Science.gov

Sample records for activate antigen-presenting cells

  1. Intestinal Antigen-Presenting Cells

    PubMed Central

    Flannigan, Kyle L.; Geem, Duke; Harusato, Akihito; Denning, Timothy L.

    2016-01-01

    The microbiota that populate the mammalian intestine are critical for proper host physiology, yet simultaneously pose a potential danger. Intestinal antigen-presenting cells, namely macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs), are integral components of the mucosal innate immune system that maintain co-existence with the microbiota in face of this constant threat. Intestinal macrophages and DCs integrate signals from the microenvironment to orchestrate innate and adaptive immune responses that ultimately lead to durable tolerance of the microbiota. Tolerance is not a default response, however, because macrophages and DCs remain poised to vigorously respond to pathogens that breach the epithelial barrier. In this review, we summarize the salient features of macrophages and DCs in the healthy and inflamed intestine and discuss how signals from the microbiota can influence their function. PMID:25976247

  2. Dissecting the Tumor Myeloid Compartment Reveals Rare Activating Antigen Presenting Cells, Critical for T cell Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Broz, Miranda; Binnewies, Mikhail; Boldajipour, Bijan; Nelson, Amanda; Pollock, Joshua; Erle, David; Barczak, Andrea; Rosenblum, Michael; Daud, Adil; Barber, Diane; Amigorena, Sebastian; van’t Veer, Laura J.; Sperling, Anne; Wolf, Denise; Krummel, Matthew F.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY It is well understood that antigen-presenting cells (APC) within tumors typically do not maintain cytotoxic T cell (CTL) function, despite engaging them. Across multiple mouse tumor models and human tumor biopsies, we have delineated the intratumoral dendritic-cell (DC) populations as distinct from macrophage populations. Within these, CD103+ DCs are extremely sparse and yet remarkably capable CTL stimulators. These are uniquely dependent upon IRF8, Zbtb46 and Batf3 transcription factors and generated by GM-CSF and Flt3L cytokines. Regressing tumors have higher proportions of these cells, T-cell dependent immune clearance relies upon them, and abundance of their transcripts in human tumors correlates with clinical outcome. This cell type presents opportunities for prognostic and therapeutic approaches across multiple cancer types. PMID:25446897

  3. Interview: glycolipid antigen presentation by CD1d and the therapeutic potential of NKT cell activation.

    PubMed

    Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2007-01-01

    Natural Killer T cells (NKT) are critical determinants of the immune response to cancer, regulation of autioimmune disease, clearance of infectious agents, and the development of artheriosclerotic plaques. In this interview, Mitch Kronenberg discusses his laboratory's efforts to understand the mechanism through which NKT cells are activated by glycolipid antigens. Central to these studies is CD1d--the antigen presenting molecule that presents glycolipids to NKT cells. The advent of CD1d tetramer technology, a technique developed by the Kronenberg lab, is critical for the sorting and identification of subsets of specific glycolipid-reactive T cells. Mitch explains how glycolipid agonists are being used as therapeutic agents to activate NKT cells in cancer patients and how CD1d tetramers can be used to assess the state of the NKT cell population in vivo following glycolipid agonist therapy. Current status of ongoing clinical trials using these agonists are discussed as well as Mitch's prediction for areas in the field of immunology that will have emerging importance in the near future.

  4. Systemic activation of antigen-presenting cells via RNA-loaded nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Sayour, Elias J.; Pham, Christina; Grippin, Adam; Kemeny, Hanna; Chua, Joshua; Sampson, John H.; Sanchez-Perez, Luis; Flores, Catherine; Mitchell, Duane A.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT While RNA-pulsed dendritic cell (DC) vaccines have shown promise, the advancement of cellular therapeutics is fraught with developmental challenges. To circumvent the challenges of cellular immunotherapeutics, we developed clinically translatable nanoliposomes that can be combined with tumor-derived RNA to generate personalized tumor RNA-nanoparticles (NPs) with considerable scale-up capacity. RNA-NPs bypass MHC restriction, are amenable to central distribution, and can provide near immediate immune induction. We screened commercially available nanoliposomal preparations and identified the cationic lipid 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane (DOTAP) as an efficient mRNA courier to antigen-presenting cells (APCs). When administered intravenously, RNA-NPs mediate systemic activation of APCs in reticuloendothelial organs such as the spleen, liver, and bone marrow. RNA-NPs increase percent expression of MHC class I/II, B7 co-stimulatory molecules, and maturation markers on APCs (all vital for T-cell activation). RNA-NPs also increase activation markers on tumor APCs and elicit potent expansion of antigen-specific T-cells superior to peptide vaccines formulated in complete Freund's adjuvant. We demonstrate that both model antigen-encoding and physiologically-relevant tumor-derived RNA-NPs expand potent antitumor T-cell immunity. RNA-NPs were shown to induce antitumor efficacy in a vaccine model and functioned as a suitable alternative to DCs in a stringent cellular immunotherapy model for a radiation/temozolomide resistant invasive murine high-grade glioma. Although cancer vaccines have suffered from weak immunogenicity, we have advanced a RNA-NP formulation that systemically activates host APCs precipitating activated T-cell frequencies necessary to engender antitumor efficacy. RNA-NPs can thus be harnessed as a more feasible and effective immunotherapy to re-program host-immunity. PMID:28197373

  5. Antigen Presentation by MHC-Dressed Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nakayama, Masafumi

    2015-01-01

    Professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs) such as conventional dendritic cells (DCs) process protein antigens to MHC-bound peptides and then present the peptide–MHC complexes to T cells. In addition to this canonical antigen presentation pathway, recent studies have revealed that DCs and non-APCs can acquire MHC class I (MHCI) and/or MHC class II (MHCII) from neighboring cells through a process of cell–cell contact-dependent membrane transfer called trogocytosis. These MHC-dressed cells subsequently activate or regulate T cells via the preformed antigen peptide–MHC complexes without requiring any further processing. In addition to trogocytosis, intercellular transfer of MHCI and MHCII can be mediated by secretion of membrane vesicles such as exosomes from APCs, generating MHC-dressed cells. This review focuses on the physiological role of antigen presentation by MHCI- or MHCII-dressed cells, and also discusses differences and similarities between trogocytosis and exosome-mediated transfer of MHC. PMID:25601867

  6. Loss of proliferation and antigen presentation activity following internalization of polydispersed carbon nanotubes by primary lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Mandavi; Sachar, Sumedha; Saxena, Rajiv K

    2012-01-01

    Interactions between poly-dispersed acid functionalized single walled carbon nanotubes (AF-SWCNTs) and primary lung epithelial (PLE) cells were studied. Peritoneal macrophages (PMs, known phagocytic cells) were used as positive controls in this study. Recovery of live cells from cultures of PLE cells and PMs was significantly reduced in the presence of AF-SWCNTs, in a time and dose dependent manner. Both PLE cells as well as PMs could take up fluorescence tagged AF-SWCNTs in a time dependent manner and this uptake was significantly blocked by cytochalasin D, an agent that blocks the activity of acto-myosin fibers and therefore the phagocytic activity of cells. Confocal microscopic studies confirmed that AF-SWCNTs were internalized by both PLE cells and PMs. Intra-trachially instilled AF-SWCNTs could also be taken up by lung epithelial cells as well as alveolar macrophages. Freshly isolated PLE cells had significant cell division activity and cell cycling studies indicated that treatment with AF-SWCNTs resulted in a marked reduction in S-phase of the cell cycle. In a previously standardized system to study BCG antigen presentation by PLE cells and PMs to sensitized T helper cells, AF-SWCNTs could significantly lower the antigen presentation ability of both cell types. These results show that mouse primary lung epithelial cells can efficiently internalize AF-SWCNTs and the uptake of nanotubes interfered with biological functions of PLE cells including their ability to present BCG antigens to sensitized T helper cells.

  7. Direct activation of antigen-presenting cells is required for CD8+ T-cell priming and tumor vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Kratky, Wolfgang; Reis e Sousa, Caetano; Oxenius, Annette; Spörri, Roman

    2011-01-01

    Successful priming of adaptive immune responses is crucially dependent on innate activation signals that convert resting antigen-presenting cells (APCs) into immunogenic ones. APCs expressing the relevant innate pattern recognition receptors can be directly activated by pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) to become competent to prime T-cell responses. Alternatively, it has been suggested that APCs could be activated indirectly by proinflammatory mediators synthesized by PAMP-exposed cells. However, data obtained with CD4+ T cells suggest that inflammatory signals often cannot substitute for direct pattern recognition in APC activation for the priming of T helper responses. To test whether the same is true for CD8+ T cells, we studied cytotoxic T lymphocyte development in vitro and in mixed chimeric mice in which coexisting APCs can either present a preprocessed model antigen or directly recognize a given PAMP, but not both. We show that indirectly activated APCs promote antigen-specific proliferation of naïve CD8+ T cells but fail to support their survival and cytotoxic T lymphocyte differentiation. Furthermore, CD8+ T cells primed by indirectly activated APCs are unable to reject tumors. Thus, inflammation cannot substitute for direct recognition of single PAMPs in CD8+ T-cell priming. These findings have important practical implications for vaccine design, indicating that adjuvants must be judiciously chosen to trigger the relevant pattern recognition receptors in APCs. PMID:21987815

  8. Modulation of human natural killer T cell ligands on TLR-mediated antigen-presenting cell activation.

    PubMed

    Salio, Mariolina; Speak, Anneliese O; Shepherd, Dawn; Polzella, Paolo; Illarionov, Petr A; Veerapen, Natacha; Besra, Gurdyal S; Platt, Frances M; Cerundolo, Vincenzo

    2007-12-18

    Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells are a subset of nonconventional T cells recognizing endogenous and/or exogenous glycolipid antigens in the context of CD1d molecules. It remains unclear whether innate stimuli can modify the profile of endogenous lipids recognized by iNKT cells on the surface of antigen-presenting cells (APCs). We report that activation of human APCs by Toll-like receptor ligands (TLR-L) modulates the lipid biosynthetic pathway, resulting in enhanced recognition of CD1d-associated lipids by iNKT cells, as defined by IFN-gamma secretion. APC-derived soluble factors further increase CD1d-restricted iNKT cell activation. Finally, using soluble tetrameric iNKT T cell receptors (TCR) as a staining reagent, we demonstrate specific up-regulation of CD1d-bound ligand(s) on TLR-mediated APC maturation. The ability of innate stimuli to modulate the lipid profile of APCs resulting in iNKT cell activation and APC maturation underscores the role of iNKT cells in assisting priming of antigen-specific immune responses.

  9. Modulation of human natural killer T cell ligands on TLR-mediated antigen-presenting cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Salio, Mariolina; Speak, Anneliese O.; Shepherd, Dawn; Polzella, Paolo; Illarionov, Petr A.; Veerapen, Natacha; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Platt, Frances M.; Cerundolo, Vincenzo

    2007-01-01

    Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells are a subset of nonconventional T cells recognizing endogenous and/or exogenous glycolipid antigens in the context of CD1d molecules. It remains unclear whether innate stimuli can modify the profile of endogenous lipids recognized by iNKT cells on the surface of antigen-presenting cells (APCs). We report that activation of human APCs by Toll-like receptor ligands (TLR-L) modulates the lipid biosynthetic pathway, resulting in enhanced recognition of CD1d-associated lipids by iNKT cells, as defined by IFN-γ secretion. APC-derived soluble factors further increase CD1d-restricted iNKT cell activation. Finally, using soluble tetrameric iNKT T cell receptors (TCR) as a staining reagent, we demonstrate specific up-regulation of CD1d-bound ligand(s) on TLR-mediated APC maturation. The ability of innate stimuli to modulate the lipid profile of APCs resulting in iNKT cell activation and APC maturation underscores the role of iNKT cells in assisting priming of antigen-specific immune responses. PMID:18077358

  10. Antigen presentation by Hodgkin's disease cells.

    PubMed

    Fisher, R I; Cossman, J; Diehl, V; Volkman, D J

    1985-11-01

    The L428 tumor cell line is a long-term tissue culture of Reed-Sternberg cells which was derived from the pleural effusion of a patient with Hodgkin's disease. The L428 cells express all known cell surface antigens, cytochemical staining, and cytologic features of freshly explanted Reed-Sternberg cells. In addition to the previously described HLA-DR cell surface antigens, the L428 cells are now demonstrated to express both DS and SB alloantigens. Thus, the L428 cells express all of the known subclasses of the human immune response genes that are located in the major histocompatibility complex. Furthermore, the L428 cells are capable of presenting soluble antigen to T cells in a genetically restricted fashion. T cell lines were established from normal donors previously immunized with tetanus toxoid. The T cells utilized were incapable of tetanus toxoid-induced proliferation unless antigen-presenting cells were added to the cultures. However, T cells from the two normal donors, which like the L428 cells expressed HLA-DR 5, demonstrated significant proliferative responses when cultured with tetanus toxoid and L428 cells. No proliferative response was observed when the L428 cells were used as antigen-presenting cells for a DR (4,-), DR (2,-) or DR (1,7) T cell line. The tetanus toxoid dose-response curve was similar regardless of whether autologous mononuclear leukocytes or L428 cells were used as antigen-presenting cells. The T cell proliferation induced by soluble antigen was also blocked by anti-HLA-DR antibody. Thus, functionally, Hodgkin's disease may be classified as a tumor of antigen-presenting cells.

  11. The Novel Toll-Like Receptor 2 Agonist SUP3 Enhances Antigen Presentation and T Cell Activation by Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xueheng; Wu, Ning; Shang, Yingli; Liu, Xin; Wu, Tao; Zhou, Yifan; Liu, Xin; Huang, Jiaoyan; Liao, Xuebin; Wu, Li

    2017-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are highly specialized antigen-presenting cells that play crucial roles in innate and adaptive immunity. Previous studies suggested that Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists could be used as potential adjuvants, as activation of TLRs can boost DC-induced immune responses. TLR2 agonists have been shown to enhance DC-mediated immune responses. However, classical TLR2 agonists such as Pam3CSK4 are not stable enough in vivo, which limits their clinical applications. In this study, a novel structurally stable TLR2 agonist named SUP3 was designed. Functional analysis showed that SUP3 induced much stronger antitumor response than Pam3CSK4 by promoting cytotoxic T lymphocytes activation in vivo. This effect was achieved through the following mechanisms: SUP3 strongly enhanced the ability of antigen cross-presentation by DCs and subsequent T cell activation. SUP3 upregulated the expression of costimulatory molecules on DCs and increased antigen deposition in draining lymph nodes. More interestingly, SUP3 induced less amount of pro-inflammatory cytokine production in vivo compared to other TLR agonists such as lipopolysaccharide. Taken together, SUP3 could serve as a novel promising immune adjuvant in vaccine development and immune modulations. PMID:28270814

  12. PD-1 on Immature and PD-1 Ligands on Migratory Human Langerhans Cells Regulate Antigen-Presenting Cell Activity

    PubMed Central

    Peña-Cruz, Victor; McDonough, Sean M.; Diaz-Griffero, Felipe; Crum, Christopher P.; Carrasco, Ruben D.; Freeman, Gordon J.

    2010-01-01

    Langerhans cells (LCs) are known as “sentinels” of the immune system that function as professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs) after migration to draining lymph node. LCs are proposed to have a role in tolerance and the resolution of cutaneous immune responses. The Programmed Death-1 (PD-1) receptor and its ligands, PD-L1 and PD-L2, are a co-inhibitory pathway that contributes to the negative regulation of T-lymphocyte activation and peripheral tolerance. Surprisingly, we found PD-1 to be expressed on immature LCs (iLCs) in situ. PD-1 engagement on iLCs reduced IL-6 and macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1α cytokine production in response to TLR2 signals but had no effect on LC maturation. PD-L1 and PD-L2 were expressed at very low levels on iLCs. Maturation of LCs upon migration from epidermis led to loss of PD-l expression and gain of high expression of PD-L1 and PD-L2 as well as co-stimulatory molecules. Blockade of PD-L1 and/or PD-L2 on migratory LCs (mLCs) and DDCs enhanced T-cell activation, as has been reported for other APCs. Thus the PD-1 pathway is active in iLCs and inhibits iLC activities, but expression of receptor and ligands reverses upon maturation and PD-L1 and PD-L2 on mLC function to inhibit T-cell responses. PMID:20445553

  13. In vivo administration of artificial antigen-presenting cells activates low-avidity T cells for treatment of cancer.

    PubMed

    Ugel, Stefano; Zoso, Alessia; De Santo, Carmela; Li, Yu; Marigo, Ilaria; Zanovello, Paola; Scarselli, Elisa; Cipriani, Barbara; Oelke, Mathias; Schneck, Jonathan P; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2009-12-15

    The development of effective antitumor immune responses is normally constrained by low-avidity, tumor-specific CTLs that are unable to eradicate the tumor. Strategies to rescue antitumor activity of low-avidity melanoma-specific CTLs in vivo may improve immunotherapy efficacy. To boost the in vivo effectiveness of low-avidity CTLs, we immunized mice bearing lung melanoma metastases with artificial antigen-presenting cells (aAPC), made by covalently coupling (pep)MHC-Ig dimers and B7.1-Ig molecules to magnetic beads. aAPC treatment induced significant tumor reduction in a mouse telomerase antigen system, and complete tumor eradication in a mouse TRP-2 antigen system, when low-avidity CTLs specific for these antigens were adoptively transferred. In addition, in an in vivo treatment model of subcutaneous melanoma, aAPC injection also augmented the activity of adoptively transferred CTLs and significantly delayed tumor growth. In vivo tumor clearance due to aAPC administration correlated with in situ proliferation of the transferred CTL. In vitro studies showed that aAPC effectively stimulated cytokine release, enhanced CTL-mediated lysis, and TCR downregulation in low-avidity CTLs. Therefore, in vivo aAPC administration represents a potentially novel approach to improve cancer immunotherapy.

  14. P2X7 Receptor Activation Impairs Exogenous MHC Class I Oligopeptides Presentation in Antigen Presenting Cells

    PubMed Central

    Baroja-Mazo, Alberto; Barberà-Cremades, Maria; Pelegrín, Pablo

    2013-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I) on antigen presenting cells (APCs) is a potent molecule to activate CD8+ T cells and initiate immunity. P2X7 receptors (P2X7Rs) are present on the plasma membrane of APCs to sense the extracellular danger signal adenosine-5′-triphosphate (ATP). P2X7R activates the inflammasome and the release of IL-1β in macrophages and other immune cells to initiate the inflammatory response. Here we show that P2X7R stimulation by ATP in APCs decreased the amount of MHC I at the plasma membrane. Specific antagonism or genetic ablation of P2X7R inhibited the effects of ATP on levels of cellular MHC I. Furthermore, P2X7R stimulation was able to inhibit activation of CD8+ T cells via specific MHC I-oligopeptide complexes. Our study suggests that P2X7R activation on APCs is a novel inhibitor of adaptive CD8+ T cell immunity. PMID:23940597

  15. The effect of antigen encapsulation in chitosan particles on uptake, activation and presentation by antigen presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Koppolu, Bhanuprasanth; Zaharoff, David A

    2013-03-01

    Particle-based vaccine delivery systems are under exploration to enhance antigen-specific immunity against safe but poorly immunogenic polypeptide antigens. Chitosan is a promising biomaterial for antigen encapsulation and delivery due to its ability to form nano- and microparticles in mild aqueous conditions thus preserving the antigenicity of loaded polypeptides. In this study, the influence of chitosan encapsulation on antigen uptake, activation and presentation by antigen presenting cells (APCs) is explored. Fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled bovine serum albumin (FITC-BSA) and ovalbumin (OVA) were used as model protein antigens and encapsulated in chitosan particles via precipitation-coacervation at loading efficiencies >89%. Formulation conditions were manipulated to create antigen-encapsulated chitosan particles (AgCPs) with discrete nominal sizes (300 nm, 1 μm, and 3 μm). Uptake of AgCPs by dendritic cells and macrophages was found to be dependent on particle size, antigen concentration and exposure time. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that uptake of AgCPs enhanced upregulation of surface activation markers on APCs and increased the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Lastly, antigen-specific T cells exhibited higher proliferative responses when stimulated with APCs activated with AgCPs versus soluble antigen. These data suggest that encapsulation of antigens in chitosan particles enhances uptake, activation and presentation by APCs.

  16. Antigen-Presenting Cells in the Skin.

    PubMed

    Kashem, Sakeen W; Haniffa, Muzlifah; Kaplan, Daniel H

    2017-02-06

    Professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs) in the skin include dendritic cells, monocytes, and macrophages. They are highly dynamic, with the capacity to enter skin from the peripheral circulation, patrol within tissue, and migrate through lymphatics to draining lymph nodes. Skin APCs are endowed with antigen sensing, processing, and presenting machinery and play key roles in initiating, modulating, and resolving cutaneous inflammation. Skin APCs are a highly heterogeneous population with functionally specialized subsets that are developmentally imprinted and modulated by local tissue microenvironmental and inflammatory cues. This review explores recent advances that have allowed for a more accurate taxonomy of APC subsets found in both mouse and human skin. It also examines the functional specificity of individual APC subsets and their collaboration with other immune cell types that together promote adaptive T cell and regional cutaneous immune responses during homeostasis, inflammation, and disease. Expected final online publication date for the Annual Review of Immunology Volume 35 is April 26, 2017 . Please see http://www.annualreviews.org/page/journal/pubdates for revised estimates.

  17. Antigen-Presenting Cells and Antigen Presentation in Tertiary Lymphoid Organs

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Catherine E.; Benson, Robert A.; Bedaj, Marija; Maffia, Pasquale

    2016-01-01

    Tertiary lymphoid organs (TLOs) form in territorialized niches of peripheral tissues characterized by the presence of antigens; however, little is known about mechanism(s) of antigen handling by ectopic lymphoid structures. In this mini review, we will discuss the role of antigen-presenting cells and mechanisms of antigen presentation in TLOs, summarizing what is currently known about this facet of the formation and function of these tissues as well as identifying questions yet to be addressed. PMID:27872626

  18. Chaperone-rich tumor cell lysate-mediated activation of antigen-presenting cells resists regulatory T cell suppression.

    PubMed

    Larmonier, Nicolas; Cantrell, Jessica; Lacasse, Collin; Li, Gang; Janikashvili, Nona; Situ, Elaine; Sepassi, Marjan; Andreansky, Samita; Katsanis, Emmanuel

    2008-04-01

    CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T lymphocytes (Tregs) critically contribute to the mechanisms of cancer-induced tolerance. These cells suppress anti-tumoral CD8(+) and CD4(+) T lymphocytes and can also restrain the function of APCs. We have previously documented the immunostimulatory effects of a chaperone-rich cell lysate (CRCL) anti-cancer vaccine. Tumor-derived CRCL induces tumor immunity in vivo, partly by promoting dendritic cell (DC) and macrophage activation. In the current study, we evaluated the effects of CD4(+)CD25(+)forkhead box P3(+) Tregs isolated from mice bearing 12B1 bcr-abl(+) leukemia on DC and macrophages that had been activated by 12B1-derived CRCL. CRCL-activated DC and macrophages resisted Treg suppression, as the production of proinflammatory cytokines, the activation of transcription factor NF-kappaB, and their immunostimulatory potential was unaffected by Tregs. Our results thus highlight CRCL as a powerful adjuvant endowed with the capacity to overcome tumor-induced Treg-inhibitory effects on APCs.

  19. From the antigen-presenting cell to the antigen-presenting vesicle: the exosomes.

    PubMed

    Schartz, Noël Emile Célestin; Chaput, Nathalie; André, Fabrice; Zitvogel, Laurence

    2002-08-01

    Exosomes are membrane vesicles of 30 to 100 nm in diameter, of endocytic origin, and are produced and secreted in vitro by living cells of diverse origin. In vivo and in vitro experiments suggest, from their particular proteomic composition, that exosomes are involved in the transfer of tumor antigens to antigen presenting cells, and in the stimulation of a specific immune response. In this review, we provide a molecular characterization of exosomes. The hypotheses accounting for exosome biogenesis will be outlined. Finally, we will describe their bioactivities and discuss their potential relevance and clinical implementation for cancer immunotherapy.

  20. Isolation and In vivo Transfer of Antigen Presenting Cells

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Pooja; Kharkwal, Shalu Sharma; Porcelli, Steven A.

    2016-01-01

    Transfer of antigen presenting cells in vivo is a method used by immunologists to examine the potency of antigen presentation by a selected population of cells. This method is most commonly used to analyze presentation of protein antigens to MHC class I or II restricted T cells, but it can also be used for studies of nonconventional antigens such as CD1-presented lipids. In a recent study focusing on CD1d-restricted glycolipid antigen presentation to Natural Killer T cells, we compared antigen presenting properties of splenic B cells, CD8αPos dendritc cells (DCs) and CD8αNeg DCs (Arora et al., 2014). This protocol describes the detailed method used for isolation of these cell populations, and their transfer into recipient mice to analyze their antigen presenting properties. PMID:27390759

  1. Self-Antigen Presentation by Dendritic Cells in Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Hopp, Ann-Katrin; Rupp, Anne; Lukacs-Kornek, Veronika

    2014-01-01

    The operation of both central and peripheral tolerance ensures the prevention of autoimmune diseases. The maintenance of peripheral tolerance requires self-antigen presentation by professional antigen presenting cells (APCs). Dendritic cells (DCs) are considered as major APCs involved in this process. The current review discusses the role of DCs in autoimmune diseases, the various factors involved in the induction and maintenance of tolerogenic DC phenotype, and pinpoints their therapeutic capacity as well as potential novel targets for future clinical studies. PMID:24592266

  2. Early Signaling in Primary T Cells Activated by Antigen Presenting Cells Is Associated with a Deep and Transient Lamellal Actin Network

    PubMed Central

    Roybal, Kole T.; Mace, Emily M.; Mantell, Judith M.; Verkade, Paul; Orange, Jordan S.; Wülfing, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Cellular signaling transduction critically depends on molecular interactions that are in turn governed by dynamic subcellular distributions of the signaling system components. Comprehensive insight into signal transduction requires an understanding of such distributions and cellular structures driving them. To investigate the activation of primary murine T cells by antigen presenting cells (APC) we have imaged more than 60 signaling intermediates during T cell stimulation with microscopy across resolution limits. A substantial number of signaling intermediates associated with a transient, wide, and actin-associated lamellum extending from an interdigitated T cell:APC interface several micrometers into the T cell, as characterized in detail here. By mapping the more than 60 signaling intermediates onto the spatiotemporal features of cell biological structures, the lamellum and other ones previously described, we also define distinct spatial and temporal characteristics of T cell signal initiation, amplification, and core signaling in the activation of primary T cells by APCs. These characteristics differ substantially from ones seen when T cells are activated using common reductionist approaches. PMID:26237050

  3. Role of antigen-presenting cells in activation of human T cells by the streptococcal M protein superantigen: requirement for secreted and membrane-associated costimulatory factors.

    PubMed Central

    Majumdar, G; Ohnishi, H; Tomai, M A; Geller, A M; Wang, B; Dockter, M E; Kotb, M

    1993-01-01

    The requirements for T-cell activation by the streptococcal superantigen (SAg), pepsin-extracted M protein from type 5 streptococci (pep M5), were studied by monitoring Ca2+ influx and cell proliferation. Cells from a pep M5-specific T-cell line showed no change in intracellular Ca2+ levels in response to pep M5 when added alone or with freshly isolated autologous antigen-presenting cells (APC). However, after being incubated with pep M5 overnight, the APC secreted soluble factors that together with pep M5 induced a marked increase in intracellular Ca2+ levels in pep M5-specific T cells or freshly isolated, purified T cells. Removal of the SAg from the overnight APC-derived supernatants resulted in loss of the Ca(2+)-mobilizing activity, which was restored within seconds of addition of SAg, suggesting that both the SAg and the soluble factors synergize to induce the Ca2+ influx. Induction of cell proliferation required additional signals inasmuch as the activated APC-derived supernatant failed to synergize with pep M5 to induce the proliferation of purified T cells and required the presence of phorbol myristate acetate for this activity. Metabolically inactive, fixed APC were impaired in their ability to present pep M5 to T cells. Presentation of pep M5 by fixed APC was, however, restored when the APC-derived soluble costimulatory factors were added to the culture. Our data suggest that pep M5-induced activation of T cells is dependent on APC-derived soluble factors and an APC membrane-associated costimulatory molecule(s). These interactions may be important in regulating the in vivo responses to M proteins, could contribute to the severity or progression of infections with Streptococcus pyogenes, and may influence the susceptibility of individuals to its associated nonsuppurative autoimmune sequelae. PMID:8423107

  4. Antigen presentation for priming T cells in central system.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Shaoni; Dasgupta, Subhajit

    2017-01-01

    Generation of myelin antigen-specific T cells is a major event in neuroimmune responses that causes demyelination. The antigen-priming of T cells and its location is important in chronic and acute inflammation. In autoimmune multiple sclerosis, the effector T cells are considered to generate in periphery. However, the reasons for chronic relapsing-remitting events are obscure. Considering mechanisms, a feasible aim of research is to investigate the role of antigen-primed T cells in lupus cerebritis. Last thirty years of investigations emphasize the relevance of microglia and infiltrated dendritic cells/macrophages as antigen presenting cells in the central nervous system. The recent approach towards circulating B-lymphocytes is an important area in the context. Here, we analyze the existing findings on antigen presentation in the central nervous system. The aim is to visualize signaling events of myelin antigen presentation to T cells and lead to the strategy of future goals on immunotherapy research.

  5. Tat engagement of p38 MAP kinase and IRF7 pathways leads to activation of interferon-stimulated genes in antigen-presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nayoung; Kukkonen, Sami; Martinez-Viedma, Maria Del Pilar; Gupta, Sumeet; Aldovini, Anna

    2013-05-16

    As a result of its interaction with transcription factors, HIV type 1 (HIV-1) Tat can modulate the expression of both HIV and cellular genes. In antigen-presenting cells Tat induces the expression of a subset of interferon (IFN)-stimulated genes (ISGs) in the absence of IFNs. We investigated the genome-wide Tat association with promoters in immature dendritic cells and in monocyte-derived macrophages. Among others, Tat associated with the MAP2K6, MAP2K3, and IRF7 promoters that are functionally part of IL-1 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways. The association correlated with their increased gene expression, increased activation of p38 MAPK and of phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1), and consequent induction of ISGs. Probing these pathways with RNA interference, pharmacological p38 MAPK inhibition, and in cell lines lacking STAT1s or the type I IFN receptor chain confirmed the role of MAPKKs and IRF7 in Tat-mediated modulation of ISGs and excluded the involvement of IFNs in this modulation. Tat interaction with the 2 MAPKK and IRF7 promoters in HIV-1-infected cells and the resulting persistent activation of ISGs, which include inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, can contribute to the increased immune activation that characterizes HIV infection.

  6. Antigen Export Reduces Antigen Presentation and Limits T Cell Control of M. tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Smita; Grace, Patricia S; Ernst, Joel D

    2016-01-13

    Persistence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis results from bacterial strategies that manipulate host adaptive immune responses. Infected dendritic cells (DCs) transport M. tuberculosis to local lymph nodes but activate CD4 T cells poorly, suggesting bacterial manipulation of antigen presentation. However, M. tuberculosis antigens are also exported from infected DCs and taken up and presented by uninfected DCs, possibly overcoming this blockade of antigen presentation by infected cells. Here we show that the first stage of this antigen transfer, antigen export, benefits M. tuberculosis by diverting bacterial proteins from the antigen presentation pathway. Kinesin-2 is required for antigen export and depletion of this microtubule-based motor increases activation of antigen-specific CD4 T cells by infected cells and improves control of intracellular infection. Thus, although antigen transfer enables presentation by bystander cells, it does not compensate for reduced antigen presentation by infected cells and represents a bacterial strategy for CD4 T cell evasion.

  7. Phenotypic and functional profiling of mouse intestinal antigen presenting cells

    PubMed Central

    Harusato, Akihito; Flannigan, Kyle L.; Geem, Duke; Denning, Timothy L.

    2015-01-01

    The microbiota that populates the mammalian intestine consists of hundreds of trillions of bacteria that are separated from underlying immune cells by a single layer of epithelial cells. The intestinal immune system effectively tolerates components of the microbiota that provide benefit to the host while remaining poised to eliminate those that are harmful. Antigen presenting cells, especially macrophages and dendritic cells, play important roles in maintaining intestinal homeostasis via their ability to orchestrate appropriate responses to the microbiota. Paramount to elucidating intestinal macrophage- and dendritic cell-mediated functions is the ability to effectively isolate and identify these cells from a complex cellular environment. In this review, we summarize methodology for the isolation and phenotypic characterization of macrophages and DCs from the mouse intestine and discuss how this may be useful for gaining insight into the mechanisms by which mucosal immune tolerance is maintained. PMID:25891794

  8. Multiphoton microscopy of antigen presenting cells in experimental cancer therapies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkins, Simon C.; Papworth, Glenn D.; Spencer, Lori A.; Larregina, Adriana T.; Hackstein, Holger

    2002-06-01

    The absence of effective conventional therapy for most cancer patients justifies the application of novel, experimental approaches. One alternative to conventional cytotoxic agents is a more defined molecular approach for cancer immune treatment; promotion of the immune system specifically to target and eliminate tumor cells on the basis of expression of tumor-associated antigens (TAA). TAA could be presented to T-cells by professional antigen-presenting cells (APC) that generate a more efficient and effective anti-tumor immune response. In fact, it has been well documented that dendritic cells, the most immunologically potent APC, are capable of recognizing, processing and presenting TAA, in turn initiating a specific antitumor immune response. Results from several laboratories and clinical trials suggested significant but still limited efficacy of TAA-pulsed dendritic cells administered to tumor-bearing hosts. Following such delivery, it is fundamentally necessary to dynamically assess cell abundance within the microenvironment of the tumor in the presence of the appropriate therapeutic agent. Multiphoton microscopy was used to assess the trafficking of pulsed dendritic cells and other APC in skin, lymph nodes and brain of several animal tumor models, following different routes of administration.

  9. HLA class II antigen presentation by prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Younger, A R; Amria, S; Jeffrey, W A; Mahdy, A E M; Goldstein, O G; Norris, J S; Haque, A

    2008-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most commonly diagnosed cancer in men. Recent evidence suggests that reduced expression of target protein antigens and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) molecules is the predominant immune escape mechanism of malignant prostate tumor cells. The purpose of this study was to investigate the prospect of antigen specific immunotherapy against prostate cancer via the HLA class II pathway of immune recognition. Here, we show for the first time that prostate cancer cells express HLA class II proteins that are recognized by CD4+ T cells. Prostate tumor cells transduced with class II molecules efficiently presented tumor-associated antigens/peptides to CD4+ T cells. This data suggests that malignant prostate tumors can be targeted via the HLA class II pathway, and that class II-positive tumors could be employed for direct antigen presentation, and CD4+ T-cell mediated tumor immunotherapy.Prostate Cancer and Prostatic Diseases (2008) 11, 334-341; doi:10.1038/sj.pcan.4501021; published online 16 October 2007.

  10. The Role of Antigen Presenting Cells in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Chastain, Emily M. L.; Duncan, D'Anne S.; Rodgers, Jane M.; Miller, Stephen D.

    2010-01-01

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a debilitating T cell-mediated autoimmune disease of the central nervous system (CNS). Animal models of MS, such as experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) and Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus-Induced demyelinating disease (TMEV-IDD) have given light to cellular mechanisms involved in the initiation and progression of this organ-specific autoimmune disease. Within the CNS, antigen presenting cells (APC) such as microglia and astrocytes participate as first line defenders against infections or inflammation. However, during chronic inflammation they can participate in perpetuating the self-destructive environment by secretion of inflammatory factors and/or presentation of myelin epitopes to autoreactive T cells. Dendritic cells (DC) are also participants in the presentation of antigen to T cells, even within the CNS. While the APCs alone are not solely responsible for mediating the destruction to the myelin sheath, they are critical players in perpetuating the inflammatory milieu. This review will highlight relevant studies which have provided insight to the roles played by microglia, DCs and astrocytes in the context of CNS autoimmunity. PMID:20637861

  11. Artificial antigen-presenting cells expressing AFP(158-166) peptide and interleukin-15 activate AFP-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Sun, Longhao; Guo, Hao; Jiang, Ruoyu; Lu, Li; Liu, Tong; Zhang, Zhixiang; He, Xianghui

    2016-04-05

    Professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs) are potent generators of tumor antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) for adoptive immunotherapy; however, generation of APCs is cumbersome, expensive, and subject to the tumor microenvironment. Artificial APCs (aAPCs) have been developed as a cost-effective alternative to APCs. We developed a cellular aAPC that efficiently generated alpha-fetoprotein (AFP)-specific CTLs. We genetically modified the human B cell lymphoma cell line BJAB with a lentiviral vector to establish an aAPC called BA15. The expression of AFP(158-166)-HLA-A*02:01 complex, CD80, CD86, and interleukin (IL)-15 in BA15 cells was assessed. The efficiency of BA15 at generating AFP-specific CTLs and the specific cytotoxicity of CTLs against AFP+ cells were also determined. BA15 cells expressed high levels of AFP(158-166) peptide, HLA-A2, CD80, CD86, and IL-15. BA15 cells also exhibited higher efficiency in generating AFP-specific CTLs than did dendritic cells. These CTLs had greater cytotoxicity against AFP+ hepatocellular carcinoma cells than did CTLs obtained from dendritic cells in vitro and in vivo. Our novel aAPC system could provide a robust platform for the generation of functional AFP-specific CTLs for adoptive immunotherapy of hepatocellular carcinoma.

  12. Persistence of Zinc-Binding Bacterial Superantigens at the Surface of Antigen-Presenting Cells Contributes to the Extreme Potency of These Superantigens as T-Cell Activators

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    Contributes to the Extreme Potency of These Superantigens as T-Cell Activators Dorothy D. Pless,† Gordon Ruthel, Emily K. Reinke, Robert G. Ulrich, and Sina...immunoglobulin G, and the cells were analyzed with a FACSort flow cytometer (Becton Dickinson , Mountain View, CA). To measure off rates, 1 or 5 g of SE or

  13. The Other Function: Class II-Restricted Antigen Presentation by B Cells

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Lital N.; Jiang, Wei; Bhamidipati, Kartik; Millican, Matthew; Macaubas, Claudia; Hung, Shu-chen; Mellins, Elizabeth D.

    2017-01-01

    Mature B lymphocytes (B cells) recognize antigens using their B cell receptor (BCR) and are activated to become antibody-producing cells. In addition, and integral to the development of a high-affinity antibodies, B cells utilize the specialized major histocompatibility complex class II (MHCII) antigen presentation pathway to process BCR-bound and internalized protein antigens and present selected peptides in complex with MHCII to CD4+ T cells. This interaction influences the fate of both types of lymphocytes and shapes immune outcomes. Specific, effective, and optimally timed antigen presentation by B cells requires well-controlled intracellular machinery, often regulated by the combined effects of several molecular events. Here, we delineate and summarize these events in four steps along the antigen presentation pathway: (1) antigen capture and uptake by B cells; (2) intersection of internalized antigen/BCRs complexes with MHCII in peptide-loading compartments; (3) generation and regulation of MHCII/peptide complexes; and (4) exocytic transport for presentation of MHCII/peptide complexes at the surface of B cells. Finally, we discuss modulation of the MHCII presentation pathway across B cell development and maturation to effector cells, with an emphasis on the shaping of the MHCII/peptide repertoire by two key antigen presentation regulators in B cells: HLA-DM and HLA-DO. PMID:28386257

  14. An Overview of B-1 Cells as Antigen-Presenting Cells

    PubMed Central

    Popi, Ana F.; Longo-Maugéri, Ieda M.; Mariano, Mario

    2016-01-01

    The role of B cells as antigen-presenting cells (APCs) has been extensively studied, mainly in relation to the activation of memory T cells. Considering the B cell subtypes, the role of B-1 cells as APCs is beginning to be explored. Initially, it was described that B-1 cells are activated preferentially by T-independent antigens. However, some reports demonstrated that these cells are also involved in a T-dependent response. The aim of this review is to summarize information about the ability of B-1 cells to play a role as APCs and to briefly discuss the role of the BCR and toll-like receptor signals in this process. Furthermore, some characteristics of B-1 cells, such as natural IgM production and phagocytic ability, could interfere in the participation of these cells in the onset of an adaptive response. PMID:27148259

  15. A three-dimensional tumor cell defect in activating autologous CTLs is associated with inefficient antigen presentation correlated with heat shock protein-70 down-regulation.

    PubMed

    Dangles-Marie, Virginie; Richon, Sophie; El-Behi, Mohamed; Echchakir, Hamid; Dorothée, Guillaume; Thiery, Jérôme; Validire, Pierre; Vergnon, Isabelle; Menez, Jeanne; Ladjimi, Moncef; Chouaib, Salem; Bellet, Dominique; Mami-Chouaib, Fathia

    2003-07-01

    We described previously a CTL clone able to lyse the autologous carcinoma cell line IGR-Heu after specific recognition of an HLA-A2/mutated alpha-actinin-4 peptide complex. Here, we used IGR-Heu, cultured either as standard two-dimensional monolayers or as three-dimensional spheroids, to further analyze the influence of target architecture on CTL reactivity. Interestingly, we found that changes in the tumor structure from two- to three-dimensional induced a dramatic decrease in its capacity to activate autologous CTL, as measured by IFN-gamma and tumor necrosis factor-alpha secretion. These functional alterations were attributable neither to MHC class I expression nor to tumor antigen (Ag) down-regulation, because IGR-Heu, cultured as two- or three-dimensional, expressed similar levels of HLA-A2 and alpha-actinin-4. More importantly, incubation of three-dimensional cells with synthetic epitope completely restored cytokine release by CTL. This defective Ag presentation correlated with a decrease in heat shock protein (hsp)70 expression by three-dimensional tumors compared with two-dimensional cells. Furthermore, transfection of the tumor cells with hsp70 cDNA completely restored the Ag-presenting potential of spheroids and, therefore, cytokine production by T cells. These data strongly suggest that hsp70 down-regulation in three-dimensional cells may result in tumor resistance to the immune response.

  16. Tubulin and Actin Interplay at the T Cell and Antigen-Presenting Cell Interface

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Cófreces, Noa Beatriz; Alarcón, Balbino; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco

    2011-01-01

    T cells reorganize their actin and tubulin-based cytoskeletons to provide a physical basis to the immune synapse. However, growing evidence shows that their roles on T cell activation are more dynamic than merely serving as tracks or scaffold for different molecules. The crosstalk between both skeletons may be important for the formation and movement of the lamella at the immunological synapse by increasing the adhesion of the T cell to the antigen-presenting cells (APC), thus favoring the transport of components toward the plasma membrane and in turn regulating the T-APC intercellular communication. Microtubules and F-actin appear to be essential for the transport of the different signaling microclusters along the membrane, therefore facilitating the propagation of the signal. Finally, they can also be important for regulating the endocytosis, recycling, and degradation of the T cell receptor signaling machinery, thus helping both to sustain the activated state and to switch it off. PMID:22566814

  17. Inhibitory effects of thymus-independent type 2 antigens on MHC class II-restricted antigen presentation: comparative analysis of carbohydrate structures and the antigen presenting cell.

    PubMed

    González-Fernández, M; Carrasco-Marín, E; Alvarez-Domínguez, C; Outschoorn, I M; Leyva-Cobián, F

    1997-02-25

    The role of thymus-independent type 2 (TI-2) antigens (polysaccharides) on the MHC-II-restricted processing of protein antigens was studied in vitro. In general, antigen presentation is inhibited when both peritoneal and splenic macrophages (M phi) as well as Küpffer cells (KC) are preincubated with acidic polysaccharides or branched dextrans. However, the inhibitory effect of neutral polysaccharides was minimal when KC were used as antigen presenting cells (APC). Morphological evaluation of the uptake of fluoresceinated polysaccharides clearly correlates with this selective and differential interference. Polysaccharides do not block MHC-I-restricted antigen presentation. Some chemical characteristics shared by different saccharides seem to be specially related to their potential inhibitory abilities: (i) those where two anomeric carbon atoms of two interlinked sugars and (ii) those containing several sulfate groups per disaccharide repeating unit. No polysaccharide being inhibitory in M phi abrogated antigen processing in other APC: lipopolysaccharide-activated B cells, B lymphoma cells, or dendritic cells (DC). Using radiolabeled polysaccharides it was observed that DC and B cells incorporated less radioactivity as a function of time than M phi. Morphological evaluation of these different APC incubated for extended periods of time with inhibitory concentrations of polysaccharides revealed intense cytoplasmic vacuolization in M phi but not in B cells or DC. The large majority of M phi lysosomes containing polysaccharides fail to fuse with incoming endocytic vesicles and delivery of fluid-phase tracers was reduced, suggesting that indigestible carbohydrates reduced the fusion of these loaded lysosomes with endosomes containing recently internalized tracers. It is suggested that the main causes of this antigen presentation blockade are (i) the chemical characteristics of certain carbohydrates and whether the specific enzymatic machinery for their intracellular

  18. Modes of Antigen Presentation by Lymph Node Stromal Cells and Their Immunological Implications.

    PubMed

    Hirosue, Sachiko; Dubrot, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Antigen presentation is no longer the exclusive domain of cells of hematopoietic origin. Recent works have demonstrated that lymph node stromal cell (LNSC) populations, such as fibroblastic reticular cells, lymphatic and blood endothelial cells, not only provide a scaffold for lymphocyte interactions but also exhibit active immunomodulatory roles that are critical to mounting and resolving effective immune responses. Importantly, LNSCs possess the ability to present antigens and establish antigen-specific interactions with T cells. One example is the expression of peripheral tissue antigens, which are presented on major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-I molecules with tolerogenic consequences on T cells. Additionally, exogenous antigens, including self and tumor antigens, can be processed and presented on MHC-I complexes, which result in dysfunctional activation of antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells. While MHC-I is widely expressed on cells of both hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic origins, antigen presentation via MHC-II is more precisely regulated. Nevertheless, LNSCs are capable of endogenously expressing, or alternatively, acquiring MHC-II molecules. Transfer of antigen between LNSC and dendritic cells in both directions has been recently suggested to promote tolerogenic roles of LNSCs on the CD4(+) T cell compartment. Thus, antigen presentation by LNSCs is thought to be a mechanism that promotes the maintenance of peripheral tolerance as well as generates a pool of diverse antigen-experienced T cells for protective immunity. This review aims to integrate the current and emerging literature to highlight the importance of LNSCs in immune responses, and emphasize their role in antigen trafficking, retention, and presentation.

  19. Serine Proteases Enhance Immunogenic Antigen Presentation on Lung Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Peters, Haley L; Tripathi, Satyendra C; Kerros, Celine; Katayama, Hiroyuki; Garber, Haven R; St John, Lisa S; Federico, Lorenzo; Meraz, Ismail M; Roth, Jack A; Sepesi, Boris; Majidi, Mourad; Ruisaard, Kathryn; Clise-Dwyer, Karen; Roszik, Jason; Gibbons, Don L; Heymach, John V; Swisher, Stephen G; Bernatchez, Chantale; Alatrash, Gheath; Hanash, Samir; Molldrem, Jeffrey J

    2017-03-02

    Immunotherapies targeting immune checkpoints have proven efficacious in reducing the burden of lung cancer in patients; however, the antigenic targets of these reinvigorated T cells remain poorly defined. Lung cancer tumors contain tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) and neutrophils, which release the serine proteases neutrophil elastase (NE) and proteinase 3 (P3) into the tumor microenvironment. NE and P3 shape the antitumor adaptive immune response in breast cancer and melanoma. In this report, we demonstrate that lung cancer cells cross-presented the tumor-associated antigen PR1, derived from NE and P3. Additionally, NE and P3 enhanced the expression of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I molecules on lung cancer cells and induced unique, endogenous peptides in the immunopeptidome, as detected with mass spectrometry sequencing. Lung cancer patient tissues with high intratumoral TAMs were enriched for MHC class I genes and T-cell markers, and patients with high TAM and cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) infiltration had improved overall survival. We confirmed the immunogenicity of unique, endogenous peptides with cytotoxicity assays against lung cancer cell lines, using CTLs from healthy donors that had been expanded against select peptides. Finally, CTLs specific for serine proteases-induced endogenous peptides were detected in lung cancer patients using peptide/HLA-A2 tetramers and were elevated in tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes. Thus, serine proteases in the tumor microenvironment of lung cancers promote the presentation of HLA class I immunogenic peptides that are expressed by lung cancer cells, thereby increasing the antigen repertoire that can be targeted in lung cancer. Cancer Immunol Res; 5(4); 1-11. ©2017 AACR.

  20. Nanoengineering approaches to the design of artificial antigen-presenting cells

    PubMed Central

    Sunshine, Joel C; Green, Jordan J

    2014-01-01

    Artificial antigen-presenting cells (aAPCs) have shown great initial promise for ex vivo activation of cytotoxic T cells. The development of aAPCs has focused mainly on the choice of proteins to use for surface presentation to T cells when conjugated to various spherical, microscale particles. We review here biomimetic nanoengineering approaches that have been applied to the development of aAPCs that move beyond initial concepts about aAPC development. This article also discusses key technologies that may be enabling for the development of nano- and micro-scale aAPCs with nanoscale features, and suggests several future directions for the field. PMID:23837856

  1. Quantitative immunophenotypic analysis of antigen-presenting cells involved in ectromelia virus antigen presentation in BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Szulc-Dąbrowska, Lidia; Gieryńska, Małgorzata; Boratyńska-Jasińska, Anna; Martyniszyn, Lech; Winnicka, Anna; Niemiałtowski, Marek G

    2013-08-01

    During mousepox in resistant (C57BL/6) or susceptible (BALB/c) strains of mice, stimulation of Th1 or Th2 cytokine immune response, respectively, is observed. Because mechanisms of different polarization of T cells remain elusive, in this study, we quantitatively assessed the phenotype of antigen-presenting cells (APCs) involved in ectromelia virus (ECTV) antigen presentation and cluster formation with effector cells in secondary lymphoid organs of BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice. We showed that both strains of mice display similar dynamics and kinetics of viral antigen presentation by CD11c(+) , CD11b(+) , and CD19(+) cells. CD11c(+) and CD11b(+) cells highly participated in viral antigen presentation during all stages of mousepox, whereas CD19(+) cells presented viral peptides later in infection. The main population of dendritic cells (DCs) engaged in ECTV antigen presentation and cell junction formation with effector cells was a population of myeloid CD11b(+) DCs (mDCs). We suggest that, on the one hand, ECTV may differentially affect the functions of APCs depending on the strain of mice. On the other hand, we suggest that some types of APCs, such as mDCs or other DCs subsets, have different abilities to direct the shape of immune response depending on the host resistance to mousepox.

  2. Survival and signaling changes in antigen presenting cell subsets after radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Jennifer Janell

    Radiation therapy is a widely used cancer treatment that has the potential to influence anti-tumor immune responses. Both myeloablative and non-myeloablative radiation are often used as part of preparatory regimens for hematopoetic stem cell transplantation, in combination with other chemotherapy or immuno-modulatory (e.g. Anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG)) therapies for both cytotoxic and immune modulatory purposes. However, the mechanisms responsible for the effect of radiation on antigen presenting cell (APC) responsiveness and radioresistance are poorly understood. The first studies described in this thesis were designed to identify and characterize early radiation-induced signaling changes in antigen presenting cells and to determine the effects of these signaling changes on APC receptor expression and function. The NFkappaB pathway in antigen presenting cells was chosen for study because it is activated by radiation in a wide range of other cell types and plays a vital role in the maintenance and regulation of the immune system. The effects of therapeutically relevant doses radiation (2 and 20 Gy) were compared at various timepoints in the human monocytic cell line (U937) using phospho-flow cytometry staining methods and cytometric analysis. These studies demonstrated that radiation-induced changes in the phosphorylation state of NFkappaB family members that were p53 independent. However, these changes were dependent upon activation of ATM in response to single or double-stranded breaks in DNA, as shown in experiments using an inhibitor of ATM and ATM siRNA knockdown U937 cells. In addition, studies examining the effect of radiation on co-stimulatory receptors with and without inhibition of the NFkappaB pathway via phospho-flow cytometry revealed that radiation-induced phosphorylation of NEMO promoted the activation and functional maturation of U937 cells. Furthermore, functional studies using both phospho-flow cytometry and/or mixed lymphocyte reactions to

  3. Interleukin 10 (IL-10)-mediated Immunosuppression: MARCH-I INDUCTION REGULATES ANTIGEN PRESENTATION BY MACROPHAGES BUT NOT DENDRITIC CELLS.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Sharad K; Cho, Kyung-Jin; Ishido, Satoshi; Roche, Paul A

    2015-11-06

    Efficient immune responses require regulated antigen presentation to CD4 T cells. IL-10 inhibits the ability of dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages to stimulate antigen-specific CD4 T cells; however, the mechanisms by which IL-10 suppresses antigen presentation remain poorly understood. We now report that IL-10 stimulates expression of the E3 ubiquitin ligase March-I in activated macrophages, thereby down-regulating MHC-II, CD86, and antigen presentation to CD4 T cells. By contrast, IL-10 does not stimulate March-I expression in DCs, does not suppress MHC-II or CD86 expression on either resting or activated DCs, and does not affect antigen presentation by activated DCs. IL-10 does, however, inhibit the process of DC activation itself, thereby reducing the efficiency of antigen presentation in a March-I-independent manner. Thus, IL-10 suppression of antigen presenting cell function in macrophages is March-I-dependent, whereas in DCs, suppression is March- I-independent.

  4. Collective Genetic Interaction Effects and the Role of Antigen-Presenting Cells in Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Hyung Jun; Yu, Chenggang; Reifman, Jaques

    2017-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases occur when immune cells fail to develop or lose their tolerance toward self and destroy body’s own tissues. Both insufficient negative selection of self-reactive T cells and impaired development of regulatory T cells preventing effector cell activation are believed to contribute to autoimmunity. Genetic predispositions center around the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II loci involved in antigen presentation, the key determinant of CD4+ T cell activation. Recent studies suggested that variants in the MHC region also exhibit significant non-additive interaction effects. However, collective interactions involving large numbers of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) contributing to such effects are yet to be characterized. In addition, relatively little is known about the cell-type-specificity of such interactions in the context of cellular pathways. Here, we analyzed type 1 diabetes (T1D) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) genome-wide association data sets via large-scale, high-performance computations and inferred collective interaction effects involving MHC SNPs using the discrete discriminant analysis. Despite considerable differences in the details of SNP interactions in T1D and RA data, the enrichment pattern of interacting pairs in reference epigenomes was remarkably similar: statistically significant interactions were epigenetically active in cell-type combinations connecting B cells to T cells and intestinal epithelial cells, with both helper and regulatory T cells showing strong disease-associated interactions with B cells. Our results provide direct genetic evidence pointing to the important roles B cells play as antigen-presenting cells toward CD4+ T cells in the context of central and peripheral tolerance. In addition, they are consistent with recent experimental studies suggesting that the repertoire of B cell-specific self-antigens in the thymus are critical to the effective control of corresponding autoimmune activation

  5. Hemopoietic cell kinase (Hck) and p21-activated kinase 2 (PAK2) are involved in the down-regulation of CD1a lipid antigen presentation by HIV-1 Nef in dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Shinya, Eiji; Shimizu, Masumi; Owaki, Atsuko; Paoletti, Samantha; Mori, Lucia; De Libero, Gennaro; Takahashi, Hidemi

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play a major role in in vivo pathogenesis of HIV-1 infection. Therefore, DCs may provide a promising strategy to control and eventually overcome the fatal infection. Especially, immature DCs express all CD1s, the non-MHC lipid antigen -presenting molecules, and HIV-1 Nef down-regulates CD1 expression besides MHC. Moreover, CD1d-restricted CD4(+) NKT cells are infected by HIV-1, reducing the number of these cells in HIV-1-infected individuals. To understand the exact role of DCs and CD1-mediated immune response during HIV-1 infection, Nef down-regulation of CD1a-restricted lipid/glycolipid Ag presentation in iDCs was analyzed. We demonstrated the involvement of the association of Nef with hemopoietic cell kinase (Hck) and p21-activated kinase 2 (PAK2), and that Hck, which is expressed strongly in iDCs, augmented this mutual interaction. Hck might be another therapeutic target to preserve the function of HIV-1 infected DCs, which are potential reservoirs of HIV-1 even after antiretroviral therapy.

  6. Ethanol Metabolism Alters Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I-Restricted Antigen Presentation In Liver Cells

    PubMed Central

    Osna, Natalia A.; White, Ronda L.; Thiele, Geoffrey M.; Donohue, Terrence M.

    2009-01-01

    The proteasome is a major enzyme that cleaves proteins for antigen presentation. Cleaved peptides traffic to the cell surface, where they are presented in the context of MHC class I. Recognition of these complexes by cytotoxic T lymphocytes is crucial for elimination of cells bearing “non-self” proteins. Our previous studies revealed that ethanol suppresses proteasome function in ethanol-metabolizing liver cells. We hypothesized that proteasome suppression reduces the hydrolysis of antigenic peptides, thereby decreasing the presentation of the peptide-MHC class I-complexes on the cell surface. To test this, we used the mouse hepatocyte cell line (CYP2E1/ADH-transfected HepB5 cells) or primary mouse hepatocytes, both derived from livers of C57Bl/6 mice, which present the ovalbumin peptide, SIINFEKL, complexed with H2Kb. To induce H2Kb expression, HepB5 cells were treated with interferon gamma (IFNγ) and then exposed to ethanol. In these cells, ethanol metabolism decreased not only proteasome activity, but also hydrolysis of the C-extended peptide, SIINFEKL-TE and the presentation of SIINFEKL-H2Kb complexes measured after the delivery of SIINFEKL-TE to cytoplasm. The suppressive effects of ethanol were, in part, attributed to ethanol-elicited impairment of IFNγ signaling. However, in primary hepatocytes, even in the absence of IFNγ, we observed a similar decline in proteasome activity and antigen presentation after ethanol exposure. We conclude that proteasome function is directly suppressed by ethanol metabolism and indirectly, by preventing the activating effects of IFNγ. Ethanol-elicited reduction in proteasome activity contributes to the suppression of SIINFEKL-H2Kb presentation on the surface of liver cells. Immune response to viral antigens plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of hepatitis C or B viral infections (HCV and HBV, respectively). Professional antigen-presenting cells (dendritic cells and macrophages) are responsible for priming the

  7. Killer artificial antigen-presenting cells: a novel strategy to delete specific T cells.

    PubMed

    Schütz, Christian; Fleck, Martin; Mackensen, Andreas; Zoso, Alessia; Halbritter, Dagmar; Schneck, Jonathan P; Oelke, Mathias

    2008-04-01

    Several cell-based immunotherapy strategies have been developed to specifically modulate T cell-mediated immune responses. These methods frequently rely on the utilization of tolerogenic cell-based antigen-presenting cells (APCs). However, APCs are highly sensitive to cytotoxic T-cell responses, thus limiting their therapeutic capacity. Here, we describe a novel bead-based approach to modulate T-cell responses in an antigen-specific fashion. We have generated killer artificial APCs (kappaaAPCs) by coupling an apoptosis-inducing alpha-Fas (CD95) IgM mAb together with HLA-A2 Ig molecules onto beads. These kappaaAPCs deplete targeted antigen-specific T cells in a Fas/Fas ligand (FasL)-dependent fashion. T-cell depletion in cocultures is rapidly initiated (30 minutes), dependent on the amount of kappaaAPCs and independent of activation-induced cell death (AICD). kappaaAPCs represent a novel technology that can control T cell-mediated immune responses, and therefore has potential for use in treatment of autoimmune diseases and allograft rejection.

  8. Limited sufficiency of antigen presentation by dendritic cells in models of central nervous system autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Gregory F; Shindler, Kenneth S; Allenspach, Eric J; Stephen, Tom L; Thomas, Hannah L; Mikesell, Robert J; Cross, Anne H; Laufer, Terri M

    2011-02-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a model for the human disease multiple sclerosis (MS), is dependent upon the activation and effector functions of autoreactive CD4 T cells. Multiple interactions between CD4 T cells and major histocompatibility class II (MHCII)+ antigen presenting cells (APCs) must occur in both the periphery and central nervous system (CNS) to elicit autoimmunity. The identity of the MHCII+ APCs involved throughout this process remains in question. We investigated which APC in the periphery and CNS mediates disease using transgenic mice with MHCII expression restricted to dendritic cells (DCs). MHCII expression restricted to DCs results in normal susceptibility to peptide-mediated EAE. Indeed, radiation-sensitive bone marrow-derived DCs were sufficient for all APC functions during peptide-induced disease. However, DCs alone were inefficient at promoting disease after immunization with the myelin protein myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG), even in the presence of MHCII-deficient B cells. Consistent with a defect in disease induction following protein immunization, antigen presentation by DCs alone was incapable of mediating spontaneous optic neuritis. These results indicate that DCs are capable of perpetuating CNS-targeted autoimmunity when antigens are readily available, but other APCs are required to efficiently initiate pathogenic cognate CD4 T cell responses.

  9. Regulation of the polarization of T cells toward antigen-presenting cells by Ras-related GTPase CDC42.

    PubMed Central

    Stowers, L; Yelon, D; Berg, L J; Chant, J

    1995-01-01

    The mechanisms by which cells rapidly polarize in the direction of external signals are not understood. Helper T cells, when contacted by an antigen-presenting cell, polarize their cytoskeletons toward the antigen-presenting cell within minutes. Here we show that, in T cells, the mammalian Ras-related GTPase CDC42 (the homologue of yeast CDC42, a protein involved in budding polarity) can regulate the polarization of both actin and microtubules toward antigen-presenting cells but is not involved in other T-cell signaling processes such as those which culminate in interleukin 2 production. Although T-cell polarization appears dispensable for signaling leading to interleukin 2 production, polarization may direct lymphokine secretion towards the correct antigen-presenting cell in a crowded cellular environment. Inhibitor experiments suggest that phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase is required for cytoskeletal polarization but that calcineurin activity, known to be important for other aspects of signaling, is not. Apparent conservation of CDC42 function between yeast and T cells suggests that this GTPase is a general regulator of cytoskeletal polarity in many cell types. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7761442

  10. Impaired antigen presentation and potent phagocytic activity identifying tumor-tolerant human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Soares-Schanoski, Alessandra; Jurado, Teresa; Córdoba, Raúl; Siliceo, María; Fresno, Carlos Del; Gómez-Piña, Vanesa; Toledano, Victor; Vallejo-Cremades, Maria T; Alfonso-Iñiguez, Sergio; Carballo-Palos, Arkaitz; Fernández-Ruiz, Irene; Cubillas-Zapata, Carolina; Biswas, Subhra K; Arnalich, Francisco; García-Río, Francisco; López-Collazo, Eduardo

    2012-06-29

    Monocyte exposure to tumor cells induces a transient state in which these cells are refractory to further exposure to cancer. This phenomenon, termed "tumor tolerance", is characterized by a decreased production of proinflammatory cytokines in response to tumors. In the past, we found that this effect comprises IRAK-M up regulation and TLR4 and CD44 activation. Herein we have established a human model of tumor tolerance and have observed a marked down-regulation of MHCII molecules as well as the MHCII master regulator, CIITA, in monocytes/macrophages. These cells combine an impaired capability for antigen presentation with potent phagocytic activity and exhibit an M2-like phenotype. In addition circulating monocytes isolated from Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia patients exhibited the same profile as tumor tolerant cells after tumor ex vivo exposition.

  11. The Transcription Factor NFAT Exhibits Signal Memory during Serial T Cell Interactions with Antigen Presenting Cells

    PubMed Central

    Marangoni, Francesco; Murooka, Thomas T.; Manzo, Teresa; Kim, Edward Y.; Carrizosa, Esteban; Elpek, Natalie M.; Mempel, Thorsten R.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Interactions with antigen-presenting cells (APCs) interrupt T cell migration through tissues and trigger signaling pathways that converge on the activation of transcriptional regulators, including NFAT, which control T cell function and differentiation. Both stable and unstable modes of cognate T cell-APC interactions have been observed in vivo, but the functional significance of unstable, serial contacts has remained unclear. Here we used multiphoton intravital microscopy in lymph nodes and tumors to show that while NFAT nuclear import was fast (t1/2 max~1min), nuclear export was slow (t1/2~20min) in T cells. During delayed export, nuclear NFAT constituted a short-term imprint of transient TCR signals and remained transcriptionally active for the T cell tolerance gene Egr2, but not for the effector gene Ifng, which required continuous TCR triggering for expression. This provides a potential mechanistic basis for the observation that a predominance of unstable APC interactions correlates with the induction of T cell tolerance. PMID:23313588

  12. Modulation of Immune Responses by Exosomes Derived from Antigen-Presenting Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shenoda, Botros B.; Ajit, Seena K.

    2016-01-01

    Exosome-mediated signaling is important in mediating the inflammatory response. To exert their biological or pathophysiological functions in the recipient cells, exosomes deliver a diverse array of biomacromolecules including long and short coding and non-coding RNAs, proteins, and lipids. Exosomes secreted by antigen-presenting cells can confer therapeutic benefits by attenuating or stimulating the immune response. Exosomes play a crucial role in carrying and presenting functional major histocompatibility peptide complexes to modulate antigen-specific T cell responses. Exosomes from Dendritic Cells (DCs) can activate T and B cells and have been explored for their immunostimulatory properties in cancer therapy. The immunosuppressive properties of exosomes derived from macrophages and DCs can reduce inflammation in animal models for several inflammatory disorders. This review focuses on the protective role of exosomes in attenuating inflammation or augmenting immune response, emphasizing studies on exosomes derived from DCs and macrophages. PMID:27660518

  13. Regulation of NK-cell function by mucins via antigen-presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Laskarin, G; Redzovic, A; Medancic, S Srsen; Rukavina, D

    2010-12-01

    Decidual antigen-presenting cells including dendritic cells (DCs) and CD14(+) macrophages, as mediators of the first encounter with fetal antigens, appear to be critically involved in the initiation of primary immune response by regulating innate- and adaptive immunity. Interleukin-15, produced by them, permits the proliferation and differentiation of CD3(-)CD16(-)CD94(+)NKG2A(+)CD56(+bright) decidual NK cells that identify trophoblast cells. These cells are able to kill them after Th1 cytokine overstimulation and by increasing the release of preformed cytotoxic mediators. Thus, the local microenvironment is a potent modulator of antigen-presenting cell functions. Tumor associated glycoprotein-72 (TAG-72) and mucine 1 (MUC-1) are glycoproteins secreted by uterine epithelial cells. Our hypothesis is that TAG-72 and MUC-1 are the natural ligands for carbohydrate recognition domains (CRDs) of endocytic mannose receptor (MR or CD206) and DC-specific ICAM non-integrin (DC-SIGN or CD209) expressed on decidual CD14(+) macrophages and CD1a(+) DCs. They might be able to condition antigen-presenting cells to produce distinct profiles of cyto/chemokines with consequential reduction in NK-cell numbers and cytotoxic potential leading to insufficient control over trophoblast growth. This hypothesis could explain the disappearance of MUC-1 beneath the attached embryo during the process of successful implantation when tight regulation of trophoblast invasion is needed. As IL-15 is the earliest and the most important factor in NK-cell proliferation, differentiation, and maturation, we expected primarily an increase of IL-15 expression in antigen-presenting cells concomitant with the disappearance of mucins and the enhancement in NK cells numbers and of cytotoxic potential after their close contact with early pregnancy decidual antigen-presenting cells. If our hypothesis is correct, it would contribute to the understanding of the role of mucins in the redirection of immune response

  14. Oxidative bioactivation of abacavir in subcellular fractions of human antigen presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Bell, Catherine C; Santoyo Castelazo, Anahi; Yang, Emma L; Maggs, James L; Jenkins, Rosalind E; Tugwood, Jonathan; O'Neill, Paul M; Naisbitt, Dean J; Park, B Kevin

    2013-07-15

    Human exposure to abacavir, a primary alcohol antiretroviral, is associated with the development of immunological drug reactions in individuals carrying the HLA risk allele B*57:01. Interaction of abacavir with antigen presenting cells results in cell activation through an Hsp70-mediated Toll-like receptor pathway and the provision of T-cell antigenic determinants. Abacavir's electrophilic aldehyde metabolites are potential precursors of neoantigens. Herein, we have used mass spectrometry to study the oxidative metabolism of abacavir in EBV-transformed human B-cells. RNA and protein were isolated from the cells and subjected to transcriptomic and mass spectrometric analyses to identify the redox enzymes expressed. Low levels of isomeric abacavir carboxylic acids were detected in subcellular fractions of EBV-transformed human B-cells incubated with abacavir. Metabolite formation was time-dependent but was not reduced by an inhibitor of Class I alcohol dehydrogenases. Relatively high levels of mRNA were detected for several redox enzymes, including alcohol dehydrogenase 5 (Class III), aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDH3A2, ALDH6A1, and ALDH9A1), CYP1B1, CYP2R1, CYP7B1, and hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 10. Over 2600 proteins were identified by mass spectrometry. More than 1000 of these proteins exhibited catalytic activity, and 80 were oxido-reductases. This is the first proteomic inventory of enzymes in antigen presenting cells. However, neither of the hepatic alcohol dehydrogenases of Class I which metabolize abacavir in vitro was expressed at the protein level. Nevertheless the metabolic production of abacavir carboxylic acids by B-cell fractions implies abacavir-treated immune cells might be exposed to the drug's protein-reactive aldehyde metabolites in vivo.

  15. The role of antigen-presenting cells in filoviral hemorrhagic fever: gaps in current knowledge

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Osvaldo; Leung, Lawrence W.; Basler, Christopher F.

    2012-01-01

    The filoviruses, ebolavirus (EBOV) and marburgvirus (MARV), are highly lethal zoonotic agents of concern as emerging pathogens and potential bioweapons. Antigen-presenting cells (APCs), particularly macrophages and dendritic cells, are targets of filovirus infection in vivo. Infection of these cell types has been proposed to contribute to the inflammation, activation of coagulation cascades and ineffective immune responses characteristic of filovirus hemorrhagic fever. However, many aspects of filovirus-APC interactions remain to be clarified. Among the unanswered questions: What determines the ability of filoviruses to replicate in different APC subsets? What are the cellular signaling pathways that sense infection and lead to production of copious quantities of cytokines, chemokines and tissue factor? What are the mechanisms by which innate antiviral responses are disabled by these viruses, and how may these mechanisms contribute to inadequate adaptive immunity? A better understanding of these issues will clarify the pathogenesis of filoviral hemorrhagic fever and provide new avenues for development of therapeutics. PMID:22333482

  16. Mechanism of Action of Probiotic Bacteria on Intestinal and Systemic Immunities and Antigen-Presenting Cells.

    PubMed

    Fong, Fiona Long Yan; Shah, Nagendra P; Kirjavainen, Pirkka; El-Nezami, Hani

    2016-05-03

    Immunomodulation has been shown to be one of the major functions of probiotic bacteria. This review is presented to provide detailed information on the immunomodulatory properties of probiotics in various animal models and clinical practices. Probiotics can regulate helper T (Th) responses and release of cytokines in a strain-specific manner. For example, Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG can induce beneficial Th1 immunomodulatory effect in infants with cow's milk allergy and relieve intestinal inflammation in atopic children by promoting IL-10 generation. Mechanism of action of probiotics on antigen-presenting cells at gastrointestinal tract is also postulated in this review. Probiotic bacterial cells and their soluble factors may activate dendritic cells, macrophages, and to certain extent monocytes via toll-like-receptor recognition and may further provoke specific Th responses. They are speculated to elicit immunomodulatory effects on intestinal and systemic immunities.

