luminous Blue Variables and other transition stars are present in the Atlas and show very diverse spectra, dominated by circumstellar gas and dust features. We show that the [8]-[24] Spitzer colors (IRAC and MIPS) are poor predictors of spectral type for most luminosity classes.

  9. Stretched View Showing 'Victoria'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Stretched View Showing 'Victoria'

    This pair of images from the panoramic camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity served as initial confirmation that the two-year-old rover is within sight of 'Victoria Crater,' which it has been approaching for more than a year. Engineers on the rover team were unsure whether Opportunity would make it as far as Victoria, but scientists hoped for the chance to study such a large crater with their roving geologist. Victoria Crater is 800 meters (nearly half a mile) in diameter, about six times wider than 'Endurance Crater,' where Opportunity spent several months in 2004 examining rock layers affected by ancient water.

    When scientists using orbital data calculated that they should be able to detect Victoria's rim in rover images, they scrutinized frames taken in the direction of the crater by the panoramic camera. To positively characterize the subtle horizon profile of the crater and some of the features leading up to it, researchers created a vertically-stretched image (top) from a mosaic of regular frames from the panoramic camera (bottom), taken on Opportunity's 804th Martian day (April 29, 2006).

    The stretched image makes mild nearby dunes look like more threatening peaks, but that is only a result of the exaggerated vertical dimension. This vertical stretch technique was first applied to Viking Lander 2 panoramas by Philip Stooke, of the University of Western Ontario, Canada, to help locate the lander with respect to orbiter images. Vertically stretching the image allows features to be more readily identified by the Mars Exploration Rover science team.

    The bright white dot near the horizon to the right of center (barely visible without labeling or zoom-in) is thought to be a light-toned outcrop on the far wall of the crater, suggesting that the rover can see over the low rim of Victoria. In figure 1, the northeast and southeast rims are labeled

  10. Investigation of Raman spectra of polyethylene terephthalate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Changjun; Tong, Na; Song, Lixin; Zhang, Guoqing

    2015-08-01

    Raman spectrometry was employed to study the characteristics of Raman spectra of polyethylene terephthalate (PET), which were treated with sodium hydroxide, sulfuric acid and copper sulfate, respectively. Raman spectra under different conditions were obtained and the characteristics of the Raman spectra were analyzed. The morphology structures were observed under different conditions using Atomic Force Microscope. The results show that the spectral intensity of PET treated with sodium hydroxide is higher than that untreated between 200-1750 cm-1, while the intensity of PET treated with sodium hydroxide is lower than that untreated beyond 1750 cm-1 and the fluorescence background of Raman spectra is decreased. The spectral intensity of PET treated with sulfuric acid is remarkably reduced than that untreated, and the intensity of PET treated with copper sulphate is much higher than that untreated.

  11. [Spectra of dark green jade from Myanmar].

    PubMed

    Mao, Jian; Chai, Lin-Tao; Guo, Shou-Guo; Fan, Jian-Liang; Bao, Feng

    2013-05-01

    Chemical compositions and spectral characteristics of one type of dark green jades assumed from omphacite jadeite from Myanmar jadeite mining area were studied by X-ray powder diffraction(XRD), X-ray fluorescence spectra(XRF), Raman spectra(RM) and UV-Vis Spectroscopy, etc. Based on testing by XRD and XRF, it was shown that it belongs to iron-enriched plagioclase, including albite and anorthite. The compositions range is between Ab0.731 An0.264 Or0.004 and Ab0.693 An0.303 Or0.004. Raman spectra of samples, albite jade and anorthite were collected and analyzed. Additionally, the distributions of Si, Al in the crystal structure were also discussed. UV-Vis spectra showed that dark green hue of this mineral is associated with d--d electronic transition of Fe3+ and Cr3+.

  12. SPECTRA. September 2011

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    Transportation Services program with the Dragon capsule. (Credit: SpaceX /Chris Thompson) S p a c e c r a f t e n g in e e r in g spectra NRL...secondary payloads on board a Space Exploration Technologies ( SpaceX ), Inc., Falcon 9 launch vehicle. NRL’s nanosatellites are part of the CubeSat...Maryland. The primary payload launched aboard the SpaceX Falcon 9 was the Dragon capsule. Developed by SpaceX and sponsored by NASA’s Commercial Orbital

  13. Determinations of Photon Spectra

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    COVERED O14. DATE OF REPORT (Year, Month, Day) 115. PAGE COUNT THESIS/ftFROW*W FROM TO 1989 1 54 16. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTATION A ?RQVk;U kOR 3UB LIC RELEASE...IAW AFR 190- 1 ERNEST A. HAYGOOD, 1st Lt, USAF Executive Officer, Civilian Institution ProQrams 17. COSATI CODES 18. SUBJECT TERMS (Continue on...spectra from measurements obtained with a sodium iodide counting system. A response matrix is computed by combining photon cross sections with

  14. Stereoscopically Observing Manipulative Actions

    PubMed Central

    Ferri, S.; Pauwels, K.; Rizzolatti, G.; Orban, G. A.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the contribution of stereopsis to the processing of observed manipulative actions. To this end, we first combined the factors “stimulus type” (action, static control, and dynamic control), “stereopsis” (present, absent) and “viewpoint” (frontal, lateral) into a single design. Four sites in premotor, retro-insular (2) and parietal cortex operated specifically when actions were viewed stereoscopically and frontally. A second experiment clarified that the stereo-action-specific regions were driven by actions moving out of the frontoparallel plane, an effect amplified by frontal viewing in premotor cortex. Analysis of single voxels and their discriminatory power showed that the representation of action in the stereo-action-specific areas was more accurate when stereopsis was active. Further analyses showed that the 4 stereo-action-specific sites form a closed network converging onto the premotor node, which connects to parietal and occipitotemporal regions outside the network. Several of the specific sites are known to process vestibular signals, suggesting that the network combines observed actions in peripersonal space with gravitational signals. These findings have wider implications for the function of premotor cortex and the role of stereopsis in human behavior. PMID:27252350

  15. Control spectra for Quito

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguiar, Roberto; Rivas-Medina, Alicia; Caiza, Pablo; Quizanga, Diego

    2017-03-01

    The Metropolitan District of Quito is located on or very close to segments of reverse blind faults, Puengasí, Ilumbisí-La Bota, Carcelen-El Inca, Bellavista-Catequilla and Tangahuilla, making it one of the most seismically dangerous cities in the world. The city is divided into five areas: south, south-central, central, north-central and north. For each of the urban areas, elastic response spectra are presented in this paper, which are determined by utilizing some of the new models of the Pacific Earthquake Engineering Research Center (PEER) NGA-West2 program. These spectra are calculated considering the maximum magnitude that could be generated by the rupture of each fault segment, and taking into account the soil type that exists at different points of the city according to the Norma Ecuatoriana de la Construcción (2015). Subsequently, the recurrence period of earthquakes of high magnitude in each fault segment is determined from the physical parameters of the fault segments (size of the fault plane and slip rate) and the pattern of recurrence of type Gutenberg-Richter earthquakes with double truncation magnitude (Mmin and Mmax) is used.

  16. Theoretical Studies of Molecular Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKay, Christopher (Technical Monitor); Freedman, Richard S.

    2002-01-01

    This summary describes the research activities of the principal investigator during the reporting period. The research includes spectroscopy, management of molecular databases, and generation of spectral line profiles and opacity data. The spectroscopy research includes oxygen broadening of nitric oxide (NO), analysis of CO2 spectra, analysis of HNO3 spectra, and analysis of CO spectra.

  17. Action Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1996

    These four papers were presented at a symposium on action learning moderated by Lex Dilworth at the 1996 conference of the Academy of Human Resource Development. "Developing an Infrastructure for Individual and Organizational Change: Transfer of Learning from an Action Reflection Learning (ARL) Program" (ARL Inquiry) reports findings…

  18. [Vibrational spectra of Corallium elatius].

    PubMed

    Fan, Lu-wei; Zhang, Yan; Hu, Yang

    2013-09-01

    Corallium elatius, which has unique color distribution characteristic, is the most important species of Taiwan precious corals. EPMA, XRD, FTIR and Laser Raman detective methods were used to study the chemical, mineral composition and spectra characteristics of Corallium elatius. The result of EPMA, XRD and FTIR shows the high-Mg calcite mineral componentand the stable minor chemical constituents of the samples. Meanwhile, the cell parameter indicates the lattice distortion and the preferred orientation of calcite grain caused by organic matter. The red part of the samples shows a different Raman spectrum from that of the white part, located at 1517/1128 cm(-1) and 1296/1016 cm(-1). Raman scattering measurement reveals the relationship between the organic matter and color.

  19. Continuum Fitting HST QSO Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tytler, David; Oliversen, Ronald J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Principal Component Analysis (PCA) method which we are using to fit and describe QSO spectra relies upon the fact that QSO continuum are generally very smooth and simple except for emission and absorption lines. To see this we need high signal-to-noise (S/N) spectra of QSOs at low redshift which have relatively few absorption lines in the Lyman-a forest. We need a large number of such spectra to use as the basis set for the PCA analysis which will find the set of principal component spectra which describe the QSO family as a whole. We have found that too few HST spectra have the required S/N and hence we need to supplement them with ground based spectra of QSOs at higher redshift. We have many such spectra and we have been working to make them suitable for this analysis. We have concentrated on this topic since 12/15/01.

  20. Stabilizing bottomless action theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greensite, J.; Halpern, M. B.

    1984-08-01

    We show how to construct the euclidean quantum theory corresponding to classical actions which are unbounded from below. Our method preserves the classical limit, the large- N limit, and the perturbative expansion of the unstabilized theories.

  1. Action perception predicts action performance

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Heather R.; Kurby, Christopher A.; Giovannetti, Tania; Zacks, Jeffrey M.

    2013-01-01

    Everyday action impairments often are observed in demented older adults, and they are common potential barriers to functional independence. We evaluated whether the ability to segment and efficiently encode activities is related to the ability to execute activities. Further, we evaluated whether brain regions important for segmentation also were important for action performance. Cognitively healthy older adults and those with very mild or mild dementia of the Alzheimer's type watched and segmented movies of everyday activities and then completed the Naturalistic Action Test. Structural MRI was used to measure volume in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), medial temporal lobes (MTL), posterior cortex, and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). Dementia status and the ability to segment everyday activities strongly predicted naturalistic action performance, and MTL volume largely accounted for this relationship. In addition, the current results supported the Omission-Commission Model: Different cognitive and neurological mechanisms predicted different types of action error. Segmentation, dementia severity, and MTL volume predicted everyday omission errors, DLPFC volume predicted commission errors, and ACC volume predicted action additions. These findings suggest that event segmentation may be critical for effective action production, and that the segmentation and production of activities may recruit the same event representation system. PMID:23851113

  2. Action perception predicts action performance.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Heather R; Kurby, Christopher A; Giovannetti, Tania; Zacks, Jeffrey M

    2013-09-01

    Everyday action impairments often are observed in demented older adults, and they are common potential barriers to functional independence. We evaluated whether the ability to segment and efficiently encode activities is related to the ability to execute activities. Further, we evaluated whether brain regions important for segmentation also were important for action performance. Cognitively healthy older adults and those with very mild or mild dementia of the Alzheimer's type watched and segmented movies of everyday activities and then completed the Naturalistic Action Test. Structural MRI was used to measure volume in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), medial temporal lobes (MTL), posterior cortex, and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). Dementia status and the ability to segment everyday activities strongly predicted naturalistic action performance, and MTL volume largely accounted for this relationship. In addition, the current results supported the Omission-Commission Model: Different cognitive and neurological mechanisms predicted different types of action error. Segmentation, dementia severity, and MTL volume predicted everyday omission errors, DLPFC volume predicted commission errors, and ACC volume predicted action additions. These findings suggest that event segmentation may be critical for effective action production, and that the segmentation and production of activities may recruit the same event representation system.

  3. Conscious Vision in Action.

    PubMed

    Briscoe, Robert; Schwenkler, John

    2015-09-01

    It is natural to assume that the fine-grained and highly accurate spatial information present in visual experience is often used to guide our bodily actions. Yet this assumption has been challenged by proponents of the Two Visual Systems Hypothesis (TVSH), according to which visuomotor programming is the responsibility of a "zombie" processing stream whose sources of bottom-up spatial information are entirely non-conscious (Clark, 2007, 2009; Goodale & Milner, 1992, 2004a; Milner & Goodale, 1995/2006, 2008). In many formulations of TVSH, the role of conscious vision in action is limited to "recognizing objects, selecting targets for action, and determining what kinds of action, broadly speaking, to perform" (Clark, 2007, p. 570). Our aim in this study is to show that the available evidence not only fails to support this dichotomous view but actually reveals a significant role for conscious vision in motor programming, especially for actions that require deliberate attention.

  4. Sequencing BPS spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gukov, Sergei; Nawata, Satoshi; Saberi, Ingmar; Stošić, Marko; Sułkowski, Piotr

    2016-03-01

    This paper provides both a detailed study of color-dependence of link homologies, as realized in physics as certain spaces of BPS states, and a broad study of the behavior of BPS states in general. We consider how the spectrum of BPS states varies as continuous parameters of a theory are perturbed. This question can be posed in a wide variety of physical contexts, and we answer it by proposing that the relationship between unperturbed and perturbed BPS spectra is described by a spectral sequence. These general considerations unify previous applications of spectral sequence techniques to physics, and explain from a physical standpoint the appearance of many spectral sequences relating various link homology theories to one another. We also study structural properties of colored HOMFLY homology for links and evaluate Poincaré polynomials in numerous examples. Among these structural properties is a novel "sliding" property, which can be explained by using (refined) modular S-matrix. This leads to the identification of modular transformations in Chern-Simons theory and 3d {N}=2 theory via the 3d/3d correspondence. Lastly, we introduce the notion of associated varieties as classical limits of recursion relations of colored superpolynomials of links, and study their properties.

  5. Sequencing BPS spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Gukov, Sergei; Nawata, Satoshi; Saberi, Ingmar; Stošić, Marko; Sułkowski, Piotr

    2016-03-02

    In this article, we provide both a detailed study of color-dependence of link homologies, as realized in physics as certain spaces of BPS states, and a broad study of the behavior of BPS states in general. We consider how the spectrum of BPS states varies as continuous parameters of a theory are perturbed. This question can be posed in a wide variety of physical contexts, and we answer it by proposing that the relationship between unperturbed and perturbed BPS spectra is described by a spectral sequence. These general considerations unify previous applications of spectral sequence techniques to physics, and explain from a physical standpoint the appearance of many spectral sequences relating various link homology theories to one another. We also study structural properties of colored HOMFLY homology for links and evaluate Poincar e polynomials in numerous examples. Among these structural properties is a novel "sliding" property, which can be explained by using (re fined) modular S-matrix. This leads to the identi fication of modular transformations in Chern-Simons theory and 3d N = 2 theory via the 3d/3d correspondence. In conclusion, we introduce the notion of associated varieties as classical limits of recursion relations of colored superpolynomials of links, and study their properties.

  6. Sequencing BPS spectra

    DOE PAGES

    Gukov, Sergei; Nawata, Satoshi; Saberi, Ingmar; ...

    2016-03-02

    In this article, we provide both a detailed study of color-dependence of link homologies, as realized in physics as certain spaces of BPS states, and a broad study of the behavior of BPS states in general. We consider how the spectrum of BPS states varies as continuous parameters of a theory are perturbed. This question can be posed in a wide variety of physical contexts, and we answer it by proposing that the relationship between unperturbed and perturbed BPS spectra is described by a spectral sequence. These general considerations unify previous applications of spectral sequence techniques to physics, and explainmore » from a physical standpoint the appearance of many spectral sequences relating various link homology theories to one another. We also study structural properties of colored HOMFLY homology for links and evaluate Poincar e polynomials in numerous examples. Among these structural properties is a novel "sliding" property, which can be explained by using (re fined) modular S-matrix. This leads to the identi fication of modular transformations in Chern-Simons theory and 3d N = 2 theory via the 3d/3d correspondence. In conclusion, we introduce the notion of associated varieties as classical limits of recursion relations of colored superpolynomials of links, and study their properties.« less

  7. Laboratory simulation of dust spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allamandola, L. J.; Sandford, S. A.

    1988-01-01

    Laboratory studies of the IR spectra of interstellar dust are reviewed. Studies of the absorption spectra of dense molecular clouds are discussed, including methods to produce interstellar ice analogues, simulations of astronomical spectra, and IR absorption features caused by ices. Comparisons are made between observational and experimental results of interstellar dust studies. Also, the interstellar emission features associated with dusty regions exposed to UV radiation are examined, including bands related to PAHs and PAH-related materials. It is shown that interstellar spectra are more consistant with emission from free PAHs than with emission from particles.

  8. EEG Power Spectra of Adolescent Poor Readers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ackerman, Peggy T.; McPherson, W. Brian; Oglesby, D. Michael; Dykman, Roscoe A.

    1998-01-01

    Electroencephalographic power spectra were studied in two poor-reading adolescent groups (n=38), dysphonetic and phonetic. Significant Group x Hemisphere effects were found in the alpha and beta bands, with the phonetic group showing right greater than left asymmetry. Results suggest more circumscribed and mature processing in the phonetically…

  9. Vibrational spectra study on quinolones antibiotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu; Yu, Ke; Wang, Sihuan

    2006-09-01

    In order to be able to fully understand and easily identify the quilonoles, we collected IR and Raman spectra of six quinolones, and attempted to assign the attribution of the observed frequencies and their association with specific modes of vibration. According to the structure, the compounds were divided into the groups, and the similarities and differences were further studied by comparing. The result of the study shows that the frequency and intensity are comparable to the corresponding structure. The spectra not only have the commonness but also the individualities.

  10. Gravitational effects on planetary neutron flux spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, W. C.; Drake, D. M.; O'dell, R. D.; Brinkley, F. W.; Anderson, R. C.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of gravity on the planetary neutron flux spectra for planet Mars, and the lifetime of the neutron, were investigated using a modified one-dimensional diffusion accelerated neutral-particle transport code, coupled with a multigroup cross-section library tailored specifically for Mars. The results showed the presence of a qualitatively new feature in planetary neutron leakage spectra in the form of a component of returning neutrons with kinetic energies less than the gravitational binding energy (0.132 eV for Mars). The net effect is an enhancement in flux at the lowest energies that is largest at and above the outermost layer of planetary matter.

  11. Topological lattice actions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bietenholz, W.; Gerber, U.; Pepe, M.; Wiese, U.-J.

    2010-12-01

    We consider lattice field theories with topological actions, which are invariant against small deformations of the fields. Some of these actions have infinite barriers separating different topological sectors. Topological actions do not have the correct classical continuum limit and they cannot be treated using perturbation theory, but they still yield the correct quantum continuum limit. To show this, we present analytic studies of the 1-d O(2) and O(3) model, as well as Monte Carlo simulations of the 2-d O(3) model using topological lattice actions. Some topological actions obey and others violate a lattice Schwarz inequality between the action and the topological charge Q. Irrespective of this, in the 2-d O(3) model the topological susceptibility {χ_t} = {{{left< {{Q^2}} rightrangle }} left/ {V} right.} is logarithmically divergent in the continuum limit. Still, at non-zero distance the correlator of the topological charge density has a finite continuum limit which is consistent with analytic predictions. Our study shows explicitly that some classically important features of an action are irrelevant for reaching the correct quantum continuum limit.

  12. Cloud supersaturations from CCN spectra Hoppel minima

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, James G.; Noble, Stephen; Tabor, Samantha

    2015-04-01

    High-resolution cloud condensation nucleus (CCN) spectral measurements in two aircraft field projects, Marine Stratus/Stratocumulus Experiment (MASE) and Ice in Clouds Experiment-Tropical (ICE-T), often showed bimodality that had previously been observed in submicrometer aerosol size distributions obtained by differential mobility analyzers. However, a great deal of spectral shape variability from very bimodal to very monomodal was observed in close proximity. Cloud supersaturation (S) estimates based on critical S, Sc, at minimal CCN concentrations between two modes (Hoppel minima) were ascertained for 63% of 325 measured spectra. These cloud S were lower than effective S (Seff) determined by comparing ambient CCN spectra with nearby cloud droplet concentrations (Nc). Averages for the polluted MASE stratus were 0.15 and 0.23% and for the cumulus clouds of ICE-T 0.44 and 1.03%. This cloud S disagreement between the two methods might in part be due to the fact that Hoppel minima include the effects of cloud processing, which push CCN spectra toward lower S. Furthermore, there is less cloud processing by the smaller cloud droplets, which might be related to smaller droplets evaporating more readily. Significantly lower concentrations within the more bimodal spectra compared with the monomodal spectra indicated active physical processes: Brownian capture of interstitial CCN and droplet coalescence. Chemical cloud processing also contributed to bimodality, especially in MASE.

  13. EXPLORING THE MORPHOLOGY OF RAVE STELLAR SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Matijevic, G.; Zwitter, T.; Bienayme, O.; Siebert, A.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Boeche, C.; Grebel, E. K.; Freeman, K. C.; Gibson, B. K.; Gilmore, G.; Helmi, A.; Munari, U.; Navarro, J.; Parker, Q. A.; Reid, W.; Seabroke, G.; Siviero, A.; Steinmetz, M.; Williams, M.; Watson, F. G.; and others

    2012-06-01

    The RAdial Velocity Experiment (RAVE) is a medium-resolution (R {approx} 7500) spectroscopic survey of the Milky Way that has already obtained over half a million stellar spectra. They present a randomly selected magnitude-limited sample, so it is important to use a reliable and automated classification scheme that identifies normal single stars and discovers different types of peculiar stars. To this end, we present a morphological classification of {approx}350, 000 RAVE survey stellar spectra using locally linear embedding, a dimensionality reduction method that enables representing the complex spectral morphology in a low-dimensional projected space while still preserving the properties of the local neighborhoods of spectra. We find that the majority of all spectra in the database ({approx} 90%-95%) belong to normal single stars, but there is also a significant population of several types of peculiars. Among them, the most populated groups are those of various types of spectroscopic binary and chromospherically active stars. Both of them include several thousands of spectra. Particularly the latter group offers significant further investigation opportunities since activity of stars is a known proxy of stellar ages. Applying the same classification procedure to the sample of normal single stars alone shows that the shape of the projected manifold in two-dimensional space correlates with stellar temperature, surface gravity, and metallicity.

  14. Spacelike brane actions.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Koji; Ho, Pei-Ming; Wang, John E

    2003-04-11

    We derive effective actions for "spacelike branes" (S-branes) and find a solution describing the formation of fundamental strings in the rolling tachyon background. The S-brane action is a Dirac-Born-Infeld action for Euclidean world volumes defined in the context of time-dependent tachyon condensation of non-BPS (Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield) branes. It includes gauge fields and, in particular, a scalar field associated with translation along the time direction. We show that the BIon spike solutions constructed in this system correspond to the production of a confined electric flux tube (a fundamental string) at late time of the rolling tachyon.

  15. Red spectra from white and blue noise

    PubMed Central

    Balmforth, N. J.; Provenzale, A.; Spiegel, E. A.; Martens, M.; Tresser, C.; Wu, C. W.

    1999-01-01

    The value of maps of the interval in modelling population dynamics has recently been called into question because temporal variations from such maps have blue or white power spectra, whereas many observations of real populations show time-series with red spectra. One way to deal with this discrepancy is to introduce chaotic or stochastic fluctuations in the parameters of the map. This leads to on–off intermittency and can markedly redden the spectrum produced by a model that does not by itself have a red spectrum. The parameter fluctuations need not themselves have a red spectrum in order to achieve this effect. Because the power spectrum is not invariant under a change of variable, another way to redden the spectrum is by a suitable transformation of the variables used. The question this poses is whether spectra are the best means of characterizing a fluctuating variable.

  16. FAST INVERSION OF SOLAR Ca II SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, C.; Choudhary, D. P.; Rezaei, R.; Louis, R. E.

    2015-01-10

    We present a fast (<<1 s per profile) inversion code for solar Ca II lines. The code uses an archive of spectra that are synthesized prior to the inversion under the assumption of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). We show that it can be successfully applied to spectrograph data or more sparsely sampled spectra from two-dimensional spectrometers. From a comparison to a non-LTE inversion of the same set of spectra, we derive a first-order non-LTE correction to the temperature stratifications derived in the LTE approach. The correction factor is close to unity up to log τ ∼ –3 and increases to values of 2.5 and 4 at log τ = –6 in the quiet Sun and the umbra, respectively.

  17. The action spectrum for vitamin D3: initial skin reaction and prolonged exposure.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, Arjan; den Outer, Peter; van Kranen, Henk; Slaper, Harry

    2016-07-06

    Vitamin D3 photosynthesis in the skin is formulated as a set of reaction equations, including side-reactions to lumisterol, tachysterol and toxisterols, and the accompanying reverse reactions, isomerisation of previtamin D3 to vitamin D3 and photodegradation of vitamin D3. The solution of this set is given for the stationary irradiance spectrum. The effective action spectrum for the instantaneous vitamin D3 production changes shape as a function of exposure, and therefore, no single action spectrum can be used. We assessed the action spectrum for unexposed skin and for skin that has been exposed to 7.5 Standard Erythemal Doses (SED). We constructed two new estimates: (1) the RIVM action spectrum, based on absorption spectra, quantum yields and skin transmission spectra, and (2) the modified QUT action spectrum, which is adjusted for self-absorption and skin transmission. For previously unexposed skin, the modified QUT action spectrum gives a qualitatively similar, but larger estimate than the RIVM action spectrum. We have not been able to solve the lack of quantitative agreement between the vitamin D production estimates from the three action spectrum estimates (RIVM, modified QUT and CIE). All new action spectra have stronger emphasis on the short wavelengths than the CIE action spectrum. We showed that, for wavelengths larger than 300 nm, the bandwidth that was used in the experiment that formed the basis of the CIE action spectrum, gives a red-shift of about 1 nm. Generally, with the formation of previtamin D3, the return reaction to provitamin D3 limits the production of vitamin D3. After some exposure, the new action spectrum has negative values for the longer wavelengths in the UVB. For the RIVM action spectrum, this happens after 7.5 SED, for the modified QUT action spectrum already after 1.25 SED, and after 7.5 SED the net production rate is largely cancelled. Thus prolonged exposure of previously unexposed skin saturates vitamin D3 formation. For maximum

  18. Controlling Attention through Action: Observing Actions Primes Action-Related Stimulus Dimensions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fagioli, Sabrina; Ferlazzo, Fabio; Hommel, Bernhard

    2007-01-01

    Previous findings suggest that planning an action "backward-primes" perceptual dimension related to this action: planning a grasp facilitates the processing of visual size information, while planning a reach facilitates the processing of location information. Here we show that dimensional priming of perception through action occurs even in the…

  19. Catalogue of representative meteor spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vojáček, V.; Borovička, J.; Koten, P.; Spurný, P.; Štork, R.

    2016-01-01

    We present a library of low-resolution meteor spectra that includes sporadic meteors, members of minor meteor showers, and major meteor showers. These meteors are in the magnitude range from +2 to -3, corresponding to meteoroid sizes from 1 mm to10 mm. This catalogue is available online at the CDS for those interested in video meteor spectra.

  20. Projecting Spectra for Classroom Investigations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sadler, Philip

    1991-01-01

    Describes an inexpensive spectrum projector that makes high-dispersion, high-efficiency diffraction gratings using a holographic process. Discusses classroom applications such as transmission spectra, absorption spectra, reflection characteristics of materials, color mixing, florescence and phosphorescence, and break up spectral colors. (MDH)

  1. Angels in Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stylianou, Xanthippi Cynthia

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the importance of the placement of action lines to show the direction of movement. The author shows some visuals of angels and discusses in details the texture of the wings, the hair and the clothing.

  2. Infrared spectra of cesium chloride aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Max, Jean-Joseph; Chapados, Camille

    2000-10-01

    The aqueous solutions of CsCl were studied at room temperature by infrared (IR) spectroscopy in the entire solubility range, 0-1200 g/L, using attenuated total reflection (ATR) sampling. The influence of anomalous dispersion on the IR-ATR spectra was evaluated by calculating the imaginary refractive index, k(ν), of each sample. Factor analysis (FA) was used to determine the number and abundance of species in the solutions. FA applied to both k(ν) spectra and IR-ATR spectra produced two principal spectra with a similar abundance of species. This result indicates that, even at high salt concentration, the optical effects do not influence the chemical analysis of IR-ATR spectra. The spectral modifications related to the salt concentrations are mainly first order. Second order effects were observed, but being weak, were not investigated. The two principal spectra are related to the two species present in the solution: pure water and CsCl-solvated water. From the latter, 2.8±0.4 water molecules were calculated to be associated with each close-bound Cs+/Cl- ion pair. In the case of KCl and NaCl aqueous solutions, both of which showed the same number of species, the number of water molecules associated to an ion pair was 5.0±0.4. That the latter number is different from that of CsCl indicates that the interaction between water molecules and ion pairs is different when cation Na or K in the chloride salt is replaced by Cs.

  3. Radial Distribution of Electron Spectra from High-Energy Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Katz, Robert; Wilson, John W.

    1998-01-01

    The average track model describes the response of physical and biological systems using radial dose distribution as the key physical descriptor. We report on an extension of this model to describe the average distribution of electron spectra as a function of radial distance from an ion. We present calculations of these spectra for ions of identical linear energy transfer (LET), but dissimilar charge and velocity to evaluate the differences in electron spectra from these ions. To illustrate the usefulness of the radial electron spectra for describing effects that are not described by electron dose, we consider the evaluation of the indirect events in microdosimetric distributions for ions. We show that folding our average electron spectra model with experimentally determined frequency distributions for photons or electrons provides a good representation of radial event spectra from high-energy ions in 0.5-2 micrometer sites.

  4. Simulation of dielectric spectra of erythrocytes with various shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asami, Koji

    2009-07-01

    Dielectric spectra of erythrocyte suspensions were numerically simulated over a frequency range from 1 kHz to 100 MHz to study the effects of erythrocyte shape on the dielectric spectra. First, a biconcave-discoid model for normal erythrocytes or discocytes was compared with an equivalent oblate spheroid model. The two models showed similar dielectric spectra to each other, suggesting that the oblate spheroid model can be approximately used for discocytes. Second, dielectric spectra were simulated for discocytes deformed by osmotic cell swelling. The deformation resulted in the increase in relaxation intensity and the sharpening of spectrum shape. Finally, dielectric spectra were simulated for echinocytes, stomatocytes and sickle cells that are induced by chemical agents and diseases. The dielectric spectra of echinocytes and stomatocytes were similar to each other, being distinguishable from that of discocytes and quite different from that of sickle cells.

  5. Citizen's actions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The role played by individual citizens as consumers of energy was examined, with emphasis on studying ways in which their action could result in energy conservation. It was shown that there are ways that energy can be conserved in this way, with citizens acting either individually or in groups. The potential savings are significant, but the actual savings may be quite small. The citizens need to be motivated to save and to believe in a conservation ethic; developing such an ethic is difficult, and perhaps not responsive to the shotgun approach now being attempted. The true course of action may be to synthesize new societal structures that provide the maximum evolution of culture within the limitation of scarce energy resources.

  6. EMPCA and Cluster Analysis of Quasar Spectra: Construction and Application to Simulated Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrs, Adam; Leighly, Karen; Wagner, Cassidy; Macinnis, Francis

    2017-01-01

    Quasars have complex spectra with emission lines influenced by many factors. Therefore, to fully describe the spectrum requires specification of a large number of parameters, such as line equivalent width, blueshift, and ratios. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) aims to construct eigenvectors-or principal components-from the data with the goal of finding a few key parameters that can be used to predict the rest of the spectrum fairly well. Analysis of simulated quasar spectra was used to verify and justify our modified application of PCA.We used a variant of PCA called Weighted Expectation Maximization PCA (EMPCA; Bailey 2012) along with k-means cluster analysis to analyze simulated quasar spectra. Our approach combines both analytical methods to address two known problems with classical PCA. EMPCA uses weights to account for uncertainty and missing points in the spectra. K-means groups similar spectra together to address the nonlinearity of quasar spectra, specifically variance in blueshifts and widths of the emission lines.In producing and analyzing simulations, we first tested the effects of varying equivalent widths and blueshifts on the derived principal components, and explored the differences between standard PCA and EMPCA. We also tested the effects of varying signal-to-noise ratio. Next we used the results of fits to composite quasar spectra (see accompanying poster by Wagner et al.) to construct a set of realistic simulated spectra, and subjected those spectra to the EMPCA /k-means analysis. We concluded that our approach was validated when we found that the mean spectra from our k-means clusters derived from PCA projection coefficients reproduced the trends observed in the composite spectra.Furthermore, our method needed only two eigenvectors to identify both sets of correlations used to construct the simulations, as well as indicating the linear and nonlinear segments. Comparing this to regular PCA, which can require a dozen or more components, or to

  7. Phonon spectra of alkali metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeković, S.; Vukajlović, F.; Veljković, V.

    1982-10-01

    In this work we used a simple local model pseudopotential which includes screening for the phonon spectra calculations of alkali metals. The results obtained are in very good agreement with experimental data. In some branches of phonon spectra the differences between theoretical and experimental results are within 1-2%, while the maximum error is about 6%. The suggested form of the pseudopotential allows us to describe the phonon spectra of Na, K and Rb with only one, and, at the same time, a unique, parameter. In this case, the maximum disagreements from experiment are 9% for Na, 8% for K and 7% for Rb.

  8. Bending effects on lasing action of semiconductor nanowires.

    PubMed

    Yang, Weisong; Ma, Yaoguang; Wang, Yipei; Meng, Chao; Wu, Xiaoqin; Ye, Yu; Dai, Lun; Tong, Limin; Liu, Xu; Yang, Qing

    2013-01-28

    High flexibility has been one of advantages for one-dimensional semiconductor nanowires (NWs) in wide application of nanoscale integrated circuits. We investigate the bending effects on lasing action of CdSe NWs. Threshold increases and differential efficiency decreases gradually when we decrease the bending radius step by step. Red shift and mode reduction in the output spectra are also observed. The bending loss of laser oscillation is considerably larger than that of photoluminescence (PL), and both show the exponential relationship with the bending radius. Diameter and mode dependent bending losses are investigated. Furthermore, the polarizations of output can be modulated linearly by bending the NWs into different angles continuously.

  9. [Raman spectra of YBCO superconductor with hot ultrapressing treatment].

    PubMed

    Yang, Hai-feng; Wei, Le-han; Cao, Xiao-wei

    2002-02-01

    Laser Raman spectra of YBCO oxide superconductor with hot ultrapressing and annealing treatment are reported. In addition to improving physical properties, the spectra data show that the processing can also perfect orthorhombie phase and enhance lattice on orientation trend as well as is good for formation of two dimension CuO2 net. The relation between structure and the superconductivity has been discussed.

  10. OVI absorbers in SDSS spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Stephan

    with the ubiquitous Lya forest lines, and estimate the success rate of retrieving each individual candidate as a function of its redshift, the emission redshift of the quasar, the strength of the absorber and the measured S/N of the spectrum by modelling typical Ly forest spectra. These correction factors allow us to derive the 'incompleteness and S/N corrected' redshift number densities of O VI absorbers. We can place a secure lower limit for the contribution of O VI to the closure mass density at the redshifts probed here: O OV I (2.8 < z < 3.2) >= 1.9 × 10 - 8 h -1 . We show that the strong lines we probe account for over 65% of the mass in the O VI absorbers; the weak absorbers, while dominant in line number density, do not contribute significantly to the mass density. Making a conservative assumption about the ionisation fraction, [Special characters omitted.] , and adopting the Anders & Grevesse (1989) solar abundance values, we derive the mean metallicty of the gas probed in our search : z(2.8 < z < 3.2) >= 3.6 × 10 -4 h , in good agreement with other studies. These results demonstrate that large spectroscopic datasets such as SDSS can play an important role in QSO absorption line studies, in spite of the relatively low resolution. Lastly, we have performed a stacking analysis whereby we shift individual spectra back to the rest-frame of the absorber candidate, and derive a mean absorption spectrum for various subsamples. Besides further validating the reality of the absorbers themselves, i.e. ruling out spurious interlopers and other misclassifications, we can use these stacked spectra for a variety of purposes. First of all, we can judge the effects of additional cut criteria like a minimal strength for associated CIV absorption, and hence produce cleaner and better defined subsamples, increasing the strength of future proposals for high-resolution studies. Secondly, the stack itself contains valuable information about the gas probed in our search. We have

  11. Spectra ID of recent SN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Challis, Peter

    2013-12-01

    P. Challis, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA), on behalf of the CfA Supernova Group, report spectra (range 320-860 nm) of various SN obtained during Dec. 24-27 UT by P. Challis, S. Gottilla (MMTO.org), and E. Marin (MMTO.org) with the MMT 6.5-m telescope (+ Blue Channel). Cross-correlation with a library of supernova spectra using the "Supernova Identification" code (SNID; Blondin and Tonry 2007, Ap.J.

  12. Temporal Evolution of Solar Energetic Particle Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doran, Donald J.; Dalla, Silvia

    2016-08-01

    During solar flares and coronal mass ejections, Solar Energetic Particles (SEPs) may be released into the interplanetary medium and near-Earth locations. The energy spectra of SEP events at 1 AU are typically averaged over the entire event or studied in a few snapshots. In this article we analyze the time evolution of the energy spectra of four large selected SEP events using a large number of snapshots. We use a multi-spacecraft and multi-instrument approach for the observations, obtained over a wide SEP energy range. We find large differences in the spectra at the beginning of the events as measured by different instruments. We show that over time, a wave-like structure is observed traveling through the spectra from the highest energies to the lowest energies, creating an "arch" shape that then straightens into a power law later in the event, after times on the order of 10 hours. We discuss the processes that determine SEP intensities and their role in shaping the spectral time evolution.

  13. Relevance of Light Spectra to Growth of the Rearing Tiger Puffer Takifugu rubripes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Byeong-Hoon; Hur, Sung-Pyo; Hur, Sang-Woo; Lee, Chi-Hoon; Lee, Young-Don

    2016-01-01

    In fish, light (photoperiod, intensity and spectra) is main regulator in many physiological actions includinggrowth. We investigate the effect of light spectra on the somatic growth and growth-related gene expression in the rearing tiger puffer. Fish was reared under different light spectra (blue, green and red) for 8 weeks. Fish body weight and total length were promoted when reared under green light condition than red light condition. Expression of somatostatins (ss1 and ss2) in brain were showed higher expression under red light condition than green light condition. The ss3 mRNA was observed only higher expression in blue light condition. Expression of growth hormone (gh) in pituitary was detected no different levels between experimental groups. However, the fish of green light condition group was showed more high weight gain and feed efficiency than other light condition groups. Our present results suggest that somatic growth of tiger puffer is induced under green light condition because of inhibiting ss mRNA expression in brain by effect of green wavelength. PMID:27294208

  14. Conscious Action/Zombie Action

    PubMed Central

    Shepherd, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Abstract I argue that the neural realizers of experiences of trying (that is, experiences of directing effort towards the satisfaction of an intention) are not distinct from the neural realizers of actual trying (that is, actual effort directed towards the satisfaction of an intention). I then ask how experiences of trying might relate to the perceptual experiences one has while acting. First, I assess recent zombie action arguments regarding conscious visual experience, and I argue that contrary to what some have claimed, conscious visual experience plays a causal role for action control in some circumstances. Second, I propose a multimodal account of the experience of acting. According to this account, the experience of acting is (at the very least) a temporally extended, co‐conscious collection of agentive and perceptual experiences, functionally integrated and structured both by multimodal perceptual processing as well as by what an agent is, at the time, trying to do. PMID:27667859

  15. Conscious Action/Zombie Action.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, Joshua

    2016-06-01

    I argue that the neural realizers of experiences of trying (that is, experiences of directing effort towards the satisfaction of an intention) are not distinct from the neural realizers of actual trying (that is, actual effort directed towards the satisfaction of an intention). I then ask how experiences of trying might relate to the perceptual experiences one has while acting. First, I assess recent zombie action arguments regarding conscious visual experience, and I argue that contrary to what some have claimed, conscious visual experience plays a causal role for action control in some circumstances. Second, I propose a multimodal account of the experience of acting. According to this account, the experience of acting is (at the very least) a temporally extended, co-conscious collection of agentive and perceptual experiences, functionally integrated and structured both by multimodal perceptual processing as well as by what an agent is, at the time, trying to do.

  16. Antisymmetric string actions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aragone, C.

    1986-12-01

    An action is presented for the free bosonic string on external flat space in terms of an antisymmetric second-rank string background tensor which is classically equivalent to the Nambu-Goto action. Both action and field equations are entirely described in terms of 2D world-sheet forms, without any reference to a 2D metric tensor background. The analysis of its canonical formulation shows how the quadratic Virasoro constraints are generated in this case and what their connection with the Bianchi identities are. Since in the orthonormal gauge the reduced action coincides with the standard one, it has the same critical dimension D = 26. The existence of an interaction term of a purely geometric structure stemming in the extrinsic curvature is pointed out. Its action and the new string field equations are then derived. This polynomial antisymmetric string action is uniformly generalized in order to describe d < D-dimensional extended objects in D-dimensional flat space. On leave of absence from Departamento de Física, Universidad Simon Bolívar, Apartado 80659, Caracas 1080A, Venezuela.

  17. [Near infrared Raman spectra analysis of rhizoma dioscoreae].

    PubMed

    Lin, Wen-Shuo; Chen, Rong; Li, Yong-Zeng; Feng, Shang-Yuan; Huang, Zu-Fang; Xie, Bing-Xian

    2008-05-01

    A novel and compact near-infrared (NIR) Raman system was developed using 785 nm diode laser, volume-phase technology holographic system, and NIR intensified charge-coupled device (CCD). The Raman spectra and first derivative spectra of rhizoma dioscoreae were obtained. The Raman spectra of rhizoma dioscoreae showed three strong characteristic peaks at 477, 863 and 936 cm(-1), respectively. The major ingredients are protein, amino acid, starch, polysaccharides and so on, matching the known basic biochemical composition of rhizoma dioscoreae. In the first derivative spectra of rhizoma dioscoreae, the distinguishing characteristic peaks appeared at 467, 484, 870 and 943 cm(-1). Contrasted with rhizoma dioscoreae Raman spectra in the ranges of 600 to 800 cm(-1) and 1 000 to 1 400 cm(-1), the changes in rhizoma dioscoreae Raman first derivative spectra are represented more clearly than the rhizoma dioscoreae Raman spectra. So the rhizoma dioscoreae Raman first derivative spectra can be an accurate supplementary analysis method to the rhizoma dioscoreae Raman spectra.

  18. Energy spectra in elasto-inertial turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valente, P. C.; da Silva, C. B.; Pinho, F. T.

    2016-07-01

    Direct numerical simulations of statistically steady homogeneous isotropic turbulence in viscoelastic fluids described by the FENE-P model are presented. Emphasis is given to large polymer relaxation times compared to the eddy turnover time, which is a regime recently termed elasto-inertial turbulence. In this regime the polymers are ineffective in dissipating kinetic energy but they play a lead role in transferring kinetic energy to the small solvent scales which turns out to be concomitant with the depletion of the usual non-linear energy cascade. However, we show that the non-linear interactions are still highly active, but they lead to no net downscale energy transfer because the forward and reversed energy cascades are nearly balanced. Finally, we show that the tendency for a steeper elasto-inertial power-law spectra is reversed for large polymer relaxation times and the spectra tend towards the usual k-5/3 functional form.

  19. First Infrared Predissociation Spectra of He-TAGGED Protonated Primary Alcohols at 4 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoffels, Alexander; Redlich, Britta; Oomens, J.; Asvany, Oskar; Brünken, Sandra; Jusko, Pavol; Thorwirth, Sven; Schlemmer, Stephan

    2015-06-01

    Cryogenic multipole ion traps have become popular devices in the development of sensitive action-spectroscopic techniques. The low ion temperature leads to enhanced spectral resolution, and less congested spectra. In the early 2000s, a 22-pole ion trap was coupled to the Free-Electron Laser for Infrared eXperiments (FELIX), yielding infrared Laser Induced Reaction (LIR) spectra of the molecular ions C_2H_2+ and CH_5+. This pioneering work showed the great opportunities combining cold mass-selected molecular ions with widely tunable broadband IR radiation. In the past year a cryogenic (T>3.9 K) 22-pole ion trap designed and built in Cologne (FELion) has been successfully coupled to FELIX, which in its current configuration provides continuously tunable infrared radiation from 3 μm to 150 μm, hence allowing to probe characteristic vibrational spectra in the so-called "fingerprint region" with a sufficient spectral energy density also allowing for multiple photon processes (IR-MPD). Here we present the first infrared predissociation spectra of He-tagged protonated methanol and ethanol (MeOH_2+/EtOH_2+) stored at 4 K. These vibrational spectra were recorded with both a commercial OPO and FELIX, covering a total spectral range from 3700 wn to 550 wn at a spectral resolution of a few wn. The H-O-H stretching and bending modes clearly distinguish the protonated alcohols from their neutral analoga. For EtOH_2+, also IR-MPD spectra of the bare ion could be recorded. The symmetric and antisymmetric H-O-H stretching bands at around 3 μm show no significant shift within the given spectral resolution in comparison to those recorded with He predissociation, indicating a rather small perturbation caused by the attached He. The vibrational bands were assigned using quantum-chemical calculations on different levels of theory. The computed frequencies correspond favorably to the experimental spectra. Subsequent high resolution measurements could lead to a better structural

  20. Reanalysis of Tyrannosaurus rex Mass Spectra.

    PubMed

    Bern, Marshall; Phinney, Brett S; Goldberg, David

    2009-09-01

    Asara et al. reported the detection of collagen peptides in a 68-million-year-old Tyrannosaurus rex bone by shotgun proteomics. This finding has been called into question as a possible statistical artifact. We reanalyze Asara et al.'s tandem mass spectra using a different search engine and different statistical tools. Our reanalysis shows a sample containing common laboratory contaminants, soil bacteria, and bird-like hemoglobin and collagen.

  1. Action Learning: Avoiding Conflict or Enabling Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corley, Aileen; Thorne, Ann

    2006-01-01

    Action learning is based on the premise that action and learning are inextricably entwined and it is this potential, to enable action, which has contributed to the growth of action learning within education and management development programmes. However has this growth in action learning lead to an evolution or a dilution of Revan's classical…

  2. Raman spectra of carotenoids in natural products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Withnall, Robert; Chowdhry, Babur Z.; Silver, Jack; Edwards, Howell G. M.; de Oliveira, Luiz F. C.

