Science.gov

Sample records for action working group

  1. The Expert Group Work Supervision Process: Apperception, Actions, and Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubel, Deborah; Atieno Okech, Jane E.

    2009-01-01

    The researchers conducted a systematic exploration of the experiences of expert group work supervisors during the supervision process. This article's purpose is to report results that inform intentional practice and illustrate supervision interventions for group work supervisors. Results indicated that participants experienced an interactive…

  2. One Health in action: the work of the HAIRS group.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Dilys

    2014-07-19

    The Human Animal Infections and Risk Surveillance (HAIRS) group is a collaboration between a number of human and animal health organisations within the UK government. The group aims to provide a 'joined-up' response to emerging diseases that threaten the health of people or animals. Here, Dilys Morgan, who chairs the group, discusses its work, highlighting its response to Schmallenberg virus, and shows how a One Health approach can improve government responses to potential crises.

  3. Toward Solutions: The Work of the Physics Action-Research Group. Learning in Science Project. Working Paper No. 32.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osborne, Roger; Schollum, Brendan

    In the action-research phase of the Learning in Science Project, four groups of people worked on problems identified in the project's second (in-depth) phase. The Physics action-research group considered problems related to the teaching and learning of ideas associated with force and motion, suggesting that children's ideas of these concepts might…

  4. Toward Solutions: The Work of the Chemistry Action-Research Group. Learning in Science Project. Working Paper No. 35.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osborne, Roger; And Others

    In the action-research phase of the Learning in Science Project, four groups of people worked on problems identified in the project's second (in-depth) phase. The Chemistry Action-Research Group considered problems related to the teaching and learning of ideas associated with particles and physical/chemical changes. Based on findings during the…

  5. Toward Solutions: The Work of the Biology Action-Research Group. Learning in Science Project. Working Paper No. 29.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boe, Robyn; And Others

    Many students, even after formal science instruction, have not developed a scientifically acceptable concept of "living,""animal," or "plant." Therefore, as part of the action-research phase of the Learning in Science Project, a working group was formed to explore (with teachers) some possible strategies aimed at modifying students' current…

  6. Actions of the Burkina Faso women in physics working group at the University of Ouagadougou

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kafando, Pétronille; Zerbo, Issa

    2013-03-01

    At the University of Ouagadougou, the largest university in Burkina Faso, the percentage of female student enrollment in the Exact and Applied Sciences Unit was 5.1% (for all the levels) from 2006 to 2009-this rate was 2.3% for physics. For the same period, 22 women out of 455 students (4.8%) were enrolled in PhD (all the fields of the Exact and Applied Sciences Unit) and three women out of 180 students (1.7%) registered in physics PhD. During the 3rd IUPAP International Conference on Women in Physics in 2008, the Burkina Faso Working Group proposed some strategies to attract more women to physics and all the sciences. Some actions were initiated at the University of Ouagadougou as well as in secondary schools. These actions and the feedback of female students are presented.

  7. Center Director Bridges visits Disability Awareness and Action working Group Technology Fair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Center Director Roy Bridges stops to talk to one of the vendors at the Disability Awareness and Action Working Group (DAAWG) Technology Fair being held Oct. 20-21 at Kennedy Space Center. With him at the far left is Sterling Walker, director of Engineering Development at KSC and chairman of DAAWG, and Nancie Strott, a multi-media specialist with Dynacs and chairperson of the Fair; at the right is Carol Cavanaugh, with KSC Public Services. The Fair is highlighting vendors demonstrating mobility, hearing, vision and silent disability assistive technology. The purpose is to create an awareness of the types of technology currently available to assist people with various disabilities in the workplace. The theme is that of this year's National Disability Employment Awareness Month, 'Opening Doors to Ability.' Some of the vendors participating are Canine Companions for Independence, Goodwill Industries, Accessible Structures, Division of Blind Services, Space Coast Center for Independent Living, KSC Fitness Center and Delaware North Parks Services.

  8. Center Director Bridges visits Disability Awareness and Action working Group Technology Fair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Center Director Roy Bridges (standing, center) poses with members of the Disability Awareness and Action Working Group (DAAWG), which is holding the 1999 Technology Fair Oct. 20-21 at Kennedy Space Center. The Fair is highlighting vendors demonstrating mobility, hearing, vision and silent disability assistive technology. The purpose is to create an awareness of the types of technology currently available to assist people with various disabilities in the workplace. The theme is that of this year's National Disability Employment Awareness Month, 'Opening Doors to Ability.' Some of the vendors participating are Canine Companions for Independence, Goodwill Industries, Accessible Structures, Division of Blind Services, Space Coast Center for Independent Living, KSC Fitness Center and Delaware North Parks Services.

  9. {A Review of Working Group 2 (Advanced Terrestrial Systems) of the COST 296 Action}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warrington, E. M.; Tulunay, E.

    2009-04-01

    E.M. Warrington, E. Tulunay, N.M. Abbasi, J. Azevedo, L. Bertel, A. Bourdillon, E. Benito, C. Bianchi, A. Casimiro, L. Economou, Y. Erhel, S.M. Feeney, S.D. Gunashekar, H. Haralambous, D. Lemur, F. Marie, J.P. Monilie, M. Muriuki, M. Oger M. Pietrella, V. Rannou, H. Rothkaehl, S. Saillant, S. Salous, O. Sari, A.J. Stocker, H.J. Strangeways, Y. Tulunay and N.Y. Zaalov This paper deals with the research undertaken during the COST 296 Action in Working Group 2 on Advanced Terrestrial Systems. The Working Group comprised three work packages covering various topics: Radar and Radiolocation, HF/MF Communications, and Spectrum Management. Results from this Working Group are presented in this paper, and may be summarised as follows. Aspects of HF propagation The propagation characteristics of radio signals are important parameters to consider when designing and operating radio systems. From the point of view Working Group 2 of the COST-296 Action, interest lies with effects associated with propagation via the ionosphere of signals within the HF band. Several aspects were covered: The directions of arrival and times of flight of signals received over a path oriented along the trough have been examined and several types of propagation effects identified. Of particular note, combining the HF observations with satellite measurements has identified the presence of irregularities within the floor of the trough that result in propagation displaced from the great circle direction. An understanding of the propagation effects that result in deviations of the signal path from the great circle direction are of particular relevance to the operation of HF radiolocation systems. Inclusion of the results from the above mentioned measurements into a propagation model of the northerly ionosphere (i.e. those regions of the ionosphere located poleward of, and including, the mid-latitude trough) and the use of this model to predict the coverage expected from transmitters where the signals

  10. Center Director Bridges visits Disability Awareness and Action working Group Technology Fair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Center Director Roy Bridges stops to pet one of the dogs that serves with Canine Companions for Independence, a vendor displaying its capabilities at the Disability Awareness and Action Working Group (DAAWG) 1999 Technology Fair being held Oct. 20-21 at Kennedy Space Center. Standing at the right is Carol Cavanaugh, with KSC Public Services; behind Bridges is Nancie Strott (left), a multi-media specialist with Dynacs and chairperson of the Fair, and Sterling Walker (right), director of Engineering Development and chairman of DAAWG. The Fair is highlighting vendors demonstrating mobility, hearing, vision and silent disability assistive technology. The purpose is to create an awareness of the types of technology currently available to assist people with various disabilities in the workplace. The theme is that of this year's National Disability Employment Awareness Month, 'Opening Doors to Ability.' Some of the other vendors participating are Goodwill Industries, Accessible Structures, Division of Blind Services, Space Coast Center for Independent Living, KSC Fitness Center and Delaware North Parks Services.

  11. Center Director Bridges visits Disability Awareness and Action working Group Technology Fair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Center Director Roy Bridges stops at the Stewart Eye Institute table at the Disability Awareness and Action Working Group (DAAWG) 1999 Technology Fair being held Oct. 20-21 at Kennedy Space Center. Behind Bridges is Sterling Walker, director of Engineering Development at KSC and chairman of DAAWG. At the near right are George and Marian Hall, who are with the Institute. At the left is Nancie Strott, a multi-media specialist with Dynacs and chairperson of the Fair. The Fair is highlighting vendors demonstrating mobility, hearing, vision and silent disability assistive technology. The purpose is to create an awareness of the types of technology currently available to assist people with various disabilities in the workplace. The theme is that of this year's National Disability Employment Awareness Month, 'Opening Doors to Ability.' Some of the vendors participating are Canine Companions for Independence, Goodwill Industries, Accessible Structures, Division of Blind Services, Space Coast Center for Independent Living, KSC Fitness Center and Delaware North Parks Services.

  12. {A Review of Working Group 2 (Advanced Terrestrial Systems) of the COST 296 Action}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warrington, E. M.; Tulunay, E.

    2009-04-01

    E.M. Warrington, E. Tulunay, N.M. Abbasi, J. Azevedo, L. Bertel, A. Bourdillon, E. Benito, C. Bianchi, A. Casimiro, L. Economou, Y. Erhel, S.M. Feeney, S.D. Gunashekar, H. Haralambous, D. Lemur, F. Marie, J.P. Monilie, M. Muriuki, M. Oger M. Pietrella, V. Rannou, H. Rothkaehl, S. Saillant, S. Salous, O. Sari, A.J. Stocker, H.J. Strangeways, Y. Tulunay and N.Y. Zaalov This paper deals with the research undertaken during the COST 296 Action in Working Group 2 on Advanced Terrestrial Systems. The Working Group comprised three work packages covering various topics: Radar and Radiolocation, HF/MF Communications, and Spectrum Management. Results from this Working Group are presented in this paper, and may be summarised as follows. Aspects of HF propagation The propagation characteristics of radio signals are important parameters to consider when designing and operating radio systems. From the point of view Working Group 2 of the COST-296 Action, interest lies with effects associated with propagation via the ionosphere of signals within the HF band. Several aspects were covered: The directions of arrival and times of flight of signals received over a path oriented along the trough have been examined and several types of propagation effects identified. Of particular note, combining the HF observations with satellite measurements has identified the presence of irregularities within the floor of the trough that result in propagation displaced from the great circle direction. An understanding of the propagation effects that result in deviations of the signal path from the great circle direction are of particular relevance to the operation of HF radiolocation systems. Inclusion of the results from the above mentioned measurements into a propagation model of the northerly ionosphere (i.e. those regions of the ionosphere located poleward of, and including, the mid-latitude trough) and the use of this model to predict the coverage expected from transmitters where the signals

  13. Action Learning at Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mumford, Alan, Ed.

    This book contains 34 papers examining the theory, process, and outcomes of action learning at work. The following papers are included: "An Introduction to the Text" (Alan Mumford); "The Learning Equation" (Reg Revans); "Action Learning as a Vehicle for Learning" (Alan Mumford); "Placing Action Learning and Action Research in Context" (Cliff…

  14. Group Work Publication-1991.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimpfer, David G.

    1992-01-01

    Lists 21 new publications in group work, of which 9 are reviewed. Those discussed include publications on group counseling and psychotherapy, structured groups, support groups, psychodrama, and social group work. (Author/NB)

  15. Working Group 7 Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Nagaitsev S.; Berg J.

    2012-06-10

    The primary subject of working group 7 at the 2012 Advanced Accelerator Concepts Workshop was muon accelerators for a muon collider or neutrino factory. Additionally, this working group included topics that did not fit well into other working groups. Two subjects were discussed by more than one speaker: lattices to create a perfectly integrable nonlinear lattice, and a Penning trap to create antihydrogen.

  16. The GROOP Effect: Groups Mimic Group Actions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsai, Jessica Chia-Chin; Sebanz, Natalie; Knoblich, Gunther

    2011-01-01

    Research on perception-action links has focused on an interpersonal level, demonstrating effects of observing individual actions on performance. The present study investigated perception-action matching at an inter-group level. Pairs of participants responded to hand movements that were performed by two individuals who used one hand each or they…

  17. Group Work. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Karen

    2010-01-01

    According to Johnson and Johnson, group work helps increase student retention and satisfaction, develops strong oral communication and social skills, as well as higher self-esteem (University of Minnesota, n.d.). Group work, when planned and implemented deliberately and thoughtfully helps students develop cognitive and leadership skills as well as…

  18. Work group diversity.

    PubMed

    van Knippenberg, Daan; Schippers, Michaéla C

    2007-01-01

    Work group diversity, the degree to which there are differences between group members, may affect group process and performance positively as well as negatively. Much is still unclear about the effects of diversity, however. We review the 1997-2005 literature on work group diversity to assess the state of the art and to identify key issues for future research. This review points to the need for more complex conceptualizations of diversity, as well as to the need for more empirical attention to the processes that are assumed to underlie the effects of diversity on group process and performance and to the contingency factors of these processes.

  19. Work group diversity.

    PubMed

    van Knippenberg, Daan; Schippers, Michaéla C

    2007-01-01

    Work group diversity, the degree to which there are differences between group members, may affect group process and performance positively as well as negatively. Much is still unclear about the effects of diversity, however. We review the 1997-2005 literature on work group diversity to assess the state of the art and to identify key issues for future research. This review points to the need for more complex conceptualizations of diversity, as well as to the need for more empirical attention to the processes that are assumed to underlie the effects of diversity on group process and performance and to the contingency factors of these processes. PMID:16903805

  20. Operable Unit 3-13, Group 3, Other Surface Soils Remediation Sets 4-6 (Phase II) Remedial Design/Remedial Action Work Plan

    SciTech Connect

    D. E. Shanklin

    2006-06-01

    This Remedial Design/Remedial Action Work Plan provides the framework for defining the remedial design requirements, preparing the design documentation, and defining the remedial actions for Waste Area Group 3, Operable Unit 3-13, Group 3, Other Surface Soils, Remediation Sets 4-6 (Phase II) located at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center at the Idaho National Laboratory. This plan details the design developed to support the remediation and disposal activities selected in the Final Operable Unit 3-13, Record of Decision.

  1. Parton Distributions Working Group

    SciTech Connect

    de Barbaro, L.; Keller, S. A.; Kuhlmann, S.; Schellman, H.; Tung, W.-K.

    2000-07-20

    This report summarizes the activities of the Parton Distributions Working Group of the QCD and Weak Boson Physics workshop held in preparation for Run II at the Fermilab Tevatron. The main focus of this working group was to investigate the different issues associated with the development of quantitative tools to estimate parton distribution functions uncertainties. In the conclusion, the authors introduce a Manifesto that describes an optimal method for reporting data.

  2. Instructions to working groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foushee, H. Clayton

    1987-01-01

    The key to the success of this workshop is your active participation in the working group process. The goals of this workshop are to address four major questions regarding Cockpit Resource Management (CRM) Training. To some extent the working group topic areas parallel these issues, but in some cases they do not. However, it is important for all of the working groups to keep these general questions in mind during their deliberations: (1) What are the essential elements of an optimal CRM Training program; (2) What are the strengths and weaknesses of current approaches to CRM Training; (3) How can CRM Training best be implemented, and what barriers exist; and (4) Is CRM Training effective, do we know, and if not, how can we find out.

  3. Facilities removal working group

    SciTech Connect

    1997-03-01

    This working group`s first objective is to identify major economic, technical, and regulatory constraints on operator practices and decisions relevant to offshore facilities removal. Then, the group will try to make recommendations as to regulatory and policy adjustments, additional research, or process improvements and/or technological advances, that may be needed to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the removal process. The working group will focus primarily on issues dealing with Gulf of Mexico platform abandonments. In order to make the working group sessions as productive as possible, the Facilities Removal Working Group will focus on three topics that address a majority of the concerns and/or constraints relevant to facilities removal. The three areas are: (1) Explosive Severing and its Impact on Marine Life, (2) Pile and Conductor Severing, and (3) Deep Water Abandonments This paper will outline the current state of practice in the offshore industry, identifying current regulations and specific issues encountered when addressing each of the three main topics above. The intent of the paper is to highlight potential issues for panel discussion, not to provide a detailed review of all data relevant to the topic. Before each panel discussion, key speakers will review data and information to facilitate development and discussion of the main issues of each topic. Please refer to the attached agenda for the workshop format, key speakers, presentation topics, and panel participants. The goal of the panel discussions is to identify key issues for each of the three topics above. The working group will also make recommendations on how to proceed on these key issues.

  4. On extending actions of groups

    SciTech Connect

    Ageev, Sergei M; Repovs, Dusan

    2010-02-28

    Problems of dense and closed extension of actions of compact transformation groups are solved. The method developed in the paper is applied to problems of extension of equivariant maps and of construction of equivariant compactifications. Bibliography: 27 titles.

  5. Six Considerations for Social Justice Group Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Anneliese A.; Salazar, Carmen F.

    2010-01-01

    This article describes "courageous conversations" in social justice group work and a continuum of action for social justice interventions. It analyzes themes from 20 contributions to 2 consecutive special issues of "The Journal for Specialists in Group Work" on social justice group work. Implications for future development in group leadership and…

  6. Abandoning wells working group

    SciTech Connect

    1997-03-01

    The primary objective of this working group is to identify major technical, regulatory, and environmental issues that are relevant to the abandonment of offshore wellbores. Once the issues have been identified, the working group also has the objective of making recommendations or providing potential solutions for consideration. Areas for process improvement will be identified and {open_quotes}best practices{close_quotes} will be discussed and compared to {open_quotes}minimum standards.{close_quotes} The working group will primarily focus on wellbore abandonment in the Gulf of Mexico. However, workshop participants are encouraged to discuss international issues which may be relevant to wellbore abandonment practices in the Gulf of Mexico. The Abandoning Wells Group has identified several major areas for discussion that have concerns related to both operators and service companies performing wellbore abandonments in the Gulf of Mexico. The following broad topics were selected for the agenda: (1) MMS minimum requirements and state regulations. (2) Co-existence of best practices, new technology, and P & A economics. (3) Liability and environmental issues relating to wellbore abandonment.

  7. Working Group Report: Sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Artuso, M.; et al.,

    2013-10-18

    Sensors play a key role in detecting both charged particles and photons for all three frontiers in Particle Physics. The signals from an individual sensor that can be used include ionization deposited, phonons created, or light emitted from excitations of the material. The individual sensors are then typically arrayed for detection of individual particles or groups of particles. Mounting of new, ever higher performance experiments, often depend on advances in sensors in a range of performance characteristics. These performance metrics can include position resolution for passing particles, time resolution on particles impacting the sensor, and overall rate capabilities. In addition the feasible detector area and cost frequently provides a limit to what can be built and therefore is often another area where improvements are important. Finally, radiation tolerance is becoming a requirement in a broad array of devices. We present a status report on a broad category of sensors, including challenges for the future and work in progress to solve those challenges.

  8. NOSS science working group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The members of the NOSS Science Working Group are John Apel, Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratories/NOAA; Tim Barnett, Scripps Institution of Oceanography; Francis Bretherton (chairman), National Center for Atmospheric Research; Otis Brown, University of Miami; Joost Businger, University of Washington; Garrett Campbell, NCAR; Mark Cane, Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Robert Edwards, National Marine Fisheries Service/NOAA; James Mueller, Naval Postgraduate School; Peter Niiler, Oregon State University; James J. O'Brien, Florida State University; Norman Phillips, National Meteorological Center/NOAA; Owen Phillips, The Johns Hopkins University; Stephen Piacsek, NSTL Station, NORDA; Trevor Platt, Bedford Institute of Oceanography; Stephen Pond, University of British Columbia; Stanley Ruttenberg (executive secretary), NCAR; William Schmitz, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution; Jerry Schubel, State University of New York; Robert Stewart, Scripps; Norbert Untersteiner, NOAA; and Alan Weinstein, Naval Environmental Prediction Research Facility.

  9. Instrumentation Working Group Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaller, Michelle; Miake-Lye, Richard

    1999-01-01

    The Instrumentation Working Group compiled a summary of measurement techniques applicable to gas turbine engine aerosol precursors and particulates. An assessment was made of the limits, accuracy, applicability, and technology readiness of the various techniques. Despite advances made in emissions characterization of aircraft engines, uncertainties still exist in the mechanisms by which aerosols and particulates are produced in the near-field engine exhaust. To adequately assess current understanding of the formation of sulfuric acid aerosols in the exhaust plumes of gas turbine engines, measurements are required to determine the degree and importance of sulfur oxidation in the turbine and at the engine exit. Ideally, concentrations of all sulfur species would be acquired, with emphasis on SO2 and SO3. Numerous options exist for extractive and non-extractive measurement of SO2 at the engine exit, most of which are well developed. SO2 measurements should be performed first to place an upper bound on the percentage of SO2 oxidation. If extractive and non-extractive techniques indicate that a large amount of the fuel sulfur is not detected as SO2, then efforts are needed to improve techniques for SO3 measurements. Additional work will be required to account for the fuel sulfur in the engine exhaust. Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (CI-MS) measurements need to be pursued, although a careful assessment needs to be made of the sampling line impact on the extracted sample composition. Efforts should also be placed on implementing non-intrusive techniques and extending their capabilities by maximizing exhaust coverage for line-of-sight measurements, as well as development of 2-D techniques, where feasible. Recommendations were made to continue engine exit and combustor measurements of particulates. Particulate measurements should include particle size distribution, mass fraction, hydration properties, and volatile fraction. However, methods to ensure that unaltered

  10. Design and testing of Ground Penetrating Radar equipment dedicated for civil engineering applications: ongoing activities in Working Group 1 of COST Action TU1208

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pajewski, Lara; Manacorda, Guido; Persico, Raffaele

    2015-04-01

    This work aims at presenting the ongoing research activities carried out in Working Group 1 'Novel GPR instrumentation' of the COST (European COoperation in Science and Technology) Action TU1208 'Civil Engineering Applications of Ground Penetrating Radar' (www.GPRadar.eu). The principal goal of the COST Action TU1208 is to exchange and increase scientific-technical knowledge and experience of GPR techniques in civil engineering, simultaneously promoting throughout Europe the effective use of this safe and non-destructive technique in the monitoring of infrastructures and structures. Working Group 1 (WG1) of the Action focuses on the development of innovative GPR equipment dedicated for civil engineering applications. It includes three Projects. Project 1.1 is focused on the 'Design, realisation and optimisation of innovative GPR equipment for the monitoring of critical transport infrastructures and buildings, and for the sensing of underground utilities and voids.' Project 1.2 is concerned with the 'Development and definition of advanced testing, calibration and stability procedures and protocols, for GPR equipment.' Project 1.3 deals with the 'Design, modelling and optimisation of GPR antennas.' During the first year of the Action, WG1 Members coordinated between themselves to address the state of the art and open problems in the scientific fields identified by the above-mentioned Projects [1, 2]. In carrying our this work, the WG1 strongly benefited from the participation of IDS Ingegneria dei Sistemi, one of the biggest GPR manufacturers, as well as from the contribution of external experts as David J. Daniels and Erica Utsi, sharing with the Action Members their wide experience on GPR technology and methodology (First General Meeting, July 2013). The synergy with WG2 and WG4 of the Action was useful for a deep understanding of the problems, merits and limits of available GPR equipment, as well as to discuss how to quantify the reliability of GPR results. An

  11. Democratic Group Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laursen, Erik K.; Tate, Thomas F.

    2012-01-01

    For a century, democratic values have called for abandoning coercive approaches and teaching children and youth to be responsible citizens. The authors explore strategies for creating respectful environments and positive group cultures with challenging youth. They offer suggestions to adult group facilitators to support youth in developing…

  12. Instrumentation Working Group Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaller, Michelle; Miake-Lye, Richard

    1999-01-01

    The Instrumentation Working Group compiled a summary of measurement techniques applicable to gas turbine engine aerosol precursors and particulates. An assessment was made of the limits, accuracy, applicability, and technology readiness of the various techniques. Despite advances made in emissions characterization of aircraft engines, uncertainties still exist in the mechanisms by which aerosols and particulates are produced in the near-field engine exhaust. To adequately assess current understanding of the formation of sulfuric acid aerosols in the exhaust plumes of gas turbine engines, measurements are required to determine the degree and importance of sulfur oxidation in the turbine and at the engine exit. Ideally, concentrations of all sulfur species would be acquired, with emphasis on SO2 and SO3. Numerous options exist for extractive and non-extractive measurement of SO2 at the engine exit, most of which are well developed. SO2 measurements should be performed first to place an upper bound on the percentage of SO2 oxidation. If extractive and non-extractive techniques indicate that a large amount of the fuel sulfur is not detected as SO2, then efforts are needed to improve techniques for SO3 measurements. Additional work will be required to account for the fuel sulfur in the engine exhaust. Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (CI-MS) measurements need to be pursued, although a careful assessment needs to be made of the sampling line impact on the extracted sample composition. Efforts should also be placed on implementing non-intrusive techniques and extending their capabilities by maximizing exhaust coverage for line-of-sight measurements, as well as development of 2-D techniques, where feasible. Recommendations were made to continue engine exit and combustor measurements of particulates. Particulate measurements should include particle size distribution, mass fraction, hydration properties, and volatile fraction. However, methods to ensure that unaltered

  13. GPR surveying of transport infrastructures and buildings; underground utility and void sensing - ongoing activities in Working Group 2 of COST Action TU1208

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pajewski, Lara; Plati, Christina; Derobert, Xavier

    2015-04-01

    This work aims at presenting the ongoing research activities carried out in Working Group 2 'GPR surveying of pavements, bridges, tunnels and buildings; underground utility and void sensing' of the COST (European COoperation in Science and Technology) Action TU1208 'Civil Engineering Applications of Ground Penetrating Radar' (www.GPRadar.eu). The principal goal of the COST Action TU1208 is to exchange and increase scientific-technical knowledge and experience of Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) techniques in civil engineering, whilst simultaneously promoting throughout Europe the effective use of this safe and non-destructive technique in the monitoring of infrastructures and structures. Four Working Groups (WGs) carry out the research activities. WG1 focuses on the development of innovative GPR equipment dedicated for civil engineering applications. WG2 deals with the development of guidelines and protocols for the surveying, through the use of a GPR system, of transport infrastructure and buildings, as well as for the sensing of utilities and voids. WG3 deals with the development of electromagnetic forward and inverse scattering methods, for the characterization of GPR scenarios, as well as with data- processing algorithms for the elaboration of the data collected during GPR surveys. WG4 is concerned with the use of GPR in fields different from the civil engineering, as well as with the integration of GPR with other non-destructive testing techniques. Each WG includes several Projects. WG2 includes five Projects. Project 2.1 focuses on outlining 'Innovative inspection procedures for effective GPR surveying of critical transport infrastructures (pavements, bridges and tunnels).' Project 2.2 is concerned with the development of 'Innovative inspection procedures for effective GPR surveying of buildings.' Project 2.3 deals with identifying 'Innovative inspection procedures for effective GPR sensing and mapping of underground utilities and voids, with a focus to urban

  14. Engaging and Informing Students through Group Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Stella

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this action research was to explore the benefits of group work as a tool for engaging students with introductory material. It was the researcher's expectation that group work, would provide a means of reducing cognitive load (Kirschner, Sweller & Clark, 2006) and encouraging on task behaviour (Wentzel & Watkins, 2002). This would result…

  15. Working With Citizens' Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, James B.

    1974-01-01

    The growing demand for expert technical advice in the areas of environmental impact statements, testimony at public hearings, and testimony in consumer or environmental litigation is examined. Brief descriptions of thirteen of the most active public-interest science groups are included. (DT)

  16. Information basis for developing comprehensive waste management system-US-Japan joint nuclear energy action plan waste management working group phase I report.

    SciTech Connect

    Nutt, M.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2010-05-25

    The activity of Phase I of the Waste Management Working Group under the United States - Japan Joint Nuclear Energy Action Plan started in 2007. The US-Japan JNEAP is a bilateral collaborative framework to support the global implementation of safe, secure, and sustainable, nuclear fuel cycles (referred to in this document as fuel cycles). The Waste Management Working Group was established by strong interest of both parties, which arise from the recognition that development and optimization of waste management and disposal system(s) are central issues of the present and future nuclear fuel cycles. This report summarizes the activity of the Waste Management Working Group that focused on consolidation of the existing technical basis between the U.S. and Japan and the joint development of a plan for future collaborative activities. Firstly, the political/regulatory frameworks related to nuclear fuel cycles in both countries were reviewed. The various advanced fuel cycle scenarios that have been considered in both countries were then surveyed and summarized. The working group established the working reference scenario for the future cooperative activity that corresponds to a fuel cycle scenario being considered both in Japan and the U.S. This working scenario involves transitioning from a once-through fuel cycle utilizing light water reactors to a one-pass uranium-plutonium fuel recycle in light water reactors to a combination of light water reactors and fast reactors with plutonium, uranium, and minor actinide recycle, ultimately concluding with multiple recycle passes primarily using fast reactors. Considering the scenario, current and future expected waste streams, treatment and inventory were discussed, and the relevant information was summarized. Second, the waste management/disposal system optimization was discussed. Repository system concepts were reviewed, repository design concepts for the various classifications of nuclear waste were summarized, and the factors

  17. Group Work: How to Use Groups Effectively

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Alison

    2011-01-01

    Many students cringe and groan when told that they will need to work in a group. However, group work has been found to be good for students and good for teachers. Employers want college graduates to have developed teamwork skills. Additionally, students who participate in collaborative learning get better grades, are more satisfied with their…

  18. Design and testing of Ground Penetrating Radar equipment dedicated for civil engineering applications: ongoing activities in Working Group 1 of COST Action TU1208

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pajewski, Lara; Manacorda, Guido; Persico, Raffaele

    2015-04-01

    This work aims at presenting the ongoing research activities carried out in Working Group 1 'Novel GPR instrumentation' of the COST (European COoperation in Science and Technology) Action TU1208 'Civil Engineering Applications of Ground Penetrating Radar' (www.GPRadar.eu). The principal goal of the COST Action TU1208 is to exchange and increase scientific-technical knowledge and experience of GPR techniques in civil engineering, simultaneously promoting throughout Europe the effective use of this safe and non-destructive technique in the monitoring of infrastructures and structures. Working Group 1 (WG1) of the Action focuses on the development of innovative GPR equipment dedicated for civil engineering applications. It includes three Projects. Project 1.1 is focused on the 'Design, realisation and optimisation of innovative GPR equipment for the monitoring of critical transport infrastructures and buildings, and for the sensing of underground utilities and voids.' Project 1.2 is concerned with the 'Development and definition of advanced testing, calibration and stability procedures and protocols, for GPR equipment.' Project 1.3 deals with the 'Design, modelling and optimisation of GPR antennas.' During the first year of the Action, WG1 Members coordinated between themselves to address the state of the art and open problems in the scientific fields identified by the above-mentioned Projects [1, 2]. In carrying our this work, the WG1 strongly benefited from the participation of IDS Ingegneria dei Sistemi, one of the biggest GPR manufacturers, as well as from the contribution of external experts as David J. Daniels and Erica Utsi, sharing with the Action Members their wide experience on GPR technology and methodology (First General Meeting, July 2013). The synergy with WG2 and WG4 of the Action was useful for a deep understanding of the problems, merits and limits of available GPR equipment, as well as to discuss how to quantify the reliability of GPR results. An

  19. 2010 Chemical Working Group Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Concha M.

    2010-01-01

    The Steering Group for the Interagency Advanced Power Group (IAPG) held their business meeting on November 30-December 1st in McLean, Virginia. Status reports were presented from each of the IAPG's Working Groups. These charts contain a brief summary of the IAPG Chemical Working Group's activities during 2010 and its plans for 2011.

  20. GPR surveying of transport infrastructures and buildings; underground utility and void sensing - ongoing activities in Working Group 2 of COST Action TU1208

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pajewski, Lara; Plati, Christina; Derobert, Xavier

    2015-04-01

    This work aims at presenting the ongoing research activities carried out in Working Group 2 'GPR surveying of pavements, bridges, tunnels and buildings; underground utility and void sensing' of the COST (European COoperation in Science and Technology) Action TU1208 'Civil Engineering Applications of Ground Penetrating Radar' (www.GPRadar.eu). The principal goal of the COST Action TU1208 is to exchange and increase scientific-technical knowledge and experience of Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) techniques in civil engineering, whilst simultaneously promoting throughout Europe the effective use of this safe and non-destructive technique in the monitoring of infrastructures and structures. Four Working Groups (WGs) carry out the research activities. WG1 focuses on the development of innovative GPR equipment dedicated for civil engineering applications. WG2 deals with the development of guidelines and protocols for the surveying, through the use of a GPR system, of transport infrastructure and buildings, as well as for the sensing of utilities and voids. WG3 deals with the development of electromagnetic forward and inverse scattering methods, for the characterization of GPR scenarios, as well as with data- processing algorithms for the elaboration of the data collected during GPR surveys. WG4 is concerned with the use of GPR in fields different from the civil engineering, as well as with the integration of GPR with other non-destructive testing techniques. Each WG includes several Projects. WG2 includes five Projects. Project 2.1 focuses on outlining 'Innovative inspection procedures for effective GPR surveying of critical transport infrastructures (pavements, bridges and tunnels).' Project 2.2 is concerned with the development of 'Innovative inspection procedures for effective GPR surveying of buildings.' Project 2.3 deals with identifying 'Innovative inspection procedures for effective GPR sensing and mapping of underground utilities and voids, with a focus to urban

  1. Electromagnetic modelling, inversion and data-processing techniques for GPR: ongoing activities in Working Group 3 of COST Action TU1208

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pajewski, Lara; Giannopoulos, Antonis; van der Kruk, Jan

    2015-04-01

    This work aims at presenting the ongoing research activities carried out in Working Group 3 (WG3) 'EM methods for near-field scattering problems by buried structures; data processing techniques' of the COST (European COoperation in Science and Technology) Action TU1208 'Civil Engineering Applications of Ground Penetrating Radar' (www.GPRadar.eu). The principal goal of the COST Action TU1208 is to exchange and increase scientific-technical knowledge and experience of GPR techniques in civil engineering, simultaneously promoting throughout Europe the effective use of this safe and non-destructive technique in the monitoring of infrastructures and structures. WG3 is structured in four Projects. Project 3.1 deals with 'Electromagnetic modelling for GPR applications.' Project 3.2 is concerned with 'Inversion and imaging techniques for GPR applications.' The topic of Project 3.3 is the 'Development of intrinsic models for describing near-field antenna effects, including antenna-medium coupling, for improved radar data processing using full-wave inversion.' Project 3.4 focuses on 'Advanced GPR data-processing algorithms.' Electromagnetic modeling tools that are being developed and improved include the Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) technique and the spectral domain Cylindrical-Wave Approach (CWA). One of the well-known freeware and versatile FDTD simulators is GprMax that enables an improved realistic representation of the soil/material hosting the sought structures and of the GPR antennas. Here, input/output tools are being developed to ease the definition of scenarios and the visualisation of numerical results. The CWA expresses the field scattered by subsurface two-dimensional targets with arbitrary cross-section as a sum of cylindrical waves. In this way, the interaction is taken into account of multiple scattered fields within the medium hosting the sought targets. Recently, the method has been extended to deal with through-the-wall scenarios. One of the

  2. Group Work in Science Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGregor, Debbie; Tolmie, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    This article considers how students might work together in small groups, from two to eight, in either a primary or secondary science classroom. The nature of group work can vary widely and could include, for example, a pair carrying out an illustrative experiment, a trio or quad debating climate change, or six or seven rehearsing how they will…

  3. Group Work with Transgender Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickey, Lore M.; Loewy, Michael I.

    2010-01-01

    Drawing on the existing literature, the authors' research and clinical experiences, and the first author's personal journey as a member and leader of the transgender community, this article offers a brief history of group work with transgender clients followed by suggestions for group work with transgender clients from a social justice…

  4. Challenges Facing Group Work Online

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Bo; Kang, Haijun

    2016-01-01

    Online group work can be complicated because of its asynchronous characteristics and lack of physical presence, and its requirements for skills in handling technology, human relationships, and content-related tasks. This study focuses on the administrative, logistical and relationship-related challenges in online group work. Challenges in areas…

  5. Metabolomics and Epidemiology Working Group

    Cancer.gov

    The Metabolomics and Epidemiology (MetEpi) Working Group promotes metabolomics analyses in population-based studies, as well as advancement in the field of metabolomics for broader biomedical and public health research.

  6. Social Group Work in Hospitals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stambler, Moses

    This literature review focuses on social group work in the hospital setting. The first section addresses the need for a holistic approach within a typology of illness, and discusses the social work role and intervention tasks required at different stages of illness, i.e., diagnosis, adaptation to long-term illness, and the ending of the illness…

  7. Taxonomy Working Group Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons, Vickie S.; Beil, Robert J.; Terrone, Mark; Barth, Timothy S.; Panontin, Tina L.; Wales, Roxana; Rackley, Michael W.; Milne, James S.; McPherson, John W.; Dutra, Jayne E.; Shaw, Larry C.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the Taxonomy Working Group was to develop a proposal for a common taxonomy to be used by all NASA projects in the classifying of nonconformances, anomalies, and problems. Specifically, the group developed a recommended list of data elements along with general suggestions for the development of a problem reporting system to better serve NASA's need for managing, reporting, and trending project aberrant events. The Group's recommendations are reported in this document.

  8. 77 FR 74203 - Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-13

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group (TAMWG) affords stakeholders the opportunity to give policy, management, and technical input concerning Trinity...

  9. 76 FR 23621 - Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-27

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group (TAMWG) affords stakeholders the opportunity to give policy, management, and technical input concerning Trinity...

  10. 77 FR 10766 - Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-23

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group (TAMWG) affords stakeholders the opportunity to give policy, management, and technical input concerning Trinity...

  11. 75 FR 27814 - Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-18

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group (TAMWG) affords stakeholders the opportunity to give policy, management, and technical input concerning Trinity...

  12. 76 FR 34248 - Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-13

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group (TAMWG) affords stakeholders the opportunity to give policy, management, and technical input concerning Trinity...

  13. 75 FR 51284 - Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-19

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group (TAMWG) affords stakeholders the opportunity to give policy, management, and technical input concerning Trinity...

  14. 75 FR 17158 - Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-05

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group (TAMWG) affords stakeholders the opportunity to give policy, management, and technical input concerning Trinity...

  15. 76 FR 70751 - Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-15

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group (TAMWG) affords stakeholders the opportunity to give policy, management, and technical input concerning Trinity...

  16. 76 FR 14044 - Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-15

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group (TAMWG) affords stakeholders the opportunity to give policy, management, and technical input concerning Trinity...

  17. 75 FR 10501 - Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-08

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group (TAMWG) affords stakeholders the opportunity to give policy, management, and technical input concerning Trinity...

  18. 75 FR 70947 - Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-19

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group (TAMWG) affords stakeholders the opportunity to give policy, management, and technical input concerning Trinity...

  19. 77 FR 45370 - Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-31

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group (TAMWG) affords stakeholders the opportunity to give policy, management, and technical input concerning Trinity...

  20. 77 FR 50155 - Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-20

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group (TAMWG) affords stakeholders the opportunity to give policy, management, and technical input concerning Trinity...

  1. CFCC working group meeting: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-31

    This report is a compilation of the vugraphs presented at this meeting. Presentations covered are: CFCC Working Group; Overview of study on applications for advanced ceramics in industries for the future; Design codes and data bases: The CFCC program and its involvement in ASTM, ISO, ASME, and military handbook 17 activities; CFCC Working Group meeting (McDermott Technology); CFCC Working Group meeting (Textron); CFCC program for DMO materials; Developments in PIP-derived CFCCs; Toughened Silcomp (SiC-Si) composites for gas turbine engine applications; CFCC program for CVI materials; Self-lubricating CFCCs for diesel engine applications; Overview of the CFCC program`s supporting technologies task; Life prediction methodologies for CFCC components; Environmental testing of CFCCs in combustion gas environments; High-temperature particle filtration ORNL/DCC CRADA; HSCT CMC combustor; and Case study -- CFCC shroud for industrial gas turbines.

  2. Visual Working Memory for Observed Actions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Justin N.

    2007-01-01

    Human society depends on the ability to remember the actions of other individuals, which is information that must be stored in a temporary buffer to guide behavior after actions have been observed. To date, however, the storage capacity, contents, and architecture of working memory for observed actions are unknown. In this article, the author…

  3. Teaching Group Work on Teletechnet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Nina W.

    Many undergraduate courses can be easily modified for televised instruction. However, courses such as group work require weekly writing, have major expectations of practice, and necessitate immediate feedback, and so need considerable revamping for televised instruction. Ways to achieve this modification are covered here. The first consideration…

  4. Radiation sources working group summary

    SciTech Connect

    Fazio, M.V.

    1998-12-31

    The Radiation Sources Working Group addressed advanced concepts for the generation of RF energy to power advanced accelerators. The focus of the working group included advanced sources and technologies above 17 GHz. The topics discussed included RF sources above 17 GHz, pulse compression techniques to achieve extreme peak power levels, components technology, technology limitations and physical limits, and other advanced concepts. RF sources included gyroklystrons, magnicons, free-electron masers, two beam accelerators, and gyroharmonic and traveling wave devices. Technology components discussed included advanced cathodes and electron guns, high temperature superconductors for producing magnetic fields, RF breakdown physics and mitigation, and phenomena that impact source design such as fatigue in resonant structures due to RF heating. New approaches for RF source diagnostics located internal to the source were discussed for detecting plasma and beam phenomena existing in high energy density electrodynamic systems in order to help elucidate the reasons for performance limitations.

  5. Visualization and Modeling Working Group

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, S.J.; Dodrill, K.A.

    2007-03-01

    During the 2005 Hurricane season, many consequence predictions were available from 36 to 96 hours before landfalls, via the Department of Energy’s Visualization and Modeling Working Group (VMWG). Real-time data can be tapped by local officials and utilities, and can also be accessed for post-event regulatory audits. An overview of VMWG’s models, results and uses will be presented.

  6. SETI science working group report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drake, F.; Wolfe, J. H.; Seeger, C. L.

    1984-01-01

    This report covers the initial activities and deliberations of a continuing working group asked to assist the SETI Program Office at NASA. Seven chapters present the group's consensus on objectives, strategies, and plans for instrumental R&D and for a microwave search for extraterrestrial in intelligence (SETI) projected for the end of this decade. Thirteen appendixes reflect the views of their individual authors. Included are discussions of the 8-million-channel spectrum analyzer architecture and the proof-of-concept device under development; signal detection, recognition, and identification on-line in the presence of noise and radio interference; the 1-10 GHz sky survey and the 1-3 GHz targeted search envisaged; and the mutual interests of SETI and radio astronomy. The report ends with a selective, annotated SETI reading list of pro and contra SETI publications.

  7. Working group 1: Coronal streamers

    SciTech Connect

    Kopp, R.A.

    1994-04-01

    The working group on colonel streamers convened on the first day of the 2nd SOHO Workshop, which took place in Marciana Marina, Isola d`Elba, 27 September--1 October 1993. Recent progress in streamer observational techniques and theoretical modeling was reported. The contribution of streamers to the mass and energy supply for the solar wind was discussed. Moreover, the importance of thin electric current sheets for determining both the gross dynamical properties of streamers and the fine-scale filamentary structure within streamers, was strongly emphasized. Potential advances to our understanding of these areas of colonel physics that could be made by the contingent of instruments aboard SOHO were pointed out.

  8. Reflections on Working with Critical Action Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rigg, Clare; Trehan, Kiran

    2004-01-01

    Critical action learning engages participants in a process of drawing from critical perspectives to make connections between their learning and work experiences, to understand and change interpersonal and organisational practices. But what does this mean in practice? How can critical action learning be expedited? What outcomes can critical action…

  9. Accelerator Physics Working Group Summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, D.; Uesugi, T.; Wildnerc, E.