  17. Modulation of liver tolerance by conventional and nonconventional antigen-presenting cells and regulatory immune cells

    PubMed Central

    Horst, Andrea Kristina; Neumann, Katrin; Diehl, Linda; Tiegs, Gisa

    2016-01-01

    The liver is a tolerogenic organ with exquisite mechanisms of immune regulation that ensure upkeep of local and systemic immune tolerance to self and foreign antigens, but that is also able to mount effective immune responses against pathogens. The immune privilege of liver allografts was recognized first in pigs in spite of major histo-compatibility complex mismatch, and termed the “liver tolerance effect”. Furthermore, liver transplants are spontaneously accepted with only low-dose immunosuppression, and induce tolerance for non-hepatic co-transplanted allografts of the same donor. Although this immunotolerogenic environment is favorable in the setting of organ transplantation, it is detrimental in chronic infectious liver diseases like hepatitis B or C, malaria, schistosomiasis or tumorigenesis, leading to pathogen persistence and weak anti-tumor effects. The liver is a primary site of T-cell activation, but it elicits poor or incomplete activation of T cells, leading to their abortive activation, exhaustion, suppression of their effector function and early death. This is exploited by pathogens and can impair pathogen control and clearance or allow tumor growth. Hepatic priming of T cells is mediated by a number of local conventional and nonconventional antigen-presenting cells (APCs), which promote tolerance by immune deviation, induction of T-cell anergy or apoptosis, and generating and expanding regulatory T cells. This review will focus on the communication between classical and nonclassical APCs and lymphocytes in the liver in tolerance induction and will discuss recent insights into the role of innate lymphocytes in this process. PMID:27041638

  18. Human γδ T Cells Augment Antigen Presentation in Listeria Monocytogenes Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yuli; Wang, Huaishan; Xu, Yi; Hu, Yu; Chen, Hui; Cui, Lianxian; Zhang, Jianmin; He, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Circulating γδ T cells in healthy individuals rapidly respond to bacterial and viral pathogens. Many studies have demonstrated that γδ T cells are activated and expanded by Listeria monocytogenes (L. monocytogenes), a foodborne bacterial pathogen with high fatality rates. However, the roles of γδ T cells during L. monocytogenes infection are not clear. In the present study, we characterized the morphological characteristics of phagocytosis in γδ T cells after L. monocytogenes infection using transmission electron microscopy. Results show activation markers including human leucocyte antigen DR (HLA–DR) and lymph node–homing receptor CCR7 on γδ T cells were upregulated after stimulation via L. monocytogenes. Significant proliferation and differentiation of primary αβ T cells was also observed after coculture of peripheral blood mononuclear cells with γδ T cells anteriorly stimulated by L. monocytogenes. L. monocytogenes infection decreased the percentage of γδ T cells in mouse intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs) and increased MHC-II expression on the surface of γδ T cells in vivo. Our findings shed light on antigen presentation of γδ T cells during L. monocytogenes infection. PMID:27652377

  19. Pros and Cons of Antigen-Presenting Cell Targeted Tumor Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Goyvaerts, Cleo; Breckpot, Karine

    2015-01-01

    In therapeutic antitumor vaccination, dendritic cells play the leading role since they decide if, how, when, and where a potent antitumor immune response will take place. Since the disentanglement of the complexity and merit of different antigen-presenting cell subtypes, antitumor immunotherapeutic research started to investigate the potential benefit of targeting these subtypes in situ. This review will discuss which antigen-presenting cell subtypes are at play and how they have been targeted and finally question the true meaning of targeting antitumor-based vaccines.

  20. Pros and Cons of Antigen-Presenting Cell Targeted Tumor Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Goyvaerts, Cleo; Breckpot, Karine

    2015-01-01

    In therapeutic antitumor vaccination, dendritic cells play the leading role since they decide if, how, when, and where a potent antitumor immune response will take place. Since the disentanglement of the complexity and merit of different antigen-presenting cell subtypes, antitumor immunotherapeutic research started to investigate the potential benefit of targeting these subtypes in situ. This review will discuss which antigen-presenting cell subtypes are at play and how they have been targeted and finally question the true meaning of targeting antitumor-based vaccines. PMID:26583156

  1. Interferon regulatory factor 8 regulates pathways for antigen presentation in myeloid cells and during tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Marquis, Jean-François; Kapoustina, Oxana; Langlais, David; Ruddy, Rebecca; Dufour, Catherine Rosa; Kim, Bae-Hoon; MacMicking, John D; Giguère, Vincent; Gros, Philippe

    2011-06-01

    IRF8 (Interferon Regulatory Factor 8) plays an important role in defenses against intracellular pathogens, including several aspects of myeloid cells function. It is required for ontogeny and maturation of macrophages and dendritic cells, for activation of anti-microbial defenses, and for production of the Th1-polarizing cytokine interleukin-12 (IL-12) in response to interferon gamma (IFNγ) and protection against infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The transcriptional programs and cellular pathways that are regulated by IRF8 in response to IFNγ and that are important for defenses against M. tuberculosis are poorly understood. These were investigated by transcript profiling and chromatin immunoprecipitation on microarrays (ChIP-chip). Studies in primary macrophages identified 368 genes that are regulated by IRF8 in response to IFNγ/CpG and that behave as stably segregating expression signatures (eQTLs) in F2 mice fixed for a wild-type or mutant allele at IRF8. A total of 319 IRF8 binding sites were identified on promoters genome-wide (ChIP-chip) in macrophages treated with IFNγ/CpG, defining a functional G/AGAAnTGAAA motif. An analysis of the genes bearing a functional IRF8 binding site, and showing regulation by IFNγ/CpG in macrophages and/or in M. tuberculosis-infected lungs, revealed a striking enrichment for the pathways of antigen processing and presentation, including multiple structural and enzymatic components of the Class I and Class II MHC (major histocompatibility complex) antigen presentation machinery. Also significantly enriched as IRF8 targets are the group of endomembrane- and phagosome-associated small GTPases of the IRG (immunity-related GTPases) and GBP (guanylate binding proteins) families. These results identify IRF8 as a key regulator of early response pathways in myeloid cells, including phagosome maturation, antigen processing, and antigen presentation by myeloid cells.

  2. Extracts from presumed "reduced harm" cigarettes induce equivalent or greater toxicity in antigen-presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Vassallo, Robert; Wang, Lei; Hirano, Yoshimi; Walters, Paula; Grill, Diane

    2015-09-01

    The tobacco industry has promoted certain cigarette products with claims that their use may be less harmful to the smoker as they purportedly deliver lower amounts of toxic chemicals compared to conventional cigarettes. This study was designed to compare the relative antigen presenting cellular toxicity of Eclipse, a presumed reduced exposure product (PREP) cigarette, when compared with the reference research 3R4F cigarettes (Kentucky University). Utilizing a murine macrophage cell line, murine bone marrow derived dendritic cells (DCs) and human monocyte-derived DCs incubated with extracts generated from Eclipse and Kentucky reference 3R4F cigarettes, we determined the relative toxic effects of the different cigarette smoke extracts on cellular viability, oxidative stress, T-helper-1 (Th-1) polarizing cytokine production and general gene expression. Eclipse and 3R4F cigarette smoke extracts induced equivalent oxidatively-mediated cellular heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) protein levels in macrophages and DCs. Cellular viability determination demonstrated greater induction of cell death by apoptosis and necrosis by Eclipse extracts in DCs. The production of the key Th-1 polarizing cytokine interleukin-12 (IL-12) by activated DCs or macrophages was suppressed to an equivalent or greater extent by Eclipse extracts. Microarray studies performed on bone marrow derived murine DCs incubated with Eclispe or 3R4F cigarette extracts showed identical genotoxic profiles. These studies imply that presumed reduced harm Eclipse cigarettes induce equivalent or greater antigen presenting cell dysfunction relative to 3R4F cigarettes and illustrate the importance of independent validation and testing of similar products claimed to be associated with reduced toxicity relative to other cigarettes.

  3. Cell surface phenotype and ultramicroscopic analysis of purified human enterocytes: a possible antigen-presenting cell in the intestine.

    PubMed

    Martín-Villa, J M; Ferre-López, S; López-Suárez, J C; Corell, A; Pérez-Blas, M; Arnaiz-Villena, A

    1997-12-01

    Epithelial cells of the intestine seem to act as antigen-presenting cells to surrounding lymphoid tissue and may be crucial to maintain the pool of peripheral T lymphocytes. The scope of this study was to carry out an immunophenotypic and ultramicroscopic analysis of purified human enterocytes to elucidate their role as antigen-presenting cells, in the immune responses in the gut-associated lymphoid tissue. A method has been developed to obtain purified and viable human enterocyte populations, later labeled with relevant monoclonal antibodies directed to leukocyte antigens and subjected to cytofluorometric analysis. Phenotypic analysis revealed the presence of markers common to "classical" antigen-presenting cells (CD14, CD35, CD39, CD43, CD63 and CD64), reinforcing the idea that enterocytes may act as such. Moreover, several integrins (CD11b, CD11c, CD18, CD41a, CD61 and CD29) were also found. CD25 (IL-2 receptor alpha chain) and CD28, characteristic of T cells, were detected on the surface of these cells; this latter finding rises the possibility that enterocytes could be activated by IL-2 and/or via CD28 through binding to its ligands CD80 or CD86. Finally, the presence of CD21, CD32, CD35 and CD64 that may bind immune complexes via Fc or C3, suggests their participation in the metabolism of immune complexes. Furthermore, the finding of a Birbeck's-like granule in the cytoplasm of the cells, shows that enterocytes contain an ultramicroscopic feature previously thought to be characteristic of Langerhans' cells, an antigen-presenting cell. The phenotype detected on the surface of enterocytes, along with their ultramicroscopic characteristics, suggests that they may play an important role in the immune responses elicited in the gut, presenting antigens to surrounding lymphoid cells, and establishing cognate interactions with them.

  4. Enrichment and Expansion with Nanoscale Artificial Antigen Presenting Cells for Adoptive Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Perica, Karlo; Bieler, Joan Glick; Schütz, Christian; Varela, Juan Carlos; Douglass, Jacqueline; Skora, Andrew; Chiu, Yen Ling; Oelke, Mathias; Kinzler, Kenneth; Zhou, Shibin; Vogelstein, Bert; Schneck, Jonathan P

    2015-07-28

    Adoptive immunotherapy (AIT) can mediate durable regression of cancer, but widespread adoption of AIT is limited by the cost and complexity of generating tumor-specific T cells. Here we develop an Enrichment + Expansion strategy using paramagnetic, nanoscale artificial antigen presenting cells (aAPC) to rapidly expand tumor-specific T cells from rare naïve precursors and predicted neo-epitope responses. Nano-aAPC are capable of enriching rare tumor-specific T cells in a magnetic column and subsequently activating them to induce proliferation. Enrichment + Expansion resulted in greater than 1000-fold expansion of both mouse and human tumor-specific T cells in 1 week, with nano-aAPC based enrichment conferring a proliferation advantage during both in vitro culture and after adoptive transfer in vivo. Robust T cell responses were seen not only for shared tumor antigens, but also for computationally predicted neo-epitopes. Streamlining the rapid generation of large numbers of tumor-specific T cells in a cost-effective fashion through Enrichment + Expansion can be a powerful tool for immunotherapy.

  5. The peripheral blood fibrocyte is a potent antigen-presenting cell capable of priming naive T cells in situ.

    PubMed

    Chesney, J; Bacher, M; Bender, A; Bucala, R

    1997-06-10

    Recent studies have identified a novel population of blood-borne cells, termed fibrocytes, that have a distinct cell surface phenotype (collagen+/CD13(+)/CD34(+)/CD45(+)), rapidly enter sites of tissue injury, and synthesize connective tissue matrix molecules. We found by flow cytometry that purified human fibrocytes express each of the known surface components that are required for antigen presentation, including class II major histocompatability complex molecules (HLA-DP, -DQ, and -DR), the costimulatory molecules CD80 and CD86, and the adhesion molecules CD11a, CD54, and CD58. Human fibrocytes induced antigen-presenting cell-dependent T cell proliferation when cultured with specific antigen and this proliferative activity was significantly higher than that induced by monocytes and nearly as high as that induced by purified dendritic cells. Mouse fibrocytes also were found to express the surface components required for antigen presentation and to function as potent APCs in vitro. Mouse fibrocytes pulsed in vitro with the HIV-proteins p24 or gp120 and delivered to a site of cutaneous injury were found to migrate to proximal lymph nodes and to specifically prime naive T cells. These data suggest that fibrocytes play an early and important role in the initiation of antigen-specific immunity.

  6. Regulation of Hemichannels and Gap Junction Channels by Cytokines in Antigen-Presenting Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shoji, Kenji F.; Aguirre, Adam; Sáez, Juan C.

    2014-01-01

    Autocrine and paracrine signals coordinate responses of several cell types of the immune system that provide efficient protection against different challenges. Antigen-presenting cells (APCs) coordinate activation of this system via homocellular and heterocellular interactions. Cytokines constitute chemical intercellular signals among immune cells and might promote pro- or anti-inflammatory effects. During the last two decades, two membrane pathways for intercellular communication have been demonstrated in cells of the immune system. They are called hemichannels (HCs) and gap junction channels (GJCs) and provide new insights into the mechanisms of the orchestrated response of immune cells. GJCs and HCs are permeable to ions and small molecules, including signaling molecules. The direct intercellular transfer between contacting cells can be mediated by GJCs, whereas the release to or uptake from the extracellular milieu can be mediated by HCs. GJCs and HCs can be constituted by two protein families: connexins (Cxs) or pannexins (Panxs), which are present in almost all APCs, being Cx43 and Panx1 the most ubiquitous members of each protein family. In this review, we focus on the effects of different cytokines on the intercellular communication mediated by HCs and GJCs in APCs and their impact on purinergic signaling. PMID:25301274

  7. Killer artificial antigen-presenting cells: the synthetic embodiment of a 'guided missile'.

    PubMed

    Schütz, Christian; Oelke, Mathias; Schneck, Jonathan P; Mackensen, Andreas; Fleck, Martin

    2010-07-01

    At present, the treatment of T-cell-dependent autoimmune diseases relies exclusively on strategies leading to nonspecific suppression of the immune systems causing a substantial reduced ability to control concomitant infections or malignancies. Furthermore, long-term treatment with most drugs is accompanied by several serious adverse effects and does not consequently result in cure of the primary immunological malfunction. By contrast, antigen-specific immunotherapy offers the potential to achieve the highest therapeutic efficiency in accordance with minimal adverse effects. Therefore, several studies have been performed utilizing antigen-presenting cells specifically engineered to deplete allo- or antigen-specific T cells ('guided missiles'). Many of these strategies take advantage of the Fas/Fas ligand signaling pathway to efficiently induce antigen-presenting cell-mediated apoptosis in targeted T cells. In this article, we discuss the advantages and shortcomings of a novel non-cell-based 'killer artificial antigen-presenting cell' strategy, developed to overcome obstacles related to current cell-based approaches for the treatment of T-cell-mediated autoimmunity.

  8. Equine infectious anemia virus-infected dendritic cells retain antigen presentation capability

    SciTech Connect

    Rivera, Julie A.; McGuire, Travis C. . E-mail: mcguiret@vetmed.wsu.edu

    2005-05-10

    To determine if equine monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DC) were susceptible to equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) infection, ex vivo-generated DC were infected with virus in vitro. EIAV antigen was detected by immunofluorescence 3 days post-infection with maximum antigen being detected on day 4, whereas there was no antigen detected in DC incubated with the same amount of heat-inactivated EIAV. No cytolytic activity was observed after EIAV{sub WSU5} infection of DC. These monocyte-derived DC were more effective than macrophages and B cells in stimulating allogenic T lymphocytes. Both infected macrophages and DC stimulated similar levels of memory CTL responses in mixtures of CD8+ and CD4+ cells as detected with {sup 51}Cr-release assays indicating that EIAV infection of DC did not alter antigen presentation. However, EIAV-infected DC were more effective than infected macrophages when used to stimulate memory CTL in isolated CD8+ cells. The maintenance of antigen processing and presenting function by EIAV-infected DC in vitro suggests that this function is maintained during in vivo infection.

  9. Antigen Presenting Properties of a Myeloid Dendritic-Like Cell in Murine Spleen.

    PubMed

    Hey, Ying-Ying; O'Neill, Helen C

    This paper distinguishes a rare subset of myeloid dendritic-like cells found in mouse spleen from conventional (c) dendritic cells (DC) in terms of phenotype, function and gene expression. These cells are tentatively named "L-DC" since they resemble dendritic-like cells produced in longterm cultures of spleen. L-DC can be distinguished on the basis of their unique phenotype as CD11bhiCD11cloMHCII-CD43+Ly6C-Ly6G-Siglec-F- cells. They demonstrate similar ability as cDC to uptake and retain complex antigens like mannan via mannose receptors, but much lower ability to endocytose and retain soluble antigen. While L-DC differ from cDC by their inability to activate CD4+ T cells, they are capable of antigen cross-presentation for activation of CD8+ T cells, although less effectively so than the cDC subsets. In terms of gene expression, CD8- cDC and CD8+ cDC are quite distinct from L-DC. CD8+ cDC are distinguishable from the other two subsets by expression of CD24a, Clec9a, Xcr1 and Tlr11, while CD8- cDC are distinguished by expression of Ccnd1 and H-2Eb2. L-DC are distinct from the two cDC subsets through upregulated expression of Clec4a3, Emr4, Itgam, Csf1r and CD300ld. The L-DC gene profile is quite distinct from that of cDC, confirming a myeloid cell type with distinct antigen presenting properties.

  10. Probiotic metabolites from Bacillus coagulans GanedenBC30TM support maturation of antigen-presenting cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Benson, Kathleen F; Redman, Kimberlee A; Carter, Steve G; Keller, David; Farmer, Sean; Endres, John R; Jensen, Gitte S

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To study the effects of probiotic metabolites on maturation stage of antigen-presenting immune cells. METHODS: Ganeden Bacillus coagulans 30 (GBC30) bacterial cultures in log phase were used to isolate the secreted metabolite (MET) fraction. A second fraction was made to generate a crude cell-wall-enriched fraction, by centrifugation and lysis, followed by washing. A preparation of MET was subjected to size exclusion centrifugation, generating three fractions: < 3 kDa, 3-30 kDa, and 30-200 kDa and activities were tested in comparison to crude MET and cell wall in primary cultures of human peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) as a source of antigen-presenting mononuclear phagocytes. The maturation status of mononuclear phagocytes was evaluated by staining with monoclonal antibodies towards CD14, CD16, CD80 and CD86 and analyzed by flow cytometry. RESULTS: Treatment of PBMC with MET supported maturation of mononuclear phagocytes toward both macrophage and dendritic cell phenotypes. The biological activity unique to the metabolites included a reduction of CD14+ CD16+ pro-inflammatory cells, and this property was associated with the high molecular weight metabolite fraction. Changes were also seen for the dendritic cell maturation markers CD80 and CD86. On CD14dim cells, an increase in both CD80 and CD86 expression was seen, in contrast to a selective increase in CD86 expression on CD14bright cells. The co-expression of CD80 and CD86 indicates effective antigen presentation to T cells and support of T helper cell differentiation. The selective expression of CD86 in the absence of CD80 points to a role in generating T regulatory cells. CONCLUSION: The data show that a primary mechanism of action of GBC30 metabolites involves support of more mature phenotypes of antigen-presenting cells, important for immunological decision-making. PMID:22563167

  11. Biomimetic biodegradable artificial antigen presenting cells synergize with PD-1 blockade to treat melanoma.

    PubMed

    Kosmides, A K; Meyer, R A; Hickey, J W; Aje, K; Cheung, K N; Green, J J; Schneck, J P

    2017-02-01

    Biomimetic materials that target the immune system and generate an anti-tumor responses hold promise in augmenting cancer immunotherapy. These synthetic materials can be engineered and optimized for their biodegradability, physical parameters such as shape and size, and controlled release of immune-modulators. As these new platforms enter the playing field, it is imperative to understand their interaction with existing immunotherapies since single-targeted approaches have limited efficacy. Here, we investigate the synergy between a PLGA-based artificial antigen presenting cell (aAPC) and a checkpoint blockade molecule, anti-PD1 monoclonal antibody (mAb). The combination of antigen-specific aAPC-based activation and anti-PD-1 mAb checkpoint blockade induced the greatest IFN-γ secretion by CD8+ T cells in vitro. Combination treatment also acted synergistically in an in vivo murine melanoma model to result in delayed tumor growth and extended survival, while either treatment alone had no effect. This was shown mechanistically to be due to decreased PD-1 expression and increased antigen-specific proliferation of CD8+ T cells within the tumor microenvironment and spleen. Thus, biomaterial-based therapy can synergize with other immunotherapies and motivates the translation of biomimetic combinatorial treatments.

  12. Two genetically identical antigen-presenting cell clones display heterogeneity in antigen processing.

    PubMed Central

    Michalek, M T; Benacerraf, B; Rock, K L

    1989-01-01

    Evidence from various antigen systems suggests that antigen processing can be one factor that determines the repertoire of immunogenic peptides. Thus, processing events may account for some of the disparity between the available and expressed helper T-cell repertoires. In this report, we demonstrate that the immunodominant T-cell determinant in ovalbumin [p323-339; ovalbumin-(323-339) heptadecapeptide] is processed differently by two genetically identical antigen-presenting cell lines, M12 and A20. The ovalbumin-specific T-cell-T-cell hybridomas, DO-11.10 and 3DO-54.8, were used to detect processed antigen. These T-T hybridomas have different fine specificities for the p323-339 determinant. A20 cells presented native ovalbumin well to both T-T hybridomas, whereas M12 cells presented native ovalbumin well to 3DO-54.8 but very inefficiently to DO-11.10. M12 and A20 cells effectively stimulated both T-T hybridomas with the same concentrations of the immunogenic synthetic peptide p323-339. Therefore, M12 cells and DO-11.10 can interact with each other, and both T-T hybridomas have similar sensitivities for the same immunogenic peptide. We conclude that genetically identical antigen-presenting cells can display heterogeneity in the fine processing of an immunodominant T-cell determinant, and synthetic model peptides that represent the minimal stimulatory sequence of a T-cell determinant are not necessarily identical to the structure of in vivo processed antigen. Heterogeneity in antigen processing by individual antigen-presenting cells would serve to increase the repertoire of immunogenic peptides that are presented to T cells. PMID:2470101

  13. Engineered artificial antigen presenting cells facilitate direct and efficient expansion of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Development of a standardized platform for the rapid expansion of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) with anti-tumor function from patients with limited TIL numbers or tumor tissues challenges their clinical application. Methods To facilitate adoptive immunotherapy, we applied genetically-engineered K562 cell-based artificial antigen presenting cells (aAPCs) for the direct and rapid expansion of TILs isolated from primary cancer specimens. Results TILs outgrown in IL-2 undergo rapid, CD28-independent expansion in response to aAPC stimulation that requires provision of exogenous IL-2 cytokine support. aAPCs induce numerical expansion of TILs that is statistically similar to an established rapid expansion method at a 100-fold lower feeder cell to TIL ratio, and greater than those achievable using anti-CD3/CD28 activation beads or extended IL-2 culture. aAPC-expanded TILs undergo numerical expansion of tumor antigen-specific cells, remain amenable to secondary aAPC-based expansion, and have low CD4/CD8 ratios and FOXP3+ CD4+ cell frequencies. TILs can also be expanded directly from fresh enzyme-digested tumor specimens when pulsed with aAPCs. These "young" TILs are tumor-reactive, positively skewed in CD8+ lymphocyte composition, CD28 and CD27 expression, and contain fewer FOXP3+ T cells compared to parallel IL-2 cultures. Conclusion Genetically-enhanced aAPCs represent a standardized, "off-the-shelf" platform for the direct ex vivo expansion of TILs of suitable number, phenotype and function for use in adoptive immunotherapy. PMID:21827675

  14. Unidirectional transfer of microRNA-loaded exosomes from T cells to antigen-presenting cells

    PubMed Central

    Mittelbrunn, María; Gutiérrez-Vázquez, Cristina; Villarroya-Beltri, Carolina; González, Susana; Sánchez-Cabo, Fátima; González, Manuel Ángel; Bernad, Antonio; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco

    2011-01-01

    The immune synapse is an exquisitely evolved means of communication between T cells and antigen-presenting cells (APCs) during antigen recognition. Recent evidence points to the transfer of RNA via exosomes as a novel mode of intercellular communication. Here we show that exosomes of T, B and dendritic immune cells contain microRNA (miRNA) repertoires that differ from those of their parent cells. We investigate whether miRNAs are exchanged during cognate immune interactions, and demonstrate the existence of antigen-driven unidirectional transfer of miRNAs from the T cell to the APC, mediated by the delivery of CD63+ exosomes on immune synapse formation. Inhibition of exosome production by targeting neutral sphingomyelinase-2 impairs transfer of miRNAs to APCs. Moreover, miRNAs transferred during immune synapsis are able to modulate gene expression in recipient cells. Thus, our results support a mechanism of cellular communication involving antigen-dependent, unidirectional intercellular transfer of miRNAs by exosomes during immune synapsis. PMID:21505438

  15. Antigenically Modified Human Pluripotent Stem Cells Generate Antigen-Presenting Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Jieming; Wu, Chunxiao; Wang, Shu

    2015-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) provide a promising platform to produce dendritic cell (DC) vaccine. To streamline the production process, we investigated a unique antigen-loading strategy that suits this novel platform. Specifically, we stably modified hPSCs using tumour antigen genes in the form of a full-length tumour antigen gene or an artificial tumour antigen epitope-coding minigene. Such antigenically modified hPSCs were able to differentiate into tumour antigen-presenting DCs. Without conventional antigen-loading, DCs derived from the minigene-modified hPSCs were ready to prime a tumour antigen-specific T cell response and further expand these specific T cells in restimulation processes. These expanded tumour antigen-specific T cells were potent effectors with central memory or effector memory phenotype. Thus, we demonstrated that immunocompetent tumour antigen-loaded DCs can be directly generated from antigenically modified hPSCs. Using such strategy, we can completely eliminate the conventional antigen-loading step and significantly simplify the production of DC vaccine from hPSCs. PMID:26471005

  16. The effect of CpG-ODN on antigen presenting cells of the foal

    PubMed Central

    Flaminio, M Julia BF; Borges, Alexandre S; Nydam, Daryl V; Horohov, David W; Hecker, Rolf; Matychak, Mary Beth

    2007-01-01

    Background Cytosine-phosphate-guanosine oligodeoxynucleotide (CpG-ODN) has been used successfully to induce immune responses against viral and intracellular organisms in mammals. The main objective of this study was to test the effect of CpG-ODN on antigen presenting cells of young foals. Methods Peripheral blood monocytes of foals (n = 7) were isolated in the first day of life and monthly thereafter up to 3 months of life. Adult horse (n = 7) monocytes were isolated and tested once for comparison. Isolated monocytes were stimulated with IL-4 and GM-CSF (to obtain dendritic cells, DC) or not stimulated (to obtain macrophages). Macrophages and DCs were stimulated for 14–16 hours with either CpG-ODN, LPS or not stimulated. The stimulated and non-stimulated cells were tested for cell surface markers (CD86 and MHC class II) using flow cytometry, mRNA expression of cytokines (IL-12, IFNα, IL-10) and TLR-9 using real time quantitative RT-PCR, and for the activation of the transcription factor NF-κB p65 using a chemiluminescence assay. Results The median fluorescence of the MHC class II molecule in non-stimulated foal macrophages and DCs at birth were 12.5 times and 11.2 times inferior, respectively, than adult horse cells (p = 0.009). That difference subsided at 3 months of life (p = 0.3). The expression of the CD86 co-stimulatory molecule was comparable in adult horse and foal macrophages and DCs, independent of treatment. CpG-ODN stimulation induced IL-12p40 (53 times) and IFNα (23 times) mRNA expression in CpG-ODN-treated adult horse DCs (p = 0.078), but not macrophages, in comparison to non-stimulated cells. In contrast, foal APCs did not respond to CpG-ODN stimulation with increased cytokine mRNA expression up to 3 months of age. TLR-9 mRNA expression and NF-kB activation (NF-kB p65) in foal DCs and macrophages were comparable (p > 0.05) to adult horse cells. Conclusion CpG-ODN treatment did not induce specific maturation and cytokine expression in foal

  17. The proteasome activator 11 S REG (PA28) and class I antigen presentation.

    PubMed Central

    Rechsteiner, M; Realini, C; Ustrell, V

    2000-01-01

    There are two immune responses in vertebrates: humoral immunity is mediated by circulating antibodies, whereas cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) confer cellular immunity. CTL lyse infected cells upon recognition of cell-surface MHC Class I molecules complexed with foreign peptides. The displayed peptides are produced in the cytosol by degradation of host proteins or proteins from intracellular pathogens that might be present. Proteasomes are cylindrical multisubunit proteases that generate many of the peptides eventually transferred to the cell surface for immune surveillance. In mammalian proteasomes, six active sites face a central chamber. As this chamber is sealed off from the enzyme's surface, there must be mechanisms to promote entry of substrates. Two protein complexes have been found to bind the ends of the proteasome and activate it. One of the activators is the 19 S regulatory complex of the 26 S proteasome; the other activator is '11 S REG' [Dubiel, Pratt, Ferrell and Rechsteiner (1992) J. Biol. Chem. 267, 22369-22377] or 'PA28' [Ma, Slaughter and DeMartino (1992) J. Biol. Chem. 267, 10515-10523]. During the past 7 years, our understanding of the structure of REG molecules has increased significantly, but much less is known about their biological functions. There are three REG subunits, namely alpha, beta and gamma. Recombinant REGalpha forms a ring-shaped heptamer of known crystal structure. 11 S REG is a heteroheptamer of alpha and beta subunits. REGgamma is also presumably a heptameric ring, and it is found in the nuclei of the nematode work Caenorhabditis elegans and higher organisms, where it may couple proteasomes to other nuclear components. REGalpha and REGbeta, which are abundant in vertebrate immune tissues, are located mostly in the cytoplasm. Synthesis of REG alpha and beta subunits is induced by interferon-gamma, and this has led to the prevalent hypothesis that REG alpha/beta hetero-oligomers play an important role in Class I antigen

  18. Antigen presenting cells in situ: their identification and involvement in immunopathology.

    PubMed Central

    Poulter, L W

    1983-01-01

    Macrophages and other dendritic non-lymphoid cells have been shown to be functionally capable of presenting antigen to induce lymphocyte responses. These cells can now be studied in situ and distinguished, one from another, within normal tissues and sites of cellular infiltration. Analysis of the microenvironment within which these cells are found can be made with immunohistological methods using monoclonal antibodies (McAbs) and cytochemical techniques. In some cases McAbs are specific for particular types of antigen presenting cell. Using such reagents, evidence is accumulating that these cells may be intimately involved in the pathogenesis of immunoregulatory disorders. What is now required is a more definitive correlation between functional capacity and cell phenotype established with cells isolated from blood, and from normal and pathological tissues. If this is possible the immunopathologist may be able, not only to analyse complex microenvironments but also directly determine the interactions and mechanisms at play within the diseased tissues. PMID:6352095

  19. Innate autoreactive B cells as antigen-presenting cells in the induction of tolerance to conserved keratin polypeptide.

    PubMed

    Fu, Meng; Li, Wei; Tian, Rong; Gao, Jixin; Xing, Ying; Li, Chengxin; Wang, Gang; Li, Chunying; Gao, Tianwen; Han, Hua; Liu, Yufeng

    2013-01-01

    Innate B cells account for a substantial proportion of total B lymphocytes and express autoreactive B cell receptors directed against self-constituents. However, whether innate autoreactive B cells present auto-antigens to T cells, and if so, whether they trigger an autoimmune response, are unclear. In this study, we have characterized splenic keratin-reactive B cells from naïve mice and investigated their roles in keratin antigen presentation. We observed that splenic keratin-reactive B cells expressed germline encoded VH and VK genes based on Igs from anti-keratin hybridomas. Moreover, they frequently utilized gene segment of DFL16.2 and JK2 in the CDR3 regions of heavy and light chain, suggesting that these cells are probably selected on the basis of the specificity of their BCRs. In the presence of keratin antigen, splenic keratin-reactive B cells stimulated significant IL-2 productions from keratin-specific T hybridomas, which were augmented by increasing the concentration of keratin and the numbers of keratin-reactive B cells. By contrast, keratin-reactive B cells failed to stimulate the proliferations of freshly isolated keratin-specific T cells from lymph nodes. The phenotypic analysis of splenic keratin-reactive B cells indicated that low expressions of B7-1 and B7-2 might be the underlying mechanisms for this incomplete function of B cell presentation. Our experiments indicate that splenic keratin-reactive B cells are ineffective in activating freshly isolated T cells from lymph nodes, suggesting a role for innate autoreactive B cells as antigen-presenting cells in tolerance to self-antigens.

  20. Estimation of low frequency antigen presenting cells with a novel RELISPOT assay

    PubMed Central

    Dzutsev, Amiran K.; Belyakov, Igor M.; Isakov, Dmitry V.; Gagnon, Susan J.; Margulies, David H.; Berzofsky, Jay A.

    2008-01-01

    Adequate presentation of self and foreign antigens is a key factor for efficient T-cell immunosurveillance against pathogens and tumors. Cells presenting foreign antigens usually comprise a rare population and are difficult to detect even at the peak of infection. Here we demonstrate a CD8+ T-cell-based approach that allows detection of specific antigen-presenting cells (APC) at a frequency of less than 0.0005%. When T cells are in excess, they form rosettes with rare APCs, which appear as single spots in an IFN-γ ELISPOT assay. Using this RELISPOT (Rosette ELISPOT) method we demonstrate the dynamic interplay between CD8 T cells and professional and non-professional APCs following virus challenge. PMID:18294650

  1. Emergence of distinct multi-armed immunoregulatory antigen presenting cells during persistent viral infection

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Elizabeth B.; Kidani, Yoko; Elsaesser, Heidi; Barnard, Jennifer; Raff, Laura; Karp, Christopher L.; Bensinger, Steven; Brooks, David G.

    2012-01-01

    During persistent viral infection, adaptive immune responses are suppressed by immunoregulatory factors, contributing to viral persistence. Although this suppression is mediated by inhibitory factors, the mechanisms by which virus-specific T cells encounter and integrate immunoregulatory signals during persistent infection are unclear. We show that a distinct population of IL-10-expressing immunoregulatory antigen presenting cells (APC) is amplified during chronic versus acute lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) infection and suppresses T cell responses. Although acute LCMV infection induces the expansion of immunoregulatory APC, they subsequently decline. However, during persistent LCMV infection, immunoregulatory APC are amplified and parallel the viral replication kinetics. Further characterization demonstrates that immunoregulatory APC are molecularly and metabolically distinct, and exhibit increased expression of T cell-interacting molecules and negative regulatory factors that suppress T cell responses. Thus, immunoregulatory APC are amplified during viral persistence and deliver inhibitory signals that suppress antiviral T cell immunity and likely contribute to persistent infection. PMID:22607801

  2. Skin-Resident Antigen-Presenting Cells: Instruction Manual for Vaccine Development

    PubMed Central

    Fehres, Cynthia M.; Garcia-Vallejo, Juan J.; Unger, Wendy W. J.; van Kooyk, Yvette

    2013-01-01

    The induction of antigen-specific effector T cells is driven by proper antigen presentation and co-stimulation by dendritic cells (DCs). For this reason strategies have been developed to instruct DCs for the induction of CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses. Since DCs are localized, amongst other locations, in peripheral tissues such as the skin, new vaccines are aiming at targeting antigens to DCs in situ. Optimal skin-DC targeting in combination with adequate adjuvant delivery facilitates DC maturation and migration to draining lymph nodes and enhances antigen cross-presentation and T cell priming. In this review we describe what DC subsets populate the human skin, as well as current vaccination strategies based on targeting strategies and alternative administration for the induction of robust long-lived anti-cancer effector T cells. PMID:23801994

  3. RNAi screen for kinases and phosphatases that play a role in antigen presentation by dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Moita, Catarina F; Chora, Ângelo; Hacohen, Nir; Moita, Luis F

    2012-07-01

    Effective CD8(+) T-cell responses against tumor or microbial antigens that are not directly expressed in antigen-presenting cells (APCs) depend on the cross-presentation of these antigens on MHC class I in APCs. To identify signaling molecules that regulate cross-presentation, we used lentiviral-based RNA interference to test the roles of hundreds of kinases and phosphatases in this process. Our study uncovered eight previously unknown genes, consisting of one positive and seven negative regulators of antigen cross-presentation. Depletion of Acvr1c, a type I receptor for TGF-β family of signaling molecules, led to an increase in CD80 and CD86 co-stimulator surface expression and secreted IL-12 in mouse bone marrow-derived DCs, as well as antigen-specific T-cell proliferation.

  4. Intestinal Antigen-Presenting Cells: Key Regulators of Immune Homeostasis and Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Flannigan, Kyle L; Geem, Duke; Harusato, Akihito; Denning, Timothy L

    2015-07-01

    The microbiota that populate the mammalian intestine are critical for proper host physiology, yet simultaneously pose a potential danger. Intestinal antigen-presenting cells, namely macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs), are integral components of the mucosal innate immune system that maintain co-existence with the microbiota in face of this constant threat. Intestinal macrophages and DCs integrate signals from the microenvironment to orchestrate innate and adaptive immune responses that ultimately lead to durable tolerance of the microbiota. Tolerance is not a default response, however, because macrophages and DCs remain poised to vigorously respond to pathogens that breach the epithelial barrier. In this review, we summarize the salient features of macrophages and DCs in the healthy and inflamed intestine and discuss how signals from the microbiota can influence their function.

  5. ImmunoChip study implicates antigen presentation to T cells in narcolepsy.

    PubMed

    Faraco, Juliette; Lin, Ling; Kornum, Birgitte Rahbek; Kenny, Eimear E; Trynka, Gosia; Einen, Mali; Rico, Tom J; Lichtner, Peter; Dauvilliers, Yves; Arnulf, Isabelle; Lecendreux, Michel; Javidi, Sirous; Geisler, Peter; Mayer, Geert; Pizza, Fabio; Poli, Francesca; Plazzi, Giuseppe; Overeem, Sebastiaan; Lammers, Gert Jan; Kemlink, David; Sonka, Karel; Nevsimalova, Sona; Rouleau, Guy; Desautels, Alex; Montplaisir, Jacques; Frauscher, Birgit; Ehrmann, Laura; Högl, Birgit; Jennum, Poul; Bourgin, Patrice; Peraita-Adrados, Rosa; Iranzo, Alex; Bassetti, Claudio; Chen, Wei-Min; Concannon, Patrick; Thompson, Susan D; Damotte, Vincent; Fontaine, Bertrand; Breban, Maxime; Gieger, Christian; Klopp, Norman; Deloukas, Panos; Wijmenga, Cisca; Hallmayer, Joachim; Onengut-Gumuscu, Suna; Rich, Stephen S; Winkelmann, Juliane; Mignot, Emmanuel

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in the identification of susceptibility genes and environmental exposures provide broad support for a post-infectious autoimmune basis for narcolepsy/hypocretin (orexin) deficiency. We genotyped loci associated with other autoimmune and inflammatory diseases in 1,886 individuals with hypocretin-deficient narcolepsy and 10,421 controls, all of European ancestry, using a custom genotyping array (ImmunoChip). Three loci located outside the Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) region on chromosome 6 were significantly associated with disease risk. In addition to a strong signal in the T cell receptor alpha (TRA@), variants in two additional narcolepsy loci, Cathepsin H (CTSH) and Tumor necrosis factor (ligand) superfamily member 4 (TNFSF4, also called OX40L), attained genome-wide significance. These findings underline the importance of antigen presentation by HLA Class II to T cells in the pathophysiology of this autoimmune disease.

  6. Neutrophils acquire the capacity for antigen presentation to memory CD4(+) T cells in vitro and ex vivo.

    PubMed

    Vono, Maria; Lin, Ang; Norrby-Teglund, Anna; Koup, Richard A; Liang, Frank; Loré, Karin

    2017-04-06

    Neutrophils are critical cells of the innate immune system and rapidly respond to tissue injury and infection. Increasing evidence also indicates that neutrophils have versatile functions in contributing to adaptive immunity by internalizing and transporting antigen and influencing antigen-specific responses. Here, we demonstrate that freshly isolated human neutrophils can function as antigen-presenting cells (APCs) to memory CD4(+) T cells. Neutrophils pulsed with the cognate antigens cytomegalovirus pp65 or influenza hemagglutinin were able to present the antigens to autologous antigen-specific CD4(+) T cells in a major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II; HLA-DR)-dependent manner. Although myeloid dendritic cells and monocytes showed superior presenting ability, neutrophils consistently displayed antigen presentation capability. Upregulation of HLA-DR on neutrophils required the presence of the antigen-specific or activated T cells whereas exposure to innate stimuli such as Toll-like receptor ligands was not sufficient. Neutrophils sorted from vaccine-draining lymph nodes from rhesus macaques also showed expression of HLA-DR and were capable of presenting vaccine antigen to autologous antigen-specific memory CD4(+) T cells ex vivo. Altogether, the data demonstrate that neutrophils can adapt a function as APCs and, in combination with their abundance in the immune system, may have a significant role in regulating antigen-specific T-cell responses.

  7. Mannose receptor-mediated gene delivery into antigen presenting dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Diebold, Sandra S; Plank, Christian; Cotten, Matt; Wagner, Ernst; Zenke, Martin

    2002-11-01

    Dendritic cells are professional antigen presenting cells and are unique in their ability to prime naïve T cells. Gene modification of dendritic cells is of particular interest for immunotherapy of diseases where the immune system has failed or is aberrantly regulated, such as in cancer or autoimmune disease, respectively. Dendritic cells abundantly express mannose receptor and mannose receptor-related receptors, and receptor-mediated gene transfer via mannose receptor offers a versatile tool for targeted gene delivery into these cells. Accordingly, mannose polyethylenimine DNA transfer complexes were generated and used for gene delivery into dendritic cells. Mannose receptor belongs to the group of scavenger receptors that allow dendritic cells to take up pathogenic material, which is directed for degradation and MHC class II presentation. Therefore, a limiting step of transgene expression by mannose receptor-mediated gene delivery is endosomal degradation of DNA. Several strategies have been explored to overcome this limitation including the addition of endosomolytic components to DNA transfer complexes like adenovirus particles and influenza peptides. Here, we review the current understanding of mannose receptor-mediated gene delivery into dendritic cells and discuss strategies to identify appropriate endosomolytic agents to improve DNA transfer efficacy.

  8. Unique Transcompartmental Bridge: Antigen-Presenting Cells Sampling across Endothelial and Mucosal Barriers

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Frederick; Tong, Alexander A.; Huang, Alex Y.

    2016-01-01

    Potentially harmful pathogens can gain access to tissues and organ systems through body sites that are in direct contact with the outside environment, such as the skin, the gut, and the airway mucosa. Antigen-presenting cells (APCs) represent a bridge between the innate and adaptive immunity, and their capacity for constant immune surveillance and rapid sampling of incoming pathogens and other potentially harmful antigens is central for mounting an effective and robust protective host response. The classical view is that APCs perform this task efficiently within the tissue to sense invading agents intra-compartmentally. However, recent data based on high resolution imaging support an additional transcompartmental surveillance behavior by APC by reaching across intact physical barriers. In this review, we summarize intravital microscopic evidences of APC to sample antigens transcompartmentally at the gut mucosa and other body sites. PMID:27375624

  9. B7 expression and antigen presentation by human brain endothelial cells: requirement for proinflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Prat, A; Biernacki, K; Becher, B; Antel, J P

    2000-02-01

    Interaction between systemic immune cells with cells of the blood-brain barrier is a central step in development of CNS-directed immune responses. Endothelial cells are the first cells of the blood-brain barrier encountered by migrating lymphocytes. To investigate the antigen-presenting capacity of human adult brain endothelial cells (HBECs), we used HBECs derived from surgically resected temporal lobe tissue, cocultured with allogeneic peripheral blood derived CD4+ T lymphocytes. HBECs in response to IFN-gamma, but not under basal culture conditions, expressed HLA-DR, B7.1 and B7.2 antigens. Despite such up-regulation, these IFN-gamma-treated HBECs, in contrast to human microglia and PB monocytes, did not sustain allogeneic CD4+ cell proliferation, supported only low levels of IL-2 and IFN-gamma production, and did not stimulate IL-2 receptor expression. CD4+ T cell proliferation and increased IL-2 receptor expression could be obtained by addition of IL-2. Our data suggests that, although HBECs cannot alone support T cell proliferation and cytokine production, HBECs acting in concert with cytokines derived from a proinflammatory environment could support such a response.

  10. Synovial fluid antigen-presenting cells unmask peripheral blood T cell responses to bacterial antigens in inflammatory arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Life, P F; Viner, N J; Bacon, P A; Gaston, J S

    1990-01-01

    We and others have previously shown that synovial fluid (SF) mononuclear cells (MC) from patients with both reactive arthritis and other inflammatory arthritides proliferate in vitro in response to bacteria clinically associated with the triggering of reactive arthritis. In all cases, such SFMC responses are greater than the corresponding peripheral blood (PB) MC responses, often markedly so, and the mechanism for this is unclear. We have investigated this phenomenon by comparing the relative abilities of irradiated non-T cells derived from PB and SF to support autologous T cell responses to ReA-associated bacteria. Seven patients whose SFMC had been shown previously to respond to bacteria were studied. We demonstrate antigen-specific responses of PB T cells to bacteria in the presence of SF non-T cells which are in marked contrast to the minimal responses of either unfractionated PBMC or PB T cells reconstituted with PB non-T cells. We also show that PB, but not SF T cells respond strongly to autologous SF non-T cells in the absence of antigen or mitogen. These findings demonstrate that SF antigen-presenting cells (APC) are potent activators of PB T cells. We conclude that the contrasting responses of SFMC and PBMC to bacterial antigens may be accounted for at least in part by an enhanced ability of SF APC to support T cell proliferative responses. PMID:2311298

  11. Luciferase mRNA Transfection of Antigen Presenting Cells Permits Sensitive Nonradioactive Measurement of Cellular and Humoral Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Omokoko, Tana A.; Luxemburger, Uli; Bardissi, Shaheer; Simon, Petra; Utsch, Magdalena; Breitkreuz, Andrea; Türeci, Özlem; Sahin, Ugur

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapy is rapidly evolving as an effective treatment option for many cancers. With the emerging fields of cancer vaccines and adoptive cell transfer therapies, there is an increasing demand for high-throughput in vitro cytotoxicity assays that efficiently analyze immune effector functions. The gold standard 51Cr-release assay is very accurate but has the major disadvantage of being radioactive. We reveal the development of a versatile and nonradioactive firefly luciferase in vitro transcribed (IVT) RNA-based assay. Demonstrating high efficiency, consistency, and excellent target cell viability, our optimized luciferase IVT RNA is used to transfect dividing and nondividing primary antigen presenting cells. Together with the long-lasting expression and minimal background, the direct measurement of intracellular luciferase activity of living cells allows for the monitoring of killing kinetics and displays paramount sensitivity. The ability to cotransfect the IVT RNA of the luciferase reporter and the antigen of interest into the antigen presenting cells and its simple read-out procedure render the assay high-throughput in nature. Results generated were comparable to the 51Cr release and further confirmed the assay's ability to measure antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity and complement-dependent cytotoxicity. The assay's combined simplicity, practicality, and efficiency tailor it for the analysis of antigen-specific cellular and humoral effector functions during the development of novel immunotherapies. PMID:27057556

  12. Antigen-presenting cells in human cutaneous leishmaniasis due to Leishmania major.

    PubMed Central

    ElHassan, A M; Gaafar, A; Theander, T G

    1995-01-01

    In this study biopsies from skin lesions and draining lymph nodes of patients suffering from cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania major were examined by immunohistochemistry, and by light and electron microscopy to identify the types of antigen-presenting cells (APC) and their location. APC, identified morphologically and by their expression of specific cell markers, included Langerhans cells, macrophages, follicular dendritic cells, and interdigitating reticulum cells of the paracortex of lymph nodes. These cells expressed MHC class II antigens and contained Leishmania antigen. Since some keratinocytes and endothelial cells also showed these characteristics, they may also act as APC. By examining tissue samples from skin lesions and draining lymph nodes it was possible to follow the probable route of trafficking of various inflammatory cells between the skin lesion and lymph nodes. Leishmania antigen containing Langerhans cells were found in the epidermis, dermis and the regional lymph nodes. We believe these cells translocate from the epidermis to the dermis, where they take up antigen and migrate to the paracortex of the regional lymph nodes. There they are intimately associated with cells of the paracortex, and could be involved in the generation of Leishmania-specific T memory cells. LFA-1-positive T cells of the CD45RO phenotype were found in the skin lesion. Venular endothelium in the skin lesions expressed intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), which is the ligand for LFA-1. The migration of lymphocytes from the vascular lumen to the site of inflammation is possibly a result of the interaction of these two adhesion molecules. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7882568

  13. Nanoparticle-Based Manipulation of Antigen-Presenting Cells for Cancer Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Fang, Ronnie H; Kroll, Ashley V; Zhang, Liangfang

    2015-11-04

    Immunotherapeutic approaches for treating cancer overall have been receiving a considerable amount of interest due to the recent approval of several clinical formulations. Among the different modalities, anticancer vaccination acts by training the body to endogenously generate a response against tumor cells. However, despite the large amount of work that has gone into the development of such vaccines, the near absence of clinically approved formulations highlights the many challenges facing those working in the field. The generation of potent endogenous anticancer responses poses unique challenges due to the similarity between cancer cells and normal, healthy cells. As researchers continue to tackle the limited efficacy of vaccine formulations, fresh and novel approaches are being sought after to address many of the underlying problems. Here the application of nanoparticle technology towards the development of anticancer vaccines is discussed. Specifically, there is a focus on the benefits of using such strategies to manipulate antigen presenting cells (APCs), which are essential to the vaccination process, and how nanoparticle-based platforms can be rationally engineered to elicit appropriate downstream immune responses.

  14. Engineered Hydrogen-Bonded Glycopolymer Capsules and Their Interactions with Antigen Presenting Cells.

    PubMed

    Kempe, Kristian; Xiang, Sue D; Wilson, Paul; Rahim, Md Arifur; Ju, Yi; Whittaker, Michael R; Haddleton, David M; Plebanski, Magdalena; Caruso, Frank; Davis, Thomas P

    2017-02-22

    Hollow glycopolymer microcapsules were fabricated by hydrogen-bonded layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly, and their interactions with a set of antigen presenting cells (APCs), including dendritic cells (DCs), macrophages (MACs), and myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), were investigated. The glycopolymers were obtained by cascade postpolymerization modifications of poly(oligo(2-ethyl-2-oxazoline methacrylate)-stat-glycidyl methacrylate) involving the modification of the glycidyl groups with propargylamine and the subsequent attachment of mannose azide by copper(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC). Multilayer assembly of the hydrogen-bonding pair (glycopolymer/poly(methacrylic acid) (PMA)) onto planar and particulate supports (SiO2 particles, d = 1.16 μm) yielded stable glycopolymer films upon cross-linking by CuAAC. The silica (SiO2) particle templates were removed yielding hollow monodisperse capsules, as demonstrated by fluorescence and scanning electron microscopy. Cellular uptake studies using flow cytometry revealed the preferential uptake of the capsules by DCs when compared to MACs or MDSCs. Mannosylated capsules showed a cytokine independent cis-upregulation of CD80 specifically on DCs and a trans-downregulation of PDL-1 on MDSCs. Thus, the glycopolymer capsules may have potential as vaccine carriers, as they are able to upregulate costimulatory molecules for immune cell stimulation on DCs and at the same time downregulate immune inhibitory receptors on suppressor APC such as MDSCs.

  15. Expanded Human Blood-Derived γδT Cells Display Potent Antigen-Presentation Functions

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Mohd Wajid A.; Curbishley, Stuart M.; Chen, Hung-Chang; Thomas, Andrew D.; Pircher, Hanspeter; Mavilio, Domenico; Steven, Neil M.; Eberl, Matthias; Moser, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    Cell-based immunotherapy strategies target tumors directly (via cytolytic effector cells) or aim at mobilizing endogenous anti-tumor immunity. The latter approach includes dendritic cells (DC) most frequently in the form of in vitro cultured peripheral blood monocytes-derived DC. Human blood γδT cells are selective for a single class of non-peptide agonists (“phosphoantigens”) and develop into potent antigen-presenting cells (APC), termed γδT-APC within 1–3 days of in vitro culture. Availability of large numbers of γδT-APC would be advantageous for use as a novel cellular vaccine. We here report optimal γδT cell expansion (>107 cells/ml blood) when peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from healthy individuals and melanoma patients were stimulated with zoledronate and then cultured for 14 days in the presence of IL-2 and IL-15, yielding γδT cell cultures of variable purity (77 ± 21 and 56 ± 26%, respectively). They resembled effector memory αβT (TEM) cells and retained full functionality as assessed by in vitro tumor cell killing as well as secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IFNγ, TNFα) and cell proliferation in response to stimulation with phosphoantigens. Importantly, day 14 γδT cells expressed numerous APC-related cell surface markers and, in agreement, displayed potent in vitro APC functions. Day 14 γδT cells from PBMC of patients with cancer were equally effective as their counterparts derived from blood of healthy individuals and triggered potent CD8+ αβT cell responses following processing and cross-presentation of simple (influenza M1) and complex (tuberculin purified protein derivative) protein antigens. Of note, and in clear contrast to peripheral blood γδT cells, the ability of day 14 γδT cells to trigger antigen-specific αβT cell responses did not depend on re-stimulation. We conclude that day 14 γδT cell cultures provide a convenient source of autologous APC for use in immunotherapy of patients

  16. Expanded Human Blood-Derived γδT Cells Display Potent Antigen-Presentation Functions.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mohd Wajid A; Curbishley, Stuart M; Chen, Hung-Chang; Thomas, Andrew D; Pircher, Hanspeter; Mavilio, Domenico; Steven, Neil M; Eberl, Matthias; Moser, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    Cell-based immunotherapy strategies target tumors directly (via cytolytic effector cells) or aim at mobilizing endogenous anti-tumor immunity. The latter approach includes dendritic cells (DC) most frequently in the form of in vitro cultured peripheral blood monocytes-derived DC. Human blood γδT cells are selective for a single class of non-peptide agonists ("phosphoantigens") and develop into potent antigen-presenting cells (APC), termed γδT-APC within 1-3 days of in vitro culture. Availability of large numbers of γδT-APC would be advantageous for use as a novel cellular vaccine. We here report optimal γδT cell expansion (>10(7) cells/ml blood) when peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from healthy individuals and melanoma patients were stimulated with zoledronate and then cultured for 14 days in the presence of IL-2 and IL-15, yielding γδT cell cultures of variable purity (77 ± 21 and 56 ± 26%, respectively). They resembled effector memory αβT (TEM) cells and retained full functionality as assessed by in vitro tumor cell killing as well as secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IFNγ, TNFα) and cell proliferation in response to stimulation with phosphoantigens. Importantly, day 14 γδT cells expressed numerous APC-related cell surface markers and, in agreement, displayed potent in vitro APC functions. Day 14 γδT cells from PBMC of patients with cancer were equally effective as their counterparts derived from blood of healthy individuals and triggered potent CD8(+) αβT cell responses following processing and cross-presentation of simple (influenza M1) and complex (tuberculin purified protein derivative) protein antigens. Of note, and in clear contrast to peripheral blood γδT cells, the ability of day 14 γδT cells to trigger antigen-specific αβT cell responses did not depend on re-stimulation. We conclude that day 14 γδT cell cultures provide a convenient source of autologous APC for use in immunotherapy of patients

  17. A fusion DNA vaccine that targets antigen-presenting cells increases protection from viral challenge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deliyannis, Georgia; Boyle, Jefferey S.; Brady, Jamie L.; Brown, Lorena E.; Lew, Andrew M.

    2000-06-01

    Improving the immunological potency, particularly the Ab response, is a serious hurdle for the protective efficacy and hence broad application of DNA vaccines. We examined the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of a hemagglutinin-based influenza DNA vaccine that was targeted to antigen-presenting cells (APCs) by fusion to CTLA4. The targeted vaccine was shown to induce an accelerated and increased Ab response (as compared with those receiving the nontargeted control) that was predominated by IgG1 and recognized conformationally dependent viral epitopes. Moreover, mice receiving the APC-targeted DNA vaccine had significantly reduced viral titers (100-fold) after a nonlethal virus challenge. The increased protective efficacy was most likely because of increased Ab responses, as cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses were not enhanced. Targeting was demonstrated by direct binding studies of CTLA4 fusion proteins to the cognate ligand (B7; expressed on APCs in vivo). In addition, a targeted protein was detected at 4-fold higher levels in draining lymph nodes within 2-24 h of administration. Therefore, this study demonstrates that targeting DNA-encoded antigen to APCs results in enhanced immunity and strongly suggests that this approach may be useful in improving the protective efficacy of DNA vaccines.

  18. Human Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells Efficiently Capture HIV-1 Envelope Glycoproteins via CD4 for Antigen Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Sandgren, Kerrie J; Smed-Sörensen, Anna; Forsell, Mattias N; Soldemo, Martina; Adams, William C; Liang, Frank; Perbeck, Leif; Koup, Richard A; Wyatt, Richard T; Hedestam, Gunilla B Karlsson; Loré, Karin

    2013-01-01

    Advances in HIV-1 vaccine clinical trials and preclinical research indicate that the virus envelope glycoproteins (Env) are likely to be an essential component of a prophylactic vaccine. Efficient antigen uptake and presentation by dendritic cells (DCs) is important for strong CD4+ T helper cell responses and the development of effective humoral immune responses. Here, we examined the capacity of distinct primary human DC subsets to internalise and present recombinant Env to CD4+ T cells. Consistent with their specific receptor expression, skin DCs bound and internalised Env via C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) while blood DC subsets, including CD1c+ myeloid DCs (MDCs), CD123+ plasmacytoid DCs (PDCs) and CD141+ DCs exhibited a restricted repertoire of CLRs and relied on CD4 for uptake of Env. Despite a generally poor capacity for antigen uptake compared to MDCs, the high expression of CD4 on PDCs allowed them to bind and internalise Env very efficiently. CD4-mediated uptake delivered Env to EEA1+ endosomes that progressed to Lamp1+ and MHC class II+ lysosomes where internalised Env was degraded rapidly. Finally, all three blood DC subsets were able to internalise an Env-CMV pp65 fusion protein via CD4 and stimulate pp65-specific CD4+ T cells. Thus, in the in vitro systems described here, CD4-mediated uptake of Env is a functional pathway leading to antigen presentation and this may therefore be a mechanism utilised by blood DCs, including PDCs, for generating immune responses to Env-based vaccines. PMID:23729440

  19. Characterization of antigen-presenting cells from the porcine respiratory system.

    PubMed

    López-Robles, Guadalupe; Silva-Campa, Erika; Burgara-Estrella, Alexel; Hernández, Jesús

    2015-06-01

    Antigen-presenting cells (APCs) are strategically placed in all anatomic sites with high antigen exposure such as the respiratory system. The aim of this study was to evaluate phenotypic and functional properties of APCs from the lung (L-Cs), mediastinal lymph node (LN-Cs) and bronchoalveolar lavage cells (BAL-Cs). The APCs were first analyzed based on forward scatter and side scatter profiles and the selection of MHC-II(high)CD172a(+) cells (referred to as APCs); then the expression of CD1a, CD163, CD206, CD16 and CD11R3 was evaluated in the APCs. The results showed that CD1a, CD163 and CD206 were differentially expressed among L-Cs, LN-Cs and BAL-Cs, suggesting the phenotype MHC-II(high)CD172a(+)CD1a(low/-)CD163(low)CD206(-) for L-Cs and MHC-II(high)CD172a(+)CD1a(+)CD163(low/-)CD206(+) for LN-Cs. BAL-Cs were MHC-II(high)CD172a(+)CD1a(-)CD163(high)CD206(+/-). The functional characteristics of L-Cs and LN-Cs were different from those of BAL-Cs, confirming that L-Cs and LN-Cs resemble specialized APCs. In conclusion, we present the characterization of APCs from L-Cs, LN-Cs and BAL-Cs of the porcine respiratory system.

  20. IL-4 abrogates TH17 cell-mediated inflammation by selective silencing of IL-23 in antigen-presenting cells

    PubMed Central

    Guenova, Emmanuella; Skabytska, Yuliya; Hoetzenecker, Wolfram; Weindl, Günther; Sauer, Karin; Tham, Manuela; Kim, Kyu-Won; Park, Ji-Hyeon; Seo, Ji Hae; Ignatova, Desislava; Cozzio, Antonio; Levesque, Mitchell P.; Volz, Thomas; Köberle, Martin; Kaesler, Susanne; Thomas, Peter; Mailhammer, Reinhard; Ghoreschi, Kamran; Schäkel, Knut; Amarov, Boyko; Eichner, Martin; Schaller, Martin; Clark, Rachael A.; Röcken, Martin; Biedermann, Tilo

    2015-01-01

    Interleukin 4 (IL-4) can suppress delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions (DTHRs), including organ-specific autoimmune diseases in mice and humans. Despite the broadly documented antiinflammatory effect of IL-4, the underlying mode of action remains incompletely understood, as IL-4 also promotes IL-12 production by dendritic cells (DCs) and IFN-γ–producing TH1 cells in vivo. Studying the impact of IL-4 on the polarization of human and mouse DCs, we found that IL-4 exerts opposing effects on the production of either IL-12 or IL-23. While promoting IL-12–producing capacity of DCs, IL-4 completely abrogates IL-23. Bone marrow chimeras proved that IL-4–mediated suppression of DTHRs relies on the signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6)-dependent abrogation of IL-23 in antigen-presenting cells. Moreover, IL-4 therapy attenuated DTHRs by STAT6- and activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3)-dependent suppression of the IL-23/TH17 responses despite simultaneous enhancement of IL-12/TH1 responses. As IL-4 therapy also improves psoriasis in humans and suppresses IL-23/TH17 responses without blocking IL-12/TH1, selective IL-4–mediated IL-23/TH17 silencing is promising as treatment against harmful inflammation, while sparing the IL-12–dependent TH1 responses. PMID:25646481

  1. Nano-clustering of ligands on surrogate antigen presenting cells modulates T cell membrane adhesion and organization.

    PubMed

    Dillard, Pierre; Pi, Fuwei; Lellouch, Annemarie C; Limozin, Laurent; Sengupta, Kheya

    2016-03-14

    We investigate the adhesion and molecular organization of the plasma membrane of T lymphocytes interacting with a surrogate antigen presenting cell comprising glass supported ordered arrays of antibody (α-CD3) nano-dots dispersed in a non-adhesive matrix of polyethylene glycol (PEG). The local membrane adhesion and topography, as well as the distribution of the T cell receptors (TCRs) and the kinase ZAP-70, are influenced by dot-geometry, whereas the cell spreading area is determined by the overall average density of the ligands rather than specific characteristics of the dots. TCR clusters are recruited preferentially to the nano-dots and the TCR cluster size distribution has a weak dot-size dependence. On the patterns, the clusters are larger, more numerous, and more enriched in TCRs, as compared to the homogeneously distributed ligands at comparable concentrations. These observations support the idea that non-ligated TCRs residing in the non-adhered parts of the proximal membrane are able to diffuse and enrich the existing clusters at the ligand dots. However, long distance transport is impaired and cluster centralization in the form of a central supramolecular cluster (cSMAC) is not observed. Time-lapse imaging of early cell-surface contacts indicates that the ZAP-70 microclusters are directly recruited to the site of the antibody dots and this process is concomitant with membrane adhesion. These results together point to a complex interplay of adhesion, molecular organization and activation in response to spatially modulated stimulation.

  2. B7-H1–expressing antigen-presenting cells mediate polarization of protumorigenic Th22 subsets

    PubMed Central

    Kuang, Dong-Ming; Xiao, Xiao; Zhao, Qiyi; Chen, Min-Min; Li, Xue-Feng; Liu, Rui-Xian; Wei, Yuan; Ouyang, Fang-Zhu; Chen, Dong-Ping; Wu, Yan; Lao, Xiang-Ming; Deng, Hong; Zheng, Limin

    2014-01-01

    Classical IL-22–producing T helper cells (Th22 cells) mediate inflammatory responses independently of IFN-γ and IL-17; however, nonclassical Th22 cells have been recently identified and coexpress IFN-γ and/or IL-17 along with IL-22. Little is known about how classical and nonclassical Th22 subsets in human diseases are regulated. Here, we used samples of human blood, normal and peritumoral liver, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) to delineate the phenotype, distribution, generation, and functional relevance of various Th22 subsets. Three nonclassical Th22 subsets constituted the majority of all Th22 cells in human liver and HCC tissues, although the classical Th22 subset was predominant in blood. Monocytes activated by TLR2 and TLR4 agonists served as the antigen-presenting cells (APCs) that most efficiently triggered the expansion of nonclassical Th22 subsets from memory T cells and classical Th22 subsets from naive T cells. Moreover, B7-H1–expressing monocytes skewed Th22 polarization away from IFN-γ and toward IL-17 through interaction with programmed death 1 (PD-1), an effect that can create favorable conditions for in vivo aggressive cancer growth and angiogenesis. Our results provide insight into the selective modulation of Th22 subsets and suggest that strategies to influence functional activities of inflammatory cells may benefit anticancer therapy. PMID:25244097

  3. Immune Tolerance Maintained by Cooperative Interactions between T Cells and Antigen Presenting Cells Shapes a Diverse TCR Repertoire

    PubMed Central

    Best, Katharine; Chain, Benny; Watkins, Chris

    2015-01-01

    The T cell population in an individual needs to avoid harmful activation by self peptides while maintaining the ability to respond to an unknown set of foreign peptides. This property is acquired by a combination of thymic and extra-thymic mechanisms. We extend current models for the development of self/non-self discrimination to consider the acquisition of self-tolerance as an emergent system level property of the overall T cell receptor repertoire. We propose that tolerance is established at the level of the antigen presenting cell/T cell cluster, which facilitates and integrates cooperative interactions between T cells of different specificities. The threshold for self-reactivity is therefore imposed at a population level, and not at the level of the individual T cell/antigen encounter. Mathematically, the model can be formulated as a linear programing optimization problem that can be implemented as a multiplicative update algorithm, which shows a rapid convergence to a stable state. The model constrains self-reactivity within a predefined threshold, but maintains repertoire diversity and cross reactivity which are key characteristics of human T cell immunity. We show further that the size of individual clones in the model repertoire becomes heterogeneous, and that new clones can establish themselves even when the repertoire has stabilized. Our study combines the salient features of the “danger” model of self/non-self discrimination with the concepts of quorum sensing, and extends repertoire generation models to encompass the establishment of tolerance. Furthermore, the dynamic and continuous repertoire reshaping, which underlies tolerance in this model, suggests opportunities for therapeutic intervention to achieve long-term tolerance following transplantation. PMID:26300880

  4. Mannose-poly(ethylene glycol)-linked SPION targeted to antigen presenting cells for magnetic resonance imaging on lymph node.

    PubMed

    Muthiah, Muthunarayanan; Vu-Quang, Hieu; Kim, You-Kyoung; Rhee, Joon Haeng; Kang, Sang Hyeon; Jun, Soo Youn; Choi, Yun-Jaie; Jeong, Yong Yeon; Cho, Chong-Su; Park, In-Kyu

    2013-02-15

    The aim of this study is to prepare biocompatible and targetable nanoparticles in lymph nodes (LNs) for lymph node-specific magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Mannan-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) (mannan-SPION), carboxylic mannan-coated SPION (CM-SPION), and β-glucan-coated SPION (Glucan-SPION) have been developed to target antigen-presenting cells (APCs), for lymph node detection by MR imaging. In this study, mannose-polyethylene glycol (PEG) was prepared by conjugating D-mannopyranosylphenyl isothiocyanate and amine-PEG-carboxyl. The 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES)-activated SPION and the mannose-PEG were cross-linked to produce mannose-PEG-linked SPION (Mannose-PEG-SPION). Mannose-PEG-SPION carrying mannose on the surface were assumed efficient at targeting APCs through the specific interactions of the mannose tethered on the Mannose-PEG-SPION and the mannose receptors on the antigen presenting cells. The hydrophilic PEG corona layer in the Mannose-PEG-SPION could be prevented from aggregation during the systemic circulation with accompanying enhanced specificity and minimized systemic toxicity. The accumulation of SPION in the lymph nodes led to increased negative enhancement in the MR images. In the in vivo study, rats were injected intravenously with Mannose-PEG-SPION and PEG-SPION, as a control and then tracked by MR imaging after 1 h, 2 h, 3 h, and 24 h. MR imaging on lymph nodes clearly revealed the preferential uptake of Mannose-PEG-SPION in immune cell-rich lymph nodes. The predominant accumulation of Mannose-PEG-SPION in the lymph nodes was also confirmed by Prussian blue staining. Based on these results, Mannose-PEG-SPION shows great potential for lymph node-specific MR imaging.

  5. Predominant role for directly transfected dendritic cells in antigen presentation to CD8+ T cells after gene gun immunization.

    PubMed

    Porgador, A; Irvine, K R; Iwasaki, A; Barber, B H; Restifo, N P; Germain, R N

    1998-09-21

    Cutaneous gene (DNA) bombardment results in substantial expression of the encoded antigen in the epidermal layer as well as detectable expression in dendritic cells (DC) in draining lymph nodes (LNs). Under these conditions, two possible modes of DC antigen presentation to naive CD8+ T cells might exist: (a) presentation directly by gene-transfected DC trafficking to local lymph nodes, and (b) cross-presentation by untransfected DC of antigen released from or associated with transfected epidermal cells. The relative contributions of these distinct modes of antigen presentation to priming for cytotoxic T cell (CTL) responses have not been clearly established. Here we show that LN cells directly expressing the DNA-encoded antigen are rare; 24 h after five abdominal skin bombardments, the number of these cells does not exceed 50-100 cells in an individual draining LN. However, over this same time period, the total number of CD11c+ DC increases more than twofold, by an average of 20,000-30,000 DC per major draining node. This augmentation is due to gold bombardment and is independent of the presence of plasmid DNA. Most antigen-bearing cells in the LNs draining the site of DNA delivery appear to be DC and can be depleted by antibodies to an intact surface protein encoded by cotransfected DNA. This finding of predominant antigen presentation by directly transfected cells is also consistent with data from studies on cotransfection with antigen and CD86-encoding DNA, showing that priming of anti-mutant influenza nucleoprotein CTLs with a single immunization is dependent upon coexpression of the DNAs encoding nucleoprotein and B7.2 in the same cells. These observations provide insight into the relative roles of direct gene expression and cross-presentation in CD8+ T cell priming using gene gun immunization, and indicate that augmentation of direct DC gene expression may enhance such priming.

  6. Killer Artificial Antigen Presenting Cells (KaAPC) for Efficient In Vitro Depletion of Human Antigen-specific T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schütz, Christian; Fleck, Martin; Schneck, Jonathan P.; Oelke, Mathias

    2014-01-01

    Current treatment of T cell mediated autoimmune diseases relies mostly on strategies of global immunosuppression, which, in the long term, is accompanied by adverse side effects such as a reduced ability to control infections or malignancies. Therefore, new approaches need to be developed that target only the disease mediating cells and leave the remaining immune system intact. Over the past decade a variety of cell based immunotherapy strategies to modulate T cell mediated immune responses have been developed. Most of these approaches rely on tolerance-inducing antigen presenting cells (APC). However, in addition to being technically difficult and cumbersome, such cell-based approaches are highly sensitive to cytotoxic T cell responses, which limits their therapeutic capacity. Here we present a protocol for the generation of non-cellular killer artificial antigen presenting cells (KaAPC), which allows for the depletion of pathologic T cells while leaving the remaining immune system untouched and functional. KaAPC is an alternative solution to cellular immunotherapy which has potential for treating autoimmune diseases and allograft rejections by regulating undesirable T cell responses in an antigen specific fashion. PMID:25145915

  7. The immunogenicity of L1210 lymphoma clones correlates with their ability to function as antigen-presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Cycon, Kelly A; Clements, James L; Holtz, Renae; Fuji, Hiroshi; Murphy, Shawn P

    2009-09-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class II (MHCII) antigen expression is directly correlated with immunogenicity, and inversely correlated with tumorigenicity, in clones of the L1210 murine B lymphoma. Moreover, loss of MHCII expression on human diffuse large B-cell lymphoma is associated with dramatic decreases in patient survival. Thus, the role that MHCII antigens play in the progression of B-cell lymphomas is clinically important. In this study, we investigated the basis for the immunogenicity of MHCII(+) L1210 clones. Immunogenic, but not tumorigenic L1210 clones stimulated the proliferation of naïve T cells and their interleukin (IL)-2 production, which indicates that the immunogenic clones can function as antigen-presenting cells (APCs). However, subclonal variants of the immunogenic L1210 clones, which form tumours slowly in mice, could not activate T cells. The costimulatory molecules B7-1, B7-2 and CD40 were expressed on the immunogenic L1210 clones, but not the tumorigenic clones. Importantly, the tumour-forming subclonal variants expressed MHCII and B7-1, but lacked B7-2 and CD40. These results suggest that MHCII and B7-1 expression on L1210 cells is insufficient to activate naïve T cells, and, furthermore, loss of B7-2 and/or CD40 expression contributes to the decreased immunogenicity of L1210 subclones. Blocking B7-1 or B7-2 function on immunogenic L1210 cells reduced their capacity to activate naïve T cells. Furthermore, incubation of immunogenic L1210 cells with CD40 antibodies significantly enhanced APC function. Therefore, the immunogenicity of L1210 cells directly correlates (i) with their ability to stimulate naïve T cells, and (ii) with the concomitant expression of MHCII, B7-1, B7-2, and CD40.

