Science.gov

Sample records for action studies demonstrated

  1. NATO/CCMS pilot study on demonstration of remedial-action technologies for contaminated land and ground water: 1988 activities

    SciTech Connect

    Sanning, D.E.; Smith, M.A.; Bell, R.M.

    1988-01-01

    The paper describes the nature, structure and content of the NATO Committee on the Challenges of Modern Society (CCMS) Pilot Study Demonstration of Remedial Action Technologies for Contaminated Land and Groundwater and the associated CCMS Fellowship program. To date, twelve projects in six countries have been selected for inclusion in the program which will involve periodic expert review during the five years for which the project will run. The paper draws special attention to the work on microbial clean up techniques included in the program, and the outcome of the first international meeting held in Washington, D.C. in 1987.

  2. Using discrepant events in science demonstrations to promote student engagement in scientific investigations: An action research study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancuso, Vincent J.

    Students' scientific investigations have been identified in national standards and related reform documents as a critical component of students' learning experiences in school, yet it is not easy to implement them in science classrooms. Could science demonstrations help science teachers put this recommendation into practice? While demonstrations are a common practice in the science classroom and research has documented some positive effects in terms of student motivation and engagement from their use, the literature also shows that, as traditionally presented, science demonstrations do not always achieve their intended outcomes. This, in turn, suggested the value of investigating what design elements of demonstrations could be used to promote specific instructional goals. Employing action research as a methodology, the proposed study was developed to explore how science demonstrations can be designed so as to most effectively promote student engagement in scientific investigations. More specifically, I was interested in examining the effects of using a discrepant event as part of the demonstration, as a way to create cognitive conflict and, thus, increase interest and engagement. I also investigated the relative merit of the well-researched POE (Predict, Observe, Explain) design versus employing demonstrations that appear to the student to be unplanned (what I will refer to as NOE, or a Naturally Occurring Experience). This study was informed by Constructivism, Situated Cognition and Conceptual Change as theoretical frameworks. The project included the design, implementation and study of an intervention consisting of three instructional units designed to support students' learning of the concepts of density, molecular arrangement of gas particles, and cohesion, respectively. In each of these units, lasting a total of two 80-minute class periods, students were asked to design and conduct an investigation to gain a better understanding of the concept under study. In

  3. Pilot Study on Demonstration of Remedial Action Technologies for Contaminated Land and Groundwater Volumes 1 and 2 EPA/600/SR-93/012

    EPA Science Inventory

    This two-volume report presents information on a 5-yr pilot study (1986- 1991) sponsored by the North Atlantic Treaty Organization's (NATO) Committee on the Challenges of Modern Society (CCMS) entitled "Demonstration of Remedial Action Technologies for Contaminated Land and Gr...

  4. Using Discrepant Events in Science Demonstrations to Promote Student Engagement in Scientific Investigations: An Action Research Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mancuso, Vincent J.

    2010-01-01

    Students' scientific investigations have been identified in national standards and related reform documents as a critical component of students' learning experiences in school, yet it is not easy to implement them in science classrooms. Could science demonstrations help science teachers put this recommendation into practice? While demonstrations…

  5. Infants learn enduring functions of novel tools from action demonstrations

    PubMed Central

    Hernik, Mikołaj; Csibra, Gergely

    2015-01-01

    According to recent theoretical proposals, one function of infant goal attribution is to support early social learning of artifact functions from instrumental actions, and one function of infant sensitivity to communication is to support early acquisition of generic knowledge about enduring, kind-relevant properties of the referents. The present study tested two hypotheses, derived from these proposals, about the conditions that facilitate the acquisition of enduring functions for novel tools in human infancy. Using a violation-of-expectation paradigm, we show that 13.5-months-old infants encode arbitrary end-states of action-sequences in relation to the novel tools employed to bring them about. These mappings are not formed if the same end states of action sequences cannot be interpreted as action goals. Moreover, the tool-goal mappings acquired from infant-directed communicative demonstrations are more resilient to counter-evidence than those acquired from non-infant-directed presentations, and thus show similarities to generic rather than episodic representations. These findings suggest that the acquisition of tool functions in infancy is guided by both teleological action interpretation mechanisms and the expectation that communicative demonstrations reveal enduring dispositional properties of tools. PMID:25462040

  6. Infant's action skill dynamically modulates parental action demonstration in the dyadic interaction.

    PubMed

    Fukuyama, Hiroshi; Qin, Shibo; Kanakogi, Yasuhiro; Nagai, Yukie; Asada, Minoru; Myowa-Yamakoshi, Masako

    2015-11-01

    When interacting with infants, human adults modify their behaviours in an exaggerated manner. Previous studies have demonstrated that infant-directed modification affects the infant's behaviour. However, little is known about how infant-directed modification is elicited during infant-parent interaction. We investigated whether and how the infant's behaviour affects the mother's action during an interaction. We recorded three-dimensional information of cup movements while mothers demonstrated a cup-nesting task during interaction with their infants aged 11 to 13 months. Analyses revealed that spatial characteristics of the mother's task demonstration clearly changed depending on the infant's object manipulation. In particular, the variance in the distance that the cup was moved decreased after the infant's cup nesting and increased after the infant's task-irrelevant manipulation (e.g. cup banging). This pattern was not observed for mothers with 6- to 8-month-olds, who do not have the fine motor skill to perform the action. These results indicate that the infant's action skill dynamically affects the infant-directed action and suggest that the mother is sensitive to the infant's potential to learn a novel action. A video abstract of this article can be viewed at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VNS2IHwLIhg&feature=youtu.be. PMID:25483121

  7. Orbital construction demonstration study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    A conceptual design and program plan for an Orbital Construction Demonstration Article (OCDA) was developed that can be used for evaluating and establishing practical large structural assembly operations. A flight plan for initial placement and continued utility is presented as a basic for an entirely new shuttle payload line-item having great future potential benefit for space applications. The OCDA is a three-axis stabilized platform in low-earth orbit with many structural nodals for mounting large construction and fabrication equipments. This equipment would be used to explore methods for constructing the large structures for future missions. The OCDA would be supported at regular intervals by the shuttle. Construction experiments and consumables resupply are performed during shuttle visit periods. A 250 kw solar array provides sufficient power to support the shuttle while attached to the OCDA and to run construction experiments at the same time. Wide band communications with a Telemetry and Data Relay Satellite compatible high gain antenna can be used between shuttle revisits to perform remote controlled, TV assisted construction experiments.

  8. When What's Inside Counts: Sequence of Demonstrated Actions Affects Preschooler's Categorization by Nonobvious Properties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Yue; Kushnir, Tamar

    2016-01-01

    This study explores the role of a particular social cue--the "sequence" of demonstrated actions and events--in preschooler's categorization. A demonstrator sorted objects that varied on both a surface feature (color) and a nonobvious property (sound made when shaken). Children saw a sequence of actions in which the nonobvious property…

  9. Audience-Contingent Variation in Action Demonstrations for Humans and Computers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herberg, Jonathan S.; Saylor, Megan M.; Ratanaswasd, Palis; Levin, Daniel T.; Wilkes, D. Mitchell

    2008-01-01

    People may exhibit two kinds of modifications when demonstrating action for others: modifications to facilitate bottom-up, or sensory-based processing; and modifications to facilitate top-down, or knowledge-based processing. The current study examined actors' production of such modifications in action demonstrations for audiences that differed in…

  10. Demonstration of transcriptional regulation of specific genes by phytochrome action

    PubMed Central

    Silverthorne, Jane; Tobin, Elaine M.

    1984-01-01

    We have developed an in vitro transcription system that uses nuclei isolated from Lemna gibba G-3. The in vitro transcripts include sequences homologous to hybridization probes for the small subunit of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase [3-phospho-D-glycerate carboxy-lyase (dimerizing), EC 4.1.1.39], the light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b-protein, and rRNA. Light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b-protein sequences are transcribed to a greater extent in nuclei isolated from plants grown in darkness with 2 min of red light every 8 hr than in nuclei isolated from dark-treated plants. Furthermore, the amount of these transcripts measured in plants given a single minute of red light after dark treatment is increased over the amount measured in dark-treated plants. The effect of red light is at least partially reversible by 10 min of far-red light given immediately after the red light pulse. Transcription of both rRNA and small subunit sequences is also stimulated by a single minute of red light as compared to dark-treated tissue. However, the relative magnitudes of the increases compared to the dark levels are smaller than the increase seen for the chlorophyll a/b-protein, possibly because of the higher level of transcription of these sequences in the dark. The effect of red light on the transcription of small subunit and rRNA sequences is also reversible by immediate treatment with 10 min of far-red light. Pulse chase studies of dark-treated nuclei for up to 110 min do not show substantial turnover of in vitro labeled small subunit and chlorophyll a/b-protein transcripts. We therefore conclude that phytochrome action has induced specific changes in transcription of these genes. Images PMID:16593420

  11. RADON MITIGATION STUDIES: NASHVILLE DEMONSTRATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an EPA radon mitigation demonstration project involving 14 houses in the Nashville, TN, area with indoor radon levels of 5.6-47.6 pCi/L, using a variety of techniques, designed to be the most cost effective methods possible to implement, and yet adequa...

  12. Mu rhythm suppression demonstrates action representation in pianists during passive listening of piano melodies.

    PubMed

    Wu, C Carolyn; Hamm, Jeff P; Lim, Vanessa K; Kirk, Ian J

    2016-08-01

    Musicians undergo extensive training which enhances established neural links between auditory and motor areas of the brain. Long-term training develops, strengthens and enables flexibility in these connections allowing proficiency in performance. Previous research has indicated that passive listening of trained music results in the recruitment of premotor areas. It has been argued that this sound-action representation may rely on activity in mirror neuron systems and that these systems are heavily dependent on actual sensorimotor experience. Action observation studies using electroencephalography have associated changes in mu rhythm activity with the mirror neuron system in the visuomotor domain. We aimed to investigate similar effects in the audiomotor domain. We utilised a mu suppression method in our action-listening study to detect involuntary motor coactivation when pianists passively listened to piano melodies. Wavelet analysis revealed sensorimotor mu rhythm suppression while pianists listened passively to piano melodies. Thus, we show that this spectral analysis method can also be used to demonstrate that auditory stimuli can activate the human mirror neuron system when sounds are linked to actions. Mu suppression could be a useful index for further research on action representation and training-induced plasticity. PMID:26993491

  13. [The demonstration of environmental radioactive contamination by its gametocidal action].

    PubMed

    Popova, O N; Taskaev, A I; Frolova, N P

    1991-01-01

    Two Viola matutina Klok. populations growing in two areas of the thirty-kilometer zone of Chernobyl varying in gamma radiation background have been studied. Stable, repeated (during a period of 1987-1988) differences between the populations with respect to the amount of sterile pollen and the pattern of anther distribution curves have been revealed. It is suggested that the increased radiation loading is the cause of the increased occurrence of sterile pollen in one of the populations. PMID:2034797

  14. When what's inside counts: Sequence of demonstrated actions affects preschooler's categorization by nonobvious properties.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yue; Kushnir, Tamar

    2016-03-01

    This study explores the role of a particular social cue-the sequence of demonstrated actions and events-in preschooler's categorization. A demonstrator sorted objects that varied on both a surface feature (color) and a nonobvious property (sound made when shaken). Children saw a sequence of actions in which the nonobvious property was revealed before (shake-first) or after (shake-last) categorization. Four experiments (N = 150) showed that both 4-year-olds (M(age) = 4.5 years) and 3-year-olds (M(age) = 3.5 years) shifted toward categorizing by nonobvious property after the shake-first sequence compared with the shake-last sequence (Experiment 1 and 4); 4-year-olds also generalized their categorization strategy to new objects (Experiment 2) and objects that were both labeled and categorized (Experiment 3). Results are discussed with regard to preschooler's ability to integrate social and pedagogical cues in category learning. PMID:26689759

  15. Do children with autism re-enact object movements rather than imitate demonstrator actions?

    PubMed

    Custance, Deborah M; Mayer, Jennifer L; Kumar, Emmelianna; Hill, Elisabeth; Heaton, Pamela F

    2014-02-01

    It has been suggested that autism-specific imitative deficits may be reduced or even spared in object-related activities. However, most previous research has not sufficiently distinguished object movement reenactment (learning about the ways in which object move) from imitation (learning about the topography of demonstrated actions). Twenty children with autism (CWA) and 20 typically developing children (TDC) were presented with puzzle boxes containing prizes. Test objects and experimental conditions were designed to isolate object- and action-related aspects of demonstrations. There were four types of video demonstrations: (a) a full demonstration by an adult; (b) a ghost demonstration with object movements alone; (c) mimed solutions demonstrated adjacent to the objects; and (d) random actions performed on the surface of the objects. There were no significant between-group differences in the degree to which CWA and TDC matched the full demonstrations, the actual demonstrations or in their times to first solution in any of the conditions. Although there was no clear imitative deficit in the CWA, regression analyses were conducted to explore in more detail whether diagnosis, verbal intelligence quotient (VIQ), nonverbal IQ NVIQ, age or motor coordination predicted performance. The results are discussed in relation to the use of extrinsic vs. intrinsic rewards and the interplay between motor coordination and the relative rigidity vs. pliability of objects. PMID:24022995

  16. Studying the Greenhouse Effect: A Simple Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papageorgiou, G.; Ouzounis, K.

    2000-01-01

    Studies the parameters involved in a presentation of the greenhouse effect and describes a simple demonstration of this effect. Required equipment includes a 100-120 watt lamp, a 250mL beaker, and a thermometer capable of recording 0-750 degrees Celsius together with a small amount of chloroform. (Author/SAH)

  17. A study of actions in operative notes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Pakhomov, Serguei; Burkart, Nora E; Ryan, James O; Melton, Genevieve B

    2012-01-01

    Operative notes contain rich information about techniques, instruments, and materials used in procedures. To assist development of effective information extraction (IE) techniques for operative notes, we investigated the sublanguage used to describe actions within the operative report 'procedure description' section. Deep parsing results of 362,310 operative notes with an expanded Stanford parser using the SPECIALIST Lexicon resulted in 200 verbs (92% coverage) including 147 action verbs. Nominal action predicates for each action verb were gathered from WordNet, SPECIALIST Lexicon, New Oxford American Dictionary and Stedman's Medical Dictionary. Coverage gaps were seen in existing lexical, domain, and semantic resources (Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) Metathesaurus, SPECIALIST Lexicon, WordNet and FrameNet). Our findings demonstrate the need to construct surgical domain-specific semantic resources for IE from operative notes. PMID:23304423

  18. Continuous theta-burst stimulation demonstrates a causal role of premotor homunculus in action understanding.

    PubMed

    Michael, John; Sandberg, Kristian; Skewes, Joshua; Wolf, Thomas; Blicher, Jakob; Overgaard, Morten; Frith, Chris D

    2014-04-01

    Although it is well established that regions of premotor cortex (PMC) are active during action observation, it remains controversial whether they play a causal role in action understanding. In the experiment reported here, we used off-line continuous theta-burst stimulation (cTBS) to investigate this question. Participants received cTBS over the hand and lip areas of left PMC, in separate sessions, before completing a pantomime-recognition task in which half of the trials contained pantomimed hand actions, and half contained pantomimed mouth actions. The results reveal a double dissociation: Participants were less accurate in recognizing pantomimed hand actions after receiving cTBS over the hand area than over the lip area and less accurate in recognizing pantomimed mouth actions after receiving cTBS over the lip area than over the hand area. This finding constrains theories of action understanding by showing that somatotopically organized regions of PMC contribute causally to action understanding and, thus, that the mechanisms underpinning action understanding and action performance overlap. PMID:24549297

  19. Following the Action in Action Learning: Towards Ethnomethodological Studies of (Critical) Action Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Steve

    2009-01-01

    Action learning is a pedagogical practice that helps participants learn by talking about their workplace action with fellow participants ("comrades in adversity") in their action learning set. This paper raises questions about the action in action learning, such as: how do members of an action learning set learn from and through each other? How do…

  20. An ERP study of motor compatibility effects in action language.

    PubMed

    Santana, Eduardo J; de Vega, Manuel

    2013-08-14

    This ERP study explores the brain's response to the manipulation of motor compatibility in action-related language. In Experiment 1 participants read sentences in which a protagonist performed two different manual actions either simultaneously or consecutively (e.g. While/after cleaning the wound he unrolled the bandage…). The ERPs were measured in the second-clause verb (e.g. unrolled) and noun (e.g. bandage). Notably, only the noun showed compatibility effects, namely a larger N400 in the simultaneous (incompatible) version than in the consecutive (compatible) version, suggesting that readers need to integrate the meaning of the whole sentence to evaluate the feasibility of the actions. In Experiment 2, motor compatibility was manipulated in a different way: all the sentences described the protagonist as performing two simultaneous actions that were both manual (While cleaning the wound he unrolled the bandage), or one action that was perceptual and the other manual (While looking at the wound he unrolled the bandage). The N400 effects for the former incompatible condition were replicated, again in the second-clause noun. The results demonstrated that readers of action language employ their pragmatic world knowledge to test the feasibility of motor actions, taking into account the embodied constraints of such actions. PMID:23796780

  1. Action Learning in ActionAid Nepal: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lustig, Patricia; Rai, Deep Ranjani

    2009-01-01

    This article describes an example of how action learning was used as a framework for an organisational intervention to fundamentally change the organisational culture over a period of time. It also identifies our learning over that period of time and what worked well (and not so well) in an International Non-Governmental Organisation in Nepal.

  2. Demonstrating and Evaluating an Action Learning Approach to Building Project Management Competence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kotnour, Tim; Starr, Stan; Steinrock, T. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper contributes a description of an action-learning approach to building project management competence. This approach was designed, implemented, and evaluated for use with the Dynacs Engineering Development Contract at the Kennedy Space Center. The aim of the approach was to improve three levels of competence within the organization: individual project management skills, project team performance. and organizational capabilities such as the project management process and tools. The overall steps to the approach, evaluation results, and lessons learned are presented. Managers can use this paper to design a specific action-learning approach for their organization.

  3. A Playbook for Data: Real-Life Scenario Demonstrates Learning Forward's Data Standard in Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirsh, Stephanie; Hord, Shirley

    2012-01-01

    This article is an excerpt from "A Playbook for Professional Learning: Putting the Standards Into Action" (Learning Forward, 2012). Written by Learning Forward Executive Director Stephanie Hirsh and Scholar Laureate Shirley Hord, "A Playbook for Professional Learning" provides those who work in professional learning with readily accessible…

  4. Understanding communicative actions: a repetitive TMS study.

    PubMed

    Stolk, Arjen; Noordzij, Matthijs L; Volman, Inge; Verhagen, Lennart; Overeem, Sebastiaan; van Elswijk, Gijs; Bloem, Bas; Hagoort, Peter; Toni, Ivan

    2014-02-01

    Despite the ambiguity inherent in human communication, people are remarkably efficient in establishing mutual understanding. Studying how people communicate in novel settings provides a window into the mechanisms supporting the human competence to rapidly generate and understand novel shared symbols, a fundamental property of human communication. Previous work indicates that the right posterior superior temporal sulcus (pSTS) is involved when people understand the intended meaning of novel communicative actions. Here, we set out to test whether normal functioning of this cerebral structure is required for understanding novel communicative actions using inhibitory low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS). A factorial experimental design contrasted two tightly matched stimulation sites (right pSTS vs left MT+, i.e., a contiguous homotopic task-relevant region) and tasks (a communicative task vs a visual tracking task that used the same sequences of stimuli). Overall task performance was not affected by rTMS, whereas changes in task performance over time were disrupted according to TMS site and task combinations. Namely, rTMS over pSTS led to a diminished ability to improve action understanding on the basis of recent communicative history, while rTMS over MT+ perturbed improvement in visual tracking over trials. These findings qualify the contributions of the right pSTS to human communicative abilities, showing that this region might be necessary for incorporating previous knowledge, accumulated during interactions with a communicative partner, to constrain the inferential process that leads to action understanding. PMID:24268321

  5. Social Action As An Objective of Social Studies Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, Charles K.

    This paper presents a rationale for making social action a major goal of elementary and secondary school social studies education. In addition, it describes social action models, suggests social action approaches appropriate for students at various grade levels, and reviews literature on social action by public school students. Social action is…

  6. Exploring Coaching Actions Based on Developed Values: A Case Study of a Female Hockey Coach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callary, Bettina; Werthner, Penny; Trudel, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    There are few empirical studies that demonstrate how values are developed and how they are linked to coaching actions. There can be a discrepancy between the statement of coaches' values and their actual coaching actions. In order to examine how coaching actions are influenced by values that are developed over a lifetime, the purpose of this…

  7. A diary study of action slips in healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Jónsdóttir, María K; Adólfsdóttir, Steinunn; Cortez, Rúna Dögg; Gunnarsdóttir, María; Gústafsdóttir, Agústa Hlín

    2007-12-01

    Memory complaints following minor head injury or whiplash are common and often bear similarity to absent mindedness or action slips (Reason, 1979). We replicated Reason's study by asking 189 healthy volunteers to keep diaries of their action slips for a week. The mean number of slips was 6.4 (SD = 4.9). Perceived stress did not correlate with number of slips but there was a weak positive correlation between action slips and scores on a memory failures questionnaire. Memory diaries may be clinically useful when assessing individuals who worry about cognitive sequelae of minor injuries. Diaries clarify the nature of the complaints and may have therapeutic value by demonstrating that the memory slips are less frequent than estimated by the patients. PMID:17853144

  8. Tested Demonstrations: Visualization of Buffer Action and the Acidifying Effect of Carbon Dioxide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1985-01-01

    Presents a buffer demonstration which features visualization of the effects of carbon dioxide on pH. Background information, list of materials needed, procedures used, and a discussion of results obtained are included. (JN)

  9. U.S. EPA's Ultraviolet Disinfection Technologies Demonstration Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation will give a background on USEPA's Disinfection Technologies Demonstration Study. This will include regulatory background, science background, goals of the project, and ultimate expected outcome of the project. This presentation will preceed a panel discussion ...

  10. Dance Education Action Research: A Twin Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giguere, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    In this article, the author compares the practices, philosophy, and history of action research, also known as participatory action research, to the purposes and practices of dance education. The comparison yields connections in four categories, enhancing self-reflective teaching and curriculum design, taking responsibility for teaching outcomes,…

  11. Goal anticipation during action observation is influenced by synonymous action capabilities, a puzzling developmental study.

    PubMed

    Gredebäck, Gustaf; Kochukhova, Olga

    2010-04-01

    Eighteen- and 25-month-old human toddlers' ability to manually solve a puzzle and their ability to anticipate the goal during observation of similar actions were investigated. Results demonstrate that goal anticipation during action observation is dependent on manual ability, both on a group level (only 25-month-olds solved the manual task and anticipated the goal during observation) and individually within the older age group (r (xy) = 0.53). These findings suggests a connection between manual ability and the ability to anticipate the goal of others' actions in toddlers, in accordance with the direct matching hypothesis. PMID:20041233

  12. Cell transfection as a tool to study growth hormone action

    SciTech Connect

    Norstedt, G.; Enberg, B.; Francis, S.

    1994-12-31

    The isolation of growth hormone receptor (GHR) cDNA clones has made possible the transfection of GHRs into cultured cells. Our aim in this minireview is to show how the application of such approaches have benefited GHR research. GH stimulation of cells expressing GHR cDNAs can cause an alteration of cellular function that mimic those of the endogenous GHR. GHR cDNA transfected cells also offer a system where the mechanism of GH action can be studied. Such a system has been used to demonstrate that the GHR itself becomes tyrosine phosphorylated and that further phosphorylation of downstream proteins is important in GH action. The GH signals are transmitted to the nucleus and GH regulated genes have now begun to be characterized. The ability to use cell transfection for mechanistic studies of GH action will be instrumental to define domains within the receptor that are of functional importance and to determined pathways whereby GH signals are conveyed within the cell. 33 refs., 2 tabs.

  13. 75 FR 66822 - Study on Extraterritorial Private Rights of Action

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-29

    ... COMMISSION Study on Extraterritorial Private Rights of Action AGENCY: Securities and Exchange Commission. ACTION: Request for Comments. SUMMARY: Section 929Y of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer... rights of action under the antifraud provisions of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (the...

  14. Measuring Problem Solving with Technology: A Demonstration Study for NAEP

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Randy Elliot; Persky, Hilary; Weiss, Andy; Jenkins, Frank

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a study intended to demonstrate how an emerging skill, problem solving with technology, might be measured in the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP). Two computer-delivered assessment scenarios were designed, one on solving science-related problems through electronic information search and the other on solving…

  15. A database of whole-body action videos for the study of action, emotion, and untrustworthiness.

    PubMed

    Keefe, Bruce D; Villing, Matthias; Racey, Chris; Strong, Samantha L; Wincenciak, Joanna; Barraclough, Nick E

    2014-12-01

    We present a database of high-definition (HD) videos for the study of traits inferred from whole-body actions. Twenty-nine actors (19 female) were filmed performing different actions-walking, picking up a box, putting down a box, jumping, sitting down, and standing and acting-while conveying different traits, including four emotions (anger, fear, happiness, sadness), untrustworthiness, and neutral, where no specific trait was conveyed. For the actions conveying the four emotions and untrustworthiness, the actions were filmed multiple times, with the actor conveying the traits with different levels of intensity. In total, we made 2,783 action videos (in both two-dimensional and three-dimensional format), each lasting 7 s with a frame rate of 50 fps. All videos were filmed in a green-screen studio in order to isolate the action information from all contextual detail and to provide a flexible stimulus set for future use. In order to validate the traits conveyed by each action, we asked participants to rate each of the actions corresponding to the trait that the actor portrayed in the two-dimensional videos. To provide a useful database of stimuli of multiple actions conveying multiple traits, each video name contains information on the gender of the actor, the action executed, the trait conveyed, and the rating of its perceived intensity. All videos can be downloaded free at the following address: http://www-users.york.ac.uk/~neb506/databases.html. We discuss potential uses for the database in the analysis of the perception of whole-body actions. PMID:24584971

  16. A simple demonstration when studying the equivalence principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, Valery; Varaksina, Ekaterina

    2016-06-01

    The paper proposes a lecture experiment that can be demonstrated when studying the equivalence principle formulated by Albert Einstein. The demonstration consists of creating stroboscopic photographs of a ball moving along a parabola in Earth's gravitational field. In the first experiment, a camera is stationary relative to Earth's surface. In the second, the camera falls freely downwards with the ball, allowing students to see that the ball moves uniformly and rectilinearly relative to the frame of reference of the freely falling camera. The equivalence principle explains this result, as it is always possible to propose an inertial frame of reference for a small region of a gravitational field, where space-time effects of curvature are negligible.

  17. Infants' perception of actions and situational constraints: an eye-tracking study.

    PubMed

    Elsner, Birgit; Pfeifer, Caroline; Parker, Charlene; Hauf, Petra

    2013-10-01

    Rational action understanding requires that infants evaluate the efficiency of a movement in achieving a goal with respect to situational constraints. In contrast, recent accounts have highlighted the impact of perceptual characteristics of the demonstrated movement or constraints to explain infants' behavior in so-called rational imitation tasks. The current study employed eye tracking to investigate how 13- to 15-month-old infants distribute their visual attention to different aspects of an action demonstration. In three tasks (touchlight, house, and obstacle), infants watched videos in which a model performed an unusual action while she was or was not restricted by situational constraints. Infants' overall looking to the demonstration as well as looking to four segments of the video (initial segment, constraint demonstration, action performance, and final segment) and to specific areas (constraint area of interest [AOI] and action AOI) was analyzed. Overall, infants looked longer at the demonstration in the constraint condition compared with the no-constraint condition. The condition differences occurred in the two video segments where the constraint or action was displayed and were especially profound for the constraint AOI. These findings indicate that infants processed the situational constraints. However, the pattern of condition differences varied slightly in the three tasks. In sum, the data imply that infants process perceptual characteristics of the movement or constraints and that low-level perceptual processes interact with higher level cognitive processes in infants' action perception. PMID:23410481

  18. Student Voice in High School: An Action Research Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Termini, Lorraine

    2013-01-01

    This action research study examined the effects of student voice in one high school and the self-reflection of the researcher-administrator involved in the effort. Using three cycles of action research, the researcher-administrator completed a pilot study, implemented a student voice project in one class, and developed a professional development…

  19. Middle School Responses to Cyberbullying: An Action Research Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zidack, Astri Marie

    2013-01-01

    This action research study engaged a small public middle school in the northwest United States in a collaborative process to address cyberbullying issues that often lead to academic and behavior problems in schools (Hinduja, 2010; Olweus, 2010). The specific purpose of this action research study was to address the middle school's cyberbullying…

  20. Embodied Learning and Creative Writing: An Action Research Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tobin, Jennifer Ann

    2012-01-01

    This action research study used narrative analysis to explore the role of the body in the writing process of creative writers. Specifically, the purpose of this action research study was threefold: it was first to examine how professional creative writers describe their writing process with particular attention to their perceptions of the role and…

  1. Demonstration Report: ESTCP UXO Discrimination Study ESTCP PROJECT # MM-0838

    SciTech Connect

    Gasperikova, Erika

    2010-02-15

    In 2003, the Defense Science Board observed: 'The problem is that instruments that can detect the buried UXOs also detect numerous scrap metal objects and other artifacts, which leads to an enormous amount of expensive digging. Typically 100 holes may be dug before a real UXO is unearthed! The Task Force assessment is that much of this wasteful digging can be eliminated by the use of more advanced technology instruments that exploit modern digital processing and advanced multi-mode sensors to achieve an improved level of discrimination of scrap from UXOs.' Significant progress has been made in discrimination technology. To date, testing of these approaches has been primarily limited to test sites with only limited application at live sites. Acceptance of discrimination technologies requires demonstration of system capabilities at real UXO sites under real world conditions. Any attempt to declare detected anomalies to be harmless and requiring no further investigation will require demonstration to regulators of not only individual technologies, but of an entire decision making process. This characterization study was be the second phase in what is expected to be a continuing effort that will span several years. The FY06 Defense Appropriation contained funding for the 'Development of Advanced, Sophisticated, Discrimination Technologies for UXO Cleanup' in the Environmental Security Technology Certification Program (ESTCP). ESTCP responded by conducting a UXO Discrimination Study at the former Camp Sibert, AL. The results of this first demonstration were very encouraging. Although conditions were favorable at this site, a single target of interest (4.2-in mortar) and benign topography and geology, all of the classification approaches demonstrated were able to correctly identify a sizable fraction of the anomalies as arising from non-hazardous items that could be safely left in the ground. To build upon the success of the first phase of this study, ESTCP sponsored a

  2. Studying Action Representation in Children via Motor Imagery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gabbard, Carl

    2009-01-01

    The use of motor imagery is a widely used experimental paradigm for the study of cognitive aspects of action planning and control in adults. Furthermore, there are indications that motor imagery provides a window into the process of action representation. These notions complement internal model theory suggesting that such representations allow…

  3. A Study of Educational Components of Community Action Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Computer Applications, Inc., Silver Spring, MD.

    Information was gathered concerning community Action Agencies (CAA) educational activities, programatic activities and organizational interactions both within the CAA structure and between the CAA and other organizations. The study was designed to focus on a comparison between CAA educational activities and specified Community Action Program (CAP)…

  4. Whirl Flutter Studies for a SSTOL Transport Demonstrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acree, C. W., Jr.; Hoffman, Krishna

    2004-01-01

    A proposed new class of aircraft - the Advanced Theater Transport (ATT) will combine strategic range and high payload with 'Super-STOL' (short take-off and landing) capability. It is also proposed to modify a YC-15 into a technology demonstrator with a 20-deg tilt wing; four, eight-bladed propellers; cross-shafted gearboxes and V-22 engines. These constitute a unique combination of design features that potentially affect performance, loads and whirl-mode stability (whirl flutter). NASA Ames Research Center is working with Boeing and Hamilton Sundstrand on technology challenges presented by the concept; the purpose of NASA involvement is to establish requirements for the demonstrator and for early design guidance, with emphasis on whirl flutter. CAMRAD II is being used to study the effects of various design features on whirl flutter, with special attention to areas where such features differ from existing aircraft, notably tiltrotors. Although the stability margins appear to be more than adequate, the concept requires significantly different analytical methods, principally including far more blade modes, than typically used for tiltrotors.

  5. The Use of Demonstrative Pronoun and Demonstrative Determiner "This" in Upper-Level Student Writing: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rustipa, Katharina

    2015-01-01

    Demonstrative "this" is worthy to investigate because of the role of "this" as a common cohesive device in academic writing. This study attempted to find out the variables underlying the realization of demonstrative "this" in graduate-student writing of Semarang State University, Indonesia. The data of the study were…

  6. A Chinaman's Chance in Civil Rights Demonstration: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sim, Yawsoon

    A traffic incident in April of 1975 developed into an unprecedented civil rights demonstration by Chinese residents in New York City's Chinatown in May of that year. This paper attempts to trace the factors which led to this large scale demonstration and analyze the development of decision making in this case. The demonstration was the result of…

  7. A Preliminary Study of Demonstratives in Aklanon Narratives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, Kristine; Barlaan, Rodolfo

    1992-01-01

    This paper addresses the spatiotemporal, discourse and emotional or connotative functions of demonstratives in Aklanon narrative discourse. The demonstrative system of Aklanon in terms of the spatial relation between speaker and hearer is described. Discourse functions of demonstratives (exophoric, endophoric, cataphoric, and anaphoric reference)…

  8. Comparative Actions of Barbiturates Studied by Pollen Grain Germination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kordan, Herbert A.; Mumford, Pauline M.

    1979-01-01

    Describes a simple experimental system whereby the comparative actions of long, medium, and short-acting barbiturates can be demonstrated in a relatively short period of time under optical microscopy using pollen grains as the biological test or assay system. (Author/HM)

  9. Leadership development through action learning sets: an evaluation study.

    PubMed

    Walia, Surinder; Marks-Maran, Di

    2014-11-01

    This article examines the use of action learning sets in a leadership module delivered by a university in south east England. An evaluation research study was undertaking using survey method to evaluate student engagement with action learning sets, and their value, impact and sustainability. Data were collected through a questionnaire with a mix of Likert-style and open-ended questions and qualitative and quantitative data analysis was undertaken. Findings show that engagement in the action learning sets was very high. Action learning sets also had a positive impact on the development of leadership knowledge and skills and are highly valued by participants. It is likely that they would be sustainable as the majority would recommend action learning to colleagues and would consider taking another module that used action learning sets. When compared to existing literature on action learning, this study offers new insights as there is little empirical literature on student engagement with action learning sets and even less on value and sustainability. PMID:25164108

  10. Democracy and Diversity: Social Studies in Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia, Jesus

    2005-01-01

    The author of this article, president of NCSS (2004-2005), is a professor of social studies education at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. This address was delivered at the 84th NCSS Annual Conference in Baltimore, Maryland, November 2004. The author's vision for social studies and NCSS in the twenty-first century comes from growing up in a…

  11. Syntax of Demonstrative Adjectives in Japanese: A Preliminary Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fukuda, Minoru

    1996-01-01

    The interactions among demonstrative adjectives in certain genitive phrases and WH-words in Japanese are investigated in this report on a work in progress. It is argued that certain demonstrative adjectives in Japanese, such as "ano" ("that"), occupy the highest Spec position in DP and that they block A-bar movement out of DP; genitive phrases,…

  12. Research, Demonstration, and Evaluation Studies: Fiscal Year 1974.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, Barbara, Ed.

    This report provides descriptive information on the research, demonstration, and evaluation programs of the Office of Child Development during fiscal year 1974. An overview describing the role, function, and long range goals of the Office of Child Development is presented. Specific research, demonstration, and evaluation projects (both…

  13. Research, Demonstration, and Evaluation Studies: Fiscal Year 1976.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rackley, Ray, Ed.

    This report provides descriptive information on the Research, Demonstration, and Evaluation Program of the Office of Child Development (OCD) for Fiscal Year 1976. An overview describing the mission, function and long range goals of the OCD is included along with a discussion of the Research, Demonstration and Evaluation Program and its activities…

  14. Research, Demonstration, and Evaluation Studies Fiscal Year 1975.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Arlene, Ed.

    This report provides descriptive information on the research, demonstration, and evaluation program of the Office of Child Development (OCD) for fiscal year 1975. An overview describing the role, function, and long range goals of OCD is included along with a discussion of the research, demonstration, and evaluation program's major areas of…

  15. A Case Study of Three Satellite Technology Demonstration School Sites.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Law, Gordon

    The Satellite Technology Demonstration (STD) represented a cooperative and complex effort involving federal, regional, state and local interests and demonstrated the feasibility of media distribution by communication satellite of social services for rural audiences. As part of a comprehensive evaluation plan, the summative data base was augmented…

  16. Orbital construction demonstration study. Volume 3: Requirements document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A comprehensive set of requirements that defines the objective, scope and configuration of the orbital test facility needed to demonstrate the necessary automated fabrication, construction and assembly technology is provided. In addition to the requirements for the orbital demonstration facility, a detailed list of experiment requirements is included for various areas of technology.

  17. Stimulus-dependent deliberation process leading to a specific motor action demonstrated via a multi-channel EEG analysis

    PubMed Central

    Henz, Sonja; Kutz, Dieter F.; Werner, Jana; Hürster, Walter; Kolb, Florian P.; Nida-Ruemelin, Julian

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine whether a deliberative process, leading to a motor action, is detectable in high density EEG recordings. Subjects were required to press one of two buttons. In a simple motor task the subject knew which button to press, whilst in a color-word Stroop task subjects had to press the right button with the right index finger when meaning and color coincided, or the left button with the left index finger when meaning and color were disparate. EEG recordings obtained during the simple motor task showed a sequence of positive (P) and negative (N) cortical potentials (P1-N1-P2) which are assumed to be related to the processing of the movement. The sequence of cortical potentials was similar in EEG recordings of subjects having to deliberate over how to respond, but the above sequence (P1-N1-P2) was preceded by slowly increasing negativity (N0), with N0 being assumed to represent the end of the deliberation process. Our data suggest the existence of neurophysiological correlates of deliberative processes. PMID:26190987

  18. Use of interactive lecture demonstrations: A ten year study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Manjula D.; Johnston, Ian D.; Johnston, Helen; Varvell, Kevin; Robertson, Gordon; Hopkins, Andrew; Stewart, Chris; Cooper, Ian; Thornton, Ronald

    2010-07-01

    The widely held constructivist view of learning advocates student engagement via interactivity. Within the physics education research community, several specific interactive strategies have been developed to enhance conceptual understanding. One such strategy, the Interactive Lecture Demonstration (ILD) is designed for large lecture classes and, if measured using specific conceptual surveys, is purported to provide learning gains of up to 80%. This paper reports on learning gains for two different Projects over ten years. In Project 1, the ILDs were implemented from 1999 to 2001 with students who had successfully completed senior high school physics. The learning gains for students not exposed to the ILDs were in the range 13% to 16% while those for students exposed to the ILDs was 31% to 50%. In Project 2, the ILDs were implemented from 2007 to 2009 with students who had not studied senior high school physics. Since the use of ILDs in Project 1 had produced positive results, ethical considerations dictated that all students be exposed to ILDs. The learning gains were from 28% to 42%. On the one hand it is pleasing to note that there is an increase in learning gains, yet on the other, we note that the gains are nowhere near the claimed 80%. This paper also reports on teacher experiences of using the ILDs, in Project 2.

  19. Denver Potable Water Reuse Demonstration Project: comprehensive chronic rat study.

    PubMed

    Condie, L W; Lauer, W C; Wolfe, G W; Czeh, E T; Burns, J M

    1994-11-01

    The health effects testing program for the Denver Water Department's Potable Water Reuse Demonstration Project was designed to evaluate the relative health effects of highly treated reclaimed water derived from secondary wastewater in comparison with Denver's present high-quality drinking water. The 1 x 10(6) gal/day treatment plant provided 500-fold concentrates of water that had been treated by multiple processes to remove microbial and chemical contaminants. Fischer 344 rats were exposed to the complex mixture solutions for up to 2 yr to evaluate chronic toxicity and oncogenicity effects. The following parameters were evaluated: clinical observations, survival rate, growth, food and water consumption, haematology, clinical chemistry, urinalysis, organ weights, gross autopsy and histopathological examination of all lesions, major tissues and organs. Clinical pathology, gross pathology, and microscopic pathology conducted at wk 26 and 65 and at the end of the study did not reveal any findings that could be considered to be treatment related. Administration of drinking water concentrates at up to 500 times the original concentration in the original water samples to F344 rats for up to 104 wk did not result in any overt toxicological or carcinogenic effects. PMID:7959456

  20. Professional Vision in Action: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherin, Miriam Gamoran; Russ, Rosemary S.; Sherin, Bruce L.; Colestock, Adam

    2008-01-01

    The study of teachers' professional vision poses some unique challenges. The application of professional vision happens in a manner that is fleeting, and that is distributed through the moments of instruction. Because of the ongoing nature of instruction, it is not realistic to expect that one could "pause" instruction momentarily, ask a teacher…

  1. Engineering a Poem: An Action Research Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koch, Janice; Feingold, Brooke

    2006-01-01

    This study explores the use of design technology to teach a unit on poetry in a fifth grade class. The main goals of the poetry unit were to develop students' abilities to use their own creative voices to express themselves and to write descriptive poetry that creates detailed images for the reader. This unit was implemented in a fifth grade class…

  2. Studying Distance Students: Methods, Findings, Actions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wahl, Diane; Avery, Beth; Henry, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    University of North Texas (UNT) Libraries began studying the library needs of distance learners in 2009 using a variety of approaches to explore and confirm these needs as well as obtain input into how to meet them. Approaches used to date include analysis of both quantitative and qualitative responses by online students to the LibQUAL+[R] surveys…

  3. New Case Studies of Citizen Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanner, Thomas

    1977-01-01

    Describes a six-unit case study curriculum package designed for secondary and college-level courses relating to environmental education. The units deal with nuclear power, stream channelization, a river dam project, overgrazing of public lands, agribusiness versus the family farm, and swamp preservation. (Author/DB)

  4. [Epilobium parviflorum--in vitro study of biological action].

    PubMed

    Hevesi Tóth, Barbara; Kéry, Agnes

    2009-01-01

    Epilobium parviflorum Schreb. (willow-herb) is used for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), but its biological action is not entirely identified. This paper aims to report data on willow-herbs probable biological effect. In vitro studies have been made to investigate different aspects of its antioxidant capacity, anti-inflammatory (COX-inhibitory) action, steroid-receptor -agonistic and -antagonostic effect as well as aromatase-inhibitory effect. Based on our results, willow-herb possess remarkable antioxidant and COX-inhibitory action. PMID:19526676

  5. Human habitation field study of the Habitat Demonstration Unit (HDU)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litaker, Harry L.; Archer, Ronald D.; Szabo, Richard; Twyford, Evan S.; Conlee, Carl S.; Howard, Robert L.

    2013-10-01

    Landing and supporting a permanent outpost on a planetary surface represents humankind's capability to expand its own horizons and challenge current technology. With this in mind, habitability of these structures becomes more essential given the longer durations of the missions. The purpose of this evaluation was to obtain preliminary human-in-the-loop performance data on the Habitat Demonstration Unit (HDU) in a Pressurized Excursion Module (PEM) configuration during a 14-day simulated lunar exploration field trial and to apply this knowledge to further enhance the habitat's capabilities for forward designs. Human factors engineers at the NASA/Johnson Space Center's Habitability and Human Factors Branch recorded approximately 96 h of crew task performance with four work stations. Human factors measures used during this study included the NASA Task Load Index (TLX) and customized post questionnaires. Overall the volume for the PEM was considered acceptable by the crew; however; the habitat's individual work station volume was constrained when setting up the vehicle for operation, medical operations, and suit maintenance while general maintenance, logistical resupply, and geo science was considered acceptable. Crew workload for each station indicated resupply as being the lowest rated, with medical operations, general maintenance, and geo science tasks as being light, while suit maintenance was considered moderate and general vehicle setup being rated the highest. Stowage was an issue around the habitat with the Space Exploration Vehicle (SEV) resupply stowage located in the center of the habitat as interfering with some work station volumes and activities. Ergonomics of the geo science station was considered a major issue, especially with the overhead touch screens.

  6. Interference Effects Demonstrate Distinct Roles for Visual and Motor Imagery during the Mental Representation of Human Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, J.A.

    2005-01-01

    Four experiments were completed to characterize the utilization of visual imagery and motor imagery during the mental representation of human action. In Experiment 1, movement time functions for a motor imagery human locomotion task conformed to a speed-accuracy trade-off similar to Fitts' Law, whereas those for a visual imagery object motion task…

  7. Use of Interactive Lecture Demonstrations: A Ten Year Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharma, Manjula D.; Johnston, Ian D.; Johnston, Helen; Varvell, Kevin; Robertson, Gordon; Hopkins, Andrew; Stewart, Chris; Cooper, Ian; Thornton, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    The widely held constructivist view of learning advocates student engagement via interactivity. Within the physics education research community, several specific interactive strategies have been developed to enhance conceptual understanding. One such strategy, the Interactive Lecture Demonstration (ILD) is designed for large lecture classes and,…

  8. Decontamination demonstration facility (D. D. F) modularization/mobility study

    SciTech Connect

    FitzPatrick, V.F.; Butts, H.L.; Moles, R.G.; Lundgren, R.A.

    1980-11-01

    The component decontamination technology, developed under the DOE sponsored TRU Waste Decontamination Program, has potential benefits to nuclear utility owners in four strategic areas: (1) Meeting ALARA Criteria for Maintenance/Operations; (2) Management of wastes and waste forms; (3) Accident Response; (4) Decommissioning. The most significant step in transferring this technology directly to the nuclear industry is embodied in the TMI Decontamination Demonstration Facility (D.D.F.).

  9. Orbital construction demonstration study. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A conceptual design and program plan for an Orbital Construction Demonstration Article (OCDA), that can be used for technology growth and verification, and as the construction facility for a variety of large structures is presented. The OCDA design includes a large work platform, a rotating manipulator boom, a 250 kw solar array, and a core module of subsystems with a total mass of 37,093 kg, that can be assembled in three shuttle flights. An analysis of OCDA continued utility potential indicates that a shuttle tended platform with 250 kW of power can effectively be used to construct highly beneficial antenna systems and large demonstration articles that advance solar power satellite technologies. The construction of 100 m parabolic reflectors for use as a radiometer for measuring soil moisture and water salinity was found to be within the capabilities of OCDA concept. With 252 fixed beams for high population centers, and 16 scanning beams for rural areas, the antenna has the potential to significantly improve U.S. space based communications systems. The OCDA, that is slightly increased in size, was found adequate to build a large 2 MW solar array which, when coupled to a transmit antenna, demonstrate power transfer from space to ground.

  10. Melatonin action in tumor skeletal muscle cells: an ultrastructural study.

    PubMed

    Burattini, S; Battistelli, M; Codenotti, S; Falcieri, E; Fanzani, A; Salucci, S

    2016-04-01

    Melatonin (Mel), or N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine, is a circadian hormone that can diffuse through all the biological membranes thanks to its amphiphilic structure, also overcoming the blood-brain barrier and placenta. Although Mel has been reported to exhibit strong antioxidant properties in healthy tissues, studies carried out on tumor cultures gave a different picture of its action, often describing Mel as effective to trigger the cell death of tumor cells by enhancing oxidative stress. Based on this premise, here Mel effect was investigated using a tumor cell line representative of the human alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma (ARMS), the most frequent soft tissue sarcoma affecting childhood. For this purpose, Mel was given either dissolved in ethanol (EtOH) or dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) at different concentrations and time exposures. Cell viability assays and ultrastructural observations demonstrated that Mel was able to induce a dose- and time-dependent cell death independently on the dissolution solvent. Microscopy analyses highlighted the presence of various apoptotic and necrotic patterns correlating with the increasing Mel dose and time of exposure. These findings suggest that Mel, triggering apoptosis in ARMS cells, could be considered as a promising drug for future multitargeted therapies. PMID:26953151

  11. Distributed Leadership: Developing a New Practice. An Action Research Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chamberland, Lorie

    2009-01-01

    This action research study examines the development of distributed leadership practice among a new team of teacher leaders and their principal at an elementary school. Using a qualitative approach including a series of interviews, observations and journal entries, this study analyzes the interactions and changing roles of teacher leaders and their…

  12. Demonstrations of the Action and Reaction Law and the Energy Conservation Law Using Fine Spherical Plastic Beads

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khumaeni, A.; Tanaka, S.; Kobayashi, A.; Lee, Y. I.; Kurniawan, K. H.; Ishii, K.; Kagawa, K.

    2008-01-01

    Equipment for demonstrating Newton's third law and the energy conservation law in mechanics have successfully been constructed utilizing fine spherical plastic beads in place of metal ball bearings. To demonstrate Newton's third law, special magnetized Petri dishes were employed as objects, while to examine the energy conservation law, a…

  13. Direct oxide reduction demonstration, small-scale studies

    SciTech Connect

    Long, J.L.; Santi, D.J.; Fisher, D.C.; Humiston, T.J.

    1991-12-09

    This project was initiated to provide process design information to the Plutonium Recovery Project (PRP). Although direct oxide reduction (DOR) has been operated in a production mode both at the Rocky Flats Plant (now operated by EG&G, Inc.) and Los Alamos National Laboratory, many aspects of the process are ill-defined. Because the PRP plans include significant DOR capability, a well-defined process should minimize capital cost and maximize productivity. Reduced radiation exposure may also be realized. A detailed, statistically valid investigation of the direct oxide reduction process was carried out utilizing 100 grams or less of plutonium dioxide per experiment. Conditions were established for obtaining 95% + yields. Conclusions drawn from the results of the experimental work were utilized to make recommendations for future large-scale investigative and confirmative work as well large-scale production demonstration work. 4 refs., 5 figs., 14 tabs.