    2010-03-01

    The Accelerator Physics Working Group addressed the worldwide R&D activities performed in support of future neutrino facilities. These studies cover R&D activities for Super Beam, Beta Beam and muon-based Neutrino Factory facilities. Beta Beam activities reported the important progress made, together with the research activity planned for the coming years. Discussion sessions were also organized jointly with other working groups in order to define common ground for the optimization of a future neutrino facility. Lessons learned from already operating neutrino facilities provide key information for the design of any future neutrino facility, and were also discussed in this meeting. Radiation damage, remote handling for equipment maintenance and exchange, and primary proton beam stability and monitoring were among the important subjects presented and discussed. Status reports for each of the facility subsystems were presented: proton drivers, targets, capture systems, and muon cooling and acceleration systems. The preferred scenario for each type of possible future facility was presented, together with the challenges and remaining issues. The baseline specification for the muon-based Neutrino Factory was reviewed and updated where required. This report will emphasize new results and ideas and discuss possible changes in the baseline scenarios of the facilities. A list of possible future steps is proposed that should be followed up at NuFact10.

  10. Mixed Waste Working Group report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-11-09

    The treatment of mixed waste remains one of this country`s most vexing environmental problems. Mixed waste is the combination of radioactive waste and hazardous waste, as defined by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The Department of Energy (DOE), as the country`s largest mixed waste generator, responsible for 95 percent of the Nation`s mixed waste volume, is now required to address a strict set of milestones under the Federal Facility Compliance Act of 1992. DOE`s earlier failure to adequately address the storage and treatment issues associated with mixed waste has led to a significant backlog of temporarily stored waste, significant quantities of buried waste, limited permanent disposal options, and inadequate treatment solutions. Between May and November of 1993, the Mixed Waste Working Group brought together stakeholders from around the Nation. Scientists, citizens, entrepreneurs, and bureaucrats convened in a series of forums to chart a course for accelerated testing of innovative mixed waste technologies. For the first time, a wide range of stakeholders were asked to examine new technologies that, if given the chance to be tested and evaluated, offer the prospect for better, safer, cheaper, and faster solutions to the mixed waste problem. In a matter of months, the Working Group has managed to bridge a gap between science and perception, engineer and citizen, and has developed a shared program for testing new technologies.

  11. Collective action problem in heterogeneous groups.

    PubMed

    Gavrilets, Sergey

    2015-12-01

    I review the theoretical and experimental literature on the collective action problem in groups whose members differ in various characteristics affecting individual costs, benefits and preferences in collective actions. I focus on evolutionary models that predict how individual efforts and fitnesses, group efforts and the amount of produced collective goods depend on the group's size and heterogeneity, as well as on the benefit and cost functions and parameters. I consider collective actions that aim to overcome the challenges from nature or win competition with neighbouring groups of co-specifics. I show that the largest contributors towards production of collective goods will typically be group members with the highest stake in it or for whom the effort is least costly, or those who have the largest capability or initial endowment. Under some conditions, such group members end up with smaller net pay-offs than the rest of the group. That is, they effectively behave as altruists. With weak nonlinearity in benefit and cost functions, the group effort typically decreases with group size and increases with within-group heterogeneity. With strong nonlinearity in benefit and cost functions, these patterns are reversed. I discuss the implications of theoretical results for animal behaviour, human origins and psychology.

  12. California Tsunami Policy Working Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Real, C. R.; Johnson, L. A.

    2012-12-01

    California has established a Tsunami Policy Working Group of specialists from government and industry, from diverse fields including tsunami, seismic, and flood hazards, local and regional planning, structural engineering, natural hazard policy, and coastal engineering that have come together to facilitate the development of policy recommendations for tsunami hazard mitigation. The group is acting on findings from two major efforts: the USGS SAFRR (Science Application for Risk Reduction) Project - Tsunami Scenario, a comprehensive impact analysis of a large credible tsunami originating from a M 9.0 earthquake on the Aleutian Islands striking California's Coastline, and the State's Tsunami Hazard Mitigation and Education Program carried out by the California Emergency Management Agency and the California Geological Survey. The latter program is currently involved with several projects to help coastal communities reduce their tsunami risk, including two pilot projects (Crescent City in Del Norte County and the City of Huntington Beach in Orange County) where tsunami risk is among the highest in California, and a third pilot study focusing on the maritime community. The pilot projects are developing and testing probabilistic tsunami hazard products that will assist land-use and construction decisions for coastal development. The role of the policy group is to identify gaps and issues in current tsunami hazard mitigation, make recommendations that will help eliminate these impediments and to provide advice that will assist in the development and implementation of effective tsunami hazard products that will help coastal communities improve tsunami resiliency.

  13. Exascale Hardware Architectures Working Group

    SciTech Connect

    Hemmert, S; Ang, J; Chiang, P; Carnes, B; Doerfler, D; Leininger, M; Dosanjh, S; Fields, P; Koch, K; Laros, J; Noe, J; Quinn, T; Torrellas, J; Vetter, J; Wampler, C; White, A

    2011-03-15

    The ASC Exascale Hardware Architecture working group is challenged to provide input on the following areas impacting the future use and usability of potential exascale computer systems: processor, memory, and interconnect architectures, as well as the power and resilience of these systems. Going forward, there are many challenging issues that will need to be addressed. First, power constraints in processor technologies will lead to steady increases in parallelism within a socket. Additionally, all cores may not be fully independent nor fully general purpose. Second, there is a clear trend toward less balanced machines, in terms of compute capability compared to memory and interconnect performance. In order to mitigate the memory issues, memory technologies will introduce 3D stacking, eventually moving on-socket and likely on-die, providing greatly increased bandwidth but unfortunately also likely providing smaller memory capacity per core. Off-socket memory, possibly in the form of non-volatile memory, will create a complex memory hierarchy. Third, communication energy will dominate the energy required to compute, such that interconnect power and bandwidth will have a significant impact. All of the above changes are driven by the need for greatly increased energy efficiency, as current technology will prove unsuitable for exascale, due to unsustainable power requirements of such a system. These changes will have the most significant impact on programming models and algorithms, but they will be felt across all layers of the machine. There is clear need to engage all ASC working groups in planning for how to deal with technological changes of this magnitude. The primary function of the Hardware Architecture Working Group is to facilitate codesign with hardware vendors to ensure future exascale platforms are capable of efficiently supporting the ASC applications, which in turn need to meet the mission needs of the NNSA Stockpile Stewardship Program. This issue is

  14. Executive Committee Working Group: Women in Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Primas, Francesca; Maddison, Sarah; Primas, Francesca; Aerts, Conny; Clayton, Geoffrey; Combes, Françoise; Elmegreen, Debra; Feretti, Luigina; Jog, Chanda; Kobayashi, Chiaki; Lazzaro, Daniela; Liang, Yanchun; Mandrini, Cristina; Mathews, Brenda; Rovira, Marta

    2016-04-01

    The gender† dimension of science and technology has become one of the most important and debated issues worldwide, impacting society at every level. A variety of international initiatives on the subject have been undertaken, including the continued monitoring of the status of women in science by Unesco Institute for Statistics (UIS) or the annual reports ``Education at a Glance'' by the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) as well as field-related working groups and networking in order to collect data in a consistent manner. The majority of the international organizations have made clear statements about their discrimination policies (independently of their main field(s) of action), including the International Council for Science whose regulations are followed by the IAU. Gender equality at large is one of the eight United Nations Millennium Development Goals, which clearly calls for action related to science, technology and gender.

  15. A Model for Action Oriented Structured Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George, Robert J.

    This presentation describes an experiential group design which can be employed with large, diverse populations. It is especially applicable at the university level. The design encourages self-clarification and self-confrontation on personalized issues and culminates in an individual commitment to action. Techniques such as "life space" drawings…

  16. ICDF Complex Remedial Action Work Plan

    SciTech Connect

    W. M. Heileson

    2006-12-01

    This Remedial Action Work Plan provides the framework for operation of the Idaho Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Disposal Facility Complex (ICDF). This facility includes (a) an engineered landfill that meets the substantial requirements of DOE Order 435.1, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Subtitle C, Idaho Hazardous Waste Management Act, and Toxic Substances Control Act polychlorinated biphenyl landfill requirements; (b) centralized receiving, inspections, administration, storage/staging, and treatment facilities necessary for CERCLA investigation-derived, remedial, and removal waste at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) prior to final disposition in the disposal facility or shipment off-Site; and (c) an evaporation pond that has been designated as a corrective action management unit. The ICDF Complex, including a buffer zone, will cover approximately 40 acres, with a landfill disposal capacity of approximately 510,000 yd3. The ICDF Complex is designed and authorized to accept INL CERCLA-generated wastes, and includes the necessary subsystems and support facilities to provide a complete waste management system. This Remedial Action Work Plan presents the operational approach and requirements for the various components that are part of the ICDF Complex. Summaries of the remedial action work elements are presented herein, with supporting information and documents provided as appendixes to this work plan that contain specific detail about the operation of the ICDF Complex. This document presents the planned operational process based upon an evaluation of the remedial action requirements set forth in the Operable Unit 3-13 Final Record of Decision.

  17. Group action in topos quantum physics

    SciTech Connect

    Flori, C.

    2013-03-15

    Topos theory has been suggested first by Isham and Butterfield, and then by Isham and Doering, as an alternative mathematical structure within which to formulate physical theories. In particular, it has been used to reformulate standard quantum mechanics in such a way that a novel type of logic is used to represent propositions. In this paper, we extend this formulation to include the notion of a group and group transformation in such a way that we overcome the problem of twisted presheaves. In order to implement this we need to change the type of topos involved, so as to render the notion of continuity of the group action meaningful.

  18. Housekeeping category corrective action unit work plan

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-01

    The purpose of this Corrective Action Unit (CAU) Work Plan is to provide a strategy to be used by the US Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV), the US Department of Defense (DoD) Defense Special Weapons Agency (DSWA) (formerly the Defense Nuclear Agency), and contractor personnel for conducting corrective actions at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and Nevada off-site locations including the Tonopah Test Range (TTR), the Project Shoal Area, and the Central Nevada Test Area. This Work Plan applies to housekeeping category CAUs already listed in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) Appendices (FFACO, 1996) as well as newly identified Corrective Action Sites (CASs) that will follow the housekeeping process.

  19. Maintenance Action Work Plan for Waste Area Grouping 1 inactive tanks 3001-B, 3004-B, T-30, and 3013 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    This Maintenance Action Work Plan has been prepared to document the activities and procedures for the remediation of four inactive, low-level radioactive tanks at Waste Area Grouping 1, from the Category D list of tanks in the Federal Facility Agreement for the Oak Ridge Reservation (EPA et al. 1994). The four tanks to remediated are tanks 3001-B, 3004-B, T-30, and 3013. Three of the tanks (3001-B, 3004-B, and T-30) will be physically removed from the ground. Because of logistical issues associted with excavation and site access, the fourth tank (3013) will be grouted in place and permanently closed.

  20. CFCC working group meeting: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    The theme of the meeting was ``A Path to Commercialization`` and discussion was devoted to addressing the nearest-term products and the time frame for implementation. The objectives of the meeting were to identify the barriers to commercialization, methods to overcome these barriers, and the actions required to achieve success. The meeting was planned to bring together government agencies and industry customers and, suppliers to discuss and conclude where the CFCC Program is today, where it is going, and how they plan to get there. It was also planned to join component developers with end users who can describe systems needs and projected schedules for introducing CFCC components in industrial applications.

  1. HELIOS Third Joint Working Group Meeting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ousley, Gilbert; Kutzer, Ants

    1970-01-01

    During the past six months since the Second Helios Joint Working Group Meeting held 27-30 April 1970 at Goddard Space Flight Center, the TDS Sub-Group supported the Helios Project Office and the other Sub-Groups in the timely disposition of action items and the dissemination of information pertinent to the development of interface documentation. Of particular importance during this time period was the Project's decision to incorporate a single-channel telemetry system design aboard the spacecraft. The TDS Sub-Group participated actively in the process that led to this decision. Still under active study with TDS participation is the pending Project Office decision regarding the incorporation of a ranging capability within the telecommunications design. The TDS Sub-Group assisted the Mission Analysis and Operations Sub-Group in establishment of a study effort concerning the Near-Earth Sequence of Events from launch to launch plus 8 hours. This study, which will provide valuable data for the spacecraft telecommunications design, will include participation by the Experiment, Launch Vehicle, Spacecraft, as well as the TDS and MA&O Sub-Groups. Also during the past 6-month period, the TDS, in conjunction with the Spacecraft Sub-Group, initiated activity to develop the Helios Spacecraft/TDS Compatibility Test Plans and Procedures. Activity concerning the foregoing interface discussions has been and will continue to be based upon the "TDS Estimated Capabilities Document for the Helios Missions" (613-1), and the "DSN/Flight Project Interface Design Handbook" (810-5). These will continue to be considered TDS controlling documents until specific Helios Project/TDS interface documentation is generated and signed off by the respective parties. In addition to the above, the DSN continued the Helios Trainee Program with seven GfW/DFVLR trainees in residence at JPL. Two trainees will complete their year's residency concurrent with the Third Helios Joint Working Group Meeting, while

  2. New Drugs and Novel Mechanisms of Action in Multiple Myeloma in 2013: A Report from the International Myeloma Working Group (IMWG)

    PubMed Central

    Ocio, EM; Richardson, PG; Rajkumar, SV; Palumbo, A; Mateos, MV; Orlowski, R; Kumar, S; Usmani, S; Roodman, D; Niesvizky, R; Einsele, H; Anderson, KC; Dimopoulos, MA; Avet-Loiseau, H; Mellqvist, UH; Turesson, I; Merlini, G; Schots, R; McCarthy, P; Bergsagel, L; Chim, J; Lahuerta, JJ; Shah, J; Reiman, A; Mikhael, J; Zweegman, S; Lonial, S; Comenzo, R; Chng, WJ; Moreau, P; Sonneveld, P; Ludwig, H; Durie, BGM; San Miguel, JF

    2014-01-01

    Treatment in medical oncology is gradually shifting from the use of non-specific chemotherapeutic agents towards an era of novel targeted therapy in which drugs and their combinations target specific aspects of the biology of tumor cells. Multiple myeloma (MM) has become one of the best examples in this regard, reflected in the identification of new pathogenic mechanisms, together with the development of novel drugs that are being explored from the preclinical setting to the early phases of clinical development. We review the biological rationale for the use of the most important new agents for treating MM and summarize their clinical activity in an increasingly busy field. First, we discuss data from already approved and active agents (including second- and third-generation- proteasome inhibitors, immunomodulatory agents (IMIDs) and alkylators). Then we focus on agents with novel mechanisms of action, such as monoclonal antibodies (MoAb), cell cycle specific drugs, deacetylase inhibitors, agents acting on the unfolded protein response, signaling transduction pathway inhibitors, and kinase inhibitors. Among this plethora of new agents or mechanisms some are specially promising: Anti-CD38 MoAb, such as daratumumab, are the first antibodies with clinical activity as single agents in MM. Also the kinesin spindle protein inhibitor Arry-520 is effective in monotherapy as well as in combination with dexamethasone in heavily pretreated patients. Immunotherapy against MM is also being explored, and probably the most attractive example of this approach is the combination of the anti-CS1 MoAb elotuzumab with lenalidomide and dexamethasone, that has produced exciting results in the relapsed/refractory setting. PMID:24253022

  3. New drugs and novel mechanisms of action in multiple myeloma in 2013: a report from the International Myeloma Working Group (IMWG).

    PubMed

    Ocio, E M; Richardson, P G; Rajkumar, S V; Palumbo, A; Mateos, M V; Orlowski, R; Kumar, S; Usmani, S; Roodman, D; Niesvizky, R; Einsele, H; Anderson, K C; Dimopoulos, M A; Avet-Loiseau, H; Mellqvist, U-H; Turesson, I; Merlini, G; Schots, R; McCarthy, P; Bergsagel, L; Chim, C S; Lahuerta, J J; Shah, J; Reiman, A; Mikhael, J; Zweegman, S; Lonial, S; Comenzo, R; Chng, W J; Moreau, P; Sonneveld, P; Ludwig, H; Durie, B G M; Miguel, J F S

    2014-03-01

    Treatment in medical oncology is gradually shifting from the use of nonspecific chemotherapeutic agents toward an era of novel targeted therapy in which drugs and their combinations target specific aspects of the biology of tumor cells. Multiple myeloma (MM) has become one of the best examples in this regard, reflected in the identification of new pathogenic mechanisms, together with the development of novel drugs that are being explored from the preclinical setting to the early phases of clinical development. We review the biological rationale for the use of the most important new agents for treating MM and summarize their clinical activity in an increasingly busy field. First, we discuss data from already approved and active agents (including second- and third-generation proteasome inhibitors (PIs), immunomodulatory agents and alkylators). Next, we focus on agents with novel mechanisms of action, such as monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs), cell cycle-specific drugs, deacetylase inhibitors, agents acting on the unfolded protein response, signaling transduction pathway inhibitors and kinase inhibitors. Among this plethora of new agents or mechanisms, some are specially promising: anti-CD38 MoAb, such as daratumumab, are the first antibodies with clinical activity as single agents in MM. Moreover, the kinesin spindle protein inhibitor Arry-520 is effective in monotherapy as well as in combination with dexamethasone in heavily pretreated patients. Immunotherapy against MM is also being explored, and probably the most attractive example of this approach is the combination of the anti-CS1 MoAb elotuzumab with lenalidomide and dexamethasone, which has produced exciting results in the relapsed/refractory setting.

  4. 78 FR 63459 - GPS Satellite Simulator Control Working Group Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Air Force GPS Satellite Simulator Control Working Group Meeting AGENCY: Department of the Air Force. ACTION..., that the GPS Directorate will host a GPS Satellite Simulator Control Working Group (SSCWG) meeting on...

  5. 78 FR 7810 - Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-04

    ... Bureau of Reclamation Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group AGENCY: Bureau of Reclamation, Interior. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: The Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group (AMWG) makes recommendations to the Secretary of the Interior concerning Glen Canyon Dam operations...

  6. 76 FR 24516 - Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-02

    ... Bureau of Reclamation Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group AGENCY: Bureau of Reclamation, Interior. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: The Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group (AMWG) makes recommendations to the Secretary of the Interior concerning Glen Canyon Dam operations...

  7. 77 FR 9265 - Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-16

    ... Bureau of Reclamation Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group AGENCY: Bureau of Reclamation, Interior. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: The Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group (AMWG) makes recommendations to the Secretary of the Interior concerning Glen Canyon Dam operations...

  8. 78 FR 21415 - Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-10

    ... Bureau of Reclamation Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group AGENCY: Bureau of Reclamation, Interior. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: The Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group (AMWG) makes recommendations to the Secretary of the Interior concerning Glen Canyon Dam operations...

  9. 77 FR 43117 - Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-23

    ... Bureau of Reclamation Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group AGENCY: Bureau of Reclamation, Interior. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: The Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group (AMWG) makes recommendations to the Secretary of the Interior concerning Glen Canyon Dam operations...

  10. ILDG Middleware Working Group Status Report

    SciTech Connect

    B. Joo; W. Watson

    2004-09-01

    We report on the status of the ILDG Middleware Working Group. The Middleware Working Group was formed with the aim of designing standard middleware to allow the interoperation of the data grids of ILDG member collaborations. Details of the working group are given. In this contribution we outline the role of middleware in the ILDG, present our proposed middleware architecture and discuss our current status and future work within the working group.

  11. Group work. Cope street revisited.

    PubMed

    Rowe, A

    1993-10-01

    45 Cope Street is a preventive health project working with pregnant women and young mothers aged between 16 and 25 years and their children in the inner city of Nottingham. A beacon of innovative health visiting practice, it has recently passed the fifth anniversary of its opening. Team leader Ann Rowe describes their philosophy and practice.

  12. 77 FR 22801 - Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-17

    ... Bureau of Reclamation Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group AGENCY: Bureau of Reclamation, Interior. ACTION: Notice of public meeting (WebEx/conference call). SUMMARY: The Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive... Dam operations and other management actions to protect resources downstream of Glen Canyon...

  13. Worked Example Effects in Individual and Group Work Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Retnowati, Endah; Ayres, Paul; Sweller, John

    2010-01-01

    This study compared the effects of worked example and problem-solving approaches in individual or group work settings on learning to solve geometry problems. One hundred and one seventh graders from Indonesia were randomly allocated to four experimental groups using a 2 (problem-solving vs. worked examples) x 2 (individual vs. group study) design.…

  14. Group Work and Multicultural Management Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Phil

    2009-01-01

    Globalization changes the composition of the adult classroom, increasing diversity and bringing new associated teaching and learning problems; problems with group work. Educators may have goals to teach transferable multicultural group working skills yet learners find such work more challenging, showing a propensity to form groups containing…

  15. Hadron Colliders Working Group Report

    SciTech Connect

    S. Peggs and M.J. Syphers

    2001-11-08

    The ''point design'' studied this year shows that a staged VLHC (40, {approx} 200 TeV) is feasible, with no insurmountable challenges. Further work can provide a more optimized design, by studying various alternative field strengths (e.g., superferric magnets for Stage 1) for improvements to vacuum, wall impedance, and other major performance parameters. It may be that a ''single-stage'' scenario for accessing higher energies sooner is the correct approach. A next-step design study should be considered to look at the two cases near to and complementary to the 2001 VLHC Design Study. The effectiveness of photon stops and their engineering design need to be addressed in the near future to truly determine if these devices can lead this effort to even higher luminosities and energies. The superbunch approach should continue to be studied, as well as IR designs, new instrumentation and diagnostics, and beam dynamics issues. Finally, a well organized VLHC-motivated beam studies effort should become part of the national program.

  16. Lung cancer working group report.

    PubMed

    Saijo, Nagahiro; Fukuoka, Masahiro; Thongprasert, Sumitra; Ichinose, Yukito; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya; Mok, Tony Shu Kam; Ohe, Yuichiro; Park, Keunchil; Wu, Yi-Long

    2010-09-01

    Asia needs a guideline for non-small-cell lung cancer because of differences in medical care, medical care insurance, ethnic variation and drug approval lag within Asian countries and compared with Western countries. Due to ethnic differences, drug dosages are often higher in the USA than in Japan. EGFR mutation in non-small-cell lung cancer was detected in 32% of Asians but only 6% of non-Asians, while differences in irinotecan metabolism cause higher frequencies of toxicity (leukopenia, diarrhea) in Asians. Pharmacodynamic ethnic differences in relation to paclitaxel/carboplatin resulted in longer median survival and a higher 1-year survival rate for Japanese-advanced non-small-cell lung cancer patients compared with Americans. To solve the problem of drug lag, pharmaceutical companies must perform multinational Asian clinical trials with quick accrual of patients, while regulatory authorities must establish high-quality, efficient approval processes, and achieve regulatory harmonization. The National Comprehensive Cancer Network promotes creation of national clinical practice guidelines, and Korea, China and Thailand adapted the National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines. Many Asian countries still lack such guidelines, and there are no pan-Asian guidelines for non-small-cell lung cancer. Japan developed its own non-small-cell lung cancer guidelines and also a gefitinib guidance. The study group members concluded that immediate establishment of an Asian non-small-cell lung cancer guideline will be difficult because of the differences among the countries. Asian collaborative trials on treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer need to be started at an early date to generate Asian data.

  17. How Much "Group" Is There in Online Group Work?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowes, Susan

    2014-01-01

    The ability to work in groups across time and space has become a frequent requirement for the workplace and is increasingly common in higher education, but there is a surprising lack of research on how online groups work. This research applies analytic approaches used in studies of face-to-face classroom "talk" to multiple groups in two…

  18. Using Working Agreements in Participatory Action Research: Working through Moral Problems with Malaysian Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balakrishnan, Vishalache; Cornforth, Sue

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we propose that taking time before the work begins to develop agreements about how to work together in participatory action research enables researchers to directly address several ethical issues that can be problematic in this type of research: gaining fully informed consent; in-group confidentiality; cultural misconceptions; and…

  19. Post-Disaster Social Justice Group Work and Group Supervision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bemak, Fred; Chung, Rita Chi-Ying

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses post-disaster group counseling and group supervision using a social justice orientation for working with post-disaster survivors from underserved populations. The Disaster Cross-Cultural Counseling model is a culturally responsive group counseling model that infuses social justice into post-disaster group counseling and…

  20. Student Attitudes about Experiences with Work Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chalupa, Marilyn R.; Sormunen, Carolee; Charles, Thomas A.

    1997-01-01

    After 110 business students participated in collaborative learning activities, male attitudes toward work groups became significantly more positive, females' less. Those reporting mostly positive group experiences preferred collaborative working styles; those rating the experience as "just OK" preferred working alone or with one other person. (SK)

  1. Effects of action video game training on visual working memory.

    PubMed

    Blacker, Kara J; Curby, Kim M; Klobusicky, Elizabeth; Chein, Jason M

    2014-10-01

    The ability to hold visual information in mind over a brief delay is critical for acquiring information and navigating a complex visual world. Despite the ubiquitous nature of visual working memory (VWM) in our everyday lives, this system is fundamentally limited in capacity. Therefore, the potential to improve VWM through training is a growing area of research. An emerging body of literature suggests that extensive experience playing action video games yields a myriad of perceptual and attentional benefits. Several lines of converging work suggest that action video game play may influence VWM as well. The current study utilized a training paradigm to examine whether action video games cause improvements to the quantity and/or the quality of information stored in VWM. The results suggest that VWM capacity, as measured by a change detection task, is increased after action video game training, as compared with training on a control game, and that some improvement to VWM precision occurs with action game training as well. However, these findings do not appear to extend to a complex span measure of VWM, which is often thought to tap into higher-order executive skills. The VWM improvements seen in individuals trained on an action video game cannot be accounted for by differences in motivation or engagement, differential expectations, or baseline differences in demographics as compared with the control group used. In sum, action video game training represents a potentially unique and engaging platform by which this severely capacity-limited VWM system might be enhanced. PMID:25068696

  2. Effects of action video game training on visual working memory.

    PubMed

    Blacker, Kara J; Curby, Kim M; Klobusicky, Elizabeth; Chein, Jason M

    2014-10-01

    The ability to hold visual information in mind over a brief delay is critical for acquiring information and navigating a complex visual world. Despite the ubiquitous nature of visual working memory (VWM) in our everyday lives, this system is fundamentally limited in capacity. Therefore, the potential to improve VWM through training is a growing area of research. An emerging body of literature suggests that extensive experience playing action video games yields a myriad of perceptual and attentional benefits. Several lines of converging work suggest that action video game play may influence VWM as well. The current study utilized a training paradigm to examine whether action video games cause improvements to the quantity and/or the quality of information stored in VWM. The results suggest that VWM capacity, as measured by a change detection task, is increased after action video game training, as compared with training on a control game, and that some improvement to VWM precision occurs with action game training as well. However, these findings do not appear to extend to a complex span measure of VWM, which is often thought to tap into higher-order executive skills. The VWM improvements seen in individuals trained on an action video game cannot be accounted for by differences in motivation or engagement, differential expectations, or baseline differences in demographics as compared with the control group used. In sum, action video game training represents a potentially unique and engaging platform by which this severely capacity-limited VWM system might be enhanced.

  3. IVS Working Group 4: VLBI Data Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gipson, John

    2010-01-01

    In 2007 the IVS Directing Board established IVS Working Group 4 on VLBI Data Structures. This note discusses the current VLBI data format, goals for a new format, the history and formation of the Working Group, and a timeline for the development of a new VLBI data format.

  4. Group Work vs. Whole Class Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanveer, Asma

    2008-01-01

    Group work has only been recently introduced in the education system of Pakistan but many primary teachers, especially in the public schools, are still not aware of how different kinds of strategies that is group work and whole class teaching facilitate learning among students. This paper aims to provide an overview of teaching strategies to…

  5. Ecological Group Work Applied to Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conyne, Robert K.; Mazza, Jamie

    2007-01-01

    This article underscores the value of school counselors connecting their group work practice with ecological concepts of context, collaboration, interconnection, social system maintenance, meaning-making, and sustainability (Conyne & Cook, 2004; Conyne, Crowell, & Newmeyer, in press). The authors elaborate ecological group work (Bemak & Conyne,…

  6. Predicting Satisfaction with Group Work Assignments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burdett, Jane; Hastie, Brianne

    2009-01-01

    Universities are increasingly using group based assessment tasks; however, as with work-place teams, such tasks often elicit mixed feelings from participants. This study investigated factors that may predict student satisfaction with group work at university. Final-year business students completed a questionnaire addressing experiences of group…

  7. Group Work Management in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forslund Frykedal, Karin; Hammar Chiriac, Eva

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to provide a better understanding of teachers' managing roles when using group work in the classroom. Building on Granström's 2 concepts of leadership and teachership, a more specific aim is to investigate teachers' managing roles when using group work and how teachers' presumptions affect the way in which they…

  8. School Counselors' Experiential Training in Group Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bore, Samuel K.; Armstrong, Stephen A.; Womack, Ashley

    2010-01-01

    School counselors' perceptions of the efficacy and satisfaction of their experiential training in group work were investigated. An exploratory factor analysis (n = 304) revealed four salient factors: leader characteristics, leader responsibilities, child/adolescent group leadership and adult group leadership. A majority of participants indicated…

  9. Improving work group decision-making effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Schoonover-Shoffner, K

    1989-01-01

    Many of the decisions in complex health care organizations are made by small work groups. Nurse administrators often lead or are highly involved in these groups, where reaching quality decisions is a critical goal. This paper examines research and information from the communications field, presenting a model for making decisions in small groups. The author identifies common pitfalls of decision-making groups and presents strategies for problem solving and improved decision making.

  10. IGS Data Center Working Group Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noll, Carey E.

    2004-01-01

    At its 18th meeting held December 09, 2001 in San Francisco, the IGS Governing Board recommended the formation of a working group to focus on data center issues. This working group will tackle many of the problems facing the IGS data centers as well as develop new ideas to aid users both internal and external to the IGS. The direction of the IGS has changed since its start in 1992 and many new working groups, projects, data sets, and products have been created and incorporated into the service since that time. Therefore, this may be an appropriate time to revisit the requirements of data centers within the IGS.

  11. Learning Vocabulary in Group Work in Vietnam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huong, Le Pham Hoai

    2006-01-01

    This study investigated learning vocabulary in group work at university in Vietnam. The students were studied in two kinds of group settings, "unassisted" and "assisted", the first consisting of five students from the same class level and the second of four from the same class and a student from a higher class. Differences were observed in both…

  12. Report of the tunnel safety working group

    SciTech Connect

    Gannon, J.

    1991-04-01

    On 18 February 1991 the Project Manager formed a working group to address the safety guidelines and requirements for the underground facilities during the period of accelerator construction, installation, and commissioning. The following report summarizes the research and discussions conducted by the group and the recommended guidelines for safety during this phase of the project.

  13. Productive Group Work for Students. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    There is clear evidence that students who are involved in productive collaborative groups outperform their peers. Cooperative group work also results in improved self-esteem, improved relationships and enhanced social and decision-making skills. Johnson and Johnson (1993) identified the elements of a successful collaborative activity. They include…

  14. The transportation external coordination working group

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    In an effort to improve coordinated interactions between the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and external groups interested in transportation activities, DOE established the Transportation External Coordination Working Group (TEC/WG). Membership includes representatives from State, Tribal and local governments, industry, and professional organizations. All DOE programs with significant transportation programs participate.

  15. Teaching Group Work with "The Great Debaters"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moe, Jeffry; Autry, Linda; Olson, Joann S.; Johnson, Kaprea F.

    2014-01-01

    An experiential learning activity, based on the film "The Great Debaters" (Washington, D., 2007), was used during a group work class. Description and preliminary evaluation of the activity is provided, including analysis of participant scores on the group leader self-efficacy instrument at multiple points. Implications and future…

  16. Psychological Measurement for Specialists in Group Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marley, Scott C.

    2010-01-01

    Recent articles in "The Journal for Specialists in Group Work" have discussed credibility indicators for quantitative and qualitative studies (Asner-Self, 2009; Rubel & Villalba, 2009). This article extends upon these contributions by discussing measurement issues that are relevant to producers and consumers of quantitative group research. This…

  17. Modification: A Leader Skill in Group Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Arthur J.

    1995-01-01

    Modification mitigates negative feedback by immediately attempting to improve the feedback's level of acceptability. This article introduces modification as a group-leader skill necessary for the processing of messages containing both counterproductive and productive elements. Describes the value and application of modification in group work. (RJM)

  18. Job Design for Learning in Work Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lantz, Annika; Brav, Agneta

    2007-01-01

    Purpose--What is required of job design and production planning, if they are to result in a work group taking a self-starting approach and going beyond what is formally required of it? This paper aims to contribute to group research by testing a theoretical model of relations between job design on the one hand (captured as completeness, demand on…

  19. Management, Technology and Behavior of Work Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drake, Charles A.

    This study examines the impact various variables associated with the technical structure of a work setting have on the potential relationship between supervisory style and the attitudes and behavior of industrial work groups. The research explores the assumption that supervision is an integral part of an organization and whatever characteristics…

  20. Diversity Competent Group Work Supervision: An Application of the Supervision of Group Work Model (SGW)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okech, Jane E. Atieno; Rubel, Deborah

    2007-01-01

    This article emphasizes the need for concrete descriptions of supervision to promote diversity-competent group work and presents an application of the supervision of group work model (SGW) to this end. The SGW, a supervision model adapted from the discrimination model, is uniquely suited for promoting diversity competence in group work, since it…

  1. Report of the ESO OPC Working Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinks, E.; Leibundgut, B.; Mathys, G.

    2012-12-01

    With over 1000 proposals per semester for ESO telescopes, the community is facing the problem of fair and robust selection of observing programmes. We report here on a working group to investigate the current selection process and procedures and identify possible improvements. The working group report summarises the current process, based on peer review, that has been in use for many years at ESO and other comparable ground- and space-based observatories, and presents an inventory of the changes and approaches that may be considered to make the process more manageable and less time-consuming, while at the same time preserving its integrity. The working group presented several recommendations, which have been discussed with ESO committees and analysed by the operational groups at ESO.

  2. Group work as an incentive for learning - students' experiences of group work.

    PubMed

    Hammar Chiriac, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Group work is used as a means for learning at all levels in educational systems. There is strong scientific support for the benefits of having students learning and working in groups. Nevertheless, studies about what occurs in groups during group work and which factors actually influence the students' ability to learn is still lacking. Similarly, the question of why some group work is successful and other group work results in the opposite is still unsolved. The aim of this article is to add to the current level of knowledge and understandings regarding the essence behind successful group work in higher education. This research is focused on the students' experiences of group work and learning in groups, which is an almost non-existing aspect of research on group work prior to the beginning of the 21st century. A primary aim is to give university students a voice in the matter by elucidating the students' positive and negative points of view and how the students assess learning when working in groups. Furthermore, the students' explanations of why some group work ends up being a positive experience resulting in successful learning, while in other cases, the result is the reverse, are of interest. Data were collected through a study-specific questionnaire, with multiple choice and open-ended questions. The questionnaires were distributed to students in different study programs at two universities in Sweden. The present result is based on a reanalysis and qualitative analysis formed a key part of the study. The results indicate that most of the students' experiences involved group work that facilitated learning, especially in the area of academic knowledge. Three important prerequisites (learning, study-social function, and organization) for group work that served as an effective pedagogy and as an incentive for learning were identified and discussed. All three abstractions facilitate or hamper students' learning, as well as impact their experiences with group work

  3. Pilot mental health: expert working group recommendations.

    PubMed

    2012-12-01

    Following a March 27, 2012, incident in which a pilot of a major commercial airline experienced a serious disturbance in his mental health, the Aerospace Medical Association formed an Ad Hoc Working Group on Pilot Mental Health. The working group met several times and analyzed current medical standards for evaluating pilot mental health. The result of the working group was a letter sent to the FAA and other organizations worldwide interested in medical standards. The Committee found that it is neither productive nor cost effective to perform extensive psychiatric evaluations as part of the routine pilot aeromedical assessment. However it did recommend greater attention be given to mental health issues by aeromedical examiners, especially to the more common and detectable mental health conditions and life stressors that can affect pilots and flight performance. They encouraged this through increased education and global recognition of the importance of mental health in aviation safety.

  4. Abandoned Mine Waste Working Group report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-10

    The Mine Waste Working Group discussed the nature and possible contributions to the solution of this class of waste problem at length. There was a consensus that the mine waste problem presented some fundamental differences from the other classes of waste addresses by the Develop On-Site Innovative Technologies (DOIT) working groups. Contents of this report are: executive summary; stakeholders address the problems; the mine waste program; current technology development programs; problems and issues that need to be addressed; demonstration projects to test solutions; conclusion-next steps; and appendices.

  5. Astrophysics at RIA (ARIA) Working Group

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Michael S.; Schatz, Hendrik; Timmes, Frank X.; Wiescher, Michael; Greife, Uwe

    2006-07-12

    The Astrophysics at RIA (ARIA) Working Group has been established to develop and promote the nuclear astrophysics research anticipated at the Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA). RIA is a proposed next-generation nuclear science facility in the U.S. that will enable significant progress in studies of core collapse supernovae, thermonuclear supernovae, X-ray bursts, novae, and other astrophysical sites. Many of the topics addressed by the Working Group are relevant for the RIKEN RI Beam Factory, the planned GSI-Fair facility, and other advanced radioactive beam facilities.

  6. Astrophysics at RIA (ARIA) Working Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Michael S.; Schatz, Hendrik; Timmes, Frank X.; Wiescher, Michael; Greife, Uwe

    2006-07-01

    The Astrophysics at RIA (ARIA) Working Group has been established to develop and promote the nuclear astrophysics research anticipated at the Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA). RIA is a proposed next-generation nuclear science facility in the U.S. that will enable significant progress in studies of core collapse supernovae, thermonuclear supernovae, X-ray bursts, novae, and other astrophysical sites. Many of the topics addressed by the Working Group are relevant for the RIKEN RI Beam Factory, the planned GSI-Fair facility, and other advanced radioactive beam facilities.

  7. Military Munitions Waste Working Group report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-11-30

    This report presents the findings of the Military Munitions Waste Working Group in its effort to achieve the goals directed under the Federal Advisory Committee to Develop On-Site Innovative Technologies (DOIT Committee) for environmental restoration and waste management. The Military Munitions Waste Working Group identified the following seven areas of concern associated with the ordnance (energetics) waste stream: unexploded ordnance; stockpiled; disposed -- at known locations, i.e., disposal pits; discharged -- impact areas, unknown disposal sites; contaminated media; chemical sureties/weapons; biological weapons; munitions production; depleted uranium; and rocket motor and fuel disposal (open burn/open detonation). Because of time constraints, the Military Munitions Waste Working Group has focused on unexploded ordnance and contaminated media with the understanding that remaining waste streams will be considered as time permits. Contents of this report are as follows: executive summary; introduction; Military Munitions Waste Working Group charter; description of priority waste stream problems; shortcomings of existing approaches, processes and technologies; innovative approaches, processes and technologies, work force planning, training, and education issues relative to technology development and cleanup; criteria used to identify and screen potential demonstration projects; list of potential candidate demonstration projects for the DOIT committee decision/recommendation and appendices.

  8. Far-field environment working group summary

    SciTech Connect

    Pearcy, E.C.; Cady, R.E.

    1995-09-01

    This article is a summary of the proceedings of a group discussion which took place at the Workshop on the Role of Natural Analogs in Geologic Disposal of High-Level Nuclear Waste in San Antonio, Texas on July 22-25, 1991. The working group concentrated on the subject of the potential impacts of underground disposal of high-level radioactive wastes on the far-field environment.

  9. Manned Mars missions: A working group report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duke, Michael B. (Editor); Keaton, Paul W. (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    The discussions of the Working Group (based in large part on working papers, which will shortly be published separately) are summarized. These papers cover a broad range of subjects which need to be addressed in the formulation of such a formidable enterprise as a manned Mars program. Science objective and operations; Mars surface infrastructure and activities; mission and system concepts and configurations; life sciences; impacts on the space infrastructure; and costs, schedules, and organizations are addressed.

  10. Learning Climate and Work Group Skills in Care Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westerberg, Kristina; Hauer, Esther

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The overall aim of the present study was to investigate the learning climate and work group skills perceived by managers and their subordinates in the municipal elderly care, prior to a development project. The specific research questions were: Are managers' and their subordinates' perceptions of the learning climate related? and Does the…

  11. Positive Action. What Works Clearinghouse Intervention Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2006

    2006-01-01

    "Positive Action," a K-12 program, aims to promote a positive self-concept, character development, healthy behavior, and social-emotional skills and to reduce disruptive and problem behavior. The curricula for elementary and middle school students each have seven units per kit, with nine kits per grade level. The high school curriculum has six…

  12. NASA/NSF Antarctic Science Working Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoklosa, Janis H.

    1990-01-01

    A collection of viewgraphs on NASA's Life Sciences Biomedical Programs is presented. They show the structure of the Life Sciences Division; the tentative space exploration schedule from the present to 2018; the biomedical programs with their objectives, research elements, and methodological approaches; validation models; proposed Antarctic research as an analog for space exploration; and the Science Working Group's schedule of events.

  13. Spent Fuel Working Group Report. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    O`Toole, T.

    1993-11-01

    The Department of Energy is storing large amounts of spent nuclear fuel and other reactor irradiated nuclear materials (herein referred to as RINM). In the past, the Department reprocessed RINM to recover plutonium, tritium, and other isotopes. However, the Department has ceased or is phasing out reprocessing operations. As a consequence, Department facilities designed, constructed, and operated to store RINM for relatively short periods of time now store RINM, pending decisions on the disposition of these materials. The extended use of the facilities, combined with their known degradation and that of their stored materials, has led to uncertainties about safety. To ensure that extended storage is safe (i.e., that protection exists for workers, the public, and the environment), the conditions of these storage facilities had to be assessed. The compelling need for such an assessment led to the Secretary`s initiative on spent fuel, which is the subject of this report. This report comprises three volumes: Volume I; Summary Results of the Spent Fuel Working Group Evaluation; Volume II, Working Group Assessment Team Reports and Protocol; Volume III; Operating Contractor Site Team Reports. This volume presents the overall results of the Working Group`s Evaluation. The group assessed 66 facilities spread across 11 sites. It identified: (1) facilities that should be considered for priority attention. (2) programmatic issues to be considered in decision making about interim storage plans and (3) specific vulnerabilities for some of these facilities.

  14. Organizational citizenship behavior in work groups: a group norms approach.

    PubMed

    Ehrhart, Mark G; Naumann, Stefanie E

    2004-12-01

    Although the relationship between unit-level organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) and unit outcomes has been well established in recent years, the conceptual development of OCB at the unit level of analysis has not been adequately addressed. In an effort to fill this conceptual gap and to spur future research, the authors apply the literature on group norms to the concept of OCB. The resulting framework suggests a cyclical relationship between individual- and group-level processes and ultimately offers an explanation for how OCB norms are established and maintained in work groups. The authors demonstrate how this framework incorporates past research on the relationship between unit-level OCB and unit outcomes and how it extends previous research by suggesting multiple directions for future efforts related to unit-level OCB.

  15. Spatial Working Memory Is Necessary for Actions to Guide Thought

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Laura E.

    2013-01-01

    Directed actions can play a causal role in cognition, shaping thought processes. What drives this cross-talk between action and thought? I investigated the hypothesis that representations in spatial working memory mediate interactions between directed actions and problem solving. Participants attempted to solve an insight problem while…

  16. Working group for planetary system nomenclature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Most of the activity of the Working Group and Task Group of the IAU during these three years has been centered on the nomenclature of Neptune's satellites and rings as revealed by the Voyager spacecraft. The emphasis is now shifting to Venus, in preparation for the detailed radar mapping of that planet begun by the Magellan spacecraft in August 1990. Approval has been asked for nomenclature of the Earth's moon, Venus, Mars, and Triton features as well as 4 other Neptune satellites and three Neptune rings.

  17. Summary of the impedance working group

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, A.W.