  8. Interleukin-10 Modulates Antigen Presentation by Dendritic Cells through Regulation of NLRP3 Inflammasome Assembly during Chlamydia Infection

    PubMed Central

    Omosun, Yusuf; McKeithen, Danielle; Ryans, Khamia; Kibakaya, Caroline; Blas-Machado, Uriel; Li, Duo; Singh, Rajesh; Inoue, Koichi; Xiong, Zhi-Gang; Eko, Francis; Black, Carolyn; Igietseme, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Interleukin-10 (IL-10) has been implicated in susceptibility to genital chlamydial infection and the development of tubal pathologies. IL-10 limitation also resulted in the rapid elicitation of immune responses against Chlamydia, and decreased levels of IL-10 correlated with protective anti-Chlamydia immunity. To investigate the molecular basis for these effects, we compared the reproductive pathologies and fertility rates in Chlamydia-infected wild-type (WT) and IL-10-knockout (IL-10−/−) mice; we also analyzed the expression of the Toll-like receptor (TLR)/interleukin-1 receptor (IL-1R) superfamily, IL-1β production, NLRP3 inflammasome assembly and activation, and the immunostimulatory capacity and apoptotic predilection of Chlamydia-exposed dendritic cells (DCs) from WT and IL-10−/− mice. Our results revealed that, in addition to the rapid clearance of infection, genitally infected IL-10−/− mice were protected from tubal pathologies and infertility, whereas WT (IL-10+/+) mice were not. Chlamydia-pulsed IL-10−/− DCs expressed larger numbers of TLR4/IL-1R molecules and had enhanced IL-1β production. In addition, NLRP3 inflammasome assembly was suppressed in IL-10−/− DCs through the inhibition of the P2X purinoceptor 7 (P2X7) receptor (P2X7R), an ATP-gated ion channel, and a decrease in intracellular Ca2+ levels, which inhibited DC apoptosis. Thus, the potent immunostimulatory capacity of IL-10-deficient DCs is due, at least in part, to the suppression of the intracellular inflammasome assembly, which prevents DC apoptosis, allowing efficient antigen presentation. The results indicate that IL-10 deficiency enables efficient antigen presentation by DCs for rapid and enhanced immune activation against Chlamydia, which results in rapid microbial clearance, which prevents tubal pathologies during infection. Our finding has important implications for the induction of protective immunity against Chlamydia and other infectious and noninfectious

  9. Asymmetric cell division of T cells upon antigen presentation uses multiple conserved mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Oliaro, Jane; Van Ham, Vanessa; Sacirbegovic, Faruk; Pasam, Anupama; Bomzon, Ze'ev; Pham, Kim; Ludford-Menting, Mandy J; Waterhouse, Nigel J; Bots, Michael; Hawkins, Edwin D; Watt, Sally V; Cluse, Leonie A; Clarke, Chris J P; Izon, David J; Chang, John T; Thompson, Natalie; Gu, Min; Johnstone, Ricky W; Smyth, Mark J; Humbert, Patrick O; Reiner, Steven L; Russell, Sarah M

    2010-07-01

    Asymmetric cell division is a potential means by which cell fate choices during an immune response are orchestrated. Defining the molecular mechanisms that underlie asymmetric division of T cells is paramount for determining the role of this process in the generation of effector and memory T cell subsets. In other cell types, asymmetric cell division is regulated by conserved polarity protein complexes that control the localization of cell fate determinants and spindle orientation during division. We have developed a tractable, in vitro model of naive CD8(+) T cells undergoing initial division while attached to dendritic cells during Ag presentation to investigate whether similar mechanisms might regulate asymmetric division of T cells. Using this system, we show that direct interactions with APCs provide the cue for polarization of T cells. Interestingly, the immunological synapse disseminates before division even though the T cells retain contact with the APC. The cue from the APC is translated into polarization of cell fate determinants via the polarity network of the Par3 and Scribble complexes, and orientation of the mitotic spindle during division is orchestrated by the partner of inscuteable/G protein complex. These findings suggest that T cells have selectively adapted a number of evolutionarily conserved mechanisms to generate diversity through asymmetric cell division.

  10. Intestinal antigen-presenting cells in mucosal immune homeostasis: crosstalk between dendritic cells, macrophages and B-cells.

    PubMed

    Mann, Elizabeth R; Li, Xuhang

    2014-08-07

    The intestinal immune system maintains a delicate balance between immunogenicity against invading pathogens and tolerance of the commensal microbiota. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) involves a breakdown in tolerance towards the microbiota. Dendritic cells (DC), macrophages (MΦ) and B-cells are known as professional antigen-presenting cells (APC) due to their specialization in presenting processed antigen to T-cells, and in turn shaping types of T-cell responses generated. Intestinal DC are migratory cells, unique in their ability to generate primary T-cell responses in mesenteric lymph nodes or Peyer's patches, whilst MΦ and B-cells contribute to polarization and differentiation of secondary T-cell responses in the gut lamina propria. The antigen-sampling function of gut DC and MΦ enables them to sample bacterial antigens from the gut lumen to determine types of T-cell responses generated. The primary function of intestinal B-cells involves their secretion of large amounts of immunoglobulin A, which in turn contributes to epithelial barrier function and limits immune responses towards to microbiota. Here, we review the role of all three types of APC in intestinal immunity, both in the steady state and in inflammation, and how these cells interact with one another, as well as with the intestinal microenvironment, to shape mucosal immune responses. We describe mechanisms of maintaining intestinal immune tolerance in the steady state but also inappropriate responses of APC to components of the gut microbiota that contribute to pathology in IBD.

  11. Herpes simplex virus γ34.5 interferes with autophagosome maturation and antigen presentation in dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Gobeil, Philipe A M; Leib, David A

    2012-10-16

    The cellular autophagy response induced by herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is countered by the viral γ34.5 protein. γ34.5 modulates autophagy by binding to the host autophagy protein Beclin-1 and through this binding inhibits the formation of autophagosomes in fibroblasts and neurons. In contrast, in this study dendritic cells (DCs) infected with HSV-1 showed an accumulation of autophagosomes and of the long-lived protein p62. No such accumulations were observed in DCs infected with a γ34.5-null virus or a virus lacking the Beclin-binding domain (BBD) of γ34.5. To explore this further, we established stably transduced DC lines to show that γ34.5 expression alone induced autophagosome accumulation yet prevented p62 degradation. In contrast, DCs expressing a BBD-deleted mutant of γ34.5 were unable to modulate autophagy. DCs expressing γ34.5 were less capable of stimulating T-cell activation and proliferation in response to intracellular antigens, demonstrating an immunological consequence of inhibiting autophagy. Taken together, these data show that in DCs, γ34.5 antagonizes the maturation of autophagosomes and T cell activation in a BBD-dependent manner, illustrating a unique interface between HSV and autophagy in antigen-presenting cells. IMPORTANCE Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is a highly prevalent pathogen causing widespread morbidity and some mortality. HSV infections are lifelong, and there are no vaccines or antivirals to cure HSV infections. The ability of HSV to modulate host immunity is critical for its virulence. HSV inhibits host autophagy, a pathway with importance in many areas of health and disease. Autophagy is triggered by many microbes, some of which harness autophagy for replication; others evade autophagy or prevent it from occurring. Autophagy is critical for host defense, either by directly degrading the invading pathogen ("xenophagy") or by facilitating antigen presentation to T cells. In this study, we show that HSV manipulates

  12. Dynamics of antigen presentation to transgene product-specific CD4+ T cells and of Treg induction upon hepatic AAV gene transfer

    PubMed Central

    Perrin, George Q; Zolotukhin, Irene; Sherman, Alexandra; Biswas, Moanaro; de Jong, Ype P; Terhorst, Cox; Davidoff, Andrew M; Herzog, Roland W

    2016-01-01

    The tolerogenic hepatic microenvironment impedes clearance of viral infections but is an advantage in viral vector gene transfer, which often results in immune tolerance induction to transgene products. Although the underlying tolerance mechanism has been extensively studied, our understanding of antigen presentation to transgene product-specific CD4+ T cells remains limited. To address this, we administered hepatotropic adeno-associated virus (AAV8) vector expressing cytoplasmic ovalbumin (OVA) into wt mice followed by adoptive transfer of transgenic OVA-specific T cells. We find that that the liver-draining lymph nodes (celiac and portal) are the major sites of MHC II presentation of the virally encoded antigen, as judged by in vivo proliferation of DO11.10 CD4+ T cells (requiring professional antigen-presenting cells, e.g., macrophages) and CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ Treg induction. Antigen presentation in the liver itself contributes to activation of CD4+ T cells egressing from the liver. Hepatic-induced Treg rapidly disseminate through the systemic circulation. By contrast, a secreted OVA transgene product is presented in multiple organs, and OVA-specific Treg emerge in both the thymus and periphery. In summary, liver draining lymph nodes play an integral role in hepatic antigen presentation and peripheral Treg induction, which results in systemic regulation of the response to viral gene products. PMID:27933310

  13. The plasticity of gamma delta T cells: innate immunity, antigen presentation and new immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Casetti, Rita; Martino, Angelo

    2008-06-01

    Several signals influence dendritic cell (DC) functions and consequent the immune responses to infectious pathogens. Our recent findings provide a new model of intervention on DCs implicating human gammadelta T cell stimuli. Vgamma9Vdelta2 T cells represent the major subset of circulating human gammadelta T cells and can be activated by non-peptidic molecules derived from different microorganisms or abnormal metabolic routes. With activated-Vgamma9Vdelta2 T cell co-culture, immature DCs acquire features of mature DCs, such as increasing the migratory activity, up-regulating the chemokine receptors, and triggering the Th1 immune response. Similar to the NK-derived signals, DC activation is mediated by soluble factors as well as cell-to-cell contact. Many non-peptidic molecules including nitrogen-containing bisphosphonates and pyrophosphomonoester drugs, can stimulate the activity of Vgamma9Vdelta2 T cells in vitro and in vivo. The relatively low in vivo toxicity of many of these drugs makes possible novel vaccine and immune-based strategies against infectious diseases.

  14. The Plasticity of γδ T Cells: Innate Immunity, Antigen Presentation and New Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Casetti, Rita; Martino, Angelo

    2008-01-01

    Several signals influence dendritic cell (DC) functions and consequent the immune responses to infectious pathogens. Our recent findings provide a new model of intervention on DCs implicating human γδ T cell stimuli. Vγ9Vδ2 T cells represent the major subset of circulating human γδ T cells and can be activated by non-peptidic molecules derived from different microorganisms or abnormal metabolic routes. With activated-Vγ9Vδ2 T cell co-culture, immature DCs acquire features of mature DCs, such as increasing the migratory activity, up-regulating the chemokine receptors, and triggering the Th1 immune response. Similar to the NK-derived signals, DC activation is mediated by soluble factors as well as cell-to-cell contact. Many non-peptidic molecules including nitrogen-containing bisphosphonates and pyrophosphomonoester drugs, can stimulate the activity of Vγ9Vδ2 T cells in vitro and in vivo. The relatively low in vivo toxicity of many of these drugs makes possible novel vaccine and immune-based strategies against infectious diseases. PMID:18582397

  15. Detection of rare antigen-presenting cells through T cell-intrinsic meandering motility, mediated by Myo1g.

    PubMed

    Gérard, Audrey; Patino-Lopez, Genaro; Beemiller, Peter; Nambiar, Rajalakshmi; Ben-Aissa, Khadija; Liu, Yin; Totah, Fadi J; Tyska, Matthew J; Shaw, Stephen; Krummel, Matthew F

    2014-07-31

    To mount an immune response, T lymphocytes must successfully search for foreign material bound to the surface of antigen-presenting cells. How T cells optimize their chances of encountering and responding to these antigens is unknown. T cell motility in tissues resembles a random or Levy walk and is regulated in part by external factors including chemokines and lymph-node topology, but motility parameters such as speed and propensity to turn may also be cell intrinsic. Here we found that the unconventional myosin 1g (Myo1g) motor generates membrane tension, enforces cell-intrinsic meandering search, and enhances T-DC interactions during lymph-node surveillance. Increased turning and meandering motility, as opposed to ballistic motility, is enhanced by Myo1g. Myo1g acts as a "turning motor" and generates a form of cellular "flânerie." Modeling and antigen challenges show that these intrinsically programmed elements of motility search are critical for the detection of rare cognate antigen-presenting cells.

  16. The Effect of the Nonionic Block Copolymer Pluronic P85 on Gene Expression in Mouse Muscle and Antigen Presenting Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gaymalov, Zagit Z.; Yang, Zhihui; Pisarev, Vladimir M.; Alakhov, Valery Yu.; Kabanov, Alexander V.

    2008-01-01

    DNA vaccines can be greatly improved by polymer agents that simultaneously increase transgene expression and activate immunity. We describe here Pluronic P85 (P85), a triblock copolymer of ethylene oxide (EO) and propylene oxide (PO) EO26-PO40-EO26,. Using a mouse model we demonstrate that co-administration of a bacterial plasmid DNA with P85 in a skeletal muscle greatly increases gene expression in the injection site and distant organs, especially the draining lymph nodes and spleen. The reporter expression colocalizes with the specific markers of myocytes and keratinocytes in the muscle, as well as dendritic cells (DC) and macrophages in the muscle, lymph nodes and spleen. Furthermore, DNA/P85 and P85 alone increase the systemic expansion of CD11c+ (DC), and local expansion of CD11c+, CD14+ (macrophages) and CD49b+ (natural killer) cell populations. DNA/P85 (but not P85) also increases maturation of local DC (CD11c+CD86+, CD11c+CD80+, and CD11c+CD40+). We suggest that DNA/P85 promotes the activation and recruitment of the antigen-presenting cells, which further incorporate, express and carry the transgene to the immune system organs. PMID:19064283

  17. Granuloma cells in chronic inflammation express CD205 (DEC205) antigen and harbor proliferating T lymphocytes: similarity to antigen-presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Ohtani, Haruo

    2013-02-01

    Granulomas are classified as immune or foreign body granulomas. Of these, the immune granulomas, a hallmark of granulomatous inflammation, are closely related to cell-mediated immune responses. The aim of the present study is to characterize immune granuloma cells in 33 patients with granulomatous inflammation focusing on the expression of CD205 (DEC205), a cell surface marker of antigen presenting cells, and their spatial relationship to T cells. CD205 was frequently expressed by immune granuloma cells, in contrast to foreign body granuloma cells that lacked CD205 expression. T cells were not only distributed in a lymphocyte collar around the granuloma, but also present among the granuloma cells (termed 'intra-granuloma T cells'). Intra-granuloma T cells stained positive for Ki-67 (median positivity = 9.4%) by double immunostaining for CD3 and Ki-67. This indicated the presence of proliferative stimuli within the granuloma that could activate the intra-granuloma T cells. The labeling index of Ki-67 in intra-granuloma T cells was significantly higher than that of T cells in the lymphocyte collar (P < 0.0001) or T cells in the T cell zone (paracortex) of chronic tonsillitis or reactive lymphadenitis (P = 0.002). These data indicate a close similarity between immune granulomas and antigen presenting cells.

  18. Changes in antigen-presenting cell function in the spleen and lymph nodes of ultraviolet-irradiated mice

    SciTech Connect

    Gurish, M.F.; Lynch, D.H.; Daynes, R.A.

    1982-03-01

    It has been previously reported that mice exposed to ultraviolet (UV) radiation exhibit a decrease in splenic antigen-presenting cell (APC) function. The results presented here confirm this observation and further demonstrate that animals exposed daily to UV for extended periods of time (5 weeks instead of 6 days) no longer exhibit this depressed capability. In spite of the depression in splenic APC activity found in 6-day UV-irradiated mice, lymph node APC function from these same animals was elevated compared with that found in the lymph nodes from normal animals. Lymph node APC activity in animals that were splenectomized prior to the UV irradiation, however, was not enhanced over controls. Treatment of animals with a chemical irritant (turpentine) also caused a depression in splenic APC function without modifying lymph node activity. Collectively, our findings suggest that the observed decrease in splenic APC activity, found after the first week of UV exposures, may be attributable to the migration of splenic APC to peripheral lymphoid tissue which drain the site of epidermal inflammation.

  19. A new TLR2 agonist promotes cross-presentation by mouse and human antigen presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Santone, Melissa; Aprea, Susanna; Wu, Tom Y H; Cooke, Michael P; Mbow, M Lamine; Valiante, Nicholas M; Rush, James S; Dougan, Stephanie; Avalos, Ana; Ploegh, Hidde; De Gregorio, Ennio; Buonsanti, Cecilia; D'Oro, Ugo

    2015-01-01

    Cross-presentation is the process by which professional APCs load peptides from an extracellularly derived protein onto class I MHC molecules to trigger a CD8(+) T cell response. The ability to enhance this process is therefore relevant for the development of antitumor and antiviral vaccines. We investigated a new TLR2-based adjuvant, Small Molecule Immune Potentiator (SMIP) 2.1, for its ability to stimulate cross-presentation. Using OVA as model antigen, we demonstrated that a SMIP2.1-adjuvanted vaccine formulation induced a greater CD8(+) T cell response, in terms of proliferation, cytokine production and cytolytic activity, than a non-adjuvanted vaccine. Moreover, using an OVA-expressing tumor model, we showed that the CTLs induced by the SMIP2.1 formulated vaccine inhibits tumor growth in vivo. Using a BCR transgenic mouse model we found that B cells could cross-present the OVA antigen when stimulated with SMIP2.1. We also used a flow cytometry assay to detect activation of human CD8(+) T cells isolated from human PBMCs of cytomegalovirus-seropositive donors. Stimulation with SMIP2.1 increased the capacity of human APCs, pulsed in vitro with the pp65 CMV protein, to activate CMV-specific CD8(+) T cells. Therefore, vaccination with an exogenous antigen formulated with SMIP2.1 is a successful strategy for the induction of a cytotoxic T cell response along with antibody production.

  20. Nasal submucosal administration of antigen-presenting cells induces effective immunological responses in cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Yoshitaka; Fujikawa, Akira; Kurosaki, Motoyoshi; Yamasaki, Kazuki; Sakurai, Daijyu; Horiguchi, Shigetoshi; Nakayama, Toshinori

    2011-01-01

    Human NKT cells are known to have strong antitumor activities and to be activated by specific ligand, α-galactosylceramide (αGelCer). We examined the migration pattern of αGalCer-pulsed DCs and the immune responses after administration by different routes. DCs injected into nasal submucosa quickly migrated to the lateral neck lymph rather than the lateral lymph nodes. The absolute number of NKT cells and the IFN-γ-producing cells increased in peripheral blood after injection of the DCs into nasal submucosa. We conducted a phase I study with αGalCer-pulsed DCs administered in nasal submucosa of patients with head and neck cancer, and evaluated safety and feasibility. The results showed that nasal submucosal administration of α-GalCer-pulsed DCs was safe and a smaller number of these DCs could exhibit significant immune responses and some positive clinical effects. In additional study, the use of the intra-arterial infusion of activated NKT cells and the submucosal injection of α-GalCer-pulsed DCs has been shown to induce significant antitumor immunity and had beneficial clinical effects in the management of advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. The NKT cell-based cancer immunotherapy may be helpful in management of head and neck cancer and needs to be explored in further detail.

  1. Usage of Murine T-cell Hybridoma Cells as Responder Cells Reveals Interference of Helicobacter Pylori with Human Dendritic Cell-mediated Antigen Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Fehlings, Michael; Drobbe, Lea; Beigier-Bompadre, Macarena; Viveros, Pablo Renner; Moos, Verena; Schneider, Thomas; Meyer, Thomas F.; Aebischer, Toni; Ignatius, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    Direct effects of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) on human CD4+ T-cells hamper disentangling a possible bacterial-mediated interference with major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II)-dependent antigen presentation to these cells. To overcome this limitation, we employed a previously described assay, which enables assessing human antigen-processing cell function by using murine T-cell hybridoma cells restricted by human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles. HLA-DR1+ monocyte-derived dendritic cells were exposed to H. pylori and pulsed with the antigen 85B from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis). Interleukin-2 (IL-2) secretion by AG85Baa97-112-specific hybridoma cells was then evaluated as an integral reporter of cognate antigen presentation. This methodology enabled revealing of interference of H. pylori with the antigen-presenting capacity of human dendritic cells. PMID:27980859

  2. Corruption of dendritic cell antigen presentation during acute GVHD leads to regulatory T-cell failure and chronic GVHD.

    PubMed

    Leveque-El Mouttie, Lucie; Koyama, Motoko; Le Texier, Laetitia; Markey, Kate A; Cheong, Melody; Kuns, Rachel D; Lineburg, Katie E; Teal, Bianca E; Alexander, Kylie A; Clouston, Andrew D; Blazar, Bruce R; Hill, Geoffrey R; MacDonald, Kelli P A

    2016-08-11

    Chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) is a major cause of late mortality following allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) and is characterized by tissue fibrosis manifesting as scleroderma and bronchiolitis obliterans. The development of acute GVHD (aGVHD) is a powerful clinical predictor of subsequent cGVHD, suggesting that aGVHD may invoke the immunologic pathways responsible for cGVHD. In preclinical models in which sclerodermatous cGVHD develops after a preceding period of mild aGVHD, we show that antigen presentation within major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II of donor dendritic cells (DCs) is markedly impaired early after BMT. This is associated with a failure of regulatory T-cell (Treg) homeostasis and cGVHD. Donor DC-restricted deletion of MHC class II phenocopied this Treg deficiency and cGVHD. Moreover, specific depletion of donor Tregs after BMT also induced cGVHD, whereas adoptive transfer of Tregs ameliorated it. These data demonstrate that the defect in Treg homeostasis seen in cGVHD is a causative lesion and is downstream of defective antigen presentation within MHC class II that is induced by aGVHD.

  3. Characterization of defectiveness in endogenous antigen presentation of novel murine cells established from methylcholanthrene-induced fibrosarcomas.

    PubMed Central

    Kuroda, K; Yamashina, K; Kitatani, N; Kagishima, A; Hamaoka, T; Hosaka, Y

    1995-01-01

    Three cell lines (4A1, 4C2 and 6D1 cells) derived from fibrosarcoma induced by the inoculation of 3-methylcholanthrene into C3H/HeN (H-2k) mice were examined for their ability to present antigens to CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). 6D1 and 4C2 cells were deficient in presenting endogenously synthesized influenza virus antigens to CTL, but they were able to present antigens when they were sensitized with a synthetic epitope peptide. The expression of the H-2 Kk gene in 4C2 and 6D1 cells was much reduced and was detectable only with Northern blot hybridization. The expression of two transporter genes (TAP1 and TAP2), examined by Northern hybridization, was also reduced in both cells, and negligible particularly in 4C2 cells. Interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) treatment of these cells induced expression of Kk, TAP1 and TAP2 genes and rescued the defect of class I-restricted antigen presentation in 4C2 and 6D1 cells. Even after this treatment, however, antigen-presentation capability of 4C2 cells was still much lower than that of normal 4A1 cells. This finding suggests that 4C2 cells might have an additional defective gene(s), whose products are involved in the processing of class I-restricted antigen, besides the Kk and TAP genes, and this may explain the difficulty of 4C2 cells to induce tumour-specific immunity, as described previously. To our knowledge, the 4C2 cell is the first tumour cell postulated to have more than three defective genes involved in class I-restricted antigen presentation. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7890298

  4. Disruption of HLA class II antigen presentation in Burkitt lymphoma: implication of a 47,000 MW acid labile protein in CD4+ T-cell recognition.

    PubMed

    God, Jason M; Zhao, Dan; Cameron, Christine A; Amria, Shereen; Bethard, Jennifer R; Haque, Azizul

    2014-07-01

    While Burkitt lymphoma (BL) has a well-known defect in HLA class I-mediated antigen presentation, the exact role of BL-associated HLA class II in generating a poor CD4(+) T-cell response remains unresolved. Here, we found that BL cells are deficient in their ability to optimally stimulate CD4(+) T cells via the HLA class II pathway. This defect in CD4(+) T-cell recognition was not associated with low levels of co-stimulatory molecules on BL cells, as addition of external co-stimulation failed to elicit CD4(+) T-cell activation by BL. Further, the defect was not caused by faulty antigen/class II interaction, because antigenic peptides bound with measurable affinity to BL-associated class II molecules. Interestingly, functional class II-peptide complexes were formed at acidic pH 5·5, which restored immune recognition. Acidic buffer (pH 5·5) eluate from BL cells contained molecules that impaired class II-mediated antigen presentation and CD4(+) T-cell recognition. Biochemical analysis showed that these molecules were greater than 30,000 molecular weight in size, and proteinaceous in nature. In addition, BL was found to have decreased expression of a 47,000 molecular weight enolase-like molecule that enhances class II-mediated antigen presentation in B cells, macrophages and dendritic cells, but not in BL cells. These findings demonstrate that BL likely has multiple defects in HLA class II-mediated antigen presentation and immune recognition, which may be exploited for future immunotherapies.

  5. Ectopic expression of HLA-DO in mouse dendritic cells diminishes MHC class II antigen presentation.

    PubMed

    Fallas, Jennifer L; Tobin, Helen M; Lou, Olivia; Guo, Donglin; Sant'Angelo, Derek B; Denzin, Lisa K

    2004-08-01

    The MHC class II-like molecule HLA-DM (DM) (H-2M in mice) catalyzes the exchange of CLIP for antigenic peptides in the endosomes of APCs. HLA-DO (DO) (H-2O in mice) is another class II-like molecule that is expressed in B cells, but not in other APCs. Studies have shown that DO impairs or modifies the peptide exchange activity of DM. To further evaluate the role of DO in Ag processing and presentation, we generated transgenic mice that expressed the human HLA-DOA and HLA-DOB genes under the control of a dendritic cell (DC)-specific promoter. Our analyses of DCs from these mice showed that as DO levels increased, cell surface levels of A(b)-CLIP also increased while class II-peptide levels decreased. The presentation of some, but not all, exogenous Ags to T cells or T hybridomas was significantly inhibited by DO. Surprisingly, H-2M accumulated in DO-expressing DCs and B cells, suggesting that H-2O/DO prolongs the half-life of H-2M. Overall, our studies showed that DO expression impaired H-2M function, resulting in Ag-specific down-modulation of class II Ag processing and presentation.

  6. Ubiquitination by March-I prevents MHC class II recycling and promotes MHC class II turnover in antigen-presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kyung-Jin; Walseng, Even; Ishido, Satoshi; Roche, Paul A

    2015-08-18

    MHC class II (MHC-II)-dependent antigen presentation by antigen-presenting cells (APCs) is carefully controlled to achieve specificity of immune responses; the regulated assembly and degradation of antigenic peptide-MHC-II complexes (pMHC-II) is one aspect of such control. In this study, we have examined the role of ubiquitination in regulating pMHC-II biosynthesis, endocytosis, recycling, and turnover in APCs. By using APCs obtained from MHC-II ubiquitination mutant mice, we find that whereas ubiquitination does not affect pMHC-II formation in dendritic cells (DCs), it does promote the subsequent degradation of newly synthesized pMHC-II. Acute activation of DCs or B cells terminates expression of the MHC-II E3 ubiquitin ligase March-I and prevents pMHC-II ubiquitination. Most importantly, this change results in very efficient pMHC-II recycling from the surface of DCs and B cells, thereby preventing targeting of internalized pMHC-II to lysosomes for degradation. Biochemical and functional assays confirmed that pMHC-II turnover is suppressed in MHC-II ubiquitin mutant DCs or by acute activation of wild-type DCs. These studies demonstrate that acute APC activation blocks the ubiquitin-dependent turnover of pMHC-II by promoting efficient pMHC-II recycling and preventing lysosomal targeting of internalized pMHC-II, thereby enhancing pMHC-II stability for efficient antigen presentation to CD4 T cells.

  7. HLA Class II Antigen Presentation in Prostate Cancer Cells: A Novel Approach to Prostate Tumor Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Doonan, Bently Patrick; Haque, Azizul

    2010-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a deadly disease that is in drastic need of new treatment strategies for late stage and metastatic prostate cancer. Immunotherapy has emerged as a viable option to fill this void. Clinical trials have been conducted that induce tumor clearance through cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) activation, these studies have had mixed outcomes with the overlying problem being the lack of a complete immune response with sustained killing and the formation of tumor specific memory cells. To overcome this, we have outlined the need for activating the HLA class II pathway in inducing a sustained CD8+ T cell response and the development of effective memory. We have also discussed the ability of prostate cancer cells to express stable HLA class II molecules that can be manipulated for tumor antigen (Ag) processing and presentation. This review also sets to outline new directions that exist for the use of class II-restricted Ags/peptides in devising cancer vaccines as well as combined chemoimmunotherapy. A better understanding of these concepts will improve future cancer vaccine studies and further the field of cancer immunobiology.

  8. Reassessing the role of HLA-DRB3 T-cell responses: evidence for significant expression and complementary antigen presentation.

    PubMed

    Faner, Rosa; James, Eddie; Huston, Laurie; Pujol-Borrel, Ricardo; Kwok, William W; Juan, Manel

    2010-01-01

    In humans, several HLA-DRB loci (DRB1/3/4/5) encode diverse beta-chains that pair with alpha-chains to form DR molecules on the surface of APC. While DRB1 and DRB5 have been extensively studied, the role of DRB3/4 products of DR52/DR53 haplotypes has been largely neglected. To clarify the relative expression of DRB3, we quantified DRB3 mRNA levels in comparison with DRB1 mRNA from the same haplotype in both B cells and monocytes, observing quantitatively significant DRB3 synthesis. In CD19+ cells, DRB1*03/11/13 was 3.5-fold more abundant than DRB3, but in CD14+ this difference was only two-fold. Monocytes also had lower overall levels of DR mRNA compared with B cells, which was confirmed by cell surface staining of DRB1 and DRB3. To evaluate the functional role of DRB3, tetramer-guided epitope mapping was used to detect T cells against tetanus toxin and several influenza antigens presented by DRB3*0101/0202 or DRB1*03/11/13. None of the epitopes discovered were shared among any of the DR molecules. Quantitative assessment of DRB3-tetanus toxin specific T cells revealed that they are present at similar frequencies as those observed for DRB1. These results suggest that DRB3 plays a significant role in antigen presentation with different epitopic preferences to DRB1. Therefore, DRB3, like DRB5, serves to extend and complement the peptide repertoire of DRB1 in antigen presentation.

  9. A Lipid Based Antigen Delivery System Efficiently Facilitates MHC Class-I Antigen Presentation in Dendritic Cells to Stimulate CD8+ T Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maji, Mithun; Mazumder, Saumyabrata; Bhattacharya, Souparno; Choudhury, Somsubhra Thakur; Sabur, Abdus; Shadab, Md.; Bhattacharya, Pradyot; Ali, Nahid

    2016-06-01

    The most effective strategy for protection against intracellular infections such as Leishmania is vaccination with live parasites. Use of recombinant proteins avoids the risks associated with live vaccines. However, due to low immunogenicity, they fail to trigger T cell responses particularly of CD8+ cells requisite for persistent immunity. Previously we showed the importance of protein entrapment in cationic liposomes and MPL as adjuvant for elicitation of CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses for long-term protection. In this study we investigated the role of cationic liposomes on maturation and antigen presentation capacity of dendritic cells (DCs). We observed that cationic liposomes were taken up very efficiently by DCs and transported to different cellular sites. DCs activated with liposomal rgp63 led to efficient presentation of antigen to specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Furthermore, lymphoid CD8+ T cells from liposomal rgp63 immunized mice demonstrated better proliferative ability when co-cultured ex vivo with stimulated DCs. Addition of MPL to vaccine enhanced the antigen presentation by DCs and induced more efficient antigen specific CD8+ T cell responses when compared to free and liposomal antigen. These liposomal formulations presented to CD8+ T cells through TAP-dependent MHC-I pathway offer new possibilities for a safe subunit vaccine.

  10. Cholera Toxin Promotes Th17 Cell Differentiation by Modulating Expression of Polarizing Cytokines and the Antigen-Presenting Potential of Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jung-Ok; Lee, Jee-Boong

    2016-01-01

    Cholera toxin (CT), an exotoxin produced by Vibrio cholera, acts as a mucosal adjuvant. In a previous study, we showed that CT skews differentiation of CD4 T cells to IL-17-producing Th17 cells. Here, we found that intranasal administration of CT induced migration of migratory dendritic cell (DC) populations, CD103+ DCs and CD11bhi DCs, to the lung draining mediastinal lymph nodes (medLN). Among those DC subsets, CD11bhi DCs that were relatively immature had a major role in Th17 cell differentiation after administration of CT. CT-treated BMDCs showed reduced expression of MHC class II and CD86, similar to CD11bhi DCs in medLN, and these BMDCs promoted Th17 cell differentiation more potently than other BMDCs expressing higher levels of MHC class II and CD86. By analyzing the expression of activation markers such as CD25 and CD69, proliferation and IL-2 production, we determined that CT-treated BMDCs showed diminished antigen-presenting potential to CD4+ T cells compared with normal BMDCs. We also found that CT-stimulated BMDCs promote activin A expression as well as IL-6 and IL-1β, and activin A had a synergic role with TGF-β1 in CT-mediated Th17 cell differentiation. Taken together, our results suggest that CT-stimulated DCs promote Th17 cell differentiation by not only modulating antigen-presenting potential but also inducing Th polarizing cytokines. PMID:27271559

  11. A Lipid Based Antigen Delivery System Efficiently Facilitates MHC Class-I Antigen Presentation in Dendritic Cells to Stimulate CD8(+) T Cells.

    PubMed

    Maji, Mithun; Mazumder, Saumyabrata; Bhattacharya, Souparno; Choudhury, Somsubhra Thakur; Sabur, Abdus; Shadab, Md; Bhattacharya, Pradyot; Ali, Nahid

    2016-06-02

    The most effective strategy for protection against intracellular infections such as Leishmania is vaccination with live parasites. Use of recombinant proteins avoids the risks associated with live vaccines. However, due to low immunogenicity, they fail to trigger T cell responses particularly of CD8(+) cells requisite for persistent immunity. Previously we showed the importance of protein entrapment in cationic liposomes and MPL as adjuvant for elicitation of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell responses for long-term protection. In this study we investigated the role of cationic liposomes on maturation and antigen presentation capacity of dendritic cells (DCs). We observed that cationic liposomes were taken up very efficiently by DCs and transported to different cellular sites. DCs activated with liposomal rgp63 led to efficient presentation of antigen to specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. Furthermore, lymphoid CD8(+) T cells from liposomal rgp63 immunized mice demonstrated better proliferative ability when co-cultured ex vivo with stimulated DCs. Addition of MPL to vaccine enhanced the antigen presentation by DCs and induced more efficient antigen specific CD8(+) T cell responses when compared to free and liposomal antigen. These liposomal formulations presented to CD8(+) T cells through TAP-dependent MHC-I pathway offer new possibilities for a safe subunit vaccine.

  12. B cell antigen presentation is sufficient to drive neuroinflammation in an animal model of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Parker Harp, Chelsea R; Archambault, Angela S; Sim, Julia; Ferris, Stephen T; Mikesell, Robert J; Koni, Pandelakis A; Shimoda, Michiko; Linington, Christopher; Russell, John H; Wu, Gregory F

    2015-06-01

    B cells are increasingly regarded as integral to the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis, in part as a result of the success of B cell-depletion therapy. Multiple B cell-dependent mechanisms contributing to inflammatory demyelination of the CNS have been explored using experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a CD4 T cell-dependent animal model for multiple sclerosis. Although B cell Ag presentation was suggested to regulate CNS inflammation during EAE, direct evidence that B cells can independently support Ag-specific autoimmune responses by CD4 T cells in EAE is lacking. Using a newly developed murine model of in vivo conditional expression of MHC class II, we reported previously that encephalitogenic CD4 T cells are incapable of inducing EAE when B cells are the sole APC. In this study, we find that B cells cooperate with dendritic cells to enhance EAE severity resulting from myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) immunization. Further, increasing the precursor frequency of MOG-specific B cells, but not the addition of soluble MOG-specific Ab, is sufficient to drive EAE in mice expressing MHCII by B cells alone. These data support a model in which expansion of Ag-specific B cells during CNS autoimmunity amplifies cognate interactions between B and CD4 T cells and have the capacity to independently drive neuroinflammation at later stages of disease.

  13. KIM-1-/TIM-1-mediated phagocytosis links ATG5-/ULK1-dependent clearance of apoptotic cells to antigen presentation

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Craig R; Yeung, Melissa Y; Brooks, Yang S; Chen, Hui; Ichimura, Takaharu; Henderson, Joel M; Bonventre, Joseph V

    2015-01-01

    Phagocytosis of apoptotic cells by both professional and semi-professional phagocytes is required for resolution of organ damage and maintenance of immune tolerance. KIM-1/TIM-1 is a phosphatidylserine receptor that is expressed on epithelial cells and can transform the cells into phagocytes. Here, we demonstrate that KIM-1 phosphorylation and association with p85 results in encapsulation of phagosomes by lipidated LC3 in multi-membrane organelles. KIM-1-mediated phagocytosis is not associated with increased ROS production, and NOX inhibition does not block LC3 lipidation. Autophagy gene expression is required for efficient clearance of apoptotic cells and phagosome maturation. KIM-1-mediated phagocytosis leads to pro-tolerogenic antigen presentation, which suppresses CD4 T-cell proliferation and increases the percentage of regulatory T cells in an autophagy gene-dependent manner. Taken together, these data reveal a novel mechanism of epithelial biology linking phagocytosis, autophagy and antigen presentation to regulation of the inflammatory response. PMID:26282792

  14. Use of human antigen presenting cell gene array profiling to examine the effect of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 Tax on primary human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Ahuja, Jaya; Kampani, Karan; Datta, Suman; Wigdahl, Brian; Flaig, Katherine E; Jain, Pooja

    2006-02-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is etiologically linked to adult T-cell leukemia and a progressive demyelinating disorder termed HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). One of the most striking features of the immune response in HAM/TSP centers on the expansion of HTLV-1-specific CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) compartment in the peripheral blood and cerebrospinal fluid. More than 90% of the HTLV-1-specific CTLs are directed against the viral Tax (11-19) peptide implying that Tax is available for immune recognition by antigen presenting cells, such as dendritic cells (DCs). DCs obtained from HAM/TSP patients have been shown to be infected with HTLV-1 and exhibit rapid maturation. Therefore, we hypothesized that presentation of Tax peptides by activated DCs to naIve CD8(+) T cells may play an important role in the induction of a Tax-specific CTL response and neurologic dysfunction. In this study, a pathway-specific antigen presenting cell gene array was used to study transcriptional changes induced by exposure of monocyte-derived DCs to extracellular HTLV-1 Tax protein. Approximately 100 genes were differentially expressed including genes encoding toll-like receptors, cell surface receptors, proteins involved in antigen uptake and presentation and adhesion molecules. The differential regulation of chemokines and cytokines characteristic of functional DC activation was also observed by the gene array analyses. Furthermore, the expression pattern of signal transduction genes was also significantly altered. These results have suggested that Tax-mediated DC gene regulation might play a critical role in cellular activation and the mechanisms resulting in HTLV-1-induced disease.

  15. Ectopic ATP synthase facilitates transfer of HIV-1 from antigen-presenting cells to CD4+ target cells

    PubMed Central

    Yavlovich, Amichai; Viard, Mathias; Zhou, Ming; Veenstra, Timothy D.; Wang, Ji Ming; Gong, Wanghua; Heldman, Eliahu; Blumenthal, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Antigen-presenting cells (APCs) act as vehicles that transfer HIV to their target CD4+ cells through an intercellular junction, termed the virologic synapse. The molecules that are involved in this process remain largely unidentified. In this study, we used photoaffinity labeling and a proteomic approach to identify new proteins that facilitate HIV-1 transfer. We identified ectopic mitochondrial ATP synthase as a factor that mediates HIV-1 transfer between APCs and CD4+ target cells. Monoclonal antibodies against the β-subunit of ATP synthase inhibited APC-mediated transfer of multiple strains HIV-1 to CD4+ target cells. Likewise, the specific inhibitors of ATPase, citreoviridin and IF1, completely blocked APC-mediated transfer of HIV-1 at the APC-target cell interaction step. Confocal fluorescent microscopy showed localization of extracellular ATP synthase at junctions between APC and CD4+ target cells. We conclude that ectopic ATP synthase could be an accessible molecular target for inhibiting HIV-1 proliferation in vivo. PMID:22753871

  16. Differential response of antigen presenting cells from susceptible and resistant strains of mice to Taenia crassiceps infection.

    PubMed

    Reyes, José L; Terrazas, César A; Vera-Arias, Laura; Terrazas, Luis I

    2009-12-01

    Antigen presenting cells (APCs) are critically involved in the interaction between pathogens and the host immune system. Here, we examined two different populations of APCs in mice that are susceptible (BALB/c) or resistant (C57BL/6) to Taenia crassiceps cysticercosis. Bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) from both strains of mice were exposed to T. crassiceps excreted/secreted antigens (TcES) and, at the same time, to the Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligand LPS. BMDCs from BALB/c mice underwent a partial maturation when incubated with TcES and displayed decreased responses to TLR-dependent stimuli associated with low CD80, CD86, CD40 and CCR7 expression and impaired IL-15 production. These BMDCs-induced impaired allogenic responses. In contrast, BMDCs from C57BL/6 mice displayed normal maturation and induced strong allogenic responses. Moreover, the exposure to TcES resulted in a lower production of IL-12 and TNF-alpha by LPS-activated DCs from BALB/c mice compared to C57BL/6 DCs. Three parameters of macrophage activation were assessed during Taenia infection: LPS+IFN-gamma-induced production of IL-12, TNF-alpha and nitric oxide (NO) in vitro; infection-induced markers for alternatively activated macrophages (Arginase-1, RELM-alpha, Ym-1 and TREM-2 expression) and suppressive activity. The maximum response to LPS+IFN-gamma-induced TNF-alpha, IL-12 and NO production by macrophages from both strains of mice occurred 2 wk post-infection. However, as infection progressed, the production of these molecules by BALB/c macrophages declined. While the BALB/c macrophages displayed impaired pro-inflammatory responses, these macrophages showed strong Arginase-1, Ym-1, RELM-alpha and TREM-2 expression. By contrast, C57BL/6 macrophages maintained a pro-inflammatory profile and low transcripts for alternative activation markers. Macrophages from T. crassiceps-infected BALB/c mice showed stronger suppressive activity than those from C57BL/6 mice. These findings suggest that

  17. Hepatitis B virus-like particles access major histocompatibility class I and II antigen presentation pathways in primary dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Moffat, Jessica M; Cheong, Wan-Shoo; Villadangos, José A; Mintern, Justine D; Netter, Hans J

    2013-04-26

    Virus-like particles (VLPs) represent high density displays of viral proteins that efficiently trigger immunity. VLPs composed of the small hepatitis B virus envelope protein (HBsAgS) are useful vaccine platforms that induce humoral and cellular immune responses. Notably, however, some studies suggest HBsAgS VLPs impair dendritic cell (DC) function. Here we investigated HBsAgS VLP interaction with DC subsets and antigen access to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and II antigen presentation pathways in primary DCs. HBsAgS VLPs impaired plasmacytoid DC (pDC) interferon alpha (IFNα) production in response to CpG in vitro, but did not alter conventional DC (cDC) or pDC phenotype when administered in vivo. To assess cellular immune responses, HBsAgS VLPs were generated containing the ovalbumin (OVA) model epitopes OVA(257-264) and OVA(323-339) to access MHCI and MHCII antigen presentation pathways, respectively; both in vitro and following immunisation in vivo. HBsAgS VLP-OVA(257-264) elicited CTL responses in vivo that were not enhanced by inclusion of an additional MHCII helper epitope. HBsAgS VLP-OVA(257-264) administered in vivo was cross-presented by CD8(+) DCs, but not CD8(-) DCs. Therefore, HBsAgS VLPs can deliver antigen to both MHCI and MHCII antigen presentation pathways in primary DCs and promote cytotoxic and helper T cell priming despite their suppressive effect on pDCs.

  18. B lymphocytes as direct antigen-presenting cells for anti-tumor DNA vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Colluru, Viswa Teja; McNeel, Douglas G.

    2016-01-01

    In spite of remarkable preclinical efficacy, DNA vaccination has demonstrated low immunogenicity in humans. While efforts have focused on increasing cross-presentation of DNA-encoded antigens, efforts to increase DNA vaccine immunogenicity by targeting direct presentation have remained mostly unexplored. In these studies, we compared the ability of different APCs to present antigen to T cells after simple co-culture with plasmid DNA. We found that human primary peripheral B lymphocytes, and not monocytes or in vitro derived dendritic cells (DCs), were able to efficiently encode antigen mRNA and expand cognate tumor antigen-specific CD8 T cells ex vivo. Similarly, murine B lymphocytes co-cultured with plasmid DNA, and not DCs, were able to prime antigen-specific T cells in vivo. Moreover, B lymphocyte-mediated presentation of plasmid antigen led to greater Th1-biased immunity and was sufficient to elicit an anti-tumor effect in vivo. Surprisingly, increasing plasmid presentation by B cells, and not cross presentation of peptides by DCs, further augmented traditional plasmid vaccination. Together, these data suggest that targeting plasmid DNA to B lymphocytes, for example through transfer of ex vivo plasmidloaded B cells, may be novel means to achieve greater T cell immunity from DNA vaccines. PMID:27661128

  19. Measuring antigen presentation in mouse brain endothelial cells ex vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Howland, Shanshan W; Gun, Sin Yee; Claser, Carla; Poh, Chek Meng; Rénia, Laurent

    2015-12-01

    We have recently demonstrated that brain endothelial cells cross-present parasite antigen during mouse experimental cerebral malaria (ECM). Here we describe a 2-d protocol to detect cross-presentation by isolating the brain microvessels and incubating them with a reporter cell line that expresses lacZ upon detection of the relevant peptide-major histocompatibility complex. After X-gal staining, a typical positive result consists of hundreds of blue spots, compared with fewer than 20 spots from a naive brain. The assay is generalizable to other disease contexts by using reporter cells that express appropriate specific T cell receptors. Also described is the protocol for culturing endothelial cells from brain microvessels isolated from naive mice. After 7-10 d, an in vitro cross-presentation assay can be performed by adding interferon-γ, antigen (e.g., Plasmodium berghei-infected red blood cells) and reporter cells in sequence over 3 d. This is useful for comparing different antigen forms or for probing the effects of various interventions.

  20. T-cell brain infiltration and immature antigen-presenting cells in transgenic models of Alzheimer's disease-like cerebral amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Ferretti, M T; Merlini, M; Späni, C; Gericke, C; Schweizer, N; Enzmann, G; Engelhardt, B; Kulic, L; Suter, T; Nitsch, R M

    2016-05-01

    Cerebral beta-amyloidosis, one of the pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD), elicits a well-characterised, microglia-mediated local innate immune response. In contrast, it is not clear whether cells of the adaptive immune system, in particular T-cells, react to cerebral amyloidosis in AD. Even though parenchymal T-cells have been described in post-mortem brains of AD patients, it is not known whether infiltrating T-cells are specifically recruited to the extracellular deposits of beta-amyloid, and whether they are locally activated into proliferating, effector cells upon interaction with antigen-presenting cells (APCs). To address these issues we have analysed by confocal microscopy and flow-cytometry the localisation and activation status of both T-cells and APCs in transgenic (tg) mice models of AD-like cerebral amyloidosis. Increased numbers of infiltrating T-cells were found in amyloid-burdened brain regions of tg mice, with concomitant up-regulation of endothelial adhesion molecules ICAM-1 and VCAM-1, compared to non-tg littermates. The infiltrating T-cells in tg brains did not co-localise with amyloid plaques, produced less interferon-gamma than those in controls and did not proliferate locally. Bona-fide dendritic cells were virtually absent from the brain parenchyma of both non-tg and tg mice, and APCs from tg brains showed an immature phenotype, with accumulation of MHC-II in intracellular compartments. These results indicate that cerebral amyloidosis promotes T-cell infiltration but interferes with local antigen presentation and T-cell activation. The inability of the brain immune surveillance to orchestrate a protective immune response to amyloid-beta peptide might contribute to the accumulation of amyloid in the progression of the disease.

  1. Transcript origin analysis identifies antigen-presenting cells as primary targets of socially regulated gene expression in leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Steven W.; Hawkley, Louise C.; Arevalo, Jesusa M. G.; Cacioppo, John T.

    2011-01-01

    To clarify the biological rationale for social regulation of gene expression, this study sought to identify the specific immune cell types that are transcriptionally sensitive to subjective social isolation (loneliness). Using reference distributions for the expression of each human gene in each major leukocyte subtype, we mapped the cellular origin of transcripts found to be differentially expressed in the circulating immune cells from chronically lonely individuals. Loneliness-associated genes derived primarily from plasmacytoid dendritic cells, monocytes, and, to a lesser extent, B lymphocytes. Those dynamics reflected per-cell changes in the expression of inducible genes and related more strongly to the subjective experience of loneliness than to objective social network size. Evolutionarily ancient myeloid antigen-presenting cells appear to have evolved a transcriptional sensitivity to socioenvironmental conditions that may allow them to shift basal gene expression profiles to counter the changing microbial threats associated with hostile vs. affine social conditions. PMID:21300872

  2. MyD88/CD40 Genetic Adjuvant Function in Cutaneous Atypical Antigen-Presenting Cells Contributes to DNA Vaccine Immunogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Slawin, Kevin M.; Levitt, Jonathan M.; Spencer, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic DNA-based vaccines aim to prime an adaptive host immune response against tumor-associated antigens, eliminating cancer cells primarily through CD8+ cytotoxic T cell-mediated destruction. To be optimally effective, immunological adjuvants are required for the activation of tumor-specific CD8+ T cells responses by DNA vaccination. Here, we describe enhanced anti-tumor efficacy of an in vivo electroporation-delivered DNA vaccine by inclusion of a genetically encoded chimeric MyD88/CD40 (MC) adjuvant, which integrates both innate and adaptive immune signaling pathways. When incorporated into a DNA vaccine, signaling by the MC adjuvant increased antigen-specific CD8+ T cells and promoted elimination of pre-established tumors. Interestingly, MC-enhanced vaccine efficacy did not require direct-expression of either antigen or adjuvant by local antigen-presenting cells, but rather our data supports a key role for MC function in “atypical” antigen-presenting cells of skin. In particular, MC adjuvant-modified keratinocytes increased inflammatory cytokine secretion, upregulated surface MHC class I, and were able to increase in vitro and in vivo priming of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells. Furthermore, in the absence of critical CD8α+/CD103+ cross-priming dendritic cells, MC was still able to promote immune priming in vivo, albeit at a reduced level. Altogether, our data support a mechanism by which MC signaling activates an inflammatory phenotype in atypical antigen-presenting cells within the cutaneous vaccination site, leading to an enhanced CD8+ T cell response against DNA vaccine-encoded antigens, through both CD8α+/CD103+ dendritic cell-dependent and independent pathways. PMID:27741278

  3. Antigen Presented by Tumors in Vivo Determines the Nature of CD8+ T Cell Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Shanker, Anil; Brooks, Alan D.; Jacobsen, Kristen M.; Wine, John W.; Wiltrout, Robert H.; Yagita, Hideo; Sayers, Thomas J.

    2009-01-01

    The biological relevance of the perforin and Fas ligand (FasL) cytolytic pathways of CD8+ T lymphocytes (CTL) for cancer immunotherapy is controversial. We investigated the importance of these pathways in a murine renal cell carcinoma expressing influenza viral hemagglutinin as a defined surrogate antigen (Renca-HA). Following Renca-HA injection, all FasL-dysfunctional FasLgld/gld mice (n = 54) died from Renca-HA tumors by day 62. By contrast, perforin−/− (51%, n = 45) and Faslpr/lpr (55%, n = 51) mice remained tumor-free at day 360. Blocking FasL in vivo inhibited tumor rejection in these mice. Moreover, established Renca-HA tumors were cleared more efficiently by adoptively transferred HA518–526-specific T cell receptor-transgenic CTL utilizing FasL rather than perforin. Strikingly, a range of mouse tumor cells presenting low concentrations of immunogenic peptide were all preferentially lysed by the FasL but not the Pfp-mediated effector pathway of CTL, whereas at higher peptide concentrations the preference in effector pathway usage by CTL was lost. Interestingly, a number of human renal cancer lines were also susceptible to FasL-mediated cytotoxicity. Therefore, the FasL cytolytic pathway may be particularly important for eradicating Fas-sensitive tumors presenting low levels of MHC class-I-associated antigens following adoptive T cell therapy. PMID:19654302

  4. Th1 cytokines promote T-cell binding to antigen-presenting cells via enhanced hyaluronan production and accumulation at the immune synapse.

    PubMed

    Bollyky, Paul L; Evanko, Stephen P; Wu, Rebecca P; Potter-Perigo, Susan; Long, S Alice; Kinsella, Brian; Reijonen, Helena; Guebtner, Kelly; Teng, Brandon; Chan, Christina K; Braun, Kathy R; Gebe, John A; Nepom, Gerald T; Wight, Thomas N

    2010-05-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) production by dendritic cells (DCs) is known to promote antigen presentation and to augment T-cell activation and proliferation. We hypothesized that pericellular HA can function as intercellular 'glue' directly mediating T cell-DC binding. Using primary human cells, we observed HA-dependent binding between T cells and DCs, which was abrogated upon pre-treatment of the DCs with 4-methylumbelliferone (4-MU), an agent which blocks HA synthesis. Furthermore, T cells regulate HA production by DCs via T cell-derived cytokines in a T helper (Th) subset-specific manner, as demonstrated by the observation that cell-culture supernatants from Th1 but not Th2 clones promote HA production. Similar effects were seen upon the addition of exogenous Th1 cytokines, IL-2, interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha). The critical factors which determined the extent of DC-T cell binding in this system were the nature of the pre-treatment the DCs received and their capacity to synthesize HA, as T-cell clones which were pre-treated with monensin, added to block cytokine secretion, bound equivalently irrespective of their Th subset. These data support the existence of a feedforward loop wherein T-cell cytokines influence DC production of HA, which in turn affects the extent of DC-T cell binding. We also document the presence of focal deposits of HA at the immune synapse between T-cells and APC and on dendritic processes thought to be important in antigen presentation. These data point to a pivotal role for HA in DC-T cell interactions at the IS.

  5. Comparative study of the role of professional versus semiprofessional or nonprofessional antigen presenting cells in the rejection of vascularized organ allografts.

    PubMed

    Sundstrom, J B; Ansari, A A

    1995-12-01

    for this phenomenon is the fact that cardiac myocytes do not constitutively express MHC class II molecules and express only low levels of class I molecules. However, this immunological unresponsiveness is maintained even after the induction of MHC class II and upregulation of MHC class I on these cells by interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma). Similar results have also been reported for cells of different tissue lineages (e.g. chondrocytes, keratinocytes, neural cells). Until now, cells have been defined as professional or nonprofessional for the purposes of defining their potential for antigen presentation to T cells. Professional antigen presenting cells have been identified as cells that are of haematopoietic origin, that constitutively express MHC class I and class II molecules as well as potent costimulatory molecules, and that are able to induce both primary and secondary immune responses, whereas nonprofessional antigen presenting cells are not bone marrow derived, do not constitutively express MHC class II, but may in some cases initiate primary and secondary immune responses after induction of MHC class II antigen by proinflammatory cytokines (e.g. IFN-gamma). The findings of our laboratory and others suggest that cells of certain lineages be considered in the separate class of 'nonantigen presenting cells'. Indeed, nonprofessional antigen presenting cells can be reclassified into three categories: semiprofessional-, nonprofessional-, or nonantigen presenting cells that are able to present antigen to and activate naive T cells, activated T cells, or no T Cells, respectively. The aim of this review is to identify and (re)examine the antigen presentation characteristics of cells of different tissue lineages in terms of their ability to activate different subsets of T cells. This approach is taken in an attempt to synthesize these concepts into a unified picture of T cell activation in the context of antigen processing and presentation by different cell types.

  6. Th1 cytokines promote T-cell binding to antigen-presenting cells via enhanced hyaluronan production and accumulation at the immune synapse

    PubMed Central

    Bollyky, Paul L; Evanko, Stephen P; Wu, Rebecca P; Potter-Perigo, Susan; Long, S Alice; Kinsella, Brian; Reijonen, Helena; Guebtner, Kelly; Teng, Brandon; Chan, Christina K; Braun, Kathy R; Gebe, John A; Nepom, Gerald T; Wight, Thomas N

    2010-01-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) production by dendritic cells (DCs) is known to promote antigen presentation and to augment T-cell activation and proliferation. We hypothesized that pericellular HA can function as intercellular ‘glue' directly mediating T cell–DC binding. Using primary human cells, we observed HA-dependent binding between T cells and DCs, which was abrogated upon pre-treatment of the DCs with 4-methylumbelliferone (4-MU), an agent which blocks HA synthesis. Furthermore, T cells regulate HA production by DCs via T cell-derived cytokines in a T helper (Th) subset-specific manner, as demonstrated by the observation that cell-culture supernatants from Th1 but not Th2 clones promote HA production. Similar effects were seen upon the addition of exogenous Th1 cytokines, IL-2, interferon γ (IFN-γ) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α). The critical factors which determined the extent of DC–T cell binding in this system were the nature of the pre-treatment the DCs received and their capacity to synthesize HA, as T-cell clones which were pre-treated with monensin, added to block cytokine secretion, bound equivalently irrespective of their Th subset. These data support the existence of a feedforward loop wherein T-cell cytokines influence DC production of HA, which in turn affects the extent of DC–T cell binding. We also document the presence of focal deposits of HA at the immune synapse between T-cells and APC and on dendritic processes thought to be important in antigen presentation. These data point to a pivotal role for HA in DC–T cell interactions at the IS. PMID:20228832

  7. A novel system of artificial antigen-presenting cells efficiently stimulates Flu peptide-specific cytotoxic T cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Hui; Peng, Ji-Run; Chen, Peng-Cheng; Gong, Lei; Qiao, Shi-Shi; Wang, Wen-Zhen; Cui, Zhu-Qingqing; Yu, Xin; Wei, Yu-Hua; Leng, Xi-Sheng

    2011-08-05

    Highlights: {yields} Adoptive immunotherapy depends on relevant numbers of cytolytic T lymphocytes. {yields} An ideal artificial APCs system was successfully prepared in vivo. {yields} Controlled release of IL-2 leads to much more T-cell expansion. {yields} This system is better than general cellular APCs on T-cell expansion. -- Abstract: Therapeutic numbers of antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) are key effectors in successful adoptive immunotherapy. However, efficient and reproducible methods to meet the qualification remain poor. To address this issue, we designed the artificial antigen-presenting cell (aAPC) system based on poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA). A modified emulsion method was used for the preparation of PLGA particles encapsulating interleukin-2 (IL-2). Biotinylated molecular ligands for recognition and co-stimulation of T cells were attached to the particle surface through the binding of avidin-biotin. These formed the aAPC system. The function of aAPCs in the proliferation of specific CTLs against human Flu antigen was detected by enzyme-linked immunospot assay (ELISPOT) and MTT staining methods. Finally, we successfully prepared this suitable aAPC system. The results show that IL-2 is released from aAPCs in a sustained manner over 30 days. This dramatically improves the stimulatory capacity of this system as compared to the effect of exogenous addition of cytokine. In addition, our aAPCs promote the proliferation of Flu antigen-specific CTLs more effectively than the autologous cellular APCs. Here, this aAPC platform is proved to be suitable for expansion of human antigen-specific T cells.

  8. Glucose-Regulated Protein 78-Induced Myeloid Antigen-Presenting Cells Maintained Tolerogenic Signature upon LPS Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Muyang; Zhang, Fan; Qin, Kai; Wu, Min; Li, Heli; Zhu, Huifen; Ning, Qin; Lei, Ping; Shen, Guanxin

    2016-01-01

    The 78-kDa glucose-regulated protein (Grp78) is stress-inducible chaperone that mostly reside in the endoplasmic reticulum. Grp78 has been described to be released at times of cellular stress and as having extracellular properties that are anti-inflammatory or favor the resolution of inflammation. As antigen-presenting cells (APCs) play a critical role in both the priming of adaptive immune responses and the induction of self-tolerance, herein, we investigated the effect of Grp78 on the maturation of murine myeloid APCs (CD11c+ cells). Results showed that CD11c+ cells could be bound by AF488-labeled Grp78 and that Grp78 treatment induced a tolerogenic phenotype comparable to immature cells. Furthermore, when exposed to lipopolysaccharide, Grp78-treated CD11c+ cells (DCGrp78) did not adopt a mature dendritic cell phenotype. DCGrp78-primed T cells exhibited reduced proliferation along with a concomitant expansion of CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ cells in pancreaticoduodenal lymph nodes and induction of T cell apoptosis in vitro and ex vivo. The above work suggests that Grp78 is an immunomodulatory molecule that could aid resolution of inflammation. It may thus contribute to induce durable tolerance to be of potential therapeutic benefit in transplanted allogeneic grafts and autoimmune diseases such as type I diabetes. PMID:27990144

  9. Minimum information about tolerogenic antigen-presenting cells (MITAP): a first step towards reproducibility and standardisation of cellular therapies.

    PubMed

    Lord, Phillip; Spiering, Rachel; Aguillon, Juan C; Anderson, Amy E; Appel, Silke; Benitez-Ribas, Daniel; Ten Brinke, Anja; Broere, Femke; Cools, Nathalie; Cuturi, Maria Cristina; Diboll, Julie; Geissler, Edward K; Giannoukakis, Nick; Gregori, Silvia; van Ham, S Marieke; Lattimer, Staci; Marshall, Lindsay; Harry, Rachel A; Hutchinson, James A; Isaacs, John D; Joosten, Irma; van Kooten, Cees; Lopez Diaz de Cerio, Ascension; Nikolic, Tatjana; Oral, Haluk Barbaros; Sofronic-Milosavljevic, Ljiljana; Ritter, Thomas; Riquelme, Paloma; Thomson, Angus W; Trucco, Massimo; Vives-Pi, Marta; Martinez-Caceres, Eva M; Hilkens, Catharien M U

    2016-01-01

    Cellular therapies with tolerogenic antigen-presenting cells (tolAPC) show great promise for the treatment of autoimmune diseases and for the prevention of destructive immune responses after transplantation. The methodologies for generating tolAPC vary greatly between different laboratories, making it difficult to compare data from different studies; thus constituting a major hurdle for the development of standardised tolAPC therapeutic products. Here we describe an initiative by members of the tolAPC field to generate a minimum information model for tolAPC (MITAP), providing a reporting framework that will make differences and similarities between tolAPC products transparent. In this way, MITAP constitutes a first but important step towards the production of standardised and reproducible tolAPC for clinical application.

  10. Minimum information about tolerogenic antigen-presenting cells (MITAP): a first step towards reproducibility and standardisation of cellular therapies

    PubMed Central

    Spiering, Rachel; Aguillon, Juan C.; Anderson, Amy E.; Appel, Silke; Benitez-Ribas, Daniel; ten Brinke, Anja; Broere, Femke; Cools, Nathalie; Cuturi, Maria Cristina; Diboll, Julie; Geissler, Edward K.; Giannoukakis, Nick; Gregori, Silvia; van Ham, S. Marieke; Lattimer, Staci; Marshall, Lindsay; Harry, Rachel A.; Hutchinson, James A.; Isaacs, John D.; Joosten, Irma; van Kooten, Cees; Lopez Diaz de Cerio, Ascension; Nikolic, Tatjana; Oral, Haluk Barbaros; Sofronic-Milosavljevic, Ljiljana; Ritter, Thomas; Riquelme, Paloma; Thomson, Angus W.; Trucco, Massimo; Vives-Pi, Marta; Martinez-Caceres, Eva M.

    2016-01-01

    Cellular therapies with tolerogenic antigen-presenting cells (tolAPC) show great promise for the treatment of autoimmune diseases and for the prevention of destructive immune responses after transplantation. The methodologies for generating tolAPC vary greatly between different laboratories, making it difficult to compare data from different studies; thus constituting a major hurdle for the development of standardised tolAPC therapeutic products. Here we describe an initiative by members of the tolAPC field to generate a minimum information model for tolAPC (MITAP), providing a reporting framework that will make differences and similarities between tolAPC products transparent. In this way, MITAP constitutes a first but important step towards the production of standardised and reproducible tolAPC for clinical application. PMID:27635311

  11. Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis recombinant heat shock protein 70 interaction with different bovine antigen-presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Langelaar, M F M; Hope, J C; Rutten, V P M G; Noordhuizen, J P T M; van Eden, W; Koets, A P

    2005-03-01

    Abstract Heat shock proteins (Hsp) can deliver antigen into the major histocompatibility complex class I presentation pathway of antigen-presenting cells (APC), a process called cross priming, thus stimulating antigen-specific CD8+ T-cell reactions. Hsp were shown to elicit proinflammatory responses in APC. Both processes require interaction of Hsp with APC via specific receptors. This study describes the interaction of recombinant Hsp70 (rHsp70) of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis with bovine peripheral blood mononuclear cells that was restricted to CD14+ cells. Characterized monocyte-derived macrophages, monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DC) and BoMac, an immortalized bovine macrophage cell line, were used to investigate the interaction of rHsp70 with different bovine APC. Saturation of immature DC with high concentrations of rHsp70 is demonstrated, and it was found that interaction of rHsp70 with DC was related to the maturation stage of the DC. Involvement of CD91 as a cellular receptor for rHsp70 was demonstrated; however, competition studies with immature DC demonstrated that other receptors exist on bovine APC. These data suggest that rHsp70-based vaccines may be useful for the successful immunization of cattle.

  12. Interference with PD-L1/PD-1 co-stimulation during antigen presentation enhances the multifunctionality of antigen-specific T cells.

    PubMed

    Pen, J J; Keersmaecker, B D; Heirman, C; Corthals, J; Liechtenstein, T; Escors, D; Thielemans, K; Breckpot, K

    2014-03-01

    The release of cytokines by T cells strongly defines their functional activity in vivo. The ability to produce multiple cytokines has been associated with beneficial immune responses in cancer and infectious diseases, while their progressive loss is associated with T-cell exhaustion, senescence and anergy. Consequently, strategies that enhance the multifunctional status of T cells are a key for immunotherapy. Dendritic cells (DCs) are professional antigen presenting cells that regulate T-cell functions by providing positive and negative co-stimulatory signals. A key negative regulator of T-cell activity is provided by binding of programmed death-1 (PD-1) receptor on activated T cells, to its ligand PD-L1, expressed on DCs. We investigated the impact of interfering with PD-L1/PD-1 co-stimulation on the multifunctionality of T cells, by expression of the soluble extracellular part of PD-1 (sPD-1) or PD-L1 (sPD-L1) in human monocyte-derived DCs during antigen presentation. Expression, secretion and binding of these soluble molecules after mRNA electroporation were demonstrated. Modification of DCs with sPD-1 or sPD-L1 mRNA resulted in increased levels of the co-stimulatory molecule CD80 and a distinct cytokine profile, characterized by the secretion of IL-10 and TNF-α, respectively. Co-expression in DCs of sPD-1 and sPD-L1 with influenza virus nuclear protein 1 (Flu NP1) stimulated Flu NP1 memory T cells, with a significantly higher number of multifunctional T cells and increased cytokine secretion, while it did not induce regulatory T cells. These data provide a rationale for the inclusion of interfering sPD-1 or sPD-L1 in DC-based immunotherapeutic strategies.

  13. Self-Antigen Presentation by Keratinocytes in the Inflamed Adult Skin Modulates T-Cell Auto-Reactivity.

    PubMed

    Meister, Michael; Tounsi, Amel; Gaffal, Evelyn; Bald, Tobias; Papatriantafyllou, Maria; Ludwig, Julia; Pougialis, Georg; Bestvater, Felix; Klotz, Luisa; Moldenhauer, Gerhard; Tüting, Thomas; Hämmerling, Günter J; Arnold, Bernd; Oelert, Thilo

    2015-08-01

    Keratinocytes have a pivotal role in the regulation of immune responses, but the impact of antigen presentation by these cells is still poorly understood, particularly in a situation where the antigen will be presented only in adult life. Here, we generated a transgenic mouse model in which keratinocytes exclusively present a myelin basic protein (MBP) peptide covalently linked to the major histocompatibility complex class II β-chain, solely under inflammatory conditions. In these mice, inflammation caused by epicutaneous contact sensitizer treatment resulted in keratinocyte-mediated expansion of MBP-specific CD4(+) T cells in the skin. Moreover, repeated contact sensitizer application preceding a systemic MBP immunization reduced the reactivity of the respective CD4(+) T cells and lowered the symptoms of the resulting experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. This downregulation was CD4(+) T-cell-mediated and dependent on the presence of the immune modulator Dickkopf-3. Thus, presentation of a neo self-antigen by keratinocytes in the inflamed, adult skin can modulate CD4(+) T-cell auto-aggression at a distal organ.

  14. Regression of melanoma metastases after immunotherapy is associated with activation of antigen presentation and interferon-mediated rejection genes

    PubMed Central

    Carretero, Rafael; Wang, Ena; Rodriguez, Ana I.; Reinboth, Jennifer; Ascierto, Maria L.; Engle, Alyson M.; Liu, Hui; Camacho, Francisco M.; Marincola, Francesco M.; Garrido, Federico; Cabrera, Teresa

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of a comparative gene expression analysis of 15 metastases (10 regressing and 5 progressing) obtained from 2 melanoma patients with mixed response following different forms of immunotherapy. Whole genome transcriptional analysis clearly indicate that regression of melanoma metastases is due to an acute immune rejection mediated by the upregulation of genes involved in antigen presentation and interferon mediated response (STAT-1/IRF-1) in all the regressing metastases from both patients. In contrast, progressing metastases showed low transcription levels of genes involved in these pathways. Histological analysis showed T cells and HLA-DR positive infiltrating cells in the regressing but not in the progressing metastases. Quantitative expression analysis of HLA-A, B and C genes on microdisected tumoral regions indicate higher HLA expression in regressing than in progressing metastases. The molecular signature obtained in melanoma rejection appeared to be similar to that observed in other forms of immune-mediated tissue-specific rejection such as allograft, pathogen clearance, graft versus host or autoimmune disease, supporting the immunological constant of rejection. We favor the idea that the major factor determining the success or failure of immunotherapy is the nature of HLA Class I alterations in tumor cells and not the type of immunotherapy used. If the molecular alteration is reversible by the immunotherapy, the HLA expression will be upregulated and the lesion will be recognized and rejected. In contrast, if the defect is structural the MHC Class I expression will remain unchanged and the lesion will progress. PMID:21964766

  15. Direct binding of a myasthenia gravis related epitope to MHC class II molecules on living murine antigen-presenting cells.

    PubMed Central

    Mozes, E; Dayan, M; Zisman, E; Brocke, S; Licht, A; Pecht, I

    1989-01-01

    MHC gene products present antigenic epitopes to the antigen receptor on T cells. Nevertheless, direct binding of such epitopes to MHC class II proteins on normal living antigen-presenting cells (APCs) has not yet been demonstrated. We have previously shown a significant difference in the ability of T cells of myasthenia gravis (MG) patients to proliferate in response to the synthetic peptide p195-212 of the human acetylcholine receptor (AChR) alpha-subunit in comparison to healthy controls. The observed proliferative responses correlated significantly with HLA-DR5. Moreover, lymph node cells of various mouse strains that were primed with the T cell epitope, p195-212, were found to proliferate to different extents. To investigate these observations further, we designed an assay for direct binding of p195-212 to MHC class II proteins on the surface of freshly prepared splenic adherent cells. Binding of a biotinylated p195-212 was monitored using phycoerythrin-avidin by flow cytometry. Fifteen to sixty per cent of the cells were labeled following incubation with the biotinylated peptide. Binding was observed only to splenic adherent cells derived from mouse strains of which T cells were capable of proliferating in response to p195-212. The binding specificity, in terms of epitope structure and its site of interaction on the cells, was shown by its inhibition with an excess of the unlabeled peptide or with the relevant monoclonal anti-I-A antibodies. These results constitute the first direct evidence for the specific binding of a T cell epitope to live APC. PMID:2480232

  16. Distinct temporal programming of naive CD4+ T cells for cell division versus TCR-dependent death susceptibility by antigen-presenting macrophages.

    PubMed

    Schrum, Adam G; Palmer, Ed; Turka, Laurence A

    2005-02-01

    Naive T cells become programmed for clonal expansion and contraction during the early hours of antigenic signaling. Recent studies support an 'autopilot' model, wherein the commitment to proliferate and the magnitude of the proliferative response are simultaneously determined during a single, brief period of antigen exposure. Here, we have examined whether the proliferation of naive CD4+ T cells must occur on 'autopilot', or whether extended periods of antigenic signaling can impact primary proliferative responses to antigen-presenting macrophages (macrophage APC). We found that a single exposure to antigen (18 h) simultaneously committed T cells to (1) up-regulate surface TCR above the level expressed on naive T cells, (2) undergo minimal cell division, and (3) acquire susceptibility to TCR-dependent activation-induced cell death. However, continued antigenic signaling between 18 and 72 h was required to amplify the number of daughter cells derived from the already committed T cells. Thus, a discrete commitment time was followed by a 'tuning' period, where extended antigenic signaling determined the volume of the proliferative response. We conclude that T cell commitment to full clonal expansion versus TCR-dependent death susceptibility represent two separate programming events whose timing can be segregated by macrophage APC.

