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Sample records for actions including anti-inflammatory

  1. Actions and toxicity of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed

    Simon, L S

    1996-05-01

    Use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) continues to be an important therapeutic intervention throughout the world for patients with pain and inflammation. The six major classes of NSAIDs (including the salicylates) bear the common property of inhibiting cyclooxygenase, the enzyme that catalyzes the synthesis of cyclic endoperoxides from arachidonic acid to yield prostaglandins. Anecdotal evidence has accumulated that the nonacetylated salicylates are as efficacious as the other NSAIDs, but there have been few controlled trials demonstrating that they are reasonable anti-inflammatory agents. This paper discusses the newest of the available clinical observations that nonacetylated salicylates are as efficacious as one of the newer NSAIDs in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Because the nonacetylated salicylates are weak prostaglandin inhibitors, several other non-prostaglandin mediated mechanisms of action for the NSAIDs have been postulated and are described in this paper. In addition to papers describing NSAID effects on cartilage, this year several interesting papers described further effects of tenidap, a novel NSAID presently in development. Other papers reviewed attempts to develop NSAIDs with less severe gastrointestinal effects. Some reports discuss the use of topical NSAIDs, which are not clearly better than oral preparations. Data are also reviewed demonstrating that misoprostol effectively decreased significant poor gastrointestinal outcomes in patients who were treated with this NSAID for 6 months. New treatment regimens for decreasing misoprostol-induced toxicity are also reviewed. Finally, the effects of NSAID prophylaxis in preventing heterotopic bone formation in patients with osteoarthritis who undergo hip replacement surgery are noted. PMID:8796974

  2. The Anti-Inflammatory Actions of Exercise Training

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Michael G.; McFarlin, Brian K.; Markofski, Melissa M.

    2014-01-01

    The list of diseases with a known inflammatory etiology is growing. Cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, diabetes, geriatric cachexia, and Alzheimer’s disease have all been shown to be linked to or exacerbated by aberrantly regulated inflammatory processes. Nevertheless, there is mounting evidence that those who are physically active, or who become physically active, have a reduction in biomarkers associated with chronic inflammation. There was strong early consensus that exercise-induced reductions in inflammation were explained by body mass index or body fatness, but recent studies provide support for the contention that exercise has body fat–independent anti-inflammatory effects. With few exceptions, the anti-inflammatory effects of exercise appear to occur regardless of age or the presence of chronic diseases. What remains unclear are the mechanisms by which exercise training induces these anti-inflammatory effects, but there are several intriguing possibilities, including release of endogenous products, such as heat shock proteins; selective reduction of visceral adipose tissue mass or reducing infiltration of adipocytes by macrophages; shift in immune cell phenotype; cross-tolerizing effects; or exercise-induced shifts in accessory proteins of toll-like receptor signaling. However, future research endeavors are likely to uncover additional potential mechanisms, and it could be some time before functional mechanisms are made clear. In summary, the potential anti-inflammatory influences of exercise training may provide a low-cost, readily available, and effective treatment for low-grade systemic inflammation and could contribute significantly to the positive effects of exercise training on chronic disease. PMID:25431545

  3. Redox-dependent anti-inflammatory signaling actions of unsaturated fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Delmastro-Greenwood, Meghan; Freeman, Bruce A; Wendell, Stacy Gelhaus

    2014-01-01

    Unsaturated fatty acids are metabolized to reactive products that can act as pro- or anti-inflammatory signaling mediators. Electrophilic fatty acid species, including nitro- and oxo-containing fatty acids, display salutary anti-inflammatory and metabolic actions. Electrophilicity can be conferred by both enzymatic and oxidative reactions, via the homolytic addition of nitrogen dioxide to a double bond or via the formation of α,β-unsaturated carbonyl and epoxide substituents. The endogenous formation of electrophilic fatty acids is significant and influenced by diet, metabolic, and inflammatory reactions. Transcriptional regulatory proteins and enzymes can sense the redox status of the surrounding environment upon electrophilic fatty acid adduction of functionally significant, nucleophilic cysteines. Through this covalent and often reversible posttranslational modification, gene expression and metabolic responses are induced. At low concentrations, the pleiotropic signaling actions that are regulated by these protein targets suggest that some classes of electrophilic lipids may be useful for treating metabolic and inflammatory diseases. PMID:24161076

  4. Redox-Dependent Anti-Inflammatory Signaling Actions of Unsaturated Fatty Acids

    PubMed Central

    Delmastro-Greenwood, Meghan; Freeman, Bruce A.; Wendell, Stacy Gelhaus

    2014-01-01

    Unsaturated fatty acids are metabolized to reactive products that can act as pro- or anti-inflammatory signaling mediators. Electrophilic fatty acid species, including nitro- and oxo-containing fatty acids, display salutary anti-inflammatory and metabolic actions. Electrophilicity can be conferred by both enzymatic and oxidative reactions, via the homolytic addition of nitrogen dioxide to a double bond or via the formation of α,β-unsaturated carbonyl and epoxide substituents. The endogenous formation of electrophilic fatty acids is significant and influenced by diet, metabolic, and inflammatory reactions. Transcriptional regulatory proteins and enzymes can sense the redox status of the surrounding environment upon electrophilic fatty acid adduction of functionally significant, nucleophilic cysteines. Through this covalent and often reversible posttranslational modification, gene expression and metabolic responses are induced. At low concentrations, the pleiotropic signaling actions that are regulated by these protein targets suggest that some classes of electrophilic lipids may be useful for treating metabolic and inflammatory diseases. PMID:24161076

  5. [The mode of anti-inflammatory action of a topical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, etofenamate].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, H; Motoyoshi, S; Ishii, K; Seto, Y; Shimoda, A; Kadokawa, T

    1987-01-01

    In order to ascertain the mode of anti-inflammatory action of a topical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, etofenamate which is a diethylene glycol ester of flufenamic acid, the in vitro test for the mechanism of the action were carried out. Etofenamate (3 microM) was hydrolysed to flufenamic acid at a rate of 39.5% and 57.0% of the dose during 30 and 60 min incubation, respectively, when incubated with rat peritoneal macrophages stimulated with starch and bacto peptone in phosphate-buffered saline. PGE2 generation by these cells in MEM medium was dose-relatedly inhibited with etofenamate as well as flufenamic acid at the dosage range of 1 to 30 microM. This suggests that unchanged etofenamate is active, since the highest conversion rate of etofenamate to flufenamic acid was 15% of the dose during the incubation. Etofenamate produced a dose-related inhibition against lipoxygenase prepared from peritoneal polymorphonuclear leucocytes of guinea pigs, and its activity (IC50 = 5.3 X 10(-5) M) was stronger than that of caffeic acid; flufenamic acid was inactive. Inhibitory activity of etofenamate was one-third or less that of flufenamic acid against the hypotonic-hyperthermic lysis of rat erythrocytes and heat-denaturation of bovine serum albumin. From these results, it was suggested that topically applied etofenamate produces its anti-inflammatory action through prostaglandin synthesis inhibition by flufenamic acid produced in the inflammatory tissue and inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis by macrophages and lipoxygenase inhibition by unchanged etofenamate. PMID:2883093

  6. Anti-inflammatory Actions of Adjunctive Tetracyclines and Other Agents in Periodontitis and Associated Comorbidities

    PubMed Central

    Tilakaratne, Aruni; Soory, Mena

    2014-01-01

    The non-antimicrobial properties of tetracyclines such as anti-inflammatory, proanabolic and anti-catabolic actions make them effective pharmaceuticals for the adjunctive management of chronic inflammatory diseases. An over-exuberant inflammatory response to an antigenic trigger in periodontitis and other chronic inflammatory diseases could contribute to an autoimmune element in disease progression. Their adjunctive use in managing periodontitis could have beneficial effects in curbing excessive inflammatory loading from commonly associated comorbidities such as CHD, DM and arthritis. Actions of tetracyclines and their derivatives include interactions with MMPs, tissue inhibitors of MMPs, growth factors and cytokines. They affect the sequence of inflammation with implications on immunomodulation, cell proliferation and angiogenesis; these actions enhance their scope, in treating a range of disease entities. Non-antimicrobial chemically modified tetracyclines (CMTs) sustain their diverse actions in organ systems which include anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic, anti-proteolytic actions, inhibition of angiogenesis and tumor metastasis. A spectrum of biological actions in dermatitis, periodontitis, atherosclerosis, diabetes, arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, malignancy and prevention of bone resorption is particularly relevant to minocycline. Experimental models of ischemia indicate their specific beneficial effects. Parallel molecules with similar functions, improved Zn binding and solubility have been developed for reducing excessive MMP activity. Curbing excessive MMP activity is particularly relevant to periodontitis, and comorbidities addressed here, where specificity is paramount. Unique actions of tetracyclines in a milieu of excessive inflammatory stimuli make them effective therapeutic adjuncts in the management of chronic inflammatory disorders. These beneficial actions of tetracyclines are relevant to the adjunctive management of periodontitis subjects

  7. Analgesic and Anti-inflammatory action of Opuntia elatior Mill fruits

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Sanjay P.; Sheth, Navin R.; Suhagia, Bhanubhai N.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Opuntia elatio Mill is a xerophytic plant with potentially active nutrients. It is traditionally appreciated for its pharmacological properties; however, the scientific information on this plant is insufficient. Objective: The present study evaluates the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory action of prickly pear. Materials and Methods: Writhing and tail-immersion tests were carried out to evaluate analgesic action, while the carrageenan-induced paw edema and neutrophil adhesion tests were conducted in Albino wistar rats to assess anti-inflammatory action. Results: ED50 values of the fruit juice in writhing, tail immersion, and paw edema test were 0.919, 2.77, and 9.282 ml/kg, respectively. The fruits of Opuntia produced analgesic and anti-inflammatory action in a dose-dependent manner. Conclusion: The results establish the folklore use of prickly pear may be due to the presence of betacyanin and/or other phenolic compounds. PMID:26166996

  8. Proteomic analysis of the anti-inflammatory action of minocycline

    PubMed Central

    Dunston, Christopher R; Griffiths, Helen R; Lambert, Peter A; Staddon, Susan; Vernallis, Ann B

    2011-01-01

    Minocycline possesses anti-inflammatory properties independently of its antibiotic activity although the underlying molecular mechanisms are unclear. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced cytokines and pro-inflammatory protein expression are reduced by minocycline in cultured macrophages. Here, we tested a range of clinically important tetracycline compounds (oxytetracycline, doxycycline, minocycline and tigecycline) and showed that they all inhibited LPS-induced nitric oxide production. We made the novel finding that tigecycline inhibited LPS-induced nitric oxide production to a greater extent than the other tetracycline compounds tested. To identify potential targets for minocycline, we assessed alterations in the macrophage proteome induced by LPS in the presence or absence of a minocycline pre-treatment using 2-DE and nanoLC-MS. We found a number of proteins, mainly involved in cellular metabolism (ATP synthase β-subunit and aldose reductase) or stress response (heat shock proteins), which were altered in expression in response to LPS, some of which were restored, at least in part, by minocycline. This is the first study to document proteomic changes induced by minocycline. The observation that minocycline inhibits some, but not all, of the LPS-induced proteomic changes shows that minocycline specifically affects some signalling pathways and does not completely inhibit macrophage activation. PMID:21182193

  9. Nitric oxide mediates anti-inflammatory action of extracorporeal shock waves.

    PubMed

    Ciampa, Anna R; de Prati, Alessandra Carcereri; Amelio, Ernesto; Cavalieri, Elisabetta; Persichini, Tiziana; Colasanti, Marco; Musci, Giovanni; Marlinghaus, Ernst; Suzuki, Hisanori; Mariotto, Sofia

    2005-12-19

    Here, we show that extracorporeal shock waves (ESW), at a low energy density value, quickly increase neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) activity and basal nitric oxide (NO) production in the rat glioma cell line C6. In addition, the treatment of C6 cells with ESW reverts the decrease of nNOS activity and NO production induced by a mixture of lipopolysaccharides (LPS), interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) plus tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). Finally, ESW treatment efficiently downregulates NF-kappaB activation and NF-kappaB-dependent gene expression, including inducible NOS and TNF-alpha. The present report suggests a possible molecular mechanism of the anti-inflammatory action of ESW treatment. PMID:16325181

  10. Anti-inflammatory action of ethanolic extract of Ramulus mori on the BLT2-linked cascade.

    PubMed

    Park, Geun-Soo; Kim, Jeong-Keun; Kim, Jae-Hong

    2016-04-01

    Mulberry tree twigs (Ramulus mori) contain large amounts of oxyresveratrols and have traditionally been used as herbal medicines because of their anti-inflammatory properties. However, the signaling mechanism by which R. mori exerts its anti-inflammatory action remains to be elucidated. In this study, we observed that R. mori ethanol extracts (RME) exerted an inhibitory effect on the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced production of the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6) in Raw264.7 macrophage cells. Additionally, RME inhibited IL-6 production by blocking the leukotriene B4 receptor- 2 (BLT2)-dependent-NADPH oxidase 1 (NOX1)-reactive oxygen species (ROS) cascade, leading to anti-inflammatory activity. Finally, RME suppressed the production of the BLT2 ligands LTB4 and 12(S)-HETE by inhibiting the p38 kinase- cytosolic phospholipase A2-5-/12-lipoxygenase cascade in LPS-stimulated Raw264.7 cells. Overall, our results suggest that RME inhibits the 'BLT2 ligand-BLT2'-linked autocrine inflammatory axis, and that this BLT2-linked cascade is one of the targets of the anti-inflammatory action of R. mori. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(4): 232-237]. PMID:26879317

  11. Anti-inflammatory action of ethanolic extract of Ramulus mori on the BLT2-linked cascade

    PubMed Central

    Park, Geun-Soo; Kim, Jeong-Keun; Kim, Jae-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Mulberry tree twigs (Ramulus mori) contain large amounts of oxyresveratrols and have traditionally been used as herbal medicines because of their anti-inflammatory properties. However, the signaling mechanism by which R. mori exerts its anti-inflammatory action remains to be elucidated. In this study, we observed that R. mori ethanol extracts (RME) exerted an inhibitory effect on the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced production of the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6) in Raw264.7 macrophage cells. Additionally, RME inhibited IL-6 production by blocking the leukotriene B4 receptor-2 (BLT2)-dependent-NADPH oxidase 1 (NOX1)-reactive oxygen species (ROS) cascade, leading to anti-inflammatory activity. Finally, RME suppressed the production of the BLT2 ligands LTB4 and 12(S)-HETE by inhibiting the p38 kinase-cytosolic phospholipase A2-5-/12-lipoxygenase cascade in LPS-stimulated Raw264.7 cells. Overall, our results suggest that RME inhibits the ‘BLT2 ligand-BLT2’-linked autocrine inflammatory axis, and that this BLT2-linked cascade is one of the targets of the anti-inflammatory action of R. mori. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(4): 232-237] PMID:26879317

  12. An Organ System Approach to Explore the Antioxidative, Anti-Inflammatory, and Cytoprotective Actions of Resveratrol

    PubMed Central

    Malhotra, Ashim; Bath, Sundeep; Elbarbry, Fawzy

    2015-01-01

    Resveratrol is a phenolic phytochemical, with a stilbene backbone, derived from edible plants such as grape and peanut. It is a bioactive molecule with physiological effects on multiple organ systems. Its effects range from the neuroprotective to the nephroprotective, including cardiovascular, neuronal, and antineoplastic responses as a part of its broad spectrum of action. In this review, we examine the effects of resveratrol on the following organ systems: the central nervous system, including neurological pathology such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease; the cardiovascular system, including disorders such as atherosclerosis, ischemia-reperfusion injury, and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy; the kidneys, including primary and secondary nephropathies and nephrolithiasis; multiple forms of cancer; and metabolic syndromes including diabetes. We emphasize commonalities in extracellular matrix protein alterations and intracellular signal transduction system induction following resveratrol treatment. We summarize the known anti-inflammatory, antioxidative, and cytoprotective effects of resveratrol across disparate organ systems. Additionally, we analyze the available literature regarding the pharmacokinetics of resveratrol formulations used in these studies. Finally, we critically examine select clinical trials documenting a lack of effect following resveratrol treatment. PMID:26180596

  13. The microalga Spirulina platensis presents anti-inflammatory action as well as hypoglycemic and hypolipidemic properties in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Joventino, Ivan P; Alves, Henrique G R; Neves, Lia C; Pinheiro-Joventino, Francisca; Leal, Luzia Kalyne A M; Neves, Samya A; Ferreira, Francisco Valdeci; Brito, Gerly Anne C; Viana, Glauce B

    2012-01-01

    Spirulina platensis (Spi) is a microalga presenting high contents of proteins, γ-linolenic acid, vitamins and minerals, and showing many biological activities. It is a promising drug for the treatment of diseases including diabetes. The objectives of this work were to study Spi effects on alloxan-induced diabetic rats, and associate this to its anti-inflammatory activity. The treatment with Spi (25, 50 or 100 mg/kg, p.o.) started 48 h after the alloxan injection, continuing for 5 or 10 days. Biochemical parameters were measured in sera of treated and untreated animals. The anti-inflammatory activity of Spi was assessed by the formalin test and carrageenan-induced paw edema in mice. Immunostainings for TNF-alpha were carried out in the carrageenan-induced paw edema in rats, before and after the Spi treatment, and its effect on the release of myeloperoxidase from human neutrophils was also determined. Spi decreased glycemia as well as triglyceride and total cholesterol levels of diabetic rats. Levels of urea and creatinine were also reduced, while liver transaminases were unaltered. Spi also decreased dose-dependently the 1st (neurogenic) and mainly the 2nd phase (inflammatory) of the formalin test, as well as the carrageenan-induced paw edema in mice. The anti-inflammatory effect of Spi was further confirmed by decreases in TNF-alpha immunostaining in the inflamed paw and in the myeloperoxidase release from human neutrophils. The results showed that the anti-diabetic effect of S. platensis is already manifested after a 5-day treatment. Additionally, considering the relationship between diabetes and inflammation, the microalga anti-inflammatory action may also be involved. PMID:22944720

  14. Glucocorticoids: mechanisms of action and anti-inflammatory potential in asthma.

    PubMed Central

    van der Velden, V H

    1998-01-01

    GLUCOCORTICOIDS are potent inhibitors of inflammatory processes and are widely used in the treatment of asthma. The anti-inflammatory effects are mediated either by direct binding of the glucocorticoid/glucocorticoid receptor complex to glucocorticoid responsive elements in the promoter region of genes, or by an interaction of this complex with other transcription factors, in particular activating protein-1 or nuclear factor-kappaB. Glucocorticoids inhibit many inflammation-associated molecules such as cytokines, chemokines, arachidonic acid metabolites, and adhesion molecules. In contrast, anti-inflammatory mediators often are up-regulated by glucocorticoids. In vivo studies have shown that treatment of asthmatic patients with inhaled glucocorticoids inhibits the bronchial inflammation and simultaneously improves their lung function. In this review, our current knowledge of the mechanism of action of glucocorticoids and their anti-inflammatory potential in asthma is described. Since bronchial epithelial cells may be important targets for glucocorticoid therapy in asthma, the effects of glucocorticoids on epithelial expressed inflammatory genes will be emphasized. PMID:9792333

  15. Role of transcriptional coregulator GRIP1 in the anti-inflammatory actions of glucocorticoids

    PubMed Central

    Chinenov, Yurii; Gupte, Rebecca; Dobrovolna, Jana; Flammer, Jamie R.; Liu, Bill; Michelassi, Francesco E.; Rogatsky, Inez

    2012-01-01

    Inhibition of cytokine gene expression by the hormone-activated glucocorticoid receptor (GR) is the key component of the anti-inflammatory actions of glucocorticoids, yet the underlying molecular mechanisms remain obscure. Here we report that glucocorticoid repression of cytokine genes in primary macrophages is mediated by GR-interacting protein (GRIP)1, a transcriptional coregulator of the p160 family, which is recruited to the p65-occupied genomic NFκB-binding sites in conjunction with liganded GR. We created a mouse strain enabling a conditional hematopoietic cell-restricted deletion of GRIP1 in adult animals. In this model, GRIP1 depletion in macrophages attenuated in a dose-dependent manner repression of NFκB target genes by GR irrespective of the upstream Toll-like receptor pathway responsible for their activation. Furthermore, genome-wide transcriptome analysis revealed a broad derepression of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced glucocorticoid-sensitive targets in GRIP1-depleted macrophages without affecting their activation by LPS. Consistently, conditional GRIP1-deficient mice were sensitized, relative to the wild type, to a systemic inflammatory challenge developing characteristic signs of LPS-induced shock. Thus, by serving as a GR corepressor, GRIP1 facilitates the anti-inflammatory effects of glucocorticoids in vivo. PMID:22753499

  16. Purification and anti-inflammatory action of tripeptide from salmon pectoral fin byproduct protein hydrolysate.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Chang-Bum; Cho, Young-Sook; Je, Jae-Young

    2015-02-01

    In this study, the anti-inflammatory peptide from salmon pectoral fin byproduct protein hydrolysate by pepsin hydrolysis, was purified and identified using Sephadex G-25 gel permeation chromatography, high performance liquid chromatography and time-of-flight liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (TOF LC/MS/MS). The purified anti-inflammatory peptide was identified to be a tripeptide (PAY). Lipopolysaccharide treatment significantly (p<0.05) stimulated the production of nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in RAW264.7 cells. However, PAY treatment significantly (p<0.05) inhibited the production of NO by 63.80% and PGE2 by 45.33%. Western blotting analysis revealed that PAY significantly (p<0.05) suppressed the protein expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2, which are responsible for the production of NO and PGE2. Additionally, PAY treatment also significantly (p<0.05) attenuated the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including tumour necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6 and -1β. PMID:25172694

  17. Immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory action of Nigella sativa and thymoquinone: A comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Majdalawieh, Amin F; Fayyad, Muneera W

    2015-09-01

    Many herbal products are now used as remedies to treat various infectious and non-infectious conditions. Even though the use of herbs and natural products is much more evident in the Eastern world, their use in Western cultures is continuously increasing. Although the immunomodulatory effects of some herbs have been extensively studied, research related to possible immunomodulatory effects of many herbs and various spices is relatively scarce. Here, we provide a comprehensive review of the immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory properties of Nigella sativa, also known as black seed or black cumin, and its major active ingredient, thymoquinone (TQ). This review article focuses on analyzing in vitro and in vivo experimental findings that were reported with regard to the ability of N. sativa and TQ to modulate inflammation, cellular and humoral adaptive immune responses, and Th1/Th2 paradigm. The reported capability of N. sativa to augment the cytotoxic activity of natural killer (NK) cells against cancer cells is also emphasized. The molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying such immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory effects of N. sativa and TQ are highlighted. Moreover, the signal transduction pathways implicated in the immunoregulatory functions of N. sativa and TQ are underscored. Experimental evidence suggests that N. sativa extracts and TQ can potentially be employed in the development of effective therapeutic agents towards the regulation of immune reactions implicated in various infectious and non-infectious conditions including different types of allergy, autoimmunity, and cancer. PMID:26117430

  18. Anti-Inflammatory Applications of Melittin, a Major Component of Bee Venom: Detailed Mechanism of Action and Adverse Effects.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gihyun; Bae, Hyunsu

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation is a pervasive phenomenon triggered by the innate and adaptive immune systems to maintain homeostasis. The phenomenon normally leads to recovery from infection and healing, but when not properly phased, inflammation may cause immune disorders. Bee venom is a toxin that bees use for their protection from enemies. However, for centuries it has been used in the Orient as an anti-inflammatory medicine for the treatment of chronic inflammatory diseases. Bee venom and its major component, melittin, are potential means of reducing excessive immune responses and provide new alternatives for the control of inflammatory diseases. Recent experimental studies show that the biological functions of melittin could be applied for therapeutic use in vitro and in vivo. Reports verifying the therapeutic effects of melittin are accumulating in the literature, but the cellular mechanism(s) of the anti-inflammatory effects of melittin are not fully elucidated. In the present study, we review the current knowledge on the therapeutic effects of melittin and its detailed mechanisms of action against several inflammatory diseases including skin inflammation, neuroinflammation, atherosclerosis, arthritis and liver inflammation, its adverse effects as well as future prospects regarding the use of melittin. PMID:27187328

  19. Anti-inflammatory activities of cecropin A and its mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eunjung; Shin, Areum; Kim, Yangmee

    2015-01-01

    Cecropin A is a novel 37-residue cecropin-like antimicrobial peptide isolated from the cecropia moth, Hyalophora cecropia. We have demonstrated that cecropin A is an antibacterial agent and have investigated its mode of action. In this study, we show that cecropin A has potent antimicrobial activity against 2 multidrug resistant organisms-Acinetobacter baumanii and-Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Interactions between cecropin A and membrane phospholipids were studied using tryptophan blue shift experiments. Cecropin A has a strong interaction with bacterial cell mimetic membranes. These results imply that cecropin A has selectivity for bacterial cells. To address the potential the rapeutic efficacy of cecropin A, its anti-inflammatory activities and mode of action in mouse macrophage-derived RAW264.7 cells stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) were examined. Cecropin A suppressed nitrite production, mTNF-α, mIL-1β, mMIP-1, and mMIP-2 cytokine release in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells. Furthermore, cecropin A inhibited intracellular cell signaling via the ERK, JNK, and p38 MAPK pathway, leading to the prevention of COX-2 expression in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells. These results strongly suggest that cecropin A should be investigated as a potential agent for the prevention and treatment of inflammatory diseases. PMID:25319409

  20. ATP-Binding Pocket-Targeted Suppression of Src and Syk by Luteolin Contributes to Its Anti-Inflammatory Action

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jeong-Oog; Jeong, Deok; Kim, Mi-Yeon; Cho, Jae Youl

    2015-01-01

    Luteolin is a flavonoid identified as a major anti-inflammatory component of Artemisia asiatica. Numerous reports have demonstrated the ability of luteolin to suppress inflammation in a variety of inflammatory conditions. However, its exact anti-inflammatory mechanism has not been fully elucidated. In the present study, the anti-inflammatory mode of action in activated macrophages of luteolin from Artemisia asiatica was examined by employing immunoblotting analysis, a luciferase reporter gene assay, enzyme assays, and an overexpression strategy. Luteolin dose-dependently inhibited the secretion of nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and diminished the levels of mRNA transcripts of inducible NO synthase (iNOS), tumor necrosis factor- (TNF-) α, and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) and pam3CSK-treated macrophage-like RAW264.7 cells without displaying cytotoxicity. Luteolin displayed potent NO-inhibitory activity and also suppressed the nuclear translocation of NF-κB (p65 and p50) via blockade of Src and Syk, but not other mitogen-activated kinases. Overexpression of wild type Src and point mutants thereof, and molecular modelling studies, suggest that the ATP-binding pocket may be the luteolin-binding site in Src. These results strongly suggest that luteolin may exert its anti-inflammatory action by suppressing the NF-κB signaling cascade via blockade of ATP binding in Src and Syk. PMID:26236111

  1. Anti-Inflammatory Action of Angiotensin 1-7 in Experimental Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Khajah, Maitham A.; Fateel, Maryam M.; Ananthalakshmi, Kethireddy V.; Luqmani, Yunus A.

    2016-01-01

    Background There is evidence to support a role for angiotensin (Ang) 1–7 in reducing the activity of inflammatory signaling molecules such as MAPK, PKC and SRC. Enhanced angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) expression has been observed in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) suggesting a role in its pathogenesis, prompting this study. Methods The colonic expression/activity profile of ACE2, Ang 1–7, MAS1-receptor (MAS1-R), MAPK family and Akt were determined by western blot and immunofluorescence. The effect of either exogenous administration of Ang 1–7 or pharmacological inhibition of its function (by A779 treatment) was determined using the mouse dextran sulfate sodium model. Results Enhanced colonic expression of ACE2, Ang1-7 and MAS1-R was observed post-colitis induction. Daily Ang 1–7 treatment (0.01–0.06 mg/kg) resulted in significant amelioration of DSS-induced colitis. In contrast, daily administration of A779 significantly worsened features of colitis. Colitis-associated phosphorylation of p38, ERK1/2 and Akt was reduced by Ang 1–7 treatment. Conclusion Our results indicate important anti-inflammatory actions of Ang 1–7 in the pathogenesis of IBD, which may provide a future therapeutic strategy to control the disease progression. PMID:26963721

  2. Brain-Derived Estrogen Exerts Anti-inflammatory and Neuroprotective Actions in the Rat Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Quan-Guang; Wang, Ruimin; Tang, Hui; Dong, Yan; Chan, Alice; Sareddy, Gangadhara Reddy; Vadlamudi, Ratna K.; Brann, Darrell W.

    2014-01-01

    17β-estradiol (E2) has been implicated to play a critical role in neuroprotection, synaptic plasticity, and cognitive function. Classically, the role of gonadal-derived E2 in these events is well established, but the role of brain-derived E2 is less clear. To address this issue, we investigated the expression, localization, and modulation of aromatase and local E2 levels in the hippocampus following global cerebral ischemia (GCI) in adult ovariectomized rats. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) revealed that the hippocampal regions CA1, CA3 and dentate gyrus (DG) exhibited high levels of immunoreactive aromatase staining, with aromatase being co-localized primarily in neurons in non-ischemic animals. Following GCI, aromatase became highly expressed in GFAP-positive astrocytes in the hippocampal CA1 region at 2–3 days post GCI reperfusion. An ELISA for E2 and IHC for E2 confirmed the GCI-induced elevation of local E2 in the CA1 region and that the increase in local E2 occurred in astrocytes. Furthermore, central administration of aromatase antisense (AS) oligonucleotides, but not missense (MS) oligonucleotides, blocked the increase in aromatase and local E2 in astrocytes after GCI, and resulted in a significant increase in GCI-induced hippocampal CA1 region neuronal cell death and neuroinflammation. As a whole, these results suggest that brain-derived E2 exerts important neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory actions in the hippocampal CA1 region following GCI. PMID:24508637

  3. Anti-atherosclerotic and anti-inflammatory actions of sesame oil.

    PubMed

    Narasimhulu, Chandrakala Aluganti; Selvarajan, Krithika; Litvinov, Dmitry; Parthasarathy, Sampath

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis, a major form of cardiovascular disease, has now been recognized as a chronic inflammatory disease. Nonpharmacological means of treating chronic diseases have gained attention recently. We previously reported that sesame oil has anti-atherosclerotic properties. In this study, we have determined the mechanisms by which sesame oil might modulate atherosclerosis by identifying genes and inflammatory markers. Low-density lipoprotein receptor knockout (LDLR(-/-)) female mice were fed with either an atherogenic diet or an atherogenic diet reformulated with sesame oil (sesame oil diet). Plasma lipids and atherosclerotic lesions were quantified after 3 months of feeding. Plasma samples were used for cytokine analysis. RNA was extracted from the liver tissue and used for global gene arrays. The sesame oil diet significantly reduced atherosclerotic lesions, plasma cholesterol, triglyceride, and LDL cholesterol levels in LDLR(-/-) mice. Plasma inflammatory cytokines, such as MCP-1, RANTES, IL-1α, IL-6, and CXCL-16, were significantly reduced, demonstrating an anti-inflammatory property of sesame oil. Gene array analysis showed that sesame oil induced many genes, including ABCA1, ABCA2, APOE, LCAT, and CYP7A1, which are involved in cholesterol metabolism and reverse cholesterol transport. In conclusion, our studies suggest that a sesame oil-enriched diet could be an effective nonpharmacological treatment for atherosclerosis by controlling inflammation and regulating lipid metabolism. PMID:25562618

  4. Anti-Atherosclerotic and Anti-Inflammatory Actions of Sesame Oil

    PubMed Central

    Narasimhulu, Chandrakala Aluganti; Selvarajan, Krithika; Litvinov, Dmitry

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Atherosclerosis, a major form of cardiovascular disease, has now been recognized as a chronic inflammatory disease. Nonpharmacological means of treating chronic diseases have gained attention recently. We previously reported that sesame oil has anti-atherosclerotic properties. In this study, we have determined the mechanisms by which sesame oil might modulate atherosclerosis by identifying genes and inflammatory markers. Low-density lipoprotein receptor knockout (LDLR−/−) female mice were fed with either an atherogenic diet or an atherogenic diet reformulated with sesame oil (sesame oil diet). Plasma lipids and atherosclerotic lesions were quantified after 3 months of feeding. Plasma samples were used for cytokine analysis. RNA was extracted from the liver tissue and used for global gene arrays. The sesame oil diet significantly reduced atherosclerotic lesions, plasma cholesterol, triglyceride, and LDL cholesterol levels in LDLR−/− mice. Plasma inflammatory cytokines, such as MCP-1, RANTES, IL-1α, IL-6, and CXCL-16, were significantly reduced, demonstrating an anti-inflammatory property of sesame oil. Gene array analysis showed that sesame oil induced many genes, including ABCA1, ABCA2, APOE, LCAT, and CYP7A1, which are involved in cholesterol metabolism and reverse cholesterol transport. In conclusion, our studies suggest that a sesame oil-enriched diet could be an effective nonpharmacological treatment for atherosclerosis by controlling inflammation and regulating lipid metabolism. PMID:25562618

  5. Effects of quinone derivatives, such as 1,4-naphthoquinone, on DNA polymerase inhibition and anti-inflammatory action.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Kazuki; Nishiumi, Shin; Nishida, Masayuki; Hirai, Midori; Azuma, Takeshi; Yoshida, Hiromi; Mizushina, Yoshiyuki; Yoshida, Masaru

    2011-01-01

    Previously, we reported that vitamin K(3), which consists of a quinone component, inhibits the activity of human DNA polymerase γ (pol γ). In this study, we investigated the inhibitory effects of 4 quinone derivatives (1,4-benzoquinone (BQ), 1,4-naphthoquinone (NQ), 9,10-anthraquinone (AQ) and 5,12-naphthacenequinone (NCQ)) on the activity of mammalian pols. BQ and NQ potently inhibited the activity of all the pol species: pols α, β, γ, δ, ε and λ, and NQ was a stronger pol inhibitor than BQ. Because we previously found a positive relationship between pol l inhibition and anti-inflammatory action, we examined whether these quinone derivatives could inhibit inflammatory responses. BQ and NQ caused a marked reduction in 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced acute inflammation in mouse ear, although AQ and NCQ did not. In a cell culture system using mouse macrophages, NQ displayed the strongest suppression in the production of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) among the quinone derivatives tested. Moreover, NQ was found to inhibit the action of nuclear factor (NF)-κ. In an in vivo mouse model of LPS-evoked acute inflammation, intraperitoneal injection of BQ and NQ to mice led to suppression of TNF-α production in serum. These anti-inflammatory responses of NQ were more potent than those of BQ. In conclusion, this study has identified several quinone derivatives, such as NQ, that are promising anti-inflammatory candidates. PMID:21235518

  6. In-vitro and in-vivo anti-inflammatory action of the ethanol extract of Trachelospermi caulis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mu Hong; Lee, Jeong Min; Jun, Sung Hoon; Ha, Chul Gyu; Lee, Seung-Ha; Kim, Nam Wook; Lee, Jun Ho; Ko, Na Young; Mun, Se Hwan; Park, Seung Hwa; Kim, Bo Kyung; Her, Erk; Kim, Young Mi; Choi, Wahn Soo

    2007-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to investigate the anti-inflammatory activity, antinociceptive activity and the action mechanism of Trachelospermi caulis extract. The anti-inflammatory effects were investigated using arachidonic acid, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate or carrageenan-induced oedema assays. Antinociceptive activity, using the acetic acid-induced writhing model, was also tested in mice. The extract exhibited dose-dependent and significant (P<0.05 at 100-400 mg kg-1) anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive activity in the animals. To further understand the mechanism of activity, we investigated whether the extract inhibited the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), the production of nitric oxide (NO) and the expression of TNF-alpha from murine macrophage RAW 264.7 cells. Similar to the in-vivo activity, the iNOS expression, NO production and TNF-alpha expression were found to be dose dependent and significantly suppressed by the extract through the inhibition of the p38 MAP kinase/NF-kappaB pathway. Taken together, the results presented here suggest that T. caulis extract may be useful for the treatment of various inflammatory diseases. PMID:17227629

  7. Toll-like receptor-mediated anti-inflammatory action of glaucine and oxoglaucine.

    PubMed

    Remichkova, Mimi; Dimitrova, Petya; Philipov, Stefan; Ivanovska, Nina

    2009-10-01

    Two isochinoline alkaloids, glaucine and oxoglaucine were investigated for their suggested anti-inflammatory influence concerning nitric oxide and cytokine production. Mouse peritoneal macrophages were stimulated with different Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands such as LPS for TLR4, zymosan for TLR2 and CpG for TLR9. The alkaloids inhibited TNF-alpha and IL-6 production induced by these ligands. In regard to IL-12 suppressive effect was registered in the case of CpG stimulation. Glaucine succeeded to enhance LPS and zymosan-induced IL-10 production. The reduction of pro-inflammatory cytokines and increase of anti-inflammatory IL-10 are indicative for their use in different acute and chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:19481591

  8. Mechanisms of Action of Ig Preparations: Immunomodulatory and Anti-Inflammatory Effects

    PubMed Central

    Matucci, Andrea; Maggi, Enrico; Vultaggio, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    Primary immunodeficiency (PID) disorders that predispose patients to recurrent infections require immunoglobulin (Ig) replacement therapy. Ig replacement therapy has been stated as beneficial, although the optimal IgG trough level to be maintained over time in order to minimize infectious risk has not been established. The most common route of administration of Ig has been intravenously, although there are different options, one of them being the subcutaneous route. Ig replacement therapy has been a life-saving treatment for patients suffering from primary and secondary antibody immunodeficiency. The key role of regular Ig replacement in patients with antibody deficiencies is related to the ability to provide specific antibodies that could not be produced by these patients as demonstrated by the reduction of severe infections such as meningitis and pneumonia. The therapeutic benefits of Ig may also be due to an active role in various anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory activities, which may complicate the clinical picture of PID. Anti-inflammatory activities are seen more generally when intravenous Ig is administered at high dose. The immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory activities are important not only in the treatment of autoimmune diseases but also in patients suffering from immunodeficiency. PMID:25628625

  9. Anti-inflammatory action of γ-irradiated genistein in murine peritoneal macrophage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, Nak-Yun; Byun, Eui-Baek; Song, Du-Sup; Jin, Yeung-Bae; Park, Jae-Nam; Kim, Jae-Kyung; Park, Jong-Heum; Song, Beom-Seok; Park, Sang-Hyun; Lee, Ju-Woon; Kim, Jae-Hun

    2014-12-01

    This present study was to examine the cytotoxicity and anti-inflammatory activity of gamma (γ)-irradiated genistein in murine peritoneal macrophage. Inflammation to macrophage was induced by adding the lipopolysaccharide (LPS). γ-Irradiated genistein significantly decreased the cytotoxicity to murine peritoneal macrophage in dose ranges from 5 to 10 μM than that of non-irradiated genistein. Anti-inflammatory activity within the doses less than 2 μM showed that γ-irradiated genistein treatment remarkably reduced the lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation by decreasing the nitric oxide (NO) and cytokines (TNF-α, IL-6) production. In a structural analysis through the high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC), γ-irradiated genistein showed a new peak production distinguished from main peak of genistein (non-irradiated). Therefore, increase of anti-inflammatory activity may closely mediate with structural changes induced by γ irradiation exposure. Based on the above result, γ-irradiation could be an effective tool for reduction of toxicity and increase of physiological activity of biomolecules.

  10. Bronchodilator and Anti-Inflammatory Action of Theophylline in a Model of Ovalbumin-Induced Allergic Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Urbanova, A; Kertys, M; Simekova, M; Mikolka, P; Kosutova, P; Mokra, D; Mokry, J

    2016-01-01

    Phosphodiesterases (PDEs) represent a super-family of 11 enzymes hydrolyzing cyclic nucleotides into inactive 5' monophosphates. Inhibition of PDEs leads to a variety of cellular effects, including airway smooth muscle relaxation, inhibition of cellular inflammation, and immune responses. In this study we focused on theophylline, a known non-selective inhibitor of PDEs. Theophylline has been used for decades in the treatment of chronic inflammatory airway diseases. It has a narrow therapeutic window and belongs to the drugs whose plasma concentration should be monitored. Therefore, the main goal of this study was to evaluate the plasma theophylline concentration and to determine its relevance to pharmacological effects after single and longer term (7 days) administration of theophylline at different doses (5, 10, 20, and 50 mg/kg) in guinea pigs. Airway hyperresponsiveness was assessed by repeated exposure to ovalbumin. Theophylline reduced specific airway resistance in response to histamine nebulization, measured in a double chamber body plethysmograph. A decrease in tracheal smooth muscle contractility after cumulative doses of histamine and acetylcholine was confirmed in vitro. A greater efficacy of theophylline after seven days long treatment indicates the predominance of its anti-inflammatory activity, which may be involved in the bronchodilating action. PMID:27334733

  11. Involvement of proton-sensing receptor TDAG8 in the anti-inflammatory actions of dexamethasone in peritoneal macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    He, Xiao-dong; Tobo, Masayuki; Mogi, Chihiro; Nakakura, Takashi; Komachi, Mayumi; Murata, Naoya; Takano, Mutsumi; Tomura, Hideaki; Sato, Koichi; Okajima, Fumikazu

    2011-12-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Glucocorticoid (GC) induced the expression of proton-sensing TDAG8 in macrophages. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer GC enhanced acidic pH-induced cAMP accumulation and inhibition of TNF-{alpha} production. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The enhancement of the GC-induced actions was lost by TDAG8 deficiency. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer GC-induced anti-inflammatory actions are partly mediated by TDAG8 expression. -- Abstract: Dexamethasone (DEX), a potent glucocorticoid, increased the expression of T-cell death associated gene 8 (TDAG8), a proton-sensing G protein-coupled receptor, which is associated with the enhancement of acidic pH-induced cAMP accumulation, in peritoneal macrophages. We explored the role of increased TDAG8 expression in the anti-inflammatory actions of DEX. The treatment of macrophages with either DEX or acidic pH induced the cell death of macrophages; however, the cell death was not affected by TDAG8 deficiency. While DEX inhibited lipopolysaccharide-induced production of tumor necrosis factor-{alpha}, an inflammatory cytokine, which was independent of TDAG8, at neutral pH, the glucocorticoid enhanced the acidic pH-induced inhibition of tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} production in a manner dependent on TDAG8. In conclusion, the DEX-induced increase in TDAG8 expression is in part involved in the glucocorticoid-induced anti-inflammatory actions through the inhibition of inflammatory cytokine production under the acidic pH environment. On the other hand, the role of TDAG8 in the DEX-induced cell death is questionable.

  12. 4-Phenylselenyl-7-chloroquinoline, a new quinoline derivative containing selenium, has potential antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory actions.

    PubMed

    Pinz, Mikaela; Reis, Angélica S; Duarte, Vanessa; da Rocha, Márcia J; Goldani, Bruna S; Alves, Diego; Savegnago, Lucielli; Luchese, Cristiane; Wilhelm, Ethel A

    2016-06-01

    The development of new drugs to treat painful and inflammatory clinical conditions continues to be of great interest. The present study evaluated the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects of 4-phenylselenyl-7-chloroquinoline (4-PSQ). Mice were orally (p.o.) pretreated with 4-PSQ (0.1-25mg/kg), meloxicam (25mg/kg, a reference drug) or vehicle, 30min prior to the acetic acid, formalin, hot-plate and open-field tests. 4-PSQ reduced abdominal writhing induced by acetic acid and it caused an increase in latency time in the hot-plate test. 4-PSQ inhibited early and late phases of nociception and reduced the paw edema caused by formalin. Locomotor and exploratory activities in the open field test were not altered by treatments. In addition, a time-response curve was carried out by administration of 4-PSQ (25mg/kg; p.o.) at different times before the acetic acid injection. The antinociceptive effect in inhibiting acetic acid-induced abdominal writhing of 4-PSQ started at 0.5h and remained significant up to 4h after administration. Indeed, the anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties of 4-PSQ were investigated. 4-PSQ diminished the edema formation and decreased the myeloperoxidase activity and reactive species levels induced by croton oil in the ear tissue. 4-PSQ partially protected against the decrease of the 2,2'-Azinobis-3-ethylbenzothiazoline 6-sulfonic acid (ABTS) and 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) levels induced by croton oil. Meloxicam presented similar results for 4-PSQ in tests evaluated. These results demonstrated that 4-PSQ exerts acute anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive actions, suggesting that it may represent an alternative in the development of future new therapeutic strategies. PMID:27020552

  13. MicroRNA-124 mediates the cholinergic anti-inflammatory action through inhibiting the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yang; Li, Qi; Gui, Huan; Xu, Dong-Ping; Yang, Yi-Li; Su, Ding-Feng; Liu, Xia

    2013-01-01

    The vagus nerve can control inflammatory response through a 'cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway', which is mediated by the α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR) on macrophages. However, the intracellular mechanisms that link α7nAChR activation and pro-inflammatory cytokine production remain not well understood. In this study, we found that miR-124 is upregulated by cholinergic agonists in LPS-exposed cells and mice. Utilizing miR-124 mimic and siRNA knockdown, we demonstrated that miR-124 is a critical mediator for the cholinergic anti-inflammatory action. Furthermore, our data indicated that miR-124 modulates LPS-induced cytokine production by targeting signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) to decrease IL-6 production and TNF-α converting enzyme (TACE) to reduce TNF-α release. These results also indicate that miR-124 is a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of inflammatory diseases. PMID:23979021

  14. [Anti-inflammatory activity of benzo(c) phenanthridine derivatives and possible mechanisms of action (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Iwata, H; Yamamoto, I; Masukawa, T; Komoriya, K; Iwaki, H

    1977-07-01

    Of five newly synthesized benzo[c]phenanthridine derivatives tested, the two compounds, BPD-I and BPD-II were found to have potent anti-edematous activity with intraperitoneal administration to S.D. rats. BPD-I showed a marked inhibitory effect against acute inflammation such as induced rat paw edema and leucocyte emigration and protein exudation by means of CMC pouch method and capillary permeability enhancement induced by various phlogists. This compound also inhibited subacute and chronic inflammatory responses such as granuloma formation induced by croton oil or cotton pellet. The anti-inflammatory activities of this compound resembled those of hydrocortisone. The inhibitory effects of carragenan edema and capillary permeability enhancement by ATP were strikingly reduced in adrenalectomized rats suggesting involvement of the hypophysis-adrenal systems. Rat serum corticosterone level and hepatic tyrosine aminotransferase activity (TAT) were then measured after BPD-I injection. The serum corticosterone level was increased and shortly after the elevation of corticosterone, hepatic TAT levels also increased. Thus it is concluded that the corticosterone release from adrenal gland plays a role in the anti-inflammatory action of BPD-I. PMID:21834

  15. Hyporesponsiveness to the anti-inflammatory action of interleukin-10 in type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Barry, Julianne C.; Shakibakho, Soroush; Durrer, Cody; Simtchouk, Svetlana; Jawanda, Kamaldeep K.; Cheung, Sylvia T.; Mui, Alice L.; Little, Jonathan P.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic low-grade inflammation contributes to the pathology and complications of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Interleukin-10 (IL10), an anti-inflammatory cytokine, is suggested to play a protective role in T2D. However, the impact of T2D on IL10 function has not been previously assessed. We examined the ability of IL10 to inhibit inflammation in human T2D immune cells and explored underlying mechanisms using macrophage models. IL10 was less effective at inhibiting tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α secretion in T2D whole blood cultures, which was not explained by altered IL10 receptor surface expression. These findings were observed in macrophages exposed to high glucose, which demonstrated similar IL10 resistance or hyporesponsiveness. These findings were also not explained by changes in IL10 receptor protein or other downstream signaling proteins. High glucose was also shown to impair the ability of IL10 to activate STAT3, a downstream signaling protein of IL10. Treatment with the SHIP1 agonist, AQX-MN100, reversed IL10 hyporesponsiveness in macrophages cultured in high glucose and showed equal effectiveness at different glucose conditions. This data supports the idea that IL10 hyporesponsiveness may contribute to chronic inflammation in T2D. These novel findings suggest that strategies aimed to overcome IL10 hyporesponsiveness may hold therapeutic potential for reducing inflammation in T2D. PMID:26883847

  16. Anti-Inflammatory and Antimicrobial Actions of Vitamin D in Combating TB/HIV

    PubMed Central

    Coussens, Anna K.; Martineau, Adrian R.; Wilkinson, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) disease activation is now believed to arise due to a lack of inflammatory homeostatic control at either end of the spectrum of inflammation: either due to immunosuppression (decreased antimicrobial activity) or due to immune activation (excess/aberrant inflammation). Vitamin D metabolites can increase antimicrobial activity in innate immune cells, which, in the context of HIV-1 coinfection, have insufficient T cell-mediated help to combat Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) infection. Moreover, maintaining vitamin D sufficiency prior to MTB infection enhances the innate antimicrobial response to T cell-mediated interferon-γ. Conversely, vitamin D can act to inhibit expression and secretion of a broad range of inflammatory mediators and matrix degrading enzymes driving immunopathology during active TB and antiretroviral- (ARV-) mediated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS). Adjunct vitamin D therapy during treatment of active TB may therefore reduce lung pathology and TB morbidity, accelerate resolution of cavitation and thereby decrease the chance of transmission, improve lung function following therapy, prevent relapse, and prevent IRIS in those initiating ARVs. Future clinical trials of vitamin D for TB prevention and treatment must be designed to detect the most appropriate primary endpoint, which in some cases should be anti-inflammatory and not antimicrobial. PMID:25101194

  17. Possible Involvement of the Inhibition of NF-κB Factor in Anti-Inflammatory Actions That Melatonin Exerts on Mast Cells.

    PubMed

    Maldonado, M D; García-Moreno, H; González-Yanes, C; Calvo, J R

    2016-08-01

    Melatonin is a molecule endogenously produced in a wide variety of immune cells, including mast cells (RBL-2H3). It exhibits immunomodulatory, anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic properties. The physiologic mechanisms underlying these activities of melatonin have not been clarified in mast cells. This work is designed to determine the anti-inflammatory effect and mechanism of action of melatonin on activated mast cells. RBL-2H3 were pre-treated with exogenous melatonin (MELx) at physiological (100nM) and pharmacological (1 mM) doses for 30 min, washed and activated with PMACI (phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate plus calcium ionophore A23187) for 2 h and 12 h. The data shows that pre-treatment of MELx in stimulated mast cells, significantly reduced the levels of endogenous melatonin production (MELn), TNF-α and IL-6. These effects are directly related with the MELx concentration used. MELx also inhibited IKK/NF-κB signal transduction pathway in stimulated mast cells. These results indicate a molecular basis for the ability of melatonin to prevent inflammation and for the treatment of allergic inflammatory diseases through the down-regulation of mast cell activation. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 1926-1933, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26756719

  18. Suppression of MAPKs/NF-κB Activation Induces Intestinal Anti-Inflammatory Action of Ginsenoside Rf in HT-29 and RAW264.7 Cells.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Sungeun; Siddiqi, Muhammad Hanif; Aceituno, Veronica Castro; Simu, Shakina Yesmin; Yang, Deok Chun

    2016-07-01

    This study investigated the intestinal anti-inflammatory action of ginsenoside Rf in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). IBD is a chronic inflammatory disease that affects the intestinal tract. It is associated with elevated levels of various inflammatory mediators, including interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), nitric oxide (NO), and reactive oxygen species (ROS). Ginsenosides, the main active constituents of ginseng, have been reported to exert potent therapeutic effects against diverse diseases. However, ginsenoside Rf treatment for inflammation has not yet been examined. In this study, we evaluated the inhibitory effect of ginsenoside Rf on the inflammatory mediators downstream of p38/NF-kB activation on TNF-α-stimulated intestinal epithelial cells (HT-29) and mouse macrophage cells (RAW264.7). Our results showed that ginsenoside Rf significantly reduced the production of IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, NO, and ROS, which are most highly activated in IBD. In addition, ginsenoside Rf significantly suppressed TNF-α/LPS-induced NF-κB transcriptional activity. These results suggest that ginsenoside Rf contains a compound that has potent intestinal anti-inflammatory effects that could be used to treat diseases such as IBD. PMID:27224660

  19. Emerging concepts on the anti-inflammatory actions of carbon monoxide-releasing molecules (CO-RMs)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Carbon monoxide-releasing molecules (CO-RMs) are a class of organometallo compounds capable of delivering controlled quantities of CO gas to cells and tissues thus exerting a broad spectrum of pharmacological effects. CO-RMs containing transition metal carbonyls were initially implemented to mimic the function of heme oxygenase-1 (HMOX1), a stress inducible defensive protein that degrades heme to CO and biliverdin leading to anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory actions. Ten years after their discovery, the research on the chemistry and biological activities of CO-RMs has greatly intensified indicating that their potential use as CO delivering agents for the treatment of several pathological conditions is feasible. Although CO-RMs are a class of compounds that structurally diverge from traditional organic-like pharmaceuticals, their behaviour in the biological environments is progressively being elucidated revealing interesting features of metal-carbonyl chemistry towards cellular targets. Specifically, the presence of carbonyl groups bound to transition metals such as ruthenium, iron or manganese appears to make CO-RMs unique in their ability to transfer CO intracellularly and amplify the mechanisms of signal transduction mediated by CO. In addition to their well-established vasodilatory activities and protective effects against organ ischemic damage, CO-RMs are emerging for their striking anti-inflammatory properties which may be the result of the multiple activities of metal carbonyls in the control of redox signaling, oxidative stress and cellular respiration. Here, we review evidence on the pharmacological effects of CO-RMs in models of acute and chronic inflammation elaborating on some emerging concepts that may help to explain the chemical reactivity and mechanism(s) of action of this distinctive class of compounds in biological systems. PMID:23171578

  20. Intracerebroventricularly delivered VEGF promotes contralesional corticorubral plasticity after focal cerebral ischemia via mechanisms involving anti-inflammatory actions

    PubMed Central

    Herz, Josephine; Reitmeir, Raluca; Hagen, Sabine I.; Reinboth, Barbara S.; Guo, Zeyun; Zechariah, Anil; ElAli, Ayman; Doeppner, Thorsten R.; Bacigaluppi, Marco; Pluchino, Stefano; Kilic, Ülkan; Kilic, Ertugrul; Hermann, Dirk M.

    2015-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has potent angiogenic and neuroprotective effects in the ischemic brain. Its effect on axonal plasticity and neurological recovery in the post-acute stroke phase was unknown. Using behavioral tests combined with anterograde tract tracing studies and with immunohistochemical and molecular biological experiments, we examined effects of a delayed i.c.v. delivery of recombinant human VEGF165, starting 3 days after stroke, on functional neurological recovery, corticorubral plasticity and inflammatory brain responses in mice submitted to 30 min of middle cerebral artery occlusion. We herein show that the slowly progressive functional improvements of motor grip strength and coordination, which are induced by VEGF, are accompanied by enhanced sprouting of contralesional corticorubral fibres that branched off the pyramidal tract in order to cross the midline and innervate the ipsilesional parvocellular red nucleus. Infiltrates of CD45+ leukocytes were noticed in the ischemic striatum of vehicle-treated mice that closely corresponded to areas exhibiting Iba-1+ activated microglia. VEGF attenuated the CD45+ leukocyte infiltrates at 14 but not 30 days post ischemia and diminished the microglial activation. Notably, the VEGF-induced anti-inflammatory effect of VEGF was associated with a downregulation of a broad set of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in both brain hemispheres. These data suggest a link between VEGF’s immunosuppressive and plasticity-promoting actions that may be important for successful brain remodeling. Accordingly, growth factors with anti-inflammatory action may be promising therapeutics in the post-acute stroke phase. PMID:22198574

  1. Nanomechanical sensing of the endothelial cell response to anti-inflammatory action of 1-methylnicotinamide chloride

    PubMed Central

    Kolodziejczyk, AM; Brzezinka, GD; Khurana, K; Targosz-Korecka, M; Szymonski, M

    2013-01-01

    Background There is increasing evidence that cell elastic properties should change considerably in response to chemical agents affecting the physiological state of the endothelium. In this work, a novel assay for testing prospective endothelium-targeted agents in vitro is presented. Materials and methods The proposed methodology is based on nanoindentation spectroscopy using an atomic force microscope tip, which allows for quantitative evaluation of cell stiffness. As an example, we chose a pyridine derivative, 1-methylnicotinamide chloride (MNA), known to have antithrombotic and anti-inflammatory properties, as reported in recent in vivo experiments. Results First, we determined a concentration range of MNA in which physiological parameters of the endothelial cells in vitro are not affected. Then, cell dysfunction was induced by incubation with tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and the cellular response to MNA treatment after TNF-α incubation was studied. In parallel to the nanoindentation spectroscopy, the endothelium phenotype was characterized using a fluorescence spectroscopy with F-actin labeling, and biochemical methods, such as secretion measurements of both nitric oxide (NO), and prostacyclin (PGI2) regulatory agents. Conclusion We found that MNA could reverse the dysfunction of the endothelium caused by inflammation, if applied in the proper time and to the concentration scheme established in our investigations. A surprisingly close correlation was found between effective Young’s modulus of the cells and actin polymerization/depolymerization processes in the endothelium cortical cytoskeleton, as well as NO and PGI2 levels. These results allow us to construct the physiological model of sequential intracellular pathways activated in the endothelium by MNA. PMID:23946648

  2. Anti-Inflammatory Action of an Antimicrobial Model Peptide That Suppresses the TRIF-Dependent Signaling Pathway via Inhibition of Toll-Like Receptor 4 Endocytosis in Lipopolysaccharide-Stimulated Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Do-Wan; Heo, Kang-Hyuck; Kim, Young-Kyu; Sim, Eun-Jeong; Kang, Tae-Bong; Choi, Jae-Wan; Sim, Dae-Won; Cheong, Sun-Hee; Lee, Seung-Hong; Bang, Jeong-Kyu; Won, Hyung-Sik; Lee, Kwang-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), also called host defense peptides, particularly those with amphipathic helical structures, are emerging as target molecules for therapeutic development due to their immunomodulatory properties. Although the antimicrobial activity of AMPs is known to be exerted primarily by permeation of the bacterial membrane, the mechanism underlying its anti-inflammatory activity remains to be elucidated. We report potent anti-inflammatory activity of WALK11.3, an antimicrobial model peptide with an amphipathic helical conformation, in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW264.7 cells. This peptide inhibited the expression of inflammatory mediators, including nitric oxide, COX-2, IL-1β, IL-6, INF-β, and TNF-α. Although WALK11.3 did not exert a major effect on all downstream signaling in the MyD88-dependent pathway, toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)- mediated pro-inflammatory signals were markedly attenuated in the TRIF-dependent pathway due to inhibition of the phosphorylation of STAT1 by attenuation of IRF3 phosphorylation. WALK11.3 specifically inhibited the endocytosis of TLR4, which is essential for triggering TRIF-mediated signaling in macrophage cells. Hence, we suggest that specific interference with TLR4 endocytosis could be one of the major modes of the anti-inflammatory action of AMPs. Our designed WALK11 peptides, which possess both antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory activities, may be promising molecules for the development of therapies for infectious inflammation. PMID:26017270

  3. Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor ameliorates early renal injury through its anti-inflammatory action in a rat model of type 1 diabetes

    SciTech Connect

    Kodera, Ryo; Shikata, Kenichi; Takatsuka, Tetsuharu; Oda, Kaori; Miyamoto, Satoshi; Kajitani, Nobuo; Hirota, Daisho; Ono, Tetsuichiro; Usui, Hitomi Kataoka; Makino, Hirofumi

    2014-01-17

    Highlights: •DPP-4 inhibitor decreased urinary albumin excretion in a rat of type 1 diabetes. •DPP-4 inhibitor ameliorated histlogical changes of diabetic nephropathy. •DPP-4 inhibitor has reno-protective effects through anti-inflammatory action. •DPP-4 inhibitor is beneficial on diabetic nephropathy besides lowering blood glucose. -- Abstract: Introduction: Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors are incretin-based drugs in patients with type 2 diabetes. In our previous study, we showed that glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist has reno-protective effects through anti-inflammatory action. The mechanism of action of DPP-4 inhibitor is different from that of GLP-1 receptor agonists. It is not obvious whether DPP-4 inhibitor prevents the exacerbation of diabetic nephropathy through anti-inflammatory effects besides lowering blood glucose or not. The purpose of this study is to clarify the reno-protective effects of DPP-4 inhibitor through anti-inflammatory actions in the early diabetic nephropathy. Materials and methods: Five-week-old male Sprague–Dawley (SD) rats were divided into three groups; non-diabetes, diabetes and diabetes treated with DPP-4 inhibitor (PKF275-055; 3 mg/kg/day). PKF275-055 was administered orally for 8 weeks. Results: PKF275-055 increased the serum active GLP-1 concentration and the production of urinary cyclic AMP. PKF275-055 decreased urinary albumin excretion and ameliorated histological change of diabetic nephropathy. Macrophage infiltration was inhibited, and inflammatory molecules were down-regulated by PKF275-055 in the glomeruli. In addition, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activity was suppressed in the kidney. Conclusions: These results indicate that DPP-4 inhibitor, PKF275-055, have reno-protective effects through anti-inflammatory action in the early stage of diabetic nephropathy. The endogenous biological active GLP-1 might be beneficial on diabetic nephropathy besides lowering blood glucose.

  4. Evidence for simvastatin anti-inflammatory actions based on quantitative analyses of NETosis and other inflammation/oxidation markers

    PubMed Central

    Al-Ghoul, Walid M.; Kim, Margarita S.; Fazal, Nadeem; Azim, Anser C.; Ali, Ashraf

    2014-01-01

    Simvastatin (SMV) has been shown to exhibit promising anti-inflammatory properties alongside its classic cholesterol lowering action. We tested these emerging effects in a major thermal injury mouse model (3rd degree scald, ~20% TBSA) with previously documented, inflammation-mediated intestinal defects. Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) inflammation measurement methods were used alongside classic gut mucosa inflammation and leakiness measurements with exogenous melatonin treatment as a positive control. Our hypothesis is that simvastatin has protective therapeutic effects against early postburn gut mucosa inflammation and leakiness. To test this hypothesis, we compared untreated thermal injury (TI) adult male mice with TI littermates treated with simvastatin (0.2 mg/kg i.p., TI + SMV) immediately following burn injury and two hours before being sacrificed the day after; melatonin-treated (Mel) (1.86 mg/kg i.p., TI + Mel) mice were compared as a positive control. Mice were assessed for the following: (1) tissue oxidation and neutrophil infiltration in terminal ileum mucosa using classic carbonyl, Gr-1, and myeloperoxidase immunohistochemical or biochemical assays, (2) NETosis in terminal ileum and colon mucosa homogenates and peritoneal and fluid blood samples utilizing flow cytometric analyses of the surrogate NETosis biomarkers, picogreen and Gr-1, and (3) transepithelial gut leakiness as measured in terminal ileum and colon with FITC-dextran and transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER). Our results reveal that simvastatin and melatonin exhibit consistently comparable therapeutic protective effects against the following: (1) gut mucosa oxidative stress as revealed in the terminal ileum by markers of protein carbonylation as well as myeloperoxidase (MPO) and Gr-1 infiltration, (2) NETosis as revealed in the gut milieu, peritoneal lavage and plasma utilizing picogreen and Gr-1 flow cytometry and microscopy, and (3) transepithelial gut leakiness as

  5. Hypoglycemic agents and potential anti-inflammatory activity

    PubMed Central

    Kothari, Vishal; Galdo, John A; Mathews, Suresh T

    2016-01-01

    Current literature shows an association of diabetes and secondary complications with chronic inflammation. Evidence of these immunological changes include altered levels of cytokines and chemokines, changes in the numbers and activation states of various leukocyte populations, apoptosis, and fibrosis during diabetes. Therefore, treatment of diabetes and its complications may include pharmacological strategies to reduce inflammation. Apart from anti-inflammatory drugs, various hypoglycemic agents have also been found to reduce inflammation that could contribute to improved outcomes. Extensive studies have been carried out with thiazolidinediones (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ agonist), dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors, and metformin (AMP-activated protein kinase activator) with each of these classes of compounds showing moderate-to-strong anti-inflammatory action. Sulfonylureas and alpha glucosidase inhibitors appeared to exert modest effects, while the injectable agents, insulin and glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists, may improve secondary complications due to their anti-inflammatory potential. Currently, there is a lack of clinical data on anti-inflammatory effects of sodium–glucose cotransporter type 2 inhibitors. Nevertheless, for all these glucose-lowering agents, it is essential to distinguish between anti-inflammatory effects resulting from better glucose control and effects related to intrinsic anti-inflammatory actions of the pharmacological class of compounds. PMID:27114714

  6. Omega-3 fatty acid concentrate from Dunaliella salina possesses anti-inflammatory properties including blockade of NF-κB nuclear translocation.

    PubMed

    Chitranjali, T; Anoop Chandran, P; Muraleedhara Kurup, G

    2015-02-01

    The health benefits of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFA), mainly eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA 20:5) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6), have been long known. Although various studies have demonstrated the health benefits of ω-3 PUFA, the mechanisms of action of ω-3 PUFAs are still not completely understood. While the major commercial source is marine fish oil, in this study we suggest the marine micro algae, Dunaliella salina as an alternate source of omega-3 fatty acids. Treatment with this algal omega-3 fatty acid concentrate (Ds-ω-3 FA) resulted in significant down-regulation of LPS-induced production of TNF-α and IL-6 by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). The concentrate was also found to be a potent blocker of cyclooxygenase (COX-2) and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-2 and MMP-9) expression. The present study reveals the anti-inflammatory properties of Ds-ω-3 FA concentrate including the inhibition of NF-κB translocation. PMID:25391558

  7. Protective Effect of Flos Lonicerae against Experimental Gastric Ulcers in Rats: Mechanisms of Antioxidant and Anti-Inflammatory Action

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jung-Woo; Yun, Nari; Han, Hae-Jung; Kim, Jeom-Yong; Kim, Joo-Young; Lee, Sun-Mee

    2014-01-01

    Flos Lonicerae is one of the oldest and most commonly prescribed herbs in Eastern traditional medicine to treat various inflammatory diseases. In the present study, we investigated the effects of ethyl acetate fraction of Flos Lonicerae (GC-7101) on experimental gastric ulcer models and its mechanisms of action in gastric ulcer healing. The pharmacological activity of GC-7101 was investigated in rats on HCl/EtOH, indomethacin, water immersion restraint stress induced acute gastric ulcer, and acetic-acid-induced subchronic gastric ulcer. To determine its gastroprotective mechanisms, gastric wall mucus secretion, mucosal PGE2, mucosal NO content, nuclear translocation of NF-κB, mRNA expression of inflammatory cytokines, lipid peroxidation and glutathione content, and superoxide dismutase and catalase activities were measured. GC-7101 significantly attenuated development of acute gastric ulcer and accelerated the healing of acetic-acid-induced subchronic gastric ulcer. In HCl/EtOH-induced gastric ulcer, GC-7101 markedly enhanced gastric wall mucus content which was accompanied by increased mucosal PGE2 and NO production. Furthermore, treatment of GC-7101 exhibited anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities as evidenced by decreased myeloperoxidase activity, NF-κB translocation, inflammatory cytokines mRNA expression, and lipid peroxidation and increased glutathione content and superoxide dismutase and catalase activities. These results demonstrated that GC-7101 possesses strong antiulcerogenic effect by modulating oxidative stress and proinflammatory mediators. PMID:25610477

  8. Differential Action between Schisandrin A and Schisandrin B in Eliciting an Anti-Inflammatory Action: The Depletion of Reduced Glutathione and the Induction of an Antioxidant Response

    PubMed Central

    Leong, Pou Kuan; Wong, Hoi Shan; Chen, Jihang; Chan, Wing Man; Leung, Hoi Yan; Ko, Kam Ming

    2016-01-01

    Schisandrin A (Sch A) and schisandrin B (Sch B) are active components of Schisandrae Fructus. We compared the biochemical mechanism underlying the anti-inflammatory action of Sch A and Sch B, using cultured lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophages and concanavalin (ConA)-stimulated mouse splenocytes. Pre-incubation with Sch A or Sch B produced an anti-inflammatory action in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells, as evidenced by the inhibition of the pro-inflammatory c-Jun N-terminal kinases/p38 kinase/nuclear factor-κB signaling pathway as well as the suppression of various pro-inflammatory cytokines and effectors, with the extent of inhibition by Sch A being more pronounced. The greater activity of Sch A in anti-inflammatory response was associated with a greater decrease in cellular reduced glutathione (GSH) level and a greater increase in glutathione S-transferase activity than corresponding changes produced by Sch B. However, upon incubation, only Sch B resulted in the activation of the nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like factor 2 and the induction of a significant increase in the expression of thioredoxin (TRX) in RAW264.7 cells. The Sch B-induced increase in TRX expression was associated with the suppression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and effectors in LPS-stimulated macrophages. Studies in a mouse model of inflammation (carrageenan-induced paw edema) indicated that while long-term treatment with either Sch A or Sch B suppressed the extent of paw edema, only acute treatment with Sch A produced a significant degree of inhibition on the inflammatory response. Although only Sch A decreased the cellular GSH level and suppressed the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and cell proliferation in ConA-simulated splenocytes in vitro, both Sch A and Sch B treatments, while not altering cellular GSH levels, suppressed ConA-stimulated splenocyte proliferation ex vivo. These results suggest that Sch A and Sch B may act differentially on activating GST

  9. Differential Action between Schisandrin A and Schisandrin B in Eliciting an Anti-Inflammatory Action: The Depletion of Reduced Glutathione and the Induction of an Antioxidant Response.

    PubMed

    Leong, Pou Kuan; Wong, Hoi Shan; Chen, Jihang; Chan, Wing Man; Leung, Hoi Yan; Ko, Kam Ming

    2016-01-01

    Schisandrin A (Sch A) and schisandrin B (Sch B) are active components of Schisandrae Fructus. We compared the biochemical mechanism underlying the anti-inflammatory action of Sch A and Sch B, using cultured lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophages and concanavalin (ConA)-stimulated mouse splenocytes. Pre-incubation with Sch A or Sch B produced an anti-inflammatory action in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells, as evidenced by the inhibition of the pro-inflammatory c-Jun N-terminal kinases/p38 kinase/nuclear factor-κB signaling pathway as well as the suppression of various pro-inflammatory cytokines and effectors, with the extent of inhibition by Sch A being more pronounced. The greater activity of Sch A in anti-inflammatory response was associated with a greater decrease in cellular reduced glutathione (GSH) level and a greater increase in glutathione S-transferase activity than corresponding changes produced by Sch B. However, upon incubation, only Sch B resulted in the activation of the nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like factor 2 and the induction of a significant increase in the expression of thioredoxin (TRX) in RAW264.7 cells. The Sch B-induced increase in TRX expression was associated with the suppression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and effectors in LPS-stimulated macrophages. Studies in a mouse model of inflammation (carrageenan-induced paw edema) indicated that while long-term treatment with either Sch A or Sch B suppressed the extent of paw edema, only acute treatment with Sch A produced a significant degree of inhibition on the inflammatory response. Although only Sch A decreased the cellular GSH level and suppressed the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and cell proliferation in ConA-simulated splenocytes in vitro, both Sch A and Sch B treatments, while not altering cellular GSH levels, suppressed ConA-stimulated splenocyte proliferation ex vivo. These results suggest that Sch A and Sch B may act differentially on activating GST

  10. Antinociceptive, anti-inflammatory and smooth muscle relaxant activities of the pyrrolo[3,4-d]pyridazinone derivatives: Possible mechanisms of action.

    PubMed

    Mogilski, Szczepan; Kubacka, Monika; Redzicka, Aleksandra; Kazek, Grzegorz; Dudek, Magdalena; Malinka, Wiesław; Filipek, Barbara

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the analgesic as well as anti-inflammatory activities of the new pyrrolo[3,4-d]pyridazinone derivatives. Moreover, the present study attempted to assess some of the mechanisms involved in the pharmacological activity of these compounds. In the previous studies it was shown that these compounds were highly active in the phenylbenzoquinone-induced 'writhing syndrome' test and had much lower activity in the hot plate, which indicates that mainly peripheral mechanisms of analgesia are involved in their effects. In these extended studies the analgesic activity of two tested compounds (4c, 4f) was confirmed in some animal models of pain. The studied compounds showed a significant and dose-related antinociceptive effect in the models of pain induced by formalin, capsaicin and glutamic acid. Both compounds decreased the edema formation and one of them (4c) attenuated mechanical hyperalgesia in carrageenan-induced paw inflammation in rats. Furthermore, both compounds inhibited cell migration, plasma exudation and nociceptive reaction in zymosan A-induced mouse peritonitis. In the subsequent studies, including experiments on isolated organs (ileum, trachea, aorta), radioligand assays and biochemical tests, it was demonstrated that analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of the investigated structures are largely due to their competitive antagonism for histamine H1 receptor. The influence on the level of cAMP in inflammatory cells (shown in RAW 264.7 macrophages) and subsequent inhibition of cytokine (TNFα, IL-1β) release can also be one of the important mechanisms of their action. Moreover some additional mechanisms may also be involved in the eventual analgesic effect of tested pyrrolo[3,4-d]pyridazinone derivatives. PMID:25847619

  11. Metabolic inactivation of resolvin E1 and stabilization of its anti-inflammatory actions.

    PubMed

    Arita, Makoto; Oh, Sungwhan F; Chonan, Tomomichi; Hong, Song; Elangovan, Siva; Sun, Yee-Ping; Uddin, Jasim; Petasis, Nicos A; Serhan, Charles N

    2006-08-11

    The resolvins (Rv) are lipid mediators derived from omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids that act within a local inflammatory milieu to stop leukocyte recruitment and promote resolution. Resolvin E1 (RvE1; (5S,12R,18R)-trihydroxy-6Z,8E,10E,14Z,16E-eicosapentaenoic acid) is an oxygenase product derived from omega-3 eicosapentaenoic acid that displays potent anti-inflammation/pro-resolution actions in vivo. Here, we determined whether oxidoreductase enzymes catalyze the conversion of RvE1 and assessed the biological activity of the RvE1 metabolite. With NAD+ as a cofactor, recombinant 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase acted as an 18-hydroxyl dehydrogenase to form 18-oxo-RvE1. In the murine lung, dehydrogenation of the hydroxyl group at carbon 18 position to form 18-oxo-RvE1 represented the major initial metabolic route for RvE1. At a concentration where RvE1 potently reduced polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) recruitment in zymosan-induced peritonitis, 18-oxo-RvE1 was devoid of activity. In human neutrophils, carbon 20 hydroxylation of RvE1 was the main route of conversion. An RvE1 analog, i.e. 19-(p-fluorophenoxy)-RvE1, was synthesized that resisted rapid metabolic inactivation and proved to retain biological activity reducing PMN infiltration and pro-inflammatory cytokine/chemokine production in vivo. These results established the structure of a novel RvE1 initial metabolite, indicating that conversion of RvE1 to the oxo product represents a mode of RvE1 inactivation. Moreover, the designed RvE1 analog, which resisted further metabolism/inactivation, could be a useful tool to evaluate the actions of RvE1 in complex disease models. PMID:16757471

  12. Anti-Inflammatory Action of Pterostilbene is Mediated Through the p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Pathway in Colon Cancer Cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oxidation and nitration/nitrosation stress and generation of pro-inflammatory cytokines are hallmarks of inflammation. Since chronic inflammation is implicated in several pathological conditions in humans, including cancers of the colon, we have been interested in identifying new anti-inflammatory c...

  13. The anti-inflammatory action of the analgesic kyotorphin neuropeptide derivatives: insights of a lipid-mediated mechanism.

    PubMed

    Conceição, Katia; Magalhães, Pedro R; Campos, Sara R R; Domingues, Marco M; Ramu, Vasanthakumar G; Michalek, Matthias; Bertani, Philippe; Baptista, António M; Heras, Montserrat; Bardaji, Eduard R; Bechinger, Burkhard; Ferreira, Mônica Lopes; Castanho, Miguel A R B

    2016-01-01

    Recently, a designed class of efficient analgesic drugs derived from an endogenous neuropeptide, kyotorphin (KTP, Tyr-Arg) combining C-terminal amidation (KTP-NH2) and N-terminal conjugation to ibuprofen (Ib), IbKTP-NH2, was developed. The Ib moiety is an enhancer of KTP-NH2 analgesic action. In the present study, we have tested the hypothesis that KTP-NH2 is an enhancer of the Ib anti-inflammatory action. Moreover, the impact of the IbKTP-NH2 conjugation on microcirculation was also evaluated by a unified approach based on intravital microscopy in the murine cremasteric muscle. Our data show that KTP-NH2 and conjugates do not cause damage on microcirculatory environment and efficiently decrease the number of leukocyte rolling induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Isothermal titration calorimetry showed that the drugs bind to LPS directly thus contributing to LPS aggregation and subsequent elimination. In a parallel study, molecular dynamics simulations and NMR data showed that the IbKTP-NH2 tandem adopts a preferential "stretched" conformation in lipid bilayers and micelles, with the simulations indicating that the Ib moiety is anchored in the hydrophobic core, which explains the improved partition of IbKTP-NH2 to membranes and the permeability of lipid bilayers to this conjugate relative to KTP-NH2. The ability to bind glycolipids concomitant to the anchoring in the lipid membranes through the Ib residue explains the analgesic potency of IbKTP-NH2 given the enriched glycocalyx of the blood-brain barrier cells. Accumulation of IbKTP-NH2 in the membrane favors both direct permeation and local interaction with putative receptors as the location of the KTP-NH2 residue of IbKTP-NH2 and free KTP-NH2 in lipid membranes is the same. PMID:26347373

  14. Natural products and anti-inflammatory activity.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Gaofeng; Wahlqvist, Mark L; He, Guoqing; Yang, Min; Li, Duo

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this review paper was to summarise some commonly available natural products and their anti-inflammatory activity. We have collected data from MEDLINE, Current Contents and scientific journals, which included 92 publications. There are numerous natural products detailed in this literature; however we have summarized a few of the most commonly available and potent ones. In this paper, the natural products with anti-inflammatory activity including curcumin, parthenolide, cucurbitacins, 1,8-cineole, pseudopterosins, lyprinol, bromelain, flavonoids, saponins, marine sponge natural products and Boswellia serrata gum resin were reviewed. Natural products play a significant role in human health in relation to the prevention and treatment of inflammatory conditions. Further studies are being conducted to investigate the mechanism of action, metabolism, safety and long term side effect of these natural products, as well as interactions between these natural products with food and drug components. PMID:16672197

  15. Inflammatory Regulation Effect and Action Mechanism of Anti-Inflammatory Effective Parts of Housefly (Musca domestica) Larvae on Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Chu, Fu Jiang; Jin, Xiao Bao; Xu, Yin Ye; Ma, Yan; Li, Xiao Bo; Lu, Xue Mei; Liu, Wen Bin; Zhu, Jia Yong

    2013-01-01

    The protein-enriched extracts of housefly larvae were segregated by gel-filtration chromatography (GFC) and then anti-inflammatory activity screening in RAW264.7 (induced by LPS) was carried out. After acquire the anti-inflammatory effective parts, its anti-atherosclerotic properties in vivo were then evaluated. Results showed that the anti-inflammatory effective parts of housefly larvae were low-molecular-weight parts. After treated with the effective parts oral gavaged for 4 weeks, the atherosclerotic lesions of the mouse were significantly decreased. The inflammatory and lipid parameters were also reduced (except HDL which was increased). Western blot analysis demonstrated that the effective parts exerted potent inhibitory effect on expression of p65 in nucleus and cytoplasm. The results of immunofluorescence microscopy analysis also showed that the expressions of p65 both in cytoplasm and nucleus were significantly reduced. The hypothesis that the anti-inflammatory effective parts of housefly larvae possessed anti-atherosclerosis activity in mouse and the possible mechanism could be associated with the inhibition of expression and nuclear transfer of NF- κ B p65 could be derived. PMID:23554828

  16. Mechanism of action for NNZ-2566 anti-inflammatory effects following PBBI involves upregulation of immunomodulator ATF3.

    PubMed

    Cartagena, Casandra M; Phillips, Katie L; Williams, Garry L; Konopko, Melissa; Tortella, Frank C; Dave, Jitendra R; Schmid, Kara E

    2013-09-01

    The tripeptide glycine-proline-glutamate analogue NNZ-2566 (Neuren Pharmaceuticals) demonstrates neuroprotective efficacy in models of traumatic brain injury. In penetrating ballistic-like brain injury (PBBI), it significantly decreases injury-induced upregulation of inflammatory cytokines including TNF-α, IFN-γ, and IL-6. However, the mechanism by which NNZ-2566 acts has yet to be determined. The activating transcription factor-3 (ATF3) is known to repress expression of these inflammatory cytokines and was increased at the mRNA and protein level 24-h post-PBBI. This study investigated whether 12 h of NNZ-2566 treatment following PBBI alters atf3 expression. PBBI alone significantly increased atf3 mRNA levels by 13-fold at 12 h and these levels were increased by an additional fourfold with NNZ-2566 treatment. To confirm that changes in mRNA translated to changes in protein expression, ATF3 expression levels were determined in vivo in microglia/macrophages, T cells, natural killer cells (NKCs), astrocytes, and neurons. PBBI alone significantly increased ATF3 in microglia/macrophages (820%), NKCs (58%), and astrocytes (51%), but decreased levels in T cells (48%). NNZ-2566 treatment further increased ATF3 protein expression in microglia/macrophages (102%), NKCs (308%), and astrocytes (13%), while reversing ATF3 decreases in T cells. Finally, PBBI increased ATF3 levels by 55% in neurons and NNZ-2566 treatment further increased these levels an additional 33%. Since increased ATF3 may be an innate protective mechanism to limit inflammation following injury, these results demonstrating that the anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective drug NNZ-2566 increase both mRNA and protein levels of ATF3 in multiple cell types provide a cellular mechanism for NNZ-2566 modulation of neuroinflammation following PBBI. PMID:23765588

  17. Mechanisms Involved in the Anti-Inflammatory Action of a Polysulfated Fraction from Gracilaria cornea in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Coura, Chistiane Oliveira; Souza, Ricardo Basto; Rodrigues, José Ariévilo Gurgel; Vanderlei, Edfranck de Sousa Oliveira; de Araújo, Ianna Wivianne Fernandes; Ribeiro, Natássia Albuquerque; Frota, Annyta Fernandes; Ribeiro, Kátia Alves; Chaves, Hellíada Vasconcelos; Pereira, Karuza Maria Alves; da Cunha, Rodrigo Maranguape Silva; Bezerra, Mirna Marques; Benevides, Norma Maria Barros

    2015-01-01

    The anti-inflammatory mechanisms of the sulfated polysaccharidic fraction obtained from red marine alga Gracilaria cornea (Gc-FI) were investigated using a paw edema model induced in rats by different inflammatory agents (carrageenan, dextran, serotonin, bradykinin, compound 48/80 or L-arginine). Gc-FI at the doses of 3, 9 or 27 mg/kg, subcutaneously - s.c., significantly inhibited rat paw edema induced by carrageenan and dextran, as confirmed by myeloperoxidase and Evans’ blue assessments, respectively. Gc-FI (9 mg/kg, s.c.) inhibited rat paw edema induced by histamine, compound 48/80 and L-arginine. Additionally, Gc-FI (9 mg/kg, s.c.) inhibited Cg-induced edema in animals with intact mast cells but did not inhibit that with degranulated mast cells by compound 48/80, revealing a protective role on mast cell membranes. Gc-FI down-regulated the IL-1β, TNF-α and COX-2 mRNA and protein levels compared with those of the carrageenan group, based on qRT-PCR and immunohistochemistry analyses. After inhibition with ZnPP IX, a specific heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) inhibitor, the anti-inflammatory effect of Gc-FI was not observed in Cg-induced paw edema, suggesting that the anti-inflammatory effect of Gc-FI is, in part, dependent on the integrity of the HO-1 pathway. Gc-FI can target a combination of multiple points involved in inflammatory phenomena. PMID:25807556

  18. Biochemical and histological evaluations of anti-inflammatory and antioxidant p-chloro-selenosteroid actions in acute murine models of inflammation.