  14. Direct oxide reduction demonstration, small-scale studies

    SciTech Connect

    Long, J.L.; Santi, D.J.; Fisher, D.C.; Humiston, T.J.

    1991-12-09

    This project was initiated to provide process design information to the Plutonium Recovery Project (PRP). Although direct oxide reduction (DOR) has been operated in a production mode both at the Rocky Flats Plant (now operated by EG G, Inc.) and Los Alamos National Laboratory, many aspects of the process are ill-defined. Because the PRP plans include significant DOR capability, a well-defined process should minimize capital cost and maximize productivity. Reduced radiation exposure may also be realized. A detailed, statistically valid investigation of the direct oxide reduction process was carried out utilizing 100 grams or less of plutonium dioxide per experiment. Conditions were established for obtaining 95% + yields. Conclusions drawn from the results of the experimental work were utilized to make recommendations for future large-scale investigative and confirmative work as well large-scale production demonstration work. 4 refs., 5 figs., 14 tabs.

  15. Partial Irrigation Feasibility Study and Demonstration Project, Phase IV Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Northwest Economic Association.

    1987-09-01

    This report deals with a three year study of the practice of partial irrigation. (Partial irrigation is defined as the deliberate underirrigation of a crop while maintaining or improving farm income.) Objective was to observe and document the use of this strategy on farms in the Columbia Basin. Wheat and corn were studied as candidates for partial irrigation. Potatoes were included only to better understand how irrigation practices in the Columbia Basin are influenced by this crop. The report begins with a review of the underlying theory of partial irrigation. The second section of the report details the procedures followed during the study. The third section, covering the results of the study, is presented in four parts. The first is a summary of the relevant data. The second consists of observations on the practice of partial irrigation. The results observed for wheat over the three years of the study are interpreted in terms of the theory outlined in the first section. The third part of the results section deals with case studies of the economic merits of the partial irrigation practices that were observed. 26 figs., 23 tabs.

  16. Studies on the oxygenation of human blood by photocatalytic action.

    PubMed

    Subrahmanyam, Aryasomayajula; Arokiadoss, Thevasahayam; Ramesh, T Paul

    2007-11-01

    The present article gave the proof of concept for oxygenating human blood using the established principles of photocatalytic action of anatase TiO2 thin films in generating oxygen from water. The photocatalytic action involves the absorption of the UV optical energy (365 nm) to split water available in the blood into oxygen and hydrogen, and the generated oxygen is attached to the hemoglobin. In the present study, an enhanced catalytic action was achieved by preparing the nanosized anatase TiO2 thin films on tin-doped indium oxide (ITO) thin films, forming TiO2/ITO semiconducting junction. These TiO2 and ITO thin films and the semiconducting junctions were grown by the reactive DC Magnetron sputtering technique (using pure metallic targets) at room temperature (300 K) and subsequently annealed at 870 K for 60 min. The annealing process (i) influenced the formation of the anatase phase of TiO2; and (ii) diffused indium from ITO into TiO2, forming InTi(2)O(5). The work functions of ITO and InTi(2)O(5) were measured to be 4.72 and 4.76 eV, respectively. The higher efficacy of the photocatalytic action was attributed to the lower work function of ITO. The results clearly show that the photocatalytic action increases the oxygen content in the blood significantly. PMID:18001391

  17. Effective Use of Action-Oriented Studies in Pakistan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miles, M.

    1991-01-01

    This article summarizes results from action-oriented studies carried out at the Mental Heath Centre in Peshawar, Pakistan, dealing with such topics as attitudes toward disability, casual integration, and trends in polio paralysis. The article also considers problems associated with the dissemination of special education and rehabilitation research…

  18. Study Challenges Assumptions about Affirmative-Action Bans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Peter

    2008-01-01

    This article reports the results of a new study on the impact of bans on race-conscious admissions policies which seem to confirm what many critics of affirmative action have long suspected: It is Asian-Americans, rather than whites, who are most disadvantaged by elite universities' consideration of ethnicity and race. Left unanswered are the…

  19. Case Studies of Action Research in Various Adult Education Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuhne, Gary W.; Weirauch, Drucie; Fetterman, David J.; Mearns, Raiana M.; Kalinosky, Kathy; Cegles, Kathleen A.; Ritchey, Linda

    1997-01-01

    Six case studies illustrate action research in adult education: faculty development in a museum, participation in a church congregation, retention of literacy volunteers in a corrections center, learner participation in a homeless shelter, technology innovation in a university, and infection control in a hospital. (SK)

  20. A Longitudinal Study of the Impact of an Environmental Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rioux, Liliane; Pasquier, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    In a previous study, we investigated the impact of an awareness-raising campaign on the behaviour of secondary school children in the Centre Region of France, regarding the recycling of used batteries. But, was it a question of pro-environmental behaviour or simply an environmental action? To answer this question, a three-year longitudinal study…

  1. Minesweeper and Hypothetical Thinking Action Research & Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Jacob J.

    2010-01-01

    This Action Research project and Pilot Study was designed and implemented to improve students' hypothetical thinking abilities by exploring the possibility that learning and playing the computer game Minesweeper may inherently help improve hypothetical thinking. One objective was to use educational tools to make it easier for students to learn the…

  2. Using theories of action to guide national program evaluation and local strategy in the community care network demonstration.

    PubMed

    Sofaer, Shoshanna; Bazzoli, Gloria J; Alexander, Jeffrey A; Conrad, Douglas A; Hasnain-Wynia, Romana; Shortell, Stephen M; Margolin, Frances; Pittman, Mary; Casey, Elizabeth; Ladenheim, Kala; Mauery, D Richard; Zukoski, Ann P

    2003-12-01

    Evaluations of multisite community-based projects are notoriously difficult to conceptualize and conduct. Projects may share an overarching vision but operate in varying contexts and pursue different initiatives. One tool that can assist evaluators facing these challenges is to develop a "theory of action" (TOA) that identifies critical assumptions regarding how a program expects to achieve its goals. Community Care Network (CCN) evaluators used the TOA to refine research questions, define key variables, relate questions to each other, and identify when we might realistically expect to observe answers. In this article, the authors present their national-level CCN TOA. They also worked with sites to help them "surface" their local TOA; the article analyzes the results to determine the content, clarity, extent of evidence base, and strategic orientation of theories articulated by different sites. PMID:14687428

  3. A demonstration of the applicability of implementing the enhanced Remedial Action Priority System (RAPS) for environmental releases

    SciTech Connect

    Whelan, G.; Droppo, J.G. Jr.; Strenge, D.L.; Walter, M.B.; Buck, J.W.

    1989-12-01

    The Remedial Action Priority System (RAPS) and the Multimedia Environmental Pollutant Assessment System (MEPAS) were developed to prioritize problems associated with potential releases of hazardous chemical and radioactive materials in a scientific and objective manner based on limited site information. This report documents the model testing efforts of the RAPS/MEPAS methodology for the atmospheric, surface water, groundwater, and exposure components. Comparisons are given of model outputs with measured data at three sites: the US Department of Energy's Mound facility in Ohio and Hanford facility in Washington, and a chromium-cadmium plating site in New York. The results show that the simulated magnitudes, spacial and temporal trends, and distributions of contaminants corresponded well with the measured data. 25 refs., 86 figs., 26 tabs.

  4. Mitochondrial Genome-Knockout Cells Demonstrate a Dual Mechanism of Action for the Electron Transport Complex I Inhibitor Mycothiazole

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Kirsten J.; Singh, A. Jonathan; Cameron, Alanna; Tan, An S.; Leahy, Dora C.; O’Sullivan, David; Joshi, Praneta; La Flamme, Anne C.; Northcote, Peter T.; Berridge, Michael V.; Miller, John H.

    2012-01-01

    Mycothiazole, a polyketide metabolite isolated from the marine sponge Cacospongia mycofijiensis, is a potent inhibitor of metabolic activity and mitochondrial electron transport chain complex I in sensitive cells, but other cells are relatively insensitive to the drug. Sensitive cell lines (IC50 0.36–13.8 nM) include HeLa, P815, RAW 264.7, MDCK, HeLa S3, 143B, 4T1, B16, and CD4/CD8 T cells. Insensitive cell lines (IC50 12.2–26.5 μM) include HL-60, LN18, and Jurkat. Thus, there is a 34,000-fold difference in sensitivity between HeLa and HL-60 cells. Some sensitive cell lines show a biphasic response, suggesting more than one mechanism of action. Mitochondrial genome-knockout ρ0 cell lines are insensitive to mycothiazole, supporting a conditional mitochondrial site of action. Mycothiazole is cytostatic rather than cytotoxic in sensitive cells, has a long lag period of about 12 h, and unlike the complex I inhibitor, rotenone, does not cause G2/M cell cycle arrest. Mycothiazole decreases, rather than increases the levels of reactive oxygen species after 24 h. It is concluded that the cytostatic inhibitory effects of mycothiazole on mitochondrial electron transport function in sensitive cell lines may depend on a pre-activation step that is absent in insensitive cell lines with intact mitochondria, and that a second lower-affinity cytotoxic target may also be involved in the metabolic and growth inhibition of cells. PMID:22690150

  5. Environmental process improvement feasibility study and demonstration program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Rodger L.

    1994-01-01

    This report is the final product of an environmental study conducted by Western Commercial Space Center, Inc. under contract to Tennessee-Calspan Center for Space Transportation and Applied Research. The purpose of this investigation is to accurately document the current environmental and permitting processes associated with commercial space launch activity at Vandenberg AFB, and make recommendations to streamline those processes. The particular areas of interest focus on: identifying applicable Federal, state, and local laws, Department of Defense directives, and Air force regulations; defining the environmental process on Vandenberg AFB and how it relates with other agencies, including Federal and state regulatory agencies; and defining the air quality permit process. Study investigation results are applied to an example Pilot Space Launch Vehicle (PSLV) planning to launch from Vandenberg AFB. The PSLV space hardware is analyzed with respect to environmental and permitting issues associated with vehicle processing, facilities required (existing or new), and launch. The PSLV verified the earlier findings of the study and gave insight into streamlining recommendations.

  6. Feasibility study of full-reactor gas core demonstration test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunze, J. F.; Lofthouse, J. H.; Shaffer, C. J.; Macbeth, P. J.

    1973-01-01

    Separate studies of nuclear criticality, flow patterns, and thermodynamics for the gas core reactor concept have all given positive indications of its feasibility. However, before serious design for a full scale gas core application can be made, feasibility must be shown for operation with full interaction of the nuclear, thermal, and hydraulic effects. A minimum sized, and hence minimum expense, test arrangement is considered for a full gas core configuration. It is shown that the hydrogen coolant scattering effects dominate the nuclear considerations at elevated temperatures. A cavity diameter of somewhat larger than 4 ft (122 cm) will be needed if temperatures high enough to vaporize uranium are to be achieved.

  7. Students of Action? A Comparative Investigation of Secondary Science and Social Studies Students' Action Repertoires in a Land Use Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumler, Lori M.

    2011-01-01

    Environmental education (EE) and social studies education share an interest in behavioral outcomes. This study compares behavioral outcomes--including both self-reported knowledge of actions and reported actions taken--in the context of a land use curriculum enacted in secondary science versus social studies classes with 500 students and nine…

  8. Transcriptomic landscape of Pueraria lobata demonstrates potential for phytochemical study.

    PubMed

    Han, Rongchun; Takahashi, Hiroki; Nakamura, Michimi; Yoshimoto, Naoko; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Shibata, Daisuke; Yamazaki, Mami; Saito, Kazuki

    2015-01-01

    Pueraria lobata (Willd.) Ohwi has a long and broad application in the treatment of disease. However, in the US and EU, it is treated as a notorious weed. The information to be gained from decoding the deep transcriptome profile would facilitate further research on P. lobata. In this study, more than 93 million fastq format reads were generated by Illumina's next-generation sequencing approach using five types of P. lobata tissue, followed by CLC de novo assembly methods, ultimately yielding about 83,041 contigs in total. Then BLASTx similarity searches against the NCBI NR database and UniProtKB database were conducted. Once the duplicates among BLASTx hits were eliminated, ID mapping against the UniProt database was conducted online to retrieve Gene Ontology information. In search of the putative genes relevant to essential biosynthesis pathways, all 1,348 unique enzyme commission numbers were used to map pathways against the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes. Enzymes related to the isoflavonoid and flavonoid biosynthesis pathways were focused for detailed investigation and subsequently, quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction was conducted for biological validation. Metabolites of interest, puerarin and daidzin were studied by HPLC. The findings in this report may serve as a footstone for further research into this promising medicinal plant. PMID:26157443

  9. ACTION FOR BOSTON COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT, INC. AND BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY DEMONSTRATION COLLEGE COMPUS PROGRAM, SUMMER, 1964 BRANDIS UNIVERSITY, WALTHAM, MASSACHUSETTES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SACHAR, ABRAHAM

    A LARGE PERCENTAGE OF BOYS FROM POORER URBAN NEIGHBORHOODS DO NOT SEEK EDUCATION BEYOND HIGH SCHOOL, FOR FINANCIAL REASONS OR LACK OF INTEREST IN OR KNOWLEDGE ABOUT COLLEGE LIFE. THIS PROPOSAL HAS AS ITS PRIMARY OBJECTIVES TO DEMONSTRATE THAT POTENTIALLY ABLE BUT UNDERACHIEVING STUDENTS, WHEN EXPOSED TO A SUMMER PROGRAM THAT RECOGNIZES AND…

  10. Webcams for Bird Detection and Monitoring: A Demonstration Study

    PubMed Central

    Verstraeten, Willem W.; Vermeulen, Bart; Stuckens, Jan; Lhermitte, Stefaan; Van der Zande, Dimitry; Van Ranst, Marc; Coppin, Pol

    2010-01-01

    Better insights into bird migration can be a tool for assessing the spread of avian borne infections or ecological/climatologic issues reflected in deviating migration patterns. This paper evaluates whether low budget permanent cameras such as webcams can offer a valuable contribution to the reporting of migratory birds. An experimental design was set up to study the detection capability using objects of different size, color and velocity. The results of the experiment revealed the minimum size, maximum velocity and contrast of the objects required for detection by a standard webcam. Furthermore, a modular processing scheme was proposed to track and follow migratory birds in webcam recordings. Techniques such as motion detection by background subtraction, stereo vision and lens distortion were combined to form the foundation of the bird tracking algorithm. Additional research to integrate webcam networks, however, is needed and future research should enforce the potential of the processing scheme by exploring and testing alternatives of each individual module or processing step. PMID:22319308

  11. Action Researchers' Perspectives about the Distinguishing Characteristics of Action Research: A Delphi and Learning Circles Mixed-Methods Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowell, Lonnie L.; Polush, Elena Yu; Riel, Margaret; Bruewer, Aaron

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify distinguishing characteristics of action research within the Action Research Special Interest Group of the American Educational Research Association. The authors sought to delineate the foundational framework endorsed by this community. The study was conducted during January-April 2012 and employed an…

  12. A Home Made Lava Lamp That Demonstrates Thermochemical Convection in Action and is Unlikely to Cause Fatal Injuries to Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moresi, L.; Farrington, R.; Moradi, H.; Kiel, P.

    2005-12-01

    It can be quite difficult to instill an intuitive sense of the scaling relationships for mantle convection to a class of geology students, but the use of various props can help. One favorite demonstration tool is the good old lava lamp which, coincidentally, first went on sale at the very time plate tectonic theory was gaining acceptance. Armed with one or more lava lamps, a lecturer can quickly impress upon students how scaling effects such as viscosity, heat input, gravitional acceleration influence the vigour of convection - a first step to understanding basic concepts such as Rayleigh number from a non-mathematical perspective. For more advanced students it is instructive to build a lava lamp for themselves because then it is necessary to understand the trade-off between chemical and thermal buoyancy, and how the equivalent scaling relationships to the purely thermal convection case play out. However, most of the recipes for lava lamps which you can find on the web involve the use of highly toxic substances, often flammable, and suggest the use of mains electricity to provide the light and heat. Needless to say, university safety officers and concerned parents are nervous about permitting such activities in student offices, dorms or at home. We share their concerns, of course, and here suggest a number of relatively safe alternatives which can be constructed from supermarket foodstuffs and cosmetic products together with heat sources such as a cappucino machine, a laptop running finite element simulations, as well as sealed chemical handwarmers.

  13. Savinase action on bovine serum albumin (BSA) monolayers demonstrated with measurements at the air-water interface and liquid Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) imaging.

    PubMed

    Balashev, Konstantin; Callisen, Thomas H; Svendsen, Allan; Bjørnholm, Thomas

    2011-12-01

    We studied the enzymatic action of Savinase on bovine serum albumin (BSA) organized in a monolayer spread at the air/water interface or adsorbed at the mica surface. We carried out two types of experiments. In the first one we followed the degradation of the protein monolayer by measuring the surface pressure and surface area decrease versus time. In the second approach we applied AFM imaging of the supported BSA monolayers adsorbed on mica solid supports and extracted information for the enzyme action by analyzing the obtained images of the surface topography in the course of enzyme action. In both cases we obtained an estimate for the turnover number (TON) of the enzyme reaction. PMID:21868205

  14. Bioremediation demonstration on Kwajalein Island: Site characterization and on-site biotreatability studies

    SciTech Connect

    Siegrist, R.L.; Korte, N.E.; Pickering, D.A. ); Phelps, T.J. )

    1991-09-01

    An environmental study was conducted during February 1991 on Kwajalein Island, a US Army Kwajalein Atoll (USAKA) Base in the Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI). This study was undertaken for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program (HAZWRAP) acting in behalf of USAKA. The purpose of the study was to determine if selected locations for new construction on Kwajalein Island were contaminated by petroleum hydrocarbons as suspected and, if so, whether bioremediation appeared to be a feasible technology for environmental restoration. Two different sites were evaluated: (1) the site planned freshwater production facility and (2) a site adjacent to an aboveground diesel fuel storage tank. Within the proposed construction zone for the freshwater production facility (a.k.a desalination plant), total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) where either absent or at low levels. Characterization data for another potential construction site adjacent to an aboveground diesel fuel storage tank southeast of the old diesel power plant revealed high concentrations of diesel fuel in the soil and groundwater beneath the site. Results of this investigation indicate that there are petroleum-contaminated soils on Kwajalein Island and bioremediation appears to be a viable environmental restoration technique. Further experimentation and field demonstration are required to determine the design and operating conditions that provide for optimum biodegradation and restoration of the petroleum-contaminated soils. 17 refs., 7 figs., 26 figs.

  15. Priorities for Action in a Rural Older Adults Study

    PubMed Central

    Averill, Jennifer B.

    2013-01-01

    This article reports the findings from a recent study of older adults in the rural southwestern United States and discusses practice and research implications. The aim of the study was to analyze health disparities and strengths in the contexts of rurality, aging, a depressed economy, and limited health resources. Identified themes needing action included sustained access to prescriptions, transportation solutions for older adults in isolated communities, inadequate access to care, poor infrastructure and coordination of services, scarce assisted living and in-home care for frail older adults, and barriers related to culture, language, and economics. PMID:22929381

  16. A Self-Study of the Teaching of Action Research in a University Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Jung-ah

    2011-01-01

    Despite the potential benefits of action research, teaching action research in a university setting can present challenges. Analyzing my own experiences of teaching a university-based course on action research, this self-study investigates what my students (all classroom teachers) did and did not understand about action research and what hindered…

  17. A Case Study Examining Change in Teacher Beliefs Through Collaborative Action Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaino, Katrin; Holbrook, Jack; Rannikmäe, Miia

    2013-01-01

    The main goal of this study was to explore the role of collaborative action research in eliciting change in teacher beliefs. The beliefs were those of five chemistry teachers in implementing a new teaching approach, geared to enhancing students' scientific and technological literacy (STL). The teacher beliefs were analysed based on Ajzen's Theory of Planned Behaviour (2005) by looking at the teacher's (a) attitude towards implementing STL modules, (b) perceived subjective norms, and (c) behavioural control regarding the new teaching approach. After an introductory year, when teachers familiarised themselves with the new approach, a collaborative action research project was initiated in the second year of the study, helping teachers to minimise or overcome initially perceived constraints when implementing STL modules in their classroom. The processes of teacher change and the course of the project were investigated by teacher interviews, teacher informal commentaries, and meeting records. The formation of positive beliefs towards a STL approach increased continuously, although its extent and character varied depending on the teacher. The close cooperation, in the format of collaborative action research and especially through teacher group reflections and perceived collegial support, did support teacher professional development including change in their beliefs towards the new teaching approach. Additionally, positive feedback gained from other teachers through running a two-day in-service course in year three helped to strengthen all five teachers' existing beliefs towards the new approach. The current research demonstrated that perceived constraints, where identified, can be meaningfully addressed by teachers, through undertaking collaborative action research.

  18. Action-State Orientation and the Theory of Planned Behavior: A Study of Job Search in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Song, Zhaoli; Wanberg, Connie; Niu, Xiongying; Xie, Yizhong

    2006-01-01

    Job search is an important element of people's careers and is especially critical for unemployed individuals. The current study surveyed a sample of 328 unemployed job seekers in China to test hypotheses related to the theory of planned behavior and action-state orientation theory. Results of the three-wave longitudinal study demonstrated that the…

  19. Refined conceptual model for the Volatile Organic Compounds-Arid Integrated Demonstration and 200 West Area Carbon Tetrachloride Expedited Response Action

    SciTech Connect

    Last, G.V.; Rohay, V.J.

    1993-03-01

    This report presents a refined geohydrologic and geochemical conceptual model of the host site (Hanford Reservation) for the Volatile Organic Compounds -- Arid Integrated Demonstration (VOC-Arid ID) and 200 West Area Carbon Tetrachloride (CCl{sub 4}) Expedited Response Action (ERA), based on the results from fiscal year 1992 site characterization activities. The ERA was initiated in December 1990 to minimize or stabilize CCl{sub 4} migration within the unsaturated (vadose) zone in the vicinity of three CCl{sub 4} disposal sites in the 200 West Area (216-Z-1A tile field, 216-Z-9 trench, and 216-Z-18 crib). Implementation of this ERA was based on concerns that CCl{sub 4} residing in the soils was continuing to spread to the groundwater and, if left unchecked, would significantly increase the area of groundwater contamination. A soil-vapor-extraction system began operating at the site in February 1992.

  20. The Oligo-Acyl Lysyl Antimicrobial Peptide C12K-2β12 Exhibits a Dual Mechanism of Action and Demonstrates Strong In Vivo Efficacy against Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Makobongo, Morris O.; Gancz, Hanan; Carpenter, Beth M.; McDaniel, Dennis P.

    2012-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori has developed antimicrobial resistance to virtually all current antibiotics. Thus, there is a pressing need to develop new anti-H. pylori therapies. We recently described a novel oligo-acyl-lysyl (OAK) antimicrobial peptidomimetic, C12K-2β12, that shows potent in vitro bactericidal activity against H. pylori. Herein, we define the mechanism of action and evaluate the in vivo efficacy of C12K-2β12 against H. pylori after experimental infection of Mongolian gerbils. We demonstrate using a 1-N-phenylnaphthylamine (fluorescent probe) uptake assay and electron microscopy that C12K-2β12 rapidly permeabilizes the bacterial membrane and creates pores that cause bacterial cell lysis. Furthermore, using nucleic acid binding assays, Western blots, and confocal microscopy, we show that C12K-2β12 can cross the bacterial membranes into the cytoplasm and tightly bind to bacterial DNA, RNA, and proteins, a property that may result in inhibition of enzymatic activities and macromolecule synthesis. To define the in vivo efficacy of C12K-2β12, H. pylori-infected gerbils were orogastrically treated with increasing doses and concentrations of C12K-2β12 1 day or 1 week postinfection. The efficacy of C12K-2β12 was strongest in animals that received the largest number of doses at the highest concentration, indicating dose-dependent activity of the peptide (P < 0.001 by analysis of variance [ANOVA]) regardless of the timing of the treatment with C12K-2β12. Overall, our results demonstrate a dual mode of action of C12K-2β12 against the H. pylori membrane and cytoplasmic components. Moreover, and consistent with the previously reported in vitro efficacy, C12K-2β12 shows significant in vivo efficacy against H. pylori when used as monotherapy. Therefore, OAK peptides may be a valuable resource for therapeutic treatment of H. pylori infection. PMID:22064541

  1. Studies on the Mechanism of Action of Dinitramine

    PubMed Central

    Travis, Robert L.; Woods, William G.

    1977-01-01

    The effect of dinitramine, a selective herbicide, on the plasma membrane of the soybean (Glycine max L.) root was studied. Used as marker systems to observe the herbicide effect were two plasma-membrane-specific enzymes, pH 6.5 ATPase and glucan synthetase. The activity of pH 6.5 ATPase decreased significantly in membrane vesicles prepared from roots harvested 15 minutes after treatment with dinitramine. Maximum inhibition occurred in roots harvested 2 hours after treatment. Glucan synthetase activity decreased similarly within 2 hours of treatment. Membrane permeability to 86Rb was rapidly increased by dinitramine. The activity of pH 6.5 ATPase returned to the control level within 8 hours of treatment with dinitramine. These results show dinitramine's initial site of action to be the plasma membrane, producing an over-all reduction in membrane function through inactivation of membrane-associated proteins. PMID:16660043

  2. Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) Program Case Studies: Demonstrating Program Outcomes, Volume III

    EPA Science Inventory

    This booklet, ETV Program Case Studies: Demonstrating Program Outcomes, Volume III contains two case studies, addressing verified environmental technologies for decentalized wastewater treatment and converting animal waste to energy. Each case study contains a brief description ...

  3. How Action and Context Priming Influence Categorization: A Developmental Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalenine, Solene; Bonthoux, Francoise; Borghi, Anna M.

    2009-01-01

    Embodied views of cognition propose that concepts are grounded in sensorimotor experience. Diverse aspects of sensorimotor experience, like action and context information, could play a key role in the formation and processing of manipulable object concepts. Specifically, contextual information could help to link specific actions experienced with…

  4. Insight and Action Analytics: Three Case Studies to Consider

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milliron, Mark David; Malcolm, Laura; Kil, David

    2014-01-01

    Civitas Learning was conceived as a community of practice, bringing together forward-thinking leaders from diverse higher education institutions to leverage insight and action analytics in their ongoing efforts to help students learn well and finish strong. We define insight and action analytics as drawing, federating, and analyzing data from…

  5. In situ vitrification demonstration at Pit 1, Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Volume 1: Results of treatability study

    SciTech Connect

    Spalding, B.P.; Naney, M.T.; Cline, S.R.; Bogle, M.A.; Tixier, J.S.

    1997-12-01

    A treatability study was initiated in October 1993 to apply in situ vitrification (ISV) to at least two segments of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) seepage Pit 1 by the end of fiscal year (FY) 1995. This treatability study was later extended to include all of Pit 1 and was performed to support a possible Interim Record of Decision or removal action for closure of one or more of the seepage pits and trenches beginning as early as FY 1997. This treatability study was carried out to establish the field-scale technical performance of ISV for (1) attaining the required depth, nominally 15 ft, to incorporate source contamination within and beneath the pits; (2) demonstrating field capability for the overlap of melt settings which will be necessary to achieve fused, melted segments of the source contamination; (3) demonstrating off-gas handling technology for accommodating and minimizing the volatilization of {sup 137}Cs; (4) demonstrating adequate site characterization techniques to predict ISV melting kinetics, processing temperatures, and product durability; and (5) promoting public acceptance of ISV technology by demonstrating its safety, implementability, site impacts, and air emissions and by coordinating the treatability study within the regulatory closure process. In April 1996 an expulsion of an estimated 10% of the 196 Mg (216 tons) melt body occurred resulting in significant damage to ISV equipment and, ultimately, led to an indefinite suspension of further ISV operations at Pit 1. This report summarizes the technical accomplishments and status of the project in fulfilling these objectives through September 1997.

  6. Inhibitory action of sphingosine, sphinganine and dexamethasone on glucose uptake: Studies with hydrogen peroxide and phorbol ester

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, D.K.; Hill, M.E.; Nelson, D.H. )

    1990-01-01

    The mechanism of the inhibitory action of glucocorticoids on glucose uptake is incompletely understood. Treatment with corticosteriods of cells in which glucose uptake is stimulated at insulin postbinding and postreceptor sites may clarify the site of the steroid inhibitory action. Hydrogen peroxide, which has been shown to stimulate the insulin receptor tyrosine kinase, and phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) which stimulates protein kinase C were, therefore, used as stimulators of glucose transport in this study. These studies demonstrate that dexamethasone and the sphingoid bases, sphinganine and sphingosine, inhibit glucose uptake that has been stimulated at either the receptor kinase or protein kinase C level in both 3T3-L1 and 3T3-C2 cells. These data confirm glucocorticoid inhibitory action at a post binding level and support the suggestion that some corticosteriod inhibitory effects may be mediated by an action on sphingolipid metabolism.

  7. Examination of mechanisms underlying enhanced memory performance in action video game players: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xianchun; Cheng, Xiaojun; Li, Jiaying; Pan, Yafeng; Hu, Yi; Ku, Yixuan

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have shown enhanced memory performance resulting from extensive action video game playing. The mechanisms underlying the cognitive benefit were investigated in the current study. We presented two types of retro-cues, with variable intervals to memory array (Task 1) or test array (Task 2), during the retention interval in a change detection task. In Task 1, action video game players demonstrated steady performance while non-action video game players showed decreased performance as cues occurred later, indicating their performance difference increased as the cue-to-memory-array intervals became longer. In Task 2, both participant groups increased their performance at similar rates as cues presented later, implying the performance difference in two groups were irrespective of the test-array-to-cue intervals. These findings suggested that memory benefit from game plays is not attributable to the higher ability of overcoming interference from the test array, but to the interactions between the two processes of protection from decay and resistance from interference, or from alternative hypotheses. Implications for future studies were discussed. PMID:26136720

  8. Examination of mechanisms underlying enhanced memory performance in action video game players: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Li, Xianchun; Cheng, Xiaojun; Li, Jiaying; Pan, Yafeng; Hu, Yi; Ku, Yixuan

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have shown enhanced memory performance resulting from extensive action video game playing. The mechanisms underlying the cognitive benefit were investigated in the current study. We presented two types of retro-cues, with variable intervals to memory array (Task 1) or test array (Task 2), during the retention interval in a change detection task. In Task 1, action video game players demonstrated steady performance while non-action video game players showed decreased performance as cues occurred later, indicating their performance difference increased as the cue-to-memory-array intervals became longer. In Task 2, both participant groups increased their performance at similar rates as cues presented later, implying the performance difference in two groups were irrespective of the test-array-to-cue intervals. These findings suggested that memory benefit from game plays is not attributable to the higher ability of overcoming interference from the test array, but to the interactions between the two processes of protection from decay and resistance from interference, or from alternative hypotheses. Implications for future studies were discussed. PMID:26136720

  9. Nitazoxanide: Nematicidal Mode of Action and Drug Combination Studies

    PubMed Central

    Somvanshi, Vishal S.; Ellis, Brian L.; Hu, Yan; Aroian, Raffi V.

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal nematodes or roundworms (aka soil-transmitted helminths or STHs) cause great disease. They infect upwards of two billion people, leading to high morbidity and a range of health problems, especially in infected children and pregnant women. Development of resistance to the two main classes of drugs used to treat intestinal nematode infections of humans has been reported. To fight STH infections, we need new and more effective drugs and ways to improve the efficacy of the old drugs. One promising alternative drug is nitazoxanide (NTZ). NTZ, approved for treating human protozoan infections, was serendipitously shown to have therapeutic activity against STHs. However, its mechanism of action against nematodes is not known. Using the laboratory nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, we show that NTZ acts on the nematodes through avr-14, an alpha-type subunit of a glutamate-gated chloride ion channel known for its role in ivermectin susceptibility. In addition, a forward genetic screen to select C. elegans mutants resistant to NTZ resulted in isolation of two NTZ resistant mutants that are not in avr-14, suggesting that additional mechanisms are involved in resistance to NTZ. We found that NTZ combines synergistically with other classes of anthelmintic drugs, i.e. albendazole and pyrantel, making it a good candidate for further studies on its use in drug combination therapy of STH infections. Given NTZ acts against a wide range of nematode parasites, our findings also validate avr-14 as an excellent target for pan-STH therapy. PMID:24412397

  10. Mode of Action Studies on Nitrodiphenyl Ether Herbicides

    PubMed Central

    Bowyer, John R.; Smith, Beverly J.; Camilleri, Patrick; Lee, Susan A.

    1987-01-01

    5-[2-Chloro-4-(trifluoromethyl)phenoxy]-2-nitroacetophenone oxime-o-(acetic acid, methyl ester) (DPEI), is a potent nitrodiphenyl ether herbicide which causes rapid leaf wilting, membrane lipid peroxidation, and chlorophyll destruction in a process which is both light- and O2-dependent. These effects resemble those of other nitrodiphenyl ether herbicides. Unlike paraquat, the herbicidal effects of DPEI are only slightly reduced by pretreatment with the photosynthetic electron transport inhibitor 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea. DPEI is a weak inhibitor of photosynthetic electron transport (I50 15 micromolar for water to paraquat) in vitro, with at least one site of action at the cytochrome b6f complex. Ultrastructural studies and measurements of ethane formation resulting from lipid peroxidation indicate that mutants of barley lacking photosystem I (PSI) (viridis-zb63) or photosystem II (viridis-zd69) are resistant to paraquat but susceptible to DPEI. The results indicate that electron transfer through both photosystems is not essential for the toxic effects of nitrodiphenyl ether herbicides. Furthermore, the results show that neither cyclic electron transport around PSI, nor the diversion of electrons from PSI to O2 when NADPH consumption is blocked are essential for the phytotoxicity of nitrodiphenyl ether herbicides. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:16665297

  11. Virgin Islands Demonstration Library Network Study: Exploring Library Networking in Remote, Disadvantaged Areas. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Henry C.; And Others

    The Virgin Islands Demonstration Library Network Study (VIDLNS) seeks to determine whether the development of either local or regional library networks would be the key to optimal organization of small library collections in isolated areas. This report describes the research and demonstration components of the exploratory phase of the project: (1)…

  12. Understanding affirmative action.

    PubMed

    Crosby, Faye J; Iyer, Aarti; Sincharoen, Sirinda

    2006-01-01

    Affirmative action is a controversial and often poorly understood policy. It is also a policy that has been widely studied by social scientists. In this review, we outline how affirmative action operates in employment and education settings and consider the major points of controversy. In addition, we detail the contributions of psychologists and other social scientists in helping to demonstrate why affirmative action is needed; how it can have unintended negative consequences; and how affirmative action programs can be most successful. We also review how psychologists have examined variations in people's attitudes toward affirmative action, in part as a means for testing different theories of social behavior. PMID:16318608

  13. Gender differences in non-standard mapping tasks: A kinematic study using pantomimed reach-to-grasp actions.

    PubMed

    Copley-Mills, Freya; Connolly, Jason D; Cavina-Pratesi, Cristiana

    2016-09-01

    Comparison between real and pantomimed actions is used in neuroscience to dissociate stimulus-driven (real) as compared to internally driven (pantomimed) visuomotor transformations, with the goal of testing models of vision (Milner & Goodale, 1995) and diagnosing neuropsychological deficits (apraxia syndrome). Real actions refer to an overt movement directed toward a visible target whereas pantomimed actions refer to an overt movement directed either toward an object that is no longer available. Although similar, real and pantomimed actions differ in their kinematic parameters and in their neural substrates. Pantomimed-reach-to-grasp-actions show reduced reaching velocities, higher wrist movements, and reduced grip apertures. In addition, seminal neuropsychological studies and recent neuroimaging findings confirmed that real and pantomimed actions are underpinned by separate brain networks. Although previous literature suggests differences in the praxis system between males and females, no research to date has investigated whether or not gender differences exist in the context of real versus pantomimed reach-to-grasp actions. We asked ten male and ten female participants to perform real and pantomimed reach-to-grasp actions toward objects of different sizes, either with or without visual feedback. During pantomimed actions participants were required to pick up an imaginary object slightly offset relative to the location of the real one (which was in turn the target of the real reach-to-grasp actions). Results demonstrate a significant difference between the kinematic parameters recorded in male and female participants performing pantomimed, but not real reach-to-grasp tasks, depending on the availability of visual feedback. With no feedback both males and females showed smaller grip aperture, slower movement velocity and lower reach height. Crucially, these same differences were abolished when visual feedback was available in male, but not in female participants

  14. Action of Molecular Switches in GPCRs - Theoretical and Experimental Studies

    PubMed Central

    Trzaskowski, B; Latek, D; Yuan, S; Ghoshdastider, U; Debinski, A; Filipek, S

    2012-01-01

    G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), also called 7TM receptors, form a huge superfamily of membrane proteins that, upon activation by extracellular agonists, pass the signal to the cell interior. Ligands can bind either to extracellular N-terminus and loops (e.g. glutamate receptors) or to the binding site within transmembrane helices (Rhodopsin-like family). They are all activated by agonists although a spontaneous auto-activation of an empty receptor can also be observed. Biochemical and crystallographic methods together with molecular dynamics simulations and other theoretical techniques provided models of the receptor activation based on the action of so-called “molecular switches” buried in the receptor structure. They are changed by agonists but also by inverse agonists evoking an ensemble of activation states leading toward different activation pathways. Switches discovered so far include the ionic lock switch, the 3-7 lock switch, the tyrosine toggle switch linked with the nPxxy motif in TM7, and the transmission switch. The latter one was proposed instead of the tryptophan rotamer toggle switch because no change of the rotamer was observed in structures of activated receptors. The global toggle switch suggested earlier consisting of a vertical rigid motion of TM6, seems also to be implausible based on the recent crystal structures of GPCRs with agonists. Theoretical and experimental methods (crystallography, NMR, specific spectroscopic methods like FRET/BRET but also single-molecule-force-spectroscopy) are currently used to study the effect of ligands on the receptor structure, location of stable structural segments/domains of GPCRs, and to answer the still open question on how ligands are binding: either via ensemble of conformational receptor states or rather via induced fit mechanisms. On the other hand the structural investigations of homo- and heterodimers and higher oligomers revealed the mechanism of allosteric signal transmission and receptor

  15. In vitro and in vivo studies of the Interferon-alpha action on distinct Orthobunyavirus.

    PubMed

    Livonesi, Márcia Cristina; de Sousa, Ricardo Luiz Moro; Badra, Soraya Jabur; Figueiredo, Luiz Tadeu Moraes

    2007-08-01

    Oropouche, Caraparu, Guama, Guaroa and Tacaiuma viruses (Orthobunyavirus genus) cause human febrile illnesses and/or encephalitis. To achieve a therapeutical agent to prevent and/or treat these diseases we evaluated the antiviral action of Interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha) on these orthobunyaviruses. In vitro results showed that all the studied orthobunyaviruses are susceptible to antiviral action of IFN-alpha, but this susceptibility is limited and dependent on both concentration of drug and treatment period. In vivo results demonstrated that IFN-alpha present antiviral action on Oropouche and Guaroa viruses when used as a prophylactic treatment. Moreover, a treatment initiated 3h after infection prevented the death of Guaroa virus infected-mice. Additionally, mortality of mice was related to the migration and replication of viruses in their brains. Our results suggest that IFN-alpha could be potentially useful in the prevention of diseases caused by Oropouche virus and in the prevention and/or treatment of diseases caused by Guaroa virus. PMID:17368573

  16. Difficult action decisions reduce the sense of agency: A study using the Eriksen flanker task.

    PubMed

    Sidarus, Nura; Haggard, Patrick

    2016-05-01

    The sense of agency refers to the feeling that we are in control of our actions and, through them, of events in the outside world. Much research has focused on the importance of retrospectively matching predicted and actual action outcomes for a strong sense of agency. Yet, recent studies have revealed that a metacognitive signal about the fluency of action selection can prospectively inform our sense of agency. Fluent, or easy, action selection leads to a stronger sense of agency over action outcomes than dysfluent, or difficult, selection. Since these studies used subliminal priming to manipulate action selection, it remained unclear whether supraliminal stimuli affecting action selection would have similar effects. We used supraliminal flankers to manipulate action selection in response to a central target. Experiment 1 revealed that conflict in action selection, induced by incongruent flankers and targets, led to reduced agency ratings over an outcome that followed the participant's response, relative to neutral and congruent flanking conditions. Experiment 2 replicated this result, and extended it to free choice between alternative actions. Finally, Experiment 3 varied the stimulus onset asynchrony (SOA) between flankers and target. Action selection performance varied with SOA. Agency ratings were always lower in incongruent than congruent trials, and this effect did not vary across SOAs. Sense of agency is influenced by a signal that tracks conflict in action selection, regardless of the visibility of stimuli inducing conflict, and even when the timing of the stimuli means that the conflict may not affect performance. PMID:27017411

  17. Multi-Lab EV Smart Grid Integration Requirements Study. Providing Guidance on Technology Development and Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Markel, T.; Meintz, A.; Hardy, K.; Chen, B.; Bohn, T.; Smart, J.; Scoffield, D.; Hovsapian, R.; Saxena, S.; MacDonald, J.; Kiliccote, S.; Kahl, K.; Pratt, R.

    2015-05-28

    The report begins with a discussion of the current state of the energy and transportation systems, followed by a summary of some VGI scenarios and opportunities. The current efforts to create foundational interface standards are detailed, and the requirements for enabling PEVs as a grid resource are presented. Existing technology demonstrations that include vehicle to grid functions are summarized. The report also includes a data-based discussion on the magnitude and variability of PEVs as a grid resource, followed by an overview of existing simulation tools that vi This report is available at no cost from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) at www.nrel.gov/publications. can be used to explore the expansion of VGI to larger grid functions that might offer system and customer value. The document concludes with a summary of the requirements and potential action items that would support greater adoption of VGI.

  18. Actionable Postcolonial Theory in Education. Postcolonial Studies in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andreotti, Vanessa

    2011-01-01

    "Actionable Postcolonial Theory in Education" illustrates how postcolonial theory can be put to work in education. It offers an accessible and handy overview and comparison of postcolonial theory and other theoretical debates related to critiques of Western ethnocentrism and hegemony. It also offers examples that illustrate how a discursive strand…

  19. Action Research. Case Studies in TESOL Practice Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edge, Julian, Ed.

    Chapter titles in this book include the following: "Attitude and Access: Building a New Teaching/Learning Community in TESOL" (Julian Edge); "Here It Is, Rough Though It May Be: Basic Computer for ESL" (Alison Perkins); "An 'It's Not Action Research Yet, but I'm Getting There' Approach to Teaching Writing" (Neil Cowie); "Early Reflections:…

  20. Motivating Struggling Adolescent Readers: An Action Research Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Eileen M.

    2016-01-01

    In a high-school reading class, the author used Reader's Theater as an instructional and motivational strategy for underachieving students. This action research focused on the extent to which implementing Reader's Theater motivated students to read and improve their reading skills. Consistent increases in scores for all students occurred over the…

  1. Action Learning with Second Life--A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, Christian; Ip, Rachael K. F.

    2009-01-01

    Virtual worlds, computer-based simulated environments in which users interact via avatars, provide an opportunity for the highly realistic enactment of real life activities online. Unlike computer games, which have a pre-defined purpose, pay-off structure, and action patterns, virtual worlds can leave many of these elements for users to determine.…

  2. The Eight-Year Study: From Evaluative Research to Demonstration Project, 1930-1940

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watras, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    From 1932 to 1940, the Progressive Education Association (PEA) conducted its Eight-Year Study. At first, the study appeared to be a poorly funded comparison of two groups of students in secondary schools. During the last four years, as more financial support became available, the Eight-Year Study became a broadly based demonstration of a wide…

  3. Studies on the mechanism of action of benzamide riboside: a novel inhibitor of IMP dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Gharehbaghi, Kamran; Grünberger, Werner; Jayaram, Hiremagalur N

    2002-04-01

    Benzamide is a well known inhibitor of poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase, an enzyme involved in DNA repair. However, benzamide exhibited neuotoxicity in animals and hence, in the hope of overcoming this problem, benzamide riboside (BR) was synthesized. Our mechanism of action studies on BR suggested that the agent was being metabolized to its 5'-monophosphate and then to its NAD analogue (BAD, benzamide adenine dinucleotide) that inhibits Inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH). IMPDH is the rate-limiting enzyme of the branched purine nucleotide synthetic pathway that provides guanylates including GTP and dGTP. There are two isoforms of IMPDH, type I that is constitutively present in all cells, and type II that is inducible and is present in highly proliferating cells such as cancer. Ongoing studies with BR analogues suggest that they are more selective in inhibiting IMPDH type II. Our studies have characterized the metabolites of BR, especially its NAD analogue, BAD, by synthesizing this active metabolite by enzymatic means, and identifying its structure by NMR and mass spectrometry. We have partially purified IMPDH from tumor cells and have examined the kinetics of inhibition of IMPDH by BAD. We have also compared biochemical and cytotoxic activities of BR with tiazofurin and selenazofurin, that share similar mechanisms of action with BR. Our studies demonstrated that 2-3-fold more BAD is formed compared to TAD and SAD, the active metabolites of tiazofurin and selenazofurin, respectively. BR has demonstrated potent cytotoxic activity in a diverse group of human tumor cells, specifically more active in sarcomas and CNS neoplasms compared to tiazofurin or selenazofurin. Future in vivo animal studies should set a stage for determining its effectiveness in clinical Phase I studies. PMID:11966437

  4. The cerebellum in action: a simulation and robotics study.

    PubMed

    Hofstötter, Constanze; Mintz, Matti; Verschure, Paul F M J

    2002-10-01

    The control or prediction of the precise timing of events are central aspects of the many tasks assigned to the cerebellum. Despite much detailed knowledge of its physiology and anatomy, it remains unclear how the cerebellar circuitry can achieve such an adaptive timing function. We present a computational model pursuing this question for one extensively studied type of cerebellar-mediated learning: the classical conditioning of discrete motor responses. This model combines multiple current assumptions on the function of the cerebellar circuitry and was used to investigate whether plasticity in the cerebellar cortex alone can mediate adaptive conditioned response timing. In particular, we studied the effect of changes in the strength of the synapses formed between parallel fibres and Purkinje cells under the control of a negative feedback loop formed between inferior olive, cerebellar cortex and cerebellar deep nuclei. The learning performance of the model was evaluated at the circuit level in simulated conditioning experiments as well as at the behavioural level using a mobile robot. We demonstrate that the model supports adaptively timed responses under real-world conditions. Thus, in contrast to many other models that have focused on cerebellar-mediated conditioning, we investigated whether and how the suggested underlying mechanisms could give rise to behavioural phenomena. PMID:12405996

  5. Learning from Action Evaluation of the Use of Multimedia Case Studies in Management Information Systems Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kawulich, Barbara B.

    2011-01-01

    This manuscript shares lessons learned from conducting an action evaluation of the use of multimedia case studies in Management Information Systems (MIS) courses. Three undergraduate MIS classes took part in the study. The purpose for using case studies in these classes was to teach students about the role of MIS in business. An action evaluation…

  6. Sensitivity of Alpha and Beta Oscillations to Sensorimotor Characteristics of Action: An EEG Study of Action Production and Gesture Observation

    PubMed Central

    Quandt, Lorna C.; Marshall, Peter J.; Shipley, Thomas F.; Beilock, Sian L.; Goldin-Meadow, Susan

    2012-01-01

    The sensorimotor experiences we gain when performing an action have been found to influence how our own motor systems are activated when we observe others performing that same action. Here we asked whether this phenomenon applies to the observation of gesture. Would the sensorimotor experiences we gain when performing an action on an object influence activation in our own motor systems when we observe others performing a gesture for that object? Participants were given sensorimotor experience with objects that varied in weight, and then observed video clips of an actor producing gestures for those objects. Electroencephalography (EEG) was recorded while participants first observed either an iconic gesture (pantomiming lifting an object) or a deictic gesture (pointing to an object) for an object, and then grasped and lifted the object indicated by the gesture. We analyzed EEG during gesture observation to determine whether oscillatory activity was affected by the observer’s sensorimotor experiences with the object represented in the gesture. Seeing a gesture for an object previously experienced as light was associated with a suppression of power in alpha and beta frequency bands, particularly at posterior electrodes. A similar pattern was found when participants lifted the light object, but over more diffuse electrodes. Moreover, alpha and beta bands at right parieto-occipital electrodes were sensitive to the type of gesture observed (iconic vs. deictic). These results demonstrate that sensorimotor experience with an object affects how a gesture for that object is processed, as measured by the gesture-observer’s EEG, and suggest that different types of gestures recruit the observer’s own motor system in different ways. PMID:22910276

  7. A design study for a medium-scale field demonstration of the viscous barrier technology

    SciTech Connect

    Moridis, G.; Yen, P.; Persoff, P.; Finsterle, S.; Williams, P.; Myer, L.; Pruess, K.

    1996-09-01

    This report is the design study for a medium-scale field demonstration of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory`s new subsurface containment technology for waste isolation using a new generation of barrier liquids. The test site is located in central California in a quarry owned by the Los Banos Gravel Company in Los Banos, California, in heterogeneous unsaturated deposits of sand, silt, and -ravel typical of many of the and DOE cleanup sites and particularly analogous to the Hanford site. The coals of the field demonstration are (a) to demonstrate the ability to create a continuous subsurface barrier isolating a medium-scale volume (30 ft long by 30 ft wide by 20 ft deep, i.e. 1/10th to 1/8th the size of a buried tank at the Hanford Reservation) in the subsurface, and (b) to demonstrate the continuity, performance, and integrity of the barrier.