    2003-08-01

    Resonance Raman spectra of naturally occurring carotenoids have been obtained from nautilus, periwinkle ( Littorina littorea) and clam shells under 514.5 nm excitation and these spectra are compared with the resonance Raman spectra obtained in situ from tomatoes, carrots, red peppers and saffron. The tomatoes, carrots and red peppers gave rise to resonance Raman spectra exhibiting a ν1 band at ca. 1520 cm -1, in keeping with its assignment to carotenoids with ca. nine conjugated carboncarbon double bonds in their main chains, whereas the resonance Raman spectrum of saffron showed a ν1 band at 1537 cm -1 which can be assigned to crocetin, having seven conjugated carboncarbon double bonds. A correlation between ν1 wavenumber location and effective conjugated chain length has been used to interpret the data obtained from the shells, and the wavenumber position (1522 cm -1) of the ν1 band of the carotenoid in the orange clam shell suggests that it contains nine conjugated double bonds in the main chain. However, the black periwinkle and nautilus shells exhibit ν1 bands at 1504 and 1496 cm -1, respectively. On the basis of the correlation between ν1 wavenumber location and effective conjugated chain length, this indicates that they contain carotenoids with longer conjugated chains, the former having ca. 11 double bonds and the latter ca. 13 or even more. Raman spectra of the nautilus, periwinkle and clam shells also exhibited a strong band at 1085 cm -1 and a doublet with components at 701 and 705 cm -1, which can be assigned to biogenic calcium carbonate in the aragonite crystallographic form.

  3. An Interactive Gallery of Planetary Nebula Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwitter, K. B.; Henry, R. B. C.

    2002-12-01

    We have created a website containing high-quality moderate-resolution spectra of 88 planetary nebulae (PNe) from 3600 to 9600 Å, obtained at KPNO and CTIO. Spectra are displayed in a zoomable window, and there are templates available that show wavelength and ion identifications. In addition to the spectra themselves, the website also contains a brief discussion of PNe as astronomical objects and as contributors to our understanding of stellar evolution, and a table with atlas information for each object along with a link to an image. This table can be re-ordered by object name, galactic or equatorial coordinates, distance from the sun, the galactic center, or the galactic plane. We envision that this website, which concentrates a large amount of data in one place, will be of interest to a variety of users. PN researchers might need to check the spectrum of a particular object of interest; the non-specialist astronomer might simply be interested in perusing such a collection of spectra; and finally, teachers of introductory astronomy can use this database to illustrate basic principles of atomic physics and radiation. To encourage such use, we have written two simple exercises at a basic level to introduce beginning astronomy students to the wealth of information that PN spectra contain. We are grateful to Adam Wang of the Williams College OIT and to his summer student teams who worked on various apects of the implementation of this website. This work has been supported by NSF grant AST-9819123 and by Williams College and the University of Oklahoma.

  4. 15. Detail showing lower chord pinconnected to vertical member, showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. Detail showing lower chord pin-connected to vertical member, showing floor beam riveted to extension of vertical member below pin-connection, and showing brackets supporting cantilevered sidewalk. View to southwest. - Selby Avenue Bridge, Spanning Short Line Railways track at Selby Avenue between Hamline & Snelling Avenues, Saint Paul, Ramsey County, MN

  5. Classroom Assessment in Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shermis, Mark D.; DiVesta, Francis J.

    2011-01-01

    "Classroom Assessment in Action" clarifies the multi-faceted roles of measurement and assessment and their applications in a classroom setting. Comprehensive in scope, Shermis and Di Vesta explain basic measurement concepts and show students how to interpret the results of standardized tests. From these basic concepts, the authors then…

  6. The minimalist grammar of action

    PubMed Central

    Pastra, Katerina; Aloimonos, Yiannis

    2012-01-01

    Language and action have been found to share a common neural basis and in particular a common ‘syntax’, an analogous hierarchical and compositional organization. While language structure analysis has led to the formulation of different grammatical formalisms and associated discriminative or generative computational models, the structure of action is still elusive and so are the related computational models. However, structuring action has important implications on action learning and generalization, in both human cognition research and computation. In this study, we present a biologically inspired generative grammar of action, which employs the structure-building operations and principles of Chomsky's Minimalist Programme as a reference model. In this grammar, action terminals combine hierarchically into temporal sequences of actions of increasing complexity; the actions are bound with the involved tools and affected objects and are governed by certain goals. We show, how the tool role and the affected-object role of an entity within an action drives the derivation of the action syntax in this grammar and controls recursion, merge and move, the latter being mechanisms that manifest themselves not only in human language, but in human action too. PMID:22106430

  7. Vibrational Spectra of Selected Monohalogenated Monocarboxylic Acids.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    HALOGENATED HYDROCARBONS, INFRARED SPECTRA), (*CARBOXYLIC ACIDS, *INFRARED SPECTRA), IODINE COMPOUNDS, CHLORINE COMPOUNDS, BROMINE COMPOUNDS, ACETIC ACID , ACETATES, MOLECULAR STRUCTURE, MOLECULAR ASSOCIATION

  8. Photon spectra from WIMP annihilation

    SciTech Connect

    Cembranos, J. A. R.; Cruz-Dombriz, A. de la; Dobado, A.; Maroto, A. L.; Lineros, R. A.

    2011-04-15

    If the present dark matter in the Universe annihilates into standard model particles, it must contribute to the fluxes of cosmic rays that are detected on the Earth and, in particular, to the observed gamma-ray fluxes. The magnitude of such a contribution depends on the particular dark matter candidate, but certain features of the produced photon spectra may be analyzed in a rather model-independent fashion. In this work we provide the complete photon spectra coming from WIMP annihilation into standard model particle-antiparticle pairs obtained by extensive Monte Carlo simulations. We present results for each individual annihilation channel and provide analytical fitting formulas for the different spectra for a wide range of WIMP masses.

  9. [Variations of IR-spectra of three coating materials before and after spraying on urea fertilizer].

    PubMed

    Liu, Xing-bin; Chen, Li-jun; Wu, Zhi-jie; Zhang, Guang-na

    2009-09-01

    Coated fertilizer is a hot spot in the domain of fertilizer research. Related researches mainly focused on the action mechanisms of coating materials in controlling the nutrient release from coated fertilizers, but less information is available on the structural variation of the coating materials before and after spraying on fertilizers, which is the key to whether we can directly use coating materials to extrapolate its mechanisms in controlling coated fertilizers' nutrient release. With polylactic acid (PLA), poly (butynelenes succinate) (PBS), and polycarbonate (PC) as test materials, the variations of their IR spectra before and after spraying on urea fertilizer were determined, which was aimed to supply theoretical basis for further studying the action mechanisms of coating materials in controlling coated fertilizers nutrient release. The results showed that PLA and PC had less variation in their IR spectra before and after spraying on urea fertilizer, while PBS acted in reverse, suggesting that the former two coating materials could be directly used for studying the patterns of nutrient release from coated fertilizers.

  10. QUALITATIVE INTERPRETATION OF GALAXY SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez Almeida, J.; Morales-Luis, A. B.; Terlevich, R.; Terlevich, E.; Cid Fernandes, R. E-mail: abml@iac.es E-mail: eterlevi@inaoep.mx

    2012-09-10

    We describe a simple step-by-step guide to qualitative interpretation of galaxy spectra. Rather than an alternative to existing automated tools, it is put forward as an instrument for quick-look analysis and for gaining physical insight when interpreting the outputs provided by automated tools. Though the recipe is for general application, it was developed for understanding the nature of the Automatic Spectroscopic K-means-based (ASK) template spectra. They resulted from the classification of all the galaxy spectra in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey data release 7, thus being a comprehensive representation of the galaxy spectra in the local universe. Using the recipe, we give a description of the properties of the gas and the stars that characterize the ASK classes, from those corresponding to passively evolving galaxies, to H II galaxies undergoing a galaxy-wide starburst. The qualitative analysis is found to be in excellent agreement with quantitative analyses of the same spectra. We compare the mean ages of the stellar populations with those inferred using the code STARLIGHT. We also examine the estimated gas-phase metallicity with the metallicities obtained using electron-temperature-based methods. A number of byproducts follow from the analysis. There is a tight correlation between the age of the stellar population and the metallicity of the gas, which is stronger than the correlations between galaxy mass and stellar age, and galaxy mass and gas metallicity. The galaxy spectra are known to follow a one-dimensional sequence, and we identify the luminosity-weighted mean stellar age as the affine parameter that describes the sequence. All ASK classes happen to have a significant fraction of old stars, although spectrum-wise they are outshined by the youngest populations. Old stars are metal-rich or metal-poor depending on whether they reside in passive galaxies or in star-forming galaxies.

  11. Automated analysis of slitless spectra - Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beauchemin, M.; Borra, E. F.; Levesque, S.

    1991-09-01

    The stellar spectral classification that can be achieved with very low-dispersion spectroscopy is examined. Several methods are applied to slitless spectra taken from the automated grens plates analysis project undertaken at Laval University. It is suggested that an accuracy in B - V of about 0.1 mag at B approximating 19 for stars bluer than B - V below 0.8 mag or better for redder stars can be obtained by probing the continuum. Results from DDO-like photometry show that grens data behave similarly to the Gunn and Stryker library of standard stars for many indices. Results of multivariate analysis are coherent with the stellar spectral classification and provide a powerful and objective means of cataloging spectra of the same spectral shape.

  12. High resolution derivative spectra in remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demetriades-Shah, Tanvir H.; Steven, Michael D.; Clark, Jeremy A.

    1990-01-01

    The use of derivative spectra is an established technique in analytical chemistry for the elimination of background signals and for resolving overlapping spectral features. Application of this technique for tackling analogous problems such as interference from soil background reflectance in the remote sensing of vegetation or for resolving complex spectra of several target species within individual pixels in remote sensing is proposed. Methods for generating derivatives of high spectral resolution data are reviewed. Results of experiments to test the use of derivatives for monitoring chlorosis in vegetation show that derivative spectral indices are superior to conventional broad-band spectral indices such as the near-infrared/red reflectance ratio. Conventional broad-band indices are sensitive to both leaf cover as well as leaf color. New derivative spectral indices which were able to monitor chlorosis unambiguously were identified. Potential areas for the application of this technique in remote sensing are considered.

  13. Terahertz-sideband spectra involving Kapteyn series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerche, Ian; Tautz, Robert C.; Citrin, D. S.

    2009-09-01

    Kapteyn series of the second kind appear in models of even- and odd-order sideband spectra in the optical regime of a quantum system modulated by a high-frequency (e.g., terahertz) electromagnetic field (Citrin D S 1999 Phys. Rev. B 60 5659) and in certain time-periodic transport problems in superlattices (Ignatov A A and Romanov Y A 1976 Phys. Status Solidi b 73 327; Feise M W and Citrin D S 1999 Appl. Phys. Lett. 75 3536). This paper shows that both the even- and the odd-order Kapteyn series that appear can be summed in closed form, thereby allowing more transparent insight into the structural dependence of the sideband spectra and also providing an analytic control for the accuracy of numerical procedures designed to evaluate the series. The general method of analysis may also be of interest for other Kapteyn series.

  14. Creating semiconductor metafilms with designer absorption spectra

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soo Jin; Fan, Pengyu; Kang, Ju-Hyung; Brongersma, Mark L.

    2015-01-01

    The optical properties of semiconductors are typically considered intrinsic and fixed. Here we leverage the rapid developments in the field of optical metamaterials to create ultrathin semiconductor metafilms with designer absorption spectra. We show how such metafilms can be constructed by placing one or more types of high-index semiconductor antennas into a dense array with subwavelength spacings. It is argued that the large absorption cross-section of semiconductor antennas and their weak near-field coupling open a unique opportunity to create strongly absorbing metafilms whose spectral absorption properties directly reflect those of the individual antennas. Using experiments and simulations, we demonstrate that near-unity absorption at one or more target wavelengths of interest can be achieved in a sub-50-nm-thick metafilm using judiciously sized and spaced Ge nanobeams. The ability to create semiconductor metafilms with custom absorption spectra opens up new design strategies for planar optoelectronic devices and solar cells. PMID:26184335

  15. Specific heat of multifractal energy spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, L. R.; Vallejos, R. O.; Tsallis, C.; Mendes, R. S.; Roux, S.

    2001-07-01

    Motivated by the self-similar character of energy spectra demonstrated for quasicrystals, we investigate the case of multifractal energy spectra, and compute the specific heat associated with simple archetypal forms of multifractal sets as generated by iterated maps. We considered the logistic map and the circle map at their threshold to chaos. Both examples show nontrivial structures associated with the scaling properties of their respective chaotic attractors. The specific heat displays generically log-periodic oscillations around a value that characterizes a single exponent, the ``fractal dimension,'' of the distribution of energy levels close to the minimum value set to 0. It is shown that when the fractal dimension and the frequency of log oscillations of the density of states are large, the amplitude of the resulting log oscillation in the specific heat becomes much smaller than the log-periodic oscillation measured on the density of states.

  16. Neutron Spectra in a 15 MV LINAC

    SciTech Connect

    Vega-Carrillo, H. R.; Chu, Wei-Han; Tung, Chuan-Jong; Lan, Jen-Hong

    2010-12-07

    Neutron spectra were calculated inside the treatment hall of a 15 MV LINAC, calculations were carried out using Monte Carlo methods. With a Bonner sphere spectrometer with pairs of thermoluminiscent dosimeters the neutron spectrum at 100 cm from the isocenter was measured and compared with the calculated spectrum. All the spectra in the treatment hall show the presence of evaporation and knock-on neutrons; also the room-return due to the hall features is shown. In the maze the large contribution are due to epithermal and thermal neutrons. A good agreement between the calculated and measured spectrum at 100 cm was noticed, from this comparison the differences are attributed to the water content in the concrete of the hall.

  17. Recovery of fluctuation spectrum evolution from tomographic shear spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Bonometto, Silvio A.; Mezzetti, Marino E-mail: mezzetti@oats.inaf.it

    2013-05-01

    Forthcoming large angle surveys are planned to obtain high precision tomographic shear data. In principle, they will allow us to recover the spectra of matter density fluctuation, at various redshift, through the inversion of the expressions yielding shear spectra from fluctuation spectra. This was discussed in previous work, where SVD techniques for matrix inversion were also shown to be the optimal tool to this aim. Here we show the significant improvements obtainable by using a 7 bin tomography, as allowed by future Euclid data, and discuss error propagation from shear to fluctuation spectra. We find that the technique is a promising tool, namely for the analysis of baryon physics through high–l shear spectra and to test the consistency between expansion rate and fluctuation growth.

  18. The structure of BPS spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longhi, Pietro

    In this thesis we develop and apply novel techniques for analyzing BPS spectra of supersymmetric quantum field theories of class S. By a combination of wall-crossing, spectral networks and quiver methods we explore the BPS spectra of higher rank four-dimensional N = 2 super Yang-Mills, uncovering surprising new phenomena. Focusing on the SU(3) case, we prove the existence of wild BPS spectra in field theory, featuring BPS states of higher spin whose degeneracies grow exponentially with the energy. The occurrence of wild BPS states is surprising because it appears to be in tension with physical expectations on the behavior of the entropy as a function of the energy scale. The solution to this puzzle comes from realizing that the size of wild BPS states grows rapidly with their mass, and carefully analyzing the volume-dependence of the entropy of BPS states. We also find some interesting structures underlying wild BPS spectra, such as a Regge-like relation between the maximal spin of a BPS multiplet and the square of its mass, and the existence of a universal asymptotic distribution of spin-j irreps within a multiplet of given charge. We also extend the spectral networks construction by introducing a refinement in the topological classification of 2d-4d BPS states, and identifying their spin with a topological invariant known as the "writhe of soliton paths". A careful analysis of the 2d-4d wall-crossing behavior of this refined data reveals that it is described by motivic Kontsevich-Soibelman transformations, controlled by the Protected Spin Character, a protected deformation of the BPS index encoding the spin of BPS states. Our construction opens the way for the systematic study of refined BPS spectra in class S theories. We apply it to several examples, including ones featuring wild BPS spectra, where we find an interesting relation between spectral networks and certain functional equations. For class S theories of A 1 type, we derive an alternative technique for

  19. The Holst Action by the Spectral Action Principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfäffle, Frank; Stephan, Christoph A.

    2011-10-01

    We investigate the Holst action for closed Riemannian 4-manifolds with orthogonal connections. For connections whose torsion has zero Cartan type component we show that the Holst action can be recovered from the heat asymptotics for the natural Dirac operator acting on left-handed spinor fields.

  20. Exploiting Low-Dimensional Structure in Astronomical Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Joseph W.; Freeman, Peter E.; Lee, Ann B.; Schafer, Chad M.

    2009-01-01

    Dimension-reduction techniques can greatly improve statistical inference in astronomy. A standard approach is to use Principal Components Analysis (PCA). In this work, we apply a recently developed technique, diffusion maps, to astronomical spectra for data parameterization and dimensionality reduction, and develop a robust, eigenmode-based framework for regression. We show how our framework provides a computationally efficient means by which to predict redshifts of galaxies, and thus could inform more expensive redshift estimators such as template cross-correlation. It also provides a natural means by which to identify outliers (e.g., misclassified spectra, spectra with anomalous features). We analyze 3835 Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectra and show how our framework yields a more than 95% reduction in dimensionality. Finally, we show that the prediction error of the diffusion-map-based regression approach is markedly smaller than that of a similar approach based on PCA, clearly demonstrating the superiority of diffusion maps over PCA for this regression task.

  1. Infrared transmission spectra of Sea of Fertility regolith

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akhmanova, M. V.; Karyakin, A. V.; Tartasov, L. S.

    1974-01-01

    Transmission spectra in the 2-25 micrometer region were obtained for samples of lunar regolith returned by the Luna 16 automatic station. A comparison of the Luna 16, Apollo 11, and Apollo 12 samples showed that the infrared transmission spectra of regolith samples from the mare regions are similar and characteristic of basic basaltic rocks. The absorption bands show up in the vibration region of the SiO4 groups. No water and OH groups were found in the samples based on the spectrum. Spectra of regolith samples calcined at 1000C showed changes that can be interpreted as changes in the spectra of irradiated crystals (especially distinctly for the Luna 16 samples).

  2. Computer Simulation of NMR Spectra.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellison, A.

    1983-01-01

    Describes a PASCAL computer program which provides interactive analysis and display of high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra from spin one-half nuclei using a hard-copy or monitor. Includes general and theoretical program descriptions, program capability, and examples of its use. (Source for program/documentation is included.)…

  3. Classical Trajectories and Quantum Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mielnik, Bogdan; Reyes, Marco A.

    1996-01-01

    A classical model of the Schrodinger's wave packet is considered. The problem of finding the energy levels corresponds to a classical manipulation game. It leads to an approximate but non-perturbative method of finding the eigenvalues, exploring the bifurcations of classical trajectories. The role of squeezing turns out decisive in the generation of the discrete spectra.

  4. Discrimination of petroleum fluorescence spectra.

    PubMed

    Stelmaszewski, Adam

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents studies of the total spectra (fluorescence-excitation matrix) of petroleum with regard to the utilization of fluorescence for determining petroleum pollutants. Thorough testing of one group, comprising almost forty lubricating oils in the form of their hexane solutions, points out their discrimination.

  5. Early Developments in Joint Action

    PubMed Central

    Brownell, Celia A.

    2012-01-01

    Joint action, critical to human social interaction and communication, has garnered increasing scholarly attention in many areas of inquiry, yet its development remains little explored. This paper reviews research on the growth of joint action over the first 2 years of life to show how children become progressively more able to engage deliberately, autonomously, and flexibly in joint action with adults and peers. It is suggested that a key mechanism underlying the dramatic changes in joint action over the second year of life is the ability to reflect consciously on oneself and one’s behavior and volition and correspondingly, on the behavior, goals, and intentions of others. PMID:23087769

  6. Shape effects on asteroid spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davalos, J.; Carvano, J.

    2014-07-01

    The objective of this work is to probe how the shape of a body like an asteroid could be modifying its observed spectra and the derived mineralogical interfaces based on spectral modeling. To model this effect, we construct an oblate ellipsoid with triangular facets, where each facet contributes to the overall reflectance. The synthetic spectra is generated by the isotropic multiple-scattering approximation (IMSA) reflectance model of Hapke (1993). First, we obtained optical constants by inverting the spectra of meteorites, obtained from the RELAB spectral database. These optical constants were found inverting the reflectance bidirectional equation of Hapke; this is made in two steps: (i) The first inversion is to find the single-scattering albedo π (ii) in the model of Hapke, this albedo is found under the regime of the geometric optics, where the particle size is much larger than the wavelength of the incident radiation. Here we assumed a constant value for the real part of the optical constant n=1.5. With these optical constants, we can construct synthetic spectra for any particle size. The phase function used is the double Henyey-Greenstein phase function and an accurate expression for the H-functions. We started with the ellipsoidal shape a=1.0, b=c=0.5 for two particle size 50 and 250 μ m, in this part, we found good differences in the BAR parameter between the two geometric models, this was done for 100 Eucrite meteorites spectra. In this first study, we found that the BAR parameter between the two models is bigger when the particle size increases. In the second part, we started with different ellipsoidal shapes and produced synthetic spectra for material with eucrite and diogenite composition with a phase angle of 20 degrees, incidence and emission angles of 10 degrees, and particle size at 250 μ m. All spectra was generated for four parameters of phase angle b=[0.2,0.4,0.6,0.8] taking the empirical relation between the phase constants of Hapke (2012

  7. Philosophy, Methodology and Action Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, Wilfred

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to examine the role of methodology in action research. It begins by showing how, as a form of inquiry concerned with the development of practice, action research is nothing other than a modern 20th century manifestation of the pre-modern tradition of practical philosophy. It then draws in Gadamer's powerful vindication of…

  8. Integrating CHAT and Action Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, Gordon

    2011-01-01

    The question as to how action research (AR) is related to cultural-historical activity theory (CHAT) is not answerable in categorical terms. Both CHAT and AR have been variously interpreted and much depends on the individual biographies of those who pronounce on their relationship. The aim of this paper is to show how action research, conducted…

  9. Hey Teacher, Your Personality's Showing!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paulsen, James R.

    1977-01-01

    A study of 30 fourth, fifth, and sixth grade teachers and 300 of their students showed that a teacher's age, sex, and years of experience did not relate to students' mathematics achievement, but that more effective teachers showed greater "freedom from defensive behavior" than did less effective teachers. (DT)

  10. Planning a Successful Tech Show

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nikirk, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Tech shows are a great way to introduce prospective students, parents, and local business and industry to a technology and engineering or career and technical education program. In addition to showcasing instructional programs, a tech show allows students to demonstrate their professionalism and skills, practice public presentations, and interact…

  11. Nebular spectra of pair-instability supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerkstrand, A.; Smartt, S. J.; Heger, A.

    2016-01-01

    If very massive stars (M ≳ 100 M⊙) can form and avoid too strong mass-loss during their evolution, they are predicted to explode as pair-instability supernovae (PISNe). One critical test for candidate events is whether their nucleosynthesis yields and internal ejecta structure, being revealed through nebular-phase spectra at t ≳ 1 yr, match those of model predictions. Here, we compute theoretical spectra based on model PISN ejecta at 1-3 yr post-explosion to allow quantitative comparison with observations. The high column densities of PISNe lead to complete gamma-ray trapping for t ≳ 2 yr which, combined with fulfilled conditions of steady state, leads to bolometric supernova luminosities matching the 56Co decay. Most of the gamma-rays are absorbed by the deep-lying iron and silicon/sulphur layers. The ionization balance shows a predominantly neutral gas state, which leads to emission lines of Fe I, Si I, and S I. For low-mass PISNe, the metal core expands slowly enough to produce a forest of distinct lines, whereas high-mass PISNe expand faster and produce more featureless spectra. Line blocking is complete below ˜5000 Å for several years, and the model spectra are red. The strongest line is typically [Ca II] λλ7291, 7323, one of few lines from ionized species. We compare our models with proposed PISN candidates SN 2007bi and PTF12dam, finding discrepancies for several key observables and thus no support for a PISN interpretation. We discuss distinct spectral features predicted by the models, and the possibility of detecting pair-instability explosions among non-superluminous supernovae.

  12. EFFECTS OF FORSTERITE GRAIN SHAPE ON INFRARED SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Koike, C.; Imai, Y.; Chihara, H.; Murata, K.; Tsuchiyama, A.; Suto, H.; Tachibana, S.; Ohara, S.

    2010-02-01

    The Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) detected several sharp infrared features around young stars, comets, and evolved stars. These sharp features were identified as Mg-rich crystalline silicates of forsterite and enstatite by comparison with spectra from laboratory data. However, certain infrared emission bands in the observed spectra cannot be identified because they appear at slightly shorter wavelengths than the peaks in forsterite laboratory spectra, where the shapes of forsterite particles are irregular. To solve this problem, we measured infrared spectra of forsterite grains of various shapes (irregular, plate-like with no sharp edges, elliptical, cauliflower, and spherical) in the infrared spectral region between 5 and 100 mum. The spectra depend on particle shape. The spectra of the 11, 19, 23, and 33 mum bands, in particular, are extremely sensitive to particle shape, whereas some peaks such as the 11.9, 49, and 69 mum bands remained almost unchanged despite different particle shapes. This becomes most evident from the spectra of near-spherical particles produced by annealing an originally amorphous silicate sample at temperature from 600 to 1150 deg. C. The spectra of these samples differ strongly from those of other ones, showing peaks at much shorter wavelengths. At a higher annealing temperature of 1200 deg. C, the particle shapes changed drastically from spherical to irregular and the spectra became similar to those of forsterite particles with irregular shapes. Based on ISO data and other observational data, the spectra of outflow sources and disk sources may correspond to differences in forsterite shape, and further some unidentified peaks, such as those at 32.8 or 32.5 mum, may be due to spherical or spherical-like forsterite.

  13. The analysis of spectra of novae taken near maximum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stryker, L. L.; Hestand, J.; Starrfield, S.; Wehrse, R.; Hauschildt, P.; Spies, W.; Baschek, B.; Shaviv, G.

    1988-01-01

    A project to analyze ultraviolet spectra of novae obtained at or near maximum optical light is presented. These spectra are characterized by a relatively cool continuum with superimposed permitted emission lines from ions such as Fe II, Mg II, and Si II. Spectra obtained late in the outburst show only emission lines from highly ionized species and in many cases these are forbidden lines. The ultraviolet data will be used with calculations of spherical, expanding, stellar atmospheres for novae to determine elemental abundances by spectral line synthesis. This method is extremely sensitive to the abundances and completely independent of the nebular analyses usually used to obtain novae abundances.

  14. Anomalous Raman spectra from La2CuO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, Gerald; Dacol, F. H.

    1990-03-01

    We show that some published Raman spectra from the superconductors (La2-xSrx)CuO4 and La2NiO4 are incorrect. We believe that these spectra were obtained when the samples were ``burnt'' by the focused laser beam and were actually due to La2O3. Similar anomalous results can be obtained when starting with Nd2CuO4 where the spectra come from Nd2O3. A spectrum distinctly different from those of La2O3 or Nd2O3 is obtained from Y2O3.

  15. Satellite Animation Shows California Storms

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation of visible and infrared imagery from NOAA's GOES-West satellite shows a series of moisture-laden storms affecting California from Jan. 6 through Jan. 9, 2017. TRT: 00:36 Credit: NASA...

  16. Satellite Movie Shows Erika Dissipate

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation of visible and infrared imagery from NOAA's GOES-West satellite from Aug. 27 to 29 shows Tropical Storm Erika move through the Eastern Caribbean Sea and dissipate near eastern Cuba. ...

  17. Phobos surface spectra mineralogical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pajola, M.; Lazzarin, M.; Dalle Ore, C. M.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Roush, T. L.; Pendleton, Y.; Bertini, I.; Magrin, S.; Carli, C.; La Forgia, F.; Barbieri, C.

    2014-04-01

    A mineralogical model composed of a mixture of Tagish Lake meteorite (TL) and Pyroxene Glass (PM80) was presented in [1] to explain the surface reflectance of Phobos from 0.25 to 4.0 μm. The positive results we obtained, when comparing the OSIRIS data [2] extended in wavelength to include the [3,4] spectra, forced us to perform a wider comparison between our TL-PM80 model and the CRISM and OMEGA Phobos spectra presented in [5]. Such spectra cover three different regions of interest (ROIs) situated in the Phobos sub-Mars hemisphere: the interior of the Stickney crater, its eastern rim, and its proximity terrain southeast of the Reldresal crater. We decided to vary the percentage mixture of the components of our model (80% TL, 20% PM80), between pure TL and pure PM80, by means of the radiative transfer code based on the [6] formulation of the slab approximation. Once this spectral range was derived, see Fig. 1, we attempted to compare it with the [5] spectra between 0.4 and 2.6 μm, i.e. below the thermal emitted radiation, to see if any spectral match was possible. We observed that CRISM scaled spectra above 1.10 μm fall within pure Tagish Lake composition and the [1] model. The CRISM data below 1.10 μm present more discrepancies with our models, in particular for the Stickney's rim spectrum. Nevertheless the TL and PM80 components seem to be good mineralogical candidates on Phobos. We performed the same analysis with the OMEGA data and, again, we found out that the Stickney's rim spectrum lies out of our model range, while the two remaining spectra still lie between pure TL and 80% TL - 20% PM80, but indicating that a different, more complicated mixture is expected in order to explain properly both the spectral trend and the possible absorption bands located above 2.0 μm. Within this analysis, we point out that a big fraction of TL material (modeled pure or present with a minimum percentage of 80% mixed together with 20% PM80) seems to explain Phobos spectral

  18. A Metadata Action Language

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, Keith; Clancy, Dan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The data management problem comprises data processing and data tracking. Data processing is the creation of new data based on existing data sources. Data tracking consists of storing metadata descriptions of available data. This paper addresses the data management problem by casting it as an AI planning problem. Actions are data-processing commands, plans are dataflow programs and goals are metadata descriptions of desired data products. Data manipulation is simply plan generation and execution, and a key component of data tracking is inferring the effects of an observed plan. We introduce a new action language for data management domains, called ADILM. We discuss the connection between data processing and information integration and show how a language for the latter must be modified to support the former. The paper also discusses information gathering within a data-processing framework, and show how ADILM metadata expressions are a generalization of Local Completeness.

  19. National Orange Show Photovoltaic Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Dan Jimenez Sheri Raborn, CPA; Tom Baker

    2008-03-31

    National Orange Show Photovoltaic Demonstration created a 400KW Photovoltaic self-generation plant at the National Orange Show Events Center (NOS). The NOS owns a 120-acre state fairground where it operates an events center and produces an annual citrus fair known as the Orange Show. The NOS governing board wanted to employ cost-saving programs for annual energy expenses. It is hoped the Photovoltaic program will result in overall savings for the NOS, help reduce the State's energy demands as relating to electrical power consumption, improve quality of life within the affected grid area as well as increase the energy efficiency of buildings at our venue. In addition, the potential to reduce operational expenses would have a tremendous effect on the ability of the NOS to service its community.

  20. Hierarchical analysis of molecular spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, M.J.

    1996-03-01

    A novel representation of molecular spectra in terms of hierarchical trees has proven to be an important aid for the study of many significant problems in gas-phase chemical dynamics. Trees are generated from molecular spectra by monitoring the changes that occur in a spectrum as resolution is changed in a continuous manner. A tree defines a genealogy among all lines of a spectrum. This allows for a detailed understanding of the assignment of features of a spectrum that may be difficult to obtain any other way as well as an understanding of intramolecular energy transfer time scales, mechanisms, and pathways. The methodology has been applied to several problems: transition state spectroscopy, intramolecular energy transfer in highly excited molecules, high-resolution overtone spectroscopy, and the nature of the classical-quantum correspondence when there is classical chaos (``quantum chaos``).

  1. Eigenvectors of optimal color spectra.

    PubMed

    Flinkman, Mika; Laamanen, Hannu; Tuomela, Jukka; Vahimaa, Pasi; Hauta-Kasari, Markku

    2013-09-01

    Principal component analysis (PCA) and weighted PCA were applied to spectra of optimal colors belonging to the outer surface of the object-color solid or to so-called MacAdam limits. The correlation matrix formed from this data is a circulant matrix whose biggest eigenvalue is simple and the corresponding eigenvector is constant. All other eigenvalues are double, and the eigenvectors can be expressed with trigonometric functions. Found trigonometric functions can be used as a general basis to reconstruct all possible smooth reflectance spectra. When the spectral data are weighted with an appropriate weight function, the essential part of the color information is compressed to the first three components and the shapes of the first three eigenvectors correspond to one achromatic response function and to two chromatic response functions, the latter corresponding approximately to Munsell opponent-hue directions 9YR-9B and 2BG-2R.

  2. Formation of cyclotron lines in gamma-ray burst spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, S. G.; Meszaros, P.

    1989-01-01

    A transmission model of gamma-ray burst sources is studied using the relativistic QED magnetic-resonant opacities including multiple photon scattering, incorporated into a discrete-ordinate radiative-transport scheme. The physics of the cyclotron line-producing region is discussed in general, and the expected line profiles, relative harmonic strengths, and polarizations are indicated under various conditions. The calculated spectra for these models show good agreement with the spectra reported from Ginga for GB 880205 and GB 870303.

  3. Accelerated Fitting of Stellar Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting, Yuan-Sen; Conroy, Charlie; Rix, Hans-Walter

    2016-07-01

    Stellar spectra are often modeled and fitted by interpolating within a rectilinear grid of synthetic spectra to derive the stars’ labels: stellar parameters and elemental abundances. However, the number of synthetic spectra needed for a rectilinear grid grows exponentially with the label space dimensions, precluding the simultaneous and self-consistent fitting of more than a few elemental abundances. Shortcuts such as fitting subsets of labels separately can introduce unknown systematics and do not produce correct error covariances in the derived labels. In this paper we present a new approach—Convex Hull Adaptive Tessellation (chat)—which includes several new ideas for inexpensively generating a sufficient stellar synthetic library, using linear algebra and the concept of an adaptive, data-driven grid. A convex hull approximates the region where the data lie in the label space. A variety of tests with mock data sets demonstrate that chat can reduce the number of required synthetic model calculations by three orders of magnitude in an eight-dimensional label space. The reduction will be even larger for higher dimensional label spaces. In chat the computational effort increases only linearly with the number of labels that are fit simultaneously. Around each of these grid points in the label space an approximate synthetic spectrum can be generated through linear expansion using a set of “gradient spectra” that represent flux derivatives at every wavelength point with respect to all labels. These techniques provide new opportunities to fit the full stellar spectra from large surveys with 15-30 labels simultaneously.

  4. Atoms in Action

    SciTech Connect

    2009-01-01

    This movie produced with Berkeley Lab's TEAM 0.5 microscope shows the growth of a hole and the atomic edge reconstruction in a graphene sheet. An electron beam focused to a spot on the sheet blows out the exposed carbon atoms to make the hole. The carbon atoms then reposition themselves to find a stable configuration. http://newscenter.lbl.gov/press-releases/2009/03/26/atoms-in-action/

  5. Ultraviolet Spectra of Uranian Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roush, Ted

    1996-07-01

    The ultraviolet reflectance spectra of the icy satellites ofUranus are largely unknown. We propose to use the HubbleSpace Telescope Faint Object Spectrograph in order to obtainthe first high S/N UV spectra of Ariel, Titania, and Oberon.Because of our innovative targeting approach, we have alsobeen able to include Umbriel in our observational plans.These satellites sample almost the full range of UV albedosand UV/VIS colors exhibited by the large Uranian satellites.The spectral resolution and range will overlap with earth-based telescopic and spacecraft observations of these objectsallowing for comparisons of the UV data with existing visualand near-infrared spectra of these objects. These comparisonswill ultimately provide greater constraints on the relativelylow albedo spectrally neutral non-ice component on the Uraniansatellites. The existance of UV spectral features due tospecies such as O_3, H_2O_2 or carbon-rich macromolecules(e.g. polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) can provide evidencefor modification of the surfaces via plasma or meteoriticbombardment, alteration by high-energy ultraviolet radiation,or accretion of particles from nearby sources such asplanetary rings or dust bands.

  6. Phyllodes tumor showing intraductal growth.

    PubMed

    Makidono, Akari; Tsunoda, Hiroko; Mori, Miki; Yagata, Hiroshi; Onoda, Yui; Kikuchi, Mari; Nozaki, Taiki; Saida, Yukihisa; Nakamura, Seigo; Suzuki, Koyu

    2013-07-01

    Phyllodes tumor of the breast is a rare fibroepithelial lesion and particularly uncommon in adolescent girls. It is thought to arise from the periductal rather than intralobular stroma. Usually, it is seen as a well-defined mass. Phyllodes tumor showing intraductal growth is extremely rare. Here we report a girl who has a phyllodes tumor with intraductal growth.

  7. Bodily action penetrates affective perception

    PubMed Central

    Rigutti, Sara; Gerbino, Walter

    2016-01-01

    Fantoni & Gerbino (2014) showed that subtle postural shifts associated with reaching can have a strong hedonic impact and affect how actors experience facial expressions of emotion. Using a novel Motor Action Mood Induction Procedure (MAMIP), they found consistent congruency effects in participants who performed a facial emotion identification task after a sequence of visually-guided reaches: a face perceived as neutral in a baseline condition appeared slightly happy after comfortable actions and slightly angry after uncomfortable actions. However, skeptics about the penetrability of perception (Zeimbekis & Raftopoulos, 2015) would consider such evidence insufficient to demonstrate that observer’s internal states induced by action comfort/discomfort affect perception in a top-down fashion. The action-modulated mood might have produced a back-end memory effect capable of affecting post-perceptual and decision processing, but not front-end perception. Here, we present evidence that performing a facial emotion detection (not identification) task after MAMIP exhibits systematic mood-congruent sensitivity changes, rather than response bias changes attributable to cognitive set shifts; i.e., we show that observer’s internal states induced by bodily action can modulate affective perception. The detection threshold for happiness was lower after fifty comfortable than uncomfortable reaches; while the detection threshold for anger was lower after fifty uncomfortable than comfortable reaches. Action valence induced an overall sensitivity improvement in detecting subtle variations of congruent facial expressions (happiness after positive comfortable actions, anger after negative uncomfortable actions), in the absence of significant response bias shifts. Notably, both comfortable and uncomfortable reaches impact sensitivity in an approximately symmetric way relative to a baseline inaction condition. All of these constitute compelling evidence of a genuine top-down effect on

  8. Rogue wave spectra of the Kundu-Eckhaus equation.

    PubMed

    Bayındır, Cihan

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we analyze the rogue wave spectra of the Kundu-Eckhaus equation (KEE). We compare our findings with their nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLSE) analogs and show that the spectra of the individual rogue waves significantly differ from their NLSE analogs. A remarkable difference is the one-sided development of the triangular spectrum before the rogue wave becomes evident in time. Also we show that increasing the skewness of the rogue wave results in increased asymmetry in the triangular Fourier spectra. Additionally, the triangular spectra of the rogue waves of the KEE begin to develop at earlier stages of their development compared to their NLSE analogs, especially for larger skew angles. This feature may be used to enhance the early warning times of the rogue waves. However, we show that in a chaotic wave field with many spectral components the triangular spectra remain as the main attribute as a universal feature of the typical wave fields produced through modulation instability and characteristic features of the KEE's analytical rogue wave spectra may be suppressed in a realistic chaotic wave field.

  9. Rogue wave spectra of the Kundu-Eckhaus equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayındır, Cihan

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we analyze the rogue wave spectra of the Kundu-Eckhaus equation (KEE). We compare our findings with their nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLSE) analogs and show that the spectra of the individual rogue waves significantly differ from their NLSE analogs. A remarkable difference is the one-sided development of the triangular spectrum before the rogue wave becomes evident in time. Also we show that increasing the skewness of the rogue wave results in increased asymmetry in the triangular Fourier spectra. Additionally, the triangular spectra of the rogue waves of the KEE begin to develop at earlier stages of their development compared to their NLSE analogs, especially for larger skew angles. This feature may be used to enhance the early warning times of the rogue waves. However, we show that in a chaotic wave field with many spectral components the triangular spectra remain as the main attribute as a universal feature of the typical wave fields produced through modulation instability and characteristic features of the KEE's analytical rogue wave spectra may be suppressed in a realistic chaotic wave field.

  10. LET spectra measurements on LDEF: variations with shielding and location.

    PubMed

    Benton, E V; Frank, A L; Csige, I; Frigo, L A; Benton, E R

    1996-11-01

    LET spectra measurements made with passive plastic nuclear track detectors (PNTDs) were found to depend on detector orientation, shielding and experiment location. LET spectra were measured at several locations on LDEF as part of the P0006 LETSME experiment (Benton and Parnell, 1984), the P0004 Seeds in Space experiment (Parks and Alston, 1984), the A00l5 Free Flyer Biostacks and the M0004 Fiber Optics Data Link experiment (Taylor, 1984). Locations included the east, west and Earth sides of the LDEF satellite. The LET spectra measured with PNTDs deviated significantly from calculations, especially for high LET particles (LET infinity H2O > or = 100 keV/micrometer). At high LETs, short-range inelastic secondary particles produced by trapped proton interactions with the nuclei of the detector were found to be the principal contributor to LET spectra. At lower LETs, the spectra appeared to be due to short-range, inelastic and stopping primary protons, with primary GCR particles making a smaller contribution. The dependence of LET spectra on detector orientation and shielding was studied using the four orthogonal stacks in the P0006 experiment. Both measurements of total track density and LET spectra showed a greater number of particles arriving from the direction of space than from Earth. Measurements of LET spectra in CR-39 PNTD on the east (leading) and west (trailing) sides of LDEF showed a higher rate of production at the west side. This was caused by a larger flux of trapped protons on the west side as predicted by the east/west trapped proton anisotropy in the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA). Track density measured in CR-39 PNTDs increased as a function of shielding depth in the detector stack. A similar measurement made in a thick stack of CR-39 interspersed with layers of Al and exposed to 154 MeV protons at a ground-based accelerator showed a similar result, indicating that a significant fraction of the particle events counted were from secondaries and that the

  11. LET spectra measurements on LDEF: variations with shielding and location

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benton, E. V.; Frank, A. L.; Csige, I.; Frigo, L. A.; Benton, E. R.

    1996-01-01

    LET spectra measurements made with passive plastic nuclear track detectors (PNTDs) were found to depend on detector orientation, shielding and experiment location. LET spectra were measured at several locations on LDEF as part of the P0006 LETSME experiment (Benton and Parnell, 1984), the P0004 Seeds in Space experiment (Parks and Alston, 1984), the A00l5 Free Flyer Biostacks and the M0004 Fiber Optics Data Link experiment (Taylor, 1984). Locations included the east, west and Earth sides of the LDEF satellite. The LET spectra measured with PNTDs deviated significantly from calculations, especially for high LET particles (LET infinity H2O > or = 100 keV/micrometer). At high LETs, short-range inelastic secondary particles produced by trapped proton interactions with the nuclei of the detector were found to be the principal contributor to LET spectra. At lower LETs, the spectra appeared to be due to short-range, inelastic and stopping primary protons, with primary GCR particles making a smaller contribution. The dependence of LET spectra on detector orientation and shielding was studied using the four orthogonal stacks in the P0006 experiment. Both measurements of total track density and LET spectra showed a greater number of particles arriving from the direction of space than from Earth. Measurements of LET spectra in CR-39 PNTD on the east (leading) and west (trailing) sides of LDEF showed a higher rate of production at the west side. This was caused by a larger flux of trapped protons on the west side as predicted by the east/west trapped proton anisotropy in the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA). Track density measured in CR-39 PNTDs increased as a function of shielding depth in the detector stack. A similar measurement made in a thick stack of CR-39 interspersed with layers of Al and exposed to 154 MeV protons at a ground-based accelerator showed a similar result, indicating that a significant fraction of the particle events counted were from secondaries and that the

  12. The role of action prediction and inhibitory control for joint action coordination in toddlers.

    PubMed

    Meyer, M; Bekkering, H; Haartsen, R; Stapel, J C; Hunnius, S

    2015-11-01

    From early in life, young children eagerly engage in social interactions. Yet, they still have difficulties in performing well-coordinated joint actions with others. Adult literature suggests that two processes are important for smooth joint action coordination: action prediction and inhibitory control. The aim of the current study was to disentangle the potential role of these processes in the early development of joint action coordination. Using a simple turn-taking game, we assessed 2½-year-old toddlers' joint action coordination, focusing on timing variability and turn-taking accuracy. In two additional tasks, we examined their action prediction capabilities with an eye-tracking paradigm and examined their inhibitory control capabilities with a classic executive functioning task (gift delay task). We found that individual differences in action prediction and inhibitory action control were distinctly related to the two aspects of joint action coordination. Toddlers who showed more precision in their action predictions were less variable in their action timing during the joint play. Furthermore, toddlers who showed more inhibitory control in an individual context were more accurate in their turn-taking performance during the joint action. On the other hand, no relation between timing variability and inhibitory control or between turn-taking accuracy and action prediction was found. The current results highlight the distinct role of action prediction and inhibitory action control for the quality of joint action coordination in toddlers. Underlying neurocognitive mechanisms and implications for processes involved in joint action coordination in general are discussed.

  13. "Medicine show." Alice in Doctorland.

    PubMed

    1987-01-01

    This is an excerpt from the script of a 1939 play provided to the Institute of Social Medicine and Community Health by the Library of Congress Federal Theater Project Collection at George Mason University Library, Fairfax, Virginia, pages 2-1-8 thru 2-1-14. The Federal Theatre Project (FTP) was part of the New Deal program for the arts 1935-1939. Funded by the Works Progress Administration (WPA) its goal was to employ theater professionals from the relief rolls. A number of FTP plays deal with aspects of medicine and public health. Pageants, puppet shows and documentary plays celebrated progress in medical science while examining social controversies in medical services and the public health movement. "Medicine Show" sharply contrasts technological wonders with social backwardness. The play was rehearsed by the FTP but never opened because funding ended. A revised version ran on Broadway in 1940. The preceding comments are adapted from an excellent, well-illustrated review of five of these plays by Barabara Melosh: "The New Deal's Federal Theatre Project," Medical Heritage, Vol. 2, No. 1 (Jan/Feb 1986), pp. 36-47.

  14. CLASSIFICATION OF STELLAR SPECTRA WITH LOCAL LINEAR EMBEDDING

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, Scott F.; Connolly, Andrew; Vanderplas, Jake; Schneider, Jeff; Xiong Liang

    2011-12-15

    We investigate the use of dimensionality reduction techniques for the classification of stellar spectra selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Using local linear embedding (LLE), a technique that preserves the local (and possibly nonlinear) structure within high-dimensional data sets, we show that the majority of stellar spectra can be represented as a one-dimensional sequence within a three-dimensional space. The position along this sequence is highly correlated with spectral temperature. Deviations from this 'stellar locus' are indicative of spectra with strong emission lines (including misclassified galaxies) or broad absorption lines (e.g., carbon stars). Based on this analysis, we propose a hierarchical classification scheme using LLE that progressively identifies and classifies stellar spectra in a manner that requires no feature extraction and that can reproduce the classic MK classifications to an accuracy of one type.