  17. Immunobiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus strains differentially modulate antiviral immune response in porcine intestinal epithelial and antigen presenting cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous findings suggested that Lactobacillus rhamnosus CRL1505 is able to increase resistance of children to intestinal viral infections. However, the intestinal cells, cytokines and receptors involved in the immunoregulatory effect of this probiotic strain have not been fully characterized. Results We aimed to gain insight into the mechanisms involved in the immunomodulatory effect of the CRL1505 strain and therefore evaluated in vitro the crosstalk between L. rhamnosus CRL1505, porcine intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) and antigen presenting cells (APCs) from swine Peyer’s patches in order to deepen our knowledge about the mechanisms, through which this strain may help preventing viral diarrhoea episodes. L. rhamnosus CRL1505 was able to induce IFN–α and –β in IECs and improve the production of type I IFNs in response to poly(I:C) challenge independently of Toll-like receptor (TLR)-2 or TLR9 signalling. In addition, the CRL1505 strain induced mRNA expression of IL-6 and TNF-α via TLR2 in IECs. Furthermore, the strain significantly increased surface molecules expression and cytokine production in intestinal APCs. The improved Th1 response induced by L. rhamnosus CRL1505 was triggered by TLR2 signalling and included augmented expression of MHC-II and co-stimulatory molecules and expression of IL-1β, IL-6, and IFN-γ in APCs. IL-10 was also significantly up-regulated by CRL1505 in APCs. Conclusions It was recently reviewed the emergence of TLR agonists as new ways to transform antiviral treatments by introducing panviral therapeutics with less adverse effects than IFN therapies. The use of L. rhamnosus CRL1505 as modulator of innate immunity and inductor of antiviral type I IFNs, IFN-γ, and regulatory IL-10 clearly offers the potential to overcome this challenge. PMID:24886142

  18. Membrane Ia expression and antigen-presenting accessory cell function of L cells transfected with class II major histocompatibility complex genes

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    To study the relationship between the structure and function of Ia antigens, as well as the physiologic requirements for antigen presentation to major histocompatibility complex-restricted T cells, class II A alpha and A beta genes from the k and d haplotypes were transfected into Ltk- fibroblasts using the calcium phosphate coprecipitation technique. Individually transfected genes were actively transcribed in the L cells without covalent linkage to, or cotransformation with, viral enhancer sequences. However, cell surface expression of detectable I-A required the presence of transfected A alpha dA beta d or A alpha kA beta k pairs in a single cell. The level of I-A expression under these conditions was 1/5-1/10 that of Ia+ B lymphoma cells, or B lymphoma cells expressing transfected class II genes. These I-A-expressing transfectants were tested for accessory cell function and shown to present polypeptide and complex protein antigens to T cell clones and hybridomas in the context of the transfected gene products. One T cell clone, restricted to I-Ak plus GAT (L-glutamic acid60-L-alanine30-L-tyrosine10), had a profound cytotoxic effect on I-Ak- but not I-Ad-expressing transfectants in the presence of specific antigen. Assays of unprimed T cells showed that both Ia+ and Ia- L cells could serve as accessory cells for concanavalin A-induced proliferative responses. These data indicate that L cells can transcribe, translate, and express transfected class II genes and that such I-A-bearing L cells possess the necessary metabolic mechanisms for presenting these antigens to T lymphocytes in the context of their I-A molecules. PMID:6436430

  19. A Toll-like receptor 2 agonist-fused antigen enhanced antitumor immunity by increasing antigen presentation and the CD8 memory T cells population

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chiao-Chieh; Liu, Shih-Jen; Chen, Hsin-Wei; Shen, Kuan-Yin; Leng, Chih-Hsiang

    2016-01-01

    The induction of long-lived effector CD8+ T cells is key to the development of efficient cancer vaccines. In this study, we demonstrated that a Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) agonist-fused antigen increased antigen presentation via TLR2 signaling and induced effector memory-like CD8+ T cells against cancer after immunization. The N-terminus of ovalbumin (OVA) was biologically fused with a bacterial lipid moiety TLR2 agonist to produce a recombinant lipidated ovalbumin (rlipo-OVA). We demonstrated that rlipo-OVA activated bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BM-DCs) maturation and increased antigen presentation by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I via TLR2. After immunization, rlipo-OVA skewed the immune response towards T helper (Th) 1 and induced OVA-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses. Moreover, immunization with rlipo-OVA induced higher numbers of effector memory (CD44+CD62L−) CD8+ T cells compared with recombinant ovalbumin (rOVA) alone or rOVA mixed with the TLR2 agonist Pam3CSK4. Accordingly, the CD27+CD43+ effector memory CD8+ T cells expressed high levels of the long-lived CD127 marker. The administration of rlipo-OVA could inhibit tumor growth, but the anti-tumor effects were lost after the depletion of CD8 or CD127 cells in vivo. These findings suggested that the TLR2 agonist-fused antigen induced long-lived memory CD8+ T cells for efficient cancer therapy. PMID:27127171

  20. Pharmacologic IKK/NF-κB inhibition causes antigen presenting cells to undergo TNFα dependent ROS-mediated programmed cell death

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilstra, Jeremy S.; Gaddy, Daniel F.; Zhao, Jing; Davé, Shaival H.; Niedernhofer, Laura J.; Plevy, Scott E.; Robbins, Paul D.

    2014-01-01

    Monocyte-derived antigen presenting cells (APC) are central mediators of the innate and adaptive immune response in inflammatory diseases. As such, APC are appropriate targets for therapeutic intervention to ameliorate certain diseases. APC differentiation, activation and functions are regulated by the NF-κB family of transcription factors. Herein, we examined the effect of NF-κB inhibition, via suppression of the IκB Kinase (IKK) complex, on APC function. Murine bone marrow-derived macrophages and dendritic cells (DC), as well as macrophage and DC lines, underwent rapid programmed cell death (PCD) after treatment with several IKK/NF-κB inhibitors through a TNFα-dependent mechanism. PCD was induced proximally by reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, which causes a loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and activation of a caspase signaling cascade. NF-κB-inhibition-induced PCD of APC may be a key mechanism through which therapeutic targeting of NF-κB reduces inflammatory pathologies.

  1. Particle-based transcutaneous administration of HIV-1 p24 protein to human skin explants and targeting of epidermal antigen presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Rancan, Fiorenza; Amselgruber, Sarah; Hadam, Sabrina; Munier, Sevérine; Pavot, Vincent; Verrier, Bernard; Hackbarth, Steffen; Combadiere, Behazine; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike; Vogt, Annika

    2014-02-28

    Transcutaneous immunization is a promising vaccination strategy for the treatment of infectious diseases and cancer. In this study, we investigate the combination of cyanoacrylate skin surface stripping (CSSS) and particle-based antigen delivery to target the HIV-1 p24 protein to skin antigen presenting cells (APC). The CSSS treatment pre-activates skin APC and opens hair follicles, where protein-loaded particles accumulate and allow for sustained delivery of the loaded antigen to perifollicular APC. We found that poly-lactic acid (PLA) and polystyrene (PS) particles targeted the adsorbed HIV-1 p24 protein to the hair follicles. Small amounts of PS and PLA particles were found to translocate to the epidermis and be internalized by skin cells, whereas most of the particles aggregated in the hair follicle canal, where they released the loaded antigen. The p24 protein diffused to the epidermis and dermis and was detected in skin cells, especially in Langerhans cells and dermal dendritic cells. Furthermore, the combination of CSSS and particle-based delivery resulted in activation and maturation of Langerhans cells (HLA-DR, CD80 and CD83). We conclude that particle-based antigen delivery across partially disrupted skin barrier is a feasible and effective approach to needle-free transcutaneous vaccination.

  2. Synthesis of protein-loaded hydrogel particles in an aqueous two-phase system for coincident antigen and CpG oligonucleotide delivery to antigen-presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Jain, Siddhartha; Yap, Woon Teck; Irvine, Darrell J

    2005-01-01

    Materials that effectively deliver protein antigens together with activating ligands to antigen-presenting cells are sought for improved nonviral vaccines. To this end, we synthesized protein-loaded poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-based hydrogel particles by cross-linking PEG within the polymer-rich phase of an emulsion formed by a poly(ethylene oxide-b-propylene oxide-b-ethylene oxide) triblock copolymer in saturated aqueous salt solution. These particles (500-nm diameter) contained high levels of encapsulated protein (approximately 75% of dry mass), which was selectively released by proteolytic enzymes normally present in the phagosomal/endosomal compartments of dendritic cells (DCs). For co-delivery of cellular activation signals, gel particles were surface-modified by sequential adsorption of poly(l-arginine) and CpG oligonucleotides. DCs pulsed with protein-loaded particles activated naïve T cells in vitro approximately 10-fold more efficiently than DCs incubated with soluble protein. This organic solvent-free strategy for protein encapsulation within submicron-sized hydrophilic particles is attractive for macromolecule delivery to a variety of phagocytic and nonphagocytic cells.

  3. Changes in the localization of antigen presenting cells and T cells in the utero-vaginal junction after repeated artificial insemination in laying hens.

    PubMed

    Das, Shubash Chandra; Nagasaka, Naohiro; Yoshimura, Yukinori

    2005-10-01

    The goal of our present study was to observe whether the populations of antigen presenting cells (Ia+ cells) and T cell subsets (CD4+ and CD8+ T cells) change in the utero-vaginal junction (UVJ) of Rhode Island Red laying hens that showed dramatic declines in fertility after repeated artificial insemination (AI). Rhode Island Red laying hens were divided into two groups: a virgin group (R-V) and artificial inseminated group (R-AI), which was exposed to weekly AI for a period of 3 mo. Undiluted fresh semen collected from healthy Tosa-Jidori roosters, a native Japanese breed maintained in Kochi Prefecture, was used for AI. The UVJ tissues were processed for frozen sections, and Ia+ cells and CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were identified by immunohistochemistry. The Ia+ cells and CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were observed in the stroma and mucosal epithelium of UVJ in both the R-AI and R-V birds. The frequencies of them in the stroma were significantly higher in R-AI than R-V. The higher frequency of Ia+ cells in the UVJ of R-AI group indicated a greater potential capability for antigen presentation to CD4+ cells. The significant increase in CD8+ and CD4+ T cells in the UVJ of R-AI birds might be the result of a homing process of lymphocytes, which may affect sperm survivability and fertility.

  4. Bruton's tyrosine kinase defect in dendritic cells from X-linked agammaglobulinaemia patients does not influence their differentiation, maturation and antigen-presenting cell function

    PubMed Central

    GAGLIARDI, M C; FINOCCHI, A; ORLANDI, P; CURSI, L; CANCRINI, C; MOSCHESE, V; MIYAWAKI, T; ROSSI, P

    2003-01-01

    X-linked agammaglobulinaemia (XLA) is a primary immunodeficiency disease characterized by very low levels or even absence of circulating antibodies. The immunological defect is caused by deletions or mutations of Bruton's tyrosine kinase gene (Btk), whose product is critically involved in the maturation of pre-B lymphocytes into mature B cells. Btk is expressed not only in B lymphocytes but also in cells of the myeloid lineage, including dendritic cells (DC). These cells are professional antigen presenting cells (APC) that play a fundamental role in the induction and regulation of T-cell responses. In this study, we analysed differentiation, maturation, and antigen-presenting function of DC derived from XLA patients (XLA-DC) as compared to DC from age-matched healthy subjects (healthy-DC). We found that XLA-DC normally differentiate from monocyte precursors and mature in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) as assessed by de novo expression of CD83, up-regulation of MHC class II, B7·1 and B7·2 molecules as well as interleukin (IL)-12 and IL-10 production. In addition, we demonstrated that LPS stimulated XLA-DC acquire the ability to prime naïve T cells and to polarize them toward a Th1 phenotype, as observed in DC from healthy donors stimulated in the same conditions. In conclusion, these data indicate that Btk defect is not involved in DC differentiation and maturation, and that XLA-DC can act as fully competent antigen presenting cells in T cell-mediated immune responses. PMID:12823285

  5. Notch pathway plays a novel and critical role in regulating responses of T and antigen-presenting cells in aGVHD.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xiaodan; Xu, Lihua; Li, Yangqiu; Tan, Huo

    2017-04-01

    Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) induced by host antigen-presenting cells (APCs) and donor-derived T cells remains the major limitation of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (allo-BMT). Notch signaling pathway is a highly conserved cell-cell communication that is important in T cell development. Recently, Notch signaling pathway is reported to be involved in regulating GVHD. To investigate the role of Notch inhibition in modulating GVHD, we established MHC-mismatched murine allo-BMT model. We found that inhibition of Notch signaling pathway by γ-secretase inhibitor in vivo could reduce aGVHD, which was shown by the onset time of aGVHD, body weight, clinical aGVHD scores, pathology aGVHD scores, and survival. Inhibition of Notch signaling pathway by DAPT ex vivo only reduced pathology aGVHD scores in the liver and intestine and had no impact on the onset time and clinical aGVHD scores. We investigated the possible mechanism by analyzing the phenotype of host APCs and donor-derived T cells. Notch signaling pathway had a broad effect on both host APCs and donor-derived T cells. The expressions of CD11c, CD40, and CD86 as the markers of activated dendritic cells (DCs) were decreased. The proliferative response of CD8+ T cell decreased, while CD4(+) Notch-deprived T cells had preserved expansion with increased expressions of CD25 and Foxp3 as markers of regulatory T cells (Tregs). In conclusion, Notch inhibition may minimize aGVHD by decreasing proliferation and activation of DCs and CD8(+) T cells while preserving Tregs expansion.

  6. Distinct roles for transforming growth factor-β2 and tumour necrosis factor-α in immune deviation elicited by hapten-derivatized antigen-presenting cells

    PubMed Central

    Hecker, K H; Niizeki, H; Streilein, J W

    1999-01-01

    The role of antigen-presenting cells (APC) in the induction of antigen-specific unresponsiveness was examined, using two functionally distinct murine macrophage hybridomas, #59 and #63 cells. Derivatized with the hapten (dinitrofluorobenzene; DNFB), #59 cells induced contact hypersensitivity (CH) in mice. Hapten-derivatized #63 cells failed to induce CH. Instead, they prevented recipients from acquiring CH when exposed subsequently to a sensitizing dose of the hapten. Similarly, hapten-derivatized #59 cells, pretreated in vitro with transforming growth factor-β2 (TGF-β2) lost their capacity to evoke CH, and induced tolerance. Hapten-derivatized #63 cells and TGF-β2-treated #59 cells eliminated CH in mice sensitized to hapten. Reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction analysis of mRNAs for various accessory molecules important in T-cell activation revealed that #63 and TGF-β2-treated #59 cells differed only in their expression of tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) mRNA. The latter expressed higher levels of TNF-α mRNA than did untreated #59 cells. As a consequence, #63 and TGF-β2-treated #59 cells, both of which induce tolerance, secrete TNF-α protein unlike untreated #59 cells, which do not induce tolerance to hapten. Since neutralizing anti-TNF-α antibodies abrogated the tolerogenic potential of #63 cells in vivo, we conclude that TGF-β2 equips hapten-bearing APC with the capacity to evoke systemic immune deviation in which CH is selectively silenced. We speculate that one effect of TGF-β2 is to cause APC to up-regulate TNF-α production. In turn, this cytokine biases the functional property of responding hapten-specific T cells in a direction that not only interferes with acquisition, but suppresses induction of CH. PMID:10233718

  7. Influence of the Tissue Microenvironment on Toll-Like Receptor Expression by CD11c+ Antigen-Presenting Cells Isolated from Mucosal Tissues▿

    PubMed Central

    Takenaka, Shunsuke; McCormick, Sarah; Safroneeva, Ekaterina; Xing, Zhou; Gauldie, Jack

    2009-01-01

    It is recognized that functional activities of antigen-presenting cells (APCs) in mucosal tissue sites differ from those of systemic APCs; however, it is unknown whether there are further differences between APC populations residing in different mucosal sites. In this study, we directly compared murine CD11c+ APCs isolated from colon, lung, and spleen and found that APCs isolated from these tissues differ considerably in Toll-like receptor (TLR) expression and responses to in vitro TLR ligand stimulation. We also provide evidence that tissue microenvironments dictate distinct patterns of TLR expression by CD11c+ APCs in different mucosal tissues. Moreover, CD11c+ cells isolated from different tissues have varied capacities to induce the development of T helper 1 (Th1), Th2, or regulatory CD4+ T cells. Thus, unique tissue microenvironments have a significant influence on determining TLR expression by CD11c+ cells that migrate to and reside in each mucosal tissue and are likely to modulate their functional activities. PMID:19776199

  8. Proteomic analysis uncovers common effects of IFN-γ and IL-27 on the HLA class I antigen presentation machinery in human cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Inglese, Elvira; Lavarello, Chiara; Pistillo, Maria Pia; Rigo, Valentina; Croce, Michela; Longo, Luca; Martini, Stefania; Vacca, Paola

    2016-01-01

    IL-27, a member of the IL-12-family of cytokines, has shown anti-tumor activity in several pre-clinical models due to anti-proliferative, anti-angiogenic and immune-enhancing effects. On the other hand, IL-27 demonstrated immune regulatory activities and inhibition of auto-immunity in mouse models. Also, we reported that IL-27, similar to IFN-γ, induces the expression of IL-18BP, IDO and PD-L1 immune regulatory molecules in human cancer cells. Here, a proteomic analysis reveals that IL-27 and IFN-γ display a broad overlap of functions on human ovarian cancer cells. Indeed, among 990 proteins modulated by either cytokine treatment in SKOV3 cells, 814 showed a concordant modulation by both cytokines, while a smaller number (176) were differentially modulated. The most up-regulated proteins were common to both IFN-γ and IL-27. In addition, functional analysis of IL-27-regulated protein networks highlighted pathways of interferon signaling and regulation, antigen presentation, protection from natural killer cell-mediated cytotoxicity, regulation of protein polyubiquitination and proteasome, aminoacid catabolism and regulation of viral protein levels. Importantly, we found that IL-27 induced HLA class I molecule expression in human cancer cells of different histotypes, including tumor cells showing very low expression. IL-27 failed only in a cancer cell line bearing a homozygous deletion in the B2M gene. Altogether, these data point out to a broad set of activities shared by IL-27 and IFN-γ, which are dependent on the common activation of the STAT1 pathway. These data add further explanation to the anti-tumor activity of IL-27 and also to its dual role in immune regulation. PMID:27683036

  9. Functional Specialty of CD40 and Dendritic Cell Surface Lectins for Exogenous Antigen Presentation to CD8(+) and CD4(+) T Cells.

    PubMed

    Yin, Wenjie; Gorvel, Laurent; Zurawski, Sandra; Li, Dapeng; Ni, Ling; Duluc, Dorothée; Upchurch, Katherine; Kim, JongRok; Gu, Chao; Ouedraogo, Richard; Wang, Zhiqing; Xue, Yaming; Joo, HyeMee; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre; Zurawski, Gerard; Oh, SangKon

    2016-03-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are major antigen-presenting cells that can efficiently prime and cross-prime antigen-specific T cells. Delivering antigen to DCs via surface receptors is thus an appealing strategy to evoke cellular immunity. Nonetheless, which DC surface receptor to target to yield the optimal CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cell responses remains elusive. Herein, we report the superiority of CD40 over 9 different lectins and scavenger receptors at evoking antigen-specific CD8(+) T cell responses. However, lectins (e.g., LOX-1 and Dectin-1) were more efficient than CD40 at eliciting CD4(+) T cell responses. Common and distinct patterns of subcellular and intracellular localization of receptor-bound αCD40, αLOX-1 and αDectin-1 further support their functional specialization at enhancing antigen presentation to either CD8(+) or CD4(+) T cells. Lastly, we demonstrate that antigen targeting to CD40 can evoke potent antigen-specific CD8(+) T cell responses in human CD40 transgenic mice. This study provides fundamental information for the rational design of vaccines against cancers and viral infections.

  10. A comparison of the antigen-presenting capabilities of class II MHC-expressing human lung epithelial and endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, A C; Zhang, J G; Moy, J V; Ali, S; Kirby, J A

    1997-01-01

    Human lung alveolar epithelial cells constitutively express class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC). Human lung microvascular endothelial and small airway epithelial cells can be induced to express class II MHC by stimulation with the pro-inflammatory cytokine interferon-gamma. The levels of class II MHC on lung epithelial and endothelial cells were comparable to those seen on an Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed B-cell line. However, the costimulatory molecules B7-1 and B7-2 were not expressed. The ability of the class II MHC expressing human lung parenchymal cells to present alloantigen to CD4+ T lymphocytes was investigated. Freshly isolated human alveolar epithelial cells (type II pneumocytes) and monolayers of interferon-gamma-stimulated small airway epithelial and lung microvascular endothelial cells were co-cultured with allogeneic CD4+ T lymphocytes and proliferation determined by [3H]thymidine incorporation. A clear difference was observed between effects of the epithelial and endothelial cells on CD4+ T-lymphocyte activation. Alveolar and small airway epithelial cells failed to stimulate the proliferation of allogeneic CD4+ T lymphocytes whereas lung microvascular endothelial cells did stimulate proliferation. This difference could not be explained by the levels of class II MHC or the lack of B7-1 and B7-2 solely. Microvascular endothelial cells, and not alveolar or small airway epithelial cells, possess B7-independent costimulatory pathways. PMID:9301537

  11. Immunobiotic Lactobacillus jensenii modulates the Toll-like receptor 4-induced inflammatory response via negative regulation in porcine antigen-presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Villena, Julio; Suzuki, Rie; Fujie, Hitomi; Chiba, Eriko; Takahashi, Takuya; Tomosada, Yohsuke; Shimazu, Tomoyuki; Aso, Hisashi; Ohwada, Shyuichi; Suda, Yoshihito; Ikegami, Shuji; Itoh, Hiroyuki; Alvarez, Susana; Saito, Tadao; Kitazawa, Haruki

    2012-07-01

    Previously, we demonstrated that Lactobacillus jensenii TL2937 attenuates the inflammatory response triggered by activation of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR-4) in porcine intestinal epithelial cells. In view of the critical importance of antigen-presenting cell (APC) polarization in immunoregulation, the objective of the present study was to examine the effect of strain TL2937 on the activation patterns of APCs from swine Peyer's patches (PPs). We demonstrated that direct exposure of porcine APCs to L. jensenii in the absence of inflammatory signals increased expression of interleukin-10 (IL-10) and transforming growth factor β in CD172a(+) APCs and caused them to display tolerogenic properties. In addition, pretreatment of CD172a(+) APCs with L. jensenii resulted in differential modulation of the production of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in response to TLR4 activation. The immunomodulatory effect of strain TL2937 was not related to a downregulation of TLR4 but was related to an upregulation of the expression of three negative regulators of TLRs: single immunoglobulin IL-1-related receptor (SIGIRR), A20, and interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase M (IRAK-M). Our results also indicated that TLR2 has an important role in the anti-inflammatory activity of L. jensenii TL2937, since anti-TLR2 antibodies blocked the upregulation of SIGIRR and IRAK-M in CD172a(+) APCs and the production of IL-10 in response to TLR4 activation. We performed, for the first time, a precise functional characterization of porcine APCs from PPs, and we demonstrated that CD172a(+) cells were tolerogenic. Our findings demonstrate that adherent cells and isolated CD172a(+) cells harvested from swine PPs were useful for in vitro study of the inflammatory responses in the porcine gut and the immunomodulatory effects of immunobiotic microorganisms.

  12. Prolonged antigen presentation by immune complex-binding dendritic cells programs the proliferative capacity of memory CD8 T cells.

    PubMed

    León, Beatriz; Ballesteros-Tato, André; Randall, Troy D; Lund, Frances E

    2014-07-28

    The commitment of naive CD8 T cells to effector or memory cell fates can occur after a single day of antigenic stimulation even though virus-derived antigens (Ags) are still presented by DCs long after acute infection is resolved. However, the effects of extended Ag presentation on CD8 T cells are undefined and the mechanisms that regulate prolonged Ag presentation are unknown. We showed that the sustained presentation of two different epitopes from influenza virus by DCs prevented the premature contraction of the primary virus-specific CD8 T cell response. Although prolonged Ag presentation did not alter the number of memory CD8 T cells that developed, it was essential for programming the capacity of these cells to proliferate, produce cytokines, and protect the host after secondary challenge. Importantly, prolonged Ag presentation by DCs was dependent on virus-specific, isotype-switched antibodies (Abs) that facilitated the capture and cross-presentation of viral Ags by FcγR-expressing DCs. Collectively, our results demonstrate that B cells and Abs can regulate the quality and functionality of a subset of antiviral CD8 T cell memory responses and do so by promoting sustained Ag presentation by DCs during the contraction phase of the primary T cell response.

  13. GM-CSF-neuroantigen fusion proteins reverse experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and mediate tolerogenic activity in adjuvant-primed environments: association with inflammation-dependent, inhibitory antigen presentation2

    PubMed Central

    Islam, S.M. Touhidul; Curtis, Alan D.; Taslim, Najla; Wilkinson, Daniel S.; Mannie, Mark D.

    2014-01-01

    Single-chain fusion proteins comprised of GM-CSF and neuroantigen (NAg) are potent, NAg-specific inhibitors of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). An important question was whether GMCSF-NAg tolerogenic vaccines retained inhibitory activity within inflammatory environments or were contingent upon steady-state conditions. A GMCSF-MOG fusion protein reversed established paralytic disease in both passive and active models of EAE in C57BL/6 mice. The fusion protein also reversed EAE in CD4-deficient and B cell-deficient mice. Notably, GMCSF-MOG inhibited EAE when co-injected adjacent to the MOG35-55/CFA emulsion. GMCSF-MOG also retained dominant inhibitory activity when directly emulsified with MOG35-55 in the CFA emulsion in both C57BL/6 or B cell-deficient models of EAE. Likewise, when combined with PLP139-151 in CFA, GMCSF-PLP inhibited EAE in SJL mice. When deliberately emulsified in CFA with the NAg, GMCSF-NAg inhibited EAE even though NAg was present at more than a 30-fold molar excess. In vitro studies revealed that the GMCSF domain of GMCSF-MOG stimulated growth and differentiation of inflammatory dendritic cells (DC) and simultaneously targeted the MOG35-55 domain for enhanced presentation by these DC. These inflammatory DC presented MOG35-55 to MOG-specific T cells by an inhibitory mechanism that was mediated in part by IFN-γ signaling and NO production. In conclusion, GMCSF-NAg was tolerogenic in CFA-primed pro-inflammatory environments by a mechanism associated with targeted antigen presentation by inflammatory DC and an inhibitory IFN-γ/ NO pathway. The inhibitory activity of GMCSF-NAg in CFA-primed lymphatics distinguishes GMCSF-NAg fusion proteins as a unique class of inflammation-dependent tolerogens that are mechanistically distinct from naked peptide or protein-based tolerogens. PMID:25049359

  14. Vanilloid Receptor 1 Agonists, Capsaicin and Resiniferatoxin, Enhance MHC Class I-restricted Viral Antigen Presentation in Virus-infected Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young-Hee; Im, Sun-A; Kim, Ji-Wan

    2016-01-01

    DCs, like the sensory neurons, express vanilloid receptor 1 (VR1). Here we demonstrate that the VR1 agonists, capsaicin (CP) and resiniferatoxin (RTX), enhance antiviral CTL responses by increasing MHC class I-restricted viral antigen presentation in dendritic cells (DCs). Bone marrow-derived DCs (BM-DCs) were infected with a recombinant vaccinia virus (VV) expressing OVA (VV-OVA), and then treated with CP or RTX. Both CP and RTX increased MHC class I-restricted presentation of virus-encoded endogenous OVA in BM-DCs. Oral administration of CP or RTX significantly increased MHC class I-restricted OVA presentation by splenic and lymph node DCs in VV-OVA-infected mice, as assessed by directly measuring OVA peptide SIINFEKL-Kb complexes on the cell surface and by performing functional assays using OVA-specific CD8 T cells. Accordingly, oral administration of CP or RTX elicited potent OVA-specific CTL activity in VV-OVA-infected mice. The results from this study demonstrate that VR1 agonists enhance anti-viral CTL responses, as well as a neuro-immune connection in anti-viral immune responses. PMID:27574502

  15. A NOVEL ROLE FOR HISTONE DEACETYLASE 6 (HDAC6) IN THE REGULATION OF THE TOLEROGENIC STAT3/IL-10 PATHWAY IN ANTIGEN PRESENTING CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Fengdong; Lienlaf, Maritza; Wang, Hong-Wei; Perez-Villarroel, Patricio; Lee, Calvin; Woan, Karrune; Rock-Klotz, Jennifer; Sahakian, Eva; Woods, David; Pinilla-Ibarz, Javier; Kalin, Jay; Tao, Jianguo; Hancock, Wayne; Kozikowski, Alan; Seto, Edward; Villagra, Alejandro; Sotomayor, Eduardo M.

    2014-01-01

    Antigen-presenting cells (APCs) are critical in T-cell activation and in the induction of T-cell tolerance. Epigenetic modifications of specific genes in the APC play a key role in this process, and among them, histone deacetylases (HDACs) have emerged as key participants. HDAC6, one of the members of this family of enzymes, has been shown to be involved in regulation of inflammatory and immune responses. Here we show for the first time, that genetic or pharmacologic disruption of HDAC6 in macrophages and dendritic cells resulted in diminished production of the immunosuppressive cytokine IL-10, and induction of inflammatory APCs that effectively activate antigen-specific naïve T-cells and restore the responsiveness of anergic CD4+ T-cells. Mechanistically, we have found that HDAC6 forms a previously unknown molecular complex with STAT3, association that was detected in both the cytoplasmic and nuclear compartments of the APC. By using HDAC6 recombinant mutants we identified the domain comprising aminoacids 503-840 as being required for HDAC6 interaction with STAT3. Furthermore, by re-chromatin immunoprecipitation we confirmed that HDAC6 and STAT3 are both recruited to the same DNA sequence within the Il10 gene promoter. Of note, disruption of this complex by knocking down HDAC6 resulted in decreased STAT3 phosphorylation -but no changes in STAT3 acetylation- as well as diminished recruitment of STAT3 to the Il10 gene promoter region. The additional demonstration that a selective HDAC6 inhibitor disrupts this STAT3/IL-10 tolerogenic axis points to HDAC6 as a novel molecular target in APCs to overcome immune tolerance and tips the balance towards T-cell immunity. PMID:25108026

  16. Characterization of Yellow Fever Virus Infection of Human and Non-human Primate Antigen Presenting Cells and Their Interaction with CD4+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cong, Yu; McArthur, Monica A.; Cohen, Melanie; Jahrling, Peter B.; Janosko, Krisztina B.; Josleyn, Nicole; Kang, Kai; Zhang, Tengfei; Holbrook, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    Humans infected with yellow fever virus (YFV), a mosquito-borne flavivirus, can develop illness ranging from a mild febrile disease to hemorrhagic fever and death. The 17D vaccine strain of YFV was developed in the 1930s, has been used continuously since development and has proven very effective. Genetic differences between vaccine and wild-type viruses are few, yet viral or host mechanisms associated with protection or disease are not fully understood. Over the past 20 years, a number of cases of vaccine-associated disease have been identified following vaccination with 17D; these cases have been correlated with reduced immune status at the time of vaccination. Recently, several studies have evaluated T cell responses to vaccination in both humans and non-human primates, but none have evaluated the response to wild-type virus infection. In the studies described here, monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) and dendritic cells (MoDC) from both humans and rhesus macaques were evaluated for their ability to support infection with either wild-type Asibi virus or the 17D vaccine strain and the host cytokine and chemokine response characterized. Human MoDC and MDM were also evaluated for their ability to stimulate CD4+ T cells. It was found that MoDC and MDM supported viral replication and that there were differential cytokine responses to infection with either wild-type or vaccine viruses. Additionally, MoDCs infected with live 17D virus were able to stimulate IFN-γ and IL-2 production in CD4+ T cells, while cells infected with Asibi virus were not. These data demonstrate that wild-type and vaccine YFV stimulate different responses in target antigen presenting cells and that wild-type YFV can inhibit MoDC activation of CD4+ T cells, a critical component in development of protective immunity. These data provide initial, but critical insight into regulatory capabilities of wild-type YFV in development of disease. PMID:27191161

  17. Characterization of Yellow Fever Virus Infection of Human and Non-human Primate Antigen Presenting Cells and Their Interaction with CD4+ T Cells.

    PubMed

    Cong, Yu; McArthur, Monica A; Cohen, Melanie; Jahrling, Peter B; Janosko, Krisztina B; Josleyn, Nicole; Kang, Kai; Zhang, Tengfei; Holbrook, Michael R

    2016-05-01

    Humans infected with yellow fever virus (YFV), a mosquito-borne flavivirus, can develop illness ranging from a mild febrile disease to hemorrhagic fever and death. The 17D vaccine strain of YFV was developed in the 1930s, has been used continuously since development and has proven very effective. Genetic differences between vaccine and wild-type viruses are few, yet viral or host mechanisms associated with protection or disease are not fully understood. Over the past 20 years, a number of cases of vaccine-associated disease have been identified following vaccination with 17D; these cases have been correlated with reduced immune status at the time of vaccination. Recently, several studies have evaluated T cell responses to vaccination in both humans and non-human primates, but none have evaluated the response to wild-type virus infection. In the studies described here, monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) and dendritic cells (MoDC) from both humans and rhesus macaques were evaluated for their ability to support infection with either wild-type Asibi virus or the 17D vaccine strain and the host cytokine and chemokine response characterized. Human MoDC and MDM were also evaluated for their ability to stimulate CD4+ T cells. It was found that MoDC and MDM supported viral replication and that there were differential cytokine responses to infection with either wild-type or vaccine viruses. Additionally, MoDCs infected with live 17D virus were able to stimulate IFN-γ and IL-2 production in CD4+ T cells, while cells infected with Asibi virus were not. These data demonstrate that wild-type and vaccine YFV stimulate different responses in target antigen presenting cells and that wild-type YFV can inhibit MoDC activation of CD4+ T cells, a critical component in development of protective immunity. These data provide initial, but critical insight into regulatory capabilities of wild-type YFV in development of disease.

  18. Chronic pulmonary accumulation of iron oxide nanoparticles induced Th1-type immune response stimulating the function of antigen-presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Eun-Jung; Oh, Seung Yun; Lee, Sang Jin; Lee, Kyuhong; Kim, Younghun; Lee, Byoung-Seok; Kim, Jong Sung

    2015-11-01

    Although there is growing evidence that suggests that pulmonary exposure to nanoparticles causes adverse health effects by modulating immune system of the body, available information is very limited. In this study, we investigated immune response following chronic pulmonary accumulation of iron oxide nanoparticles (FeNPs, Fe2O3). FeNPs have a needle-like shape in suspension (101.3±4.2 nm). On day 90 after a single intratracheal instillation (0.5, 1, and 2 mg/kg), the FeNPs remained in the lung and particle-laden macrophages were clearly observed in the BAL fluid of the treated-mice. The number of total cells and proportions of neutrophils and lymphocytes significantly increased at 2 mg/kg dose, and the percentage of apoptotic cells and LDH release increased in a dose-dependent manner. We also found that Th1-polarized inflammatory response was induced in the lung of the treated group accompanying the elevated secretion of chemokines, including GM-CSF, MCP-1, and MIP-1. Additionally, FeNPs enhanced the expression of antigen presentation-related proteins, including CD80, CD86, and MHC class II, on antigen-presenting cells in BAL fluid. Taken together, we suggest that chronic pulmonary accumulation of FeNPs may induce Th1-polarized immune response augmenting the function of antigen-presenting cells in the lung.

  19. Toll-Like Receptor Ligand-Based Vaccine Adjuvants Require Intact MyD88 Signaling in Antigen-Presenting Cells for Germinal Center Formation and Antibody Production

    PubMed Central

    Mosaheb, Munir M.; Reiser, Michael L.; Wetzler, Lee M.

    2017-01-01

    Vaccines are critical in the fight against infectious diseases, and immune-stimulating adjuvants are essential for enhancing vaccine efficacy. However, the precise mechanisms of action of most adjuvants are unknown. There is an urgent need for customized and adjuvant formulated vaccines against immune evading pathogens that remain a risk today. Understanding the specific role of various cell types in adjuvant-induced protective immune responses is vital for an effective vaccine design. We have investigated the role of cell-specific MyD88 signaling in vaccine adjuvant activity in vivo, using Neisserial porin B (PorB), a TLR2 ligand-based adjuvant, compared with an endosomal TLR9 ligand (CpG) and toll-like receptor (TLR)-independent (alum, MF59) adjuvants. We found that intact MyD88 signaling is essential, separately, in all three antigen-presenting cell types [B cells, macrophages, and dendritic cells (DCs)] for optimal TLR ligand-based adjuvant activity. The role of MyD88 signaling in B cell and DC in vaccine adjuvant has been previously investigated. In this study, we now demonstrate that the immune response was also reduced in mice with macrophage-specific MyD88 deletion (Mac-MyD88−/−). We demonstrate that TLR-dependent adjuvants are potent inducers of germinal center (GC) responses, but GCs are nearly absent in Mac-MyD88−/− mice following immunization with TLR-dependent adjuvants PorB or CpG, but not with TLR-independent adjuvants MF59 or alum. Our findings reveal a unique and here-to-for unrecognized importance of intact MyD88 signaling in macrophages, to allow for a robust vaccine-induced immune responses when TLR ligand-based adjuvants are used. PMID:28316602

  20. Virus-triggered acquired immunodeficiency by cytotoxic T-cell-dependent destruction of antigen-presenting cells and lymph follicle structure.

    PubMed Central

    Odermatt, B; Eppler, M; Leist, T P; Hengartner, H; Zinkernagel, R M

    1991-01-01

    Virus-induced acquired immune suppression in mice infected with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus is shown here to be caused by the CD8+-T-cell-dependent elimination of macrophages/antigen-presenting cells. Surprisingly, this is associated with severe destruction of the follicular organization of lymphoid organs, indicating a crucial role for dendritic cells and marginal zone macrophages in maintaining follicular structure. Once established, this immunopathology cannot be readily reversed by the elimination of CD8+ effector cells. Such a T-cell-mediated pathogenesis may play a pivotal role in acquired virus-induced immunosuppression and may represent one strategy by which virus escapes immune surveillance and establishes persistent infections in initially immunocompetent hosts. Images PMID:1910175

  1. Cyclosporine inhibits macrophage-mediated antigen presentation

    SciTech Connect

    Ziegler, H.K.; Palay, D.; Wentworth, P.; Cluff, C.

    1986-03-01

    The influence of cyclosporine on antigen-specific, macrophage-dependent T cell activation was analyzed in vitro. Murine T cell activation by antigens derived from Listeria monocytogenes was monitored by the production of interleukin-2. Pretreatment (2 hrs., 37/sup 0/C) of macrophages with cyclosporine resulted in a population of macrophages with a markedly diminished capacity to support the activation of T lymphocytes. When cyclosporine-pretreated macrophages were added to cultures of antigen and untreated T cells, the dose of cyclosporine which produced 50% inhibition was 1.5 ..mu..g/ml. Appropriate control experiments indicated that cyclosporine was indeed inhibiting at the macrophage level. The addition of interleukin-1 or indomethacin to the cultures did not alter the inhibitory effect of cyclosporine. Under conditions which produced >90% inhibition of antigen presentation, macrophage surface Ia expression was not altered, and the uptake and catabolism of radiolabelled antigen was normal. Thus, cyclosporine inhibits antigen presentation by a mechanism which appears unrelated to changes in Il-1 elaboration, prostaglandin production, Ia expression, or antigen uptake and catabolism.

  2. Nanoparticle-based targeting of vaccine compounds to skin antigen-presenting cells by hair follicles and their transport in mice.

    PubMed

    Mahe, Brice; Vogt, Annika; Liard, Christelle; Duffy, Darragh; Abadie, Valérie; Bonduelle, Olivia; Boissonnas, Alexandre; Sterry, Wolfram; Verrier, Bernard; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike; Combadiere, Behazine

    2009-05-01

    Particle-based drug delivery systems target active compounds to the hair follicle and may result in a better penetration and higher efficiency of compound uptake by skin resident cells. As previously proposed, such delivery systems could be important tools for vaccine delivery. In this study, we investigated the penetration of solid fluorescent 40 or 200 nm polystyrene nanoparticles (NPs) as well as virus particles in murine skin to further investigate the efficacy of transcutaneously (TC) applied particulate vaccine delivery route. We demonstrated that 40 and 200 nm NPs and modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) expressing the green-fluorescent protein penetrated deeply into hair follicles and were internalized by perifollicular antigen-presenting cells (APCs). Fibered-based confocal microscopy analyses allowed visualizing in vivo particle penetration along the follicular duct, diffusion into the surrounding tissue, uptake by APCs and transport to the draining lymph nodes. The application of small particles, such as ovalbumin coding DNA or MVA, induced both humoral and cellular immune responses. Furthermore, TC applied MVA induced protection against vaccinia virus challenge. Our results strengthen the concept of TC targeting of cutaneous APCs by hair follicles and will contribute to the development of advanced vaccination protocols using NPs or viral vectors.

  3. Intracellular transport of MHC class II and associated invariant chain in antigen presenting cells from AP-3-deficient mocha mice.

    PubMed

    Sevilla, L M; Richter, S S; Miller, J

    2001-06-15

    MHC class II-restricted antigen presentation requires trafficking of newly synthesized class II-invariant chain complexes from the trans-Golgi network to endosomal, peptide-loading compartments. This transport is mediated by dileucine-like motifs within the cytosolic tail of the invariant chain. Although these signals have been well characterized, the cytosolic proteins that interact with these dileucine signals and mediate Golgi sorting and endosomal transport have not been identified. Recently, an adaptor complex, AP-3, has been identified that interacts with dileucine motifs and mediates endosomal/lysosomal transport in yeast, Drosophila, and mammals. In this report, we have assessed class II-invariant chain trafficking in a strain of mice (mocha) which lacks expression of AP-3. Our studies demonstrate that the lack of AP-3 does not affect the kinetics of invariant chain degradation, the route of class II-invariant chain transport, or the rate and extent of class II-peptide binding as assessed by the generation of SDS-stable dimers. The possible role of other known or unknown adaptor complexes in class II-invariant chain transport is discussed.

  4. IL-27 in human secondary lymphoid organs attracts myeloid dendritic cells and impairs HLA class I-restricted antigen presentation.

    PubMed

    Morandi, Fabio; Di Carlo, Emma; Ferrone, Soldano; Petretto, Andrea; Pistoia, Vito; Airoldi, Irma

    2014-03-15

    Different cytokines play crucial roles in inflammation and in polarizing immune responses, including IL-27 that exerts pro- and anti-inflammatory functions. Although the activity of IL-27 is well characterized in murine immune cells, only limited information is available regarding the natural cellular sources of IL-27 in humans and its effects on human immune cells. Dendritic cells (DCs) are the most potent professional APCs that in the immature state are positioned throughout peripheral tissues by acting as sentinels, sensing the presence of Ags. Activated DCs migrate into the lymph nodes and direct Ag-specific T cell responses, thus acting as key players in both adaptive and innate immunity. In this study we asked whether IL-27 is produced by human secondary lymphoid organs and what is its functional role on human DCs. To our knowledge, we provide the first evidence that 1) in lymph nodes, macrophages are the major source for IL-27; 2) immature and mature human DCs express functional IL-27R; 3) IL-27 exerts immunosuppressive activity by crippling the Ag processing machinery in immature DCs under steady-state conditions and after pulsing with a viral Ag; and 4) IL-27 is chemotactic for human DCs. Our findings highlight novel mechanisms underlying the immunosuppressive activity of IL-27, suggesting that this cytokine may function as a homeostatic cytokine in secondary lymphoid organs by limiting duration and/or intensity of ongoing adaptive immune responses. The results presented in this study pave the way to future studies aimed at investigating whether dysregulation of IL-27 expression and function may be involved in pathogenesis of autoimmune disease and cancer.

  5. CNS myelin induces regulatory functions of DC-SIGN–expressing, antigen-presenting cells via cognate interaction with MOG

    PubMed Central

    García-Vallejo, J.J.; Ilarregui, J.M.; Kalay, H.; Chamorro, S.; Koning, N.; Unger, W.W.; Ambrosini, M.; Montserrat, V.; Fernandes, R.J.; Bruijns, S.C.M.; van Weering, J.R.T.; Paauw, N.J.; O’Toole, T.; van Horssen, J.; van der Valk, P.; Nazmi, K.; Bolscher, J.G.M.; Bajramovic, J.; Dijkstra, C.D.; ’t Hart, B.A.

    2014-01-01

    Myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG), a constituent of central nervous system myelin, is an important autoantigen in the neuroinflammatory disease multiple sclerosis (MS). However, its function remains unknown. Here, we show that, in healthy human myelin, MOG is decorated with fucosylated N-glycans that support recognition by the C-type lectin receptor (CLR) DC-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3–grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN) on microglia and DCs. The interaction of MOG with DC-SIGN in the context of simultaneous TLR4 activation resulted in enhanced IL-10 secretion and decreased T cell proliferation in a DC-SIGN-, glycosylation-, and Raf1-dependent manner. Exposure of oligodendrocytes to proinflammatory factors resulted in the down-regulation of fucosyltransferase expression, reflected by altered glycosylation at the MS lesion site. Indeed, removal of fucose on myelin reduced DC-SIGN–dependent homeostatic control, and resulted in inflammasome activation, increased T cell proliferation, and differentiation toward a Th17-prone phenotype. These data demonstrate a new role for myelin glycosylation in the control of immune homeostasis in the healthy human brain through the MOG–DC-SIGN homeostatic regulatory axis, which is comprised by inflammatory insults that affect glycosylation. This phenomenon should be considered as a basis to restore immune tolerance in MS. PMID:24935259

  6. CD1 antigen presentation: how it works.

    PubMed

    Barral, Duarte C; Brenner, Michael B

    2007-12-01

    The classic concept of self-non-self discrimination by the immune system focused on the recognition of fragments from proteins presented by classical MHC molecules. However, the discovery of MHC-class-I-like CD1 antigen-presentation molecules now explains how the immune system also recognizes the abundant and diverse universe of lipid-containing antigens. The CD1 molecules bind and present amphipathic lipid antigens for recognition by T-cell receptors. Here, we outline the recent advances in our understanding of how the processes of CD1 assembly, trafficking, lipid-antigen binding and T-cell activation are achieved and the new insights into how lipid antigens differentially elicit CD1-restricted innate and adaptive T-cell responses.

  7. Lipid antigen presentation through CD1d pathway in mouse lung epithelial cells, macrophages and dendritic cells and its suppression by poly-dispersed single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Rizvi, Zaigham Abbas; Puri, Niti; Saxena, Rajiv K

    2015-09-01

    Effect of poly-dispersed acid-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (AF-SWCNTs) was examined on lipid antigen presentation through CD1d pathway on three cell lines, LA4, MHS, and JAWSII used as prototype antigen presenting cells (APCs). CD1d molecule was expressed on 80-90% MHS (prototype macrophages) and JAWSII (prototype dendritic cells) cells whereas <5% LA4 cells (lung epithelial cells, non-classical APCs) expressed CD1d. Treatment with AF-SWCNTs but not with pristine SWCNTs resulted in a significant decline in the level of CD1d mRNA as well as mRNA levels of some other intracellular proteins involved in lipid antigen presentation pathway (MTP, ApoE, prosaposin, SR-BI and LDLr). Lipid antigen presentation was assessed by first incubating the cells with a prototype lipid antigen (α-Glactosylceramide or αGC) and then staining with L363 monoclonal antibody that detects αGC bound to CD1d molecule. While 100% MHS and JAWSII cells presented αGC, only 20% LA4 cells presented the CD1d antigen. Treatment with AF-SWCNTs resulted in a 30-40% decrease in αGC antigen presentation in all three cell lines. These results show that AF-SWCNT treatment down regulated the lipid antigen presentation pathway in all three cell lines and significantly lowered the ability of these cell lines to present αGC antigen.

  8. Generation of antigen-presenting cells from tumor-infiltrated CD11b myeloid cells with DNA demethylating agent 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine.

    PubMed

    Daurkin, Irina; Eruslanov, Evgeniy; Vieweg, Johannes; Kusmartsev, Sergei

    2010-05-01

    Tumor-recruited CD11b myeloid cells, including myeloid-derived suppressor cells, play a significant role in tumor progression, as these cells are involved in tumor-induced immune suppression and tumor neovasculogenesis. On the other hand, the tumor-infiltrated CD11b myeloid cells could potentially be a source of immunostimulatory antigen-presenting cells (APCs), since most of these cells represent common precursors of both dendritic cells and macrophages. Here, we investigated the possibility of generating mature APCs from tumor-infiltrated CD11b myeloid cells. We demonstrate that in vitro exposure of freshly excised mouse tumors to DNA methyltransferase inhibitor 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (decitabine, AZA) results in selective elimination of tumor cells, but, surprisingly it also enriches CD45(+) tumor-infiltrated cells. The majority of "post-AZA" surviving CD45(+) tumor-infiltrated cells were represented by CD11b myeloid cells. A culture of isolated tumor-infiltrated CD11b cells in the presence of AZA and GM-CSF promoted their differentiation into mature F4/80/CD11c/MHC class II-positive APCs. These tumor-derived myeloid APCs produced substantially reduced amounts of immunosuppressive (IL-13, IL-10, PGE(2)), pro-angiogenic (VEGF, MMP-9) and pro-inflammatory (IL-1beta, IL-6, MIP-2) mediators than their precursors, freshly isolated tumor-infiltrated CD11b cells. Vaccinating naïve mice with ex vivo generated tumor-derived APCs resulted in the protection of 70% mice from tumor outgrowth. Importantly, no loading of tumor-derived APC with exogenous antigen was needed to stimulate T cell response and induce the anti-tumor effect. Collectively, our results for the first time demonstrate that tumor-infiltrated CD11b myeloid cells can be enriched and differentiated in the presence of DNA demethylating agent 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine into mature tumor-derived APCs, which could be used for cancer immunotherapy.

  9. Modulation of antigen presentation by autoreactive B cell clones specific for GAD65 from a type I diabetic patient

    PubMed Central

    BANGA, J P; MOORE, J K; DUHINDAN, N; MADEC, A M; VAN ENDERT, P M; ORGIAZZI, J; ENDL, J

    2004-01-01

    We used a GAD65-specific human B–T cell line cognate system in vitro to investigate the modulation of GAD65 presentation by autoantibody, assessed in a proliferation assay. Generally, if the T cell determinant overlaps or resides within the antibody epitope, effects of presentation are blunted while if they are distant can lead to potent presentation. For three different autoreactive B–T cell line cognate pairs, the modulation of GAD65 presentation followed the mode of overlapping or distant epitopes with resultant potent or undetectable presentation. However, other cognate pairs elicited variability in this pattern of presentation. Notably, one B cell line, DPC, whose antibody epitope did not overlap with the T cell determinants, was consistently poor in presenting GAD65. Using the fluorescent dye Alexa Fluor 647 conjugated to GAD65 to study receptor-mediated antigen endocytosis showed that all the antigen-specific B cell clones were efficient in intracellular accumulation of the antigen. Additionally, multicolour immunofluorescence microscopy showed that the internalized GAD65/surface IgG complexes were rapidly targeted to a perinuclear compartment in all GAD-specific B cell clones. This analysis also demonstrated that HLA-DM expression was reduced strongly in DPC compared to the stimulatory B cell clones. Thus the capability of antigen-specific B cells to capture and present antigen to human T cell lines is dependent on the spatial relationship of B and T cell epitopes as well other factors which contribute to the efficiency of presentation. PMID:14678267

  10. Rainbow trout CK9, a CCL25-like ancient chemokine that attracts and regulates B cells and macrophages, the main antigen presenting cells in fish

    PubMed Central

    Aquilino, Carolina; Granja, Aitor G.; Castro, Rosario; Wang, Tiehui; Abos, Beatriz; Parra, David; Secombes, Christopher J.; Tafalla, Carolina

    2016-01-01

    CK9 is a rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) CC chemokine phylogenetically related to mammalian CCL25. Although CK9 is known to be transcriptionally regulated in response to inflammation particularly in mucosal tissues, its functionality has never been revealed. In the current work, we have demonstrated that CK9 is chemoattractant for antigen presenting cells (APCs) expressing major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II) on the cell surface. Among these APCs, CK9 has a strong chemotactic capacity for both B cells (IgM+ and IgT+) and macrophages. Along with its chemotactic capacities, CK9 modulated the MHC II turnover of B lymphocytes and up-regulated the phagocytic capacity of both IgM+ cells and macrophages. Although CK9 had no lymphoproliferative effects, it increased the survival of IgT+ lymphocytes. Furthermore, we have established that the chemoattractant capacity of CK9 is strongly increased after pre-incubation of leukocytes with a T-independent antigen, whereas B cell receptor (BCR) cross-linking strongly abrogated their capacity to migrate to CK9, indicating that CK9 preferentially attracts B cells at the steady state or under BCR-independent stimulation. These results point to CK9 being a key regulator of B lymphocyte trafficking in rainbow trout, able to modulate innate functions of teleost B lymphocytes and macrophages. PMID:27003360

  11. Bacillus subtilis-specific poly-gamma-glutamic acid regulates development pathways of naive CD4(+) T cells through antigen-presenting cell-dependent and -independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sunghoon; Yang, Jun Young; Lee, Kyuheon; Oh, Kyu Heon; Gi, Mia; Kim, Jung Mogg; Paik, Doo Jin; Hong, Seokmann; Youn, Jeehee

    2009-08-01

    Peripheral naive CD4(+) T cells selectively differentiate to type 1 T(h), type 2 T(h) and IL-17-producing T(h) (T(h)17) cells, depending on the priming conditions. Since these subsets develop antagonistically to each other to elicit subset-specific adaptive immune responses, balance between these subsets can regulate the susceptibility to diverse immune diseases. The present study was undertaken to determine whether poly-gamma-glutamic acid (gamma-PGA), an edible and safe exopolymer that is generated by microorganisms such as Bacillus subtilis, could modulate the development pathways of T(h) subsets. The presence of gamma-PGA during priming promoted the development of T(h)1 and T(h)17 cells but inhibited development of T(h)2 cells. gamma-PGA up-regulated the expression of T-bet and ROR-gammat, the master genes of T(h)1 and T(h)17 cells, respectively, whereas down-regulating the level of GATA-3, the master gene of T(h)2 cells. gamma-PGA induced the expression of IL-12p40, CD80 and CD86 in dendritic cells (DC) and macrophages in a Toll-like receptor-4-dependent manner, and the effect of gamma-PGA on T(h)1/T(h)2 development was dependent on the presence of antigen-presenting cells (APC). Furthermore, gamma-PGA-stimulated DC favored the polarization of naive CD4(+) T cells toward T(h)1 cells rather than T(h)2 cells. In contrast, gamma-PGA affected T(h)17 cell development, regardless of the presence or absence of APC. Thus, these data demonstrate that gamma-PGA has the potential to regulate the development pathways of naive CD4(+) T cells through APC-dependent and -independent mechanisms and to be applicable to treating T(h)2-dominated diseases.

  12. Enhanced antigen-presenting capacity of cultured Langerhans' cells is associated with markedly increased expression of Ia antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Shimada, S.; Caughman, S.W.; Sharrow, S.O.; Stephany, D.; Katz, S.I.

    1987-10-15

    Recent studies indicate that when epidermal Langerhans' cells (LC) are cultured for 2 to 3 days they, in comparison to freshly prepared LC, exhibit markedly enhanced ability to stimulate T cell proliferative responses in oxidative mitogenesis and in the mixed epidermal-leukocyte reaction. In this study, we determined whether cultured LC enhance antigen-specific T cell responses, and whether such enhanced stimulatory capacity correlates with the level of Ia antigen expressed on LC. We used C3H/He (Iak) epidermal cells as stimulators and, as responder cells, both the trinitrophenyl-specific clones D8 and SE4, which were assayed for (/sup 3/H)dThd incorporation, and the pigeon cytochrome c specific hybridoma 2C2, which was assayed for interleukin 2 production. Cultured LC induced 10 to 100 times greater proliferation or interleukin 2 production by responder cells than did freshly prepared LC. The intensity of I-Ak and I-Ek, expressed on cultured LC as assessed by immunofluorescence and flow cytometry, was found to be 10 to 36 times greater on a per cell basis than that on freshly prepared LC. Depletion of LC from fresh epidermal cell suspensions by anti-Iak and complement or treatment with 50 mJ/cm/sup 2/ medium range ultraviolet light or cycloheximide before culture abrogated both the increase in Ia expression and antigen-specific clonal proliferation. The results suggest that when LC are removed from their usual epidermal milieu, they express increased amounts of Ia and become more potent stimulators of T cell responses.

  13. Cathepsin B in Antigen-Presenting Cells Controls Mediators of the Th1 Immune Response during Leishmania major Infection

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Leal, Iris J.; Röger, Bianca; Schwarz, Angela; Schirmeister, Tanja; Reinheckel, Thomas; Lutz, Manfred B.; Moll, Heidrun

    2014-01-01

    Resistance and susceptibility to Leishmania major infection in the murine model is determined by the capacity of the host to mount either a protective Th1 response or a Th2 response associated with disease progression. Previous reports involving the use of cysteine cathepsin inhibitors indicated that cathepsins B (Ctsb) and L (Ctsl) play important roles in Th1/Th2 polarization during L. major infection in both susceptible and resistant mouse strains. Although it was hypothesized that these effects are a consequence of differential patterns of antigen processing, the mechanisms underlying these differences were not further investigated. Given the pivotal roles that dendritic cells and macrophages play during Leishmania infection, we generated bone-marrow derived dendritic cells (BMDC) and macrophages (BMM) from Ctsb−/− and Ctsl−/− mice, and studied the effects of Ctsb and Ctsl deficiency on the survival of L. major in infected cells. Furthermore, the signals used by dendritic cells to instruct Th cell polarization were addressed: the expression of MHC class II and co-stimulatory molecules, and cytokine production. We found that Ctsb−/− BMDC express higher levels of MHC class II molecules than wild-type (WT) and Ctsl−/− BMDC, while there were no significant differences in the expression of co-stimulatory molecules between cathepsin-deficient and WT cells. Moreover, both BMDC and BMM from Ctsb−/− mice significantly up-regulated the levels of interleukin 12 (IL-12) expression, a key Th1-inducing cytokine. These findings indicate that Ctsb−/− BMDC display more pro-Th1 properties than their WT and Ctsl−/− counterparts, and therefore suggest that Ctsb down-regulates the Th1 response to L. major. Moreover, they propose a novel role for Ctsb as a regulator of cytokine expression. PMID:25255101

  14. A minor subset of Batf3-dependent antigen presenting cells in islets of Langerhans is essential for the development of autoimmune diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Ferris, Stephen T.; Carrero, Javier A.; Mohan, James F.; Calderon, Boris; Murphy, Kenneth M.; Unanue, Emil R.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Autoimmune diabetes is characterized by inflammatory infiltration; however the initiating events are poorly understood. We found that the islets of Langerhans in young non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice contained two antigen presenting cell (APC) populations: a major macrophage and a minor CD103+ dendritic cell (DC) population. By four weeks of age, CD4+ T cells entered islets coincident with an increase of CD103+ DCs. In order to examine the role of the CD103+ DCs in diabetes, we examined Batf3-deficient NOD mice that lacked the CD103+ DCs in islets and pancreatic lymph nodes. This led to a lack of autoreactive T cells in islets and, importantly, no incidence of diabetes. Additional examination revealed that presentation of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I epitopes in the pancreatic lymph nodes was absent with a partial impairment of MHC class II presentation. Altogether, this study reveals that CD103+ DCs were essential for autoimmune diabetes development. PMID:25367577

  15. A minor subset of Batf3-dependent antigen-presenting cells in islets of Langerhans is essential for the development of autoimmune diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ferris, Stephen T; Carrero, Javier A; Mohan, James F; Calderon, Boris; Murphy, Kenneth M; Unanue, Emil R

    2014-10-16

    Autoimmune diabetes is characterized by inflammatory infiltration; however, the initiating events are poorly understood. We found that the islets of Langerhans in young nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice contained two antigen-presenting cell (APC) populations: a major macrophage and a minor CD103(+) dendritic cell (DC) population. By 4 weeks of age, CD4(+) T cells entered islets coincident with an increase in CD103(+) DCs. In order to examine the role of the CD103(+) DCs in diabetes, we examined Batf3-deficient NOD mice that lacked the CD103(+) DCs in islets and pancreatic lymph nodes. This led to a lack of autoreactive T cells in islets and, importantly, no incidence of diabetes. Additional examination revealed that presentation of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I epitopes in the pancreatic lymph nodes was absent with a partial impairment of MHC class II presentation. Altogether, this study reveals that CD103(+) DCs are essential for autoimmune diabetes development.

  16. Brucella suis prevents human dendritic cell maturation and antigen presentation through regulation of tumor necrosis factor alpha secretion.

    PubMed

    Billard, Elisabeth; Dornand, Jacques; Gross, Antoine

    2007-10-01

    Brucella is a facultative intracellular pathogen and the etiological agent of brucellosis. In some cases, human brucellosis results in a persistent infection that may reactivate years after the initial exposure. The mechanisms by which the parasite evades clearance by the immune response to chronically infect its host are unknown. We recently demonstrated that dendritic cells (DCs), which are critical components of adaptive immunity, are highly susceptible to Brucella infection and are a preferential niche for the development of the bacteria. Here, we report that in contrast to several intracellular bacteria, Brucella prevented the infected DCs from engaging in their maturation process and impaired their capacities to present antigen to naïve T cells and to secrete interleukin-12. Moreover, Brucella-infected DCs failed to release tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), a defect involving the bacterial protein Omp25. Exogenous TNF-alpha addition to Brucella-infected DCs restored cell maturation and allowed them to present antigens. Two avirulent mutants of B. suis, B. suis bvrR and B. suis omp25 mutants, which do not express the Omp25 protein, triggered TNF-alpha production upon DC invasion. Cells infected with these mutants subsequently matured and acquired the ability to present antigens, two properties which were dramatically impaired by addition of anti-TNF-alpha antibodies. In light of these data, we propose a model in which virulent Brucella alters the maturation and functions of DCs through Omp25-dependent control of TNF-alpha production. This model defines a specific evasion strategy of the bacteria by which they can escape the immune response to chronically infect their host.

  17. Replication-deficient mutant Herpes Simplex Virus-1 targets professional antigen presenting cells and induces efficient CD4+ T helper responses.

    PubMed

    Fiorentini, Simona; Marconi, Peggy; Avolio, Manuela; Marini, Elena; Garrafa, Emirena; Caracciolo, Sonia; Rossi, Daniele; Bozac, Alexandra; Becker, Pablo D; Gentili, Francesca; Facchetti, Fabio; Guzman, Carlos A; Manservigi, Roberto; Caruso, Arnaldo

    2007-07-01

    Both neutralizing antibodies and cytotoxic T-cells are necessary to control a viral infection. However, vigorous T helper responses are essential for their elicitation and maintenance. Here we show that a recombinant replication-deficient Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV)-1 vector encoding the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-1 matrix protein p17 (T0-p17) was capable of infecting professional antigen presenting cells (APCs) in vitro and in vivo. The injection of T0-p17 in the mouse dermis generated a strong p17-specific CD4+ T helper response preceding both p17-specific humoral and effector T cell responses. Moreover, we show that T0-p17 infection did not interfere with the endogenous processing of the transgene encoded antigen, since infected APCs were able to evoke a strong recall response in vitro. Our results demonstrate that replication-deficient HSV vectors can be appealing candidates for the development of vaccines able to trigger T helper responses.

  18. Potent costimulation of human CD8 T cells by anti-4-1BB and anti-CD28 on synthetic artificial antigen presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Rudolf, Despina; Silberzahn, Tobias; Walter, Steffen; Maurer, Dominik; Engelhard, Johanna; Wernet, Dorothee; Bühring, Hans-Jörg; Jung, Gundram; Kwon, Byoung S; Rammensee, Hans-Georg; Stevanović, Stefan

    2008-02-01

    The in vitro generation of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) for anticancer immunotherapy is a promising approach to take patient-specific therapy from the bench to the bedside. Two criteria must be met by protocols for the expansion of CTLs: high yield of functional cells and suitability for good manufacturing practice (GMP). The antigen presenting cells (APCs) used to expand the CTLs are the key to achieving both targets but they pose a challenge: Unspecific stimulation is not feasible because only memory T cells are expanded and not rare naïve CTL precursors; in addition, antigen-specific stimulation by cell-based APCs is cumbersome and problematic in a clinical setting. However, synthetic artificial APCs which can be loaded reproducibly with MHC-peptide monomers and antibodies specific for costimulatory molecules could resolve these problems. The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential of complex synthetic artificial APCs in triggering the costimulatory molecules CD28 and 4-1BB on the T cell. Anti-4-1BB antibodies were added to an established system of microbeads coated with MHC-peptide monomers and anti-CD28. Triggering via CD28 and 4-1BB resulted in strong costimulatory synergy. The quantitative ratio between these signals determined the outcome of the stimulation with optimal results when anti-4-1BB and anti-CD28 were applied in a 3:1 ratio. Functional CTLs of an effector memory subtype (CD45RA(-) CCR7(-)) were generated in high numbers. We present a highly defined APC platform using off-the-shelf reagents for the convenient generation of large numbers of antigen-specific CTLs.

  19. Human Articular Chondrocytes Regulate Immune Response by Affecting Directly T Cell Proliferation and Indirectly Inhibiting Monocyte Differentiation to Professional Antigen-Presenting Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Rui C.; Martinelli, Daniela; Cancedda, Ranieri; Gentili, Chiara; Poggi, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Autologous chondrocyte implantation is the current gold standard cell therapy for cartilage lesions. However, in some instances, the heavily compromised health of the patient can either impair or limit the recovery of the autologous chondrocytes and a satisfactory outcome of the implant. Allogeneic human articular chondrocytes (hAC) could be a good alternative, but the possible immunological incompatibility between recipient and hAC donor should be considered. Herein, we report that allogeneic hAC inhibited T lymphocyte response to antigen-dependent and -independent proliferative stimuli. This effect was maximal when T cells and hAC were in contact and it was not relieved by the addition of exogenous lymphocyte growth factor interleukin (IL)-2. More important, hAC impaired the differentiation of peripheral blood monocytes induced with granulocyte monocyte colony-stimulating factor and IL-4 (Mo) to professional antigen-presenting cells, such as dendritic cells (DC). Indeed, a marked inhibition of the onset of the CD1a expression and an ineffective downregulation of CD14 antigens was observed in Mo–hAC co-cultures. Furthermore, compared to immature or mature DC, Mo from Mo–hAC co-cultures did not trigger an efficacious allo-response. The prostaglandin (PG) E2 present in the Mo–hAC co-culture conditioned media is a putative candidate of the hAC-mediated inhibition of Mo maturation. Altogether, these findings indicate that allogeneic hAC inhibit, rather than trigger, immune response and strongly suggest that an efficient chondrocyte implantation could be possible also in an allogeneic setting. PMID:27822208

  20. Phenotypic and Functional Properties of Human Steady State CD14+ and CD1a+ Antigen Presenting Cells and Epidermal Langerhans Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fehres, Cynthia. M.; Bruijns, Sven C. M.; Sotthewes, Brigit N.; Kalay, Hakan; Schaffer, Lana; Head, Steven R.; de Gruijl, Tanja D.; Garcia-Vallejo, Juan J.; van Kooyk, Yvette

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous antigen presenting cells (APCs) are critical for the induction and regulation of skin immune responses. The human skin contains phenotypically and functionally distinct APCs subsets that are present at two separated locations. While CD1ahigh LCs form a dense network in the epidermis, the CD14+ and CD1a+ APCs reside in the dermal compartment. A better understanding of the biology of human skin APC subsets is necessary for the improvement of vaccine strategies that use the skin as administration route. In particular, progress in the characterization of uptake and activatory receptors will certainly improve APC-targeting strategies in vaccination. Here we performed a detailed analysis of the expression and function of glycan-binding and pattern-recognition receptors in skin APC subsets. The results demonstrate that under steady state conditions human CD1a+ dermal dendritic cells (DCs) were phenotypically most mature as measured by the expression of CD83 and CD86, whereas the CD14+ cells showed a higher expression of the CLRs DC-SIGN, mannose receptor and DCIR and had potent antigen uptake capacity. Furthermore, steady state LCs showed superior antigen cross-presentation as compared to the dermal APC subsets. Our results also demonstrate that the TLR3 ligand polyribosinic-polyribocytidylic acid (pI:C) was the most potent stimulator of cytokine production by both LCs and dDCs. These studies warrant further exploration of human CD1a+ dDCs and LCs as target cells for cancer vaccination to induce anti-tumor immune responses. PMID:26605924

  1. Mitomycin C-treated antigen-presenting cells as a tool for control of allograft rejection and autoimmunity: from bench to bedside.

    PubMed

    Terness, Peter; Kleist, Christian; Simon, Helmut; Sandra-Petrescu, Flavius; Ehser, Sandra; Chuang, Jing-Jing; Mohr, Elisabeth; Jiga, Lucian; Greil, Johann; Opelz, Gerhard

    2009-07-01

    Cells have been previously used in experimental models for tolerance induction in organ transplantation and autoimmune diseases. One problem with the therapeutic use of cells is standardization of their preparation. We discuss an immunosuppressive strategy relying on cells irreversibly transformed by a chemotherapeutic drug. Dendritic cells (DCs) of transplant donors pretreated with mitomycin C (MMC) strongly prolonged rat heart allograft survival when injected into recipients before transplantation. Likewise, MMC-DCs loaded with myelin basic protein suppressed autoreactive T cells of MS patients in vitro and prevented experimental autoimmune encephalitis in mice. Comprehensive gene microarray analysis identified genes that possibly make up the suppressive phenotype, comprising glucocorticoid leucine zipper, immunoglobulin-like transcript 3, CD80, CD83, CD86, and apoptotic genes. Based on these findings, a hypothetical model of tolerance induction by MMC-treated DCs is delineated. Finally, we describe the first clinical application of MMC-treated monocyte-enriched donor cells in an attempt to control the rejection of a haploidentical stem cell transplant in a sensitized recipient and discuss the pros and cons of using MMC-treated antigen-presenting cells for tolerance induction. Although many questions remain, MMC-treated cells are a promising clinical tool for controlling allograft rejection and deleterious immune responses in autoimmune diseases.

  2. Stat6-Dependent Inhibition of Mincle Expression in Mouse and Human Antigen-Presenting Cells by the Th2 Cytokine IL-4

    PubMed Central

    Hupfer, Thomas; Schick, Judith; Jozefowski, Katrin; Voehringer, David; Ostrop, Jenny; Lang, Roland

    2016-01-01

    The C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) Mincle, Mcl, and Dectin-2 bind mycobacterial and fungal cell wall glycolipids and carbohydrates. Recently, we described that expression of these CLR is downregulated during differentiation of human monocytes to dendritic cells (DC) in the presence of GM-CSF and IL-4. Here, we demonstrate that the Th2 cytokine IL-4 specifically inhibits expression of Mincle, Mcl, and Dectin-2 in human antigen-presenting cells (APC). This inhibitory effect of IL-4 was observed across species, as murine macrophages and DC treated with IL-4 also downregulated these receptors. IL-4 blocked upregulation of Mincle and Mcl mRNA expression and cell surface protein by murine macrophages in response to the Mincle ligand Trehalose-6,6-dibehenate (TDB), whereas the TLR4 ligand LPS overcame inhibition by IL-4. Functionally, downregulation of Mincle expression by IL-4 was accompanied by reduced cytokine production upon stimulation with TDB. These inhibitory effects of IL-4 were dependent on the transcription factor Stat6. Together, our results show that the key Th2 cytokine IL-4 exerts a negative effect on the expression of Mincle and other Dectin-2 cluster CLR in mouse and human macrophages and DC, which may render these sentinel cells less vigilant for sensing mycobacterial and fungal ligands. PMID:27790218

  3. Tumour immunogenicity, antigen presentation and immunological barriers in cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Escors, David

    2014-01-01

    Since the beginning of the 20th century, scientists have tried to stimulate the anti-tumour activities of the immune system to fight against cancer. However, the scientific effort devoted on the development of cancer immunotherapy has not been translated into the expected clinical success. On the contrary, classical anti-neoplastic treatments such as surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy are the first line of treatment. Nevertheless, there is compelling evidence on the immunogenicity of cancer cells, and the capacity of the immune system to expand cancer-specific effector cytotoxic T cells. However, the effective activation of anti-cancer T cell responses strongly depends on efficient tumour antigen presentation from professional antigen presenting cells such as dendritic cells (DCs). Several strategies have been used to boost DC antigen presenting functions, but at the end cancer immunotherapy is not as effective as would be expected according to preclinical models. In this review we comment on these discrepancies, focusing our attention on the contribution of regulatory T cells and myeloid-derived suppressor cells to the lack of therapeutic success of DC-based cancer immunotherapy. PMID:24634791

  4. Antigen presentation by non-immune B-cell hybridoma clones: presentation of synthetic antigenic sites reveals clones that exhibit no specificity and clones that present only one epitope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohly, H. H.; Morrison, D. R.; Atassi, M. Z.