  8. Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer Technology Demonstration: Prephase A Government Point-of-Departure Concept Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulqueen, J. A.; Addona, B. M.; Gwaltney, D. A.; Holt, K. A.; Hopkins, R. C.; Matis, J. A.; McRight, P. S.; Popp, C. G.; Sutherlin, S. G.; Thomas, H. D.; Baysinger, M. F.; Maples, C. D.; Capizzo, P. D.; Fabisinski, L. L.; Hornsby, L. S.; Percy, T. K.; Thomas, S. D.

    2012-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to define a point-of-departure prephase A mission concept for the cryogenic propellant storage and transfer technology demonstration mission to be conducted by the NASA Office of the Chief Technologist (OCT). The mission concept includes identification of the cryogenic propellant management technologies to be demonstrated, definition of a representative mission timeline, and definition of a viable flight system design concept. The resulting mission concept will serve as a point of departure for evaluating alternative mission concepts and synthesizing the results of industry- defined mission concepts developed under the OCT contracted studies

  9. Creative Expression as a Way of Knowing in Diabetes Adult Health Education: An Action Research Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuckey, Heather L.

    2009-01-01

    This action research study explores the meaning-making process using forms of creative expression for eight women with insulin-dependent diabetes. The study is theoretically informed by arts-based ways of knowing and aspects of feminist poststructuralism, and explains the process of creativity used in the action research process. The findings…

  10. Developmental Advising for Marginalized Community College Students: An Action Research Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Terrica S.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this action research study was to understand, evaluate, and improve the developmental advising practices used at a Washington State community college. This action research study endeavored to strengthen the developmental advising model originally designed to support the college's marginalized students. Guiding questions for the…

  11. A School Action Plan with Stakeholder Involvement: A Case Study of One Elementary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Getty, Jacob J., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    This case study focused on a school action plan, using a planning and implementation process that focused on improving stakeholder involvement and responsibility for student reading achievement at Eisenberg Elementary School. This study examined the impact of the school action process on the development of a new plan compared to other traditional…

  12. The Impact of Special Education on Self-Perception: An Autoethnographic-Action Research Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zabonick, Lisa A.

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative autoethnographic-action research study examined how lack of voice as a special education student in the mid-1970s influenced my self-perception. This study also examined, through the use of action research, what influence storytelling had on teacher perceptions of students with disabilities. Autoethnographic data results were used…

  13. Transforming Language Ideologies through Action Research: A Case Study of Bilingual Science Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Eunah

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative case study explored a third grade bilingual teacher's transformative language ideologies through participating in a collaborative action research project. By merging language ideologies theory, Cultural Historical Activity Theory (CHAT), and action research, I was able to identify the analytic focus of this study. I analyzed…

  14. Case Study for the ARRA-funded GSHP Demonstration at University at Albany

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xiaobing; Malhotra, Mini; Xiong, Zeyu

    2015-03-01

    High initial costs and lack of public awareness of ground-source heat pump (GSHP) technology are the two major barriers preventing rapid deployment of this energy-saving technology in the United States. Under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), 26 GSHP projects have been competitively selected and carried out to demonstrate the benefits of GSHP systems and innovative technologies for cost reduction and/or performance improvement. This report highlights the findings of a case study of one of the ARRA-funded GSHP demonstration projects—a distributed GSHP system at a new 500-bed apartment-style student residence hall at the University at Albany. This case study is based on the analysis of detailed design documents, measured performance data, published catalog data of heat pump equipment, and actual construction costs. Simulations with a calibrated computer model are performed for both the demonstrated GSHP system and a baseline heating, ventilation, and airconditioning (HVAC) system to determine the energy savings and other related benefits achieved by the GSHP system. The evaluated performance metrics include the energy efficiency of the heat pump equipment and the overall GSHP system, as well as the pumping performance, energy savings, carbon emission reductions, and cost-effectiveness of the demonstrated GSHP system compared with the baseline HVAC system. This case study also identifies opportunities for improving the operational efficiency of the demonstrated GSHP system.

  15. Experimental study of cyclic action of plasma on tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voronin, A. V.; Aleksandrov, A. E.; Ber, B. Ya.; Brunkov, P. N.; Bormatov, A. A.; Gusev, V. K.; Demina, E. V.; Novokhatskii, A. N.; Pavlov, S. I.; Prusakova, M. D.; Sotnikova, G. Yu.; Yagovkina, M. A.

    2016-03-01

    We report on experimental results on multiple action of hydrogen, deuterium, and helium plasmas produced by a plasma gun and the Globus-M tokamak on tungsten. The surface temperature in the course of irradiation is measured with a bichromatic pyrometer with a time resolution of ⩾1 μs. The morphology of the surface layer is investigated and X-ray structure analysis of tungsten exposed to multiple radiations by the plasma under various conditions is carried out. A slight decrease in the lattice parameter in the sample subjected to the maximal number of irradiation cycles is detected. It is shown that the morphology of the tungsten surface irradiated by the hydrogen plasma from the gun and by the deuterium plasma from the Globus-M tokamak changes (the structure becomes smoother). The characteristic depth of the layer in which impurities have been accumulated exceeds 0.5 μm. This depth was the largest for the sample exposed to 1000 shots from the gun and 2370 shots from the tokamak. It is shown that the helium jet from the plasma gun makes it possible to simulate the action of helium ions on the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) diverter, producing a layer of submicrometer particles (bubbles).

  16. Biosphere reserves in action: Case studies of the American experience

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-26

    For nearly 20 years, biosphere reserves have offered a unique framework for building the knowledge, skills, and attitudes required for conservation and sustainable use of ecosystems. The 12 case studies in this volume chronicle many of the cooperative efforts to implement the biosphere reserve concept in the United States. Considered together, these efforts involve more than 20 types of protected areas, and the participation of all levels of government, and many private organizations, academic institutions, citizens groups, and individuals. Biosphere reserves are multi-purpose areas that are nominated by the national committee of the Man and the Biosphere Program (MAB) and designated by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) to serve as demonstration areas for cooperation in building harmonious relationships between human activities and the conservation of ecosystems and biological diversity. Each biosphere reserve exemplifies the characteristic ecosystems of one of the worlds biogeographical regions. It is a land or coas%arine area involving human communities as integral components and including resources managed for objectives ranging from complete protection to intensive, yet sustainable development. A biosphere reserve is envisioned as a regional ''landscape for learning'' in which monitoring, research, education, and training are encouraged to support sustainable conservation of natural and managed ecosystems. It is a framework for regional cooperation involving government decisionmakers, scientists, resource managers, private organizations and local people (i.e., the biosphere reserve ''stakeholders''). Finally, each biosphere reserve is part of a global network for sharing information and experience to help address complex problems of conservation and development. The 12 case studies presented in this report represent only a few of the possible evolutions of a biosphere reserve in its efforts to reach out to the local

  17. Fire vs. Metal: A Laboratory Study Demonstrating Microbial Responses to Soil Disturbances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stromberger, Mary E.

    2005-01-01

    Incubation studies are traditionally used in soil microbiology laboratory classes to demonstrate microbial respiration and N mineralization-immobilization processes. Sometimes these exercises are done to calculate a N balance in N fertilizer-amended soils. However, examining microbial responses to environmental perturbations would appeal to soil…

  18. THE ENGLISH PROGRAM OF THE USOE CURRICULUM STUDY AND DEMONSTRATION CENTER MATERIALS CURRENTLY AVAILABLE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1967

    AFTER FIVE YEARS OF FEDERALLY-SUPPORTED CURRICULUM RESEARCH IN ENGLISH, 14 STUDY CENTERS AND FIVE DEMONSTRATION CENTERS ARE NOW MAKING THE RESULTS OF THEIR WORK AVAILABLE TO THE PUBLIC. THIS PAMPHLET LISTS TITLES OF REPORTS AND INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS PREPARED BY THE FOLLOWING CENTERS--(1) CARNEGIE-MELLON UNIVERSITY, (2) TEACHERS COLLEGE, COLUMBIA…

  19. 1993 FIELD STUDY/DEMONSTRATION OF AUTOMATED GAS CHROMATOGRAPH IN CONNECTICUT AND OTHER LABORATORIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objectives of this study were to install, test and demonstrate two automated gas chromatographic (GC) systems to state and regional EPA groups. he two GC systems required no liquid cryogen for operational purposes. he Dynatherm/Hewlett Packard GC system was designed for the m...

  20. A Study of Library Cooperatives, Networks and Demonstration Projects. Final Report. Volume I: Findings and Recommendations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patrick, Ruth; And Others

    This study evaluates the impact and effectiveness of the Library Research and Demonstration Program of the Higher Education Act (HEA II-B), and Title III, Interlibrary Cooperation, of the Library Services and Construction Act (LSCA III), USOE administered grant programs to aid in developing and improving library and information services. It…

  1. Embodied Action Improves Cognition in Children: Evidence from a Study Based on Piagetian Conservation Tasks.

    PubMed

    Lozada, Mariana; Carro, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    Converging evidence highlights the relevance of embodied cognition in learning processes. In this study we evaluate whether embodied action (enaction) improves cognitive understanding in children. Using the Piagetian conservation tasks in 6-7 year olds, we analyzed quantity conservation conceptualization in children who were active participants in the transformation process and compared these results to those of children who were mere observers of an adult's demonstration (as traditionally conducted). The investigation was performed with 105 first-graders. Conservation tasks were demonstrated to half the children, while the other half actively carried out the transformation of matter. Our findings showed that active manipulation of the material helped children recognize quantity invariance in a higher proportion than when the demonstration was only observed. That is, their enactive experience enabled them to comprehend conservation phenomena more easily than if they were merely passive observers. The outcome of this research thus emphasizes how active participation benefits cognitive processes in learning contexts, promoting autonomy, and agency during childhood. PMID:27047420

  2. Embodied Action Improves Cognition in Children: Evidence from a Study Based on Piagetian Conservation Tasks

    PubMed Central

    Lozada, Mariana; Carro, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    Converging evidence highlights the relevance of embodied cognition in learning processes. In this study we evaluate whether embodied action (enaction) improves cognitive understanding in children. Using the Piagetian conservation tasks in 6–7 year olds, we analyzed quantity conservation conceptualization in children who were active participants in the transformation process and compared these results to those of children who were mere observers of an adult's demonstration (as traditionally conducted). The investigation was performed with 105 first-graders. Conservation tasks were demonstrated to half the children, while the other half actively carried out the transformation of matter. Our findings showed that active manipulation of the material helped children recognize quantity invariance in a higher proportion than when the demonstration was only observed. That is, their enactive experience enabled them to comprehend conservation phenomena more easily than if they were merely passive observers. The outcome of this research thus emphasizes how active participation benefits cognitive processes in learning contexts, promoting autonomy, and agency during childhood. PMID:27047420

  3. Numerical Studies of Dynamo Action in a Turbulent Shear Flow. I.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Nishant K.; Jingade, Naveen

    2015-06-01

    We perform numerical experiments to study the shear dynamo problem where we look for the growth of a large-scale magnetic field due to non-helical stirring at small scales in a background linear shear flow in previously unexplored parameter regimes. We demonstrate the large-scale dynamo action in the limit where the fluid Reynolds number (\\operatorname{Re}) is below unity while the magnetic Reynolds number (Rm) is above unity; the exponential growth rate scales linearly with shear, which is consistent with earlier numerical works. The limit of low \\operatorname{Re} is particularly interesting, as seeing the dynamo action in this limit would provide enough motivation for further theoretical investigations, which may focus attention on this analytically more tractable limit of \\operatorname{Re}\\lt 1 compared to the more formidable limit of \\operatorname{Re}\\gt 1. We also perform simulations in the regimes where (i) both (\\operatorname{Re}, Rm) < 1, and (ii) \\operatorname{Re}\\gt 1 and Rm\\lt 1, and compute all of the components of the turbulent transport coefficients ({{α }ij} and {{η }ij}) using the test-field method. A reasonably good agreement is observed between our results and the results of earlier analytical works in similar parameter regimes.

  4. Choosing Actions

    PubMed Central

    Rosenbaum, David A.; Chapman, Kate M.; Coelho, Chase J.; Gong, Lanyun; Studenka, Breanna E.

    2013-01-01

    Actions that are chosen have properties that distinguish them from actions that are not. Of the nearly infinite possible actions that can achieve any given task, many of the unchosen actions are irrelevant, incorrect, or inappropriate. Others are relevant, correct, or appropriate but are disfavored for other reasons. Our research focuses on the question of what distinguishes actions that are chosen from actions that are possible but are not. We review studies that use simple preference methods to identify factors that contribute to action choices, especially for object-manipulation tasks. We can determine which factors are especially important through simple behavioral experiments. PMID:23761769

  5. The Early Development of Object Knowledge: A Study of Infants' Visual Anticipations during Action Observation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunnius, Sabine; Bekkering, Harold

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the developing object knowledge of infants through their visual anticipation of action targets during action observation. Infants (6, 8, 12, 14, and 16 months) and adults watched short movies of a person using 3 different everyday objects. Participants were presented with objects being brought either to a correct or to an…

  6. Studying Your Own School: An Educator's Guide to Practitioner Action Research, Second Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Gary L.; Herr, Kathryn G.; Nihlen, Ann

    2007-01-01

    Since the publication of the first edition of "Studying Your Own School", practitioner action research has become an established professional development practice in schools and teacher education programs.While the fundamentals of practitioner action research have not changed, the challenges of large scale reform have dramatically altered the…

  7. Student Attitudes toward Affirmative Action in Higher Education: Findings from a National Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sax, Linda J.; Arredondo, Marisol

    This report examines the affirmative action attitudes of 204,103 college freshmen from 473 colleges and universities nationwide and from four racial/ethnic groups: Whites, African Americans, Asian Americans, and Mexican Americans. The study addresses how and why student support for affirmative action in higher education admissions depends on how…

  8. Mood as Embodied Action: A Phenomenological Study of Interaction between Self and the Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manley, Dolores R.

    2009-01-01

    This phenomenological study explored the interaction between the affective phenomenon of mood (Davidson, et al., 2003) and embodied action (Varela, et al., 1993) experienced during interaction between self and the environment. Exploring the complementarity of mood and embodied action for organizations, teams, or individuals provided insightful…

  9. Iontophoretic study of speed of action of various muscle relaxants.

    PubMed

    Min, J C; Bekavac, I; Glavinovic, M I; Donati, F; Bevan, D R

    1992-08-01

    The speed of action of nondepolarizing muscle relaxants is inversely related to potency. The hypothesis that this effect occurs at the end plate was tested in a frog (Rana pipiens) cutaneous pectoris muscle preparation. Brief acetylcholine pulses (10-100 ms) were applied iontophoretically from a central barrel of a triple-barrelled microelectrode located near an end plate. Long pulses (10-200 s) of muscle relaxant (gallamine, rocuronium, d-tubocurarine, atracurium, vecuronium, pancuronium, and doxacurium) were applied from one of two other barrels. The responses were a voltage change at the end plate, measured with an intracellular electrode. To evaluate potency, intracellular voltage changes following iontophoretic acetylcholine pulses were measured after application of various concentrations of muscle relaxants. The following were the equilibrium dissociation constants, which represent concentration of relaxant for 50% inhibition of response (mean plus or minus standard deviation): gallamine, 4.56 +/- 0.44 microM (n = 5); rocuronium, 0.71 +/- 0.09 microM (n = 6); d-tubocurarine, 0.59 +/- 0.07 microM (n = 4); atracurium, 0.31 +/- 0.03 microM (n = 4); vecuronium, 0.23 +/- 0.02 microM (n = 5); pancuronium, 0.18 +/- 0.03 microM (n = 3); doxacurium, 0.11 +/- 0.03 microM (n = 5). Both onset and offset of effect of muscle relaxant proceeded with an exponential time course.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1353667

  10. Case study for ARRA-funded ground-source heat pump (GSHP) demonstration at Oakland University

    SciTech Connect

    Im, Piljae; Liu, Xiaobing

    2015-09-01

    High initial costs and lack of public awareness of ground-source heat pump (GSHP) technology are the two major barriers preventing rapid deployment of this energy-saving technology in the United States. Under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), 26 GSHP projects have been competitively selected and carried out to demonstrate the benefits of GSHP systems and innovative technologies for cost reduction and/or performance improvement. This paper highlights the findings of a case study of one of the ARRA-funded GSHP demonstration projects, a ground-source variable refrigerant flow (GS-VRF) system installed at the Human Health Building at Oakland University in Rochester, Michigan. This case study is based on the analysis of measured performance data, maintenance records, construction costs, and simulations of the energy consumption of conventional central heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems providing the same level of space conditioning as the demonstrated GS-VRF system. The evaluated performance metrics include the energy efficiency of the heat pump equipment and the overall GS-VRF system, pumping performance, energy savings, carbon emission reductions, and cost-effectiveness of the GS-VRF system compared with conventional HVAC systems. This case study also identified opportunities for reducing uncertainties in the performance evaluation, improving the operational efficiency, and reducing the installed cost of similar GSHP systems in the future.

  11. California: A Case Study in the Loss of Affirmative Action. A Policy Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gandara, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    This paper briefly reviews the various efforts undertaken by the University of California to maintain diversity in the institution, and especially at its highly competitive flagship campuses, UCLA and Berkeley, in the face of the loss of affirmative action during the mid-1990s. It demonstrates the continuing decline in representation of…

  12. Teaching in Action: Case Studies from Second Language Classrooms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Jack C., Ed.

    The 76 case studies presented here describe how teachers of English as a second language (ESL) respond to problems they encounter in teaching. Each case study describes the context in which the teacher is working, the problem, and the teacher's response. Following each case study is a brief commentary by a teacher educator who reflects that type…

  13. Pharmacodynamic properties of faropenem demonstrated by studies of time-kill kinetics and postantibiotic effect.

    PubMed

    Boswell, F J; Andrews, J M; Wise, R

    1997-03-01

    The pharmacodynamic properties of faropenem, a new oral penem antibiotic, were investigated by studying time-kill kinetics and postantibiotic effect. Time-kill kinetics were employed against strains of Bacteroides fragilis, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Haemophilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis and Streptococcus pyogenes. The postantibiotic effects of faropenem were studied using strains of E. coli, S. aureus, H. influenzae and Streptococcus pneumoniae. The time-kill kinetic data demonstrated that faropenem has bactericidal activity. Faropenem exhibited a significant postantibiotic effect against all strains except H. influenzae. PMID:9096193

  14. Tethered elevator and platforms as space station facilities: Systems studies and demonstrative experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Several key concepts of the science and applications tethered platforms were studied. Some conclusions reached are herein listed. Tether elevator and platform could improve the space station scientific and applicative capabilities. The space elevator presents unique characteristics as microgravity facility and as a tethered platform servicing vehicle. Pointing platforms could represent a new kind of observation facility for large class of payloads. The dynamical, control and technological complexity of these concepts advised demonstrative experiments. The on-going tethered satellite system offers the opportunity to perform such experiments. And feasibility studies are in progress.

  15. Action Video Game Training for Healthy Adults: A Meta-Analytic Study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ping; Liu, Han-Hui; Zhu, Xing-Ting; Meng, Tian; Li, Hui-Jie; Zuo, Xi-Nian

    2016-01-01

    Action video game (AVG) has attracted increasing attention from both the public and from researchers. More and more studies found video game training improved a variety of cognitive functions. However, it remains controversial whether healthy adults can benefit from AVG training, and whether young and older adults benefit similarly from AVG training. In the present study, we aimed to quantitatively assess the AVG training effect on the cognitive ability of adults and to compare the training effects on young and older adults by conducting a meta-analysis on previous findings. We systematically searched video game training studies published between January 1986 and July 2015. Twenty studies were included in the present meta-analysis, for a total of 313 participants included in the training group and 323 participants in the control group. The results demonstrate that healthy adults achieve moderate benefit from AVG training in overall cognitive ability and moderate to small benefit in specific cognitive domains. In contrast, young adults gain more benefits from AVG training than older adults in both overall cognition and specific cognitive domains. Age, education, and some methodological factors, such as the session duration, session number, total training duration, and control group type, modulated the training effects. These meta-analytic findings provide evidence that AVG training may serve as an efficient way to improve the cognitive performance of healthy adults. We also discussed several directions for future AVG training studies. PMID:27378996

  16. Action Video Game Training for Healthy Adults: A Meta-Analytic Study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ping; Liu, Han-Hui; Zhu, Xing-Ting; Meng, Tian; Li, Hui-Jie; Zuo, Xi-Nian

    2016-01-01

    Action video game (AVG) has attracted increasing attention from both the public and from researchers. More and more studies found video game training improved a variety of cognitive functions. However, it remains controversial whether healthy adults can benefit from AVG training, and whether young and older adults benefit similarly from AVG training. In the present study, we aimed to quantitatively assess the AVG training effect on the cognitive ability of adults and to compare the training effects on young and older adults by conducting a meta-analysis on previous findings. We systematically searched video game training studies published between January 1986 and July 2015. Twenty studies were included in the present meta-analysis, for a total of 313 participants included in the training group and 323 participants in the control group. The results demonstrate that healthy adults achieve moderate benefit from AVG training in overall cognitive ability and moderate to small benefit in specific cognitive domains. In contrast, young adults gain more benefits from AVG training than older adults in both overall cognition and specific cognitive domains. Age, education, and some methodological factors, such as the session duration, session number, total training duration, and control group type, modulated the training effects. These meta-analytic findings provide evidence that AVG training may serve as an efficient way to improve the cognitive performance of healthy adults. We also discussed several directions for future AVG training studies. PMID:27378996

  17. Dynamic modeling and validation of a lignocellulosic enzymatic hydrolysis process--a demonstration scale study.

    PubMed

    Prunescu, Remus Mihail; Sin, Gürkan

    2013-12-01

    The enzymatic hydrolysis process is one of the key steps in second generation biofuel production. After being thermally pretreated, the lignocellulosic material is liquefied by enzymes prior to fermentation. The scope of this paper is to evaluate a dynamic model of the hydrolysis process on a demonstration scale reactor. The following novel features are included: the application of the Convection-Diffusion-Reaction equation to a hydrolysis reactor to assess transport and mixing effects; the extension of a competitive kinetic model with enzymatic pH dependency and hemicellulose hydrolysis; a comprehensive pH model; and viscosity estimations during the course of reaction. The model is evaluated against real data extracted from a demonstration scale biorefinery throughout several days of operation. All measurements are within predictions uncertainty and, therefore, the model constitutes a valuable tool to support process optimization, performance monitoring, diagnosis and process control at full-scale studies. PMID:24212094

  18. Mathematics in Action: Two New Zealand Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, David M.

    Mathematics is playing an increasingly important role in business and industry. In this paper we present two case studies to illustrate the power and impact of mathematics in two important practical applications in New Zealand. The first case study describes the development of a mathematical optimization model to maximize the value of aluminum…

  19. The Girl Child and the Family: An Action Research Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anandalakshmy, S., Comp.

    This report describes a nationwide study of female children and the family in rural India. The objectives of the study were to generate data on the situation of female children; to identify the major problems related to their status; to start a series of programs to help remedy those shortcomings; and to assist communities, and women in…

  20. Educational Cost Analysis in Action: Case Studies for Planners -- II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coombs, Philip H.; Hallak, Jacques

    This document is the second in a series of three documents, which together contain 27 case studies on the uses of cost analysis in educational planning. The case studies are presented to help planners and administrators see how cost analysis can be used to improve the efficiency of their educational systems, or to get the best value existing…

  1. Mapping perception to action in piano practice: a longitudinal DC-EEG study

    PubMed Central

    Bangert, Marc; Altenmüller, Eckart O

    2003-01-01

    Background Performing music requires fast auditory and motor processing. Regarding professional musicians, recent brain imaging studies have demonstrated that auditory stimulation produces a co-activation of motor areas, whereas silent tapping of musical phrases evokes a co-activation in auditory regions. Whether this is obtained via a specific cerebral relay station is unclear. Furthermore, the time course of plasticity has not yet been addressed. Results Changes in cortical activation patterns (DC-EEG potentials) induced by short (20 minute) and long term (5 week) piano learning were investigated during auditory and motoric tasks. Two beginner groups were trained. The 'map' group was allowed to learn the standard piano key-to-pitch map. For the 'no-map' group, random assignment of keys to tones prevented such a map. Auditory-sensorimotor EEG co-activity occurred within only 20 minutes. The effect was enhanced after 5-week training, contributing elements of both perception and action to the mental representation of the instrument. The 'map' group demonstrated significant additional activity of right anterior regions. Conclusion We conclude that musical training triggers instant plasticity in the cortex, and that right-hemispheric anterior areas provide an audio-motor interface for the mental representation of the keyboard. PMID:14575529

  2. An fMRI study of perception and action in deaf signers.

    PubMed

    Okada, Kayoko; Rogalsky, Corianne; O'Grady, Lucinda; Hanaumi, Leila; Bellugi, Ursula; Corina, David; Hickok, Gregory

    2016-02-01

    Since the discovery of mirror neurons, there has been a great deal of interest in understanding the relationship between perception and action, and the role of the human mirror system in language comprehension and production. Two questions have dominated research. One concerns the role of Broca's area in speech perception. The other concerns the role of the motor system more broadly in understanding action-related language. The current study investigates both of these questions in a way that bridges research on language with research on manual actions. We studied the neural basis of observing and executing American Sign Language (ASL) object and action signs. In an fMRI experiment, deaf signers produced signs depicting actions and objects as well as observed/comprehended signs of actions and objects. Different patterns of activation were found for observation and execution although with overlap in Broca's area, providing prima facie support for the claim that the motor system participates in language perception. In contrast, we found no evidence that action related signs differentially involved the motor system compared to object related signs. These findings are discussed in the context of lesion studies of sign language execution and observation. In this broader context, we conclude that the activation in Broca's area during ASL observation is not causally related to sign language understanding. PMID:26796716

  3. Demonstration testing and evaluation of in situ soil heating. Treatability study work plan, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Sresty, G.C.

    1994-07-07

    A Treatability Study planned for the demonstration of the in situ electromagnetic (EM) heating process to remove organic solvents is described in this Work Plan. The treatability study will be conducted by heating subsurface vadose-zone soils in an organic plume adjacent to the Classified Burial Ground K-1070-D located at K-25 Site, Oak Ridge. The test is scheduled to start during the fourth quarter of FY94 and will be completed during the first quarter of FY95. The EM heating process for soil decontamination is based on volumetric heating technologies developed during the `70s for the recovery of fuels from shale and tar sands by IIT Research Institute (IITRI) under a co-operative program with the US Department of Energy (DOE). Additional modifications of the technology developed during the mid `80s are currently used for the production of heavy oil and waste treatment. Over the last nine years, a number of Government agencies (EPA, Army, AF, and DOE) and industries sponsored further development and testing of the in situ heating and soil decontamination process for the remediation of soils containing hazardous organic contaminants. In this process the soil is heated in situ using electrical energy. The contaminants are removed from the soil due to enhanced vaporization, steam distillation and stripping. IITRI will demonstrate the EM Process for in situ soil decontamination at K-25 Site under the proposed treatability study. Most of the contaminants of concern are volatile organics which can be removed by heating the soil to a temperature range of 85 to 95 C. The efficiency of the treatment will be determined by comparing the concentration of contaminants in soil samples. Samples will be obtained before and after the demonstration for a measurement of the concentration of contaminants of concern.

  4. Feasibility study for a demonstration plant for liquefaction and coprocessing of waste plastics and tires

    SciTech Connect

    Huffman, G.P.; Shah, N.; Shelley, M.

    1998-04-01

    The results of a feasibility study for a demonstration plant for the liquefaction of waste polymers and the coprocessing of waste polymers with coal are presented. The study was carried out by a committee of participants from five universities, the US DOE Federal Energy Technology Center, and Burns & Roe Corporation. The study included an assessment of current recycling practices, a review of pertinent research, and a survey of feedstock availability. A conceptual design for a demonstration plant was developed and a preliminary economic analysis for various feedstock mixes was carried out. The base case for feedstock scenarios was chosen to be 200 tons per day of waste plastic and 100 tons per day of waste tires. For this base case, the return on investment (ROI) was found to range from 8% to 16% as tipping fees for waste plastic and tires increased over a range comparable to that existing in the US. A number of additional feedstock scenarios that were both more and less profitable were also considered and are briefly discussed.

  5. Feasibility study for a demonstration plant for liquefaction and coprocessing of waste plastics and tires

    SciTech Connect

    Huffman, G.P.; Shah, N.; Shelley, M.; El-Halwagi, M.; Schindler, H.; Eastman, M.

    1998-07-01

    The results of a feasibility study for a demonstration plant for the liquefaction of waste polymers and the coprocessing of waste polymers with coal are presented. The study was carried out by a committee of participants from five universities, the US DOE Federal Energy Technology Center, and Burns and Roe Corporation. The study included an assessment of current recycling practices, a review of pertinent research, and a survey of feedstock availability. A conceptual design for a demonstration plant was developed and a preliminary economic analysis for various feedstock mixes was carried out. The base case for feedstock scenarios was chosen to be 200 tons per day of waste plastic and 200 tons per day of waste tires. For this base case, the return on investment (ROI) was found to range from 8% to 16% as tipping fees for waste plastic and tires increased over a range comparable to that existing in the US. A number of additional feedstock scenarios that were both more and less profitable were also considered and are briefly discussed.

  6. A Multidisciplinary Osteoporosis Service-Based Action Research Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitehead, Dean; Keast, John; Montgomery, Val; Hayman, Sue

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate an existing Trust-based osteoporosis service's preventative activity, determine any issues and problems and use this data to reorganise the service, as part of a National Health Service Executive/Regional Office-commissioned and funded study. Setting: A UK Hospital Trust's Osteoporosis Service. Design & Method: A…

  7. From Numbers to Action: A Preliminary Study of Retention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenlee, Shelia Parker; Greenlee, Harry

    This study examined retention at Christopher Newport University (CNU) in Newport News, Virginia, focusing on the demographic characteristics of those students who left the university as well as the reasons why they left. A total of 159 students who had attended CNU during the 1994-95 academic year but who did not re-enroll in the fall of 1995 were…

  8. Reading Comprehension across Different Genres: An Action Research Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lubawski, Michael; Sheehan, Caitlyn

    2010-01-01

    Reading comprehension is often a forgotten skill in secondary classrooms. Teachers of older students assign readings of different styles and levels, but don't teach the skills necessary to process different kinds of texts. This study examined which strategies are effective in giving students the skills necessary to read for understanding by…

  9. Distributed Curriculum Leadership in Action: A Hong Kong Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Law, Edmond; Galton, Maurice; Wan, Sally

    2010-01-01

    This study was designed primarily to investigate the impact of school-based curriculum development teams on teacher development within the tradition of school-based curriculum development. The results are expected to provide valuable insights for teachers, school management and policy making. Teacher interviews in a primary school in Hong Kong…

  10. Rural Action: A Collection of Community Work Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Paul, Ed.; Francis, David, Ed.

    This book contains 10 case studies of rural community development in England, Wales, Scotland, Ireland, and Catalonia, as seen from the perspective of community-work practitioners. Development projects encompassed such activities as promotion of tourism, establishment of community centers, vocational training for school dropouts, adult community…

  11. Rhetoric to action: a study of stakeholder perceptions of aging well in two local communities.

    PubMed

    Everingham, Jo-Anne; Lui, Chi-Wai; Bartlett, Helen; Warburton, Jeni; Cuthill, Michael

    2010-11-01

    This qualitative study of local perceptions of policy goals and action in relation to aging reports 31 stakeholder interviews within 2 Australian communities exploring (a) the meaning of aging well; and (b) preferred policy actions to achieve positive aging outcomes. Findings suggest that community perceptions of aging well are broadly consistent with the goals of national and international policy frameworks in focusing on 3 dimensions--health, social engagement, and security. Further, participants believe that achievement of positive aging outcomes requires a mix of self-help, community action, and government intervention--particularly government support and encouragement for aging well initiatives. PMID:20972930

  12. Initial Development and Pilot Study Design of Interactive Lecture Demonstrations for ASTRO 101

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwortz, Andria C.; French, D. A; Gutierrez, Joseph V; Sanchez, Richard L; Slater, Timothy F.; Tatge, Coty

    2014-06-01

    Interactive lecture demonstrations (ILDs) have repeatedly shown to be effective tools for improving student achievement in the context of learning physics. As a first step toward systematic development of interactive lecture demonstrations in ASTRO 101, the introductory astronomy survey course, a systematic review of education research, describing educational computer simulations (ECSs) reveals that initial development requires a targeted study of how ASTRO 101 students respond to ECSs in the non-science majoring undergraduate lecture setting. In this project we have adopted the process by which ILDs were designed, pilot-tested, and successfully implemented in the context of physics teaching (Sokoloff & Thornton, 1997; Sokoloff & Thornton, 2004). We have designed the initial pilot-test set of ASTRO 101 ILD instructional materials relying heavily on ECSs. Both an instructor’s manual and a preliminary classroom-ready student workbook have been developed, and we are implementing a pilot study to explore their effectiveness in communicating scientific content, and the extent to which they might enhance students’ knowledge of and perception about astronomy and science in general. The study design uses a pre-/post-test quasi-experimental study design measuring students’ normalized gain scores, calculated as per Hake (1998) and Prather (2009), using a slightly modified version of S. Slater’s (2011) Test Of Astronomy STandards TOAST combined with other instruments. The results of this initial study will guide the iterative development of ASTRO 101 ILDs that are intended to both be effective at enhancing student achievement and easy for instructors to successfully implement.

  13. Activity-Based Teaching in Social Studies Education: An Action Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akkus, Zekerya

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine pre-service social studies teachers' skills to plan and apply the activity-based teaching and contribute to their development of these skills. In the study, the action research design of qualitative research was used. The sample of the study consisted of 6 pre-service teachers who were 4th year students at…

  14. [Exploration and demonstration study on drug combination from clinical real world].

    PubMed

    Xie, Yan-ming; Wang, Lian-xin; Wang, Yong-yan

    2014-09-01

    Drug combination is extensive in the clinical real world,which is an important part and the inherent requirements of the post-marketing evaluation of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). The key issues and technology include multi-domain and multi-disciplinary such as the rationality, efficacy and safety evaluation of combination drug starting from clinical real world, study on component in vivo and mechanism of combination drug, the risk/benefit assessment and cost-benefit evaluation of combination drug and so on. The topic has been studied as clinical demonstration on combination therapy of variety of diseases such as coronary heart disease, stroke, insomnia, depression, hepatitis, herpes zoster, psoriasis and ectopic pregnancy. Meanwhile, multi-disciplinary dynamic innovation alliance of clinical drug combination has been presented, which can promote the academic development and improving service ability and level of TCM. PMID:25532371

  15. Microcalorimetry studies of the antimicrobial actions of Aconitum alkaloids*

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yan-bin; Liu, Lian; Shao, Wei; Wei, Ting; Lin, Gui-mei

    2015-01-01

    The metabolic activity of organisms can be measured by recording the heat output using microcalorimetry. In this paper, the total alkaloids in the traditional Chinese medicine Radix Aconiti Lateralis were extracted and applied to Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. The effect of alkaloids on bacteria growth was studied by microcalorimetry. The power-time curves were plotted with a thermal activity monitor (TAM) air isothermal microcalorimeter and parameters such as growth rate constant (μ), peak-time (Tm), inhibitory ratio (I), and enhancement ratio (E) were calculated. The relationships between the concentration of Aconitum alkaloids and μ of E. coli or S. aureus were discussed. The results showed that Aconitum alkaloids had little effect on E. coli and had a potentially inhibitory effect on the growth of S. aureus. PMID:26238544

  16. Microcalorimetry studies of the antimicrobial actions of Aconitum alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yan-bin; Liu, Lian; Shao, Wei; Wei, Ting; Lin, Gui-mei

    2015-08-01

    The metabolic activity of organisms can be measured by recording the heat output using microcalorimetry. In this paper, the total alkaloids in the traditional Chinese medicine Radix Aconiti Lateralis were extracted and applied to Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. The effect of alkaloids on bacteria growth was studied by microcalorimetry. The power-time curves were plotted with a thermal activity monitor (TAM) air isothermal microcalorimeter and parameters such as growth rate constant (μ), peak-time (Tm), inhibitory ratio (I), and enhancement ratio (E) were calculated. The relationships between the concentration of Aconitum alkaloids and μ of E. coli or S. aureus were discussed. The results showed that Aconitum alkaloids had little effect on E. coli and had a potentially inhibitory effect on the growth of S. aureus. PMID:26238544

  17. Canceling planned action: an FMRI study of countermanding saccades.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Clayton E; Cole, Michael W; Rao, Vikas Y; D'Esposito, Mark

    2005-09-01

    We investigated the voluntary control of motor behavior by studying the process of deciding whether or not to execute a movement. We imaged the human dorsal cortex while subjects performed a countermanding task that allowed us to manipulate the probability that subjects would be able to cancel a planned saccade in response to an imperative stop signal. We modeled the behavioral data as a race between gaze-shifting mechanisms and gaze-holding mechanisms towards a finish line where a saccade is generated or canceled, and estimated that saccade cancelation took approximately 160 ms. The frontal eye fields showed greater activation on stop signal trials regardless of successful cancelation, suggesting coactivation of saccade and fixation mechanisms. The supplementary eye fields, however, distinguished between successful and unsuccessful cancelation, suggesting a role in monitoring performance. These oculomotor regions play distinct roles in the decision processes mediating saccadic choice. PMID:15616130

  18. [Study of residual levels of delayed-action neuroleptics].

    PubMed

    Furet, Y; Breteau, M; Etienne, T

    1991-01-01

    Pharmacokinetics of the depot antipsychotics are unclear and mainly depend on releasing from the depot site (according to a "flip-flop" model). Few data are available on residual plasma concentrations of those drugs. We have practiced 38 blood determinations among 15 patients treated by long-acting neuroleptics (10 by fluphenazine decanoate, 4 by flupentixol decanoate and 1 by pipotiazine palmitate). Radio Receptor Assay method was used (based on competition for dopamine receptors binding), with results expressed as chlorpromazine equivalents. They showed; a wide interindividual variability; considering each subject, intraindividual variability is attenuated; blood measurements are mainly higher than therapeutic ranges (especially for patients on fluphenazine decanoate). Those results might involve that some patients are overdosed, but other studies are needed in this way. PMID:1675816

  19. Study of the mode of action of some nitrodiphenyl ethers.

    PubMed

    Piekarski, D; Potier, P; Giannotti, C

    1990-01-01

    Nitrosoderivatives of the nitrodiphenyl ether herbicides (nitrofen, bifenox) have been studied. UV irradiation in different organic solvents gives degradation products. In buffered aqueous media, in the presence of chloroplasts and spin traps such as DMPO, hydroxy and peroxy radicals have been characterized. In organic media and in the presence of spin traps such as DMPO, PBN, 4-POBN, solvent radicals (.CHCl2, .CCl3, .CH2 [symbol: see text]) have been formed. Nitro-derivatives have been studied under UV irradiation and in the presence of tetramethylethylene (TME), alkenylhydroxylamines are formed which autoxidize in nitroxide radicals. The formation of the stable nitroxide radical occurs in the dark process after continuous irradiation. The intensity of the signal decreases strongly when a new irradiation is applied. Radical species, with analogous ESR spectral characteristics are formed on reaction with nitrodiphenyl ethers and fatty acids. The reactivity of these herbicides in micellar media (SDS, Brij 35, and CTAB) has been investigated. The kinetics of formation of the ESR signal corresponding to the photoreduction of the nitrodiphenyl ether in the presence of TME behave differently in a micellar environment as compared to solution. The intensity of the formation of the nitroxide increases under irradiation and decreases in the dark; the rotational correlation time tau c has been determined for each type of micelle. Synthetic nitrosodiphenyl ether made by the reduction of nitrodiphenyl ether using hydrogen gas and PtO2 as a catalyst gives the corresponding amine, which is oxidized with meta-chloroperbenzoic acid (m.CPBA). The nitrosodiphenyl ether in the presence of soja azolectin liposome containing a fluorescent probe has been analysed.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2165990

  20. Some studies on the rodenticidal action of indomethacin.

    PubMed

    Omogbai, E K; Ozolua, R I; Idaewor, P E; Isah, A O

    1999-11-01

    The oral LD50 of indomethacin for a seven-day observation was found to be 12.58 +/- 1.15 mg/kg. At LD10 of 6.61 mg/kg, a dose to weight ratio of 28 was obtained for a 240 g rat, while at a maximum single dose of 3 mg/kg in man it is only 0.04. Neither diazepam nor phenobarbital influenced death at the doses of both drugs used. However, cholestyramine 2 g/kg/day was found to protect by 50% from the LD100 of indomethacin. Gross pathological studies showed dose-dependent ulceration and perforation (P < 0.001, 12 vs 24 mg/kg) and such lesions occurred in starved rats, were low in bile duct-ligated compared to sham-operated rats (P < 0.001) and were also low in cholestyramine-treated rats. Indomethacin-induced lethality in rats was found to be dose-dependent. PMID:10536753

  1. A study of hazardous air pollutants at the Tidd PFBC Demonstration Plant

    SciTech Connect

    1994-10-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Clean Coal Technology (CCD Program is a joint effort between government and industry to develop a new generation of coal utilization processes. In 1986, the Ohio Power Company, a subsidiary of American Electric Power (AEP), was awarded cofunding through the CCT program for the Tidd Pressure Fluidized Bed Combustor (PFBC) Demonstration Plant located in Brilliant, Ohio. The Tidd PFBC unit began operation in 1990 and was later selected as a test site for an advanced particle filtration (APF) system designed for hot gas particulate removal. The APF system was sponsored by the DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) through their Hot Gas Cleanup Research and Development Program. A complementary goal of the DOE CCT and METC R&D programs has always been to demonstrate the environmental acceptability of these emerging technologies. The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA) have focused that commitment toward evaluating the fate of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) associated with advanced coal-based and hot gas cleanup technologies. Radian Corporation was contacted by AEP to perform this assessment of HAPs at the Tidd PFBC demonstration plant. The objective of this study is to assess the major input, process, and emission streams at Plant Tidd for the HAPs identified in Title III of the CAAA. Four flue gas stream locations were tested: ESP inlet, ESP outlet, APF inlet, and APF outlet. Other process streams sampled were raw coal, coal paste, sorbent, bed ash, cyclone ash, individual ESP hopper ash, APF ash, and service water. Samples were analyzed for trace elements, minor and major elements, anions, volatile organic compounds, dioxin/furan compounds, ammonia, cyanide, formaldehyde, and semivolatile organic compounds. The particle size distribution in the ESP inlet and outlet gas streams and collected ash from individual ESP hoppers was also determined.

  2. The Quality Improvement Demonstration Study: An example of evidence-based policy-making in practice

    PubMed Central

    Shimkhada, Riti; Peabody, John W; Quimbo, Stella A; Solon, Orville

    2008-01-01

    Background Randomized trials have long been the gold-standard for evaluating clinical practice. There is growing recognition that rigorous studies are similarly needed to assess the effects of policy. However, these studies are rarely conducted. We report on the Quality Improvement Demonstration Study (QIDS), an example of a large randomized policy experiment, introduced and conducted in a scientific manner to evaluate the impact of large-scale governmental policy interventions. Methods In 1999 the Philippine government proposed sweeping reforms in the National Health Sector Reform Agenda. We recognized the unique opportunity to conduct a social experiment. Our ongoing goal has been to generate results that inform health policy. Early on we concentrated on developing a multi-institutional collaborative effort. The QIDS team then developed hypotheses that specifically evaluated the impact of two policy reforms on both the delivery of care and long-term health status in children. We formed an experimental design by randomizing matched blocks of three communities into one of the two policy interventions plus a control group. Based on the reform agenda, one arm of the experiment provided expanded insurance coverage for children; the other introduced performance-based payments to hospitals and physicians. Data were collected in household, hospital-based patient exit, and facility surveys, as well as clinical vignettes, which were used to assess physician practice. Delivery of services and health status were evaluated at baseline and after the interventions were put in place using difference-in-difference estimation. Results We found and addressed numerous challenges conducting this study, namely: formalizing the experimental design using the existing health infrastructure; securing funding to do research coincident with the policy reforms; recognizing biases and designing the study to account for these; putting in place a broad data collection effort to account for

  3. Non-physics peer demonstrators in undergraduate laboratories: a study of students’ perceptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Michael; Kirkup, Les

    2016-01-01

    Laboratory demonstrators play a crucial role in facilitating students’ learning in physics subjects. Inspired by the success of peer-led activities, we introduced peer demonstrators to support student learning in first-year physics subjects that enrol students not intending to major in physics. Surveys were administered to 1700 students over 4 years in four subjects to examine student perceptions of how demonstrators assisted them in the laboratory. Scores awarded to peer demonstrators by students were no lower than those awarded to demonstrators traditionally employed in the first year physics laboratory. These latter demonstrators were drawn mainly from the ranks of physics research students. The findings validate the recruitment of peer demonstrators and will be used to inform the recruitment and support programmes for laboratory demonstrators.

  4. Achieving Citizenship Goals: Demonstrations, Engagement, and Sensitivity in Social Studies. Current Concerns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKay, Roberta

    1993-01-01

    Questions how the goal of participatory citizenship can be taught within the typical classroom environment. Argues that the hidden curriculum, textbooks, and instructional methods do not provide opportunities to see citizenship in action or ways to practice it. Recommends providing students with choices and opportunities for engagement in some…

  5. Translational studies of goal-directed action as a framework for classifying deficits across psychiatric disorders

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, Kristi R.; Morris, Richard W.; Balleine, Bernard W.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to learn contingencies between actions and outcomes in a dynamic environment is critical for flexible, adaptive behavior. Goal-directed actions adapt to changes in action-outcome contingencies as well as to changes in the reward-value of the outcome. When networks involved in reward processing and contingency learning are maladaptive, this fundamental ability can be lost, with detrimental consequences for decision-making. Impaired decision-making is a core feature in a number of psychiatric disorders, ranging from depression to schizophrenia. The argument can be developed, therefore, that seemingly disparate symptoms across psychiatric disorders can be explained by dysfunction within common decision-making circuitry. From this perspective, gaining a better understanding of the neural processes involved in goal-directed action, will allow a comparison of deficits observed across traditional diagnostic boundaries within a unified theoretical framework. This review describes the key processes and neural circuits involved in goal-directed decision-making using evidence from animal studies and human neuroimaging. Select studies are discussed to outline what we currently know about causal judgments regarding actions and their consequences, action-related reward evaluation, and, most importantly, how these processes are integrated in goal-directed learning and performance. Finally, we look at how adaptive decision-making is impaired across a range of psychiatric disorders and how deepening our understanding of this circuitry may offer insights into phenotypes and more targeted interventions. PMID:24904322

  6. The Altus Cumulus Electrification Study (ACES): A UAV-Based Science Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blakeslee, R. J.; Croskey, C. L.; Desch, M. D.; Farrell, W. M.; Goldberg, R. A.; Houser, J. G.; Kim, H. S.; Mach, D. M.; Mitchell, J. D.; Stoneburner, J. C.

    2003-01-01

    The Altus Cumulus Electrification Study (ACES) is an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV)- based project that investigated thunderstorms in the vicinity of the Florida Everglades in August 2002. ACES was conducted to investigate storm electrical activity and its relationship to storm morphology, and to validate satellite-based lightning measurements. In addition, as part of the NASA sponsored UAV-based science demonstration program, this project provided a scientifically useful demonstration of the utility and promise of UAV platforms for Earth science and applications observations. ACES employed the Altus II aircraft, built by General Atomics - Aeronautical Systems, Inc. Key science objectives simultaneously addressed by ACES are to: (1) investigate lightning-storm relationships, (2) study storm electrical budgets, and provide Lightning Imaging Sensor validation. The ACES payload included electrical, magnetic, and optical sensors to remotely characterize the lightning activity and the electrical environment within and around thunderstorms. ACES contributed important electrical and optical measurements not available from other sources. Also, the high altitude vantage point of the UAV observing platform (up to 55,000 feet) provided cloud-top perspective. By taking advantage of its slow flight speed (70 to 100 knots), long endurance, and high altitude flight, the Altus was flown near, and when possible, over (but never into) thunderstorms for long periods of time that allowed investigations to be conducted over entire storm life cycles. An innovative real time weather system was used to identify and vector the aircraft to selected thunderstorms and safely fly around these storms, while, at the same time monitor the weather near our base of operations. In addition, concurrent ground-based observations that included radar (Miami and Key West WSRBD, NASA NPOL), satellite imagery, and lightning (NALDN and Los Alamos EDOT) enable the UAV measurements to be more completely

  7. Motor Inhibition during Overt and Covert Actions: An Electrical Neuroimaging Study

    PubMed Central

    Angelini, Monica; Calbi, Marta; Ferrari, Annachiara; Sbriscia-Fioretti, Beatrice; Franca, Michele; Gallese, Vittorio; Umiltà, Maria Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    Given ample evidence for shared cortical structures involved in encoding actions, whether or not subsequently executed, a still unsolved problem is the identification of neural mechanisms of motor inhibition, preventing “covert actions” as motor imagery from being performed, in spite of the activation of the motor system. The principal aims of the present study were the evaluation of: 1) the presence in covert actions as motor imagery of putative motor inhibitory mechanisms; 2) their underlying cerebral sources; 3) their differences or similarities with respect to cerebral networks underpinning the inhibition of overt actions during a Go/NoGo task. For these purposes, we performed a high density EEG study evaluating the cerebral microstates and their related sources elicited during two types of Go/NoGo tasks, requiring the execution or withholding of an overt or a covert imagined action, respectively. Our results show for the first time the engagement during motor imagery of key nodes of a putative inhibitory network (including pre-supplementary motor area and right inferior frontal gyrus) partially overlapping with those activated for the inhibition of an overt action during the overt NoGo condition. At the same time, different patterns of temporal recruitment in these shared neural inhibitory substrates are shown, in accord with the intended overt or covert modality of action performance. The evidence that apparently divergent mechanisms such as controlled inhibition of overt actions and contingent automatic inhibition of covert actions do indeed share partially overlapping neural substrates, further challenges the rigid dichotomy between conscious, explicit, flexible and unconscious, implicit, inflexible forms of motor behavioral control. PMID:26000451

  8. Baca geothermal demonstration project baseline ecosystem studies of cooling tower emission effects

    SciTech Connect

    Leitner, P.; Osterling, R.; Price, D.; Westermeier, J.