    1995-05-01

    The impedance working group concentrated on the LHC design during the workshop. They look at the impedance contributions of liner, beam position monitors, shielded bellows, experimental chambers, superconducting cavities, recombination chambers, space charge, kickers, and the resistive wall. The group concluded that the impedance budgeting and the conceptual designs of the vacuum chamber components looked basically sound. It also noted, not surprisingly, that a large amount of studies are to be carried out further, and it ventured to give a partial list of these studies.

  18. Volcanism/tectonics working group summary

    SciTech Connect

    Kovach, L.A.; Young, S.R.

    1995-09-01

    This article is a summary of the proceedings of a group discussion which took place at the Workshop on the Role of Natural Analogs in Geologic Disposal of High-Level Nuclear Waste in San Antonio, Texas on July 22-25, 1991. The working group concentrated on the subject of the impacts of earthquakes, fault rupture, and volcanic eruption on the underground repository disposal of high-level radioactive wastes. The tectonics and seismic history of the Yucca Mountain site in Nevada is discussed and geologic analogs to that site are described.

  19. Progress by the JWST Science Working Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, Jonathan P.

    2007-01-01

    The JWST Science Working Group recently published a comprehensive, top-level review of JWST science in the journal Space Science Reviews (Gardner et al. 2006, SSR, 123, 485). That review paper gives details of the 4 JWST science themes, and describes the design of the observatory and ground system. Since publication, the SWG, working with members of the astronomical community, has continued to develop the science case for JWST, giving more details in a series of white papers. The white paper topics include first light, galaxy surveys, AGN, supernovae, stellar populations, and exoplanets. The white papers are in various stages of completion. In this poster, I will review recent progress.

  20. Mixed Braid Group Actions From Deformations of Surface Singularities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donovan, Will; Segal, Ed

    2015-04-01

    We consider a set of toric Calabi-Yau varieties which arise as deformations of the small resolutions of type A surface singularities. By careful analysis of the heuristics of B-brane transport in the associated gauged linear sigma models, we predict the existence of a mixed braid group action on the derived category of each variety, and then prove that this action does indeed exist. This generalizes the braid group action found by Seidel and Thomas for the undeformed resolutions. We also show that the actions for different deformations are related, in a way that is predicted by the physical heuristics.

  1. Meeting Summary, Credit Trading Work Group

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin Bryan

    2000-12-07

    OAK-B135 Credit Trading Work Group Meeting Summary. The purpose of the meeting is to: (1) Provide an opportunity for NWCC Work Group Members, NWCC Members, and invited expert participants to hear an overview of the draft NWCC Credit Trading Report and to critically review and discuss the report's recommendations and principles. (2) Hear presentations from several perspectives of other experts on credit trading which provide: (a) a brief summary of credit trading activities they are involved in, and (b) critical responses to the NWCC draft report. (3) Identify how the report can be improved at the big picture level. Attempt to resolve issues or concerns if necessary. (4) Discuss the recommendations and credit trading principles in detail and attempt to reach consensus on these sections for presentation to the NWCC. (5) Discuss if any of the outreach and communication recommendations in the report should be conducted by the NWCC.

  2. Meaning and action in employed mothers' health work.

    PubMed

    Kushner, Kaysi Eastlick

    2007-02-01

    The purpose of this critical feminist study was to examine employed mothers' meanings of family and personal health as they frame the context of daily experience in caring for their families' and their own health. Twenty mothers employed in support staff positions with a large institution in Western Canada participated in repeat interviews over 2 years. Women considered individual family members and the family group as they emphasized everyday function and satisfaction, and the presence or absence of various attributes of health as a multifaceted and dynamic experience. Women's health work included keeping track, constructing routines, facing challenges, setting priorities, being there for each other, finding joy and fulfillment, and fostering personal development. A preliminary typology of four orientations to family health work is suggested. Common themes between women's and family health and congruence between women's health meanings and actions provide guidance to nurses in family health promotion practice.

  3. Meaning and action in employed mothers' health work.

    PubMed

    Kushner, Kaysi Eastlick

    2007-02-01

    The purpose of this critical feminist study was to examine employed mothers' meanings of family and personal health as they frame the context of daily experience in caring for their families' and their own health. Twenty mothers employed in support staff positions with a large institution in Western Canada participated in repeat interviews over 2 years. Women considered individual family members and the family group as they emphasized everyday function and satisfaction, and the presence or absence of various attributes of health as a multifaceted and dynamic experience. Women's health work included keeping track, constructing routines, facing challenges, setting priorities, being there for each other, finding joy and fulfillment, and fostering personal development. A preliminary typology of four orientations to family health work is suggested. Common themes between women's and family health and congruence between women's health meanings and actions provide guidance to nurses in family health promotion practice. PMID:17220381

  4. Developing Healthcare Practice through Action Learning: Individual and Group Journeys

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Valerie; McCormack, Brendan; Ives, Glenice

    2008-01-01

    Action Learning is now a well established strategy for reflective inquiry in healthcare. Whilst a great deal is know about action learning there has been inadequate research on the process of learning that takes place, and the impact that this holds for individuals, groups or organisations. This article reports on the findings of 15-month action…

  5. Cold moderator test facilities working group

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, Guenter S.; Lucas, A. T.

    1997-09-01

    The working group meeting was chaired by Bauer and Lucas.Testing is a vital part of any cold source development project. This applies to specific physics concept verification, benchmarking in conjunction with computer modeling and engineering testing to confirm the functional viability of a proposed system. Irradiation testing of materials will always be needed to continuously extend a comprehensive and reliable information database. An ever increasing worldwide effort to enhance the performance of reactor and accelerator based neutron sources, coupled with the complexity and rising cost of building new generation facilities, gives a new dimension to cold source development and testing programs. A stronger focus is now being placed on the fine-tuning of cold source design to maximize its effectiveness in fully exploiting the facility. In this context, pulsed spallation neutron sources pose an extra challenge due to requirements regarding pulse width and shape which result from a large variety of different instrument concepts. The working group reviewed these requirements in terms of their consequences on the needs for testing equipment and compiled a list of existing and proposed facilities suitable to carry out the necessary development work.

  6. A Virtual Notebook for biomedical work groups.

    PubMed Central

    Gorry, G A; Burger, A M; Chaney, R J; Long, K B; Tausk, C M

    1988-01-01

    During the past several years, Baylor College of Medicine has made a substantial commitment to the use of information technology in support of its corporate and academic programs. The concept of an Integrated Academic Information Management System (IAIMS) has proved central in our planning, and the IAIMS activities that we have undertaken with funding from the National Library of Medicine have proved to be important extensions of our technology development. Here we describe our Virtual Notebook system, a conceptual and technologic framework for task coordination and information management in biomedical work groups. When fully developed and deployed, the Virtual Notebook will improve the functioning of basic and clinical research groups in the college, and it currently serves as a model for the longer-term development of our entire information management environment. PMID:3046694

  7. A Virtual Notebook for biomedical work groups.

    PubMed

    Gorry, G A; Burger, A M; Chaney, R J; Long, K B; Tausk, C M

    1988-07-01

    During the past several years, Baylor College of Medicine has made a substantial commitment to the use of information technology in support of its corporate and academic programs. The concept of an Integrated Academic Information Management System (IAIMS) has proved central in our planning, and the IAIMS activities that we have undertaken with funding from the National Library of Medicine have proved to be important extensions of our technology development. Here we describe our Virtual Notebook system, a conceptual and technologic framework for task coordination and information management in biomedical work groups. When fully developed and deployed, the Virtual Notebook will improve the functioning of basic and clinical research groups in the college, and it currently serves as a model for the longer-term development of our entire information management environment.

  8. The International Space Life Sciences Working Group.

    PubMed

    Vernikos, J; Ahlf, P R

    1998-07-01

    The International Space Life Sciences Working Group (ISLSWG) is made up of representatives from five space agencies: the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the European Space Agency (ESA), the Canadian Space Agency (CSA), the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiale (CNES), the Deutsches Zentrum fur Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR, formerly the Deutsche Agentur fur Raumfahrtangelegenheiten or DARA), and the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA). The group met for the first time in 1989, and since that time has developed a Strategic Plan and has taken concrete steps to implement this plan. The result is a closely coordinated international program of Space Life Sciences which will enable optimal utilization of space flight opportunities.

  9. Working group on chromospheric fields - Canopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, H. P.

    1985-01-01

    Although there are many points of uncertainty and controversy, the working group on chromospheric fields focussed its discussion on the concept of canopies; i.e., no one disagreed that a central issue relating to magnetic fields and chromospheric models is to learn how the photospheric field spreads with height. However, it quickly became apparent that in the time available, there was little prospect of building new unified models of magnetic field phenomena in the chromosphere beyond the scope of the formal presentations. Thus, the discussion was devoted to formulating questions which seemed both possible to address in future work and important for advancing understanding of the chromosphere. It began by discussing unresolved physical issues (almost everything) and then proceeded to consider means, both observational and synthetic, to address them.

  10. Alaska Interagency Ecosystem Health Work Group

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shasby, Mark

    2009-01-01

    The Alaska Interagency Ecosystem Health Work Group is a community of practice that recognizes the interconnections between the health of ecosystems, wildlife, and humans and meets to facilitate the exchange of ideas, data, and research opportunities. Membership includes the Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium, U.S. Geological Survey, Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation, Alaska Department of Health and Social Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Alaska Sea Life Center, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and Alaska Department of Fish and Game.

  11. NASA's Internal Space Weather Working Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St. Cyr, O. C.; Guhathakurta, M.; Bell, H.; Niemeyer, L.; Allen, J.

    2011-01-01

    Measurements from many of NASA's scientific spacecraft are used routinely by space weather forecasters, both in the U.S. and internationally. ACE, SOHO (an ESA/NASA collaboration), STEREO, and SDO provide images and in situ measurements that are assimilated into models and cited in alerts and warnings. A number of years ago, the Space Weather laboratory was established at NASA-Goddard, along with the Community Coordinated Modeling Center. Within that organization, a space weather service center has begun issuing alerts for NASA's operational users. NASA's operational user community includes flight operations for human and robotic explorers; atmospheric drag concerns for low-Earth orbit; interplanetary navigation and communication; and the fleet of unmanned aerial vehicles, high altitude aircraft, and launch vehicles. Over the past three years we have identified internal stakeholders within NASA and formed a Working Group to better coordinate their expertise and their needs. In this presentation we will describe this activity and some of the challenges in forming a diverse working group.

  12. Division XII / Commission 5 / Working Group Designations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, Marion; Andernach, Heinz J.; Borde, Suzanne; Borne, Kirk D.; Cowley, Anne P.; Dickel, Helene R.; Dubois, Pascal; Gallagher, John S.; Genova, Françoise; Hodge, Paul W.; Hunstead, Richard W.; Lortet, Marie-Claire; Lubowich, Donald A.; Malkov, Oleg Yu.; Nagata, Tetsuya; Ochsenbein, François; Urban, Sean E.; Vishniac, Ethan T.; Warren, Wayne H.; Zacharias, Norbert

    2007-12-01

    At the 2003 Sydney IAU meeting, Marion Schmitz (Caltech, USA) took over the chair of the Commission 5 Working Group Designations, succeeding Helene Dickel. The Working Group Designations of IAU Commission 5 clarifies existing astronomical nomenclature and helps astronomers avoid potential problems when designating their sources. The most important function of WG Designations during the period 2003-2005 was overseeing the IAU REGISTRY FOR ACRONYMS (for newly discovered astronomical sources of radiation: see the website ) which is sponsored by the WG and operated by the Centre de Données de Strasbourg (CDS). The Clearing House, a subgroup of the WG, screens the submissions for accuracy and conformity to the IAU Recommendations for Nomenclature (). From its beginning in 1997 through August 2006, there have been 132 submissions and 111 acceptances. Attempts to register asterisms, common star names, and suspected variable stars were rejected. The past three years saw 61 acronyms submitted with 50 of them being accepted. (GIRL - yes; WOMEN - no).

  13. The Multispectral Imaging Science Working Group. Volume 2: Working group reports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, S. C. (Editor)

    1982-01-01

    Summaries of the various multispectral imaging science working groups are presented. Current knowledge of the spectral and spatial characteristics of the Earth's surface is outlined and the present and future capabilities of multispectral imaging systems are discussed.

  14. Annual report of the Summit Members' Working Group on Controlled Thermonuclear Fusion (Fusin Working Group (FWG))

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    1987-04-01

    The Summit Members' Working Group on Controlled Thermonuclear Fusion (Fusion Working Group (FWG)) was established in 1983 in response to the Declaration of the Heads of State and Government at the Versailles Economic Summit meeting of 1982, and in response to the subsequent report of the Working Group in Technology, Growth and Employment (TGE) as endorsed at the Williamsburg Summit meeting, 1983. This document contains the complete written record of each of the three FWG meetings which include the minutes, lists of attendees, agendas, statements, and summary conclusions as well as the full reports of the Technical Working Party. In addition, there is a pertinent exchange of correspondence between FWG members on the role of the Technical Working Party and a requested background paper on the modalities associated with a possible future ETR project.

  15. Summary Report of Working Group 2: Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoltz, P. H.; Tsung, R. S.

    2009-01-01

    The working group on computation addressed three physics areas: (i) plasma-based accelerators (laser-driven and beam-driven), (ii) high gradient structure-based accelerators, and (iii) electron beam sources and transport [1]. Highlights of the talks in these areas included new models of breakdown on the microscopic scale, new three-dimensional multipacting calculations with both finite difference and finite element codes, and detailed comparisons of new electron gun models with standard models such as PARMELA. The group also addressed two areas of advances in computation: (i) new algorithms, including simulation in a Lorentz-boosted frame that can reduce computation time orders of magnitude, and (ii) new hardware architectures, like graphics processing units and Cell processors that promise dramatic increases in computing power. Highlights of the talks in these areas included results from the first large-scale parallel finite element particle-in-cell code (PIC), many order-of-magnitude speedup of, and details of porting the VPIC code to the Roadrunner supercomputer. The working group featured two plenary talks, one by Brian Albright of Los Alamos National Laboratory on the performance of the VPIC code on the Roadrunner supercomputer, and one by David Bruhwiler of Tech-X Corporation on recent advances in computation for advanced accelerators. Highlights of the talk by Albright included the first one trillion particle simulations, a sustained performance of 0.3 petaflops, and an eight times speedup of science calculations, including back-scatter in laser-plasma interaction. Highlights of the talk by Bruhwiler included simulations of 10 GeV accelerator laser wakefield stages including external injection, new developments in electromagnetic simulations of electron guns using finite difference and finite element approaches.

  16. Summary Report of Working Group 2: Computation

    SciTech Connect

    Stoltz, P. H.; Tsung, R. S.

    2009-01-22

    The working group on computation addressed three physics areas: (i) plasma-based accelerators (laser-driven and beam-driven), (ii) high gradient structure-based accelerators, and (iii) electron beam sources and transport [1]. Highlights of the talks in these areas included new models of breakdown on the microscopic scale, new three-dimensional multipacting calculations with both finite difference and finite element codes, and detailed comparisons of new electron gun models with standard models such as PARMELA. The group also addressed two areas of advances in computation: (i) new algorithms, including simulation in a Lorentz-boosted frame that can reduce computation time orders of magnitude, and (ii) new hardware architectures, like graphics processing units and Cell processors that promise dramatic increases in computing power. Highlights of the talks in these areas included results from the first large-scale parallel finite element particle-in-cell code (PIC), many order-of-magnitude speedup of, and details of porting the VPIC code to the Roadrunner supercomputer. The working group featured two plenary talks, one by Brian Albright of Los Alamos National Laboratory on the performance of the VPIC code on the Roadrunner supercomputer, and one by David Bruhwiler of Tech-X Corporation on recent advances in computation for advanced accelerators. Highlights of the talk by Albright included the first one trillion particle simulations, a sustained performance of 0.3 petaflops, and an eight times speedup of science calculations, including back-scatter in laser-plasma interaction. Highlights of the talk by Bruhwiler included simulations of 10 GeV accelerator laser wakefield stages including external injection, new developments in electromagnetic simulations of electron guns using finite difference and finite element approaches.

  17. Fourier Analytic Approach to Quantum Estimation of Group Action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Masahito

    2016-10-01

    This article proposes a unified method to estimation of group action by using the inverse Fourier transform of the input state. The method provides optimal estimation for commutative and non-commutative groups with and without energy constraint. The proposed method can be applied to projective representations of non-compact groups as well as of compact groups. This paper addresses the optimal estimation of R, U(1), SU(2), SO(3), and R^2 with Heisenberg representation under a suitable energy constraint.

  18. Group Work Ideas I Have Made Aphoristic (For Me).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conyne, Robert K.

    1997-01-01

    Presents descriptions of 27 aphorisms designed to reflect the effectiveness of group work. These short statements include the following: group work works; group work is a major counseling intervention; group work comes in a rainbow of types; group leadership involves continual choice making; trust the process; and less is more. (RJM)

  19. Computational Accelerator Physics Working Group Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Cary, John R.; Bohn, Courtlandt L.

    2004-08-27

    The working group on computational accelerator physics at the 11th Advanced Accelerator Concepts Workshop held a series of meetings during the Workshop. Verification, i.e., showing that a computational application correctly solves the assumed model, and validation, i.e., showing that the model correctly describes the modeled system, were discussed for a number of systems. In particular, the predictions of the massively parallel codes, OSIRIS and VORPAL, used for modeling advanced accelerator concepts, were compared and shown to agree, thereby establishing some verification of both codes. In addition, a number of talks on the status and frontiers of computational accelerator physics were presented, to include the modeling of ultrahigh-brightness electron photoinjectors and the physics of beam halo production. Finally, talks discussing computational needs were presented.

  20. Computational Accelerator Physics Working Group Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Cary, John R.; Bohn, Courtlandt L.

    2004-12-07

    The working group on computational accelerator physics at the 11th Advanced Accelerator Concepts Workshop held a series of meetings during the Workshop. Verification, i.e., showing that a computational application correctly solves the assumed model, and validation, i.e., showing that the model correctly describes the modeled system, were discussed for a number of systems. In particular, the predictions of the massively parallel codes, OSIRIS and VORPAL, used for modeling advanced accelerator concepts, were compared and shown to agree, thereby establishing some verification of both codes. In addition, a number of talks on the status and frontiers of computational accelerator physics were presented, to include the modeling of ultrahigh-brightness electron photoinjectors and the physics of beam halo production. Finally, talks discussing computational needs were presented.

  1. Summary of the accelerator working group

    SciTech Connect

    Ankenbrandt, C.; Noble, R.J.

    1998-03-01

    We present a summary of the main topics discussed in the Accelerator Working Group during the ``Workshop on the Physics at the First Muon Collider``. The discussions centered on critical design issues for a high-intensity, medium-energy proton synchrotron that would replace the present Fermilab 8 GeV Booster early in the next century. Such a machine is intended both to serve the hadron program with an order of magnitude increase in average proton current and to be compatible as a source for a future muon collider. Particular issues discussed at length include rf system design, control of longitudinal space-charge effects, bunching of proton beams and beam instabilities.

  2. IERS Working Group on Prediction: Preliminary Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wooden, W.; Kosek, W.; van Dam, T.

    2008-12-01

    The International Earth Rotation and Reference Systems Service (IERS) has established a Working Group on Prediction (WGP). The goals are to investigate the needs of the user community regarding IERS Earth orientation prediction products and to examine in detail the fundamental properties of possible input data sets and prediction algorithms. The first task is complete. The user community needs increased accuracy and there seems to be a growing interest in daily and sub-daily prediction. The task to understand fundamental properties of input data sets and algorithms is in progress. A repository for data sets and results was established at the University of Luxembourg, input data sets were identified and placed in the repository, algorithms were identified, and information on various algorithms was gathered. Preliminary results are presented.

  3. Working Group Report: Lattice Field Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Blum, T.; et al.,

    2013-10-22

    This is the report of the Computing Frontier working group on Lattice Field Theory prepared for the proceedings of the 2013 Community Summer Study ("Snowmass"). We present the future computing needs and plans of the U.S. lattice gauge theory community and argue that continued support of the U.S. (and worldwide) lattice-QCD effort is essential to fully capitalize on the enormous investment in the high-energy physics experimental program. We first summarize the dramatic progress of numerical lattice-QCD simulations in the past decade, with some emphasis on calculations carried out under the auspices of the U.S. Lattice-QCD Collaboration, and describe a broad program of lattice-QCD calculations that will be relevant for future experiments at the intensity and energy frontiers. We then present details of the computational hardware and software resources needed to undertake these calculations.

  4. Working Group Proposed to Preserve Archival Records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartlett, Jennifer L.

    2013-01-01

    The AAS and AIP co-hosted a Workshop in April 2012 with NSF support (AST-1110231) that recommends establishing a Working Group on Time Domain Astronomy (WGTDA) to encourage and advise on preserving historical observations in a form meaningful for future scientific analysis. Participants specifically considered archival observations that could describe how astronomical objects change over time. Modern techniques and increased storage capacity enable extracting additional information from older media. Despite the photographic plate focus, other formats also concerned participants. To prioritize preservation efforts, participants recommended considering the information density, the amount of previously published data, their format and associated materials, their current condition, and their expected deterioration rate. Because the best digitization still produces an observation of an observation, the originals should be retained. For accessibility, participants recommended that observations and their metadata be available digitally and on-line. Standardized systems for classifying, organizing, and listing holdings should enable discovery of historical observations through the Virtual Astronomical Observatory. Participants recommended pilot projects that produce scientific results, demonstrate the dependence of some advances on heritage data, and open new avenues of exploration. Surveying a broad region of the sky with a long time-base and high cadence should reveal new phenomena and improve statistics for rare events. Adequate financial support is essential. While their capacity to produce new science is the primary motivation for preserving astronomical records, their potential for historical research and citizen science allows targeting cultural institutions and other private sources. A committee was elected to prepare the WGTDA proposal. The WGTDA executive committee should be composed of ~10 members representing modern surveys, heritage materials, data management

  5. Summary of the laser working group

    SciTech Connect

    Bigio, I.J.; Kurnit, N.A. ); Donaldson, W.R. . Lab. for Laser Energetics); Geissler, K. ); Srinivasan-Rao, T. )

    1988-10-01

    The laser working group considered several options to deliver synchronized laser pulses of the required energy to the photocathode and laser triggered switches. These requirements actually decreased during the course of the workshop, and the values finally settled upon (<10 {mu}J in 100 fs at {approximately}250 nm for the photocathode and {approximately}20 mJ in 2 ps near either 250 nm or 1 {mu}m for the switches) were considered to be well within the state of the art. Some development work may be required, however, to provide a system that has the desirable characteristics of stability, ease of use and low maintenance. The baseline concept, which is similar to a number of existing systems, utilizes doubled Nd:YAG-pumped dye oscillator/amplifiers to produce an upconverted picosecond pulse that can be amplified to tens of mJ in a KrF excimer laser. A fraction of the dye oscillator output is also compressed by means of a fiber-grating compressor and further amplified in a dye amplifier before being upconverted to produce the synchronized pulse for the photocathode. 9 refs., 1 fig.

  6. Charter for Systems Engineer Working Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suffredini, Michael T.; Grissom, Larry

    2015-01-01

    This charter establishes the International Space Station Program (ISSP) Mobile Servicing System (MSS) Systems Engineering Working Group (SEWG). The MSS SEWG is established to provide a mechanism for Systems Engineering for the end-to-end MSS function. The MSS end-to-end function includes the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS), the Mobile Remote Servicer (MRS) Base System (MBS), Robotic Work Station (RWS), Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator (SPDM), Video Signal Converters (VSC), and Operations Control Software (OCS), the Mobile Transporter (MT), and by interfaces between and among these elements, and United States On-Orbit Segment (USOS) distributed systems, and other International Space Station Elements and Payloads, (including the Power Data Grapple Fixtures (PDGFs), MSS Capture Attach System (MCAS) and the Mobile Transporter Capture Latch (MTCL)). This end-to-end function will be supported by the ISS and MSS ground segment facilities. This charter defines the scope and limits of the program authority and document control that is delegated to the SEWG and it also identifies the panel core membership and specific operating policies.

  7. Epos Working Group 10 Infrastructure for Georesources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlecka-Sikora, Beata; Lasocki, Stanisław; Kwiatek, Grzegorz

    2013-04-01

    Working Group 10 "Infrastructure for Georesources" deals primarily with induced seismicity (IS) infrastructure. Established during the EPOS Annual Meeting in Utrecht, November 2011, WG10 aims to integrate the research infrastructure in the area of seismicity induced by human activity: tremors and rockbursts in underground mines, seismicity associated with conventional and unconventional oil and gas production, induced by geothermal energy extraction and by underground reposition and storage of liquids (e.g. water disposal associated with energy extraction) and gases (CO2 sequestration, inter alia) and triggered by filling surface water reservoirs, etc. Until now the research in the area of IS has been organized around induced technologies rather than physical problems, common for these shallow seismic processes. This has hampered the integration of IS research community and the research progress. WG10 intends to work out a first step towards changing the IS research perspective from the present, technology-oriented, to physical problems-oriented without, however, losing touch with technological conditions of IS generation. This will be achieved by the integration of IS Research Infrastructure (ISRI) and the creation of Induced Seismicity Node within EPOS. The ISRI to be integrated has three components: data, software and reports. The IS data consists of seismic data and auxiliary data: geological, displacement, geomechanical, geodetic, etc, and last, but by no means least, technological data. A research in the field of IS cannot do without this last data class. The IS software comprises common software tools for data handling and visualisation, standard and advanced software for research and software based on newly proposed algorithms for tests and development. The IS reports are both peer reviewed and unreviewed as well as an internet forum. In addition to that the IS Node will play a significant role in integrating IS community and accelerating research, it will

  8. Applying Group Work to Improve College Students' Oral English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jiang, Yongmei

    2009-01-01

    After a brief introduction, this paper dwells on the merits of group work, and then suggested the evaluation methods of group work. The author also mentioned the Demerits of group work and how to avoid them.

  9. Attachment Theory: Contributions to Group Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pistole, M. Carole

    1997-01-01

    Describes attachment theory, explores its application to group counseling, and elaborates points of interest to group workers. Focuses on attachment styles, attachment and caregiving, the group leader's goals, the group as an attachment experience, interventions based on attachment theory, its use in psychoeducational groups, and complexities in…

  10. Effectiveness of a healthy work organization intervention: ethnic group differences.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyoung-Ok; Schaffer, Bryan S; Griffin-Blake, C Shannon; Dejoy, David M; Wilson, Mark G; Vandenberg, Robert J

    2004-07-01

    This study examined ethnic group differences in the effectiveness of a healthy work organization intervention on organizational climate and worker health and well-being. Our sample consisted of employees from 21 stores of a large national retail chain. The intervention involved establishing and facilitating employee problem-solving teams in 11 of the stores. Teams were charged with developing and implementing action plans tailored to the needs of their specific site. Pre- and postcomparisons of the treatment and control groups showed that the intervention produced positive effects on both the climate and health and well-being outcomes; however, these effects varied significantly by ethnic group. Particularly in terms of organizational climate, black and Hispanic employees were the primary beneficiaries of the participatory intervention process. These results are interpreted in terms of social identification and self-categorization theories and are contrasted with traditional participatory and diversity training approaches. PMID:15247801

  11. Effectiveness of a healthy work organization intervention: ethnic group differences.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyoung-Ok; Schaffer, Bryan S; Griffin-Blake, C Shannon; Dejoy, David M; Wilson, Mark G; Vandenberg, Robert J

    2004-07-01

    This study examined ethnic group differences in the effectiveness of a healthy work organization intervention on organizational climate and worker health and well-being. Our sample consisted of employees from 21 stores of a large national retail chain. The intervention involved establishing and facilitating employee problem-solving teams in 11 of the stores. Teams were charged with developing and implementing action plans tailored to the needs of their specific site. Pre- and postcomparisons of the treatment and control groups showed that the intervention produced positive effects on both the climate and health and well-being outcomes; however, these effects varied significantly by ethnic group. Particularly in terms of organizational climate, black and Hispanic employees were the primary beneficiaries of the participatory intervention process. These results are interpreted in terms of social identification and self-categorization theories and are contrasted with traditional participatory and diversity training approaches.

  12. THE HIGGS WORKING GROUP: SUMMARY REPORT.

    SciTech Connect

    DAWSON, S.; ET AL.

    2005-08-01

    This working group has investigated Higgs boson searches at the Tevatron and the LHC. Once Higgs bosons are found their properties have to be determined. The prospects of Higgs coupling measurements at the LHC and a high-energy linear e{sup +}e{sup -} collider are discussed in detail within the Standard Model and its minimal supersymmetric extension (MSSM). Recent improvements in the theoretical knowledge of the signal and background processes are presented and taken into account. The residual uncertainties are analyzed in detail. Theoretical progress is discussed in particular for the gluon-fusion processes gg {yields} H(+j), Higgs-bremsstrahlung off bottom quarks and the weak vector-boson-fusion (VBF) processes. Following the list of open questions of the last Les Houches workshop in 2001 several background processes have been calculated at next-to-leading order, resulting in a significant reduction of the theoretical uncertainties. Further improvements have been achieved for the Higgs sectors of the MSSM and NMSSM. This report summarizes our work performed before and after the workshop in Les Houches. Part A describes the theoretical developments for signal and background processes. Part B presents recent progress in Higgs boson searches at the Tevatron collider. Part C addresses the determination of Higgs boson couplings, part D the measurement of tan {beta} and part E Higgs boson searches in the VBF processes at the LHC. Part F summarizes Higgs searches in supersymmetric Higgs decays, part G photonic Higgs decays in Higgs-strahlung processes at the LHC, while part H concentrates on MSSM Higgs bosons in the intense-coupling regime at the LHC. Part I presents progress in charged Higgs studies and part J the Higgs discovery potential in the NMSSM at the LHC. The last part K describes Higgs coupling measurements at a 1 TeV linear e{sup +}e{sup -} collider.

  13. International Space Station Earth Observations Working Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stefanov, William L.; Oikawa, Koki

    2015-01-01

    The multilateral Earth Observations Working Group (EOWG) was chartered in May 2012 in order to improve coordination and collaboration of Earth observing payloads, research, and applications on the International Space Station (ISS). The EOWG derives its authority from the ISS Program Science Forum, and a NASA representative serves as a permanent co-chair. A rotating co-chair position can be occupied by any of the international partners, following concurrence by the other partners; a JAXA representative is the current co-chair. Primary functions of the EOWG include, 1) the exchange of information on plans for payloads, from science and application objectives to instrument development, data collection, distribution and research; 2) recognition and facilitation of opportunities for international collaboration in order to optimize benefits from different instruments; and 3) provide a formal ISS Program interface for collection and application of remotely sensed data collected in response to natural disasters through the International Charter, Space and Major Disasters. Recent examples of EOWG activities include coordination of bilateral data sharing protocols between NASA and TsNIIMash for use of crew time and instruments in support of ATV5 reentry imaging activities; discussion of continued use and support of the Nightpod camera mount system by NASA and ESA; and review and revision of international partner contributions on Earth observations to the ISS Program Benefits to Humanity publication.

  14. TAP Report - Southwest Idaho Juniper Working Group

    SciTech Connect

    Gresham, Garold Linn

    2015-09-01

    There is explicit need for characterization of the materials for possible commercialization as little characterization data exists. Pinyon-juniper woodlands are a major ecosystem type found in the Southwest and the Intermountain West regions of the United States including Nevada, Idaho and Oregon. These widespread ecosystems are characterized by the presence of several different species of pinyon and juniper as the dominant plant cover. Since the 1800s, pinyon-juniper woodlands have rapidly expanded their range at the expense of existing ecosystems. Additionally, existing woodlands have become denser, progressively creating potential fire hazards as seen in the Soda Fire, which burned more than 400 sq. miles. Land managers responsible for these areas often desire to reduce pinyon-juniper coverage on their lands for a variety of reasons, as stated in the Working Group objectives. However, the cost of clearing thinning pinyon-juniper stands can be prohibitive. One reason for this is the lack of utilization options for the resulting biomass that could help recover some of the cost of pinyon-juniper stand management. The goal of this TAP effort was to assess the feedstock characteristics of biomass from a juniper harvested from Owyhee County to evaluate possible fuel and conversion utilization options.

  15. Group work with individuals with chronic cancer.

    PubMed

    Glaser, Susan R; Glassman, Richard

    2014-01-01

    This article discusses the value and importance of support groups for people living with chronic cancer. It is a primer for the professional mental health practitioner interested in leading a support group. Group formation, screening, open versus closed groups, size, co-facilitation, duration and phases-beginning, middle and end will be discussed. Leadership, structure, and group dynamics are explained using case examples to highlight the issues. The effect of the deterioration and death of group members on both the facilitators and the group's members will be explored. The paper ends with a discussion of counter-transference, stress, self-care and resiliency. PMID:24405237

  16. Empowering Youth Work Supervisors with Action Research Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herman, Margo

    2012-01-01

    Supervising youth workers is a challenging, demanding job in a complex field. Too frequently youth workers get mired in reacting to the everyday crises that dominate their work, finding it difficult to rise above the daily demands to reach a place where reflection can help guide their work. Strategies based in action research can empower youth…

  17. Social Media Working Group Act of 2014

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Rep. Brooks, Susan W. [R-IN-5

    2014-03-14

    07/09/2014 Received in the Senate and Read twice and referred to the Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed HouseHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  18. Youth Participatory Action Research Groups as School Counseling Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Laura; Davis, Kathryn; Bhowmik, Malika

    2010-01-01

    Youth participatory action research (YPAR) projects offer young people the opportunity to increase their sociocultural awareness, critical thinking abilities, and sense of agency within a collaborative group experience. Thus far, however, such projects have been primarily the province of educators and social psychologists, and not substantively…

  19. The Experiences of Expert Group Work Supervisors: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atieno Okech, Jane E.; Rubel, Deborah

    2009-01-01

    Evaluation of group work supervision literature suggests that description of expert group work supervisors' experiences could be useful for expanding existing group work supervision practices and models. This study provided a systematic exploration of the experiences of expert group work supervisors during the supervision process. Results indicate…

  20. Multicultural Group Work: A Force for Developing and Healing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Donald

    2007-01-01

    Multicultural group work represents a powerful tool for helping and healing in the context of human diversity. This article summarizes multicultural group work, including task, psychoeducational, counseling, and psychotherapy groups, and describes a group work model for multicultural assessment, diagnosis, and treatment planning. Group work…

  1. 76 FR 65534 - Call for Nominations for the Pinedale Anticline Working Group, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-21

    ... planning, management across jurisdictional boundaries, data sharing, information exchange, and partnerships... Bureau of Land Management Call for Nominations for the Pinedale Anticline Working Group, Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Nominations are being solicited for...

  2. The Roots of Social Justice in Group Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Anneliese A.; Salazar, Carmen F.

    2010-01-01

    This article revisits the history of group work, highlighting elements of empowerment and advocacy in the work of some key figures, and noting events and movements that nourished group work's social justice roots.

  3. Working with Cooperative Small Groups. Classroom Tips

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Federation of Teachers (NJ), 2010

    2010-01-01

    Diversified small groups in the classroom provide a good opportunity for students to share information and ideas with each other. The research on cooperative small groups points out the benefits of these interactions and describes the process as a powerful forum for developing students' critical thinking and higher-order skills: (1) Cooperative…

  4. Innovative Approaches to Preventing Child Abuse: Volunteers in Action. Prevention Focus Working Paper 015.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Committee for Prevention of Child Abuse, Chicago, IL.

    Collected in this working paper are summary descriptions of 17 innovative community action programs designed to prevent child abuse. These programs were developed by individuals, community groups, hospitals, and/or state chapters of the National Committee for Prevention of Child Abuse, as well as by other groups and organizations. Located in…

  5. Group Chaos Theory: A Metaphor and Model for Group Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivera, Edil Torres; Wilbur, Michael; Frank-Saraceni, James; Roberts-Wilbur, Janice; Phan, Loan T.; Garrett, Michael T.

    2005-01-01

    Group phenomena and interactions are described through the use of the chaos theory constructs and characteristics of sensitive dependence on initial conditions, phase space, turbulence, emergence, self-organization, dissipation, iteration, bifurcation, and attractors and fractals. These constructs and theoretical tenets are presented as applicable…

  6. Diagnostics summary: Working group T9

    SciTech Connect

    Ralph J. Pasquinelli; Marc C. Ross

    2002-12-09

    The diagnostics T9 group was charged with reviewing the diagnostic requirements of the proposed accelerators for the future. The list includes the e+e- colliders, Muon Neutrino source, NLC, Proton Driver, Tesla, and the VLHC. While the machines vary widely on diagnostic requirements, there are many similarities that were discovered. The following sections will attempt to point out the similarities and requirements for R and D for these future accelerators. To answer the Charge to the group they organized joint sessions with most of the machine groups and several of the technical groups. In addition, due to their overwhelming importance, they held a special session on position monitor systems. For each of the joint machine group sessions they generated a table of required diagnostic systems, selected the highest priority items using a ranking based on need and RD effort, and pondered a RD path leading from the present state of the technology to a system satisfying the requirement. They used the joint technical group sessions to collect up to date RD plans and to assess the applicability of new ideas in a broad range of topics. As required by their Charge, they have also tried to include promising new ideas.

  7. 78 FR 42799 - Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-17

    ... Bureau of Reclamation Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group Meetings AGENCY: Bureau of Reclamation, Interior. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: The Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group (AMWG) makes recommendations to the Secretary of the Interior concerning Glen Canyon...

  8. Hatchery Effectiveness Technical Work Group Retreat Proceedings, January 9-11, 1990.

    SciTech Connect

    Fickeisen, Duane H.; Neitzel, D.A.; Dauble, Dennis D.

    1990-04-01

    This report summarizes a retreat held for the Hatchery Effectiveness Technical Work Group (HETWG). The objectives were to improve the effectiveness of the Technical Work Group (TWG) through developing procedures for its operation, and to develop an action plan for revision of their current research plan.

  9. Capitalising on Learner Agency and Group Work in Learning Writing in English as a Foreign Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Zheng

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the roles of learner agency and group work in learning writing in English as a foreign language (EFL). Through exploratory and participatory action research, this study examines how learner agency and group work function amidst the activity system of task-based EFL writing, especially how they influence and are influenced…

  10. BILATERAL WORKING GROUP - MISSION, WORK PROGRAMME AND STATUS (ABSTRACT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) have been working in an ongoing partnership to gain an understanding of each other's approach to the cleanup of chemical contamination in order to protect huma...

  11. BILATERAL WORKING GROUP - MISSION, WORK PROGRAM, AND STATUS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) have been working in an ongoing partnership to gain an understanding of each other's approach to the cleanup of chemical contamination in order to protect huma...

  12. A Full Course Banquet: Designing a Single Group Work Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazar, Ana

    2007-01-01

    The first course in group work was taught in 1923 and was followed by a growing recognition in social work education of the importance of preparing students to work with groups. Unfortunately by the end of the 1970s group work located within a generalist curriculum had all but disappeared. This article presents a single course elective that…

  13. Encompassing the Complexity of Group Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacNair-Semands, Rebecca R.

    1998-01-01

    Claims that Waldo and Bauman's Goals and Process (GAP) matrix improves the ability of both researchers and practitioners to communicate in more sophisticated terms about the goals and processes of various groups. Proposes that the GAP matrix be revised without retaining the original categories because they are obscure and obsolete. (MKA)

  14. From the inside Out: Group Work with Women of Color

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Short, Ellen L.; Williams, Wendi S.

    2014-01-01

    This article will present two models for conducting group work with Women of Color (WOC): the SisterCircle Approach and the Group Relations Model. The authors contend that the models, when used together, combine an internal and external focus ("inside out") of group work that can assist group workers to conduct individual and group-level…

  15. Report of the Working Design Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1992-11-01

    The engineering study group in the LOUISA workshop was responsible for producing a preliminary general design for an optical synthetic aperture telescope on the Moon. This design is intended to be a test case for focusing continuing design studies. The scope of the design included consideration of the array geometry, individual telescopes, metrology, site attributes, and construction. However, no attempt was made to go into further depth in the design than to cover the essential characteristics of the instrument. The starting point for the array design was the lunar optical array discussed by Burke (1985). His array geometry followed the design and correlation procedure of the 27-element Very Large Array (VLA) radio telescopes near Socorro, New Mexico.

  16. Report of the Working Design Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The engineering study group in the LOUISA workshop was responsible for producing a preliminary general design for an optical synthetic aperture telescope on the Moon. This design is intended to be a test case for focusing continuing design studies. The scope of the design included consideration of the array geometry, individual telescopes, metrology, site attributes, and construction. However, no attempt was made to go into further depth in the design than to cover the essential characteristics of the instrument. The starting point for the array design was the lunar optical array discussed by Burke (1985). His array geometry followed the design and correlation procedure of the 27-element Very Large Array (VLA) radio telescopes near Socorro, New Mexico.

  17. An Action Research Process on University Tutorial Sessions with Small Groups: Presentational Tutorial Sessions and Online Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alcaraz-Salarirche, Noelia; Gallardo-Gil, Monsalud; Herrera-Pastor, David; Servan-Nunez, Maria Jose

    2011-01-01

    We describe and analyse the action research process carried out by us as teachers in a general didactics course in the University of Malaga (Spain). The course methodology combined lectures to the whole class and small-group work. We were in charge of guiding small-group work. In the small groups, students researched on an educational innovation…

  18. Strategies to Improve Student Reaction to Group Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kriflik, Lynda; Mullan, Judy

    2007-01-01

    After receiving negative feedback from students and tutors about their group work experiences in a health subject, strategies to resolve these collaborative learning issues were considered. The objectives were to facilitate student ability to resolve group work issues, highlight group work as an important graduate attribute and to improve…

  19. International Technical Working Group Round Robin Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Dudder, Gordon B.; Hanlen, Richard C.; Herbillion, Georges M.

    2003-02-01

    The goal of nuclear forensics is to develop a preferred approach to support illicit trafficking investigations. This approach must be widely understood and accepted as credible. The principal objectives of the Round Robin Tests are to prioritize forensic techniques and methods, evaluate attribution capabilities, and examine the utility of database. The HEU (Highly Enriched Uranium) Round Robin, and previous Plutonium Round Robin, have made tremendous contributions to fulfilling these goals through a collaborative learning experience that resulted from the outstanding efforts of the nine participating internal laboratories. A prioritized list of techniques and methods has been developed based on this exercise. Current work is focused on the extent to which the techniques and methods can be generalized. The HEU Round Robin demonstrated a rather high level of capability to determine the important characteristics of the materials and processes using analytical methods. When this capability is combined with the appropriate knowledge/database, it results in a significant capability to attribute the source of the materials to a specific process or facility. A number of shortfalls were also identified in the current capabilities including procedures for non-nuclear forensics and the lack of a comprehensive network of data/knowledge bases. The results of the Round Robin will be used to develop guidelines or a ''recommended protocol'' to be made available to the interested authorities and countries to use in real cases.

  20. US CLIVAR Extremes Working Group Results, Recommendations, and Recourses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grotjahn, R.

    2015-12-01

    The topic of extreme weather and climate is very broad. One can easily list a dozen different types of atmospheric extreme phenomena. In addition, some extreme phenomena have multiple types of extremes as well as categories of extremes. The first US CLIVAR working group on extremes (EWG) chose to narrow the extreme phenomena to temperature and precipitation extremes having a time scale of a few days to a week. The primary extremes considered were short term heat waves, cold air outbreaks, and extreme precipitation not from tropical cyclones. All of these have produced multi-billion dollar losses in recent years. Even this subset of extremes is very broad, so additional focus was placed upon the large scale meteorological patterns (LSMPs) that accompany these extremes. This working group was most active from its inception in 2012 until its nominal ending in 2015. Additional work continues, including follow-on activities spawned or informed by the EWG. In this talk, the EWG activities are summarized in four areas: data for extremes, statistical analyses applicable to extremes, synoptic-dynamics of these extremes, and simulation of these extremes in climate models. The emphasis will be upon knowledge gaps and recommended further actions in these four areas. The recommendations span basic science through applications. The EWG participation included input into the US CLIVAR science plan, as one of the four research challenges there being 'extremes'. A scientific session at this AGU meeting was a direct outgrowth of the EWG 2013 workshop. Other follow-on work includes consultation with various national and international efforts in extremes. Finally, some possible future applications of the EWG efforts, such as adequate datasets and climate model diagnostic tools, will be mentioned that may inform providers of information having direct interest to end-users.

