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Sample records for activate cre-dependent cyclin

  1. Nerve growth factor enhances the CRE-dependent transcriptional activity activated by nobiletin in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Takito, Jiro; Kimura, Junko; Kajima, Koji; Uozumi, Nobuyuki; Watanabe, Makoto; Yokosuka, Akihito; Mimaki, Yoshihiro; Nakamura, Masanori; Ohizumi, Yasushi

    2016-07-01

    Prevention and treatment of Alzheimer disease are urgent problems for elderly people in developed countries. We previously reported that nobiletin, a poly-methoxylated flavone from the citrus peel, improved the symptoms in various types of animal models of memory loss and activated the cAMP responsive element (CRE)-dependent transcription in PC12 cells. Nobiletin activated the cAMP/PKA/MEK/Erk/MAPK signaling pathway without using the TrkA signaling activated by nerve growth factor (NGF). Here, we examined the effect of combination of nobiletin and NGF on the CRE-dependent transcription in PC12 cells. Although NGF alone had little effect on the CRE-dependent transcription, NGF markedly enhanced the CRE-dependent transcription induced by nobiletin. The NGF-induced enhancement was neutralized by a TrkA antagonist, K252a. This effect of NGF was effective on the early signaling event elicited by nobiletin. These results suggested that there was crosstalk between NGF and nobiletin signaling in activating the CRE-dependent transcription in PC12 cells.

  2. Cre-dependent DNA recombination activates a STING-dependent innate immune response

    PubMed Central

    Pépin, Geneviève; Ferrand, Jonathan; Höning, Klara; Jayasekara, W. Samantha N.; Cain, Jason E.; Behlke, Mark A.; Gough, Daniel J.; G. Williams, Bryan R.; Hornung, Veit; Gantier, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    Gene-recombinase technologies, such as Cre/loxP-mediated DNA recombination, are important tools in the study of gene function, but have potential side effects due to damaging activity on DNA. Here we show that DNA recombination by Cre instigates a robust antiviral response in mammalian cells, independent of legitimate loxP recombination. This is due to the recruitment of the cytosolic DNA sensor STING, concurrent with Cre-dependent DNA damage and the accumulation of cytoplasmic DNA. Importantly, we establish a direct interplay between this antiviral response and cell–cell interactions, indicating that low cell densities in vitro could be useful to help mitigate these effects of Cre. Taking into account the wide range of interferon stimulated genes that may be induced by the STING pathway, these results have broad implications in fields such as immunology, cancer biology, metabolism and stem cell research. Further, this study sets a precedent in the field of gene-engineering, possibly applicable to other enzymatic-based genome editing technologies. PMID:27166376

  3. Imaging Activity in Neurons and Glia with a Polr2a-based and Cre-dependent GCaMP5G-IRES-tdTomato Reporter Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Gee, J. Michael; Smith, Nathan A.; Fernandez, Fernando R.; Economo, Michael N.; Brunert, Daniela; Rothermel, Markus; Morris, S. Craig; Talbot, Amy; Palumbos, Sierra; Ichida, Jennifer M.; Shepherd, Jason D.; West, Peter J.; Wachowiak, Matt; Capecchi, Mario R.; Wilcox, Karen S.; White, John A.; Tvrdik, Petr

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY New strategies for introducing genetically encoded activity indicators into animal models facilitate the investigation of nervous system function. We have developed the PC::G5-tdT mouse line that expresses the GCaMP5G calcium indicator in a Cre-dependent fashion. Instead of targeting the ROSA26 locus, we inserted the reporter cassette nearby the ubiquitously expressed Polr2a gene without disrupting locus integrity. The indicator was tagged with IRES-tdTomato to aid detection of positive cells. This reporter system is effective in a wide range of developmental and cellular contexts. We recorded spontaneous cortical calcium waves in intact awake newborns and evaluated concentration-dependent responses to odorants in the adult olfactory bulb. Moreover, PC::G5-tdT effectively reports intracellular calcium dynamics in somas and fine processes of astrocytes and microglial cells. Through electrophysiological and behavioral analyses, we determined that GCaMP5G expression had no major impact on nervous system performance. PC::G5-tdT will be instrumental for a variety of brain mapping experiments. PMID:25155958

  4. Cyclin activation of p34cdc2.

    PubMed

    Solomon, M J; Glotzer, M; Lee, T H; Philippe, M; Kirschner, M W

    1990-11-30

    The gradual accumulation of cyclin in the frog egg induces an abrupt and concerted activation of p34cdc2 that initiates mitosis. Activation is delayed even after the accumulation of cyclin to a critical threshold concentration. We have reproduced these unusual kinetic properties of p34cdc2 activation in vitro using bacterially expressed cyclin proteins and extracts derived from Xenopus eggs. Abrupt activation follows a lag period, the length of which is independent of the concentration of cyclin. The threshold concentration of cyclin and the length of the lag period are regulated by INH, an inhibitor of MPF activation in oocytes recently identified as a type 2A protein phosphatase. Binding to cyclin induces both tyrosine and threonine phosphorylation of the previously unphosphorylated p34cdc2, rendering it inactivated. The concerted transition into mitosis involves both a reduction in the rate of p34cdc2 phosphorylation on tyrosine and an increase in its rate of dephosphorylation.

  5. CREB-2, a Cellular CRE-Dependent Transcription Repressor, Functions in Association with Tax as an Activator of the Human T-Cell Leukemia Virus Type 1 Promoter

    PubMed Central

    Gachon, Frederic; Peleraux, Annick; Thebault, Sabine; Dick, Joelle; Lemasson, Isabelle; Devaux, Christian; Mesnard, Jean-Michel

    1998-01-01

    The Tax protein of the human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) has been implicated in human T-cell immortalization. The primary function of Tax is to transcriptionally activate the HTLV-1 promoter, but Tax is also known to stimulate expression of cellular genes. It has been reported to associate with several transcription factors, as well as proteins not involved in transcription. To better characterize potential cellular targets of Tax present in infected cells, a Saccharomyces cerevisiae two-hybrid screening was performed with a cDNA library constructed from the HTLV-1-infected MT2 cell line. From this study, we found 158 positive clones representing seven different cDNAs. We focused our attention on the cDNA encoding the transcription factor CREB-2. CREB-2 is an unconventional member of the ATF/CREB family in that it lacks a protein kinase A (PKA) phosphorylation site and has been reported to negatively regulate transcription from the cyclic AMP response element of the human enkephalin promoter. In this study, we demonstrate that CREB-2 cooperates with Tax to enhance viral transcription and that its basic-leucine zipper C-terminal domain is required for both in vitro and in vivo interactions with Tax. Our results confirm that the activation of the HTLV-1 promoter through Tax and factors of the ATF/CREB family is PKA independent. PMID:9733879

  6. Phosphate-Activated Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Stabilizes G1 Cyclin To Trigger Cell Cycle Entry

    PubMed Central

    Menoyo, S.; Ricco, N.; Bru, S.; Hernández-Ortega, S.; Escoté, X.; Aldea, M.

    2013-01-01

    G1 cyclins, in association with a cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK), are universal activators of the transcriptional G1-S machinery during entry into the cell cycle. Regulation of cyclin degradation is crucial for coordinating progression through the cell cycle, but the mechanisms that modulate cyclin stability to control cell cycle entry are still unknown. Here, we show that a lack of phosphate downregulates Cln3 cyclin and leads to G1 arrest in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The stability of Cln3 protein is diminished in strains with low activity of Pho85, a phosphate-sensing CDK. Cln3 is an in vitro substrate of Pho85, and both proteins interact in vivo. More interestingly, cells that carry a CLN3 allele encoding aspartic acid substitutions at the sites of Pho85 phosphorylation maintain high levels of Cln3 independently of Pho85 activity. Moreover, these cells do not properly arrest in G1 in the absence of phosphate and they die prematurely. Finally, the activity of Pho85 is essential for accumulating Cln3 and for reentering the cell cycle after phosphate refeeding. Taken together, our data indicate that Cln3 is a molecular target of the Pho85 kinase that is required to modulate cell cycle entry in response to environmental changes in nutrient availability. PMID:23339867

  7. Phosphate-activated cyclin-dependent kinase stabilizes G1 cyclin to trigger cell cycle entry.

    PubMed

    Menoyo, S; Ricco, N; Bru, S; Hernández-Ortega, S; Escoté, X; Aldea, M; Clotet, J

    2013-04-01

    G1 cyclins, in association with a cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK), are universal activators of the transcriptional G1-S machinery during entry into the cell cycle. Regulation of cyclin degradation is crucial for coordinating progression through the cell cycle, but the mechanisms that modulate cyclin stability to control cell cycle entry are still unknown. Here, we show that a lack of phosphate downregulates Cln3 cyclin and leads to G1 arrest in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The stability of Cln3 protein is diminished in strains with low activity of Pho85, a phosphate-sensing CDK. Cln3 is an in vitro substrate of Pho85, and both proteins interact in vivo. More interestingly, cells that carry a CLN3 allele encoding aspartic acid substitutions at the sites of Pho85 phosphorylation maintain high levels of Cln3 independently of Pho85 activity. Moreover, these cells do not properly arrest in G1 in the absence of phosphate and they die prematurely. Finally, the activity of Pho85 is essential for accumulating Cln3 and for reentering the cell cycle after phosphate refeeding. Taken together, our data indicate that Cln3 is a molecular target of the Pho85 kinase that is required to modulate cell cycle entry in response to environmental changes in nutrient availability.

  8. Design of a novel class of peptide inhibitors of cyclin-dependent kinase/cyclin activation.

    PubMed

    Gondeau, Claire; Gerbal-Chaloin, Sabine; Bello, Paul; Aldrian-Herrada, Gudrun; Morris, May C; Divita, Gilles

    2005-04-08

    Cyclin dependent kinases (CDKs) are key regulators of the cell cycle progression and therefore constitute excellent targets for the design of anticancer agents. Most of the inhibitors identified to date inhibit kinase activity by interfering with the ATP-binding site of CDKs. We recently proposed that the protein/protein interface and conformational changes required in the molecular mechanism of CDK2-cyclin A activation were potential targets for the design of specific inhibitors of cell cycle progression. To this aim, we have designed and characterized a small peptide, termed C4, derived from amino acids 285-306 in the alpha5 helix of cyclin A. We demonstrate that this peptide does not interfere with complex formation but forms stable complexes with CDK2-cyclin A. The C4 peptide significantly inhibits kinase activity of complexes harboring CDK2 in a competitive fashion with respect to substrates but does not behave as an ATP antagonist. Moreover, when coupled with the protein transduction domain of Tat, the C4 peptide blocks the proliferation of tumor cell lines, thereby constituting a potent lead for the development of specific CDK-cyclin inhibitors.

  9. Regulation of small GTPase activity by G1 cyclins.

    PubMed

    Pedraza, Neus; Cemeli, Tània; Monserrat, Ma Ventura; Garí, Eloi; Ferrezuelo, Francisco

    2017-01-27

    Together with a cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) partner G1 cyclins control cell cycle entry by phosphorylating a number of nuclear targets and releasing a transcriptional program at the end of G1 phase. Yeast G1 cyclins also operate on cytoplasmic targets involved in the polarization of the cytoskeleton and vesicle trafficking. These processes are mainly controlled by the small GTPase Cdc42, and G1 cyclins regulate the activity of this and other small GTPases through the modulation of their regulators and effectors. This regulation is key for different developmental outcomes in unicellular organisms. In mammalian cells cytoplasmic G1 cyclin D1 has been shown to promote the activity of Rac1 and Ral GTPases and to block RhoA. Regulation of these small GTPases by G1 cyclins may constitute a mechanism to coordinate proliferation with cell migration and morphogenesis, important processes not only during normal development and organogenesis but also for tumor formation and metastasis. Here we briefly review the evidence supporting a role of G1 cyclins and CDKs as regulators of the activity of small GTPases, emphasizing their functional relevance both in budding yeast and in mammalian cells.

  10. The SET protein regulates G2/M transition by modulating cyclin B-cyclin-dependent kinase 1 activity.

    PubMed

    Canela, Núria; Rodriguez-Vilarrupla, Aina; Estanyol, Josep Maria; Diaz, Carmen; Pujol, María Jesús; Agell, Neus; Bachs, Oriol

    2003-01-10

    The SET protein and the cell cycle inhibitor p21(Cip1) interact in vivo and in vitro. We identified here the domain (157)LIF(159) of p21(Cip1) as essential for the binding of SET. We also found that SET contains at least two domains of interaction with p21(Cip1), one located in the fragment amino acids 81-180 and the other one in the fragment including amino acids 181-277. SET and p21(Cip1) co-localize in the cell nucleus in a temporal manner. Overexpression of SET blocks the cell cycle at the G(2)/M transition in COS and HCT116 cells. Moreover, SET inhibits cyclin B-CDK1 activity both in vivo and in vitro in both cell types. This effect is specific for these complexes since SET did not inhibit either cyclin A-CDK2 or cyclin E-CDK2 complexes. SET and p21(Cip1) cooperate in the inhibition of cyclin B-CDK1 activity. The inhibitory effect of SET resides in its acidic C terminus, as demonstrated by the ability of this domain to inhibit cyclin B-CDK1 activity and by the lack of blocking G(2)/M transition when a mutated form of SET lacking this C terminus domain was overexpressed in COS cells. These results indicate that SET might regulate G(2)/M transition by modulating cyclin B-CDK1 activity.

  11. Activation of cyclin A-dependent protein kinases during apoptosis.

    PubMed Central

    Meikrantz, W; Gisselbrecht, S; Tam, S W; Schlegel, R

    1994-01-01

    Apoptosis was induced in S-phase-arrested HeLa cells by staurosporine, caffeine, 6-dimethylaminopurine, and okadaic acid, agents that activate M-phase-promoting factor and induce premature mitosis in similarly treated hamster cell lines. Addition of these agents to asynchronously growing HeLa cells or to cells arrested in early G1 phase with lovastatin had little or no effect. S-phase arrest also promoted tumor necrosis factor alpha-induced apoptosis, eliminating the normal requirement for simultaneous cycloheximide treatment. For all of the apoptosis-inducing agents tested, the appearance of condensed chromatin was accompanied by 2- to 7-fold increases in cyclin A-associated histone H1 kinase activity, levels approximating the mitotic value. Where examined, both Cdc2 and Cdk2, the catalytic subunits known to associate with cyclin A, were activated. Stable overexpression of bcl-2 suppressed the apoptosis-inducing activity of all agents tested and reduced the amount of Cdc2 and Cdk2 in the nucleus, suggesting a possible mechanism by which bcl-2 inhibits the chromatin condensation characteristic of apoptosis. These findings suggest that at least one of the biochemical steps required for mitosis, activation of cyclin A-dependent protein kinases, is also an important event during apoptosis. Images PMID:8170983

  12. Genetically Targeted All-Optical Electrophysiology with a Transgenic Cre-Dependent Optopatch Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Shan; Adam, Yoav; Weinstein, Eli N.; Williams, Erika; Williams, Katherine; Parot, Vicente; Kavokine, Nikita; Liberles, Stephen; Madisen, Linda; Zeng, Hongkui

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in optogenetics have enabled simultaneous optical perturbation and optical readout of membrane potential in diverse cell types. Here, we develop and characterize a Cre-dependent transgenic Optopatch2 mouse line that we call Floxopatch. The animals expressed a blue-shifted channelrhodopsin, CheRiff, and a near infrared Archaerhodopsin-derived voltage indicator, QuasAr2, via targeted knock-in at the rosa26 locus. In Optopatch-expressing animals, we tested for overall health, genetically targeted expression, and function of the optogenetic components. In offspring of Floxopatch mice crossed with a variety of Cre driver lines, we observed spontaneous and optically evoked activity in vitro in acute brain slices and in vivo in somatosensory ganglia. Cell-type-specific expression allowed classification and characterization of neuronal subtypes based on their firing patterns. The Floxopatch mouse line is a useful tool for fast and sensitive characterization of neural activity in genetically specified cell types in intact tissue. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Optical recordings of neural activity offer the promise of rapid and spatially resolved mapping of neural function. Calcium imaging has been widely applied in this mode, but is insensitive to the details of action potential waveforms and subthreshold events. Simultaneous optical perturbation and optical readout of single-cell electrical activity (“Optopatch”) has been demonstrated in cultured neurons and in organotypic brain slices, but not in acute brain slices or in vivo. Here, we describe a transgenic mouse in which expression of Optopatch constructs is controlled by the Cre-recombinase enzyme. This animal enables fast and robust optical measurements of single-cell electrical excitability in acute brain slices and in somatosensory ganglia in vivo, opening the door to rapid optical mapping of neuronal excitability. PMID:27798186

  13. Cyclin B1–Cdk1 Activation Continues after Centrosome Separation to Control Mitotic Progression

    PubMed Central

    Lindqvist, Arne; van Zon, Wouter; Karlsson Rosenthal, Christina; Wolthuis, Rob M. F

    2007-01-01

    Activation of cyclin B1–cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1), triggered by a positive feedback loop at the end of G2, is the key event that initiates mitotic entry. In metaphase, anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome–dependent destruction of cyclin B1 inactivates Cdk1 again, allowing mitotic exit and cell division. Several models describe Cdk1 activation kinetics in mitosis, but experimental data on how the activation proceeds in mitotic cells have largely been lacking. We use a novel approach to determine the temporal development of cyclin B1–Cdk1 activity in single cells. By quantifying both dephosphorylation of Cdk1 and phosphorylation of the Cdk1 target anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome 3, we disclose how cyclin B1–Cdk1 continues to be activated after centrosome separation. Importantly, we discovered that cytoplasmic cyclin B1–Cdk1 activity can be maintained even when cyclin B1 translocates to the nucleus in prophase. These experimental data are fitted into a model describing cyclin B1–Cdk1 activation in human cells, revealing a striking resemblance to a bistable circuit. In line with the observed kinetics, cyclin B1–Cdk1 levels required to enter mitosis are lower than the amount of cyclin B1–Cdk1 needed for mitotic progression. We propose that gradually increasing cyclin B1–Cdk1 activity after centrosome separation is critical to coordinate mitotic progression. PMID:17472438

  14. Cyclin D1 repression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma expression and transactivation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chenguang; Pattabiraman, Nagarajan; Zhou, Jian Nian; Fu, Maofu; Sakamaki, Toshiyuki; Albanese, Chris; Li, Zhiping; Wu, Kongming; Hulit, James; Neumeister, Peter; Novikoff, Phyllis M; Brownlee, Michael; Scherer, Philipp E; Jones, Joan G; Whitney, Kathleen D; Donehower, Lawrence A; Harris, Emily L; Rohan, Thomas; Johns, David C; Pestell, Richard G

    2003-09-01

    The cyclin D1 gene is overexpressed in human breast cancers and is required for oncogene-induced tumorigenesis. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR gamma) is a nuclear receptor selectively activated by ligands of the thiazolidinedione class. PPAR gamma induces hepatic steatosis, and liganded PPAR gamma promotes adipocyte differentiation. Herein, cyclin D1 inhibited ligand-induced PPAR gamma function, transactivation, expression, and promoter activity. PPAR gamma transactivation induced by the ligand BRL49653 was inhibited by cyclin D1 through a pRB- and cdk-independent mechanism, requiring a region predicted to form an helix-loop-helix (HLH) structure. The cyclin D1 HLH region was also required for repression of the PPAR gamma ligand-binding domain linked to a heterologous DNA binding domain. Adipocyte differentiation by PPAR gamma-specific ligands (BRL49653, troglitazone) was enhanced in cyclin D1(-/-) fibroblasts and reversed by retroviral expression of cyclin D1. Homozygous deletion of the cyclin D1 gene, enhanced expression by PPAR gamma ligands of PPAR gamma and PPAR gamma-responsive genes, and cyclin D1(-/-) mice exhibit hepatic steatosis. Finally, reduction of cyclin D1 abundance in vivo using ponasterone-inducible cyclin D1 antisense transgenic mice, increased expression of PPAR gamma in vivo. The inhibition of PPAR gamma function by cyclin D1 is a new mechanism of signal transduction cross talk between PPAR gamma ligands and mitogenic signals that induce cyclin D1.

  15. The assembly, activation, and substrate specificity of Cyclin D1/Cdk2 complexes

    PubMed Central

    Jahn, Stephan C.; Law, Mary E.; Corsino, Patrick E.; Rowe, Thomas C.; Davis, Bradley J.; Law, Brian K.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have shown conflicting data regarding Cyclin D1/Cdk2 complexes and, considering the widespread overexpression of Cyclin D1 in cancer, it is important to fully understand their relevance. While many have shown Cyclin D1/Cdk2 complexes to form active complexes, others have failed to show activity or association. Here, using a novel p21-PCNA fusion protein as well as p21 mutant proteins, we show that p21 is a required scaffolding protein, with Cyclin D1 and Cdk2 failing to complex in its absence. These p21/Cyclin D1/Cdk2 complexes are active and also bind the trimeric PCNA complex, with each trimer capable of independently binding distinct Cyclin/Cdk complexes. We also show that increased p21 levels due to treatment with chemotherapeutic agents result in increased formation and kinase activity of Cyclin D1/Cdk2 complexes, and that Cyclin D1/Cdk2 complexes are able to phosphorylate a number of substrates in addition to Rb. Nucleophosmin and Cdh1, two proteins important for centrosome replication and implicated in the chromosomal instability of cancer are shown to be phosphorylated by Cyclin D1/Cdk2 complexes. Additionally, PSF is identified as a novel Cdk2 substrate, being phosphorylated by Cdk2 complexed with either Cyclin E or Cyclin D1, and given the many functions of PSF, it could have important implications on cellular activity. PMID:23627734

  16. Cyclin D1 represses peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha and inhibits fatty acid oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Hanse, Eric A.; Mashek, Douglas G.; Mashek, Mara T.; Hendrickson, Anna M.; Mullany, Lisa K.; Albrecht, Jeffrey H.

    2016-01-01

    Cyclin D1 is a cell cycle protein that promotes proliferation by mediating progression through key checkpoints in G1 phase. It is also a proto-oncogene that is commonly overexpressed in human cancers. In addition to its canonical role in controlling cell cycle progression, cyclin D1 affects other aspects of cell physiology, in part through transcriptional regulation. In this study, we find that cyclin D1 inhibits the activity of a key metabolic transcription factor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα), a member of nuclear receptor family that induces fatty acid oxidation and may play an anti-neoplastic role. In primary hepatocytes, cyclin D1 inhibits PPARα transcriptional activity and target gene expression in a cdk4-independent manner. In liver and breast cancer cells, knockdown of cyclin D1 leads to increased PPARα transcriptional activity, expression of PPARα target genes, and fatty acid oxidation. Similarly, cyclin D1 depletion enhances binding of PPARα to target sequences by chromatin immunoprecipitation. In proliferating hepatocytes and regenerating liver in vivo, induction of endogenous cyclin D1 is associated with diminished PPARα activity. Cyclin D1 expression is both necessary and sufficient for growth factor-mediated repression of fatty acid oxidation in proliferating hepatocytes. These studies indicate that in addition to playing a pivotal role in cell cycle progression, cyclin D1 represses PPARα activity and inhibits fatty acid oxidation. Our findings establish a new link between cyclin D1 and metabolism in both tumor cells and physiologic hepatocyte proliferation. PMID:27351284

  17. Cyclin D1 represses peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha and inhibits fatty acid oxidation.

    PubMed

    Kamarajugadda, Sushama; Becker, Jennifer R; Hanse, Eric A; Mashek, Douglas G; Mashek, Mara T; Hendrickson, Anna M; Mullany, Lisa K; Albrecht, Jeffrey H

    2016-07-26

    Cyclin D1 is a cell cycle protein that promotes proliferation by mediating progression through key checkpoints in G1 phase. It is also a proto-oncogene that is commonly overexpressed in human cancers. In addition to its canonical role in controlling cell cycle progression, cyclin D1 affects other aspects of cell physiology, in part through transcriptional regulation. In this study, we find that cyclin D1 inhibits the activity of a key metabolic transcription factor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα), a member of nuclear receptor family that induces fatty acid oxidation and may play an anti-neoplastic role. In primary hepatocytes, cyclin D1 inhibits PPARα transcriptional activity and target gene expression in a cdk4-independent manner. In liver and breast cancer cells, knockdown of cyclin D1 leads to increased PPARα transcriptional activity, expression of PPARα target genes, and fatty acid oxidation. Similarly, cyclin D1 depletion enhances binding of PPARα to target sequences by chromatin immunoprecipitation. In proliferating hepatocytes and regenerating liver in vivo, induction of endogenous cyclin D1 is associated with diminished PPARα activity. Cyclin D1 expression is both necessary and sufficient for growth factor-mediated repression of fatty acid oxidation in proliferating hepatocytes. These studies indicate that in addition to playing a pivotal role in cell cycle progression, cyclin D1 represses PPARα activity and inhibits fatty acid oxidation. Our findings establish a new link between cyclin D1 and metabolism in both tumor cells and physiologic hepatocyte proliferation.

  18. Constitutively active K-cyclin/cdk6 kinase in Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus-infected cells.

    PubMed

    Van Dross, Rukiyah; Yao, Shan; Asad, Shaheena; Westlake, Grant; Mays, Deborah J; Barquero, Laura; Duell, Stephanie; Pietenpol, Jennifer A; Browning, Philip J

    2005-05-04

    Kaposi sarcoma-associated human herpesvirus (KSHV) encodes K-cyclin, a homologue of D-type cellular cyclins, which binds cyclin-dependent kinases to phosphorylate various substrates. K-cyclin/cdk phosphorylates a subset of substrates normally targeted by cyclins D, E, and A. We used cells naturally infected with KSHV to further characterize the biochemical features of K-cyclin. We used immunoprecipitation with K-cyclin antibodies to examine the association of K-cyclin with cdk2, cdk6, p21Cip1, and p27Kip1 proteins in BC3 cells. We separated populations of BC3 cells enriched in cells in G1, S, or G2/M phases by elutriation and measured K-cyclin protein and the kinase activity of K-cyclin/cdk6 complexes. The half-life of K-cyclin and cyclin D2 proteins was determined by blocking protein synthesis with cycloheximide and measuring proteins in cell lysates by western blot analysis. We fused the entire K-cyclin sequence to the carboxyl-terminal sequence of cellular cyclin D that contains the PEST degradation sequence to produce K-cyclin/D2 and transfected K-cyclin/D2 into K-cyclin-negative cells to investigate the effect of the PEST sequence on K-cyclin's stability. Viral K-cyclin interacted with cyclin-dependent kinases cdk2, cdk4, and cdk6 and with the cyclin/cdk inhibitory proteins p21Cip1 and p27Kip1 in BC3 cell lysates. Unlike D-type cyclins, whose expression is cell cycle dependent, the level of K-cyclin was stable throughout the cell cycle, and the kinase associated with the K-cyclin/cdk6 complex was constitutively active. The half-life of K-cyclin (6.9 hours) was much longer than that of cellular cyclin D2 (0.6 hour) and that of K-cyclin/D2 (0.5 hour), probably because K-cyclin lacks the PEST degradation sequence present in D-type cyclins. The constitutive activation of K-cyclin/cdk complexes in KSHV-infected cells appears to result from the extended half-life of K-cyclin and may explain its role in Kaposi sarcoma.

  19. The cyclosome, a large complex containing cyclin-selective ubiquitin ligase activity, targets cyclins for destruction at the end of mitosis.

    PubMed Central

    Sudakin, V; Ganoth, D; Dahan, A; Heller, H; Hershko, J; Luca, F C; Ruderman, J V; Hershko, A

    1995-01-01

    The ubiquitin-mediated degradation of mitotic cyclins is required for cells to exit from mitosis. Previous work with cell-free systems has revealed four components required for cyclin-ubiquitin ligation and proteolysis: a nonspecific ubiquitin-activating enzyme E1, a soluble fraction containing a ubiquitin carrier protein activity called E2-C, a crude particulate fraction containing a ubiquitin ligase (E3) activity that is activated during M-phase, and a constitutively active 26S proteasome that degrades ubiquitinated proteins. Here, we identify a novel approximately 1500-kDa complex, termed the cyclosome, which contains a cyclin-selective ubiquitin ligase activity, E3-C. E3-C is present but inactive during interphase; it can be activated in vitro by the addition of cdc2, enabling the transfer of ubiquitin from E2-C to cyclin. The kinetics of E3-C activation suggest the existence of one or more intermediates between cdc2 and E3-C. Cyclosome-associated E3-C acts on both cyclin A and B, and requires the presence of wild-type N-terminal destruction box motifs in each cyclin. Ubiquitinated cyclins are then rapidly recognized and degraded by the proteasome. These results identify the cyclosome-associated E3-C as the component of the cyclin destruction machinery whose activity is ultimately regulated by cdc2 and, as such, the element directly responsible for setting mitotic cyclin levels during early embryonic cell cycles. Images PMID:7787245

  20. Cyclin E constrains Cdk5 activity to regulate synaptic plasticity and memory formation.

    PubMed

    Odajima, Junko; Wills, Zachary P; Ndassa, Yasmine M; Terunuma, Miho; Kretschmannova, Karla; Deeb, Tarek Z; Geng, Yan; Gawrzak, Sylwia; Quadros, Isabel M; Newman, Jennifer; Das, Manjusri; Jecrois, Marie E; Yu, Qunyan; Li, Na; Bienvenu, Frederic; Moss, Stephen J; Greenberg, Michael E; Marto, Jarrod A; Sicinski, Piotr

    2011-10-18

    Cyclin E is a component of the core cell cycle machinery, and it drives cell proliferation by regulating entry and progression of cells through the DNA synthesis phase. Cyclin E expression is normally restricted to proliferating cells. However, high levels of cyclin E are expressed in the adult brain. The function of cyclin E in quiescent, postmitotic nervous system remains unknown. Here we use a combination of in vivo quantitative proteomics and analyses of cyclin E knockout mice to demonstrate that in terminally differentiated neurons cyclin E forms complexes with Cdk5 and controls synapse function by restraining Cdk5 activity. Ablation of cyclin E led to a decreased number of synapses, reduced number and volume of dendritic spines, and resulted in impaired synaptic plasticity and memory formation in cyclin E-deficient animals. These results reveal a cell cycle-independent role for a core cell cycle protein, cyclin E, in synapse function and memory. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Cyclin F suppresses B-Myb activity to promote cell cycle checkpoint control.

    PubMed

    Klein, Ditte Kjærsgaard; Hoffmann, Saskia; Ahlskog, Johanna K; O'Hanlon, Karen; Quaas, Marianne; Larsen, Brian D; Rolland, Baptiste; Rösner, Heike I; Walter, David; Kousholt, Arne Nedergaard; Menzel, Tobias; Lees, Michael; Johansen, Jens Vilstrup; Rappsilber, Juri; Engeland, Kurt; Sørensen, Claus Storgaard

    2015-01-05

    Cells respond to DNA damage by activating cell cycle checkpoints to delay proliferation and facilitate DNA repair. Here, to uncover new checkpoint regulators, we perform RNA interference screening targeting genes involved in ubiquitylation processes. We show that the F-box protein cyclin F plays an important role in checkpoint control following ionizing radiation. Cyclin F-depleted cells initiate checkpoint signalling after ionizing radiation, but fail to maintain G2 phase arrest and progress into mitosis prematurely. Importantly, cyclin F suppresses the B-Myb-driven transcriptional programme that promotes accumulation of crucial mitosis-promoting proteins. Cyclin F interacts with B-Myb via the cyclin box domain. This interaction is important to suppress cyclin A-mediated phosphorylation of B-Myb, a key step in B-Myb activation. In summary, we uncover a regulatory mechanism linking the F-box protein cyclin F with suppression of the B-Myb/cyclin A pathway to ensure a DNA damage-induced checkpoint response in G2.

  2. The structure of cyclin E1/CDK2: implications for CDK2 activation and CDK2-independent roles.

    PubMed

    Honda, Reiko; Lowe, Edward D; Dubinina, Elena; Skamnaki, Vicky; Cook, Atlanta; Brown, Nick R; Johnson, Louise N

    2005-02-09

    Cyclin E, an activator of phospho-CDK2 (pCDK2), is important for cell cycle progression in metazoans and is frequently overexpressed in cancer cells. It is essential for entry to the cell cycle from G0 quiescent phase, for the assembly of prereplication complexes and for endoreduplication in megakaryotes and giant trophoblast cells. We report the crystal structure of pCDK2 in complex with a truncated cyclin E1 (residues 81-363) at 2.25 A resolution. The N-terminal cyclin box fold of cyclin E1 is similar to that of cyclin A and promotes identical changes in pCDK2 that lead to kinase activation. The C-terminal cyclin box fold shows significant differences from cyclin A. It makes additional interactions with pCDK2, especially in the region of the activation segment, and contributes to CDK2-independent binding sites of cyclin E. Kinetic analysis with model peptide substrates show a 1.6-fold increase in kcat for pCDK2/cyclin E1 (81-363) over kcat of pCDK2/cyclin E (full length) and pCDK2/cyclin A. The structural and kinetic results indicate no inherent substrate discrimination between pCDK2/cyclin E and pCDK2/cyclin A with model substrates.

  3. Monosynaptic circuit tracing in vivo through Cre-dependent targeting and complementation of modified rabies virus.

    PubMed

    Wall, Nicholas R; Wickersham, Ian R; Cetin, Ali; De La Parra, Mauricio; Callaway, Edward M

    2010-12-14

    We describe a powerful system for revealing the direct monosynaptic inputs to specific cell types in Cre-expressing transgenic mice through the use of Cre-dependent helper virus and a modified rabies virus. We generated helper viruses that target gene expression to Cre-expressing cells, allowing us to control initial rabies virus infection and subsequent monosynaptic retrograde spread. Investigators can use this system to elucidate the connections onto a desired cell type in a high-throughput manner, limited only by the availability of Cre mouse lines. This method allows for identification of circuits that would be extremely tedious or impossible to study with other methods and can be used to build subcircuit maps of inputs onto many different types of cells within the same brain region. Furthermore, by expressing various transgenes from the rabies genome, this system also has the potential to allow manipulation of targeted neuronal circuits without perturbing neighboring cells.

  4. Cyclin B Translation Depends on mTOR Activity after Fertilization in Sea Urchin Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Boulben, Sandrine; Glippa, Virginie; Morales, Julia; Cormier, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    The cyclin B/CDK1 complex is a key regulator of mitotic entry. Using PP242, a specific ATP-competitive inhibitor of mTOR kinase, we provide evidence that the mTOR signalling pathway controls cyclin B mRNA translation following fertilization in Sphaerechinus granularis and Paracentrotus lividus. We show that PP242 inhibits the degradation of the cap-dependent translation repressor 4E-BP (eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-Binding Protein). PP242 inhibits global protein synthesis, delays cyclin B accumulation, cyclin B/CDK1 complex activation and consequently entry into the mitotic phase of the cell cycle triggered by fertilization. PP242 inhibits cyclin B mRNA recruitment into active polysomes triggered by fertilization. An amount of cyclin B mRNA present in active polysomes appears to be insensitive to PP242 treatment. Taken together, our results suggest that, following sea urchin egg fertilization, cyclin B mRNA translation is controlled by two independent mechanisms: a PP242-sensitive and an additional PP242-insentitive mechanism. PMID:26962866

  5. Cyclin B Translation Depends on mTOR Activity after Fertilization in Sea Urchin Embryos.

    PubMed

    Chassé, Héloïse; Mulner-Lorillon, Odile; Boulben, Sandrine; Glippa, Virginie; Morales, Julia; Cormier, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    The cyclin B/CDK1 complex is a key regulator of mitotic entry. Using PP242, a specific ATP-competitive inhibitor of mTOR kinase, we provide evidence that the mTOR signalling pathway controls cyclin B mRNA translation following fertilization in Sphaerechinus granularis and Paracentrotus lividus. We show that PP242 inhibits the degradation of the cap-dependent translation repressor 4E-BP (eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-Binding Protein). PP242 inhibits global protein synthesis, delays cyclin B accumulation, cyclin B/CDK1 complex activation and consequently entry into the mitotic phase of the cell cycle triggered by fertilization. PP242 inhibits cyclin B mRNA recruitment into active polysomes triggered by fertilization. An amount of cyclin B mRNA present in active polysomes appears to be insensitive to PP242 treatment. Taken together, our results suggest that, following sea urchin egg fertilization, cyclin B mRNA translation is controlled by two independent mechanisms: a PP242-sensitive and an additional PP242-insentitive mechanism.

  6. Efficient soluble expression of active recombinant human cyclin A2 mediated by E. coli molecular chaperones.

    PubMed

    Grigoroudis, Asterios I; McInnes, Campbell; Premnath, Padmavathy Nandha; Kontopidis, George

    2015-09-01

    Bacterial expression of human proteins continues to present a critical challenge in protein crystallography and drug design. While human cyclin A constructs have been extensively characterized in complex with cyclin dependent kinase 2 (CDK2), efforts to express the monomeric human cyclin A2 in Escherichia coli in a stable form, without the kinase subunit, have been laden with technical difficulties, including solubility, yield and purity. Here, optimized conditions are described with the aim of generating for first time, sufficient quantities of human recombinant cyclin A2 in a soluble and active form for crystallization and ligand characterization purposes. The studies involve implementation of a His-tagged heterologous expression system under conditions of auto-induction and mediated by molecular chaperone-expressing plasmids. A high yield of human cyclin A2 was obtained in natively folded and soluble form, through co-expression with groups of molecular chaperones from E. coli in various combinations. A one-step affinity chromatography method was utilized to purify the fusion protein products to homogeneity, and the biological activity confirmed through ligand-binding affinity to inhibitory peptides, representing alternatives for the key determinants of the CDK2 substrate recruitment site on the cyclin regulatory subunit. As a whole, obtaining the active cyclin A without the CDK partner (referred to as monomeric in this work) in a straightforward and facile manner will obviate protein--production issues with the CDK2/cyclin A complex and enable drug discovery efforts for non-ATP competitive CDK inhibition through the cyclin groove. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Efficient Soluble Expression of Active Recombinant Human Cyclin A2 Mediated by E. coli Molecular Chaperones

    PubMed Central

    Grigoroudis, Asterios I.; McInnes, Campbell; Premnath, Padmavathy Nandha; Kontopidis, George

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial expression of human proteins continues to present a critical challenge in protein crystallography and drug design. While human cyclin A constructs have been extensively characterized in complex with cyclin dependent kinase 2 (CDK2), efforts to express the monomeric human cyclin A2 in Escherichia coli in a stable form, without the kinase subunit, have been laden with technical difficulties, including solubility, yield and purity. Here, optimized conditions are described with the aim of generating for first time, sufficient quantities of human recombinant cyclin A2 in a soluble and active form for crystallization and ligand characterization purposes. The studies involve implementation of a His-tagged heterologous expression system under conditions of auto-induction and mediated by molecular chaperone-expressing plasmids. A high yield of human cyclin A2 was obtained in natively folded and soluble form, through co-expression with groups of molecular chaperones from E. coli in various combinations. A one-step affinity chromatography method was utilized to purify the fusion protein products to homogeneity, and the biological activity confirmed through ligand-binding affinity to inhibitory peptides, representing alternatives for the key determinants of the CDK2 substrate recruitment site on the cyclin regulatory subunit. As a whole, obtaining the active cyclin A without the CDK partner (referred as monomeric in this work) in a straightforward and facile manner will obviate protein –production issues with the CDK2/cyclin A complex and enable drug discovery efforts for non-ATP competitive CDK inhibition through the cyclin groove. PMID:25956535

  8. Reversible phosphorylation controls the activity of cyclosome-associated cyclin-ubiquitin ligase.

    PubMed Central

    Lahav-Baratz, S; Sudakin, V; Ruderman, J V; Hershko, A

    1995-01-01

    Cyclin B/cdc2 is responsible both for driving cells into mitosis and for activating the ubiquitin-dependent degradation of mitotic cyclins near the end of mitosis, an event required for the completion of mitosis and entry into interphase of the next cell cycle. Previous work with cell-free extracts of rapidly dividing clam embryos has identified two specific components required for the ubiquitination of mitotic cyclins: E2-C, a cyclin-selective ubiquitin carrier protein that is constitutively active during the cell cycle, and E3-C, a cyclin-selective ubiquitin ligase that purifies as part of a approximately 1500-kDa complex, termed the cyclosome, and which is active only near the end of mitosis. Here, we have separated the cyclosome from its ultimate upstream activator, cdc2. The mitotic, active form of the cyclosome can be inactivated by incubation with a partially purified, endogenous okadaic acid-sensitive phosphatase; addition of cdc2 restores activity to the cyclosome after a lag that reproduces that seen previously in intact cells and in crude extracts. These results demonstrate that activity of cyclin-ubiquitin ligase is controlled by reversible phosphorylation of the cyclosome complex. Images Fig. 3 PMID:7568122

  9. The N-terminal domains of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitory proteins block the phosphorylation of cdk2/Cyclin E by the CDK-activating kinase.

