Science.gov

Sample records for actions involving students

  1. Participatory action research: involving students in parent education.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Cathrine; Wu, Cynthia; Lam, Winsome

    2014-01-01

    Competition for scarce clinical placements has increased requiring new and innovative models to be developed to meet the growing need. A participatory action research project was used to provide a community nursing clinical experience of involvement in parent education. Nine Hong Kong nursing students self-selected to participate in the project to implement a parenting program called Parenting Young Children in a Digital World. Three project cycles were used: needs identification, skills development and program implementation. Students were fully involved in each cycle's planning, action and reflection phase. Qualitative and quantitative data were collected to inform the project. The overall outcome of the project was the provision of a rich and viable clinical placement experience that created significant learning opportunities for the students and researchers. This paper will explore the student's participation in this PAR project as an innovative clinical practice opportunity.

  2. A Piece of the Action: Student Involvement in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunlap, Robert L., Ed.

    1973-01-01

    This journal issue explores alternative ways to increase student involvement in the social studies classroom. Subject content remains a major stumbling block because of the knowledge explosion and the realization that half the students in school today will earn a living in an occupation not yet invented. The relationship between content and…

  3. Taking Action: An Educator's Guide to Involving Students in Environmental Action Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoner, Darlene K.; And Others

    The goal of Project WILD, a K-12 interdisciplinary conservation and environmental education program emphasizing wildlife, is to assist learners of any age in developing awareness, knowledge, skills, and commitment resulting in informed decisions, responsible behavior, and constructive actions concerning wildlife and the environment. The purpose of…

  4. Taking Action: An Educator's Guide to Involving Students in Environmental Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council for Environmental Education, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Developed in cooperation with the World Wildlife Fund, "Taking Action" inspires ideas and provides models for conducting effective environmental projects--projects that dynamically engage students from start to finish. From adopting species to protecting habitats to saving energy and creating publications, this guide will help educators plan,…

  5. Involving Students in Action Research: A Team Report on Assessing Needs for Program Improvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarthy-Tucker, Sherri N.; Swanson, Paul; Lund, David

    The Master's Program in Counseling and Human Relations at Northern Arizona University is a broad-based professional preparation degree that attracts students from a variety of areas, including nursing, social services, psychology, criminal justice, and education. The program provides advanced preparation in facilitation of learning, understanding…

  6. Examination Involving Students as Peer Examiners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ljungman, Anders G.; Silen, Charlotte

    2008-01-01

    The main interest in this article is students' involvement in assessment as a part of growth towards self-directedness in learning. In order to enhance students' development of autonomy in learning, a project involving "older" students as peer examiners for "younger" students was designed and carried out. Students in the sixth semester in a…

  7. Student Involvement: A Bridge to Total Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Instruction, Raleigh.

    This document, prepared by students involved in the Task Force on Student Involvement program, provides guidelines for administrators who are attempting to enhance constructive student participation in the total educational program. An outline of specific recommendations for dealing with high school unrest is followed by general recommendations…

  8. A School Action Plan with Stakeholder Involvement: A Case Study of One Elementary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Getty, Jacob J., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    This case study focused on a school action plan, using a planning and implementation process that focused on improving stakeholder involvement and responsibility for student reading achievement at Eisenberg Elementary School. This study examined the impact of the school action process on the development of a new plan compared to other traditional…

  9. Joint action modulates motor system involvement during action observation in 3-year-olds.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Marlene; Hunnius, Sabine; van Elk, Michiel; van Ede, Freek; Bekkering, Harold

    2011-06-01

    When we are engaged in a joint action, we need to integrate our partner's actions with our own actions. Previous research has shown that in adults the involvement of one's own motor system is enhanced during observation of an action partner as compared to during observation of an individual actor. The aim of this study was to investigate whether similar motor system involvement is present at early stages of joint action development and whether it is related to joint action performance. In an EEG experiment with 3-year-old children, we assessed the children's brain activity and performance during a joint game with an adult experimenter. We used a simple button-pressing game in which the two players acted in turns. Power in the mu- and beta-frequency bands was compared when children were not actively moving but observing the experimenter's actions when (1) they were engaged in the joint action game and (2) when they were not engaged. Enhanced motor involvement during action observation as indicated by attenuated sensorimotor mu- and beta-power was found when the 3-year-olds were engaged in the joint action. This enhanced motor activation during action observation was associated with better joint action performance. The findings suggest that already in early childhood the motor system is differentially activated during action observation depending on the involvement in a joint action. This motor system involvement might play an important role for children's joint action performance.

  10. Background Papers on Student Drug Involvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollander, Charles, Ed.

    The National Student Association (NSA) presents its position on student drug involvement in part 1 of this collection. A resolution calling for re-investigation of existing marijuana laws and guaranteed rights to the privacy of students was passed by NSA in August, 1966. This resolution is discussed. In part 2, papers presented at the National…

  11. Student Attrition: Strategies for Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alfred, Richard L., Ed.

    Four main objectives of the conference reported in these proceedings were: (1) to provide a basic orientation for two-year college faculty and administrative personnel as to what student attrition is and the types of impact that it has upon the institutional setting; (2) to interpret the vocabulary pertinent to student attrition, identifying new…

  12. Action Learning: Student Community Service Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aronstein, Laurence W.; Olsen, Edward G.

    By engaging students in community service projects, action learning uses resources of the real world to give students opportunities to participate in performing tasks and making decisions that confront societal problems. Such projects should be decided on after a study of the needs of the community. After a project is selected, all relevant…

  13. Mining Login Data for Actionable Student Insight

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agnihotri, Lalitha; Aghababyan, Ani; Mojarad, Shirin; Riedesel, Mark; Essa, Alfred

    2015-01-01

    Student login data is a key resource for gaining insight into their learning experience. However, the scale and the complexity of this data necessitate a thorough exploration to identify potential actionable insights, thus rendering it less valuable compared to student achievement data. To compensate for the underestimation of login data…

  14. realfriends: A Student Social Action Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Zoost, Steven

    2012-01-01

    "realfriends" is a social action project created by Grade 12 English students in Windsor, Nova Scotia. Its purpose was to create a face-to-face social network that would help change the school climate into a more social space. Interest in socializing is nothing new for teenagers, but these students articulated a worry that people their…

  15. Introducing the Action Potential to Psychology Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon-Dack, Stephanie L.

    2014-01-01

    For this simple active learning technique for teaching, students are assigned "roles" and act out the process of the action potential (AP), including the firing threshold, ion-specific channels for ions to enter and leave the cell, diffusion, and the refractory period. Pre-post test results indicated that students demonstrated increased…

  16. Lights! Camera! Action Projects! Engaging Psychopharmacology Students in Service-based Action Projects Focusing on Student Alcohol Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol abuse continues to be an issue of major concern for the health and well-being of college students. Estimates are that over 80% of college students are involved in the campus “alcohol culture.” Annually, close to 2000 students die in the United States due to alcohol-related accidents, with another 600,000 sustaining injury due to alcohol-related incidents (NIAAA, 2013). Students enrolled in a Psychopharmacology course engaged in action projects (community outreach) focused on alcohol abuse on our campus. Research has indicated that these types of projects can increase student engagement in course material and foster important skills, including working with peers and developing involvement in one’s community. This paper describes the structure and requirements of five student outreach projects and the final projects designed by the students, summarizes the grading and assessment of the projects, and discusses the rewards and challenges of incorporating such projects into a course. PMID:27385923

  17. Lights! Camera! Action Projects! Engaging Psychopharmacology Students in Service-based Action Projects Focusing on Student Alcohol Abuse.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol abuse continues to be an issue of major concern for the health and well-being of college students. Estimates are that over 80% of college students are involved in the campus "alcohol culture." Annually, close to 2000 students die in the United States due to alcohol-related accidents, with another 600,000 sustaining injury due to alcohol-related incidents (NIAAA, 2013). Students enrolled in a Psychopharmacology course engaged in action projects (community outreach) focused on alcohol abuse on our campus. Research has indicated that these types of projects can increase student engagement in course material and foster important skills, including working with peers and developing involvement in one's community. This paper describes the structure and requirements of five student outreach projects and the final projects designed by the students, summarizes the grading and assessment of the projects, and discusses the rewards and challenges of incorporating such projects into a course.

  18. Environmental Volunteers: Factors Influencing Their Involvement in Environmental Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liarakou, Georgia; Kostelou, Eleni; Gavrilakis, Costas

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the factors that influence volunteers to become involved in environmental action. The research focused on volunteers undertaking action in summer camps organised by an environmental non-governmental organisation (NGO) in Greece. The results suggest that the environmental issues addressed in volunteer…

  19. Increased Student Achievement through Parental Involvement and Increased Student Responsibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boberg, Tim; Carpenter, Kerry; Haiges, Shelley; Lundsgaard, Barb

    This action research project addressed the problem of missing assignments among fourth- and fifth-graders at a school in northern Illinois. In order to document the extent to which students lacked responsibility for turning in daily assignments, the teacher-researchers kept track of missing assignments for each student and grade book records for 6…

  20. Students' Interpretations of Mathematical Statements Involving Quantification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piatek-Jimenez, Katrina

    2010-01-01

    Mathematical statements involving both universal and existential quantifiers occur frequently in advanced mathematics. Despite their prevalence, mathematics students often have difficulties interpreting and proving quantified statements. Through task-based interviews, this study took a qualitative look at undergraduate mathematics students'…

  1. Getting Elementary Students Involved in Band

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Patience

    2009-01-01

    The author discusses getting elementary students involved in a band. The goals of an elementary band instructor should include introduction of good practice habits, working within an ensemble, and rehearsal procedures, along with the focusing on the essentials of music. Instructors should let students use the basic instruments: flute, clarinet,…

  2. Chapter 5. Students' Involvement with the Internet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russian Education and Society, 2004

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the authors examine a number of questions that make it possible to characterize the different aspects of students' involvement with the Internet. They will analyse the regularity of students in using the Internet, the age at which they begin to use means of electronic communication, the place where they use it, the intensiveness…

  3. Involvement: The Key to Success. Involving Students in the Student Advisory Board.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doi, Wes

    Involving middle school students in decision making is an important way to make them feel that they are part of the educational process in their school, that they are part of the "school team." A key way to involve students is through the creation of a Student Advisory Board (SAB), such as the one in place at Schmucker Middle School in…

  4. Shuttle Student Involvement Project for Secondary Schools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, G. P.; Ladwig, A.

    1981-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has initiated the Shuttle Student Involvement Project for Secondary Schools (SSIP-S), an annual nationwide competition to select student proposals for experiments suitable for flight aboard the Space Shuttle. The objective of the project is to stimulate the study of science and technology in grades 9 through 12 by directly relating students to a space research program. This paper will analyze the first year of the project from a standpoint of how the competition was administered; the number and types of proposals that were submitted; and will discuss the process involved in preparing the winning experiments for eventual flight.

  5. Involving students in experimental design: three approaches.

    PubMed

    McNeal, A P; Silverthorn, D U; Stratton, D B

    1998-12-01

    Many faculty want to involve students more actively in laboratories and in experimental design. However, just "turning them loose in the lab" is time-consuming and can be frustrating for both students and faculty. We describe three different ways of providing structures for labs that require students to design their own experiments but guide the choices. One approach emphasizes invertebrate preparations and classic techniques that students can learn fairly easily. Students must read relevant primary literature and learn each technique in one week, and then design and carry out their own experiments in the next week. Another approach provides a "design framework" for the experiments so that all students are using the same technique and the same statistical comparisons, whereas their experimental questions differ widely. The third approach involves assigning the questions or problems but challenging students to design good protocols to answer these questions. In each case, there is a mixture of structure and freedom that works for the level of the students, the resources available, and our particular aims.

  6. Student-Industry Plan for Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association of Manufacturers, New York, NY. Education Committee.

    The guidelines for a student-industry action committee represent an attempt by the authors to reverse the trend of mistrust demonstrated by the American public toward business and industry. Twelve chapter presidents of Delta Sigma Pi, a university business fraternity, met initially with representatives of the National Association of Manufacturers…

  7. Computations involving differential operators and their actions on functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crouch, Peter E.; Grossman, Robert; Larson, Richard

    1991-01-01

    The algorithms derived by Grossmann and Larson (1989) are further developed for rewriting expressions involving differential operators. The differential operators involved arise in the local analysis of nonlinear dynamical systems. These algorithms are extended in two different directions: the algorithms are generalized so that they apply to differential operators on groups and the data structures and algorithms are developed to compute symbolically the action of differential operators on functions. Both of these generalizations are needed for applications.

  8. Increasing Student Involvement in Cognitive Aging Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henkel, Linda A.

    2006-01-01

    The involvement of undergraduates in research on aging has benefits for the students and for the faculty mentors, as well as for their departments, their universities, and the field of gerontology at large. This article reports on the application of a 3-year Academic Research Enhancement Award (AREA) by the National Institute on Aging awarded to…

  9. (abstract) Student Involvement in the Pluto Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstein, Stacy

    1994-01-01

    The Pluto Fast Flyby mission development baseline consists of 2 identical spacecraft (120 - 165 kg) to be launched to Pluto/ Charon in the late 1990s. These spacecraft are intended to fly by Pluto and Charon in order to perform various remote-sensing scientific investigations and have a mission development cost less than $400M (FY92$) through launch plus 30 days. The Pluto team is committed to involving students in all areas of mission development and operations. In November 1992, the Pluto team sent a request for information to industry and universities looking for ways to lower the mass and cost of the mission. A number of universities responded with creative and promising technological developments. In addition to contracts with industry and other federal labs, contracts were signed with schools which allowed students to apply their research, enabling the Pluto team to use valuable resources on a variety of advanced technology endeavors. Perhaps the most exciting aspect of these investigations was that the deliverables that the students produced were not just final reports, but actual prototype hardware complete with write-ups on lessons learned in machining, programming, and design. Another exciting development was a prototype adapter competition in which 7 universities competed to design, build, and test their idea of a lightweight spacecraft-propulsion stack adapter. Georgia Tech won with an innovative dodecahedron composite lattice cone. Other students from other universities were involved as well. All in all, over 40 students from 20 different colleges made significant contributions to the Pluto Fast Flyby mission development through their efforts. This paper will give an overview of Pluto student involvement, the technologies which they examined, and useful results for the mission.

  10. Making Sense of Students' Actions in an Open-Ended Virtual Laboratory Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gal, Ya'akov; Uzan, Oriel; Belford, Robert; Karabinos, Michael; Yaron, David

    2015-01-01

    A process for analyzing log files collected from open-ended learning environments is developed and tested on a virtual lab problem involving reaction stoichiometry. The process utilizes a set of visualization tools that, by grouping student actions in a hierarchical manner, helps experts make sense of the linear list of student actions recorded in…

  11. Democracy in Action for Student Security

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grossman, Robert J.; MacGregor, Archie

    1977-01-01

    Presents a philosophical and practical checklist of considerations to keep in mind in planning and evaluating college security programs, emphasizing the need for student involvement and cooperation. Available from Security World Publishing Co., P.O. Box 272, Culver City, California 90230; single copies $2.00. (JG)

  12. Historical Experiments in Students' Hands: Unfragmenting Science through Action and History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavicchi, Elizabeth Mary

    2008-01-01

    Two students, meeting together with a teacher, redid historical experiments. Unlike conventional instruction where science topics and practices often fragment, they experienced interrelatedness among phenomena, participants' actions, and history. This study narrates actions that fostered an interrelated view. One action involved opening up…

  13. The Action Research Dissertation: A Guide for Students and Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herr, Kathryn; Anderson, Gary L.

    2005-01-01

    Many students struggle with turning action research projects into a Master's thesis or doctoral dissertation: to address this need, the authors have distilled decades of action research experience into a reference for graduate students. This book is designed to provide a roadmap to show that action research is appropriate not only for a…

  14. Rates of Student Disciplinary Action in Australian Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindsay, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    Although a growing body of research has been conducted on student misconduct in universities, quantitative data on disciplinary action undertaken by institutions against student transgressions are largely absent from the literature. This paper provides baseline quantitative data on disciplinary action against students in the universities. It is…

  15. Parent Involvement and Student Performance: The Influence of School Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeal, Ralph B., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    Researchers focusing on parent involvement continue to concentrate their efforts on the relationship between involvement and student performance in isolation of the school context in which involvement occurs. This research outlines an ecology of involvement and how this social context affects parent involvement and student performance. Relying on…

  16. Student Involvement: A Developmental Theory for Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Astin, Alexander W.

    1984-01-01

    Presents a student development theory based on student involvement, which refers to the quantity and quality of the physical and psychological energy students invest in their college experience. Discusses implications for practice and research. (JAC)

  17. 7 CFR 210.12 - Student, parent and community involvement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Student, parent and community involvement. 210.12... School Food Authority Participation § 210.12 Student, parent and community involvement. (a) General. School food authorities shall promote activities to involve students and parents in the Program....

  18. 7 CFR 210.12 - Student, parent and community involvement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Student, parent and community involvement. 210.12... School Food Authority Participation § 210.12 Student, parent and community involvement. (a) General. School food authorities shall promote activities to involve students and parents in the Program....

  19. 7 CFR 210.12 - Student, parent and community involvement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Student, parent and community involvement. 210.12... School Food Authority Participation § 210.12 Student, parent and community involvement. (a) General. School food authorities shall promote activities to involve students and parents in the Program....

  20. 7 CFR 210.12 - Student, parent and community involvement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Student, parent and community involvement. 210.12... School Food Authority Participation § 210.12 Student, parent and community involvement. (a) General. School food authorities shall promote activities to involve students and parents in the Program....

  1. From Service to Action? Students, Volunteering and Community Action in Mid Twentieth-Century Britain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brewis, Georgina

    2010-01-01

    Volunteering by higher education students in the UK has a long history which remains largely unexplored despite recent research and policy attention. This article offers a brief overview of the development of student volunteering before the 1960s and then discusses a shift from student social service to Student Community Action in the late 1960s…

  2. 40 CFR 300.525 - State involvement in removal actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) SUPERFUND, EMERGENCY PLANNING, AND COMMUNITY RIGHT-TO-KNOW PROGRAMS NATIONAL OIL AND HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES... removal actions. (a) States may undertake Fund-financed removal actions pursuant to a cooperative agreement with EPA. State-lead removal actions taken pursuant to cooperative agreements must be conducted...

  3. Mining Students' Inquiry Actions for Understanding of Complex Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Sharona T.; Wilensky, Uri

    2011-01-01

    This study lies at an intersection between advancing educational data mining methods for detecting students' knowledge-in-action and the broader question of how conceptual and mathematical forms of knowing interact in exploring complex chemical systems. More specifically, it investigates students' inquiry actions in three computer-based models of…

  4. Training for Nonviolent Action for High School Students: A Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKay, Bidge

    The handbook for secondary students advocates nonviolent action, not passivity nor retaliation toward injustices. Emphasis is upon helping students to understand nonviolent action; to be familiar with training information on courses, time requirements, problems, costs, and procedures; and to deal with direct objectives toward peaceful social…

  5. 7 CFR 210.12 - Student, parent and community involvement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... School Food Authority Participation § 210.12 Student, parent and community involvement. (a) General. School food authorities shall promote activities to involve students and parents in the Program. Such... student-community support activities. School food authorities are encouraged to use the school...

  6. An inferentialist perspective on the coordination of actions and reasons involved in makinga statistical inference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakker, Arthur; Ben-Zvi, Dani; Makar, Katie

    2017-01-01

    To understand how statistical and other types of reasoning are coordinated with actions to reduce uncertainty, we conducted a case study in vocational education that involved statistical hypothesis testing. We analyzed an intern's research project in a hospital laboratory in which reducing uncertainties was crucial to make a valid statistical inference. In his project, the intern, Sam, investigated whether patients' blood could be sent through pneumatic post without influencing the measurement of particular blood components. We asked, in the process of making a statistical inference, how are reasons and actions coordinated to reduce uncertainty? For the analysis, we used the semantic theory of inferentialism, specifically, the concept of webs of reasons and actions—complexes of interconnected reasons for facts and actions; these reasons include premises and conclusions, inferential relations, implications, motives for action, and utility of tools for specific purposes in a particular context. Analysis of interviews with Sam, his supervisor and teacher as well as video data of Sam in the classroom showed that many of Sam's actions aimed to reduce variability, rule out errors, and thus reduce uncertainties so as to arrive at a valid inference. Interestingly, the decisive factor was not the outcome of a t test but of the reference change value, a clinical chemical measure of analytic and biological variability. With insights from this case study, we expect that students can be better supported in connecting statistics with context and in dealing with uncertainty.

  7. Homework Involvement and Academic Achievement of Native and Immigrant Students.

    PubMed

    Suárez, Natalia; Regueiro, Bibiana; Epstein, Joyce L; Piñeiro, Isabel; Díaz, Sara M; Valle, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Homework is a debated issue in society and its relationship with academic achievement has been deeply studied in the last years. Nowadays, schools are multicultural stages in which students from different cultures and ethnicities work together. In this sense, the present study aims to compare homework involvement and academic achievement in a sample of native and immigrant students, as well as to study immigrant students' relationship between homework involvement and Math achievement. The sample included 1328 students, 10-16 years old from Spanish families (85.6%) or immigrant students or students of immigrant origin (14.4%) from South America, Europe, Africa, and Asia. The study was developed considering three informants: elementary and secondary students, their parents and their teachers. Results showed higher involvement in homework in native students than in immigrant. Between immigrants students, those who are more involved in homework have better academic achievement in Math at secondary grades. There weren't found gender differences on homework involvement, but age differences were reported. Immigrant students are less involved in homework at secondary grades that students in elementary grades. The study highlights the relevance of homework involvement in academic achievement in immigrant students.

  8. NASA newsletters for the Weber Student Shuttle Involvement Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morey-Holton, E. R.; Sebesta, P. D.; Ladwig, A. M.; Jackson, J. T.; Knott, W. M., III

    1988-01-01

    Biweekly reports generated for the Weber Student Shuttle Involvement Project (SSIP) are discussed. The reports document the evolution of science, hardware, and logistics for this Shuttle project aboard the eleventh flight of the Space Transportation System (STS-41B), launched from Kennedy Space Center on February 3, 1984, and returned to KSC 8 days later. The reports were intended to keep all members of the team aware of progress in the project and to avoid redundancy and misunderstanding. Since the Weber SSIP was NASA's first orbital rat project, documentation of all actions was essential to assure the success of this complex project. Eleven reports were generated: October 3, 17 and 31; November 14 and 28; and December 12 and 17, 1983; and January 3, 16, and 23; and May 1, 1984. A subject index of the reports is included. The final report of the project is included as an appendix.

  9. Student Involvement in Space Exploration: The Next Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagenal, F.; Horanyi, M.

    2017-02-01

    Involvement of students in space missions exposes them to the technical realities of space exploration – delivers deep learning experience and feeds the professional pipeline. Give students the opportunity to explore every corner of the solar system.

  10. Teacher-Student Negotiation in an Action Research Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsafos, Vassilis

    2009-01-01

    Students in Greece are required to study classical texts, a task often challenging both for them and for their teachers. In this article, a teacher action researcher describes how he explored ways to enhance student engagement in the required reading. By negotiating the task of indexing, a process where students go through the text collecting…

  11. Homework Involvement and Academic Achievement of Native and Immigrant Students

    PubMed Central

    Suárez, Natalia; Regueiro, Bibiana; Epstein, Joyce L.; Piñeiro, Isabel; Díaz, Sara M.; Valle, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Homework is a debated issue in society and its relationship with academic achievement has been deeply studied in the last years. Nowadays, schools are multicultural stages in which students from different cultures and ethnicities work together. In this sense, the present study aims to compare homework involvement and academic achievement in a sample of native and immigrant students, as well as to study immigrant students’ relationship between homework involvement and Math achievement. The sample included 1328 students, 10–16 years old from Spanish families (85.6%) or immigrant students or students of immigrant origin (14.4%) from South America, Europe, Africa, and Asia. The study was developed considering three informants: elementary and secondary students, their parents and their teachers. Results showed higher involvement in homework in native students than in immigrant. Between immigrants students, those who are more involved in homework have better academic achievement in Math at secondary grades. There weren’t found gender differences on homework involvement, but age differences were reported. Immigrant students are less involved in homework at secondary grades that students in elementary grades. The study highlights the relevance of homework involvement in academic achievement in immigrant students. PMID:27757097

  12. Improving Student Engagement: Ten Proposals for Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zepke, Nick; Leach, Linda

    2010-01-01

    Since the 1980s an extensive research literature has investigated how to improve student success in higher education focusing on student outcomes such as retention, completion and employability. A parallel research programme has focused on how students engage with their studies and what they, institutions and educators can do to enhance their…

  13. Student Microwave Experiments Involving the Doppler Effect.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, F. Neff; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Described is the use of the Doppler Effect with microwaves in the measurement of the acceleration due to gravity of falling objects. The experiments described add to the repertoire of quantitative student microwave experiments. (Author/DS)

  14. Student Action Research: Reaping the Benefits for Students and School Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Beth C.; Jones, Makeba

    2007-01-01

    Recent years have seen a proliferation of student action research both nationally and internationally. Going by various names--participatory research, action research, participatory evaluation--student action research is research that (a) is conducted by youth, within or outside of schools and classrooms, with the goal of informing and affecting…

  15. Removing the College Involvement "Research Asterisk": Identifying and Rethinking Predictors of American Indian College Student Involvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garland, John L.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify campus environmental predictors of American Indian college student involvement. The American Indian research asterisk, or not including American Indian data, has prevailed over student development research for decades. As a result, student affairs professionals have been limited in their ability to develop…

  16. Involving Students in Residence Halls in Hong Kong

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ting, S. Raymond; Chan, Rebecca; Lee, Esther

    2016-01-01

    This article reports a study based on A. W. Astin's (1984) involvement theory applied in residence halls at a public university in Hong Kong, China. The resident students who were involved as participants or student leaders in this study were found to be better developed in terms of leadership, career development, multicultural experience,…

  17. Parental Involvement in Schooling, Classroom Environment and Student Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adamski, Aurora; Fraser, Barry J.; Peiro, Maria M.

    2013-01-01

    We investigated relationships between students' perceptions of parental involvement in schooling, their Spanish classroom environment and student outcomes (attitudes and achievement). Modified Spanish versions of the What Is Happening In this Class?, Test of Spanish-Related Attitudes-L[subscript 1], a parental involvement questionnaire and a…

  18. Student Involvement in the Egyptian Quality Assurance System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elassy, Noha

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to study the extent and the quality of student involvement in the quality assurance process (QAP) in Egyptian higher education institutions (HEIs). Design/methodology/approach: In this study, two qualitative methods were used to explore the extent and the quality of student involvement; these were focus groups…

  19. Democratic Involvement of Students in High School Governance in Lesotho

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matsepe, Mokone W.

    2014-01-01

    This paper is premised on the thesis that there is importance and necessity of involving high school students in school governance in Lesotho as well as consideration of cultural values' impact on this issue. The possibilities and limits of involving the high school students in school governance in Lesotho are examined. There are two opposing…

  20. Effectively Involving Faculty in the Assessment of Student Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson Laird, Thomas F.; Smallwood, Robert; Niskode-Dossett, Amanda Suniti; Garver, Amy K.

    2009-01-01

    The formal assessment of student engagement, as it has developed in recent years, is not necessarily a faculty-driven activity. Most faculty members who teach undergraduates are involved in the informal assessment of student engagement by taking attendance, observing student behaviors or expressions in class, providing feedback on assignments, and…

  1. Involving Students in Learning through Rubrics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoshina, Joan M.; Harada, Violet H.

    2007-01-01

    In inquiry environments, assessment is integral to the learning process. This means that students not only assess their own work, but they also help identify the criteria for assessment and design the tools for measuring the quality of the performance. One critical assessment tool, which is being used in countless classrooms, is the rubric.…

  2. Design: Cost Control, Student Involvement, Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nation's Schools and Colleges, 1975

    1975-01-01

    Shoreline, Washington, Public Schools remodeled adjoining empty schools to form a high school; engineering students at the University of California (Davis) built their own housing; a Texas high school uses a wide corridor for a variety of purposes; Bates College, Lewiston, Maine, expanded its library facilities. (Author/MLF)

  3. Involving Students with the Short Story.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duke, Charles R.

    Although the short story is brief and seemingly simple to comprehend, experienced teachers know from painful experience that students often read without "seeing" and that the only way to get them to "see" is to isolate some of the elements of the short story and present them in a different way to focus attention on them. For example, to…

  4. Student Privacy Rights Involving Strip Searches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Essex, Nathan L.

    2005-01-01

    The Fourth Amendment to the US Constitution provides protection of all citizens against unreasonable search and seizure. The US Supreme Court has affirmed that the basic purpose of the Fourth Amendment is to safeguard the privacy and security of individuals against unreasonable intrusive searches by governmental officials. Since students possess…

  5. Increasing Teacher, Parent, and Student Involvement To Promote Student Learning and Self-Esteem.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eilers, Janet L.; Fox, Judith L.; Welvaert, Mona S.; Wood, Jacqueline M.

    This action research study examined the problem of the loss of commitment to schoolwork by middle level students as evidenced by missing assignments; late work, incomplete work, or both; and an attitude of indifference on the part of the students. The study also reviewed a variety of strategies to improve student learning and students' view of…

  6. Anxiolytic action of pterostilbene: involvement of hippocampal ERK phosphorylation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pterostilbene, a natural analog of resveratrol, has diverse health-beneficial properties. However, the neurological activities of this compound are largely unexplored. Here we report that pterostilbene shows anxiolytic action by downregulating phosphorylated levels of ERKs in the hippocampus of mice...

  7. Reduce Toxic Exposures: Get Involved and Take Action!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Exceptional Parent, 2006

    2006-01-01

    There is a growing concern about the connection between many chemical exposures and learning and other developmental disabilities (LDD). National and local groups are developing new programs around the country that are making this connection--and taking action with regard to policy, education and research efforts. They are working towards reducing…

  8. Affirmative Action Now: A Guide for Students, Families, and Counselors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beckman, James A.

    2006-01-01

    Designed for students, parents, and counselors, this timely work addresses the present state of affirmative action in higher education after the landmark decisions of "Gratz v. Bollinger" and "Grutter v. Bollinger." Informative chapters provide an overall understanding of the history of affirmative action in higher education in…

  9. Student projects involving novel interaction with large displays.

    PubMed

    Dias, Paulo; Sousa, Tiago; Parracho, Joao; Cardoso, Igor; Monteiro, Andre; Sousa Santos, Beatriz

    2014-01-01

    DETI-Interact is an interactive system that offers information relevant to students in the lobby of the University of Aveiro's Department of Electronics, Telecommunications and Informatics (DETI). The project started in 2009 with a master's thesis addressing interaction with public displays through Android smartphones. Since then, it has evolved considerably; it currently allows gesture interaction based on a Kinect sensor. Meanwhile, it has involved third-year students, master's students, and undergraduate students participating in a research initiation program.

  10. The Myth of the "Green Student": Student Involvement in Australian University Sustainability Programmes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butt, L.; More, E.; Avery, G. C.

    2014-01-01

    The paper questions the prevalence of "green students" and their impact on decision-making in sustainability programmes in Australian universities. While the universities studied provide numerous opportunities for student involvement in sustainability programmes, comparatively few students actually become involved, making student impact…

  11. Improving Community Involvement and Citizenship among Elementary School Students through Service Learning Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Mandi

    2007-01-01

    This Action Research Project was designed to increase student awareness and involvement of socio-economic differences and how the children can make a difference in their community. Service learning projects were non-existent at the Academy causing the young children to miss out on learning experiences that would teach them how to make a difference…

  12. Historical Experiments in Students' Hands: Unfragmenting Science through Action and History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavicchi, Elizabeth Mary

    2008-08-01

    Two students, meeting together with a teacher, redid historical experiments. Unlike conventional instruction where science topics and practices often fragment, they experienced interrelatedness among phenomena, participants’ actions, and history. This study narrates actions that fostered an interrelated view. One action involved opening up historical telephones to examine interior circuitry. Another made sound visible in a transparent air column filled with Styrofoam bits and through Lissajous figures produced by reflecting light off orthogonal nineteenth century tuning forks crafted by Koenig and Kohl. Another involved orienting magnetic compasses to reveal the magnetism of conducting wires, historically investigated by Oersted and Schweigger. Replicating Homberg’s triboluminescent compound elicited students’ reflective awareness of history. These actions bore pedagogical value in recovering some of the interrelatedness inherent in the history and reintroducing the wonder of science phenomena to students today.

  13. Mature age students access, entry and success in nurse education: an action research study.

    PubMed

    Kenny, Amanda; Kidd, Tracy; Nankervis, Katrina; Connell, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    This action research study involved an 'expert group' that was convened to consider issues for mature age nursing students in the Australian context and develop recommendations that could be used to strengthen mature age entry, access and success in nursing programs. Consistent with action research, the group worked through phases of planning, action, observation, evaluation and critical reflection. In developing recommendations that could be used for future planning, the group met regularly, reviewed extensive literature, and conducted two data collection activities, a questionnaire and focus group with education providers. From the action research activities, five major recommendations were generated. These focused on the value of mature age students, the need for specific information, transparent and clear processes for students entering nurse education, study support and finally, the provision of financial assistance.

  14. Parent Involvement, Business Partnerships Promote Student Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Danny D.

    1994-01-01

    To tap the resources, knowledge, and expertise of parents, a West Virginia middle school initiated a parent-involvement program in fall 1992. The parents created their own program, the Red Apple Corps, which planned and promoted a back-to-school day, a birthday bulletin board, a tutoring program, a school pride award, and the school newspaper.…

  15. Help Teachers Engage Students: Action Tools for Administrators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brinkman, Annette; Forlini, Gary; Williams, Ellen

    2009-01-01

    This unique, hands-on reference for school administrators offers guidelines for effective student engagement as well as reproducible action tools that will enable you to: (1) Identify and share "The Big Eight Student Engagement Strategies" with your teachers; (2) Promote teacher growth and provide support for new and/or struggling teachers; (3)…

  16. Enhancing Students' Creative Writing Skills: An Action Research Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nasir, Laraib; Naqvi, Syeda Meenoo; Bhamani, Shelina

    2013-01-01

    This research aimed to improve written expression (composition) skills of 5th grade students of an elite private school. The research was designed under the paradigm of action research. A total sample of 39 students' from the same grade was chosen for the study. The baseline assessment was carried out to explore the pre-intervention writing skill…

  17. Project SAVE, Student Action for Valuing the Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cripe, Julie, Ed.; Wright, Joe, Ed.

    Project SAVE (Student Action for Valuing the Environment) encourages a team approach to solving environmental problems. SAVE suggests that students initiate, create, and implement practical approaches to solving community environmental problems. Included in this publication are descriptions of 13 exemplary programs that include elementary schools,…

  18. The Impact of Parental Involvement on Kindergarten Student Writing Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Somer Knight

    2013-01-01

    Although researchers have studied parental involvement and reading achievement, few have examined the effects of parental involvement on young children's developmental writing. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between parent involvement in a writing workshop and the writing development of kindergarten students in an…

  19. Students of Action? A Comparative Investigation of Secondary Science and Social Studies Students' Action Repertoires in a Land Use Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumler, Lori M.

    2011-01-01

    Environmental education (EE) and social studies education share an interest in behavioral outcomes. This study compares behavioral outcomes--including both self-reported knowledge of actions and reported actions taken--in the context of a land use curriculum enacted in secondary science versus social studies classes with 500 students and nine…

  20. The Relationship between High School Students' Attitudes and Actions toward "Slow Learners." Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Carol T.; Gibbs, Elizabeth D.

    The relationship between high school students' attitudes and their involvement in a peer tutoring program for slow learners was examined, on the basis of M. Fishbein's theory of reasoned action, which suggests that the best predictor of behavior is the individual's intention to perform the behavior and that intentions are functions of attitude and…

  1. Studying Distance Students: Methods, Findings, Actions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wahl, Diane; Avery, Beth; Henry, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    University of North Texas (UNT) Libraries began studying the library needs of distance learners in 2009 using a variety of approaches to explore and confirm these needs as well as obtain input into how to meet them. Approaches used to date include analysis of both quantitative and qualitative responses by online students to the LibQUAL+[R] surveys…

  2. Student-Involved Data Use: Establishing the Evidence Base

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jimerson, Jo Beth; Reames, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    In this conceptual paper, we map the research terrain on what we term "student-involved data use" (SIDU)--that is, the practice of having students track, chart, and analyze their own data in formal and structured ways. Drawing on peer-reviewed research as well as practitioner-oriented literature, social media, and district websites, we…

  3. Civic Engagement in College Students: Connections between Involvement and Attitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Leary, Lisa S.

    2014-01-01

    This chapter describes how canonical correlation was used in conjunction with an item response theory model to address the relationship between college students' civic engagement involvement and attitudes as undergraduates. The constructs of interest were students' participation in civic, political, and expressive activities, as well as…

  4. Adult Undergraduate Students: Patterns of Learning Involvement. Final Research Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kasworm, Carol E.; Blowers, Sally S.

    A research study examined the complex roles of adult life in relation to the student role, the nature of adult undergraduate engagement in learning, and adult perceptions of involvement. Adult students were interviewed in three types of institutions: 38 at two liberal arts colleges, 29 at two community colleges, and 23 at two public universities.…

  5. Student Involvement in the Community College Setting. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaves, Christopher A.

    This document discusses the challenges community colleges, particularly urban ones, face in delivering education to their first-generation, immigrant, economically disadvantaged, non-white, limited-English-ability, and other non-traditional students. These challenges can be exacerbated by students' failure to connect and become involved in college…

  6. THE BIOLOGICAL ACTIONS OF DEHYDROEPIANDROSTERONE INVOLVES MULTIPLE RECEPTORS

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Stephanie J.; Geoghegan, Thomas E.; Prough, Russell A.; Miller, Kristy K. Michael

    2008-01-01

    Dehydroepiandrosterone has been thought to have physiological functions other than as an androgen precursor. The previous studies performed have demonstrated a number of biological effects in rodents, such as amelioration of disease in diabetic, chemical carcinogenesis, and obesity models. To date, activation of the peroxisome proliferators activated receptor alpha, pregnane X receptor, and estrogen receptor by DHEA and its metabolites have been demonstrated. Several membrane-associated receptors have also been elucidated leading to additional mechanisms by which DHEA may exert its biological effects. This review will provide an overview of the receptor multiplicity involved in the biological activity of this sterol. PMID:16684650

  7. Enhancing professionalism among engineering students through involvements in technical societies.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Sreejita; Samineni, Anvesh; Mandal, Subhamoy; Murari, Bhaskar Mohan

    2015-08-01

    A student chapter can be considered to be a miniature enterprise; however without the latter's major financial risks. Involvement in the student chapter of a professional society like IEEE at undergraduate level plays a pivotal role in the overall professional development of the student by keeping the students informed about the various career possibilities. A student chapter shapes the hitherto naive students into industry ready professionals and to suitable candidates for some of the best grad schools worldwide. This assertion has been discussed in-depth taking the example of IEEE EMBS Student Branch chapter of VIT University. It has been described how the entire process, - starting from inception of an idea to its materialization in to an activity, has shaped the volunteers and participants into better professionals.

  8. The Role of Student Support Services in Encouraging Student Involvement and Its Impact on Student Perceptions and Academic Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelley-Hall, Caren

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the role of Student Support Services (SSS) in encouraging student involvement and its impact on student perceptions and academic experiences in three technical colleges in upstate South Carolina. By examining Alexander Astin's theory of student involvement in the services provided by the program, a better…

  9. Parental Involvement and Student Motivation: A Quantitative Study of the Relationship between Student Goal Orientation and Student Perceptions of Parental Involvement among 5th Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendoza, Christine Daryabigi

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine a possible relationship between student perceptions of parental involvement and student goal orientation for an ethnically diverse fifth grade elementary population from high-poverty schools. This study was quantitative in nature and employed the Patterns of Adaptive Learning Scales (PALS) to assess the…

  10. Responding to Students with Mental Disorders; A Framework for Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leach, Bob E.; Sewell, James D.