  15. Predicting Infrared Spectra of Nerve Agents Using Density Functional Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.-P.; Wang, H.-T.; Zheng, W.-P.; Sun, C.; Bai, Y.; Guo, X.-D.; Sun, H.

    2016-09-01

    Vibration frequencies of four nerve agents and two simulators are calculated using B3LYP coupled with ten basis sets. To evaluate the accuracy of calculated spectra, root mean square error (RMSE) and weighted cross-correlation average (WCCA) are considered. The evaluation shows that B3LYP/6-311+g(d,p) performs best in predicting infrared spectra, and polarization functions are found to be more important than diffusion functions in spectra simulation. Moreover, B3LYP calculation underestimates frequencies related to the P atom. The WCCA metric derives 1.008 as a unique scaling factor for calculated frequencies. The results indicate that the WCCA metric can identify six agents based on calculated spectra.

  16. Power spectra at radio frequency of lightning return stroke waveforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanzerotti, L. J.; Thomson, D. J.; Maclennan, C. G.; Rinnert, K.; Krider, E. P.

    1989-01-01

    The power spectra of the wideband (10 Hz to 100 kHz) magnetic field signals in a number of lightning return strokes (primarily first return strokes) measured during a lightning storm which occurred in Lindau, West Germany in August, 1984 have been calculated. The RF magnetic field data were obtained with the engineering unit of the Galileo Jupiter Probe lightning experiment. The spectra of the magnetic field data definitely show fine structure, with two or three distinct peaks appearing in the spectra of many of the waveforms. An enhancement of power at frequencies of about 60-70 kHz is often seen in the spectra of the waveform time segments preceding and following the rise-to-peak amplitude of the return stroke.

  17. Mammography X-Ray Spectra Simulated with Monte Carlo

    SciTech Connect

    Vega-Carrillo, H. R.; Gonzalez, J. Ramirez; Manzanares-Acuna, E.; Hernandez-Davila, V. M.; Villasana, R. Hernandez; Mercado, G. A.

    2008-08-11

    Monte Carlo calculations have been carried out to obtain the x-ray spectra of various target-filter combinations for a mammography unit. Mammography is widely used to diagnose breast cancer. Further to Mo target with Mo filter combination, Rh/Rh, Mo/Rh, Mo/Al, Rh/Al, and W/Rh are also utilized. In this work Monte Carlo calculations, using MCNP 4C code, were carried out to estimate the x-ray spectra produced when a beam of 28 keV electrons did collide with Mo, Rh and W targets. Resulting x-ray spectra show characteristic x-rays and continuous bremsstrahlung. Spectra were also calculated including filters.

  18. [Study on THz spectra of nicotinic acid, nicotinamide and nicotine].

    PubMed

    Yu, Bin; Huang, Zhen; Wang, Xiao-yan; Zhao, Guo-zhong

    2009-09-01

    The terahertz (THz) spectra of nicotinic acid, nicotinamide and nicotine were studied at room temperature. The time-domain THz spectra were measured. The frequency-domain spectra were obtained by fast Fourier transform (FFT). The spectral response and the dispersive relationship of refractive index in THz spectral range were obtained. The results show that the samples have obvious spectral response in THz spectral range except nicotine. The corresponding stimulated spectra were given by using density functional theory (DFT) method for both nicotinamide and nicotinic acid. The origin of the absorption peaks of nicotinic acid and nicotinamide was explored. It is thought that the absorption peak of nicotinic acid is caused by the torsion and wagging of the molecule, but the absorption peaks of nicotinamide (except 1.93 THz) are caused by intermolecular or phonon mode. It was shown that the molecule structure and vibrational modes of nicotinic acid and nicotinamide can be analyzed by the combination of simulation and experimental results.

  19. The absorption spectra of carbonates and their precursors.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koike, C.; Chihara, H.; Suto, H.

    The carbonates calcite and dolomite have been discovered in the dust shells of evolved stars (Kemper et al. 2002) and young proto stars (Ceccarelli et al. 2002). The mechanism for carbonate formation with a aqueous or non-aqueous process were discussed in their papers. These processes have not yet been reproduced in a laboratory experiment. First of all, we measured the mass absorption spectra of varous carbonates were measured in the mid- and far-infrared region. These spectra show very strong and broad peaks in the far-infrared region. The calcite and dolomite have peaks at about 92 microns and 63 microns, respectively. The alternative process of carbonates has not yet been clear. We investigate the alternative process measuring the spectra of the precursors of carbonates. We will report the preliminary results and discuss about the alternative process comparing the measured spectra of the precursors with the observation.

  20. "Show me" bioethics and politics.

    PubMed

    Christopher, Myra J

    2007-10-01

    Missouri, the "Show Me State," has become the epicenter of several important national public policy debates, including abortion rights, the right to choose and refuse medical treatment, and, most recently, early stem cell research. In this environment, the Center for Practical Bioethics (formerly, Midwest Bioethics Center) emerged and grew. The Center's role in these "cultural wars" is not to advocate for a particular position but to provide well researched and objective information, perspective, and advocacy for the ethical justification of policy positions; and to serve as a neutral convener and provider of a public forum for discussion. In this article, the Center's work on early stem cell research is a case study through which to argue that not only the Center, but also the field of bioethics has a critical role in the politics of public health policy.

  1. Phoenix Scoop Inverted Showing Rasp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This image taken by the Surface Stereo Imager on Sol 49, or the 49th Martian day of the mission (July 14, 2008), shows the silver colored rasp protruding from NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Robotic Arm scoop. The scoop is inverted and the rasp is pointing up.

    Shown with its forks pointing toward the ground is the thermal and electrical conductivity probe, at the lower right. The Robotic Arm Camera is pointed toward the ground.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is led by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  2. ShowMe3D

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, Michael B

    2012-01-05

    ShowMe3D is a data visualization graphical user interface specifically designed for use with hyperspectral image obtained from the Hyperspectral Confocal Microscope. The program allows the user to select and display any single image from a three dimensional hyperspectral image stack. By moving a slider control, the user can easily move between images of the stack. The user can zoom into any region of the image. The user can select any pixel or region from the displayed image and display the fluorescence spectrum associated with that pixel or region. The user can define up to 3 spectral filters to apply to the hyperspectral image and view the image as it would appear from a filter-based confocal microscope. The user can also obtain statistics such as intensity average and variance from selected regions.

  3. The Optical Spectra of Aerosols.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-10-01

    espressione dell’ampiezza di diffusione in * avanti vengono fattorizzati. In questo modo la somma delle am- piezze di diftusione di "cluster" con...F1D-Ali35 687 THE OPTICAL SPECTRA OF REROSOLSOU) MESSINA UNIV (ITALY) i/i 1ST DI STRIJTTURA DELLA IIATERIA F BORIIHESE OCT 83 UNCLASSIFIED DRR78--85F...ELEMENT PROJECT, TASK AREA & WORK UNIT NUMBERS * Istituto di Struttura della Materia 61102A-1T161102-BH57-01 Un iversita di Messina V~nina. Ttalv St

  4. Seasonal Variations of Stratospheric Age Spectra in GEOSCCM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Feng; Waugh, Darryn; Douglass, Anne R.; Newman, Paul A.; Pawson, Steven; Stolarski, Richard S.; Strahan, Susan E.; Nielsen, J. Eric

    2011-01-01

    There are many pathways for an air parcel to travel from the troposphere to the stratosphere, each of which takes different time. The distribution of all the possible transient times, i.e. the stratospheric age spectrum, contains important information on transport characteristics. However, it is computationally very expensive to compute seasonally varying age spectra, and previous studies have focused mainly on the annual mean properties of the age spectra. To date our knowledge of the seasonality of the stratospheric age spectra is very limited. In this study we investigate the seasonal variations of the stratospheric age spectra in the Goddard Earth Observing System Chemistry Climate Model (GEOSCCM). We introduce a method to significantly reduce the computational cost for calculating seasonally dependent age spectra. Our simulations show that stratospheric age spectra in GEOSCCM have strong seasonal cycles and the seasonal cycles change with latitude and height. In the lower stratosphere extratropics, the average transit times and the most probable transit times in the winter/early spring spectra are more than twice as old as those in the summer/early fall spectra. But the seasonal cycle in the subtropical lower stratosphere is nearly out of phase with that in the extratropics. In the middle and upper stratosphere, significant seasonal variations occur in the sUbtropics. The spectral shapes also show dramatic seasonal change, especially at high latitudes. These seasonal variations reflect the seasonal evolution of the slow Brewer-Dobson circulation (with timescale of years) and the fast isentropic mixing (with timescale of days to months).

  5. Method of processing positron lifetime spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Valuev, N.P.; Klimov, A.B.; Zhikharev, A.N.

    1985-05-01

    This paper describes a method for the processing of spectra of positron annihilation which permits a much more relaible determination of the lifetime during numerical processing of spectra by computer.

  6. Infrared Spectra of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Bakes, E. L. O.

    2000-01-01

    We have computed the synthetic infrared spectra of some polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons containing up to 54 carbon atoms. The species studied include ovalene, circumcoronene, dicoronylene, and hexabenzocoronene. We report spectra for anions, neutrals, cations, and multiply charged cations.

  7. Casimir experiments showing saturation effects

    SciTech Connect

    Sernelius, Bo E.

    2009-10-15

    We address several different Casimir experiments where theory and experiment disagree. First out is the classical Casimir force measurement between two metal half spaces; here both in the form of the torsion pendulum experiment by Lamoreaux and in the form of the Casimir pressure measurement between a gold sphere and a gold plate as performed by Decca et al.; theory predicts a large negative thermal correction, absent in the high precision experiments. The third experiment is the measurement of the Casimir force between a metal plate and a laser irradiated semiconductor membrane as performed by Chen et al.; the change in force with laser intensity is larger than predicted by theory. The fourth experiment is the measurement of the Casimir force between an atom and a wall in the form of the measurement by Obrecht et al. of the change in oscillation frequency of a {sup 87}Rb Bose-Einstein condensate trapped to a fused silica wall; the change is smaller than predicted by theory. We show that saturation effects can explain the discrepancies between theory and experiment observed in all these cases.

  8. Effect of Temperature on Jet Velocity Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, James E.; Wernet, Mark P.

    2007-01-01

    Statistical jet noise prediction codes that accurately predict spectral directivity for both cold and hot jets are highly sought both in industry and academia. Their formulation, whether based upon manipulations of the Navier-Stokes equations or upon heuristic arguments, require substantial experimental observation of jet turbulence statistics. Unfortunately, the statistics of most interest involve the space-time correlation of flow quantities, especially velocity. Until the last 10 years, all turbulence statistics were made with single-point probes, such as hotwires or laser Doppler anemometry. Particle image velocimetry (PIV) brought many new insights with its ability to measure velocity fields over large regions of jets simultaneously; however, it could not measure velocity at rates higher than a few fields per second, making it unsuitable for obtaining temporal spectra and correlations. The development of time-resolved PIV, herein called TR-PIV, has removed this limitation, enabling measurement of velocity fields at high resolution in both space and time. In this paper, ground-breaking results from the application of TR-PIV to single-flow hot jets are used to explore the impact of heat on turbulent statistics of interest to jet noise models. First, a brief summary of validation studies is reported, undertaken to show that the new technique produces the same trusted results as hotwire at cold, low-speed jets. Second, velocity spectra from cold and hot jets are compared to see the effect of heat on the spectra. It is seen that heated jets possess 10 percent more turbulence intensity compared to the unheated jets with the same velocity. The spectral shapes, when normalized using Strouhal scaling, are insensitive to temperature if the stream-wise location is normalized relative to the potential core length. Similarly, second order velocity correlations, of interest in modeling of jet noise sources, are also insensitive to temperature as well.

  9. Action-effect bindings and ideomotor learning in intention- and stimulus-based actions.

    PubMed

    Herwig, Arvid; Waszak, Florian

    2012-01-01

    According to ideomotor theory, action-effect associations are crucial for voluntary action control. Recently, a number of studies started to investigate the conditions that mediate the acquisition and application of action-effect associations by comparing actions carried out in response to exogenous stimuli (stimulus-based) with actions selected endogenously (intention-based). There is evidence that the acquisition and/or application of action-effect associations is boosted when acting in an intention-based action mode. For instance, bidirectional action-effect associations were diagnosed in a forced choice test phase if participants previously experienced action-effect couplings in an intention-based but not in a stimulus-based action mode. The present study aims at investigating effects of the action mode on action-effect associations in more detail. In a series of experiments, we compared the strength and durability of short-term action-effect associations (binding) immediately following intention- as well as stimulus-based actions. Moreover, long-term action-effect associations (learning) were assessed in a subsequent test phase. Our results show short-term action-effect associations of equal strength and durability for both action modes. However, replicating previous results, long-term associations were observed only following intention-based actions. These findings indicate that the effect of the action mode on long-term associations cannot merely be a result of accumulated short-term action-effect bindings. Instead, only those episodic bindings are selectively perpetuated and retrieved that integrate action-relevant aspects of the processing event, i.e., in case of intention-based actions, the link between action and ensuing effect.

  10. Visible Spectra of Titanium Dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, V.; Nagarajan, R.; Maier, J. P.; Zhuang, X.; Le, A.; Steimle, T. C.

    2011-05-01

    Titanium oxide (TiO) has been extensively studied spectroscopically due to its astrophysical relevance. TiO is the main opacity source in the atmospheres of cool M-type stars in the visible and near infrared. In view of the high cosmic abundance of Ti and O, titanium dioxide (TiO2) is believed to play an important role in dust formation processes from the gas-phase in circumstellar shells of oxygen-rich stars. The electronic spectra of a cold molecular beam of TiO2 have been investigated using mass-resolved resonance enhanced multi-photon ionization and laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy. TiO2 was produced by laser ablation of a pure titanium rod in the presence of a supersonic expanding mixture of approximately 5% O2 in either helium or argon. The spectra were recorded in the region 17500 cm-1 to 22500 cm-1 and the bands assigned to the A1B2 ← X1A1 transition. The origin and harmonic vibrational constants for the A1B2 state were determined to be: T000 = 17593(5) cm-1, ω1 = 876(3) cm-1, ω2 = 184(1) cm-1, and ω3 = 316(2) cm-1. Further, the dispersed fluorescence of a few bands were recorded to obtain vibrational parameters for the X1A1 state.

  11. Protective Action Guides (PAGs)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Protective Action Guide (PAG) manual contains radiation dose guidelines that would trigger public safety measures. EPA developed Protective Action Guides to help responders plan for radiation emergencies.

  12. Mimas Showing False Colors #1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    False color images of Saturn's moon, Mimas, reveal variation in either the composition or texture across its surface.

    During its approach to Mimas on Aug. 2, 2005, the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera obtained multi-spectral views of the moon from a range of 228,000 kilometers (142,500 miles).

    The image at the left is a narrow angle clear-filter image, which was separately processed to enhance the contrast in brightness and sharpness of visible features. The image at the right is a color composite of narrow-angle ultraviolet, green, infrared and clear filter images, which have been specially processed to accentuate subtle changes in the spectral properties of Mimas' surface materials. To create this view, three color images (ultraviolet, green and infrared) were combined into a single black and white picture that isolates and maps regional color differences. This 'color map' was then superimposed over the clear-filter image at the left.

    The combination of color map and brightness image shows how the color differences across the Mimas surface materials are tied to geological features. Shades of blue and violet in the image at the right are used to identify surface materials that are bluer in color and have a weaker infrared brightness than average Mimas materials, which are represented by green.

    Herschel crater, a 140-kilometer-wide (88-mile) impact feature with a prominent central peak, is visible in the upper right of each image. The unusual bluer materials are seen to broadly surround Herschel crater. However, the bluer material is not uniformly distributed in and around the crater. Instead, it appears to be concentrated on the outside of the crater and more to the west than to the north or south. The origin of the color differences is not yet understood. It may represent ejecta material that was excavated from inside Mimas when the Herschel impact occurred. The bluer color of these materials may be caused by subtle differences in

  13. First dynamic spectra of stellar microwave flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bastian, T. S.; Bookbinder, J. A.

    1987-01-01

    The VLA has been used in the spectral-line mode at 1.4 GHz to obtain the first dynamic spectra of stellar sources other than the sun. Two very intense, highly circularly polarized, microwave outbursts were observed on the dMe flare star UV Cet, in addition to a slowly varying, unpolarized component. One outburst was purely left circularly polarized and showed no variations as a function of frequency across the 41 MHz band, whereas the other was as much as 70 percent right-circularly polarized and showed distinct variations with frequency. Although the slowly varying emission is probably due to incoherent gyrosynchrotron emission, the two flaring events are the result of coherent mechanisms. The coherent emission is interpreted in terms of plasma radiation and the cyclotron maser instability.

  14. Spectra of Particulate Backscattering in Natural Waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Howard, R.; Lewis, Marlon R.; McLean, Scott D.; Twardowski, Michael S.; Freeman, Scott A.; Voss, Kenneth J.; Boynton, Chris G.

    2009-01-01

    Hyperspectral profiles of downwelling irradiance and upwelling radiance in natural waters (oligotrophic and mesotrophic) are combined with inverse radiative transfer to obtain high resolution spectra of the absorption coefficient (a) and the backscattering coefficient (bb) of the water and its constituents. The absorption coefficient at the mesotrophic station clearly shows spectral absorption features attributable to several phytoplankton pigments (Chlorophyll a, b, c, and Carotenoids). The backscattering shows only weak spectral features and can be well represented by a power-law variation with wavelength (lambda): b(sub b) approx. Lambda(sup -n), where n is a constant between 0.4 and 1.0. However, the weak spectral features in b(sub b), suggest that it is depressed in spectral regions of strong particle absorption. The applicability of the present inverse radiative transfer algorithm, which omits the influence of Raman scattering, is limited to lambda < 490 nm in oligotrophic waters and lambda < 575 nm in mesotrophic waters.

  15. LSD-based analysis of high-resolution stellar spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsymbal, V.; Tkachenko, A.; Van, Reeth T.

    2014-11-01

    We present a generalization of the method of least-squares deconvolution (LSD), a powerful tool for extracting high S/N average line profiles from stellar spectra. The generalization of the method is effected by extending it towards the multiprofile LSD and by introducing the possibility to correct the line strengths from the initial mask. We illustrate the new approach by two examples: (a) the detection of astroseismic signatures from low S/N spectra of single stars, and (b) disentangling spectra of multiple stellar objects. The analysis is applied to spectra obtained with 2-m class telescopes in the course of spectroscopic ground-based support for space missions such as CoRoT and Kepler. Usually, rather high S/N is required, so smaller telescopes can only compete successfully with more advanced ones when one can apply a technique that enables a remarkable increase in the S/N of the spectra which they observe. Since the LSD profiles have a potential for reconstruction what is common in all the spectral profiles, it should have a particular practical application to faint stars observed with 2-m class telescopes and whose spectra show remarkable LPVs.

  16. Spectra of clinical CT scanners using a portable Compton spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Duisterwinkel, H. A.; Abbema, J. K. van; Kawachimaru, R.; Paganini, L.; Graaf, E. R. van der; Brandenburg, S.; Goethem, M. J. van

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: Spectral information of the output of x-ray tubes in (dual source) computer tomography (CT) scanners can be used to improve the conversion of CT numbers to proton stopping power and can be used to advantage in CT scanner quality assurance. The purpose of this study is to design, validate, and apply a compact portable Compton spectrometer that was constructed to accurately measure x-ray spectra of CT scanners. Methods: In the design of the Compton spectrometer, the shielding materials were carefully chosen and positioned to reduce background by x-ray fluorescence from the materials used. The spectrum of Compton scattered x-rays alters from the original source spectrum due to various physical processes. Reconstruction of the original x-ray spectrum from the Compton scattered spectrum is based on Monte Carlo simulations of the processes involved. This reconstruction is validated by comparing directly and indirectly measured spectra of a mobile x-ray tube. The Compton spectrometer is assessed in a clinical setting by measuring x-ray spectra at various tube voltages of three different medical CT scanner x-ray tubes. Results: The directly and indirectly measured spectra are in good agreement (their ratio being 0.99) thereby validating the reconstruction method. The measured spectra of the medical CT scanners are consistent with theoretical spectra and spectra obtained from the x-ray tube manufacturer. Conclusions: A Compton spectrometer has been successfully designed, constructed, validated, and applied in the measurement of x-ray spectra of CT scanners. These measurements show that our compact Compton spectrometer can be rapidly set-up using the alignment lasers of the CT scanner, thereby enabling its use in commissioning, troubleshooting, and, e.g., annual performance check-ups of CT scanners.

  17. Reflectance Spectra of Space Debris in GEO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schildknecht, T.; Vannanti, A.; Krag, H.; Erd, C.

    The space debris environment in the Geostationary Earth Orbit (GEO) region is mostly investigated by means of optical surveys. Such surveys revealed a considerable amount of debris in the size range of 10 centimeter to one meter. Some of these debris exhibit particularly high area-to-mass ratios as derived from the evolution of their orbits. In order to understand the nature and eventually the origin of these objects, observations allowing to derive physical characteristics like size, shape and material are required. Information on the shape and the attitude motion of a debris piece may be obtained by photometric light curves. The most promising technique to investigate the surface material properties is reflectance spectroscopy. This paper discusses preliminary results obtained from spectrometric observations of space debris in GEO. The observations were acquired at the 1-meter ESA Space Debris Telescope (ESASDT) on Tenerife with a low-resolution spectrograph in the wavelength range of 450-960 nm. The target objects were space debris of different types with brightness as small as magnitude 15. Some simple-shaped, intact "calibration objects" with known surface materials like the MSG-2 satellites were also observed. The spectra show shape variations expected to be caused by the different physical properties of the objects. The determination of the possible materials is still in a preliminary phase. Limitations of the acquisition process of the spectra and the subsequent analysis are discussed. Future steps planned for a better characterization of the debris from the observed data are briefly outlined.

  18. Equilibria and absorption spectra of tryptophanase.

    PubMed

    Metzler, C M; Viswanath, R; Metzler, D E

    1991-05-25

    Tryptophanase (tryptophan: indole-lyase) from Escherichia coli has been isolated in the holoenzyme form and its absorption spectra and acid-base chemistry have been reevaluated. Apoenzyme has been prepared by dialysis against sodium phosphate and L-alanine and molar absorptivities of the coenzyme bands have been estimated by readdition of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate. The spectrophotometric titration curve, whose midpoint is at pH 7.6 in 0.1 M potassium phosphate buffers, indicates some degree of cooperativity in dissociation of a pair of protons. Resolution of the computed spectra of individual ionic forms of the enzyme with lognormal distribution curves shows that band shapes are similar to those of model Schiff bases and of aspartate aminotransferase. Using molar areas from the latter we estimated amounts of individual tautomeric species. In addition to ketoenamine and enolimine or covalent adduct the high pH form also appears to contain approximately 18% of a species with a dipolar ionic ring (protonated on the ring nitrogen and with phenolate -O-). We suggest that this may be the catalytically active form of the coenzyme in tryptophanase. The equilibrium between tryptophanase and L-alanine has also been reevaluated.

  19. Millimeter wave absorption spectra of biological samples

    SciTech Connect

    Gandhi, O.P.; Hagmann, M.J.; Hill, D.W.; Partlow, L.M.; Bush, L.

    1980-01-01

    A solid-state computer-controlled system has been used to make swept-frequency measurements of absorption of biological specimens from 26.5 to 90.0 GHz. A wide range of samples was used, including solutions of DNA and RNA, and suspensions of BHK-21/C13 cells, Candida albicans, C krusei, and Escherichia coli. Sharp spectra reported by other workers were not observed. The strong absorbance of water (10--30 dB/mm) caused the absorbance of all aqueous preparations that we examined to have a water-like dependence on frequency. Reduction of incident power (to below 1.0 microW), elimination of modulation, and control of temperature to assure cell viability were not found to significantly alter the water-dominated absorbance. Frozen samples of BHK-21/C13 cells tested at dry ice and liquid nitrogen temperatures were found to have average insertion loss reduced to 0.2 dB/cm but still showed no reproducible peaks that could be attributed to absorption spectra. It is concluded that the special resonances reported by others are likely to be in error.

  20. Serial FBG sensor network allowing overlapping spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbenseth, S.; Lochmann, S.; Ahrens, A.; Rehm, B.

    2016-05-01

    For structure or material monitoring low impact serial fiber Bragg grating (FBG) networks have attracted increasing research interest. Common sensor networks using wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) for FBG interrogation are limited in their efficiency by the spectral width of their light source, the FBG tuning range and the spectral guard bands. Overlapping spectra are strictly forbidden in this case. Applying time division multiplexing (TDM) or active resonator schemes may overcome these restrictions. However, they introduce other substantial disadvantages like signal roundtrip dependency or sophisticated control of active resonating structures. Code division multiplexing (CDM) as a means of FBG interrogation by simple autocorrelation of appropriate codes has been shown to be superior in this respect. However, it came at the cost of a second spectrometer introducing additional equalization efforts. We demonstrate a new serial FBG sensor network utilizing CDM signal processing for efficient sensor interrogation without the need of a second spectrometer and additional state of polarization (SOP) controlling components. It allows overlapping spectra even when all sensing FBGs are positioned at the same centre wavelength and it shows a high degree of insensitivity to SOP. Sequence inversed keyed (SIK) serial signal processing utilizing quasi-orthogonal balanced codes ensures simple and quick sensor interrogation with high signal-to-interference/noise ratio.

  1. Discriminating Dysarthria Type From Envelope Modulation Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Liss, Julie M.; LeGendre, Sue; Lotto, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Previous research demonstrated the ability of temporally based rhythm metrics to distinguish among dysarthrias with different prosodic deficit profiles (J. M. Liss et al., 2009). The authors examined whether comparable results could be obtained by an automated analysis of speech envelope modulation spectra (EMS), which quantifies the rhythmicity of speech within specified frequency bands. Method EMS was conducted on sentences produced by 43 speakers with 1 of 4 types of dysarthria and healthy controls. The EMS consisted of the spectra of the slow-rate (up to 10 Hz) amplitude modulations of the full signal and 7 octave bands ranging in center frequency from 125 to 8000 Hz. Six variables were calculated for each band relating to peak frequency and amplitude and relative energy above, below, and in the region of 4 Hz. Discriminant function analyses (DFA) determined which sets of predictor variables best discriminated between and among groups. Results Each of 6 DFAs identified 2–6 of the 48 predictor variables. These variables achieved 84%–100% classification accuracy for group membership. Conclusions Dysarthrias can be characterized by quantifiable temporal patterns in acoustic output. Because EMS analysis is automated and requires no editing or linguistic assumptions, it shows promise as a clinical and research tool. PMID:20643800

  2. Analysis on the spectra and synchronous radiated electric field observation of cloud-to-ground lightning discharge plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Cen Jianyong; Yuan Ping; Qu Haiyan; Zhang Tinglong

    2011-11-15

    According to the spectra of cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning discharge plasma captured by a slit-less spectrograph and the information of synchronous radiated electric field, the temperatures, the total intensity of spectra, the peak value of current and its action integral of discharge plasma channel have been calculated. Furthermore, the correlativity of these parameters has been analyzed for the first time. The results indicate that the total intensity of spectra has a positive correlation to the discharge current in different strokes of one CG lightning, and the temperature of discharge plasma is direct proportion to the action integral in the first return strokes of different lightning.

  3. Spectra from pair-equilibrium plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zdziarski, A. A.

    1984-01-01

    A numerical model of relativistic nonmagnetized plasma with uniform temperature and electron density distributions is considered, and spectra from plasma in pair equilibrium are studied. A range of dimensionless temperature (T) greater than about 0.2 is considered. The spectra from low pair density plasmas in pair equilibrium vary from un-Comptonized bremsstrahlung spectra at Thomson cross section tau(N) much less than one to Comptonized bremsstrahlung spectra with tau(N) over one. For high pair density plasmas the spectra are flat for T greater than about one, and have broad intensity peaks at energy roughly equal to 3T for T less than one. In the latter region the total luminosity is approximately twice the annihilation luminosity. All spectra are flat in the X-ray region, in contradiction to observed AGN spectra. For dimensionless luminosity greater than about 100, the cooling time becomes shorter than the Thomson time.

  4. Power spectra of solar convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, D.-Y.; Labonte, B. J.; Braun, D. C.; Duvall, T. L., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The properties of convective motions on the sun are studied using Kitt Peak Doppler images and power spectra of convection. The power peaks at a scale of about 29,000 km and drops off smoothly with wavenumber. There is no evidence of apparent energy excess at the scale of the mesogranulation proposed by other authors. The vertical and horizontal power for each wavenumber are obtained and used to calculate the vertical and horizontal velocities of the supergranulation. The amplitude of vertical and horizontal velocities of the supergranulation are 0.034 (+ or - 0.002) km/s and 0.38 (+ or - 0.01) km/s, respectively. The corresponding rms values are 0.024 (+ or - 0.002) km/s and 0.27 (+ or - 0.01) km/s.

  5. Reflectance spectra of primitive chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trigo-Rodríguez, J. M.; Moyano-Cambero, C. E.; Llorca, J.

    2013-05-01

    We are studying a wide sample of pristine carbonaceous chondrites from the NASA Antarctic collection in order to get clues on the physico-chemical processes occurred in the parent bodies of these meteorites. We are obtaining laboratory reflectance spectra of different groups of carbonaceous chondrites, but here we focus in CM and CI chondrites. We discuss the main spectral features that can be used to identify primitive carbonaceous asteroids by remote sensing techniques. Two different spectrometers were used covering the entire 0.3 to 30 μm electromagnetic window. Only a handful of Near Earth Objects (NEOs) exhibit bands or features clearly associated with aqueous alteration. Among them are the target asteroids of Osiris Rex and Marco Polo-R missions.

  6. Following the mechanisms of bacteriostatic versus bactericidal action using Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bernatová, Silvie; Samek, Ota; Pilát, Zdeněk; Serý, Mojmír; Ježek, Jan; Jákl, Petr; Siler, Martin; Krzyžánek, Vladislav; Zemánek, Pavel; Holá, Veronika; Dvořáčková, Milada; Růžička, Filip

    2013-10-24

    Antibiotics cure infections by influencing bacterial growth or viability. Antibiotics can be divided to two groups on the basis of their effect on microbial cells through two main mechanisms, which are either bactericidal or bacteriostatic. Bactericidal antibiotics kill the bacteria and bacteriostatic antibiotics suppress the growth of bacteria (keep them in the stationary phase of growth). One of many factors to predict a favorable clinical outcome of the potential action of antimicrobial chemicals may be provided using in vitro bactericidal/bacteriostatic data (e.g., minimum inhibitory concentrations-MICs). Consequently, MICs are used in clinical situations mainly to confirm resistance, and to determine the in vitro activities of new antimicrobials. We report on the combination of data obtained from MICs with information on microorganisms' "fingerprint" (e.g., DNA/RNA, and proteins) provided by Raman spectroscopy. Thus, we could follow mechanisms of the bacteriostatic versus bactericidal action simply by detecting the Raman bands corresponding to DNA. The Raman spectra of Staphylococcus epidermidis treated with clindamycin (a bacteriostatic agent) indeed show little effect on DNA which is in contrast with the action of ciprofloxacin (a bactericidal agent), where the Raman spectra show a decrease in strength of the signal assigned to DNA, suggesting DNA fragmentation.

  7. Pressure spectra and cross spectra at an area contraction in a ducted combustion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, J. H.; Raftopoulos, D. D.

    1980-01-01

    Pressure spectra and cross-spectra at an area contraction in a liquid fuel, ducted, combustion noise test facility are analyzed. Measurements made over a range of air and fuel flows are discussed. Measured spectra are compared with spectra calculated using a simple analytical model.

  8. Submillimeter Spectra of Low Temperature Gases and Mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Wishnow, E H; Gush, H P; Halpern M; Ozier, I

    2002-09-19

    Submillimeter absorption spectra of nitrogen, nitrogen-argon mixtures, and methane have been measured using temperatures and pressures near to those found in the atmospheres of Titan and Saturn. The experiments show the spectral signature of dimers which will likely appear in far-infrared spectra of Titan that will be obtained by the Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) onboard the Cassini spacecraft. The recent CIRS spectrum of Jupiter shows far-infrared spectral lines of methane and the corresponding lines are observed in the laboratory. We are extending this work to lower frequencies using a new differential Michelson interferometer that operates over the frequency region 3-30 cm{sup -1}.

  9. Submillimeter Spectra of Low Temperature Gases and Mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wishnow, E. H.; Gush, H. P.; Halpern, M.; Ozier, I.

    2002-01-01

    Submillimeter absorption spectra of nitrogen, nitrogen-argon mixtures, and methane have been measured using temperatures and pressures near to those found in the atmospheres of Titan and Saturn. The experiments show the spectral signature of dimers which will likely appear in far-infrared spectra of Titan that will be obtained by the Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIS) onboard the Cassini spacecraft. The recent CIRS spectrum of Jupiter shows far-infrared spectral lines of methane and the corresponding lines are observed in the laboratory. We are extending this work to lower frequencies using a new differential Michelson interferometer that operates over the frequency region 3-30 1/cm..

  10. Line Coupling in Atmospheric Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tipping, R. H.

    1996-01-01

    The theoretical modeling of atmospheric spectra is important for a number of different applications: for instance, in the determination of minor atmospheric constituents such as ozone, carbon dioxide, CFC's etc.; in monitoring the temperature profile for climate studies; and in measuring the incoming and outgoing radiation to input into global climate models. In order to accomplish the above mentioned goal, one needs to know the spectral parameters characterizing the individual spectral lines (frequency, width, strength, and shape) as well as the physical parameters of the atmosphere (temperature, abundances, and pressure). When all these parameters are known, it is usually assumed that the resultant spectra and concomitant absorption coefficient can then be calculated by a superposition of individual profiles of appropriate frequency, strength and shape. However, this is not true if the lines are 'coupled'. Line coupling is a subtle effect that takes place when lines of a particular molecule overlap in frequency. In this case when the initial states and the final states of two transitions are connected by collisions, there is a quantum interference resulting in perturbed shapes. In general, this results in the narrowing of Q-branches (those in which the rotational quantum number does not change), and vibration-rotational R- and P branches (those in which the rotational quantum number changes by +/- 1), and in the spectral region beyond band heads (regions where the spectral lines pile up due to centrifugal distortion). Because these features and spectral regions are often those of interest in the determination of the abundances and pressure-temperature profiles, one must take this effect into account in atmospheric models.

  11. Ultraviolet Spectra of Two Magnetic White Dwarfs and Ultraviolet Spectra of Subluminous Objects Found in the Kiso Schmidt Survey and Ultraviolet Absorptions in the Spectra of DA White Dwarfds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wegner, Gary A.

    1988-01-01

    Research under NASA Grant NAG5-287 has carried out a number of projects in conjunction with the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) satellite. These include: (1) studies of the UV spectra of DA white dwarfs which show quasi-molecular bands of H2 and H2(+); (2) the peculiar star HR6560; (3) the UV spectra of two magnetic white dwarfs that also show the quasi-molecular features; (4) investigations of the UV spectra of subluminous stars, primarily identified from visual wavelength spectroscopy in the Kiso survey of UV excess stars, some of which show interesting metal lines in their UV spectra; and (5) completion of studies of UV spectra of DB stars. The main result of this research has been to further knowledge of the structure and compositions of subluminous stars which helps cast light on their formation and evolution.

  12. Action Research: Rethinking Lewin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickens, Linda; Watkins, Karen

    1999-01-01

    Explores both historical and contemporary definitions of action research. Describes the process and goals of action research in the tradition of Lewin. Presents a case study of an action-research project involving two teams in a high-technology corporation that depicts the process in action. (Author/CCM)

  13. [Predicting Spectra of Accretion Disks Around Galactic Black Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krolik, Julian H.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this grant was to construct detailed atmosphere solutions in order to predict the spectra of accretion disks around Galactic black holes. Our plan of action was to take an existing disk atmosphere code (TLUSTY, created by Ivan Hubeny) and introduce those additional physical processes necessary to make it applicable to disks of this variety. These modifications include: treating Comptonization; introducing continuous opacity due to heavy elements; incorporating line opacity due to heavy elements; adopting a disk structure that reflects readjustments due to radiation pressure effects; and injecting heat via a physically-plausible vertical distribution.

  14. Spectra of small Koronis family members

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, C.; Rivkin, A.; Trilling, D.; Moskovitz, N.

    2014-07-01

    The space-weathering process and its implications for the relationships between S- and Q-type asteroids and ordinary chondrite meteorites are long-standing problems in asteroid science. Although the visible and near-infrared spectra of S- and Q-type objects qualitatively show the same absorption features and quantitatively show evidence of the same minerals, the S types display increased spectral slopes and muted absorption features compared to the Q types. This spectral mismatch is consistent with the effects of the space weathering process. Binzel et al. provided the missing link between Q- and S-type bodies in near-Earth space by showing a reddening of spectral slope in objects from 0.1 to 5 km that corresponded to the transition from Q- to S-type spectra. This result implied that size, and therefore age, is related to the relationship between Q- and S-type. The existence of Q-type objects in the main belt was not confirmed until Mothe-Diniz and Nesvorny (2008) found them in young S-type clusters. To investigate the trend from Q to S in the main belt, we examined space weathering within the old main-belt Koronis family using a spectrophotometric survey (Rivkin et al. 2011, Thomas et al. 2011). Rivkin et al. (2011) identified several potential Q-type objects within the Koronis family. Our Q-type candidates were identified using broad-band spectrophotometry and could not be taxonomically classified on that basis alone. We obtained follow-up visible and near-infrared spectral observations of our potential Q-type objects, (26970) Elias, (45610) 2000 DJ_{48}, and (37411) 2001 XF_{152}, using Gemini and Magellan. We will present the results of these spectral follow-up observations. Observations of (26970) Elias demonstrate that the object is more consistent with the average Q-type spectrum than the average S-type spectrum.

  15. Quasinormal Modes of Charged Dilaton Black Holes and Their Entropy Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakalli, I.

    2013-08-01

    In this study, we employ the scalar perturbations of the charged dilaton black hole (CDBH) found by Chan, Horne and Mann (CHM), and described with an action which emerges in the low-energy limit of the string theory. A CDBH is neither asymptotically flat (AF) nor non-asymptotically flat (NAF) spacetime. Depending on the value of its dilaton parameter a, it has both Schwarzschild and linear dilaton black hole (LDBH) limits. We compute the complex frequencies of the quasinormal modes (QNMs) of the CDBH by considering small perturbations around its horizon. By using the highly damped QNM in the process prescribed by Maggiore, we obtain the quantum entropy and area spectra of these black holes (BHs). Although the QNM frequencies are tuned by a, we show that the quantum spectra do not depend on a, and they are equally spaced. On the other hand, the obtained value of undetermined dimensionless constant ɛ is the double of Bekenstein's result. The possible reason of this discrepancy is also discussed.

  16. A simple model for strong ground motions and response spectra

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Safak, Erdal; Mueller, Charles; Boatwright, John

    1988-01-01

    A simple model for the description of strong ground motions is introduced. The model shows that response spectra can be estimated by using only four parameters of the ground motion, the RMS acceleration, effective duration and two corner frequencies that characterize the effective frequency band of the motion. The model is windowed band-limited white noise, and is developed by studying the properties of two functions, cumulative squared acceleration in the time domain, and cumulative squared amplitude spectrum in the frequency domain. Applying the methods of random vibration theory, the model leads to a simple analytical expression for the response spectra. The accuracy of the model is checked by using the ground motion recordings from the aftershock sequences of two different earthquakes and simulated accelerograms. The results show that the model gives a satisfactory estimate of the response spectra.

  17. Vibrationally high-resolved electronic spectra of MCl2 (M = C, Si, Ge, Sn, Pb) and photoelectron spectra of MCl2-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ran, Yibin; Pang, Min; Shen, Wei; Li, Ming; He, Rongxing

    2016-10-01

    We systematically studied the vibrational-resolved electronic spectra of group IV dichlorides using the Franck-Condon approximation combined with the Duschinsky and Herzberg-Teller effects in harmonic and anharmonic frameworks (only the simulation of absorption spectra includes the anharmonicity). Calculated results showed that the band shapes of simulated spectra are in accordance with those of the corresponding experimental or theoretical ones. We found that the symmetric bend mode in progression of absorption is the most active one, whereas the main contributor in photoelectron spectra is the symmetric stretching mode. Moreover, the Duschinsky and anharmonic effects exert weak influence on the absorption spectra, except for PbCl2 molecule. The theoretical insights presented in this work are significant in understanding the photophysical properties of MCl2 (M = C, Si, Ge, Sn, Pb) and studying the Herzberg-Teller and the anharmonic effects on the absorption spectra of new dichlorides of this main group.

  18. General computational spectroscopic framework applied to Z-pinch dynamic hohlraum K-shell argon spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, M L; Sinars, D B; Scott, H A

    2005-01-10

    We describe a general computational spectroscopic framework for interpreting observed spectra. The framework compares synthetic spectra with measured spectra, then optimizes the agreement using the Dakota toolkit to minimize a merit function that incorporates established spectroscopic techniques. We generate synthetic spectra using the self-consistent nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium atomic kinetics and radiative transfer code Cretin, relativistic atomic structure and cross section data from Hullac, and detailed spectral line shapes from Totalb. We test the capabilities of both our synthetic spectra model and general spectroscopic framework by analyzing a K-shell argon spectrum from a Z-pinch dynamic hohlraum inertial confinement fusion capsule implosion experiment. The framework obtains close agreement between an experimental spectrum measured by a time integrated focusing spectrometer and the optimal synthetic spectrum. The synthetic spectra show that considering the spatial extent of the capsule and including the effects of optically thick resonance lines significantly affects the interpretation of measured spectra.

  19. Use of thin ionization calorimeters for measurements of cosmic ray energy spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. V.; Ormes, J. S.; Schmidt, W. K. H.

    1976-01-01

    The reliability of performing measurements of cosmic ray energy spectra with a thin ionization calorimeter was investigated. Monte Carlo simulations were used to determine whether energy response fluctuations would cause measured spectra to be different from the primary spectra. First, Gaussian distributions were assumed for the calorimeter energy resolutions. The second method employed a detailed Monte Carlo simulation of cascades from an isotropic flux of protons. The results show that as long as the energy resolution does not change significantly with energy, the spectral indices can be reliably determined even for sigma sub e/e = 50%. However, if the energy resolution is strongly energy dependent, the measured spectra do not reproduce the true spectra. Energy resolutions greatly improving with energy result in measured spectra that are too steep, while resolutions getting much worse with energy cause the measured spectra to be too flat.

  20. The mid-infrared transmission spectra of Antarctic ureilites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandford, Scott A.

    1993-01-01

    The mid-IR (4000-450/cm; 2.5-22.2 microns) transmission spectra of seven Antarctic ureilites and 10 Antarctic H-5 ordinary chondrites are presented. The ureilite spectra show a number of absorption bands, the strongest of which is a wide, complex feature centered near 1000/cm (10 microns) due to Si-O stretching vibrations in silicates. The profiles and positions of the substructure in this feature indicate that Mg-rich olivines and pyroxenes are the main silicates responsible. The relative abundances of these two minerals, as inferred from the spectra, show substantial variation from meteorite to meteorite, but generally indicate olivine is the most abundant (olivine:pyroxene = 60:40 to 95:5). Both the predominance of olivine and the variable olivine-to-pyroxene ratio are consistent with the known composition and heterogeneity of ureilites. The H-5 ordinary chondrites spanned a range of weathering classes and were used to provide a means of addressing the extent to which the ureilite spectra may have been altered by weathering processes. It was found that, while weathering of these meteorites produces some weak bands due to the formation of small amounts of carbonates and hydrates, the profile of the main silicate feature has been little affected by Antarctic exposure in the meteorites studied here. The mid-IR ureilite spectra provide an additional means of testing potential asteroidal parent bodies for the ureilites.

  1. Phonon spectra of plutonium at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorado, Boris; Bottin, François; Bouchet, Johann

    2017-03-01

    Ab initio molecular dynamics calculations are used to investigate the vibrational properties of the high-temperature δ and ɛ phases of plutonium. We combine the local-density approximation (LDA)+U for strong electron correlations and the temperature-dependent effective potential method in order to calculate the phonon spectra of the two phases, as well as their dependence on temperature. Our results show that the ɛ phase can only be stabilized when temperature and correlations are simultaneously accounted for. We are also able to quantify the degree of anharmonicity of the two phases. While the δ phase is fairly harmonic up to 1000 K, we find that the ɛ phase is strongly anharmonic, which explains why this structure dominates the phase diagram at high temperature.

  2. Optical absorption spectra of dications of carotenoids

    SciTech Connect

    Jeevarajan, J.A.; Wei, C.C.; Jeevarajan, A.S.; Kispert, L.D.

    1996-04-04

    Quantitative optical absorption spectra of the cation radicals and the dications of canthaxanthin (I), {beta}carotene (II), 7`-cyano-7`-ethoxycarbonyl-7`-apo-{beta}-carotene (III), and 7`,7`-dimethyl-7`-apo-{beta}-carotene (IV) in dichloromethane solution are reported. Exclusive formation of dications occurs when the carotenoids are oxidized with ferric chloride. Addition of neutral carotenoid to the dications results in equilibrium formation of cation radicals. Oxidation with iodine in dichloromethane affords only cation radicals; electrochemical oxidation under suitable conditions yields both dications and cation radicals. Values of the optical parameters depend on the nature of the oxidative medium. The oscillator strengths calculated for gas phase cation radicals and dications of I-IV using the INDO/S method show the same trend as the experimental values. 31 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. X ray spectra of cataclysmic variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Joseph; Halpern, Jules

    1990-01-01

    X ray spectral parameters of cataclysmic variables observed with the 'Einstein' imaging proportional counter were determined by fitting an optically thin, thermal bremsstrahlung spectrum to the raw data. Most of the sources show temperatures of order a few keV, while a few sources exhibit harder spectra with temperatures in excess of 10 keV. Estimated 0.1 to 3.5 keV luminosities are generally in the range from 10(exp 30) to 10(exp 32) erg/sec. The results are consistent with the x rays originating in a disk/white dwarf boundary layer of non-magnetic systems, or in a hot, post-shock region in the accretion column of DQ Her stars, with a negligible contribution from the corona of the companion. In a few objects column densities were found that are unusually high for interstellar material. It was suggested that the absorption occurs in the system itself.

  4. Inferences about Action Engage Action Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Lawrence J.; Lev-Ari, Shiri; Zwaan, Rolf A.

    2008-01-01

    Verbal descriptions of actions activate compatible motor responses [Glenberg, A. M., & Kaschak, M. P. (2002). Grounding language in action. "Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 9", 558-565]. Previous studies have found that the motor processes for manual rotation are engaged in a direction-specific manner when a verb disambiguates the direction of…

  5. Stellar parametrization from Gaia RVS spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Recio-Blanco, A.; de Laverny, P.; Allende Prieto, C.; Fustes, D.; Manteiga, M.; Arcay, B.; Bijaoui, A.; Dafonte, C.; Ordenovic, C.; Ordoñez Blanco, D.