    PubMed

    Rank, K B; Evans, D B; Sharma, S K

    2000-05-10

    It has been suggested that binding of p27 and p21 kinase inhibitory proteins (KIPs) to cyclin-dependent kinases (cdks) render them inaccessible to cdk-activating kinase (CAK), presumably by steric hindrance by the C-terminal residues. However, this common mechanism of inhibition is inconsistent with the known structural divergence in the p27 and p21 C-terminal domains. Therefore, we studied the direct binding of N-terminal minimal domain of p27 (amino acids 28-81) to cdk2/cyclin E. An unlabeled p27 minimal domain, mutated in the N-terminal LFG motif, was unable to compete with a labeled minimal domain for binding to cdk2/cyclin E. The p27 and its minimal domain inhibited CAK-mediated phosphorylation of cdk2/cyclin E. This inhibitory effect was significantly diminished with p27 minimal domain mutated in the LFG motif. A synthetic peptide, ACRRLFGPVDSE, from the N-terminal residues 17-28 of p21, was also a potent inhibitor of CAK-mediated cdk2/cyclin E phosphorylation. Taken together, these results show that anchoring of p27 or p21 KIPs to cyclin E via the N-terminal LFG-containing motif can block CAK access to its cdk2/cyclin E substrate.

  10. Binding Activity Prediction of Cyclin-Dependent Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Saha, Indrajit; Rak, Benedykt; Bhowmick, Shib Sankar; Maulik, Ujjwal; Bhattacharjee, Debotosh; Koch, Uwe; Lazniewski, Michal; Plewczynski, Dariusz

    2015-07-27

    The Cyclin-Dependent Kinases (CDKs) are the core components coordinating eukaryotic cell division cycle. Generally the crystal structure of CDKs provides information on possible molecular mechanisms of ligand binding. However, reliable and robust estimation of ligand binding activity has been a challenging task in drug design. In this regard, various machine learning techniques, such as Support Vector Machine, Naive Bayesian classifier, Decision Tree, and K-Nearest Neighbor classifier, have been used. The performance of these heterogeneous classification techniques depends on proper selection of features from the data set. This fact motivated us to propose an integrated classification technique using Genetic Algorithm (GA), Rotational Feature Selection (RFS) scheme, and Ensemble of Machine Learning methods, named as the Genetic Algorithm integrated Rotational Ensemble based classification technique, for the prediction of ligand binding activity of CDKs. This technique can automatically find the important features and the ensemble size. For this purpose, GA encodes the features and ensemble size in a chromosome as a binary string. Such encoded features are then used to create diverse sets of training points using RFS in order to train the machine learning method multiple times. The RFS scheme works on Principal Component Analysis (PCA) to preserve the variability information of the rotational nonoverlapping subsets of original data. Thereafter, the testing points are fed to the different instances of trained machine learning method in order to produce the ensemble result. Here accuracy is computed as a final result after 10-fold cross validation, which also used as an objective function for GA to maximize. The effectiveness of the proposed classification technique has been demonstrated quantitatively and visually in comparison with different machine learning methods for 16 ligand binding CDK docking and rescoring data sets. In addition, the best possible features

  11. v-Src Oncogene Induces Trop2 Proteolytic Activation via Cyclin D1.

    PubMed

    Ju, Xiaoming; Jiao, Xuanmao; Ertel, Adam; Casimiro, Mathew C; Di Sante, Gabriele; Deng, Shengqiong; Li, Zhiping; Di Rocco, Agnese; Zhan, Tingting; Hawkins, Adam; Stoyanova, Tanya; Andò, Sebastiano; Fatatis, Alessandro; Lisanti, Michael P; Gomella, Leonard G; Languino, Lucia R; Pestell, Richard G

    2016-11-15

    Proteomic analysis of castration-resistant prostate cancer demonstrated the enrichment of Src tyrosine kinase activity in approximately 90% of patients. Src is known to induce cyclin D1, and a cyclin D1-regulated gene expression module predicts poor outcome in human prostate cancer. The tumor-associated calcium signal transducer 2 (TACSTD2/Trop2/M1S1) is enriched in the prostate, promoting prostate stem cell self-renewal upon proteolytic activation via a γ-secretase cleavage complex (PS1, PS2) and TACE (ADAM17), which releases the Trop2 intracellular domain (Trop2 ICD). Herein, v-Src transformation of primary murine prostate epithelial cells increased the proportion of prostate cancer stem cells as characterized by gene expression, epitope characteristics, and prostatosphere formation. Cyclin D1 was induced by v-Src, and Src kinase induction of Trop2 ICD nuclear accumulation required cyclin D1. Cyclin D1 induced abundance of the Trop2 proteolytic cleavage activation components (PS2, TACE) and restrained expression of the inhibitory component of the Trop2 proteolytic complex (Numb). Patients with prostate cancer with increased nuclear Trop2 ICD and cyclin D1, and reduced Numb, had reduced recurrence-free survival probability (HR = 4.35). Cyclin D1, therefore, serves as a transducer of v-Src-mediated induction of Trop2 ICD by enhancing abundance of the Trop2 proteolytic activation complex. Cancer Res; 76(22); 6723-34. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  12. Telomerase activates transcription of cyclin D1 gene through an interaction with NOL1.

    PubMed

    Hong, Juyeong; Lee, Ji Hoon; Chung, In Kwon

    2016-04-15

    Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein enzyme that is required for the maintenance of telomere repeats. Although overexpression of telomerase in normal human somatic cells is sufficient to overcome replicative senescence, the ability of telomerase to promote tumorigenesis requires additional activities that are independent of its role in telomere extension. Here, we identify proliferation-associated nucleolar antigen 120 (NOL1, also known as NOP2) as a telomerase RNA component (TERC)-binding protein that is found in association with catalytically active telomerase. Although NOL1 is highly expressed in the majority of human tumor cells, the molecular mechanism by which NOL1 contributes to tumorigenesis remained unclear. We show that NOL1 binds to the T-cell factor (TCF)-binding element of the cyclin D1 promoter and activates its transcription. Interestingly, telomerase is also recruited to the cyclin D1 promoter in a TERC-dependent manner through the interaction with NOL1, further enhancing transcription of the cyclin D1 gene. Depletion of NOL1 suppresses cyclin D1 promoter activity, thereby leading to induction of growth arrest and altered cell cycle distributions. Collectively, our findings suggest that NOL1 represents a new route by which telomerase activates transcription of cyclin D1 gene, thus maintaining cell proliferation capacity. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  13. Cyclin A2 Mutagenesis Analysis: A New Insight into CDK Activation and Cellular Localization Requirements

    PubMed Central

    Bendris, Nawal; Lemmers, Bénédicte; Blanchard, Jean-Marie; Arsic, Nikola

    2011-01-01

    Cyclin A2 is essential at two critical points in the somatic cell cycle: during S phase, when it activates CDK2, and during the G2 to M transition when it activates CDK1. Based on the crystal structure of Cyclin A2 in association with CDKs, we generated a panel of mutants to characterize the specific amino acids required for partner binding, CDK activation and subcellular localization. We find that CDK1, CDK2, p21, p27 and p107 have overlapping but distinct requirements for association with this protein. Our data highlight the crucial importance of the N-terminal α helix, in conjunction with the α3 helix within the cyclin box, in activating CDK. Several Cyclin A2 mutants selectively bind to either CDK1 or CDK2. We demonstrate that association of Cyclin A2 to proteins such as CDK2 that was previously suggested as crucial is not a prerequisite for its nuclear localization, and we propose that the whole protein structure is involved. PMID:21829545

  14. Cyclin A2 mutagenesis analysis: a new insight into CDK activation and cellular localization requirements.

    PubMed

    Bendris, Nawal; Lemmers, Bénédicte; Blanchard, Jean-Marie; Arsic, Nikola

    2011-01-01

    Cyclin A2 is essential at two critical points in the somatic cell cycle: during S phase, when it activates CDK2, and during the G2 to M transition when it activates CDK1. Based on the crystal structure of Cyclin A2 in association with CDKs, we generated a panel of mutants to characterize the specific amino acids required for partner binding, CDK activation and subcellular localization. We find that CDK1, CDK2, p21, p27 and p107 have overlapping but distinct requirements for association with this protein. Our data highlight the crucial importance of the N-terminal α helix, in conjunction with the α3 helix within the cyclin box, in activating CDK. Several Cyclin A2 mutants selectively bind to either CDK1 or CDK2. We demonstrate that association of Cyclin A2 to proteins such as CDK2 that was previously suggested as crucial is not a prerequisite for its nuclear localization, and we propose that the whole protein structure is involved.

  15. Cycloheximide-induced activation of mouse eggs: effects on cdc2/cyclin B and MAP kinase activities.

    PubMed

    Moos, J; Kopf, G S; Schultz, R M

    1996-04-01

    Fertilization of metaphase II-arrested mouse eggs results in resumption of meiosis and a decrease in both cdc2/cyclin B kinase and MAP kinase activities; the decrease in cdc2/cyclin B kinase activity precedes the decrease in MAP kinase activity. Cycloheximide treatment of metaphase II-arrested mouse eggs also results in resumption of meiosis but bypasses the fertilization-induced Ca2+ transient. However, it is not known if cycloheximide treatment results in the same temporal changes in cdc2/cyclin B kinase and MAP kinase activities that are intimately associated with resumption of meiosis. We report that cycloheximide-treated mouse eggs manifest similar temporal changes in the decrease in both cdc2/cyclin B kinase and MAP kinase activities that occur following fertilization, although cortical granule exocytosis is not stimulated. The decrease in cdc2/cyclin B kinase activity, however, does not seem to be required for the decrease in MAP kinase activity, since the decrease in MAP kinase activity still occurs in cycloheximide-treated eggs that are also incubated in the presence of nocodazole, which inhibits cyclin B degradation and hence the decrease in cdc2/cyclin B kinase. Following removal of these drugs, cdc2/cyclin B kinase activity remains high, MAP kinase activity increases to levels similar to that in the metaphase II-arrested eggs, and a spindle(s) forms with the chromosomes aligned on a metaphase plate. Results of these experiments suggest that some other protein with a relatively short half-life, e.g. cmos, a known upstream activator of MAP kinase, may be responsible for events leading to the decrease in MAP kinase activity.

  16. Cyclin D activates the Rb tumor suppressor by mono-phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Narasimha, Anil M; Kaulich, Manuel; Shapiro, Gary S; Choi, Yoon J; Sicinski, Piotr; Dowdy, Steven F

    2014-06-04

    The widely accepted model of G1 cell cycle progression proposes that cyclin D:Cdk4/6 inactivates the Rb tumor suppressor during early G1 phase by progressive multi-phosphorylation, termed hypo-phosphorylation, to release E2F transcription factors. However, this model remains unproven biochemically and the biologically active form(s) of Rb remains unknown. In this study, we find that Rb is exclusively mono-phosphorylated in early G1 phase by cyclin D:Cdk4/6. Mono-phosphorylated Rb is composed of 14 independent isoforms that are all targeted by the E1a oncoprotein, but show preferential E2F binding patterns. At the late G1 Restriction Point, cyclin E:Cdk2 inactivates Rb by quantum hyper-phosphorylation. Cells undergoing a DNA damage response activate cyclin D:Cdk4/6 to generate mono-phosphorylated Rb that regulates global transcription, whereas cells undergoing differentiation utilize un-phosphorylated Rb. These observations fundamentally change our understanding of G1 cell cycle progression and show that mono-phosphorylated Rb, generated by cyclin D:Cdk4/6, is the only Rb isoform in early G1 phase.

  17. Direct activation of cyclin-dependent kinase 2 by human papillomavirus E7.

    PubMed

    He, Wanxia; Staples, Doug; Smith, Clark; Fisher, Chris

    2003-10-01

    Addition of human papillomavirus (HPV) E7 CDK2/cyclin A or CDK2/cyclin E, purified from either insect cells or bacteria, dramatically upregulates histone H1 kinase activity. Activation is substrate specific, with a smaller effect noted for retinoblastoma protein (Rb). The CDK2 stimulatory activity is equivalent in high-risk (HPV type 16 [HPV16] and HPV31) and low-risk (HPV6b) E7. Mutational analyses of HPV16 E7 indicate that the major activity resides in amino acids 9 to 38, spanning CR1 and CR2, and does not require casein kinase II or Rb-binding domain functions. Synthetic peptides spanning HPV16 amino acid residues 9 to 38 also activate CDK2. Peptides containing this sequence that carry biotin on the carboxy terminus, as well as a photoactivated cross-linking group (benzophenone), also activate the complex and covalently associate with the CDK2/cyclin A complex in a specific manner requiring UV. Cross-linking studies that use protein monomers detect association of the E7 peptides with cyclin A but not CDK2. Together, our results indicate a novel mechanism whereby E7 promotes HPV replication by directly altering CDK2 activity and substrate specificity.

  18. Cyclin I-like (CCNI2) is a cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) activator and is involved in cell cycle regulation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chengcheng; Zhai, Xiaoyan; Zhao, Bin; Wang, Yanfei; Xu, Zhigang

    2017-01-01

    In contrast to conventional cyclin-dependent kinases that are important for mitotic cell division, cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) is predominantly activated in post-mitotic cells and is involved in various cellular events. The kinase activity of CDK5 is tightly regulated by specific activators including p35, p39, and cyclin I (CCNI). Here we show that cyclin I-like (CCNI2), a homolog of CCNI, interacts with CDK5 and activates the kinase activity of CDK5. Different from CCNI, which colocalizes with CDK5 in the nuclei in transfected cells, CCNI2 mainly retains CDK5 in the cytoplasm as well as on the cell membrane. Furthermore, although the expression level of CCNI2 mRNA and CCNI2 protein do not change significantly during cell cycle, depletion of CCNI2 with siRNA affects cell cycle progression as well as cell proliferation. In conclusion, our data strongly suggest that CCNI2 is a novel CDK5 activator and is involved in cell cycle regulation. PMID:28112194

  19. Pesticide Roundup provokes cell division dysfunction at the level of CDK1/cyclin B activation.

    PubMed

    Marc, Julie; Mulner-Lorillon, Odile; Boulben, Sandrine; Hureau, Dorothée; Durand, Gaël; Bellé, Robert

    2002-03-01

    To assess human health risk from environmental chemicals, we have studied the effect on cell cycle regulation of the widely used glyphosate-containing pesticide Roundup. As a model system we have used sea urchin embryonic first divisions following fertilization, which are appropriate for the study of universal cell cycle regulation without interference with transcription. We show that 0.8% Roundup (containing 8 mM glyphosate) induces a delay in the kinetic of the first cell cleavage of sea urchin embryos. The delay is dependent on the concentration of Roundup. The delay in the cell cycle could be induced using increasing glyphosate concentrations (1-10 mM) in the presence of a subthreshold concentration of Roundup 0.2%, while glyphosate alone was ineffective, thus indicating synergy between glyphosate and Roundup formulation products. The effect of Roundup was not lethal and involved a delay in entry into M-phase of the cell cycle, as judged cytologically. Since CDK1/cyclin B regulates universally the M-phase of the cell cycle, we analyzed CDK1/cyclin B activation during the first division of early development. Roundup delayed the activation of CDK1/cyclin B in vivo. Roundup inhibited also the global protein synthetic rate without preventing the accumulation of cyclin B. In summary, Roundup affects cell cycle regulation by delaying activation of the CDK1/cyclin B complex, by synergic effect of glyphosate and formulation products. Considering the universality among species of the CDK1/cyclin B regulator, our results question the safety of glyphosate and Roundup on human health.

  20. Characterization of a new family of cyclin-dependent kinase activators

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Progression through the cell cycle is regulated by CDKs (cyclin-dependent kinases), which associate with activating partners, named cyclins, to efficiently phosphorylate substrates. We previously reported the identification of RINGO, a Xenopus protein that can activate CDK1 and CDK2 despite lack of sequence similarity to cyclins, which plays a role in the regulation of the meiotic cell cycle in oocytes. In the present study we report the characterization of four mammalian RINGO proteins, which are 53–68% identical with Xenopus RINGO in a central core of about 75 residues. We show that all RINGO family members can bind to and activate CDK1 and CDK2, albeit with different efficiencies, but they do not bind to CDK4 or CDK6. The core RINGO sequences are critical for CDK activation. We also identified key residues in CDK2 that are required for RINGO binding. All RINGO proteins can also bind the CDK inhibitor p27Kip1, but with an inverse efficiency of their ability to bind to CDK1. Our results identify a new family of mammalian proteins that can activate CDKs and therefore potentially function as cell cycle regulators. The ability of RINGO proteins to activate CDK1 and CDK2 suggest also cyclin-independent roles for these kinases. PMID:15574121

  1. Mitochondrial Ribosomal Protein L10 Associates with Cyclin B1/Cdk1 Activity and Mitochondrial Function

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hai-Bo; Wang, Ruo-Xi; Jiang, Hai-Bo; Zhang, En-dong; Tan, Jie-Qiong; Xu, Hui-Zhuo

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial ribosomal proteins are important for mitochondrial-encoded protein synthesis and mitochondrial function. In addition to their roles in mitoribosome assembly, several mitochondrial ribosome proteins are also implicated in cellular processes like cell cycle regulation, apoptosis, and mitochondrial homeostasis regulation. Here, we demonstrate that MRPL10 regulates cyclin B1/Cdk1 (cyclin-dependent kinase 1) activity and mitochondrial protein synthesis in mammalian cells. In Drosophila, inactivation of mRpL10 (the Drosophila ortholog of mammalian MRPL10) in eyes results in abnormal eye development. Furthermore, expression of human cyclin B1 suppresses eye phenotypes and mitochondrial abnormality of mRpL10 knockdown Drosophila. This study identified that the physiological regulatory pathway of MRPL10 and providing new insights into the role of MRPL10 in growth control and mitochondrial function. PMID:27726420

  2. Cell cycle regulated D3-type cyclins form active complexes with plant-specific B-type cyclin-dependent kinase in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Kazue; Murray, James A H; Shinmyo, Atsuhiko; Sekine, Masami

    2006-05-01

    Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) cv Bright Yellow-2 (BY-2) cells are the most highly synchronizable plant cell culture, and previously we used them to analyze cell cycle regulation of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) containing the cyclin binding motifs PSTAIRE (CDKA) and PPTA/TLRE (CDKB). Here we describe the analysis of tobacco CycD3 cyclins whose transcripts predominantly accumulate during G2 to M phase, which represents a unique feature of this type of cyclin D in plants. Although protein levels of CycD3s fluctuate with different patterns during the cell cycle, kinase assays revealed that the CycD3-associated kinases phosphorylate histone H1 and the tobacco retinoblastoma related protein (NtRBR1) with two peaks at the G1/S and G2/M boundaries. In vitro pull-down assays revealed that cell cycle-regulated CycD3s bind to CDKA, but more weakly than does CycD3;3, and that they also bind to CDKB and the CDK inhibitor NtKIS1a. Mutations in the cyclin box of the CycD3s showed that two amino acids are required for binding with CDKA and NtKIS1a, but no diminished interaction was observed with CDKB. A reconstituted kinase assay was adapted for use with bacterially produced GST-CycD3s, and kinase activity could be activated by incubation of extracts from exponentially growing BY-2 cells. Such activated complexes contained CDKA and CDKB, and the reconstituted GST-CycD3 mutants, retaining binding ability to CDKB, showed kinase activity, suggesting that these cell cycle-regulated CycD3s form active complexes with both A- and B-type CDKs in vitro.

  3. Do truncated cyclins contribute to aberrant cyclin expression in cancer?

    PubMed

    Van Dross, Rukiyah; Browning, Philip J; Pelling, Jill C

    2006-03-01

    Cyclin overexpression is found in several types of cancer. Genetic events that place cyclin genes under the control of active promoters or that increase cyclin gene copy number account for most instances of cyclin overexpression. New paradigms for aberrant cyclin expression have been suggested by studies showing that truncated cyclins are expressed in specific subsets of cancer. The altered cyclins lack regulatory sequences (compared to the wild-type protein) that modulate their stability, subcellular localization or cdk-associated kinase activity. In this communication, we review the current literature and assess the role of truncated cyclins D, E, A, B, C and virus encoded-cyclin D (K-cyclin) in the development of cancer. We also report the molecular characteristics, expression patterns and if available, prognostic significance of these proteins.

  4. Expression, regulation and activity of a B2-type cyclin in mitotic and endoreduplicating maize endosperm

    PubMed Central

    Sabelli, Paolo A.; Dante, Ricardo A.; Nguyen, Hong N.; Gordon-Kamm, William J.; Larkins, Brian A.

    2014-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases, the master regulators of the eukaryotic cell cycle, are complexes comprised of a catalytic serine/threonine protein kinase and an essential regulatory cyclin. The maize genome encodes over 50 cyclins grouped in different types, but they have been little investigated. We characterized a type B2 cyclin (CYCB2;2) during maize endosperm development, which comprises a cell proliferation phase based on the standard mitotic cell cycle, followed by an endoreduplication phase in which DNA replication is reiterated in the absence of mitosis or cytokinesis. CYCB2;2 RNA was present throughout the period of endosperm development studied, but its level declined as the endosperm transitioned from a mitotic to an endoreduplication cell cycle. However, the level of CYCB2;2 protein remained relatively constant during both stages of endosperm development. CYCB2;2 was recalcitrant to degradation by the 26S proteasome in endoreduplicating endosperm extracts, which could explain its sustained accumulation during endosperm development. In addition, although CYCB2;2 was generally localized to the nucleus of endosperm cells, a lower molecular weight form of the protein accumulated specifically in the cytosol of endoreduplicating endosperm cells. In dividing cells, CYCB2;2 appeared to be localized to the phragmoplast and may be involved in cytokinesis and cell wall formation. Kinase activity was associated with CYCB2;2 in mitotic endosperm, but was absent or greatly reduced in immature ear and endoreduplicating endosperm. CYCB2;2-associated kinase phosphorylated maize E2F1 and the “pocket” domains of RBR1 and RBR3. CYCB2;2 interacted with both maize CDKA;1 and CDKA;3 in insect cells. These results suggest CYCB2;2 functions primarily during the mitotic cell cycle, and they are discussed in the context of the roles of cyclins, CDKs and proteasome activity in the regulation of the cell cycle during endosperm development. PMID:25368625

  5. Characterization of the mouse cyclin D3 gene: Exon/intron organization and promoter activity

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhengyu; Zhang, Ying; Ravid, K.

    1996-07-01

    The three D-type cyclins have been shown to be differentially expressed in a number of cell types, suggesting that they play distinct roles in cell cycle regulation in particular cell lineages. We have determined the complete nucleotide sequence (-1681 to +6582) of the mouse cyclin D3 gene, which encodes a G1 phase cyclin. The gene consists of five exons and four introns, varying in length from 422 to 2472 bp. Primer extension analysis revealed one major transcription initiation site at the position 107 bp 5{prime} upstream of the translation start. The promoter region lacks both canonical {open_quotes}TATA{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}CAAT{close_quotes} boxes. It contains, however, multiple transcription factor recognition by GATA, NF-{kappa}B, ATF, E2F, and TRE/AP1 transcription factors, E box binding myogenic factors, and the IL-6 induced-transcription factor, APRF. Promoter activity of the 1681-bp fragment upstream of the transcription initiation site was confirmed by linking it to a reporter gene and subjecting it to transient expression experiments in various cell types. Promoter activity was high in cell lines that expressed high levels of endogenous D3 mRNA, as indicated by Northern blot analysis, and was significantly reduced when the promoter was truncated to -122 bp. The characterization of the mouse cyclin D3 gene and insight into its promoter region will allow further studies defining the molecular events regulating the expression of this cyclin in proliferating and quiescent cells. 60 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  6. An activation domain within the walleye dermal sarcoma virus retroviral cyclin protein is essential for inhibition of the viral promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Rovnak, Joel; Hronek, Brett W.; Ryan, Sean O.; Cai, Sumin; Quackenbush, Sandra L. . E-mail: sandra.quackenbush@colostate.edu

    2005-11-25

    Walleye dermal sarcoma virus (WDSV) is a complex retrovirus associated with seasonal dermal sarcomas. Developing tumors have low levels of accessory gene transcripts, A1 and B, and regressing tumors have high levels of full-length and spliced transcripts. Transcript A1 encodes a retroviral cyclin (rv-cyclin) with limited homology to host cyclins. The rv-cyclin is physically linked to components of the transcriptional co-activator complex, Mediator, and regulates transcription. In walleye fibroblasts, it inhibits the WDSV promoter independently of cis-acting DNA sequences. The rv-cyclin activates transcription from GAL4 promoters when fused to the GAL4 DNA binding domain. A 30 a.a. activation domain in the carboxy region can be inactivated by single point mutations, and these mutations diminish the ability of the rv-cyclin to inhibit the WDSV promoter. When fused to glutathione S-transferase, the rv-cyclin, its carboxy region, and the activation domain pull down components of transcription complexes from nuclear extracts, and pulldown is lost by mutation of the activation domain.

  7. Pneumocystis carinii inhibits cyclin-dependent kinase activity in lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Limper, A H; Edens, M; Anders, R A; Leof, E B

    1998-01-01

    Pneumocystis carinii remains an important cause of pneumonia in patients with AIDS. Attachment of the organism to epithelial cells is a central event in establishing infection, impairing the growth potential of lung epithelial cells and thereby slowing repair. In light of investigations documenting a central role for cyclin-dependent kinases in controlling the cell cycle, we addressed the hypothesis that P. carinii inhibits epithelial cell growth by interfering with host epithelial cyclin-dependent kinase (cdk) activity. We observed that P. carinii significantly impaired growth of cultured mink lung epithelial cells, with effects observed after 48-72 h of treatment. However, the kinase activity associated with p34cdc2 or p33cdk2 was maximally inhibited as early as 24 h after P. carinii exposure. The inhibitory effect on cyclin-dependent kinase activity was mediated by the trophozoite form of P. carinii, in that highly purified trophozoites exerted marked inhibition of p34cdc2 activity. Growth impairment was similarly preceded by P. carinii-induced alteration in the state of epithelial cell p34cdc2 phosphorylation, with no change in p34cdc2 or p33cdk2 protein levels. These data strongly suggest that the antiproliferative activity of P. carinii on respiratory epithelium is mediated in part through modulation of the host cell cycle machinery. PMID:9486986

  8. A new mouse line for cell ablation by diphtheria toxin subunit A controlled by a Cre-dependent FLEx switch.

    PubMed

    Plummer, Nicholas W; Ungewitter, Erica K; Smith, Kathleen G; Yao, Humphrey H-C; Jensen, Patricia

    2017-09-05

    Recombinase responsive mouse lines expressing diphtheria toxin subunit A (DTA) are well established tools for targeted ablation of genetically defined cell populations. Here we describe a new knock-in allele at the Gt(Rosa)26Sor locus that retains the best features of previously described DTA alleles-including a CAG promoter, attenuated mutant DTA cDNA, and ubiquitous EGFP labeling-with the addition of a Cre-dependent FLEx switch for tight control of expression. The FLEx switch consists of two pairs of antiparallel lox sites requiring Cre-mediated recombination for inversion of the DTA to the proper orientation for transcription. We demonstrate its utility by Cre-dependent ablation of both a broad domain in the embryonic nervous system and a discrete population of cells in the fetal gonads. We conclude that this new DTA line is useful for targeted ablation of genetically-defined cell populations. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. c-Jun induces apoptosis of starved BM2 monoblasts by activating cyclin A-CDK2

    SciTech Connect

    Vanhara, Petr; Bryja, Vitezslav; Horvath, Viktor; Kozubik, Alois; Hampl, Ales; Smarda, Jan . E-mail: smarda@sci.muni.cz

    2007-02-02

    c-Jun is one of the major components of the activating protein-1 (AP-1), the transcription factor that participates in regulation of proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. In this study, we explored functional interactions of the c-Jun protein with several regulators of the G1/S transition in serum-deprived v-myb-transformed chicken monoblasts BM2. We show that the c-Jun protein induces expression of cyclin A, thus up-regulating activity of cyclin A-associated cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2), and causing massive programmed cell death of starved BM2cJUN cells. Specific inhibition of CDK2 suppresses frequency of apoptosis of BM2cJUN cells. We conclude that up-regulation of cyclin A expression and CDK2 activity can represent important link between the c-Jun protein, cell cycle machinery, and programmed cell death pathway in leukemic cells.

  10. Copper Uptake in Mammary Epithelial Cells Activates Cyclins and Triggers Antioxidant Response.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Nathália Villa; Matias, Andreza Cândido; Higa, Guilherme Shigueto Vilar; Kihara, Alexandre Hiroaki; Cerchiaro, Giselle

    2015-01-01

    The toxicologic effects of copper (Cu) on tumor cells have been studied during the past decades, and it is suggested that Cu ion may trigger antiproliferative effects in vitro. However, in normal cells the toxicologic effects of high exposures of free Cu are not well understood. In this work, Cu uptake, the expression of genes associated with cell cycle regulation, and the levels of ROS production and related oxidative processes were evaluated in Cu-treated mammary epithelial MCF10A nontumoral cells. We have shown that the Cu additive is associated with the activation of cyclin D1 and cyclin B1, as well as cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2). These nontumor cells respond to Cu-induced changes in the oxidative balance by increase of the levels of reduced intracellular glutathione (GSH), decrease of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and accumulation during progression of the cell cycle, thus preventing the cell abnormal proliferation or death. Taken together, our findings revealed an effect that contributes to prevent a possible damage of normal cells exposed to chemotherapeutic effects of drugs containing the Cu ion.

  11. Protocatechualdehyde possesses anti-cancer activity through downregulating cyclin D1 and HDAC2 in human colorectal cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Jin Boo; Lee, Seong-Ho

    2013-01-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Protocatechualdehyde (PCA) suppressed cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in human colorectal cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PCA enhanced transcriptional downregulation of cyclin D1 gene. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PCA suppressed HDAC2 expression and activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer These findings suggest that anti-cancer activity of PCA may be mediated by reducing HDAC2-derived cyclin D1 expression. -- Abstract: Protocatechualdehyde (PCA) is a naturally occurring polyphenol found in barley, green cavendish bananas, and grapevine leaves. Although a few studies reported growth-inhibitory activity of PCA in breast and leukemia cancer cells, the underlying mechanisms are still poorly understood. Thus, we performed in vitro study to investigate if treatment of PCA affects cell proliferation and apoptosis in human colorectal cancer cells and define potential mechanisms by which PCA mediates growth arrest and apoptosis of cancer cells. Exposure of PCA to human colorectal cancer cells (HCT116 and SW480 cells) suppressed cell growth and induced apoptosis in dose-dependent manner. PCA decreased cyclin D1 expression in protein and mRNA level and suppressed luciferase activity of cyclin D1 promoter, indicating transcriptional downregulation of cyclin D1 gene by PCA. We also observed that PCA treatment attenuated enzyme activity of histone deacetylase (HDAC) and reduced expression of HDAC2, but not HDAC1. These findings suggest that cell growth inhibition and apoptosis by PCA may be a result of HDAC2-mediated cyclin D1 suppression.

  12. Cell-type specific circuit connectivity of hippocampal CA1 revealed through Cre-dependent rabies tracing

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yanjun; Nguyen, Amanda; Nguyen, Joseph; Le, Luc; Saur, Dieter; Choi, Jiwon; Callaway, Edward M.; Xu, Xiangmin

    2014-01-01

    Summary We applied a new Cre-dependent, genetically modified rabies-based tracing system to map direct synaptic connections to CA1 excitatory and inhibitory neuron types in mouse hippocampus. We found common inputs to excitatory and inhibitory CA1 neurons from CA3, CA2, entorhinal cortex and the medial septum (MS), and unexpectedly also from the subiculum. Excitatory CA1 neurons receive inputs from both cholinergic and GABAergic MS neurons while inhibitory CA1 neurons receive a great majority of input from GABAergic MS neurons; both cell types also receive weaker input from glutamatergic MS neurons. Comparisons of inputs to CA1 PV+ interneurons versus SOM+ interneurons showed similar strengths of input from the subiculum, but PV+ interneurons receive much stronger input than SOM+ neurons from CA3, entorhinal cortex and MS. Differential input from CA3 to specific CA1 cell types was also demonstrated functionally using laser scanning photostimulation and whole cell recordings. PMID:24656815

  13. Cell-type-specific circuit connectivity of hippocampal CA1 revealed through Cre-dependent rabies tracing.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yanjun; Nguyen, Amanda Q; Nguyen, Joseph P; Le, Luc; Saur, Dieter; Choi, Jiwon; Callaway, Edward M; Xu, Xiangmin

    2014-04-10

    We developed and applied a Cre-dependent, genetically modified rabies-based tracing system to map direct synaptic connections to specific CA1 neuron types in the mouse hippocampus. We found common inputs to excitatory and inhibitory CA1 neurons from CA3, CA2, the entorhinal cortex (EC), the medial septum (MS), and, unexpectedly, the subiculum. Excitatory CA1 neurons receive inputs from both cholinergic and GABAergic MS neurons, whereas inhibitory neurons receive a great majority of inputs from GABAergic MS neurons. Both cell types also receive weaker input from glutamatergic MS neurons. Comparisons of inputs to CA1 PV+ interneurons versus SOM+ interneurons showed similar strengths of input from the subiculum, but PV+ interneurons received much stronger input than SOM+ neurons from CA3, the EC, and the MS. Thus, rabies tracing identifies hippocampal circuit connections and maps how the different input sources to CA1 are distributed with different strengths on each of its constituent cell types.

  14. Cyclin A-dependent phosphorylation of the ETS-related protein, MEF, restricts its activity to the G1 phase of the cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Y; Boccuni, P; Mao, S; Zhang, J; Erdjument-Bromage, H; Tempst, P; Kiyokawa, H; Nimer, S D

    2001-11-02

    MEF, a recently identified member of the E74 family of ETS-related transcription factors, is a strong transcriptional activator of cytokine gene expression. Using a green fluorescent protein gene reporter plasmid regulated by an MEF-responsive promoter, we determined that the transcriptional activity of MEF is largely restricted to the G1 phase of the cell cycle. MEF-dependent transcription was suppressed by the expression of cyclin A but not by cyclin D or cyclin E. This effect was due to the kinase activity generated by cyclin A expression, as co-expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p21 or p27, or a dominant negative form of CDK2 (DNK2), abrogated the reduction of MEF transcriptional activity by cyclin A. Cyclin A-CDK2 phosphorylated MEF protein in vitro more efficiently than cyclin D-CDK4 or cyclin E-CDK2, and phosphorylation of MEF by cyclin A-CDK2 reduced its ability to bind DNA. We determined one site of phosphorylation by cyclin A-CDK2 at the C terminus of MEF, using mass-spectrometry; mutation of three serine or threonine residues in this region significantly reduced phosphorylation of MEF by cyclin A and reduced cyclin A-mediated suppression of its transactivating activity. These amino acid substitutions also reduced the restriction of MEF activity to G1. Phosphorylation of MEF by the cyclin A-CDK2 complex controls its transcriptional activity during the cell cycle, establishing a novel link between the ETS family of proteins and the cell cycle machinery.

  15. Tumor suppressor protein C53 antagonizes checkpoint kinases to promote cyclin-dependent kinase 1 activation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hai; Wu, Jianchun; He, Chen; Yang, Wending; Li, Honglin

    2009-04-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1)/cyclin B1 complex is the driving force for mitotic entry, and its activation is tightly regulated by the G2/M checkpoint. We originally reported that a novel protein C53 (also known as Cdk5rap3 and LZAP) potentiates DNA damage-induced cell death by modulating the G2/M checkpoint. More recently, Wang et al. (2007) found that C53/LZAP may function as a tumor suppressor by way of inhibiting NF-kappaB signaling. We report here the identification of C53 protein as a novel regulator of Cdk1 activation. We found that knockdown of C53 protein causes delayed Cdk1 activation and mitotic entry. During DNA damage response, activation of checkpoint kinase 1 and 2 (Chk1 and Chk2) is partially inhibited by C53 overexpression. Intriguingly, we found that C53 interacts with Chk1 and antagonizes its function. Moreover, a portion of C53 protein is localized at the centrosome, and centrosome-targeting C53 potently promotes local Cdk1 activation. Taken together, our results strongly suggest that C53 is a novel negative regulator of checkpoint response. By counteracting Chk1, C53 promotes Cdk1 activation and mitotic entry in both unperturbed cell-cycle progression and DNA damage response.