    1981-03-01

    Results of baseline studies for boron, arsenic, mercury, and fluorine in vegetation and soil near the Baca Geothermal Demonstration Power Plant are provided for the 1980 sampling season. Preliminary results of visual vegetation assessments and population density studies of soil invertebrate fauna are also provided. Foliage samples were collected for chemical analysis on a total of 17 plots on 5 transects. Two to five plant species were sampled at each plot. Samples were collected in June-July and September. Soil samples were collected at each plot during September. Visual vegetation inspections were conducted along each transect. Eighty-eight soil samples were collected for soil invertebrate studies. Boron, arsenic, mercury, and fluorine levels in vegetation were within normal range for natural vegetation and crops. Concentrations of soil arsenic and mercury were comparable to foliage concentrations. Boron concentrations were lower in soil than in foliage, whereas soil fluorine concentrations were considerably higher than foliage concentrations. With the exception of heavy insect infestations in June-July, no vegetation abnormalities were noted. Preliminary soil invertebrate analysis indicated an overall arthropod density of approximately 100,000/m/sup 2/ which appears within the normal range encountered in forest and meadow soil.

  9. Neuroanatomical substrates of action perception and understanding: an anatomic likelihood estimation meta-analysis of lesion-symptom mapping studies in brain injured patients

    PubMed Central

    Urgesi, Cosimo; Candidi, Matteo; Avenanti, Alessio

    2014-01-01

    Several neurophysiologic and neuroimaging studies suggested that motor and perceptual systems are tightly linked along a continuum rather than providing segregated mechanisms supporting different functions. Using correlational approaches, these studies demonstrated that action observation activates not only visual but also motor brain regions. On the other hand, brain stimulation and brain lesion evidence allows tackling the critical question of whether our action representations are necessary to perceive and understand others’ actions. In particular, recent neuropsychological studies have shown that patients with temporal, parietal, and frontal lesions exhibit a number of possible deficits in the visual perception and the understanding of others’ actions. The specific anatomical substrates of such neuropsychological deficits however, are still a matter of debate. Here we review the existing literature on this issue and perform an anatomic likelihood estimation meta-analysis of studies using lesion-symptom mapping methods on the causal relation between brain lesions and non-linguistic action perception and understanding deficits. The meta-analysis encompassed data from 361 patients tested in 11 studies and identified regions in the inferior frontal cortex, the inferior parietal cortex and the middle/superior temporal cortex, whose damage is consistently associated with poor performance in action perception and understanding tasks across studies. Interestingly, these areas correspond to the three nodes of the action observation network that are strongly activated in response to visual action perception in neuroimaging research and that have been targeted in previous brain stimulation studies. Thus, brain lesion mapping research provides converging causal evidence that premotor, parietal and temporal regions play a crucial role in action recognition and understanding. PMID:24910603

  10. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1984-01-01

    Procedures for two demonstrations are presented. The first is a demonstration of chemiluminescence. The second is a demonstration using a secondary battery constructed from common household articles. (JN)

  11. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1978-01-01

    Presents the following chemistry lecture demonstrations and experiments: (1) a versatile kinetic demonstration; (2) the Bakelite Demonstration; (3) applying Beer's law; and (4) entropy calculations. (HM)

  12. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1979-01-01

    Presents two demonstrations which are intended for chemistry college students. These demonstrations are: (1) enhancement of concentration quenching by micelles; and (2) the thermite lecture demonstration. (HM)

  13. Site of anticonvulsant action on sodium channels: autoradiographic and electrophysiological studies in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Worley, P.F.; Baraban, J.M.

    1987-05-01

    The anticonvulsants phenytoin and carbamazepine interact allosterically with the batrachotoxin binding site of sodium channels. In the present study, we demonstrate an autoradiographic technique to localize the batrachotoxin binding site on sodium channels in rat brain using (/sup 3/H)batrachotoxinin-A 20-alpha-benzoate (BTX-B). Binding of (/sup 3/H)BTX-B to brain sections is dependent on potentiating allosteric interactions with scorpion venom and is displaced by BTX-B (Kd approximately 200 nM), aconitine, veratridine, and phenytoin with the same rank order of potencies as described in brain synaptosomes. The maximum number of (/sup 3/H)BTX-B binding sites in forebrain sections also agrees with biochemical determinations. Autoradiographic localizations indicate that (/sup 3/H)BTX-B binding sites are not restricted to cell bodies and axons but are present in synaptic zones throughout the brain. For example, a particularly dense concentration of these sites in the substantia nigra is associated with afferent terminals of the striatonigral projection. By contrast, myelinated structures possess much lower densities of binding sites. In addition, we present electrophysiological evidence that synaptic transmission, as opposed to axonal conduction, is preferentially sensitive to the action of aconitine and veratridine. Finally, the synaptic block produced by these sodium channel activators is inhibited by phenytoin and carbamazepine at therapeutic anticonvulsant concentrations.

  14. Biological mode of action of a nitrophenolates-based biostimulant: case study

    PubMed Central

    Przybysz, Arkadiusz; Gawrońska, Helena; Gajc-Wolska, Janina

    2014-01-01

    The challenges facing modern plant production involve (i) responding to the demand for food and resources of plant origin from the world's rapidly growing population, (ii) coping with the negative impact of stressful conditions mainly due to anthropopressure, and (iii) meeting consumers' new requirements and preferences for food that is high in nutritive value, natural, and free from harmful chemical additives. Despite employing the most modern plant cultivation technologies and the progress that has been made in breeding programs, the genetically-determined crop potential is still far from being fully exploited. Consequently yield and quality are often reduced, making production less, both profitable and attractive. There is an increasing desire to reduce the chemical input in agriculture and there has been a change toward integrated plant management and sustainable, environmentally-friendly systems. Biostimulants are a category of relatively new products of diverse formulations that positively affect a plant's vital processes and whose impact is usually more evident under stressful conditions. In this paper, information is provided on the mode of action of a nitrophenolates-based biostimulant, Atonik, in model species and economically important crops grown under both field and controlled conditions in a growth chamber. The effects of Atonik on plant morphology, physiology, biochemistry (crops and model plant) and yield and yield parameters (crops) is demonstrated. Effects of other biostimulants on studied in this work processes/parameters are also presented in discussion. PMID:25566287

  15. Syntax in Action Has Priority over Movement Selection in Piano Playing: An ERP Study.

    PubMed

    Bianco, Roberta; Novembre, Giacomo; Keller, Peter E; Scharf, Florian; Friederici, Angela D; Villringer, Arno; Sammler, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Complex human behavior is hierarchically organized. Whether or not syntax plays a role in this organization is currently under debate. The present ERP study uses piano performance to isolate syntactic operations in action planning and to demonstrate their priority over nonsyntactic levels of movement selection. Expert pianists were asked to execute chord progressions on a mute keyboard by copying the posture of a performing model hand shown in sequences of photos. We manipulated the final chord of each sequence in terms of Syntax (congruent/incongruent keys) and Manner (conventional/unconventional fingering), as well as the strength of its predictability by varying the length of the Context (five-chord/two-chord progressions). The production of syntactically incongruent compared to congruent chords showed a response delay that was larger in the long compared to the short context. This behavioral effect was accompanied by a centroparietal negativity in the long but not in the short context, suggesting that a syntax-based motor plan was prepared ahead. Conversely, the execution of the unconventional manner was not delayed as a function of Context and elicited an opposite electrophysiological pattern (a posterior positivity). The current data support the hypothesis that motor plans operate at the level of musical syntax and are incrementally translated to lower levels of movement selection. PMID:26351994

  16. Transforming Language Ideologies through Action Research: A Case Study of Bilingual Science Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Eunah

    This qualitative case study explored a third grade bilingual teacher's transformative language ideologies through participating in a collaborative action research project. By merging language ideologies theory, Cultural Historical Activity Theory (CHAT), and action research, I was able to identify the analytic focus of this study. I analyzed how one teacher and I, the researcher, collaboratively reflected on classroom language practices during the video analysis meetings and focus groups. Further, I analyzed twelve videos that we coded together to see the changes in the teacher's language practices over time. My unit of analysis was the discourse practice mediated by additive language ideologies. Throughout the collaborative action research process, we both critically reflected on the classroom language use. We also developed a critical consciousness about the participatory shifts and learning of focal English Learner (EL) students. Finally, the teacher made changes to her classroom language practices. The results of this study will contribute to the literacy education research field for theoretical, methodological, and practical insights. The integration of language ideologies, CHAT, and action research can help educational practitioners, researchers, and policy makers understand the importance of transforming teachers' language ideologies in designing additive learning contexts for ELs. From a methodological perspective, the transformative language ideologies through researcher and teacher collaborated video analysis process provide a unique contribution to the language ideologies in education literature, with analytic triangulation. As a practical implication, this study suggests action research can be one of the teacher education tools to help the teachers transform language ideologies for EL education.

  17. Anatomical correlates for category-specific naming of objects and actions: a brain stimulation mapping study.

    PubMed

    Lubrano, Vincent; Filleron, Thomas; Démonet, Jean-François; Roux, Franck-Emmanuel

    2014-02-01

    The production of object and action words can be dissociated in aphasics, yet their anatomical correlates have been difficult to distinguish in functional imaging studies. To investigate the extent to which the cortical neural networks underlying object- and action-naming processing overlap, we performed electrostimulation mapping (ESM), which is a neurosurgical mapping technique routinely used to examine language function during brain-tumor resections. Forty-one right-handed patients who had surgery for a brain tumor were asked to perform overt naming of object and action pictures under stimulation. Overall, 73 out of the 633 stimulated cortical sites (11.5%) were associated with stimulation-induced language interferences. These interference sites were very much localized (<1 cm(2) ), and showed substantial variability across individuals in their exact localization. Stimulation interfered with both object and action naming over 44 sites, whereas it specifically interfered with object naming over 19 sites and with action naming over 10 sites. Specific object-naming sites were mainly identified in Broca's area (Brodmann area 44/45) and the temporal cortex, whereas action-naming specific sites were mainly identified in the posterior midfrontal gyrus (Brodmann area 6/9) and Broca's area (P = 0.003 by the Fisher's exact test). The anatomical loci we emphasized are in line with a cortical distinction between objects and actions based on conceptual/semantic features, so the prefrontal/premotor cortex would preferentially support sensorimotor contingencies associated with actions, whereas the temporal cortex would preferentially underpin (functional) properties of objects. PMID:23015527

  18. RCRA permit modifications and the functional equivalency demonstration: A case study

    SciTech Connect

    Kinker, J.; Lyon, W.; Carnes, R.; Loehr, C.; Elsberry, K.; Garcia, P.

    1996-05-01

    Hazardous waste operating permits issued under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) often impose requirements, typically by reference to the original permit application, that specific components and equipment be used. Consequently, changing these items, even for the purpose of routine maintenance, may first require that the owner/operator request a potentially time-consuming and costly permit modification. However, the owner/operator may demonstrate that a modification is not required because the planned changes are functionally equivalent, as defined by RCRA, to the original specifications embodied by the permit. The Controlled-Air Incinerator at Los Alamos National Laboratory is scheduled for maintenance and improvements that involve replacement of components. The incinerator`s carbon adsorption unit/high efficiency particulate air filtration system, in particular, was redesigned to improve reliability and minimize maintenance. A study was performed to determine whether the redesigned unit would qualify as functionally equivalent to the original component. in performing this study, the following steps were taken: (a) the key performance factors were identified; (b) performance data describing the existing unit were obtained; (c) performance of both the existing and redesigned units was simulated; and (d) the performance data were compared to ascertain whether the components could qualify as functionally equivalent.

  19. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1988-01-01

    Details three demonstrations for use in chemistry classrooms. Includes: "A Demonstration of Corrosion by Differential Aeration"; "A Simple Demonstration of the Activation Energy Concept"; and "A Boiling Demonstration at Room Temperature." Each description includes equipment, materials, and methods. (CW)

  20. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1988-01-01

    Describes two chemistry demonstrations including a demonstration of chemical inhibition and "The Rayleigh Fountain" which demonstrates the polarity of the water molecule. Provides instructions and explanations for each demonstration. (CW)

  1. Cancer, Employment, and American Indians: A Participatory Action Research Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Sharon R.; Finifrock, DeAnna; Marshall, Catherine A.; Jaakola, Julia; Setterquist, Janette; Burross, Heidi L.; Hodge, Felicia Schanche

    2011-01-01

    American Indian cancer survivors are an underserved and understudied group. In this pilot study we attempted to address, through participatory action research, missing information about those factors that serve to either facilitate employment or hinder it for adult cancer survivors. One task of the study was to develop and/or modify…

  2. Reconstructing a Community, Reclaiming a Playground: A Participatory Action Research Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutzel, Karen

    2007-01-01

    This article describes a participatory action research study that examined participant's perceptions of community and of the West End neighborhood in Cincinnati, Ohio, where the study took place. It is argued that oppressive situations have developed strong collective identities and social capital among residents, which can lead to the development…

  3. Understanding the Impact of Affirmative Action Bans in Different Graduate Fields of Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garces, Liliana M.

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the effects of affirmative action bans in four states (California, Florida, Texas, and Washington) on the enrollment of underrepresented students of color within six different graduate fields of study: the natural sciences, engineering, social sciences, business, education, and humanities. Findings show that affirmative action…

  4. A Study of Participatory Action Research as Professional Development for Educators in Areas of Educational Disadvantage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, E. Alana

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the final analysis of a mixed methodological study of participatory action research (PAR) as professional development. The participants were administrators and teachers studying extreme educational disadvantage caused by homeless and transient living conditions. Two questions are answered: 1. What was the experience of…

  5. Reconnecting with Your Passion: An Action Research Study Exploring Humanities and Professional Nursing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Melissa J.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this action research study was two-fold. The first purpose was to examine the process of how nurses engaged in a professional development program that drew upon reading and creative writing related to their lives and work as nurses. Secondly, this study examined the nurses' perspectives on how their involvement in the process…

  6. Changing Preschool Children's Attitudes into Behavior towards Selected Environmental Issues: An Action Research Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ertürk Kara, Gözde; Aydos, E. Hande; Aydin, Özge

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to provide the transform of attitudes into behavior of 60-72 month of age children continued early childhood education toward environmental issues. Collaborative action research method of qualitative design was used. The whole participants of the study were 60-72 months of age children who were attending in an early…

  7. Evaluation of logistic and economic impacts of hybrid vehicle propulsion/microgrid concepts: Demonstration of LOCSS applied to HE HMMWV in future unit of action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, Michael; Tiberi, Lisa; Burns, Joseph; Udvare, Thomas B.

    2006-05-01

    Computer models have been developed and used to predict the performance of vehicles equipped with advanced fuel and power train technologies such as hybrid electric or fuel cells. However, simulations that describe the interaction of the vehicle with the rest of the vehicle fleet and infrastructure are just emerging. This paper documents the results of an experiment to demonstrate the utility of these types of simulations. The experiment examined the business case of fielding hybrid electric, high-mobility multipurpose wheeled vehicles (HE HMMWVs) in a future Army organization. The hypothesis was that fielding HE vehicles would significantly reduce fuel consumption due to the economy offered by the HE technology and reducing the number of generators as a result of using the vehicles to generate electrical power. The Logistical and Combat Systems Simulation (LOCSS) was used to estimate differences in fuel consumption and associated equipment during a 72-hour operation with and without HE HMMWVs. There was a 25 percent reduction in fuel consumption over the systems examined. However, due to the relatively low density of the HE vehicles in the organization, the total difference in fuel consumption was not operationally significant; and the savings in fuel costs did not overcome the additional procurement costs over a twenty-year life cycle.

  8. The GROOP Effect: Groups Mimic Group Actions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsai, Jessica Chia-Chin; Sebanz, Natalie; Knoblich, Gunther

    2011-01-01

    Research on perception-action links has focused on an interpersonal level, demonstrating effects of observing individual actions on performance. The present study investigated perception-action matching at an inter-group level. Pairs of participants responded to hand movements that were performed by two individuals who used one hand each or they…

  9. Proximity Operations Nano-Satellite Flight Demonstration (PONSFD) Rendezvous Proximity Operations Design and Trade Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griesbach, J.; Westphal, J. J.; Roscoe, C.; Hawes, D. R.; Carrico, J. P.

    2013-09-01

    The Proximity Operations Nano-Satellite Flight Demonstration (PONSFD) program is to demonstrate rendezvous proximity operations (RPO), formation flying, and docking with a pair of 3U CubeSats. The program is sponsored by NASA Ames via the Office of the Chief Technologist (OCT) in support of its Small Spacecraft Technology Program (SSTP). The goal of the mission is to demonstrate complex RPO and docking operations with a pair of low-cost 3U CubeSat satellites using passive navigation sensors. The program encompasses the entire system evolution including system design, acquisition, satellite construction, launch, mission operations, and final disposal. The satellite is scheduled for launch in Fall 2015 with a 1-year mission lifetime. This paper provides a brief mission overview but will then focus on the current design and driving trade study results for the RPO mission specific processor and relevant ground software. The current design involves multiple on-board processors, each specifically tasked with providing mission critical capabilities. These capabilities range from attitude determination and control to image processing. The RPO system processor is responsible for absolute and relative navigation, maneuver planning, attitude commanding, and abort monitoring for mission safety. A low power processor running a Linux operating system has been selected for implementation. Navigation is one of the RPO processor's key tasks. This entails processing data obtained from the on-board GPS unit as well as the on-board imaging sensors. To do this, Kalman filters will be hosted on the processor to ingest and process measurements for maintenance of position and velocity estimates with associated uncertainties. While each satellite carries a GPS unit, it will be used sparsely to conserve power. As such, absolute navigation will mainly consist of propagating past known states, and relative navigation will be considered to be of greater importance. For relative observations

  10. An exploratory pilot study of mechanisms of action within normative feedback for adult drinkers

    PubMed Central

    Muench, Frederick J.; Lee, Rufina; Pena, Juan; Hail, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Background. Normative feedback (NF), or receiving information about one’s drinking compared to peer drinking norms, is one of the most widely used brief interventions for prevention and intervention for hazardous alcohol use. NF has demonstrated predominantly small but significant effect sizes for intention to change and other drinking related outcomes. Identifying mechanisms of action may improve the effectiveness of NF; however, few studies have examined NF’s mechanisms of action, particularly among adults. Objective. This study is an exploratory analysis of two theorized mechanisms of NF: discrepancy (specifically personal dissonance—the affective response to feedback) and belief in the accuracy of feedback. Method. Using Amazon’s Mechanical Turk, 87 men (n = 56) and women (n = 31) completed an online survey during which they were asked about their perceptions about their drinking and actual drinking behaviors. Then participants were provided tailored NF and evaluated for their reactions. Severity of discrepancy was measured by the difference between one’s estimated percentile ranking of drinking compared to peers and actual percentile ranking. Surprise and worry reported due to the discrepancy were proxies for personal dissonance. Participants were also asked if they believed the feedback and if they had any plans to change their drinking. Mediation analyses were implemented, exploring whether surprise, worry, or belief in the accuracy of feedback mediated severity of discrepancy’s impact on plan for change. Results. Among this sample of adult drinkers, severity of discrepancy did not predict plan for change, and personal dissonance did not mediate severity of discrepancy. Severity of discrepancy was mediated by belief in the accuracy of feedback. In addition, viewing one’s drinking as a problem prior to feedback and post-NF worry both predicted plan for change independently. Conclusions. Results revealed that NF may not work to create personal

  11. Competencies Demonstrated by Municipal Employees during Adaptation to Climate Change: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pruneau, Diane; Kerry, Jackie; Blain, Sylvie; Evichnevetski, Evgueni; Deguire, Paul; Barbier, Pierre-Yves; Freiman, Viktor; Therrien, Jimmy; Langis, Joanne; Lang, Mathieu

    2013-01-01

    Since coastal communities are already subjected to the impacts of climate change, adaptation has become a necessity. This article presents competencies demonstrated by Canadian municipal employees during an adaptation process to sea level rise. To adapt, the participants demonstrated the following competencies: problem solving (highlighting…

  12. Study and Development of a Sub-Orbital Re-Entry Demonstrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savino, R.

    The Italian and European Space Agencies are supporting a research programme, developed in Campania region by a cluster of industries, research institutes and universities, on a low-cost re-entry capsule, able to return payloads from the ISS to Earth and/or to perform short-duration scientific missions in Low Earth Orbit (LEO). The ballistic capsule is characterized by a deployable, disposable "umbrella-like" heat shield that allows relatively small dimensions at launch and a sufficient exposed surface area in re-entry conditions, reducing the ballistic coefficient and leading to acceptable heat fluxes, mechanical loads and final descent velocity. ESA is supporting a preliminary study to develop a flight demonstrator of the capsule to be embarked as a secondary payload onboard a sub-orbital sounding rocket. The deployable thermal protection system concept may be applied to future science and robotic exploration mission requiring planetary entry and, possibly also to missions in the framework of Human Space flight, requiring planetary entry or re-entry. The technology offers also an interesting potential for aerobraking, aerocapture and for de-orbiting. This paper summarizes the results of these activities, which are being more and more refined as the work proceeds, including the definition and analysis of the mission scenario, the aerodynamic, aerothermodynamic, mechanical and structural analyses and the technical definition of avionics, instrumentation and main subsystems.

  13. Quantitative and empirical demonstration of the Matthew effect in a study of career longevity

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Alexander M.; Jung, Woo-Sung; Yang, Jae-Suk; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2011-01-01

    The Matthew effect refers to the adage written some two-thousand years ago in the Gospel of St. Matthew: “For to all those who have, more will be given.” Even two millennia later, this idiom is used by sociologists to qualitatively describe the dynamics of individual progress and the interplay between status and reward. Quantitative studies of professional careers are traditionally limited by the difficulty in measuring progress and the lack of data on individual careers. However, in some professions, there are well-defined metrics that quantify career longevity, success, and prowess, which together contribute to the overall success rating for an individual employee. Here we demonstrate testable evidence of the age-old Matthew “rich get richer” effect, wherein the longevity and past success of an individual lead to a cumulative advantage in further developing his or her career. We develop an exactly solvable stochastic career progress model that quantitatively incorporates the Matthew effect and validate our model predictions for several competitive professions. We test our model on the careers of 400,000 scientists using data from six high-impact journals and further confirm our findings by testing the model on the careers of more than 20,000 athletes in four sports leagues. Our model highlights the importance of early career development, showing that many careers are stunted by the relative disadvantage associated with inexperience. PMID:21173276

  14. Design of the Massachusetts Childhood Obesity Research Demonstration (MA-CORD) Study

    PubMed Central

    Blaine, Rachel E.; Davison, Kirsten K.; Gortmaker, Steven; Anand, Shikha; Falbe, Jennifer; Kwass, Jo-Ann; Perkins, Meghan; Giles, Catherine; Criss, Shaniece; Colchamiro, Rachel; Woo Baidal, Jennifer; Land, Thomas; Smith, Lauren

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Childhood obesity is highly prevalent, is associated with both short- and long-term adverse outcomes, disproportionately affects racial/ethnic minority and economically deprived children, and represents a major threat to public health. Among the most promising approaches for its prevention and management are multilevel, multisector strategies. Methods/Design: The Massachusetts Childhood Obesity Research Demonstration (MA-CORD) Study was a comprehensive, systematic intervention to prevent and reduce childhood obesity among low-income children ages 2–12 years in two selected cities in Massachusetts. Building on the Obesity Chronic Care Model, MA-CORD expanded a state public health department community-level obesity prevention initiative that incorporated evidence-based interventions in primary healthcare, the Women, Infants, and Children program, early care and education, schools/afterschool programs, as well as community-wide programs to improve food, beverage, physical activity (PA), and messaging environments. The study used a combination of pre– and post–time series and quasi-experimental designs to examine the extent to which the intervention resulted in changes in BMI, individual-level lifestyle behaviors, satisfaction with healthcare services, and quality of life among children, as well as changes in health policies, programs, and environments in the two intervention cities, compared to a comparison city. The intervention period was 2 years. Conclusions: MA-CORD will determine the extent to which a multisetting, multilevel intervention that integrates activities in primary care with broader public health interventions in schools, early care and education, and the community at large can improve children's dietary and PA behaviors and ultimately reduce obesity in low-income children. PMID:25469676

  15. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act permit modifications and the functional equivalency demonstration: a case study

    SciTech Connect

    Elsberry, K.; Garcia, P.; Carnes, R.; Kinker, J.; Loehr, C; Lyon, W.

    1996-02-01

    Hazardous waste operating permits issued under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) often impose requirements that specific components and equipment be used. Consequently, changing these items, may first require that the owner/operator request a potentially time-consuming and costly permit modification. However, the owner/operator may demonstrate that a modification is not required because the planned changes are ``functionally equivalent.`` The Controlled-Air Incinerator at Los Alamos National Laboratory is scheduled for maintenance and improvements. The incinerator`s carbon adsorption unit/high efficiency particulate air filtration system, was redesigned to improve reliability and minimize maintenance. A study was performed to determine whether the redesigned unit would qualify as functionally equivalent to the original component. In performing this study, the following steps were taken: (a) the key performance factors were identified; (b) performance data describing the existing unit were obtained; (c) performance of both the existing and redesigned units was simulated; and (d) the performance data were compared to ascertain whether the components could qualify as functionally equivalent. In this case, the key performance data included gas residence time and distribution of flow over the activated carbon. Because both units were custom designed and fabricated, a simple comparison of manufacturers` specifications was impossible. Therefore, numerical simulation of each unit design was performed using the TEMPEST thermal-hydraulic computer code to model isothermal hydrodynamic performance under steady-state conditions. The results of residence time calculations from the model were coupled with flow proportion and sampled using a Monte Carlo-style simulation to derive distributions that describe the predicted residence times.

  16. A Participatory Action Research Study of Nature Education in Nature: Towards Community-Based Eco-Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eryaman, Mustafa Yunus; Yalcin-Ozdilek, Sukran; Okur, Emel; Cetinkaya, Zeynep; Uygun, Selcuk

    2010-01-01

    Contemporary nature education is exploring different ways to develop awareness for change and initiate action. Such educational activities go beyond creating understanding and awareness in order to develop a sense of commitment for individual and collective action. This participatory action research study aimed to improve teachers' sensitiveness…

  17. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1988-01-01

    Describes three flame test demonstrations including "Student-Presented Demonstrations on the Colors of Transition Metal Complexes,""A Flame Test Demonstration Device," and "Vivid Flame Tests." Preparation and procedures are discussed. Included in the first demonstration is an evaluation scheme for grading student demonstrations. (CW)

  18. NAS battery demonstration at American Electric Power:a study for the DOE energy storage program.

    SciTech Connect

    Newmiller, Jeff; Norris, Benjamin L. (Norris Energy Consulting Company, Martinez, CA); Peek, Georgianne Huff

    2006-03-01

    The first U.S. demonstration of the NGK sodium/sulfur battery technology was launched in August 2002 when a prototype system was installed at a commercial office building in Gahanna, Ohio. American Electric Power served as the host utility that provided the office space and technical support throughout the project. The system was used to both reduce demand peaks (peak-shaving operation) and to mitigate grid power disturbances (power quality operation) at the demonstration site. This report documents the results of the demonstration, provides an economic analysis of a commercial sodium/sulfur battery energy storage system at a typical site, and describes a side-by-side demonstration of the capabilities of the sodium/sulfur battery system, a lead-acid battery system, and a flywheel-based energy storage system in a power quality application.

  19. The Environmental Action and Philosophy Matrix: An Exploratory Study of the Environmental Attitudes of Recreation Management and Environmental Studies Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Jeremy R.; Simpson, Steven; Elfessi, Abdulaziz M.

    2011-01-01

    This study is a comparative analysis of the environmental philosophies of college undergraduates enrolled in a Midwestern university. Two courses were used for the research, one from a recreation management curriculum and the other from environmental studies. The study utilized a survey instrument called the Environmental Action and Philosophy…

  20. Separation and preconcentration phenomena in internally heated poly(dimethylsilicone) capillaries: preliminary modelling and demonstration studies.

    PubMed

    Rezgui, N D; Kanu, A B; Waters, K E; Grant, B M B; Reader, A J; Thomas, C L P

    2005-05-01

    The concept of achieving low-resolution separations in internally heated capillary membranes is discussed in terms of controlling the diffusion coefficients of volatile organic compounds in poly(dimethylsilicone) membranes in space and time. The behaviour of 1,1,1-trichloroethane in polydimethylsilicone was used in conjunction with a mixed-physics finite element model, incorporating second order partial differential equations, to describe time and spatial variations of mass-flux, membrane temperature and diffusion coefficients. The model, coded with Femlab, predicted highly non-linear diffusion coefficient profiles resulting from temperature programming a 500 [micro sign]m thick membrane, with an increase in the diffusion coefficient of approximately 30% in the last 30% of the membrane thickness. Simulations of sampling hypothetical analytes, with disparate temperature dependent diffusion coefficient relationships, predicted distinct thermal desorption profiles with selectivities that reflected the extent of diffusion through the membrane. The predicted desorption profiles of these analytes also indicated that low resolution separations were possible. An internally heated poly(dimethylsilicone) capillary membrane was constructed from a 10 cm long, 1.5 mm od capillary with 0.5 mm thick walls. Thirteen aqueous standards of volatile organic compounds of environmental significance were studied, and low-resolution separations were indicated, with temperature programming of the membrane enabling desorption profiles to be differentiated. Further, analytically useful relationships in the [micro sign]g cm(-3) concentration range were demonstrated with correlation coefficients >0.96 observed for linear regressions of desorption profile intensities to analyte concentrations. PMID:15852148

  1. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Presented are three demonstrations for chemical education. The activities include: (1) demonstration of vapor pressure; (2) a multicolored luminol-based chemiluminescence demonstration; and (3) a Charles's Law/Vapor pressure apparatus. (RH)

  2. Reflectance Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kowalski, Frank

    1993-01-01

    Presents a demonstration in which a mirror "disappears" upon rotation. The author has used the demonstration with students from fourth grade up through college. Suggestions are given for making the demonstration into a permanent hallway display. (MVL)

  3. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1982-01-01

    Three chemistry demonstrations are described: (1) partition coefficients; (2) Rutherford simulation experiment; and (3) demonstration of the powerful oxidizing property of dimanganeseheptoxide. Background information, materials needed, and procedures are provided for each demonstration. (JN)

  4. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1981-01-01

    Provides procedures for demonstrations: (1) the ferrioxalate actinometer, which demonstrates a photochemical reaction; and (2) the silver mirror, which demonstrates the reduction of a metal salt to the metal and/or the reducing power of sugars. (CS)

  5. Resolving Leadership Dilemmas in New Zealand Kindergartens: An Action Research Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cardno, Carol; Reynolds, Bronwyn

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine dilemmas encountered by kindergarten head teachers with the further aim of developing their capability to recognise and resolve "leadership dilemmas". Design/methodology/approach: Action research was used to conduct a three-phase study involving 16 kindergarten head teachers and six system managers…

  6. An Action Research Study of Student Self-Assessment in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walser, Tamara M.

    2009-01-01

    Although student self-assessment is considered a critical component of assessment for learning, its use and related research are rare in higher education. This article describes an action research study of self-assessment as an instructional strategy in two university courses. Results indicate that self-assessment exercises provided students the…

  7. How Trainee Music Teachers Learn about Teaching by Talking to Each Other: An Action Research Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cain, Tim

    2011-01-01

    This article presents an action research study into how trainee music teachers in England use a structured discussion process called "Collegial Consultation" to learn about teaching. The research shows that, in Collegial Consultation, trainees learn from each other by offering several solutions to a problem, offering reasons for their ideas,…

  8. Using Professional Development to Improve Elementary Teachers' Mathematics Teaching: An Action Research Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Good, Leslie

    2009-01-01

    Research indicates that it is common for elementary teachers to possess limited mathematics content knowledge, high levels of math anxiety, and low levels of mathematics teacher efficacy. Assuming action research as the chosen methodology, this research study was developed with the ultimate goal of improving how elementary teachers in my district…

  9. Exploring Student Experiences of Belonging within an Urban High School Choral Ensemble: An Action Research Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Elizabeth Cassidy

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this action research study was to describe adolescent singers' experiences of belonging within one urban high school choral ensemble. Understanding student perspectives on belonging within music ensembles can assist choral educators, parents and administrators in order to more fully support adolescent emotional and social…

  10. A Community Organizes for Action: A Case Study of the Mon-Yough Region in Pennsylvania.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avery, Robert W.; Chesler, Herbert A.

    This case study examines the development and problems of the Mon-Yough Community Action Committee, Inc. (MYCAC), one of the local anti-poverty agencies in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania. The agency's major effort is to overcome problems created by the decline of the local steel industry by supporting existing welfare agencies, and through such…

  11. Implementing an Action Research Project: A Case Study in Making Decisions and Managing Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenbank, Paul

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the challenges involved in implementing an action research project. It discusses a project which uses a series of interventions (unfreezing techniques, cases studies in conjunction with analogical encoding and lecturer input) to encourage students to critically reflect on their approach to career decision-making. This paper…

  12. A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Study of Community Mural Making and Social Action Art Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossetto, Erica

    2012-01-01

    Through a hermeneutic phenomenological study of interview data from 8 community artists, the author sought to discover commonalities and differences in the worldviews and philosophies of self that underlie community mural making as they relate to art therapy as social action and art therapy practice within a traditional Western cultural framework.…

  13. Training and Work Organisation: An Action-Research Study in a Sales and Distribution Company

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernardes, Alda Cristina; Lopes, Albino Pedro

    2005-01-01

    This study seeks to define a method of designing work-linked training, based on day-to-day work practices and the collaboration between all those involved. From diagnosis to evaluation, no training is designed or given without considering the opinions and interests of the parties involved. The method used is based on action research (AR) and on…

  14. Developing Pedagogical Content Knowledge of Science Teachers through Action Research: A Case Study from Pakistan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halai, Nelofer; Khan, Manzoor Ali

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study is to analyze the action research undertaken by Khan as a teacher researcher in a private school as part of the degree requirement of his M.Ed. program in Teacher Education at the Aga Khan University, Institute for Educational Development. The purpose of this analysis undertaken by the first author and supervisor of the study…

  15. An Action Research Study on the Effect of Interactive Technology and Active Learning on Student Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bear, Teresa J.

    2013-01-01

    This quantitative action science research study utilized a causal-comparative experimental research design in order to determine if the use of student response systems (clickers), as an active learning strategy in a community college course, improved student performance in the course. Students in the experimental group (n = 26) used clickers to…

  16. Seeking New Ways of Living Community in the Classroom and the World: An Action Research Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Action research is a method of examining one's own practice through reflection and critical self-study. In this paper, the author considers her experience teaching a two-day lesson on connections and relationships in William Forsythe's dance "One Flat Thing, reproduced" (2000) and the accompanying website, Synchronous Objects. The author reviews…

  17. A Case Study Examining Change in Teacher Beliefs through Collaborative Action Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaino, Katrin; Holbrook, Jack; Rannikmae, Miia

    2013-01-01

    The main goal of this study was to explore the role of collaborative action research in eliciting change in teacher beliefs. The beliefs were those of five chemistry teachers in implementing a new teaching approach, geared to enhancing students' scientific and technological literacy (STL). The teacher beliefs were analysed based on Ajzen's Theory…

  18. Service Learning Experience and Undergraduate Leadership Behaviors: An Action Research Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenary, Judy

    2010-01-01

    Service-learning has been shown to be an effective practice that positively affects students' academic achievement, self-esteem, and problem-solving skills (Billig, 2002; Eyler & Giles, 1999; Wilczenski & Coomey, 2007). This mixed-method action research case study was conducted to explore the possible link between service-learning experience and…

  19. Learning How to Manage Bias: A Case Study of Youth Participatory Action Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirshner, Ben; Pozzoboni, Kristen; Jones, Hannah

    2011-01-01

    Youth programs that are organized around intellectually challenging, socially relevant projects create opportunities for deep cognitive engagement. One type of authentic project that deserves attention from applied developmental scientists is youth participatory action research (YPAR), in which participants study a problem relevant to young…

  20. Effects of Information, Guidance, and Actions on Postsecondary Destinations: A Study of Talent Loss.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plank, Stephen B.; Jordan, Will J.

    2001-01-01

    Uses National Educational Longitudinal Study data for approximately 25,000 students to show that information about higher education, guidance, and essential preparatory actions taken by secondary school students influences whether they will attend postsecondary education institutions within 2 years of high school graduation, and the types of…

  1. Characterizing Teaching Effectiveness in the Joint Action Theory in Didactics: An Exploratory Study in Primary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sensevy, Gérard

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an exploratory study of two consecutive reading sessions conducted in primary school by two different teachers. Our purpose is twofold. From a theoretical viewpoint, we propose a tentative set of conditions of teaching effectiveness by relying on the Joint Action Theory in Didactics. From a methodological viewpoint, drawing on…

  2. An Action Research Study of Effective and Efficient Rehearsals in a Grade 8 Band Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferley, Maureen

    2007-01-01

    Involving 28 grade eight students, this action research study examined strategies that lead to effective and efficient band rehearsals at the junior high level. Data was gathered concerning the proportion of instructional time spent on teaching concepts and skills, on active music making, and on classroom management. From this, and a review of the…

  3. Reflective Practice and Motion Sickness: Thoughts on the First North American Action Research Study Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowell, Lonnie; Inoue, Noriyuki; Getz, Cheryl

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the experience of an action research "Study Day" to investigate development of a culture of reflective practice among educators. Shared recognition of the importance of reflective practice in education is now a well-established part of both pre-service preparation and in-service work experience for educators. Osterman…

  4. Exploring a Science Teacher's Uncertainty with Integrating Engineering Design: An Action Research Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capobianco, Brenda M.

    2011-01-01

    This study examines a fifth grade science teacher's attempts at integrating engineering design using the construct of uncertainty. Collaborative action research served as a supportive mechanism to uncover and confront the teacher's uncertainties. Data were gathered through semi-structured interviews, reflections, classroom observations, lesson…

  5. An Intervention to Increase the Use of Asthma Action Plans in Schools: A MASNRN Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pulcini, Joyce; DeSisto, Marie C.; McIntyre, C. Lynne

    2007-01-01

    School nurses, in collaboration with primary care providers (PCPs), can work to better manage asthma by using the Asthma Action Plan (AAP) with peak flow monitoring. The aim of this pilot study was to determine the effectiveness of an intervention to increase the number of AAPs in schools for students with asthma by having school nurses provide…

  6. Self-Study in Teaching and Teacher Development: A Call to Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pithouse, Kathleen; Mitchell, Claudia; Weber, Sandra

    2009-01-01

    This article maps out key features of self-study in teaching and teacher development, particularly in relation to social action. As teacher educator-researchers, we have become increasingly interested in how self-reflexivity in teaching and teacher development can illuminate social and educational challenges that have resonance beyond the self and…

  7. Teachers' Continuation of Action Research Elements after Conducting Studies during a Master's Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, Johanna S.

    2013-01-01

    Teachers are critical to student learning in the classroom, and just like students, teachers perform better when they are able to make choices based on what is relevant to them. Action research is a way for teachers to systematically inquire and reflect to make necessary improvements in practice for student learning. This study involved teachers…

  8. Interdisciplinary Literacy through Social Media in the Mathematics Classroom: An Action Research Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casey, Gail

    2013-01-01

    This article looks at how social and participatory media can be used to strengthen interdisciplinary literacy and connects the multimodality of social environments with Middle-Years Mathematics curriculum and delivery. The article reports on part of an eighteen months action research study in an Australian public high school within the…

  9. The Treatment of Maladaptive Shame in Borderline Personality Disorder: A Pilot Study of "Opposite Action"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rizvi, Shireen L.; Linehan, Marsha M.

    2005-01-01

    This study sought to pilot test a short-term intervention for maladaptive shame in borderline personality disorder (BPD) based on the skill of "opposite action" from dialectical behavior therapy. Five women with BPD were treated with the intervention using a single-subject, multiple-baseline design. Results indicate that, although state ratings of…

  10. Habitual vs Non-Habitual Manual Actions: An ERP Study on Overt Movement Execution

    PubMed Central

    Westerholz, Jan; Schack, Thomas; Schütz, Christoph; Koester, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    This study explored the neurophysiological mechanisms underlying the planning and execution of an overt goal-related handle rotation task. More specifically, we studied the neural basis of motor actions concerning the influence of the grasp choice. The aim of the present study was to differentiate cerebral activity between grips executed in a habitual and a non-habitual mode, and between specified and free grip choices. To our knowledge, this is the first study to differentiate cerebral activity underlying overt goal-related actions executed with a focus on the habitual mode. In a handle rotation task, participants had to use thumb-toward (habitual) or thumb-away (non-habitual) grips to rotate a handle to a given target position. Reaction and reach times were shorter for the habitual compared to the non-habitual mode indicating that the habitual mode requires less cognitive processing effort than the non-habitual mode. Neural processes for action execution (measured by event-related potentials (ERPs)) differed between habitual and non-habitual conditions. We found differential activity between habitual and non-habitual conditions in left and right frontal areas from −600 to 200 ms time-locked to reaching the target position. No differential neural activity could be traced for the specification of the grip. The results suggested that the frontal negativity reflected increased difficulty in movement precision control in the non-habitual mode compared to the habitual mode during the homing in phase of grasp and rotation actions. PMID:24691654

  11. Education as Sustainability: An Action Research Study of the Burns Model of Sustainability Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Heather

    2009-01-01

    Postsecondary teaching and learning must be reoriented to equip learners with the knowledge, skills, and values they will need for creating a more sustainable world. This action research study examined the effects of implementing the "Burns model of sustainability pedagogy" in university courses taught by the researcher. This model is comprised of…

  12. An Action Research Study Designed to Implement Student Negotiation to Improve Speaking Classroom Practice in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uztosun, Mehmet Sercan; Skinner, Nigel; Cadorath, Jill

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports the second stage of an action research study designed to improve the effectiveness of speaking classes through negotiating the lesson contents with students. The data were collected through interviews, questionnaires and observations as a way of eliciting students' views. The research, conducted in an English language…

  13. An Action Research Study: Using Classroom Guidance Lessons to Teach Middle School Students about Sexual Harassment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, Rebecca C.

    2006-01-01

    This article describes a three-part classroom guidance lesson that teaches middle school students the definition of sexual harassment, the difference between flirting and sexual harassment, and the harmful effects of sexual harassment. An action research study evaluated the effectiveness of the lessons in decreasing referrals for sexual harassment…

  14. Joint Action in Didactics and Classroom Ecology: Comparing Theories Using a Case Study in Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amade-Escot, Chantal; Venturini, Patrice

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the respective contribution of two theoretical approaches to teaching and learning: the classroom ecology (CE) framework from Anglo-American research and the joint action in didactics (JAD) framework, which is part of French "didactique" research. This theoretical comparison is grounded in data from a case study in a…

  15. Dialogic Construction and Reflective Practice: A Teacher Educator's Action Research Study of Teacher as Learner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haley, Marjorie; Wesley-Nero, Sabrina

    This paper reports on an action research study on the use of reflective practice by a teacher educator. It highlights how the teacher educator co-constructed knowledge with a doctoral student within reflective environments, examining teaching practices, and analyzed dialogic perspectives. Using journals as a primary means of reflection allowed the…

  16. An Evaluation of Professional Development to Improve Teachers' Perspectives and Behaviors: An Action Research Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beckford-Young, Paulette Vivienne

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this action research study was to conduct a professional development activity to provide content-area teachers with academic vocabulary strategies to be implemented during instruction on a daily basis. Professional development is essential for teachers to gain new knowledge and skills in order to hone their craft to improve student…

  17. Scientist-Teacher Partnerships as Professional Development: An Action Research Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willcuts, Meredith Harris

    2009-01-01

    The overall purpose of this action research study was to explore the experiences of ten middle school science teachers involved in a three-year partnership program between scientists and teachers at a Department of Energy national laboratory, including the impact of the program on their professional development, and to improve the partnership…

  18. Applying the Participatory Action Research Model to the Study of Social Inclusion at Worksites.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Hyun-Sook; Gonsier-Gerdin, Jean; Hoffman, Stacey; Whaley, Susan; Yount, Michael

    1998-01-01

    A study used participatory action research (PAR) to explore social inclusion/relationships at worksites of 10 students (ages 17-21). The participatory intervention process assisted teachers and job coaches in making constructive changes in transition work experience programs to provide social opportunities for students and help them become part of…

  19. We Did It Together: A Participatory Action Research Study on Poverty and Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buettgen, Alexis; Richardson, Jason; Beckham, Kristie; Richardson, Kathy; Ward, Michelle; Riemer, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the perspective of both non-disabled and developmentally disabled people working together in a research project on poverty and disability. Our study used a participatory action research approach that challenges the norm of exclusion in the research process. Control of the research agenda has been inclusive and shared to…

  20. In-Service Teacher Training and Coaching on Marzano's Instructional Strategies: An Action Research Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Shenequa C.

    2014-01-01

    The focus of this action research study was the implementation of a professional development initiative comprised of two phases: a training program for teachers on Marzano's nine research-based instructional strategies, and the implementation, supported by follow-up coaching, during "Pear Mountain" High School's (a pseudonym) six-week…

  1. Task-Based Language Learning and Teaching: An Action-Research Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calvert, Megan; Sheen, Younghee

    2015-01-01

    The creation, implementation, and evaluation of language learning tasks remain a challenge for many teachers, especially those with limited experience with using tasks in their teaching. This action-research study reports on one teacher's experience of developing, implementing, critically reflecting on, and modifying a language learning task…

  2. Improving Middle School Parental Engagement in Transition to Common Core State Standards: An Action Research Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harla, Donna K.

    2014-01-01

    Parental involvement in schools is an important potential contributor to improving American education and making the U.S. more globally competitive. This qualitative and quantitative mixed-methodology action research study probed the viability of engaging parents around issues of educational improvement by inviting them to participate in training…

  3. Web 2.0 and Language Learners' Motivation: An Action Research Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anwaruddin, Sardar M.

    2013-01-01

    Based on the observation that most of my students use computer-based technology (CBT) in their daily activities, I used computer assisted language learning (CALL) as an intervention in this action research study, carried out at a university in Bangladesh. This CALL curriculum was focused on Web 2.0 and its applications for educational purposes.…

  4. Investigating the neural basis of cooperative joint action. An EEG hyperscanning study.

    PubMed

    Astolfi, L; Toppi, J; Vogel, P; Mattia, D; Babiloni, F; Ciaramidaro, A; Siniatchkin, M

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to investigate the neurophysiological basis of the cognitive functions underlying the execution of joint actions, by means of the recent technique called hyperscanning. Neuroelectrical hyperscanning is based on the simultaneous recording of brain activity from multiple subjects and includes the analysis of the functional relation between the brain activity of all the interacting individuals. We recorded simultaneous high density electroencephalography (hdEEG) from 16 pairs of subjects involved in a computerized joint action paradigm, with controlled levels of cooperation. Results of cortical connectivity analysis returned significant differences, in terms of inter-brain functional causal links, between the condition of cooperative joint action and a condition in which the subjects were told they were interacting with a PC, while actually interacting with another human subject. Such differences, described by selected brain connectivity indices, point toward an integration between the two subjects' brain activity in the cooperative condition, with respect to control conditions. PMID:25571089

  5. The association between protective actions and homicide risk: findings from the Oklahoma Lethality Assessment Study.

    PubMed

    Messing, Jill Theresa; Campbell, Jacquelyn C; Brown, Sheryll; Patchell, Beverly; Androff, David K; Wilson, Janet Sullivan

    2014-01-01

    This study focuses on the relationship between women's risk of homicide as measured by the Danger Assessment and 13 protective actions. Participants (N = 432) experienced an incident of police involved intimate partner violence (IPV) and subsequently completed a structured telephone interview. Most women in this sample experienced severe violence and were classified as being at high risk for homicide. Participants engaged in an average of 3.81 (SD = 2.73) protective actions. With the exception of the use of formal domestic violence services, women in the high-risk category were significantly more likely than women in the lower risk category to have used each of the protective actions examined. Implications for research and practice are discussed. PMID:25199385

  6. Development of Criteria to Measure the Extent of Implementation and the Effectiveness of Demonstration in Vocational Education. Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Development Associates, Inc., Arlington, VA.