    2016-01-01

    found for A-type stars, while the log(g) derivation is more accurate (errors of 0.07 and 0.12 dex at GRVS = 12.6 and 13.4, respectively). For the faintest stars, with GRVS≳ 13-14, a Teff input from the spectrophotometric-derived parameters will allow the final GSP-Spec parametrization to be improved. Conclusions: The reported results, while neglecting possible mismatches between synthetic and real spectra, show that the contribution of the RVS-based stellar parameters will be unique in the brighter part of the Gaia survey, which allows for crucial age estimations and accurate chemical abundances. This will constitute a unique and precious sample, providing many pieces of the Milky Way history puzzle with unprecedented precision and statistical relevance.

  6. Interpretation of Anomalous Ultraviolet Transitions of Fe II Observed in Laboratory Fourier Transform Spectra and Stellar HST and IUE Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, Sveneric; Brage, Tomas; Leckrone, David S.; Nave, Gillian; Wahlgren, Glenn M.

    1995-06-01

    We discuss LS-forbidden ΔS = 2 transitions of Fe II that appear as strong lines in ultraviolet stellar and laboratory spectra. The lines occur because of indirect level mixing-two close energy levels, W2P3/2 and x6P3/2, are mixed through a third level acting as a catalyst. In transition multiplets, that involve either the w2P3/2 or the x6P3/2 level, the normal component is accompanied by a close, parasite component. These components are well resolved in laboratory Fourier transform spectra, from which accurate intensity ratios can be measured. Spectra of the HgMn star χ Lupi recorded with the Hubble Space Telescope, show the normal and the parasite components resolved for the first time in stellar spectra. These have been used together with laboratory spectra to derive oscillator strengths for four multiplets and the mixing coefficients for the two interacting energy levels. We also provide improved spectroscopic data for all Fe ii multiplets that include the w2P3/2 and x6P3/2 levels. The level mixing involves the UV 191 multiplet of Fe II around 1780 Å, which is shown to have one parasite component. This multiplet is known to be a prominent emission feature in spectra of various objects, e.g., cool star chromospheres and symbiotic stars. As an example, we show IUE spectra of the eclipsing binary 32 Cyg, which provides perfect conditions for fluorescence experiments, and discuss possible excitation mechanisms of UV 191. Based on second-order perturbation theory and multiconfiguration Hartree-Fock calculations, an atomic three-level model is constructed. This model explains the contradiction found when applying first-order perturbation theory, viz., two close energy levels perturbing each other without causing a repulsion.

  7. Blind extraction of exoplanetary spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morello, Giuseppe; Waldmann, Ingo P.; Tinetti, Giovanna

    2016-06-01

    In the last decade, remote sensing spectroscopy enabled characterization of the atmospheres of extrasolar planets. Transmission and emission spectra of tens of transiting exoplanets have been measured with multiple instruments aboard Spitzer and Hubble Space Telescopes as well as ground-based facilities, revealing the presence of atomic, ionic and molecular species in their atmospheres, and constraining their temperature and pressure profiles.Early analyses were somehow heuristic both in measuring the spectra and in their interpretation, leading to some controversies in the literature.A photometric precision of 0.01% is necessary to detect the atmospheric spectral modulations. Current observatories, except Kepler, were not designed to achieve this precision. Data reduction is necessary to minimize the effect of instrument systematics in order to achieve the target precision. In the past, parametric models have extensively been used by most teams to remove correlated noise with the aid of auxiliary information of the instrument, the so-called optical state vectors (OSVs). Such OSVs can include inter- and intra-pixel position of the star or its spectrum, instrument temperatures and inclinations, and/or other parameters. In some cases, different parameterizations led to discrepant results.We recommend the use of blind non-parametric data detrending techniques to overcome those issues. In particular, we adopt Independent Component Analysis (ICA), i.e. a blind source separation (BSS) technique to disentangle the multiple instrument systematics and astrophysical signals in transit/eclipse light curves. ICA does not require a model for the systematics, and for this reason, it can be applied to any instrument with little changes, if any. ICA-based algorithms have been applied to Spitzer/IRAC and synthetic observations in photometry (Morello et al. 2014, 2015, 2016; Morello 2015) and to Hubble/NICMOS and Spitzer/IRS in spectroscopy (Waldmann 2012, 2014, Waldmann et al. 2013

  8. 76 FR 64041 - Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Show Low, AZ

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-17

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Show Low, AZ AGENCY... action proposes to modify Class E airspace at Show Low Regional Airport, Show Low, AZ. Controlled...) standard instrument approach procedures at Show Low Regional Airport. The FAA is proposing this action...

  9. Interpretation of Nitroindolinospirobenzothiopyran Vibrational Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladkov, L. L.; Khamchukov, Yu. D.; Lyubimov, A. V.

    2016-05-01

    The structures of four possible stereoisomers of the closed form of photochromic nitroindolinospirobenzothiopyran (NISTP) {1',3'-dihydro-1',3',3'-trimethyl-6-nitrospiro[2H-1-benzothiopyran-2,2'-(2H)-indoline]} were determined by the DFT method. The geometry of the most stable isomer was defined. Nitro-substitution changes mainly the lengths of bonds formed by S and N with spiro-atom Cs. According to the calculations, the CsS bond changes most and lengthens by 0.019 Å. It is shown that the S atom has large displacement amplitudes in normal modes assigned to Raman lines at 230, 285, 360, and 575 cm-1 and weak IR bands at 467 and 577 cm-1. Oscillations involving the nitro group are very active in Raman and IR spectra. Their frequencies are slightly lower than similar frequencies of nitrobenzene and nitroindolinospirobenzopyran, indicating a higher degree of vibrational coupling of the NO2 group with the NISTP molecular skeleton.

  10. Reflectance spectra of subarctic lichens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petzold, Donald E.; Goward, Samuel N.

    1988-01-01

    Lichens constitute a major portion of the ground cover of high latitude environments, but little has been reported concerning their in situ solar spectral reflectance properties. Knowledge of these properties is important for the interpretation of remotely sensed observations from high latitude regions, as well as in studies of high latitude ecology and energy balance climatology. The spectral reflectance of common boreal vascular plants is similar to that of vascular plants of the midlatitudes. The dominant lichens, in contrast, display variable reflectance patterns in visible wavelengths. The relative reflectance peak at 0.55 microns, common to green vegetation, is absent or indistinct in spectra of pervasive boreal forest and tundra lichens, despite the presence of chlorophyll in the inner algal cells. Lichens of the dominant genus, Cladina, display strong absorption of ultraviolet energy and short-wavelength blue light relative to their absorption in other visible wavelengths. Since the Cladinae dominate both the surface vegetation in open woodlands of the boreal forest and the low arctic tundra, their unusual spectral reflectance patterns will enable accurate monitoring of the boreal forest-tundra ecotone and detection of its vigor and movement in the future.

  11. Numerical Tests of the Improved Fermilab Action

    SciTech Connect

    Detar, C.; Kronfeld, A.S.; Oktay, M.B.

    2010-11-01

    Recently, the Fermilab heavy-quark action was extended to include dimension-six and -seven operators in order to reduce the discretization errors. In this talk, we present results of the first numerical simulations with this action (the OK action), where we study the masses of the quarkonium and heavy-light systems. We calculate combinations of masses designed to test improvement and compare results obtained with the OK action to their counterparts obtained with the clover action. Our preliminary results show a clear improvement.

  12. X-ray spectra of supernova remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szymkowiak, A. E.

    1985-01-01

    X-ray spectra were obtained from fields in three supernova remnants with the solid state spectrometer of the HEAO 2 satellite. These spectra, which contain lines from K-shell transitions of several abundant elements with atomic numbers between 10 and 22, were compared with various models, including some of spectra that would be produced by adiabatic phase remnants when the time-dependence of the ionization is considered.

  13. Non-linear power spectra in the synchronous gauge

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Jai-chan; Noh, Hyerim; Jeong, Donghui; Gong, Jinn-Ouk; Biern, Sang Gyu E-mail: hr@kasi.re.kr E-mail: jinn-ouk.gong@apctp.org

    2015-05-01

    We study the non-linear corrections to the matter and velocity power spectra in the synchronous gauge (SG). For the leading correction to the non-linear power spectra, we consider the perturbations up to third order in a zero-pressure fluid in a flat cosmological background. Although the equations in the SG happen to coincide with those in the comoving gauge (CG) to linear order, they differ from second order. In particular, the second order hydrodynamic equations in the SG are apparently in the Lagrangian form, whereas those in the CG are in the Eulerian form. The non-linear power spectra naively presented in the original SG show rather pathological behavior quite different from the result of the Newtonian theory even on sub-horizon scales. We show that the pathology in the nonlinear power spectra is due to the absence of the convective terms in, thus the Lagrangian nature of, the SG. We show that there are many different ways of introducing the corrective convective terms in the SG equations. However, the convective terms (Eulerian modification) can be introduced only through gauge transformations to other gauges which should be the same as the CG to the second order. In our previous works we have shown that the density and velocity perturbation equations in the CG exactly coincide with the Newtonian equations to the second order, and the pure general relativistic correction terms starting to appear from the third order are substantially suppressed compared with the relativistic/Newtonian terms in the power spectra. As a result, we conclude that the SG per se is an inappropriate coordinate choice in handling the non-linear matter and velocity power spectra of the large-scale structure where observations meet with theories.

  14. ALIEN: A nebular spectra analysis software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, R.; Vazquez, R.

    2000-11-01

    A new C-coded software, designed to analyze nebular spectra, is presented. T his software is able to read the fluxes of the most important ions directly from IRAF's output file (splot.log). Spectra can be dereddened using the Balmer lines ratio and the Seaton's extinction law. Electron temperature and density, as well as ionic abundances by number are estimated by means of numeric calculations based on the five-level atom model. The dereddened spectra and the table containing the ionic abundances can be saved in a LaTex formatted file. This software has been initially designed to work with a low dispersion spectra.

  15. Near-Infrared Spectra of Uranian Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venturini, C. C.; Lynch, D. K.; Rudy, R. J.; Mazuk, S.; Puetter, R. C.

    2001-05-01

    We present 0.8 to 2.5 micron spectra taken on June 21 & 22, 1998 UT of the Uranian satellites Miranda, Titania, Ariel, Oberon, and Umbriel. The spectra were taken using The Aerospace Corporation's Near-Infrared Imaging Spectragraph (NIRIS) on the University of California's Lick Observatory 3 meter Shane telescope. These spectra will be compared with previous work including Brown, R.H. and Cruikshank, D.P. (1983) as well as more recent spectra and analysis by Grundy, W. et al. (1999). Support for this research was provided by The Aerospace Corporation's Independent Research and Development Program.

  16. [Describing language of spectra and rough set].

    PubMed

    Qiu, Bo; Hu, Zhan-yi; Zhao, Yong-heng

    2002-06-01

    It is the traditional way to analyze spectra by experiences in astronomical field. And until now there has never been a suitable theoretical frame to describe spectra, which is may be owing to small spectra datasets that astronomers can get by low-level instruments. With the high-speed development of telescopes, especially on behalf of LAMOST, a large telescope which can collect more than 20,000 spectra in an observing night, spectra datasets are becoming larger and larger very fast. Facing these voluminous datasets, the traditional spectra-processing way simply depending on experiences becomes unfit. In this paper, we develop a brand-new language--describing language of spectra (DLS) to describe spectra of celestial bodies by defining BE (Basic element). And based on DLS, we introduce the method of RSDA (Rough set and data analysis), which is a technique of data mining. By RSDA we extract some rules of stellar spectra, and this experiment can be regarded as an application of DLS.

  17. The effect of osmotic swelling and hemolysis of erythrocytes on the transmission spectra of radiation by a layer of diluted blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumenko, E. K.; Davydovskii, A. G.

    2010-08-01

    We study how the degree of violation of osmotic equilibrium affects the spectral characteristics of radiation scattered by erythrocyte suspensions in media of various osmolarity. The transmission spectra were measured in the wavelength range of 450-860 nm for blood samples diluted with NaCl water solutions of various concentration. From an analysis of numerical simulation results and experimental data, we show that measuring the light scattering characteristics constitutes the basis of a new optical method for determining erythrocyte osmotic resistance. The method excludes the necessity of strong action on erythrocytes, differs in its simplicity and expressivity, and can be implemented using standard spectrometers.

  18. Laser Spectra and efficiencies of pyrazolo derivatives of coumarins

    SciTech Connect

    Padhye, M.R.; Varadarajan, T.S.; Deshpande, A.V.

    1985-09-01

    Of the new laser dyes of coumarin series reported earlier, pyrazolo derivatives have been further studied. The paper reports their laser spectra and efficiencies in various solvents compared to a standard coumarin laser dye C/sub 515/. One of the derivatives shows comparable output under optimum concentration conditions as compared to the standard.

  19. Gun Show Loophole Closing Act of 2013

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Rep. McCarthy, Carolyn [D-NY-4

    2013-01-03

    01/25/2013 Referred to the Subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism, Homeland Security, And Investigations. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  20. Consistent cosmic microwave background spectra from quantum depletion

    SciTech Connect

    Casadio, Roberto; Orlandi, Alessio; Kühnel, Florian E-mail: florian.kuhnel@fysik.su.se

    2015-09-01

    Following a new quantum cosmological model proposed by Dvali and Gomez, we quantitatively investigate possible modifications to the Hubble parameter and following corrections to the cosmic microwave background spectrum. In this model, scalar and tensor perturbations are generated by the quantum depletion of the background inflaton and graviton condensate respectively. We show how the inflaton mass affects the power spectra and the tensor-to-scalar ratio. Masses approaching the Planck scale would lead to strong deviations, while standard spectra are recovered for an inflaton mass much smaller than the Planck mass.

  1. Atomic transition probabilities of Ce I from Fourier transform spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitz, D. E.; Lawler, J. E.; Chisholm, J.; Wood, M. P.; Sobeck, J.; den Hartog, E. A.

    2010-03-01

    We report transition probabilities for 2874 lines of CeI in the wavelength range 360 -- 1500 nm. These are derived from new branching fraction measurements on Fourier transform spectra normalized with recently-reported radiative lifetimes (Den Hartog et al., J. Phys. B 42, 085006 (2009)). We have analyzed the decay branches for 153 upper levels in 14 different spectra recorded under a variety of discharge lamp conditions. Comparison of results with previous less extensive investigations shows good agreement for lines studied in common. Accurate Ce I transition probabilities are needed for applications in astrophysics and in lighting research, particularly for the development of improved metal halide high-intensity discharge lamps.

  2. Partitioning Ocean Wave Spectra Obtained from Radar Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delaye, Lauriane; Vergely, Jean-Luc; Hauser, Daniele; Guitton, Gilles; Mouche, Alexis; Tison, Celine

    2016-08-01

    2D wave spectra of ocean waves can be partitioned into several wave components to better characterize the scene. We present here two methods of component detection: one based on watershed algorithm and the other based on a Bayesian approach. We tested both methods on a set of simulated SWIM data, the Ku-band real aperture radar embarked on the CFOSAT (China- France Oceanography Satellite) mission which launch is planned mid-2018. We present the results and the limits of both approaches and show that Bayesian method can also be applied to other kind of wave spectra observations as those obtained with the radar KuROS, an airborne radar wave spectrometer.

  3. 10 CFR 590.401 - Orders to show cause.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... response to an application by any person requesting FE action against any other person alleged to be in contravention or violation of any authorization, statute, rule, order, or law administered by FE applicable to... exportation of natural gas over which FE has jurisdiction. Any show cause order issued shall identify...

  4. 10 CFR 590.401 - Orders to show cause.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... response to an application by any person requesting FE action against any other person alleged to be in contravention or violation of any authorization, statute, rule, order, or law administered by FE applicable to... exportation of natural gas over which FE has jurisdiction. Any show cause order issued shall identify...

  5. Objects tell us what action we can expect: dissociating brain areas for retrieval and exploitation of action knowledge during action observation in fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Schubotz, Ricarda I.; Wurm, Moritz F.; Wittmann, Marco K.; von Cramon, D. Yves

    2014-01-01

    Objects are reminiscent of actions often performed with them: knife and apple remind us on peeling the apple or cutting it. Mnemonic representations of object-related actions (action codes) evoked by the sight of an object may constrain and hence facilitate recognition of unrolling actions. The present fMRI study investigated if and how action codes influence brain activation during action observation. The average number of action codes (NAC) of 51 sets of objects was rated by a group of n = 24 participants. In an fMRI study, different volunteers were asked to recognize actions performed with the same objects presented in short videos. To disentangle areas reflecting the storage of action codes from those exploiting them, we showed object-compatible and object-incompatible (pantomime) actions. Areas storing action codes were considered to positively co-vary with NAC in both object-compatible and object-incompatible action; due to its role in tool-related tasks, we here hypothesized left anterior inferior parietal cortex (aIPL). In contrast, areas exploiting action codes were expected to show this correlation only in object-compatible but not incompatible action, as only object-compatible actions match one of the active action codes. For this interaction, we hypothesized ventrolateral premotor cortex (PMv) to join aIPL due to its role in biasing competition in IPL. We found left anterior intraparietal sulcus (IPS) and left posterior middle temporal gyrus (pMTG) to co-vary with NAC. In addition to these areas, action codes increased activity in object-compatible action in bilateral PMv, right IPS, and lateral occipital cortex (LO). Findings suggest that during action observation, the brain derives possible actions from perceived objects, and uses this information to shape action recognition. In particular, the number of expectable actions quantifies the activity level at PMv, IPL, and pMTG, but only PMv reflects their biased competition while observed action unfolds

  6. Star Shows It Has The Right Stuff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-01-01

    Astronomers have used an observation by NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory to make the best case yet that a star can be engulfed by its companion star and survive. This discovery will help astronomers better understand how closely coupled stars, and perhaps even stars and planets, evolve when one of the stars expands enormously in its red giant phase. The binary star system known as V471 Tauri comprises a white dwarf star (the primary) in a close orbit -- one thirtieth of the distance between Mercury and the Sun -- with a normal Sun-like star (the secondary). Chandra's data showed that the hot upper atmosphere of the secondary star has a deficit of carbon atoms relative to nitrogen atoms. "This deficit of carbon atoms is the first clear observational evidence that the normal star was engulfed by its companion in the past," according to Jeremy Drake of the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory in Cambridge, MA, who coauthored an article on V471 in The Astrophysical Journal Letters with Marek Sarna of the N. Copernicus Astronomical Center in Poland. The white dwarf star was once a star several times as massive as the Sun. Nuclear fusion reactions in the core of such a star convert carbon into nitrogen over a period of about a billion years. When the fuel in the core of the star is exhausted, the core collapses, triggering more energetic nuclear reactions that cause the star to expand and transform into a red giant before eventually collapsing to become a white dwarf. The carbon-poor material in the core of the red giant is mixed with outer part of the star, so its atmosphere shows a deficit of carbon, as compared with Sun-like stars. The X-ray spectra of a red giant star (top panel) and a Sun-like star (bottom panel) show the large difference in the peaks due to carbon atoms in the two stars. Theoretical calculations indicate that a red giant in a binary system can completely envelop its companion star and dramatically affect its evolution. During this common envelope

  7. Comparative Modelling of the Spectra of Cool Giants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lebzelter, T.; Heiter, U.; Abia, C.; Eriksson, K.; Ireland, M.; Neilson, H.; Nowotny, W; Maldonado, J; Merle, T.; Peterson, R.; Plez, B.; Short, C. I.; Wahlgren, G. M.; Worley, C.; Aringer, B.; Bladh, S.; de Laverny, P.; Goswami, A.; Mora, A.; Norris, R. P.; Recio-Blanco, A.; Scholz, M.; Thevenin, F.; Tsuji, T.; Kordopatis, G.

    2012-01-01

    Our ability to extract information from the spectra of stars depends on reliable models of stellar atmospheres and appropriate techniques for spectral synthesis. Various model codes and strategies for the analysis of stellar spectra are available today. Aims. We aim to compare the results of deriving stellar parameters using different atmosphere models and different analysis strategies. The focus is set on high-resolution spectroscopy of cool giant stars. Methods. Spectra representing four cool giant stars were made available to various groups and individuals working in the area of spectral synthesis, asking them to derive stellar parameters from the data provided. The results were discussed at a workshop in Vienna in 2010. Most of the major codes currently used in the astronomical community for analyses of stellar spectra were included in this experiment. Results. We present the results from the different groups, as well as an additional experiment comparing the synthetic spectra produced by various codes for a given set of stellar parameters. Similarities and differences of the results are discussed. Conclusions. Several valid approaches to analyze a given spectrum of a star result in quite a wide range of solutions. The main causes for the differences in parameters derived by different groups seem to lie in the physical input data and in the details of the analysis method. This clearly shows how far from a definitive abundance analysis we still are.

  8. Spectral classification with the International Ultraviolet Explorer: An atlas of B-type spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rountree, Janet; Sonneborn, George

    1993-01-01

    New criteria for the spectral classification of B stars in the ultraviolet show that photospheric absorption lines in the 1200-1900A wavelength region can be used to classify the spectra of B-type dwarfs, subgiants, and giants on a 2-D system consistent with the optical MK system. This atlas illustrates a large number of such spectra at the scale used for classification. These spectra provide a dense matrix of standard stars, and also show the effects of rapid stellar rotation and stellar winds on the spectra and their classification. The observational material consists of high-dispersion spectra from the International Ultraviolet Explorer archives, resampled to a resolution of 0.25 A, uniformly normalized, and plotted at 10 A/cm. The atlas should be useful for the classification of other IUE high-dispersion spectra, especially for stars that have not been observed in the optical.

  9. HF Accelerated Electron Fluxes, Spectra, and Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, Herbert C.; Jensen, Joseph B.

    2015-10-01

    Wave particle interactions, an essential aspect of laboratory, terrestrial, and astrophysical plasmas, have been studied for decades by transmitting high power HF radio waves into Earth's weakly ionized space plasma, to use it as a laboratory without walls. Application to HF electron acceleration remains an active area of research (Gurevich in Usp Fizicheskikh Nauk 177(11):1145-1177, 2007) today. HF electron acceleration studies began when plasma line observations proved (Carlson et al. in J Atmos Terr Phys 44:1089-1100, 1982) that high power HF radio wave-excited processes accelerated electrons not to ~eV, but instead to -100 times thermal energy (10 s of eV), as a consequence of inelastic collision effects on electron transport. Gurevich et al (J Atmos Terr Phys 47:1057-1070, 1985) quantified the theory of this transport effect. Merging experiment with theory in plasma physics and aeronomy, enabled prediction (Carlson in Adv Space Res 13:1015-1024, 1993) of creating artificial ionospheres once ~GW HF effective radiated power could be achieved. Eventual confirmation of this prediction (Pedersen et al. in Geophys Res Lett 36:L18107, 2009; Pedersen et al. in Geophys Res Lett 37:L02106, 2010; Blagoveshchenskaya et al. in Ann Geophys 27:131-145, 2009) sparked renewed interest in optical inversion to estimate electron spectra in terrestrial (Hysell et al. in J Geophys Res Space Phys 119:2038-2045, 2014) and planetary (Simon et al. in Ann Geophys 29:187-195, 2011) atmospheres. Here we present our unpublished optical data, which combined with our modeling, lead to conclusions that should meaningfully improve future estimates of the spectrum of HF accelerated electron fluxes. Photometric imaging data can significantly improve detection of emissions near ionization threshold, and confirm depth of penetration of accelerated electrons many km below the excitation altitude. Comparing observed to modeled emission altitude shows future experiments need electron density profiles

  10. Universality of vibrational spectra of globular proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Na, Hyuntae; Song, Guang; ben-Avraham, Daniel

    2016-02-01

    It is shown that the density of modes of the vibrational spectrum of globular proteins is universal, i.e. regardless of the protein in question, it closely follows one universal curve. The present study, including 135 proteins analyzed with a full atomic empirical potential (CHARMM22) and using the full complement of all atoms Cartesian degrees of freedom, goes far beyond previous claims of universality, confirming that universality holds even in the frequency range that is well above 100 cm-1 (300-4000 cm-1), where peaks and turns in the density of states are faithfully reproduced from one protein to the next. We also characterize fluctuations of the spectral density from the average, paving the way to a meaningful discussion of rare, unusual spectra and the structural reasons for the deviations in such ‘outlier’ proteins. Since the method used for the derivation of the vibrational modes (potential energy formulation, set of degrees of freedom employed, etc) has a dramatic effect on the spectral density, another significant implication of our findings is that the universality can provide an exquisite tool for assessing and improving the quality of potential functions and the quality of various models used for NMA computations. Finally, we show that the input configuration also affects the density of modes, thus emphasizing the importance of simplified potential energy formulations that are minimized at the outset. In summary, our findings call for a serious two-way dialogue between theory and experiment: experimental spectra of proteins could now guide the fine tuning of theoretical empirical potentials, and the various features and peaks observed in theoretical studies—being universal, and hence now rising in importance—would hopefully spur experimental confirmation.

  11. Prediction of electroencephalographic spectra from neurophysiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, P. A.; Rennie, C. J.; Wright, J. J.; Bahramali, H.; Gordon, E.; Rowe, D. L.

    2001-02-01

    A recent neurophysical model of propagation of electrical waves in the cortex is extended to include a physiologically motivated subcortical feedback loop via the thalamus. The electroencephalographic spectrum when the system is driven by white noise is then calculated analytically in terms of physiological parameters, including the effects of filtering of signals by the cerebrospinal fluid, skull, and scalp. The spectral power at low frequencies is found to vary as f-1 when awake and f-3 when asleep, with a breakpoint to a steeper power-law tail at frequencies above about 20 Hz in both cases; the f-1 range concurs with recent magnetoencephalographic observations of such a regime. Parameter sensitivities are explored, enabling a model with fewer free parameters to be proposed, and showing that spectra predicted for physiologically reasonable parameter values strongly resemble those observed in the laboratory. Alpha and beta peaks seen near 10 Hz and twice that frequency, respectively, in the relaxed wakeful state are generated via subcortical feedback in this model, thereby leading to predictions of their frequencies in terms of physiological parameters, and of correlations in their occurrence. Subcortical feedback is also predicted to be responsible for production of anticorrelated peaks in deep sleep states that correspond to the occurrence of theta rhythm at around half the alpha frequency and sleep spindles at 3/2 times the alpha frequency. An additional positively correlated waking peak near three times the alpha frequency is also predicted and tentatively observed, as are two new types of sleep spindle near 5/2 and 7/2 times the alpha frequency, and anticorrelated with alpha. These results provide a theoretical basis for the conventional division of EEG spectra into frequency bands, but imply that the exact bounds of these bands depend on the individual. Three types of potential instability are found: one at zero frequency, another in the theta band at around

  12. An analysis of scattered light in low dispersion IUE spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basri, G.; Clarke, J. T.; Haisch, B. M.

    1985-01-01

    A detailed numerical simulation of light scattering from the low-resolution grating in the short wavelength spectrograph of the IUE Observatory was developed, in order to quantitatively analyze the effects of scattering on both continuum and line emission spectra. It is found that: (1) the redistribution of light by grating scattering did not appreciably alter either the shape or the absolute flux level of continuum spectra for A-F stars; (2) late-type stellar continua showed a tendency to flatten when observed in scattered light toward the shorter wavelengths; and (3) the effect of grating scattering on emission lines is to decrease measured line intensities by an increasing percentage toward the shorter wavelengths. The spectra obtained from scattering experiments for solar-type and late type stars are reproduced in graphic form.

  13. Properties of artificial networks evolved to contend with natural spectra.

    PubMed

    Morgenstern, Yaniv; Rostami, Mohammad; Purves, Dale

    2014-07-22

    Understanding why spectra that are physically the same appear different in different contexts (color contrast), whereas spectra that are physically different appear similar (color constancy) presents a major challenge in vision research. Here, we show that the responses of biologically inspired neural networks evolved on the basis of accumulated experience with spectral stimuli automatically generate contrast and constancy. The results imply that these phenomena are signatures of a strategy that biological vision uses to circumvent the inverse optics problem as it pertains to light spectra, and that double-opponent neurons in early-level vision evolve to serve this purpose. This strategy provides a way of understanding the peculiar relationship between the objective world and subjective color experience, as well as rationalizing the relevant visual circuitry without invoking feature detection or image representation.

  14. Properties of artificial networks evolved to contend with natural spectra

    PubMed Central

    Morgenstern, Yaniv; Rostami, Mohammad; Purves, Dale

    2014-01-01

    Understanding why spectra that are physically the same appear different in different contexts (color contrast), whereas spectra that are physically different appear similar (color constancy) presents a major challenge in vision research. Here, we show that the responses of biologically inspired neural networks evolved on the basis of accumulated experience with spectral stimuli automatically generate contrast and constancy. The results imply that these phenomena are signatures of a strategy that biological vision uses to circumvent the inverse optics problem as it pertains to light spectra, and that double-opponent neurons in early-level vision evolve to serve this purpose. This strategy provides a way of understanding the peculiar relationship between the objective world and subjective color experience, as well as rationalizing the relevant visual circuitry without invoking feature detection or image representation. PMID:25024184

  15. Spectra modulation of terahertz radiation from air plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ying; Sun, Wenfeng; Zhang, Yan

    2016-11-01

    Terahertz spectra modulation can be potentially used in the remote sensing. The spectra modulation of terahertz radiation from two plasmas is demonstrated experimentally. With the comparison of the spectra of terahertz radiated from single and two plasmas, the output spectrum of terahertz wave has been proved to be of interference superposition of the two separate terahertz waves. With measurement and analysis of the polarization states of the output terahertz wave, it is fund that the two orthogonal components of THz electric fields have effects on the components involved in the interference of two terahertz waves. The output terahertz radiation from two plasmas is simulated, and the result shows that the distance between two plasmas contributes greatly to the spectrum modulation of terahertz radiation.

  16. Candidates for Pulsars with Gigahertz-Peaked Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarczewski, L.; Kijak, J.; Lewandowski, W.

    2012-12-01

    Kijak et al. (2011) provided a definite evidence for a new type of pulsar radio spectra. These spectra show the maximum flux above 1 GHz and their energy decreases below 1 GHz, producing a positive spectral index at lower frequencies. They called these objects the gigahertz-peaked spectra (GPS) pulsars. We study a spectrum of radio pulsars and try to find pulsars with the turn-over effect at high frequencies. We created a database of candidates for pulsars with GPS effect using Maron et al. (2000) and ATNF database (Manchester et al. 2005), and also using recent papers where flux measurements were published (for example Bates et al. 2011). As a result a set of 22 candidates for pulsars with GPS was found.

  17. Quantum optimal control of photoelectron spectra and angular distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goetz, R. Esteban; Karamatskou, Antonia; Santra, Robin; Koch, Christiane P.

    2016-01-01

    Photoelectron spectra and photoelectron angular distributions obtained in photoionization reveal important information on, e.g., charge transfer or hole coherence in the parent ion. Here we show that optimal control of the underlying quantum dynamics can be used to enhance desired features in the photoelectron spectra and angular distributions. To this end, we combine Krotov's method for optimal control theory with the time-dependent configuration interaction singles formalism and a splitting approach to calculate photoelectron spectra and angular distributions. The optimization target can account for specific desired properties in the photoelectron angular distribution alone, in the photoelectron spectrum, or in both. We demonstrate the method for hydrogen and then apply it to argon under strong XUV radiation, maximizing the difference of emission into the upper and lower hemispheres, in order to realize directed electron emission in the XUV regime.

  18. An atlas of ultraviolet spectra of star-forming galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinney, A. L.; Bohlin, R. C.; Calzetti, D.; Panagia, N.; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.

    1993-01-01

    A systematic study is presented of the UV spectra of star-forming galaxies of different morphological type and activity class using a sample drawn from a uniformly reduced IUE data set. The spectra for a wide variety of galaxies, including normal spiral, LINER, starburst, blue compact, blue compact dwarf, and Seyfert 2 galaxies, are presented in the form of spectral energy distributions to demonstrate the overall characteristics according to morphology and activity class and in the form of absolute flux distributions to better show the absorption and emission features of individual objects. The data support the picture based on UV spectra of the Orbiting Astronomical Observatory and of the Astronautical Netherlands Satellite that spiral galaxies of later Hubble class have more flux at the shortest UV wavelengths than do spiral galaxies of earlier Hubble class.

  19. Optical transmission spectra in quasiperiodic multilayered photonic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Medeiros, F. F.; Albuquerque, E. L.; Vasconcelos, M. S.

    2006-10-01

    Optical transmission spectra in quasiperiodic multilayered photonic structures, composed of both positive (SiO2) and negative refractive index materials, are calculated by using a theoretical model based on the transfer matrix approach for normal incidence geometry. The quasiperiodic structures are substitutional sequences, characterized by the nature of their Fourier spectrum, which can be dense pure point (e.g. Fibonacci sequence) or singular continuous (e.g. Thue-Morse and double-period sequences). The transmission spectra for the case where both refractive indices can be approximated by a different constant show a unique mirror symmetrical profile, with no counterpart for the positive refractive index case, as well as a striking self-similar behaviour related to the Fibonacci sequence. For a more realistic frequency-dependent refractive index, the transmission spectra are characterized by a rich transmission profile of Bragg peaks with no more self-similarity or mirror symmetry.

  20. [The analysis and identification of fritillaria cirrhosa by Raman spectra].

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen-Na; Chen, Di-Ling; Zhu, Mei-Fang; Zhang, He-Ming

    2013-08-01

    Laser Raman spectrum technology was used to distinguish fritillaria cirrhosa from its adulterants rapidly and accurately. The study is based on that different traditional Chinese medicine contains different chemical compositions, and the differences could be displayed in Raman spectra. The Raman spectra of fritillaria cirrhosas shows that several characteristic strong peaks could be found at 442, 480, 863, 941, 1 083, 1 129, 1 342, 1 463 and 2 910 cm(-1), and a few obvious peaks appear at 111, 302, 360, 409, 527, 579, 618, 718, 767, 1 052, 1 083, 1 207 and 1 261 cm(-1). According to the Raman spectra, a Raman fingerprint of fritillaria cirrhosa was set up, which could be used to distinguish its adulterants. This analysis could be used in identifying fritillaria cirrhosa rapidly, accurately and nondestructively.

  1. Characteristics of the Brillouin spectra in Erbium-Ytterbium fibers.

    PubMed

    Canat, G; Durécu, A; Lesueur, G; Lombard, L; Bourdon, P; Jolivet, V; Jaouën, Y

    2008-03-03

    This paper reports the main characteristics of the Stokes spectra for typical pumped and unpumped Erbium-Ytterbium doped fibers. Doped fibers show shorter Brillouin shifts and their spectra are up to 1.6 times broader than undoped fibers. Those spectra are composed of several peaks originating from several longitudinal acoustic modes. The effective Brillouin gain of the secondary modes can be as large as 20% of the main peak gain. They can merge into a more complex structure for the largest cores. Simulations allow to relate these characteristics to the influence of codoping and index profile inhomogeneity. An additional broadening of the Stokes spectrum in pumped fibers is reported and attributed to thermal effects.

  2. Online Action Monitoring and Memory for Self-Performed Actions in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grainger, Catherine; Williams, David M.; Lind, Sophie E.

    2014-01-01

    This study explored whether individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) experience difficulties with action monitoring. Two experimental tasks examined whether adults with ASD are able to monitor their own actions online, and whether they also show a typical enactment effects in memory (enhanced memory for actions they have performed compared…

  3. Set Goals & Select Actions

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This phase of the Local Climate Action Framework will help users articulate the goals for their climate, energy, and sustainability programs, as well as to identify the actions that are most appropriate to help meet those goals.

  4. American Lead Action Memorandum

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ACTION MEMORANDUM— Request for a Time-Critical Removal Action andExemption from the $2 Million and 12-Month Statutory Limits at the AmericanLead Site, Indianapolis, Marion County, Indiana (Site ID #B56J)

  5. Action spectrum for phototherapy of psoriasis

    SciTech Connect

    Parrish, J.A.; Jaenicke, K.F.

    1981-05-01

    Using a monochromator the action spectrum for ultraviolet phototherapy of psoriasis was determined for radiation between 254 and 313 nm and compared to the action spectrum for erythema of uninvolved adjacent skin. Daily exposures of different doses of 254, 280, 290, 296, 300, 304 and 313 nm radiation were observed. Wavelengths of 254, 280, 290 nm were erythemogenic but not therapeutic even at 10 to 50 times the minimal erythema dose. At the other wavelengths studied, the 2 action spectra were similar. In general, fixed daily doses cleared at lower cumulative dose than did incrementally increased daily doses. The small number of suberythemogenic exposure doses required suggests that monochromatic radiation may have advantages over broadband sources.

  6. Effectiveness of Spectral Similarity Measures to Develop Precise Crop Spectra for Hyperspectral Data Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauhan, H.; Krishna Mohan, B.

    2014-11-01

    The present study was undertaken with the objective to check effectiveness of spectral similarity measures to develop precise crop spectra from the collected hyperspectral field spectra. In Multispectral and Hyperspectral remote sensing, classification of pixels is obtained by statistical comparison (by means of spectral similarity) of known field or library spectra to unknown image spectra. Though these algorithms are readily used, little emphasis has been placed on use of various spectral similarity measures to select precise crop spectra from the set of field spectra. Conventionally crop spectra are developed after rejecting outliers based only on broad-spectrum analysis. Here a successful attempt has been made to develop precise crop spectra based on spectral similarity. As unevaluated data usage leads to uncertainty in the image classification, it is very crucial to evaluate the data. Hence, notwithstanding the conventional method, the data precision has been performed effectively to serve the purpose of the present research work. The effectiveness of developed precise field spectra was evaluated by spectral discrimination measures and found higher discrimination values compared to spectra developed conventionally. Overall classification accuracy for the image classified by field spectra selected conventionally is 51.89% and 75.47% for the image classified by field spectra selected precisely based on spectral similarity. KHAT values are 0.37, 0.62 and Z values are 2.77, 9.59 for image classified using conventional and precise field spectra respectively. Reasonable higher classification accuracy, KHAT and Z values shows the possibility of a new approach for field spectra selection based on spectral similarity measure.

  7. Action in Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Hofsten, Claes

    2007-01-01

    It is argued that cognitive development has to be understood in the functional perspective provided by actions. Actions reflect all aspects of cognitive development including the motives of the child, the problems to be solved, and the constraints and possibilities of the child's body and sensorimotor system. Actions are directed into the future…

  8. Action Learning at Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mumford, Alan, Ed.

    This book contains 34 papers examining the theory, process, and outcomes of action learning at work. The following papers are included: "An Introduction to the Text" (Alan Mumford); "The Learning Equation" (Reg Revans); "Action Learning as a Vehicle for Learning" (Alan Mumford); "Placing Action Learning and…

  9. Conservation Action Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Rifle Association, Washington, DC.

    Conservation problems are identified, with some suggestions for action. General areas covered are: Wildlife Conservation, Soil Conservation, Clean Water, Air Pollution Action, and Outdoor Recreation Action. Appendices list private organizations or agencies concerned with natural resource use and/or management, congressional committees considering…

  10. Planning as Action Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Gonzalez, Carmen Beatriz; Hernandez, Teresa; Kusch, Jim; Ryan, Charly

    2004-01-01

    Planning contains so much more than the written plan. Early in 2000, an invitation came from the Collaborative Action Research Network (CARN), to people experienced in action research who might want to help plan and present an action research event for elementary school science teachers in Venezuela, South America, in Autumn 2000. This article…

  11. Participatory Action Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Martha Lentz

    1993-01-01

    Describes aspects of participatory action research and considers advantages of using participatory action research in research by disabilities and rehabilitation researchers. Notes that participatory action research can be built into any rehabilitation research design but that it rests upon the recognition of persons with disabilities as integral…

  12. Spectra Handling from AIRS and IRIS for Climate Change Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Y.; Lau, M.; Aumann, H. H.; Yung, Y. L.

    2010-12-01

    model shows consistent spectra for both clear sky and low cloud with both AIRS and IRIS by introducing water vapor in the model. The model results indicate the CO2 and CH4 increase which is consistent with the IPCC report. Due to the broad emission range of the water vapor in the troposphere, it plays a significant role in the model simulations.

  13. Show Me What You Know: Pre-Service City Teachers and Social Justice in Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marquez-Zenkov, Kristien; Corrigan, Diane; Brockett, Christina; Lehrian, Sarah

    2008-01-01

    Few current definitions and assessments of teacher "quality" have considered the social justice-oriented characteristics the authors consider most important in their work with future city teachers. This paper describes the masters licensure program with which the authors are involved, the portfolio assessment system this program utilizes to…

  14. Spectra of the Jovian ring and Amalthea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neugebauer, G.; Becklin, E. E.; Jewitt, D. C.; Danielson, G. E.; Terrile, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    Measurements made between 0.887 and 2.4 microns demonstrate that the Jovian ring and Amalthea have similar reflection spectra. The spectra, in particular the ratio of the 0.9- to 2.2-micron reflectivities, are inconsistent with those expected from water, ammonia, or methane frosts, but are consistent with reflection from large rock bodies.

  15. Observing Joint Action: Coordination Creates Commitment

    PubMed Central

    Michael, John; Sebanz, Natalie; Knoblich, Günther

    2016-01-01

    Previous research has shown that interpersonal coordination enhances pro-social attitudes and behavior. Here, we extend this research by investigating whether the degree of coordination observed in a joint action enhances the perception of individuals’ commitment to the joint action. In four experiments, participants viewed videos of joint actions. In the low coordination condition, two agents made independent individual contributions to a joint action. In the high coordination condition, the individual contributions were tightly linked. Participants judged whether and for how long the observed agents would resist a tempting outside option and remain engaged in the joint action. The results showed that participants were more likely to expect agents to resist outside options when observing joint actions with a high degree of coordination. This indicates that observing interpersonal coordination is sufficient to enhance the perception of commitment to joint action. PMID:27610745

  16. Blind extraction of exoplanetary spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morello, Giuseppe; Waldmann, Ingo; Damiano, Mario; Tinetti, Giovanna

    2016-10-01

    In the last decade, remote sensing spectroscopy enabled characterization of the atmospheres of extrasolar planets. Transmission and emission spectra of tens of transiting exoplanets have been measured with multiple instruments aboard Spitzer and Hubble Space Telescopes as well as ground-based facilities, revealing the presence of chemical species in their atmospheres, and constraining their temperature and pressure profiles.Early analyses were somehow heuristic, leading to some controversies in the literature.A photometric precision of 0.01% is necessary to detect the atmospheric spectral modulations. Current observatories, except Kepler, were not designed to achieve this precision. Data reduction is necessary to minimize the effect of instrument systematics in order to achieve the target precision. In the past, parametric models have extensively been used by most teams to remove correlated noise with the aid of auxiliary information of the instrument, the so-called optical state vectors (OSVs). Such OSVs can include inter- and intra-pixel position of the star or its spectrum, instrument temperatures and inclinations, and/or other parameters. In some cases, different parameterizations led to discrepant results.We recommend the use of blind non-parametric data detrending techniques to overcome those issues. In particular, we adopt Independent Component Analysis (ICA), i.e. a powerful blind source separation (BSS) technique to disentangle the multiple instrument systematics and astrophysical signals in transit/eclipse light curves. ICA does not require a model for the systematics, thence it can be applied to any instrument with little changes, if any. ICA-based algorithms have been applied to Spitzer/IRAC and synthetic observations in photometry (Morello et al. 2014, 2015, 2016; Morello 2015) and to Hubble/WFC3, Hubble/NICMOS and Spitzer/IRS and Hubble/WFC3 in spectroscopy (Damiano, Morello et al., in prep., Waldmann 2012, 2014, Waldmann et al. 2013) with excellent

  17. Isotope shifts in spectra of molecular liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubrovskaya, E. V.; Kolomiitsova, T. D.; Shurukhina, A. V.; Shchepkin, D. N.

    2016-02-01

    In the IR absorption spectra of low-temperature molecular liquids, we have observed anomalously large isotope shifts of frequencies of vibrational bands that are strong in the dipole absorption. The same effect has also been observed in their Raman spectra. At the same time, in the spectra of cryosolutions, the isotope shifts of the same bands coincide with a high accuracy (±(0.1-0.5) cm-1) with the shifts that are observed in the spectra of the gas phase. The difference between the spectra of examined low-temperature systems is caused by the occurrence of resonant dipole-dipole interactions between spectrally active identical molecules. The calculation of the band contour in the spectrum of liquid freon that we have performed in this work taking into account the resonant interaction between states of simultaneous transitions in isotopically substituted molecules can explain this effect.

  18. PCA: Principal Component Analysis for spectra modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurley, Peter D.; Oliver, Seb; Farrah, Duncan; Wang, Lingyu; Efstathiou, Andreas

    2012-07-01

    The mid-infrared spectra of ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) contain a variety of spectral features that can be used as diagnostics to characterize the spectra. However, such diagnostics are biased by our prior prejudices on the origin of the features. Moreover, by using only part of the spectrum they do not utilize the full information content of the spectra. Blind statistical techniques such as principal component analysis (PCA) consider the whole spectrum, find correlated features and separate them out into distinct components. This code, written in IDL, classifies principal components of IRS spectra to define a new classification scheme using 5D Gaussian mixtures modelling. The five PCs and average spectra for the four classifications to classify objects are made available with the code.

  19. Energy of hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic waves with point and continuous spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirota, M.; Fukumoto, Y.

    2008-08-01

    Energy of waves (or eigenmodes) in an ideal fluid and plasma is formulated in the noncanonical Hamiltonian context. By imposing the kinematical constraint on perturbations, the linearized Hamiltonian equation provides a formal definition of wave energy not only for eigenmodes corresponding to point spectra but also for singular ones corresponding to a continuous spectrum. The latter becomes dominant when mean fields have inhomogeneity originating from shear or gradient of the fields. The energy of each wave is represented by the eigenfrequency multiplied by the wave action, which is nothing but the action variable and, moreover, is associated with a derivative of a suitably defined dispersion relation. The sign of the action variable is crucial to the occurrence of Hopf bifurcation in Hamiltonian systems of finite degrees of freedom [M. G. Krein, Dokl. Akad. Nauk SSSR, Ser. A 73, 445 (1950)]. Krein's idea is extended to the case of coalescence between point and continuous spectra.

  20. Doppler-shifting effects on frequency spectra of gravity waves observed near the summer mesopause at high latitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fritts, David C.; Wang, Ding-Yi

    1991-01-01

    Results are presented of radar observations of horizontal and vertical velocities near the summer mesopause at Poker Flat (Alaska), showing that the observed vertical velocity spectra were influenced strongly by Doppler-shifting effects. The horizontal velocity spectra, however, were relatively insensitive to horizontal wind speed. The observed spectra are compared with predicted spectra for various models of the intrinsic motion spectrum and degrees of Doppler shifting.