  16. AP-1 blockade in breast cancer cells causes cell cycle arrest by suppressing G1 cyclin expression and reducing cyclin-dependent kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yongmin; Lu, Chunhua; Shen, Qiang; Munoz-Medellin, Debbie; Kim, Heetae; Brown, Powel H

    2004-10-28

    The AP-1 transcription factor is a central component of signal transduction pathways in many cells, although the exact role of AP-1 in controlling cell growth and malignant transformation is unknown. We have previously shown that AP-1 complexes are activated by peptide and steroid growth factors in both normal and malignant breast cells, and that blocking AP-1 by overexpressing a dominant-negative form of cJun (cJun-DN, TAM67) inhibits breast cancer cell growth both in vivo and in vitro. We hypothesized that TAM67 inhibits cell growth by altering the expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins, thus causing a cell cycle block. In the present study, we used clones of MCF7 breast cancer cells that express TAM67 under the control of an inducible promoter. First, we determined the effect of AP-1 blockade on cell growth, then we performed 3H-thymidine incorporation and flow cytometry assays to investigate whether TAM67 inhibits the cell cycle. We observed that in the presence of serum TAM67 inhibited cell growth and caused a block in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Next, we performed Western-blotting and CDK kinase assays to determine the effects of TAM67 on retinoblastoma (Rb) phosphorylation, the expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins, and CDK activity. We discovered that TAM67 inhibited Rb phosphorylation and reduced E2F activity. We also found that TAM67 decreased the expression of D and E cyclins, reduced CDK2 and CDK4 activity, and increased the CDK inhibitor p27. The studies of gene expression at the RNA level showed that TAM67 decreased cyclin Ds mRNA expression. Our study suggests that in the presence of serum, TAM67 inhibits breast cancer growth predominantly by inducing inhibitors of cyclin-dependent kinases (such as p27) and by reducing the expression of the cyclins involved in transitioning from G1 into S phase of the cell cycle. These studies lay the foundation for future attempt to develop new agents for the treatment and prevention of breast

  17. Activation of the EGFR/Akt/NF-κB/cyclinD1 survival signaling pathway in human cholesteatoma epithelium.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Yin, Tuanfang; Ren, Jihao; Li, Lihua; Xiao, Zian; Chen, Xing; Xie, Dinghua

    2014-02-01

    Cholesteatoma is a benign keratinizing squamous epithelial lesion characterized by the hyper-proliferation of keratinocytes with abundant production of keratin debris in the middle ear. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)/Akt/nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB)/cyclinD1 signaling pathway is one of the most important pathways in regulating cell survival and proliferation. We hypothesized that the EGFR/Akt/NF-κB/cyclinD1 signaling pathway may be activated and involved in the cellular hyperplasia mechanism in acquired cholesteatoma epithelium. Immunohistochemical staining of phosphorylated EGFR (p-EGFR), phosphorylated Akt (p-Akt), activated NF-κB and cyclinD1 protein was performed in 40 cholesteatoma samples and 20 samples of normal external auditory canal (EAC) epithelium. Protein expression of p-EGFR, p-Akt, activated NF-κB and cyclinD1 in cholesteatoma epithelium was significantly increased when compared with normal EAC epithelium (p < 0.01). In cholesteatoma epithelium, a significant positive association was observed between p-EGFR and p-Akt expression and between the expressions of p-Akt and NF-κB, NF-κB and cyclinD1, respectively (p < 0.01). No significant relationships were observed between the levels of investigated proteins and the degree of bone destruction (p > 0.05). The increased protein expression of p-EGFR, p-Akt, NF-κB and cyclinD1 and their associations in cholesteatoma epithelium suggest that the EGFR/Akt/NF-κB/cyclinD1 survival signaling pathway is active and may be involved in the regulatory mechanisms of cellular hyperplasia in cholesteatoma epithelium.

  18. Cyclin B-cdk activity stimulates meiotic rereplication in budding yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Strich, Randy; Mallory, Michael J; Jarnik, Michal; Cooper, Katrina F

    2004-01-01

    Haploidization of gametes during meiosis requires a single round of premeiotic DNA replication (meiS) followed by two successive nuclear divisions. This study demonstrates that ectopic activation of cyclin B/cyclin-dependent kinase in budding yeast recruits up to 30% of meiotic cells to execute one to three additional rounds of meiS. Rereplication occurs prior to the meiotic nuclear divisions, indicating that this process is different from the postmeiotic mitoses observed in other fungi. The cells with overreplicated DNA produced asci containing up to 20 spores that were viable and haploid and demonstrated Mendelian marker segregation. Genetic tests indicated that these cells executed the meiosis I reductional division and possessed a spindle checkpoint. Finally, interfering with normal synaptonemal complex formation or recombination increased the efficiency of rereplication. These studies indicate that the block to rereplication is very different in meiotic and mitotic cells and suggest a negative role for the recombination machinery in allowing rereplication. Moreover, the production of haploids, regardless of the genome content, suggests that the cell counts replication cycles, not chromosomes, in determining the number of nuclear divisions to execute. PMID:15342503

  19. Signal transduction pathways that contribute to CDK1/cyclin B activation during the first mitotic division in sea urchin embryos.

    PubMed

    Salaün, Patrick; Le Breton, Magali; Morales, Julia; Bellé, Robert; Boulben, Sandrine; Mulner-Lorillon, Odile; Cormier, Patrick

    2004-06-10

    In sea urchins, fertilization triggers a rapid rise in protein synthesis necessary for activation of CDK1/cyclin B, the universal cell cycle regulator. It has been shown that FRAP/mTOR is required for eIF4E release from the translational repressor 4E-BP, a process that occurs upstream of de novo cyclin B synthesis. Here, we investigate whether PI 3-kinase acts independently or upstream from FRAP/mTOR in the signal transduction pathway that links fertilization to the activation of the CDK1/cyclin B complex in sea urchin egg. We found that wortmannin, a potent inhibitor of PI 3-kinase, partially inhibited the global increase in protein synthesis triggered by fertilization. Furthermore, wortmannin treatment induced partial inhibition of cyclin B translation triggered by fertilization, in correlation with an intermediate effect of the drug on 4E-BP degradation and on the dissociation of the 4E-BP/eIF4E complex induced by fertilization. Our results presented here suggest that PI 3-kinase activity is required for completion of mitotic divisions of the sea urchin embryo. Incubation of eggs with wortmannin or microinjection of wortmannin or LY 294002 affects drastically mitotic divisions induced by fertilization. In addition, we found that wortmannin treatment inhibits dephosphorylation of the tyrosine inhibitory site of CDK1. Taken together, these data suggest that PI 3-kinase acts upstream of at least two independent targets that function in the CDK1/cyclin B activation triggered by fertilization of sea urchin oocytes. We discuss the significance of these results concerning the cascade of reactions that impinge upon the activation of the CDK1/cyclin B complex that follows sea urchin oocyte fertilization.

  20. Translational repression of cyclin E prevents precocious mitosis and embryonic gene activation during C. elegans meiosis.

    PubMed

    Biedermann, Bjoern; Wright, Jane; Senften, Mathias; Kalchhauser, Irene; Sarathy, Gautham; Lee, Min-Ho; Ciosk, Rafal

    2009-09-01

    Germ cells, the cells that give rise to sperm and egg, maintain the potential to recreate all cell types in a new individual. This wide developmental potential, or totipotency, is manifested in unusual tumors called teratomas, in which germ cells undergo somatic differentiation. Although recent studies have implicated RNA regulation, the mechanism that normally prevents the loss of germ cell identity remains unexplained. In C. elegans, a teratoma is induced in the absence of the conserved RNA-binding protein GLD-1. Here, we demonstrate that GLD-1 represses translation of CYE-1/cyclin E during meiotic prophase, which prevents germ cells from re-entering mitosis and inducing embryonic-like transcription. We describe a mechanism that prevents precocious mitosis in germ cells undergoing meiosis, propose that this mechanism maintains germ cell identity by delaying the onset of embryonic gene activation until after fertilization, and provide a paradigm for the possible origin of human teratomas.

  1. Adapalene inhibits the activity of cyclin-dependent kinase 2 in colorectal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    SHI, XI-NAN; LI, HONGJIAN; YAO, HONG; LIU, XU; LI, LING; LEUNG, KWONG-SAK; KUNG, HSIANG-FU; LIN, MARIE CHIA-MI

    2015-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) has been reported to be overexpressed in human colorectal cancer; it is responsible for the G1-to-S-phase transition in the cell cycle and its deregulation is a hallmark of cancer. The present study was the first to use idock, a free and open-source protein-ligand docking software developed by our group, to identify potential CDK2 inhibitors from 4,311 US Food and Drug Administration-approved small molecular drugs with a re-purposing strategy. Among the top compounds identified by idock score, nine were selected for further study. Among them, adapalene (ADA; CD271,6-[3-(1-adamantyl)-4-methoxyphenyl]-2-naphtoic acid) exhibited the highest anti-proliferative effects in LoVo and DLD1 human colon cancer cell lines. Consistent with the expected properties of CDK2 inhibitors, the present study demonstrated that ADA significantly increased the G1-phase population and decreased the expression of CDK2, cyclin E and retinoblastoma protein (Rb), as well as the phosphorylation of CDK2 (on Thr-160) and Rb (on Ser-795). Furthermore, the anti-cancer effects of ADA were examined in vivo on xenograft tumors derived from DLD1 human colorectal cancer cells subcutaneously inoculated in BALB/C nude mice. ADA (20 mg/kg orally) exhibited marked anti-tumor activity, comparable to that of oxaliplatin (40 mg/kg), and dose-dependently inhibited tumor growth (P<0.05), while combined administration of ADA and oxaliplatin produced the highest therapeutic effect. To the best of our knowledge, the present study was the first to indicate that ADA inhibits CDK2 and is a potential candidate drug for the treatment of human colorectal cancer. PMID:26398439

  2. Adapalene inhibits the activity of cyclin-dependent kinase 2 in colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xi-Nan; Li, Hongjian; Yao, Hong; Liu, Xu; Li, Ling; Leung, Kwong-Sak; Kung, Hsiang-Fu; Lin, Marie Chia-Mi

    2015-11-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) has been reported to be overexpressed in human colorectal cancer; it is responsible for the G1‑to‑S‑phase transition in the cell cycle and its deregulation is a hallmark of cancer. The present study was the first to use idock, a free and open‑source protein‑ligand docking software developed by our group, to identify potential CDK2 inhibitors from 4,311 US Food and Drug Administration‑approved small molecular drugs with a re‑purposing strategy. Among the top compounds identified by idock score, nine were selected for further study. Among them, adapalene (ADA; CD271,6‑[3‑(1‑adamantyl)‑4‑methoxyphenyl]‑2‑naphtoic acid) exhibited the highest anti‑proliferative effects in LOVO and DLD1 human colon cancer cell lines. Consistent with the expected properties of CDK2 inhibitors, the present study demonstrated that ADA significantly increased the G1‑phase population and decreased the expression of CDK2, cyclin E and retinoblastoma protein (Rb), as well as the phosphorylation of CDK2 (on Thr‑160) and Rb (on Ser‑795). Furthermore, the anti‑cancer effects of ADA were examined in vivo on xenograft tumors derived from DLD1 human colorectal cancer cells subcutaneously inoculated in BALB/C nude mice. ADA (20 mg/kg orally) exhibited marked anti‑tumor activity, comparable to that of oxaliplatin (40 mg/kg), and dose‑dependently inhibited tumor growth (P<0.05), while combined administration of ADA and oxaliplatin produced the highest therapeutic effect. To the best of our knowledge, the present study was the first to indicate that ADA inhibits CDK2 and is a potential candidate drug for the treatment of human colorectal cancer.

  3. Elevated cyclin A associated kinase activity promotes sensitivity of metastatic human cancer cells to DNA antimetabolite drug.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jin; Yin, Hailin; Panandikar, Ashwini; Gandhi, Varsha; Sen, Subrata

    2015-08-01

    Drug resistance is a major obstacle in successful systemic therapy of metastatic cancer. We analyzed the involvement of cell cycle regulatory proteins in eliciting response to N (phosphonoacetyl)-L-aspartate (PALA), an inhibitor of de novo pyrimidine synthesis, in two metastatic variants of human cancer cell line MDA-MB-435 isolated from lung (L-2) and brain (Br-1) in nude mouse, respectively. L-2 and Br-l cells markedly differed in their sensitivity to PALA. While both cell types displayed an initial S phase delay/arrest, Br-l cells proliferated but most L-2 cells underwent apoptosis. There was distinct elevation in cyclin A, and phosphorylated Rb proteins concomitant with decreased expression of bcl-2 protein in the PALA treated L-2 cells undergoing apoptosis. Markedly elevated cyclin A associated and cdk2 kinase activities together with increased E2F1-DNA binding were detected in these L-2 cells. Induced ectopic cyclin A expression sensitized Br-l cells to PALA by activating an apoptotic pathway. Our findings demonstrate that elevated expression of cyclin A and associated kinase can activate an apoptotic pathway in cells exposed to DNA antimetabolites. Abrogation of this pathway can lead to resistance against these drugs in metastatic variants of human carcinoma cells.

  4. Viral Cyclins Mediate Separate Phases of Infection by Integrating Functions of Distinct Mammalian Cyclins

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Katherine S.; Suarez, Andrea L.; Claypool, David J.; Armstrong, Taylor K.; Buckingham, Erin M.; van Dyk, Linda F.

    2012-01-01

    Gammaherpesvirus cyclins have expanded biochemical features relative to mammalian cyclins, and promote infection and pathogenesis including acute lung infection, viral persistence, and reactivation from latency. To define the essential features of the viral cyclin, we generated a panel of knock-in viruses expressing various viral or mammalian cyclins from the murine gammaherpesvirus 68 cyclin locus. Viral cyclins of both gammaherpesvirus 68 and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus supported all cyclin-dependent stages of infection, indicating functional conservation. Although mammalian cyclins could not restore lung replication, they did promote viral persistence and reactivation. Strikingly, distinct and non-overlapping mammalian cyclins complemented persistence (cyclin A, E) or reactivation from latency (cyclin D3). Based on these data, unique biochemical features of viral cyclins (e.g. enhanced kinase activation) are not essential to mediate specific processes during infection. What is essential for, and unique to, the viral cyclins is the integration of the activities of several different mammalian cyclins, which allows viral cyclins to mediate multiple, discrete stages of infection. These studies also demonstrated that closely related stages of infection, that are cyclin-dependent, are in fact genetically distinct, and thus predict that cyclin requirements may be used to tailor potential therapies for virus-associated diseases. PMID:22319441

  5. Actin interaction and regulation of cyclin-dependent kinase 5/p35 complex activity.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jiqing; Tsutsumi, Koji; Tokuraku, Kiyotaka; Estes, Katherine A; Hisanaga, Shin-ichi; Ikezu, Tsuneya

    2011-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) plays a critical role during neurodevelopment, synaptic plasticity, and neurodegeneration. Cdk5 activity depends on association with neuronal proteins p35 and p25, a proteolytic product of p35. Cdk5 regulates the actin cytoskeletal dynamics that are essential for neuronal migration, neuritic growth, and synaptogenesis. However, little is known about the interaction of actin and Cdk5 and its effect on neuronal Cdk5 activity. In a previous study, we observed that Cdk5/p35 activity is negatively correlated with co-immunoprecipitated F-actin (filamentous actin) amounts in the mouse brain, and suggested that F-actin inhibits the formation of the Cdk5/p35 complex [Journal of Neuroscience (2008) vol. 28, p. 14511]. The experiments reported here were undertaken to elucidate the relationship between actin and the formation of the Cdk5/p35 complex and its activity. Instead of an F-actin-mediated inhibition, we propose that G-actin (globular actin) in the F-actin preparations is responsible for inhibiting Cdk5/p35 and Cdk5/p25 kinase activity. We found that F-actin binds to p35 but not p25 or Cdk5. We have shown that G-actin binds directly to Cdk5 without disrupting the formation of the Cdk5/p35 or Cdk5/p25 complexes. G-actin potently suppressed Cdk5/p35 and Cdk5/p25 activity when either histone H1 or purified human tau protein were used as substrates, indicating a substrate-independent inhibitory effect of G-actin on Cdk5 activity. Finally, G-actin suppressed the activity of Cdk5 immunoprecipitated from wild type and p35-deficient mouse brain, suggesting that G-actin suppresses endogenous Cdk5 activity in a p35-independent manner. Together, these results suggest a novel mechanism of actin cytoskeletal regulation of Cdk5/p35 activity.

  6. Anticancer activity of calyx of Diospyros kaki Thunb. through downregulation of cyclin D1 via inducing proteasomal degradation and transcriptional inhibition in human colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Su Bin; Park, Gwang Hun; Song, Hun Min; Son, Ho-Jun; Um, Yurry; Kim, Hyun-Seok; Jeong, Jin Boo

    2017-09-05

    Although it has been reported to contain high polyphenols, the pharmacological studies of the calyx of Diospyros kaki Thunb (DKC) have not been elucidated in detail. In this study, we elucidated anti-cancer activity and potential molecular mechanism of DKC against human colorectal cancer cells. Anti-cell proliferative effect of 70% ethanol extracts from the calyx of Diospyros kaki (DKC-E70) was evaluated by MTT assay. The effect of DKC-E70 on the expression of cyclin D1 in the protein and mRNA level was evaluated by Western blot and RT-PCR, respectively. DKC-E70 suppressed the proliferation of human colorectal cancer cell lines such as HCT116, SW480, LoVo and HT-29. Although DKC-E70 decreased cyclin D1 expression in protein and mRNA level, decreased level of cyclin D1 protein by DKC-E70 occurred at the earlier time than that of cyclin D1 mRNA, which indicates that DKC-E70-mediated downregulation of cyclin D1 protein may be a consequence of the induction of degradation and transcriptional inhibition of cyclin D1. In cyclin D1 degradation, we found that cyclin D1 downregulation by DKC-E70 was attenuated in presence of MG132. In addition, DKC-E70 phosphorylated threonine-286 (T286) of cyclin D1 and T286A abolished cyclin D1 downregulation by DKC-E70. We also observed that DKC-E70-mediated T286 phosphorylation and subsequent cyclin D1 degradation was blocked in presence of the inhibitors of ERK1/2, p38 or GSK3β. In cyclin D1 transcriptional inhibition, DKC-E70 inhibited the expression of β-catenin and TCF4, and β-catenin/TCF-dependent luciferase activity. Our results suggest that DKC-E70 may downregulate cyclin D1 as one of the potential anti-cancer targets through cyclin D1 degradation by T286 phosphorylation dependent on ERK1/2, p38 or GSK3β, and cyclin D1 transcriptional inhibition through Wnt signaling. From these findings, DKC-E70 has potential to be a candidate for the development of chemoprevention or therapeutic agents for human colorectal cancer.

  7. [Bacteriostatic and bactericidal activities of cyclines, macrolides and fluoroquinolones against Chlamydia trachomatis].

    PubMed

    Dailloux, M; Villemain, P

    1992-05-01

    The in vitro activity of minocycline, doxycycline, erythromycin, roxithromycin, spiramycin, pefloxacin, and ofloxacin against ten C. trachomatis strains recovered from human genital tract specimens was evaluated. Mac Coy cell monolayers in 24-microwell plates were used. The C. trachomatis inoculum was 10(4) IFU/well. Appropriate dilutions of antibiotic were added and inclusions were detected by immunofluorescence using monoclonal antibodies. MICs were determined after 48 hours of exposure to each antimicrobial. The MIC90 for cyclines was 0.2 mg/l. Among tested macrolides, roxithromycin had a lower MIC than erythromycin (0.2 versus 0.4 mg/l) whereas spiramycin inhibited growth only in a concentration of 2 mg/l. Ofloxacin showed better activity than pefloxacin. Bactericidal activity was evaluated by determining two parameters: MBC1 (without transfer to new cells) measured the ability of a C. trachomatis particle to persist in a latent form within cells exposed to an antibiotic and to grow again following removal of the antibiotic, whereas MBC2 (with transfer to new cells) reflected infectivity of the bacteria after 48 hours exposure to the antimicrobial. None of the tested antibiotics was bactericidal according to both parameters. The ability of C. trachomatis to remain within antibiotic-exposed cells in a latent form was clearly demonstrated by the high MBC1 values. This feature may explain why recurrences are common in clinical practice.

  8. CK2 regulates in vitro the activity of the yeast cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor Sic1.

    PubMed

    Barberis, Matteo; Pagano, Mario A; Gioia, Luca De; Marin, Oriano; Vanoni, Marco; Pinna, Lorenzo A; Alberghina, Lilia

    2005-11-04

    We have previously demonstrated that the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor (Cki) Sic1 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is phosphorylated in vitro by the CK2 kinase on Ser(201) residue. Moreover, we have collected evidence showing that Sic1 is functionally and structurally related to mammalian Cki p27(Kip1) and binds to the mammalian Cdk2/cyclin A complex with a similar mode of inhibition. In this paper, we use SPR analysis to investigate the binding of Sic1 to the catatytic and regulatory subunits of CK2. Evidence is presented showing that phosphorylation of Sic1 at the CK2 consensus site QES(201)EDEED increases the binding of a Sic1-derived peptide to the Cdk2/cyclin A complex, a functional homologue of the yeast Cdk1/Clb5,6. Moreover, Sic1 fully phosphorylated in vitro on Ser(201) by CK2 is shown to be a stronger inhibitor of the Cdk/cyclin complexes than the unphosphorylated protein. Taken together, these data disclose the possibility that CK2 plays a role in the regulation of Sic1 activity.

  9. Cyclin C regulates adipogenesis by stimulating transcriptional activity of CCAAT/enhancer binding protein alpha.

    PubMed

    Song, Ziyi; Xiaoli, Alus M; Zhang, Quanwei; Zhang, Yi; Yang, Ellen S T; Wang, Sven; Chang, Rui; Zhang, Zhengdong D; Yang, Gongshe; Strich, Randy; Pessin, Jeffrey E; Yang, Fajun

    2017-03-28

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is important for maintaining energy homeostasis and adaptive thermogenesis in rodents and humans. As disorders arising from dysregulated energy metabolism, such as obesity and metabolic diseases, have increased, so has interest in the molecular mechanisms in adipocyte biology. Using a functional screen, we identified cyclin C (CycC), a conserved subunit of the Mediator complex, as a novel regulator for brown adipocyte formation. siRNA-mediated CycC knockdown (KD) in brown preadipocytes impaired the early transcriptional program of differentiation, and genetic knockout (KO) of CycC completely blocked the differentiation process. RNA-seq analyses of CycC-KD revealed a critical role of CycC in activating genes co-regulated by peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein alpha (C/EBPα). Overexpression of PPARγ2 or addition of the PPARγ ligand rosiglitazone rescued the defects in CycC-KO brown preadipocytes, and efficiently activated the PPARγ-responsive promoters in both wild-type (WT) and CycC-KO cells, suggesting that CycC is not essential for PPARγ transcriptional activity. In contrast, CycC-KO significantly reduced C/EBPα-dependent gene expression. Unlike for PPARγ, overexpression of C/EBPα could not induce C/EBPα target gene expression in CycC-KO cells or rescue the CycC-KO defects in brown adipogenesis, suggesting that CycC is essential for C/EBPα-mediated gene activation. CycC physically interacted with C/EBPα and this interaction was required for C/EBPα transactivation domain activity. Consistent with the role of C/EBPα in white adipogenesis, CycC-KD also inhibited differentiation of 3T3-L1 cells into white adipocytes. Together, these data indicate that CycC activates adipogenesis by stimulating the transcriptional activity of C/EBPα.

  10. Activation of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 mediates orofacial mechanical hyperalgesia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) is a unique member of the serine/threonine kinase family. This kinase plays an important role in neuronal development, and deregulation of its activity leads to neurodegenerative disorders. Cdk5 also serves an important function in the regulation of nociceptive signaling. Our previous studies revealed that the expression of Cdk5 and its activator, p35, is upregulated in nociceptive neurons during peripheral inflammation. The aim of the present study was to characterize the involvement of Cdk5 in orofacial pain. Since mechanical hyperalgesia is the distinctive sign of many orofacial pain conditions, we adapted an existing orofacial stimulation test to assess the behavioral responses to mechanical stimulation in the trigeminal region of the transgenic mice with either reduced or increased Cdk5 activity. Results Mice overexpressing or lacking p35, an activator of Cdk5, showed altered phenotype in response to noxious mechanical stimulation in the trigeminal area. Mice with increased Cdk5 activity displayed aversive behavior to mechanical stimulation as indicated by a significant decrease in reward licking events and licking time. The number of reward licking/facial contact events was significantly decreased in these mice as the mechanical intensity increased. By contrast, mice deficient in Cdk5 activity displayed mechanical hypoalgesia. Conclusions Collectively, our findings demonstrate for the first time the important role of Cdk5 in orofacial mechanical nociception. Modulation of Cdk5 activity in primary sensory neurons makes it an attractive potential target for the development of novel analgesics that could be used to treat multiple orofacial pain conditions. PMID:24359609

  11. Alternative splicing of human cyclin E.

    PubMed

    Sewing, A; Rönicke, V; Bürger, C; Funk, M; Müller, R

    1994-02-01

    Cyclin E is a regulatory subunit of the cdc2-related protein kinase cdk2, which is activated shortly before S-phase entry, thus defining it as a G1 cyclin. We report here the existence of a 43 kDa splice variant of human cyclin E, termed cyclin Es, which lacks 49 amino acids within the cyclin box compared to the known 48 kDa cyclin E. Cyclin Es is expressed at approximately 1/10 of the level of full-length cyclin E in several cell lines analysed. The two cyclin E forms differ functionally in that cyclin E, but not cyclin Es, is able to complex with cdk2, to activate the histone H1, pRb and p107 in vitro kinase activity of cdk2 and to rescue a triple CLN mutation in S. cerevisiae. Cyclin Es is the first splice variant of a cell cycle regulatory protein to be described. Our findings also indicate that the cyclin box in cyclin E mediates the interaction with cdk2.

  12. The prognostic value of mitotic activity index (MAI), phosphohistone H3 (PPH3), cyclin B1, cyclin A, and Ki67, alone and in combinations, in node-negative premenopausal breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Klintman, Marie; Strand, Carina; Ahlin, Cecilia; Beglerbegovic, Sanda; Fjällskog, Marie-Louise; Grabau, Dorthe; Gudlaugsson, Einar; Janssen, Emiel A M; Lövgren, Kristina; Skaland, Ivar; Bendahl, Pär-Ola; Malmström, Per; Baak, Jan P A; Fernö, Mårten

    2013-01-01

    Proliferation, either as the main common denominator in genetic profiles, or in the form of single factors such as Ki67, is recommended for clinical use especially in estrogen receptor-positive (ER) patients. However, due to high costs of genetic profiles and lack of reproducibility for Ki67, studies on other proliferation factors are warranted. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the prognostic value of the proliferation factors mitotic activity index (MAI), phosphohistone H3 (PPH3), cyclin B1, cyclin A and Ki67, alone and in combinations. In 222 consecutive premenopausal node-negative breast cancer patients (87% without adjuvant medical treatment), MAI was assessed on whole tissue sections (predefined cut-off ≥10 mitoses), and PPH3, cyclin B1, cyclin A, and Ki67 on tissue microarray (predefined cut-offs 7th decile). In univariable analysis (high versus low) the strongest prognostic proliferation factor for 10-year distant disease-free survival was MAI (Hazard Ratio (HR)=3.3, 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 1.8-6.1), followed by PPH3, cyclin A, Ki67, and cyclin B1. A combination variable, with patients with MAI and/or cyclin A high defined as high-risk, had even stronger prognostic value (HR=4.2, 95%CI: 2.2-7). When stratifying for ER-status, MAI was a significant prognostic factor in ER-positive patients only (HR=7.0, 95%CI: 3.1-16). Stratified for histological grade, MAI added prognostic value in grade 2 (HR=7.2, 95%CI: 3.1-38) and grade 1 patients. In multivariable analysis including HER2, age, adjuvant medical treatment, ER, and one proliferation factor at a time, only MAI (HR=2.7, 95%CI: 1.1-6.7), and cyclin A (HR=2.7, 95%CI: 1.2-6.0) remained independently prognostic. In conclusion this study confirms the strong prognostic value of all proliferation factors, especially MAI and cyclin A, in all patients, and more specifically in ER-positive patients, and patients with histological grade 2 and 1. Additionally, by combining two proliferation factors

  13. Molecular dynamics simulations on the inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinases 2 and 5 in the presence of activators.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bing; Tan, Vincent B C; Lim, Kian Meng; Tay, Tong Earn

    2006-06-01

    Interests in CDK2 and CDK5 have stemmed mainly from their association with cancer and neuronal migration or differentiation related diseases and the need to design selective inhibitors for these kinases. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have not only become a viable approach to drug design because of advances in computer technology but are increasingly an integral part of drug discovery processes. It is common in MD simulations of inhibitor/CDK complexes to exclude the activator of the CDKs in the structural models to keep computational time tractable. In this paper, we present simulation results of CDK2 and CDK5 with roscovitine using models with and without their activators (cyclinA and p25). While p25 was found to induce slight changes in CDK5, the calculations support that cyclinA leads to significant conformational changes near the active site of CDK2. This suggests that detailed and structure-based inhibitor design targeted at these CDKs should employ activator-included models of the kinases. Comparisons between P/CDK2/cyclinA/roscovitine and CDK5/p25/roscovitine complexes reveal differences in the conformations of the glutamine around the active sites, which may be exploited to find highly selective inhibitors with respect to CDK2 and CDK5.

  14. Molecular dynamics simulations on the inhibition of Cyclin-Dependent Kinases 2 and 5 in the presence of activators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bing; Tan, Vincent B. C.; Lim, Kian Meng; Tay, Tong Earn

    2006-06-01

    Interests in CDK2 and CDK5 have stemmed mainly from their association with cancer and neuronal migration or differentiation related diseases and the need to design selective inhibitors for these kinases. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have not only become a viable approach to drug design because of advances in computer technology but are increasingly an integral part of drug discovery processes. It is common in MD simulations of inhibitor/CDK complexes to exclude the activator of the CDKs in the structural models to keep computational time tractable. In this paper, we present simulation results of CDK2 and CDK5 with roscovitine using models with and without their activators (cyclinA and p25). While p25 was found to induce slight changes in CDK5, the calculations support that cyclinA leads to significant conformational changes near the active site of CDK2. This suggests that detailed and structure-based inhibitor design targeted at these CDKs should employ activator-included models of the kinases. Comparisons between P/CDK2/cyclinA/roscovitine and CDK5/p25/roscovitine complexes reveal differences in the conformations of the glutamine around the active sites, which may be exploited to find highly selective inhibitors with respect to CDK2 and CDK5.

  15. Lack of cyclin-dependent kinase 4 inhibits c-myc tumorigenic activities in epithelial tissues.

    PubMed

    Miliani de Marval, Paula L; Macias, Everardo; Rounbehler, Robert; Sicinski, Piotr; Kiyokawa, Hiroaki; Johnson, David G; Conti, Claudio J; Rodriguez-Puebla, Marcelo L

    2004-09-01

    The proto-oncogene c-myc encodes a transcription factor that is implicated in the regulation of cellular proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis and that has also been found to be deregulated in several forms of human and experimental tumors. We have shown that forced expression of c-myc in epithelial tissues of transgenic mice (K5-Myc) resulted in keratinocyte hyperproliferation and the development of spontaneous tumors in the skin and oral cavity. Although a number of genes involved in cancer development are regulated by c-myc, the actual mechanisms leading to Myc-induced neoplasia are not known. Among the genes regulated by Myc is the cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) gene. Interestingly, previous studies from our laboratory showed that the overexpression of CDK4 led to keratinocyte hyperproliferation, although no spontaneous tumor development was observed. Thus, we tested the hypothesis that CDK4 may be one of the critical downstream genes involved in Myc carcinogenesis. Our results showed that CDK4 inhibition in K5-Myc transgenic mice resulted in the complete inhibition of tumor development, suggesting that CDK4 is a critical mediator of tumor formation induced by deregulated Myc. Furthermore, a lack of CDK4 expression resulted in marked decreases in epidermal thickness and keratinocyte proliferation compared to the results obtained for K5-Myc littermates. Biochemical analysis of the K5-Myc epidermis showed that CDK4 mediates the proliferative activities of Myc by sequestering p21Cip1 and p27Kip1 and thereby indirectly activating CDK2 kinase activity. These results show that CDK4 mediates the proliferative and oncogenic activities of Myc in vivo through a mechanism that involves the sequestration of specific CDK inhibitors.

  16. Distinct Effects of Mitogens and the Actin Cytoskeleton on CREB and Pocket Protein Phosphorylation Control the Extent and Timing of Cyclin A Promoter Activity

    PubMed Central

    Bottazzi, Maria Elena; Buzzai, Monica; Zhu, Xiaoyun; Desdouets, Chantal; Bréchot, Christian; Assoian, Richard K.

    2001-01-01

    Soluble mitogens and adhesion-dependent organization of the actin cytoskeleton are required for cells to enter S phase in fibroblasts. The induction of cyclin A is also required for S-phase entry, and we now report that distinct effects of mitogens and the actin cytoskeleton on the phosphorylation of CREB and pocket proteins regulate the extent and timing of cyclin A promoter activity, respectively. First, we show that CREB phosphorylation and binding to the cyclic AMP response element (CRE) determines the extent, but not the timing, of cyclin A promoter activity. Second, we show that pocket protein inactivation regulates the timing, but not the extent, of cyclin A promoter activity. CREB phosphorylation and CRE occupancy are regulated by soluble mitogens alone, while the phosphorylation of pocket proteins requires both mitogens and the organized actin cytoskeleton. Mechanistically, cytoskeletal integrity controls pocket protein phosphorylation by allowing for sustained ERK signaling and, thereby, the expression of cyclin D1. Our results lead to a model of cyclin A gene regulation in which mitogens play a permissive role by stimulating early G1-phase phosphorylation of CREB and a distinct regulatory role by cooperating with the organized actin cytoskeleton to regulate the duration of ERK signaling, the expression of cyclin D1, and the timing of pocket protein phosphorylation. PMID:11604497

  17. Cyclin A/CDK2 binds directly to E2F-1 and inhibits the DNA-binding activity of E2F-1/DP-1 by phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Xu, M; Sheppard, K A; Peng, C Y; Yee, A S; Piwnica-Worms, H

    1994-12-01

    E2F-1, a member of the E2F transcription factor family, contributes to the regulation of the G1-to-S phase transition in higher eukaryotic cells. E2F-1 forms a heterodimer with DP-1 and binds to several cell cycle regulatory proteins, including the retinoblastoma family (RB, p107, p130) and cyclin A/CDK2 complexes. We have analyzed E2F-1 phosphorylation and its interaction with cyclin A/CDK2 complexes both in vivo and in vitro. In vitro, E2F-1 formed a stable complex with cyclin A/CDK2 but not with either subunit alone. DP-1 did not interact with cyclin A, CDK2, or the cyclin A/CDK2 complex. While the complex of cyclin A/CDK2 was required for stable complex formation with E2F-1, the kinase-active form of CDK2 was not required. However, E2F-1 was phosphorylated by cyclin A/CDK2 in vitro and was phosphorylated in vivo in HeLa cells. Two-dimensional tryptic phosphopeptide mapping studies demonstrated an overlap in the phosphopeptides derived from E2F-1 labeled in vitro and in vivo, indicating that cyclin A/CDK2 may be responsible for the majority of E2F-1 phosphorylation in vivo. Furthermore, an active DNA-binding complex could be reconstituted from purified E2F-1/DP-1 and cyclin A/CDK2. Binding studies conducted both in vitro and in vivo demonstrated that the cyclin A/CDK2-binding region resided within the N-terminal 124 amino acids of E2F-1. Because the stable association of E2F-1 with cyclin A/CDK2 in vitro and in vivo did not require a DP-1- or RB-binding domain and because the interactions could be reconstituted from purified components in vitro, we conclude that the interactions between cyclin A/CDK2 and E2F-1 are direct. Finally, we report that the DNA-binding activity of the E2F-1/DP-1 complex is inhibited following phosphorylation by cyclin A/CDK2.

  18. GCIP, a novel human grap2 and cyclin D interacting protein, regulates E2F-mediated transcriptional activity.

    PubMed

    Xia, C; Bao, Z; Tabassam, F; Ma, W; Qiu, M; Hua, S; Liu, M

    2000-07-07

    Regulation of mammalian cell growth and proliferation is governed through receptor-mediated signaling networks that ultimately converge on the cell cycle machinery. Adaptor proteins play essential roles in the formation of intracellular signaling complexes, relaying extracellular signals from the plasma membrane to the nucleus of a cell. The leukocyte-specific adaptor protein Grap2 is a central linker protein in immune cell signaling and activation. Using Grap2 as bait protein, we identified a novel human protein, GCIP (Grap2 cyclin-D interacting protein). We found that GCIP bound to Grap2 in both yeast two-hybrid assays and in mammalian cells through binding to the COOH-terminal unique domain and SH3 domain (designated QC domain) of Grap2. GCIP also associated with cyclin D both in vitro and in vivo. The expression of GCIP was found in all human tissues examined with the highest level of expression in the heart, muscle, peripheral blood leukocytes, and brain. Furthermore, phosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein by cyclin D-dependent protein kinase was reduced and E2F1-mediated transcription activity was inhibited in cells transfected with GCIP. High level expression of GCIP in terminally differentiated tissues and the inhibition of E2F1 transcription activation suggest that GCIP could play an important role in controlling cell differentiation and proliferation.

  19. Viral cyclin-cyclin-dependent kinase 6 complexes initiate nuclear DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Laman, H; Coverley, D; Krude, T; Laskey, R; Jones, N

    2001-01-01

    The cyclins encoded by Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus and herpesvirus saimiri are homologs of human D-type cyclins. However, when complexed to cdk6, they have several activities that distinguish them from D-type cyclin-cdk6 complexes, including resistance to cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors and an enhanced substrate range. We find that viral cyclins interact with and phosphorylate proteins involved in replication initiation. Using mammalian in vitro replication systems, we show that viral cyclin-cdk6 complexes can directly trigger the initiation of DNA synthesis in isolated late-G(1)-phase nuclei. Viral cyclin-cdk6 complexes share this capacity with cyclin A-cdk2, demonstrating that in addition to functioning as G(1)-phase cyclin-cdk complexes, they function as S-phase cyclin-cdk complexes.

  20. Involvement of aberrant cyclin-dependent kinase 5/p25 activity in experimental traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Yousuf, Mohammad A; Tan, Chunfeng; Torres-Altoro, Melissa I; Lu, Fang-Min; Plautz, Erik; Zhang, Shanrong; Takahashi, Masaya; Hernandez, Adan; Kernie, Steven G; Plattner, Florian; Bibb, James A

    2016-07-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is associated with adverse effects on brain functions, including sensation, language, emotions and/or cognition. Therapies for improving outcomes following TBI are limited. A better understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms of TBI may suggest novel treatment strategies to facilitate recovery and improve treatment outcome. Aberrant activation of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) has been implicated in neuronal injury and neurodegeneration. Cdk5 is a neuronal protein kinase activated via interaction with its cofactor p35 that regulates numerous neuronal functions, including synaptic remodeling and cognition. However, conversion of p35 to p25 via Ca(2+) -dependent activation of calpain results in an aberrantly active Cdk5/p25 complex that is associated with neuronal damage and cell death. Here, we show that mice subjected to controlled cortical impact (CCI), a well-established experimental TBI model, exhibit increased p25 levels and consistently elevated Cdk5-dependent phosphorylation of microtubule-associated protein tau and retinoblastoma (Rb) protein in hippocampal lysates. Moreover, CCI-induced neuroinflammation as indicated by increased astrocytic activation and number of reactive microglia. Brain-wide conditional Cdk5 knockout mice (Cdk5 cKO) subjected to CCI exhibited significantly reduced edema, ventricular dilation, and injury area. Finally, neurophysiological recordings revealed that CCI attenuated excitatory post-synaptic potential field responses in the hippocampal CA3-CA1 pathway 24 h after injury. This neurophysiological deficit was attenuated in Cdk5 cKO mice. Thus, TBI induces increased levels of p25 generation and aberrant Cdk5 activity, which contributes to pathophysiological processes underlying TBI progression. Hence, selectively preventing aberrant Cdk5 activity may be an effective acute strategy to improve recovery from TBI. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) increases astrogliosis and microglial activation

  1. Are progenitor cells pre-programmed for sequential cell cycles not requiring cyclins D and E and activation of Cdk2?

    PubMed

    Xie, D-X; Yao, J; Zhang, P; Li, X-L; Feng, Y-D; Wu, J-H; Tao, D-D; Hu, J-B; Gong, J-P

    2008-04-01

    Based on studies of unicellular organisms or cultured mammalian cells, the generally accepted model of cell-cycle regulation has been developed in which sequential (scheduled) expression of cyclins D, E, A and B and activation of Cdk2 and Cdk1 takes place. It is assumed that the same model is applicable both in vivo and in vitro. In the present study, we compared proliferating marrow cells freshly isolated from healthy individuals with proliferating lymphocytes in cultures. We demonstrate that during progression of freshly collected human bone marrow cells through G(1), S and G(2)/M, only Cdk1 combined with cyclins A and B(1) was distinctly present and active, and its activity gradually increased. In contrast, in vitro growing mitogen-stimulated lymphocytes had perfectly scheduled sequential expression of all four cyclins and Cdk1 and Cdk2 activities. Our findings demonstrate that the pattern of cyclin expression and Cdk activity in bone marrow in vivo is distinctly different from the one observed for normal cells in vitro. Because proliferating bone marrow cells are predominantly expanding populations of committed progenitors, it is likely that during the expansion phase their cell-cycle progression is pre-programmed, being driven solely by Cdk1 combined either with cyclin A or with cyclin B(1). Expansion of progenitor cells thus may not require the early steps of cell-cycle regulation, associated with triggering progression by availability of growth factors and mitogens.