    1984-01-01

    Outlines legal perspectives and operating procedures for developing university policies to deal with students who exhibit mental and emotional disturbances. Procedures involving appropriate off-campus resources are needed. (JAC)

  11. Conducting Action Research in a Practicum: A Student Teacher's Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kasula, Alex

    2015-01-01

    This article looks at my reflection as a teacher during a master's degree practicum for a Second Language Studies Program. This particular practicum differs from the other common student teacher-training courses found in master's programs as it incorporated a teacher-training session on conducting action research (AR) in the classroom, a practice…

  12. Action Research to Improve Collaboration among Student Support Services Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salm, Twyla

    2014-01-01

    This study explores action research as a professional development strategy to improve interprofessional collaboration in a school division team focused on supporting students with a variety of learning and behavioural needs. Occupational therapists, speech and language pathologists, a psychologist, and a social worker worked together to learn more…

  13. Fostering Resiliency in Students: Positive Action Strategies for Classroom Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruce, Mary Alice

    1995-01-01

    Describes research-supported positive action strategies for teachers that will help foster resiliency in their classrooms and promote the healthy development and social competence of all students. Strategies include brainstorming, creative problem solving, goal setting, critical thinking and reflection, sensitivity to social learning, and…

  14. Uncovering Student Thinking in Science through CTS Action Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tugel, Joyce; Porter, Ingrid

    2010-01-01

    Curriculum top study (CTS) action research is a specific type of inquiry that combines curriculum topic study (Keeley 2005) with an examination of students' thinking using formative assessment probes (Keeley, Eberle, and Farrin 2005; Keeley, Eberle, and Tugel 2007; Keeley, Eberle, and Dorsey 2008; Keeley and Tugel 2009) and a variety of…

  15. [The action control scale for diagnosing performance in nursing students].

    PubMed

    Branco, Elen Martins da Silva Castelo; Peixoto, Mauricio Abreu Pinto; Alvim, Neide Aparecida Titonelli

    2013-12-01

    Quantitative research aimed to verify the relevance of Action Control Theory for the identification of risk for poor performance in the planning of preventive care for pressure ulcers. The action - state orientation deals with individual differences and the ability to regulate emotions, cognitions and attitudes to complete the intentional actions. The instruments used were the Student Assessment Instrument and HAKEMP 90, derived from this theory, in 46 undergraduate nursing students. The analysis showed high sensitivity (0.84) for the diagnosis of risk for poor performance and high specificity (0.90) for detecting the absence of risk in the care planning. The results suggest the HAKEMP 90 as a diagnostic tool for identifying essential elements of nursing education as active learning, regulation of cognitive processes and relevance of basic nursing care in hospital.

  16. Mode of Action of the Natural Insecticide, Decaleside Involves Sodium Pump Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Rajashekar, Yallappa; Shivanandappa, Thimmappa

    2017-01-01

    Decalesides are a new class of natural insecticides which are toxic to insects by contact via the tarsal gustatory chemosensilla. The symptoms of their toxicity to insects and the rapid knockdown effect suggest neurotoxic action, but the precise mode of action and the molecular targets for decaleside action are not known. We have presented experimental evidence for the involvement of sodium pump inhibition in the insecticidal action of decaleside in the cockroach and housefly. The knockdown effect of decaleside is concomitant with the in vivo inhibition of Na+, K+ -ATPase in the head and thorax. The lack of insecticidal action by experimental ablation of tarsi or blocking the tarsal sites with paraffin correlated with lack of inhibition of Na+- K+ ATPase in vivo. Maltotriose, a trisaccharide, partially rescued the toxic action of decaleside as well as inhibition of the enzyme, suggesting the possible involvement of gustatory sugar receptors. In vitro studies with crude insect enzyme preparation and purified porcine Na+, K+ -ATPase showed that decaleside competitively inhibited the enzyme involving the ATP binding site. Our study shows that the insecticidal action of decaleside via the tarsal gustatory sites is causally linked to the inhibition of sodium pump which represents a unique mode of action. The precise target(s) for decaleside in the tarsal chemosensilla and the pathway linked to inhibition of sodium pump and the insecticidal action remain to be understood. PMID:28125742

  17. Parent involvement and student academic performance: A multiple mediational analysis

    PubMed Central

    Topor, David R.; Keane, Susan P.; Shelton, Terri L.; Calkins, Susan D.

    2011-01-01

    Parent involvement in a child's education is consistently found to be positively associated with a child's academic performance. However, there has been little investigation of the mechanisms that explain this association. The present study examines two potential mechanisms of this association: the child's perception of cognitive competence and the quality of the student-teacher relationship. This study used a sample of 158 seven-year old participants, their mothers, and their teachers. Results indicated a statistically significant association between parent involvement and a child's academic performance, over and above the impact of the child's intelligence. A multiple mediation model indicated that the child's perception of cognitive competence fully mediated the relation between parent involvement and the child's performance on a standardized achievement test. The quality of the student-teacher relationship fully mediated the relation between parent involvement and teacher ratings of the child's classroom academic performance. Limitations, future research directions, and implications for public policy initiatives were discussed. PMID:20603757

  18. Parent involvement and student academic performance: a multiple mediational analysis.

    PubMed

    Topor, David R; Keane, Susan P; Shelton, Terri L; Calkins, Susan D

    2010-01-01

    Parent involvement in a child's education is consistently found to be positively associated with a child's academic performance. However, there has been little investigation of the mechanisms that explain this association. The present study examines two potential mechanisms of this association: the child's perception of cognitive competence and the quality of the student-teacher relationship. This study used a sample of 158 seven-year-old participants, their mothers, and their teachers. Results indicated a statistically significant association between parent involvement and a child's academic performance, over and above the impact of the child's intelligence. A multiple mediation model indicated that the child's perception of cognitive competence fully mediated the relation between parent involvement and the child's performance on a standardized achievement test. The quality of the student-teacher relationship fully mediated the relation between parent involvement and teacher ratings of the child's classroom academic performance. Limitations, future research directions, and implications for public policy initiatives are discussed.

  19. The Effects of Student Involvement on Graduate Student Satisfaction: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farley, Kelsey; McKee, Mallory; Brooks, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The pilot study discussed in this article investigates the perception of counselor education students' level of involvement and their satisfaction regarding their graduate program experience. It is believed, more involved students are more satisfied. Because there is limited existing data, this study seeks to ignite the conversation and future…

  20. Social Involvement and Commuter Students: The First-Year Student Voice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krause, Kerri-Lee D.

    2007-01-01

    This qualitative study explores the nature of undergraduate commuter students' social involvement with peers during the transitional first six months of their university experience. Focus group interviews with 46 participants provided a student perspective of the role of social interactions in students' transition to university life. Findings…

  1. Final Year Faculty of Education Students' Views Concerning Parent Involvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindberg, E. Nihal

    2014-01-01

    This study has aimed to determine the knowledge, skills, and views held by pre-service teachers attending different teacher training programs about parent involvement. A total of 520 4th year students receiving education in primary school teaching and in branch teaching programs participated in the study. Data were collected by the "Parent…

  2. Process Guide for Student Involvement in Historical Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Charles; Lenihan, J. Michael

    The booklet describes the local history component of an interdisciplinary high school course on American Studies. The program involves students over a three-year period in collecting, recording, organizing, interpreting, and disseminating the history, culture, and tradition of Scituate, Rhode Island. The booklet is presented in six chapters.…

  3. Impacts of Campus Involvement on Hospitality Student Achievement and Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yin, Dean; Lei, Simon A.

    2007-01-01

    Campus involvement affecting satisfaction and academic achievement (overall grade point average) of hospitality undergraduate students at a state university in the Midwest (University X) was investigated through a survey research. A four-part survey instrument was developed to facilitate this study. There were a number of academic, professional,…

  4. Parental involvement in the habilitation process following children's cochlear implantation: an action theory perspective.

    PubMed

    Zaidman-Zait, Anat; Young, Richard A

    2008-01-01

    Action theory and the qualitative action-project method are used in this study to address and illustrate the complexity of parenting children who have received cochlear implants (CIs) as well as the intentionality of parents engaged in that process. "Action" refers to individual and joint goal-directed and intentional behaviors. Action theory has the advantage of using the perspectives provided by manifest behavior, internal processes, and social meaning in the analysis of action. Two cases are used to describe the individual and joint actions and projects, as related to parents' involvement in the habilitation process of children's postcochlear implantation. These joint projects are described at the levels of meanings/goals, functional processes, behaviors, structural support, and resources. From the rich descriptions and analysis of the cases, we draw potentially illuminative implications for the "current thinking" in relation to parenting children with CIs.

  5. Student involvement in the UK sex industry: motivations and experiences.

    PubMed

    Sagar, Tracey; Jones, Debbie; Symons, Katrien; Tyrie, Jacky; Roberts, Ron

    2016-12-01

    The Student Sex Work Project was set up in 2012 in the United Kingdom (UK) to locate students who are involved in the sex industry, to discover their motivations and needs, and in doing so provide an evidence base to consider the development of policy and practice within Higher Education. As part of this initiative, a large survey was undertaken comprising students from throughout the UK. Reporting on the findings from this survey, the article sheds some light on what occupations students take up in the sex industry, what motivates their participation and how they experience the work. The study also offers a much-needed empirical input to the ongoing academic debates on the nature of sex work. The results suggest that there can be little doubt of a student presence within the sex industry in the UK. The motivations and experiences of student sex workers cover elements of agency and choice as well as of force and exploitation and it is suggested that student sex work is best understood from a polymorphous framework which leaves room for a wide variety of experiences and challenges.

  6. Multiple Goals and Homework Involvement in Elementary School Students.

    PubMed

    Valle, Antonio; Pan, Irene; Núñez, José C; Rodríguez, Susana; Rosário, Pedro; Regueiro, Bibiana

    2015-10-27

    This work arises from the need to investigate the role of motivational variables in homework involvement and academic achievement of elementary school students. The aims of this study are twofold: identifying the different combinations of student academic goals and analyzing the differences in homework involvement and academic achievement. The sample was composed of 535 fourth-, fifth- and sixth-grade elementary school students, between the ages of 9 and 13 years old. Findings showed three groups with different motivational profiles: a group of students with high multiple goals, another group with a learning goal orientation and a third group defined by a low multiple goals profile. Focusing on the differences between groups, it was observed that the amount of time doing homework was not associated with any motivational profile. Nevertheless, the differences were statistically significant between the motivational groups in the amount of homework (F(2, 530) = 42.59; p < .001; ηp 2 = .138), in the management of time spent on homework (F(2, 530) = 33.08; p < .001; ηp 2 = .111), and in academic achievement (F(2, 530) = 33.99; p < .001; ηp 2 = .114). The effect size was large for the amount of homework performed and was also relatively large in the case of management of time and academic achievement.

  7. Teacher Actions That Encourage Students to Persist in Solving Challenging Mathematical Tasks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingram, Naomi; Linsell, Chris; Holmes, Marilyn; Livy, Sharyn; Sullivan, Peter

    2016-01-01

    As part of a project exploring the use of challenging mathematical tasks, data from New Zealand teachers and their students were analysed to explore teachers' actions that encouraged students to persist. Rather than rescuing the students when they needed help, the teachers' actions included arranging for and encouraging students to work…

  8. Field classes: key to involve and attract students to soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muggler, Cristine Carole; Cardoso, Irene Maria; da Silva Lopes, Angelica

    2015-04-01

    Soil genesis is a subject taught to students of Agrarian Sciences and Geography at the Federal University of Viçosa in Minas Gerais, Brazil. Each semester 200 to 250 students inscribe for it. It is organized as the first 60 hours course on soils for 1st and 2nd year's students. The course has a distinct pedagogical approach, which is based on Paulo Freire's education principles, known as socio constructivism. In such approach, learning environments and materials are prepared to stimulate dialogues and exchange of knowledge between students themselves, strengthening that their role is crucial to their own learning. During the course, students have different types of practical classes: indoors, in a class room or at the Earth Sciences museum and outdoors, in the field. In the class room they have the opportunity to handle materials -minerals, rocks, soils and maps-, follow demonstrations and perform small experiments. The classes given in the museum intend a broadening of the subjects approached in theoretical and practical classes. In the field classes the students are organized in small groups with the task to investigate soil formation by observation and description of geology, landscape, land use, soil expositions and some of the soil properties. Attracting students to soils involves looking at meanings and perceptions related to soils they bring with themselves and follow this up to sensitize and create awareness about their importance. With this aim, it is also included, as part of the evaluation, a final voluntary presentation that many of the students do. The presentation can be a song, a poem, a sketch or whatever they propose and create. Many of the presentations bring topics related to the new perception about soils they get during the semester and to ideas or questions raised in the field classes. A survey with the students showed that field classes are by far the preferred classes and they are considered more dynamic. Since students have less and less

  9. Parent Involvement Practices of High-Achieving Elementary Science Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waller, Samara Susan

    This study addressed a prevalence of low achievement in science courses in an urban school district in Georgia. National leaders and educators have identified the improvement of science proficiency as critical to the future of American industry. The purpose of this study was to examine parent involvement in this school district and its contribution to the academic achievement of successful science students. Social capital theory guided this study by suggesting that students achieve best when investments are made into their academic and social development. A collective case study qualitative research design was used to interview 9 parent participants at 2 elementary schools whose children scored in the exceeds category on the Science CRCT. The research questions focused on what these parents did at home to support their children's academic achievement. Data were collected using a semi-structured interview protocol and analyzed through the categorical aggregation of transcribed interviews. Key findings revealed that the parents invested time and resources in 3 practices: communicating high expectations, supporting and developing key skills, and communicating with teachers. These findings contribute to social change at both the local and community level by creating a starting point for teachers, principals, and district leaders to reexamine the value of parent input in the educational process, and by providing data to support the revision of current parent involvement policies. Possibilities for further study building upon the findings of this study may focus on student perceptions of their parents' parenting as it relates to their science achievement.

  10. [A classification of foods by the amount of masticatory action involved].

    PubMed

    Yanagisawa, Y; Tamura, A; Teramoto, Y; Akasaka, M

    1989-01-01

    With a view to classifying foods on the basis of the amount of masticatory action required, an attempt was made to correlate the properties of different foods as shown by mechanical measurements with the amount of masticatory action involved as determined by means of an electromyogram. We obtained the following results: 1) We found an extremely high correlation (r = 0.924) between the amount of masticatory action involved and the mechanical properties of our samples when these were expressed as values given by the formula: log (firmness x cohesiveness x strainess x 10) We refer to this parameter as toughness. 2) We were then able to estimate the amount of activity necessary in actual mastication of various foods from out toughness values and other values obtained through texturometer readings, a procedure which we carried out for 144 types of foods. 3) We were thus able to classify foods into ten levels according to masticatory action. We further feel justified to add masticatory action to our list of classification criteria as set out in an earlier report by the present author and others entitled "A classification of foods by physical properties."

  11. Neural mirroring and social interaction: Motor system involvement during action observation relates to early peer cooperation.

    PubMed

    Endedijk, H M; Meyer, M; Bekkering, H; Cillessen, A H N; Hunnius, S

    2017-01-07

    Whether we hand over objects to someone, play a team sport, or make music together, social interaction often involves interpersonal action coordination, both during instances of cooperation and entrainment. Neural mirroring is thought to play a crucial role in processing other's actions and is therefore considered important for social interaction. Still, to date, it is unknown whether interindividual differences in neural mirroring play a role in interpersonal coordination during different instances of social interaction. A relation between neural mirroring and interpersonal coordination has particularly relevant implications for early childhood, since successful early interaction with peers is predictive of a more favorable social development. We examined the relation between neural mirroring and children's interpersonal coordination during peer interaction using EEG and longitudinal behavioral data. Results showed that 4-year-old children with higher levels of motor system involvement during action observation (as indicated by lower beta-power) were more successful in early peer cooperation. This is the first evidence for a relation between motor system involvement during action observation and interpersonal coordination during other instances of social interaction. The findings suggest that interindividual differences in neural mirroring are related to interpersonal coordination and thus successful social interaction.

  12. The Differential Patterns of College Involvement between Transfer and Native Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Xueli; Wharton, Barbara I.

    2010-01-01

    Guided by a conceptual model of student involvement, this study examined the patterns of undergraduate student involvement in academic and social activities and student services, focusing on a comparison between transfer and native students at a large, Midwestern public research university. The results indicated that compared to native students,…

  13. The action of orexin B on passive avoidance learning. Involvement of neurotransmitters.

    PubMed

    Palotai, Miklós; Telegdy, Gyula; Ekwerike, Alphonsus; Jászberényi, Miklós

    2014-10-01

    The extensive projection of orexigenic neurons and the diffuse expression of orexin receptors suggest that endogenous orexins are involved in several physiological functions of the central nervous system, including learning and memory. Our previous study demonstrated that orexin A improves learning, consolidation and retrieval processes, which involves α- and β-adrenergic, cholinergic, dopaminergic, GABA-A-ergic, opiate and nitrergic neurotransmissions. However, we have little evidence about the action of orexin B on memory processes and the underlying neuromodulation. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the action of orexin B on passive avoidance learning and the involvement of neurotransmitters in this action in rats. Accordingly, rats were pretreated with the selective orexin 2 receptor (OX2R) antagonist, EMPA; the γ-aminobutyric acid subunit A (GABA-A) receptor antagonist, the bicuculline; a D2, D3, D4 dopamine receptor antagonist, haloperidol; the nonselective opioid receptor antagonist, naloxone; the non-specific nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor, nitro-l-arginine; the nonselective α-adrenergic receptor antagonist, phenoxybenzamine and the β-adrenergic receptor antagonist, propranolol. Our results demonstrate that orexin B can improve learning, consolidation of memory and retrieval. EMPA reversed completely the action of orexin B on memory consolidation. Bicuculline blocked fully; naloxone, nitro-l-arginine, phenoxybenzamine and propranolol attenuated the orexin B-induced memory consolidation, whereas haloperidol was ineffective. These data suggest that orexin B improves memory functions through OX2R and GABA-ergic, opiate, nitrergic, α- and β-adrenergic neurotransmissions are also involved in this action.

  14. Motor control hierarchy in joint action that involves bimanual force production

    PubMed Central

    Masumoto, Junya

    2015-01-01

    The concept of hierarchical motor control has been viewed as a means of progressively decreasing the number of variables manipulated by each higher control level. We tested the hypothesis that turning an individual bimanual force-production task into a joint (two-participant) force-production task would lead to positive correlation between forces produced by the two hands of the individual participant (symmetric strategy) to enable negative correlation between forces produced by two participants (complementary strategy). The present study consisted of individual and joint tasks that involved both unimanual and bimanual conditions. In the joint task, 10 pairs of participants produced periodic isometric forces, such that the sum of forces that they produced matched a target force cycling between 5% and 10% of maximum voluntary contraction at 1 Hz. In the individual task, individuals attempted to match the same target force. In the joint bimanual condition, the two hands of each participant adopted a symmetric strategy of force, whereas the two participants adopted a complementary strategy of force, highlighting that the bimanual action behaved as a low level of a hierarchy, whereas the joint action behaved as an upper level. The complementary force production was greater interpersonally than intrapersonally. However, whereas the coherence was highest at 1 Hz in all conditions, the frequency synchrony was stronger intrapersonally than interpersonally. Moreover, whereas the bimanual action exhibited a smaller error and variability of force than the unimanual action, the joint action exhibited a less-variable interval and force than the individual action. PMID:25904710

  15. Motor control hierarchy in joint action that involves bimanual force production.

    PubMed

    Masumoto, Junya; Inui, Nobuyuki

    2015-06-01

    The concept of hierarchical motor control has been viewed as a means of progressively decreasing the number of variables manipulated by each higher control level. We tested the hypothesis that turning an individual bimanual force-production task into a joint (two-participant) force-production task would lead to positive correlation between forces produced by the two hands of the individual participant (symmetric strategy) to enable negative correlation between forces produced by two participants (complementary strategy). The present study consisted of individual and joint tasks that involved both unimanual and bimanual conditions. In the joint task, 10 pairs of participants produced periodic isometric forces, such that the sum of forces that they produced matched a target force cycling between 5% and 10% of maximum voluntary contraction at 1 Hz. In the individual task, individuals attempted to match the same target force. In the joint bimanual condition, the two hands of each participant adopted a symmetric strategy of force, whereas the two participants adopted a complementary strategy of force, highlighting that the bimanual action behaved as a low level of a hierarchy, whereas the joint action behaved as an upper level. The complementary force production was greater interpersonally than intrapersonally. However, whereas the coherence was highest at 1 Hz in all conditions, the frequency synchrony was stronger intrapersonally than interpersonally. Moreover, whereas the bimanual action exhibited a smaller error and variability of force than the unimanual action, the joint action exhibited a less-variable interval and force than the individual action.

  16. Collaborative Action Research Approach Promoting Professional Development for Teachers of Students with Visual Impairment in Assistive Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Argyropoulos, Vassilios; Nikolaraizi, Magda; Tsiakali, Thomai; Kountrias, Polychronis; Koutsogiorgou, Sofia-Marina; Martos, Aineias

    2014-01-01

    This paper highlights the framework and discusses the results of an action research project which aimed to facilitate the adoption of assistive technology devices and specialized software by teachers of students with visual impairment via a digital educational game, developed specifically for this project. The persons involved in this…

  17. Involvement of the globus pallidus in behavioral goal determination and action specification.

    PubMed

    Arimura, Nariko; Nakayama, Yoshihisa; Yamagata, Tomoko; Tanji, Jun; Hoshi, Eiji

    2013-08-21

    Multiple loop circuits interconnect the basal ganglia and the frontal cortex, and each part of the cortico-basal ganglia loops plays an essential role in neuronal computational processes underlying motor behavior. To gain deeper insight into specific functions played by each component of the loops, we compared response properties of neurons in the globus pallidus (GP) with those in the dorsal premotor cortex (PMd) and the ventrolateral and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (vlPFC and dlPFC) while monkeys performed a behavioral task designed to include separate processes for behavioral goal determination and action selection. Initially, visual signals instructed an abstract behavioral goal, and seconds later, a choice cue to select an action was presented. When the instruction cue appeared, GP neurons started to reflect visual features as early as vlPFC neurons. Subsequently, GP neurons began to reflect goals informed by the visual signals no later than neurons in the PMd, vlPFC, and dlPFC, indicating that the GP is involved in the early determination of behavioral goals. In contrast, action specification occurred later in the GP than in the cortical areas, and the GP was not as involved in the process by which a behavioral goal was transformed into an action. Furthermore, the length of time representing behavioral goal and action was shorter in the GP than in the PMd and dlPFC, indicating that the GP may play an important role in detecting individual behavioral events. These observations elucidate the involvement of the GP in goal-directed behavior.

  18. Using Social Justice Vignettes to Prepare Students for Social Action Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burrell Storms, Stephanie

    2014-01-01

    One of the learning goals for social justice education courses is to prepare students for social action engagement. Teaching students about issues related to social justice is complex. Prior studies have found a positive relationship between student enrollment in social justice education courses and action-oriented outcomes. While these findings…

  19. Involving service users in the classroom with social work students.

    PubMed

    Mackay, Rob; Millar, Jeremy

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore and discuss issues related to the requirement by the Scottish Social Services Council (SSSC) and the Scottish Government that service users and carers are partners and stakeholders in social work education. This requirement is one of several that are used by the SSSC in the approval of Scottish Universities to deliver social work courses. This paper explains the developmental process of involving service users and carers as partners in the planning of social work courses at the Robert Gordon University (RGU), Aberdeen. This is illustrated with reference to a group made up of young people ('The Voice of Reason') and also in relation to a group made up of adult service users (the Service User Panel). This short paper suggests there are benefits for student learning if we invite service users and carers to become partners in the teaching/learning process. There are also benefits for teaching staff and indeed for the University itself as a public institution on the basis that an ongoing relationship allows for good partnership working. This enables the University and its staff to be viewed positively and from that vantage point further developments are more likely. At the same time this paper has discussed the need to avoid tokenistic moves through ensuring a sound organisational commitment is made to providing effective support and putting in place enabling structures and processes. Lastly it discusses the broader implications for partnership working in relation to the education and training of students for professional practice. The suggestion is made that such a teaching and learning approach equips the students with good partnership skills and attitudes that will help to inform their practice post-qualification. Interest is expressed in the experiences of other professions who have adopted similar approaches to incorporating service users into students' learning experiences.

  20. A longitudinal online interprofessional education experience involving family nurse practitioner students and pharmacy students.

    PubMed

    Collins, Andrea; Broeseker, Amy; Cunningham, Jill; Cortes, Cyndi; Beall, Jennifer; Bigham, Amy; Chang, Jongwha

    2017-03-01

    Interprofessional education (IPE) continues to gain traction worldwide. Challenges integrating IPE into health profession programmes include finding convenient times, meeting spaces, and level-appropriate assignments for each profession. This article describes the implementation of a 21-month prospective cohort study pilot programme for the Master of Science in nursing family nurse practitioner (FNP) and doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) students at a private university in the United States. This IPE experience utilised a blended approach for the learning activities; these students had initial and final sessions where they met face-to-face, with asynchronous online activities between these two sessions. The online assignments, discussions, and quizzes during the pilot programme involved topics such as antimicrobial stewardship, hormone replacement therapy, human papilloma virus vaccination, prenatal counselling, emergency contraception, and effects of the Affordable Care Act on practice. The results suggested that the FNP students held more favourable attitudes about online IPE and that the PharmD students reported having a clearer understanding of their own roles and those of the other participating healthcare students. However, the students also reported wanting more face-to-face interaction during their online IPE experience. Implications from this study suggest that effective online IPE can be supported by ensuring educational parity between students regarding the various topics discussed and a consistent approach of the required involvement for all student groups is needed. In addition, given the students desire for more face-to-face interaction, it may be beneficial to offer online IPE activities for a shorter time period. It is anticipated that this study may inform other programmes that are exploring innovative approaches to provide IPE to promote effective collaboration in patient care.

  1. Undergraduate Research and Metropolitan Commuter University Student Involvement: Exploring the Narratives of Five Female Undergraduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwong Caputo, Jolina Jade

    2013-01-01

    This study sought to explore the lived experiences of five female, first-generation, low-income students who attend a metropolitan commuter university, and investigate how a structured undergraduate research experience exerts influence on the women's academic and social involvement. A qualitative case study with a narrative and grounded…

  2. Ca2+ involvement in the action potential generation of myenteric neurones in the rat oesophagus.

    PubMed

    De Laet, A; Cornelissen, W; Adriaensen, D; Van Bogaert, P-P; Scheuermann, D W; Timmermans, J-P

    2002-04-01

    Intracellular recordings were used to study the physiological behaviour of rat oesophageal myenteric neurones, which are embedded in striated muscle. Injection of depolarizing pulses evoked action potentials with a clear 'shoulder' in all neurones. This shoulder disappeared under low Ca2+/high Mg2+ conditions. Tetrodotoxin (TTX; 1 micromol L-1) did not impede spike firing, whereas under combined TTX and low Ca2+/high Mg2+ conditions the action potentials were completely abolished, indicating that TTX- resistant action potentials are mediated by a Ca2+ current. Further experiments with omega-conotoxin GVIA (100 nmol L-1) revealed that these Ca2+ currents enter the cell via N-type voltage-activated Ca2+ channels (see also accompanying paper). Tetraethylammonium (10 mmol L-1) caused broadening of the action potentials, which probably resulted from prolonged Ca2+ influx due to blockade of the delayed rectifier K+ channel. Although Ca2+ appears to be involved in the spike generation of all rat oesophageal myenteric neurones, only a minority (14%) shows a slow afterhyperpolarization. Thus, no strict correlation exists between the presence of a shoulder and a slow afterhyperpolarization. Furthermore, morphological identification of 25 of the impaled neurones revealed that there was no strict correlation between morphology and electrophysiological behaviour. Consequently, rat oesophageal myenteric neurones appear to differ in several aspects from myenteric neurones in smooth muscle regions of the gastrointestinal tract.

  3. Trypanocidal Action of (−)-Elatol Involves an Oxidative Stress Triggered by Mitochondria Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Desoti, Vânia Cristina; Lazarin-Bidóia, Danielle; Sudatti, Daniela Bueno; Pereira, Renato Crespo; Alonso, Antonio; Ueda-Nakamura, Tania; Dias Filho, Benedito Prado; Nakamura, Celso Vataru; Silva, Sueli de Oliveira

    2012-01-01

    Natural compounds have shown good potential for the discovery of new chemotherapeutics for the treatment of Chagas’ disease. Recently, our group reported the effective trypanocidal activity of (−)-elatol, extracted from the red macroalgae Laurencia dendroidea present in the Brazilian coast against Trypanosoma cruzi. However, the mechanism of action of this compound has remained unclear. There are only hypotheses concerning its action on mitochondrial function. Here, we further investigated the mechanisms of action of (−)-elatol on trypomastigotes of T. cruzi. For this, we evaluated some biochemical alterations in trypomastigotes treated with (−)-elatol. Our results show that (−)-elatol induced depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane, an increase in the formation of mitochondrial superoxide anion and loss of cell membrane and DNA integrity. Additionally, (−)-elatol induced formation of autophagic vacuoles and a decrease in cell volume. All together, these results suggest that the trypanocidal action of (−)-elatol involves multiple events and mitochondria might be the initial target organelle. Our hypothesis is that the mitochondrial dysfunction leads to an increase of ROS production through the electron transport chain, which affects cell membrane and DNA integrity leading to different types of parasite death. PMID:23015766

  4. Using Social Networking Sites for Teaching and Learning: Students' Involvement in and Acceptance of Facebook® as a Course Management System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albayrak, Duygu; Yildirim, Zahide

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates students' involvement in Facebook® as a course management system (CMS), Facebook acceptance, and the relationships between the two. The study used Facebook as a CMS in two freshman courses and employed mixed method as part of an action-research approach. Forty-two students participated in the study, and 12 of those students…

  5. Student Participation and Parental Involvement in Relation to Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niia, Anna; Almqvist, Lena; Brunnberg, Elinor; Granlund, Mats

    2015-01-01

    This study shows that students, teachers, and parents in Swedish schools ascribe differing meanings and significance to students' participation in school in relation to academic achievement. Students see participation as mainly related to social interaction and not academic achievement, whilst teachers view students' participation as more closely…

  6. Student Involvement as a Vehicle for Empowerment: A Case Study of the Student Platform for Engineering Education Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delaine, David A.; Seif-Naraghi, Sonya B.; Al-Haque, Shahed; Wojewoda, Nicolo; Meninato, Yvonne; DeBoer, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the mission, structure and outputs of one organisation, the Student Platform for Engineering Education Development (SPEED), as a case study for how student-led organisations can use student involvement to promote and sustain student self-efficacy in an academic field. SPEED attracts young people to engineering through student…

  7. Students' Concepts- and Theorems-in-Action on a Novel Task about Similarity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeJarnette, Anna Fricano; Walczak, Marissa; González, Gloriana

    2014-01-01

    Similarity is a fundamental concept in the middle grades. In this study, we applied Vergnaud's theory of conceptual fields to answer the following questions: What concepts-in-action and theorems-in-action about similarity surfaced when students worked in a novel task that required them to enlarge a puzzle piece? How did students use geometric…

  8. Australian Secondary Students' Views about Global Warming: Beliefs about Actions, and Willingness to Act

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyes, Edward; Skamp, Keith; Stanisstreet, Martin

    2009-01-01

    A 44-item questionnaire was constructed to determine secondary students' views about how useful various specific actions might be at reducing global warming, their willingness to undertake the various actions, and the extent to which these two might be linked. Responses (n = 500) were obtained from students in years 7 to 10 in three schools in…

  9. Action Research and the Student Teacher: A Framework for Problem-Solving and Reflective Thinking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zelazek, John R.; Lamson, Sharon

    This paper describes a course taken by elementary student teachers at Central Missouri State University, with particular emphasis on the action research projects that are a part of the course requirements. The intent of the course and the action research is to foster in the student teachers reflective decision making in their own classrooms.…

  10. Teaching Students to Attain Annual Transition Goals Using the Take Action Goal Attainment Lessons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Jodie D.; Martin, James E.; Osmani, Kimberly J.

    2014-01-01

    This study used the Take Action goal attainment lesson package and assistive technology to teach nine high school students with mild to moderate disabilities to attain annual transition goals. The Take Action lessons increased students' goal attainment knowledge, and this knowledge generalized to improved Plan Organizers, and slightly increased…

  11. The Meaning and Organization of Physical Education Teachers' Actions during Conflict with Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flavier, Eric; Bertone, Stefano; Hauw, Denis; Durand, Marc

    2002-01-01

    Used course-of-action theory to identify typical organization of teachers' actions when in conflict with students. Middle school physical educators were interviewed and filmed during lessons. Overall, teacher-student conflicts were infrequent. When conflict occurred, teacher attempts at resolution were under strong time pressure, leading to risk…

  12. Omani Students' Views about Global Warming: Beliefs about Actions and Willingness to Act

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ambusaidi, Abdullah; Boyes, Edward; Stanisstreet, Martin; Taylor, Neil

    2012-01-01

    A 44-item questionnaire was designed to determine students' views about how useful various "specific" actions might be in helping to reduce global warming, their willingness to undertake these various actions and the extent to which these two might be related. The instrument was administered to students in Grades 6 to 12 (N = 1532) from…

  13. Student Involvement in the "Systems Approach to Biology."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smiley, Curtis L.; And Others

    1973-01-01

    Points out findings that students are motivated quite highly if a systems approach is used for instruction. Data presented reveal overall increased participation by students in instructional program. (PS)

  14. The action of kisspeptin-13 on passive avoidance learning in mice. Involvement of transmitters.

    PubMed

    Telegdy, Gyula; Adamik, Ágnes

    2013-04-15

    Kisspeptins are G protein-coupled receptor ligands originally identified as human metastasis suppressor gene products that have the ability to suppress melanoma and breast cancer metastasis and recently found to play an important role in initiating the secretion of gonadotropin-releasing hormone at puberty. Kisspeptin-13 is an endogenous isoform that consists of 13 amino acids. The action of kisspeptin in the regulation of gonadal function has been widely studied, but little is known as concerns its function in limbic brain structures. In the brain, the gene is transcribed within the hippocampal dentate gyrus. This paper reports on a study the effects of kisspeptin-13 on passive avoidance learning and the involvement of the adrenergic, serotonergic, cholinergic, dopaminergic and GABA-A-ergic, opiate receptors and nitric oxide in its action in mice. Mice were pretreated with a nonselective α-adrenergic receptor antagonist, phenoxybenzamine, an α2-adrenergic receptor antagonist, yohimbine, a β-adrenergic receptor antagonist, propranolol, a mixed 5-HT1/5-HT2 serotonergic receptor antagonist, methysergide, a nonselective 5-HT2 serotonergic receptor antagonist, cyproheptadine, a nonselective muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist, atropine, D2, D3, D4 dopamine receptor antagonist, haloperidol, a γ-aminobutyric acid subunit A (GABAA) receptor antagonist, bicuculline, naloxone, a nonselective opioid receptor antagonist and nitro-l-arginine, a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor. Kisspeptin-13 facilitated learning and memory consolidation in a passive avoidance paradigm. Phenoxybenzamine, yohimbine, propranolol, methysergide, cyproheptadine, atropine, bicuculline and nitro-l-arginine prevented the action of kisspeptin-13 on passive avoidance learning, but haloperidol and naloxone did not block the effects of kisspeptin-13. The results demonstrated that the action of kisspeptin-13 on the facilitation of passive avoidance learning and memory consolidation is mediated

  15. Enhancing Fourth Grade Students' Writing Achievement through Purposeful Experiential Learning: An Action Research Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McManus, Michael S.; Thiamwong, Ladda

    2015-01-01

    This study focuses on the effects of involving fourth grade students in an experiential learning task that improves the school and requires the students to call on community agency, area business, and high school student support. Data related to students' learning were collected by using evaluative writing surveys, student and parent conferences,…

  16. Enhancing Student Outcomes through Mentoring, Peer Counselling and Parental Involvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sottie, Cynthia Akorfa; Dubus, Nicole; Sossou, Marie-Antoinette

    2013-01-01

    The government of Ghana has designed various initiatives to achieve the Millennium Development Goals on education and the Education for All goals. Despite these initiatives, student outcomes continue to be poorer than desired. Although access to education has improved, student dropout remains a problem and student scores on achievement tests…

  17. Does Involvement Really Matter? Indicators of College Student Success and Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webber, Karen L.; Krylow, Rebecca Bauer; Zhang, Qin

    2013-01-01

    Theories of involvement and quality of effort posit that student engagement in academic activities is critical to success. College officials invest substantial resources in activities and facilities to encourage student involvement, yet some reports find that many students study few hours per week and commit little time to academic activities. A…

  18. The Estimated Effects of College Student Involvement on Psychological Well-Being

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilgo, Cindy A.; Mollet, Amanda L.; Pascarella, Ernest T.

    2016-01-01

    This brief examines student psychological well-being, an important issue of growing interest in U.S. higher education. Extensive research focused on student involvement in college suggested that quality involvement leads to higher levels of student learning and development. This study for psychological well-being was measured using the Ryff Scales…

  19. Student involvement and self-authorship among African American undergraduate students at a STEM-focused university

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCoy, Netreia Z. McNulty

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the association between student involvement and self-authorship among African American undergraduate students enrolled at a medium-sized, North Texas STEM-focused university. Self-identified African American undergraduate students at the university completed an online, researcher-developed survey focused on co-curricular involvement activities, degree of involvement in those activities, and perceived self-authorship indicators. From the completed survey pool (N = 49), 10 females and 5 males participated in follow-up focus group sessions. The survey data analysis was limited to descriptive statistics of student involvement and demographic data. Survey results showed that African American undergraduate students at the university were actively involved in co-curricular activities and generally satisfied with their involvement experiences. The focus groups provided a more in-depth picture of the involvement experiences showing that students believed that their commitment to cocurricular activities contributed significantly to their interpersonal and intrapersonal growth--- characteristics of self-authorship. The survey and qualitative data combined suggested a positive association between the involvement of African American undergraduate students in co-curricular activities at the university and the development of self-authorship characteristics in those students. Findings from this study support the practice of intentional outreach to African American undergraduate students in order to promote their active involvement in campus activities and events.

  20. A Phenomenological Study of Parental Involvement and the Undergraduate College Student Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrison, David Michael

    2013-01-01

    Parents highly involved in the academic lives of their college-going children have become increasingly common and yet the effect of such involvement on students is poorly understood by student services administrators and faculty. The purpose of this study was to better define the phenomenon of parental involvement in college through an…

  1. The Influence of Psychosocial Factors on Bullying Involvement of Students with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Chad A.; Forber-Pratt, Anjali J.; Espelage, Dorothy L.; Aragon, Steven R.

    2013-01-01

    The involvement of students with disabilities within the bullying dynamic has been recognized as a pressing issue within the nation's schools. Unfortunately, few studies have examined the psychosocial outcomes related to the bullying involvement of students with disabilities. However, involvement in bullying has been linked to negative short-…

  2. The Role of Perceived Parental Over-Involvement in Student Test Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shadach, Eran; Ganor-Miller, Orit

    2013-01-01

    The effects of perceived parental over-involvement on students' level of test anxiety were examined in two studies. In study 1, parental over-involvement scale was developed. The sample comprised 105 male and female undergraduate college students between the ages of 21 and 26. The scale contained two aspects of parental over-involvement: parental…

  3. The effectiveness of Family Science and Technology Workshops on parental involvement, student achievement, and student curiosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosten, Lora Bechard

    The literature suggests that parental involvement in schools results in positive changes in students and that schools need to provide opportunities for parents to share in the learning process. Workshops are an effective method of engaging parents in the education of their children. This dissertation studies the effects of voluntary Family Science and Technology Workshops on elementary children's science interest and achievement, as well as on parents' collaboration in their child's education. The study involved 35 second and third-grade students and their parents who volunteered to participate. The parental volunteers were randomly assigned to either the control group (children attending the workshops without a parent) or the treatment group (children attending the workshops with a parent). The study was conducted in the Fall of 1995 over a four-week period. The Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) and Kruskal-Wallis tests were used to determine the effects of the workshops on children's science achievement and science curiosity, as well as on parents' involvement with their child's education. The study revealed that there was no significant statistical difference at the.05 level between the treatment/control groups in children's science achievement or science curiosity, or in parent's involvement with their children's education. However, the study did focus parental attention on effective education and points the way to more extensive research in this critical learning area. This dual study, that is, the effects of teaching basic technology to young students with the support of their parents, reflects the focus of the Salve Regina University Ph.D. program in which technology is examined in its effects on humans. In essence, this program investigates what it means to be human in an age of advanced technology.