    PubMed

    Marcondes Sari, Marcel Henrique; Souza, Ana Cristina Guerra; Rosa, Suzan Gonçalves; Chagas, Pietro Maria; da Luz, Sônia Cristina Almeida; Rodrigues, Oscar Endrigo Dorneles; Nogueira, Cristina Wayne

    2016-06-15

    This study investigated the potential p-chloro-selenosteroid (PCS) anti-inflammatory effect in different animal models of acute inflammation. In order to determine a time- and a dose-curve response of action, female adult Swiss mice (25-35g) were divided in different groups and pretreated by the intragastric route (i.g.) with PCS (5-10mg/kg) and after the specific times (5, 30 and 60min) the ear inflammation was induced with croton oil (2.5%, 20μl). The ear edema, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and histological analyses were performed. In a second experiment, the pleurisy model was used to determine the PCS protective effect (10mg/kg, i.g., 30min before induction) in the inflammatory and oxidative alterations induced by an intrapleural injection of a 1% carrageenan solution (0.1ml) in exudate and lung samples. Dexamethasone (1mg/kg, i.g.) was used as positive control for both models. Statistical analysis was performed through a One-Way ANOVA test followed by the Newman-Keuls' test. Pretreatment of 30min with PCS, only at a dose of 10mg/kg, decreased ear edema and the MPO activity as well as the histological alterations induced by croton oil. In the pleurisy model, PCS (10mg/kg, i.g.; 30min) reduced the leukocyte counts, histological alterations, MPO and adenosine deaminase activities, oxidative damage and the non-enzymatic antioxidant defense imbalance. PCS had a similar anti-inflammatory profile to dexamethasone; however, it showed a better antioxidant effect. PCS had anti-inflammatory and antioxidant actions in two well established inflammation models in mice. PMID:27102337

  19. Chemopreventive action of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on the inflammatory pathways in colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Ghanghas, Preety; Jain, Shelly; Rana, Chandan; Sanyal, S N

    2016-03-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are emerging as novel chemopreventive agents against a variety of cancers owing to their capability in blocking the tumor development by cellular proliferation and by promoting apoptosis. Inflammation is principal cause of colon carcinogenesis. A missing link between inflammation and cancer could be the activation of NF-κB, which is a hallmark of inflammatory response, and is commonly detected in malignant tumors. Therefore, targeting pro-inflammatory cyclooxygenase enzymes and transcription factors will be profitable as a mechanism to inhibit tumor growth. In the present study, we have studied the role of various pro-inflammatory enzymes and transcription factors in the development of the 1,2-dimethylhydrazine dihydrochloride (DMH)-induced colorectal cancer and also observed the role of three NSAIDs, viz., Celecoxib, Etoricoxib and Diclofenac. Carcinogenic changes were observed in morphological and histopathological studies, whereas protein regulations of various biomolecules were identified by immunofluorescence analysis. Apoptotic studies was done by TUNEL assay and Hoechst/PI co-staining of the isolated colonocytes. It was found that DMH-treated animals were having an over-expression of pro-inflammatory enzymes, aberrant nuclear localization of activated cell survival transcription factor, NF-κB and suppression of anti-inflammatory transcription factor PPAR-γ, thereby suggesting a marked role of inflammation in the tumor progression. However, co-administration of NSAIDs has significantly reduced the inflammatory potential of the growing neoplasm. PMID:26898448

  20. The Anti-Inflammatory and Antibacterial Action of Nanocrystalline Silver and Manuka Honey on the Molecular Alternation of Diabetic Foot Ulcer: A Comprehensive Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Tsang, Ka-Kit; Kwong, Enid Wai-Yung; Woo, Kevin Y.; To, Tony Shing-Shun; Chung, Joanne Wai-Yee; Wong, Thomas Kwok-Shing

    2015-01-01

    Honey and silver have been used since ancient times for treating wounds. Their widespread clinical application has attracted attention in light of the increasing prevalence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. While there have been a number of studies exploring the anti-inflammatory and antibacterial effects of manuka honey and nanocrystalline silver, their advantages and limitations with regard to the treatment of chronic wounds remain a subject of debate. The aim of this paper is to examine the evidence on the use of nanocrystalline silver and manuka honey for treating diabetic foot ulcers through a critical and comprehensive review of in vitro studies, animal studies, and in vivo studies. The findings from the in vitro and animal studies suggest that both agents have effective antibacterial actions. Their anti-inflammatory action and related impact on wound healing are unclear. Besides, there is no evidence to suggest that any topical agent is more effective for use in treating diabetic foot ulcer. Overall, high-quality, clinical human studies supported by findings from the molecular science on the use of manuka honey or nanocrystalline silver are lacking. There is a need for rigorously designed human clinical studies on the subject to fill this knowledge gap and guide clinical practice. PMID:26290672

  1. The Anti-Inflammatory and Antibacterial Action of Nanocrystalline Silver and Manuka Honey on the Molecular Alternation of Diabetic Foot Ulcer: A Comprehensive Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Ka-Kit; Kwong, Enid Wai-Yung; Woo, Kevin Y; To, Tony Shing-Shun; Chung, Joanne Wai-Yee; Wong, Thomas Kwok-Shing

    2015-01-01

    Honey and silver have been used since ancient times for treating wounds. Their widespread clinical application has attracted attention in light of the increasing prevalence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. While there have been a number of studies exploring the anti-inflammatory and antibacterial effects of manuka honey and nanocrystalline silver, their advantages and limitations with regard to the treatment of chronic wounds remain a subject of debate. The aim of this paper is to examine the evidence on the use of nanocrystalline silver and manuka honey for treating diabetic foot ulcers through a critical and comprehensive review of in vitro studies, animal studies, and in vivo studies. The findings from the in vitro and animal studies suggest that both agents have effective antibacterial actions. Their anti-inflammatory action and related impact on wound healing are unclear. Besides, there is no evidence to suggest that any topical agent is more effective for use in treating diabetic foot ulcer. Overall, high-quality, clinical human studies supported by findings from the molecular science on the use of manuka honey or nanocrystalline silver are lacking. There is a need for rigorously designed human clinical studies on the subject to fill this knowledge gap and guide clinical practice. PMID:26290672

  2. Anti-inflammatory and Anti-nociceptive Actions of Systemically or Locally Treated Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Experimental Inflammatory Model.

    PubMed

    Mert, Tufan; Kurt, Akif H; Arslan, Mahmut; Çelik, Ahmet; Tugtag, Berin; Akkurt, Aysenur

    2015-01-01

    Cell-based therapies using mesenchymal stem cells provide hopeful results. Therefore, in this present study, possible anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive actions of locally or systemically treated adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADMSCs) investigated in experimental inflammation model. ADMSCs were isolated from a male Wistar rat under anesthesia, and then they were cultured and expanded for transplantation in all the experimental animals. Effects of intraperitoneal or intraplantar ADMSC treatments on the hallmarks of the inflammatory nociception, such as hyperalgesia, allodynia, edema, and several biochemical parameters were investigated using a well-established carrageenan (CG)-induced hindpaw inflammation model in male rats. Both local and systemic ADMSC treatment increased the latencies, thresholds, and the development of edema in a time-dependent manner. In addition, administration of ADMSC suppressed the increased level of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and nitric oxide (NO), but further enhanced that of IL-10. Locally treated ADMSC at inflammatory sites effectively suppressed the CG-induced inflammatory responses when compared to the intraperitoneal route of administration. Findings suggest that therapeutic potential of ADMSC can change depending on its route of administration. Local ADMSC treatments may suppress the development of inflammatory-nociception and edema by decreasing the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and NO level and increasing the anti-inflammatory cytokine production at inflammatory sites. PMID:25563206

  3. [An experimental study of the anti-inflammatory action of noopept and its effect on the level of cytokines].

    PubMed

    Alekseeva, S V; Kovalenko, L P; Tallerova, A V; Gudasheva, T A; Durnev, A D

    2012-01-01

    The anti-inflammatory effects of noopept (dipeptide analog of piracetam) upon a single intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration at doses of 1, 5, and 10 mg/kg in comparison to the reference drug diclofenac (10 mg/kg, i.p.) have been studied on a model of acute exudative inflammation induced by carrageenan in outbred rats and concanavalin A (Con A) in CBA mice. The level of cytokines was studied on the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) model (single administration, 100 mg/kg, i.p.) with 5-day administration of noopept at a dose of 5 mg/kg (i.p., before endotoxin injection) in C57BL/6 mice. The administration of noopept led to a significant suppression of the inflammatory response to both carrageenan and Con A. The administration of Con A caused a 16-fold increase in the level of IL-6 interleukin in the blood serum of mice as compared to control. Noopept (5 mg/kg) reduced the level of IL-6 by a factor of 1.8 in the inflammatory response to Con A. The administration of LPS led to pronounced increase in the levels ofpro-inflammatory IL-6 and TNF-alpha in the blood serum of test mice as compared to intact animals. The course administration of noopept (5 mg/kg) significantly decreased the level of IL-6 and reduced by half the level of TNF-alpha. PMID:23156084

  4. Anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive action of an orally available nociceptin receptor agonist SCH 221510 in a mouse model of inflammatory bowel diseases.

    PubMed

    Sobczak, Marta; Mokrowiecka, Anna; Cygankiewicz, Adam I; Zakrzewski, Piotr K; Sałaga, Maciej; Storr, Martin; Kordek, Radzisław; Małecka-Panas, Ewa; Krajewska, Wanda M; Fichna, Jakub

    2014-03-01

    The nociceptin receptors (NOPs) are expressed in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract on muscle cell membranes and neurons, as well as the immune cells that infiltrate the mucosa. The involvement of NOPs in the pathophysiology of GI inflammation has been suggested, but due to the lack of selective NOP agonists, it never fully elucidated. Our aim was to characterize the anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive effect of the NOP agonist, SCH 221510 [3-endo-8-[bis(2-methylphenyl)methyl]-3-phenyl-8-azabicyclo [3.2.1]octan-3-ol], as a potential therapeutic strategy in the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). The anti-inflammatory action of SCH 221510 was determined after intraperitoneal, oral, and intracolonic administration of SCH 221510 (0.1-3.0 mg/kg once or twice daily) in mice treated with 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS). Antinociceptive action of SCH 221510 was evaluated in the mouse model of mustard oil (MO)-induced abdominal pain. Relative NOP mRNA expression was assessed in patients with IBD using real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. We found that the expression of NOP mRNA was significantly decreased in patients with IBD. The administration (0.1 and 1.0 mg/kg i.p. twice daily and 3 mg/kg p.o. twice daily) of SCH 221510 attenuated TNBS colitis in mice. This effect was blocked by a selective NOP antagonist [J-113397 [(±)-1-[(3R*,4R*)-1-(cyclooctylmethyl)-3-(hydroxymethyl)-4-piperidinyl]-3-ethyl-1,3-dihydro-2H-benzimidazol-2-one

  5. Human renal mesangial cells are a target for the anti-inflammatory action of 9-cis retinoic acid

    PubMed Central

    Manzano, V Moreno; Muñoz, J C Sepúlveda; Jiménez, J Rodriguez; Puyol, M Rodriguez; Puyol, D Rodriguez; Kitamura, M; Cazaña, F J Lucio

    2000-01-01

    Mesangial cells play an active role in the inflammatory response to glomerular injury. We have studied in cultured human mesangial cells (CHMC) several effects of 9-cis retinoic acid (9-cRA), an activator of both retinoic acid receptors (RARs) and retinoid X receptors (RXRs). 9-cRA inhibited foetal calf serum-induced CHMC proliferation. It also prevented CHMC death induced by the inflammatory mediator H2O2. This preventive effect was not due to any increase in H2O2 catabolism and it persisted even when both catalase and glutathione synthesis were inhibited. Finally, 9-cRA diminished monocyte adhesion to FCS-stimulated CHMC. Interestingly, the retinoid also inhibited in FCS-stimulated cells the protein expression of two mesangial adhesion molecules, fibronectin and osteopontin, but it did not modify the protein expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and vascular adhesion molecule-1. All major RARs and RXRs isotypes were expressed in CHMC regardless of the presence or absence of 9-cRA. Transcripts to RAR-α, RAR-β and RXR-α increased after incubation with 9-cRA whereas RXR-γ was inhibited, suggesting a major role for RARs and RXRs in 9-cRA-anti-inflammatory effects. 9-cRA was toxic only at 50 μM (a concentration 50–5000 times higher than required for the effects above). Cell death occurred by apoptosis, whose onset was associated with a pronounced increase in catalase activity and reduced glutathione content, being more effectively induced by all-trans retinoic acid. Modulation of the oxidant/antioxidant balance failed to inhibit apoptosis. We conclude that mesangial cells might be a target for the treatment of inflammatory glomerulopathies with 9-cRA. PMID:11139446

  6. Marine Diterpenoids as Potential Anti-Inflammatory Agents.

    PubMed

    González, Yisett; Torres-Mendoza, Daniel; Jones, Gillian E; Fernandez, Patricia L

    2015-01-01

    The inflammatory response is a highly regulated process, and its dysregulation can lead to the establishment of chronic inflammation and, in some cases, to death. Inflammation is the cause of several diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel diseases, multiple sclerosis, and asthma. The search for agents inhibiting inflammation is a great challenge as the inflammatory response plays an important role in the defense of the host to infections. Marine invertebrates are exceptional sources of new natural products, and among those diterpenoids secondary metabolites exhibit notable anti-inflammatory properties. Novel anti-inflammatory diterpenoids, exclusively produced by marine organisms, have been identified and synthetic molecules based on those structures have been obtained. The anti-inflammatory activity of marine diterpenoids has been attributed to the inhibition of Nuclear Factor-κB activation and to the modulation of arachidonic acid metabolism. However, more research is necessary to describe the mechanisms of action of these secondary metabolites. This review is a compilation of marine diterpenoids, mainly isolated from corals, which have been described as potential anti-inflammatory molecules. PMID:26538822

  7. Marine Diterpenoids as Potential Anti-Inflammatory Agents

    PubMed Central

    González, Yisett; Torres-Mendoza, Daniel; Jones, Gillian E.; Fernandez, Patricia L.

    2015-01-01

    The inflammatory response is a highly regulated process, and its dysregulation can lead to the establishment of chronic inflammation and, in some cases, to death. Inflammation is the cause of several diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel diseases, multiple sclerosis, and asthma. The search for agents inhibiting inflammation is a great challenge as the inflammatory response plays an important role in the defense of the host to infections. Marine invertebrates are exceptional sources of new natural products, and among those diterpenoids secondary metabolites exhibit notable anti-inflammatory properties. Novel anti-inflammatory diterpenoids, exclusively produced by marine organisms, have been identified and synthetic molecules based on those structures have been obtained. The anti-inflammatory activity of marine diterpenoids has been attributed to the inhibition of Nuclear Factor-κB activation and to the modulation of arachidonic acid metabolism. However, more research is necessary to describe the mechanisms of action of these secondary metabolites. This review is a compilation of marine diterpenoids, mainly isolated from corals, which have been described as potential anti-inflammatory molecules. PMID:26538822

  8. Sesquiterpenes from Essential Oils and Anti-Inflammatory Activity.

    PubMed

    da Silveira e Sá, Rita de Cássia; Andrade, Luciana Nalone; de Sousa, Damião Pergentino

    2015-10-01

    This review is aimed at presenting relevant information on the therapeutic potential of essential oil sesquiterpenes with anti-inflammatory activity. The data reviewed provide a basis for seeking new anti-inflammatory drugs from natural products that do not exhibit the undesirable side effects often displayed by anti-inflammatory drugs. In this review the experimental models, possible mechanisms of action, and chemical structures of 12 sesquiterpenes are presented. PMID:26669122

  9. The β2-adrenoceptor agonist clenbuterol elicits neuroprotective, anti-inflammatory and neurotrophic actions in the kainic acid model of excitotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Gleeson, Lorna C; Ryan, Katie J; Griffin, Eadaoin W; Connor, Thomas J; Harkin, Andrew

    2010-11-01

    Excitotoxicity is a mechanism of neuronal cell death implicated in a range of neurodegenerative conditions. Systemic administration of the excitotoxin kainic acid (KA) induces inflammation and apoptosis in the hippocampus, resulting in neuronal loss. Evidence indicates that stimulation of glial β(2)-adrenoceptors has anti-inflammatory and neurotrophic properties that could result in neuroprotection. Consequently, in this study we examined the effect of the β(2)-adrenoceptor agonist clenbuterol on KA-induced inflammation, neurotrophic factor expression and apoptosis in the hippocampus. Clenbuterol (0.5mg/kg) was administered to rats one hour prior to KA (10mg/kg). Epileptic behaviour induced by KA was assessed for three hours following administration using the Racine scale. Twenty-four hours later TUNEL staining in the CA3 hippocampal subfield and hippocampal caspase-3 activity was assessed to measure KA-induced apoptosis. In addition, expression of inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β and IFN-γ), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), kynurenine pathway enzymes indolamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) and kynurenine monooxygenase (KMO), the microglial activation marker CD11b, and the neurotrophins BDNF and NGF were quantified in the hippocampus using real-time PCR. Whilst clenbuterol treatment did not significantly alter KA-induced epileptic behavior it ameliorated KA-induced apoptosis, and this neuroprotective effect was accompanied by reduced inflammatory cytokine expression, reduced expression of iNOS, IDO, KMO and CD11b, coupled with increased BDNF and NGF expression in KA-treated rats. In conclusion, the β(2)-adrenoceptor agonist clenbuterol has anti-inflammatory and neurotrophic actions and elicits a neuroprotective effect in the KA model of neurodegeneration. PMID:20599496

  10. Anti-inflammatory Activity.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation is the body's first response to infection or injury and is critical for both innate and adaptive immunity. It can be considered as part of the complex biological response of vascular tissues to harmful stimuli such as pathogens, damaged cells, or irritants. The search for natural compounds and phytoconstituents that are able to interfere with these mechanisms by preventing a prolonged inflammation could be useful for human health. Here, the anti-inflammatory properties of plant-based drugs are put together with both in vitro and acute (carrageenan, egg albumin and croton oil) and chronic (cotton pellet) in vivo models. PMID:26939273

  11. Anti-Inflammatory Iridoids of Botanical Origin

    PubMed Central

    Viljoen, A; Mncwangi, N; Vermaak, I

    2012-01-01

    Inflammation is a manifestation of a wide range of disorders which include; arthritis, atherosclerosis, Alzheimer’s disease, inflammatory bowel syndrome, physical injury and infection amongst many others. Common treatment modalities are usually non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as aspirin, paracetamol, indomethacin and ibuprofen as well as corticosteroids such as prednisone. These however, may be associated with a host of side effects due to non-selectivity for cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes involved in inflammation and those with selectivity may be highly priced. Thus, there is a continuing search for safe and effective anti-inflammatory molecules from natural sources. Research has confirmed that iridoids exhibit promising anti-inflammatory activity which may be beneficial in the treatment of inflammation. Iridoids are secondary metabolites present in various plants, especially in species belonging to the Apocynaceae, Lamiaceae, Loganiaceae, Rubiaceae, Scrophulariaceae and Verbenaceae families. Many of these ethnobotanicals have an illustrious history of traditional use alluding to their use to treat inflammation. Although iridoids exhibit a wide range of pharmacological activities such as cardiovascular, hepatoprotection, hypoglycaemic, antimutagenic, antispasmodic, anti-tumour, antiviral, immunomodulation and purgative effects this review will acutely focus on their anti-inflammatory properties. The paper aims to present a summary for the most prominent iridoid-containing plants for which anti-inflammatory activity has been demonstrated in vitro and / or in vivo. PMID:22414102

  12. A Newly Designed Curcumin Analog Y20 Mitigates Cardiac Injury via Anti-Inflammatory and Anti-Oxidant Actions in Obese Rats

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Dandan; Xu, Zheng; Skibba, Melissa; Zeng, Chunlai; Li, Xiaokun; Wei, Tiemin; Wu, Lianpin; Liang, Guang

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is strongly associated with the cause of structural and functional changes of the heart in both human and animal models. Oxidative stress and inflammation play a critical role in the development of obesity-induced cardiac disorders. Curcumin is a natural product from Curcuma Longa with multiple bioactivities. In our previous study, in order to reach better anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant dual activities, we designed a new mono-carbonyl curcumin analog, Y20, via the structural modification with both trifluoromethyl and bromine. This study was designed to investigate the protective effects of Y20 on obesity-induced cardiac injury and its underlying mechanisms. In high fat diet–fed rats, oral administration of Y20 at 20 mg/kg or curcumin at 50 mg/kg significantly decreased the cardiac inflammation and oxidative stress and eventually improved the cardiac remodeling by mitigating cardiac disorganization, hypertrophy, fibrosis and apoptosis. Y20 at 20 mg/kg showed comparable and even stronger bioactivities than curcumin at 50 mg/kg. The beneficial actions of Y20 are closely associated with its ability to increase Nrf2 expression and inhibit NF-κB activation. Taken together, these results suggest that Y20 may have a great therapeutic potential in the treatment of obesity-induced cardiac injury using Nrf2 and NF-κB as the therapeutic targets for treating obesity-related disorders. PMID:25786209

  13. Underlying mechanism of regulatory actions of diclofenac, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agent, on neuronal potassium channels and firing: an experimental and theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Huang, C W; Hung, T Y; Liao, Y K; Hsu, M C; Wu, S N

    2013-06-01

    Diclofenac (DIC), a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, is known to exert anti-nociceptive and anti-convulsant actions; however, its effects on ion currents, in neurons remain debatable. We aimed to investigate (1) potential effects of diclofenac on membrane potential and potassium currents in differentiated NSC-34 neuronal cells and dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons with whole-cell patch-clamp technology, and (2) firing of action potentials (APs), using a simulation model from hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons based on diclofenac's effects on potassium currents. In the NSC-34 cells, diclofenac exerted an inhibitory effect on delayed-rectifier K⁺ current (I(KDR)) with an IC₅₀ value of 73 μM. Diclofenac not merely inhibited the I(KDR) amplitude in response to membrane depolarization, but also accelerated the process of current inactivation. The inhibition by diclofenac of IK(DR) was not reversed by subsequent application of either naloxone. Importantly, diclofenac (300 μM) increased the amplitude of M-type K⁺ current (I)(KM)), while flupirtine (10 μM) or meclofenamic acid (10 μM) enhanced it effectively. Consistently, diclofenac (100 μM) increased the amplitude of I(KM) and diminished the I(KDR) amplitude, with a shortening of inactivation time constant in DRG neurons. Furthermore, by using the simulation modeling, we demonstrated the potential electrophysiological mechanisms underlying changes in AP firing caused by diclofenac. During the exposure to diclofenac, the actions on both I(KM) and I(KDR) could be potential mechanism through which it influences the excitability of fast-spiking neurons. Caution needs to be made in attributing the effects of diclofenac primarily to those produced by the activation of I(KM). PMID:23959723

  14. The anti-inflammatory action of fermented soybean products in kidney of high-fat-fed rats.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jehun; Kwon, Sun-Hwa; Park, Kun-Young; Yu, Byung Pal; Kim, Nam Deuk; Jung, Jee H; Chung, Hae Young

    2011-03-01

    Soybean has many compounds with a variety of biological properties that potentially benefit human health; among them, isoflavones have inhibitory effects on lipid oxidation in adipose tissue. In this study, we examined two Korean traditional fermented soybean products--doenjang (DNJ) and cheonggukjang (CGJ)--for their ability to suppress redox-sensitive nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) activation in the kidney of rats fed a high-fat diet. Sprague-Dawley rats, 4 weeks old, were fed soybean, DNJ, or CGJ (1 g/kg/day) with a 20% fat diet for 6 weeks. Body weight and food intake were carefully monitored. NF-κB-related activities of genes for inflammatory proteins, such as inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), were determined. The soybean products exhibited antioxidative action by maintaining redox regulation, suppressing NF-κB activation, and modulating the expression of genes for NF-κB-induced inflammatory proteins such as COX-2, iNOS, and VCAM-1. Based on these results, we conclude that Korean traditional soybean fermented products, especially CGJ, suppress the generation of reactive species, NF-κB activity, and NF-κB-related inflammatory genes. PMID:21332402

  15. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of GLP-1-Based Therapies beyond Glucose Control

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young-Sun; Jun, Hee-Sook

    2016-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an incretin hormone mainly secreted from intestinal L cells in response to nutrient ingestion. GLP-1 has beneficial effects for glucose homeostasis by stimulating insulin secretion from pancreatic beta-cells, delaying gastric emptying, decreasing plasma glucagon, reducing food intake, and stimulating glucose disposal. Therefore, GLP-1-based therapies such as GLP-1 receptor agonists and inhibitors of dipeptidyl peptidase-4, which is a GLP-1 inactivating enzyme, have been developed for treatment of type 2 diabetes. In addition to glucose-lowering effects, emerging data suggests that GLP-1-based therapies also show anti-inflammatory effects in chronic inflammatory diseases including type 1 and 2 diabetes, atherosclerosis, neurodegenerative disorders, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, diabetic nephropathy, asthma, and psoriasis. This review outlines the anti-inflammatory actions of GLP-1-based therapies on diseases associated with chronic inflammation in vivo and in vitro, and their molecular mechanisms of anti-inflammatory action. PMID:27110066

  16. Mushrooms: A Potential Natural Source of Anti-Inflammatory Compounds for Medical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Elsayed, Elsayed A.; El Enshasy, Hesham; Wadaan, Mohammad A. M.; Aziz, Ramlan

    2014-01-01

    For centuries, macrofungi have been used as food and medicine in different parts of the world. This is mainly attributed to their nutritional value as a potential source of carbohydrates, proteins, amino acids, and minerals. In addition, they also include many bioactive metabolites which make mushrooms and truffles common components in folk medicine, especially in Africa, the Middle East, China, and Japan. The reported medicinal effects of mushrooms include anti-inflammatory effects, with anti-inflammatory compounds of mushrooms comprising a highly diversified group in terms of their chemical structure. They include polysaccharides, terpenoids, phenolic compounds, and many other low molecular weight molecules. The aims of this review are to report the different types of bioactive metabolites and their relevant producers, as well as the different mechanisms of action of mushroom compounds as potent anti-inflammatory agents. PMID:25505823

  17. Inhibition of mitochondrial complex I by various non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and its protection by quercetin via a coenzyme Q-like action.

    PubMed

    Sandoval-Acuña, Cristian; Lopez-Alarcón, Camilo; Aliaga, Margarita E; Speisky, Hernán

    2012-07-30

    Mitochondrial dysfunction plays a major role in the development of oxidative stress and cytotoxicity induced by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). A major objective of the present study was to investigate whether in vitro the NSAIDs, aspirin, indomethacin, diclofenac, piroxicam and ibuprofen, which feature different chemical structures, are able to inhibit mitochondrial complex I. All NSAIDs were effective inhibitors when added both, directly to mitochondria isolated from rat duodenum epithelium (50 μM) or to Caco-2 cells (250 μM). In the former system, complex I inhibition was concentration-dependent and susceptible to competition and reversion by the addition of coenzyme Q (32.5-520 μM). Based on reports suggesting a potential gastro-protective activity of quercetin, the ability of this flavonoid to protect isolated mitochondria against NSAIDs-induced complex I inhibition was evaluated. Low micromolar concentrations of quercetin (1-20 μM) protected against such inhibition, in a concentration dependent manner. In the case of aspirin, quercetin (5 μM) increased the IC50 by 10-fold. In addition, the present study shows that quercetin (5-10 μM) can behave as a "coenzyme Q-mimetic" molecule, allowing a normal electron flow along the whole electron transporting chain (complexes I, II, III and IV). The exposed findings reveal that complex I inhibition is a common deleterious effect of NSAIDs at the mitochondrial level, and that such effect is, for all tested agents, susceptible to be prevented by quercetin. Data provided here supports the contention that the protective action of quercetin resides on its, here for first time-shown, ability to behave as a coenzyme Q-like molecule. PMID:22652335

  18. Anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties of Carica papaya.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Saurabh; Cabot, Peter J; Shaw, P Nicholas; Hewavitharana, Amitha K

    2016-07-01

    Chronic inflammation is linked with the generation and progression of various diseases such as cancer, diabetes and atherosclerosis, and anti-inflammatory drugs therefore have the potential to assist in the treatment of these conditions. Carica papaya is a tropical plant that is traditionally used in the treatment of various ailments including inflammatory conditions. A literature search was conducted by using the keywords "papaya", "anti-inflammatory and inflammation" and "immunomodulation and immune" along with cross-referencing. Both in vitro and in vivo investigation studies were included. This is a review of all studies published since 2000 on the anti-inflammatory activity of papaya extracts and their effects on various immune-inflammatory mediators. Studies on the anti-inflammatory activities of recognized phytochemicals present in papaya are also included. Although in vitro and in vivo studies have shown that papaya extracts and papaya-associated phytochemicals possess anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties, clinical studies are lacking. PMID:27416522

  19. Antimicrobial Peptide CMA3 Derived from the CA-MA Hybrid Peptide: Antibacterial and Anti-inflammatory Activities with Low Cytotoxicity and Mechanism of Action in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong-kook; Seo, Chang Ho; Luchian, Tudor

    2015-01-01

    CA-MA is a hybrid antimicrobial peptide (AMP) derived from two naturally occurring AMPs, cecropin A and magainin 2. CA-MA shows strong antimicrobial activity against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria but also exhibits cytotoxicity toward mammalian cells. Our objective was to identify CA-MA analogues with reduced cytotoxicity by systematic replacement of amino acids with positively charged R groups (His and Lys), aliphatic R groups (Leu), or polar R groups (Glu). Among the CA-MA analogues studied (CMA1 to -6), CMA3 showed the strongest antimicrobial activity, including against drug-resistant Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains isolated from hospital patients. CMA3 appeared to act by inducing pore formation (toroidal model) in the bacterial membrane. In cytotoxicity assays, CMA3 showed little cytotoxicity toward human red blood cells (hRBCs) or HaCaT cells. Additionally, no fluorescence was released from small or giant unilamellar vesicles exposed to 60 μM CMA3 for 80 s, whereas fluorescence was released within 35 s upon exposure to CA-MA. CMA3 also exerted strong lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-neutralizing activity in RAW 264.7 cells, and BALB/c mice exposed to LPS after infection by Escherichia coli showed improved survival after administration of one 0.5-mg/kg of body weight or 1-mg/kg dose of CMA3. Finally, in a mouse model of septic shock, CMA3 reduced the levels of proinflammatory factors, including both nitric oxide and white blood cells, and correspondingly reduced lung tissue damage. This study suggests that CMA3 is an antimicrobial/antiendotoxin peptide that could serve as the basis for the development of anti-inflammatory and/or antimicrobial agents with low cytotoxicity. PMID:26552969

  20. Anti-inflammatory iridoids of botanical origin.

    PubMed

    Viljoen, A; Mncwangi, N; Vermaak, I

    2012-01-01

    Inflammation is a manifestation of a wide range of disorders which include; arthritis, atherosclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, inflammatory bowel syndrome, physical injury and infection amongst many others. Common treatment modalities are usually nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as aspirin, paracetamol, indomethacin and ibuprofen as well as corticosteroids such as prednisone. These however, may be associated with a host of side effects due to non-selectivity for cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes involved in inflammation and those with selectivity may be highly priced. Thus, there is a continuing search for safe and effective antiinflammatory molecules from natural sources. Research has confirmed that iridoids exhibit promising anti-inflammatory activity which may be beneficial in the treatment of inflammation. Iridoids are secondary metabolites present in various plants, especially in species belonging to the Apocynaceae, Lamiaceae, Loganiaceae, Rubiaceae, Scrophulariaceae and Verbenaceae families. Many of these ethnobotanicals have an illustrious history of traditional use alluding to their use to treat inflammation. Although iridoids exhibit a wide range of pharmacological activities such as cardiovascular, hepatoprotection, hypoglycaemic, antimutagenic, antispasmodic, anti-tumour, antiviral, immunomodulation and purgative effects this review will acutely focus on their anti-inflammatory properties. The paper aims to present a summary for the most prominent iridoid-containing plants for which anti-inflammatory activity has been demonstrated in vitro and / or in vivo. PMID:22414102

  1. Systems pharmacology dissection of the anti-inflammatory mechanism for the medicinal herb Folium eriobotryae.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingxiao; Li, Yan; Chen, Su-Shing; Zhang, Lilei; Wang, Jinghui; Yang, Yinfeng; Zhang, Shuwei; Pan, Yanqiu; Wang, Yonghua; Yang, Ling

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is a hallmark of many diseases like diabetes, cancers, atherosclerosis and arthritis. Thus, lots of concerns have been raised toward developing novel anti-inflammatory agents. Many alternative herbal medicines possess excellent anti-inflammatory properties, yet their precise mechanisms of action are yet to be elucidated. Here, a novel systems pharmacology approach based on a large number of chemical, biological and pharmacological data was developed and exemplified by a probe herb Folium Eriobotryae, a widely used clinical anti-inflammatory botanic drug. The results show that 11 ingredients of this herb with favorable pharmacokinetic properties are predicted as active compounds for anti-inflammatory treatment. In addition, via systematic network analyses, their targets are identified to be 43 inflammation-associated proteins including especially COX2, ALOX5, PPARG, TNF and RELA that are mainly involved in the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway, the rheumatoid arthritis pathway and NF-κB signaling pathway. All these demonstrate that the integrated systems pharmacology method provides not only an effective tool to illustrate the anti-inflammatory mechanisms of herbs, but also a new systems-based approach for drug discovery from, but not limited to, herbs, especially when combined with further experimental validations. PMID:25636035

  2. Chemical composition and anti-inflammatory activity of the leaves of Byrsonima verbascifolia.

    PubMed

    Saldanha, Aline Aparecida; do Carmo, Lucas Fernandes; do Nascimento, Sara Batista; de Matos, Natália Alves; de Carvalho Veloso, Clarice; Castro, Ana Hortência Fonsêca; De Vos, Ric C H; Klein, André; de Siqueira, João Máximo; Carollo, Carlos Alexandre; do Nascimento, Thalita Vieira; Toffoli-Kadri, Mônica Cristina; Soares, Adriana Cristina

    2016-10-01

    An ethnopharmacological survey indicates that the genus Byrsonima has some medicinal species that are commonly found in the Brazilian Cerrado and has been used as an anti-inflammatory and for gastroduodenal disorders. The aim of this study was to evaluate the anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activity along with qualitative chemical characterization of the methanolic extract of the leaves of Byrsonima verbascifolia (BvME) obtained by exhaustive percolation. The data from the chemical analyses by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry led to tentative identification of 42 compounds belonging to proanthocyanidins, galloyl quinic acid derivatives, flavonoids, and triterpene glycoside derivatives. BvME contain flavonoids and show an antioxidative activity. The methanolic extract administered intraperitoneally at doses of 50, 100, or 300 mg/kg showed a significant reduction in paw edema and modulated the neutrophil influx in a mouse model. Furthermore, the anti-edematogenic activity of the extract provided in smaller doses (12.5 and 25 mg/kg) was also demonstrated in a mouse paw edema model. The extract inhibited NO production by macrophages induced by lipopolysaccharide. We presume that the anti-inflammatory effects of BvME are due to a combination of compounds present in B. verbascifolia, including catechins (procyanidins), flavonoids, and triterpene glycosides and that these anti-inflammatory actions should be mediated, at least partly, through the inhibition of NO production. This study supports and validates the ethnopharmacological uses of B. verbascifolia as an anti-inflammatory. PMID:27278224

  3. Systems Pharmacology Dissection of the Anti-Inflammatory Mechanism for the Medicinal Herb Folium Eriobotryae

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jingxiao; Li, Yan; Chen, Su-Shing; Zhang, Lilei; Wang, Jinghui; Yang, Yinfeng; Zhang, Shuwei; Pan, Yanqiu; Wang, Yonghua; Yang, Ling

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is a hallmark of many diseases like diabetes, cancers, atherosclerosis and arthritis. Thus, lots of concerns have been raised toward developing novel anti-inflammatory agents. Many alternative herbal medicines possess excellent anti-inflammatory properties, yet their precise mechanisms of action are yet to be elucidated. Here, a novel systems pharmacology approach based on a large number of chemical, biological and pharmacological data was developed and exemplified by a probe herb Folium Eriobotryae, a widely used clinical anti-inflammatory botanic drug. The results show that 11 ingredients of this herb with favorable pharmacokinetic properties are predicted as active compounds for anti-inflammatory treatment. In addition, via systematic network analyses, their targets are identified to be 43 inflammation-associated proteins including especially COX2, ALOX5, PPARG, TNF and RELA that are mainly involved in the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway, the rheumatoid arthritis pathway and NF-κB signaling pathway. All these demonstrate that the integrated systems pharmacology method provides not only an effective tool to illustrate the anti-inflammatory mechanisms of herbs, but also a new systems-based approach for drug discovery from, but not limited to, herbs, especially when combined with further experimental validations. PMID:25636035

  4. Evaluation of the anti-inflammatory action of curcumin analog (DM1): Effect on iNOS and COX-2 gene expression and autophagy pathways.

    PubMed

    Paulino, Niraldo; Paulino, Amarilis Scremin; Diniz, Susana N; de Mendonça, Sergio; Gonçalves, Ivair D; Faião Flores, Fernanda; Santos, Reginaldo Pereira; Rodrigues, Carina; Pardi, Paulo Celso; Quincoces Suarez, José Agustin

    2016-04-15

    This work describes the anti-inflammatory effect of the curcumin-analog compound, sodium 4-[5-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-3-oxo-penta-1,4-dienyl]-2-methoxy-phenolate (DM1), and shows that DM1 modulates iNOS and COX-2 gene expression in cultured RAW 264.7 cells and induces autophagy on human melanoma cell line A375. PMID:27010501

  5. Activating transcription factor-3 induction is involved in the anti-inflammatory action of berberine in RAW264.7 murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Bae, Young-An; Cheon, Hyae Gyeong

    2016-07-01

    Berberine is an isoquinoline alkaloid found in Rhizoma coptidis, and elicits anti-inflammatory effects through diverse mechanisms. Based on previous reports that activating transcription factor-3 (ATF-3) acts as a negative regulator of LPS signaling, the authors investigated the possible involvement of ATF-3 in the anti-inflammatory effects of berberine. It was found berberine concentration-dependently induced the expressions of ATF-3 at the mRNA and protein levels and concomitantly suppressed the LPS-induced productions of proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β). In addition, ATF-3 knockdown abolished the inhibitory effects of berberine on LPS-induced proinflammatory cytokine production, and prevented the berberine-induced suppression of MAPK phosphorylation, but had little effect on AMPK phosphorylation. On the other hand, the effects of berberine, that is, ATF-3 induction, proinflammatory cytokine inhibition, and MAPK inactivation, were prevented by AMPK knockdown, suggesting ATF-3 induction occurs downstream of AMPK activation. The in vivo administration of berberine to mice with LPS-induced endotoxemia increased ATF-3 expression and AMPK phosphorylation in spleen and lung tissues, and concomitantly reduced the plasma and tissue levels of proinflammatory cytokines. These results suggest berberine has an anti-inflammatory effect on macrophages and that this effect is attributable, at least in part, to pathways involving AMPK activation and ATF-3 induction. PMID:27382358

  6. Evaluation of the new anti-inflammatory compound ethyl salicylate 2-O-β-D-glucoside and its possible mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Xin, Wenyu; Huang, Chao; Zhang, Xue; Zhang, Guidong; Ma, Xiaowei; Sun, Lan; Wang, Chao; Zhang, Dongming; Zhang, Tiantai; Du, Guanhua

    2013-02-01

    Ethyl salicylate 2-O-β-d-glucoside (ESG) is a derivative of natural salicylate isolated from Gaultheria yunnanensis (Franch.) Rehder, it has been used for the treatments of rheumatoid arthritis, swelling and pain. The aim of this study was to evaluate the anti-inflammatory effects of ESG and explore the anti-inflammatory mechanisms. We found that ESG had potent anti-inflammatory effects on the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated murine macrophages RAW264.7. ESG exerted a dose-dependent inhibition of the LPS-stimulated release of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-1β. Moreover, it significantly inhibited LPS-stimulated the production of NO and PGE2 by repressing the expression of iNOS and COX protein respectively. Western blot analysis showed that ESG prominently inhibited LPS-induced activation of NF-κB in RAW264.7 cells by blocking phosphorylation of inhibitor IκBα and p65. Consistent with these results, we found that ESG prevented the nuclear translocation of NF-κB induced by LPS. Our study suggests that ESG may be effective in the treatment of inflammatory diseases by inhibiting the pro-inflammatory cytokine production and regulating the NF-κB signal pathway. PMID:23219581

  7. Activating transcription factor-3 induction is involved in the anti-inflammatory action of berberine in RAW264.7 murine macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Young-An

    2016-01-01

    Berberine is an isoquinoline alkaloid found in Rhizoma coptidis, and elicits anti-inflammatory effects through diverse mechanisms. Based on previous reports that activating transcription factor-3 (ATF-3) acts as a negative regulator of LPS signaling, the authors investigated the possible involvement of ATF-3 in the anti-inflammatory effects of berberine. It was found berberine concentration-dependently induced the expressions of ATF-3 at the mRNA and protein levels and concomitantly suppressed the LPS-induced productions of proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β). In addition, ATF-3 knockdown abolished the inhibitory effects of berberine on LPS-induced proinflammatory cytokine production, and prevented the berberine-induced suppression of MAPK phosphorylation, but had little effect on AMPK phosphorylation. On the other hand, the effects of berberine, that is, ATF-3 induction, proinflammatory cytokine inhibition, and MAPK inactivation, were prevented by AMPK knockdown, suggesting ATF-3 induction occurs downstream of AMPK activation. The in vivo administration of berberine to mice with LPS-induced endotoxemia increased ATF-3 expression and AMPK phosphorylation in spleen and lung tissues, and concomitantly reduced the plasma and tissue levels of proinflammatory cytokines. These results suggest berberine has an anti-inflammatory effect on macrophages and that this effect is attributable, at least in part, to pathways involving AMPK activation and ATF-3 induction. PMID:27382358

  8. Free Radical-Scavenging, Anti-Inflammatory/Anti-Fibrotic and Hepatoprotective Actions of Taurine and Silymarin against CCl4 Induced Rat Liver Damage

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Moneim, Ashraf M.; Al-Kahtani, Mohammed A.; El-Kersh, Mohamed A.; Al-Omair, Mohammed A.

    2015-01-01

    The present study aims to investigate the hepatoprotective effect of taurine (TAU) alone or in combination with silymarin (SIL) on CCl4-induced liver damage. Twenty five male rats were randomized into 5 groups: normal control (vehicle treated), toxin control (CCl4 treated), CCl4+TAU, CCl4+SIL and CCl4+TAU+SIL. CCl4 provoked significant increases in the levels of hepatic TBARS, NO and NOS compared to control group, but the levels of endogenous antioxidants such as SOD, GPx, GR, GST and GSH were significantly decreased. Serum pro-inflammatory and fibrogenic cytokines including TNF-α, TGF-β1, IL-6, leptin and resistin were increased while the anti-inflammatory (adiponectin) cytokine was decreased in all treated rats. Our results also showed that CCl4 induced an increase in liver injury parameters like serum ALT, AST, ALP, GGT and bilirubin. In addition, a significant increase in liver tissue hydroxyproline (a major component of collagen) was detected in rats exposed to CCl4. Moreover, the concentrations of serum TG, TC, HDL-C, LDL-C, VLDL-C and FFA were significantly increased by CCl4. Both TAU and SIL (i.e., antioxidants) post-treatments were effectively able to relieve most of the above mentioned imbalances. However, the combination therapy was more effective than single applications in reducing TBARS levels, NO production, hydroxyproline content in fibrotic liver and the activity of serum GGT. Combined treatment (but not TAU- or SIL-alone) was also able to effectively prevent CCl4-induced decrease in adiponectin serum levels. Of note, the combined post-treatment with TAU+SIL (but not monotherapy) normalized serum FFA in CCl4-treated rats. The biochemical results were confirmed by histological and ultrastructural changes as compared to CCl4-poisoned rats. Therefore, on the basis of our work, TAU may be used in combination with SIL as an additional adjunct therapy to cure liver diseases such as fibrosis, cirrhosis and viral hepatitis. PMID:26659465

  9. Evaluation of Caesalpinia bonducella flower extract for anti-inflammatory action in rats and its high performance thin layer chromatography chemical fingerprinting

    PubMed Central

    Arunadevi, Rathinam; Murugammal, Shanmugam; Kumar, Dinesh; Tandan, Surendra Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The study is aimed to evaluate anti-inflammatory activity of Caesalpinia bonducella Fleming (Caesalpiniaceae) flower extract (CBFE) and to study its effect on radiographic outcome in adjuvant induced arthritis and authentication by high performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC) chemical fingerprinting. Materials and Methods: CBFE was administered orally (30, 100, and 300 mg/kg b.wt.) and tested for its anti-inflammatory activity in carrageenan-induced inflammation, cotton pellet induced chronic granulomatous inflammation and autacoids-induced inflammation. Effect on radiographic outcome was tested in adjuvant-induced arthritis. CBFE was HPTLC fingerprinted in suitable solvent system. Result: In carrageenan-induced inflammation, CBFE produced significant inhibition in edema volume at all the doses (30, 100 and 300 mg/kg b.wt.) and percentage of inhibition was 28.68, 31.00, and 22.48, respectively as compared to control at 5 h of its administration. In cotton pellet granuloma assay, CBFE significantly decreased the granuloma weight at 300 mg/kg dose level by 22.53%. CBFE (300 mg/kg) caused significant inhibition by 37.5, 44.44, and 35.29% edema volume, at ½, 1 and 3 h after 5-hydroxytryptamine injection, respectively. Radiographic score of animals treated with 300 mg/kg CBFE was significantly decreased when compared to arthritic control animals. Conclusion: The extract was found to possess significant anti-inflammatory activity. CBFE treatment improved the bony architecture in adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats. The developed HPTLC fingerprint would be helpful in the authentication of C. bonducella flower extract. PMID:26729956

  10. Analysis of the dissociated steroid RU24858 does not exclude a role for inducible genes in the anti-inflammatory actions of glucocorticoids.

    PubMed

    Chivers, Joanna E; Gong, Wei; King, Elizabeth M; Seybold, Joachim; Mak, Judith C; Donnelly, Louise E; Holden, Neil S; Newton, Robert

    2006-12-01

    Although repression of inflammatory gene expression makes glucocorticoids powerful anti-inflammatory agents, side effects limit usage and drive the search for improved glucocorticoid receptor (GR) ligands. In A549 pulmonary cells, dexamethasone and the prototypical dissociated ligand RU24858 (Mol Endocrinol 11:1245-1255, 1997) repress interleukin (IL)-1beta-induced expression of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 and IL-8. Although RU24858 is a weaker GR ligand, both glucocorticoids showed similar efficacies on transrepression of nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB)-dependent transcription, whereas RU24858 yielded less than 12% of the response to dexamethasone on a classic glucocorticoid response element (GRE) reporter (transactivation). Modest NF-kappaB-dependent transrepression ( approximately 40%), along with analysis of IL-8 transcription rate and the accumulation of unspliced nuclear RNA, indicates that transrepression does not fully account for the repression of genes such as IL-8. This was confirmed by the finding that mRNA degradation is increased by both dexamethasone and RU24858. Analysis of IL-1beta-induced steady-state mRNA levels for IL-8 and COX-2 show that dexamethasone- and RU24858-dependent repression of these genes is attenuated by inhibitors of transcription and protein synthesis. Because similar effects were observed with respect to COX-2 and IL-8 protein expression, we conclude that glucocorticoid-dependent gene expression is necessary for repression by both glucocorticoids. Despite RU24858 being defective at classic GRE-dependent transactivation, both dexamethasone and RU24858 induced the expression of potentially anti-inflammatory genes and metabolic genes, suggesting the importance of nontraditional glucocorticoid-dependent gene expression. Thus, classic transactivation- and transrepressionbased screens for anti-inflammatory "dissociated" GR ligands may be flawed because they may not reflect the effects on real glucocorticoid-inducible genes. PMID:16988013

  11. Hormetic and anti-inflammatory properties of oxidized phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Mauerhofer, Christina; Philippova, Maria; Oskolkova, Olga V; Bochkov, Valery N

    2016-06-01

    Oxidized phospholipids are generally recognized as deleterious factors involved in disease pathogenesis. This review summarizes the data suggesting that under certain biological conditions the opposite is correct, namely that OxPLs can also induce protective effects. Examples that are discussed in the review include upregulation of antioxidant genes, inhibition of inflammatory signaling pathways through Nrf2-dependent and -independent mechanisms, antagonism of Toll-like receptors, immuno-modulating and immuno-suppressive action of OxPLs in adaptive immunity and autoimmune disease, activation of PPARs known for their anti-inflammatory action, as well as protective action against lung edema in acute lung inflammation. The data support the notion that oxidation of phospholipids provides a negative feedback preventing damage to host tissues due to uncontrolled inflammation and oxidative stress. PMID:26948981

  12. Anti-inflammatory strategies in the treatment of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Chittaranjan

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a major mental illness with a lifetime prevalence of about 1%. Antipsychotic drugs, with a primary mechanism of action that involves dopamine receptor blockade, are the mainstay in the treatment of the disorder. However, despite optimum antipsychotic treatment, few patients return to pre-morbid levels; the treatment deficit includes refractory positive symptoms, negative symptoms, mood impairments, cognitive impairments, social impairments, and/or a variety of medication-related adverse effects, including extrapyramidal symptoms, metabolic disturbances, hyperprolactinemia, and others. To address these, antipsychotic treatment has been augmented with psychosocial interventions, cognitive rehabilitation, different kinds of electrical and magnetic brain stimulation, and a large range of drugs from the neuropsychiatric as well as, surprise, the general medical pharmacopeia. The pleomorphic pathophysiology of schizophrenia includes abnormalities in immunological and inflammatory pathways, and so it is not surprising that anti-inflammatory drugs have also been trialed as augmentation agents in schizophrenia. This article critically examines the outcomes after augmentation with conventional anti-inflammatory interventions; results from randomized controlled trials do not encourage the use of either aspirin (1000 mg/day) or celecoxib (400 mg/day), both of which have been studied for this indication during the past decade and a half. PMID:26427750

  13. Erdosteine: antitussive and anti-inflammatory effects.

    PubMed

    Dal Negro, Roberto W

    2008-01-01

    Erdosteine is a multifactorial drug currently used in COPD for its rheologic activity on bronchial secretions and its positive effects on bacterial adhesiveness. Erdosteine produces an active metabolite (Met 1) which was shown to produce antioxidant effects during the respiratory burst of human PMNs, due to the presence of an SH group. The substantial antitussive effects of erdosteine were first documented in clinical trials even though mucolytic agents are regarded as not consistently effective in ameliorating cough in patients with bronchitis, although they may be of benefit to this population in other ways. Actually, a mucolytic drug could exert antitussive effects if it also affects mucus consistency and enhances ciliary function. In the last decade, data from several studies on animal models pointed to the possible antitussive and anti-inflammatory properties of erdosteine and an indirect anti-inflammatory mechanism of action was suggested. Recently, data from some controlled versus placebo studies documented the antioxidant properties of erdosteine in humans and in current smokers with COPD. The mechanism of action was described as related to erdosteine's ability to inhibit some inflammatory mediators and some pro-inflammatory cytokines that are specifically involved in oxidative stress. As oxidative stress is also presumed to impair beta-adrenoceptor function and contribute to airway obstruction, specific controlled studies recently investigated the effect of antioxidant intervention on short-term airway response to salbutamol in nonreversible COPD, according to a double-blind design versus placebo and NAC. Only erdosteine consistently restored a significant short-term reversibility in COPD subjects, previously unresponsive to beta(2) adrenergics. This peculiar activity of erdosteine (to our knowledge never previously assessed) proved related to the ROS scavenging activity (which actually proved equal to that of N), and its significant inhibiting effect on

  14. The Relationship Between Cytokine Regulation and Anti-Inflammatory Action of Amine-Carboxyborane in L929 Fibroblasts and IC-21 Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Murphy, M E; Shrewsbury, R P; Sood, A; Spielvogel, B F; Elkins, A L; Hall, I

    1995-01-01

    The amine-carboxyboranes anti-inflammatory agents were shown to block TNF alpha release at 90 min. and IL-1 release at 5 hr. from macrophages. The agenst competed with L929 fibroblasts high affinity receptors for endogenous cytokines which regulate the inflammation process. Blocking the TNFalpha receptor at 90 min. by the agents from 10 to 50 muMu, resulted in lysosomal hydrolytic enzyme inhibition and lowering of prostaglandin synthesis as well as reductions in calcitonin high affinity receptor binding and calcium influx into the cells. IL-1 receptors when blocked by the agents at 5 hr. resulted in a reduction of NAG activity and leukotriene synthesis. An elevation of proline incorporation into collagen occurred at 90 min. and 24 hr. in the presence of the agents. PMID:18472777

  15. The Relationship Between Cytokine Regulation and Anti-Inflammatory Action of Amine-Carboxyborane in L929 Fibroblasts and IC-21 Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Margaret E.; Shrewsbury, Robert P.; Sood, Anup; Spielvogel, Bernard F.; Elkins, Amy L.; Hall, Iris

    1995-01-01

    The amine-carboxyboranes anti-inflammatory agents were shown to block TNF α release at 90 min. and IL-1 release at 5 hr. from macrophages. The agenst competed with L929 fibroblasts high affinity receptors for endogenous cytokines which regulate the inflammation process. Blocking the TNFα receptor at 90 min. by the agents from 10 to 50  μΜ, resulted in lysosomal hydrolytic enzyme inhibition and lowering of prostaglandin synthesis as well as reductions in calcitonin high affinity receptor binding and calcium influx into the cells. IL-1 receptors when blocked by the agents at 5 hr. resulted in a reduction of NAG activity and leukotriene synthesis. An elevation of proline incorporation into collagen occurred at 90 min. and 24 hr. in the presence of the agents. PMID:18472777

  16. Anti-inflammatory treatment.

    PubMed

    Fistarol, Susanna K; Itin, Peter H

    2011-01-01

    Inflammatory mucosal disorders are treated conventionally with potent or superpotent topical corticosteroids. For more than 20 years, topical cyclosporine has been used in the management of oral mucous membrane affections. Recently other topically applied calcineurin inhibitors, namely tacrolimus and pimecrolimus, expanded the armamentarium for the treatment of inflammatory mucosal diseases. This chapter places its main emphasis on the efficacy and safety of topical calcineurin inhibitors in the management of different oral and genital conditions, including anogenital lichen sclerosus (LS), oral and genital lichen planus, plasma cell balanitis and vulvitis, mucous membrane pemphigoid and pemphigus vulgaris, all conditions having usually a protracted course, requiring long-lasting treatment. There is current evidence for the effectiveness of both pimecrolimus and tacrolimus in the topical treatment of inflammatory oral mucosal diseases and genital dermatoses, especially oral lichen planus and genital LS. PMID:21325840

  17. Chemoprevention in gastrointestinal physiology and disease. Anti-inflammatory approaches for colorectal cancer chemoprevention.

    PubMed

    Fajardo, Alexandra M; Piazza, Gary A

    2015-07-15

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common human malignancies and a leading cause of cancer-related deaths in developed countries. Identifying effective preventive strategies aimed at inhibiting the development and progression of CRC is critical for reducing the incidence and mortality of this malignancy. The prevention of carcinogenesis by anti-inflammatory agents including nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), selective cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors, and natural products is an area of considerable interest and research. Numerous anti-inflammatory agents have been identified as potential CRC chemopreventive agents but vary in their mechanism of action. This review will discuss the molecular mechanisms being studied for the CRC chemopreventive activity of NSAIDs (i.e., aspirin, sulindac, and ibuprofen), COX-2 inhibitors (i.e., celecoxib), natural products (i.e., curcumin, resveratrol, EGCG, genistein, and baicalein), and metformin. A deeper understanding of how these anti-inflammatory agents inhibit CRC will provide insight into the development of potentially safer and more effective chemopreventive drugs. PMID:26021807

  18. Chemoprevention in gastrointestinal physiology and disease. Anti-inflammatory approaches for colorectal cancer chemoprevention

    PubMed Central

    Piazza, Gary A.

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common human malignancies and a leading cause of cancer-related deaths in developed countries. Identifying effective preventive strategies aimed at inhibiting the development and progression of CRC is critical for reducing the incidence and mortality of this malignancy. The prevention of carcinogenesis by anti-inflammatory agents including nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), selective cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors, and natural products is an area of considerable interest and research. Numerous anti-inflammatory agents have been identified as potential CRC chemopreventive agents but vary in their mechanism of action. This review will discuss the molecular mechanisms being studied for the CRC chemopreventive activity of NSAIDs (i.e., aspirin, sulindac, and ibuprofen), COX-2 inhibitors (i.e., celecoxib), natural products (i.e., curcumin, resveratrol, EGCG, genistein, and baicalein), and metformin. A deeper understanding of how these anti-inflammatory agents inhibit CRC will provide insight into the development of potentially safer and more effective chemopreventive drugs. PMID:26021807

  19. Neuroprotection of Neuro2a cells and the cytokine suppressive and anti-inflammatory mode of action of resveratrol in activated RAW264.7 macrophages and C8-B4 microglia.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Nicole; Balez, Rachelle; Karunaweera, Niloo; Lind, Joanne M; Münch, Gerald; Ooi, Lezanne

    2016-05-01

    Chronic inflammation is a hallmark of neurodegenerative disease and cytotoxic levels of nitric oxide (NO) and pro-inflammatory cytokines can initiate neuronal death pathways. A range of cellular assays were used to assess the anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective action of resveratrol using murine microglial (C8-B4), macrophage (RAW264.7) and neuronal-like (Neuro2a) cell lines. We examined the release of NO by Griess assay and used a Bioplex array to measure a panel of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, in response to the inflammatory stimuli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ). Resveratrol was a potent inhibitor of NO and cytokine release in activated macrophages and microglia. The activity of resveratrol increased marginally in potency with longer pre-incubation times in cell culture that was not due to cytotoxicity. Using an NO donor we show that resveratrol can protect Neuro2a cells from cytotoxic concentrations of NO. The protective effect of resveratrol from pro-inflammatory signalling in RAW264.7 cells was confirmed in co-culture experiments leading to increased survival of Neuro2a cells. Together our data are indicative of the potential neuroprotective effect of resveratrol during nitrosative stress and neuroinflammation. PMID:26522689

  20. Anti-inflammatory effects of fangchinoline and tetrandrine.

    PubMed

    Choi, H S; Kim, H S; Min, K R; Kim, Y; Lim, H K; Chang, Y K; Chung, M W

    2000-02-01

    Fangchinoline and tetrandrine are the major alkaloids from Stephania tetrandrae S. Moore which has been used traditionally for the treatment of inflammatory diseases in oriental countries including Korea. Both fangchinoline and tetrandrine showed anti-inflammatory effects on mouse ear edema induced by croton oil. In addition, the effects of fangchinoline and tetrandrine on cyclooxygenase, murine interleukin-5 (mIL-5) and human interleukin-6 (hIL-6) were examined in vitro to investigate the anti-inflammatory action mechanisms. One hundred micromolar of fangchinoline showed 35% of inhibition on cyclooxygenase, but the same concentration of tetrandrine did not show any inhibition. On the other hand, 12.5 microM of tetrandrine exhibited 95% of inhibition on mIL-5 activity, while fangchinoline did not show any effects. However, 4 microM of fangchinoline and 6 microM of tetrandrine showed 63 and 86% of inhibitions on hIL-6 activity, respectively. These results suggest that biochemical mechanisms of fangchinoline and tetrandrine on anti-inflammation are significantly different even though they are similar in chemical structure. PMID:10687873

  1. Suppression of Transglutaminase-2 is Involved in Anti-Inflammatory Actions of Glucosamine in 12-O-Tetradecanoylphorbol-13-Acetate-Induced Skin Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sun A; Lee, Hye Ja; Lee, Eun Ji; Kang, June Hee; Kim, You Lee; Kim, Hyun Ji; Oh, Seung Hyun; Choi, Changsun; Lee, Ho; Kim, Soo Youl

    2012-01-01

    Glucosamine (GS) is well known for the treatment of inflam-mation. However, the mechanism and efficacy of GS for skin inflammation are unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects and mechanism of GS in the mouse 12-O-tetradecanoyl 13-acetate (TPA)-induced ear edema model. TPA-induced ear edema was evoked in ICR or transglutaminase 2 (Tgase-2) (-/-) mice. GS was administered orally (10-100 mg/kg) or topically (0.5-2.0 w/v %) prior to TPA treatment. Orally administered GS at 10 mg/kg showed a 76 or 57% reduction in ear weight or myeloperoxidase, respectively, and a decreased expression of cyclooxy-genase-2 (COX-2), NF-κB and Tgase-2 in TPA-induced ear edema by western blot and immunohistochemistry. Role of Tgase-2 in TPA ear edema is examined using Tgase-2 (-/-) mice and TPA did not induce COX-2 expression in ear of Tgase-2 (-/-) mice. These observations suggested that Tgase-2 is involved in TPA-induced COX-2 expression in the inflamed ear of mice and anti-inflammatory effects of glucosamine is mediated through suppression of Tgase-2 in TPA ear edema. PMID:24009824

  2. The Use of Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs in Sports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calabrese, Leonard H.; Rooney, Theodore W.

    1986-01-01

    Recent advances in the understanding of the mechanism of action and clinical pharmacology of the new nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) can help practitioners decide which to use and how to administer them. Indications for and effects of NSAIDs are described. (MT)

  3. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Metformin Irrespective of Diabetes Status

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Amy R.; Morrison, Vicky L.; Levin, Daniel; Mohan, Mohapradeep; Forteath, Calum; Beall, Craig; McNeilly, Alison D.; Balfour, David J.K.; Savinko, Terhi; Wong, Aaron K.F.; Viollet, Benoit; Sakamoto, Kei; Fagerholm, Susanna C.; Foretz, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Rationale: The diabetes mellitus drug metformin is under investigation in cardiovascular disease, but the molecular mechanisms underlying possible benefits are poorly understood. Objective: Here, we have studied anti-inflammatory effects of the drug and their relationship to antihyperglycemic properties. Methods and Results: In primary hepatocytes from healthy animals, metformin and the IKKβ (inhibitor of kappa B kinase) inhibitor BI605906 both inhibited tumor necrosis factor-α–dependent IκB degradation and expression of proinflammatory mediators interleukin-6, interleukin-1β, and CXCL1/2 (C-X-C motif ligand 1/2). Metformin suppressed IKKα/β activation, an effect that could be separated from some metabolic actions, in that BI605906 did not mimic effects of metformin on lipogenic gene expression, glucose production, and AMP-activated protein kinase activation. Equally AMP-activated protein kinase was not required either for mitochondrial suppression of IκB degradation. Consistent with discrete anti-inflammatory actions, in macrophages, metformin specifically blunted secretion of proinflammatory cytokines, without inhibiting M1/M2 differentiation or activation. In a large treatment naive diabetes mellitus population cohort, we observed differences in the systemic inflammation marker, neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio, after incident treatment with either metformin or sulfonylurea monotherapy. Compared with sulfonylurea exposure, metformin reduced the mean log-transformed neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio after 8 to 16 months by 0.09 U (95% confidence interval, 0.02–0.17; P=0.013) and increased the likelihood that neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio would be lower than baseline after 8 to 16 months (odds ratio, 1.83; 95% confidence interval, 1.22–2.75; P=0.00364). Following up these findings in a double-blind placebo controlled trial in nondiabetic heart failure (trial registration: NCT00473876), metformin suppressed plasma cytokines including the aging

  4. The patterns of toxicity and management of acute nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) overdose

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Laura J; Wood, David M; Dargan, Paul I

    2011-01-01

    The nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are widely used for their analgesic, anti-inflammatory and antipyretic actions. They are commonly taken in overdose in many areas of the world. The majority of patients with acute NSAID overdose will remain asymptomatic or develop minor self-limiting gastrointestinal symptoms. However, serious clinical sequelae have been reported in patients with acute NSAID overdose and these include convulsions, metabolic acidosis, coma and acute renal failure. There appear to be some differences between the NSAIDs in terms of the relative risk of these complications; in particular mefenamic acid is most commonly associated with convulsions. The management of these serious clinical features is largely supportive and there are no specific antidotes for acute NSAID toxicity. PMID:27147851

  5. Corneal reepithelialization and anti-inflammatory agents.

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, B D

    1982-01-01

    These studies have demonstrated that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents (cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase inhibitors) can inhibit PMN arrival in the tear fluid following corneal injury but do not inhibit the reepithelialization either by corneal epithelial cells or by conjunctival epithelial cells. Therefore, they can be used safely in ocular inflammatory conditions even when corneal epithelial defects are present. Corticosteroids, on the other hand, inhibit reepithelialization by conjunctival epithelial cells and not by corneal epithelial cells in the doses tested. This inhibition does not occur with pretreatment prior to injury, suggesting that corticosteroids can be used clinically in conditions that have intact corneal epithelium without fear of slowing down wound healing should epithelial defects occur when not on steroid therapy. Furthermore, the steroid inhibition is temporary since there is a breakthrough in steroid inhibition with time, and occurs only if the steroids have been used shortly after deepithelialization. The steroid inhibition can be reversed by specific steroid antagonist, indicating that the steroid effect is mediated through specific receptors. An exciting and new hypothesis proposes that corticosteroids induce the formation of an inhibitory protein that inhibits the phospholipase enzyme to cause a block in arachidonic acid release from cell membranes. This mechanism of action may also be prevalent in the steroid effect on corneal reepithelialization, and experiments are under way to isolate this inhibitory protein from steroid-treated conjunctival epithelium. This isolation and pharmacologic characterization of this inhibitory protein is of obvious advantage to the field of ophthalmic therapeutics since this protein may have the anti-inflammatory potential of the steroids without their steroid sideeffects. Images FIGURE 3 a FIGURE 3 b PMID:6763806

  6. [Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Valha, P; Zmrhal, J; Feyereisl, J

    2010-02-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, usually abbreviated to NSAIDs, are drugs with analgesic, antipyretic (lowering an elevated body temperature and relieving pain without impairing consciousness) and, in higher doses, with anti-inflammatory effects (reducing inflammation). As inhibitors of cyclooxygenase NSAIDs given during pregnancy have the potential to cause adverse maternal and fetal effects. Maternal effects include prolongation of pregnancy and labour, whereas constriction of the ductus arteriosus, renal dysfunction and haemostatic abnormalities can occur in the fetus and neonate. As weak acids, NSAIDs are excreted in small amounts into human breast milk with little risk for adverse effects in the suckling infant. PMID:20437842

  7. Analgesic, diuretic, and anti-inflammatory principle from Scoparia dulcis.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, M; Shikha, H A; Sadhu, S K; Rahman, M T; Datta, B K

    2001-08-01

    Scoparinol, a diterpene, isolated from Scoparia dulcis showed significant analgesic (p < 0.001) and anti-inflammatory activity (p < 0.01) in animals. A sedative action of scoparinol was demonstrated by a marked potentiation of pentobarbital-induced sedation with a significant effect on both onset and duration of sleep (p < 0.05). Measurement of urine volume after administration of scoparinol indicated its significant diuretic action. PMID:11534346

  8. Review of Anti-Inflammatory Herbal Medicines

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemian, Mona; Owlia, Sina; Owlia, Mohammad Bagher

    2016-01-01

    Medicinal plants and their secondary metabolites are progressively used in the treatment of diseases as a complementary medicine. Inflammation is a pathologic condition that includes a wide range of diseases such as rheumatic and immune-mediated conditions, diabetes, cardiovascular accident, and etcetera. We introduce some herbs which their anti-inflammatory effects have been evaluated in clinical and experimental studies. Curcuma longa, Zingiber officinale, Rosmarinus officinalis, Borago officinalis, evening primrose, and Devil's claw are some of the introduced medicinal herbs in this review. Since the treatment of inflammation is not a one-dimensional remedy, this review tries to reach a multidimensional therapeutic approach to inflammation with the help of herbal medicine and modification in lifestyle. PMID:27247570

  9. Review of Anti-Inflammatory Herbal Medicines.

    PubMed

    Ghasemian, Mona; Owlia, Sina; Owlia, Mohammad Bagher

    2016-01-01

    Medicinal plants and their secondary metabolites are progressively used in the treatment of diseases as a complementary medicine. Inflammation is a pathologic condition that includes a wide range of diseases such as rheumatic and immune-mediated conditions, diabetes, cardiovascular accident, and etcetera. We introduce some herbs which their anti-inflammatory effects have been evaluated in clinical and experimental studies. Curcuma longa, Zingiber officinale, Rosmarinus officinalis, Borago officinalis, evening primrose, and Devil's claw are some of the introduced medicinal herbs in this review. Since the treatment of inflammation is not a one-dimensional remedy, this review tries to reach a multidimensional therapeutic approach to inflammation with the help of herbal medicine and modification in lifestyle. PMID:27247570

  10. Effectiveness and mode of action of a combination therapy for heterotopic ossification with a retinoid agonist and an anti-inflammatory agent.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Sayantani; Uchibe, Kenta; Usami, Yu; Pacifici, Maurizio; Iwamoto, Masahiro

    2016-09-01

    Heterotopic ossification (HO) consists of ectopic cartilage and bone formation following severe trauma or invasive surgeries, and a genetic form of it characterizes patients with Fibrodysplasia Ossificans Progressiva (FOP). Recent mouse studies showed that HO was significantly inhibited by systemic treatment with a corticosteroid or the retinoic acid receptor γ agonist Palovarotene. Because these drugs act differently, the data raised intriguing questions including whether the drugs affected HO via similar means, whether a combination therapy would be more effective or whether the drugs may hamper each other's action. To tackle these questions, we used an effective HO mouse model involving subcutaneous implantation of Matrigel plus rhBMP2, and compared the effectiveness of prednisone, dexamathaosone, Palovarotene or combination of. Each corticosteroid and Palovarotene reduced bone formation at max doses, and a combination therapy elicited similar outcomes without obvious interference. While Palovarotene had effectively prevented the initial cartilaginous phase of HO, the steroids appeared to act more on the bony phase. In reporter assays, dexamethasone and Palovarotene induced transcriptional activity of their respective GRE or RARE constructs and did not interfere with each other's pathway. Interestingly, both drugs inhibited the activity of a reporter construct for the inflammatory mediator NF-κB, particularly in combination. In good agreement, immunohistochemical analyses showed that both drugs markedly reduced the number of mast cells and macrophages near and within the ectopic Matrigel mass and reduced also the number of progenitor cells. In sum, corticosteroids and Palovarotene appear to block HO via common and distinct mechanisms. Most importantly, they directly or indirectly inhibit the recruitment of immune and inflammatory cells present at the affected site, thus alleviating the effects of key HO instigators. PMID:26891836

  11. Immunoadjuvant and anti-inflammatory plant saponins: characteristics and biotechnological approaches towards sustainable production.

    PubMed

    de Costa, F; Yendo, A C A; Fleck, J D; Gosmann, G; Fett-Neto, A G

    2011-09-01

    Saponins can be classified as triterpenoid (C30) or steroidal (C27), based on their carbon nucleus (aglycone). Sugar residues are linked to the aglycone, conferring an amphiphilic nature on these molecules, which is relevant for their biological activities. Saponins include a large variety of molecules that find several applications in pharmacology. Saponins have been shown to display immunoadjuvant, anti-inflammatory, antiplatelet, hypocholesterolemic, antitumoral, anti-HIV, antibacterial, insecticide, fungicide and anti-leishmanial activities. Anti-inflammatory medicines are increasingly demanded to treat various forms of arthritis in aging and obese populations and to help reduce the doses and duration of conventional corticotherapy with less side effects and without immunosuppression. The vaccine market for both human and veterinary uses is close to US$ 15 billion, progressively inflated by the recurrent threat of global pandemics.This paper provides an overview of recent advances (main focus on the last five years) on plant saponins that show anti-inflammatory and/or immunoadjuvant activities: source plants, isolation procedures, mechanism of action and biotechnological approaches towards sustainable production of bioactive saponins. Special attention is given to ginseng and Quillaja saponins. Strategies based on plant cultivation, cell and tissue culture, elicitation, and metabolic engineering for improved production of saponins are described. Future directions for research in the field and strategies to overcome bottlenecks are also discussed. PMID:21762102

  12. Controlled tetra-Fc sialylation of IVIg results in a drug candidate with consistent enhanced anti-inflammatory activity

    PubMed Central

    Washburn, Nathaniel; Schwab, Inessa; Ortiz, Daniel; Bhatnagar, Naveen; Lansing, Jonathan C.; Medeiros, Amy; Tyler, Steven; Mekala, Divya; Cochran, Edward; Sarvaiya, Hetal; Garofalo, Kevin; Meccariello, Robin; Meador, James W.; Rutitzky, Laura; Schultes, Birgit C.; Ling, Leona; Avery, William; Nimmerjahn, Falk; Manning, Anthony M.; Kaundinya, Ganesh V.; Bosques, Carlos J.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the beneficial therapeutic effects of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) in inflammatory diseases, consistent therapeutic efficacy and potency remain major limitations for patients and physicians using IVIg. These limitations have stimulated a desire to generate therapeutic alternatives that could leverage the broad mechanisms of action of IVIg while improving therapeutic consistency and potency. The identification of the important anti-inflammatory role of fragment crystallizable domain (Fc) sialylation has presented an opportunity to develop more potent Ig therapies. However, translating this concept to potent anti-inflammatory therapeutics has been hampered by the difficulty of generating suitable sialylated products for clinical use. Therefore, we set out to develop the first, to our knowledge, robust and scalable process for generating a well-qualified sialylated IVIg drug candidate with maximum Fc sialylation devoid of unwanted alterations to the IVIg mixture. Here, we describe a controlled enzymatic, scalable process to produce a tetra-Fc–sialylated (s4-IVIg) IVIg drug candidate and its qualification across a wide panel of analytic assays, including physicochemical, pharmacokinetic, biodistribution, and in vivo animal models of inflammation. Our in vivo characterization of this drug candidate revealed consistent, enhanced anti-inflammatory activity up to 10-fold higher than IVIg across different animal models. To our knowledge, this candidate represents the first s4-IVIg suitable for clinical use; it is also a valuable therapeutic alternative with more consistent and potent anti-inflammatory activity. PMID:25733881

  13. Anti-inflammatory activity studies on the stems and roots of Jasminum lanceolarium Roxb.

    PubMed

    Yan, Wen-xia; Zhang, Jian-hua; Zhang, Yi; Meng, Da-li; Yan, Dan

    2015-08-01

    Jasminum lanceolarium Roxb is an important traditional Chinese medicine. Its stems and roots have been used for the treatment of rheumatism and fever while the leaves are used as an anti-inflammatory agent to relieve pain. In order to support its traditional Chinese medicinal uses, five animal models were designed and the anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties of the 70% EtOH-H2O extracts of J. lanceolarium (EJL) were investigated. Meanwhile, biochemical parameters such as cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) in blood serum of rats exposed to acute (carrageenan) inflammation model were evaluated. At doses of 400 mg/kg, EJL exhibited higher anti-inflammation effect than that of indomethacin and better analgesic activity than that of aspirin (P<0.001). Furthermore, eleven isolated compounds including six lignanoids (1, 2, 6, 7, 8, and 11) and five iridoids (3, 4, 5, 9, and 10) were isolated from the active extracts and showed significant anti-inflammatory activities with the IC50 values of 1.76-5.22 mg/mL, respectively, when testing their inhibitory effects on phospholipase A2 in vitro. The results demonstrated that the possible anti-inflammatory mechanisms might be attributed to inhibit the hydrolysis of membrane phospholipids, production on both COX-2 and 5-LOX, and then finally inhibit the release of prostaglandins (PGs), which suggested that EJL had a non-selective inhibitory effect on the release or actions of these mediators, and might be a dual LOX-COX inhibitor for the treatment of inflammation from the natural resource. The studies on the animals and the inflammatory mediators, along with the bioactive compounds presumed that the existences of iridoids and lignanoids could be response for their bioactivities of the whole plants. PMID:26055344

  14. Boswellia carterii liquisolid systems with promoted anti-inflammatory activity.

    PubMed

    Mostafa, Dina Mahmoud; Ammar, Nagwa Mohammed; Abd El-Alim, Sameh Hosam; Kassem, Ahmed Alaa; Hussein, Rehab Ali; Awad, Gamal; El-Awdan, Sally Abdul-Wanees

    2015-01-01

    Boswellia carterii (BC) Birdwood oleogum resin is an ancient remedy of inflammation processes known since Ancient Egyptian time. Of boswellic acids, 3-acetyl-11-keto-β-boswellic acid (AKBA) is the most potent anti-inflammatory active principle. Liquisolid systems of the biologically active fraction of BC oleogum resin were prepared for improving dissolution properties using low dose oral delivery to achieve enhanced anti-inflammatory activity, in comparison with the standard oral anti-inflammatory; Indomethacin. AKBA was assayed, employing an accurate and sensitive HPLC method. Detection was carried out at 210 nm using UV/Vis detector. A solubility study for the bioactive fraction was conducted. Microcrystalline cellulose and Aeroperl®300 Pharma were used as carrier and coating materials. Angle of slide, liquid load factor and Carr's flow index were estimated. Six systems were prepared using polyethylene glycol 400, solvent and two drug loading concentrations; 20 and 40 %. For each concentration, three carrier: coat ratios were dispensed; 20:1, 10:1, and 5:1. Dissolution study was performed and two systems were selected for characterization and in vivo evaluation by investigating upper GIT ulcerogenic effect and anti-inflammatory efficacy in rats. Results indicate absence of ulcers and significantly higher and prolonged anti-inflammatory efficacy for formulations F1 and F2, with carrier: coat ratio, 5:1 and drug loads of 20 and 40 %, respectively, compared with standard oral indomethacin. We conclude higher efficacy of BC bioactive fraction liquisolids compared with Indomethacin with greater safety on GIT, longer duration of action and hence better patient compliance. PMID:25895614

  15. Anti-inflammatory drug delivery from hyaluronic acid hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Sei K; Jelacic, Sandra; Maier, Ronald V; Stayton, Patrick S; Hoffman, Allan S

    2004-01-01

    Two different types of hyaluronic acid (HA) hydrogels were synthesized by crosslinking HA with divinyl sulfone (DVS) and poly(ethylene glycol)-divinyl sulfone (VS-PEG-VS). Vitamin E succinate (VES), an anti-inflammatory drug, and bovine serum albumin (BSA), a model of anti-inflammatory protein drugs, were loaded into the gels and their release kinetics were measured in vitro. VES and BSA released with a burst from both HA hydrogels during the first few hours, and release continued gradually for several days. The rate of release from HA-VS-PEG-VS-HA hydrogels was faster than that from HA-DVS-HA hydrogels, presumably due to the lower crosslink density in the former. The anti-inflammatory action of released VES was tested by incubating peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) on HA hydrogels with and without VES in the gel. The number of cells adhering on HA hydrogels was very low compared to that on tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS), which might be one of the important advantages of using HA hydrogels for implant coatings or tissue engineering applications. ELISA test results showed that the tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) concentration was very low in the supernatant of the wells containing the HA hydrogel with VES in contact with the activated macrophages compared to that without VES. This is probably the effect of the released VES reducing the production of anti-inflammatory cytokine, TNF-alpha. HA hydrogels containing anti-inflammatory drugs may have potential for use in tissue engineering and also as biocompatible coatings of implants. PMID:15503629

  16. Marine Pharmacology in 2009–2011: Marine Compounds with Antibacterial, Antidiabetic, Antifungal, Anti-Inflammatory, Antiprotozoal, Antituberculosis, and Antiviral Activities; Affecting the Immune and Nervous Systems, and other Miscellaneous Mechanisms of Action

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Alejandro M. S.; Rodríguez, Abimael D.; Taglialatela-Scafati, Orazio; Fusetani, Nobuhiro

    2013-01-01

    The peer-reviewed marine pharmacology literature from 2009 to 2011 is presented in this review, following the format used in the 1998–2008 reviews of this series. The pharmacology of structurally-characterized compounds isolated from marine animals, algae, fungi and bacteria is discussed in a comprehensive manner. Antibacterial, antifungal, antiprotozoal, antituberculosis, and antiviral pharmacological activities were reported for 102 marine natural products. Additionally, 60 marine compounds were observed to affect the immune and nervous system as well as possess antidiabetic and anti-inflammatory effects. Finally, 68 marine metabolites were shown to interact with a variety of receptors and molecular targets, and thus will probably contribute to multiple pharmacological classes upon further mechanism of action studies. Marine pharmacology during 2009–2011 remained a global enterprise, with researchers from 35 countries, and the United States, contributing to the preclinical pharmacology of 262 marine compounds which are part of the preclinical pharmaceutical pipeline. Continued pharmacological research with marine natural products will contribute to enhance the marine pharmaceutical clinical pipeline, which in 2013 consisted of 17 marine natural products, analogs or derivatives targeting a limited number of disease categories. PMID:23880931

  17. The present status of anti-inflammatory agents in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Stüttgen, G

    1988-01-01

    Many classes of drugs exert anti-inflammatory activity through mechanisms which affect all or part of the inflammatory process. Some of these agents are beneficial in the practice of dermatology, while others, such as penicillamine, mast cell blockers and serotonin antagonists, find little or no application. Corticosteroids, for example, are nonspecific in their anti-inflammatory effects and remain a mainstay of therapy, despite their side effect profile. Other drugs, such as the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents or gold, can be used in the treatment of diseases associated with rheumatic or autoimmune states. Moreover, antihistamines play an important role in the control of itching, but are mainly indicated in controlling non-dermatological allergic sequelae. Interestingly, chloroquine and dapsone, which were originally developed for use in malaria prophylaxis and leprosy, respectively, have value in treating a wide range of dermatological conditions via mechanisms which include the inhibition of P-450 isoenzymes. In diseases characterised by disturbed cornification (e.g. psoriasis pustulosa), retinoids are of particular value. These drugs are thought to act by inhibition of collagenases, proteases and granulocyte migration. Undoubtedly, further investigation of drug classes such as oxygen radical controllers and immunomodulators will clarify their mechanisms and establish their therapeutic usefulness among the anti-inflammatory agents now available for dermatological use. PMID:3076131

  18. Glycosaminoglycan analogs as a novel anti-inflammatory strategy

    PubMed Central

    Severin, India C.; Soares, Adriano; Hantson, Jennifer; Teixeira, Mauro; Sachs, Daniela; Valognes, Delphine; Scheer, Alexander; Schwarz, Matthias K.; Wells, Timothy N. C.; Proudfoot, Amanda E. I.; Shaw, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    Heparin, a glycosaminoglycan (GAG), has both anti-inflammatory and anti-coagulant properties. The clinical use of heparin against inflammation, however, has been limited by concerns about increased bleeding. While the anti-coagulant activity of heparin is well understood, its anti-inflammatory properties are less so. Heparin is known to bind to certain cytokines, including chemokines, small proteins which mediate inflammation through their control of leukocyte migration and activation. Molecules which can interrupt the chemokine-GAG interaction without inhibiting coagulation could therefore, represent a new class of anti-inflammatory agents. In the present study, two approaches were undertaken, both focusing on the heparin-chemokine relationship. In the first, a structure based strategy was used: after an initial screening of potential small molecule binders using protein NMR on a target chemokine, binding molecules were optimized through structure-based design. In the second approach, commercially available short oligosaccharides were polysulfated. In vitro, these molecules prevented chemokine-GAG binding and chemokine receptor activation without disrupting coagulation. However, in vivo, these compounds caused variable results in a murine peritoneal recruitment assay, with a general increase of cell recruitment. In more disease specific models, such as antigen-induced arthritis and delayed-type hypersensitivity, an overall decrease in inflammation was noted, suggesting that the primary anti-inflammatory effect may also involve factors beyond the chemokine system. PMID:23087686

  19. Pharmacology and potential therapeutic applications of nitric oxide-releasing non-steroidal anti-inflammatory and related nitric oxide-donating drugs

    PubMed Central

    Keeble, J E; Moore, P K

    2002-01-01

    This review examines the biological significance, therapeutic potential and mechanism(s) of action of a range of nitric oxide-releasing non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NO-NSAID) and related nitric oxide-releasing donating drugs (NODD). The slow release of nitric oxide (NO) from these compounds leads to subtle changes in the profile of pharmacological activity of the parent, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID). For example, compared with NSAID, NO-NSAID cause markedly diminished gastrointestinal toxicity and improved anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive efficacy. In addition, nitroparacetamol exhibits hepatoprotection as opposed to the hepatotoxic activity of paracetamol. The possibility that NO-NSAID or NODD may be of therapeutic benefit in a wide variety of disease states including pain and inflammation, thrombosis and restenosis, neurodegenerative diseases of the central nervous system, colitis, cancer, urinary incontinence, liver disease, impotence, bronchial asthma and osteoporosis is discussed. PMID:12237248

  20. Bioengineered Colorectal Cancer Drugs: Orally Delivered Anti-Inflammatory Agents.

    PubMed

    Urbanska, Aleksandra Malgorzata; Zhang, Xiaoying; Prakash, Satya

    2015-07-01

    Intestinal inflammation is one of the major factors that increase colorectal cancer (CRC) incidence worldwide. Inflammation in the gastrointestinal tract is directly linked to tumor development at the early stages of the disease, thus a key issue toward the prevention and the treatment of colonic neoplasia. Thus, the use of anti-inflammatory drugs has emerged first as a strategy to reduce chronic inflammation in case of many inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), but it has proven its efficacy by reducing the risk of colonic neoplasia. This comprehensive review highlights the role of chronic inflammation, mainly in IBD, in the development of CRC including molecular and immune mechanisms that have tumorigenic effects. Multiple lines of evidence indicate that several bioactive and phytochemical compounds used as anti-inflammatory drugs have also antitumoral attributes. The uses of orally delivered cytokines and small molecules, as well as key dietary supplementation as anti-inflammatory therapeutics are discussed. In addition, comprehensive knowledge about CRC and intestinal inflammation, and the importance of the intestinal mucosal wall as a mucosal immunological barrier that comes into play during interactions with gut microbiota (pathogens and commensal), luminal secretions (bile acids, and bacterial and epithelial metabolites), and ingested chemicals (food components, high fat content, heterocyclic amines, and low intake of dietary fiber) are underscored. The multifunctionality of several anti-inflammatory drugs opens a line for their application in the treatment and prevention not only in IBD but also in CRC. Current bioengineering approaches for oral delivery of anti-inflammatory agents including cytokines, genetically modified bacteria, or small molecule inhibitors of inflammation directly contribute to the early management of CRC. Limitations of the current therapeutics, which stem from the lack of complete understanding of the complex molecular interactions

  1. Anti-inflammatory activity of root bark and stem bark of Shyonaka

    PubMed Central

    Doshi, Krunal; Ilanchezhian, R; Acharya, Rabinarayan; Patel, B. R.; Ravishankar, B.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Shyonaka (Oroxylum indicum Vent.; Bignoniaceae) root bark is one of the ingredients of dashamoola (a group of 10 roots), and is used for its anti-inflammatory and analgesic action in a number of compound formulations in Ayurveda. Aim: Ayurvedic Pharmacopoeia of India (API) recommends using the stem bark instead of root bark. Material and Methods: An attempt has been made to study the anti-inflammatory activity of both root bark and stem bark kashaya (decoction) experimentally. Conclusion Results showed significant anti-inflammatory activity of root bark and stem bark decoction. PMID:23326090

  2. Anti-Inflammatory Drug Design Using a Molecular Hybridization Approach

    PubMed Central

    Bosquesi, Priscila Longhin; Melo, Thais Regina Ferreira; Vizioli, Ednir Oliveira; dos Santos, Jean Leandro; Chung, Man Chin

    2011-01-01

    The design of new drugs with better physiochemical properties, adequate absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion, effective pharmacologic potency and lacking toxicity remains is a challenge. Inflammation is the initial trigger of several different diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease, asthma, atherosclerosis, colitis, rheumatoid arthritis, depression, cancer; and disorders such as obesity and sexual dysfunction. Although inflammation is not the direct cause of these disorders, inflammatory processes often increase related pain and suffering. New anti-inflammatory drugs developed using molecular hybridization techniques to obtain multiple-ligand drugs can act at one or multiple targets, allowing for synergic action and minimizing toxicity. This work is a review of new anti-inflammatory drugs developed using the molecular modification approach.