  2. Fluorescent peptide biosensor for monitoring CDK4/cyclin D kinase activity in melanoma cell extracts, mouse xenografts and skin biopsies.

    PubMed

    Prével, Camille; Pellerano, Morgan; González-Vera, Juan A; Henri, Pauline; Meunier, Laurent; Vollaire, Julien; Josserand, Véronique; Morris, May C

    2016-11-15

    Melanoma constitutes the most aggressive form of skin cancer, which further metastasizes into a deadly form of cancer. The p16(INK4a)-Cyclin D-CDK4/6-pRb pathway is dysregulated in 90% of melanomas. CDK4/Cyclin D kinase hyperactivation, associated with mutation of CDK4, amplification of Cyclin D or loss of p16(INK4a) leads to increased risk of developing melanoma. This kinase therefore constitutes a key biomarker in melanoma and an emerging pharmacological target, however there are no tools enabling direct detection or quantification of its activity. Here we report on the design and application of a fluorescent peptide biosensor to quantify CDK4 activity in melanoma cell extracts, skin biopsies and melanoma xenografts. This biosensor provides sensitive means of comparing CDK4 activity between different melanoma cell lines and further responds to CDK4 downregulation by siRNA or small-molecule inhibitors. By affording means of monitoring CDK4 hyperactivity consequent to cancer-associated molecular alterations in upstream signaling pathways that converge upon this kinase, this biosensor offers an alternative to immunological identification of melanoma-specific biomarkers, thereby constituting an attractive tool for diagnostic purposes, providing complementary functional information to histological analysis, of particular utility for detection of melanoma onset in precancerous lesions. This is indeed the first fluorescent peptide biosensor which has been successfully implemented to monitor kinase activity in skin samples and melanoma tumour xenografts. Moreover by enabling to monitor response to CDK4 inhibitors, this biosensor constitutes an attractive companion assay to identify compounds of therapeutic relevance for melanoma.

  3. A tumor suppressor C53 protein antagonizes checkpoint kinases to promote cyclin-dependent kinase 1 activation

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hai; Wu, Jianchun; He, Chen; Yang, Wending; Li, Honglin

    2009-01-01

    Cyclin dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1)/cyclin B1 complex is the driving force for mitotic entry, and its activation is tightly regulated by the G2/M checkpoint. We originally reported that a novel protein C53 (also known as Cdk5rap3 and LZAP) potentiates DNA damage-induced cell death by modulating the G2/M checkpoint (1). More recently, Wang et al (2007) found that C53/LZAP may function as a tumor suppressor via inhibiting NF-κB signaling (2). We report here identification of C53 protein as a novel regulator of Cdk1 activation. We found that knockdown of C53 protein causes delayed Cdk1 activation and mitotic entry. During DNA damage response, activation of checkpoint kinase 1 and 2 (Chk1 and Chk2) is partially inhibited by C53 overexrepsssion. Intriguingly, we found that C53 interacts with checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1) and antagonizes its function. Moreover, a portion of C53 protein is localized at the centrosome, and centrosome-targeting C53 potently promotes local Cdk1 activation. Taken together, our results strongly suggest that C53 is a novel negative regulator of checkpoint response. By counteracting Chk1, C53 promotes Cdk1 activation and mitotic entry in both unperturbed cell cycle progression and DNA damage response. PMID:19223857

  4. Regulation of Cdc28 Cyclin-Dependent Protein Kinase Activity during the Cell Cycle of the Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Mendenhall, Michael D.; Hodge, Amy E.

    1998-01-01

    The cyclin-dependent protein kinase (CDK) encoded by CDC28 is the master regulator of cell division in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. By mechanisms that, for the most part, remain to be delineated, Cdc28 activity controls the timing of mitotic commitment, bud initiation, DNA replication, spindle formation, and chromosome separation. Environmental stimuli and progress through the cell cycle are monitored through checkpoint mechanisms that influence Cdc28 activity at key cell cycle stages. A vast body of information concerning how Cdc28 activity is timed and coordinated with various mitotic events has accrued. This article reviews that literature. Following an introduction to the properties of CDKs common to many eukaryotic species, the key influences on Cdc28 activity—cyclin-CKI binding and phosphorylation-dephosphorylation events—are examined. The processes controlling the abundance and activity of key Cdc28 regulators, especially transcriptional and proteolytic mechanisms, are then discussed in detail. Finally, the mechanisms by which environmental stimuli influence Cdc28 activity are summarized. PMID:9841670

  5. Sp1 phosphorylation by cyclin-dependent kinase 1/cyclin B1 represses its DNA-binding activity during mitosis in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chuang, J-Y; Wang, S-A; Yang, W-B; Yang, H-C; Hung, C-Y; Su, T-P; Chang, W-C; Hung, J-J

    2012-11-22

    Sp1 is important for the transcription of many genes. Our previous studies have shown that Sp1 is degraded in normal cell, but it is preserved in cancer cells during mitosis and exists a priori in the daughter cells, ready to engage in gene transcription and thereby contributes to the proliferation and survival of cancer cells. The mechanism by which Sp1 is preserved in cancer cells during mitosis remains unknown. In this study, we observed that Sp1 strongly colocalized with cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1)/cyclin B1 during mitosis. Moreover, we showed that Sp1 is a novel mitotic substrate of CDK1/cyclin B1 and is phosphorylated by it at Thr 739 before the onset of mitosis. Phospho-Sp1 reduced its DNA-binding ability and facilitated the chromatin condensation process during mitosis. Mutation of Thr739 to alanine resulted in Sp1 remaining in the chromosomes, delayed cell-cycle progression, and eventually led to apoptosis. Screening of Sp1-associated proteins during mitosis by using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry indicated the tethering of Sp1 to myosin/F-actin. Furthermore, phospho-Sp1 and myosin/F-actin appeared to exist as a congregated ring at the periphery of the chromosome. However, at the end of mitosis and the beginning of interphase, Sp1 was dephosphorylated by PP2A and returned to the chromatin. These results indicate that cancer cells use CDK1 and PP2A to regulate the movement of Sp1 in and out of the chromosomes during cell-cycle progression, which may benefit cancer-cell proliferation.

  6. Sp1 phosphorylation by cyclin-dependent kinase 1/cyclin B1 represses its DNA-binding activity during mitosis in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, J-Y; Wang, S-A; Yang, W-B; Yang, H-C; Hung, C-Y; Su, T-P; Chang, W-C; Hung, J-J

    2013-01-01

    Sp1 is important for the transcription of many genes. Our previous studies have shown that Sp1 is degraded in normal cell, but it is preserved in cancer cells during mitosis and exists a priori in the daughter cells, ready to engage in gene transcription and thereby contributes to the proliferation and survival of cancer cells. The mechanism by which Sp1 is preserved in cancer cells during mitosis remains unknown. In this study, we observed that Sp1 strongly colocalized with cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1)/cyclin B1 during mitosis. Moreover, we showed that Sp1 is a novel mitotic substrate of CDK1/cyclin B1 and is phosphorylated by it at Thr 739 before the onset of mitosis. Phospho-Sp1 reduced its DNA-binding ability and facilitated the chromatin condensation process during mitosis. Mutation of Thr739 to alanine resulted in Sp1 remaining in the chromosomes, delayed cell-cycle progression, and eventually led to apoptosis. Screening of Sp1-associated proteins during mitosis by using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry indicated the tethering of Sp1 to myosin/F-actin. Furthermore, phospho-Sp1 and myosin/F-actin appeared to exist as a congregated ring at the periphery of the chromosome. However, at the end of mitosis and the beginning of interphase, Sp1 was dephosphorylated by PP2A and returned to the chromatin. These results indicate that cancer cells use CDK1 and PP2A to regulate the movement of Sp1 in and out of the chromosomes during cell-cycle progression, which may benefit cancer-cell proliferation. PMID:22266860

  7. Leptin-induced Growth Stimulation of Breast Cancer Cells Involves Recruitment of Histone Acetyltransferases and Mediator Complex to CYCLIN D1 Promoter via Activation of Stat3*

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Neeraj K.; Vertino, Paula M.; Anania, Frank A.; Sharma, Dipali

    2010-01-01

    Numerous epidemiological studies documented that obesity is a risk factor for breast cancer development in postmenopausal women. Leptin, the key player in the regulation of energy balance and body weight control also acts as a growth factor on certain organs in both normal and disease state. In this study, we analyzed the role of leptin and the molecular mechanism(s) underlying its action in breast cancer cells that express both short and long isoforms of leptin receptor. Leptin increased MCF7 cell population in the S-phase of the cell cycle along with a robust increase in CYCLIN D1 expression. Also, leptin induced Stat3-phosphorylation-dependent proliferation of MCF7 cells as blocking Stat3 phosphorylation with a specific inhibitor, AG490, abolished leptin-induced proliferation. Using deletion constructs of CYCLIN D1 promoter and chromatin immunoprecipitation assay, we show that leptin induced increase in CYCLIN D1 promoter activity is mediated through binding of activated Stat3 at the Stat binding sites and changes in histone acetylation and methylation. We also show specific involvement of coactivator molecules, histone acetyltransferase SRC1, and mediator complex in leptin-mediated regulation of CYCLIN D1 promoter. Importantly, silencing of SRC1 and Med1 abolished the leptin induced increase in CYCLIN D1 expression and MCF7 cell proliferation. Intriguingly, recruitment of both SRC1 and Med1 was dependent on phosphorylated Stat3 as AG490 treatment inhibited leptin-induced recruitment of these coactivators to CYCLIN D1 promoter. Our data suggest that CYCLIN D1 may be a target gene for leptin mediated growth stimulation of breast cancer cells and molecular mechanisms involve activated Stat3-mediated recruitment of distinct coactivator complexes. PMID:17344214

  8. The ω-3 epoxide of eicosapentaenoic acid inhibits endothelial cell proliferation by p38 MAP kinase activation and cyclin D1/CDK4 down-regulation

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Pei H; Petrovic, Nenad; Murray, Michael

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Dietary intake of ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFAs) like eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) decreases cancer risk, while arachidonic acid and other ω-6 PUFAs increase risk, but the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Cytochrome P450 (CYP)-derived epoxides contribute to enhanced tumourigenesis due to ω-6 PUFA intake. Thus, ω-6 arachidonic acid epoxides (EETs) inhibit apoptosis and stimulate proliferation by up-regulating cyclin D1 expression in cells. The present study evaluated the corresponding ω-3 PUFA epoxides and assessed their role in the regulation of cell proliferation. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Four chemically stable EPA epoxides (formed at the 8,9-, 11,12-, 14,15- and 17,18-olefinic bonds) were synthesized and tested against growth-related signalling pathways in brain microvascular endothelial bEND.3 cells. Cell cycle distribution was determined by flow cytometry and cyclin gene expression by immunoblotting and real-time PCR. The role of the p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase in cyclin D1 dysregulation was assessed using specific inhibitors and dominant-negative expression plasmids. KEY RESULTS The ω-3 17,18-epoxide of EPA decreased cell proliferation, interrupted the cell cycle in S-phase and down-regulated the cyclin D1/cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK)-4 complex, whereas the 8,9-, 11,12- and 14,15-epoxides were either inactive or enhanced proliferation. Cyclin D1 down-regulation by 17,18-epoxy-EPA was mediated by activation of the growth-suppressing p38 MAP kinase, but the alternate EPA-epoxides were inactive. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS The present findings suggest that the epoxide formed by CYP enzymes at the ω-3 olefinic bond may contribute to the beneficial effects of ω-3 PUFA by down-regulating cyclin D1 and suppressing cell proliferation. PMID:21077851

  9. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 activity is required for T cell activation and induction of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Pareek, Tej K.; Lam, Eric; Zheng, Xiaojing; Askew, David; Kulkarni, Ashok B.; Chance, Mark R.; Huang, Alex Y.; Cooke, Kenneth R.

    2010-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) is a ubiquitously expressed serine/threonine kinase. However, a requirement for Cdk5 has been demonstrated only in postmitotic neurons where there is abundant expression of its activating partners p35 and/or p39. Although hyperactivation of the Cdk5–p35 complex has been found in a variety of inflammatory neurodegenerative disorders, the potential contribution of nonneuronal Cdk5–p35 activity has not been explored in this context. We describe a previously unknown function of the Cdk5–p35 complex in T cells that is required for induction of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). T cell receptor (TCR) stimulation leads to a rapid induction of Cdk5–p35 expression that is required for T lymphocyte activation. Chimeric mice lacking Cdk5 gene expression in hematopoietic tissues (Cdk5−/−C) are resistant to induction of EAE, and adoptive transfer of either Cdk5−/−C or p35−/− encephalitogenic lymphocytes fails to transfer disease. Moreover, our data reveal a novel mechanism involving Cdk5-mediated phosphorylation of the actin modulator coronin 1a on threonine 418. Cdk5-deficient lymphocytes lack this posttranslational modification of coronin 1a and exhibit defective TCR-induced actin polarization and reduced migration toward CCL-19. These data define a distinct role for Cdk5 in lymphocyte biology and suggest that inhibition of this kinase may be beneficial in the treatment of T cell–mediated inflammatory disorders. PMID:20937706

  10. Binding of Drosophila ORC proteins to anaphase chromosomes requires cessation of mitotic cyclin-dependent kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Baldinger, Tina; Gossen, Manfred

    2009-01-01

    The initial step in the acquisition of replication competence by eukaryotic chromosomes is the binding of the multisubunit origin recognition complex, ORC. We describe a transgenic Drosophila model which enables dynamic imaging of a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged Drosophila melanogaster ORC subunit, DmOrc2-GFP. It is functional in genetic complementation, expressed at physiological levels, and participates quantitatively in complex formation. This fusion protein is therefore able to depict both the holocomplex DmOrc1-6 and the core complex DmOrc2-6 formed by the Drosophila initiator proteins. Its localization can be monitored in vivo along the cell cycle and development. DmOrc2-GFP is not detected on metaphase chromosomes but binds rapidly to anaphase chromatin in Drosophila embryos. Expression of either stable cyclin A, B, or B3 prevents this reassociation, suggesting that cessation of mitotic cyclin-dependent kinase activity is essential for binding of the DmOrc proteins to chromosomes.

  11. Selective anticancer activity of a hexapeptide with sequence homology to a non-kinase domain of Cyclin Dependent Kinase 4

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Cyclin-dependent kinases 2, 4 and 6 (Cdk2, Cdk4, Cdk6) are closely structurally homologous proteins which are classically understood to control the transition from the G1 to the S-phases of the cell cycle by combining with their appropriate cyclin D or cyclin E partners to form kinase-active holoenzymes. Deregulation of Cdk4 is widespread in human cancer, CDK4 gene knockout is highly protective against chemical and oncogene-mediated epithelial carcinogenesis, despite the continued presence of CDK2 and CDK6; and overexpresssion of Cdk4 promotes skin carcinogenesis. Surprisingly, however, Cdk4 kinase inhibitors have not yet fulfilled their expectation as 'blockbuster' anticancer agents. Resistance to inhibition of Cdk4 kinase in some cases could potentially be due to a non-kinase activity, as recently reported with epidermal growth factor receptor. Results A search for a potential functional site of non-kinase activity present in Cdk4 but not Cdk2 or Cdk6 revealed a previously-unidentified loop on the outside of the C'-terminal non-kinase domain of Cdk4, containing a central amino-acid sequence, Pro-Arg-Gly-Pro-Arg-Pro (PRGPRP). An isolated hexapeptide with this sequence and its cyclic amphiphilic congeners are selectively lethal at high doses to a wide range of human cancer cell lines whilst sparing normal diploid keratinocytes and fibroblasts. Treated cancer cells do not exhibit the wide variability of dose response typically seen with other anticancer agents. Cancer cell killing by PRGPRP, in a cyclic amphiphilic cassette, requires cells to be in cycle but does not perturb cell cycle distribution and is accompanied by altered relative Cdk4/Cdk1 expression and selective decrease in ATP levels. Morphological features of apoptosis are absent and cancer cell death does not appear to involve autophagy. Conclusion These findings suggest a potential new paradigm for the development of broad-spectrum cancer specific therapeutics with a companion diagnostic

  12. Cyclin-dependent kinases

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Summary Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are protein kinases characterized by needing a separate subunit - a cyclin - that provides domains essential for enzymatic activity. CDKs play important roles in the control of cell division and modulate transcription in response to several extra- and intracellular cues. The evolutionary expansion of the CDK family in mammals led to the division of CDKs into three cell-cycle-related subfamilies (Cdk1, Cdk4 and Cdk5) and five transcriptional subfamilies (Cdk7, Cdk8, Cdk9, Cdk11 and Cdk20). Unlike the prototypical Cdc28 kinase of budding yeast, most of these CDKs bind one or a few cyclins, consistent with functional specialization during evolution. This review summarizes how, although CDKs are traditionally separated into cell-cycle or transcriptional CDKs, these activities are frequently combined in many family members. Not surprisingly, deregulation of this family of proteins is a hallmark of several diseases, including cancer, and drug-targeted inhibition of specific members has generated very encouraging results in clinical trials. PMID:25180339

  13. Phosphorylation of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) at Tyr-15 is inhibited by Cdk5 activators and does not contribute to the activation of Cdk5.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Hiroyuki; Saito, Taro; Sato, Ko; Furusawa, Kotaro; Hosokawa, Tomohisa; Tsutsumi, Koji; Asada, Akiko; Kamada, Shinji; Ohshima, Toshio; Hisanaga, Shin-ichi

    2014-07-11

    Cdk5 is a member of the cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) family. In contrast to other Cdks that promote cell proliferation, Cdk5 plays a role in regulating various neuronal functions, including neuronal migration, synaptic activity, and neuron death. Cdks responsible for cell proliferation need phosphorylation in the activation loop for activation in addition to binding a regulatory subunit cyclin. Cdk5, however, is activated only by binding to its activator, p35 or p39. Furthermore, in contrast to Cdk1 and Cdk2, which are inhibited by phosphorylation at Tyr-15, the kinase activity of Cdk5 is reported to be stimulated when phosphorylated at Tyr-15 by Src family kinases or receptor-type tyrosine kinases. We investigated the activation mechanism of Cdk5 by phosphorylation at Tyr-15. Unexpectedly, however, it was found that Tyr-15 phosphorylation occurred only on monomeric Cdk5, and the coexpression of activators, p35/p25, p39, or Cyclin I, inhibited the phosphorylation. In neuron cultures, too, the activation of Fyn tyrosine kinase did not increase Tyr-15 phosphorylation of Cdk5. Further, phospho-Cdk5 at Tyr-15 was not detected in the p35-bound Cdk5. In contrast, expression of active Fyn increased p35 in neurons. These results indicate that phosphorylation at Tyr-15 is not an activation mechanism of Cdk5 but, rather, indicate that tyrosine kinases could activate Cdk5 by increasing the protein amount of p35. These results call for reinvestigation of how Cdk5 is regulated downstream of Src family kinases or receptor tyrosine kinases in neurons, which is an important signaling cascade in a variety of neuronal activities.

  14. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma agonists induce proteasome-dependent degradation of cyclin D1 and estrogen receptor alpha in MCF-7 breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Qin, Chunhua; Burghardt, Robert; Smith, Roger; Wormke, Mark; Stewart, Jessica; Safe, Stephen

    2003-03-01

    Treatment of MCF-7 cells with the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) gamma agonists ciglitazone or 15-deoxy-Delta 12,14-prostaglandin J2 resulted in a concentration- and time-dependent decrease of cyclin D1 and estrogen receptor (ER) alpha proteins, and this was accompanied by decreased cell proliferation and G(1)-G(0)-->S-phase progression. Down-regulation of cyclin D1 and ER alpha by PPARgamma agonists was inhibited in cells cotreated with the proteasome inhibitors MG132 and PSII, but not in cells cotreated with the protease inhibitors calpain II and calpeptin. Moreover, after treatment of MCF-7 cells with 15-deoxy-Delta 12,14-prostaglandin J2 and immunoprecipitation with cyclin D1 or ER alpha antibodies, there was enhanced formation of ubiquitinated cyclin D1 and ER alpha bands. Thus, PPARgamma-induced inhibition of breast cancer cell growth is due, in part, to proteasome-dependent degradation of cyclin D1 (and ER alpha), and this pathway may be important for other cancer cell lines.

  15. A p21(Waf1/Cip1)carboxyl-terminal peptide exhibited cyclin-dependent kinase-inhibitory activity and cytotoxicity when introduced into human cells.

    PubMed

    Mutoh, M; Lung, F D; Long, Y Q; Roller, P P; Sikorski, R S; O'Connor, P M

    1999-07-15

    In the present study, we report the cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk)-inhibitory activity of a series of p21waf1/cip1 (p21) peptide fragments spanning the whole protein against the cyclin D1/Cdk4 and cyclin E/Cdk2 enzymes. The most potent p21 peptide tested in our initial peptide series, designated W10, spanned amino acids 139 to 164, a region of p21 that has been found independently to bind to proliferating cell nuclear antigen and also to inhibit Cdk activity. We go on to report the importance of putative beta-strand and 3(10)-helix motifs in the W10 peptide for cyclin-dependent kinase-inhibitory activity. We also describe the cellular activity of W10 and derivatives that were chemically linked to an antennapedia peptide, the latter segment acting as a cell membrane carrier. We found that the W10AP peptide exhibited growth inhibition that resulted from necrosis in human lymphoma CA46 cells. Furthermore, regions in the W10 peptide responsible for Cdk-inhibition were also important for the degree of this cellular activity. These studies provide insights that may eventually, through further design, yield agents for the therapy of cancer.

  16. Identification of multiple cyclin subunits of human P-TEFb

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Junmin; Zhu, Yuerong; Milton, Jeffrey T.; Price, David H.

    1998-01-01

    The transition from abortive into productive elongation is proposed to be controlled by a positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) through phosphorylation of the carboxy-terminal domain (CTD) of the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II. Drosophila P-TEFb was identified recently as a cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK9) paired with a cyclin subunit (cyclin T). We demonstrate here the cloning of multiple cyclin subunits of human P-TEFb (T1 and T2). Cyclin T2 has two forms (T2a and T2b) because of alternative splicing. Both cyclin T1 and T2 are ubiquitously expressed. Immunoprecipitation and immunodepletion experiments carried out on HeLa nuclear extract (HNE) indicated that cyclin T1 and T2 were associated with CDK9 in a mutually exclusive manner and that almost all CDK9 was associated with either cyclin T1 or T2. Recombinant CDK9/cyclin T1, CDK9/cyclin T2a, and CDK9/cyclin T2b produced in Sf9 cells possessed DRB-sensitive kinase activity and functioned in transcription elongation in vitro. Either cyclin T1 or T2 was required to activate CDK9, and the truncation of the carboxyl terminus of the cyclin reduced, but did not eliminate, P-TEFb activity. Cotransfection experiments indicated that all three CDK9/cyclin combinations dramatically activated the CMV promoter. PMID:9499409

  17. Cartilage-Specific and Cre-Dependent Nkx3.2 Overexpression In Vivo Causes Skeletal Dwarfism by Delaying Cartilage Hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Da-Un; Choi, Je-Yong; Kim, Dae-Won

    2017-01-01

    Nkx3.2, the vertebrate homologue of Drosophila bagpipe, has been implicated as playing a role in chondrogenic differentiation. In brief, Nkx3.2 is initially expressed in chondrocyte precursor cells and later during cartilage maturation, its expression is diminished in hypertrophic chondrocytes. In addition to Nkx3.2 expression analyses, previous studies using ex vivo chick embryo cultures and in vitro cell cultures have suggested that Nkx3.2 can suppress chondrocyte hypertrophy. However, it has never been demonstrated that Nkx3.2 functions in regulating chondrocyte hypertrophy during cartilage development in vivo. Here, we show that cartilage-specific and Cre-dependent Nkx3.2 overexpression in mice results in significant postnatal dwarfism in endochondral skeletons, while intramembranous bones remain unaltered. Further, we observed significant delays in cartilage hypertrophy in conditional transgenic ciTg-Nkx3.2 mice. Together, these findings confirm that Nkx3.2 is capable of controlling hypertrophic maturation of cartilage in vivo, and this regulation plays a significant role in endochondral ossification and longitudinal bone growth. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 78-90, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Chk1 is activated at the midblastula transition in Xenopus laevis embryos independently of DNA content and the cyclin E/Cdk2 developmental timer.

    PubMed

    Adjerid, Nassiba; Wroble, Brian N; Sible, Jill C

    2008-04-15

    Cell cycle checkpoints that are engaged in response to damaged and unreplicated DNA may serve additional, constitutive functions. In the developing Xenopus laevis embryo, the checkpoint kinase Chk1 is transiently activated at the midblastula transition (MBT), a period of extensive cell cycle remodeling including the acquisition of cell cycle checkpoints. The timing of many cell cycle remodeling events at the MBT, such as the lengthening of cell cycles, depends upon a critical nucleocytoplasmic (N/C) ratio. However, other events, including the degradation of maternal cyclin E, do not depend upon the N/C ratio, and are regulated by an autonomous developmental timer. To better understand what regulates Chk1 activation at the MBT, embryos were treated with aphidicolin, at different developmental times and for different lengths of time, to reduce the DNA content at the MBT. Chk1 was activated at the MBT in these embryos establishing that Chk1 activation occurs independently of the N/C ratio. Cdc25A is normally phosphorylated by Chk1 at the MBT and then degraded. The degradation of Cdc25A demonstrated partial dependence on DNA content, suggesting that factors other than Chk1 regulate its degradation. When the cyclin E developmental timer was disrupted with the Cdk2 inhibitor delta34-Xic1, Chk1 was still activated at the MBT, indicating that activation of Chk1 at the MBT was not directly linked to the cyclin E timer. Conversely, unreplicated or damaged DNA, delayed the degradation of cyclin E at the MBT, indicating that the cyclin E/Cdk2 timer is sensitive to engagement of cell cycle checkpoints.

  19. Membrane association facilitates degradation and cleavage of the cyclin-dependent kinase 5 activators p35 and p39.

    PubMed

    Minegishi, Seiji; Asada, Akiko; Miyauchi, Shinya; Fuchigami, Takahiro; Saito, Taro; Hisanaga, Shin-Ichi

    2010-07-06

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) is activated by binding to its activators, p35 and p39. The level of Cdk5 activity is determined by the amount of p35 and p39, which is regulated not only by transcription but also via proteasomal degradation. Alternatively, calpain-induced cleavage of p35 to p25 can induce aberrant Cdk5 activation. As the regulation of p35 and p39 proteolysis is not well understood, we have studied here the mechanisms governing their degradation and cleavage. We find that p35 and p39 undergo proteasomal degradation in neurons, with p39 showing a slower degradation rate than p35. Degradation of the activators is dependent on their respective N-terminal p10 region, as indicated by experiments in which cognate p10 regions were swapped between p35 and p39. The effect of the p10 region on degradation and cleavage could be assigned to its membrane binding properties, mediated predominantly by myristoylation. Together, these results indicate that both proteasomal degradation and calpain cleavage of p35 and p39 are stimulated by membrane association, which is in turn mediated via myristoylation of their p10 regions. However, p35 and p39 show differences in degradation and cleavage rates, which may in fact underlie the distinct physiological and pathological functions of these two Cdk5 activators.

  20. Baicalein induces G1 arrest in oral cancer cells by enhancing the degradation of cyclin D1 and activating AhR to decrease Rb phosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Ya-Hsin; Li, Lih-Ann; Lin, Pinpin; Cheng, Li-Chuan; Hung, Chein-Hui; Chang, Nai Wen; Lin, Chingju

    2012-09-15

    Baicalein is a flavonoid, known to have anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer effects. As an aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) ligand, baicalein at high concentrations blocks AhR-mediated dioxin toxicity. Because AhR had been reported to play a role in regulating the cell cycle, we suspected that the anti-cancer effect of baicalein is associated with AhR. This study investigated the molecular mechanism involved in the anti-cancer effect of baicalein in oral cancer cells HSC-3, including whether such effect would be AhR-mediated. Results revealed that baicalein inhibited cell proliferation and increased AhR activity in a dose-dependent manner. Cell cycle was arrested at the G1 phase and the expression of CDK4, cyclin D1, and phosphorylated retinoblastoma (pRb) was decreased. When the AhR was suppressed by siRNA, the reduction of pRb was partially reversed, accompanied by a decrease of cell population at G1 phase and an increase at S phase, while the reduction of cyclin D1 and CDK4 did not change. This finding suggests that the baicalein activation of AhR is indeed associated with the reduction of pRb, but is independent of the reduction of cyclin D1 and CDK4. When cells were pre-treated with LiCl, the inhibitor of GSK-3β, the decrease of cyclin D1 was blocked and the reduction of pRb was recovered. The data indicates that in HSC-3 the reduction of pRb is both mediated by baicalein through activation of AhR and facilitation of cyclin D1 degradation, which causes cell cycle arrest at the G1 phase, and results in the inhibition of cell proliferation. -- Highlights: ► Baicalein causes the G1 phase arrest by decreasing Rb phosphorylation. ► Baicalein modulates AhR-mediated cell proliferation. ► Both AhR activation and cyclin D1 degradation results in hypophosphorylation of Rb. ► Baicalein facilitates cyclin D1 degradation by signalling the GSK-3β pathway.

  1. Expression of retinoblastoma gene product (pRb) in mantle cell lymphomas. Correlation with cyclin D1 (PRAD1/CCND1) mRNA levels and proliferative activity.

    PubMed Central

    Jares, P.; Campo, E.; Pinyol, M.; Bosch, F.; Miquel, R.; Fernandez, P. L.; Sanchez-Beato, M.; Soler, F.; Perez-Losada, A.; Nayach, I.; Mallofré, C.; Piris, M. A.; Montserrat, E.; Cardesa, A.

    1996-01-01

    Mantle cell lymphomas (MCLs) are molecularly characterized by bcl-1 rearrangement and constant cyclin D1 (PRAD-1/CCND1) gene overexpression. Cyclin D1 is a G1 cyclin that participates in the control of the cell cycle progression by interacting with the retinoblastoma gene product (pRb). Inactivation of the Rb tumor suppressor gene has been implicated in the development of different types of human tumors including some high grade non-Hodgkin's lymphomas. To determine the role of the retinoblastoma gene in the pathogenesis of MCLs and its possible interaction with cyclin D1, pRb expression was examined in 23 MCLs including 17 typical and 6 blastic variants by immunohistochemistry and Western blot. Rb gene structure was studied in 13 cases by Southern blot. Cytogenetic analysis was performed in 5 cases. The results were compared with the cyclin D1 mRNA levels examined by Northern analysis, and the proliferative activity of the tumors was measured by Ki-67 growth fraction and flow cytometry. pRb was expressed in all MCLs. The expression varied from case to case (mean, 14.1% of positive cells; range, 1.3 to 42%) with a significant correlation with the proliferative activity of the tumors (mitotic index r = 0.85; Ki-67 r = 0.7; S phase = 0.73). Blastic variants showed higher numbers of pRb-positive cells (mean, 29%) than the typical cases (10%; P < 0.005) by immunohistochemistry and, concordantly, higher levels of expression by Western blot. In addition, the blastic cases also had an increased expression of the phosphorylated protein. No alterations in Rb gene structure were observed by Southern blot analysis. Cyclin D1 mRNA levels were independent of pRb expression and the proliferative activity of the tumors. These findings suggest that pRb in MCLs is normally regulated in relation to the proliferative activity of the tumors. Cyclin D1 overexpression may play a role in the maintenance of cell proliferation by overcoming the suppressive growth control of pRb. Images

  2. Rescue of cyclin D1 deficiency by knockin cyclin E.

    PubMed

    Geng, Y; Whoriskey, W; Park, M Y; Bronson, R T; Medema, R H; Li, T; Weinberg, R A; Sicinski, P

    1999-06-11

    D-type cyclins and cyclin E represent two very distinct classes of mammalian G1 cyclins. We have generated a mouse strain in which the coding sequences of the cyclin D1 gene (Ccnd1) have been deleted and replaced by those of human cyclin E (CCNE). In the tissues and cells of these mice, the expression pattern of human cyclin E faithfully reproduces that normally associated with mouse cyclin D1. The replacement of cyclin D1 with cyclin E rescues all phenotypic manifestations of cyclin D1 deficiency and restores normal development in cyclin D1-dependent tissues. Thus, cyclin E can functionally replace cyclin D1. Our analyses suggest that cyclin E is the major downstream target of cyclin D1.

  3. Interferon-induces expression of cyclin-dependent kinase-inhibitors p21WAF1 and p27Kip1 that prevent activation of cyclin-dependent kinase by CDK-activating kinase (CAK).

    PubMed

    Mandal, M; Bandyopadhyay, D; Goepfert, T M; Kumar, R

    1998-01-15

    To understand the mechanism of interferon (IFN)-mediated suppression of cell cycle progression, we have earlier shown that IFN-alpha enhances the expression of underphosphorylated retinoblastoma protein by inhibiting the cyclin-dependent kinase-2 (CDK-2) activity (Kumar and Atlas, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. 89, 6599-6603, 1992; Zhang and Kumar, Biochem. Biophysi. Res. Comm., 200, 522-528, 1994). In the studies presented here, we investigated the mechanism of inhibition of CDKs in IFN-treated cells by delineating the potential role(s) of CDK-inhibitors (CKIs) and CDK-activating kinase (CAK). We report that IFN-alpha inhibits the H-1 kinase activity associated with CDK-4 or CDK-2 due to induction of expression of CDK-inhibitor p21WAF1 (but not p27Kip1) as its immunodepletion from IFN-treated extracts restored the CDK-associated H-1 kinase activity. In addition, we also show that IFN-gamma induces expression of CDK-inhibitors p21WAF1 and p27Kip1 and inhibited the H-1 kinase activity associated with CDK-2 or CDK-4. The observed IFN-gamma-mediated inhibition of CDK-2 and CDK-4 kinase activity was due to enhanced interactions with p21WAF1 and p27Kip1, respectively. We also demonstrated that IFN-induced CKIs prevent CAK from activating the CDK-2 as immunodepletion of induced CKIs from the inhibitory extracts resulted in the restoration of CAK-mediated activation of CDK-2.

  4. Regulation of cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) 2 Thr-160 phosphorylation and activity by mitogen-activated protein kinase in late G1 phase.

    PubMed Central

    Chiariello, M; Gomez, E; Gutkind, J S

    2000-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases, p42(MAPK) and p44(MAPK), are central components of growth-promoting signalling pathways. However, how stimulation of MAP kinases culminates in cell-cycle progression is still poorly understood. Here we show that mitogenic stimulation of NIH 3T3 cells causes a sustained activation of MAP kinases, which lasts until cells begin progressing through the G(1)/S boundary. Furthermore, we observed that disruption of the MAP-kinase pathway with a selective MEK (MAP kinase/extracellular-signal-regulated protein kinase kinase) inhibitor, PD98059, prevents the activation of cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) 2 and DNA synthesis, even when added during late G(1) phase, once the known mechanisms by which MAP kinase controls G(1) progression, accumulation of G(1) cyclins and degradation of Cdk inhibitors have already taken place. Moreover, we provide evidence indicating that MAP kinases control Cdk2 Thr-160 activating phosphorylation and function, possibly by regulating the activity of a Cdk-activating kinase, thus promoting the re-initiation of DNA synthesis. These findings suggest the existence of a novel mechanism whereby signal-transducing pathways converging on MAP kinases can affect the cell-cycle machinery and, ultimately, participate in cell-growth control. PMID:10903150

  5. Activation of cyclin D1 by estradiol and spermine in MCF-7 breast cancer cells: a mechanism involving the p38 MAP kinase and phosphorylation of ATF-2.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Joan S; Vijayanathan, Veena; Thomas, T J; Pestell, Richard G; Albanese, Chris; Gallo, Michael A; Thomas, Thresia

    2005-01-01

    Estradiol (E2) and the naturally occurring polyamines (putrescine, spermidine, and spermine) play important roles in breast cancer cell growth and differentiation. We examined the effects of E2 and spermine on the phosphorylation and DNA binding of activating transcription factor-2 (ATF-2) in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. ATF-2 is a transcription factor involved in estrogenic regulation of cyclin D1 gene, and thereby cell cycle progression. DNA affinity immunoblot assays showed a six- to eightfold increase in the binding of ATF-2 to a 74-mer ATF/CRE oligonucleotide (ODN1) from cyclin D1 promoter in the presence of 4 nM E2 and 0.5 mM spermine, compared to untreated control. Individual treatments with E2 or spermine caused a twofold or lower increase in ATF-2 binding to ODN1. Immunoblotting with phospho-ATF-2 antibody showed that increased DNA binding of ATF-2 was associated with its phosphorylation. A p38 MAP kinase inhibitor, PD169316, inhibited ATF-2 phosphorylation. In contrast, the MEK-ERK1/2 inhibitor, PD98059, or the JNK inhibitor, SP600125, had no significant effect on DNA binding of ATF-2. Cyclin D1 promoter (-1745CD1) activity increased by approximately 12-fold (above control) in the presence of E2 and spermine, compared to a sixfold increase in the presence of E2 alone and a twofold increase with spermine. Cells transfected with a dominant negative mutant of ATF-2 showed decreased transactivation of cyclin D1 promoter in response to E2 and spermine. These results indicate that spermine can enhance E2-induced cell signaling and cyclin D1 transcription by activation of the p38 MAP kinase and phosphorylation of ATF-2, contributing to breast cancer cell proliferation.

  6. CDK1-Cyclin B1 Activates RNMT, Coordinating mRNA Cap Methylation with G1 Phase Transcription.

    PubMed

    Aregger, Michael; Kaskar, Aneesa; Varshney, Dhaval; Fernandez-Sanchez, Maria Elena; Inesta-Vaquera, Francisco A; Weidlich, Simone; Cowling, Victoria H

    2016-03-03

    The creation of translation-competent mRNA is dependent on RNA polymerase II transcripts being modified by addition of the 7-methylguanosine (m7G) cap. The factors that mediate splicing, nuclear export, and translation initiation are recruited to the transcript via the cap. The cap structure is formed by several activities and completed by RNMT (RNA guanine-7 methyltransferase), which catalyzes N7 methylation of the cap guanosine. We report that CDK1-cyclin B1 phosphorylates the RNMT regulatory domain on T77 during G2/M phase of the cell cycle. RNMT T77 phosphorylation activates the enzyme both directly and indirectly by inhibiting interaction with KPNA2, an RNMT inhibitor. RNMT T77 phosphorylation results in elevated m7G cap methyltransferase activity at the beginning of G1 phase, coordinating mRNA capping with the burst of transcription that occurs following nuclear envelope reformation. RNMT T77 phosphorylation is required for the production of cohort of proteins, and inhibiting T77 phosphorylation reduces the cell proliferation rate. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. CDK1-Cyclin B1 Activates RNMT, Coordinating mRNA Cap Methylation with G1 Phase Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Aregger, Michael; Kaskar, Aneesa; Varshney, Dhaval; Fernandez-Sanchez, Maria Elena; Inesta-Vaquera, Francisco A.; Weidlich, Simone; Cowling, Victoria H.