  1. Non-LTE Stellar Population Synthesis of Globular Clusters Using Synthetic Integrated Light Spectra. I. Constructing the IL Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Mitchell. E.; Short, C. Ian

    2017-02-01

    We present an investigation of the globular cluster population synthesis method of McWilliam & Bernstein, focusing on the impact of non-LTE (NLTE) modeling effects and color–magnitude diagram (CMD) discretization. Johnson–Cousins–Bessel U – B, B-V, V-I, and J-K colors are produced for 96 synthetic integrated light (IL) spectra with two different discretization prescriptions and three degrees of NLTE treatment. These color values are used to compare NLTE- and LTE-derived population ages. Relative contributions of different spectral types to the IL spectra for different wavebands are measured. IL NLTE spectra are shown to be more luminous in the UV and optical than LTE spectra, but show stronger absorption features in the IR. The main features showing discrepancies between NLTE and LTE IL spectra may be attributed to light metals, primarily Fe i, Ca i, and Ti i, as well as TiO molecular bands. Main-sequence stars are shown to have negligible NLTE effects at IR wavelengths compared to more evolved stars. Photometric color values are shown to vary at the millimagnitude level as a function of CMD discretization. Finer CMD sampling for the upper main sequence and turnoff, base of the red giant branch, and the horizontal branch minimizes this variation. Differences in ages derived from LTE and NLTE IL spectra are found to range from 0.55 to 2.54 Gyr, comparable to the uncertainty in GC ages derived from color indices with observational uncertainties of 0.01 mag, the limiting precision of the Harris catalog.

  2. On the importance of being first: serial order effects in the interaction between action plans and ongoing actions.

    PubMed

    Fournier, Lisa R; Gallimore, Jonathan M; Feiszli, Kevin R; Logan, Gordon D

    2014-02-01

    When we plan sequences of actions, we must hold some elements of the sequence in working memory (WM) while we execute others. Research shows that execution of an action can be delayed if it partly overlaps (vs. does not overlap) with another action plan maintained in WM (partial repetition cost). However, it is not known whether all features of the action maintained in WM interfere equally with current actions. Most serial models of memory and action assume that interference will be equal, because all action features in the sequence should be activated to an equal degree in parallel; others assume that action features earlier in the sequence will interfere more than those later in the sequence, because earlier features will be more active. Using a partial repetition paradigm, this study examined whether serial position of action features in action sequences maintained in WM have an influence on current actions. Two stimulus events occurred in a sequence, and participants planned and maintained an action sequence to the first event (action A) in WM while executing a speeded response to the second event (action B). Results showed delayed execution of action B when it matched the first feature in the action A sequence (partial repetition cost), but not when it matched the last feature. These findings suggest that serial order is represented in the action plan prior to response execution, consistent with models that assume that serial order is represented by a primacy gradient of parallel feature activation prior to action execution.

  3. Binding Action and Emotion in Social Understanding

    PubMed Central

    Ferri, Francesca; Ebisch, Sjoerd J. H.; Costantini, Marcello; Salone, Anatolia; Arciero, Giampiero; Mazzola, Viridiana; Ferro, Filippo Maria; Romani, Gian Luca; Gallese, Vittorio

    2013-01-01

    In social life actions are tightly linked with emotions. The integration of affective- and action-related information has to be considered as a fundamental component of appropriate social understanding. The present functional magnetic resonance imaging study aimed at investigating whether an emotion (Happiness, Anger or Neutral) dynamically expressed by an observed agent modulates brain activity underlying the perception of his grasping action. As control stimuli, participants observed the same agent either only expressing an emotion or only performing a grasping action. Our results showed that the observation of an action embedded in an emotional context (agent’s facial expression), compared with the observation of the same action embedded in a neutral context, elicits higher neural response at the level of motor frontal cortices, temporal and occipital cortices, bilaterally. Particularly, the dynamic facial expression of anger modulates the re-enactment of a motor representation of the observed action. This is supported by the evidence that observing actions embedded in the context of anger, but not happiness, compared with a neutral context, elicits stronger activity in the bilateral pre-central gyrus and inferior frontal gyrus, besides the pre-supplementary motor area, a region playing a central role in motor control. Angry faces not only seem to modulate the simulation of actions, but may also trigger motor reaction. These findings suggest that emotions exert a modulatory role on action observation in different cortical areas involved in action processing. PMID:23349792

  4. Impulsive action: emotional impulses and their control

    PubMed Central

    Frijda, Nico H.; Ridderinkhof, K. Richard; Rietveld, Erik

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a novel theoretical view on impulsive action, integrating thus far separate perspectives on non-reflective action, motivation, emotion regulation, and impulse control. We frame impulsive action in terms of directedness of the individual organism toward, away, or against other givens – toward future states and away from one’s present state. First, appraisal of a perceived or thought-of event or object on occasion, rapidly and without premonition or conscious deliberation, triggers a motive to modify one’s relation to that event or object. Situational specifics of the event as perceived and appraised motivate and guide selection of readiness for a particular kind of purposive action. Second, perception of complex situations can give rise to multiple appraisals, multiple motives, and multiple simultaneous changes in action readiness. Multiple states of action readiness may interact in generating action, by reinforcing or attenuating each other, thereby yielding impulse control. We show how emotion control can itself result from a motive state or state of action readiness. Our view links impulsive action mechanistically to states of action readiness, which is the central feature of what distinguishes one kind of emotion from another. It thus provides a novel theoretical perspective to the somewhat fragmented literature on impulsive action. PMID:24917835

  5. Biological spectra analysis: Linking biological activity profiles to molecular structure

    PubMed Central

    Fliri, Anton F.; Loging, William T.; Thadeio, Peter F.; Volkmann, Robert A.

    2005-01-01

    Establishing quantitative relationships between molecular structure and broad biological effects has been a longstanding challenge in science. Currently, no method exists for forecasting broad biological activity profiles of medicinal agents even within narrow boundaries of structurally similar molecules. Starting from the premise that biological activity results from the capacity of small organic molecules to modulate the activity of the proteome, we set out to investigate whether descriptor sets could be developed for measuring and quantifying this molecular property. Using a 1,567-compound database, we show that percent inhibition values, determined at single high drug concentration in a battery of in vitro assays representing a cross section of the proteome, provide precise molecular property descriptors that identify the structure of molecules. When broad biological activity of molecules is represented in spectra form, organic molecules can be sorted by quantifying differences between biological spectra. Unlike traditional structure–activity relationship methods, sorting of molecules by using biospectra comparisons does not require knowledge of a molecule's putative drug targets. To illustrate this finding, we selected as starting point the biological activity spectra of clotrimazole and tioconazole because their putative target, lanosterol demethylase (CYP51), was not included in the bioassay array. Spectra similarity obtained through profile similarity measurements and hierarchical clustering provided an unbiased means for establishing quantitative relationships between chemical structures and biological activity spectra. This methodology, which we have termed biological spectra analysis, provides the capability not only of sorting molecules on the basis of biospectra similarity but also of predicting simultaneous interactions of new molecules with multiple proteins. PMID:15625110

  6. Magnetoabsorption spectra of bilayer graphene ribbons with Bernal stacking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Y. C.; Chang, C. P.; Lin, M. F.

    2008-09-01

    Magnetoabsorption spectra of bilayer graphene ribbons with Bernal stacking are studied by the Peierls-coupling tight-binding method. When the magnetic confinement prevails over the quantum confinement, low-energy spectra chiefly exhibit many Landau peaks, which are strongly modified by the inter-ribbon interactions and the magnetic-field magnitude (B) . The spectra show denser Landau peaks in bilayer graphene ribbon than in a monolayer ribbon with the same ribbon width. The absorption frequencies of Landau peaks of a wide monolayer ribbon show the B dependence, while those of a bilayer ribbon exhibit a varying B -field dependence. In the spectra region ω≤100meV , the absorption frequencies of Landau peaks are linearly dependent on the magnetic-field magnitude. At ω≥100meV , they evolve from the B dependence to the B dependence with the increase in the field strength. The absorption frequencies of Landau peaks exhibit B dependence at B≥20T . The relationship between the magneto-optical properties and electronic structures (the state energies and wave functions) are explored. The Landau wave functions are illustrated and used to identify the optical selection rule.

  7. IUE spectra of F and late A stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linsky, J. L.; Marstad, N. C.

    1981-01-01

    The International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) spectra of alpha CMi (F5 IV-V), beta Cas (F2 IV), alpha Car (F0 Ib), and gamma Boo (A7 III) in the context of the question as to whether chromospheres disappear in the early F late A portions of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram. Both alpha CMi (Procyon) and beta Cas show bright emission line spectra indicative of chromospheres and transition regions, but neither alpha Car (Canopus) nor gamma Boo show any evidence of emission in their SWP spectra or at the Mg II lines, despite very deep exposures. Alpha CMi has emission line fluxes roughly 6 times those of the quiet Sun, but the rapidly rotating delta Scuti type variable beta Cas has surface fluxes 10 to 50 times those of the quiet Sun. Upper limits on emission line fluxes for alpha Car are 4 to 20 and for gamma Boo 15 to 80 times the quiet Sun. It is concluded that the apparent absence of emission lines in the spectra of alpha Car and gamma Boo should not be interpreted as due to the absence of nonradiatively heated outer atmospheres in stars hotter than spectral type F0, but rather to the inability to see emission lines with IUE against a background of scattered light and a bright photospheric absorption line spectrum either in low or high dispersion.

  8. Multibubble Sonoluminescence Spectra of Water which Resemble Single-Bubble Sonoluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Didenko, Y. T.; Gordeychuk, T. V.

    2000-06-01

    Multibubble sonoluminescence (MBSL) spectra of water from cavitation clouds were collected in the presence of different noble gases and at different acoustic intensities. Results show that at high acoustic intensity and with xenon as a dissolved gas the emission of the OH* radical becomes indiscernible from the continuum. These spectra resemble single-bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) spectra. It is concluded that the source of emission in MBSL and SBSL can be the same, the difference in spectra is due to the higher temperature inside the bubble during SBSL.

  9. Multibubble sonoluminescence spectra of water which resemble single-bubble sonoluminescence

    PubMed

    Didenko; Gordeychuk

    2000-06-12

    Multibubble sonoluminescence (MBSL) spectra of water from cavitation clouds were collected in the presence of different noble gases and at different acoustic intensities. Results show that at high acoustic intensity and with xenon as a dissolved gas the emission of the OH* radical becomes indiscernible from the continuum. These spectra resemble single-bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) spectra. It is concluded that the source of emission in MBSL and SBSL can be the same, the difference in spectra is due to the higher temperature inside the bubble during SBSL.

  10. Study of N2 CARS spectra of a coal-fired flow facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Jagdish P.; Yueh, Fang-Yu

    1993-07-01

    A comparative study of N2 CARS spectra was performed at a coal-fired flow facility diffuser and aerodynamic duct. Spectra recorded at the diffuser have atypical feature near V = 1-2 N2 CARS vibrational transition. Atypical feature intensity decreases in the aerodynamic duct spectra. N2 CARS spectra at the aerodynamic duct show the laser-produced C2 absorption around the fundamental band. The CARS inferred temperature at the diffuser is estimated to be +/- 100 K where as at the aerodynamic duct it is +/- 250 K. The error in the inferred temperature with different interference in the CARS spectrum was also studied.

  11. Development of site-specific earthquake response spectra for eastern US sites

    SciTech Connect

    Beavers, J.E.; Brock, W.R.; Hunt, R.J.; Shaffer, K.E.

    1993-08-01

    Site-specific earthquake, uniform-hazard response spectra have been defined for the Department of Energy Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and Portsmouth, Ohio, sites for use in evaluating existing facilities and designing new facilities. The site-specific response spectra were defined from probabilistic and deterministic seismic hazard studies following the requirements in DOE-STD-1024-92, ``Guidelines for Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Curves at DOE Sites.` For these two sites, the results show that site-specific uniform-hazard response spectra are slightly higher in the high-frequency range and considerably lower in the low-frequency range compared with response spectra defined for these sites in the past.

  12. [Study on temperature correction of near-infrared spectra of solution].

    PubMed

    Chen, Yun; Shi, Zhen-Zhi; Xu, Ke-Xin; Chen, Wen-Liang

    2009-11-01

    The near-infrared spectrum of some common solvents, such as water, has very high sensitivity to temperature. So, the effect of temperature can not be ignored in NIRS. When temperature changes, the transmission spectra of the solution will also change. The influence of the temperature was deduced theoretically based on the Lambert-Beer's law in the present paper. And a method for temperature correction of sample's spectra was proposed. By using the change in pure solvent's absorbency with temperature disturbance, the method is used to correct the spectra of prediction samples. The spectra of glucose aqueous solution and albumin aqueous solution were measured at different temperatures. The calibration models of glucose and albumin concentration prediction were built respectively by using the calibration sample's spectra at 30 degrees C. The absorbency of pure water has different value at different temperature, and this difference was used to correct the spectra of sample which was measured at temperatures other than 30 degrees C. The experiment results showed that the curves of absorbancy difference of prediction samples, which were measured at different temperatures, show good superposition after spectra correction. And the root mean square error (RMSEP) of prediction was reduced obviously. It also means that the influence of temperature on the spectra can be eliminated effectively after spectra correction by using the method proposed in this paper.

  13. Handbook of Monochromatic XPS Spectra, Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crist, B. Vincent

    2000-10-01

    This handbook is one of three containing an invaluable collection of research grade XPS Spectra. Each handbook concentrates on a specific family of materials (the elements and their native oxides, semiconductors and polymers) and is entirely self-contained. The introductory section to each handbook includes comprehensive information about the XPS instrument used, the materials and the advanced methods used to collect the spectra. Energy resolution settings, instrument characteristics, energy referencing methods, traceability, energy scale calibration details and transmission function are all reported. Among the many valuable features included in each of these handbooks are: ? All spectra were measured by using AlK monochromatic X-rays ? All spectra were collected in a self-consistent manner to maximise data reliability and quality ? All peaks in the wide spectra are fully annotated and accompanied by detailed atom % tables that report BEs for each of the labelled peaks ? Each high-energy resolution spectrum is peak-fitted and accompanied by detailed tables containing binding energies, FWHMs and relative percentages. In this volume 'Semiconductors' are contained XPS Spectra from a wide range of semiconductive materials and related materials, a rare tool for scientists and analysts in this area. Exclusive features of this volume include: ? Binding energies are accurate to +/- 0.08eV ? Charge compensation was done with a flood-gun mesh-screen system ? Valence band spectra document the occupied density of states (DOS) and the fundamental electronic nature of the semi-conductive materials analysed ? Analyses were done: "as received", "freshly fractured in air", "ion etched" and "chemically treated" ? Alphabetically organised by chemical abbreviations for ease of locating each material This handbook is an invaluable reference for materials scientists and electrical engineers in industry, academia and government laboratories interested in the analysis of semiconductors

  14. Subliminal priming of actions influences sense of control over effects of action.

    PubMed

    Wenke, Dorit; Fleming, Stephen M; Haggard, Patrick

    2010-04-01

    The experience of controlling one's own actions, and through them events in the outside world, is a pervasive feature of human mental life. Two experiments investigated the relation between this sense of control and the internal processes involved in action selection and cognitive control. Action selection was manipulated by subliminally priming left or right keypress actions in response to a supraliminal visual target. The action caused the display of one of several colours as an action effect. The specific colour shown depended on whether the participant's action was compatible or incompatible with the preceding subliminal prime, and not on the prime identity alone. Unlike previous studies, therefore, the primes did not predict the to-be-expected action effects. Participants rated how much control they experienced over the different colours. Replicating previous results, compatible primes facilitated responding, whereas incompatible primes interfered with response selection. Crucially, priming also modulated the sense of control over action effects: participants experienced more control over colours produced by actions that were compatible with the preceding prime than over colours associated with prime-incompatible actions. Experiment 2 showed that this effect was not solely due to priming modulating action-effect contingencies. These results suggest that sense of control is linked to processes of selection between alternative actions, being strongest when selection is smooth and uncontested.

  15. Methane on Triton and Pluto - New CCD spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apt, J.; Carleton, N. P.; Mackay, C. D.

    1983-07-01

    Spectra of Triton and of Pluto from 4553-9558 A at 25 A resolution are presented. Both spectra show the methane absorption near 8900 A; its equivalent width was 16 times greater on Pluto than on Triton at the time of the observations. This is the first published observation of the 8900 A feature in Triton's spectrum. The previously reported 27 m-amagat abundance of the Pluto atmosphere ignored contributions due to methane ice and should therefore be regarded as an upper limit. The observations of the Pluto spectrum discussed here show sharp structure in the 8900 and 8600 A bands; the case for an atmosphere on Pluto may turn on whether new laboratory measurements show that such structure is present in methane ice.

  16. Computer processing of tunable diode laser spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, Randy D.

    1989-01-01

    A computer-controlled tunable diode laser spectrometer and spectral analysis software are described. The three-channel system records simultaneously the transmission of a subject gas, a temperature-stabilized etalon, and a calibration gas. The software routines are applied to diode laser spectra of HNO3 and NO2 to illustrate the procedures adopted for conversion of raw spectral data to useful transmission and harmonic spectra. Extraction of line positions, absorption intensities, collisional broadening coefficients, and gas concentrations from recorded spectra is also described.

  17. Analysis of atmospheric spectra for trace gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinsland, Curtis P.; Seals, Robert K., Jr.; Smith, Mary Ann H.; Goldman, Aaron; Murcray, David G.; Murcray, Frank J.

    1990-01-01

    The objective is the comprehensive analysis of high resolution atmospheric spectra recorded in the middle-infrared region to obtain simultaneous measurements of coupled parameters (gas concentrations of key trace constituents, total column amounts, pressure, and temperature) in the stratosphere and upper troposphere. Solar absorption spectra recorded at 0.002 and 0.02 cm exp -1 resolutions with the University of Denver group's balloon-borne, aircraft borne, and ground-based interferometers and 0.005 to 0.01 cm exp -1 resolution solar spectra from Kitt Peak are used in the analyses.

  18. Vibrational spectra and structure of isopropylbenzene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fishman, A. I.; Noskov, A. I.; Remizov, A. B.; Chachkov, D. V.

    2008-12-01

    Infrared spectra (4000-400 cm -1) and Raman spectra (1700-40 cm -1) of the liquid and two crystalline solids of isopropylbenzene (cumene) and isopropylbenzene-d 12 have been recorded. The spectra indicate that in the liquid and crystalline solids isopropylbenzene exists in planar conformation only (C sbnd H bond is in the plane of the benzene ring). An assignment of the observed band wave numbers both isopropylbenzene and isopropylbenzene-d 12 is discussed by comparison with normal mode wave numbers and IR intensities calculated from ab initio 6-31G (d) force fields.

  19. Tetrahdroxysqualene from Rhus taitensis Shows Antimycobacterial Activity Against Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Noro, Jeffrey C.; Barrows, Louis R.; Gideon, Osia G.; Ireland, Chris M.; Koch, Michael; Matainaho, Teatulohi; Piskaut, Pius; Pond, Christopher D.; Bugni, Tim S.

    2010-01-01

    Tuberculosis has become a major health problem, in particular with the emergence of extremely drug resistant tuberculosis (XDRTB). In our search for new therapeutic leads against TB, we isolated a new triterpene (1) from the plant Rhus taitensis collected in Papua New Guinea. Tetrahydroxysqualene (1) was isolated using bioassay-guided fractionation of the methanolic extract of R. taitensis leaves and twigs. The structure of tetrahydroxysqualene (1) was elucidated on the basis of HRESIMS and 1D and 2D NMR spectra. Tetrahydroxysqualene (1) exhibited anti–tuberculosis activity with an MIC of 10.0 μg/mL while showing only modest cytotoxicity. PMID:18710283

  20. DFT studies of the vibrational spectra of salicylic acid and related compounds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Compounds that exhibit intra- and intermolecular hydrogen bonds can have infrared and Raman spectra that show evidences of these hydrogen bonds. In modeling the vibrational spectra of such compounds, the addition of explicit hydrogen bonding species (e.g. solvent molecules) can often improve agreeme...

  1. Use of an improved radiation amplification factor to estimate the effect of total ozone changes on action spectrum weighted irradiances and an instrument response function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, Jay R.

    2010-12-01

    Multiple scattering radiative transfer results are used to calculate action spectrum weighted irradiances and fractional irradiance changes in terms of a power law in ozone Ω, U(Ω/200)-RAF, where the new radiation amplification factor (RAF) is just a function of solar zenith angle. Including Rayleigh scattering caused small differences in the estimated 30 year changes in action spectrum-weighted irradiances compared to estimates that neglect multiple scattering. The radiative transfer results are applied to several action spectra and to an instrument response function corresponding to the Solar Light 501 meter. The effect of changing ozone on two plant damage action spectra are shown for plants with high sensitivity to UVB (280-315 nm) and those with lower sensitivity, showing that the probability for plant damage for the latter has increased since 1979, especially at middle to high latitudes in the Southern Hemisphere. Similarly, there has been an increase in rates of erythemal skin damage and pre-vitamin D3 production corresponding to measured ozone decreases. An example conversion function is derived to obtain erythemal irradiances and the UV index from measurements with the Solar Light 501 instrument response function. An analytic expressions is given to convert changes in erythemal irradiances to changes in CIE vitamin-D action spectrum weighted irradiances.

  2. Use of an Improved Radiation Amplification Factor to Estimate the Effect of Total Ozone Changes on Action Spectrum Weighted Irradiances and an Instrument Response Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, Jay R.

    2010-01-01

    Multiple scattering radiative transfer results are used to calculate action spectrum weighted irradiances and fractional irradiance changes in terms of a power law in ozone OMEGA, U(OMEGA/200)(sup -RAF), where the new radiation amplification factor (RAF) is just a function of solar zenith angle. Including Rayleigh scattering caused small differences in the estimated 30 year changes in action spectrum-weighted irradiances compared to estimates that neglect multiple scattering. The radiative transfer results are applied to several action spectra and to an instrument response function corresponding to the Solar Light 501 meter. The effect of changing ozone on two plant damage action spectra are shown for plants with high sensitivity to UVB (280-315 run) and those with lower sensitivity, showing that the probability for plant damage for the latter has increased since 1979, especially at middle to high latitudes in the Southern Hemisphere. Similarly, there has been an increase in rates of erythemal skin damage and pre-vitamin D3 production corresponding to measured ozone decreases. An example conversion function is derived to obtain erythemal irradiances and the UV index from measurements with the Solar Light 501 instrument response function. An analytic expressions is given to convert changes in erythemal irradiances to changes in CIE vitamin-D action spectrum weighted irradiances.

  3. Determining the vibrational pattern via overtone cold spectra: C-H methyl stretches of propyne.

    PubMed

    Portnov, Alex; Bespechansky, Evgeny; Ganot, Yuval; Rosenwaks, Salman; Bar, Ilana

    2005-06-08

    Vibrationally mediated photodissociation and photoacoustic (PA) spectroscopy were employed for studying the intramolecular dynamics of propyne initially excited to the first through fourth overtone of methyl C-H stretching modes. Room-temperature PA and jet-cooled action spectra, monitoring the absorption of the parent and the yield of the ensuing H photofragments, respectively, were obtained. The PA spectra exhibit mainly broad features, while the action spectra, due to inhomogeneous structure reduction, expose multiple peaks of recognizable shapes in the differing overtone manifolds. Symmetric rotor simulations of the band contours of the action spectra allowed retrieving of band origins and linewidths. The linewidths of the bands in each manifold enabled estimates for energy redistribution times out of the corresponding states to the bath states, the times ranging from 18+/-6 ps for two quanta of C-H excitation to subpicosecond for five quanta. The data were also analyzed in terms of a normal-mode model and a joint local-/normal-mode model. These models enabled determination of harmonic frequencies, anharmonicities, and interaction parameters reproducing the observed data in all monitored regions and provided spectral assignments. The measured Doppler profiles were well fitted by Gaussians with widths suggesting low average translational energies for the released H photofragments. These low energies and their similarities to those for dissociation of propyne isotopomers preexcited to acetylenic C-H stretches were ascribed to an indirect dissociation process occurring after internal conversion to the ground electronic state and isomerization to allene.

  4. Electronic spectra of semiconductor nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Alivisatos, A.P.

    1993-12-31

    Semiconductor nanocrystals smaller than the bulk exciton show substantial quantum confinement effects. Recent experiments including Stark effect, resonance Raman, valence band photoemission, and near edge X-ray adsorption will be used to put together a picture of the nanocrystal electronic states.

  5. National Biofuels Action Plan

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-01

    Leading the Federal Interagency Biomass Research and Development Initiative October 2008 National Biofuels Action Plan Biomass Research and...REPORT DATE OCT 2008 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2008 to 00-00-2008 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE National Biofuels Action Plan 5a. CONTRACT...goal of the National Biofuels Action Plan is to maximize the environmental and economic benefi ts of biofuels use by advancing sustainable practices

  6. Shape of the A=14 {beta} spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, A.; Brown, B.A.

    1995-10-01

    The shape of allowed {Beta} spectra have a small contribution from the interference of the vector, weak-magnetism and axial GT matrix elements. According to CVC plus charge-symmetry of nuclear interactions, in a 0{sup +}{r_arrow} 1{sup +} transition like the {Beta} and {gamma} decays of the A=14 system, the weak-magnetism and electro-magnetic-Ml matrix elements should be equal. A measurement of the shape of the {sup 14}O spectrum, however, disagrees, by a factor of two with naive calculation described above. It has been speculated that because of the high supression of GT matrix element in the A=14 system, one could understand this discrepancy based on small charge-symmetry-effects. We have used shell-model wave functions adjusted to fit {sup 14}N(e,e{sup {prime}}) inelastic scattering, the width of the M1-{gamma} transition, and the {Beta} log f t`s, and show that reasonable assumptions lead to estimates that are very close to the naive CVC estimation. We propose that the {sup 14}O discrepancy is important and that new experiments should be done to measure the shape of the spectrum.

  7. Conformal symmetry and light flavor baryon spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchbach, M.; Compean, C. B.

    2010-08-01

    The degeneracy among parity pairs systematically observed in the N and Δ spectra is interpreted to hint on a possible conformal symmetry realization in the light flavor baryon sector in line with AdS5/CFT4. The case is made by showing that all the observed N and Δ resonances with masses below 2500 MeV distribute fairly well each over the first levels of a unitary representation of the conformal group, a representation that covers the spectrum of a quark-diquark system, placed directly on a conformally compactified Minkowski spacetime, R1⊗S3, as approached from the AdS5 cone. The free geodesic motion on the S3 manifold is described by means of the scalar conformal equation there, which is of the Klein-Gordon-type. The equation is then gauged by the curved Coulomb potential that has the form of a cotangent function. Conformal symmetry is not exact, this because the gauge potential slightly modifies the conformal centrifugal barrier of the free geodesic motion. Thanks to this, the degeneracy between P11-S11 pairs from same level is relaxed, while the remaining states belonging to same level remain practically degenerate. The model describes the correct mass ordering in the P11-S11 pairs through the spectra as a combined effect of the above conformal symmetry breaking, on the one side, and a parity change of the diquark from a scalar at low masses, to a pseudoscalar at higher masses, on the other. The quality of the wave functions is illustrated by calculations of realistic mean square charge radii and electric charge form factors on the examples of the proton, and the protonic P11(1440), and S11(1535) resonances. The scheme also allows for a prediction of the dressing function of an effective instantaneous gluon propagator from the Fourier transform of the gauge potential. We find a dressing function that is finite in the infrared and tends to zero at infinity.

  8. The Mid-Infrared Transmission Spectra of Antarctic Ureilites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandford, Scott A.

    1993-01-01

    The mid-infrared (4000-450 1/cm; 2.5-22.2 micron) transmission spectra of seven Antarctic ureilites and 10 Antarctic H-5 ordinary chondrites are presented. The ureilite spectra show a number of absorption bands, the strongest of which is a wide, complex feature centered near 1000 1/cm (10 micron) due to Si-O stretching vibrations in silicates. The profiles and positions of the substructure in this feature indicate that Mg-rich olivines and pyroxenes are the main silicates responsible. The relative abundances of these two minerals, as inferred from the spectra, show substantial variation from meteorite to meteorite, but generally indicate olivine is the most abundant (olivine:pyroxene = 60:40 to 95:5). Both the predominance of olivine and the variable olivine-to-pyroxene ratio are consistent with the known composition and heterogeneity of ureilites. The H-5 ordinary chondrites spanned a range of weathering classes and were used to provide a means of addressing the extent to which the ureilite spectra may have been altered by weathering processes. It was found that, while weathering of these meteorites produces some weak bands due to the formation of small amounts of carbonates and hydrates, the profile of the main silicate feature has been little affected by Antarctic exposure in the meteorites studied here. The mid-infrared ureilite spectra provide an additional means of testing potential asteroidal parent bodies for the ureilites. At present, the best candidates include the subset of S-type asteroids having low albedos and weak absorption features in the near infrared.

  9. Spectra: Time series power spectrum calculator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallardo, Tabaré

    2017-01-01

    Spectra calculates the power spectrum of a time series equally spaced or not based on the Spectral Correlation Coefficient (Ferraz-Mello 1981, Astron. Journal 86 (4), 619). It is very efficient for detection of low frequencies.

  10. Spatial evolution of ocean wave spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beal, R. C.

    1981-01-01

    The spatially evolving deep water synthetic aperture radar (SAR) directional spectra of a mixed ocean wave system are compared with a comprehensive set of surface and aircraft measurements. The evolution of the SAR spectra, at least for ocean wavelengths greater than 80 m, is seen as generally consistent with the auxiliary data set in both time and space. From the spatial evolution of the angular component of the spectra, it is possible to project back to an apparent remote storm source that is also consistent with the storm location via GOES satellite imagery. The data provide compelling evidence that the spatial evolution of SAR ocean wave spectra can be a useful tool in global ocean wave monitoring and forecasting.

  11. Synthesis and Spectra of Vanadium Complexes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ophardt, Charles E.; Stupgia, Sean

    1984-01-01

    Describes an experiment which illustrates simple synthetic techniques, redox principles in synthesis reactions, interpretation of visible spectra using Orgel diagrams, and the spectrochemical series. The experiment is suitable for the advanced undergraduate inorganic chemistry laboratory. (JN)

  12. An analysis of middle ultraviolet dayglow spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walden, Billie S.

    1991-12-01

    Middle ultraviolet spectra from 1800 to 3400A are analyzed. These spectra were obtained from the March 1990 rocket flight of the NPS MUSTANG instrument over the altitudes 105km to 315km. The data were compared with computer generated synthetic spectra. A least squares fitting procedure was developed for this purpose. Each data point was weighted using the standard deviation of the means. Synthetic spectra were generated for the following emissions: N2 Vegard-Kaphan; N2 Lyman-Birge-Hopfield; NO gamma, delta, and epsilon; OI 2972A, OII 2470A; and NII 2143A. Altitude profiles for the emissions were obtained. Tentative identification was made of the OIII 2853A emission. A comparison of VK and LBH profiles demonstrates the process of N2 A-state quenching by atomic oxygen.

  13. Microwave spectra of some volatile organic compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, W. F.

    1975-01-01

    A computer-controlled microwave (MRR) spectrometer was used to catalog reference spectra for chemical analysis. Tables of absorption frequency, peak absorption intensity, and integrated intensity are included for 26 volatile organic compounds, all but one of which contain oxygen.

  14. Frequency Spectra of Magnetoacoustic Emission in Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanchenko, S. V.; Grokhovsky, V. I.; Kolchanov, N. N.

    2016-08-01

    We analyzed the magnetoacoustic emission spectra of iron meteorites and their industrial analogs. The revealed differences in signal amplitude, position and width of the peaks are associated with the features of structure and the magnetic texture.

  15. Contribution to the study of turbulence spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dumas, R.

    1979-01-01

    An apparatus suitable for turbulence measurement between ranges of 1 to 5000 cps and from 6 to 16,000 cps was developed and is described. Turbulence spectra downstream of the grills were examined with reference to their general characteristics, their LF qualities, and the effects of periodic turbulence. Medium and HF are discussed. Turbulence spectra in the boundary layers are similarly examined, with reference to their fluctuations at right angles to the wall, and to lateral fluctuations. Turbulence spectra in a boundary layer with suction to the wall is discussed. Induced turbulence, and turbulence spectra at high Reynolds numbers. Calculations are presented relating to the effect of filtering on the value of the correlations in time and space.

  16. Comparing Ultraviolet Spectra Against Calculations: First Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Ruth C.

    2003-01-01

    The five-year goal of this effort is to calculate high fidelity mid-UV spectra for individual stars and stellar systems for a wide range of ages, abundances, and abundance ratios. In this first year, the emphasis was placed on revising the list of atomic line parameters used to calculate mid-UV spectra. First, new identifications of atomic lines and measurements of their transition probabilities were obtained for lines of the first and second ionization stages of iron-peak elements. Second, observed mid-UV and optical spectra for standard stars were re-analyzed and compared to new calculations, to refine the determination of transition probabilities and to estimate the identity of lines still missing from the laboratory lists. As evidenced by the figures, a dramatic improvement has resulted in the reproduction of the spectra of standard stars by the calculations.

  17. Action principles in nature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrow, John D.; Tipler, Frank J.

    1988-01-01

    Physical theories have their most fundamental expression as action integrals. This suggests that the total action of the universe is the most fundamental physical quantity, and hence finite. In this article it is argued that finite universal action implies that the universe is spatially closed. Further, the possible spatial topologies, the types of matter that can dominate the early universe dynamics, and the form of any quadratic additions to the lagrangian of general relativity are constrained. Initial and final cosmological curvature singularities are required to avoid a universal action singularity.

  18. POLLUX: a database of synthetic stellar spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palacios, A.; Gebran, M.; Josselin, E.; Martins, F.; Plez, B.; Belmas, M.; Lèbre, A.

    2010-06-01

    Aims: Synthetic spectra are needed to determine fundamental stellar and wind parameters of all types of stars. They are also used for the construction of theoretical spectral libraries helpful for stellar population synthesis. Therefore, a database of theoretical spectra is required to allow rapid and quantitative comparisons to spectroscopic data. We provide such a database offering an unprecedented coverage of the entire Hertzsprung-Russell diagram. Methods: We present the POLLUX database of synthetic stellar spectra. For objects with Teff ≤ 6000 K, MARCS atmosphere models are computed and the program TURBOSPECTRUM provides the synthetic spectra. ATLAS12 models are computed for stars with 7000 K ≤ Teff ≤ 15 000 K. SYNSPEC gives the corresponding spectra. Finally, the code CMFGEN provides atmosphere models for the hottest stars (Teff > 25 000 K). Their spectra are computed with CMF_FLUX. Both high resolution (R > 150 000) optical spectra in the range 3000 to 12 000 Å and spectral energy distributions extending from the UV to near-IR ranges are presented. These spectra cover the HR diagram at solar metallicity. Results: We propose a wide variety of synthetic spectra for various types of stars in a format that is compliant with the Virtual Observatory standards. A user-friendly web interface allows an easy selection of spectra and data retrieval. Upcoming developments will include an extension to a large range of metallicities and to the near-IR high resolution spectra, as well as a better coverage of the HR diagram, with the inclusion of models for Wolf-Rayet stars and large datasets for cool stars. The POLLUX database is accessible at http://pollux.graal.univ-montp2.fr/ and through the Virtual Observatory. Copy of database is only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb

  19. Action orientation overcomes the ego depletion effect.

    PubMed

    Dang, Junhua; Xiao, Shanshan; Shi, Yucai; Mao, Lihua

    2015-04-01

    It has been consistently demonstrated that initial exertion of self-control had negative influence on people's performance on subsequent self-control tasks. This phenomenon is referred to as the ego depletion effect. Based on action control theory, the current research investigated whether the ego depletion effect could be moderated by individuals' action versus state orientation. Our results showed that only state-oriented individuals exhibited ego depletion. For individuals with action orientation, however, their performance was not influenced by initial exertion of self-control. The beneficial effect of action orientation against ego depletion in our experiment results from its facilitation for adapting to the depleting task.

  20. Children's Actions when Experiencing Domestic Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Overlien, Carolina; Hyden, Margareta

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this article is, by analysing children's discourses, to investigate their actions or absence of actions during a domestic violence episode. The empirical data are recorded group therapy sessions and individual interviews with children who have grown up experiencing their fathers' violence against their mothers. The analysis shows that…

  1. Conformal symmetry of brane world effective actions

    SciTech Connect

    McFadden, Paul L.; Turok, Neil

    2005-01-15

    A simple derivation of the low-energy effective action for brane worlds is given, highlighting the role of conformal invariance. We show how to improve the effective action for a positive- and negative-tension brane pair using the AdS/CFT correspondence.

  2. Perceiving Virtual Geographical Slant: Action Influences Perception

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Creem-Regehr, Sarah H.; Gooch, Amy A.; Sahm, Cynthia S.; Thompson, William B.

    2004-01-01

    In 4 experiments, the authors varied the extent and nature of participant movement in a virtual environment to examine the influence of action on estimates of geographical slant. Previous studies showed that people consciously overestimate hill slant but can still accurately guide an action toward the hill (D. R. Proffitt, M. Bhalla, R.…

  3. Diffuse emission and pathological Seyfert spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, Jules P.

    1995-01-01

    In this annual ROSAT status report, the diffuse emission and spectra from Seyfert galaxies are examined. Three papers are presented and their contents include the soft x-ray properties and spectra of a binary millisecond pulsar, the PSPC and HRI observations of a Starburst/Seyfert 2 Galaxy, and an analysis of the possibility of x-ray luminous starbursts in the Einstein Medium Sensitivity Survey.

  4. On the Photoelectron Spectra of Li4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    The most stable structure for Li4(-) is found to be the rhombus. Electron detachment from this structure does not seem able to fully explain the photoelectron spectra. The computed results are consistent with those Rao, Jena, and Ray who have proposed that the experimental spectra consists of a superposition of detachment from the Li4(-) rhombus and tetrahedron, forming the singlet and triplet states of Li4, respectively.

  5. New atlas of IR solar spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, A.; Blatherwick, R. D.; Murcray, F. H.; Vanallen, J. W.; Bradford, C. M.; Cook, G. R.; Murcray, D. G.

    1980-01-01

    Over 4500 absorption lines have been marked on the spectra and the corresponding line positions tabulated. The associated absorbing telluric or solar species for more than 90% of these lines have been identified and only a fraction of the unidentified lines have peak absorptions greater than a few percent. The high resolution and the low Sun spectra greatly enhance the sensitivity limits for identification of trace constituents.

  6. Trigonometric Polynomials For Estimation Of Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenhall, Charles A.

    1990-01-01

    Orthogonal sets of trigonometric polynomials used as suboptimal substitutes for discrete prolate-spheroidal "windows" of Thomson method of estimation of spectra. As used here, "windows" denotes weighting functions used in sampling time series to obtain their power spectra within specified frequency bands. Simplified windows designed to require less computation than do discrete prolate-spheroidal windows, albeit at price of some loss of accuracy.

  7. Playing Action Video Games Improves Visuomotor Control.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Chen, Rongrong; Chen, Jing

    2016-08-01

    Can playing action video games improve visuomotor control? If so, can these games be used in training people to perform daily visuomotor-control tasks, such as driving? We found that action gamers have better lane-keeping and visuomotor-control skills than do non-action gamers. We then trained non-action gamers with action or nonaction video games. After they played a driving or first-person-shooter video game for 5 or 10 hr, their visuomotor control improved significantly. In contrast, non-action gamers showed no such improvement after they played a nonaction video game. Our model-driven analysis revealed that although different action video games have different effects on the sensorimotor system underlying visuomotor control, action gaming in general improves the responsiveness of the sensorimotor system to input error signals. The findings support a causal link between action gaming (for as little as 5 hr) and enhancement in visuomotor control, and suggest that action video games can be beneficial training tools for driving.

  8. Overlapping spectra resolution using non-negative matrix factorization.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hong-Tao; Li, Tong-Hua; Chen, Kai; Li, Wei-Guang; Bi, Xian

    2005-03-31

    Non-negative matrix factorization (NMF), with the constraints of non-negativity, has been recently proposed for multi-variate data analysis. Because it allows only additive, not subtractive, combinations of the original data, NMF is capable of producing region or parts-based representation of objects. It has been used for image analysis and text processing. Unlike PCA, the resolutions of NMF are non-negative and can be easily interpreted and understood directly. Due to multiple solutions, the original algorithm of NMF [D.D. Lee, H.S. Seung, Nature 401 (1999) 788] is not suitable for resolving chemical mixed signals. In reality, NMF has never been applied to resolving chemical mixed signals. It must be modified according to the characteristics of the chemical signals, such as smoothness of spectra, unimodality of chromatograms, sparseness of mass spectra, etc. We have used the modified NMF algorithm to narrow the feasible solution region for resolving chemical signals, and found that it could produce reasonable and acceptable results for certain experimental errors, especially for overlapping chromatograms and sparse mass spectra. Simulated two-dimensional (2-D) data and real GUJINGGONG alcohol liquor GC-MS data have been resolved soundly by NMF technique. Butyl caproate and its isomeric compound (butyric acid, hexyl ester) have been identified from the overlapping spectra. The result of NMF is preferable to that of Heuristic evolving latent projections (HELP). It shows that NMF is a promising chemometric resolution method for complex samples.

  9. Independent component analysis classification of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forni, Olivier; Maurice, Sylvestre; Gasnault, Olivier; Wiens, Roger C.; Cousin, Agnès; Clegg, Samuel M.; Sirven, Jean-Baptiste; Lasue, Jérémie

    2013-08-01

    The ChemCam instrument on board Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover uses the laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique to remotely analyze Martian rocks. It retrieves spectra up to a distance of seven meters to quantify and to quantitatively analyze the sampled rocks. Like any field application, on-site measurements by LIBS are altered by diverse matrix effects which induce signal variations that are specific to the nature of the sample. Qualitative aspects remain to be studied, particularly LIBS sample identification to determine which samples are of interest for further analysis by ChemCam and other rover instruments. This can be performed with the help of different chemometric methods that model the spectra variance in order to identify a the rock from its spectrum. In this paper we test independent components analysis (ICA) rock classification by remote LIBS. We show that using measures of distance in ICA space, namely the Manhattan and the Mahalanobis distance, we can efficiently classify spectra of an unknown rock. The Mahalanobis distance gives overall better performances and is easier to manage than the Manhattan distance for which the determination of the cut-off distance is not easy. However these two techniques are complementary and their analytical performances will improve with time during MSL operations as the quantity of available Martian spectra will grow. The analysis accuracy and performances will benefit from a combination of the two approaches.

  10. Theoretical calculation of spectra of dibutyl phthalate and dioctyl phthalate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Jian-Bin; Tang, Yan-Lin; Long, Zheng-Wen; Hu, Shuang-Hui; Li, Tao

    2014-05-01

    Dibutyl phthalate DBP and dioctyl phthalate DOP are the main components of the plasticizers. In order to investigate their molecular structure, chemical bond and spectrum, the geometrical parameters of the ground state and infrared (IR) spectrum are calculated using the density functional theory B3LYP method at the level of 6-311++G( d, p). On this basis, the first twenty-six excited states and the UV-Vis absorption spectra of DBP and DOP are studied using the time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) in the same fundamental group and compared with the ultraviolet absorption peak of the molecules measured with UNICO UV-Vis spectrophotometer. The two kinds of molecular spectra are then classified and compared with that in reference. The results show that the strong absorption of IR spectra of DOP and DBP are produced by C-H bending in-plane vibration and C=O telescopic vibration producing. The most absorption of UV-Vis absorption spectra appears in the end absorption belt from n to σ* transition, and the stronger absorption in the E belt of benzene electronic transition from π to π*. There are blue shift for DOP end absorption belt from n to σ* transition and red shift for DOP E absorption belt from π to π* transition relative to that of DBP. This calculation results are better in accord with the spectral data measured by UNICO ultraviolet and visible spectrophotometer.

  11. Tunneling spectra for electrons in the lowest Landau level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnell, F. J.; Simon, Steven H.

    2010-03-01

    The recently developed experimental technique of time dependent capacitance spectroscopy [1] allows for measurements of high-resolution tunneling spectra of 2DEGs in the quantum Hall regime, giving a detailed probe of the single particle spectral function (electron addition and subtraction spectra). These experiments show a number of interesting features including Landau level structure, exchange enhanced Zeeman energy, Coulomb gap physics, effects of fractional quantization, as well as several key features that remain to be explained. While there has been some prior theoretical work[2] towards explaining low energy Coulomb gap features of tunneling spectra found in much earlier tunneling experiments [3], the new experiments[1] have uncovered physics outside of the prior theoretical explanations. Building on a number of these prior theoretical works, we investigate theoretically the expected tunneling spectra for electrons in low Landau levels, including the effects of electron spin and coupling to collective modes. [1] O. E. Dial, R.C. Ashoori, L.N. Pfeiffer, and K.W. West, Nature 448, 176-179 (2007) ; O. E. Dial et al, unpublished. [2] I. Aleiner et al, Phys. Rev. Lett 74 3435; (1994) S. R. E. Yang and A. MacDonald PRL 70 4110 (1993); S. He, P.M. Platzman, and B. I. Halperin, PRL 71 777 (1993). [3] J. P. Eisenstein et al, Phy. Rev. Lett. 69, 3804 (1992).

  12. Theoretical study on absorption and emission spectra of adenine analogues.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongxia; Song, Qixia; Yang, Yan; Li, Yan; Wang, Haijun

    2014-04-01

    Fluorescent nucleoside analogues have attracted much attention in studying the structure and dynamics of nucleic acids in recent years. In the present work, we use theoretical calculations to investigate the structural and optical properties of four adenine analogues (termed as A1, A2, A3, and A4), and also consider the effects of aqueous solution and base pairing. The results show that the fluorescent adenine analogues can pair with thymine to form stable H-bonded WC base pairs. The excited geometries of both adenine analogues and WC base pairs are similar to the ground geometries. The absorption and emission maxima of adenine analogues are greatly red shifted compared with nature adenine, the oscillator strengths of A1 and A2 are stronger than A3 and A4 in both absorption and emission spectra. The calculated low-energy peaks in the absorption spectra are in good agreement with the experimental data. In general, the aqueous solution and base pairing can slightly red-shift both the absorption and emission maxima, and can increase the oscillator strengths of absorption spectra, but significantly decrease the oscillator strengths of A3 in emission spectra.

  13. Standardization of near infrared spectra measured on multi-instrument.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Cai, Wensheng; Shao, Xueguang

    2014-07-11

    Calibration model transfer is essential for practical applications of near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy because the measurements of the spectra may be performed on different instruments and the difference between the instruments must be corrected. An approach for calibration transfer based on alternating trilinear decomposition (ATLD) algorithm is proposed in this work. From the three-way spectral matrix measured on different instruments, the relative intensity of concentration, spectrum and instrument is obtained using trilinear decomposition. Because the relative intensity of instrument is a reflection of the spectral difference between instruments, the spectra measured on different instruments can be standardized by a correction of the coefficients in the relative intensity. Two NIR datasets of corn and tobacco leaf samples measured with three instruments are used to test the performance of the method. The results show that, for both the datasets, the spectra measured on one instrument can be correctly predicted using the partial least squares (PLS) models built with the spectra measured on the other instruments.