  4. 7 CFR 799.10 - Criteria and identification of FSA actions as to degree of involvement under the NEPA process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... § 799.10 Criteria and identification of FSA actions as to degree of involvement under the NEPA process... an environmental evaluation not to significantly affect the quality of the human environment. (c) FSA... 7 Agriculture 7 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Criteria and identification of FSA actions as...

  5. Preparing Students for Social Action in a Social Justice Education Course: What Works?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Storms, Stephanie Burrell

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore students' perceptions of how the curriculum and teaching strategies in a social justice education course prepared them for social action engagement. Past studies using a similar approach to teaching about social justice issues did not include student interviews. Students' perspectives can shed light on how…

  6. Using Action Research to Teach Students to Manage Team Learning and Improve Teamwork Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott-Ladd, Brenda; Chan, Christopher C. A.

    2008-01-01

    This article reports on a study investigating strategies that students can use to develop skills in managing team learning. Two groups of second-year management students participated in a semester-long action research project over two semesters. The students were educated on team development, team processes and conflict management and how to…

  7. An Action Research Study on the Effect of Interactive Technology and Active Learning on Student Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bear, Teresa J.

    2013-01-01

    This quantitative action science research study utilized a causal-comparative experimental research design in order to determine if the use of student response systems (clickers), as an active learning strategy in a community college course, improved student performance in the course. Students in the experimental group (n = 26) used clickers to…

  8. Students as Researchers: A Framework for Using Action Research Principles to Improve Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Linda P.

    2009-01-01

    Many instructors teach courses that prepare students to do research individually or in teams. These instructors also supervise their students' research projects. Continuous and systematic use of action research principles can help instructors prepare for problems that may develop when students encounter unfamiliar issues at research sites due to…

  9. Neuronal adaptation involves rapid expansion of the action potential initiation site

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Ricardo S.; Henneberger, Christian; Padmashri, Ragunathan; Anders, Stefanie; Jensen, Thomas P.; Rusakov, Dmitri A.

    2014-01-01

    Action potential (AP) generation is the key to information-processing in the brain. Although APs are normally initiated in the axonal initial segment, developmental adaptation or prolonged network activity may alter the initiation site geometry thus affecting cell excitability. Here we find that hippocampal dentate granule cells adapt their spiking threshold to the kinetics of the ongoing dendrosomatic excitatory input by expanding the AP-initiation area away from the soma while also decelerating local axonal spikes. Dual-patch soma–axon recordings combined with axonal Na+ and Ca2+ imaging and biophysical modelling show that the underlying mechanism involves distance-dependent inactivation of axonal Na+ channels due to somatic depolarization propagating into the axon. Thus, the ensuing changes in the AP-initiation zone and local AP propagation could provide activity-dependent control of cell excitability and spiking on a relatively rapid timescale. PMID:24851940

  10. Complying with Land Disposal Restrictions (LDR) for CERCLA remedial actions involving contaminated soil and debris

    SciTech Connect

    Bascietto, J.

    1991-01-01

    CERCLA Sect. 121(e) requires that remedial actions must comply with at least the minimum standards of all applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements'' (ARARs) of federal and state laws. EPA has determined that RCRA land disposal restrictions may be ARAR for certain CERCLA remedial actions involving soil and debris. This means that soil and debris contaminated with prohibited or restricted wastes cannot be land disposed if (1) these wastes have not attained the treatment standards set by EPA for a specified waste or (2) have been the subject of a case-by-case extension, national capacity variance, or successful no migration'' petition. RCRA LDR treatment standards are based on Best Demonstrated Available Technology'' (BDAT), not on health-based concentrations. Because the treatment of the soil and debris matrix presents technological difficulties not yet addressed by EPA (BDAT standards are generally set for industrial process wastes), compliance options such as obtaining a Treatability Variance, are available and will generally be necessary for soil and debris wastes. In the recently promulgated revisions to the National Contingency Plan (NCP) for CERCLA implementation, EPA provides important information for CERCLA project managers regarding LDR compliance, particularly for obtaining a treatability variance for land disposal of contaminated soil and debris.

  11. Implications of State Dental Board Disciplinary Actions for Teaching Dental Students About Emotional Intelligence.

    PubMed

    Munk, Lyle Kris

    2016-01-01

    The primary emphasis in dental education is on developing students' cognitive intelligence (thinking) and technical intelligence (doing), while emotional intelligence (being) receives less emphasis. The aim of this study was to explore a potential consequence of the paucity of emotional intelligence education by determining the level of emotional intelligence-related (EI-R) infractions in state dental board disciplinary actions and characterizing the types of those infractions. For this study, 1,100 disciplinary action reports from 21 state dental boards were reviewed, and disciplinary infractions were classified as cognitive intelligence-related (CI-R) infractions, technical intelligence-related (TI-R) infractions, and EI-R infractions. EI-R infractions were then subcategorized into emotional intelligence clusters and competencies using the Emotional and Social Competency Inventory (ESCI). The results showed that 56.6% of the infractions were EI-R. When the EI-R infractions were subcategorized, the four competencies most frequently violated involved transparency, teamwork and collaboration, organizational awareness, and accurate self-assessment. Understanding the frequency and nature of EI-R infractions may promote awareness of the need for increased attention to principles of emotional intelligence in dental education and may encourage integration of those principles across dental curricula to help students understand the impact of emotional intelligence on their future well-being and livelihood.

  12. Communicating Research Through Student Involvement in Phenological Investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparrow, E. B.; Kopplin, M.; Gazal, R. M.; Robin, J. H.; Boger, R. A.

    2011-12-01

    Phenology plays a key role in the environment and ecosystem. Primary and secondary students around the world have been collecting vegetation phenology data and contributing to ongoing scientific investigations. They have increased research capacity by increasing spatial coverage of ground observations that can be useful for validation of remotely sensed data. The green-up and green-down phenology measurement protocols developed at the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF) as part of the Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment (GLOBE) program, have been used in more than 250 schools in over 20 countries. In addition to contributing their data, students have conducted their own investigations and presented them at science fairs and symposiums, and international conferences. An elementary school student in Alaska conducted a comprehensive study on the green-down rates of native and introduced trees and shrubs. Her project earned her a one-year college scholarship at UAF. Students from the Model Secondary School for the Deaf in Washington, D. C. and from the Indiana School for the Deaf collaborated on a comparative green-up study, and were chosen to present at an international conference where students from more than 20 countries participated. Similarly, students in Thailand presented at national conferences, their studies such as "The Relationship between Environmental Conditions and Green-down of Teak Trees (Tectona grandis L.)" at Roong Aroon School, Bangkok and "The Comparison of Budburst and Green-up of Leab Trees (Ficus infectoria Roxb.) at Rob Wiang and Mae Khao Tom Sub-district in Chiang Rai Province". Some challenges in engaging students in phenological studies include the mismatch in timing of the start and end of the plant growing season with that of the school year in northern latitudes and the need for scientists and teachers to work with students to ensure accurate measurements. However these are outweighed by benefits to the scientists

  13. Simulating City Councils: Increasing Student Awareness and Involvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rinfret, Sara R.

    2012-01-01

    As state capitals and city halls influence our daily lives, how can students become active participants in the affairs of their communities (Saffell and Basehart 2009)? For students to explore this question and local policy making in general, I developed a city council simulation for a state and local government course. This article describes the…

  14. Beyond Involvement: Promoting Student Ownership of Learning in Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Paula E.; Graham-Day, Kristall J.; Ressa, Virginia A.; Peters, Mary T.; Konrad, Moira

    2014-01-01

    With many states adopting new standards and evaluation systems, teachers must adopt effective instructional strategies and assessment methods aligned to the rigor of new standards and assessments. One way to improve student achievement is through supporting student ownership of learning, a core component of formative instructional practices.…

  15. Newspapers in Science Education: A Study Involving Sixth Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lai, Ching-San; Wang, Yun-Fei

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the learning performance of sixth grade elementary school students using newspapers in science teaching. A quasi-experimental design with a single group was used in this study. Thirty-three sixth grade elementary school students participated in this study. The research instruments consisted of three…

  16. Opinions of High School Students Involved in Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karaman, Ömer; Tomakin, Hasan; Kiliç, Ismet; Yilmaz, Erkan

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this research is to assess the opinions of students in a variety of high schools at different class levels who received disciplinary punishment for violence. The research comprised 35 boys and 10 girls, for a total of 45 students. The data for the research were obtained with semi-structured interviews. The results show that the students…

  17. Enhancing Student Involvement and Comprehension through Group and Class Discussions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finkel, Deborah

    1999-01-01

    Incorporated group and class discussions in two psychology courses to promote critical thinking and interaction among students. Discussion, writing of position papers, and readings from "Opposing Viewpoints" texts were used. Quantitative and qualitative data from student evaluations suggested that the discussions improved interaction, engaged them…

  18. Portfolio Assessments: Involving Students in Their Journey to Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baron, Rosemary W.; Johnson, C. Jill; Acor, Shelly

    1998-01-01

    Describes use of behavioral descriptors called Performance Results to guide instruction, combined with implementation of portfolio assessment, for middle level students in Utah's Salt Lake City School District. Discusses stumbling blocks to using the Performance Results for teachers and students, positive outcomes from the process, and future…

  19. Community Involvement of High School Students: A Grounded Theory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Storm, Karin Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    This qualitative, grounded theory study focused on the perspectives of high school seniors, college freshmen, and working young adults in Orange County, California, to create a useful and practical theory about high school students' civic participation as it relates to students' enrollment in postsecondary education. Data collection consisted of…

  20. One mechanism of glucocorticoid action in asthma may involve the inhibition of IL-25 expression

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Wei; Lu, Chao; Zhang, Chengming; Zhang, Chenghao

    2017-01-01

    While the mechanism of action of classic cytokines in asthma has received increased attention from researchers, certain non-classical cytokines, such as IL-25, also participate in this mechanism. The present study was performed to investigate the changes in IL-25 (IL-17E) mRNA and protein in bronchial asthma and to further characterize the mechanism underlying the action of glucocorticoids in asthma. A total of 96 specific pathogen-free BALB/c male mice were randomly divided into three normal groups (after the first allergization, after the second allergization and after excitation), three asthma groups (with the same three subgroups), a dexamethasone group and a budesonide group (n=12/group). An asthma model was established via the ovalbumin-sensitized excitation method. Mice in the dexamethasone group received intraperitoneal injections of dexamethasone 1 h prior to each excitation, the budesonide group received a budesonide suspension via inhalation 2 h before and after each provocation, and the normal group was sensitized and challenged with isotonic saline. IL-25 protein expression levels in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were measured by ELISA, and the relative IL-25 mRNA content in lung tissue was determined by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Compared with the normal groups, both the protein and mRNA levels of IL-25 were significantly increased (P<0.05) in the asthma groups. Dexamethasone and budesonide groups exhibited significant protein and mRNA reductions in IL-25, as compared with the asthma group after excitation (P<0.05), whereas these two groups significantly increased levels compared with the normal group after excitation (P<0.05). No significant differences in IL-25 mRNA expression levels were detected in the dexamethasone and budesonide groups when compared with the normal group after excitation. Therefore, we conclude that IL-25 is involved throughout the process of inflammation and inflammatory immune pathogenesis

  1. Parental Involvement in the Habilitation Process Following Children's Cochlear Implantation: An Action Theory Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaidman-Zait, Anat; Young, Richard A.

    2008-01-01

    Action theory and the qualitative action-project method are used in this study to address and illustrate the complexity of parenting children who have received cochlear implants (CIs) as well as the intentionality of parents engaged in that process. "Action" refers to individual and joint goal-directed and intentional behaviors. Action theory has…

  2. Teaching Students to Dig Deeper: The Common Core in Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Ben

    2013-01-01

    This important new book identifies the skills and qualities students need, based on the Common Core State Standards, to be "really" ready for college and careers. Go beyond content knowledge...the deep thinking and learning skills detailed in this book will equip students for success! Prepare your students for their futures by helping them become:…

  3. Reducing Student Loan Defaults: A Plan for Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farrell, Mary

    The federal Guaranteed Student Loan programs provide low-interest, long-term loans to students with demonstrated financial need to help them pay for their postsecondary education. The number of loan defaults and the associated federal costs are increasing; this handbook is an effort to protect students, increase accountability, and reduce default…

  4. The relationship between promotions committees' identification of problem medical students and subsequent state medical board actions.

    PubMed

    Santen, Sally A; Petrusa, Emil; Gruppen, Larry D

    2015-05-01

    Studies have found unprofessional behavior in medical school was associated with disciplinary action by state medical boards. For medical schools, promotions committees are responsible for identifying which students do not demonstrate academic performance and professional behavior acceptable for promotion and graduation. The objective of this study was to determine if student identification by promotions committees during medical school was associated with disciplinary actions by state medical boards later in practice. We reviewed 20 years of promotions committees' records from a single institution and noted students identified by promotions committees for performance or behavioral issues. These were compared with disciplinary action reports from the Federation of State Medical Boards (FSMB) for graduates. Over the two decades, 2,131 students matriculated and 2,078 of these graduated. The promotions committees identified 140 students for poor academic performance or behavioral problems (140/2,078, 6.7 %). Of these, 108 students graduated. FSMB records showed 29 of the 2,078 graduates had sanctions by state boards (29/2,078, 1.4 %). Only four students that had actions by state medical boards were among the 108 graduated students identified by medical school promotions committees (4/108, 3.7 %). Of the students not identified by promotions committees, 25 eventually had disciplinary actions (25/1,970, 1.3 %). The odds of having state medical board action if identified by promotions committees was 3.0 (CI 1.02-8.8, p < 0.05). In conclusion, identification of students by medical school promotions committees was later associated with state medical board actions. However, most graduates with state medical board actions were not identified by medical school promotions committees.

  5. Student Perceptions of School Efforts to Facilitate Student Involvement, School Commitment, Self-Determination, and High School Graduation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavendish, Wendy

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between student perceptions of school efforts to facilitate student involvement, school commitment, self-determination skills, and on track indicators for graduation in 10th grade and actual graduation outcomes two years later. The participants were 154 primarily minority students in a large, urban school…

  6. Involvement of the Motor System in Comprehension of Non-Literal Action Language: A Meta-Analysis Study.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie; Shu, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Although numerous studies have shown that the sensory-motor system is involved in semantic processing of language stimuli, it is still unclear whether comprehension of abstract concepts is embodied, and whether the involvement of the sensory-motor system is context-dependent. Investigation of how the motor system is activated during comprehension of non-literal action languages can help address these issues. So far several studies have reported brain activations during non-literal action language comprehension, but the findings are highly inconsistent because of different types of non-literal action language stimuli. To clarify how the motor system is involved in comprehension of different types of non-literal languages, the current study conducted quantitative meta-analyses on fMRI findings about comprehension of sentences describing fictive motions, metaphoric actions, and idiomatic actions. Results showed that fictive motion sentences elicited activation in the right parahippocampal gyrus, an area important for spatial processing. For metaphoric actions, the left precentral gyrus (BA 6) was strongly activated, suggesting a link between metaphoric and literal meanings. For idiomatic actions, activity was found in the left inferior frontal gyrus (BA 44/45), highlighting semantic selection and inhibition. No premotor or motor activity was found in idiom condition. These results together suggest that the involvement of the sensory-motor system in abstract concepts processing is flexible, depending on semantic features of the language stimuli and links between abstract and literal meanings.

  7. Perceptions of parental involvement and support as predictors of college students' persistence in a science curriculum.

    PubMed

    Ratelle, Catherine F; Larose, Simon; Guay, Frédéric; Senécal, Caroline

    2005-06-01

    As technological and scientific skills are increasingly needed, finding that science students encounter significant problems in their academic program causes serious concern. The authors examined how perceived parental involvement and support predict college students' persistence in science based on J. P. Connell and J. G. Wellborn's (1991) theoretical model: Perceived parental involvement and support should foster student persistence by promoting students' competence, autonomy, and relatedness. Results suggest that perceived parental autonomy supports predicted scientific persistence partly through students' autonomy. Perceived parental involvement, although unrelated to persistence, was a significant predictor of autonomy and relatedness. Results suggest that perceived parental involvement and support have specific roles in predicting student self-processes and achievement, highlighting the importance of sustaining parents' contribution for college students.

  8. Involvement of Nursing Students in Unethical Classroom and Clinical Behaviors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilbert, Gail A.

    1985-01-01

    A study to determine the incidence of unethical classroom and clinical behaviors among nursing students, to find out their opinions, and to investigate the relationships among demographic data, unethical behaviors and opinions about the behaviors is discussed. (Author/MLW)

  9. Action research methodology in clinical pharmacy: how to involve and change.

    PubMed

    Nørgaard, Lotte Stig; Sørensen, Ellen Westh

    2016-06-01

    Introduction The focus in clinical pharmacy practice is and has for the last 30-35 years been on changing the role of pharmacy staff into service orientation and patient counselling. One way of doing this is by involving staff in change process and as a researcher to take part in the change process by establishing partnerships with staff. On the background of the authors' widespread action research (AR)-based experiences, recommendations and comments for how to conduct an AR-study is described, and one of their AR-based studies illustrate the methodology and the research methods used. Methodology AR is defined as an approach to research which is based on a problem-solving relationship between researchers and clients, which aims at both solving a problem and at collaboratively generating new knowledge. Research questions relevant in AR-studies are: what was the working process in this change oriented study? What learning and/or changes took place? What challenges/pitfalls had to be overcome? What were the influence/consequences for the involved parts? When to use If you want to implement new services and want to involve staff and others in the process, an AR methodology is very suitable. The basic advantages of doing AR-based studies are grounded in their participatory and democratic basis and their starting point in problems experienced in practice. Limitations Some of the limitations in AR-studies are that neither of the participants in a project steering group are the only ones to decide. Furthermore, the collective process makes the decision-making procedures relatively complex.

  10. Student involvement as a vehicle for empowerment: a case study of the student platform for engineering education development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delaine, David A.; Seif-Naraghi, Sonya B.; Al-Haque, Shahed; Wojewoda, Nicolò; Meninato, Yvonne; DeBoer, Jennifer

    2010-08-01

    This paper examines the mission, structure and outputs of one organisation, the Student Platform for Engineering Education Development (SPEED), as a case study for how student-led organisations can use student involvement to promote and sustain student self-efficacy in an academic field. SPEED attracts young people to engineering through student participation in engineering education (EE). SPEED is a global, non-profit student organisation that functions as an interdisciplinary network to diversify dialogue, stimulate change and impact the development of EE and its effect on society. SPEED is directly attracting young people to engineering in various ways: the organisation of its keynote event, the Global Student Forum; facilitating interactions between globally minded, socially inclined engineers with aspirations to change the world; and through the global dissemination of SPEED's work and practices through broad and relevant channels. Short-term outcomes are highlighted here. This case study can serve as a model for student engagement and involvement in other disciplines.

  11. 4. What Roles Do Parent Involvement, Family Background, and Culture Play in Student Motivation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Usher, Alexandra; Kober, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    This is the fourth in a series of six papers from the Center on Education Policy exploring issues related to students' motivation to learn. This paper examines findings from research about the impact of various family background and cultural factors on student motivation, as well as the role of parental beliefs, attitudes, and actions in fostering…

  12. Increasing Homework Completion of Middle School Students by Using Parental Involvement Strategies and Establishing Routines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haas, Rebecca; Reiley, Kimberly

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this action research project report was to increase the homework completion rate of middle school students through the use of interventions. The participants in this study came from one public middle school. The participants were thirty-four 6th grade students in language arts, respectively. The intervention took place from…

  13. Students' community health service delivery: experiences of involved parties.

    PubMed

    Greeff, M; van der Walt, E; Strydom, C; Wessels, C; Schutte, P J

    2009-03-01

    For several years the School of Nursing Science and the School of Psychosocial Behavioural Science, of a specific university, have been offering health care services in response to some of the health needs of a disadvantaged community as part of their students' experiential learning. However, these health care services were rendered independently by these two schools, implying that no feedback system existed to evaluate the worth and quality of these student-rendered health care services. The objectives of this research were to explore and describe the experiences of senior nursing and social work students, the experiences of health service delivery organisations concerned and the experiences of the disadvantaged community members receiving such health care services, as well as to investigate which communication models were apparent with regard to the major factors within health communication. An exploratory descriptive qualitative research design was used. Focus group discussions were held, interviews were conducted and field notes taken. Focus group discussions and interviews were transcribed and analysed by the research team to determine themes and sub-themes using the open coding technique. The results of the three groups showed similarities. The health service delivery organisations also identified a communication barrier, although the students were prepared to bridge it. The health service delivery organisations and the community felt positive towards the students and what they offered to the organisations and to the patients. A greater need for multi-disciplinary team work was recognised by al parties concerned. Recommendations focus on improved student accompaniment by lecturers; extending health care delivery to include a multi-disciplinary team approach by students; as well as improving the delivery of health care services.

  14. Parental Involvement, Is It Real? A Study of Viewpoints Promoting Parental Involvement That Enhances Student Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rucker, Lorretta Faye

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative case study was to explore the motives, practices, attitudes, and barriers of parental involvement as recognized by administrators and teachers in southwest Tennessee in order to improve the school-home and community relationship in southwest Tennessee. This study investigated the benefits of parental involvement and…

  15. 46 CFR 1.03-45 - Appeals from decisions or actions involving documentation of vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... a formal appeal of that decision or action to the Director of Prevention Policy, Commandant (CG-54... Director of Prevention Policy, Commandant (CG-54), on such an appeal will constitute final agency action....

  16. A Gendered Perspective on the Predictors of Student Involvement in Collegiate Clubs and Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Case, Kimberly Fay

    2010-01-01

    The theory of student involvement (Astin, 1984) acknowledges that as students devote sufficient time and energy to educationally purposeful activities, they can expect to make desirable gains throughout the college years. Participation in campus clubs and organizations is one form of involvement found to be associated with a host of learning and…

  17. Student Involvement in Wellness Policies: A Study of Pennsylvania Local Education Agencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jomaa, Lamis H.; McDonnell, Elaine; Weirich, Elaine; Hartman, Terryl; Jensen, Leif; Probart, Claudia

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Explore student-involvement goals in local wellness policies (LWPs) of local education agencies (LEAs) in Pennsylvania (PA) and investigate associations with LEA characteristics. Design: An observational study that helped examine student-involvement goals. Setting: Public PA LEAs. Participants: LWPs submitted by 539 PA public LEAs. Main…

  18. Making It Happen: Student Involvement in Education Planning, Decision Making, and Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wehmeyer, Michael L., Ed.; Sands, Deanna J., Ed.

    This book provides teachers and other practitioners with a variety of procedures and materials to help students with disabilities become involved in their transition planning to the maximum extent possible. Chapters include: (1) "Student Involvement in Education Planning, Decision Making, and Instruction: An Idea Whose Time Has Arrived" (Michael…

  19. The Relationship between Parental Involvement and Mathematics Achievement for Students with Visual Impairments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonnall, Michele Capella; Cavenaugh, Brenda S.; Giesen, J. Martin

    2012-01-01

    The effect of parental involvement on achievement has received a significant amount of research attention in the general student population, but surprisingly very little research has been conducted in this area for students with disabilities. This study investigated the association between parental involvement (both at home and at school) and…

  20. Parental Involvement and Students' Achievement in Cambodia: Focusing on Parental Resourcing of Public Schooling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nguon, Sokcheng

    2012-01-01

    Studies of the effect of parental involvement on students' achievement in a variety of contexts can provide valuable insights into how the relationship between parental involvement and students' achievement may depend on specific local contexts of education and family. Drawing on the theoretical perspectives derived from social capital model, this…

  1. Motivations for Involvement: An Empirical Test of Parents of Students with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fishman, Callen E.

    2011-01-01

    Parents of students in special education have greater barriers to parent involvement than parents of students in general education. Little is known, however, about the factors that facilitate or impede involvement practices for this group. This study investigated the extent to which the motivational factors from Hoover-Dempsey and Sandler's (2005)…

  2. A Gendered Perspective on Student Involvement in Collegiate Clubs and Organizations in Christian Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Case, Kimberly F.

    2011-01-01

    The theory of student involvement (Astin, 1984) acknowledges that as students devote time and energy to educationally purposeful activities, they can expect to make cognitive and affective gains throughout the college years. Participation in clubs and organizations is one form of involvement associated with a host of learning and developmental…

  3. Students in a School Environment: A Project Focused on Family Involvement of At-Risk

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denney, Pat

    2011-01-01

    This project examined family involvement of at risk students in mid-west communities. The purpose of this project was to study the affect of family involvement on at-risk student achievement. The redefining of the perception of America has resulted in a crisis of academic performance in the traditionally slow-changing education systems. This topic…

  4. Classroom Climate, Parental Educational Involvement, and Student School Functioning in Early Adolescence: A Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan Toren, Nurit; Seginer, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    In this 2-year longitudinal study, we examine the effects of perceived classroom climate and two aspects of parental educational involvement (home-based and school-based) on junior high school students' self-evaluation and academic achievement. Our main hypothesis was that perceived parental educational involvement mediates students' perceived…

  5. Differences in Work, Levels of Involvement, and Academic Performance between Residential and Commuter Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alfano, Halley J.; Eduljee, Nina B.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between work, levels of involvement and academic performance between residential and commuter students. One hundred and eight undergraduate students at a private college in the Northeast were surveyed. Surveys aimed at examining work and levels of involvement were administered to the…

  6. The Impact of Motivation to Lead on College Students' Cocurricular Involvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pepper, Robert C.

    2009-01-01

    This exploratory research examined the impact of motivation to lead on college students' cocurricular involvement. The question driving this research was: Is motivation to lead a predictor of cocurricular student involvement? A 52-item questionnaire that included the Motivation to Lead Self-Report Questionnaire (Chan & Drasgow, 2001) was used to…

  7. Strategies to Involve Families of Latino Students with Disabilities: When Parent Initiative Is Not Enough

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, Raymond Joseph; Blatz, Erin Teresa; Elbaum, Batya

    2014-01-01

    Despite a growing literature on the value of family involvement for students with disabilities, there are ongoing misunderstandings about the reasons why culturally and linguistically diverse families of students with disabilities might be less involved with their child at school than other families. This article describes a project conducted with…

  8. Involving a Village: Student Teachers' Sense of Belonging in Their School-Based Placement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ussher, Bill

    2010-01-01

    Educating a student on teaching placement involves a "village", just as it takes a whole "village" to raise a child. Creating a "village" around each student teacher gives them greater agency, a sense of belonging and being valued as a member of that professional "village". Participating students, teachers…

  9. A Study of Lipscomb University Students' Internet Use and Involvement in Extracurricular Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Samuel Aarron

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze Lipscomb University students' Internet use and involvement in extracurricular activities. A survey of students at Lipscomb University was conducted. As confirmed by the data the research was able to determine that the type of extracurricular activity a student participates in most often is related to the…

  10. Beyond the Classroom: Involving Students with Disabilities in Extracurricular Activities at Levy Middle School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Pam; And Others

    Six students in a special education classroom at Levy Middle School (Syracuse, New York) became involved in a variety of after-school activities with nondisabled students. The students participated in the school computer club, cross-country skiing, volleyball, stage crew, intramural basketball, the Spanish Club, and after-school programs at two…

  11. A Correlational Study of Extracurricular Involvement and Homework Performance of Third Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Rachel; Moulden, Ryan

    2011-01-01

    There are many opportunities for students to participate in nonacademic activities. These activities can include: sports, clubs, private lessons, and religious activities. Participation in these activities enriches students' lives by encouraging social skills. Yet, if students are involved in activities requiring many hours of participation, does…

  12. How Involvement in African American Student Organizations Supports and Hinders Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guiffrida, Douglas A.

    2004-01-01

    The perspectives of 84 African American students attending a predominantly White institution (PWI) were qualitatively analyzed to identify the conditions under which African American student organizations were perceived as assets and liabilities to academic success. Results indicate that involvement in African American student organizations can…

  13. Using Panel Debates to Increase Student Involvement in the Introductory Sociology Class.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crone, James A.

    1997-01-01

    Suggests that professors who want to increase students' participation and foster student involvement should employ panel debates in their classes. Outlines the background readings and organization steps required to set up a panel debate. Reviews literature relating to the use of student debates in sociology instruction. (DSK)

  14. Parental Involvement in Middle School Predicting College Attendance for First-Generation Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bui, Khanh; Rush, Ryan A.

    2016-01-01

    Using data from the National Education Longitudinal Study, this report examined the relationship between parental involvement in eighth grade and college attendance by eight years after high school for students whose parents have no college education (i.e., first-generation students; n = 1,358) in comparison to students whose parents have some…

  15. Homework Involvement and Functions: Perceptions of Hong Kong Chinese Primary School Students and Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tam, Vicky C. W.; Chan, Raymond M. C.

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the perceptions of Chinese students and parents in Hong Kong on homework involvement, assignment type and homework functions. The relationships of homework perceptions to student and parent attributes are also assessed. The sample includes 1393 pairs of students and their parents from 36 primary schools in Hong Kong. Findings…

  16. Students' Perceptions of Parental and Teacher Academic Involvement: Consequences on Achievement Goals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regner, Isabelle; Loose, Florence; Dumas, Florence

    2009-01-01

    The present study examined whether students' perceptions of two major facets of parental and teacher academic involvement (i.e., academic support and academic monitoring), contribute to the process of students' achievement goals adoption. French junior high-school students completed two questionnaires assessing first their perceptions of parental…

  17. Engaging Students in the Action of Chemistry: An Effective, Fun, and Inexpensive Outreach Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Doren, Jane M.; Nestor, Lisa P.; Berk Knighton, W.

    1997-10-01

    Engaging students actively is essential for an effective outreach program. Our program engages students by appointing them as chief detectives in a mystery. Their goal is to determine the identify of the thief. The program is designed for middle school students with little or no laboratory experience and is structured so that these students can solve the mystery themselves with minimal assistance from laboratory supervisors. Students are presented with a synopsis of the mystery, small samples of evidence collected at the scene and information about the suspects. Through a series of chemical experiments students identify the evidence collected. Using this information together with the information provided about the suspects and the crime scene, students determine the identify of the thief. Students involved in this program learn about experimental design, careful observation, analytical reasoning and have fun in the process. The program is designed to spark interest in science and to build student self-confidence by actively involving students in an experimental investigation.

  18. Student Affairs Progress toward Professionalism: Recommendations for Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stamatakos, Louis C.

    1981-01-01

    Discussed changes in the field of student affairs suggesting that they have not been as directional or significant as they should have been. Due to increasing pressures of accountability and rising professional expectations, it is recommended that student affairs personnel accept and respond to the ever-present goal of professional recognition.…

  19. Student-Centered Learning: Nine Classrooms in Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nave, Bill, Ed.

    2015-01-01

    What does student-centered learning look like in real-life classrooms? In this collection, educator Bill Nave and nine award-winning K-12 teachers tell the story of how and why they changed their teaching and redesigned their classrooms in order to "reach every child." They reflect on their successes and struggles to put students in…

  20. Commencing Student Experience: New Insights and Implications for Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grebennikov, Leonid; Shah, Mahsood

    2012-01-01

    In many developed countries, including Australia, it is common practice to regularly survey university students in order to assess their experience inside and beyond the classroom. Governments conduct nationwide surveys to assess the quality of student experience, benchmark outcomes nationally and in some cases reward better performing…

  1. Fair Student Funding Summit: Conference Proceedings and Recommendations for Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Resource Strategies, 2010

    2010-01-01

    On March 25-26, 2010, a cadre of urban education leaders gathered in Baltimore, Maryland for the "Fair Student Funding Summit," a conference that brought together districts that use weighted student funding (WSF) as an approach for allocating dollars to schools. Convened by Education Resource Strategies (ERS) and hosted by Baltimore City…

  2. Students at Risk: The Teachers' Call to Action!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonilla, Carlos A., Ed.; Goss, Joyce, Ed.

    Written by a team of graduate student teachers, this collection of papers focuses on the challenges of teaching at-risk students and the development of successful classroom strategies. The first chapter, "Kids in Need: The Teachers' Perspective," addresses Hispanic children in poverty, the effects of poverty on academic achievement, and…

  3. Students Learning Agroecology: Phenomenon-Based Education for Responsible Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ostergaard, Edvin; Lieblein, Geir; Breland, Tor Arvid; Francis, Charles

    2010-01-01

    Preparing students for a complex and dynamic future is a challenge for educators. This article explores three crucial issues related to agroecological education and learning: (1) the phenomenological foundation for learning agroecology in higher education; (2) the process of students' interactions with a wide range of various learners within and…

  4. Faculty support for ESL nursing students: action plan for success.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Eileen; Beaver, Shirley

    2012-01-01

    Nursing students whose first language is not English have lower retention and NCLEX-RN pass rates. This review identifies four areas of difficulty and recommends strategies that can be employed by supportive faculty to assist these students and help ensure a more diverse nursing workforce to care for our increasingly diverse patient population.

  5. Parental Involvement with College Students in Germany, Hong Kong, Korea, and the United States.

    PubMed

    Fingerman, Karen L; Cheng, Yen-Pi; Kim, Kyungmin; Fung, Helene H; Han, Gyounghae; Lang, Frieder R; Lee, Wonkyung; Wagner, Jenny

    2016-07-01

    Rates of college attendance have increased throughout the world. This study asked whether students across nations experience high involvement with parents (frequent contact and support) and how satisfied they are with parental involvement. College students from four major Western and Asian economies participated: Germany (n = 458), Hong Kong (n = 276), Korea (n = 257), and the United States (n = 310). Consistent with solidarity theory, students across nations reported frequent contact with parents and receiving several forms of social support (e.g., practical, emotional, and advice) every month. Multilevel models revealed Asian students received more frequent parental support than German or US students, but were less satisfied with that support. Students in Hong Kong resided with parents more often and gave more support to parents than students in other cultures. Discussion focuses on cultural (i.e., filial obligation) and structural (i.e., coresidence) factors explaining parental involvement.

  6. Student Involvement in the Instructional Process Through Tutoring.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClellan, Billie Frances

    This review of the literature on student tutoring considers four questions: 1) are there patterns of cross-age, cross-culture, or cross-ability which increase or decrease the tutoring effectiveness? 2) does a highly-structured, controlled program mean better results than informal tutoring? 3) is the level of learning actually raised for both tutor…

  7. Improvement in South African Students' Outlook Due to Music Involvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, Michael M.; Devroop, Karendra; Getz, Laura

    2015-01-01

    In the spring of 2009, we started a concert band programme at a high school in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. In the fall of 2011, we returned to the school to measure the impact of participating in a concert band on the students' attitude and outlook. During our initial and return visits, we measured feelings of self-esteem, optimism, positive…

  8. Involving Students in Assessing Their Reading: The Winter Count.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Afflerbach, Peter; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Describes a program intended to help students reflect on, discuss, and evaluate their reading and their accomplishments related to reading. Notes that the program uses a set of materials and procedures based on a Native American winter count (an animal hide or cloth on which the Yankton Sioux recorded important events). (SR)

  9. Spiritual Dynamics Involved with Overseas Student Teaching: A Qualitative Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Firmin, Michael W.; Firmin, Ruth L.; MacKay, Brenda B.

    2009-01-01

    We present the results of a qualitative, phenomenological research study that explored the spiritual dynamics of 13 overseas student teachers. Overall, participants in our sample described spiritual growth on two levels. First, they related that spiritual development often followed an inside-out pattern. In explaining this phenomenon, students…

  10. Collateral Informant Assessment in Alcohol Use Research Involving College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagman, Brett T.; Cohn, Amy M.; Noel, Nora E.; Clifford, Patrick R.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This study examined the associations between college students' self-reported alcohol use and corresponding collateral reports and identified factors that influence agreement between both sets of reports. Participants/Methods: Subject-collateral pairs (N = 300) were recruited from undergraduate psychology courses. Results: Data yielded…

  11. Professional Involvement: Requirements as Students and Trends after Certification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lancaster, Jennifer N.; Myers, Bettye; Nichols, David L.; Webb, Kerry S.

    2014-01-01

    Context: The field of athletic training needs young engaged professionals for continued progress in allied health care. Academic and clinical requirements during the entry-level education could potentially impact the decisions and directions these students choose to pursue as young professionals. Objective: To determine the difference in…

  12. Involving Students in Natural Resource Decision-Making Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellsworth, Peter; Ellsworth, Judith

    2001-01-01

    Describes the Coordinated Resource Management (CRM) in the Classroom project, in which Wyoming high school students work on an authentic natural resource problem, using a decision-making process based on consensus to reach agreement on solutions to the problem. Notes implementation issues of professional development and support, and considers…

  13. Significant Life Experiences on the Formation of Environmental Action among Chinese College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Danqing; Chen, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Determining the factors that influence young adults' engagement in environmental action is critical to further developing their active and important participation in environmental issues. In this paper, we designed two studies to identify life experiences of Chinese college students that foster environmental action. In Study 1, we used an…

  14. The Power of Student Resistance in Action Research: Teacher Educators Respond to Classroom Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryant, Jill; Bates, Alisa

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to study the design and implementation of a newly developed, two-semester, action research course in a Master of Arts in Teaching program. Over a four-year period, we (the instructors) used action research methodologies for analysis and evaluation of the course. Throughout this study, students expressed varying…

  15. Teacher-Student Development in Mathematics Classrooms: Interrelated Zones of Free Movement and Promoted Actions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hussain, Mohammed Abdul; Monaghan, John; Threlfall, John

    2013-01-01

    This paper applies and extends Valsiner's "zone theory" (zones of free movement and promoted actions) through an examination of an intervention to establish inquiry communities in primary mathematics classrooms. Valsiner's zone theory, in a classroom setting, views students' freedom of choice of action and thought as mediated by the teacher. The…

  16. Student Accounts of Action Learning on a DBA Programme: Learning Inaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendonça, Roger; Parker, Anthony; Udo, Uwem; Groves, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    This account of practice sets out the action learning experience of three doctoral students on the same Doctoral Programme in Business Administration at a UK university. It also include the sense-making of a fourth member of the set. It explores the tension between their area of work and their engagement in the action learning process and, in so…

  17. Oncogenic Actions of SKP2 Involves Deregulation of CDK1 Turnover Mediated by FOXM1.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Anand; K, Dhanya; Babu P S, Saneesh; Jagadeeshan, Sankar; Prasad, Manu; Nair, S Asha

    2017-04-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (cdks) are central catalytic units of cell division cycle. Among the cdk family members, cdk1 has critical roles in multiple phases of the cell cycle. Aberrant expression or hyper-actions of cdk1 are tumorigenic and yet the complex oncogenic network that regulates its turnover is poorly understood. We found a hitherto unexplored functional connection between skp2 and cdk1 turn over. In vitro knockdown or overexpression of skp2 in cultured cells reduced or induced cdk1 expression indicating skp2 as a positive driver for cdk1. A partial inhibitory role for p27 was identified in this context. Interestingly, concurrent overexpression of skp2 and p27 favored cdk1 upregulation in vitro, which correlated well with similar observations in clinical tumor samples. We found that the transcription factor FOXM1 may play a central role in the skp2-cdk1 loop. Additional molecular involvement in the skp2-cdk1 loop was also explored. In conclusion, our results revealed hitherto unexplored p27 independent molecular mechanisms for skp2 driven tumor progression. Our results support the previous findings that skp2 may be a potential therapeutic target for the management of tumors. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 797-807, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Social choice functions: A tool for ranking variables involved in action plans against road noise.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Padillo, Alejandro; de Oliveira, Thiago B F; Alves, Matheus; Bazzan, Ana L C; Ruiz, Diego P

    2016-08-01

    Traffic noise is gaining importance in planning and operation of roads in developing countries, and particularly in Europe and Latin America. Many variables with different degrees of importance influence the perception of noise from roads. Thus, the problem of prioritizing road stretches for action against such noise is an important issue in environmental noise management. For example, it can be addressed using multicriteria methods. However, these methodologies require criteria or suitable variables to be ranked according to their relative importance. In the present study, for this ranking, a list of nine variables involved in the decision-making process (called "road stretch priority variables") was presented in the form of questionnaires to high-level experts from Andalusia, southern Spain. These experts ranked the variables by relevance. Using the same data, seven social choice functions (Plurality, Raynaud, Kemeny-Young, Copeland, Simpson, Schulze, and Borda) were used in order to rank the variables. The results indicate that the most important variables were those that take into account the parameters of greatest exposure for the citizens, followed by variables related to the intensity of the problem analyzed. The results show that a combination of the use of social choice functions on aggregated information from expert panels can provide a consensus for ranking priority variables related to road stretches.