    2016-01-01

    Summary The creation of translation-competent mRNA is dependent on RNA polymerase II transcripts being modified by addition of the 7-methylguanosine (m7G) cap. The factors that mediate splicing, nuclear export, and translation initiation are recruited to the transcript via the cap. The cap structure is formed by several activities and completed by RNMT (RNA guanine-7 methyltransferase), which catalyzes N7 methylation of the cap guanosine. We report that CDK1-cyclin B1 phosphorylates the RNMT regulatory domain on T77 during G2/M phase of the cell cycle. RNMT T77 phosphorylation activates the enzyme both directly and indirectly by inhibiting interaction with KPNA2, an RNMT inhibitor. RNMT T77 phosphorylation results in elevated m7G cap methyltransferase activity at the beginning of G1 phase, coordinating mRNA capping with the burst of transcription that occurs following nuclear envelope reformation. RNMT T77 phosphorylation is required for the production of cohort of proteins, and inhibiting T77 phosphorylation reduces the cell proliferation rate. PMID:26942677

  8. The CDK4/6 inhibitor PD0332991 reverses epithelial dysplasia associated with abnormal activation of the cyclin-CDK-Rb pathway.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, M Carla; Díaz-Cruz, Edgar S; Kallakury, Bhaskar V S; Pishvaian, Michael J; Grubbs, Clinton J; Muccio, Donald D; Furth, Priscilla A

    2012-06-01

    Loss of normal growth control is a hallmark of cancer progression. Therefore, understanding the early mechanisms of normal growth regulation and the changes that occur during preneoplasia may provide insights of both diagnostic and therapeutic importance. Models of dysplasia that help elucidate the mechanisms responsible for disease progression are useful in highlighting potential targets for prevention. An important strategy in cancer prevention treatment programs is to reduce hyperplasia and dysplasia. This study identified abnormal upregulation of cell cycle-related proteins cyclin D1, cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK)4, CDK6, and phosphorylated retinoblastoma protein (pRb) as mechanisms responsible for maintenance of hyperplasia and dysplasia following downregulation of the initiating viral oncoprotein Simian virus 40 (SV40) T antigen. Significantly, p53 was not required for successful reversal of hyperplasia and dysplasia. Ligand-induced activation of retinoid X receptor and PPARγ agonists attenuated cyclin D1 and CDK6 but not CDK4 or phosphorylated pRb upregulation with limited reversal of hyperplasia and dysplasia. PD0332991, an orally available CDK4/6 inhibitor, was able to prevent upregulation of cyclin D1 and CDK6 as well as CDK4 and phosphorylated pRb and this correlated with a more profound reversal of hyperplasia and dysplasia. In summary, the study distinguished CDK4 and phosphorylated pRb as targets for chemoprevention regimens targeting reversal of hyperplasia and dysplasia. ©2012 AACR.

  9. Regulation of APC(Cdh1) E3 ligase activity by the Fbw7/cyclin E signaling axis contributes to the tumor suppressor function of Fbw7.

    PubMed

    Lau, Alan W; Inuzuka, Hiroyuki; Fukushima, Hidefumi; Wan, Lixin; Liu, Pengda; Gao, Daming; Sun, Yi; Wei, Wenyi

    2013-07-01

    Fbw7 and Cdh1 are substrate-recognition subunits of the SCF- and APC-type E3 ubiquitin ligases, respectively. There is emerging evidence suggesting that both Fbw7 and Cdh1 function as tumor suppressors by targeting oncoproteins for destruction. Loss of Fbw7, but not Cdh1, is frequently observed in various human tumors. However, it remains largely unknown how Fbw7 mechanistically functions as a tumor suppressor and whether there is a signaling crosstalk between Fbw7 and Cdh1. Here, we report that Fbw7-deficient cells not only display elevated expression levels of SCF(Fbw7) substrates, including cyclin E, but also have increased expression of various APC(Cdh1) substrates. We further defined cyclin E as the critical signaling link by which Fbw7 governs APC(Cdh1) activity, as depletion of cyclin E in Fbw7-deficient cells results in decreased expression of APC(Cdh1) substrates to levels comparable to those in wild-type (WT) cells. Conversely, ectopic expression of cyclin E recapitulates the aberrant APC(Cdh1) substrate expression observed in Fbw7-deficient cells. More importantly, 4A-Cdh1 that is resistant to Cdk2/cyclin E-mediated phosphorylation, but not WT-Cdh1, reversed the elevated expression of various APC(Cdh1) substrates in Fbw7-deficient cells. Overexpression of 4A-Cdh1 also resulted in retarded cell growth and decreased anchorage-independent colony formation. Altogether, we have identified a novel regulatory mechanism by which Fbw7 governs Cdh1 activity in a cyclin E-dependent manner. As a result, loss of Fbw7 can lead to aberrant increase in the expression of both SCF(Fbw7) and APC(Cdh1) substrates. Our study provides a better understanding of the tumor suppressor function of Fbw7, and suggests that Cdk2/cyclin E inhibitors could serve as effective therapeutic agents for treating Fbw7-deficient tumors.

  10. The Requirement for Cyclin D Function in Tumor Maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yoon Jong; Li, Xiaoyu; Hydbring, Per; Sanda, Takaomi; Stefano, Joanna; Christie, Amanda L.; Signoretti, Sabina; Look, A. Thomas; Kung, Andrew L.; von Boehmer, Harald; Sicinski, Piotr

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY D-cyclins represent components of cell cycle machinery. To test the efficacy of targeting D-cyclins in cancer treatment, we engineered mouse strains which allow acute and global ablation of individual D-cyclins in a living animal. Ubiquitous shutdown of cyclin D1 or inhibition of cyclin D-associated kinase activity in mice bearing ErbB2-driven mammary carcinomas triggered tumor cell senescence, without compromising the animals’ health. Ablation of cyclin D3 in mice bearing Notch1-driven T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias (T-ALL) triggered tumor cell apoptosis. Such selective killing of leukemic cells can also be achieved by inhibiting cyclin D-associated kinase activity in mouse and human T-ALL models. Inhibition of cyclin D-kinase activity represents a highly-selective anti-cancer strategy that specifically targets cancer cells without significantly affecting normal tissues. PMID:23079655

  11. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 activity is required for allogeneic T-cell responses after hematopoietic cell transplantation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Pareek, Tej K.; Eid, Saada; Ganguly, Sudipto; Tyler, Megan; Huang, Alex Y.; Letterio, John J.

    2017-01-01

    Molecular intermediates in T-cell activation pathways are crucial targets for the therapy and prevention of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) following allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT). We recently identified an essential role for cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) in T-cell activation and effector function, but the contribution of Cdk5 activity to the development of GVHD has not been explored. Using an established, preclinical, murine, GVHD model, we reveal that Cdk5 activity is increased in key target organs early after allo-HCT. We then generated chimeric mice (Cdk5+/+C or Cdk5−/−C) using hematopoietic progenitors from either embryonic day 16.5 Cdk5+/+ or Cdk5−/− embryos to enable analyses of the role of Cdk5 in GVHD, as germ line Cdk5 gene deletion is embryonically lethal. The immunophenotype of adult Cdk5−/−C mice is identical to control Cdk5+/+C mice. However, transplantation of donor Cdk5−/−C bone marrow and T cells dramatically reduced the severity of systemic and target organ GVHD. This phenotype is attributed to decreased T-cell migration to secondary lymphoid organs (SLOs), reduced in vivo proliferation within these organs, and fewer cytokine-producing donor T cells during GVHD development. Moreover, these defects in Cdk5−/− T-cell function are associated with altered CCR7 signaling following ligation by CCL19, a receptor:ligand interaction critical for T-cell migration into SLOs. Although Cdk5 activity in donor T cells contributed to graft-versus-tumor effects, pharmacologic inhibition of Cdk5 preserved leukemia-free survival. Collectively, our data implicate Cdk5 in allogeneic T-cell responses after HCT and as an important new target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:28064242

  12. Apoptosis in 7-hydroxystaurosporine-treated T lymphoblasts correlates with activation of cyclin-dependent kinases 1 and 2.

    PubMed

    Wang, Q; Worland, P J; Clark, J L; Carlson, B A; Sausville, E A

    1995-08-01

    7-Hydroxystaurosporine (UCN-01) is a potent inhibitor of protein kinase C (PKC) isozymes alpha, beta, and gamma [Seynaeve et al., Mol. Pharmacol, 45: 1207-1214, 1994] that also has antitumor effects in vivo. To determine whether inhibition of PKC can be related to inhibition of cell growth with induction of apoptosis, we compared the effects of UCN-01 to those of the highly selective bisindolylmaleimide PKC antagonist GF 109203X in leukemic T-cell lines. Both compounds potently inhibited PKC activity when added to T-cell membrane preparations and reversed phorbol ester-induced c-fos gene expression in intact cells. However, whereas UCN-01 potently inhibited growth of Jurkat, Molt-3, Molt-4, and Hut-78 cells (IC50 = 20-65 nM, irreversible after 24 h of exposure), GF 109203X had IC50s for cell growth of 3.6-5.0 muM. Less than 3 h after addition, UCN-01 but not GF 109203X-treated cells displayed loss of cells with G2-M DNA content, appearance of a hypodiploid DNA fraction, and evidence of internucleosomal DNA fragmentation. Six h after treatment, cells appeared to accumulate with S-phase DNA content. These effects correlated with selective UCN-01 but not GF 109203X-induced decrease in total and tyrosine phosphorylation of cyclin-dependent kinases (cdks) 1 and 2, and with increases in the histone H1 kinase activities of cdk1 and cdk2. UCN-01 was relatively less potent in inhibition of properly activated cdk1 and cdk2 when added in vitro to H1 kinase assays (IC50 = 1000 and 600 nM, respectively). We conclude that inhibition of PKC alone is not sufficient to account for the actions of UCN-01 and are led to the hypothesis that inappropriate cdk activation either correlates with or actually mediates cell growth inhibition with apoptosis in T lymphoblasts exposed to UCN-01.

  13. Regulation of the activation of the Fanconi anemia pathway by the p21 cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Rego, M A; Harney, J A; Mauro, M; Shen, M; Howlett, N G

    2012-01-19

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare disease characterized by congenital defects, progressive bone marrow failure and heightened cancer susceptibility. The FA proteins, BRCA1 and FANCD1/BRCA2 function cooperatively in the FA-BRCA pathway to repair damaged DNA. Activation of the FA-BRCA pathway occurs via the monoubiquitination of the FANCD2 and FANCI proteins, targeting these proteins to discrete nuclear foci where they function in DNA repair. The cellular regulation of FANCD2/I monoubiquitination, however, remains poorly understood. In this study, we have examined the roles of the p53 tumor suppressor protein, as well as its downstream target, the p21(Cip1/Waf1) cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, in the regulation of the activation of the FA-BRCA pathway. We demonstrate that, in contrast to p53, p21 has a major role in the regulation of the activation of the FA-BRCA pathway: p21 promotes S-phase and DNA damage-inducible FANCD2/I monoubiquitination and nuclear foci formation. Several lines of evidence establish that this effect is not a consequence of a defective G1-S checkpoint or altered cell-cycle progression in the absence of p21. Instead, we demonstrate that p21 is required for the transcriptional repression of the USP1 deubiquitinating enzyme upon exposure to DNA-damaging agents. In the absence of p21, persistent USP1 expression precludes the DNA damage-inducible accumulation of monoubiquitinated FANCD2 and FANCI. Consequently, p21(-/-) cells exhibit increased levels of mitomycin C-inducible complex chromosomal aberrations and elevated γH2AX nuclear foci formation. Our results demonstrate that p21 has a critical role in the regulation of the activation of the FA-BRCA pathway and suggest a broader role for p21 in the orchestration of DNA repair processes following exposure to DNA crosslinking agents.

  14. Candida albicans Cyclin Clb4 Carries S-Phase Cyclin Activity▿†

    PubMed Central

    Ofir, Ayala; Kornitzer, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are key regulators of eukaryotic cell cycle progression. The cyclin subunit activates the CDK and also imparts to the complex, at least in some cases, substrate specificity. Saccharomyces cerevisiae, an organism in which the roles of individual cyclins are best studied, contains nine cyclins (three G1 cyclins and six B-type cyclins) capable of activating the main cell cycle CDK, Cdc28. Analysis of the genome of the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans revealed only two sequences corresponding to B-type cyclins, C. albicans Clb2 (CaClb2) and CaClb4. Notably, no homolog of the S. cerevisiae S-phase-specific cyclins, Clb5/Clb6, could be detected. Here, we performed an in vitro analysis of the activity of CaClb2 and CaClb4 and of three G1 cyclins, as well as an analysis of the phenotype of S. cerevisiae cells expressing CaClb2 or CaClb4 instead of Clb5. Remarkably, replacement of CLB5 by CaCLB4 caused rapid diploidization of S. cerevisiae. In addition, both in vivo and in vitro analyses indicate that, in spite of the higher sequence similarity of CaClb2 to Clb5/Clb6, CaClb4 is the functional homolog of Clb5/Clb6. The activity of a CaClb2/CaClb4 cyclin hybrid suggests that the cyclin box domain of CaClb4 carries the functional specificity of the protein. These results have implications for our understanding of the evolution of specificity of the cell cycle cyclins. PMID:20639412

  15. Nuclear Import of Cdk/Cyclin Complexes: Identification of Distinct Mechanisms for Import of Cdk2/Cyclin E and Cdc2/Cyclin B1

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Jonathan D.; Yang, Jing; Truant, Ray; Kornbluth, Sally

    1999-01-01

    Reversible phosphorylation of nuclear proteins is required for both DNA replication and entry into mitosis. Consequently, most cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk)/cyclin complexes are localized to the nucleus when active. Although our understanding of nuclear transport processes has been greatly enhanced by the recent identification of nuclear targeting sequences and soluble nuclear import factors with which they interact, the mechanisms used to target Cdk/cyclin complexes to the nucleus remain obscure; this is in part because these proteins lack obvious nuclear localization sequences. To elucidate the molecular mechanisms responsible for Cdk/cyclin transport, we examined nuclear import of fluorescent Cdk2/cyclin E and Cdc2/cyclin B1 complexes in digitonin-permeabilized mammalian cells and also examined potential physical interactions between these Cdks, cyclins, and soluble import factors. We found that the nuclear import machinery recognizes these Cdk/cyclin complexes through direct interactions with the cyclin component. Surprisingly, cyclins E and B1 are imported into nuclei via distinct mechanisms. Cyclin E behaves like a classical basic nuclear localization sequence–containing protein, binding to the α adaptor subunit of the importin-α/β heterodimer. In contrast, cyclin B1 is imported via a direct interaction with a site in the NH2 terminus of importin-β that is distinct from that used to bind importin-α. PMID:9922449

  16. Cell Cycle Regulatory Proteins p27(kip), Cyclins Dl and E and Proliferative Activity in Oncocytic (Hurthle Cell) Lesions of the Thyroid.

    PubMed

    Maynes, Lincoln J.; Hutzler, Michael J.; Patwardhan, Nilima A.; Wang, Songtao; Khan, Ashraf

    2000-01-01

    Cyclins are prime cell-cycle regulators central to the control of cell proliferation in eukaryotic cells. The formation of cyclin/cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK) complexes activates the kinases and initiates a cascade of events, which directs cells through the cell cycle. CDK inhibitors (CDKIs) such as p27(kip1) inhibit cyclln-CDK complexes and function as negative regulators of the cell cycle. Previous studies have shown that p27(kip1) is decreased In malignant relative to benign thyroid tumors, but its role and Interaction with other cell cycle regulatory proteins have not been well established In oncocytic lesions of the thyroid. We studied the expression of p27(kip1), cyclins D1 and E, and Ki67 In 20 cases of oncocytic adenoma (AD). 6 cases of oncocytic carcinoma (CA). 8 cases of Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT). and 9 cases of nodular goiter with oncocytic change (NG) by Immunohistochemlstry. In the latter two lesions only oncocytic cells were evaluated. The positive staining was stratified Into four groups. Statistical analysis was done using the Kruslcal-Wallis one-way analysis of variance test, and, when significant the Dunn multiple-comparisons procedure was used to determine pairwise differences. AllI 20 AD were p27(kip1) posItive, 10 were 4+, 2 were 3+, and the remaining 8 were 1+. In contrast all 6 CA showed 4+ p27(kip1) staining, of the 8 HT 2 were 4+, two 3+, three1+, and I was negative.All 9 NG were p27 positive, 7 showed 4+, one 3+, and one 1+ staining. On pairwise comparison differences in p27(kip1) staining between AD and CA and between HT and CA were statistically significant (p=0.0243 and p=0.0142, respectively). In all but one case Ki67 expression was either very low (<3%) or negative. No significant differences were seen in the expression of cyclin D1 or cyclin E among the groups observed. In conclusion, the increased p27(kip1) expression in malignant oncocytlc tumors relative to benign oncocytic lesions is unlike any other malignant progression

  17. Preclinical Activity of Simvastatin Induces Cell Cycle Arrest in G1 via Blockade of Cyclin D-Cdk4 Expression in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC)

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yu-Wei; Chang, Chi-Chang; Hung, Chao-Ming; Chen, Tzu-Yu; Huang, Tzuu-Yuan; Hsu, Yi-Chiang

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer-related death. Nonetheless, a decrease in overall incidence and mortality has been observed in the last 30 years due to prevention strategies and improvements in the use of chemotherapeutic agents. In recent studies, Simvastatin (SIM) has demonstrated anti-tumor activity, as well as potent chemopreventive action. As an inhibitor of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMG-CoA), SIM has been shown to stimulate apoptotic cell death. In this study, an MTT assay revealed the cytotoxic activity of SIM against human large cell lung cancer (Non-small cell lung cancer; NSCLC) cells (NCI-H460); however, induced apoptosis was not observed in NCI-H460 cells. Protein expression levels of cell cycle regulating proteins Cdk4, Cyclin D1, p16 and p27 were markedly altered by SIM. Collectively, our results indicate that SIM inhibits cell proliferation and arrests NCI-H460 cell cycle progression via inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinases and cyclins and the enhancement of CDK inhibitors p16 and p27. Our findings suggest that, in addition to the known effects on hypercholesterolemia therapy, SIM may also provide antitumor activity in established NSCLC. PMID:23481641

  18. MAD1 and p27KIP1 Cooperate To Promote Terminal Differentiation of Granulocytes and To Inhibit Myc Expression and Cyclin E-CDK2 Activity

    PubMed Central

    McArthur, Grant A.; Foley, Kevin P.; Fero, Matthew L.; Walkley, Carl R.; Deans, Andrew J.; Roberts, James M.; Eisenman, Robert N.

    2002-01-01

    To understand how cellular differentiation is coupled to withdrawal from the cell cycle, we have focused on two negative regulators of the cell cycle, the MYC antagonist MAD1 and the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27KIP1. Generation of Mad1/p27KIP1 double-null mice revealed a number of synthetic effects between the null alleles of Mad1 and p27KIP1, including embryonic lethality, increased proliferation, and impaired differentiation of granulocyte precursors. Furthermore, with granulocyte cell lines derived from the Mad1/p27KIP1 double-null mice, we observed constitutive Myc expression and cyclin E-CDK2 kinase activity as well as impaired differentiation following treatment with an inducer of differentiation. By contrast, similar treatment of granulocytes from Mad1 or p27KIP1 single-null mice resulted in differentiation accompanied by downregulation of both Myc expression and cyclin E-CDK2 kinase activity. In the double-null granulocytic cells, addition of a CDK2 inhibitor in the presence of differentiation inducer was sufficient to restore differentiation and reduce Myc levels. We conclude that Mad1 and p27KIP1 operate, at least in part, by distinct mechanisms to downregulate CDK2 activity and Myc expression in order to promote cell cycle exit during differentiation. PMID:11940659

  19. Helical fold prediction for the cyclin box.

    PubMed

    Bazan, J F

    1996-01-01

    The smooth progression of the eukaryotic cell cycle relies on the periodic activation of members of a family of cell cycle kinases by regulatory proteins called cyclins. Outside of the cell cycle, cyclin homologs play important roles in regulating the assembly of transcription complexes; distant structural relatives of the conserved cyclin core or "box" can also function as general transcription factors (like TFIIB) or survive embedded in the chain of the tumor suppressor, retinoblastoma protein. The present work attempts the prediction of the canonical secondary, supersecondary, and tertiary fold of the minimal cyclin box domain using a combination of techniques that make use of the evolutionary information captured in a multiple alignment of homolog sequences. A tandem set of closely packed, helical modules are predicted to form the cyclin box domain.

  20. A Dual-Specificity Phosphatase Cdc25B Is an Unstable Protein and Triggers p34cdc2/Cyclin B Activation in Hamster BHK21 Cells Arrested with Hydroxyurea

    PubMed Central

    Nishijima, Hitoshi; Nishitani, Hideo; Seki, Takashi; Nishimoto, Takeharu

    1997-01-01

    By incubating at 30°C in the presence of an energy source, p34cdc2/cyclin B was activated in the extract prepared from a temperature-sensitive mutant, tsBN2, which prematurely enters mitosis at 40°C, the nonpermissive temperature (Nishimoto, T., E. Eilen, and C. Basilico. 1978. Cell. 15:475–483), and wild-type cells of the hamster BHK21 cell line arrested in S phase, without protein synthesis. Such an in vitro activation of p34cdc2/cyclin B, however, did not occur in the extract prepared from cells pretreated with protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide, although this extract still retained the ability to inhibit p34cdc2/cyclin B activation. When tsBN2 cells arrested in S phase were incubated at 40°C in the presence of cycloheximide, Cdc25B, but not Cdc25A and C, among a family of dual-specificity phosphatases, Cdc25, was lost coincidentally with the lack of the activation of p34cdc2/cyclin B. Consistently, the immunodepletion of Cdc25B from the extract inhibited the activation of p34cdc2/cyclin B. Cdc25B was found to be unstable (half-life < 30 min). Cdc25B, but not Cdc25C, immunoprecipitated from the extract directly activated the p34cdc2/cyclin B of cycloheximide-treated cells as well as that of nontreated cells, although Cdc25C immunoprecipitated from the extract of mitotic cells activated the p34cdc2/cyclin B within the extract of cycloheximide-treated cells. Our data suggest that Cdc25B made an initial activation of p34cdc2/cyclin B, which initiates mitosis through the activation of Cdc25C. PMID:9281587

  1. BAFF induces spleen CD4{sup +} T cell proliferation by down-regulating phosphorylation of FOXO3A and activates cyclin D2 and D3 expression

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Fang; Chen, Rongjing; Liu, Baojun; Zhang, Xiaoping; Han, Junli; Wang, Haining; Shen, Gang; Tao, Jiang

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Firstly analyze the mechanism of BAFF and anti-CD3 co-stimulation on purified mouse splenic CD4{sup +} T cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carrying out siRNA technology to study FOXO3A protein function. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Helpful to understand the T cell especially CD4{sup +} T cell's role in immunological reaction. -- Abstract: The TNF ligand family member 'B cell-activating factor belonging to the TNF family' (BAFF, also called BLyS, TALL-1, zTNF-4, and THANK) is an important survival factor for B and T cells. In this study, we show that BAFF is able to induce CD4{sup +} spleen T cell proliferation when co-stimulated with anti-CD3. Expression of phosphorylated FOXO3A was notably down-regulated and cyclins D2 and D3 were up-regulated and higher in the CD4{sup +} T cells when treated with BAFF and anti-CD3, as assessed by Western blotting. Furthermore, after FOXO3A was knocked down, expression of cyclin D1 was unchanged, compared with control group levels, but the expression of cyclins D2 and D3 increased, compared with the control group. In conclusion, our results suggest that BAFF induced CD4{sup +} spleen T cell proliferation by down-regulating the phosphorylation of FOXO3A and then activating cyclin D2 and D3 expression, leading to CD4{sup +} T cell proliferation.

  2. T3 enhances thyroid cancer cell proliferation through TRβ1/Oct-1-mediated cyclin D1 activation.

    PubMed

    Perri, Anna; Catalano, Stefania; Bonofiglio, Daniela; Vizza, Donatella; Rovito, Daniela; Qi, Hongyan; Aquila, Saveria; Panza, Salvatore; Rizza, Pietro; Lanzino, Marilena; Andò, Sebastiano

    2014-01-25

    Several studies have demonstrated that thyroid hormone T3 promotes cancer cell growth, even though the molecular mechanism involved in such processes still needs to be elucidated. In this study we demonstrated that T3 induced proliferation in papillary thyroid carcinoma cell lines concomitantly with an up-regulation of cyclin D1 expression, that is a critical mitogen-regulated cell-cycle control element. Our data revealed that T3 enhanced the recruitment of the TRβ1/Oct-1 complex on Octamer-transcription factor-1 site within cyclin D1 promoter, leading to its transactivation. In addition, silencing of TRβ1 or Oct-1 expression by RNA interference reversed both increased cell proliferation and up-regulation of cyclin D1, underlying the important role of both transcriptional factors in mediating these effects. Finally, T3-induced increase in cell growth was abrogated after knocking down cyclin D1 expression. All these findings highlight a new molecular mechanism by which T3 promotes thyroid cancer cell growth.

  3. Quercetin reduces cyclin D1 activity and induces G1 phase arrest in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jin; Li, L U; Fang, L I; Xie, Hua; Yao, Wenxiu; Zhou, Xiang; Xiong, Zhujuan; Wang, L I; Li, Zhixi; Luo, Feng

    2016-07-01

    Quercetin is able to inhibit proliferation of malignant tumor cells; however, the exact mechanism involved in this biological process remains unclear. The current study utilized a quantitative proteomic analysis to explore the antitumor mechanisms of quercetin. The leucine of HepG2 cells treated with quercetin was labeled as d3 by stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC). The isotope peaks of control HepG2 cells were compared with the d3-labeled HepG2 cells by mass spectrometry (MS) to identify significantly altered proteins. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and western blot analyses were subsequently employed to verify the results of the MS analysis. A flow cytometry assay was designed to observe the influence of various quercetin treatment concentrations on the cell cycle distribution of HepG2 cells. The results indicated that quercetin is able to substantially inhibit proliferation of HepG2 cells and induce an obvious morphological alteration of cells. According to the MS results, the 70 credibly-changed proteins that were identified may play important roles in multiple cellular processes, including protein synthesis, signaling, cytoskeletal processes and metabolism. Among these functional proteins, the expression of cyclin D1 (CCND1) was found to be significantly decreased. RT-PCR and western blot analyses verified the SILAC-MS results of decreased CCND1 expression. In summary, flow cytometry revealed that quercetin is able to induce G1 phase arrest in HepG2 cells. Based on the aforementioned observations, it is suggested that quercetin exerts antitumor activity in HepG2 cells through multiple pathways, including interfering with CCND1 gene expression to disrupt the cell cycle and proliferation of HepG2 cells. In the future, we aim to explore this effect in vivo.

  4. Selective usage of D-type cyclins in lymphoid malignancies.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, R; Kuroda, H; Komatsu, H; Hosokawa, Y; Kagami, Y; Ogura, M; Nakamura, S; Kodera, Y; Morishima, Y; Ueda, R; Seto, M

    1999-09-01

    Three D-type cyclins, cyclin D1, D2 and D3, belong to the G1 cyclin, which regulates the G1/S transition of the cell cycle, and feature highly homologous amino acid sequences. The cyclin D1 gene was found to be transcriptionally activated in B-lymphoid malignancies with t(11;14), but available information is limited regarding expression of cyclin D2 and D3 in hematopoietic malignancies. We examined the expressions of three D-type cyclins to investigate how these homologous genes are differentially used. Northern blot hybridization with densitometric analyses was performed to examine 64 cell lines and 159 patients with various hematopoietic malignancies. Among lymphoid malignancies, cyclin D1 overexpression was exclusively detected in B cell malignancies accompanied by a genetic event consisting of 11q13 chromosomal translocation, consisting of 13 of 19 (68%) patients with mantle cell lymphoma, two of 11 (18%) with B-chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and one of six (17%) with multiple myeloma. The cyclin D2 expression was significantly higher in T cell malignancies than in B cell malignancies (P = 0.003 for cell lines and P < 0.0001 for patient samples, respectively). In the T cell malignancies, cyclin D2 overexpression was predominantly recognized in those with mature phenotype. Furthermore, cyclin D2 expression was upregulated by phytohemagglutinin (PHA) stimulation of normal T-lymphocytes, suggesting that this simply represents the proliferation status of mature T cells. Although cyclin D3 was ubiquitously expressed, its expression was reduced in lymphoid malignancies with cyclin D1 or D2 overexpression. In myeloid leukemias, although three D-type type cyclins were differentially expressed, no preference for particular D-type cyclins was found. This selective usage of D-type cyclins in lymphoid malignancies suggests an existence of a regulatory mechanism among three D-type cyclins.

  5. Redox regulation of cardiomyocyte cell cycling via an ERK1/2 and c-Myc-dependent activation of cyclin D2 transcription

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Thomas V.A.; Smyrnias, Ioannis; Schnelle, Moritz; Mistry, Rajesh K.; Zhang, Min; Beretta, Matteo; Martin, Daniel; Anilkumar, Narayana; de Silva, Shana M.; Shah, Ajay M.; Brewer, Alison C.

    2015-01-01

    Adult mammalian cardiomyocytes have a very limited capacity to proliferate, and consequently the loss of cells after cardiac stress promotes heart failure. Recent evidence suggests that administration of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), can regulate redox-dependent signalling pathway(s) to promote cardiomyocyte proliferation in vitro, but the potential relevance of such a pathway in vivo has not been tested. We have generated a transgenic (Tg) mouse model in which the H2O2-generating enzyme, NADPH oxidase 4 (Nox4), is overexpressed within the postnatal cardiomyocytes, and observed that the hearts of 1–3 week old Tg mice pups are larger in comparison to wild type (Wt) littermate controls. We demonstrate that the cardiomyocytes of Tg mouse pups have increased cell cycling capacity in vivo as determined by incorporation of 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine. Further, microarray analyses of the transcriptome of these Tg mouse hearts suggested that the expression of cyclin D2 is significantly increased. We investigated the molecular mechanisms which underlie this more proliferative phenotype in isolated neonatal rat cardiomyocytes (NRCs) in vitro, and demonstrate that Nox4 overexpression mediates an H2O2-dependent activation of the ERK1/2 signalling pathway, which in turn phosphorylates and activates the transcription factor c-myc. This results in a significant increase in cyclin D2 expression, which we show to be mediated, at least in part, by cis-acting c-myc binding sites within the proximal cyclin D2 promoter. Overexpression of Nox4 in NRCs results in an increase in their proliferative capacity that is ablated by the silencing of cyclin D2. We further demonstrate activation of the ERK1/2 signalling pathway, increased phosphorylation of c-myc and significantly increased expression of cyclin D2 protein in the Nox4 Tg hearts. We suggest that this pathway acts to maintain the proliferative capacity of cardiomyocytes in Nox4 Tg pups in vivo and so delays their exit from the cell

  6. Cyclin I is involved in the regulation of cell cycle progression.

    PubMed

    Nagano, Taiki; Hashimoto, Toshiaki; Nakashima, Akio; Hisanaga, Shin-ichi; Kikkawa, Ushio; Kamada, Shinji

    2013-08-15

    Cyclins control cell cycle progression by regulating the activity of cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks). Cyclin I is a member of the cyclin family because of the presence of a cyclin box motif. It has been suggested that Cyclin I is involved in various biological processes, such as cell survival, angiogenesis, and cell differentiation. However, whether or not Cyclin I has a role in regulating the cell cycle similarly to other cyclins has yet to be clarified. Therefore, we investigated the role for Cyclin I in cell cycle progression. We showed that the protein level of Cyclin I oscillated during the cell cycle, and that Cyclin I was subjected to ubiquitination and degradation in cells. The interaction between Cyclin I and Cdk5 was detected in cells overexpressed with both proteins. Furthermore, depletion of Cyclin I by siRNAs prevented cell proliferation, suggesting the positive role of Cyclin I for the cell cycle progression. In addition, flow cytometric analysis revealed that cells depleted of Cyclin I were accumulated at G₂/M phases. By using HeLa.S-Fucci (fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicator) cells, we further confirmed that knockdown of Cyclin I induced cell cycle arrest at S/G₂/M phases. These results strongly suggest that Cyclin I has the role in the regulation of cell cycle progression.

  7. Determinants of Human Cyclin B1 Association with Mitotic Chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Pfaff, Kathleen L.; King, Randall W.

    2013-01-01

    Cyclin B1–CDK1 activity is essential for mitotic entry, but questions remain regarding how the activity of this kinase is spatially regulated. Previous studies showed that the cyclin B1 subunit localizes to several compartments of a mitotic cell, including the centrosomes, mitotic spindle, kinetochores and chromosomes via distinct sequence elements. Mitotic chromosome association occurs through the unstructured N-terminal domain of cyclin B1 and is independent of CDK1 binding. Here, we use live cell imaging of human cyclin B1 fused to GFP to precisely define the sequence elements within cyclin B1 that mediate its association with condensed mitotic chromosomes. We find that a short, evolutionarily conserved N-terminal motif is required for cyclin B1 to localize to mitotic chromosomes. We further reveal a role for arginine residues within and near the destruction box sequence in the chromosome association of cyclin B1. Additionally, our data suggest that sequences further downstream in cyclin B1, such as the cytoplasmic retention sequence and the cyclin box, may negatively modulate chromosome association. Because multiple basic residues are required for cyclin B1 association with mitotic chromosomes, electrostatic interactions with DNA may facilitate cyclin B1 localization to chromosomes. PMID:23505570

  8. A novel quantitative model of cell cycle progression based on cyclin-dependent kinases activity and population balances.

    PubMed

    Pisu, Massimo; Concas, Alessandro; Cao, Giacomo

    2015-04-01

    Cell cycle regulates proliferative cell capacity under normal or pathologic conditions, and in general it governs all in vivo/in vitro cell growth and proliferation processes. Mathematical simulation by means of reliable and predictive models represents an important tool to interpret experiment results, to facilitate the definition of the optimal operating conditions for in vitro cultivation, or to predict the effect of a specific drug in normal/pathologic mammalian cells. Along these lines, a novel model of cell cycle progression is proposed in this work. Specifically, it is based on a population balance (PB) approach that allows one to quantitatively describe cell cycle progression through the different phases experienced by each cell of the entire population during its own life. The transition between two consecutive cell cycle phases is simulated by taking advantage of the biochemical kinetic model developed by Gérard and Goldbeter (2009) which involves cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) whose regulation is achieved through a variety of mechanisms that include association with cyclins and protein inhibitors, phosphorylation-dephosphorylation, and cyclin synthesis or degradation. This biochemical model properly describes the entire cell cycle of mammalian cells by maintaining a sufficient level of detail useful to identify check point for transition and to estimate phase duration required by PB. Specific examples are discussed to illustrate the ability of the proposed model to simulate the effect of drugs for in vitro trials of interest in oncology, regenerative medicine and tissue engineering.

  9. GLP-1 ameliorates the proliferation activity of INS-1 cells inhibited by intermittent high glucose concentrations through the regulation of cyclins.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhen; Li, Jing; Jiang, Xinkui; Yang, Lei; Lei, Lei; Cai, Dehong; Zhang, Hua; Chen, Hong

    2014-08-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and its analog exendin (EX)-4 have been considered to promote β-cell growth and expansion. In the present, study we investigated the effect of GLP-1 on proliferative activity and cell cycle regulation in the pancreatic insulin-secreting β-cell line, INS-1, treated with intermittent high glucose. INS-1 cells were treated with normal glucose (5.5 mmol/l), constant high glucose (30 mmol/l) and intermittent high glucose (rotation/24 h in 5.5 or 30 mmol/l) in the presence or absence of GLP-1 (100 nmol/l) for seven days. Proliferative activity, cell cycle and the expression of cyclin D1, p21, p27 and Skp2 were examined. INS-1 treated with intermittent high glucose and GLP-1 demonstrated a significant increase in proliferation activity (1.45±0.12; P<0.01) and decreased cell proportion in G0/G1 phase (49.73±4.04%, P<0.01) compared with those without GLP-1. Furthermore, the expression levels of cyclin D1 and Skp2 were increased, while the expression of p27 and p21 were significantly reduced. Similar results were identified in those treated with constant high glucose and GLP-1. These results suggest that GLP-1 may ease the G0/G1 cell cycle arrest of INS-1 cells induced by intermittent high glucose by upregulating the expression of cyclin D1 and Skp2, downregulating the expression of p21 and p27, and finally promoting the cell cycle progression and proliferation activity.

  10. S-nitrosylation of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (cdk5) regulates its kinase activity and dendrite growth during neuronal development.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Yu, Pei-Chun; Tsang, Anthony H K; Chen, Yu; Fu, Amy K Y; Fu, Wing-Yu; Chung, Kenny K; Ip, Nancy Y

    2010-10-27

    Precise regulation of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5), a member of the cyclin-dependent kinase family, is critical for proper neuronal development and functions. Cdk5 is activated through its association with the neuron-specific activator p35 or p39. Nonetheless, how its kinase activity is regulated in neurons is not well understood. In this study, we found that Cdk5 activity is regulated by S-nitrosylation, a post-translational modification of protein that affects a plethora of neuronal functions. S-nitrosylation of Cdk5 occurs at Cys83, which is one of the critical amino acids within the ATP-binding pocket of the kinase. Upon S-nitrosylation, Cdk5 exhibits reduced kinase activity, whereas mutation of Cys83 to Ala on Cdk5 renders the kinase refractory to such inhibition. Importantly, S-nitrosylated Cdk5 can be detected in the mouse brain, and blocking the S-nitrosylation of Cdk5 in cultured hippocampal neurons enhances dendritic growth and branching. Together, our findings reveal an important role of S-nitrosylation in regulating Cdk5 kinase activity and dendrite growth in neurons during development.