    This document presents case studies of eight demonstration projects selected to assess the practicality and feasibility of a monograph for improving and measuring the impact of vocational education demonstration projects. An introduction provides background of the project that developed that monograph and information on the case studies, including…

  7. Regulators of Androgen Action Resource: a one-stop shop for the comprehensive study of androgen receptor action.

    PubMed

    DePriest, Adam D; Fiandalo, Michael V; Schlanger, Simon; Heemers, Frederike; Mohler, James L; Liu, Song; Heemers, Hannelore V

    2016-01-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that is the main target for treatment of non-organ-confined prostate cancer (CaP). Failure of life-prolonging AR-targeting androgen deprivation therapy is due to flexibility in steroidogenic pathways that control intracrine androgen levels and variability in the AR transcriptional output. Androgen biosynthesis enzymes, androgen transporters and AR-associated coregulators are attractive novel CaP treatment targets. These proteins, however, are characterized by multiple transcript variants and isoforms, are subject to genomic alterations, and are differentially expressed among CaPs. Determining their therapeutic potential requires evaluation of extensive, diverse datasets that are dispersed over multiple databases, websites and literature reports. Mining and integrating these datasets are cumbersome, time-consuming tasks and provide only snapshots of relevant information. To overcome this impediment to effective, efficient study of AR and potential drug targets, we developed the Regulators of Androgen Action Resource (RAAR), a non-redundant, curated and user-friendly searchable web interface. RAAR centralizes information on gene function, clinical relevance, and resources for 55 genes that encode proteins involved in biosynthesis, metabolism and transport of androgens and for 274 AR-associated coregulator genes. Data in RAAR are organized in two levels: (i) Information pertaining to production of androgens is contained in a 'pre-receptor level' database, and coregulator gene information is provided in a 'post-receptor level' database, and (ii) an 'other resources' database contains links to additional databases that are complementary to and useful to pursue further the information provided in RAAR. For each of its 329 entries, RAAR provides access to more than 20 well-curated publicly available databases, and thus, access to thousands of data points. Hyperlinks provide direct access to gene

  8. Regulators of Androgen Action Resource: a one-stop shop for the comprehensive study of androgen receptor action

    PubMed Central

    Fiandalo, Michael V.; Schlanger, Simon; Heemers, Frederike; Mohler, James L.; Liu, Song; Heemers, Hannelore V.

    2016-01-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that is the main target for treatment of non-organ-confined prostate cancer (CaP). Failure of life-prolonging AR-targeting androgen deprivation therapy is due to flexibility in steroidogenic pathways that control intracrine androgen levels and variability in the AR transcriptional output. Androgen biosynthesis enzymes, androgen transporters and AR-associated coregulators are attractive novel CaP treatment targets. These proteins, however, are characterized by multiple transcript variants and isoforms, are subject to genomic alterations, and are differentially expressed among CaPs. Determining their therapeutic potential requires evaluation of extensive, diverse datasets that are dispersed over multiple databases, websites and literature reports. Mining and integrating these datasets are cumbersome, time-consuming tasks and provide only snapshots of relevant information. To overcome this impediment to effective, efficient study of AR and potential drug targets, we developed the Regulators of Androgen Action Resource (RAAR), a non-redundant, curated and user-friendly searchable web interface. RAAR centralizes information on gene function, clinical relevance, and resources for 55 genes that encode proteins involved in biosynthesis, metabolism and transport of androgens and for 274 AR-associated coregulator genes. Data in RAAR are organized in two levels: (i) Information pertaining to production of androgens is contained in a ‘pre-receptor level’ database, and coregulator gene information is provided in a ‘post-receptor level’ database, and (ii) an ‘other resources’ database contains links to additional databases that are complementary to and useful to pursue further the information provided in RAAR. For each of its 329 entries, RAAR provides access to more than 20 well-curated publicly available databases, and thus, access to thousands of data points. Hyperlinks provide direct access to

  9. A case study of the development of environmental action projects from the framework of participatory action research within two middle school classrooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charmatz, Kim

    The purpose of this study was to understand student and teacher empowerment through a socially critical environmental education perspective. The main research question guiding this study was: How do participants make sense of a learning experience in which students design and carry out an environmental action project in their community? This study used participatory action research and critical theory as practical and theoretical frameworks. These frameworks were relevant as this study sought to examine social change, power, and relationships through participants' experiences. The context of this study was within one seventh and one eighth grade classroom participating in environmental projects. The study was conducted in spring 2005 with an additional follow-up data collection period during spring 2006. The school was located in a densely populated metropolitan suburb. Fifty-three students, a teacher researcher, and three science teachers participated. Data sources were written surveys, scores on Middle School Environmental Literacy Survey Instrument (MSELI), observations, interviews, and student work. This study used a mixed methodological approach. Quantitative data analysis involved dependent samples t-test scores on the MSELI before and after the completion of the projects. Qualitative data were analyzed using an inductive analysis approach. This study has implications for educators interested in democratic education. Environmental action projects provide a context for students and teachers to learn interdisciplinary content knowledge, develop personal beliefs, and learn ways to take action in their communities. This pedagogy has the potential to increase cooperation, communication, and tensions within school communities. Students' participation in the development of environmental action projects may lead to feelings of empowerment or being able to make a difference in their community, as an individual or member of a group. Future research is needed to discern

  10. Tested Demonstrations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1977-01-01

    Three demonstrations are described: paramagnetic properties of Fe(11) and Fe(111), the preparation of polyurethane foam: a lecture demonstration and the electrolysis of water-fuel cell reactions. A small discussion of the concepts demonstrated is included in each demonstration's description. (MR)

  11. Final corrective action study for the former CCC/USDA facility in Ramona, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.

    2011-04-20

    Past operations at a grain storage facility formerly leased and operated by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) in Ramona, Kansas, resulted in low concentrations of carbon tetrachloride in groundwater that slightly exceed the regulatory standard in only one location. As requested by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment, the CCC/USDA has prepared a Corrective Action Study (CAS) for the facility. The CAS examines corrective actions to address groundwater impacted by the former CCC/USDA facility but not releases caused by other potential groundwater contamination sources in Ramona. Four remedial alternatives were considered in the CAS. The recommended remedial alternative in the CAS consists of Environmental Use Control to prevent the inadvertent use of groundwater as a water supply source, coupled with groundwater monitoring to verify the continued natural improvement in groundwater quality. The Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) has directed Argonne National Laboratory to prepare a Corrective Action Study (CAS), consistent with guidance from the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE 2001a), for the CCC/USDA grain storage facility formerly located in Ramona, Kansas. This effort is pursuant to a KDHE (2007a) request. Although carbon tetrachloride levels at the Ramona site are low, they remain above the Kansas Tier 2 risk-based screening level (RBSL) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 5 {micro}g/L (Kansas 2003, 2004). In its request for the CAS, the KDHE (2007a) stated that, because of these levels, risk is associated with potential future exposure to contaminated groundwater. The KDHE therefore determined that additional measures are warranted to limit future use of the property and/or exposure to contaminated media as part of site closure. The KDHE further requested comparison of at least two corrective

  12. Systems definition study for shuttle demonstration flights of large space structures. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The development of large space structure technology is discussed, with emphasis on space fabricated structures which are automatically manufactured in space from sheet-strip materials and assembled on-orbit. Definition of a flight demonstration involving an Automated Beam Builder and the building and assembling of large structures is presented.

  13. Studies on the mechanisms of action of the herbicide safener CGA-92194

    SciTech Connect

    Zama, P.

    1986-01-01

    CGA-92194 is a herbicide safener that is used as a seed dressing agent to protect grain sorghum against metolachlor injury. The potential adverse phytotoxic effects and the mechanisms of the protective action of this safener were studied in laboratory experiments. Adverse phytotoxicity was assessed by comparing CGA-92194 and the herbicide safeners cyometrinil and flurazole for their effects on CO/sub 2/ fixation, protein, DNA, RNA and lipid synthesis of enzymatically isolated leaf cells of soybean. The safening action mechanisms of CGA-92194 were studied by examining the potential interactions of this safener with metolachlor at the levels of uptake and macromolecular syntheses in enzymatically isolated leaf mesophyll protoplasts of grain sorghum. When CGA-92194 and metolachlor were given simultaneously, CGA-92194 enhanced /sup 14/C-metolachlor uptake into the sorghum protoplasts in a concentration-dependent pattern. Treatments with metolachlor and CGA-92194 in combination inhibited the incorporation of /sup 14/C-uracil, /sup 3/H-thymidine and /sup 14/C-acetate into sorghum protoplast macromolecules less than metolachlor given alone, suggesting the potential involvement of a competitive antagonism in CGA-92194 mechanism of action. The metabolic activity and growth of sorghum seedlings grown from CGA-92194-pretreated seeds were lower than that of seedlings grown from untreated seeds at 10 or 20 days after planting. These results indicate that a safener-induced stimulation of the spontaneous or enzymatic conjugation of metolachlor with GSH is most likely involved in CGA-92194 protective action.

  14. An Ontology for Requesting Distant Robotic Action: A Case Study in Naming and Action Identification for Planning on the Mars Exploration Rover Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wales, Roxana C.; Shalin, Valerie L.; Bass, Deborah S.

    2004-01-01

    This paper focuses on the development and use of the abbreviated names as well as an emergent ontology associated with making requests for action of a distant robotic rover during the 2003-2004 NASA Mars Exploration Rover (MER) mission, run by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The infancy of the domain of Martian telerobotic science, in which specialists request work from a rover moving through the landscape, as well as the need to consider the interdisciplinary teams involved in the work required an empirical approach. The formulation of this ontology is grounded in human behavior and work practice. The purpose of this paper is to identify general issues for an ontology of action (specifically for requests for action), while maintaining sensitivity to the users, tools and the work system within a specific technical domain. We found that this ontology of action must take into account a dynamic environment, changing in response to the movement of the rover, changes on the rover itself, as well as be responsive to the purposeful intent of the science requestors. Analysis of MER mission events demonstrates that the work practice and even robotic tool usage changes over time. Therefore, an ontology must adapt and represent both incremental change and revolutionary change, and the ontology can never be more than a partial agreement on the conceptualizations involved. Although examined in a rather unique technical domain, the general issues pertain to the control of any complex, distributed work system as well as the archival record of its accomplishments.

  15. Case Study of The ARRA-Funded GSHP Demonstration at the Natural Sources Building, Montana Tech

    SciTech Connect

    Malhotra, Mini; Liu, Xiaobing

    2015-04-01

    Under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), 26 ground source heat pump (GSHP) projects were competitively selected in 2009 to demonstrate the benefits of GSHP systems and innovative technologies for cost reduction and/or performance improvement. One of the selected demonstration projects was proposed by Montana Tech of the University of Montana for a 56,000 sq ft, newly constructed, on-campus research facility – the Natural Resources Building (NRB) located in Butte, Montana. This demonstrated GSHP system consists of a 50 ton water-to-water heat pump and a closed-loop ground heat exchanger with two redundant 7.5 hp constant-speed pumps to use water in the nearby flooded mines as a heat source or heat sink. It works in conjunction with the originally installed steam HX and an aircooled chiller to provide space heating and cooling. It is coupled with the existing hot water and chilled water piping in the building and operates in the heating or cooling mode based on the outdoor air temperature. The ground loop pumps operate in conjunction with the existing pumps in the building hot and chilled water loops for the operation of the heat pump unit. The goal of this demonstration project is to validate the technical and economic feasibility of the demonstrated commercial-scale GSHP system in the region, and illustrate the feasibility of using mine waters as the heat sink and source for GSHP systems. Should the demonstration prove satisfactory and feasible, it will encourage similar GSHP applications using mine water, thus help save energy and reduce carbon emissions. The actual performance of the system is analyzed with available measured data for January through July 2014. The annual energy performance is predicted and compared with a baseline scenario, with the heating and cooling provided by the originally designed systems. The comparison is made in terms of energy savings, operating cost savings, cost-effectiveness, and environmental benefits. Finally

  16. Cells from Degenerative Intervertebral Discs Demonstrate Unfavorable Responses to Mechanical and Inflammatory Stimuli: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Sowa, Gwendolyn A.; Coelho, J. Paulo; Vo, Nam V.; Pacek, Corey; Westrick, Edward; Kang, James D.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Mechanical forces and inflammatory signaling influence intervertebral disc matrix homeostasis. We hypothesized that annulus fibrosus cells from degenerative discs would have altered responses to mechanical and inflammatory stimuli compared with cells isolated from normal discs. Design Annulus fibrosus cells were isolated from New Zealand White rabbits with normal and magnetic resonance imaging-confirmed degenerative discs created by annular stab. Cells were cultured with and without inflammatory and mechanical stimuli (tensile strain). After 4 or 24 hrs, the mRNA expression of inflammatory, catabolic, and anabolic genes was measured by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Results Baseline gene expression differences were noted between cells from normal and degenerative discs. Degenerative cells demonstrated a more proinflammatory response profile to inflammatory and mechanical stimuli and loss of the beneficial effects of mechanical signaling. Decreased expression of catabolic and anabolic genes was observed in degenerative cells under conditions of inflammatory and mechanical stimuli. Conclusions These data demonstrate that degenerative cells have a decreased capacity to respond positively to beneficial levels of mechanical strain and demonstrate an exaggerated response to an inflammatory stimulus. This may, in part, help to explain differential responses to motion-based therapies in patients with intervertebral disc degeneration. PMID:22760106

  17. Factors Influencing Blount County, Tennessee Home Demonstration Club Members' Use of Consumer Credit. A Research Summary of a Graduate Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neas, Ethel Josephine; And Others

    A study was made of the use of consumer credit by Home Demonstration Club (HDC) members in Blount County, Tennessee, as a basis for planning educational programs. Data were secured by group interviews from 237 Home Demonstration Club members representing 24 clubs. The data were classified according to the members use of consumer credit: those who…

  18. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Provides instructions on conducting four demonstrations for the chemistry classroom. Outlines procedures for demonstrations dealing with coupled oscillations, the evaporation of liquids, thioxanthone sulfone radical anion, and the control of variables and conservation of matter. (TW)

  19. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1990-01-01

    Presented are two demonstrations; "Heat of Solution and Colligative Properties: An Illustration of Enthalpy and Entropy," and "A Vapor Pressure Demonstration." Included are lists of materials and experimental procedures. Apparatus needed are illustrated. (CW)

  20. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1978-01-01

    Presents two demonstrations; one on Boyle's Law, to illustrate the gas law and serve as a challenging problem for the students; the other is a modified Color Blind Traffic Light demonstration in which the oscillating reactions were speeded up. (GA)

  1. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1978-01-01

    Two demonstrations are described which are suitable for introductory chemistry classes. The first involves the precipitation of silver, and the second is a demonstration of the relationship between rate constants and equilibrium constants using water and beakers. (BB)

  2. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1981-01-01

    Presents: (1) a simple demonstration which illustrates the driving force of entropy using the familiar effects of the negative thermal expansion coefficient of rubber; and (2) a demonstration of tetrahedral bonding using soap films. (CS)

  3. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Presented are two demonstrations including a variation of the iodine clock reaction, and a simple demonstration of refractive index. The materials, procedures, and a discussion of probable results are given for each. (CW)

  4. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1981-01-01

    Two demonstrations are described: (1) red cabbage and electrolysis of water to bring together acid/base and electrochemical concepts; and (2) a model to demonstrate acid/base conjugate pairs utilizing magnets. (SK)

  5. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1988-01-01

    Describes two demonstrations for college level chemistry courses including: "Electrochemical Cells Using Sodium Silicate" and "A Simple, Vivid Demonstration of Selective Precipitation." Lists materials, preparation, procedures, and precautions. (CW)

  6. The role of action effects in 12-month-olds' action control: a comparison of televised model and live model.

    PubMed

    Klein, Annette M; Hauf, Petra; Aschersleben, Gisa

    2006-12-01

    The present study investigated differences in infant imitation after watching a televised model and a live model and addressed the issue of whether action effects influence infants' action control in both cases. In a 2x2 design, 12-month-old infants observed a live or a televised model performing a three-step action sequence, in which either the 2nd or the 3rd action step was combined with an acoustical action effect. We assumed that infants would use the observed action-effect relations for their own action control in the test phase afterwards. Even though results exhibited differences in the absolute amount of imitation between the two demonstration groups, both groups showed similar result patterns regarding the action effect manipulation: infants imitated the action step that was followed by a salient action effect more often and mostly as the first target action, emphasizing the important role of action effects in infants' action control. PMID:17138306

  7. Can discrete joint action be synergistic? Studying the stabilization of interpersonal hand coordination.

    PubMed

    Romero, Veronica; Kallen, Rachel; Riley, Michael A; Richardson, Michael J

    2015-10-01

    The human perceptual-motor system is tightly coupled to the physical and informational dynamics of a task environment. These dynamics operate to constrain the high-dimensional order of the human movement system into low-dimensional, task-specific synergies-functional groupings of structural elements that are temporarily constrained to act as a single coordinated unit. The aim of the current study was to determine whether synergistic processes operate when coacting individuals coordinate to perform a discrete joint-action task. Pairs of participants sat next to each other and each used 1 arm to complete a pointer-to-target task. Using the uncontrolled manifold (UCM) analysis for the first time in a discrete joint action, the structure of joint-angle variance was examined to determine whether there was synergistic organization of the degrees of freedom employed at the interpersonal or intrapersonal levels. The results revealed that the motor actions performed by coactors were synergistically organized at both the interpersonal and intrapersonal levels. More importantly, however, the interpersonal synergy was found to be significantly stronger than the intrapersonal synergies. Accordingly, the results provide clear evidence that coacting individuals can become temporarily organized to form single synergistic 2-person systems during performance of a discrete joint action. PMID:26052696

  8. Can Discrete Joint Action Be Synergistic? Studying the Stabilization of Interpersonal Hand Coordination

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Veronica; Kallen, Rachel; Riley, Michael A.; Richardson, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    The human perceptual-motor system is tightly coupled to the physical and informational dynamics of a task environment. These dynamics operate to constrain the high-dimensional order of the human movement system into low-dimensional, task-specific synergies—functional groupings of structural elements that are temporarily constrained to act as a single coordinated unit. The aim of the current study was to determine whether synergistic processes operate when coacting individuals coordinate to perform a discrete joint-action task. Pairs of participants sat next to each other and each used 1 arm to complete a pointer-to-target task. Using the uncontrolled manifold (UCM) analysis for the first time in a discrete joint action, the structure of joint-angle variance was examined to determine whether there was synergistic organization of the degrees of freedom employed at the interpersonal or intrapersonal levels. The results revealed that the motor actions performed by coactors were synergistically organized at both the interpersonal and intrapersonal levels. More importantly, however, the interpersonal synergy was found to be significantly stronger than the intrapersonal synergies. Accordingly, the results provide clear evidence that coacting individuals can become temporarily organized to form single synergistic 2-person systems during performance of a discrete joint action. PMID:26052696

  9. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Describes a demonstration involving the controlled combustion of a mixture of metals with black and smokeless powder in a small Erlenmeyer flask. Also describes demonstrations using a device that precludes breathing of hazardous vapors during class demonstrations; the device is easy to transport and use in rooms without sinks. (JN)

  10. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Describes two classroom chemistry demonstrations which focus on the descriptive chemistry of bromine and iodine. Outlines the chemicals and equipment needed, experimental procedures, and discussion of one demonstration of the oxidation states of bromine and iodine, and another demonstration of the oxidation states of iodine. (TW)

  11. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sands, Robert; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Procedures for two demonstrations are provided. The solubility of ammonia gas in water is demonstrated by introducing water into a closed can filled with the gas, collapsing the can. The second demonstration relates scale of standard reduction potentials to observed behavior of metals in reactions with hydrogen to produce hydrogen gas. (Author/JN)

  12. Demonstrating Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foy, Barry G.

    1977-01-01

    Two demonstrations are described. Materials and instructions for demonstrating movement of molecules into cytoplasm using agar blocks, phenolphthalein, and sodium hydroxide are given. A simple method for demonstrating that the rate of diffusion of a gas is inversely proportional to its molecular weight is also presented. (AJ)

  13. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1985-01-01

    List of materials needed, procedures used, and results obtained are provided for two demonstrations. The first is an inexpensive and quick method for demonstrating column chromatography of plant pigments of spinach extract. The second is a demonstration of cathodic protection by impressed current. (JN)

  14. Feasibility study of endoscopic x-ray luminescence computed tomography: Simulation demonstration and phantom application

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xueli; Liang, Jimin; Cao, Xin; Yang, Defu; Chen, Dongmei; Ripoll, Jorge; Tian, Jie

    2013-08-28

    Even though endoscopic fluorescence diffuse optical tomography (eFDOT) exhibits significant potential, currently its application is limited due to the existence of strong autofluorescence and the imaging inaccuracy caused by a very short source-detector distance. Motivated by the emerging X-ray luminescence computed tomography (XLCT) technology, we presented an endoscopic XLCT (eXLCT) methodology. In the methodology, the aperture angle of the objective was incorporated into the forward model, providing a more accurate description of light propagation. Numerical simulation with a heterogeneous geometry and an imaging experiment with a physical phantom were illustrated to demonstrate the feasibility of the presented eXLCT methodology.

  15. Systems definition study for shuttle demonstration flights of large space structures, Volume 2: Technical Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The development of large space structure (LSS) technology is discussed, with emphasis on space fabricated structures which are automatically manufactured in space from sheet-strip materials and assembled on-orbit. It is concluded that an LSS flight demonstration using an Automated Beam Builder and the orbiter as a construction base, could be performed in the 1983-1984 time period. The estimated cost is $24 million exclusive of shuttle launch costs. During the mission, a simple space platform could be constructed in-orbit to accommodate user requirements associated with earth viewing and materials exposure experiments needs.

  16. Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Newly Generated Liquid Waste Demonstration Project Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Herbst, A.K.

    2000-02-01

    A research, development, and demonstration project for the grouting of newly generated liquid waste (NGLW) at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center is considered feasible. NGLW is expected from process equipment waste, decontamination waste, analytical laboratory waste, fuel storage basin waste water, and high-level liquid waste evaporator condensate. The potential grouted waste would be classed as mixed low-level waste, stabilized and immobilized to meet RCRA LDR disposal in a grouting process in the CPP-604 facility, and then transported to the state.

  17. Studies on the mechanism of action of 1-beta-D-arabinofuranosyl-5-azacytosine (fazarabine) in mammalian lymphoblasts.

    PubMed

    Barchi, J J; Cooney, D A; Ahluwalia, G S; Gharehbaghi, K; Covey, J M; Hochman, I; Paull, K D; Jayaram, H N

    1996-05-01

    Fazarabine has shown activity in the panel of 60 cultured human tumor lines of the National Cancer Institute. COMPARE analyses relating correlation coefficients of other anticancer drugs with those of fazarabine suggest that this agent operates through a similar mode of action to that of cytarabine. Studies have been carried out both in culture and in vivo to examine the mechanism of action of fazarabine in P388 murine and Molt-4 human lymphoblasts. Authentic fazarabine nucleotide standards were prepared by chemical and enzymatic methods and characterized on HPLC by comparison to related pyrimidine nucleoside-5'-phosphates as well as by enzymatic digestion. Fazarabine inhibited the incorporation of labeled thymidine into DNA without influencing the synthesis of RNA or protein. Deoxycytidine overcomes this inhibition of DNA synthesis and also prevents the cytotoxicity of the drug to lymphoblasts, probably by competing for fazarabine uptake and metabolism. Fazarabine was rapidly phosphorylated in both cell lines; in P388 cells it was incorporated into DNA, where it continued to undergo the same type of ring opening and degradation as the free nucleoside. Alkaline elution studies demonstrated that exposure to the agent resulted in the formation of alkaline labile sites. Fazarabine also inhibited the methylation of deoxycytidine residues in DNA, but this effect was less pronounced than that produced by 5-azacytidine. Taken together, these studies suggest that fazarabine probably acts by arresting the synthesis and/or altering the structural integrity or functional competence of DNA. PMID:9414404

  18. An EEG study on the somatotopic organisation of sensorimotor cortex activation during action execution and observation in infancy

    PubMed Central

    de Klerk, Carina C.J.M.; Johnson, Mark H.; Southgate, Victoria

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that sensorimotor cortex activation is somatotopically-organised during action execution and observation in adulthood. Here we aimed to investigate the development of this phenomenon in infancy. We elicited arm and leg actions from 12-month-old infants and presented them, and a control group of adults, with videos of arm and leg actions while we measured their sensorimotor alpha suppression using EEG. Sensorimotor alpha suppression during action execution was somatotopically organised in 12-month-old infants: there was more suppression over the arm areas when infants performed reaching actions, and more suppression over the leg area when they performed kicking actions. Adults also showed somatotopically-organised activation during the observation of reaching and kicking actions. In contrast, infants did not show somatotopically-organised activation during action observation, but instead activated the arm areas when observing both reaching and kicking actions. We suggest that the somatotopic organisation of sensorimotor cortex activation during action observation may depend on infants’ understanding of the action goal and their expectations about how this goal will be achieved. PMID:26318840

  19. Observation and imitation of actions performed by humans, androids, and robots: an EMG study

    PubMed Central

    Hofree, Galit; Urgen, Burcu A.; Winkielman, Piotr; Saygin, Ayse P.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding others’ actions is essential for functioning in the physical and social world. In the past two decades research has shown that action perception involves the motor system, supporting theories that we understand others’ behavior via embodied motor simulation. Recently, empirical approach to action perception has been facilitated by using well-controlled artificial stimuli, such as robots. One broad question this approach can address is what aspects of similarity between the observer and the observed agent facilitate motor simulation. Since humans have evolved among other humans and animals, using artificial stimuli such as robots allows us to probe whether our social perceptual systems are specifically tuned to process other biological entities. In this study, we used humanoid robots with different degrees of human-likeness in appearance and motion along with electromyography (EMG) to measure muscle activity in participants’ arms while they either observed or imitated videos of three agents produce actions with their right arm. The agents were a Human (biological appearance and motion), a Robot (mechanical appearance and motion), and an Android (biological appearance and mechanical motion). Right arm muscle activity increased when participants imitated all agents. Increased muscle activation was found also in the stationary arm both during imitation and observation. Furthermore, muscle activity was sensitive to motion dynamics: activity was significantly stronger for imitation of the human than both mechanical agents. There was also a relationship between the dynamics of the muscle activity and motion dynamics in stimuli. Overall our data indicate that motor simulation is not limited to observation and imitation of agents with a biological appearance, but is also found for robots. However we also found sensitivity to human motion in the EMG responses. Combining data from multiple methods allows us to obtain a more complete picture of action

  20. Observation and imitation of actions performed by humans, androids, and robots: an EMG study.

    PubMed

    Hofree, Galit; Urgen, Burcu A; Winkielman, Piotr; Saygin, Ayse P

    2015-01-01

    Understanding others' actions is essential for functioning in the physical and social world. In the past two decades research has shown that action perception involves the motor system, supporting theories that we understand others' behavior via embodied motor simulation. Recently, empirical approach to action perception has been facilitated by using well-controlled artificial stimuli, such as robots. One broad question this approach can address is what aspects of similarity between the observer and the observed agent facilitate motor simulation. Since humans have evolved among other humans and animals, using artificial stimuli such as robots allows us to probe whether our social perceptual systems are specifically tuned to process other biological entities. In this study, we used humanoid robots with different degrees of human-likeness in appearance and motion along with electromyography (EMG) to measure muscle activity in participants' arms while they either observed or imitated videos of three agents produce actions with their right arm. The agents were a Human (biological appearance and motion), a Robot (mechanical appearance and motion), and an Android (biological appearance and mechanical motion). Right arm muscle activity increased when participants imitated all agents. Increased muscle activation was found also in the stationary arm both during imitation and observation. Furthermore, muscle activity was sensitive to motion dynamics: activity was significantly stronger for imitation of the human than both mechanical agents. There was also a relationship between the dynamics of the muscle activity and motion dynamics in stimuli. Overall our data indicate that motor simulation is not limited to observation and imitation of agents with a biological appearance, but is also found for robots. However we also found sensitivity to human motion in the EMG responses. Combining data from multiple methods allows us to obtain a more complete picture of action

  1. Demonstration and study of the dispersion of water waves with a computer-controlled ripple tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ströbel, Bernhard

    2011-06-01

    The design of a ripple tank built in an undergraduate student project is described. Water waves are excited acoustically using computer programmable wave shapes. The projected wave patterns are recorded with a video camera and analyzed quantitatively. From the propagation of wave packets in distilled water at three different depths, the phase and group velocities are measured in the frequency range from 2 to 50 Hz. Good agreement with theory is found. The propagation of wave trains of different shapes is recorded and explained on the basis of the stationary phase approximation. Various types of precursors are detected. For a depth slightly above the critical depth and thus nearly dispersion-free, the solitary-like propagation of a single pulse is observed. In shallow water, the compression of a chirped pulse is demonstrated. Circular waves produced by falling water drops are recorded and analyzed.

  2. Multi-long-slit Spectroscopy For Kinematic Studies. I. Implementation And Demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walterbos, Rene A. M.; Choi, J.; Cisneros, S.; Patterson, M.; Wu, C.

    2007-12-01

    Several methods exist for spectroscopy of ionized gas to measure the kinematics of galaxies. These include single long-slit spectroscopy, or integral field spectroscopy where a multi-fiber or lenslet-array feeds a spectrograph, or an imaging Fabry-Perot. We demonstrate here another method for 2-dimensional spectroscopy, using a mask with several parallel long slits in combination with a narrow band filter. This enables observations at H-alpha for up to 16 slits simultaneously with the Apache Point Observatory's ARC-3.5m telescope, using a conventional optical spectrograph (the Double Imaging Spectrograph). Compared to most multi-fiber and lenslet integral field instruments, this setup allows for larger field of view. For our system, the 16 slits are distributed over a 4x5 arcmin sq. area. Compared to a Fabry-Perot, our method can be faster for obtaining 2-D velocity fields for disk galaxies since we do not require scanning an etalon through all velocity channels. Complete 2-D coverage can be obtained with our method too by stepping the telescope in position between exposures. Galaxies at different redshifts or other emission lines can be observed by changing the narrow band filter. The implementation is very inexpensive in terms of hardware cost and involves only production of a set of multi-long-slit masks and suitable filters. The spectral resolution we can obtain is typical of that of a medium resolution spectrograph, about 2-4 Angstrom depending on slit width and grating. We demonstrate the implementation through observations of the Owl nebula and the nearby spiral M33. This research was supported by an award from Research Corporation.

  3. Improving Students' Study Habits by Demonstrating the Mnemonic Benefits of Semantic Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bugg, Julie M.; DeLosh, Edward L.; McDaniel, Mark A.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes an in-class exercise that illustrates the advantage of semantic over nonsemantic study habits. The exercise includes a survey of students' current study strategies, followed by the presentation of an abbreviated version of Craik and Tulving's(1975) classic levels-of-processing experiment. We observed significant benefits of…

  4. The CARN/ARNA Inaugural Study Day Inquiry: What Happens to Action Research after the Master's Degree?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shosh, Joseph M.; McAteer, Mary

    2016-01-01

    The Collaborative Action Research Network (CARN) held its first American study day on the east coast of the United States in conjunction with the Action Research Network of the Americas (ARNA) 2014 conference in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, USA. Study day participants visited three American secondary schools, one each in Pennsylvania, New York, and…

  5. Participatory Action Research and the Reconstruction of Teachers' Practical Thinking: Lesson Studies and Core Reflection. An Experience in Spain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez, Angel I.; Soto, Encarnacion; Servan, M. Jose

    2010-01-01

    Following the thoughts and topics we have discussed and worked on for a very long time with Bridget Somekh, we would like to present the theoretical relationship between lesson studies, action research and practical knowledge in teacher education. Inspired by the pedagogical philosophy of lesson studies, participatory action research, and core…

  6. Demonstration of digital radiographs by means of ink jet-printed paper copies: pilot study.

    PubMed

    Kirkhorn, T; Kehler, M; Nilsson, J; Lyttkens, K; Andersson, B; Holmer, N G

    1992-11-01

    Different digital medical images have been printed on paper with a continuous ink jet printer, and the quality has been evaluated. The emphasis has been on digital chest radiographs from a computed radiography system. The ink jet printing technique is described as well as the handling of the image data from image source to printer. Different versions of paper prints and viewing conditions were compared to find the optimum alternative. The evaluation has been performed to maximize the quality of the paper images to make them conform with the corresponding film prints and monitor images as much as possible. The continuous ink jet technique offers high-quality prints on paper at a considerably lower cost per copy compared with the cost of a film print. With a future switch-over from diagnosing of digital images on film to diagnosing them on monitors, hard copies for demonstration purposes will occasionally be needed. This need can be filled by ink jet-printed paper copies. PMID:1457540

  7. Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome: A case demonstrated by a cytogenetic study.

    PubMed

    Pokale, Yamini S; Jadhav, Ajinkya M; Kate, Ushang

    2012-01-01

    We present a case with a 4p terminal deletion, evidenced in GTG-banded chromosome study. Phenotypic signs described in the classical Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome were found on clinical examination of our patient. PMID:22754235

  8. DEMONSTRATION OF LOW COST, LOW BURDEN EXPOSURE MONITORING STRATEGIES FOR USE IN LONGITUDINAL COHORT STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A large longitudinal cohort study designed to evaluate the association between children's exposures to environmental agents and health outcomes presents many challenges for exposure monitoring. Exposure of the child must be measured for multiple chemicals through multiple path...

  9. 78 FR 58382 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on the Proposed U.S. 50 Study Crossing Over Sinepauxent...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-23

    ...This notice announces actions taken by the FHWA and other Federal agencies that are final within the meaning of 23 U.S.C. 139(l)(1). The action relates to the U.S. 50 Crossing over Sinepauxent Bay Study from MD 611 to MD 378 and 5th Street to Somerset Street located in the Town of Ocean City, Worcester County, Maryland. This action grants approval for the...

  10. ParticipACTION: Baseline assessment of the capacity available to the 'New ParticipACTION': A qualitative study of Canadian organizations

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Evaluation of the original ParticipACTION campaign effects focused on individual awareness, recall, and understanding. Less studied has been the impact such campaigns have had on the broader organizational capacity to mobilize and advocate for physical activity. With the relaunch of ParticipACTION, the purpose of this study was to qualitatively explore baseline organizational capacity to promote physical activity messages, programs, and services within the Canadian context. Methods Using a purposeful sampling strategy, we conducted semi-structured telephone interviews with 49 key informants representing a range of national, provincial, and local organizations with a mandate to promote physical activity. Interview data were analysed using a thematic analytic approach. Results Key informants painted a generally positive picture of current organizational capacity to promote physical activity messages, programs, and services in Canada. Will and leadership were clear strengths while infrastructure limitations remained the greatest concern. Some specific challenges included: 1) funding issues: the absence of core funding in a climate of shifting funding priorities; 2) the difficulty of working without a national physical activity policy (lack of leadership); 3) inconsistent provincial and educational sector level policies; and 4) a persistent focus on obesity rather than physical inactivity. Conclusion The data generated here can be utilized to monitor the future impact of ParticipACTION on enhancing and utilizing this organizational capacity. A range of indicators are suggested that could be used to illustrate ParticipACTION's impact on the broad field of physical activity promotion in the future. PMID:19995458

  11. Chitosan-poly(acrylic) acid polyionic complex: in vivo study to demonstrate prolonged gastric retention.

    PubMed

    Torrado, Susana; Prada, Pablo; de la Torre, Paloma M; Torrado, Santiago

    2004-02-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a chitosan-poly(acrylic) acid based controlled drug release system for gastric antibiotic delivery. Different mixtures of amoxicillin (A), chitosan (CS), and poly(acrylic) acid (PAA) were employed to obtain these polyionic complexes. A non-invasive method was employed for determining the gastric residence time of the formulations. It was studied the swelling behavior and drug release from these complexes. Gastric emptying rate study was performed by means of the [13C]octanoic acid breath test. The gastric emptying rates of two different formulations (conventional and gastric retentive system) were studied. Swelling studies indicated that the extent of swelling was greater in the polyionic complexes than in the single chitosan formulations. The amoxicillin diffusion from the hydrogels was controlled by the polymer/drug interaction. The property of these complexes to control the solute diffusion depends on the network mesh size, which is a significant factor in the overall behavior of the hydrogels. The gastric half-emptying time of the polyionic complex was significantly delayed compared to the reference formulation, showing mean values of 164.32+/-26.72 and 65.06+/-11.50min, respectively (P<0.01). The results of this study suggest that, these polyionic complexes are good systems for specific gastric drug delivery. PMID:14609680

  12. Visual exploration patterns of human figures in action: an eye tracker study with art paintings

    PubMed Central

    Villani, Daniela; Morganti, Francesca; Cipresso, Pietro; Ruggi, Simona; Riva, Giuseppe; Gilli, Gabriella

    2015-01-01

    Art exploration is a complex process conditioned by factors at different levels and includes both basic visual principles and complex cognitive factors. The human figure is considered a critical factor attracting the attention in art painting. Using an eye-tracking methodology, the goal of this study was to explore different elements of the human figure performing an action (face and body parts in action) in complex social scenes characterized by different levels of social interaction between agents depicted in scenes (individual vs. social). The sample included 44 laypersons, and the stimuli consisted of 10 fine art paintings representing the figurative style of classical art. The results revealed different scanning patterns of the human figure elements related to the level of social interaction of agents depicted in the scene. The agents’ face attracted eye movements in social interaction scenes while the agents’ body parts attracted eye movements only when the agents were involved in individual actions. These processes were confirmed specifically in participants with high empathic abilities who became immediately fixated on faces to develop a mimetic engagement with other agents. Future studies integrating other measures would help confirm the results obtained and strengthen their implication for embodiment processes. PMID:26579021

  13. CERCLA interim action at the Par Pond unit: A case study

    SciTech Connect

    Hickey, H.M.; Matthews, S.S.; Neal, L.W.; Weiss, W.R.

    1993-11-01

    The Par Pond unit designated under CERCLA consists of sediments within a Savannah River Site (SRS) cooling water reservoir. The sediments are contaminated with radionuclides and nonradioactive constituents from nuclear production reactor operations. The mercury in Par Pond is believed to have originated from the Savannah River. Because of Par Pond Dam safety Issues, the water level of the reservoir was drawn down, exposing more than 1300 acres of contaminated sediments and triggering the need for CERCLA interim remedial action. This paper presents the interim action approach taken with Par Pond as a case study. The approach considered the complexity of the Par Pond ecosystem, the large size of Par Pond, the volume of contaminated sediments, and the institutional controls existing at SRS. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) considers units with large volumes of low-concentration wastes, as is the case with Par Pond, to be {open_quotes}special sites.{close_quotes} Accordingly, EPA guidance establishes that the range of alternatives developed focus primarily on containment options and other remedial approaches that mitigate potential risks associated with the {open_quotes}special site.{close_quotes} The remedial alternatives, according to EPA, are not to be prohibitively expensive or difficult to implement. This case study also is representative of the types of issues that will need to be addressed within the Department of Energy (DOE) complex as nuclear facilities are transitioned to inactive status and corrective/remedial actions are warranted.

  14. Studies on the Mode of Action of Acifluorfen-Methyl in Nonchlorophyllous Soybean Cells 1

    PubMed Central

    Matringe, M.; Scalla, R.

    1988-01-01

    Phytotoxic effects of the herbicide acifluorfen-methyl on nonchlorophyllous soybean cells were estimated by 86Rb leakage. An action spectrum study showed maximum injury at 350 to 450 nanometers, with lesser activity between 450 and 700 nanometers. Cells treated in the dark with acifluorfen-methyl accumulated fluorescent pigments with the spectral characteristics of protoporphyrin IX. The action spectrum of acifluorfen-methyl matched the absorption spectrum of this tetrapyrrole, and the extent of cellular damage in the light was related to the degree of fluorescent pigment accumulation. We propose that the phytotoxicity of diphenyl ether herbicides could be explained by their ability to cause abnormal accumulations of tetrapyrroles, which in turn induce lethal photooxidative reactions. PMID:16665956

  15. [Studying of sclerosing action of the foam form of polidokanol in experiment in vivo].

    PubMed

    Palamarchuk, V I; Bondarenko, Iu I; Titova, Iu P; Irkin, I V; Zarits'ka, V I

    2014-08-01

    The results of investigation on impact of the foam form of sclerosant in experiment on 80 mongrel white rats, were presented. Sclerosing action of 0.5%, 2%, 3% solution of polydocanol in a microfoam form was studied after its infusion into lateral caudal vein of the rat. Quantity of preparation 0,5 cm3 was determined in accordance to the vein volume. Clinical and macroscopic estimation of the preparation action on internal organs and caudal rat's vein was conducted on the 10th min, every day during 1 week and on the 30th day. When the foam form of sclerosant is introduced intravenously there was not observed thrombotic complications of posterior vena cava and specific macroscopic changes in internal organs, not depending from its concentration, what witnesses security of the method, and selection of the sclerosant solution concentration must depend on the vessel diameter. PMID:25417296

  16. Representing actions through their sound.

    PubMed

    Aglioti, Salvatore M; Pazzaglia, Mariella

    2010-10-01

    Since the discovery of 'mirror neurons' in the monkey premotor and parietal cortex, an increasing body of evidence in animals and humans alike has supported the notion of the inextricable link between action execution and action perception. Although research originally focused on the relationship between performed and viewed actions, more recent studies highlight the importance of representing the actions of others through audition. In the first part of this article, we discuss animal studies, which provide direct evidence that action is inherently linked to multi-sensory cues, as well as the studies carried out on healthy subjects by using state-of-the-art cognitive neuroscience techniques such as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), event-related potentials (ERP), magnetoencephalography (MEG), and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). In the second section, we review the lesion analysis studies in brain-damaged patients demonstrating the link between 'resonant' fronto-parieto-temporal networks and the ability to represent an action by hearing its sound. Moreover, we examine the evidence in favour of somatotopy as a possible representational rule underlying the auditory mapping of actions and consider the links between language and audio-motor action mapping. We conclude with a discussion of some outstanding questions for future research on the link between actions and the sounds they produce. PMID:20602092

  17. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1983-01-01

    Describes a lecture demonstration of a solid state phase transition using a thermodynamic material which changes state at room temperature. Also describes a demonstration on kinetics using a "Big Bang" (trade mark) calcium carbide cannon. Indicates that the cannon is safe to use. (JN)

  18. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1983-01-01

    Provides directions for setup and performance of two demonstrations. The first demonstrates the principles of Raoult's Law; using a simple apparatus designed to measure vapor pressure. The second illustrates the energy available from alcohol combustion (includes safety precautions) using an alcohol-fueled missile. (JM)

  19. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1979-01-01

    Presents two demonstrations for classroom use related to precipitation of ferrous hydroxide and to variation of vapor pressure with temperature. The former demonstration is simple and useful when discussing solubility of ionic compounds electrode potential of transition elements, and mixed valence compounds. (Author/SA)

  20. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1990-01-01

    Described are demonstrations designed to reveal the important "nonsolvent" properties of water through its interaction with a toy called "Magic Sand" and other synthetic silica derivatives, especially those bonded with organic moities. The procedures for seven demonstrations along with a discussion of the effects are presented. (CW)

  1. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Presented are two chemistry demonstrations: (1) an alternative method for the demonstration of the properties of alkali metals, water is added to small amounts of metal; (2) an exploration of the properties of hydrogen, helium, propane, and carbon dioxide using an open trough and candle. (MVL)

  2. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Outlines a simple, inexpensive way of demonstrating electroplating using the reaction between nickel ions and copper metal. Explains how to conduct a demonstration of the electrolysis of water by using a colored Na2SO4 solution as the electrolyte so that students can observe the pH changes. (TW)

  3. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1983-01-01

    Free radical chlorination of methane is used in organic chemistry to introduce free radical/chain reactions. In spite of its common occurrence, demonstrations of the reaction are uncommon. Therefore, such a demonstration is provided, including background information, preparation of reactants/reaction vessel, introduction of reactants, irradiation,…

  4. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Describes two demonstrations designed to help chemistry students visualize certain chemical properties. One experiment uses balloons to illustrate the behavior of gases under varying temperatures and pressures. The other uses a makeshift pea shooter and a commercial model to demonstrate atomic structure and the behavior of high-speed particles.…

  5. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1980-01-01

    Two demonstrations are described: (1) a variant of preparing purple benzene by phase transfer catalysis with quaternary ammonium salts and potassium permanganate in which crown ethers are used; (2) a corridor or "hallway" demonstration in which unknown molecular models are displayed and prizes awarded to students correctly identifying the…

  6. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1982-01-01

    Three chemistry demonstrations are described: (1) modification of copper catalysis demonstration apparatus; (2) experiments in gas-liquid chromatography with simple gas chromatography at room temperature; and (3) equilibria in silver arsenate-arsenic acid and silver phosphate-phosphoric acid systems. Procedures and materials needed are provided.…

  7. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1980-01-01

    Described is a demonstration utilized to measure the heat of vaporization using the Clausius-Clapeyron equation. Explained is that when measurement is made as part of a demonstration, it raises student's consciousness that chemistry is experimentally based. (Author/DS)

  8. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Describes two laboratory demonstrations in chemistry. One uses dry ice, freon, and freezer bags to demonstrate volume changes, vapor-liquid equilibrium, a simulation of a rain forest, and vaporization. The other uses the clock reaction technique to illustrate fast reactions and kinetic problems in releasing carbon dioxide during respiration. (TW)

  9. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1990-01-01

    Presented are three demonstrations: "The Construction and Use of Commercial Voltaic Cell Displays in Freshman Chemistry"; Dramatizing Isotopes: Deuterated Ice Cubes Sink"; and "A Simple Apparatus to Demonstrate Differing Gas Diffusion Rates (Graham's Law)." Materials, procedures, and safety considerations are discussed. (CW)

  10. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1984-01-01

    Background information and procedures are provided for a second part to the dichromate volcano demonstration. The green ash produced during the demonstration is reduced to metal using aluminothermy (Goldschmide process). Also describes suitable light sources and spectroscopes for student observation of emission spectra in lecture halls. (JN)

  11. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Provides three descriptions of demonstrations used in various chemistry courses. Includes the use of a simple demonstration model to illustrate principles of chromatography, techniques for using balloons to teach about the behavior of gases, and the use of small concentrations of synthetic polyelectrolytes to induce the flocculation hydrophobic…

  12. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses a supplement to the "water to rose" demonstration in which a pink color is produced. Also discusses blood buffer demonstrations, including hydrolysis of sodium bicarbonate, simulated blood buffer, metabolic acidosis, natural compensation of metabolic acidosis, metabolic alkalosis, acidosis treatment, and alkalosis treatment. Procedures…

  13. Action observers implicitly expect actors to act goal-coherently, even if they do not: an fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Hrkać, Mari; Wurm, Moritz F; Schubotz, Ricarda I

    2014-05-01

    Actions observed in everyday life normally consist of one person performing sequences of goal-directed actions. The present fMRI study tested the hypotheses that observers are influenced by the actor's identity, even when this information is task-irrelevant, and that this information shapes their expectation on subsequent actions of the same actor. Participants watched short video clips of action steps that either pertained to a common action with an overarching goal or not, and were performed by either one or by varying actors (2 × 2 design). Independent of goal coherence, actor coherence elicited activation in dorsolateral and ventromedial frontal cortex, together pointing to a spontaneous attempt to integrate all actions performed by one actor. Interestingly, watching an actor performing unrelated actions elicited additional activation in left inferior frontal gyrus, suggesting a search in semantic memory in an attempt to construct an overarching goal that can reconcile the disparate action steps with a coherent intention. Post-experimental surveys indicate that these processes occur mostly unconsciously. Findings strongly suggest a spontaneous expectation bias toward actor-related episodes in action observers, and hence to the immense impact of actor information on action observation. PMID:23983202

  14. Entrepreneurial Learning through Action: A Case Study of the Six-Squared Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pittaway, Luke; Missing, Caroline; Hudson, Nigel; Maragh, Dean

    2009-01-01

    This paper explores the role of "action" in entrepreneurial learning and illustrates how programs designed to support action learning can enhance management development in entrepreneurial businesses. The paper begins by exploring action learning and the way "action" is conceived in different types of program. In the second part, the paper details…

  15. DEMONSTRATION OF FUEL CELLS TO RECOVER ENERGY FROM LANDFILL GAS - PHASE I FINAL REPORT: CONCEPTUAL STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report discusses results of a conceptual design, cost, and evaluation study of energy recovery from landfill gas using a commercial phosphoric acid fuel cell power plant. The conceptual design of the fuel cell energy recovery system is described, and its economic and environm...

  16. The Warm-Cold Study: A Classroom Demonstration of Impression Formation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Symbaluk, Diane G.; Cameron, Judy

    1998-01-01

    Describes a procedure for teaching experimental design to students in the social sciences. Argues that by replicating Solomon Asch's and H. Kelley's classic studies on impression formation, students learn how to conduct experiments, analyze data, and evaluate the significance of research. Provides instructions for implementing the strategy. (DSK)

  17. [Comparative sonographic-anatomic studies aimed at demonstrating intrarenal fine structure].

    PubMed

    Zilch, H G; Posel, P

    1985-07-01

    The detailed structure of the kidneys was studied in 40 excised organs by means of high resolution sonography. It becomes possible to differentiate the details within the renal parenchyma and the sinus. Intrarenal vascular details can also be defined. The clinical relevance of these results is discussed. PMID:2992015

  18. Research study demonstrates computer simulation can predict warpage and assist in its elimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glozer, G.; Post, S.; Ishii, K.

    1994-10-01

    Programs for predicting warpage in injection molded parts are relatively new. Commercial software for simulating the flow and cooling stages of injection molding have steadily gained acceptance; however, warpage software is not yet as readily accepted. This study focused on gaining an understanding of the predictive capabilities of the warpage software. The following aspects of this study were unique. (1) Quantitative results were found using a statistically designed set of experiments. (2) Comparisons between experimental and simulation results were made with parts produced in a well-instrumented and controlled injection molding machine. (3) The experimental parts were accurately measured on a coordinate measuring machine with a non-contact laser probe. (4) The effect of part geometry on warpage was investigated.