  1. Designing and Assessing Productive Group Work in Secondary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaca, Javier; Lapp, Diane; Fisher, Douglas

    2011-01-01

    A history teacher examines what is successful and not successful in group work in his high school classroom and gives concrete suggestions for improving group practice. Topics discussed include preparing students for group work, supporting collaboration, inviting critical analysis, and assessing both group and individual performance. (Contains 2…

  2. Work Group Performance on Production Operations Management Tasks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brauchle, Paul E.; Evans, Richard V., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    A class of 71 industrial technology students was divided into either self-selected (homogeneous) work groups or randomly assigned (heterogeneous) groups. The heterogeneous groups had significantly better peer ratings and adjusted scores on their work tasks, but not better raw scores. Despite evidence of higher achievement in random groups,…

  3. Habitat planning, maintenance and management working group

    SciTech Connect

    1997-03-01

    The Gulf of Mexico (GOM), called {open_quotes}America`s Sea,{close_quotes} is actually a small ocean basin covering over 1.5 million square kilometers. Because of the multiple uses, diversity, and size of the Gulf`s resources, management is shared by a number of governmental agencies including the Minerals Management Service, the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council, the Gulf States Marine Fisheries Commission, National Marine Fisheries Service, the US Coast Guard, the US Army Corps of Engineers, and the five Gulf states fisheries agencies. All of these entities share a common goal of achieving optimum sustainable yield to maximize geological, biological, social, and economic benefits from these resources. These entities also share a common theme that the successful management of the northern GOM requires maintenance and enhancement of both the quantity and quality of habitats. A closer look at the GOM shows the sediment to be clearly dominated by vast sand and mud plains. These soft bottom habitats are preferred by many groundfish and shrimp species and, thus, have given rise to large commercial fisheries on these stocks. Hard bottom and reef habitats, on the other hand, are limited to approximately 1.6% of the total area of the Gulf, so that, while there are high demands by commercial and recreational fishermen for reef associated species, the availability of habitat for these stocks is limited. The thousands of oil and gas structures placed in the Gulf have added significant amounts of new hard substrate. The rigs-to-reefs concept was a common sense idea with support from environmental user groups and the petroleum industry for preserving a limited but valuable habitat type. As long as maximizing long-term benefits from the Gulf s resources for the greatest number of users remains the goal, then programs such as Rigs-to-Reefs will remain an important tool for fisheries and habitat managers in the Gulf.

  4. Group Work Practice with Transgendered Male to Female Sex Workers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Rebecca

    1999-01-01

    Examines group work with transgendered male-to-female adolescents who engage in sex work. Provides an overview of the role that sex work plays in the lives of some transgendered youth, using case examples, and offers guidance for those utilizing group work approaches with transgendered adolescents. Discusses homelessness and institutionalization,…

  5. Teaching Standards-Based Group Work Competencies to Social Work Students: An Empirical Examination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macgowan, Mark J.; Vakharia, Sheila P.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Accreditation standards and challenges in group work education require competency-based approaches in teaching social work with groups. The Association for the Advancement of Social Work with Groups developed Standards for Social Work Practice with Groups, which serve as foundation competencies for professional practice. However, there…

  6. Consensus statements regarding the multidisciplinary care of limb amputation patients in disasters or humanitarian emergencies: report of the 2011 Humanitarian Action Summit Surgical Working Group on amputations following disasters or conflict.

    PubMed

    Knowlton, Lisa Marie; Gosney, James E; Chackungal, Smita; Altschuler, Eric; Black, Lynn; Burkle, Frederick M; Casey, Kathleen; Crandell, David; Demey, Didier; Di Giacomo, Lillian; Dohlman, Lena; Goldstein, Joshua; Gosselin, Richard; Ikeda, Keita; Le Roy, Andree; Linden, Allison; Mullaly, Catherine M; Nickerson, Jason; O'Connell, Colleen; Redmond, Anthony D; Richards, Adam; Rufsvold, Robert; Santos, Anna L R; Skelton, Terri; McQueen, Kelly

    2011-12-01

    Limb amputations are frequently performed as a result of trauma inflicted during conflict or disasters. As demonstrated during the 2010 earthquake in Haiti, coordinating care of these patients in austere settings is complex. During the 2011 Humanitarian Action Summit, consensus statements were developed for international organizations providing care to limb amputation patients during disasters or humanitarian emergencies. Expanded planning is needed for a multidisciplinary surgical care team, inclusive of surgeons, anesthesiologists, rehabilitation specialists and mental health professionals. Surgical providers should approach amputation using an operative technique that optimizes limb length and prosthetic fitting. Appropriate anesthesia care involves both peri-operative and long-term pain control. Rehabilitation specialists must be involved early in treatment, ideally before amputation, and should educate the surgical team in prosthetic considerations. Mental health specialists must be included to help the patient with community reintegration. A key step in developing local health systems the establishment of surgical outcomes monitoring. Such monitoring can optimizepatient follow-up and foster professional accountability for the treatment of amputation patients in disaster settings and humanitarian emergencies.

  7. Action Planning Mediates Guidance of Visual Attention from Working Memory.

    PubMed

    Feldmann-Wüstefeld, Tobias; Schubö, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Visual search is impaired when a salient task-irrelevant stimulus is presented together with the target. Recent research has shown that this attentional capture effect is enhanced when the salient stimulus matches working memory (WM) content, arguing in favor of attention guidance from WM. Visual attention was also shown to be closely coupled with action planning. Preparing a movement renders action-relevant perceptual dimensions more salient and thus increases search efficiency for stimuli sharing that dimension. The present study aimed at revealing common underlying mechanisms for selective attention, WM, and action planning. Participants both prepared a specific movement (grasping or pointing) and memorized a color hue. Before the movement was executed towards an object of the memorized color, a visual search task (additional singleton) was performed. Results showed that distraction from target was more pronounced when the additional singleton had a memorized color. This WM-guided attention deployment was more pronounced when participants prepared a grasping movement. We argue that preparing a grasping movement mediates attention guidance from WM content by enhancing representations of memory content that matches the distractor shape (i.e., circles), thus encouraging attentional capture by circle distractors of the memorized color. We conclude that templates for visual search, action planning, and WM compete for resources and thus cause interferences. PMID:26171241

  8. The Preparation of Professional School Counselors for Group Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steen, Sam; Bauman, Sheri; Smith, Julie

    2008-01-01

    An online survey about the group work training experiences of school counselors was completed by 802 members of the American School Counseling Association (ASCA). Most respondents had one course in group work; a minority had the opportunity to observe or co-lead groups with children and/or adolescents as part of their training. Qualitative…

  9. Dealing with Slackers in College Classroom Work Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Scott A.; Smith, Nicole A.; Eidsness, Mary A.; Bogdan, Leah M.; Zackery, Brooke A.; Thompson, Michelle R.; Schoo, Meghan E.; Johnson, Angela N.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to probe the presence of slackers in college classroom work group, how students react to slackers, and the recommendations students would make for working with slackers in future group projects. Thirty-seven college students participated in one of five focus groups. Results indicate that (a) college students working…

  10. An Update on the ISBD(s) Working Group.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parent, Ingrid

    This paper discusses the work of the International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) International Standard Bibliographic Description (ISBD) working group. The first section provides background on ISBDs and the revision process. Reasons for the current need for an ISBD working group are summarized in the second section, including the…

  11. 75 FR 1338 - Online Safety and Technology Working Group Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-11

    ... National Telecommunications and Information Administration Online Safety and Technology Working Group... and Technology Working Group (OSTWG). DATES: The meeting will be held on February 4, 2010, from 8:40 a... and technology, with an emphasis on issues relevant to the work of the subcommittees on data...

  12. Remedial Action Work Plan Amchitka Island Mud Pit Closures

    SciTech Connect

    DOE /NV

    2001-04-05

    This remedial action work plan presents the project organization and construction procedures developed for the performance of the remedial actions at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE's) sites on Amchitka Island, Alaska. During the late1960s and early 1970s, the U.S. Department of Defense and the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (the predecessor agency to DOE) used Amchitka Island as a site for underground nuclear tests. A total of nine sites on the Island were considered for nuclear testing; however, tests were only conducted at three sites (i.e., Long Shot in 1965, Milrow in 1969, and Cannikin in 1971). In addition to these three sites, large diameter emplacement holes were drilled in two other locations (Sites D and F) and an exploratory hole was in a third location (Site E). It was estimated that approximately 195 acres were disturbed by drilling or preparation for drilling in conjunction with these activities. The disturbed areas include access roads, spoil-disposal areas, mud pits which have impacted the environment, and an underground storage tank at the hot mix plant which was used to support asphalt-paving operations on the island. The remedial action objective for Amchitka Island is to eliminate human and ecological exposure to contaminants by capping drilling mud pits, removing the tank contents, and closing the tank in place. The remedial actions will meet State of Alaska regulations, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service refuge management goals, address stakeholder concerns, and address the cultural beliefs and practices of the native people. The U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office will conduct work on Amchitka Island under the authority of the Comprehensive Emergency Response, Compensation, and Liability Act. Field activities are scheduled to take place May through September 2001. The results of these activities will be presented in a subsequent Closure Report.

  13. Status of Laser/Lidar Working Group Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavaya, Michael J.; Gentry, Bruce M.

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the status of the development of the requirements by the Laser/Lidar working group. Included in the presentation is another viewgraph report on the NASA Earth Science Technology Office (ESTO) Laser/Lidar working group, by the chairperson of the working group. Some of the uses of Laser and Lidar in earth sciences are reviewed and a roadmap for the future use of the technology is included.

  14. Interagency working group on data management for global change

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, G.

    1992-12-31

    This article describes the Interagency Working Group on Data Management for Global Change, organized in 1987. Approaches of the Group to data management problems are given along with its accomplishments.

  15. Summary of the TeV33 working group

    SciTech Connect

    Bagley, P.P.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Colestock, P.

    1996-10-01

    This summary of the TeV33 working group at Snowmass reports on work in the areas of Tevatron store parameters, the beam-beam interaction, Main Injector intensity (slip stacking), antiproton production, and electron cooling.

  16. Peer Tutoring and Response Groups. What Works Clearinghouse Intervention Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2007

    2007-01-01

    "Peer Tutoring and Response Groups" aims to improve the language and achievement of English language learners by pairing or grouping students to work on a task. The students may be grouped by age or ability (English-only, bilingual, or limited English proficient) or the groups may be mixed. Both peer tutoring pairs and peer response groups…

  17. Trans-NCI Pharmacogenomics and Pharmacoepidemiology Working Group (PPWG)

    Cancer.gov

    NCI established the Trans-NCI Pharmacogenomics and Pharmacoepidemiology Working Group to support development of a comprehensive and interdisciplinary pharmacoepidemiology and pharmacogenomics cancer research program.

  18. Students' Perceptions of Classroom Group Work as a Function of Group Member Selection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Scott A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this assessment was to examine whether differences exist between students who self-select their classroom work group members and students who are randomly assigned to their classroom work groups in terms of their use of organizational citizenship behaviors with their work group members; their commitment to, trust in, and relational…

  19. Work-family conflict in work groups: social information processing, support, and demographic dissimilarity.

    PubMed

    Bhave, Devasheesh P; Kramer, Amit; Glomb, Theresa M

    2010-01-01

    We used social information processing theory to examine the effect of work-family conflict (WFC) at the work group level on individuals' experience of WFC. Consistent with hypotheses, results suggest that WFC at the work group level influences individual WFC over and above the shared work environment and job demands. It was also observed that work group support and demographic dissimilarity moderate this relationship. Moderator analyses suggest that work group social support buffers WFC for individuals but is also associated with a stronger effect of work group WFC on individuals' WFC. Moreover, the work group effect on individuals' WFC was shown to be stronger for individuals who were demographically dissimilar to the work group in terms of sex and number of dependents. The interpretations and implications of these findings are discussed.

  20. Graduate Social Work Students' Experiences with Group Work in the Field and the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Harriet; Knight, Carolyn; Khudododov, Khudodod

    2014-01-01

    For decades, group work scholars have described a discrepancy between student preparation for group work practice and opportunities to work with groups in the field practicum and professional practice. Educators in related disciplines such as counseling and psychology have expressed similar concerns. This article reports findings of a study of MSW…

  1. Has Group Work Education Lost Its Social Group Work Essence? A Content Analysis of MSW Course Syllabi in Search of Mutual Aid and Group Conflict Content

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweifach, Jay Stephen

    2015-01-01

    This article presents the results of a content analysis of MSW group work course syllabi in an effort to better understand the extent to which mutual aid and group conflict, two important dimensions of social group work, are included and featured as prominent elements in MSW-level group work instruction.

  2. Workflow in Astronomy : the VO France Workflow Working Group experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaaff, A.; Petit, F. L.; Prugniel, P.; Slezak, E.; Surace, C.

    2008-08-01

    The French Action Spécifique Observatoires Virtuels has created the Workflow Working Group in 2005. Its aim is to explore the use of the Workflow paradigm in the astronomical domain. The first consensus was the definition of a Workflow as a sequence of tasks realized in a controlled context (at various levels: intelligence in the choice of the algorithms, flow control, etc.), based on use cases studies, in an architecture which takes into account VO standards. The current roadmap is to provide scientific use cases in several domains (image, spectrum, simulation, data mining, etc.) and to improve them mainly with VO existing tools. Another important point is to develop collaborations with the IT community (links to EGEE, ...). Use cases are useful to compare the pertinence of the possible workflow models and to understand how to implement it as efficiently as possible with the existing tools (ex. : AstroGrid, AÏDA, WebCom-G, etc.). The execution (local machine, cluster, grid) through this kind of tools and the use of VO functionalities (Web Services, Grid, VOSpace, etc.) becomes almost transparent.

  3. The Algebra Initiative Colloquium. Volume 2: Working Group Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lacampagne, Carole B., Ed.; And Others

    This volume presents recommendations from four working groups at a conference on reform in algebra held in Leesburg, Virginia, December 9-12, 1993. Working Group 1: Creating an Appropriate Algebra Experience for All Grades K-12 Students produced the following papers: (1) "Report" (A. H. Schoenfeld); (2) "Five Questions About Algebra Reform (and a…

  4. 78 FR 67132 - GPS Satellite Simulator Control Working Group Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Air Force GPS Satellite Simulator Control Working Group Meeting AGENCY: Space and Missile..., that the GPS Directorate will host a GPS Satellite Simulator Control Working Group (SSCWG) meeting on...

  5. 77 FR 70421 - GPS Satellite Simulator Control Working Group Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Air Force GPS Satellite Simulator Control Working Group Meeting AGENCY: Space and Missile..., that the GPS Directorate will host a GPS Satellite Simulator Control Working Group (SSCWG) meeting...

  6. 75 FR 34476 - Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-17

    ... Bureau of Reclamation Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group AGENCY: Bureau of Reclamation... Interior (Secretary) is renewing the charter for the Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group. The... with respect to the operation of Glen Canyon Dam and the exercise of other authorities pursuant...

  7. Group Work in Schools: A Process Consultation Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farouk, Shaalan

    2004-01-01

    This paper provides a description of how an educational psychologist can consult with groups of teachers mostly in relation to their work with pupils who display emotional behavioural difficulties. The paper includes a review of the work on group consultation in schools, followed by a description of process consultation (Schein, 1988 ) and how the…

  8. Effects of Personality on Attitudes toward Academic Group Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forrester, William R.; Tashchian, Armen

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of personality on attitudes toward academic group work among a sample of 225 business students. Data were collected using pre-existing scales for measuring personality and attitudes toward academic group work. Specifically, the Neo-FFI scale was used to measure the five personality dimensions of openness,…

  9. Teachers' Leadership and Students' Experience of Group Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammar Chiriac, Eva; Granstrom, Kjell

    2012-01-01

    Group work is used as a means of learning at all levels of most educational systems. However, teachers often use group work without considering its "pros and cons." Such a mode of non-reflected application may sometimes end up in positive experiences and learning, but the likelihood is that the outcome will be the opposite. The aim of this…

  10. Student Group Project Work: A Pioneering Experiment in Interactive Engagement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mallow, Jeffry V.

    2001-01-01

    Fully half of the curriculum at Roskilde University in Denmark is student-driven group research project work that is often interdisciplinary. Describes the practice of group project work in the sciences at RUC and evaluates implications for educational practice in the United States. (Author/SAH)

  11. Integrating Social Justice in Group Work: The Next Decade

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hays, Danica G.; Arredondo, Patricia; Gladding, Samuel T.; Toporek, Rebecca L.

    2010-01-01

    Group work can be an effective outlet for facilitating client empowerment at individual and systemic levels. This article outlines strategies for increasing attention to social justice issues in group work over the next decade within education, training, supervision, practice, and research. Drawing from historical perspectives, current literature,…

  12. Using Small Group Work To Motivate English Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lacey, Andria; Walker, William J.

    The use of small group work in the classroom can increase student motivation, interest, participation, learning, and retention. Small group work can also increase the quality and quantity of participation among students, elevate the level of thinking skills developed in the classroom, increase the level of self-esteem among participants, and teach…

  13. The Eight-Step Method to Great Group Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steward, Sally; Swango, Jill

    2004-01-01

    Many science teachers already understand the importance of cooperative learning in the classroom and during lab exercises. From a theoretical perspective, students working in groups learn teamwork and discussion techniques as well as how to formulate and ask questions amongst themselves. From a practical standpoint, group work saves precious…

  14. 78 FR 23329 - Aircraft Access to SWIM Working Group Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-18

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Aircraft Access to SWIM Working Group Meeting Meeting Announcement... attend and participate in an Aircraft Access to SWIM Working Group Meeting scheduled for Thursday, May 16..., Phone Number, U.S. Citizen (Y/N). RSVPs to Corey Muller are required by COB May 1, 2013. Aircraft...

  15. The LGBTQ Responsive Model for Supervision of Group Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodrich, Kristopher M.; Luke, Melissa

    2011-01-01

    Although supervision of group work has been linked to the development of multicultural and social justice competencies, there are no models for supervision of group work specifically designed to address the needs of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning (LGBTQ) persons. This manuscript presents the LGBTQ Responsive Model for…

  16. Pilot Mental Health: Expert Working Group Recommendations - Revised 2015.

    PubMed

    2016-05-01

    In September 2012, the Aerospace Medical Association published and distributed recommendations from its Pilot Mental Health Working Group to improve awareness and identification of pilot mental health issues during the aeromedical assessment of pilots. Following the crash of Germanwings Flight 9525 in March 2015 with pilot suicide as the probable cause, the Pilot Mental Health Working Group reconvened to review their recommendations. As a result, the working group revised the recommendations which are provided here and which were distributed worldwide. The Working Group continues to emphasize the importance of assessing and optimizing pilot mental health, while providing additional recommendations on building trust and rapport between the aeromedical examiner and the pilot, on utilizing aviation mental health and aeromedical specialists, and on the balance between medical confidentiality and risk to public safety. The working group encourages all organizations involved in flight safety to review and consider implementing these recommendations within their usual operations.

  17. Students' use of the interactive whiteboard during physics group work

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strøm Mellingsæter, Magnus; Bungum, Berit

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents a case study of how the interactive whiteboard (IWB) may facilitate collective meaning-making processes in group work in engineering education. In the case, first-year students attended group-work sessions as an organised part of a basic physics course at a Norwegian university college. Each student group was equipped with an IWB, which the groups used to write down and hand in their solutions to the physics problems. Based on a Vygotskian, dialectical stance, this study investigates how the students used the IWB in the group-work situation. From qualitative analysis of video data, we identified four group-work processes where the IWB played a key role: exploratory, explanatory, clarifying and insertion. The results show that the IWB may facilitate a 'joint workspace', a social realm in which the students' dialogues are situated.

  18. Group Work and Leadership: Perception of FCS Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arendt, Susan W.; Gregoire, Mary B.

    2006-01-01

    No known studies have examined the perception of family and consumer science (FCS) students related to group work in the classroom and its relationship to leadership. In this qualitative study, two groups of FCS students--hospitality management and dietetics--viewed group projects as exercises in leadership skills that had many barriers.…

  19. Friend or ally: whether cross-group contact undermines collective action depends on what advantaged group members say (or don't say).

    PubMed

    Becker, Julia C; Wright, Stephen C; Lubensky, Micah E; Zhou, Shelly

    2013-04-01

    Previous research shows that positive contact with members of advantaged groups can undermine collective action among the disadvantaged. The present work provides the first experimental evidence of this effect and introduces a moderator which highlights the fundamental role of communication about perceptions of the legitimacy of intergroup inequality. Study 1 (N = 267) focused on the lesbian/gay/bisexual/transgendered community's struggle for same-sex marriage in California. In Study 2 (N = 81), cross-group contact was initiated between members of two universities that differ in social status. Results revealed that positive cross-group contact undermined public collective action among the disadvantaged when the advantaged-group partner described their group's advantaged position as legitimate or when they did not communicate their feelings about intergroup inequality (leaving them ambiguous). In contrast, when the advantaged-group partner clearly described the intergroup inequality as illegitimate, cross-group contact did not undermine participation in public collective action. PMID:23504760

  20. Causal Relationships between Communication Confidence, Beliefs about Group Work, and Willingness to Communicate in Foreign Language Group Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fushino, Kumiko

    2010-01-01

    This article reports on the causal relationships between three factors in second language (L2) group work settings: communication confidence (i.e., confidence in one's ability to communicate), beliefs about group work, and willingness to communicate (WTC). A questionnaire was administered to 729 first-year university students in Japan. A model…

  1. Association for Specialists in Group Work: Multicultural and Social Justice Competence Principles for Group Workers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Anneliese A.; Merchant, Niloufer; Skudrzyk, Bogusia; Ingene, Daphne

    2012-01-01

    The Association for Specialists in Group Work (ASGW) is committed to understanding how issues of multiculturalism and social justice affect all aspects of group work. This document reflects the updating and revision of a previous document entitled, "Principles for Diversity-Competent Group Workers," which was endorsed by ASGW in 1998 and published…

  2. Action-oriented use of ergonomic checkpoints for healthy work design in different settings.

    PubMed

    Kogi, Kazutaka

    2007-12-01

    Recent experiences in the action-oriented use of ergonomic checkpoints in different work settings are reviewed. The purpose is to know what features are useful for healthy work design adjusted to each local situation. Based on the review results, common features of ergonomic checkpoints used in participatory training programs for improving workplace conditions in small enterprises, construction sites, home work and agriculture in industrially developing countries in Asia are discussed. These checkpoints generally compile practical improvement options in a broad range of technical areas, such as materials handling, workstation design, physical environment and work organization. Usually, "action checklists" comprising the tiles of the checkpoints are used together. A clear focus is placed on readily applicable low-cost options. Three common features of these various checkpoints appear to be important. First, the checkpoints represent typical good practices in multiple areas. Second, each how-to section of these checkpoints presents simple improvements reflecting basic ergonomic principles. Examples of these principles include easy reach, fewer and faster transport, elbow-level work, coded displays, isolated or screened hazards and shared teamwork. Third, the illustrated checkpoints accompanied by corresponding checklists are used as group work tools in short-term training courses. Many practical improvements achieved are displayed in websites for inter-country work improvement networks. It is suggested to promote the use of locally adjusted checkpoints in various forms of participatory action-oriented training in small-scale workplaces and in agriculture particularly in industrially developing countries.

  3. KANSAS WIND POWERING AMERICAN STATE OUTREACH: KANSAS WIND WORKING GROUP

    SciTech Connect

    HAMMARLUND, RAY

    2010-10-27

    The Kansas Wind Working Group (WWG) is a 33-member group announced by former Governor Kathleen Sebelius on Jan. 7, 2008. Formed through Executive Order 08-01, the WWG will educate stakeholder groups with the current information on wind energy markets, technologies, economics, policies, prospects and issues. Governor Mark Parkinson serves as chair of the Kansas Wind Working Group. The group has been instrumental in focusing on the elements of government and coordinating government and private sector efforts in wind energy development. Those efforts have moved Kansas from 364 MW of wind three years ago to over 1000 MW today. Further, the Wind Working Group was instrumental in fleshing out issues such as a state RES and net metering, fundamental parts of HB 2369 that was passed and is now law in Kansas. This represents the first mandatory RES and net metering in Kansas history.

  4. 75 FR 439 - Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group (AMWG)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-05

    ... Bureau of Reclamation Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group (AMWG) AGENCY: Bureau of Reclamation, Interior. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: The Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Program (AMP) was implemented as a result of the Record of Decision on the Operation of Glen Canyon Dam...

  5. 75 FR 20381 - Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group (AMWG)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-19

    ... Bureau of Reclamation Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group (AMWG) AGENCY: Bureau of Reclamation, Interior. ACTION: Notice of public meeting (webinar conference call). SUMMARY: The Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive... Canyon Dam Final Environmental Impact Statement to comply with consultation requirements of the...

  6. 78 FR 49281 - Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group; Public Meeting, Teleconference and Web-Based Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-13

    ... Web-Based Meeting AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: We, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, announce a public meeting, teleconference, and web-based meeting of the Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group (TAMWG). DATES: Public meeting, Teleconference, and...

  7. 78 FR 35312 - Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group; Public Meeting, Teleconference and Web-Based Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-12

    ... Web-Based Meeting AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: We, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, announce a public meeting, teleconference and web-based meeting of the Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group (TAMWG). DATES: Public meeting, Teleconference, and...

  8. 78 FR 17226 - Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group; Public Meeting, Teleconference and Web-Based Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-20

    ... Web-Based Meeting AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: We, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, announce a public meeting, teleconference and web-based meeting of the Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group (TAMWG). DATES: Public meeting, Teleconference, and...

  9. 75 FR 44809 - Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group (AMWG)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-29

    ... Bureau of Reclamation Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group (AMWG) AGENCY: Bureau of Reclamation, Interior. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: The Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Program (AMP) was implemented as a result of the Record of Decision on the Operation of Glen Canyon Dam...

  10. 77 FR 2315 - Call for Nominations for the Pinedale Anticline Working Group, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Land Management Call for Nominations for the Pinedale Anticline Working Group, Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Nominations are being solicited for...

  11. 75 FR 53980 - Notice of Field Tours for the Pinedale Anticline Working Group

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-02

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Field Tours for the Pinedale Anticline Working Group AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: In accordance with the Federal Land Policy and Management Act (1976), the Federal Advisory Committee Act (1972), and the Record of Decision (ROD) for...

  12. 75 FR 47626 - Notice of Reestablishment of the Pinedale Anticline Working Group, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-06

    ..., BLM Advisory Committee Lead (600), Bureau of Land Management, 1620 L Street, NW., MS-LS-401... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Reestablishment of the Pinedale Anticline Working Group, Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This notice is published...

  13. STP WORKING GROUP FOR HISTORIAL DATA OF PROLIFERATIVE RODENT LESIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract: The Historical Control Data Working Group, under the direction of the Scientific and Regulatory Policy Committee, is tasked with the preparation of a document that reviews current scientific practices, regulations and relevant literature in order to provide best practic...

  14. 2016 Mission Operations Working Group: Earth Observing-1 (EO-1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frye, Stuart

    2016-01-01

    EO-1 Mission Status for the Constellation Mission Operations Working Group to discuss the EO-1 flight systems, mission enhancements, debris avoidance maneuver, orbital information, 5-year outlook, and new ground stations.

  15. Flavor physics: The flavor physics (P2) working group

    SciTech Connect

    Marina Artuso et al.

    2002-12-10

    Flavor physics has recently made striking advances. The Snowmass Flavor Physics Working Group has attempted to identify the important open questions in this field, and to describe the diverse future program that would address them.

  16. Citing Dynamic Data - Research Data Alliance working group recommendations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asmi, Ari; Rauber, Andreas; Pröll, Stefan; van Uytvanck, Dieter

    2016-04-01

    Geosciences research data sets are typically dynamic: changing over time as new records are added, errors are corrected and obsolete records are deleted from the data sets. Researchers often use only parts of the data sets or data stream, creating specific subsets tailored to their experiments. In order to keep such experiments reproducible and to share and cite the particular data used in a study, researchers need means of identifying the exact version of a subset as it was used during a specific execution of a workflow, even if the data source is continuously evolving. Some geosciences data services have tried to approach this problem by creating static versions of their data sets, and some have simply ignored this issue. The RDA Working Group on Dynamic Data Citation (WGDC) has instead approached the issue with a set of recommendations based upon versioned data, timestamping and a query based subsetting mechanism. The 14 RDA WGDC recommendations on how to adapt a data source for providing identifiable subsets for the long term are: Preparing the Data and the Query Store R1 - Data Versioning R2 - Timestamping R3 - Query Store Facilities Persistently Identifying Specific Data Sets R4 - Query Uniqueness R5 - Stable Sorting R6 - Result Set Verification R7 - Query Timestamping R8 - Query PID R9 - Store the Query R10 - Automated Citation Texts Resolving PIDs and Retrieving the Data - R11 - Landing Page R12 - Machine Actionability Upon modifications to the Data Infrastructure R13 - Technology Migration R14 - Migration Verification We present a detailed discussion of the recommendations, the rationale behind them, and give examples of how to implement them.

  17. The Multispectral Imaging Science Working Group. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, S. C. (Editor)

    1982-01-01

    Results of the deliberations of the six multispectral imaging science working groups (Botany, Geography, Geology, Hydrology, Imaging Science and Information Science) are summarized. Consideration was given to documenting the current state of knowledge in terrestrial remote sensing without the constraints of preconceived concepts such as possible band widths, number of bands, and radiometric or spatial resolutions of present or future systems. The findings of each working group included a discussion of desired capabilities and critical developmental issues.

  18. Physical Workload and Work Capacity across Occupational Groups.

    PubMed

    Brighenti-Zogg, Stefanie; Mundwiler, Jonas; Schüpbach, Ulla; Dieterle, Thomas; Wolfer, David Paul; Leuppi, Jörg Daniel; Miedinger, David

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to determine physical performance criteria of different occupational groups by investigating physical activity and energy expenditure in healthy Swiss employees in real-life workplaces on workdays and non-working days in relation to their aerobic capacity (VO2max). In this cross-sectional study, 337 healthy and full-time employed adults were recruited. Participants were classified (nine categories) according to the International Standard Classification of Occupations 1988 and merged into three groups with low-, moderate- and high-intensity occupational activity. Daily steps, energy expenditure, metabolic equivalents and activity at different intensities were measured using the SenseWear Mini armband on seven consecutive days (23 hours/day). VO2max was determined by the 20-meter shuttle run test. Data of 303 subjects were considered for analysis (63% male, mean age: 33 yrs, SD 12), 101 from the low-, 102 from the moderate- and 100 from the high-intensity group. At work, the high-intensity group showed higher energy expenditure, metabolic equivalents, steps and activity at all intensities than the other groups (p<0.001). There were no significant differences in physical activity between the occupational groups on non-working days. VO2max did not differ across groups when stratified for gender. The upper workload limit was 21%, 29% and 44% of VO2max in the low-, moderate- and high-intensity group, respectively. Men had a lower limit than women due to their higher VO2max (26% vs. 37%), when all groups were combined. While this study did confirm that the average workload limit is one third of VO2max, it showed that the average is misrepresenting the actual physical work demands of specific occupational groups, and that it does not account for gender-related differences in relative workload. Therefore, clinical practice needs to consider these differences with regard to a safe return to work, particularly for the high-intensity group. PMID:27136206

  19. Physical Workload and Work Capacity across Occupational Groups

    PubMed Central

    Brighenti-Zogg, Stefanie; Mundwiler, Jonas; Schüpbach, Ulla; Dieterle, Thomas; Wolfer, David Paul; Leuppi, Jörg Daniel; Miedinger, David

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to determine physical performance criteria of different occupational groups by investigating physical activity and energy expenditure in healthy Swiss employees in real-life workplaces on workdays and non-working days in relation to their aerobic capacity (VO2max). In this cross-sectional study, 337 healthy and full-time employed adults were recruited. Participants were classified (nine categories) according to the International Standard Classification of Occupations 1988 and merged into three groups with low-, moderate- and high-intensity occupational activity. Daily steps, energy expenditure, metabolic equivalents and activity at different intensities were measured using the SenseWear Mini armband on seven consecutive days (23 hours/day). VO2max was determined by the 20-meter shuttle run test. Data of 303 subjects were considered for analysis (63% male, mean age: 33 yrs, SD 12), 101 from the low-, 102 from the moderate- and 100 from the high-intensity group. At work, the high-intensity group showed higher energy expenditure, metabolic equivalents, steps and activity at all intensities than the other groups (p<0.001). There were no significant differences in physical activity between the occupational groups on non-working days. VO2max did not differ across groups when stratified for gender. The upper workload limit was 21%, 29% and 44% of VO2max in the low-, moderate- and high-intensity group, respectively. Men had a lower limit than women due to their higher VO2max (26% vs. 37%), when all groups were combined. While this study did confirm that the average workload limit is one third of VO2max, it showed that the average is misrepresenting the actual physical work demands of specific occupational groups, and that it does not account for gender-related differences in relative workload. Therefore, clinical practice needs to consider these differences with regard to a safe return to work, particularly for the high-intensity group. PMID:27136206

  20. Group Work and Outreach Plans for College Counselors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitch, Trey, Ed.; Marshall, Jennifer L., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    In this book, group work and college counseling leaders offer step-by-step instruction in the effective use and processing of structured group activities on topics such as test anxiety; stress and anxiety management; ADHD; career development; substance abuse; eating disorders; and the unique concerns faced by GLBT students, first-generation…

  1. Facilitating Support Groups for Professionals Working with People with AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grossman, Arnold H.; Silverstein, Charles

    1993-01-01

    Describes support groups for health care professionals who work with people with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) or Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and who are experiencing burnout from excessive demands on their energy, strength, and resources. Discusses group administration, effective intervention techniques, and issues of health…

  2. The Final Report of the Higher Education Work Group

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kentucky Council on Postsecondary Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    In October 2008, Governor Steven Beshear formed the Higher Education Work Group (HEWG), a bipartisan body of prominent business, education, and policy leaders. As a first step, the Governor called on the group to propose measures that could be implemented immediately to improve college access and affordability in the Commonwealth. HEWG recommends…

  3. Group Work Tests for Context-Rich Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Chris

    2016-01-01

    The group work test is an assessment strategy that promotes higher-order thinking skills for solving context-rich problems. With this format, teachers are able to pose challenging, nuanced questions on a test, while providing the support weaker students need to get started and show their understanding. The test begins with a group discussion…

  4. A Two-Fold Unveiling: Unmasking Classism in Group Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newton, Kathryn

    2010-01-01

    The pervasive myth of the United States as a "classless society" silences the reality of social class oppression in this country. This silencing has received little attention to date in group work training, research, and practice. Unmasking classism may generate anxiety for group workers and members alike, yet holds potential for significant…

  5. Intelligent Agents To Support Students Working in Groups Online.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whatley, Janice; Staniford, Geof; Beer, Martin; Scown, Phil

    1999-01-01

    Describes initial investigations into the problems encountered when college students undertake online group projects and introduces a method for designing intelligent software agents capable of recognizing and alleviating problems concerned with the maintenance roles of group project work. Discusses computer mediated communication and user…

  6. Learning What Works: Promoting Small-Group Discussions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeJarnette, Anna F.; Dao, Jennifer N.; González, Gloriana

    2014-01-01

    Many teachers have designed lessons for students who will be working in groups to discuss and solve a problem. After investing time in constructing an interesting problem, creating strategically designed groups, and introducing the problem carefully, teachers may be left wondering how to help students collaborate to make sense of mathematical…

  7. Understanding the Process by Which New Employees Enter Work Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Summers, Donald B.

    1977-01-01

    The Group Integration Process, described in this article, serves as a broad and guiding set of steps (invitation, induction, orientation, training, relationship, and integration) that helps the supervisor better understand what is to be done in managing a new employee's entrance into a work group. (TA)

  8. The Dynamics of Access to Groups in Working Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farrell, Simon; Lelievre, Anna

    2012-01-01

    The finding that participants leave a pause between groups when attempting serial recall of temporally grouped lists has been taken to indicate access to a hierarchical representation of the list in working memory. An alternative explanation is that the dynamics of serial recall solely reflect output (rather than memorial) processes, with the…

  9. NORTHEAST LOON STUDY WORKING GROUP PARTNERSHIP TO ASSESS ENVIRONMENTAL RISK

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Northeast Loon Study Working Group (NELSWG) was formed in 1994 to proactively identify threats to one of the Northeast's most popular waterbirds, the common loon, Gavia immer. Seventeen institutions have come together to identify strategy, coordinate the work load, and share ...

  10. NuFact'03 machine working group summary

    SciTech Connect

    T.R. Edgecock; S. Machida; R.A. Rimmer

    2004-10-01

    The machine working group sessions at NuFact workshops have always been characterized by the presentation and discussion of both new ideas and the developments in existing concepts and by lively debate. The machine sessions at NuFact'03 were no exception to this. In this article, we will try and summarize the work presented and the discussion that took place.

  11. Using journals for community health students engaged in group work.

    PubMed

    Drevdahl, Denise J; Dorcy, Kathleen Shannon

    2002-01-01

    Teaching students concepts integral to community health nursing, such as collaboration and partnership, while providing clinical practica in community agencies, mandates that students address group process and evaluate self-growth. To facilitate reflection on self-learning in the context of collaborative group work, faculty and students use a structured, graded, weekly journal. This teaching and learning tool serves as a mechanism for assisting students with understanding group process.

  12. Waste Contaminants at Military Bases Working Group report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-11-04

    The Waste Contaminants at Military Bases Working Group has screened six prospective demonstration projects for consideration by the Federal Advisory Committee to Develop On-Site Innovative Technologies (DOIT). These projects include the Kirtland Air Force Base Demonstration Project, the March Air Force Base Demonstration Project, the McClellan Air Force Base Demonstration Project, the Williams Air Force Base Demonstration Project, and two demonstration projects under the Air Force Center for Environmental Excellence. A seventh project (Port Hueneme Naval Construction Battalion Center) was added to list of prospective demonstrations after the September 1993 Working Group Meeting. This demonstration project has not been screened by the working group. Two additional Air Force remediation programs are also under consideration and are described in Section 6 of this document. The following information on prospective demonstrations was collected by the Waste Contaminants at Military Bases Working Group to assist the DOIT Committee in making Phase 1 Demonstration Project recommendations. The remainder of this report is organized into seven sections: Work Group Charter`s mission and vision; contamination problems, current technology limitations, and institutional and regulatory barriers to technology development and commercialization, and work force issues; screening process for initial Phase 1 demonstration technologies and sites; demonstration descriptions -- good matches;demonstration descriptions -- close matches; additional candidate demonstration projects; and next steps.

  13. The International Space Life Sciences Strategic Planning Working Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Ronald J.; Rabin, Robert; Lujan, Barbara F.

    1993-01-01

    Throughout the 1980s, ESA and the space agencies of Canada, Germany, France, Japan, and the U.S. have pursued cooperative projects bilaterally and multilaterally to prepare for, and to respond to, opportunities in space life sciences research previously unapproachable in scale and sophistication. To cope effectively with likely future space research opportunities, broad, multilateral, coordinated strategic planning is required. Thus, life scientists from these agencies have allied to form the International Space Life Sciences Strategic Planning Working Group. This Group is formally organized under a charter that specifies the purpose of the Working Group as the development of an international strategic plan for the space life sciences, with periodic revisions as needed to keep the plan current. The plan will be policy-, not operations-oriented. The Working Group also may establish specific implementation teams to coordinate multilateral science policy in specific areas; such teams have been established for space station utilization, and for sharing of flight equipment.

  14. Social Norms about a Health Issue in Work Group Networks

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Lauren B.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to advance theorizing about how small groups understand health issues through the use of social network analysis. To achieve this goal, an adapted cognitive social structure examines group social norms around a specific health issue, H1N1 flu prevention. As predicted, individual’s attitudes, self-efficacy, and perceived social norms were each positively associated with behavioral intentions for at least one of the H1N1 health behaviors studied. Moreover, collective norms of the whole group were also associated with behavioral intentions, even after controlling for how individual group members perceive those norms. For members of work groups in which pairs were perceived to agree in their support for H1N1 vaccination, the effect of individually perceived group norms on behavioral intentions was stronger than for groups with less agreement. PMID:26389934

  15. Breaking Cycles of Violence. A Work Group of the International Work Group on Death, Dying and Bereavement (IWG)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Death Studies, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Violence begets violence and it is important to understand how cycles of violence are perpetuated if we are to find solutions to the global problems they present. A multi-disciplinary group of The International Work Group on Death, Dying and Bereavement has developed a model of the cyclical events that perpetuate violence at all levels including…

  16. 2006 Annual Operations Report for INTEC Operable Unit 3-13, Group 1, Tank Farm Interim Action

    SciTech Connect

    D. E. Shanklin

    2007-02-14

    This annual operations report describes the requirements followed and activities conducted to inspect, monitor, and maintain the items installed during performance of the Waste Area Group 3, Operable Unit 3-13, Group 1, Tank Farm Interim Action, at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. This report covers the time period from January 1 through December 31, 2006, and describes inspection and monitoring activities for the surface-sealed areas within the tank farm, concrete-lined ditches and culverts in and around the tank farm, the lift station, and the lined evaporation pond. These activities are intended to assure that the interim action is functioning adequately to meet the objectives stated in the Operable Unit 3-13, Record of Decision for the Group 1, Tank Farm Interim Action (DOE/ID-10660) as described in the Group 1 Remedial Design/Remedial Action Work Plan (DOE/ID-10772).

  17. Nuclear Forensics: Report of the AAAS/APS Working Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tannenbaum, Benn

    2008-04-01

    This report was produced by a Working Group of the American Physical Society's Program on Public Affairs in conjunction with the American Association for the Advancement of Science Center for Science, Technology and Security Policy. The primary purpose of this report is to provide the Congress, U.S. government agencies and other institutions involved in nuclear forensics with a clear unclassified statement of the state of the art of nuclear forensics; an assessment of its potential for preventing and identifying unattributed nuclear attacks; and identification of the policies, resources and human talent to fulfill that potential. In the course of its work, the Working Group observed that nuclear forensics was an essential part of the overall nuclear attribution process, which aims at identifying the origin of unidentified nuclear weapon material and, in the event, an unidentified nuclear explosion. A credible nuclear attribution capability and in particular nuclear forensics capability could deter essential participants in the chain of actors needed to smuggle nuclear weapon material or carry out a nuclear terrorist act and could also encourage states to better secure such materials and weapons. The Working Group also noted that nuclear forensics result would take some time to obtain and that neither internal coordination, nor international arrangements, nor the state of qualified personnel and needed equipment were currently enough to minimize the time needed to reach reliable results in an emergency such as would be caused by a nuclear detonation or the intercept of a weapon-size quantity of material. The Working Group assesses international cooperation to be crucial for forensics to work, since the material would likely come from inadequately documented foreign sources. In addition, international participation, if properly managed, could enhance the credibility of the deterrent effect of attribution. Finally the Working Group notes that the U.S. forensics

  18. Positive Action. Revised. What Works Clearinghouse Intervention Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2007

    2007-01-01

    "Positive Action," a K-12 program, aims to promote character development, academic achievement, and social-emotional skills and to reduce disruptive and problem behavior. The program is based on the philosophy that you feel good about yourself when you think and do positive actions, and there is always a positive way to do everything. The…

  19. Many hands make light work: further studies in group evolution.

    PubMed

    Tomko, Nicholas; Harvey, Inman; Virgo, Nathaniel; Philippides, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    When niching or speciation is required to perform a task that has several different component parts, standard genetic algorithms (GAs) struggle. They tend to evaluate and select all individuals on the same part of the task, which leads to genetic convergence within the population. The goal of evolutionary niching methods is to enforce diversity in the population so that this genetic convergence is avoided. One drawback with some of these niching methods is that they require a priori knowledge or assumptions about the specific fitness landscape in order to work; another is that many such methods are not set up to work on cooperative tasks where fitness is only relevant at the group level. Here we address these problems by presenting the group GA, described earlier by the authors, which is a group-based evolutionary algorithm that can lead to emergent niching. After demonstrating the group GA on an immune system matching task, we extend the previous work and present two modified versions where the number of niches does not need to be specified ahead of time. In the random-group-size GA, the number of niches is varied randomly during evolution, and in the evolved-group-size GA the number of niches is optimized by evolution. This provides a framework in which we can evolve groups of individuals to collectively perform tasks with minimal a priori knowledge of how many subtasks there are or how they should be shared out.