  11. Viral Cyclin–Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 6 Complexes Initiate Nuclear DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Laman, Heike; Coverley, Dawn; Krude, Torsten; Laskey, Ronald; Jones, Nic

    2001-01-01

    The cyclins encoded by Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus and herpesvirus saimiri are homologs of human D-type cyclins. However, when complexed to cdk6, they have several activities that distinguish them from D-type cyclin-cdk6 complexes, including resistance to cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors and an enhanced substrate range. We find that viral cyclins interact with and phosphorylate proteins involved in replication initiation. Using mammalian in vitro replication systems, we show that viral cyclin-cdk6 complexes can directly trigger the initiation of DNA synthesis in isolated late-G1-phase nuclei. Viral cyclin-cdk6 complexes share this capacity with cyclin A-cdk2, demonstrating that in addition to functioning as G1-phase cyclin-cdk complexes, they function as S-phase cyclin-cdk complexes. PMID:11134348

  12. Nucleolar GTP-binding Protein-1 (NGP-1) Promotes G1 to S Phase Transition by Activating Cyclin-dependent Kinase Inhibitor p21Cip1/Waf1*

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Debduti; Anbarasu, Kumaraswamy; Rajabather, Suryaraja; Priya, Rangasamy Sneha; Desai, Pavitra; Mahalingam, Sundarasamy

    2015-01-01

    Nucleolar GTP-binding protein (NGP-1) is overexpressed in various cancers and proliferating cells, but the functional significance remains unknown. In this study, we show that NGP-1 promotes G1 to S phase transition of cells by enhancing CDK inhibitor p21Cip-1/Waf1 expression through p53. In addition, our results suggest that activation of the cyclin D1-CDK4 complex by NGP-1 via maintaining the stoichiometry between cyclin D1-CDK4 complex and p21 resulted in hyperphosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein at serine 780 (p-RBSer-780) followed by the up-regulation of E2F1 target genes required to promote G1 to S phase transition. Furthermore, our data suggest that ribosomal protein RPL23A interacts with NGP-1 and abolishes NGP-1-induced p53 activity by enhancing Mdm2-mediated p53 polyubiquitination. Finally, reduction of p-RBSer-780 levels and E2F1 target gene expression upon ectopic expression of RPL23a resulted in arrest at the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Collectively, this investigation provides evidence that NGP-1 promotes cell cycle progression through the activation of the p53/p21Cip-1/Waf1 pathway. PMID:26203195

  13. Rac1b enhances cell survival through activation of the JNK2/c-JUN/Cyclin-D1 and AKT2/MCL1 pathways

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong; Wei, Si-Si; Chen, Jie; Chen, Yi-He; Xu, Wei-Ping; Jie, Qi-Qiang; Zhou, Qing; Li, Yi-Gang; Wei, Yi-Dong; Wang, Yue-Peng

    2016-01-01

    Rac1b is a constitutively activated, alternatively spliced form of the small GTPase Rac1. Previous studies showed that Rac1b promotes cell proliferation and inhibits apoptosis. In the present study, we used microarray analysis to detect genes differentially expressed in HEK293T cells and SW480 human colon cancer cells stably overexpressing Rac1b. We found that the pro-proliferation genes JNK2, c-JUN and cyclin-D1 as well as anti-apoptotic AKT2 and MCL1 were all upregulated in both lines. Rac1b promoted cell proliferation and inhibited apoptosis by activating the JNK2/c-JUN/cyclin-D1 and AKT2/MCL1 pathways, respectively. Very low Rac1b levels were detected in the colonic epithelium of wild-type Sprague-Dawley rats. Knockout of the rat Rac1 gene exon-3b or knockdown of endogenous Rac1b in HT29 human colon cancer cells downregulated only the AKT2/MCL1 pathway. Our study revealed that very low levels of endogenous Rac1b inhibit apoptosis, while Rac1b upregulation both promotes cell proliferation and inhibits apoptosis. It is likely the AKT2/MCL1 pathway is more sensitive to Rac1b regulation. PMID:26918455

  14. Cyclin D2 Protein Stability Is Regulated in Pancreatic β-Cells

    PubMed Central

    He, Lu Mei; Sartori, Daniel J.; Teta, Monica; Opare-Addo, Lynn M.; Rankin, Matthew M.; Long, Simon Y.; Diehl, J. Alan; Kushner, Jake A.

    2009-01-01

    The molecular determinants of β-cell mass expansion remain poorly understood. Cyclin D2 is the major D-type cyclin expressed in β-cells, essential for adult β-cell growth. We hypothesized that cyclin D2 could be actively regulated in β-cells, which could allow mitogenic stimuli to influence β-cell expansion. Cyclin D2 protein was sharply increased after partial pancreatectomy, but cyclin D2 mRNA was unchanged, suggesting posttranscriptional regulatory mechanisms influence cyclin D2 expression in β-cells. Consistent with this hypothesis, cyclin D2 protein stability is powerfully regulated in fibroblasts. Threonine 280 of cyclin D2 is phosphorylated, and this residue critically limits D2 stability. We derived transgenic (tg) mice with threonine 280 of cyclin D2 mutated to alanine (T280A) or wild-type cyclin D2 under the control of the insulin promoter. Cyclin D2 T280A protein was expressed at much higher levels than wild-type cyclin D2 protein in β-cells, despite equivalent expression of tg mRNAs. Cyclin D2 T280A tg mice exhibited a constitutively nuclear cyclin D2 localization in β-cells, and increased cyclin D2 stability in islets. Interestingly, threonine 280-mutant cyclin D2 tg mice had greatly reduced β-cell apoptosis, with suppressed expression of proapoptotic genes. Suppressed β-cell apoptosis in threonine 280-mutant cyclin D2 tg mice resulted in greatly increased β-cell area in aged mice. Taken together, these data indicate that cyclin D2 is regulated by protein stability in pancreatic β-cells, that signals that act upon threonine 280 limit cyclin D2 stability in β-cells, and that threonine 280-mutant cyclin D2 overexpression prolongs β-cell survival and augments β-cell mass expansion. PMID:19628581

  15. Lupeol induces p53 and cyclin-B-mediated G2/M arrest and targets apoptosis through activation of caspase in mouse skin

    SciTech Connect

    Nigam, Nidhi Prasad, Sahdeo; George, Jasmine; Shukla, Yogeshwer

    2009-04-03

    Lupeol, present in fruits and medicinal plants, is a biologically active compound that has been shown to have various pharmacological properties in experimental studies. In the present study, we demonstrated the modulatory effect of lupeol on 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA)-induced alterations on cell proliferation in the skin of Swiss albino mice. Lupeol treatment showed significant (p < 0.05) preventive effects with marked inhibition at 48, 72, and 96 h against DMBA-mediated neoplastic events. Cell-cycle analysis showed that lupeol-induced G2/M-phase arrest (16-37%) until 72 h, and these inhibitory effects were mediated through inhibition of the cyclin-B-regulated signaling pathway involving p53, p21/WAF1, cdc25C, cdc2, and cyclin-B gene expression. Further lupeol-induced apoptosis was observed, as shown by an increased sub-G1 peak (28%) at 96 h, with upregulation of bax and caspase-3 genes and downregulation of anti-apoptotic bcl-2 and survivin genes. Thus, our results indicate that lupeol has novel anti-proliferative and apoptotic potential that may be helpful in designing strategies to fight skin cancer.

  16. BMP6 Regulates Proliferation and Apoptosis of Human Sertoli Cells Via Smad2/3 and Cyclin D1 Pathway and DACH1 and TFAP2A Activation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong; Yuan, Qingqing; Sun, Min; Niu, Minghui; Wen, Liping; Fu, Hongyong; Zhou, Fan; Chen, Zheng; Yao, Chencheng; Hou, Jingmei; Shen, Ruinan; Lin, Qisheng; Liu, Wenjie; Jia, Ruobing; Li, Zheng; He, Zuping

    2017-01-01

    Sertoli cells are essential for regulating normal spermatogenesis. However, the mechanisms underlying human Sertoli cell development remain largely elusive. Here we examined the function and signaling pathways of BMP6 in regulating human Sertoli cells. RT-PCR, immunocytochemistry and Western blots revealed that BMP6 and its multiple receptors were expressed in human Sertoli cells. CCK-8 and EDU assays showed that BMP6 promoted the proliferation of Sertoli cells. Conversely, BMP6 siRNAs inhibited the division of these cells. Annexin V/PI assay indicated that BMP6 reduced the apoptosis in human Sertoli cells, whereas BMP6 knockdown assumed reverse effects. BMP6 enhanced the expression levels of ZO1, SCF, GDNF and AR in human Sertoli cells, and ELISA assay showed an increase of SCF by BMP6 and a reduction by BMP6 siRNAs. Notably, Smad2/3 phosphorylation and cyclin D1 were enhanced by BMP6 and decreased by BMP6 siRNAs in human Sertoli cells. The levels of DACH1 and TFAP2A were increased by BMP6 and reduced by BMP6 siRNAs, and the growth of human Sertoli cells was inhibited by these siRNAs. Collectively, these results suggest that BMP6 regulates the proliferation and apoptosis of human Sertoli cells via activating the Smad2/3/cyclin D1 and DACH1 and TFAP2A pathway. PMID:28387750

  17. Activation of c-Myc and Cyclin D1 by JCV T-Antigen and β-Catenin in Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ripple, Michael J.; Parker Struckhoff, Amanda; Trillo-Tinoco, Jimena; Li, Li; Margolin, David A.; McGoey, Robin; Valle, Luis Del

    2014-01-01

    During the last decade, mounting evidence has implicated the human neurotropic virus JC virus in the pathology of colon cancer. However, the mechanisms of JC virus-mediated oncogenesis are still not fully determined. One candidate to mediate these effects is the viral early transcriptional product T-Antigen, which has the ability to inactivate cell cycle regulatory proteins such as p53. In medulloblastomas, T-Antigen has been shown to bind the Wnt signaling pathway protein β-catenin; however, the effects of this interaction on downstream cell cycle regulatory proteins remain unknown. In light of these observations, we investigated the association of T-Antigen and nuclear β-catenin in colon cancer cases and the effects of this complex in the activation of the transcription and cell cycle regulators c-Myc and Cyclin D1 in vitro. Gene amplification demonstrated the presence of viral sequences in 82.4% of cases and we detected expression of T-Antigen in 64.6% of cases by immunohistochemistry. Further, we found that T-Antigen and β-catenin co-localized in the nuclei of tumor cells and we confirmed the physical binding between these two proteins in vitro. The nuclear presence of T-Antigen and β-catenin resulted in the significant enhancement of TCF-dependent promoter activity and activation of the β-catenin downstream targets, c-Myc and Cyclin D1. These observations provide further evidence for a role of JCV T-Antigen in the dysregulation of the Wnt signaling pathway and in the pathogenesis of colon cancer. PMID:25229241

  18. Abrogation of p53 by its antisense in MCF-7 breast carcinoma cells increases cyclin D1 via activation of Akt and promotion of cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Chhipa, Rishi Raj; Kumari, Ratna; Upadhyay, Ankur Kumar; Bhat, Manoj Kumar

    2007-11-15

    The p53 protein has been a subject of intense research interest since its discovery as about 50% of human cancers carry p53 mutations. Mutations in the p53 gene are the most frequent genetic lesions in breast cancers suggesting a critical role of p53 in breast cancer development, growth and chemosensitivity. This report describes the derivation and characterization of MCF-7As53, an isogenic cell line derived from MCF-7 breast carcinoma cells in which p53 was abrogated by antisense p53 cDNA. Similar to MCF-7 and simultaneously selected hygromycin resistant MCF-7H cells, MCF-7As53 cells have consistent basal epithelial phenotype, morphology, and estrogen receptor expression levels at normal growth conditions. Present work documents investigation of molecular variations, growth kinetics, and cell cycle related studies in relation to absence of wild-type p53 protein and its transactivation potential as well. Even though wild-type tumor suppressor p53 is an activator of cell growth arrest and apoptosis-mediator genes such as p21, Bax, and GADD45 in MCF-7As53 cells, no alterations in expression levels of these genes were detected. The doubling time of these cells decreased due to depletion of G0/G1 cell phase because of constitutive activation of Akt and increase in cyclin D1 protein levels. This proliferative property was abrogated by wortmannin, an inhibitor of PI3-K/Akt signaling pathway. Therefore this p53 null cell line indicates that p53 is an indispensable component of cellular signaling system which is regulated by caveolin-1 expression, involving Akt activation and increase in cyclin D1, thereby promoting proliferation of breast cancer cells.

  19. FTY720 Shows Promising In vitro and In vivo Preclinical Activity by Downmodulating Cyclin D1 and Phospho-Akt in Mantle Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qing; Alinari, Lapo; Chen, Ching-Shih; Yan, Fengting; Dalton, James T.; Lapalombella, Rosa; Zhang, Xiaoli; Mani, Rajeswaran; Lin, Teresa; Byrd, John C.; Baiocchi, Robert A.; Muthusamy, Natarajan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Despite the progress that has been made in the treatment of mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), all patients invariably relapse with the currently available therapies. Because of the absence of curative therapy for MCL, we explored FTY720 as a novel agent against MCL. Experimental Design The cytotoxic effect of FTY720 in primary MCL tumor cells and cell lines were evaluated in vitro. The effects of FTY720 on caspase activation, generation of reactive oxygen species, and modulation of Cyclin D1 and Akt, which are implied in the pathogenesis of MCL, were investigated. The in vivo efficacy of FTY720 was evaluated in a Jeko-severe combined immunodeficient xenograft model of human MCL. Results FTY720 mediated time- and dose-dependent cytotoxicity in primary MCL tumor cells and MCL cell lines in vitro. FTY720-induced cytotoxicity occured independent of caspase activation but dependent on the generation of ROS in MCL. In addition, FTY720 treatment resulted in the time-dependent downmodulation of Cyclin D1 and accumulation of cells in G0-G1 and G2-M phases of the cell cycle with concomitant decrease in S-phase entry. Furthermore, concentrations of FTY720 that induced cytotoxicity led to decreased phospho-Akt in primary MCL cells and cell lines. Most importantly, the in vivo therapeutic activity of FTY720 was shown in severe combined immunodeficient mice engrafted with the Jeko MCL cell line. Conclusions These results provide the first evidence for a potential use of FTY720 in targeting key pathways that are operable in the pathogenesis of MCL and warrant further investigation of FTY720 in clinical trials to treat patients with MCL. PMID:20460491

  20. Differential regulation of cyclins D1 and D3 in hepatocyte proliferation.

    PubMed

    Rickheim, David G; Nelsen, Christopher J; Fassett, John T; Timchenko, Nikolai A; Hansen, Linda K; Albrecht, Jeffrey H

    2002-07-01

    Substantial evidence suggests that cyclin D1 plays a pivotal role in the control of the hepatocyte cell cycle in response to mitogenic stimuli, whereas the closely related protein cyclin D3 has not been extensively evaluated. In the current study, we examined the regulation of cyclins D1 and D3 during hepatocyte proliferation in vivo after 70% partial hepatectomy (PH) and in culture. In contrast to cyclin D1, which was nearly undetectable in quiescent liver and substantially up-regulated after PH, cyclin D3 was constitutively expressed and induced only modestly. In the regenerating liver, the concentration of cyclin D3 was only about 10% of that of cyclin D1. Cyclin D1 formed complexes primarily with cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (cdk4), which were markedly activated in the regenerating liver and readily sequestered the cell cycle inhibitory proteins, p21 and p27. Cyclin D3 bound to both cdk4 and cdk6. Cyclin D3/cdk6 activity was readily detectable in quiescent liver and changed little after PH, and this complex appeared to play a minor role in sequestering p21 and p27. In cultured hepatocytes, epidermal growth factor or insulin had little effect, but the combination of these agents substantially induced cyclin D1 and cell cycle progression. Inhibition of Mek1 or phosphoinositide 3-kinase markedly inhibited cyclin D1 expression and replication. In contrast, cyclin D3 was expressed in the absence of mitogens and was only modestly affected by these manipulations. In addition, growth-inhibitory extracellular matrix conditions inhibited cyclin D1 but not cyclin D3 expression. In conclusion, these results support the concept that cyclin D1 is critically regulated by extracellular stimuli that control proliferation, whereas cyclin D3 is regulated through different pathways and plays a distinct role in the liver.

  1. Ubiquitination of free cyclin D1 is independent of phosphorylation on threonine 286.

    PubMed

    Germain, D; Russell, A; Thompson, A; Hendley, J

    2000-04-21

    Cyclin D1 binds and regulates the activity of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) 4 and 6. Phosphorylation of the retinoblastoma protein by cyclin D1.CDK4/6 complexes during the G(1) phase of the cell cycle promotes entry into S phase. Cyclin D1 protein is ubiquitinated and degraded by the 26 S proteasome. Previous studies have demonstrated that cyclin D1 ubiquitination is dependent on its phosphorylation by glycogen synthase kinase 3beta (GSK-3beta) on threonine 286 and that this phosphorylation event is greatly enhanced by binding to CDK4 (Diehl, J. A., Cheng, M. G., Roussel, M. F., and Sherr, C. J. (1998) Genes Dev. 12, 3499-3511). We now report an additional pathway for the ubiquitination of free cyclin D1 (unbound to CDKs). We show that, when unbound to CDK4, a cyclin D1-T286A mutant is ubiquitinated. Further, we show that a mutant of cyclin D1 that cannot bind to CDK4 (cyclin D1-KE) is also ubiquitinated in vivo. Our results demonstrate that free cyclin D1 is ubiquitinated independently of its phosphorylation on threonine 286 by GSK-3beta, suggesting that, as has been shown for cyclin E, distinct pathways of ubiquitination lead to the degradation of free and CDK-bound cyclin D1. The pathway responsible for ubiquitination of free cyclin D1 may be important in limiting the effects of cyclin D1 overexpression in a variety of cancers.

  2. A Minimal Chimera of Human Cyclin T1 and Tat Binds TAR and Activates Human Immunodeficiency Virus Transcription in Murine Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fujinaga, Koh; Irwin, Dan; Taube, Ran; Zhang, Fan; Geyer, Matthias; Peterlin, B. Matija

    2002-01-01

    The transcriptional elongation of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is mediated by the virally encoded transactivator Tat and its cellular cofactor, positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb). The human cyclin T1 (hCycT1) subunit of P-TEFb forms a stable complex with Tat and the transactivation response element (TAR) RNA located at the 5′ end of all viral transcripts. Previous studies have demonstrated that hCycT1 binds Tat in a Zn2+-dependent manner via the cysteine at position 261, which is a tyrosine in murine cyclin T1. In the present study, we mutated all other cysteines and histidines that could be involved in this Zn2+-dependent interaction. Because all of these mutant proteins except hCycT1(C261Y) activated viral transcription in murine cells, no other cysteine or histidine in hCycT1 is responsible for this interaction. Next, we fused the N-terminal 280 residues in hCycT1 with Tat. Not only the full-length chimera but also the mutant hCycT1 with an N-terminal deletion to position 249, which retained the Tat-TAR recognition motif, activated HIV-1 transcription in murine cells. This minimal hybrid mutant hCycT1-Tat protein bound TAR RNA as well as human and murine P-TEFb in vitro. We conclude that this minimal chimera not only reproduces the high-affinity binding among P-TEFb, Tat, and TAR but also will be invaluable for determining the three-dimensional structure of this RNA-protein complex. PMID:12438619

  3. Cyclin D1 regulates hepatic estrogen and androgen metabolism.

    PubMed

    Mullany, Lisa K; Hanse, Eric A; Romano, Andrea; Blomquist, Charles H; Mason, J Ian; Delvoux, Bert; Anttila, Chelsea; Albrecht, Jeffrey H

    2010-06-01

    Cyclin D1 is a cell cycle control protein that plays an important role in regenerating liver and many types of cancer. Previous reports have shown that cyclin D1 can directly enhance estrogen receptor activity and inhibit androgen receptor activity in a ligand-independent manner and thus may play an important role in hormone-responsive malignancies. In this study, we examine a distinct mechanism by which cyclin D1 regulates sex steroid signaling, via altered metabolism of these hormones at the tissue and cellular level. In male mouse liver, ectopic expression of cyclin D1 regulated genes involved in the synthesis and degradation of sex steroid hormones in a pattern that would predict increased estrogen and decreased androgen levels. Indeed, hepatic expression of cyclin D1 led to increased serum estradiol levels, increased estrogen-responsive gene expression, and decreased androgen-responsive gene expression. Cyclin D1 also regulated the activity of several key enzymatic reactions in the liver, including increased oxidation of testosterone to androstenedione and decreased conversion of estradiol to estrone. Similar findings were seen in the setting of physiological cyclin D1 expression in regenerating liver. Knockdown of cyclin D1 in HuH7 cells produced reciprocal changes in steroid metabolism genes compared with cyclin D1 overexpression in mouse liver. In conclusion, these studies establish a novel link between the cell cycle machinery and sex steroid metabolism and provide a distinct mechanism by which cyclin D1 may regulate hormone signaling. Furthermore, these results suggest that increased cyclin D1 expression, which occurs in liver regeneration and liver diseases, may contribute to the feminization seen in these settings.

  4. Differential regulation of CDP/Cux p110 by cyclin A/Cdk2 and cyclin A/Cdk1.

    PubMed

    Santaguida, Marianne; Nepveu, Alain

    2005-09-23

    Previous experiments with peptide fusion proteins suggested that cyclin A/Cdk1 and Cdk2 might exhibit similar yet distinct phosphorylation specificities. Using a physiological substrate, CDP/Cux, our study confirms this notion. Proteolytic processing of CDP/Cux by cathepsin L generates the CDP/Cux p110 isoform at the beginning of S phase. CDP/Cux p110 makes stable interactions with DNA during S phase but is inhibited in G2 following the phosphorylation of serine 1237 by cyclin A/Cdk1. In this study, we propose that differential phosphorylation by cyclin A/Cdk1 and cyclin A/Cdk2 enables CDP/Cux p110 to exert its function as a transcriptional regulator specifically during S phase. We found that like cyclin A/Cdk1, cyclin A/Cdk2 interacted efficiently with recombinant CDP/Cux proteins that contain the Cut homeodomain and an adjacent cyclin-binding motif (Cy). In contrast to cyclin A/Cdk1, however, cyclin A/Cdk2 did not efficiently phosphorylate CDP/Cux p110 on serine 1237 and did not inhibit its DNA binding activity in vitro. Accordingly, co-expression with cyclin A/Cdk2 in cells did not inhibit the DNA binding and transcriptional activities of CDP/Cux p110. To confirm that the sequence surrounding serine 1237 was responsible for the differential regulation by Cdk1 and Cdk2, we replaced 4 amino acids flanking the phosphorylation site to mimic a known Cdk2 phosphorylation site present in the Cdc6 protein. Both cyclin A/Cdk2 and Cdk1 efficiently phosphorylated the CDP/Cux(Cdc6) mutant and inhibited its DNA binding activity. Altogether our results help explain why the DNA binding activity of CDP/Cux p110 is maximal during S phase and decreases in G2 phase.

  5. p39, the Primary Activator for Cyclin-dependent Kinase 5 (Cdk5) in Oligodendroglia, Is Essential for Oligodendroglia Differentiation and Myelin Repair*

    PubMed Central

    Bankston, Andrew N.; Li, Wenqi; Zhang, Hui; Ku, Li; Liu, Guanglu; Papa, Filomena; Zhao, Lixia; Bibb, James A.; Cambi, Franca; Tiwari-Woodruff, Seema K.; Feng, Yue

    2013-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) plays key roles in normal brain development and function. Dysregulation of Cdk5 may cause neurodegeneration and cognitive impairment. Besides the well demonstrated role of Cdk5 in neurons, emerging evidence suggests the functional requirement of Cdk5 in oligodendroglia (OL) and CNS myelin development. However, whether neurons and OLs employ similar or distinct mechanisms to regulate Cdk5 activity remains elusive. We report here that in contrast to neurons that harbor high levels of two Cdk5 activators, p35 and p39, OLs express abundant p39 but negligible p35. In addition, p39 is selectively up-regulated in OLs during differentiation along with elevated Cdk5 activity, whereas p35 expression remains unaltered. Specific knockdown of p39 by siRNA significantly attenuates Cdk5 activity and OL differentiation without affecting p35. Finally, expression of p39, but not p35, is increased during myelin repair, and remyelination is impaired in p39−/− mice. Together, these results reveal that neurons and OLs harbor distinct preference of Cdk5 activators and demonstrate important functions of p39-dependent Cdk5 activation in OL differentiation during de novo myelin development and myelin repair. PMID:23645679

  6. Cyclin C mediates stress-induced mitochondrial fission and apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kun; Yan, Ruilan; Cooper, Katrina F.; Strich, Randy

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria are dynamic organelles that undergo constant fission and fusion cycles. In response to cellular damage, this balance is shifted dramatically toward fission. Cyclin C–Cdk8 kinase regulates transcription of diverse gene sets. Using knockout mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs), we demonstrate that cyclin C directs the extensive mitochondrial scission induced by the anticancer drug cisplatin or oxidative stress. This activity is independent of transcriptional regulation, as Cdk8 is not required for this activity. Furthermore, adding purified cyclin C to unstressed permeabilized MEF cultures induced complete mitochondrial fragmentation that was dependent on the fission factors Drp1 and Mff. To regulate fission, a portion of cyclin C translocates from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, where it associates with Drp1 and is required for its enhanced mitochondrial activity in oxidatively stressed cells. In addition, although HeLa cells regulate cyclin C in a manner similar to MEF cells, U2OS osteosarcoma cultures display constitutively cytoplasmic cyclin C and semifragmented mitochondria. Finally, cyclin C, but not Cdk8, is required for loss of mitochondrial outer membrane permeability and apoptosis in cells treated with cisplatin. In conclusion, this study suggests that cyclin C connects stress-induced mitochondrial hyperfission and programmed cell death in mammalian cells. PMID:25609094

  7. Regulation of cyclin E stability in Xenopus laevis embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt-(Webb), Yekaterina

    Cyclin-Cdk complexes positively regulate cell cycle progression. Cyclins are regulatory subunits that bind to and activate cyclin-dependent kinases or Cdks. Cyclin E associates with Cdk2 to mediate G1/S phase transition of the cell cycle. Cyclin E is overexpressed in breast, lung, skin, gastrointestinal, cervical, and ovarian cancers. Its overexpression correlates with poor patient prognosis and is involved in the etiology of breast cancer. We have been studying how this protein is downregulated during development in order to determine if these mechanisms are disrupted during tumorigenesis, leading to its overexpression. Using Xenopus laevis embryos as a model, we have shown previously that during the first 12 embryonic cell cycles Cyclin E levels remain constant yet Cdk2 activity oscillates twice per cell cycle. Cyclin E is abruptly destabilized by an undefined mechanism after the 12th cell cycle, which corresponds to the midblastula transition (MBT). Based on work our work and work by others, we have hypothesized that differential phosphorylation and a change in localization result in Cyclin E degradation by the 26S proteasome at the MBT. To test this, we generated a series of point mutations in conserved threonine/serine residues implicated in degradation of human Cyclin E. Using Western blot analysis, we show that similarly to human Cyclin E, mutation of these residues to unphosphorylatable alanine stabilizes Cyclin E past the MBT when they are expressed in vivo. Cyclin E localization was studied by immunofluorescence analysis of endogenous and exogenous protein in pre-MBT, MBT, and post-MBT embryos. In addition, we developed a novel method of conjugating recombinant His6-tagged Cyclin E to fluorescent (CdSe)ZnS nanoparticles (quantum dots) capped with dihydrolipoic acid. Confocal microscopy was used to visualize His6Cyclin E-quantum dot complexes inside embryo cells in real time. We found that re-localization at the MBT from the cytoplasm to the nucleus

  8. Specific activity of cyclin-dependent kinase I is a new potential predictor of tumour recurrence in stage II colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zeestraten, E C M; Maak, M; Shibayama, M; Schuster, T; Nitsche, U; Matsushima, T; Nakayama, S; Gohda, K; Friess, H; van de Velde, C J H; Ishihara, H; Rosenberg, R; Kuppen, P J K; Janssen, K-P

    2012-01-01

    Background: There are no established biomarkers to identify tumour recurrence in stage II colon cancer. As shown previously, the enzymatic activity of the cyclin-dependent kinases 1 and 2 (CDK1 and CDK2) predicts outcome in breast cancer. Therefore, we investigated whether CDK activity identifies tumour recurrence in colon cancer. Methods: In all, 254 patients with completely resected (R0) UICC stage II colon cancer were analysed retrospectively from two independent cohorts from Munich (Germany) and Leiden (Netherlands). None of the patients received adjuvant treatment. Development of distant metastasis was observed in 27 patients (median follow-up: 86 months). Protein expression and activity of CDKs were measured on fresh-frozen tumour samples. Results: Specific activity (SA) of CDK1 (CDK1SA), but not CDK2, significantly predicted distant metastasis (concordance index=0.69, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.55–0.79, P=0.036). Cutoff derivation by maximum log-rank statistics yielded a threshold of CDK1SA at 11 (SA units, P=0.029). Accordingly, 59% of patients were classified as high-risk (CDK1SA ⩾11). Cox proportional hazard analysis revealed CDK1SA as independent prognostic variable (hazard ratio=6.2, 95% CI: 1.44–26.9, P=0.012). Moreover, CKD1SA was significantly elevated in microsatellite-stable tumours. Conclusion: Specific activity of CDK1 is a promising biomarker for metastasis risk in stage II colon cancer. PMID:22108518

  9. Cdks, cyclins and CKIs: roles beyond cell cycle regulation.

    PubMed

    Lim, Shuhui; Kaldis, Philipp

    2013-08-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks) are serine/threonine kinases and their catalytic activities are modulated by interactions with cyclins and Cdk inhibitors (CKIs). Close cooperation between this trio is necessary for ensuring orderly progression through the cell cycle. In addition to their well-established function in cell cycle control, it is becoming increasingly apparent that mammalian Cdks, cyclins and CKIs play indispensable roles in processes such as transcription, epigenetic regulation, metabolism, stem cell self-renewal, neuronal functions and spermatogenesis. Even more remarkably, they can accomplish some of these tasks individually, without the need for Cdk/cyclin complex formation or kinase activity. In this Review, we discuss the latest revelations about Cdks, cyclins and CKIs with the goal of showcasing their functional diversity beyond cell cycle regulation and their impact on development and disease in mammals.

  10. Aberrant expression of cyclin D1 in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Kazushi; Fry, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    Cyclin D1 binds and activates cyclin-dependent kinases 4/6 (Cdk4/6) to phosphorylate the retinoblastoma (RB) family proteins, relieving E2F/DPs from the negative restraint of RB proteins and histone deacetylases. The cyclin D-Cdk4/6 complexes activate cyclin E/Cdk2 through titration of the Cdk inhibitors p21Cip1/p27Kip1. Cyclin E/Cdk2 further phosphorylates RBs, thereby activating E2F/DPs, and cells enter the S phase of the cell cycle. Cyclin D-Cdk4/6 also phosphorylates MEP50 subunit of the protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5), which cooperates with cyclin D1 to drive lymphomagenesis in vivo. Activated PRMPT5 causes arginine methylation of p53 to suppress expression of pro-apoptotic and anti-proliferative target genes, explaining the molecular mechanism for tumorigenesis. Cyclin D1 physically interacts with transcription factors such as estrogen receptor, androgen receptor, and Myb family proteins to regulate gene expression in Cdk-independent fashion. Dmp1 is a Myb-like protein that quenches the oncogenic signals from activated Ras or HER2 by inducing Arf/p53-dependent cell cycle arrest. Cyclin D1 binds to Dmp1α to activate both Arf and Ink4a promoters to induce cell cycle arrest or apoptosis in non-transformed cells to prevent them from neoplastic transformation. Dmp1-deficiency significantly accelerates mouse mammary tumorigenesis with reduced apoptosis and increased metastasis. Cyclin D1 interferes with ligand activation of PPARγ involved in cellular differentiation; it also physically interacts with histone deacetylases (HDACs) and p300 to repress gene expression. It has also been shown that cyclin D1 accelerates tumorigenesis through transcriptional activation of miR-17/20 and Dicer1 which, in turn, represses cyclin D1 expression. Identification of cyclin D1-binding proteins/promoters will be essential for further clarification of its biological activities. PMID:28090171

  11. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 modulates the transcriptional activity of the mineralocorticoid receptor and regulates expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

    PubMed

    Kino, Tomoshige; Jaffe, Howard; Amin, Niranjana D; Chakrabarti, Mayukh; Zheng, Ya-Li; Chrousos, George P; Pant, Harish C

    2010-05-01

    Glucocorticoids, major end effectors of the stress response, play an essential role in the homeostasis of the central nervous system (CNS) and contribute to memory consolidation and emotional control through their intracellular receptors, the glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptors. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5), on the other hand, plays important roles in the morphogenesis and functions of the central nervous system, and its aberrant activation has been associated with development of neurodegenerative disorders. We previously reported that CDK5 phosphorylated the glucocorticoid receptor and modulated its transcriptional activity. Here we found that CDK5 also regulated mineralocorticoid receptor-induced transcriptional activity by phosphorylating multiple serine and threonine residues located in its N-terminal domain through physical interaction. Aldosterone and dexamethasone, respectively, increased and suppressed mRNA/protein expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in rat cortical neuronal cells, whereas the endogenous glucocorticoid corticosterone showed a biphasic effect. CDK5 enhanced the effect of aldosterone and dexamethasone on BDNF expression. Because this neurotrophic factor plays critical roles in neuronal viability, synaptic plasticity, consolidation of memory, and emotional changes, we suggest that aberrant activation of CDK5 might influence these functions through corticosteroid receptors/BDNF.

  12. The Activators of Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 5 p35 and p39 Are Essential for Oligodendrocyte Maturation, Process Formation, and Myelination

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Fucheng; Zhang, Jessie; Burke, Kathryn

    2016-01-01

    The regulation of oligodendrocyte development and myelin formation in the CNS is poorly defined. Multiple signals influence the rate and extent of CNS myelination, including the noncanonical cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) whose functions are regulated by its activators p35 and p39. Here we show that selective loss of either p35 or p39 perturbed specific aspects of oligodendrocyte development, whereas loss of both p35 and p39 completely inhibited the development of mature oligodendrocytes and myelination. In the absence of p35, oligodendrocyte differentiation was delayed, process outgrowth was truncated in vitro, and the patterning and extent of myelination were perturbed in the CNS of p35−/− mice. In the absence of p39, oligodendrocyte maturation was transiently affected both in vitro and in vivo. However, loss of both p35 and p39 in oligodendrocyte lineage cells completely inhibited oligodendrocyte progenitor cell differentiation and myelination both in vitro and after transplantation into shiverer slice cultures. Loss of p35 and p39 had a more profound effect on oligodendrocyte development than simply the loss of Cdk5 and could not be rescued by Cdk5 overexpression. These data suggest p35 and p39 have specific and overlapping roles in oligodendrocyte development, some of which may be independent of Cdk5 activation. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The development of oligodendrocytes and myelination is essential for normal CNS function and cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) activity is critical for oligodendrocyte maturation, but how Cdk5 activity is controlled is unclear. Here we show that the coactivators of Cdk5, p35 and p39, regulate distinct stages of oligodendrocyte development and myelination. Loss of p35 perturbs oligodendrocyte progenitor cell differentiation, whereas loss of p39 delays oligodendrocyte maturation. Loss of both completely inhibits oligodendrogenesis and myelination. Disruption of oligodendrocyte development was more pronounced in p35−/−;p39

  13. Cyclin E Uses Cdc6 as a Chromatin-Associated Receptor Required for DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Furstenthal, Laura; Kaiser, Brett K.; Swanson, Craig; Jackson, Peter K.

    2001-01-01

    Using an in vitro chromatin assembly assay in Xenopus egg extract, we show that cyclin E binds specifically and saturably to chromatin in three phases. In the first phase, the origin recognition complex and Cdc6 prereplication proteins, but not the minichromosome maintenance complex, are necessary and biochemically sufficient for ATP-dependent binding of cyclin E–Cdk2 to DNA. We find that cyclin E binds the NH2-terminal region of Cdc6 containing Cy–Arg-X-Leu (RXL) motifs. Cyclin E proteins with mutated substrate selection (Met-Arg-Ala-Ile-Leu; MRAIL) motifs fail to bind Cdc6, fail to compete with endogenous cyclin E–Cdk2 for chromatin binding, and fail to rescue replication in cyclin E–depleted extracts. Cdc6 proteins with mutations in the three consensus RXL motifs are quantitatively deficient for cyclin E binding and for rescuing replication in Cdc6-depleted extracts. Thus, the cyclin E–Cdc6 interaction that localizes the Cdk2 complex to chromatin is important for DNA replication. During the second phase, cyclin E–Cdk2 accumulates on chromatin, dependent on polymerase activity. In the third phase, cyclin E is phosphorylated, and the cyclin E–Cdk2 complex is displaced from chromatin in mitosis. In vitro, mitogen-activated protein kinase and especially cyclin B–Cdc2, but not the polo-like kinase 1, remove cyclin E–Cdk2 from chromatin. Rebinding of hyperphosphorylated cyclin E–Cdk2 to interphase chromatin requires dephosphorylation, and the Cdk kinase–directed Cdc14 phosphatase is sufficient for this dephosphorylation in vitro. These three phases of cyclin E association with chromatin may facilitate the diverse activities of cyclin E–Cdk2 in initiating replication, blocking rereplication, and allowing resetting of origins after mitosis. PMID:11257126

  14. APC/C(Cdh1) Enables Removal of Shugoshin-2 from the Arms of Bivalent Chromosomes by Moderating Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Activity.

    PubMed

    Rattani, Ahmed; Ballesteros Mejia, Randy; Roberts, Katherine; Roig, Maurici B; Godwin, Jonathan; Hopkins, Michael; Eguren, Manuel; Sanchez-Pulido, Luis; Okaz, Elwy; Ogushi, Sugako; Wolna, Magda; Metson, Jean; Pendás, Alberto M; Malumbres, Marcos; Novák, Béla; Herbert, Mary; Nasmyth, Kim

    2017-05-22

    In mammalian females, germ cells remain arrested as primordial follicles. Resumption of meiosis is heralded by germinal vesicle breakdown, condensation of chromosomes, and their eventual alignment on metaphase plates. At the first meiotic division, anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome associated with Cdc20 (APC/C(Cdc20)) activates separase and thereby destroys cohesion along chromosome arms. Because cohesion around centromeres is protected by shugoshin-2, sister chromatids remain attached through centromeric/pericentromeric cohesin. We show here that, by promoting proteolysis of cyclins and Cdc25B at the germinal vesicle (GV) stage, APC/C associated with the Cdh1 protein (APC/C(Cdh1)) delays the increase in Cdk1 activity, leading to germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD). More surprisingly, by moderating the rate at which Cdk1 is activated following GVBD, APC/C(Cdh1) creates conditions necessary for the removal of shugoshin-2 from chromosome arms by the Aurora B/C kinase, an event crucial for the efficient resolution of chiasmata. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. Cyclin A is required at two points in the human cell cycle.

    PubMed Central

    Pagano, M; Pepperkok, R; Verde, F; Ansorge, W; Draetta, G

    1992-01-01

    Cyclins play a fundamental role in regulating cell cycle events in all eukaryotic cells. The human cyclin A gene was identified as the site of integration of hepatitis B virus in a hepatocarcinoma cell line; in addition, cyclin A is associated with the E2F transcription factor in a complex which is dissociated by the E1A oncogene product. Such findings suggest that cyclin A is a target for oncogenic signals. We have now found that DNA synthesis and entry into mitosis are inhibited in human cells microinjected with anti-cyclin A antibodies at distinct times. Cyclin A binds both cdk2 and cdc2, giving two distinct cyclin A kinase activities, one appearing in S phase, the other in G2. These results suggest that cyclin A defines novel control points of the human cell cycle. Images PMID:1312467

  16. Regulation of Exit from Quiescence by p27 and Cyclin D1-CDK4

    PubMed Central

    Ladha, Mohamed H.; Lee, Kwang Y.; Upton, Todd M.; Reed, Michael F.; Ewen, Mark E.

    1998-01-01

    The synthesis of cyclin D1 and its assembly with cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) to form an active complex is a rate-limiting step in progression through the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Using an activated allele of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1 (MEK1), we show that this kinase plays a significant role in positively regulating the expression of cyclin D1. This was found both in quiescent serum-starved cells and in cells expressing dominant-negative Ras. Despite the observation that cyclin D1 is a target of MEK1, in cycling cells, activated MEK1, but not cyclin D1, is capable of overcoming a G1 arrest induced by Ras inactivation. Either wild-type or catalytically inactive CDK4 cooperates with cyclin D1 in reversing the G1 arrest induced by inhibition of Ras activity. In quiescent NIH 3T3 cells expressing either ectopic cyclin D1 or activated MEK1, cyclin D1 is able to efficiently associate with CDK4; however, the complex is inactive. A significant percentage of the cyclin D1-CDK4 complexes are associated with p27 in serum-starved activated MEK1 or cyclin D1 cell lines. Reduction of p27 levels by expression of antisense p27 allows for S-phase entry from quiescence in NIH 3T3 cells expressing ectopic cyclin D1, but not in parental cells. PMID:9774675

  17. Role of the mTORC1 complex in satellite cell activation by RNA-induced mitochondrial restoration: dual control of cyclin D1 through microRNAs.