  19. Involvement of the endogenous opioid system in the psychopharmacological actions of ethanol: the role of acetaldehyde

    PubMed Central

    Font, Laura; Luján, Miguel Á.; Pastor, Raúl

    2013-01-01

    Significant evidence implicates the endogenous opioid system (EOS) (opioid peptides and receptors) in the mechanisms underlying the psychopharmacological effects of ethanol. Ethanol modulates opioidergic signaling and function at different levels, including biosynthesis, release, and degradation of opioid peptides, as well as binding of endogenous ligands to opioid receptors. The role of β-endorphin and µ-opioid receptors (OR) have been suggested to be of particular importance in mediating some of the behavioral effects of ethanol, including psychomotor stimulation and sensitization, consumption and conditioned place preference (CPP). Ethanol increases the release of β-endorphin from the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (NArc), which can modulate activity of other neurotransmitter systems such as mesolimbic dopamine (DA). The precise mechanism by which ethanol induces a release of β-endorphin, thereby inducing behavioral responses, remains to be elucidated. The present review summarizes accumulative data suggesting that the first metabolite of ethanol, the psychoactive compound acetaldehyde, could participate in such mechanism. Two lines of research involving acetaldehyde are reviewed: (1) implications of the formation of acetaldehyde in brain areas such as the NArc, with high expression of ethanol metabolizing enzymes and presence of cell bodies of endorphinic neurons and (2) the formation of condensation products between DA and acetaldehyde such as salsolinol, which exerts its actions via OR. PMID:23914161

  20. Mechanisms involved in the anti-inflammatory action of inhaled tea tree oil in mice.

    PubMed

    Golab, Mateusz; Skwarlo-Sonta, Krystyna

    2007-03-01

    Tea tree oil (TTO) is well known as an antimicrobial and immunomodulatory agent. In the present study we confirmed the anti-inflammatory properties of TTO and investigated the involvement of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis in the immunomodulatory action of TTO administered by inhalation. Sexually mature, 6-8-week-old, C(57)BI(10) x CBA/H (F(1)) male mice were used. One group of animals was injected intra-peritoneally (ip) with Zymosan to elicit peritoneal inflammation and was then submitted to four sessions of TTO inhalation (15 mins each). Some of the mice were simultaneously injected ip with Antalarmin, a CRH-1 receptor antagonist, to block HPA axis functions. Twenty-four hours after the injections the mice were killed by CO(2) asphyxia, and peritoneal leukocytes (PTLs) were isolated and counted. Levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cyclooxygenase (COX) activity in PTLs were assessed by fluorimetric and colorimetric assays, respectively. The results obtained show that sessions of TTO inhalation exert a strong anti-inflammatory influence on the immune system stimulated by Zymosan injection, while having no influence on PTL number, ROS level, and COX activity in mice without inflammation. The HPA axis was shown to mediate the anti-inflammatory effect of TTO; Antalarmin abolished the influence of inhaled TTO on PTL number and their ROS production in mice with experimental peritonitis, but it had no effect on these parameters in mice without inflammation.

  1. Motivationally significant self-control: enhanced action withholding involves the right inferior frontal junction.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, David A; Upton, Daniel J; Moore, Jennifer; Hester, Robert

    2015-01-01

    In everyday life, people use self-control to withhold actions. This ability is particularly important when the consequences of action withholding have an impact on the individual's well-being. Despite its importance, it is unclear as to how the neural nodes implicated in action withholding contribute to this real-world type of self-control. By modifying an action withholding paradigm, the go/no-go task, we examined how the brain exerts self-control during a scenario in which the implications of withholding an action are meaningful and motivationally significant. A successfully withheld response contributed to long-term monetary rewards, whereas failure to withhold a response incurred an immediate monetary punishment. Compared with neutral action withholding, participants significantly improved their performance when these contingencies were applied. Crucially, although the right IFG and pre-SMA were found to promote overall action withholding, the enhancement in behavioral performance relative to a neutral condition was only reflected by a physiological change in a region encompassing the right inferior frontal junction and precentral gyrus. We speculate that the ability to flexibly modulate attention to goal-relevant stimuli is crucial to enhanced, motivationally driven action withholding and that this ability is subserved by the right inferior frontal junction. These findings suggest that control-modulating factors, rather than action withholding processes per se, can be critical to improving motivationally significant action withholding outcomes.

  2. Mechanisms of Action Involved in Ozone Therapy: Is healing induced via a mild oxidative stress?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    oxidative stress. Recently these concepts have become widely accepted. The versatility of ozone in treating vascular and degenerative diseases as well as skin lesions, hernial disc and primary root carious lesions in children is emphasized. Further researches able to elucidate whether the mechanisms of action of ozone therapy involve nuclear transcription factors, such as Nrf2, NFAT, AP-1, and HIF-1α are warranted. PMID:22185664

  3. Mechanisms of Action Involved in Ozone Therapy: Is healing induced via a mild oxidative stress?

    PubMed

    Sagai, Masaru; Bocci, Velio

    2011-12-20

    stress. Recently these concepts have become widely accepted. The versatility of ozone in treating vascular and degenerative diseases as well as skin lesions, hernial disc and primary root carious lesions in children is emphasized. Further researches able to elucidate whether the mechanisms of action of ozone therapy involve nuclear transcription factors, such as Nrf2, NFAT, AP-1, and HIF-1α are warranted.

  4. Making Sense of Undergraduate Students' Reflections as They Learn through Writing an Action Research Proposal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maoto, S.

    2011-01-01

    This article explores learning opportunities offered by students' written reflections as they learn through writing an action research proposal. From tapping into students' reported struggles, I analysed data using three stages of qualitative data analysis: data reduction, data display, and conclusion drawing (Miles and Huberman 1994). It emerged…

  5. Promoting Student Achievement: A Case Study of Change Actions Employed by an Urban School Superintendent

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bealer, David E.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the change strategies and actions taken by an urban district superintendent to improve student achievement. In a qualitative case study of a large urban school district, one research question and three subquestions focused on: 10 specific reform strategies to improve student achievement, how the quality and…

  6. Disciplinary Action as an Intervention That Supports Students: Lessons from a Large Comprehensive High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pharrams, Lorenza

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative research study was to identify if there was a relationship between student or administrator characteristics (Independent variables) and the application of various disciplinary actions (Dependent variables). This study examined student's gender, race, grade point average, number of credits, and disciplinary…

  7. An Action Research Study Designed to Implement Student Negotiation to Improve Speaking Classroom Practice in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uztosun, Mehmet Sercan; Skinner, Nigel; Cadorath, Jill

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports the second stage of an action research study designed to improve the effectiveness of speaking classes through negotiating the lesson contents with students. The data were collected through interviews, questionnaires and observations as a way of eliciting students' views. The research, conducted in an English language teaching…

  8. Fostering Communication between Students Working Collaboratively: Results from a Practitioner Action Research Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quebec Fuentes, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    As a secondary mathematics teacher, I used practitioner action research to determine effective ways to intervene with students working in groups, with the goal of improving their communication. Utilising transcripts of group interactions and teacher interventions, field notes, and student feedback, I discovered ten different issues that prevent…

  9. An Action Research Study of Student Self-Assessment in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walser, Tamara M.

    2009-01-01

    Although student self-assessment is considered a critical component of assessment for learning, its use and related research are rare in higher education. This article describes an action research study of self-assessment as an instructional strategy in two university courses. Results indicate that self-assessment exercises provided students the…

  10. Urban High School Students' Critical Science Agency: Conceptual Understandings and Environmental Actions around Climate Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeill, Katherine L.; Vaughn, Meredith Houle

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates how the enactment of a climate change curriculum supports students' development of critical science agency, which includes students developing deep understandings of science concepts and the ability to take action at the individual and community levels. We examined the impact of a four to six week urban ecology curriculum…

  11. Promoting Attitude Change and Expressed Willingness to Take Action toward Climate Change in College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinatra, Gale M.; Kardash, CarolAnne M.; Taasoobshirazi, Gita; Lombardi, Doug

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the relationship among cognitive and motivational variables impacting college students' willingness to take mitigative action to reduce the impacts of human-induced climate change. One hundred and forty college students were asked to read a persuasive text about human-induced climate change and were pre- and post-tested on…

  12. Seventh-Grade Students' Understanding of Chemical Reactions: Reflections from an Action Research Interview Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eilks, Ingo; Moellering, Jens; Valanides, Nicos

    2007-01-01

    This paper discusses seventh-grade students' explanations of dissolution and combustion and also identifies their understanding of the differences between physical and chemical changes. A teaching strategy was initially negotiated within an action research group and this strategy was then employed in teaching seventh-grade students. The teaching…

  13. Action for a Change. A Student's Manual for Public Interest Organizing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nader, Ralph; Ross, Donald

    In this action-oriented manual, Ralph Nader answers the plea of college students: What can we do about pollution and consumer injustice? How can students and other citizens work to get things done in their communities and states? A step by step guide is offered for forming Public Interest Research Groups (PIRG) like Nader's in Washington, D. C.,…

  14. Special Education Referrals and Disciplinary Actions for Latino Students in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moreno, Gerardo; Segura-Herrera, Theresa

    2014-01-01

    Latino students are the largest growing minority group in the U.S. school system. However, there are critical barriers that impeded the development of sustained academic success for this particular population. Latino students have been found to be over-represented in the delivery of disciplinary actions and in the identification of disabilities in…

  15. An Action Science Research Approach to Reducing Student Tardiness at the High School Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gile, Curtis S.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this action research study was to design, implement, analyze, and evaluate a series of interventions to reduce student tardiness at the high school level. Another purpose of the study was to determine the underlying values, beliefs, and behaviors associated with student tardiness from a faculty and staff perspective. The study…

  16. Participatory Action Research with College Students with Disabilities: Photovoice for an Inclusive Campus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agarwal, Neelam; Moya, Eva M.; Yasui, Naoko Yura; Seymour, Corene

    2015-01-01

    College students with disabilities face various barriers to academic and social engagement. The present project was conducted based on principles of participatory action research (PAR) using Photovoice method with six students, gathering images representing such barriers, and developing narratives to describe the problems as well as possible ways…

  17. An Examination of Student Reengagement District Administrative Procedures: An Action Research Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoadley, Jared Louis

    2016-01-01

    Changes in Washington State law require all school districts to adopt policies and procedures concerned with student reengagement. This dissertation describes the action research undertaken in the Mead School District to address requirements of the new law to successfully reenter students after being absent due to exclusionary discipline. The…

  18. Supplemental action learning workshops: Understanding the effects of independent and cooperative workshops on students' knowledge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Kathryn Michelle

    Community colleges enroll more than half of the undergraduate population in the United States, thereby retaining students of varying demographics with extracurricular demands differing from traditional four-year university students. Often in a collegiate lecture course, students are limited in their abilities to absorb and process information presented by their instructors due to content-specific cognitive gaps between the instructor and the student (Preszler, 2009). Research has shown that implementation of instructor-facilitated action learning workshops as supplemental instruction may help bridge these cognitive gaps allowing better student conceptualization and dissemination of knowledge (Drake, 2011; Fullilove & Treisman, 1990; Preszler, 2009; Udovic, Morris, Dickman, Postlethwait, & Wetherwax, 2002). The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of cooperative action learning workshops and independent action learning workshops on students' knowledge of specified topics within a General Biology I with lab course. The results of this investigation indicate that implementation of an instructor-facilitated action learning workshop did not affect students' knowledge gain; furthermore, attendance of a particular workshop style (independent or cooperative) did not affect students' knowledge gain.

  19. The sequential encoding of competing action goals involves dynamic restructuring of motor plans in working memory.

    PubMed

    Gallivan, Jason P; Bowman, Natasha A R; Chapman, Craig S; Wolpert, Daniel M; Flanagan, J Randall

    2016-06-01

    Recent neural and behavioral findings provide support for the influential idea that in situations in which multiple action options are presented simultaneously, we prepare action plans for each competing option before deciding between and executing one of those plans. However, in natural, everyday environments, our available action options frequently change from one moment to the next, and there is often uncertainty as to whether additional options will become available before having to select a particular course of action. Here, with the use of a target-directed reaching task, we show that in this situation, the brain specifies a competing action for each new, sequentially presented potential target and that recently formed action plans can be revisited and updated so as to conform with separate, more newly developed, plans. These findings indicate that the brain forms labile motor plans for sequentially arising target options that can be flexibly restructured to accommodate new motor plans.

  20. Identifying Associations between Student Achievement and Parental Involvement Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waddle, Ann R.

    2011-01-01

    The revision and renewal of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 will likely expand its parental involvement component to engage educators, parents, and community partners in supporting public education for children. This revisions call for best practices, but current literature fails to identify specific activities associated…

  1. Physician Collaboration Involving Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Cynthia R.; Lutz, Richard E.; Schaefer, G. Bradley; Woods, Kathryn E.

    2007-01-01

    Each year, an increasing number of children and adolescents are diagnosed with an Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). ASDs involve impairment to an individual's social, language, and behavioral functioning. Due to the complexity of this disorder, a comprehensive, multidisciplinary assessment and treatment approach is recommended in order to meet the…

  2. Substance use by college students: the role of intrinsic versus extrinsic motivation for athletic involvement.

    PubMed

    Rockafellow, Bradley D; Saules, Karen K

    2006-09-01

    Certain types of athletic involvement may confer risk for substance use by college students. This study investigated whether motivational factors play a role in the relationship between athletic involvement and substance use. Intercollegiate athletes (n=98) and exercisers (n=120) were surveyed about substance use and motivation for athletic involvement. Athletes and exercisers who were extrinsically motivated had significantly higher rates of alcohol use than their intrinsically motivated counterparts. Results suggest that college students who are extrinsically motivated for involvement in physical activity/athletics--particularly those involved in team sports--may be in need of targeted prevention efforts.

  3. Effect of an educational game on university students' learning about action potentials.

    PubMed

    Luchi, Kelly Cristina Gaviao; Montrezor, Luís Henrique; Marcondes, Fernanda K

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of an educational game that is used for teaching the mechanisms of the action potentials in cell membranes. The game was composed of pieces representing the intracellular and extracellular environments, ions, ion channels, and the Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase pump. During the game activity, the students arranged the pieces to demonstrate how the ions move through the membrane in a resting state and during an action potential, linking the ion movement with a graph of the action potential. To test the effect of the game activity on student understanding, first-year dental students were given the game to play at different times in a series of classes teaching resting membrane potential and action potentials. In all experiments, students who played the game performed better in assessments. According to 98% of the students, the game supported the learning process. The data confirm the students' perception, indicating that the educational game improved their understanding about action potentials.

  4. Involvement of ethylene in the action of the cotton defoliant thidiazuron.

    PubMed

    Suttle, J C

    1985-06-01

    The effect of the defoliant thidiazuron (N-phenyl-N'-1,2,3-thiadiazol-5-ylurea) on endogenous ethylene evolution and the role of endogenous ethylene in thidiazuron-mediated leaf abscission were examined in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L. cv Stoneville 519) seedlings. Treatment of 20- to 30-day-old seedlings with thidiazuron at concentrations equal to or greater than 10 micromolar resulted in leaf abscission. At a treatment concentration of 100 micromolar, nearly total abscission of the youngest leaves was observed. Following treatment, abscission of the younger leaves commenced within 48 hours and was complete by 120 hours. A large increase in ethylene evolution from leaf blades and abscission zone explants was readily detectable within 24 hours of treatment and persisted until leaf fall. Ethylene evolution from treated leaf blades was greatest 1 day posttreatment and reached levels in excess of 600 nanoliters per gram fresh weight per hour (26.7 nanomoles per gram fresh weight per hour). The increase in ethylene evolution occurred in the absence of increased ethane evolution, altered leaf water potential, or decreased chlorophyll levels. Treatment of seedlings with inhibitors of ethylene action (silver thiosulfate, hypobaric pressure) or ethylene synthesis (aminoethoxyvinylglycine) resulted in an inhibition of thidiazuron-induced defoliation. Application of exogenous ethylene or 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid largely restored the thidiazuron response. The results indicate that thidiazuron-induced leaf abscission is mediated, at least in part, by an increase in endogenous ethylene evolution. However, alterations of other phytohormone systems thought to be involved in regulating leaf abscission are not excluded by these studies.

  5. Melatonin nephroprotective action in Zucker diabetic fatty rats involves its inhibitory effect on NADPH oxidase.

    PubMed

    Winiarska, Katarzyna; Dzik, Jolanta M; Labudda, Mateusz; Focht, Dorota; Sierakowski, Bartosz; Owczarek, Aleksandra; Komorowski, Lukasz; Bielecki, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    Excessive activity of NADPH oxidase (Nox) is considered to be of importance for the progress of diabetic nephropathy. The aim of the study was to elucidate the effect of melatonin, known for its nephroprotective properties, on Nox activity under diabetic conditions. The experiments were performed on three groups of animals: (i) untreated lean (?/+) Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats; (ii) untreated obese diabetic (fa/fa) ZDF rats; and (iii) ZDF fa/fa rats treated with melatonin (20 mg/L) in drinking water. Urinary albumin excretion was measured weekly. After 4 wk of the treatment, the following parameters were determined in kidney cortex: Nox activity, expression of subunits of the enzyme, their phosphorylation and subcellular distribution. Histological studies were also performed. Compared to ?/+ controls, ZDF fa/fa rats exhibited increased renal Nox activity, augmented expression of Nox4 and p47(phox) subunits, elevated level of p47(phox) phosphorylation, and enlarged phospho-p47(phox) and p67(phox) content in membrane. Melatonin administration to ZDF fa/fa rats resulted in the improvement of renal functions, as manifested by considerable attenuation of albuminuria and some amelioration of structural abnormalities. The treatment turned out to nearly normalize Nox activity, which was accompanied by considerably lowered expression and diminished membrane distribution of regulatory subunits, that is, phospho-p47(phox) and p67(phox) . Thus, it is concluded that: (i) melatonin beneficial action against diabetic nephropathy involves attenuation of the excessive activity of Nox; and (ii) the mechanism of melatonin inhibitory effect on Nox is based on the mitigation of expression and membrane translocation of its regulatory subunits.

  6. Bothrops jararaca Peptide with Anti-Hypertensive Action Normalizes Endothelium Dysfunction Involved in Physiopathology of Preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Benedetti, Gabriel; Morais, Katia L. P.; Guerreiro, Juliano R.; de Oliveira, Eduardo Fontana; Hoshida, Mara Sandra; Oliveira, Leandro; Sass, Nelson; Lebrun, Ivo; Ulrich, Henning; Lameu, Claudiana; de Camargo, Antonio Carlos Martins

    2011-01-01

    Preeclampsia, a pregnancy-specific syndrome characterized by hypertension, proteinuria and edema, is a major cause of fetal and maternal morbidity and mortality especially in developing countries. Bj-PRO-10c, a proline-rich peptide isolated from Bothrops jararaca venom, has been attributed with potent anti-hypertensive effects. Recently, we have shown that Bj-PRO-10c-induced anti-hypertensive actions involved NO production in spontaneous hypertensive rats. Using in vitro studies we now show that Bj-PRO-10c was able to increase NO production in human umbilical vein endothelial cells from hypertensive pregnant women (HUVEC-PE) to levels observed in HUVEC of normotensive women. Moreover, in the presence of the peptide, eNOS expression as well as argininosuccinate synthase activity, the key rate-limiting enzyme of the citrulline-NO cycle, were enhanced. In addition, excessive superoxide production due to NO deficiency, one of the major deleterious effects of the disease, was inhibited by Bj-PRO-10c. Bj-PRO-10c induced intracellular calcium fluxes in both, HUVEC-PE and HUVEC, which, however, led to activation of eNOS expression only in HUVEC-PE. Since Bj-PRO-10c promoted biological effects in HUVEC from patients suffering from the disorder and not in normotensive pregnant women, we hypothesize that Bj-PRO-10c induces its anti-hypertensive effect in mothers with preeclampsia. Such properties may initiate the development of novel therapeutics for treating preeclampsia. PMID:21858206

  7. Learning Global Citizenship: Students and Teachers in Belize and the U.S. Take Action Together

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fry, Sara; Griffin, Shari; Kirshner, Jean

    2012-01-01

    The Belize Education Project seeks to empower Belizean children and teachers by providing professional development for teachers, and books, school supplies and scholarships for students. According to the authors, involving their U.S. students not only helps sustain the initiative, it allows their students to make lasting connections with teachers…

  8. Effect of scaffolding on helping introductory physics students solve quantitative problems involving strong alternative conceptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Shih-Yin; Singh, Chandralekha

    2015-12-01

    It is well known that introductory physics students often have alternative conceptions that are inconsistent with established physical principles and concepts. Invoking alternative conceptions in the quantitative problem-solving process can derail the entire process. In order to help students solve quantitative problems involving strong alternative conceptions correctly, appropriate scaffolding support can be helpful. The goal of this study is to examine how different scaffolding supports involving analogical problem-solving influence introductory physics students' performance on a target quantitative problem in a situation where many students' solution process is derailed due to alternative conceptions. Three different scaffolding supports were designed and implemented in calculus-based and algebra-based introductory physics courses involving 410 students to evaluate the level of scaffolding needed to help students learn from an analogical problem that is similar in the underlying principles involved but for which the problem-solving process is not derailed by alternative conceptions. We found that for the quantitative problem involving strong alternative conceptions, simply guiding students to work through the solution of the analogical problem first was not enough to help most students discern the similarity between the two problems. However, if additional scaffolding supports that directly helped students examine and repair their knowledge elements involving alternative conceptions were provided, e.g., by guiding students to contemplate related issues and asking them to solve the targeted problem on their own first before learning from the analogical problem provided, students were more likely to discern the underlying similarities between the problems and avoid getting derailed by alternative conceptions when solving the targeted problem. We also found that some scaffolding supports were more effective in the calculus-based course than in the algebra

  9. Under-Represented College Students and Extracurricular Involvement: The Effects of Various Student Organizations on Academic Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Christina N.

    2008-01-01

    Several studies indicate that students who are involved in extracurricular activities during college are more academically successful than are those who are not; however, most studies do not distinguish between different types of activities nor do they adequately consider the unique experiences of under-represented college students. Drawing on…

  10. Fostering an Action-Reflection Dynamic amongst Student Practitioners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Francis, Helen; Cowan, John

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This paper seeks to explore changes taking place in a curriculum design for postgraduate teaching in personnel and development, aimed at enhancing lifelong learning. A scheme is described which aims to improve the alignment for professional development of students, in ways that facilitate critically reflective practice.…

  11. Absentee Rates Spike as Students Support Pro-Immigrant Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zehr, Mary Ann

    2006-01-01

    This brief article reports that on May 1, 2006, tens of thousands of students across the country stayed out of school to join a nationwide boycott, organized mostly by Latinos, to oppose federal proposals that would crack down on illegal immigration. Public school districts in Chicago, Denver, Los Angeles, San Diego, and San Francisco reported…

  12. Model-based action planning involves cortico-cerebellar and basal ganglia networks

    PubMed Central

    Fermin, Alan S. R.; Yoshida, Takehiko; Yoshimoto, Junichiro; Ito, Makoto; Tanaka, Saori C.; Doya, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Humans can select actions by learning, planning, or retrieving motor memories. Reinforcement Learning (RL) associates these processes with three major classes of strategies for action selection: exploratory RL learns state-action values by exploration, model-based RL uses internal models to simulate future states reached by hypothetical actions, and motor-memory RL selects past successful state-action mapping. In order to investigate the neural substrates that implement these strategies, we conducted a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiment while humans performed a sequential action selection task under conditions that promoted the use of a specific RL strategy. The ventromedial prefrontal cortex and ventral striatum increased activity in the exploratory condition; the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, dorsomedial striatum, and lateral cerebellum in the model-based condition; and the supplementary motor area, putamen, and anterior cerebellum in the motor-memory condition. These findings suggest that a distinct prefrontal-basal ganglia and cerebellar network implements the model-based RL action selection strategy. PMID:27539554

  13. 31 CFR 363.45 - What are the rules for judicial and administrative actions involving securities held in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... administrative actions involving securities held in TreasuryDirect ®? 363.45 Section 363.45 Money and Finance... BUREAU OF THE PUBLIC DEBT REGULATIONS GOVERNING SECURITIES HELD IN TREASURYDIRECT General Provisions Governing Securities Held in TreasuryDirect § 363.45 What are the rules for judicial and...

  14. 24 CFR 248.221 - Approval of a plan of action that involves termination of low income affordability restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... involves termination of low income affordability restrictions. 248.221 Section 248.221 Housing and Urban... LOAN INSURANCE PROGRAMS UNDER NATIONAL HOUSING ACT AND OTHER AUTHORITIES PREPAYMENT OF LOW INCOME HOUSING MORTGAGES Prepayment and Plans of Action Under the Emergency Low Income Preservation Act of...

  15. It takes the whole brain to make a cup of coffee: the neuropsychology of naturalistic actions involving technical devices.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Karoline; Goldenberg, Georg; Daumüller, Maike; Hermsdörfer, Joachim

    2005-01-01

    Left hemisphere dominance has been established for use of single familiar tools and tool/object pairs, but everyday action in natural environment frequently affords multi-step actions with more or less novel technical devices. One purpose of our study was to find out whether left hemisphere dominance extends to such naturalistic action. Another aim was to analyze the cognitive components contributing to success or failure. Patients with LBD and aphasia, patients with RBD, and healthy controls were examined on experimental tests assessing retrieval of functional knowledge from semantic memory, inference of function from structure, and solution of mechanical and non-mechanical multi-step problems, and were confronted with two naturalistic tasks involving technical devices: preparing coffee with a drip coffee maker and fixing a cassette recorder. Both patient groups were about equally impaired on both naturalistic actions. Analysis of the experimental tests and their correlations to naturalistic actions suggested that different cognitive deficits caused failure in both patient groups, and that in LBD patients there were also different causes for failure on both naturalistic actions. The main difficulty of RBD patients seemed to reside in the demand to keep track of multi-step actions. In aphasic LBD patients difficulties with making coffee but not the cassette recorder were correlated with aphasia and defective retrieval of functional knowledge from semantic memory, whereas the cassette recorder correlated more strongly with a test probing solution of multi-step mechanical problems. Inference of function from structure which had been shown to be important for use of single familiar tools or tool/objects pairs [Goldenberg, G., Hagmann, S. (1998). AT Tool use and mechanical problem solving in apraxia. Neuropsychologia, 36, 581-589] appeared to play only a subordinate role for naturalistic actions involving technical devices.

  16. Root-Shoot Signaling crosstalk involved in the shoot growth promoting action of rhizospheric humic acids

    PubMed Central

    Olaetxea, Maite; Mora, Verónica; García, Andrés Calderin; Santos, Leandro Azevedo; Baigorri, Roberto; Fuentes, Marta; Garnica, María; Berbara, Ricardo Luis Louro; Zamarreño, Angel Maria; Garcia-Mina, Jose M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Numerous studies have shown the ability of humic substances to improve plant development. This action is normally reflected in an enhancement of crop yields and quality. However, the mechanisms responsible for this action of humic substances remain rather unknown. Our studies have shown that the shoot promoting action of sedimentary humic acids is dependent of its ability to increase root hydraulic conductivity through signaling pathways related to ABA, which in turn is affected in roots by humic acids in an IAA-NO dependent way. Furthermore, these studies also indicate that the primary action of humic acids in roots might also be physical, resulting from a transient mild stress caused by humic acids associated with a fouling-cleaning cycle of wall cell pores. Finally the role of alternative signal molecules, such as ROS, and corresponding signaling pathways are also discussed and modeled in the context of the above-mentioned framework. PMID:26966789

  17. DEPTOR-related mTOR suppression is involved in metformin's anti-cancer action in human liver cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Obara, Akio; Fujita, Yoshihito; Abudukadier, Abulizi; Fukushima, Toru; Oguri, Yasuo; Ogura, Masahito; Harashima, Shin-ichi; Hosokawa, Masaya; Inagaki, Nobuya

    2015-05-15

    Metformin, one of the most commonly used drugs for patients with type 2 diabetes, recently has received much attention regarding its anti-cancer action. It is thought that the suppression of mTOR signaling is involved in metformin's anti-cancer action. Although liver cancer is one of the most responsive types of cancer for reduction of incidence by metformin, the molecular mechanism of the suppression of mTOR in liver remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of the suppressing effect of metformin on mTOR signaling and cell proliferation using human liver cancer cells. Metformin suppressed phosphorylation of p70-S6 kinase, and ribosome protein S6, downstream targets of mTOR, and suppressed cell proliferation. We found that DEPTOR, an endogenous substrate of mTOR suppression, is involved in the suppressing effect of metformin on mTOR signaling and cell proliferation in human liver cancer cells. Metformin increases the protein levels of DEPTOR, intensifies binding to mTOR, and exerts a suppressing effect on mTOR signaling. This increasing effect of DEPTOR by metformin is regulated by the proteasome degradation system; the suppressing effect of metformin on mTOR signaling and cell proliferation is in a DEPTOR-dependent manner. Furthermore, metformin exerts a suppressing effect on proteasome activity, DEPTOR-related mTOR signaling, and cell proliferation in an AMPK-dependent manner. We conclude that DEPTOR-related mTOR suppression is involved in metformin's anti-cancer action in liver, and could be a novel target for anti-cancer therapy. - Highlights: • We elucidated a novel pathway of metformin's anti-cancer action in HCC cells. • DEPTOR is involved in the suppressing effect of metformin on mTOR signaling. • Metformin increases DEPTOR protein levels via suppression of proteasome activity. • DEPTOR-related mTOR suppression is involved in metformin's anti-cancer action.

  18. Remediation of at-risk medical students: theory in action

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous work has shown that a programme that draws on a blend of theories makes a positive difference to outcomes for students who fail and repeat their first semester at medical school. Exploration of student and teacher perspectives revealed that remediation of struggling medical students can be achieved through a cognitive apprenticeship within a small community of inquiry. This community needs expert teachers capable of performing a unique combination of roles (facilitator, nurturing mentor, disciplinarian, diagnostician and role model), with high levels of teaching presence and practical wisdom. Yet, despite participants’ convergent opinions on the elements of effective remediation, significant differences were found between outcomes of students working with experienced and inexperienced teachers. The current study explores the actual practice of teachers on this remediation course, aiming to exemplify elements of our theory of remediation and explore differences between teachers. Methods Since it is in the classroom context that the interactions that constitute the complex process of remediation emerge, this practice-based research has focused on direct observation of classroom teaching. Nineteen hours of small group sessions were recorded and transcribed. Drawing on ethnography and sociocultural discourse analysis, selected samples of talk-in-context demonstrate how the various elements of remediation play out in practice, highlighting aspects that are most effective, and identifying differences between experienced and novice teachers. Results Long-term student outcomes are strongly correlated to teacher experience (r, 0.81). Compared to inexperienced teachers, experienced teachers provide more challenging, disruptive facilitation, and take a dialogic stance that encourages more collaborative group dynamics. They are more expert at diagnosing cognitive errors, provide frequent metacognitive time-outs and make explicit links across the

  19. Students' learning as the focus for shared involvement between universities and clinical practice: a didactic model for postgraduate degree projects.

    PubMed

    Öhlén, J; Berg, L; Björk Brämberg, E; Engström, Å; German Millberg, L; Höglund, I; Jacobsson, C; Lepp, M; Lidén, E; Lindström, I; Petzäll, K; Söderberg, S; Wijk, H

    2012-10-01

    In an academic programme, completion of a postgraduate degree project could be a significant means of promoting student learning in evidence- and experience-based practice. In specialist nursing education, which through the European Bologna process would be raised to the master's level, there is no tradition of including a postgraduate degree project. The aim was to develop a didactic model for specialist nursing students' postgraduate degree projects within the second cycle of higher education (master's level) and with a specific focus on nurturing shared involvement between universities and healthcare settings. This study embodies a participatory action research and theory-generating design founded on empirically practical try-outs. The 3-year project included five Swedish universities and related healthcare settings. A series of activities was performed and a number of data sources secured. Constant comparative analysis was applied. A didactic model is proposed for postgraduate degree projects in specialist nursing education aimed at nurturing shared involvement between universities and healthcare settings. The focus of the model is student learning in order to prepare the students for participation as specialist nurses in clinical knowledge development. The model is developed for the specialist nursing education, but it is general and could be applicable to various education programmes.

  20. Student Belief and Involvement in the Paranormal and Performance in Introductory Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Messer, Wayne S.; Griggs, Richard A.

    1989-01-01

    Assesses student belief and involvement in 10 paranormal phenomena. Findings show 99 percent of the sample expressed belief in at least one. Students expressing these beliefs achieved significantly lower course grades. Discusses instructor's role in combating unfounded beliefs and fostering critical thinking. (NL)

  1. An Active Self-Determination Technique: Involving Students in Effective Career Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denison, Grace L.

    This paper discusses creating story boards to help students with disabilities to develop effective career plans. It describes storyboarding as a technique for project planning which requires active involvement of both hemispheres of the brain. A group of 6-8 people, including students, teachers, counselors, and vocational rehabilitation…

  2. The Effects of Parental Involvement in Homework on Student Achievement in Portugal and Luxembourg.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villas-Boas, Adelina

    1998-01-01

    Details a study investigating the effect of well-designed homework activities on 6-7 and 11-12 year-old students' second-language acquisition and literacy skills in Portugal and Luxembourg, and whether parental involvement in these homework activities enhances students' learning. Highlights findings that strongly suggest this is so. Includes…

  3. Middle-Class Parental Involvement in the Summer Activities of Four Elementary Students: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballard, Iva B.; Chappell, Manya; Johnson, Susan; Ngassam, Marlise DePaul

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we explore middle-class parental involvement in summer activities of four elementary students. Many researchers discuss summer programs initiated by institutions, but fail to explain how parents' availability, experiences, and related criteria affect student summer activities. From our interviews, observations, and artifacts, we…

  4. Student Performance Predictors Involving Numerically Based Subject Matter: Lecture versus Web Presentation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guidry, Krisandra

    2013-01-01

    This study examines whether student performance predictors in a numerically based lecture course are similar to those for the web version of the same course. A numerically based course involves quantitative concepts and requires mathematical calculations. Data were collected from students taking a financial management class at a medium sized state…

  5. Students' Involvement in Social Networking and Attitudes towards Its Integration into Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Umoh, Ukeme Ekpedeme; Etuk, Etuk Nssien

    2016-01-01

    The study examined Students' Involvement in Social Networking and attitudes towards its Integration into Teaching. The study was carried out in the University of Uyo, Akwa Ibom State, Nigeria. The population of the study consisted of 17,618 undergraduate students enrolled into full time degree programmes in the University of Uyo for 2014/2015…

  6. Effect of Scaffolding on Helping Introductory Physics Students Solve Quantitative Problems Involving Strong Alternative Conceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Shih-Yin; Singh, Chandralekha

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that introductory physics students often have alternative conceptions that are inconsistent with established physical principles and concepts. Invoking alternative conceptions in the quantitative problem-solving process can derail the entire process. In order to help students solve quantitative problems involving strong…

  7. Undergraduate Research Involving Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Students in Interdisciplinary Science Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pagano, Todd; Ross, Annemarie; Smith, Susan B.

    2015-01-01

    Scientific undergraduate research in higher education often yields positive outcomes for student and faculty member participants alike, with underrepresented students often showing even more substantial gains (academic, professional, and personal) as a result of the experience. Significant success can be realized when involving deaf and…

  8. Parental Involvement in the Musical Education of Violin Students: Suzuki and "Traditional" Approaches Compared

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bugeja, Clare

    2009-01-01

    This article investigates parental involvement in the musical education of violin students and the changing role of the parents' across the learning process. Two contexts were compared, one emphasising the Suzuki methodology and the other a "traditional" approach. Students learning "traditionally" are typically taught note reading from the…

  9. Importance of Peer Support and Tutor Involvement in Entrepreneurship Education for Overseas Bioscience Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, P. C.; McKeown, A. E.

    2004-01-01

    An increasing number of Bioscience courses embed entrepreneurship learning outcomes within the curriculum, across a number of modules and/or within a dedicated module. The level 2, Developing People and Products module is one such example, involving students in 100 study effort hours over 7 weeks. This module was delivered to students (n = 37)…

  10. Community College Transfer Student Involvement Experiences at a Selective, Private Four-Year University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castillo, Carolina

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation tested the constructs of academic and social involvement and adjustment on grades as a pathway to explain community college transfer student experiences beyond the concept of transfer shock. The study contributes to the growing body of literature on Latina(o) community college transfer student experiences with the application of…

  11. Calculus Limits Involving Infinity: The Role of Students' Informal Dynamic Reasoning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Steven R.

    2015-01-01

    Few studies on calculus limits have centred their focus on student understanding of limits at infinity or infinite limits that involve continuous functions (as opposed to discrete sequences). This study examines student understanding of these types of limits using both pure mathematics and applied-science functions and formulas. Seven calculus…

  12. Action research to promote medical students' motivation in an English for Specific Purposes class.

    PubMed

    Dehnad, Afsaneh; Nasser, Hayedeh

    2014-01-01

    Action research is an attempt to seek immediate solutions to the problems experienced in educational settings. In this type of research, teachers are the researchers who intend to make instant reforms to develop, and improve their teaching styles and reflect on pedagogical practices. The purpose of this study was to conduct an action research to tackle the problem of students' low motivation in English classes at the medical school of Iran University of Medical Sciences in fall 2010. Participants of this study were 98 third-semester ESP students of medicine. To reform the situation and promote students' motivation to participate in classes more actively and eagerly, the researchers changed the syllabus by applying Kemmis and McTaggart's (1988) cyclical model of action research, and adopting task-based teaching. Data was collected by means of interviews with both teachers and students to determine the changes to be made in the syllabus, classroom observations to monitor students' behavioral changes, and a questionnaire to assess students' attitudes towards the changes. This research study had a number of valuable outcomes the most important of which was a change in classroom behavior of the students.

  13. Effect of Student Vulnerability on Perceptions of Teacher-Student Sexual Involvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fromuth, Mary Ellen; Mackey, Amber L.; Wilson, Amy

    2010-01-01

    This study explored whether the vulnerability of an adolescent student affected perceptions of teacher sexual misconduct. Respondents (150 male and 150 female undergraduates) read scenarios depicting teacher sexual misconduct varied by respondent gender, gender dyad (male teacher-female student and female teacher-male student), and three levels of…

  14. Faculty Background, Involvement, and Knowledge of Student Transfer at an Urban Community College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tatum, Charles B.; Hayward, Peggy; Monzon, Rey

    2006-01-01

    Previous studies of community colleges have shown that instructors play a vital role in the plans and actions of students who transfer to 4-year colleges and universities (Britt & Hirt, 1999; Cejda & Kaylor, 2001; Cuseo, 1998; Gaskin, 1999; Tatum, 2001). The purpose of the current study was to obtain information from the faculty on the extent of…

  15. Demographics and Police Involvement: Implications for Student Civil Liberties and Just Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torres, Mario S., Jr.; Stefkovich, Jacqueline A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: A factor largely overlooked amid the press for greater security in schools is the extent to which law enforcement participates in search and seizure and the implications such actions carry for student civil liberties. As case law suggests, police engaged in school searches may be held to the probable cause standard or the more flexible…

  16. Calculus limits involving infinity: the role of students' informal dynamic reasoning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Steven R.