  20. Environmental interactions in space exploration: Environmental interactions working group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolecki, Joseph C.; Hillard, G. Barry

    1992-01-01

    With the advent of the Space Exploration Initiative, the possibility of designing and using systems on scales heretofore unattempted presents exciting new challenges in systems design and space science. The environments addressed by the Space Exploration Initiative include the surfaces of the Moon and Mars, as well as the varied plasma and field environments which will be encountered by humans and cargo enroute to these destinations. Systems designers will need to understand environmental interactions and be able to model these mechanisms from the earliest conceptual design stages through design completion. To the end of understanding environmental interactions and establishing robotic precursor mission requirements, an Environmental Interactions Working Group was established as part of the Robotic Missions Working Group. The working group is described, and its current activities are updated.

  1. 75 FR 66828 - Eleventh Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 214: Working Group 78: Standards for Air Traffic Data...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-29

    ... for Air Traffic Data Communication Services AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of RTCA Special Committee 214: Working Group 78: Standards for Air Traffic Data Communication... Committee 214: Working Group 78: Standards for Air Traffic Data Communication Services. DATES: The...

  2. 76 FR 47237 - Notice of Public Meeting for the Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group Federal Advisory...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-04

    ... Bureau of Reclamation Notice of Public Meeting for the Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group... Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group (AMWG) makes recommendations to the Secretary of the Interior concerning Glen Canyon Dam operations and other management actions to protect resources downstream of...

  3. 76 FR 17473 - Twelfth Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 214: Working Group 78: Standards for Air Traffic Data...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-29

    ... for Air Traffic Data Communication Services AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of RTCA Special Committee 214: Working Group 78: Standards for Air Traffic Data Communication... Committee 214: Working Group 78: Standards for Air Traffic Data Communication Services. DATES: The...

  4. Group Work Tests for Context-Rich Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Chris

    2016-05-01

    The group work test is an assessment strategy that promotes higher-order thinking skills for solving context-rich problems. With this format, teachers are able to pose challenging, nuanced questions on a test, while providing the support weaker students need to get started and show their understanding. The test begins with a group discussion phase, when students are given a "number-free" version of the problem. This phase allows students to digest the story-like problem, explore solution ideas, and alleviate some test anxiety. After 10-15 minutes of discussion, students inform the instructor of their readiness for the individual part of the test. What follows next is a pedagogical phase change from lively group discussion to quiet individual work. The group work test is a natural continuation of the group work in our daily physics classes and helps reinforce the importance of collaboration. This method has met with success at York Mills Collegiate Institute, in Toronto, Ontario, where it has been used consistently for unit tests and the final exam of the grade 12 university preparation physics course.

  5. Waste forms, packages, and seals working group summary

    SciTech Connect

    Sridhar, N.; McNeil, M.B.

    1995-09-01

    This article is a summary of the proceedings of a group discussion which took place at the Workshop on the Role of Natural Analogs in Geologic Disposal of High-Level Nuclear Waste in San Antonio, Texas on July 22-25, 1991. The working group concentrated on the subject of radioactive waste forms and packaging. Also included is a description of the use of natural analogs in waste packaging, container materials and waste forms.

  6. Introduction of the UNIX International Performance Management Work Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Henry

    1993-01-01

    In this paper we presented the planned direction of the UNIX International Performance Management Work Group. This group consists of concerned system developers and users who have organized to synthesize recommendations for standard UNIX performance management subsystem interfaces and architectures. The purpose of these recommendations is to provide a core set of performance management functions and these functions can be used to build tools by hardware system developers, vertical application software developers, and performance application software developers.

  7. Forming a Turbomachinery Seals Working Group - An Overview and Discussion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, Margaret P.

    2007-01-01

    A proposal to form a Turbomachinery Seals Working Group is discussed. Survey responses regarding the purpose, membership, and meeting frequency are presented as well as the areas of expertise and experience of the respondents. The types of seals used, designed, or sold, current work, and technical challenges of turbomachinery seals, their materials, analysis, geometry, manufacturing, maintenance, testing, and incorporation into engine systems are also presented.

  8. Advancing Adult Workforce Skills: Opportunities and Requirements for State Action. EQW Working Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, David W.

    State programs offer greatest promise for practical strategic actions to enhance the quality of the nation's adult work force. Three steps in the recursive process that create a model of state action are as follows: (1) documentation of the platform for action, which consists of current adult work force attributes and current institutional…

  9. Action!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Senese, Joseph

    1998-01-01

    A small group of teachers at one Illinois high school is helping to effect and promote change. Through the Action Research Laboratory (ARL), teams of teachers conduct collaborative action research to improve classroom practices. Data from the first two years of the ARL indicate that teachers are eager to participate in, and have thrived in, their…

  10. Social Work as an Action Science: A Perspective from Europe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sommerfeld, Peter

    2014-01-01

    It is a surprising fact that social work is not conceived as a scientific discipline in many countries and especially in the United States. It is surprising because the extent of academic social work programs and the scientific output of people working at schools of social work are significant. And it is surprising anyway if social work is…

  11. Near-field environment/processes working group summary

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, W.M.

    1995-09-01

    This article is a summary of the proceedings of a group discussion which took place at the Workshop on the Role of Natural Analogs in Geologic Disposal of High-Level Nuclear Waste in San Antonio, Texas on July 22-25, 1991. The working group concentrated on the subject of the near-field environment to geologic repositories for high-level nuclear waste. The near-field environment may be affected by thermal perturbations from the waste, and by disturbances caused by the introduction of exotic materials during construction of the repository. This group also discussed the application of modelling of performance-related processes.

  12. International Consultation and Training on Group Work in South Asia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ibrahim, Farah A.

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a consultation and training for faculty and graduate students in South Asia under the auspices of the United Nations' Transfer of Knowledge Through Expatriate Nationals (TOKTEN) Program. It describes the development of a consultation relationship and training on group work. Needs assessments focusing on both cultural…

  13. Summary of beam quality diagnostics and control working group

    SciTech Connect

    Lewellen, John; Piot, Philippe; /Northern Illinois U. /Fermilab

    2006-09-01

    The working group on beam quality, diagnostics, and control at the 12th Advanced Accelerator Concepts Workshop held a series of meetings during the Workshop. The generation of bright charged-particle beams (in particular electron and positron beams), along with state-of-the-art beam diagnostics and synchronization were discussed.

  14. 7 CFR 610.25 - Subcommittees and Local Working Groups.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Subcommittees and Local Working Groups. 610.25 Section 610.25 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CONSERVATION OPERATIONS TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE State...

  15. Investigating the LGBTQ Responsive Model for Supervision of Group Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luke, Melissa; Goodrich, Kristopher M.

    2013-01-01

    This article reports an investigation of the LGBTQ Responsive Model for Supervision of Group Work, a trans-theoretical supervisory framework to address the needs of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning (LGBTQ) persons (Goodrich & Luke, 2011). Findings partially supported applicability of the LGBTQ Responsive Model for Supervision…

  16. 78 FR 36541 - Public Interface Control Working Group (ICWG) Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-18

    ... be hosting a Public Interface Control Working Group (ICWG) meeting for the Navstar GPS public signals... Segment L5 Interfaces), IS-GPS-800 (User Segment L1C Interface), and the Next Generation Operational... signals-in-space documents with respect to the six issues outlined below, and (2) to collect...

  17. Cooperative Work Groups: Preparing Students for the Real World.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mandel, Scott M.

    This book outlines how educators can design meaningful learning experiences that address standards and utilize cooperative learning, brain research, and the Internet to effectively develop a students' ability to thrive in the 21st century workplace. After an introduction that explains cooperative work groups, there are 13 chapters in four parts.…

  18. Affective and Motivational Outcomes of Working in Collaborative Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boekaerts, Monique; Minnaert, Alexander

    2006-01-01

    The Quality of Working in Groups Instrument (QWIGI) was used in this research to measure students' fluctuating psychological need states as well as their situational interest online. Based on previous research with the QWIGI, it was predicted that the variance in university sophomores' situational interest in each of the five different topics of…

  19. Presentation to U.S.-Canada Bilateral Technical Working Group

    EPA Science Inventory

    DHS and EPA have collaborated in the development of a draft charter for Technical Working Group (TWG) to serve as the basis of negotiations of bilateral agreements with other countries. The TWG would provide a mechanism for sharing both response and R&D expertise and experience i...

  20. Effects of Racial Composition on Small Work Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruhe, John; Eatman, John

    1977-01-01

    Evaluates the effect of integration and segregation of Blacks and whites in a small group setting in a work environment. Discriminant analysis suggests that while few behavioral and attitudinal differences exist between Blacks and whites, integration is beneficial to Blacks and not detrimental to whites. (Author)

  1. Time for Review: Supporting the Work of an Advisory Group

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Jill; Parsons, Sarah; Robertson, Christopher

    2006-01-01

    This paper raises methodological issues about the challenges and dilemmas of inclusive research practices reflecting on the work of an advisory group carrying out research on using Information and Communication Technology (ICT) to enhance community participation. The interests of three parties can be identified--the commissioning agent, the…

  2. Planning Self-Managed Work Groups. Features of Self-Managed Work Groups. Results of Using Self-Managed Work Groups. Issues and Implications in Using Self-Managed Work Groups. Status of Ohio Manufacturing Companies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smylie, Patrick E.; Jacobs, Ronald L.

    A study was conducted to describe the present status of self-managed work groups in Ohio manufacturing companies. Data for the study were gathered through lengthy interviews and site visits with 45 manufacturing companies in the state, 24 employing 2,000-14,000 workers and 21 employing 300 to 1,900 workers. The results of the study are presented…

  3. 77 FR 30314 - Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Fish and Wildlife Service Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service... Course Road, Weaverville, CA 96093. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Meeting Information: Nancy J....

  4. An Examination of Socially Destructive Behaviors in Group Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, Lynne; Greenacre, Luke

    2011-01-01

    With the increasing prevalence of group work in marketing courses there is a need to consider the impact of students' social dynamics on both learning and satisfaction outcomes. This article explores one such dynamic at both intra- and intergroup levels. Using data generated from multiple sources, it was identified that students who are actively…

  5. Big Data: Laying the Groundwork. ECAR Working Group Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Almes, Guy T.; Hillegas, Curtis W.; Lance, Timothy; Lynch, Clifford A.; Monaco, Gregory E.; Mundrane, Michael R.; Zottola, Ralph J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper is part of series of the EDUCAUSE Center for Analysis and Research Campus Cyberinfrastructure (ECAR-CCI) Working Group. The topic of big data continues to receive a great deal of publicity because of its promise for opening new avenues of scholarly discovery and commercial opportunity. The ability to sift rapidly through massive amounts…

  6. Summary report for the Microwave Source Working Group

    SciTech Connect

    Westenskow, G.A.

    1997-01-01

    This report summarizes the discussions of the Microwave Source Working Group during the Advanced Accelerator Concepts Workshop held October 13-19, 1996 in the Granlibakken Conference Center at Lake Tahoe, California. Progress on rf sources being developed for linear colliders is reviewed. Possible choices for high-power rf sources at 34 GHz and 94 GHz for future colliders are examined. 27 refs.

  7. National Nutrition Policy: Nutrition and Special Groups. A Working Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quimby, Freeman H.; Chapman, Cynthia B.

    The contents of this working paper comprise a series of journal articles focusing on nutrition and special groups. Papers relating to those on the aged are entitled: Nutrition and Health of Older People, and Nutrition for the Aged--A Summation. Those on the American Indian discuss nutrition intake and food patterns, contemporary dietary patterns,…

  8. Group Work in a Technology-Rich Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penner, Nikolai; Schulze, Mathias

    2010-01-01

    This paper addresses several components of successful language-learning methodologies--group work, task-based instruction, and wireless computer technologies--and examines how the interplay of these three was perceived by students in a second-year university foreign-language course. The technology component of our learning design plays a central…

  9. Prolonged Field Care Working Group Fluid Therapy Recommendations.

    PubMed

    Baker, Benjamin L; Powell, Doug; Riesberg, Jamie; Keenan, Sean

    2016-01-01

    The Prolonged Field Care Working Group concurs that fresh whole blood (FWB) is the fluid of choice for patients in hemorrhagic shock, and the capability to transfuse FWB should be a basic skill set for Special Operations Forces (SOF) Medics. Prolonged field care (PFC) must also address resuscitative and maintenance fluid requirements in nonhemorrhagic conditions. PMID:27045508

  10. Lattice/beam dynamics working group. Summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Syphers, M.

    1994-12-31

    The Lattice/Beam Dynamics Working Group was charged with reviewing and identifying technical issues and their potential solutions for (a) a 2 x 2 TeV high luminosity p-pbar collider, and (b) a 30 x 30 TeV high luminosity pp collider. Rather than attempting to solve very specific problems for these devices in the relatively short time scale of a workshop, the group attempted to look at more general questions to try to indicate in which directions future work in these areas should proceed. The emphasis of the group tended toward lattice issues and general accelerator design issues for the above two cases, with more specific questions being addressed as directed by the needs seen by the Workshop Synthesizers.

  11. Tennessee Valley and Eastern Kentucky Wind Working Group

    SciTech Connect

    Katie Stokes

    2012-05-03

    In December 2009, the Southern Alliance for Clean Energy (SACE), through a partnership with the Appalachian Regional Commission, EKPC, Kentucky's Department for Energy Development and Independence, SACE, Tennessee's Department of Environment and Conservation, and TVA, and through a contract with the Department of Energy, established the Tennessee Valley and Eastern Kentucky Wind Working Group (TVEKWWG). TVEKWWG consists of a strong network of people and organizations. Working together, they provide information to various organizations and stakeholders regarding the responsible development of wind power in the state. Members include representatives from utility interests, state and federal agencies, economic development organizations, non-government organizations, local decision makers, educational institutions, and wind industry representatives. The working group is facilitated by the Southern Alliance for Clean Energy. TVEKWWG supports the Department of Energy by helping educate and inform key stakeholders about wind energy in the state of Tennessee.

  12. GGOS working group on ground networks and communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearlman, M.; Altamimi, Z.; Beck, N.; Forsberg, R.; Gurtner, W.; Kenyon, S.; Behrend, D.; Lemoine, F. G.; Ma, C.; Noll, C. E.; Pavlis, E. C.; Malkin, Z.; Moore, A.; Webb, F. H.; Neilan, R.; Ries, J. C.; Rothacher, M.; Willis, P.

    2005-01-01

    Activities of this Working Group include the investigation of the status quo and the development of a plan for full network integration to support improvements in terrestrial reference frame establishment and maintenance, Earth orientation and gravity field monitoring, precision orbit determination, and other geodetic and gravimetric applications required for the long-term observation of global change. This integration process includes the development of a network of fundamental stations with as many co-located techniques as possible, with precisely determined intersystem vectors. This network would exploit the strengths of each technique and minimize the weaknesses where possible. This paper discusses the organization of the working group, the work done to date, and future tasks.

  13. Engineering students' experiences from physics group work in learning labs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strøm Mellingsæter, Magnus

    2014-01-01

    Background: This paper presents a case study from a physics course at a Norwegian university college, investigating key aspects of a group-work project, so-called learning labs, from the participating students' perspective. Purpose: In order to develop these learning labs further, the students' perspective is important. Which aspects are essential for how the students experience the learning labs, and how do these aspects relate to the emergence of occurrences termed joint workspace, i.e. the maintenance of content-related dialogues within the group? Programme description: First year mechanical engineering students attended the learning labs as a compulsory part of the physics course. The student groups were instructed to solve physics problems using the interactive whiteboard and then submit their work as whiteboard files. Sample: One group of five male students was followed during their work in these learning labs through one term. Design and methods: Data were collected as video recordings and fieldwork observation. In this paper, a focus group interview with the students was the main source of analysis. The interpretations of the interview data were compared with the video material and the fieldwork observations. Results: The results show that the students' overall experience with the learning labs was positive. They did, however, point to internal aspects of conflicting common and personal goals, which led to a group-work dynamics that seemed to inhibit elaborate discussions and collaboration. The students also pointed to external aspects, such as a close temporal proximity between lectures and exercises, which also seemed to inhibit occurrences termed joint workspace. Conclusions: In order to increase the likelihood of a joint workspace throughout the term in the learning labs, careful considerations have to be made with regard to timing between lectures and exercises, but also with regard to raising the students' awareness about shared and personal goals.

  14. Clean energy for development investment framework: the World Bank Group action plan

    SciTech Connect

    2007-03-06

    In September 2005 the Development Committee requested the World Bank to develop an Investment Framework for Clean Energy and Development - in the context of the Gleneagles Communique on Climate Change, Clean Energy and Sustainable Development which was issued in July 2005. This Action Plan provides an update of work undertaken to date as well as actions planned by the World Bank Group (WBG) in support of the Clean Energy for Development Investment Framework (CEIF). The Action Plan relies on partnerships, including with the International Financial Institutions (IFIs) and the private sector. While it concentrates on maximizing and extending existing instruments, it provides for continued dialogue with governments and the private sector on new approaches to accelerate the transition to a low carbon economy. In addition to increased investments, the private sector has an important role to play in closing the investment gap in many countries. Projects such as Bujagali (Uganda), Nam Theun II (Laos) and China and India Thermal Power Plant Rehabilitation projects are examples of how partnerships with the private sector can work, both on financing but also on enhancing the overall regulatory framework for enhanced partnerships. The report was prepared for the 15 April 2007 Development Committee meeting, a joint committee of the Board of Governors of the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund on the transfer of real resources to developing countries. 3 figs., 3 tabs., 5 annexes.

  15. Creativity, Group Pedagogy and Social Action: A Departure from Gough

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, James; Cook, Ian; Griffiths, Helen

    2008-01-01

    The following paper continues discussions within this journal about how the work of Delueze and Guattari can inform radical pedagogy. Building primarily on Noel Gough's 2004 paper, we take up the challenge to move towards a more creative form of "becoming cyborg" in our teaching. In contrast to work that has focused on Deleuzian theories of the…

  16. "I Hate Group Work!": Addressing Students' Concerns about Small-Group Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allan, Elizabeth G.

    2016-01-01

    This article identifies the strategies used by architecture professors and their undergraduate students to mitigate common issues that students raise about group work. Based on participant-observation, interviews with students and faculty, and analysis of instructional materials and student work, this IRB-approved ethnographic case study…

  17. Implementation of Pair Work and Group Work for Creation of Interaction Opportunities for Learners in Large Classes: The Viability of the Two Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Otienoh, Ruth O.

    2015-01-01

    This paper is based on an action research carried out in two Kenyan Primary schools in Nairobi. The purpose was to implement group work and pair work to improve teaching and learning in large classes by creating interaction opportunities for learners. This was a mixed method study of dominant/less dominant design where interviews and structured…

  18. Scientific working group on gunshot residue (SWGGSR): a progress report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trimpe, Michael A.

    2011-06-01

    The Scientific Working Group on Gunshot Residue (SWGGSR) was founded in 2007. Twenty-four experienced and well-recognized scientists throughout the world are working toward internationally accepted guidelines in the analysis of gunshot residue. With this goal in mind the group has set up specific committees to cogitate and develop recommendations in key areas of gunshot residue analysis. The SWGGSR meets annually and is in constant contact throughout the year via email. In 2007 SWGGSR assumed responsibility for updating ASTM E-1588 the Standard Guide for Gunshot Residue Analysis by Scanning Electron Microscopy/ Energy Dispersive Xray Spectrometry. In 2010 a revised E-1588 was published. The SWGGSR is currently working on a more comprehensive guide that will be published through NIJ (National Institute of Justice) and available for free to everyone in the world. In addition, we have attended meetings hosted by the federal government's SoFs (Subcommittee on Forensic Science) IWG (Interagency Working Groups) to insure our input on the future of forensic science in the Untied States.

  19. Insights into Action: Successful School Leaders Share What Works

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sterrett, William L.

    2011-01-01

    What does it take to be a great school leader? An award-winning former principal poses this question to renowned school leaders and experts in the field to provide you with insight into the actions that lead to success. These giants in the field of educational leadership--including Baruti Kafele, Rick DuFour, Carol Ann Tomlinson, and James…

  20. Skills for Action. What Works Clearinghouse Intervention Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2006

    2006-01-01

    "Skills for Action," a program to build positive character values and life and citizenship skills for students in grades 9-12, includes classroom lessons and service learning. The program, with more than 100 lessons focused around 26 personal, social, and thinking skills, ranges from one semester to four years in length. Students explore personal…

  1. China Earthquake Relief: Participatory Action Work with Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeng, Emily Jie; Silverstein, Louise Bordeaux

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a community-focused participatory action project designed to promote children's resilience in the early aftermath of the cataclysmic May 2008 Earthquake in Beichuan, China. Thirty children aged 7- to 15-years-old participated in the project. The project encompassed four phases that evolved from adult-directed/initiated…

  2. Summary Report of Working Group 4: Plasma Wakefield Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenzweig, J.B.; Seryi, A.; /SLAC

    2012-06-11

    This report gives a guide to the discussions of Working Group 4 of the 2010 Advanced Accelerator Concepts Workshop, which was devoted to theory, simulation and experimental issues associated with plasma wakefield acceleration (PWFA). Sessions were organized thematically in this group, concentrating on broad issues of: exploitation of future facilities such as FACET; pushing the accelerating gradient beyond the current frontier, to over a TeV/m; use of positively charged beams to drive plasma wakes; resonant excitation of the PWFA with pulse trains; beam-plasma instabilities; and injection and capture of electron beams into PWFA systems.

  3. Summary Report of Working Group 4: Plasma Wakefield Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenzweig, J. B.; Seryi, A.

    2010-11-04

    This report gives a guide to the discussions of Working Group 4 of the 2010 Advanced Accelerator Concepts Workshop, which was devoted to theory, simulation and experimental issues associated with plasma wakefield acceleration (PWFA). Sessions were organized thematically in this group, concentrating on broad issues of: exploitation of future facilities such as FACET; pushing the accelerating gradient beyond the current frontier, to over a TeV/m; use of positively charged beams to drive plasma wakes; resonant excitation of the PWFA with pulse trains; beam-plasma instabilities; and injection and capture of electron beams into PWFA systems.

  4. PROLIFERATION RESISTANCE AND PHYSICAL PROTECTION WORKING GROUP: METHODOLOGY AND APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Bari R. A.; Whitlock, J.; Therios, I.U.; Peterson, P.F.

    2012-11-14

    We summarize the technical progress and accomplishments on the evaluation methodology for proliferation resistance and physical protection (PR and PP) of Generation IV nuclear energy systems. We intend the results of the evaluations performed with the methodology for three types of users: system designers, program policy makers, and external stakeholders. The PR and PP Working Group developed the methodology through a series of demonstration and case studies. Over the past few years various national and international groups have applied the methodology to nuclear energy system designs as well as to developing approaches to advanced safeguards.

  5. Local Entropy, Metric Entropy and Topological Entropy for Countable Discrete Amenable Group Actions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Xiankun; Sun, Wenxiang

    2016-06-01

    Let X be a compact metric space and G a countable infinite discrete amenable group acting on X. Like in the ℤ-action cases we define the notion of local entropy and by it we bound the difference between metric entropy and that of a partition, and bound the difference between topological entropy and that of a separated set, which generalize Theorems 1(1) and 1(2) in [Newhouse, 1989] from ℤ-actions to amenable group actions. We further prove that the entropy function hμ(G) is upper semi-continuous on ℳ(X,G) for an asymptotic entropy expansive amenable group action.

  6. Explaining radical group behavior: Developing emotion and efficacy routes to normative and nonnormative collective action.

    PubMed

    Tausch, Nicole; Becker, Julia C; Spears, Russell; Christ, Oliver; Saab, Rim; Singh, Purnima; Siddiqui, Roomana N

    2011-07-01

    A recent model of collective action distinguishes 2 distinct pathways: an emotional pathway whereby anger in response to injustice motivates action and an efficacy pathway where the belief that issues can be solved collectively increases the likelihood that group members take action (van Zomeren, Spears, Fischer, & Leach, 2004). Research supporting this model has, however, focused entirely on relatively normative actions such as participating in demonstrations. We argue that the relations between emotions, efficacy, and action differ for more extreme, nonnormative actions and propose (a) that nonnormative actions are often driven by a sense of low efficacy and (b) that contempt, which, unlike anger, entails psychological distancing and a lack of reconciliatory intentions, predicts nonnormative action. These ideas were tested in 3 survey studies examining student protests against tuition fees in Germany (N = 332), Indian Muslims' action support in relation to ingroup disadvantage (N = 156), and British Muslims' responses to British foreign policy (N = 466). Results were generally supportive of predictions and indicated that (a) anger was strongly related to normative action but overall unrelated or less strongly related to nonnormative action, (b) contempt was either unrelated or negatively related to normative action but significantly positively predicted nonnormative action, and (c) efficacy was positively related to normative action and negatively related to nonnormative action. The implications of these findings for understanding and dealing with extreme intergroup phenomena such as terrorism are discussed. PMID:21500925

  7. Summary of Working Group 1: Laser Plasma Wakefield Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Krushelnick, Karl; Kaganovich, Dmitri; Gonsalves, Anthony

    2009-01-22

    There have been many significant experimental and theoretical advances recently with regard to the production of relativistic electron beams using laser wakefield accelerators (LWFA) driven by high power short pulse lasers. In particular, there has been an explosion of interest in this field following the discovery of methods to generate such beams with low energy spread. In recent work by many groups around the world the energy and quality of these beams has been improved and a more complete understanding of the 'bubble' regime of electron acceleration has been obtained, enabling a significant improvement in the output electron beam stability. The 2008 Advanced Accelerator Concepts workshop in Santa Cruz CA brought together the leading groups engaged in this research from around the world. This paper will summarize the major results presented at the conference. Further details on the work described here can be found in the other related papers in these proceedings.

  8. Summary of Sessions: Ionosphere - Thermosphere - Mesosphere Working Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spann, J. F.; Bhattacharyya, A.

    2006-01-01

    The topics covered by the sessions under the working group on Ionosphere-Thermosphere-Mesosphere dealt with various aspects of the response of the ionosphere-thermosphere coupled system and the middle atmosphere to solar variability. There were four plenary talks related to the theme of this working group, thirteen oral presentations in three sessions and six poster presentations. A number of issues related to effects of solar variability on the ionosphere-thermosphere, observed using satellite and ground-based data including ground magnetometer observations, radio beacon studies of equatorial spread F, and modeling of some of these effects, were discussed. Radar observations of the mesosphere-lower thermosphere region and a future mission to study the coupling of thunderstorm processes to this region, the ionosphere, and magnetosphere were also presented.

  9. Executive committee report: geotechnical instrumentation working group meeting

    SciTech Connect

    Wilder, D.G.; Rogue, F.; Beloff, W.R.; Binnall, E.; Gregory, E.C.

    1982-04-26

    Responding to the widespread need for the geotechnical community to discuss instrumentation for nuclear waste repositories, a meeting was held December 2 and 3, 1981, in Denver, Colorado. This report gives the group's consensus recommendations to aid in making decisions for development of instrumentation for future repository work. The main conclusions of the working group meeting were as follows: (1) monitoring of geotechnical parameters in nuclear waste repositories will be necessary to meet licensing requirements; (2) currently available instruments are underdeveloped for this monitoring; (3) research and development to provide adequate instrumentation will need to be performed under federal sponsorship by national laboratories, universities, contractors, and consultants; and (4) a NASA-type reliability program is needed to meet the quality assurance, durability, calibration, and time schedule demands of geotechnical instrumentation development. This will require significant financial commitments from the federal sector.

  10. Preregistration and post graduate practice training period. FDI Working Group.

    PubMed

    1995-04-01

    Working Group 14 has had formal meetings at FDI Congresses in Milan 1991, Berlin 1992 and Göteborg 1993 and this report was approved by the Commission at the Vancouver FDI World Dental Congress in 1994. At all stages the subject has attracted great interest and working group meetings have been well attended. The agreed terms of reference were: To collect information on practice training systems. To prepare an analytical report to assist those countries that would like to introduce a practice training period. During the early meetings it was quickly realised that no single system could be identified as the desirable global model and that an illustration of some systems currently operating would assist FDI member countries contemplating the commencement of a practice training scheme. To this extent the terms of reference have been fulfilled. This descriptive report makes no attempt to be definitive and there are, of necessity, some anecdotal elements within it. PMID:7558352

  11. IYA2009USA: Cultural Astronomy and Storytelling Working Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holbrook, Jarita; IYA2009

    2009-01-01

    Cultural astronomy focuses on human's relationship with the sky using the disciplinary tools of anthropology, archeology, folklore, history, and folklore - not all at the same time. The USA is one of the few nations that include cultural astronomy and storytelling under its International Year of Astronomy 2009 (IYA2009) activities. The working group focuses on indigenous sky knowledge; celestial stories, activities to explore the links between astronomy and culture; and on astronomers: their achievements and their academic culture. This presentation is an overview of the IYA2009USA Cultural Astronomy and Storytelling working group. Included will be our website, our goals, our projects, our outreach and dissemination strategies, and how we uniquely contribute to IYA2009.

  12. Report from the dosimetry working group to CEDR project management

    SciTech Connect

    Fix, J J

    1994-08-01

    On August 2, 1989, Admiral Watkins, Secretary of the US Department of Energy (DOE), presented a four-point program designed to enhance the DOE epidemiology program. One part of this program was the establishment of a Comprehensive Epidemiologic Data Resource (CEDR) to facilitate independent research to validate and supplement DOE research on human health effects. A Dosimetry Working Group was formed during May 1991 to evaluate radiation dose variables and associated documentation that would be most useful to researchers for retrospective and prospective studies. The Working Group consisted of thirteen individuals with expertise and experience in health physics, epidemiology, dosimetry, computing, and industrial hygiene. A final report was delivered to CEDR Project Management during February 1992. The report contains a number of major recommendations concerning collection, interpretation, and documentation of dosimetry data to maximize their usefulness to researchers using CEDR for examining possible health effects of occupational exposure to ionizing radiation.

  13. Orbit structure of Hamiltonian systems arising from Lie transformation group actions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garzia, M. R.; Loparo, K. A.; Martin, C. F.

    1983-01-01

    This paper associates the Riccati group and its group action on linear-quadratic optimal control problems to the action of a Lie transformation group on a set of Hamiltonian matrices. In this Lie theoretic setting results are presented concerning the associated orbit structure and the structure of the group itself. These results are of importance in understanding the solution structure of matrix Riccati differential equations, and thus also of importance in linear-quadratic optimal control.

  14. Summary of “Future of DIS” Working Group Session

    SciTech Connect

    Lamont M.; Guzey, V.; Polini, A.

    2011-04-11

    Despite the closure of the HERA accelerator in the past few years, much physics still remains to be understood, from the quark and gluon content of the nucleon/nucleus across all x to the still unknown spin structure of the proton. The 'Future of DIS' working group was dedicated to discussions on these and many other subjects. This paper represents a brief overview of the discussions. For further details, please refer to individual contributions.

  15. Summary: Working Group on QCD and Strong Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Edmond L. Berger et al.

    2002-12-23

    In this summary of the considerations of the QCD working group at Snowmass 2001, the roles of quantum chromodynamics in the Standard Model and in the search for new physics are reviewed, with empahsis on frontier areas in the field. We discuss the importance of, and prospects for, precision QCD in perturbative and lattice calculations. We describe new ideas in the analysis of parton distribution functions and jet structure, and review progress in small-x and in polarization experiments.

  16. NASA MEVTV Program Working Group Meeting: Volcanism on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this working group meeting is to focus predominantly on volcanism on Mars, prior to considering the more complex issues of interactions between volcanism and tectonism or between volcanism and global or regional volatile evolution. It is also hoped that the topical areas of research identified will aid the planetary geology community in understanding volcanism on Mars and its relationship to other physical processes.

  17. Combustion Dynamics Facility: April 1990 workshop working group reports

    SciTech Connect

    Kung, A.H.; Lee, Y.T.

    1990-04-01

    This document summarizes results from a workshop held April 5--7, 1990, on the proposed Combustion Dynamics Facility (CDF). The workshop was hosted by the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) to provide an opportunity for potential users to learn about the proposed experimental and computational facilities, to discuss the science that could be conducted with such facilities, and to offer suggestions as to how the specifications and design of the proposed facilities might be further refined to address the most visionary scientific opportunities. Some 130 chemical physicists, combustion chemists, and specialists in UV synchrotron radiation sources and free-electron lasers (more than half of whom were from institutions other than LBL and SNL) attended the five plenary sessions and participated in one or more of the nine parallel working group sessions. Seven of these sessions were devoted to broadening and strengthening the scope of CDF scientific opportunities and to detail the experimental facilities required to realize these opportunities. Two technical working group sessions addressed the design and proposed performance of two of the major CDF experimental facilities. These working groups and their chairpersons are listed below. A full listing of the attendees of the workshop is given in Appendix A. 1 tab.

  18. Conceptual change strategies and cooperative group work in chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basili, Patricia A.; Sanford, Julie P.

    This study conducted at a suburban community college tested a method of conceptual change in which treatment students worked in small cooperative groups on tasks aimed at eliciting their misconceptions so that they could then be discussed in contrast to the scientific conceptions that had been taught in direct instruction. Categorizations of student understanding of the target concepts of the laws of conservation of matter and energy and aspects of the particulate nature of gases, liquids, and solids were ascertained by pre- and posttesting. Audiotapes of student verbal interaction in the small groups provided quantitative and qualitative data concerning student engagement in behaviors suggestive of the conditions posited to be part of the conceptual change process (Posner, Strike, Hewson & Gertzog, 1982). Chi-square analysis of posttests indicated that students in treatment groups had significantly lower (p < 0.05) proportion of misconceptions than control students on four of the five target concepts. Students who exhibited no change in concept state had a higher frequency of verbal behaviors suggestive of impeding conceptual change when compared to students who did change. Three factors emerged from qualitative analysis of group interaction that appeared to influence learning: (a) many students had flawed understanding of concepts that supported the target concepts; (b) student views towards learning science affected their engagement in assigned tasks, (c) good and poor group leaders had a strong influence on group success.

  19. Summary of the particle physics and technology working group

    SciTech Connect

    Stephan Lammel et al.

    2002-12-10

    Progress in particle physics has been tightly related to technological advances during the past half century. Progress in technologies has been driven in many cases by the needs of particle physics. Often, these advances have benefited fields beyond particle physics: other scientific fields, medicine, industrial development, and even found commercial applications. The particle physics and technology working group of Snowmass 2001 reviewed leading-edge technologies recently developed or in the need of development for particle physics. The group has identified key areas where technological advances are vital for progress in the field, areas of opportunities where particle physics may play a principle role in fostering progress, and areas where advances in other fields may directly benefit particle physics. The group has also surveyed the technologies specifically developed or enhanced by research in particle physics that benefit other fields and/or society at large.

  20. Improving tsunami resiliency: California's Tsunami Policy Working Group

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Real, Charles R.; Johnson, Laurie; Jones, Lucile M.; Ross, Stephanie; Kontar, Y.A.; Santiago-Fandiño, V.; Takahashi, T.

    2014-01-01

    California has established a Tsunami Policy Working Group to facilitate development of policy recommendations for tsunami hazard mitigation. The Tsunami Policy Working Group brings together government and industry specialists from diverse fields including tsunami, seismic, and flood hazards, local and regional planning, structural engineering, natural hazard policy, and coastal engineering. The group is acting on findings from two parallel efforts: The USGS SAFRR Tsunami Scenario project, a comprehensive impact analysis of a large credible tsunami originating from an M 9.1 earthquake in the Aleutian Islands Subduction Zone striking California’s coastline, and the State’s Tsunami Preparedness and Hazard Mitigation Program. The unique dual-track approach provides a comprehensive assessment of vulnerability and risk within which the policy group can identify gaps and issues in current tsunami hazard mitigation and risk reduction, make recommendations that will help eliminate these impediments, and provide advice that will assist development and implementation of effective tsunami hazard risk communication products to improve community resiliency.

  1. Enhancing the Effectiveness of Work Groups and Teams.

    PubMed

    Kozlowski, Steve W J; Ilgen, Daniel R

    2006-12-01

    Teams of people working together for a common purpose have been a centerpiece of human social organization ever since our ancient ancestors first banded together to hunt game, raise families, and defend their communities. Human history is largely a story of people working together in groups to explore, achieve, and conquer. Yet, the modern concept of work in large organizations that developed in the late 19th and early 20th centuries is largely a tale of work as a collection of individual jobs. A variety of global forces unfolding over the last two decades, however, has pushed organizations worldwide to restructure work around teams, to enable more rapid, flexible, and adaptive responses to the unexpected. This shift in the structure of work has made team effectiveness a salient organizational concern. Teams touch our lives everyday and their effectiveness is important to well-being across a wide range of societal functions. There is over 50 years of psychological research-literally thousands of studies-focused on understanding and influencing the processes that underlie team effectiveness. Our goal in this monograph is to sift through this voluminous literature to identify what we know, what we think we know, and what we need to know to improve the effectiveness of work groups and teams. We begin by defining team effectiveness and establishing the conceptual underpinnings of our approach to understanding it. We then turn to our review, which concentrates primarily on topics that have well-developed theoretical and empirical foundations, to ensure that our conclusions and recommendations are on firm footing. Our review begins by focusing on cognitive, motivational/affective, and behavioral team processes-processes that enable team members to combine their resources to resolve task demands and, in so doing, be effective. We then turn our attention to identifying interventions, or "levers," that can shape or align team processes and thereby provide tools and

  2. Ready for Work. Advocates Series. Action Brief No.2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forum for Youth Investment, 2006

    2006-01-01

    In the past, much attention has been paid to the leaks in the "education pipeline", but now employers, youth and communities are focusing on repairing the "work pipeline" to ensure that young people are ready for work by age 21. This issue brief is the second in a series developed by the Forum for Youth Investment, Connect for Kids, Voices for…

  3. Learning through Working Life: Self and Individuals' Agentic Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Billett, Stephen; Pavlova, Margarita

    2005-01-01

    An individuals' capacity to be effective throughout their working life is now claimed to be necessary to sustain individual, local and national well-being. Yet without knowing more about an individual's motivations to continually learn throughout their working life, it remains uncertain how realistic these expectations are. This paper examines the…

  4. The scaup conservation action plan: working toward coherence

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Austin, Jane E.

    2010-01-01

    The last in a series of three workshops to develop a decision framework for the scaup conservation action plan was conducted in September 2009. Fifteen waterfowl biologists and managers met in Memphis, Tennessee at the Ducks Unlimited Headquarters to review and refine the decision statement, objectives, and prototype model for the continental scaup population, with a special focus on vital rate parameters that are affected during migration and winter. In a significant step toward coherence, the participants also developed models for incorporating human dimensions – hunters – into the decision framework, and to link the population of diving duck hunters with the continental scaup population.

  5. Family Group Conferences and Cultural Competence in Social Work

    PubMed Central

    Barn, Ravinder; Das, Chaitali

    2016-01-01

    Family Group Conferences (FGCs) as a method of preventive work came into being over two decades ago. The FGC approach arose from a minority cultural perspective and the rising numbers of Maori children in state care in New Zealand. Two decades after the Family Rights Group first championed FGC in the UK, it is a great concern that we know little or nothing about how such an approach is being utilised with culturally diverse families in the UK. This paper draws upon an empirical study carried out in London to ascertain the views and experiences of social and community work FGC coordinators and managers, located in statutory and non-government organisations, who employed the FGC approach with culturally diverse families. Findings from this study are discussed in the context of extant research literature into the nature and extent of involvement of black and minority ethnic (BME) families with child welfare services across the globe. Moreover, given the inherent emphasis on the foundational ‘cultural framework’ of the FGC approach, the paper makes an important contribution to the literature on cultural competence within social work through the practice of FGC. PMID:27559207

  6. Affirmative Action in Education: Evidence From Engineering College Admissions in India. NBER Working Paper No. 13926

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bertrand, Marianne; Hanna, Rema; Mullainathan, Sendhil

    2008-01-01

    Many countries mandate affirmative action in university admissions for traditionally disadvantaged groups. Little is known about either the efficacy or costs of these programs. This paper examines affirmative action in engineering colleges in India for "lower-caste" groups. We find that it successfully targets the financially disadvantaged: the…

  7. Introducing the AAS Working Group on Astroinformatics and Astrostatistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivezic, Zeljko

    2014-01-01

    In response to two White Papers submitted to the Astro2010 Decadal Survey (1,2), a new AAS Working Group on Astroinformatics and Astrostatistics (WGAA) has been approved by the AAS Council at the 220th Meeting, June 2012, in Anchorage. The motivation for this WG is the growing importance of the interface between astronomy and various branches of applied mathematics, computer science and the emerging field of data science. With the new data-intensive projects envisioned for the coming decade, the need for advice derived from the focused attention of a group of AAS members who work in these areas is bound to increase. The Working Group is charged with spreading awareness of rapidly advancing computational techniques, sophsticated statistical methods, and highly capble software to further the goals of astronomical and astrophysical research. The three main strategic goals adopted by the WGAA Steering Committee for the next few years are to: (i) develop, organize and maintain methodological resources (such as software tools, papers, books, and lectures); (ii) enhance human resources (such as foster the creation of career paths, establish a Speakers' Bureau, establish and maintain an archived discussion forum, enable periodic news distribution); and (iii) organize topical meetings. The WGAA Steering Committee at this time includes twelve members: Kirk Borne, George Djorgovski, Eric Feigelson, Eric Ford, Alyssa Goodman, Joe Hilbe, Zeljko Ivezic (chair), Ashish Mahabal, Aneta Siemiginowska, Alex Szalay, Rick White, and Padma Yanamandra-Fisher. I will summarize our accomplishments since July 2012. (1) Astroinformatics: A 21st Century Approach to Astronomy (Borne & 90 coauthors), (2) The Astronomical Information Sciences: A Keystone for 21st-Century Astronomy (Loredo & 72 coauthors)

  8. Working group report on hadrons in the nuclear medium

    SciTech Connect

    Ent, R.; Milner, R.G.

    1994-04-01

    This working group focussed on the subject of hadrons in the nuclear medium. It encompassed both the understanding of the nucleus itself in terms of its binding and its structure, and the use of the nucleus as a medium to probe QCD and the structure of hadrons. Both aspects were addressed during the workshop, though the emphasis tended towards the latter. Almost inescapably this working group had some overlap with the other working groups, as the nucleus can also be used as a medium to probe the production and structure of vector mesons. Also, inclusive and semi-inclusive processes can be used as a probe of nuclear effects, for instance in the case of deep-inelastic scattering for x > 1. In this summary report the authors will try to restrict themselves to only those issues where the nuclear medium is important. To increase their understanding of the nucleus in terms of its binding and structure, they would like to know the effect of a dense nuclear medium on a nucleon, to know the non-nucleonic degrees of freedom needed to describe a nuclear system, and to understand the implications of the fact that a bound nucleon is necessarily off its mass-shell. The results of many lepton scattering experiments during the last two decades have raised these questions, but at this moment there are no definitive answers. The hope is that the well-known electron probe, with sufficient energy to probe the short-range properties of nuclei, can provide insight. Especially, the authors would like a conclusive answer to the question if, and to what extent, quark degrees of freedom are necessary to describe a nuclear system.