    PubMed

    Jash, Sukanta; Dhar, Gunjan; Ghosh, Utpalendu; Adhya, Samit

    2014-10-01

    During myogenesis, satellite stem cells (SCs) are induced to proliferate and differentiate to myogenic precursors. The role of energy sensors such as the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and the mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) in SC activation is unclear. We previously observed that upregulation of ATP through RNA-mediated mitochondrial restoration (MR) accelerates SC activation following skeletal muscle injury. We show here that during regeneration, the AMPK-CRTC2-CREB and Raptor-mTORC-4EBP1 pathways were rapidly activated. The phosho-CRTC2-CREB complex was essential for myogenesis and activated transcription of the critical cell cycle regulator cyclin D1 (Ccnd1). Knockdown (KD) of either mTORC or its subunit Raptor delayed SC activation without influencing the differentiation program. KD of 4EBP1 had no effect on SC activation but enhanced myofiber size. mTORC1 positively regulated Ccnd1 translation but destabilized Ccnd1 mRNA. These antithetical effects of mTORC1 were mediated by two microRNAs (miRs) targeted to the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of Ccnd1 mRNA: miR-1 was downregulated in mTORC-KD muscle, and depletion of miR-1 resulted in increased levels of mRNA without any effect on Ccnd1 protein. In contrast, miR-26a was upregulated upon mTORC depletion, while anti-miR-26a oligonucleotide specifically stimulated Ccnd1 protein expression. Thus, mTORC may act as a timer of satellite cell proliferation during myogenesis.

  18. Hierarchy of S-Phase-Promoting Factors: Yeast Dbf4-Cdc7 Kinase Requires Prior S-Phase Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Activation

    PubMed Central

    Nougarède, Romain; Della Seta, Flavio; Zarzov, Patrick; Schwob, Etienne

    2000-01-01

    In all eukaryotes, the initiation of DNA synthesis requires the formation of prereplicative complexes (pre-RCs) on replication origins, followed by their activation by two S-T protein kinases, an S-phase cyclin-dependent kinase (S-CDK) and a homologue of yeast Dbf4-Cdc7 kinase (Dbf4p-dependent kinase [DDK]). Here, we show that yeast DDK activity is cell cycle regulated, though less tightly than that of the S-CDK Clb5-Cdk1, and peaks during S phase in correlation with Dbf4p levels. Dbf4p is short-lived throughout the cell cycle, but its instability is accentuated during G1 by the anaphase-promoting complex. Downregulating DDK activity is physiologically important, as joint Cdc7p and Dbf4p overexpression is lethal. Because pre-RC formation is a highly ordered process, we asked whether S-CDK and DDK need also to function in a specific order for the firing of origins. We found that both kinases are activated independently, but we show that DDK can perform its function for DNA replication only after S-CDKs have been activated. Cdc45p, a protein needed for initiation, binds tightly to chromatin only after S-CDK activation (L. Zou and B. Stillman, Science 280:593–596, 1998). We show that Cdc45p is phosphorylated by DDK in vitro, suggesting that it might be one of DDK's critical substrates after S-CDK activation. Linking the origin-bound DDK to the tightly regulated S-CDK in a dependent sequence of events may ensure that DNA replication initiates only at the right time and place. PMID:10805723

  19. The cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor roscovitine inhibits kinase activity, cell proliferation, multicellular development, and Cdk5 nuclear translocation in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Huber, Robert J; O'Day, Danton H

    2012-03-01

    Roscovitine, a cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) inhibitor, inhibited kinase activity and the axenic growth of Dictyostelium discoideum at micromolar concentrations. Growth was almost fully rescued in 50 µM and ≈ 50% rescued in 100 µM roscovitine-treated cultures by the over-expression of Cdk5-GFP. This supports the importance of Cdk5 function during cell proliferation in Dictyostelium and indicates that Cdk5 is a primary target of the drug. Roscovitine did not affect the expression of Cdk5 protein during axenic growth but did inhibit its nuclear translocation. This novel result suggests that the effects of roscovitine could be due in part to altering Cdk5 translocation in other systems as well. Kinase activity was inhibited by roscovitine in assays using AX3 whole cell lysates, but not in assays using lysates from Cdk5-GFP over-expressing cells. At higher concentrations, roscovitine impaired slug and fruiting body formation. Fruiting bodies that did form were small and produced relatively fewer spores many of which were round. However, roscovitine did not affect stalk cell differentiation. Together with previous findings, these data reveal that roscovitine inhibits Cdk5 during growth and as yet undefined Cdks during mid-late development. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Lipin1 Regulates Skeletal Muscle Differentiation through Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinase (ERK) Activation and Cyclin D Complex-regulated Cell Cycle Withdrawal*

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Weihua; Zhu, Jing; Zhuang, Xun; Zhang, Xiping; Luo, Tao; Esser, Karyn A.; Ren, Hongmei

    2015-01-01

    Lipin1, an intracellular protein, plays critical roles in controlling lipid synthesis and energy metabolism through its enzymatic activity and nuclear transcriptional functions. Several mouse models of skeletal muscle wasting are associated with lipin1 mutation or altered expression. Recent human studies have suggested that children with homozygous null mutations in the LPIN1 gene suffer from rhabdomyolysis. However, the underlying pathophysiologic mechanism is still poorly understood. In the present study we examined whether lipin1 contributes to regulating muscle regeneration. We characterized the time course of skeletal muscle regeneration in lipin1-deficient fld mice after injury. We found that fld mice exhibited smaller regenerated muscle fiber cross-sectional areas compared with wild-type mice in response to injury. Our results from a series of in vitro experiments suggest that lipin1 is up-regulated and translocated to the nucleus during myoblast differentiation and plays a key role in myogenesis by regulating the cytosolic activation of ERK1/2 to form a complex and a downstream effector cyclin D3-mediated cell cycle withdrawal. Overall, our study reveals a previously unknown role of lipin1 in skeletal muscle regeneration and expands our understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying skeletal muscle regeneration. PMID:26296887

  1. The transcriptional network activated by Cln3 cyclin at the G1-to-S transition of the yeast cell cycle

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The G1-to-S transition of the cell cycle in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae involves an extensive transcriptional program driven by transcription factors SBF (Swi4-Swi6) and MBF (Mbp1-Swi6). Activation of these factors ultimately depends on the G1 cyclin Cln3. Results To determine the transcriptional targets of Cln3 and their dependence on SBF or MBF, we first have used DNA microarrays to interrogate gene expression upon Cln3 overexpression in synchronized cultures of strains lacking components of SBF and/or MBF. Secondly, we have integrated this expression dataset together with other heterogeneous data sources into a single probabilistic model based on Bayesian statistics. Our analysis has produced more than 200 transcription factor-target assignments, validated by ChIP assays and by functional enrichment. Our predictions show higher internal coherence and predictive power than previous classifications. Our results support a model whereby SBF and MBF may be differentially activated by Cln3. Conclusions Integration of heterogeneous genome-wide datasets is key to building accurate transcriptional networks. By such integration, we provide here a reliable transcriptional network at the G1-to-S transition in the budding yeast cell cycle. Our results suggest that to improve the reliability of predictions we need to feed our models with more informative experimental data. PMID:20573214

  2. [Ru(pipe)(dppb)(bipy)]PF6: A novel ruthenium complex that effectively inhibits ERK activation and cyclin D1 expression in A549 cells.

    PubMed

    Ferreira-Silva, Guilherme A; Ortega, Marina M; Banionis, Marco A; Garavelli, Graciana Y; Martins, Felipe T; Dias, Julia S M; Viegas, Cláudio; Oliveira, Jaqueline C de; Nascimento, Fabio B do; Doriguetto, Antonio C; Barbosa, Marilia I F; Ionta, Marisa

    2017-10-01

    Lung cancer is the most frequent type of cancer worldwide. In Brazil, only 14% of the patients diagnosed with lung cancer survived 5years in the last decades. Although improvements in the therapeutic approach, it is relevant to identify new chemotherapeutic agents. In this framework, ruthenium metal compounds emerge as a promising alternative to platinum-based compounds once they displayed lower cytotoxicity and more selectivity for tumor cells. The present study aimed to evaluate the antitumor potential of innovative ruthenium(II) complex, [Ru(pipe)(dppb)(bipy)]PF6 (PIPE) on A549 cells, which is derived from non-small cell lung cancer. Results demonstrated that PIPE effectively reduced the viability and proliferation rate of A549 cells. When PIPE was used at 9μM there was increase in G0/G1 cell population with concomitant reduction in frequency of cells in S-phase, indicating cell cycle arrest in G1/S transition. Antiproliferative activity of PIPE was associated to its ability of reducing cyclin D1 expression and ERK phosphorylation levels. Cytotoxic activity of PIPE on A549 cells was observed when PIPE was used at 18μM, which was associated to its ability of inducing apoptosis by intrinsic pathway. Taken together, the data demonstrated that PIPE is a promising antitumor agent and further in vivo studies should be performed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The Activators of Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 5 p35 and p39 Are Essential for Oligodendrocyte Maturation, Process Formation, and Myelination.

    PubMed

    Luo, Fucheng; Zhang, Jessie; Burke, Kathryn; Miller, Robert H; Yang, Yan

    2016-03-09

    The regulation of oligodendrocyte development and myelin formation in the CNS is poorly defined. Multiple signals influence the rate and extent of CNS myelination, including the noncanonical cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) whose functions are regulated by its activators p35 and p39. Here we show that selective loss of either p35 or p39 perturbed specific aspects of oligodendrocyte development, whereas loss of both p35 and p39 completely inhibited the development of mature oligodendrocytes and myelination. In the absence of p35, oligodendrocyte differentiation was delayed, process outgrowth was truncated in vitro, and the patterning and extent of myelination were perturbed in the CNS of p35(-/-) mice. In the absence of p39, oligodendrocyte maturation was transiently affected both in vitro and in vivo. However, loss of both p35 and p39 in oligodendrocyte lineage cells completely inhibited oligodendrocyte progenitor cell differentiation and myelination both in vitro and after transplantation into shiverer slice cultures. Loss of p35 and p39 had a more profound effect on oligodendrocyte development than simply the loss of Cdk5 and could not be rescued by Cdk5 overexpression. These data suggest p35 and p39 have specific and overlapping roles in oligodendrocyte development, some of which may be independent of Cdk5 activation.

  4. Interactions between human cyclin T, Tat, and the transactivation response element (TAR) are disrupted by a cysteine to tyrosine substitution found in mouse cyclin T.

    PubMed

    Fujinaga, K; Taube, R; Wimmer, J; Cujec, T P; Peterlin, B M

    1999-02-16

    The transcriptional transactivator Tat from HIV binds to the transactivation response element (TAR) RNA to increase rates of elongation of viral transcription. Human cyclin T supports these interactions between Tat and TAR. In this study, we report the sequence of mouse cyclin T and identify the residues from positions 1 to 281 in human cyclin T that bind to Tat and TAR. Mouse cyclin T binds to Tat weakly and is unable to facilitate interactions between Tat and TAR. Reciprocal exchanges of the cysteine and tyrosine at position 261 in human and mouse cyclin T proteins also render human cyclin T inactive and mouse cyclin T active. These findings reveal the molecular basis for the restriction of Tat transactivation in rodent cells.

  5. Identification of a p130 domain mediating interactions with cyclin A/cdk 2 and cyclin E/cdk 2 complexes.

    PubMed

    Lacy, S; Whyte, P

    1997-05-22

    P130 shares structural and functional homology with pRb and p107. One property common to p107 and p130, but not to pRb, is the ability to stably interact with cyclin A/cdk2 and cyclin E/cdk2 complexes in vitro and in vivo. Using GST-p130 fusion proteins representing various regions of p130, baculovirus-produced cyclin A/cdk2 and cyclin E/cdk2 complexes were found to interact with residues within a part of p130 known as the spacer region. Cyclin E was able to bind the p130 spacer region in the presence or absence of cdk2 whereas cyclin A binding was dependent upon the presence of cdk2. The smallest p130 fusion protein sufficient to interact with cyclin A/cdk2 or cyclin E/cdk2 complexes contained p130 amino acids 652-698 and deletion of p130 amino acids 680-682 abolished binding to both of the cyclin/cdk2 complexes. When overexpressed in C33A cells, a p130 mutant containing a deletion of amino acids 620-697 was unable to form complexes with either cyclin A or cyclin E. This p130 mutant was at least as active as wild type p130 in suppressing the growth of G418 resistant colonies when overexpressed in C33A or SAOS-2 cells.

  6. [Retracted] Epidermal growth factor-stimulated human cervical cancer cell growth is associated with EGFR and cyclin D1 activation, independent of COX-2 expression levels.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Rajkishen; Kim, Hye Na; Narayanan, Narayanan K; Nargi, Dominick; Narayanan, Bhagavathi

    2017-01-01

    Following the publication of this article, which was concerned with the expression of phosphorylated epidermal growth factor receptor (pEGFR) and cyclin D1 activation independently of the expression levels of cyclo-oxygenase-2, an interested reader drew to our attention apparent anomalies associated with the western blot data shown in Fig. 2C. Following an internal investigation at the New York University School of Medicine, we were requested to produce the original film, or the scan of the image of the film, for verification. Unfortunately, we were unable to provide the original film or scanned image to disprove the allegation, since the original pEGFR image could not be found. Therefore, the Investigation Committee recommended that this article be retracted, and we are withdrawing the article in line with the request. All the authors agree to the retraction of this paper. We sincerely regret any inconvenience this has caused. [the original article was published in the International Journal of Oncology 40: 13-20, 2012; DOI: 10.3892/ijo.2011.1211].

  7. Pyrazolo[4,3-d]pyrimidine bioisostere of roscovitine: evaluation of a novel selective inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinases with antiproliferative activity.

    PubMed

    Jorda, Radek; Havlícek, Libor; McNae, Iain W; Walkinshaw, Malcolm D; Voller, Jirí; Sturc, Antonín; Navrátilová, Jana; Kuzma, Marek; Mistrík, Martin; Bártek, Jirí; Strnad, Miroslav; Krystof, Vladimír

    2011-04-28

    Inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) with small molecules has been suggested as a strategy for treatment of cancer, based on deregulation of CDKs commonly found in many types of human tumors. Here, a new potent CDK2 inhibitor with pyrazolo[4,3-d]pyrimidine scaffold has been synthesized, characterized, and evaluated in cellular and biochemical assays. 7-Benzylamino-5(R)-[2-(hydroxymethyl)propyl]amino-3-isopropyl-1(2)H-pyrazolo[4,3-d]pyrimidine, compound 7, was prepared as a bioisostere of the well-known CDK inhibitor roscovitine. An X-ray crystal structure of compound 7 bound to CDK2 has been determined, revealing a binding mode similar to that of roscovitine. Protein kinase selectivity profile of compound 7 and its biological effects (cell cycle arrest, dephosphorylation of the retinoblastoma protein, accumulation of the tumor suppressor protein p53, induction of apoptosis, inhibition of homologous recombination) are consistent with CDK inhibition as a primary mode of action. Importantly, as the anticancer activities of the pyrazolo[4,3-d]pyrimidine 7 exceed those of its bioisostere roscovitine, compound 7 reported here may be preferable for cancer therapy.

  8. Alternatively Spliced Isoforms of KV10.1 Potassium Channels Modulate Channel Properties and Can Activate Cyclin-dependent Kinase in Xenopus Oocytes*

    PubMed Central

    Ramos Gomes, Fernanda; Romaniello, Vincenzo; Sánchez, Araceli; Weber, Claudia; Narayanan, Pratibha; Psol, Maryna; Pardo, Luis A.

    2015-01-01

    KV10.1 is a voltage-gated potassium channel expressed selectively in the mammalian brain but also aberrantly in cancer cells. In this study we identified short splice variants of KV10.1 resulting from exon-skipping events (E65 and E70) in human brain and cancer cell lines. The presence of the variants was confirmed by Northern blot and RNase protection assays. Both variants completely lacked the transmembrane domains of the channel and produced cytoplasmic proteins without channel function. In a reconstituted system, both variants co-precipitated with the full-length channel and induced a robust down-regulation of KV10.1 current when co-expressed with the full-length form, but their effect was mechanistically different. E65 required a tetramerization domain and induced a reduction in the overall expression of full-length KV10.1, whereas E70 mainly affected its glycosylation pattern. E65 triggered the activation of cyclin-dependent kinases in Xenopus laevis oocytes, suggesting a role in cell cycle control. Our observations highlight the relevance of noncanonical functions for the oncogenicity of KV10.1, which need to be considered when ion channels are targeted for cancer therapy. PMID:26518875

  9. Distinct and Overlapping Requirements for Cyclins A, B, and B3 in Drosophila Female Meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Bourouh, Mohammed; Dhaliwal, Rajdeep; Rana, Ketki; Sinha, Sucheta; Guo, Zhihao; Swan, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Meiosis, like mitosis, depends on the activity of the cyclin dependent kinase Cdk1 and its cyclin partners. Here, we examine the specific requirements for the three mitotic cyclins, A, B, and B3 in meiosis of Drosophila melanogaster. We find that all three cyclins contribute redundantly to nuclear envelope breakdown, though cyclin A appears to make the most important individual contribution. Cyclin A is also required for biorientation of homologs in meiosis I. Cyclin B3, as previously reported, is required for anaphase progression in meiosis I and in meiosis II. We find that it also plays a redundant role, with cyclin A, in preventing DNA replication during meiosis. Cyclin B is required for maintenance of the metaphase I arrest in mature oocytes, for spindle organization, and for timely progression through the second meiotic division. It is also essential for polar body formation at the completion of meiosis. With the exception of its redundant role in meiotic maturation, cyclin B appears to function independently of cyclins A and B3 through most of meiosis. We conclude that the three mitotic cyclin-Cdk complexes have distinct and overlapping functions in Drosophila female meiosis. PMID:27652889

  10. ATM is required for rapid degradation of cyclin D1 in response to {gamma}-irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Choo, Dong Wan; Baek, Hye Jung; Motoyama, Noboru; Cho, Kwan Ho; Kim, Hye Sun; Kim, Sang Soo

    2009-01-23

    The cellular response to DNA damage induced by {gamma}-irradiation activates cell-cycle arrest to permit DNA repair and to prevent replication. Cyclin D1 is the key molecule for transition between the G1 and S phases of the cell-cycle, and amplification or overexpression of cyclin D1 plays pivotal roles in the development of several human cancers. To study the regulation of cyclin D1 in the DNA-damaged condition, we analyzed the proteolytic regulation of cyclin D1 expression upon {gamma}-irradiation. Upon {gamma}-irradiation, a rapid reduction in cyclin D1 levels was observed prior to p53 stabilization, indicating that the stability of cyclin D1 is controlled in a p53-independent manner. Further analysis revealed that irradiation facilitated ubiquitination of cyclin D1 and that a proteasome inhibitor blocked cyclin D1 degradation under the same conditions. Interestingly, after mutation of threonine residue 286 of cyclin D1, which is reported to be the GSK-3{beta} phosphorylation site, the mutant protein showed resistance to irradiation-induced proteolysis although inhibitors of GSK-3{beta} failed to prevent cyclin D1 degradation. Rather, ATM inhibition markedly prevented cyclin D1 degradation induced by {gamma}-irradiation. Our data indicate that communication between ATM and cyclin D1 may be required for maintenance of genomic integrity achieved by rapid arrest of the cell-cycle, and that disruption of this crosstalk may increase susceptibility to cancer.

  11. The PP2A-B56 phosphatase opposes cyclin E autocatalytic degradation via site-specific dephosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Davis, Ryan J; Swanger, Jherek; Hughes, Bridget T; Clurman, Bruce E

    2017-01-30

    Cyclin E, in conjunction with its catalytic partner cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2), regulates cell cycle progression as cells exit quiescence and enter S-phase. Multiple mechanisms control cyclin E periodicity during the cell cycle, including phosphorylation-dependent cyclin E ubiquitylation by the SCF(Fbw7) ubiquitin ligase. Serine 384 (S384) is the critical cyclin E phosphorylation site that stimulates Fbw7 binding and cyclin E ubiquitylation and degradation. Because S384 is autophosphorylated by bound CDK2, this presents a paradox as to how cyclin E can evade autocatalytically induced degradation in order to phosphorylate its other substrates. We found that S384 phosphorylation is dynamically regulated in cells, and that cyclin E is specifically dephosphorylated at S384 by the PP2A-B56 phosphatase, thereby uncoupling cyclin E degradation from cyclin E-CDK2 activity. Furthermore, the rate of S384 dephosphorylation is high in interphase but low in mitosis. This provides a mechanism whereby interphase cells can oppose autocatalytic cyclin E degradation and maintain cyclin E-CDK2 activity, while also enabling cyclin E destruction in mitosis, when inappropriate cyclin E expression is genotoxic.

  12. The PP2A-B56 Phosphatase Opposes Cyclin E Autocatalytic Degradation via Site-Specific Dephosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Ryan J.; Swanger, Jherek; Hughes, Bridget T.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cyclin E, in conjunction with its catalytic partner cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2), regulates cell cycle progression as cells exit quiescence and enter S-phase. Multiple mechanisms control cyclin E periodicity during the cell cycle, including phosphorylation-dependent cyclin E ubiquitylation by the SCFFbw7 ubiquitin ligase. Serine 384 (S384) is the critical cyclin E phosphorylation site that stimulates Fbw7 binding and cyclin E ubiquitylation and degradation. Because S384 is autophosphorylated by bound CDK2, this presents a paradox as to how cyclin E can evade autocatalytically induced degradation in order to phosphorylate its other substrates. We found that S384 phosphorylation is dynamically regulated in cells and that cyclin E is specifically dephosphorylated at S384 by the PP2A-B56 phosphatase, thereby uncoupling cyclin E degradation from cyclin E-CDK2 activity. Furthermore, the rate of S384 dephosphorylation is high in interphase but low in mitosis. This provides a mechanism whereby interphase cells can oppose autocatalytic cyclin E degradation and maintain cyclin E-CDK2 activity while also enabling cyclin E destruction in mitosis, when inappropriate cyclin E expression is genotoxic. PMID:28137908

  13. Upstream stimulatory factor regulates expression of the cell cycle-dependent cyclin B1 gene promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Cogswell, J P; Godlevski, M M; Bonham, M; Bisi, J; Babiss, L

    1995-01-01

    Progression through the somatic cell cycle requires the temporal regulation of cyclin gene expression and cyclin protein turnover. One of the best-characterized examples of this regulation is seen for the B-type cyclins. These cyclins and their catalytic component, cdc2, have been shown to mediate both the entry into and maintenance of mitosis. The cyclin B1 gene has been shown to be expressed between the late S and G2 phases of the cell cycle, while the protein is degraded specifically at interphase via ubiquitination. To understand the molecular basis for transcriptional regulation of the cyclin B1 gene, we cloned the human cyclin B1 gene promoter region. Using a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter system and both stable and transient assays, we have shown that the cyclin B1 gene promoter (extending to -3800 bp relative to the cap site) can confer G2-enhanced promoter activity. Further analysis revealed that an upstream stimulatory factor (USF)-binding site and its cognate transcription factor(s) are critical for expression from the cyclin B1 promoter in cycling HeLa cells. Interestingly, USF DNA-binding activity appears to be regulated in a G2-specific fashion, supporting the idea that USF may play some role in cyclin B1 gene activation. These studies suggest an important link between USF and the cyclin B1 gene, which in part explains how maturation promoting factor complex formation is regulated. PMID:7739559

  14. An update on the implications of cyclin D1 in oral carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ramos-García, P; Gil-Montoya, J A; Scully, C; Ayén, A; González-Ruiz, L; Navarro-Triviño, F J; González-Moles, M A

    2017-10-01

    Cyclin D1 promotes cell cycle progression during G1 phase, a key event in G1-S transition. The protein is encoded by gene CCND1, located in chromosomal band 11q13. Cyclin D1 plays key roles in cell biology, including cell proliferation and growth regulation, mitochondrial activity modulation, DNA repair, and cell migration control. CCND1 gene and its protein cyclin D1 are frequently altered by different molecular mechanisms, including amplification, chromosomal translocations, mutations, and activation of the pathways involved in cyclin D1 expression, alterations which appear to be essential in the development of human cancers, including oral carcinoma. This is the first published review of the specific features of cyclin D1 overexpression in oral oncogenesis. Starting with the physiological regulation of cyclin D1, there is an evaluation of its functions, overexpression mechanisms, and the implications of the oncogenic activation of CCND1/cyclin D1 in oral squamous cell carcinoma. The potential diagnostic and prognostic value of cyclin D1 is reviewed. The influence of CCND1/cyclin D1 on tumor size and clinical stage is reported, and an update is provided on the utilization of cyclin D1 as therapeutic target and on the combination of cyclin D1 inhibitors with cytotoxic agents. Future research lines in this field are also proposed. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Constitutive activation of glycogen synthase kinase-3β correlates with better prognosis and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors in human gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Aberrant regulation of glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) has been implicated in several human cancers; however, it has not been reported in the gastric cancer tissues to date. The present study was performed to determine the expression status of active form of GSK-3β phosphorylated at Tyr216 (pGSK-3β) and its relationship with other tumor-associated proteins in human gastric cancers. Methods Immunohistochemistry was performed on tissue array slides containing 281 human gastric carcinoma specimens. In addition, gastric cancer cells were cultured and treated with a GSK-3β inhibitor lithium chloride (LiCl) for immunoblot analysis. Results We found that pGSK-3β was expressed in 129 (46%) of 281 cases examined, and was higher in the early-stages of pathologic tumor-node-metastasis (P < 0.001). The expression of pGSK-3β inversely correlated with lymphatic invasion (P < 0.001) and lymph node metastasis (P < 0.001) and correlated with a longer patient survival (P < 0.001). In addition, pGSK-3β expression positively correlated with that of p16, p21, p27, p53, APC, PTEN, MGMT, SMAD4, or KAI1 (P < 0.05), but not with that of cyclin D1. This was confirmed by immunoblot analysis using SNU-668 gastric cancer cells treated with LiCl. Conclusions GSK-3β activation was frequently observed in early-stage gastric carcinoma and was significantly correlated with better prognosis. Thus, these findings suggest that GSK-3β activation is a useful prognostic marker for the early-stage gastric cancer. PMID:20704706

  16. GSK3β-dependent cyclin D1 and cyclin E1 degradation is indispensable for NVP-BEZ235 induced G0/G1 arrest in neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shan-Ling; Liu, Zhen; Zhang, Li-Di; Zhu, Han-Qing; Guo, Jia-Hui; Zhao, Mei; Wu, Yingli; Liu, Feng; Gao, Feng-Hou

    2017-10-05

    Cyclin D1 and cyclin E1, as vital regulatory factors of G1-S phase cell cycle progression, are frequently constitutive expressed and associated with pathogenesis and tumorigenesis in most human cancers and they have been regarded as promising targets for cancer therapy. In this study, we established NVP-BEZ235, a potent dual kinase inhibitor, could induce neuroblastoma cells proliferation inhibition without apoptosis activation. Moreover, we showed NVP-BEZ235 could induce neuroblastoma cells arrested at G0/G1 phase accompanied with significant reduction of the cyclin D1 and E1 proteins in a dose dependent manner at nanomole concentration. Additionally we found that GSK3β was dephosphorylated and activated by NVP-BEZ235 and then triggered cyclin D1 and cyclin E1 degradation through ubiquitination proteasome pathway, based on the evidences that NVP-BEZ235 induced downregulation of cyclin D1 and cyclin E1 were obviously recovered by proteasome inhibitor and the blockade of GSK3β contributed to remarkable rescue of cyclin D1 and cyclin E1. Analogous results about its anti-proliferation effects and molecular mechanism were observed on neuroblastoma xenograft mouse model in vivo. Therefore, these results indicate that NVP-BEZ235-induced cyclin D1 and cyclin E1 degradation, which happened through activating GSK3β, and GSK3β-dependent down-regulation of cyclin D1 and cyclin E1 should be available for anticancer therapeutics.

  17. Both cyclin I and p35 are required for maximal survival benefit of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 in kidney podocytes.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Yoshinori; Pippin, Jeffrey W; Hagmann, Henning; Krofft, Ronald D; Chang, Alice M; Zhang, Jiong; Terada, Yoshio; Brinkkoetter, Paul; Shankland, Stuart J

    2012-05-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk)-5 is activated by both cyclin I and the noncyclin activator p35 in terminally differentiated cells such as kidney podocytes and neurons. Cyclin I and p35 are restricted to podocytes in the kidney, and each limit podocyte apoptosis by activating Cdk5. To determine whether both activators are necessary, or whether they serve backup roles, a double cyclin I-p35 null mouse was generated. Experimental glomerular disease characterized by podocyte apoptosis was then induced by administering an anti-podocyte antibody. The results showed that under nonstressed conditions double mutants had normal kidney structure and function and were indistinguishable from wild-type, cyclin I(-/-), or p35(-/-) mice. In contrast, when stressed with disease, podocyte apoptosis increased fourfold compared with diseased cyclin I(-/-) or p35(-/-) mice. This resulted in a more pronounced decrease in podocyte number, proteinuria, and glomerulosclerosis. Under normal states and nephritic states, levels for the prosurvival protein Bcl-2 were lower in double cyclin I(-/-) p35(-/-) mice than the other mice. Similarly, levels of Bcl-xL, another prosurvival member, were lower in normal and nephritic double cyclin I(-/-) p35(-/-) mice but similar to single-cyclin I(-/-) mice. Moreover, levels of ERK1/2 and MEK1/2 activation were lower in nephritic double cyclin I(-/-) p35(-/-) mice but similar to single-cyclin I(-/-) mice. The results demonstrate that the activators of Cdk5, p35, and cyclin I are not required for normal kidney function. However, they play pivotal coordinated roles in maintaining podocyte survival during stress states in disease.

  18. MEK2 controls the activation of MKK3/MKK6-p38 axis involved in the MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell survival: Correlation with cyclin D1 expression.

    PubMed

    Huth, Hugo W; Albarnaz, Jonas D; Torres, Alice A; Bonjardim, Claudio A; Ropert, Catherine

    2016-09-01

    The Ras-Raf-MEK-ERK1/2 signaling pathway regulates fundamental processes in malignant cells. However, the exact contributions of MEK1 and MEK2 to the development of cancer remain to be established. We studied the effects of MEK small-molecule inhibitors (PD98059 and U0126) and MEK1 and MEK2 knock-down on cell proliferation, apoptosis and MAPK activation. We showed a diminution of cell viability that was associated with a downregulation of cyclin D1 expression and an increase of apoptosis marker in MEK2 silenced cells; by contrast, a slight increase of cell survival was observed in the absence of MEK1 that correlated with an augment of cyclin D1 expression. These data indicate that MEK2 but not MEK1 is essential for MDA-MB-231 cell survival. Importantly, the role of MEK2 in cell survival appeared independent on ERK1/2 phosphorylation since its absence did not alter the level of activated ERK1/2. Indeed, we have reported an unrevealed link between MEK2 and MKK3/MKK6-p38 MAPK axis where MEK2 was essential for the phosphorylation of MKK3/MKK6 and p38 MAPK that directly impacted on cyclin D1 expression. Importantly, the MEK1 inhibitor PD98059, like MEK1 silencing, induced an augment of cyclin D1 expression that correlated with an increase of MDA-MB-231 cell proliferation suggesting that MEK1 may play a regulatory role in these cells. In sum, the crucial role of MEK2 in MDA-MB-231 cell viability and the unknown relationship between MEK2 and MKK3/MKK6-p38 axis here revealed may open new therapeutic strategies for aggressive breast cancer.

  19. Mechanisms and regulation of the degradation of cyclin B.

    PubMed Central

    Hershko, A

    1999-01-01

    The degradation of the cyclin B subunit of protein kinase Cdk1/cyclin B is required for inactivation of the kinase and exit from mitosis. Cyclin B is degraded by the ubiquitin pathway, a system involved in most selective protein degradation in eukaryotic cells. In this pathway, proteins are targeted for degradation by ligation to ubiquitin, a process carried out by the sequential action of three enzymes: the ubiquitin-activating enzyme E1, a ubiquitin-carrier protein E2 and a ubiquitin-protein ligase E3. In the system responsible for cyclin B degradation, the E3-like function is carried out by a large complex called cyclosome or anaphase-promoting complex (APC). In the early embryonic cell cycles, the cyclosome is inactive in the interphase, but becomes active at the end of mitosis. Activation requires phosphorylation of the cyclosome/APC by protein kinase Cdk1/cyclin B. The lag kinetics of cyclosome activation may be explained by Suc1-assisted multiple phosphorylations of partly phosphorylated complex. The presence of a Fizzy/Cdc20-like protein is necessary for maximal activity of the mitotic form of cyclosome/APC in cyclin-ubiquitin ligation. PMID:10582242

  20. Two Degradation Pathways of the p35 Cdk5 (Cyclin-dependent Kinase) Activation Subunit, Dependent and Independent of Ubiquitination.

    PubMed

    Takasugi, Toshiyuki; Minegishi, Seiji; Asada, Akiko; Saito, Taro; Kawahara, Hiroyuki; Hisanaga, Shin-ichi

    2016-02-26

    Cdk5 is a versatile protein kinase that is involved in various neuronal activities, such as the migration of newborn neurons, neurite outgrowth, synaptic regulation, and neurodegenerative diseases. Cdk5 requires the p35 regulatory subunit for activation. Because Cdk5 is more abundantly expressed in neurons compared with p35, the p35 protein levels determine the kinase activity of Cdk5. p35 is a protein with a short half-life that is degraded by proteasomes. Although ubiquitination of p35 has been previously reported, the degradation mechanism of p35 is not yet known. Here, we intended to identify the ubiquitination site(s) in p35. Because p35 is myristoylated at the N-terminal glycine, the possible ubiquitination sites are the lysine residues in p35. We mutated all 23 Lys residues to Arg (p35 23R), but p35 23R was still rapidly degraded by proteasomes at a rate similar to wild-type p35. The degradation of p35 23R in primary neurons and the Cdk5 activation ability of p35 23R suggested the occurrence of ubiquitin-independent degradation of p35 in physiological conditions. We found that p35 has the amino acid sequence similar to the ubiquitin-independent degron in the NKX3.1 homeodomain transcription factor. An Ala mutation at Pro-247 in the degron-like sequence made p35 stable. These results suggest that p35 can be degraded by two degradation pathways: ubiquitin-dependent and ubiquitin-independent. The rapid degradation of p35 by two different methods would be a mechanism to suppress the production of p25, which overactivates Cdk5 to induce neuronal cell death.

  1. Disruption of transforming growth factor-beta signaling through beta-spectrin ELF leads to hepatocellular cancer through cyclin D1 activation.

    PubMed

    Kitisin, K; Ganesan, N; Tang, Y; Jogunoori, W; Volpe, E A; Kim, S S; Katuri, V; Kallakury, B; Pishvaian, M; Albanese, C; Mendelson, J; Zasloff, M; Rashid, A; Fishbein, T; Evans, S R T; Sidawy, A; Reddy, E P; Mishra, B; Johnson, L B; Shetty, K; Mishra, L

    2007-11-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) signaling members, TGF-beta receptor type II (TBRII), Smad2, Smad4 and Smad adaptor, embryonic liver fodrin (ELF), are prominent tumor suppressors in gastrointestinal cancers. Here, we show that 40% of elf(+/-) mice spontaneously develop hepatocellular cancer (HCC) with markedly increased cyclin D1, cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (Cdk4), c-Myc and MDM2 expression. Reduced ELF but not TBRII, or Smad4 was observed in 8 of 9 human HCCs (P<0.017). ELF and TBRII are also markedly decreased in human HCC cell lines SNU-398 and SNU-475. Restoration of ELF and TBRII in SNU-398 cells markedly decreases cyclin D1 as well as hyperphosphorylated-retinoblastoma (hyperphosphorylated-pRb). Thus, we show that TGF-beta signaling and Smad adaptor ELF suppress human hepatocarcinogenesis, potentially through cyclin D1 deregulation. Loss of ELF could serve as a primary event in progression toward a fully transformed phenotype and could hold promise for new therapeutic approaches in human HCCs.

  2. PinX1 suppresses bladder urothelial carcinoma cell proliferation via the inhibition of telomerase activity and p16/cyclin D1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian-Ye; Qian, Dong; He, Li-Ru; Li, Yong-Hong; Liao, Yi-Ji; Mai, Shi-Juan; Tian, Xiao-Peng; Liu, Yan-Hui; Zhang, Jia-Xing; Kung, Hsiang-Fu; Zeng, Yi-Xin; Zhou, Fang-Jian; Xie, Dan

    2013-11-23

    PIN2/TRF1-interacting telomerase inhibitor1 (PinX1) was recently suggested as a putative tumor suppressor in several types of human cancer, based on its binding to and inhibition of telomerase. Moreover, loss of PinX1 has been detected in many human malignancies. However, the possible involvement of PinX1 and its clinical/prognostic significance in urothelial carcinoma of the bladder (UCB) are unclear. The PinX1 expression profile was examined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), western blotting, and immunohistochemistry (IHC) in UCB tissues and adjacent normal urothelial bladder epithelial tissues. PinX1 was overexpressed and silenced in UCB cell lines to determine its role in tumorigenesis, development of UCB, and the possible mechanism. PinX1 expression in UCB was significantly down-regulated at both mRNA and protein level as compared with that in normal urothelial bladder epithelial tissues. PinX1 levels were inversely correlated with tumor multiplicity, advanced N classification, high proliferation index (Ki-67), and poor survival (P < 0.05). Moreover, overexpression of PinX1 in UCB cells significantly inhibited cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo, whereas silencing PinX1 dramatically enhanced cell proliferation. Overexpression of PinX1 resulted in G1/S phase arrest and cell growth/proliferation inhibition, while silencing PinX1 led to acceleration of G1/S transition, and cell growth/proliferation promotion by inhibiting/enhancing telomerase activity and via the p16/cyclin D1 pathway. These findings suggest that down-regulation of PinX1 play an important role in the tumorigenesis and development of UCB and that the expression of PinX1 as detected by IHC is an independent molecular marker in patients with UCB.