  3. Anti-inflammatory actions of herbal formula Gyejibokryeong-hwan regulated by inhibiting chemokine production and STAT1 activation in HaCaT cells.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Soo-Jin; Lim, Hye-Sun; Seo, Chang-Seob; Jin, Seong-Eun; Yoo, Sae-Rom; Lee, Nari; Shin, Hyeun-Kyoo

    2015-01-01

    Gyejibokryeong-hwan (GJBRH; Keishi-bukuryo-gan in Japan and Guizhi Fuling Wan in China) is a traditional herbal formula comprising five medicinal herbs and is used to treat climacteric syndrome. GJBRH has been shown to exhibit biological activity against diabetes, diabetic nephropathy, atherosclerosis, ischemia, and cancer. However, there is no scientific evidence of its activities against skin inflammation, including atopic dermatitis. We used the HaCaT human keratinocyte cell line to investigate the effects of GJBRH on skin inflammation. No significant cytotoxicity was observed in cells treated with GJBRH up to a concentration of 1000 µg/mL. Exposure to the proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) significantly increased HaCaT cell production of the following chemokines: macrophage-derived chemokine (MDC)/CCL22; regulated on activation, normal T-cell expressed and secreted (RANTES)/CCL5; and interleukin-8 (IL-8). In contrast, GJBRH significantly reduced the production of MDC, RANTES, and IL-8 compared with control cells simulated with TNF-α and IFN-γ. Consistently, GJBRH suppressed the mRNA expression of MDC, RANTES, and IL-8 in TNF-α and IFN-γ-treated cells. Treatment with GJBRH markedly inhibited phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) in HaCaT cells stimulated with TNF-α and IFN-γ. Our findings indicate that GJBRH impairs TNF-α and IFN-γ-mediated inflammatory chemokine production and STAT1 phosphorylation in keratinocytes. We suggest that GJBRH may be a potent therapeutic agent for inflammatory skin disorders. PMID:25757924

  4. [Anti-Inflammatory Activity of the Polypeptide of the Sea Anemone, Heteractis crispa].

    PubMed

    Sintsova, O V; Monastyrnaya, M M; Pislyagin, E A; Menchinskaya, E S; Leychenko, E V; Aminin, D L; Kozlovskaya, E P

    2015-01-01

    The anti-inflammatory effect of the recombinant polypeptide HCGS 1.20, a Kunitz-type serine protease inhibitor of the sea anemone Heteractis crispa, was investigated. It was shown that the polypeptide inhibits the increase of the concentration of calcium ions in mouse bone marrow derived macrophages elicited by histamine, and reduces the content of NO in lipopolysaccharide stimulated macrophages. A presumable mechanism of anti-inflammatory action of the polypeptide was being discussed. PMID:27125018

  5. Pharmacology in rehabilitation: nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents.

    PubMed

    Biederman, Ross E

    2005-06-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents (NSAIDs) are the most commonly encountered over-the-counter (OTC) and prescription medications in physical therapy practice. Worldwide, over 73000000 prescriptions for nonsteroidal agents are written yearly. NSAIDs produce a wide range of beneficial effects to the physical therapy patient, enhancing the outcome of treatment. Helpful effects of NSAIDs include analgesia, antipyretic, anti-inflammatory, and antithrombotic properties. However, NSAIDs are also associated with frequent and significant side effects that are deleterious to treatment outcome, including delay in soft tissue and bone healing, renal and liver toxicity, hemorrhagic events, gastric irritation and ulceration, and central nervous system effects. Understanding of the pharmacological properties of these drugs, exemplified by aspirin, and the individual pharmacokinetics of specific preparations will help the therapist to screen patients for potential side effects, develop more effective plans of care, and, where allowed, effectively and safely prescribe NSAIDs. PMID:16001907

  6. Pharmaceutical aspects of anti-inflammatory TNF-blocking drugs.

    PubMed

    Jinesh, Sandhya

    2015-06-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is a key regulator of inflammatory processes in several immune-mediated inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. Inactivating TNF has been found to be a plausible approach in treating these conditions. Two major strategies have been adopted by scientists to inactivate TNF: one is to use monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that bind to TNF, and the other is to use fusion proteins that bind to TNF, both inactivate TNF and help to prevent TNF-mediated inflammatory processes. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are biological products that selectively bind to specific antigen molecules, and fusion proteins are soluble receptors that bind to TNF. These types of drugs are generally known as biologics and there has been an explosion in the development and testing of biologics since the 1994 US approval and launch of abciximab, a mAb that binds to GPIIb/IIIa on platelets. Anti-TNF drugs that are currently approved by FDA for treating inflammatory conditions include adalimumab, certolizumab pegol, golimumab, infliximab and etanercept. Since these agents are complex protein molecules, the pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of these drugs are different from small-molecule anti-inflammatory agents. This review focuses on the pharmaceutical aspects of these drugs such as mechanism of action, adverse effects, pharmacokinetics and drug interactions. An effort was also taken to compare the pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetic properties of these drugs, with the available data at this time. PMID:25687751

  7. Mechanisms of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Umar, Asad; Steele, Vernon E; Menter, David G; Hawk, Ernest T

    2016-02-01

    Various clinical and epidemiologic studies show that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), including aspirin and cyclooxygenase inhibitors (COXIBs) help prevent cancer. Since eicosanoid metabolism is the main inhibitory targets of these drugs the resulting molecular and biological impact is generally accepted. As our knowledge base and technology progress we are learning that additional targets may be involved. This review attempts to summarize these new developments in the field. PMID:26970125

  8. Anti-inflammatory activity of cationic lipids.

    PubMed

    Filion, M C; Phillips, N C

    1997-10-01

    1. The effect of liposome phospholipid composition has been assumed to be relatively unimportant because of the presumed inert nature of phospholipids. 2. We have previously shown that cationic liposome formulations used for gene therapy inhibit, through their cationic component, the synthesis by activated macrophages of the pro-inflammatory mediators nitric oxide (NO) and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). 3. In this study, we have evaluated the ability of different cationic lipids to reduce footpad inflammation induced by carrageenan and by sheep red blood cell challenge. 4. Parenteral (i.p. or s.c) or local injection of the positively charged lipids dimethyldioctadecylammomium bromide (DDAB), dioleyoltrimethylammonium propane (DOTAP), dimyristoyltrimethylammonium propane (DMTAP) or dimethylaminoethanecarbamoyl cholesterol (DC-Chol) significantly reduced the inflammation observed in both models in a dose-dependent manner (maximum inhibition: 70-95%). 5. Cationic lipids associated with dioleyol- or dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylethanolamine retained their anti-inflammatory activity while cationic lipids associated with dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) or dimyristoylphosphatidylglycerol (DMPG) showed no anti-inflammatory activity, indicating that the release of cationic lipids into the macrophage cytoplasm is a necessary step for anti-inflammatory activity. The anti-inflammatory activity of cationic lipids was abrogated by the addition of dipalmitoylphosphatidylethanolamine-poly(ethylene)glycol-2000 (DPPE-PEG2000) which blocks the interaction of cationic lipids with macrophages. 6. Because of the significant role of protein kinase C (PKC) in the inflammatory process we have determined whether the cationic lipids used in this study inhibit PKC activity. The cationic lipids significantly inhibited the activity of PKC but not the activity of a non-related protein kinase, PKA. The synthesis of interleukin-6 (IL-6), which is not dependent on PKC activity for its

  9. Radical Scavenging Activity-Based and AP-1-Targeted Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Lutein in Macrophage-Like and Skin Keratinocytic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Jueun; Kim, Ji Hye; Park, Jae Gwang; Yi, Young-Su; Park, Kye Won; Rho, Ho Sik; Lee, Min-Seuk; Yoo, Jae Won; Kang, Seung-Hyun; Hong, Yong Deog; Shin, Song Seok; Cho, Jae Youl

    2013-01-01

    Lutein is a naturally occurring carotenoid with antioxidative, antitumorigenic, antiangiogenic, photoprotective, hepatoprotective, and neuroprotective properties. Although the anti-inflammatory effects of lutein have previously been described, the mechanism of its anti-inflammatory action has not been fully elucidated. Therefore, in the present study, we aimed to investigate the regulatory activity of lutein in the inflammatory responses of skin-derived keratinocytes or macrophages and to elucidate the mechanism of its inhibitory action. Lutein significantly reduced several skin inflammatory responses, including increased expression of interleukin-(IL-) 6 from LPS-treated macrophages, upregulation of cyclooxygenase-(COX-) 2 from interferon-γ/tumor necrosis-factor-(TNF-) α-treated HaCaT cells, and the enhancement of matrix-metallopeptidase-(MMP-) 9 level in UV-irradiated keratinocytes. By evaluating the intracellular signaling pathway and the nuclear transcription factor levels, we determined that lutein inhibited the activation of redox-sensitive AP-1 pathway by suppressing the activation of p38 and c-Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK). Evaluation of the radical and ROS scavenging activities further revealed that lutein was able to act as a strong anti-oxidant. Taken together, our findings strongly suggest that lutein-mediated AP-1 suppression and anti-inflammatory activity are the result of its strong antioxidative and p38/JNK inhibitory activities. These findings can be applied for the preparation of anti-inflammatory and cosmetic remedies for inflammatory diseases of the skin. PMID:23533312

  10. Structural characterization of anti-inflammatory Immunoglobulin G Fc proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Alysia A.; Giddens, John; Pincetic, Andrew; Lomino, Joseph V.; Ravetch, Jeffrey V.; Wang, Lai-Xi; Bjorkman, Pamela J.

    2014-01-01

    Immunoglobulin G (IgG) is a central mediator of host defense due to its ability to recognize and eliminate pathogens. The recognition and effector responses are encoded on distinct regions of IgGs. The diversity of the antigen recognition Fab domains accounts for IgG's ability to bind with high specificity to essentially any antigen. Recent studies have indicated that the Fc effector domain also displays considerable heterogeneity, accounting for its complex effector functions of inflammation, modulation and immune suppression. Therapeutic anti-tumor antibodies, for example, require the pro-inflammatory properties of the IgG Fc to eliminate tumor cells, while the anti-inflammatory activity of Intravenous Immunoglobulin G (IVIG) requires specific Fc glycans for activity. In particular, the anti-inflammatory activity of IVIG is ascribed to a small population of IgGs in which the Asn297-linked complex N-glycans attached to each Fc CH2 domain include terminal α2,6-linked sialic acids. We used chemoenzymatic glycoengineering to prepare fully di-sialylated IgG Fc and solved its crystal structure. Comparison of the structures of asialylated Fc, sialylated Fc, and F241A Fc, a mutant that displays increased glycan sialylation, suggests that increased conformational flexibility of the CH2 domain is associated with the switch from pro- to anti-inflammatory activity of the Fc. PMID:25036289

  11. UV Filters, Ingredients with a Recognized Anti-Inflammatory Effect

    PubMed Central

    Couteau, Céline; Chauvet, Catherine; Paparis, Eva; Coiffard, Laurence

    2012-01-01

    Background To explain observed differences during SPF determination using either an in vivo or in vitro method, we hypothesized on the presence of ingredients having anti-inflammatory properties. Methodology/Principal Findings To research our hypothesis, we studied the 21 UV filters both available on the market and authorized by European regulations and subjected these filters to the phorbol-myristate-acetate test using mice. We then catalogued the 13 filters demonstrating a significant anti-inflammatory effect with edema inhibition percentages of more than 70%. The filters are: diethylhexyl butamido triazone (92%), benzophenone-5 and titanium dioxide (90%), benzophenone-3 (83%), octocrylène and isoamyl p-methoxycinnamate (82%), PEG-25 PABA and homosalate (80%), octyl triazone and phenylbenzimidazole sulfonic acid (78%), octyl dimethyl PABA (75%), bis-ethylhexyloxyphenol methoxyphenyl triazine and diethylamino hydroxybenzoyl hexylbenzoate (70%). These filters were tested at various concentrations, including their maximum authorized dose. We detected a dose-response relationship. Conclusions/Significance The anti-inflammatory effect of a sunscreen ingredient may affect the in vivo SPF value. PMID:23284607

  12. Anti-inflammatory properties of pterocarpanquinone LQB-118 in mice.

    PubMed

    Riça, Ingred G; Netto, Chaquip D; Rennó, Magdalena N; Abreu, Paula A; Costa, Paulo R R; da Silva, Alcides J M; Cavalcante, Moisés C M

    2016-09-15

    Pterocarpanquinone (+/-)-LQB-118 presents antineoplastic and antiparasitic properties and also shows great inhibitory effect on TNF-α release in vitro. Here, its anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated in a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced lung inflammation model in C57BL/6 mice. LPS inhalation induced a marked neutrophil infiltration to the lungs which was reduced by intraperitoneal treatment with (+/-)-LQB-118 in a similar manner to that of dexamethasone and even better than that of acetylsalicylic acid. Moreover, (+/-)-LQB-118 administration resulted in decrease of NF-κB activation and KC level in lungs, with a pronounced inhibitory effect on TNF-α release, measured in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Trying to understand the anti-inflammatory mechanism by which (+/-)-LQB-118 acts, we performed a molecular modeling analysis, including docking to estrogen receptors α and β. Results suggested that (+/-)-LQB-118 may bind to both receptors, with a similar orientation to 17-β-estradiol. Together, these results showed that (+/-)-LQB-118 exhibits an anti-inflammatory effect, most likely by inhibiting TNF-α release and NF-κB activation, which may be related to the estrogen receptor binding. PMID:27492193

  13. Antioxidant, antinociceptive, and anti-inflammatory properties of the ethanolic extract of Combretum duarteanum in rodents.

    PubMed

    Gouveia, Marcos G S; Xavier, Maria A; Barreto, André S; Gelain, Daniel P; Santos, João P A; Araújo, Adriano A S; Silva, Francilene A; Quintans, Jullyana S; Agra, Maria F; Cabral, Analúcia G S; Tavares, Josean F; Silva, Marcelo S; Quintans-Júnior, Lucindo J

    2011-11-01

    The antioxidant, antinociceptive, and anti-inflammatory activities of the ethanolic extract from leaves of Combretum duarteanum (EEC) were assessed in rodents through in vitro tests. The antioxidant activity was investigated by using thiobarbituric acid reactive species (TBARS), hydroxyl radical-scavenging, and scavenging activity of nitric oxide assays. The antinociceptive activity was investigated by using acetic acid-induced writhing, formalin, and hot-plate tests in mice. The anti-inflammatory activity was assessed in rats by using the carrageenan-induced hind-paw edema test and arachidonic acid-induced paw edema test. EEC possesses a strong antioxidant potential according to the TBARS, nitric oxide, and hydroxyl radical-scavenging assays; it also presented scavenger activity in all in vitro tests. After intraperitoneal injection, EEC (100, 200, and 400 mg/kg) significantly reduced the number of writhes (38.1%, 90.6%, and 97.8%, respectively) in a writhing test and the number of paw licks during phase 1 (30.5% and 69.5%, higher doses) and phase 2 (38.1%, 90.6%, and 97.8%, all doses) of a formalin test when compared with the control group. Naloxone (1.5 mg/kg, intraperitoneally) antagonized the antinociceptive action of EEC (400 mg/kg), and this finding suggests participation of the opioid system. Administration of 200 and 400 mg/kg (intraperitoneally) of EEC exhibited an anti-inflammatory activity in the carrageenin test, which was based on interference with prostaglandin synthesis. This finding was confirmed by the arachidonic acid test. Together, these results indicate that properties of EEC might be further explored in the search for newer tools to treat painful inflammatory conditions, including those related to pro-oxidant states. PMID:21663477

  14. Chemical Constituents from the Fruiting Bodies of Hexagonia apiaria and Their Anti-inflammatory Activity.

    PubMed

    Thang, Tran Dinh; Kuo, Ping-Chung; Ngoc, Nguyen Thi Bich; Hwang, Tsong-Long; Yang, Mei-Lin; Ta, Shih-Huang; Lee, E-Jian; Kuo, Dai-Huang; Hung, Nguyen Huy; Tuan, Nguyen Ngoc; Wu, Tian-Shung

    2015-11-25

    A chemical investigation of the fruiting bodies of Hexagonia apiaria resulted in the identification of nine compounds including five new triterpenoids, hexagonins A-E (1-5), along with four known compounds. The purified constituents were examined for their anti-inflammatory activity. Among the tested compounds, hexatenuin A displayed the most significant inhibition of superoxide anion generation and elastase release. These triterpenoids may have potentials as anti-inflammatory agents. PMID:26575215

  15. Anti-Inflammatories and Corticosteroids

    MedlinePlus

    ... with anabolic steroids and have often feared their use. Anabolic steroids are testosterone, or the male sex hormone. This hormone is also secreted by the adrenal cortex. This hormone is androgenic, ... mass. The medical use of this hormone includes stimulation of red blood ...

  16. Medicinal plants with anti-inflammatory activities.

    PubMed

    Maione, Francesco; Russo, Rosa; Khan, Haroon; Mascolo, Nicola

    2016-06-01

    Medicinal plants have been the main remedy to treat various ailments for a long time and nowadays, many drugs have been developed from traditional medicine. This paper reviews some medicinal plants and their main constituents which possess anti-inflammatory activities useful for curing joint inflammation, inflammatory skin disorders, cardiovascular inflammation and other inflammatory diseases. Here, we provide a brief overview of quick and easy reading on the role of medicinal plants and their main constituents in these inflammatory diseases. We hope that this overview will shed some light on the function of these natural anti-inflammatory compounds and attract the interest of investigators aiming at the design of novel therapeutic approaches for the treatment of various inflammatory conditions. PMID:26221780

  17. Antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities of the essential oil of Nepeta crispa Willd. in experimental rat models.

    PubMed

    Ali, Taskina; Javan, Mohammad; Sonboli, Ali; Semnanian, Saeed

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities of the essential oil of Nepeta crispa. The study was done using the tail-flick and formalin test pain models and the paw oedema model of inflammation. Male Wistar rats were used as the animal model. The essential oil dose-dependently produced analgesia in the acute pain models, including the tail-flick (p < 0.001) and the first phase of the formalin test (p < 0.01). In the late phase of the formalin test, as a model of chronic pain, the essential oil significantly reduced the pain-induced behaviour (p < 0.01). Nepeta crispa essential oil caused potent anti-inflammatory effects in the formalin-induced paw inflammation model and significantly reduced the paw oedema in all applied doses (p < 0.01). Its effects on pain in both the acute and chronic pain models and its anti-inflammatory effect suggest both central and peripheral mechanisms of action for the essential oil obtained from N. crispa. PMID:21981349

  18. The new nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed

    Scherbel, A L; Wilke, W S

    1981-10-01

    Most physicians regard to newer short-acting anti-inflammatory drugs as a substitute for aspirin because they are less toxic. Although these drugs cannot induce remissions of rheumatoid arthritis, they do afford symptomatic relief and exert both a moderate algesic and anti-inflammatory effect in conditions like osteoarthritis, gout, pseudogout, and a variety of musculoskeletal syndromes. The many adverse reactions and toxic effects associated with these drugs are probably related to the inhibition of prostaglandin synthetase, which in turn reduces the biosynthesis of prostaglandins in widespread areas of the body. Thus limited in number, these compounds cannot play an effective role in the body's defense mechanisms. Researchers postulate that this failure accounts for the gastrointestinal and renal lesions--as well as other, as yet unexplained toxic manifestations--noted in patients taking these drugs. For safety's sake, the newer anti-inflammatory drugs should be used with large doses of aspirin, other agents that inhibit prostaglandin synthetase, or drugs that are potentially nephro-toxic. PMID:6974117

  19. Anti-inflammatory properties of cryptolepine.

    PubMed

    Olajide, Olumayokun A; Ajayi, Abayomi M; Wright, Colin W

    2009-10-01

    Cryptolepine is the major alkaloid of the West African shrub, Cryptolepis sanguinolenta. Cryptolepine has been shown to inhibit nitric oxide production, and DNA binding of Nuclear Factor-kappa B following inflammatory stimuli in vitro. In order to validate the anti-inflammatory property of this compound in vivo, we investigated its effects on a number of animal models of inflammation. Cryptolepine (10-40 mg/kg i.p.) produced significant dose-dependent inhibition of the carrageenan-induced rat paw oedema, and carrageenan-induced pleurisy in rats. These effects were compared with those of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug indomethacin (10 mg/kg). At doses of 10-40 mg/kg i.p., cryptolepine inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced microvascular permeability in mice in a dose-related fashion. Oral administration of up to 40 mg/kg of the compound for four consecutive days did not induce gastric lesion formation in rats. Analgesic activity was also exhibited by cryptolepine through a dose-related (10-40 mg/kg i.p.) inhibition of writhing induced by i.p. administration of acetic acid in mice. The results of this study reveal that cryptolepine possesses in vivo anti-inflammatory activity. PMID:19288476

  20. Anti-Inflammatory Effect of Apigenin on LPS-Induced Pro-Inflammatory Mediators and AP-1 Factors in Human Lung Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Patil, Rajeshwari H; Babu, R L; Naveen Kumar, M; Kiran Kumar, K M; Hegde, Shubha M; Nagesh, Rashmi; Ramesh, Govindarajan T; Sharma, S Chidananda

    2016-02-01

    Apigenin is one of the plant flavonoids present in fruits and vegetables, acting as an important nutraceutical component. It is recognized as a potential antioxidant, antimicrobial, and anti-inflammatory molecule. In the present study, the mechanism of anti-inflammatory action of apigenin on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced pro-inflammatory cytokines and activator protein-1 (AP-1) factors in human lung A549 cells was investigated. The anti-inflammatory activity of apigenin on LPS-induced inflammation was determined by analyzing the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and different AP-1 factors. Apigenin significantly inhibited the LPS-induced expression of iNOS, COX-2, expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-2, IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α), and AP-1 proteins (c-Jun, c-Fos, and JunB) including nitric oxide production. Study confirms the anti-inflammatory effect of apigenin by inhibiting the expression of inflammatory mediators and AP-1 factors involved in the inflammation and its importance in the treatment of lung inflammatory diseases. PMID:26276128

  1. The Antinociceptive and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Caulerpin, a Bisindole Alkaloid Isolated from Seaweeds of the Genus Caulerpa

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Éverton Tenório; de Lira, Daysianne Pereira; de Queiroz, Aline Cavalcanti; da Silva, Diogo José Costa; de Aquino, Anansa Bezerra; Campessato Mella, Eliane A.; Lorenzo, Vitor Prates; de Miranda, George Emmanuel C.; de Araújo-Júnior, João Xavier; de Oliveira Chaves, Maria Célia; Barbosa-Filho, José Maria; de Athayde-Filho, Petrônio Filgueiras; de Oliveira Santos, Bárbara Viviana; Alexandre-Moreira, Magna Suzana

    2009-01-01

    The antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activity of caulerpin was investigated. This bisindole alkaloid was isolated from the lipoid extract of Caulerpa racemosa and its structure was identified by spectroscopic methods, including IR and NMR techniques. The pharmacological assays used were the writhing and the hot plate tests, the formalin-induced pain, the capsaicin-induced ear edema and the carrageenan-induced peritonitis. Caulerpin was given orally at a concentration of 100 μmol/kg. In the abdominal constriction test caulerpin showed reduction in the acetic acid-induced nociception at 0.0945 μmol (0.0103–1.0984) and for dypirone it was 0.0426 μmol (0.0092–0.1972). In the hot plate test in vivo the inhibition of nociception by caulerpin (100 μmol/kg, p.o.) was also favorable. This result suggests that this compound exhibits a central activity, without changing the motor activity (seen in the rotarod test). Caulerpin (100 μmol/kg, p.o.) reduced the formalin effects in both phases by 35.4% and 45.6%, respectively. The possible anti-inflammatory activity observed in the second phase in the formalin test of caulerpin (100 μmol/kg, p.o.) was confirmed on the capsaicin-induced ear edema model, where an inhibition of 55.8% was presented. Indeed, it was also observed in the carrageenan-induced peritonitis that caulerpin (100 μmol/kg, p.o.) exhibited anti-inflammatory activity, reducing significantly the number of recruit cells by 48.3%. Pharmacological studies are continuing in order to characterize the mechanism(s) responsible for the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory actions and also to identify other active principles present in Caulerpa racemosa. PMID:20098607

  2. Hypusine modification of the ribosome-binding protein eIF5A, a target for new anti-inflammatory drugs: understanding the action of the inhibitor GC7 on a murine macrophage cell line.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Oedem Paulo; Toledo, Thais Regina; Rossi, Danuza; Rossetto, Daniella de Barros; Watanabe, Tatiana Faria; Galvão, Fábio Carrilho; Medeiros, Alexandra Ivo; Zanelli, Cleslei Fernando; Valentini, Sandro Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation is part of an important mechanism triggered by the innate immune response that rapidly responds to invading microorganisms and tissue injury. One important elicitor of the inflammatory response is the Gram-negative bacteria component lipopolysaccharide (LPS), which induces the activation of innate immune response cells, the release of proinflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin 1 and tumor necrosis factor α(TNF-α), and the cellular generation of nitric oxide (NO) by the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). Although essential to the immune response, uncontrolled inflammatory responses can lead to pathological conditions, such as sepsis and rheumatoid arthritis. Therefore, identifying cellular targets for new anti-inflammatory treatments is crucial to improving therapeutic control of inflammation-related diseases. More recently, the translation factor eIF5A has been demonstrated to have a proinflammatory role in the release of cytokines and the production of NO. As eIF5A requires and essential and unique modification of a specific residue of lysine, changing it to hypusine, eIF5A is an interesting cellular target for anti-inflammatory treatment. The present study reviews the literature concerning the anti-inflammatory effects of inhibiting eIF5A function. We also present new data showing that the inhibition of eIF5A function by the small molecule GC7 significantly decreases TNF-α release without affecting TNF-α mRNA levels. We discuss the mechanisms by which eIF5A may interfere with TNF-α mRNA translation by binding to and regulating the function of ribosomes during protein synthesis. PMID:23701550

  3. Anti-inflammatory Actions of (+)-3'α-Angeloxy-4'-keto-3',4'-dihydroseselin (Pd-Ib) against Dextran Sulfate Sodium-Induced Colitis in C57BL/6 Mice.

    PubMed

    Mu, Huai-Xue; Liu, Jing; Fatima, Sarwat; Lin, Cheng-Yuan; Shi, Xiao-Ke; Du, Bin; Xiao, Hai-Tao; Fan, Bao-Min; Bian, Zhao-Xiang

    2016-04-22

    The immunoregulatory protective properties of (+)-3'α-angeloxy-4'-keto-3',4'-dihydroseselin (Pd-Ib) isolated from Bupleurum malconense has not been reported. In the present study, the therapeutic effect of Pd-Ib (30, 60, and 120 mg/kg/day) was examined in a mouse model of dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced acute colitis. Administration of Pd-Ib significantly reduced the disease activity index, inhibited the shortening of colon length, reduced colonic tissue damage, and suppressed colonic myeloperoxidase activity and nitric oxide levels in mice with DSS-induced colitis. Moreover, Pd-Ib greatly suppressed the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-6, and IL-17A while enhancing the level of anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-4. The protein levels of phosphorylated STAT3 (p-STAT3) and phosphorylated p38 (p-p38) were down-regulated in the colonic tissues of DSS-treated mice. Importantly, the anti-inflammatory effect of Pd-Ib against acute colitis was comparable to the anti-inflammatory sulfa drug sulfasalazine (300 mg/kg). Furthermore, the in vitro study showed that the inhibitory effect of Pd-Ib on p-STAT3 and IL-6 protein levels was accompanied by the reduction of MAPKs (JNK and p38). In conclusion, this study suggested that Pd-Ib attenuated DSS-induced acute colitis via the regulation of interleukins principally through the STAT3 and MAPK pathways. PMID:26905227

  4. Antimicrobial, Antiparasitic, Anti-Inflammatory, and Cytotoxic Activities of Lopezia racemosa

    PubMed Central

    Cruz Paredes, Carla; Bolívar Balbás, Paulina; Juárez, Zaida Nelly; Sánchez Arreola, Eugenio; Hernández, Luis Ricardo

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigates the potential benefits of the Mexican medicinal plant Lopezia racemosa (Onagraceae). Extracts and fractions from aerial parts of this plant were assessed to determine their antibacterial, antifungal, antiparasitic, anti-inflammatory and cytotoxic activities in vitro. Aerial parts of the plant were extracted with various solvents and fractionated accordingly. Extracts and fractions were tested against a panel of nine bacterial and four fungal species. The antiparasitic activity was tested against Leishmania donovani, whereas the anti-inflammatory activity of the compounds was determined by measuring the secretion of interleukin-6 from human-derived macrophages. The same macrophage cell line was used to investigate the cytotoxicity of the compounds. Various extracts and fractions showed antibacterial, antifungal, antiparasitic, and anti-inflammatory activities. The hexanic fraction HF 11-14b was the most interesting fraction with antimicrobial, and anti-inflammatory activities. The benefit of L. racemosa as a traditional medicinal plant was confirmed as shown by its antibacterial, antifungal and anti-inflammatory activities. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study reporting the biological activities of L. racemosa, including antiparasitic and anti-inflammatory activities. PMID:23843731

  5. Heme oxygenase-1 is dispensable for the anti-inflammatory activity of intravenous immunoglobulin

    PubMed Central

    Galeotti, Caroline; Hegde, Pushpa; Das, Mrinmoy; Stephen-Victor, Emmanuel; Canale, Fernando; Muñoz, Marcos; Sharma, Varun K.; Dimitrov, Jordan D.; Kaveri, Srini V.; Bayry, Jagadeesh

    2016-01-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin G (IVIG) is used in the therapy of various autoimmune and inflammatory conditions. The mechanisms by which IVIG exerts anti-inflammatory effects are not completely understood. IVIG interacts with numerous components of the immune system including dendritic cells, macrophages, T and B cells and modulate their functions. Recent studies have reported that heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) pathway plays an important role in the regulation of inflammatory response in several pathologies. Several therapeutic agents exert anti-inflammatory effects via induction of HO-1. Therefore, we aimed at exploring if anti-inflammatory effects of IVIG are mediated via HO-1 pathway. Confirming the previous reports, we report that IVIG exerts anti-inflammatory effects on innate cells as shown by the inhibitory effects on IL-6 and nitric oxide production and confers protection in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) model. However, these effects were not associated with an induction of HO-1 either in innate cells such as monocytes, dendritic cells and macrophages or in the kidneys and liver of IVIG-treated EAE mice. Also, inhibition of endogenous HO-1 did not modify anti-inflammatory effects of IVIG. These results thus indicate that IVIG exerts anti-inflammatory effects independent of HO-1 pathway. PMID:26796539

  6. Chemical constituents and in vitro anti-inflammatory activity of Cistanche violacea Desf. (Orobanchaceae) extract.

    PubMed

    Bougandoura, Amina; D'Abrosca, Brigida; Ameddah, Souad; Scognamiglio, Monica; Mekkiou, Ratiba; Fiorentino, Antonio; Benayache, Samir; Benayache, Fadila

    2016-03-01

    A new iridoid (1) and a new phenylethanoid glycoside (4), together with five known compounds (2, 3, 5, 6 and 7), were isolated for the first time from the ethyl acetate soluble part of the hydroalcoholic extract of the aerial parts of Cistanche violacea Desf. (Orobanchaceae), an endemic species of the North of the Sahara. The structures of these compounds have been elucidated on the basis of extensive 2D NMR spectroscopic analysis, including COSY, TOCSY, NOESY, HSQC, CIGAR-HMBC, H2BC and HSQC-TOCSY. All compounds were isolated from C. violacea for the first time. The anti-inflammatory activity of the EtOAc extract of C. violacea, was investigated by using human red blood cell (HRBC) membrane stabilization and inhibition of the albumin denaturation method. This study demonstrates, for the first time the effectiveness of C. violacea in combating inflammation, this might be believed to be influenced by the synergistic action of the above isolated compounds. The present study suggests that C. violacea would serve as a source for the discovery of novel anti-inflammatory agents. PMID:26784519

  7. The effects of selected drugs, including chlorpromazine and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents, on polyclonal IgG synthesis and interleukin 1 production by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Martinez, F; Coleman, J W

    1989-05-01

    We tested a range of drugs for their effects on in vitro polyclonal IgG synthesis by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) stimulated with the lectin pokeweed mitogen (PWM). The test drugs were selected on the basis of reported disruptive effects on immune function in vivo. IgG production between day 4 and days 7 or 8 of culture was measured by biotin-streptavidin sandwich ELISA. The anti-psychotic agent chlorpromazine (0.55-1.7 microM) enhanced IgG synthesis to approximately double control levels. In contrast, the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) indomethacin, piroxicam, ibuprofen and aspirin inhibited IgG synthesis by up to 50%, with a rank order of potency that reflects their activity as inhibitors of cyclo-oxygenase. Phenytoin, procainamide, propylthiouracil, methimazole, D-penicillamine and D-penicillamine-L-cysteine all failed to modulate IgG synthesis at non-toxic concentrations. The potentiation and inhibition of IgG synthesis by chlorpromazine and indomethacin, respectively, was observed only when the drug was present during the first 24 h of culture. Neither chlorpromazine nor indomethacin, at non-toxic concentrations, affected PHA- and PWM-stimulated proliferation of PBMC. In addition, chlorpromazine, indomethacin and piroxicam, at concentrations which produced maximal modulation of IgG synthesis, and D-penicillamine and D-penicillamine-L-cysteine at 10 microM failed to influence production of interleukin-1-like activity. We conclude that chlorpromazine and NSAIDs, although they exert opposite effects on IgG synthesis, act at an early stage of B cell differentiation that appears to be independent of interleukin 1 synthesis and early proliferative events. PMID:2788047

  8. Anti-inflammatory and Antimicrobial Effects of Heat-Clearing Chinese Herbs: A Current Review

    PubMed Central

    Muluye, Rekik A.; Bian, Yuhong; Alemu, Paulos N.

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation is a normal immune response; but if the body's regulation of inflammation is dysfunctional, then it will have an adverse effect on the body. Although use of modern drugs for inflammation has a relieving effect, it is still unsatisfactory. Moreover, the emergence of drug-resistant strains and even new kinds of microorganisms is causing significant morbidity and mortality. Recently, more attention has been focused on herbal medicine to treat various diseases because of the ability of the herbs to affect multiple target signaling pathways and their multiple mechanisms of action. Thus, a large number of studies have reported on the anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial effects of the traditional Chinese herbs. Literature survey was performed by conducting systematic electronic search in PubMed, Science Direct, Google Scholar, and in books. This review has listed 11 heat-clearing Chinese herbs (HCCHs) including Scutellaria baicalensis (黃芩 Huáng Qín), Coptis chinensis (黃連 Huáng Lián), Flos Lonicerae (金銀花 Jīn Yín Hūa), Forsythia suspensa (連翹 Lián Qiào), Isatidis Folium (大青葉 Dà Qīn Yè), Radix Isatidis (板藍根 Bǎn Lán Gēn), Viola yedoensis (紫花地丁 Zǐ Huā Dì Dīn), Pulsatilla Radix (白頭翁 Bái Tóu Wēn), Andrographis paniculata (穿心蓮 Chuān Xīn Lián), Houttuynia cordata (魚腥草 Yú Xīng Cǎo), and Patrinia Herba (敗醬草 Bài Jiàn Cǎo), which have anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial effects, and has described their effects through different mechanisms of action and multiple targets. Their ability to affect multiple target signaling pathways and their potential mechanisms of action contributing to their anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial activity may be related to their action of removing heat and counteracting toxicity. Further studies are needed on the collection of HCCHs to know the detailed mechanism of action of herbs in this group for the assessment of effective drug. PMID:24860732

  9. Anti-inflammatory and Antimicrobial Effects of Heat-Clearing Chinese Herbs: A Current Review.

    PubMed

    Muluye, Rekik A; Bian, Yuhong; Alemu, Paulos N

    2014-04-01

    Inflammation is a normal immune response; but if the body's regulation of inflammation is dysfunctional, then it will have an adverse effect on the body. Although use of modern drugs for inflammation has a relieving effect, it is still unsatisfactory. Moreover, the emergence of drug-resistant strains and even new kinds of microorganisms is causing significant morbidity and mortality. Recently, more attention has been focused on herbal medicine to treat various diseases because of the ability of the herbs to affect multiple target signaling pathways and their multiple mechanisms of action. Thus, a large number of studies have reported on the anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial effects of the traditional Chinese herbs. Literature survey was performed by conducting systematic electronic search in PubMed, Science Direct, Google Scholar, and in books. This review has listed 11 heat-clearing Chinese herbs (HCCHs) including Scutellaria baicalensis ( Huáng Qín), Coptis chinensis ( Huáng Lián), Flos Lonicerae ( Jīn Yín Hūa), Forsythia suspensa ( Lián Qiào), Isatidis Folium ( Dà Qīn Yè), Radix Isatidis ( Bǎn Lán Gēn), Viola yedoensis ( Zǐ Huā Dì Dīn), Pulsatilla Radix ( Bái Tóu Wēn), Andrographis paniculata ( Chuān Xīn Lián), Houttuynia cordata ( Yú Xīng Cǎo), and Patrinia Herba ( Bài Jiàn Cǎo), which have anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial effects, and has described their effects through different mechanisms of action and multiple targets. Their ability to affect multiple target signaling pathways and their potential mechanisms of action contributing to their anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial activity may be related to their action of removing heat and counteracting toxicity. Further studies are needed on the collection of HCCHs to know the detailed mechanism of action of herbs in this group for the assessment of effective drug. PMID:24860732

  10. Identification of 14,20-dihydroxy-docosahexaenoic acid as a novel anti-inflammatory metabolite.

    PubMed

    Yokokura, Yoshiyuki; Isobe, Yosuke; Matsueda, Shinnosuke; Iwamoto, Ryo; Goto, Tomomi; Yoshioka, Takeshi; Urabe, Daisuke; Inoue, Masayuki; Arai, Hiroyuki; Arita, Makoto

    2014-12-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) exhibits anti-inflammatory activity related to some of its oxygenated metabolites, such as D-series resolvins, protectin and maresin. Here, we analysed the lipids in inflammatory exudates using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and identified a novel DHA metabolite, 14,20-dihydroxy-DHA (14,20-diHDHA) and showed that it is biosynthesized by eosinophils through the 12/15-lipoxygenase pathway. The chemical structure of the dominant 14,20-diHDHA isomer, which is endogenously biosynthesized by eosinophils, was identified as 14S,20R-diHDHA using chemically synthesized stereoisomers. Nanogram doses of 14,20-diHDHA displayed a potent anti-inflammatory action by limiting neutrophil infiltration in zymosan-induced peritonitis. The in vivo formation and potent anti-inflammatory action of 14,20-diHDHA may contribute to the protective effects of DHA. PMID:25012818

  11. Identification of the bioactive constituent and its mechanisms of action in mediating the anti-inflammatory effects of black cohosh and related Cimicifuga species on human primary blood macrophages.

    PubMed

    Yang, Cindy L H; Chik, Stanley C C; Li, James C B; Cheung, Benny K W; Lau, Allan S Y

    2009-11-12

    Cimicifuga species have been used as traditional medicinal herbs to treat inflammation and symptoms associated with menopause in Asia, Europe, and North America. However, the underlying mechanism of their anti-inflammatory effects remains to be investigated. With bioactivity guided purification involving the use of partitioning extraction and high performance liquid chromatography, we isolated one of the key bioactive constituents from the rhizome extracts of Cimicifuga racemosa. By NMR spectroscopy, the molecule was identified to be cimiracemate A (1). This compound (140 muM) suppressed the lipopolysaccharide-induced TNF-alpha production in the blood macrophages by 47 +/- 19% and 58 +/- 30% at LPS concentrations of 1 ng/mL and 10 ng/mL, respectively. The anti-inflammatory activity of compound 1 may be due to its modulation of a signaling mitogen activated protein kinase and transcription factor nuclear factor-kappaB activities. Compound 1 was found in other Cimicifuga species. Our data indicate that compound 1 or its chemical analogues may have the potential to be further developed as a new class of therapeutic agent. PMID:19835377

  12. Terpenoids with anti-inflammatory activity from Abies chensiensis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qian-Qian; Wang, Shu-Fang; Li, Ya; Song, Qiu-Yan; Gao, Kun

    2016-06-01

    The phytochemical investigation of Abies chensiensis led to the isolation and identification of nine new compounds including eight triterpenoids (1-8) and a new abietane-type diterpene (9), along with three known compounds (10-12). The absolute configuration of 9 was assigned by X-ray diffraction analysis. Compounds 1-11 were evaluated for the anti-inflammatory activity. Among the tested compounds, 1, 2, 5 and 6 exhibited potent inhibitory activity with IC50 values of 15.97, 18.73, 20.18 and 10.97μM, respectively. PMID:27080759

  13. Anti-inflammatory, antiapoptotic, and antioxidant activity of fluoxetine.

    PubMed

    Caiaffo, Vitor; Oliveira, Belisa D R; de Sá, Fabrício B; Evêncio Neto, Joaquim

    2016-06-01

    Fluoxetine is a selective serotonin uptake inhibitor that has been widely used to determine the neurotransmission of serotonin in the central nervous system. This substance has emerged as the drug of choice for the treatment of depression due to is safer profile, fewer side effects, and greater tolerability. Studies have found the following important functions of fluoxetine related to the central nervous system: neuroprotection; anti-inflammatory properties similar to standard drugs for the treatment of inflammatory conditions; antioxidant properties, contributing to its therapeutic action and an important intracellular mechanism underlying the protective pharmacological effects seen in clinical practice in the treatment of different stress-related adverse health conditions; and antiapoptotic properties, with greater neuron survival and a reduction in apoptosis mediators as well as oxidative substances, such as superoxide dismutase and hydrogen peroxide. The aim of this study was to perform a review of the literature on the important role of fluoxetine in anti-inflammatory, cell survival, and neuron trophicity mechanisms (antiapoptotic properties) as well as its role regarding enzymes of the antioxidant defense system. PMID:27433341

  14. Analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of bupropion in animal models

    PubMed Central

    Hajhashemi, V.; Khanjani, P.

    2014-01-01

    Antidepressants are widely used for the treatment of various neuropathic pain conditions in humans. Recent studies have demonstrated that bupropion is effective for the treatment of neuropathic pain. Also antidepressants like bupropion showed anti-inflammatory properties. So in the present study, the analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of bupropion in mice and rat were investigated. The acetic acid, formalin and hot plate tests were used in male mice to assess analgesic activity. For evaluation of anti-inflammatory effect, carrageenan-induced rat paw edema and croton oil-induced ear edema were used. Bupropion was administered at the doses of 10, 20 and 40 mg/kg (i.p.). Bupropion at a dose of 40 mg/kg significantly reduced acetic acid-induced abdominal writhes and also was effective in suppression of formalin-induced behavior and showed significant analgesia in hot plate test. While 40 mg/kg bupropion showed considerable anti-inflammatory response in carrageenan test, but no effect was observed in croton oil-induced ear edema. The results showed that bupropion has analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects in animal models and further studies are needed to find out its mechanism of action. PMID:25657796

  15. In vivo anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive activities of Cheilanthes farinosa.

    PubMed

    Yonathan, Mariamawit; Asres, Kaleab; Assefa, Ashenafi; Bucar, Franz

    2006-12-01

    In Ethiopia inflammatory skin diseases are among the most common health problems treated with traditional remedies which mainly comprise medicinal plants. In the present work, the anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive activities of Cheilanthes farinosa (Forsk.) Kaulf (Adianthaceae), a fern used in many parts of Ethiopia to treat inflammatory skin disorders, were studied using in vivo models of inflammation and pain. The results of the study showed that the fronds Cheilanthes farinosa possess strong anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive properties. It was further demonstrated that the active ingredients of the fern reside mainly in the methanol fraction from which three compounds viz. the flavonol glycoside rutin, and the natural cinnamic acids, caffeic acid and its quinic acid derivative chlorogenic acid have been isolated. The methanol extract was also shown to potentiate the anti-inflammatory activity of acetyl salicylic acid. At the tested concentrations, the methanol extract displayed a better anti-nociceptive activity than that of ASA in both the early and late phases of formalin induced nociception in mice. However, the activity of the extract was more pronounced in the late phase, which is commonly associated with inflammatory pain. Evaluation of the pharmacological properties of the compounds isolated from the active fractions pointed out that chlorogenic acid possesses strong anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive activities while caffeic acid and rutin were inactive. Moreover, on molar basis chlorogenic acid was proved to be superior in its anti-inflammatory action to acetyl salicylic acid. It was therefore concluded that chlorogenic acid contributes, in full or in part, to the anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive activities of Cheilanthes farinosa. Both the methanolic extract and pure chlorogenic acid failed to display anti-nociceptive activity when tested by the tail-flick test indicating that the plant is not a centrally acting analgesic but

  16. A Systematic Review for Anti-Inflammatory Property of Clusiaceae Family: A Preclinical Approach

    PubMed Central

    de Melo, Mônica Santos; Quintans, Jullyana de Souza Siqueira; Araújo, Adriano Antunes de Souza; Duarte, Marcelo Cavalcante; Bonjardim, Leonardo Rigoldi; Moraes, Valéria Regina de Souza; de Araújo-Júnior, João Xavier

    2014-01-01

    Background. Clusiaceae family (sensu lato) is extensively used in ethnomedicine for treating a number of disease conditions which include cancer, inflammation, and infection. The aim of this review is to report the pharmacological potential of plants of Clusiaceae family with the anti-inflammatory activity in animal experiments. Methods. A systematic review about experiments investigating anti-inflammatory activity of Clusiaceae family was carried out by searching bibliographic databases such as Medline, Scopus and Embase. In this update, the search terms were “anti-inflammatory agents,” “Clusiaceae,” and “animals, laboratory.” Results. A total of 255 publications with plants this family were identified. From the initial 255 studies, a total of 21 studies were selected for the final analysis. Studies with genera Allanblackia, Clusia, Garcinia or Rheedia, and Hypericum showed significant anti-inflammatory activity. The findings include a decrease of total leukocytes, a number of neutrophils, total protein concentration, granuloma formation, and paw or ear edema formation. Other interesting findings included decreased of the MPO activity, and inflammatory mediators such as NF-κB and iNOS expression, PGE2 and Il-1β levels and a decrease in chronic inflammation. Conclusion. The data reported suggests the anti-inflammatory effect potential of Clusiaceae family in animal experiments. PMID:24976853

  17. Anti-inflammatory activity of extracts from Conyza canadensis.

    PubMed

    Lenfeld, J; Motl, O; Trka, A

    1986-04-01

    The petroleum ether and ethanolic extract from the epigean part of Conyza canadensis exhibits a significant anti-inflammatory effect on rats with a carrageenin and formalin oedema. Eight sesquiterpenic hydrocarbons with the highest anti-inflammatory activity were found in the petroleum ether fraction (beta-santalene, beta-himachalene, cuparene, alpha-curcumene, gamma-cadinene and three other unidentified hydrocarbons). Of these substances, beta-himachalene was further studied and its anti-inflammatory activity was demonstrated. PMID:3725873

  18. Molecular Targets of Dietary Polyphenols with Anti-inflammatory Properties

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Joo-Heon

    2005-01-01

    There is persuasive epidemiological and experimental evidence that dietary polyphenols have anti-inflammatory activity. Aspirin and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have long been used to combat inflammation. Recently, cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitors have been developed and recommended for treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoarthritis (OA). However, two COX inhibitors have been withdrawn from the market due to unexpected side effects. Because conventional therapeutic and surgical approaches have not been able to fully control the incidence and outcome of many inflammatory diseases, there is an urgent need to find safer compounds and to develop mechanism-based approaches for the management of these diseases. Polyphenols are found in many dietary plant products, including fruits, vegetables, beverages, herbs, and spices. Several of these compounds have been found to inhibit the inflammation process as well as tumorigenesis in experimental animals; they can also exhibit potent biological properties. In addition, epidemiological studies have indicated that populations who consume foods rich in specific polyphenols have lower incidences of inflammatory disease. This paper provides an overview of the research approaches that can be used to unravel the biology and health effects of polyphenols. Polyphenols have diverse biological effects, however, this review will focus on some of the pivotal molecular targets that directly affect the inflammation process. PMID:16259055

  19. Anti-inflammatory Cerebrosides from Cultivated Cordyceps militaris.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Ching-Peng; Liu, Shan-Chi; Tang, Chih-Hsin; Chan, You; El-Shazly, Mohamed; Lee, Chia-Lin; Du, Ying-Chi; Wu, Tung-Ying; Chang, Fang-Rong; Wu, Yang-Chang

    2016-02-24

    Cordyceps militaris (bei-chong-chaw, northern worm grass) is a precious and edible entomopathogenic fungus, which is widely used in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) as a general booster for the nervous system, metabolism, and immunity. Saccharides, nucleosides, mannitol, and sterols were isolated from this fungus. The biological activity of C. militaris was attributed to the saccharide and nucleoside contents. In this study, the aqueous methanolic fraction of C. militaris fruiting bodies exhibited a significant anti-inflammatory activity. Bioactivity-guided fractionation of the active fraction led to the isolation of eight compounds, including one new and two known cerebrosides (ceramide derivatives), two nucleosides, and three sterols. Cordycerebroside A (1), the new cerebroside, along with soyacerebroside I (2) and glucocerebroside (3) inhibited the accumulation of pro-inflammatory iNOS protein and reduced the expression of COX-2 protein in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophages. This is the first study on the isolation of cerebrosides with anti-inflammatory activity from this TCM. PMID:26853111

  20. Anti-inflammatory activity and mechanism of surfactin in lipopolysaccharide-activated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuanyuan; Liu, Chuan; Dong, Bin; Ma, Xiaolei; Hou, Lihua; Cao, Xiaohong; Wang, Chunling

    2015-04-01

    Surfactin is primarily produced by Bacillus natto TK-1 and is one of the most powerful biosurfactants. It consists of a heptapeptide interlinked with a β-hydroxy fatty acid. Because of its special structure, surfactin shows broad biological effects, including anti-tumour, anti-microbial and anti-mycoplasma activities. It also has potential anti-inflammatory activity; however, the anti-inflammatory mechanism of surfactin has not been explored. In this study, we investigated the anti-inflammatory mechanism of surfactin in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated macrophages. Surfactin exhibited an anti-inflammatory effect without cytotoxicity at certain concentrations, and the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated cells appeared normal after surfactin treatment. Surfactin significantly inhibited the increased expression of IFN-γ, IL-6, iNOS and nitric oxide (NO). TLR4 is the critical receptor for LPS; therefore, the TLR4 signal transduction pathway is the primary pathway that mediates LPS-induced inflammation. The results show that surfactin downregulated the LPS-induced TLR4 protein expression of macrophages and indicated that the surfactin-mediated signal pathway was involved in with TLR4. The subsequent studies demonstrated that surfactin exhibited anti-inflammatory effects by attenuating the activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), which is involved in the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) cell signalling pathways. These results suggest that surfactin may be a new therapeutic agent for inflammation. PMID:25331175

  1. Antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities of berberine in the treatment of diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Li, Zheng; Geng, Ya-Na; Jiang, Jian-Dong; Kong, Wei-Jia

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress and inflammation are proved to be critical for the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus. Berberine (BBR) is a natural compound isolated from plants such as Coptis chinensis and Hydrastis canadensis and with multiple pharmacological activities. Recent studies showed that BBR had antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities, which contributed in part to its efficacy against diabetes mellitus. In this review, we summarized the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities of BBR as well as their molecular basis. The antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities of BBR were noted with changes in oxidative stress markers, antioxidant enzymes, and proinflammatory cytokines after BBR administration in diabetic animals. BBR inhibited oxidative stress and inflammation in a variety of tissues including liver, adipose tissue, kidney and pancreas. Mechanisms of the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities of BBR were complex, which involved multiple cellular kinases and signaling pathways, such as AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) pathway, and nuclear factor- κ B (NF- κ B) pathway. Detailed mechanisms and pathways for the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities of BBR still need further investigation. Clarification of these issues could help to understand the pharmacology of BBR in the treatment of diabetes mellitus and promote the development of antidiabetic natural products. PMID:24669227

  2. Antioxidant and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Berberine in the Treatment of Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Ya-Na; Kong, Wei-Jia

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress and inflammation are proved to be critical for the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus. Berberine (BBR) is a natural compound isolated from plants such as Coptis chinensis and Hydrastis canadensis and with multiple pharmacological activities. Recent studies showed that BBR had antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities, which contributed in part to its efficacy against diabetes mellitus. In this review, we summarized the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities of BBR as well as their molecular basis. The antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities of BBR were noted with changes in oxidative stress markers, antioxidant enzymes, and proinflammatory cytokines after BBR administration in diabetic animals. BBR inhibited oxidative stress and inflammation in a variety of tissues including liver, adipose tissue, kidney and pancreas. Mechanisms of the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities of BBR were complex, which involved multiple cellular kinases and signaling pathways, such as AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) pathway, and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) pathway. Detailed mechanisms and pathways for the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities of BBR still need further investigation. Clarification of these issues could help to understand the pharmacology of BBR in the treatment of diabetes mellitus and promote the development of antidiabetic natural products. PMID:24669227

  3. QSAR and Docking Studies on Capsazepine Derivatives for Immunomodulatory and Anti-Inflammatory Activity

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Aparna; Sharma, Pooja; Prakash, Om; Singh, Monika; Kalani, Komal; Khan, Feroz; Bawankule, Dnyaneshwar Umrao; Luqman, Suaib; Srivastava, Santosh Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Capsazepine, an antagonist of capsaicin, is discovered by the structure and activity relationship. In previous studies it has been found that capsazepine has potency for immunomodulation and anti-inflammatory activity and emerging as a favourable target in quest for efficacious and safe anti-inflammatory drug. Thus, a 2D quantitative structural activity relationship (QSAR) model against target tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) was developed using multiple linear regression method (MLR) with good internal prediction (r2 = 0.8779) and external prediction (r2pred = 0.5865) using Discovery Studio v3.5 (Accelrys, USA). The predicted activity was further validated by in vitro experiment. Capsazepine was tested in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced inflammation in peritoneal mouse macrophages. Anti-inflammatory profile of capsazepine was assessed by its potency to inhibit the production of inflammatory mediator TNF-α. The in vitro experiment indicated that capsazepine is an efficient anti-inflammatory agent. Since, the developed QSAR model showed significant correlations between chemical structure and anti-inflammatory activity, it was successfully applied in the screening of forty-four virtual derivatives of capsazepine, which finally afforded six potent derivatives, CPZ-29, CPZ-30, CPZ-33, CPZ-34, CPZ-35 and CPZ-36. To gain more insights into the molecular mechanism of action of capsazepine and its derivatives, molecular docking and in silico absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicity (ADMET) studies were performed. The results of QSAR, molecular docking, in silico ADMET screening and in vitro experimental studies provide guideline and mechanistic scope for the identification of more potent anti-inflammatory & immunomodulatory drug. PMID:25003344

  4. Marine pharmacology in 2005–6: Marine Compounds with Anthelmintic, Antibacterial, Anticoagulant, Antifungal, Anti-inflammatory, Antimalarial, Antiprotozoal, Antituberculosis, and Antiviral Activities; affecting the Cardiovascular, Immune and Nervous Systems, and other Miscellaneous Mechanisms of Action

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Alejandro M. S.; Rodriguez, Abimael D.; Berlinck, Roberto G. S.; Hamann, Mark T.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND The review presents the 2005–2006 peer-reviewed marine pharmacology literature, and follows a similar format to the authors’ 1998–2004 reviews. The preclinical pharmacology of chemically characterized marine compounds isolated from marine animals, algae, fungi and bacteria is systematically presented. RESULTS Anthelminthic, antibacterial, anticoagulant, antifungal, antimalarial, antiprotozoal, antituberculosis and antiviral activities were reported for 78 marine chemicals. Additionally 47 marine compounds were reported to affect the cardiovascular, immune and nervous system as well as possess anti-inflammatory effects. Finally, 58 marine compounds were shown to bind to a variety of molecular targets, and thus could potentially contribute to several pharmacological classes. CONCLUSIONS Marine pharmacology research during 2005–2006 was truly global in nature, involving investigators from 32 countries, and the United States, and contributed 183 marine chemical leads to the research pipeline aimed at the discovery of novel therapeutic agents. SIGNIFICANCE Continued preclinical and clinical research with marine natural products demonstrating a broad spectrum of pharmacological activity and will probably result in novel therapeutic agents for the treatment of multiple disease categories. PMID:19303911

  5. Marine pharmacology in 2003-4: Marine Compounds with Anthelminthic, Antibacterial, Anticoagulant, Antifungal, Anti-inflammatory, Antimalarial, Antiplatelet, Antiprotozoal, Antituberculosis, and Antiviral Activities; affecting the Cardiovascular, Immune and Nervous Systems, and other Miscellaneous Mechanisms of Action

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Alejandro M.S.; Rodriguez, Abimael D.; Berlinck, Roberto G.S.; Hamann, Mark T.

    2007-01-01

    The current marine pharmacology review that covers the peer-reviewed literature during 2003 and 2004 is a sequel to the authors' 1998-2002 reviews, and highlights the preclinical pharmacology of 166 marine chemicals derived from a diverse group of marine animals, algae, fungi and bacteria. Anthelminthic, antibacterial, anticoagulant, antifungal, antimalarial, antiplatelet, antiprotozoal, antituberculosis or antiviral activities were reported for 67 marine chemicals. Additionally 45 marine compounds were shown to have significant effects on the cardiovascular, immune and nervous system as well as possessing anti-inflammatory effects. Finally, 54 marine compounds were reported to act on a variety of molecular targets and thus may potentially contribute to several pharmacological classes. Thus, during 2003-2004, research on the pharmacology of marine natural products which involved investigators from Argentina, Australia, Brazil, Belgium, Canada, China, France, Germany, India, Indonesia, Israel, Italy, Japan, Mexico, Morocco, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Panama, the Philippines, Portugal, Russia, Slovenia, South Korea, Spain, Thailand, Turkey, United Kingdom, and the United States, contributed numerous chemical leads for the continued global search for novel therapeutic agents with broad spectrum activity. PMID:17392033

  6. Marine pharmacology in 2001–2002: Marine compounds with anthelmintic, antibacterial, anticoagulant, antidiabetic, antifungal, anti-inflammatory, antimalarial, antiplatelet, antiprotozoal, antituberculosis, and antiviral activities; affecting the cardiovascular, immune and nervous systems and other miscellaneous mechanisms of action

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Alejandro M.S.; Hamann, Mark T.

    2016-01-01

    During 2001–2002, research on the pharmacology of marine chemicals continued to be global in nature involving investigators from Argentina, Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, Denmark, France, Germany, India, Indonesia, Israel, Italy, Japan, Mexico, Netherlands, New Zealand, Pakistan, the Philippines, Russia, Singapore, Slovenia, South Africa, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Thailand, United Kingdom, and the United States. This current article, a sequel to the authors’ 1998, 1999 and 2000 marine pharmacology reviews, classifies 106 marine chemicals derived from a diverse group of marine animals, algae, fungi and bacteria, on the basis of peer-reviewed preclinical pharmacology. Anthelmintic, antibacterial, anticoagulant, antifungal, antimalarial, antiplatelet, antiprotozoal, antituberculosis or antiviral activities were reported for 56 marine chemicals. An additional 19 marine compounds were shown to have significant effects on the cardiovascular, immune and nervous system as well as to possess anti-inflammatory and antidiabetic effects. Finally, 31 marine compounds were reported to act on a variety of molecular targets and thus may potentially contribute to several pharmacological classes. Thus, during 2001–2002 pharmacological research with marine chemicals continued to contribute potentially novel chemical leads for the ongoing global search for therapeutic agents for the treatment of multiple disease categories. PMID:15919242

  7. Marine Pharmacology in 2000: Marine Compounds with Antibacterial, Anticoagulant, Antifungal, Anti-inflammatory, Antimalarial, Antiplatelet, Antituberculosis, and Antiviral Activities; Affecting the Cardiovascular, Immune, and Nervous Systems and Other Miscellaneous Mechanisms of Action

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Alejandro M. S.; Hamann, Mark T.

    2016-01-01

    During 2000 research on the pharmacology of marine chemicals involved investigators from Australia, Brazil, Canada, Egypt, France, Germany, India, Indonesia, Israel, Italy, Japan, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Phillipines, Singapore, Slovenia, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, United Kingdom, and the United States. This current review, a sequel to the authors’ 1998 and 1999 reviews, classifies 68 peer-reviewed articles on the basis of the reported preclinical pharmacologic properties of marine chemicals derived from a diverse group of marine animals, algae, fungi, and bacteria. Antibacterial, anticoagulant, antifungal, antimalarial, antiplatelet, antituberculosis, or antiviral activity was reported for 35 marine chemicals. An additional 20 marine compounds were shown to have significant effects on the cardiovascular and nervous system, and to possess anti-inflammatory or immunosuppressant properties. Finally, 23 marine compounds were reported to act on a variety of molecular targets and thus could potentially contribute to several pharmacologic classes. Thus, as in 1998 and 1999, during 2000 pharmacologic research with marine chemicals continued to contribute potentially novel chemical leads to the ongoing global search for therapeutic agents in the treatment of multiple disease categories. PMID:14583811

  8. Anti-inflammatory action of high molecular weight Mytilus edulis hydrolysates fraction in LPS-induced RAW264.7 macrophage via NF-κB and MAPK pathways.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Sang; Ahn, Chang-Bum; Je, Jae-Young

    2016-07-01

    Anti-inflammatory Mytilus edulis hydrolysates (MEHs) were prepared by peptic hydrolysis and MEH was further fractionated into three fractions based on molecular weight, namely >5kDa, 1-5kDa, and <1kDa. The >5kDa peptide fraction exerted the highest nitric oxide (NO) inhibitory activity and inhibited prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) secretion in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophages. Pretreatment with the >5kDa peptide fraction markedly inhibited LPS-stimulated inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) protein and gene expressions. Stimulation by LPS induced the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and -1β (IL-1β), whereas co-treatment with the >5kDa peptide fraction suppressed pro-inflammatory cytokine production. The >5kDa peptide fraction inhibited the translocation of NF-κB (nuclear factor-kappa B) through the prevention of IκBα (inhibitory factor kappa B alpha) phosphorylation and degradation and also inhibited the MAPK signaling pathway in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophages. PMID:26920260

  9. Flavonoids as anti-inflammatory agents: implications in cancer and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    García-Lafuente, Ana; Guillamón, Eva; Villares, Ana; Rostagno, Mauricio A; Martínez, José Alfredo

    2009-09-01

    Chronic inflammation is being shown to be increasingly involved in the onset and development of several pathological disturbances such as arteriosclerosis, obesity, diabetes, neurodegenerative diseases and even cancer. Treatment for chronic inflammatory disorders has not been solved, and there is an urgent need to find new and safe anti-inflammatory compounds. Flavonoids belong to a group of natural substances occurring normally in the diet that exhibit a variety of beneficial effects on health. The anti-inflammatory properties of flavonoids have been studied recently, in order to establish and characterize their potential utility as therapeutic agents in the treatment of inflammatory diseases. Several mechanisms of action have been proposed to explain in vivo flavonoid anti-inflammatory actions, such as antioxidant activity, inhibition of eicosanoid generating enzymes or the modulation of the production of proinflammatory molecules. Recent studies have also shown that some flavonoids are modulators of proinflammatory gene expression, thus leading to the attenuation of the inflammatory response. However, much work remains to be done in order to achieve definitive conclusions about their potential usefulness. This review summarizes the known mechanisms involved in the anti-inflammatory activity of flavonoids and the implications of these effects on the protection against cancer and cardiovascular disease. PMID:19381780

  10. Antinociceptive anti-inflammatory effect of Monotropein isolated from the root of Morinda officinalis.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jongwon; Lee, Kyung-Tae; Choi, Moo-Young; Nam, Jung-Hwan; Jung, Hyun-Ju; Park, Sun-Kyu; Park, Hee-Juhn

    2005-10-01

    The root of Morinda officinalis (Rubiaceae) is used to treat rheumatoid arthritis and impotence in the traditional Oriental medicine. To identify the antinociceptive anti-inflammatory components of this crude drug, we adopted an activity-directed fractionation approach. The active fraction of the BuOH extract of M. officinalis root was subjected to silica gel and ODS column chromatography to yield two diterpenes, compounds 1 and 2 and these were identified as monotropein and deacetylasperulosidic acid, respectively. The iridoid glycoside, monotropein, was tested for its anti-inflammatory antinociceptive effects using hot plate- and writhing antinociceptive assays and by using carrageenan-induced anti-inflammatory assays in mice and rats. Pretreatment with monotropein (at 20, 30 mg/kg/d, p.o.) significantly reduced stretching episodes and prolonged action time in mice. It also significantly reduced acute paw edema by carrageenan in rats. These results indicate that monotropein contributes to the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory action of Morinda officinalis root. PMID:16204945

  11. Intravital Microscopic Methods to Evaluate Anti-inflammatory Effects and Signaling Mechanisms Evoked by Hydrogen Sulfide

    PubMed Central

    Zuidema, Mozow Y.; Korthuis, Ronald J.

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an endogenous gaseous signaling molecule with potent anti-inflammatory properties. Exogenous application of H2S donors, administered either acutely during an inflammatory response or as an antecedent preconditioning intervention that invokes the activation of anti-inflammatory cell survival programs, effectively limits leukocyte rolling, adhesion and emigration, generation of reactive oxygen species, chemokine and cell adhesion molecule expression, endothelial barrier disruption,capillary perfusion deficits, and parenchymal cell dysfunction and injury. This chapter focuses on intravital microscopic methods that can be used to assess the anti-inflammatory effects exerted by H2S, as well as to explore the cellular signaling mechanisms by which this gaseous molecule limits the aforementioned inflammatory responses. Recent advances include use of intravital multiphoton microscopy and optical biosensor technology to explore signaling mechanisms in vivo. PMID:25747477

  12. Anti-inflammatory effect of diosmectite in hapten-induced colitis in the rat

    PubMed Central

    González, Raquel; Sánchez de Medina, Fermin; Martínez-Augustin, Olga; Nieto, Ana; Gálvez, Julio; Risco, Severiano; Zarzuelo, Antonio

    2004-01-01

    Diosmectite is a natural silicate effectively used in the treatment of infectious diarrhoea. Its antidiarrhoeal properties involve adsorption of toxins and bacteria and modifications of the rheological characteristics of gastrointestinal mucus. Hence, the aim of this study was to test the intestinal anti-inflammatory activity of diosmectite. Diosmectite (500 mg kg−1 day−1, p.o.) was administered as a post-treatment to rats with chronic trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid colitis. Colonic status was checked 1 and 2 weeks after colitis induction by macroscopic, histological and biochemical examination. Diosmectite post-treatment resulted in amelioration of the morphological signs (intestinal weight, macroscopic damage, necrosed area, histology) and biochemical markers (myeloperoxidase activity, glutathione levels, MUC2 expression, inducible nitric oxide synthase and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and leukotriene B4 synthesis), as well as in the reduction of the severity of diarrhoea. The effect of the clay was comparable to that of sulphasalazine (50 mg kg−1 day−1). Diosmectite exhibited a dose-dependent capacity to adsorb proteins in vitro as well as a dose-dependent inhibitory effect on the basolateral secretion of IL-8 by lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated HT29 cells. Diosmectite had a dose-dependent inhibitory effect on IL-1β production by LPS-stimulated THP-1 cells. The effect of diosmectite on MUC2 was post-transcriptional, since mRNA levels were unaffected. However, diosmectite is able to upregulate MUC2 mRNA levels in HT29-MTX cells. Diosmectite has anti-inflammatory activity administered as a post-treatment. Possible mechanisms include adsorption of luminal antigens, increase of colonic mucin levels and possibly a direct modulatory action of cytokine production by mucosal cells. PMID:14993105

  13. Anti-inflammatory and protective properties of daphnetin in endotoxin-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wen-wen; Lu, Zhe; Zhang, Hang; Kang, Yan-hua; Mao, Yun; Wang, Huan-huan; Ge, Wei-hong; Shi, Li-yun

    2014-12-24

    Uncontrolled inflammatory responses cause tissue injury and severe immunopathology. Pharmacological interference of intracellular pro-inflammatory signaling may confer a therapeutic benefit under these conditions. Daphnetin, a natural coumarin derivative, has been used to treat inflammatory diseases including bronchitis. However, the protective effect of daphnetin in inflammatory airway disorders has yet to be determined, and the molecular basis for its anti-inflammatory properties is unknown. This paper shows that daphnetin treatment conferred substantial protection from endotoxin-induced acute lung injury (ALI), in parallel with reductions in the production of inflammatory mediators, symptoms of airway response, and infiltration of inflammatory cells. Further studies indicate that activation of macrophage and human alveolar epithelial cells in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was remarkably suppressed by daphnetin, which was related to the down-regulation of NF-κB-dependent signaling events. Importantly, this study demonstrates that TNF-α-induced protein 3 (TNFAIP3), also known as A20, was significantly induced by daphnetin, which appeared to be largely responsible for the down-regulation of NF-κB activity through modulation of nondegradative TRAF6 ubiquitination. Accordingly, the deletion of TNFAIP3 in primary macrophages reversed daphnetin-elicited inhibition of immune response, and the beneficial effect of daphnetin in the pathogenesis of ALI was, partially at least, abrogated by TNFAIP3 knockdown. These findings demonstrate the anti-inflammatory and protective functions of daphnetin in endotoxin-induced lung inflammation and injury and also reveal the key mechanism underlying its action in vitro as well as in vivo. PMID:25419854

  14. Convergence of Nitric Oxide and Lipid Signaling: Anti-Inflammatory Nitro-Fatty Acids

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Paul R.S.; Schopfer, Francisco J.; O’Donnell, Valerie B.; Freeman, Bruce A.