    1989-01-01

    Recently, we reported the preparation and antigen-presenting properties of hybridoma B-cell clones obtained after fusing non-secreting, non-antigen presenting Balb/c 653-myeloma cells with non-immune SJL spleen cells. It was found that antigen presentation at the clonal level can be specific or non-specific, depending on the particular B-cell clone. In the present work, one specific and one general presenter B-cell clones were tested for their epitope presentation ability to SJL T-cells that were specific to lysozyme or myoglobin. B-cell clone A1G12, a general presenter which presented both lysozyme and myoglobin to their respective T-cell lines, was found to present all five myoglobin epitopes while clone A1L16, a lysozyme specific presenter presented only one of the three epitopes of lysozyme. The latter reveals a hitherto unknown submolecular specificity (to a given epitope within a protein) for antigen presenting cells at the clonal level. Therefore, the specificity of T-cell recognition does not only derive from the T-cell but may also be dependent on the epitope specificity of the antigen-presenting B-cell.

  5. Refining human T-cell immunotherapy of cytomegalovirus disease: a mouse model with 'humanized' antigen presentation as a new preclinical study tool.

    PubMed

    Lemmermann, Niels A W; Reddehase, Matthias J

    2016-12-01

    by 'humanizing' antigen presentation using antigenically chimeric CMV and HLA-transgenic mice to allow for an in vivo testing of the antiviral function of human CMV-specific T cells. As an important new message, this model predicts that T cell immunotherapy is most efficient if CD4 T cells are equipped with a transduced TCR directed against an epitope presented by MHC/HLA class-I for local delivery of 'cognate' help to CD8 effector T cells at infected MHC/HLA class-II-negative host tissue cells.

  6. Prior stimulation of antigen-presenting cells with Lactobacillus regulates excessive antigen-specific cytokine responses in vitro when compared with Bacteroides

    PubMed Central

    Tsuda, Masato; Yanagibashi, Tsutomu; Hachimura, Satoshi; Hirayama, Kazuhiro; Itoh, Kikuji; Takahashi, Kyoko; Kaminogawa, Shuichi

    2007-01-01

    The development of allergy is related to differences in the intestinal microbiota. Therefore, it is suggested that the immune responses induced by different genera of bacteria might be regulated through adaptive as well as innate immunity. In this study, we examined whether antigen-specific immune responses were affected by stimulation with the different genera of intestinal bacteria in vitro. Mesenteric lymph node (MLN) cells isolated from germ-free ovalbumin (OVA)-specific T cell receptor transgenic (OVA-Tg) mice were stimulated with OVA and intestinal bacteria. Cecal contents from conventional mice but not germ-free mice could induce OVA-specific cytokine production. Among the murine intestinal bacteria, Bacteroides acidofaciens (BA) enhanced OVA-specific IFN-γ and IL-10 production while Lactobacillusjohnsonii (LA) increased OVA-specific IL-10 production only. The expression of cell surface molecules and cytokine production by antigen-presenting cells (APCs) from germ-free Balb/c mice were analyzed. BA increased the expression of MHC II and co-stimulatory molecules on APCs compared with LA. BA increased IL-6 and IL-10 production but induced less IL-12p40 than LA. To examine the effects of prior stimulation of APCs by intestinal bacteria on the induction of antigen-specific immune responses, cytokine production was determined following co-culture with OVA, CD4+ T cells from OVA-Tg mice, and APCs which were pre-stimulated with the bacteria or not. APCs pre-stimulated with LA did not enhance OVA-specific cytokine production while BA stimulated OVA-specific IL-10 production. These results suggest that the prior stimulation of intestinal immunocytes by Lactobacillus might regulate excessive antigen-specific cytokine responses via APCs when compared with prior stimulation by Bacteroides. PMID:19002998

  7. A nonimmunogenic sarcoma transduced with the cDNA for interferon gamma elicits CD8+ T cells against the wild-type tumor: correlation with antigen presentation capability

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    To be recognized by CD8+ T lymphocytes, target cells must process and present peptide antigens in the context of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules. The nonimmunogenic, low class I- expressing, methylcholanthrene (MCA)-induced murine sarcoma cell line, MCA 101, is a poor presenter of endogenously generated viral antigens to specific CD8+ T lymphocytes and cannot be used to generate tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL). Since interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) has been shown to upregulate three sets of molecules important for antigen processing and presentation, we retrovirally transduced wild-type MCA 101 (101.WT) tumor with the mIFN-gamma cDNA to create the 101.NAT cell line. Unlike 101.WT, some clones of retrovirally transduced 101.NAT tumor expressed high levels of class I, and could be used to generate CD8+ TIL. More importantly, these TIL were therapeutic in vivo against established pulmonary metastases from the wild-type tumor. Although not uniformly cytotoxic amongst several separate cultures, these TIL did specifically release cytokines (IFN-gamma and tumor necrosis factor- alpha) in response to 101.WT targets. 101.WT's antigen presentation deficit was also reversed by gene modification with mIFN-gamma cDNA. 101.NAT had a greatly improved capacity to present viral antigens to CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes. These findings show that a nonimmunogenic tumor, incapable of generating a CD8+ T cell immune response, could be gene-modified to generate a therapeutically useful immune response against the wild-type tumor. This strategy may be useful in developing treatments for tumor histologies not thought to be susceptible to T cell-based immunotherapy. PMID:1588273

  8. Development of an enhanced bovine viral diarrhea virus subunit vaccine based on E2 glycoprotein fused to a single chain antibody which targets to antigen-presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Pecora, Andrea; Malacari, Darío A; Pérez Aguirreburualde, María S; Bellido, Demian; Escribano, José M; Dus Santos, María J; Wigdorovitz, Andrés

    2015-01-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is an important cause of economic losses worldwide. E2 is an immunodominant protein and a promising candidate to develop subunit vaccines. To improve its immunogenicity, a truncated E2 (tE2) was fused to a single chain antibody named APCH, which targets to antigen-presenting cells. APCH-tE2 and tE2 proteins were expressed in the baculovirus system and their immunogenicity was firstly compared in guinea pigs. APCH-tE2 vaccine was the best one to evoke a humoral response, and for this reason, it was selected for a cattle vaccination experiment. All the bovines immunized with 1.5 μg of APCH-tE2 developed high levels of neutralizing antibodies against BVDV up to a year post-immunization, demonstrating its significant potential as a subunit vaccine. This novel vaccine is undergoing scale-up and was transferred to the private sector. Nowadays, it is being evaluated for registration as the first Argentinean subunit vaccine for cattle.

  9. Granulocyte/macrophage-colony stimulating factor produced by recombinant avian poxviruses enriches the regional lymph nodes with antigen-presenting cells and acts as an immunoadjuvant.

    PubMed

    Kass, E; Panicali, D L; Mazzara, G; Schlom, J; Greiner, J W

    2001-01-01

    Recombinant avian poxviruses [fowlpox and canarypox (ALVAC)], restricted for replication in nonavian cell substrates and expressing granulocyte/macrophage-colony stimulating factor (avipox-GM-CSF), were evaluated for their ability to enrich an immunization site with antigen-presenting cells (APCs) and, in turn, function as biological vaccine adjuvants. Avipox-GM-CSF administered as a single s.c. injection significantly enhanced the percentage and absolute number of APCs in the regional lymph nodes that drain the injection site. Both the magnitude and duration of the cellular and phenotypic increases within the lymph nodes induced by the avipox-GM-CSF viruses were significantly (P < 0.05) greater than those measured in mice treated with four daily injections of recombinant GM-CSF protein. Temporal studies revealed that the APC enrichment of regional lymph nodes was sustained for 21-28 days after injection of the recombinant avipox virus expressing GM-CSF and, moreover, three injections of the recombinant virus could be given without any appreciable loss of in vivo bioactivity. Mice expressing human carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) as a transgene (CEA.Tg) developed CEA-specific humoral and cell-mediated immunity after being immunized with avipox-CEA. The coadministration of recombinant avipox viruses expressing CEA and GM-CSF significantly enhanced CEA-specific host immunity with an accompanying immunotherapeutic response in tumor-bearing CEA.Tg mice. The optimal use of avipox-GM-CSF, in terms of dose and dose schedule, especially when used with different immunogens, remains to be determined. Nonetheless, the present findings demonstrate: (a) the effective delivery of GM-CSF to an immunization site using a recombinant avian poxvirus; (b) the compatibility of delivering an antigen and GM-CSF in replication-defective viruses to enhance antigen-specific immunity; and (c) the combined use of recombinant avipox viruses expressing CEA and GM-CSF to generate antitumor

  10. Antigen-Presenting Human γδ T Cells Promote Intestinal CD4(+) T Cell Expression of IL-22 and Mucosal Release of Calprotectin.

    PubMed

    Tyler, Christopher J; McCarthy, Neil E; Lindsay, James O; Stagg, Andrew J; Moser, Bernhard; Eberl, Matthias

    2017-03-22

    The cytokine IL-22 plays a critical role in mucosal barrier defense, but the mechanisms that promote IL-22 expression in the human intestine remain poorly understood. As human microbe-responsive Vγ9/Vδ2 T cells are abundant in the gut and recognize microbiota-associated metabolites, we assessed their potential to induce IL-22 expression by intestinal CD4(+) T cells. Vγ9/Vδ2 T cells with characteristics of APCs were generated from human blood and intestinal organ cultures, then cocultured with naive and memory CD4(+) T cells obtained from human blood or the colon. The potency of blood and intestinal γδ T-APCs was compared with that of monocytes and dendritic cells, by assessing CD4(+) T cell phenotypes and proliferation as well as cytokine and transcription factor profiles. Vγ9/Vδ2 T cells in human blood, colon, and terminal ileum acquired APC functions upon microbial activation in the presence of microenvironmental signals including IL-15, and were capable of polarizing both blood and colonic CD4(+) T cells toward distinct effector fates. Unlike monocytes or dendritic cells, gut-homing γδ T-APCs employed an IL-6 independent mechanism to stimulate CD4(+) T cell expression of IL-22 without upregulating IL-17. In human intestinal organ cultures, microbial activation of Vγ9/Vδ2 T cells promoted mucosal secretion of IL-22 and ICOSL/TNF-α-dependent release of the IL-22 inducible antimicrobial protein calprotectin without modulating IL-17 expression. In conclusion, human γδ T-APCs stimulate CD4(+) T cell responses distinct from those induced by myeloid APCs to promote local barrier defense via mucosal release of IL-22 and calprotectin. Targeting of γδ T-APC functions may lead to the development of novel gut-directed immunotherapies and vaccines.

  11. The MS Risk Allele of CD40 Is Associated with Reduced Cell-Membrane Bound Expression in Antigen Presenting Cells: Implications for Gene Function.

    PubMed

    Field, Judith; Shahijanian, Fernando; Schibeci, Stephen; Johnson, Laura; Gresle, Melissa; Laverick, Louise; Parnell, Grant; Stewart, Graeme; McKay, Fiona; Kilpatrick, Trevor; Butzkueven, Helmut; Booth, David

    2015-01-01

    Human genetic and animal studies have implicated the costimulatory molecule CD40 in the development of multiple sclerosis (MS). We investigated the cell specific gene and protein expression variation controlled by the CD40 genetic variant(s) associated with MS, i.e. the T-allele at rs1883832. Previously we had shown that the risk allele is expressed at a lower level in whole blood, especially in people with MS. Here, we have defined the immune cell subsets responsible for genotype and disease effects on CD40 expression at the mRNA and protein level. In cell subsets in which CD40 is most highly expressed, B lymphocytes and dendritic cells, the MS-associated risk variant is associated with reduced CD40 cell-surface protein expression. In monocytes and dendritic cells, the risk allele additionally reduces the ratio of expression of full-length versus truncated CD40 mRNA, the latter encoding secreted CD40. We additionally show that MS patients, regardless of genotype, express significantly lower levels of CD40 cell-surface protein compared to unaffected controls in B lymphocytes. Thus, both genotype-dependent and independent down-regulation of cell-surface CD40 is a feature of MS. Lower expression of a co-stimulator of T cell activation, CD40, is therefore associated with increased MS risk despite the same CD40 variant being associated with reduced risk of other inflammatory autoimmune diseases. Our results highlight the complexity and likely individuality of autoimmune pathogenesis, and could be consistent with antiviral and/or immunoregulatory functions of CD40 playing an important role in protection from MS.

  12. The MS Risk Allele of CD40 Is Associated with Reduced Cell-Membrane Bound Expression in Antigen Presenting Cells: Implications for Gene Function

    PubMed Central

    Field, Judith; Shahijanian, Fernando; Schibeci, Stephen; Johnson, Laura; Gresle, Melissa; Laverick, Louise; Parnell, Grant; Stewart, Graeme; McKay, Fiona; Kilpatrick, Trevor; Butzkueven, Helmut; Booth, David

    2015-01-01

    Human genetic and animal studies have implicated the costimulatory molecule CD40 in the development of multiple sclerosis (MS). We investigated the cell specific gene and protein expression variation controlled by the CD40 genetic variant(s) associated with MS, i.e. the T-allele at rs1883832. Previously we had shown that the risk allele is expressed at a lower level in whole blood, especially in people with MS. Here, we have defined the immune cell subsets responsible for genotype and disease effects on CD40 expression at the mRNA and protein level. In cell subsets in which CD40 is most highly expressed, B lymphocytes and dendritic cells, the MS-associated risk variant is associated with reduced CD40 cell-surface protein expression. In monocytes and dendritic cells, the risk allele additionally reduces the ratio of expression of full-length versus truncated CD40 mRNA, the latter encoding secreted CD40. We additionally show that MS patients, regardless of genotype, express significantly lower levels of CD40 cell-surface protein compared to unaffected controls in B lymphocytes. Thus, both genotype-dependent and independent down-regulation of cell-surface CD40 is a feature of MS. Lower expression of a co-stimulator of T cell activation, CD40, is therefore associated with increased MS risk despite the same CD40 variant being associated with reduced risk of other inflammatory autoimmune diseases. Our results highlight the complexity and likely individuality of autoimmune pathogenesis, and could be consistent with antiviral and/or immunoregulatory functions of CD40 playing an important role in protection from MS. PMID:26068105

  13. Antigen recognition. V. Requirement for histocompatibility between antigen-presenting cell and B cell in the response to a thymus- dependent antigen, and lack of allogeneic restriction between T and B cells

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    The restrictions imposed by the major histocompatibility complex on T-B- antigen-presenting cell (APC) interactions were studied with an in vivo adoptive transfer system, using mutually tolerant T and B cells taken from one-way fetal liver chimeras. It was found that the B cells and adoptive recipient (which provides APC function) have to share determinants encoded by the left-hand end of the H-2 complex for cooperation, whereas there is apparently no such requirement for T-B cell syngeneicity. Suppression arising from allogeneic effects between the host and the transferred T or B cells was excluded by the use of tolerant as well as normal adoptive recipients; both were functionally equivalent. We conclude that under experimental conditions, unrestricted helper T cell function and concurrent APC-B cell genetic restriction can be demonstrated in vivo. PMID:7276826

  14. Type 1 Diabetes and NKT Cells: A Report on the 3rd International Workshop on NKT Cells and CD1-Mediated Antigen Presentation, September 2004, Heron Island, QLD, Australia

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Julie M.; Jordan, Margaret A.; Baxter, Alan G.

    2004-01-01

    NKT cells play a major role in regulating the vigor and character of a broad range of immune responses. Defects in NKT cell numbers and function have been associated with type 1 diabetes, especially in the NOD mouse model. The 3rd International Workshop on NKT Cells and CD1-Mediated Antigen Presentation provided an opportunity for researchers in the field of NKT cell biology to discuss their latest results, many of which have direct relevance to understanding the etiology and pathogenesis of diabetes. PMID:17491677

  15. Regulation of MHC II and CD1 antigen presentation: from ubiquity to security.

    PubMed

    Gelin, Catherine; Sloma, Ivan; Charron, Dominique; Mooney, Nuala

    2009-02-01

    MHC class II and CD1-mediated antigen presentation on various APCs [B cells, monocytes, and dendritic cells (DC)] are subject to at least three distinct levels of regulation. The first one concerns the expression and structure of the antigen-presenting molecules; the second is based on the extracellular environment and signals of danger detected. However, a third level of regulation, which has been largely overlooked, is determined by lateral associations between antigen-presenting molecules and other proteins, their localization in specialized microdomains within the plasma membrane, and their trafficking pathways. This review focuses on features common to MHC II and CD1 molecules in their ability to activate specific T lymphocytes with the objective of addressing one basic question: What are the mechanisms regulating antigen presentation by MHC II and CD1 molecules within the same cell? Recent studies in immature DC, where MHC II and CD1 are coexpressed, suggest that the invariant chain (Ii) regulates antigen presentation by either protein. Ii could therefore favor MHC II or CD1 antigen presentation and thereby discriminate between antigens.

  16. IgE-mediated enhancement of CD4+ T cell responses requires antigen presentation by CD8α− conventional dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Zhoujie; Dahlin, Joakim S.; Xu, Hui; Heyman, Birgitta

    2016-01-01

    IgE, forming an immune complex with small proteins, can enhance the specific antibody and CD4+ T cell responses in vivo. The effects require the presence of CD23 (Fcε-receptor II)+ B cells, which capture IgE-complexed antigens (Ag) in the circulation and transport them to splenic B cell follicles. In addition, also CD11c+ cells, which do not express CD23, are required for IgE-mediated enhancement of T cell responses. This suggests that some type of dendritic cell obtains IgE-Ag complexes from B cells and presents antigenic peptides to T cells. To elucidate the nature of this dendritic cell, mice were immunized with ovalbumin (OVA)-specific IgE and OVA, and different populations of CD11c+ cells, obtained from the spleens four hours after immunization, were tested for their ability to present OVA. CD8α− conventional dendritic cells (cDCs) were much more efficient in inducing specific CD4+ T cell proliferation ex vivo than were CD8α+ cDCs or plasmacytoid dendritic cells. Thus, IgE-Ag complexes administered intravenously are rapidly transported to the spleen by recirculating B cells where they are delivered to CD8α− cDCs which induce proliferation of CD4+ T cells. PMID:27306570

  17. Skewed Helper T-Cell Responses to IL-12 Family Cytokines Produced by Antigen-Presenting Cells and the Genetic Background in Behcet's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Jun; Kaneko, Fumio; Suzuki, Noboru

    2013-01-01

    Behcet's disease (BD) is a multisystemic inflammatory disease and is characterized by recurrent attacks on eyes, brain, skin, and gut. There is evidence that skewed T-cell responses contributed to its pathophysiology in patients with BD. Recently, we found that Th17 cells, a new helper T (Th) cell subset, were increased in patients with BD, and both Th type 1 (Th1) and Th17 cell differentiation signaling pathways were overactivated. Several researches revealed that genetic polymorphisms in Th1/Th17 cell differentiation signaling pathways were associated with the onset of BD. Here, we summarize current findings on the Th cell subsets, their contribution to the pathogenesis of BD and the genetic backgrounds, especially in view of IL-12 family cytokine production and pattern recognition receptors of macrophages/monocytes. PMID:24490076

  18. Murine Melanoma-Infiltrating Dendritic Cells Are Defective in Antigen Presenting Function Regardless of the Presence of CD4+CD25+ Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ataera, Haley; Hyde, Evelyn; Price, Kylie M.; Stoitzner, Patrizia; Ronchese, Franca

    2011-01-01

    Tumor-infiltrating dendritic cells are often ineffective at presenting tumor-derived antigen in vivo, a defect usually ascribed to the suppressive tumor environment. We investigated the effects of depleting CD4+CD25+ “natural” regulatory T cells (Treg) on the frequency, phenotype and function of total dendritic cell populations in B16.OVA tumors and in tumor-draining lymph nodes. Intraperitoneal injection of the anti-CD25 monoclonal antibody PC61 reduced Treg frequency in blood and tumors, but did not affect the frequency of tumor-infiltrating dendritic cells, or their expression of CD40, CD86 and MHCII. Tumor-infiltrating dendritic cells from PC61-treated or untreated mice induced the proliferation of allogeneic T cells in vitro, but could not induce proliferation of OVA-specific OTI and OTII T cells unless specific peptide antigen was added in culture. Some proliferation of naïve, OVA-specific OTI T cells, but not OTII T cells, was observed in the tumor-draining LN of mice carrying B16.OVA tumors, however, this was not improved by PC61 treatment. Experiments using RAG1−/− hosts adoptively transferred with OTI and CD25-depleted OTII cells also failed to show improved OTI and OTII T cell proliferation in vivo compared to C57BL/6 hosts. We conclude that the defective presentation of B16.OVA tumor antigen by tumor-infiltrating dendritic cells and in the tumor-draining lymph node is not due to the presence of “natural” CD4+CD25+ Treg. PMID:21390236

  19. Increased antigen presentation but impaired T cells priming after upregulation of interferon-beta induced by lipopolysaccharides is mediated by upregulation of B7H1 and GITRL.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fang; Wang, Yan Yan; Li, Juan; You, Xiang; Qiu, Xin Hui; Wang, Yi Nan; Gao, Feng Guang

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic cells are able to present Ag-derived peptides on MHC class I and II molecules and induce T cells priming. Lipopolysaccharides (LPS), an activator of Toll-like 4 receptor (TLR4) signaling, has been demonstrated to facilitate Ag-presentation, up-regulate surface molecules expression but impair T cells priming. In this study, we investigated the effect of LPS on nicotine-enhanced DCs-dependent T cells priming and the mechanisms of LPS orchestrating the immunosuppressive program. We could demonstrate that the treatment with LPS resulted in increased surface molecules expression, enhanced Ag-presentation, up-regulated release of TGF-beta, TNF-alpha, IL-6, and IFN-beta. Concomititantly, the upregulation of IFN-beta in DCs induces the up-regulation of coinhibitory molecules B7H1 and GITRL, which cause an impaired activation of naïve Ag-specific T cells and the induction of T cell tolerance by enhancing B7H1-PD-1 interactions and promoting GITRL-GITL facilitated Treg generation, respectively. These data provide a mechanistic basis for the immunomodulatory action of IFN-beta which might open new possibilities in the development of therapeutic approaches aimed at the control of excessive immune response and persistent infection.

  20. Chitosan as an Immunomodulating Adjuvant on T-Cells and Antigen-Presenting Cells in Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Do-Hyun; Anower, A. K. M. Mostafa; Islam, S. M. Shamsul

    2016-01-01

    Herpes disease caused by herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) is an intractable condition. It is a major concern in public health. Our purpose of this study was to verify the function of chitosan as an adjuvant for immune regulation specifically under herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection. Ahead of HSV infection, chitosan, heat inactivated green fluorescent protein expressing HSV (G-HSV), and a combination of chitosan and G-HSV were used to pretreat ICR mice followed by HSV-1 infection. Using flow cytometric analysis, the frequencies of T-cells, monocytes, dendritic cells (DCs), and natural killer (NK) cells were analyzed by surface expression of CD4+, CD8+, CD14+, CD11c+, NK1.1+, and DX5+ cells. In HSV infected mice, chitosan treatment significantly increased the frequencies of CD4+ T-cells (33.6 ± 5.78%) compared to those in the control group (24.02 ± 12.47%, p = 0.05). The frequencies of DC and NK cells were also significantly different between chitosan treated mice and control mice. In addition, anti-HSV IgG antibody was downregulated in chitosan treated mice. These results suggest that chitosan is a potential modulator or immune stimulator as an adjuvant in HSV-1 infected mice. PMID:28096567

  1. Costimulator B7-1 confers antigen-presenting-cell function to parenchymal tissue and in conjunction with tumor necrosis factor alpha leads to autoimmunity in transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Guerder, S; Picarella, D E; Linsley, P S; Flavell, R A

    1994-01-01

    Tolerance to peripheral antigens is thought to result from the inability of parenchymal tissue to stimulate T cells--an inability that is believed to relate to the lack of expression of the costimulatory signal(s) required for T-cell activation. To test this model, we generated transgenic mice expressing costimulatory molecule B7-1 on the B cells of the pancreas. We find that islets from these transgenic mice are immunogenic for naive T cells in vitro and in vivo. Nonetheless, mice expressing the costimulator B7-1 specifically on beta cells do not develop diabetes, suggesting that expression of the B7-1 costimulator is not sufficient to abrogate the tolerance to peripheral antigens. We have reported that tumor necrosis factor alpha subunit (TNF-alpha) expressed by beta cells leads to a local inflammation but no islet destruction. Strikingly, however, the combination of a local inflammation due to the expression of the cytokine TNF-alpha and the expression of B7-1 results in tissue destruction and diabetes. Images PMID:7515187

  2. Different HIV pox viral vector-based vaccines and adjuvants can induce unique antigen presenting cells that modulate CD8 T cell avidity.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Shubhanshi; Jackson, Ronald J; Ranasinghe, Charani

    2014-11-01

    The lung-derived dendritic cell (LDC) recruitment following intranasal (i.n.) vaccination of different poxviral vector-based vaccines/adjuvants were evaluated to decipher how these factors influenced CD8(+) T cell avidity. Compared to the standard i.n. recombinant fowlpox virus (FPV)-HIV vaccination, the FPV-HIV IL-13Rα2 or IL-4Rα antagonist adjuvanted vaccines that induced higher avidity CD8(+) T cells, also recruited significantly elevated MHCII(+) CD11c(+) CD11b(+) CD103(-) CD64(-) MAR-1(-) conventional DC (cDCs) to the lung mucosae (hierarchy: IL-4R antagonist>IL-13Rα2>unadjuvanted). In contrast, elevated CD11b(-) CD103(+) LDCs were detected in animals that received recombinant HIV vaccinia virus (rVV) or Modified Vaccinia Ankara virus (MVA) vector-based vaccines. Adoptive transfer studies indicated that CD11b(-) CD103(+) LDCs significantly dampened HIV-specific CD8(+) T cell avidity compared to CD11b(+) CD103(-) LDCs. Collectively; our observations revealed that rFPV vector prime and transient inhibition of IL-4/IL-13 at the vaccination site favoured the recruitment of unique LDCs, associated with the induction of high quality immunity.

  3. GM-CSF-neuroantigen fusion proteins reverse experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and mediate tolerogenic activity in adjuvant-primed environments: association with inflammation-dependent, inhibitory antigen presentation.

    PubMed

    Islam, S M Touhidul; Curtis, Alan D; Taslim, Najla; Wilkinson, Daniel S; Mannie, Mark D

    2014-09-01

    Single-chain fusion proteins comprised of GM-CSF and neuroantigen (NAg) are potent, NAg-specific inhibitors of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). An important question was whether GMCSF-NAg tolerogenic vaccines retained inhibitory activity within inflammatory environments or were contingent upon steady-state conditions. GM-CSF fused to the myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein MOG35-55 peptide (GMCSF-MOG) reversed established paralytic disease in both passive and active models of EAE in C57BL/6 mice. The fusion protein also reversed EAE in CD4-deficient and B cell-deficient mice. Notably, GMCSF-MOG inhibited EAE when coinjected adjacent to the MOG35-55/CFA emulsion. GMCSF-MOG also retained dominant inhibitory activity when directly emulsified with MOG35-55 in the CFA emulsion in both C57BL/6 or B cell-deficient models of EAE. Likewise, when combined with proteolipid protein 139-151 in CFA, GM-CSF fused to proteolipid protein 139-151 peptide inhibited EAE in SJL mice. When deliberately emulsified in CFA with the NAg, GMCSF-NAg inhibited EAE even though NAg was present at >30-fold molar excess. In vitro studies revealed that the GM-CSF domain of GMCSF-MOG stimulated growth and differentiation of inflammatory dendritic cells (DC) and simultaneously targeted the MOG35-55 domain for enhanced presentation by these DC. These inflammatory DC presented MOG35-55 to MOG-specific T cells by an inhibitory mechanism that was mediated in part by IFN-γ signaling and NO production. In conclusion, GMCSF-NAg was tolerogenic in CFA-primed proinflammatory environments by a mechanism associated with targeted Ag presentation by inflammatory DC and an inhibitory IFN-γ/NO pathway. The inhibitory activity of GMCSF-NAg in CFA-primed lymphatics distinguishes GMCSF-NAg fusion proteins as a unique class of inflammation-dependent tolerogens that are mechanistically distinct from naked peptide or protein-based tolerogens.

  4. GV1001 immunotherapy ameliorates joint inflammation in a murine model of rheumatoid arthritis by modifying collagen-specific T-cell responses and downregulating antigen-presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, In Ah; Choi, Ji Yong; Jung, Sundo; Basri, Fathihah; Park, Seho; Lee, Eun Young

    2017-03-14

    This study investigated whether GV1001 may be useful for treating rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Two collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) experiments showed that therapeutic, but not preventive, GV1001 treatment reduced the severity of joint inflammation in CIA. The third CIA experiment indicated that, compared to vehicle treatment, therapeutic GV1001 treatment was associated with a significantly smaller area under the curve for the overall clinical joint score over the 98day observation period (p<0.05). GV1001 treatment was also associated with lower Day 98 serum IL-6 levels (p<0.01) and histological joint scores (p<0.05). Moreover, splenocytes harvested from the GV1001-treated mice exhibited lower basal and collagen-stimulated production of IFN-γ and IL-6 on Days 49 and 98 than the splenocytes from vehicle-treated mice. The fourth and fifth experiments indicated that earlier treatment resulted in a better response. In addition, human (THP-1) and murine (RAW 264.7) macrophages and fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) from RA patients were used for in vitro analyses. GV1001 treatment of lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophages derived from THP-1 and RAW 264.7 monocytes significantly reduced TNF-α and IL-6 secretion (THP-1: all p<0.05; RAW 264.7: all p<0.01). However, GV1001 treatment did not affect IL-6 expression in TNFα-stimulated RA FLS. GV1001 reduced the clinical joint scores, serum IL-6 levels, and histological joint scores of mice with CIA. In addition, GV1001 lowered the collagen-stimulated IFN-γ and IL-6 production of murine T-cells and reduced the TNF-α and IL-6 production of macrophages in vitro. Thus, GV1001 may ameliorate joint inflammation by modifying T-cell reactions to the triggering autoantigen and by reducing macrophage cytokine production.

  5. Bone marrow transplantation alters lung antigen presenting cells to promote TH17 response and the development of pneumonitis and fibrosis following gammaherpesvirus infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiaofeng; Loomis-King, Hillary; Gurczynski, Stephen J.; Wilke, Carol A.; Konopka, Kristine E.; Ptaschinski, Catherine; Coomes, Stephanie M; Iwakura, Yoichiro; van Dyk, Linda F.; Lukacs, Nicholas W.; Moore, Bethany B.

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) efficacy is limited by numerous pulmonary complications. We developed a model of syngeneic bone marrow transplant (BMT) followed by infection with murine gamma herpesvirus (γHV-68) that results in pneumonitis and fibrosis and mimics human “non-infectious” HSCT complications. BMT mice experience increased early lytic replication, but establish viral latency by 21 days post infection (dpi). CD4 T cells in BMT mice are skewed towards IL-17A rather than IFN-γ production. Transplantation of bone marrow from Il-17a−/− donors or treatment with anti-IL-17A neutralization antibodies at late stages attenuates pneumonitis and fibrosis in infected BMT mice, suggesting that hematopoietic-derived IL-17A is essential for development of pathology. IL-17A directly influences activation and extracellular matrix production by lung mesenchymal cells. Lung CD11c+ cells of BMT mice secrete more TGF-β1, and pro-TH17 mRNAs for IL-23 and IL-6, and less TH1-promoting cytokine mRNA for IFN-γ but slightly more IL-12 mRNA in response to viral infection. Adoptive transfer of non-BMT lung CD11c-enriched cells restores robust TH1 response and suppresses aberrant TH17 response in BMT mice to improve lung pathology. Our data suggest “non-infectious” HSCT lung complications may reflect preceding viral infections and demonstrate that IL-17A neutralization may offer therapeutic advantage even after disease onset. PMID:26376362

  6. Production of CXC and CC chemokines by human antigen-presenting cells in response to Lassa virus or closely related immunogenic viruses, and in cynomolgus monkeys with lassa fever.

    PubMed

    Pannetier, Delphine; Reynard, Stéphanie; Russier, Marion; Carnec, Xavier; Baize, Sylvain

    2014-01-01

    The pathogenesis of Lassa fever (LF), a hemorrhagic fever endemic to West Africa, remains unclear. We previously compared Lassa virus (LASV) with its genetically close, but nonpathogenic homolog Mopeia virus (MOPV) and demonstrated that the strong activation of antigen-presenting cells (APC), including type I IFN production, observed in response to MOPV probably plays a crucial role in controlling infection. We show here that human macrophages (MP) produce large amounts of CC and CXC chemokines in response to MOPV infection, whereas dendritic cells (DC) release only moderate amounts of CXC chemokines. However, in the presence of autologous T cells, DCs produced CC and CXC chemokines. Chemokines were produced in response to type I IFN synthesis, as the levels of both mediators were strongly correlated and the neutralization of type I IFN resulted in an inhibition of chemokine production. By contrast, LASV induced only low levels of CXCL-10 and CXCL-11 production. These differences in chemokine production may profoundly affect the generation of virus-specific T-cell responses and may therefore contribute to the difference of pathogenicity between these two viruses. In addition, a recombinant LASV (rLASV) harboring the NP-D389A/G392A mutations, which abolish the inhibition of type I IFN response by nucleoprotein (NP), induced the massive synthesis of CC and CXC chemokines in both DC and MP, confirming the crucial role of arenavirus NP in immunosuppression and pathogenicity. Finally, we confirmed, using PBMC samples and lymph nodes obtained from LASV-infected cynomolgus monkeys, that LF was associated with high levels of CXC chemokine mRNA synthesis, suggesting that the very early synthesis of these mediators may be correlated with a favourable outcome.

  7. STAT3 promotes CD1d-mediated lipid antigen presentation by regulating a critical gene in glycosphingolipid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Abhirami K; Liu, Jianyun; Gallo, Richard M; Kaplan, Mark H; Brutkiewicz, Randy R

    2015-11-01

    Cytokines that regulate the immune response signal through the Janus kinase / signal transducer and activation of transcription (JAK/STAT) pathway, but whether this pathway can regulate CD1d-mediated lipid antigen presentation to natural killer T (NKT) cells is unknown. Here, we found that STAT3 promotes antigen presentation by CD1d. Antigen-presenting cells (APCs) in which STAT3 expression was inhibited exhibited markedly reduced endogenous lipid antigen presentation to NKT cells without an impact on exogenous lipid antigen presentation by CD1d. Consistent with this observation, in APCs where STAT3 was knocked down, dramatically decreased levels of UDP glucose ceramide glucosyltransferase (UGCG), an enzyme involved in the first step of glycosphingolipid biosynthesis, were observed. Impaired lipid antigen presentation was reversed by ectopic expression of UGCG in STAT3-silenced CD1d(+) APCs. Hence, by controlling a fundamental step in CD1d-mediated lipid antigen presentation, STAT3 signalling promotes innate immune responses driven by CD1d.

  8. Viral immune evasion: Lessons in MHC class I antigen presentation.

    PubMed

    van de Weijer, Michael L; Luteijn, Rutger D; Wiertz, Emmanuel J H J

    2015-03-01

    The MHC class I antigen presentation pathway enables cells infected with intracellular pathogens to signal the presence of the invader to the immune system. Cytotoxic T lymphocytes are able to eliminate the infected cells through recognition of pathogen-derived peptides presented by MHC class I molecules at the cell surface. In the course of evolution, many viruses have acquired inhibitors that target essential stages of the MHC class I antigen presentation pathway. Studies on these immune evasion proteins reveal fascinating strategies used by viruses to elude the immune system. Viral immunoevasins also constitute great research tools that facilitate functional studies on the MHC class I antigen presentation pathway, allowing the investigation of less well understood routes, such as TAP-independent antigen presentation and cross-presentation of exogenous proteins. Viral immunoevasins have also helped to unravel more general cellular processes. For instance, basic principles of ER-associated protein degradation via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway have been resolved using virus-induced degradation of MHC class I as a model. This review highlights how viral immunoevasins have increased our understanding of MHC class I-restricted antigen presentation.

  9. A critical role for Syk protein tyrosine kinase in Fc receptor-mediated antigen presentation and induction of dendritic cell maturation.

    PubMed

    Sedlik, Christine; Orbach, Daniel; Veron, Philippe; Schweighoffer, Edina; Colucci, Francesco; Gamberale, Romina; Ioan-Facsinay, Andrea; Verbeek, Sjef; Ricciardi-Castagnoli, Paola; Bonnerot, Christian; Tybulewicz, Victor L J; Di Santo, James; Amigorena, Sebastian

    2003-01-15

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are the only APCs capable of initiating adaptive immune responses. The initiation of immune responses requires that DCs 1) internalize and present Ags; and 2) undergo a differentiation process, called "maturation", which transforms DCs into efficient APCs. DC maturation may be initiated by the engagement of different surface receptors, including certain cytokine receptors (such as TNFR), Toll-like receptors, CD40, and FcRs. The early activation events that link receptor engagement and DC maturation are not well characterized. We found that FcR engagement by immune complexes induced the phosphorylation of Syk, a protein tyrosine kinase acting immediately downstream of FcRs. Syk was dispensable for DC differentiation in vitro and in vivo, but was strictly required for immune complexes internalization and subsequent Ag presentation to T lymphocytes. Importantly, Syk was also required for the induction of DC maturation and IL-12 production after FcR engagement, but not after engagement of other surface receptors, such as TNFR or Toll-like receptors. Therefore, protein tyrosine phosphorylation by Syk represents a novel pathway for the induction of DC maturation.

  10. Endogenous antigen presentation by autoantigen-transfected Epstein-Barr virus-lymphoblastoid cells. I. Generation of human thyroid peroxidase-reactive T cells and their T cell receptor repertoire.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, A; Magnusson, R P; Kendler, D L; Concepcion, E; Ben-Nun, A; Davies, T F

    1993-01-01

    To develop a model for endogenous thyroid autoantigen presentation, we transfected EBV-transformed B lymphoblastoid cell lines (EBV-LCL), established from patients with autoimmune thyroid disease and normal controls, with cDNA for the human thyroid autoantigen thyroid peroxidase (hTPO). hTPO-antigen presentation to patient peripheral blood T cells was demonstrated after stimulation in vitro for 7 d with irradiated hTPO-transfected or untransfected autologous EBV-LCL. Anti-hTPO-reactive T cells were subsequently cloned in the presence of irradiated, autologous hTPO-transfected EBV-LCL and IL-2.10 T cell-cloned lines exhibited specific hTPO-induced proliferation (stimulation indices of 2.1-7.9) towards autologous hTPO-transfected EBV-LCL, and were subjected to human T cell receptor (hTCR) V gene analysis, using the PCR for the detection of V alpha and V beta hTcR gene families. The results indicated a preferential use of hTCR V alpha 1 and/or V alpha 3 in 9 of the 10 lines. In contrast, hTCR V beta gene family use was more variable. These data demonstrate a model for the endogenous presentation of human thyroid peroxidase in the absence of other thyroid specific antigens. The high frequency of antigen-specific T cells obtained from PBMC using this technique will facilitate further studies at both the functional and hTCR V gene level. Images PMID:7682574

  11. Inhibition of CD1d-mediated antigen presentation by the transforming growth factor-β/Smad signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Jennifer C; Iyer, Abhirami K; Renukaradhya, Gourapura J; Lin, Yinling; Nguyen, Hoa; Brutkiewicz, Randy R

    2014-12-01

    CD1d-mediated lipid antigen presentation activates a subset of innate immune lymphocytes called invariant natural killer T (NKT) cells that, by virtue of their potent cytokine production, bridge the innate and adaptive immune systems. Transforming growth factor (TGF-β) is a known immune modulator that can activate the mitogen-activated protein kinase p38; we have previously shown that p38 is a negative regulator of CD1d-mediated antigen presentation. Several studies implicate a role for TGF-β in the activation of p38. Therefore, we hypothesized that TGF-β would impair antigen presentation by CD1d. Indeed, a dose-dependent decrease in CD1d-mediated antigen presentation and impairment of lipid antigen processing was observed in response to TGF-β treatment. However, it was found that this inhibition was not through p38 activation. Instead, Smads 2, 3 and 4, downstream elements of the TGF-β canonical signalling pathway, contributed to the observed effects. In marked contrast to that observed with CD1d, TGF-β was found to enhance MHC class II-mediated antigen presentation. Overall, these results suggest that the canonical TGF-β/Smad pathway negatively regulates an important arm of the host's innate immune responses - CD1d-mediated lipid antigen presentation to NKT cells.

  12. Interleukin-19: A Constituent of the Regulome That Controls Antigen Presenting Cells in the Lungs and Airway Responses to Microbial Products

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Carol; Park, Sung-Hyun; Daley, Eleen; Emson, Claire; Louten, Jennifer; Sisco, Maureen; de Waal Malefyt, Rene; Grunig, Gabriele

    2011-01-01

    Background Interleukin (IL)-19 has been reported to enhance chronic inflammatory diseases such as asthma but the in vivo mechanism is incompletely understood. Because IL-19 is produced by and regulates cells of the monocyte lineage, our studies focused on in vivo responses of CD11c positive (CD11c+) alveolar macrophages and lung dendritic cells. Methodology/Principal Findings IL-19-deficient (IL-19-/-) mice were studied at baseline (naïve) and following intranasal challenge with microbial products, or recombinant cytokines. Naïve IL-19-/- mixed background mice had a decreased percentage of CD11c+ cells in the bronchoalveolar-lavage (BAL) due to the deficiency in IL-19 and a trait inherited from the 129-mouse strain. BAL CD11c+ cells from fully backcrossed IL-19-/- BALB/c or C57BL/6 mice expressed significantly less Major Histocompatibility Complex class II (MHCII) in response to intranasal administration of lipopolysaccharide, Aspergillus antigen, or IL-13, a pro-allergic cytokine. Neurogenic-locus-notch-homolog-protein-2 (Notch2) expression by lung monocytes, the precursors of BAL CD11c+ cells, was dysregulated: extracellular Notch2 was significantly decreased, transmembrane/intracellular Notch2 was significantly increased in IL-19-/- mice relative to wild type. Instillation of recombinant IL-19 increased extracellular Notch2 expression and dendritic cells cultured from bone marrow cells in the presence of IL-19 showed upregulated extracellular Notch2. The CD205 positive subset among the CD11c+ cells was 3-5-fold decreased in the airways and lungs of naïve IL-19-/- mice relative to wild type. Airway inflammation and histological changes in the lungs were ameliorated in IL-19-/- mice challenged with Aspergillus antigen that induces T lymphocyte-dependent allergic inflammation but not in IL-19-/- mice challenged with lipopolysaccharide or IL-13. Conclusions/Significance Because MHCII is the molecular platform that displays peptides to T lymphocytes and Notch2

  13. Comparison of immune responses induced by rat RT-1 antigens presented as inserts into liposomes, as protein micelles and as intact cells.

    PubMed

    Hedlund, G; Jansson, B; Sjögren, H O

    1984-09-01

    Partially purified rat transplantation antigens (RT-1) were inserted into liposomes composed of various types of lipids and used for immunization. The immune responses induced by the liposomes were compared with responses induced by RT-1 as protein micelles, alone or emulsified in Freund's incomplete adjuvant, or intact cells. Liposomes gave generally a higher humoral response than protein micelles. Each type of RT-1 immunization gave a particular pattern of specific Ig (sub)class responses. Freund's incomplete adjuvant was not only lacking in potentiating effect on low protein dose immunization but had a significant inhibitory effect. Besides intact cells only distearoyl-phosphatidylcholine liposomes had the potential to induce a cell-mediated cytotoxic response.

  14. The Neck Region of the C-type Lectin DC-SIGN Regulates Its Surface Spatiotemporal Organization and Virus-binding Capacity on Antigen-presenting Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Manzo, Carlo; Torreno-Pina, Juan A.; Joosten, Ben; Reinieren-Beeren, Inge; Gualda, Emilio J.; Loza-Alvarez, Pablo; Figdor, Carl G.; Garcia-Parajo, Maria F.; Cambi, Alessandra

    2012-01-01

    The C-type lectin DC-SIGN expressed on dendritic cells (DCs) facilitates capture and internalization of a plethora of different pathogens. Although it is known that DC-SIGN organizes in nanoclusters at the surface of DCs, the molecular mechanisms responsible for this well defined nanopatterning and role in viral binding remain enigmatic. By combining biochemical and advanced biophysical techniques, including optical superresolution and single particle tracking, we demonstrate that DC-SIGN intrinsic nanoclustering strictly depends on its molecular structure. DC-SIGN nanoclusters exhibited free, Brownian diffusion on the cell membrane. Truncation of the extracellular neck region, known to abrogate tetramerization, significantly reduced nanoclustering and concomitantly increased lateral diffusion. Importantly, DC-SIGN nanocluster dissolution exclusively compromised binding to nanoscale size pathogens. Monte Carlo simulations revealed that heterogeneity on nanocluster density and spatial distribution confers broader binding capabilities to DC-SIGN. As such, our results underscore a direct relationship between spatial nanopatterning, driven by intermolecular interactions between the neck regions, and receptor diffusion to provide DC-SIGN with the exquisite ability to dock pathogens at the virus length scale. Insight into how virus receptors are organized prior to virus binding and how they assemble into functional platforms for virus docking is helpful to develop novel strategies to prevent virus entry and infection. PMID:23019323

  15. Anti-TNF monoclonal antibodies prevent haemorrhage-induced suppression of Kupffer cell antigen presentation and MHC class II antigen expression.

    PubMed Central

    Ertel, W; Morrison, M H; Ayala, A; Perrin, M M; Chaudry, I H

    1991-01-01

    Kupffer cells (KC), by virtue of their ability to present antigen (AP) and express major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II antigen (Ia), play a pivotal role in the host defence system against invading micro-organisms. Although haemorrhagic shock depresses the above KC functions, it is not known whether increased KC tumour necrosis factor (TNF) production and elevated TNF plasma levels following haemorrhage are responsible for it. To study this, C3H/HeN mice were pretreated intraperitoneally with either anti-murine TNF antibody (anti-TNF Ab) or saline. Twenty hours later mice were bled and maintained at a mean blood pressure of 35 mmHg for 60 min followed by adequate fluid resuscitation. Two and 24 hr later, plasma was collected and KC were isolated. AP was measured by co-culturing KC with the D10.G4.1 Th cell clone. Ia expression was determined by direct immunofluorescence. Interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6 and TNF levels in KC supernatants and plasma were measured with bioassays or ELISA. Haemorrhage increased circulating TNF levels by 215% at 2 hr and by 76% at 24 hr (P less than 0.05), which was prevented by pretreatment with anti-TNF Ab. Haemorrhage-induced increase of circulating IL-6 was abolished (P less than 0.05) at 2 hr but not at 24 hr in the anti-TNF Ab group. The suppression of KC AP (P less than 0.05) and Ia expression (P less than 0.05) due to haemorrhage was attenuated (P less than 0.05) in anti-TNF Ab-treated mice at 2 and 24 hr and KC IL-1 and TNF synthesis was further (P less than 0.01) increased. These results indicate that TNF plays a critical role in the initiation and regulation of KC AP, Ia expression, and cytokine production following haemorrhage. PMID:1748476

  16. Graves’ Disease Is Associated with a Defective Expression of the Immune Regulatory Molecule Galectin-9 in Antigen-Presenting Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    de la Fuente, Hortensia; Rodríguez-Muñoz, Ana; Ramos-Levi, Ana; Sampedro-Nuñez, Miguel; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco; González-Amaro, Roberto; Marazuela, Mónica

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Patients with autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) show defects in their immune-regulatory mechanisms. Herein we assessed the expression and function of galectin-1 and galectin-9 (Gal-1, Gal-9) in dendritic cells (DCs) from patients with AITD. Materials and Methods Peripheral blood samples from 25 patients with Graves’ disease (GD), 11 Hashimoto’s thyroiditis (HT), and 24 healthy subjects were studied. Thyroid tissue samples from 44 patients with AITD and 22 patients with goiter were also analyzed. Expression and function of Gal-1 and Gal-9 was assessed by quantitative RT-PCR, immunofluorescence and flow cytometry. Results A diminished expression of Gal-9, but not of Gal-1, by peripheral blood DCs was observed in GD patients, mainly in those with Graves´ ophthalmopathy, and a significant negative association between disease severity and Gal-9 expression was detected. In addition, the mRNA levels of Gal-9 and its ligand TIM-3 were increased in thyroid tissue from AITD patients and its expression was associated with the levels of Th1/Th12/Th17 cytokines. Immunofluorescence studies proved that intrathyroidal Gal-9 expression was confined to DCs and macrophages. Finally, in vitro functional assays showed that exogenous Gal-9 had a suppressive effect on the release of Th1/Th2/Th17 cytokines by DC/lymphocyte autologous co-cultures from both AITD patients and healthy controls. Conclusions The altered pattern of expression of Gal-9 in peripheral blood DCs from GD patients, its correlation with disease severity as well as its ability to suppress cytokine release suggest that Gal-9 could be involved in the pathogenesis of AITD. PMID:25880730

  17. Anti-inflammatory effects of tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha are mediated via TNF-R2 (p75) in tolerogenic transforming growth factor-beta-treated antigen-presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Masli, Sharmila; Turpie, Bruce

    2009-05-01

    Exposure of macrophages to transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta is known to alter their functional phenotype such that antigen presentation by these cells leads to tolerance rather than an inflammatory immune response. Typically, eye-derived antigen-presenting cells (APCs) exposed to TGF-beta in the local environment are known to induce a form of peripheral tolerance and protect the eye from inflammatory immune effector-mediated damage. In response to TGF-beta, APCs increase their expression of tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and TNF receptor 2 (TNF-R2). Although TNF-alpha has been implicated in tolerance and the associated regulation of the inflammatory immune response, its source and the receptors involved remain unclear. In this report we determined the contribution of TNF-alpha and TNF-R2 expressed by TGF-beta-treated APCs to their anti-inflammatory tolerogenic effect. Our results indicate that APC-derived TNF-alpha is essential for the ability of APCs to regulate the immune response and their IL-12 secretion. Moreover, in the absence of TNF-R2, APCs exposed to TGF-beta failed to induce tolerance or regulatory cells known to participate in this tolerance. Also, blocking of TNF-R1 signalling enhanced the ability of the APCs to secrete increased TGF-beta in response to TGF-beta exposure. Together our results support an anti-inflammatory role of TNF-alpha in regulation of an immune response by TGF-beta-treated APCs and suggest that TNF-R2 contributes significantly to this role.

  18. Identification of a peptide binding protein that plays a role in antigen presentation

    SciTech Connect

    Lakey, E.K.; Margoliash, E.; Pierce, S.K.

    1987-03-01

    The helper T-cell response to globular proteins appears, in general, to require intracellular processing of the antigen, such that a peptide fragment containing the T-cell antigenic determinant is released and transported to and held on the surface of an Ia-expressing, antigen-presenting cell. However, the molecular details underlying these phenomena are largely unknown. The means by which antigenic peptides are anchored on the antigen-presenting cell surface was investigated. A cell surface protein is identified that was isolated by it ability to bind to a 24-amino acid peptide fragment of pigeon cytochrome c, residues 81-104, containing the major antigenic determinant for B10.A mouse T cells. This peptide binding protein, purified from (/sup 35/S)methionine-labeled cells, appears as two discrete bands of approx. =72 and 74 kDa after NaDodSO/sub 4//PAGE. The protein can be eluted from the peptide affinity column with equivalent concentrations of either the antigenic pigeon cytochrome c peptide or the corresponding nonantigenic peptide of mouse cytochrome c. However, it does not bind to the native cytochromes c, either of pigeon or mouse, and thus the protein appears to recognize some structure available only in the free peptides. This protein plays a role in antigen presentation. Its expression is not major histocompatibility complex-restricted in that the blocking activity of the antisera can be absorbed on spleen cells from mice of different haplotypes. This peptide binding protein can be isolated from a variety of cell types, including B cells, T cells, and fibroblasts. The anchoring of processed peptides on the cell surface by such a protein may play a role in antigen presentation.

  19. Umbilical cord blood regulatory T-cell expansion and functional effects of tumor necrosis factor receptor family members OX40 and 4-1BB expressed on artificial antigen-presenting cells

    PubMed Central

    Harker-Murray, Paul; Porter, Stephen B.; Merkel, Sarah C.; Londer, Aryel; Taylor, Dawn K.; Bina, Megan; Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela; Rubinstein, Pablo; Van Rooijen, Nico; Golovina, Tatiana N.; Suhoski, Megan M.; Miller, Jeffrey S.; Wagner, John E.; June, Carl H.; Riley, James L.

    2008-01-01

    Previously, we showed that human umbilical cord blood (UCB) regulatory T cells (Tregs) could be expanded approximately 100-fold using anti-CD3/28 monoclonal antibody (mAb)–coated beads to provide T-cell receptor and costimulatory signals. Because Treg numbers from a single UCB unit are limited, we explored the use of cell-based artificial antigen-presenting cells (aAPCs) preloaded with anti-CD3/28 mAbs to achieve higher levels of Treg expansion. Compared with beads, aAPCs had similar expansion properties while significantly increasing transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) secretion and the potency of Treg suppressor function. aAPCs modified to coexpress OX40L or 4-1BBL expanded UCB Tregs to a significantly greater extent than bead- or nonmodified aAPC cultures, reaching mean expansion levels exceeding 1250-fold. Despite the high expansion and in contrast to studies using other Treg sources, neither OX40 nor 4-1BB signaling of UCB Tregs reduced in vitro suppression. UCB Tregs expanded with 4-1BBL expressing aAPCs had decreased levels of proapoptotic bim. UCB Tregs expanded with nonmodified or modified aAPCs versus beads resulted in higher survival associated with increased Treg persistence in a xeno-geneic graft-versus-host disease lethality model. These data offer a novel approach for UCB Treg expansion using aAPCs, including those coexpressing OX40L or 4-1BBL. PMID:18645038

  20. Specific killing of cytotoxic T cells and antigen-presenting cells by CD4+ cytotoxic T cell clones. A novel potentially immunoregulatory T-T cell interaction in man

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Mycobacterial antigens not only stimulate Th cells that produce macrophage-activating factors, but also CD4+ and CD8+ CTL that lyse human macrophages. The mycobacterial recombinant 65-kD hsp was previously found to be an important target antigen for polyclonal CD4+ CTL. Because of the major role of 65-kD hsp in the immune response to mycobacterial as well as autoantigens, we have studied CTL activity to this protein at the clonal level. HLA-DR or HLA-DQ restricted, CD4+CD8- T cell clones that recognize different peptides of the M. leprae 65-kD hsp strongly lysed EBV-BLCL pulsed with specific but not irrelevant peptide. No bystander lysis of B cells, T cells, or tumor cells was seen. Target cell lysis could not be triggered by PMA + Ca2+ ionophore alone and depended on active metabolism. Interestingly, these CD4+ CTL also strongly lysed themselves and other HLA-class II compatible CD4+ (TCR-alpha/beta or -gamma/delta) or CD8+ CTL clones in the presence of peptide, suggesting that CTL are not actively protected from CTL- mediated lysis. Cold target competition experiments suggested that EBV- BLCL targets were more efficiently recognized than CD4+ CTL targets. These results demonstrate that hsp65 peptide-specific HLA class II- restricted CD4+ T cell clones display strong peptide-dependent cytolytic activity towards both APCs, and, unexpectedly, CD4+ and CD8+ CTL clones, including themselves. Since, in contrast to murine T cells human T cells express class II, CTL-mediated T cell killing may represent a novel immunoregulatory pathway in man. PMID:1972178

  1. Naturally processed peptides spanning the HPA-1a polymorphism are efficiently generated and displayed from platelet glycoprotein by HLA-DRB3*0101-positive antigen-presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Anani Sarab, Gholamreza; Moss, Michael; Barker, Robert N; Urbaniak, Stanislaw J

    2009-08-27

    In neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia, almost all human platelet antigen (HPA)-1b1b mothers who produce anti-HPA-1a antibody through carrying an HPA-1a fetus are human histocompatibility leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DRB3*0101 positive. It is predicted that the HPA-1a Leu(33) polymorphism forms part of an HLA-DRB3*0101-restricted T-helper epitope, and acts as an anchor residue for binding this class II molecule. However, it is not known whether any corresponding peptides are naturally processed and presented from platelet glycoprotein. In this study, peptides displayed by a homozygous HLA-DRB3*0101 antigen-presenting cell line were identified after pulsing with recombinant HPA-1a (Leu(33) plexin-semaphorin-integrin domain). The peptides were eluted from HLA-DR molecules, fractionated by high performance liquid chromatography, and analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry. A "nested set" of naturally presented HPA-1a-derived peptides, each containing the Trp(25)-Leu(33) core epitope, was identified, with the most abundant member being the 16-mer Met(22)-Arg(37). These peptides may provide the basis for novel treatments to tolerize the corresponding T-helper response in women at risk of neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia.

  2. MHC structure and function – antigen presentation. Part 1

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Anna Carla; Rizzo, Luiz Vicente

    2015-01-01

    The setting for the occurrence of an immune response is that of the need to cope with a vast array of different antigens from both pathogenic and non-pathogenic sources. When the first barriers against infection and innate defense fail, adaptive immune response enters the stage for recognition of the antigens by means of extremely variable molecules, namely immunoglobulins and T-cell receptors. The latter recognize the antigen exposed on cell surfaces, in the form of peptides presented by the HLA molecule. The first part of this review details the central role played by these molecules, establishing the close connection existing between their structure and their antigen presenting function. PMID:25807245

  3. Antigen presentation by peritoneal macrophages from young adult and old mice

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, E.H.; Massucci, J.M.; Glover, P.L.

    1982-01-01

    Macrophages perform vital inductive and regulatory functions in immune processes and host defense mechanisms. However, macrophage function during senescence has not been extensively studied. Although antibody response is dramatically reduced in old animals, antigen presentation has never been directly assessed. Therefore, the antigen-presenting capabilities of purified peritoneal macrophages from young adult and old mice were studied by quantitatively measuring their ability to induce antigen specific proliferation of lymph node T lymphocytes. Increasing numbers (10/sup 2/ to 10/sup 5/) of macrophages from nonimmunized young adult (3 to 6 months) or aged (27 to 36 months) animals were cultured in the presence of antigen with a constant number (2 x 10/sup 5/) of column-separated popliteal lymph node cells from young adult mice. The latter had been immunized with the dinitrophenyl conjugate of bovine ..gamma..-globulin in complete Freund's adjuvant by footpad injection. Macrophages from old animals were equal to macrophages from young adult in stimulating T-lymphocyte proliferation, and the kinetics of incorporation was identical with increasing numbers of macrophages from either young adult or old animals. However, greater numbers of resident or induced peritoneal macrophages were always harvested from old animals. Differences in macrophage activity as assessed by different functional parameters may be reconciled by implicating subpopulations of macrophages that perform separate functions, e.g. Ia-positive antigen presenter and Ia-negative scavenger macrophages.

  4. MHC structure and function − antigen presentation. Part 2

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Anna Carla; Rizzo, Luiz Vicente

    2015-01-01

    The second part of this review deals with the molecules and processes involved in the processing and presentation of the antigenic fragments to the T-cell receptor. Though the nature of the antigens presented varies, the most significant class of antigens is proteins, processed within the cell to be then recognized in the form of peptides, a mechanism that confers an extraordinary degree of precision to this mode of immune response. The efficiency and accuracy of this system is also the result of the myriad of mechanisms involved in the processing of proteins and production of peptides, in addition to the capture and recycling of alternative sources aiming to generate further diversity in the presentation to T-cells. PMID:25807243

  5. Exosomes function in antigen presentation during an in vivo Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Victoria L.; Cheng, Yong; Bryant, Barry R.; Schorey, Jeffrey S.

    2017-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected macrophages and dendritic cells are limited in their ability to present antigen to CD4+ T cells suggesting that other mechanism of antigen presentation are driving the robust T cell response observed during an M. tuberculosis infection. These mechanisms could include antigens present in apoptotic bodies, necrotic debris, exosomes or even release of non-vesicular antigen from infected cells. However, there is limited data to support any of these mechanisms as important in driving T cell activation in vivo. In the present study we use Rab27a-deficient mice which show diminished trafficking of mycobacterial components to exosomes as well as M. tuberculosis strains that express recombinant proteins which traffic or fail to traffic to exosomes. We observed that exosomes released during a mouse M. tuberculosis infection contribute significantly to its T cell response. These finding imply that exosomes function to promote T cell immunity during a bacterial infection and are an important source of extracellular antigen. PMID:28262829

  6. Exosomes function in antigen presentation during an in vivo Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Smith, Victoria L; Cheng, Yong; Bryant, Barry R; Schorey, Jeffrey S

    2017-03-06

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected macrophages and dendritic cells are limited in their ability to present antigen to CD4+ T cells suggesting that other mechanism of antigen presentation are driving the robust T cell response observed during an M. tuberculosis infection. These mechanisms could include antigens present in apoptotic bodies, necrotic debris, exosomes or even release of non-vesicular antigen from infected cells. However, there is limited data to support any of these mechanisms as important in driving T cell activation in vivo. In the present study we use Rab27a-deficient mice which show diminished trafficking of mycobacterial components to exosomes as well as M. tuberculosis strains that express recombinant proteins which traffic or fail to traffic to exosomes. We observed that exosomes released during a mouse M. tuberculosis infection contribute significantly to its T cell response. These finding imply that exosomes function to promote T cell immunity during a bacterial infection and are an important source of extracellular antigen.

  7. Isolation of a peptide binding protein and its role in antigen presentation

    SciTech Connect

    Lakey, E.; Pierce, S.K.; Margoliash, E.

    1986-03-05

    A mouse T cell hybrid, TPc9.1, recognizes pigeon cytochrome c (Pc) as processed and presented by histocompatible antigen presenting cells (APC). When paraformaldehyde fixed APC are employed, only a peptide fragment of Pc, Pc 81-104, and not the native Pc, is capable of stimulating TPc9.1 cells. Pc 81-104 appears to associate tightly with the APC surface since paraformaldehyde fixed APC which have been incubated with Pc 81-104 remain stimulatory following extensive washing. When APC are surface labeled with /sup 125/I, solubilized and affinity purified on Pc 81-104-Sepharose 4B columns, two predominant polypeptides of approximately 72 and 74 kd are isolated. Little or no immunoglobulin, Class I or Class II proteins are obtained under these conditions. Antisera from rabbits immunized with the affinity purified material, but not preimmune sera, block the activation of TPc 9.1 cells by Pc as well as Pc 81-104 when presented by live APC. Furthermore, these antisera are even more effective in blocking the activation of TPc9.1 cells by either APC which had been pulsed with Pc and then paraformaldehyde fixed, or by Pc 81-104 when added to paraformaldehyde fixed APC, suggesting that these antisera were not affecting antigen processing. Thus, these peptide binding proteins may play a role in antigen presentation, and they are being further characterized.

  8. The Cellular Redox Environment Alters Antigen Presentation*

    PubMed Central

    Trujillo, Jonathan A.; Croft, Nathan P.; Dudek, Nadine L.; Channappanavar, Rudragouda; Theodossis, Alex; Webb, Andrew I.; Dunstone, Michelle A.; Illing, Patricia T.; Butler, Noah S.; Fett, Craig; Tscharke, David C.; Rossjohn, Jamie; Perlman, Stanley; Purcell, Anthony W.

    2014-01-01

    Cysteine-containing peptides represent an important class of T cell epitopes, yet their prevalence remains underestimated. We have established and interrogated a database of around 70,000 naturally processed MHC-bound peptides and demonstrate that cysteine-containing peptides are presented on the surface of cells in an MHC allomorph-dependent manner and comprise on average 5–10% of the immunopeptidome. A significant proportion of these peptides are oxidatively modified, most commonly through covalent linkage with the antioxidant glutathione. Unlike some of the previously reported cysteine-based modifications, this represents a true physiological alteration of cysteine residues. Furthermore, our results suggest that alterations in the cellular redox state induced by viral infection are communicated to the immune system through the presentation of S-glutathionylated viral peptides, resulting in altered T cell recognition. Our data provide a structural basis for how the glutathione modification alters recognition by virus-specific T cells. Collectively, these results suggest that oxidative stress represents a mechanism for modulating the virus-specific T cell response. PMID:25135637

  9. Targeting the MHC Class II antigen presentation pathway in cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Thibodeau, Jacques; Bourgeois-Daigneault, Marie-Claude; Lapointe, Réjean

    2012-09-01

    The success of immunotherapy relies on the participation of all arms of the immune system and the role of CD4+ T lymphocytes in preventing tumor growth is now well established. Understanding how tumors evade immune responses holds the key to the development of cancer immunotherapies. In this review, we discuss how MHC Class II expression varies in cancer cells and how this influences antitumor immune responses. We also discuss the means that are currently available for harnessing the MHC Class II antigen presentation pathway for the development of efficient vaccines to activate the immune system against cancer.

  10. Cordyceps militaris Enhances MHC-restricted Antigen Presentation via the Induced Expression of MHC Molecules and Production of Cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Seulmee; Park, Yoonhee; Kim, Seulah; Oh, Hee-Eun; Ko, Young-Wook; Han, Shinha; Lee, Seungjeong; Lee, Chong-Kil; Cho, Kyunghae

    2010-01-01

    Background Cordyceps militarys water extract (CME) has been reported to exert antitumor and immunomodulatory activities in vivo and in vitro. However, the therapeutic mechanism has not yet been elucidated. In this study, we examined the effects of CME on the antigen presenting function of antigen presenting cells (APCs). Methods Dendritic cells (DCs) were cultured in the presence of CME, and then allowed to phagocytose microspheres containing ovalbumin (OVA). After washing and fixing the efficacy of OVA, peptide presentation by DCs were evaluated using CD8 and CD4 T cells. Also, we confirmed the protein levels of proinflammatory cytokines through western blot analysis. Results CME enhanced both MHC class I and class II-restricted presentation of OVA in DCs. In addition, the expression of both MHC class I and II molecules was enhanced, but there was no changes in the phagocytic activity of exogenous OVA. Furthermore, CME induced the protein levels of iNOS, COX-2, proinflammatory cytokines, and nuclear p65 in a concentration-dependent manner, as determined by western blot. Conclusion These results provide an understanding of the mechanism of the immuno-enhancing activity of CME on the induction of MHC-restricted antigen presentation in relation to their actions on APCs. PMID:20844738

  11. Boosting the MHC Class II-Restricted Tumor Antigen Presentation to CD4+ T Helper Cells: A Critical Issue for Triggering Protective Immunity and Re-Orienting the Tumor Microenvironment Toward an Anti-Tumor State

    PubMed Central

    Accolla, Roberto S.; Lombardo, Letizia; Abdallah, Rawan; Raval, Goutham; Forlani, Greta; Tosi, Giovanna

    2014-01-01

    Although the existence of an immune response against tumor cells is well documented, the fact that tumors take off in cancer patients indicates that neoplastic cells can circumvent this response. Over the years many investigators have described strategies to rescue the anti-tumor immune response with the aim of creating specific and long-lasting protection against the disease. When exported to human clinical settings, these strategies have revealed in most cases a very limited, if any, positive outcome. We believe that the failure is mostly due to the inadequate triggering of the CD4+ T helper (TH) cell arm of the adaptive immunity, as TH cells are necessary to trigger all the immune effector mechanisms required to eliminate tumor cells. In this review, we focus on novel strategies that by stimulating MHC class II-restricted activation of TH cells generate a specific and persistent adaptive immunity against the tumor. This point is of critical importance for both preventive and therapeutic anti-tumor vaccination protocols, because adaptive immunity with its capacity to produce specific, long-lasting protection and memory responses is indeed the final goal of vaccination. We will discuss data from our as well as other laboratories which strongly suggest that triggering a specific and persistent anti-tumor CD4+ TH cell response stably modify not only the tumor microenvironment but also tumor-dependent extratumor microenvironments by eliminating and/or reducing the blood-derived tumor infiltrating cells that may have a pro-tumor growth function such as regulatory CD4+/CD25+ T cells and myeloid-derived-suppressor cells. Within this frame, therefore, we believe that the establishment of a pro-tumor environment is not the cause but simply the consequence of the tumor strategy to primarily counteract components of the adaptive cellular immunity, particularly TH lymphocytes. PMID:24600588

  12. Enhanced Direct Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Self-Antigen Presentation Induced by Chlamydia Infection.

    PubMed

    Cram, Erik D; Simmons, Ryan S; Palmer, Amy L; Hildebrand, William H; Rockey, Daniel D; Dolan, Brian P

    2015-11-23

    The direct major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I antigen presentation pathway ensures intracellular peptides are displayed at the cellular surface for recognition of infected or transformed cells by CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Chlamydia spp. are obligate intracellular bacteria and, as such, should be targeted by CD8(+) T cells. It is likely that Chlamydia spp. have evolved mechanisms to avoid the CD8(+) killer T cell responses by interfering with MHC class I antigen presentation. Using a model system of self-peptide presentation which allows for posttranslational control of the model protein's stability, we tested the ability of various Chlamydia species to alter direct MHC class I antigen presentation. Infection of the JY lymphoblastoid cell line limited the accumulation of a model host protein and increased presentation of the model-protein-derived peptides. Enhanced self-peptide presentation was detected only when presentation was restricted to defective ribosomal products, or DRiPs, and total MHC class I levels remained unaltered. Skewed antigen presentation was dependent on a bacterial synthesized component, as evidenced by reversal of the observed phenotype upon preventing bacterial transcription, translation, and the inhibition of bacterial lipooligosaccharide synthesis. These data suggest that Chlamydia spp. have evolved to alter the host antigen presentation machinery to favor presentation of defective and rapidly degraded forms of self-antigen, possibly as a mechanism to diminish the presentation of peptides derived from bacterial proteins.

  13. Enhanced Direct Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Self-Antigen Presentation Induced by Chlamydia Infection

    PubMed Central

    Cram, Erik D.; Simmons, Ryan S.; Palmer, Amy L.; Hildebrand, William H.; Rockey, Daniel D.

    2015-01-01

    The direct major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I antigen presentation pathway ensures intracellular peptides are displayed at the cellular surface for recognition of infected or transformed cells by CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Chlamydia spp. are obligate intracellular bacteria and, as such, should be targeted by CD8+ T cells. It is likely that Chlamydia spp. have evolved mechanisms to avoid the CD8+ killer T cell responses by interfering with MHC class I antigen presentation. Using a model system of self-peptide presentation which allows for posttranslational control of the model protein's stability, we tested the ability of various Chlamydia species to alter direct MHC class I antigen presentation. Infection of the JY lymphoblastoid cell line limited the accumulation of a model host protein and increased presentation of the model-protein-derived peptides. Enhanced self-peptide presentation was detected only when presentation was restricted to defective ribosomal products, or DRiPs, and total MHC class I levels remained unaltered. Skewed antigen presentation was dependent on a bacterial synthesized component, as evidenced by reversal of the observed phenotype upon preventing bacterial transcription, translation, and the inhibition of bacterial lipooligosaccharide synthesis. These data suggest that Chlamydia spp. have evolved to alter the host antigen presentation machinery to favor presentation of defective and rapidly degraded forms of self-antigen, possibly as a mechanism to diminish the presentation of peptides derived from bacterial proteins. PMID:26597986

  14. Induction of potent CD8⁺ T cell responses through the delivery of subunit protein vaccines to skin antigen-presenting cells using densely packed microprojection arrays.

    PubMed

    Ng, Hwee-Ing; Fernando, Germain J P; Kendall, Mark A F

    2012-09-28

    The generation of both antibody and CD8⁺ T cell responses against pathogens is considered important for many advanced vaccines for diseases including tuberculosis, HIV and malaria. However, most current vaccines are delivered into muscle by the needle and syringe method and induce protection via humoral (antibody) immune responses. In this paper, we test the hypothesis that delivering a model subunit protein antigen (ovalbumin) to the skin's abundant immune cell population using a densely packed microprojection array (Nanopatch) enhances CD8⁺ T cell responses. We found that the Nanopatch significantly enhanced the CD8⁺ T cell responses when compared to intramuscular delivery of both antigen-only and adjuvanted cases (Quil-A and CpG; separately). To our knowledge, this is the first published study demonstrating significantly improved CD8⁺ T cell responses achieved by delivering subunit vaccines to the skin's abundant immune cell population. Successfully replicating these findings in humans could significantly advance the reach of vaccines.

  15. Efficient targeting of protein antigen to the dendritic cell receptor DEC-205 in the steady state leads to antigen presentation on major histocompatibility complex class I products and peripheral CD8+ T cell tolerance.