    2015-01-01

    Few studies on calculus limits have centred their focus on student understanding of limits at infinity or infinite limits that involve continuous functions (as opposed to discrete sequences). This study examines student understanding of these types of limits using both pure mathematics and applied-science functions and formulas. Seven calculus students' approaches to understanding, calculating, and interpreting answers to these types of limits are examined. The dynamic reasoning used by these students led to good justifications and meaningful interpretations of their answers. On the other hand, when students engaged less with dynamic reasoning, they struggled more and made less reasonable interpretations of their answers. Furthermore, dynamic reasoning helped the students in this study overcome previously documented pitfalls and encouraged covariational reasoning. The applied-science contexts at times helped the students engage in dynamic reasoning.

  17. Investigation of Parental Involvement Tasks as Predictors of Primary Students' Turkish, Math, and Science & Technology Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sad, Suleyman Nihat

    2012-01-01

    Problem statement: Parental involvement is used as an umbrella term to imply parents' efforts to take an active role in their children's education. In this sense it takes many forms ranging from parent-child communication to participating/volunteering in school activities. Although parental involvement is one condition for students' success, the…

  18. Involving Adult Service Users with Learning Disabilities in the Training of Speech and Language Therapy Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harding, Celia

    2009-01-01

    This article describes a pilot project carried out at City University London, Department of Language and Communication Science, where adult service users with learning disabilities trained first-year speech and language therapy students. The training involved presentations by the service users on their involvement in interviewing support staff,…

  19. Exploring the Meaning of Parental Involvement in Physical Education for Students with Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    An, Jihoun

    2011-01-01

    Parental involvement has been studied in the field of education since the 1970s. Scholars assert that parental involvement affects students' achievement and performance (Christenson, Rounds, & Gorney, 1992; Epstein, Sanders, Simons, Salinas, Janson, & Van Voorhis, 2002; Fan & Chen, 2001; Herman & Yeh, 1983; von Voorhis, 2003).…

  20. Modeling the Relations among Parental Involvement, School Engagement and Academic Performance of High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Alwan, Ahmed F.

    2014-01-01

    The author proposed a model to explain how parental involvement and school engagement related to academic performance. Participants were (671) 9th and 10th graders students who completed two scales of "parental involvement" and "school engagement" in their regular classrooms. Results of the path analysis suggested that the…

  1. Predictors and Outcomes of Parental Involvement with High School Students in Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shumow, Lee; Lyutykh, Elena; Schmidt, Jennifer A.

    2011-01-01

    Demographic and psychological predictors of parent involvement with their children's science education both at home and at school were examined during high school. Associations between both types of parent involvement and numerous academic outcomes were tested. Data were collected from 244 high school students in 12 different science classrooms…

  2. Parental Involvement: How Does It Relate to Student Behavior and Academic Success?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Thaddues J.

    2012-01-01

    Parents are encouraged to be actively involved in the educational lives of their children regardless of the age of the children. Henderson and Berla (1996) asserted that parental involvement is linked to student success. Researchers have sought to understand the relationship between academic success and behavior. Previous research suggested that…

  3. The Relationship between Parental Involvement and Student Achievement in the U.S. Virgin Islands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durand, Felix

    2014-01-01

    Although many studies have been conducted on the relationship between parental involvement and student achievement, the effect of parental involvement in the U.S. Virgin Islands had not been substantiated empirically. It should not be assumed that research conducted in the United States or other geographic areas will necessarily apply to the…

  4. Parental Involvement as a Mediator of Academic Performance among Special Education Middle School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flores de Apodaca, Roberto; Gentling, Dana G.; Steinhaus, Joanna K.; Rosenberg, Elena A.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined parental involvement as a mediator of the academic performance of middle school students with special needs. The study built on the different types of parental involvement theorized by Epstein and colleagues (2002) and studied empirically by Fan and Chen (2001). Using a specially developed questionnaire, a sample of 82 parents…

  5. Linking Parent and Community Involvement with Student Achievement: Comparing Principal and Teacher Perceptions of Stakeholder Influence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Molly F.; Louis, Karen Seashore

    2009-01-01

    Expanding the sources of leadership in schools has been a reform theme since the mid 1980s. Using exploratory factor analysis and regression, we examine the following questions: (1) How does leadership style affect principals' openness to community involvement? (2) Is a principal's openness to community involvement related to student achievement?…

  6. A Model of Student Involvement in the Quality Assurance System at Institutional Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elassy, Noha

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to create a theoretical model of student involvement in the institutional quality assurance process at their universities. Design/methodology/approach: The model suggested in this paper was created and developed from a critical examination of relevant literature on stakeholder involvement in decision making and quality…

  7. Together yet Separate: Students' Associating Amounts of Change in Quantities Involved in Rate of Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Heather L.

    2015-01-01

    This paper extends work about quantitative reasoning related to covarying quantities involved in rate of change. It reports a multiple case study of three students' reasoning about quantities involved in rate of change when working on tasks incorporating multiple representations of covarying quantities. When interpreting relationships between…

  8. Getting Students REALLY Involved in Design and Construction--Are You Mad?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Gareth; Watson, Alison

    2011-01-01

    Involve students in the design and construction stages of new schools?--"Are you serious?" "Leave it to the experts", "We don't have time--the programme is very tight", "What do they know?", "They'll get in the way!", "It's not our job!" are still responses from some involved with design…

  9. A Study of the Relationship between Parental Involvement and Mental Health of College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blake Payne, Ruthanna

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the characteristics of parental involvement and mental health in a sample of traditionally aged college students and investigate the variance parental involvement predicts in mental health. Five hundred and eighty-eight freshmen at a large research university responded to a 97 question survey. Parental…

  10. Sport Involvement and Educational Outcomes of High School Students: A Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Seunghyun; Feltz, Deborah L.; Kietzmann, Laura A.; Diemer, Matthew A.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the relations among sport involvement and social and personal influences on high school students' educational expectations and attainment, using National Education Longitudinal Survey-88. Athletic engagement, educational expectations of significant others, peer support for academics, parental involvement in academics, and…

  11. Family Involvement and Parent-Teacher Relationships for Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garbacz, S. Andrew; McIntyre, Laura Lee; Santiago, Rachel T.

    2016-01-01

    Family educational involvement and parent--teacher relationships are important for supporting student outcomes and have unique implications for families of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). However, little research has examined child and family characteristics among families of children with ASD as predictors of family involvement and…

  12. Involvement in Transition Planning Meetings among High School Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffin, Megan M.; Taylor, Julie Lounds; Urbano, Richard C.; Hodapp, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Although students with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are least likely to attend and participate in transition planning meetings, little is known about factors related to their involvement. Using a national data set, we conducted regressions to identify predictors of the involvement of 320 youth with ASD. Attendance positively related to higher…

  13. Success for Students and Nurses With Disabilities: A Call to Action for Nurse Educators.

    PubMed

    Marks, Beth; McCulloh, Karen

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a "call to action" for nurse educators to identify and implement best practices supporting the success of students with disabilities given recent federal legislative changes. Best practices for educating students with disabilities in nursing education are discussed. Increasing our understanding of disability from a variety of models--not just the medical model--will promote greater diversity and inclusivity within the nursing profession, which will enhance patient care.

  14. 24 CFR 248.145 - Criteria for approval of a plan of action involving incentives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... may approve a plan of action for extension of the low income affordability restrictions on an eligible... section, for the remaining useful life of the project; (3) Throughout the remaining useful life of the...) Implementation. Any agreement to maintain the low income affordability restrictions for the remaining useful...

  15. 24 CFR 248.145 - Criteria for approval of a plan of action involving incentives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... may approve a plan of action for extension of the low income affordability restrictions on an eligible... section, for the remaining useful life of the project; (3) Throughout the remaining useful life of the...) Implementation. Any agreement to maintain the low income affordability restrictions for the remaining useful...

  16. 25 CFR 169.21 - Condemnation actions involving individually owned lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    .... 169.21 Section 169.21 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER... facts relating to any condemnation action to obtain a right-of-way over individually owned lands shall be reported immediately by officials of the Bureau of Indian Affairs having knowledge of such...

  17. Human Securitability: A Participatory Action Research Study Involving Novice Teachers and Youngsters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kravale-Paulina, Marite; Olehnovica, Eridiana

    2015-01-01

    Civic participation, initiative and interest in current events can bridge the alienation felt towards national and municipal institutions, thereby enabling individuals to improve their quality of life and contribute to all-round sustainable development of their resident state. This paper reports on a participatory action research study into civic…

  18. Heterosexual and nonheterosexual young university students' involvement in traditional and cyber forms of bullying.

    PubMed

    Wensley, Kate; Campbell, Marilyn

    2012-12-01

    Research has consistently found that school students who do not identify as self-declared completely heterosexual are at increased risk of victimization by bullying from peers. This study examined heterosexual and nonheterosexual university students' involvement in both traditional and cyber forms of bullying, as either bullies or victims. Five hundred twenty-eight first-year university students (M=19.52 years old) were surveyed about their sexual orientation and their bullying experiences over the previous 12 months. The results showed that nonheterosexual young people reported higher levels of involvement in traditional bullying, both as victims and perpetrators, in comparison to heterosexual students. In contrast, cyberbullying trends were generally found to be similar for heterosexual and nonheterosexual young people. Gender differences were also found. The implications of these results are discussed in terms of intervention and prevention of the victimization of nonheterosexual university students.

  19. What Will Teachers Do to Involve Parents in Education?: Using a Theory of Reasoned Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pryor, Brandt W.; Pryor, Caroline R.

    2009-01-01

    Parents' involvement in their children's education is associated with a variety of benefits, including higher achievement, yet teachers are not uniformly supportive and encouraging. Teacher attitudes and beliefs about parental involvement are a predictive factor which schools, and preservice programs, could influence, yet little is known about how…

  20. Mechanisms involved in the relaxant action of testosterone in the renal artery from male normoglycemic and diabetic rabbits.

    PubMed

    Marrachelli, Vannina G; Miranda, Francisco J; Centeno, José M; Burguete, María C; Castelló-Ruiz, María; Jover-Mengual, Teresa; Pérez, Antonio M; Salom, Juan B; Torregrosa, Germán; Alborch, Enrique

    2010-02-01

    Kidney disease is a frequent complication in diabetes, and significant differences have been reported between male and female patients. Our working hypothesis was that diabetes might modify the vascular actions of testosterone in isolated rabbit renal arteries and the mechanisms involved in these actions. Testosterone (10(-8) to 10(-4)M) induced relaxation of precontracted arteries, without significant differences between control and diabetic rabbits. Both in control and diabetic rabbits endothelium removal inhibited testosterone relaxant action. In arteries with endothelium, incubation with indomethacin (10(-5)M), N(G)-nitro-l-arginine (10(-5)M) or tetraethylammonium (10(-5)M) did not modify relaxations to testosterone neither in control nor in diabetic rabbits. In endothelium-denuded arteries indomethacin enhanced the relaxant action of testosterone, both in control and diabetic rabbits. In arteries from diabetic rabbits, eNOS, iNOS and COX-1 expression and testosterone-induced release of thromboxane A(2) and prostacyclin were not significantly different from those observed in control rabbits. However, COX-2 expression was significantly lower in diabetic rabbits that in control rabbits. In nominally Ca(2+)-free medium, cumulative addition of CaCl2 (10(-5) to 3x10(-2)M) contracted previously depolarized arteries. Testosterone (10(-4)M) inhibited CaCl2 contractions of the renal artery both in control and diabetic rabbits. These results show that testosterone relaxes the renal artery both in control and diabetic rabbits. This relaxation is modulated by muscular thromboxane A(2), it is partially mediated by endothelial prostacyclin, and it involves the blocking of extracellular Ca2+ entry. Diabetes does not modify the mechanisms involved in the relaxant action of testosterone in the rabbit renal artery.

  1. Involvement of the dopaminergic system in the central orexin-induced antinociceptive action against colonic distension in conscious rats.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Toshikatsu; Nozu, Tsukasa; Kumei, Shima; Takakusaki, Kaoru; Miyagishi, Saori; Ohhira, Masumi

    2015-09-25

    We have recently demonstrated that orexin acts centrally in the brain to induce antinociceptive action against colonic distension through orexin 1 receptors in conscious rats. Although the dopaminergic system can induce antinociceptive action for somatic pain, the association between changes in the dopaminergic system and visceral pain perception has not been investigated. In the present study, we hypothesized that the dopaminergic system may be involved in visceral nociception, and if so, the dopaminergic system may mediate the orexin-induced visceral antinociception. Visceral sensation was evaluated using the colonic distension-induced abdominal withdrawal reflex (AWR) in conscious rats. Intracisternal injection of D1 (SKF38398) or D2 (quinpirole) dopamine receptor agonist increased the threshold volume of colonic distension-induced AWR in a dose-dependent manner. Pretreatment with either the D1 or D2 dopamine receptor antagonist (SCH23390 or sulpiride, respectively) potently blocked the centrally injected orexin-A-induced antinociceptive action against colonic distension. These results suggest for the first time that dopaminergic signaling via D1 and D2 dopamine receptors in the brain may induce visceral antinociception and that the dopaminergic signaling may be involved in the central orexin-induced antinociceptive action against colonic distension.

  2. Additional Evidence of the Trypanocidal Action of (−)-Elatol on Amastigote Forms through the Involvement of Reactive Oxygen Species

    PubMed Central

    Desoti, Vânia Cristina; Lazarin-Bidóia, Danielle; Sudatti, Daniela Bueno; Pereira, Renato Crespo; Ueda-Nakamura, Tania; Nakamura, Celso Vataru; de Oliveira Silva, Sueli

    2014-01-01

    Chagas’ disease, a vector-transmitted infectious disease, is caused by the protozoa parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. Drugs that are currently available for the treatment of this disease are unsatisfactory, making the search for new chemotherapeutic agents a priority. We recently described the trypanocidal action of (−)-elatol, extracted from the macroalga Laurencia dendroidea. However, nothing has been described about the mechanism of action of this compound on amastigotes that are involved in the chronic phase of Chagas’ disease. The goal of the present study was to evaluate the effect of (−)-elatol on the formation of superoxide anions (O2•−), DNA fragmentation, and autophagy in amastigotes of T. cruzi to elucidate the possible mechanism of the trypanocidal action of (−)-elatol. Treatment of the amastigotes with (−)-elatol increased the formation of O2•− at all concentrations of (−)-elatol assayed compared with untreated parasites. Increased fluorescence was observed in parasites treated with (−)-elatol, indicating DNA fragmentation and the formation of autophagic compartments. The results suggest that the trypanocidal action of (−)-elatol might involve the induction of the autophagic and apoptotic death pathways triggered by an imbalance of the parasite’s redox metabolism. PMID:25257785

  3. The Effects of a Career Guidance Program Involving Teachers and Parents of Tenth Grade Students. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petersen, M. Larry

    The report describes a career guidance program for grade 10 students at Logan Senior High School involving parents, teachers, and guidance counselors. Parent and student occupational aspirations and knowledge of career development principles and planning were investigated with three groups--tutor-parent-student, parent-student, and student. All…

  4. Student Feedback via Screen Capture Digital Video: Stimulating Student's Modified Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Nigel; Georghiades, Panicos; Gunson, John

    2012-01-01

    A new technique of providing assessment feedback to students is demonstrated via a case study of MBA and undergraduate students. The feedback method uses inexpensive and widely available screen capture digital video technology; it gives the student an impression of being present during the marking process. In addition it enables the tutor to…

  5. Waking action of ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) involves histamine and GABAA receptor block.

    PubMed

    Yanovsky, Yevgenij; Schubring, Stephan R; Yao, Quiaoling; Zhao, Yan; Li, Sha; May, Andrea; Haas, Helmut L; Lin, Jian-Sheng; Sergeeva, Olga A

    2012-01-01

    Since ancient times ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), a constituent of bile, is used against gallstone formation and cholestasis. A neuroprotective action of UDCA was demonstrated recently in models of Alzheimer's disease and retinal degeneration. The mechanisms of UDCA action in the nervous system are poorly understood. We show now that UDCA promotes wakefulness during the active period of the day, lacking this activity in histamine-deficient mice. In cultured hypothalamic neurons UDCA did not affect firing rate but synchronized the firing, an effect abolished by the GABA(A)R antagonist gabazine. In histaminergic neurons recorded in slices UDCA reduced amplitude and duration of spontaneous and evoked IPSCs. In acutely isolated histaminergic neurons UDCA inhibited GABA-evoked currents and sIPSCs starting at 10 µM (IC(50) = 70 µM) and did not affect NMDA- and AMPA-receptor mediated currents at 100 µM. Recombinant GABA(A) receptors composed of α1, β1-3 and γ2L subunits expressed in HEK293 cells displayed a sensitivity to UDCA similar to that of native GABA(A) receptors. The mutation α1V256S, known to reduce the inhibitory action of pregnenolone sulphate, reduced the potency of UDCA. The mutation α1Q241L, which abolishes GABA(A)R potentiation by several neurosteroids, had no effect on GABA(A)R inhibition by UDCA. In conclusion, UDCA enhances alertness through disinhibition, at least partially of the histaminergic system via GABA(A) receptors.

  6. Facilitating Student Involvement in Transition Assessment: A Pilot Study of the "Student Transition Questionnaire"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collier, Margo L.; Griffin, Megan M.; Wei, Yonghua

    2016-01-01

    This article describes the pilot study of an informal assessment, the "Student Transition Questionnaire" (STQ). The STQ is a 38-item assessment designed to elicit student perspectives on transition-related topics. In this mixed-methods study, we piloted the STQ with 186 participants, and then conducted focus groups with various…

  7. Does parental involvement matter for student achievement and mental health in high school?

    PubMed

    Wang, Ming-Te; Sheikh-Khalil, Salam

    2014-01-01

    Parental involvement in education remains important for facilitating positive youth development. This study conceptualized parental involvement as a multidimensional construct-including school-based involvement, home-based involvement, and academic socialization-and examined the effects of different types of parental involvement in 10th grade on student achievement and depression in 11th grade (approximately ages 15-17 years). In addition, this study tested whether parental involvement influenced adolescent outcomes by increasing their academic engagement in school. A total of 1,056 adolescents participated in the study (51% males; 53% European American, 40% African American, and 7% other). Parental involvement was found to improve academic and emotional functioning among adolescents. In addition, parental involvement predicted adolescent academic success and mental health both directly and indirectly through behavioral and emotional engagement.

  8. An Action Research in Science: Providing Metacognitive Support to Year 9 Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagaba, Francis; Treagust, David F.; Chandrasegaran, A. L.; Won, Mihye

    2016-01-01

    An action research study was designed to evaluate the effectiveness of providing metacognitive support to enhance Year 9 students' metacognitive capabilities in order to better understand science concepts related to light, environmental health, ecosystems, genetics, ecology, atoms and the Periodic Table. The study was conducted over three years…

  9. Dramatic Impact of Action Research of Arts-Based Teaching on At-Risk Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Xin; Kenzy, Patty; Underwood, Lucy; Severson, Laura

    2015-01-01

    This study was presented at the American Educational Research Association 2012 conference in Vancouver, Canada. The study explored how action research of arts-based teaching (ABT) impacted at-risk students in three urban public schools in southern California, USA. ABT was defined as using arts, music, drama, and dance in teaching other subjects. A…

  10. Serving the Needs of Challenged Students at a Private Shanghai School: An Action Research Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Jerry

    2013-01-01

    This action research started in year 2009 at LIU Shanghai, a private school for children with autism spectrum disorder, to serve the needs of challenged students. The purpose of this qualitative study was to identify the strengths and challenges of the program, plus solicit recommendations from the parents and teachers for making improvements. The…

  11. An Action Research Approach to Supporting Elite Student-Athletes in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKenna, Jim; Dunstan-Lewis, Nicky

    2004-01-01

    Support for elite student-athletes was explored within a single English university using Stringer's (1996) Look, Think, Act model of action research. Entry to the ongoing support programme is competitive and participation is voluntary, with sessions delivered every second week after lectures. Based on supporting documentation, interviews, focus…

  12. Action Research and Differentiating Reading Instruction in Mississippi: Fourth-Grade Students' Reading Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mims, Wyn, M.; Lockley, Jeannie

    2017-01-01

    A fourth-grade teacher utilized action research in order to make data-driven decisions about reading interventions with her students. The teacher decided on a broad intervention, which was differentiating reading instruction, implemented differentiated instruction, collected data and continuously adjusted interventions based on monitoring data.…

  13. Conscious Engagement in Undergraduate Male Nursing Students: Facilitating Voice through an Action Research Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maykut, Colleen A.; Lee, Andrew; Argueta, Nelson Garcia; Grant, Sean; Miller, Cole

    2016-01-01

    Although women have made significant progress into traditionally male-dominated professions, such as medicine and engineering, the same cannot be said of men in the nursing profession. Utilizing a critical social theory perspective, an action research project was designed to encourage participants, current male nursing students and alumni of…

  14. Moving from I to Us: The Power of Action Research To Improve Students' Writing Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, A. Christine; Cross, Lorraine

    Project WATCH! (Writing Across the Curriculum Hawks!) was the 1999-2000 schoolwide action research project at the A.D. Henderson University School grades K-8. The study question, "How can teachers build schoolwide capacity to support improved student writing across the curriculum?", examined whole-school collaboration where all teachers understand…

  15. A Programme for Future Audit Professionals: Using Action Research to Nurture Student Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Peursem, Karen; Samujh, R. Helen; Nath, Nirmala

    2016-01-01

    Professionals require decision-making skills as well as technical knowledge. One might assume that their university education prepares them for this role yet, and least for future audit professionals, traditional text--and lecture--methods dominate teaching practice. This Participation Action Research study develops with auditing students a…

  16. Promoting Engagement: Using Species Action Plans to Bring Together Students and Conservation Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Graham W.; Turnbull, Shona; Spencer, James

    2008-01-01

    We describe an exercise, the production of a species action plan, which utilises components of both transmission mode and experiential learning. This exercise brings together students and a professional role model to promote a stronger engagement with aspects of local biodiversity management. We outline perceived benefits and outcomes of the…

  17. The Effects of Single Laban Effort Action Instruction on Undergraduate Conducting Students' Gestural Clarity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, John T., Jr.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of Laban Effort Action (slash) instruction in an undergraduate conducting class on college wind ensemble member's ratings of conductors' gestural clarity. Participants--undergraduate and graduate wind ensemble members (N = 28)--rated 32 videos of eight undergraduate conducting students who had…

  18. The Relationship between Promotions Committees' Identification of Problem Medical Students and Subsequent State Medical Board Actions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santen, Sally A.; Petrusa, Emil; Gruppen, Larry D.

    2015-01-01

    Studies have found unprofessional behavior in medical school was associated with disciplinary action by state medical boards. For medical schools, promotions committees are responsible for identifying which students do not demonstrate academic performance and professional behavior acceptable for promotion and graduation. The objective of this…

  19. Contextual Predictors of Self-Determined Actions in Students with and without Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mumbardó-Adam, Cristina; Shogren, Karrie A.; Guàrdia-olmos, Joan; Giné, Climent

    2017-01-01

    Research in the field of intellectual disability suggests that promotion of self-determination triggers positive transition outcomes for youth with intellectual disability. This article examines the contributions of personal and environmental variables in predicting self-determined action in students with and without intellectual disability. The…

  20. Were Minority Students Discouraged from Applying to University of California Campuses after the Affirmative Action Ban?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antonovics, Kate; Backes, Ben

    2013-01-01

    This paper uses student-level data to investigate how the college application behavior of underrepresented minorities (URMs) changed in response to the 1998 end of affirmative action in admissions at the University of California (UC). We show that all URMs experienced a drop in their probability of admission to at least one UC campus. However, the…

  1. Promoting Student Teachers' Understanding of Action Research: An Experience from Teacher Education in Ethiopia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hussein, Jeylan Wolyie

    2009-01-01

    This article reports on hopes and challenges in the first attempt to assist Ethiopian student teachers to develop practical awareness about action research through collaborative learning methods. First, the candidates were organized as a cohort. Then a framework was developed to help them construct reflective questions before and during action…

  2. Riding the Wave: Student Researcher Reflection on the Action Research Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burrows, Andrea; Thomas, Jonathan; Woods, Angie; Suess, Robert; Dole, Deborah

    2012-01-01

    The focus of this article is the exploration of and an explanation of student researchers' affect and activity in an action research project. Using a hermeneutical theoretical framework we argue that the researcher group as a whole constructs a wave process and at the same time each individual researcher in the group creates a wave process that…

  3. Promoting Students' Motivation in Learning Physical Science--An Action Research Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuan, Hsiao-Lin; Chin, Chi-Chin; Tsai, Chih-Chung

    This study reported how four science teachers used action research to promote their students' motivation in learning physical science. Four teachers with one of their 8th grade physical science classes participated in the study. A combination of qualitative and quantitative research design were used in the study, and data collection included…

  4. Enhancing the Undergraduate Student Experience via Fund-Raising Partnerships: An Action Research Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thorley, Wendy; Marjoribanks, Bruce; Kranz, Julian

    2014-01-01

    This project was developed from practitioner action research and considers the impact of integrating fund-raising activities into the formal curriculum with a target group of undergraduate students. The main aim of this project was to evaluate the impact of developing fund-raising activities as an integral aspect at both module and programme…

  5. An Action Research Study: Using Classroom Guidance Lessons to Teach Middle School Students about Sexual Harassment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, Rebecca C.

    2006-01-01

    This article describes a three-part classroom guidance lesson that teaches middle school students the definition of sexual harassment, the difference between flirting and sexual harassment, and the harmful effects of sexual harassment. An action research study evaluated the effectiveness of the lessons in decreasing referrals for sexual harassment…

  6. We love our school toilets: involving primary school students in improving their school toilets.

    PubMed

    Senior, Elizabeth

    2014-03-01

    This article reports on the planning, implementation and evaluation of an intervention to improve school students' experience of using the school toilet in a primary school in Melbourne, Australia. 20 students from grades 2-6 participated in focus groups, to discuss what they valued about the school and raise awareness of issues they were not happy about. A common theme from all of the focus groups was that students reported avoiding use of the school toilets. Using the ideas generated from the focus groups, the student council (with input from staff), developed a self-administered pre- and post-test questionnaire. This was given to 220 students in grades 1-4, aged 6-10 years. Improvements suggested by the students were made to the toilet block, and then a post-test was administered. Independent t tests were conducted. The pre-test indicated that 71% of girls and 65% of boys feared the behaviour of other students in the toilet. Overwhelmingly, the qualitative comments focused on poor student behaviour in the toilets, with lack of privacy due to student misbehaviour mentioned in 90% of the comments. After the toilets were revamped, the greatest gains were made in students' attitudes toward the toilets, with a 37% increase in students who indicated they now liked the toilet facility. Incidents of vandalism also decreased; however, student misconduct in the toilets was still regarded as a problem. Involving students in refurbishing their toilets improved how students viewed the toilets and reduced vandalism; however, a different intervention is required to change inappropriate behaviours in the toilet.

  7. Diversity of mechanisms involved in aromatase regulation and estrogen action in the brain

    PubMed Central

    Charlier, Thierry D.; Cornil, Charlotte A.; Ball, Gregory F.; Balthazart, Jacques

    2010-01-01

    The mechanisms through which estrogens modulate neuronal physiology, brain morphology, and behavior in recent years have proven to be far more complex than previously thought. For example, a second nuclear estrogen receptor has been identified, a new family of coregulatory proteins regulating steroid-dependent gene transcriptions was discovered and, finally, it has become clear that estrogens have surprisingly rapid effects based on their actions on cell membranes, which in turn results in the modulation of intracellular signaling cascades. This paper presents a selective review of new findings in this area related to work in our laboratories, focusing on the role of estrogens in the activation of male sexual behavior. Two separate topics are considered. We first discuss functions of the steroid receptor coactivator-1 (SRC-1) that has emerged as a key limiting factor for behavioral effects of estradiol. Knocking-down its expression by antisense oligonucleotides drastically inhibits male-typical sexual behaviors. Secondly, we describe rapid regulations of brain estradiol production by calcium-dependent phosphorylations of the aromatase enzyme, themselves under the control of neurotransmitter activity. These rapid changes in estrogen bioavailability have clear behavioral consequences. Increases or decreases in estradiol concentrations respectively obtained by an acute injection of estradiol itself or of an aromatase inhibitor lead within 15-30 min to parallel changes in sexual behavior frequencies. These new controls of estrogens action offer a vast array of possibilities for discrete local controls of estrogen action. They also represent a formidable challenge for neuroendocrinologists trying to obtain an integrated view of brain function in relation to behavior. PMID:20060879

  8. Possible involvement of programmed cell death pathways in the neuroprotective action of polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Bastianetto, S; Krantic, S; Chabot, J-G; Quirion, R

    2011-08-01

    One of the hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease is the accumulation of senile plaques composed of extra-cellular aggregates of beta-amyloid (Aβ) peptides. It is well established that at least in vitro, Aβ triggers apoptotic cell death via the activation of caspase-dependent and -independent cell death effectors, namely caspase-3 and apoptosis inducing factor (AIF), respectively. Epidemiological studies have reported that elderly people have a lower risk (up to 50%) of developing dementia if they regularly eat fruits and vegetables and drink tea and red wine (in moderation). Numerous studies indicate that polyphenols derived from these foods and beverages account for the observed neuroprotective effects. In particular, we have reported that polyphenols extracted from green tea (i.e. epigallocatechin gallate or EGCG) and red wine (i.e. resveratrol) block Aβ-induced hippocampal cell death, by at least partially inhibiting Aβ fibrillisation. It has been shown that polyphenols may also modulate caspase-dependent and -independent programmed cell death (PCD) pathways. Indeed, polyphenols including resveratrol, EGCG and luteolin significantly inhibit the activation of the key apoptotic executioner, caspase-3 and are able to modulate mitogen-activated protein kinases known to play an important role in neuronal apoptosis. Moreover, it has been reported that polyphenols may exert their anti-apoptotic action by inhibiting AIF release from mitochondria, thus providing new mechanism of action for polyphenols. This review aims to update the current knowledge regarding the differential effects of polyphenols on PCD pathways and discuss their putative neuroprotective action resulting from their capacity to modulate these pathways.

  9. Baking together-the coordination of actions in activities involving people with dementia.

    PubMed

    Majlesi, Ali Reza; Ekström, Anna

    2016-08-01

    This study explores interaction and collaboration between people with dementia and their spouses in relation to the performance of household chores with the focus on instruction as an interactional context to engage the person with dementia in collaboration to accomplish joint activities. Dementia is generally associated with pathological changes in people's cognitive functions such as diminishing memory functions, communicative abilities and also diminishing abilities to take initiative as well as to plan and execute tasks. Using video recordings of everyday naturally occurring activities, we analyze the sequential organization of actions (see Schegloff, 2007) oriented toward the accomplishment of a joint multi-task activity of baking. The analysis shows the specific ways of collaboration through instructional activities in which the person with dementia exhibits his competence and skills in accomplishing the given tasks through negotiating the instructions with his partner and carrying out instructed actions. Although the driving force of the collaboration seems to be a series of directive sequences only initiated by the partner throughout the baking activity, our analyses highlight how the person with dementia can actively use the material environment-including collaborating partners-to compensate for challenges and difficulties encountered in achieving everyday tasks. The sequential organization of instructions and instructed actions are in this sense argued to provide an interactional environment wherein the person with dementia can make contributions to the joint activity in an efficient way. While a collaborator has been described as necessary for a person with dementia to be able to partake in activities, this study shows that people with dementia are not only guided by their collaborators in joint activities but they can also actively use their collaborators in intricate compensatory ways.

  10. Queer Student Leaders: An Exploratory Case Study of Identity Development and LGBT Student Involvement at a Midwestern Research University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renn, Kristen A.; Bilodeau, Brent

    2005-01-01

    Using the first phase of a longitudinal study of student leaders of the 2002 Midwest Bi-, Lesbian, Gay, Transgender and Allies College Conference (MBLGTACC), the authors explore the intersections of involvement in identity-specific leadership activities and development of LGBT/Queer identity. LGBT leadership experiences appear to have contributed…

  11. From Data Source to Co-Researchers? Tracing the Shift from "Student Voice" to Student--teacher Partnerships in "Educational Action Research"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groundwater-Smith, Susan; Mockler, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    This article provides a review of the concept of student voice as it has been represented in "Educational Action Research" from the 1990s to the present day. Contextualised within an exploration of the challenges posed by educational action research that incorporates student voice in the current age of accountability as reflected and…

  12. Involving postgraduate's students in undergraduate small group teaching promotes active learning in both

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Ruchi; Modi, Jyoti Nath; Vyas, Rashmi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Lecture is a common traditional method for teaching, but it may not stimulate higher order thinking and students may also be hesitant to express and interact. The postgraduate (PG) students are less involved with undergraduate (UG) teaching. Team based small group active learning method can contribute to better learning experience. Aim: To-promote active learning skills among the UG students using small group teaching methods involving PG students as facilitators to impart hands-on supervised training in teaching and managerial skills. Methodology: After Institutional approval under faculty supervision 92 UGs and 8 PGs participated in 6 small group sessions utilizing the jigsaw technique. Feedback was collected from both. Observations: Undergraduate Feedback (Percentage of Students Agreed): Learning in small groups was a good experience as it helped in better understanding of the subject (72%), students explored multiple reading resources (79%), they were actively involved in self-learning (88%), students reported initial apprehension of performance (71%), identified their learning gaps (86%), team enhanced their learning process (71%), informal learning in place of lecture was a welcome change (86%), it improved their communication skills (82%), small group learning can be useful for future self-learning (75%). Postgraduate Feedback: Majority performed facilitation for first time, perceived their performance as good (75%), it was helpful in self-learning (100%), felt confident of managing students in small groups (100%), as facilitator they improved their teaching skills, found it more useful and better identified own learning gaps (87.5%). Conclusions: Learning in small groups adopting team based approach involving both UGs and PGs promoted active learning in both and enhanced the teaching skills of the PGs. PMID:26380201

  13. Measuring 3D-orthodontic actions to guide clinical treatments involving coil springs and miniscrews.

    PubMed

    Mencattelli, Margherita; Donati, Elisa; Spinelli, Pasqua; Cultrone, Massimo; Luzi, Cesare; Cantarella, Daniele; Stefanini, Cesare

    2017-03-01

    The understanding of the phenomena at the base of tooth movement, due to orthodontic therapy, is an ambitious topic especially with regard to the "optimal forces" able to move teeth without causing irreversible tissue damages. To this aim, a measuring platform for detecting 3D orthodontic actions has been developed. It consists of customized load cells and dedicated acquisition electronics. The force sensors are able to detect, simultaneously and independently of each other, the six orthodontic components which a tooth is affected by. They have been calibrated and then applied on a clinical case that required NiTi closed coil springs and miniscrews for the treatment of upper post-extraction spaces closure. The tests have been conducted on teeth stumps belonging to a plaster cast of the patient's mouth. The load cells characteristics (sensor linearity and repeatability) have been analyzed (0.97 < R (2) < 1; 6.3*10 (-6) % < STD < 8.8 %) and, on the basis of calibration data, the actions exerted on teeth have been determined. The biomechanical behavior of the frontal group and clinical interpretation of the results are discussed.

  14. "From Worse to Better": How Kenyan Student-Teachers Can Use Participatory Action Research in Health Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dahl, Kari Kragh Blume

    2014-01-01

    This study focuses on Kenyan student-teachers' professional learning and development in health education in a participatory action research project conducted in one Kenyan teacher training college. The aim was to explore the potential of participatory action research to instigate change in student-teachers' health education practices in a…

  15. Indian Secondary Students' Views about Global Warming: Beliefs about the Usefulness of Actions and Willingness to Act

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chhokar, Kiran; Dua, Shweta; Taylor, Neil; Boyes, Edward; Stanisstreet, Martin

    2011-01-01

    A 44-item survey instrument was designed to determine secondary students' views about how useful various specific actions related to reducing global warming might be, their willingness to undertake these various actions and the extent to which these 2 might be linked. The instrument was administered to students in grades 6-10 (n = 768) from 4…

  16. High school students' posttraumatic symptoms, substance abuse and involvement in violence in the aftermath of war.

    PubMed

    Schiff, Miriam; Pat-Horenczyk, Ruth; Benbenishty, Rami; Brom, Danny; Baum, Naomi; Astor, Ron Avi

    2012-10-01

    This study examined one-year after effects of exposure to war events on adolescents' Posttraumatic Stress Symptoms (PTS) and risk behaviors (substance use and involvement in school violence). In addition, it addressed two potential vulnerability factors: at the micro level, it examined whether childhood trauma raised the vulnerability of Israeli adolescents to PTS and risk behaviors when exposed to war events. At the macro level, we explored whether ethnicity, i.e., being an Israeli Arab, is a vulnerability factor to PTS and risk behaviors. We used a representative sample of 7th to 11th grade students from the north of Israel that included 4151 students: 1800 Jewish (54.4% boys) and 2351 Arab (41.5% boys). We assessed exposure to war events and childhood traumatic events, PTS and PTSD, substance use (alcohol, cannabis, Ecstasy) and involvement in school violence. The findings revealed extensive exposure to war events among both Jewish and Arab students. A year after the war, its effects on adolescents were still manifested in PTS, and involvement in school violence and substance use. Exposure to child physical abuse was associated with higher levels of PTS symptoms, substance use and involvement in violence. Exposure to other traumatic events was also associated with greater PTS symptoms and involvement in violence but not with greater substance use. Arab students were a more vulnerable population. They reported higher PTS symptoms, more cannabis use and greater involvement in school violence than Jewish students. However, exposure to war events had similar effects on both Arab and Jewish students. We conclude that war effects include a broad range of psychological distress and risk behaviors that last long after the war ends, especially among youth who have experienced childhood trauma and high exposure to war-related stressors.

  17. Participation As Relational Process: Unpacking Involvement in Social Action and Community Service

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Jeffrey N.; Bench, Joshua H.; Warnaar, Bethany L.; Stroup, John T.

    2013-01-01

    Educators, policymakers, and other concerned adults share an interest in promoting lifelong patterns of community service in youth. Practitioners and researchers alike highlight the importance of youth participation in afterschool service activities so the author's focus in this paper is on youth involved in PeaceJam, an innovative…

  18. The Longitudinal Process of Early Parent Involvement on Student Achievement: A Path Analysis.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Momoko; Englund, Michelle M; Warner-Richter, Mallory N; Reynolds, Arthur J

    2013-01-01

    This longitudinal study investigated the process whereby early parent involvement in preschool effects student achievement from kindergarten through 6(th) grade. Participants were 1,539 low-income, mainly African American children and their mothers, in the Chicago Longitudinal Study. Program children (N = 989) received one or two years of the Child-Parent Center (CPC) program - a preschool intervention that strongly promoted parents' development of parent involvement skills within the school and at home. Children from similar backgrounds who did not attend the CPC, but participated in available local resources (e.g. day care), were obtained as a comparison group (N = 550). Path analysis revealed an interactive process between parent involvement, academic achievement, and children's motivation. Early parent involvement directly influenced kindergarten achievement, which in turn influenced first grade student motivation. Highly motivated children then encouraged parents to continue involvement. The cyclic nature of this process across elementary school was observed. The model accounted for 61% of the variance in 6(th) grade achievement. Findings suggest that early parent involvement promoted in the CPC program, sets the stage for subsequent parent involvement, student motivation, and academic achievement throughout early and middle childhood.