    2009-01-01

    The signaling mediators nitric oxide (·NO) and oxidized lipids, once viewed to transduce metabolic and inflammatory information via discrete and independent pathways, are now appreciated as interdependent regulators of immune response and metabolic homeostasis. The interactions between these two classes of mediators result in reciprocal control of mediator sythesis that is strongly influenced by the local chemical environment. The relationship between the two pathways extends beyond co-regulation of ·NO and eicosanoid formation to converge via the nitration of unsaturated fatty acids to yield nitro derivatives (NO2-FA). These pluripotent signaling molecules are generated in vivo as an adaptive response to oxidative inflammatory conditions and manifest predominantly anti-inflammatory signaling reactions. These actions of NO2-FA are diverse, with these species serving as a potential chemical reserve of ·NO, reacting with cellular nucleophiles to post-translationally modify protein structure, function and localization. In this regard these species act as potent endogenous ligands for peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ. Functional consequences of these signaling mechanisms have been shown in multiple model systems, including the inhibition of platelet and neutrophil functions, induction of heme oxygenase-1, inhibition of LPS-induced cytokine release in monocytes, increased insulin sensitivity and glucose uptake in adipocytes and relaxation of pre-constricted rat aortic segments. These observations have propelled further in vitro and in vivo studies of mechanisms of NO2-FA signaling and metabolism, highlighting the therapeutic potential of this class of molecules as anti-inflammatory drug candidates. PMID:19200454

  15. New Anti-Inflammatory Metabolites by Microbial Transformation of Medrysone

    PubMed Central

    Bano, Saira; Wahab, Atia-tul-; Yousuf, Sammer; Jabeen, Almas; Mesaik, Mohammad Ahmed; Rahman, Atta-ur-; Choudhary, M. Iqbal

    2016-01-01

    Microbial transformation of the anti-inflammatory steroid medrysone (1) was carried out for the first time with the filamentous fungi Cunninghamella blakesleeana (ATCC 8688a), Neurospora crassa (ATCC 18419), and Rhizopus stolonifer (TSY 0471). The objective was to evaluate the anti-inflammatory potential of the substrate (1) and its metabolites. This yielded seven new metabolites, 14α-hydroxy-6α-methylpregn-4-ene-3,11,20-trione (2), 6β-hydroxy-6α-methylpregn-4-ene-3,11,20-trione (3), 15β-hydroxy-6α-methylpregn-4-ene-3,11,20-trione (4), 6β,17α-dihydroxy-6α-methylpregn-4-ene-3,11,20-trione (5), 6β,20S-dihydroxy-6α-methylpregn-4-ene-3,11-dione (6), 11β,16β-dihydroxy-6α-methylpregn-4-ene-3,11-dione (7), and 15β,20R-dihydroxy-6α-methylpregn-4-ene-3,11-dione (8). Single-crystal X-ray diffraction technique unambiguously established the structures of the metabolites 2, 4, 6, and 8. Fungal transformation of 1 yielded oxidation at the C-6β, -11β, -14α, -15β, -16β positions. Various cellular anti-inflammatory assays, including inhibition of phagocyte oxidative burst, T-cell proliferation, and cytokine were performed. Among all the tested compounds, metabolite 6 (IC50 = 30.3 μg/mL) moderately inhibited the reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced from zymosan-induced human whole blood cells. Compounds 1, 4, 5, 7, and 8 strongly inhibited the proliferation of T-cells with IC50 values between <0.2–10.4 μg/mL. Compound 7 was found to be the most potent inhibitor (IC50 < 0.2 μg/mL), whereas compounds 2, 3, and 6 showed moderate levels of inhibition (IC50 = 14.6–20.0 μg/mL). Compounds 1, and 7 also inhibited the production of pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α. All these compounds were found to be non-toxic to 3T3 cells (mouse fibroblast), and also showed no activity when tested against HeLa (human epithelial carcinoma), or against PC3 (prostate cancer) cancer cell lines. PMID:27104348

  16. Antioxidant and anti-inflammatory potential of hesperetin metabolites obtained from hesperetin-administered rat serum: an ex vivo approach.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hsin-Ling; Chen, Ssu-Ching; Senthil Kumar, K J; Yu, Kang-Ni; Lee Chao, Pei-Dawn; Tsai, Shang-Yuan; Hou, Yu-Chi; Hseu, You-Cheng

    2012-01-11

    In recent years much attention has been focused on the pharmaceutical relevance of bioflavonoids, especially hesperidin and its aglycon hesperetin in terms of their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory actions. However, the bioactivity of their metabolites, the real molecules in vivo hesperetin glucuronides/sulfates produced after ingestion, has been poorly understood. Thus, the study using an ex vivo approach is aimed to compare the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities of hesperidin/hesperetin or hesperetin metabolites derived from hesperetin-administered rat serum. We found that hesperetin metabolites (2.5-20 μM) showed higher antioxidant activity against various oxidative systems, including superoxide anion scavenging, reducing power, and metal chelating effects, than that of hesperidin or hesperetin. The data also showed that pretreatment of hesperetin metabolites (1-10 μM) within the range of physiological concentrations, compared to hesperetin, significantly inhibited nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) production, as evidenced by the inhibition of their precursors, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) protein levels without appreciable cytotoxicity on LPS-activated RAW264.7 macrophages or A7r5 smooth muscle cells. Concomitantly, hesperetin metabolites dose-dependently inhibited LPS-induced intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). Furthermore, hesperetin metabolites significantly downregulate LPS-induced nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation followed by the suppression of inhibitor-κB (I-κB) degradation and phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase1/2 (JNK1/2) and p38 MAPKs after challenge with LPS. Hesperetin metabolites ex vivo showed potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity in comparison with hesperidin/hesperetin. PMID:22098419

  17. Anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive activities of Solenostemon monostachyus aerial part extract in mice

    PubMed Central

    Okokon, Jude Fiom; Davis, Koofreh; Nwidu, Lucky Legbosi

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Solenostemon monostachyus is used in traditional medicine for the treatment of various ailments such as ulcer, hypertension, pains and inflammatory diseases. Evaluation of anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities of S. monostachyus aerial parts was carried out to ascertain its uses in traditional medicine. Materials and Methods: The aerial parts of S. monostachyus was cold extracted by soaking the dried powdered material in ethanol. The aerial parts crude extract (75 –225 mg/kg) of S. monostachyus was investigated for analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities using various experimental models; acetic acid, formalin and thermal- induced pains models for analgesic study and carrageenin, egg albumin and xylene – induced edema models for anti-inflammatory investigation. Results: The extract caused a significant (p<0.05 – 0.001) dose-dependent reduction of inflammation and pains induced by different phlogistic agents used. These effects were comparable to those of the standard drug, (ASA, 100 mg/kg) used in some models. Conclusion: The anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects of this plant may in part be mediated through the chemical constituents of the plant and the results of the analgesic action suggest central and peripheral mechanisms. The findings of this work confirm the ethno medical use of this plant to treat inflammatory conditions. PMID:27462551

  18. A review of anti-inflammatory agents for symptoms of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Keller, William R; Kum, Lionel M; Wehring, Heidi J; Koola, Maju Mathew; Buchanan, Robert W; Kelly, Deanna L

    2013-04-01

    Schizophrenia is a chronic debilitating mental disorder that affects about 1% of the US population. The pathophysiology and etiology remain unknown, thus new treatment targets have been challenging and few novel treatments with new mechanisms of action have come to market in the past few decades. Increasing attention has been paid to the role of inflammation in schizophrenia and new data suggests that decreasing inflammation and inflammatory biomarkers may play some role in schizophrenia treatment. This review summarizes the clinical trial literature regarding medications that possess anti-inflammatory properties that have been tested for schizophrenia symptoms and covers such medications as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents, such as the cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors and aspirin, omega-3 fatty acids, neurosteroids and minocycline. Overall, there is accumulating evidence, albeit mostly adjunctive treatments, that agents working on inflammatory pathways have some benefits in people with schizophrenia. In the next few years the field will begin to see data on many treatments with anti-inflammatory properties that are currently under study. Hopefully advancements in understanding inflammation and effective treatments having anti-inflammatory properties may help revolutionize our understanding and provide new targets for prevention and treatment in schizophrenia. PMID:23151612

  19. Anti-inflammatory and antiarthritic activity of anthraquinone derivatives in rodents.

    PubMed

    Kshirsagar, Ajay D; Panchal, Prashant V; Harle, Uday N; Nanda, Rabindra K; Shaikh, Haidarali M

    2014-01-01

    Aloe emodin is isolated compound of aloe vera which is used traditionally as an anti-inflammatory agent. In vitro pharmacokinetic data suggest that glucuronosyl or sulfated forms of aloe emodin may provide some limitations in its absorption capacity. Aloe emodin was reported to have in vitro anti-inflammatory activity due to inhibition of inducible nitric oxide (iNO) and prostaglandin E2, via its action on murine macrophages. However, present work evidenced that molecular docking of aloe emodin modulates the anti-inflammatory activity, as well as expression of COX-2 (cyclooxygenase-2) in rodent. The AEC (4,5-dihydroxy-9,10-dioxo-9,10-dihydroanthracene-2 carboxylic acid) was synthesized using aloe emodin as starting material. The study was planned for evaluation of possible anti-inflammatory and antiarthritic activity in carrageenan rat induced paw oedema and complete Freund's adjuvant induced arthritis in rats. The AE (aloe emodin) and AEC significantly (P < 0.001) reduced carrageenan induced paw edema at 50 and 75 mg/kg. Complete Freund's adjuvant induced arthritis model showed significant (P < 0.001) decrease in injected and noninjected paw volume, arthritic score. AE and AEC showed significant effect on various biochemical, antioxidant, and hematological parameters. Diclofenac sodium 10 mg/kg showed significant (P < 0.001) inhibition in inflammation and arthritis. PMID:25610704

  20. AMP-activated protein kinase is activated by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed

    King, Tanya S; Russe, Otto Quintus; Möser, Christine V; Ferreirós, Nerea; Kynast, Katharina L; Knothe, Claudia; Olbrich, Katrin; Geisslinger, Gerd; Niederberger, Ellen

    2015-09-01

    AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) is a cellular energy sensor, which is activated in stages of increased adenosine triphosphate (ATP) consumption. Its activation has been associated with a number of beneficial effects such as decrease of inflammatory processes and inhibition of disease progression of diabetes and obesity. A recent study suggested that salicylate, the active metabolite of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) acetyl-salicylic acid (aspirin), is able to activate AMPK pharmacologically. This observation raised the question whether or not other NSAIDs might also act as AMPK activators and whether this action might contribute to their cyclooxygenase (COX)-independent anti-inflammatory properties. In this study, we investigated mouse and human neuronal cells and liver tissue of mice after treatment with various NSAIDs. Our results showed that the non-selective acidic NSAIDs ibuprofen and diclofenac induced AMPK activation similar to aspirin while the COX-2 selective drug etoricoxib and the non-opioid analgesic paracetamol, both drugs have no acidic structure, failed to activate AMPK. In conclusion, our results revealed that AMPK can be activated by specific non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as salicylic acid, ibuprofen or diclofenac possibly depending on the acidic structure of the drugs. AMPK might therefore contribute to their antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory properties. PMID:26049010

  1. Anti-Inflammatory Constituents from Bidens frondosa.

    PubMed

    Le, Jiamei; Lu, Wenquan; Xiong, Xiaojuan; Wu, Zhijun; Chen, Wansheng

    2015-01-01

    A new polyacetylene glucoside (3E,5E,11E)-tridecatriene-7,9-diyne-1,2,13-triol-2-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (1), a new phenylpropanoid glucoside 2'-butoxyethylconiferin (2), and a new flavonoid glycoside 8,3',4'-trihydroxyflavone-7-O-(6''-O-p-coumaroyl)-β-D-glucopyranoside (3), have been isolated from Bidens frondosa together with fifty-three known compounds 4-56. The structures of these compounds were established by spectroscopic methods. mainly ESIMS, 1D- and 2D-NMR spectroscopic data. and comparison with literature data. Compounds 1-34, 36, 39, 43, 47, 51, and 52 were tested for inhibition of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) in 293-NF-κB-luciferase report cell line induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and compounds 1, 2, 3, 9, 15, 21, 24 and 51 were tested for the production of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10 in RAW 264.7 macrophages induced by LPS. In conclusion, the isolated compounds 1, 2, 3, 9, 15, 21, 24 and 51 exhibited significant activity in anti-inflammatory activity assays. PMID:26473814

  2. Anti-inflammatory effects of hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives

    SciTech Connect

    Nagasaka, Reiko; Chotimarkorn, Chatchawan; Shafiqul, Islam Md.; Hori, Masatoshi; Ozaki, Hiroshi; Ushio, Hideki . E-mail: hushio@kaiyodai.ac.jp

    2007-06-29

    NF-{kappa}B family of transcription factors are involved in numerous cellular processes, including differentiation, proliferation, and inflammation. It was reported that hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives (HADs) are inhibitors of NF-{kappa}B activation. Rice bran oil contains a lot of phytosteryl ferulates, one of HADs. We have investigated effects of phytosteryl ferulates on NF-{kappa}B activation in macrophage. Cycloartenyl ferulate (CAF), one of phytosteryl ferulates, significantly reduced lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced NO production and mRNA expression of inducible NO synthase and cyclooxygenese-2 but upregulated SOD activity. Electrophoresis mobility shift assay revealed that CAF inhibited DNA-binding of NF-{kappa}B. CAF and phytosteryl ferulates probably have potentially anti-inflammatory properties.

  3. Anti-inflammatory effects of the hydroxycarboxylic acid receptor 2.

    PubMed

    Graff, Emily C; Fang, Han; Wanders, Desiree; Judd, Robert L

    2016-02-01

    The hydroxycarboxylic acid receptors (HCA1-3) are a family of G-protein-coupled receptors that are critical for sensing endogenous intermediates of metabolism. All three receptors are predominantly expressed on adipocytes and mediate anti-lipolytic effects. In addition to adipocytes, HCA2 is highly expressed on immune cells, including macrophages, monocytes, neutrophils and dermal dendritic cells, among other cell types. The endogenous ligand for HCA2 is beta-hydroxybutyrate (β-OHB), a ketone body produced by the liver through β-oxidation when an individual is in a negative energy balance. Recent studies demonstrate that HCA2 mediates profound anti-inflammatory effects in a variety of tissues, indicating that HCA2 may be an important therapeutic target for treating inflammatory disease processes. This review summarizes the roles of HCA2 on inflammation in a number of tissues and clinical states. PMID:26773933

  4. Risk of stroke associated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ki; Bavry, Anthony A

    2014-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), both cyclooxygenase (COX)-2-selective and nonselective agents, have been associated with the increased risk of adverse cardiovascular events. The majority of studies have focused on myocardial infarction as the primary cardiovascular outcome. However, the association between NSAIDs and the risk of stroke events is not as clear, although an understanding of this association is important since stroke continues to be a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. Various factors may contribute to an association between NSAIDs and stroke, including hypertension and thrombosis. Additionally, the risk may vary with different NSAID types. In this review, we discuss the relevant literature assessing the possible association between NSAID use and stroke events, along with the potential mechanisms and the possible directions for future study. PMID:24421643

  5. Anti-inflammatory agents from plants: progress and potential.

    PubMed

    Recio, M C; Andujar, I; Rios, J L

    2012-01-01

    The identification of substances that can promote the resolution of inflammation in a way that is homeostatic, modulatory, efficient, and well-tolerated by the body is of fundamental importance. Traditional medicines have long provided front-line pharmacotherapy for many millions of people worldwide. Medicinal extracts are a rich source of therapeutic leads for the pharmaceutical industry. The use of medicinal plant therapies to treat chronic illness, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), is thus widespread and on the rise.The aim of this review is to present recent progress in clinical anti-inflammatory studies of plant extracts and compound leads such as green tea polyphenols, curcumin, resveratrol, boswellic acid, and cucurbitacins, among others, against chronic inflammatory diseases, mainly RA and IBD. In this context, the present paper also highlights the most promising experimental data on those plant extracts and pure compounds active in animal models of the aforementioned diseases. PMID:22414101

  6. Anti-inflammatory polyphenol constituents derived from Cissus pteroclada Hayata.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi-Jie; Xu, Cheng-Ting; Lin, Dan-Dan; Qin, Jiang-Ke; Ye, Gao-Jie; Deng, Qing-Hua

    2016-08-01

    A new bergenin derivative, bergenin-11-O-α-d-galactopyranoside (compound 1), together with seven known polyphenolic compounds, were isolated from the stem of Cissus pteroclada Hayata. The structures of the 8 compounds were elucidated by spectroscopic methods, including extensive 1D and 2D NMR techniques. Moreover, the in vitro anti-inflammatory effects of compounds (1-8) in LPS-stimulated murine macrophage RAW 264.7 cells were also investigated. Our results revealed that compound 1 inhibited the production of pro-inflammatory mediators NO and PGE2 and the expression of NF-κB, TNF-α, IL-1β, iNOS and COX-2. PMID:27374242

  7. Anti-Inflammatory and Immunomodulatory Mechanism of Tanshinone IIA for Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhuo

    2014-01-01

    Tanshinone IIA (Tan II A) is widely used in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases as an active component of Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge. It has been demonstrated to have pleiotropic effects for atherosclerosis. From the anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory mechanism perspective, this paper reviewed major progresses of Tan IIA in antiatherosclerosis research, including immune cells, antigens, cytokines, and cell signaling pathways. PMID:25525444

  8. Anti-inflammatory properties of quebecol and its derivatives.

    PubMed

    Cardinal, Sébastien; Azelmat, Jabrane; Grenier, Daniel; Voyer, Normand

    2016-01-15

    Herein we report our results on the anti-inflammatory activity of quebecol, a polyphenolic compound discovered in maple syrup. Bioassays demonstrated that quebecol has an anti-inflammatory effect on LPS-induced NF-κB activation and inhibits the secretion of two pro-inflammatory cytokines, IL-6 and TNF-α. We also prepared and tested precursors of quebecol and its derivatives corresponding to its substructures of interest, with the aim to study the structure-activity relationships. Comparing the results obtained for all tested compounds allowed the identification of the main moiety responsible for the anti-inflammatory activity of quebecol. PMID:26691759

  9. Cissus sicyoides: Pharmacological Mechanisms Involved in the Anti-Inflammatory and Antidiarrheal Activities

    PubMed Central

    Beserra, Fernando Pereira; de Cássia Santos, Raquel; Périco, Larissa Lucena; Rodrigues, Vinicius Peixoto; de Almeida Kiguti, Luiz Ricardo; Saldanha, Luiz Leonardo; Pupo, André Sampaio; da Rocha, Lúcia Regina Machado; Dokkedal, Anne Lígia; Vilegas, Wagner; Hiruma-Lima, Clélia Akiko

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the pharmacological mechanisms involved in anti-inflammatory and antidiarrheal actions of hydroalcoholic extract obtained from the leaves of Cissus sicyoides (HECS). The anti-inflammatory effect was evaluated by oral administration of HECS against acute model of edema induced by xylene, and the mechanisms of action were analysed by involvement of arachidonic acid (AA) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). The antidiarrheal effect of HECS was observed and we analyzed the motility and accumulation of intestinal fluid. We also analyzed the antidiarrheal mechanisms of action of HECS by evaluating the role of the opioid receptor, α2 adrenergic receptor, muscarinic receptor, nitric oxide (NO) and PGE2. The oral administration of HECS inhibited the edema induced by xylene and AA and was also able to significantly decrease the levels of PGE2. The extract also exhibited significant anti-diarrheal activity by reducing motility and intestinal fluid accumulation. This extract significantly reduced intestinal transit stimulated by muscarinic agonist and intestinal secretion induced by PGE2. Our data demonstrate that the mechanism of action involved in the anti-inflammatory effect of HECS is related to PGE2. The antidiarrheal effect of this extract may be mediated by inhibition of contraction by acting on the intestinal smooth muscle and/or intestinal transit. PMID:26805827

  10. Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Chitooligosaccharides in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, João C.; Spindola, Humberto; de Sousa, Vanessa; Santos-Silva, Alice; Pintado, Manuela E.; Malcata, Francisco Xavier; Carvalho, João E.

    2010-01-01

    All the reports to date on the anti-inflammatory activity of chitooligosaccharides (COS) are mostly based on in vitro methods. In this work, the anti-inflammatory activity of two COS mixtures is characterized in vivo (using balb/c mice), following the carrageenan-induced paw edema method. This is a widely accepted animal model of acute inflammation to evaluate the anti-inflammatory effect of drugs. Our data suggest that COS possess anti-inflammatory activity, which is dependent on dose and, at higher doses, also on the molecular weight. A single dose of 500 mg/kg b.w. weight may be suitable to treat acute inflammation cases; however, further studies are needed to ascertain the effect upon longer inflammation periods as well as studies upon the bioavailability of these compounds. PMID:20631868

  11. Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Delonix regia (Boj. Ex. Hook)

    PubMed Central

    Shewale, Vaishali D.; Deshmukh, Tushar A.; Patil, Liladhar S.; Patil, Vijay R.

    2012-01-01

    The present work was to evaluate the anti-inflammatory activity of Delonix regia leaves (Family: Caesalpiniaceae). The powder of Delonix regia leaves was subjected to extraction with ethanol in soxhlet extractor. The ethanol extract after preliminary phytochemical investigation showed the presence of sterols, triterpenoids, phenolic compounds and flavonoids. The anti-inflammatory activity was studied using carrageenan-induced rat paw edema and cotton pellet granuloma at a three different doses (100, 200, and 400 mg/kg b.w. p.o.) of ethanol extract. The ethanol extract of Delonix regia leaves was exhibited significant anti-inflammatory activity at the dose of 400 mg/kg in both models when compared with control group. Indomethacin (10 mg/kg b.w. p.o) was also shown significant anti-inflammatory activity in both models. PMID:22110490

  12. [The experience with the topical application of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents for the treatment of otitis media].

    PubMed

    Razvozzhaev, A A; Starodumova, T A; Nemstsveridze, E Ia

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to estimate the therapeutic efficacy and safety of the topically applied otinum ear drops. The authors present the results of the combined treatment of acute catarrhal otitis in the children with the use of choline salicilate (otinum). The study included 50 patients randomized into two identical groups. The children of group 1 received systemic therapy supplemented by the topical application of otinum, those in group 2 were prescribed a 3% alcoholic solution of boric acid. The study has demonstrated a significantly more pronounced positive dynamics of clinical conditions in the patients of group 1 compared with those of the control group. The total duration of therapy in the first group was 37.5% shorter than in the second. The results of the study confirmed the strong anti-inflammatory and analgesic action of choline salicilate. The pain was relieved within 7 minutes on the average after the application of this agent. It is concluded that otinum can be recommended for the introduction into combined therapy of acute catarrhal otitis media as an efficacious anti-inflammatory and analgetic drug. PMID:22810643

  13. The anti-inflammatory effect of Ilex paraguariensis A. St. Hil (Mate) in a murine model of pleurisy.

    PubMed

    Luz, Ana Beatriz Gobbo; da Silva, Carlos Henrique Blum; Nascimento, Marcus Vinicius P S; de Campos Facchin, Bruno Matheus; Baratto, Bruna; Fröde, Tânia Silvia; Reginatto, Flávio Henrique; Dalmarco, Eduardo Monguilhott

    2016-07-01

    Ilex paraguariensis is a native plant from Southern America, where it is used as a beverage. In traditional medicine, it is used to treat many diseases including inflammation. However, we do not yet know precisely how this effect occurs. We therefore evaluated its anti-inflammatory effect in a murine model of pleurisy. The standardized CE, BF and ARF fractions, Caf, Rut and CGA were able to reduce leukocyte migration, exudate concentration, MPO and ADA activities and NOx levels. Moreover, I. paraguariensis also inhibited the release of Th1/Th17 pro-inflammatory cytokines, while increasing IL-10 production and improving the histological architecture of inflamed lungs. In addition, its major compounds decreased p65 NF-κB phosphorylation. Based on our results, we can conclude that I. paraguariensis exerts its anti-inflammatory action by attenuating the Th1/Th17 polarization in this model. This fact suggests that the use of this plant as a beverage can protect against Th1/Th17 inflammatory diseases. PMID:27155392

  14. Antibacterial and Anti-inflammatory Activities of Ppc-1, Active Principle of the Cellular Slime Mold Polysphondylium pseudo-candidum.

    PubMed

    Azelmat, Jabrane; Fiorito, Serena; Genovese, Salvatore; Epifano, Francesco; Grenier, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The diisopentenyloxy quinolobactin derivative 3-methylbut-2-enyl-4-methoxy-8-[(3-methylbut-2-enyl)oxy] quinoline-2-carboxylate, also named as Ppc-1, has been initially isolated from the fruiting bodies of the cellular slime mold Polysphondylium pseudo-candidum. Given that few data are available in the literature concerning the biological properties of this compound, this study was undertaken to evaluate its antibacterial and anti-inflammatory properties. Ppc-1 exerted antibacterial activity on the Gram negative periodontopathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis, while it had no such effect on the other bacterial species tested. The antibacterial activity of Ppc-1 appeared to result from its ability to permeate the cell membrane. Using the U937-3xκB-LUC human monocytic cell line, Ppc-1 was found to dose-dependently inhibit the lipopolysaccharide-induced NF-κB activation, a signaling pathway that has been associated with inflammatory mediator secretion. In conclusion, Ppc-1, by exhibiting a dual mode of action including antibacterial and anti-inflammatory activities, may represent a promising targeted therapeutic agent for periodontal diseases. PMID:25925558

  15. Analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of a fraction rich in gaultherin isolated from Gaultheria yunnanensis (FRANCH.) REHDER.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bin; Li, Jian-Bei; Zhang, Dong-Ming; Ding, Yi; Du, Guan-Hua

    2007-03-01

    The analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of a salicylate derivatives fraction (SDF) isolated from Gaultheria yunnanensis (FRANCH.) REHDER and the mechanisms of actions were investigated in the present study. The major constituent of SDF, which represented around 50% of this fraction, was a methyl salicylate diglycoside named gaultherin. SDF showed a significant inhibition on the hind paw edema in rats (200, 400 mg/kg body wt., p.o.) and ear swelling in mice (200, 400, 800 mg/kg body wt., p.o.) caused by carrageenin and croton oil, respectively. In addition, SDF (400, 800 mg/kg body wt., p.o.) inhibited only the second phase (inflammatory) in the formalin test, and showed no effect in the hot-plate test in mice. The antinociceptive activity of SDF was predominantly peripheral and independent of the opioid system. These findings demonstrate that SDF from Gaultheria yunnanensis (FRANCH.) REHDER possesses analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities, which may be mediated, at least partly, through the suppression of inflammatory mediators or their release suggested by the animal experiment. The observed effects of SDF are probably due to the presence of high content of salicylate derivatives (80%), including gaultherin, MSTG-A and MSTG-B. PMID:17329839

  16. Traumeel – an emerging option to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in the management of acute musculoskeletal injuries

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Musculoskeletal injuries are on the rise. First-line management of such injuries usually employs the RICE (rest, ice, compression, and elevation) approach to limit excessive inflammation. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are also commonly used to limit inflammation and to control pain. Traumeel®, a preparation with bioregulatory effects is also used to treat the symptoms associated with acute musculoskeletal injuries, including pain and swelling. Traumeel is a fixed combination of biological and mineral extracts, which aims to apply stimuli to multiple targets to restore normal functioning of regulatory mechanisms. This paper presents the accumulating evidence of Traumeel’s action on the inflammatory process, and of its efficacy and tolerability in randomized trials, as well as observational and surveillance studies for the treatment of musculoskeletal injuries. Traumeel has shown comparable effectiveness to NSAIDs in terms of reducing symptoms of inflammation, accelerating recovery, and improving mobility, with a favorable safety profile. While continued research and development is ongoing to broaden the clinical evidence of Traumeel in acute musculoskeletal injury and to further establish its benefits, current information suggests that Traumeel may be considered as an anti-inflammatory agent that is at least as effective and appears to be better tolerated than NSAIDs. PMID:21556350

  17. Comparative topical anti-inflammatory activity of cannabinoids and cannabivarins.

    PubMed

    Tubaro, Aurelia; Giangaspero, Anna; Sosa, Silvio; Negri, Roberto; Grassi, Gianpaolo; Casano, Salvatore; Della Loggia, Roberto; Appendino, Giovanni

    2010-10-01

    A selection of seven phytocannabinoids representative of the major structural types of classic cannabinoids and their corresponding cannabivarins was investigated for in vivo topical anti-inflammatory activity in the Croton oil mouse ear dermatitis assay. Differences in the terpenoid moiety were far more important for anti-inflammatory activity than those at the C-3 alkyl residue, suggesting the involvement not only of cannabinoid receptors, but also of other inflammatory end-points targeted by phytocannabinoids. PMID:20450962

  18. Synthesis and anti-inflammatory activity of aromatic glucosinolates.

    PubMed

    Vo, Quan V; Trenerry, Craige; Rochfort, Simone; Wadeson, Jenny; Leyton, Carolina; Hughes, Andrew B

    2013-10-01

    Aromatic GLs are important members of the glucosinolate family of compounds because of their potential biological activity and medicinal properties. This study has shown success in the high yielding synthesis of some important aromatic GLs as well as the results of testing for anti-inflammatory properties of the synthetic GLs. 3,4-Dimethoxyphenylglucosinolate was found to be the most active anti-inflammatory of the seven glucosinolates assayed. PMID:23978357

  19. Inhibition of amyloidogenesis by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and their hybrid nitrates

    PubMed Central

    Schiefer, Isaac T.; Abdul-Hay, Samer; Wang, Huali; Vanni, Michael; Qin, Zhihui; Thatcher, Gregory R. J.

    2011-01-01

    Poor blood-brain barrier penetration of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) has been blamed for the failure of the selective amyloid lowering agent (SALA) R-flurbiprofen in phase 3 clinical trials for Alzheimer’s disease (AD). NO-donor NSAIDs (NO-NSAIDs) provide an alternative, gastric-sparing approach to NSAID SALAs, which may improve bioavailability. NSAID analogs were studied for anti-inflammatory activity and for SALA activity in N2a neuronal cells transfected with human amyloid precursor protein (APP). Flurbiprofen (1) analogs were obtained with enhanced anti-inflammatory and anti-amyloidogenic properties compared to 1, however, esterification led to elevated Aβ1–42 levels. Hybrid nitrate prodrugs possessed superior anti-inflammatory activity and reduced toxicity relative to the parent NSAIDs, including clinical candidate, CHF5074. Although hybrid nitrates elevated Aβ1–42 at higher concentration, SALA activity was observed at low concentrations (≤ 1 µM): both Aβ1–42 and the ratio of Aβ1–42/Aβ1–40 were lowered. This biphasic SALA activity was attributed to the intact nitrate drug. For several compounds the selective modulation of amyloidogenesis was tested using an immunoprecipitation MALDI-TOF approach. These data support the development of NO-NSAIDs as an alternative approach towards a clinically useful SALA. PMID:21405086

  20. A Review on the Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Pomegranate in the Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Colombo, Elisa; Sangiovanni, Enrico; Dell'Agli, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Several biological activities of pomegranate have been widely described in the literature, but the anti-inflammatory effect in the gastrointestinal tract has not been reviewed till now. The aim of the present paper is to summarize the evidence for or against the efficacy of pomegranate for coping with inflammatory conditions of the gastro-intestinal tract. The paper has been organized in three parts: (1) the first one is devoted to the modifications of pomegranate active compounds in the gastro-intestinal tract; (2) the second one considering the literature regarding the anti-inflammatory effect of pomegranate at gastric level; (3) the third part considers the anti-inflammatory effect of pomegranate in the gut. In vivo studies performed on the whole fruit or juice, peel, and flowers demonstrate antiulcer effect in a variety of animal models. Ellagic acid was the main responsible for this effect, although other individual ellagitannins could contribute to the biological activity of the mixture. Different preparations of pomegranate, including extracts from peels, flowers, seeds, and juice, show a significant anti-inflammatory activity in the gut. No clinical studies have been found, thus suggesting that future clinical studies are necessary to clarify the beneficial effects of pomegranate in the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:23573120

  1. AP-1/IRF-3 Targeted Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Andrographolide Isolated from Andrographis paniculata.

    PubMed

    Shen, Ting; Yang, Woo Seok; Yi, Young-Su; Sung, Gi-Ho; Rhee, Man Hee; Poo, Haryoung; Kim, Mi-Yeon; Kim, Kyung-Woon; Kim, Jong Heon; Cho, Jae Youl

    2013-01-01

    Andrographolide (AG) is an abundant component of plants of the genus Andrographis and has a number of beneficial properties including neuroprotective, anticancer, anti-inflammatory, and antidiabetic effects. Despite numerous pharmacological studies, the precise mechanism of AG is still ambiguous. Thus, in the present study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms of AG and its target proteins as they pertain to anti-inflammatory responses. AG suppressed the production of nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), as well as the mRNA abundance of inducible NO synthase (iNOS), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF- α ), cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, and interferon-beta (IFN- β ) in a dose-dependent manner in both lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) activated RAW264.7 cells and peritoneal macrophages. AG also substantially ameliorated the symptoms of LPS-induced hepatitis and EtOH/HCl-induced gastritis in mice. Based on the results of luciferase reporter gene assays, kinase assays, and measurement of nuclear levels of transcription factors, the anti-inflammatory effects of AG were found to be clearly mediated by inhibition of both (1) extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)/activator protein (AP)-1 and (2) I κ B kinase ε (IKK ε )/interferon regulatory factor (IRF)-3 pathways. In conclusion, we detected a novel molecular signaling pathway by which AG can suppress inflammatory responses. Thus, AG is a promising anti-inflammatory drug with two pharmacological targets. PMID:23840248

  2. [Anti-inflammatory effects of methylprednisolone aceponate in animals].

    PubMed

    Ikoma, Y; Yamashita, M; Kamitani, K; Nakagawa, H

    1991-11-01

    In the case of dermal application of the drugs to croton oil-induced ear edema in rats and picryl chloride-induced delayed type hypersensitivity in mice, the anti-inflammatory effect of methylprednisolone aceponate (MPA) was slightly weaker than those of clobetasol 17-propionate and diflucortolone 21-valerate, but stronger than those of hydrocortisone 17-butyrate and hydrocortisone 17-butyrate 21-propionate. Betamethasone 17-valerate applied dermally was less and more effective than MPA to ear edema in rats and delayed type hypersensitivity in mice, respectively. The anti-inflammatory effect of MPA was weaker in subcutaneous administration than in topical application to the two inflammatory models. It was suggested that MPA has strong anti-inflammatory effects and weak systemic effects by topical application. Methylprednisolone 17-propionate (MP-17P) and methylprednisolone (MP), unesterified in only the C-21 position and in both the C-17 and 21 positions of MPA, respectively, showed weaker anti-inflammatory activities than MPA by topical application to croton oil-induced ear edema. The ratio of the anti-inflammatory effects by topical application to subcutaneous administration of MPA was higher than those of MP-17P and MP. The excellent characteristics of MPA as a dermal anti-inflammatory drug are suggested to be derived from di-esterification of MP, which has a weak activity intrinsically. PMID:1813371

  3. Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory-Organometallic Anticancer Compounds.

    PubMed

    Păunescu, Emilia; McArthur, Sarah; Soudani, Mylène; Scopelliti, Rosario; Dyson, Paul J

    2016-02-15

    Compounds that combine metal-based drugs with covalently linked targeted organic agents have been shown, in some instances, to exhibit superior anticancer properties compared to the individual counterparts. Within this framework, we prepared a series of organometallic ruthenium(II)- and osmium(II)-p-cymene complexes modified with the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) indomethacin and diclofenac. The NSAIDs are attached to the organometallic moieties via monodentate (pyridine/phosphine) or bidentate (bipyridine) ligands, affording piano-stool Ru(II) and Os(II) arene complexes of general formula [M(η(6)-p-cymene)Cl2(N)], where N is a pyridine-based ligand, {2-(2-(1-(4-chlorobenzoyl)-5-methoxy-2-methyl-1H-indol-3-yl)acetoxy)ethyl-3-(pyridin-3-yl)propanoate} or {2-(2-(2-((2,6-dichlorophenyl)amino)phenyl)acetoxy)ethyl-3-(pyridin-3-yl)propanoate}, [M(η(6)-p-cymene)Cl2(P)], where P is a phosphine ligand, {2-(2-(1-(4-chlorobenzoyl)-5-methoxy-2-methyl-1H-indol-3-yl)acetoxy)ethyl-4-(diphenylphosphanyl)benzoate} or {2-(2-(2-((2,6-dichlorophenyl)amino)phenyl)acetoxy)ethyl-4-(diphenylphosphanyl)benzoate, and [M(η(6)-p-cymene)Cl(N,N')][Cl], where N,N' is a bipyridine-based ligand, (4'-methyl-[2,2'-bipyridin]-4-yl)methyl-2-(1-(4-chlorobenzoyl)-5-methoxy-2-methyl-1H-indol-3-yl)acetate), (4'-methyl-[2,2'-bipyridin]-4-yl)methyl-2-(2-((2,6-dichlorophenyl)amino)phenyl)acetate), (bis(2-(2-(1-(4-chlorobenzoyl)-5-methoxy-2-methyl-1H-indol-3-yl)acetoxy)ethyl)[2,2'-bipyridine]-5,5'-dicarboxylate), or (bis(2-(2-(2-((2,6-dichlorophenyl)amino)phenyl)acetoxy)ethyl)[2,2'-bipyridine]-5,5'-dicarboxylate). The antiproliferative properties of the complexes were assessed in human ovarian cancer cells (A2780 and A2780cisR, the latter being resistant to cisplatin) and nontumorigenic human embryonic kidney (HEK-293) cells. Some of the complexes are considerably more cytotoxic than the original drugs and also display significant cancer cell selectivity. PMID:26824462

  4. Anti-Inflammatory and Antinociceptive Activities of a Hydroethanolic Extract of Tamarindus indica Leaves.

    PubMed

    Bhadoriya, Santosh Singh; Mishra, Vijay; Raut, Sushil; Ganeshpurkar, Aditya; Jain, Sunil K

    2012-09-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive potential of a hydroethanolic extract of Tamarindus indica L. leaves (HTI) along with its possible mode of action. The anti-inflammatory activity of HTI was estimated by carrageenan-induced hind paw oedema in male Wistar albino rats. Furthermore, HTI was assessed to determine its effects on membrane stabilization. The antinociceptive action was determined by acetic acid-induced writhing, tail-flick, and the hot plate model. Oral administration of HTI at the dose of 500, 750, and 1000 mg/kg body weight produced significant (P< 0.01) anti-inflammatory as well as antinociceptive actions in a dose-dependent manner. Among all tested doses, 1000 mg/kg, p. o. reduced carrageenan-induced rat paw oedema at 1, 2, 3, and 4 h. Moreover, the 1000 mg/kg dose exhibited maximum percentage inhibition of acetic acid-induced writhing (48.9%), whereas standard drug diclofenac (25 mg/kg, p. o.) showed maximum inhibition (50.9%) of writhing. In the hot plate model, HTI (1000 mg/kg, orally) increased mean basal reaction time after 120 min (7.12±0.05 sec). In the tail flick model, HTI increased the maximum percentage of latency (36.06%), whereas the standard drug pethidine (4 mg/kg, intraperitoneally) showed maximum percentage of latency (43.85%) after 60 min. The findings of the present study supported anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive claims of T. indica as were mentioned in Indian traditional and folklore practices. PMID:23008815

  5. Anti-Inflammatory and Antinociceptive Activities of a Hydroethanolic Extract of Tamarindus indica Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Bhadoriya, Santosh Singh; Mishra, Vijay; Raut, Sushil; Ganeshpurkar, Aditya; Jain, Sunil K.

    2012-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive potential of a hydroethanolic extract of Tamarindus indica L. leaves (HTI) along with its possible mode of action. The anti-inflammatory activity of HTI was estimated by carrageenan-induced hind paw oedema in male Wistar albino rats. Furthermore, HTI was assessed to determine its effects on membrane stabilization. The antinociceptive action was determined by acetic acid-induced writhing, tail-flick, and the hot plate model. Oral administration of HTI at the dose of 500, 750, and 1000 mg/kg body weight produced significant (P< 0.01) anti-inflammatory as well as antinociceptive actions in a dose-dependent manner. Among all tested doses, 1000 mg/kg, p. o. reduced carrageenan-induced rat paw oedema at 1, 2, 3, and 4 h. Moreover, the 1000 mg/kg dose exhibited maximum percentage inhibition of acetic acid-induced writhing (48.9%), whereas standard drug diclofenac (25 mg/kg, p. o.) showed maximum inhibition (50.9%) of writhing. In the hot plate model, HTI (1000 mg/kg, orally) increased mean basal reaction time after 120 min (7.12±0.05 sec). In the tail flick model, HTI increased the maximum percentage of latency (36.06%), whereas the standard drug pethidine (4 mg/kg, intraperitoneally) showed maximum percentage of latency (43.85%) after 60 min. The findings of the present study supported anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive claims of T. indica as were mentioned in Indian traditional and folklore practices. PMID:23008815

  6. Cerebral analgesic response to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug ibuprofen.

    PubMed

    Hodkinson, Duncan J; Khawaja, Nadine; OʼDaly, Owen; Thacker, Michael A; Zelaya, Fernando O; Wooldridge, Caroline L; Renton, Tara F; Williams, Steven C R; Howard, Matthew A

    2015-07-01

    Nonopioid agents, such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), are the most commonly used class of analgesics. Increasing evidence suggests that cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibition at both peripheral and central sites can contribute to the antihyperalgesic effects of NSAIDs, with the predominant clinical effect being mediated centrally. In this study, we examined the cerebral response to ibuprofen in presurgical and postsurgical states and looked at the analgesic interaction between surgical state and treatment. We used an established clinical pain model involving third molar extraction, and quantitative arterial spin labelling (ASL) imaging to measure changes in tonic/ongoing neural activity. Concurrent to the ASL scans, we presented visual analogue scales inside the scanner to evaluate the subjective experience of pain. This novel methodology was incorporated into a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled design, with an open method of drug administration. We found that independent of its antinociceptive action, ibuprofen has no effect on regional cerebral blood flow under pain-free conditions (presurgery). However, in the postsurgical state, we observed increased activation of top-down modulatory circuits, which was accompanied by decreases in the areas engaged because of ongoing pain. Our findings demonstrate that ibuprofen has a measurable analgesic response in the human brain, with the subjective effects of pain relief reflected in two distinct brain networks. The observed activation of descending modulatory circuits warrants further investigation, as this may provide new insights into the inhibitory mechanisms of analgesia that might be exploited to improve safety and efficacy in pain management. PMID:25851460

  7. Immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory effects of chondroitin sulphate

    PubMed Central

    du Souich, Patrick; García, Antonio G; Vergés, Josep; Montell, Eulàlia

    2009-01-01

    Chondroitin sulphate (CS) is a natural glycosaminoglycan present in the extracellular matrix and is formed by the 1–3 linkage of D-glucuronic acid to N-acetylgalactosamine. In chondrocytes, CS diminishes interleukin-1 p (IL-1p)-induced increases in p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38MAPK) and signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (Erk1/2) phosphorylation, and decreases nuclear factor-KB (NF-kB) nuclear translocation and as a consequence, reduces the formation of pro-inflammatory cytokines, IL-1 p and TNF-a, and pro-inflammatory enzymes, such as phospholipase A2 (PLA2), cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) and nitric oxide synthase-2 (NOS-2). The mechanism of action of CS explains its beneficial effect on the cartilage, synovial membrane and subchondral bone. On the other hand, in vivo, CS given orally prevents hepatic NF-κB nuclear translocation, suggesting that systemic CS may elicit an anti-inflammatory effect in many tissues besides the articulation. There is preliminary evidence showing that in human beings, CS may be of benefit in other diseases where inflammation is an essential marker, such as psoriasis and atherosclerosis. The review of the literature suggest that CS might also be of interest for the treatment of other diseases with an inflammatory and/or autoimmune character, such as inflammatory bowel disease, degenerative diseases of the central nervous system and stroke, multiple sclerosis and other autoimmune diseases. PMID:19522843

  8. Effects of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on microvascular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Slater, C; House, S D

    1993-03-01

    Techniques of intravital microscopy were used to assess the effect of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), indomethacin and ibuprofen, on the microcirculation. Hemodynamics in venules of the rat mesentery were studied in terms of vessel diameter, red blood cell velocity, and leukocyte-endothelium interactions: leukocyte-endothelium adhesion (LEA), white blood cell (WBC) marginating flux, and WBC velocity. Measurements were made during (1) control conditions (topical suffusion with ringer-gelatin drip), (2) topically suffused indomethacin or ibuprofen, (3) an induced inflammatory response (suffusion with the chemoattractant N-Formyl-Methionyl-Leucyl-Phenylalanine (FMLP)), and (4) concomitant suffusion with FMLP and NSAID. Short term topical suffusion (90 sec) with indomethacin and ibuprofen had little or no effect on control hemodynamics. Five-minute suffusions with indomethacin (5 x 10(-5) to 5 x 10(-4) M) significantly increased LEA while ibuprofen (5 x 10(-3) M) significantly decreased LEA. Topical suffusion with the chemotactic agent FMLP induced inflammation and significantly increased LEA in venules. Treatment with indomethacin during induced inflammation had no effect on the inflammatory reaction in terms of the microvascular hemodynamics measured in this study. Treatment with ibuprofen during induced inflammation significantly reduced LEA and increased red blood cell velocity. In conclusion, although both of the NSAIDs studied here are known to block the cyclooxygenase pathway of arachidonic acid metabolism, the actions of indomethacin and ibuprofen on the inflammatory process are very different with an important effect of ibuprofen being to decrease LEA. PMID:8361400

  9. Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drug Hypersensitivity in Preschool Children

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Although extensively studied in adults, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) hypersensitivity in children, especially in young children, remains poorly defined. Pediatricians, prescribing antipyretics for children, rarely encounter significant problems, but the few epidemiologic studies performed show conflicting results. Although it is clear that some patients with acetylsalicylic acid (ASA)-sensitive asthma have their clinical onset of disease in childhood and bronchoconstriction after ASA challenge is seen in 0 to 22% of asthmatic children so challenged, ibuprofen at antipyretic doses may cause acute respiratory problems only in a very small number of mild to moderate asthmatics. The recently elucidated mechanism of action of acetaminophen may explain some occurrences of adverse reactions in patients with cross-reactive NSAID hypersensitivity on the basis of its inhibitory activity on the newly described enzyme, cyclooxygenase (COX)-3. This nonspecific sensitivity to inhibition of COX is most likely genetically determined and shows a remarkable association with atopic disease even in the very young age group and possibly an increased predilection in specific ethnic groups. This review summarizes state-of-the-art published data on NSAID hypersensitivity in preschool children. PMID:20525116

  10. Development and mechanism investigation of a new piperlongumine derivative as a potent anti-inflammatory agent.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lan-Di; Wang, Fu; Dai, Fang; Wang, Yi-Hua; Lin, Dong; Zhou, Bo

    2015-06-01

    Inflammation, especially chronic inflammation, is directly involvement in the pathogenesis of many diseases including cancer. An effective approach for managing inflammation is to employ chemicals to block activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), a key regulator for inflammatory processes. Piperlongumine (piplartine, PL), an electrophilic molecule isolated from Piper longum L., possesses excellent anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory properties. In this study, a new PL analogue (PL-0N) was designed by replacing nitrogen atom of lactam in PL with carbon atom to increase its electrophilicity and thus anti-inflammatory activity. It was found that PL-0N is more potent than the parent compound in suppressing lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced secretion of nitric oxide and prostaglandin E2 as well as expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 in RAW264.7 macrophages. Mechanistic investigation implies that PL-0N exerts anti-inflammatory activity through inhibition of LPS-induced NF-κB transduction pathway, down-regulation of LPS-induced MAPKs activation and impairment of proteasomal activity, but also enhancement of LPS-induced autophagy; the inhibition of NF-κB by PL-0N is achieved at various stages by: (i) preventing phosphorylation of IKKα/β, (ii) stabilizing the suppressor protein IκBα, (iii) interfering with the nuclear translocation of NF-κB, and (iv) inhibiting the DNA-binding of NF-κB. These data indicate that nitrogen-atom-lacking pattern is a successful strategy to improve anti-inflammatory property of PL, and that the novel molecule, PL-0N may be served as a promising lead for developing natural product-directed anti-inflammatory agents. PMID:25850000

  11. Analgesic, anti-inflammatory and anti-pyretic activities of Caesalpinia decapetala

    PubMed Central

    Parveen, Amna; Sajid Hamid Akash, Muhammad; Rehman, Kanwal; Mahmood, Qaisar; Qadir, Muhammad Imran

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: In many pathological conditions, pain, inflammation and fever are interdependent to each other. Due to the use of synthetic drugs, many unwanted effects usually appear. Various studies have been conducted on Caesalpinia decapetala (C. decapetala) to evaluate its effects in the treatment of various diseases but no sufficient scientific literature is available online to prove its analgesic, anti-inflammatory and anti-pyretic activities. Methods: The analgesic, anti-inflammatory and anti-pyretic activities of 70% aqueous methanolic and n-hexane extracts of C. decapetala was evaluated using Swiss albino mice (20-30 g). Results: The results showed that aqueous methanolic extract of C. decapetala at the dose of 100 mg/kg exhibited significant (p< 0.05) activities in various pain models including acetic acid-induced writhing (18.4 ± 0.53), formalin-induced licking (275 ± 4.18) and hot plate method (2.3 ± 0.0328); whereas,  n-hexane extract showed its effects in acetic acid-induced writhing (20 ± 0.31), formalin-induced licking (293 ± 1.20) and hot plate method (2.224 ± 0.029) compared to the effects observed in control group animals. Similarly, the aqueous methanolic extract of C. decapetala after 2 h of treatment exhibited more significant anti-inflammatory (0.66 ± 0.06) and anti-pyretic (38.81 ± 0.05) activities compared to the control group animals. Conclusion: From the findings of our present study, we concluded that the aqueous methanolic extract of C. decapetala has stronger analgesic, anti-inflammatory and anti-pyretic effects than its n-hexane extract. Further studies are required to investigate the active constituents of C. decapetala that exhibit analgesic, anti-inflammatory and anti-pyretic activities. PMID:24790898

  12. Repositioning drugs for inflammatory disease – fishing for new anti-inflammatory agents

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Christopher J.; Wicker, Sophie M.; Chien, An-Tzu; Tromp, Alisha; Lawrence, Lisa M.; Sun, Xueying; Krissansen, Geoffrey W.; Crosier, Kathryn E.; Crosier, Philip S.

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation is an important and appropriate host response to infection or injury. However, dysregulation of this response, with resulting persistent or inappropriate inflammation, underlies a broad range of pathological processes, from inflammatory dermatoses to type 2 diabetes and cancer. As such, identifying new drugs to suppress inflammation is an area of intense interest. Despite notable successes, there still exists an unmet need for new effective therapeutic approaches to treat inflammation. Traditional drug discovery, including structure-based drug design, have largely fallen short of satisfying this unmet need. With faster development times and reduced safety and pharmacokinetic uncertainty, drug repositioning – the process of finding new uses for existing drugs – is emerging as an alternative strategy to traditional drug design that promises an improved risk-reward trade-off. Using a zebrafish in vivo neutrophil migration assay, we undertook a drug repositioning screen to identify unknown anti-inflammatory activities for known drugs. By interrogating a library of 1280 approved drugs for their ability to suppress the recruitment of neutrophils to tail fin injury, we identified a number of drugs with significant anti-inflammatory activity that have not previously been characterized as general anti-inflammatories. Importantly, we reveal that the ten most potent repositioned drugs from our zebrafish screen displayed conserved anti-inflammatory activity in a mouse model of skin inflammation (atopic dermatitis). This study provides compelling evidence that exploiting the zebrafish as an in vivo drug repositioning platform holds promise as a strategy to reveal new anti-inflammatory activities for existing drugs. PMID:25038060

  13. Anti-inflammatory effects of methoxyphenolic compounds on human airway cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The respiratory epithelium plays a central role in the inflammatory response in asthma and other diseases. Methoxyphenolic compounds are purported to be effective anti-inflammatory agents, but their effects on the airway epithelium have not been well characterized. Methods Human airway cells were stimulated with TNF-α in the presence or absence of 4-substituted methoxyphenols and resveratrol. The expression of various cytokines was measured by qPCR, ELISAs, and protein arrays. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was measured with a reactive fluorescent probe (3',6'-diacetate-2',7'-dichlorofluorescein). Activation of NF-κB was measured by nuclear translocation and phosphorylation. Ribonuclear protein association with mRNA was assessed with a biotin-RNA affinity isolation assay. Results Multiple inflammatory mediators were inhibited by methoxyphenols, including: CCL2, CCL5, IL-6, IL-8, ICAM-1, MIF, CXCL1, CXCL10, and Serpin E1. IC50 values were obtained for each compound that showed significant anti-inflammatory activity: diapocynin (20.3 μM), resveratrol (42.7 μM), 2-methoxyhydroquinone (64.3 μM), apocynin (146.6 μM), and 4-amino-2-methoxyphenol (410 μM). The anti-inflammatory activity did not correlate with inhibition of reactive oxygen species production or NF-κB activation. However, methoxyphenols inhibited binding of the RNA-binding protein HuR to mRNA, indicating that they may act post-transcriptionally. Conclusions Methoxyphenols demonstrate anti-inflammatory activity in human airway cells. More potent compounds that act via similar mechanisms may have therapeutic potential as novel anti-inflammatory agents. PMID:22414048

  14. An Overview Of The Physiology And Pharmacology Of Aspirin And Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Koester, Michael C.

    1993-01-01

    In this article, I present an overview of the actions and effects of aspirin and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Although athletic trainers cannot prescribe or dispense prescription medications, they should be as aware of their effects as they are of other methods of injury treatment. To set the discussion in proper perspective, the inflammatory process and its mediators are reviewed briefly. The eicosanoids are a family of very active chemicals, which include: the prostaglandins, thromboxane, and the leukotrienes. They affect inflammation as well as numerous other body processes. Ingesting aspirin and NSAIDs blocks the production of prostaglandins and thromboxane, resulting in desired and undesired effects. The NSAIDs were developed to have the same action as aspirin, but with fewer adverse side effects. Many NSAIDs are currently available, and the decision as to which agent to use depends upon various factors. Surprisingly, recent studies suggest that some NSAIDs may hinder the healing process. Although not a NSAID, acetaminophen has many important clinical uses. Armed with an understanding of how these drugs act, and their potentially harmful aspects, the athletic trainer can assist the team physician in designing an aspirin- or NSAID-therapy regimen. PMID:16558240

  15. Effects of some nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents on experimental radiation pneumonitis

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, N.J.; Holloway, N.O.; Narine, K.R. )

    1991-09-01

    Corticosteroids have previously been found to be protective against the mortality of radiation pneumonitis in mice, even when given well after lethal lung irradiation. The authors explored the possibility that this effect was due to their well-known anti-inflammatory actions by giving various nonsteroidal inhibitors of arachidonate metabolism to groups of mice that had received 19 Gy to the thorax (bilaterally). Treatments of four cyclooxygenase inhibitors, one lipoxygenase inhibitor, and one leukotriene receptor antagonist, given by various routes in various doses, were commenced 10 weeks after irradiation or sham irradiation and continued throughout the period when death from radiation pneumonitis occurs, 11-26 weeks after irradiation. Each of the treatments had the appropriate effect on arachidonate metabolism in the lungs as assessed by LTB4 and PGE2 levels in lung lavage fluid. The principal end point was mortality. The 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor diethylcarbamazine and the LTD4/LTE4 receptor antagonist LY 171883 markedly reduced mortality in dose-response fashion. The effects of cyclooxygenase inhibitors were divergent; piroxicam and ibuprofen were marginally protective, indomethacin in all doses accelerated mortality, and aspirin reduced mortality in a dose-response fashion. These results suggest that the protective effect of corticosteroids in radiation pneumonitis can be tentatively attributed to their anti-inflammatory actions, and that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents, particularly those that affect lipoxygenase products, may offer equal or better protection than corticosteroids against mortality due to radiation pneumonitis.

  16. Evaluation of Anti-Nociceptive and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of a Heterofucan from Dictyota menstrualis

    PubMed Central

    Albuquerque, Ivan Rui Lopes; Cordeiro, Sara Lima; Gomes, Dayanne Lopes; Dreyfuss, Juliana Luporini; Filgueira, Luciana Guimarães Alves; Leite, Edda Lisboa; Nader, Helena Bonciani; Rocha, Hugo Alexandre Oliveira

    2013-01-01

    Fucan is a term that defines a family of homo- and hetero-polysaccharides containing sulfated l-fucose in its structure. In this work, a heterofucan (F2.0v) from the seaweed, Dictyota menstrualis, was evaluated as an antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory agent. F2.0v (20.0 mg/kg) inhibits 100% of leukocyte migration into the peritoneal cavity after chemical stimulation. However, F2.0v does not alter the expression of interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) and interleukin-6 (IL-6), as well as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). F2.0v (20.0 mg/kg) has peripheral antinociceptive activity with potency similar to dipyrone. On the other hand, it had no effect on pain response on the hot plate test. Confocal microscopy analysis and flow cytometry showed that F2.0v binds to the surface of leucocytes, which leads us to suggest that the mechanism of action of anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive F2.0v is related to its ability to inhibit the migration of leukocytes to the site of tissue injury. In summary, the data show that F2.0v compound has great potential as an antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory, and future studies will be performed to further characterize the mechanism of action of F2.0v. PMID:23917068

  17. Analgesic and Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Pinus roxburghii Sarg.

    PubMed Central

    Kaushik, Dhirender; Kumar, Ajay; Kaushik, Pawan; Rana, A. C.

    2012-01-01

    The Chir Pine, Pinus roxburghii, named after William Roxburgh, is a pine native to the Himalaya. Pinus roxburghii Sarg. (Pinaceae) is traditionally used for several medicinal purposes in India. As the oil of the plant is extensively used in number of herbal preparation for curing inflammatory disorders, the present study was undertaken to assess analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of its bark extract. Dried and crushed leaves of Pinus roxburghii Sarg. were defatted with petroleum ether and then extracted with alcohol. The alcoholic extract at the doses of 100 mg/kg, 300 mg/kg, and 500 mg/kg body weight was subjected to evaluation of analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities in experimental animal models. Analgesic activity was evaluated by acetic acid-induced writhing and tail immersion tests in Swiss albino mice; acute and chronic anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated by carrageenan-induced paw oedema and cotton pellet granuloma in Wistar albino rats. Diclofenac sodium and indomethacin were employed as reference drugs for analgesic and anti-inflammatory studies, respectively. In the present study, the alcoholic bark extract of Pinus roxburghii Sarg. demonstrated significant analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities in the tested models. PMID:22761611

  18. Anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects of Daphne retusa Hemsl.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiaojia; Jin, Huizi; Xu, Wenzheng; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Xiaohua; Yan, Shikai; Chen, Ming; Li, Jianqiang; Zhang, Wei-dong

    2008-10-30

    Daphne retusa Hemsl. belongs to the genus Daphne, a member of Thymelaeaceae family. The barks and stems of Daphne retusa are used as a folkloric medicine 'Zhu Shi Ma' in Western China because of its effects of detumescence and acesodyne. In this paper, we investigate the anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects of the 75% ethanol extract of the stems and barks of Daphne retusa and different fractions partitioned with petroleum ether, methylene chloride, ethyl acetate and n-butanol, respectively. The anti-inflammatory effects were evaluated using xylene-induced ear oedema in mice and carrageenan-induced paw oedema in rats, while the acetic acid-induced writhing test and hot-plate test as models for evaluating the centrally and peripherally analgesic activity. The results showed the plant has significant anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects (P<0.05-0.01). Meanwhile, the result of the acute toxicity test at which the MTD was above 5g/kg indicates that the plant extract is relatively safe in, and/or non-toxic to, mice. The findings of these experimental animal studies indicate that the Daphne retusa ethanol extract possesses anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties, and thus provide pharmacological support to folkloric, ethnomedical uses of 'Zhu shima' in the treatment and/of management of anti-inflammatory and painful conditions in China. PMID:18692124

  19. Modeling Natural Anti-Inflammatory Compounds by Molecular Topology

    PubMed Central

    Galvez-Llompart, María; Zanni, Riccardo; García-Domenech, Ramón

    2011-01-01

    One of the main pharmacological problems today in the treatment of chronic inflammation diseases consists of the fact that anti-inflammatory drugs usually exhibit side effects. The natural products offer a great hope in the identification of bioactive lead compounds and their development into drugs for treating inflammatory diseases. Computer-aided drug design has proved to be a very useful tool for discovering new drugs and, specifically, Molecular Topology has become a good technique for such a goal. A topological-mathematical model, obtained by linear discriminant analysis, has been developed for the search of new anti-inflammatory natural compounds. An external validation obtained with the remaining compounds (those not used in building up the model), has been carried out. Finally, a virtual screening on natural products was performed and 74 compounds showed actual anti-inflammatory activity. From them, 54 had been previously described as anti-inflammatory in the literature. This can be seen as a plus in the model validation and as a reinforcement of the role of Molecular Topology as an efficient tool for the discovery of new anti-inflammatory natural compounds. PMID:22272145

  20. Determination of Teloschistes flavicans (sw) norm anti-inflammatory activity

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Eugênia C.; da Silva, Nicácio H.; Santos, Renata Almeida; Sudário, Ana Patrícia Paiva; Rodrigues e Silva, Antonio Alfredo; de Sousa Maia, Maria Bernadete

    2010-01-01

    Background: Lichens produce a variety of substances that possesses pharmacological actions. However, rare products are submitted to rigorous scientific tests or have the risk potential or side effects evaluated. The lack of medical and sanitary control, absence of accurate botanical identification or purity certification, founded in diverse natural products, may represent great danger to population health. This work aimed to evaluate toxic effects and anti-inflammatory action in vivo of Teloschistes flavicans (Sw.) Norm. (TFN) unrefined extracts, as well as determinate its main constituents. Methods: The carrageenan induced paw edema and cotton pellet implant induced granuloma methods were utilized, besides a classic acute toxicity test. TFN acetone extract inhibited carrageenan paw edema on 60, 120, and 180 min (inhibition percentiles of 45.03%, 60.59% and 41.72%). Results: TFN ethereal (inhibition percentiles of 23.95% and 29.01%) and chloroform (inhibition percentiles of 28.8% and 22.04%) extracts inhibited edema on 120 and 180 min. None of the extract inhibited the granuloma development. None of the extract caused death or other acute toxicity signs. Vicanicine (60.26% in ethereal extract and 51.17% in acetone extract), parietine (9.60% in ethereal extract and 15.38% on second), falacinol (0.78% in ether and 14.95% in acetone) and very low concentration of falacinal (0.15% in ethereal extract and 3.32% in acetone extract) were detected in the medicine. Conclusions: The tested extracts have antiedematogenic activity, but are not effective on subchronic inflammation. The extracts do not present toxic effects in administered doses. PMID:21808568

  1. Colonic anastomoses and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed

    Slim, K; Joris, J; Beloeil, H

    2016-08-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) play an important role in the treatment of post-operative pain, particularly in the context of enhanced recovery after colorectal surgery. Several recent articles have suggested that NSAID may have a deleterious effect on colo-colic or colo-rectal anastomoses. The aim of this review is to analyze the evidence based on meta-analyses and cohort studies in the literature. A systematic review of clinical studies identified twelve studies including two meta-analyses and ten comparative cohort studies that included a large number of patients. The data in these studies are heterogeneous, often biased, and do not permit a formal recommendation based on a high level of evidence. The main conclusion of this review is that the balance of benefit vs. risk (analgesic effect/risk of anastomotic disruption) is acceptable; it appears (with a low level of evidence) that a prescription of NSAID for 48h after surgery may be recommended for elective colon surgery. Nevertheless, it is important to respect the specific contra-indications of NSAID and avoid post-operative NSAID use if there are risk factors for anastomotic leakage: advanced age, malnutrition, severe co-morbidities, intra-operative difficulties. PMID:27480526

  2. Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor drugs as potential novel anti-inflammatory and pro-resolution agents

    PubMed Central

    Leitch, AE; Haslett, C; Rossi, AG

    2009-01-01

    The cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor (CDKi) drugs such as R-roscovitine have emerged as potential anti-inflammatory, pharmacological agents that can influence the resolution of inflammation. Usually, once an inciting inflammatory stimulus has been eliminated, resolution proceeds by prompt, safe removal of dominant inflammatory cells. This is accomplished by programmed cell death (apoptosis) of prominent effector, inflammatory cells typified by the neutrophil. Apoptosis of neutrophils ensures that toxic neutrophil granule contents are securely packaged in apoptotic bodies and expedites phagocytosis by professional phagocytes such as macrophages. A panel of CDKi drugs have been shown to promote neutrophil apoptosis in a concentration- and time-dependent manner and the archetypal CDKi drug, R-roscovitine, overrides the anti-apoptotic effects of powerful survival factors [including lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF)]. Inflammatory cell longevity and survival signalling is integral to the inflammatory process and any putative anti-inflammatory agent must unravel a complex web of redundancy in order to be effective. CDKi drugs have also been demonstrated to have significant effects on other cell types including lymphocytes and fibroblasts indicating that they may have pleiotropic anti-inflammatory, pro-resolution activity. In keeping with this, CDKi drugs like R-roscovitine have been reported to be efficacious in resolving established animal models of neutrophil-dominant and lymphocyte-driven inflammation. However, the mechanism of action behind these powerful effects has not yet been fully elucidated. CDKs play an integral role in the regulation of the cell cycle but are also recognized as participants in processes such as apoptosis and transcriptional regulation. Neutrophils have functional CDKs, are transcriptionally active and demonstrate augmented apoptosis in response to CDKi drugs, while lymphocyte proliferation

  3. [Nonsteroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) and risk of cardiovascular events. Literature review and clinical implications].

    PubMed

    Temporelli, Pier Luigi; Zito, Giovanni Battista; Pedretti, Roberto Franco; Belisarii, Franceso Iachini; Putortí, Giuseppe; Faggiano, Pompilio

    2014-09-01

    Non steroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are largely used for treatment of acute and chronic pain, even for long periods of time (months or years). While it is known that their use is frequently associated with gastrointestinal damage, including major bleedings from peptic ulcer, the risk of cardiovascular events related to NSAID has received much less attention. However, there is a large body of evidence showing that NSAIDs (both "traditional", such as diclofenac or indobufen, and selective cyclooxygenase inhibitors, COX-2) are associated with a significant increase of risk of cardiovascular events, both fatal and nonfatal. Consequently, several options have been proposed for the treatment of pain, including the use of analgesic drugs with different mechanisms of action, such as the opiates. Of interest, the Italian Drug Agency (AIFA) published a few years ago a warning (Nota 66) on the careful prescription of NSAIDs in patients with overt heart disease, such as coronary artery disease and heart failure. Aim of this paper is to present the current status of knowledge on the proper use of NSAIDs and other analgesic drugs in the management of acute and chronic pain. PMID:26058269

  4. Hesperetin derivatives: Synthesis and anti-inflammatory activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qian-Qian; Shi, Jing-Bo; Chen, Chen; Huang, Cheng; Tang, Wen-Jian; Li, Jun

    2016-03-01

    Sixteen novel hesperetin derivatives containing Mannich base moiety were designed and synthesized and their anti-inflammatory activities were evaluated by inhibiting tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in mouse RAW264.7 macrophages. Compounds 3a-3k showed better hydrophilic, while compounds 3l-3p with aromatic groups was hydrophobic. The anti-inflammatory activity of title compounds was correlated with logP values, among them, compounds 3c, 3e and 3i with minus logP values exhibited best anti-inflammatory activity through decreasing both IL-6 and TNF-α. Furthermore, the expression of LPS-induced notch1 and inos was reduced by compounds 3c, 3e, and 3i, and compound 3e attenuated LPS-induced inos protein levels in a dose-dependent manner. PMID:26848111

  5. Animal Models as Tools to Investigate Antidiabetic and Anti-Inflammatory Plants

    PubMed Central

    Eddouks, Mohamed; Chattopadhyay, Debprasad; Zeggwagh, Naoufel Ali

    2012-01-01

    Plants have been historically used for diabetes treatment and related anti-inflammatory activity throughout the world; few of them have been validated by scientific criteria. Recently, a large diversity of animal models has been developed for better understanding the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus and its underlying inflammatory mechanism and new drugs have been introduced in the market to treat this disease. The aim of this work is to review the available animal models of diabetes and anti-inflammatory activity along with some in vitro models which have been used as tools to investigate the mechanism of action of drugs with potential antidiabetic properties and related anti-inflammatory mechanism. At present, the rigorous procedures for evaluation of conventional antidiabetic medicines have rarely been applied to test raw plant materials used as traditional treatments for diabetes; and natural products, mainly derived from plants, have been tested in chemically induced diabetes model. This paper contributes to design new strategies for the development of novel antidiabetic drugs and its related inflammatory activity in order to treat this serious condition which represents a global public health problem. PMID:22899950

  6. In vitro anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties of umbelliprenin and methyl galbanate.

    PubMed

    Zamani Taghizadeh Rabe, Shahrzad; Iranshahi, Mehrdad; Mahmoudi, Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    Ferula species (Apiaceae) are considered important medicinal plants. The present in vitro study sought to investigate the immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory properties of terpenoid coumarins isolated from Ferula szowitsiana on immune cells isolated from naïve mice and to elucidate possible underlying mechanisms of action. With splenocytes, effects of the agents on PHA-induced proliferation and interleukin (IL)-4 and interferon (IFN)-γ release were assessed. With peritoneal macrophages, anti-inflammatory potentials were evaluated in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)/IFNγ-stimulated cells via measures of changes in nitric oxide (NO) and PGE(2) secretion. Expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) was also determined via Western blot analysis. The results indicated that umbelliprenin (UMB) and methyl galbanate (MG) reduced remarkably PHA-induced splenocyte proliferation and both preferentially induced T(H)2 IL-4 and suppressed T(H)1 IFNγ secretion. Each also significantly suppressed LPS-induced production of NO and PGE(2) apparently and also led to reductions in inducible iNOS and COX-expression. To the authors' knowledge, the present study is the first to report on anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects of UMB and MG in vitro. The present results suggest that each could potentially be exploited as a natural immunosuppressant against inflammatory and autoimmune diseases once substantial further toxicological analyses have been done to confirm overall safety in vivo. PMID:26004404

  7. Ortho-eugenol exhibits anti-nociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities.

    PubMed

    Fonsêca, Diogo V; Salgado, Paula R R; Aragão Neto, Humberto de C; Golzio, Adriana M F O; Caldas Filho, Marcelo R D; Melo, Cynthia G F; Leite, Fagner C; Piuvezam, Marcia R; Pordeus, Liana Clébia de Morais; Barbosa Filho, José M; Almeida, Reinaldo N

    2016-09-01

    Ortho-eugenol is a much used phenylpropanoid whose ability to reduce pain and inflammation has never been studied. Researching ortho-eugenol's antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activity, and its possible mechanisms of action is therefore of interest. The administration of vehicle, ortho-eugenol (50, 75 and 100mg/kg i.p.), morphine (6mg/kg, i.p.) or dexamethasone (2mg/kg, s.c.) occurred 30min before the completion of pharmacological tests. Pretreatment with ortho-eugenol did not change motor coordination test results, but reduced the number of writhes and licking times in the writhing test and glutamate test, respectively. The reaction time from thermal stimulus was significantly increased in the hot plate test after administration of ortho-eugenol. Treatment with yohimbine reversed the antinociceptive effect of ortho-eugenol, suggesting involvement of the adrenergic system. In anti-inflammatory tests, ortho-eugenol inhibited acetic acid induced vascular permeability and leukocyte migration, reducing TNF-α and IL-1β by virtue of its suppression of NF-κB and p38 phosphorylated forms in the peritonitis test. From these results, ortho-eugenol antinociceptive effects mediated by the adrenergic system and anti-inflammatory activity through regulation of proinflammatory cytokines and phosphorylation of NF-kB and p38 become evident for the first time. PMID:27355133

  8. Incorporation of anti-inflammatory agent into mesoporous silica.

    PubMed

    Braz, Wilson Rodrigues; Rocha, Natállia Lamec; de Faria, Emerson H; Silva, Márcio L A E; Ciuffi, Katia J; Tavares, Denise C; Furtado, Ricardo Andrade; Rocha, Lucas A; Nassar, Eduardo J

    2016-09-23

    The unique properties of macroporous, mesoporous, and microporous systems, including their ability to accommodate molecules of different sizes inside their pores and to act as drug delivery systems, have been the object of extensive studies. In this work, mesoporous silica with hexagonal structure was obtained by template synthesis via the sol-gel process. The resulting material was used as support to accommodate the anti-inflammatory agent indomethacin. The alkaline route was used to prepare the mesoporous silica; cetyltrimethylammonium bromide was employed as porogenic agent. The silica particles were functionalized with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane alkoxide (APTES) by the sol-gel post-synthesis method. Indomethacin was incorporated into the silica functionalized with APTES and into non-functionalized silica. The resulting systems were characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD), specific area, infrared spectroscopy, and thermal analyses (TGA). XRD attested to formation of mesoporous silica with hexagonal structure. This structure remained after silica functionalization with APTES and incorporation of indomethacin. Typical infrared spectroscopy vibrations and organic material decomposition during TGA confirmed silica functionalization and drug incorporation. The specific surface area and pore volume of the functionalized material incorporated with indomethacin decreased as compared with the specific surface area and pore volume of the non-functionalized silica containing no drug, suggesting both the functionalizing agent and the drug were present in the silica. Cytotoxicity tests conducted on normal fibroblasts (GM0479A) cells attested that the silica matrix containing indomethacin was less toxic than the free drug. PMID:27533108

  9. Anti-inflammatory effects of glaucocalyxin B in microglia cells.

    PubMed

    Gan, Ping; Zhang, Li; Chen, Yanke; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Fali; Zhou, Xiang; Zhang, Xiaohu; Gao, Bo; Zhen, Xuechu; Zhang, Jian; Zheng, Long Tai

    2015-05-01

    Over-activated microglia is involved in various kinds of neurodegenerative process including Parkinson, Alzheimer and HIV dementia. Suppression of microglial over activation has emerged as a novel strategy for treatment of neuroinflammation-based neurodegeneration. In the current study, anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects of the ent-kauranoid diterpenoids, which were isolated from the aerial parts of Rabdosia japonica (Burm. f.) var. glaucocalyx (Maxim.) Hara, were investigated in cultured microglia cells. Glaucocalyxin B (GLB), one of five ent-kauranoid diterpenoids, significantly decreased the generation of nitric oxide (NO), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated microglia cells. In addition, GLB inhibited activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in LPS-activated microglia cells. Furthermore, GLB strongly induced the expression of heme oxygenase (HO)-1 in BV-2 microglia cells. Finally, GLB exhibited neuroprotective effect by preventing over-activated microglia induced neurotoxicity in a microglia/neuron co-culture model. Taken together, the present study demonstrated that the GLB possesses anti-nueroinflammatory activity, and might serve as a potential therapeutic agent for treating neuroinflammatory diseases. PMID:26003084

  10. Proteasome inhibition: a new anti-inflammatory strategy.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Peter J; Zollner, Thomas Matthias; Boehncke, Wolf-Henning

    2003-04-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome pathway has a central role in the selective degradation of intracellular proteins. Among the key proteins modulated by the proteasome are those involved in the control of inflammatory processes, cell cycle regulation, and gene expression. Consequently proteasome inhibition is a potential treatment option for cancer and inflammatory conditions. Thus far, proof of principle has been obtained from studies in numerous animal models for a variety of human diseases including cancer, reperfusion injury, and inflammatory conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis, asthma, multiple sclerosis, and psoriasis. Two proteasome inhibitors, each representing a unique chemical class, are currently under clinical evaluation. Velcade (PS-341) is currently being evaluated in multiple phase II clinical trials for several solid tumor indications and has just entered a phase III trial for multiple myeloma. PS-519, representing another class of inhibitors, focuses on the inflammatory events following ischemia and reperfusion injury. Since proteasome inhibitors exhibit anti-inflammatory and antiproliferative effects, diseases characterized by both of these processes simultaneously, as is the case in rheumatoid arthritis or psoriasis, might also represent clinical opportunities for such drugs. PMID:12700891

  11. Anti-inflammatory Hydrolyzable Tannins from Myricaria bracteata.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia-Bao; Ding, Ya-Si; Zhang, Ying; Chen, Jia-Bao; Cui, Bao-Song; Bai, Jin-Ye; Lin, Ming-Bao; Hou, Qi; Zhang, Pei-Cheng; Li, Shuai

    2015-05-22

    Twelve hydrolyzable tannins were obtained from the twigs of Myricaria bracteata, including two new hellinoyl-type dimers, bracteatinins D1 (1) and D2 (2); a new hellinoyl-type trimer, bracteatinin T1 (3); two known monomers, nilotinin M4 (4) and 1,3-di-O-galloyl-4,6-O-(aS)-hexahydroxydiphenoyl-β-d-glucose (5); six known dimers, tamarixinin A (6), nilotinin D8 (7), hirtellins A (10), B (9), and E (8), and isohirtellin C (11); and a known trimer, hirtellin T3 (12). The structures of the tannins were elucidated by spectroscopic data analysis and comparisons to known tannins. All compounds were evaluated as free radical scavengers using 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl and hydroxy radicals and compared to the activity of BHT and Trolox. Compound 6 showed a significant anti-inflammatory effect on croton oil-induced ear edema in mice (200 mg/kg, inhibition rate 69.8%) and on collagen-induced arthritis in DBA/1 mice (20 mg/kg, inhibition rate 46.0% at day 57). PMID:25918997

  12. Protection against chemotaxis in the anti-inflammatory effect of bioactives from tomato ketchup.

    PubMed

    Hazewindus, Merel; Haenen, Guido R M M; Weseler, Antje R; Bast, Aalt

    2014-01-01

    The consumption of tomato products has been associated with a decreased risk for chronic inflammatory diseases. In this study, the anti-inflammatory potential of tomato ketchup was evaluated by studying the effect of tomato ketchup extracts and bioactives from tomato ketchup on human monocytes and vascular endothelial cells (HUVEC). HUVEC were pre-treated for 1 h with either individual bioactives (7.5 µM lycopene, 1.4 µM α-tocopherol or 55 µM ascorbic acid) or a combination of these three compounds, or with the hydrophilic or lipophilic tomato ketchup extracts or with the two extracts combined. After the pretreatment, the cells were washed and challenged with TNF-α (10 ng/ml) for 6 h. The medium was used for the determination of the release of cytokines and the chemotaxis of monocytes. Inflammatory protein expression and production were assayed with real-time RT-PCR and ELISA. It was found that tomato ketchup extracts significantly reduced gene expression and release of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-8 in HUVEC after the inflammatory challenge, whereas the release of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 was increased. Chemotaxis was effectively impeded as demonstrated by a reduced monocyte migration. This effect correlated with the reduction of IL-8 production in the presence of the test compounds and extracts. The results consistently emphasize the contribution of lycopene to the anti-inflammatory effect of tomato ketchup. Other compounds in tomato ketchup such as α-tocopherol and ascorbic acid appeared to strengthen the anti-inflammatory effect of lycopene. The tomato ketchup extracts subtly interfered with several inflammatory phases that inhibit chemotaxis. Such a pleotropic mode of action exemplifies its potential mitigation of diseases characterized by prolonged low grade inflammation. PMID:25551565

  13. Protection against Chemotaxis in the Anti-Inflammatory Effect of Bioactives from Tomato Ketchup

    PubMed Central

    Hazewindus, Merel; Haenen, Guido R. M. M.; Weseler, Antje R.; Bast, Aalt

    2014-01-01

    The consumption of tomato products has been associated with a decreased risk for chronic inflammatory diseases. In this study, the anti-inflammatory potential of tomato ketchup was evaluated by studying the effect of tomato ketchup extracts and bioactives from tomato ketchup on human monocytes and vascular endothelial cells (HUVEC). HUVEC were pre-treated for 1 h with either individual bioactives (7.5 µM lycopene, 1.4 µM α-tocopherol or 55 µM ascorbic acid) or a combination of these three compounds, or with the hydrophilic or lipophilic tomato ketchup extracts or with the two extracts combined. After the pretreatment, the cells were washed and challenged with TNF-α (10 ng/ml) for 6 h. The medium was used for the determination of the release of cytokines and the chemotaxis of monocytes. Inflammatory protein expression and production were assayed with real-time RT-PCR and ELISA. It was found that tomato ketchup extracts significantly reduced gene expression and release of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-8 in HUVEC after the inflammatory challenge, whereas the release of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 was increased. Chemotaxis was effectively impeded as demonstrated by a reduced monocyte migration. This effect correlated with the reduction of IL-8 production in the presence of the test compounds and extracts. The results consistently emphasize the contribution of lycopene to the anti-inflammatory effect of tomato ketchup. Other compounds in tomato ketchup such as α-tocopherol and ascorbic acid appeared to strengthen the anti-inflammatory effect of lycopene. The tomato ketchup extracts subtly interfered with several inflammatory phases that inhibit chemotaxis. Such a pleotropic mode of action exemplifies its potential mitigation of diseases characterized by prolonged low grade inflammation. PMID:25551565

  14. Anti-inflammatory activity of linalool and linalyl acetate constituents of essential oils.

    PubMed

    Peana, A T; D'Aquila, P S; Panin, F; Serra, G; Pippia, P; Moretti, M D L

    2002-12-01

    Linalool and linalyl acetate are the principal components of many essential oils known to possess several biological activities, attributable to these monoterpene compounds. In this work, we evaluated individually the anti-inflammatory properties of (-) linalool, that is, the natural occurring enantiomer, and its racemate form, present in various amounts in distilled or extracted essential oils. Because in the linalool-containing essential oils, linalyl acetate, is frequently present, we also examined the anti-inflammatory action of this monoterpene ester. Carrageenin-induced edema in rats was used as a model of inflammation. The experimental data indicate that both the pure enantiomer and its racemate induced, after systemic administration, a reduction of edema. Moreover, the pure enantiomer, at a dose of 25 mg/kg, elicited a delayed and more prolonged effect, while the racemate form induced a significant reduction of the edema only one hour after carrageenin administration. At higher doses, no differences were observed between the (-) enantiomer and the racemate; a further increase in the dose of both forms did not result in an increased effect at any time of observation. The effects of equi-molar doses of linalyl acetate on local edema were less relevant and more delayed than that of the corresponding alcohol. These finding suggest a typical pro-drug behavior of linalyl acetate. The results obtained indicate that linalool and the corresponding acetate play a major role in the anti-inflammatory activity displayed by the essential oils containing them, and provide further evidence suggesting that linalool and linalyl acetate-producing species are potentially anti-inflammatory agents. PMID:12587692

  15. Potential anti-inflammatory effects of Melaleuca alternifolia essential oil on human peripheral blood leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Caldefie-Chézet, F; Fusillier, C; Jarde, T; Laroye, H; Damez, M; Vasson, M-P; Guillot, J

    2006-05-01

    The fungicidal and bactericidal actions of the essential oil (EO) of Melaleuca alternifolia seem well established, but their anti-inflammatory and antioxidative effects remain unclear. This study investigated in vitro the possible role of whole Melaleuca alternifolia EO as a modulator of the inflammatory/non-specific immune response by exploring the chemotaxis and kinetic radical oxygen species (ROS) production of leukocytes and cytokine secretion in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in humans. The influence of Melaleuca alternifolia EO on the chemotaxis under agarose of isolated neutrophils (PMNs) was evaluated. The kinetics of ROS production by stimulated total circulating leukocytes was followed over 2 h by recording the fluorescence intensity of oxidized dihydrorhodamine 123. The effects of this EO on pro-(interleukin IL-2) and anti-(IL-4 and IL10) inflammatory cytokine secretions were determined by ELISA following incubation of PBMCs with the EO for 24 h. Melaleuca alternifolia EO was inefficient on the chemotaxis of PMNs. It exerted an antioxidant effect, reducing ROS production throughout the kinetic study. Melaleuca alternifolia EO inhibited PBMC proliferation, as revealed by a reduction in IL-2 secretion by stimulated lymphocytes. This EO at 0.1% directly increased the secretion of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-4 compared with IL-4 secretion without EO (18.5 +/- 10.0 vs 3.3 +/- 1, p < 0.05), and also increased IL-10 secretion at 0.01% (94.9 +/- 38.7 vs 44.1 +/- 18, ns). Melaleuca alternifolia EO may not only act as an anti-inflammatory mediator through its antioxidant activity but may also efficiently protect the organism by reducing the proliferation of inflammatory cells without affecting their capacity to secrete anti-inflammatory cytokines. PMID:16619364

  16. Analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of essential oils of Eucalyptus.

    PubMed

    Silva, Jeane; Abebe, Worku; Sousa, S M; Duarte, V G; Machado, M I L; Matos, F J A

    2003-12-01

    Many species of the genus Eucalyptus from the Myrtaceae family are used in Brazilian folk medicine for the treatment of various medical conditions such as cold, flue, fever, and bronchial infections. In the current investigation, we evaluated the analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of essential oil extracts from three species of Eucalyptus employing various standard experimental test models. Using acetic acid-induced writhes in mice and hot plate thermal stimulation in rats, it was shown that the essential oils of Eucalyptus citriodora (EC), Eucalyptus tereticornis (ET), and Eucalyptus globulus (EG) induced analgesic effects in both models, suggesting peripheral and central actions. In addition, essential oil extracts from the three Eucalyptus species produced anti-inflammatory effects, as demonstrated by inhibition of rat paw edema induced by carrageenan and dextran, neutrophil migration into rat peritoneal cavities induced by carrageenan, and vascular permeability induced by carrageenan and histamine. However, no consistent results were observed for some of the parameters evaluated, both in terms of activities and dose-response relationships, reflecting the complex nature of the oil extracts and/or the assay systems used. Taken together, the data suggest that essential oil extracts of EC, ET, and EG possess central and peripheral analgesic effects as well as neutrophil-dependent and independent anti-inflammatory activities. These initial observations provide support for the reported use of the eucalyptus plant in Brazilian folk medicine. Further investigation is warranted for possible development of new classes of analgesic and anti-inflammatory drugs from components of the essential oils of the Eucalyptus species. PMID:14611892

  17. Investigation of the Anti-Inflammatory and Analgesic Activities of Ethanol Extract of Stem Bark of Sonapatha Oroxylum indicum In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lalrinzuali, K.; Vabeiryureilai, M.