  9. Treatment optimization in MS: Canadian MS Working Group updated recommendations.

    PubMed

    Freedman, Mark S; Selchen, Daniel; Arnold, Douglas L; Prat, Alexandre; Banwell, Brenda; Yeung, Michael; Morgenthau, David; Lapierre, Yves

    2013-05-01

    The Canadian Multiple Sclerosis Working Group (CMSWG) developed practical recommendations in 2004 to assist clinicians in optimizing the use of disease-modifying therapies (DMT) in patients with relapsing multiple sclerosis. The CMSWG convened to review how disease activity is assessed, propose a more current approach for assessing suboptimal response, and to suggest a scheme for switching or escalating treatment. Practical criteria for relapses, Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) progression and MRI were developed to classify the clinical level of concern as Low, Medium and High. The group concluded that a change in treatment may be considered in any RRMS patient if there is a high level of concern in any one domain (relapses, progression or MRI), a medium level of concern in any two domains, or a low level of concern in all three domains. These recommendations for assessing treatment response should assist clinicians in making more rational choices in their management of relapsing MS patients. PMID:23603165

  10. Tevatron-for-LHC Report of the QCD Working Group

    SciTech Connect

    Albrow, Michael G.; Begel, M.; Bourilkov, D.; Campanelli, M.; Chlebana, F.; De Roeck, A.; Dittmann, J.R.; Ellis, S.D.; Field, B.; Field, R.; Gallinaro, M.; /Fermilab /Rochester U. /Florida U. /Geneva U. /CERN /Baylor U. /Washington U., Seattle /Florida State U. /Rockefeller U. /Prague, Tech. U. /Michigan State U.

    2006-10-01

    The experiments at Run 2 of the Tevatron have each accumulated over 1 fb{sup -1} of high-transverse momentum data. Such a dataset allows for the first precision (i.e. comparisons between theory and experiment at the few percent level) tests of QCD at a hadron collider. While the Large Hadron Collider has been designed as a discovery machine, basic QCD analyses will still need to be performed to understand the working environment. The Tevatron-for-LHC workshop was conceived as a communication link to pass on the expertise of the Tevatron and to test new analysis ideas coming from the LHC community. The TeV4LHC QCD Working Group focused on important aspects of QCD at hadron colliders: jet definitions, extraction and use of Parton Distribution Functions, the underlying event, Monte Carlo tunes, and diffractive physics. This report summarizes some of the results achieved during this workshop.

  11. Work group design in pharmacy: the pharmacist-technician team.

    PubMed

    Kershaw, B P; Solomon, D K; Zarowitz, B J

    1987-05-01

    The contemporary pharmacy practice manager faces the challenge of designing pharmacy service programs that not only satisfy the needs of the patient, but at the same time satisfy and motivate the pharmacists and technicians who sustain the programs. This research examined the team design, which has been recommended but not fully described in the literature. This application did not explore the full potential of the team design in the hospital pharmacy setting. More study is needed in this area to assess the impact of work group design on the expansion of clinical programs, employee turnover rates, quality and quantity of work produced, and, most important, the impact on job satisfaction enjoyed by pharmacists and technicians. PMID:10314224

  12. The AAS Working Group on Accessibility and Disability (WGAD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monkiewicz, Jacqueline A.; Shanahan, J.; Murphy, Nicholas Arnold; Gilbert, Lauren

    2016-06-01

    The Working Group on Accessibility and Disability (WGAD) was formed by the Council of the American Astronomical Society in late 2015 in order to monitor and addresses issues of inclusivity in the astronomical community related to disability. WGAD promotes of the principles of universal accessibility and disability justice in both professional astronomy and astronomy education. The short term goals of WGAD for the next two years include producing a set of guidelines for a wide range of activities including supporting improved access to journals, data, and conferences. We will provide information and training regarding universal design as a guiding principle. The longer term goals of WGAD include integrating universal design as primary design strategy across the board in our many aspects of daily work life.

  13. Summary Report of Working Group 1: Laser-Plasma Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Geddes, C. G. R.; Clayton, C.; Lu, W.; Thomas, A. G. R.

    2010-11-04

    Advances in and physics of the acceleration of particles using underdense plasma structures driven by lasers were the topics of presentations and discussions in Working Group 1 of the 2010 Advanced Accelerator Concepts Workshop. Such accelerators have demonstrated gradients several orders beyond conventional machines, with quasi-monoenergetic beams at MeV-GeV energies, making them attractive candidates for next generation accelerators. Workshop discussions included advances in control over injection and laser propagation to further improve beam quality and stability, detailed diagnostics and physics models of the acceleration process, radiation generation as a source and diagnostic, and technological tools and upcoming facilities to extend the reach of laser-plasma accelerators.

  14. Summary Report of Working Group 1: Laser-Plasma Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Geddes, C.G.R.; Clayton, C.; Lu, W.; Thomas, A.G.R.

    2010-06-01

    Advances in and physics of the acceleration of particles using underdense plasma structures driven by lasers were the topics of presentations and discussions in Working Group 1 of the 2010 Advanced Accelerator Concepts Workshop. Such accelerators have demonstrated gradients several orders beyond conventional machines, with quasi-monoenergetic beams at MeV-GeV energies, making them attractive candidates for next generation accelerators. Workshop discussions included advances in control over injection and laser propagation to further improve beam quality and stability, detailed diagnostics and physics models of the acceleration process, radiation generation as a source and diagnostic, and technological tools and upcoming facilities to extend the reach of laser-plasma accelerators.

  15. Working Group 5: Measurements technology and active experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whipple, E.; Barfield, J. N.; Faelthammar, C.-G.; Feynman, J.; Quinn, J. N.; Roberts, W.; Stone, N.; Taylor, W. L.

    1986-01-01

    Technology issues identified by working groups 5 are listed. (1) New instruments are needed to upgrade the ability to measure plasma properties in space. (2) Facilities should be developed for conducting a broad range of plasma experiments in space. (3) The ability to predict plasma weather within magnetospheres should be improved and a capability to modify plasma weather developed. (4) Methods of control of plasma spacecraft and spacecraft plasma interference should be upgraded. (5) The space station laboratory facilities should be designed with attention to problems of flexibility to allow for future growth. These issues are discussed.

  16. Summary Report of Working Group 6: Laser-Plasma Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Leemans, Wim P.; Downer, Michael; Siders, Craig

    2006-07-01

    A summary is given of presentations and discussions in theLaser-Plasma Acceleration Working Group at the 2006 Advanced AcceleratorConcepts Workshop. Presentation highlights include: widespreadobservation of quasi-monoenergetic electrons; good agreement betweenmeasured and simulated beam properties; the first demonstration oflaser-plasma acceleration up to 1 GeV; single-shot visualization of laserwakefield structure; new methods for measuring<100 fs electronbunches; and new methods for "machining" laser-plasma acceleratorstructures. Discussion of future direction includes: developing a roadmapfor laser-plasma acceleration beyond 1 GeV; a debate over injection andguiding; benchmarking simulations with improved wake diagnostics;petawatt laser technology for future laser-plasmaaccelerators.

  17. SPARC Groups: A Model for Incorporating Spiritual Psychoeducation into Group Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christmas, Christopher; Van Horn, Stacy M.

    2012-01-01

    The use of spirituality as a resource for clients within the counseling field is growing; however, the primary focus has been on individual therapy. The purpose of this article is to provide counseling practitioners, administrators, and researchers with an approach for incorporating spiritual psychoeducation into group work. The proposed model can…

  18. Considerations of circadian impact for defining 'shift work' in cancer studies: IARC Working Group Report.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Richard G; Hansen, Johnni; Costa, Giovanni; Haus, Erhard; Kauppinen, Timo; Aronson, Kristan J; Castaño-Vinyals, Gemma; Davis, Scott; Frings-Dresen, Monique H W; Fritschi, Lin; Kogevinas, Manolis; Kogi, Kazutaka; Lie, Jenny-Anne; Lowden, Arne; Peplonska, Beata; Pesch, Beate; Pukkala, Eero; Schernhammer, Eva; Travis, Ruth C; Vermeulen, Roel; Zheng, Tongzhang; Cogliano, Vincent; Straif, Kurt

    2011-02-01

    Based on the idea that electric light at night might account for a portion of the high and rising risk of breast cancer worldwide, it was predicted long ago that women working a non-day shift would be at higher risk compared with day-working women. This hypothesis has been extended more recently to prostate cancer. On the basis of limited human evidence and sufficient evidence in experimental animals, in 2007 the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) classified 'shift work that involves circadian disruption' as a probable human carcinogen, group 2A. A limitation of the epidemiological studies carried out to date is in the definition of 'shift work.' IARC convened a workshop in April 2009 to consider how 'shift work' should be assessed and what domains of occupational history need to be quantified for more valid studies of shift work and cancer in the future. The working group identified several major domains of non-day shifts and shift schedules that should be captured in future studies: (1) shift system (start time of shift, number of hours per day, rotating or permanent, speed and direction of a rotating system, regular or irregular); (2) years on a particular non-day shift schedule (and cumulative exposure to the shift system over the subject's working life); and (3) shift intensity (time off between successive work days on the shift schedule). The group also recognised that for further domains to be identified, more research needs to be conducted on the impact of various shift schedules and routines on physiological and circadian rhythms of workers in real-world environments.

  19. [Uterotonic action of extracts from a group of medicinal plants].

    PubMed

    Shipochliev, T

    1981-01-01

    Water extracts (infusions) from a group of medicinal plants were studied in terms of their activity enhancing the uterine tonus in a series of experiments with a preparation of an isolated rabbit and guinea pig uterine horn. In a final extract concentration of 1 to 2 mg crude drug per 1 cm3 the plants ranked in the following descending order with regard to their tonus-raising effect on the uterus: camomile (Matricaria chamomilla L.), potmarigold calendula (Calendula officinalis L.) cockscomb (Celosia cristata L.), plantain (Plantago lanceolata L. et Plantago major L.), symphytum (Symphytum officinale L.), shepherdspurse (Capsella bursa pastoris L.), St.-John's wort (Hypericum perforatum L.). No effect showed the infusions of flax seeds (Linum usitatissimum L.) and bearberry leaves (Arctostaphylos uva-ursi L.). The combined preparation 'Antiinflamin', consisting of a pooled freeze-dried extract from three plants and chemotherapeutic agents produced a good enhancing effect, in the form of 'comprets' for intrauterine application at the rate of one compret per 2500 cm3. PMID:7314446

  20. [Uterotonic action of extracts from a group of medicinal plants].

    PubMed

    Shipochliev, T

    1981-01-01

    Water extracts (infusions) from a group of medicinal plants were studied in terms of their activity enhancing the uterine tonus in a series of experiments with a preparation of an isolated rabbit and guinea pig uterine horn. In a final extract concentration of 1 to 2 mg crude drug per 1 cm3 the plants ranked in the following descending order with regard to their tonus-raising effect on the uterus: camomile (Matricaria chamomilla L.), potmarigold calendula (Calendula officinalis L.) cockscomb (Celosia cristata L.), plantain (Plantago lanceolata L. et Plantago major L.), symphytum (Symphytum officinale L.), shepherdspurse (Capsella bursa pastoris L.), St.-John's wort (Hypericum perforatum L.). No effect showed the infusions of flax seeds (Linum usitatissimum L.) and bearberry leaves (Arctostaphylos uva-ursi L.). The combined preparation 'Antiinflamin', consisting of a pooled freeze-dried extract from three plants and chemotherapeutic agents produced a good enhancing effect, in the form of 'comprets' for intrauterine application at the rate of one compret per 2500 cm3.

  1. Shift work and health: current problems and preventive actions.

    PubMed

    Costa, Giovanni

    2010-12-01

    The paper gives an overview of the problems to be tackled nowadays by occupational health with regards to shift work as well as the main guidelines at organizational and medical levels on how to protect workers' health and well-being. Working time organization is becoming a key factor on account of new technologies, market globalization, economic competition, and extension of social services to general populations, all of which involve more and more people in continuous assistance and control of work processes over the 24 hours in a day. The large increase of epidemiological and clinical studies on this issue document the severity of this risk factor on human health and well being, at both social and psychophysical levels, starting from a disruption of biological circadian rhythms and sleep/wake cycle and ending in several psychosomatic troubles and disorders, likely also including cancer, and extending to impairment of performance efficiency as well as family and social life. Appropriate interventions on the organization of shift schedules according to ergonomic criteria and careful health surveillance and social support for shift workers are important preventive and corrective measures that allow people to keep working without significant health impairment. PMID:22953171

  2. Working with School Systems: Educational Outreach and Action Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wingfield, Marvin; Salam, Shereen

    This guide explains how individuals and American-Arab Anti-Discrimination Committee (ADC) chapters can work with school systems to reduce discrimination against students of Arab background and to educate teachers and other students about the cultures of the Middle East. Arab Americans can make a difference in the school systems by personal…

  3. White Americans' opposition to affirmative action: group interest and the harm to beneficiaries objection.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Laurie T; Garcia, Donna; Crandall, Christian S; Kordys, Justin

    2010-12-01

    We focused on a powerful objection to affirmative action - that affirmative action harms its intended beneficiaries by undermining their self-esteem. We tested whether White Americans would raise the harm to beneficiaries objection particularly when it is in their group interest. When led to believe that affirmative action harmed Whites, participants endorsed the harm to beneficiaries objection more than when led to believe that affirmative action did not harm Whites. Endorsement of a merit-based objection to affirmative action did not differ as a function of the policy's impact on Whites. White Americans used a concern for the intended beneficiaries of affirmative action in a way that seems to further the interest of their own group. PMID:20712918

  4. Gender-heterogeneous working groups produce higher quality science.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Lesley G; Mehtani, Siya; Dozier, Mary E; Rinehart, Janice

    2013-01-01

    Here we present the first empirical evidence to support the hypothesis that a gender-heterogeneous problem-solving team generally produced journal articles perceived to be higher quality by peers than a team comprised of highly-performing individuals of the same gender. Although women were historically underrepresented as principal investigators of working groups, their frequency as PIs at the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis is now comparable to the national frequencies in biology and they are now equally qualified, in terms of their impact on the accumulation of ecological knowledge (as measured by the h-index). While women continue to be underrepresented as working group participants, peer-reviewed publications with gender-heterogeneous authorship teams received 34% more citations than publications produced by gender-uniform authorship teams. This suggests that peers citing these publications perceive publications that also happen to have gender-heterogeneous authorship teams as higher quality than publications with gender uniform authorship teams. Promoting diversity not only promotes representation and fairness but may lead to higher quality science. PMID:24205372

  5. Chemical Safety Vulnerability Working Group report. Volume 3

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    The Chemical Safety Vulnerability (CSV) Working Group was established to identify adverse conditions involving hazardous chemicals at DOE facilities that might result in fires or explosions, release of hazardous chemicals to the environment, or exposure of workers or the public to chemicals. A CSV Review was conducted in 148 facilities at 29 sites. Eight generic vulnerabilities were documented related to: abandoned chemicals and chemical residuals; past chemical spills and ground releases; characterization of legacy chemicals and wastes; disposition of legacy chemicals; storage facilities and conditions; condition of facilities and support systems; unanalyzed and unaddressed hazards; and inventory control and tracking. Weaknesses in five programmatic areas were also identified related to: management commitment and planning; chemical safety management programs; aging facilities that continue to operate; nonoperating facilities awaiting deactivation; and resource allocations. Volume 3 consists of eleven appendices containing the following: Field verification reports for Idaho National Engineering Lab., Rocky Flats Plant, Brookhaven National Lab., Los Alamos National Lab., and Sandia National Laboratories (NM); Mini-visits to small DOE sites; Working Group meeting, June 7--8, 1994; Commendable practices; Related chemical safety initiatives at DOE; Regulatory framework and industry initiatives related to chemical safety; and Chemical inventory data from field self-evaluation reports.

  6. Summary for working group B on long-term stability

    SciTech Connect

    Peggs, S.G.

    1992-12-31

    A total of 36 workshop participants attended at least one session of the Long-Term Stability working group. We avoided turning these sessions into a specialized seminar series by meeting in two subgroups, loosely labeled Analysis and Diffusion & Tracking, so that working discussions among a reasonably small number of people were possible. Nonetheless, no attempt is made to categorize the 13 group B papers according to original subgroup. A similar workshop, the Workshop on Accelerator Orbit and Particle Tracking Problems, was held almost exactly 10 years ago at Brookhaven. It is interesting to see how many of the participants in the photograph of that workshop appear again in the photograph at the front of these proceedings. Fortunately, it is not correct to infer that little progress has been made in the last decade, nor that the average age of the participants has increased significantly. Rather, the recent photograph has many more, younger, faces than its predecessor. This attests to the ongoing interest and vigorous activity in an area of central importance to accelerator physics.

  7. Group Work Experiences: Domestic MBA Student Experiences and Outcomes when Working with International Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rafferty, Patricia D.

    2013-01-01

    This article forms part of an exploration into the results of a single-case, embedded study that was conducted to explore how domestic part-time graduate business students in the United States experience group work for summative assessment. Multiple information collection methods were utilised, including open-ended and semi-structured interviews,…

  8. Review Of The Working Group On Precession And The Ecliptic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilton, J. L.

    2006-08-01

    The IAU Working Group on Precession and the Ecliptic was charged with providing a precession model that was both dynamically consistent and compatible with the IAU 2000A nutation model, along with an updated definition and model for the ecliptic. The report of the working group has been accepted for publication in Celestial Mechanics (Hilton et al. 2006, in press) and has resulted in a recommendation to be considered at this General Assembly of the IAU. Specifically, the working group recommends: 1. That the terms lunisolar precession and planetary precession be replaced by precession of the equator and precession of the ecliptic, respectively. 2. That, beginning on 1 January 2009, the precession component of the IAU 2000A precession-nutation model be replaced by the P03 precession theory, of Capitaine et al. (2003, A&A, 412, 567-586) for the precession of the equator (Eqs. 37) and the precession of the ecliptic (Eqs. 38); the same paper provides the polynomial developments for the P03 primary angles and a number of derived quantities for use in both the equinox based and Celestial Intermediate Origin based paradigms. 3. That the choice of precession parameters be left to the user. 4. That the ecliptic pole should be explicitly defined by the mean orbital angular momentum vector of the Earth-Moon barycenter in an inertial reference frame, and this definition should be explicitly stated to avoid confusion with other, older definitions. consistent and compatible with the IAU 2000A nutation model, along consistent and compatible with the IAU 2000A nutation model, along with an updated definition and model for the ecliptic. The report of the working group has been accepted for publication in Celestial Mechanics (Hilton et al. 2006, in press) and has resulted in a recommendation to be considered at this General Assembly of the IAU. Specifically, the working group recommends, * that the terms lunisolar precession and planetary precession be replaced by precession of the

  9. Report of the IAU Working Group on Solar Eclipses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasachoff, Jay M.

    2015-08-01

    The Working Group on Solar Eclipses coordinates scientists and information in the study of the Sun and the heliosphere at solar eclipses. Our Website at http://eclipses.info has a wide variety of information, including links to maps and other websites dealing with solar eclipses, as well as information on how to observe the partial-phases of solar eclipses safely and why it is interesting for not only scientists but also for the public to observe eclipses and to see how we work to uncover the mysteries of the sun's upper atmosphere. In the last triennium, there were total eclipses in Australia and the Pacific in 2012; in an arc across Africa from Gabon to Uganda and Kenya in 2013; and in the Arctic, including Svalbard and the Faeroes plus many airplanes aloft, in 2015. In the coming triennium, there will be total solar eclipses in Indonesia and the Pacific in 2016 and then, on 21 August 2017, a total solar eclipse that will sweep across the Continental United States from northwest to southeast. Mapping websites, all linked to http://eclipses.info, include Fred Espenak's http://EclipseWise.com; Michael Zeiler's http://GreatAmericanEclipse.com and http://eclipse-maps.com; Xavier Jubier's http://xjubier.free.fr; and (with weather and cloudiness analysis) Jay Anderson's http://eclipser.ca. Members of the Working Group, chaired by Jay Pasachoff (U.S.), include Iraida Kim (Russia), Kiroki Kurokawa (Japan), Jagdev Singh (India), Vojtech Rusin (Slovakia), Zhongquan Qu (China), Fred Espenak (U.S.), Jay Anderson (Canada), Glenn Schneider (U.S.), Michael Gill (U.K.), Xavier Jubier (France), Michael Zeiler (U.S.), and Bill Kramer (U.S.).

  10. Group action planning as a support strategy for Hispanic families: parent and professional perspectives.

    PubMed

    Blue-Banning, M J; Turnbull, A P; Pereira, L

    2000-06-01

    Focus group interviews were conducted to obtain participants' preliminary reactions to the responsiveness of group action planning, a person-centered planning approach, as a support strategy for Hispanic families of individuals with disabilities. Focus group participants were 38 Hispanic parents of youth/young adults with developmental disabilities and 22 professionals who provided support services to Hispanic youth/young adults with developmental disabilities and their families. Both constituency groups identified advantages and disadvantages of group action planning. We focus our key recommendations on the implications of this information for education and human service systems as well as directions for future research. PMID:10900934

  11. An integrated large- and small-group approach for conducting meetings that lead to social action.

    PubMed

    Peck, H B

    1997-01-01

    Large meetings and small-group sessions each have advantages and deficiencies in dealing with social issues. The goals of conveying information, effectively changing attitudes, and encouraging action are often best achieved by integrating small-group sessions within the context of a large meeting. An approach involving three phases for a 2-hour meeting is described: (1) and initial plenary of all participants; (2) small-group sessions conducted by previously trained group facilitators drawn from the host organization; (3) a concluding plenary session centering around brief reports from the small groups. The application of some concepts of positive mental health, contracting, and empowerment to facilitate social action are discussed.

  12. The Fisheries and Marine Renewable Energy Working Group: creating an agenda for improved co-existence.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, M. S.; De Groot, J.; Ashley, M.; Rodwell, L.

    2014-12-01

    As an emerging industry, Marine Renewable Energy (MRE) is expected to play a major contributory role if the UK is to successfully reach its desired target of renewable energy production by 2020. However, due to the competing objectives and priorities of MRE and other industries, for example fisheries, and in the delivering of conservation measures, the demand for space within our marine landscape is increasing, and interactions are inevitable. In order to promote better understanding of the challenges in resolving interactions between these industries, a Fisheries and Marine Renewable Energy Working Group was set up under the Natural Environment Research Council Marine Renewable Energy Knowledge Exchange Programme (NERC MREKEP). The Working Group carried out an initial scoping survey in order to summarise recent and current research activities and identify key issues and topics in the fields of fisheries and MRE interactions. Mixed stakeholder groups discussed four primary topics: priority issues; barriers to progress; problem mitigation; and thoughts on the consultation process. Points of discussion were categorized into themes to aid analysis and protocol development. These themes were: culture, community and economy; legislation and rights; data and information; and collaboration and communication. Subsequent invited stakeholder and expert panel workshops were held to facilitate knowledge exchange between fisheries and development of MRE in order to identify priority research issues, knowledge gaps and collaboration needs. Four group sessions identified: practical steps to aid interaction between industries; barriers, opportunities and solutions; an agenda for action, timescales and partners; and action points carried forward by each stakeholder group. This Working Group, guided under the MREKEP banner, is the first of its kind in the UK, bringing together individuals from a nationally diverse group of academics, regulators, policy makers and representatives

  13. Enhancing School Asthma Action Plans: Qualitative Results from Southeast Minnesota Beacon Stakeholder Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Egginton, Jason S.; Textor, Lauren; Knoebel, Erin; McWilliams, Deborah; Aleman, Marty; Yawn, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    Background: This study explores ways southeast Minnesota schools currently address asthma problems, identifies areas for improvement, and assesses the potential value of asthma action plans (AAPs) in schools. Methods: Focus groups were used to query stakeholder groups on asthma care in schools. Groups were held separately for elementary school…

  14. "Who Did What?": A Participatory Action Research Project to Increase Group Capacity for Advocacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia-Iriarte, E.; Kramer, J. C.; Kramer, J. M.; Hammel, J.

    2009-01-01

    Background: This participatory action research (PAR) project involved a collaboration with a self-advocacy group of people with intellectual disabilities that sought to build group capacity for advocacy. Materials and Methods: This study used a focus group, sustained participatory engagement and a reflexive process to gather qualitative and…

  15. 77 FR 43808 - Advisory Committee and Species Working Group Technical Advisor Appointment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-26

    ... Atlantic Tunas (ICCAT) as established by the Atlantic Tunas Convention Act (ATCA). NMFS is also soliciting.... Commissioners: a Bluefin Tuna Working Group, a Swordfish Working Group, a Sharks Working Group, a Billfish Working Group, and a Bigeye Tuna, Albacore, Yellowfin, and Skipjack (BAYS) Tunas Working Group....

  16. Collective action control by goals and plans: applying a self-regulation perspective to group performance.

    PubMed

    Wieber, Frank; Thürmer, J Lukas; Gollwitzer, Peter M

    2012-01-01

    In celebration of the 125th anniversary of The American Journal of Psychology, this article discusses a seminal publication by Marjorie Shaw (1932) on small group performance in the rational solution of complex problems. We then propose an approach for the effective regulation of group goal striving based on the collective action control perspective. From this perspective, group performance might be hindered by a collective intention-behavior gap: Groups fail to act on their intentions despite being strongly committed to the collective goal, knowing what the necessary actions are, and being capable of performing them. To reduce this gap, we suggest specific if-then plans (implementation intentions) in which groups specify when, where, and how to act toward their collective goal as an easily applicable self-regulation strategy to automate collective action control. Studies in which implementation intentions improved group performance in hidden profile, escalation of commitment, and cooperation task paradigms are reported and discussed.

  17. Work group diversity and group performance: an integrative model and research agenda.

    PubMed

    van Knippenberg, Daan; De Dreu, Carsten K W; Homan, Astrid C

    2004-12-01

    Research on the relationship between work group diversity and performance has yielded inconsistent results. To address this problem, the authors propose the categorization-elaboration model (CEM), which reconceptualizes and integrates information/decision making and social categorization perspectives on work-group diversity and performance. The CEM incorporates mediator and moderator variables that typically have been ignored in diversity research and incorporates the view that information/decision making and social categorization processes interact such that intergroup biases flowing from social categorization disrupt the elaboration (in-depth processing) of task-relevant information and perspectives. In addition, the authors propose that attempts to link the positive and negative effects of diversity to specific types of diversity should be abandoned in favor of the assumption that all dimensions of diversity may have positive as well as negative effects. The ways in which these propositions may set the agenda for future research in diversity are discussed.

  18. EM Structure-Based Accelerators Working Group Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, W.D.; Lidia, S.M.

    2004-12-07

    This Working Group (WG) focused on EM Structure-Based Accelerators, which covers a broad area of mechanisms and experiments. Topics covered included dielectric wakefield accelerators (DWA), photonic bandgap accelerators (PBGA), inverse free electron lasers (IFEL), vacuum laser accelerators (VLA), other novel schemes, and supporting analysis and modeling. In addition, this WG was tasked at the Workshop with developing conceptual (strawman) designs for a 1-GeV accelerator system based upon any of the experimentally-proven approaches covered in this WG. Two strawmen designs were developed based upon IFELs and DWAs. The presentations given and strawmen designs indicate great progress has been made in many areas. Proof-of-principle experiments will occur shortly in PBGA and VLA. Other well-proven devices, such as IFELs, are becoming accepted as 'workhorse' providers of microbunches.

  19. The Third Annual NASA Science Internet User Working Group Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lev, Brian S. (Editor); Gary, J. Patrick (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    The NASA Science Internet (NSI) User Support Office (USO) sponsored the Third Annual NSI User Working Group (NSIUWG) Conference March 30 through April 3, 1992, in Greenbelt, MD. Approximately 130 NSI users attended to learn more about the NSI, hear from projects which use NSI, and receive updates about new networking technologies and services. This report contains material relevant to the conference; copies of the agenda, meeting summaries, presentations, and descriptions of exhibitors. Plenary sessions featured a variety of speakers, including NSI project management, scientists, and NSI user project managers whose projects and applications effectively use NSI, and notable citizens of the larger Internet community. The conference also included exhibits of advanced networking applications; tutorials on internetworking, computer security, and networking technologies; and user subgroup meetings on the future direction of the conference, networking, and user services and applications.

  20. Working Group Report: Computing for the Intensity Frontier

    SciTech Connect

    Rebel, B.; Sanchez, M. C.; Wolbers, S.

    2013-10-25

    This is the report of the Computing Frontier working group on Lattice Field Theory prepared for the proceedings of the 2013 Community Summer Study ("Snowmass"). We present the future computing needs and plans of the U.S. lattice gauge theory community and argue that continued support of the U.S. (and worldwide) lattice-QCD effort is essential to fully capitalize on the enormous investment in the high-energy physics experimental program. We first summarize the dramatic progress of numerical lattice-QCD simulations in the past decade, with some emphasis on calculations carried out under the auspices of the U.S. Lattice-QCD Collaboration, and describe a broad program of lattice-QCD calculations that will be relevant for future experiments at the intensity and energy frontiers. We then present details of the computational hardware and software resources needed to undertake these calculations.

  1. Activities of the IERS Working Group on prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wooden, W.

    2008-04-01

    The International Earth Rotation and Reference Systems Service (IERS) established a Working Group on Prediction (WGP) to investigate what IERS prediction products are useful to the user community in addition to making a detailed examination of the fundamental properties of the different input data sets and algorithms. The major goals and objectives of the WGP are to determine the desired Earth orientation prediction products, the importance of observational accuracy, which types of input data provide an optimal prediction, the strengths and weaknesses of various prediction algorithms, and the interactions between series and algorithms that are beneficial or harmful. To focus the research efforts of the WGP, the user community was polled to ascertain what prediction products are needed and at what level of accuracy. The current status of WGP activities and the anticipated future directions are presented.

  2. International Technical Working Group Cooperation to Counter Illicit Nuclear Trafficking

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D K; Niemeyer, S

    2004-09-18

    The Nuclear Smuggling International Technical Working Group (ITWG) is an international body of nuclear forensic experts that cooperate to deter the illicit trafficking of nuclear materials. The objective of the ITWG is to provide a common approach and effective technical solutions to governments who request assistance in nuclear forensics. The ITWG was chartered in 1996 and since that time more than 28 nations and organizations have participated in 9 international meetings and 2 analytical round-robin trials. Soon after its founding the ITWG adopted a general framework to guide nuclear forensics investigations that includes recommendations for nuclear crime scene security and analysis, the best application of radioanalytical methods, the conduct of traditional forensic analysis of contaminated materials, and effective data analysis to interpret the history of seized nuclear materials. This approach has been adopted by many nations as they respond to incidents of illicit nuclear trafficking.

  3. Chemical Safety Vulnerability Working Group report. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    The Chemical Safety Vulnerability (CSV) Working Group was established to identify adverse conditions involving hazardous chemicals at DOE facilities that might result in fires or explosions, release of hazardous chemicals to the environment, or exposure of workers or the public to chemicals. A CSV Review was conducted in 148 facilities at 29 sites. Eight generic vulnerabilities were documented related to: abandoned chemicals and chemical residuals; past chemical spills and ground releases; characterization of legacy chemicals and wastes; disposition of legacy chemicals; storage facilities and conditions; condition of facilities and support systems; unanalyzed and unaddressed hazards; and inventory control and tracking. Weaknesses in five programmatic areas were also identified related to: management commitment and planning; chemical safety management programs; aging facilities that continue to operate; nonoperating facilities awaiting deactivation; and resource allocations. Volume 1 contains the Executive summary; Introduction; Summary of vulnerabilities; Management systems weaknesses; Commendable practices; Summary of management response plan; Conclusions; and a Glossary of chemical terms.

  4. Process thresholds: Report of Working Group Number 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. S., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The Process Thresholds Working Group concerned itself with whether a geomorphic process to be monitored on satellite imagery must be global, regional, or local in its effect on the landscape. It was pointed out that major changes in types and magnitudes of processes operating in an area are needed to be detectable on a global scale. It was concluded from a review of geomorphic studies which used satellite images that they do record change in landscape over time (on a time-lapse basis) as a result of one or more processes. In fact, this may be one of the most important attributes of space imagery, in that one can document land form changes in the form of a permanent historical record. The group also discussed the important subject of the acquisition of basic data sets by different satellite imaging systems. Geomorphologists already have available one near-global basis data set resulting from the early LANDSAT program, especially images acquired by LANDSATs 1 and 2. Such historic basic data sets can serve as a benchmark for comparison with landscape changes that take place in the future. They can also serve as a benchmark for comparison with landscape changes that have occurred in the past (as recorded) by images, photography and maps.

  5. Bullying in work groups: the impact of leadership.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Morten Birkeland

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study is to examine whether and how laissez-faire, transformational, and authentic leadership styles are related to the occurrence of bullying in work groups. It is hypothesized that the investigated leadership styles have direct associations, as well as indirect associations through group cohesion and safety perceptions, with indicators of bullying among subordinates. Using a cross-sectional survey design, the variables were assessed in a randomly selected sample comprising 594 seafarers from two Norwegian shipping companies. Laissez-faire leadership was associated with an increased risk of exposure to bullying behavior, self-labeled victimization from bullying, and perpetrated bullying. Transformational leadership and authentic leadership were related to decreased risk of exposure to bullying behavior. Authentic leadership contributed to the variance in bullying beyond laissez-faire and transformational leadership. Analyses of indirect effects showed that the association between transformational leadership and bullying was fully mediated through safety perceptions, whereas a partial indirect association through safety perceptions was found for authentic leadership. This study makes a significant contribution to the literature by providing evidence for how leadership styles predict workplace bullying. The findings highlight the importance of recruiting, developing, and training leaders who promote both positive psychological capacities and positive perceptions among their subordinates. PMID:23198817

  6. Bullying in work groups: the impact of leadership.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Morten Birkeland

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study is to examine whether and how laissez-faire, transformational, and authentic leadership styles are related to the occurrence of bullying in work groups. It is hypothesized that the investigated leadership styles have direct associations, as well as indirect associations through group cohesion and safety perceptions, with indicators of bullying among subordinates. Using a cross-sectional survey design, the variables were assessed in a randomly selected sample comprising 594 seafarers from two Norwegian shipping companies. Laissez-faire leadership was associated with an increased risk of exposure to bullying behavior, self-labeled victimization from bullying, and perpetrated bullying. Transformational leadership and authentic leadership were related to decreased risk of exposure to bullying behavior. Authentic leadership contributed to the variance in bullying beyond laissez-faire and transformational leadership. Analyses of indirect effects showed that the association between transformational leadership and bullying was fully mediated through safety perceptions, whereas a partial indirect association through safety perceptions was found for authentic leadership. This study makes a significant contribution to the literature by providing evidence for how leadership styles predict workplace bullying. The findings highlight the importance of recruiting, developing, and training leaders who promote both positive psychological capacities and positive perceptions among their subordinates.

  7. Activities of the EMRAS Tritium/C14 Working Group

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, P.A.; Balonov, M.; Venter, A

    2005-07-15

    A new model evaluation program, Environmental Modeling for Radiation Safety (EMRAS), was initiated by the International Atomic Energy Agency in September 2003. EMRAS includes a working group (WG) on modeling tritium and C-14 transfer through the environment to biota and man. The main objective of this WG is to develop and test models of the uptake, formation and translocation of organically bound tritium (OBT) in food crops, animals and aquatic systems. To the extent possible, the WG is carrying out its work by comparing model predictions with experimental data to identify the modeling approaches and assumptions that lead to the best agreement between predictions and observations. Results for scenarios involving a chronically contaminated aquatic ecosystem and short-term exposure of soybeans are presently being analyzed. In addition, calculations for scenarios involving chronically contaminated terrestrial food chains and hypothetical short-term releases are currently underway, and a pinetree scenario is being developed. The preparation of datasets on tritium dynamics in large animals and fish is being encouraged, since these are the areas of greatest uncertainty in OBT modeling. These activities will be discussed in this paper.

  8. The sense of agency is action-effect causality perception based on cross-modal grouping.

    PubMed

    Kawabe, Takahiro; Roseboom, Warrick; Nishida, Shin'ya

    2013-07-22

    Sense of agency, the experience of controlling external events through one's actions, stems from contiguity between action- and effect-related signals. Here we show that human observers link their action- and effect-related signals using a computational principle common to cross-modal sensory grouping. We first report that the detection of a delay between tactile and visual stimuli is enhanced when both stimuli are synchronized with separate auditory stimuli (experiment 1). This occurs because the synchronized auditory stimuli hinder the potential grouping between tactile and visual stimuli. We subsequently demonstrate an analogous effect on observers' key press as an action and a sensory event. This change is associated with a modulation in sense of agency; namely, sense of agency, as evaluated by apparent compressions of action-effect intervals (intentional binding) or subjective causality ratings, is impaired when both participant's action and its putative visual effect events are synchronized with auditory tones (experiments 2 and 3). Moreover, a similar role of action-effect grouping in determining sense of agency is demonstrated when the additional signal is presented in the modality identical to an effect event (experiment 4). These results are consistent with the view that sense of agency is the result of general processes of causal perception and that cross-modal grouping plays a central role in these processes.

  9. The QCD/SM working group: Summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Dobbs, Matt; Frixione, S.; Laenen, E.; De Roeck, A.; Tollefson, K.; Andersen, J.; Balazs, C.; Banfi, A.; Bernreuther, W.; Binoth, T.; Brandenburg, A.; Buttar, C.; Cao, C-H.; Cruz, A.; Dawson, I.; DelDuca, V.; Drollinger, V.; Dudko, L.; Eynck, T.; Field, R.; Grazzini, M.; Guillet, J.P.; Heinrich, G.; Huston, J.; Kauer, N.; Kidonakis, N.; Kulesza, A.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Magnea, L.; Mahmoudi, F.; Maina, E.; Maltoni, F.; Nolten, M.; Moraes, A.; Moretti, S.; Mrenna, S.; Nagy, Z.; Olness, F.; Puljak, I.; Ross, D.A.; Sabio-Vera, A.; Salam, G.P.; Sherstnev, A.; Si, Z.G.; Sjostrand, T.; Skands, P.; Thome, E.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Uwer, P.; Weinzierl, S.; Yuan, C.P.; Zanderighi,G.; Zanderighi, G.

    2004-04-09

    Among the many physics processes at TeV hadron colliders, we look most eagerly for those that display signs of the Higgs boson or of new physics. We do so however amid an abundance of processes that proceed via Standard Model (SM) and in particular Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) interactions, and that are interesting in their own right. Good knowledge of these processes is required to help us distinguish the new from the known. Their theoretical and experimental study teaches us at the same time more about QCD/SM dynamics, and thereby enables us to further improve such distinctions. This is important because it is becoming increasingly clear that the success of finding and exploring Higgs boson physics or other New Physics at the Tevatron and LHC will depend significantly on precise understanding of QCD/SM effects for many observables. To improve predictions and deepen the study of QCD/SM signals and backgrounds was therefore the ambition for our QCD/SM working group at this Les Houches workshop. Members of the working group made significant progress towards this on a number of fronts. A variety of tools were further developed, from methods to perform higher order perturbative calculations or various types of resummation, to improvements in the modeling of underlying events and parton showers. Furthermore, various precise studies of important specific processes were conducted. A significant part of the activities in Les Houches revolved around Monte Carlo simulation of collision events. A number of contributions in this report reflect the progress made in this area. At present a large number of Monte Carlo programs exist, each written with a different purpose and employing different techniques. Discussions in Les Houches revealed the need for an accessible primer on Monte Carlo programs, featuring a listing of various codes, each with a short description, but also providing a low-level explanation of the underlying methods. This primer has now been compiled and a

  10. The QCD/SM Working Group: Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    M. Dobbs et al.

    2004-08-05

    Among the many physics processes at TeV hadron colliders, we look most eagerly for those that display signs of the Higgs boson or of new physics. We do so however amid an abundance of processes that proceed via Standard Model (SM) and in particular Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) interactions, and that are interesting in their own right. Good knowledge of these processes is required to help us distinguish the new from the known. Their theoretical and experimental study teaches us at the same time more about QCD/SM dynamics, and thereby enables us to further improve such distinctions. This is important because it is becoming increasingly clear that the success of finding and exploring Higgs boson physics or other New Physics at the Tevatron and LHC will depend significantly on precise understanding of QCD/SM effects for many observables. To improve predictions and deepen the study of QCD/SM signals and backgrounds was therefore the ambition for our QCD/SM working group at this Les Houches workshop. Members of the working group made significant progress towards this on a number of fronts. A variety of tools were further developed, from methods to perform higher order perturbative calculations or various types of resummation, to improvements in the modeling of underlying events and parton showers. Furthermore, various precise studies of important specific processes were conducted. A significant part of the activities in Les Houches revolved around Monte Carlo simulation of collision events. A number of contributions in this report reflect the progress made in this area. At present a large number of Monte Carlo programs exist, each written with a different purpose and employing different techniques. Discussions in Les Houches revealed the need for an accessible primer on Monte Carlo programs, featuring a listing of various codes, each with a short description, but also providing a low-level explanation of the underlying methods. This primer has now been compiled and a

  11. Affirmative Action. Module Number 16. Work Experience Program Modules. Coordination Techniques Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shawhan, Carl; Morley, Ray

    This self-instructional module, the last in a series of 16 on techniques for coordinating work experience programs, deals with affirmative action. Addressed in the module are the following topics: the nature of affirmative action legislation and regulations, the role of the teacher-coordinator as a resource person for affirmative action…

  12. The space shuttle payload planning working groups. Volume 7: Earth observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The findings of the Earth Observations working group of the space shuttle payload planning activity are presented. The objectives of the Earth Observation experiments are: (1) establishment of quantitative relationships between observable parameters and geophysical variables, (2) development, test, calibration, and evaluation of eventual flight instruments in experimental space flight missions, (3) demonstration of the operational utility of specific observation concepts or techniques as information inputs needed for taking actions, and (4) deployment of prototype and follow-on operational Earth Observation systems. The basic payload capability, mission duration, launch sites, inclinations, and payload limitations are defined.

  13. Love of the World: Civic Skills for Jobs, Work, and Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ronan, Bernie

    2016-01-01

    This chapter looks at civic learning and democratic engagement from the perspective of political philosophy to suggest the essential cognitive, affective, and political skills needed for careers of fulfilling public work and for civic action.

  14. Energy technology assessments for energy security -- Working Group report

    SciTech Connect

    Lamont, A.D.; Schock, R.N.