  19. CINRG Duchenne Natural History Study demonstrates insufficient diagnosis and treatment of cardiomyopathy in Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Spurney, Christopher; Shimizu, Reiko; Hache, Lauren P.; Kolski, Hanna; Gordish-Dressman, Heather; Clemens, Paula R.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Cardiomyopathy is a common cause of morbidity and death in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Methods A cross-sectional analysis of clinical data from a multi-institutional, international CINRG DMD Natural History Study of 340 DMD patients aged 2 to 28 years. Cardiomyopathy was defined as shortening fraction (SF) <28% or ejection fraction (EF) <55%. Results 231 participants reported a prior clinical echocardiogram study, and 174 had data for SF or EF. The prevalence of cardiomyopathy was 27% (47/174), and it was significantly associated with age and clinical stage. The association of cardiomyopathy with age and clinical stage was not changed by glucocorticoid use as a covariate (P>0.68). In patients with cardiomyopathy, 57 % (27/47) reported not taking any cardiac medications. Cardiac medications were used in 12% (15/127) of patients without cardiomyopathy. Discussion Echocardiograms were underutilized, and cardiomyopathy was undertreated in this DMD natural history cohort. PMID:24395289

  20. Demonstration of multi- and single-reader sample size program for diagnostic studies software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillis, Stephen L.; Schartz, Kevin M.

    2015-03-01

    The recently released software Multi- and Single-Reader Sample Size Sample Size Program for Diagnostic Studies, written by Kevin Schartz and Stephen Hillis, performs sample size computations for diagnostic reader-performance studies. The program computes the sample size needed to detect a specified difference in a reader performance measure between two modalities, when using the analysis methods initially proposed by Dorfman, Berbaum, and Metz (DBM) and Obuchowski and Rockette (OR), and later unified and improved by Hillis and colleagues. A commonly used reader performance measure is the area under the receiver-operating-characteristic curve. The program can be used with typical common reader-performance measures which can be estimated parametrically or nonparametrically. The program has an easy-to-use step-by-step intuitive interface that walks the user through the entry of the needed information. Features of the software include the following: (1) choice of several study designs; (2) choice of inputs obtained from either OR or DBM analyses; (3) choice of three different inference situations: both readers and cases random, readers fixed and cases random, and readers random and cases fixed; (4) choice of two types of hypotheses: equivalence or noninferiority; (6) choice of two output formats: power for specified case and reader sample sizes, or a listing of case-reader combinations that provide a specified power; (7) choice of single or multi-reader analyses; and (8) functionality in Windows, Mac OS, and Linux.

  1. STUDY OF HOME DEMONSTRATION UNITS IN A SAMPLE OF 27 COUNTIES IN NEW YORK STATE, NUMBER 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ALEXANDER, FRANK D.; HARSHAW, JEAN

    AN EXPLORATORY STUDY EXAMINED CHARACTERISTICS OF 1,128 HOME DEMONSTRATION UNITS TO SUGGEST HYPOTHESES AND SCOPE FOR A MORE INTENSIVE STUDY OF A SMALL SAMPLE OF UNITS, AND TO PROVIDE GUIDANCE IN SAMPLING. DATA WERE OBTAINED FROM A SPECIALLY DESIGNED MEMBERSHIP CARD USED IN 1962. UNIT SIZE AVERAGED 23.6 MEMBERS BUT THE RANGE WAS FAIRLY GREAT. A NEED…

  2. "Ready To Learn" Transmedia Demonstration Station Study: A Report to the CPB-PBS "Ready to Learn Initiative"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pasnik, Shelley; Llorente, Carlin

    2012-01-01

    The 2012 Transmedia Demonstration Stations program study is part of the multiyear CPB-PBS "Ready To Learn" summative evaluation initiative by Education Development Center, Inc., (EDC) and SRI International (SRI). Through a series of related studies, the authors are documenting, and, whenever possible, measuring the impact of PBS KIDS transmedia…

  3. Enhancing local action planning through quantitative flood risk analysis: a case study in Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo-Rodríguez, Jesica Tamara; Escuder-Bueno, Ignacio; Perales-Momparler, Sara; Ramón Porta-Sancho, Juan

    2016-07-01

    This article presents a method to incorporate and promote quantitative risk analysis to support local action planning against flooding. The proposed approach aims to provide a framework for local flood risk analysis, combining hazard mapping with vulnerability data to quantify risk in terms of expected annual affected population, potential injuries, number of fatalities, and economic damages. Flood risk is estimated combining GIS data of loads, system response, and consequences and using event tree modelling for risk calculation. The study area is the city of Oliva, located on the eastern coast of Spain. Results from risk modelling have been used to inform local action planning and to assess the benefits of structural and non-structural risk reduction measures. Results show the potential impact on risk reduction of flood defences and improved warning communication schemes through local action planning: societal flood risk (in terms of annual expected affected population) would be reduced up to 51 % by combining both structural and non-structural measures. In addition, the effect of seasonal population variability is analysed (annual expected affected population ranges from 82 to 107 %, compared with the current situation, depending on occupancy rates in hotels and campsites). Results highlight the need for robust and standardized methods for urban flood risk analysis replicability at regional and national scale.

  4. Experimental study on bubble pulse features under the combined action of horizontal and vertical walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shi-ping; Chu, Wen-hua; Zhang, A.-man

    2014-06-01

    The pulse features of a bubble have a close connection with the boundary condition. When a bubble moves near a rigid wall, it will be attracted by the Bjerknes force of the wall, and a jet pointing at the wall will be generated. In real application, the bubble may move under the combined action of walls in different directions when it forms at the corner of a pipe or at the bottom of a dam. The motion of the bubble shows complex and nonlinear characteristics under these conditions. In order to investigate the bubble pulse features near complex walls, a horizontal wall and a vertical wall are put into the experimental water tank synchronously, and an electric circuit with 200 voltages is designed to generate discharge bubbles, and then experimental study on the bubble pulse features under the combined action of horizontal and vertical walls is carried out. The influences of the combined action of two walls on the bubble shape, pulse period, moving trace and inside jet are obtained by changing the distances from bubble center to the two walls. It aims at providing references for the relevant theoretical and numerical research.

  5. Affordance effects in grasping actions for graspable objects: electromyographic reaction time study.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Tomotaka; Takagi, Mineko; Sugawara, Kenichi

    2012-12-01

    It is unclear whether affordance effects shorten the reaction time in the interaction between objects and actions. This study investigated affordance effects based on compatibility between perception of graspable objects and the act of grasping. The electromyographic reaction time (EMG-RT) was used as the response, and Go/NoGo (Experiment 1) and choice (Experiment 2) reaction-time tasks were performed using combinations of two types of stimulus image (tools and animals) and two types of response task (flexion and extension of all fingers). In Experiment 1, no interaction of stimulus images and response tasks occurred, but the EMG-RT for tools was statistically significantly delayed longer than that for animals. In Experiment 2, the EMG-RT of flexion of all fingers for tools was statistically significantly delayed compared with that for animals, showing interaction. Affordance effects based on compatibility of objects and actions are the basis on human-tool interaction. This interaction induces a goal-directed act and prolongs motor execution of grasping actions for them. PMID:23409599

  6. Data Integrity-A Study of Current Regulatory Thinking and Action.

    PubMed

    Shafiei, Nader; De Montardy, Regis; Rivera-Martinez, Edwin

    2015-01-01

    In reaction to breaches of data integrity in the pharmaceutical industry, regulatory authorities have introduced inspection approaches or initiatives with the aim of reducing occurrences of data integrity problems. This review article-based on study of 65 cases of regulatory action from 2002 to 2014-provides an overview of current regulatory thinking and action on breaches of data integrity affecting GxP (health-related regulations) processes supporting non-clinical studies, clinical studies, laboratory controls, and production controls. These case studies largely represent position of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the regulatory agencies affiliated with the European Medicines Agency. Also discussed is the role of human factors as a potential source of data integrity problems. The article concludes by recommending some remedial controls that could be established to avoid or reduce occurrences of data integrity problems.Lay Abstract: In fulfilling their mission to protect public health, regulatory agencies (e.g., U.S. Food and Drug Administration, European Medicines Agency) must establish confidence that medical products they approve are fit for their intended use. In so doing they rely on scientific and operational data generated during research, development, manufacturing, sales, marketing, distribution, and post-marketing surveillance activities. The level of confidence they build is directly proportional to the scientific validity and integrity of data presented to them by the sponsors of medical products. In this article we present analysis of 65 case studies that document regulatory action taken by various regulatory agencies on breach of data integrity between 2002 and 2014. The ensuing discussion on current trends largely represents position of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and European Medicines Agency. The article concludes by proposing some remedial controls that could be established by pharmaceutical companies to avoid or reduce

  7. The functional subdivision of the visual brain: Is there a real illusion effect on action? A multi-lab replication study.

    PubMed

    Kopiske, Karl K; Bruno, Nicola; Hesse, Constanze; Schenk, Thomas; Franz, Volker H

    2016-06-01

    It has often been suggested that visual illusions affect perception but not actions such as grasping, as predicted by the "two-visual-systems" hypothesis of Milner and Goodale (1995, The Visual Brain in Action, Oxford University press). However, at least for the Ebbinghaus illusion, relevant studies seem to reveal a consistent illusion effect on grasping (Franz & Gegenfurtner, 2008. Grasping visual illusions: consistent data and no dissociation. Cognitive Neuropsychology). Two interpretations are possible: either grasping is not immune to illusions (arguing against dissociable processing mechanisms for vision-for-perception and vision-for-action), or some other factors modulate grasping in ways that mimic a vision-for perception effect in actions. It has been suggested that one such factor may be obstacle avoidance (Haffenden Schiff & Goodale, 2001. The dissociation between perception and action in the Ebbinghaus illusion: nonillusory effects of pictorial cues on grasp. Current Biology, 11, 177-181). In four different labs (total N = 144), we conducted an exact replication of previous studies suggesting obstacle avoidance mechanisms, implementing conditions that tested grasping as well as multiple perceptual tasks. This replication was supplemented by additional conditions to obtain more conclusive results. Our results confirm that grasping is affected by the Ebbinghaus illusion and demonstrate that this effect cannot be explained by obstacle avoidance. PMID:27156056

  8. Judgment of actions in experts: a high-resolution EEG study in elite athletes.

    PubMed

    Babiloni, Claudio; Del Percio, Claudio; Rossini, Paolo M; Marzano, Nicola; Iacoboni, Marco; Infarinato, Francesco; Lizio, Roberta; Piazza, Marina; Pirritano, Mirella; Berlutti, Giovanna; Cibelli, Giuseppe; Eusebi, Fabrizio

    2009-04-01

    The present study tested the two following hypotheses: (i) compared to non-athletes, elite athletes are characterized by a reduced cortical activation during the judgment of sporting observed actions; (ii) in elite athletes, a good judgment of observed sporting actions is related to a low cortical activation. To address these issues, electroencephalographic (EEG) data were recorded in 15 elite rhythmic gymnasts and 13 non-gymnasts. They observed a series of 120 rhythmic gymnastic videos. At the end of each video, the subjects had to judge the artistic/athletic level of the exercise by a scale from 0 to 10. The mismatch between their judgment and that of the coach indexed the degree of action judgment. The EEG cortical sources were estimated by sLORETA. With reference to a pre-stimulus period, the power decrease of alpha (8-12 Hz) rhythms during the videos indexed the cortical activation (event related desynchronization, ERD). Regarding the hypothesis (i), low- and high-frequency alpha ERD was lower in amplitude in the elite rhythmic gymnasts compared to the non-gymnasts in occipital and temporal areas (ventral pathway) and in dorsal pathway. Regarding the hypothesis (ii), in the elite rhythmic gymnasts high-frequency alpha ERD was higher in amplitude with the videos characterized by a high judgment error than those characterized by a low judgment error; this was true in inferior posterior parietal and ventral premotor areas ("mirror" pathway). These results globally suggest that the judgment of observed sporting actions is related to low amplitude of alpha ERD, as a possible index of spatially selective cortical activation ("neural efficiency"). PMID:19111623

  9. Action-Monitoring Dysfunction in Obstructive Sleep Apnea - A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Ping-Song; Hsu, Chung-Yao; Wu, Meng-Ni; Liou, Li-Min; Lu, Shinag-Ru; Liu, Ching-Kuan; Lai, Chiou-Lian

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with a broad range of frontal lobe dysfunctions. However, no study has investigated action monitoring, a crucial domain of frontal cognitive functions, in patients with OSA. By using the modified Flanker task, we tested the hypothesis that patients with OSA have an impaired action monitoring function. We recruited 25 untreated patients with moderate–severe OSA and 12 control participants who were matched for age, sex, apolipoprotein E4, and education level. Every enrolled participant underwent a standard overnight laboratory-based polysomnography and completed a modified Flanker task. Compared with the controls, the patients with OSA presented a significantly lower correct response rate in all trials (78.9% vs 95.9%, P = .008), congruent trials (84.7% vs 98.3%, P = .016), and incongruent trials (77.4% vs 94.7%, P = .009). The post-error correction rate was significantly lower in the patients with OSA than in the controls (74.9% vs 93.8%, P = .005). Furthermore, strong significant correlations were observed between the arousal index and correct rate in all trials (r = −0.390, P < .05) and in the incongruent trials (r = −0.429, P < .01), as well as between the arousal index and rate of post-error correction (r = −0.435, P < .01). We concluded that the action monitoring function was impaired in the patients with OSA. Sleep fragmentation was a major determinant of impaired action monitoring in these patients. PMID:27300504

  10. Less irritative action of wine and Japanese sake in rat stomachs: a comparative study with ethanol.

    PubMed

    Nakagiri, Akari; Fukushima, Kazuhiro; Kato, Shinichi; Takeuchi, Koji

    2006-02-01

    The ingestion of alcohol, especially in excess, causes acute gastric lesions and gastritis in humans, yet the mucosal irritative action of alcoholic beverages remains largely unknown. We examined the mucosal irritative action of whiskey, wine and Japanese sake in the rat stomach both ex vivo and in vitro, in comparison with ethanol. Under urethane anesthesia, a rat stomach was mounted in an ex vivo chamber, then superfused with saline, and the transmucosal potential difference (PD) was measured. After the basal PD had stabilized, the mucosa was exposed for 30 min to 2 ml of 15% ethanol, whiskey (containing 15% ethanol), white wine, or Japanese sake (the ethanol concentration of the latter two is 12-15%). In the in vitro study, rat epithelial cells (RGM1) were treated with the alcoholic beverages for 5 min, and the cell viability was determined with crystal violet. Ethanol or whiskey applied to the chamber caused a decrease in PD, while wine or Japanese sake did not. Histologically, surface epithelial damage was observed after exposure to both ethanol and whiskey, yet no damage was induced by white wine and Japanese sake. Likewise, both ethanol and whiskey markedly reduced the viability of RGM1 cells after 5 min of incubation, while neither white wine nor Japanese sake had any effect. In addition, supplementation of glucose significantly prevented the reduction in both PD and cell viability caused by ethanol. These results suggest that the mucosal irritative action of Japanese sake and white wine is much less pronounced than that of ethanol or whiskey and that the less damaging action of Japanese sake and white wine may be, at least partly, accounted for by the glucose contained in these alcoholic beverages. PMID:16534671

  11. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1980-01-01

    Presented is a Corridor Demonstration which can be set up in readily accessible areas such as hallways or lobbies. Equipment is listed for a display of three cells (solar cells, fuel cells, and storage cells) which develop electrical energy. (CS)

  12. Kinetic Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgardt, Erik D.; Ryan, Hank

    1996-01-01

    Presents a unit on chemical reaction kinetics that consists of a predemonstration activity, the demonstration, and a set of postdemonstration activities that help students transfer the concepts to actual chemical reactions. Simulates various aspects of chemical reaction kinetics. (JRH)

  13. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roffia, Sergio; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Reports two electrochemical demonstrations. Uses a hydrogen-oxygen fuel cell to power a clock. Includes description of methods and materials. Investigates the "potato clock" used with different fruits. Lists emf and current for various fruit and electrode combinations. (ML)

  14. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rehfeld, D. W.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes two demonstrations (1) a dust explosion using a coffee can, candle, rubber tubing, and cornstarch and (2) forming a silicate-polyvinyl alcohol polymer which can be pressed into plastic sheets or molded. Gives specific instructions. (MVL)

  15. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Presents three demonstrations suitable for undergraduate chemistry classes. Focuses on experiments with calcium carbide, the induction by iron of the oxidation of iodide by dichromate, and the classical iodine clock reaction. (ML)

  16. Tested Demonstrations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1977-01-01

    Describes a room-temperature method for demonstrating phosphorescence by including samples in a polymer matrix. Also discusses the Old Nassau Reaction, a clock reaction which turns orange then black. (MLH)

  17. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L.

    1990-01-01

    Included are three demonstrations that include the phase change of ice when under pressure, viscoelasticity and colloid systems, and flame tests for metal ions. The materials, procedures, probable results, and applications to real life situations are included. (KR)

  18. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Background information, list of materials needed, and procedures used are provided for a demonstration involving the transformation of a hydrophobic liquid to a partially hydrophobic semisolid. Safety considerations are noted. (JN)

  19. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1988-01-01

    Describes two demonstrations for use in college chemistry classes. Includes "Spectroscopy in Large Lecture Halls" and "The Endothermic Dissolution of Ammonium Nitrate." Gives materials lists and procedures as well as a discussion of the results. (CW)

  20. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1979-01-01

    Presents a recipe for the Nylon Rope Trick, which is considered to be one of the most spectacular demonstrations in chemistry. Materials for growing the polymer and some safety precautions are given. (SA)

  1. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L.

    1982-01-01

    Two demonstrations are described: (1) a sunset effect using a gooseneck lamp and 20 sheets of paper and (2) the preparation and determination of structural features of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) by infrared spectroscopy. (SK)

  2. Dictyostelium discoideum to human cells: pharmacogenetic studies demonstrate a role for sphingolipids in chemoresistance.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Stephen; Min, Junxia; Alexander, Hannah

    2006-03-01

    Resistance to chemotherapy is a major obstacle for the treatment of cancer and a subject of extensive research. Numerous mechanisms of drug resistance have been proposed, and they differ for different drugs. Nevertheless, it is clear that our understanding of this important problem is still incomplete, and that new targets for modulating therapy still await discovery. The attractive biology and the availability of powerful molecular techniques have made the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum, a powerful non-mammalian model for drug target discovery, and the problem of drug resistance. To understand the molecular basis of chemoresistance to the widely used drug cisplatin, both genetic and pharmacological approaches have been applied to this versatile experimental system. These studies have resulted in the identification of novel molecular pathways which can be used to increase the efficacy of cisplatin, and brought attention to the role of sphingolipids in mediating the cellular response to chemotherapeutic drugs. In the following review, we will describe the history and utility of D. discoideum in pharmacogenetics, and discuss recent studies which focus attention on the role of sphingolipids in chemotherapy and chemoresistance. PMID:16403600

  3. α -Mangostin from Cratoxylum arborescens (Vahl) Blume Demonstrates Anti-Ulcerogenic Property: A Mechanistic Study.

    PubMed

    Sidahmed, Heyam M A; Abdelwahab, Siddig Ibrahim; Mohan, Syam; Abdulla, Mahmood Ameen; Mohamed Elhassan Taha, Manal; Hashim, Najihah Mohd; Hadi, A Hamid A; Vadivelu, Jamunarani; Loke Fai, Mun; Rahmani, Mawardi; Yahayu, Maizatulakmal

    2013-01-01

    Cratoxylum arborescens (Vahl) Blume is an Asian herbal medicine with versatile ethnobiological properties including treatment of gastric ulcer. This study evaluated the antiulcerogenic mechanism(s) of α -mangostin (AM) in a rat model of ulcer. AM is a prenylated xanthone derived through biologically guided fractionation of C. arborescens. Rats were orally pretreated with AM and subsequently exposed to acute gastric lesions induced by ethanol. Following treatment, ulcer index, gastric juice acidity, mucus content, histological and immunohistochemical analyses, glutathione (GSH), malondialdehyde (MDA), nitric oxide (NO), and nonprotein sulfhydryl groups (NP-SH) were evaluated. The anti-Helicobacter pylori, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitory effect, and antioxidant activity of AM were also investigated in vitro. AM (10 and 30 mg/kg) inhibited significantly (P < 0.05) ethanol-induced gastric lesions by 66.04% and 74.39 %, respectively. The compound induces the expression of Hsp70, restores GSH levels, decreases lipid peroxidation, and inhibits COX-2 activity. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of AM showed an effective in vitro anti-H. pylori activity. The efficacy of the AM was accomplished safely without presenting any toxicological parameters. The results of the present study indicate that the antioxidant properties and the potent anti-H. pylori, in addition to activation of Hsp70 protein, may contribute to the gastroprotective activity of α -mangostin. PMID:23634169

  4. α-Mangostin from Cratoxylum arborescens (Vahl) Blume Demonstrates Anti-Ulcerogenic Property: A Mechanistic Study

    PubMed Central

    Sidahmed, Heyam M. A.; Abdelwahab, Siddig Ibrahim; Abdulla, Mahmood Ameen; Mohamed Elhassan Taha, Manal; Hashim, Najihah Mohd; Hadi, A. Hamid A.; Vadivelu, Jamunarani; Loke Fai, Mun; Rahmani, Mawardi; Yahayu, Maizatulakmal

    2013-01-01

    Cratoxylum arborescens (Vahl) Blume is an Asian herbal medicine with versatile ethnobiological properties including treatment of gastric ulcer. This study evaluated the antiulcerogenic mechanism(s) of α-mangostin (AM) in a rat model of ulcer. AM is a prenylated xanthone derived through biologically guided fractionation of C. arborescens. Rats were orally pretreated with AM and subsequently exposed to acute gastric lesions induced by ethanol. Following treatment, ulcer index, gastric juice acidity, mucus content, histological and immunohistochemical analyses, glutathione (GSH), malondialdehyde (MDA), nitric oxide (NO), and nonprotein sulfhydryl groups (NP-SH) were evaluated. The anti-Helicobacter pylori, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitory effect, and antioxidant activity of AM were also investigated in vitro. AM (10 and 30 mg/kg) inhibited significantly (P < 0.05) ethanol-induced gastric lesions by 66.04% and 74.39 %, respectively. The compound induces the expression of Hsp70, restores GSH levels, decreases lipid peroxidation, and inhibits COX-2 activity. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of AM showed an effective in vitro anti-H. pylori activity. The efficacy of the AM was accomplished safely without presenting any toxicological parameters. The results of the present study indicate that the antioxidant properties and the potent anti-H. pylori, in addition to activation of Hsp70 protein, may contribute to the gastroprotective activity of α-mangostin. PMID:23634169

  5. Demonstration of an advanced circulation fludized bed coal combustor phase 1: Cold model study. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Govind, R.

    1993-03-20

    It was found that there was a strong dependence of the density profile on the secondary air injection location and that there was a pronounced solid separation from the conveying gas, due to the swirl motion. Furthermore, the swirl motion generated strong internal circulation patterns and higher slip velocities than in the case of nonswirl motion as in an ordinary circulating fluidized bed. Radial solids flux profiles were measured at different axial locations. The general radial profile in a swirling circulating fluidized bed indicated an increased downward flow of solids near the bed walls, and strong variations in radial profiles along the axial height. For swirl numbers less than 0.9, which is typical for swirling circulating fluidized beds, there is no significant increase in erosion due to swirl motion inside the bed. Pending further investigation of swirl motion with combustion, at least from our cold model studies, no disadvantages due to the introduction of swirl motion were discovered.

  6. Genomewide association study in cervical dystonia demonstrates possible association with sodium leak channel

    PubMed Central

    Mok, Kin Y; Schneider, Susanne A; Trabzuni, Daniah; Stamelou, Maria; Edwards, Mark; Kasperaviciute, Dalia; Pickering-Brown, Stuart; Silverdale, Monty; Hardy, John; Bhatia, Kailash P

    2014-01-01

    Dystonia is a common movement disorder. A number of monogenic causes have been identified. However, the majority of dystonia cases are not explained by single gene defects. Cervical dystonia is one of the commonest forms without genetic causes identified. This pilot study aimed to identify large effect-size risk loci in cervical dystonia. A genomewide association study (GWAS) was performed. British resident cervical dystonia patients of European descent were genotyped using the Illumina-610-Quad. Comparison was made with controls of European descent from the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium using logistic regression algorithm from PLINK. SNPs not genotyped by the array were imputed with 1000 Genomes Project data using the MaCH algorithm and minimac. Postimputation analysis was done with the mach2dat algorithm using a logistic regression model. After quality control measures, 212 cases were compared with 5173 controls. No single SNP passed the genomewide significant level of 5 × 10−8 in the analysis of genotyped SNP in PLINK. Postimputation, there were 5 clusters of SNPs that had P value <5 × 10−6, and the best cluster of SNPs was found near exon 1 of NALCN, (sodium leak channel) with P = 9.76 × 10−7. Several potential regions were found in the GWAS and imputation analysis. The lowest P value was found in NALCN. Dysfunction of this ion channel is a plausible cause for dystonia. Further replication in another cohort is needed to confirm this finding. We make this data publicly available to encourage further analyses of this disorder. PMID:24227479

  7. Action Research as another Literacy Skill To Improve Academic Performance: A Case Study of Empowered Language Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ariizumi, Yoshihiko

    2006-01-01

    Background: Even though action research has been employed in an increasing number of fields of practice including teaching, nursing, and business, application in learning has been scarcely reported. This case study is one of the first attempts to apply action research principles to help learners improve their learning performance. Purpose: This…

  8. An Exploratory Study of Undergraduates' Attitudes toward Affirmative Action Policies for Asian Americans in College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartlep, Nicholas Daniel; Lowinger, Robert Jay

    2014-01-01

    This exploratory study examined white undergraduate students' (a) racial attitudes towards Asian Americans, (b) principled policy attitudes toward affirmative action, and (c) self-interest in relation to their support for college-based affirmative action policies for Asian Americans at a Midwestern university. A sample (n = 264, 28% male, 72%…

  9. Using Reflective Practice to Incorporate Formative Assessment in a Middle School Science Classroom: A Participatory Action Research Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trauth-Nare, Amy; Buck, Gayle

    2011-01-01

    Our purpose was to investigate the efficacy of using reflective practice to guide our action research study of incorporating formative assessment into middle school science teaching and learning. Using participatory action research, we worked collaboratively to incorporate formative assessment into two instructional units, and then engaged in…

  10. Place-based pedagogy in the era of accountability: An action research study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saracino, Peter C.

    Today's most common method of teaching biology---driven by calls for standardization and high-stakes testing---relies on a standards-based, de-contextualized approach to education. This results in "one size fits all" curriculums that ignore local contexts relevant to students' lives, discourage student engagement and ultimately work against a deep and lasting understanding of content. In contrast, place-based education---a pedagogical paradigm grounded in situated cognition and the progressive education tradition of John Dewey---utilizes the community as an integrating context for learning. It encourages the growth of school-community partnerships with an eye towards raising student achievement while also drawing students into the economic, political, social and ecological life of their communities. Such an approach seeks to provide students with learning experiences that are both academically significant and valuable to their communities. This study explores how high school science teachers can capitalize on the rich affordances offered by a place-based approach despite the constraints imposed by a state-mandated curriculum and high-stakes testing. Using action research, I designed, implemented, evaluated and refined an intervention that grounded a portion of a Living Environment high school course I teach in a place-based experience. This experience served as a unique anchoring event to contextualize students' learning of other required core topics. The overarching question framing this study is: How can science teachers capitalize on the rich affordances offered by a place-based approach despite the constraints imposed by a state-mandated curriculum and high-stakes testing? The following more specific questions were explored within the context of the intervention: (1) Which elements of the place-based paradigm could I effectively integrate into a Living Environment course? (2) In what ways would this integration impact students' interest? (3) In what ways would

  11. Intermittent flow system for population toxicity studies demonstrated with Daphnia and copper

    SciTech Connect

    van Leeuwen, C.J.; Buechner, J.L.; van Dijk, H.

    1988-04-01

    Until the introduction of continuous-flow procedures, the physical aspects of testing the toxicity of chemicals and aqueous effluents to aquatic organisms had been of minor consideration. Today's devices ranging from pneumatic systems to electric pumps, all have some drawback or other but many of them are reduced to a minimum by the use of the proportional diluter, which is a well-established and reliable dosing apparatus. However, the Mount-Brungs diluter cannot be used for testing volatile chemicals, nor does it allow simultaneous dosing of a constant food suspension and several toxicant concentrations, which are important conditions for population toxicity studies with small invertebrates like the crustacean Daphnia magna. These restrictions are removed by the use of electric pumps, solenoids and time relays. The system described here provides for the delivery of 250 mL every 5 min to 6 h with no perceptible current-induced effects on the test organisms; it allows the automatic supply of known concentrations of food at each dilution cycle as well as the testing of volatile chemicals. The system has operated for almost 3 years and has proven to be reliable, accurate and easy to maintain. In order to illustrate its usefulness in tests with Daphnia populations, the toxicity of copper was tested.

  12. Intermittent flow system for population toxicity studies demonstrated with Daphnia and copper

    SciTech Connect

    van Leeuwen, C.J.; Buechner, J.L.; van Dijk, H. )

    1988-05-01

    Until the introduction of continuous-flow procedures, the physical aspects of testing the toxicity of chemicals and aqueous effluents to aquatic organisms had been of minor consideration. Today's devices ranging from pneumatic systems to electric pumps, all have some drawback or other but many of them are reduced to a minimum by the use of the proportional diluter, which is a well-established and reliable dosing apparatus. However, the Mount-Brungs diluter cannot be used for testing volatile chemicals, nor does it allow simultaneous dosing of a constant food suspension and several toxicant concentrations, which are important conditions for population toxicity studies with small invertebrates like the crustacean Daphnia magna. These restrictions are removed by the use of electric pumps, solenoids and time relays. The system described here provides for the delivery of 250 mL every 5 min to 6 h with no perceptible current-induced effects on the test organisms; it allows the automatic supply of known concentrations of food at each dilution cycle as well as the testing of volatile chemicals. In order to illustrate its usefulness in tests with Daphnia populations, the toxicity of copper was tested.

  13. Development study of precooled-cycle hypersonic turbojet engine for flight demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Tetsuya; Taguchi, Hideyuki; Kobayashi, Hiroaki; Kojima, Takayuki; Okai, Keiichi; Fujita, Kazuhisa; Masaki, Daisaku; Hongo, Motoyuki; Ohta, Toyohiko

    2007-06-01

    This paper describes a development study of a precooled-cycle hypersonic turbojet engine for the first stage of TSTO space plane and hypersonic airplane. With reflecting the key technologies accumulated from ATREX (expander cycle ATR engine) ground tests, the next flyable subscale engine "S-engine" is now developed. S-engine has 23cm×23cm of rectangular cross-section, 2.2 m of the overall length and about 100 kg of the weight employing a variable-geometry rectangular inlet and nozzle. It produces 1.2 kN of thrust at SLS, which corresponds to {1}/{4} of the ATREX engine. Design of the hypersonic components such as the inlet, precooler and nozzle has been finished and their aerodynamic performances were verified by wind tunnel tests and CFD analyses. A prototype model of the diagonal-flow compressor whose pressure ratio is 6 was manufactured. Its rotating tests under the very-low pressure conditions are now in progress. The reverse-flow annular combustion chamber was successfully tested. The first flight test of the S-engine is to be conducted in 2008 by the balloon-based operation vehicle (BOV) which is about 5 m in length, 0.55 m in diameter and 500 kg in weight. The vehicle is dropped from an altitude of 40 km by a high altitude balloon. After 40-s free-fall, the vehicle pulls up and S-engine operates for 30 s at about Mach 2. High altitude tests of the engine components corresponding to the BOV's flight condition have been conducted.

  14. Longitudinal and retrospective study has demonstrated morphometric variations in the fingerprints of elderly individuals.

    PubMed

    Silva, Lara Rosana Vieira; Mizokami, Leila Lopes; Vieira, Paola Rabello; Kuckelhaus, Selma Aparecida Souza

    2016-02-01

    Dermatoglyphics can be found in the thick skin of both hands and feet which make the identification process possible, however morphological changes throughout life can affect identification in elderly individuals. Considering that dermatoglyphics is an important biometric method, due to it being practical and inexpensive, this longitudinal and retrospective study was aimed to evaluate the morphological variations in fingerprints obtained from men and women (n=20) during their adult and elderly stages of life; the time between obtaining the two fingerprints was 33.5±9.4 years. For the morphometric analysis, an area of 1 cm(2) was selected to quantify the visible friction ridges, minutiae, interpapillary and white lines, and later side-by-side confrontation was used to determine the identity of the individuals. Our results showed a reduction of friction ridges, an increase in the number of white lines for the group (men and women) and a decrease in the number of interpapillary lines in the group of women. It also showed that the selection of compatible fingerprints by the automated AFIS/VRP system allowed the identification of 23 individuals (57.5%), but when the identification was made by the automated AFIS/VRP system, followed by the analysis of archived patterns to eliminate incompatible fingerprints, determination of the identity of 28 individuals (70.0%) was possible. The dermatoglyphics of the elderly suffered morphometric changes that prevented the identification of 30% of them, probably due to the aging process, and pointed to the importance of improving the methods of obtaining fingerprints to clarify issues related to the identification of the elderly. PMID:26734989

  15. Specification aggregate quarry expansion: a case study demonstrating sustainable management of natural aggregate resources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langer, William H.; Tucker, M.L.

    2003-01-01

    Many countries, provinces, territories, or states in the European Union, Australia, Canada, the United States, and elsewhere have begun implementing sustainability programs, but most of those programs stop short of sustainable management of aggregate resources. Sustainable practices do not always have to be conducted under the title of sustainability. This case study describes how Lafarge, a large multinational construction materials supplier, implemented the principles of sustainability even though there was an absence of existing local government policies or procedures addressing sustainable resource management. Jefferson County, Colorado, USA, is one of three counties in the six-county Denver, Colorado, region that has potentially available sources of crushed stone. Crushed stone comprises 30 percent of the aggregate produced in the area and plays a major role in regional aggregate resource needs. Jefferson County is home to four of the five crushed stone operations in the Denver region. Lafarge operates one of those four quarries. Lafarge recently proposed to expand its reserves by exchanging company-owned land for existing dedicated open space land adjacent to their quarry but owned by Jefferson County. A similar proposal submitted about 10 years earlier had been denied. Contrary to the earlier proposal, which was predicated on public relations, the new proposal was predicated on public trust. Although not explicitly managed under the moniker of sustainability, Lafarge used basic management principles that embody the tenets of sustainability. To achieve the goals of sustainable aggregate management where no governmental policies existed, Lafarge not only assumed their role of being a responsible corporate and environmental member of the community, but also assumed the role of facilitator to encourage and enable other stakeholders to responsibly resolve legitimate concerns regarding the Lafarge quarry proposal. Lafarge successfully presented an enlightened

  16. Including stratigraphic hierarchy information in geostatistical simulation: a demonstration study on analogs of alluvial sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comunian, Alessandro; Felletti, Fabrizio; Giacobbo, Francesca; Giudici, Mauro; Bersezio, Riccardo

    2015-04-01

    When building a geostatistical model of the hydrofacies distribution in a volume block it is important to include all the relevant available information. Localised information about the observed hydrofacies (hard data) are routinely included in the simulation procedures. Non stationarities in the hydrofacies distribution can be handled by considering auxiliary (soft) data extracted, for example, from the results of geophysical surveys. This piece of information can be included as auxiliary data both in variogram based methods (i.e. co-Kriging) and in multiple-point statistics (MPS) methods. The latter methods allow to formalise some soft knowledge about the considered model of heterogeneity using a training image. However, including information related to the stratigraphic hierarchy in the training image is rarely straightforward. In this work, a methodology to include the information about the stratigraphic hierarchy in the simulation process is formalised and implemented in a MPS framework. The methodology is applied and tested by reconstructing two model blocks of alluvial sediments with an approximate volume of few cubic meters. The external faces of the blocks, exposed in a quarry, were thoroughly mapped and their stratigraphic hierarchy was interpreted in a previous study. The bi-dimensional (2D) maps extracted from the faces, which are used as training images and as hard data, present a vertical trend and complex stratigraphic architectures. The training images and the conditioning data are classified according to the proposed stratigraphic hierarchy, and the hydrofacies codes are grouped to allow a sequence of interleaved binary MPS simulation. Every step of the simulation sequence corresponds to a group of hydrofacies defined in the stratigraphic hierarchy. The blocks simulated with the proposed methodology are compared with blocks simulated with a standard MPS approach. The comparisons are performed on many realisations using connectivity indicators and

  17. Experimental Studies on Model Reference Adaptive Control with Integral Action Employing a Rotary Encoder and Tachometer Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Guo-Qiang; Wu, Shu-Nan; Bai, Yu-Guang; Liu, Lei

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, an adaptive law with an integral action is designed and implemented on a DC motor by employing a rotary encoder and tachometer sensors. The stability is proved by using the Lyapunov function. The tracking errors asymptotically converge to zero according to the Barbalat lemma. The tracking performance is specified by a reference model, the convergence rate of Lyapunov function is specified by the matrix Q and the control action and the state weighting are restricted by the matrix Γ. The experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed control. The maximum errors of the position and velocity with the integral action are reduced from 0.4 V and 1.5 V to 0.2 V and 0.4 V, respectively. The adaptive control with the integral action gives satisfactory performance, even when it suffers from input disturbance. PMID:23575034

  18. Demonstration Explosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Charles "Skip"

    1998-05-01

    Last week I did a demonstration that produced a serious explosion. After putting methanol in a big glass carboy and rotating the carboy to build up some methanol vapor, I lit the mouth of the carboy. What normally happens is a "jet engine" effect out of the mouth of the carboy. In my case, the carboy exploded. Two polycarbonate blast shields were shattered and glass was blown as far as 15 feet away. I was not seriously cut and bruised, but had I not been using the two blast shields, I would have been severely injured. At this time, I am not sure what caused the explosion. I have done this demonstration around one hundred times with no problem using the exact same amount of methanol and technique. I think it is important to get the word out that this demonstration may be more dangerous than previously thought. I would also welcome any hypotheses concerning what caused the carboy to explode.

  19. Vortex Apparatus and Demonstrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakerin, Said

    2010-05-01

    Vortex flow, from millimeter to kilometer in scale, is important in many scientific and technological areas. Examples are seen in water strider locomotion, from industrial pipe flow (wastewater treatment) to air traffic control (safe distance between aircrafts on a runway ready for takeoff) to atmospheric studies.2-5 In this paper, we focus on a particular vortex known as bathtub vortex (BTV). It occurs when water is drained from a hole at the bottom of a container such as a bathtub or a sink under the action of gravity. The vortex has a funnel shape with a central air core, resembling a tornado. We have designed a portable apparatus to demonstrate bathtub vortex on a continual basis. The apparatus consists of a clear cylinder supported by a frame over a water reservoir and a submersible pump. Young and old have been equally amazed by watching the demonstrations at various public presentations held at the University of the Pacific recently. With material cost of less than 100, the apparatus can be easily fabricated and used at other universities. With a short set-up time, it is an ideal device for promoting science to the general public, and it can be used to enhance lectures in physics courses as well.

  20. Polychlorinated biphenyls in the electrical machinery industry: an ethnological study of community action and corporate responsibility.

    PubMed

    Nash, J; Kirsch, M

    1986-01-01

    Environmental and occupational health problems cannot be understood through purely medical and epidemiological analyses, the social forces affecting biologically adaptive behavior must also be analyzed. Research on the political economy of health needs to generate an ethnology of community action relevant to the analyses of corporate structures for which it is best known. In studying the community of Pittsfield, Mass., where a General Electric plant is located, we encountered environmental and occupational health problems in just this context. This essay is, therefore, an effort to extend the political economy of health into the ethnological domain of community research. PMID:3092365

  1. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L.

    1983-01-01

    An apparatus is described in which effects of pressure, volume, and temperature changes on a gas can be observed simultaneously. Includes use of the apparatus in demonstrating Boyle's, Gay-Lussac's, and Charles' Laws, attractive forces, Dalton's Law of Partial pressures, and in illustrating measurable vapor pressures of liquids and some solids.…

  2. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses three broad classes of magnetic behavior: diamagnetic, paramagnetic, and ferromagnetic. Presents a simple lecture demonstration using an overhead projector to synthesize triiron tetraoxide and to show its interaction with a magnetic field and comparing it to a paramagnetic material. (MVL)

  3. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1985-01-01

    Describes two demonstrations that require almost no preparation time, are visually stimulating, and present a variety of material for class discussion (with sample questions provided). The first involves a sodium bicarbonate hydrochloric acid volcano; the second involves a dissolving polystyrene cup. Procedures used and information on…

  4. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cliche, Jean-Marie; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes two demonstrations: 1) the effect of polarity on solubility using sodium dichromate, TTE, ligroin, and water to form nonpolar-polar-nonpolar layers with the polar layer being colored; 2) determination of egg whites to be yellow by determining the content of yellow colored riboflavin in the egg white. (MVL)

  5. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1981-01-01

    Provides instructions and a list of materials needed to demonstrate: (1) a model of the quantum mechanical atom; (2) principles involved in metal corrosion and in the prevention of this destructive process by electrochemical means; and (3) a Thermit reaction, modified to make it more dramatic and interesting for students. (SK)

  6. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1985-01-01

    Background information, procedures, and typical results obtained are provided for two demonstrations. The first involves the colorful complexes of copper(II). The second involves reverse-phase separation of Food, Drug, and Cosmetic (FD & C) dyes using a solvent gradient. (JN)

  7. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1984-01-01

    Two demonstrations are described. The first shows the effect of polarity on solubility. The second is based on the unexpected formation of a precipitate of barium nitrate when barium carbonate or barium phosphate is treated with dilute nitric acid. List of materials needed and procedures used are included. (JN)

  8. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Describes two demonstrations to illustrate characteristics of substances. Outlines a method to detect the changes in pH levels during the electrolysis of water. Uses water pistols, one filled with methane gas and the other filled with water, to illustrate the differences in these two substances. (TW)

  9. Tested Demonstrations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1976-01-01

    Describes two demonstrations: one that illustrates the attainment of equilibrium in first-order reactions by changing the volumes of two beakers of water at a specified rate, and another that illustrates the role of indicators in showing pH changes in buffer solutions. (MLH)

  10. Neuroplasticity of imagined wrist actions after spinal cord injury: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Di Rienzo, Franck; Guillot, Aymeric; Mateo, Sébastien; Daligault, Sébastien; Delpuech, Claude; Rode, Gilles; Collet, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Motor imagery (MI - i.e., the mental representation of an action without physically executing it) stimulates brain motor networks and promotes motor learning after spinal cord injury (SCI). An interesting issue is whether the brain networks controlling MI are being reorganized with reference to spared motor functions. In this pilot study, we tested using magnetoencephalography (MEG) whether changes in cortical recruitment during MI were related to the motor changes elicited by rehabilitation. Over a 1-year period of inclusion, C6 SCI participants (n = 4) met stringent criteria for inclusion in a rehabilitation program focused on the tenodesis prehension (i.e., a compensatory prehension enabling seizing of objects in spite of hand and forearm muscles paralysis). After an extended baseline period of 5 weeks including repeated MEG and chronometric assessments of motor performance, MI training was embedded to the classical course of physiotherapy for five additional weeks. Posttest MEG and motor performance data were collected. A group of matched healthy control participants underwent a similar procedure. The MI intervention resulted in changes in the variability of the wrist extensions, i.e., a key movement of the tenodesis grasp (p < .05). Interestingly, the extent of cortical recruitment, quantified by the number of MEG activation sources recorded within Brodmann areas 1-8 during MI of the wrist extension, significantly predicted actual movement variability changes across sessions (p < .001). However, no such relationship was present for movement times. Repeated measurements afforded a reliable statistical power (range .70-.97). This pilot study does not provide straightforward evidence of MI efficacy, which would require a randomized controlled trial. Nonetheless, the data showed that the relationship between action and imagery of spared actions may be preserved after SCI. PMID:25300960

  11. Development, Demonstration, and Dissemination: Case Studies of Selected Specific Projects in Adult Basic Education. Occasional Paper No. 42.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beder, Harold W.; Darkenwald, Gordon G.

    In an effort to determine the effectiveness of 309 (b) projects (experimental demonstration projects in Adult Basic Education funded through the Adult Education Act), selected projects were used as the basis for several case studies and evaluated. Project RFD was never intended to be utilized by Adult Basic Education (ABE) programs but instead…

  12. DEMONSTRATION OF FUEL CELLS TO RECOVER ENERGY FROM ANAEROBIC DIGESTER GAS - PHASE I. CONCEPTUAL DESIGN, PRELIMINARY COST, AND EVALUATION STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report discusses Phase I (a conceptual design, preliminary cost, and evaluation study) of a program to demonstrate the recovery of energy from waste methane produced by anaerobic digestion of waste water treatment sludge. The fuel cell is being used for this application becau...

  13. The Effect of Interactive Lecture Demonstrations on Students' Understanding of Heat and Temperature: A Study from Thailand

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanahoung, Choksin; Chitaree, Ratchapak; Soankwan, Chernchok; Sharma, Manjula D.; Johnston, Ian D.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of Interactive Lecture Demonstrations over traditional instruction on university students' understanding of heat and temperature. The participants were 327 first year undergraduate students from two science classes in two academic years from the same university in Thailand. One class…

  14. Moving mirrors: a high-density EEG study investigating the effect of camera movements on motor cortex activation during action observation.

    PubMed

    Heimann, Katrin; Umiltà, Maria Alessandra; Guerra, Michele; Gallese, Vittorio

    2014-09-01

    Action execution-perception links (mirror mechanism) have been repeatedly suggested to play crucial roles in social cognition. Remarkably, the designs of most studies exploring this topic so far excluded even the simplest traces of social interaction, such as a movement of the observer toward another individual. This study introduces a new design by investigating the effects of camera movements, possibly simulating the observer's own approaching movement toward the scene. We conducted a combined high-density EEG and behavioral study investigating motor cortex activation during action observation measured by event-related desynchronization and resynchronization (ERD/ERS) of the mu rhythm. Stimuli were videos showing a goal-related hand action filmed while using the camera in four different ways: filming from a fixed position, zooming in on the scene, approaching the scene by means of a dolly, and approaching the scene by means of a steadycam. Results demonstrated a consistently stronger ERD of the mu rhythm for videos that were filmed while approaching the scene with a steadycam. Furthermore, videos in which the zoom was applied reliably demonstrated a stronger rebound. A rating task showed that videos in which the camera approached the scene were felt as more involving and the steadycam was most able to produce a visual experience close to the one of a human approaching the scene. These results suggest that filming technique predicts time course specifics of ERD/ERS during action observation with only videos simulating the natural vision of a walking human observer eliciting a stronger ERD than videos filmed from a fixed position. This demonstrates the utility of ecologically designed studies for exploring social cognition. PMID:24666130

  15. The impact of inquiry-based instructional professional development upon instructional practice: An action research study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broom, Frances A.

    This mixed method case study employs action research, conducted over a three month period with 11 elementary math and science practitioners. Inquiry as an instructional practice is a vital component of math and science instruction and STEM teaching. Teachers examined their beliefs and teaching practices with regard to those instructional factors that influence inquiry instruction. Video-taped lessons were compared to a rubric and pre and post questionnaires along with two interviews which informed the study. The results showed that while most beliefs were maintained, teachers implemented inquiry at a more advanced level after examining their teaching and reflecting on ways to increase inquiry practices. Because instructional practices provide only one component of inquiry-based instruction, other components need to be examined in a future study.

  16. Applying Organizational Theories to Action Research in Community Settings: A Case Study in Urban Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryan, Keli S.; Klein, Dena A.; Elias, Maurice J.

    2007-01-01

    Action research is well grounded in the worlds of organizational and community psychology. The practice of action research within each of these fields has been shaped by their dominant settings, theories, and values; where these diverge, rich learning opportunities have been created. Each phase of the action research cycle has particular…

  17. The Influence of Action Perception on Object Recognition: A Developmental Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mounoud, Pierre; Duscherer, Katia; Moy, Guenael; Perraudin, Sandrine

    2007-01-01

    Two experiments explored the existence and the development of relations between action representations and object representations. A priming paradigm was used in which participants viewed an action pantomime followed by the picture of a tool, the tool being either associated or unassociated with the preceding action. Overall, we observed that the…

  18. Genomic and Proteomic Studies on the Mode of Action of Oxaboroles against the African Trypanosome

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Deuan C.; Foth, Bernardo J.; Urbaniak, Michael D.; Patterson, Stephen; Ong, Han B.; Berriman, Matthew; Fairlamb, Alan H.