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation is all a pervasive phenomenon, which is elicited by the body in response to obnoxious stimuli as a protective measure. However, sustained inflammation leads to several diseases including cancer. Therefore it is necessary to neutralize inflammation. Sonapatha (Oroxylum indicum), a medicinal plant, is traditionally used as a medicine in Ayurveda and other folk systems of medicine. It is commonly used to treat inflammatory diseases including rheumatoid arthritis and asthma. Despite this fact its anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects are not evaluated scientifically. Therefore, the anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities of Sonapatha (Oroxylum indicum) were studied in Swiss albino mice by different methods. The hot plate, acetic acid, and tail immersion tests were used to evaluate the analgesic activity whereas xylene-induced ear edema and formalin induced paw edema tests were used to study the anti-inflammatory activity of Sonapatha. The administration of mice with 250 and 300 mg/kg b.wt. of O. indicum reduced pain and inflammation indicating that Sonapatha possesses analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities. The maximum analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities were observed in mice receiving 300 mg/kg b.wt. of O. indicum ethanol extract. Our study indicates that O. indicum possesses both anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities and it may be useful as an anti-inflammatory agent in the inflammation related disorders. PMID:26925290

  18. Gastrointestinal and Cardiovascular Risk of Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Al-Saeed, Abdulwahed

    2011-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) confer a gastrointestinal (GI) side effect profile and concerns regarding adverse cardiovascular effects have emerged associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. NSAIDs are highly effective in treating pain and inflammation, but it is well recognized that these agents are associated with substantial gastrointestinal toxicity. Cyclo-oxygenase-2 inhibitors may also reduce the risk for gastrointestinal events, although they may increase cardiovascular adverse events. The selection of an appropriate analgesic or anti-inflammatory agent with or without gastroprotective therapy should be individualized. PMID:22253945

  19. Kalanchosine dimalate, an anti-inflammatory salt from Kalanchoe brasiliensis.

    PubMed

    Costa, Sônia Soares; de Souza, Maria de Lourdes Mendes; Ibrahim, Tereza; de Melo, Giany Oliveira; de Almeida, Ana Paula; Guette, Catherine; Férézou, Jean-Pierre; Koatz, Vera Lucia G

    2006-05-01

    This report describes the isolation and characterization of kalanchosine dimalate (KMC), an anti-inflammatory salt from the fresh juice of the aerial parts of Kalanchoe brasiliensis. KMC comprises the new metabolite kalanchosine (1) and malic acid (2) in a 1:2 stoichiometric ratio. Kalanchosine (1), 3,6-diamino-4,5-dihydroxyoctanedioic acid, is the first naturally occurring dimeric bis(gamma-hydroxy-beta-amino acid) and is at least partially responsible for the anti-inflammatory properties of K. brasiliensis. PMID:16724848

  20. Vasoconstrictor and the anti-inflammatory effects of 7 corticosteroids.

    PubMed

    Crijns, M B; Nater, J P; van Oostveen, F; van der Valk, P G

    1984-08-01

    The vasoconstrictor effect of 7 proprietary corticosteroid creams was compared with their effect on patches of allergic contact dermatitis provoked by patch testing in 20 subjects. A parallel between the blanching effect on the normal skin and the anti-inflammatory effect on the eczematous skin was generally found. A modified patch test method using the Finn chamber technique is described, which (with certain restrictions) offers an opportunity of studying the anti-inflammatory effect of corticosteroids on allergic dermatitis under standard conditions. PMID:6488765

  1. Anti-inflammatory effects of antidepressants: possibilities for preventives against Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Hashioka, Sadayuki; McGeer, Patrick L; Monji, Akira; Kanba, Shigenobu

    2009-03-01

    Increasing evidence of pro-inflammatory mediator expression in major depressions indicate that inflammatory changes may play a role. If this is true, the efficacy of antidepressants may be partially attributable to suppression of inflammation. Various types of antidepressants can suppress serum and plasma levels of pro-inflammatory mediators in patients with major depression. Therefore they can inhibit the production of pro-inflammatory mediators by immune cells. These include glial cells, which are the main sources and targets of cytokines in the brain. This review summarizes the evidence showing that antidepressants have an anti-inflammatory potential. The putative mechanisms are also discussed. Because of the anti-inflammatory effects of antidepressants, they might also act as preventives for neurodegenerative dementias including Alzheimer's disease, where the pathogenesis involves chronic inflammation associated with activated microglia. PMID:20021334

  2. Mediators, Receptors, and Signalling Pathways in the Anti-Inflammatory and Antihyperalgesic Effects of Acupuncture

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, John L.; Cripps, Allan W.; Smith, Peter K.

    2015-01-01

    Acupuncture has been used for millennia to treat allergic diseases including both intermittent rhinitis and persistent rhinitis. Besides the research on the efficacy and safety of acupuncture treatment for allergic rhinitis, research has also investigated how acupuncture might modulate immune function to exert anti-inflammatory effects. A proposed model has previously hypothesized that acupuncture might downregulate proinflammatory neuropeptides, proinflammatory cytokines, and neurotrophins, modulating transient receptor potential vallinoid (TRPV1), a G-protein coupled receptor which plays a central role in allergic rhinitis. Recent research has been largely supportive of this model. New advances in research include the discovery of a novel cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway activated by acupuncture. A chemokine-mediated proliferation of opioid-containing macrophages in inflamed tissues, in response to acupuncture, has also been demonstrated for the first time. Further research on the complex cross talk between receptors during inflammation is also helping to elucidate the mediators and signalling pathways activated by acupuncture. PMID:26339274

  3. Black Cumin (Nigella sativa) and Its Active Constituent, Thymoquinone: An Overview on the Analgesic and Anti-inflammatory Effects.

    PubMed

    Amin, Bahareh; Hosseinzadeh, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    For many centuries, seeds of Nigella sativa (black cumin), a dicotyledon of the Ranunculaceae family, have been used as a seasoning spice and food additive in the Middle East and Mediterranean areas. Traditionally, the plant is used for asthma, hypertension, diabetes, inflammation, cough, bronchitis, headache, eczema, fever, dizziness, and gastrointestinal disturbances. The literature regarding the biological activities of seeds of this plant is extensive, citing bronchodilative, anti-inflammatory, antinociceptive, antibacterial, hypotensive, hypolipidemic, cytotoxic, antidiabetic, and hepatoprotective effects. The active ingredients of N. sativa are mainly concentrated in the fixed or essential oil of seeds, which are responsible for most health benefits. This review will provide all updated reported activities of this plant with an emphasis on the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects. Results of various studies have demonstrated that the oil, extracts, and their active ingredients, in particular, thymoquinone, possess antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects, supporting the common folk perception of N. Sativa as a potent analgesic and anti-inflammatory agent. Many protective properties are attributed to reproducible radical scavenging activity as well as an interaction with numerous molecular targets involved in inflammation, including proinflammatory enzymes and cytokines. However, there is a need for further investigations to find out the precise mechanisms responsible for the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects of this plant and its active constituents. PMID:26366755

  4. Lupeol, A Novel Anti-inflammatory and Anti-cancer Dietary Triterpene

    PubMed Central

    Saleem, Mohammad

    2009-01-01

    In the Western world, an average of 250 mg per day of triterpenes (member of phytosterol family), largely derived from vegetable oils, cereals, fruits and vegetables is consumed by humans. During the last decade, there has been an unprecedented escalation of interest in triterpenes due to their cholesterol-lowering properties and evidence of this phenomenon include at least 25 clinical studies, 20 patents and at least 10 major commercially triterpene-based products currently being sold all around the world. Lupeol a triterpene [also known as Fagarsterol] found in white cabbage, green pepper, strawberry, olive, mangoes and grapes was reported to possess beneficial effects as a therapeutic and preventive agent for a range of disorders. Last 15 years have seen tremendous efforts by researchers worldwide to develop this wonderful molecule for its clinical use for the treatment of variety of disorders. These studies also provide insight into the mechanism of action of Lupeol and suggest that it is a multi-target agent with immense anti-inflammatory potential targeting key molecular pathways which involve nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB), cFLIP, Fas, Kras, phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt and Wnt/β-catenin in a variety of cells. It is noteworthy that Lupeol at its effective therapeutic doses exhibit no toxicity to normal cells and tissues. This mini review provides detailed account of preclinical studies conducted to determine the utility of Lupeol as a therapeutic and chemopreventive agent for the treatment of inflammation and cancer. PMID:19464787

  5. Anti-Inflammatory Activities of a Chinese Herbal Formula IBS-20 In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhonghan; Grinchuk, Viktoriya; Ip, Siu Po; Che, Chun-Tao; Fong, Harry H. S.; Lao, Lixing; Wu, Justin C.; Sung, Joseph J.; Berman, Brian; Shea-Donohue, Terez; Zhao, Aiping

    2012-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional bowel disorder and the etiology is not well understood. Currently there is no cure for IBS and no existing medication induces symptom relief in all patients. IBS-20 is a 20-herb Chinese medicinal formula that offers beneficial effects in patients with IBS; however, the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. This study showed that IBS-20 potently inhibited LPS- or IFNΓ-stimulated expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, as well as classically activated macrophage marker nitric oxide synthase 2. Similarly, IBS-20 or the component herb Coptis chinensis decreased LPS-stimulated pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion from JAWS II dendritic cells. IBS-20 or the component herbs also blocked or attenuated the IFNΓ-induced drop in transepithelial electric resistance, an index of permeability, in fully differentiated Caco-2 monolayer. Finally, the up-regulation of key inflammatory cytokines in inflamed colon from TNBS-treated mice was suppressed significantly by orally administrated IBS-20, including IFNΓ and IL-12p40. These data indicate that the anti-inflammatory activities of IBS-20 may contribute to the beneficial effects of the herbal extract in patients with IBS, providing a potential mechanism of action for IBS-20. In addition, IBS-20 may be a potential therapeutic agent against other Th1-dominant gut pathologies such as inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:22461841

  6. Anti-inflammatory role of Fetuin-A in Injury and Infection

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haichao; Sama, Andrew E.

    2012-01-01

    Infection and injury are two seemingly unrelated processes that often converge on common innate inflammatory responses mediated by pathogen- or damage-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs or DAMPs). If dysregulated, an excessive inflammation manifested by the overproduction and release of proinflammatory mediators (e.g., TNF, IFN-γ, and HMGB1) may adversely lead to many pathogenic consequences. As a counter-regulatory mechanism, the liver strategically re-prioritizes the synthesis and systemic release of acute phase proteins (APP) including the fetuin-A (also termed alpha-2-HS-glycoprotein for the human homologue). Fetuin-A is divergently regulated by different proinflammatory mediators, and functions as a positive or negative APP in injury and infection. It not only facilitates anti-inflammatory actions of cationic polyamines (e.g., spermine), but also directly inhibits PAMP-induced HMGB1 release by innate immune cells. Peripheral administration of fetuin-A promotes a short-term reduction of cerebral ischemic injury, but confers a long-lasting protection against lethal endotoxemia. Furthermore, delayed administration of fetuin-A rescues mice from lethal sepsis even when the first dose is given 24 hours post the onset of disease. Collectively, these findings have reinforced an essential role for fetuin-A in counter-regulating injury- or infection-elicited inflammatory responses. PMID:22292896

  7. Pitavastatin is a potent anti-inflammatory agent in the rat paw model of acute inflammation.

    PubMed

    Qadir, Farida; Alam, Syed Mahboob; Siddiqi, Abeer Qamar; Kamran, Afshan

    2014-11-01

    Statins are used extensively as anti-hyperlipidemic agents. In addition to curtailing cholesterol synthesis they have been found to have multiple actions unrelated to cholesterol lowering "the pleiotropic effects," which includes inhibition of inflammation. We aimed at investigating the effect of pitavastatin a 3rd generation statin, in suppressing acute inflammation in rat paw edema model. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to one of five groups (n=8): Control, indomethacin and pitavastatin (0.2mg/kg, 0.4mg/kg, 0.8mg/kg) treated. 1hour following treatment, inflammation was induced by sub-planter injection of egg albumin into the hind paw. Anti-inflammatory effect was evaluated by measurement of edema formation every half hour for three hours, assessment of polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMNL) infiltration and measurement of tissue damage in skin biopsies. Ascending doses of pitavastatin were found to attenuate these parameters. The lowest dose of pitavastatin (0.2mg/kg) was found to significantly reduce edema volume, PMNL infiltration and tissue damage. The efficacy of the smallest dose was found comparable to indomethacin. PMID:26045381

  8. Antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects of resveratrol in airway disease.

    PubMed

    Wood, Lisa G; Wark, Peter A B; Garg, Manohar L

    2010-11-15

    Respiratory diseases, such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), are a significant and increasing global health problem. These diseases are characterized by airway inflammation, which develops in response to various stimuli. In asthma, inflammation is driven by exposure to a variety of triggers, including allergens and viruses, which activate components of both the innate and acquired immune responses. In COPD, exposure to cigarette smoke is the primary stimulus of airway inflammation. Activation of airway inflammatory cells leads to the release of excessive quantities of reactive oxygen species (ROS), resulting in oxidative stress. Antioxidants provide protection against the damaging effects of oxidative stress and thus may be useful in the management of inflammatory airways disease. Resveratrol, a polyphenol that demonstrates both antioxidative and anti-inflammatory functions, has been shown to improve outcomes in a variety of diseases, in particular, in cancer. We review the evidence for a protective role of resveratrol in respiratory disease. Mechanisms of resveratrol action that may be relevant to respiratory disease are described. We conclude that resveratrol has potential as a therapeutic agent in respiratory disease, which should be further investigated. PMID:20214495

  9. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug sensitizes Mycobacterium tuberculosis to endogenous and exogenous antimicrobials

    PubMed Central

    Gold, Ben; Pingle, Maneesh; Brickner, Steven J.; Shah, Nilesh; Roberts, Julia; Rundell, Mark; Bracken, W. Clay; Warrier, Thulasi; Somersan, Selin; Venugopal, Aditya; Darby, Crystal; Jiang, Xiuju; Warren, J. David; Fernandez, Joseph; Ouerfelli, Ouathek; Nuermberger, Eric L.; Cunningham-Bussel, Amy; Rath, Poonam; Chidawanyika, Tamutenda; Deng, Haiteng; Realubit, Ronald; Glickman, J. Fraser; Nathan, Carl F.

    2012-01-01

    Existing drugs are slow to eradicate Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) in patients and have failed to control tuberculosis globally. One reason may be that host conditions impair Mtb’s replication, reducing its sensitivity to most antiinfectives. We devised a high-throughput screen for compounds that kill Mtb when its replication has been halted by reactive nitrogen intermediates (RNIs), acid, hypoxia, and a fatty acid carbon source. At concentrations routinely achieved in human blood, oxyphenbutazone (OPB), an inexpensive anti-inflammatory drug, was selectively mycobactericidal to nonreplicating (NR) Mtb. Its cidal activity depended on mild acid and was augmented by RNIs and fatty acid. Acid and RNIs fostered OPB’s 4-hydroxylation. The resultant 4-butyl-4-hydroxy-1-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-2-phenylpyrazolidine-3,5-dione (4-OH-OPB) killed both replicating and NR Mtb, including Mtb resistant to standard drugs. 4-OH-OPB depleted flavins and formed covalent adducts with N-acetyl-cysteine and mycothiol. 4-OH-OPB killed Mtb synergistically with oxidants and several antituberculosis drugs. Thus, conditions that block Mtb’s replication modify OPB and enhance its cidal action. Modified OPB kills both replicating and NR Mtb and sensitizes both to host-derived and medicinal antimycobacterial agents. PMID:23012453

  10. Food-Derived Bioactives Can Protect the Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Cortisol with Antioxidant-Dependent and -Independent Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Ruijters, Erik J. B.; Haenen, Guido R. M. M.; Willemsen, Mathijs; Weseler, Antje R.; Bast, Aalt

    2016-01-01

    In chronic inflammatory diseases the anti-inflammatory effect of glucocorticoids (GCs) is often decreased, leading to GC resistance. Inflammation is related with increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), leading to oxidative stress which is thought to contribute to the development of GC resistance. Plant-derived compounds such as flavonoids are known for their ability to protect against ROS. In this exploratory study we screened a broad range of food-derived bioactives for their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects in order to investigate whether their antioxidant effects are associated with the ability to preserve the anti-inflammatory effects of cortisol. The anti-inflammatory potency of the tested compounds was assessed by measuring the oxidative stress–induced GC resistance in human macrophage-like cells. Cells were pre-treated with H2O2 (800 µM) with and without bioactives and then exposed to lipopolysaccharides (LPS) (10 ng/mL) and cortisol (100 nM). The level of inflammation was deducted from the concentration of interleukin-8 (IL-8) in the medium. Intracellular oxidative stress was measured using the fluorescent probe 2′,7′-dichlorofluorescein (DCFH). We found that most of the dietary bioactives display antioxidant and anti-inflammatory action through the protection of the cortisol response. All compounds, except for quercetin, revealing antioxidant activity also protect the cortisol response. This indicates that the antioxidant activity of compounds plays an important role in the protection of the GC response. However, next to the antioxidant activity of the bioactives, other mechanisms also seem to be involved in this protective, anti-inflammatory effect. PMID:26891295

  11. Food-Derived Bioactives Can Protect the Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Cortisol with Antioxidant-Dependent and -Independent Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ruijters, Erik J B; Haenen, Guido R M M; Willemsen, Mathijs; Weseler, Antje R; Bast, Aalt

    2016-01-01

    In chronic inflammatory diseases the anti-inflammatory effect of glucocorticoids (GCs) is often decreased, leading to GC resistance. Inflammation is related with increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), leading to oxidative stress which is thought to contribute to the development of GC resistance. Plant-derived compounds such as flavonoids are known for their ability to protect against ROS. In this exploratory study we screened a broad range of food-derived bioactives for their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects in order to investigate whether their antioxidant effects are associated with the ability to preserve the anti-inflammatory effects of cortisol. The anti-inflammatory potency of the tested compounds was assessed by measuring the oxidative stress-induced GC resistance in human macrophage-like cells. Cells were pre-treated with H₂O₂ (800 µM) with and without bioactives and then exposed to lipopolysaccharides (LPS) (10 ng/mL) and cortisol (100 nM). The level of inflammation was deducted from the concentration of interleukin-8 (IL-8) in the medium. Intracellular oxidative stress was measured using the fluorescent probe 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein (DCFH). We found that most of the dietary bioactives display antioxidant and anti-inflammatory action through the protection of the cortisol response. All compounds, except for quercetin, revealing antioxidant activity also protect the cortisol response. This indicates that the antioxidant activity of compounds plays an important role in the protection of the GC response. However, next to the antioxidant activity of the bioactives, other mechanisms also seem to be involved in this protective, anti-inflammatory effect. PMID:26891295

  12. Generation and Dietary Modulation of Anti-Inflammatory Electrophilic Omega-3 Fatty Acid Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Cipollina, Chiara; Salvatore, Sonia R.; Muldoon, Matthew F.; Freeman, Bruce A.; Schopfer, Francisco J.

    2014-01-01

    Dietary ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) decrease cardiovascular risk via suppression of inflammation. The generation of electrophilic α,β-unsaturated ketone derivatives of the ω-3 PUFAs docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and docosapentaenoic acid (DPA) in activated human macrophages is catalyzed by cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2). These derivatives are potent pleiotropic anti-inflammatory signaling mediators that act via mechanisms including the activation of Nrf2-dependent phase 2 gene expression and suppression of pro-inflammatory NF-κB-driven gene expression. Herein, the endogenous generation of ω-3 PUFAs electrophilic ketone derivatives and their hydroxy precursors was evaluated in human neutrophils. In addition, their dietary modulation was assessed through a randomized clinical trial. Methods Endogenous generation of electrophilic omega-3 PUFAs and their hydroxy precursors was evaluated by mass spectrometry in neutrophils isolated from healthy subjects, both at baseline and upon stimulation with calcium ionophore. For the clinical trial, participants were healthy adults 30–55 years of age with a reported EPA+DHA consumption of ≤300 mg/day randomly assigned to parallel groups receiving daily oil capsule supplements for a period of 4 months containing either 1.4 g of EPA+DHA (active condition, n = 24) or identical appearing soybean oil (control condition, n = 21). Participants and laboratory technicians remained blinded to treatment assignments. Results 5-lypoxygenase-dependent endogenous generation of 7-oxo-DHA, 7-oxo-DPA and 5-oxo-EPA and their hydroxy precursors is reported in human neutrophils stimulated with calcium ionophore and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). Dietary EPA+DHA supplementation significantly increased the formation of 7-oxo-DHA and 5-oxo-EPA, with no significant modulation of arachidonic acid (AA) metabolite levels. Conclusions The endogenous detection of these electrophilic ω-3 fatty acid ketone derivatives supports the

  13. Optimization and pharmacological validation of a leukocyte migration assay in zebrafish larvae for the rapid in vivo bioactivity analysis of anti-inflammatory secondary metabolites.

    PubMed

    Cordero-Maldonado, María Lorena; Siverio-Mota, Dany; Vicet-Muro, Liliana; Wilches-Arizábala, Isabel María; Esguerra, Camila V; de Witte, Peter A M; Crawford, Alexander D

    2013-01-01

    Over the past decade, zebrafish (Danio rerio) have emerged as an attractive model for in vivo drug discovery. In this study, we explore the suitability of zebrafish larvae to rapidly evaluate the anti-inflammatory activity of natural products (NPs) and medicinal plants used in traditional medicine for the treatment of inflammatory disorders. First, we optimized a zebrafish assay for leukocyte migration. Inflammation was induced in four days post-fertilization (dpf) zebrafish larvae by tail transection and co-incubation with bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS), resulting in a robust recruitment of leukocytes to the zone of injury. Migrating zebrafish leukocytes were detected in situ by myeloperoxidase (MPO) staining, and anti-inflammatory activity was semi-quantitatively scored using a standardized scale of relative leukocyte migration (RLM). Pharmacological validation of this optimized assay was performed with a panel of anti-inflammatory drugs, demonstrating a concentration-responsive inhibition of leukocyte migration for both steroidal and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (SAIDs and NSAIDs). Subsequently, we evaluated the bioactivity of structurally diverse NPs with well-documented anti-inflammatory properties. Finally, we further used this zebrafish-based assay to quantify the anti-inflammatory activity in the aqueous and methanolic extracts of several medicinal plants. Our results indicate the suitability of this LPS-enhanced leukocyte migration assay in zebrafish larvae as a front-line screening platform in NP discovery, including for the bioassay-guided isolation of anti-inflammatory secondary metabolites from complex NP extracts. PMID:24124487

  14. Optimization and Pharmacological Validation of a Leukocyte Migration Assay in Zebrafish Larvae for the Rapid In Vivo Bioactivity Analysis of Anti-Inflammatory Secondary Metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Vicet-Muro, Liliana; Wilches-Arizábala, Isabel María; Esguerra, Camila V.; de Witte, Peter A. M.; Crawford, Alexander D.

    2013-01-01

    Over the past decade, zebrafish (Danio rerio) have emerged as an attractive model for in vivo drug discovery. In this study, we explore the suitability of zebrafish larvae to rapidly evaluate the anti-inflammatory activity of natural products (NPs) and medicinal plants used in traditional medicine for the treatment of inflammatory disorders. First, we optimized a zebrafish assay for leukocyte migration. Inflammation was induced in four days post-fertilization (dpf) zebrafish larvae by tail transection and co-incubation with bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS), resulting in a robust recruitment of leukocytes to the zone of injury. Migrating zebrafish leukocytes were detected in situ by myeloperoxidase (MPO) staining, and anti-inflammatory activity was semi-quantitatively scored using a standardized scale of relative leukocyte migration (RLM). Pharmacological validation of this optimized assay was performed with a panel of anti-inflammatory drugs, demonstrating a concentration-responsive inhibition of leukocyte migration for both steroidal and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (SAIDs and NSAIDs). Subsequently, we evaluated the bioactivity of structurally diverse NPs with well-documented anti-inflammatory properties. Finally, we further used this zebrafish-based assay to quantify the anti-inflammatory activity in the aqueous and methanolic extracts of several medicinal plants. Our results indicate the suitability of this LPS-enhanced leukocyte migration assay in zebrafish larvae as a front-line screening platform in NP discovery, including for the bioassay-guided isolation of anti-inflammatory secondary metabolites from complex NP extracts. PMID:24124487

  15. Bioactive compounds from Bauhinia purpurea possessing antimalarial, antimycobacterial, antifungal, anti-inflammatory, and cytotoxic activities.

    PubMed

    Boonphong, Surat; Puangsombat, Pakawan; Baramee, Apiwat; Mahidol, Chulabhorn; Ruchirawat, Somsak; Kittakoop, Prasat

    2007-05-01

    Eleven new secondary metabolites (1-11), together with two known flavanones (12 and 13) and five known bibenzyls (14-18), were isolated from the root extract of Bauhinia purpurea. New compounds include eight dihydrodibenzoxepins (1-8), a dihydrobenzofuran (9), a novel spirochromane-2,1'-hexenedione (10), and a new bibenzyl (11). Antimycobacterial, antimalarial, antifungal, cytotoxic, and anti-inflammatory activities of the isolated compounds are reported, and biosynthetic pathways of these compounds are also discussed. PMID:17480099

  16. Analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and CNS depressant activities of new constituents of Nepeta clarkei.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Javid; Ur Rehman, Najeeb; Hussain, Hidayat; Al-Harrasi, Ahmed; Ali, Liaqat; Rizvi, Tania Shamim; Ahmad, Mansoor; Mehjabeen

    2012-04-01

    Two new pentacyclic triterpenes named kirmanoic acid (1) and kurramanoic acid (2) have been isolated from the chloroform-soluble portion of the whole plant of Nepeta clarkei Hook. The structures of the two new compounds were assigned on the basis of their ¹H and ¹³C NMR spectra including two-dimensional NMR techniques such as COSY, HMQC, and HMBC experiments. Kirmanoic acid (1) was investigated for analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and CNS depressant activities. Interestingly kirmanoic acid (1) showed strong analgesic activity than standard drug in acetic induced writhing and formalin tests. Similarly kirmanoic acid (1) also showed strong anti-inflammatory activity than its standard drug. The gross behavioral study of kirmanoic acid (1) revealed that it exhibited mild CNS stimulant and muscle relaxant in the mice. Compound 1 showed a slight increase in Locomotor activity and possesses the antidepressant effect. PMID:22266390

  17. Synthesis, anti-inflammatory activity and ulcerogenic liability of novel nitric oxide donating/chalcone hybrids.

    PubMed

    Abuo-Rahma, Gamal El-Din A A; Abdel-Aziz, Mohamed; Mourad, Mai A E; Farag, Hassan H

    2012-01-01

    A group of novel nitric oxide (NO) donating chalcone derivatives was prepared by binding various amino chalcones with different NO donating moieties including; nitrate ester, oximes and furoxans. Most of the prepared compounds showed significant anti-inflammatory activity using carrageenan-induced rat paw edema method compared with indomethacin. The prepared compounds exhibited more protection than indomethacin in regard to gastric toxicity. Histopathological investigation confirmed the beneficial effects of the NO releasing compounds in reducing ulcer formation. The incorporation of the NO-donating group into the parent chalcone derivatives caused a moderate increase in the anti-inflammatory activity with a marked decrease in gastric ulcerations compared to their parent chalcone derivatives. PMID:22137931

  18. Myeloid cells in atherosclerosis: a delicate balance of anti-inflammatory and proinflammatory mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Koltsova, Ekaterina K.; Hedrick, Catherine C.; Ley, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Atherosclerosis is chronic disease, whose progression is orchestrated by the balance between proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory mechanisms. Various myeloid cells, including monocytes, macrophages, dendritic cells and neutrophils can be found in normal and atherosclerotic aortas, in which they regulate inflammation and progression of atherosclerosis. The lineage relationship between blood monocyte subsets and the various phenotypes and functions of myeloid cells in diseased aortas is under active investigation. Recent findings Various subsets of myeloid cells play diverse roles in atherosclerosis. This review discusses new findings in phenotypic and functional characterization of different subsets of macrophages, in part determined by the transcription factors IRF5 and Trib1, and dendritic cells, characterized by the transcription factor Zbtb46, in atherosclerosis. Summary Improved understanding proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory mechanisms of macrophages and dendritic cell functions is needed for better preventive and therapeutic measures in atherosclerosis. PMID:24005215

  19. The Dietary Flavonoid Kaempferol Mediates Anti-Inflammatory Responses via the Src, Syk, IRAK1, and IRAK4 Molecular Targets

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Shi Hyoung; Park, Jae Gwang; Lee, Jongsung; Yang, Woo Seok; Park, Gye Won; Kim, Han Gyung; Baek, Kwang-Soo; Hossen, Muhammad Jahangir; Lee, Mi-nam; Kim, Jong-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Even though a lot of reports have suggested the anti-inflammatory activity of kaempferol (KF) in macrophages, little is known about its exact anti-inflammatory mode of action and its immunopharmacological target molecules. In this study, we explored anti-inflammatory activity of KF in LPS-treated macrophages. In particular, molecular targets for KF action were identified by using biochemical and molecular biological analyses. KF suppressed the release of nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), downregulated the cellular adhesion of U937 cells to fibronectin (FN), neutralized the generation of radicals, and diminished mRNA expression levels of inflammatory genes encoding inducible NO synthase (iNOS), TNF-α, and cyclooxygenase- (COX-) 2 in lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) and sodium nitroprusside- (SNP-) treated RAW264.7 cells and peritoneal macrophages. KF reduced NF-κB (p65 and p50) and AP-1 (c-Jun and c-Fos) levels in the nucleus and their transcriptional activity. Interestingly, it was found that Src, Syk, IRAK1, and IRAK4 responsible for NF-κB and AP-1 activation were identified as the direct molecular targets of KF by kinase enzyme assays and by measuring their phosphorylation patterns. KF was revealed to have in vitro and in vivo anti-inflammatory activity by the direct suppression of Src, Syk, IRAK1, and IRAK4, involved in the activation of NF-κB and AP-1. PMID:25922567

  20. Colitis caused by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Ravi, S.; Keat, A. C.; Keat, E. C.

    1986-01-01

    Four cases of acute proctocolitis associated with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug therapy are presented. The drugs implicated were flufenamic acid, mefenamic acid, naproxen and ibuprofen. After resolution of symptoms and signs of proctocolitis three of the four patients were subsequently rechallenged with the implicated drug: in each there was a rapid relapse. PMID:3774712

  1. The Role of Inflammatory and Anti-Inflammatory Cytokines in the Pathogenesis of Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Poniatowski, Łukasz A.

    2014-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common chronic disease of human joints. The basis of pathologic changes involves all the tissues forming the joint; already, at an early stage, it has the nature of inflammation with varying degrees of severity. An analysis of the complex relationships indicates that the processes taking place inside the joint are not merely a set that (seemingly) only includes catabolic effects. Apart from them, anti-inflammatory anabolic processes also occur continually. These phenomena are driven by various mediators, of which the key role is attributed to the interactions within the cytokine network. The most important group controlling the disease seems to be inflammatory cytokines, including IL-1β, TNFα, IL-6, IL-15, IL-17, and IL-18. The second group with antagonistic effect is formed by cytokines known as anti-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-4, IL-10, and IL-13. The role of inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines in the pathogenesis of OA with respect to inter- and intracellular signaling pathways is still under investigation. This paper summarizes the current state of knowledge. The cytokine network in OA is put in the context of cells involved in this degenerative joint disease. The possibilities for further implementation of new therapeutic strategies in OA are also pointed. PMID:24876674

  2. Antioxidant, Analgesic, Anti-Inflammatory, and Hepatoprotective Effects of the Ethanol Extract of Mahonia oiwakensis Stem

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Jung; Liao, Jiunn-Wang; Peng, Wen-Huang; Lee, Meng-Shiou; Pao, Li-Heng; Cheng, Hao-Yuan

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate pharmacological properties of ethanol extracted from Mahonia oiwakensis Hayata stems (MOSEtOH). The pharmacological properties included antioxidant, analgesic, anti-inflammatory and hepatoprotective effects. The protoberberine alkaloid content of the MOSEtOH was analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The results revealed that three alkaloids, berberine, palmatine and jatrorrhizine, could be identified. Moreover, the MOSEtOH exhibited antioxidative activity using the DPPH assay (IC50, 0.743 mg/mL). The DPPH radical scavenging activity of MOSEtOH was five times higher that that of vitamin C. MOSEtOH was also found to inhibit pain induced by acetic acid, formalin, and carrageenan inflammation. Treatment with MOSEtOH (100 and 500 mg/kg) or silymarin (200 mg/kg) decreased the serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) levels compared with the CCl4-treated group. Histological evaluation showed that MOSEtOH reduced the degree of liver injury, including vacuolization, inflammation and necrosis of hepatocytes. The anti-inflammatory and hepatoprotective effect of MOSEtOH were found to be related to the modulation of antioxidant enzyme activity in the liver and decreases in malondialdehyde (MDA) level and nitric oxide (NO) contents. Our findings suggest that MOSEtOH has analgesic, anti-inflammatory and hepatoprotective effects. These effects support the use of MOSEtOH for relieving pain and inflammation in folk medicine. PMID:23364614

  3. Anti-inflammatory activity of AP-SF, a ginsenoside-enriched fraction, from Korean ginseng

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Kwang-Soo; Hong, Yong Deog; Kim, Yong; Sung, Nak Yoon; Yang, Sungjae; Lee, Kyoung Min; Park, Joo Yong; Park, Jun Seong; Rho, Ho Sik; Shin, Song Seok; Cho, Jae Youl

    2014-01-01

    Background Korean ginseng is an ethnopharmacologically valuable herbal plant with various biological properties including anticancer, antiatherosclerosis, antidiabetic, and anti-inflammatory activities. Since there is currently no drug or therapeutic remedy derived from Korean ginseng, we developed a ginsenoside-enriched fraction (AP-SF) for prevention of various inflammatory symptoms. Methods The anti-inflammatory efficacy of AP-SF was tested under in vitro inflammatory conditions including nitric oxide (NO) production and inflammatory gene expression. The molecular events of inflammatory responses were explored by immunoblot analysis. Results AP-SF led to a significant suppression of NO production compared with a conventional Korean ginseng saponin fraction, induced by both lipopolysaccharide and zymosan A. Interestingly, AP-SF strongly downregulated the mRNA levels of genes for inducible NO synthase, tumor necrosis factor-α, and cyclooxygenase) without affecting cell viability. In agreement with these observations, AP-SF blocked the nuclear translocation of c-Jun at 2 h and also reduced phosphorylation of p38, c-Jun N-terminal kinase, and TAK-1, all of which are important for c-Jun translocation. Conclusion Our results suggest that AP-SF inhibits activation of c-Jun-dependent inflammatory events. Thus, AP-SF may be useful as a novel anti-inflammatory remedy. PMID:26045689

  4. Antidepressant Compounds Can Be Both Pro- and Anti-Inflammatory in Human Hippocampal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Horowitz, Mark Abie; Wertz, Jasmin; Zhu, Danhui; Cattaneo, Annamaria; Musaelyan, Ksenia; Nikkheslat, Naghmeh; Thuret, Sandrine; Pariante, Carmine Maria

    2015-01-01

    Background: The increasingly recognized role of inflammation in the pathogenesis and prognosis of depression has led to a renewed focus on the immunomodulatory properties of compounds with antidepressant action. Studies have, so far, explored such properties in human blood samples and in animal models. Methods: Here we used the more relevant model of human hippocampal progenitor cells exposed to an inflammatory milieu, induced by treatment with IL-1β. This increased the levels of a series of cytokines and chemokines produced by the cells, including a dose- and time-dependent increase of IL-6. We investigated the immunomodulatory properties of four monoaminergic antidepressants (venlafaxine, sertraline, moclobemide, and agomelatine) and two omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs; eicosapentanoic acid [EPA] and docosahexanoic acid [DHA]). Results: We found that venlafaxine and EPA were anti-inflammatory: venlafaxine decreased IL-6, with a trend for decreases of IL-8 and IP-10, while EPA decreased the levels of IL-6, IL-15, IL-1RA, and IP-10. These effects were associated with a corresponding decrease in NF-kB activity. Unexpectedly, sertraline and DHA had pro-inflammatory effects, with sertraline increasing IFN-α and IL-6 and DHA increasing IL-15, IL-1RA, IFN-α, and IL-6, though these changes were also associated with a decrease in NF-kB activity, suggesting distinct modes of action. Agomelatine and moclobemide had no effect on IL-6 secretion. Conclusions: These observations indicate that monoaminergic antidepressants and n-3 PUFAs have distinctive effects on immune processes in human neural cells. Further characterization of these actions may enable more effective personalization of treatment based on the inflammatory status of patients. PMID:25522414

  5. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Heparin and Its Derivatives: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Mousavi, Sarah; Moradi, Mandana; Khorshidahmad, Tina; Motamedi, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Background. Heparin, used clinically as an anticoagulant, also has anti-inflammatory properties. The purpose of this systematic review was to provide a comprehensive review regarding the efficacy and safety of heparin and its derivatives as anti-inflammatory agents. Methods. We searched the following databases up to March 2012: Pub Med, Scopus, Web of Science, Ovid, Elsevier, and Google Scholar using combination of Mesh terms. Randomized Clinical Trials (RCTs) and trials with quasi-experimental design in clinical setting published in English were included. Quality assessments of RCTs were performed using Jadad score and Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) checklist. Results. A total of 280 relevant studies were reviewed and 57 studies met the inclusion criteria. Among them 48 studies were RCTs. About 65% of articles had score of 3 and higher according to Jadad score. Twelve studies had a quality score > 40% according to CONSORT items. Asthma (n = 7), inflammatory bowel disease (n = 5), cardiopulmonary bypass (n = 8), and cataract surgery (n = 6) were the most studied disease condition. Forty studies use unfractionated heparin (UFH) for intervention; the remaining studies use low molecular weight heparin (LMWH). Conclusion. Despite the conflicting results, heparin seems to be a safe and effective anti-inflammatory agent; although it is shown that heparin can decrease the level of inflammatory biomarkers and improves patient conditions, still more data from larger rigorously designed studies are needed to support use of heparin as an anti-inflammatory agent in clinical setting. However, because of the association between inflammation, atherogenesis, thrombogenesis, and cell proliferation, heparin and related compounds with pleiotropic effects may have greater therapeutic efficacy than compounds acting against a single target. PMID:26064103

  6. A novel anti-inflammatory role of GPR120 in intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Anbazhagan, Arivarasu N; Priyamvada, Shubha; Gujral, Tarunmeet; Bhattacharyya, Sumit; Alrefai, Waddah A; Dudeja, Pradeep K; Borthakur, Alip

    2016-04-01

    GPR120 (free fatty acid receptor-4) is a G protein-coupled receptor for medium- and long-chain unsaturated fatty acids, including ω-3 fatty acids. Recent studies have shown GPR120 to play cardinal roles in metabolic disorders via modulation of gut hormone secretion and insulin sensitivity and to exert anti-inflammatory effects in macrophages and adipose tissues. However, information on anti-inflammatory role of GPR120 at the level of intestinal epithelium is very limited. Current studies demonstrated differential levels of GPR120 mRNA and protein along the length of the human, mouse, and rat intestine and delineated distinct anti-inflammatory responses following GPR120 activation in model human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells, but not in model mouse intestinal epithelial endocrine cell line STC-1. In Caco-2 cells, GPR120 was internalized, bound to β-arrestin-2, and attenuated NF-κB activation in response to 30-min exposure to the agonists GW9508, TUG-891, or docosahexaenoic acid. These effects were abrogated in response to small interfering RNA silencing of β-arrestin-2. Treatment of STC-1 cells with these agonists did not induce receptor internalization and had no effects on NF-κB activation, although treatment with the agonists GW9508 or TUG-891 for 6 h augmented the synthesis and secretion of the gut hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 in this cell line. Our studies for the first time demonstrated a GPR120-mediated novel anti-inflammatory pathway in specific intestinal epithelial cell types that could be of therapeutic relevance to intestinal inflammatory disorders. PMID:26791484

  7. Differential Anti-inflammatory Activity of HDAC Inhibitors in Human Macrophages and Rat Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Lohman, Rink-Jan; Iyer, Abishek; Fairlie, Thomas J; Cotterell, Adam; Gupta, Praveer; Reid, Robert C; Vesey, David A; Sweet, Matthew J; Fairlie, David P

    2016-02-01

    Vorinostat and other inhibitors of different histone deacetylase (HDAC) enzymes are currently being sought to modulate a variety of human conditions, including chronic inflammatory diseases. Some HDAC inhibitors are anti-inflammatory in rodent models of arthritis and colitis, usually at cytotoxic doses that may cause side effects. Here, we investigate the dose-dependent pro- and anti-inflammatory efficacy of two known inhibitors of multiple HDACs, vorinostat and BML281, in human macrophages and in a rat model of collagen-induced arthritis by monitoring effects on disease progression, histopathology, and immunohistochemistry. Both HDAC inhibitors differentially modulated lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced cytokine release from human macrophages, suppressing release of some inflammatory mediators (IL12p40, IL6) at low concentrations (<3 µM) but amplifying production of others (TNF, IL1β) at higher concentration (>3 μΜ). This trend translated in vivo to rat arthritis, with anti-inflammatory activity inversely correlating with dose. Both compounds were efficacious only at a low dose (1 mg⋅kg(-1)⋅day(-1) s.c.), whereas a higher dose (5 mg⋅kg(-1)⋅day(-1) s.c.) showed no positive effects on reducing pathology, even showing signs of exacerbating disease. These striking effects suggest a smaller therapeutic window than previously reported for HDAC inhibition in experimental arthritis. The findings support new investigations into repurposing HDAC inhibitors for anti-inflammatory therapeutic applications. However, HDAC inhibitors should be reinvestigated at lower, rather than higher, doses for enhanced efficacy in chronic diseases that require long-term treatment, with careful management of efficacy and long-term safety. PMID:26660228

  8. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Heparin and Its Derivatives: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Mousavi, Sarah; Moradi, Mandana; Khorshidahmad, Tina; Motamedi, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Background. Heparin, used clinically as an anticoagulant, also has anti-inflammatory properties. The purpose of this systematic review was to provide a comprehensive review regarding the efficacy and safety of heparin and its derivatives as anti-inflammatory agents. Methods. We searched the following databases up to March 2012: Pub Med, Scopus, Web of Science, Ovid, Elsevier, and Google Scholar using combination of Mesh terms. Randomized Clinical Trials (RCTs) and trials with quasi-experimental design in clinical setting published in English were included. Quality assessments of RCTs were performed using Jadad score and Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) checklist. Results. A total of 280 relevant studies were reviewed and 57 studies met the inclusion criteria. Among them 48 studies were RCTs. About 65% of articles had score of 3 and higher according to Jadad score. Twelve studies had a quality score > 40% according to CONSORT items. Asthma (n = 7), inflammatory bowel disease (n = 5), cardiopulmonary bypass (n = 8), and cataract surgery (n = 6) were the most studied disease condition. Forty studies use unfractionated heparin (UFH) for intervention; the remaining studies use low molecular weight heparin (LMWH). Conclusion. Despite the conflicting results, heparin seems to be a safe and effective anti-inflammatory agent; although it is shown that heparin can decrease the level of inflammatory biomarkers and improves patient conditions, still more data from larger rigorously designed studies are needed to support use of heparin as an anti-inflammatory agent in clinical setting. However, because of the association between inflammation, atherogenesis, thrombogenesis, and cell proliferation, heparin and related compounds with pleiotropic effects may have greater therapeutic efficacy than compounds acting against a single target. PMID:26064103

  9. Anti-inflammatory properties of intestinal Bifidobacterium strains isolated from healthy infants.

    PubMed

    Khokhlova, Ekaterina V; Smeianov, Vladimir V; Efimov, Boris A; Kafarskaia, Lyudmila I; Pavlova, Svetlana I; Shkoporov, Andrei N

    2012-01-01

    Certain Bifidobacterium strains have been shown to inhibit inflammatory responses in intestinal epithelial cells. However, the precise mechanisms of these effects, including the chemical nature of the active compounds, remain to be elucidated. Here partial characterization of the anti-inflammatory properties of Bifidobacterium strains isolated from feces of healthy infants is reported. It was found that conditioned media (CM) of all strains studied are capable of attenuating tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and lipopolysaccharide- (LPS) induced inflammatory responses in the HT-29 cell line. In contrast, neither killed bifidobacterial cells, nor cell-free extracts showed such activities. Further investigations resulted in attribution of this activity to heat-stable, non-lipophilic compound(s) resistant to protease and nuclease treatments and of molecular weight less than 3 kDa. The anti-inflammatory effects were dose- and time-dependent and associated with inhibition of IκB phosphorylation and nuclear factor-κ light chain enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB)-dependent promoter activation. The combined treatments of cells with CMs and either LPS or TNF-α, but not with CMs alone, resulted in upregulation of transforming growth factor-β1, IκBζ, and p21(CIP) mRNAs. Our data suggest certain species-specificities of the anti-inflammatory properties of bifidobacteria. This observation should prompt additional validation studies using larger set of strains and employing the tools of comparative genomics. PMID:22040047

  10. Anti-Inflammatory and Organ-Protective Effects of Resveratrol in Trauma-Hemorrhagic Injury

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fu-Chao; Tsai, Yung-Fong; Tsai, Hsin-I; Yu, Huang-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Resveratrol, a natural polyphenolic compound of grape and red wine, owns potential anti-inflammatory effects, which results in the reduction of cytokines overproduction, the inhibition of neutrophil activity, and the alteration of adhesion molecules expression. Resveratrol also possesses antioxidant, anti-coagulation and anti-aging properties, and it may control of cell cycle and apoptosis. Resveratrol has been shown to reduce organ damage following traumatic and shock-like states. Such protective phenomenon is reported to be implicated in a variety of intracellular signaling pathways including the activation of estrogen receptor, the regulation of the sirtuin 1/nuclear factor-kappa B and mitogen-activated protein kinases/hemeoxygenase-1 pathway, and the mediation of proinflammatory cytokines and reactive oxygen species formation and reaction. In the recent studies, resveratrol attenuates hepatocyte injury and improves cardiac contractility due to reduction of proinflammatory mediator expression and ameliorates hypoxia-induced liver and kidney mitochondrial dysfunction following trauma and hemorrhagic injuries. Moreover, through anti-inflammatory effects and antioxidant properties, the resveratrol is believed to protect organ function in trauma-hemorrhagic injury. In this review, the organ-protective and anti-inflammatory effects of resveratrol in trauma-hemorrhagic injury will be discussed. PMID:26273141

  11. Anti-inflammatory Activity of Constituents Isolated from Aerial Part of Angelica acutiloba Kitagawa.

    PubMed

    Uto, Takuhiro; Tung, Nguyen Huu; Taniyama, Risa; Miyanowaki, Tosihide; Morinaga, Osamu; Shoyama, Yukihiro

    2015-12-01

    Recently, the resources of medicinal plants have been exhausting. The root of Angelica acutiloba is one of the most important ingredients in Japanese Kampo medicine for the treatment of gynecological diseases. In our search for alternative medicinal plant resources of the root of A. acutiloba, we found that its aerial part has the anti-inflammatory potency as well as the root. Phytochemical investigation of the aerial part resulted in the isolation of four compounds including a new dimeric phthalide, namely tokiaerialide (2), along with Z-ligustilide (1), falcarindiol (3), and bergaptol (4). Next, we investigated the in vitro anti-inflammatory activity of 1-4 in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated RAW264 macrophages. Among the isolated compounds, 1 exhibited the most potent inhibition against lipopolysaccharide-induced production of prostaglandin E2 , nitric oxide, and pro-inflammatory cytokines (interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α). Compounds 3 and 4 also inhibited all inflammatory mediators, but their inhibitory abilities were weaker than those of 1. Furthermore, 1, 3, and 4 strongly also induced heme oxygenase-1. These results suggest that 1, 3, and 4 potentially exert anti-inflammatory activity, and the aerial part of A. acutiloba may be considered to be a useful medicinal resource for inflammatory diseases. PMID:26463105

  12. Avicenna's Canon of Medicine: a review of analgesics and anti-inflammatory substances

    PubMed Central

    Mahdizadeh, Shahla; Khaleghi Ghadiri, Maryam; Gorji, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Naturally occurring substances mentioned in medieval medical literatures currently have, and will continue to have, a crucial place in drug discovery. Avicenna was a Persian physician who is known as the most influential medical writers in the Middle ages. Avicenna`s Canon of Medicine, the most famous books in the history of medicine, presents a clear and organized summary of all the medical knowledge of the time, including a long list of drugs. Several hundred substances and receipts from different sources are mentioned for treatment of different illnesses in this book. The aim of the present study was to provide a descriptive review of all anti-inflammatory and analgesic drugs presented in this comprehensive encyclopedia of medicine. Data for this review were provided by searches of different sections of this book. Long lists of anti-inflammatory and analgesic substances used in the treatment of various diseases are provided. The efficacy of some of these drugs, such as opium, willow oil, curcuma, and garlic, was investigated by modern medicine; pointed to their potent anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties. This review will help further research into the clinical benefits of new drugs for treatment of inflammatory diseases and pain. PMID:26101752

  13. Avicenna's Canon of Medicine: a review of analgesics and anti-inflammatory substances.

    PubMed

    Mahdizadeh, Shahla; Khaleghi Ghadiri, Maryam; Gorji, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Naturally occurring substances mentioned in medieval medical literatures currently have, and will continue to have, a crucial place in drug discovery. Avicenna was a Persian physician who is known as the most influential medical writers in the Middle ages. Avicenna`s Canon of Medicine, the most famous books in the history of medicine, presents a clear and organized summary of all the medical knowledge of the time, including a long list of drugs. Several hundred substances and receipts from different sources are mentioned for treatment of different illnesses in this book. The aim of the present study was to provide a descriptive review of all anti-inflammatory and analgesic drugs presented in this comprehensive encyclopedia of medicine. Data for this review were provided by searches of different sections of this book. Long lists of anti-inflammatory and analgesic substances used in the treatment of various diseases are provided. The efficacy of some of these drugs, such as opium, willow oil, curcuma, and garlic, was investigated by modern medicine; pointed to their potent anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties. This review will help further research into the clinical benefits of new drugs for treatment of inflammatory diseases and pain. PMID:26101752

  14. Identification of anti-inflammatory constituents in Hypericum perforatum and Hypericum gentianoides extracts using RAW 264.7 mouse macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Nan; Rizshsky, Ludmila; Hauck, Cathy; Nikolau, Basil J.; Murphy, Patricia A.; Birt, Diane F.

    2011-01-01

    Hypericum perforatum (St. John’s wort) is an herb widely used as supplement for mild to moderate depression. Our prior studies revealed synergistic anti-inflammatory activity associated with 4 bioactive compounds in a fraction of H. perforatum ethanol extract. Whether these 4 compounds also contributed to the ethanol extract activity was addressed in the research reported here. Despite the popularity of H. perforatum, other Hypericum species with different phytochemical profiles could have their anti-inflammatory potentials attributed to these or other compounds. In the current study, ethanol extracts of different Hypericum species were compared for their inhibitory effect on LPS-induced prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and nitric oxide (NO) production in RAW 264.7 mouse macrophages. Among these extracts, those made from H. perforatum and H. gentianoides demonstrated stronger overall efficacy. LC-MS analysis indicated the 4 compounds in H. perforatum extract and pseudohypericin in all active fractions. The 4 compounds accounted for a significant part of the extract’s inhibitory activity on PGE2, NO, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) in RAW 264.7 as well as peritoneal macrophages. Pseudohypericin was the most important contributor of the anti-inflammatory potential among the 4 compounds. The lipophilic fractions of H. gentianoides extract, which did not contain the previously identified active constituents, decreased PGE2 and NO potently. These fractions were rich in acylphloroglucinols, including uliginosin A that accounted for a proportion of the anti-inflammatory activity observed with the active fractions. Overall, the current study revealed a different group of major anti-inflammatory constituents in H. gentianoides, while showing that a previously identified 4 compounds combination was important for H. perforatum’s anti-inflammatory potential. PMID:21855951

  15. The anti-inflammatory prostaglandin 15d-PGJ2 and its nuclear receptor PPARgamma are decreased in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Gras, Isabel; Pérez-Nievas, Beatriz G; García-Bueno, Borja; Madrigal, José L M; Andrés-Esteban, Eva; Rodríguez-Jiménez, Roberto; Hoenicka, Janet; Palomo, Tomás; Rubio, Gabriel; Leza, Juan C

    2011-05-01

    A number of findings suggest that inflammation plays a role in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Taking into account a physiological balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators, we measured the plasma levels of cyclooxygenase-derived mediators and other key pro- and anti-inflammatory transcription factors in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Forty healthy subjects and 46 treated chronic schizophrenic patients with an acutely exacerbated condition who met DSM-IV criteria were included. COX by-products prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and 15d-prostaglandin J2 (15d-PGJ2) plasma levels were measured by EIA. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) as well as nuclear factor kappaB (NFκB) activity in nuclear extracts from PBMC and expression of its inhibitory subunit IκBα in cytosolic extracts were determined using ELISA-based kits. Schizophrenic patients showed higher plasma levels of pro-inflammatory PGE2 than age-matched controls (p=0.043). On the contrary, levels of anti-inflammatory 15-d-PGJ2 were lower (p=0.004), correlating with a lower expression of its nuclear target, PPARγ in nuclear extracts from PBMC (p=0.001). Although no changes in NFκB activity were observed between patients and healthy controls, the expression of its inhibitory protein IκBα was lower in the patients compared to the controls (p=0.027). These findings suggest that schizophrenia is associated with a systemic imbalance in the plasma levels of pro-inflammatory/anti-inflammatory prostaglandins in favor of the former. Furthermore, the expression and activity of anti-inflammatory PPARγ are diminished in PBMC, which indicates a state of inflammation and blunted anti-inflammatory counterbalancing mechanisms at systemic level in these patients. PMID:21334179

  16. Anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects of cucurbitacins from Wilbrandia ebracteata.

    PubMed

    Peters, R R; Farias, M R; Ribeiro-do-Valle, R M

    1997-12-01

    The anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive actions of the CH2Cl2 extract and semipurified fraction (F-III) from roots of Wilbrandia ebracteata Cogn. have been investigated in rats and mice. The CH2Cl2 extract (1-10 mg/kg, i.p.; ID50 5 mg/kg) and (3-30 mg/kg, p.o.; ID50 15 mg/kg) inhibited, in a dose-related manner, carrageenan-induced paw edema in rats. The subfraction (F-III) from CH2Cl2 extract and compounds isolated as cucurbitacin B and E also inhibited carrageenan-induced edema. The CH2Cl2 extract and F-III also exhibited significant analgesic action in acetic acid-induced pain in mice. In the formalin test, the CH2Cl2 extract (0.3-10 mg/kg, i.p.) and (3-30 mg/kg, p.o.) caused inhibition of the neurogenic (first phase) and inflammatory phase (second phase) of formalin-induced pain. However, the CH2Cl2 extract was more effective in relation to the second phase than in inhibition of the formalin-induced edema. These findings suggest that CH2Cl2 extract has potent anti-inflammatory and analgesic action and that F-III and cucurbitacin B and E may account for these actions. PMID:9434604

  17. Anti-inflammatory effect of Momordica charantia in sepsis mice.

    PubMed

    Chao, Che-Yi; Sung, Ping-Jyun; Wang, Wei-Hsien; Kuo, Yueh-Hsiung

    2014-01-01

    Wild bitter gourd (Momordica charantia L. var. abbreviate Seringe), a common vegetable in Asia, is used in traditional medicine to treat various diseases, including inflammation. Extant literature indicates that wild bitter gourds have components that activate PPARα and PPARγ. This research probed the influence of adding wild bitter gourd to diets on inflammation responses in mice with sepsis induced by intraperitoneal injection of LPS. Male BALB/c mice were divided normal, sepsis, positive control, and three experimental groups. The latter ate diets with low (1%), moderate (2%), and high (10%) ratios of wild bitter gourd lyophilized powder. Before mice were sacrificed, with the exception of the normal group, intraperitoneal injection of LPS induced sepsis in each group; positive control group was injected with LPS after PDTC. This experiment revealed starkly lower weights in groups with added wild bitter gourd than those of the remaining groups. Blood lipids (TG, cholesterol, and NEFA) were also lower in comparison to the sepsis group, and blood glucose concentrations recovered and approached normal levels. Blood biochemistry values related to inflammation reactions indicated GOT, GPT, C-RP, and NO concentrations of groups with added wild bitter gourd were all lower than those of the sepsis group. Secretion levels of the spleen pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1, IL-6, and TNF-α tallied significantly lower in comparison to the sepsis group, whereas secretion levels of IL-10 anti-inflammatory cytokine increased. Expression level of proteins NF-κB, iNOS, and COX-2 were significantly inhibited. Results indicate wild bitter gourd in diets promoted lipid metabolism, reducing fat accumulation, and improving low blood glucose in sepsis. Addition of wild bitter gourd can reduce inflammation biochemical markers or indicators and pro-inflammatory cytokines in the body, hence improving the inflammation responses in mice with sepsis. PMID:25153878

  18. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Hyptis albida Chloroform Extract on Lipopolysaccharide-Stimulated Peritoneal Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Sánchez Miranda, Elizabeth; Pérez Ramos, Julia; Fresán Orozco, Cristina; Zavala Sánchez, Miguel Angel; Pérez Gutiérrez, Salud

    2013-01-01

    We examined the effects of a chloroform extract of Hyptis albida (CHA) on inflammatory responses in mouse lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced peritoneal macrophages. Our findings indicate that CHA inhibits LPS-induced production of tumor necrosis factor (TNF- α ) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). During the process, levels of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and nitric oxide (NO) increased in the mouse peritoneal macrophages; however, the extract suppressed them significantly. These results provide novel insights into the anti-inflammatory actions of CHA and support its potential use in the treatment of inflammatory diseases. PMID:23970974

  19. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Hyptis albida Chloroform Extract on Lipopolysaccharide-Stimulated Peritoneal Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez Miranda, Elizabeth; Pérez Ramos, Julia; Fresán Orozco, Cristina; Zavala Sánchez, Miguel Angel; Pérez Gutiérrez, Salud

    2013-01-01

    We examined the effects of a chloroform extract of Hyptis albida (CHA) on inflammatory responses in mouse lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced peritoneal macrophages. Our findings indicate that CHA inhibits LPS-induced production of tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). During the process, levels of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and nitric oxide (NO) increased in the mouse peritoneal macrophages; however, the extract suppressed them significantly. These results provide novel insights into the anti-inflammatory actions of CHA and support its potential use in the treatment of inflammatory diseases. PMID:23970974

  20. Src kinase-targeted anti-inflammatory activity of davallialactone from Inonotus xeranticus in lipopolysaccharide-activated RAW264.7 cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Y G; Lee, W M; Kim, J Y; Lee, J Y; Lee, I-K; Yun, B-S; Rhee, M H; Cho, J Y

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: Mushrooms are popular both as food and as a source of natural compounds of biopharmaceutical interest. Some mushroom-derived compounds such as β-glucan have been shown to be immunostimulatory; this study explores the anti-inflammatory properties of hispidin analogues derived from the mushroom, Inonotus xeranticus. We sought to identify the molecular mechanism of action of these hispidin analogues by determining their effects on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-mediated inflammatory responses in a macrophage cell line. Experimental approach: The production of inflammatory mediators was determined by Griess assay, reverse transcription-PCR and ELISA. The inhibitory effect of davalliactone on LPS-induced activation of signalling cascades was assessed by western blotting, immunoprecipitation and direct kinase assay. Key results: In activated RAW264.7 cells, davallialactone strongly downregulated LPS-mediated inflammatory responses, including NO production, prostaglandin E2 release, expression of proinflammatory cytokine genes and cell surface expression of co-stimulatory molecules. Davallialactone treatment did not alter cell viability or morphology. Davallialactone was found to exert its anti-inflammatory effects by inhibiting a signalling cascade that activates nuclear factor kappa B via PI3K, Akt and IKK, but not mitogen-activated protein kinases. Treatment with davallialactone affected the phosphorylation of these signalling proteins, but not their level of expression. These inhibitory effects were not due to the interruption of toll-like receptor 4 binding to CD14. In particular, davallialactone strongly inhibited the LPS-induced phosphorylation and kinase activity of Src, implying that Src may be a potential pharmacological target of davallialactone. Conclusions and implications: Our data suggest that davallialactone, a small molecule found in edible mushrooms, has anti-inflammatory activity. Davallialactone can be developed as a pharmaceutically

  1. Viscum album Exerts Anti-Inflammatory Effect by Selectively Inhibiting Cytokine-Induced Expression of Cyclooxygenase-2

    PubMed Central

    Hegde, Pushpa; Maddur, Mohan S.; Friboulet, Alain; Bayry, Jagadeesh; Kaveri, Srini V.

    2011-01-01

    Viscum album (VA) preparations are extensively used as complementary therapy in cancer and are shown to exert anti-tumor activities which involve the cytotoxic properties, induction of apoptosis, inhibition of angiogenesis and several other immunomodulatory mechanisms. In addition to their application in cancer therapy, VA preparations have also been successfully utilized in the treatment of several inflammatory pathologies. Owing to the intricate association of inflammation and cancer and in view of the fact that several anti-tumor phytotherapeutics also exert a potent anti-inflammatory effect, we hypothesized that VA exerts an anti-inflammatory effect that is responsible for its therapeutic benefit. Since, inflammatory cytokine-induced cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) play a critical role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases, we investigated the anti-inflammatory effect of VA on regulation of cyclo-oxygenase expression and PGE2 biosynthesis by using human lung adenocarcinoma cells (A549 cells) as a model. A549 cells were stimulated with IL-1β and treated with VA preparation (VA Qu Spez) for 18 hours. PGE2 was analysed in the culture supernatants by enzyme immunoassay. Expression of COX-2 and COX-1 proteins was analyzed by immunoblotting and the expression of COX-2 mRNA was assessed by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. We found that VA Qu Spez inhibit the secretion of IL-1β-induced PGE2 in a dose-dependent manner. Further, we also show that this inhibitory action was associated with a reduced expression of COX-2 without modulating the COX-1 expression. Together these results demonstrate a novel anti-inflammatory mechanism of action of VA preparations wherein VA exerts an anti-inflammatory effect by inhibiting cytokine-induced PGE2 via selective inhibition of COX-2. PMID:22028854

  2. Evaluation of Anti-Inflammatory and Anti-Nociceptive Effects of Defatted Fruit Extract of Olea europaea

    PubMed Central

    Sahranavard, Shamim; Kamalinejad, Mohammad; Faizi, Mehrdad

    2014-01-01

    Fruits of Olea europaea L. have been used for centuries in folk medicine to treat many inflammatory diseases. In order to evaluate the anti-nociceptive activities of the methanolic and aqueous extracts of defatted fruits of O. europaea, formalin test was used and for evaluation of anti-inflammatory effects of the extract, the volume of paw edema was measured. The results revealed that both extracts did not exhibit significant analgesic activity in the first phase of formalin test, whereas methanolic extract at the 600 mg/Kg dose and aqueous extract at the 450 and 600 mg/Kg doses could inhibit induced pain in the second phase of formalin test. Furthermore, the results of paw edema volume measurement indicated that the aqueous extract has anti-inflammatory effects at dose of 600 mg/Kg. Induced anti-nociception by aqueous olive extract was not reversed by naloxone, which indicates that the opioid receptors are not involved in the analgesic effects of the extracts. The present data pointed out that the extracts of olive defatted fruit have anti-nociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects in rats but further studies are needed to elucidate the mechanism(s) of action and active components which are involved in analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects. PMID:24711837

  3. Anti-inflammatory and cytotoxic activities of Bursera copallifera

    PubMed Central

    Columba-Palomares, M. F. María C.; Villareal, Dra. María L.; Acevedo Quiroz, M. C. Macdiel E.; Marquina Bahena, M. C. Silvia; Álvarez Berber, Dra. Laura P.; Rodríguez-López, Dra. Verónica

    2015-01-01

    Background: The plant species Bursera copallifera (DC) bullock is used in traditional medicine to treat inflammation. The leaves of this plant can be prepared as an infusion to treat migraines, bronchitis, and dental pain Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine the anti-inflammatory and cytotoxic activities of organic extracts from the stems, stem bark, and leaves of B. copallifera, which was selected based on the knowledge of its traditional use. Materials and Methods: We evaluated the ability of extracts to inhibit mouse ear inflammation in response to topical application of 12-O tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate. The extracts with anti-inflammatory activity were evaluated for their inhibition of pro-inflammatory enzymes. In addition, the in vitro cytotoxic activities of the organic extracts were evaluated using the sulforhodamine B assay. Results: The hydroalcoholic extract of the stems (HAS) exhibited an anti-inflammatory activity of 54.3% (0.5 mg/ear), whereas the anti-inflammatory activity of the dichloromethane-methanol extract from the leaves (DMeL) was 55.4% at a dose of 0.1 mg/ear. Methanol extract from the leaves (MeL) showed the highest anti-inflammatory activity (IC50 = 4.4 μg/mL), hydroalcoholic extract of leaves, and DMeL also reduce the enzyme activity, (IC50 = 6.5 μg/mL, IC50 = 5.7 μg/mL), respectively, from stems HAS exhibit activity at the evaluated concentrations (IC50 =6.4 μg/mL). The hydroalcoholic extract of the stems exhibited the highest cytotoxic activity against a breast adenocarcinoma cell line (MCF7, IC50 = 0.90 μg/mL), whereas DMeL exhibited an IC50 value of 19.9 μg/mL. Conclusion: In conclusion, extracts from leaves and stems inhibited cyclooxygenase-1, which is the target enzyme for nonsteroidal anti inflammatory drugs, and some of these extracts demonstrated substantial antiproliferative effects against the MCF7 cell line. These results validate the traditional use of B. copallifera. PMID:26664022

  4. Role of fumaric acid in anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities of a Fumaria indica extracts

    PubMed Central

    Shakya, Anshul; Singh, Gireesh Kumar; Chatterjee, Shyam Sunder; Kumar, Vikas

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The aim was to test whether the ethanolic extract of Fumaria indica (FI) possesses anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities, and fumaric acid (FA) could be one of its bioactive constituent involved in such activities of the extract. Materials and Methods: For anti-inflammatory activity, carrageenan-induced edema and cotton pellet induced granuloma tests in rats and for analgesic activity rat tail flick test and hot plate and acetic acid writhing tests in mice were used. All tests were performed after seven daily oral doses of the FI extract (100, 200, and 400 mg/kg/day) and pure FA (1.25, 2.50, and 5.00 mg/kg/day). Results: Anti-inflammatory activities of FI and FA were observed in carrageenan-induced edema and cotton pallet granuloma even after their lowest tested doses. No analgesic activity of lowest tested dose of FA was observed in the acetic acid writhing test, but likewise, all tested dose levels of FI, higher tested dose levels of FA were also possess significant analgesic activity in this test. Further, significant analgesic activities of both FI and FA in hot plate and tale flick tests were observed after all their tested doses. Conclusions: These observations are in agreement with our working hypothesis on the connection of FA in mode(s) of action(s) of FI, and reaffirm the conviction that FI could be an herbal alternative against fibromyalgia and other pathologies often associate with, or caused by, inflammatory processes. PMID:26401369

  5. Antinociceptive and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Telfairia occidentalis Hydroethanolic Leaf Extract (Cucurbitaceae).

    PubMed

    Akindele, Abidemi James; Oladimeji-Salami, Joy Awulika; Usuwah, Blessing Amarachi

    2015-10-01

    Telfairia occidentalis (Cucurbitaceae) is a tropical vine grown in West Africa as a leaf vegetable and for its edible seeds. The plant is noted to have healing properties. It is used as a blood tonic to revive weak/ill individuals and its use by sickle cell patients has been documented. In this study, the antinociceptive activity of the hydroethanolic leaf extract of Telfairia occidentalis (TO) was evaluated using the acetic acid-induced writhing, formalin, tail clip, and hot plate tests in mice. The carrageenan- and egg albumin-induced rat paw edema tests were used to evaluate the anti-inflammatory action. The extract (50-400 mg/kg, p.o.) produced significant (P<.05) dose-dependent inhibition of pain response elicited by acetic acid and formalin while also increasing the nociceptive reaction latency in the tail clip and hot plate tests. In respect of anti-inflammatory activity, the extract elicited significant (P<.05) time and dose-dependent inhibition of edema development in the carrageenan and egg albumin tests. Peak effects of TO in the models were generally comparable with the effects of the standard drugs (acetylsalicylic acid, morphine, indomethacin, and chlorpheniramine) used. Phytochemical screening of the extract revealed the presence of tannins, saponins, phlobatannins, and anthraquinones. The extract did not produce any mortality and visible signs of delayed toxicity when administered orally up to 2000 mg/kg. The LD50 (i.p.) was estimated to be 4073.80 mg/kg. The results obtained in this study suggest that TO possesses antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities possibly mediated through peripheral and central mechanisms involving inhibition of release and/or actions of vasoactive substances and prostaglandins. PMID:25961368

  6. Synthesis and characterization of norbelladine, a precursor of Amaryllidaceae alkaloid, as an anti-inflammatory/anti-COX compound

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rising ROS and systemic inflammation is often a serious concern in many disease conditions including obesity. Therefore, compounds with both anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activities are considered beneficial in preventing/treating several human chronic diseases. Norbelladine is an amine compou...

  7. Therapeutic Potential of Hydrazones as Anti-Inflammatory Agents

    PubMed Central

    Bala, Suman; Sharma, Neha; Saini, Vipin

    2014-01-01

    Hydrazones are a special class of organic compounds in the Schiff base family. Hydrazones constitute a versatile compound of organic class having basic structure (R1R2C=NNR3R4). The active centers of hydrazone, that is, carbon and nitrogen, are mainly responsible for the physical and chemical properties of the hydrazones and, due to the reactivity toward electrophiles and nucleophiles, hydrazones are used for the synthesis of organic compound such as heterocyclic compounds with a variety of biological activities. Hydrazones and their derivatives are known to exhibit a wide range of interesting biological activities like antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anticonvulsant, analgesic, antimicrobial, anticancer, antiprotozoal, antioxidant, antiparasitic, antiplatelet, cardioprotective, anthelmintic, antidiabetic, antitubercular, trypanocidal, anti-HIV, and so forth. The present review summarizes the efficiency of hydrazones as potent anti-inflammatory agents. PMID:25383223

  8. Isoflavones: Anti-Inflammatory Benefit and Possible Caveats

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jie; Bi, Xiaojuan; Yu, Bing; Chen, Daiwen

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation, a biological response of body tissues to harmful stimuli, is also known to be involved in a host of diseases, such as obesity, atherosclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, and even cancer. Isoflavones are a class of flavonoids that exhibit antioxidant, anticancer, antimicrobial, and anti-inflammatory properties. Increasing evidence has highlighted the potential for isoflavones to prevent the chronic diseases in which inflammation plays a key role, though the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Recently, some studies have raised concerns about isoflavones induced negative effects like carcinogenesis, thymic involution, and immunosuppression. Therefore, this review aims to summarize the anti-inflammatory effects of isoflavones, unravel the underlying mechanisms, and present the potential health risks. PMID:27294954

  9. Anti-inflammatory and antipyretic effects of boldine.

    PubMed

    Backhouse, N; Delporte, C; Givernau, M; Cassels, B K; Valenzuela, A; Speisky, H

    1994-10-01

    Boldine, an antioxidant alkaloid isolated from Peumus boldus, exhibits a dose-dependent anti-inflammatory activity in the carrageenan-induced guinea pig paw edema test with an oral ED50 of 34 mg/kg. Boldine also reduces bacterial pyrogen-induced hyperthermia in rabbits to an extent which varied between 51% and 98% at a dose of 60 mg/kg p.o. In vitro studies carried out in rat aortal rings revealed that boldine is an effective inhibitor of prostaglandin biosynthesis, promoting 53% inhibition at 75 microM. The latter in vitro effect may be mechanistically linked to the anti-inflammatory and antipyretic effects of boldine exerted in vivo. PMID:7879695

  10. Constituents from Vigna vexillata and Their Anti-Inflammatory Activity

    PubMed Central

    Leu, Yann-Lii; Hwang, Tsong-Long; Kuo, Ping-Chung; Liou, Kun-Pei; Huang, Bow-Shin; Chen, Guo-Feng

    2012-01-01

    The seeds of Vigna genus are important food resources and there have already been many reports regarding their bioactivities. In our preliminary bioassay, the chloroform layer of methanol extracts of V. vexillata demonstrated significant anti-inflammatory bioactivity. Therefore, the present research is aimed to purify and identify the anti-inflammatory principles of V. vexillata. One new sterol (1) and two new isoflavones (2,3) were reported from the natural sources for the first time and their chemical structures were determined by the spectroscopic and mass spectrometric analyses. In addition, 37 known compounds were identified by comparison of their physical and spectroscopic data with those reported in the literature. Among the isolates, daidzein (23), abscisic acid (25), and quercetin (40) displayed the most significant inhibition of superoxide anion generation and elastase release. PMID:22949828

  11. Anti-inflammatory properties of α- and γ-tocopherol

    PubMed Central

    Reiter, Elke; Jiang, Qing; Christen, Stephan

    2007-01-01

    Natural vitamin E consists of four different tocopherol and four different tocotrienol homologues (α, β, γ, δ) that all have antioxidant activity. However, recent data indicate that the different vitamin E homologues also have biological activity unrelated to their antioxidant activity. In this review, we discuss the anti-inflammatory properties of the two major forms of vitamin E, α-tocopherol (αT) and γ-tocopherol (γT), and discuss the potential molecular mechanisms involved in these effects. While both tocopherols exhibit anti-inflammatory activity in vitro and in vivo, supplementation with mixed (γT-enriched) tocopherols seems to be more potent than supplementation with αT alone. This may explain the mostly negative outcomes of the recent large-scale interventional chronic disease prevention trials with αT and thus warrants further investigation. PMID:17316780

  12. Anti-inflammatory effects of a Houttuynia cordata supercritical extract.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sunhee; Joo, Seong Soo; Jeon, Jeong Hee; Park, Dongsun; Jang, Min Jung; Kim, Tae Ook; Kim, Hyun Kyu; Hwang, Bang Yeon; Kim, Ki Yon; Kim, Yun Bae

    2010-09-01

    Anti-inflammatory effects of Houttuynia cordata supercritical extract (HSE) were investigated in a carrageenan-air pouch model. HSE (200 mg/kg, oral) suppressed exudation and albumin leakage, as well as inflammatory cell infiltration. Dexamethasone (2 mg/kg, i.p.) only decreased exudation and cell infiltration, while indomethacin (2 mg/kg, i.p.) reduced exudate volume and albumin content. HSE lowered tumor-necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and nitric oxide (NO), as well as prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)). Dexamethasone only reduced TNF-alpha and NO, while indomethacin decreased TNF-alpha and PGE(2). The suppressive activity of HSE on NO and PGE(2) production was confirmed in RAW 264.7. These results demonstrate that HSE exerts anti-inflammatory effects by inhibiting both TNF-alpha-NO and cyclooxygenase II-PGE(2) pathways. PMID:20706037

  13. Isoflavones: Anti-Inflammatory Benefit and Possible Caveats.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jie; Bi, Xiaojuan; Yu, Bing; Chen, Daiwen

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation, a biological response of body tissues to harmful stimuli, is also known to be involved in a host of diseases, such as obesity, atherosclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, and even cancer. Isoflavones are a class of flavonoids that exhibit antioxidant, anticancer, antimicrobial, and anti-inflammatory properties. Increasing evidence has highlighted the potential for isoflavones to prevent the chronic diseases in which inflammation plays a key role, though the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Recently, some studies have raised concerns about isoflavones induced negative effects like carcinogenesis, thymic involution, and immunosuppression. Therefore, this review aims to summarize the anti-inflammatory effects of isoflavones, unravel the underlying mechanisms, and present the potential health risks. PMID:27294954

  14. Antibiotic and Anti-Inflammatory Therapies for Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Chmiel, James F.; Konstan, Michael W.; Elborn, J. Stuart

    2013-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease is characterized by chronic bacterial infection and an unremitting inflammatory response, which are responsible for most of CF morbidity and mortality. The median expected survival has increased from <6 mo in 1940 to >38 yr now. This dramatic improvement, although not great enough, is due to the development of therapies directed at secondary disease pathologies, especially antibiotics. The importance of developing treatments directed against the vigorous inflammatory response was realized in the 1990s. New therapies directed toward the basic defect are now visible on the horizon. However, the impact of these drugs on downstream pathological consequences is unknown. It is likely that antibiotics and anti-inflammatory drugs will remain an important part of the maintenance regimen for CF in the foreseeable future. Current and future antibiotic and anti-inflammatory therapies for CF are reviewed. PMID:23880054

  15. Antibiotic and anti-inflammatory therapies for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Chmiel, James F; Konstan, Michael W; Elborn, J Stuart

    2013-10-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease is characterized by chronic bacterial infection and an unremitting inflammatory response, which are responsible for most of CF morbidity and mortality. The median expected survival has increased from <6 mo in 1940 to >38 yr now. This dramatic improvement, although not great enough, is due to the development of therapies directed at secondary disease pathologies, especially antibiotics. The importance of developing treatments directed against the vigorous inflammatory response was realized in the 1990s. New therapies directed toward the basic defect are now visible on the horizon. However, the impact of these drugs on downstream pathological consequences is unknown. It is likely that antibiotics and anti-inflammatory drugs will remain an important part of the maintenance regimen for CF in the foreseeable future. Current and future antibiotic and anti-inflammatory therapies for CF are reviewed. PMID:23880054

  16. Phosphorylation of Akt Mediates Anti-Inflammatory Activity of 1-p-Coumaroyl β-D-Glucoside Against Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Inflammation in RAW264.7 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Vo, Van Anh; Lee, Jae-Won; Kim, Ji-Young; Park, Jun-Ho; Lee, Hee Jae; Kim, Sung-Soo; Kwon, Yong-Soo

    2014-01-01

    Hydroxycinnamic acids have been reported to possess numerous pharmacological activities such as antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-tumor properties. However, the biological activity of 1-p-coumaroyl β-D-glucoside (CG), a glucose ester derivative of p-coumaric acid, has not been clearly examined. The objective of this study is to elucidate the anti-inflammatory action of CG in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophage cells. In the present study, CG significantly suppressed LPS-induced excessive production of pro-inflammatory mediators such as nitric oxide (NO) and PGE2 and the protein expression of iNOS and COX-2. CG also inhibited LPS-induced secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines, IL-1β and TNF-α. In addition, CG significantly suppressed LPS-induced degradation of IκB. To elucidate the underlying mechanism by which CG exerts its anti-inflammatory action, involvement of various signaling pathways were examined. CG exhibited significantly increased Akt phosphorylation in a concentration-dependent manner, although MAPKs such as Erk, JNK, and p38 appeared not to be involved. Furthermore, inhibition of Akt/PI3K signaling pathway with wortmannin significantly, albeit not completely, abolished CG-induced Akt phosphorylation and anti-inflammatory actions. Taken together, the present study demonstrates that Akt signaling pathway might play a major role in CG-mediated anti-inflammatory activity in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophage cells. PMID:24634601

  17. [Helicobacter pylori, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents and gastroduodenal changes].

    PubMed

    Teixeira, A V

    1995-09-01

    The author discusses the possible interactions between non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and Helicobacter pylori (Hp) which may play an important role in the unleashing of gastroduodenal lesions. To our knowledge, AINEs have no influence on the prevalence of infection by Hp and the latter does not seem to influence the development and intensity of the lesions caused by NSAIDs. PMID:7484272

  18. Clinical Management of Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drug Hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Hypersensitivity diseases caused by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents are relatively common in the population. This article summarizes the present understanding on the various allergic and nonallergic clinical pictures produced through hypersensitivity to these drugs using the pathogenic classification of hypersensitivity reactions recently proposed by the Nomenclature Committee of the World Allergy Organization to guide clinicians in the diagnosis and management of patients with these conditions. PMID:23283307

  19. Photoelectron spectroscopy of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novak, Igor; Klasinc, Leo; Chong, Delano P.; McGlynn, Sean P.

    2013-08-01

    The electronic structures of eight non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) had been studied by UV photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS) and high-level Green's function (GF) calculations. Our UPS data show that the electronic structure influences the measured biological activity of NSAID, but that it is not the dominating factor. The role of electronic structure needs to be considered in conjunction with other factors like steric properties of the COX active site and orientation of relevant residues in the same site.