    1993-03-01

    In the first phase of the evaluation process the group identified technology areas that are clearly important for reducing US vulnerability to oil supply disruptions. The important technologies were then evaluated against the following specific criteria: Additions to world oil and gas reserves outside the Middle East; increase in efficiency in the oil consuming sectors; displacement of petroleum-based fuels; reduction in demand for oil-fueled transportation; increase in the ability to switch quickly away from petroleum based fuels; increases in domestic and international oil stocks; reduction in world oil demand; and additions to domestic, non-petroleum electrical generating capacity (important in the ultimate term). The technology areas deemed by the members of the working group to be most important are: (1) In the near term, technologies related to improved recovery of natural gas, the conversion of natural gas to liquids, advanced liquefaction of coal, the development of alternatively fueled vehicles, automobiles and light truck improvements to increase efficiency, and vehicles that operate on alternative fuels. (2) In the long term, these technologies, as well as those related to hydrogen production, storage and utilization, biomass derived fuels, electric and hybrid vehicles, building heating and cooling using solar energy, more efficient appliances, improved HVAC, and advanced building materials and envelopes were also judged to be most important. (3) In the ultimate term (>2030) other technologies have the possibility to join with these to increase energy security. These are improved oil and gas exploration and extraction, heavy oil and hydrocarbon conversion, gas recovery from unconventional sources, advanced fission reactors and fuel cycles, solar generation of electricity, and fusion energy. An increase in US electrical generating capacity is also thought to bear directly on energy security in this time-frame.

  15. Terrestrial Planet Finder Interferometer Science Working Group Report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, Peter R.; Lay, O. P.; Johnston, K. J.; Beichman, C. A.

    2007-03-01

    Over the past two years, the focus of the project for the interferometric version of the Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF-I) has been on the development of the scientific rational for the mission, the assessment of TPF-I architectures, the laboratory demonstration of key technologies, and the development of a detailed technology roadmap. The Science Working Group (SWG), in conjunction with European colleagues working on the European Space Agency s (ESA s) Darwin project, has reaffirmed the goals of TPF-I as part of a broad vision for the detection and characterization of Earth-like planets orbiting nearby stars and for the search for life on those planets. The SWG also helped to assess the performance of different interferometric configurations for TPF-I/Darwin. Building on earlier SWG reports, this document restates the scientific case for TPF-I, assesses suitable target stars and relevant wavelengths for observation, discusses dramatic new capabilities for general astrophysical observations, and summarizes how Spitzer has improved our knowledge of the incidence of zodiacal emission on the search for planets. This document discusses in some detail on laboratory advances in interferometric nulling and formation flying. Laboratory experiments have now achieved stable narrow- and broad-band nulling the levels of 10-6 and 2.0 10-5, respectively. A testbed has demonstrated formation flying using two realistic spacecraft mockups. With a suitably funded program of technology development, as summarized herein and described in more detail in the Technology Plan for the Terrestrial Planet Finder Interferometer (2005), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and ESA would be able to start within the coming decade a full-scale TPF-I/Darwin mission capable of finding Earths orbiting more than 150 nearby stars, or a scaled back interferometer capable of studying more than 30 stars. Finding evidence for life on just one of those planets would revolutionize our

  16. Terrestrial Planet Finder Interferometer Science Working Group Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, Peter R. (Editor); Lay, Oliver P. (Editor); Johnston, Kenneth J. (Editor); Beichman, Charles A. (Editor)

    2007-01-01

    Over the past two years, the focus of the project for the interferometric version of the Terrestrial Planet Finder(TPF-I) has been on the development of the scientific rational for the mission, the assessment of TPF-I architectures, the laboratory demonstration of key technologies, and the development of a detailed technology roadmap. The Science Working Group (SWG), in conjunction with European colleagues working on the European Space Agency's (ESA's) Darwin project, has reaffirmed the goals of TPF-I as part of a broad vision for the detection and characterization of Earth-like planets orbiting nearby stars and for the search for life on those planets. The SWG also helped to assess the performance of different interferometric configurations for TPF-I/Darwin. Building on earlier SWG reports, this document restates the scientific case for TPF-I, assesses suitable target stars and relevant wavelengths for observation, discusses dramatic new capabilities for general astrophysical observations, and summarizes how Spitzer has improved our knowledge of the incidence of zodiacal emission on the search for planets. This document discusses in some detail on laboratory advances in interferometric nulling and formation flying. Laboratory experiments have now achieved stable narrow- and broad-band nulling the levels of 10-6 and 2.0x10-5, respectively. A testbed has demonstrated formation flying using two realistic spacecraft mockups. With a suitably funded program of technology development, as summarized herein and described in more detail in the Technology Plan for the Terrestrial Planet Finder Interferometer (2005), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and ESA would be able to start within the coming decade a full-scale TPF-I/Darwin mission capable of finding Earths orbiting more than 150 nearby stars, or a scaled back interferometer capable of studying more than 30 stars. Finding evidence for life on just one of those planets would revolutionize our

  17. Carpal tunnel syndrome and work organisation in repetitive work: a cross sectional study in France. Study Group on Repetitive Work

    PubMed Central

    Leclerc, A.; Franchi, P.; Cristofari, M. F.; Delemotte, B.; Mereau, P.; Teyssier-Cotte, C.; Touranchet, A.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To study the determinants of signs of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) in repetitive industrial work, with special attention to occupational constraints at group level and management practices of the companies. METHOD: A cross sectional study was conducted in three sectors: assembly line; clothing and shoe industry; food industry. A total of 1210 workers in repetitive work, from 53 different companies, was compared with a control group of 337 workers. Constraints at the workplace were partly self declared, and partly assessed by the occupational physicians in charge of the employees of the company. The definition of CTS was based on a standardised clinical examination. RESULTS: CTS was associated with repetitive work, especially packaging. It was more frequent among subjects who declared psychological and psychosomatic problems and those with a body mass index > or = 27. Dissatisfaction with work, lack of job control, short cycle time, and having to press repeatedly with the hand were associated with the syndrome. An odds ratio (OR) of 2.24 was found for "just in time" production. CONCLUSION: The results emphasise the complexity of the determinants of CTS, the role of psychosocial factors at work and the potentially negative effects of some practices of the companies aimed at enhancing their competitiveness.   PMID:9624269

  18. Acting in solidarity: Testing an extended dual pathway model of collective action by bystander group members.

    PubMed

    Saab, Rim; Tausch, Nicole; Spears, Russell; Cheung, Wing-Yee

    2015-09-01

    We examined predictors of collective action among bystander group members in solidarity with a disadvantaged group by extending the dual pathway model of collective action, which proposes one efficacy-based and one emotion-based path to collective action (Van Zomeren, Spears, Fischer, & Leach, 2004). Based on two proposed functions of social identity performance (Klein, Spears, & Reicher, 2007), we distinguished between the efficacy of collective action at consolidating the identity of a protest movement and its efficacy at achieving social change (political efficacy). We expected identity consolidation efficacy to positively predict collective action tendencies directly and indirectly via political efficacy. We also expected collective action tendencies to be positively predicted by moral outrage and by sympathy in response to disadvantaged outgroup's suffering. These hypotheses were supported in two surveys examining intentions to protest for Palestine in Britain (Study 1), and intentions to attend the June 4th vigil in Hong Kong to commemorate the Tiananmen massacre among a sample of Hong Kong citizens (Study 2). The contributions of these findings to research on the dual pathway model of collective action and the different functions of collective action are discussed. PMID:25406712

  19. The Impact of Instructor's Group Management Strategies on Students' Attitudes to Group Work and Generic Skill Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Natoli, Riccardo; Jackling, Beverley; Seelanatha, Lalith

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the influence of two distinct group work management strategies on finance students' attitudes towards group work and their perceptions of generic skill development. Using quantitative and qualitative data, comparisons are made between students who experienced a supportive group work environment and students who experienced an…

  20. Offshore springs and seeps are focus of working group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnett, Bill

    People have been curious about offshore springs and seeps since at least the days of the Romans. In spite of many centuries of both casual and serious observations, there has been relatively little scientific study concerning the magnitude and effects of groundwater flow into the sea. Rather, studies were performed mostly to address water resource issues. Investigations over the past decade or so have now shown that groundwater discharge, at least in some cases, may be important for geochemical budgets and ecological effects.The Scientific Committee on Oceanic Research (SCOR) and the Land-Ocean Interactions in the Coastal Zone (LOICZ) Project of the International Geosphere-Biosphere Program have recently established a working group of experts to examine questions relating specifically to groundwater discharge in the coastal zone. Direct groundwater flow into the ocean is known to occur as springs and seeps in near-shore areas in many parts of the world. Submarine springs, for example, are well known off both coasts of Florida; Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula; in several areas around the Pacific rim including Chile, Hawaii, Guam, American Samoa, and Australia; in the Persian Gulf near Bahrain; in the Mediterranean Sea off Spain, France, Italy, Greece, Syria, Lebanon, Israel, and Libya; and in many other locations.

  1. Chemical Safety Vulnerability Working Group report. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    The Chemical Safety Vulnerability (CSV) Working Group was established to identify adverse conditions involving hazardous chemicals at DOE facilities that might result in fires or explosions, release of hazardous chemicals to the environment, or exposure of workers or the public to chemicals. A CSV Review was conducted in 148 facilities at 29 sites. Eight generic vulnerabilities were documented related to: abandoned chemicals and chemical residuals; past chemical spills and ground releases; characterization of legacy chemicals and wastes; disposition of legacy chemicals; storage facilities and conditions; condition of facilities and support systems; unanalyzed and unaddressed hazards; and inventory control and tracking. Weaknesses in five programmatic areas were also identified related to: management commitment and planning; chemical safety management programs; aging facilities that continue to operate; nonoperating facilities awaiting deactivation; and resource allocations. Volume 2 consists of seven appendices containing the following: Tasking memorandums; Project plan for the CSV Review; Field verification guide for the CSV Review; Field verification report, Lawrence Livermore National Lab.; Field verification report, Oak Ridge Reservation; Field verification report, Savannah River Site; and the Field verification report, Hanford Site.

  2. Report of the Working Group on Space/Lunar Tradeoffs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The group discussed the advantages and disadvantages of five locations for an optical/infrared array: low-Earth orbit (LEO), Sun-synchronous Earth-orbit, geosynchronous orbit (GEO), Lagrangian points (L4 and L5), and the lunar surface. The factors affecting an array and our assessments of them are given and briefly discussed. In the discussions, two axioms are assumed: (1) Human expansion into space and to the Moon will occur; and (2) The Space Station will be constructed and operational. The major conclusion reached is that baselines of moderate size (greater than 300 m) are best done on the Moon and that large baselines (greater than 10 km) can be done only on the Moon. Three areas needing additional research were identified as follows. (1) Studies are needed on methods to steer long-baseline systems in orbit. This involves learning how to control free-flyers. It is not clear how the difficulty of control varies with orbital elevation. (2) More work is needed on the internal metrology of array systems, both orbital and lunar-surface systems.(3) We need to understand the radiation effects on detectors and electronics and learn how to mitigate them.

  3. PM Science Working Group Meeting on Spacecraft Maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parkinson, Claire L.

    1997-01-01

    The EOS PM Science Working Group met on May 6, 1997, to examine the issue of spacecraft maneuvers. The meeting was held at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and was attended by the Team Leaders of all four instrument science teams with instruments on the PM-1 spacecraft, additional representatives from each of the four teams, the PM Project management, and random others. The meeting was chaired by the PM Project Scientist and open to all. The meeting was called in order to untangle some of the concerns raised over the past several months regarding whether or not the PM-1 spacecraft should undergo spacecraft maneuvers to allow the instruments to obtain deep-space views. Two of the Science Teams, those for the Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES), had strongly expressed the need for deep-space views in order to calibrate their instruments properly and conveniently. The other two teams, those for the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E) and the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU), and the Humidity Sounder for Brazil (HSB), had expressed concerns that the maneuvers involve risks to the instruments and undesired gaps in the data sets.

  4. Patterns of authorship in the IPCC Working Group III report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbera, Esteve; Calvet-Mir, Laura; Hughes, Hannah; Paterson, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has completed its Fifth Assessment Report (AR5). Here, we explore the social scientific networks informing Working Group III (WGIII) assessment of mitigation for the AR5. Identifying authors’ institutional pathways, we highlight the persistence and extent of North-South inequalities in the authorship of the report, revealing the dominance of US and UK institutions as training sites for WGIII authors. Examining patterns of co-authorship between WGIII authors, we identify the unevenness in co-authoring relations, with a small number of authors co-writing regularly and indicative of an epistemic community’s influence over the IPCC’s definition of mitigation. These co-authoring networks follow regional patterns, with significant EU-BRICS collaboration and authors from the US relatively insular. From a disciplinary perspective, economists, engineers, physicists and natural scientists remain central to the process, with insignificant participation of scholars from the humanities. The shared training and career paths made apparent through our analysis suggest that the idea that broader geographic participation may lead to a wider range of viewpoints and cultural understandings of climate change mitigation may not be as sound as previously thought.

  5. An interagency working group on lightning threat warning

    SciTech Connect

    Hasbrouck, R.T.

    1988-01-01

    In a lightning environment, it is desirable to experience a thunderstorm without sustaining serious physical or economic loss. Properly implemented and maintained protection techniques go a long way toward minimizing or eliminating losses. However, activities that cannot be pracitcally protected must be temporarily curtailed during a lightning hazard period. Thus, some method for sensing the onset and departure of the hazard is required. Untimely curtailment or resumption of activities can place personnel and equipment in jeopardy, or result in excessive, and expensive, downtime. False alarms are equally undesirable. Presently, this need for a lightning warning system can be partially met through the use of a cloud-to-ground lightning detection and tracking system. Several manufacturers are installing these systems and the Federal government is seeking to coordinate them into a nationwide network. However, these systems do not provide lightning threat (pre-first-strike) warning. Techniques and equipment for producting such warnings exist, but until recently there has been no unified effort to consolidate the knowledge, standardize the requirements, and identify the problems of the various users. This paper will briefly describe the formation of an interagency working group which intends to specifically address such issues. 4 refs.

  6. A solution to the collective action problem in between-group conflict with within-group inequality.

    PubMed

    Gavrilets, Sergey; Fortunato, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Conflict with conspecifics from neighbouring groups over territory, mating opportunities and other resources is observed in many social organisms, including humans. Here we investigate the evolutionary origins of social instincts, as shaped by selection resulting from between-group conflict in the presence of a collective action problem. We focus on the effects of the differences between individuals on the evolutionary dynamics. Our theoretical models predict that high-rank individuals, who are able to usurp a disproportional share of resources in within-group interactions, will act seemingly altruistically in between-group conflict, expending more effort and often having lower reproductive success than their low-rank group-mates. Similar behaviour is expected for individuals with higher motivation, higher strengths or lower costs, or for individuals in a leadership position. Our theory also provides an evolutionary foundation for classical equity theory, and it has implications for the origin of coercive leadership and for reproductive skew theory. PMID:24667443

  7. The Beyond the standard model working group: Summary report

    SciTech Connect

    G. Azuelos et al.

    2004-03-18

    In this working group we have investigated a number of aspects of searches for new physics beyond the Standard Model (SM) at the running or planned TeV-scale colliders. For the most part, we have considered hadron colliders, as they will define particle physics at the energy frontier for the next ten years at least. The variety of models for Beyond the Standard Model (BSM) physics has grown immensely. It is clear that only future experiments can provide the needed direction to clarify the correct theory. Thus, our focus has been on exploring the extent to which hadron colliders can discover and study BSM physics in various models. We have placed special emphasis on scenarios in which the new signal might be difficult to find or of a very unexpected nature. For example, in the context of supersymmetry (SUSY), we have considered: how to make fully precise predictions for the Higgs bosons as well as the superparticles of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) (parts III and IV); MSSM scenarios in which most or all SUSY particles have rather large masses (parts V and VI); the ability to sort out the many parameters of the MSSM using a variety of signals and study channels (part VII); whether the no-lose theorem for MSSM Higgs discovery can be extended to the next-to-minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (NMSSM) in which an additional singlet superfield is added to the minimal collection of superfields, potentially providing a natural explanation of the electroweak value of the parameter {micro} (part VIII); sorting out the effects of CP violation using Higgs plus squark associate production (part IX); the impact of lepton flavor violation of various kinds (part X); experimental possibilities for the gravitino and its sgoldstino partner (part XI); what the implications for SUSY would be if the NuTeV signal for di-muon events were interpreted as a sign of R-parity violation (part XII). Our other main focus was on the phenomenological implications of extra

  8. Interprofessional education in Erlangen: A needs analysis and the conceptual work of a student working group

    PubMed Central

    Konietzko, Raffael; Frank, Luca; Maudanz, Nils; Binder, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Interprofessional education (IPE) is receiving growing significance both nationally and internationally. Despite this, organizational and curricular changes are posing challenges. The level of need for IPE and how changes can be made to curricula and infrastructure were investigated at the University of Erlangen in Germany. Method: The student working group for interprofessional teaching (AGIL) has turned its attention to these issues. This group is composed of students from medicine, dentistry, molecular medicine, medical technology and speech therapy. In June, 2015, a needs analysis was carried out among the students in the study programs represented in the working group to assess the actual and target situation concerning IPE (n=1,105). In the search for answers and to better measure any needs, contact was sought with instructors. Results: The majority of students feel that they are insufficiently educated in terms of interprofessional skills. A large proportion of the students wish to see expansion of the IPE offerings. Students also expressed a desire for additional spaces and welcomed the idea of an interprofessional learning center. AGIL began establishing interprofessional electives in October 2015. A concept for an interprofessional learning center was developed. Discussion: Based on the survey results, a need for improvements to curricula and infrastructure can be seen; however, the results are limited to the student point of view. AGIL would like to establish more interprofessional electives. These courses would then facilitate curricular implementation. Modern ideas about study environments could be applied to IPE, in particular to promote informal forms of learning. Contact with instructors was crucial for the project work and should be expanded. Realizing and financing the learning center in Erlangen are now the future goals of AGIL. The aim is to create a foundation for this purpose. PMID:27280129

  9. Groups' Actions Trump Injunctive Reaction in an Incidental Observation by Young Children

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Cameron R.; Nielsen, Mark; Collier-Baker, Emma

    2014-01-01

    Children's ability to use social information to direct their behavior is key to their survival and development. However, in observing adult behavior, children are confronted with multiple forms of social information that may vary in reliability and adaptiveness. Two of the most well established biases influencing human behavior are: (1) following the majority (majority influence or conformity); and (2) the use of emotional signals. The current experiment aimed to evaluate how children respond when both information about the majority behavior of a group (descriptive norm) and attitudes of the group towards a behavior (injunctive norm, expressed through an emotional reaction) are present and what happens when they are in conflict. We used a method designed to mimic the manner in which children might observe group members' behavior during development. Novel apparatuses were constructed for which there were two discrete actions that could be performed to retrieve a reward. Three-year-olds observed four adults demonstrating one set of actions, followed by a fifth adult who presented an alternative set of actions. The first four adults' injunctive responses to this fifth adult's actions were manipulated between-groups: positive, negative, or neutral. It was found that children preferred to copy the majority action, regardless of the injunctive reaction of the group. We argue that this affirms the adaptive utility of copying the majority. PMID:25198163

  10. Groups' actions trump injunctive reaction in an incidental observation by young children.

    PubMed

    Turner, Cameron R; Nielsen, Mark; Collier-Baker, Emma

    2014-01-01

    Children's ability to use social information to direct their behavior is key to their survival and development. However, in observing adult behavior, children are confronted with multiple forms of social information that may vary in reliability and adaptiveness. Two of the most well established biases influencing human behavior are: (1) following the majority (majority influence or conformity); and (2) the use of emotional signals. The current experiment aimed to evaluate how children respond when both information about the majority behavior of a group (descriptive norm) and attitudes of the group towards a behavior (injunctive norm, expressed through an emotional reaction) are present and what happens when they are in conflict. We used a method designed to mimic the manner in which children might observe group members' behavior during development. Novel apparatuses were constructed for which there were two discrete actions that could be performed to retrieve a reward. Three-year-olds observed four adults demonstrating one set of actions, followed by a fifth adult who presented an alternative set of actions. The first four adults' injunctive responses to this fifth adult's actions were manipulated between-groups: positive, negative, or neutral. It was found that children preferred to copy the majority action, regardless of the injunctive reaction of the group. We argue that this affirms the adaptive utility of copying the majority.

  11. 75 FR 20423 - Tenth Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 214: Working Group 78: Standards for Air Traffic Data...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-19

    ... Activities Briefing from SC-217/WG-44 (D-TAXI, Airport Data Base) Briefing from SC-186/WG-51 (CPDLC support... Air Traffic Data Communication Services AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of RTCA Special Committee 214: Working Group 78: Standards for Air Traffic Data...

  12. Behavioral Group Work in a Home for the Aged

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linsk, N.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Elderly people in institutions frequently become isolated and noncommunicative. By using behavioral measurements of group workers and group members, the authors have formulated ways of treatment that encourage members to participate more actively. (Author)

  13. Group Work for Bulimia: A Review of Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimpfer, David G.

    1990-01-01

    Reviews descriptive and experimental research relating to the eating disorder known as bulimia nervosa. Reviews outcome studies of group treatment of bulimia to examine the effectiveness of group intervention. Provides recommendations for practice and future research. (Author/PVV)

  14. Food parenting measurement issues: working group consensus report.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Sheryl O; Frankel, Leslie A; Beltran, Alicia; Hodges, Eric; Hoerr, Sharon; Lumeng, Julie; Tovar, Alison; Kremers, Stef

    2013-08-01

    Childhood obesity is a growing problem. As more researchers become involved in the study of parenting influences on childhood obesity, there appears to be a lack of agreement regarding the most important parenting constructs of interest, definitions of those constructs, and measurement of those constructs in a consistent manner across studies. This article aims to summarize findings from a working group that convened specifically to discuss measurement issues related to parental influences on childhood obesity. Six subgroups were formed to address key measurement issues. The conceptualization subgroup proposed to define and distinguish constructs of general parenting styles, feeding styles, and food parenting practices with the goal of understanding interrelating levels of parental influence on child eating behaviors. The observational subgroup identified the need to map constructs for use in coding direct observations and create observational measures that can capture the bidirectional effects of parent-child interactions. The self-regulation subgroup proposed an operational definition of child self-regulation of energy intake and suggested future measures of self-regulation across different stages of development. The translational/community involvement subgroup proposed the involvement of community in the development of surveys so that measures adequately reflect cultural understanding and practices of the community. The qualitative methods subgroup proposed qualitative methods as a way to better understand the breadth of food parenting practices and motivations for the use of such practices. The longitudinal subgroup stressed the importance of food parenting measures sensitive to change for use in longitudinal studies. In the creation of new measures, it is important to consider cultural sensitivity and context-specific food parenting domains. Moderating variables such as child temperament and child food preferences should be considered in models.

  15. Food Parenting Measurement Issues: Working Group Consensus Report

    PubMed Central

    Frankel, Leslie A.; Beltran, Alicia; Hodges, Eric; Hoerr, Sharon; Lumeng, Julie; Tovar, Alison; Kremers, Stef

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Childhood obesity is a growing problem. As more researchers become involved in the study of parenting influences on childhood obesity, there appears to be a lack of agreement regarding the most important parenting constructs of interest, definitions of those constructs, and measurement of those constructs in a consistent manner across studies. This article aims to summarize findings from a working group that convened specifically to discuss measurement issues related to parental influences on childhood obesity. Six subgroups were formed to address key measurement issues. The conceptualization subgroup proposed to define and distinguish constructs of general parenting styles, feeding styles, and food parenting practices with the goal of understanding interrelating levels of parental influence on child eating behaviors. The observational subgroup identified the need to map constructs for use in coding direct observations and create observational measures that can capture the bidirectional effects of parent–child interactions. The self-regulation subgroup proposed an operational definition of child self-regulation of energy intake and suggested future measures of self-regulation across different stages of development. The translational/community involvement subgroup proposed the involvement of community in the development of surveys so that measures adequately reflect cultural understanding and practices of the community. The qualitative methods subgroup proposed qualitative methods as a way to better understand the breadth of food parenting practices and motivations for the use of such practices. The longitudinal subgroup stressed the importance of food parenting measures sensitive to change for use in longitudinal studies. In the creation of new measures, it is important to consider cultural sensitivity and context-specific food parenting domains. Moderating variables such as child temperament and child food preferences should be considered in models

  16. Food parenting measurement issues: working group consensus report.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Sheryl O; Frankel, Leslie A; Beltran, Alicia; Hodges, Eric; Hoerr, Sharon; Lumeng, Julie; Tovar, Alison; Kremers, Stef

    2013-08-01

    Childhood obesity is a growing problem. As more researchers become involved in the study of parenting influences on childhood obesity, there appears to be a lack of agreement regarding the most important parenting constructs of interest, definitions of those constructs, and measurement of those constructs in a consistent manner across studies. This article aims to summarize findings from a working group that convened specifically to discuss measurement issues related to parental influences on childhood obesity. Six subgroups were formed to address key measurement issues. The conceptualization subgroup proposed to define and distinguish constructs of general parenting styles, feeding styles, and food parenting practices with the goal of understanding interrelating levels of parental influence on child eating behaviors. The observational subgroup identified the need to map constructs for use in coding direct observations and create observational measures that can capture the bidirectional effects of parent-child interactions. The self-regulation subgroup proposed an operational definition of child self-regulation of energy intake and suggested future measures of self-regulation across different stages of development. The translational/community involvement subgroup proposed the involvement of community in the development of surveys so that measures adequately reflect cultural understanding and practices of the community. The qualitative methods subgroup proposed qualitative methods as a way to better understand the breadth of food parenting practices and motivations for the use of such practices. The longitudinal subgroup stressed the importance of food parenting measures sensitive to change for use in longitudinal studies. In the creation of new measures, it is important to consider cultural sensitivity and context-specific food parenting domains. Moderating variables such as child temperament and child food preferences should be considered in models. PMID:23944928

  17. Operable Unit 3-13, Group 3, Other Surface Soils (Phase I) Remedial Action Report

    SciTech Connect

    L. Davison

    2007-07-31

    This Remedial Action Report summarizes activities undertaken to remediate the Operable Unit 3-13, Group 3, Other Surface Soils, Phase I sites at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center at the Idaho National Laboratory Site. The 10 sites addressed in this report were defined in the Operable Unit 3-13 Record of Decision and subsequent implementing documents. This report concludes that remediation requirements and cleanup goals established for these 10 sites have been accomplished and are hereafter considered No Action or No Further Action sites.

  18. Percepts of Tasks and Communication Dispersion Potential in Working Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elkins, David

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between individual group members' concepts of tasks and their tendency to communicate with each other about tasks as related to the groups' abilities to adapt to the demands of a dynamic environment. Data was gathered from five persons in the Audiovisual Support group of the American…

  19. Group Work with the Elderly: An Overview for Counselors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capuzzi, Dave; Gross, Doug

    1980-01-01

    Loneliness and isolation of older adults can be treated with group therapy. Group methods such as reality orientation, remotivation, reminiscing and psychotherapy groups can increase social interaction but require special consideration of environment, scheduling and individual limitation as well as counselor training. (JAC)

  20. Academic and Personal Development through Group Work: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steen, Sam

    2011-01-01

    This exploratory study linked academic and personal development within a group counseling intervention. A pre-test post-test research design compared social skills, learning behaviors, and achievement with a convenience sample and control group of students from three elementary schools. For the treatment group, grade point average in Language Arts…

  1. Building Work Skills through Volunteering. Ideas for Action in Education and Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Marilyn

    A progress report on "Building Work Skills through Volunteering," a demonstration project designed to use the volunteer experience to develop and practice work skills, is presented. The initial section describes the participants, methods, and materials at each of four sites: a private corporation, a suburban school district, a voluntary…

  2. Pathways to hostile collective action: The roles of general attitudes toward the advantaged group and situational anger.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jie; Wang, Erping

    2012-12-01

    Collective action is a group behavior that aims to improve the status, power, or influence of an entire group. The present study focused on hostile collective action performed for releasing negative emotions, and explored a pathway including the roles of general attitudes toward the advantaged group and situational group-based anger in predicting the disadvantaged groups' hostile collective action. Group-level data were collected via a laboratory experiment. The results obtained using multiple regression analysis suggested that general attitudes toward the advantaged group formed before the trigger event predicted hostile collective action indirectly through the mediating effects of situational group-based anger and collective action tendencies, which were both produced after that trigger event. In addition, situational group-based anger predicted hostile collective action fully through collective action tendencies. These pathways provided a continuous process of hostile collective action in which general attitudes toward the advantaged group that were formed before the trigger events would influence situational group-based anger when the trigger events occurred, and then affected hostile collective action for responding to these events. Thus, hostile collective action could be predicted before the trigger events by monitoring the disadvantaged groups' attitudes toward the advantaged group. Moreover, reducing destructive collective action by improving intergroup attitudes through some effective interventions was discussed in this study.

  3. 75 FR 56055 - Advisory Committee and Species Working Group Technical Advisor Appointments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-15

    ... Atlantic Tunas (ICCAT) as established by the Atlantic Tunas Convention Act of 1975 (ATCA). NMFS is also... Bluefin Tuna Working Group, a Swordfish and Sharks Working Group, a Billfish Working Group, and a BAYS (Bigeye, Albacore, Yellowfin, and Skipjack) Tunas Working Group. Technical Advisors to the species...

  4. Cyber Security: Big Data Think II Working Group Meeting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinke, Thomas; Shaw, Derek

    2015-01-01

    This presentation focuses on approaches that could be used by a data computation center to identify attacks and ensure malicious code and backdoors are identified if planted in system. The goal is to identify actionable security information from the mountain of data that flows into and out of an organization. The approaches are applicable to big data computational center and some must also use big data techniques to extract the actionable security information from the mountain of data that flows into and out of a data computational center. The briefing covers the detection of malicious delivery sites and techniques for reducing the mountain of data so that intrusion detection information can be useful, and not hidden in a plethora of false alerts. It also looks at the identification of possible unauthorized data exfiltration.

  5. Concern for the in-group and opposition to affirmative action.

    PubMed

    Lowery, Brian S; Unzueta, Miguel M; Knowles, Eric D; Goff, Phillip Atiba

    2006-06-01

    The present experiments suggest that the desire to benefit the in-group drives dominant-group members' policy preferences, independent of concern for out-groups' outcomes. In Experiment 1, the effect of a manipulation of affirmative action procedures on policy support was mediated by how Whites expected the policy to affect fellow Whites, but not by the expected effect on minorities. In Experiments 2 and 3, when focused on losses for the White in-group, Whites' racial identity was negatively related to support for affirmative action. However, when focused on gains for the Black out-group or when participants were told that Whites were not affected by the policy, racial identity did not predict attitudes toward the policy. In Experiments 2 and 3, perceived fairness mediated these effects. PMID:16784345

  6. Training and Work Organisation: An Action-Research Study in a Sales and Distribution Company

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernardes, Alda Cristina; Lopes, Albino Pedro

    2005-01-01

    This study seeks to define a method of designing work-linked training, based on day-to-day work practices and the collaboration between all those involved. From diagnosis to evaluation, no training is designed or given without considering the opinions and interests of the parties involved. The method used is based on action research (AR) and on…

  7. Rotational Seismology: AGU Session, Working Group, and Website

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, William H.K.; Igel, Heiner; Todorovska, Maria I.; Evans, John R.

    2007-01-01

    . Igel, W.H.K. Lee, and M. Todorovska during the 2006 AGU Fall Meeting. The goal of this session was to discuss rotational sensors, observations, modeling, theoretical aspects, and potential applications of rotational ground motions. The session was accompanied by the inauguration of an International Working Group on Rotational Seismology (IWGoRS) which aims to promote investigations of all aspects of rotational motions in seismology and their implications for related fields such as earthquake engineering, geodesy, strong-motion seismology, and tectonics, as well as to share experience, data, software, and results in an open Web-based environment. The primary goal of this article is to make the Earth Science Community aware of the emergence of the field of rotational seismology.

  8. Report of the Solar and Atmospheric Neutrino Working Group

    SciTech Connect

    Back, H.; Bahcall, J.N.; Bernabeu, J.; Boulay, M.G.; Bowles, T.; Calaprice, F.; Champagne, A.; Freedman, S.; Gai, M.; Galbiati, C.; Gallagher, H.; Gonzalez-Garcia, C.; Hahn, R.L.; Heeger, K.M.; Hime, A.; Jung, C.K.; Klein, J.R.; Koike, M.; Lanou, R.; Learned, J.G.; Lesko, K.T.; Losecco, J.; Maltoni, M.; Mann, A.; McKinsey, D.; Palomares-Ruiz, S.; Pena-Garay, C.; Petcov, S.T.; Piepke, A.; Pitt, M.; Raghavan, R.; Robertson, R.G.H.; Scholberg, K.; Sobel, H.W.; Takeuchi, T.; Vogelaar, R.; Wolfenstein, L.

    2004-10-22

    The highest priority of the Solar and Atmospheric Neutrino Experiment Working Group is the development of a real-time, precision experiment that measures the pp solar neutrino flux. A measurement of the pp solar neutrino flux, in comparison with the existing precision measurements of the high energy {sup 8}B neutrino flux, will demonstrate the transition between vacuum and matter-dominated oscillations, thereby quantitatively testing a fundamental prediction of the standard scenario of neutrino flavor transformation. The initial solar neutrino beam is pure {nu}{sub e}, which also permits sensitive tests for sterile neutrinos. The pp experiment will also permit a significantly improved determination of {theta}{sub 12} and, together with other solar neutrino measurements, either a measurement of {theta}{sub 13} or a constraint a factor of two lower than existing bounds. In combination with the essential pre-requisite experiments that will measure the {sup 7}Be solar neutrino flux with a precision of 5%, a measurement of the pp solar neutrino flux will constitute a sensitive test for non-standard energy generation mechanisms within the Sun. The Standard Solar Model predicts that the pp and {sup 7}Be neutrinos together constitute more than 98% of the solar neutrino flux. The comparison of the solar luminosity measured via neutrinos to that measured via photons will test for any unknown energy generation mechanisms within the nearest star. A precise measurement of the pp neutrino flux (predicted to be 92% of the total flux) will also test stringently the theory of stellar evolution since the Standard Solar Model predicts the pp flux with a theoretical uncertainty of 1%. We also find that an atmospheric neutrino experiment capable of resolving the mass hierarchy is a high priority. Atmospheric neutrino experiments may be the only alternative to very long baseline accelerator experiments as a way of resolving this fundamental question. Such an experiment could be a very

  9. The Native American Sweat Lodge as Metaphor for Group Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrett, Michael Walkingstick; Osborne, W. Larry

    1995-01-01

    Discusses how the interrelationship and growth emphasized by the Native American sweat lodge ceremony and "the talking circle" can provide a richer understanding of group counseling. Details each ceremony and explores the implications of practices that are based on cultural traditions, arguing that such traditions can enrich the group experience.…

  10. Working with Groups. Building Success through Better Behaviour Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Rob

    2005-01-01

    Many children with emotional and behavioural difficulties behave well in a one-to-one situation with an adult. It is when they are in a group with their peers that their behaviour deteriorates dramatically. The more teachers understand about group dynamics, the better equipped they will be to support children who find such skills as turn-taking…

  11. Complications in Working with AIDS Patients in Group Psychotherapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tunnell, Gil

    Numerous research studies have documented that for patients coping with chronic illness, social support is extremely important in facilitating adjustment to the illness. The support may come from organized therapy and self-help groups or from interpersonal relationships outside a group. However, Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) is a…

  12. Supervision of Group Work: Infusing the Spirit of Social Justice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernando, Delini M.; Herlihy, Barbara R.

    2010-01-01

    The authors explore how supervisors may support the development of social justice consciousness for group leader supervisees, the role of the supervisor in generating social justice awareness and discussing social justice topics, and supervision that supports group leaders in addressing the challenges and opportunities related to social justice…

  13. The positive and negative framing of affirmative action: a group dominance perspective.

    PubMed

    Haley, Hillary; Sidanius, Jim

    2006-05-01

    Using a sample of 328 White, Latino, and Black Los Angeles County adults, the authors examined the tendency to employ various affirmative action "frames" (e.g., affirmative action as a "tie-breaking" device or as a quota-based policy). All three groups agreed about which frames cast affirmative action in a positive light and which cast it in a negative light. Although minorities had a tendency to frame affirmative action in terms that most people find morally acceptable, Whites had a tendency to frame affirmative action in terms most people find unacceptable. In addition, compared to minorities, Whites were less supportive of affirmative action regardless of how it was framed. LISREL modeling also was employed to test two competing models regarding predictors of the tendency to use frames that one personally finds to be relatively negative versus positive. Consistent with the expectations of social dominance theory and a motivated cognition perspective, the authors found that social dominance orientation (SDO) had significant net direct and indirect effects on one's framing of affirmative action. PMID:16702158

  14. A comparison of the relationships between psychosocial factors, occupational strain, and work ability among 4 ethnic teacher groups in China.

    PubMed

    Lian, Yulong; Xiao, Jing; Zhang, Chen; Guan, Suzhen; Li, Fuye; Ge, Hua; Liu, Jiwen

    2016-01-01

    The present study compared the level of occupational strain and work ability among Han, Hui, Uygur, Hui, and Kazakh teachers, and explored ethnic differences based on the associations of psychosocial factors at work, occupational strain, and work ability. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 2,941 teachers in primary and secondary schools in Xinjiang Province, China. Psychosocial factors, occupational strain, and work ability were measured using the Occupation Stress Inventory-Revised Edition (OSI-R) and Work Ability Index. Han and Hui teachers experienced reduced work ability compared with Uygur and Kazakh teachers, and this finding was caused, in part, by exposure to psychosocial factors at work. The vocational and psychological strains caused by these factors play an important role in reduced work ability among all ethnic teacher groups. The findings indicate the importance of taking action to reduce occupational strain for promoting teachers' work ability in multiethnic workplaces.

  15. The QCD/SM working group: Summary report

    SciTech Connect

    W. Giele et al.

    2004-01-12

    Quantum Chromo-Dynamics (QCD), and more generally the physics of the Standard Model (SM), enter in many ways in high energy processes at TeV Colliders, and especially in hadron colliders (the Tevatron at Fermilab and the forthcoming LHC at CERN), First of all, at hadron colliders, QCD controls the parton luminosity, which rules the production rates of any particle or system with large invariant mass and/or large transverse momentum. Accurate predictions for any signal of possible ''New Physics'' sought at hadron colliders, as well as the corresponding backgrounds, require an improvement in the control of uncertainties on the determination of PDF and of the propagation of these uncertainties in the predictions. Furthermore, to fully exploit these new types of PDF with uncertainties, uniform tools (computer interfaces, standardization of the PDF evolution codes used by the various groups fitting PDF's) need to be proposed and developed. The dynamics of colour also affects, both in normalization and shape, various observables of the signals of any possible ''New Physics'' sought at the TeV scale, such as, e.g. the production rate, or the distributions in transverse momentum of the Higgs boson. Last, but not least, QCD governs many backgrounds to the searches for this ''New Physics''. Large and important QCD corrections may come from extra hard parton emission (and the corresponding virtual corrections), involving multi-leg and/or multi-loop amplitudes. This requires complex higher order calculations, and new methods have to be designed to compute the required multi-legs and/or multi-loop corrections in a tractable form. In the case of semi-inclusive observables, logarithmically enhanced contributions coming from multiple soft and collinear gluon emission require sophisticated QCD resummation techniques. Resummation is a catch-all name for efforts to extend the predictive power of QCD by summing the large logarithmic corrections to all orders in perturbation theory. In

  16. The index theory on non-compact manifolds with proper group action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braverman, Maxim

    2015-12-01

    We construct a regularized index of a generalized Dirac operator on a complete Riemannian manifold endowed with a proper action of a unimodular Lie group. We show that the index is preserved by a certain class of non-compact cobordisms and prove a gluing formula for the regularized index. The results of this paper generalize our previous construction of index for compact group action and the recent paper of Hochs and Mathai who studied the case of a Hamiltonian action on a symplectic manifold. As an application of the cobordism invariance of the index we give an affirmative answer to a question of Hochs and Mathai about the independence of the Hochs-Mathai quantization of the metric, connection and other choices.

  17. 300-FF-1 remedial design report/remedial action work plan

    SciTech Connect

    Gustafson, F.W.

    1997-02-01

    The 300 Area has been divided into three operable units 300-FF-1, 300-FF-2, and 300-FF-5 all of which are in various stages of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) process. The 300-FF-1 Operable Unit, the subject of this report, includes liquid waste disposal sites, landfills, and a burial ground. This Remedial Design Report/Remedial Action Work Plan (RDR/RAWP) provides a summary description of each waste site included in the 300-FF-1 Operable Unit, the basis for remedial actions to be taken, and the remedial action approach and management process for implementing these actions. The remedial action approach and management sections provide a description of the remedial action process description, the project schedule, the project team, required planning documentation, the remedial action change process, the process for verifying attainment of the remedial action goals, and the required CERCLA and RCRA closeout documentation. Appendix A provides additional details on each waste site. In addition to remediation of the waste sites, waste generated during the remedial investigation/feasibility study portions of the project will also be disposed at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF). Appendix B provides a summary of the modeling performed in the 300-FF-1 Phase 3 FS and a description of the modeling effort to be used to show attainment of the remedial action goals. Appendix C provides the sampling and analysis plan (SAP) for all sampling and field-screening activities performed during remediation and for verification of attainment with the remedial action goals. Appendix D provides the public involvement plan, prepared to ensure information is provided to the public during remedial design and remedial action processes.

  18. Benefits, Barriers, and Cues to Action of Yoga Practice: A Focus Group Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkinson, Nancy L.; Permuth-Levine, Rachel

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: To explore perceived benefits, barriers, and cues to action of yoga practice among adults. Methods: Focus groups were conducted with persons who had never practiced yoga, practitioners of one year or less, and practitioners for more than one year. The Health Belief Model was the theoretical foundation of inquiry. Results: All…

  19. Group Action Planning: An Innovative Manual for Building a Self-Determined Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Emma Longan; And Others

    This manual is designed to provide adolescents and young adults who have disabilities with a blueprint for setting and achieving goals, making decisions, acquiring needed supports, and achieving a self-determined and sustainable lifestyle. A planning process called Group Action Planning is used as a foundation for self-determination, with…

  20. Working Group Reports and Presentations: Virtual Worlds and Virtual Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LAmoreaux, Claudia

    2006-01-01

    Scientists and engineers are continually developing innovative methods to capitalize on recent developments in computational power. Virtual worlds and virtual exploration present a new toolset for project design, implementation, and resolution. Replication of the physical world in the virtual domain provides stimulating displays to augment current data analysis techniques and to encourage public participation. In addition, the virtual domain provides stakeholders with a low cost, low risk design and test environment. The following document defines a virtual world and virtual exploration, categorizes the chief motivations for virtual exploration, elaborates upon specific objectives, identifies roadblocks and enablers for realizing the benefits, and highlights the more immediate areas of implementation (i.e. the action items). While the document attempts a comprehensive evaluation of virtual worlds and virtual exploration, the innovative nature of the opportunities presented precludes completeness. The authors strongly encourage readers to derive additional means of utilizing the virtual exploration toolset.

  1. The Removal Action Work Plan for CPP-603A Basin Facility

    SciTech Connect

    B. T. Richards

    2006-06-05

    This revised Removal Action Work Plan describes the actions to be taken under the non-time-critical removal action recommended in the Action Memorandum for the Non-Time Critical Removal Action at the CPP-603A Basins, Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, as evaluated in the Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis for the CPP-603A Basin Non-Time Critical Removal Action, Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. The regulatory framework outlined in this Removal Action Work Plan has been modified from the description provided in the Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis (DOE/NE-ID-11140, Rev. 1, August 2004). The modification affects regulation of sludge removal, treatment, and disposal, but the end state and technical approaches have not changed. Revision of this document had been delayed until the basin sludge was successfully managed. This revision (Rev. 1) has been prepared to provide information that was not previously identified in Rev. 0 to describe the removal, treatment, and disposal of the basin water at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) CERCLA Disposal Facility evaporation ponds and fill the basins with grout/controlled low strength material (CLSM) was developed. The Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis for the CPP-603A Basin Non-Time Critical Removal Action, Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center - conducted pursuant to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act - evaluated risks associated with deactivation of the basins and alternatives for addressing those risks. The decision to remove and dispose of the basin water debris not containing uranium grouted in place after the sludge has been removed and managed under the Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act has been documented in the Act Memorandum for the Non-Time Critical Removal Action at the CPP-603A Basins, Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center.