    PubMed

    Bonifaz, Laura; Bonnyay, David; Mahnke, Karsten; Rivera, Miguel; Nussenzweig, Michel C; Steinman, Ralph M

    2002-12-16

    To identify endocytic receptors that allow dendritic cells (DCs) to capture and present antigens on major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I products in vivo, we evaluated DEC-205, which is abundant on DCs in lymphoid tissues. Ovalbumin (OVA) protein, when chemically coupled to monoclonal alphaDEC-205 antibody, was presented by CD11c+ lymph node DCs, but not by CD11c- cells, to OVA-specific, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Receptor-mediated presentation was at least 400 times more efficient than unconjugated OVA and, for MHC class I, the DCs had to express transporter of antigenic peptides (TAP) transporters. When alphaDEC-205:OVA was injected subcutaneously, OVA protein was identified over a 4-48 h period in DCs, primarily in the lymph nodes draining the injection site. In vivo, the OVA protein was selectively presented by DCs to TCR transgenic CD8+ cells, again at least 400 times more effectively than soluble OVA and in a TAP-dependent fashion. Targeting of alphaDEC-205:OVA to DCs in the steady state initially induced 4-7 cycles of T cell division, but the T cells were then deleted and the mice became specifically unresponsive to rechallenge with OVA in complete Freund's adjuvant. In contrast, simultaneous delivery of a DC maturation stimulus via CD40, together with alphaDEC-205:OVA, induced strong immunity. The CD8+ T cells responding in the presence of agonistic alphaCD40 antibody produced large amounts of interleukin 2 and interferon gamma, acquired cytolytic function in vivo, emigrated in large numbers to the lung, and responded vigorously to OVA rechallenge. Therefore, DEC-205 provides an efficient receptor-based mechanism for DCs to process proteins for MHC class I presentation in vivo, leading to tolerance in the steady state and immunity after DC maturation.

  16. Efficient Targeting of Protein Antigen to the Dendritic Cell Receptor DEC-205 in the Steady State Leads to Antigen Presentation on Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Products and Peripheral CD8+ T Cell Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Bonifaz, Laura; Bonnyay, David; Mahnke, Karsten; Rivera, Miguel; Nussenzweig, Michel C.; Steinman, Ralph M.

    2002-01-01

    To identify endocytic receptors that allow dendritic cells (DCs) to capture and present antigens on major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I products in vivo, we evaluated DEC-205, which is abundant on DCs in lymphoid tissues. Ovalbumin (OVA) protein, when chemically coupled to monoclonal αDEC-205 antibody, was presented by CD11c+ lymph node DCs, but not by CD11c− cells, to OVA-specific, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Receptor-mediated presentation was at least 400 times more efficient than unconjugated OVA and, for MHC class I, the DCs had to express transporter of antigenic peptides (TAP) transporters. When αDEC-205:OVA was injected subcutaneously, OVA protein was identified over a 4–48 h period in DCs, primarily in the lymph nodes draining the injection site. In vivo, the OVA protein was selectively presented by DCs to TCR transgenic CD8+ cells, again at least 400 times more effectively than soluble OVA and in a TAP-dependent fashion. Targeting of αDEC-205:OVA to DCs in the steady state initially induced 4–7 cycles of T cell division, but the T cells were then deleted and the mice became specifically unresponsive to rechallenge with OVA in complete Freund's adjuvant. In contrast, simultaneous delivery of a DC maturation stimulus via CD40, together with αDEC-205:OVA, induced strong immunity. The CD8+ T cells responding in the presence of agonistic αCD40 antibody produced large amounts of interleukin 2 and interferon γ, acquired cytolytic function in vivo, emigrated in large numbers to the lung, and responded vigorously to OVA rechallenge. Therefore, DEC-205 provides an efficient receptor-based mechanism for DCs to process proteins for MHC class I presentation in vivo, leading to tolerance in the steady state and immunity after DC maturation. PMID:12486105

  17. Modulation for antigen presentation in tuberculosis by using synthetic peptides.

    PubMed

    Méndez-Samperio, P; Jiménez-Zamudio, L

    1991-01-01

    Competition assay technology has been a very useful tool in the study of parasite antigens and has been inferred but never proven that this approach can be applied to select T-cell epitopes by using another microorganisms. In this study, HLA-restricted T-cell clones specific to synthetic peptides derived from the 65 kDa mycobacterial protein were used to investigate whether these peptides are able to compete with each other at the level of MHC-binding sites in tuberculosis. Fixed APCs were pulsed with suboptimal concentration of stimulator peptide in the presence of various concentrations of competitor peptide. The results showed that two peptides from this protein were able to compete with each other inducing a significant inhibition in the proliferation assays while there was no competition by using a control peptide. The amount of cross-reactivity was influenced by the peptide concentrations. More important was the observation that these peptides were able to bind to the same HLA-class II molecules therefore blocking the binding of each other. The fact that these peptides have not an identical amino acid sequence support the idea that the MHC-peptide interaction must have a broad specificity to be able to bind a large number of peptides. These results demonstrate that it is possible to modulate the antigen presentation by blocking the peptide MHC-class II interaction in tuberculosis and support the idea that this approach facilitates the selection of appropriate T-cell epitopes to be incorporated in a vaccine.

  18. Evaluation of the ability of N-terminal fragment of lethal factor of Bacillus anthracis for delivery of Mycobacterium T cell antigen ESAT-6 into cytosol of antigen presenting cells to elicit effective cytotoxic T lymphocyte response

    SciTech Connect

    Chandra, Subhash; Kaur, Manpreet; Midha, Shuchi; Bhatnagar, Rakesh . E-mail: rakbhat01@yahoo.com; Banerjee-Bhatnagar, Nirupama . E-mail: nirupama@icgeb.res.in

    2006-12-22

    We report the ability of N-terminal fragment of lethal factor of Bacillus anthracis to deliver genetically fused ESAT-6 (early secretory antigen target), a potent T cell antigen of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, into cytosol to elicit Cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response. In vitro Th1 cytokines data and CTL assay proved that efficient delivery of LFn.ESAT-6 occurs in cytosol, in the presence of protective antigen (PA), and leads to generation of effective CTL response. Since CTL response is essential for protection against intracellular pathogens and, it is well known that only single T cell epitope or single antigenic protein is not sufficient to elicit protective CTL response due to variation or polymorphism in MHC-I alleles among the individuals, we suggest that as a fusion protein LFn can be used to deliver multiepitopes of T cells or multiproteins which can generate effective CTLs against intracellular pathogens like M. tuberculosis. It can be used to enhance the protective efficacy of BCG vaccine.

  19. A fully synthetic glycopeptide antitumor vaccine based on multiple antigen presentation on a hyperbranched polymer.

    PubMed

    Glaffig, Markus; Palitzsch, Björn; Hartmann, Sebastian; Schüll, Christoph; Nuhn, Lutz; Gerlitzki, Bastian; Schmitt, Edgar; Frey, Holger; Kunz, Horst

    2014-04-07

    For antitumor vaccines both the selected tumor-associated antigen, as well as the mode of its presentation, affect the immune response. According to the principle of multiple antigen presentation, a tumor-associated MUC1 glycopeptide combined with the immunostimulating T-cell epitope P2 from tetanus toxoid was coupled to a multi-functionalized hyperbranched polyglycerol by "click chemistry". This globular polymeric carrier has a flexible dendrimer-like structure, which allows optimal antigen presentation to the immune system. The resulting fully synthetic vaccine induced strong immune responses in mice and IgG antibodies recognizing human breast-cancer cells.

  20. Self-adjuvanted nanovaccine for cancer immunotherapy: Role of lysosomal rupture-induced ROS in MHC class I antigen presentation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ce; Li, Ping; Liu, Lanlan; Pan, Hong; Li, Hongchang; Cai, Lintao; Ma, Yifan

    2016-02-01

    MHC class I (MHC I) antigen presentation of exogenous antigens (so called "cross presentation") is a central mechanism of CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses essential for successful vaccine-based cancer immunotherapy. The present study constructed amphiphilic pH-sensitive galactosyl dextran-retinal (GDR) nanogels for cancer vaccine delivery, in which dextran was conjugated with all-trans retinal (a metabolite of vitamin A) through a pH-sensitive hydrazone bond, followed by galactosylation to acquire dendritic cell (DC)-targeting ability. Our results showed that pH-sensitive GDR nanogel was a self-adjuvanted vaccine carrier that not only promoted DC maturation through activating retinoic acid receptor (RAR) signaling, but also facilitated antigen uptake and cytosolic antigen release in DCs. Furthermore, pH-sensitive GDR nanogel effectively augmented MHC I antigen presentation and evoked potent anti-cancer immune responses in vivo. More importantly, we first reported that nanoparticle-triggered lysosome rupture could directly induce ROS production in DCs, which was found to be essential for augmenting proteasome activity and downstream MHC I antigen presentation. Hence, DC-targeted pH-sensitive GDR nanogels could be a potent delivery system for cancer vaccine development. Triggering lyososomal rupture in DCs with pH-sensitive nanoparticles might be a plausible strategy to elevate intracellular ROS production for promoting antigen cross presentation, thereby improving cancer vaccine efficacy.

  1. Analysis of HLA-DR glycoproteins by DNA-mediated gene transfer. Definition of DR2 beta gene products and antigen presentation to T cell clones from leprosy patients

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    We have used DNA-mediated gene transfer to express HLA class II molecules in mouse L cells for serological, biochemical, and functional analysis. cDNA clones encoding the DR2 beta a and DR2 beta b products of the DR2Dw2 haplotype were subcloned into a mouse Moloney leukemia virus-based expression vector (pJ4) and transfected separately into mouse L cells together with a HLA-DR alpha/pJ4 construct. These transfectants have allowed differential analysis of the two DR2 beta products in a manner normally prohibited by the concomitant expression seen in B cells. Two-dimensional SDS-PAGE analysis of the transfectants defines the more acidic beta chain as the product of the DR2 beta a sequence, and the more basic chain as the product of the DR2 beta b sequence. The LDR2a transfectants present antigen efficiently to M.leprae-specific T cell clones and are capable of presenting synthetic peptide, 65-kD recombinant mycobacterial antigen and M.leprae. Of the DR2Dw2-restricted T cell clones we have tested, all use the DR2 beta a chain as their restriction element. Inhibition studies with mAbs demonstrate the dependence of presentation by the transfectant on class II and CD4, while mAbs against LFA-1, which substantially inhibit presentation by B-lymphoblastoid cell lines, do not inhibit transfectant presentation. PMID:3128633

  2. Suppression of autophagy and antigen presentation by Mycobacterium tuberculosis PE_PGRS47.

    PubMed

    Saini, Neeraj K; Baena, Andres; Ng, Tony W; Venkataswamy, Manjunatha M; Kennedy, Steven C; Kunnath-Velayudhan, Shajo; Carreño, Leandro J; Xu, Jiayong; Chan, John; Larsen, Michelle H; Jacobs, William R; Porcelli, Steven A

    2016-08-15

    Suppression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II antigen presentation is believed to be among the major mechanisms used by Mycobacterium tuberculosis to escape protective host immune responses. Through a genome-wide screen for the genetic loci of M. tuberculosis that inhibit MHC class II-restricted antigen presentation by mycobacteria-infected dendritic cells, we identified the PE_PGRS47 protein as one of the responsible factors. Targeted disruption of the PE_PGRS47 (Rv2741) gene led to attenuated growth of M. tuberculosis in vitro and in vivo, and a PE_PGRS47 mutant showed enhanced MHC class II-restricted antigen presentation during in vivo infection of mice. Analysis of the effects of deletion or over-expression of PE_PGRS47 implicated this protein in the inhibition of autophagy in infected host phagocytes. Our findings identify PE_PGRS47 as a functionally relevant, non-redundant bacterial factor in the modulation of innate and adaptive immunity by M. tuberculosis, suggesting strategies for improving antigen presentation and the generation of protective immunity during vaccination or infection.

  3. Comparative Analysis of Gingival Tissue Antigen Presentation Pathways in Aging and Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, O.A.; Novak, M.J.; Kirakodu, S.; Orraca, L.; Chen, K.C.; Strom-berg, A.; Gonzalez-Martinez, J.; Ebersole, J. L.

    2014-01-01

    Aim Gingival tissues of periodontitis lesions contribute to local elevations in mediators, including both specific T cell and antibody immune responses to oral bacterial antigens. Thus, antigen processing and presentation activities must exist in these tissues to link antigen-presenting cells with adaptive immunity. We hypothesized that alterations in the transcriptome of antigen processing and presentation genes occur in aging gingival tissues and that periodontitis enhances these differences reflecting tissues less capable of immune resistance to oral pathogens. Materials and Methods Rhesus monkeys (n=34) from 3–23 years of age were examined. A buccal gingival sample from healthy or periodontitis sites were obtained, total RNA isolated, and microarray analysis was used to describe the transcriptome. Results The results demonstrated increased transcription of genes related to the MHC class II and negative regulation of NK cells with aging in healthy gingival tissues. In contrast, both adult and aging periodontitis tissues showed decreased transcription of genes for MHC class II antigens, coincident with up-regulation of MHC class I-associated genes. Conclusion These transcriptional changes suggest a response of healthy aging tissues through the class II pathway (i.e., endocytosed antigens) and altered responses in periodontitis that could reflect host-associated self-antigens or targeting cytosolic intra-cellular microbial pathogens. PMID:24304139

  4. Epstein-Barr virus latent membrane protein 2A exacerbates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and enhances antigen presentation function

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Rhoda A.; Miller, Stephen D.; Longnecker, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory, autoimmune disease of the central nervous system. The cause of MS is still unknown but epidemiological and immunological studies have implicated Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), which infects B cells, as a possible etiological agent involved in disease. Of particular interest is EBV latent membrane protein 2A (LMP2A) because previous studies have demonstrated that LMP2A enhances the expansion and differentiation of B cells upon antigen stimulation, revealing a potential contribution of this protein in autoimmunity. Since B cells are thought to contribute to MS, we examined the role of LMP2A in the animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). In this model, transgenic mice in which B cells express LMP2A show increased severity and incidence of disease. This difference was not due to lymphocyte recruitment into the CNS or differences in T cell activation, rather, we show that LMP2A enhances antigen presentation function. PMID:22616025

  5. Parasite Manipulation of the Invariant Chain and the Peptide Editor H2-DM Affects Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Antigen Presentation during Toxoplasma gondii Infection

    PubMed Central

    Nishi, Manami; El-Hage, Sandy; Fox, Barbara A.; Bzik, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular protozoan parasite. This apicomplexan is the causative agent of toxoplasmosis, a leading cause of central nervous system disease in AIDS. It has long been known that T. gondii interferes with major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) antigen presentation to attenuate CD4+ T cell responses and establish persisting infections. Transcriptional downregulation of MHC-II genes by T. gondii was previously established, but the precise mechanisms inhibiting MHC-II function are currently unknown. Here, we show that, in addition to transcriptional regulation of MHC-II, the parasite modulates the expression of key components of the MHC-II antigen presentation pathway, namely, the MHC-II-associated invariant chain (Ii or CD74) and the peptide editor H2-DM, in professional antigen-presenting cells (pAPCs). Genetic deletion of CD74 restored the ability of infected dendritic cells to present a parasite antigen in the context of MHC-II in vitro. CD74 mRNA and protein levels were, surprisingly, elevated in infected cells, whereas MHC-II and H2-DM expression was inhibited. CD74 accumulated mainly in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and this phenotype required live parasites, but not active replication. Finally, we compared the impacts of genetic deletion of CD74 and H2-DM genes on parasite dissemination toward lymphoid organs in mice, as well as activation of CD4+ T cells and interferon gamma (IFN-γ) levels during acute infection. Cyst burdens and survival during the chronic phase of infection were also evaluated in wild-type and knockout mice. These results highlight the fact that the infection is influenced by multiple levels of parasite manipulation of the MHC-II antigen presentation pathway. PMID:26195549

  6. Alloantigen presentation by B cells: analysis of the requirement for B-cell activation.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, J L; Cunningham, A C; Kirby, J A

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes a model for investigation of the functional implications of B-cell activation for antigen presentation. Mixed lymphocyte cultures were used to assess the ability of freshly isolated B cells, mitogen-activated B cells and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed B-cell lines to stimulate the activation and proliferation of allogeneic T cells under a variety of experimental conditions. It was found that resting B cells presented antigen poorly, while activated cells were highly immunogenic. Paraformaldehyde fixation completely eliminated antigen presentation by resting B cells, despite constitutive expression of class II MHC antigens. However, fixation had little effect on antigen presentation by activated B cells that expressed B7-1 and B7-2 in addition to class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules. Arrest of B-cell activation by serial fixation after treatment with F(ab')2 fragments of goat anti-human IgM produced cells with variable antigen-presenting capacity. Optimal antigen presentation was observed for cells fixed 72 hr after the initiation of B-cell activation. Although both B7-1 and B7-2 antigen expression increased after B-cell activation, it was found that the rate of T-cell proliferation correlated most closely with B7-2 expression. Stimulation of T cells by fixed activated B lymphocytes could be blocked by antibodies directed at class II MHC molecules, indicating involvement of the T-cell antigen receptor. In addition, T-cell proliferation was inhibited by antibodies specific for B7-1 and B7-2 and by the fusion protein CTLA4-Ig, demonstrating a requirement for CD28 signal transduction. The sole requirement of B7 family expression for antigen presentation by B lymphocytes was shown by demonstration of T-cell stimulation by fixed resting B cells in the presence of CD28 antibody as a source of artificial costimulation. PMID:8550066

  7. Identifying a Small Molecule Blocking Antigen Presentation in Autoimmune Thyroiditis*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Cheuk Wun; Menconi, Francesca; Osman, Roman; Mezei, Mihaly; Jacobson, Eric M.; Concepcion, Erlinda; David, Chella S.; Kastrinsky, David B.; Ohlmeyer, Michael; Tomer, Yaron

    2016-01-01

    We previously showed that an HLA-DR variant containing arginine at position 74 of the DRβ1 chain (DRβ1-Arg74) is the specific HLA class II variant conferring risk for autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD). We also identified 5 thyroglobulin (Tg) peptides that bound to DRβ1-Arg74. We hypothesized that blocking the binding of these peptides to DRβ1-Arg74 could block the continuous T-cell activation in thyroiditis needed to maintain the autoimmune response to the thyroid. The aim of the current study was to identify small molecules that can block T-cell activation by Tg peptides presented within DRβ1-Arg74 pockets. We screened a large and diverse library of compounds and identified one compound, cepharanthine that was able to block peptide binding to DRβ1-Arg74. We then showed that Tg.2098 is the dominant peptide when inducing experimental autoimmune thyroiditis (EAT) in NOD mice expressing human DRβ1-Arg74. Furthermore, cepharanthine blocked T-cell activation by thyroglobulin peptides, in particular Tg.2098 in mice that were induced with EAT. For the first time we identified a small molecule that can block Tg peptide binding and presentation to T-cells in autoimmune thyroiditis. If confirmed cepharanthine could potentially have a role in treating human AITD. PMID:26703475

  8. Identifying a Small Molecule Blocking Antigen Presentation in Autoimmune Thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Li, Cheuk Wun; Menconi, Francesca; Osman, Roman; Mezei, Mihaly; Jacobson, Eric M; Concepcion, Erlinda; David, Chella S; Kastrinsky, David B; Ohlmeyer, Michael; Tomer, Yaron

    2016-02-19

    We previously showed that an HLA-DR variant containing arginine at position 74 of the DRβ1 chain (DRβ1-Arg74) is the specific HLA class II variant conferring risk for autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD). We also identified 5 thyroglobulin (Tg) peptides that bound to DRβ1-Arg74. We hypothesized that blocking the binding of these peptides to DRβ1-Arg74 could block the continuous T-cell activation in thyroiditis needed to maintain the autoimmune response to the thyroid. The aim of the current study was to identify small molecules that can block T-cell activation by Tg peptides presented within DRβ1-Arg74 pockets. We screened a large and diverse library of compounds and identified one compound, cepharanthine that was able to block peptide binding to DRβ1-Arg74. We then showed that Tg.2098 is the dominant peptide when inducing experimental autoimmune thyroiditis (EAT) in NOD mice expressing human DRβ1-Arg74. Furthermore, cepharanthine blocked T-cell activation by thyroglobulin peptides, in particular Tg.2098 in mice that were induced with EAT. For the first time we identified a small molecule that can block Tg peptide binding and presentation to T-cells in autoimmune thyroiditis. If confirmed cepharanthine could potentially have a role in treating human AITD.

  9. Influence of Endosomal Escape and Degradation of α-Galactosylceramide Loaded Liposomes on CD1d Antigen Presentation.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Takashi; Kuroi, Moeka; Harashima, Hideyoshi

    2015-08-03

    Alpha-galactosylceramide (GC), a lipid antigen present on CD1d molecules, is a unique adjuvant that enables a strong antitumor effect to be induced via activation of natural killer T cells. We previously reported that a liposomal formulation of GC significantly enhanced GC presentation via CD1d and antitumor immunity. However, the influence of the intracellular fate of liposomes controlled by the lipid composition on GC presentation using GC-loaded liposomes (GC-Lip) remains unclear. In this study, we prepared a GC-Lip formulation by incorporating dioleoyl-phosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE)/cholesterol, egg phosphatidylcholine (EPC)/cholesterol, and distearoyl phosphocholine (DSPC)/cholesterol, and investigated the relationship between the intracellular trafficking of GC-Lip and GC presentation in antigen-presenting cells. When GC-Lip was prepared using DOPE, a fusogenic lipid, the endosomal escape of liposomes was enhanced, resulting in a decrease in GC presentation of CD1d, compared to the EPC based GC-Lip (EPC/GC-Lip). The stability of liposomes in endosomes/lysosomes had no influence on GC presentation. The DSPC based GC-Lip (DSPC/GC-Lip) induced GC presentation without any detectable degradation in liposomal structure, although the EPC/GC-Lip induced GC presentation with degradation of liposomal structure. The efficiency of GC presentation between EPC/GC-Lip and DSPC/GC-Lip was comparable. These GC presentations that were independent of the degradation of liposomes were dominated by saposins, sphingolipid activator proteins. Our findings reveal that GC presentation on CD1d from the fluid liposomes involves the action of saposins, regardless of whether liposome degradation occurs. This insight can be of use in terms of developing GC-Lip formulation for efficient GC presentation.

  10. Enhancement of MHC-I antigen presentation via architectural control of pH-responsive, endosomolytic polymer nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wilson, John T; Postma, Almar; Keller, Salka; Convertine, Anthony J; Moad, Graeme; Rizzardo, Ezio; Meagher, Laurence; Chiefari, John; Stayton, Patrick S

    2015-03-01

    Protein-based vaccines offer a number of important advantages over organism-based vaccines but generally elicit poor CD8(+) T cell responses. We have previously demonstrated that pH-responsive, endosomolytic polymers can enhance protein antigen delivery to major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) antigen presentation pathways thereby augmenting CD8(+) T cell responses following immunization. Here, we describe a new family of nanocarriers for protein antigen delivery assembled using architecturally distinct pH-responsive polymers. Reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization was used to synthesize linear, hyperbranched, and core-crosslinked copolymers of 2-(N,N-diethylamino)ethyl methacrylate (DEAEMA) and butyl methacrylate (BMA) that were subsequently chain extended with a hydrophilic N,N-dimethylacrylamide (DMA) segment copolymerized with thiol-reactive pyridyl disulfide (PDS) groups. In aqueous solution, polymer chains assembled into 25 nm micellar nanoparticles and enabled efficient and reducible conjugation of a thiolated protein antigen, ovalbumin. Polymers demonstrated pH-dependent membrane-destabilizing activity in an erythrocyte lysis assay, with the hyperbranched and cross-linked polymer architectures exhibiting significantly higher hemolysis at pH ≤ 7.0 than the linear diblock. Antigen delivery with the hyperbranched and cross-linked polymer architecture enhanced in vitro MHC-I antigen presentation relative to free antigen, whereas the linear construct did not have a discernible effect. The hyperbranched system elicited a four- to fivefold increase in MHC-I presentation relative to the cross-linked architecture, demonstrating the superior capacity of the hyperbranched architecture in enhancing MHC-I presentation. This work demonstrates that the architecture of pH-responsive, endosomolytic polymers can have dramatic effects on intracellular antigen delivery, and offers a promising strategy for enhancing CD8(+) T cell

  11. Oxidation matters: the ubiquitin proteasome system connects innate immune mechanisms with MHC class I antigen presentation.

    PubMed

    Warnatsch, Annika; Bergann, Theresa; Krüger, Elke

    2013-09-01

    During innate immune responses the delicate balance of protein synthesis, quality control and degradation is severely challenged by production of radicals and/or the massive synthesis of pathogen proteins. The regulated degradation of ubiquitin-tagged proteins by the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) represents one major pathway for the maintenance of cellular proteostasis and regulatory processes under these conditions. In addition, MHC class I antigen presentation is strictly dependent on an appropriate peptide supply by the UPS to efficiently prime CD8(+) T cells and to initiate an adaptive immune response. We here discuss recent efforts in defining the link between innate immune mechanisms like cytokine and ROS production, the induction of an efficient adaptive immune response and the specific involvement of the UPS therein. Cytokines and/or infections induce translation and the production of free radicals, which in turn confer oxidative damage to nascent as well as folded proteins. In parallel, the same signaling cascades are able to accelerate the protein turnover by the concomitantly induced ubiquitin conjugation and degradation of such damaged polypeptides by immunoproteasomes. The ability of immunoproteasomes to efficiently degrade such oxidant-damaged ubiquitylated proteins protects cells from accumulating toxic ubiquitin-rich aggregates. At the same time, this innate immune mechanism facilitates a sufficient peptide supply for MHC class I antigen presentation and connects it to initiation of adaptive immunity.

  12. Polymer blend particles with defined compositions for targeting antigen to both class I and II antigen presentation pathways.

    PubMed

    Tran, Kenny K; Zhan, Xi; Shen, Hong

    2014-05-01

    Defense against many persistent and difficult-to-treat diseases requires a combination of humoral, CD4(+) , and CD8(+) T-cell responses, which necessitates targeting antigens to both class I and II antigen presentation pathways. In this study, polymer blend particles are developed by mixing two functionally unique polymers, poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) and a pH-responsive polymer, poly(dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate-co-propylacrylic acid-co-butyl methacrylate) (DMAEMA-co-PAA-co-BMA). Polymer blend particles are shown to enable the delivery of antigens into both class I and II antigen presentation pathways in vitro. Increasing the ratio of the pH-responsive polymer in blend particles increases the degree of class I antigen presentation, while maintaining high levels of class II antigen presentation. In a mouse model, it is demonstrated that a significantly higher and sustained level of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell responses, and comparable antibody responses, are elicited with polymer blend particles than PLGA particles and a conventional vaccine, Alum. The polymer blend particles offer a potential vaccine delivery platform to generate a combination of humoral and cell-mediated immune responses that insure robust and long-lasting immunity against many infectious diseases and cancers.

  13. Wheeling and Dealing With Antigen Presentation in Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Hudrisier, Denis; Neyrolles, Olivier

    2016-03-01

    In tuberculosis, antigens are transferred from infected to uninfected dendritic cells. Does this favor T lymphocyte response and anti-mycobacterial host defense? In a recent report published in Cell Host & Microbe, Ernst and colleagues show that Mycobacterium tuberculosis seems to have hijacked this mechanism for its own benefit.

  14. Uptake of HLA Alloantigens via CD89 and CD206 Does Not Enhance Antigen Presentation by Indirect Allorecognition

    PubMed Central

    Breman, Eytan; Ruben, Jurjen M.; Franken, Kees L.; Heemskerk, Mirjam H. M.; Roelen, Dave L.; Claas, Frans H.

    2016-01-01

    In organ transplantation, alloantigens are taken up by antigen presenting cells and presented via the indirect pathway to T-cells which in turn can induce allograft rejection. Monitoring of these T-cells is of major importance; however no reliable assay is available to routinely monitor indirect allorecognition. Recently we showed that HLA monomers can be successfully used to monitor indirect allorecognition. Targeting antigens to endocytic receptors on antigen presenting cells may further enhance the presentation of antigens via HLA class II and improve the efficiency of this assay. In the current study we explored targeting of HLA monomers to either CD89 expressing monocytes or mannose receptor expressing dendritic cells. Monomer-antibody complexes were generated using biotin-labeled monomers and avidin labeling of the antibodies. We demonstrate that targeting the complexes to these receptors resulted in a dose-dependent HLA class II mediated presentation to a T-cell clone. The immune-complexes were efficiently taken up and presented to T-cells. However, the level of T-cell reactivity was similar to that when only exogenous antigen was added. We conclude that HLA-A2 monomers targeted for presentation through CD89 on monocytes or mannose receptor on dendritic cells lead to proper antigen presentation but do not enhance indirect allorecognition via HLA-DR. PMID:27413760

  15. Immunology by numbers: quantitation of antigen presentation completes the quantitative milieu of systems immunology!

    PubMed

    Purcell, Anthony W; Croft, Nathan P; Tscharke, David C

    2016-06-01

    We review approaches to quantitate antigen presentation using a variety of biological and biochemical readouts and highlight the emerging role of mass spectrometry (MS) in defining and quantifying MHC-bound peptides presented at the cell surface. The combination of high mass accuracy in the determination of the molecular weight of the intact peptide of interest and its signature pattern of fragmentation during tandem MS provide an unambiguous and definitive identification. This is in contrast to the potential receptor cross-reactivity towards closely related peptides and variable dose responsiveness seen in biological readouts. In addition, we gaze into the not too distant future where big data approaches in MS can be accommodated to quantify whole immunopeptidomes both in vitro and in vivo.

  16. Human invariant chain isoform p35 restores thymic selection and antigen presentation in CD74-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Genève, Laetitia; Chemali, Magali; Desjardins, Michel; Labrecque, Nathalie; Thibodeau, Jacques

    2012-10-01

    The invariant chain (Ii) has pleiotropic functions and is a key factor in antigen presentation. Ii associates with major histocompatibility complex class II molecules in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and targets the complex in the endocytic pathway to allow antigenic peptide loading. The human Iip35 isoform includes a cytoplasmic extension containing a di-arginine motif causing ER retention. This minor isoform does not exist in mice and its function in humans has not been thoroughly investigated. We have recently generated transgenic mice expressing Iip35 and these were crossed with Ii-deficient mice to generate animals (Tgp35/mIiKO) expressing exclusively the human isoform. In these mice, we show that Iip35 is expressed in antigen presenting cells and is inducible by interferon gamma (IFN-γ). Despite the low constitutive expression of the protein and some minor differences in the Vβ repertoire of Tgp35/mIiKO mice, Iip35 restored thymic selection of CD4(+) T cells and of invariant natural killer T cells. In vitro functional assays using purified primary macrophages treated with IFN-γ showed that Iip35 allows presentation of an Ii-dependent ovalbumin T-cell epitope. Altogether, our results suggest that Iip35 is functional and does not require co-expression of other isoforms for antigen presentation.

  17. Effects of messenger RNA structure and other translational control mechanisms on major histocompatibility complex-I mediated antigen presentation.

    PubMed

    Murat, Pierre; Tellam, Judy

    2015-01-01

    Effective T-cell surveillance of antigen-presenting cells is dependent on the expression of an array of antigenic peptides bound to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I (MHC-I) or class II (MHC-II) molecules. Pathogens co-evolving with their hosts exploit crucial translational regulatory mechanisms in order to evade host immune recognition and thereby sustain their infection. Evasion strategies that downregulate viral protein synthesis and thereby restrict antigen presentation to cytotoxic T-cells through the endogenous MHC-I pathway have been implicated in the pathogenesis of viral-associated malignancies. An understanding of the mechanisms by which messenger RNA (mRNA) structure modulates both viral mRNA translation and the antigen processing machinery to escape immune surveillance, will stimulate the development of alternative therapeutic strategies focused on RNA-directed drugs designed to enhance immune responses against infected cells. In this review, we discuss regulatory aspects of the MHC-I pathway and summarize current knowledge of the role attributed by mRNA structure and other translational regulatory mechanisms in immune evasion. In particular we highlight the impact of recently identified G-quadruplex structures within virally encoded transcripts as unique regulatory signals for translational control and antigen presentation.

  18. Organic extract of diesel exhaust particles stimulates expression of Ia and costimulatory molecules associated with antigen presentation in rat peripheral blood monocytes but not in alveolar macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Koike, Eiko . E-mail: ekoike@nies.go.jp; Kobayashi, Takahiro

    2005-12-15

    We hypothesized that diesel exhaust particles (DEP) induce the activation of antigen-presenting cells (APC) in lung. The present study was designed to clarify the following about DEP: (1) whether it affects the expression of Ia and B7 molecules in alveolar macrophages (AM) as a mature cell or in peripheral blood monocytes (PBM) as an immature cell (2) if it affects the antigen-presenting (AP) activity of PBM (3) what component of DEP is responsible for the effects, and (4) whether the effect of DEP is related to oxidative stress. DEP was extracted with methylene chloride. Cells were exposed to whole DEP, organic extract, or residual particles for 24 h. Cell-surface molecules were measured by flow cytometry. AP activity was assessed by antigen-specific T cell proliferation. Whole DEP or organic extract significantly increased the expression of Ia and B7 molecules on PBM but not on AM. No significant effect of residual particles was observed. A low concentration of organic extract also increased the AP activity of PBM. When the induction of an antioxidative enzyme was assessed, heme oxygenase-1 protein was found to be significantly increased by exposure to whole DEP, and the organic extract was more effective than the residual particles. Furthermore, the organic extract-induced expression of Ia antigen on PBM was reduced by the addition of an antioxidative agent. These results suggest that DEP may act on immature APC and enhance their AP activity and that the action contributing to oxidative stress may be mediated by organic compounds of DEP.

  19. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Cif protein enhances the ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation of the transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) and reduces major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I antigen presentation.

    PubMed

    Bomberger, Jennifer M; Ely, Kenneth H; Bangia, Naveen; Ye, Siying; Green, Kathy A; Green, William R; Enelow, Richard I; Stanton, Bruce A

    2014-01-03

    Cif (PA2934), a bacterial virulence factor secreted in outer membrane vesicles by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, increases the ubiquitination and lysosomal degradation of some, but not all, plasma membrane ATP-binding cassette transporters (ABC), including the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator and P-glycoprotein. The goal of this study was to determine whether Cif enhances the ubiquitination and degradation of the transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP1 and TAP2), members of the ABC transporter family that play an essential role in antigen presentation and intracellular pathogen clearance. Cif selectively increased the amount of ubiquitinated TAP1 and increased its degradation in the proteasome of human airway epithelial cells. This effect of Cif was mediated by reducing USP10 deubiquitinating activity, resulting in increased polyubiquitination and proteasomal degradation of TAP1. The reduction in TAP1 abundance decreased peptide antigen translocation into the endoplasmic reticulum, an effect that resulted in reduced antigen available to MHC class I molecules for presentation at the plasma membrane of airway epithelial cells and recognition by CD8(+) T cells. Cif is the first bacterial factor identified that inhibits TAP function and MHC class I antigen presentation.

  20. Role of antigen presentation in the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in obese adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Majdoubi, Abdelilah; Kishta, Osama A; Thibodeau, Jacques

    2016-06-01

    Type II diabetes regroups different physiological anomalies that ultimately lead to low-grade chronic inflammation, insulin resistance and loss of pancreatic β-cells. Obesity is one of the best examples of such a condition that can develop into Metabolic Syndrome, causing serious health problems of great socio-economic consequences. The pathological outcome of obesity has a genetic basis and depends on the delicate balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory effectors of the immune system. The causal link between obesity and inflammation is well established. While innate immunity plays a key role in the development of a pro-inflammatory state in obese adipose tissues, it has now become clear that adaptive immune cells are also involved and participate in the cascade of events that lead to metabolic perturbations. The efficacy of some immunotherapeutic protocols in reducing the symptoms of obesity-driven metabolic syndrome in mice implicated all arms of the immune response. Recently, the production of pathogenic immunoglobulins and pro-inflammatory cytokines by B and T lymphocytes suggested an auto-immune basis for the establishment of a non-healthy obese state. Understanding the cellular landscape of obese adipose tissues and how immune cells sustain chronic inflammation holds the key to the development of targeted therapies. In this review, we emphasize the role of antigen-presenting cells and MHC molecules in obese adipose tissue and the general contribution of the adaptive arm of the immune system in inflammation-induced insulin resistance.

  1. Genetic modulation of antigen presentation by HLA-B27 molecules

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    In studies of antigenic peptide presentation, we have found a healthy volunteer whose lymphoblastoid cells were unable to present three different virus-derived epitopes to cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) despite expressing the correct restricting HLA-B27 molecules on the cell surface. B cell lines were established from other members of the donor's family, including individuals suffering from ankylosing spondylitis and related diseases, and were tested for their ability to function as target cells in the same assay. None of the eight B cell lines that expressed HLA-B27 presented a known peptide epitope to CTL. However, cells from a family member that expressed HLA-B8 could present an epitope peptide restricted by that molecule. The B27 molecule in this family proved to be the B2702 subtype on isoelectric focusing gels, appearing in exactly the same position as B2702 from other cell lines that did present the peptide. To exclude mutations resulting in noncharged amino acid substitutions, cDNA coding for B2702 was cloned from the proband's cell line and sequenced. No coding changes were found. The cloned cDNA was transfected into HLA-A- and B-negative HMy/C1R cells, and the B2702 molecules generated in this environment rendered these cells, after incubation with peptide, susceptible to lysis by peptide-specific CTL. These data are compatible with the presence of a factor(s), possibly HLA linked, interfering with antigen presentation by otherwise normal B2702 molecules in this family. PMID:1370680

  2. Cowpox virus employs a two-pronged strategy to outflank MHCI antigen presentation.

    PubMed

    McCoy, William H; Wang, Xiaoli; Yokoyama, Wayne M; Hansen, Ted H; Fremont, Daved H

    2013-09-01

    Smallpox decimated humanity for thousands of years before being eradicated by vaccination, a success facilitated by the fact that humans are the only host of variola virus. In contrast, other orthopoxviruses such as cowpox virus can infect a variety of mammalian species, although its dominant reservoir appears to be rodents. This difference in host specificity suggests that cowpox may have developed promiscuous immune evasion strategies to facilitate zoonosis. Recent experiments have established that cowpox can disrupt MHCI antigen presentation during viral infection of both human and murine cells, a process enabled by two unique proteins, CPXV012 and CPXV203. While CPXV012 inhibits antigenic peptide transport from the cytosol to the ER, CPXV203 blocks MHCI trafficking to the cell surface by exploiting the KDEL-receptor recycling pathway. Our recent investigations of CPXV203 reveal that it binds a diverse array of classical and non-classical MHCI proteins with dramatically increased affinities at the lower pH of the Golgi relative to the ER, thereby providing mechanistic insight into how it works synergistically with KDEL receptors to block MHCI surface expression. The strategy used by cowpox to both limit peptide supply and disrupt trafficking of fully assembled MHCI acts as a dual-edged sword that effectively disables adaptive immune surveillance of infected cells.

  3. No Major Role for Insulin-Degrading Enzyme in Antigen Presentation by MHC Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Hsiang-Ting; Burgevin, Anne; Guénette, Suzanne; Moser, Anna; van Endert, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Antigen presentation by MHC class I molecules requires degradation of epitope source proteins in the cytosol. Although the preeminent role of the proteasome is clearly established, evidence suggesting a significant role for proteasome-independent generation of class I ligands has been reported repeatedly. However, an enzyme responsible for such a role has not been identified. Recently insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) was shown to produce an antigenic peptide derived from the tumor antigen MAGE-A3 in an entirely proteasome-independent manner, raising the question of the global impact of IDE in MHC class I antigen processing. Here we report that IDE knockdown in human cell lines, or knockout in two different mouse strains, has no effect on cell surface expression of various MHC class I molecules, including allomorphs such as HLA-A3 and HLA-B27 suggested to be loaded in an at least a partly proteasome-independent manner. Moreover, reduced or absent IDE expression does not affect presentation of five epitopes including epitopes derived from beta amyloid and proinsulin, two preferred IDE substrates. Thus, IDE does not play a major role in MHC class I antigen processing, confirming the dominant and almost exclusive role of the proteasome in cytosolic production of MHC class I ligands. PMID:24516642

  4. A Systems Approach to Understand Antigen Presentation and the Immune Response.

    PubMed

    Dudek, Nadine L; Croft, Nathan P; Schittenhelm, Ralf B; Ramarathinam, Sri H; Purcell, Anthony W

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian immune system has evolved to respond to pathogenic, environmental, and cellular changes in order to maintain the health of the host. These responses include the comparatively primitive innate immune response, which represents a rapid and relatively nonspecific reaction to challenge by pathogens and the more complex cellular adaptive immune response. This adaptive response evolves with the pathogenic challenge, involves the cross talk of several cell types, and is highly specific to the pathogen due to the liberation of peptide antigens and their presentation on the surface of affected cells. Together these two forms of immunity provide a surveillance mechanism for the system-wide scrutiny of cellular function, environment, and health. As such the immune system is best understood at a systems biology level, and studies that combine gene expression, protein expression, and liberation of peptides for antigen presentation can be combined to provide a detailed understanding of immunity. This chapter details our experience in identifying peptide antigens and combining this information with more traditional proteomics approaches to understand the generation of immune responses on a holistic level.

  5. High-density lipoprotein affects antigen presentation by interfering with lipid raft: a promising anti-atherogenic strategy.

    PubMed

    Wang, S-H; Yuan, S-G; Peng, D-Q; Zhao, S-P

    2010-05-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease. Immunomodulation of atherosclerosis emerges as a promising approach to prevention and treatment of this widely prevalent disease. The function of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) to promote reverse cholesterol transport may explain the ability of its protection against atherosclerosis. Findings that HDL and apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) inhibited the ability of antigen presenting cells (APCs) to stimulate T cells might be attributed to lipid raft, a cholesterol-rich microdomain exhibiting functional properties depending largely upon its lipid composition. Thus, modulating cholesterol in lipid raft may provide a promising anti-atherogenic strategy.

  6. Loss of antigen-presenting molecules (MHC class I and TAP-1) in lung cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Korkolopoulou, P.; Kaklamanis, L.; Pezzella, F.; Harris, A. L.; Gatter, K. C.

    1996-01-01

    Presentation of endogenous antigenic peptides to cytotoxic T lymphocytes is mediated by the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules. For the stable assembly of MHC class I complex it is necessary that the antigenic peptide is transported by the MHC-encoded transporters TAP-1 and TAP-2 into a pre-Golgi region. T-cell-mediated host-vs-tumour response might therefore depend on the presence of these molecules on tumour cells. The presence of MHC class I antigens and TAP-1 was studied in a series of 93 resection specimens of non-small-cell lung carcinomas (NSCLCs) by immunohistochemical methods using antibodies against the assembled class I molecule, beta 2-microglobulin (beta 2-m), heavy-chain A locus, A2 allele and TAP-1 protein. Eighty-six patients were included in the survival analysis. Total loss of class I molecule was observed in 38% of the cases and was usually accompanied by loss of beta 2-m and of heavy chain A locus. Selective loss of A locus was seen in 8.3% and of A2 allele in 27% of the cases. TAP-1 loss was always combined with beta 2-m and/or heavy chain A locus loss. No correlation was found between the expressional status of any of the above molecules, including the selective A2 allelic loss and histological type, degree of differentiation, tumoral stage, nodal stage and survival. Our findings suggest that loss of antigen-presenting molecules (including both MHC class I alleles and TAP-1) is a frequent event in lung cancer. However, the immunophenotypic profile of MHC class I and TAP-1 seems to be unrelated in vivo to the phenotype, growth or survival of NSCLC. Images Figure 1 PMID:8546899

  7. Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) Class I and MHC Class II Proteins: Conformational Plasticity in Antigen Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Wieczorek, Marek; Abualrous, Esam T.; Sticht, Jana; Álvaro-Benito, Miguel; Stolzenberg, Sebastian; Noé, Frank; Freund, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Antigen presentation by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins is essential for adaptive immunity. Prior to presentation, peptides need to be generated from proteins that are either produced by the cell’s own translational machinery or that are funneled into the endo-lysosomal vesicular system. The prolonged interaction between a T cell receptor and specific pMHC complexes, after an extensive search process in secondary lymphatic organs, eventually triggers T cells to proliferate and to mount a specific cellular immune response. Once processed, the peptide repertoire presented by MHC proteins largely depends on structural features of the binding groove of each particular MHC allelic variant. Additionally, two peptide editors—tapasin for class I and HLA-DM for class II—contribute to the shaping of the presented peptidome by favoring the binding of high-affinity antigens. Although there is a vast amount of biochemical and structural information, the mechanism of the catalyzed peptide exchange for MHC class I and class II proteins still remains controversial, and it is not well understood why certain MHC allelic variants are more susceptible to peptide editing than others. Recent studies predict a high impact of protein intermediate states on MHC allele-specific peptide presentation, which implies a profound influence of MHC dynamics on the phenomenon of immunodominance and the development of autoimmune diseases. Here, we review the recent literature that describe MHC class I and II dynamics from a theoretical and experimental point of view and we highlight the similarities between MHC class I and class II dynamics despite the distinct functions they fulfill in adaptive immunity. PMID:28367149

  8. Recent advances in Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class I antigen presentation: Plastic MHC molecules and TAPBPR-mediated quality control

    PubMed Central

    van Hateren, Andy; Bailey, Alistair; Elliott, Tim

    2017-01-01

    We have known since the late 1980s that the function of classical major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules is to bind peptides and display them at the cell surface to cytotoxic T cells. Recognition by these sentinels of the immune system can lead to the destruction of the presenting cell, thus protecting the host from pathogens and cancer. Classical MHC class I molecules (MHC I hereafter) are co-dominantly expressed, polygenic, and exceptionally polymorphic and have significant sequence diversity. Thus, in most species, there are many different MHC I allotypes expressed, each with different peptide-binding specificity, which can have a dramatic effect on disease outcome. Although MHC allotypes vary in their primary sequence, they share common tertiary and quaternary structures. Here, we review the evidence that, despite this commonality, polymorphic amino acid differences between allotypes alter the ability of MHC I molecules to change shape (that is, their conformational plasticity). We discuss how the peptide loading co-factor tapasin might modify this plasticity to augment peptide loading. Lastly, we consider recent findings concerning the functions of the non-classical MHC I molecule HLA-E as well as the tapasin-related protein TAPBPR (transporter associated with antigen presentation binding protein-related), which has been shown to act as a second quality-control stage in MHC I antigen presentation. PMID:28299193

  9. Rheumatoid arthritis vaccine therapies: perspectives and lessons from therapeutic ligand epitope antigen presentation system vaccines for models of rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Rosenthal, Kenneth S.; Mikecz, Katalin; Steiner, Harold L.; Glant, Tibor T.; Finnegan, Alison; Carambula, Roy E.; Zimmerman, Daniel H.

    2016-01-01

    The current status of therapeutic vaccines for autoimmune diseases is reviewed with rheumatoid arthritis as the focus. Therapeutic vaccines for autoimmune diseases must regulate or subdue responses to common self-antigens. Ideally, such a vaccine would initiate an antigen-specific modulation of the T-cell immune response that drives the inflammatory disease. Appropriate animal models and types of T helper cells and signature cytokine responses that drive autoimmune disease are also discussed. Interpretation of these animal models must be done cautiously because the means of initiation, autoantigens, and even the signature cytokine and T helper cell (Th1 or Th17) responses that are involved in the disease may differ significantly from those in humans. We describe ligand epitope antigen presentation system vaccine modulation of T-cell autoimmune responses as a strategy for the design of therapeutic vaccines for rheumatoid arthritis, which may also be effective in other autoimmune conditions. PMID:25787143

  10. Rheumatoid arthritis vaccine therapies: perspectives and lessons from therapeutic ligand epitope antigen presentation system vaccines for models of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, Kenneth S; Mikecz, Katalin; Steiner, Harold L; Glant, Tibor T; Finnegan, Alison; Carambula, Roy E; Zimmerman, Daniel H

    2015-06-01

    The current status of therapeutic vaccines for autoimmune diseases is reviewed with rheumatoid arthritis as the focus. Therapeutic vaccines for autoimmune diseases must regulate or subdue responses to common self-antigens. Ideally, such a vaccine would initiate an antigen-specific modulation of the T-cell immune response that drives the inflammatory disease. Appropriate animal models and types of T helper cells and signature cytokine responses that drive autoimmune disease are also discussed. Interpretation of these animal models must be done cautiously because the means of initiation, autoantigens, and even the signature cytokine and T helper cell (Th1 or Th17) responses that are involved in the disease may differ significantly from those in humans. We describe ligand epitope antigen presentation system vaccine modulation of T-cell autoimmune responses as a strategy for the design of therapeutic vaccines for rheumatoid arthritis, which may also be effective in other autoimmune conditions.

  11. Salt bridge residues between I-Ak dimer of dimers alpha-chains modulate antigen presentation.

    PubMed

    Yadati, S; Nydam, T; Demian, D; Wade, T K; Gabriel, J L; Barisas, B G; Wade, W F

    1999-03-15

    Class II dimers of dimers are predicted to have functional significance in antigen presentation. The putative contact amino acids of the I-Ak class II dimer of dimers have been identified by molecular modeling based on the DR1 crystal structure (Nydam et al., Int. Immunol. 10, 1237,1998). We have previously reported the role in antigen presentation of dimer of dimers contact amino acids located in the C-terminal domains of the alpha- and beta-chains of class II. Our calculations show that residues Ealpha89 and Ralpha145 in the alpha2-domain form an inter alpha-chain salt bridge between pairs of alphabeta-heterodimers. Other residues, Qalpha92 and Nalpha115, may be involved in close association in that part of the alpha-chain. We investigated the role of these amino acids on class II expression and antigen presentation. Class II composed of an Ealpha89K substituted alpha-chain paired with a wt beta-chain exhibited inhibited antigen presentation and expression of alpha-chain serologic epitopes. In contrast, mutation of Ralpha145E had less affect on antigen presentation and did not affect I-Ak serologic epitopes. Interchanging charges of the salt bridge residues by expressing both Ralpha145E and Ealpha89K on the same chain obviated the large negative effect of the Ealpha89K mutation on antigen presentation but not on the serologic epitopes. Our results are similar for those reported for mutation of DR3's inter-chain salt bridge with the exception that double mutants did not moderate the DR3 defect. Interestingly, the amino acids differences between I-A and DR change the location of the inter-chain salt bridges. In DR1 these residues are located at positions Ealpha88 and Kalpha111; in I-Ak these residues are located at position Ealpha89 and Ralpha145. Inter alpha-chain salt bridges are thus maintained in various class II molecules by amino acids located in different parts of the alpha2-domain. This conservation of structure suggests that considerable functional

  12. T cell activation requires force generation

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Kenneth H.

    2016-01-01

    Triggering of the T cell receptor (TCR) integrates both binding kinetics and mechanical forces. To understand the contribution of the T cell cytoskeleton to these forces, we triggered T cells using a novel application of atomic force microscopy (AFM). We presented antigenic stimulation using the AFM cantilever while simultaneously imaging with optical microscopy and measuring forces on the cantilever. T cells respond forcefully to antigen after calcium flux. All forces and calcium responses were abrogated upon treatment with an F-actin inhibitor. When we emulated the forces of the T cell using the AFM cantilever, even these actin-inhibited T cells became activated. Purely mechanical stimulation was not sufficient; the exogenous forces had to couple through the TCR. These studies suggest a mechanical–chemical feedback loop in which TCR-triggered T cells generate forceful contacts with antigen-presenting cells to improve access to antigen. PMID:27241914

  13. Kinetics of adeno-associated virus serotype 2 (AAV2) and AAV8 capsid antigen presentation in vivo are identical.

    PubMed

    He, Yi; Weinberg, Marc S; Hirsch, Matt; Johnson, Mark C; Tisch, Roland; Samulski, R Jude; Li, Chengwen

    2013-05-01

    Adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors 2 and 8 have been used in clinical trials for patients with hemophilia, and data suggest that the capsid-specific CD8⁺ T cell response has had a negative impact on therapeutic success. To date the pattern of capsid cross-presentation from AAV2 and AAV8 transduction in vivo has not been elucidated. Previously, we have demonstrated that an engineered AAV2 virus carrying the immune-dominant SIINFEKL peptide in the capsid backbone was indistinguishable from wild type with respect to titer, tropism, and the ability to induce capsid-specific CD8⁺ T cell responses in vivo. In this study, we used the same strategy to engineer an AAV8 vector and demonstrated that antigen from SIINFEKL peptide-integrated AAV8 capsid was effectively presented via either plasmid transfection or AAV8 transduction in vitro. The tissue tropism and transgene expression kinetics of the engineered AAV8 vector in vivo were identical to that of wild-type AAV8. Animal studies show that capsid antigen presentation from AAV transduction was dose dependent, and more importantly, the proliferation of capsid-specific CD8⁺ T cells had similar kinetics (detectable before 30 days and undetectable after 40 days) for both AAV2 and AAV8 vectors. Elucidation of the kinetics of capsid antigen presentation from AAV transduction by various serotypes provides new insight into the potential impact CD8⁺ T cells can have during clinical trials and may help with rational design of effective strategies to prevent capsid-specific CD8⁺ T cell-mediated elimination of AAV-transduced target cells.

  14. Improved Transgenic Mouse Model for Studying HLA Class I Antigen Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Man; Zhang, Wei; Guo, Jie; Wei, Xundong; Phiwpan, Krung; Zhang, Jianhua; Zhou, Xuyu

    2016-01-01

    HLA class I (HLA-I) transgenic mice have proven to be useful models for studying human MHC-related immune responses over the last two decades. However, differences in the processing and presentation machinery between humans and mice may have profound effects on HLA-I restricted antigen presentation. In this study, we generated a novel human TAP-LMP (hTAP-LMP) gene cluster transgenic mouse model carrying an intact human TAP complex and two human immunoproteasome LMP subunits, PSMB8/PSMB9. By crossing the hTAP-LMP strain with different HLA-I transgenic mice, we found that the expression levels of human HLA-I molecules, especially the A3 supertype members (e.g., A11 and A33), were remarkably enhanced in corresponding HLA-I/hTAP-LMP transgenic mice. Moreover, we found that humanized processing and presentation machinery increased antigen presentation of HLA-A11-restricted epitopes and promoted the rapid reduction of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in HLA-A11/hTAP-LMP mice. Together, our study highlights that HLA-I/hTAP-LMP mice are an improved model for studying antigen presentation of HLA-I molecules and their related CTL responses. PMID:27634283

  15. Suboptimal Antigen Presentation Contributes to Virulence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Grace, Patricia S; Ernst, Joel D

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis commonly causes persistent or chronic infection, despite the development of Ag-specific CD4 T cell responses. We hypothesized that M. tuberculosis evades elimination by CD4 T cell responses by manipulating MHC class II Ag presentation and CD4 T cell activation and tested this hypothesis by comparing activation of Ag85B-specific CD4 T cell responses to M. tuberculosis and M. bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) Pasteur in vivo and in vitro. We found that, although M. tuberculosis persists in lungs of immunocompetent mice, M. bovis BCG is cleared, and clearance is T cell dependent. We further discovered that M. tuberculosis-infected macrophages and dendritic cells activate Ag85B-specific CD4 T cells less efficiently and less effectively than do BCG-infected cells, in vivo and in vitro, despite higher production and secretion of Ag85B by M. tuberculosis. During BCG infection, activation of Ag85B-specific CD4 T cells requires fewer infected dendritic cells and fewer Ag-producing bacteria than during M. tuberculosis infection. When dendritic cells containing equivalent numbers of M. tuberculosis or BCG were transferred to mice, BCG-infected cells activated proliferation of more Ag85B-specific CD4 T cells than did M. tuberculosis-infected cells. Differences in Ag85B-specific CD4 T cell activation were attributable to differential Ag presentation rather than differential expression of costimulatory or inhibitory molecules. These data indicate that suboptimal Ag presentation contributes to persistent infection and that limiting Ag presentation is a virulence property of M. tuberculosis.

  16. Activation strategies for invariant natural killer T cells.

    PubMed

    Kohlgruber, Ayano C; Donado, Carlos A; LaMarche, Nelson M; Brenner, Michael B; Brennan, Patrick J

    2016-08-01

    Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells are a specialized T cell subset that plays an important role in host defense, orchestrating both innate and adaptive immune effector responses against a variety of microbes. Specific microbial lipids and mammalian self lipids displayed by the antigen-presenting molecule CD1d can activate iNKT cells through their semi-invariant αβ T cell receptors (TCRs). iNKT cells also constitutively express receptors for inflammatory cytokines typically secreted by antigen-presenting cells (APCs) after recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), and they can be activated through these cytokine receptors either in combination with TCR signals, or in some cases even in the absence of TCR signaling. During infection, experimental evidence suggests that both TCR-driven and cytokine-driven mechanisms contribute to iNKT cell activation. While the relative contributions of these two signaling mechanisms can vary widely depending on the infectious context, both lipid antigens and PAMPs mediate reciprocal activation of iNKT cells and APCs, leading to downstream activation of multiple other immune cell types to promote pathogen clearance. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms involved in iNKT cell activation during infection, focusing on the central contributions of both lipid antigens and PAMP-induced inflammatory cytokines, and highlight in vivo examples of activation during bacterial, viral, and fungal infections.

  17. Identification of immunogenic hot spots within plum pox potyvirus capsid protein for efficient antigen presentation.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Fernández, M Rosario; Martínez-Torrecuadrada, Jorge L; Roncal, Fernando; Domínguez, Elvira; García, Juan Antonio

    2002-12-01

    PEPSCAN analysis has been used to characterize the immunogenic regions of the capsid protein (CP) in virions of plum pox potyvirus (PPV). In addition to the well-known highly immunogenic N- and C-terminal domains of CP, regions within the core domain of the protein have also shown high immunogenicity. Moreover, the N terminus of CP is not homogeneously immunogenic, alternatively showing regions frequently recognized by antibodies and others that are not recognized at all. These results have helped us to design efficient antigen presentation vectors based on PPV. As predicted by PEPSCAN analysis, a small displacement of the insertion site in a previously constructed vector, PPV-gamma, turned the derived chimeras into efficient immunogens. Vectors expressing foreign peptides at different positions within a highly immunogenic region (amino acids 43 to 52) in the N-terminal domain of CP were the most effective at inducing specific antibody responses against the foreign sequence.

  18. The critical role of antigen-presentation-induced cytokine crosstalk in the central nervous system in multiple sclerosis and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Sosa, Rebecca A; Forsthuber, Thomas G

    2011-10-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a debilitating disease of the central nervous system (CNS) that has been extensively studied using the animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). It is believed that CD4(+) T lymphocytes play an important role in the pathogenesis of this disease by mediating the demyelination of neuronal axons via secretion of proinflammatory cytokines resulting in the clinical manifestations. Although a great deal of information has been gained in the last several decades about the cells involved in the inflammatory and disease mediating process, important questions have remained unanswered. It has long been held that initial neuroantigen presentation and T cell activation events occur in the immune periphery and then translocate to the CNS. However, an increasing body of evidence suggests that antigen (Ag) presentation might initiate within the CNS itself. Importantly, it has remained unresolved which antigen presenting cells (APCs) in the CNS are the first to acquire and present neuroantigens during EAE/MS to T cells, and what the conditions are under which this takes place, ie, whether this occurs in the healthy CNS or only during inflammatory conditions and what the related cytokine microenvironment is comprised of. In particular, the central role of interferon-γ as a primary mediator of CNS pathology during EAE has been challenged by the emergence of Th17 cells producing interleukin-17. This review describes our current understanding of potential APCs in the CNS and the contribution of these and other CNS-resident cells to disease pathology. Additionally, we discuss the question of where Ag presentation is initiated and under what conditions neuroantigens are made available to APCs with special emphasis on which cytokines may be important in this process.

  19. The Critical Role of Antigen-Presentation-Induced Cytokine Crosstalk in the Central Nervous System in Multiple Sclerosis and Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Sosa, Rebecca A.

    2011-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a debilitating disease of the central nervous system (CNS) that has been extensively studied using the animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). It is believed that CD4+ T lymphocytes play an important role in the pathogenesis of this disease by mediating the demyelination of neuronal axons via secretion of proinflammatory cytokines resulting in the clinical manifestations. Although a great deal of information has been gained in the last several decades about the cells involved in the inflammatory and disease mediating process, important questions have remained unanswered. It has long been held that initial neuroantigen presentation and T cell activation events occur in the immune periphery and then translocate to the CNS. However, an increasing body of evidence suggests that antigen (Ag) presentation might initiate within the CNS itself. Importantly, it has remained unresolved which antigen presenting cells (APCs) in the CNS are the first to acquire and present neuroantigens during EAE/MS to T cells, and what the conditions are under which this takes place, ie, whether this occurs in the healthy CNS or only during inflammatory conditions and what the related cytokine microenvironment is comprised of. In particular, the central role of interferon-γ as a primary mediator of CNS pathology during EAE has been challenged by the emergence of Th17 cells producing interleukin-17. This review describes our current understanding of potential APCs in the CNS and the contribution of these and other CNS-resident cells to disease pathology. Additionally, we discuss the question of where Ag presentation is initiated and under what conditions neuroantigens are made available to APCs with special emphasis on which cytokines may be important in this process. PMID:21919736

  20. EpsinR, a target for pyrenocine B, role in endogenous MHC-II-restricted antigen presentation.

    PubMed

    Shishido, Tatsuya; Hachisuka, Masami; Ryuzaki, Kai; Miura, Yuko; Tanabe, Atsushi; Tamura, Yasuaki; Kusayanagi, Tomoe; Takeuchi, Toshifumi; Kamisuki, Shinji; Sugawara, Fumio; Sahara, Hiroeki

    2014-11-01

    While the presentation mechanism of antigenic peptides derived from exogenous proteins by MHC class II molecules is well understood, relatively little is known about the presentation mechanism of endogenous MHC class II-restricted antigens. We therefore screened a chemical library of 200 compounds derived from natural products to identify inhibitors of the presentation of endogenous MHC class II-restricted antigens. We found that pyrenocine B, a compound derived from the fungus Pyrenochaeta terrestris, inhibits presentation of endogenous MHC class II-restricted minor histocompatibility antigen IL-4 inducible gene 1 (IL4I1) by primary dendritic cells (DCs). Phage display screening and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analysis were used to investigate the mechanism of suppressive action by pyrenocine B. EpsinR, a target molecule for pyrenocine B, mediates endosomal trafficking through binding of soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors (SNAREs). Lentiviral-mediated short hairpin (sh) RNA downregulation of EpsinR expression in DCs resulted in a decrease in the responsiveness of CD4+ T cells. Our data thus suggest that EpsinR plays a role in antigen presentation, which provides insight into the mechanism of presentation pathway of endogenous MHC class II-restricted antigen.

  1. Visualizing how T cells collect activation signals in vivo.

    PubMed

    Moreau, Hélène D; Bousso, Philippe

    2014-02-01

    A decade ago the first movies depicting T cell behavior in vivo with the help of two-photon microscopy were generated. These initial experiments revealed that T cells migrate rapidly and randomly in secondary lymphoid organs at steady state and profoundly alter their behavior during antigen recognition, establishing both transient and stable contacts with antigen-presenting cells (APCs). Since then, in vivo imaging has continuously improved our understanding of T cell activation. In particular, recent studies uncovered how T cells may be guided in their search for the best APCs. Additionally, the development of more sophisticated fluorescent tools has permitted not only to visualize T cell-APC contacts but also to probe their functional impact on T cell activation. These recent progresses are providing new insights into how T cells sense antigen, collect activation signals during distinct types of interaction and integrate information over successive encounters.

  2. Kinetic discrimination in T-cell activation.

    PubMed Central

    Rabinowitz, J D; Beeson, C; Lyons, D S; Davis, M M; McConnell, H M

    1996-01-01

    We propose a quantitative model for T-cell activation in which the rate of dissociation of ligand from T-cell receptors determines the agonist and antagonist properties of the ligand. The ligands are molecular complexes between antigenic peptides and proteins of the major histocompatibility complex on the surfaces of antigen-presenting cells. Binding of ligand to receptor triggers a series of biochemical reactions in the T cell. If the ligand dissociates after these reactions are complete, the T cell receives a positive activation signal. However, dissociation of ligand after completion of the first reaction but prior to generation of the final products results in partial T-cell activation, which acts to suppress a positive response. Such a negative signal is brought about by T-cell ligands containing the variants of antigenic peptides referred to as T-cell receptor antagonists. Results of recent experiments with altered peptide ligands compare favorably with T-cell responses predicted by this model. PMID:8643643

  3. Association of Polymorphisms in HLA Antigen Presentation-Related Genes with the Outcomes of HCV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xiaomei; Xu, Yin; Wang, Jie; Zhang, Yun; Yu, Rongbin; Su, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Antigen-presentation genes play a vital role in the pathogenesis of HCV infection. However, the relationship of variants of these genes with spontaneous outcomes of HCV infection has not been fully investigated. To explore novel loci in the Chinese population, 34 tagging-SNPs in 9 candidate genes were genotyped for their associations with the outcomes of HCV infection. The distributions of different genotypes and haplotypes were compared among 773 HCV-negative controls, 246 subjects with HCV natural clearance, and 218 HCV persistent carriers recruited from hemodialysis patients and intravenous drug users. Our study implicated that TAP2, HLA-DOA, HLA-DOB, and tapasin loci were novel candidate regions for susceptibility to HCV infection and viral clearance in the Chinese population. Logistic regression analyses showed that TAP2 rs1800454 A (OR = 1.48, P = 0.002) and HLA-DOB rs2071469 G (OR = 1.23, P = 0.048) were significantly associated with increased susceptibility to establishment of HCV infection. However, high-risk behavior exposure and age were stronger predictors of HCV infection. Mutation of tapasin rs9277972 T (OR = 1.57, P =0.043) increased the risk of HCV chronicity, and HLA-DOA rs3128935 C (OR = 0.62, P = 0.019) increased the chance of viral resolution. With regards to the effect of rs3128925, interactions were found with high-risk behavior (P = 0.013) and age (P = 0.035). The risk effect of rs3128925 T for persistent HCV infection was higher in injecting drug users (vs. dialysis patients) and in subjects ≥ 40 years old (vs. < 40 years old). PMID:25874709

  4. First identification of regulatory B cell subsets expressing IL-10 in teleost fish

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    IL-10 is an immunoregulatory cytokine with a potent anti-inflammatory activity, thus inhibiting the production of proinflammatory cytokines as well as processes of antigen presentation. IL-10 is produced by variety of cells, including antigen presentation cells (i.e., monocytes, macrophages and den...

  5. Transgelin-2 in B-Cells Controls T-Cell Activation by Stabilizing T Cell - B Cell Conjugates

    PubMed Central

    Chae, Myoung-Won; Kim, Hye-Ran; Kim, Chang-Hyun; Jun, Chang-Duk; Park, Zee-Yong

    2016-01-01

    The immunological synapse (IS), a dynamic and organized junction between T-cells and antigen presenting cells (APCs), is critical for initiating adaptive immunity. The actin cytoskeleton plays a major role in T-cell reorganization during IS formation, and we previously reported that transgelin-2, an actin-binding protein expressed in T-cells, stabilizes cortical F-actin, promoting T-cell activation in response to antigen stimulation. Transgelin-2 is also highly expressed in B-cells, although no specific function has been reported. In this study, we found that deficiency in transgelin-2 (TAGLN2-/-) in B-cells had little effect on B-cell development and activation, as measured by the expression of CD69, MHC class II molecules, and CD80/86. Nevertheless, in B-cells, transgelin-2 accumulated in the IS during the interaction with T-cells. These results led us to hypothesize that transgelin-2 may also be involved in IS stability in B-cells, thereby influencing T-cell function. Notably, we found that transgelin-2 deficiency in B-cells reduced T-cell activation, as determined by the release of IL-2 and interferon-γ and the expression of CD69. Furthermore, the reduced T-cell activation was correlated with reduced B-cell–T-cell conjugate formation. Collectively, these results suggest that actin stability in B-cells during IS formation is critical for the initiation of adaptive T-cell immunity. PMID:27232882

  6. New Design of MHC Class II Tetramers to Accommodate Fundamental Principles of Antigen Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Landais, Elise; Romagnoli, Pablo A.; Corper, Adam L.; Shires, John; Altman, John D.; Wilson, Ian A.; Garcia, K. Christopher; Teyton, Luc

    2009-01-01

    Direct identification and isolation of antigen-specific T cells became possible with the development of “MHC tetramers”, based on fluorescent avidins displaying biotinylated peptide-MHC (pMHC) complexes. This approach, extensively used for MHC class I–restricted T cells, has met very limited success with MHC class II tetramers (pMHCT-2) for the detection of CD4+ specific T cells. In addition, a very large number of these reagents while capable of specifically activating T cells after being coated on solid support, are still unable to stain. In order to try to understand this puzzle and design usable tetramers, we examined each parameter critical for the production of pMHCT-2 using the I-Ad-OVA system as a model. Through this process the geometry of pMHC display by avidin tetramers was examined, as well as the stability of recombinant MHC molecules. However, we discovered that the most important factor limiting the reactivity of pMHCT-2 was the display of peptides. Indeed, long peptides, as presented by MHC class II molecules, can be bound to I-A/HLA-DQ molecules in more than one register as suggested by structural studies. This mode of anchorless peptide binding allows the selection of a broader repertoire on single peptides and should favor anti-infectious immune responses. Thus, beyond the technical improvements that we propose, the redesign of pMHCT-2 will give us the tools to evaluate the real size of the CD4 repertoire and help us in the production and testing of new vaccines. PMID:19923463

  7. Balancing Selection Maintains a Form of ERAP2 that Undergoes Nonsense-Mediated Decay and Affects Antigen Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Kretzschmar, Warren W.; Cannons, Jennifer L.; Lee-Lin, Shih-Queen; Hurle, Belen; Schwartzberg, Pamela L.; Bustamante, Carlos D.; Nielsen, Rasmus; Clark, Andrew G.; Green, Eric D.

    2010-01-01

    A remarkable characteristic of the human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is its extreme genetic diversity, which is maintained by balancing selection. In fact, the MHC complex remains one of the best-known examples of natural selection in humans, with well-established genetic signatures and biological mechanisms for the action of selection. Here, we present genetic and functional evidence that another gene with a fundamental role in MHC class I presentation, endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase 2 (ERAP2), has also evolved under balancing selection and contains a variant that affects antigen presentation. Specifically, genetic analyses of six human populations revealed strong and consistent signatures of balancing selection affecting ERAP2. This selection maintains two highly differentiated haplotypes (Haplotype A and Haplotype B), with frequencies 0.44 and 0.56, respectively. We found that ERAP2 expressed from Haplotype B undergoes differential splicing and encodes a truncated protein, leading to nonsense-mediated decay of the mRNA. To investigate the consequences of ERAP2 deficiency on MHC presentation, we correlated surface MHC class I expression with ERAP2 genotypes in primary lymphocytes. Haplotype B homozygotes had lower levels of MHC class I expressed on the surface of B cells, suggesting that naturally occurring ERAP2 deficiency affects MHC presentation and immune response. Interestingly, an ERAP2 paralog, endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase 1 (ERAP1), also shows genetic signatures of balancing selection. Together, our findings link the genetic signatures of selection with an effect on splicing and a cellular phenotype. Although the precise selective pressure that maintains polymorphism is unknown, the demonstrated differences between the ERAP2 splice forms provide important insights into the potential mechanism for the action of selection. PMID:20976248

  8. Dynamics of Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Compartments during B Cell Receptor–mediated Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Lankar, Danielle; Vincent-Schneider, Hélène; Briken, Volker; Yokozeki, Takeaki; Raposo, Graça; Bonnerot, Christian

    2002-01-01

    Antigen recognition by clonotypic B cell receptor (BcR) is the first step of B lymphocytes differentiation into plasmocytes. This B cell function is dependent on efficient major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II–restricted presentation of BcR-bound antigens. In this work, we analyzed the subcellular mechanisms underlying antigen presentation after BcR engagement on B cells. In quiescent B cells, we found that MHC class II molecules mostly accumulated at the cell surface and in an intracellular pool of tubulovesicular structures, whereas H2-M molecules were mostly detected in distinct lysosomal compartments devoid of MHC class II. BcR stimulation induced the transient intracellular accumulation of MHC class II molecules in newly formed multivesicular bodies (MVBs), to which H2-M was recruited. The reversible downregulation of cathepsin S activity led to the transient accumulation of invariant chain–MHC class II complexes in MVBs. A few hours after BcR engagement, cathepsin S activity increased, the p10 invariant chain disappeared, and MHC class II–peptide complexes arrived at the plasma membrane. Thus, BcR engagement induced the transient formation of antigen-processing compartments, enabling antigen-specific B cells to become effective antigen-presenting cells. PMID:11854359

  9. [Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and the inflammatory/immune response. I. The natural environment of the antigen presentation and immunologic chaos induced by the virus].