  20. Anti-inflammatory activity of mycelial extracts from medicinal mushrooms.

    PubMed

    Geng, Yan; Zhu, Shuiling; Lu, Zhenming; Xu, Hongyu; Shi, Jin-Song; Xu, Zheng-Hong

    2014-01-01

    Medicinal mushrooms have been essential components of traditional Chinese herbal medicines for thousands of years, and they protect against diverse health-related conditions. The components responsible for their anti-inflammatory activity have yet to be fully studied. This study investigates the anti-inflammatory activity of n-hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate, and methanol extracts of mycelia in submerged culture from 5 commercially available medicinal mushrooms, namely Cephalosporium sinensis, Cordyceps mortierella, Hericium erinaceus, Ganoderma lucidum, and Armillaria mellea. MTT colorimetric assay was applied to measure the cytotoxic effects of different extracts. Their anti-inflammatory activities were evaluated via inhibition against production of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced nitric oxide (NO) in murine macrophage-like cell line RAW264.7 cells. Of the 20 extracts, n-hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate, and methanol extracts from C. sinensis, C. mortierella, and G. lucidum; chloroform extracts from H. erinaceus and A. mellea; and ethyl acetate extracts from A. mellea at nontoxic concentrations (<300 μg/mL) dose-dependently inhibited LPS-induced NO production. Among them, the chloroform extract from G. lucidum was the most effective inhibitor, with the lowest half maximal inhibitory concentration (64.09 ± 6.29 μg/mL) of the LPS-induced NO production. These results indicate that extracts from medicinal mushrooms exhibited anti-inflammatory activity that might be attributable to the inhibition of NO generation and can therefore be considered a useful therapeutic and preventive approach to various inflammation-related diseases. PMID:25271860

  1. Anti-inflammatory cyclohexenyl chalcone derivatives in Boesenbergia pandurata.

    PubMed

    Tuchinda, Patoomratana; Reutrakul, Vichai; Claeson, Per; Pongprayoon, Ubonwan; Sematong, Tuanta; Santisuk, Thawatchai; Taylor, Walter C

    2002-01-01

    The cyclohexenyl chalcone derivative [(-)-hydroxypanduratin A], together with the previously known panduratin A, sakuranetin, pinostrobin, pinocembrin, and dihydro-5,6-dehydrokawain were isolated from the chloroform extract of the red rhizome variety of Boesenbergia pandurata (Robx.) Schltr. [currently known as Boesenbergia rotunda (L.) Mansf., Kulturpfl.]. Their structures were assigned on the basis of their spectroscopic data. (-)-Hydroxypanduratin A and (-)-panduratin A showed significant topical anti-inflammatory activity in the assay of TPA-induced ear edema in rats. PMID:11809452

  2. Anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial activities of novel pyrazole analogues.

    PubMed

    Surendra Kumar, R; Arif, Ibrahim A; Ahamed, Anis; Idhayadhulla, Akbar

    2016-09-01

    A new sequence of pyrazole derivatives (1-6) was synthesized from condensation technique under utilizing ultrasound irradiation. Synthesized compounds were characterized from IR, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, Mass and elemental analysis. Synthesized compounds (1-6) were screened for antimicrobial activity. Among the compounds 3 (MIC: 0.25 μg/mL) was exceedingly antibacterially active against gram negative bacteria of Escherichia coli and compound 4 (MIC: 0.25 μg/mL) was highly active against gram positive bacteria of Streptococcus epidermidis compared with standard Ciprofloxacin. Compound 2 (MIC: 1 μg/mL) was highly antifungal active against Aspergillus niger proportionate to Clotrimazole. Synthesized compounds (1-6) were screened for anti-inflammatory activity and the compound 2-((5-hydroxy-3-methyl-1H-pyrazol-4-yl)(4-nitrophenyl)methyl)hydrazinecarboxamide (4) was better activity against anti-inflammatory when compared with standard drugs (Diclofenac sodium). Compounds (2, 3 and 4) are the most important molecules and hence the need to develop new drugs of antibacterial, antifungal and anti-inflammatory agents. PMID:27579011

  3. Anti-inflammatory activities of selected synthetic homoisoflavanones.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Mahidansha M; Kruger, Hendrik G; Bodenstein, Johannes; Smith, Peter; du Toit, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Four homoisoflavanones of the 3-benzylidene-4-chromanone type, some of which were previously isolated from Caesalpinia pulcherrima, were synthesised to determine their anti-inflammatory activity and cytotoxicity. A range of four different homoisoflavanones (compounds 4a-4d) were synthesised from the corresponding substituted phenols. ¹H- and ¹³C-NMR data together with high-resolution mass spectroscopy data were employed to elucidate the structures. Anti-inflammatory activity was determined in mice with acute croton oil-induced auricular dermatitis. In vitro cytotoxicity was tested against a Chinese hamster ovarian cell line using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazoliumbromide (MTT) assay. Compound 4a exhibited a tendency to inhibit oedema in a dose-dependent manner after 3 and 6 h of treatment. Compounds 4b-4d also inhibited oedema, although a clear dose-response relationship was not observed. Compounds 4a-4c were found to be less cytotoxic than compound 4d. Compound 4b was the least cytotoxic. Compounds 4a-4d exhibited anti-inflammatory activity and varying levels of cytotoxicity. PMID:21950651

  4. Anti-inflammatory activity and composition of Senecio salignus Kunth.

    PubMed

    González, Cuauhtemoc Pérez; Vega, Roberto Serrano; González-Chávez, Marco; Sánchez, Miguel Angel Zavala; Gutiérrez, Salud Pérez

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the anti-inflammatory activity of Senecio salignus. This medicinal plant is often used in Mexico for the treatment of fever and rheumatism. Chloroform and methanol extracts of the plant were tested on 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate- (TPA-) induced edema in mice ears. The methanol extract of the plant inhibited edema by 36 ± 4.4% compared with the control, while the chloroform extract exhibited an even greater level of inhibition (64.1%). The chloroform extract was then fractionated, and the composition of the active fraction was determined by GC-MS. The anti-inflammatory activity of this fraction was then tested on TPA-induced ear edema in mice, and we found that the active fraction could inhibit edema by 46.9%. The anti-inflammatory effect of the fraction was also tested on carrageenan-induced paw edema in rats at doses of 100 mg/kg; a 58.9 ± 2.8% reduction of the edema was observed 4 h after administration of carrageenan, and the effect was maintained for 5 h. PMID:23691512

  5. Anti-Inflammatory Activity and Composition of Senecio salignus Kunth

    PubMed Central

    Pérez González, Cuauhtemoc; Serrano Vega, Roberto; González-Chávez, Marco; Zavala Sánchez, Miguel Angel; Pérez Gutiérrez, Salud

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the anti-inflammatory activity of Senecio salignus. This medicinal plant is often used in Mexico for the treatment of fever and rheumatism. Chloroform and methanol extracts of the plant were tested on 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate- (TPA-) induced edema in mice ears. The methanol extract of the plant inhibited edema by 36 ± 4.4% compared with the control, while the chloroform extract exhibited an even greater level of inhibition (64.1%). The chloroform extract was then fractionated, and the composition of the active fraction was determined by GC-MS. The anti-inflammatory activity of this fraction was then tested on TPA-induced ear edema in mice, and we found that the active fraction could inhibit edema by 46.9%. The anti-inflammatory effect of the fraction was also tested on carrageenan-induced paw edema in rats at doses of 100 mg/kg; a 58.9 ± 2.8% reduction of the edema was observed 4 h after administration of carrageenan, and the effect was maintained for 5 h. PMID:23691512

  6. Anti-inflammatory effect of thalidomide dithiocarbamate and dithioate analogs.

    PubMed

    Talaat, Roba; El-Sayed, Waheba; Agwa, Hussein S; Gamal-Eldeen, Amira M; Moawia, Shaden; Zahran, Magdy A H

    2015-08-01

    Thalidomide has anti-inflammatory, immunomodulatory, and anti-angiogenic properties. It has been used to treat a variety of cancers and autoimmune diseases. This study aimed to characterize anti-inflammatory activities of novel thalidomide analogs by exploring their effects on splenocytes proliferation and macrophage functions and their antioxidant activity. MTT assay was used to assess the cytotoxic effect of thalidomide analogs against splenocytes. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB-P65) were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Nitric oxide (NO) was estimated by colorimetric assay. Antioxidant activity was examined by ORAC assay. Our results demonstrated that thalidomide dithioate analog 2 and thalidomide dithiocarbamate analog 4 produced a slight increase in splenocyte proliferation compared with thalidomide. Thalidomide dithiocarbamate analog 1 is a potent inhibitor of TNF-α production, whereas thalidomide dithiocarbamate analog 5 is a potent inhibitor of both TNF-α and NO. Analog 2 has a pronounced inhibitory effect on NF-κB-P65 production level. All thalidomide analogs showed prooxidant activity against hydroxyl (OH) radical. Analog 1 and thalidomide dithioate analog 3 have prooxidant activity against peroxyl (ROO) radical in relation to thalidomide. On the other hand, analog 4 has a potent scavenging capacity against peroxyl (ROO) radical compared with thalidomide. Taken together, the results of this study suggest that thalidomide analogs might have valuable anti-inflammatory activities with more pronounced effect than thalidomide itself. PMID:26051520

  7. Anti-inflammatory effect of methanol extract from Erigeron Canadensis L. may be involved with upregulation of heme oxygenase-1 expression and suppression of NFκB and MAPKs activation in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Jeehye; Sung, Misun; Kim, Younghwa; Ham, Hyeonmi; Jeong, Heon-Sang

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES In this study, we determined the anti-inflammatory activities and the underlying molecular mechanisms of the methanol extract from Erigeron Canadensis L. (ECM) in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophage cells. MATERIALS/METHODS The potential anti-inflammatory properties of ECM were investigated by using RAW264.7 macrophages. We used western blot assays and real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction to detect protein and mRNA expression, respectively. Luciferase assays were performed to determine the transactivity of transcription factors. RESULTS ECM significantly inhibited inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS)-derived NO and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) derived PGE2 production in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophages. These inhibitory effects of ECM were accompanied by decreases in LPS-induced nuclear translocations and transactivities of NFκB. Moreover, phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPKs) including extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK1/2), p38, and c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) was significantly suppressed by ECM in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophages. Further studies demonstrated that ECM by itself induced heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) protein expression at the protein levels in dose-dependent manner. However, zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP), a selective HO-1 inhibitor, abolished the ECM-induced suppression of NO production. CONCLUSIONS These results suggested that ECM-induced HO-1 expression was partly responsible for the resulting anti-inflammatory effects. These findings suggest that ECM exerts anti-inflammatory actions and help to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the potential therapeutic values of Erigeron Canadensis L. PMID:25110553

  8. Anti-inflammatory, gastroprotective and anti-ulcerogenic effects of red algae Gracilaria changii (Gracilariales, Rhodophyta) extract

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Gracilaria changii (Xia et Abbott) Abbott, Zhang et Xia, a red algae commonly found in the coastal areas of Malaysia is traditionally used for foods and for the treatment of various ailments including inflammation and gastric ailments. The aim of the study was to investigate anti-inflammatory, gastroprotective and anti-ulcerogenic activities of a mass spectrometry standardized methanolic extract of Gracilaria changii. Methods Methanolic extract of Gracilaria changii (MeOHGCM6 extract) was prepared and standardized using mass spectrometry (MS). Anti-inflammatory activities of MeOHGCM6 extract were examined by treating U937 cells during its differentiation with 10 μg/ml MeOHGCM6 extract. Tumour necrosis factors-α (TNF-α) response level and TNF-α and interleukin-6 (IL-6) gene expression were monitored and compared to that treated by 10 nM betamethasone, an anti-inflammatory drug. Gastroprotective and anti-ulcerogenic activities of MeOHGCM6 extract were examined by feeding rats with MeOHGCM6 extract ranging from 2.5 to 500 mg/kg body weight (b.w.) following induction of gastric lesions. Production of mucus and gastric juice, pH of the gastric juice and non-protein sulfhydryls (NP-SH) levels were determined and compared to that fed by 20 mg/kg b.w. omeprazole (OMP), a known anti-ulcer drug. Results MS/MS analysis of the MeOHGCM6 extracts revealed the presence of methyl 10-hydroxyphaeophorbide a and 10-hydroxypheophytin a, known chlorophyll proteins and several unidentified molecules. Treatment with 10 μg/ml MeOHGCM6 extract during differentiation of U937 cells significantly inhibited TNF-α response level and TNF-α and IL-6 gene expression. The inhibitory effect was comparable to that of betamethasone. No cytotoxic effects were recorded for cells treated with the 10 μg/ml MeOHGCM6 extract. Rats fed with MeOHGCM6 extract at 500 mg/kg b.w. showed reduced absolute ethanol-induced gastric lesion sizes by > 99% (p < 0.05). This protective

  9. Strong and Long-Lasting Antinociceptive and Anti-inflammatory Conjugate of Naturally Occurring Oleanolic Acid and Aspirin

    PubMed Central

    Bednarczyk-Cwynar, Barbara; Wachowiak, Natalia; Szulc, Michal; Kamińska, Ewa; Bogacz, Anna; Bartkowiak-Wieczorek, Joanna; Zaprutko, Lucjusz; Mikolajczak, Przemyslaw L.

    2016-01-01

    The conjugate 8 was obtained as a result of condensation of 3-hydroxyiminooleanolic acid morfolide (7) and aspirin in dioxane. Analgesic effect of OAO-ASA (8) for the range of doses 0.3–300.0 mg/kg (p.o.) was performed in mice using a hot-plate test. Anti-inflammatory activity was assessed on carrageenan-induced paw edema in rats for the same range of doses. The conjugate OAO-ASA (8) did not significantly change locomotor activity of mice, therefore sedative properties of the compound should be excluded. The compound 8 proved a simple, proportional, dose-dependent analgesic action and expressed strong anti-inflammatory activity showing a reversed U-shaped, dose-dependent relation with its maximum at 30.0 mg/kg. After its combined administration with morphine (MF, 5.0 mg/kg, s.c.) the lowering of antinociceptive activity was found; however, the interaction with naloxone (NL, 3.0 mg/kg, s.c.) did not affect the antinociceptive effect of OAO-ASA (8), therefore its opioid mechanism of action should be rather excluded. After combined administration with acetylsalicylic acid (ASA, 300.0 mg/kg, p.o.) in hot-plate test, the examined compound 8 enhanced the antinociceptive activity in significant way. It also shows that rather the whole molecule is responsible for the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effect of the tested compound 8, however, it cannot be excluded that the summarizing effect is produced by ASA released from the compound 8 and the rest of triterpene derivative. The occurrence of tolerance for triterpenic derivative 8 was not observed, since the analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects after chronic administration of the conjugate OAO-ASA (8) was on the same level as after its single treatment. It seemed that the anti-inflammatory mechanism of action of OAO-ASA (8) is not simple, even its chronic administration lowered both blood concentration of IL-6 and mRNA IL-6 expression. However, the effects of the conjugate OAO-ASA (8) on TNF-α level and m

  10. Lipophilic stinging nettle extracts possess potent anti-inflammatory activity, are not cytotoxic and may be superior to traditional tinctures for treating inflammatory disorders

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Tyler A.; Sohn, Johann; Inman, Wayne D.; Bjeldanes, Leonard F.; Rayburn, Keith

    2012-01-01

    Extracts of four plant portions (roots, stems, leaves and flowers) of Urtica dioica, (the stinging nettle) were prepared using accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) involving water, hexanes, methanol and dichloromethane. The extracts were evaluated for their anti-inflammatory and cytotoxic activity in an NF-κB luciferase and MTT assay using macrophage immune (RAW264.7) cells. A standardized commercial ethanol extract of nettle leaves were also evaluated. The methanolic extract of the flowering portions displayed significant anti-inflammatory activity on par with the standard anti-inflammatory agent celastrol (1) but was moderately cytotoxic. Alternatively, the polar extracts (water, methanol, ethanol) of the roots, stems and leaves plant portions displayed moderate to weak anti-inflammatory activity, while the methanol and especially the water soluble extracts exhibited noticeable cytotoxicity. In contrast, the lipophilic dichloromethane extracts of the roots, stems and leaves exhibited potent anti-inflammatory effects ≥ 1 with minimal cytotoxicity to RAW264.7 cells. Collectively these results suggest that using lipophilic extracts of the roots, stems or leaves of stinging nettle may be more effective then traditional tinctures (water, methanol, ethanol) to undergo clinical evaluations for the treatment of inflammatory disorders including arthritis. A chemical investigation into the lipophillic extracts of stinging nettle to identify the bioactive compound(s) responsible for their observed anti-inflammatory activity is further warranted. PMID:23092723

  11. Evaluation of anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities of extracts from herb of Chelidonium majus L.

    PubMed Central

    Kędzia, Bogdan; Ożarowski, Marcin; Kujawski, Radosław; Bogacz, Anna; Bartkowiak-Wieczorek, Joanna; Białas, Wojciech; Gryszczyńska, Agnieszka; Buchwald, Waldemar; Szulc, Michał; Wasiak, Natalia; Górska-Paukszta, Małgorzata; Baraniak, Justyna; Czerny, Bogusław; Seremak-Mrozikiewicz, Agnieszka

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate analgesic activity (“hot plate” test), anti-inflammatory activity (carrageenan-induced paw edema) and locomotor activity in rats under the influence of three fractions of Chelidonium majus herb extract: full water extract (FWE), protein enriched fraction (PEF), and non-protein fraction (NPF). Effects of the fractions on the level of chosen cytokines and their mRNA levels were also assessed using lipopolysaccharide (LPS) administration as a proinflammatory cue. All fractions and diclofenac did not affect the locomotor activity of rats in comparison with the control group. FWE and PEF three hours after administration showed statistically significant analgesic activities comparable to morphine (p < 0.05). A slight reduction in rat paw edema was observed after three (comparable with diclofenac) and six hours in the NPF group. FWE revealed a statistically significant pro-inflammatory effect after three hours in comparison with the control group. Peripheral IL-1 and IL-4 cytokine concentrations were reduced under FWE and NPF, PEF fractions. The combination of FWE, PEF and NPF together with LPS showed only the effects of LPS. We suggest that protein enriched fraction (PEF) produced centrally mediated (morphine-like) analgesic action, whereas the anti-inflammatory potential was shown only after LPS-induced inflammation. The precise mechanisms involved in the production of anti-nociceptive and anti-inflammatory responses of studied fractions are not completely understood, but they may be caused rather by the presence of protein more than alkaloids-enriched fraction. This fraction of the extract could be used as an alternative therapy for the prevention of inflammatory-related diseases in the future, but further studies are needed. PMID:26862303

  12. Antioxidant and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Unexplored Brazilian Native Fruits

    PubMed Central

    Infante, Juliana; Rosalen, Pedro Luiz; Lazarini, Josy Goldoni; Franchin, Marcelo; de Alencar, Severino Matias

    2016-01-01

    Brazilian native fruits are unmatched in their variety, but a poorly explored resource for the development of food and pharmaceutical products. The aim of this study was to evaluate the phenolic composition as well as the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities of the extracts of leaves, seeds, and pulp of four Brazilian native fruits (Eugenia leitonii, Eugenia involucrata, Eugenia brasiliensis, and Eugenia myrcianthes). GC—MS analyses of the ethanolic extracts showed the presence of epicatechin and gallic acid as the major compounds in these fruits. Antioxidant activity was measured using synthetic DPPH free-radical scavenging, β-carotene bleaching assay, and reactive oxygen species (ROO·, O2·−, and HOCl). The fruit extracts also exhibited antioxidant effect against biologically relevant radicals such as peroxyl, superoxide, and hypochlorous acid. In general, the pulps were the fruit fractions that exhibited the lowest antioxidant activities, whereas the leaves showed the highest ones. The anti-inflammatory activity was assessed in an in vivo model using the carrageenan-induced neutrophil migration assay, which evaluates the inflammatory response in the acute phase. The pulp, seeds, and leaves of these fruits reduced the neutrophil influx by 40% to 64%. Based on these results, we suggest that the anti-inflammatory activity of these native fruits is related to the modulation of neutrophil migration, through the inhibition of cytokines, chemokines, and adhesion molecules, as well as to the antioxidant action of their ethanolic extracts in scavenging the free-radicals released by neutrophils. Therefore, these native fruits can be useful to produce food additives and functional foods. PMID:27050817

  13. Baicalein exhibits anti-inflammatory effects via inhibition of NF-κB transactivation.

    PubMed

    Patwardhan, Raghavendra S; Sharma, Deepak; Thoh, Maikho; Checker, Rahul; Sandur, Santosh K

    2016-05-15

    NF-κB is a crucial mediator of inflammatory and immune responses and a number of phytochemicals that can suppress this immune-regulatory transcription factor are known to have promising anti-inflammatory potential. However, we report that inducer of pro-inflammatory transcription factor NF-κB functions as an anti-inflammatory agent. Our findings reveal that a plant derived flavonoid baicalein could suppress mitogen induced T cell activation, proliferation and cytokine secretion. Treatment of CD4+ T cells with baicalein prior to transfer in to lymphopenic allogenic host significantly suppressed graft versus host disease. Interestingly, addition of baicalein to murine splenic lymphocytes induced DNA binding of NF-κB but did not suppress Concanavalin A induced NF-κB. Since baicalein did not inhibit NF-κB binding to DNA, we hypothesized that baicalein may be suppressing NF-κB trans-activation. Thioredoxin system is implicated in the regulation of NF-κB trans-activation potential and therefore inhibition of thioredoxin system may be responsible for suppression of NF-κB dependent genes. Baicalein not only inhibited TrxR activity in cell free system but also suppressed mitogen induced thioredoxin activity in the nuclear compartment of lymphocytes. Similar to baicalein, pharmacological inhibitors of thioredoxin system also could suppress mitogen induced T cell proliferation without inhibiting DNA binding of NF-κB. Further, activation of cellular thioredoxin system by the use of pharmacological activator or over-expression of thioredoxin could abrogate the anti-inflammatory action of baicalein. We propose a novel strategy using baicalein to limit NF-κB dependent inflammatory responses via inhibition of thioredoxin system. PMID:27019135

  14. Antioxidant and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Unexplored Brazilian Native Fruits.

    PubMed

    Infante, Juliana; Rosalen, Pedro Luiz; Lazarini, Josy Goldoni; Franchin, Marcelo; Alencar, Severino Matias de

    2016-01-01

    Brazilian native fruits are unmatched in their variety, but a poorly explored resource for the development of food and pharmaceutical products. The aim of this study was to evaluate the phenolic composition as well as the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities of the extracts of leaves, seeds, and pulp of four Brazilian native fruits (Eugenia leitonii, Eugenia involucrata, Eugenia brasiliensis, and Eugenia myrcianthes). GC-MS analyses of the ethanolic extracts showed the presence of epicatechin and gallic acid as the major compounds in these fruits. Antioxidant activity was measured using synthetic DPPH free-radical scavenging, β-carotene bleaching assay, and reactive oxygen species (ROO·, O2·-, and HOCl). The fruit extracts also exhibited antioxidant effect against biologically relevant radicals such as peroxyl, superoxide, and hypochlorous acid. In general, the pulps were the fruit fractions that exhibited the lowest antioxidant activities, whereas the leaves showed the highest ones. The anti-inflammatory activity was assessed in an in vivo model using the carrageenan-induced neutrophil migration assay, which evaluates the inflammatory response in the acute phase. The pulp, seeds, and leaves of these fruits reduced the neutrophil influx by 40% to 64%. Based on these results, we suggest that the anti-inflammatory activity of these native fruits is related to the modulation of neutrophil migration, through the inhibition of cytokines, chemokines, and adhesion molecules, as well as to the antioxidant action of their ethanolic extracts in scavenging the free-radicals released by neutrophils. Therefore, these native fruits can be useful to produce food additives and functional foods. PMID:27050817

  15. Effects of anti-inflammatory agents and some other drugs on prostaglandin biotransport.

    PubMed

    Bito, L Z; Salvador, E V

    1976-08-01

    The inhibitory effects of drugs on prostaglandin biotransport were studied by measuring the concentrative accumulation of 3H by rabbit choroid plexuses, segments of anterior uvea and kidney cortex slices after incubation in tissue culture medium containing 3H-prostaglandin F2 alpha. After 10 minutes of incubation in the absence of an inhibitor, the choroid plexus showed a tissue/medium 3H accumulation ratio of 14 +/- 0.7; after 30 minutes of incubation, the anterior uvea and the kidney cortex slices showed accumulation ratios of 6.4 +/- 0.5 and 5.6 +/- 0.1, respectively. The I50 values for inhibition of 3H accumulation by indomethacin were 10, 8 and 12 muM for the three tissues, respectively. Some related drugs-oxyphenbutazone, D-naproxen, l-naproxen, ibuprofen, phenylbutazone and pirprofen-were also found to be effective inhibitors of 3H accumulation (I50 for anterior uvea, 6-28 muM) whereas aspirin, dexamethasone phosphate and penicillin had an inhibitory effect only at much higher concentrations (I50 0.1-2.0 mM). Papaverine, fursemide and probenecid were approximately as effective as the anti-inflammatory organic acids (I50 0.01-0.1 mM), whereas bromcresol green was at least 10-fold more effective. Diphenhydramine and the nonacidic prostaglandin synthesis inhibitors, phenelzine and paracetamol, showed little (I50 greater than 1 mM) or no inhibitory effect. The inhibition of this transport system by some drugs, most notably nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory organic acids, and consequent alterations in the distribution and disposition of prostaglandins must be taken into account in the development of new anti-inflammatory agents and in the interpretation of the mechansim of action and side effects of such drugs. PMID:948038

  16. Endogenous ghrelin attenuates pressure overload-induced cardiac hypertrophy via a cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway.

    PubMed

    Mao, Yuanjie; Tokudome, Takeshi; Kishimoto, Ichiro; Otani, Kentaro; Nishimura, Hirohito; Yamaguchi, Osamu; Otsu, Kinya; Miyazato, Mikiya; Kangawa, Kenji

    2015-06-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy, which is commonly caused by hypertension, is a major risk factor for heart failure and sudden death. Endogenous ghrelin has been shown to exert a beneficial effect on cardiac dysfunction and postinfarction remodeling via modulation of the autonomic nervous system. However, ghrelin's ability to attenuate cardiac hypertrophy and its potential mechanism of action are unknown. In this study, cardiac hypertrophy was induced by transverse aortic constriction in ghrelin knockout mice and their wild-type littermates. After 12 weeks, the ghrelin knockout mice showed significantly increased cardiac hypertrophy compared with wild-type mice, as evidenced by their significantly greater heart weight/tibial length ratios (9.2±1.9 versus 7.9±0.8 mg/mm), left ventricular anterior wall thickness (1.3±0.2 versus 1.0±0.2 mm), and posterior wall thickness (1.1±0.3 versus 0.9±0.1 mm). Furthermore, compared with wild-type mice, ghrelin knockout mice showed suppression of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway, as indicated by reduced parasympathetic nerve activity and higher plasma interleukin-1β and interleukin-6 levels. The administration of either nicotine or ghrelin activated the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway and attenuated cardiac hypertrophy in ghrelin knockout mice. In conclusion, our results show that endogenous ghrelin plays a crucial role in the progression of pressure overload-induced cardiac hypertrophy via a mechanism that involves the activation of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway. PMID:25870195

  17. 40 CFR 1502.14 - Alternatives including the proposed action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alternatives including the proposed action. 1502.14 Section 1502.14 Protection of Environment COUNCIL ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT § 1502.14 Alternatives including the proposed action. This section is the heart of...

  18. 40 CFR 1502.14 - Alternatives including the proposed action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alternatives including the proposed action. 1502.14 Section 1502.14 Protection of Environment COUNCIL ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT § 1502.14 Alternatives including the proposed action. This section is the heart of...

  19. 40 CFR 1502.14 - Alternatives including the proposed action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alternatives including the proposed action. 1502.14 Section 1502.14 Protection of Environment COUNCIL ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT § 1502.14 Alternatives including the proposed action. This section is the heart of...

  20. 40 CFR 1502.14 - Alternatives including the proposed action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alternatives including the proposed action. 1502.14 Section 1502.14 Protection of Environment COUNCIL ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT § 1502.14 Alternatives including the proposed action. This section is the heart of...

  1. CSTMP Exerts Anti-Inflammatory Effects on LPS-Induced Human Renal Proximal Tubular Epithelial Cells by Inhibiting TLR4-Mediated NF-κB Pathways.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yan; Liao, Wang; He, Xiaojie; Xiang, Wei; Lu, Qianjin

    2016-04-01

    (E)-2-(2-chlorostyryl)-3,5,6-trimethylpyrazine (CSTMP), a novel stilbene derivative, have been shown to have cytoprotective effects against H2O2-induced oxidative stress in human endothelial cells. However, little is known about its anti-inflammatory effects in lupus nephritis (LN). In the present study, we investigated the anti-inflammatory effects of CSTMP on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced human renal proximal tubular epithelial cells (hRPTECs) and elucidated its molecular mechanisms. CSTMP significantly attenuated the cytotoxicity and suppressed the release of proinflammatory mediators, including iNOS, COX-2, TNF-α, IL-6, IL-8, CCL-2, ICAM-1, IL-1β, and MCP-1 in LPS-induced hRPTECs. In addition, CSTMP decreased the expression of TLR4 and its adapter molecules (MyD88, phosphorylation of TAK1, TRAF6, and IRAK1) and abolished its interactions with these adapter molecules in LPS-induced hRPTECs, resulting in an inhibition of the TLR4/MyD88/TAK1/ TRAF6/IRAK1 complex. Moreover, CSTMP also attenuated phosphorylation of IκB and IKK-α/β, and P50-NF-κB and P65-NF-κB translocation to nucleus in LPS-induced hRPTECs. These findings provided new insights to understand the mode of action of CSTMP in treatment of inflammatory diseases, such as LN. PMID:26956469

  2. The Hypolipidemic and Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Boronated Aromatic Amino Acids in CF1 Male Mice

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Merrill C.; Sood, A.; Spielvogel, Bernard F.

    1999-01-01

    The boronated aromatic amino acids were shown to be potent hypolipidemic agents in mice lowering both serum cholesterol and triglycerides after 16 days. Selective compounds were as effective as the clinical standards. Furthermore, the compounds were effective anti-inflammatory agents reducing local and central pain as well as suppressing LPS induced endotoxic shock in mice. These agents inhibited lysosomal and proteolytic enzymes of the liver and macrophages as a part of their mechanism of action. PMID:18475910

  3. 6-Hydroxyflavone and Derivatives Exhibit Potent Anti-Inflammatory Activity among Mono-, Di- and Polyhydroxylated Flavones in Kidney Mesangial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sidhu, Preetpal Singh; Desai, Umesh R.; Zhou, Qibing

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory responses by kidney mesangial cells play a critical role in the glomerulonephritis. The anti-inflammatory potential of nineteen mono-, di- and polyhydroxylated flavones including fisetin, quercetin, morin, tricetin, gossypetin, apigenin and myricetin were investigated on rat mesangial cells with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) as the inflammatory stimuli. 6-Hydroxyflavone and 4′,6-dihydroxyflavone exhibited high activity with IC50 in the range of 2.0 μM, a much better inhibition potential in comparison to the well-studied polyhydroxylated flavones. Interestingly, the anti-inflammatory activity was not due to direct quenching of NO radicals. Investigation on derivatives with methylation, acetylation or sulfation of 6-hydroxyl group revealed that 6-methoxyflavone was the most potent with an IC50 of 192 nM. Mechanistic study indicated that the anti-inflammatory activity of 6-methoxyflavone arose via the inhibition of LPS-induced downstream inducible NO synthase in mesangial cells. The identification of 6-hydroxyflavone and 6-methoxyflavone with potent anti-inflammatory activity in kidney mesangial cells provides a new flavone scaffold and direction to develop naturally derived products for potential nephritis prevention and treatment. PMID:25790236

  4. Anti-inflammatory effects of novel barbituric acid derivatives in T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chenjia; Wyman, Arlene R; Alaamery, Manal A; Argueta, Shannon A; Ivey, F Douglas; Meyers, John A; Lerner, Adam; Burdo, Tricia H; Connolly, Timothy; Hoffman, Charles S; Chiles, Thomas C

    2016-09-01

    We have used a high throughput small molecule screen, using a fission yeast-based assay, to identify novel phosphodiesterase 7 (PDE7) inhibitors. One of the most effective hit compounds was BC12, a barbituric acid-based molecule that exhibits unusually potent immunosuppressive and immunomodulatory actions on T lymphocyte function, including inhibition of T cell proliferation and IL-2 cytokine production. BC12 treatment confers a >95% inhibition of IL-2 secretion in phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) plus phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) stimulated Jurkat T cells. The effect of BC12 on IL-2 secretion is not due to decreased cell viability; rather, BC12 blocks up-regulation of IL-2 transcription in activated T cells. BC12 also inhibits IL-2 secretion in human peripheral T lymphocytes stimulated in response to CD3/CD28 co-ligation or the combination of PMA and ionomycin, as well as the proliferation of primary murine T cells stimulated with PMA and ionomycin. A BC12 analog that lacks PDE7 inhibitory activity (BC12-4) displays similar biological activity, suggesting that BC12 does not act via PDE7 inhibition. To investigate the mechanism of inhibition of IL-2 production by BC12, we performed microarray analyses using unstimulated and stimulated Jurkat T cells in the presence or absence of BC12 or BC12-4. Our studies show these compounds affect the transcriptional response to stimulation and act via one or more shared targets to produce both anti-inflammatory and pro-stress effects. These results demonstrate potent immunomodulatory activity for BC12 and BC12-4 in T lymphocytes and suggest a potential clinical use as an immunotherapeutic to treat T lymphocyte-mediated diseases. PMID:27302770

  5. Cardiovascular complications of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed

    Fosslien, Egil

    2005-01-01

    Coxibs, such as rofecoxib, celecoxib, and valdecoxib, selectively inhibit cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, the mainly inducible, pro-inflammatory COX isoform. Unlike traditional non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) most coxibs do not significantly inhibit COX-1 and are therefore less toxic to the gastrointestinal tract. Hence, coxibs widely replaced traditional NSAIDs for treatment of arthritis and other painful inflammatory conditions. In many, but not all, clinical studies, coxibs became associated with higher risks of myocardial infarction (MI) and stroke. Several mechanisms may be involved in the pathogenesis of such complications. First, selective inhibition of COX-1 lowers platelet synthesis of thromboxane (TXA(2)), a thrombogenic and atherogenic eicosanoid. Selective inhibition of COX-2 limits endothelial cell synthesis of prostacyclin (PGI(2)), an arachidonic acid product that opposes the effects of thromboxane. In apoE-/- mice, interruption of TXA(2) signaling by deletion of its receptor (TP) limits atherogenesis, whereas interruption of PGI2 signaling by deletion of its receptor (IP) accelerates atherogenesis. This suggests that selective inhibition of COX-2 can disrupt the physiological balance between thromboxane and prostacyclin and thus increase atherosclerosis, thrombogenesis, and the risk of cardiovascular complications. Second, COX inhibition can raise levels of arachidonic acid, which can inhibit mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) and increase OXPHOS generation of reactive oxygen species. Several NSAIDs, including coxibs and meloxicam, directly uncouple or inhibit OXPHOS. Studies of apoE-/- mice indicate that mitochondrial dysfunction plays an early role in atherogenesis. Third, many NSAIDs exhibit COX-independent properties. For example, in animal models, short-term treatment with celecoxib reduces monocyte chemotaxis by reducing expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1. However, long-term treatment results in the

  6. Low-Dose Tramadol and Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drug Combination Therapy Prevents the Transition to Chronic Low Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Orita, Sumihisa; Yamauchi, Kazuyo; Suzuki, Takane; Suzuki, Miyako; Sakuma, Yoshihiro; Kubota, Go; Oikawa, Yasuhiro; Sainoh, Takeshi; Sato, Jun; Fujimoto, Kazuki; Shiga, Yasuhiro; Abe, Koki; Kanamoto, Hirohito; Inoue, Masahiro; Kinoshita, Hideyuki; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Ohtori, Seiji

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective study. Purpose To determine whether low-dose tramadol plus non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug combination therapy could prevent the transition of acute low back pain to chronic low back pain. Overview of Literature Inadequately treated early low back pain transitions to chronic low back pain occur in approximately 30% of affected individuals. The administration of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs is effective for treatment of low back pain in the early stages. However, the treatment of low back pain that is resistant to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs is challenging. Methods Patients who presented with acute low back pain at our hospital were considered for inclusion in this study. After the diagnosis of acute low back pain, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug administration was started. Forty patients with a visual analog scale score of >5 for low back pain 1 month after treatment were finally enrolled. The first 20 patients were included in a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug group, and they continued non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug therapy for 1 month. The next 20 patients were included in a combination group, and they received low-dose tramadol plus non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug combination therapy for 1 month. The incidence of adverse events and the improvement in the visual analog scale score at 2 months after the start of treatment were analyzed. Results No adverse events were observed in the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug group. In the combination group, administration was discontinued in 2 patients (10%) due to adverse events immediately following the start of tramadol administration. At 2 months, the improvement in the visual analog scale score was greater in the combination group than in the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug group (p<0.001). Conclusions Low-dose tramadol plus non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug combination therapy might decrease the incidence of adverse events and prevent

  7. Anti-inflammatory guaiane-type sesquiterpenes from the fruits of Pittosporum undulatum.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Sofia A C; Mansoor, Tayyab A; Rodrigues, Ana; Armas, Jácome Bruges; Ferreira, Maria-José U

    2013-11-01

    Two unprecedented guaiane-type sesquiterpene glycosides (undulatumosides A and B) were isolated by bioassay-guided fractionation from the MeOH extract of Pittosporum undulatum fruits, along with six known compounds, including the guaiane isomers 5-guaien-11-ol and 4-guaien-11-ol. The structures of the compounds were established as 4-guaiene-11-O-β-d-(3'-angeloxy-6'-deoxy)-glucopyranoside and 1(5)-guaiene-11-O-β-d-(3'-angeloxy-6'-deoxy)-glucopyranoside by spectroscopic methods, including 1D and 2D homo- and heteronuclear NMR experiments (COSY, HSQC, HMBC and NOESY), and HR-mass spectrometry. P. undulatum is a highly invasive weed that often outcompetes other plants, yet its fruits have become a traditional anti-inflammatory medicine in Azores. Therefore, aiming to investigate the claimed properties, the in vitro anti-inflammatory activity of guaiane-type sesquiterpenes was evaluated by analyzing their inhibitory effects on chemical mediators released by the LPS activated RAW 264.7 murine macrophages cell line. In addition, the cytotoxicity of these compounds was also evaluated in this cell line. Undulatumoside A, 5-guaien-11-ol and 4-guaien-11-ol displayed anti-inflammatory activity with IC50 values of 16.4, 8.1 and 7.2μM, respectively, comparable to that of the positive control, indomethacin (IC50=18.2 μM), with no cytotoxic effects (IC50 ≥ 198 μM). Furthermore, the same set of compounds was also assessed for anti-proliferative activity in lung large cell carcinoma COR-L23 and amelanotic melanoma C32 cells. PMID:23899690

  8. Head-to-Head Comparison of Anti-Inflammatory Performance of Known Natural Products In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Allijn, Iris E.; Vaessen, Stefan F. C.; Quarles van Ufford, Linda C.; Beukelman, Kees J.; de Winther, Menno P. J.; Storm, Gert; Schiffelers, Raymond M.

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation is an important therapeutic target. Due to their potency, steroidal drugs dominate the current treatment of inflammatory disorders. However, steroidal drugs can also exert a broad range of side effects and appear not always effective. This calls for the development of alternative drugs with a different mechanism of action, which are likely to be found in the field of natural products (NPs). For many NPs strong anti-inflammatory effects have been described, but usually investigating a single compound in a single assay. In this study, eight promising NPs were selected and tested against the strong anti-inflammatory drug prednisolone. For this head-to-head comparison, in vitro assays were used which represent different pathways of the inflammatory response: TNF-α and IL-6 expression by macrophages, IL-8 expression by colon epithelial cells, ROS production in polymorphonuclear leukocytes and platelet activation in whole blood. Performance profiles were established which allowed us to identify curcumin, berberine chloride and epigallocatechin gallate as potential alternatives for prednisolone or other glucocorticoids in inflammation. PMID:27163931

  9. Diuretic and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of the Microencapsulated Acrocomia aculeata (Arecaceae) Oil on Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Iwamoto, Renan Donomae; Sanjinez-Argandoña, Eliana Janet; Kassuya, Cândida Aparecida Leite

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Acrocomia aculeata, popularly known as “bocaiuva,” is widely acknowledged in culinary and traditional medicines to treat cardiovascular diseases, a combined effect with diuretics that are also used for hypertension. However, there are no scientific data published to support its use as functional food and its ethnopharmacological use. This study intended to determine the composition of fatty acids of the pulp oil and evaluate the diuretic action and anti-inflammatory activity of the in natura and microencapsulated oil orally administrated on rats. The obtained results confirm the prevalence of monounsaturated fatty acids (68.51%), especially oleic acid (65.68%±1.05%), in the oil from the bocaiuva pulp. The in natura A. aculeata oil has diuretic (P<.01) and anti-inflammatory potential, which promoted a marked inhibition on the hind paw edema induced by carrageenan (67%±7% after 2 h) (P<.01). In addition, results show that the oral administration of the bocaiuva oil at 300 (P<.05) and 700 (P<.05) mg/kg doses significantly inhibited the leukocyte migration induced by carrageenan to the pleural cavity in rats. The inhibitions equaled 91%±3% and 81%±16%, respectively. The microencapsulated oil also showed antiedematogenic (P<.01) as well as diuretic activities (P<.01). The microencapsulation by complex coacervation was shown to be a technique that favors the bioavailability and preservation of bioactive components of the bocaiuva oil. PMID:25369069

  10. Assessment and prevention of gastrointestinal toxicity of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed

    Lane, Majella E; Kim, Mi-Jeong

    2006-10-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are widely used for analgesic, anti-inflammatory and, in the case of aspirin, for anti-thrombotic actions. The serious gastrointestinal side-effects associated with these drugs are of concern and pose a significant obstacle to their use. This review discusses the pathogenic mechanisms by which the conventional acidic NSAIDs induce gastrointestinal toxicity, with particular emphasis on non-prostaglandin effects. Methods of assessment of NSAID-induced enteropathy are reviewed, with particular emphasis on the use of functional measurement of NSAID-induced changes in the gastrointestinal tract. The advances in our knowledge of the pathogenesis of these effects have resulted in the development of a range of novel NSAIDs. Where functional assessment of the effects of NSAIDs has been employed, it appears to be more useful as an indicator of early-stage changes rather than a predictor of the effects of long-term NSAID exposure. Successful pharmaceutical strategies now offer considerable promise for reducing the severity of NSAID damage to the gastrointestinal tract. The utility of intestinal permeability measurements for selection and assessment of these strategies is discussed. PMID:17034651

  11. [Appropriate prescription, adherence and safety of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs].

    PubMed

    Sostres, Carlos; Lanas, Ángel

    2016-03-18

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are the most numerous category of drugs sharing the same mechanism of action and therapeutic activities (anti-inflammatory, analgesic and anti-pyretic). Despite having similar efficacy for pain relieve, the different available NSAIDs show variability in its safety profile. The risk of gastrointestinal and cardiovascular complications varies depending on the dose of NSAID and also the presence of different risk factors. It is necessary, therefore, an individualized case assessment before establishing the indication of the best NSAID for each patient, taking account of the best gastroprotection strategy. Improved prescription and enhanced treatment adherence are central objectives to reduce NSAID-related complications. A recent consensus of the Spanish Association of Gastroenterology and the Spanish societies of Cardiology and Rheumatology intends to promote the rational use of NSAIDs according to new recent studies. This review provides additional aspects to facilitate the optimal decision-making process in the routine use of these drugs in clinical practice. PMID:26724872

  12. Diuretic and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of the Microencapsulated Acrocomia aculeata (Arecaceae) Oil on Wistar Rats.

    PubMed

    Lescano, Caroline Honaiser; Iwamoto, Renan Donomae; Sanjinez-Argandoña, Eliana Janet; Kassuya, Cândida Aparecida Leite

    2015-06-01

    Acrocomia aculeata, popularly known as "bocaiuva," is widely acknowledged in culinary and traditional medicines to treat cardiovascular diseases, a combined effect with diuretics that are also used for hypertension. However, there are no scientific data published to support its use as functional food and its ethnopharmacological use. This study intended to determine the composition of fatty acids of the pulp oil and evaluate the diuretic action and anti-inflammatory activity of the in natura and microencapsulated oil orally administrated on rats. The obtained results confirm the prevalence of monounsaturated fatty acids (68.51%), especially oleic acid (65.68%±1.05%), in the oil from the bocaiuva pulp. The in natura A. aculeata oil has diuretic (P<.01) and anti-inflammatory potential, which promoted a marked inhibition on the hind paw edema induced by carrageenan (67%±7% after 2 h) (P<.01). In addition, results show that the oral administration of the bocaiuva oil at 300 (P<.05) and 700 (P<.05) mg/kg doses significantly inhibited the leukocyte migration induced by carrageenan to the pleural cavity in rats. The inhibitions equaled 91%±3% and 81%±16%, respectively. The microencapsulated oil also showed antiedematogenic (P<.01) as well as diuretic activities (P<.01). The microencapsulation by complex coacervation was shown to be a technique that favors the bioavailability and preservation of bioactive components of the bocaiuva oil. PMID:25369069

  13. Head-to-Head Comparison of Anti-Inflammatory Performance of Known Natural Products In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Allijn, Iris E; Vaessen, Stefan F C; Quarles van Ufford, Linda C; Beukelman, Kees J; de Winther, Menno P J; Storm, Gert; Schiffelers, Raymond M

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation is an important therapeutic target. Due to their potency, steroidal drugs dominate the current treatment of inflammatory disorders. However, steroidal drugs can also exert a broad range of side effects and appear not always effective. This calls for the development of alternative drugs with a different mechanism of action, which are likely to be found in the field of natural products (NPs). For many NPs strong anti-inflammatory effects have been described, but usually investigating a single compound in a single assay. In this study, eight promising NPs were selected and tested against the strong anti-inflammatory drug prednisolone. For this head-to-head comparison, in vitro assays were used which represent different pathways of the inflammatory response: TNF-α and IL-6 expression by macrophages, IL-8 expression by colon epithelial cells, ROS production in polymorphonuclear leukocytes and platelet activation in whole blood. Performance profiles were established which allowed us to identify curcumin, berberine chloride and epigallocatechin gallate as potential alternatives for prednisolone or other glucocorticoids in inflammation. PMID:27163931

  14. Relevance of the anti-inflammatory properties of curcumin in neurodegenerative diseases and depression.

    PubMed

    Tizabi, Yousef; Hurley, Laura L; Qualls, Zakiya; Akinfiresoye, Luli

    2014-01-01

    This review is an attempt to summarize our current understanding of curcumin's potential as a neuroprotectant and an antidepressant. This dual property confers a unique advantage to this herbal medication, believed to be devoid of any major side effects, to combat commonly observed co-morbid conditions of a neurodegenerative and a neuropsychiatric disorder. Moreover, in line with the theme of this series, the role of inflammation and stress in these diseases and possible anti-inflammatory effects of curcumin, as well as its interaction with signal transduction proteins as a common denominator in its varied mechanisms of action, are also discussed. Thus, following a brief introduction of curcumin's pharmacology, we present research suggesting how its anti-inflammatory properties have therapeutic potential in treating a devastating neurological disorder (Parkinson's disease = PD) and a debilitating neuropsychiatric disorder (major depressive disorder = MDD). It is concluded that curcumin, or better yet, an analog with better and longer bioavailability could be of important therapeutic potential in PD and/or major depression. PMID:25514226

  15. Effect of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on the cellular membrane fluidity.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Célia; Nunes, Cláudia; Lúcio, Marlene; Ferreira, Helena; Lima, José L F C; Tavares, Joana; Cordeiro-da-Silva, Anabela; Reis, Salette

    2008-08-01

    In this work, fluorescence measurements were performed using the fluorescent probe 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH) to evaluate the effects of the interaction of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs--NSAIDs (meloxicam, lornoxicam, and nimesulide) with several membrane systems (liposomes with and without cholesterol, mouse splenocytes, mouse macrophages cell line--J774, human leukemia monocyte cell line--THP-1, and human granulocytes and mononuclear cells). DPH fluorescence quenching studies revealed that the NSAIDs studied were able to efficiently quench the probe located in membrane hydrocarbon region. Fluorescence anisotropy measurements were also made to investigate the effects on membrane fluidity resulting from the interaction between the drugs and membrane systems. All the anti-inflammatory drugs studied show an increase in the membrane fluidity in a concentration dependent manner. Results obtained provide an insight into NSAIDs capacity to be inserted in lipid bilayers and alter the lipid dynamics. The induced changes in lipid dynamics may modulate the activity of inflammatory enzymes or may be related with deleterious topical action of NSAIDs on gastric phospholipid fluidity. PMID:17990311

  16. Molecules of natural origin, semi-synthesis and synthesis with anti-inflammatory and anticancer utilities.

    PubMed

    Lourenço, A M; Ferreira, L M; Branco, P S

    2012-01-01

    The development of new drugs that can be valuable for the evolution of diseases' treatment is a goal for different areas of research, namely natural products chemistry, molecular biology and biochemistry, pharmacology, medicinal chemistry, synthetic organic chemistry and analytical chemistry. Nature is the main source of compounds for pharmaceutical purposes, either by providing the natural organic chemical compounds of interest or as a source of inspiration for the design of new drugs. The known anti-inflammatory and anticancer agents belong to a great diversity of structural skeletons since inflammatory and cancer processes involve many different biological targets. Their origins extend to plants, fungi, bacteria, and marine organisms, besides those produced by semi-synthesis and total synthesis. The tasks of the organic chemist are the screening, the structure assignment, and the semi and total syntheses of active molecules. Herein the screening and assignment of new active structures is addressed, together with other aspects, namely the improvements, both in availability and in effectiveness of action that can be achieved from new derivatives by synthetic or semi-synthetic strategies. Some aspects of drug delivery of anti-inflammatory and anticancer agents are considered. The bibliography presented is far from being exhaustive due to the prodigious number of published works. Instead, the most significant contributions in the scope of this review are described. The active compounds are organised by their biosynthetic origins as terpenoids; macrolides, polyketides and ansamycins; phenolics; alkaloids; peptides; glycoconjugates; other compounds, and food compounds. PMID:22632756

  17. Anti-Inflammatory and Antioxidant Activity of Acalypha hispida Leaf and Analysis of its Major Bioactive Polyphenols by HPLC

    PubMed Central

    Siraj, Md. Afjalus; Shilpi, Jamil A.; Hossain, Md. Golam; Uddin, Shaikh Jamal; Islam, Md. Khirul; Jahan, Ismet Ara; Hossain, Hemayet

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Inflammation and oxidative stress can lead to different chronic diseases including cancer and atherosclerosis. Many medicinal plants have the potential to show as anti-inflammatory activity. Present investigation was performed to investigate anti-inflammatory, antioxidant activity, and quantification of selected bioactive plant polyphenols of the ethanol (EAH) and aqueous (AAH) extracts of Acalypha hispida (Euphorbiaceae) leaves. Methods: Anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated by carragenan and histamine induced rat paw edema models while antioxidant capacity was evaluated by DPPH free radical scavenging, Fe+2 chelating ability, reducing power, NO scavenging, total phenolic and total flavonoid content assay. Identification and quantification of bioactive polyphenols was done by HPLC. Results: At the doses of 200 and 400 mg/kg, both EAH and AAH showed statistically significant inhibition of paw volume in the anti-inflammatory activity test. Both the extracts showed DPPH scavenging (IC50: 14 and 17 µg/ml, respectively), Fe+2 ion chelating (IC50: 40 and 46 µg/ml, respectively), NO scavenging activity (65.49 and 60.66% inhibition at 100 µg/ml), and concentration dependent reducing power ability. For EAH and AAH, flavonoid content was 126.30 and 149.72 mg QE/g dry extract, while phenolic content was 130.51 and 173.80 mg GAE/g dry extract, respectively. HPLC analysis of EAH and AAH indicated the presence of high content of ellagic acid along with other phenolic constituents. Conclusion: High content of ellagic acid along with other phenolic constituents might have played an important role in the observed anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activity. PMID:27478793

  18. Antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory potential of Rhododendron arboreum bark.

    PubMed

    Nisar, Muhammad; Ali, Sajid; Muhammad, Naveed; Gillani, Syed N; Shah, Muhmmad R; Khan, Haroon; Maione, Francesco

    2016-07-01

    Rhododendron arboreum Smith. (Ericaceae), an evergreen small tree, is one of the 1000 species that belongs to genus Rhododendron distributed worldwide. In folk medicine, as various parts of this plant exhibit medicinal properties, it is used in the treatment of different ailments.The present study was designed to evaluate the potential anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive effects of methanolic extract of R. arboreum bark, followed by activity-guided fractionation of n-hexane, n-butanol, chloroform, ethyl acetate and aqueous fractions.The ethyl acetate fraction (200 mg/kg i.p.) showed the maximum analgesic effect (82%) in acetic acid-induced writhing, followed, to a less extent, by crude extract and chloroform fraction both at a dose of 200 mg/kg i.p. (65.09% and 67.89%, respectively). In carrageenan-induced mouse paw oedema, the crude extract and its related fractions displayed in a dose-dependent manner (50-200 mg/kg i.p.) an anti-inflammatory activity for all time-courses (1-5 hrs). For the active extract/fractions (200 mg/kg i.p.), the maximum effect was observed 5 h after carrageenan injection. These evidences were also supported by in vitro lipoxygenase inhibitory properties. In conclusion, R. arboreum crude methanolic extract and its fractions exhibited anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive effects. For these reasons, this plant could be a promising source of new compounds for the management of pain and inflammatory diseases. PMID:25501256

  19. Anti-Inflammatory and Antinociceptive Activities of Bufalin in Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yang; Yin, Junqiang; Lin, Wenqian

    2014-01-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects of bufalin, a major component of “Chan-su.” We used a carrageenan-induced paw edema model to assess the anti-inflammatory activity of this compound, and Western blot analysis detected NF-κB signaling during this effect. The antinociceptive activities were evaluated by acetic acid-induced writhing, formalin, and hot-plate tests; open-field test investigated effects on the central nervous system. Our data showed that bufalin (0.3 and 0.6 mg/kg, i.p.) potently decreased carrageenan-induced paw edema. Bufalin down regulated the expression levels of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) during these treatments. Further studies demonstrated that bufalin significantly inhibited the activation of NF-κB signaling. Bufalin also reduced acetic acid-induced writhing and the licking time in the formalin test and increased hot-plate reaction latencies. Naloxone pretreatment (2 mg/kg, i.p.) in the early phases of the formalin test and hot-plate test significantly attenuated the bufalin-induced antinociception effects, which suggests the involvement of the opioid system. A reduction in locomotion was not observed in the open-field test after bufalin administration. Taken together, bufalin treatment resulted in in vivo anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects, and bufalin may be a novel, potential drug for the treatment of inflammatory diseases. PMID:24719521

  20. Anti-inflammatory activity of Euphorbia aegyptiaca extract in rats

    PubMed Central

    Abo-dola, Marium A.; Lutfi, Mohamed F.

    2016-01-01

    Background There were no studies on the anti-inflammatory activity of Euphorbia aegyptiaca, though it is commonly used by Sudanese herbalists in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. Objectives To determine phytochemical constituents of Euphorbia aegyptiaca To investigate the anti-inflammatory activity of Euphorbia aegyptiaca in rats. Methodology Plant material was extracted by ethanol and phytochemical screening was done according to standard methods. The thickness of Albino rats’ paws were measured before injection of 0.1 ml of 1% formalin in the sub planter region and then, 1, 2, 3, 4 and 24 hours after oral dose of ethanolic extract of Euphorbia aegyptiaca at a rate of 400mg/kg, 800mg/kg, indomethacin (5mg/kg) and normal saline (5ml/kg). Edema inhibition percentage (EI%) and mean paw thickness (MPT) were measured in the different groups and compared using appropriate statistical methods. Results The phytochemical screening revealed the presence of saponins, cumarins, flavonoids, tannins, sterols, triterpenes, and absence of alkaloids, anthraquinones glycosides and cyanogenic glycosides. The mean of EI% of rats treated with indomethacin at a dose of 5 mg/kg over different time intervals (64.0%) was significantly lower compared to those treated with Euphorbia aegyptiaca at a dose of 800 mg/kg (75.0%, P< 0.001), but higher compared to rats treated at higher dose of 400 mg/kg (57.4%, P< 0.001). In contrast, MPT of rats treated with indomethacin at a dose of 5 mg/kg (6.5±1.1 mm) was significantly higher compared to those treated with Euphorbia aegyptiaca at a dose of 800 mg/kg (6.1±.7 mm, P< 0.001) as well as 400 mg/kg (5.9±.5, P< 0.001). Conclusion Euphorbia aegyptiaca ethanolic extract has a sustained dose-dependent anti-inflammatory activity. PMID:27004059

  1. Anti-inflammatory and vascularprotective properties of 8-prenylapigenin.

    PubMed

    Paoletti, Tiziana; Fallarini, Silvia; Gugliesi, Francesca; Minassi, Alberto; Appendino, Giovanni; Lombardi, Grazia

    2009-10-12

    Flavonoids display several biological activities, but exhibit poor oral absorption and rapid metabolism. To improve their pharmacological profile four C8-prenyl flavonoids, structurally related to the anti-inflammatory lead apigenin, were synthesized, and the two least cytotoxic (IC(50)>30 microM) compounds [8-prenylnaringenin (8-PN) and 8-prenylapigenin (8-PA)] in RAW 264.7 murine macrophages were assayed against a panel of biological targets. The anti-inflammatory properties of these compounds were evaluated in an in vitro model of inflammation [cells exposed to 0.1 microg/ml lipopolysaccharide (LPS) for 24h]. Both 8-PN and 8-PA were equally effective and potent in inhibiting the LPS-induced gene expression [tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase (COX)-2] (RT-PCR) and release (ELISA) of pro-inflammatory mediators [TNF-alpha, NO, prostaglandin (PG)E(2)], through mechanisms involving the inhibition of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) activation (EMSA) and reactive oxygen species accumulation [2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA) determination]. One-digit nM concentrations of 8-PN or 8-PA induced a significant increase in the basal production of the atheroprotective prostacyclin (PGI(2)) by human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), with maximal effects at 10 nM. Both NS-398, a specific COX-2 inhibitor, and ICI 182 780, a non-selective estrogen receptor antagonist, abolished the activity of these compounds, suggesting a COX- and estrogen receptor-dependent mechanism of activity. 8-PA, a weaker estrogenic compound than 8-PN, resulted only 2-fold less potent than 8-PN in potentiating PGI(2) production by HUVEC, qualifying this C8-prenyl flavonoid as a lead for the rational design of new anti-inflammatory and vascularprotective compounds. PMID:19686724

  2. Anti-inflammatory activity of Abutilon indicum extract.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Priyanka; Chauhan, N S; Patel, J R

    2012-01-01

    Abutilon indicum Linn. had been broadly used for its reported biological activities in indigenous system of medicine. The ethanolic extract of the whole plant of A. indicum Linn. was evaluated for its anti-inflammatory activity at doses 250, 500 and 750 mg kg⁻¹ using the carrageenan-induced paw oedema in healthy Wistar albino rats. Results of in vivo activity led to the conclusion that the ethanolic extract of A. indicum showed predominantly significant activity in a dose-dependent manner, which is comparable to the reference standard ibuprofen. The results prove the traditional use of plant in the treatment of inflammation. PMID:21999427

  3. Natural anti-inflammatory agents for pain relief

    PubMed Central

    Maroon, Joseph C.; Bost, Jeffrey W.; Maroon, Adara

    2010-01-01

    The use of both over-the-counter and prescription nonsteroidal medications is frequently recommended in a typical neurosurgical practice. But persistent long-term use safety concerns must be considered when prescribing these medications for chronic and degenerative pain conditions. This article is a literature review of the biochemical pathways of inflammatory pain, the potentially serious side effects of nonsteroidal drugs and commonly used and clinically studied natural alternative anti-inflammatory supplements. Although nonsteroidal medications can be effective, herbs and dietary supplements may offer a safer, and often an effective, alternative treatment for pain relief, especially for long-term use. PMID:21206541

  4. Multiple cutaneous sensitization to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed

    Gonzalo, M A; Revenga, F

    1996-01-01

    The use of topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs is widespread (particularly in countries bordering the Mediterranean). Compared to their wide use, the incidence of published adverse cutaneous effects appears minimal, although they are increasing. Most of them are a form of allergic contact dermatitis (ACD). Multiple sensitization and/or cross-reactions are rarely reported. Interestingly, our patient presented ACD with diclofenac and etofenamate (both from different chemical groups) and, furthermore, patch tests were positive with bencydamine and indomethacin (both indolacetic acid derivatives), piroxicam and fepradinol. We think that our results could not be explained due to cross-reactivity, and that multiple sensitization was more likely. PMID:8864624

  5. Synthesis and anti-inflammatory activity of indole glucosinolates.

    PubMed

    Vo, Quan V; Trenerry, Craige; Rochfort, Simone; Wadeson, Jenny; Leyton, Carolina; Hughes, Andrew B

    2014-01-15

    The nitronate and nitrovinyl methods to synthesize indole glucosinolates (GLs) have been investigated. The results were applied to generally the most prevalent natural indole glucosinolates to synthesize 4-methoxyglucobrassicin (MGB) and neo-glucobrassicin (NGB) in moderate overall yield for the first time. The anti-inflammatory activity of the synthetic indole GLs was determined by inhibition of TNF-α secretion in LPS-stimulated THP-1 cells. The data showed that glucobrassicin (GB) exhibited higher activity than other synthetic indolyl GLs. PMID:24360830

  6. Anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive drugs and reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Østensen, Monika; Khamashta, Munther; Lockshin, Michael; Parke, Ann; Brucato, Antonio; Carp, Howard; Doria, Andrea; Rai, Raj; Meroni, Pierluigi; Cetin, Irene; Derksen, Ronald; Branch, Ware; Motta, Mario; Gordon, Caroline; Ruiz-Irastorza, Guillermo; Spinillo, Arsenio; Friedman, Deborah; Cimaz, Rolando; Czeizel, Andrew; Piette, Jean Charles; Cervera, Ricard; Levy, Roger A; Clementi, Maurizio; De Carolis, Sara; Petri, Michelle; Shoenfeld, Yehuda; Faden, David; Valesini, Guido; Tincani, Angela

    2006-01-01

    Rheumatic diseases in women of childbearing years may necessitate drug treatment during a pregnancy, to control maternal disease activity and to ensure a successful pregnancy outcome. This survey is based on a consensus workshop of international experts discussing effects of anti-inflammatory, immunosuppressive and biological drugs during pregnancy and lactation. In addition, effects of these drugs on male and female fertility and possible long-term effects on infants exposed to drugs antenatally are discussed where data were available. Recommendations for drug treatment during pregnancy and lactation are given. PMID:16712713

  7. The proinflammatory function of lymphocytes in non-immune inflammation: effect of steroidal and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents.

    PubMed Central

    Leme, J. G.; Bechara, G. H.; Sudo, L. S.

    1977-01-01

    Leucopenia rendered rats unresponsive to various inflammatory stimuli. The intensity of the inflammatory response in such animals was restored by i.v. administration of suspensions of lymphocytes, but not of granulocytes. This restorative effect was blocked by both steroidal and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Utilizing carrageenin to induce inflammatory responses in the rat's paw, the effect of these drugs on lymphocytes was observed in two circumstances. First, following incubation of the cells with the drugs in concentrations not exceeding the peak plasma levels estimated for these substances in man or laboratory animals; the effect of the drugs seemed selective, since anti-histamine and anti-serotonin agents, as well as amethopterin, were devoid of action. Second, when lymphocytes were collected from rats previously treated with the various anti-inflammatory agents, injected 6-hourly during periods of 18 and 36 h, respectively, for steroidal and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory substances. The total amounts given were lower than those required to produce consistent anti-inflammatory effects in normal animals, when the drug was given as a single dose before injection of the irritant. It is concluded that the pro-inflammatory function of lymphocytes in non-immune inflammation can be blocked by steroidal and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents. PMID:607989

  8. Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Fruit Fractions in Vitro, Mediated through Toll-Like Receptor 4 and 2 in the Context of Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nasef, Noha Ahmed; Mehta, Sunali; Murray, Pamela; Marlow, Gareth; Ferguson, Lynnette R.

    2014-01-01

    Pattern recognition receptors such as Toll-Like Receptor 2 (TLR2) and 4 (TLR4) are important in detecting and responding to stress and bacterial stimuli. Defect or damage in the TLR2 and TLR4 pathways can lead to sustained inflammation, characteristic of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The goal of this study was to identify fruit fractions that can be tested further to develop them as complementary therapies for IBD. In order to do this, we identified fruit fractions that mediate their anti-inflammatory response through the TLR4 and TLR2 pathway. Human Embryonic Kidney (HEK)-hTLR4 and hTLR2 cells were stimulated with their respective ligands to induce inflammation. These cells were treated with one of the 12 fractionated fruits and the inflammatory effect measured. 10 of the fruits came up as anti-inflammatory in the hTLR4 assay and nine in the hTLR2 assays. Many of the fruit fractions mediated their anti-inflammatory actions either mainly in their hydrophobic fractions (such as elderberry) or hydrophilic fractions (such as red raspberry), or both. The strongest anti-inflammatory effects were seen for feijoa and blackberry. This study shows that fruits can have multiple fractions eliciting anti-inflammatory effects in a pathway specific manner. This suggests that the compounds found in fruits can act together to produce health benefits by way of reducing inflammation. Exploiting this property of fruits can help develop complimentary therapies for inflammatory diseases. PMID:25415606

  9. Peimine, a main active ingredient of Fritillaria, exhibits anti-inflammatory and pain suppression properties at the cellular level.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jianwei; Zhao, Wei; Pan, Lanying; Zhang, Ailian; Chen, Qingmao; Xu, Kai; Lu, Haiyin; Chen, Yuan

    2016-06-01

    Fritillaria is one of the most important herbs in Chinese traditional medicine and represents an annual ¥700 million industry. It is often used as an anti-inflammatory, pain relieving and antitussive medicine. However, the mechanisms of these effects are still unclear. Peimine is one of active ingredients of Fritillaria. Using the patch-clamp technique, we profiled the action of Peimine against selected ion channels stably expressed in HEK 293 cell lines. Our data indicated that Peimine was not only able to block the Nav1.7 ion channel but also preferably inhibited the Kv1.3 ion channel. Thus, the study suggested potential mechanisms of Fritillaria as a pain relieving and anti-inflammatory herb. PMID:27033404

  10. The promotion of functional urinary bladder regeneration using anti-inflammatory nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Bury, Matthew I; Fuller, Natalie J; Meisner, Jay W; Hofer, Matthias D; Webber, Matthew J; Chow, Lesley W; Prasad, Sheba; Thaker, Hatim; Yue, Xuan; Menon, Vani S; Diaz, Edward C; Stupp, Samuel I; Cheng, Earl Y; Sharma, Arun K

    2014-11-01

    Current attempts at tissue regeneration utilizing synthetic and decellularized biologic-based materials have typically been met in part by innate immune responses in the form of a robust inflammatory reaction at the site of implantation or grafting. This can ultimately lead to tissue fibrosis with direct negative impact on tissue growth, development, and function. In order to temper the innate inflammatory response, anti-inflammatory signals were incorporated through display on self-assembling peptide nanofibers to promote tissue healing and subsequent graft compliance throughout the regenerative process. Utilizing an established urinary bladder augmentation model, the highly pro-inflammatory biologic scaffold (decellularized small intestinal submucosa) was treated with anti-inflammatory peptide amphiphiles (AIF-PAs) or control peptide amphiphiles and used for augmentation. Significant regenerative advantages of the AIF-PAs were observed including potent angiogenic responses, limited tissue collagen accumulation, and the modulation of macrophage and neutrophil responses in regenerated bladder tissue. Upon further characterization, a reduction in the levels of M2 macrophages was observed, but not in M1 macrophages in control groups, while treatment groups exhibited decreased levels of M1 macrophages and stabilized levels of M2 macrophages. Pro-inflammatory cytokine production was decreased while anti-inflammatory cytokines were up-regulated in treatment groups. This resulted in far fewer incidences of tissue granuloma and bladder stone formation. Finally, functional urinary bladder testing revealed greater bladder compliance and similar capacities in groups treated with AIF-PAs. Data demonstrate that AIF-PAs can alleviate galvanic innate immune responses and provide a highly conducive regenerative milieu that may be applicable in a variety of clinical settings. PMID:25145852

  11. Efficacy of Anti-inflammatory Agents to Improve Symptoms in Patients With Schizophrenia: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Sommer, Iris E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The inflammatory hypothesis of schizophrenia is not new, but recently it has regained interest because more data suggest a role of the immune system in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. If increased inflammation of the brain contributes to the symptoms of schizophrenia, reduction of the inflammatory status could improve the clinical picture. Lately, several trials have been conducted investigating the potential of anti-inflammatory agents to improve symptoms of schizophrenia. This study provides an update regarding the efficacy of anti-inflammatory agents on schizophrenic symptoms in clinical studies performed so far. Methods: An electronic search was performed using PubMed, Embase, the National Institutes of Health web site http://www.clinicaltrials.gov, Cochrane Schizophrenia Group entries in PsiTri, and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. Only randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies that investigated clinical outcome were included. Results: Our search yielded 26 double-blind randomized controlled trials that provided information on the efficacy on symptom severity of the following components: aspirin, celecoxib, davunetide, fatty acids such as eicosapentaenoic acids and docosahexaenoic acids, estrogens, minocycline, and N-acetylcysteine (NAC). Of these components, aspirin (mean weighted effect size [ES]: 0.3, n = 270, 95% CI: 0.06–0.537, I2 = 0), estrogens (ES: 0.51, n = 262, 95% CI: 0.043–0.972, I2 = 69%), and NAC (ES: 0.45, n = 140, 95% CI: 0.112–0.779) showed significant effects. Celecoxib, minocycline, davunetide, and fatty acids showed no significant effect. Conclusion: The results of aspirin addition to antipsychotic treatment seem promising, as does the addition of NAC and estrogens. These 3 agents are all very broadly active substances, and it has to be investigated if the beneficial effects on symptom severity are indeed mediated by their anti-inflammatory aspects. PMID:24106335

  12. Identification of metabolic signatures linked to anti-inflammatory effects of Faecalibacterium prausnitzii

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Miquel, Sylvie; Leclerc, Marion; Martin, Rebeca; Chain, Florian; Lenoir, Marion; Raguideau, Sébastien; Hudault, Sylvie; Bridonneau, Chantal; Northen, Trent; Bowen, Benjamin; et al

    2015-04-21

    Faecalibacterium prausnitzii is an anti-inflammatory commensal bacterium identified on the basis of human clinical data. The mechanisms underlying its beneficial effects are still unknown. Gnotobiotic mice harboring F. prausnitzii (A2-165) and Escherichia coli (K-12 JM105) were subjected to 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced acute colitis. The inflammatory colitis scores and a gas chromatography-time of flight (GC/TOF) mass spectrometry-based metabolomic profile were monitored in blood, ileum, cecum, colon, and feces in gnotobiotic mice. The potential anti-inflammatory metabolites were tested in vitro. We obtained stable E. coli and F. prausnitzii-diassociated mice in which E. coli primed the gastrointestinal tract (GIT), allowing a durable andmore » stable establishment of F. prausnitzii. The disease activity index, histological scores, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, and serum cytokine levels were significantly lower in the presence of F. prausnitzii after TNBS challenge. The protective effect of F. prausnitzii against colitis was correlated to its implantation level and was linked to overrepresented metabolites along the GIT and in serum. Among 983 metabolites in GIT samples and serum, 279 were assigned to known chemical reactions. Some of them, belonging to the ammonia (α-ketoglutarate), osmoprotective (raffinose), and phenolic (including anti-inflammatory shikimic and salicylic acids) pathways, were associated with a protective effect of F. prausnitzii, and the functional link was established in vitro for salicylic acid. We show for the first time that F. prausnitzii is a highly active commensal bacterium involved in reduction of colitis through in vivo modulation of metabolites along the GIT and in the peripheral blood.« less

  13. The promotion of functional urinary bladder regeneration using anti-inflammatory nanofibers

    PubMed Central

    Bury, Matthew I.; Fuller, Natalie J.; Meisner, Jay W.; Hofer, Matthias D.; Webber, Matthew J.; Chow, Lesley W.; Prasad, Sheba; Thaker, Hatim; Yue, Xuan; Menon, Vani S.; Diaz, Edward C.; Stupp, Samuel I.; Cheng, Earl Y.; Sharma, Arun K.

    2014-01-01

    Current attempts at tissue regeneration utilizing synthetic and decellularized biologic-based materials have typically been met in part by innate immune responses in the form of a robust inflammatory reaction at the site of implantation or grafting. This can ultimately lead to tissue fibrosis with direct negative impact on tissue growth, development, and function. In order to temper the innate inflammatory response, anti-inflammatory signals were incorporated through display on self-assembling peptide nanofibers to promote tissue healing and subsequent graft compliance throughout the regenerative process. Utilizing an established urinary bladder augmentation model, the highly pro-inflammatory biologic scaffold (decellularized small intestinal submucosa) was treated with anti-inflammatory peptide amphiphiles (AIF-PAs) or control peptide amphiphiles and used for augmentation. Significant regenerative advantages of the AIF-PAs were observed including potent angiogenic responses, limited tissue collagen accumulation, and the modulation of macrophage and neutrophil responses in regenerated bladder tissue. Upon further characterization, a reduction in the levels of M2 macrophages was observed, but not in M1 macrophages in control groups, while treatment groups exhibited decreased levels of M1 macrophages and stabilized levels of M2 macrophages. Pro-inflammatory cytokine production was decreased while anti-inflammatory cytokines were up-regulated in treatment groups. This resulted in far fewer incidences of tissue granuloma and bladder stone formation. Finally, functional urinary bladder testing revealed greater bladder compliance and similar capacities in groups treated with AIF-PAs. Data demonstrate that AIF-PAs can alleviate galvanic innate immune responses and provide a highly conducive regenerative milieu that may be applicable in a variety of clinical settings. PMID:25145852

  14. Mechanisms Involved in the Anti-inflammatory and Vascular Effects of Iberis amara Extract.

    PubMed

    Khayyal, Mohamed T; Agha, Azza M; Zaki, Hala F; El-Sahar, Ayman; Abdel-Aziz, Heba

    2015-08-01

    The anti-inflammatory potential and vasoprotective effects of an Iberis amara extract in a rat model of arthritis were investigated. I. amara, or bitter candytuft, has long been known for its anti-inflammatory properties on account of its active constituents, including cucurbitacins, kaempferol, and sinapic acid. The present study was intended to explore more in depth its anti-inflammatory activity in both acute (carrageenan rat paw edema) and chronic (adjuvant-induced arthritis) models of inflammation. An extract of I. amara dose-dependently reduced the extent of edema in both models. In the chronic model, this was associated with a reduction in the inflammation mediators tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, and prostaglandin E2 and in the antioxidant biomarkers malondialdehyde and total nitrate/nitrite. Because arthritis was reported both clinically and experimentally to contribute towards different vascular complications, it was of interest to study ex vivo the sensitivity of aortic rings in our experimental setup towards norepinephrine, acetylcholine, and sodium nitroprusside. The aortic rings from arthritic rats showed no change in sensitivity to norepinephrine, but showed a reduced sensitivity to sodium nitroprusside and acetylcholine. To show whether the treatment of the arthritis would restore endothelial function, I. amara extract was shown to markedly reduce the reactivity to norepinephrine, but not to appreciably affect the reactivity towards sodium nitroprusside and it had a tendency towards normalizing reactivity to acetylcholine. Taken collectively, the findings imply an improvement in endothelial function and lend support to the use of the extract in rheumatic inflammatory conditions to help safeguard the integrity of the endothelium and reduce the risk of vascular complications. PMID:26287692

  15. Identification of Metabolic Signatures Linked to Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Faecalibacterium prausnitzii

    PubMed Central

    Miquel, Sylvie; Leclerc, Marion; Martin, Rebeca; Chain, Florian; Lenoir, Marion; Raguideau, Sébastien; Hudault, Sylvie; Bridonneau, Chantal; Northen, Trent; Bowen, Benjamin; Bermúdez-Humarán, Luis G.; Sokol, Harry; Thomas, Muriel

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Faecalibacterium prausnitzii is an anti-inflammatory commensal bacterium identified on the basis of human clinical data. The mechanisms underlying its beneficial effects are still unknown. Gnotobiotic mice harboring F. prausnitzii (A2-165) and Escherichia coli (K-12 JM105) were subjected to 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced acute colitis. The inflammatory colitis scores and a gas chromatography-time of flight (GC/TOF) mass spectrometry-based metabolomic profile were monitored in blood, ileum, cecum, colon, and feces in gnotobiotic mice. The potential anti-inflammatory metabolites were tested in vitro. We obtained stable E. coli and F. prausnitzii-diassociated mice in which E. coli primed the gastrointestinal tract (GIT), allowing a durable and stable establishment of F. prausnitzii. The disease activity index, histological scores, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, and serum cytokine levels were significantly lower in the presence of F. prausnitzii after TNBS challenge. The protective effect of F. prausnitzii against colitis was correlated to its implantation level and was linked to overrepresented metabolites along the GIT and in serum. Among 983 metabolites in GIT samples and serum, 279 were assigned to known chemical reactions. Some of them, belonging to the ammonia (α-ketoglutarate), osmoprotective (raffinose), and phenolic (including anti-inflammatory shikimic and salicylic acids) pathways, were associated with a protective effect of F. prausnitzii, and the functional link was established in vitro for salicylic acid. We show for the first time that F. prausnitzii is a highly active commensal bacterium involved in reduction of colitis through in vivo modulation of metabolites along the GIT and in the peripheral blood. PMID:25900655

  16. Anti-inflammatory Effect of Isaria sinclairii Glycosaminoglycan in an Adjuvant-treated Arthritis Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Jee, Sang Duck; Hwang, Jae Sam; Yun, Eun Young; Ahn, Kwang Seok; Kim, Yeong Shik

    2013-01-01

    The anti-inflammatory effects of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) derived from Isaria sinclairii (IS) and of IS extracts were investigated in a complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA)-treated chronic arthritis rat model. Groups of rats were treated orally with 30 mg/kg one of the following: [1] saline control, extracts of [2] water-IS, [3] methanol-IS, [4] butanol-IS, [5] ethyl acetate-IS, or [6] Indomethacin® as the positive control for a period of two weeks. The anti-paw edema effects of the individual extracts were in the following order: water-IS ex. > methanol ex. > butanol ex. > ethyl acetate ex. The water/methanol extract from I. sinclairii remarkably inhibited UV-mediated upregulation of NF-κB activity in transfected HaCaT cells. GAG as a water-soluble alcohol precipitated fraction also produced a noticeable anti-edema effect. This GAG also inhibited the pro-inflammatory cytokine levels of prostaglandin E2-stimulated lipopolysaccharide in LAW 264.7 cells, cytokine TNF-α production in splenocytes, and atherogenesis cytokine levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) production in HUVEC cells in a dose-dependent manner. In the histological analysis, the LV dorsal root ganglion, including the articular cartilage, and linked to the paw-treated IS GAG, was repaired against CFA-induced cartilage destruction. Combined treatment with Indomethacin® (5 mg/kg) and IS GAG (10 mg/kg) also more effectively inhibited CFA-induced paw edema at 3 hr, 24 hr, and 48 hr to levels comparable to the anti-inflammatory drug, indomethacin. Thus, the IS GAG described here holds great promise as an anti-inflammatory drug in the future. PMID:24386520

  17. The antioxidant, immunomodulatory, and anti-inflammatory activities of Spirulina: an overview.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qinghua; Liu, Lian; Miron, Anca; Klímová, Blanka; Wan, Dan; Kuča, Kamil

    2016-08-01

    Spirulina is a species of filamentous cyanobacteria that has long been used as a food supplement. In particular, Spirulina platensis and Spirulina maxima are the most important. Thanks to a high protein and vitamin content, Spirulina is used as a nutraceutical food supplement, although its other potential health benefits have attracted much attention. Oxidative stress and dysfunctional immunity cause many diseases in humans, including atherosclerosis, cardiac hypertrophy, heart failure, and hypertension. Thus, the antioxidant, immunomodulatory, and anti-inflammatory activities of these microalgae may play an important role in human health. Here, we discuss the antioxidant, immunomodulatory, and anti-inflammatory activities of Spirulina in both animals and humans, along with the underlying mechanisms. In addition, its commercial and regulatory status in different countries is discussed as well. Spirulina activates cellular antioxidant enzymes, inhibits lipid peroxidation and DNA damage, scavenges free radicals, and increases the activity of superoxide dismutase and catalase. Notably, there appears to be a threshold level above which Spirulina will taper off the antioxidant activity. Clinical trials show that Spirulina prevents skeletal muscle damage under conditions of exercise-induced oxidative stress and can stimulate the production of antibodies and up- or downregulate the expression of cytokine-encoding genes to induce immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory responses. The molecular mechanism(s) by which Spirulina induces these activities is unclear, but phycocyanin and β-carotene are important molecules. Moreover, Spirulina effectively regulates the ERK1/2, JNK, p38, and IκB pathways. This review provides new insight into the potential therapeutic applications of Spirulina and may provide new ideas for future studies. PMID:27259333

  18. Bioaccessibility, in vitro antioxidant activities and in vivo anti-inflammatory activities of a purple tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.).

    PubMed

    Li, Hongyan; Deng, Zeyuan; Liu, Ronghua; Loewen, Steven; Tsao, Rong

    2014-09-15

    The bioaccessibility, antioxidant activities and anti-inflammatory activities of phytochemicals in a purple tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) V118 was studied using a simulated gastrointestinal digestion model, chemical and cell based antioxidant assays. The total phenolic and carotenoid contents and the antioxidant activities were significantly lowered (37-72%) and degradation seemed to have occurred during the in vitro digestion. Results indicated that these phytochemicals were bioavailable to the cells as demonstrated by the cell based antioxidant assay. Extracts from the purple tomato showed significant and dose dependent anti-inflammatory effect in the in vivo carrageenan-induced paw oedema rat study (oedematous inhibition: 7.48% and 13.8%), suggesting that anthocyanins may play a role in the anti-inflammatory effect. Direct antioxidant actions as indicated by reduced MDA and NO production and indirect actions as shown in increased GPx and SOD activities in oedematous tissue support the conclusion that tomatoes containing anthocyanins can potentially provide better protection against oxidative stress related chronic diseases of humans. PMID:24767066

  19. Ternatin, an anti-inflammatory flavonoid, inhibits thioglycolate-elicited rat peritoneal neutrophil accumulation and LPS-activated nitric oxide production in murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Rao, V S N; Paiva, L A F; Souza, M F; Campos, A R; Ribeiro, R A; Brito, G A C; Teixeira, M J; Silveira, E R

    2003-09-01

    Ternatin, an anti-inflammatory flavonoid from Egletes viscosa Less., was examined for its possible influence on thioglycolate-elicited neutrophil influx into the rat peritoneal cavity in vivo and nitric oxide production in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated mouse peritoneal macrophages ex vivo. The neutrophil influx induced by thioglycolate was found to be significantly lower in ternatin (25 and 50 mg/kg, s. c.) pre-treated rats with a similar magnitude of inhibition produced by dexamethasone (1 mg/kg, s. c.), a known anti-inflammatory agent. Also, peritoneal macrophages from ternatin (25 mg/kg)-treated mice that were exposed to LPS demonstrated significantly less production of nitric oxide (NO). These results suggest that ternatin exerts its anti-inflammatory action, at least in part, through inhibition of neutrophil migration and modulation of macrophage function. PMID:14598213

  20. General unknown screening, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory potential of Dendrobium macrostachyum Lindl.