  14. Quantitative Comparison of Tandem Mass Spectra Obtained on Various Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazsó, Fanni Laura; Ozohanics, Oliver; Schlosser, Gitta; Ludányi, Krisztina; Vékey, Károly; Drahos, László

    2016-08-01

    The similarity between two tandem mass spectra, which were measured on different instruments, was compared quantitatively using the similarity index (SI), defined as the dot product of the square root of peak intensities in the respective spectra. This function was found to be useful for comparing energy-dependent tandem mass spectra obtained on various instruments. Spectral comparisons show the similarity index in a 2D "heat map", indicating which collision energy combinations result in similar spectra, and how good this agreement is. The results and methodology can be used in the pharma industry to design experiments and equipment well suited for good reproducibility. We suggest that to get good long-term reproducibility, it is best to adjust the collision energy to yield a spectrum very similar to a reference spectrum. It is likely to yield better results than using the same tuning file, which, for example, does not take into account that contamination of the ion source due to extended use may influence instrument tuning. The methodology may be used to characterize energy dependence on various instrument types, to optimize instrumentation, and to study the influence or correlation between various experimental parameters.

  15. Properties of Martian Hematite at Meridiani Planum by Simultaneous Fitting of Mars Mossbauer Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agresti, D. G.; Fleischer, I.; Klingelhoefer, G.; Morris, R. V.

    2010-01-01

    temperature dependence of certain parameters. By examining different fitting models, we demonstrate an improved fit for martian hematite modeled with two sextets rather than as a single sextet, and show that outcrop and spherule hematite are distinct. For outcrop, the weaker sextet indicates a Morin transition typical of well-crystallized and chemically pure hematite, while most of the outcrop hematite remains in a weakly ferromagnetic state at all temperatures. For spherule spectra, both sextets are consistent with weakly ferromagnetic hematite with no Morin transition. For both hematites, there is evidence for a range of particle sizes.

  16. On optimization of absorption-dispersion spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawranek, J. P.; Grabska, J.; Beć, K. B.

    2016-12-01

    A modified approach to the analysis of spectra of the complex electric permittivity of liquids in the Infrared region is presented. These spectra are derived from experimental spectra of the complex refractive index. Subsequently they are used to determine important secondary quantities, e.g. spectra of complex molecular polarizabilities and an integral property - the molar vibrational polarization. The accuracy of these quantities depends essentially on the accuracy of both components of the complex electric permittivity spectrum. In the proposed procedure, the spectra of the complex electric permittivity are approximated using the Classical Damped Harmonic Oscillator (CDHO) model for the description of individual bandshapes. The CDHO model defines both the real and imaginary part of the complex permittivity. The fitting procedure includes a simultaneous optimization of both the real and imaginary parts of the complex permittivity spectrum. A comparison of absorption-only curve fitting and the novel absorption-dispersion double curve fitting is presented; advantages of the new approach in accuracy, reliability and convergence time are pointed out. Due to the complexity of the problem, the choice was restricted to non-gradient methods of optimization. The performance of several gradientless algorithms was tested. Among numerous procedures the Powell General Least Squares Method Without Derivatives was found to be the most efficient. The reliability of obtained results of the band separatiovn process was tested on several simulated spectra of increasing complexity. The applicability of the developed approach to the analysis of exemplary experimental data was evaluated and discussed.

  17. Rank Pooling for Action Recognition.

    PubMed

    Fernando, Basura; Gavves, Efstratios; Oramas M, Jose Oramas; Ghodrati, Amir; Tuytelaars, Tinne

    2017-04-01

    We propose a function-based temporal pooling method that captures the latent structure of the video sequence data - e.g., how frame-level features evolve over time in a video. We show how the parameters of a function that has been fit to the video data can serve as a robust new video representation. As a specific example, we learn a pooling function via ranking machines. By learning to rank the frame-level features of a video in chronological order, we obtain a new representation that captures the video-wide temporal dynamics of a video, suitable for action recognition. Other than ranking functions, we explore different parametric models that could also explain the temporal changes in videos. The proposed functional pooling methods, and rank pooling in particular, is easy to interpret and implement, fast to compute and effective in recognizing a wide variety of actions. We evaluate our method on various benchmarks for generic action, fine-grained action and gesture recognition. Results show that rank pooling brings an absolute improvement of 7-10 average pooling baseline. At the same time, rank pooling is compatible with and complementary to several appearance and local motion based methods and features, such as improved trajectories and deep learning features.

  18. 78 FR 32556 - Safety Zone; 2013 Ocean City Air Show, Atlantic Ocean; Ocean City, MD

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-31

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; 2013 Ocean City Air Show, Atlantic Ocean; Ocean City, MD AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard is... City, MD to support the Ocean City Air Show. This action is intended to restrict vessel...

  19. 77 FR 27120 - Safety Zone; Virginia Beach Oceanfront Air Show, Atlantic Ocean, Virginia Beach, VA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-09

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Virginia Beach Oceanfront Air Show, Atlantic Ocean, Virginia Beach, VA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule. SUMMARY: The... Beach, VA to support the Virginia Beach Oceanfront Air Show. This action is necessary to provide for...

  20. Eigenvalue Spectra of Modular Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peixoto, Tiago P.

    2013-08-01

    A large variety of dynamical processes that take place on networks can be expressed in terms of the spectral properties of some linear operator which reflects how the dynamical rules depend on the network topology. Often, such spectral features are theoretically obtained by considering only local node properties, such as degree distributions. Many networks, however, possess large-scale modular structures that can drastically influence their spectral characteristics and which are neglected in such simplified descriptions. Here, we obtain in a unified fashion the spectrum of a large family of operators, including the adjacency, Laplacian, and normalized Laplacian matrices, for networks with generic modular structure, in the limit of large degrees. We focus on the conditions necessary for the merging of the isolated eigenvalues with the continuous band of the spectrum, after which the planted modular structure can no longer be easily detected by spectral methods. This is a crucial transition point which determines when a modular structure is strong enough to affect a given dynamical process. We show that this transition happens in general at different points for the different matrices, and hence the detectability threshold can vary significantly, depending on the operator chosen. Equivalently, the sensitivity to the modular structure of the different dynamical processes associated with each matrix will be different, given the same large-scale structure present in the network. Furthermore, we show that, with the exception of the Laplacian matrix, the different transitions coalesce into the same point for the special case where the modules are homogeneous but separate otherwise.

  1. An Inverse Modeling Approach to Estimating Phytoplankton Pigment Concentrations from Phytoplankton Absorption Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moisan, John R.; Moisan, Tiffany A. H.; Linkswiler, Matthew A.

    2011-01-01

    Phytoplankton absorption spectra and High-Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) pigment observations from the Eastern U.S. and global observations from NASA's SeaBASS archive are used in a linear inverse calculation to extract pigment-specific absorption spectra. Using these pigment-specific absorption spectra to reconstruct the phytoplankton absorption spectra results in high correlations at all visible wavelengths (r(sup 2) from 0.83 to 0.98), and linear regressions (slopes ranging from 0.8 to 1.1). Higher correlations (r(sup 2) from 0.75 to 1.00) are obtained in the visible portion of the spectra when the total phytoplankton absorption spectra are unpackaged by multiplying the entire spectra by a factor that sets the total absorption at 675 nm to that expected from absorption spectra reconstruction using measured pigment concentrations and laboratory-derived pigment-specific absorption spectra. The derived pigment-specific absorption spectra were further used with the total phytoplankton absorption spectra in a second linear inverse calculation to estimate the various phytoplankton HPLC pigments. A comparison between the estimated and measured pigment concentrations for the 18 pigment fields showed good correlations (r(sup 2) greater than 0.5) for 7 pigments and very good correlations (r(sup 2) greater than 0.7) for chlorophyll a and fucoxanthin. Higher correlations result when the analysis is carried out at more local geographic scales. The ability to estimate phytoplankton pigments using pigment-specific absorption spectra is critical for using hyperspectral inverse models to retrieve phytoplankton pigment concentrations and other Inherent Optical Properties (IOPs) from passive remote sensing observations.

  2. Representation of action in Parkinson's disease: imagining, observing, and naming actions.

    PubMed

    Poliakoff, Ellen

    2013-09-01

    People with Parkinson's disease (PD) exhibit slowed movements and difficulty in initiating movements. This review addresses the issue of whether or not cognitive representations of actions in PD are affected, alongside these motor problems. In healthy people, the motor system can be involved in tasks such as observing a graspable object or another person's action, or imagining and naming actions, in the absence of overt movement. As described in this review, the fact that the slowed real movements exhibited by PD patients are coupled with slower motor imagery and verb processing provides additional evidence for the involvement of the motor system in these processes. On the other hand, PD patients can still engage in motor imagery and action observation to some extent, which is encouraging for the use of these processes in rehabilitation. Findings across the different domains of action-representation reveal several important factors. First, the nature of action is critical: patients' performance in observation and naming tasks is influenced by whether or not the action is in their repertoire and by the extent of motion required to execute the action. Second, people with PD may use alternative or compensatory mechanisms to represent actions, such as relying more on a third-person perspective or a visual strategy. Third, people with PD show a lack of specificity, responding as strongly to stimuli related and unrelated to actions. Investigating action-representation in PD has implications for our understanding of both the symptoms of PD and the cognitive representation of actions in the healthy system.

  3. Energy spectra of ions from impulsive solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reames, D. V.; Richardson, I. G.; Wenzel, K.-P.

    1991-01-01

    A study of the energy spectra of ions from impulsive solar flares in the 0.1 to 100 MeV region is reported with data from the combined observations of experiments on the ISEE 3 and IMP 8 spacecraft. Most of the events studied are dominated by He, and these He spectra show a persistent steepening or break above about 10 MeV resulting in an increase in the power-law spectral indices from about 2 to about 3.5 or more. One event, dominated by protons, shows a clear maximum in the spectrum near 1 MeV. If the rollover in the spectrum below 1 MeV is interpreted as a consequence of matter traversal in the solar atmosphere, then the source of the acceleration would lie only about 800 km above the photosphere, well below the corona. An alternative interpretation is that trapping in the acceleration region directly causes a peak in the spectrum.

  4. Calculation of IR-spectra of structural fragments of lignins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derkacheva, O. Yu.; Ishankhodzhaeva, M. M.

    2016-12-01

    To study structure of softwood lignins the experimental and theoretical IR-spectra in middle IR-diapason were analyzed. To interpret these data the quantum chemical calculations of IR-spectra of general dimmer fragments of softwood lignins by method of density functional theory (DFT/B3LYP) with 6-31G(d,p) as basis set were carried out. These calculations showed that frequencies of normal vibrations of fragment with β-alkyl-aryl linkage are close to the experimental values of the IR absorption bands of lignin, and infrared spectrum of this structure is similar to the experimental spectrum of lignin. The calculations with accounting for the solvent showed a strong increase in the intensity of the majority of the bands and the solvent effect on the frequencies of vibrations.

  5. Deriving motor primitives through action segmentation.

    PubMed

    Hemeren, Paul E; Thill, Serge

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the present experiment is to further understand the effect of levels of processing (top-down vs. bottom-up) on the perception of movement kinematics and primitives for grasping actions in order to gain insight into possible primitives used by the mirror system. In the present study, we investigated the potential of identifying such primitives using an action segmentation task. Specifically, we investigated whether or not segmentation was driven primarily by the kinematics of the action, as opposed to high-level top-down information about the action and the object used in the action. Participants in the experiment were shown 12 point-light movies of object-centered hand/arm actions that were either presented in their canonical orientation together with the object in question (top-down condition) or upside down (inverted) without information about the object (bottom-up condition). The results show that (1) despite impaired high-level action recognition for the inverted actions participants were able to reliably segment the actions according to lower-level kinematic variables, (2) segmentation behavior in both groups was significantly related to the kinematic variables of change in direction, velocity, and acceleration of the wrist (thumb and finger tips) for most of the included actions. This indicates that top-down activation of an action representation leads to similar segmentation behavior for hand/arm actions compared to bottom-up, or local, visual processing when performing a fairly unconstrained segmentation task. Motor primitives as parts of more complex actions may therefore be reliably derived through visual segmentation based on movement kinematics.

  6. Habits as action sequences: hierarchical action control and changes in outcome value

    PubMed Central

    Dezfouli, Amir; Lingawi, Nura W.; Balleine, Bernard W.

    2014-01-01

    Goal-directed action involves making high-level choices that are implemented using previously acquired action sequences to attain desired goals. Such a hierarchical schema is necessary for goal-directed actions to be scalable to real-life situations, but results in decision-making that is less flexible than when action sequences are unfolded and the decision-maker deliberates step-by-step over the outcome of each individual action. In particular, from this perspective, the offline revaluation of any outcomes that fall within action sequence boundaries will be invisible to the high-level planner resulting in decisions that are insensitive to such changes. Here, within the context of a two-stage decision-making task, we demonstrate that this property can explain the emergence of habits. Next, we show how this hierarchical account explains the insensitivity of over-trained actions to changes in outcome value. Finally, we provide new data that show that, under extended extinction conditions, habitual behaviour can revert to goal-directed control, presumably as a consequence of decomposing action sequences into single actions. This hierarchical view suggests that the development of action sequences and the insensitivity of actions to changes in outcome value are essentially two sides of the same coin, explaining why these two aspects of automatic behaviour involve a shared neural structure. PMID:25267824

  7. Online action monitoring and memory for self-performed actions in autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Grainger, Catherine; Williams, David M; Lind, Sophie E

    2014-05-01

    This study explored whether individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) experience difficulties with action monitoring. Two experimental tasks examined whether adults with ASD are able to monitor their own actions online, and whether they also show a typical enactment effects in memory (enhanced memory for actions they have performed compared to actions they have observed being performed). Individuals with ASD and comparison participants showed a similar pattern of performance on both tasks. In a task which required individuals to distinguish person-caused from computer-caused changes in phenomenology both groups found it easier to monitor their own actions compared to those of an experimenter. Both groups also showed typical enactment effects. Despite recent suggestions to the contrary, these results support suggestions that action monitoring is unimpaired in ASD.

  8. K-inflationary power spectra at second order

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Jérôme; Vennin, Vincent; Ringeval, Christophe E-mail: christophe.ringeval@uclouvain.be

    2013-06-01

    Within the class of inflationary models, k-inflation represents the most general single field framework that can be associated with an effective quadratic action for the curvature perturbations and a varying speed of sound. The incoming flow of high-precision cosmological data, such as those from the Planck satellite and small scale Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) experiments, calls for greater accuracy in the inflationary predictions. In this work, we calculate for the first time the next-to-next-to-leading order scalar and tensor primordial power spectra in k-inflation needed in order to obtain robust constraints on the inflationary theory. The method used is the uniform approximation together with a second order expansion in the Hubble and sound flow functions. Our result is checked in various limits in which it reduces to already known situations.

  9. Vacuum Ultraviolet Action Spectroscopy of Polysaccharides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enjalbert, Quentin; Brunet, Claire; Vernier, Arnaud; Allouche, Abdul-Rahman; Antoine, Rodolphe; Dugourd, Philippe; Lemoine, Jérôme; Giuliani, Alexandre; Nahon, Laurent

    2013-08-01

    We studied the optical properties of gas-phase polysaccharides (maltose, maltotetraose, and maltohexaose) ions by action spectroscopy using the coupling between a quadrupole ion trap and a vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) beamline at the SOLEIL synchrotron radiation facility (France) in the 7 to 18 eV range. The spectra provide unique benchmarks for evaluation of theoretical data on electronic transitions of model carbohydrates in the VUV range. The effects of the nature of the charge held by polysaccharide ions on the relaxation processes were also explored. Finally the effect of isomerization of polysaccharides (with melezitose and raffinose) on their photofragmentation with VUV photons is presented.

  10. Action Learning in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marquardt, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Action learning was introduced into China less than 20 years ago, but has rapidly become a valuable tool for organizations seeking to solve problems, develop their leaders, and become learning organizations. This article provides an historical overview of action learning in China, its cultural underpinnings, and five case studies. It concludes…

  11. Who Needs Affirmative Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ginger, Ann Fagan

    1979-01-01

    Affirmative action and reverse discrimination are discussed. Facts that were omitted from the court record on the Bakke case are examined. The need for encouraging minority students and women to continue to press for school admission and for lawyers to continue to press affirmative action suits is stressed. (MC)

  12. Renormalized action improvements

    SciTech Connect

    Zachos, C.

    1984-01-01

    Finite lattice spacing artifacts are suppressed on the renormalized actions. The renormalized action trajectories of SU(N) lattice gauge theories are considered from the standpoint of the Migdal-Kadanoff approximation. The minor renormalized trajectories which involve representations invariant under the center are discussed and quantified. 17 references.

  13. Training for Nonviolent Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Theodore W.; Shivers, Lynne

    The theory and practice of nonviolent action training as it exists to date are reviewed in this pamphlet. A response to a renewal of interest in alternative forms of social action, the pamphlet results specifically from an international seminar of experienced organizers and trainers held at Preston Patrick, Westmorland, England, June 27 - July 2,…

  14. Affirmative Action Program Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ventura County Community Coll. District, CA.

    Guidelines relating to the affirmative action program of the Ventura County Community College District are provided in this manual. Affirmative action is defined as, "A set of specific and result-oriented procedures to which a contractor commits himself/herself to apply every good faith effort. The objective of those procedures, plus such efforts,…

  15. 25 Action Learning Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association of Secondary School Principals, Reston, VA.

    This booklet on action-learning reflects an interest in preparing youth for the world of real experiences. Arranged in two major parts, the first offers information on the background and development of action-learning. Included in this section are the conclusions of the Panel on Youth of the President's Science Advisory Committee, the National…

  16. ACTION. 1977 Annual Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ACTION, Washington, DC.

    In this report are described projects and activities undertaken by ACTION's volunteer programs in 1977. The first section concentrates on reviews conducted, including a major review of ACTION's domestic volunteer programs and the management systems supporting them and an assessment of its programs using the Zero-Base Budget approach called for by…

  17. Action Learning and Leadership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marquardt, Michael J.

    2000-01-01

    Today's leaders perform the following roles: systems thinker, change agent, innovator, servant, polychronic coordinator, teacher-mentor, and visionary. The elements of action learning (real problems, teams, reflective inquiry, commitment to action, focus on learning) contribute to the development of these critical skills. (Author/SK)

  18. Handbook for Ecology Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eber, Ronald

    This handbook has been compiled to aid concerned individuals and ecology groups more adequately define their goals, initiate good programs, and take effective action. It examines the ways a group of working individuals can become involved in action programs for ecological change. Part 1 deals with organization, preliminary organizing, structuring,…

  19. NEXAFS of ionic solids as seen through resonant electron spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elango, M.; Kikas, A.; Maiste, A.; Ruus, R.; Saar, A.

    1995-02-01

    We show that the nonradiative decay patterns of core-hole-electron bound states (core excitons) in the regions of K L 23 edge of KMnF 3 and KCl, Cl L 23 edge of NaCl, and F K edge of alkali fluorides include specific spectator structures which are clearly distinguishable from the normal Auger spectra excited in the regions of continuum transitions.

  20. Condensed-matter energetics from diatomic molecular spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, In H.; Jeanloz, Raymond; Jhung, Kyu S.

    1993-01-01

    Analyses of molecular spectra and compression data from crystals show that a single function successfully describes the dependence on interatomic separation of both the potential energy of diatomic molecules and the cohesive binding energy of condensed matter. The empirical finding that one function describes interatomic energies for such diverse forms of matter and over a wide range of conditions can be used to extend condensed-matter equations of state but warrants further theoretical study.

  1. Disks of T Tauri stars with flat infrared spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, F.C.; Shu, F.H.; Lada, C.J.

    1988-03-01

    The energy distributions of T Tauri stars with flat infrared spectra is modeled by assuming that they have spatially thin disks with unorthodox radial gradients of temperature. Derived model parameters show that the disks associated with the flat-spectrum sources must contain intrinsic luminosity in addition to the energy intercepted and reprocessed from the central star, i.e., the disks must be active. Self-gravity may provide a possible source for this activity. 80 references.

  2. DFT simulations and vibrational analysis of FTIR and FT-Raman spectra of 2-amino-4-methyl benzonitrile.

    PubMed

    Dheivamalar, S; Silambarasan, V

    2012-10-01

    This work deals with the vibrational spectroscopy of 2-amino-4-methyl benzonitrile (AMB) by means of quantum chemical calculations. The mid and far FTIR and FT-Raman spectra were measured in the condensed state. Hartree-Fock (HF/6-31G(*)) and density functional theory (DFT, B3LYP/6-31G(*)) ab initio methods have been performed to interpret the observed vibrational spectra. The vibrational spectra were interpreted with the aid of normal coordinate analysis based on scaled density functional force field. The results of the calculations were applied to simulated infrared and Raman spectra of the title compound, which showed excellent agreement with the observed spectra.

  3. Embracing causality in specifying the indeterminate effects of actions

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, F.

    1996-12-31

    This paper makes the following two contributions to formal theories of actions: Showing that a causal minimization framework can be used effectively to specify the effects of indeterminate actions; and showing that for certain classes of such actions, regression, an effective computational mechanism, can be used to reason about them.

  4. Lamplighter groups, de Brujin graphs, spider-web graphs and their spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigorchuk, R.; Leemann, P.-H.; Nagnibeda, T.

    2016-05-01

    We study the infinite family of spider-web graphs \\{{{ S }}k,N,M\\}, k≥slant 2, N≥slant 0 and M≥slant 1, initiated in the 50s in the context of network theory. It was later shown in physical literature that these graphs have remarkable percolation and spectral properties. We provide a mathematical explanation of these properties by putting the spider-web graphs in the context of group theory and algebraic graph theory. Namely, we realize them as tensor products of the well-known de Bruijn graphs \\{{{ B }}k,N\\} with cyclic graphs \\{{C}M\\} and show that these graphs are described by the action of the lamplighter group {{ L }}k={Z}/k{Z}\\wr {Z} on the infinite binary tree. Our main result is the identification of the infinite limit of \\{{{ S }}k,N,M\\}, as N,M\\to ∞ , with the Cayley graph of the lamplighter group {{ L }}k which, in turn, is one of the famous Diestel-Leader graphs {{DL}}k,k. As an application we compute the spectra of all spider-web graphs and show their convergence to the discrete spectral distribution associated with the Laplacian on the lamplighter group.

  5. Gravitational spectra from direct measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, C. A.; Colombo, O. L.

    1978-01-01

    A simple rapid method is described for determining the spectrum of a surface field from harmonic analysis of direct measurements along great circle arcs. The method is shown to give excellent overall trends to very high degree from even a few short arcs of satellite data. Three examples are taken with perfect measurements of satellite tracking over a planet made up of hundreds of point-masses using (1) altimetric heights from a low orbiting spacecraft, (2) velocity residuals between a low and a high satellite in circular orbits, and (3) range-rate data between a station at infinity and a satellite in highly eccentric orbit. In particular, the smoothed spectrum of the Earth's gravitational field is determined to about degree 400(50 km half wavelength) from 1 D x 1 D gravimetry and the equivalent of 11 revolutions of Geos 3 and Skylab altimetry. This measurement shows there is about 46 cm of geoid height remaining in the field beyond degree 180.

  6. Infrared spectra of silica polymorphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koike, C.; Noguchi, R.; Chihara, H.; Suto, H.; Ohtaka, O.; Imai, Y.; Matsumoto, T.; Tsuchiyama, A.

    The existence of silica within several debris disks has been suggested. We investigate the annealing conditions of α-cristobalite, and further prepare various types of silica, including α-cristobalite, α-quartz, coesite, stishovite, and fused quartz, which are natural, synthetic or commercial samples. We compare the results to previous studies and find that α-cristobalite synthesized at higher temperature than annealed silica. The interesting result of features similar to those of forsterite should be highlighted, where αcristobalite and coesite showed similar peaks at 16, 33, and 69 μm as forsterite. The 69 μm band for αcristobalite is especially very broad and strong, and shifts largely to a shorter wavelengths under cooling to low temperatures. The band for coesite, however, is very sharp, and shifts only a small amount to longer wavelengths under cooling to low temperatures. The peak positions of 16 and 69-μm band due to α-cristobalite can become index for temperature of silica dust. We discuss the possibility of silica detection around debris disks.

  7. Resonant spectra of quadrupolar anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fossez, K.; Mao, Xingze; Nazarewicz, W.; Michel, N.; Garrett, W. R.; Płoszajczak, M.

    2016-09-01

    In quadrupole-bound anions, an extra electron is attached at a sufficiently large quadrupole moment of a neutral molecule, which is lacking a permanent dipole moment. The nature of the bound states and low-lying resonances of such anions is of interest for understanding the threshold behavior of open quantum systems in general. In this work, we investigate the properties of quadrupolar anions as halo systems, the formation of rotational bands, and the transition from a subcritical to supercritical electric quadrupole moment. We solve the electron-plus-rotor problem using a nonadiabatic coupled-channel formalism by employing the Berggren ensemble, which explicitly contains bound states, narrow resonances, and the scattering continuum. The rotor is treated as a linear triad of point charges with zero monopole and dipole moments and nonzero quadrupole moment. We demonstrate that binding energies and radii of quadrupolar anions strictly follow the scaling laws for two-body halo systems. Contrary to the case of dipolar anions, ground-state band of quadrupolar anions smoothly extend into the continuum, and many rotational bands could be identified above the detachment threshold. We study the evolution of a bound state of an anion as it dives into the continuum at a critical quadrupole moment and we show that the associated critical exponent is α =2 . Everything considered, quadrupolar anions represent a perfect laboratory for the studies of marginally bound open quantum systems.

  8. Parameterizing Stellar Spectra Using Deep Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiang-Ru; Pan, Ru-Yang; Duan, Fu-Qing

    2017-03-01

    Large-scale sky surveys are observing massive amounts of stellar spectra. The large number of stellar spectra makes it necessary to automatically parameterize spectral data, which in turn helps in statistically exploring properties related to the atmospheric parameters. This work focuses on designing an automatic scheme to estimate effective temperature ({T}{eff}), surface gravity ({log}g) and metallicity [Fe/H] from stellar spectra. A scheme based on three deep neural networks (DNNs) is proposed. This scheme consists of the following three procedures: first, the configuration of a DNN is initialized using a series of autoencoder neural networks; second, the DNN is fine-tuned using a gradient descent scheme; third, three atmospheric parameters {T}{eff}, {log}g and [Fe/H] are estimated using the computed DNNs. The constructed DNN is a neural network with six layers (one input layer, one output layer and four hidden layers), for which the number of nodes in the six layers are 3821, 1000, 500, 100, 30 and 1, respectively. This proposed scheme was tested on both real spectra and theoretical spectra from Kurucz’s new opacity distribution function models. Test errors are measured with mean absolute errors (MAEs). The errors on real spectra from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) are 0.1477, 0.0048 and 0.1129 dex for {log}g, {log}{T}{eff} and [Fe/H] (64.85 K for {T}{eff}), respectively. Regarding theoretical spectra from Kurucz’s new opacity distribution function models, the MAE of the test errors are 0.0182, 0.0011 and 0.0112 dex for {log}g, {log}{T}{eff} and [Fe/H] (14.90 K for {T}{eff}), respectively.

  9. Can We Infer Ocean Dynamics from Altimeter Wavenumber Spectra?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richman, James; Shriver, Jay; Arbic, Brian

    2012-01-01

    The wavenumber spectra of sea surface height (SSH) and kinetic energy (KE) have been used to infer the dynamics of the ocean. When quasi-geostrophic dynamics (QG) or surface quasi-geostrophic (SQG) turbulence dominate and an inertial subrange exists, a steep SSH wavenumber spectrum is expected with k-5 for QG turbulence and a flatter k-11/3 for SQG turbulence. However, inspection of the spectral slopes in the mesoscale band of 70 to 250 km shows that the altimeter wavenumber slopes typically are much flatter than the QG or SQG predictions over most of the ocean. Comparison of the altimeter wavenumber spectra with the spectra estimated from the output of an eddy resolving global ocean circulation model (the Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model, HYCOM, at 1/25 resolution), which is forced by high frequency winds and includes the astronomical forcing of the sun and the moon, suggests that the flatter slopes of the altimeter may arise from three possible sources, the presence of internal waves, the lack of an inertial subrange in the 70 to 250 km band and noise or submesoscales at small scales. When the wavenumber spectra of SSH and KE are estimated near the internal tide generating regions, the resulting spectra are much flatter than the expectations of QG or SQG theory. If the height and velocity variability are separated into low frequency (periods greater than 2 days) and high frequency (periods less than a day), then a different pattern emerges with a relatively flat wavenumber spectrum at high frequency and a steeper wavenumber spectrum at low frequency. The stationary internal tides can be removed from the altimeter spectrum, which steepens the spectral slopes in the energetic internal wave regions. Away from generating regions where the internal waves

  10. Transit Spectra of a Hazy World Revealed by Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Tyler D.; Maltagliati, Luca; Marley, Mark S.

    2015-01-01

    Hazes dramatically influence exoplanet observations by obscuring deeper atmospheric layers. This effect is especially pronounced in transit spectroscopy, which probes large pathlengths through an exoplanet atmosphere as it crosses the disk of its host star. While hazes are proposed to explain observed featureless transit spectra, it is difficult to make inferences from the observations because of the need to disentangle effects of noise, gas absorption, and haze extinction. Here, we turn to Titan, an extremely well studied world with a hazy atmosphere, to better understand how high altitude hazes can impact exoplanet transit observations. We use solar occultation observations from the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) aboard NASA's Cassini spacecraft to generate transit spectra. Our approach exploits symmetry between occultations and transits, producing transit radius spectra that inherently include the effects of haze multiple scattering, refraction, and gas absorption. The data, which span 0.88-5 microns at a resolution of 12-18 nm, show strong methane absorption features, and weaker features due to other gases, including acetylene and carbon monoxide. Unlike the usual assumption made when modeling and interpreting transit observations of potentially hazy worlds, the slope set by haze in our spectra is not flat, and creates a variation in transit height whose magnitude is comparable to those from the strongest gaseous absorption features. We use a simple model of haze extinction to explore how Titan's haze affects its transit spectrum, and demonstrate how high altitude hazes can severely limit the atmospheric depths probed by transit spectra, bounding our observations to pressures smaller than 0.1-10 mbar, depending on wavelength. Overall, these new data challenge our understanding of how hazes influence exoplanet transit observations, and provide a means of testing proposed approaches for exoplanet characterization. Additionally, our findings will

  11. Titan Reveals Transit Spectra of a Definitively Hazy World

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Tyler D.; Maltagliati, Luca; Marley, Mark S.; Fortney, Jonathan J.

    2014-11-01

    Hazes dramatically influence exoplanet observations by obscuring deeper atmospheric layers. This effect is especially pronounced in transit spectroscopy, which probes large pathlengths through an exoplanet atmosphere as it crosses the disk of its host star. While hazes are proposed to explain observed featureless transit spectra, it is difficult to make inferences from the observations because of the need to disentangle effects of noise, gas absorption, and haze extinction. Here, we turn to Titan, an extremely well studied world with a hazy atmosphere, to better understand how high altitude hazes can impact exoplanet transit observations. We use solar occultation observations from the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) aboard NASA's Cassini spacecraft to generate transit spectra. Our approach exploits symmetry between occultations and transits, producing transit radius spectra that inherently include the effects of haze multiple scattering, refraction, and gas absorption. The data, which span 0.88-5 microns at a resolution of 12-18 nm, show strong methane absorption features, and weaker features due to other gases, including acetylene and carbon monoxide. Unlike the usual assumption made when modeling and interpreting transit observations of potentially hazy worlds, the slope set by haze in our spectra is neither flat nor has a pure Rayleigh slope, and creates a variation in transit height whose magnitude is comparable to those from the strongest gaseous absorption features. We use a simple model of haze extinction to explore how Titan's haze affects its transit spectrum, and demonstrate how high altitude hazes can severely limit the atmospheric depths probed by transit spectra, bounding our observations to pressures smaller than 0.1-10 mbar, depending on wavelength. Overall, these new data challenge our understanding of how hazes influence exoplanet transit observations, and provide a means of testing proposed approaches for exoplanet characterization

  12. DETERMINING REFLECTANCE SPECTRA OF SURFACES AND CLOUDS ON EXOPLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, Nicolas B.; Strait, Talia E.

    2013-03-01

    Planned missions will spatially resolve temperate terrestrial planets from their host star. Although reflected light from such a planet encodes information about its surface, it has not been shown how to establish surface characteristics of a planet without assuming known surfaces to begin with. We present a reanalysis of disk-integrated, time-resolved, multiband photometry of Earth obtained by the Deep Impact spacecraft as part of the EPOXI Mission of Opportunity. We extract reflectance spectra of clouds, ocean, and land without a priori knowledge of the numbers or colors of these surfaces. We show that the inverse problem of extracting surface spectra from such data is a novel and extreme instance of spectral unmixing, a well-studied problem in remote sensing. Principal component analysis is used to determine an appropriate number of model surfaces with which to interpret the data. Shrink-wrapping a simplex to the color excursions of the planet yields a conservative estimate of the planet's endmember spectra. The resulting surface maps are unphysical, however, requiring negative or larger-than-unity surface coverage at certain locations. Our ''rotational unmixing'' supersedes the endmember analysis by simultaneously solving for the surface spectra and their geographical distributions on the planet, under the assumption of diffuse reflection and known viewing geometry. We use a Markov Chain Monte Carlo to determine best-fit parameters and their uncertainties. The resulting albedo spectra are similar to clouds, ocean, and land seen through a Rayleigh-scattering atmosphere. This study suggests that future direct-imaging efforts could identify and map unknown surfaces and clouds on exoplanets.

  13. Action spectrum for retinal thermal injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lund, David J.; Edsall, Peter R.

    1999-06-01

    The action spectrum for light-induced damage to the retina results from the wavelength dependence transmission of the preretinal ocular media, wavelength dependent absorption in retinal chromophores and chromatic aberration of the eye optics. While various light/tissue interaction mechanisms have been implicated, thermal mechanisms dominate in the red and near-infrared for all exposure durations and in the visible for exposures shorter than a few seconds. A number of investigators have measured the transmission of the eye and the spectra of retinal absorbers, and thermal models based on these data predict the broad features of the action spectrum. Dose/response studies with lasers and incoherent light sources, conducted over the past 10 years mainly validate the thermal models.

  14. Theoretical spectra of floppy molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hua

    2000-09-01

    Detailed studies of the vibrational dynamics of floppy molecules are presented. Six-D bound-state calculations of the vibrations of rigid water dimer based on several anisotropic site potentials (ASP) are presented. A new sequential diagonalization truncation approach was used to diagonalize the angular part of the Hamiltonian. Symmetrized angular basis and a potential optimized discrete variable representation for intermonomer distance coordinate were used in the calculations. The converged results differ significantly from the results presented by Leforestier et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 106 , 8527 (1997)]. It was demonstrated that ASP-S potential yields more accurate tunneling splittings than other ASP potentials used. Fully coupled 4D quantum mechanical calculations were performed for carbon dioxide dimer using the potential energy surface given by Bukowski et al [J. Chem. Phys., 110, 3785 (1999)]. The intermolecular vibrational frequencies and symmetry adapted force constants were estimated and compared with experiments. The inter-conversion tunneling dynamics was studied using the calculated virtual tunneling splittings. Symmetrized Radau coordinates and the sequential diagonalization truncation approach were formulated for acetylene. A 6D calculation was performed with 5 DVR points for each stretch coordinate, and an angular basis that is capable of converging the angular part of the Hamiltonian to 30 cm-1 for internal energies up to 14000 cm-1. The probability at vinylidene configuration were evaluated. It was found that the eigenstates begin to extend to vinylidene configuration from about 10000 cm-1, and the ra, coordinate is closely related to the vibrational dynamics at high energy. Finally, a direct product DVR was defined for coupled angular momentum operators, and the SDT approach were formulated. They were applied in solving the angular part of the Hamiltonian for carbon dioxide dimer problem. The results show the method is capable of giving very accurate

  15. Numbers in Action

    PubMed Central

    Rugani, Rosa; Sartori, Luisa

    2016-01-01

    Humans show a remarkable tendency to describe and think of numbers as being placed on a mental number line (MNL), with smaller numbers located on the left and larger ones on the right. Faster responses to small numbers are indeed performed on the left side of space, while responses to large numbers are facilitated on the right side of space (spatial-numerical association of response codes, SNARC effect). This phenomenon is considered the experimental demonstration of the MNL and has been extensively replicated throughout a variety of paradigms. Nevertheless, the majority of previous literature has mainly investigated this effect by means of response times and accuracy, whereas studies considering more subtle and automatic measures such as kinematic parameters are rare (e.g., in a reaching-to-grasp movement, the grip aperture is enlarged in responding to larger numbers than in responding to small numbers). In this brief review we suggest that numerical magnitude can also affect the what and how of action execution (i.e., temporal and spatial components of movement). This evidence could have large implications in the strongly debated issue concerning the effect of experience and culture on the orientation of MNL. PMID:27524965

  16. Numbers in Action.

    PubMed

    Rugani, Rosa; Sartori, Luisa

    2016-01-01

    Humans show a remarkable tendency to describe and think of numbers as being placed on a mental number line (MNL), with smaller numbers located on the left and larger ones on the right. Faster responses to small numbers are indeed performed on the left side of space, while responses to large numbers are facilitated on the right side of space (spatial-numerical association of response codes, SNARC effect). This phenomenon is considered the experimental demonstration of the MNL and has been extensively replicated throughout a variety of paradigms. Nevertheless, the majority of previous literature has mainly investigated this effect by means of response times and accuracy, whereas studies considering more subtle and automatic measures such as kinematic parameters are rare (e.g., in a reaching-to-grasp movement, the grip aperture is enlarged in responding to larger numbers than in responding to small numbers). In this brief review we suggest that numerical magnitude can also affect the what and how of action execution (i.e., temporal and spatial components of movement). This evidence could have large implications in the strongly debated issue concerning the effect of experience and culture on the orientation of MNL.

  17. Less chalk more action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitriceski Andelkovic, Bojana; Jovic, Sladjana

    2016-04-01

    Less chalk more action Education should not be a mechanical system that operates according to the principles of the orders and implementation. Education should respect the basic laws of the develop and progress. Curiosity is the engine of achievement and children spontaneously and happily learn only if they get interested, if teacher wake up and stimulate their creativity and individuality. We would like to present classes that are realized as thematic teaching with several subjects involved: chemistry, geography, math, art and biology. Classes were organized for students at age from 10 to 13 years, every month during autumn and winter 2015. Better students identified themselves as teachers and presented peer education .Teachers were monitoring the process of teaching and help to develop links between younger and older students, where older students were educators to younger students. Also one student with special needs was involved in this activities and was supported by other students during the workshops The benefit from this project will be represented with evaluation marks. Evaluation table shows that group of ten students(age 10 to13 years) which are selected in October as children with lack of motivation for learning, got better marks, at the end of January , then they had it in the beginning of the semester.

  18. Disk-Averaged Synthetic Spectra of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinetti, Giovanna; Meadows, Victoria S.; Crisp, David; Fong ,William; Velusamy, Thangasamy; Snively, Heather

    2005-08-01

    The principal goal of the NASA Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) and European Space Agency's Darwin mission concepts is to directly detect and characterize extrasolar terrestrial (Earthsized) planets. This first generation of instruments is expected to provide disk-averaged spectra with modest spectral resolution and signal-to-noise. Here we use a spatially and spectrally resolved model of a Mars-like planet to study the detectability of a planet's surface and atmospheric properties from disk-averaged spectra. We explore the detectability as a function of spectral resolution and wavelength range, for both the proposed visible coronograph (TPFC) and mid-infrared interferometer (TPF-I/Darwin) architectures. At the core of our model is a spectrum-resolving (line-by-line) atmospheric/surface radiative transfer model. This model uses observational data as input to generate a database of spatially resolved synthetic spectra for a range of illumination conditions and viewing geometries. The model was validated against spectra recorded by the Mars Global Surveyor-Thermal Emission Spectrometer and the Mariner 9-Infrared Interferometer Spectrometer. Results presented here include disk-averaged synthetic spectra, light curves, and the spectral variability at visible and mid-infrared wavelengths for Mars as a function of viewing angle, illumination, and season. We also considered the differences in the spectral appearance of an increasingly ice-covered Mars, as a function of spectral resolution, signal-to-noise and integration time for both TPF-C and TPFI/ Darwin.

  19. H. N. Russell and Atomic Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devorkin, David

    2001-04-01

    “I would rather analyze spectra than do cross-word puzzles or do almost anything else” Henry Norris Russell wrote to William F. Meggers in 1927. Meggers, chief of the spectroscopy division at the NBS, had been surprised that an astrophysicist could be so keen about the analysis of complex spectra. But Russell was a new type of astrophysicist, one who made physics the core of his research. Spectra, for Russell, held the "master key" to knowledge about the universe, and of the atom. He was first attracted by the challenge of detecting and explaining anomalies, which he hoped would lead to new knowledge about the structure of matter. Then, influenced by physicists such as Meggers, he devoted himself to filling in the picture of the structure of atoms from their characteristic spectra as completely as possible. In this talk I will review how Russell worked with Meggers and became the nucleus of an ever-widening circle of spectroscopists devoted to the analysis of complex spectra.

  20. Improving Algorithm for Automatic Spectra Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rackovic, K.; Nikolic, S.; Kotrc, P.

    2009-09-01

    Testing and improving of the computer program for automatic processing (flat-fielding) of a great number of solar spectra obtained with the horizontal heliospectrograph HSFA2 has been done. This program was developed in the Astronomical Institute of Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic in Ondřejov. An irregularity in its work has been discovered, i.e. the program didn't work for some of the spectra. To discover a cause of this error an algorithm has been developed, and a program for examination of the parallelism of reference hairs crossing the spectral slit on records of solar spectra has been made. The standard methods for data processing have been applied-calculating and analyzing higher-order moments of distribution of radiation intensity. The spectra with the disturbed parallelism of the reference hairs have been eliminated from further processing. In order to improve this algorithm of smoothing of spectra, isolation and removal of the harmonic made by a sunspot with multiple elementary transformations of ordinates (Labrouste's transformations) are planned. This project was accomplished at the first summer astronomy practice of students of the Faculty of Mathematics, University of Belgrade, Serbia in 2007 in Ondřejov.

  1. Disk-averaged synthetic spectra of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinetti, Giovanna; Meadows, Victoria S.; Crisp, David; Fong, William; Velusamy, Thangasamy; Snively, Heather

    2005-01-01

    The principal goal of the NASA Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) and European Space Agency's Darwin mission concepts is to directly detect and characterize extrasolar terrestrial (Earthsized) planets. This first generation of instruments is expected to provide disk-averaged spectra with modest spectral resolution and signal-to-noise. Here we use a spatially and spectrally resolved model of a Mars-like planet to study the detectability of a planet's surface and atmospheric properties from disk-averaged spectra. We explore the detectability as a function of spectral resolution and wavelength range, for both the proposed visible coronograph (TPFC) and mid-infrared interferometer (TPF-I/Darwin) architectures. At the core of our model is a spectrum-resolving (line-by-line) atmospheric/surface radiative transfer model. This model uses observational data as input to generate a database of spatially resolved synthetic spectra for a range of illumination conditions and viewing geometries. The model was validated against spectra recorded by the Mars Global Surveyor-Thermal Emission Spectrometer and the Mariner 9-Infrared Interferometer Spectrometer. Results presented here include disk-averaged synthetic spectra, light curves, and the spectral variability at visible and mid-infrared wavelengths for Mars as a function of viewing angle, illumination, and season. We also considered the differences in the spectral appearance of an increasingly ice-covered Mars, as a function of spectral resolution, signal-to-noise and integration time for both TPF-C and TPFI/ Darwin.

  2. Disk-averaged synthetic spectra of Mars.

    PubMed

    Tinetti, Giovanna; Meadows, Victoria S; Crisp, David; Fong, William; Velusamy, Thangasamy; Snively, Heather

    2005-08-01

    The principal goal of the NASA Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) and European Space Agency's Darwin mission concepts is to directly detect and characterize extrasolar terrestrial (Earthsized) planets. This first generation of instruments is expected to provide disk-averaged spectra with modest spectral resolution and signal-to-noise. Here we use a spatially and spectrally resolved model of a Mars-like planet to study the detectability of a planet's surface and atmospheric properties from disk-averaged spectra. We explore the detectability as a function of spectral resolution and wavelength range, for both the proposed visible coronograph (TPFC) and mid-infrared interferometer (TPF-I/Darwin) architectures. At the core of our model is a spectrum-resolving (line-by-line) atmospheric/surface radiative transfer model. This model uses observational data as input to generate a database of spatially resolved synthetic spectra for a range of illumination conditions and viewing geometries. The model was validated against spectra recorded by the Mars Global Surveyor-Thermal Emission Spectrometer and the Mariner 9-Infrared Interferometer Spectrometer. Results presented here include disk-averaged synthetic spectra, light curves, and the spectral variability at visible and mid-infrared wavelengths for Mars as a function of viewing angle, illumination, and season. We also considered the differences in the spectral appearance of an increasingly ice-covered Mars, as a function of spectral resolution, signal-to-noise and integration time for both TPF-C and TPFI/ Darwin.

  3. Cleaning HI Spectra Contaminated by GPS RFI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sylvia, Kamin; Hallenbeck, Gregory L.; Undergraduate ALFALFA Team

    2016-01-01

    The NUDET systems aboard GPS satellites utilize radio waves to communicate information regarding surface nuclear events. The system tests appear in spectra as RFI (radio frequency interference) at 1381MHz, which contaminates observations of extragalactic HI (atomic hydrogen) signals at 50-150 Mpc. Test durations last roughly 20-120 seconds and can occur upwards of 30 times during a single night of observing. The disruption essentially renders the corresponding HI spectra useless.We present a method that automatically removes RFI in HI spectra caused by these tests. By capitalizing on the GPS system's short test durations and predictable frequency appearance we are able to devise a method of identifying times containing compromised data records. By reevaluating the remaining data, we are able to recover clean spectra while sacrificing little in terms of sensitivity to extragalactic signals. This method has been tested on 500+ spectra taken by the Undergraduate ALFALFA Team (UAT), in which it successfully identified and removed all sources of GPS RFI. It will also be used to eliminate RFI in the upcoming Arecibo Pisces-Perseus Supercluster Survey (APPSS).This work has been supported by NSF grant AST-1211005.

  4. Background noise spectra of global seismic stations

    SciTech Connect

    Wada, M.M.; Claassen, J.P.