  2. Emotions in Group Work: Insights from an Appraisal-Oriented Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zschocke, Karen; Wosnitza, Marold; Bürger, Kathrin

    2016-01-01

    Small group work is common practice in higher education. However, empirical research on students' emotions related to group work is still relatively scarce. Particularly, little is known about students' appraisals of a group task as antecedents of emotions arising in the context of group work. This paper provides a first attempt to systematically…

  3. The Work Compatibility Improvement Framework: theory and application of improvement action and intervention strategies.

    PubMed

    Genaidy, Ash M; Rinder, Magda M; Sequeira, Reynold; A-Rehim, Amal D

    2009-05-01

    Challenges facing management of manufacturing firms can be transformed into asset gains by giving careful consideration to the worker-work environment interface. The benefits of a 'healthy' interface may lead to sizable reductions in rising health care costs and retention of highly qualified workers. This paper presents a novel approach for the 'improve' phase of the Work Compatibility Improvement Framework. The work tasks of this research consisted of: (a) fundamentals of cognitive-based improvement action and intervention; (b) design concepts and process of improvement action/intervention generation; (c) assessment model of estimated gains in company's assets; (d) application demonstration in the manufacturing sector. The process of improvement action/intervention generation is described, preceded by a description of the fundamentals of cognitive-based improvement action and intervention and system architecture. This is followed by a documentation of estimated asset gains as a result of the improvement plan. The results showed that expert workers were, on average, 78% in agreement with the algorithm-identified improvement actions. Their knowledge was used to update the recommended actions as well as to detail the multiple strategies required to address the improvement actions. As a result, an integrated improvement plan was developed resulting in estimated asset gains of $1.6 million, which was validated by the general manager. The research reported herein documented the theory and application of the 'improve' phase of the Work Compatibility Improvement Framework. The economic assessment of the suggested improvement is also reported and this has proved to be an important driver to secure the firm collaboration of manufacturing enterprise management. An integrated improvement solution plan backed by a detailed economic assessment of suggested improvements is essential to demonstrate the full potential of workplace micro- and macro-ergonomic interventions. PMID

  4. Software Development Group. Software Review Center. Microcomputing Working Paper Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perkey, Nadine; Smith, Shirley C.

    Two papers describe the roles of the Software Development Group (SDG) and the Software Review Center (SRC) at Drexel University. The first paper covers the primary role of the SDG, which is designed to assist Drexel faculty with the technical design and programming of courseware for the Apple Macintosh microcomputer; the relationship of the SDG…

  5. Working in the Cafe: Lessons in Group Dialogue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prewitt, Vana

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this paper is to report on findings related to the use of a large group intervention method known as The World Cafe. Design/methodology/approach: The intervention method and its philosophical genesis are described along with lessons learned from observation, personal use, and interviews with cafe participants. Findings: While…

  6. Working in the Cafe: Lessons in Group Dialogue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prewitt, Vana

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to report on findings related to the use of a large group intervention method known as The World Cafe. Design/methodology/approach: The intervention method and its philosophical genesis are described, along with lessons learned from observation, personal use, and interviews with cafe participants. Findings:…

  7. Report of the Working Group on Media Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Sessler, A.M.

    1982-04-12

    A summary is given of the activities of those in the Media Accelerator Group. Attention was focused on the Inverse Cherenkov Accelerator, the Laser Focus Accelerator, and the Beat Wave Accelerator. For each of these the ultimate capability of the concept was examined as well as the next series of experiments which needs to be performed in order to advance the concept.

  8. Key Determinants of Student Satisfaction When Undertaking Group Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pang, Elvy; Tong, Canon; Wong, Anthony

    2011-01-01

    The increasing popularity of team structures in business environment coupled with the common practice of including group projects/assignments in university curricula means that business schools should direct efforts towards maximizing team as well as personal results. Yet, most frameworks for studying teams center exclusively on team level…

  9. Growing Up Girl: Preparing for Change through Group Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khattab, Nancy; Jones, Cathy P.

    2007-01-01

    The early years of school provide opportunities for active learning, including developing habits of resiliency and perceptions of self-worth. Girls in particular may be at risk for developing negative self-perceptions. This article presents a pilot group (psychoeducational and counseling) designed to educate members about pre-adolescent…

  10. Multi-Disciplinary Peer-Mark Moderation of Group Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willmot, Peter; Pond, Keith

    2012-01-01

    Self and peer assessment offers benefits for enhancing student learning. Peer moderation provides a convenient solution for awarding individual marks in group assignments. This paper provides a significant review of peer-mark moderation, and describes an award winning, web-based tool that was developed in the UK and is now spreading across the…

  11. Polycomb group protein bodybuilding: working out the routines.

    PubMed

    Sievers, Cem; Paro, Renato

    2013-09-30

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins regulate gene expression by modifying chemical and structural properties of chromatin. Isono et al. (2013) now report in Developmental Cell a polymerization-dependent mechanism used by PcG proteins to form higher-order chromatin structures, referred to as Polycomb bodies, and demonstrate its necessity for gene silencing.

  12. Evaluating Culturally Responsive Group Work with Black Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Lani V.; Warner, Lynn A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined the efficacy of a culturally congruent group treatment model, entitled "Claiming Your Connections" (CYC) aimed at reducing depressive symptoms and perceived stress, and enhancing psychosocial competence (i.e., locus of control and active coping) among Black women. Method: A total of 58 Black women recruited from health…

  13. Crossing the Line: Collusion or Collaboration in University Group Work?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutherland-Smith, Wendy

    2013-01-01

    "Almost everyone has difficulty identifying where collaboration stops and collusion begins." (Carroll & Appleton, 2001, p.15) In both policy and practice, collusion is a perplexing area of academic integrity. Students are expected to learn to work collaboratively in university courses, yet are often required to submit assessment tasks as…

  14. Working memory modulates neural efficiency over motor components during a novel action planning task: an EEG study.

    PubMed

    Behmer, Lawrence P; Fournier, Lisa R

    2014-03-01

    Research shows neural efficiency of motor-related activity based on learning and expertise in a specific domain (e.g., guitar playing, sharp-shooting or a sport). However, it is unknown whether neural efficiency of motor-related activity, underlying action planning and maintenance, can be modulated by general cognitive ability alone. This study examined whether working memory span can influence motor-related neural activity during a novel motor task. Participants were divided into low- and high-span working memory groups based on their scores in an operation span task. Afterwards, participants learned different sequences of button responses corresponding to different abstract stimuli. The task required participants to briefly maintain an action plan in working memory to a stimulus that they would execute after responding to a subsequent stimulus. We used EEG to record changes in event related power in the mu- and beta-bands in left and right motor components during the interval where participants planned and maintained an action in working memory. Results showed decreases in mu- and beta-event related power for low-span participants and increases in mu- and beta-event related power for high-span participants over the left motor cluster while maintaining an action plan in working memory. Also, high-span participants were faster and more accurate in the task than low-span participants. This suggests that neural efficiency during a novel motor task can be influenced by working memory span, and that such differences are localized to the motor system. PMID:24291024

  15. A Demands-Resources Model of Work Pressure in IT Student Task Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, E. Vance; Sheetz, Steven D.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an initial test of the group task demands-resources (GTD-R) model of group task performance among IT students. We theorize that demands and resources in group work influence formation of perceived group work pressure (GWP) and that heightened levels of GWP inhibit group task performance. A prior study identified 11 factors…

  16. The Spanish human papillomavirus vaccine consensus group: a working model.

    PubMed

    Cortés-Bordoy, Javier; Martinón-Torres, Federico

    2010-08-01

    Successful implementation of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine in each country can only be achieved from a complementary and synergistic perspective, integrating all the different points of view of the diverse related professionals. It is this context where the Spanish HPV Vaccine Consensus Group (Grupo Español de Consenso sobre la Vacuna VPH, GEC-VPH) was created. GEC-VPH philosophy, objectives and experience are reported in this article, with particular attention to the management of negative publicity and anti-vaccine groups. Initiatives as GEC-VPH--adapted to each country's particular idiosyncrasies--might help to overcome the existing barriers and to achieve wide and early implementation of HPV vaccination. PMID:20484987

  17. Working Group Reports and Presentations: Mars Settlement and Society

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKay, Chris

    2006-01-01

    The long-term implications of space exploration must be considered early in the process. With this in mind, the Mars Settlement and Society Group focused on five key areas: Philosophical Framework, Community Infrastructure and Government, Creating Stakeholders, Human Subsystems, and Habitat Design. The team proposes long and short term goals to support getting to and then staying long-term on Mars. All objectives shared the theme that they should engage, inspire, and educate the public with the intent of fostering stakeholders in the exploration of Mars. The objectives of long-term settlement on Mars should not neglect group dynamics, issues of reproduction, and a strong philosophical framework for the establishment of a society.

  18. The Canon Group's effort: working toward a merged model.

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, C; Huff, S M; Hersh, W R; Pattison-Gordon, E; Cimino, J J

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop a representational schema for clinical data for use in exchanging data and applications, using a collaborative approach. DESIGN: Representational models for clinical radiology were independently developed manually by several Canon Group members who had diverse application interests, using sample reports. These models were merged into one common model through an iterative process by means of workshops, meetings, and electronic mail. RESULTS: A core merged model for radiologic findings present in a set of reports that subsumed the models that were developed independently. CONCLUSIONS: The Canon Group's modeling effort focused on a collaborative approach to developing a representational schema for clinical concepts, using chest radiography reports as the initial experiment. This effort resulted in a core model that represents a consensus. Further efforts in modeling will extend the representational coverage and will also address issues such as scalability, automation, evaluation, and support of the collaborative effort. PMID:7895135

  19. Operable Unit 3-13, Group 7, SFE-20 Hot Waste Tank System Remedial Action Report

    SciTech Connect

    Lee Davison

    2009-06-30

    This Remedial Action Report summarizes activities undertaken to remediate the Operable Unit 3-13, Group 7, SFE-20 Hot Waste Tank System at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center at the Idaho National Laboratory Site. The site addressed in this report was defined in the Operable Unit 3-13 Record of Decision and subsequent implementing documents. This report concludes that remediation requirements and cleanup goals established for the site have been accomplished and is hereafter considered a No Further Action site.

  20. Operable Unit 3-13, Group 7, SFE-20 Hot Waste Tank System Remedial Action Request

    SciTech Connect

    L. Davison

    2009-06-30

    This Remedial Action Report summarizes activities undertaken to remediate the Operable Unit 3-13, Group 7, SFE-20 Hot Waste Tank System at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center at the Idaho National Laboratory Site. The site addressed in this report was defined in the Operable Unit 3-13 Record of Decision and subsequent implementing documents. This report concludes that remediation requirements and cleanup goals established for the site have been accomplished and is hereafter considered a No Further Action site.

  1. Group mentoring: a transition-to-work strategy.

    PubMed

    Scott, Elaine S; Smith, Sherry D

    2008-01-01

    Current financial constraints and workplace staffing shortages challenge the viability of using one-on-one mentoring models to support new graduate nurses. This article describes an innovative strategy for mentoring a large cohort of new nurses. Using a Group Mentoring Team, education specialists in a small rural hospital implemented a cost-effective program to help new nurses gain confidence and competence in the first year of nursing practice. PMID:18838903

  2. [Draft minutes of IAPG Mechanical Working Group meeting

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, D.M.

    1993-12-15

    This report provides the draft minutes of the Interagency Advanced Power Group meeting held November 3--4, 1993. Topics addressed are: Materials for thermal management; photovoltaic programs in the Airforce; ground based radar advanced power system development program; battery research; generator prognostics & diagnostics equipment; a thermal flight experiment test program; power systems assessment; Overview: Phillip`s space thermal technologies branch; and development of actuator thermal management.

  3. Work Process in Primary Health Care: action research with Community Health Workers.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, Luciana; Soares, Cassia Baldini

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this article was to describe and analyze the work of community health workers (CHW). The main objective of study was to analyze the development process of primary health care practices related to drug consumption. The study is based on the Marxist theoretical orientation and the action research methodology, which resulted in the performance of 15 emancipatory workshops. The category work process spawned the content analysis. It exposed the social abandonment of the environment in which the CHWs work is performed. The latter had an essential impact on the identification of the causes of drug-related problems. These findings made it possible to criticize the reiterative, stressful actions that are being undertaken there. Such an act resulted in raising of the awareness and creating the means for political action. The CHWs motivated themselves to recognize the object of the work process in primary health care, which they found to be the disease or addiction in the case of drug users. They have criticized this categorization as well as discussed the social division of work and the work itself whilst recognizing themselves as mere instruments in the work process. The latter has inspired the CHW to become subjects, or co-producers of transformations of social needs.

  4. Group effects of instrumentality and name relation on action naming in bilingual anomic aphasia.

    PubMed

    Kambanaros, Maria

    2009-07-01

    Verb production in sentences was investigated in two groups of late bilingual Greek-English speakers: individuals with anomic aphasia and a control group. Verb retrieval in sentences was significantly impaired in both languages for the individuals with anomic aphasia. Additional results revealed no effect of instrumentality on action naming in sentences in either language. However, there was a negative effect of verb-noun name relation on instrumental verb production in English only. Results confirm intact verb lemma retrieval for this group of bilingual individuals with anomic aphasia, but a breakdown at the level of accessing the phonological or lexical form.

  5. Work Personality, Work Engagement, and Academic Effort in a Group of College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strauser, David R.; O'Sullivan, Deirdre; Wong, Alex W. K.

    2012-01-01

    The authors investigated the relationship between the variables of work engagement, developmental work personality, and academic effort in a sample of college students. This study provides evidence for the hypothesized positive relationship between academic effort, engagement, and work personality. When gender was controlled, the Work Tasks…

  6. Constellation Mission Operation Working Group: ESMO Maneuver Planning Process Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moyer, Eric

    2015-01-01

    The Earth Science Mission Operation (ESMO) Project created an Independent Review Board to review our Conjunction Risk evaluation process and Maneuver Planning Process to identify improvements that safely manages mission conjunction risks, maintains ground track science requirements, and minimizes overall hours expended on High Interest Events (HIE). The Review Board is evaluating the current maneuver process which requires support by multiple groups. In the past year, there have been several changes to the processes although many prior and new concerns exist. This presentation will discuss maneuver process reviews and Board comments, ESMO assessment and path foward, ESMO future plans, recent changes and concerns.

  7. Division XII / Commission 14 / Working Group Collision Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peach, Gillian; Dimitrijevic, Milan S.

    2012-04-01

    Research in atomic and molecular collision processes and spectral line broadening has been very active since our last report, Peach, Dimitrijević & Stancil 2009. Given the large volume of the published literature and the limited space available, we have attempted to identify work most relevant to astrophysics. Since our report can not be comprehensive, additional publications can be found in the databases at the web addresses listed in the final section. Elastic and inelastic collisions among electrons, atoms, ions, and molecules are included and charge transfer can be very important in collisions between heavy particles.

  8. Division B Commission 14 Working Group: Collision Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peach, Gillian; Dimitrijevic, Milan S.; Barklem, Paul S.

    2016-04-01

    Since our last report (Peach & Dimitrijević 2012), a large number of new publications on the results of research in atomic and molecular collision processes and spectral line broadening have been published. Due to the limited space available, we have only included work of importance for astrophysics. Additional relevant papers, not included in this report, can be found in the databases at the web addresses provided in Section 6. Elastic and inelastic collisions between electrons, atoms, ions, and molecules are included, as well as charge transfer in collisions between heavy particles which can be very important.

  9. Civilian Agency Industry Working Group EVM World Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerby, Jerald

    2013-01-01

    Objectives include: Promote the use of standards ]based, objective, and quantitative systems for managing projects and programs in the federal government. Understand how civilian agencies in general, manage their projects and programs. Project management survey expected to go out soon to civilian agencies. Describe how EVM and other best practices can be applied by the government to better manage its project and programs irrespective of whether work is contracted out or the types of contracts employed. Develop model policies aimed at project and program managers that are transportable across the government.

  10. Learning about friction: group dynamics in engineering students' work with free body diagrams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berge, Maria; Weilenmann, Alexandra

    2014-11-01

    In educational research, it is well-known that collaborative work on core conceptual issues in physics leads to significant improvements in students' conceptual understanding. In this paper, we explore collaborative learning in action, adding to previous research in engineering education with a specific focus on the students' use of free body diagrams in interaction. By looking at details in interaction among a group of three engineering students, we illustrate how they collectively construct a free body diagram together when learning introductory mechanics. In doing so, we have focused on both learning possibilities and the dynamic processes that take place in the learning activity. These findings have a number of implications for educational practice.

  11. A path less traveled: A self-guided action science inquiry among a small group of adult learners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folkman, Daniel Vance

    This dissertation provides an analysis of the dialogue that occurred among a small group of adult learners who engaged in a self-guided action science inquiry into their own practice. The following pages describe how this group of five practitioners ventured into a critical, self-reflective inquiry into their own values, feelings, and intentions in search of personal and professional growth. It is a deeply revealing story that shows how, through group dialogue, the members gradually unravel the interconnections between their values, feelings, and intention. They uncover surprising and unanticipated patterns in their reasoning-in-action that reflect lessons from present day experiences as well as childhood axioms about what constitutes appropriate behavior. They push their learning further to recognize emotional triggers that are useful in confronting old habits of mind that must be overcome if new Model II strategies are to be learned and internalized. They conclude that becoming Model II requires a centering on basic values, a personal commitment to change, a willingness to persist in the face of resistance, and the wisdom to act with deliberate caution. The transformative power of this insight lies in the realization of what it takes personally and collectively to make the world a truly respectful, productive, democratic, and socially just place in which to live and work. The action science literature holds the assumption that a trained facilitator is needed to guide such an inquiry and the learning of Model II skills. Unfortunately, there are few educator-trainers available to facilitate the learning of Model II proficiencies over the months and years that may be required. The data presented here show that it is possible for a group of highly motivated individuals to initiate and sustain their own action science inquiry without the aid of a highly skilled facilitator. A model of the group dialogue is presented that highlights the salient characteristics of an

  12. What Works in Oklahoma Schools: A Comprehensive Needs Assessment of Oklahoma Schools. Phase III Action Steps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marzano Research Laboratory, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This document contains the Phase III report from the "What Works in Oklahoma Schools" study. As opposed to describing the findings from the study that was conducted, it provides a tool-kit that can be used by Oklahoma principals and teachers to determine the best courses of action for their schools and classrooms. The tools provided in this report…

  13. Medical Residents' Beliefs and Actions: Implications for Clinical Teaching during Work Rounds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valerio, Nina Morena L.

    A study was done to examine the relationships between medical residents' beliefs about their clinical teaching roles and their teaching behaviors within the context of work rounds. The research was conceptually based on theories of symbolic interactionism and reasoned action. Fourteen residents in general internal medicine, representing four…

  14. Using Work Action Analysis to Identify Web-Portal Requirements for a Professional Development Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nickles, George

    2007-01-01

    This article describes using Work Action Analysis (WAA) as a method for identifying requirements for a web-based portal that supports a professional development program. WAA is a cognitive systems engineering method for modeling multi-agent systems to support design and evaluation. A WAA model of the professional development program of the…

  15. Maintaining professional confidence--monitoring work with obese schoolchildren with support of an action plan.

    PubMed

    Müllersdorf, Maria; Zuccato, Linda Martinson; Nimborg, Jennie; Eriksson, Henrik

    2010-03-01

    School nurses meet obese children in their everyday work. Although school nurses acknowledge the importance of getting hold of school children's obesity, they seem to lack strategies enabling them to handle the delicacy of the problem. The aim of this study was to describe how school nurses perceive their work with obese children with support of an action plan. Qualitative in-depth interviews were performed with six school nurses working in a municipality, where an action plan for the work with obese school-age children had been implemented. The transcribed data was analysed by a manifest content analysis. The results showed that the informants perceived having a key role in the obesity work, which they experienced as meaningful, but full of pitfalls. They found themselves suitable for the task, but perceived lacking deeper knowledge about specific modes of work such as motivational conversation. As the task was considered delicate, there were great demands for guidelines, education and cooperation. The action plan served as support for maintaining professional confidence throughout the process, but there was room for improvements.

  16. 77 FR 74827 - Working Group on Access to Information on Prescription Drug Container Labels

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-18

    ... a stakeholder working group to develop best practices for making information on prescription drug... working group to develop best practices for making information on prescription drug container labels... to develop best practices for pharmacies on providing independent access to prescription...

  17. Indigenous youth participatory action research: re-visioning social justice for social work with indigenous youths.

    PubMed

    Johnston-Goodstar, Katie

    2013-10-01

    The NASW Code of Ethics identifies social justice as one of six foundational values of the social work profession. Indigenous communities have long questioned the authenticity of this commitment and rightly so, given the historical activities of social work and social workers. Still, the commitment persists as an inspiration for an imperfect, yet determined, profession. This article presents a theoretical discussion of questions pertinent for social justice in social work practice in Native American communities: Whose definition of social justice should prevail in work with and in Indigenous communities? What can a revisioning of social justice mean to the development of Native communities and for Native youths in particular? What methods or processes of social work are most appropriate for this social justice work? This article presents a case for the practice of youth participatory action research as one method to work for social justice in Native communities.

  18. Future Research Directions in Asthma. An NHLBI Working Group Report.

    PubMed

    Levy, Bruce D; Noel, Patricia J; Freemer, Michelle M; Cloutier, Michelle M; Georas, Steve N; Jarjour, Nizar N; Ober, Carole; Woodruff, Prescott G; Barnes, Kathleen C; Bender, Bruce G; Camargo, Carlos A; Chupp, Geoff L; Denlinger, Loren C; Fahy, John V; Fitzpatrick, Anne M; Fuhlbrigge, Anne; Gaston, Ben M; Hartert, Tina V; Kolls, Jay K; Lynch, Susan V; Moore, Wendy C; Morgan, Wayne J; Nadeau, Kari C; Ownby, Dennis R; Solway, Julian; Szefler, Stanley J; Wenzel, Sally E; Wright, Rosalind J; Smith, Robert A; Erzurum, Serpil C

    2015-12-01

    Asthma is a common chronic disease without cure. Our understanding of asthma onset, pathobiology, classification, and management has evolved substantially over the past decade; however, significant asthma-related morbidity and excess healthcare use and costs persist. To address this important clinical condition, the NHLBI convened a group of extramural investigators for an Asthma Research Strategic Planning workshop on September 18-19, 2014, to accelerate discoveries and their translation to patients. The workshop focused on (1) in utero and early-life origins of asthma, (2) the use of phenotypes and endotypes to classify disease, (3) defining disease modification, (4) disease management, and (5) implementation research. This report summarizes the workshop and produces recommendations to guide future research in asthma. PMID:26305520

  19. Future Research Directions in Asthma. An NHLBI Working Group Report.

    PubMed

    Levy, Bruce D; Noel, Patricia J; Freemer, Michelle M; Cloutier, Michelle M; Georas, Steve N; Jarjour, Nizar N; Ober, Carole; Woodruff, Prescott G; Barnes, Kathleen C; Bender, Bruce G; Camargo, Carlos A; Chupp, Geoff L; Denlinger, Loren C; Fahy, John V; Fitzpatrick, Anne M; Fuhlbrigge, Anne; Gaston, Ben M; Hartert, Tina V; Kolls, Jay K; Lynch, Susan V; Moore, Wendy C; Morgan, Wayne J; Nadeau, Kari C; Ownby, Dennis R; Solway, Julian; Szefler, Stanley J; Wenzel, Sally E; Wright, Rosalind J; Smith, Robert A; Erzurum, Serpil C

    2015-12-01

    Asthma is a common chronic disease without cure. Our understanding of asthma onset, pathobiology, classification, and management has evolved substantially over the past decade; however, significant asthma-related morbidity and excess healthcare use and costs persist. To address this important clinical condition, the NHLBI convened a group of extramural investigators for an Asthma Research Strategic Planning workshop on September 18-19, 2014, to accelerate discoveries and their translation to patients. The workshop focused on (1) in utero and early-life origins of asthma, (2) the use of phenotypes and endotypes to classify disease, (3) defining disease modification, (4) disease management, and (5) implementation research. This report summarizes the workshop and produces recommendations to guide future research in asthma.

  20. Division B Commission 14 Working Group: Molecular Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Federman, Steven R.; Bernath, Peter F.; Müller, Holger S. P.

    2016-04-01

    The current report covers the period from the second half of 2011 to late 2014. It is divided into three areas covering rotational, vibrational, and electronic spectroscopy. A signifcant amount of experimental and theoretical work has been accomplished over the past three years, leading to the development and expansion of a number of databases whose links are provided below. Two notable publications have appeared recently: An issue of The Journal of Physical Chemistry A in 2013 honoring the many contributions of Takeshi Oka (J. Phys. Chem. A, 117, pp. 9305-10143); and IAU Symposium 297 on Diffuse Interstellar Bands (Cami & Cox 2014). A number of the relevant papers from these volumes are cited in what follows. Related research on collisions, reactions on grain surfaces, and astrochemistry are not included here.

  1. The WHO Informal Working Group on Echinococcosis. Coordinating Board of the WHO-IWGE.

    PubMed

    Vuitton, D A

    1997-12-01

    WHO Informal Working Groups on Echinococcosis were founded in 1985 and for 10 years, under the leadership of Prof. J. Eckert (Zurich, Switzerland), they contributed much to facilitate exchanges between interested scientists working in their respective areas. In 1995, the Veterinary Public Health Unit, at WHO, decided to modify the functioning of the Groups and to transform them into a single Group. The Working Group brings together all the scientists involved in research on Echinococcosis whatever their specialty, field of interest, or type of Echinococcosis studied. The aim of the Group is to establish international networks on relevant, up-to-date and/or important problems in Echinococcosis on the basis of i) international cooperation, ii) high scientific standards, and iii) accurate methodology. A Coordinator is designated by WHO and has a 4-year term. He/she is assisted by a Coordinating Board. This board is also proposed for a 4-year term, so that it can be regularly renewed. It, thus, will give an opportunity for closer association with the life of the Working Group to many scientists; the coordinator for the next term will be chosen from among the participants so that a continuity of action is ensured. The current networks deal with: "Standardization of the ultra-sound classification of hydatid cysts" (coordinator: C. Mcpherson); "Long-term follow-up of patients treated with PAIR" (coordinator: C. Filice); "Standardization of the staging/classification of patients with Alveolar Echinococcosis" (coordinator: P. Kern); "Vaccination of sheep for the prevention of Echinococcosis: pilot trials" (coordinator: M. Lightowlers); "Standardization of immunological tools for the detection of Echinococcus coproantigens in carnivores" (coordinator: P.S. Craig); "Educational material for Echinococcosis prevention/control" (coordinator: L. Garcia); and "Methodology for the evaluation of the economical cost of Echinococcosis" (coordinator: G. Battelli). Two new networks are

  2. Management response plan for the Chemical Safety Vulnerability Working Group report. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    The Chemical Safety Vulnerability (CSV) Working Group was established to identify adverse conditions involving hazardous chemicals at DOE facilities that might result in fires or explosions, release of hazardous chemicals to the environment, or exposure of workers or the public to chemicals. A CSV Review was conducted in 146 facilities at 29 sites. Eight generic vulnerabilities were documented related to: abandoned chemicals and chemical residuals; past chemical spills and ground releases; characterization of legacy chemicals and wastes; disposition of legacy chemicals; storage facilities and conditions; condition of facilities and support systems; unanalyzed and unaddressed hazards; and inventory control and tracking. Weaknesses in five programmatic areas were also identified related to: management commitment and planning; chemical safety management programs; aging facilities that continue to operate; nonoperating facilities awaiting deactivation; and resource allocations. To address the facility-specific and site-specific vulnerabilities, responsible DOE and site-contractor line organizations have developed initial site response plans. These plans, presented as Volume 2 of this Management Response Plan, describe the actions needed to mitigate or eliminate the facility- and site-specific vulnerabilities identified by the CSV Working Group field verification teams. Initial site response plans are described for: Brookhaven National Lab., Hanford Site, Idaho National Engineering Lab., Lawrence Livermore National Lab., Los Alamos National Lab., Oak Ridge Reservation, Rocky Flats Plant, Sandia National Laboratories, and Savannah River Site.

  3. Effects of Group Work Training on Science Attainment in Rural and Urban Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thurston, A.; Topping, K. J.; Christie, D.; Donaldson, C.; Howe, C. J.; Jessiman, E.; Livingston, K.; Tolmie, A.

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of collaborative group work skills training on pupil attainment in science. Twenty-four experimental classes were drawn from schools in rural and urban settings. Pupils in experimental classrooms engaged in general group work skills training and two structured group work activities in science. Attainment was…

  4. 78 FR 54482 - Charter Renewal, Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-04

    ... Bureau of Reclamation Charter Renewal, Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group AGENCY: Bureau of... the Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group. The purpose of the Adaptive Management Work Group is to provide advice and recommendations to the Secretary concerning the operation of Glen Canyon...

  5. 76 FR 54487 - Charter Renewal, Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-01

    ... Bureau of Reclamation Charter Renewal, Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group AGENCY: Bureau of... the Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group. The purpose of the Adaptive Management Work Group... Canyon Dam and the exercise of other authorities pursuant to applicable Federal law. FOR...

  6. Positioning during Group Work on a Novel Task in Algebra II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeJarnette, Anna F.; González, Gloriana

    2015-01-01

    Given the prominence of group work in mathematics education policy and curricular materials, it is important to understand how students make sense of mathematics during group work. We applied techniques from Systemic Functional Linguistics to examine how students positioned themselves during group work on a novel task in Algebra II classes. We…

  7. Association for Specialists in Group Work: Best Practice Guidelines 2007 Revisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, R. Valorie; Pender, Debra A.

    2008-01-01

    The Association for Specialists in Group Work (ASGW) supports the practice of ethical and effective group work through the publication of guiding principles in planning, performing and processing group work. Originally prepared, approved and published in 1998 (ASGW; Rapin and Keel), the current revision addresses changes in the American Counseling…

  8. Exploring Students' Group Work Needs in the Context of Internationalisation Using a Creative Visual Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Andrew; Chiles, Prue; Care, Leo

    2012-01-01

    While UK universities see group work as essential to building higher order intellectual and team skills, many international students are unfamiliar with this way of studying. Group work is also a focus of home students' concerns. Cultural differences in the interpretation of space for learning or how spatial issues affect group work processes has…

  9. Teachers' and Students' Negotiation Moves When Teachers Scaffold Group Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    González, Gloriana; DeJarnette, Anna F.

    2015-01-01

    Group work has been a main activity recommended by mathematics education reform. We aim at describing the patterns of interaction between teachers and students during group work. We ask: How do teachers scaffold group work during a problem-based lesson? We use data from a problem-based lesson taught in six geometry class periods by two teachers…

  10. Summary of the Working Group 2: Ion beams from plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Julien

    2014-03-01

    The production of ion beams by high-power, short-pulse lasers [1] has been the focus of many research groups worldwide during the last decade, mostly driven by the high prospects for applications for science studies (e.g. ultrafast radiography, or prompt heating of dense matter) and society (for medical applications). Compared to ion beams produced by conventional accelerators, the beams produced by intense lasers have been shown to have exceptional properties like extreme brightness, short burst duration and high laminarity. For example, for proton energies above 10 MeV, the transverse (resp. longitudinal) emittance is <0.004 mm m rad (resp. <10-4 eV s), i.e. at least 100-fold (resp. 104-fold) better than conventional accelerator beams. However, their spectral cut-off, although high, is still far from the one reached by conventional accelerators, the beams are divergent (20° typical divergence at the source), and the momentum spectrum of the ions is in general broadband.

  11. EarthCube's Governance Working Group Steering Committee presents roadmap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowring, James F.; Pearthree, Genevieve M.

    2012-10-01

    June 2012 EarthCube Charrette;Washington, D. C., 12-14 June 2012 EarthCube is a U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF) initiative sponsored by the Directorate for Geosciences and the Office of Cyberinfrastructure to transform the conduct of research through open, community- guided development of cyberinfrastructure across the geosciences. EarthCube recently held its second organizational charrette (collaborative design event), with the objective of engaging its 190 physical and 60 remote attendees in discussions and workshops on developing EarthCube. One goal of the charrette was to review and integrate draft roadmaps produced by four NSF- funded Community Groups (Governance, Data, Semantics, and Workflow) and five Concept Awards (Brokering, Earth System Models, Layered Architecture, Interoperability, and Web Services), which emerged from the first charrette, held in November 2011. The roadmaps are the culmination of 6 months of research, community outreach, and deliberations in virtual and physical meetings; they identify initial EarthCube stakeholders and cyberinfrastructure components, in addition to key issues related to advancing EarthCube.

  12. HEP-FCE Working Group on Libraries and Tools

    SciTech Connect

    Borgland, Anders; Elmer, Peter; Kirby, Michael; Patton, Simon; Potekhin, Maxim; Viren, Brett; Yanny, Brian

    2014-12-19

    The High-Energy Physics Forum for Computational Excellence (HEP-FCE) was formed by the Department of Energy as a follow-up to a recent report from the Topical Panel on Computing[1] and the associated P5 recommendation[2]. It is a pilot project distributed across the DOE Labs. During this initial incubation period the Forum is to develop a plan for a robust, long-term organization structure and a functioning web presence for forum activities and outreach, and a study of hardware and software needs across the HEP program. In the following sections we give this working group’s “vision” for aspects and qualities we wish to see in a future HEP-FCE. We then give a prioritized list of technical activities with suggested scoping and deliverables that can be expected to provide cross-experiment benefits. The remaining bulk of the report gives a technical survey of some specific “areas of opportunity” for cross-experiment benefit in the realm of software libs/tools. This survey serves as support for the vision and prioritized list. For each area we describe the ways that cross-experiment benefit is achieved today, as well as describe known failings or pitfalls where such benefit has failed to be achieved and which should be avoided in the future. For both cases, we try to give concrete examples. Each area then ends with an examination of what opportunities exist for improvements in that particular area.

  13. Dream Work: Demystifying Dreams Using a Small Group for Personal Growth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berube, Lionel

    1999-01-01

    Small group dream work facilitates group cohesion and is fun, stimulating, and powerful in assisting with the development of personal insight. Group process protocols, necessary leadership skills, preparation of members, and stages of group dream work are outlined. (Author/GCP)

  14. Working Group Meeting on Heavy Vehicle Aerodynamic Drag: Presentations and Summary of Comments and Conclusions

    SciTech Connect

    Browand, F; Gutierrez, W; Leonard, A; McBride, D; McCallen, R; Ross, J; Roth, K; Rutledge, W; Salari, K

    1998-09-28

    The first Working Group Meeting on Heavy Vehicle Aerodynamic Drag was held at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in Albuquerque, New Mexico on August 28, 1998. The purpose of the meeting was to review the proposed Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP) and provide an update on the Group"s progress. In addition, the technical details of each organization"s activities were presented and discussed. Presentations were given by representatives from the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Transportation Technology Office of Heavy Vehicle Technology (OHVT), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), SNL, University of Southern California (USC), California Institute of Technology (Caltech), and NASA Ames Research Center. These presenters are part of a DOE appointed Technical Team assigned to developing the MYPP. The goal of the MYPP is to develop and demonstrate the ability to simulate and analyze aerodynamic flow around heavy truck vehicles using existing and advanced computational tools (A Multi-Year Program Plan for the Aerodynamic Design of Heavy Vehicles, R. McCallen, D. McBride, W. Rutledge, F. Browand, A. Leonard, .I. Ross, UCRL-PROP- 127753 Dr. Rev 2, May 1998). This report contains the technical presentations (viewgraphs) delivered at the Meeting, briefly summarizes the comments and conclusions from the Meeting participants, and outlines the future action items.

  15. Childhood Memories and Receptivity to Corrective Feedback in Group Supervision: Implications for Group Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Angela; Hulse-Killacky, Diana

    2005-01-01

    This article presents findings from an exploration into supervisees' perspectives on childhood memories and receptivity to corrective feedback in group supervision. Historically, students' receptivity to corrective feedback has not been explored relative to their childhood memories. Ten graduate students from four practicum groups participated in…

  16. Report of the APS Neutrino Study Reactor Working Group

    SciTech Connect

    Abouzaid, E.; Anderson, K.; Barenboim, G.; Berger, B.; Blucher, E.; Bolton, T.; Choubey, S.; Conrad, J.; Formaggio, J.; Freedman, S.; Finely, D.; Fisher, P.; Fujikawa, B.; Gai, M.; Goodman, M.; de Goueva, A.; Hadley, N.; Hahn, R.; Horton-Smith, G.; Kadel, R.; Kayser, B.; Heeger, K.; Klein, J.; Learned, J.; Lindner, M.; Link, J.; Luk, K.-B.; McKeown, R.; Mocioiu, I.; Mohapatra, R.; Naples, D.; Peng, J.; Petcov, S.; Pilcher, J.; Rapidis, P.; Reyna, D.; Shaevitz, M.; Shrock, R.; Stanton, N.; Stefanski, R.; Yamamoto, R.; Worcester, M.

    2004-10-28

    The worldwide program to understand neutrino oscillations and determine the neutrino mixing parameters, CP violating effects, and mass hierarchy will require a broad combination of measurements. The group believes that a key element of this future neutrino program is a multi-detector neutrino experiment (with baselines of {approx} 200 m and {approx} 1.5 km) with a sensitivity of sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 13} = 0.01. In addition to oscillation physics, the reactor experiment may provide interesting measurements of sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub W} at Q{sup 2} = 0, neutrino couplings, magnetic moments, and mixing with sterile neutrino states. {theta}{sub 13} is one of the twenty-six parameters of the standard model, the best model of electroweak interactions for energies below 100 GeV and, as such, is worthy of a precision measurement independent of other considerations. A reactor experiment of the proposed sensitivity will allow a measurement of {theta}{sub 13} with no ambiguities and significantly better precision than any other proposed experiment, or will set limits indicating the scale of future experiments required to make progress. Figure 1 shows a comparison of the sensitivity of reactor experiments of different scales with accelerator experiments for setting limits on sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 13} if the mixing angle is very small, or for making a measurement of sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 13} if the angle is observable. A reactor experiment with a 1% precision may also resolve the degeneracy in the {theta}{sub 23} parameter when combined with long-baseline accelerator experiments. In combination with long-baseline measurements, a reactor experiment may give early indications of CP violation and the mass hierarchy. The combination of the T2K and Nova long-baseline experiments will be able to make significant measurements of these effects if sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 13} > 0.05 and with enhanced beam rates can improve their reach to the sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 13} > 0.02 level

  17. Recommendations and Ongoing Efforts within the NASA Data Quality Working Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moroni, D. F.; Ramapriyan, H.; Bagwell, R.; Downs, R. R.

    2015-12-01

    Since its inception in March 2014, the NASA Data Quality Working Group (DQWG) has procured a set of 12 high level recommendations which had been sifted from and aggregated from a prioritized subset of nearly 100 unique recommendations spanning four unique data quality management phases and distributed between two actionable categories. The four data quality management phases as identified by the DQWG are: 1. Capturing (i.e., deriving, collecting and organizing the information), 2. Describing (i.e., documenting and procuring the information for public consumption), 3. Facilitating Discovery (i.e., publishing and providing access to the information), and 4. Enabling Use (i.e., enhancing the utility of the information). Mapping each of our recommendations to one or more of the above management phases is intended to enable improved assessment of cost, feasibility, and relevancy to the entities responsible for implementing such recommendations. The DQWG further defined two distinct actionable categories: 1) Data Systems and 2) Science. The purpose of these actionable categories is to define specifically who is responsible for the implementation and adherence toward these recommendations; we refer to the responsible entities as the "actionees". Here we will summarize each of the high level recommendations along with their corresponding management phases and actionees. We will present what has recently been identified as our set of "low-hanging fruit" recommendations, which are intended for near-term implementation. Finally, we will present the status and motivation for continuing and future planned activities, which include but are not limited to: engaging inter-agency and international communities, more direct feedback from Earth observation missions, and mapping of "low-hanging fruit" recommendations to existing solutions.

  18. Suicide prevention by online support groups: an action theory-based model of emotional first aid.

    PubMed

    Gilat, Itzhak; Shahar, Golan

    2009-01-01

    In the last two decades, online support groups have become a valuable source of help for individuals in suicidal crisis. Their attractiveness is attributed to features that enhance help-seeking and self-disclosure such as availability, anonymity, and use of written communication. However, online support groups also suffer from limitations and potential risks as agents of suicide prevention. The Israeli Association for Emotional First Aid (ERAN) has developed a practical model that seeks to maximize the benefits and minimize the risks of online suicide prevention. The model applies the Action Theory concepts whereby individuals shape their own environment. The present paper presents the model, which is based on an online support group combined with personal chat and a telephonic help line. The online support group is moderated by paraprofessionals who function as both process regulators and support providers. The principles and practice of the model are described, the theoretical rationale is presented, and directions for future research are suggested.

  19. Acceptable Risk? The Nuclear Age in the United States. Study/Action Guide [and] Companion to Study/Action Guide for Congregations and Religious Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Friends Service Committee, Philadelphia, PA. National Action/Research on the Military Industrial Complex.

    A study-action guide and a companion guide are intended to help citizens explore some of the challenging dilemmas of U.S. nuclear policy. The two guides place strong emphasis on group discussion and participation as well as action citizens might want to take to bring about a non-nuclear world. The companion guide is intended for congregations and…

  20. The SM and NLO Multileg Working Group: Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, J.R.; Archibald, J.; Badger, S.; Ball, R.D.; Bevilacqua, G.; Bierenbaum, I.; Binoth, T.; Boudjema, F.; Boughezal, R.; Bredenstein, A.; Britto, R.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, J.; Carminati, L.; Chachamis, G.; Ciulli, V.; Cullen, G.; Czakon, M.; Del Debbio, L.; Denner, A.; Dissertori, G.; /Edinburgh U. /Zurich, ETH /Michigan State U. /CAFPE, Granada /CERN /Durham U., IPPP /DESY, Zeuthen /Democritos Nucl. Res. Ctr. /Valencia U., IFIC /Annecy, LAPTH /Zurich U. /KEK, Tsukuba /Saclay, SPhT /University Coll. London /Fermilab /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /PSI, Villigen /Florence U. /INFN, Florence /RWTH Aachen U.

    2012-04-10

    After years of waiting, and after six Les Houches workshops, the era of LHC running is finally upon us, albeit at a lower initial center-of-mass energy than originally planned. Thus, there has been a great sense of anticipation from both the experimental and theoretical communities. The last two years, in particular, have seen great productivity in the area of multi-parton calculations at leading order (LO), next-to-leading order (NLO) and next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO), and this productivity is reflected in the proceedings of the NLM group. Both religions, Feynmanians and Unitarians, as well as agnostic experimenters, were well-represented in both the discussions at Les Houches, and in the contributions to the write-up. Next-to-leading order (NLO) is the first order at which the normalization, and in some cases the shape, of perturbative cross sections can be considered reliable. This can be especially true when probing extreme kinematic regions, as for example with boosted Higgs searches considered in several of the contributions to this writeup. A full understanding for both standard model and beyond the standard model physics at the LHC requires the development of fast, reliable programs for the calculation of multi-parton final states at NLO. There have been many advances in the development of NLO techniques, standardization and automation for such processes and this is reflected in the contributions to the first section of this writeup. Many calculations have previously been performed with the aid of semi-numerical techniques. Such techniques, although retaining the desired accuracy, lead to codes which are slow to run. Advances in the calculation of compact analytic expressions for Higgs + 2 jets have resulted in the development of much faster codes, which extend the phenomenology that can be conducted, as well as making the code available to the public for the first time. A prioritized list of NLO cross sections was assembled at Les Houches in 2005