    2015-01-01

    SCYX-7158, an oxaborole, is currently in Phase I clinical trials for the treatment of human African trypanosomiasis. Here we investigate possible modes of action against Trypanosoma brucei using orthogonal chemo-proteomic and genomic approaches. SILAC-based proteomic studies using an oxaborole analogue immobilised onto a resin was used either in competition with a soluble oxaborole or an immobilised inactive control to identify thirteen proteins common to both strategies. Cell-cycle analysis of cells incubated with sub-lethal concentrations of an oxaborole identified a subtle but significant accumulation of G2 and >G2 cells. Given the possibility of compromised DNA fidelity, we investigated long-term exposure of T. brucei to oxaboroles by generating resistant cell lines in vitro. Resistance proved more difficult to generate than for drugs currently used in the field, and in one of our three cell lines was unstable. Whole-genome sequencing of the resistant cell lines revealed single nucleotide polymorphisms in 66 genes and several large-scale genomic aberrations. The absence of a simple consistent mechanism among resistant cell lines and the diverse list of binding partners from the proteomic studies suggest a degree of polypharmacology that should reduce the risk of resistance to this compound class emerging in the field. The combined genetic and chemical biology approaches have provided lists of candidates to be investigated for more detailed information on the mode of action of this promising new drug class. PMID:26684831

  19. Involvement of the Motor System in Comprehension of Non-Literal Action Language: A Meta-Analysis Study.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie; Shu, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Although numerous studies have shown that the sensory-motor system is involved in semantic processing of language stimuli, it is still unclear whether comprehension of abstract concepts is embodied, and whether the involvement of the sensory-motor system is context-dependent. Investigation of how the motor system is activated during comprehension of non-literal action languages can help address these issues. So far several studies have reported brain activations during non-literal action language comprehension, but the findings are highly inconsistent because of different types of non-literal action language stimuli. To clarify how the motor system is involved in comprehension of different types of non-literal languages, the current study conducted quantitative meta-analyses on fMRI findings about comprehension of sentences describing fictive motions, metaphoric actions, and idiomatic actions. Results showed that fictive motion sentences elicited activation in the right parahippocampal gyrus, an area important for spatial processing. For metaphoric actions, the left precentral gyrus (BA 6) was strongly activated, suggesting a link between metaphoric and literal meanings. For idiomatic actions, activity was found in the left inferior frontal gyrus (BA 44/45), highlighting semantic selection and inhibition. No premotor or motor activity was found in idiom condition. These results together suggest that the involvement of the sensory-motor system in abstract concepts processing is flexible, depending on semantic features of the language stimuli and links between abstract and literal meanings. PMID:25681159

  20. Factors Affecting Collective Action for Forest Fire Management: A Comparative Study of Community Forest User Groups in Central Siwalik, Nepal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapkota, Lok Mani; Shrestha, Rajendra Prasad; Jourdain, Damien; Shivakoti, Ganesh P.

    2015-01-01

    The attributes of social ecological systems affect the management of commons. Strengthening and enhancing social capital and the enforcement of rules and sanctions aid in the collective action of communities in forest fire management. Using a set of variables drawn from previous studies on the management of commons, we conducted a study across 20 community forest user groups in Central Siwalik, Nepal, by dividing the groups into two categories based on the type and level of their forest fire management response. Our study shows that the collective action in forest fire management is consistent with the collective actions in other community development activities. However, the effectiveness of collective action is primarily dependent on the complex interaction of various variables. We found that strong social capital, strong enforcement of rules and sanctions, and users' participation in crafting the rules were the major variables that strengthen collective action in forest fire management. Conversely, users' dependency on a daily wage and a lack of transparency were the variables that weaken collective action. In fire-prone forests such as the Siwalik, our results indicate that strengthening social capital and forming and enforcing forest fire management rules are important variables that encourage people to engage in collective action in fire management.

  1. Factors affecting collective action for forest fire management: a comparative study of community forest user groups in central Siwalik, Nepal.

    PubMed

    Sapkota, Lok Mani; Shrestha, Rajendra Prasad; Jourdain, Damien; Shivakoti, Ganesh P

    2015-01-01

    The attributes of social ecological systems affect the management of commons. Strengthening and enhancing social capital and the enforcement of rules and sanctions aid in the collective action of communities in forest fire management. Using a set of variables drawn from previous studies on the management of commons, we conducted a study across 20 community forest user groups in Central Siwalik, Nepal, by dividing the groups into two categories based on the type and level of their forest fire management response. Our study shows that the collective action in forest fire management is consistent with the collective actions in other community development activities. However, the effectiveness of collective action is primarily dependent on the complex interaction of various variables. We found that strong social capital, strong enforcement of rules and sanctions, and users' participation in crafting the rules were the major variables that strengthen collective action in forest fire management. Conversely, users' dependency on a daily wage and a lack of transparency were the variables that weaken collective action. In fire-prone forests such as the Siwalik, our results indicate that strengthening social capital and forming and enforcing forest fire management rules are important variables that encourage people to engage in collective action in fire management. PMID:25413128

  2. Experimental Semiotics: A New Approach For Studying Communication As A Form Of Joint Action

    PubMed Central

    Galantucci, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    In the last few years, researchers have begun to investigate the emergence of novel forms of human communication in the laboratory. I survey this growing line of research, which may be called experimental semiotics, from three distinct angles. First, I situate the new approach in its theoretical and historical context. Second, I review a sample of studies that exemplify experimental semiotics. Third, I present an empirical study that illustrates how the new approach can help us understand the sociocognitive underpinnings of human communication. The main conclusion of the paper will be that, by reproducing micro samples of historical processes in the laboratory, experimental semiotics offers new powerful tools for investigating human communication as a form of joint action. PMID:25164941

  3. Differentiation of teaching and learning mathematics: an action research study in tertiary education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konstantinou-Katzi, Panagiota; Tsolaki, Eleni; Meletiou-Mavrotheris, Maria; Koutselini, Mary

    2013-04-01

    Diversity and differentiation within our classrooms, at all levels of education, is nowadays a fact. It has been one of the biggest challenges for educators to respond to the needs of all students in such a mixed-ability classroom. Teachers' inability to deal with students with different levels of readiness in a different way leads to school failure and all the negative outcomes that come with it. Differentiation of teaching and learning helps addressing this problem by respecting the different levels that exist in the classroom, and by responding to the needs of each learner. This article presents an action research study where a team of mathematics instructors and an expert in curriculum development developed and implemented a differentiated instruction learning environment in a first-year engineering calculus class at a university in Cyprus. This study provides evidence that differentiated instruction has a positive effect on student engagement and motivation and improves students' understanding of difficult calculus concepts.

  4. Do emotions or gender drive our actions? A study of motor distractibility.

    PubMed

    Ambron, Elisabetta; Rumiati, Raffaella I; Foroni, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    People's interaction with the social environment depends on the ability to attend social cues with human faces being a key vehicle of this information. This study explores whether directing the attention to gender or emotion of a face interferes with ongoing actions. In two experiments, participants reached for one of two possible targets by relying on one of two features of a face, namely, emotion (Experiment 1) or gender (Experiment 2) of a non-target stimulus (a task-relevant distractor). Participants' reaching movements deviated toward the task-relevant distractor in both experiments. However, when attending to the gender of the face the distractor effect was modulated by both gender (task-relevant feature) and emotion (task-irrelevant feature), with the largest movement deviation being observed toward angry male faces. Endogenous allocation of attention toward faces elicits a competing motor response to the ongoing action and the emotional content of the face contributes to this process at a more automatic and implicit level. PMID:26418348

  5. Eating tools in hand activate the brain systems for eating action: a transcranial magnetic stimulation study.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Kaori; Nakamura, Kimihiro; Oga, Tatsuhide; Nakajima, Yasoichi

    2014-07-01

    There is increasing neuroimaging evidence suggesting that visually presented tools automatically activate the human sensorimotor system coding learned motor actions relevant to the visual stimuli. Such crossmodal activation may reflect a general functional property of the human motor memory and thus can be operating in other, non-limb effector organs, such as the orofacial system involved in eating. In the present study, we predicted that somatosensory signals produced by eating tools in hand covertly activate the neuromuscular systems involved in eating action. In Experiments 1 and 2, we measured motor evoked response (MEP) of the masseter muscle in normal humans to examine the possible impact of tools in hand (chopsticks and scissors) on the neuromuscular systems during the observation of food stimuli. We found that eating tools (chopsticks) enhanced the masseter MEPs more greatly than other tools (scissors) during the visual recognition of food, although this covert change in motor excitability was not detectable at the behavioral level. In Experiment 3, we further observed that chopsticks overall increased MEPs more greatly than scissors and this tool-driven increase of MEPs was greater when participants viewed food stimuli than when they viewed non-food stimuli. A joint analysis of the three experiments confirmed a significant impact of eating tools on the masseter MEPs during food recognition. Taken together, these results suggest that eating tools in hand exert a category-specific impact on the neuromuscular system for eating. PMID:24835403

  6. Health activism and the logic of connective action. A case study of rare disease patient organisations

    PubMed Central

    Vicari, Stefania; Cappai, Franco

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT This exploratory work investigates the role of digital media in expanding health discourse practices in a way to transform traditional structures of agency in public health. By focusing on a sample of rare disease patient organisations as representative of contemporary health activism, this study investigates the role of digital communication in the development of (1) bottom-up sharing and co-production of health knowledge, (2) health public engagement dynamics and (3) health information pathways. Findings show that digital media affordances for patient organisations go beyond the provision of social support for patient communities; they ease one-way, two-way and crowdsourced processes of health knowledge sharing, exchange and co-production, provide personalised routes to health public engagement and bolster the emergence of varied pathways to health information where experiential knowledge and medical authority are equally valued. These forms of organisationally enabled connective action can help the surfacing of personal narratives that strengthen patient communities, the bottom-up production of health knowledge relevant to a wider public and the development of an informational and eventually cultural context that eases patients’ political action. PMID:27499676

  7. Collaborative agency to support integrated care for children, young people and families: an action research study

    PubMed Central

    Stuart, Kaz

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Collaboration was legislated in the delivery of integrated care in the early 2000s in the UK. This research explored how the reality of practice met the rhetoric of collaboration. Theory The paper is situated against a theoretical framework of structure, agency, identity and empowerment. Collectively and contextually these concepts inform the proposed model of ‘collaborative agency’ to sustain integrated care. The paper brings sociological theory on structure and agency to the dilemma of collaboration. Methods Participative action research was carried out in collaborative teams that aspired to achieve integrated care for children, young people and families between 2009 and 2013. It was a part time, PhD study in collaborative practice. Results The research established that people needed to be able to be jointly aware of their context, to make joint decisions, and jointly act in order to deliver integrated services, and proposes a model of collaborative agency derived from practitioner’s experiences and integrated action research and literature on agency. The model reflects the effects of a range of structures in shaping professional identity, empowerment, and agency in a dynamic. The author proposes that the collaborative agency model will support integrated care, although this is, as yet, an untested hypothesis. PMID:24868192

  8. Exploring the meaning of recovery-oriented care: an action-research study.

    PubMed

    Kidd, Susan; Kenny, Amanda; McKinstry, Carol

    2015-02-01

    The present study describes participants' perspectives of the meaning of recovery-oriented care in developing services for people with psychosocial disability associated with mental illness. Participants were involved in a 12-month cooperative inquiry action-research group from August 2012 to July 2013, with six consumers, four clinicians, and a carer. A major finding was the importance of the facilitation of dialogue that acknowledged the asymmetrical power differences between participants. Thematically-analysed data identified an overarching global theme: 'I want services to hear me'. The theme reflected a shared view that participation is important in service development. Actions included mapping the integration of consumer participation within a mental health service and developing workshops to support change. Addressing the asymmetrical power relationship inherent in traditional mental health design is important. Using participatory processes, structural discrimination is revealed, and tensions associated with clinical mental health services and psychiatric practice can be discussed. A partnership approach to service development enables the social determinants of health to be addressed more effectively, as well as supporting individual recovery. These approaches create the potential for genuine transformational change. Approaches that support coproduction and codesign have the potential to enable solutions. PMID:25394375

  9. The Characteristics of Action Research in Music Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cain, Tim

    2008-01-01

    This review article discusses the use of action research in music education and its potential for producing knowledge and improving practice. The discussion is situated in an analysis of action research studies in music education. The review demonstrates that action research in music education focuses on a wide variety of subject matter,…

  10. Comparative human bioavailability study of macrocrystalline nitrofurantoin and two prolonged-action hydroxymethylnitrofurantoin preparations.

    PubMed

    Guelen, P J; Boerema, J B; Vree, T B

    1988-12-01

    This single-blind crossover study compared the human bioavailability of macrocrystalline nitrofurantoin (Furadantine MC) and two prolonged-action hydroxymethylnitrofurantoin formulations (Urfadyn PL, bid, and Uridurine, tid), based on plasma nitrofurantoin concentrations and urinary nitrofurantoin excretion. The drugs were administered to 16 healthy females for a single day according to the recommended daily dosages. For comparison, Furadantine MC was administered both at the qid dosage recommended by the manufacturer and at tid dosage. Pharmacokinetic parameters determined were maximum plasma concentration after first dose, minimum plasma concentration after first dose, area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC), cumulative renal excretion over 30 hours (ARE), overall renal clearance, total body clearance, and bioavailability relative to Furadantine MC qid, based on plasma AUC (F) and ARE (Fren). F for Furadantine MC 100 mg tid was 108 +/- 25 percent (mean +/- SD); for Uridurine 100 mg tid and Urfadyn PL 100 mg bid, F equalled 86 +/- 33 percent and 53 +/- 20 percent (p less than 0.05), respectively. A similar relationship was observed between Fren for Furadantine MC 100 mg qid and the respective Fren of Furadantine MC 100 mg tid, Uridurine 100 mg tid, and Urfadyn PL 100 mg bid. No significant difference was found between the respective F and Fren of each of the drugs studied. Although bioavailability was comparable for Furadantine MC tid and qid, the single-day design of these studies precludes inferring that these dosage schedules are therapeutically equivalent. However, the significantly lower relative bioavailabilities for the prolonged-action hydroxymethylnitrofurantoin formulations suggest that Urfadyn PL 100 mg bid and Uridurine 100 mg tid are not pharmacokinetically equivalent to Furadantine MC. PMID:3243175

  11. Review of toluene action: clinical evidence, animal studies and molecular targets

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Silvia L.; Rivera-García, María Teresa; Woodward, John J.

    2014-01-01

    It has long been known that individuals will engage in voluntary inhalation of volatile solvents for their rewarding effects. However, research into the neurobiology of these agents has lagged behind that of more commonly used drugs of abuse such as psychostimulants, alcohol and nicotine. This imbalance has begun to shift in recent years as the serious effects of abused inhalants, especially among children and adolescents, on brain function and behavior have become appreciated and scientifically documented. In this review, we discuss the physicochemical and pharmacological properties of toluene, a representative member of a large class of organic solvents commonly used as inhalants. This is followed by a brief summary of the clinical and pre-clinical evidence showing that toluene and related solvents produce significant effects on brain structures and processes involved in the rewarding aspects of drugs. This is highlighted by tables highlighting toluene’s effect on behaviors (reward, motor effects, learning, etc.) and cellular proteins (e.g. voltage and ligand-gated ion channels) closely associated the actions of abused substances. These sections demonstrate not only the significant progress that has been made in understanding the neurobiological basis for solvent abuse but also reveal the challenges that remain in developing a coherent understanding of this often overlooked class of drugs of abuse. PMID:25360325

  12. Case study: the Argentina Road Safety Project: lessons learned for the decade of action for road safety, 2011-2020.

    PubMed

    Raffo, Veronica; Bliss, Tony; Shotten, Marc; Sleet, David; Blanchard, Claire

    2013-12-01

    This case study of the Argentina Road Safety Project demonstrates how the application of World Bank road safety project guidelines focused on institution building can accelerate knowledge transfer, scale up investment and improve the focus on results. The case study highlights road safety as a development priority and outlines World Bank initiatives addressing the implementation of the World Report on Road Traffic Injury's recommendations and the subsequent launch of the Decade of Action for Road Safety, from 2011-2020. The case study emphasizes the vital role played by the lead agency in ensuring sustainable road safety improvements and promoting the shift to a 'Safe System' approach, which necessitated the strengthening of all elements of the road safety management system. It summarizes road safety performance and institutional initiatives in Argentina leading up to the preparation and implementation of the project. We describe the project's development objectives, financing arrangements, specific components and investment staging. Finally, we discuss its innovative features and lessons learned, and present a set of supplementary guidelines, both to assist multilateral development banks and their clients with future road safety initiatives, and to encourage better linkages between the health and transportation sectors supporting them. PMID:24722740

  13. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenster, Ariel E.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Identifies a technique using methylene blue and glucose to explain a genetically related enzyme shortage causing blue skin in humans. Offers a laser technique to study solubility of silver salts of chloride and chromate. Encourages the use of models and class participation in the study of chirality and enantiomers. (ML)

  14. Functionally Optimized Neuritogenic Farinosone C Analogs: SAR-Study and Investigations on Their Mode of Action

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Several natural products derived from entomopathogenic fungi have been shown to initiate neuronal differentiation in the rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cell line. After the successful completion of the total synthesis program, the reduction of structural complexity while retaining biological activity was targeted. In this study, farinosone C served as a lead structure and inspired the preparation of small molecules with reduced complexity, of which several were able to induce neurite outgrowth. This allowed for the elaboration of a detailed structure–activity relationship. Investigations on the mode of action utilizing a computational similarity ensemble approach suggested the involvement of the endocannabinoid system as potential target for our analogs and also led to the discovery of four potent new endocannabinoid transport inhibitors. PMID:24900793

  15. Studying tungsten under the cyclic action of a plasma gun jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voronin, A. V.; Gusev, V. K.; Demina, E. V.; Novokhatskii, A. N.; Prusakova, M. D.

    2014-12-01

    We have studied the cyclic action of a plasma gun jet, which modeled nonstationary thermal load related to the edge localized modes (ELMs), on the surface of tungsten elements intended for the ITER divertor. The results revealed significant changes in both the structure and morphology of a surface layer. After 100 irradiation cycles, a columnar or "ridged" structure of elements perpendicular to the initial irradiated surface is formed. Exposure to 1000 cycles changes the mechanism of material degradation and radically modifies the character of the surface topography, since the ridges are melted with the formation of droplet structures. The surface becomes rough, a loose material layer appears under the irradiated surface, and a 100-μm-thick recrystallized layer is formed.

  16. In vitro and in vivo studies of ribavirin action on Brazilian Orthobunyavirus.

    PubMed

    Livonesi, Márcia C; De Sousa, Ricardo L Moro; Badra, Soraya J; Figueiredo, Luiz T M

    2006-11-01

    Oropouche, Caraparu, Guama, Guaroa, and Tacaiuma are viruses (genus Orthobunyavirus) that cause human febrile illnesses and encephalitis. The goal of this study was to evaluate the antiviral action of ribavirin on these orthobunyaviruses to achieve a therapeutical agent to treat the diseases caused by these viruses. In vitro results showed that ribavirin (50 microg/mL) had antiviral activity only on the Tacaiuma virus. Addition of guanosine in the culture reversed the antiviral effect of ribavirin on Tacaiuma virus, suggesting that ribavirin inhibited this virus by reducing the intra-cellular guanosine pool. Moreover, ribavirin was not an effective drug in vivo because it was unable to inhibit the death of the mice or virus replication in the brain. The results suggest that ribavirin has no antiviral activity on the Oropouche, Caraparu, Guama, Guaroa, or Tacaiuma viruses; consequently, ribavirin would not be a good therapeutical agent to treat these arboviruses. PMID:17124004

  17. The study of hydrogen peroxide level under cisplatin action using genetically encoded sensor hyper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belova, A. S.; Orlova, A. G.; Maslennikova, A. V.; Brilkina, A. A.; Balalaeva, I. V.; Antonova, N. O.; Mishina, N. M.; Shakhova, N. M.; Belousov, V. V.

    2014-03-01

    The aim of the work was to study the participation of hydrogen peroxide in reaction of cervical cancer cell line HeLa Kyoto on cisplatin action. Determination of hydrogen peroxide level was performed using genetically encoded fluorescent sensor HyPer2. The dependence of cell viability on cisplatin concentration was determined using MTT assay. Mechanisms of cell death as well as HyPer2 reaction was revealed by flow cytometry after 6-hours of incubation with cisplatin in different concentrations. Cisplatin used in low concentrations had no effect on hydrogen peroxide level in HeLa Kyoto cells. Increase of HyPer2 fluorescence was detected only after exposure with cisplatin in high concentration. The reaction was not the consequence of cell death.

  18. Therapeutic antibodies: their mechanisms of action and the pathological findings they induce in toxicity studies

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Masami; Kato, Chie; Kato, Atsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies can swiftly provide therapeutics to target disease-related molecules discovered in genomic research. Antibody engineering techniques have been actively developed and these technological innovations have intensified the development of therapeutic antibodies. From the mid-1990’s, a series of therapeutic antibodies were launched that are now being used in clinic. The disease areas that therapeutic antibodies can target have subsequently expanded, and antibodies are currently utilized as pharmaceuticals for cancer, inflammatory disease, organ transplantation, cardiovascular disease, infection, respiratory disease, ophthalmologic disease, and so on. This paper briefly describes the modes of action of therapeutic antibodies. Several non-clinical study results of the pathological changes induced by therapeutic antibodies are also presented to aid the future assessment of the toxic potential of an antibody developed as a therapeutic. PMID:26441475

  19. Effect of holmium and erbium laser action on the human lens: an in-vitro study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasprzak, Jan; Kecik, Dariusz

    1997-10-01

    We investigated the holmium and erbium lasers operating at the medium IR range, used for cataract surgery. The main advantage of these lasers action on biological structures is total absorption of radiation by superficial layers. During the study of the lens emulsification process we found that the mechanical properties of the lens nucleus were of crucial importance for the rate of emulsification. The soft lenses were fragmented and emulsified after 200-700 pulses, while the hard lens required 5000 or more pulses while complete emulsification was not achieved. The results are promising and show that the holmium and erbium lasers can be used for human lens emulsification during ECCE. For clinical purposes, however, it is necessary to construct a suitable fiberoptic tip to be used in cataract removal. It seems that lasers whose beam is in the medium IR range could be used in many ophthalmic operations.

  20. Scientist-Teacher Partnerships as Professional Development: An Action Research Study

    SciTech Connect

    Willcuts, Meredith H.

    2009-04-01

    The overall purpose of this action research study was to explore the experiences of ten middle school science teachers involved in a three-year partnership program between scientists and teachers at a Department of Energy national laboratory, including the impact of the program on their professional development, and to improve the partnership program by developing a set of recommendations based on the study’s findings. This action research study relied on qualitative data including field notes recorded at the summer academies and data from two focus groups with teachers and scientists. Additionally, the participating teachers submitted written reflections in science notebooks, participated in open-ended telephone interviews that were transcribed verbatim, and wrote journal summaries to the Department of Energy at the end of the summer academy. The analysis of the data, collaboratively examined by the teachers, the scientists, and the science education specialist acting as co-researchers on the project, revealed five elements critical to the success of the professional development of science teachers. First, scientist-teacher partnerships are a unique contribution to the professional development of teachers of science that is not replicated in other forms of teacher training. Second, the role of the science education specialist as a bridge between the scientists and teachers is a unique and vital one, impacting all aspects of the professional development. Third, there is a paradox for classroom teachers as they view the professional development experience from two different lenses – that of learner and that of teacher. Fourth, learning for science teachers must be designed to be constructivist in nature. Fifth, the principles of the nature of science must be explicitly showcased to be seen and understood by the classroom teacher.

  1. GASIS demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Vidas, E.H.

    1995-04-01

    A prototype of the GASIS database and retrieval software has been developed and is the subject of this poster session and computer demonstration. The prototype consists of test or preliminary versions of the GASIS Reservoir Data System and Source Directory datasets and the software for query and retrieval. The prototype reservoir database covers the Rocky Mountain region and contains the full GASIS data matrix (all GASIS data elements) that will eventually be included on the CD-ROM. It is populated for development purposes primarily by the information included in the Rocky Mountain Gas Atlas. The software has been developed specifically for GASIS using Foxpro for Windows. The application is an executable file that does not require Foxpro to run. The reservoir database software includes query and retrieval, screen display, report generation, and data export functions. Basic queries by state, basin, or field name will be assisted by scrolling selection lists. A detailed query screen will allow record selection on the basis of any data field, such as depth, cumulative production, or geological age. Logical operators can be applied to any-numeric data element or combination of elements. Screen display includes a {open_quotes}browse{close_quotes} display with one record per row and a detailed single record display. Datasets can be exported in standard formats for manipulation with other software packages. The Source Directory software will allow record retrieval by database type or subject area.

  2. The Dilemma of High Level Planning in Distributed Agile Software Projects: An Action Research Study in a Danish Bank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svejvig, Per; Fladkjær Nielsen, Ann-Dorte

    The chapter reports on an action research study with the aim to design a high level planning process in distributed and co-located software projects based on agile methods. The main contributions are the insight that high level planning process is highly integrated with other project disciplines and specific steps has to be taken to apply the process in distributed projects; and the action research approach is indeed suitable to software process improvements.

  3. Are Sudanese community pharmacists capable to prescribe and demonstrate asthma inhaler devices to patrons? A mystery patient study

    PubMed Central

    Osman, Abuzar; Ahmed Hassan, Imad S.; Ibrahim, Mohamed Izham M.

    Although community pharmacists have become more involved in the care of asthma patients, several studies have assessed pharmacists’'ability to illustrate appropriately inhalation technique of different asthma devices. Many studies addressed inappropriate use of asthma devices by patients and pharmacists, in addition to its clinical, humanistic and economic burden. Objective To evaluate community pharmacists' practical knowledge and skills of demonstrating proper inhalation technique of asthma inhaler devices available in Sudan. Methods Three hundred community pharmacies located around the three major hospitals in the capital city (Khartoum) and four other provinces were approached, and four asthma devices were assessed: Metered-dose inhaler (MDI) (n=105), MDI with Spacer (n=83), Turbuhaler (n=61), and Diskus (n=51). Investigator (a pharmacist) acted as a mystery patient. He selected one device and asked the serving pharmacist to demonstrate how to use the device. Investigator completed a checklist of 9 steps of inhaler device use immediately after leaving the pharmacy. Essential steps derived from published literature were pre-specified for each device. Five evaluation categories were accordingly formulated as follows: optimal technique, adequate technique, poor technique, totally unfamiliar with the device, and does not know. Results More than half of the pharmacists approached with metered dose inhaler did not know how to use optimal technique (ie all steps correct) all through. A third poorly demonstrated the technique, and only one pharmacist was categorized as being able to demonstrate an "optimal technique". The majority of pharmacists approached with spacing chamber and dry powder inhalers (Turbuhaler and Diskus) either did not know proper technique or were totally unfamiliar with the devices. Conclusions The majority of community pharmacists, who were expected to educate asthma patients on their dispensed inhalers, lack the basic knowledge of proper use

  4. Mirtazapine orally disintegrating tablet versus sertraline: a prospective onset of action study.

    PubMed

    Behnke, Kirsten; Søgaard, Jesper; Martin, Stephen; Bäuml, Josef; Ravindran, Arun V; Agren, Hans; Vester-Blokland, Estelle D

    2003-08-01

    This multinational, randomized, double-blind study was specifically designed to prospectively compare the onset of antidepressant efficacy of mirtazapine orally disintegrating tablets and sertraline at dosages commonly used in clinical practice. A total of 345 patients with major depressive episode (DSM-IV) received mirtazapine (30-45 mg/d) or sertraline (50-150 mg/d) for 8 weeks. Mirtazapine was administered in the newly developed fast dissolving, orally disintegrating tablet formulation. Assessments were performed at baseline and on days 4, 7, 10, 14, 28, 42, and 56. The primary efficacy variable (mean absolute change from baseline in the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale [HAMD] total score [17 items]) showed that mirtazapine was significantly (P < 0.05) more effective than sertraline at all assessments during the first 2 weeks of the study. After this time, HAMD total scores were similar in both groups. These findings were supported by analysis of the HAMD response rate (ie, > or =50% reduction in HAMD total score from baseline), HAMD remission rate (HAMD total score of < or =7), and the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS). Both treatments were well tolerated. In addition, mirtazapine had a greater effect than sertraline on sexual functioning. In conclusion, this first prospective onset of action study using the orally disintegrating tablet indicates that mirtazapine has a faster onset of therapeutic effect than sertraline. The orally disintegrating tablet formulation of mirtazapine used in this study is known to enhance the convenience and compliance by the patient. PMID:12920411

  5. Synaptic action of R beta neurons on phrenic motoneurons studied with spike-triggered averaging.

    PubMed

    Lipski, J; Kubin, L; Jodkowski, J

    1983-12-12

    The functional role of dorsal medullary inspiratory neurons with excitatory input from lung stretch receptors (R beta neurons) is a matter of controversy. The present study, performed on chloralose-anesthetized and paralyzed cats, ventilated mainly with a phrenic-controlled servorespirator, deals with the spinal projection of these neurons, a property which suggests their involvement in the efferent part of the medullary respiratory complex. Out of 37 inspiratory neurons which could be excited antidromically following microstimulation within the contralateral C6 phrenic nucleus (latency 2.0 ms +/- 0.4, S.D.), 17 were classified by the 'no-inflation' test as R beta. Intracellular recording of synaptic potentials from phrenic motoneurons using the 'spike-triggered averaging' technique were made. In 10 phrenic motoneurons, the averaging revealed individual EPSPs (peak amplitude 150 +/- 110 microV, rise time 0.5 +/- 0.2 ms) time-locked to action potentials of 5 out of 7 R beta neurons tested. Cross-correlation of the R beta neurons firing with the activity of C5 and C6 phrenic rootlets indicated a divergence of excitatory action within the phrenic nucleus. For comparison, in 3 phrenic motoneurons individual EPSPs were recorded when the activity of 3 R alpha cells was used to trigger the averaging. It is concluded that at least some R beta neurons, similarly to R alpha neurons, project to the contralateral phrenic nucleus and can make monosynaptic excitatory connections with phrenic motoneurons. The finding that individual EPSPs were similar when averaging was triggered by the activity of either R beta or R alpha neurons provides new evidence for our earlier hypothesis that bulbospinal inspiratory neurons of the solitary tract nucleus may be subdivided into two categories only on a quantitative basis. PMID:6661613

  6. Regional health workforce planning through action research: lessons for commissioning health services from a case study in Far North Queensland.

    PubMed

    Panzera, Annette June; Murray, Richard; Stewart, Ruth; Mills, Jane; Beaton, Neil; Larkins, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Creating a stable and sustainable health workforce in regional, rural and remote Australia has long been a challenge to health workforce planners, policy makers and researchers alike. Traditional health workforce planning is often reactive and assumes continuation of current patterns of healthcare utilisation. This demonstration project in Far North Queensland exemplifies how participatory regional health workforce planning processes can accurately model current and projected local workforce requirements. The recent establishment of Primary Health Networks (PHNs) with the intent to commission health services tailored to individual healthcare needs underlines the relevance of such an approach. This study used action research methodology informed by World Health Organization (WHO) systems thinking. Four cyclical stages of health workforce planning were followed: needs assessment; health service model redesign; skills-set assessment and workforce redesign; and development of a workforce and training plan. This study demonstrated that needs-based loco-regional health workforce planning can be achieved successfully through participatory processes with stakeholders. Stronger health systems and workforce training solutions were delivered by facilitating linkages and planning processes based on community need involving healthcare professionals across all disciplines and sectors. By focusing upon extending competencies and skills sets, local health professionals form a stable and sustainable local workforce. Concrete examples of initiatives generated from this process include developing a chronic disease inter-professional teaching clinic in a rural town and renal dialysis being delivered locally to an Aboriginal community. The growing trend of policy makers decentralising health funding, planning and accountability and rising health system costs increase the future utility of this approach. This type of planning can also assist the new PHNs to commission health services

  7. The Prospects and Problems of African Social Studies Teachers as Action Researchers: A Spotlight on Ghana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asimeng-Boahene, Lewis

    2004-01-01

    Several accounts concerning the systematic use of action research by eminent educators in the process of identifying and solving an educational problem(s) have appeared in professional journals. Thus, action research is gaining recognition by policy makers and educators as a tool for change However, this growing concept has not yet caught up in…

  8. Our School at Blair Grocery: A Case Study in Promoting Environmental Action through Critical Environmental Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ceaser, Donovon

    2012-01-01

    Despite wide agreement on the goals of environmental education (EE), the promotion of action is still considered contentious. Critical environmental education (critical EE) teaches students to combine critical reflection with the ability to engage in local action to address social/environmental problems. This article examines a critical urban…

  9. Does Lean Production Sacrifice Learning in a Manufacturing Environment? An Action Learning Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Fiona M.; Butler, Jim; Edwards, John

    2001-01-01

    An action learning program was implemented by a manufacturer using lean production practices. Action learning practices were accommodated during times of stability, but abandoned in times of crisis. The meaning of work in this organizational culture excluded all practices, such as reflection, that were not visible and targeted at immediate…

  10. Virtual Action Learning: Experiences from a Study of an SME e-Learning Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Jean-Anne; Alexander, Gillian

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the findings from a project investigating management development for SME managers using an action learning programme, combining both face-to-face workshops and a virtual action learning environment. This programme was undertaken as part of the ENSeL (Engaging Networks for Sustainable eLearning) project, which was supported by…

  11. Meta-Action Research with Pre-Service Teachers: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villacañas de Castro, Luis Sebastián

    2014-01-01

    This article analyses a case of action research collaboratively conducted by a university teacher and 50 students in a master's course in teacher training. Its originality resides in the socio-economic, academic, and conceptual nature of the obstacles encountered in the module; in the meta-theoretical orientation of the action research that…

  12. Teacher Development through Action Research: A Case Study of an Elementary Teacher.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodnough, Karen

    2001-01-01

    Describes the experiences of an elementary teacher who collaborated on a science action research project with an action research group involving four teachers and a university researcher. The project allowed her to critically examine and change her instructional and assessment practices. She attributed her personal and professional growth to the…

  13. Work Plan for the Feasibility Study for Remedial Action at J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    SciTech Connect

    Benioff, P.; Biang, C.; Haffenden, R.; Goyette, M.; Martino, L.; Patton, T.; Yuen, C.

    1995-05-01

    The purpose of the feasibility study is to gather sufficient information to develop and evaluate alternative remedial actions to address contamination at J-Field in compliance with the NCP, CERCLA, and SARA. This FS Work Plan summarizes existing environmental data for each AOC and outlines the tasks to be performed to evaluate and select remedial technologies. The tasks to be performed will include (1) developing remedial action objectives and identifying response actions to meet these objectives; (2) identifying and screening remedial action technologies on the basis of effectiveness, implementability, and cost; (3) assembling technologies into comprehensive alternatives for J-Field; (4) evaluating, in detail, each alternative against the nine EPA evaluation criteria and comparing the alternatives to identify their respective strengths and weaknesses; and (5) selecting the preferred alternative for each operable unit.

  14. Feasibility study of contamination remediation at Naval Weapons Station, Concord, California. Volume 1. Remedial-action alternatives. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Cullinane, M.J.; Lee, C.R.; O'Neil, L.J.

    1988-09-01

    This report identifies and describes potential remedial actions to eliminate or mitigate the release of hazardous substances onto lands of the Naval Weapons Station, Concord, CA. Hazardous substances identified as necessitating remedial actions include lead, cadmium, zinc, copper, selenium, and arsenic. The proposed remedial actions are designed to address existing or potential impacts identified in a separate study. These identified impacts include: contamination of soil with metals; contamination and toxicity in plants and soil invertebrates; reduced plant growth; increased soil acidity; surface water contamination; air contamination; loss of quantity and quality of wildlife habitat; loss of wetland function; and loss of ultimate land use. The release of hazardous substances at seven sites was identified in the remedial investigation. The seven individual areas were consolidated into four remedial action subsites (RASS's) based on an analysis of the topography and nature of the habitat.

  15. Potential of Plant Essential Oils and Their Components in Animal Agriculture – in vitro Studies on Antibacterial Mode of Action

    PubMed Central

    O’Bryan, Corliss A.; Pendleton, Sean J.; Crandall, Philip G.; Ricke, Steven C.

    2015-01-01

    The antimicrobial activity of essential oils and their components has been recognized for several years. Essential oils are produced as secondary metabolites by many plants and can be distilled from all different portions of plants. The recent emergence of bacteria resistant to multiple antibiotics has spurred research into the use of essential oils as alternatives. Recent research has demonstrated that many of these essential oils have beneficial effects for livestock, including reduction of foodborne pathogens in these animals. Numerous studies have been made into the mode of action of essential oils, and the resulting elucidation of bacterial cell targets has contributed to new perspectives on countering antimicrobial resistance and pathogenicity of these bacteria. In this review, an overview of the current knowledge about the antibacterial mode of action of essential oils and their constituents is provided. PMID:26664964

  16. Feasibility study to demonstrate cardiac imaging using fast kVp switching dual-energy computed tomography: phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madhav, Priti; Imai, Yasuhiro; Narayanan, Suresh; Dutta, Sandeep; Chandra, Naveen; Hsieh, Jiang

    2012-03-01

    Dual-energy computed tomography is a novel imaging tool that has the potential to reduce beam hardening artifacts and enhance material separation over conventional imaging techniques. Dual-energy acquisitions can be performed by using a fast kVp technology to switch between acquiring adjacent projections at two distinct x-ray spectra (80 and 140 kVp). These datasets can be used to further compute material density and monochromatic images for better material separation and beam hardening reduction by virtue of the projection domain process. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of using dual-energy in cardiac imaging for myocardial perfusion detection and coronary artery lumen visualization. Data was acquired on a heart phantom, which consisted of the chambers and aorta filled with Iodine density solution (500 HU @ 120 kVp), a defect region between the aorta and chamber (40 HU @ 120 kVp), two Iodinefilled vessels (400 HU @ 120 kVp) of different diameters with high attenuation (hydroxyapatite) plaques (HAP), and with a 30-cm water equivalent body ring around the phantom. Prospective ECG-gated single-energy and prospective ECG-gated dual-energy imaging was performed. Results showed that the generated monochromatic images had minimal beam hardening artifacts which improved the accuracy and detection of the myocardial defect region. Material density images were useful in differentiating and quantifying the actual size of the plaque and coronary artery lumen. Overall, this study shows that dual-energy cardiac imaging will be a valuable tool for cardiac applications.

  17. Site sampling and treatability studies for demonstration of WasteChem's asphalt encapsulation technology under EPA's SITE program

    SciTech Connect

    Hubbard, J.; Tsadwa, S.; Wills, N.; Evans, M.

    1990-10-01

    This paper presents a sampling approach that was used to determine whether there were adequate quantities and concentrations of wastes at the Woodland Township Route 532 Site for demonstration of the asphalt encapsulation technology. This paper also presents the result of a bench-scale treatability study on wastes from this site. The preliminary sampling and analysis confirmed most of the types of organic and inorganic contaminants found at the Woodland Township Route 532 site during the remedial investigation (RI). However, the contamination levels varied over relatively short distances across the site from some contaminants. The bench-scale treatability study indicated that, when compared with concentrations in the untreated waste, WasteChem's asphalt encapsulation technology reduced semivolatile organic compound concentrations in the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure extracts of treated wastes. The study also indicated that metals concentrations in the TCLP extracts were lower in the treated wastes than the untreated wastes in some samples and higher in others.

  18. Seasat-A ASVT: Commercial demonstration experiments. Results analysis methodology for the Seasat-A case studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The SEASAT-A commercial demonstration program ASVT is described. The program consists of a set of experiments involving the evaluation of a real time data distributions system, the SEASAT-A user data distribution system, that provides the capability for near real time dissemination of ocean conditions and weather data products from the U.S. Navy Fleet Numerical Weather Central to a selected set of commercial and industrial users and case studies, performed by commercial and industrial users, using the data gathered by SEASAT-A during its operational life. The impact of the SEASAT-A data on business operations is evaluated by the commercial and industrial users. The approach followed in the performance of the case studies, and the methodology used in the analysis and integration of the case study results to estimate the actual and potential economic benefits of improved ocean condition and weather forecast data are described.

  19. Structural and Genetic Studies Demonstrate Neurologic Dysfunction in Triosephosphate Isomerase Deficiency Is Associated with Impaired Synaptic Vesicle Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Roland, Bartholomew P.; Zeccola, Alison M.; Larsen, Samantha B.; Amrich, Christopher G.; Talsma, Aaron D.; Stuchul, Kimberly A.; Heroux, Annie; Levitan, Edwin S.; VanDemark, Andrew P.; Palladino, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Triosephosphate isomerase (TPI) deficiency is a poorly understood disease characterized by hemolytic anemia, cardiomyopathy, neurologic dysfunction, and early death. TPI deficiency is one of a group of diseases known as glycolytic enzymopathies, but is unique for its severe patient neuropathology and early mortality. The disease is caused by missense mutations and dysfunction in the glycolytic enzyme, TPI. Previous studies have detailed structural and catalytic changes elicited by disease-associated TPI substitutions, and samples of patient erythrocytes have yielded insight into patient hemolytic anemia; however, the neuropathophysiology of this disease remains a mystery. This study combines structural, biochemical, and genetic approaches to demonstrate that perturbations of the TPI dimer interface are sufficient to elicit TPI deficiency neuropathogenesis. The present study demonstrates that neurologic dysfunction resulting from TPI deficiency is characterized by synaptic vesicle dysfunction, and can be attenuated with catalytically inactive TPI. Collectively, our findings are the first to identify, to our knowledge, a functional synaptic defect in TPI deficiency derived from molecular changes in the TPI dimer interface. PMID:27031109

  20. Case study of an approved corrective action integrating active remediation with intrinsic remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Teets, D.B.; Guest, P.R.; Blicker, B.R.

    1996-12-01

    Parsons Engineering Science, Inc., performed UST removals and/or site assessments at UST system locations at a former US Air Force Base (AFB) in Denver, Colorado. Four UST systems, incorporating 17 USTs, were located within the petroleum, oils, and lubricants bulk storage yard (POL Yard) of the former AFB. During the tank removals and subsequent site investigations, petroleum hydrocarbon contamination was found in soils at each site. Significant releases from two of the UST systems resulted in a dissolved benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX) plume in the groundwater, and smear-zone contamination of soils beneath the majority of the POL Yard. Because of the close proximity of the UST systems, and the presence of the groundwater plume beneath the POL Yard, a corrective action plan (CAP) was prepared that encompassed all four UST systems. An innovative, risk-based CAP integrated active remediation of petroleum-contaminated soils with intrinsic remediation of groundwater. A natural attenuation evaluation for the dissolved BTEX was performed to demonstrate that natural attenuation processes are providing adequate remediation of groundwater and to predict the fate of the groundwater plume. BTEX concentrations versus distance were regressed to obtain attenuation rates, which were then used to calculate BTEX degradation rates using a one-dimensional, steady-state analytical solution. Additionally, electron acceptor concentrations in groundwater were compared to BTEX concentrations to provide evidence that natural attenuation of BTEX compounds was occurring. The natural attenuation evaluation was used in the CAP to support the intrinsic remediation with long-term monitoring alternative for groundwater, thereby avoiding the installation of an expensive groundwater remediation system.

  1. Catalyst for Change: An Action Research Study Using Job-Embedded Professional Development to Integrate Technology in a Rural School District

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, William A., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    This action research study was designed to determine how job-embedded professional development changes teachers' perceptions about integrating technology into their classrooms. The study was based on an action research and matrix/logical analysis design. The researcher facilitated an action research intervention utilizing job-embedded professional…

  2. Action Experience and Action Discovery in Medicated Individuals with Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Bednark, Jeffery G; Reynolds, John N J; Stafford, Tom; Redgrave, Peter; Franz, Elizabeth A

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder that markedly affects voluntary action. While regular dopamine treatment can help restore motor function, dopamine also influences cognitive portions of the action system. Previous studies have demonstrated that dopamine medication boosts action-effect associations, which are crucial for the discovery of new voluntary actions. In the present study, we investigated whether neural processes involved in the discovery of new actions are altered in PD participants on regular dopamine treatment, compared to healthy age-matched controls. We recorded brain electroencephalography (EEG) activity while PD patients and age-matched controls performed action discovery (AD) and action control tasks. We found that the novelty P3, a component normally present when there is uncertainty about the occurrence of the sensory effect, was enhanced in PD patients. However, AD was maintained in PD patients, and the novelty P3 demonstrated normal learning-related reductions. Crucially, we found that in PD patients the causal association between an action and its resulting sensory outcome did not modulate the amplitude of the feedback correct-related positivity (fCRP), an EEG component sensitive to the association between an action and its resulting effect. Collectively, these preliminary results suggest that the formation of long-term action-outcome representations may be maintained in PD patients on regular dopamine treatment, but the initial experience of action-effect association may be affected. PMID:27610079

  3. Action Experience and Action Discovery in Medicated Individuals with Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bednark, Jeffery G.; Reynolds, John N. J.; Stafford, Tom; Redgrave, Peter; Franz, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder that markedly affects voluntary action. While regular dopamine treatment can help restore motor function, dopamine also influences cognitive portions of the action system. Previous studies have demonstrated that dopamine medication boosts action-effect associations, which are crucial for the discovery of new voluntary actions. In the present study, we investigated whether neural processes involved in the discovery of new actions are altered in PD participants on regular dopamine treatment, compared to healthy age-matched controls. We recorded brain electroencephalography (EEG) activity while PD patients and age-matched controls performed action discovery (AD) and action control tasks. We found that the novelty P3, a component normally present when there is uncertainty about the occurrence of the sensory effect, was enhanced in PD patients. However, AD was maintained in PD patients, and the novelty P3 demonstrated normal learning-related reductions. Crucially, we found that in PD patients the causal association between an action and its resulting sensory outcome did not modulate the amplitude of the feedback correct-related positivity (fCRP), an EEG component sensitive to the association between an action and its resulting effect. Collectively, these preliminary results suggest that the formation of long-term action-outcome representations may be maintained in PD patients on regular dopamine treatment, but the initial experience of action-effect association may be affected. PMID:27610079

  4. A case study of bats and white-nose syndrome demonstrating how to model population viability with evolutionary effects.

    PubMed

    Maslo, Brooke; Fefferman, Nina H

    2015-08-01

    Ecological factors generally affect population viability on rapid time scales. Traditional population viability analyses (PVA) therefore focus on alleviating ecological pressures, discounting potential evolutionary impacts on individual phenotypes. Recent studies of evolutionary rescue (ER) focus on cases in which severe, environmentally induced population bottlenecks trigger a rapid evolutionary response that can potentially reverse demographic threats. ER models have focused on shifting genetics and resulting population recovery, but no one has explored how to incorporate those findings into PVA. We integrated ER into PVA to identify the critical decision interval for evolutionary rescue (DIER) under which targeted conservation action should be applied to buffer populations undergoing ER against extinction from stochastic events and to determine the most appropriate vital rate to target to promote population recovery. We applied this model to little brown bats (Myotis lucifugus) affected by white-nose syndrome (WNS), a fungal disease causing massive declines in several North American bat populations. Under the ER scenario, the model predicted that the DIER period for little brown bats was within 11 years of initial WNS emergence, after which they stabilized at a positive growth rate (λ = 1.05). By comparing our model results with population trajectories of multiple infected hibernacula across the WNS range, we concluded that ER is a potential explanation of observed little brown bat population trajectories across multiple hibernacula within the affected range. Our approach provides a tool that can be used by all managers to provide testable hypotheses regarding the occurrence of ER in declining populations, suggest empirical studies to better parameterize the population genetics and conservation-relevant vital rates, and identify the DIER period during which management strategies will be most effective for species conservation. PMID:25808080

  5. Appropriate small dam management for minimizing catchment-wide safety threats: International benchmarked guidelines and demonstrative cases studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisaniello, John D.; Tingey-Holyoak, Joanne; Burritt, Roger L.

    2012-01-01

    Small dam safety is generally being ignored. The potential for dam failure resulting in catastrophic consequences for downstream communities, property, and the environment, warrants exploration of the threats and policy issues associated with the management of small/farm dams. The paper achieves this through a comparative analysis of differing levels of dam safety assurance policy: absent, driven, strong, and model. A strategic review is undertaken to establish international dam safety policy benchmarks and to identify a best practice model. A cost-effective engineering/accounting tool is presented to assist the policy selection process and complement the best practice model. The paper then demonstrates the significance of the small-dam safety problem with a case study of four Australian States,policy-absent South Australia, policy-driven Victoria, policy-strong New South Wales, and policy-modelTasmania. Surveys of farmer behavior practices provide empirical evidence of the importance of policy and its proper implementation. Both individual and cumulative farm dam failure threats are addressed and, with supporting empirical evidence, the need for "appropriate" supervision of small dams is demonstrated. The paper adds to the existing international dam policy literature by identifying acceptable minimum level practice in private/farm dam safety assurance policy as well as updated international best practice policy guidelines while providing case study demonstration of how to apply the guidelines and empirical reinforcement of the need for "appropriate" policy. The policy guidelines, cost-effective technology, and comparative lessons presented can assist any jurisdiction to determine and implement appropriate dam safety policy.