    1996-08-01

    Over an extended period of time station noise spectra were collected from various sources for use in estimating the detection and location performance of global networks of seismic stations. As the database of noise spectra enlarged and duplicate entries became available, an effort was mounted to more carefully select station noise spectra while discarding others. This report discusses the methodology and criteria by which the noise spectra were selected. It also identifies and illustrates the station noise spectra which survived the selection process and which currently contribute to the modeling efforts. The resulting catalog of noise statistics not only benefits those who model network performance but also those who wish to select stations on the basis of their noise level as may occur in designing networks or in selecting seismological data for analysis on the basis of station noise level. In view of the various ways by which station noise were estimated by the different contributors, it is advisable that future efforts which predict network performance have available station noise data and spectral estimation methods which are compatible with the statistics underlying seismic noise. This appropriately requires (1) averaging noise over seasonal and/or diurnal cycles, (2) averaging noise over time intervals comparable to those employed by actual detectors, and (3) using logarithmic measures of the noise.

  5. Gravitational action with null boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehner, Luis; Myers, Robert C.; Poisson, Eric; Sorkin, Rafael D.

    2016-10-01

    We present a complete discussion of the boundary term in the action functional of general relativity when the boundary includes null segments in addition to the more usual timelike and spacelike segments. We confirm that ambiguities appear in the contribution from a null segment, because it depends on an arbitrary choice of parametrization for the generators. We also show that similar ambiguities appear in the contribution from a codimension-two surface at which a null segment is joined to another (spacelike, timelike, or null) segment. The parametrization ambiguity can be tamed by insisting that the null generators be affinely parametrized; this forces each null contribution to the boundary action to vanish, but leaves intact the fredom to rescale the affine parameter by a constant factor on each generator. Once a choice of parametrization is made, the ambiguity in the joint contributions can be eliminated by formulating well-motivated rules that ensure the additivity of the gravitational action. Enforcing these rules, we calculate the time rate of change of the action when it is evaluated for a so-called "Wheeler-DeWitt patch" of a black hole in asymptotically anti de Sitter space. We recover a number of results cited in the literature, obtained with a less complete analysis.

  6. [Modes of action of IUDs].

    PubMed

    Janaud, A

    1982-05-01

    There are between 14-17 million women in the world, excluding China, who wear an IUD, or about 3-5% of all married women younger than 45. Studies on the mode of action of IUDs have been conducted mostly on laboratory animals; they show that ovulation and fecundation are not inhibited by the presence of an IUD. Contrary to what was generally believed, the latest studies have shown that the principle mode of action of the IUD is not its anti-implantation effect, but it depends on the adjustment inside the uterine cavity between the size of the uterine cavity itself, and the size and shape of the device. Endometrial modifications caused by IUDs include inflammatory phenomena, and inhibition of endometrial maturation. Moreover, copper IUDs act directly on spermatozoa and on endometrial steroid receptors. It is still not clear what role prostaglandins play in the mechanism of action of IUDs. Incidence of ectopic pregnancy is not greater in IUD wearers than in women who do not use contraception. Follicle stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone levels also are comparable in IUD wearers and in nonwearers. IUD wearers have a shorter luteal phase, which entails an earlier menstrual bleeding due to the antifibrinolytic action of the IUD; progesterone levels are identical in users and in nonusers of IUDs.

  7. Antimicrobial peptide action on parasites.

    PubMed

    Torrent, Marc; Pulido, David; Rivas, Luis; Andreu, David

    2012-08-01

    Diseases caused by protozoan parasites can pose a severe thread to human health and are behind some serious neglected tropical diseases like malaria and leishmaniasis. Though several different drugs have been developed in order to eradicate these diseases, a successful candidate has not yet been discovered. Among the most active compounds tested, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are particularly appealing because of their wide spectrum of action. AMPs have been described to perturb protozoan homeostasis by disrupting the cellular membranes but also by interfering with key processes in the parasite metabolism. In this review we describe the diverse mechanisms of action of AMPs on protozoan targets and how they can be exploited to treat diseases. Moreover, we describe with detail the antimicrobial action of AMPs on two major parasitical infections: leishmaniasis and malaria. All the features reviewed here show that AMPs are promising drugs to target protozoan parasites and that further understanding of the mechanism of action of these compounds will lead to improved drugs that could be worth to test in a clinical phase.

  8. Reduced attentional capture in action video game players.

    PubMed

    Chisholm, Joseph D; Hickey, Clayton; Theeuwes, Jan; Kingstone, Alan

    2010-04-01

    Recent studies indicate that playing action video games improves performance on a number of attention-based tasks. However, it remains unclear whether action video game experience primarily affects endogenous or exogenous forms of spatial orienting. To examine this issue, action video game players and non-action video game players performed an attentional capture task. The results show that action video game players responded quicker than non-action video game players, both when a target appeared in isolation and when a salient, task-irrelevant distractor was present in the display. Action video game players additionally showed a smaller capture effect than did non-action video game players. When coupled with the findings of previous studies, the collective evidence indicates that extensive experience with action video games may enhance players' top-down attentional control, which, in turn, can modulate the negative effects of bottom-up attentional capture.

  9. Dolphin shows and interaction programs: benefits for conservation education?

    PubMed

    Miller, L J; Zeigler-Hill, V; Mellen, J; Koeppel, J; Greer, T; Kuczaj, S

    2013-01-01

    Dolphin shows and dolphin interaction programs are two types of education programs within zoological institutions used to educate visitors about dolphins and the marine environment. The current study examined the short- and long-term effects of these programs on visitors' conservation-related knowledge, attitude, and behavior. Participants of both dolphin shows and interaction programs demonstrated a significant short-term increase in knowledge, attitudes, and behavioral intentions. Three months following the experience, participants of both dolphin shows and interaction programs retained the knowledge learned during their experience and reported engaging in more conservation-related behaviors. Additionally, the number of dolphin shows attended in the past was a significant predictor of recent conservation-related behavior suggesting that repetition of these types of experiences may be important in inspiring people to conservation action. These results suggest that both dolphin shows and dolphin interaction programs can be an important part of a conservation education program for visitors of zoological facilities.

  10. Quantum confinement in metal nanofilms: Optical spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khmelinskii, Igor; Makarov, Vladimir I.

    2016-05-01

    We report optical absorption and photoluminescence spectra of Au, Fe, Co and Ni polycrystalline nanofilms in the UV-vis-NIR range, featuring discrete bands resulting from transverse quantum confinement. The film thickness ranged from 1.1 to 15.6 nm, depending on the material. The films were deposited on fused silica substrates by sputtering/thermo-evaporation, with Fe, Co and Ni protected by a SiO2 film deposited on top. The results are interpreted within the particle-in-a-box model, with the box width equal to the mass thickness of the nanofilm. The transverse-quantized energy levels and transition energies scale as the inverse square of the film thickness. The calculated values of the effective electron mass are 0.93 (Au), 0.027 (Fe), 0.21 (Co) and 0.16 (Ni), in units of mo - the mass of the free electron, being independent on the film thickness. The uncertainties in the effective mass values are ca. 2.5%, determined by the film thickness calibration. The second calculated model parameter, the quantum number n of the HOMO, was thickness-independent in Au (5.00) and Fe (6.00), and increased with the film thickness in Co (from 7 to 9) and Ni (from 7 to 11). The transitions observed in the absorbance all start at the level n and correspond to Δn=+1, +2, +3, etc. The photoluminescence bands exhibit large Stokes shifts, shifting to higher energies with the increased excitation energy. The photoluminescence quantum yields grow linearly with the excitation energy, showing evidence of multiple exciton generation. A prototype Fe-SnO2 nanofilm photovoltaic cell demonstrated at least 90% quantum yield of photoelectrons at 77 K.

  11. AGNs with composite spectra. II. Additional data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonçalves, A. C.; Véron-Cetty, M.-P.; Véron, P.

    1999-03-01

    In a previous paper \\cite[(Véron et al. 1997)]{ver97} we presented medium resolution (3.4 Angstroms FWHM) spectroscopic observations of 15 ``transition objects'', selected for having an ambiguous location in the \\cite[Veilleux & Osterbrock (1987)]{vei87} diagnostic diagrams, and showed that most of them were in fact ``composite'', this being due to the simultaneous presence on the slit of both a Seyfert or Liner nucleus and a H Ii region. Here, we report new spectroscopic observations of 53 emission-line galaxies with a ``transition'' spectrum, bringing up to 61 the total number of observed objects in an unbiased sample of 88 ``transition objects''. Almost all of the observed galaxies have a ``composite" nature, confirming the finding that true ``transition'' spectra may not exist at all. By eliminating ``composite objects'' from the diagnostic diagrams, a clear separation between the different classes of nuclear emission-line regions (Seyfert 2s, Liners and H Ii regions) becomes apparent; by restricting the volume occupied by the different line-emitting regions in the 3-dimensional diagnostic diagrams, we are also restricting the range of possible physical parameters in these regions. There seems to be no continuity between Seyfert 2s and Liners, the two classes occupying distinct volumes in the 3-dimensional space defined by lambda 6300/Hα ii, lambda 6583/Hα , and lambda 6300/Hα . Based on observations collected at the Observatoire de Haute-Provence (CNRS), France, and Hubble Space Telescope (HST) data obtained from the Space Telescope European Coordinating Facility (ST-ECF) archive. Tables 5 and 6 are also available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/Abstract.html

  12. FLUORESCENCE CHARACTERIZATION OF IHSS HUMIC SUBSTANCES: TOTAL LUMINESCENCE SPECTRA WITH ABSORBANCE CORRECTION. (R822251)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Total luminescence spectroscopy was applied to the fluorescence characterization of humic substances obtained from the International Humic Substances Society (IHSS). Results show that total luminescence spectra, represented as excitation-emission matrices (EEMs), may be used to d...

  13. Electronic and Vibrational Spectra of InP Quantum Dots Formed by Sequential Ion Implantation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, C.; Mu, R.; Tung, Y. S.; Ueda, A.; Henderson, D. O.; White, C. W.

    1997-01-01

    We have performed sequential ion implantation of indium and phosphorus into silica combined with controlled thermal annealing to fabricate InP quantum dots in a dielectric host. Electronic and vibrational spectra were measured for the as-implanted and annealed samples. The annealed samples show a peak in the infrared spectra near 320/cm which is attributed to a surface phonon mode and is in good agreement with the value calculated from Frolich's theory of surface phonon polaritons. The electronic spectra show the development of a band near 390 nm that is attributed to quantum confined InP.

  14. Conscious Control over Action.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, Joshua

    2015-06-01

    The extensive involvement of nonconscious processes in human behaviour has led some to suggest that consciousness is much less important for the control of action than we might think. In this article I push against this trend, developing an understanding of conscious control that is sensitive to our best models of overt (that is, bodily) action control. Further, I assess the cogency of various zombie challenges-challenges that seek to demote the importance of conscious control for human agency. I argue that though nonconscious contributions to action control are evidently robust, these challenges are overblown.

  15. Conscious Control over Action

    PubMed Central

    Shepherd, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    The extensive involvement of nonconscious processes in human behaviour has led some to suggest that consciousness is much less important for the control of action than we might think. In this article I push against this trend, developing an understanding of conscious control that is sensitive to our best models of overt (that is, bodily) action control. Further, I assess the cogency of various zombie challenges—challenges that seek to demote the importance of conscious control for human agency. I argue that though nonconscious contributions to action control are evidently robust, these challenges are overblown. PMID:26113753

  16. Recent pollen spectra and zonal vegetation in the western USSR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, G. M.

    The relationship of modern pollen spectra to present-day vegetation is critical to the reconstruction of vegetation and climate from fossil pollen spectra. This study uses isopoll maps to illustrate the pollen-vegetation relationships in the Soviet Union west of 100°E and presents descriptive statistics for 544 modern samples of arboreal pollen and for 370 samples of herb pollen obtained from the Soviet palynological literature. Data are assembled from this large geographic region and presented in a standardized form on a scale which can be used to relate quantitative pollen data to zonal vegetation and climatic variables and to make comparisons with other regions. In order to show the relationship between pollen types and major ecotones in forested and non-forested areas, the pollen data are presented as percentages of a sum including both arboreal and non-arboreal pollen. Major pollen types which attain values of 10% or more in at least one vegetation zone include Betula (birch), Cyperaceae (sedges), Picea (spruce), Pinus (total pine), Pinus sibirica, Ericaceae (heath family), Gramineae (grasses), Artemisia (sage), and Chenopodiaceae (i.e., saltbush, Russian thistle, pigweed family). Samples from the tundra and forest-tundra have high values of Ericaceae (heath family), birch, alder, and sedge pollen. In the boreal forest, pine, spruce, and birch pollen predominate. In the mixed and deciduous forests, Tilia (linden), Quercus (oak), Ulmus (elm), and Corylus (hazel) pollen attain maximum values. In the forest-steppe and steppe zones, arboreal pollen decreases in importance and is replaced by non-arboreal pollen types. Pollen of Artemisia and Chenopodiaceae predominates in the semi-desert zones. In spite of variation in the pollen spectra arising from the use of different sediment types (soil, peat, and river sediments), and human disturbance of vegetation, the pollen spectra are clearly related to zonal vegetation. Pollen spectra from the western USSR show

  17. Crystal field spectra of lunar pyroxenes.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, R. G.; Abu-Eid, R. M.; Huggins, F. E.

    1972-01-01

    Absorption spectra in the visible and near infrared regions have been obtained for pyroxene single crystals in rocks from the Apollo 11, 12, 14, and 15 missions. The polarized spectra are compared with those obtained from terrestrial calcic clinopyroxenes, subcalcic augites, pigeonites, and orthopyroxenes. The lunar pyroxenes contain several broad, intense absorption bands in the near infrared, the positions of which are related to bulk composition, Fe(2+) site occupancy and structure type of the pyroxene. The visible spectra contain several sharp, weak peaks mainly due to spin-forbidden transitions in Fe(2+). Additional weak bands in this region in Apollo 11 pyroxenes are attributed to Ti(3+) ions. Spectral features from Fe(3+), Mn(2+), Cr(3+), and Cr(2+) were not observed.

  18. Vibrational spectra of molecular fluids in nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arakcheev, V. G.; Morozov, V. B.

    2012-12-01

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) is applied for quantitative analysis of carbon dioxide phase composition in pores of nanoporous glass samples at nearcritical temperatures. Measurements of the 1388 1/cm Q-branch were made in a wide pressure range corresponding to coexistence of gas (gas-like), adsorbed and condensed phases within pores. At temperatures several degrees below the critical value, CARS spectra behavior is easy to interpret in terms of thermodynamic model of surface adsorption and capillary condensation. It allows estimating mass fractions of different phase components. Moreover, spectra measured at near critical temperatures 30.5 and 33°C have pronounced inhomogeneous shapes and indicate the presence of condensed phase in the volume of pores. The effect obviously reflects the fluid behaviour near the critical point in nanopores. Pores with smaller radii are filled with condensed phase at lower pressures. The analysis of the CARS spectra is informative for quantitative evaluation of phase composition in nanopores.

  19. Janus Spectra in Two-Dimensional Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chien-Chia; Cerbus, Rory T.; Chakraborty, Pinaki

    2016-09-01

    In large-scale atmospheric flows, soap-film flows, and other two-dimensional flows, the exponent of the turbulent energy spectra, α , may theoretically take either of two distinct values, 3 or 5 /3 , but measurements downstream of obstacles have invariably revealed α =3 . Here we report experiments on soap-film flows where downstream of obstacles there exists a sizable interval in which α transitions from 3 to 5 /3 for the streamwise fluctuations but remains equal to 3 for the transverse fluctuations, as if two mutually independent turbulent fields of disparate dynamics were concurrently active within the flow. This species of turbulent energy spectra, which we term the Janus spectra, has never been observed or predicted theoretically. Our results may open up new vistas in the study of turbulence and geophysical flows.

  20. Similarity of actions depends on the functionality of previously observed actions.

    PubMed

    Naber, Marnix; Eijgermans, Wessel; Herman, Anne-Sophie; Bergman, Annemiek; Hommel, Bernhard

    2016-05-01

    People have a tendency to imitate the behavior of others, sometimes even automatically. And yet, evidence suggests that many of our actions are controlled, mediated by current goals and careful considerations. Here, we investigated whether the observation and evaluation of previous actions of another person modulates the similarity of actions between people in present trials. We manipulated the functionality of a confederate's actions and the interactive context in 2 behavioral tasks, which consisted of games that participants played against a confederate or a virtual computer opponent. To measure effects of working memory load on imitation rates, participants additionally performed an easy or difficult auditory n-back task in parallel to the tasks. We show that participants occasionally produced rather bizarre and dysfunctional behavior when the confederate had done so as well. Even more importantly, results from both tasks show that participants most likely copied dysfunctional behavior in the present trial when the confederate performed functional actions in the previous trial. Thus, the positive evaluation of action consequences in previous trials increases the probability of similarity between the participant's and confederate's actions in present trials despite a chance to copy improper actions. Furthermore, we found a trend of increased action similarities when participants were under high working memory load in Experiment 1 but not in Experiment 2. These results suggest that copying an observed action is an efficient and effortless behavioral and social strategy to achieve similar goals as others, though with an increased risk of maladaptive behavior.

  1. Energy spectra of ions from impulsive solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reames, D. V.; Richardson, I. G.; Wenzel, K.-P.

    1992-01-01

    A study of the energy spectra of ions from impulsive solar flares in the 0.1-100 MeV region is reported. Most of the events studied are dominated by He and these He spectra show a persistent steepening or break above about 10 MeV resulting in an increase in the power-law spectral indices from about 2 to about 3.5 or more. Spectra of H, He-3, O, and Fe have spectral indices that are consistent with a value of about 3.5 above about 2 MeV/amu. One event, dominated by protons, shows a clear maximum in the spectrum near 1 MeV. If the rollover in the spectrum below 1 MeV is interpreted as a consequence of matter traversal in the solar atmosphere, then the source of the acceleration would lie only about 800 km above the photosphere, well below the corona. Alternative interpretations are that trapping in the acceleration region directly causes a peak in the resulting ion spectrum or that low-energy particles encounter significant additional scattering during transport from the flare.

  2. Automatic classification of spectra from the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheeseman, Peter; Stutz, John; Self, Matthew; Taylor, William; Goebel, John; Volk, Kevin; Walker, Helen

    1989-01-01

    A new classification of Infrared spectra collected by the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) is presented. The spectral classes were discovered automatically by a program called Auto Class 2. This program is a method for discovering (inducing) classes from a data base, utilizing a Bayesian probability approach. These classes can be used to give insight into the patterns that occur in the particular domain, in this case, infrared astronomical spectroscopy. The classified spectra are the entire Low Resolution Spectra (LRS) Atlas of 5,425 sources. There are seventy-seven classes in this classification and these in turn were meta-classified to produce nine meta-classes. The classification is presented as spectral plots, IRAS color-color plots, galactic distribution plots and class commentaries. Cross-reference tables, listing the sources by IRAS name and by Auto Class class, are also given. These classes show some of the well known classes, such as the black-body class, and silicate emission classes, but many other classes were unsuspected, while others show important subtle differences within the well known classes.

  3. Effect of solvents on the fluorescence spectra of bacterial luciferase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukovataya, Irina E.; Tyulkova, Natalya A.; Kaykova, Elisaveta V.

    2006-08-01

    Bacteria luciferases catalyze the oxidation reaction of the long-chain aliphatic aldehyde and reduced flavinmononucleotide involving molecular oxygen to a respective fatty acid emitting light quanta in the visible spectrum. Fluorescence emission of luciferases from Photobacterium leiognathi dissolved in organic solvent-water mixtures was investigated. Methanol, acetone, dimethyl sulfoxide and formamide were used as organic solvents. As the methanol and acetone concentration is increased the emission maximum peak is decrease. In contrast, with dimethyl sulfoxide and formamide addition induced a increasing of the emission maximum intensity. The values of wavelength maximum (λ max) at the addition of this solvent can shows the spectra shifted to the red by about 12 nm. These increasing in the fluorescence intensity and in the λ max may be due to luciferase denaturation, resulting from the more intensive contact of chromospheres of luciferase with the solvent. At all used concentrations of methanol, acetone and formamide the shape of the fluorescence spectra was not changed. These studies demonstrate that the luciferase tryptophan fluorescence is sensitive to changes of physical-chemical property of enzyme environment. A comparison of activation/inactivation and fluorescence spectra of luciferase in methanol or acetone solutions shows that the extent of inactivation is larger than the extent of fluorescence changes at the same methanol or acetone concentration.

  4. MEASUREMENTS OF STELLAR MAGNETIC FIELDS USING AUTOCORRELATION OF SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Borra, E. F.; Deschatelets, D.

    2015-11-15

    We present a novel technique that uses the autocorrelation of the spectrum of a star to measure the line broadening caused by the modulus of its average surface magnetic field. The advantage of the autocorrelation comes from the fact that it can detect very small spectral line broadening effects because it averages over many spectral lines and therefore gives an average with a very high signal-to-noise ratio. We validate the technique with the spectra of known magnetic stars and obtain autocorrelation curves that are in full agreement with published magnetic curves obtained with Zeeman splitting. The autocorrelation also gives less noisy curves so that it can be used to obtain very accurate curves. We degrade the resolution of the spectra of these magnetic stars to lower spectral resolutions where the Zeeman splitting is undetectable. At these resolutions, the autocorrelation still gives good quality curves, thereby showing that it can be used to measure magnetic fields in spectra where the Zeeman splitting is significantly smaller than the width of the spectral line. This would therefore allow observing magnetic fields in very faint Ap stars with low-resolution spectrographs, thereby greatly increasing the number of known magnetic stars. It also demonstrates that the autocorrelation can measure magnetic fields in rapidly rotating stars as well as weak magnetic fields that give a Zeeman splitting smaller than the intrinsic width of the spectral lines. Finally, it shows that the autocorrelation can be used to find unknown magnetic stars in low-resolution spectroscopic surveys.

  5. Molecular dynamics and spectra. II. Diatomic Raman

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berens, Peter H.; White, Steven R.; Wilson, Kent R.

    1981-07-01

    This paper and paper I in this series [P.H. Berens and K.R. Wilison, J. Chem. Phys. 74, 4872 (1981)] indicate that infrared and Raman rotational and fundamental vibrational-rotational spectra of dense systems (high pressure gases, liquids, and solids) are essentially classical, in that they can be computed and understood from a basically classical mechanical viewpoint, with some caveats for features in which anharmonicity is important, such as the detailed shape of Q branches. It is demonstrated here, using the diatomic case as an example, that ordinary, i.e., nonresonant, Raman band contours can be computed from classical mechanics plus simple quantum corrections. Classical versions of molecular dynamics, linear response theory, and ensemble averaging, followed by straightforward quantum corrections, are used to compute the pure rotational and fundamental vibration-rotational Raman band contours of N2 for the gas phase and for solutions of N2 in different densities of gas phase Ar and in liquid Ar. The evolution is seen from multiple peaked line shapes characteristic of free rotation in the gas phase to single peaks characteristic of hindered rotation in the liquid phase. Comparison is made with quantum and correspondence principle classical gas phase spectral calculations and with experimental measurements for pure N2 and N2 in liquid Ar. Three advantages are pointed out for a classical approach to infrared and Raman spectra. First, a classical approach can be used to compute the spectra of complex molecular systems, e.g., of large molecules, clusters, liquids, solutions, and solids. Second, this classical approach can be extended to compute the spectra of nonequilibrium and time-dependent systems, e.g., infrared and Raman spectra during the course of chemical reactions. Third, a classical viewpoint allows experimental infrared and Raman spectra to be understood and interpreted in terms of atomic motions with the considerable aid of classical models and of our

  6. Action spectra and chromatic mechanisms of cells in the median ocelli of dragonflies.

    PubMed

    Chappell, R L; DeVoe, R D

    1975-04-01

    Spectral sensitivities were recorded intracellulary in median ocelli of Anax junius, Aeschnatuberculifera, and Libellulapulcella. All cells had peak sensitivities at 360 and 500 nm while UV-blue+green cells found only in Anax had a third peak sensitivity at 440 nm. Ratios of UV-to-green sensitivities varied from cell to cell in each ocellus, but no UV-only or green-only cells were recorded. Half of the cells tested had a reverse Purkinje shift: They were more sensitive in the green at low illuminations but more sensitive in the UV at high illuminations; their intensity-response curves at 370 and 520 nm crossed but became parallel for large responses. Wave-lengths 420 nm and shorter elicited a family of low intensity-response curves with one slope; wavelengths 440 nm and longer elicities a family of curves with another slope. Orange-adapting lights selectively adapted sensitivity in the green, but UV-adapting lights had little selective effect. Amounts of log-selective adaptation were proportional to log orange-adapting intensity. It is concluded that two spectral mechanisms can be recorded from each cell, possibly by coupling of UV and green cells or possibly because each cell contains two visual pigments. Selective chromatic adaptations may provide the ocellus with a kind of "authomatic color control," while the reverse Purkinje shift could extend the ocellus' sensitivity to prevailing skylight.

  7. Action spectra and chromatic mechanisms of cells in the median ocelli of dragonflies

    PubMed Central

    1975-01-01

    Spectral sensitivities were recorded intracellulary in median ocelli of Anax junius, Aeschnatuberculifera, and Libellulapulcella. All cells had peak sensitivities at 360 and 500 nm while UV-blue+green cells found only in Anax had a third peak sensitivity at 440 nm. Ratios of UV-to- green sensitivities varied from cell to cell in each ocellus, but no UV- only or green-only cells were recorded. Half of the cells tested had a reverse Purkinje shift: They were more sensitive in the green at low illuminations but more sensitive in the UV at high illuminations; their intensity-response curves at 370 and 520 nm crossed but became parallel for large responses. Wave-lengths 420 nm and shorter elicited a family of low intensity-response curves with one slope; wavelengths 440 nm and longer elicities a family of curves with another slope. Orange-adapting lights selectively adapted sensitivity in the green, but UV-adapting lights had little selective effect. Amounts of log-selective adaptation were proportional to log orange-adapting intensity. It is concluded that two spectral mechanisms can be recorded from each cell, possibly by coupling of UV and green cells or possibly because each cell contains two visual pigments. Selective chromatic adaptations may provide the ocellus with a kind of "authomatic color control," while the reverse Purkinje shift could extend the ocellus' sensitivity to prevailing skylight. PMID:1151320

  8. BET, thermal degradation, and FTIR spectras of triazine polyamine polymers.

    PubMed

    Can, Mustafa

    2017-04-01

    Here we show effect of the polyamine polymer chain length to BET isotherms. According to IUPAC classification [1], all three polymers are fitting type 1 physical adsorption isotherm with H3 hysteresis (except for EDA having H2 hysteresis). Moreover, TG and TGA analysis of polymers triazine-ethylenediamine (EDA) and triazine-triethylenetetramine (TETA) are provided. Due to the similarities of the structure, main decomposition temperatures are close to each other (between 593 K and 873 K). In order to understand change of FTIR spectra with adsorption and stripping Au(III), fresh, Au(III) adsorbed and recycled spectras of polymers measured. For further discussions about the effect of chain length to adsorption of Au(III) onto triazine polyamine polymer particles "Au (III) Uptake by Triazine Polyamine Polymers: Mechanism, Kinetic and Equilibrium Studies" Can et al. [2] (article in press).

  9. Nonexistence results for relaxation spectra with compact support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas, R. J.; Whittle Gruffudd, H. R.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we consider the problem of recovering the (transformed) relaxation spectrum h from the (transformed) loss modulus g by inverting the integral equation g={{sech}}\\ast h, where \\ast denotes convolution, using Fourier transforms. We are particularly interested in establishing properties of h, having assumed that the Fourier transform of g has entire extension to the complex plane. In the setting of square integrable functions, we demonstrate that the Paley-Wiener theorem cannot be used to show the existence of non-trivial relaxation spectra with compact support. We prove a stronger result for tempered distributions: there are no non-trivial relaxation spectra with compact support. Finally we establish necessary and sufficient conditions for the relaxation spectrum h to be strictly positive definite.

  10. Detectability of minerals on desert alluvial fans using reflectance spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shipman, Hugh; Adams, John B.

    1987-01-01

    The visible and near-infrared reflectance spectra of soil samples collected from desert alluvial and colluvial surfaces in the Cuprite mining district, Nevada, were analyzed. These surfaces are downslope from hydrothermally altered volcanic rocks that contain spectrally characteristic minerals such as alunite and kaolinite. Coarse fractions of the soils on the alluvial fans are mineralogically variable and express the upslope lithologies; fine fractions are remarkably similar mineralogically and spectrally in all samples because of dilution of local mineral components by regionally derived windblown dust. Theoretical models for spectral mixing and for particle-size effects were used to model the observed spectral variations. Diagnostic mineral absorption bands in the spectra of fan materials were enhanced by computationally removing the spectrum of the homogeneous fine-soil component. Results show that spectral mixing models are useful for analyzing data with high spectral resolution obtained by field and aircraft spectrometers.

  11. [Singularity spectra analysis of the ST segments of 12-lead electrocardiogram].

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Ning, Xinbao; Xu, Yinlin; Ma, Qianli; Chen, Ying; Li, Dehua

    2007-12-01

    By analysing the f(a) singularity spectra of the ST segments of the synchronous 12-lead ECG, we have found that the singularity spectrum is close to monofractality and its area is only half the area of the synchronous 12-lead ECG f(alpha) singularity spectrum. The ST segments of the synchronous 12-lead ECG signal also has f(alpha) singularity spectra distribution and it also has a reasonable varying scope. We have also found that the lead number of the ST segment f (alpha) singularity spectra for adults having coronary heart disease overstep the reasonable scope tends to increase over that of the ECG f(alpha) singularity spectra. These findings show that using the ST segments f(alpha) singularity spectra distribution of the synchronous 12-lead ECG is more effective than using the synchronous 12-lead ECG on the clinical analysis.

  12. On the possibility to diagnose a kappa-distribution from EVE flare spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzifcakova, Elena; Dudík, Jaroslav

    2015-08-01

    X-ray flare emission is strongly affected by the non-thermal part of the electron distribution. RHESSI observations and also recent theoretical derivations showed that the electron distribution function in coronal X-ray sources could be a kappa-distribution. An effect of kappa-distribution on the relative intensities of spectral lines of Fe XVIII - Fe XXIV observed in SDO/EVE flare spectra was calculated using KAPPA package based on the CHIANTI. Together with CHIANTI, this allows us to estimate the influence of the kappa-distributions on the diagnostics of electron density and temperature from the flare spectra. The possibility to diagnose parameters of the kappa-distribution from EVE flare spectra is discussed. The synthetic spectra for the kappa-distribution are compared with the observed flare spectra.

  13. Raman and infrared spectra and theoretical calculations of dipicolinic acid, dinicotinic acid, and their dianions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCann, Kathleen; Laane, Jaan

    2008-11-01

    The Raman and infrared spectra of dipicolinic acid (DPA) and dinicotinic acid (DNic) and their salts (CaDPA, Na 2DPA, and CaDNic) have been recorded and the spectra have been assigned. Ab initio and DFT calculations were carried out to predict the structures and vibrational spectra and were compared to the experimental results. Because of extensive intermolecular hydrogen bonding in the crystals of these molecules, the calculated structures and spectra for the individual molecules agree only moderately well with the experimental values. Theoretical calculations were also carried out for DPA dimers and DPA·2H 2O to better understand the intermolecular interactions. The spectra do show that DPA and its calcium salt, which are present in anthrax spores, can be distinguished from the very similar DNic and CaDNic.

  14. Tentative identification of urea and formamide in ISO-SWS infrared spectra of interstellar ices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raunier, S.; Chiavassa, T.; Duvernay, F.; Borget, F.; Aycard, J. P.; Dartois, E.; d'Hendecourt, L.

    2004-03-01

    Laboratory experiments involving vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) irradiation of solid isocyanic acid (HNCO) at 10 K, followed by infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), are used to interpret the complex spectra associated with Interstellar Medium (ISM) dust grains, particularly the spectra associated with the icy phase observed toward dense molecular clouds. The comparison of the infrared spectra of the photolysis products with spectra recorded from the protostellar source NGC 7538 IRS9 shows that the ``unexplained" 1700 cm-1 feature can be attributed to the contribution of several species H2CO (formaldehyde), HCONH2 (formamide) and H2NCONH2 (urea) mixed with H2O as the main contributor. Urea, formaldehyde and NH4+OCN- (ammonium cyanate) may also contribute to a band at 1470 cm-1, widely observed in many protostellar infrared sources and which remains up to now poorly explained in numerous ISO-SWS spectra. Isocyanic acid could be a precursor of formamide and urea in interstellar ices.

  15. Consistency analysis of plastic samples based on similarity calculation from limited range of the Raman spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, B. W.; Wu, Z. X.; Dong, X. P.; Lu, D.; Tao, S. C.

    2016-07-01

    We proposed a novel method to calculate the similarity between samples with only small differences at unknown and specific positions in their Raman spectra, using a moving interval window scanning across the whole Raman spectra. Two ABS plastic samples, one with and the other without flame retardant, were tested in the experiment. Unlike the traditional method in which the similarity is calculated based on the whole spectrum, we do the calculation by using a window to cut out a certain segment from Raman spectra, each at a time as the window moves across the entire spectrum range. By our method, a curve of similarity versus wave number is obtained. And the curve shows a large change where the partial spectra of the two samples is different. Thus, the new similarity calculation method identifies samples with tiny difference in their Raman spectra better.

  16. Observed and theoretical spectra in the 10-100 A interval. [of solar spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, W. A.; Bruner, M. E.; Acton, L. W.

    1988-01-01

    The soft X-ray spectra recorded in two sounding-rocket flights in 1982 and 1985 are compared with predicted spectra. The processed densitometer trace of the full spectrum is presented, together with the new spectrum from the 1985 experiment. The intensities of the lines are then compared with predictions.

  17. Experimental Constraints on Neutrino Spectra Following Fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Napolitano, Jim; Daya Bay Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    We discuss new initiatives to constrain predictions of fission neutrino spectra from nuclear reactors. These predictions are germane to the understanding of reactor flux anomalies; are needed to reduce systematic uncertainty in neutrino oscillation spectra; and inform searches for the diffuse supernova neutrino background. The initiatives include a search for very high- Q beta decay components to the neutrino spectrum from the Daya Bay power plant; plans for a measurement of the β- spectrum from 252Cf fission products; and precision measurements of the 235U fission neutrino spectrum from PROSPECT and other very short baseline reactor experiments.

  18. A data base of geologic field spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahle, A. B.; Goetz, A. F. H.; Paley, H. N.; Alley, R. E.; Abbott, E. A.

    1981-01-01

    It is noted that field samples measured in the laboratory do not always present an accurate picture of the ground surface sensed by airborne or spaceborne instruments because of the heterogeneous nature of most surfaces and because samples are disturbed and surface characteristics changed by collection and handling. The development of new remote sensing instruments relies on the analysis of surface materials in their natural state. The existence of thousands of Portable Field Reflectance Spectrometer (PFRS) spectra has necessitated a single, all-inclusive data base that permits greatly simplified searching and sorting procedures and facilitates further statistical analyses. The data base developed at JPL for cataloging geologic field spectra is discussed.

  19. Separating Peaks in X-Ray Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicolas, David; Taylor, Clayborne; Wade, Thomas

    1987-01-01

    Deconvolution algorithm assists in analysis of x-ray spectra from scanning electron microscopes, electron microprobe analyzers, x-ray fluorescence spectrometers, and like. New algorithm automatically deconvolves x-ray spectrum, identifies locations of spectral peaks, and selects chemical elements most likely producing peaks. Technique based on similarities between zero- and second-order terms of Taylor-series expansions of Gaussian distribution and of damped sinusoid. Principal advantage of algorithm: no requirement to adjust weighting factors or other parameters when analyzing general x-ray spectra.

  20. Hadron rapidity spectra within a hybrid model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khvorostukhin, A. S.; Toneev, V. D.

    2017-01-01

    A 2-stage hybrid model is proposed that joins the fast initial state of interaction, described by the hadron string dynamics (HSD) model, to subsequent evolution of the expanding system at the second stage, treated within ideal hydrodynamics. The developed hybrid model is assigned to describe heavy-ion collisions in the energy range of the NICA collider under construction in Dubna. Generally, the model is in reasonable agreement with the available data on proton rapidity spectra. However, reproducing proton rapidity spectra, our hybrid model cannot describe the rapidity distributions of pions. The model should be improved by taking into consideration viscosity effects at the hydrodynamical stage of system evolution.

  1. Four years of meteor spectra patrol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, G. A.

    1974-01-01

    The development of the NASA-Langley Research Center meteor spectra patrol is described in general terms. The recording of very faint meteors was made possible by three great strides in optical and photographic technology in the 1960's: (1) the availability of optical-grade fused silica at modest cost, (2) the development of large transmission gratings with high blaze efficiency, and (3) the development of a method for avoiding plate fogging due to background skylight, which consisted of using a photoelectric meteor detector which actuates the spectrograph shutter when a meteor occurs in the field. The classification scheme for meteor spectra developed by Peter M. Millman is described.

  2. Micro-Raman spectra of ugrandite garnet.

    PubMed

    Moroz, T; Ragozin, A; Salikhov, D; Belikova, G; Puchkov, V; Kagi, H

    2009-08-01

    The natural garnets from chromite ores associated with pegmatoid pyroxenites of Sangalyk area (Uchaly ore district, southern Urals, Russia) were studied by means of micro-Raman spectroscopy. The compositions of these garnets were close to ugrandite, an isomorphous intermediate group of uvarovite-grossularite-andradite, X(3)Y(2)(SiO(4))(3), X = Ca(2+), Y = Al(3+), Fe(3+), Cr(3+), according to Raman spectra and X-ray microprobe analyses. An assignment of most of the observed bands in visible and near infrared Raman spectra is reported.

  3. Micro-Raman spectra of ugrandite garnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moroz, T.; Ragozin, A.; Salikhov, D.; Belikova, G.; Puchkov, V.; Kagi, H.

    2009-08-01

    The natural garnets from chromite ores associated with pegmatoid pyroxenites of Sangalyk area (Uchaly ore district, southern Urals, Russia) were studied by means of micro-Raman spectroscopy. The compositions of these garnets were close to ugrandite, an isomorphous intermediate group of uvarovite-grossularite-andradite, X 3Y 2(SiO 4) 3, X = Ca 2+, Y = Al 3+, Fe 3+, Cr 3+, according to Raman spectra and X-ray microprobe analyses. An assignment of most of the observed bands in visible and near infrared Raman spectra is reported.

  4. Algorithms for classification of astronomical object spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasiewicz, P.; Szuppe, J.; Hryniewicz, K.

    2015-09-01

    Obtaining interesting celestial objects from tens of thousands or even millions of recorded optical-ultraviolet spectra depends not only on the data quality but also on the accuracy of spectra decomposition. Additionally rapidly growing data volumes demands higher computing power and/or more efficient algorithms implementations. In this paper we speed up the process of substracting iron transitions and fitting Gaussian functions to emission peaks utilising C++ and OpenCL methods together with the NOSQL database. In this paper we implemented typical astronomical methods of detecting peaks in comparison to our previous hybrid methods implemented with CUDA.

  5. Parallel Genetic Algorithm for Alpha Spectra Fitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Orellana, Carlos J.; Rubio-Montero, Pilar; González-Velasco, Horacio

    2005-01-01

    We present a performance study of alpha-particle spectra fitting using parallel Genetic Algorithm (GA). The method uses a two-step approach. In the first step we run parallel GA to find an initial solution for the second step, in which we use Levenberg-Marquardt (LM) method for a precise final fit. GA is a high resources-demanding method, so we use a Beowulf cluster for parallel simulation. The relationship between simulation time (and parallel efficiency) and processors number is studied using several alpha spectra, with the aim of obtaining a method to estimate the optimal processors number that must be used in a simulation.

  6. Benzidine Dyes Action Plan

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This Action Plan addresses the use of benzidine-based dyes and benzidine congener-based dyes, both metalized and non-metalized, in products that would result in consumer exposure, such as for use to color textiles.

  7. Oak Canyon Action Memo

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This memorandum requests approval for a time-critical removal action at the 27 residential properties that compose the Oak Canyon Site located in the Village of Paguate, Pueblo of Laguna, near Cibola County, New Mexico.

  8. Database-Driven Analyses of Astronomical Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cami, Jan

    2012-03-01

    species to the fullerene species C60 and C70 [4]. Given the large number and variety of molecules detected in space, molecular infrared spectroscopy can be used to study pretty much any astrophysical environment that is not too energetic to dissociate the molecules. At the lowest energies, it is interesting to note that molecules such as CN have been used to measure the temperature of the Cosmic Microwave Background (see e.g., Ref. 15). The great diagnostic potential of infrared molecular spectroscopy comes at a price though. Extracting the physical parameters from the observations requires expertise in knowing how various physical processes and instrumental characteristics play together in producing the observed spectra. In addition to the astronomical aspects, this often includes interpreting and understanding the limitations of laboratory data and quantum-chemical calculations; the study of the interaction of matter with radiation at microscopic scales (called radiative transfer, akin to ray tracing) and the effects of observing (e.g., smoothing and resampling) on the resulting spectra and possible instrumental effects (e.g., fringes). All this is not trivial. To make matters worse, observational spectra often contain many components, and might include spectral contributions stemming from very different physical conditions. Fully analyzing such observations is thus a time-consuming task that requires mastery of several techniques. And with ever-increasing rates of observational data acquisition, it seems clear that in the near future, some form of automation is required to handle the data stream. It is thus appealing to consider what part of such analyses could be done without too much human intervention. Two different aspects can be separated: the first step involves simply identifying the molecular species present in the observations. Once the molecular inventory is known, we can try to extract the physical parameters from the observed spectral properties. For both

  9. Cardiac action potential imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Qinghai; Lipp, Peter; Kaestner, Lars

    2013-06-01

    Action potentials in cardiac myocytes have durations in the order of magnitude of 100 milliseconds. In biomedical investigations the documentation of the occurrence of action potentials is often not sufficient, but a recording of the shape of an action potential allows a functional estimation of several molecular players. Therefore a temporal resolution of around 500 images per second is compulsory. In the past such measurements have been performed with photometric approaches limiting the measurement to one cell at a time. In contrast, imaging allows reading out several cells at a time with additional spatial information. Recent developments in camera technologies allow the acquisition with the required speed and sensitivity. We performed action potential imaging on isolated adult cardiomyocytes of guinea pigs utilizing the fluorescent membrane potential sensor di-8-ANEPPS and latest electron-multiplication CCD as well as scientific CMOS cameras of several manufacturers. Furthermore, we characterized the signal to noise ratio of action potential signals of varying sets of cameras, dye concentrations and objective lenses. We ensured that di-8-ANEPPS itself did not alter action potentials by avoiding concentrations above 5 μM. Based on these results we can conclude that imaging is a reliable method to read out action potentials. Compared to conventional current-clamp experiments, this optical approach allows a much higher throughput and due to its contact free concept leaving the cell to a much higher degree undisturbed. Action potential imaging based on isolated adult cardiomyocytes can be utilized in pharmacological cardiac safety screens bearing numerous advantages over approaches based on heterologous expression of hERG channels in cell lines.

  10. Comparison of reflectance spectra of sound and carious enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Analoui, Mostafa; Ando, Masatoshi; Stookey, George K.

    2000-03-01

    Development of dental caries is associated with the loss of minerals and change in the enamel structure. In this study, we have measured and compared reflectance spectra of sound and carious enamel, to investigate its utility in detection and analysis of dental caries. One hundred twenty, 3-mm diameter human enamel cores, with no sign of fluorosis, tetracycline stain, hypoplasia, fracture and restorations, were prepared. The enamel surfaces then were ground and polished. Specimens were placed on a fitted holder with either black or white color for background, with no fluorescence. The baseline spectra were measured using a spectrophotometer with enclosed diffused illumination. Spectra measured from 380 to 780 nm at 5 nm intervals. All measurements were corrected to compensate for the spectrum of illumination. The specimens were divided into two groups and exposed to a demineralizing solution, for 48 and 96 hours, respectively. Reflectance spectra of specimens were measured following lesion induction. All specimens were sectioned and analyzed by transverse microradiography (TMR), where lesion depth and mineral loss ((Delta) Z) were measured. Dimensionality of multi-spectral data was reduced through its conversion to L*a*b* color coordinates and principal component analysis (PCA). Multiple linear regression analysis showed low correlation between L*a*b* and lesion depth and mineral loss. PCA analysis showed higher correlation coefficient, compared to L*a*b*. Preliminary results of this study suggest that multi-spectral measurement and analysis of the tooth surface could be useful in predicting the depth and severity of an early carious lesion.

  11. Absorption Features in Spectra of Magnetized Neutron Stars

    SciTech Connect

    Suleimanov, V.; Hambaryan, V.; Neuhaeuser, R.; Potekhin, A. Y.; Pavlov, G. G.; Adelsberg, M. van; Werner, K.

    2011-09-21

    The X-ray spectra of some magnetized isolated neutron stars (NSs) show absorption features with equivalent widths (EWs) of 50-200 eV, whose nature is not yet well known.To explain the prominent absorption features in the soft X-ray spectra of the highly magnetized (B{approx}10{sup 14} G) X-ray dim isolated NSs (XDINSs), we theoretically investigate different NS local surface models, including naked condensed iron surfaces and partially ionized hydrogen model atmospheres, with semi-infinite and thin atmospheres above the condensed surface. We also developed a code for computing light curves and integral emergent spectra of magnetized neutron stars with various temperature and magnetic field distributions over the NS surface. We compare the general properties of the computed and observed light curves and integral spectra for XDINS RBS 1223 and conclude that the observations can be explained by a thin hydrogen atmosphere above the condensed iron surface, while the presence of a strong toroidal magnetic field component on the XDINS surface is unlikely.We suggest that the harmonically spaced absorption features in the soft X-ray spectrum of the central compact object (CCO) 1E 1207.4-5209 (hereafter 1E 1207) correspond to peaks in the energy dependence of the free-free opacity in a quantizing magnetic field, known as quantum oscillations. To explore observable properties of these quantum oscillations, we calculate models of hydrogen NS atmospheres with B{approx}10{sup 10}-10{sup 11} G(i.e., electron cyclotron energy E{sub c,e}{approx}0.1-1 keV) and T{sub eff} = 1-3 MK. Such conditions are thought to be typical for 1E 1207. We show that observable features at the electron cyclotron harmonics with EWs {approx_equal}100-200 eV can arise due to these quantum oscillations.

  12. Identifying leaf traits that signal stress in TIR spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buitrago Acevedo, Maria F.; Groen, Thomas A.; Hecker, Christoph A.; Skidmore, Andrew K.