  19. Co-Constructing Student Involvement: An Examination of Teacher Confirmation and Student-to-Student Connectedness in the College Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sidelinger, Robert J.; Booth-Butterfield, Melanie

    2010-01-01

    In order for students to succeed academically instructors must foster a supportive and connected learning environment. Importantly, not only do instructors need to connect with students, they also need to allow students the opportunity to connect with one another. Following that framework, aligned with the Dimensions of Learning model, we examined…

  20. Estrogen involvement in social behavior in rodents: Rapid and long-term actions.

    PubMed

    Ervin, Kelsy S J; Lymer, Jennifer M; Matta, Richard; Clipperton-Allen, Amy E; Kavaliers, Martin; Choleris, Elena

    2015-08-01

    This article is part of a Special Issue ("Estradiol and cognition"). Estrogens have repeatedly been shown to influence a wide array of social behaviors, which in rodents are predominantly olfactory-mediated. Estrogens are involved in social behavior at multiple levels of processing, from the detection and integration of socially relevant olfactory information to more complex social behaviors, including social preferences, aggression and dominance, and learning and memory for social stimuli (e.g. social recognition and social learning). Three estrogen receptors (ERs), ERα, ERβ, and the G protein-coupled ER 1 (GPER1), differently affect these behaviors. Social recognition, territorial aggression, and sexual preferences and mate choice, all requiring the integration of socially related olfactory information, seem to primarily involve ERα, with ERβ playing a lesser, modulatory role. In contrast, social learning consistently responds differently to estrogen manipulations than other social behaviors. This suggests differential ER involvement in brain regions important for specific social behaviors, such as the ventromedial and medial preoptic nuclei of the hypothalamus in social preferences and aggression, the medial amygdala and hippocampus in social recognition, and the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus in social learning. While the long-term effects of ERα and ERβ on social behavior have been extensively investigated, our knowledge of the rapid, non-genomic, effects of estrogens is more limited and suggests that they may mediate some social behaviors (e.g. social learning) differently from long-term effects. Further research is required to compare ER involvement in regulating social behavior in male and female animals, and to further elucidate the roles of the more recently described G protein-coupled ERs, both the GPER1 and the Gq-mER.

  1. Ten-Structure as Strategy of Addition 1-20 by Involving Spatial Structuring Ability for First Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salmah, Ummy; Putri, Ratu Ilma Indra; Somakim

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to design learning activities that can support students to develop strategies for the addition of number 1 to 20 in the first grade by involving students' spatial structuring ability. This study was conducted in Indonesia by involving 27 students. In this paper, one of three activities is discussed namely ten-box activity.…

  2. Auxin Biosynthesis, Accumulation, Action and Transport are Involved in Stress-Induced Microspore Embryogenesis Initiation and Progression in Brassica napus.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Sanz, Héctor; Solís, María-Teresa; López, María-Fernanda; Gómez-Cadenas, Aurelio; Risueño, María C; Testillano, Pilar S

    2015-07-01

    Isolated microspores are reprogrammed in vitro by stress, becoming totipotent cells and producing embryos and plants via a process known as microspore embryogenesis. Despite the abundance of data on auxin involvement in plant development and embryogenesis, no data are available regarding the dynamics of auxin concentration, cellular localization and the expression of biosynthesis genes during microspore embryogenesis. This work involved the analysis of auxin concentration and cellular accumulation; expression of TAA1 and NIT2 encoding enzymes of two auxin biosynthetic pathways; expression of the PIN1-like efflux carrier; and the effects of inhibition of auxin transport and action by N-1-naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA) and α-(p-chlorophenoxy) isobutyric acid (PCIB) during Brassica napus microspore embryogenesis. The results indicated de novo auxin synthesis after stress-induced microspore reprogramming and embryogenesis initiation, accompanying the first cell divisions. The progressive increase of auxin concentration during progression of embryogenesis correlated with the expression patterns of TAA1 and NIT2 genes of auxin biosynthetic pathways. Auxin was evenly distributed in early embryos, whereas in heart/torpedo embryos auxin was accumulated in apical and basal embryo regions. Auxin efflux carrier PIN1-like gene expression was induced in early multicellular embryos and increased at the globular/torpedo embryo stages. Inhibition of polar auxin transport (PAT) and action, by NPA and PCIB, impaired embryo development, indicating that PAT and auxin action are required for microspore embryo progression. NPA also modified auxin embryo accumulation patterns. These findings indicate that endogenous auxin biosynthesis, action and polar transport are required in stress-induced microspore reprogramming, embryogenesis initiation and progression.

  3. Correlation of Parental Involvement on Students' Benchmarks among Urban Fourth-Grade Elementary Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutledge, Erika L.

    2013-01-01

    The No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 raised awareness of the educational quality gap between European Americans and minorities, especially in reading. This gap underscores the importance that students master basic reading skills in order to achieve higher levels of reading proficiency. The purpose of this quantitative quasi-experimental study was…

  4. Engaging MSW Students in Faculty Research: Students' Perspectives of Involvement in a Program Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Rebecca L.; Chiarelli-Helminiak, Christina M.; Barrette, Kyle; Ferraj, Brunilda

    2016-01-01

    Engaging social work students in research is challenging, in part, because of the way research is taught in the classroom and the need for learners to effectively develop connections between the "abstract world" of research concepts with the "real world" of professional experiences. This article describes the experiences of…

  5. Student Involvement in an EST Reading Course for Remedial Students: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. Louis, Rubena; Pereira, Silvia

    2003-01-01

    Discusses an English for science and technology course at Simon Bolivar University in Venezuela in which students were allowed to choose reading activities and alternative forms of assessment were implemented. Results of a questionnaire used to evaluate the course are provided. (Author/VWL)

  6. The Pulsar Search Collaboratory: Involving High School Students in Astronomical Research -- A Progress Report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosen, Rachel; Heatherly, S.; McLauglin, M.; Lorimer, D.

    2010-01-01

    The National Science Foundation funded "Pulsar Search Collaboratory” project is a collaboration between the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Green Bank, WV and West Virginia University aimed at provoking interest in Science-Technology-Engineering-Math (STEM) careers and increasing scientific and information technology literacy among high-school students within the state and region. Over the initial three-year phase of this program, 60 high-school teachers at schools throughout region and over 300 students will be involved in the search for new pulsars and transient objects by analyzing over 30 TB of data collected by the Green Bank Telescope in 2007. Although training is provided to teachers and student leaders via a summer workshop, additional students may join the program, learning from their peers how to conduct the data analysis. We are now in the second year of the PSC and we present a progress report from the first year of the PSC. We will summarize our approaches to implementing this challenging project, including the use of online tools to communicate with and sustain interest among the student teams, and the development of a unique graphical database through which students access and analyze pulsar plots. We will present the student results including one astronomical discovery as well as statistics on the plots that students have analyzed, including distribution among schools, number of known pulsars found, and RFI detection. Finally we will present evaluation results and lessons learned from the first year of the PSC. These include results from pre/post testing of teachers and students that show changes in student interest in STEM careers resulting from the PSC, and statistics on student participation.

  7. Antimalarial action of artesunate involves DNA damage mediated by reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Gopalakrishnan, Anusha M; Kumar, Nirbhay

    2015-01-01

    Artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) is the recommended first-line treatment for Plasmodium falciparum malaria. It has been suggested that the cytotoxic effect of artemisinin is mediated by free radicals followed by the alkylation of P. falciparum proteins. The endoperoxide bridge, the active moiety of artemisinin derivatives, is cleaved in the presence of ferrous iron, generating reactive oxygen species (ROS) and other free radicals. However, the emergence of resistance to artemisinin in P. falciparum underscores the need for new insights into the molecular mechanisms of antimalarial activity of artemisinin. Here we show that artesunate (ART) induces DNA double-strand breaks in P. falciparum in a physiologically relevant dose- and time-dependent manner. DNA damage induced by ART was accompanied by an increase in the intracellular ROS level in the parasites. Mannitol, a ROS scavenger, reversed the cytotoxic effect of ART and reduced DNA damage, and modulation of glutathione (GSH) levels was found to impact ROS and DNA damage induced by ART. Accumulation of ROS, increased DNA damage, and the resulting antiparasite effect suggest a causal relationship between ROS, DNA damage, and parasite death. Finally, we also show that ART-induced ROS production involves a potential role for NADPH oxidase, an enzyme involved in the production of superoxide anions. Our results with P. falciparum provide novel insights into previously unknown molecular mechanisms underlying the antimalarial activity of artemisinin derivatives and may help in the design of next-generation antimalarial drugs against the most virulent Plasmodium species.

  8. Antinociceptive Activity of Methanol Extract of Muntingia calabura Leaves and the Mechanisms of Action Involved

    PubMed Central

    Sani, M. H. Mohd.; Zakaria, Z. A.; Balan, T.; Teh, L. K.; Salleh, M. Z.

    2012-01-01

    Muntingia calabura L. (family Elaeocarpaceae) has been traditionally used to relieve various pain-related ailments. The present study aimed to determine the antinociceptive activity of methanol extract of M. calabura leaves (MEMC) and to elucidate the possible mechanism of antinociception involved. The in vivo chemicals (acetic acid-induced abdominal constriction and formalin-, capsaicin-, glutamate-, serotonin-induced paw licking test) and thermal (hot plate test) models of nociception were used to evaluate the extract antinociceptive activity. The extract (100, 250, and 500 mg/kg) was administered orally 60 min prior to subjection to the respective test. The results obtained demonstrated that MEMC produced significant (P < 0.05) antinociceptive response in all the chemical- and thermal-induced nociception models, which was reversed after pretreatment with 5 mg/kg naloxone, a non-selective opioid antagonist. Furthermore, pretreatment with L-arginine (a nitric oxide (NO) donor), NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl esters (L-NAME; an inhibitor of NO synthase (NOS)), methylene blue (MB; an inhibitor of cyclic-guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) pathway), or their combination also caused significant (P < 0.05) change in the intensity of the MEMC antinociception. In conclusion, the MEMC antinociceptive activity involves activation of the peripheral and central mechanisms, and modulation via, partly, the opioid receptors and NO/cGMP pathway. PMID:22611437

  9. Negligent Liability Issues Involving Colleges and Students: Does an Ethic of Caring Heighten Institutional Liability?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beckham, Joseph; Pearson, Douglas

    This paper--part of a collection of 54 papers from the 48th annual conference of the Education Law Association held in November 2002--addresses the question of how and to what extent institutions of higher learning could be held liable for negligence involving students. The paper is, mainly, a review of recent case law related to the liability of…

  10. Examination of the Predictors of Latent Class Typologies of Bullying Involvement among Middle School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lovegrove, Peter J.; Henry, Kimberly L.; Slater, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    This study employs latent class analysis to construct bullying involvement typologies among 3,114 students (48% male, 58% White) in 40 middle schools across the United States. Four classes were constructed: victims (15%); bullies (13%); bully/victims (13%); and noninvolved (59%). Respondents who were male and participated in fewer conventional…

  11. Bullying Involvement and the School Adjustment of Rural Students with and without Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, Thomas W.; Petrin, Robert; Brooks, Debbie Sprott; Hamm, Jill V.; Lambert, Kerrylin; Gravelle, Maggie

    2012-01-01

    Bullying involvement status (i.e., bully, victim, bully-victim) and school adjustment were examined in a sample of 1,389 fifth graders (745 female, 644 male) including 145 special education students who were served in general education classrooms for at least 50% of the day. The sample was drawn from 35 rural schools in seven states across all…

  12. Collegiate Diversity Experiences and Students' Views Regarding Social and Political Involvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Eugene T., III; Trolian, Teniell L.

    2015-01-01

    Using data from the Wabash National Study of Liberal Arts Education, this study examines the relationship between engagement in diversity experiences during college and student attitudes about the importance of being socially and politically involved at the end of their fourth year of college. Findings suggest a positive link between…

  13. Family Involvement in Four Voices: Administrator, Teacher, Students, and Community Member

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiseman, Angela

    2010-01-01

    Collaborations and partnerships among schools and community members have been described as a way to provide better educational opportunities for students. Such school-community partnerships have been described as relationships that involve exchange and engagement with mutually defined goals benefiting all participants. However, the process of…

  14. The Effect of Community Involvement through PENCIL Partners on School Climate and Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyatt, Aimee

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect that community partnerships could have on school climate and, ultimately, student achievement. Specifically, community partnerships that were formed through the PENCIL (Public Education Needs Community Involvement and Leadership) Foundation in Nashville, Tennessee were researched to determine…

  15. An Examination of Involvement and Socially Responsible Leadership Development of Black Students Attending Predominantly White Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCurtis, Bridget R.

    2012-01-01

    There has been an identifiable decline in moral decision making and socially responsible behaviors in society based on recent national events such as Enron and the Bernie Madoff scandal (Arvedlund, 2009; Doran, 2004). This study attempts to address this leadership crisis by examining college student involvement and leadership experiences that may…

  16. STS-4 crew meets with Space Shuttle student involvement project participant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    STS-4 crew Commander Thomas K. Mattingly, II, and Pilot Henry W. Hartsfield meets with Space Shuttle student involvement project participant Amy M. Kussi of Hill Junior High School in Long Beach, California. They met during a press conference at the Johnson Space Center.

  17. School Engagement and Parental Involvement: The Case of Cross-Border Students in Singapore

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yuen, Celeste Y. M.; Cheung, Alan C. K.

    2014-01-01

    The primary purpose of this paper is to examine the mutual relationship between school engagement of cross-border students (CBS) from Malaysia in Singapore and parental involvement in education. Focus-group interviews were conducted with school personnel, CBS and their non-local counterparts to provide a comprehensive understanding of the…

  18. The Relationship between Academic Stress and Two Aspects of Father Involvement among University Student Fathers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masciadrelli, Brian P.; Milardo, Robert M.

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the associations between academic stress experienced by university student fathers and the behavioral and cognitive involvement these fathers had with their children. Fifty-three fathers enrolled in university classes and residing with at least one child less than 12 years of age responded to questionnaire measures of…

  19. Community Involvement and Disadvantaged Students: A Review and Annotated Bibliography. Report No. 8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nettles, Saundra Murray; Greenberg, Brenda

    This review examines literature on the community's role in the achievement and psychosocial outcomes of disadvantaged students. It identifies three classes of factors as pertinent: community structure, community climate, and community involvement. Community characteristics were found to have only a weak effect on achievement at the individual…

  20. Family Lives and Parental Involvement in Migrant Students' Education. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chavkin, Nancy Feyl

    This ERIC digest describes the lives of migrant families, migrant students' education, and migrant parents' involvement in their children's education. Migrant families tend to travel along well-established geographic routes which can be identified as the East Coast Stream, the Mid-Continent Stream, and the Western Stream. In 1986, the average…

  1. Second Language Learning in Campaign Organisations: Means for Endorsing Students' Social Involvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papageorgiou, Ira

    2012-01-01

    The provision of second language courses is a means through which campaign organisations promoting a more egalitarian, integrated and inclusive society are trying to achieve their aims. It is expected that, through these classes, migrant students will be enabled to break their isolation and to become more socially involved. This paper explores…

  2. School Staff Perspectives on the Challenges and Solutions to Working with Court-Involved Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crosby, Shantel D.; Day, Angelique G.; Baroni, Beverly A.; Somers, Cheryl L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Court-involved students, such as those in foster care and the juvenile justice system, generally experience high incidences of both acute and chronic trauma, adversely impacting their educational well-being and overall academic trajectory. Utilizing perceptions of teachers and other school staff, this study explores the challenges and…

  3. Preliminary Investigation of the Relationships between Involvement in Student Affairs Professional Development and Margin in Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lagana, Brandon T.

    2007-01-01

    Involvement in student affairs professional development was investigated using McClusky's (1963) Power Load Margin (PLM) theory from the adult education field. The PLM theory is a framework for identifying sources of stress (load) and power in one's life; the amount of power available to handle stress is called margin in life (MIL). This study…

  4. Undergraduate Involvement in Extracurricular Activities and Leadership Development in College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foreman, Elizabeth A.; Retallick, Michael S.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify and describe experiences of undergraduate extracurricular involvement that result in increased leadership development. Senior students in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences at Iowa State University completed an online questionnaire about their extracurricular experiences. Leadership development…

  5. Involvement of Students with Disabilities in the New American Schools Development Corporation Projects. Project FORUM.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahearn, Eileen M.

    This study examined the involvement of students with disabilities in the New American Schools Development Corporation (NASDC) projects. The report begins with a description of the competition to select demonstration projects that would create teams to design, implement, and disseminate "break-the-mold" schools to bring about educational…

  6. Parental Involvement and Perceived At-Risk Student Performance: Views from Predominantly Hispanic Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braley, Richard; Slate, John R.; Cavazos, Jose

    2009-01-01

    These researchers analyzed the perceptions of parents of students determined to be at-risk about their involvement with their children. Parents (n = 229), predominantly Hispanic, were surveyed from elementary schools, middle schools, and high schools in a district in South Texas near the Texas-Mexico border. Quantitative data obtained from the…

  7. Project-Based Learning Involving Sensory Panelists Improves Student Learning Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Yee Ming

    2015-01-01

    Project-based, collaborative learning is an effective teaching method when compared to traditional cognitive learning. The purpose of this study was to assess student learning after the completion of a final meal project that involved a group of sensory panelists. A paper survey was conducted among 73 senior nutrition and dietetics students…

  8. Relations of Parenting Style and Parental Involvement with Ninth-Grade Students' Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paulson, Sharon E.

    1994-01-01

    Compared adolescents' and parents' perceptions of maternal and paternal demandingness, responsiveness, and parental involvement with schooling. Found that adolescents' reports of parenting correlated only moderately with parents' reports. Adolescents', but not parents', reports of parenting predicted students' achievement outcome, with parental…

  9. The Effects of Parental Involvement on Students' Academic Self-Efficacy, Engagement and Intrinsic Motivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fan, Weihua; Williams, Cathy M.

    2010-01-01

    This research examined whether various dimensions of parental involvement predicted 10th-grade students' motivation (engagement, self-efficacy towards maths and English, intrinsic motivation towards maths and English) using data from the Educational Longitudinal Study of 2002 (ELS 2002). Results showed that both parents' educational aspiration for…

  10. Keeping History from Repeating Itself: Involving Parents about Retention Decisions to Support Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akmal, Tariq T.; Larsen, Donald E.

    2004-01-01

    Collaborative ventures between families and schools can result in children being successful both academically and in life (Henderson & Berla, 1994; Jackson & Davis, 2000; Mapp, 1997). The most successful predictor of student achievement is an encouraging home environment, high expectations from parents, and parental involvement (Epstein, 2001;…

  11. Involvement of Working Memory in College Students' Sequential Pattern Learning and Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kundey, Shannon M. A.; De Los Reyes, Andres; Rowan, James D.; Lee, Bern; Delise, Justin; Molina, Sabrina; Cogdill, Lindsay

    2013-01-01

    When learning highly organized sequential patterns of information, humans and nonhuman animals learn rules regarding the hierarchical structures of these sequences. In three experiments, we explored the role of working memory in college students' sequential pattern learning and performance in a computerized task involving a sequential…

  12. Teaching Students to Analyze Agency Actions via a NEPA Analysis Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitworth, Paul M.

    2008-01-01

    Future recreation professionals need the ability to analyze the effects of proposed management actions and stakeholder concerns to make good decisions, maintain public support, and comply with state and federal laws. Importantly, when federal funds, lands, permits or licenses are involved, federal law requires consideration of environmental and…

  13. Digital Literacy Development of Students Involved in an ICT Educational Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quintana, Maria Graciela Badilla; Pujol, Meritxell Cortada

    The impact of the Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) has become the core of a change that involves most of the society fields, consequently the technological and informational literacy are essential requirements in education. The research is a quasi-experimental and ex-post-facto study in schools from Spain. The aim was to describe and analyze the involvement showed by 219 students who participated in a development of ICT's Project named Ponte dos Brozos. The research objective was to respond if the students who usually worked with ICT, had better knowledge and management with computing tools, and if they are better prepared in researching and selecting information. Results showed that students who have a higher contact with ICTs know about the technology and how to use it, also better knowledge and control of the computer and operative systems, a high information management level trough the Internet, although their literacy in information is devoid.

  14. Forty years of litigation involving medical students and their education: II. Issues of finance.

    PubMed

    Helms, L B; Helms, C M

    1991-02-01

    An analysis of reported state and federal adjudication from 1950 through 1989 was undertaken to identify trends in litigation involving medical students and undergraduate medical education. Of the 110 cited judicial decisions during that time, 59 (54%) involved disputes over financing medical education; 43 (73%) were litigated since 1985. This dramatic increase arises primarily from challenges to National Health Service Corps obligations and from attempts to discharge or reorganize debt under the Bankruptcy Code. Medical school graduates enjoyed very little success in these cases. Analysis of court decisions points to a need for informed counseling for medical students, particularly as to the consequences of timing in default on service obligations and of incurring loans under the Health Education Assistance Loan (HEAL) program as opposed to other loan sources. The growing educational debt of today's medical students foreshadows continued litigation in this area.

  15. Understanding Entry-Level Student Affairs Practitioners' Perceptions of and Involvement in Professional Development in the Student Affairs Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stafford, John D.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate entry-level student affairs practitioners' perceptions of professional development and their involvement in individualized professional development opportunities within the student affairs field. The literature review explored the founding of student affairs, a historical review of student affairs,…

  16. Examining and Predicting College Students' Reading Intentions and Behaviors: An Application of the Theory of Reasoned Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burak, Lydia

    2004-01-01

    This study examined the recreational reading attitudes, intentions, and behaviors of college students. The theory of reasoned action provided the framework for the investigation and prediction of the students' intentions and behaviors. Two hundred and one students completed questionnaires developed according to the guidelines for the construction…

  17. Understanding Teacher Effectiveness: Accessing and Using Longitudinal Data to Guide Student Learning and Growth. Data for Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Data Quality Campaign, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Teachers need longitudinal student-level data, such as attendance history, course-taking patterns, grades, and test scores, to tailor instruction to individual students' strengths and weaknesses. This factsheet uses the findings from the "Data for Action 2013" analysis to discuss how states can provide teachers with student-level…

  18. "I Have No English Friends": Some Observations on the Practice of Action Learning with International Business Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brook, Cheryl; Milner, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    This account reports on some experiences of facilitating action learning with international business students. Interest in international student learning and the international student experience is significant and increasing with a considerable range of literature on the subject. Some of this literature is concerned with the perceived…

  19. University Physics Students' Use of Models in Explanations of Phenomena Involving Interaction between Metals and Electromagnetic Radiation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redfors, Andreas; Ryder, Jim

    2001-01-01

    Examines third year university physics students' use of models when explaining familiar phenomena involving interaction between metals and electromagnetic radiation. Concludes that few students use a single model consistently. (Contains 27 references.) (DDR)

  20. The Shuttle Student Involvement Project for Secondary Schools - Reports on first flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ladwig, A.; Wilson, G. P.

    1982-01-01

    During the 1980-81 academic year, NASA established the Shuttle Student Involvement Project for Secondary Schools (SSIP), an annual competition which invites students to propose experiments suitable for flight aboard the Space Shuttle. The purpose of the project is to stimulate the teaching and study of science and engineering among students in grades 9 through 12. Results of the first year of the project have been reported. The second competition was announced in September 1981. With a February 1, 1982 deadline, 2,800 proposals were submitted. Twenty national winners were announced in May 1982. NASA is now pairing the 20 winners with a corporate sponsor and with a NASA scientist or engineer to work with the student. Most SSIP experiments are performed in the Orbiter's mid-deck, and receive up to one hour of crew time. Attention is given to the desired outcomes of SSIP, and the SSIP experiments.

  1. Involvement of AMPA receptor phosphorylation in antidepressant actions with special reference to tianeptine.

    PubMed

    Svenningsson, Per; Bateup, Helen; Qi, Hongshi; Takamiya, Kogo; Huganir, Richard L; Spedding, Michael; Roth, Bryan L; McEwen, Bruce S; Greengard, Paul

    2007-12-01

    Depression is associated with abnormal neuronal plasticity. AMPA receptors mediate transmission and plasticity at excitatory synapses in a manner which is positively regulated by phosphorylation at Ser831-GluR1, a CaMKII/PKC site, and Ser845-GluR1, a PKA site. Treatment with the selective serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine increases P-Ser845-GluR1 but not P-Ser831-GluR1. Here, it was found that treatment with another antidepressant, tianeptine, increased P-Ser831-GluR1 in the frontal cortex and the CA3 region of hippocampus and P-Ser845-GluR1 in the CA3 region of hippocampus. A receptorome profile detected no affinity for tianeptine at any monaminergic receptors or transporters, confirming an atypical profile for this compound. Behavioural analyses showed that mice bearing point mutations at both Ser831- and Ser845-GluR1, treated with saline, exhibited increased latency to enter the centre of an open field and increased immobility in the tail-suspension test compared to their wild-type counterparts. Chronic tianeptine treatment increased open-field locomotion and reduced immobility in wild-type mice but not in phosphomutant GluR1 mice. P-Ser133-CREB was reduced in the CA3 region of hippocampus in phosphomutant mice, and tianeptine decreased P-Ser133-CREB in this region in wild-type, but not in phosphomutant, mice. Tianeptine increased P-Ser133-CREB in the CA1 region in wild-type mice but not in phosphomutant GluR1 mice. There were higher basal P-Ser133-CREB and c-fos levels in frontal and cingulate cortex in phosphomutant GluR1 mice; these changes in level were counteracted by tianeptine in a GluR1-independent manner. Using phosphorylation assays and phosphomutant GluR1 mice, this study provides evidence that AMPA receptor phosphorylation mediates certain explorative and antidepressant-like actions under basal conditions and following tianeptine treatment.

  2. Involvement of exon 11-associated variants of the mu opioid receptor MOR-1 in heroin, but not morphine, actions.

    PubMed

    Pan, Ying-Xian; Xu, Jin; Xu, Mingming; Rossi, Grace C; Matulonis, Joshua E; Pasternak, Gavril W

    2009-03-24

    Heroin remains a major drug of abuse and is preferred by addicts over morphine. Like morphine, heroin has high affinity and selectivity for mu-receptors, but its residual analgesia in exon 1 MOR-1 knockout mice that do not respond to morphine suggests a different mechanism of action. MOR-1 splice variants lacking exon 1 have been observed in mice, humans, and rats, raising the possibility that they might be responsible for the residual heroin and morphine-6beta-glucuronide (M6G) analgesia in the exon 1 knockout mice. To test this possibility, we disrupted exon 11 of MOR-1, which eliminates all of the variants that do not contain exon 1. Morphine and methadone analgesia in the exon 11 knockout mouse was normal, but the analgesic actions of heroin, M6G, and fentanyl were markedly diminished in the radiant heat tail-flick and hot-plate assays. Similarly, the ability of M6G to inhibit gastrointestinal transit was greatly diminished in these exon 11 knockout mice, whereas the ability of morphine was unchanged. These findings identify receptors selectively involved with heroin and M6G actions and confirm the relevance of the exon 11-associated variants and raise important issues regarding the importance of atypical truncated G-protein-coupled receptors.

  3. Parental involvement and bullying among middle-school students in North Africa.

    PubMed

    Abdirahman, H; Fleming, L C; Jacobsen, K H

    2013-03-01

    Bullying, especially in developing countries, has not been much examined, especially the influence of parents on the risk of being bullied. The aim of this study was to determine whether active parenting is associated with reduced peer victimization among middle-school students in North Africa. A secondary analysis of data from more than 13,000 middle-school students who participated in the Global School-based Student Health Survey (GSHS) in Egypt, Libya, Morocco and Tunisia between 2006 and 2008, was conducted using multiple logistic regression models. About 60% of students in Egypt and one-third of students in Libya, Morocco and Tunisia reported having been bullied in the past month. In all 4 countries, boys reported more peer victimization than girls. In Egypt, Morocco and Tunisia, students who reported that their parents checked their homework, were understanding, and knew how the student spent free time had a reduced likelihood of peer victimization but this association was not significant in Libya. Interventions for reducing bullying should consider the positive impact of involved parents.

  4. Family involvement and parent-teacher relationships for students with autism spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Garbacz, S Andrew; McIntyre, Laura Lee; Santiago, Rachel T

    2016-12-01

    Family educational involvement and parent-teacher relationships are important for supporting student outcomes and have unique implications for families of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). However, little research has examined child and family characteristics among families of children with ASD as predictors of family involvement and parent-teacher relationships. The present study examined child and family variables that may affect family involvement and parent-teacher relationships for families of children with ASD. Findings suggested (a) parents of children with higher developmental risk reported less family involvement and poorer relationships with their child's teacher and (b) family histories accessing services predicted family involvement and parent-teacher relationships. Limitations of the current study and implications for science and practice are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record

  5. [Action tendencies of respect-related emotions: Focus on emotion episodes in Japanese university students].

    PubMed

    Muto, Sera

    2016-06-01

    This study examined the action tendencies of respect-related emotions in Japanese university students. Participants (n = 405) randomly received a questionnaire about one of six respect-related emotions: (a) keiai (respect mingled with mild love); (b) shinsui (idolatry worship, and adoration); (c) ifu (awe mingled with fear); (d) kanshin (admiration); (e) kyotan (wonder); and (f) sonkei (respect proper) and were asked to recall a situation they felt the emotion. Next, they rated how much they felt like doing the respect-related (intrapersonal or interpersonal) actions in the situation. Statistical analysis revealed several action tendencies of respect-related emotions, however, the degree of each differed between the prototypical episodes of the emotions (a)-(e). The action tendency pattern of sonkei was most similar to that of keiai, therefore keiai could be considered as the prototypical feeling of sonkei in university students. Furthermore, almost all the respect-related emotions tended to strongly motivate willingness for self-correction and improvement. These findings suggest that respect-related emotions play an important role in self-improvement and building good relationships with superiors, at least in late adolescence.

  6. An Overview of Sub-Cellular Mechanisms Involved in the Action of TTFields

    PubMed Central

    Tuszynski, Jack A.; Wenger, Cornelia; Friesen, Douglas E.; Preto, Jordane

    2016-01-01

    Long-standing research on electric and electromagnetic field interactions with biological cells and their subcellular structures has mainly focused on the low- and high-frequency regimes. Biological effects at intermediate frequencies between 100 and 300 kHz have been recently discovered and applied to cancer cells as a therapeutic modality called Tumor Treating Fields (TTFields). TTFields are clinically applied to disrupt cell division, primarily for the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). In this review, we provide an assessment of possible physical interactions between 100 kHz range alternating electric fields and biological cells in general and their nano-scale subcellular structures in particular. This is intended to mechanistically elucidate the observed strong disruptive effects in cancer cells. Computational models of isolated cells subject to TTFields predict that for intermediate frequencies the intracellular electric field strength significantly increases and that peak dielectrophoretic forces develop in dividing cells. These findings are in agreement with in vitro observations of TTFields’ disruptive effects on cellular function. We conclude that the most likely candidates to provide a quantitative explanation of these effects are ionic condensation waves around microtubules as well as dielectrophoretic effects on the dipole moments of microtubules. A less likely possibility is the involvement of actin filaments or ion channels. PMID:27845746

  7. Involvement of cytochrome P-450 enzyme activity in the selectivity and safening action of pyrazosulfuron-ethyl.

    PubMed

    Yun, M S; Shim, I S; Usui, K

    2001-03-01

    To investigate the selectivity and safening action of the sulfonylurea herbicide pyrazosulfuron-ethyl (PSE), pyrazosulfuron-ethyl O-demethylase (PSEOD) activity involving oxidative metabolism by cytochrome P-450 was studied in rice (Oryza sativa L cv Nipponbare) and Cyperus serotinus Rottb. Cytochrome P-450-dependent activity was demonstrated by the use of the inducers 1,8-naphthalic anhydride and ethanol, the herbicides PSE, bensulfuron-methyl, dimepiperate and dymron, or the inhibitor piperonyl butoxide (PBO). Growth inhibition in C serotinus seedlings was more severe than that in rice seedlings. O-Dealkylation activities of PSE were induced differently in rice and in C serotinus, with distinctly higher activity in rice seedlings. The induced PSEOD activities were slightly inhibited by PBO in rice seedlings, whereas they were strongly inhibited in C serotinus seedlings. Dimepiperate and dymron were effective safeners of rice against PSE treatment. Treatments with herbicide alone resulted in less induction of PSEOD activity compared with combined treatments of the herbicide and safener. PSEOD activity in rice seedlings induced with herbicide alone was strongly inhibited by PBO, whereas it was weakly inhibited in rice seedlings induced with combinations of PSE and two safeners. These results suggest that O-demethylation by cytochrome P-450 enzymes may be involved in the metabolism of PSE and may contribute to its selectivity and safening action. Furthermore, these results suggest the existence of a multiple form of cytochrome P-450 in plants.

  8. Rapid and reversible responses to IVIG in autoimmune neuromuscular diseases suggest mechanisms of action involving competition with functionally important autoantibodies

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Melvin; McCallus, Daniel E; Lin, Cindy Shin-Yi

    2013-01-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) is widely used in autoimmune neuromuscular diseases whose pathogenesis is undefined. Many different effects of IVIG have been demonstrated in vitro, but few studies actually identify the mechanism(s) most important in vivo. Doses and treatment intervals are generally chosen empirically. Recent studies in Guillain-Barré syndrome and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy show that some effects of IVIG are readily reversible and highly dependent on the serum IgG level. This suggests that in some autoantibody-mediated neuromuscular diseases, IVIG directly competes with autoantibodies that reversibly interfere with nerve conduction. Mechanisms of action of IVIG which most likely involve direct competition with autoantibodies include: neutralization of autoantibodies by anti-idiotypes, inhibition of complement deposition, and increasing catabolism of pathologic antibodies by saturating FcRn. Indirect immunomodulatory effects are not as likely to involve competition and may not have the same reversibility and dose-dependency. Pharmacodynamic analyses should be informative regarding most relevant mechanism(s) of action of IVIG as well as the role of autoantibodies in the immunopathogenesis of each disease. Better understanding of the role of autoantibodies and of the target(s) of IVIG could lead to more efficient use of this therapy and better patient outcomes. PMID:24200120

  9. Involvement of HCN Channel in Muscarinic Inhibitory Action on Tonic Firing of Dorsolateral Striatal Cholinergic Interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhe; Zhang, Kang; Liu, Xiaoyan; Yan, Haitao; Ma, Xiaoyun; Zhang, Shuzhuo; Zheng, Jianquan; Wang, Liyun; Wei, Xiaoli

    2016-01-01

    The striatum is the most prominent nucleus in the basal ganglia and plays an important role in motor movement regulation. The cholinergic interneurons (ChIs) in striatum are involved in the motion regulation by releasing acetylcholine (ACh) and modulating the output of striatal projection neurons. Here, we report that muscarinic ACh receptor (M receptor) agonists, ACh and Oxotremorine (OXO-M), decreased the firing frequency of ChIs by blocking the hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels. Scopolamine (SCO), a nonselective antagonist of M receptors, abolished the inhibition. OXO-M exerted its function by activating the Gi/o cAMP signaling cascade. The single-cell reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (scRT-PCR) revealed that all the five subtypes of M receptors and four subtypes of HCN channels were expressed on ChIs. Among them, M2 receptors and HCN2 channels were the most dominant ones and expressed in every single studied cholinergic interneuron (ChI).Our results suggest that ACh regulates not only the output of striatal projection neurons, but also the firing activity of ChIs themselves by activating presynaptic M receptors in the dorsal striatum. The activation of M2 receptors and blockage of HCN2 channels may play an important role in ACh inhibition on the excitability of ChIs. This finding adds a new G-protein coupled receptor mediated regulation on ChIs and provides a cellular mechanism for control of cholinergic activity and ACh release in the dorsal striatum. PMID:27047336

  10. Involvement of proton-sensing receptor TDAG8 in the anti-inflammatory actions of dexamethasone in peritoneal macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    He, Xiao-dong; Tobo, Masayuki; Mogi, Chihiro; Nakakura, Takashi; Komachi, Mayumi; Murata, Naoya; Takano, Mutsumi; Tomura, Hideaki; Sato, Koichi; Okajima, Fumikazu

    2011-12-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Glucocorticoid (GC) induced the expression of proton-sensing TDAG8 in macrophages. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer GC enhanced acidic pH-induced cAMP accumulation and inhibition of TNF-{alpha} production. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The enhancement of the GC-induced actions was lost by TDAG8 deficiency. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer GC-induced anti-inflammatory actions are partly mediated by TDAG8 expression. -- Abstract: Dexamethasone (DEX), a potent glucocorticoid, increased the expression of T-cell death associated gene 8 (TDAG8), a proton-sensing G protein-coupled receptor, which is associated with the enhancement of acidic pH-induced cAMP accumulation, in peritoneal macrophages. We explored the role of increased TDAG8 expression in the anti-inflammatory actions of DEX. The treatment of macrophages with either DEX or acidic pH induced the cell death of macrophages; however, the cell death was not affected by TDAG8 deficiency. While DEX inhibited lipopolysaccharide-induced production of tumor necrosis factor-{alpha}, an inflammatory cytokine, which was independent of TDAG8, at neutral pH, the glucocorticoid enhanced the acidic pH-induced inhibition of tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} production in a manner dependent on TDAG8. In conclusion, the DEX-induced increase in TDAG8 expression is in part involved in the glucocorticoid-induced anti-inflammatory actions through the inhibition of inflammatory cytokine production under the acidic pH environment. On the other hand, the role of TDAG8 in the DEX-induced cell death is questionable.

  11. Transfer students in STEM majors at a Midwestern University: Academic and social involvement factors that influence student success

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Carlos

    There is soon-to-be a shortage of qualified U.S. workers in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). As a result, many science-related jobs are being filled by technically-skilled foreign workers. If the U.S wants to maintain its global economic leadership, then it must ensure a continuous growth of highly-trained individuals in STEM disciplines. Therefore, American institutions of higher education, including community colleges, must identify potential factors that contribute to the lack of interest in STEM majors, as well as the low rate of success of students who enter STEM majors but struggle to finish their degrees. The purpose of this study was to ascertain the perceptions of community college transfer students who are pursuing bachelor degrees in STEM majors at Iowa State University (ISU). What were their transfer experiences and what influenced their academic success in STEM. Participants were encouraged to share their transfer experiences while at the community college as well as their experiences on the ISU campus. They were also asked about their level of academic involvement, their relationships with faculty, and their participation in peer group activities prior to and after transferring. The research design included both quantitative and qualitative components, which provided an in-depth look at the experiences of STEM non-engineering and engineering students. Quantitative data include students' background characteristics, demographic information, and college activities at the community college and ISU. Qualitative data were used to illuminate students' overall transfer experience and their successful journey in STEM fields. The combination of quantitative and qualitative methods allowed a better understanding of the strategies students put into practice once they transfer from a community college to a four-year institution in pursuit of a STEM bachelor's degree. The results of this study suggest that there is an association among the

  12. Molecular and biochemical evidence for the involvement of calcium/calmodulin in auxin action

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, T.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2000-01-01

    -dependent manner suggests that calcium/CaM regulate ZmSAUR1 at the post-translational level. Our data provide the first direct evidence for the involvement of calcium/CaM-mediated signaling in auxin-mediated signal transduction.

  13. Freshman year computer engineering students' experiences for flipped physics lab class: An action research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akı, Fatma Nur; Gürel, Zeynep

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this research is to determine the university students' learning experiences about flipped-physics laboratory class. The research has been completed during the fall semester of 2015 at Computer Engineering Department of Istanbul Commerce University. In this research, also known as a teacher qualitative research design, action research method is preferred to use. The participants are ten people, including seven freshman and three junior year students of Computer Engineering Department. The research data was collected at the end of the semester with the focus group interview which includes structured and open-ended questions. And data was evaluated with categorical content analysis. According to the results, students have some similar and different learning experiences to flipped education method for physics laboratory class.