  6. In vivo toxicity study of N-1-sulfonylcytosine derivatives and their mechanisms of action in cervical carcinoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Kašnar-Šamprec, Jelena; Ratkaj, Ivana; Mišković, Katarina; Pavlak, Marina; Baus-Lončar, Mirela; Kraljević Pavelić, Sandra; Glavaš-Obrovac, Ljubica; Žinić, Biserka

    2012-06-01

    New N-1-sulfonylpyrimidines showed potent growth inhibitory activity against human and mouse tumour cells of different origin. 1-(p-toluenesulfonyl)cytosine (TsC) and 1-(p-toluenesulfonyl)cytosine hydrochloride (TsC × HCl) inhibited the growth of human cervical carcinoma cells (HeLa), and had no significant cytotoxic effects on normal human foreskin fibroblasts (BJ). TsC and TsC × HCl interfered with the HeLa cell cycle progression bringing about the accumulation of G1 phase cells and the induction of apoptosis. Antiproliferative effects of TsC and TsC × HCl were additionally confirmed by investigating de novo synthesis of RNA, DNA and proteins in HeLa cells. Monitoring gene expression using DNA Chip Analysis and quantitative PCR showed that TsC × HCl affects the expression of several cell-cycle regulating genes implying that cell cycle arrest and DNA damage-induced apoptosis might account for the observed cellular effects. In vivo experiments revealed low toxicity of TsC × HCl, as demonstrated by unaltered haematological and metabolic blood parameters. In conclusion, potent antitumour efficacy and low toxicity of new compounds in comparison with the common chemotherapy drug 5-FU make them promising anticancer agents. Additional pre-clinical and clinical studies are warranted to illuminate the mode of action of these newly synthesized compounds in vivo, which would lay the groundwork for their further optimization. PMID:21424699

  7. Free radical scavenging actions of hippocampal metallothionein isoforms and of antimetallothioneins: an electron spin resonance spectroscopic study.

    PubMed

    Kumari, M V; Hiramatsu, M; Ebadi, M

    2000-05-01

    The high concentration of zinc in the hippocampal mossy fiber axon boutons is localized in the vesicles and is mobilized by exocytosis of the zinc-laden vesicles. Furthermore, the mammalian hippocampi contain metallothionein (MT) isoforms which regulate the steady state concentration of zinc, an important antioxidant. Indeed, zinc deprivation leads to an increased lipid peroxidation, reduces the activity of Cu++-Zn++ superoxide dismutase, and protect against oxidative stress such as exposure to ultraviolet A irradiation. By employing electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy, we have demonstrated that rat hippocampal MT isoforms 1 and 2 were able to scavenge 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radicals (DPPH), hydroxyl radicals (*OH) generated in a Fenton reaction, and superoxide anions (O2*-) generated by the hypoxanthine and xanthine oxidase system. In addition, MT-1 isoform protected the isolated hepatocytes from lipid peroxidation as determined by thiobarbituric acid bound malondialdehyde. MT antibodies scavenged DPPH radicals, hydroxyl radicals and reactive oxygen species but not superoxide anions. The results of these studies suggest that although both isoforms of MT are able to scavenge free radicals, the MT-1 appears to be a superior scavenger of superoxide anions and 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radicals. Moreover, antibodies formed against MT isoform retain some, but not all, free radical scavenging actions exhibited by MT-1 and MT-2. PMID:10872749

  8. Comparative studies on the mechanisms of action of four polysaccharides on arterial restenosis.

    PubMed

    Deux, Jean-François; Meddahi-Pellé, Anne; Bree, Françoise; Bataille, Isabelle; Michel, Jean-Baptiste; Letourneur, Didier

    2009-01-01

    Percutaneous coronary interventions play a major role in the management of patients affected by coronary artery diseases. However, their efficiency is impaired by restenosis, defined as a reduction of the vessel lumen, occurring a few months after the procedure. A low-molecular-weight fraction of fucoidan, a vegetal heparin-like sulphated polysaccharide, was recently shown to greatly reduce in-stent restenosis after angioplasty in rabbits. To better understand the in vivo anti-restenotic effects of this polymer, we used fractions of fucoidan and compared to heparin and dextran of different sizes. We carried out in vitro growth inhibition experiments on vascular smooth muscle cells, performed an in vivo pharmacokinetic study, and locally delivered fluorescently-labeled polysaccharides in rabbit iliac arteries after angioplasty with a non-occlusive catheter. The results indicated that (i) preparation of well-characterized fractions from natural fucoidan is compulsory for in vitro and in vivo studies, (ii) antiproliferative activity of sulphated polysaccharides on cultured smooth muscle cells is not a major predictive factor for the reduction of restenosis in vivo and (iii) pharmacokinetic parameters and binding of low-molecular-weight fucoidan on angioplasty-induced injured vascular walls are important local and general factors controlling its mechanisms of action. PMID:19323884

  9. Effects of Action Video Game on Attention Distribution: A Cognitive Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuemin; Yan, Bin; Shu, Hua

    Based on the previous researches, Flanker compatibility effect paradigm was applied to explore the degree where people process the visual information presented on to-be-ignored locations. In present study, this paradigm was used to investigate attention distribution of Video Game Players (VGPs) and Non Video Game Players (NVGPs). The results suggested, under low perceptual load, VGPs tried to focus their attention on the task at-hand whereas the NVGPs tried to explore the adjacent locations with the left-over resources from the research task; however, under high perceptual load, the players would process the visual information at the adjacent locations of the target with the left-over resources, because they had comparatively greater attention capability, whereas the non-players focused their attention on the target locations to finish the search task. To conclude, the present study suggested that action video game play could not only enhance the attention capacity but also cause a different way of attention distribution in different perceptual load situations.

  10. Newer technologies for study of the action of nitrates in coronary circulation and myocardial function

    SciTech Connect

    Swan, H.J.

    1985-07-01

    Minimally invasive evaluation of the behavior of the right and the left ventricle can be obtained in a dynamic way by using technetium-99 (99Tc) scintographic ventriculography. The ''first pass'' technique is particularly appropriate to the investigation of short-acting agents, such as nitroglycerin and other nitrates, but information on a 1-minute to 2-minutes steady state response can be obtained by using the ''gated blood pool'' method. Studies in patients with and without coronary heart disease have identified apparent improvement in regional and global left ventricular ejection fractions associated with afterload reduction caused by such interventions. However, part of the normalization of regions of previously abnormal myocardial contraction may be due to more uniform transmural distribution of coronary blood flow. Such techniques, including nitrate administration, have been used to define regional ischemia suitable for revascularization procedures. Sequential thallium studies also suggest that nitroglycerin reduces or prevents stress induced ischemia, although the mechanism (afterload versus coronary vasodilation) has not been completely elucidated. In the future subtraction angiographic techniques may lead to a more accurate estimate of regional distribution of blood flow and its pharmacologic manipulation. Digital techniques will also facilitate accurate measurement of coronary vascular narrowing in a manner that will serve to elucidate the direct actions of nitrates and similar substances on the coronary circulation. 20 references.

  11. Safer@home—Simulation and training: the study protocol of a qualitative action research design

    PubMed Central

    Wiig, Siri; Guise, Veslemøy; Anderson, Janet; Storm, Marianne; Lunde Husebø, Anne Marie; Testad, Ingelin; Søyland, Elsa; Moltu, Kirsti L

    2014-01-01

    Introduction While it is predicted that telecare and other information and communication technology (ICT)-assisted services will have an increasingly important role in future healthcare services, their implementation in practice is complex. For implementation of telecare to be successful and ensure quality of care, sufficient training for staff (healthcare professionals) and service users (patients) is fundamental. Telecare training has been found to have positive effects on attitudes to, sustained use of, and outcomes associated with telecare. However, the potential contribution of training in the adoption, quality and safety of telecare services is an under-investigated research field. The overall aim of this study is to develop and evaluate simulation-based telecare training programmes to aid the use of videophone technology in elderly home care. Research-based training programmes will be designed for healthcare professionals, service users and next of kin, and the study will explore the impact of training on adoption, quality and safety of new telecare services. Methods and analysis The study has a qualitative action research design. The research will be undertaken in close collaboration with a multidisciplinary team consisting of researchers and managers and clinical representatives from healthcare services in two Norwegian municipalities, alongside experts in clinical education and simulation, as well as service user (patient) representatives. The qualitative methods used involve focus group interviews, semistructured interviews, observation and document analysis. To ensure trustworthiness in the data analysis, we will apply member checks and analyst triangulation; in addition to providing contextual and sample description to allow for evaluation of transferability of our results to other contexts and groups. Ethics and dissemination The study is approved by the Norwegian Social Science Data Services. The study is based on voluntary participation and informed

  12. Study of a through-silicon/substrate via filling method based on the combinative effect of capillary action and liquid bridge rupture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Jiebin; Liu, Bingjie; Chen, Gaoli; Li, Xinxin

    2016-07-01

    Through-silicon via (TSV) is increasing its importance in advanced device packaging. In this paper, a through-silicon/substrate via filling method based on the combinative effect of liquid bridge rupture and capillary action is proposed and demonstrated. The proposed method is able to achieve alloy vias from the surface of a molten alloy pool. Two different processes were tested in experiments and the results show that one of these processes is able to achieve fully filled vias. In addition, a piece of equipment was specially made for the proposed via filling method. The via filling method studied in this paper has a potential application for TSVs in MEMS packaging.

  13. Effect of inhibition of glutathione synthesis on insulin action: in vivo and in vitro studies using buthionine sulfoximine.

    PubMed Central

    Khamaisi, M; Kavel, O; Rosenstock, M; Porat, M; Yuli, M; Kaiser, N; Rudich, A

    2000-01-01

    Decreased cellular GSH content is a common finding in experimental and human diabetes, in which increased oxidative stress appears to occur. Oxidative stress has been suggested to play a causative role in the development of impaired insulin action on adipose tissue and skeletal muscle. In this study we undertook to investigate the potential of GSH depletion to induce insulin resistance, by utilizing the GSH synthesis inhibitor, L-buthionine-[S,R]-sulfoximine (BSO). GSH depletion (20-80% in various tissues), was achieved in vivo by treating rats for 20 days with BSO, and in vitro (80%) by treating 3T3-L1 adipocytes with BSO for 18 h. No demonstrable change in the GSH/GSSG ratio was observed following BSO treatment. GSH depletion was progressively associated with abnormal glucose tolerance test, which could not be attributed to impaired insulin secretion. Skeletal muscle insulin responsiveness was unaffected by GSH depletion, based on normal glucose response to exogenous insulin, 2-deoxyglucose uptake measurements in isolated soleus muscle, and on normal skeletal muscle expression of GLUT4 protein. Adipocyte insulin responsiveness in vitro was assessed in 3T3-L1 adipocytes, which displayed decreased insulin-stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation of insulin-receptor-substrate proteins and of the insulin receptor, but exaggerated protein kinase B phosphorylation. However, insulin-stimulated glucose uptake was unaffected by GSH depletion. In accordance, normal adipose tissue insulin sensitivity was observed in BSO-treated rats in vivo, as demonstrated by normal inhibition of circulating non-esterified fatty acid levels by endogenous insulin secretion. In conclusion, GSH depletion by BSO results in impaired glucose tolerance, but preserved adipocyte and skeletal muscle insulin responsiveness. This suggests that alternative oxidation-borne factors mediate the induction of peripheral insulin resistance by oxidative stress. PMID:10880357

  14. Knowledge-to-action processes in SHRTN collaborative communities of practice: A study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The Seniors Health Research Transfer Network (SHRTN) Collaborative is a network of networks that work together to improve the health and health care of Ontario seniors. The collaborative facilitates knowledge exchange through a library service, knowledge brokers (KBs), local implementation teams, collaborative technology, and, most importantly, Communities of Practice (CoPs) whose members work together to identify innovations, translate evidence, and help implement changes. This project aims to increase our understanding of knowledge-to-action (KTA) processes mobilized through SHRTN CoPs that are working to improve the health of Ontario seniors. For this research, KTA refers to the movement of research and experience-based knowledge between social contexts, and the use of that knowledge to improve practice. We will examine the KTA processes themselves, as well as the role of human agents within those processes. The conceptual framework we have adopted to inform our research is the Promoting Action on Research Implementation in Health Services (PARIHS) framework. Methods/design This study will use a multiple case study design (minimum of nine cases over three years) to investigate how SHRTN CoPs work and pursue knowledge exchange in different situations. Each case will yield a unique narrative, framed around the three PARIHS dimensions: evidence, context, and facilitation. Together, the cases will shed light on how SHRTN CoPs approach their knowledge exchange initiatives, and how they respond to challenges and achieve their objectives. Data will be collected using interviews, document analysis, and ethnographic observation. Discussion This research will generate new knowledge about the defining characteristics of CoPs operating in the health system, on leadership roles in CoPs, and on the nature of interaction processes, relationships, and knowledge exchange mechanisms. Our work will yield a better understanding of the factors that contribute to the

  15. Using Goal- and Grip-Related Information for Understanding the Correctness of Other’s Actions: An ERP Study

    PubMed Central

    van Elk, Michiel; Bousardt, Roel; Bekkering, Harold; van Schie, Hein T.

    2012-01-01

    Detecting errors in other’s actions is of pivotal importance for joint action, competitive behavior and observational learning. Although many studies have focused on the neural mechanisms involved in detecting low-level errors, relatively little is known about error-detection in everyday situations. The present study aimed to identify the functional and neural mechanisms whereby we understand the correctness of other’s actions involving well-known objects (e.g. pouring coffee in a cup). Participants observed action sequences in which the correctness of the object grasped and the grip applied to a pair of objects were independently manipulated. Observation of object violations (e.g. grasping the empty cup instead of the coffee pot) resulted in a stronger P3-effect than observation of grip errors (e.g. grasping the coffee pot at the upper part instead of the handle), likely reflecting a reorienting response, directing attention to the relevant location. Following the P3-effect, a parietal slow wave positivity was observed that persisted for grip-errors, likely reflecting the detection of an incorrect hand-object interaction. These findings provide new insight in the functional significance of the neurophysiological markers associated with the observation of incorrect actions and suggest that the P3-effect and the subsequent parietal slow wave positivity may reflect the detection of errors at different levels in the action hierarchy. Thereby this study elucidates the cognitive processes that support the detection of action violations in the selection of objects and grips. PMID:22606261

  16. Studies on the kinetics of killing and the proposed mechanism of action of microemulsions against fungi.

    PubMed

    Al-Adham, Ibrahim S I; Ashour, Hana; Al-Kaissi, Elham; Khalil, Enam; Kierans, Martin; Collier, Phillip J

    2013-09-15

    Microemulsions are physically stable oil/water clear dispersions, spontaneously formed and thermodynamically stable. They are composed in most cases of water, oil, surfactant and cosurfactant. Microemulsions are stable, self-preserving antimicrobial agents in their own right. The observed levels of antimicrobial activity associated with microemulsions may be due to the direct effect of the microemulsions themselves on the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane. The aim of this work is to study the growth behaviour of different microbes in presence of certain prepared physically stable microemulsion formulae over extended periods of time. An experiment was designed to study the kinetics of killing of a microemulsion preparation (17.3% Tween-80, 8.5% n-pentanol, 5% isopropyl myristate and 69.2% sterile distilled water) against selected test microorganisms (Candida albicans, Aspergillus niger, Schizosaccharomyces pombe and Rhodotorula spp.). Secondly, an experiment was designed to study the effects of the microemulsion preparation on the cytoplasmic membrane structure and function of selected fungal species by observation of 260 nm component leakage. Finally, the effects of the microemulsion on the fungal membrane structure and function using S. pombe were studied using transmission electron microscopy. The results showed that the prepared microemulsions are stable, effective antimicrobial systems with effective killing rates against C. albicans, A. niger, S. pombe and Rhodotorula spp. The results indicate a proposed mechanism of action of significant anti-membrane activity, resulting in the gross disturbance and dysfunction of the cytoplasmic membrane structure which is followed by cell wall modifications, cytoplasmic coagulation, disruption of intracellular metabolism and cell death. PMID:23830945

  17. Student Teachers' Intentions and Actions on Integrating Technology into Their Classrooms during Student Teaching: A Singapore Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choy, Doris; Wong, Angela F. L.; Gao, Ping

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to explore student teachers' intentions and actions in technology integration in their classrooms. A postgraduate teacher education cohort of 118 Singapore student teachers participated in the study. The results suggested that student teachers in Singapore showed positive intentions to integrate technology to facilitate…

  18. Parent Drug Education: A Participatory Action Research Study into Effective Communication about Drugs between Parents and Unrelated Young People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mallick, Jane

    2007-01-01

    Parent drug education is considered a key aspect of drug prevention. Effective communication acts as protective factor for drug misuse in young people. This study is a Participatory Action Research study of "Drugsbridge", a drug education programme that has an emphasis on facilitating intergenerational communication about drugs between parents and…

  19. NIH study uncovers new mechanism of action for class of chemotherapy drugs

    Cancer.gov

    NIH researchers have discovered a significant new mechanism of action for a class of chemotherapy drugs known as poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitors, or PARP inhibitors. They have also identified differences in the toxic capabilities of three drugs in

  20. Mode of action from dose-response microarray data: case study using 10 environmental chemicals

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ligand-activated nuclear receptors regulate many biological processes through complex interactions with biological macromolecules. Certain xenobiotics alter nuclear receptor signaling through direct or indirect interactions. Defining the mode of action of such xenobiotics is di...

  1. Mode of Action for Reproductive and Hepatic Toxicity Inferred from a Genomic Study of Triazole Antifungals

    EPA Science Inventory

    The mode of action for the reproductive toxicity of triazole antifungals have been previously characterized by an observed increased in serum testosterone, hepatotoxicity, and reduced insemination and fertility indices. In order to refine our mechanistic understanding of these m...

  2. Role of Broca's area in encoding sequential human actions: a virtual lesion study.

    PubMed

    Clerget, Emeline; Winderickx, Aline; Fadiga, Luciano; Olivier, Etienne

    2009-10-28

    The exact contribution of Broca's area to motor cognition is still controversial. Here we used repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (5 Hz, five pulses) to interfere transiently with the function of left BA44 in 13 healthy individuals; the task consisted of reordering human actions or nonbiological events based on three pictures presented on a computer screen and extracted from a video showing the entire sequence beforehand. We found that a virtual lesion of left BA44 impairs individual performance only for biological actions, and more specifically for object-oriented syntactic actions. Our finding provides evidence that Broca's area plays a crucial role in encoding complex human movements, a process which may be crucial for understanding and/or programming actions. PMID:19809371

  3. Mechanistic Studies of Anti-Hyperpigmentary Compounds: Elucidating Their Inhibitory and Regulatory Actions

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Rosanna Y. Y.; Lin, Zhi-Xiu; Sviderskaya, Elena V.; Cheng, Christopher H. K.

    2014-01-01

    Searching for depigmenting agents from natural sources has become a new direction in the cosmetic industry as natural products are generally perceived as relatively safer. In our previous study, selected Chinese medicines traditionally used to treat hyperpigmentation were tested for anti-hyperpigmentary effects using a melan-a cell culture model. Among the tested chemical compounds, 4-ethylresorcinol, 4-ethylphenol and 1-tetradecanol were found to possess hypopigmentary effects. Western blot analysis, reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) assay, protein kinase A (PKA) activity assay, tyrosinase inhibition assay and lipid peroxidation inhibition assay were performed to reveal the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms of the hypopigmentary effects. 4-Ethylresorcinol and 4-ethylphenol attenuated mRNA and protein expression of tyrosinase-related protein (TRP)-2, and possessed antioxidative effect by inhibiting lipid peroxidation. 1-Tetradecanol was able to attenuate protein expression of tyrosinase. The hypopigmentary actions of 4-ethylresorcinol, 4-ethylphenol and 1-tetradecanol were associated with regulating downstream proteins along the PKA pathway. 4-Ethylresorcinol was more effective in inhibiting melanin synthesis when compared to 4-ethylphenol and 1-tetradecanol. PMID:25196602

  4. Hearsay Ethnography: Conversational Journals as a Method for Studying Culture in Action

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, Susan Cotts; Swidler, Ann

    2009-01-01

    Social scientists have long struggled to develop methods adequate to their theoretical understanding of meaning as collective and dynamic. While culture is widely understood as an emergent property of collectivities, the methods we use keep pulling us back towards interview-situated accounts and an image of culture as located in individual experience. Scholars who seek to access supra-individual semiotic structures by studying public rituals and other collectively-produced texts then have difficulty capturing the dynamic processes through which such meanings are created and changed in situ. To try to capture more effectively the way meaning is produced and re-produced in everyday life, we focus here on conversational interactions—the voices and actions that constitute the relational space among actors. Conversational journals provide us with a method: the analysis of texts produced by cultural insiders who keep journals of who-said-what-to-whom in conversations they overhear or events they participate in during the course of their daily lives. We describe the method, distinguishing it from other approaches and noting its drawbacks. We then illustrate the methodological advantages of conversational journals with examples from our texts. We end with a discussion of the method’s potential in our setting as well as in other places and times. PMID:20161457

  5. Phenome-wide association studies demonstrating pleiotropy of genetic variants within FTO with and without adjustment for body mass index

    PubMed Central

    Cronin, Robert M.; Field, Julie R.; Bradford, Yuki; Shaffer, Christian M.; Carroll, Robert J.; Mosley, Jonathan D.; Bastarache, Lisa; Edwards, Todd L.; Hebbring, Scott J.; Lin, Simon; Hindorff, Lucia A.; Crane, Paul K.; Pendergrass, Sarah A.; Ritchie, Marylyn D.; Crawford, Dana C.; Pathak, Jyotishman; Bielinski, Suzette J.; Carrell, David S.; Crosslin, David R.; Ledbetter, David H.; Carey, David J.; Tromp, Gerard; Williams, Marc S.; Larson, Eric B.; Jarvik, Gail P.; Peissig, Peggy L.; Brilliant, Murray H.; McCarty, Catherine A.; Chute, Christopher G.; Kullo, Iftikhar J.; Bottinger, Erwin; Chisholm, Rex; Smith, Maureen E.; Roden, Dan M.; Denny, Joshua C.

    2014-01-01

    Phenome-wide association studies (PheWAS) have demonstrated utility in validating genetic associations derived from traditional genetic studies as well as identifying novel genetic associations. Here we used an electronic health record (EHR)-based PheWAS to explore pleiotropy of genetic variants in the fat mass and obesity associated gene (FTO), some of which have been previously associated with obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D). We used a population of 10,487 individuals of European ancestry with genome-wide genotyping from the Electronic Medical Records and Genomics (eMERGE) Network and another population of 13,711 individuals of European ancestry from the BioVU DNA biobank at Vanderbilt genotyped using Illumina HumanExome BeadChip. A meta-analysis of the two study populations replicated the well-described associations between FTO variants and obesity (odds ratio [OR] = 1.25, 95% Confidence Interval = 1.11–1.24, p = 2.10 × 10−9) and FTO variants and T2D (OR = 1.14, 95% CI = 1.08–1.21, p = 2.34 × 10−6). The meta-analysis also demonstrated that FTO variant rs8050136 was significantly associated with sleep apnea (OR = 1.14, 95% CI = 1.07–1.22, p = 3.33 × 10−5); however, the association was attenuated after adjustment for body mass index (BMI). Novel phenotype associations with obesity-associated FTO variants included fibrocystic breast disease (rs9941349, OR = 0.81, 95% CI = 0.74–0.91, p = 5.41 × 10−5) and trends toward associations with non-alcoholic liver disease and gram-positive bacterial infections. FTO variants not associated with obesity demonstrated other potential disease associations including non-inflammatory disorders of the cervix and chronic periodontitis. These results suggest that genetic variants in FTO may have pleiotropic associations, some of which are not mediated by obesity. PMID:25177340

  6. [Study on action mechanism of Danhong injection based on computational system biology approach].

    PubMed

    Lv, Yan-ni; Wei, Xiao-hua; Xiao, Pin

    2015-02-01

    Danhong injection is a compound preparation of traditional Chinese medicine Salvia miltiorrhiza and Carthamus tinctorius, and has been widely applied in treating coronary heart diseases and ischemic encephalopathy in clinic. Despite the complexity of its chemical compounds and the diversity of targets, especially in system biology, there have not a report for its action mechanism as a whole regulatory biological network. In this study, protein data of S. miltiorrhiza and C. tinctorius were searched in TCMGeneDIT database and agilent literature search (ALS) system to establish the multi-component protein network of S. miltiorrhiza, C. tinctorius and Danhong injection. Besides, the protein interaction network was built based on the protein-protein interaction in Genecards, BIND, BioGRID, IntAct, MINT and other databases. According to the findings, 10 compounds of S. miltiorrhiza and 14 compounds of C. tinctorius were correlated with proteins. The 24 common compounds had interactions with 81 proteins, and formed a protein interaction network with 60 none-isolated nodes. The Cluster ONE module was applied to make an enrichment analysis on the protein interaction network and extract one sub-network with significant difference P <0.05. The sub-network contains 23 key proteins, which involved five signaling pathways, namely Nod-like receptor signaling pathway, epithelial cell signaling in helicobacter pylori infection, Toll-like receptor signaling pathway, RIG-I-like receptor signaling pathway and neurotrophin signaling pathway through KEGG signaling pathway mapping. In this study, the computational system biology approach was adopted to preliminarily explain the molecular mechanism of main compounds of Danhong injection in preventing and treating diseases and provide reference for systematic studies on traditional Chinese medicine compounds. PMID:26084184

  7. In vivo demonstration of ultrasound power delivery to charge implanted medical devices via acute and survival porcine studies.

    PubMed

    Radziemski, Leon; Makin, Inder Raj S

    2016-01-01

    Animal studies are an important step in proving the utility and safety of an ultrasound based implanted battery recharging system. To this end an Ultrasound Electrical Recharging System (USER™) was developed and tested. Experiments in vitro demonstrated power deliveries at the battery of up to 600 mW through 10-15 mm of tissue, 50 mW of power available at tissue depths of up to 50 mm, and the feasibility of using transducers bonded to titanium as used in medical implants. Acute in vivo studies in a porcine model were used to test reliability of power delivery, temperature excursions, and cooling techniques. The culminating five-week survival study involved repeated battery charging, a total of 10.5h of ultrasound exposure of the intervening living tissue, with an average RF input to electrical charging efficiency of 20%. This study was potentially the first long term cumulative living-tissue exposure using transcutaneous ultrasound power transmission to an implanted receiver in situ. Histology of the exposed tissue showed changes attributable primarily due to surgical implantation of the prototype device, and no damage due to the ultrasound exposure. The in vivo results are indicative of the potential safe delivery of ultrasound energy for a defined set of source conditions for charging batteries within implants. PMID:26243566

  8. A CASE STUDY DEMONSTRATING GUIDANCE FOR EVALUATING LANDFILL GAS EMISSIONS FROM CLOSED OR ABANDONED FACILITIES--SOMERSWORTH, NEW HAMPSHIRE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of the activities described in this document is to provide a demonstration of the procedures and methodologies described within the "Guidance for Evaluating Landfill Gas Emissions from Closed or Abandoned Facilities" (Guidance). This demonstration provides an example ...

  9. Protective action of low-intensity laser radiation relative to the toxic effect of metals (experimental study in vitro)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dejneka, S. Y.

    1997-12-01

    The study of a possible cytotoxic effect of different doses of low-insensitive laser radiation and protective action of low-intensive laser radiation relative to the toxic effect of metals was carried out by means of the alternative method of investigation in vitro on cell cultura Hela. It was established that the investigated doses of low-intensive laser radiation had not produced any toxic effect on cell culture Hela, so the mentioned doses were not cytotoxic. It was revealed that laser radiation reduced the level of the cytotoxic effect of the studied metal salts on the cell culture, and possessed the protective action against the toxic effect of metals. This action has a clear-cut dose- related character.

  10. Larger right posterior parietal volume in action video game experts: a behavioral and voxel-based morphometry (VBM) study.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Satoshi; Ikeda, Hanako; Kasahara, Kazumi; Kato, Ryo; Tsubomi, Hiroyuki; Sugawara, Sho K; Mori, Makoto; Hanakawa, Takashi; Sadato, Norihiro; Honda, Manabu; Watanabe, Katsumi

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that action video game players exhibit superior performance in visuospatial cognitive tasks compared with non-game players. However, the neural basis underlying this visuospatial cognitive performance advantage remains largely unknown. The present human behavioral and imaging study compared gray matter volume in action video game experts and non-experts using structural magnetic resonance imaging and voxel-based morphometry analysis. The results revealed significantly larger gray matter volume in the right posterior parietal cortex in experts compared with non-experts. Furthermore, the larger gray matter volume in the right posterior parietal cortex significantly correlated with individual performance in a visual working memory task in experts. These results suggest that differences in brain structure may be linked to extensive video game play, leading to superior visuospatial cognitive performance in action video game experts. PMID:23776706

  11. Larger Right Posterior Parietal Volume in Action Video Game Experts: A Behavioral and Voxel-Based Morphometry (VBM) Study

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Satoshi; Ikeda, Hanako; Kasahara, Kazumi; Kato, Ryo; Tsubomi, Hiroyuki; Sugawara, Sho K.; Mori, Makoto; Hanakawa, Takashi; Sadato, Norihiro; Honda, Manabu; Watanabe, Katsumi

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that action video game players exhibit superior performance in visuospatial cognitive tasks compared with non-game players. However, the neural basis underlying this visuospatial cognitive performance advantage remains largely unknown. The present human behavioral and imaging study compared gray matter volume in action video game experts and non-experts using structural magnetic resonance imaging and voxel-based morphometry analysis. The results revealed significantly larger gray matter volume in the right posterior parietal cortex in experts compared with non-experts. Furthermore, the larger gray matter volume in the right posterior parietal cortex significantly correlated with individual performance in a visual working memory task in experts. These results suggest that differences in brain structure may be linked to extensive video game play, leading to superior visuospatial cognitive performance in action video game experts. PMID:23776706

  12. The development of action planning in a joint action context.

    PubMed

    Paulus, Markus

    2016-07-01

    The ability to act jointly with another person is a fundamental requirement for participation in social life. The current study examines the development of action planning in a joint action context. In 4 experiments, 3-, 5-, and 7-year-old children as well as a group of adults (n = 196) interacted with another person to operate a novel apparatus. Their task was to hand the experimenter a tool with which she could activate 1 of 2 different effects on the apparatus. The elicitation of each effect required participants to grasp and insert the tool in a particular orientation. We assessed whether participants planned their grasping and reaching action in such a way that it enabled the partner to efficiently handle the tool, that is, anticipating the final end state of the joint activity. We found that 3-year-old children did not adjust their behavior to accommodate the other's action and that they did not increase their performance over multiple trials. Five- and 7-year-old children initially showed a tendency to plan their action in an egocentric manner (i.e., showed a form of egocentrism), but improved their joint action performance over time. Adult participants demonstrated joint action planning from the beginning. Interestingly, 3- and 5-year-old children were able to plan their grasp efficiently when acting alone on the apparatus. Yet, having first-hand experience with the task before acting with a partner did not facilitate performance in the joint action task for younger children. Overall, the study informs current approaches on the psychological basis and ontogenetic origins of joint action in childhood. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27337512

  13. Exploration Technology Development & Demonstration

    NASA Video Gallery

    Chris Moore delivers a presentation from the Exploration Technology Development & Demonstration (ETDD) study team on May 25, 2010, at the NASA Exploration Enterprise Workshop held in Galveston, TX....

  14. Case Study for the ARRA-funded Ground Source Heat Pump Demonstration at Denver Museum of Nature & Science

    SciTech Connect

    Im, Piljae; Liu, Xiaobing

    2015-11-30

    High initial costs and lack of public awareness of ground-source heat pump (GSHP) technology are the two major barriers preventing rapid deployment of this energy-saving technology in the United States. Under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), 26 GSHP projects were competitively selected and carried out to demonstrate the benefits of GSHP systems and innovative technologies for cost reduction and/or performance improvement. This report highlights the findings of a case study of one such GSHP demonstration projects that uses a recycled water heat pump (RWHP) system installed at the Denver Museum of Nature & Science in Denver, Colorado. The RWHP system uses recycled water from the city’s water system as the heat sink and source for a modular water-to-water heat pump (WWHP). This case study was conducted based on the available measured performance data from December 2014 through August 2015, utility bills of the building in 2014 and 2015, construction drawings, maintenance records, personal communications, and construction costs. The annual energy consumption of the RWHP system was calculated based on the available measured data and other related information. It was compared with the performance of a baseline scenario— a conventional VAV system using a water-cooled chiller and a natural gas fired boiler, both of which have the minimum energy efficiencies allowed by ASHRAE 90.1-2010. The comparison was made to determine energy savings, operating cost savings, and CO2 emission reductions achieved by the RWHP system. A cost analysis was performed to evaluate the simple payback of the RWHP system. Summarized below are the results of the performance analysis, the learned lessons, and recommended improvement in the operation of the RWHP system.

  15. A case study of global health at the university: implications for research and action

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Andrew D.; Cole, Donald C.; ter Kuile, Aleida; Forman, Lisa; Rouleau, Katherine; Philpott, Jane; Pakes, Barry; Jackson, Suzanne; Muntaner, Carles

    2014-01-01

    Background Global health is increasingly a major focus of institutions in high-income countries. However, little work has been done to date to study the inner workings of global health at the university level. Academics may have competing objectives, with few mechanisms to coordinate efforts and pool resources. Objective To conduct a case study of global health at Canada's largest health sciences university and to examine how its internal organization influences research and action. Design We drew on existing inventories, annual reports, and websites to create an institutional map, identifying centers and departments using the terms ‘global health’ or ‘international health’ to describe their activities. We compiled a list of academics who self-identified as working in global or international health. We purposively sampled persons in leadership positions as key informants. One investigator carried out confidential, semi-structured interviews with 20 key informants. Interview notes were returned to participants for verification and then analyzed thematically by pairs of coders. Synthesis was conducted jointly. Results More than 100 academics were identified as working in global health, situated in numerous institutions, centers, and departments. Global health academics interviewed shared a common sense of what global health means and the values that underpin such work. Most academics interviewed expressed frustration at the existing fragmentation and the lack of strategic direction, financial support, and recognition from the university. This hampered collaborative work and projects to tackle global health problems. Conclusions The University of Toronto is not exceptional in facing such challenges, and our findings align with existing literature that describes factors that inhibit collaboration in global health work at universities. Global health academics based at universities may work in institutional siloes and this limits both internal and external

  16. Re-training Automatic Action Tendencies to Approach Cigarettes among Adolescent Smokers: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Grace; Larsen, Helle; Cavallo, Dana; Becker, Daniela; Cousijn, Janna; Salemink, Elske; D'Escury-Koenigs, Annemat L. Collot; Morean, Meghan; Wiers, Reinout; Krishnan-Sarin, Suchitra

    2015-01-01

    Background This pilot study conducted a preliminary examination of whether Cognitive Bias Modification (CBM), a computerized task to retrain cognitive-approach biases towards smoking stimuli, (1) changed approach bias for cigarettes, and (2) improved smoking cessation outcomes in adolescent smokers. Methods Sixty adolescent smokers received four weeks of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) for smoking cessation, with CBM (90% avoidance/10% approach for smoking stimuli and 10% avoidance/90% approach for neutral stimuli) or sham (50% avoidance/50% approach for smoking and neutral stimuli) training in the Netherlands (n = 42) and the United States (n = 18). Results While we did not observe changes in action tendencies related to CBM, adolescents with higher smoking approach biases at baseline had greater decreases in approach biases at follow up, compared to adolescents with smoking avoidance biases, regardless of treatment condition (p = 0.01). Intent-to-treat (ITT) analyses showed that CBM, when compared with sham trended toward higher end-of-treatment, biochemically-confirmed, seven-day point prevalence abstinence, (17.2% vs. 3.2%, p = 0.071). ITT analysis also showed that regardless of treatment condition, cotinine level (p = 0.045) and average number of cigarette smoked (p ≤ 0.001) significantly decreased over the course of treatment. Conclusions The findings from this pilot study suggests that re-training approach biases toward cigarettes shows promise for smoking cessation among adolescent smokers. Future research should utilize larger samples and increased distinction between CBM and sham conditions, and examine mechanisms underlying the CBM approach. PMID:26186485

  17. Collaborative Action Research Supporting Teachers' Professional Development as Exemplified by One Teacher Team's Action Research on a Study of Silent Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Shelley Stagg; Swartz, Larry; Bodnar, Steve; McCaigg, Grant; Ritchie, Susan; Dawson, Ruth; Glassford, Jason

    2010-01-01

    This paper focuses on one teacher team and the university facilitators who supported their collaborative action research within a province-wide professional development initiative designed by the provincial elementary teacher union to bring together teachers and university faculty in teacher-directed action research. The paper is collaboratively…

  18. Affirmative Action: A Course for the Future. Affirmative Action Task Force for the Study "New Directions: African Americans in a Diversifying Nation."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies, Washington, DC.

    A primary social dilemma today is that current strategies have led to the perception that affirmative action favors some population groups at the expense of others, that in a sense it uses one form of discrimination to combat another. It is essential to reconsider affirmative action strategies to implement those that are most appropriate for today…

  19. An fMRI study of imitation: action representation and body schema

    PubMed Central

    Chaminade, Thierry; Meltzoff, Andrew N.; Decety, Jean

    2013-01-01

    Recent neuropsychological investigations of apraxia have led to new hypotheses about the representational defects associated with imitation impairments in neurological patients. This fMRI experiment investigated the relation between imitation and the body schema in healthy subjects. Experimental conditions were derived from a factorial plan, and participants were asked to watch a human model performing bodily gestures and then to execute either an identical or a different action, with the same or different limbs. Brain areas activated when subjects imitated the model were traced to the representation of the action (main effect of performing an identical action regardless of limb), to the body schema (using the same limb regardless of action), or to both. The first set of analyses yielded a network associated with visual perception, indicating that action representation is primarily visuospatial not motor, while the second analysis highlighted regions involved in body schema including the inferior parietal cortex and the insula. It is suggested that imitation of simple body gestures requires both a visuospatial description of the observed model, sustained by visual perception areas in the right occipitotemporal and superior parietal cortices and a visuospatial description of one’s own body, supported by the left inferior parietal lobule. These results favor a model of praxis proposing that imitation deficits in left inferior parietal lobe patients with apraxia reflect primarily an impairment of the body schema, while deficits of praxis in right parietal patients are limited to gestures demanding in terms of visuospatial analysis. PMID:15488911

  20. Great apes generate goal-based action predictions: an eye-tracking study.

    PubMed

    Kano, Fumihiro; Call, Josep

    2014-09-01

    To examine great apes' on-line prediction of other individuals' actions, we used an eye-tracking technique and an experimental paradigm previously used to test human infants. Twenty-two great apes, including bonobos, chimpanzees, and orangutans, were familiarized to movie clips of a human hand reaching to grasp one of two objects. Then the objects' locations were swapped, and in the test event, the hand made an incomplete reach between the objects. In a control condition, a mechanical claw performed the same actions. The apes predictively looked at the familiarized goal object rather than the familiarized location when viewing the hand action in the test event. However, they made no prediction when viewing the claw action. These results are similar to those reported previously for human infants, and predictive looking did not differ among the three species of great apes. Thus, great apes make on-line goal-based predictions about the actions of other individuals; this skill is not unique to humans but is shared more widely among primates. PMID:25022278

  1. Banishing the Control Homunculi in Studies of Action Control and Behavior Change

    PubMed Central

    McLaren, Ian P. L.; Chambers, Christopher D.

    2014-01-01

    For centuries, human self-control has fascinated scientists and nonscientists alike. Current theories often attribute it to an executive control system. But even though executive control receives a great deal of attention across disciplines, most aspects of it are still poorly understood. Many theories rely on an ill-defined set of “homunculi” doing jobs like “response inhibition” or “updating” without explaining how they do so. Furthermore, it is not always appreciated that control takes place across different timescales. These two issues hamper major advances. Here we focus on the mechanistic basis for the executive control of actions. We propose that at the most basic level, action control depends on three cognitive processes: signal detection, action selection, and action execution. These processes are modulated via error-correction or outcome-evaluation mechanisms, preparation, and task rules maintained in working and long-term memory. We also consider how executive control of actions becomes automatized with practice and how people develop a control network. Finally, we discuss how the application of this unified framework in clinical domains can increase our understanding of control deficits and provide a theoretical basis for the development of novel behavioral change interventions. PMID:25419227

  2. Putting Action in Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lozano, Sandra C.; Hard, Bridgette Martin; Tversky, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    Embodied approaches to cognition propose that our own actions influence our understanding of the world. Do other people's actions also have this influence? The present studies show that perceiving another person's actions changes the way people think about objects in a scene. In Study 1, participants viewed a photograph and answered a question…

  3. Infants Prefer Motionese to Adult-Directed Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brand, Rebecca J.; Shallcross, Wendy L.

    2008-01-01

    In two studies, we investigated infants' preference for infant-directed (ID) action or "motionese" (Brand, Baldwin & Ashburn, 2002) relative to adult-directed (AD) action. In Study 1, full-featured videos were shown to 32 6- to 8-month-olds, who demonstrated a strong preference for ID action. In Study 2, infants at 6-8 months (n= 28) and 11-13…

  4. Economic impact study of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action project in Colorado: Colorado state fiscal year 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-01

    This Colorado economic impact study summarizes employment and economic benefits to the state from activities associated with the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project during Colorado state fiscal year (FY) 1995 (1 July 1994 through 30 June 1995). To capture employment information, a questionnaire was distributed to subcontractor employees at the active UMTRA Project sites of Grand Junction, Gunnison, Maybell, Naturita, Rifle, and Slick Rock, Colorado. Economic data were requested from the Remedial Action Contractor (RAC), the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) and the US Department of Energy (DOE). The most significant benefits associated with the UMTRA Project in Colorado are summarized.

  5. New approach to the complex-action problem and its application to a nonperturbative study of superstring theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anagnostopoulos, K. N.; Nishimura, J.

    2002-11-01

    Monte Carlo simulations of a system whose action has an imaginary part are considered to be extremely difficult. We propose a new approach to this ``complex-action problem,'' which utilizes a factorization property of distribution functions. The basic idea is quite general, and it removes the so-called overlap problem completely. Here we apply the method to a nonperturbative study of superstring theory using its matrix formulation. In this particular example, the distribution function turns out to be positive definite, which allows us to reduce the problem even further. Our numerical results suggest an intuitive explanation for the dynamical generation of 4D space-time.

  6. Economic impact study of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project in Colorado: Colorado state fiscal year 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    The Colorado economic impact study summarizes employment and economic benefits to the state from activities associated with the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project during Colorado state fiscal year 1993 (July 1, 1992, through June 30, 1993). To capture employment benefits, a questionnaire was distributed to subcontractor employees at the active UMTRA Project sites of Grand Junction, Rifle, and Gunnison, Colorado. An estimated 52 percent of the employees working on the UMTRA Project responded to this information request. Economic data were requested from each site prime subcontractor, as well as from the Remedial Action Contractor. The most significant benefits associated with the UMTRA Project in Colorado are summarized.

  7. A Synthesis and Application Teaching Approach for Group Projects in an Undergraduate Business Course: An Action Research Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Laurena E.

    2009-01-01

    Scholars proposed it would be possible to enhance group effectiveness and functioning if people could develop a better appreciation of the processes surrounding group development (M. K. Smith, 2005). The action research study explored the facilitation of a synthesis and application teaching approach for group projects in the practice of two…

  8. Making Space for Democracy through Assessment and Feedback in Higher Education: Thoughts from an Action Research Project in Education Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonnell, Jane; Curtis, Will

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on an action research project into the development of a "democratic feedback model" with students on an education studies programme at a post-1992 university in the UK. Building on work that has explored the dialogic dimensions of assessment and feedback, the research explored the potential for more…

  9. A CROSS-SPECIES MODE OF ACTION (MOA) INFORMATION ASSESSMENT: A CASE STUDY OF BISPHENOL A (BPA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA has released a report entitled, A Cross-Species Mode of Action Information Assessment: A Case Study of Bisphenol A [EPA/600/R-50/044F] (PDF, 98pp, 2 MB, Consistency and Change in Participatory Action Research: Reflections on a Focus Group Study about How Farmers Learn

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piercy, Fred P.; Franz, Nancy; Donaldson, Joseph L.; Richard, Robert F.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to reflect on our efforts to balance consistency in our multi-year participatory action research study with the need to adapt our research protocol to what we are learning along the way. While both are important, we share several examples of how our flexibility and openness to adapt our protocol to our research…

  10. Action at an Attentional Distance: A Study of Children's Reasoning about Causes and Effects Involving Spatial and Attentional Discontinuity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grotzer, Tina A.; Solis, S. Lynneth

    2015-01-01

    Spatial discontinuity between causes and effects is a feature of many scientific concepts, particularly those in the environmental and ecological sciences. Causes can be spatially separated from their effects by great distances. Action at a distance, the idea that causes and effects can be separated in physical space, is a well-studied concept in…

  11. A Narrative Study of How an Online Practitioner Used a Personal Action Research Journal as a Form of Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker-Floyd, La-Kicia K.

    2011-01-01

    This narrative study will allow my reader a glimpse into real situations I have faced as an asynchronous online instructor in hopes to help me and my audience better understand how I, as a self-directed online practitioner, utilized action research recorded in a journal as a method to build capacity for continuous professional development to…

  12. Using Knowledge of Transactional Distance Theory to Strengthen an Online Developmental Reading Course: An Action Research Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minor, Jacquelyn Ileen

    2014-01-01

    Low retention rates for students enrolled in online developmental reading courses prompted instructors at 1 large Texas community college to examine their online classrooms for elements that were creating psychological distance and disconnectedness for their students. The purpose of this action research study was to assess the efficacy of using a…

  13. Investigating the Value of Restorative Practice: An Action Research Study of One Boy in a Mixed Secondary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Standing, Vicky; Fearon, Colm; Dee, Tim

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: In response to an increasingly high level of exclusion rates for boys within secondary school in the UK, this study seeks to explore the value of restorative practice and justice for changing student behaviour. Design/methodology/approach: As a piece of action research, the authors aimed to look at how methods of restorative practice…

  14. Social and Individual Aspects of Classroom Learning in Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder: An Action Research Pilot Study on Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asberg, Jakob; Zander, Ulla; Zander, Eric; Sandberg, Annika Dahlgren

    2012-01-01

    The current paper reports on the outcome of an ongoing action research project at a school for higher-functioning students with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) in Sweden. The overall aim of the study was to develop and evaluate a questionnaire that captures social and individual aspects of classroom learning suitable for use with students with ASD.…

  15. Consent for genetics studies among clinical trial participants: findings from Action for Health in Diabetes (Look AHEAD)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Increasingly, genetic specimens are collected to expand the value of clinical trials through study of genetic effects on disease incidence, progression or response to interventions. We describe the experience obtaining IRB-approved DNA consent forms across the 19 institutions in the Action for Healt...

  16. Building a Student-Centred Learning Framework Using Social Software in the Middle Years Classroom: An Action Research Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casey, Gail

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses the development of the online spaces that were used to create a learning framework: a student-centred framework that combined face-to-face teaching with online social and participatory media. The author, as part of her Doctoral research study, used action research as a mechanism for continual improvement as she redesigned…

  17. Using a Participatory Action Research Approach to Create a Universally Designed Inclusive High School Science Course: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dymond, Stacy K.; Renzaglia, Adelle; Rosenstein, Amy; Chun, Eul Jung; Banks, Ronald A.; Niswander, Vicki; Gilson, Christie L.

    2006-01-01

    Case study methodology was used in combination with a participatory action research (PAR) approach to examine the process of redesigning one high school science course to incorporate the principles of Universal Design for Learning (UDL) and to promote access to the general curriculum. The participants included one general education teacher and two…

  18. Media Competition Implementation for the Massachusetts Childhood Obesity Research Demonstration Study (MA-CORD): Adoption and Reach

    PubMed Central

    Criss, Shaniece; Cheung, Lilian; Giles, Catherine; Gortmaker, Steven; Viswanath, Kasisomayajula; Kwass, Jo-Ann; Davison, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    The Massachusetts Childhood Obesity Research Demonstration Study (MA-CORD) was a multi-level, multi-sector community intervention with a media competition component to provide an overarching synergy and promote awareness of target behaviors to reduce childhood obesity. Students participating in the media competition were tasked with developing videos, song/rap lyrics, and artwork that reflected the goals. The aim of this study is to document the process used to develop and implement the media competition along with its reach and adoption. An adapted version of Neta and colleagues’ 2015 framework on dissemination and implementation was used to summarize the process by which the media competition was developed and implemented. Adoption was defined by whether eligible schools or afterschool programs decided to implement the media competition. Reach was defined by student participation rates within schools/programs and the number of votes cast for the finalists on the coalition website and students’ paper ballots. A total of 595 students participated in the media competition from 18 school and afterschool programs in two communities. Adoption of the media competitions ranged from 22% to 100% in programs and reach ranged from 3% to 33% of the student population. The documentation of the implementation should contribute to the replication of the media competition. PMID:27058549

  19. Media Competition Implementation for the Massachusetts Childhood Obesity Research Demonstration Study (MA-CORD): Adoption and Reach.

    PubMed

    Criss, Shaniece; Cheung, Lilian; Giles, Catherine; Gortmaker, Steven; Viswanath, Kasisomayajula; Kwass, Jo-Ann; Davison, Kirsten

    2016-04-01

    The Massachusetts Childhood Obesity Research Demonstration Study (MA-CORD) was a multi-level, multi-sector community intervention with a media competition component to provide an overarching synergy and promote awareness of target behaviors to reduce childhood obesity. Students participating in the media competition were tasked with developing videos, song/rap lyrics, and artwork that reflected the goals. The aim of this study is to document the process used to develop and implement the media competition along with its reach and adoption. An adapted version of Neta and colleagues' 2015 framework on dissemination and implementation was used to summarize the process by which the media competition was developed and implemented. Adoption was defined by whether eligible schools or afterschool programs decided to implement the media competition. Reach was defined by student participation rates within schools/programs and the number of votes cast for the finalists on the coalition website and students' paper ballots. A total of 595 students participated in the media competition from 18 school and afterschool programs in two communities. Adoption of the media competitions ranged from 22% to 100% in programs and reach ranged from 3% to 33% of the student population. The documentation of the implementation should contribute to the replication of the media competition. PMID:27058549