    2017-03-01

    Plants under constant water and temperature stress experience a chain of reactions that in the long term alter their leaf traits (morphology, anatomy and chemistry). The use of these traits as proxies for assessing plant stress was so far mainly based on conventional laboratory methods, which are expensive and time-consuming. Remote sensing methods based on spectral changes can detect changes in pigments and productivity using the visible and near infrared. However, the use of infrared spectra, where changes in the spectra are associated with physical changes of the leaf, is still incipient. In this study plants of Rhododendron cf. catawbiense, were exposed to low temperatures and low soil water content during a six months experiment. The spectral response in the infrared region 1.4-16 μm, microstructural variables, leaf water content, leaf area and leaf molecules such as lignin and cellulose concentrations were measured in individual leaves after the period of stress. This study revealed that under cold conditions plants have most changes in leaf water content, lignin and cellulose concentrations and leaf area, while under drought conditions the most striking change is water loss. These leaf trait modifications are also correlated with changes in thermal infrared spectra, showing their potential as proxies for detecting plant stress in this species. A multinomial model allows the estimation of the stress treatments imposed on these plants from their infrared spectra. This model reveals a group of 15 bands in the SWIR and MWIR between 2.23 and 7.77 μm, which show relatively large changes, and had an overall accuracy of 87%. Finally, individual partial least squares regression models show that lignin, cellulose, leaf water content and leaf area are the leaf traits reacting significantly to long-term stress and that are also generating measurable changes in the infrared spectra. Although these models are based on laboratory data, the congruence of the identified

  13. [Addictions and action systems].

    PubMed

    Loonis, E; Apter, M J

    2000-01-01

    Generalizing from some previous analyses of addiction, and introducing the concept of an action system which governs all actions which are focussed on what Brown (1988) calls "hedonic management", we argue that addictions of every kind involve an action system that displays high salience, low variety and low vicariance. Addictions also involve what Apter (1982) calls the "paratelic state". A study was carried out comparing 31 drug addicts with 29 control subjects in terms of action system variables. To measure these variables, we constructed a new instrument, the Activity-System Drawing Test, and also used the Telic Dominance Scale to measure frequency of paratelic states. Dysphoria was measured by means of the BATE (anxiety), IDA-13 (depression), SEI (self-esteem), and TAS-20 (alexithymia) instruments. Strongly significant differences were found between groups for both action system variables and dysphoria, and there were also strong correlations between both groups of variables. This supports the idea that addictions emerge from systemic properties of the action system.

  14. Binary Pulsar B1259-63 Spectrum Evolution and Classification of Pulsar Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dembska, M.; Kijak, J.; Lewandowski, W.

    2012-12-01

    Recently published results (Kijak et al. 2011a) indicated the evidence for a new aspect in radio pulsars spectra. We studied the radio spectrum of PSR B1259-63 in an unique binary with Be star LS 2883 and showed that this pulsar undergoes a spectrum evolution due to the orbital motion. We proposed a qualitative model which explains this evolution. We considered two mechanisms that might influence the observed radio emission: free-free absorption and cyclotron resonance. According to the published results (Kijak et al. 2011b), there were found objects with a new type of pulsar radio spectra, called gigahertz-peaked spectra (GPS) pulsars. Most of them were found to exist in very interesting environments. Therefore, it is suggested that the turnover phenomenon is associated with the environment, rather than being related intrinsically to the radio emission mechanism. Having noticed an apparent resemblance between the B1259-63 spectrum and the GPS, we suggested that the same mechanisms should be responsible for both cases. Thus, we believe that this binary system can hold the clue to the understanding of the gigahertz-peaked spectra of isolated pulsars. Using the same database we constructed spectra for chosen observing days and obtained different types of spectra. Comparing to current classification of pulsar spectra, there occurs a suggestion that the appearance of various spectra shapes, different from a simple power law which is typical for radio pulsars, is possibly caused by environmental conditions around neutron stars.

  15. Identifying pure urban image spectra using a learning urban image spectral archive (LUISA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jilge, Marianne; Heiden, Uta; Habermeyer, Martin; Mende, André; Juergens, Carsten

    2016-10-01

    In this study a learning urban image spectral archive (LUISA) has been developed, that overcomes the issue of an incomplete spectral library and can be used to derive scene-specific pure material spectra. It consists of a well described starting spectral library (LUISA-A) and a tool to derive scene-based pure surface material spectra (LUISA-T). The concept is based on a three-stage approach: (1) Comparing hyperspectral image spectra with LUISA-A spectra to identify scene-specific pure materials, (2) extracting unknown pure spectra based on spatial and spectral metrics and (3) provides the framework to implement new surface material spectra into LUISA-A. The spectral comparison is based on several similarity measures, followed by an object- and spectral-based ruleset to optimize and categorize potentially new pure spectra. The results show that the majority of pure surface materials could be identified using LUISA-A. Unknown spectra are composed of mixed pixels and real pure surface materials which could be distinguished by LUISA-T.

  16. Thermal Emission and Reflected Light Spectra of Super Earths with Flat Transmission Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morley, Caroline V.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Marley, Mark S.; Zahnle, Kevin; Line, Michael; Kempton, Eliza; Lewis, Nikole; Cahoy, Kerri

    2015-12-01

    Planets larger than Earth and smaller than Neptune are some of the most numerous in the galaxy, but observational efforts to understand this population have proved challenging because optically thick clouds or hazes at high altitudes obscure molecular features. We present models of super Earths that include thick clouds and hazes and predict their transmission, thermal emission, and reflected light spectra. Very thick, lofted clouds of salts or sulfides in high metallicity (1000× solar) atmospheres create featureless transmission spectra in the near-infrared. Photochemical hazes with a range of particle sizes also create featureless transmission spectra at lower metallicities. Cloudy thermal emission spectra have muted features more like blackbodies, and hazy thermal emission spectra have emission features caused by an inversion layer at altitudes where the haze forms. Close analysis of reflected light from warm (˜400-800 K) planets can distinguish cloudy spectra, which have moderate albedos (0.05-0.20), from hazy models, which are very dark (0.0-0.03). Reflected light spectra of cold planets (˜200 K) accessible to a space-based visible light coronagraph will have high albedos and large molecular features that will allow them to be more easily characterized than the warmer transiting planets. We suggest a number of complementary observations to characterize this population of planets, including transmission spectra of hot (≳ 1000 K) targets, thermal emission spectra of warm targets using the James Webb Space Telescope, high spectral resolution (R ˜ 105) observations of cloudy targets, and reflected light spectral observations of directly imaged cold targets. Despite the dearth of features observed in super Earth transmission spectra to date, different observations will provide rich diagnostics of their atmospheres.

  17. Dry tests: construction, principle of action, and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chwojnowski, Andrzej

    2001-08-01

    A short description of dry test constructions, chemical principles of action are presented. An example of statement of reflection spectra of described dry tests were shown. For this spectra the best region for determination of analytes by reflectance were selected. The results of a few examples of determination pollution in water an din milk were shown. The all determination had been carried out by dry tests. The reading was performed by comparison with a color scale. In case of flood water analysis determination had been carried out by comparison with a color scale, reflectometrically and by means of classic colorimetric methods.

  18. 77 FR 13519 - Safety Zone; Virginia Beach Oceanfront Air Show, Atlantic Ocean, Virginia Beach, VA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-07

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Virginia Beach Oceanfront Air Show, Atlantic Ocean, Virginia Beach, VA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking. SUMMARY... Virginia Beach, VA. This action is necessary to provide for the safety of life on navigable waters...

  19. 78 FR 31840 - Safety Zone; USO Patriotic Festival Air Show, Atlantic Ocean; Virginia Beach, VA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-28

    ... Ocean; Virginia Beach, VA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule. SUMMARY: The Coast... Beach, VA. This action is necessary to provide for the safety of life on navigable waters during the USO... Concerts Entertainment, Inc. will host an air show event over the Atlantic Ocean in Virginia Beach, VA....

  20. New Insights from Modeling of Core-collapse Supernova Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillier, D. John; Dessart, Luc

    2013-06-01

    With the advent of modern survey telescopes, research into supernovae (SNe) is making huge advances. The surveys are discovering thousands of SNe, identifying new classes of SNe, refining the statistics of SNe occurrence as a function of class and host galaxy properties, and allowing the direct identification of SNe progenitors. With these new observations comes the need for theoretical advances in modeling SNe spectra. In this presentation we discuss recent advances in modeling and interpreting the spectra of core-collapse SNe (Types Ib, Ic, and II) and pair-instability SNe. Recent investigations have revealed the importance of mixing nickel into the helium-rich layer for the excitation of He I lines in Type Ib and Ic supernovae. In particular, we were able to generate Ib and Ic like spectra from the same progenitor model - the only distinction in the SN ejecta is the amount of mixing. There is also now a general realization that most Ib and Ic SNe arise from intermediate mass stars (M < 20 Mo) which have undergone complex mass-transfer and mass-loss processes in a binary system. While some super-luminous SNe have been associated with the pair-production instability, detailed spectroscopic modeling has revealed that the observed post-maximum spectra are too blue, and this raises serious doubts as to their origin. With the advent of the mesa star, a publicly available stellar evolution code, we can now create our own SN progenitors with physically consistent structures. Importantly, we can alter the inputs to mesa star to check the influence of different evolutionary parameters on the structure of the pre-SN star, and its subsequent influence on the SN light curve and spectra. We have used mesa star to generate RSG progenitors for a star with an initial mass of 15 Mo, and have examined the influence of the assumed mixing length, metallicity, rotation, and mass-loss rate. All show measurable effects on the pre-SN progenitor, and on the resulting SN light curves and

  1. Hungarian climate change action plan

    SciTech Connect

    Molnar, S.; Takacs, T.; Arpasi, M.; Farago, T.; Palvoelgyi, T.; Harnos, Z.; Lontay, Z.; Somogyi, Z.; Tajthy, T.

    1998-12-31

    In 1994--1996, within the framework of the US Country Studies Program, the Hungarian Country Study Team developed the national greenhouse gas emission inventory, and elaborated the mitigation options for the different sectors of the economy. In 1997, the development of a National Action Plan was begun as the continuation of this work. Results of the inventory study showed that greenhouse gas emissions decreased from the selected base level (i.e., from the yearly average emissions of 1985--1987) until 1994 by cca. 25%. However, this decrease was primarily caused by the deep economic recession. Therefore the policy makers have to face the problem of economic recovery without a relevant increase of greenhouse gas emissions in the near future. This is the main focus of the mitigation analysis and the National Action Plan.

  2. Fourier smoothing of digital photographic spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anupama, G. C.

    1990-03-01

    Fourier methods of smoothing one-dimensional data are discussed with particular reference to digital photographic spectra. Data smoothed using lowpass filters with different cut-off frequencies are intercompared. A method to scale densities in order to remove the dependence of grain noise on density is described. Optimal filtering technique which models signal and noise in Fourier domain is also explained.

  3. Rotational and Vibrational Spectra of Molecular Clusters.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-06-30

    3 I D ’- 2095 205 209 2105 i k (c),,.-..0 WavenumbersHCN/Av ixture .Pekarlbld asM -mnmr dmr 6 9014 CARS spectra ofthe v, region of HCN in...shown above, the bond stretching constants below the structure. Values shown in parentheses were held fixed. %% -.. .4 .. 0 Table 8 Sumawy of norma

  4. Laboratory millimeter and submillimeter spectra of CO/+/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sastry, K. V. L. N.; Helminger, P.; Herbst, E.; De Lucia, F. C.

    1981-01-01

    The strong electric dipole-allowed transitions of the molecular ion CO(+) in the region 235-470 GHz have been measured in the laboratory. The laboratory spectra at 235 GHz appear to confirm the claim by Erickson et al. (1981) to have observed CO(+) in OMC-1.

  5. Principal component analysis of phenolic acid spectra

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phenolic acids are common plant metabolites that exhibit bioactive properties and have applications in functional food and animal feed formulations. The ultraviolet (UV) and infrared (IR) spectra of four closely related phenolic acid structures were evaluated by principal component analysis (PCA) to...

  6. Variations on supersymmetry breaking and neutrino spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Borzumati, F.; Hamaguchi, K.; Nomura, Y.; Yanagida, T.

    2000-12-11

    The problem of generating light neutrinos within supersymmetric models is discussed. It is shown that the hierarchy of scales induced by supersymmetry breaking can give rise to suppression factors of the correct order of magnitude to produce experimentally allowed neutrino spectra.

  7. Chaotic spectra: How to extract dynamic information

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, H.S.; Gomez Llorente, J.M.; Zakrzewski, J.; Kulander, K.C.

    1988-10-01

    Nonlinear dynamics is applied to chaotic unassignable atomic and molecular spectra with the aim of extracting detailed information about regular dynamic motions that exist over short intervals of time. It is shown how this motion can be extracted from high resolution spectra by doing low resolution studies or by Fourier transforming limited regions of the spectrum. These motions mimic those of periodic orbits (PO) and are inserts into the dominant chaotic motion. Considering these inserts and the PO as a dynamically decoupled region of space, resonant scattering theory and stabilization methods enable us to compute ladders of resonant states which interact with the chaotic quasi-continuum computed in principle from basis sets placed off the PO. The interaction of the resonances with the quasicontinuum explains the low resolution spectra seen in such experiments. It also allows one to associate low resolution features with a particular PO. The motion on the PO thereby supplies the molecular movements whose quantization causes the low resolution spectra. Characteristic properties of the periodic orbit based resonances are discussed. The method is illustrated on the photoabsorption spectrum of the hydrogen atom in a strong magnetic field and on the photodissociation spectrum of H/sub 3//sup +/. Other molecular systems which are currently under investigation using this formalism are also mentioned. 53 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Correlation Functions Aid Analyses Of Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beer, Reinhard; Norton, Robert H., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    New uses found for correlation functions in analyses of spectra. In approach combining elements of both pattern-recognition and traditional spectral-analysis techniques, spectral lines identified in data appear useless at first glance because they are dominated by noise. New approach particularly useful in measurement of concentrations of rare species of molecules in atmosphere.

  9. Discriminating Dysarthria Type from Envelope Modulation Spectra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liss, Julie M.; LeGendre, Sue; Lotto, Andrew J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Previous research demonstrated the ability of temporally based rhythm metrics to distinguish among dysarthrias with different prosodic deficit profiles (J. M. Liss et al., 2009). The authors examined whether comparable results could be obtained by an automated analysis of speech envelope modulation spectra (EMS), which quantifies the…

  10. Prompt fission neutron spectra of actinides

    DOE PAGES

    Capote, R.; Chen, Y. -J.; Hambsch, F. -J.; ...

    2016-01-06

    Here, the energy spectrum of prompt neutrons emitted in fission (PFNS) plays a very important role in nuclear science and technology. A Coordinated Research Project (CRP) "Evaluation of Prompt Fission Neutron Spectra of Actinides" was established by the IAEA Nuclear Data Section in 2009, with the major goal to produce new PFNS evaluations with uncertainties for actinide nuclei.

  11. Spectra of Angrites and Possible Parent Bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burbine, T. H.; McCoy, T. J.; Binzel, R. P.

    2001-01-01

    One meteorite class where very little progress has been made in identifying possible parent bodies is the angrites. We have obtained spectra of two new angrites (D'Orbigny and Sahara 99555). Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  12. Calculated late time spectra of supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Axelrod, T.S.

    1987-10-30

    We consider here the nebular phase spectra of supernovae whose late time luminosity is provided by the radioactive decay of /sup 56/Ni and /sup 56/Co synthesized in the explosion. A broad variety of supernovae are known or suspected to fall in this category. This includes all SNIa and SNIb, and at least some SNII, in particular SN1987a. At sufficiently late times the expanding supernova becomes basically nebular in character due to its decreasing optical depth. The spectra produced during this stage contain information on the density and abundance structure of the entire supernova, as opposed to spectra near maximum light which are affected only by the outermost layers. A numerical model for nebular spectrum formation is therefore potentially very valuable for answering currently outstanding questions about the post-explosion supernova structure. As an example, we can hope to determine the degree of mixing which occurs between the layers of the ''onion-skin'' abundance structure predicted by current one dimensional explosion calculations. In the sections which follow, such a numerical model is briefly described and then applied to SN1972e, a typical SNIa, SN1985f, an SNIb, and finally to SN1987a. In the case of SN1987a predicted spectra are presented for the wavelength range from 1 to 100 microns at a time 300 days after explosion. 18 refs., 6 figs.

  13. Astronomy Spectra Experiment for Nonscience Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, S. E.

    1982-01-01

    An experimental technique to develop inferential thinking in less scientifically-oriented community college students is described. Students activate unlabeled gas discharge tubes and identify the gases by comparing color photographs with spectrometer observations. Includes methods for taking color photographs of spectra. (SK)

  14. Students' Mental Models of Atomic Spectra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Körhasan, Nilüfer Didis; Wang, Lu

    2016-01-01

    Mental modeling, which is a theory about knowledge organization, has been recently studied by science educators to examine students' understanding of scientific concepts. This qualitative study investigates undergraduate students' mental models of atomic spectra. Nine second-year physics students, who have already taken the basic chemistry and…

  15. Automatic Spike Removal Algorithm for Raman Spectra.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yao; Burch, Kenneth S

    2016-11-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a powerful technique, widely used in both academia and industry. In part, the technique's extensive use stems from its ability to uniquely identify and image various material parameters: composition, strain, temperature, lattice/excitation symmetry, and magnetism in bulk, nano, solid, and organic materials. However, in nanomaterials and samples with low thermal conductivity, these measurements require long acquisition times. On the other hand, charge-coupled device (CCD) detectors used in Raman microscopes are vulnerable to cosmic rays. As a result, many spurious spikes occur in the measured spectra, which can distort the result or require the spectra to be ignored. In this paper, we outline a new method that significantly improves upon existing algorithms for removing these spikes. Specifically, we employ wavelet transform and data clustering in a new spike-removal algorithm. This algorithm results in spike-free spectra with negligible spectral distortion. The reduced dependence on the selection of wavelets and intuitive wavelet coefficient adjustment strategy enables non-experts to employ these powerful spectra-filtering techniques.

  16. Solar Energetic Particle Spectra Measured with PAMELA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, James; Bruno, Alessandro; Boezio, Mirko; Bravar, Ulisse; Christian, Eric; Georgia, De Nolfo; Martucci, Matteo; Merge, Matteo; Munini, Riccardo; Sparvoli, Roberta; Stochaj, Steven; Pamela Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    We have measured the event integrated spectra from several SEP events from 2006 to 2014 in the energy range starting at 80 MeV and extending well above the neutron monitor threshold. The PAMELA instrument is in a high inclination, low Earth orbit and has access to SEPs when at high geographic latitudes. This means that the spectra have been assembled from regularly spaced measurements with gaps during the course of the event. Furthermore, the field of view of PAMELA is small and during the high latitude passes it scans a wide range of asymptotic directions as the spacecraft moves. Correcting for data gaps and solid angle effects, we have compiled event-integrated intensity spectra that typically exhibit power law shapes in energy with an exponential roll over. The events analyzed include two, maybe three, GLEs. In those cases the roll over energy lies above the neutron monitor threshold (1 GV) while the others are lower. We see no qualitative difference between the spectra of GLE vs. non-GLE events. National Science Foundation, NASA, Italian Space Agency, Russian Space Agency.

  17. [Structural characteristics of infrared spectra for polyaluminum chloride in enhanced reactions of modification].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Feng-shan; Wang, Shi-hu; Su, Jin-zhu; Sun, Hu; Ding, Jie; Xu, Yi-zhuang; Wu, Jin-guang

    2004-05-01

    As an important preparation method of Inorganic Polymer Flocculants (IPFs) with all-round performance, the use of enhanced reactions of modification for Polyaluminum Chlorides (PAC) is a trend of application. In this paper, auctorial-made multicore oligomers as a complexing agent, polysilicate as a crosslinking agent and polyacrylamide as a compounding agent are respectively used to enhance PAC and prepared three kinds of IPFs, named CO-PAC, CR-PAC and PAM-PAC. The Fourier Transform Infrared spectra (FTIR) of the three flocculants show that there have been found new chemical bonds beyond Al-OH in their structures, and each characteristic band of primary group in PAC has a band shift to a lower frequency due to its structural aberration. These evidences suggested that enhanced reactions of modification for PAC are not at all a simple process of physical mix, but a chemical reaction to form other structural characteristics of inorganic polymers. The excellent coagulation behavior of these new flocculants depends mainly on the chemical actions, but there are a little physical effects between the modifiers and PAC.

  18. Ultraviolet Photodissociation Action Spectroscopy of Protonated Azabenzenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Christopher S.; Blanksby, Stephen J.; Bieske, Evan; Reimers, Jeffrey R.; Trevitt, Adam J.

    2014-06-01

    Azabenzenes are derivatives of benzene containing between one and six nitrogen atoms. Protonated azabenzenes are the fundamental building blocks of many biomolecules, charge-transfer dyes, ionic liquids and fluorescent tags. However, despite their ubiquity, there exists limited spectroscopic data that reveals the structure, behaviour and stability of these systems in their excited states. For the case of pyridinium (C_5H_5N-H^+), the simplest azabenzene, the electronic spectroscopy is complicated by short excited state lifetimes, efficient non-radiative deactivation methods and limited fluorescence. Ultraviolet (UV) photodissociation (PD) action spectroscopy provides new insight into the spectroscopic details, excited state behaviour and photodissociation processes of a series of protonated azabenzenes including pyridinium, diazeniums and their substituted derivatives. The room-temperature UV PD action spectra, often exhibiting vibronic detail,^b will be presented alongside PD mass spectra and the kinetic data from structurally-diagnostic ion-molecule reaction kinetics. Analysis of the spectra, with the aid of quantum chemical calculations, reveal that many azabenzenes prefer a non-planar excited state geometry reminiscent of the structures encountered in 'channel 3'-like deactivation of aromatics. The normal modes active in this isomerization contribute largely to the spectroscopy of the N-pyridinium ion as they build upon totally-symmetric vibronic transitions leading to repeating sets of closely-spaced spectral features. Hansen, C.S. et al.; J. Am. Soc. Mass Spectrom. 24:932-940 (2013) Hansen, C.S. et al.; J. Phys. Chem. A 117:10839-10846 (2013)

  19. Mid-infrared spectra of comet nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, Michael S. P.; Woodward, Charles E.; Gehrz, Robert D.; Reach, William T.; Harker, David E.

    2017-03-01

    Comet nuclei and D-type asteroids have several similarities at optical and near-IR wavelengths, including near-featureless red reflectance spectra, and low albedos. Mineral identifications based on these characteristics are fraught with degeneracies, although some general trends can be identified. In contrast, spectral emissivity features in the mid-infrared provide important compositional information that might not otherwise be achievable. Jovian Trojan D-type asteroids have emissivity features strikingly similar to comet comae, suggesting that they have the same compositions and that the surfaces of the Trojans are highly porous. However, a direct comparison between a comet and asteroid surface has not been possible due to the paucity of spectra of comet nuclei at mid-infrared wavelengths. We present 5-35 μm thermal emission spectra of comets 10P/Tempel 2, and 49P/Arend-Rigaux observed with the Infrared Spectrograph on the Spitzer Space Telescope. Our analysis reveals no evidence for a coma or tail at the time of observation, suggesting the spectra are dominated by the comet nucleus. We fit each spectrum with the near-Earth asteroid thermal model (NEATM) and find sizes in agreement with previous values. However, the NEATM beaming parameters of the nuclei, 0.74-0.83, are systematically lower than the Jupiter-family comet population mean of 1.03 ± 0.11, derived from 16- and 22-μm photometry. We suggest this may be either an artifact of the spectral reduction, or the consequence of an emissivity low near 16 μm. When the spectra are normalized by the NEATM model, a weak 10-μm silicate plateau is evident, with a shape similar to those seen in mid-infrared spectra of D-type asteroids. A silicate plateau is also evident in previously published Spitzer spectra of the nucleus of comet 9P/Tempel 1. We compare, in detail, these comet nucleus emission features to those seen in spectra of the Jovian Trojan D-types (624) Hektor, (911) Agamemnon, and (1172) Aneas, as well

  20. Plan for early action: Recommendations

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-31

    This report contains recommendations on the implementation of an action plan to reduce or recapture greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in British Columbia. The report includes the consensus recommendations of the BC Greenhouse Gas Forum, as well as those items on which Forum participants have agreed to disagree, plus the reasons for those differences. The recommendations include: Umbrella actions which may affect several or all sectors of the economy, or support the success of other actions; actions to reduce vehicle kilometers travelled; actions to increase vehicle efficiency or increase the use of alternative fuels or technologies; actions to decrease GHG emissions from energy production; actions to increase end-use energy efficiency; and actions to reduce non-energy-related emissions. Appendices include work sheets on each action, with a description of the action and information on the action`s rationale, experience elsewhere, related policy initiatives, and key issues regarding feasibility and implementation.

  1. What's an Asthma Action Plan?

    MedlinePlus

    ... to 2-Year-Old What's an Asthma Action Plan? KidsHealth > For Parents > What's an Asthma Action Plan? ... normal everyday activities without having asthma symptoms. Action Plans Are Unique Each person's experience with asthma is ...

  2. Spectra of delay-coupled heterogeneous noisy nonlinear oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vüllings, Andrea; Schöll, Eckehard; Lindner, Benjamin

    2014-02-01

    Nonlinear oscillators that are subject to noise and delayed interaction have been used to describe a number of dynamical phenomena in Physics and beyond. Here we study the spectral statistics (power and cross-spectral densities) of a small number of noisy nonlinear oscillators and derive analytical approximations for these spectra. In our paper, individual oscillators are described by the normal form of a supercritical or subcritical Hopf bifurcation supplemented by Gaussian white noise. Oscillators can be distinguished from each other by their frequency, bifurcation parameter, and noise intensity. Extending previous results from the literature, we first calculate in linear response theory the power spectral density and response function of the single oscillator in both super- and subcritical parameter regime and test them against numerical simulations. For small heterogeneous groups of oscillators (N = 2 or 3), which are coupled by a delayed linear term, we use a linear response ansatz to derive approximations for the power and cross-spectral densities of the oscillators within this small network. These approximations are confirmed by comparison with extensive numerical simulations. Using the theory we relate the peaks in the spectra of the homogeneous system (identical oscillators) to periodic solutions of the deterministic (noiseless) system. For two delay-coupled subcritical Hopf oscillators, we show that the coupling can enhance the coherence resonance effect, which is known to occur for the single subcritical oscillator. In the case of heterogeneous oscillators, we find that the delay-induced characteristic profile of the spectra is conserved for moderate frequency detuning.

  3. Parameterization of directional spectra, part 2, volume 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juszko, Barbara-Ann

    1989-12-01

    The description of complex directional wave spectra using a limited number of parameters would reduce data storage requirements and facilitate the theoretical and practical use of spectral characteristics. The present work assessed the ability of a 10 parameter model developed in the WAVEC study and the existing OGDP hindcast model to represent hindcast directional wave spectra observed at a single location near Hibernia. The parametric model acceptably reproduced the hindcast spectra over 90 percent of the time. There was little loss of information as indicated by the behavior of the spectral statistics. A significant correlation was observed between energy levels, peak wave direction and vector mean direction between hindcast and observed behavior. No definite conclusions could be formed on specific frequency direction features due to intrinsic limitations in directional spectral techniques. A coherence analysis between hindcast and measured winds indicated that the man machine mix of hindcast input wind did provide an improvement over a purely geostrophic estimate. The coherence squared dropped below acceptable levels at frequencies above 0.75 cycles per day (cpd). This behavior was reflected in the coherence of the vector mean wave field. Limiting the analysis to selected wave frequency bands, indicated that the hindcast model did not reproduce the observed swell signature with any statistical confidence while the set showed acceptable coherence to frequencies between 0.75 and 1.0 cpd.

  4. IR and Raman spectra of liquid water: theory and interpretation.

    PubMed

    Auer, B M; Skinner, J L

    2008-06-14

    IR and Raman (parallel- and perpendicular-polarized) spectra in the OH stretch region for liquid water were measured some years ago, but their interpretation is still controversial. In part, this is because theoretical calculation of such spectra for a neat liquid presents a formidable challenge due to the coupling between vibrational chromophores and the effects of motional narrowing. Recently we proposed an electronic structure/molecular dynamics method for calculating spectra of dilute HOD in liquid D(2)O, which relied on ab initio calculations on clusters to provide a map from nuclear coordinates of the molecules in the liquid to OH stretch frequencies, transition dipoles, and polarizabilities. Here we extend this approach to the calculation of couplings between chromophores. From the trajectories of the fluctuating local-mode frequencies, transition moments, and couplings, we use our recently developed time-averaging approximation to calculate the line shapes. Our results are in good agreement with experiment for the IR and Raman line shapes, and capture the significant differences among them. Our analysis shows that while the coupling between chromophores is relatively modest, it nevertheless produces delocalization of the vibrational eigenstates over up to 12 chromophores, which has a profound effect on the spectroscopy. In particular, our results demonstrate that the peak in the parallel-polarized Raman spectrum at about 3250 wavenumbers is collective in nature.

  5. Hydration of amino acids: FTIR spectra and molecular dynamics studies.

    PubMed

    Panuszko, Aneta; Adamczak, Beata; Czub, Jacek; Gojło, Emilia; Stangret, Janusz

    2015-11-01

    The hydration of selected amino acids, alanine, glycine, proline, valine, isoleucine and phenylalanine, has been studied in aqueous solutions by means of FTIR spectra of HDO isotopically diluted in H2O. The difference spectra procedure and the chemometric method have been applied to remove the contribution of bulk water and thus to separate the spectra of solute-affected HDO. To support interpretation of obtained spectral results, molecular dynamics simulations of amino acids were performed. The structural-energetic characteristic of these solute-affected water molecules shows that, on average, water affected by amino acids forms stronger and shorter H-bonds than those in pure water. Differences in the influence of amino acids on water structure have been noticed. The effect of the hydrophobic side chain of an amino acid on the solvent interactions seems to be enhanced because of the specific cooperative coupling of water strong H-bond chain, connecting the carboxyl and amino groups, with the clathrate-like H-bond network surrounding the hydrocarbon side chain. The parameter derived from the spectral data, which corresponds to the contributions of the population of weak hydrogen bonds of water molecules which have been substituted by the stronger ones in the hydration sphere of amino acids, correlated well with the amino acid hydrophobicity indexes.

  6. [Feasibility of monitoring karst standing conditions with vegetation spectra].

    PubMed

    Yue, Yue-Min; Wang, Ke-Lin; Xiong, Ying

    2012-07-01

    Karst regions are typically ecological fragile zones constrained by geological setting, which resulted in high heterogeneity of vegetation standing conditions. The karst vegetation was featured with stone, dry and high calcium carbonate content growth conditions. Based on vegetation spectral analysis and canonical correspondence analysis (CCA), the present study aimed to examine the feasibility of using vegetation spectra to monitor the heterogeneous karst standing conditions. The results showed that there were significant differences between karst vegetation and non-karst vegetation within the spectral range of 1 300-2 500 nm reflectance and 400 - 680 nm first-derivative spectra. It was found that soil moisture and calcium carbonate contents had the most significant effects on vegetation spectral features in karst regions. Ordination diagrams of CCA could distinguish the differences of karst vegetation and non-karst vegetation. Our study demonstrates that vegetation spectra are highly related to karst standing conditions and it is feasible to monitor karst standing conditions with vegetation spectral features.

  7. COMPOSITE SPECTRA IN MERGING U/LIRGs CAUSED BY SHOCKS

    SciTech Connect

    Rich, J. A.; Kewley, L. J.; Dopita, M. A.

    2014-01-20

    We present a key result from our optical integral field spectroscopic survey of 27 nearby ultraluminous and luminous infrared galaxies (U/LIRGs) from the Great Observatory All-Sky LIRG Survey. Using spatially resolved multi-component emission line fitting to trace the emission line ratios and velocity dispersion of the ionized gas, we quantify for the first time the widespread shock ionization in gas-rich merging U/LIRGs. Our results show a fractional contribution to the total observed Hα flux from radiative shocks increasing from a few percent during early merger stages to upward of 60% of the observed optical emission line flux in late-stage mergers. We compare our resolved spectroscopy to nuclear spectra and find that 3/4 of the galaxies in our sample that would be classified as ''composite'' based on optical spectroscopy are primarily characterized by a combination of star formation and merger-driven shocks. Our results have important implications for the interpretation of ''composite'' rest-frame optical spectra of U/LIRGs as starburst+active galactic nucleus (AGN), as the shock emission combined with star formation can mimic ''composite'' optical spectra in the absence of any contribution from an AGN.

  8. ELM: AN ALGORITHM TO ESTIMATE THE ALPHA ABUNDANCE FROM LOW-RESOLUTION SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Bu, Yude; Zhao, Gang; Kumar, Yerra Bharat; Pan, Jingchang E-mail: gzhao@nao.cas.cn

    2016-01-20

    We have investigated a novel methodology using the extreme learning machine (ELM) algorithm to determine the α abundance of stars. Applying two methods based on the ELM algorithm—ELM+spectra and ELM+Lick indices—to the stellar spectra from the ELODIE database, we measured the α abundance with a precision better than 0.065 dex. By applying these two methods to the spectra with different signal-to-noise ratios (S/Ns) and different resolutions, we found that ELM+spectra is more robust against degraded resolution and ELM+Lick indices is more robust against variation in S/N. To further validate the performance of ELM, we applied ELM+spectra and ELM+Lick indices to SDSS spectra and estimated α abundances with a precision around 0.10 dex, which is comparable to the results given by the SEGUE Stellar Parameter Pipeline. We further applied ELM to the spectra of stars in Galactic globular clusters (M15, M13, M71) and open clusters (NGC 2420, M67, NGC 6791), and results show good agreement with previous studies (within 1σ). A comparison of the ELM with other widely used methods including support vector machine, Gaussian process regression, artificial neural networks, and linear least-squares regression shows that ELM is efficient with computational resources and more accurate than other methods.

  9. Prompt fission neutron spectra of n+235U above the (n,nf) fission threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Neng-Chuan; Jia, Min; Chen, Yong-Jing; Liu, Ting-Jin

    2015-05-01

    Calculations of prompt fission neutron spectra (PFNS) from the 235U(n, f) reaction were performed with a semi-empirical method for En = 7.0 and 14.7 MeV neutron energies. The total PFNS were obtained as a superposition of (n,xnf) pre-fission neutron spectra and post-fission spectra of neutrons which were evaporated from fission fragments, and these two kinds of spectra were taken as an expression of the evaporation spectrum. The contributions of (n,xnf) fission neutron spectra on the calculated PFNS were discussed. The results show that emission of one or two neutrons in the (n,nf) or (n,2nf) reactions influences the PFNS shape, and the neutron spectra of the (n,xnf) fission-channel are soft compared with the neutron spectra of the (n,f) fission channel. In addition, analysis of the multiple-chance fission component showed that second-chance fission dominates the PFNS with an incident neutron energy of 14.7 MeV whereas first-chance fission dominates the 7 MeV case. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11205246, 91126010, U1230127, 91226102), IAEA CRP (15905), and Defense Industrial Technology Development Program (B0120110034)

  10. On the difference between SERS spectra of cell growth media and whole bacterial cells

    PubMed Central

    Premasiri, W. Ranjith; Gebregziabher, Yoseph; Ziegler, Lawrence D.

    2013-01-01

    It has been recently suggested [N. E. Marotta and L. A. Bottomley, Appl. Spectrosc. 64, 2010, 601-06] that previously reported SERS spectra of vegetative bacterial cells are due to residual cell growth media that were not properly removed from samples of the lab cultured microorganism suspensions. SERS spectra of several commonly used cell growth media are similar to those of bacterial cells as shown here and reported elsewhere. However, a multivariate data analysis approach shows that SERS spectra of different bacterial species grown in the same growth media exhibit different characteristic vibrational spectra, SERS spectra of the same organism grown in different media display the same SERS spectrum, and SERS spectra of growth media do not cluster near the SERS spectra of washed bacteria. Furthermore, a bacterial SERS spectrum grown in a minimal medium, which uses inorganics for a nitrogen source and displays virtually no SERS features, exhibits a characteristic bacterial SERS spectrum. We use multivariate analysis to show how successive water washing and centrifugation cycles remove cell growth media and result in a robust bacterial SERS spectrum in contrast to the previous study attributing bacterial SERS signals to growth media. PMID:21513591

  11. ELM: an Algorithm to Estimate the Alpha Abundance from Low-resolution Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bu, Yude; Zhao, Gang; Pan, Jingchang; Bharat Kumar, Yerra

    2016-01-01

    We have investigated a novel methodology using the extreme learning machine (ELM) algorithm to determine the α abundance of stars. Applying two methods based on the ELM algorithm—ELM+spectra and ELM+Lick indices—to the stellar spectra from the ELODIE database, we measured the α abundance with a precision better than 0.065 dex. By applying these two methods to the spectra with different signal-to-noise ratios (S/Ns) and different resolutions, we found that ELM+spectra is more robust against degraded resolution and ELM+Lick indices is more robust against variation in S/N. To further validate the performance of ELM, we applied ELM+spectra and ELM+Lick indices to SDSS spectra and estimated α abundances with a precision around 0.10 dex, which is comparable to the results given by the SEGUE Stellar Parameter Pipeline. We further applied ELM to the spectra of stars in Galactic globular clusters (M15, M13, M71) and open clusters (NGC 2420, M67, NGC 6791), and results show good agreement with previous studies (within 1σ). A comparison of the ELM with other widely used methods including support vector machine, Gaussian process regression, artificial neural networks, and linear least-squares regression shows that ELM is efficient with computational resources and more accurate than other methods.

  12. Role of non-Condon vibronic coupling and conformation change on two-photon absorption spectra of green fluorescent protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ai, Yuejie; Tian, Guangjun; Luo, Yi

    2013-07-01

    Two-photon absorption spectra of green fluorescent proteins (GFPs) often show a blue-shift band compared to their conventional one-photon absorption spectra, which is an intriguing feature that has not been well understood. We present here a systematic study on one- and two-photon spectra of GFP chromophore by means of the density functional response theory and complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) methods. It shows that the popular density functional fails to provide correct vibrational progression for the spectra. The non-Condon vibronic coupling, through the localised intrinsic vibrational modes of the chromophore, is responsible for the blue-shift in the TPA spectra. The cis to trans isomerisation can be identified in high-resolution TPA spectra. Our calculations demonstrate that the high level ab initio multiconfigurational CASSCF method, rather than the conventional density functional theory is required for investigating the essential excited-state properties of the GFP chromophore.

  13. Classifying Facial Actions

    PubMed Central

    Donato, Gianluca; Bartlett, Marian Stewart; Hager, Joseph C.; Ekman, Paul; Sejnowski, Terrence J.

    2010-01-01

    The Facial Action Coding System (FACS) [23] is an objective method for quantifying facial movement in terms of component actions. This system is widely used in behavioral investigations of emotion, cognitive processes, and social interaction. The coding is presently performed by highly trained human experts. This paper explores and compares techniques for automatically recognizing facial actions in sequences of images. These techniques include analysis of facial motion through estimation of optical flow; holistic spatial analysis, such as principal component analysis, independent component analysis, local feature analysis, and linear discriminant analysis; and methods based on the outputs of local filters, such as Gabor wavelet representations and local principal components. Performance of these systems is compared to naive and expert human subjects. Best performances were obtained using the Gabor wavelet representation and the independent component representation, both of which achieved 96 percent accuracy for classifying 12 facial actions of the upper and lower face. The results provide converging evidence for the importance of using local filters, high spatial frequencies, and statistical independence for classifying facial actions. PMID:21188284

  14. ES H action plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    This document contains planned actions to correct the deficiencies identified in the Pre-Tiger Team Self-Assessment (PTTSA), January 1991, of Sandia National Laboratories (SNL -- Albuquerque, New Mexico; Tonopah, Nevada; and Kauai, Hawaii). The Self-Assessment was conducted by a Self-Assessment Working Group consisting of 19 department managers, with support from Environment, Safety, and Health (ES H) professionals, from October through December 1990. Findings from other past audits, dating back to 1985, were reviewed and compared with the PTTSA findings to determine if additional findings, key findings, or root causes were warranted. The resulting ES H Action Plan and individual planned actions were prepared by the ES H Action Plan Project Group with assistance from the Program owners/authors during February and March 1991. The plan was reviewed by SNL Management in April 1991. This document serves as a planning instrument for the Laboratories to aid in the scoping and sizing of activities related to ES H compliance for the coming five years. It will be modified as required to ensure a workload/funding balance and to address the findings resulting from the Tiger Team assessment at SNL, Albuquerque. The process of producing this document has served well to prepare SNL, Albuquerque, for the coming task of producing the required post-Tiger Team action plan document. 8 tabs.

  15. The Influence of Particle Size on Infrared Reflectance Spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, Tanya L.; Brauer, Carolyn S.; Su, Yin-Fong; Blake, Thomas A.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Richardson, Robert L.

    2014-06-13

    Reflectance spectra of solids are influenced by the absorption coefficient as well as the particle size and morphology. In the infrared, spectral features may be observed as either maxima or minima: in general, the upward-going peaks in the reflectance spectrum result from surface scattering, which are rays that have reflected from the surface without penetration, whereas downward-going peaks result from either absorption or volume scattering, i.e. rays that have penetrated into the sample or refracted into the sample interior and are not reflected. The light signal reflected from solids usually encompasses all these effects which include dependencies on particle size, morphology and sample density. This paper measures the reflectance spectra in the 1.3 – 16 micron range for various bulk materials that have a combination of strong and weak absorption bands in order to understand the effects on the spectral features as a function of the mean grain size of the sample. The bulk materials were ground with a mortar and pestle and then sieved to separate the samples into various size fractions: 0-45, 45-90, 90-180, 180-250, 250-500, and >500 microns. The directional-hemispherical spectra were recorded using a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer equipped with an integrating sphere to measure the reflectance for all of the particle-size fractions. We have studied both organic and inorganic materials, but this paper focuses on inorganic salts, NaNO3 in particular. Our studies clearly show that particle size has an enormous influence on the measured reflectance spectra for bulk materials and that successful identification requires sufficient representative reflectance data so as to include the particle size(s) of interest. Origins of the effects are discussed.

  16. Vibrational spectra of 3,5-dimethylpyrazole and deuterated derivatives.

    PubMed

    Orza, J M; García, M V; Alkorta, I; Elguero, J

    2000-07-01

    The infrared (IR) and Raman spectra of 3,5-dimethylpyrazole have been recorded in the vapor, liquid (melt and solution) and solid states. Two deuterated derivatives, C5H7N-ND and C5D7N-NH, were also studied in solid state and in solutions. Instrumental resolution was relatively low, 2.0 cm(-1) in the IR and approximately 2.7 cm(-1) in the Raman spectra. The solids are made of cyclic hydrogen-bonded trimers. These trimers, present also in chloroform and acetone solutions, give rise to characteristic high absorption IR spectra in the 3200-2500 cm(-1) region, related to Fermi resonance involving nu(NH) vibrations. Bands from trimers are not present in water solutions but these solutions show spectral features similar in several ways to those of the trimer, attributable to solvent-bonded complexes. Evidence of H-bonding interactions with the other solvents is also visible in the high-frequency region. The two very intense bands in the Raman spectra of the solids appearing at 115 and 82 cm(-1) in the parent compound are also connected with a trimer formation. To interpret the experimental data, ab initio computations of the harmonic vibrational frequencies and IR and Raman intensities were carried out using the Gaussian 94 program package after full optimization at the RHF/6-31G* level for the three monomeric compounds as well as for three models of the trimer, with C3h, C3 and C1 symmetry. The combined use of experiments and computations allow a firm assignment of most of the observed bands for all the systems. In general, the agreement between theory and experiment is very good, with the exception of the IR and Raman intensities of some transitions. Particularly noticeable is the failure of the theoretical calculation in accounting for the high intensity of the Raman bands of the solid about 115 and 82 cm(-1).

  17. Rationales in Children's Causal Learning from Others' Actions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sobel, David M.; Sommerville, Jessica A.

    2009-01-01

    Shown commensurate actions and information by an adult, preschoolers' causal learning was influenced by the pedagogical context in which these actions occurred. Four-year-olds who were provided with a reason for an experimenter's action relevant to learning causal structure showed more accurate causal learning than children exposed to the same…

  18. The Action Research Dissertation: A Guide for Students and Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herr, Kathryn; Anderson, Gary L.

    2005-01-01

    Many students struggle with turning action research projects into a Master's thesis or doctoral dissertation: to address this need, the authors have distilled decades of action research experience into a reference for graduate students. This book is designed to provide a roadmap to show that action research is appropriate not only for a…

  19. RESEARCH PAPER: Automated estimation of stellar fundamental parameters from low resolution spectra: the PLS method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian-Nan; Luo, A.-Li; Zhao, Yong-Heng

    2009-06-01

    PLS (Partial Least Squares regression) is introduced into an automatic estimation of fundamental stellar spectral parameters. It extracts the most correlative spectral component to the parameters (Teff, log g and [Fe/H]), and sets up a linear regression function from spectra to the corresponding parameters. Considering the properties of stellar spectra and the PLS algorithm, we present a piecewise PLS regression method for estimation of stellar parameters, which is composed of one PLS model for Teff, and seven PLS models for log g and [Fe/H] estimation. Its performance is investigated by large experiments on flux calibrated spectra and continuum normalized spectra at different signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) and resolutions. The results show that the piecewise PLS method is robust for spectra at the medium resolution of 0.23 nm. For low resolution 0.5 nm and 1 nm spectra, it achieves competitive results at higher SNR. Experiments using ELODIE spectra of 0.23 nm resolution illustrate that our piecewise PLS models trained with MILES spectra are efficient for O ~ G stars: for flux calibrated spectra, the systematic offsets are 3.8%, 0.14 dex, and -0.09 dex for Teff, log g and [Fe/H], with error scatters of 5.2%, 0.44 dex and 0.38 dex, respectively; for continuum normalized spectra, the systematic offsets are 3.8%, 0.12dex, and -0.13dex for Teff, log g and [Fe/H], with error scatters of 5.2%, 0.49 dex and 0.41 dex, respectively. The PLS method is rapid, easy to use and does not rely as strongly on the tightness of a parameter grid of templates to reach high precision as Artificial Neural Networks or minimum distance methods do.

  20. The role of von Neumann and Lueders postulates in the Einstein, Podolsky, and Rosen considerations: Comparing measurements with degenerate and nondegenerate spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Khrennikov, Andrei

    2008-05-15

    We show that the projection postulate plays a crucial role in the discussion on the so-called quantum nonlocality, in particular, in the Einstein, Podolsky, and Rosen argument. We stress that the original von Neumann projection postulate was crucially modified by extending it to observables with degenerate spectra (the Lueders postulate) and we show that this modification is highly questionable from a physical point of view and is the real source of quantum nonlocality. The use of the original von Neumann postulate eliminates this problem: instead of an action at a distance nonlocality we obtain a classical measurement nonlocality, which is related to the synchronization of two measurements (on the two parts of a composite system)