    PubMed

    Villarrubia, V G; Alvarez-Mon, M; Chirigos, M A; Herrerías, J M

    1997-12-01

    In this paper, the authors update on the immunopathology of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, with special reference to the roles of inflammatory and natural immune responses (macrophages and NK cells) in the viral clearance. The role of specific immune responses being related to the influence of the environment of the antigen presentation (macrophages, NK cells, and their related cytokines IL-12 and IFN-gamma) on Th cells within the liver. The viral scape leading to chronic hepatitis B is thought to be due (a) to the suppressive actions of the virus on NK cells and IFN-gamma production (b) to the downregulation of IL-12/IL-15 production provoked by the inflammatory response (factor C3 of the complement system) on IL-12-producing macrophages: immunologic chaos.

  10. Plasma-membrane-bound macromolecules are dynamically aggregated to form non-random codistribution patterns of selected functional elements. Do pattern recognition processes govern antigen presentation and intercellular interactions?

    PubMed

    Vereb, G; Mátyus, L; Bene, L; Panyi, G; Bacsó, Z; Balázs, M; Matkó, J; Szöllösi, J; Gáspár, R; Damjanovich, S

    1995-01-01

    Molecular recognition processes between cell surface elements are discussed with special reference to cell surface pattern formation of membrane-bound integral proteins. The existence, as detected by flow cytometric resonance energy transfer (Appendix), and significance of cell surface patterns involving the interleukin-2 receptor, the T-cell receptor-CD3 system, the intercellular adhesion molecule ICAM-1, and the major histocompatibility complex class I and class II molecules in the plasma membrane of lymphocytes are described. The modulation of antigen presentation by transmembrane potential changes is discussed, and a general role of transmembrane potential changes, and therefore of ion channel activities, adduced as one of the major regulatory mechanisms of cell-cell communication. A general role in the mediation and regulation of intercellular interactions is suggested for cell-surface macromolecular patterns. The dynamic pattern of protein and lipid molecules in the plasma membrane is generated by the genetic code, but has a remarkable flexibility and may be one of the major instruments of accommodation and recognition processes at the cellular level.

  11. Combined VEGFR and CTLA-4 blockade increases the antigen-presenting function of intratumoral DCs and reduces the suppressive capacity of intratumoral MDSCs

    PubMed Central

    Du Four, Stephanie; Maenhout, Sarah K; Niclou, Simone P; Thielemans, Kris; Neyns, Bart; Aerts, Joeri L

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma brain metastases (MBM) occur in 10% to 50% of melanoma patients. They are often associated with a high morbidity and despite the improvements in the treatment of advanced melanoma, including immunotherapy, patients with MBM still have a poor prognosis. Antiangiogenic treatment was shown to reduce the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment. Therefore we investigated the effect of the combination of VEGFR- and CTLA-4 blockade on the immune cells within the tumor microenvironment. In this study we investigated the effect of the combination of axitinib, a TKI against VEGFR-1, -2 and -3, with therapeutic inhibition of CTLA-4 in subcutaneous and intracranial mouse melanoma models. The combination of axitinib with αCTLA-4 reduced tumor growth and increased survival in both intracranial and subcutaneous models. Investigation of the splenic immune cells showed an increased number of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells after combination treatment. Moreover, combination treatment increased the number of intratumoral dendritic cells (DCs) and monocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells (moMDSCs). When these immune cell populations were sorted from the subcutaneous and intracranial tumors of mice treated with axitinib+αCTLA-4, we observed an increased antigen-presenting function of DCs and a reduced suppressive capacity of moMDSCs on a per cell basis. Our results suggest that the combination of antiangiogenesis and checkpoint inhibition can lead to an enhanced antitumor effect leading to increased survival. We found that this effect is in part due to an enhanced antitumor immune response generated by an increased antigen-presenting function of intratumoral DCs in combination with a reduced suppressive capacity of intratumoral moMDSCs. PMID:27904768

  12. Combined VEGFR and CTLA-4 blockade increases the antigen-presenting function of intratumoral DCs and reduces the suppressive capacity of intratumoral MDSCs.

    PubMed

    Du Four, Stephanie; Maenhout, Sarah K; Niclou, Simone P; Thielemans, Kris; Neyns, Bart; Aerts, Joeri L

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma brain metastases (MBM) occur in 10% to 50% of melanoma patients. They are often associated with a high morbidity and despite the improvements in the treatment of advanced melanoma, including immunotherapy, patients with MBM still have a poor prognosis. Antiangiogenic treatment was shown to reduce the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment. Therefore we investigated the effect of the combination of VEGFR- and CTLA-4 blockade on the immune cells within the tumor microenvironment. In this study we investigated the effect of the combination of axitinib, a TKI against VEGFR-1, -2 and -3, with therapeutic inhibition of CTLA-4 in subcutaneous and intracranial mouse melanoma models. The combination of axitinib with αCTLA-4 reduced tumor growth and increased survival in both intracranial and subcutaneous models. Investigation of the splenic immune cells showed an increased number of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells after combination treatment. Moreover, combination treatment increased the number of intratumoral dendritic cells (DCs) and monocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells (moMDSCs). When these immune cell populations were sorted from the subcutaneous and intracranial tumors of mice treated with axitinib+αCTLA-4, we observed an increased antigen-presenting function of DCs and a reduced suppressive capacity of moMDSCs on a per cell basis. Our results suggest that the combination of antiangiogenesis and checkpoint inhibition can lead to an enhanced antitumor effect leading to increased survival. We found that this effect is in part due to an enhanced antitumor immune response generated by an increased antigen-presenting function of intratumoral DCs in combination with a reduced suppressive capacity of intratumoral moMDSCs.

  13. MHC class I antigen presentation and implications for developing a new generation of therapeutic vaccines.

    PubMed

    Comber, Joseph D; Philip, Ramila

    2014-05-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) presented peptide epitopes provide a 'window' into the changes occurring in a cell. Conventionally, these peptides are generated by proteolysis of endogenously synthesized proteins in the cytosol, loaded onto MHC-I molecules, and presented on the cell surface for surveillance by CD8(+) T cells. MHC-I restricted processing and presentation alerts the immune system to any infectious or tumorigenic processes unfolding intracellularly and provides potential targets for a cytotoxic T cell response. Therefore, therapeutic vaccines based on MHC-I presented peptide epitopes could, theoretically, induce CD8(+) T cell responses that have tangible clinical impacts on tumor eradication and patient survival. Three major methods have been used to identify MHC-I restricted epitopes for inclusion in peptide-based vaccines for cancer: genetic, motif prediction and, more recently, immunoproteomic analysis. Although the first two methods are capable of identifying T cell stimulatory epitopes, these have significant disadvantages and may not accurately represent epitopes presented by a tumor cell. In contrast, immunoproteomic methods can overcome these disadvantages and identify naturally processed and presented tumor associated epitopes that induce more clinically relevant tumor specific cytotoxic T cell responses. In this review, we discuss the importance of using the naturally presented MHC-I peptide repertoire in formulating peptide vaccines, the recent application of peptide-based vaccines in a variety of cancers, and highlight the pros and cons of the current state of peptide vaccines.

  14. Mechanism of human natural killer cell activation by Haemophilus ducreyi.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Janowicz, Diane M; Fortney, Kate R; Katz, Barry P; Spinola, Stanley M

    2009-08-15

    The role of natural killer (NK) cells in the host response to Haemophilus ducreyi infection is unclear. In pustules obtained from infected human volunteers, there was an enrichment of CD56bright NK cells bearing the activation markers CD69 and HLA-DR, compared with peripheral blood. To study the mechanism by which H. ducreyi activated NK cells, we used peripheral blood mononuclear cells from uninfected volunteers. H. ducreyi activated NK cells only in the presence of antigen-presenting cells. H. ducreyi-infected monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages activated NK cells in a contact- and interleukin-18 (IL-18)-dependent manner, whereas monocyte-derived dendritic cells induced NK activation through soluble IL-12. More lesional NK cells than peripheral blood NK cells produced IFN-gamma in response to IL-12 and IL-18. We conclude that NK cells are recruited to experimental lesions and likely are activated by infected macrophages and dendritic cells. IFN-gamma produced by lesional NK cells may facilitate phagocytosis of H. ducreyi.

  15. Herpes virus oncolytic therapy reverses tumor immune dysfunction and facilitates tumor antigen presentation.

    PubMed

    Benencia, Fabian; Courrèges, Maria C; Fraser, Nigel W; Coukos, George

    2008-08-01

    We have previously shown that intratumor administration of HSV-1716 (an ICP34.5 null mutant) resulted in significant reduction of tumor growth and a significant survival advantage in a murine model of ovarian cancer. Herewith we report that oncolytic HSV-1716 generates vaccination effects in the same model. Upon HSV-1716 infection, mouse ovarian tumor cells showed high levels of expression viral glycoproteins B and D and were highly phagocyted by dendritic cells (DCs). Interestingly, increased phagocytosis of tumor-infected cells by DCs was impaired by heparin, and anti-HSV glycoproteins B and D, indicating that viral infection enhances adhesive interactions between DCs and tumor apoptotic bodies. Moreover, HSV-1716 infected cells expressed high levels of heat shock proteins 70 and GRP94, molecules that have been reported to induce maturation of DCs, increase cross-presentation of antigens and promote antitumor immune response. After phagocytosis of tumor-infected cells, DCs acquired a mature status in vitro and in vivo, upregulated the expression of costimulatory molecule and increased migration towards MIP-3beta. Furthermore, HSV-1716 oncolytic treatment markedly reduced vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels in tumor-bearing animals thus abrogating tumor immunosuppressive milieu. These mechanisms may account for the highly enhanced antitumoral immune responses observed in HSV-1716 treated animals. Oncolytic treatment induced a significantly higher frequency of tumor-reactive IFNgamma producing cells, and induced a robust tumor infiltration by T cells. These results indicate that oncolytic therapy with HSV-1716 facilitates antitumor immune responses.

  16. Cytosolic aminopeptidases influence MHC class I-mediated antigen presentation in an allele-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eunkyung; Kwak, Heechun; Ahn, Kwangseog

    2009-12-01

    Antigenic peptides presented by MHC class I molecules are generated mainly by the proteasome in the cytosol. Several cytosolic aminopeptidases further trim proteasomal products to form mature epitopes or individual amino acids. However, the distinct function of cytosolic aminopeptidases in MHC class I Ag processing remains to be elucidated. In this study, we show that cytosolic aminopeptidases differentially affect the cell surface expression of MHC class I molecules in an allele-dependent manner in human cells. In HeLa cells, knockdown of puromycin-sensitive aminopeptidase (PSA) by RNA interference inhibited optimal peptide loading of MHC class I molecules, and their cell surface expression was correspondingly reduced. In contrast, depletion of bleomycin hydrolase (BH) enhanced optimal peptide loading and cell surface expression of MHC class I molecules. We did not find evidence on the effect of leucine aminopeptidase knockdown on the MHC class I Ag presentation. Moreover, we demonstrated that PSA and BH influence the peptide loading and surface expression of MHC class I in an allele-specific manner. In the absence of either PSA or BH, the surface expression and peptide-dependent stability of HLA-A68 were reduced, whereas those of HLA-B15 were enhanced. The surface expression and peptide-dependent stability of HLA-A3 were enhanced by BH knockdown, although those of HLA-B8 were increased in PSA-depleted conditions.

  17. Detection of aberrant transcription of major histocompatibility complex class II antigen presentation genes in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia identifies HLA-DOA mRNA as a prognostic factor for survival.

    PubMed

    Souwer, Yuri; Chamuleau, Martine E D; van de Loosdrecht, Arjan A; Tolosa, Eva; Jorritsma, Tineke; Muris, Jettie J F; Dinnissen-van Poppel, Marion J; Snel, Sander N; van de Corput, Lisette; Ossenkoppele, Gert J; Meijer, Chris J L M; Neefjes, Jacques J; Marieke van Ham, S

    2009-05-01

    In human B cells, effective major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II-antigen presentation depends not only on MHC class II, but also on the invariant chain (CD74 or Ii), HLA-DM (DM) and HLA-DO (DO), the chaperones regulating the antigen loading process of MHC class II molecules. We analysed immediate ex vivo expression of HLA-DR (DR), CD74, DM and DO in B cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (B-CLL). Real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction demonstrated a highly significant upregulation of DRA, CD74, DMB, DOA and DOB mRNA in purified malignant cells compared to B cells from healthy donors. The increased mRNA levels were not translated into enhanced protein levels but could reflect aberrant transcriptional regulation. Indeed, upregulation of DRA, DMB, DOA and DOB mRNA correlated with enhanced expression of class II transactivator (CIITA). In-depth analysis of the various CIITA transcripts demonstrated a significant increased activity of the interferon-gamma-inducible promoter CIITA-PIV in B-CLL. Comparison of the aberrant mRNA levels with clinical outcome identified DOA mRNA as a prognostic indicator for survival. Multivariate analysis revealed that the prognostic value of DOA mRNA was independent of the mutational status of the IGHV genes. Thus, aberrant transcription of DOA forms a novel and additional prognostic indicator for survival in B-CLL.

  18. The first step of peptide selection in antigen presentation by MHC class I molecules

    PubMed Central

    Garstka, Malgorzata A.; Fish, Alexander; Celie, Patrick H. N.; Joosten, Robbie P.; Janssen, George M. C.; Berlin, Ilana; Hoppes, Rieuwert; Stadnik, Magda; Janssen, Lennert; Ovaa, Huib; van Veelen, Peter A.; Perrakis, Anastassis; Neefjes, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    MHC class I molecules present a variable but limited repertoire of antigenic peptides for T-cell recognition. Understanding how peptide selection is achieved requires mechanistic insights into the interactions between the MHC I and candidate peptides. We find that, at first encounter, MHC I H-2Kb considers a wide range of peptides, including those with expanded N termini and unfitting anchor residues. Discrimination occurs in the second step, when noncanonical peptides dissociate with faster exchange rates. This second step exhibits remarkable temperature sensitivity, as illustrated by numerous noncanonical peptides presented by H-2Kb in cells cultured at 26 °C relative to 37 °C. Crystallographic analyses of H-2Kb–peptide complexes suggest that a conformational adaptation of H-2Kb drives the decisive step in peptide selection. We propose that MHC class I molecules consider initially a large peptide pool, subsequently refined by a temperature-sensitive induced-fit mechanism to retain the canonical peptide repertoire. PMID:25605945

  19. HLA-DO as the Optimizer of Epitope Selection for MHC Class II Antigen Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Poluektov, Yuri O.; Kim, AeRyon; Hartman, Isamu Z.; Sadegh-Nasseri, Scheherazade

    2013-01-01

    Processing of antigens for presentation to helper T cells by MHC class II involves HLA-DM (DM) and HLA-DO (DO) accessory molecules. A mechanistic understanding of DO in this process has been missing. The leading model on its function proposes that DO inhibits the effects of DM. To directly study DO functions, we designed a recombinant soluble DO and expressed it in insect cells. The kinetics of binding and dissociation of several peptides to HLA-DR1 (DR1) molecules in the presence of DM and DO were measured. We found that DO reduced binding of DR1 to some peptides, and enhanced the binding of some other peptides to DR1. Interestingly, these enhancing and reducing effects were observed in the presence, or absence, of DM. We found that peptides that were negatively affected by DO were DM-sensitive, whereas peptides that were enhanced by DO were DM-resistant. The positive and negative effects of DO could only be measured on binding kinetics as peptide dissociation kinetics were not affected by DO. Using Surface Plasmon Resonance, we demonstrate direct binding of DO to a peptide-receptive, but not a closed conformation of DR1. We propose that DO imposes another layer of control on epitope selection during antigen processing. PMID:23951115

  20. Cross-dressed dendritic cells drive memory CD8+ T-cell activation after viral infection.

    PubMed

    Wakim, Linda M; Bevan, Michael J

    2011-03-31

    After an infection, cytotoxic T lymphocyte precursors proliferate and become effector cells by recognizing foreign peptides in the groove of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules expressed by antigen-presenting cells (APCs). Professional APCs specialized for T-cell activation acquire viral antigen either by becoming infected themselves (direct presentation) or by phagocytosis of infected cells, followed by transfer of antigen to the cytosol, processing and MHC class I loading in a process referred to as cross-presentation. An alternative way, referred to as 'cross-dressing', by which an uninfected APC could present antigen was postulated to be by the transfer of preformed peptide-MHC complexes from the surface of an infected cell to the APC without the need of further processing. Here we show that this mechanism exists and boosts the antiviral response of mouse memory CD8(+) T cells. A number of publications have demonstrated sharing of peptide-loaded MHC molecules in vitro. Our in vitro experiments demonstrate that cross-dressing APCs do not acquire peptide-MHC complexes in the form of exosomes released by donor cells. Rather, the APCs and donor cells have to contact each other for the transfer to occur. After a viral infection, we could isolate cross-dressed APCs able to present viral antigen in vitro. Furthermore, using the diphtheria toxin system to selectively eliminate APCs that could only acquire viral peptide-MHC complexes by cross-dressing, we show that such presentation can promote the expansion of resting memory T cells. Notably, naive T cells were excluded from taking part in the response. Cross-dressing is a mechanism of antigen presentation used by dendritic cells that may have a significant role in activating previously primed CD8(+) T cells.

  1. Defective antigen presentation by monocytes in ESRD patients not responding to hepatitis B vaccination: impaired HBsAg internalization and expression of ICAM-1 and HLA-DR/Ia molecules

    PubMed Central

    Barth, C.; Pollok, M.; Michałkiewicz, J.; Madaliński, K.; Maciejewski, J.; Baldamis, C. A.

    1995-01-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the monocyte function of uraemic non-responders to hepatitis B vaccination. Therefore, some parameters concerning antigen processing by monocytes (Mo) as antigen presenting cells (APC) were analysed. It was found that in uraemic non-responders, (1) the internalization of HBsAg by monocytes was significantly decreasjed—HBsAg complexed with specific IgG or as immune complex isolated from patients is better internalized compared with free HBsAg; (2) during antigen presentation the expression of adhesion (ICAM-1) and accessory (HLA-DR/Ia) molecules was significantly decreased in uraemic patients, especially in non-responders; and (3) impaired internalization of HBsAg as well as a decrease in ICAM-1 and HLA-DR/Ia expression, correlated well with the blunted proliferation of CD4+ T cells stimulated by autologous monocytes induced by HBsAg. PMID:18475616

  2. Interferon-α-inducible Dendritic Cells Matured with OK-432 Exhibit TRAIL and Fas Ligand Pathway-mediated Killer Activity

    PubMed Central

    Koya, Terutsugu; Yanagisawa, Ryu; Higuchi, Yumiko; Sano, Kenji; Shimodaira, Shigetaka

    2017-01-01

    Active human dendritic cells (DCs), which efficiently induce immune responses through their functions as antigen-presenting cells, exhibit direct anti-tumour killing activity in response to some pathogens and cytokines. These antigen-presenting and tumour killing abilities may provide a breakthrough in cancer immunotherapy. However, the mechanisms underlying this killer DC activity have not been fully proven, despite the establishment of interferon-α (IFN-α)-generated killer DCs (IFN-DCs). Here mature IFN-DCs (mIFN-DCs), generated from IFN-DCs primed with OK-432 (streptococcal preparation), exhibited elevated expression of CD86 and human leukocyte antigen-DR (minimum criteria for DC vaccine clinical trials) as well as antigen-presenting abilities comparable with those of mature IL-4-DCs (mIL-4-DCs). Interestingly, the killing activity of mIFN-DCs, which correlated with the expression of CD56 (natural killer cell marker) and was activated via the tumour necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) and Fas ligand pathway, was stronger than that of IFN-DCs and remarkably stronger than that of mIL-4-DCs. Therefore, mIFN-DCs exhibit great potential as an anti-cancer vaccine that would promote both acquired immunity and direct tumour killing. PMID:28191816

  3. Cytotoxic activity of interferon alpha induced dendritic cells as a biomarker of glioblastoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishinov, S. V.; Stupak, V. V.; Tyrinova, T. V.; Leplina, O. Yu.; Ostanin, A. A.; Chernykh, E. R.

    2016-08-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are the most potent antigen presenting cells that can play direct role in anti-tumor immune response as killer cells. DC tumoricidal activity can be stimulated greatly by type I IFN (IFNα and IFNβ). In the present study, we examined cytostatic and cytotoxic activity of monocyte-derived IFNα-induced DCs generated from patients with brain glioma and evaluated the potential use of these parameters in diagnostics of high-grade gliomas. Herein, we demonstrated that patient DCs do not possess the ability to inhibit the growth of tumor HEp-2 cell line but low-grade and high-grade glioma patients do not differ significantly in DC cytostatic activity. However, glioma patient DCs are characterized by reduced cytotoxic activity against HEp-2 cells. The impairment of DC cytotoxic function is observed mainly in glioblastoma patients. The cytotoxic activity of DCs against HEp-2 cells below 9% is an informative marker for glioblastomas.

  4. Human MAIT-cell responses to Escherichia coli: activation, cytokine production, proliferation, and cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Joana; Sobkowiak, Michał J.; Sandberg, Johan K.; Leeansyah, Edwin

    2016-01-01

    Mucosa-associated invariant T cells are a large and relatively recently described innate-like antimicrobial T-cell subset in humans. These cells recognize riboflavin metabolites from a range of microbes presented by evolutionarily conserved major histocompatibility complex, class I-related molecules. Given the innate-like characteristics of mucosa-associated invariant T cells and the novel type of antigens they recognize, new methodology must be developed and existing methods refined to allow comprehensive studies of their role in human immune defense against microbial infection. In this study, we established protocols to examine a range of mucosa-associated invariant T-cell functions as they respond to antigen produced by Escherichia coli. These improved and dose- and time-optimized experimental protocols allow detailed studies of MR1-dependent mucosa-associated invariant T-cell responses to Escherichia coli pulsed antigen-presenting cells, as assessed by expression of activation markers and cytokines, by proliferation, and by induction of apoptosis and death in major histocompatibility complex, class I-related–expressing target cells. The novel and optimized protocols establish a framework of methods and open new possibilities to study mucosa-associated invariant T-cell immunobiology, using Escherichia coli as a model antigen. Furthermore, we propose that these robust experimental systems can also be adapted to study mucosa-associated invariant T-cell responses to other microbes and types of antigen-presenting cells. PMID:27034405

  5. Controlling T-Cell Activation with Synthetic Dendritic Cells Using the Multivalency Effect

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Artificial antigen-presenting cells (aAPCs) have recently gained a lot of attention. They efficiently activate T cells and serve as powerful replacements for dendritic cells in cancer immunotherapy. Focusing on a specific class of polymer-based aAPCs, so-called synthetic dendritic cells (sDCs), we have investigated the importance of multivalent binding on T-cell activation. Using antibody-functionalized sDCs, we have tested the influence of polymer length and antibody density. Increasing the multivalent character of the antibody-functionalized polymer lowered the effective concentration required for T-cell activation. This was evidenced for both early and late stages of activation. The most important effect observed was the significantly prolonged activation of the stimulated T cells, indicating that multivalent sDCs sustain T-cell signaling. Our results highlight the importance of multivalency for the design of aAPCs and will ultimately allow for better mimics of natural dendritic cells that can be used as vaccines in cancer treatment. PMID:28393131

  6. A role for CD9 molecules in T cell activation

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Costimulation mediated by the CD28 molecule plays an important role in optimal activation of T cells. However, CD28-deficient mice can mount effective T cell-dependent immune responses, suggesting the existence of other costimulatory systems. In a search for other costimulatory molecules on T cells, we have developed a monoclonal antibody (mAb) that can costimulate T cells in the absence of antigen-presenting cells (APC). The molecule recognized by this mAb, 9D3, was found to be expressed on almost all mature T cells and to be a protein of approximately 24 kD molecular mass. By expression cloning, this molecule was identified as CD9, 9D3 (anti-CD9) synergized with suboptimal doses of anti-CD3 mAb in inducing proliferation by virgin T cells. Costimulation was induced by independent ligation of CD3 and CD9, suggesting that colocalization of these two molecules is not required for T cell activation. The costimulation by anti-CD9 was as potent as that by anti-CD28. Moreover, anti-CD9 costimulated in a CD28- independent way because anti-CD9 equally costimulated T cells from the CD28-deficient as well as wild-type mice. Thus, these results indicate that CD9 serves as a molecule on T cells that can deliver a potent CD28- independent costimulatory signal. PMID:8760830

  7. Activation and Function of iNKT and MAIT Cells.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Shilpi; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2015-01-01

    Over the last two decades, it has been established that peptides are not the only antigens recognized by T lymphocytes. Here, we review information on two T lymphocyte populations that recognize nonpeptide antigens: invariant natural killer T cells (iNKT cells), which respond to glycolipids, and mucosal associated invariant T cells (MAIT cells), which recognize microbial metabolites. These two populations have a number of striking properties that distinguish them from the majority of T cells. First, their cognate antigens are presented by nonclassical class I antigen-presenting molecules; CD1d for iNKT cells and MR1 for MAIT cells. Second, these T lymphocyte populations have a highly restricted diversity of their T cell antigen receptor α chains. Third, these cells respond rapidly to antigen or cytokine stimulation by producing copious amounts of cytokines, such as IFNγ, which normally are only made by highly differentiated effector T lymphocytes. Because of their response characteristics, iNKT and MAIT cells act at the interface of innate and adaptive immunity, participating in both types of responses. In this review, we will compare these two subsets of innate-like T cells, with an emphasis on the various ways that lead to their activation and their participation in antimicrobial responses.

  8. Processing and MHC class II presentation of exogenous soluble antigen involving a proteasome-dependent cytosolic pathway in CD40-activated B cells.

    PubMed

    Becker, Hans Jiro; Kondo, Eisei; Shimabukuro-Vornhagen, Alexander; Theurich, Sebastian; von Bergwelt-Baildon, Michael S

    2016-08-01

    Activated B cells have the capacity to present antigen and induce immune responses as potent antigen-presenting cells (APCs). As in other APCs, antigen presentation by B cells involves antigen internalization, antigen processing, and peptide loading onto MHC molecules. However, while the mechanism of antigen processing has been studied extensively in other APCs, this pathway remains elusive in B cells. The aim of this study was to investigate the MHC class II processing pathway in CD40-activated B cells (CD40Bs), as a model for activated, antigen-presenting B cells. Using CMV pp65 as a model antigen, we evaluated processing and presentation of the CD4 + T-cell epitope 509-523 (K509) by human CD40Bs in ELISPOT assays. As expected, stimulation of specific CD4 + T-cell clones was attenuated after pretreatment of CD40Bs with inhibitors of classic class II pathway components. However, proteasome inhibitors such as epoxomicin limited antigen presentation as well. This suggests that the antigen is processed in a non-classical, cytosolic MHC class II pathway. Further experiments with truncated protein variants revealed involvement of the proteasome in processing of the N and C extensions of the epitope. Access to the cytosol was shown to be size dependent. Epoxomicin sensitivity exclusively in CD40B cells, but not in dendritic cells, suggests a novel processing mechanism unique to this APC. Our data suggest that B cells process antigen using a distinct, non-classical class II pathway.

  9. Neuropilin-1 expression characterizes T follicular helper (Tfh) cells activated during B cell differentiation in human secondary lymphoid organs.

    PubMed

    Renand, Amédée; Milpied, Pierre; Rossignol, Julien; Bruneau, Julie; Lemonnier, François; Dussiot, Michael; Coulon, Séverine; Hermine, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    T follicular helper (Tfh) cells play an essential role in the development of antigen-specific B cell immunity. Tfh cells regulate the differentiation and survival of activated B cells outside and inside germinal centers (GC) of secondary lymphoid organs. They act through cognate contacts with antigen-presenting B cells, but there is no current marker to specifically identify those Tfh cells which productively interact with B cells. Here we show that neuropilin 1 (Nrp1), a cell surface receptor, is selectively expressed by a subset of Tfh cells in human secondary lymphoid organs. Nrp1 expression on Tfh cells correlates with B cell differentiation in vivo and in vitro, is transient, and can be induced upon co-culture with autologous memory B cells in a cell contact-dependent manner. Comparative analysis of ex vivo Nrp1(+) and Nrp1(-) Tfh cells reveals gene expression modulation during activation. Finally, Nrp1 is expressed by malignant Tfh-like cells in a severe case of angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma (AITL) associated with elevated terminal B cell differentiation. Thus, Nrp1 is a specific marker of Tfh cells cognate activation in humans, which may prove useful as a prognostic factor and a therapeutic target in neoplastic diseases associated with Tfh cells activity.

  10. Regulation of B cell fate by chronic activity of the IgE B cell receptor

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhiyong; Robinson, Marcus J; Chen, Xiangjun; Smith, Geoffrey A; Taunton, Jack; Liu, Wanli; Allen, Christopher D C

    2016-01-01

    IgE can trigger potent allergic responses, yet the mechanisms regulating IgE production are poorly understood. Here we reveal that IgE+ B cells are constrained by chronic activity of the IgE B cell receptor (BCR). In the absence of cognate antigen, the IgE BCR promoted terminal differentiation of B cells into plasma cells (PCs) under cell culture conditions mimicking T cell help. This antigen-independent PC differentiation involved multiple IgE domains and Syk, CD19, BLNK, Btk, and IRF4. Disruption of BCR signaling in mice led to consistently exaggerated IgE+ germinal center (GC) B cell but variably increased PC responses. We were unable to confirm reports that the IgE BCR directly promoted intrinsic apoptosis. Instead, IgE+ GC B cells exhibited poor antigen presentation and prolonged cell cycles, suggesting reduced competition for T cell help. We propose that chronic BCR activity and access to T cell help play critical roles in regulating IgE responses. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21238.001 PMID:27935477

  11. Regulation of B cell fate by chronic activity of the IgE B cell receptor.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhiyong; Robinson, Marcus J; Chen, Xiangjun; Smith, Geoffrey A; Taunton, Jack; Liu, Wanli; Allen, Christopher D C

    2016-12-09

    IgE can trigger potent allergic responses, yet the mechanisms regulating IgE production are poorly understood. Here we reveal that IgE(+) B cells are constrained by chronic activity of the IgE B cell receptor (BCR). In the absence of cognate antigen, the IgE BCR promoted terminal differentiation of B cells into plasma cells (PCs) under cell culture conditions mimicking T cell help. This antigen-independent PC differentiation involved multiple IgE domains and Syk, CD19, BLNK, Btk, and IRF4. Disruption of BCR signaling in mice led to consistently exaggerated IgE(+) germinal center (GC) B cell but variably increased PC responses. We were unable to confirm reports that the IgE BCR directly promoted intrinsic apoptosis. Instead, IgE(+) GC B cells exhibited poor antigen presentation and prolonged cell cycles, suggesting reduced competition for T cell help. We propose that chronic BCR activity and access to T cell help play critical roles in regulating IgE responses.

  12. TLR signaling in human antigen‐presenting cells regulates MR1‐dependent activation of MAIT cells

    PubMed Central

    van Wilgenburg, Bonnie; Hannaway, Rachel F.; Ruustal, Kerstin; Phalora, Prabhjeet; Kurioka, Ayako; Hansen, Ted H.; Willberg, Christian B.; Phillips, Rodney E.; Klenerman, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Mucosal‐associated invariant T (MAIT) cells are an abundant innate‐like T lymphocyte population that are enriched in liver and mucosal tissues. They are restricted by MR1, which presents antigens derived from a metabolic precursor of riboflavin synthesis, a pathway present in many microbial species, including commensals. Therefore, MR1‐mediated MAIT cell activation must be tightly regulated to prevent inappropriate activation and immunopathology. Using an in vitro model of MR1‐mediated activation of primary human MAIT cells, we investigated the mechanisms by which it is regulated. Uptake of intact bacteria by antigen presenting cells (APCs) into acidified endolysosomal compartments was required for efficient MR1‐mediated MAIT cell activation, while stimulation with soluble ligand was inefficient. Consistent with this, little MR1 was seen at the surface of human monocytic (THP1) and B‐cell lines. Activation with a TLR ligand increased the amount of MR1 at the surface of THP1 but not B‐cell lines, suggesting differential regulation in different cell types. APC activation and NF‐κB signaling were critical for MR1‐mediated MAIT cell activation. In primary cells, however, prolonged TLR signaling led to downregulation of MR1‐mediated MAIT cell activation. Overall, MR1‐mediated MAIT cell activation is a tightly regulated process, dependent on integration of innate signals by APCs. PMID:27105778

  13. T cell activation.

    PubMed

    Smith-Garvin, Jennifer E; Koretzky, Gary A; Jordan, Martha S

    2009-01-01

    This year marks the 25th anniversary of the first Annual Review of Immunology article to describe features of the T cell antigen receptor (TCR). In celebration of this anniversary, we begin with a brief introduction outlining the chronology of the earliest studies that established the basic paradigm for how the engaged TCR transduces its signals. This review continues with a description of the current state of our understanding of TCR signaling, as well as a summary of recent findings examining other key aspects of T cell activation, including cross talk between the TCR and integrins, the role of costimulatory molecules, and how signals may negatively regulate T cell function.Acronyms and DefinitionsAdapter protein: cellular protein that functions to bridge molecular interactions via characteristic domains able to mediate protein/protein or protein/lipid interactions Costimulation: signals delivered to T cells by cell surface receptors other than the TCR itself that potentiate T cell activation cSMAC: central supramolecular activation cluster Immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM): a short peptide sequence in the cytoplasmic tails of key surface receptors on hematopoietic cells that is characterized by tyrosine residues that are phosphorylated by Src family PTKs, enabling the ITAM to recruit activated Syk family kinases Inside-out signaling: signals initiated by engagement of immunoreceptors that lead to conformational changes and clustering of integrins, thereby increasing the affinity and avidity of the integrins for their ligands NFAT: nuclear factor of activated T cells PI3K: phosphoinositide 3-kinase PKC: protein kinase C PLC: phospholipase C pMHC: peptide major histocompatibility complex (MHC) complex pSMAC: peripheral supramolecular activation cluster PTK: protein tyrosine kinase Signal transduction: biochemical events linking surface receptor engagement to cellular responses TCR: T cell antigen receptor

  14. Influence of molecular weight upon mannosylated bio-synthetic hybrids for targeted antigen presenting cell gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Jones, Charles H; Gollakota, Akhila; Chen, Mingfu; Chung, Tai-Chun; Ravikrishnan, Anitha; Zhang, Guojian; Pfeifer, Blaine A

    2015-07-01

    Given the rise of antibiotic resistant microbes, genetic vaccination is a promising prophylactic strategy that enables rapid design and manufacture. Facilitating this process is the choice of vector, which is often situationally-specific and limited in engineering capacity. Furthermore, these shortcomings are usually tied to an incomplete understanding of the structure-function relationships driving vector-mediated gene delivery. Building upon our initial report of a hybrid bacterial-biomaterial gene delivery vector, a comprehensive structure-function assessment was completed using a class of mannosylated poly(beta-amino esters). Through a top-down screening methodology, an ideal polymer was selected on the basis of gene delivery efficacy and then used for the synthesis of a stratified molecular weight polymer library. By eliminating contributions of polymer chemical background, we were able to complete an in-depth assessment of gene delivery as a function of (1) polymer molecular weight, (2) relative mannose content, (3) polymer-membrane biophysical properties, (4) APC uptake specificity, and (5) serum inhibition. In summary, the flexibility and potential of the hybrid design featured in this work highlights the ability to systematically probe vector-associated properties for the development of translational gene delivery candidates.

  15. White button mushroom enhances maturation of bone marrow derived dendritic cells and their antigen presenting function in mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mushrooms have been shown to enhance immune response, which contributes to their anti-tumor property. White button mushrooms (Agaricus bisporus) (WBM) constitute 90 percent of the total mushrooms consumed in the United States; however, the health benefit of this strain in general is not well studied...

  16. Functional Anatomy of T Cell Activation and Synapse Formation

    PubMed Central

    Fooksman, David R.; Vardhana, Santosh; Vasiliver-Shamis, Gaia; Liese, Jan; Blair, David; Waite, Janelle; Sacristán, Catarina; Victora, Gabriel; Zanin-Zhorov, Alexandra; Dustin, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    T cell activation and function require a structured engagement of antigen-presenting cells. These cell contacts are characterized by two distinct dynamics in vivo: transient contacts resulting from promigratory junctions called immunological kinapses or prolonged contacts from stable junctions called immunological synapses. Kinapses operate in the steady state to allow referencing to self-peptide-MHC (pMHC) and searching for pathogen-derived pMHC. Synapses are induced by T cell receptor (TCR) interactions with agonist pMHC under specific conditions and correlate with robust immune responses that generate effector and memory T cells. High-resolution imaging has revealed that the synapse is highly coordinated, integrating cell adhesion, TCR recognition of pMHC complexes, and an array of activating and inhibitory ligands to promote or prevent T cell signaling. In this review, we examine the molecular components, geometry, and timing underlying kinapses and synapses. We integrate recent molecular and physiological data to provide a synthesis and suggest ways forward. PMID:19968559

  17. Mapping the polarity and stimulus density requirements for T-cell activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xunbin; Krasieva, Tatiana B.; Zhang, Zhanxiang; Negulescu, Paul A.; Sun, Chung-Ho; Berns, Michael W.; Cahalan, Michael D.; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    1998-08-01

    T-cell contact with antigen-presenting cells (APC) initiates an activation cascade which includes an increase in T-cell intracellular calcium [(Ca2+)i] and leads to T-cell proliferation and differentiation. Although T-cell/APC physical contact is required for an immune response, little is known about the patterns of cellular interaction and their relation to activation. We have combined fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging with optical manipulation to investigate the contact requirements for T-cell activation, using optical tweezers to control the orientation of T- cell/APC pairs and fluorescence microscopy to measure the subsequent (Ca2+)i response, detected as an emission shift from the combination of fura-red and oregon- green, two cytoplasmic (Ca2+) indicators. APCs or beads coated with antibodies to the T-cell receptor (TCR) are trapped with a near-infrared titanium-sapphire laser and placed at different locations along the T-cell, which has a polarized appearance defined by the shape and direction of crawling (2-5 micrometers /min). T cells contacted with antigen- presenting cells or antibody-coated beads entered a dynamic and reproducible program in the first 10 - 20 mins, including (Ca2+)i increase, changes in shape and motility, engulfment, and stable contact. T cells presented with antigen at the leading edge had a higher probability of responding (85%) and a shorter latency of response (50 secs) than those contacting APCs or beads with their trailing end (APCs: 30%, 150 secs; beads: 6%, 300 secs). Alterations in antibody density, quantified by FACS analysis, and bead size were used to determine the spatial requirements for T cell activation and the minimum number of receptors which must be engaged in order to transmit a positive signal. Preliminary data show that T cell responses [response percentage, latency and (Ca2+)i pattern] depend on both antibody density and bead size.

  18. Raman activated cell sorting.

    PubMed

    Song, Yizhi; Yin, Huabing; Huang, Wei E

    2016-08-01

    Single cell Raman spectra (SCRS) are intrinsic biochemical profiles and 'chemical images' of single cells which can be used to characterise phenotypic changes, physiological states and functions of cells. On the base of SCRS, Raman activated cell sorting (RACS) provides a label-free cell sorting approach, which can link single cells to their chemical or phenotypic profiles. Overcoming naturally weak Raman signals, establishing Raman biomarker as sorting criteria to RACS and improving specific sorting technology are three challenges of developing RACS. Advances on Raman spectroscopy such as stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) and pre-screening helped to increase RACS sorting speed. Entire SCRS can be characterised using pattern recognition methods, and specific Raman bands can be extracted as biomarkers for RACS. Recent advances on cell sorting technologies based on microfluidic device and surface-ejection enable accurate and reliable single cell sorting from complex samples. A high throughput RACS will be achievable in near future by integrating fast Raman detection system such as SRS with microfluidic RACS and Raman activated cell ejection (RACE).

  19. Immunostimulatory Activity of the Cytokine-Based Biologic, IRX-2, on Human Papillomavirus-Exposed Langerhans Cells

    PubMed Central

    Da Silva, Diane M.; Woodham, Andrew W.; Naylor, Paul H.; Egan, James E.; Berinstein, Neil L.

    2016-01-01

    Langerhans cells (LCs) are the antigen-presenting cells of the epithelial layer and are responsible for initiating immune responses against skin and mucosa-invading viruses. Human papillomavirus (HPV)-mediated suppression of LC function is a crucial mechanism of HPV immune evasion, which can lead to persistent infection and development of several human cancers, including cervical, anal, and head and neck cancers. The cell-derived cytokine-based biologic, IRX-2, consists of multiple well-defined cytokines and is broadly active on various immune cell subsets. In this study, we investigated primary human LC activation after exposure to HPV16, followed by treatment with IRX-2 in vitro, and evaluated their subsequent ability to induce HPV16-specific T cells. In contrast to its activity on dendritic cells, HPV16 alone is not sufficient to induce phenotypic and functional activation of LCs. However, IRX-2 induces a significant upregulation of antigen presentation and costimulatory molecules, T helper 1 (Th1)-associated cytokine release, and chemokine-directed migration of LCs pre-exposed to HPV16. Furthermore, LCs treated with IRX-2 after HPV16 exposure induced CD8+ T-cell responses against specific HLA-A*0201-binding HPV16 T-cell epitopes. The present study suggests that IRX-2 is an attractive immunomodulator for assisting the immune response in eradication of HPV-infected cells, thereby potentially preventing HPV-induced cancers. PMID:26653678

  20. Lysosome-Dependent Activation of Human Dendritic Cells by the Vaccine Adjuvant QS-21

    PubMed Central

    Welsby, Iain; Detienne, Sophie; N’Kuli, Francisca; Thomas, Séverine; Wouters, Sandrine; Bechtold, Viviane; De Wit, Dominique; Gineste, Romain; Reinheckel, Thomas; Elouahabi, Abdelatif; Courtoy, Pierre J.; Didierlaurent, Arnaud M.; Goriely, Stanislas

    2017-01-01

    The adjuvant properties of the saponin QS-21 have been known for decades. It is a component of the Adjuvant System AS01 that is used in several vaccine candidates. QS-21 strongly potentiates both cellular and humoral immune responses to purified antigens, yet how it activates immune cells is largely unknown. Here, we report that QS-21 directly activated human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDCs) and promoted a pro-inflammatory transcriptional program. Cholesterol-dependent QS-21 endocytosis followed by lysosomal destabilization and Syk kinase activation were prerequisites for this response. Cathepsin B, a lysosomal cysteine protease, was essential for moDC activation in vitro and contributed to the adjuvant effects of QS-21 in vivo. Collectively, these findings provide new insights into the pathways involved in the direct activation of antigen-presenting cells by a clinically relevant QS-21 formulation. PMID:28105029

  1. Targeting dendritic cells to accelerate T-cell activation overcomes a bottleneck in tuberculosis vaccine efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, Kristin L.; Ahmed, Mushtaq; Das, Shibali; Gopal, Radha; Horne, William; Connell, Terry D.; Moynihan, Kelly D.; Kolls, Jay K.; Irvine, Darrell J.; Artyomov, Maxim N.; Rangel-Moreno, Javier; Khader, Shabaana A.

    2016-01-01

    The development of a tuberculosis (TB) vaccine that induces sterilizing immunity to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection has been elusive. Absence of sterilizing immunity induced by TB vaccines may be due to delayed activation of mucosal dendritic cells (DCs), and subsequent delay in antigen presentation and activation of vaccine-induced CD4+ T-cell responses. Here we show that pulmonary delivery of activated M. tuberculosis antigen-primed DCs into vaccinated mice, at the time of M. tuberculosis exposure, can overcome the delay in accumulation of vaccine-induced CD4+ T-cell responses. In addition, activating endogenous host CD103+ DCs and the CD40–CD40L pathway can similarly induce rapid accumulation of vaccine-induced lung CD4+ T-cell responses and limit early M. tuberculosis growth. Thus, our study provides proof of concept that targeting mucosal DCs can accelerate vaccine-induced T-cell responses on M. tuberculosis infection, and provide insights to overcome bottlenecks in TB vaccine efficacy. PMID:28004802

  2. Auto-presentation of Staphylococcal enterotoxin A by mouse CD4+ T cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The currently accepted model for superantigen (SAg )induced T cell activation suggests that SAg, without being processed, cross links both MHC class II, from Antigen Presenting Cells (APC), and V-beta, from T-cell receptor (TCR), initiating nonspecific T-cell activation. This T-cell proliferation in...

  3. A dystrophic muscle broadens the contribution and activation of immune cells reacting to rAAV gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Ferrand, M; Galy, A; Boisgerault, F

    2014-09-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors (rAAVs) are used for therapeutic gene transfer in skeletal muscle, but it is unclear if immune reactivity to gene transfer and persistence of transgene are affected by pathologic conditions such as muscular dystrophy. Thus, we compared dystrophic mice devoid of α-sarcoglycan with healthy mice to characterize immune cell activation and cellular populations contributing to the loss of gene-modified myofibers. Following rAAV2/1 delivery of an immunogenic α-sarcoglycan reporter transgene in the muscle, both strains developed strong CD4 and CD8 T-cell-mediated immune responses in lymphoid organs associated with muscle CD3+ T and CD11b+ mononuclear cell infiltrates. Selective cell subset depletion models revealed that CD4+ T cells were essential for transgene rejection in both healthy and pathologic mice, but macrophages and CD8+ T cells additionally contributed as effector cells of transgene rejection only in dystrophic mice. Vectors restricting transgene expression in antigen-presenting cells showed that endogenous presentation of transgene products was the sole mechanism responsible for T-cell priming in normal mice, whereas additional and protracted antigenic presentation occurred in dystrophic animals, leading to secondary CD4+ T-cell activation and failure to maintain transgene expression. Therefore, the dystrophic environment diversifies cellular immune response mechanisms induced by gene transfer, with a negative outcome.

  4. The autophagy machinery restrains iNKT cell activation through CD1D1 internalization.

    PubMed

    Keller, Christian W; Loi, Monica; Ewert, Svenja; Quast, Isaak; Theiler, Romina; Gannagé, Monique; Münz, Christian; De Libero, Gennaro; Freigang, Stefan; Lünemann, Jan D

    2017-03-15

    Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells are innate T cells with powerful immune regulatory functions that recognize glycolipid antigens presented by the CD1D protein. While iNKT-cell-activating glycolipids are currently being explored for their efficacy to improve immunotherapy against infectious diseases and cancer, little is known about the mechanisms that control CD1D antigen presentation and iNKT cell activation in vivo. CD1D molecules survey endocytic pathways to bind lipid antigens in MHC class II containing compartments (MIICs) before recycling to the plasma membrane. Autophagosomes intersect with MIICs and autophagy-related proteins are known to support antigen loading for increased CD4(+) T cell immunity. Here, we report that mice with dendritic cell (DC)-specific deletion of the essential autophagy gene Atg5 showed better CD1D1-restricted glycolipid presentation in vivo. These effects led to enhanced iNKT cell cytokine production upon antigen recognition and lower bacterial loads during Sphingomonas paucimobilis infection. Enhanced iNKT cell activation was independent of receptor-mediated glycolipid uptake or costimulatory signals. Instead, loss of Atg5 in DCs impaired clathrin-dependent internalization of CD1D1 molecules via the adaptor protein complex 2 (AP2) and, thus, increased surface expression of stimulatory CD1D1-glycolipid complexes. These findings indicate that the autophagic machinery assists in the recruitment of AP2 to CD1D1 molecules resulting in attenuated iNKT cell activation, in contrast to the supporting role of macroautophagy in CD4(+) T cell stimulation.

  5. From Lysosomal Storage Diseases to NKT Cell Activation and Back

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Cátia S.; Ribeiro, Helena; Macedo, M. Fatima

    2017-01-01

    Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) are inherited metabolic disorders characterized by the accumulation of different types of substrates in the lysosome. With a multisystemic involvement, LSDs often present a very broad clinical spectrum. In many LSDs, alterations of the immune system were described. Special emphasis was given to Natural Killer T (NKT) cells, a population of lipid-specific T cells that is activated by lipid antigens bound to CD1d (cluster of differentiation 1 d) molecules at the surface of antigen-presenting cells. These cells have important functions in cancer, infection, and autoimmunity and were altered in a variety of LSDs’ mouse models. In some cases, the observed decrease was attributed to defects in either lipid antigen availability, trafficking, processing, or loading in CD1d. Here, we review the current knowledge about NKT cells in the context of LSDs, including the alterations detected, the proposed mechanisms to explain these defects, and the relevance of these findings for disease pathology. Furthermore, the effect of enzyme replacement therapy on NKT cells is also discussed. PMID:28245613

  6. CD169(+) macrophages present lipid antigens to mediate early activation of iNKT cells in lymph nodes.

    PubMed

    Barral, Patricia; Polzella, Paolo; Bruckbauer, Andreas; van Rooijen, Nico; Besra, Gurdyal S; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Batista, Facundo D

    2010-04-01

    Invariant natural killer T cells (iNKT cells) are involved in the host defense against microbial infection. Although it is known that iNKT cells recognize glycolipids presented by CD1d, how and where they encounter antigen in vivo remains unclear. Here we used multiphoton microscopy to visualize the dynamics and activation of iNKT cells in lymph nodes. After antigen administration, iNKT cells became confined in a CD1d-dependent manner in close proximity to subcapsular sinus CD169(+) macrophages. These macrophages retained, internalized and presented lipid antigen and were required for iNKT cell activation, cytokine production and population expansion. Thus, CD169(+) macrophages can act as true antigen-presenting cells controlling early iNKT cell activation and favoring the fast initiation of immune responses.

  7. Superior induction of anti-tumor CTL immunity by extended peptide vaccines involves prolonged, DC-focused antigen presentation.

    PubMed

    Bijker, Martijn S; van den Eeden, Susan J F; Franken, Kees L; Melief, Cornelis J M; van der Burg, Sjoerd H; Offringa, Rienk

    2008-04-01

    Anti-tumor vaccines consisting of extended CTL peptides in combination with CpG-ODN were shown to be superior to those comprising minimal CTL epitopes and CpG-ODN, in that they elicit stronger effector CTL responses with greater tumoricidal potential. We now demonstrate that this improved performance is primarily due to the focusing of CTL epitope presentation onto activated DC in the inflamed lymph nodes draining the vaccination site. In the case of vaccination with minimal peptides, additional APC including T and B cells are also loaded with CTL epitopes. Our data suggest that circulation of these peptide-loaded lymphocytes leads to epitope presentation in non-inflamed lymphoid organs distal from the vaccination site, in the absence of potent costimulatory signals required for efficient CTL priming. The resulting blend of pro-immunogenic and tolerogenic signals, which results in suboptimal activation of the CTL response, is avoided by vaccinating with extended CTL peptides. An additional advantage of extended CTL peptide vaccines is an increased duration of in vivo epitope presentation.

  8. Isolation of dendritic cells from umbilical cord blood using magnetic activated cell sorting or adherence.

    PubMed

    Bie, Yachun; Xu, Qiuxiang; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2015-07-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are a highly specialized type of antigen-presenting cell. The present study describes and compares two methods for preparing DCs from umbilical cord blood. The first method involves the isolation of DCs by magnetic activated cell sorting (MACS). This technique isolates CD34(+) cells from cord blood and induces the formation of DCs by the addition of cytokines, granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor and interleukin-4. The second method involves the generation of large numbers of DCs from cord blood using an adherent method, which isolates umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells and induces DCs in the same conditions as those used in MACS. The DCs were harvested following 7 days of incubation and observed with an inverted microscope. The phenotype of the cells was then analyzed by flow cytometry. The results revealed that, subsequent to 7 days of incubation, the differentiated DCs obtained using the adherent method were more mature than those isolated using MACS. However, these cells were unable to be maintained in culture for more than 9-10 days. By contrast, the DCs derived from CD34(+) cells by MACS were phenotypically stable and could be maintained for up to 3 weeks in culture. Either method produced DCs from cord blood. However, the DCs isolated using the MACS method demonstrated higher homogeneity, yield and viability than those obtained using the adherent method. Due to the various compositions of the monocyte subsets isolated, isolation methods affect the phenotypes and functions of the resultant DCs.

  9. Stochasticity and spatial heterogeneity in T-cell activation.

    PubMed

    Burroughs, Nigel J; van der Merwe, P Anton

    2007-04-01

    Stochastic and spatial aspects are becoming increasingly recognized as an important factor in T-cell activation. Activation occurs in an intrinsically noisy environment, requiring only a handful of agonist peptide-major histocompatibility complex molecules, thus making consideration of signal to noise of prime importance in understanding sensitivity and specificity. Furthermore, it is widely established that surface-bound ligands are more effective at activation than soluble forms, while surface patternation has highlighted the role of spatial relocation in activation. Here we consider the results of a number of models of T-cell activation, from a realistic model of kinetic segregation-induced T-cell receptor (TCR) triggering through to simple queuing theory models. These studies highlight the constraints on cell activation by a surface receptor that recruits kinases. Our analysis shows that TCR triggering based on trapping of bound TCRs in regions of close proximity that exclude large ectodomain-containing molecules, such as the phosphatases CD45 and CD148, can effectively reproduce known signaling characteristics and is a viable 'signal transduction' mechanism distinct from oligomerization and conformation-based mechanisms. A queuing theory analysis shows the interrelation between sensitivity and specificity, emphasizing that these are properties of individual cell functions and need not be, nor are likely to be, uniform across different functions. In fact, threshold-based mechanisms of detection are shown to be poor at ligand discrimination because, although they can be highly specific, that specificity is limited to a small range of peptide densities. Time integration mechanisms however are able to control noise effectively, while kinetic proofreading mechanisms endow them with good specificity properties. Thus, threshold mechanisms are likely to be important for rapidly detecting minimal signaling requirements, thus achieving efficient scanning of antigen-presenting

  10. Leptin deficiency in vivo enhances the ability of splenic dendritic cells to activate T cells

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, Oscar

    2014-01-01

    Leptin is a pleiotropic adipokine that is critical for regulating food intake and energy expenditure and also participates in functions of the immune system, including those of antigen-presenting cells. Here, we assess the effect of leptin deficiency on the function splenic dendritic cells (sDC). sDC from leptin-deficient mice (Lepob) were evaluated ex vivo for phenotype, ability to respond to inflammatory stimuli, to acquire and process antigens and to activate T cells. The data show that Lepob sDC express activation markers similar to controls and respond similarly to LPS activation or anti-CD40 cross-linking. In addition, antigen acquisition and processing by Lepob sDC was similar to controls. However, Lepob sDC elicited higher production of IFN-γ in mixed lymphocyte reactions and increased production of IL-2 by antigen-specific T-cell hybridoma relative to controls. To assess Lepob sDC activation of T cells in vivo, Lepob and control mice were infected systemically with Mycobacterium avium. Lepob mice were significantly better at neutralizing the infection as measured by splenic bacterial load over time. This was mirrored with an increased percentage of activated T cells in M. avium-infected Lepob mice. Thus, although no changes were detected in sDC phenotype, activation, antigen processing or presentation, these DC surprisingly presented an enhanced ability to activate T cells ex vivo and in vivo. These data demonstrate that leptin can modulate DC function and suggest that leptin may dampen T-cell responsiveness in the physiological setting. PMID:24966213

  11. CD169+ MACROPHAGES PRESENT LIPID ANTIGENS TO MEDIATE EARLY ACTIVATION OF INVARIANT NKT CELLS IN LYMPH NODES

    PubMed Central

    Barral, Patricia; Polzella, Paolo; Bruckbauer, Andreas; van Rooijen, Nico; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Batista, Facundo D.

    2010-01-01

    Invariant NKT (iNKT) cells are involved in host defence against microbial infections. While it is known that iNKT cells recognize glycolipids presented by CD1d, how and where they encounter antigen in vivo remains unclear. We used multi-photon microscopy to visualize the dynamics and activation of iNKT cells in lymph nodes. Following antigen administration, iNKT cells become confined in a CD1d-dependent manner in close proximity to subcapsular sinus CD169+ macrophages. These macrophages retain, internalize and present lipid antigen, and are required for iNKT cell activation, cytokine production and expansion. Thus, CD169+ macrophages can act as bona fide antigen presenting cells controlling early iNKT cell activation and favouring fast initiation of immune responses. PMID:20228797

  12. Effect of gamma radiation on resting B lymphocytes. II. Functional characterization of the antigen-presentation defect

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwell, J.D.; Jenkins, M.K.; Schwartz, R.H.

    1988-10-15

    The effect of radiation on three discrete Ag-presentation functions in resting B cells was examined: 1) Ag uptake and processing, 2) expression of processed Ag in the context of functional class II molecules, and 3) provision of necessary co-stimulatory, or second, signals. Analysis of radiation's effect on B cell presentation of intact vs fragmented Ag or its effect on presentation by Ag-pulsed B cells indicated that damage to Ag uptake and processing could not account for the bulk of the radiation-induced Ag-presentation defect. Experiments with phosphatidylinositol hydrolysis as an indirect measure of TCR occupancy suggested that irradiation caused a fairly rapid (within 1 to 2 h) decrease in the ability of the B cell APC to display a stimulatory combination of Ag and class II molecule. Ag dose-response analyses demonstrated that when presenting a fragment of the Ag pigeon cytochrome c to a T cell clone, 3000 rad-treated B cell APC were able to stimulate approximately 50% as much phosphatidylinositol turnover as unirradiated B cells. It was also found that, in contrast to their inability to initiate T cell proliferation, and similarly to chemically cross-linked splenocytes, heavily irradiated resting B cells plus Ag induced a state of Ag hyporesponsiveness in T cell clones. This effect on T cells had the same Ag- and MHC-specificity as did receptor occupancy required for proliferation, indicating that heavily irradiated resting B cells bear functional class II molecules. Co-culture of T cells with allogeneic B cells and syngeneic heavily irradiated B cells or chemically cross-linked splenic APC plus Ag resulted in T cell proliferation and interfered with the induction of the hyporesponsive state. This co-stimulatory function was radiosensitive in resting allogeneic B cells.

  13. Antibodies Against Membrane Interleukin 1α Activate Accessory Cells to Stimulate Proliferation of T Lymphocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eugui, Elsie M.; Almquist, Susan J.

    1990-02-01

    Some monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against interleukin (IL) 1α have been found to activate antigen-presenting cells (APC, human peripheral blood monocytes and B lymphocytes), so that unstimulated T lymphocytes cultured with them are induced to proliferate and secrete IL-2. Control mAbs of the same isotypes and mAbs against IL-11β do not activate APC. In the absence of APC, mAbs against IL-1α do not induce proliferation of T lymphocytes. Mitomycin C-treated activated APC still induce T-cell proliferation. Proliferation of T lymphocytes cannot be induced by culture supernatants and requires contact with APC activated by mAbs against IL-1α. The observations imply that surface membrane IL-1α can function as a triggering molecule on APC, which could play an important role in the initiation of immune responses by T lymphocytes.

  14. Antitumor efficacy of radiation plus immunotherapy depends upon dendritic cell activation of effector CDS+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Dovedi, Simon J.; Lipowska-Bhalla, Grazyna; Beers, Stephen A.; Cheadle, Eleanor J.; Mu, Lijun; Glennie, Martin J.

    2017-01-01

    Tumor cells dying after cytotoxic therapy are a potential source of antigen for T-cell priming. Antigen-presenting cells (APCs) can cross-present MHC I–restricted peptides after the uptake of dying cells. Depending on the nature of the surrounding environmental signals, APCs then orchestrate a spectrum of responses ranging from immune activation to inhibition. Previously, we had demonstrated that combining radiation with either agonistic monoclonal antibody (mAb) to CD40 or a systemically administered TLR7 agonist could enhance CD8 T-cell–dependent protection against syngeneic murine lymphoma models. However, it remains unknown how individual APC populations impact on this antitumor immune response. Using APC depletion models, we now show that dendritic cells (DCs), but not macrophages or B cells, were responsible for the generation of long-term immunological protection following combination therapy with radiotherapy and either agonistic CD40 mAb or systemic TLR7 agonist therapy. Novel immunotherapeutic approaches that augment antigen uptake and presentation by DCs may further enhance the generation of therapeutic antitumor immune responses, leading to improved outcomes after radiotherapy. PMID:27241845

  15. Retinoic Acid Can Exacerbate T Cell Intrinsic TLR2 Activation to Promote Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Vivien; Pearson, Kandyce; Kim, Jee-Hyun; Kamdar, Karishma; DePaolo, R. William

    2015-01-01

    The contribution of vitamin A to immune health has been well established. However, recent evidence indicates that its active metabolite, retinoic acid (RA), has the ability to promote both tolerogenic and inflammatory responses. While the outcome of RA-mediated immunity is dependent upon the immunological status of the tissue, the contribution of specific innate signals influencing this response have yet to be delineated. Here, we found that treatment with RA can dampen inflammation during intestinal injury. Importantly, we report a novel and unexpected requirement for TLR2 in RA-mediated suppression. Our data demonstrate that RA treatment enhances TLR2-dependent IL-10 production from T cells and this, in turn, potentiates T regulatory cell (TREG) generation without the need for activation of antigen presenting cells. These data also suggest that combinatorial therapy using RA and TLR2 ligands may be advantageous in the design of therapies to treat autoimmune or inflammatory disease. PMID:25826367

  16. The crystal structure of a TL/CD8{alpha}{alpha} complex at 2.1 {angstrom} resolution : implications for modulation of T cell activation and memory.

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y.; Xiong, Y.; Naidenko, O. V.; Liu, J.-H.; Zhang, R.; Joachimiak, A.; Kronenberg, M.; Cheroutre, H.; Reinherz, E. L.; Wang, J.-H.; Biosciences Division; Dana-Farber Cancer Inst.; Harvard Medical School; La Jolla Inst. of Allergy and Immunology

    2003-02-01

    TL is a nonclassical MHC class I molecule that modulates T cell activation through relatively high-affinity interaction with CD8{alpha}{alpha}. To investigate how the TL/CD8{alpha}{alpha} interaction influences TCR signaling, we characterized the structure of the TL/CD8{alpha}{alpha} complex using X-ray crystallography. Unlike antigen-presenting molecules, the TL antigen-binding groove is occluded by specific conformational changes. This feature eliminates antigen presentation, severely hampers direct TCR recognition, and prevents TL from participating in the TCR activation complex. At the same time, the TL/CD8{alpha}{alpha} interaction is strengthened through subtle structure changes in the TL {alpha}3 domain. Thus, TL functions to sequester and redirect CD8{alpha}{alpha} away from the TCR, modifying lck-dependent signaling.

  17. Active Cells for Multifunctional Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-24

    techniques to explore a variety of cell designs.  Designed a simplified active cell using Nitinol as the actuation method and relying on Joule heating...for contraction of the cell.  Developed manufacturing techniques for reliably creating Nitinol spring coils in a variety of diameters and gauges...design of the active cells to maximum the stroked length of the active cells by tuning the stiffness of a passive spring in parallel with the Nitinol

  18. Microtubule-associated protein-4 controls nanovesicle dynamics and T cell activation.

    PubMed

    Bustos-Morán, Eugenio; Blas-Rus, Noelia; Martin-Cófreces, Noa Beatriz; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco

    2017-04-01

    The immune synapse (IS) is a specialized structure formed at the contact area between T lymphocytes and antigen-presenting cells (APCs) that is essential for the adaptive immune response. Proper T cell activation requires its polarization towards the APC, which is highly dependent on the tubulin cytoskeleton. Microtubule-associated protein-4 (MAP4) is a microtubule (MT)-stabilizing protein that controls MTs in physiological processes, such as cell division, migration, vesicular transport or primary cilia formation. In this study, we assessed the role of MAP4 in T cell activation. MAP4 decorates the pericentrosomal area and MTs of the T cell, and it is involved in MT detyrosination and stable assembly in response to T cell activation. In addition, MAP4 prompts the timely translocation of the MT-organizing center (MTOC) towards the IS and the dynamics of signaling nanovesicles that sustains T cell activation. However, MAP4 acts as a negative regulator of other T cell activation-related signals, including diacylglycerol (DAG) production and IL2 secretion. Our data indicate that MAP4 acts as a checkpoint molecule that balances positive and negative hallmarks of T cell activation.

  19. Metabolic Maintenance of Cell Asymmetry following Division in Activated T Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Verbist, Katherine C.; Guy, Cliff S; Milasta, Sandra; Liedmann, Swantje; Kamiński, Marcin M.; Wang, Ruoning; Green, Douglas R.

    2016-01-01

    Asymmetric cell division (ACD)—the partitioning of cellular components in response to polarizing cues during mitosis—plays roles in differentiation and development1. ACD is important for the self-renewal of neuroblasts in C. elegans and fertilized zygotes in Drosophila, and participates in the development of mammalian nervous and digestive systems1. T lymphocytes, upon activation by antigen-presenting cells (APC), can undergo ACD, wherein the daughter cell proximal to the APC is more likely to differentiate into an effector-like T cell and the distal daughter more likely to differentiate into a memory-like T cell2. Upon activation and prior to cell division, expression of the transcription factor c-Myc drives metabolic reprogramming, necessary for the subsequent proliferative burst3. We found that during the first division of an activated T cell, c-Myc can sort asymmetrically. Asymmetric amino acid transporter distribution, amino acid content, and TORC1 function correlate with c-Myc expression, and both amino acids and TORC1 activity sustain the differences in c-Myc expression in one daughter over the other. Asymmetric c-Myc levels in daughter T cells affect proliferation, metabolism, and differentiation, and these effects are altered by experimental manipulation of TORC1 activity or Myc expression. Therefore, metabolic signaling pathways cooperate with transcription programs to maintain differential cell fates following asymmetric T cell division. PMID:27064903

  20. In vitro T-cell activation of monocyte-derived macrophages by soluble messengers or cell-to-cell contact in bovine tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Liébana, E; Aranaz, A; Welsh, M; Neill, S D; Pollock, J M

    2000-01-01

    The macrophage plays a dual role in tuberculosis, promoting not only protection against mycobacteria, but also survival of the pathogen. Macrophages inhibit multiplication of mycobacteria but also act in concert with lymphocytes through presentation of antigens to T cells. Studies in animal and human infections have suggested a correlation of in vitro growth rates of mycobacteria with in vivo virulence, using uracil uptake to assess mycobacterial metabolism. This study found that blood-derived, non-activated bovine macrophages were capable of controlling Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette–Guérin growth for up to 96 hr, but were permissive to intracellular growth of virulent M. bovis. The present investigation compared the in vitro modulation of these macrophage activities by cytokine-rich T-cell supernatants or cell-to-cell contact. On the one hand, treatment of cultured monocytes with mitogen-produced T-cell supernatants promoted morphological changes suggestive of an activation status, enhanced the antigen presentation capabilities of monocytes and up-regulated major histocompatibility complex class II expression. However, this activation was not associated with enhanced anti-M. bovis activity. On the other hand, incubation of infected monocytes with T-cell populations resulted in proportionally increased inhibition of M. bovis uracil uptake. This inhibition was also seen using cells from uninfected animals and indicated the necessity for cell-to-cell contact to promote antimycobacterial capability. PMID:10886395

  1. T helper 1 immunity requires complement-driven NLRP3 inflammasome activity in CD4⁺ T cells.

    PubMed

    Arbore, Giuseppina; West, Erin E; Spolski, Rosanne; Robertson, Avril A B; Klos, Andreas; Rheinheimer, Claudia; Dutow, Pavel; Woodruff, Trent M; Yu, Zu Xi; O'Neill, Luke A; Coll, Rebecca C; Sher, Alan; Leonard, Warren J; Köhl, Jörg; Monk, Pete; Cooper, Matthew A; Arno, Matthew; Afzali, Behdad; Lachmann, Helen J; Cope, Andrew P; Mayer-Barber, Katrin D; Kemper, Claudia

    2016-06-17

    The NLRP3 inflammasome controls interleukin-1β maturation in antigen-presenting cells, but a direct role for NLRP3 in human adaptive immune cells has not been described. We found that the NLRP3 inflammasome assembles in human CD4(+) T cells and initiates caspase-1-dependent interleukin-1β secretion, thereby promoting interferon-γ production and T helper 1 (T(H)1) differentiation in an autocrine fashion. NLRP3 assembly requires intracellular C5 activation and stimulation of C5a receptor 1 (C5aR1), which is negatively regulated by surface-expressed C5aR2. Aberrant NLRP3 activity in T cells affects inflammatory responses in human autoinflammatory disease and in mouse models of inflammation and infection. Our results demonstrate that NLRP3 inflammasome activity is not confined to "innate immune cells" but is an integral component of normal adaptive T(H)1 responses.

  2. Activated human B lymphocytes express three CTLA-4 counterreceptors that costimulate T-cell activation.

    PubMed Central

    Boussiotis, V A; Freeman, G J; Gribben, J G; Daley, J; Gray, G; Nadler, L M

    1993-01-01

    Signaling via the T-cell receptor complex is necessary but not sufficient to induce antigen-specific T lymphocytes to expand clonally. To proliferate, T cells must receive one or more costimulatory signals provided by antigen presenting cells (APCs). One such critical costimulatory signal is delivered by the CD28/CTLA-4 counterreceptor, B7, expressed on APCs. B7 costimulation induces CD28 signaling, resulting in interleukin 2 (IL-2) secretion, and T-cell proliferation. Conversely, T-cell receptor signaling in the absence of B7 costimulation results in induction of antigen-specific tolerance. Here, we show that activated human B lymphocytes express two additional CTLA-4 counterreceptors also capable of providing T-cell costimulation. At 24 hr postactivation, B cells express a CTLA-4 counterreceptor not recognized by anti-B7 or -BB-1 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), which induces detectable IL-2 secretion and T-cell proliferation. At 48 and 72 hr postactivation, B cells express both B7 and a third CTLA-4 counterreceptor identified by the anti-BB-1 mAb. BB-1 appears to be a molecule distinct from B7 by its expression on B7- cells and its capacity to induce T cells to proliferate without significant accumulation of IL-2. As observed for B7, costimulatory signals mediated by these alternative CTLA-4/CD28 counterreceptors are likely to be essential for generation of an immune response and their absence may result in antigen-specific tolerance. We propose the following terminology for these CTLA-4 counterreceptors: (i) B7, B7-1; (ii) early CTLA-4 binding counterreceptor, B7-2; and (iii) BB-1, B7-3. PMID:7504293

  3. Doxorubicin enhances the capacity of B cells to activate T cells in urothelial urinary bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Zirakzadeh, A Ali; Kinn, Johan; Krantz, David; Rosenblatt, Robert; Winerdal, Malin E; Hu, Jin; Hartana, Ciputra Adijaya; Lundgren, Christian; Bergman, Emma Ahlén; Johansson, Markus; Holmström, Benny; Hansson, Johan; Sidikii, Alexander; Vasko, Janos; Marits, Per; Sherif, Amir; Winqvist, Ola

    2016-12-24

    Cancer is currently treated by a combination of therapies, including chemotherapy which is believed to suppress the immune system. Combination of immunotherapy and chemotherapy correlates with improved survival but needs careful planning in order to achieve a synergistic effect. In this study, we have demonstrated that doxorubicin treatment of B cells resulted in increased expression of CD86 and concordantly increased CD4(+) T cell activation in the presence of superantigen, an effect that was inhibited by the addition of a CD86 blocking antibody. Furthermore, doxorubicin resulted in decreased expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-10 and TNF-α. Finally, B cells from urinary bladder cancer patients, treated with a neoadjuvant regiment containing doxorubicin, displayed increased CD86-expression. We conclude that doxorubicin induces CD86 expression on B cells and hence enhances their antigen-presenting ability in vitro, a finding verified in patients. Development of tailored time and dose schedules may increase the effectiveness of combining chemotherapy and immunotherapy.

  4. Brugia malayi infective larvae fail to activate Langerhans cells and dermal dendritic cells in human skin.

    PubMed

    Cotton, R N; McDonald-Fleming, R; Boyd, A; Spates, K; Nutman, T B; Tolouei Semnani, R

    2015-02-01

    Filarial infection in humans is initiated when a mosquito deposits third-stage parasite larvae (L3) in the skin. Langerhans cells (LCs) and dermal dendritic cells (DDCs) are the first cells that the parasite encounters, and L3s must evade these highly effective antigen-presenting cells to establish infection. To assess LC and DDC responses to L3 in human skin, we employed three models of increasing physiologic relevance: in vitro-generated LCs, epidermal blister explants and full-thickness human skin sections. In vitro-generated LCs expressed TLR1-10 and robustly produced IL-6 and TNF-α in response to PolyI:C, but pre-exposure to L3s did not alter inflammatory cytokine production or TLR expression. L3s did not modulate expression of LC markers CDH1, CD207, or CD1a, or the regulatory products TSLP or IDO in epidermal explants or in vitro-generated LC. LC, CD14+ DDC, CD1c+ DC and CD141+ DC from human skin sections were analysed by flow cytometry. While PolyI:C potently induced CCL22 production in LC, CD1c+ DC, and CD141+ DC, and IL-10 production in LC, L3s did not modulate the numbers of or cytokine production by any skin DC subset. L3s broadly failed to activate or modulate LCs or DDCs, suggesting filarial larvae expertly evade APC detection in human skin.

  5. Fluorescence activated cell sorting.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonner, W. A.; Hulett, H. R.; Sweet, R. G.; Herzenberg, L. A.