    PubMed Central

    Sukumaran, Nimisha Pulikkal; Yadav, R. Hiranmai

    2016-01-01

    Context: D. macrostachyum is an epiphytic orchid abundant in Southern India and is reported for pain relief in folklore. Aims: The objective of the present study was to determine in vitro free radical scavenging and anti-inflammatory activity of D. macrostachyum and to perform LCMS based metabolic profiling of the plant. Settings and Design: Sequential stem and leaf extracts were assessed for its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity by in vitro methods. Materials and Methods: The antioxidant activity determined by assays based on the decolourization of the radical monocation of DPPH, ABTS and reducing power. Total amount of phenolics for quantitative analysis of antioxidative components was estimated. In vitro anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated using protein denaturation assay, membrane stabilization assay and proteinase inhibitory activity. Methanolic extract of plant was subjected to LCMS. Results: The stem ethanolic extracts exhibited significant IC50 value of 10.21, 31.54 and 142.97 μg/ml respectively for DPPH, ABTS radical scavenging and reducing power activity. The ethanol and water extract was highly effective as albumin denaturation inhibitors (IC50 = 114.13 and 135.818 μg/ml respectively) and proteinase inhibitors (IC50 = 72.49 and 129.681 μg/ml respectively). Membrane stabilization was also noticeably inhibited by the stem ethanolic extract among other extracts (IC50 = 89.33 μg/ml) but comparatively lower to aspirin standard (IC50 = 83.926 μg/ml). The highest total phenol content was exhibited by ethanolic stem and leaf extracts respectively at 20 and 16 mg of gallic acid equivalents of dry extract. On LCMS analysis 20 constituents were identified and it included chemotaxonomic marker for Dendrobium species. Conclusions: The results showed a relatively high concentration of phenolics, high scavenger activity and high anti-inflammatory activity of the stem extract compared to the leaf extract. The results indicate that the plant can be a

  1. Anticancer and anti-inflammatory activities of some dietary cucurbits.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Dhara; Rawat, Indu; Goel, H C

    2015-04-01

    In this study, we investigated few dietary cucurbits for anticancer activity by monitoring cytotoxic (MTT and LDH assays), apoptotic (caspase-3 and annexin-V assays), and also their anti-inflammatory effects by IL-8 cytokine assay. Aqua-alcoholic (50:50) whole extracts of cucurbits [Lagenaria siceraria (Ls), Luffa cylindrica (Lc) and Cucurbita pepo (Cp)] were evaluated in colon cancer cells (HT-29 and HCT-15) and were compared with isolated biomolecule, cucurbitacin-B (Cbit-B). MTT and LDH assays revealed that the cucurbit extracts and Cbit-B, in a concentration dependent manner, decreased the viability of HT-29 and HCT-15 cells substantially. The viability of lymphocytes was, however, only marginally decreased, yielding a potential advantage over the tumor cells. Caspase-3 assay revealed maximum apoptosis with Ls while annexin V assay demonstrated maximum efficacy of Lc in this context. These cucurbits have also shown decreased secretion of IL-8, thereby revealing their anti-inflammatory capability. The results have demonstrated the therapeutic potential of dietary cucurbits in inhibiting cancer and inflammatory cytokine. PMID:26011982

  2. Immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory properties of engineered nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Ilinskaya, A N; Dobrovolskaia, M A

    2014-01-01

    Nanoparticle interactions with various components of the immune system are determined by their physicochemical properties such as size, charge, hydrophobicity and shape. Nanoparticles can be engineered to either specifically target the immune system or to avoid immune recognition. Nevertheless, identifying their unintended impacts on the immune system and understanding the mechanisms of such accidental effects are essential for establishing a nanoparticle's safety profile. While immunostimulatory properties have been reviewed before, little attention in the literature has been given to immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory properties. The purpose of this review is to fill this gap. We will discuss intended immunosuppression achieved by either nanoparticle engineering, or the use of nanoparticles to carry immunosuppressive or anti-inflammatory drugs. We will also review unintended immunosuppressive properties of nanoparticles per se and consider how such properties could be either beneficial or adverse. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed section on Nanomedicine. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-17 PMID:24724793

  3. Nanoliposomal Nitroglycerin Exerts Potent Anti-Inflammatory Effects

    PubMed Central

    Ardekani, Soroush; Scott, Harry A.; Gupta, Sharad; Eum, Shane; Yang, Xiao; Brunelle, Alexander R.; Wilson, Sean M.; Mohideen, Umar; Ghosh, Kaustabh

    2015-01-01

    Nitroglycerin (NTG) markedly enhances nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability. However, its ability to mimic the anti-inflammatory properties of NO remains unknown. Here, we examined whether NTG can suppress endothelial cell (EC) activation during inflammation and developed NTG nanoformulation to simultaneously amplify its anti-inflammatory effects and ameliorate adverse effects associated with high-dose NTG administration. Our findings reveal that NTG significantly inhibits human U937 cell adhesion to NO-deficient human microvascular ECs in vitro through an increase in endothelial NO and decrease in endothelial ICAM-1 clustering, as determined by NO analyzer, microfluorimetry, and immunofluorescence staining. Nanoliposomal NTG (NTG-NL) was formulated by encapsulating NTG within unilamellar lipid vesicles (DPhPC, POPC, Cholesterol, DHPE-Texas Red at molar ratio of 6:2:2:0.2) that were ~155 nm in diameter and readily uptaken by ECs, as determined by dynamic light scattering and quantitative fluorescence microscopy, respectively. More importantly, NTG-NL produced a 70-fold increase in NTG therapeutic efficacy when compared with free NTG while preventing excessive mitochondrial superoxide production associated with high NTG doses. Thus, these findings, which are the first to reveal the superior therapeutic effects of an NTG nanoformulation, provide the rationale for their detailed investigation for potentially superior vascular normalization therapies. PMID:26584637

  4. Nanoliposomal Nitroglycerin Exerts Potent Anti-Inflammatory Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardekani, Soroush; Scott, Harry A.; Gupta, Sharad; Eum, Shane; Yang, Xiao; Brunelle, Alexander R.; Wilson, Sean M.; Mohideen, Umar; Ghosh, Kaustabh

    2015-11-01

    Nitroglycerin (NTG) markedly enhances nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability. However, its ability to mimic the anti-inflammatory properties of NO remains unknown. Here, we examined whether NTG can suppress endothelial cell (EC) activation during inflammation and developed NTG nanoformulation to simultaneously amplify its anti-inflammatory effects and ameliorate adverse effects associated with high-dose NTG administration. Our findings reveal that NTG significantly inhibits human U937 cell adhesion to NO-deficient human microvascular ECs in vitro through an increase in endothelial NO and decrease in endothelial ICAM-1 clustering, as determined by NO analyzer, microfluorimetry, and immunofluorescence staining. Nanoliposomal NTG (NTG-NL) was formulated by encapsulating NTG within unilamellar lipid vesicles (DPhPC, POPC, Cholesterol, DHPE-Texas Red at molar ratio of 6:2:2:0.2) that were ~155 nm in diameter and readily uptaken by ECs, as determined by dynamic light scattering and quantitative fluorescence microscopy, respectively. More importantly, NTG-NL produced a 70-fold increase in NTG therapeutic efficacy when compared with free NTG while preventing excessive mitochondrial superoxide production associated with high NTG doses. Thus, these findings, which are the first to reveal the superior therapeutic effects of an NTG nanoformulation, provide the rationale for their detailed investigation for potentially superior vascular normalization therapies.

  5. Topical anti-inflammatory activity of Solanum corymbiflorum leaves.

    PubMed

    Piana, Mariana; Camponogara, Camila; Boligon, Aline Augusti; Machado, Michel Mansur; de Brum, Thiele Faccim; Oliveira, Sara Marchesan; de Freitas Bauermann, Liliane

    2016-02-17

    Solanum corymbiflorum is popularly known as "baga-de-veado" and its leaves are applied on inflamed legs, scabies, tick bite, boils, mastitis, low back pain and otitis. The aim of this study was evaluate anti-inflammatory in vivo activity and relate this activity with antioxidant compounds present in the extract of S. corymbiflorum leaves. The extract from S. corymbiflorum leaves topically applied was able to reduce the croton oil-induced ear edema and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity with maximum inhibition of 87±3% and 45±7%, rescpectively in the dose of 1mg/ear. Similar results were found for positive control dexamethasone, which presented inhibitions of ear edema and MPO activity of 89±3% and 50±3%, respectively in a dose of 0.1mg/ear. These findings are due, at least in part, the presence of polyphenols (195.28mg GAE/g) and flavonoids, as chlorogenic acid (59.27mg/g), rutin (12.72mg/g), rosmarinic acid, caffeic acid and gallic acid found by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis. This species showed potencial antioxidant by 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), and carbonyl groups in proteins methods which may be related with the presence of this compounds. This species possess anti-inflammatory activity confirming their popular use for the local treatment of skin inflammatory disorders. PMID:26721215

  6. HU-444, a Novel, Potent Anti-Inflammatory, Nonpsychotropic Cannabinoid.

    PubMed

    Haj, Christeene G; Sumariwalla, Percy F; Hanuš, Lumír; Kogan, Natalya M; Yektin, Zhana; Mechoulam, Raphael; Feldmann, Mark; Gallily, Ruth

    2015-10-01

    Cannabidiol (CBD) is a component of cannabis, which does not cause the typical marijuana-type effects, but has a high potential for use in several therapeutic areas. In contrast to Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC), it binds very weakly to the CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptors. It has potent activity in both in vitro and in vivo anti-inflammatory assays. Thus, it lowers the formation of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, a proinflammatory cytokine, and was found to be an oral antiarthritic therapeutic in murine collagen-induced arthritis in vivo. However, in acidic media, it can cyclize to the psychoactive Δ(9)-THC. We report the synthesis of a novel CBD derivative, HU-444, which cannot be converted by acid cyclization into a Δ(9)-THC-like compound. In vitro HU-444 had anti-inflammatory activity (decrease of reactive oxygen intermediates and inhibition of TNF-α production by macrophages); in vivo it led to suppression of production of TNF-α and amelioration of liver damage as well as lowering of mouse collagen-induced arthritis. HU-444 did not cause Δ(9)-THC-like effects in mice. We believe that HU-444 represents a potential novel drug for rheumatoid arthritis and other inflammatory diseases. PMID:26272937

  7. A novel anti-inflammatory peptide from human lipocortin 5.

    PubMed Central

    Perretti, M.; Becherucci, C.; Mugridge, K. G.; Solito, E.; Silvestri, S.; Parente, L.

    1991-01-01

    1. A novel anti-inflammatory peptide (residues 204-212) of human recombinant lipocortin 5 (hrLC5) found on the high similarity region with uteroglobin is described. 2. Peptide 204-212 dose-dependently inhibited the contractions of rat isolated stomach strips elicited by porcine pancreatic phospholipase A2 (PLA2). Contractions caused by arachidonic acid (AA), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and 5-hydroxytryptamine were not affected. No direct enzyme inhibition was observed in a radiochemical assay. 3. PGE2 release by both human fibroblasts and rat macrophages was reduced by peptide 204-212 in a dose-dependent manner. 4. The development of carrageenin-induced oedema in rats was significantly inhibited by the local administration of peptide 204-212. 5. The pattern and potency of the biological effects of peptide 204-212 are similar to those of antiflammin 2, a lipocortin 1-derived peptide. 6. It is suggested that peptide 204-212 may represent the active site responsible for the anti-inflammatory properties of lipocortin 5. PMID:1832064

  8. Develop Anti-Inflammatory Nanotherapies to Treat Cardiovascular Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jun

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of disease-related death in the world, accounting for 30 % global mortality. The majority of CVD is caused by atherosclerosis, a chronic inflammatory disease of major arteries featured by the deposition of lipids and cholesterol. Inflammation of atherosclerosis is mainly promoted by the pathological macrophages and monocytes, and modulating their functions has been proposed as a promising therapeutic target. This dissertation first presents the development of a novel simvastatin-loaded high-density lipoprotein (HDL) based nanoparticle ([S]-rHDL), which was able to deliver anti-inflammatory simvastatin preferentially to inflammatory monocytes in the blood and to macrophages in advanced atherosclerotic plaques, leading to the reduced inflammation in the tissue. Second, extensive in vivo characterization of [S]-rHDL in a mouse atherosclerosis model revealed that the anti-inflammatory capability of [S]-rHDL derived from its effects on blood monocytes, endothelial layer, monocyte recruitment, and plaque macrophage function. Third, a translational study that integrated the use of [S]-rHDL into oral statin treatment demonstrated a great potential for this nanomedicine as an attractive addition to the current high-dose oral statin standard-of-care for acute coronary syndrome. Finally, preliminary results suggested potential applications of the rHDL platform to other macrophage-implicated diseases.

  9. Analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and antipyretic effects of Ixora coccinea.

    PubMed

    Ali Adnan, Md Syed; Al-Amin, Md Mamun; Nasir Uddin, Mir Muhammad; Shohel, M; Bhattacharjee, Rajib; Hannan, J M A; Das, Biplab Kumar

    2014-01-27

    Abstract Background: The present study was carried out to explore the potential of the ethanol extract of Ixora coccinea L. (IC) leaves as analgesic, anti-inflammatory and antipyretic agents using the hot-plate, acetic acid-induced writhing, carrageenan-induced paw edema and brewer's yeast-induced pyrexia tests in rodents. Methods: The extract was prepared by soaking the dried powdered leaves of IC in ethanol for 2 days. The filtrate thus obtained by filtration and evaporation was considered as a stock solution and was used in all experimental models. Results: Oral administration of IC (250 and 500 mg/kg) significantly (p<0.05) increased the reaction time in the hot-plate test. Ixora coccinea (250 and 500 mg/kg) produced 56.14% and 63.16% inhibition (p<0.05) in acetic acid-induced writhing. It also (250 and 500 mg/kg) produced significant (p<0.05) inhibition of paw edema pronounced at 6 h after carrageenan injection. Intraperitoneal administration of IC (250 and 500 mg/kg) lowered the body temperature in brewer's yeast-induced hyperthermia. Conclusions: Based on the findings, it may be concluded that the IC leaves possessed analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and antipyretic activities. Phytochemical constituents of IC leaves such as flavonoids, tannins, and triterpenes in ethanol extract could be correlated with its observed biological activities. PMID:24468614

  10. A Novel Anti-Inflammatory Effect for High Density Lipoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Scott J.; Morrell, Craig N.; Bao, Clare; Swaim, AnneMarie F.; Rodriguez, Annabelle; Lowenstein, Charles J.

    2015-01-01

    High density lipoprotein has anti-inflammatory effects in addition to mediating reverse cholesterol transport. While many of the chronic anti-inflammatory effects of high density lipoprotein (HDL) are attributed to changes in cell adhesion molecules, little is known about acute signal transduction events elicited by HDL in endothelial cells. We now show that high density lipoprotein decreases endothelial cell exocytosis, the first step in leukocyte trafficking. ApoA-I, a major apolipoprotein of HDL, mediates inhibition of endothelial cell exocytosis by interacting with endothelial scavenger receptor-BI which triggers an intracellular protective signaling cascade involving protein kinase C (PKC). Other apolipoproteins within the HDL particle have only modest effects upon endothelial exocytosis. Using a human primary culture of endothelial cells and murine apo-AI knockout mice, we show that apo-AI prevents endothelial cell exocytosis which limits leukocyte recruitment. These data suggest that high density lipoprotein may inhibit diseases associated with vascular inflammation in part by blocking endothelial exocytosis. PMID:26680360

  11. Human milk anti-inflammatory component contents during acute mastitis.

    PubMed

    Buescher, E S; Hair, P S

    2001-06-15

    Mastitis is a common complication of human lactation. We examined milk specimens from eight women with clinical mastitis to determine their content of anti-inflammatory components. Antioxidant activity (spontaneous cytochrome c reducing activity), selected pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, IL-1beta), selected endogenous cytokine control molecules (sIL-6R, sIL-1RII, and sTNFRI), lactoferrin, Na(+):K(+) ratios, and milk bioactivities that cause shedding of sIL-1RII from human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN), suppress PMN aggregation, and suppress PMN adherence responses were not increased compared to normal milks. Neither the bioactivities that deplete PMN intracellular Ca(2+) stores nor those that block Ca(2+) influx into fMLP-stimulated PMN were significantly increased in mastitis milks. In contrast, levels of TNFalpha, sTNFRII, and IL-1RA and bioactivities that cause shedding of sTNFRI from human PMN were significantly increased compared to normal milks. Mastitis milk has the same anti-inflammatory components and characteristics of normal milk, with elevations in selected components/activities that may help protect the nursing infant from developing clinical illness due to feeding on mastitis milk. PMID:11520075

  12. A Novel Anti-Inflammatory Effect for High Density Lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Scott J; Morrell, Craig N; Bao, Clare; Swaim, AnneMarie F; Rodriguez, Annabelle; Lowenstein, Charles J

    2015-01-01

    High density lipoprotein has anti-inflammatory effects in addition to mediating reverse cholesterol transport. While many of the chronic anti-inflammatory effects of high density lipoprotein (HDL) are attributed to changes in cell adhesion molecules, little is known about acute signal transduction events elicited by HDL in endothelial cells. We now show that high density lipoprotein decreases endothelial cell exocytosis, the first step in leukocyte trafficking. ApoA-I, a major apolipoprotein of HDL, mediates inhibition of endothelial cell exocytosis by interacting with endothelial scavenger receptor-BI which triggers an intracellular protective signaling cascade involving protein kinase C (PKC). Other apolipoproteins within the HDL particle have only modest effects upon endothelial exocytosis. Using a human primary culture of endothelial cells and murine apo-AI knockout mice, we show that apo-AI prevents endothelial cell exocytosis which limits leukocyte recruitment. These data suggest that high density lipoprotein may inhibit diseases associated with vascular inflammation in part by blocking endothelial exocytosis. PMID:26680360

  13. Degradable magnesium-based implant materials with anti-inflammatory activity.

    PubMed

    Peng, Qiuming; Li, Kun; Han, Zengsheng; Wang, Erde; Xu, Zhigang; Liu, Riping; Tian, Yongjun

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this study was to prepare a new biodegradable Mg-based biomaterial, which provides good mechanical integrity in combination with anti-inflammatory function during the degradation process. The silver element was used, because it improved the mechanical properties as an effective grain refiner and it is also treated as a potential anti-inflammatory core. The new degradable Mg-Zn-Ag biomaterial was prepared by zone solidification technology and extrusion. The mechanical properties were mostly enhanced by fine grain strengthening. In addition, the alloys exhibited good cytocompatibility. The anti-inflammatory function of degradation products was identified by both interleukin-1α and nitric oxide modes. The anti-inflammatory impact was significantly associated with the concentration of silver ion. It was demonstrated that Mg-Zn-Ag system was a potential metallic stent with anti-inflammatory function, which can reduce the long-term dependence of anti-inflammatory drug after coronary stent implantation. PMID:23203562

  14. Stereocontrolled total synthesis of the potent anti-inflammatory and pro-resolving lipid mediator resolvin D3 and its aspirin-triggered 17R-epimer.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Jeremy W; Uddin, Jasim; Serhan, Charles N; Petasis, Nicos A

    2013-04-01

    The first total synthesis of stereochemically pure resolvin D3 and aspirin-triggered resolvin D3 is reported. These enzymatic metabolites of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) have potent anti-inflammatory and pro-resolving actions. The convergent synthetic strategy is based on enantiomerically pure starting materials, and it is highly stereocontrolled. PMID:23510485

  15. Involvement of the Antioxidant Effect and Anti-inflammatory Response in Butyrate-Inhibited Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Omana P.; Ranganna, Kasturi; Milton, Shirlette G.

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms by altering the expression and, in turn, functions of target genes have potential to modify cellular processes that are characteristics of atherosclerosis, including inflammation, proliferation, migration and apoptosis/cell death. Butyrate, a natural epigenetic modifier and a histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi), is an inhibitor of vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation, a critical event in atherogenesis. Here, we examined whether glutathione peroxidases (GPxs), a family of antioxidant enzymes, are modulated by butyrate, contributing to its antiproliferation action on VSMC through the regulation of the inflammatory response by using western blotting, immunostaining methods and activity assay. Treatment of VSMC with butyrate not only upregulates glutathione peroxidase (GPx) 3 and GPx4, but also increases the overall catalytic activity of GPx supporting involvement of antioxidant effect in butyrate arrested VSMC proliferation. Moreover, analysis of the redox-sensitive NF-κB transcription factor system, the target of GPx, reveals that butyrate causes downregulation of IKKα, IKKβ, IkBα and NF-κBp65 expression and prevents NF-κBp65 phosphorylation at serine536 causing inhibition of the expression NF-κB target inflammatory genes, including inducible nitric oxide synthase, VCAM-1 and cyclooxygenase-2. Overall, these observations suggest a link between the antioxidant effect and anti-inflammatory response in butyrate-arrested VSMC proliferation, accentuating the atheroprotective and therapeutic potential of natural products, like butyrate, in vascular proliferative diseases. PMID:25390157

  16. Anti-inflammatory effects of cannabinoid CB2 receptor activation in endotoxin-induced uveitis

    PubMed Central

    Toguri, J T; Lehmann, C; Laprairie, R B; Szczesniak, A M; Zhou, J; Denovan-Wright, E M; Kelly, M E M

    2014-01-01

    Background and PurposeCannabinoid CB2 receptors mediate immunomodulation. Here, we investigated the effects of CB2 receptor ligands on leukocyte-endothelial adhesion and inflammatory mediator release in experimental endotoxin-induced uveitis (EIU). Experimental ApproachEIU was induced by intraocular injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 20 ng·μL−1). Effects of the CB2 receptor agonist, HU308 (1.5% topical), the CB2 receptor antagonist, AM630 (2.5 mg·kg−1 i.v.), or a combination of both compounds on leukocyte-endothelial interactions were measured hourly for 6 h in rat iridial vasculature using intravital microscopy. Anti-inflammatory actions of HU308 were compared with those of clinical treatments for uveitis - dexamethasone, prednisolone and nepafenac. Transcription factors (NF-κB, AP-1) and inflammatory mediators (cytokines, chemokines and adhesion molecules) were measured in iris and ciliary body tissue. Key ResultsLeukocyte-endothelium adherence was increased in iridial microvasculature between 4–6 h after LPS. HU308 reduced this effect after LPS injection and decreased pro-inflammatory mediators: TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, CCL5 and CXCL2. AM630 blocked the actions of HU-308, and increased leukocyte-endothelium adhesion. HU-308 decreased levels of the transcription factors NF-κB and AP-1, while AM630 increased levels of NF-κB. Topical treatments with dexamethasone, prednisolone or nepafenac, failed to alter leukocyte adhesion or mitigate LPS-induced increases in inflammatory mediators during the 6 h of EIU. Conclusion and ImplicationsActivation of CB2 receptors was anti-inflammatory in a model of acute EIU and involved a reduction in NF-κB, AP-1 and inflammatory mediators. CB2 receptors may be promising drug targets for the development of novel ocular anti-inflammatory agents. Linked ArticlesThis article is part of a themed section on Cannabinoids 2013. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014

  17. Association of terpinolene and diclofenac presents antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory synergistic effects in a model of chronic inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Macedo, E.M.A.; Santos, W.C.; Sousa, B.P.; Lopes, E.M.; Piauilino, C.A.; Cunha, F.V.M.; Sousa, D.P.; Oliveira, F.A.; Almeida, F.R.C.

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacological treatment of inflammatory pain is usually done by administration of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). These drugs present high efficacy, although side effects are common, especially gastrointestinal lesions. One of the pharmacological strategies to minimize such effects is the combination of drugs and natural products with synergistic analgesic effect. The monoterpene terpinolene (TPL) is a chemical constituent of essential oils present in many plant species, which have pharmacological activities, such as analgesic and anti-inflammatory. The association of ineffective doses of TPL and diclofenac (DCF) (3.125 and 1.25 mg/kg po, respectively) presented antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects in the acute (0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 h, after treatment) and chronic (10 days) inflammatory hyperalgesia induced by Freund's complete adjuvant (CFA) in the right hind paw of female Wistar rats (170-230 g, n=6-8). The mechanical hyperalgesia was assessed by the Randall Selitto paw pressure test, which determines the paw withdrawal thresholds. The development of edema was quantified by measuring the volume of the hind paw by plethismography. The TPL/DCF association reduced neutrophils, macrophages and lymphocytes in the histological analysis of the paw, following a standard staining protocol with hematoxylin and eosin and the counts were performed with the aid of optical microscopy after chronic oral administration of these drugs. Moreover, the TPL/DCF association did not induce macroscopic gastric lesions. A possible mechanism of action of the analgesic effect is the involvement of 5-HT2A serotonin receptors, because ketanserin completely reversed the antinociceptive effect of the TPL/DCF association. These results suggest that the TPL/DCF association had a synergistic anti-inflammatory and analgesic effect without causing apparent gastric injury, and that the serotonergic system may be involved in the antinociceptive effect of this association

  18. Anti-inflammatory effects of essential oils from Chamaecyparis obtusa via the cyclooxygenase-2 pathway in rats.

    PubMed

    An, Beum-Soo; Kang, Ji-Houn; Yang, Hyun; Jung, Eui-Man; Kang, Hong-Seok; Choi, In-Gyu; Park, Mi-Jin; Jeung, Eui-Bae

    2013-07-01

    Essential oils are concentrated hydrophobic liquids containing volatile aromatic compounds from plants. In the present study, the essential oil of Chamaecyparis obtusa (C. obtusa), which is commercially used in soap, toothpaste and cosmetics, was extracted. Essential oil extracted from C. obtusa contains several types of terpenes, which have been shown to have anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory effects. In the present study, we examined the anti-inflammatory effects of C. obtusa essential oil in vivo and in vitro following the induction of inflammation by lipopolysaccharides (LPS) in rats. While LPS induced an inflammatory response through the production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in the blood and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PMNCs), these levels were reduced when essential oil was pre-administered. Additionally, the mechanism of action underlying the anti-inflammatory effects of C. obtusa essential oil was investigated by measuring the mRNA expression of inflammation‑associated genes. LPS treatment significantly induced the expression of transforming growth factor α (TNFα) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in rats, while C. obtusa essential oil inhibited this effect. Taken together, our results demonstrate that C. obtusa essential oil exerts anti‑inflammatory effects by regulating the production of PGE2 and TNFα gene expression through the COX-2 pathway. These findings suggest that C. obtusa essential oil may constitute a novel source of anti-inflammatory drugs. PMID:23652412

  19. A study on the anti-inflammatory effects of new derivatives of 3-hydroxy pyridine-4-one

    PubMed Central

    Hajhashemi, Valiollah; Mojiri-Froshani, Hoda; Saghaei, Lotfollah; Fassihi, Afshin

    2014-01-01

    Background: Derivatives of pyridine-4-one act as iron chelators and possess various pharmacological effects such as antifungal, antimalarial, antiviral, anti-inflammatory, and analgesic effects. The aim of our study was to evaluate the anti-inflammatory effects of the three new derivatives of pyridine-4-one. Materials and Methods: Carrageenan-induced paw edema in rats and croton oil-induced ear edema in mice were used to evaluate the anti-inflammatry effects of three 3-hydroxy-pyridine-4-one derivatives (compounds A, B, and C). Compound A (10, 20 mg/kg), compound B (200, 400 mg/kg), and compound C (100, 200 mg/kg), vehicle (1 mL/kg), and indomethacin as standard drug (10 mg/kg) were injected intraperitoneally 30 min prior to carrageenan injection and 4 h later, the paw volume was measured using a mercury plethysmograph. The maximum dose of each test compound was used in the croton oil-induced ear edema test. Results: All compounds showed significant anti-inflammatory activity in both tests. On a molar basis, compound A had the greatest potency, which may be due to the presence of a benzyl group substitution on the pyridine ring. Conclusions: Because cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase as key enzymes of the inflammation pathway are heme-dependent, it seems that the anti-inflammatory effect of derivatives of pyridine-4-one may be related to their iron chelating properties. However, more investigations are needed to find out their exact mechanism of actions. PMID:24949305

  20. Anti-inflammatory effects of PGE2 in the lung: role of the EP4 receptor subtype

    PubMed Central

    Birrell, Mark A; Maher, Sarah A; Dekkak, Bilel; Jones, Victoria; Wong, Sissie; Brook, Peter; Belvisi, Maria G

    2015-01-01

    Background Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are chronic inflammatory diseases of the airway. Current treatment options (long acting β-adrenoceptor agonists and glucocorticosteroids) are not optimal as they are only effective in certain patient groups and safety concerns exist regarding both compound classes. Therefore, novel bronchodilator and anti-inflammatory strategies are being pursued. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is an arachidonic acid-derived eicosanoid produced by the lung which acts on four different G-protein coupled receptors (EP1–4) to cause an array of beneficial and deleterious effects. The aim of this study was to identify the EP receptor mediating the anti-inflammatory actions of PGE2 in the lung using a range of cell-based assays and in vivo models. Methods and results It was demonstrated in three distinct model systems (innate stimulus, lipopolysaccharide (LPS); allergic response, ovalbumin (OVA); inhaled pollutant, cigarette smoke) that mice missing functional EP4 (Ptger4−/−) receptors had higher levels of airway inflammation, suggesting that endogenous PGE2 was suppressing inflammation via EP4 receptor activation. Cell-based assay systems (murine and human monocytes/alveolar macrophages) demonstrated that PGE2 inhibited cytokine release from LPS-stimulated cells and that this was mimicked by an EP4 (but not EP1–3) receptor agonist and inhibited by an EP4 receptor antagonist. The anti-inflammatory effect occurred at the transcriptional level and was via the adenylyl cyclase/cAMP/ cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) axis. Conclusion This study demonstrates that EP4 receptor activation is responsible for the anti-inflammatory activity of PGE2 in a range of disease relevant models and, as such, could represent a novel therapeutic target for chronic airway inflammatory conditions. PMID:25939749

  1. Anti-inflammatory and antifibrotic effects of methyl palmitate

    SciTech Connect

    El-Demerdash, Ebtehal

    2011-08-01

    Methyl palmitate (MP) has been shown earlier to inhibit Kupffer cells and rat peritoneal macrophages. To evaluate the potential of MP to inhibit the activation of other macrophages, RAW cells (macrophages of alveolar origin) were treated with varying concentrations of MP (0.25, 0.5, 1 mM). Assessment of cytotoxicity using MTT assay revealed that 0.25 and 0.5 mM are not toxic to RAW cells. MP was able to inhibit the phagocytic function of RAW cells. Treatment of cells with MP 24 hours prior to LPS stimulation significantly decreased nitric oxide release and altered the pattern of cytokines release; there was a significant decrease in TNF-{alpha} and a significant increase in IL-10 compared to the controls. However, there is a non-significant change in IL-6 level. Furthermore, phosphorylation of inhibitory kappa B (I{kappa}B{alpha}) protein was significantly decreased in RAW cells treated with 0.5 mM MP after LPS stimulation. Based upon the in-vitro results, it was examined whether MP treatment will be effective in preventing bleomycin-induced lung inflammation and fibrosis in-vivo. Bleomycin given by itself caused destruction of the lung architecture characterized by pulmonary fibrosis with collapse of air alveoli and emphysematous. Bleomycin induced a significant increase in hydroxyproline level and activated NF-{kappa}B, p65 expression in the lung. MP co-treatment significantly ameliorated bleomycin effects. These results suggest that MP has a potential of inhibiting macrophages in general. The present study demonstrated for the first time that MP has anti-inflammatory and antifibrotic effect that could be through NF-kB inhibition. Thus MP like molecule could be a promising anti-inflammatory and antifibrotic drug. - Research Highlights: >Methyl palmitate is a universal macrophage inhibitor. >It could be a promising nucleus of anti-inflammatory and antifibrotic drugs. >The underlying mechanism of these effects could be through NF-kB inhibition.

  2. Anti-Oxidant, Anti-Inflammatory and Anti-Angiogenic Properties of Resveratrol in Ocular Diseases.

    PubMed

    Lançon, Allan; Frazzi, Raffaele; Latruffe, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    Resveratrol (3,4',5 trihydroxy-trans-stilbene) is one of the best known phytophenols with pleiotropic properties. It is a phytoalexin produced by vine and it leads to the stimulation of natural plant defenses but also exhibits many beneficial effects in animals and humans by acting on a wide range of organs and tissues. These include the prevention of cardiovascular diseases, anti-cancer potential, neuroprotective effects, homeostasia maintenance, aging delay and a decrease in inflammation. Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is one of the main causes of deterioration of vision in adults in developed countries This review deals with resveratrol and ophthalmology by focusing on the antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-angiogenic effects of this molecule. The literature reports that resveratrol is able to act on various cell types of the eye by increasing the level of natural antioxidant enzymatic and molecular defenses. Resveratrol anti-inflammatory effects are due to its capacity to limit the expression of pro-inflammatory factors, such as interleukins and prostaglandins, and also to decrease the chemo-attraction and recruitment of immune cells to the inflammatory site. In addition to this, resveratrol was shown to possess anti-VEGF effects and to inhibit the proliferation and migration of vascular endothelial cells. Resveratrol has the potential to be used in a range of human ocular diseases and conditions, based on animal models and in vitro experiments. PMID:26950104

  3. Integrative Approach to Analyze Biodiversity and Anti-Inflammatory Bioactivity of Wedelia Medicinal Plants

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yung-Hsiang; Hsiao, Pei-Wen; Liao, Jiunn-Wang; Peng, Ching-I; Yang, Ning-Sun

    2015-01-01

    For the development of “medical foods” and/or botanical drugs as defined USA FDA, clear and systemic characterizations of the taxonomy, index phytochemical components, and the functional or medicinal bioactivities of the reputed or candidate medicinal plant are needed. In this study, we used an integrative approach, including macroscopic and microscopic examination, marker gene analysis, and chemical fingerprinting, to authenticate and validate various species/varieties of Wedelia, a reputed medicinal plant that grows naturally and commonly used in Asian countries. The anti-inflammatory bioactivities of Wedelia extracts were then evaluated in a DSS-induced murine colitis model. Different species/varieties of Wedelia exhibited distinguishable morphology and histological structures. Analysis of the ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region revealed significant differences among these plants. Chemical profiling of test Wedelia species demonstrated candidate index compounds and distinguishable secondary metabolites, such as caffeic acid derivatives, which may serve as phytochemical markers or index for quality control and identification of specific Wedelia species. In assessing their effect on treating DSS induced-murine colitis, we observed that only the phytoextract from W. chinensis species exhibited significant anti-inflammatory bioactivity on DSS-induced murine colitis among the various Wedelia species commonly found in Taiwan. Our results provide a translational research approach that may serve as a useful reference platform for biotechnological applications of traditional phytomedicines. Our findings indicate that specific Wedelia species warrant further investigation for potential treatment of human inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:26042672

  4. Anti-inflammatory activity and molecular mechanism of delphinidin 3-sambubioside, a Hibiscus anthocyanin.

    PubMed

    Sogo, Takayuki; Terahara, Norihiko; Hisanaga, Ayami; Kumamoto, Takuma; Yamashiro, Takaaki; Wu, Shusong; Sakao, Kozue; Hou, De-Xing

    2015-01-01

    Delphinidin 3-sambubioside (Dp3-Sam), a Hibiscus anthocyanin, was isolated from the dried calices of Hibiscus sabdariffa L, which has been used for folk beverages and herbal medicine although the molecular mechanisms are poorly defined. Based on the properties of Dp3-Sam and the information of inflammatory processes, we investigated the anti-inflammatory activity and molecular mechanisms in both cell and animal models in the present study. In the cell model, Dp3-Sam and Delphinidin (Dp) reduced the levels of inflammatory mediators including iNOS, NO, IL-6, MCP-1, and TNF-α induced by LPS. Cellular signaling analysis revealed that Dp3-Sam and Dp downregulated NF-κB pathway and MEK1/2-ERK1/2 signaling. In animal model, Dp3-Sam and Dp reduced the production of IL-6, MCP-1 and TNF-α and attenuated mouse paw edema induced by LPS. Our in vitro and in vivo data demonstrated that Hibiscus Dp3-Sam possessed potential anti-inflammatory properties. PMID:25728636

  5. The Anti-Inflammatory, Phytoestrogenic, and Antioxidative Role of Labisia pumila in Prevention of Postmenopausal Osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Nadia, M E; Nazrun, A S; Norazlina, M; Isa, N M; Norliza, M; Ima Nirwana, S

    2012-01-01

    Osteoporosis is characterized by skeletal degeneration with low bone mass and destruction of microarchitecture of bone tissue which is attributed to various factors including inflammation. Women are more likely to develop osteoporosis than men due to reduction in estrogen during menopause which leads to decline in bone-formation and increase in bone-resorption activity. Estrogen is able to suppress production of proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-1, IL-6, IL-7, and TNF-α. This is why these cytokines are elevated in postmenopausal women. Studies have shown that estrogen reduction is able to stimulate focal inflammation in bone. Labisia pumila (LP) which is known to exert phytoestrogenic effect can be used as an alternative to ERT which can produce positive effects on bone without causing side effects. LP contains antioxidant as well as exerting anti-inflammatory effect which can act as free radical scavenger, thus inhibiting TNF-α production and COX-2 expression which leads to decline in RANKL expression, resulting in reduction in osteoclast activity which consequently reduces bone loss. Hence, it is the phytoestrogenic, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidative properties that make LP an effective agent against osteoporosis. PMID:22611381

  6. Muscarinic Receptors and Their Antagonists in COPD: Anti-Inflammatory and Antiremodeling Effects

    PubMed Central

    Karakiulakis, George; Roth, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Muscarinic receptors are expressed by most cell types and mediate cellular signaling of their natural ligand acetylcholine. Thereby, they control numerous central and peripheral physiological organ responses to neuronal activity. In the human lung, muscarinic receptors are predominantly expressed by smooth muscle cells, epithelial cells, and fibroblasts. Antimuscarinic agents are used for the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and to a lesser extent for asthma. They are primarily used as bronchodilators, but it is now accepted that they are also associated with anti-inflammatory, antiproliferative, and antiremodeling effects. Remodeling of the small airways is a major pathology in COPD and impairs lung function through changes of the extracellular matrix. Glycosaminoglycans, particularly hyaluronic acid, and matrix metalloproteases are among extracellular matrix molecules that have been associated with tissue inflammation and remodeling in lung diseases, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma. Since muscarinic receptors have been shown to influence the homeostasis of glycosaminoglycans and matrix metalloproteases, these molecules may be proved valuable endpoint targets in clinical studies for the pharmacological exploitation of the anti-inflammatory and antiremodeling effects of muscarinic inhibitors in the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma. PMID:23226927

  7. Heparin-based hydrogels with tunable sulfation & degradation for anti-inflammatory small molecule delivery.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yifeng; Tellier, Liane E; Temenoff, Johnna S

    2016-08-16

    Sustained release of anti-inflammatory agents remains challenging for small molecule drugs due to their low molecular weight and hydrophobicity. Therefore, the goal of this study was to control the release of a small molecule anti-inflammatory agent, crystal violet (CV), from hydrogels fabricated with heparin, a highly sulfated glycosaminoglycan capable of binding positively-charged molecules such as CV. In this system, both electrostatic interactions between heparin and CV and hydrogel degradation were tuned simultaneously by varying the level of heparin sulfation and varying the amount of dithiothreitol within hydrogels, respectively. It was found that heparin sulfation significantly affected CV release, whereby more sulfated heparin hydrogels (Hep and Hep(-N)) released CV with near zero-order release kinetics (R-squared values between 0.96-0.99). Furthermore, CV was released more quickly from fast-degrading hydrogels than slow-degrading hydrogels, providing a method to tune total CV release between 5-15 days while maintaining linear release kinetics. In particular, N-desulfated heparin hydrogels exhibited efficient CV loading (∼90% of originally included CV), near zero-order CV release kinetics, and maintenance of CV bioactivity after release, making this hydrogel formulation a promising CV delivery vehicle for a wide range of inflammatory diseases. PMID:27447003

  8. Clinical implications of prescribing nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in oral health care--a review.

    PubMed

    Nagi, Ravleen; Yashoda Devi, B K; Rakesh, N; Reddy, Sujatha S; Patil, Deepa Jatti

    2015-03-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), including both the traditional nonselective NSAIDs and the selective cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 inhibitors, are widely used for their anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects. They are routinely prescribed in dental practice for the management of pain and swelling. Their use in treating acute dental pain and chronic orofacial pain, as adjuncts to the treatment of periodontal disease, and to minimize edema following surgical procedures is well documented. However, long-term utilization of nonselective NSAIDs could increase the risk of gastrointestinal symptoms, ranging from mild (e.g., dyspepsia, nausea, or vomiting) to serious gastric problems (e.g., gastric bleeding or perforation). Therefore, selective COX-2 inhibitors have been developed with fewer GI side effects but the recently identified cardiovascular adverse reactions limit their routine use in dental practice. Another major concern for oral physicians is NSAID-induced mucosal lesions and prolongation of bleeding time during invasive dental procedures. This article reviews therapeutic and analgesic uses of NSAIDs in dentistry. The various issues surrounding NSAID-induced adverse reactions and their implications in dentistry are also discussed. PMID:25617120

  9. Anti-inflammatory activity of leaf essential oil from Cinnamomum longepaniculatum (Gamble) N. Chao

    PubMed Central

    Du, Yong-Hua; Feng, Rui-Zhang; Li, Qun; Wei, Qin; Yin, Zhong-Qiong; Zhou, Li-Jun; Tao, Cui; Jia, Ren-Yong

    2014-01-01

    The anti-inflammatory activity of the essential oil from C. longepaniculatum was evaluated by three experimental models including the dimethyl benzene-induced ear edema in mice, the carrageenan-induced paw edema in rat and the acetic acid-induced vascular permeability in mice. The influence of the essential oil on histological changes and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), histamine and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) production associated with carrageenan-induced rat paw edema was also investigated. The essential oil (0.5, 0.25, 0.13 ml/kg b.w.) showed significantly inhibition of inflammation along with a dose-dependent manner in the three experimental models. The anti-inflammatory activity of essential oil was occurred both in early and late phase and peaked at 4 h after carrageenan injection. The essential oil resulted in a dose dependent reduction of the paw thickness, connective tissue injury and the infiltration of inflammatory cell. The essential oil also significantly reduced the production of PGE2, histamine and 5-HT in the exudates of edema paw induced by carrageenan. Both the essential oil and indomethacin resulted relative lower percentage inhibition of histamine and 5-HT than that of PGE2 at 4 h after carrageenan injection. PMID:25664080

  10. The Anti-Inflammatory, Phytoestrogenic, and Antioxidative Role of Labisia pumila in Prevention of Postmenopausal Osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Nadia, M. E.; Nazrun, A. S.; Norazlina, M.; Isa, N. M.; Norliza, M.; Ima Nirwana, S.

    2012-01-01

    Osteoporosis is characterized by skeletal degeneration with low bone mass and destruction of microarchitecture of bone tissue which is attributed to various factors including inflammation. Women are more likely to develop osteoporosis than men due to reduction in estrogen during menopause which leads to decline in bone-formation and increase in bone-resorption activity. Estrogen is able to suppress production of proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-1, IL-6, IL-7, and TNF-α. This is why these cytokines are elevated in postmenopausal women. Studies have shown that estrogen reduction is able to stimulate focal inflammation in bone. Labisia pumila (LP) which is known to exert phytoestrogenic effect can be used as an alternative to ERT which can produce positive effects on bone without causing side effects. LP contains antioxidant as well as exerting anti-inflammatory effect which can act as free radical scavenger, thus inhibiting TNF-α production and COX-2 expression which leads to decline in RANKL expression, resulting in reduction in osteoclast activity which consequently reduces bone loss. Hence, it is the phytoestrogenic, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidative properties that make LP an effective agent against osteoporosis. PMID:22611381

  11. The nuclear receptor Nr4a1 mediates anti-inflammatory effects of apoptotic cells.

    PubMed

    Ipseiz, Natacha; Uderhardt, Stefan; Scholtysek, Carina; Steffen, Martin; Schabbauer, Gernot; Bozec, Aline; Schett, Georg; Krönke, Gerhard

    2014-05-15

    Uptake of apoptotic cells (ACs) by macrophages ensures the nonimmunogenic clearance of dying cells, as well as the maintenance of self-tolerance to AC-derived autoantigens. Upon ingestion, ACs exert an inhibitory influence on the inflammatory signaling within the phagocyte. However, the molecular signals that mediate these immune-modulatory properties of ACs are incompletely understood. In this article, we show that the phagocytosis of apoptotic thymocytes was enhanced in tissue-resident macrophages where this process resulted in the inhibition of NF-κB signaling and repression of inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-12. In parallel, ACs induced a robust expression of a panel of immediate early genes, which included the Nr4a subfamily of nuclear receptors. Notably, deletion of Nr4a1 interfered with the anti-inflammatory effects of ACs in macrophages and restored both NF-κB signaling and IL-12 expression. Accordingly, Nr4a1 mediated the anti-inflammatory properties of ACs in vivo and was required for maintenance of self-tolerance in the murine model of pristane-induced lupus. Thus, our data point toward a key role for Nr4a1 as regulator of the immune response to ACs and of the maintenance of tolerance to "dying self." PMID:24740500

  12. Anti-inflammatory effects of mannanase-hydrolyzed copra meal in a porcine model of colitis.

    PubMed

    Ibuki, Masahisa; Fukui, Kensuke; Kanatani, Hiroyuki; Mine, Yoshinori

    2014-05-01

    We evaluated the anti-inflammatory activity of mannanase-hydrolyzed copra meal (MNB), including β-1,4-mannobiose (67.8%), in a dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced porcine model of intestinal inflammation. In the DSS-positive control (POS) and MNB treatment (MCM) groups, DSS was first administered to piglets via intragastric catheter for 5 days, followed by 5 days administration of saline or MCM. A negative control group (NEG) received a saline alternative to DSS and MNB. Inflammation was assessed by clinical signs, morphological and histological measurements, gut permeability and neutrophil infiltration. Local production of TNF-α and IL-6 were analyzed by ELISA, colonic and ileal inflammatory gene expressions were assessed by real time RT-PCR, and CD4+CD25+ cell populations were analyzed by flow cytometry. Crypt elongation and muscle thickness, D-mannitol gut permeation, colonic expression of the inflammatory mediators TNF-α and IL-6 and myeloperoxidase activity were significantly lower in the MCM group than in that of POS group. The mRNA levels of ileal IL-1β, IL-6, IL-17 and TNF-α were significantly lower following MCM treatment than with POS treatment.MNB exerts anti-inflammatory activity in vivo, suggesting that MNB is a novel therapeutic that may provide relief to human and animals suffering from intestinal inflammation. PMID:24430661

  13. Isolation and characterization of anti-inflammatory peptides derived from whey protein.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ye; Liu, Jie; Shi, Haiming; Yu, Liangli Lucy

    2016-09-01

    The present study was conducted to isolate and characterize anti-inflammatory peptides from whey protein hydrolysates using alcalase. Nine subfractions were obtained after sequential purification by ultrafiltration, Sephadex G-25 gel (GE Healthcare, Uppsala, Sweden) filtration chromatography, and preparative HPLC. Among them, subfraction F4e showed the strongest inhibitory activity on interleukin-1β (IL-1β), cyclooxygenase-2, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) mRNA expression in lipopolysaccharide-induced RAW 264.7 mouse macrophages. Eight peptides, including 2 new peptides-Asp-Tyr-Lys-Lys-Tyr (DYKKY) and Asp-Gln-Trp-Leu (DQWL)-were identified from subfractions F4c and F4e, respectively, using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Peptide DQWL showed the strongest inhibitory ability on IL-1β, cyclooxygenase-2, and TNF-α mRNA expression and production of IL-1β and TNF-α proteins at concentrations of 10 and 100μg/mL, respectively. Additionally, DQWL treatment significantly inhibited nuclear factor-κB activation by suppressing nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-κB p65 and blocking inhibitor κB kinase phosphorylation and inhibitor κB degradation together with p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase activation. Our study suggests that peptide DQWL has anti-inflammatory potential; further confirmation using an in vivo model is needed. PMID:27394940

  14. Integrative approach to analyze biodiversity and anti-inflammatory bioactivity of Wedelia medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wen-Ching; Wen, Chih-Chun; Chen, Yung-Hsiang; Hsiao, Pei-Wen; Liao, Jiunn-Wang; Peng, Ching-I; Yang, Ning-Sun

    2015-01-01

    For the development of "medical foods" and/or botanical drugs as defined USA FDA, clear and systemic characterizations of the taxonomy, index phytochemical components, and the functional or medicinal bioactivities of the reputed or candidate medicinal plant are needed. In this study, we used an integrative approach, including macroscopic and microscopic examination, marker gene analysis, and chemical fingerprinting, to authenticate and validate various species/varieties of Wedelia, a reputed medicinal plant that grows naturally and commonly used in Asian countries. The anti-inflammatory bioactivities of Wedelia extracts were then evaluated in a DSS-induced murine colitis model. Different species/varieties of Wedelia exhibited distinguishable morphology and histological structures. Analysis of the ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region revealed significant differences among these plants. Chemical profiling of test Wedelia species demonstrated candidate index compounds and distinguishable secondary metabolites, such as caffeic acid derivatives, which may serve as phytochemical markers or index for quality control and identification of specific Wedelia species. In assessing their effect on treating DSS induced-murine colitis, we observed that only the phytoextract from W. chinensis species exhibited significant anti-inflammatory bioactivity on DSS-induced murine colitis among the various Wedelia species commonly found in Taiwan. Our results provide a translational research approach that may serve as a useful reference platform for biotechnological applications of traditional phytomedicines. Our findings indicate that specific Wedelia species warrant further investigation for potential treatment of human inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:26042672

  15. Anti-inflammatory and anti-atherogenic role of BMP receptor II in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Simic, Tatjana

    2013-09-01

    Evaluation of: Kim CW, Song H, Kumar S et al. Anti-inflammatory and anti-atherogenic role of BMP receptor II in endothelial cells. Arterioscler. Thromb. Vasc. Biol. 33, 1350-1359 (2013). Increased expression of BMPs in atherosclerosis suggested that the knockdown of the receptor mediating BMP action would prevent endothelial inflammation and atherosclerosis. Based on this hypothesis, Kim et al. performed a series of experiments in which the effect of BMP receptor type II (BMPRII) knockout was tested in in vitro and in vivo models of atherogenesis. Unexpectedly, they found that the loss of BMPRII induces endothelial inflammation and atherosclerosis. Knockdown of BMPRII in endothelial cells induced monocyte adhesion through the expression of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1. The loss of BMPRII induced endothelial inflammation and atherosclerosis in apoE-deficient mice. Besides, BMPRII expression was gradually lost over the course of atherosclerosis progression in human coronary arteries. PMID:24020661

  16. Coffee with cinnamon - impact of phytochemicals interactions on antioxidant and anti-inflammatory in vitro activity.

    PubMed

    Durak, Agata; Gawlik-Dziki, Urszula; Pecio, Lukasz

    2014-11-01

    This paper evaluates the potential bioaccessibility and interactions between antiradical and anti-inflammatory compounds from coffee and cinnamon. Results obtained for whole plant material extracts were compared with those for chlorogenic and cinnamic acids (the main bioactive constituents of the study material). All samples, coffee, cinnamon and a mixture of the two showed abilities to scavenge free radicals and to inhibit lipoxygenase (LOX) activity. Both activities increased after simulated gastrointestinal digestion. In the mixture antiradical phytochemicals acted antagonistically - isoboles adopted the convex form. The same interactions were determined for chemical standards. The water-extractable LOX inhibitors acted synergistically - the isobole curve was "concave". The same type of interaction was determined for standard compounds. Interestingly, after digestion in vitro a slight antagonism in the action of LOX inhibitors was observed. The results show that the food matrix and/or its changes during digestion may play an important role in creating the biological properties. PMID:24874360

  17. Toxicology of frequently encountered nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in dogs and cats.

    PubMed

    Khan, Safdar A; McLean, Mary Kay

    2012-03-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are a group of heterogeneous compounds extensively used in both human and veterinary medicine for their antipyretic, anti-inflammation, and analgesic properties. NSAIDs consist of a wide range of pharmacologically active agents with different chemical structures, with similar therapeutic and adverse effects. The ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center received 22,206 NSAID incidents in dogs and cats (3% of total cases; dogs [15,823] and cats [1244]) during 2005 to 2010. This is roughly equivalent to 4% NSAID incidents reported in humans. The most common NSAID involved was ibuprofen, followed by aspirin, naproxen, deracoxib, meloxicam, diclofenac, piroxicam, indomethacin, nabumetone, and etodolac. This article provides a brief overview of classification, mechanism of action, pharmacologic and toxicologic properties, and treatment information involving frequently encountered human and veterinary NSAIDs in dogs and cats. PMID:22381180

  18. Arzanol, a Potent mPGES-1 Inhibitor: Novel Anti-Inflammatory Agent

    PubMed Central

    Kothavade, Pankaj S.; Nagmoti, Dnyaneshwar M.; Bulani, Vipin D.; Juvekar, Archana R.

    2013-01-01

    Arzanol is a novel phloroglucinol α-pyrone, isolated from a Mediterranean plant Helichrysum italicum (Roth) Don ssp. microphyllum which belongs to the family Asteraceae. Arzanol has been reported to possess a variety of pharmacological activities. However, anti-inflammatory, anti-HIV, and antioxidant activities have been studied in some detail. Arzanol has been reported to inhibit inflammatory transcription factor NFκB activation, HIV replication in T cells, releases of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α, and biosynthesis of PGE2 by potentially inhibiting mPGES-1 enzyme. Diversity of mechanisms of actions of arzanol may be useful in treatment of disease involving these inflammatory mediators such as autoimmune diseases and cancer. This review presents comprehensive information on the chemistry, structure-activity relationship, and pharmacological activities of arzanol. In addition this review discusses recent developments and the scope for future research in these aspects. PMID:24198734

  19. Bioassay-guided chemical study of the anti-inflammatory effect of Senna villosa (Miller) H.S. Irwin & Barneby (Leguminosae) in TPA-induced ear edema.

    PubMed

    Susunaga-Notario, Ana del Carmen; Pérez-Gutiérrez, Salud; Zavala-Sánchez, Miguel Angel; Almanza-Pérez, Julio Cesar; Gutiérrez-Carrillo, Atilano; Arrieta-Báez, Daniel; López-López, Ana Laura; Román-Ramos, Rubén; Flores-Sáenz, José Luis Eduardo; Alarcón-Aguilar, Francisco Javier

    2014-01-01

    Senna villosa (Miller) is a plant that grows in México. In traditional Mexican medicine, it is used topically to treat skin infections, pustules and eruptions and to heal wounds by scar formation. However, studies of its potential anti-inflammatory effects have not been performed. The aim of the present study was to determine the anti-inflammatory effect of extracts from the leaves of Senna villosa and to perform a bioassay-guided chemical study of the extract with major activity in a model of ear edema induced by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA). The results reveal that the chloroform extract from Senna villosa leaves has anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative properties. Nine fractions were obtained from the bioassay-guided chemical study, including a white precipitate from fractions 2 and 3. Although none of the nine fractions presented anti-inflammatory activity, the white precipitate exhibited pharmacological activity. It was chemically characterized using mass spectrometry and infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, resulting in a mixture of three aliphatic esters, which were identified as the principal constituents: hexyl tetradecanoate (C20H40O2), heptyl tetradecanoate (C21H42O2) and octyl tetradecanoate (C22H44O2). This research provides, for the first time, evidence of the anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative properties of compounds isolated from Senna villosa. PMID:25029073

  20. Go Green: The Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Biliverdin Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Wegiel, Barbara; Otterbein, Leo E.

    2012-01-01

    Biliverdin (BV) has emerged as a cytoprotective and important anti-inflammatory molecule. Conversion of BV to bilirubin (BR) is catalyzed by biliverdin reductase (BVR) and is required for the downstream signaling and nuclear localization of BVR. Recent data by others and us make clear that BVR is a critical regulator of innate immune responses resulting from acute insult and injury and moreover, that a lack of BVR results in an enhanced proinflammatory phenotype. In macrophages, BVR is regulated by its substrate BV which leads to activation of the PI3K–Akt-IL-10 axis and inhibition of TLR4 expression via direct binding of BVR to the TLR4 promoter. In this review, we will summarize recent findings on the role of BVR and the bile pigments in inflammation in context with its activity as an enzyme, receptor, and transcriptional regulator. PMID:22438844

  1. Anti-inflammatory activity of the bark of Hippocratea excelsa.

    PubMed

    Perez, R M; Perez, S; Zavala, M A; Salazar, M

    1995-07-01

    The ethanol extract of the plant Hippocratea excelsa was examined for its anti-inflammatory effects using several animal models. It produced significant inhibition of carrageenan-induced paw edema and reduced the weight of cotton pellet-induced granuloma at doses of 25-100 mg/kg. The extract was found to exert a protective effect on heat-induced erythrocyte lysis at concentrations of 25, 50 and 100 micrograms/ml. In chronic models of formaldehyde and adjuvant arthritis, its anti-arthritic activity was found to be less than that of phenylbutazone (PNB). It may be inferred that the ethanol extract is effective against both exudative-proliferative and chronic phases of inflammation. PMID:7500640

  2. Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs and the Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Hörl, Walter H.

    2010-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) inhibit the isoenzymes COX-1 and COX-2 of cyclooxygenase (COX). Renal side effects (e.g., kidney function, fluid and urinary electrolyte excretion) vary with the extent of COX-2-COX-1 selectivity and the administered dose of these compounds. While young healthy subjects will rarely experience adverse renal effects with the use of NSAIDs, elderly patients and those with co-morbibity (e.g., congestive heart failure, liver cirrhosis or chronic kidney disease) and drug combinations (e.g., renin-angiotensin blockers, diuretics plus NSAIDs) may develop acute renal failure. This review summarizes our present knowledge how traditional NSAIDs and selective COX-2 inhibitors may affect the kidney under various experimental and clinical conditions, and how these drugs may influence renal inflammation, water transport, sodium and potassium balance and how renal dysfunction or hypertension may result.

  3. [Anti-inflammatory effects of tea-flavonoids].

    PubMed

    Hoensch, H; Oertel, R

    2012-12-01

    Tea flavonoids belong to the large group of polyphenols and display antioxidative, anti-inflammatory and anti-neoplastic activities. These phytochemicals are xenobiotics and are synthesized by tea plants such as Camellia sinensis and Camomilla recucita. These botanicals exhibit in vivo activities similar to that of biologicals which are widely used for chronic inflammatory diseases (rheumatoid arthritis, chronic inflammatory bowel disease). Epigallocathechin gallate and apigenin from these plants inhibit cytokines, chemokines and activated immune cells in vivo and in vitro. Clinical disorders with induced inflammatory pathways could benefit from flavonoid treatment. Dietary supplementation with specific tea-flavonoids could be used for Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis and irritable bowel syndrome. Suppression of cytokine production could ultimately lead to inhibition of carcinogenesis. This mechanism could explain why flavonoids are effective in the prevention of intestinal neoplasia. This innovative new form of therapy should be tested in controlled, randomized clinical studies. PMID:23233307

  4. Antioxidant and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Barettin

    PubMed Central

    Lind, Karianne F.; Hansen, Espen; Østerud, Bjarne; Eilertsen, Karl-Erik; Bayer, Annette; Engqvist, Magnus; Leszczak, Kinga; Jørgensen, Trond Ø.; Andersen, Jeanette H.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we present novel bioactivity for barettin isolated from the marine sponge Geodia barretti. We found that barettin showed strong antioxidant activity in biochemical assays as well as in a lipid peroxidation cell assay. A de-brominated synthetic analogue of barettin did not show the same activity in the antioxidant cell assay, indicating that bromine is important for cellular activity. Barettin was also able to inhibit the secretion of the inflammatory cytokines IL-1β and TNFα from LPS-stimulated THP-1 cells. This combination of anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities could indicate that barettin has an atheroprotective effect and may therefore be an interesting product to prevent development of atherosclerosis. PMID:23880935

  5. Further studies on the anti-inflammatory effect of insulin.

    PubMed

    Ottlecz, A; Koltai, M; Gecse, A

    1977-10-01

    Experiments performed on rats showed that insulin, when applied i.v. or s.c., inhibited the foot edema induced by carrageenin, thermic effect of 45.7 degrees C, compound 48/80 and 5-HT, but moderately increased the paw swelling evoked by kallikrein, a kinin-forming enzyme. The increased vascular permeability elicited by intradermal injection of histamine, 5-HT, bradykinin, PGE1, carrageenin and compound 48/80 was also suppressed. The anti-inflammatory effect was not significantly altered by propranolol and adrenalectomy on the thermal and carrageenin edema, it was variably inhibited on the skin test, and was completely abolished on the paw swelling induced by 5-HT and compound 48/80. Since insulin had little or no effect on the vascular response when given topically together with the vasoactive agents, its complex effect on the acute inflammation appears to be brought about via indirect mechanisms. PMID:930760

  6. Anti-inflammatory and antiedematogenic activity of the Ocimum basilicum essential oil and its main compound estragole: In vivo mouse models.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Lindaiane Bezerra; Oliveira Brito Pereira Bezerra Martins, Anita; Cesário, Francisco Rafael Alves Santana; Ferreira E Castro, Fyama; de Albuquerque, Thaís Rodrigues; Martins Fernandes, Maria Neyze; Fernandes da Silva, Bruno Anderson; Quintans Júnior, Lucindo José; da Costa, José Galberto Martins; Melo Coutinho, Henrique Douglas; Barbosa, Roseli; Alencar de Menezes, Irwin Rose

    2016-09-25

    The genus Ocimum are used in cooking, however, their essential oils are utilized in traditional medicine as aromatherapy. The present study was carried out to investigate the chemical composition and systemic anti-inflammatory activity of the Ocimum basilicum essential oil (EOOB) and its major component estragole, as well as its possible mechanisms of action. The Ocimum basilicum essential oil was obtained by hydrodistillation and analyzed by GC-MS. The anti-inflammatory action was verified using acute and chronic in vivo tests as paw edema, peritonitis, and vascular permeability and granulomatous inflammation model. The anti-inflammatory mechanism of action was analyzed by the participation of histamine and arachidonic acid pathways. The chemical profile analysis identified fourteen components present in the essential oil, within them: estragole (60.96%). The in vivo test results show that treatment with EOOB (100 and 50 mg/kg) and estragole (60 and 30 mg/kg) significantly reduced paw edema induced by carrageenan and dextran. The smallest doses of EOOB (50 mg/kg) and estragole (30 mg/kg) showed efficacy in the reduction of paw edema induced by histamine and arachidonic acid, vascular permeability inhibition and leukocyte emigration in the peritoneal fluid. Theses doses were capable of reducing the chronic inflammatory process. The results observed between the EOOB and estragole demonstrate efficacy in anti-inflammatory activity, however, the essential oil is more efficacious in the acute and chronic anti-inflammatory action. This study confirms the therapeutic potential of this plant and reinforces the validity of its use in popular medicine. PMID:27474066

  7. In-vitro anti- inflammatory activity of aqueous extract of leaves of Plectranthus amboinicus (Lour.) Spreng

    PubMed Central

    Ravikumar, V.R.; Dhanamani, M.; Sudhamani, T.

    2009-01-01

    Aqueous extract of leaves of Plectranthus amboinicus (lour.) Spreng, which is traditionally used in the treatment of cough and cold was screened for its anti- inflammatory activity by HRBC membrane stabilisation model. Aqueous extract (500 mcg/ml) showed significant anti-inflammatory activity as compared to that of hydrocortisone sodium. PMID:22557324

  8. In-vitro anti- inflammatory activity of aqueous extract of leaves of Plectranthus amboinicus (Lour.) Spreng.

    PubMed

    Ravikumar, V R; Dhanamani, M; Sudhamani, T

    2009-04-01

    Aqueous extract of leaves of Plectranthus amboinicus (lour.) Spreng, which is traditionally used in the treatment of cough and cold was screened for its anti- inflammatory activity by HRBC membrane stabilisation model. Aqueous extract (500 mcg/ml) showed significant anti-inflammatory activity as compared to that of hydrocortisone sodium. PMID:22557324

  9. Hypericum in Infection: Identification of Anti-viral and Anti-inflammatory Constituents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Iowa Center for Research on Botanical Dietary Supplements seeks to optimize Echinacea, Hypericum and Prunella supplements for human-health benefit, focusing on anti-viral, anti-inflammatory and anti-pain effects. This paper reports on ongoing anti-viral and anti-inflammatory studies on Hypericu...

  10. Preventative oral methylthioadenosine is anti-inflammatory and reduces DSS-induced colitis in mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methylthioadenosine (MTA) is a precursor of the methionine salvage pathway and has been shown to have anti-inflammatory properties in various models of acute and chronic inflammation. However, the anti-inflammatory properties of MTA in models of intestinal inflammation are not defined. We hypothesiz...

  11. Cucurbitacin IIb exhibits anti-inflammatory activity through modulating multiple cellular behaviors of mouse lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yao; Zhao, Gao-Xiang; Xu, Li-Hui; Liu, Kun-Peng; Pan, Hao; He, Jian; Cai, Ji-Ye; Ouyang, Dong-Yun; He, Xian-Hui

    2014-01-01

    Cucurbitacin IIb (CuIIb) is one of the major active compounds in Hemsleyadine tablets which have been used for clinical treatment of bacillary dysentery, enteritis and acute tonsilitis. However, its action mechanism has not been completely understood. This study aimed to explore the anti-inflammatory activity of CuIIb and its underlying mechanism in mitogen-activated lymphocytes isolated from mouse mesenteric lymph nodes. The results showed that CuIIb inhibited the proliferation of concanavalin A (Con A)-activated lymphocytes in a time- and dose-dependent manner. CuIIb treatment arrested their cell cycle in S and G2/M phases probably due to the disruption of the actin cytoskeleton and the modulation of p27(Kip1) and cyclin levels. Moreover, the surface expression of activation markers CD69 and CD25 on Con A-activated CD3(+) T lymphocytes was suppressed by CuIIb treatment. Both Con A- and phorbol ester plus ionomycin-induced expression of TNF-α, IFN-γ and IL-6 proteins was attenuated upon exposure to CuIIb. Mechanistically, CuIIb treatment suppressed the phosphorylation of JNK and Erk1/2 but not p38 in Con A-activated lymphocytes. Although CuIIb unexpectedly enhanced the phosphorylation of IκB and NF-κB (p65), it blocked the nuclear translocation of NF-κB (p65). In support of this, CuIIb significantly decreased the mRNA levels of IκBα and TNF-α, two target genes of NF-κB, in Con A-activated lymphocytes. In addition, CuIIb downregulated Con A-induced STAT3 phosphorylation and increased cell apoptosis. Collectively, these results suggest that CuIIb exhibits its anti-inflammatory activity through modulating multiple cellular behaviors and signaling pathways, leading to the suppression of the adaptive immune response. PMID:24587010

  12. Cucurbitacin IIb Exhibits Anti-Inflammatory Activity through Modulating Multiple Cellular Behaviors of Mouse Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Kun-Peng; Pan, Hao; He, Jian; Cai, Ji-Ye; Ouyang, Dong-Yun; He, Xian-Hui

    2014-01-01

    Cucurbitacin IIb (CuIIb) is one of the major active compounds in Hemsleyadine tablets which have been used for clinical treatment of bacillary dysentery, enteritis and acute tonsilitis. However, its action mechanism has not been completely understood. This study aimed to explore the anti-inflammatory activity of CuIIb and its underlying mechanism in mitogen-activated lymphocytes isolated from mouse mesenteric lymph nodes. The results showed that CuIIb inhibited the proliferation of concanavalin A (Con A)-activated lymphocytes in a time- and dose-dependent manner. CuIIb treatment arrested their cell cycle in S and G2/M phases probably due to the disruption of the actin cytoskeleton and the modulation of p27Kip1 and cyclin levels. Moreover, the surface expression of activation markers CD69 and CD25 on Con A-activated CD3+ T lymphocytes was suppressed by CuIIb treatment. Both Con A- and phorbol ester plus ionomycin-induced expression of TNF-α, IFN-γ and IL-6 proteins was attenuated upon exposure to CuIIb. Mechanistically, CuIIb treatment suppressed the phosphorylation of JNK and Erk1/2 but not p38 in Con A-activated lymphocytes. Although CuIIb unexpectedly enhanced the phosphorylation of IκB and NF-κB (p65), it blocked the nuclear translocation of NF-κB (p65). In support of this, CuIIb significantly decreased the mRNA levels of IκBα and TNF-α, two target genes of NF-κB, in Con A-activated lymphocytes. In addition, CuIIb downregulated Con A-induced STAT3 phosphorylation and increased cell apoptosis. Collectively, these results suggest that CuIIb exhibits its anti-inflammatory activity through modulating multiple cellular behaviors and signaling pathways, leading to the suppression of the adaptive immune response. PMID:24587010

  13. Zingiber officinale attenuates retinal microvascular changes in diabetic rats via anti-inflammatory and antiangiogenic mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Dongare, Shirish; Mathur, Rajani; Saxena, Rohit; Mathur, Sandeep; Agarwal, Renu; Nag, Tapas C.; Srivastava, Sushma; Kumar, Pankaj

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Diabetic retinopathy is a common microvascular complication of long-standing diabetes. Several complex interconnecting biochemical pathways are activated in response to hyperglycemia. These pathways culminate into proinflammatory and angiogenic effects that bring about structural and functional damage to the retinal vasculature. Since Zingiber officinale (ginger) is known for its anti-inflammatory and antiangiogenic properties, we investigated the effects of its extract standardized to 5% 6-gingerol, the major active constituent of ginger, in attenuating retinal microvascular changes in rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes. Methods Diabetic rats were treated orally with the vehicle or the ginger extract (75 mg/kg/day) over a period of 24 weeks along with regular monitoring of bodyweight and blood glucose and weekly fundus photography. At the end of the 24-week treatment, the retinas were isolated for histopathological examination under a light microscope, transmission electron microscopy, and determination of the retinal tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels. Results Oral administration of the ginger extract resulted in significant reduction of hyperglycemia, the diameter of the retinal vessels, and vascular basement membrane thickness. Improvement in the architecture of the retinal vasculature was associated with significantly reduced expression of NF-κB and reduced activity of TNF-α and VEGF in the retinal tissue in the ginger extract–treated group compared to the vehicle-treated group. Conclusions The current study showed that ginger extract containing 5% of 6-gingerol attenuates the retinal microvascular changes in rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes through anti-inflammatory and antiangiogenic actions. Although precise molecular targets remain to be determined, 6-gingerol seems to be a potential candidate for further investigation. PMID:27293376

  14. Anti-inflammatory effects of Citrus sinensis L., Citrus paradisi L. and their combinations.

    PubMed

    Khan, Rafeeq Alam; Mallick, Neelam; Feroz, Zeeshan

    2016-05-01

    Citrus bioflavonoids embrace a wide group of phenolic compounds effecting the production and scavenging of reactive oxygen species and the processes relating free radical-mediated injury. Keeping in view of the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties of Citrus sinensis and Citrus paradisi, present study was undertaken to explore the effects of C. sinensis (orange juice) and C. paradisi (grapefruit juice) at three different doses alone and their two combinations with the objective to examine the effects of these compounds in an experimental model of rat colitis induced by trinitrobenzenesulphonic acid (TNBS). Hence biochemical parameters e.g. myeloperoxidase, alkaline phosphatase, C-reactive protein (CRP) and glutathione were assessed. Data entry and analysis was accomplished by Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 17 and was presented as mean ± S.E.M with 95% confidence interval. Present result shows that these juices, mainly C. paradisi, may be efficacious for the management of inflammatory bowel disease. In acute colitis model, C. paradise encouraged a decrease in the extension of the lesion escorted by a decrease in the occurrence of diarrhea and reinstatement of the glutathione content. Related effects were produced by the administration of C. sinensis, which also prevented the myeloperoxidase and alkaline phosphatase actions in acute intestinal inflammatory process. The effect of the citrus juices on the inflammatory process may be associated to their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, as revealed in present investigation. The favorable effects exerted were demonstrated both by histological and biochemical changes and were related with a progress in the colonic oxidative status. PMID:27166529

  15. Resveratrol as a Bioenhancer to Improve Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Apigenin

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin-Ah; Ha, Sang Keun; Cho, EunJung; Choi, Inwook

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to improve the anti-inflammatory activities of apigenin through co-treatment with resveratrol as a bioenhancer of apigenin. RAW 264.7 cells pretreated with hepatic metabolites formed by the co-metabolism of apigenin and resveratrol (ARMs) in HepG2 cells were stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). ARMs prominently inhibited (p < 0.05) the production of nitric oxide (NO), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α. Otherwise no such activity was observed by hepatic metabolites of apigenin alone (AMs). ARMs also effectively suppressed protein expressions of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Co-administration of apigenin (50 mg/kg) and resveratrol (25 mg/kg) also showed a significant reduction of carrageenan-induced paw edema in mice (61.20% to 23.81%). Co-administration of apigenin and resveratrol led to a 2.39 fold increase in plasma apigenin levels compared to administration of apigenin alone, suggesting that co-administration of resveratrol could increase bioavailability of apigenin. When the action of resveratrol on the main apigenin metabolizing enzymes, UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs), was investigated, resveratrol mainly inhibited the formation of apigenin glucuronides by UGT1A9 in a non-competitive manner with a Ki value of 7.782 μM. These results suggested that resveratrol helps apigenin to bypass hepatic metabolism and maintain apigenin’s anti-inflammatory activities in the body. PMID:26610561

  16. Antinociceptive and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Teucrium persicum Boiss. Extract in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Miri, Abdolhossein; Sharifi-Rad, Javad; Tabrizian, Kaveh; Nasiri, Ali Akbar

    2015-01-01

    Background. Therapeutic properties of Teucrium species as antioxidant, antibacterial, analgesic, anticancer, diuretic, and tonic compounds have been proved earlier. Materials and Methods. In this study, the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects of the aqueous extract of Teucrium persicum on chronic pain, sciatic nerve ligation as a model of neuropathic pain, and inflammatory models were investigated by formalin, hot-plate, and cotton pellet-induced granuloma models in mice, respectively. T. persicum aqueous extracts (100, 200, and 400 mg/kg) were orally gavaged for one week. On 8th day, the time spent and the number of lickings were recorded in formalin test. Morphine and Diclofenac were used intraperitoneally as positive controls. In sciatic nerve ligated animals, as a model of neuropathic pain, doses (100, 200, and 400 mg/kg) of T. persicum extract (TPE) were orally gavaged for 14 consecutive days. The analgesic effect of this extract was examined 14 days after sciatic nerve ligation using the hot-plate test. Controls received saline and Imipramine (40 mg/kg, i.p.) was used a positive control for neuropathic pain model. Results. In the formalin test, a week oral gavage of all TPE doses (100, 200, and 400 mg/kg) caused a significant decrease on the licking response compared to the control negative animals. In the hot-plate test, doses of 200 and 400 mg/kg showed significant analgesic effects in sciatic nerve ligated animals. Oral gavaged of TPE revealed significant analgesic effect on chronic pain in both formalin test and sciatic nerve ligated animals. The TPEs did not have any significant anti-inflammatory effects in cotton pellet-induced granuloma formation in mice. Conclusions. These results suggest that the aqueous extract from T. persicum Boiss. produced antinociceptive effects. Its exact mechanism of action still remains indistinct. PMID:26649227

  17. Role of lipoxins and resolvins as anti-inflammatory and proresolving mediators in colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Janakiram, Naveena B; Rao, Chinthalapally V

    2009-06-01

    Recently, lipoxins (LXs) and resolvins (Rvs) have become the topic of intense interest because of expanding views of their action, particularly in chronic disorders where unresolved inflammation is a key factor leading to colon carcinogenesis. Rvs are biosynthesized from omega-3 fatty acids eicosapentanoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) via cyclooxygenase-2/lipoxygenase (COX-2/LOX) pathways; Rvs are shown to dramatically reduce dermal inflammation, peritonitis, dendritic cell migration, and interleukin production. This explains that dietary supplementation of omega-3 fatty acids generates potent local endogenous mediators that control inflammation. LXs are biosynthesized from COX-2/LOX pathways. Metabolites of 15-LOX-1 and 2 are anti-tumorigenic; similarly, 15-epi-LXA(4) synthesized during COX-2 acetylation by low doses of aspirin too possesses anti-tumorigenic effects. Acetylating nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), like aspirin, switches COX-2 from forming PGE(2) (promoting tumorigenesis) to 15-epi-LXA(4) (antitumorigenesis). LXs and Rvs are endogenously generated during the spontaneous resolution phase. These newly identified LXs and Rvs have proved to be potent regulators of both leukocytes and cytokine productions, thereby regulating the events of interest in inflammation and resolution. In light of existing knowledge on interconnected pathways of pro-inflammatory mediators (leukotrienes, chemokines (IL8, SDF-1 alpha, MIP-1 alpha, MCP-1,2 etc), and cytokines (IL3, IL6, IL12, IL-1 beta, GM-CSF, B94, TNF-alpha etc)), the anti-inflammatory properties of pro-resolving mediators in preventing chronic inflammation which leads to carcinogenesis needs further understanding. In this review, we explore the mechanisms that trigger formation of LXs and Rvs, to highlight the relative importance of LXs and Rvs in carcinogenesis in relation to pro-inflammatory mediators. PMID:19601807

  18. Mechanisms of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ regulation by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs

    PubMed Central

    Puhl, Ana C.; Milton, Flora A.; Cvoro, Aleksandra; Sieglaff, Douglas H.; Campos, Jéssica C.L.; Bernardes, Amanda; Filgueira, Carly S.; Lindemann, Jan Lammel; Deng, Tuo; Neves, Francisco A.R.; Polikarpov, Igor; Webb, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) display anti-inflammatory, antipyretic and analgesic properties by inhibiting cyclooxygenases and blocking prostaglandin production. Previous studies, however, suggested that some NSAIDs also modulate peroxisome proliferator activated receptors (PPARs), raising the possibility that such off target effects contribute to the spectrum of clinically relevant NSAID actions. In this study, we set out to understand how peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-γ (PPARγ/PPARG) interacts with NSAIDs using X-ray crystallography and to relate ligand binding modes to effects on receptor activity. We find that several NSAIDs (sulindac sulfide, diclofenac, indomethacin and ibuprofen) bind PPARγ and modulate PPARγ activity at pharmacologically relevant concentrations. Diclofenac acts as a partial agonist and binds to the PPARγ ligand binding pocket (LBP) in typical partial agonist mode, near the β-sheets and helix 3. By contrast, two copies of indomethacin and sulindac sulfide bind the LBP and, in aggregate, these ligands engage in LBP contacts that resemble agonists. Accordingly, both compounds, and ibuprofen, act as strong partial agonists. Assessment of NSAID activities in PPARγ-dependent 3T3-L1 cells reveals that NSAIDs display adipogenic activities and exclusively regulate PPARγ-dependent target genes in a manner that is consistent with their observed binding modes. Further, PPARγ knockdown eliminates indomethacin activities at selected endogenous genes, confirming receptor-dependence of observed effects. We propose that it is important to consider how individual NSAIDs interact with PPARγ to understand their activities, and that it will be interesting to determine whether high dose NSAID therapies result in PPAR activation. PMID:26445566

  19. Proteomic and Metabolomic Analyses Reveal Contrasting Anti-Inflammatory Effects of an Extract of Mucor Racemosus Secondary Metabolites Compared to Dexamethasone.

    PubMed

    Meier, Samuel M; Muqaku, Besnik; Ullmann, Ronald; Bileck, Andrea; Kreutz, Dominique; Mader, Johanna C; Knasmüller, Siegfried; Gerner, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Classical drug assays are often confined to single molecules and targeting single pathways. However, it is also desirable to investigate the effects of complex mixtures on complex systems such as living cells including the natural multitude of signalling pathways. Evidence based on herbal medicine has motivated us to investigate potential beneficial health effects of Mucor racemosus (M rac) extracts. Secondary metabolites of M rac were collected using a good-manufacturing process (GMP) approved production line and a validated manufacturing process, in order to obtain a stable product termed SyCircue (National Drug Code USA: 10424-102). Toxicological studies confirmed that this product does not contain mycotoxins and is non-genotoxic. Potential effects on inflammatory processes were investigated by treating stimulated cells with M rac extracts and the effects were compared to the standard anti-inflammatory drug dexamethasone on the levels of the proteome and metabolome. Using 2D-PAGE, slight anti-inflammatory effects were observed in primary white blood mononuclear cells, which were more pronounced in primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Proteome profiling based on nLC-MS/MS analysis of tryptic digests revealed inhibitory effects of M rac extracts on pro-inflammatory cytoplasmic mediators and secreted cytokines and chemokines in these endothelial cells. This finding was confirmed using targeted proteomics, here treatment of stimulated cells with M rac extracts down-regulated the secretion of IL-6, IL-8, CXCL5 and GROA significantly. Finally, the modulating effects of M rac on HUVECs were also confirmed on the level of the metabolome. Several metabolites displayed significant concentration changes upon treatment of inflammatory activated HUVECs with the M rac extract, including spermine and lysophosphatidylcholine acyl C18:0 and sphingomyelin C26:1, while the bulk of measured metabolites remained unaffected. Interestingly, the effects of M rac

  20. Proteomic and Metabolomic Analyses Reveal Contrasting Anti-Inflammatory Effects of an Extract of Mucor Racemosus Secondary Metabolites Compared to Dexamethasone

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Samuel M.; Muqaku, Besnik; Ullmann, Ronald; Bileck, Andrea; Kreutz, Dominique; Mader, Johanna C.; Knasmüller, Siegfried; Gerner, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Classical drug assays are often confined to single molecules and targeting single pathways. However, it is also desirable to investigate the effects of complex mixtures on complex systems such as living cells including the natural multitude of signalling pathways. Evidence based on herbal medicine has motivated us to investigate potential beneficial health effects of Mucor racemosus (M rac) extracts. Secondary metabolites of M rac were collected using a good-manufacturing process (GMP) approved production line and a validated manufacturing process, in order to obtain a stable product termed SyCircue (National Drug Code USA: 10424–102). Toxicological studies confirmed that this product does not contain mycotoxins and is non-genotoxic. Potential effects on inflammatory processes were investigated by treating stimulated cells with M rac extracts and the effects were compared to the standard anti-inflammatory drug dexamethasone on the levels of the proteome and metabolome. Using 2D-PAGE, slight anti-inflammatory effects were observed in primary white blood mononuclear cells, which were more pronounced in primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Proteome profiling based on nLC-MS/MS analysis of tryptic digests revealed inhibitory effects of M rac extracts on pro-inflammatory cytoplasmic mediators and secreted cytokines and chemokines in these endothelial cells. This finding was confirmed using targeted proteomics, here treatment of stimulated cells with M rac extracts down-regulated the secretion of IL-6, IL-8, CXCL5 and GROA significantly. Finally, the modulating effects of M rac on HUVECs were also confirmed on the level of the metabolome. Several metabolites displayed significant concentration changes upon treatment of inflammatory activated HUVECs with the M rac extract, including spermine and lysophosphatidylcholine acyl C18:0 and sphingomyelin C26:1, while the bulk of measured metabolites remained unaffected. Interestingly, the effects of M rac

  1. Atypical Activin A and IL-10 Production Impairs Human CD16+ Monocyte Differentiation into Anti-Inflammatory Macrophages.