  14. Preparing Students for Jobs: Ensuring Student Success in the Workforce. Data for Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Data Quality Campaign, 2015

    2015-01-01

    Why do workforce data matter? A strong education prepares students to succeed in their chosen careers, but education, training, and employment pathways are changing. Individuals take multiple paths into the workforce. Some get jobs after completing high school, some after earning a college degree. To develop and support a strong workforce,…

  15. Preparing Students for Jobs: Ensuring Student Success in the Workforce. Data for Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Data Quality Campaign, 2014

    2014-01-01

    A strong education prepares students to succeed in their chosen careers; but education, training, and employment pathways are changing. Individuals take multiple paths into the workforce. Some get jobs after completing high school; some after earning a college degree. Others leave the workforce to go back to school, while still others enroll in…

  16. Academic Performance, Students' Background and Affirmative Action at a Brazilian University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedrosa, Renato H. L.; Dachs, J. Norberto W.; Maia, Rafael P.; Andrade, Cibele Y.; Carvalho, Benilton S.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the results of a detailed study relating the performance of undergraduate students admitted to Brazil's State University of Campinas (Unicamp) from 1994 through 1997 and their socioeconomic and educational background. The study is based on a hierarchical model for the relevant variables involved. The main result is that…

  17. Student Involvement in THEMIS Research and Real-Time Data Collection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orr, L. A.; Peticolas, L.; Korber, D.

    2007-12-01

    Students of Ukiah School are participating in real-time data collection and data analysis as part of NASA's THEMIS mission. The students have used onsite and remote magnetometer data to conduct long range studies of the Earth's magnetic field decline, the progression of magnetic storms, and the effects of solar events on the magnetic field. The study is based on research done by the local science teacher for the University of California at Berkeley over the summer of 2007 in which THEMIS magnetometer data was used to calculate and compare magnetic B values and a calculate and evaluate 24 hour data in a K-index style plot for Ukiah, Or and Loysburg, PA over a span of four months. The middle and high school students have taken this data and their results and are continuing and expanding it by moving farther back in the archived data for evaluation and including outside data sources for additional comparison. One of the most significant aspects of this study and its results will be the involvement of the students and the level to which they are taking ownership of the process. In a school of only 50 students, grades kindergarten through 12th, an average of 15 students are working with the data, on the expanded research, or on other THEMIS related material each academic semester; over 50% of the high school population. Preliminary evaluations of academic attitudes toward science, math, and astronomy as well as academic performance in these areas show an increase across the board.

  18. Come, Join, Lead: Attracting Students to Careers in Aging and Promoting Involvement in Gerontological Societies.

    PubMed

    Moye, Jennifer; Molinari, Victor A; Karel, Michele J; Naik, Aanand D; Sakai, Erin; Carpenter, Brian D

    2017-01-27

    Geriatric educators face the challenge of attracting more clinicians, scientists, and educators into geriatrics and gerontology, and promoting involvement in gerontological societies. A survey of psychologists (N = 100) examined factors that attract students in clinical/counseling psychology to practice with older adults, as well as experiences in organizational service. For 58%, interest in aging began at the undergraduate level, but for others interest developed later. About half cited academic exposure such as mentorship (51%), research (47%), or coursework (45%) as sparking interest, along with family (68%) or work experience (61%). Involvement in professional organizations lags (58%), in part owing to misperceptions about what those activities require. A continued targeted effort at the undergraduate and graduate level is essential to attract students to careers in aging. To preserve vital professional organizations, enhanced outreach may be useful to dispel myths about service and encourage engagement.

  19. Examination of the Predictors of Latent Class Typologies of Bullying Involvement among Middle School Students.

    PubMed

    Lovegrove, Peter J; Henry, Kimberly L; Slater, Michael D

    2012-01-01

    This study employs latent class analysis to construct bullying involvement typologies among 3114 students (48% male, 58% White) in 40 middle schools across the U.S. Four classes were constructed: victims (15%); bullies (13%); bully-victims (13%); and noninvolved (59%). Respondents who were male and participated in fewer conventional activities were more likely to be members of the victims class. Students who were African-American and reported being less successful at school had a higher likelihood of membership in the bullies class. Bully-victims shared characteristics with bullies and victims: Students with more feelings of anger toward others and a higher tendency toward sensation-seeking had a higher likelihood of membership in the bullies and bully-victims classes, whereas lower levels of social inclusion was associated with membership in the victims and bully-victims classes.

  20. Examination of the Predictors of Latent Class Typologies of Bullying Involvement among Middle School Students

    PubMed Central

    LOVEGROVE, PETER J.; HENRY, KIMBERLY L.; SLATER, MICHAEL D.

    2012-01-01

    This study employs latent class analysis to construct bullying involvement typologies among 3114 students (48% male, 58% White) in 40 middle schools across the U.S. Four classes were constructed: victims (15%); bullies (13%); bully-victims (13%); and noninvolved (59%). Respondents who were male and participated in fewer conventional activities were more likely to be members of the victims class. Students who were African-American and reported being less successful at school had a higher likelihood of membership in the bullies class. Bully-victims shared characteristics with bullies and victims: Students with more feelings of anger toward others and a higher tendency toward sensation-seeking had a higher likelihood of membership in the bullies and bully-victims classes, whereas lower levels of social inclusion was associated with membership in the victims and bully-victims classes. PMID:22606069

  1. Undocumented students pursuing medical education: The implications of deferred action for childhood arrivals (DACA).

    PubMed

    Balderas-Medina Anaya, Yohualli; del Rosario, Mithi; Doyle, Lawrence Hy; Hayes-Bautista, David E

    2014-12-01

    There are about 1.8 million young immigrants in the United States who came or were brought to the country without documentation before the age of 16. These youth have been raised and educated in the United States and have aspirations and educational achievements similar to those of their native-born peers. However, their undocumented status has hindered their pursuit of higher education, especially in medical and other graduate health sciences. Under a new discretionary policy, Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA), many of these young immigrants are eligible to receive permission to reside and work in the United States. DACA defers deportation of eligible, undocumented youth and grants lawful presence in the United States, work permits, Social Security numbers, and, in most states, driver's licenses. These privileges have diminished the barriers undocumented students traditionally have faced in obtaining higher education, specifically in pursuing medicine. With the advent of DACA, students are slowly matriculating into U.S. medical schools and residencies. However, this applicant pool remains largely untapped. In the face of a physician shortage and the implementation of the Affordable Care Act, an increase in matriculation of qualified undocumented students would be greatly beneficial. This Perspective is intended to begin discussion within the academic medicine community of the implications of DACA in reducing barriers for the selection and matriculation of undocumented medical students and residents. Moreover, this Perspective is a call to peers in the medical community to support undocumented students seeking access to medical school, residency, and other health professions.

  2. Oceans of Opportunity: Partnerships to Increase Minority Student Involvement in the Marine Geosciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pride, C.; Christensen, B.

    2007-12-01

    The Oceans of Opportunity program to increase involvement of traditionally under-represented students in the marine geosciences is in its final phase of track 1 funding from NSF. The program employs a tiered approach to research, teaching and outreach activities to enhance the K-12 to graduate pipeline. Partner institutions include Savannah State University, an HBCU in coastal Georgia; Adelphi University serving a minority population from NYC; the Georgia State University Bio-Bus serving the metro-Atlanta area; and the Joint Oceanographic Institutions. The Oceans of Opportunity education pipeline includes 1) service learning activities implemented by SSU marine science majors in partner public schools with high minority enrollment; 2) outreach by the Georgia State University Bio-Bus to Savannah area schools; 3) expansion of the SSU geoscience curriculum; and 4) development of activities based on models of ODP cores for use in both outreach and college teaching. Service learning through SSU classes has permitted contact with a large number of K-12 students. More than 1000 predominantly African-American K-12 students completed hands-on lessons on plate tectonics and plankton contributors to marine sediments in the two years of this program under the guidance of HBCU science majors. Lessons on use of the marine sediment and fossil record as proxies in paleoclimatic studies using replicas of ODP cores were delivered to 600 students in the Savannah school system and about 2000 visitors to the Georgia Aquarium in Atlanta. The marine geoscience lessons delivered at the high school level resulted in greater test score improvement when the topic had already been thoroughly introduced by the teacher. A survey of science attitudes of the high school students (n=419) indicates African-American high school students have low levels of enjoyment of and interest in the sciences. In addition, more female than male African-American students are enrolling in science courses and

  3. Adrenergic regulation of gluconeogenesis: possible involvement of two mechanisms of signal transduction in alpha 1-adrenergic action.

    PubMed Central

    García-Sáinz, J A; Hernández-Sotomayor, S M

    1985-01-01

    We have previously suggested that the effects of alpha 1-adrenergic agents on hepatocyte metabolism involve two mechanisms: (i) a calcium-independent insulin-sensitive process that is modulated by glucocorticoids and (ii) a calcium-dependent insulin-insensitive process that is modulated by thyroid hormones. We have studied the effect of epinephrine (plus propranolol) on gluconeogenesis from lactate and dihydroxyacetone. It was observed that the adrenergic stimulation of gluconeogenesis from lactate seemed to occur through both mechanisms, whereas when the substrate was dihydroxyacetone the action took place exclusively through the calcium-independent insulin-sensitive process. This effect was absent in hepatocytes from adrenalectomized rats, suggesting that it is modulated by glucocorticoids. PMID:2995981

  4. Mechanisms involved in vitamin D mediated intestinal calcium absorption and in non-classical actions of vitamin D.

    PubMed

    Christakos, Sylvia; Dhawan, Puneet; Ajibade, Dare; Benn, Bryan S; Feng, Jingjing; Joshi, Sneha S

    2010-07-01

    Recent studies in our laboratory using calbindin-D9k null mutant mice as well as mice lacking the 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3) inducible epithelial calcium channel TRPV6 provide evidence for calbindin-D9k and TRPV6 independent regulation of active intestinal calcium absorption. These findings suggest that in the knock out (KO) mice there is compensation by another calcium channel or protein and that other novel factors are involved in 1,25(OH)2D3 mediated active intestinal calcium absorption. In addition, 1,25(OH)2D3 mediated paracellular transport of calcium may have contributed to the normalization of serum calcium in the null mutant mice. 1,25(OH)2D3 downregulates cadherin-17 and upregulates claudin-2 and claudin-12 in the intestine, suggesting that 1,25(OH)2D3, by regulating these epithelial cell junction proteins, can route calcium through the paracellular path. With regard to non-classical actions, 1,25(OH)2D3 has been reported to inhibit the proliferation of a number of malignant cells and to regulate adaptive as well as innate immunity. This article will review new developments related to the function and regulation of vitamin D target proteins in classical and non-classical vitamin D target tissues that have provided novel insight into mechanisms of vitamin D action.

  5. Instructing high school students in forensic environmental science using Brownfield Action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bower, Peter; Liddicoat, Joseph; Patterson, Angelica; Kelsey, Ryan; Cox, Alice; Tynes, Nicholas

    2010-05-01

    Barnard College and Columbia University's Center for New Media Teaching and Learning's Brownfield Action is a digital web-based, interactive simulation that combines lecture, laboratory exercises, and individual and collaborative out-of-classroom assignments. The objective of the instruction is to locate and define a subsurface plume of gasoline whose point source is a leaking underground storage tank (LUST) at a gas station. In the fall of 2009, fifteen pre-college high school students from the five boroughs of New York City used Brownfield Action in a 12-week after-school enrichment program at Barnard to investigate the gasoline plume using a variety of geophysical methods - excavation, ground penetrating radar, magnetic metal detection, soil gas, and drilling. The investigation resulted in individual Phase One Site Assessment Reports about the LUST. As coordinators and instructors of the program, we will share our experience teaching the students and the advantages and challenges of using a digital simulation as an instructional centerpiece. Such instruction is intended to include civic engagement and responsibility as part of science education and to create a curriculum that, instead of relying on fragmented and abstract instruction, provides students with a realistic, inquiry-based, and interdisciplinary construction of knowledge.

  6. The Relationship of Student Involvement in Political Organizations to Self-Reported Capacities for Socially Responsible Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hogendorp, Melanie Beth

    2012-01-01

    This research investigated the relationship between college students' political involvement and their capacities for socially responsible leadership, including which student characteristics, precollege experiences, and collegiate experiences contributed to these capacities. Political involvement was defined as participation in co-curricular,…

  7. Social Consciousness of Low-Income College Students in Taiwan: The Effects of Socioeconomic Status and Collegiate Involvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Ching-Ling

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the socioeconomic status (SES), collegiate involvement, and social consciousness of low-income college students (LICSs) and higher-income college students (HICSs) in Taiwan. The study analyzed 1,453 LICSs and 1,453 HICSs from 156 colleges in Taiwan. The results showed that the two student groups exhibited different SESs and…

  8. Using Quality Circles to Enhance Student Involvement and Course Quality in a Large Undergraduate Food Science and Human Nutrition Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, S. J.; Parmer, M. S.; Bohn, D. M.

    2005-01-01

    Large undergraduate classes are a challenge to manage, to engage, and to assess, yet such formidable classes can flourish when student participation is facilitated. One method of generating authentic student involvement is implementation of quality circles by means of a Student Feedback Committee (SFC), which is a volunteer problem-solving and…

  9. The Relationship between Intensity of Involvement and Community Service Engagement in the Moral Development of Student Members of Greek Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Franklin Hadley, III

    2010-01-01

    Many students will choose to join a fraternity or sorority in college, yet much is still unknown about how these organizations impact student moral development. Using a correlational research design, the purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between the intensity of involvement of undergraduate students in social Greek…

  10. How to Involve Students in an Online Course: A Redesigned Online Pedagogy of Collaborative Learning and Self-Regulated Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsai, Chia-Wen

    2013-01-01

    In an online course, students learn independently in the virtual environment without teacher's on-the-spot support. However, many students are addicted to the Internet which is filled with a plethora of shopping websites, online games, and social networks (e.g. Facebook). To help keep students focused on and involved in online or blended…

  11. Forum: Knowledge, Action, Involvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinberger, JoAnn

    2015-01-01

    St. Clair (EJ1072357) provides a summary and lays out some of the important issues inherent in the broad strategies articulated in "Making Skills Everyone's Business: A Call to Transform Adult Learning in the United States" (MSEB) (United States Department of Education [USDoE], 2015) (see ED558793). In this commentary, JoAnn Weinberger…

  12. Parent Involvement as Parental Monitoring of Student Motivation and Parent Expectations Predicting Later Achievement among African American and European American Middle School Age Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seyfried, Sherri F.; Ick-Joong Chung

    2002-01-01

    A study examined the effects of parent involvement and expectations on academic achievement among 567 Black and White middle school students in 18 Seattle (Washington) schools. Parent and teacher surveys indicated that parental involvement was the highest contributor to academic achievement among White students, whereas earlier educational…

  13. Giving Student Groups a Stronger Voice: Using Participatory Research and Action (PRA) to Initiate Change to a Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neill, Geraldine; McMahon, Sinead

    2012-01-01

    Traditional student feedback mechanisms have been criticised for being teacher-centred in design and, in particular, for their absence of transparent follow-up actions. In contrast, this study describes the process and the evaluation of a participatory research and action (PRA) approach used in an undergraduate physiotherapy degree. This approach…

  14. The Confluence of Race, Gender, and Class among Community College Students: Assessing Attitudes toward Affirmative Action in College Admissions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zamani-Gallaher, Eboni M.

    2007-01-01

    This article examines the attitudes of baccalaureate aspiring community college students with regard to affirmative action in college admissions. Using data from UCLA's Cooperative Institutional Research Program (CIRP) Annual Freshman Year Survey, the study assessed determinants of approval or disapproval of affirmative action for 20,339 community…

  15. Bilingual communication methods, text versus video, to increase parent involvement and science fair project student achievement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clevenson, Rhonda Suzanne

    This research examined the responses of families to bilingual communication methods, text versus video, designed to facilitate school to home communication to increase parent involvement and seventh grade student achievement in the science fair project. Using an experimental design, 161 families were randomly selected to receive either a two part informational text or video series during the science fair unit taught at a culturally diverse urban middle school. The bilingual informational materials were created and produced by the staff at the research site. Measures were taken to make sure all families could access the informational materials and innovations such as a special travel envelope and reminding procedures aided data collection. Surveys measuring variables on a Likert scale with spaces for comments were collected from the parents and students. An interrater reliability study was completed to measure the agreement of the two teachers who used a grading checklist to score science fair project achievement. Quantitative methods including ANOVA and MLR were used to examine the data in terms of student achievement and the communication method (text or video), audience (students and parents), and the anticipated outcome (parent help). Nonparametric and qualitative data analyses were used to explore how families used and responded to the informational materials. Significant results were that the video communication method was positively associated with student achievement on the science fair project. Significant main effects were observed for the student characteristics, educational services (general and special education, and English as a Second Language), and previous achievement in science, and the parent characteristics, previous experience with science fair projects, primary viewing language (English or Spanish), and expectations for student achievement. Student achievement was not significantly related to the amount or usefulness of parent help. The amount

  16. A phenomenographic analysis of first-year engineering students' experiences with problems involving multiple possible solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dringenberg, Emily A.

    Engineers are expected to solve problems that are ill-structured. These problems are presented with a lack of necessary information and allow for different ways of engaging with the problem; they are open-ended and involve multiple possible solutions with multiple means of evaluation. In order to allow maximum time for students to develop skills for solving such problems, undergraduate engineering programs can introduce such problems during the first year of students' education, in the form of cornerstone design tasks. This provides students with more opportunities to develop their ability to engage with ill-structured problems, which are characteristic of engineering work. Researchers have documented variation within both the behavior and perceptions of students' early experiences with design problems. General themes include novice-like design behavior, discomfort with lack of information, difficulty with problem scoping, and resistance to ambiguity. To build on these generalizations of students' experiences, a more thorough understanding of the variation in how students experience this phenomenon of engaging with ill-structured problems is needed to design effective learning environments. This work presents the qualitatively different ways that engineering students experience problems with multiple possible solutions during their first year of engineering studies. Using phenomenography as the methodological framework, data were collected through in-depth, semi-structured interviews with 27 first-year engineering students. The iterative, phenomenographic analysis resulted in seven descriptive categories for the ways participants experienced problems involving multiple possible solutions. The names of these categories represent the different foci of the students' experiences: completion, transition, iteration, organization, collaboration, reasoning, and growth. These categories are organized along two crucial dimensions of variation: reaction to ambiguity and role

  17. The Effects of Pictures and Prompts on the Writing of Students in Primary Grades: Action-Research by Graduate Students at California State University, Northridge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joshua, Marilyn

    2007-01-01

    Nine graduate students (teacher-researchers) with an average of 6 years teaching experience (1-15 years) participated in action research to examine the influence of teacher-chosen visual aids (pictures) on children's writing. A total of 165 elementary students participated in the two phases of the research project: 83 boys and 82 girls in…

  18. The Impact of Career Workshops on Freshman College Students At-Risk for Dropout: An Action Research Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Donjanea F.

    2012-01-01

    College students on probation are generally considered at-risk for dropping out, as indicated by a wide range of literature. This article focuses on an action research study that explored the impact of a career workshop series on freshman students in a probation course at a medium-sized university located in the southeastern United States. The…

  19. Creating and Sustaining a Professional Learning Community to Impact Student Achievement on a High School Campus: An Action Research Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, Dionne DeShall

    2013-01-01

    Professional learning communities (PLCs) have become one of the most talked about ideas in education today. Many K-12 schools are working to become PLCs in the hope that student learning will improve when adults commit themselves to talking collaboratively about teaching and learning and then take action that will improve student learning and…

  20. An Action Research on the Effects of Extrinsic Rewards on Motivation of Eighth Grade Language Arts Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rejholec, Tod

    Data were collected for this action research to determine the value of an extrinsic reward as a self-management tool for motivating eighth grade language arts students. The sample was drawn from students at a school in the northwest suburbs of Chicago, Illinois. The school was one of two middle schools in the city. This convenience sample…

  1. Story Telling: Research and Action to Improve 6th Grade Students' Views about Certain Aspects of Nature of Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahraman, Feray; Karatas, Faik Özgür

    2015-01-01

    This study is a four-week section of ongoing attempts that aim to improve 6th grade students' understandings of the nature of science. The study was carried out in a sixth grade science and technology class at a rural middle school with 15 students on the basis of action research methodology. During the study, four different stories based on the…

  2. "We Are Researchers": Students with and without Intellectual Disabilities Research the University Experience in a Participatory Action Research Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Susan M.; Yuan, Susan J.; Karambelas, Alex M.; Lampugnale, Luke E.; Parrott, Bernard J.; Sagar, Cora E.; Terry, Taylor V.

    2015-01-01

    This article describes an undergraduate Participatory Action Research (PAR) course in which students with and without intellectual disabilities collaborated as co-researchers in order to explore various aspects of the university experience. The article describes the university course as well as presents results of the students' PAR projects. The…

  3. The efficacy of a modified Theory of Reasoned Action to explain gambling behavior in college students.

    PubMed

    Thrasher, Robert G; Andrew, Damon P S; Mahony, Daniel F

    2011-09-01

    Recently, Thrasher et al. (College Student Affairs Journal 27(1): 57-75, 2007) explored the efficacy of the Theory of Reasoned Action (TRA; Ajzen and Fishbein, Attitudes, personality, and behavior, 1980) in explaining gambling behavior of college students. However, their study found the TRA only predicted small amounts of variance in gambling intentions. Heeding their call to enhance the efficacy of the TRA through the addition of explanatory variables to the model, the present study incorporated gambling motivations and locus of control as moderating variables within the TRA to test the potential of a modified TRA in explaining gambling behavior of college students. A total of 345 students at a major metropolitan research university in the Midwest volunteered to participate in the study. A series of hierarchical linear regressions indicated intrinsic motivation to accomplish (p = .002) significantly moderated the relationship between gambling attitudes and gambling intentions. Further, internal locus of control (p < .001), chance locus of control (p < .001), and powerful others locus of control (p < .001) also significantly moderated the relationship between gambling attitudes and gambling intentions. The significant impact of the moderating variables on the relationship between gambling attitudes and intentions suggests intrinsic motivation and locus of control can alter the impact of the relationship between gambling attitudes and gambling intentions.

  4. [Development and consolidation of General Student Welfare Direction at National University of Cordoba: institutional actions directed to integrated student health. Decades of 1960-1970].

    PubMed

    Altamirano Bentolila, Patricia; Clark, Carmen; Stabile, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Starting from historical records attempts to identify the events which made possible the creation and regulation of Welfare Student Department. A Decade of 60 and 70 was fruitful for starting and development of first institutional politics designed to attend the health and welfare of students. In that way, the actions of Welfare Student Direction and Vocational Guidance focus their objective to bring on welfare, permanence, development of university student. It stand out the accent put it on the integral health exam of students, the concern about the empty in his cultural training, the possibility of make it easier vocational support and the execution of health insurance.

  5. Oral Efficacy of Apigenin against Cutaneous Leishmaniasis: Involvement of Reactive Oxygen Species and Autophagy as a Mechanism of Action

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca-Silva, Fernanda; Inacio, Job D. F.; Canto-Cavalheiro, Marilene M.; Menna-Barreto, Rubem F. S.; Almeida-Amaral, Elmo E.

    2016-01-01

    Background The treatment for leishmaniasis is currently based on pentavalent antimonials and amphotericin B; however, these drugs result in numerous adverse side effects. The lack of affordable therapy has necessitated the urgent development of new drugs that are efficacious, safe, and more accessible to patients. Natural products are a major source for the discovery of new and selective molecules for neglected diseases. In this paper, we evaluated the effect of apigenin on Leishmania amazonensis in vitro and in vivo and described the mechanism of action against intracellular amastigotes of L. amazonensis. Methodology/Principal Finding Apigenin reduced the infection index in a dose-dependent manner, with IC50 values of 4.3 μM and a selectivity index of 18.2. Apigenin induced ROS production in the L. amazonensis-infected macrophage, and the effects were reversed by NAC and GSH. Additionally, apigenin induced an increase in the number of macrophages autophagosomes after the infection, surrounding the parasitophorous vacuole, suggestive of the involvement of host autophagy probably due to ROS generation induced by apigenin. Furthermore, apigenin treatment was also effective in vivo, demonstrating oral bioavailability and reduced parasitic loads without altering serological toxicity markers. Conclusions/Significance In conclusion, our study suggests that apigenin exhibits leishmanicidal effects against L. amazonensis-infected macrophages. ROS production, as part of the mechanism of action, could occur through the increase in host autophagy and thereby promoting parasite death. Furthermore, our data suggest that apigenin is effective in the treatment of L. amazonensis-infected BALB/c mice by oral administration, without altering serological toxicity markers. The selective in vitro activity of apigenin, together with excellent theoretical predictions of oral availability, clear decreases in parasite load and lesion size, and no observed compromises to the overall health

  6. Mechanism of action of peptidoglycan O-acetyltransferase B involves a Ser-His-Asp catalytic triad.

    PubMed

    Moynihan, Patrick J; Clarke, Anthony J

    2014-10-07

    The O-acetylation of the essential cell wall polymer peptidoglycan is essential in many bacteria for their integrity and survival, and it is catalyzed by peptidoglycan O-acetlytransferase B (PatB). Using PatB from Neisseria gonorrhoeae as the model, we have shown previously that the enzyme has specificity for polymeric muropeptides that possess tri- and tetrapeptide stems and that rates of reaction increase with increasing degrees of polymerization. Here, we present the catalytic mechanism of action of PatB, the first to be described for an O-acetyltransferase of any bacterial exopolysaccharide. The influence of pH on PatB activity was investigated, and pKa values of 6.4-6.45 and 6.25-6.35 for the enzyme-substrate complex (kcat vs pH) and the free enzyme (kcat·KM(-1) vs pH), respectively, were determined for the respective cosubstrates. The enzyme is partially inactivated by sulfonyl fluorides but not by EDTA, suggesting the participation of a serine residue in its catalytic mechanism. Alignment of the known and hypothetical PatB amino acid sequences identified Ser133, Asp302, and His305 as three invariant amino acid residues that could potentially serve as a catalytic triad. Replacement of Asp302 with Ala resulted in an enzyme with less than 20% residual activity, whereas activity was barely detectable with (His305 → Ala)PatB and (Ser133 → Ala)PatB was totally inactive. The reaction intermediate of the transferase reaction involving acetyl- and propionyl-acyl donors was trapped on both the wild-type and (Asp302 → Ala) enzymes and LC-MS/MS analysis of tryptic peptides identified Ser133 as the catalytic nucleophile. A transacetylase mechanism is proposed based on the mechanism of action of serine esterases.

  7. Encouraging Summer Students in Science by Involving them with EPO: Case Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherrer, D.; Kosovicheva, A.; Lee, S.; Liu, S.; Scherrer, B.; Madison, J.; Winegarden, S.

    2007-12-01

    You have a bevy of high school and undergraduate students showing up soon for a summer "research experience." You know they are not going to become facile with the IDL or Matlab tools they need to analyze your data. What are you going to do with them to stimulate their interest and encourage them to continue in science? We chose to involve our summer studnets in our education and outreach projets, training them in inquiry-based methods, hands-on activities, and collaborative learning, along with providing opportunities for them to acquire knowledge of solar science. Our presentation will highlight, in their own words, projects our students undertook, their trials, tribulations, and learning experiences.

  8. Making Sense of the Parental Influence and Involvement of First-Year Students: An Interpretive Phenomenological Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaymon, Joffery A.

    2013-01-01

    Over the past ten years, colleges have experienced an influx of parental involvement. Institutions inherit a population of students that have never functioned without the input of their parents and once enrolled, welcome the same level of involvement. Though faculty and administrators perceive the level of parental involvement as encumbering,…

  9. Simple techniques suitable for student use to record action potentials from the frog heart.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, S

    2001-12-01

    Demonstrating action potentials during class experiments is very educational for science students. It is not easy, however, to obtain a stable intracellular recording of action potentials from the conventionally used skeletal muscle cells, because the tip of a glass microelectrode often comes out or breaks due to muscle contraction. Here, I present a much simpler recording method using a flexible polyethylene electrode with a wide orifice (approximately 1 mm) for a bullfrog heart beating on automaticity. Extracellular recordings of action potentials (electrocardiogram) can be obtained by placing an electrode on the cardiac surface, and transmembrane potentials can be obtained by rupturing the membrane with negative pressure, i.e., whole cell configuration. Once attached to the heart by suction, the polyethylene electrode does not easily come off during contraction of the heart. Perfusion of the heart via the postcaval vein offers us opportunities for observing the effects of either changing ionic compositions of solutions or applying drugs. The techniques shown here provide a simple and convenient way to perform a variety of class experiments.

  10. 7 CFR 799.10 - Criteria and identification of FSA actions as to degree of involvement under the NEPA process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... agencies to determine those typical classes of actions for treatment under NEPA. The typical classes of FSA actions for treatment under NEPA are set forth as follows: (1) Actions normally requiring an EIS are: (i) Production adjustment programs to balance supply and demand of specified commodities, through cropland...

  11. PRESS40: a project for involving students in active seismic risk mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnaba, Carla; Contessi, Elisa; Rosa Girardi, Maria

    2016-04-01

    To memorialize the anniversary of the 1976 Friuli earthquake, the Istituto Statale di Istruzione Superiore "Magrini Marchetti" in Gemona del Friuli (NE Italy), with the collaboration of the Istituto Nazionale di Oceanografia e di Geofisica Sperimentale (OGS), has promoted the PRESS40 Project (Prevenzione Sismica nella Scuola a 40 anni dal terremoto del Friuli, that in English sounds like "Seismic Prevention at School 40 years later the Friuli earthquake"). The project has developed in the 2015-2016 school year, starting from the 40th anniversary of the Friuli earthquake, and it aims to disseminate historical memory, seismic culture and awareness of seismic safety in the young generations, too often unconscious of past experiences, as recent seismic hazard perception tests have demonstrated. The basic idea of the PRESS40 Project is to involve the students in experimental activities to be active part of the seismic mitigation process. The Project is divided into two main parts, the first one in which students learn-receive knowledge from researchers, and the second one in which they teach-bring knowledge to younger students. In the first part of the project, 75 students of the "Magrini Marchetti" school acquired new geophysical data, covering the 23 municipalities from which they come from. These municipalities represent a wide area affected by the 1976 Friuli earthquake. In each locality a significant site was examined, represented by a school area. At least, 127 measurements of ambient noise have been acquired. Data processing and interpretation of all the results are still going on, under the supervision of OGS researchers.The second part of the project is planned for the early spring, when the students will present the results of geophysical survey to the younger ones of the monitored schools and to the citizens in occasion of events to commemorate the 40th anniversary of the Friuli earthquake.

  12. Possible involvement of sigma-1 receptors in the anti-immobility action of bupropion, a dopamine reuptake inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Dhir, Ashish; Kulkarni, S K

    2008-08-01

    Sigma receptors particularly, sigma-1 subtype is known to modulate the release of catecholamines in the brain and may participate in the mechanism of action of various antidepressants. The present study investigated the possible involvement of sigma receptors in modulating the anti-immobility-like effect of bupropion (a dopamine reuptake inhibitor) using the forced swim test (FST) in mice. Bupropion produced dose-dependent (10-40 mg/kg, i.p.) reduction in immobility period and the ED(50) value was found to be 18.5 (7.34-46.6) mg/kg, i.p. (+)-Pentazocine (2.5 mg/kg, i.p.), a high-affinity sigma-1 receptor agonist, produced synergistic response when it was co-administered with a subeffective dose of bupropion (10 mg/kg, i.p.). On the contrary, pretreatment with progesterone (10 mg/kg, s.c.), a sigma-1 receptor antagonist neurosteroid, rimcazole (5 mg/kg, i.p.), another sigma-1 receptor antagonist, or BD 1047 (1 mg/kg, i.p.), a novel sigma-1 receptor antagonist, reversed the anti-immobility effects of bupropion (20 mg/kg, i.p.). The various modulators used in the study did not show any effect per se on locomotor activity except bupropion which at a higher dose (15-40 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly increased the locomotor activity. The results for the first time demonstrated the involvement of sigma-1 receptors in the anti-immobility effects of bupropion.

  13. Personifying self in physics problem situations involving forces as a student help strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabor-Morris, A. E.

    2013-03-01

    How can physics teachers best guide students regarding physics problem situations involving forces? A suggestion is made here to personify oneself as the object in question, that is, to pretend to be the object undergoing forces and then qualify and quantify those forces according to their vectors for the system at hand. This personification is not meant to empower the object to act, just to sense the forces it is experiencing. This strategy may be especially useful to beginning physics learners attacking problems that involve both multiple forces AND multiple objects, since each object acted upon needs to be considered separately, using the idea that one cannot be two places at once. An example of this type of problem expounded on here is Atwood's machine: two weights hung over a pulley with a single rope. Another example given is electromagnetic forces on one charge caused by other charges in the vicinity. Discussion is made on implementation of classroom strategies. Department of Physics

  14. First intercomparison among laboratories involved in COST Action-TU1301 "NORM4Building": Determination of natural radionuclides in ceramics.

    PubMed

    Xhixha, Gerti; Trinidad, José Antonio; Gascó, Catalina; Mantovani, Fabio

    2017-03-01

    This work describes the outcomes of the COST Action-TU1301 "NORM4Building" intercomparison on the determination of natural radioactivity in ceramics. Twenty-two laboratories involved in the intercomparison are evaluated for their performance using robust statistics. The reference values of (226)Ra ((214)Bi and (214)Pb) are determined to be 122 ± 11 Bq kg(-1) and 124 ± 14 Bq kg(-1), respectively and in secular equilibrium in the uranium chain while the reference values of (232)Th ((228)Ac) is determined to be 61 ± 6 Bq kg(-1) and that of (40)K was determined to be 955 ± 40 Bq kg(-1). Although the aim of the exercise was to determine the activity concentration of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K and evaluation of the "Activity Concentration Index", laboratories were asked to report complete characterization of natural radionuclides. The results of this exercise pointed out a good performance among laboratories since the percentage of the acceptable results were above 90% for the radionuclides of interest. Based on these results, considering the systematic rejection of the results reported from a few laboratories we emphasize the need for quality control procedures.

  15. A call to action: training public health students to be effective agents for social change.

    PubMed

    Godwin, Hilary; Heymann, S Jody

    2015-03-01

    In the 21st century, we face enormous public health challenges that differ fundamentally from those of the last century, because these challenges involve widespread societal change and complexity. To address these challenges, public health professionals need to be able to place their work in a larger social context, understand local and global perspectives on a deeper level, and effectively engage a wide variety of stakeholders. To confer these skills, we need to change the way we train our students. We present two examples of low-cost innovative approaches to teaching public health that promote active engagement with individuals across a wide range of backgrounds and fields and that train students to be effective agents for change.

  16. A Call to Action: Training Public Health Students to Be Effective Agents for Social Change

    PubMed Central

    Heymann, S. Jody

    2015-01-01

    In the 21st century, we face enormous public health challenges that differ fundamentally from those of the last century, because these challenges involve widespread societal change and complexity. To address these challenges, public health professionals need to be able to place their work in a larger social context, understand local and global perspectives on a deeper level, and effectively engage a wide variety of stakeholders. To confer these skills, we need to change the way we train our students. We present two examples of low-cost innovative approaches to teaching public health that promote active engagement with individuals across a wide range of backgrounds and fields and that train students to be effective agents for change. PMID:25706013

  17. Focusing on the Sophomores: Characteristics Associated with the Academic and Social Involvement of Second-Year College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Xueli; Kennedy-Phillips, Lance

    2013-01-01

    Research has long suggested that an optimal level of involvement in academic and social activities positively affects student development and outcomes. However, many second-year students experience the "sophomore slump." For this study, guided by both prior literature and theoretical perspectives, a survey instrument was developed to…

  18. Toward Digital Citizenship: Examining Factors Affecting Participation and Involvement in the Internet Society among Higher Education Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Zahrani, Abdulrahman

    2015-01-01

    The current study aims to understand digital citizenship, based on the assumptions of Ribble (2014), by examining factors affecting participation and involvement in the Internet virtual societies among higher education students. A quantitative approach using a survey questionnaire was implemented. The participants were 174 students from the…

  19. Involvement in and Satisfaction with Decision Making Related to Staff and Student Behavior in IGE Schools. Technical Report No. 48.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Robert Howard

    This study examines the validity of the assumption that teacher involvement in and satisfaction with decision-making is systematically related to such organizational effectiveness criteria as (a) teacher job satisfaction, (b) student achievement in reading and mathematics, and (c) student affective behavior, in elementary schools that have…

  20. University Students' Involvement in Body Piercing and Adherence to Safe Piercing Practices: Do Males and Females Differ?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Keith A.; Vidourek, Rebecca A.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Health concerns of body piercing include infection, scarring, allergic reactions, pain, and disease. Current gaps in the research include students' perceived piercing risks and safe piercing practices. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine university students' involvement in body piercing, risk consideration and adherence…

  1. Some Considerations for Coping With School Problems Involving Indochinese Students. Office for Equity Education's Multicultural Education Resource Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Shuh Yun; And Others

    This is a guide for teachers for coping with educational and behavior problems involving Indochinese students in American schools. Problems that might be expected and factors that contribute to problems are outlined, including: (1) language difficulty; (2) imitation behavior by Indochinese students; (3) effects of camp life; (4) intragroup…

  2. The Academic Differences between Students Involved in School-Based Robotics Programs and Students Not Involved in School-Based Robotics Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koumoullos, Michael

    2013-01-01

    This research study aimed to identify any correlation between participation in afterschool robotics at the high school level and academic performance. Through a sample of N = 121 students, the researcher examined the grades and attendance of students who participated in a robotics program in the 2011-2012 school year. The academic record of these…

  3. The use of parent involved take-home science activities during student teaching: Understanding the challenges of implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarazinski, Jill

    The purpose of this study was to identify student teachers use and implementation of Science in a Bag when it was no longer a required course-based assessment. This take-home science activity acted as the elaboration component of the 5Es lesson teacher candidates designed and taught in the classroom, utilized household items, and directly involved parents in their child's education. The purposeful sample was comprised of six teacher candidates during their student teaching practicum, the last semester of the childhood education teacher certification program. This collective case study centered on student teachers' use of the focused activity, Science in a Bag, in order to gain knowledge of challenges faced in applying take-home science kits and working with parents. Data collection was comprised of student teacher and parent interviews, candidate reflections, as well as in-class observations and discussions carried out during weekly seminars. Data collection occurred throughout the seven-week student teaching practicum. The four research questions were: 1) What factors do teacher candidates identify as interfering with their ability to implement Science in a Bag during student teaching placements? 2) What factors do teacher candidates identify as enhancing their ability to carry out Science in a Bag? 3) What forms of support do teacher candidates believe are important to their success in implementing Science in a Bag during student teaching? 4) How do teacher candidates deal with obstacles when implementing Science in a Bag? Despite the fact that no student teacher was prohibited from implementing Science in a Bag, the level to which candidates valued and utilized this instructional strategy varied compared to how they were taught and practiced it during the science methods course. Some student teachers attempted to hide their feelings toward Science in a Bag, however their actions revealed that they were simply carrying out the instructional strategy because they

  4. Relationships between Perceived Parental Involvement in Homework, Student Homework Behaviors, and Academic Achievement: Differences among Elementary, Junior High, and High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Núñez, J. C.; Suárez, N.; Rosário, P.; Vallejo, G.; Valle, A.; Epstein, J. L.