    1972-01-01

    An instrument has been developed for sorting biological cells. The cells are rendered differentially fluorescent and incorporated into a small liquid stream illuminated by a laser beam. The cells pass sequentially through the beam, and fluorescent light from the cells gives rise to electrical signals. The stream is broken into a series of uniform size drops downstream of the laser. The cell signals are used to give appropriate electrostatic charges to drops containing the cells. The drops then pass between two charged plates and are deflected to appropriate containers. The system has proved capable of providing fractions containing large numbers of viable cells highly enriched in a particular functional type.

  6. Regulatory Activity of Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids in T-Cell Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Wooki; Khan, Naim A.; McMurray, David N.; Prior, Ian A.; Wang, Naisyin; Chapkin, Robert S.

    2010-01-01

    n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) are considered to be authentic immunosuppressors and appear to exert beneficial effects with respect to certain immune-mediated diseases. In addition to promoting T-helper 1 (Th1) cell to T-helper 2 (Th2) cell effector T-cell differentiation, n-3 PUFA may also exert anti-inflammatory actions by inducing apoptosis in Th1 cells. With respect to mechanisms of action, effects range from the modulation of membrane receptors to gene transcription via perturbation of a number of second messenger cascades. In this review, the putative targets of anti-inflammatory n-3 PUFA, activated during early and late events of T-cell activation will be discussed. Studies have demonstrated that these fatty acids alter plasma membrane micro-organization (lipid rafts) at the immunological synapse, the site where T-cells and antigen presenting cells (APC) form a physical contact for antigen initiated T-cell signaling. In addition, the production of diacylglycerol and the activation of different isoforms of protein kinase C (PKC), mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK), calcium signaling, and nuclear translocation/activation of transcriptional factors, can be modulated by n-3 PUFA. Advantages and limitations of diverse methodologies to study the membrane lipid raft hypothesis, as well as apparent contradictions regarding the effect of n-3 PUFA on lipid rafts will be critically presented. PMID:20176053

  7. Nuclear Envelope Lamin-A Couples Actin Dynamics with Immunological Synapse Architecture and T Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    González-Granado, José María; Trigueros-Motos, Laia; Cibrián, Danay; Morlino, Giulia; Blanco-Berrocal, Marta; Osorio, Fernando Garcia; Freije, José María Pérez; López-Otín, Carlos; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco; Andrés, Vicente

    2014-01-01

    In many cell types, nuclear A-type lamins have been implicated in structural and functional activities, including higher-order genome organization, DNA replication and repair, gene transcription, and signal transduction. However, their role in specialized immune cells remains largely unexplored. Here, we showed that the abundance of A-type lamins is almost negligible in resting naïve T lymphocytes, but that it is substantially increased upon activation of the T cell receptor (TCR), and is an early event that accelerates formation of the immunological synapse between T cells and antigen-presenting cells. We found that lamin-A enhanced the polymerization of F-actin in T cells, a critical step for immunological synapse formation, by physically connecting the nucleus to the plasma membrane through the linker of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton (LINC) complex. We also showed that lamin-A played a key role in other membrane, cytoplasmic, and nuclear events related to TCR activation, including receptor-clustering, downstream signaling, and target gene expression. Notably, the presence of lamin-A was associated with enhanced extracellular signal–regulated kinase 1/2 signaling, and pharmacological inhibition of this pathway reduced the extent of lamin-A–dependent T cell activation. Moreover, mice deficient in lamin-A exhibited impaired T cell responses in vivo. These findings underscore the importance of A-type lamins for TCR activation, and identify lamin-A as a previously unappreciated regulator of the immune response. PMID:24757177

  8. Peptide microarrays for the profiling of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte activity using minimum numbers of cells.

    PubMed

    Hoff, Antje; Bagû, Ana-Cristina; André, Thomas; Roth, Günter; Wiesmüller, Karl-Heinz; Gückel, Brigitte; Brock, Roland

    2010-09-01

    The identification of epitopes that elicit cytotoxic T-lymphocyte activity is a prerequisite for the development of cancer-specific immunotherapies. However, especially the parallel characterization of several epitopes is limited by the availability of T cells. Microarrays have enabled an unprecedented miniaturization and parallelization in biological assays. Here, we developed peptide microarrays for the detection of CTL activity. MHC class I-binding peptide epitopes were pipetted onto polymer-coated glass slides. Target cells, loaded with the cell-impermeant dye calcein, were incubated on these arrays, followed by incubation with antigen-expanded CTLs. Cytotoxic activity was detected by release of calcein and detachment of target cells. With only 200,000 cells per microarray, CTLs could be detected at a frequency of 0.5% corresponding to 1,000 antigen-specific T cells. Target cells and CTLs only settled on peptide spots enabling a clear separation of individual epitopes. Even though no physical boundaries were present between the individual spots, peptide loading only occurred locally and cytolytic activity was confined to the spots carrying the specific epitope. The peptide microarrays provide a robust platform that implements the whole process from antigen presentation to the detection of CTL activity in a miniaturized format. The method surpasses all established methods in the minimum numbers of cells required. With antigen uptake occurring on the microarray, further applications are foreseen in the testing of antigen precursors that require uptake and processing prior to presentation.

  9. Soluble, but not immobilized, anti-IgM antibody inhibits post-activation events leading to T-cell-dependent B-cell differentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Zamorano, J; Rivas, D; Gayo, A; Mozo, L; Gutiérrez, C

    1995-01-01

    The potential for surface immunoglobulin-binding ligands to modify B-cell differentiation responses induced by activated T cells has been investigated. Activated T cells in human splenic mononuclear cells cultured on anti-CD3-coated plates induced B cells to produce large amounts of IgM and IgG. In this experimental system, cross-linking of B-cell antigen receptors by soluble, bivalent monoclonal or polyclonal anti-IgM antibodies completely inhibited IgM production, and greatly diminished IgG production, in a dose-dependent manner. Similar results were obtained using a F(ab')2 fragment of a goat anti-IgM antibody. Inhibition of B-cell differentiation by bivalent cross-linking reagents did not require the presence of antigen-presenting cells (APC), as comparable results were obtained in co-cultures of purified T and B cells. In contrast, enhanced immunoglobulin secretion was seen when surface IgM was cross-linked using anti-IgM antibody immobilized on the culture plate. Interestingly, activated T cells induced similar levels of expression on B cells of the activation antigens CD23, CD25 and CD71, and of class II molecules, irrespective of any treatment with soluble or immobilized anti-IgM antibody. This indicates that soluble anti-IgM specifically inhibits B-cell differentiation without altering initial events of T-cell-dependent B-cell activation. Images Figure 3 Figure 5 PMID:7642212

  10. Early Activation of Teleost B Cells in Response to Rhabdovirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Abós, Beatriz; Castro, Rosario; González Granja, Aitor; Havixbeck, Jeffrey J.; Barreda, Daniel R.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT To date, the response of teleost B cells to specific pathogens has been only scarcely addressed. In this work, we have demonstrated that viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV), a fish rhabdovirus, has the capacity to infect rainbow trout spleen IgM-positive (IgM+) cells, although the infection is not productive. Consequently, we have studied the effects of VHSV on IgM+ cell functionality, comparing these effects to those elicited by a Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) ligand, poly(I·C). We found that poly(I·C) and VHSV significantly upregulated TLR3 and type I interferon (IFN) transcription in spleen and blood IgM+ cells. Further effects included the upregulated transcription of the CK5B chemokine. The significant inhibition of some of these effects in the presence of bafilomycin A1 (BAF), an inhibitor of endosomal acidification, suggests the involvement of an intracellular TLR in these responses. In the case of VHSV, these transcriptional effects were dependent on viral entry into B cells and the initiation of viral transcription. VHSV also provoked the activation of NF-κB and the upregulation of major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) cell surface expression on IgM+ cells, which, along with the increased transcription of the costimulatory molecules CD80/86 and CD83, pointed to VHSV-induced IgM+ cell activation toward an antigen-presenting profile. Finally, despite the moderate effects of VHSV on IgM+ cell proliferation, a consistent effect on IgM+ cell survival was detected. IMPORTANCE Innate immune responses to pathogens established through their recognition by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) have been traditionally ascribed to innate cells. However, recent evidence in mammals has revealed that innate pathogen recognition by B lymphocytes is a crucial factor in shaping the type of immune response that is mounted. In teleosts, these immediate effects of viral encounter on B lymphocytes have not been addressed to date. In our study, we

  11. Histo-Blood Group Antigen Presentation Is Critical for Binding of Norovirus VLP to Glycosphingolipids in Model Membranes.

    PubMed

    Nasir, Waqas; Frank, Martin; Kunze, Angelika; Bally, Marta; Parra, Francisco; Nyholm, Per-Georg; Höök, Fredrik; Larson, Göran

    2017-03-27

    Virus entry depends on biomolecular recognition at the surface of cell membranes. In the case of glycolipid receptors, these events are expected to be influenced by how the glycan epitope close to the membrane is presented to the virus. This presentation of membrane-associated glycans is more restricted than that of glycans in solution, particularly because of orientational constraints imposed on the glycolipid through its lateral interactions with other membrane lipids and proteins. We have developed and employed a total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy-based binding assay and a scheme for molecular dynamics (MD) membrane simulations to investigate the consequences of various glycan presentation effects. The system studied was histo-blood group antigen (HBGA) epitopes of membrane-bound glycosphingolipids (GSLs) derived from small intestinal epithelium of humans (type 1 chain) and dogs (type 2 chain) interacting with GII.4 norovirus-like particles. Our experimental results showed strong binding to all lipid-linked type 1 chain HBGAs but no or only weak binding to the corresponding type 2 chain HBGAs. This is in contrast to results derived from STD experiments with free HBGAs in solution where binding was observed for Lewis x. The MD data suggest that the strong binding to type 1 chain glycolipids was due to the well-exposed (1,2)-linked α-l-Fucp and (1,4)-linked α-l-Fucp residues, while the weaker binding or lack of binding to type 2 chain HBGAs was due to the very restricted accessibility of the (1,3)-linked α-l-Fucp residue when the glycolipid is embedded in a phospholipid membrane. Our results not only contribute to a general understanding of protein-carbohydrate interactions on model membrane surfaces, particularly in the context of virus binding, but also suggest a possible role of human intestinal GSLs as potential receptors for norovirus uptake.

  12. Expression of the RelB transcription factor correlates with the activation of human dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Clark, G J; Gunningham, S; Troy, A; Vuckovic, S; Hart, D N J

    1999-01-01

    The RelB gene product is a member of the nuclear factor (NF)-κB family of transcription factors. It has been identified recently within mouse antigen-presenting cells and human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DC). Disruption of the mouse RelB gene is accompanied, amongst other phenotypes, by abnormalities in the antigen-presenting cell lineages. In order to define RelB expression during human DC differentiation, we have analysed RelB mRNA by reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction and RelB protein by intracellular staining in CD34+ precursors and different types of DC preparations. RelB mRNA was not detected in CD34+ precursor populations. Fresh blood DC (lineage−human leucocyte antigen-DR+ (lin−HLA-DR+)) lacked RelB mRNA and cytoplasmic RelB protein but a period of in vitro culture induced RelB expression in blood DC. Purified Langerhans’ cells (LC) (CD1a+ HLA-DR+) failed to express RelB mRNA. Immunocytochemical staining identified RelB protein in human skin epithelium. RelB protein was expressed in a very few CD1a+, CD83+ or CMRF-44+ dermal DC but was not present in CD1a+ LC. Tonsil DC (lin−HLA-DR+ CMRF-44+) were positive for RelB mRNA and RelB protein. Intestinal DC (HLA-DR+) also lacked immunoreactive RelB protein. The majority of interdigitating CD83+, CMRF-44+, CMRF-56+ or p55+ DC located in paracortical T-lymphocyte areas of lymph node and tonsil contained RelB protein. The expression of RelB mRNA and RelB protein correlates with the activated phase of blood DC and the postmigration cell (activated) stage of tissue DC development. PMID:10540217

  13. Assessment of immunosuppressive activity of human mesenchymal stem cells using murine antigen specific CD4 and CD8 T cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have immunosuppressive activity. They do not induce allospecific T cell responses, making them promising tools for reducing the severity of graft versus host disease (GVHD) as well as treating various immune diseases. Currently, there is a need in the MSC field to develop a robust in vitro bioassay which can characterize the immunosuppressive function of MSCs. Methods Murine clonal CD4 and CD8 T cells were stimulated with cognate peptide antigen and antigen presenting cells (APCs) in the absence or presence of human MSCs, different aspects of T cell activation were monitored and analyzed using flow cytometery, real time RT-PCR and cytokine measurement. Results Human MSCs (hMSCs) can alter multiple aspects of murine T cell activation induced by stimulation with specific antigen, including: reduced proliferation, inhibited or stimulated cell surface marker expression (CD25, CD69, CD44 and CD62L), inhibited mRNA expression of transcription factors (T-bet and GATA-3) and decreased cytokine expression (interferon-gamma, interleukin-10). Disappearance of activation-induced cluster formation and decreased apoptosis of CD8 T cells were also observed. Moreover, the effects are specific to MSCs; incubating the T cells with non-MSC control cell lines had no effect on T cell proliferation and activation. Conclusions Clonal murine T cells can be used to measure, characterize, and quantify the in vitro immunosuppressive activity of human MSCs, representing a promising approach to improve bioassays for immunosuppression. PMID:24406271

  14. Bacterial activation of mast cells.

    PubMed

    Chi, David S; Walker, Elaine S; Hossler, Fred E; Krishnaswamy, Guha

    2006-01-01

    Mast cells often are found in a perivascular location but especially in mucosae, where they may response to various stimuli. They typically associate with immediate hypersensitive responses and are likely to play a critical role in host defense. In this chapter, a common airway pathogen, Moraxella catarrhalis, and a commensal bacterium, Neiserria cinerea, are used to illustrate activation of human mast cells. A human mast cell line (HMC-1) derived from a patient with mast cell leukemia was activated with varying concentrations of heat-killed bacteria. Active aggregation of bacteria over mast cell surfaces was detected by scanning electron microscopy. The activation of mast cells was analyzed by nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) activation and cytokine production in culture supernatants. Both M. catarrhalis and N. cinerea induce mast cell activation and the secretion of two key inflammatory cytokines, interleukin-6 and MCP-1. This is accompanied by NF-kappaB activation. Direct bacterial contact with mast cells appears to be essential for this activation because neither cell-free bacterial supernatants nor bacterial lipopolysaccharide induce cytokine secretion.

  15. Nuclear envelope lamin-A couples actin dynamics with immunological synapse architecture and T cell activation.

    PubMed

    González-Granado, José M; Silvestre-Roig, Carlos; Rocha-Perugini, Vera; Trigueros-Motos, Laia; Cibrián, Danay; Morlino, Giulia; Blanco-Berrocal, Marta; Osorio, Fernando G; Freije, José M P; López-Otín, Carlos; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco; Andrés, Vicente

    2014-04-22

    In many cell types, nuclear A-type lamins regulate multiple cellular functions, including higher-order genome organization, DNA replication and repair, gene transcription, and signal transduction; however, their role in specialized immune cells remains largely unexplored. We showed that the abundance of A-type lamins was almost negligible in resting naïve T lymphocytes, but was increased upon activation of the T cell receptor (TCR). The increase in lamin-A was an early event that accelerated formation of the immunological synapse between T cells and antigen-presenting cells. Polymerization of F-actin in T cells is a critical step for immunological synapse formation, and lamin-A interacted with the linker of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton (LINC) complex to promote F-actin polymerization. We also showed that lamin-A expression accelerated TCR clustering and led to enhanced downstream signaling, including extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) signaling, as well as increased target gene expression. Pharmacological inhibition of the ERK pathway reduced lamin-A-dependent T cell activation. Moreover, mice lacking lamin-A in immune cells exhibited impaired T cell responses in vivo. These findings underscore the importance of A-type lamins for TCR activation and identify lamin-A as a previously unappreciated regulator of the immune response.

  16. IgE epitope proximity determines immune complex shape and effector cell activation capacity

    PubMed Central

    Gieras, Anna; Linhart, Birgit; Roux, Kenneth H.; Dutta, Moumita; Khodoun, Marat; Zafred, Domen; Cabauatan, Clarissa R.; Lupinek, Christian; Weber, Milena; Focke-Tejkl, Margarete; Keller, Walter; Finkelman, Fred D.; Valenta, Rudolf

    2016-01-01

    Background IgE-allergen complexes induce mast cell and basophil activation and thus immediate allergic inflammation. They are also important for IgE-facilitated allergen presentation to T cells by antigen-presenting cells. Objective To investigate whether the proximity of IgE binding sites on an allergen affects immune complex shape and subsequent effector cell activation in vitro and in vivo. Methods We constructed artificial allergens by grafting IgE epitopes in different numbers and proximity onto a scaffold protein. The shape of immune complexes formed between artificial allergens and the corresponding IgE was studied by negative-stain electron microscopy. Allergenic activity was determined using basophil activation assays. Mice were primed with IgE, followed by injection of artificial allergens to evaluate their in vivo allergenic activity. Severity of systemic anaphylaxis was measured by changes in body temperature. Results We could demonstrate simultaneous binding of 4 IgE antibodies in close vicinity to each other. The proximity of IgE binding sites on allergens influenced the shape of the resulting immune complexes and the magnitude of effector cell activation and in vivo inflammation. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that the proximity of IgE epitopes on an allergen affects its allergenic activity. We thus identified a novel mechanism by which IgE-allergen complexes regulate allergic inflammation. This mechanism should be important for allergy and other immune complex–mediated diseases. PMID:26684291

  17. Dynamic Regulation of TCR-Microclusters and the Microsynapse for T Cell Activation.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto-Tane, Akiko; Saito, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    The interaction between a T cell and an antigen-presenting cell is the initiating event in T cell-mediated adaptive immunity. The Immunological Synapse (IS) is formed at the interface between these two cell types, and is the site where antigen (Ag)-specific recognition and activation are induced through the T cell receptor (TCR). This occurs at the center of the IS, and cell adhesion is supported through integrins in the area surrounding the TCR. Recently, this model has been revised based on data indicating that the initial Ag-specific activation signal is triggered prior to IS formation at TCR-microclusters (MCs), sites where TCR, kinases and adaptors of TCR proximal downstream signaling molecules accumulate as an activation signaling cluster. TCR-MCs then move into the center of the cell-cell interface to generate the cSMAC. This translocation of TCR-MCs is mediated initially by the actin cytoskeleton and then by dynein-induced movement along microtubules. The translocation of TCR-MCs and cSMAC formation is induced upon strong TCR stimulation through the assembly of a TCR-dynein super complex with microtubules. The Ag-specific activation signal is induced at TCR-MCs, but the adhesion signal is now shown to be induced by generating a "microsynapse," which is composed of a core of TCR-MCs and the surrounding adhesion ring of integrin and focal adhesion molecules. Since the microsynapse is critical for activation, particularly under weak TCR stimulation, this structure supports a weak TCR signal through a cell-cell adhesion signal. The microsynapse has a structure similar to the IS but on a micro-scale and regulates Ag-specific activation as well as cell-cell adhesion. We describe here the dynamic regulation of TCR-MCs, responsible for inducing Ag-specific activation signals, and the microsynapse, responsible for adhesion signals critical for cell-cell interactions, and their interrelationship.

  18. Determination of the Absolute Number of Cytokine mRNA Molecules within Individual Activated Human T Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karr, Laurel J.; Marshall, Gwen; Hockett, Richard D.; Bucy, R. Pat; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A primary function of activated T cells is the expression and subsequent secretion of cytokines, which orchestrate the differentiation of other lymphocytes, modulate antigen presenting cell activity, and alter vascular endothelium to mediate an immune response. Since many features of immune regulation probably result from modest alterations of endogenous rates of multiple interacting processes, quantitative analysis of the frequency and specific activity of individual T cells is critically important. Using a coordinated set of quantitative methods, the absolute number of molecules of several key cytokine mRNA species in individual T cells has been determined. The frequency of human blood T cells activated in vitro by mitogens and recall protein antigens was determined by intracellular cytokine protein staining, in situ hybridization for cytokine mRNA, and by limiting dilution analysis for cytokine mRNA+ cells. The absolute number of mRNA molecules was simultaneously determined in both homogenates of the entire population of cells and in individual cells obtained by limiting dilution, using a quantitative, competitive RT-PCR assay. The absolute numbers of mRNA molecules in a population of cells divided by the frequency of individual positive cells, yielded essentially the same number of mRNA molecules per cell as direct analysis of individual cells by limiting dilution analysis. Mean numbers of mRNA per positive cell from both mitogen and antigen activated T cells, using these stimulation conditions, were 6000 for IL-2, 6300 for IFN-gamma, and 1600 for IL-4.

  19. T cell immunity using transgenic B lymphocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerloni, Mara; Rizzi, Marta; Castiglioni, Paola; Zanetti, Maurizio

    2004-03-01

    Adaptive immunity exists in all vertebrates and plays a defense role against microbial pathogens and tumors. T cell responses begin when precursor T cells recognize antigen on specialized antigen-presenting cells and differentiate into effector cells. Currently, dendritic cells are considered the only cells capable of stimulating T lymphocytes. Here, we show that mature naïve B lymphocytes can be genetically programmed by using nonviral DNA and turned into powerful antigen-presenting cells with a dual capacity of synthesis and presentation of antigen to T cells in vivo. A single i.v. injection of transgenic lymphocytes activates T cell responses reproducibly and specifically even at very low cell doses (102). We also demonstrate that T cell priming can occur in the absence of dendritic cells and results in immunological memory with protective effector functions. These findings disclose aspects in the regulation of adaptive immunity and indicate possibilities for vaccination against viruses and cancer in humans.

  20. Single molecule analysis of B cell receptor motion during signaling activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rey Suarez, Ivan; Koo, Peter; Mochrie, Simon; Song, Wenxia; Upadhyaya, Arpita

    B cells are an essential part of the adaptive immune system. They patrol the body looking for signs of infection in the form of antigen on the surface of antigen presenting cells. The binding of the B cell receptor (BCR) to antigen induces signaling cascades that lead to B cell activation and eventual production of high affinity antibodies. During activation, BCR organize into signaling microclusters, which are platforms for signal amplification. The physical processes underlying receptor movement and aggregation are not well understood. Here we study the dynamics of single BCRs on activated murine primary B cells using TIRF imaging and single particle tracking. The tracks obtained are analyzed using perturbation expectation-maximization (pEM) a systems-level analysis that allows the identification of different short-time diffusive states from a set of single particle tracks. We identified five different diffusive states on wild type cells, which correspond to different molecular states of the BCR. By using actin polymerization inhibitors and mutant cells lacking important actin regulators we were able to identify the BCR molecule configuration associated with each diffusive state.

  1. NK Cells Respond to Haptens by the Activation of Calcium Permeable Plasma Membrane Channels

    PubMed Central

    Grandclément, Camille; Pick, Horst; Vogel, Horst; Held, Werner

    2016-01-01

    Natural Killer (NK) cells mediate innate immunity to infected and transformed cells. Yet, NK cells can also mount hapten-specific recall responses thereby contributing to contact hypersensitivity (CHS). However, since NK cells lack antigen receptors that are used by the adaptive immune system to recognize haptens, it is not clear if NK cells respond directly to haptens and, if so, what mediates these responses. Here we show that among four haptens the two that are known to induce NK cell-dependent CHS trigger the rapid influx of extracellular Ca2+ into NK cells and lymphocyte cell lines. Thus lymphocytes can respond to haptens independent of antigen presentation and antigen receptors. We identify the Ca2+-permeable cation channel TRPC3 as a component of the lymphocyte response to one of these haptens. These data suggest that the response to the second hapten is based on a distinct mechanism, consistent with the capacity of NK cells to discriminate haptens. These findings raise the possibility that antigen-receptor independent activation of immune cells contributes to CHS. PMID:26963818

  2. In vivo targeting of dendritic cells for activation of cellular immunity using vaccine carriers based on pH-responsive microparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Young Jik; James, Edward; Shastri, Nilabh; Fréchet, Jean M. J.

    2005-12-01

    Activating the immune system to trigger a specific response is a major challenge in vaccine development. In particular, activating sufficient cytotoxic T lymphocyte-mediated cellular immunity, which is crucial for the treatment of many diseases including cancer and AIDS, has proven to be especially challenging. In this study, antigens were encapsulated in acid-degradable polymeric particle carriers to cascade cytotoxic T lymphocyte activation. To target dendritic cells, the most potent antigen-presenting cells, the particle carriers, were further conjugated with monoclonal antibodies. A series of ex vivo and in vivo studies have shown increased receptor-mediated uptake of antibody-conjugated particles by dendritic cells as well as migration of particle-carrying dendritic cells to lymph nodes and stimulation of naïve T cells leading to enhanced cellular immune response as confirmed by specific cell lysis and IFN- secretion. acid-degradable particle | drug delivery | targeted vaccine

  3. Role of type I interferons in the activation of autoreactive B cells

    PubMed Central

    Kiefer, Kerstin; Oropallo, Michael A; Cancro, Michael P; Marshak-Rothstein, Ann

    2013-01-01

    Type I interferons (IFNs) are a family of cytokines involved in the defense against viral infections that play a key role in the activation of both the innate and adaptive immune system. IFNs both directly and indirectly enhance the capacity of B lymphocytes to respond to viral challenge and produce cytotoxic and neutralizing antibodies. However, prolonged type I IFN exposure is not always beneficial to the host. If not regulated properly IFN can drive autoantibody production as well as other parameters of systemic autoimmune disease. Type I IFNs impact B-cell function through a variety of mechanisms, including effects on receptor engagement, Toll-like receptor expression, cell migration, antigen presentation, cytokine responsiveness, cytokine production, survival, differentiation and class-switch recombination. Type I IFNs are also cytotoxic for a variety of cell types and thereby contribute to the accumulation of cell debris that serves as a potential source for autoantigens. Type I IFN engagement of a variety of accessory cells further promotes B-cell survival and activation, as exemplified by the capacity of type I IFNs to increase the level of B-cell survival factors, such as B lymphocyte stimulator, produced by dendritic cells. Therefore, it is not surprising that the loss of expression of the type I IFN receptor can have dramatic effects on the production of autoantibodies and on the clinical features of systemic autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus. PMID:22430248

  4. Activation of decidual invariant natural killer T cells promotes lipopolysaccharide-induced preterm birth.

    PubMed

    Li, Liping; Yang, Jing; Jiang, Yao; Tu, Jiaoqin; Schust, Danny J

    2015-04-01

    Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells are crucial for host defense against a variety of microbial pathogens, but the underlying mechanisms of iNKT cells activation by microbes are not fully explained. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms of iNKT cell activation in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated preterm birth using an adoptive transfer system and diverse neutralizing antibodies (Abs) and inhibitors. We found that adoptive transfer of decidual iNKT cells to LPS-stimulated iNKT cell deficient Jα18(-/-) mice that lack invariant Vα14Jα281T cell receptor (TCR) expression significantly decreased the time to delivery and increased the percentage of decidual iNKT cells. Neutralizing Abs against Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR-4), CD1d, interleukin (IL)-12 and IL-18, and inhibitors blocking the activation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) p38 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) significantly reduced in vivo percentages of decidual iNKT cells, their intracellular interferon (IFN)-γ production and surface CD69 expression. In vitro, in the presence of the same Abs and inhibitors used as in vivo, decidual iNKT cells co-cultured with LPS-pulsed dendritic cells (DCs) showed significantly decreased extracellular and intracellular IFN-γ secretion and surface CD69 expression. Our data demonstrate that the activation of decidual iNKT cells plays an important role in inflammation-induced preterm birth. Activation of decidual iNKT cells also requires TLR4-mediated NF-κB, MAPK p38 and ERK pathways, the proinflammatory cytokines IL-12 and IL-18, and endogenous glycolipid antigens presented by CD1d.

  5. Acute GVHD in patients receiving IL-15/4-1BBL activated NK cells following T-cell-depleted stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Shah, Nirali N; Baird, Kristin; Delbrook, Cynthia P; Fleisher, Thomas A; Kohler, Mark E; Rampertaap, Shakuntala; Lemberg, Kimberly; Hurley, Carolyn K; Kleiner, David E; Merchant, Melinda S; Pittaluga, Stefania; Sabatino, Marianna; Stroncek, David F; Wayne, Alan S; Zhang, Hua; Fry, Terry J; Mackall, Crystal L

    2015-01-29

    Natural killer (NK) cells can enhance engraftment and mediate graft-versus-leukemia following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), but the potency of graft-versus-leukemia mediated by naturally reconstituting NK cells following HSCT is limited. Preclinical studies demonstrate that activation of NK cells using interleukin-15 (IL-15) plus 4-1BBL upregulates activating receptor expression and augments killing capacity. In an effort to amplify the beneficial effects of NK cells post-HSCT, we conducted a first-in-human trial of adoptive transfer of donor-derived IL-15/4-1BBL-activated NK cells (aNK-DLI) following HLA-matched, T-cell-depleted (1-2 × 10(4) T cells/kg) nonmyeloablative peripheral blood stem cell transplantation in children and young adults with ultra-high-risk solid tumors. aNK-DLI were CD3(+)-depleted, CD56(+)-selected lymphocytes, cultured for 9 to 11 days with recombinant human IL-15 plus 4-1BBL(+)IL-15Rα(+) artificial antigen-presenting cells. aNK-DLI demonstrated potent killing capacity and displayed high levels of activating receptor expression. Five of 9 transplant recipients experienced acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) following aNK-DLI, with grade 4 GVHD observed in 3 subjects. GVHD was more common in matched unrelated donor vs matched sibling donor recipients and was associated with higher donor CD3 chimerism. Given that the T-cell dose was below the threshold required for GVHD in this setting, we conclude that aNK-DLI contributed to the acute GVHD observed, likely by augmenting underlying T-cell alloreactivity. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT01287104.

  6. Cell-to-cell transfer of M. tuberculosis antigens optimizes CD4 T cell priming.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Smita; Ernst, Joel D

    2014-06-11

    During Mycobacterium tuberculosis and other respiratory infections, optimal T cell activation requires pathogen transport from the lung to a local draining lymph node (LN). However, the infected inflammatory monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) that transport M. tuberculosis to the local lymph node are relatively inefficient at activating CD4 T cells, possibly due to bacterial inhibition of antigen presentation. We found that infected migratory DCs release M. tuberculosis antigens as soluble, unprocessed proteins for uptake and presentation by uninfected resident lymph node DCs. This transfer of bacterial proteins from migratory to local DCs results in optimal priming of antigen-specific CD4 T cells, which are essential in controlling tuberculosis. Additionally, this mechanism does not involve transfer of the whole bacterium and is distinct from apoptosis or exosome shedding. These findings reveal a mechanism that bypasses pathogen inhibition of antigen presentation by infected cells and generates CD4 T cell responses that control the infection.

  7. Immunotherapy and mast cell activation.

    PubMed

    Carlos, A G; Carlos, M L; Santos, M A; Pedro, E; Santos, S; Lopes-Pregal, A

    1998-10-01

    Tryptase is the more specific markers for mast cell activation and mediators release and can be used as an index of mast cell activation after challenge. Nasal provocation tests have been done in patients allergic to the pollen of Parietaria (pellitory wall) before and after specific systemic immunotherapy and tryptase release evaluated in nasal lavage fluid. After specific immunotherapy the concentration of tryptase in nasal lavage was significantly decreased to all the concentrations used in challenge and the peack of tryptase release was delayed. These results confirm that assays of tryptase in nasal fluid after nasal provocation are a reliable markers of mast cell activation. Immunotherapy with specific allergen decreases mast cell reactivity to the same allergen.

  8. Mycobacterium tuberculosis EsxH inhibits ESCRT-dependent CD4(+) T-cell activation.

    PubMed

    Portal-Celhay, Cynthia; Tufariello, JoAnn M; Srivastava, Smita; Zahra, Aleena; Klevorn, Thais; Grace, Patricia S; Mehra, Alka; Park, Heidi S; Ernst, Joel D; Jacobs, William R; Philips, Jennifer A

    2016-12-05

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) establishes a persistent infection, despite inducing antigen-specific T-cell responses. Although T cells arrive at the site of infection, they do not provide sterilizing immunity. The molecular basis of how Mtb impairs T-cell function is not clear. Mtb has been reported to block major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) antigen presentation; however, no bacterial effector or host-cell target mediating this effect has been identified. We recently found that Mtb EsxH, which is secreted by the Esx-3 type VII secretion system, directly inhibits the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) machinery. Here, we showed that ESCRT is required for optimal antigen processing; correspondingly, overexpression and loss-of-function studies demonstrated that EsxH inhibited the ability of macrophages and dendritic cells to activate Mtb antigen-specific CD4(+) T cells. Compared with the wild-type strain, the esxH-deficient strain induced fivefold more antigen-specific CD4(+) T-cell proliferation in the mediastinal lymph nodes of mice. We also found that EsxH undermined the ability of effector CD4(+) T cells to recognize infected macrophages and clear Mtb. These results provide a molecular explanation for how Mtb impairs the adaptive immune response.

  9. Tetherin/BST-2 promotes dendritic cell activation and function during acute retrovirus infection

    PubMed Central

    Li, Sam X.; Barrett, Bradley S.; Guo, Kejun; Kassiotis, George; Hasenkrug, Kim J.; Dittmer, Ulf; Gibbert, Kathrin; Santiago, Mario L.

    2016-01-01

    Tetherin/BST-2 is a host restriction factor that inhibits retrovirus release from infected cells in vitro by tethering nascent virions to the plasma membrane. However, contradictory data exists on whether Tetherin inhibits acute retrovirus infection in vivo. Previously, we reported that Tetherin-mediated inhibition of Friend retrovirus (FV) replication at 2 weeks post-infection correlated with stronger natural killer, CD4+ T and CD8+ T cell responses. Here, we further investigated the role of Tetherin in counteracting retrovirus replication in vivo. FV infection levels were similar between wild-type (WT) and Tetherin KO mice at 3 to 7 days post-infection despite removal of a potent restriction factor, Apobec3/Rfv3. However, during this phase of acute infection, Tetherin enhanced myeloid dendritic cell (DC) function. DCs from infected, but not uninfected, WT mice expressed significantly higher MHC class II and the co-stimulatory molecule CD80 compared to Tetherin KO DCs. Tetherin-associated DC activation during acute FV infection correlated with stronger NK cell responses. Furthermore, Tetherin+ DCs from FV-infected mice more strongly stimulated FV-specific CD4+ T cells ex vivo compared to Tetherin KO DCs. The results link the antiretroviral and immunomodulatory activity of Tetherin in vivo to improved DC activation and MHC class II antigen presentation. PMID:26846717

  10. The active translation of MHCII mRNA during dendritic cells maturation supplies new molecules to the cell surface pool.

    PubMed

    Malanga, Donatella; Barba, Pasquale; Harris, Paul E; Maffei, Antonella; Del Pozzo, Giovanna

    2007-04-01

    The transition of human dendritic cells (DCs) from the immature to the mature phenotype is characterized by an increased density of MHC class II (MHCII) molecules on the plasma membrane, a key requirement of their competence as professional antigen presenting cells (APCs). MHCII molecules on the cell surface derive from newly synthesized as well as from preexisting proteins. So far, all the studies done on DCs during maturation, to establish the relative contribution of newly synthesized MHCII molecules to the cell surface pool did not produced a clear, unified scenario. We report that, in human DCs stimulated ex vivo with LPS, the changes in the RNA accumulation specific for at least two MHCII genes (HLA-DRA and HLA-DQA1) due to transcriptional upregulation, is associated with the active translation at high rate of these transcripts. Our finding reveals that, across the 24h of the maturation process in human DCs, newly synthesized MHCII proteins are supplied to the APCs cell surface pool.

  11. Mechanisms of peripheral T-cell tolerance.

    PubMed

    Lechler, R; Marelli-Berg, F M

    1997-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly clear that the control of self-reactivity involves peripheral mechanisms that supplement thymic negative selection. It is now generally accepted that T-cell activation depends upon both T-cell receptor engagement and the delivery of B7-mediated costimulation by specialized antigen presenting cells (APC). In contrast, failure to deliver B7-mediated costimulation can result in the induction of antigen-specific non-responsiveness. In physiological terms, costimulation-deficient antigen presentation is the prerogative of those cells that do not express B7 molecules, even during inflammatory conditions, such as tissue parenchymal cells. The consequences of such costimulation-deficient antigen presentation are illustrated by the allospecific tolerance that is observed in animal models of transplantation following the depletion of bone marrow-derived APC from an allograft. In this paper the possible role of antigen presentation by tissue parenchymal cells in the induction and maintenance of peripheral tolerance is discussed, with particular attention to the important contribution that the liver may make to these events.

  12. Redundancy in Antigen-Presenting Function of the HLA-DR and -DQ Molecules in the Multiple Sclerosis-Associated HLA-DR2 Haplotype1

    PubMed Central

    Sospedra, Mireia; Muraro, Paolo A.; Stefanová, Irena; Zhao, Yingdong; Chung, Katherine; Li, Yili; Giulianotti, Marc; Simon, Richard; Mariuzza, Roy; Pinilla, Clemencia; Martin, Roland

    2009-01-01

    The three HLA class II alleles of the DR2 haplotype, DRB1*1501, DRB5*0101, and DQB1*0602, are in strong linkage disequilibrium and confer most of the genetic risk to multiple sclerosis. Functional redundancy in Ag presentation by these class II molecules would allow recognition by a single TCR of identical peptides with the different restriction elements, facilitating T cell activation and providing one explanation how a disease-associated HLA haplotype could be linked to a CD4+ T cell-mediated autoimmune disease. Using combinatorial peptide libraries and B cell lines expressing single HLA-DR/DQ molecules, we show that two of five in vivo-expanded and likely disease-relevant, cross-reactive cerebrospinal fluid-infiltrating T cell clones use multiple disease-associated HLA class II molecules as restriction elements. One of these T cell clones recognizes >30 identical foreign and human peptides using all DR and DQ molecules of the multiple sclerosis-associated DR2 haplotype. A T cell signaling machinery tuned for efficient responses to weak ligands together with structural features of the TCR-HLA/peptide complex result in this promiscuous HLA class II restriction. PMID:16424227

  13. CD40-activated B cells express full lymph node homing triad and induce T-cell chemotaxis: potential as cellular adjuvants.

    PubMed

    von Bergwelt-Baildon, Michael; Shimabukuro-Vornhagen, Alexander; Popov, Alexey; Klein-Gonzalez, Nela; Fiore, Francesca; Debey, Svenja; Draube, Andreas; Maecker, Britta; Menezes, Isaura; Nadler, Lee M; Schultze, Joachim L

    2006-04-01

    CD40-activated B cells (CD40-B cells) have previously been introduced as an alternative source of antigen-presenting cells for immunotherapy. CD40-B cells can prime naive and expand memory T cells, and they can be generated in large numbers from very small amounts of peripheral blood derived from healthy individuals or cancer patients alike. Administration of CD40-B cells as a cellular adjuvant would require these cells to migrate toward secondary lymphoid organs and attract T cells in situ, processes guided by specific chemokines and chemokine receptors. Here, we demonstrate that primary, human CD40-B cells express a pattern of adhesion molecules and chemokine receptors necessary for homing to secondary lymphoid organs and have the capacity to migrate to cognate ligands. Furthermore, we show that CD40-B cells express important T-cell attractants and induce strong T-cell chemotaxis. These findings further support the use of CD40-B cells as cellular adjuvant for cancer immunotherapy.

  14. Investigations on the immunosuppressive activity of derivatives of mycophenolic acid in immature dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Iwaszkiewicz-Grzes, Dorota; Cholewinski, Grzegorz; Kot-Wasik, Agata; Trzonkowski, Piotr; Dzierzbicka, Krystyna

    2017-03-01

    The main activity of mycophenolic acid 1 (MPA) and its analogs is the inhibition of proliferation of T cells. Here, we hypothesized that MPA and its conjugates inhibits also the activity of antigen-presenting cells (APC) including dendritic cells (DCs). We tested the effect of novel amino acid derivatives of MPA and conjugates of MPA with acridines/acridones on DCs by flow cytometry, ELISA and MLR assay. Both acridines/acridone derivatives could inhibit the maturation of DC, as shown by the decreased expression of B7 family receptors. It was confirmed in the mixed leucocyte reaction (MLR), in which T cells challenged with DCs pretreated with the analogs showed decreased proliferation and reduced cytokine secretion. The most interesting activity in this series of studies, that is, the suppression of CD86 receptor expression, decreased cytokine production and suppressed mixed leucocyte reaction, exhibited (mycophenoyl-N-3-propyl)-9-acridone-4-carboxamide ester 5a and (mycophenoyl-N-5-pentyl)-9-acridone-4-carboxamide ester 5b. These compounds reduced also the secretion of IL-2 and IL-15. In addition, they increased secretion of suppressive IL-10. Equally promising results were obtained for the N-mycophenoyl-D-glutamic acid 4b, which previously gave the highest value of selectivity. Acridone derivatives of MPA are therefore good immunosuppressive drug candidates for further testing.

  15. F-actin polymerization and retrograde flow drive sustained PLCγ1 signaling during T cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Babich, Alexander; Li, Shuixing; O'Connor, Roddy S.; Milone, Michael C.; Freedman, Bruce D.

    2012-01-01

    Activation of T cells by antigen-presenting cells involves assembly of signaling molecules into dynamic microclusters (MCs) within a specialized membrane domain termed the immunological synapse (IS). Actin and myosin IIA localize to the IS, and depletion of F-actin abrogates MC movement and T cell activation. However, the mechanisms that coordinate actomyosin dynamics and T cell receptor signaling are poorly understood. Using pharmacological inhibitors that perturb individual aspects of actomyosin dynamics without disassembling the network, we demonstrate that F-actin polymerization is the primary driver of actin retrograde flow, whereas myosin IIA promotes long-term integrity of the IS. Disruption of F-actin retrograde flow, but not myosin IIA contraction, arrested MC centralization and inhibited sustained Ca2+ signaling at the level of endoplasmic reticulum store release. Furthermore, perturbation of retrograde flow inhibited PLCγ1 phosphorylation within MCs but left Zap70 activity intact. These studies highlight the importance of ongoing actin polymerization as a central driver of actomyosin retrograde flow, MC centralization, and sustained Ca2+ signaling. PMID:22665519

  16. Targeted antigen delivery and activation of dendritic cells in vivo: steps towards cost effective vaccines.

    PubMed

    Tacken, Paul J; Figdor, Carl G

    2011-02-01

    During the past decade, the immunotherapeutic potential of ex vivo generated professional antigen presenting dendritic cells (DCs) has been explored in the clinic. Albeit safe, clinical results have thus far been limited. A major disadvantage of current cell-based dendritic cell (DC) therapies, preventing universal implementation of this form of immunotherapy, is the requirement that vaccines need to be tailor made for each individual. Targeted delivery of antigens to DC surface receptors in vivo would circumvent this laborious and expensive ex vivo culturing steps involved with these cell-based therapies. In addition, the opportunity to target natural and often rare DC subsets in vivo might have advantages over loading more artificial ex vivo cultured DCs. Preclinical studies show targeting antigens to DCs effectively induces humoral responses, while cellular responses are induced provided a DC maturation or activation stimulus is co-administered. Here, we discuss strategies to target antigens to distinct DC subsets and to simultaneously employ adjuvants to activate these cells to induce immunity.

  17. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma activators affect the maturation of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Gosset, P; Charbonnier, A S; Delerive, P; Fontaine, J; Staels, B; Pestel, J; Tonnel, A B; Trottein, F

    2001-10-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma ), a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily, has recently been described as a modulator of macrophage functions and as an inhibitor of T cell proliferation. Here, we investigated the role of PPARgamma in dendritic cells (DC), the most potent antigen-presenting cells. We showed that PPARgamma is highly expressed in immature human monocyte-derived DC (MDDC) and that it may affect the immunostimulatory function of MDDC stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or via CD40 ligand (CD40L). We found that the synthetic PPARgamma agonist rosiglitazone (as well as pioglitazone and troglitazone) significantly increases on LPS- and CD40L-activated MDDC, the surface expression of CD36 (by 184% and 104%, respectively) and CD86 (by 54% and 48%), whereas it reduces the synthesis of CD80 (by 42% and 42%). Moreover, activation of PPARgamma resulted in a dramatic decreased secretion of the Th1-promoting factor IL-12 in LPS- and CD40L-stimulated cells (by 47% and 62%), while the production of IL-1beta, TNF-alpha, IL-6 and IL-10 was unaffected. Finally, PPARgamma ligands down-modulate the synthesis of IFN-gamma -inducible protein-10 (recently termed as CXCL10) and RANTES (CCL5), both chemokines involved in the recruitment of Th1 lymphocytes (by 49% and 30%), but not the levels of the Th2 cell-attracting chemokines,macrophage-derived chemokine (CCL22) and thymus and activation regulated chemokine (CCL17), in mature MDDC. Taken together, our data suggest that activation of PPARgamma in human DC may have an impact in the orientation of primary and secondary immune responses by favoring type 2 responses.

  18. A novel T cell receptor single-chain signaling complex mediates antigen-specific T cell activity and tumor control

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Jennifer D.; Harris, Daniel T.; Soto, Carolina M.; Chervin, Adam S.; Aggen, David H.; Roy, Edward J.; Kranz, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of genetically modified T cells to treat cancer has shown promise in several clinical trials. Two main strategies have been applied to redirect T cells against cancer: 1) introduction of a full-length T cell receptor (TCR) specific for a tumor-associated peptide-MHC, or 2) introduction of a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR), including an antibody fragment specific for a tumor cell surface antigen, linked intracellularly to T cell signaling domains. Each strategy has advantages and disadvantages for clinical applications. Here, we present data on the in vitro and in vivo effectiveness of a single-chain signaling receptor incorporating a TCR variable fragment as the targeting element (referred to as TCR-SCS). This receptor contained a single-chain TCR (Vβ-linker-Vα) from a high-affinity TCR called m33, linked to the intracellular signaling domains of CD28 and CD3ζ. This format avoided mispairing with endogenous TCR chains, and mediated specific T cell activity when expressed in either CD4 or CD8 T cells. TCR-SCS-transduced CD8-negative cells showed an intriguing sensitivity, compared to full-length TCRs, to higher densities of less stable pepMHC targets. T cells that expressed this peptide-specific receptor persisted in vivo, and exhibited polyfunctional responses. Growth of metastatic antigen-positive tumors was significantly inhibited by T cells that expressed this receptor, and tumor cells that escaped were antigen loss variants. TCR-SCS receptors represent an alternative targeting receptor strategy that combines the advantages of single-chain expression, avoidance of TCR chain mispairing, and targeting of intracellular antigens presented in complex with MHC proteins. PMID:25082071

  19. Quantal concept of T-cell activation: adhesion domains as immunological synapses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sackmann, Erich

    2011-06-01

    Adhesion micro-domains (ADs) formed during encounters of lymphocytes with antigen-presenting cells (APC) mediate the genetic expression of quanta of cytokines interleukin-2 (IL-2). The IL-2-induced activation of IL-2 receptors promotes the stepwise progression of the T-cells through the cell cycle, hence their name, immunological synapses. The ADs form short-lived reaction centres controlling the recruitment of activators of the biochemical pathway (the kinases Lck and ZAP) while preventing the access of inhibitors (phosphatase CD45) through steric repulsion forces. CD45 acts as the generator of adhesion domains and, through its role as a spacer protein, also as the promoter of the reaction. In a second phase of T-cell-APC encounters, long-lived global reaction spaces (called supramolecular activation complexes (SMAC)) form by talin-mediated binding of the T-cell integrin (LFA-1) to the counter-receptor ICAM-1, resulting in the formation of ring-like tight adhesion zones (peripheral SMAC). The ADs move to the centre of the intercellular adhesion zone forming the central SMAC, which serve in the recycling of the AD. We propose that cell stimulation is triggered by integrating the effect evoked by the short-lived adhesion domains. Similar global reaction platforms are formed by killer cells to destruct APC. We present a testable mechanical model showing that global reaction spaces (SMAC or dome-like contacts between cytotoxic cells and APC) form by self-organization through delayed activation of the integrin-binding affinity and stabilization of the adhesion zones by F-actin recruitment. The mechanical stability and the polarization of the adhering T-cells are mediated by microtubule-actin cross-talk.

  20. [Active immunotherapy of prostate cancer with a focus on dendritic cells].

    PubMed

    Thomas-Kaskel, A K; Veelken, H

    2007-06-01

    Recurrent or metastatic prostate cancer is generally considered an incurable disease. Given the transient benefit from hormone deprivation therapy and limited successes of systemic chemotherapy, alternative treatment modalities are needed both in the situation of PSA recurrence and in hormone-refractory disease. Prostate cancer cells express several tumor associated antigens which are currently being evaluated as targets for active and specific immunotherapy approaches. Dendritic cells (DC) are the most powerful antigen-presenting cells (APC), able to prime naive T cells and to break peripheral tolerance and thus induce tumor immune responses. Close to 1000 prostate cancer patients have been treated with DC-based or other forms of active immunotherapy to date. Vaccination-induced immune responses have been reported in two thirds of DC trials, and favorable changes in the clinical course of the disease in almost half of the patients treated. Most responses, however, were modest and transient. Therefore, mechanisms of treatment failure and possibilities to improve vaccination efficacy are being discussed.

  1. SUPPRESSION OF BASAL AND CYTOKINE INDUCED EXPRESSION OF ANTIGEN PRESENTATION MARKERS ON MOUSE LUNG EPITHELIAL CELLS EXPOSED TO DIESEL EXHAUST PARTICLES.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Diesel exhaust particles (DEP) constitute a significant component of airborne particulates in urban environment. Exposure to DEP is known to enhance susceptibility to viral and bacterial infections. We hypothesized that DEP could partially exert its effect on disease susceptibili...

  2. Dendritic cells and immunotherapy for cancer.

    PubMed

    Chang, David H; Dhodapkar, Madhav V

    2003-06-01

    Dendritic cells, nature's adjuvant, are antigen-presenting cells specialized to initiate and regulate immunity. Their potent antigen-presenting function has encouraged targeting of dendritic cells (DCs) for harnessing the immune system against cancer. DCs are efficient at activating not only CD4+ helper T-cells and CD8+ killer T-cells but also B-cells and innate effectors such as natural killer and natural killer T-cells. Early studies of adoptive transfer of tumor antigen-loaded DCs have shown promise. However, DC vaccination is at an early stage, and several parameters still need to be established. The complexity of the DC system brings about the necessity for its rational manipulation for achieving protective and therapeutic immunity in patients.

  3. Differential activation of dendritic cells by toll-like receptors causes diverse differentiation of naïve CD4+ T cells from allergic patients

    PubMed Central

    Deifl, S.; Kitzmüller, C.; Steinberger, P.; Himly, M.; Jahn-Schmid, B.; Fischer, G. F.; Zlabinger, G. J.; Bohle, B.

    2014-01-01

    Background To avert the differentiation of allergen-specific Th2 cells in atopic individuals is a major goal in the prevention and therapy of IgE-mediated allergy. We aimed to compare different toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists regarding their effects on antigen-presenting cells and the differentiation of naïve T cells from allergic patients. Methods Monocytes and monocyte-derived dendritic cells (mdDC) from allergic patients were stimulated with Pam3CSK4 (TLR1/2 ligand), FSL-1 (TLR2/6 ligand), monophosphoryl lipid (MPL)-A, lipopolysaccharide (LPS, both TLR4 ligands), and flagellin (TLR5 ligand). Allergen uptake and upregulation of CD40, CD80, CD83, CD86, CD58, CCR7 and PD-L1 were analyzed by flow cytometry. Functional maturation of mdDC was tested in mixed leukocyte reactions, and the synthesis of proinflammatory cytokines, IL-10 and members of the IL-12 family was assessed. TLR-ligand-activated mdDC were used to stimulate naïve CD4+ T cells, and cytokine responses were assessed in supernatants and intracellularly. Results All TLR ligands except flagellin enhanced allergen uptake. All TLR ligands induced functional maturation of mdDC with differential expression of surface molecules and cytokines and promoted the differentiation of IFN-γ-producing T cells. LPS-matured mdDC exclusively induced Th1-like responses, whereas mdDC stimulated with the other TLR ligands induced both Th1- and Th0-like cells. Pam3CSK4 and flagellin additionally induced Th2-like cells. Th1-like responses were associated with higher expression levels of co-stimulatory molecules, PD-L1, IL-6, TNF-α, and IL-12p70. None of the TLR-ligand-stimulated mdDC induced IL-10- or IL-17-producing T cells. Conclusion Different TLR ligands differently influence T-cell responses due to varying activation of the three signals relevant for T-cell activation, that is, antigen presentation, co-stimulation and cytokine milieu. PMID:25093709

  4. Regulatory B cells inhibit cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) activity and elimination of infected CD4 T cells after in vitro reactivation of HIV latent reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Siewe, Basile; Wallace, Jennillee; Rygielski, Sonya; Stapleton, Jack T; Martin, Jeffrey; Deeks, Steven G; Landay, Alan

    2014-01-01

    During HIV infection, IL-10/IL-10 receptor and programmed death-1 (PD-1)/programmed death-1-ligand (PD-L1) interactions have been implicated in the impairment of cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) activity. Despite antiretroviral therapy (ART), attenuated anti-HIV CTL functions present a major hurdle towards curative measures requiring viral eradication. Therefore, deeper understanding of the mechanisms underlying impaired CTL is crucial before HIV viral eradication is viable. The generation of robust CTL activity necessitates interactions between antigen-presenting cells (APC), CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. We have shown that in vitro, IL-10hiPD-L1hi regulatory B cells (Bregs) directly attenuate HIV-specific CD8+-mediated CTL activity. Bregs also modulate APC and CD4+ T cell function; herein we characterize the Breg compartment in uninfected (HIVNEG), HIV-infected "elite controllers" (HIVEC), ART-treated (HIVART), and viremic (HIVvir), subjects, and in vitro, assess the impact of Bregs on anti-HIV CTL generation and activity after reactivation of HIV latent reservoirs using suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA). We find that Bregs from HIVEC and HIVART subjects exhibit comparable IL-10 expression levels significantly higher than HIVNEG subjects, but significantly lower than HIVVIR subjects. Bregs from HIVEC and HIVART subjects exhibit comparable PD-L1 expression, significantly higher than in HIVVIR and HIVNEG subjects. SAHA-treated Breg-depleted PBMC from HIVEC and HIVART subjects, displayed enhanced CD4+ T-cell proliferation, significant upregulation of antigen-presentation molecules, increased frequency of CD107a+ and HIV-specific CD8+ T cells, associated with efficient elimination of infected CD4+ T cells, and reduction in integrated viral DNA. Finally, IL-10-R and PD-1 antibody blockade partially reversed Breg-mediated inhibition of CD4+ T-cell proliferation. Our data suggest that, possibly, via an IL-10 and PD-L1 synergistic mechanism; Bregs likely inhibit APC function

  5. Activating and propagating polyclonal gamma delta T cells with broad specificity for malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Deniger, Drew C.; Maiti, Sourindra N.; Mi, Tiejuan; Switzer, Kirsten C.; Ramachandran, Vijaya; Hurton, Lenka V.; Ang, Sonny; Olivares, Simon; Rabinovich, Brian A.; Huls, Helen; Lee, Dean A.; Bast, Robert C.; Champlin, Richard E.; Cooper, Laurence J.N.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To activate and propagate populations of γδT cells expressing polyclonal repertoire of γ and δ TCR chains for adoptive immunotherapy for cancer, which has yet to be achieved. Experimental Design Clinical-grade artificial antigen presenting cells (aAPC) derived from K562 tumor cells were used as irradiated feeders to activate and expand human γδT cells to clinical scale. These cells were tested for proliferation, TCR expression, memory phenotype, cytokine secretion, and tumor killing. Results γδT cell proliferation was dependent upon CD137L expression on aAPC and addition of exogenous IL-2 and IL-21. Propagated γδT cells were polyclonal as they expressed Vδ1, Vδ2, Vδ3, Vδ5, Vδ7, and Vδ8 with Vγ2, Vγ3, Vγ7, Vγ8, Vγ9, Vγ10, and Vγ11 TCR chains. Interferon-γ production by Vδ1, Vδ2, and Vδ1negVδ2neg subsets was inhibited by pan-TCRγδantibody when added to co-cultures of polyclonal γδT cells and tumor cell lines. Polyclonal γδT cells killed acute and chronic leukemia, colon, pancreatic, and ovarian cancer cell lines, but not healthy autologous or allogeneic normal B cells. Blocking antibodies demonstrated that polyclonal γδT cells mediated tumor cell lysis through combination of DNAM1, NKG2D, and TCRγδ. The adoptive transfer of activated and propagated γδT cells expressing polyclonal versus defined Vδ TCR chains imparted a hierarchy (polyclonal>Vδ1>Vδ1negVδ2neg>Vδ2) of survival of mice with ovarian cancer xenografts. Conclusions Polyclonal γδT cells can be activated and propagated with clinical-grade aAPC and demonstrate broad anti-tumor activities, which will facilitate the implementation of γδT cell cancer immunotherapies in humans. PMID:24833662

  6. CD62L+ NKT cells have prolonged persistence and antitumor activity in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Gengwen; Courtney, Amy N.; Jena, Bipulendu; Heczey, Andras; Liu, Daofeng; Marinova, Ekaterina; Guo, Linjie; Xu, Xin; Torikai, Hiroki; Mo, Qianxing; Dotti, Gianpietro; Cooper, Laurence J.; Metelitsa, Leonid S.

    2016-01-01

    Vα24-invariant natural killer T cells (NKTs) localize to tumors and have inherent antitumor properties, making them attractive chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) carriers for redirected cancer immunotherapy. However, clinical application of CAR-NKTs has been impeded, as mechanisms responsible for NKT expansion and the in vivo persistence of these cells are unknown. Here, we demonstrated that antigen-induced expansion of primary NKTs in vitro associates with the accumulation of a CD62L+ subset and exhaustion of CD62L– cells. Only CD62L+ NKTs survived and proliferated in response to secondary stimulation. When transferred to immune-deficient NSG mice, CD62L+ NKTs persisted 5 times longer than CD62L– NKTs. Moreover, CD62L+ cells transduced with a CD19-specific CAR achieved sustained tumor regression in a B cell lymphoma model. Proliferating CD62L+ cells downregulated or maintained CD62L expression when activated via T cell receptor alone or in combination with costimulatory receptors. We generated HLAnull K562 cell clones that were engineered to express CD1d and costimulatory ligands. Clone B-8-2 (HLAnullCD1dmedCD86high4-1BBLmedOX40Lhigh) induced the highest rates of NKT expansion and CD62L expression. B-8-2–expanded CAR-NKTs exhibited prolonged in vivo persistence and superior therapeutic activities in models of lymphoma and neuroblastoma. Therefore, we have identified CD62L as a marker of a distinct NKT subset endowed with high proliferative potential and have developed artificial antigen-presenting cells that generate CD62L-enriched NKTs for effective cancer immunotherapy. PMID:27183388

  7. T-cell activation is accompanied by an ubiquitination process occurring at the immunological synapse.

    PubMed

    Wiedemann, Aurelie; Müller, Sabina; Favier, Benoit; Penna, Doris; Guiraud, Martine; Delmas, Christelle; Champagne, Eric; Valitutti, Salvatore

    2005-04-15

    The immunological synapse (IS) is a specialized signaling area formed at the contact site between T-cells and antigen-presenting cells (APC), where sustained engagement and signaling of TCR and accessory molecules occur. A key feature of T-cell antigen recognition is that the process of TCR/peptide-MHC interaction is self-limited by the internalization and degradation of triggered TCR and recruited signaling components. The mechanism of signaling component degradation involves their ubiquitination and targeting for degradation. Yet, the relationship between the ubiquitination process and TCR signaling as well as the cellular localization of TCR-induced ubiquitination are still elusive. In the present work, we visualize for the first time ubiquitination at the TCR signaling area. We show an enrichment of ubiquitin staining in TCR/CD3 caps in T-lymphocytes stimulated by anti-CD3 antibodies. Remarkably, we also show the recruitment of the ubiquitin ligase Cbl-b and a significant ubiquitination at the immunological synapse in antigen-stimulated T-cells. Our results identify the immunological synapse as the cellular area where TCR-induced protein ubiquitination occurs. They imply that the synapse is a specialized site where the activation process is not only triggered, but also controlled via ubiquitination of signaling actors.

  8. Induction of antigen-specific regulatory T lymphocytes by human dendritic cells expressing the glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper.

    PubMed

    Hamdi, Haifa; Godot, Véronique; Maillot, Marie-Christine; Prejean, Maria Victoria; Cohen, Nicolas; Krzysiek, Roman; Lemoine, François M; Zou, Weiping; Emilie, Dominique

    2007-07-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) determine whether antigen presentation leads to immune activation or to tolerance. Tolerance-inducing DCs (also called regulatory DCs) act partly by generating regulatory T lymphocytes (Tregs). The mechanism used by DCs to switch toward regulatory DCs during their differentiation is unclear. We show here that human DCs treated in vitro with glucocorticoids produce the glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper (GILZ). Antigen presentation by GILZ-expressing DCs generates CD25(high)FOXP3(+)CTLA-4/CD152(+) and interleukin-10-producing Tregs inhibiting the response of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes. This inhibition is specific to the antigen presented, and only proliferating CD4(+) T lymphocytes express the Treg markers. Interleukin-10 is required for Treg induction by GILZ-expressing DCs. It is also needed for the suppressive function of Tregs. Antigen-presenting cells from patients treated with glucocorticoids generate interleukin-10-secreting Tregs ex vivo. These antigen-presenting cells produce GILZ, which is needed for Treg induction. Therefore, GILZ is critical for commitment of DCs to differentiate into regulatory DCs and to the generation of antigen-specific Tregs. This mechanism may contribute to the therapeutic effects of glucocorticoids.

  9. Inhibition of human dendritic cell activation by hydroethanolic but not lipophilic extracts of turmeric (Curcuma longa).

    PubMed

    Krasovsky, Joseph; Chang, David H; Deng, Gary; Yeung, Simon; Lee, Mavis; Leung, Ping Chung; Cunningham-Rundles, Susanna; Cassileth, Barrie; Dhodapkar, Madhav V

    2009-03-01

    Turmeric has been extensively utilized in Indian and Chinese medicine for its immune-modulatory properties. Dendritic cells (DCs) are antigen-presenting cells specialized to initiate and regulate immunity. The ability of DCs to initiate immunity is linked to their activation status. The effects of turmeric on human DCs have not been studied. Here we show that hydroethanolic (HEE) but not lipophilic "supercritical" extraction (SCE) of turmeric inhibits the activation of human DCs in response to inflammatory cytokines. Treatment of DCs with HEE also inhibits the ability of DCs to stimulate the mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR). Importantly, the lipophilic fraction does not synergize with the hydroethanolic fraction for the ability of inhibiting DC maturation. Rather, culturing of DCs with the combination of HEE and SCE leads to partial abrogation of the effects of HEE on the MLR initiated by DCs. These data provide a mechanism for the anti-inflammatory properties of turmeric. However, they suggest that these extracts are not synergistic and may contain components with mutually antagonistic effects on human DCs. Harnessing the immune effects of turmeric may benefit from specifically targeting the active fractions.

  10. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase regulates N-Ras activation on the Golgi complex of antigen-stimulated T cells

    PubMed Central

    Ibiza, Sales; Pérez-Rodríguez, Andrea; Ortega, Ángel; Martínez-Ruiz, Antonio; Barreiro, Olga; García-Domínguez, Carlota A.; Víctor, Víctor M.; Esplugues, Juan V.; Rojas, José M.; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco; Serrador, Juan M.

    2008-01-01

    Ras/ERK signaling plays an important role in T cell activation and development. We recently reported that endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS)-derived NO regulates T cell receptor (TCR)-dependent ERK activation by a cGMP-independent mechanism. Here, we explore the mechanisms through which eNOS exerts this regulation. We have found that eNOS-derived NO positively regulates Ras/ERK activation in T cells stimulated with antigen on antigen-presenting cells (APCs). Intracellular activation of N-, H-, and K-Ras was monitored with fluorescent probes in T cells stably transfected with eNOS-GFP or its G2A point mutant, which is defective in activity and cellular localization. Using this system, we demonstrate that eNOS selectively activates N-Ras but not K-Ras on the Golgi complex of T cells engaged with APC, even though Ras isoforms are activated in response to NO from donors. We further show that activation of N-Ras involves eNOS-dependent S-nitrosylation on Cys118, suggesting that upon TCR engagement, eNOS-derived NO directly activates N-Ras on the Golgi. Moreover, wild-type but not C118S N-Ras increased TCR-dependent apoptosis, suggesting that S-nitrosylation of Cys118 contributes to activation-induced T cell death. Our data define a signaling mechanism for the regulation of the Ras/ERK pathway based on the eNOS-dependent differential activation of N-Ras and K-Ras at specific cell compartments. PMID:18641128

  11. Identification of a novel inducible cell-surface ligand of CD5 on activated lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    CD5 is a 67-kD glycoprotein that is expressed on most T lymphocytes and on a subset of mature B cells. Although its physiologic function is unknown, several lines of evidence suggest that CD5 may play a role in the regulation of T cell activation and in T cell-antigen presenting cell interactions. Using a CD5-immunoglobulin fusion protein (CD5Rg, for receptorglobulin) we have uncovered a new CD5 ligand (CD5L) expressed on the surface of activated splenocytes. Stimulation of murine splenocytes with anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 antibodies induce transient expression of CD5L on B lymphocytes that lasts for approximately 72 h. Binding of CD5Rg to activated splenocytes is trypsin resistant and independent of divalent cations. However, it is pronase sensitive and dependent on N-linked glycosylation of CD5, since treatment of CD5Rg with PNGaseF on N-glycanase completely abrogates its ability to bind activated splenocytes. It addition to splenocytes, CD5L is expressed on activated murine T cell clones. Immunoprecipitation, antibody, and recombinant protein blocking studies indicate that CD5L is distinct from CD72, which has been proposed to be a CD5 ligand. To determine whether CD5-CD5L interaction might play a role in vivo, we tested the effect of CD5Rg in a murine model of antibody-mediated membranous glomerulonephritis. Injection of CD5Rg was found to abrogate development of the disease. Taken together, our results help identify a novel ligand of CD5 and propose a role for CD5 in the regulation of immune responses. PMID:9064341

  12. Rapid Cell-Based Assay for Detection and Quantification of Active Staphylococcal Enterotoxin Type D.

    PubMed

    Rasooly, Reuven; Do, Paula M; Hernlem, Bradley J

    2017-03-01

    Food poisoning by Staphylococcus aureus is a result of ingestion of Staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEs) produced by this bacterium and is a major source of foodborne illness. Staphylococcal enterotoxin D (SED) is one of the predominant enterotoxins recovered in Staphylococcal food poisoning incidences, including a recent outbreak in Guam affecting 300 children. Current immunology methods for SED detection cannot distinguish between the biologically active form of the toxin, which poses a threat, from the inactive form, which poses no threat. In vivo bioassays that measure emetic activity in kitten and monkeys have been used, but these methods rely upon expensive procedures using live animals and raising ethical concerns. A rapid (5 h) quantitative bioluminescence assay, using a genetically engineered T-cell Jurkat cell line expressing luciferase under regulation of nuclear factor of activated T cells response elements, in combination with the lymphoblastoid B-cell line Raji for antigen presentation, was developed. In this assay, the detection limit of biologically active SED is 100 ng/mL, which is 10 times more sensitive than the splenocyte proliferation assay, and 10(5) times more sensitive than monkey or kitten bioassay. Pasteurization or repeated freeze-thaw cycles had no effect on SED activity, but reduction in SED activity was shown with heat treatment at 100°C for 5 min. It was also shown that milk exhibits a protective effect on SED. This bioluminescence assay may also be used to rapidly evaluate antibodies to SED for potential therapeutic application as a measurement of neutralizing biological effects of SED.

  13. Viral Evasion of Natural Killer Cell Activation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yi; Li, Xiaojuan; Kuang, Ersheng

    2016-04-12

    Natural killer (NK) cells play a key role in antiviral innate defenses because of their abilities to kill infected cells and secrete regulatory cytokines. Additionally, NK cells exhibit adaptive memory-like antigen-specific responses, which represent a novel antiviral NK cell defense mechanism. Viruses have evolved various strategies to evade the recognition and destruction by NK cells through the downregulation of the NK cell activating receptors. Here, we review the recent findings on viral evasion of NK cells via the impairment of NK cell-activating receptors and ligands, which provide new insights on the relationship between NK cells and viral actions during persistent viral infections.

  14. Lack of MHC class I surface expression on neoplastic cells and poor activation of the secretory pathway of cytotoxic cells in oral squamous cell carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, I; Meijer, C J L M; Walboomers, J M M; Snijders, P J F; Waal, I Van der

    1999-01-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) and natural killer (NK) cells use the secretory pathway of perforin/granzymes to kill their target cells. In contrast to NK cells, CTL responses are MHC class I restricted. In this study we analysed the relative activation of CTL and NK cells in relation with MHC class I expression on oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCCs). MHC class I expression was investigated in 47 OSCCs by immunohistochemistry using HCA2, HC10 and β2-m antibodies. The presence of CTLs, NK cells, and its activation, was investigated in 21 of these OSCCs using respectively, CD8, CD57 and GrB7 antibodies. The Q-Prodit measuring system was used for quantification of cytotoxic cells. All OSCCs showed weak or absent staining of β2-m on the cell surface. The absence of β2-m was significantly associated with absent expression of MHC class I heavy chain as detected by HC10 antibody (P = 0.004). In tumour infiltrates CTLs always outnumbered NK cells, as reflected by the ratio CD57/CD8 being always inferior to one (mean: 0.19; SD: 0.15). The proportion of activated cytotoxic cells as detected by granzyme B expression was generally low (mean: 8.6%; SD 8.9). A clear correlation between MHC class I expression and the relative proportion of NK cells/CTLs was not found. This study shows that the majority of OSCCs show weak or absent expression of MHC class I molecules on the cell surface, possibly due to alterations in the normal β2-m pathway. The low proportion of granzyme B-positive CTLs/NK cells indicates that the secretory pathway of cytotoxicity is poor in these patients. The lack of correlation between MHC class I expression and CTL/NK cell activation as detected by granzyme B expression suggests that, next to poor antigen presentation, also local factors seem to determine the final outcome of the cytotoxic immune response. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10555762

  15. Acute GVHD in patients receiving IL-15/4-1BBL activated NK cells following T-cell–depleted stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Nirali N.; Baird, Kristin; Delbrook, Cynthia P.; Fleisher, Thomas A.; Kohler, Mark E.; Rampertaap, Shakuntala; Lemberg, Kimberly; Hurley, Carolyn K.; Kleiner, David E.; Merchant, Melinda S.; Pittaluga, Stefania; Sabatino, Marianna; Stroncek, David F.; Wayne, Alan S.; Zhang, Hua; Fry, Terry J.

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells can enhance engraftment and mediate graft-versus-leukemia following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), but the potency of graft-versus-leukemia mediated by naturally reconstituting NK cells following HSCT is limited. Preclinical studies demonstrate that activation of NK cells using interleukin-15 (IL-15) plus 4-1BBL upregulates activating receptor expression and augments killing capacity. In an effort to amplify the beneficial effects of NK cells post-HSCT, we conducted a first-in-human trial of adoptive transfer of donor-derived IL-15/4-1BBL–activated NK cells (aNK-DLI) following HLA-matched, T-cell–depleted (1-2 × 104 T cells/kg) nonmyeloablative peripheral blood stem cell transplantation in children and young adults with ultra-high-risk solid tumors. aNK-DLI were CD3+-depleted, CD56+-selected lymphocytes, cultured for 9 to 11 days with recombinant human IL-15 plus 4-1BBL+IL-15Rα+ artificial antigen-presenting cells. aNK-DLI demonstrated potent killing capacity and displayed high levels of activating receptor expression. Five of 9 transplant recipients experienced acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) following aNK-DLI, with grade 4 GVHD observed in 3 subjects. GVHD was more common in matched unrelated donor vs matched sibling donor recipients and was associated with higher donor CD3 chimerism. Given that the T-cell dose was below the threshold required for GVHD in this setting, we conclude that aNK-DLI contributed to the acute GVHD observed, likely by augmenting underlying T-cell alloreactivity. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT01287104. PMID:25452614

  16. Rare Event Simulation for T-cell Activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipsmeier, Florian; Baake, Ellen

    2009-02-01

    The problem of statistical recognition is considered, as it arises in immunobiology, namely, the discrimination of foreign antigens against a background of the body's own molecules. The precise mechanism of this foreign-self-distinction, though one of the major tasks of the immune system, continues to be a fundamental puzzle. Recent progress has been made by van den Berg, Rand, and Burroughs (J. Theor. Biol. 209:465-486, 2001), who modelled the probabilistic nature of the interaction between the relevant cell types, namely, T-cells and anti