    PubMed

    González-Domínguez, Érika; Domínguez-Soto, Ángeles; Nieto, Concha; Flores-Sevilla, José Luis; Pacheco-Blanco, Mariana; Campos-Peña, Victoria; Meraz-Ríos, Marco A; Vega, Miguel A; Corbí, Ángel L; Sánchez-Torres, Carmen

    2016-02-01

    Human CD14(++)CD16(-) and CD14(+/lo)CD16(+) monocyte subsets comprise 85 and 15% of blood monocytes, respectively, and are thought to represent distinct stages in the monocyte differentiation pathway. However, the differentiation fates of both monocyte subsets along the macrophage (Mϕ) lineage have not yet been elucidated. We have now evaluated the potential of CD14(++) CD16(-) and CD16(+) monocytes to differentiate and to be primed toward pro- or anti-inflammatory Mϕs upon culture with GM-CSF or M-CSF, respectively (subsequently referred to as GM14, M14, GM16, or M16). Whereas GM16 and GM14 were phenotypic and functionally analogous, M16 displayed a more proinflammatory profile than did M14. Transcriptomic analyses evidenced that genes associated with M-CSF-driven Mϕ differentiation (including FOLR2, IL10, IGF1, and SERPINB2) are underrepresented in M16 with respect to M14. The preferential proinflammatory skewing of M16 relative to M14 was found to be mediated by the secretion of activin A and the low levels of IL-10 produced by M16. In fact, activin A receptor blockade during the M-CSF-driven differentiation of CD16(+) monocytes, or addition of IL-10-containing M14-conditioned medium, significantly enhanced their expression of anti-inflammatory-associated molecules while impairing their acquisition of proinflammatory-related markers. Thus, we propose that M-CSF drives CD14(++)CD16- monocyte differentiation into bona fide anti-inflammatory Mϕs in a self-autonomous manner, whereas M-CSF-treated CD16(+) monocytes generate Mϕs with a skewed proinflammatory profile by virtue of their high activin A expression unless additional anti-inflammatory stimuli such as IL-10 are provided. PMID:26729812

  2. Pro-/Anti-inflammatory Dysregulation in Patients With First Episode of Psychosis: Toward an Integrative Inflammatory Hypothesis of Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    García-Bueno, Borja; Bioque, Miquel; Mac-Dowell, Karina S.; Barcones, M. Fe; Leza, Juan C.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Schizophrenia is a chronic syndrome of unknown etiology, predominantly defined by signs of psychosis. The onset of the disorder occurs typically in late adolescence or early adulthood. Efforts to study pathophysiological mechanisms in early stages of the disease are crucial in order to prompt intervention. Methods: Case-control study of first-episode psychotic (FEP) patients and matched controls. We recruited 117 patients during the first year after their FEP according to the DSM-IV criteria and recruited 106 gender-, race-, and age-matched controls between September 2010 and June 2011. Results: Biochemical studies carried out in peripheral mononuclear blood cells (PMBC) and plasma evidence a significant increase in intracellular components of a main proinflammatory pathway, along with a significant decrease in the anti-inflammatory ones. Multivariate logistic regression analyses identified the expression of inducible isoforms of nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase in PMBC and homocysteine plasma levels as the most reliable potential risk factors and the inhibitor of the inflammatory transcription factor NFκB, IκBα, and the anti-inflammatory prostaglandin 15d-PGJ2 as potential protection factors. Discussion: Taken as a whole, the results of this study indicate robust phenotypical differences at the cellular machinery level in PMBC of patients with FEP. Although more scientific evidence is needed, the determination of multiple components of pro- and anti-inflammatory cellular pathways including the activity of nuclear receptors has interesting potential as biological markers and potential risk/protective factors for FEP. Due to its soluble nature, a notable finding in this study is that the anti-inflammatory mediator 15d-PGJ2 might be used as plasmatic biomarker for first episodes of psychosis. PMID:23486748

  3. Berteroin Present in Cruciferous Vegetables Exerts Potent Anti-Inflammatory Properties in Murine Macrophages and Mouse Skin

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Yoo Jin; Jung, Jae In; Cho, Han Jin; Choi, Myung-Sook; Sung, Mi-Kyung; Yu, Rina; Kang, Young-Hee; Park, Jung Han Yoon

    2014-01-01

    Berteroin (5-methylthiopentyl isothiocyanate) is a sulforaphane analog present in cruciferous vegetables, including Chinese cabbage, rucola salad leaves, and mustard oil. We examined whether berteroin exerts anti-inflammatory activities using lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated Raw 264.7 macrophages and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced mouse skin inflammation models. Berteroin decreased LPS-induced release of inflammatory mediators and pro-inflammatory cytokines in Raw 264.7 macrophages. Berteroin inhibited LPS-induced degradation of inhibitor of κBα (IκBα) and nuclear factor-κB p65 translocation to the nucleus and DNA binding activity. Furthermore, berteroin suppressed degradation of IL-1 receptor-associated kinase and phosphorylation of transforming growth factor β activated kinase-1. Berteroin also inhibited LPS-induced phosphorylation of p38 MAPK, ERK1/2, and AKT. In the mouse ear, berteroin effectively suppressed TPA-induced edema formation and down-regulated iNOS and COX-2 expression as well as phosphorylation of AKT and ERK1/2. These results demonstrate that berteroin exhibits potent anti-inflammatory properties and suggest that berteroin can be developed as a skin anti-inflammatory agent. PMID:25393510

  4. Evaluation of the Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Raisins (Vitis vinifera L.) in Human Gastric Epithelial Cells: A Comparative Study.

    PubMed

    Di Lorenzo, Chiara; Sangiovanni, Enrico; Fumagalli, Marco; Colombo, Elisa; Frigerio, Gianfranco; Colombo, Francesca; Peres de Sousa, Luis; Altindişli, Ahmet; Restani, Patrizia; Dell'Agli, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Raisins (Vitis vinifera L.) are dried grapes largely consumed as important source of nutrients and polyphenols. Several studies report health benefits of raisins, including anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties, whereas the anti-inflammatory activity at gastric level of the hydro-alcoholic extracts, which are mostly used for food supplements preparation, was not reported until now. The aim of this study was to compare the anti-inflammatory activity of five raisin extracts focusing on Interleukin (IL)-8 and Nuclear Factor (NF)-κB pathway. Raisin extracts were characterized by High Performance Liquid Chromatography-Diode Array Detector (HPLC-DAD) analysis and screened for their ability to inhibit Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)α-induced IL-8 release and promoter activity in human gastric epithelial cells. Turkish variety significantly inhibited TNFα-induced IL-8 release, and the effect was due to the impairment of the corresponding promoter activity. Macroscopic evaluation showed the presence of seeds, absent in the other varieties; thus, hydro-alcoholic extracts from fruits and seeds were individually tested on IL-8 and NF-κB pathway. Seed extract inhibited IL-8 and NF-κB pathway, showing higher potency with respect to the fruit. Although the main effect was due to the presence of seeds, the fruit showed significant activity as well. Our data suggest that consumption of selected varieties of raisins could confer a beneficial effect against gastric inflammatory diseases. PMID:27447609

  5. Antioxidant and Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Chaenomeles sinensis Leaf Extracts on LPS-Stimulated RAW 264.7 Cells.

    PubMed

    Han, Young-Ki; Kim, Yon-Suk; Natarajan, Sithranga Boopathy; Kim, Won-Suk; Hwang, Jin-Woo; Jeon, Nam-Joo; Jeong, Jae-Hyun; Moon, Sang-Ho; Jeon, Byong-Tae; Park, Pyo-Jam

    2016-01-01

    The fruit of Chaenomeles sinensis has been traditionally used in ethnomedicine for the treatment of various human ailments, including pneumonia, bronchitis, and so on, but the pharmacological applications of the leaf part of the plant have not been studied. In this study, we evaluated the various radical scavenging activities and anti-inflammatory effects of different Chaenomeles sinensis leaf (CSL) extracts. The water extract showed a higher antioxidant and radical scavenging activities. However the ethanolic extracts showed higher NO scavenging activity than water extract, therefore the ethanolic extract of CSL was examined for anti-inflammatory effects on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells. The 70% ethanol extract of CSL (CSLE) has higher anti-inflammatory activity and significantly inhibited the production of nitric oxide (NO), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). In addition, CSLE suppressed LPS-stimulated inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and NO production, IL-1β and phospho-STAT1 expression. In this study, we investigated the effect of CSLE on the production of inflammatory mediators through the inhibition of the TRIF-dependent pathways. Furthermore, we evaluated the role of CSLE on LPS-induced expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6. Our results suggest that CSLE attenuates the LPS-stimulated inflammatory responses in macrophages through regulating the key inflammatory mechanisms, providing scientific support for its traditional uses in treating various inflammatory diseases. PMID:27043497

  6. Anti-Inflammatory Activity of N-Butanol Extract from Ipomoea stolonifera In Vivo and In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Shuping; Ji, Bin; Wang, Jinzhi; Bai, Xueting; Shi, Ganggang

    2014-01-01

    Ipomoea stolonifera (I. stolonifera) has been used for the treatment of inflammatory diseases including rheumatism and rheumatoid arthritis in Chinese traditional medicine. However, the anti-inflammatory activity of I. stolonifera has not been elucidated. For this reason, the anti-inflammatory activity of n-butanol extract of I. stolonifera (BE-IS) was evaluated in vivo by using acute models (croton oil-induced mouse ear edema, carrageenan-induced rat paw edema, and carrageenan-induced rat pleurisy) and chronic models (cotton pellet-induced rat granuloma, and complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA)-induced rat arthritis). Results indicated that oral administration of BE-IS significantly attenuated croton oil-induced ear edema, decreased carrageenan-induced paw edema, reduced carrageenan-induced exudates and cellular migration, inhibited cotton pellet-induced granuloma formation and improved CFA-induced arthritis. Preliminary mechanism studies demonstrated that BE-IS decreased the levels of myeloperoxidase (MPO) and malondialdehyde (MDA), increased the activity of anti-oxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD) in vivo, and reduced the production of nitric oxide (NO), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6 in lipopolysaccharide-activated RAW264.7 macrophages in vitro. Results obtained in vivo and in vitro demonstrate that BE-IS has considerable anti-inflammatory potential, which provided experimental evidences for the traditional application of Ipomoea stolonifera in inflammatory diseases. PMID:24752203

  7. Anti-Anaphylactic and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of a Bioactive Alkaloid from the Root Bark of Plumeria acutifolia Poir

    PubMed Central

    alakshmi, Vijay; chandiran, Ravi; Velraj, Malarkodi; Hemalatha; Jayakumari

    2011-01-01

    In the present study, anti-anaphylactic, anti-inflammatory and membrane stabilizing properties of a lupine alkaloid plumerianine (compound 1), isolated from the root bark of Plumeria acutifolia Poir were investigated in animal models. The anti-anaphylactic activity of compound 1 (10, 25 and 50 mg/Kg) was studied by using models such as passive cutaneous anaphylaxis, passive paw anaphylaxis and also investigated for its anti-inflammatory activity against the carrageenin induced paw edema and cotton pellet granuloma in albino rats. A dose-dependent beneficial effect was observed on the leakage of Evans Blue dye in skin challenged with antigen and on paw anaphylaxis induced by antiserum. The compound 1 also exhibited a significant (p < 0.01) inhibition of rat paw edema and granuloma tissue formation, including significant protection of RBC against the hemolytic effect of hypotonic solution, an indication of membrane-stabilizing activity. Anti-anaphylactic activity of compound 1 may be possibly due to the inhibition of releasing various inflammatory mediators. Anti-inflammatory activity of compound 1 may be related to the inhibition of the early phase and late phase of inflammatory events. PMID:24250385

  8. Phytochemical Compositions and Antioxidant and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Crude Extracts from Ficus pandurata H. (Moraceae)

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Huiqing; Zhang, Xiaoping; Chen, XueZhi; Xie, Zhijun; Wen, Chengping; Jiang, Kezhi

    2013-01-01

    Background. Ficus pandurata H. (Moraceae) is widely used in traditional Chinese medicine as a healthy food condiment or a medicine for treatment of various diseases including inflammation. Objective. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the phytochemical compositions and antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities of crude water (FPW) and ethanolic extracts (FPE) from Ficus pandurata H. Methods. Phytochemical compositions were identified by a high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry method (HPLC-ESI-MS). The antioxidant activities were evaluated by diphenylpicrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and hydroxyl radical assays, and the anti-inflammatory activities were evaluated by paw edema and levels of inflammatory mediator TNF-α and PGE2 in monosodium urate (MSU) crystal-induced rats. Results. Six compounds were identified by HPLC-MS method, and abundance of phenolics was found in FPE. The FPE showed concentration-dependent-significant scavenging of DPPH and hydroxyl radicals with IC50 values 118.4 and 192.9 μg/mL, respectively. The FPE treatment significantly inhibited the paw edema and the production of TNF-α and PGE2 in MSU crystal-induced rats. Conclusion. The FPE exerted stronger antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities which may be attributed to its high phenolic content. PMID:24191163

  9. Anti-anaphylactic and anti-inflammatory activities of a bioactive alkaloid from the root bark of Plumeria acutifolia Poir

    PubMed Central

    Vijayalakshmi, A; Ravichandiran, V; Velraj, Malarkodi; Hemalatha, S; Sudharani, G; Jayakumari, S

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the anti-anaphylactic, anti-inflammatory and membrane stabilizing properties of plumerianine (compound 1) isolated from the root bark of Plumeria acutifolia Poir. Methods The anti-anaphylactic activity of compound 1 (10, 25 and 50 mg/kg) was studied by using models such as passive cutaneous anaphylaxis, passive paw anaphylaxis and its anti-inflammatory activity against carrageenin induced paw edema and cotton pellet granuloma in albino rats was also investigated using ketotifen and indomethacin as reference drugs. Results A dose-dependent beneficial effect was observed on leakage of evans blue dye in skin challenged with antigen and on paw anaphylaxis induced by antiserum. The compound 1 also exhibited significant (P<0.01) inhibition of rat paw edema and granuloma tissue formation, including significant protection of RBC against the haemolytic effect of hypotonic solution, an indication of membrane-stabilizing activity. Conclusions Anti-anaphylactic activity of compound 1 may be possibly due to inhibition of the release of various inflammatory mediators. Anti-inflammatory activity of compound may be related to the inhibition of the early phase and late phase of inflammatory events. PMID:23569801

  10. Anti-Inflammatory Property of the Ethanol Extract of the Root and Rhizome of Pogostemon cablin (Blanco) Benth

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chu-Wen; Zhao, Xiao-Ning; Su, Zu-Qing; Wang, Xiu-Fen; Zhang, Xiao-Jun; Zeng, Hui-Fang; Li, Yu-Cui

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the anti-inflammatory property of the ethanol extract of the root and rhizome of Pogostemon cablin (ERP). The anti-inflammatory effect was evaluated using four animal models including xylene-induced mouse ear edema, acetic acid-induced mouse vascular permeability, carrageenan-induced mouse pleurisy, and carrageenan-induced mouse hind paw edema. Results indicated that oral administration of ERP (120, 240, and 480 mg/kg) significantly attenuated xylene-induced ear edema, decreased acetic acid-induced capillary permeability, inhibited carrageenan-induced neutrophils recruitment, and reduced carrageenan-induced paw edema, in a dose-dependent manner. Histopathologically, ERP (480 mg/kg) abated inflammatory response of the edema paw. Preliminary mechanism studies demonstrated that ERP decreased the level of MPO and MDA, increased the activities of anti-oxidant enzymes (SOD, GPx, and GRd), attenuated the productions of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, PGE2 and NO, and suppressed the activities of COX-2 and iNOS. This work demonstrates that ERP has considerable anti-inflammatory potential, which provided experimental evidences for the traditional application of the root and rhizome of Pogostemon cablin in inflammatory diseases. PMID:24385881

  11. Evaluation of the Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Raisins (Vitis vinifera L.) in Human Gastric Epithelial Cells: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Di Lorenzo, Chiara; Sangiovanni, Enrico; Fumagalli, Marco; Colombo, Elisa; Frigerio, Gianfranco; Colombo, Francesca; Peres de Sousa, Luis; Altindişli, Ahmet; Restani, Patrizia; Dell’Agli, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Raisins (Vitis vinifera L.) are dried grapes largely consumed as important source of nutrients and polyphenols. Several studies report health benefits of raisins, including anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties, whereas the anti-inflammatory activity at gastric level of the hydro-alcoholic extracts, which are mostly used for food supplements preparation, was not reported until now. The aim of this study was to compare the anti-inflammatory activity of five raisin extracts focusing on Interleukin (IL)-8 and Nuclear Factor (NF)-κB pathway. Raisin extracts were characterized by High Performance Liquid Chromatography-Diode Array Detector (HPLC-DAD) analysis and screened for their ability to inhibit Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)α-induced IL-8 release and promoter activity in human gastric epithelial cells. Turkish variety significantly inhibited TNFα-induced IL-8 release, and the effect was due to the impairment of the corresponding promoter activity. Macroscopic evaluation showed the presence of seeds, absent in the other varieties; thus, hydro-alcoholic extracts from fruits and seeds were individually tested on IL-8 and NF-κB pathway. Seed extract inhibited IL-8 and NF-κB pathway, showing higher potency with respect to the fruit. Although the main effect was due to the presence of seeds, the fruit showed significant activity as well. Our data suggest that consumption of selected varieties of raisins could confer a beneficial effect against gastric inflammatory diseases. PMID:27447609

  12. Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Odina wodier Roxb, an Indian Folk Remedy, through Inhibition of Toll-Like Receptor 4 Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ojha, Durbadal; Mukherjee, Hemanta; Mondal, Supriya; Jena, Aditya; Dwivedi, Ved Prakash; Mondal, Keshab C.; Malhotra, Bharti; Samanta, Amalesh; Chattopadhyay, Debprasad

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation is part of self-limiting non-specific immune response, which occurs during bodily injury. In some disorders the inflammatory process becomes continuous, leading to the development of chronic inflammatory diseases including cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, cancer etc. Several Indian tribes used the bark of Odina wodier (OWB) for treating inflammatory disorders. Thus, we have evaluated the immunotherapeutic potential of OWB methanol extract and its major constituent chlorogenic acid (CA), using three popular in vivo antiinflammatory models: Carrageenan- and Dextran-induced paw edema, Cotton pellet granuloma, and Acetic acid-induced vascular permeability. To elucidate the possible anti-inflammatory mechanism of action we determine the level of major inflammatory mediators (NO, iNOS, COX-2-dependent prostaglandin E2 or PGE2), and pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-12). Further, we determine the toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), Myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88), c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK), nuclear factor kappa-B cells (NF-κB), and NF-kB inhibitor alpha (IK-Bα) by protein and mRNA expression, and Western blot analysis in drug treated LPS-induced murine macrophage model. Moreover, we determined the acute and sub-acute toxicity of OWB extract in BALB/c mice. Our study demonstrated a significant anti-inflammatory activity of OWB extract and CA along with the inhibition of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-12 expressions. Further, the expression of TLR4, NF-κBp65, MyD88, iNOS and COX-2 molecules were reduced in drug-treated groups, but not in the LPS-stimulated untreated or control groups, Thus, our results collectively indicated that the OWB extract and CA can efficiently inhibit inflammation through the down regulation of TLR4/MyD88/NF-kB signaling pathway. PMID:25153081

  13. Activation of macrophage peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma by diclofenac results in the induction of cyclooxygenase-2 protein and the synthesis of anti-inflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Ayoub, Samir S; Botting, Regina M; Joshi, Amrish N; Seed, Michael P; Colville-Nash, Paul R

    2009-07-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is an inducible isoform of the COX family of enzymes central to the synthesis of pro-inflammatory prostaglandins. Induction of COX-2 is mediated by many endogenous and exogenous molecules that include pro-inflammatory cytokines and bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). It has been demonstrated that COX-2 can also be induced by diclofenac in cultured J774.2 macrophages. This induction was delayed compared to COX-2 induced by LPS and paracetamol selectively inhibited activity of this protein. The aim of the present study was to determine the transcription factor involved in the production of COX-2 after treatment of J774.2 cells with 500 microM diclofenac. Pre-treatment of cells with the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPAR-gamma) antagonists GW9662 (0.1-1 microM) or biphenol A Diglycidyl Ether (100-200 microM) resulted in reduction of the induction of COX-2 by diclofenac, but not by LPS. Induction of COX-2 by the PPAR-gamma agonist 15deoxyDelta(12,14)prostaglandin J(2) was also reduced when the cells were pre-treated with the PPAR-gamma antagonists BADGE or GW9662. On the other hand, pre-treatment of cells with the nuclear factor-kappa-B (NF-kappaB) Super-repressor IkappaBalpha (150-600 nM) reduced the induction of COX-2 by LPS, but not by diclofenac. We, therefore, have identified that PPAR-gamma activation is a requirement for COX-2 induction after diclofenac stimulation of J774.2 cells. These results along with the finding that treatment of J774.2 macrophages with diclofenac resulted in the release of the anti-inflammatory cytokines, interleukin-10 and transforming growth factor-beta suggest that the diclofenac-induced COX-2 protein may possess anti-inflammatory actions. PMID:19219624

  14. Anti-inflammatory activity of Odina wodier Roxb, an Indian folk remedy, through inhibition of toll-like receptor 4 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Ojha, Durbadal; Mukherjee, Hemanta; Mondal, Supriya; Jena, Aditya; Dwivedi, Ved Prakash; Mondal, Keshab C; Malhotra, Bharti; Samanta, Amalesh; Chattopadhyay, Debprasad

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation is part of self-limiting non-specific immune response, which occurs during bodily injury. In some disorders the inflammatory process becomes continuous, leading to the development of chronic inflammatory diseases including cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, cancer etc. Several Indian tribes used the bark of Odina wodier (OWB) for treating inflammatory disorders. Thus, we have evaluated the immunotherapeutic potential of OWB methanol extract and its major constituent chlorogenic acid (CA), using three popular in vivo antiinflammatory models: Carrageenan- and Dextran-induced paw edema, Cotton pellet granuloma, and Acetic acid-induced vascular permeability. To elucidate the possible anti-inflammatory mechanism of action we determine the level of major inflammatory mediators (NO, iNOS, COX-2-dependent prostaglandin E2 or PGE2), and pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-12). Further, we determine the toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), Myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88), c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK), nuclear factor kappa-B cells (NF-κB), and NF-kB inhibitor alpha (IK-Bα) by protein and mRNA expression, and Western blot analysis in drug treated LPS-induced murine macrophage model. Moreover, we determined the acute and sub-acute toxicity of OWB extract in BALB/c mice. Our study demonstrated a significant anti-inflammatory activity of OWB extract and CA along with the inhibition of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-12 expressions. Further, the expression of TLR4, NF-κBp65, MyD88, iNOS and COX-2 molecules were reduced in drug-treated groups, but not in the LPS-stimulated untreated or control groups, Thus, our results collectively indicated that the OWB extract and CA can efficiently inhibit inflammation through the down regulation of TLR4/MyD88/NF-kB signaling pathway. PMID:25153081

  15. Alpha-lipoic acid: an inhibitor of secretory phospholipase A2 with anti-inflammatory activity.

    PubMed

    Jameel, Noor Mohamed; Shekhar, Mysore A; Vishwanath, Bannikuppe S

    2006-12-14

    Alpha-lipoic acid (ALA) and its reduced form dihydrolipoic acid (DHLA) are powerful antioxidants both in hydrophilic and lipophylic environments with diverse pharmacological properties including anti-inflammatory activity. The mechanism of anti-inflammatory activity of ALA and DHALA is not known. The present study describes the interaction of ALA and DHALA with pro-inflammatory secretory PLA(2) enzymes from inflammatory fluids and snake venoms. In vitro enzymatic inhibition of sPLA(2) from Vipera russellii, Naja naja and partially purified sPLA(2) enzymes from human ascitic fluid (HAF), human pleural fluid (HPF) and normal human serum (HS) by ALA and DHLA was studied using (14)C-oleate labeled Escherichia coli as the substrate. Biophysical interaction of ALA with sPLA(2) was studied by fluorescent spectral analysis and circular dichroism studies. In vivo anti-inflammatory activity was checked using sPLA(2) induced mouse paw edema model. ALA but not DHLA inhibited purified sPLA(2) enzymes from V. russellii, N. naja and partially purified HAF, HPF and HS in a dose dependent manner. This data indicated that ALA is critical for inhibition. IC(50) value calculated for these enzymes ranges from 0.75 to 3.0 microM. The inhibition is independent of calcium and substrate concentration. Inflammatory sPLA(2) enzymes are more sensitive to inhibition by ALA than snake venom sPLA(2) enzymes. ALA quenched the fluorescence intensity of sPLA(2) enzyme in a dose dependent manner. Apparent shift in the far UV-CD spectra of sPLA(2) with ALA indicated change in its alpha-helical confirmation and these results suggest its direct interaction with the enzyme. ALA inhibits the sPLA(2) induced mouse paw edema in a dose dependent manner and confirms the sPLA(2) inhibitory activity in vivo also. These data suggest that ALA may act as an endogenous regulator of sPLA(2) enzyme activity and suppress inflammatory reactions. PMID:17011589

  16. Antiproliferative and anti-inflammatory polyhydroxylated spirostanol saponins from Tupistra chinensis

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Limin; Yi, Xiaomin; Wang, Yihai; He, Xiangjiu

    2016-01-01

    Tupistra chinensis is widely distributed in southwestern China and its rhizome is a famous folk medicine for the treatment of carbuncles and pharyngitis. Its chemical identity of potent antiproliferative and anti-inflammatory constituents has been carried out in this study. Twenty-three polyhydroxylated spirostanol saponins, including nine novels, were isolated and identified. The new spirostanol saponins were elucidated as spirost-25(27)-en-1β,2β,3β,4β,5β-pentol-2-O-β-D-xylopyranoside (1), spirost-25(27)- en-1β,2β,3β,4β,5β-pentol-2-O-α-L-arabinopyranoside (2), spirost-25(27)-en- 1β,3α,5β-triol (12), spirost-25(27)-en-1β,3α,4β,5β,6β-pentol (13), spirost-25(27)-en- 1β,2β,3β,5β-tetraol-5-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (16), 5β-spirost-25(27)-en-1β,3β-diol- 3-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-(1 → 4)-β-D-glucopyranoside (17), (25R)-5β-spirostan- 1β,3β-diol-3-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-(1 → 6)-β-D-glucopyranoside (18), (25R)-5β- spirostan-1β,3β-diol-3-O-β-D-fructofuranosyl-(2 → 6)-β-D-glucopyranoside (19), 5β-spirost-25(27)-en-3β-ol-3-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-(1 → 4)-β-D-glucopyranoside (20). The antiproliferative effects against seven human cancer cell lines and inhibitory activities on nitric oxide (NO) production induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in a macrophage cell line RAW 264.7 were assayed for all the isolated compounds. Compounds 17, 19 and 21 exhibited potential antiproliferative activities against all of human cancer cell lines tested. Compounds 21 showed significant inhibition on NO production with IC50 values of 11.5 μM. These results showed that the spirostanol saponins isolated from the dried rhizomes of T. chinensis have potent antiproliferative and anti-inflammatory activities and T. chinensis might be used as anticancer and.anti-inflammatory supplement. PMID:27530890

  17. Antiproliferative and anti-inflammatory polyhydroxylated spirostanol saponins from Tupistra chinensis.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Limin; Yi, Xiaomin; Wang, Yihai; He, Xiangjiu

    2016-01-01

    Tupistra chinensis is widely distributed in southwestern China and its rhizome is a famous folk medicine for the treatment of carbuncles and pharyngitis. Its chemical identity of potent antiproliferative and anti-inflammatory constituents has been carried out in this study. Twenty-three polyhydroxylated spirostanol saponins, including nine novels, were isolated and identified. The new spirostanol saponins were elucidated as spirost-25(27)-en-1β,2β,3β,4β,5β-pentol-2-O-β-D-xylopyranoside (1), spirost-25(27)- en-1β,2β,3β,4β,5β-pentol-2-O-α-L-arabinopyranoside (2), spirost-25(27)-en- 1β,3α,5β-triol (12), spirost-25(27)-en-1β,3α,4β,5β,6β-pentol (13), spirost-25(27)-en- 1β,2β,3β,5β-tetraol-5-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (16), 5β-spirost-25(27)-en-1β,3β-diol- 3-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-(1 → 4)-β-D-glucopyranoside (17), (25R)-5β-spirostan- 1β,3β-diol-3-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-(1 → 6)-β-D-glucopyranoside (18), (25R)-5β- spirostan-1β,3β-diol-3-O-β-D-fructofuranosyl-(2 → 6)-β-D-glucopyranoside (19), 5β-spirost-25(27)-en-3β-ol-3-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-(1 → 4)-β-D-glucopyranoside (20). The antiproliferative effects against seven human cancer cell lines and inhibitory activities on nitric oxide (NO) production induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in a macrophage cell line RAW 264.7 were assayed for all the isolated compounds. Compounds 17, 19 and 21 exhibited potential antiproliferative activities against all of human cancer cell lines tested. Compounds 21 showed significant inhibition on NO production with IC50 values of 11.5 μM. These results showed that the spirostanol saponins isolated from the dried rhizomes of T. chinensis have potent antiproliferative and anti-inflammatory activities and T. chinensis might be used as anticancer and.anti-inflammatory supplement. PMID:27530890

  18. Non-steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs in Raptors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oaks, J. Lindsay; Meteyer, Carol U.

    2012-01-01

    The use of analgesia has become standard, and appropriate, practice in avian medicine. As in mammals, pain control in avian patients is usually accomplished with opioids and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) used singly or in combination for a multimodal approach. Despite their usefulness, widespread use, and relative safety in clinical use, few controlled studies in birds have been conducted on efficacy, safety, and dosing. The guidelines for the use of NSAIDs in raptors and other birds have mainly been empirical. More recently, NSAIDs in free-living raptors have emerged as a major conservation issue with the discovery that diclofenac sodium was responsible for the population crash of three species of Gyps vultures in southern Asia. In this context, residues of veterinary NSAIDs in domestic animals are now considered environmental contaminants that can be significantly toxic to vultures and possibly other avian scavengers. Ironically, the disaster with Asian vultures has led to a considerable body of research on NSAIDs in raptors to the benefit of clinicians who now have scientific information available to help assess dosing, safety, toxicity, and pharmacokinetics of NSAIDs in their raptor patients.

  19. Anti-inflammatory phenanthrene derivatives from stems of Dendrobium denneanum.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yuan; Wang, Fei; Yang, Li-Juan; Chun, Ze; Bao, Jin-Ku; Zhang, Guo-Lin

    2013-11-01

    Cultivated Dendrobium denneanum has been substituted for other endangered Dendrobium species in recent years, but there have been few studies regarding either its chemical constituents or pharmacological effects. In this study, three phenanthrene glycosides, three 9,10-dihydrophenanthrenes, two 9,10-dihydrophenanthrenes glycosides, and four known phenanthrene derivatives, were isolated from the stems of D. denneanum. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of MS and NMR spectroscopic data. Ten compounds were found to inhibit nitric oxide (NO) production in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated mouse macrophage RAW264.7 cells with IC50 values of 0.7-41.5 μM, and exhibited no cytotoxicity in RAW264.7, HeLa, or HepG2 cells. Additionally, it was found that 2,5-dihydroxy-4-methoxy-phenanthrene 2-O-β-d-glucopyranoside, and 5-methoxy-2,4,7,9S-tetrahydroxy-9,10-dihydrophenanthrene suppressed LPS-induced expression of inducible NO synthase (iNOS) inhibited phosphorylation of p38, JNK as well as mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and inhibitory kappa B-α (IκBα). This indicated that both compounds exert anti-inflammatory effects by inhibiting MAPKs and nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) pathways. PMID:24042064

  20. Anti-inflammatory, Analgesic and Antiulcer properties of Porphyra vietnamensis

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Saurabh; Sharma, Kiran; Sharma, Ajay; Nagpal, Kalpana; Bera, Tanmoy

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Aim of the present work was to investigate the anti-inflammatory, analgesic and antiulcer effects of red seaweed Porphyra vietnamensis (P. vietnamenis). Materials and Methods: Aqueous (POR) and alcoholic (PE) fractions were successfully isolated from P. vietnamenis. Further biological investigations were performed using a classic test of paw edema induced by carrageenan, writhing induced by acetic acid, hot plate method and naproxen induced gastro-duodenal ulcer. Results: Among the fractions POR showed better activity. POR and PE significantly (p < 0.05) reduced carrageenan induced paw edema in a dose dependent manner. In the writhing test POR significantly (p < 0.05) reduced abdominal writhes than PE. In hot plate method POR showed better analgesic activity than PE. POR showed comparable ulcers reducing potential (p<0.01) to that of omeprazole, and has more ulcer reducing potential then PE. Conclusions: The results of this study demonstrated that P. vietnamenis aqueous fraction possesses biological activity that is close to the standards taken for the treatment of peripheral painful or/and inflammatory and ulcer conditions. PMID:25767759

  1. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug gastropathy: new avenues for safety

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Sanford H

    2011-01-01

    Chronic oral or systemic nonselective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) therapy, ubiquitously used by physicians to treat osteoarthritis-associated pain, is associated with a wide range of symptomatic adverse events, the most frequent and serious of which is gastropathy. Although cardiovascular and renal problems are a very real concern, they are significantly less frequent. These complications can be life-threatening in at-risk populations such as older adults, who are common users of long-term oral systemic NSAID therapy. Topical NSAID formulations deliver effective doses of analgesics directly to the affected joints, thereby limiting systemic exposure and potentially the risk of systemic adverse events, such as gastropathy and serious cardiovascular events. There are currently two topical NSAIDs approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for osteoarthritis-associated pain, as well as for the signs and symptoms of osteoarthritis. This review discusses the relative safety, and the gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, and renal risks of chronic oral or systemic NSAID therapy and topical NSAID formulations in patients with osteoarthritis. PMID:21753867

  2. Cannabinoid-like anti-inflammatory compounds from flax fiber.

    PubMed

    Styrczewska, Monika; Kulma, Anna; Ratajczak, Katarzyna; Amarowicz, Ryszard; Szopa, Jan

    2012-09-01

    Flax is a valuable source of fibers, linseed and oil. The compounds of the latter two products have already been widely examined and have been proven to possess many health-beneficial properties. In the course of analysis of fibers extract from previously generated transgenic plants overproducing phenylpropanoids a new terpenoid compound was discovered.The UV spectra and the retention time in UPLC analysis of this new compound reveal similarity to a cannabinoid-like compound, probably cannabidiol (CBD). This was confirmed by finding two ions at m/z 174.1 and 231.2 in mass spectra analysis. Further confirmation of the nature of the compound was based on a biological activity assay. It was found that the compound affects the expression of genes involved in inflammatory processes in mouse and human fibroblasts and likely the CBD from Cannabis sativa activates the specific peripheral cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2) gene expression. Besides fibers, the compound was also found in all other flax tissues. It should be pointed out that the industrial process of fabric production does not affect CBD activity.The presented data suggest for the first time that flax products can be a source of biologically active cannabinoid-like compounds that are able to influence the cell immunological response. These findings might open up many new applications for medical flax products, especially for the fabric as a material for wound dressing with anti-inflammatory properties. PMID:22706678

  3. N-Amino acid linoleoyl conjugates: anti-inflammatory activities.

    PubMed

    Burstein, Sumner; McQuain, Catherine; Salmonsen, Rebecca; Seicol, Benjamin

    2012-01-15

    Several N-linked amino acid-linoleic acid conjugates were studied for their potential as anti inflammatory agents. The parent molecule, N-linoleoylglycine was tested in an in vivo model, the mouse peritonitis assay where it showed activity in reducing leukocyte migration at doses as low as 0.3mg/kg when administered by mouth in safflower oil. Harvested peritoneal cells produced elevated levels of the inflammation-resolving eicosanoid 15-deoxy-Δ(13,14)-PGJ(2). These results are similar to those obtained in earlier studies with N-arachidonoylglycine. An in vitro model using mouse macrophage RAW cells was used to evaluate a small group of structural analogs for their ability to stimulate 15-deoxy-Δ(13,14)-PGJ(2) production. The d-alanine derivative was the most active while the d-phenylalanine showed almost no response. A high degree of stereo specificity was observed comparing the d and l alanine isomers; the latter being the less active. It was concluded that linoleic acid conjugates could provide suitable templates in a drug discovery program leading to novel agents for promoting the resolution of chronic inflammation. PMID:22217875

  4. Anti-inflammatory glycosylated flavonoids as therapeutic agents for treatment of diabetes-impaired wounds.

    PubMed

    Antunes-Ricardo, Marilena; Gutiérrez-Uribe, Janet; Serna-Saldívar, Sergio O

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is a chronic disease that affects more than 387 million people worldwide. About 20% of patients diagnosed with diabetes develop diabetic foot ulcerations (DFU). Standard treatment of DFU includes wound debridement, infection control, revascularization and, in general, the acceleration of the healing process. Topical ointments containing flavonoids exert beneficial effects in wound healing process. Flavonoids increase the migration and proliferation of fibroblasts and collagen synthesis. Furthermore, most flavonoids exert antibacterial and astringent activities that help in infection control. Additionally, flavonoids possess antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities reducing the reactive oxygen species and modulating the inflammatory pathways, respectively. Bioactivity of flavonoids can vary according to source, chemical structure and glycosylation pattern. In summary, topical application of flavonoids reduces epithelialization and wound closure time of DFU in diabetic patients. PMID:26088354

  5. Unilateral conjunctival chemosis as a unique symptom of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug intolerance.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, V; de Frutos, C; de Barrio, M; Barranco, R; Herrero, T; Tornero, P

    2007-01-01

    Patients with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) intolerance usually have cutanous-mucosal or/and respiratory symptoms. We report the case of a patient who developed several episodes of left-eye conjunctivitis, manifested as conjunctival chemosis, with no other symptoms, after taking metamizole and other unidentified NSAIDs. We performed both a single blind placebo-controlled oral challenge test and conjunctival challenge test with different NSAIDs. The single blind placebo-controlled oral challenge was positive to ketoprofen and diclofenac. The conjunctival challenge with diclofenac and flurbiprofen was negative. The patient tolerated celecoxib and nabumetone. We believe this to be an exceptional case of NSAID intolerance as conjunctival chemosis has not hitherto been included in any of the classic types of pseudoallergic reactions. PMID:17323868

  6. Pressure-assisted electrokinetic supercharging for the enhancement of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed

    Meighan, Michelle M; Dawod, Mohamed; Guijt, Rosanne M; Hayes, Mark A; Breadmore, Michael C

    2011-09-23

    Electrokinetic supercharging (EKS) combines field-amplified sample injection with transient isotachophoresis (tITP) to create a powerful on-line preconcentration technique for capillary electrophoresis. In this work, EKS is enhanced with a positive pressure (pressure-assisted EKS, or PA-EKS) during injection to improve stacking of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Several parameters, including buffer composition and concentration, terminating electrolyte, organic modifier, and injection voltage and injection time of both terminating electrolyte and sample were optimized. Detection limits for seven NSAIDs were determined and an enhancement in sensitivity of almost 50,000-fold was obtained. The PA-EKS method has the potential to be a simple MS compatible preconcentration method to improve the sensitivity of CE. PMID:21855878

  7. Evaluation of anti-inflammatory activity of essential oils from two Asteraceae species.

    PubMed

    Souza, M C; Siani, A C; Ramos, M F S; Menezes-de-Lima, O Júnior; Henriques, M G M O

    2003-08-01

    The essential oils from two Asteraceae species, Porophyllum ruderale (PR) and Conyza bonariensis (CB) were screened for anti-inflammatory activity in the mouse model of pleurisy induced by zymosan (500 microg/cavity) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (250 ng/cavity). The main monoterpene constituents of each oil, beta-myrcene (in PR) and limonene (in CB), were tested in the LPS-induced pleurisy model and assayed also for immunoregulatory activity by measurement of the inhibition of NO and production of the cytokines, gamma-interferon and IL-4. The oils, when administered orally, were able to inhibit the LPS-induced inflammation including cell migration; with a similar effect being observed for pure limonene. Pure beta-myrcene and limonene were also effective in inhibiting production of nitric oxide at doses below the cytotoxicity of these monoterpenes. A significant inhibition of gamma-interferon and IL-4 production by limonene and beta-myrcene was also observed. PMID:12967039

  8. Amentoflavone protects hippocampal neurons: anti-inflammatory, antioxidative, and antiapoptotic effects

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhen; Sun, Tao; Niu, Jian-guo; He, Zhen-quan; Liu, Yang; Wang, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Amentoflavone is a natural biflavone compound with many biological properties, including anti-inflammatory, antioxidative, and neuroprotective effects. We presumed that amentoflavone exerts a neuroprotective effect in epilepsy models. Prior to model establishment, mice were intragastrically administered 25 mg/kg amentoflavone for 3 consecutive days. Amentoflavone effectively prevented pilocarpine-induced epilepsy in a mouse kindling model, suppressed nuclear factor-κB activation and expression, inhibited excessive discharge of hippocampal neurons resulting in a reduction in epileptic seizures, shortened attack time, and diminished loss and apoptosis of hippocampal neurons. Results suggested that amentoflavone protected hippocampal neurons in epilepsy mice via anti-inflammation, antioxidation, and antiapoptosis, and then effectively prevented the occurrence of seizures. PMID:26330838

  9. Three Novel Alkaloids from Portulaca oleracea L. and Their Anti-inflammatory Effects.

    PubMed

    Li, Cui-Yu; Meng, Yi-Han; Ying, Zhe-Ming; Xu, Nan; Hao, Dong; Gao, Ming-Zhe; Zhang, Wen-Jie; Xu, Liang; Gao, Yu-Cong; Ying, Xi-Xiang

    2016-07-27

    Three novel carbon skeleton alkaloids, named oleracimine (1), oleracimine A (2), and oleracone A (3), with one novel azulene carbon skeleton compound, oleracone B (4), and one known compound, β-carboline (5), were first isolated from Portulaca oleracea L. The structures were determined using spectroscopic methods, including one- and two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance and high-resolution electrospray ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry techniques. In addition, oleracimine (1) was used to investigate the anti-inflammatory effects on lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophages. The results of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, western blot, and real-time polymerase chain reaction showed that oleracimine (1) remarkably inhibited nitric oxide production and could dose-dependently decrease the secretions of interleukin 6, tumor necrosis factor α, nitric oxide, and prostaglandin E2 in cell culture supernatants as well as the mRNA of cyclooxygenase-2 and inducible nitric oxide synthase. PMID:27396870

  10. Anti-inflammatory Activity of Berry Fruits in Mice Model of Inflammation is Based on Oxidative Stress Modulation

    PubMed Central

    Nardi, Geisson Marcos; Farias Januario, Adriana Graziele; Freire, Cassio Geremia; Megiolaro, Fernanda; Schneider, Kétlin; Perazzoli, Marlene Raimunda Andreola; Do Nascimento, Scheley Raap; Gon, Ana Cristina; Mariano, Luísa Nathália Bolda; Wagner, Glauber; Niero, Rivaldo; Locatelli, Claudriana

    2016-01-01

    Background: Many fruits have been used as nutraceuticals because the presence of bioactive molecules that play biological activities. Objective: The present study was designed to compare the anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects of methanolic extracts of Lycium barbarum (GOJI), Vaccinium macrocarpon (CRAN) and Vaccinium myrtillus (BLUE). Materials and Methods: Mices were treated with extracts (50 and 200 mg/kg, p.o.), twice a day through 10 days. Phytochemical analysis was performed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Antioxidant activity was determine by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay, reducing power, lipid peroxidation thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), reduced glutathione (GSH) and catalase (CAT) activity. Anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated by paw edema followed by determination of myeloperoxidase (MPO) and TBARS. Results: High amount of phenolic compounds, including rutin, were identified in all berries extracts. However, quercetin was observed only in BLUE and CRAN. GOJI presents higher scavenging activity of DPPH radical and reducing power than BLUE and CRAN. The extracts improved antioxidant status in liver; BLUE showed the largest reduction (75.3%) in TBARS when compared to CRAN (70.7%) and GOJI (65.3%). Nonetheless, CAT activity was lower in BLUE group. However, hepatic concentrations of GSH were higher in animals treated with GOJI rather than CRAN and BLUE. Despite all fruits caused a remarkable reduction in paw edema and TBARS, only BLUE and CRAN were able to reduce MPO. Conclusion: These results suggest that quercetin, rutin, or other phenolic compound found in these berry fruits extracts could produce an anti-inflammatory response based on modulation of oxidative stress in paw edema model. SUMMARY Within fruits broadly consumed because of its nutraceuticals properties include, Lycium barbarum (Goji berry), Vaccinium myrtillus (Blueberry or Bilberry) and Vaccinium macrocarpon (Cranberry)The objectives of this

  11. The use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for exercise-induced muscle damage: implications for skeletal muscle development.

    PubMed

    Schoenfeld, Brad J

    2012-12-01

    Exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD) is a common condition resulting from a bout of vigorous exercise, particularly if the individual is unaccustomed to performance of the given movement. Symptoms of EIMD include delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS) and a loss of physical function. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are routinely prescribed post-exercise to alleviate these symptoms and restore normal physical function. Of potential concern for those who use NSAIDs to treat EIMD is the possibility that they may impair the adaptive response to exercise. Specifically, there is emerging evidence that the action of cyclo-oxygenase (COX) enzymes, and COX-2 in particular, are important and even necessary to achieve maximal skeletal muscle hypertrophy in response to functional overload. Given that NSAIDs exert their actions by blocking COX and thus suppressing prostaglandin production, a theoretical rationale exists whereby these drugs may have detrimental effects on muscle regeneration and supercompensation. Therefore, the purpose of this article is to extensively review the literature and evaluate the effects of NSAIDs on muscle growth and development. Based on current evidence, there is little reason to believe that the occasional use of NSAIDs will negatively affect muscle growth, although the efficacy for their use in alleviating inflammatory symptoms remains questionable. Evidence on the hypertrophic effects of the chronic use of NSAIDs is less clear. In those who are untrained, it does not appear that regular NSAID use will impede growth in the short term, and at least one study indicates that it may in fact have a positive impact. Given their reported impairment of satellite cell activity, however, longer-term NSAID use may well be detrimental, particularly in those who possess greater growth potential. PMID:23013520

  12. Anti-Angiogenic and Anti-Inflammatory Properties of Kahweol, a Coffee Diterpene

    PubMed Central

    Cárdenas, Casimiro; Quesada, Ana R.; Medina, Miguel A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Epidemiological studies have shown that unfiltered coffee consumption is associated with a low incidence of cancer. This study aims to identify the effects of kahweol, an antioxidant diterpene contained in unfiltered coffee, on angiogenesis and key inflammatory molecules. Methodology/Principal Findings The experimental procedures included in vivo angiogenesis assays (both the chicken and quail choriallantoic membrane assay and the angiogenesis assay with fluorescent zebrafish), the ex vivo mouse aortic ring assay and the in vitro analysis of the effects of treatment of human endothelial cells with kahweol in cell growth, cell viability, cell migration and zymographic assays, as well as the tube formation assay on Matrigel. Additionally, two inflammation markers were determined, namely, the expression levels of cyclooxygenase 2 and the levels of secreted monocyte chemoattractant protein-1. We show for the first time that kahweol is an anti-angiogenic compound with inhibitory effects in two in vivo and one ex vivo angiogenesis models, with effects on specific steps of the angiogenic process: endothelial cell proliferation, migration, invasion and tube formation on Matrigel. We also demonstrate the inhibitory effect of kahweol on the endothelial cell potential to remodel extracellular matrix by targeting two key molecules involved in the process, MMP-2 and uPA. Finally, the anti-inflammatory potential of this compound is demonstrated by its inhibition of both COX-2 expression and MCP-1 secretion in endothelial cells. Conclusion/Significance Taken together, our data indicate that, indeed, kahweol behaves as an anti-inflammatory and anti-angiogenic compound with potential use in antitumoral therapies. These data may contribute to the explanation of the reported antitumoral effects of kahweol, including the recent epidemiological meta-analysis showing that drinking coffee could decrease the risk of certain cancers. PMID:21858104

  13. The Anti-inflammatory Protein TSG-6 Regulates Chemokine Function by Inhibiting Chemokine/Glycosaminoglycan Interactions*

    PubMed Central

    Dyer, Douglas P.; Salanga, Catherina L.; Johns, Scott C.; Valdambrini, Elena; Fuster, Mark M.; Milner, Caroline M.; Day, Anthony J.; Handel, Tracy M.

    2016-01-01

    TNF-stimulated gene-6 (TSG-6) is a multifunctional protein secreted in response to pro-inflammatory stimuli by a wide range of cells, including neutrophils, monocytes, and endothelial cells. It has been shown to mediate anti-inflammatory and protective effects when administered in disease models, in part, by reducing neutrophil infiltration. Human TSG-6 inhibits neutrophil migration by binding CXCL8 through its Link module (Link_TSG6) and interfering with the presentation of CXCL8 on cell-surface glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), an interaction that is vital for the function of many chemokines. TSG-6 was also found to interact with chemokines CXCL11 and CCL5, suggesting the possibility that it may function as a broad specificity chemokine-binding protein, functionally similar to those encoded by viruses. This study was therefore undertaken to explore the ability of TSG-6 to regulate the function of other chemokines. Herein, we demonstrate that Link_TSG6 binds chemokines from both the CXC and CC families, including CXCL4, CXCL12, CCL2, CCL5, CCL7, CCL19, CCL21, and CCL27. We also show that the Link_TSG6-binding sites on chemokines overlap with chemokine GAG-binding sites, and that the affinities of Link_TSG6 for these chemokines (KD values 1–85 nm) broadly correlate with chemokine-GAG affinities. Link_TSG6 also inhibits chemokine presentation on endothelial cells not only through a direct interaction with chemokines but also by binding and therefore masking the availability of GAGs. Along with previous work, these findings suggest that TSG-6 functions as a pluripotent regulator of chemokines by modulating chemokine/GAG interactions, which may be a major mechanism by which TSG-6 produces its anti-inflammatory effects in vivo. PMID:27044744

  14. The Anti-inflammatory Protein TSG-6 Regulates Chemokine Function by Inhibiting Chemokine/Glycosaminoglycan Interactions.

    PubMed

    Dyer, Douglas P; Salanga, Catherina L; Johns, Scott C; Valdambrini, Elena; Fuster, Mark M; Milner, Caroline M; Day, Anthony J; Handel, Tracy M

    2016-06-10

    TNF-stimulated gene-6 (TSG-6) is a multifunctional protein secreted in response to pro-inflammatory stimuli by a wide range of cells, including neutrophils, monocytes, and endothelial cells. It has been shown to mediate anti-inflammatory and protective effects when administered in disease models, in part, by reducing neutrophil infiltration. Human TSG-6 inhibits neutrophil migration by binding CXCL8 through its Link module (Link_TSG6) and interfering with the presentation of CXCL8 on cell-surface glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), an interaction that is vital for the function of many chemokines. TSG-6 was also found to interact with chemokines CXCL11 and CCL5, suggesting the possibility that it may function as a broad specificity chemokine-binding protein, functionally similar to those encoded by viruses. This study was therefore undertaken to explore the ability of TSG-6 to regulate the function of other chemokines. Herein, we demonstrate that Link_TSG6 binds chemokines from both the CXC and CC families, including CXCL4, CXCL12, CCL2, CCL5, CCL7, CCL19, CCL21, and CCL27. We also show that the Link_TSG6-binding sites on chemokines overlap with chemokine GAG-binding sites, and that the affinities of Link_TSG6 for these chemokines (KD values 1-85 nm) broadly correlate with chemokine-GAG affinities. Link_TSG6 also inhibits chemokine presentation on endothelial cells not only through a direct interaction with chemokines but also by binding and therefore masking the availability of GAGs. Along with previous work, these findings suggest that TSG-6 functions as a pluripotent regulator of chemokines by modulating chemokine/GAG interactions, which may be a major mechanism by which TSG-6 produces its anti-inflammatory effects in vivo. PMID:27044744

  15. Anti-inflammatory activity of patchouli alcohol isolated from Pogostemonis Herba in animal models.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu-Cui; Xian, Yan-Fang; Ip, Siu-Po; Su, Zi-Ren; Su, Ji-Yan; He, Jing-Jin; Xie, Qing-Feng; Lai, Xiao-Ping; Lin, Zhi-Xiu

    2011-12-01

    Pogostemonis Herba has long been used in traditional Chinese medicine for the treatment of inflammatory disorders. Patchouli alcohol (PA), a tricyclic sesquiterpene isolated from Pogostemonis Herba, is known to possess a variety of pharmacological activities. The present study aimed to investigate the in vivo anti-inflammatory effect of PA using two common inflammatory animal models i.e., xylene-induced ear edema in mice and carrageenan-induced paw edema in rats. The degree of edema in both inflammatory animals, as well as the protein and mRNA expression of some inflammatory mediators including tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), prostaglandin E₂ (PGE₂) and nitric oxide (NO) in the hind paw of carrageenan-treated rats were measured. Results showed that PA (10-40 mg/kg) significantly inhibited the ear edema induced by xylene in mice and the paw edema induced by carrageenan in rats. In addition, treatment with PA (10-40 mg/kg) also dose-dependently decreased the production of TNF-α, IL-1β, PGE₂ and NO in the hind paw of carrageenan-treated rats. Furthermore, PA treatment also suppressed the mRNA expression of TNF-α, IL-1β, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in the hind paw of carrageenan-treated rats. These results suggest that PA possesses potent anti-inflammatory activity, which may be mediated, at least in part, by down-regulating the mRNA expression of a panel of inflammatory mediators including TNF-α, IL-1β, iNOS and COX-2. PMID:21958968

  16. Evaluation of anti-inflammatory effect of derivative (E)-N-(4-bromophenyl)-2-(thiophen-2-ylmethylene)-thiosemicarbazone.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Jamerson Ferreira; Nonato, Fabiana Regina; Zafred, Rafael Rosolen Teixeira; Leite, Nayara Maria Siqueira; Ruiz, Ana Lúcia Tasca Gois; de Carvalho, João Ernesto; da Silva, Anekécia Lauro; de Moura, Ricardo Olímpio; Alves de Lima, Maria do Carmo

    2016-05-01

    The present study aimed to further investigate the anti-inflammatory activity of (E)-N-(4-bromophenyl)-2-(thiophen-2-ylmethylene)-thiosemicarbazone (BTTSC) as well as its antinociceptive effects. The anti-inflammatory activity was assessed using the model of ear edema induced by croton oil-induced and also evaluated in models of paw edema carrageenan-induced and by compound 48/80. Evaluation of the antinociceptive effect was performed through formalin test. In the nociception test induced by formalin the BTTSC showed activity in both phases of the pain, highlighting inflammatory pain, where it was able to reduce the time to paw lick 62.3, 84.30 and 100% at doses of 30, 100 and 300mgkg(-1). The anti-inflammatory activity was performed ear edema induced by croton oil, where none of the doses tested was capable of significantly regress edema. The paw edema carrageenan-induced showed activity compound, where the edema was reduced by 81.9 and 83.2% in the first two times of the experiment at the highest dose used. The paw edema assay induced by compound 48/80, showed that BTTSC after 15min of the inoculum phlogistic agent showed significant reduction of edema with values of 56.53% at a dose of 30mgkg(-1). Our results suggesting this compound exerts its antinociception effects connected with peripheral mechanisms. Furthermore, the compound was able to act in two phases of inflammation carrageenan-induced, highlighting the initial phase. This suggests an action on the early mediators of inflammation. The paw edema assay induced by compound 48/80 confirmed our hypothesis indicating action of the compound via histamine. PMID:27133079

  17. The effect of ultraviolet radiation on the anti-inflammatory effect of filters.

    PubMed

    Couteau, C; Couteau, O; Chauvet, C; Paparis, E; Coiffard, L J M

    2013-08-16

    A certain number of filters have notable anti-inflammatory properties with percentage inhibition of PMA-induced edema in mice at over 70%. The question arose as to whether this effect was likely to continue after UV irradiation. It can be noted that 7 filters retain an equivalent anti-inflammatory effect before and after 2h of irradiation in a Suntest device (650 W/m(2)). For 9 filters, the anti-inflammatory effect decreases and for 5 filters, the anti-inflammatory effect increases. Various behaviors should be noted. 3 groups of substances can be distinguished: such as phenylbenzimidazole sulfonic acid which loses its anti-inflammatory character after irradiation (the percentage inhibition falls from 80 to 44%), oxybenzone which retains a constant anti-inflammatory character (89% inhibition before and after irradiation and also octyl methoxycinnamate which becomes very anti-inflammatory (with a percentage inhibition of 93%). The same phenomenon is observed in the case of commercial products. This should be made known as it can have a considerable impact on the results which are displayed on the packaging of sun products. PMID:23639290

  18. Anti-inflammatory effect of resveratrol through the suppression of NF-κB and JAK/STAT signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chunfang; Wang, Yin; Dong, Lei; Li, Minjing; Cai, Wanru

    2015-03-01

    Resveratrol, the most important ingredient extracted from Polygonum cuspidatum, exerts cytoprotective effects via anti-inflammatory actions in vitro. In this study, we investigated this effect of resveratrol on the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory response and its underlying molecular mechanism of action in RAW264.7 murine macrophages. Results showed that resveratrol down-regulated the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and interleukin-6 (IL-6), therefore, suppressed the production of nitric oxide and the secretion of IL-6 in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Resveratrol also inhibited the translocation of high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) from the nucleus to the cytoplasm and of nuclear transcription factor kappa-B (NF-κB) p65 from the cytoplasm to the nucleus; it suppressed the phosphorylation of IκBα. Furthermore, these actions were mediated by suppressing the phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)-1 and -3. In conclusion, these data indicate that resveratrol exerts anti-inflammatory effects, at least in part by reducing the release of HMGB1 and modulating the NF-κB and Janus kinase/STAT signaling pathways. Resveratrol could potentially be developed as a useful agent for the chemoprevention of inflammatory diseases. PMID:25651848

  19. Pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in species of veterinary interest.

    PubMed

    Lees, P; Landoni, M F; Giraudel, J; Toutain, P L

    2004-12-01

    This review summarises selected aspects of the pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). It is not intended to be comprehensive, in that it covers neither minor species nor several important aspects of NSAID PD. The limited objective of the review is to summarise those aspects of NSAID PK and PD, which are important to an understanding of PK-PD integration and PK-PD modelling (the subject of the next review in this issue). The general features of NSAID PK are: usually good bioavailability from oral, intramuscular and subcutaneous administration routes (but with delayed absorption in horses and ruminants after oral dosing), a high degree of binding to plasma protein, low volumes of distribution, limited excretion of administered dose as parent drug in urine, marked inter-species differences in clearance and elimination half-life and ready penetration into and slow clearance from acute inflammatory exudate. The therapeutic effects of NSAIDs are exerted both locally (at peripheral inflammatory sites) and centrally. There is widespread acceptance that the principal mechanism of action (both PD and toxicodynamics) of NSAIDs at the molecular level comprises inhibition of cyclooxygenase (COX), an enzyme in the arachidonic acid cascade, which generates inflammatory mediators of the prostaglandin group. However, NSAIDs possess also many other actions at the molecular level. Two isoforms of COX have been identified. Inhibition of COX-1 is likely to account for most of the side-effects of NSAIDs (gastrointestinal irritation, renotoxicity and inhibition of blood clotting) but a minor contribution also to some of the therapeutic effects (analgesic and anti-inflammatory actions) cannot be excluded. Inhibition of COX-2 accounts for most and possibly all of the therapeutic effects of NSAIDs. Consequently, there has been an intensive search to identify and develop drugs with selectivity for inhibition of COX-2. Whole blood in

  20. Effect of antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory medications on the sense of taste.

    PubMed

    Schiffman, S S; Zervakis, J; Westall, H L; Graham, B G; Metz, A; Bennett, J L; Heald, A E

    Elderly individuals and HIV-infected patients have a disproportionate number of taste complaints relative to the general population, and these taste alterations are correlated with the use of medications. Clinical reports of taste disorders have been associated with many drugs, including antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory medications. The purpose of this study was to quantify the taste effects of 6 nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS) and 13 antimicrobial drugs. The six NSAIDS were: diclofenac sodium salt, fenoprofen calcium salt, ibuprofen, ketoprofen, nabumetone, and sulindac. The 13 antimicrobials were: acyclovir, ampicillin, atovaquone, dapsone, enoxacin, ethambutol, lomefloxacin HCl, ofloxacin, pentamidine isethionate, pyrimethamine, sulfamethoxazole, tetracycline HCl, and trimethoprim. These 19 medications were applied topically to the tongues of unmedicated young and elderly volunteers as well as unmedicated HIV-infected patients to measure the direct effect of the drug on taste receptors. Topical application of drugs to the apical tongue surface was used to mimic the situation in which the drug is secreted into the saliva. The main finding was that the taste qualities of these drugs were perceived as predominantly bitter, metallic, and/or sour, although several did not have a taste. Elderly subjects had higher thresholds than young subjects for one-third of the drugs that were tested. Thresholds for HIV-infected patients were statistically equivalent to young controls; however, HIV-infected patients rated the drugs as more intense at four times above the detection threshold than young subjects. Most of these drugs when applied directly to the tongue also modified the taste intensity of other tastants (e.g., NaCl, citric acid). PMID:10913779

  1. An (Anti)-Inflammatory Microbiota: Defining the Role in Inflammatory Bowel Disease?

    PubMed

    Burman, S; Hoedt, E C; Pottenger, S; Mohd-Najman, N-S; Ó Cuív, P; Morrison, Mark

    2016-01-01

    While it is now accepted that the gut microbiota contribute to the genotype-environment-lifestyle interactions triggering inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) episodes, efforts to identify the pathogen(s) that cause these diseases have met with limited success. The advent of culture-independent techniques for characterizing the structure and/or function of microbial communities (hereafter referred to as metagenomics) has provided new insights into the events associated with the onset, remission and recurrence of IBD. A large number of observational and/or case-control studies of IBD patients have confirmed substantive changes in gut bacterial profiles (dysbiosis) associated with disease. These types of studies have been augmented by new profiling approaches that support the identification of more 'colitogenic' bacteria from numerically predominant taxa. Evidence of alterations in lesser abundant taxa such as the methanogenic archaea, to favor types that are more immunogenic, has also been forthcoming. Several recent longitudinal studies of patients with Crohn's disease have produced additional insights, including evidence for the role of 'anti-inflammatory' microbiota in providing a protective effect and/or promoting remission. In summation, the implications of dysbiosis and restoration of a 'healthy microbiota' in IBD patients requires definition beyond a taxonomic assessment of the changes in the gut microbiota during disease course. The available evidence does suggest that specific members of the gut microbiota can contribute either pro- or anti-inflammatory effects, and their ecological fitness in the large bowel affects the onset and recurrence of IBD. While metagenomics and related approaches offer the potential to provide novel and important insights into these microbiota and thereby the pathophysiology of IBD, we also need to better understand factors affecting the ecological fitness of these microbes, if new treatment of IBD patients are to be delivered. PMID

  2. Serum anti-inflammatory cytokines for the evaluation of inflammatory status in endometriosis

    PubMed Central

    Măluţan, Andrei Mihai; Drugan, Tudor; Ciortea, Răzvan; Mocan-Hognogi, Radu Florin; Bucuri, Carmen; Rada, Maria Patricia; Mihu, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Endometriosis is a frequent gynecologic disease with a severe impact on the quality of life in the affected women; its pathogenesis is yet to be fully understood, with an altered immunity as a possible key factor. The present study aimed to investigate the serum anti-inflammatory cytokine profile in the patients with endometriosis compared with the healthy controls. Materials and Methods: One hundred and sixty women were included, divided into two study groups (Group I — endometriosis; Group 2 — healthy women). We evaluated the serum levels of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra), IL-2, IL-2R, IL-4, IL-10, IL-13, and IL-15 with the use of Human multiplex cytokine panels. Statistical analyses (normality distribution analysis, independent t-test, Mann–Whitney U-test) were performed using IBM SPSS software (version 22.0) and GraphPad Prism (version 5.00); receiver operating characteristic curve were used to demonstrate the diagnostic performance of the studied markers. Results: The mean serum level of IL-1Ra, IL-4, and IL-10 were significantly higher in women with endometriosis compared to women free of disease from the control group (30.155, 138.459, and 1.489, respectively, compared to 14.109, 84.710, and 0.688, respectively; P < 0.001, P < 0.001, and P = 0.002, respectively.). No significant differences in the mean serum levels of IL-2, IL-13, and IL-15 were observed between the studied groups and IL-2R had a very low detection rate. Conclusion: Endometriosis is associated with elevated levels of anti-inflammatory cytokines, IL-1Ra, IL-4, and IL-10, markers that have a potential role as a prognostic factor for endometriosis. PMID:26622256

  3. Retention of Endogenous Viable Cells Enhances the Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Cryopreserved Amnion

    PubMed Central

    Duan-Arnold, Yi; Gyurdieva, Alexandra; Johnson, Amy; Uveges, Thomas E.; Jacobstein, Douglas A.; Danilkovitch, Alla

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Human amniotic membrane (hAM) has been used to treat wounds for more than 100 years. However, widespread use of fresh hAM has been limited due to its short shelf life and safety concerns. To overcome these concerns, different preservation methods have been introduced. The majority of these methods result in devitalized hAM (dev-hAM). Recently, we developed a cryopreservation method that retains all hAM components intact (int-hAM), including viable endogenous cells. To understand the advantages of retaining viable cells in preserved hAM, we compared the anti-inflammatory properties of int-hAM and dev-hAM. Approach: The tissue composition of int-hAM and dev-hAM was compared with fresh hAM through histology and cell viability analysis. We also evaluated the ability of int-hAM and dev-hAM to regulate tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1α (IL-1α), and IL-10 release when co-cultured with immune cells; to produce prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) on TNF-α stimulation; and to inhibit proteases. Results: Int-hAM maintained the structural and cellular integrity of fresh hAM. Int-hAM had >80% cell viability post-thaw and remained viable for at least a week in culture. Viable cells were not detected in dev-hAM. Compared with dev-hAM, int-hAM showed significantly greater downregulation of TNF-α and IL-1α, upregulation of PGE2 and IL-10, and stronger inhibition of collagenase. Innovation and Conclusion: A new cryopreservation method has been developed to retain all native components of hAM. For the first time, we show that viable endogenous cells significantly augment the anti-inflammatory activity of cryopreserved hAM. PMID:26401419

  4. Anti-inflammatory effects of ADAMTS-4 in a mouse model of ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Lemarchant, Sighild; Dunghana, Hiramani; Pomeshchik, Yuriy; Leinonen, Henri; Kolosowska, Natalia; Korhonen, Paula; Kanninen, Katja M; García-Berrocoso, Teresa; Montaner, Joan; Malm, Tarja; Koistinaho, Jari

    2016-09-01

    ADAMTS-4 (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs type 4) is a metalloprotease capable to degrade chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans leading to cartilage destruction during arthritis or to neuroplasticity during spinal cord injury (SCI). Although ADAMTS-4 is an inflammatory-regulated enzyme, its role during inflammation has never been investigated. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of ADAMTS-4 in neuroinflammation. First, we evidenced an increase of ADAMTS-4 expression in the ischemic brain hemisphere of mouse and human patients suffering from ischemic stroke. Then, we described that ADAMTS-4 has predominantly an anti-inflammatory effect in the CNS. Treatment of primary microglia or astrocyte cultures with low doses of a human recombinant ADAMTS-4 prior to LPS exposure decreased NO production and the synthesis/release of pro-inflammatory cytokines including NOS2, CCL2, TNF-α, IL-1β and MMP-9. Accordingly, when cell cultures were transfected with silencing siRNA targeting ADAMTS-4 prior to LPS exposure, the production of NO and the synthesis/release of pro-inflammatory cytokines were increased. Finally, the feasibility of ADAMTS-4 to modulate neuroinflammation was investigated in vivo after permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion in mice. Although ADAMTS-4 treatment did not influence the lesion volume, it decreased astrogliosis and macrophage infiltration, and increased the number of microglia expressing arginase-1, a marker of alternatively activated cells with inflammation inhibiting functions. Additionally, ADAMTS-4 increased the production of IL-10 and IL-6 in the peri-ischemic area. By having anti-inflammatory and neuroregenerative roles, ADAMTS-4 may represent an interesting target to treat acute CNS injuries, such as ischemic stroke, SCI or traumatic brain injury. GLIA 2016;64:1492-1507. PMID:27301579

  5. Anti-Inflammatory Dietary Combo in Overweight and Obese Women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Salama, Amany Alsayed; Amine, Ezzat Khamis; Salem, Hesham Abd Elfattah; Abd El Fattah, Nesrin Kamal

    2015-01-01

    Background: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is of clinical and public health importance, affecting up to one in five women of reproductive age. It has significant and diverse clinical implications including reproductive, metabolic, and psychological features. Aim: The study was to investigate the effect of anti-inflammatory dietary combo on metabolic, endocrine, inflammatory, and reproductive profiles in overweight and obese women with PCOS. Materials and Methods: A total of 100 nonpregnant, overweight, and obese adult females with PCOS according to the Rotterdam criteria, were screened during the year 2012, and 75 completed the trial. At baseline and study end, fasting blood samples were drawn to measure biological markers, body fat percent (BFP), and visceral fat area (VFA) were assessed by the InBody720 device and anthropometric measurements were done for all participants who were subjected to an anti-inflammatory hypocaloric diet and physical activity for 12 weeks. Results: At study completion, we achieved moderate weight loss of (± 7%) and significant improvements in body composition, hormones and menstrual cyclicity, blood pressure, glucose homeostasis, dyslipidemia, C-reactive protein (CRP), and serum amyloid A (SAA) (surrogate measures of cardiovascular risk (CVR)). This was a clinically relevant weight loss that is associated with a reduced prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) and metabolic syndrome (MS) in the general population and improved fertility outcomes in PCOS. We achieved 63% regain of menstrual cyclicity and 12% spontaneous pregnancy rate within 12 week. Conclusions: We have explored an additional dietary treatment option with good prognostic metabolic and reproductive responses to weight loss that occur in overweight and obese PCOS. PMID:26258078

  6. Anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and antitumor activities of ingredients of Curcuma phaeocaulis Val.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yan; Lu, Chuan-Li; Zeng, Qiao-Hui; Jiang, Jian-Guo

    2015-01-01

    Curcuma phaeocaulis Val. is used in Chinese Pharmacopoeia as health food and folk medicine for removing blood stasis, alleviating pain and tumor therapy. This research was aimed to explore and compare three main bioactivities including anti-oxidant, antitumor and anti-inflammatory activities between the ethanol extract of C. Phaeocaulis and its fractions using different in vitro models. Firstly, 70 % ethanol was used to extract C. Phaeocaulis, and then the crude extract was re-extracted, resulting in petroleum ether (EZ-PE), ethyl acetate (EZ-EA), and water fractions (EZ-W), respectively, and then a series of index was detected. Results showed that all the extracts had medium DPPH radical scavenging activity when the concentration was 200 μg/ml and their DPPH radical scavenging activity was in a concentration-dependent manner. The extracts except ethanol extract of C. Phaeocaulis had almost no cytotoxicity to the survival of RAW264.7 cell when the concentration reached 80 μg/ml, and all of them had medium inhibitory effect on nitrite release. Extracts of C. Phaeocaulis had medium intensity antitumor activity, EZ-PE and EZ-EA fractions significantly inhibited the proliferation of four tumor cells (SMMC-7721 cell lines, HepG-2 cell lines, A549 cell lines and Hela cell lines). C. Phaeocaulis had antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities, which did not carry out centralized phenomenon when re-extracted. EZ-PE and EZ-EA were active antitumor sites of C. Phaeocaulis. PMID:26648822

  7. Anti-Inflammatory Diet for Atherosclerosis and Coronary Artery Disease: Antioxidant Foods

    PubMed Central

    Saita, Emi; Kondo, Kazuo; Momiyama, Yukihiko

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays a role in atherosclerotic diseases such as coronary artery disease (CAD), and much attention has been paid to antioxidant foods. The relationships between the consumption of vegetables and fruits and atherosclerotic diseases have been reported in many epidemiological studies showing a reduced risk of such diseases. In addition to the antioxidant vitamins C and E, green and yellow vegetables contain abundant quantities of carotenoids and polyphenols. The consumption of carotenoids and vitamins C and E has been shown to be inversely associated with CAD. However, supplementation with beta-carotene and vitamins C and E shows no beneficial effect, but rather mortality is increased with beta-carotene and vitamin E supplements. Therefore, it is recommended to consume vegetables and fruits, but vitamin supplementation is not recommended. Many epidemiological studies also report that higher consumption of fish, rich in n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), is associated with a lower risk of CAD and stroke. Antiatherosclerotic effects of n-3 PUFAs include reduced platelet aggregation, triglyceride-lowering effect, anti-inflammatory effect, and plaque stabilization, but the anti-inflammatory effect is principally responsible for preventing atherosclerosis. It is recommended to consume fish at least twice a week in patients without CAD and to consider n-3 PUFA supplements in patients with documented CAD. Regarding soy products, soy protein consumption reduces low-density-lipoprotein cholesterol and triglyceride levels. Isoflavone, a polyphenol contained in soybeans, has antiatherosclerotic property because it has a structure similar to that of estrogen and bonds with estrogen receptors. High consumption of isoflavone has been reported to be associated with a reduced risk of CAD and stroke only in women, but the preventative effect of soy products in the general population has not yet been clarified. Thus, many epidemiological studies report the

  8. Anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and antitumor activities of ingredients of Curcuma phaeocaulis Val

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Yan; Lu, Chuan-Li; Zeng, Qiao-Hui; Jiang, Jian-Guo

    2015-01-01

    Curcuma phaeocaulis Val. is used in Chinese Pharmacopoeia as health food and folk medicine for removing blood stasis, alleviating pain and tumor therapy. This research was aimed to explore and compare three main bioactivities including anti-oxidant, antitumor and anti-inflammatory activities between the ethanol extract of C. Phaeocaulis and its fractions using different in vitro models. Firstly, 70 % ethanol was used to extract C. Phaeocaulis, and then the crude extract was re-extracted, resulting in petroleum ether (EZ-PE), ethyl acetate (EZ-EA), and water fractions (EZ-W), respectively, and then a series of index was detected. Results showed that all the extracts had medium DPPH radical scavenging activity when the concentration was 200 μg/ml and their DPPH radical scavenging activity was in a concentration-dependent manner. The extracts except ethanol extract of C. Phaeocaulis had almost no cytotoxicity to the survival of RAW264.7 cell when the concentration reached 80 μg/ml, and all of them had medium inhibitory effect on nitrite release. Extracts of C. Phaeocaulis had medium intensity antitumor activity, EZ-PE and EZ-EA fractions significantly inhibited the proliferation of four tumor cells (SMMC-7721 cell lines, HepG-2 cell lines, A549 cell lines and Hela cell lines). C. Phaeocaulis had antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities, which did not carry out centralized phenomenon when re-extracted. EZ-PE and EZ-EA were active antitumor sites of C. Phaeocaulis. PMID:26648822

  9. Anti-Inflammatory Role of MicroRNA-146a in the Pathogenesis of Diabetic Nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Kirti; Lanting, Linda L; Jia, Ye; Yadav, Sailee; Reddy, Marpadga A; Magilnick, Nathaniel; Boldin, Mark; Natarajan, Rama

    2016-08-01

    Inflammation has a critical role in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications, including diabetic nephropathy (DN). MicroRNAs have recently emerged as important regulators of DN. However, the role of microRNAs in the regulation of inflammation during DN is poorly understood. Here, we examined the in vivo role of microRNA-146a (miR-146a), a known anti-inflammatory microRNA, in the pathogenesis of DN. In a model of streptozotocin-induced diabetes, miR-146a(-/-) mice showed significantly exacerbated proteinuria, renal macrophage infiltration, glomerular hypertrophy, and fibrosis relative to the respective levels in control wild-type mice. Diabetes-induced upregulation of proinflammatory and profibrotic genes was significantly greater in the kidneys of miR-146a(-/-) than in the kidneys of wild-type mice. Notably, miR-146a expression increased in both peritoneal and intrarenal macrophages in diabetic wild-type mice. Mechanistically, miR-146a deficiency during diabetes led to increased expression of M1 activation markers and suppression of M2 markers in macrophages. Concomitant with increased expression of proinflammatory cytokines, such as IL-1β and IL-18, markers of inflammasome activation also increased in the macrophages of diabetic miR-146a(-/-) mice. These studies suggest that in early DN, miR-146a upregulation exerts a protective effect by downregulating target inflammation-related genes, resulting in suppression of proinflammatory and inflammasome gene activation. Loss of this protective mechanism in miR-146a(-/-) mice leads to accelerated DN. Taken together, these results identify miR-146a as a novel anti-inflammatory noncoding RNA modulator of DN. PMID:26647423

  10. Polysaccharide Constituents of Three Types of Sea Urchin Shells and Their Anti-Inflammatory Activities

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Heng; Shang, Xiaohui; Dong, Qi; Wang, Shuang; Liu, Xiaoyu; Zheng, Heng; Lu, Xiaoling

    2015-01-01

    As a source of potent anti-inflammatory traditional medicines, the quantitative chromatographic fingerprints of sea urchin shell polysaccharides were well established via pre-column derivatization high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis. Based on the quantitative results, the content of fucose and glucose could be used as preliminary distinguishing indicators among three sea urchin shell species. Besides, the anti-inflammatory activities of the polysaccharides from sea urchin shells and their gonads were also determined. The gonad polysaccharide of Anthocidaris crassispina showed the most potent anti-inflammatory activity among all samples tested. PMID:26389925

  11. ANTI-INFLAMMATORY AND MAST CELL PROTECTIVE EFFECT OF FICUS RELIGIOSA

    PubMed Central

    Viswanathan, S.; Thirugnanasambantham, P.; Reddy, M. Kannappa; Narasimhan, S.; Subramaniam, G. Anantha

    1990-01-01

    The aqueous extract of bark of Ficus religiosa was prepared and investigated for its anti-inflammatory effect and for its protective effect on mast cells against degranulation. A significant anti-inflammatory effect was observed in both acute and chronic models of inflammation. The extract also protected mast cells from degranulation induced by various degranulatiors. The observed anti-inflammatory and mast cell protective effect may be responsible for the beneficial effect of Ficus religiosa in kumkum dermatitis and other inflammatory conditions. PMID:22556521

  12. Anti-inflammatory and mast cell protective effect of ficus religiosa.

    PubMed

    Viswanathan, S; Thirugnanasambantham, P; Reddy, M K; Narasimhan, S; Subramaniam, G A

    1990-10-01

    The aqueous extract of bark of Ficus religiosa was prepared and investigated for its anti-inflammatory effect and for its protective effect on mast cells against degranulation. A significant anti-inflammatory effect was observed in both acute and chronic models of inflammation. The extract also protected mast cells from degranulation induced by various degranulatiors. The observed anti-inflammatory and mast cell protective effect may be responsible for the beneficial effect of Ficus religiosa in kumkum dermatitis and other inflammatory conditions. PMID:22556521

  13. Anti-Inflammatory Effect of Taurine in Burned Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lak, Sima; Ostadrahimi, Alireza; Nagili, Behrooz; Asghari-Jafarabadi, Mohammad; Beigzali, Sanaz; Salehi, Feridoon; Djafarzadeh, Roxana

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Burn induced inflammatory response can be mediated by reactive oxygen metabolites and accompanied by multiple organ dysfunction. Taurine has protective effects against various inflammatory conditions. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of Taurine supplement in thermal burn victims. Methods: Thirty patients with severe thermal burns were enrolled in this randomized double-blinded clinical trial. These patients were randomly divided into two equal groups (namely Control and Taurine groups), where both received isocaloric and isonitrogenous formula. One group was supplemented with 50 mg/kg of Taurine per day for a duration of 10 days. Blood samples were obtained to measure Interleukin-10 (IL-10), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), and Tumor Necrosis Factor alpha (TNF-α) levels at the beginning and the end of the study. Results: Change in serum level of IL-10 in Taurine group was more than Control group [-13.60(-31.40, -10.40) compared to -4.00(-20.00, -0.20) respectively; P = 0.030]. This change was significant in patients with more than 30% TBSA of burn [-14.20(-31.40, -10.40) compared to -2.40(-9.60, 0.40) respectively; P = 0.013]. As for the hs-CRP and TNF-α levels, the difference between the two groups were not significant. Conclusion: Based on the results obtained, Taurine supplement showed a positive outcome on anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 in all burn patients. This effect was even more significant in patients with higher percentage of burn area. Taurine had no significant effect on the inflammatory marker hs-CRP and the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α level. For a more thorough verification, measurement of a wider range of inflammatory cytokines in more frequent time intervals are suggested. PMID:26819926

  14. Time-dependent accident sequences including human actions

    SciTech Connect

    Apostolakis, G.; Chu, T.L.

    1984-02-01

    During an accident, transitions between plant states can occur due to operator intervention and the failure of systems while running. The latter cause of transition is much less likely than the first, which includes errors of commission and omission as well as recovery of lost functions. A methodology has been developed to model these transitions in the time domain. As an example, it is applied to the analysis of Three-Mile-Island-type accidents. Statistical evidence is collected and used in assessing the frequency of stuck-open power-operated relief valves at Babcock and Wilcox plants as well as the frequency of misdiagnosis. Statistical data are also used in modeling the timing of operator actions during the accident, i.e., turning off and on the high-pressure injection system and closing the block valves.

  15. On the antioxidant, neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory properties of S-allyl cysteine: An update.

    PubMed

    Colín-González, Ana Laura; Ali, Syed F; Túnez, Isaac; Santamaría, Abel

    2015-10-01

    Therapeutic approaches based on isolated compounds obtained from natural products to handle central and peripheral disorders involving oxidative stress and inflammation are more common nowadays. The validation of nutraceutics vs. pharmaceutics as tools to induce preventive and protective profiles in human health alterations is still far of complete acceptance, but the basis to start more solid experimental and clinical protocols with natural products has already begun. S-allyl cysteine (SAC) is a promising garlic-derived organosulfur compound exhibiting a considerable number of positive actions in cell models and living systems. An update, in the form of review, is needed from time to time to get access to the state-of-the-art on this topic. In this review we visited recent and refreshing evidence of new already proven and potential targets to explain the benefits of using SAC against toxic and pathological conditions. The broad spectrum of protective actions covered by this molecule comprises antioxidant, redox modulatory and anti-inflammatory activities, accompanied by anti-apoptotic, pro-energetic and signaling capacities. Herein, we detail the evidence on these aspects to provide the reader a more complete overview on the promising aspects of SAC in research. PMID:26122973

  16. Gaultherin, a natural salicylate derivative from Gaultheria yunnanensis: towards a better non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bin; He, Xiao-Li; Ding, Yi; Du, Guan-Hua

    2006-01-13

    One of the major factors limiting the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs is gastrointestinal toxicity. Gaultherin, 2-[(6-O-beta-D-Xylopyranosyl-beta-D-glucopyranosyl)oxy] benzoic acid methyl ester, a natural salicylate derivative extracted from Gaultheria yunnanensis, has been shown to have analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects and lack gastric ulcerogenic effect compared to aspirin in our primary study. The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanism of action of gaultherin, which may rely on its active metabolite, and the mechanism responsible for the non-ulcerogenic property. The results showed that gaultherin (200 mg/kg) significantly inhibited the abdominal contractions in the acetic acid-induced writhing test in mice. The anti-inflammatory effect of gaultherin was demonstrated in the croton oil-induced ear edema model in mice. The results showed that gaultherin and equimolar dose of aspirin produced comparable inhibitory effects. The study of the metabolism characters of gaultherin in mice and rats indicated that gaultherin could be metabolically converted to salicylate, which produced the pharmacological effects, and provided effective concentrations for an extended period. In vitro metabolism experiment showed that gaultherin was metabolized by beta-glycosidase produced by human intestinal bacteria and esterases in intestine, blood and liver successively to release salicylate finally. The study suggested gaultherin did not cause gastric ulcer for the reason that it released salicylate in intestine slowly, not in stomach and it left the cyclooxygenase-1 unaffected, which was the source of cytoprotective prostaglandins in gastric epithelium. PMID:16375889