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to produce a deeper understanding of the relationship between perceived parental homework involvement (i.e., parental homework control and parental homework support), student homework behaviors (i.e., time spend on homework completion, time management, and amount of homework completed), and student academic achievement. Using…

  5. Sphingosine Kinase-1 Involves the Inhibitory Action of HIF-1α by Chlorogenic Acid in Hypoxic DU145 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Myoung-Sun; Lee, Seon-Ok; Kim, Kyu-Ri; Lee, Hyo-Jeong

    2017-01-01

    Hypoxia enhances cancer development in a solid tumor. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 α (HIF-1α) is a transcription factor that is dominantly expressed under hypoxia in solid tumor cells and is a key factor that regulates tumor. HIF-1α regulates several target genes involved in many aspects of cancer progression, including angiogenesis, metastasis, anti-apoptosis and cell proliferation as well as imparts resistance to cancer treatment. In this study, we assessed Crataegus Pinnatifida Bunge var. typical Schneider ethanol extract (CPE) for its anti-cancer effects in hypoxia-induced DU145 human prostate cancer cell line. CPE decreased the abundance of HIF-1α and sphingosine kinase-1 (SPHK-1) in hypoxia-induced prostate cancer DU145 cells. CPE decreased HIF-1α and SPHK-1 as well as SPHK-1 activity. Chlorogenic acid (CA) is one of four major compounds of CPE. Compared to CPE, CA significantly decreased the expression of HIF-1α and SPHK-1 as well as SPHK-1 activity in hypoxia-induced DU145 cells. Furthermore, CA decreased phosphorylation AKT and GSK-3β, which are associated with HIF-1α stabilization and affected SPHK-1 in a concentration-dependent manner. We confirmed the mechanism of CA-induced inhibition of HIF-1α by SPHK-1 signaling pathway using SPHK-1 siRNA and SPHK inhibitor (SKI). CA decreased the secretion and cellular expression of VEGF, thus inhibiting hypoxia-induced angiogenesis. Treatment of DU145cells with SPHK1 siRNA and CA for 48 h decreased cancer cell growth, and the inhibitory action of SPHK siRNA and CA on cell growth was confirmed by decrease in the abundance of Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). PMID:28165392

  6. The academic differences between students involved in school-based robotics programs and students not involved in school-based robotics programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koumoullos, Michael

    This research study aimed to identify any correlation between participation in afterschool robotics at the high school level and academic performance. Through a sample of N=121 students, the researcher examined the grades and attendance of students who participated in a robotics program in the 2011-2012 school year. The academic record of these students was compared to a group of students who were members of school based sports teams and to a group of students who were not part of either of the first two groups. Academic record was defined as overall GPA, English grade, mathematics grade, mathematics-based standardized state exam scores, and attendance rates. All of the participants of this study were students in a large, urban career and technical education high school. As STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) has come to the forefront of educational focus, robotics programs have grown in quantity. Starting robotics programs requires a serious commitment of time, money, and other resources. The benefits of such programs have not been well analyzed. This research study had three major goals: to identify the academic characteristics of students who are drawn to robotics programs, to identify the academic impact of the robotics program during the robotics season, and to identify the academic impact of the robotics program at the end of the school year. The study was a non-experiment. The researchers ran MANOVS, repeated measures analyses, an ANOVA, and descriptive statistics to analyze the data. The data showed that students drawn to robotics were academically stronger than students who did not participate in robotics. The data also showed that grades and attendance did not significantly improve or degrade either during the robotics season or at year-end. These findings are significant because they show that robotics programs attract students who are academically strong. This information can be very useful in high school articulation programs

  7. Exploring the meaning of parental involvement in physical education for students with developmental disabilities.

    PubMed

    An, Jihoun; Hodge, Samuel R

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this phenomenological inquiry was to explore the experiences and meaning of parental involvement in physical education from the perspectives of the parents of students with developmental disabilities. The stories of four mothers of elementary aged children (3 boys, 1 girl), two mothers and one couple (mother and father) of secondary-aged youth (1 girl, 2 boys) with developmental disabilities, were gathered by using interviews, photographs, school documents, and the researcher's journal. Bronfenbrenner's (2005) ecological system theory provided a conceptual framework to interpret the findings of this inquiry. Three themes emerged from thematic analysis: being an advocate for my child, understanding the big picture, and collaborative partnerships undeveloped in GPE. The findings lend additional support to the need for establishing collaborative partnerships in physical education between home and school environments (An & Goodwin, 2007; Tekin, 2011).

  8. A Mixed-Methods Case Study of Parent Involvement in an Urban High School Serving Minority Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, Andrew D.; Crea, Thomas M.; Medina, Jose; Degnan, Elizabeth; McRoy, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    Parental involvement in education has been associated with a number of positive outcomes for students. Using a mixed-methods approach, the authors examine how role construction and self-efficacy (psychological motivators), invitations (contextual motivators), and life contexts influence a parent's decision to become involved within the context of…

  9. Math Achievement in Early Adolescence: The Role of Parental Involvement, Teachers' Behavior, and Students' Motivational Beliefs about Math

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levpuscek, Melita Puklek; Zupancic, Maja

    2009-01-01

    Contributions of parental involvement in educational pursuits as well as math teachers' classroom behavior to students' motivation and performance in math were investigated. By the end of the first school term, 365 Slovene eighth graders reported on their parents' academic involvement (pressure, support, and help) and their math teachers' behavior…

  10. Principals' Opinions on the Role of Speech-Language Pathologists Serving Students with Communication Disorders Involved in Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritzman, Mitzi J.; Sanger, Dixie

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to survey the opinions of principals concerning the role of speech-language pathologists (SLPs) serving students with communication disorders who have been involved in violence. Method: A mixed methods design involving 678 questionnaires was mailed to elementary, middle, and high school principals in a…

  11. Validity and Reliability of the Alcohol, Smoking, and Substance Involvement Screening Test (ASSIST) in University Students.

    PubMed

    Tiburcio Sainz, Marcela; Rosete-Mohedano, Ma Guadalupe; Natera Rey, Guillermina; Martínez Vélez, Nora Angélica; Carreño García, Silvia; Pérez Cisneros, Daniel

    2016-03-02

    The Alcohol, Smoking and Substance Involvement Screening Test (ASSIST), developed by the World Health Organization (WHO), has been used successfully in many countries, but there are few studies of its validity and reliability for the Mexican population. The objective of this study was to determine the psychometric properties of the self-administered ASSIST test in university students in Mexico. This was an ex post facto non-experimental study with 1,176 undergraduate students, the majority women (70.1%) aged 18-23 years (89.5%) and single (87.5%). To estimate concurrent validity, factor analysis and tests of reliability and correlation were carried out between the subscale for alcohol and AUDIT, those for tobacco and the Fagerström Test, and those for marijuana and DAST-20. Adequate reliability coefficients were obtained for ASSIST subscales for tobacco (alpha = 0.83), alcohol (alpha = 0.76), and marijuana (alpha = 0.73). Significant correlations were found only with the AUDIT (r = 0.71) and the alcohol subscale. The best balance of sensitivity and specificity of the alcohol subscale (83.8% and 80%, respectively) and the largest area under the ROC curve (81.9%) was found with a cutoff score of 8. The self-administered version of ASSIST is a valid screening instrument to identify at-risk cases due to substance use in this population.

  12. Transferring Evidence-Based Information from Dental School to Practitioners: A Pilot “Academic Detailing” Program Involving Dental Students

    PubMed Central

    Rugh, John D.; Sever, Naomi; Glass, Birgit Junfin; Matteson, Stephen R.

    2012-01-01

    An academic detailing program involving dental students as the academic detailers was conducted at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio Dental School in 2008 and 2009. Students were trained to visit general dentists and present critically appraised topic (CAT) documents in a face-to-face intervention. Thirty-eight students visited 143 general dentists during summer vacation breaks. Students reported that their participation in the project reinforced their commitment to evidence-based practice as taught in their coursework. The dentists also reported positively on the project. PMID:22012774

  13. Action Learning in Action: How Business Students Strengthen Their Knowledge Bases through Work-Based Experiential Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mosca, Joseph B.; Paul, David P., III; Skiba, Michaeline

    2007-01-01

    The use of service learning as a means of training future business leaders is advantageous when used as part of learning process and an introduction to problem solving. This study reviews how student knowledge can be enhanced when the learning process is linked with real world experiences such as internships, apprenticeships, cooperative education…

  14. A Multi-Institution Study on the Effectiveness of ClassAction to Promote Student Understanding in Astro 101

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kevin M.; French, R. S.; Hands, D. R.; Loranz, D. R.; Martino, D.; Rudolph, A. L.; Wysong, J.; Young, T. S.; Prather, E. E.; CATS

    2010-01-01

    ClassAction is a computer database of materials designed to enhance the conceptual understanding and reasoning abilities of Astro 101 students by promoting interactive engagement and providing rapid feedback. The main focus is dynamic conceptual questions largely based upon graphics that can be projected in the classroom. Instructors have the capability to select, order, and recast these questions into alternate permutations based on their own preferences and student responses. Instructors may also provide feedback through extensive resources including outlines, graphics, and simulations. The Light and Spectroscopy Concept Inventory (LSCI) is a multiple-choice assessment instrument which focuses on the electromagnetic spectrum, Doppler shift, Wien's Law, Stefan-Boltzmann Law, and Kirchhoff's Laws. Illustrative examples of how these concepts are targeted by the questions and resources of the ClassAction module are shown. ClassAction materials covering light and spectra concepts were utilized in multiple classrooms at 6 different institutions and the LSCI was delivered as a pretest and posttest to measure the gains in student understanding. A comparison of the gains achieved in these classes will be made against the national LSCI data. We will report on our investigation into correlations between gain and the extent of ClassAction usage. ClassAction materials are publicly available at http://astro.unl.edu. We would like to thank the NSF for funding under Grant Nos. 0404988 and 0715517, a CCLI Phase III Grant for the Collaboration of Astronomy Teaching Scholars (CATS) Program.

  15. The CLASS Action Survey: An Assessment Instrument Designed to Evaluate Students' Subjective Attitudes Regarding a Course in College Student Retention and Persistence to Graduation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kemp, Arthur D.

    2016-01-01

    This investigation explored the extent to which a newly constructed instrument, the CLASS Action Survey (CLAS), was able to accurately measure the qualities of a specialized course, the Crystallized Learning and Academic Study System (CLASS) and its stated goals: (1) to increase college students' academic mindedness, (2) to challenge…

  16. Building a Student-Centred Learning Framework Using Social Software in the Middle Years Classroom: An Action Research Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casey, Gail

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses the development of the online spaces that were used to create a learning framework: a student-centred framework that combined face-to-face teaching with online social and participatory media. The author, as part of her Doctoral research study, used action research as a mechanism for continual improvement as she redesigned…

  17. Science in Action: How Middle School Students Are Changing Their World through STEM Service-Learning Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Jane L.; Dantzler, John; Coleman, April N.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of Science in Action (SIA) was to examine the relationship between implementing quality science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) service-learning (SL) projects and the effect on students' academic engagement in middle school science, civic responsibility, and resilience to at-risk behaviors. The innovative project funded by…

  18. Psychometric Properties of the Acceptance and Action Questionnaire-II for Chinese College Students and Elite Chinese Athletes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Chun-Qing; Chung, Pak-Kwong; Si, Gangyan; Liu, Jing Dong

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the psychometric properties of the Chinese version of the Acceptance and Action Questionnaire-II (AAQ-II) across two samples of Chinese college students (n = 183 and n = 366) and a sample of elite Chinese athletes (n = 330). Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses supported the existence of a…

  19. Theory in the Service of Practice: Theories in Action Research Dissertations Written by Students in Education Doctorate Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zambo, Debby

    2014-01-01

    Educational leaders are enrolling in second-generation education doctorate (EdD) programs because these are allowing them to remain in the field as they pursue their degree and perform action research within their workplace. As part of degree requirements, students in these programs are challenged to cross the theory-to-practice divide. However,…

  20. Environmental Action and Student Environmental Leaders: Exploring the Influence of Environmental Attitudes, Locus of Control, and Sense of Personal Responsibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ernst, Julie; Blood, Nathaniel; Beery, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    The Student Climate and Conservation Congress (SC3) is a joint educational effort between the United States Fish and Wildlife Service and the Green Schools Alliance that aims to develop the next generation of conservation leaders through fostering action competence in youth. Data from SC3 participants was used to investigate four predictors of…

  1. Participatory Action Research for High School Students: Transforming Policy, Practice, and the Personal with Social Justice Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cammarota, Julio; Romero, Augustine

    2011-01-01

    The authors discuss how participatory action research (PAR) informs the pedagogy and epistemology of the social justice education. PAR facilitates students' engagement in their social context and acquisition of knowledge to initiate personal and social transformation. The scope of research contains knowledge about social justice issues negatively…

  2. Building Warmth Sculpture in the Student-Teacher Relationship: Goethean Observation and Contemplative Practice in an Action Research Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kresin-Price, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    Through an action research approach, this dissertation focuses on the central role of interpersonal warmth in the teacher and student relationship. The heart of its inquiry is based on data gathered by a set of teachers working collaboratively as co-researchers in their own classrooms. These individuals inquired into the potential of the teacher…

  3. Seek Help from Teachers or Fight Back? Student Perceptions of Teachers' Actions during Conflicts and Responses to Peer Victimization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aceves, Mario J.; Hinshaw, Stephen P.; Mendoza-Denton, Rodolfo; Page-Gould, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Previous research has shown that teachers' actions when addressing conflict on school grounds can shape adolescent perceptions regarding how well the school manages victimization. Our objective in this study was to determine how these perceptions influenced the likelihood that adolescent students would react to victimization scenarios by either…

  4. Teaching Writing Skills Based on a Genre Approach to L2 Primary School Students: An Action Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahn, Hyejeong

    2012-01-01

    This article, based on research findings, examines the effect of implementing a genre approach to develop writing competency of Year 5 and 6 L2 primary school students. Using action research, the genre approach was implemented over a 10-week term with two lessons per week in a culturally and linguistically diverse ESL class in a South Australian…

  5. 20 CFR 670.545 - How does Job Corps ensure that students receive due process in disciplinary actions?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false How does Job Corps ensure that students receive due process in disciplinary actions? 670.545 Section 670.545 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) THE JOB CORPS UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Program Activities and...

  6. 20 CFR 670.545 - How does Job Corps ensure that students receive due process in disciplinary actions?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false How does Job Corps ensure that students receive due process in disciplinary actions? 670.545 Section 670.545 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) THE JOB CORPS UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Program Activities and...

  7. 20 CFR 670.545 - How does Job Corps ensure that students receive due process in disciplinary actions?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How does Job Corps ensure that students receive due process in disciplinary actions? 670.545 Section 670.545 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR THE JOB CORPS UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Program Activities and Center Operations §...

  8. Facilitating the Learning Process in Design-Based Learning Practices: An Investigation of Teachers' Actions in Supervising Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gómez Puente, S. M.; van Eijck, M.; Jochems, W.

    2013-01-01

    Background: In research on design-based learning (DBL), inadequate attention is paid to the role the teacher plays in supervising students in gathering and applying knowledge to design artifacts, systems, and innovative solutions in higher education. Purpose: In this study, we examine whether teacher actions we previously identified in the DBL…

  9. Using a Virtual Tablet Machine to Improve Student Understanding of the Complex Processes Involved in Tablet Manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Mattsson, Sofia; Sjöström, Hans-Erik; Englund, Claire

    2016-06-25

    Objective. To develop and implement a virtual tablet machine simulation to aid distance students' understanding of the processes involved in tablet production. Design. A tablet simulation was created enabling students to study the effects different parameters have on the properties of the tablet. Once results were generated, students interpreted and explained them on the basis of current theory. Assessment. The simulation was evaluated using written questionnaires and focus group interviews. Students appreciated the exercise and considered it to be motivational. Students commented that they found the simulation, together with the online seminar and the writing of the report, was beneficial for their learning process. Conclusion. According to students' perceptions, the use of the tablet simulation contributed to their understanding of the compaction process.

  10. Involvement of protein kinase C in the mechanism of action of Escherichia coli heat-stable enterotoxin (STa) in a human colonic carcinoma cell line, COLO-205

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Dyuti Datta; Saha, Subhrajit; Chakrabarti, Manoj K. . E-mail: mkc_niced@yahoo.co.in

    2005-08-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine the involvement of calcium-protein kinase C pathway in the mechanism of action of Escherichia coli heat stable enterotoxin (STa) apart from STa-induced activation of guanylate cyclase in human colonic carcinoma cell line COLO-205, which was used as a model cultured cell line to study the mechanism of action of E. coli STa. In response to E. coli STa, protein kinase C (PKC) activity was increased in a time-dependent manner with its physical translocation from cytosol to membrane. Inhibition of the PKC activity in membrane fraction and inhibition of its physical translocation in response to IP{sub 3}-mediated calcium release inhibitor dantrolene suggested the involvement of intracellular store depletion in the regulation of PKC activity. Among different PKC isoforms, predominant involvement of calcium-dependent protein kinase C (PKC{alpha}) was specified using isotype-specific pseudosubstrate, which showed pronounce enzyme activity. Inhibition of enzyme activity by PKC{alpha}-specific inhibitor Goe6976 and immunoblott study employing isotype-specific antibody further demonstrated the involvement of calcium-dependent isoform of PKC in the mechanism of action of E. coli STa. Moreover, inhibition of guanylate cyclase activity by PKC{alpha}-specific inhibitor Goe6976 suggested the involvement of PKC{alpha} in the regulation of guanylate cyclase activity.

  11. Parental Involvement in the Lives of College Students: Impact on Student Independence, Self-Direction, and Critical Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spence, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have noted the increasing communication between parents and students while students are in college (College Parent, 2007; Hofer & Moore, 2010). The most recent study noted that the interaction between parent and student during the last year of college averages over 13 times a week (Hofer & Moore, 2010). While many articles…

  12. An Examination of the Flipped Classroom Approach on College Student Academic Involvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCallum, Shelly; Schultz, Janel; Sellke, Kristen; Spartz, Jason

    2015-01-01

    Colleges and universities remain attentive to developing and supporting ways to foster student academic success. These efforts have taken on more importance as student success, commonly measured by student learning achievement, has failed to meet expectations. For colleges and universities, the flipped classroom represents a student-centered…

  13. Identifying Aspects of Parental Involvement that Affect the Academic Achievement of High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roulette-McIntyre, Ovella; Bagaka's, Joshua G.; Drake, Daniel D.

    2005-01-01

    This study identified parental practices that relate positively to high school students' academic performance. Parents of 643 high school students participated in the study. Data analysis, using a multiple linear regression model, shows parent-school connection, student gender, and race are significant predictors of student academic performance.…

  14. Facilitating the learning process in design-based learning practices: an investigation of teachers' actions in supervising students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez Puente, S. M.; van Eijck, M.; Jochems, W.

    2013-11-01

    Background: In research on design-based learning (DBL), inadequate attention is paid to the role the teacher plays in supervising students in gathering and applying knowledge to design artifacts, systems, and innovative solutions in higher education. Purpose: In this study, we examine whether teacher actions we previously identified in the DBL literature as important in facilitating learning processes and student supervision are present in current DBL engineering practices. Sample: The sample (N=16) consisted of teachers and supervisors in two engineering study programs at a university of technology: mechanical and electrical engineering. We selected randomly teachers from freshman and second-year bachelor DBL projects responsible for student supervision and assessment. Design and method: Interviews with teachers, and interviews and observations of supervisors were used to examine how supervision and facilitation actions are applied according to the DBL framework. Results: Major findings indicate that formulating questions is the most common practice seen in facilitating learning in open-ended engineering design environments. Furthermore, other DBL actions we expected to see based upon the literature were seldom observed in the coaching practices within these two programs. Conclusions: Professionalization of teachers in supervising students need to include methods to scaffold learning by supporting students in reflecting and in providing formative feedback.

  15. Anger fosters action. Fast responses in a motor task involving approach movements toward angry faces and bodies

    PubMed Central

    de Valk, Josje M.; Wijnen, Jasper G.; Kret, Mariska E.

    2015-01-01

    Efficiently responding to others’ emotions, especially threatening expressions such as anger and fear, can have great survival value. Previous research has shown that humans have a bias toward threatening stimuli. Most of these studies focused on facial expressions, yet emotions are expressed by the whole body, and not just by the face. Body language contains a direct action component, and activates action preparation areas in the brain more than facial expressions. Hence, biases toward threat may be larger following threatening bodily expressions as compared to facial expressions. The current study investigated reaction times of movements directed toward emotional bodies and faces. For this purpose, a new task was developed where participants were standing in front of a computer screen on which angry, fearful, and neutral faces and bodies were presented which they had to touch as quickly as possible. Results show that participants responded faster to angry than to neutral stimuli, regardless of the source (face or body). No significant difference was observed between fearful and neutral stimuli, demonstrating that the threat bias was not related to the negativity of the stimulus, but likely to the directness of the threat in relation to the observer. Whereas fearful stimuli might signal an environmental threat that requires further exploration before action, angry expressions signal a direct threat to the observer, asking for immediate action. This study provides a novel and implicit method to directly test the speed of actions toward emotions from the whole body. PMID:26388793

  16. Involving International Student Teams in GPS and GRS Surveys to Study Cryospheric Change in Greenland and the Colorado Front Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzfeld, U. C.; Mayer, H.

    2009-12-01

    In the course of research programs to develop a methodology for the study of microtopography of ice and snow surfaces, we placed a strong emphasis on the involvement of students. This project provided the opportunity to engage students in every step from building the instrument through development of the data processing, the actual field measurements, processing of the resultant data, their evaluation and interpretation to the final publication in scientific journals. The development of the Glacier Roughness Sensor (GRS) incorporating Global Positioning System (GPS) technology and the fieldwork on the Greenland Inland Ice were particularly fascinating and instructive for students. In a related snow-hydrological research project on Niwot Ridge in the Colorado Front Range, we involved students in two season-long measurement campaigns in a high alpine environment. Students from the Universität Trier, Germany, and the University of Colorado Boulder participated in this project to learn about the value of international collaboration in science. Funding was provided by Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (Antarctic and Arctic Program) and the U.S. National Science Foundation (Hydrological Sciences Program). Students participated in preparatory classes and field camps, selected their own research projects and received university credit towards their degrees in geography or environmental sciences. All student participants in the MICROTOP projects have gone on to higher university education and become professionally exceptionally successful. Students setting up camp on the Greenland Ice Sheet during expedition MICROTOP 99.

  17. Improving student performance in an introductory biology majors course: A social action project in the scholarship of teaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, Sara Lang Ketchum

    This social action study followed an introductory biology course for a three-year period to determine whether changes in teaching personnel, instructional techniques and reorientation to student-centered learning would impact student performance. The course was redirected from a traditional lecture-laboratory format to one emphasizing active learning inquiry methods. Student retention, achievement, and failure were observed for three years in addition to one year prior, and one year following, the study. The study examined the two semester introductory biology course required of all biology majors and those intending a career in science, medicine or dentistry. During the first semester of the study, the dropout rate decreased from 46% to 21%. Prior to the study, 39% of the students completing the course received a grade of D or F while only 4% received a grade of B or above. During the first semester of the study 14% of the students received a grade of D or F while 46% received a B, B+ or A grade. Similar results were seen in other semesters of the study. A statistical comparison of student retention and performance was carried out using grade data for classes taught by the original faculty, the action study faculty and the post-study faculty. The differences between the original faculty and the action study faculty were statistically significant. Effect size calculations indicated large differences between the action study faculty and the two other faculty groups in terms of student retention, achievement and failure. The results are attributed to both the personnel change and, more significantly, the change in teaching methods and emphasis on student-active learning. Comparison between the pre- and post-study teams showed less dramatic effect sizes than when the action study data were compared with the data from either other team. Nevertheless, the post-study results showed that although the retention rate dropped during the year after the study, the improvement

  18. The Effects of Student Involvement and College Environment on Students' Learning and Living Experience at World-Class Research Universities in China: A Comparative Case Study of the University of Hong Kong (HKU) and Shanghai Jiao Tong University (SJTU)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Roy Yew-Hung

    2011-01-01

    This comparative research examined the effects of student involvement and college environment on students' learning and living experience delivered by two aspiring world-class universities in Hong Kong and Shanghai. Few studies have shown how the levels of student involvement and college environment can benefit students at world-class institution.…

  19. A Study of the Relationship among Student Involvement, Academic Performance, Rates of Retention, and Rates of Departure for African-American Students Enrolled at Three Rural Alabama Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Maurice

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to associate Astin's (1999) theory of student involvement and Tinto's (1993) theory of student departure as a framework for assessing and understanding the relationships among student involvements, academic performances, rates of retention, and rates of departure for African-American students enrolled at 3 rural…

  20. The involvement of P2Y12 receptors, NADPH oxidase, and lipid rafts in the action of extracellular ATP on synaptic transmission at the frog neuromuscular junction.

    PubMed

    Giniatullin, A; Petrov, A; Giniatullin, R

    2015-01-29

    Adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) is the main co-transmitter accompanying the release of acetylcholine from motor nerve terminals. Previously, we revealed the direct inhibitory action of extracellular ATP on transmitter release via redox-dependent mechanism. However, the receptor mechanism of ATP action and ATP-induced sources of reactive oxygen sources (ROS) remained not fully understood. In the current study, using microelectrode recordings of synaptic currents from the frog neuromuscular junction, we analyzed the receptor subtype involved in synaptic action of ATP, receptor coupling to NADPH oxidase and potential location of ATP receptors within the lipid rafts. Using subtype-specific antagonists, we found that the P2Y13 blocker 2-[(2-chloro-5-nitrophenyl)azo]-5-hydroxy-6-methyl-3-[(phosphonooxy)methyl]-4-pyridinecarboxaldehyde did not prevent the depressant action of ATP. In contrast, the P2Y12 antagonist 2-methylthioadenosine 5'-monophosphate abolished the inhibitory action of ATP, suggesting the key role of P2Y12 receptors in ATP action. As the action of ATP is redox-dependent, we also tested potential involvement of the NADPH oxidase, known as a common inducer of ROS. The depressant action of extracellular ATP was significantly reduced by diphenyleneiodonium chloride and 4-(2-aminoethyl)-benzenesulfonyl fluoride hydrochloride, two structurally different inhibitors of NADPH oxidase, indicating that this enzyme indeed mediates the action of ATP. Since the location and activity of various receptors are often associated with lipid rafts, we next tested whether ATP-driven inhibition depends on lipid rafts. We found that the disruption of lipid rafts with methyl-beta-cyclodextrin reduced and largely delayed the action of ATP. Taken together, these data revealed key steps in the purinergic control of synaptic transmission via P2Y12 receptors associated with lipid rafts, and identified NADPH oxidase as the main source of ATP-induced inhibitory ROS at the neuromuscular

  1. Reducing cyberbullying: A theory of reasoned action-based video prevention program for college students.

    PubMed

    Doane, Ashley N; Kelley, Michelle L; Pearson, Matthew R

    2016-01-01

    Few studies have evaluated the effectiveness of cyberbullying prevention/intervention programs. The goals of the present study were to develop a Theory of Reasoned Action (TRA)-based video program to increase cyberbullying knowledge (1) and empathy toward cyberbullying victims (2), reduce favorable attitudes toward cyberbullying (3), decrease positive injunctive (4) and descriptive norms about cyberbullying (5), and reduce cyberbullying intentions (6) and cyberbullying behavior (7). One hundred sixty-seven college students were randomly assigned to an online video cyberbullying prevention program or an assessment-only control group. Immediately following the program, attitudes and injunctive norms for all four types of cyberbullying behavior (i.e., unwanted contact, malice, deception, and public humiliation), descriptive norms for malice and public humiliation, empathy toward victims of malice and deception, and cyberbullying knowledge significantly improved in the experimental group. At one-month follow-up, malice and public humiliation behavior, favorable attitudes toward unwanted contact, deception, and public humiliation, and injunctive norms for public humiliation were significantly lower in the experimental than the control group. Cyberbullying knowledge was significantly higher in the experimental than the control group. These findings demonstrate a brief cyberbullying video is capable of improving, at one-month follow-up, cyberbullying knowledge, cyberbullying perpetration behavior, and TRA constructs known to predict cyberbullying perpetration. Considering the low cost and ease with which a video-based prevention/intervention program can be delivered, this type of approach should be considered to reduce cyberbullying.

  2. Impact of Prosocial Behavioral Involvement on School Violence Perpetration Among African American Middle School and High School Students.

    PubMed

    McDade, Rhyanne S; King, Keith A; Vidourek, Rebecca A; Merianos, Ashley L

    2017-01-04

    The purpose of this study was to examine factors associated with school violence perpetration among African American youth. African American students in 7th through 12th grade (n = 7488) in schools within one Metropolitan area completed the Pride National Drug Survey. Chi square analyses revealed school violence perpetration significantly differed based on grade and prosocial behavioral involvement. Students in 7th-8th grade (54.7%) were more likely to engage in school violence in comparison to 9th-12th grade students (48.8%). Students with low prosocial behavior (52.8%) involvement were more likely than their counterparts (48.9%) to engage in school violence perpetration. Logistic regression also indicated females and 9th-12th students with low prosocial behavior involvement were significantly less likely than their counterparts to engage in school violence. Findings should be considered by health educators and prevention specialists when developing programs and efforts to prevent in school violence perpetration among African American students.

  3. The impact of self-concept and college involvement on the first-year success of medical students in China.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ying-Xue; Ou, Chun-Quan; Zhao, Zhi-Tao; Wan, Cheng-Song; Guo, Cui; Li, Li; Chen, Ping-Yan

    2015-03-01

    Students' first-year academic success plays a critical role on their overall development in college, which implies the need to concentrate on identifying ways to improve students' first-year academic success. Different from most research on the subject, this study attempted to combine the sociological perspective of college impact with a psychological perspective to synthetically explore the causal relationship of specific types of self-concept and college involvement with academic success of medical students. A longitudinal study was conducted using 519 matriculates at a medical university in mainland China. We conducted the Cooperative Institutional Research Program freshmen survey and the Your First College Year survey to collect data of the pre-college and college academic and social self-concept, college involvement components, and some input characteristics. The academic success was measured by the first-year grade point average. A pathway analysis was conducted and showed the following results. Having high academic self-concept, being engaged in class and putting effort in homework or study directly contributes to increasing college achievement. Students' pre-college achievement and self-concept, faculty interaction, and homework involvement positively affected students' college academic self-concept development, which indirectly improved average grade point. These findings contribute to our understanding of a student's ability to interact with his or her collegiate environment and to experience academic success.

  4. 24 CFR 248.141 - Criteria for approval of a plan of action involving prepayment and voluntary termination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... of action will not— (i) Materially increase economic hardship for current tenants, and will not in... most recent available local data concerning changes in population, households, employment, the housing inventory, residential construction activity, and the current and anticipated supply/demand...

  5. 24 CFR 248.141 - Criteria for approval of a plan of action involving prepayment and voluntary termination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... of action will not— (i) Materially increase economic hardship for current tenants, and will not in... most recent available local data concerning changes in population, households, employment, the housing inventory, residential construction activity, and the current and anticipated supply/demand...

  6. Action at an Attentional Distance: A Study of Children's Reasoning about Causes and Effects Involving Spatial and Attentional Discontinuity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grotzer, Tina A.; Solis, S. Lynneth

    2015-01-01

    Spatial discontinuity between causes and effects is a feature of many scientific concepts, particularly those in the environmental and ecological sciences. Causes can be spatially separated from their effects by great distances. Action at a distance, the idea that causes and effects can be separated in physical space, is a well-studied concept in…

  7. Parents as Co-Researchers: A Participatory Action Research Initiative Involving Parents of People with Intellectual Disabilities in Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walmsley, Jan; Mannan, Hasheem

    2009-01-01

    This paper evaluates a participatory action research (PAR) approach to conducting family research in Ireland. Drawing on PAR methodology it describes how parents of people with intellectual disabilities were recruited and trained to facilitate focus groups of parents in Ireland, in order to create an evidence base to support improved dialogue…

  8. The relation between perceived parental involvement and academic achievement: the roles of Taiwanese students' academic beliefs and filial piety.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Wen; Ho, Hsiu-Zu

    2012-01-01

    The excellent academic performance among East-Asian students has drawn international attention from educators and psychologists. However, the process that underlies student academic achievement for this particular group has rarely been documented. The present study examines how the relation between perceived parental involvement and Taiwanese students' academic achievement is mediated by student academic beliefs (i.e., beliefs about effort, academic self-concept, and perceived control). The study further explores whether this mediating effect varies with types of filial piety. Participants were 468 first-year students from colleges and universities in Taiwan. Multiple-group mediating models were analyzed using structural equation modeling (SEM). Results indicated that, for the Taiwanese sample, students' academic beliefs mediated the relation between perceived parental involvement and academic achievement. Furthermore, the mediational effect was significant for the reciprocal filial type, but not for the authoritarian filial type. The importance of the quality of the parent-child relationship and the internalization process related to children's assumptions of their parents' educational values indicate the need for a contextual view when examining predictors of student academic achievement.

  9. The Actions of Headmasters and Headmistresses in Fostering Parent & Family Involvement in Low-Income Schools in Tamil Nadu, India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shekar, Anupama

    2013-01-01

    Decades of research has examined the contribution of parent involvement to children's educational outcomes. Research has also attempted to identify meaningful involvement practices, taking place at home or in school and, as a result, measuring its effects on school, school staff and parents themselves. Despite the extensive research base, very…

  10. A systematic review of the evidence on service user involvement in interpersonal skills training of mental health students.

    PubMed

    Perry, J; Watkins, M; Gilbert, A; Rawlinson, J

    2013-08-01

    Service user involvement has become a common feature of education programmes for mental health students. However, little is known about the effects of this type of education on the interpersonal skills of students taking part. This paper reports findings from a systematic review that formed part of a wider investigation into service user involvement in teaching interpersonal skills. The review aimed to locate and assess the quality of the published evidence relating to the effects of service user involvement on mental health students interpersonal skills and to synthesize results, using a definition of interpersonal skill that includes attitudes, empathy and skills as its key components. Results from this study indicate that the quality of evidence in this area is poor. However, sufficient synthesis of the evidence base was possible to allow conclusions and recommendations for both research and practice. Conclusions were that the involvement of service users in this area is both acceptable and valuable for students and had specific impacts on attitudes, empathy and skills. Some difficulties and reservations about the style of involvement are discussed. Recommendations for the conduct of future research are also made.

  11. Does Parental Involvement Matter for Student Achievement and Mental Health in High School?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Ming-Te; Sheikh-Khalil, Salam

    2014-01-01

    Parental involvement in education remains important for facilitating positive youth development. This study conceptualized parental involvement as a multidimensional construct--including school-based involvement, home-based involvement, and academic socialization--and examined the effects of different types of parental involvement in 10th grade on…

  12. Implementation of Biofeedback Techniques To Reduce Stress Involving Communication Skills with Elementary School Hearing Impaired Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Litus, Tonyia J.

    Two sixth-grade, hearing-impaired students were studied to determine the effectiveness of stress management techniques using biofeedback instruments to monitor their nervous and cardiovascular systems. The male student had behavior problems, exhibiting explosive behavior without warning. The female student experienced excessive audible inhalations…

  13. Getting Everybody Involved: Cooperative PowerPoint Creations Benefit Inclusion Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Rebecca

    1999-01-01

    Describes the use of PowerPoint software in a cooperative setting that allows inclusion students to create presentations as part of the learning process. Discusses equipment needed, audience, teacher and student preparation, and student evaluation, and includes examples of storyboards and worksheets. (Author/LRW)

  14. Themed Residential Learning Communities: The Importance of Purposeful Faculty and Staff Involvement and Student Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frazier, William; Eighmy, Myron

    2012-01-01

    This study examined three themed residential learning communities and their impact on students' satisfaction with their overall university experience, residence hall living experience, residence hall learning experience, their interactions with residence hall student staff, and the students' academic experience. The researchers were specifically…

  15. Effect of Learning Communities on Student Attitudes and Corresponding Behaviors: "A Mediated Test of Involvement Theory"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonilla, Daniel; Buch, Kimberly K.; Johnson, Cindy Wolf

    2013-01-01

    Learning communities are small pre-selected student groups based on a common interest with a variety of goals related to student outcomes. Previous research has shown robust effects of learning community participation on student success outcomes, but little is known about the mechanisms which may mediate these effects. The current study analyzed…

  16. Agnew Meets the Student Dissenters: An Experimental Study of Ego-Involvement and Argumentation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Timothy P.; Cronen, Vernon E.

    1972-01-01

    Study deals with effects of David Frost show of September 25, 1970, featuring Vice President Spiro Agnew and five student dissenters on the attitudes of students. Results showed that students exposed to the program were significantly less negative in attitudes toward Agnew. (DS)

  17. Decentering: A Construct to Analyze and Explain Teacher Actions as They Relate to Student Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teuscher, Dawn; Moore, Kevin C.; Carlson, Marilyn P.

    2016-01-01

    Mathematics educators and writers of mathematics education policy documents continue to emphasize the importance of teachers focusing on and using student thinking to inform their instructional decisions and interactions with students. In this paper, we characterize the interactions between a teacher and student(s) that exhibit this focus.…

  18. A social justice epistemology and pedagogy for Latina/o students: Transforming public education with participatory action research.

    PubMed

    Cammarota, Julio; Romero, Augustine F

    2009-01-01

    The article reports on Latina/o high school students who conducted participatory action research (PAR) on problems that circumscribe their possibilities for self-determination. The intention is to legitimize student knowledge to develop effective educational policies and practices for young Latinas/os. PAR is engaged through the Social Justice Education Project, which provides students with all social science requirements for their junior and senior years. The mandated curriculum is supplemented with advanced-level readings from Chicana/o studies, critical race theory, critical pedagogy, and, most important, PAR. The intention is for students to meet the requirements for graduation and to develop sophisticated critical analyses to address problems in their own social contexts.

  19. An Action Research Inquiry into the Relationship Among Aerobic Activities, Memory, and Stress with Students Identified as Gifted

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Denise Marie

    Students identified as gifted come from varying socio-economic strata and nationalities with a range of talents and temperaments comprising a diverse community. They may experience stress for a variety of reasons. Although a certain amount of stress can enhance the learning process, too much stress can impede learning, especially memory. Strategies have been offered for relieving stress, yet the benefits of physical activities as stress reducers for the gifted have frequently been overlooked. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship among aerobic activity, stress, and memory ability in students in an elementary school gifted program. An exceptional aspect of this research was that the students were an integral part of their own study. As co-researchers they had a vested interest in what they were doing, enhancing the significance of the experience and heightening learning. This action research project conducted in a mid-western school district with fourth and fifth grade students examined the impact of aerobic movement on physical indicators of stress and memory. The study lasted twelve weeks with data collected on physical indicators of stress, memory test scores, parent observations, interviews with students, a parent focus group session, observational data, student comments, and investigator/teacher journal. By infusing regular exercise into curricula, stress levels in students identified as gifted were examined. Students' scores on declarative memory tasks conducted with and without an accompanying aerobic activity were documented. Students learned of the delicate relationship between stress and memory as they studied the physiology of the brain. Twenty-four hour retention rates of declarative memory items were higher when a 20-minute aerobic activity intervention preceded the memory activity. Perceived stress levels were lowered for 14 of the 16 co-researchers. Students indicated a positive attitude toward physical activity and its

  20. Factors associated with regulatory action involving investigation of illnesses associated with Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli in products regulated by the Food Safety and Inspection Service.

    PubMed

    Green, Alice L; Seys, Scott; Douris, Aphrodite; Levine, Jeoff; Robertson, Kis

    2014-07-01

    We described characteristics of the Escherichia coli O157 and Escherichia coli non-O157 illness investigations conducted by the United States Department of Agriculture's Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) during the 5-year period from 2006 through 2010. We created a multivariable logistic regression model to determine characteristics of these investigations that were associated with FSIS regulatory action, which was defined as having occurred if a product recall occurred or if FSIS personnel performed an environmental health assessment (Food Safety Assessment) at the implicated establishment. During this period, FSIS took regulatory action in 38 of 88 (43%) investigations. Illness investigations in which FoodNet states were involved were more likely to result in regulatory action. Illness investigations in which state and local traceback, or FSIS traceback occurred were more likely to result in regulatory action. Reasons for lack of action included evidence of cross-contamination after the product left a regulated establishment, delayed notification, lack of epidemiological information, and insufficient product information.