  3. An Integrated Bioinformatics Approach Identifies Elevated Cyclin E2 Expression and E2F Activity as Distinct Features of Tamoxifen Resistant Breast Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lei; Zhao, Shuangping; Frasor, Jonna M.; Dai, Yang

    2011-01-01

    Approximately half of estrogen receptor (ER) positive breast tumors will fail to respond to endocrine therapy. Here we used an integrative bioinformatics approach to analyze three gene expression profiling data sets from breast tumors in an attempt to uncover underlying mechanisms contributing to the development of resistance and potential therapeutic strategies to counteract these mechanisms. Genes that are differentially expressed in tamoxifen resistant vs. sensitive breast tumors were identified from three different publically available microarray datasets. These differentially expressed (DE) genes were analyzed using gene function and gene set enrichment and examined in intrinsic subtypes of breast tumors. The Connectivity Map analysis was utilized to link gene expression profiles of tamoxifen resistant tumors to small molecules and validation studies were carried out in a tamoxifen resistant cell line. Despite little overlap in genes that are differentially expressed in tamoxifen resistant vs. sensitive tumors, a high degree of functional similarity was observed among the three datasets. Tamoxifen resistant tumors displayed enriched expression of genes related to cell cycle and proliferation, as well as elevated activity of E2F transcription factors, and were highly correlated with a Luminal intrinsic subtype. A number of small molecules, including phenothiazines, were found that induced a gene signature in breast cancer cell lines opposite to that found in tamoxifen resistant vs. sensitive tumors and the ability of phenothiazines to down-regulate cyclin E2 and inhibit proliferation of tamoxifen resistant breast cancer cells was validated. Our findings demonstrate that an integrated bioinformatics approach to analyze gene expression profiles from multiple breast tumor datasets can identify important biological pathways and potentially novel therapeutic options for tamoxifen-resistant breast cancers. PMID:21789246

  4. An integrated bioinformatics approach identifies elevated cyclin E2 expression and E2F activity as distinct features of tamoxifen resistant breast tumors.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lei; Zhao, Shuangping; Frasor, Jonna M; Dai, Yang

    2011-01-01

    Approximately half of estrogen receptor (ER) positive breast tumors will fail to respond to endocrine therapy. Here we used an integrative bioinformatics approach to analyze three gene expression profiling data sets from breast tumors in an attempt to uncover underlying mechanisms contributing to the development of resistance and potential therapeutic strategies to counteract these mechanisms. Genes that are differentially expressed in tamoxifen resistant vs. sensitive breast tumors were identified from three different publically available microarray datasets. These differentially expressed (DE) genes were analyzed using gene function and gene set enrichment and examined in intrinsic subtypes of breast tumors. The Connectivity Map analysis was utilized to link gene expression profiles of tamoxifen resistant tumors to small molecules and validation studies were carried out in a tamoxifen resistant cell line. Despite little overlap in genes that are differentially expressed in tamoxifen resistant vs. sensitive tumors, a high degree of functional similarity was observed among the three datasets. Tamoxifen resistant tumors displayed enriched expression of genes related to cell cycle and proliferation, as well as elevated activity of E2F transcription factors, and were highly correlated with a Luminal intrinsic subtype. A number of small molecules, including phenothiazines, were found that induced a gene signature in breast cancer cell lines opposite to that found in tamoxifen resistant vs. sensitive tumors and the ability of phenothiazines to down-regulate cyclin E2 and inhibit proliferation of tamoxifen resistant breast cancer cells was validated. Our findings demonstrate that an integrated bioinformatics approach to analyze gene expression profiles from multiple breast tumor datasets can identify important biological pathways and potentially novel therapeutic options for tamoxifen-resistant breast cancers.

  5. Cell cycle stage-specific transcriptional activation of cyclins mediated by HAT2-dependent H4K10 acetylation of promoters in Leishmania donovani.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Udita; Yadav, Aarti; Kumar, Devanand; Saha, Swati

    2017-09-01

    Chromatin modifications affect several processes. In investigating the Leishmania donovani histone acetyltransferase HAT2, using in vitro biochemical assays and HAT2-heterozygous genomic knockout we found the constitutively nuclear HAT2 acetylated histone H4K10 in vitro and in vivo. HAT2 was essential. HAT2-depleted cells displayed growth and cell cycle defects, and poor survival in host cells. Real time PCR and DNA microarray analyses, as well as rescue experiments, revealed that downregulation of cyclins CYC4 and CYC9 were responsible for S phase and G2/M defects of HAT2-depleted cells respectively. Leishmania genes are arranged in unidirectional clusters, and clustered genes are coordinately transcribed as long polycistronic units, typically from divergent strand switch regions (dSSRs) which initiate transcription bidirectionally on opposite strands. In investigating the mechanism by which CYC4 and CYC9 expression levels are reduced in HAT2-depleted cells without other genes in their polycistronic transcription units being coordinately downregulated, we found using reporter assays that CYC4 and CYC9 have their own specific promoters. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays with H4acetylK10 antibodies and real time PCR analyses of RNA suggested these gene-specific promoters were activated in cell cycle-dependent manner. Nuclear run-on analyses confirmed that CYC4 and CYC9 were transcriptionally activated from their own promoters at specific cell cycle stages. Thus, there are two tiers of gene regulation. Transcription of polycistronic units primarily initiates at dSSRs, and this most likely occurs constitutively. A subset of genes have their own promoters, at least some of which are activated in a cell-cycle dependent manner. This second tier of regulation is more sensitive to H4K10 acetylation levels, resulting in downregulation of expression in HAT2-depleted cells. This report presents the first data pointing to cell cycle-specific activation of promoters in

  6. PfPK6, a novel cyclin-dependent kinase/mitogen-activated protein kinase-related protein kinase from Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed Central

    Bracchi-Ricard, V; Barik, S; Delvecchio, C; Doerig, C; Chakrabarti, R; Chakrabarti, D

    2000-01-01

    We have isolated a novel protein kinase cDNA, PfPK6, by differential display RT-PCR (DDRT-PCR) of mRNA obtained from different asexual erythrocytic stages of Plasmodium falciparum, which shows sequence similarity to both cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family members. The 915 bp open reading frame (ORF) is interrupted by seven introns and encodes a 305-residue polypeptide with a predicted molecular mass of 35848 Da. Several cDNA clones with some of the intron sequences were isolated, indicating alternate or defective splicing of PfPK6 transcripts because the gene seems to be a single copy located on chromosome 13. The similarity of the catalytic domain of PfPK6 to those of CDK2 and MAPK is 57.3% and 49.6%, respectively. The signature PSTAIRE (single-letter amino acid codes) CDK motif is changed to SKCILRE in PfPK6. The TXY residues that are phosphorylated in MAPKs for their activation are T(173)PT in PfPK6. Three size classes of PfPK6 transcripts of 6.5, 2.0 and 1.1 kb are up-regulated during the transition of P. falciparum from ring to trophozoite. Western blot analysis suggested the expression of a 35 kDa polypeptide in trophozoites and schizonts. Immunofluorescence studies indicated both nuclear and cytoplasmic localization of PfPK6 in trophozoite, schizont and segmenter stages. In vitro, recombinant PfPK6 phosphorylated itself and also exogenous substrates, histone and the small subunit of the malarial ribonucleotide reductase (R2). The kinase activity of PfPK6 is sensitive to CDK inhibitors such as olomoucine and roscovitine. PfPK6 showed a preference for Mn(2+) over Mg(2+) ions as a cofactor. The Lys(38)-->Arg mutant is severely defective in its interaction with ATP and bivalent cations and somewhat defective in catalytic rate for R2 phosphorylation. PMID:10727426

  7. Regulation of estrogen receptor transcriptional enhancement by the cyclin A/Cdk2 complex.

    PubMed

    Trowbridge, J M; Rogatsky, I; Garabedian, M J

    1997-09-16

    We have found that ectopic expression of cyclin A increases hormone-dependent and hormone-independent transcriptional activation by the estrogen receptor in vivo in a number of cell lines, including HeLa cells, U-2 OS osteosarcoma cells and Hs 578Bst breast epithelial cells. This effect can be further enhanced in HeLa cells by the concurrent expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase activator, cyclin H, and cdk7, and abolished by expression of the cdk inhibitor, p27(KIP1), or by the expression of a dominant negative catalytically inactive cdk2 mutant. ER is phosphorylated between amino acids 82 and 121 in vitro by the cyclin A/cdk2 complex and incorporation of phosphate into ER is stimulated by ectopic expression of cyclin A in vivo. Together, these results strongly suggest a direct role for the cyclin A/cdk2 complex in phosphorylating ER and regulating its transcriptional activity.

  8. Expression of cyclins E1 and E2 during mouse development and in neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Yan; Yu, Qunyan; Whoriskey, Wendy; Dick, Fred; Tsai, Kenneth Y.; Ford, Heide L.; Biswas, Debajit K.; Pardee, Arthur B.; Amati, Bruno; Jacks, Tyler; Richardson, Andrea; Dyson, Nicholas; Sicinski, Piotr

    2001-01-01

    Cyclin E1 (formerly called cyclin E) and the recently described cyclin E2 belong to the family of E-type cyclins that operate during the G1/S phase progression in mammalian cells. The two E-cyclins share a catalytic partner, cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2), and activate their associated kinase activities at similar times during cell cycle progression. Despite these similarities, it is unknown whether the two proteins perform distinct functions, or, alternatively, they control S-phase entry of different cell types in a tissue-specific fashion. To start addressing in vivo functions of E-cyclins, we determined the expression pattern of cyclins E1 and E2 during normal mouse development. We found that the two E-cyclins showed very similar patterns of expression; both were expressed within the proliferating compartment during embryo development. Analyses of cells and tissues lacking members of the retinoblastoma (pRB) family of proteins revealed that the expression of both cyclins is controlled in a pRB-dependent, but p107- and p130-independent fashion, likely through the pRB-dependent E2F transcription factors. We also found that cyclins E1 and E2 are expressed at high levels in mouse breast tumors driven by the Myc oncogene. Last, we found that cyclin E2 is overexpressed in ≈24% of analyzed human mammary carcinomas. Collectively these findings suggest that the expression of cyclins E1 and E2 is governed by similar molecular circuitry. PMID:11687642

  9. Expression of cyclins E1 and E2 during mouse development and in neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Geng, Y; Yu, Q; Whoriskey, W; Dick, F; Tsai, K Y; Ford, H L; Biswas, D K; Pardee, A B; Amati, B; Jacks, T; Richardson, A; Dyson, N; Sicinski, P

    2001-11-06

    Cyclin E1 (formerly called cyclin E) and the recently described cyclin E2 belong to the family of E-type cyclins that operate during the G(1)/S phase progression in mammalian cells. The two E-cyclins share a catalytic partner, cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2), and activate their associated kinase activities at similar times during cell cycle progression. Despite these similarities, it is unknown whether the two proteins perform distinct functions, or, alternatively, they control S-phase entry of different cell types in a tissue-specific fashion. To start addressing in vivo functions of E-cyclins, we determined the expression pattern of cyclins E1 and E2 during normal mouse development. We found that the two E-cyclins showed very similar patterns of expression; both were expressed within the proliferating compartment during embryo development. Analyses of cells and tissues lacking members of the retinoblastoma (pRB) family of proteins revealed that the expression of both cyclins is controlled in a pRB-dependent, but p107- and p130-independent fashion, likely through the pRB-dependent E2F transcription factors. We also found that cyclins E1 and E2 are expressed at high levels in mouse breast tumors driven by the Myc oncogene. Last, we found that cyclin E2 is overexpressed in approximately 24% of analyzed human mammary carcinomas. Collectively these findings suggest that the expression of cyclins E1 and E2 is governed by similar molecular circuitry.

  10. D-type cyclins and G1 progression during liver development in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Boylan, Joan M. . E-mail: Joan_Boylan@brown.edu; Gruppuso, Philip A. . E-mail: Philip_Gruppuso@brown.edu

    2005-05-13

    Initiation and progression through G1 requires the activity of signaling complexes containing cyclins (D- or E-type) and cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK4/6 and CDK2, respectively). We set out to identify the G1-phase cyclins and CDKs that are operative during late gestation liver development in the rat. This is a period during which hepatocytes show a high rate of proliferation that is, at least in part, independent of the mitogenic signaling pathways that are functional in mature hepatocytes. RNase protection assay and Western immunoblotting indicated that cyclin D1 is expressed at similar levels in fetal and adult liver. When cyclin D1 was induced after partial hepatectomy, its predominant CDK-binding partner was CDK4. In contrast, cyclins D2 and D3 predominated in fetal liver and were complexed with both CDK4 and CDK6. Little CDK6 protein was expressed in quiescent or regenerating adult liver. Cyclins E1 and E2 were both transcriptionally up-regulated in fetal liver. Activity of complexes containing cyclins E1 and E2 was higher in fetal liver, as was content of the cell cycle regulator, Rb. In fetal liver, Rb was highly phosphorylated at both cyclin D- and cyclin E-dependent sites. In conclusion, liver development is associated with a switch from cyclin D2/D3-containing complexes to cyclin D1:CDK4 complexes. We speculate that the switch in D-type cyclins may be associated with the dependence on mitogenic signaling that develops as hepatocytes mature.

  11. Foci of cyclin A2 interact with actin and RhoA in mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Loukil, Abdelhalim; Izard, Fanny; Georgieva, Mariya; Mashayekhan, Shaereh; Blanchard, Jean-Marie; Parmeggiani, Andrea; Peter, Marion

    2016-01-01

    Cyclin A2 is a key player in the regulation of the cell cycle. Its degradation in mid-mitosis depends primarily on the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS), while autophagy also contributes. However, a fraction of cyclin A2 persists beyond metaphase. In this work, we focus on cyclin A2-rich foci detected in mitosis by high resolution imaging and analyse their movements. We demonstrate that cyclin A2 interacts with actin and RhoA during mitosis, and that cyclin A2 depletion induces a dramatic decrease in active RhoA in mitosis. Our data suggest cyclin A2 participation in RhoA activation in late mitosis. PMID:27279564

  12. Cell cycle regulatory effects of retinoic Acid and forskolin are mediated by the cyclin C gene.

    PubMed

    Makkonen, Katri M; Malinen, Marjo; Ropponen, Antti; Väisänen, Sami; Carlberg, Carsten

    2009-10-23

    As a partner of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 3, Cyclin C controls cellular proliferation and, together with CDK8, represses gene transcription. In this study, we showed that the highly expressed Cyclin C gene is a direct target of the nuclear hormone all-trans retinoic acid (RA) in HEK293 human embryonal kidney cells. The RA receptor (RAR) gamma associates with a Cyclin C promoter region containing two RAR binding sites. The Cyclin C gene also directly responds to the cAMP activator Forskolin via the transcription factor CREB1 (cAMP response element-binding protein 1), for which we identified four binding sites within the first 2250 bp of its promoter. RARgamma and CREB1 show functional convergence via the corepressor NCoR1, which controls in particular the Forskolin response of Cyclin C. The histone deacetylases 1, 5, 6, 7 and 11 are involved in the basal expression of Cyclin C, but in HEK293 and MCF-7 human breast carcinoma cells the antiproliferative effects of the histone deacetylase inhibitor SAHA (suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid) are not mediated by Cyclin C. However, cell cycle progressing effects of all-trans RA and Forskolin are dependent on Cyclin C expression levels. This suggests that the primary regulation of Cyclin C by all-trans RA and Forskolin mediates some of the cell cycle control actions of these compounds.

  13. Cyclin B2 and p53 control proper timing of centrosome separation

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Hyun-Ja; van Deursen, Jan M.

    2015-01-01

    Cyclins Bl and B2 are frequently elevated in human cancers and are associated with tumour aggressiveness and poor clinical outcome; however, whether and how B-type cyclins drive tumorigenesis is unknown. Here we show that cyclin Bl and B2 transgenic mice are highly prone to tumours, including tumour types where B-type cyclins serve as prognosticators. Cyclins Bl and B2 both induce aneuploidy when overexpressed but through distinct mechanisms, with cyclin Bl inhibiting separase activation, leading to anaphase bridges, and cyclin B2 triggering aurora-A-mediated Plkl hyperactivation, resulting in accelerated centrosome separation and lagging chromosomes. Complementary experiments revealed that cyclin B2 and p53 act antagonistically to control aurora-A-mediated centrosome splitting and accurate chromosome segregation in normal cells. These data demonstrate a causative link between B-type cyclin overexpression and tumour pathophysiology, and uncover previously unknown functions of cyclin B2 and p53 in centrosome separation that may be perturbed in many human cancers. PMID:24776885

  14. Discovery of [4-Amino-2-(1-methanesulfonylpiperidin-4-ylamino)pyrimidin-5-yl](2,3-difluoro-6-methoxyphenyl)methanone (R547), A Potent and Selective Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor with Significiant in Vivo Antitumor Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Chu,X.; DePinto, W.; Bartkovitz, D.; So, S.; Vu, B.; Packman, K.; Lukacs, C.; Ding, Q.; Jiang, N.; et al.

    2006-01-01

    The cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) and their cyclin partners are key regulators of the cell cycle. Since deregulation of CDKs is found with high frequency in many human cancer cells, pharmacological inhibition of CDKs with small molecules has the potential to provide an effective strategy for the treatment of cancer. The 2,4-diamino-5-ketopyrimidines 6 reported here represent a novel class of potent and ATP-competitive inhibitors that selectively target the cyclin-dependent kinase family. This diaminopyrimidine core with a substituted 4-piperidine moiety on the C2-amino position and 2-methoxybenzoyl at the C5 position has been identified as the critical structure responsible for the CDK inhibitory activity. Further optimization has led to a good number of analogues that show potent inhibitory activities against CDK1, CDK2, and CDK4 but are inactive against a large panel of serine/threonine and tyrosine kinases (K{sub i} > 10 {mu}M). As one of these representative analogues, compound 39 (R547) has the best CDK inhibitory activities (K{sub i} = 0.001, 0.003, and 0.001 M for CDK1, CDK2, and CDK4, respectively) and excellent in vitro cellular potency, inhibiting the growth of various human tumor cell lines including an HCT116 cell line (IC{sub 50} = 0.08 {mu}M). An X-ray crystal structure of 39 bound to CDK2 has been determined in this study, revealing a binding mode that is consistent with our SAR. Compound 39 demonstrates significant in vivo efficacy in the HCT116 human colorectal tumor xenograft model in nude mice with up to 95% tumor growth inhibition. On the basis of its superior overall profile, 39 was chosen for further evaluation and has progressed into Phase I clinical trial for the treatment of cancer.

  15. Enhanced expression of cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases in aniline-induced cell proliferation in rat spleen

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianling; Wang, Gangduo; Ma, Huaxian; Khan, M. Firoze

    2010-01-01

    Aniline exposure is associated with toxicity to the spleen leading to splenomegaly, hyperplasia, fibrosis and a variety of sarcomas of the spleen on chronic exposure. In earlier studies, we have shown that aniline exposure leads to iron overload, oxidative stress and activation of redox-sensitive transcription factors, which could regulate various genes leading to a tumorigenic response in the spleen. However, molecular mechanisms leading to aniline-induced cellular proliferation in the spleen remain largely unknown. This study was, therefore, undertaken on the regulation of G1 phase cell cycle proteins (cyclins), expression of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs), phosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein (pRB) and cell proliferation in the spleen, in an experimental condition preceding a tumorigenic response. Male SD rats were treated with aniline (0.5 mmol/kg/day via drinking water) for 30 days (controls received drinking water only), and splenocyte proliferation, protein expression of G1 phase cyclins, CDKs and pRB were measured. Aniline treatment resulted in significant increases in splenocyte proliferation, based on cell counts, cell proliferation markers including proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), nuclear Ki67 protein (Ki67) and minichromosome maintenance (MCM), MTT assay and flow cytometric analysis. Western blot analysis of splenocyte proteins from aniline-treated rats showed significantly increased expression of cyclins D1, D2, D3 and cyclin E, as compared to the controls. Similarly, real-time PCR analysis showed significantly increased mRNA expression for cyclins D1, D2, D3 and E in the spleens of aniline-treated rats. The overexpression of these cyclins was associated with increases in the expression of CDK4, CDK6, CDK2 as well as phosphorylation of pRB protein. Our data suggest that increased expression of cyclins, CDKs and phosphorylation of pRB protein could be critical in cell proliferation, and may contribute to aniline-induced tumorigenic

  16. Cytoplasmic sequestration of cyclin D1 associated with cell cycle withdrawal of neuroblastoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sumrejkanchanakij, Piyamas; Eto, Kazuhiro; Ikeda, Masa-Aki . E-mail: mikeda.emb@tmd.ac.jp

    2006-02-03

    The regulation of D-type cyclin-dependent kinase activity is critical for neuronal differentiation and apoptosis. We recently showed that cyclin D1 is sequestered in the cytoplasm and that its nuclear localization induces apoptosis in postmitotic primary neurons. Here, we further investigated the role of the subcellular localization of cyclin D1 in cell cycle withdrawal during the differentiation of N1E-115 neuroblastoma cells. We show that cyclin D1 became predominantly cytoplasmic after differentiation. Targeting cyclin D1 expression to the nucleus induced phosphorylation of Rb and cdk2 kinase activity. Furthermore, cyclin D1 nuclear localization promoted differentiated N1E-115 cells to reenter the cell cycle, a process that was inhibited by p16{sup INK4a}, a specific inhibitor of D-type cyclin activity. These results indicate that cytoplasmic sequestration of cyclin D1 plays a role in neuronal cell cycle withdrawal, and suggests that the abrogation of machinery involved in monitoring aberrant nuclear cyclin D1 activity contributes to neuronal tumorigenesis.

  17. Localization and Dynamics of Cdc2-Cyclin B during Meiotic Reinitiation in Starfish OocytesV⃞

    PubMed Central

    Terasaki, Mark; Okumura, Ei-ichi; Hinkle, Beth; Kishimoto, Takeo

    2003-01-01

    The Cdc2-cyclin B kinase has a central role in regulating the onset of M phase. In starfish oocytes, Cdc2-cyclin B begins to be activated ∼10 min after application of maturation hormone, followed by accumulation in the nucleus then nuclear envelope breakdown. By immunofluorescence and by expressing a green fluorescent (GFP) chimera of cyclin B, we find that cyclin B is present in aggregates in the cytoplasm of immature oocytes. The aggregates disperse at ∼10 min, suggesting that the dispersal is closely related to the activation of the kinase. Using cyclin B-GFP, the dispersion begins from the region containing the centrosomes. Extractability of Cdc2-cyclin B changes with similar kinetics during maturation. Active Cdc25 phosphatase released Cdc2-cyclin B from the detergent-insoluble fraction independently of its phosphatase activity. Live cell imaging also showed that Cdc2-cyclin B begins to accumulate in the nucleus before changes in nuclear pore permeability, consistent with Cdc2-cyclin B-induced disassembly of the pores. PMID:14551249

  18. Distinct proliferative and transcriptional effects of the D-type cyclins in vivo.

    PubMed

    Mullany, Lisa K; White, Peter; Hanse, Eric A; Nelsen, Christopher J; Goggin, Melissa M; Mullany, Joseph E; Anttila, Chelsea K; Greenbaum, Linda E; Kaestner, Klaus H; Albrecht, Jeffrey H

    2008-07-15

    The D-type cyclins (D1, D2 and D3) are components of the cell cycle machinery and govern progression through G(1) phase in response to extracellular signals. Although these proteins are highly homologous and conserved in evolution, they contain distinct structural motifs and are differentially regulated in various cell types. Cyclin D1 appears to play a role in many different types of cancer, whereas cyclins D2 and D3 are less frequently associated with malignancy. In this study, we transiently expressed cyclin D1, D2 or D3 in hepatocytes and analyzed transcriptional networks regulated by each. All three D-type cyclins promoted robust hepatocyte proliferation and marked liver growth, although cyclin D3 stimulated less DNA synthesis than D1 or D2. Accordingly, the three D-type cyclins similarly activated genes associated with cell division. Cyclin D1 regulated transcriptional pathways involved in the metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids, and other substrates, whereas cyclin D2 did not regulate these pathways despite having an equivalent effect on proliferation. Comparison of transcriptional profiles following 70% partial hepatectomy and cyclin D1 transduction revealed a highly significant overlap, suggesting that cyclin D1 may regulate diverse cellular processes in the regenerating liver. In summary, these studies provide the first comparative analysis of the transcriptional networks regulated by the D-type cyclins and provide insight into novel functions of these key cell cycle proteins. Further study of the unique targets of cyclin D1 should provide further insight into its prominent role in proliferation, growth and cancer.

  19. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) inhibits EGF-induced cell transformation via reduction of cyclin D1 mRNA stability

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jingjie; Ouyang, Weiming; Li, Jingxia; Zhang, Dongyun; Yu, Yonghui; Wang, York; Li, Xuejun; Huang, Chuanshu

    2012-09-01

    Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) inhibiting cancer cell growth has been associated with its downregulation of cyclin D1 protein expression at transcription level or translation level. Here, we have demonstrated that SAHA inhibited EGF-induced Cl41 cell transformation via the decrease of cyclin D1 mRNA stability and induction of G0/G1 growth arrest. We found that SAHA treatment resulted in the dramatic inhibition of EGF-induced cell transformation, cyclin D1 protein expression and induction of G0/G1 growth arrest. Further studies showed that SAHA downregulation of cyclin D1 was only observed with endogenous cyclin D1, but not with reconstitutionally expressed cyclin D1 in the same cells, excluding the possibility of SAHA regulating cyclin D1 at level of protein degradation. Moreover, SAHA inhibited EGF-induced cyclin d1 mRNA level, whereas it did not show any inhibitory effect on cyclin D1 promoter-driven luciferase reporter activity under the same experimental conditions, suggesting that SAHA may decrease cyclin D1 mRNA stability. This notion was supported by the results that treatment of cells with SAHA decreased the half-life of cyclin D1 mRNA from 6.95 h to 2.57 h. Consistent with downregulation of cyclin D1 mRNA stability, SAHA treatment also attenuated HuR expression, which has been well-characterized as a positive regulator of cyclin D1 mRNA stability. Thus, our study identifies a novel mechanism responsible for SAHA inhibiting cell transformation via decreasing cyclin D1 mRNA stability and induction of G0/G1 growth arrest in Cl41 cells. -- Highlights: ► SAHA inhibits cell transformation in Cl41 cells. ► SAHA suppresses Cyclin D1 protein expression. ► SAHA decreases cyclin D1 mRNA stability.

  20. A novel function for Cyclin A2: Control of cell invasion via RhoA signaling

    PubMed Central

    Arsic, Nikola; Bendris, Nawal; Peter, Marion; Begon-Pescia, Christina; Rebouissou, Cosette; Gadéa, Gilles; Bouquier, Nathalie; Bibeau, Frédéric

    2012-01-01

    Cyclin A2 plays a key role in cell cycle regulation. It is essential in embryonic cells and in the hematopoietic lineage yet dispensable in fibroblasts. In this paper, we demonstrate that Cyclin A2–depleted cells display a cortical distribution of actin filaments and increased migration. These defects are rescued by restoration of wild-type Cyclin A2, which directly interacts with RhoA, or by a Cyclin A2 mutant unable to associate with Cdk. In vitro, Cyclin A2 potentiates the exchange activity of a RhoA-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor. Consistent with this, Cyclin A2 depletion enhances migration of fibroblasts and invasiveness of transformed cells via down-regulation of RhoA activity. Moreover, Cyclin A2 expression is lower in metastases relative to primary colon adenocarcinoma in matched human tumors. All together, these data show that Cyclin A2 negatively controls cell motility by promoting RhoA activation, thus demonstrating a novel Cyclin A2 function in cytoskeletal rearrangements and cell migration. PMID:22232705

  1. Rsf-1 is overexpressed in non-small cell lung cancers and regulates cyclinD1 expression and ERK activity

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Qingchang; Dong, Qianze; Wang, Enhua

    2012-03-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rsf-1 expression is elevated in non-small cell lung cancers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rsf-1 depletion inhibits proliferation and increased apoptosis in lung cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rsf-1 depletion decreases the level of cyclinD1 and phosphor-ERK expression. -- Abstract: Rsf-1 (HBXAP) was recently reported to be overexpressed in various cancers and associated with the malignant behavior of cancer cells. However, the expression of Rsf-1 in primary lung cancer and its biological roles in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) have not been reported. The molecular mechanism of Rsf-1 in cancer aggressiveness remains ambiguous. In the present study, we analyzed the expression pattern of Rsf-1 in NSCLC tissues and found that Rsf-1 was overexpressed at both the mRNA and protein levels. There was a significant association between Rsf-1 overexpression and TNM stage (p = 0.0220) and poor differentiation (p = 0.0013). Furthermore, knockdown of Rsf-1 expression in H1299 and H460 cells with high endogenous Rsf-1 expression resulted in a decrease of colony formation ability and inhibition of cell cycle progression. Rsf-1 knockdown also induced apoptosis in these cell lines. Further analysis showed that Rsf-1 knockdown decreased cyclin D1 expression and phospho-ERK levels. In conclusion, Rsf-1 is overexpressed in NSCLC and contributes to malignant cell growth by cyclin D1 and ERK modulation, which makes Rsf-1 a candidate therapeutic target in lung cancer.

  2. Understanding and modulating cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor specificity: molecular modeling and biochemical evaluation of pyrazolopyrimidinones as CDK2/cyclin A and CDK4/cyclin D1 inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Karen A.; Markwalder, Jay A.; Seitz, Steven P.; Chang, Chong-Hwan; Cox, Sarah; Boisclair, Michael D.; Brizuela, Leonardo; Brenner, Stephen L.; Stouten, Pieter F. W.

    2005-02-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) play a key role in regulating the cell cycle. The cyclins, their activating agents, and endogenous CDK inhibitors are frequently mutated in human cancers, making CDKs interesting targets for cancer chemotherapy. Our aim is the discovery of selective CDK4/cyclin D1 inhibitors. An ATP-competitive pyrazolopyrimidinone CDK inhibitor was identified by HTS and docked into a CDK4 homology model. The resulting binding model was consistent with available SAR and was validated by a subsequent CDK2/inhibitor crystal structure. An iterative cycle of chemistry and modeling led to a 70-fold improvement in potency. Small substituent changes resulted in large CDK4/CDK2 selectivity changes. The modeling revealed that selectivity is largely due to hydrogen-bonded interactions with only two kinase residues. This demonstrates that small differences between enzymes can efficiently be exploited in the design of selective inhibitors.

  3. Colocalization of β-catenin with Notch intracellular domain in colon cancer: a possible role of Notch1 signaling in activation of CyclinD1-mediated cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Gopalakrishnan, Natarajan; Saravanakumar, Marimuthu; Madankumar, Perumal; Thiyagu, Mani; Devaraj, Halagowder

    2014-11-01

    The Wnt and Notch1 signaling pathways play major roles in intestinal development and tumorigenesis. Sub-cellular localization of β-catenin has been implicated in colorectal carcinogenesis. However, the β-catenin and Notch intracellular domain (NICD) interaction has to be addressed. Immunohistochemistries of β-catenin, NICD, and dual immunofluorescence of β-catenin and NICD were analyzed in colorectal tissues and HT29 cell line. Moreover, real-time PCR analysis of CyclinD1, Hes1 and MUC2 was done in HT29 cells upon N-[N-(3, 5-difluorophenacetyl)-L-alanyl]-S-phenylglycine t-butyl ester (DAPT) treatment. Dual staining emphasized the strong interaction of β-catenin and NICD in adenoma and adenocarcinoma than in normal tissues. Hes1 transcript levels were decreased 1.5- and 7.1-fold in 12.5 and 25 µM DAPT-treated HT29 cells. CyclinD1 transcript levels decreased 1.2- and 1.6-fold, and MUC2 transcript level increased 4.3- and 7.5-fold in 12.5 and 25 µM DAPT-treated HT29 cells. The results of this study showed that the sub-cellular localization of β-catenin converges with NICD inducing proliferation through the activation of CyclinD1 and Hes1. Moreover, the inhibition of Notch1 signaling by DAPT leads to the arrest of cell proliferation and induces apoptosis leading to the upregulation of MUC2, a secretory cell lineage marker.

  4. Induction of cyclin A gene expression by homocysteine in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, J C; Wang, H; Perrella, M A; Yoshizumi, M; Sibinga, N E; Tan, L C; Haber, E; Chang, T H; Schlegel, R; Lee, M E

    1996-01-01

    Homocysteine is an important and independent risk factor for arteriosclerosis. We showed previously that homocysteine stimulates vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation, a hallmark of arteriosclerosis. We show here that homocysteine and serum increased DNA synthesis synergistically in both human and rat aortic smooth muscle cells (RASMCs). Treatment of quiescent RASMCs with 1 mM homocysteine or 2% calf serum for 36 h increased cyclin A mRNA levels by 8- and 14-fold, respectively, whereas homocysteine plus serum increased cyclin A mRNA levels by 40-fold, indicating a synergistic induction of cyclin A mRNA. Homocysteine did not increase the half-life of cyclin A mRNA (2.9 h), but it did increase the transcriptional rate of the cyclin A gene in nuclear run-on experiments. The positive effect of homocysteine on cyclin A gene transcription was confirmed by our finding that homocysteine increased cyclin A promoter activity and ATF-binding protein levels in RASMCs. Finally, 1 mM homocysteine increased cyclin A protein levels and cyclin A-associated kinase activity by threefold. This homocysteine-induced expression lesions by promoting proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells. PMID:8550827

  5. Identification of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 3 as a new interaction partner of cyclin D3

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Maoyun; Wei Yuanyan; Yao Luyang; Xie Jianhui; Chen Xiaoning; Wang Hanzhou; Jiang Jianhai; Gu Jianxin . E-mail: jxgu@shmu.edu.cn

    2006-02-03

    Cyclin D3, like cyclin D1 and D2 isoforms, is a crucial component of the core cell cycle machinery in mammalian cells. It also exhibits its unique properties in many other physiological processes. In the present study, using yeast two-hybrid screening, we identified ERK3, an atypical mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), as a cyclin D3 binding partner. GST pull-down assays showed that cyclin D3 interacts directly and specifically with ERK3 in vitro. The binding of cyclin D3 and ERK3 was further confirmed in vivo by co-immunoprecipitation assay and confocal microscopic analysis. Moreover, carboxy-terminal extension of ERK3 was responsible for its association with intact cyclin D3. These findings further expand distinct roles of cyclin D3 and suggest the potential activity of ERK3 in cell proliferation.

  6. Cytotoxicity of diacetoxyscirpenol is associated with apoptosis by activation of caspase-8 and interruption of cell cycle progression by down-regulation of cdk4 and cyclin B1 in human Jurkat T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jun, Do Youn; Kim, Jun Seok; Park, Hae Sun; Song, Woo Sun; Bae, Young Seuk; Kim, Young Ho . E-mail: ykim@knu.ac.kr

    2007-07-15

    To understand the mechanism underlying T-cell toxicity of diacetoxyscirpenol (DAS) from Fusarium sambucinum, its apoptogenic as well as growth retardation activity was investigated in human Jurkat T cells. Exposure to DAS (0.01-0.15 {mu}M) caused apoptotic DNA fragmentation along with caspase-8 activation, Bid cleavage, mitochondrial cytochrome c release, activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3, and PARP degradation, without any alteration in the levels of Fas or FasL. Under these conditions, necrosis was not accompanied. The cytotoxicity of DAS was not blocked by the anti-Fas neutralizing antibody ZB-4. Although the DAS-induced apoptotic events were completely prevented by overexpression of Bcl-xL, the cells overexpressing Bcl-xL were unable to divide in the presence of DAS, resulting from the failure of cell cycle progression possibly due to down-regulation in the protein levels of cdk4 and cyclin B1. The DAS-mediated apoptosis and activation of caspase-8, -9, and -3 were abrogated by either pan-caspase inhibitor (z-VAD-fmk) or caspase-8 inhibitor (z-IETD-fmk). While the DAS-mediated apoptosis and activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3 were slightly suppressed by the mitochondrial permeability transition pore inhibitor (CsA), both caspase-8 activation and Bid cleavage were not affected by CsA. The activated normal peripheral T cells possessed a similar susceptibility to the cytotoxicity of DAS. These results demonstrate that the T-cell toxicity of DAS is attributable to not only apoptosis initiated by caspase-8 activation and subsequent mitochondrion-dependent or -independent activation of caspase cascades, which can be regulated by Bcl-xL, but also interruption of cell cycle progression caused by down-regulation of cdk4 and cyclin B1 proteins.

  7. Transcriptional role of cyclin D1 in development revealed by a “genetic-proteomic” screen

    PubMed Central

    Bienvenu, Frédéric; Jirawatnotai, Siwanon; Elias, Joshua E.; Meyer, Clifford A.; Mizeracka, Karolina; Marson, Alexander; Frampton, Garrett M.; Cole, Megan F.; Odom, Duncan T.; Odajima, Junko; Geng, Yan; Zagozdzon, Agnieszka; Jecrois, Marie; Young, Richard A.; Liu, X. Shirley; Cepko, Constance L.; Gygi, Steven P.; Sicinski, Piotr

    2010-01-01

    Cyclin D1 belongs to the core cell cycle machinery, and it is frequently overexpressed in human cancers1,2. The full repertoire of cyclin D1 functions in normal development and in oncogenesis is currently unclear. Here we developed FLAG- and HA-tagged cyclin D1 knock-in mouse strains that allowed high-throughput mass spectrometry approach to search for cyclin D1-binding proteins in different mouse organs. In addition to cell cycle partners, we observed several proteins involved in transcription. Genome-wide location (ChIP-chip) analyses revealed that during mouse development cyclin D1 occupies promoters of abundantly expressed genes. In particular, we found that in developing mouse retinas – an organ that critically requires cyclin D1 function3,4 – cyclin D1 binds the upstream regulatory region of the Notch1 gene where it serves to recruit CBP histone acetyltransferase. Genetic ablation of cyclin D1 resulted in decreased CBP recruitment, decreased histone acetylation of the Notch1 promoter region, and led to decreased levels of the Notch transcript and protein in cyclin D1-null retinas. Transduction of an activated allele of Notch1 into cyclin D1−/− retinas increased proliferation of retinal progenitor cells, indicating that upregulating Notch1 signaling alleviates the phenotype of cyclin D1-deficiency. These studies reveal that in addition to its well-established cell cycle roles, cyclin D1 plays an in vivo transcriptional function in mouse development. Our approach, which we term “genetic-proteomic” can be used to study the in vivo function of essentially any protein. PMID:20090754

  8. Cyclin E marks quiescent neural stem cells and caspase-3-positive newborn cells during adult hippocampal neurogenesis in mice.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Yayoi; Ikeda, Masa-Aki

    2015-10-21

    Cyclin E is a key regulator of progression through the G1-phase of the cell cycle. Recently, a cell cycle-independent role for cyclin E in the adult mouse central nervous system has been suggested. In the present study, we examined expression of cyclin E in the mouse hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG), a region of neurogenesis in adulthood, using immunofluorescence. In the adult DG, cyclin E-immunoreactive (cyclin E+) cells was limited to postmitotic cells. In the subgranular zone, cyclin E was detected in the vertical process of radial glia-like cells, which were marked by the neural stem cell markers nestin and GFAP. Cyclin E was also detected in the nucleus of cells, which were labeled with stage-specific neuronal cell markers, including Pax6, Sox2, NeuroD, doublecortin, and NeuN. The densities of cyclin E+ cells in the DG reduced and increased with age and running, respectively. Furthermore, the majority of cyclin E+ cells co-expressed active caspase-3, a marker of apoptosis. Together, the results indicate that cyclin E is expressed in the process of quiescent neural stem cells and in the nucleus of active caspase-3+ cells during neuronal cell differentiation, suggesting that cyclin E has a Cdk-independent function, which might be important for the mechanisms regulating adult hippocampal neurogenesis.

  9. Implications of caspase-dependent proteolytic cleavage of cyclin A1 in DNA damage-induced cell death

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, Sang Hyeok; Seo, Sung-Keum; An, Sungkwan; Choe, Tae-Boo; Hong, Seok-Il; Lee, Yun-Han; Park, In-Chul

    2014-10-24

    Highlights: • Caspase-1 mediates doxorubicin-induced downregulation of cyclin A1. • Active caspase-1 effectively cleaved cyclin A1 at D165. • Cyclin A1 expression is involved in DNA damage-induced cell death. - Abstract: Cyclin A1 is an A-type cyclin that directly binds to CDK2 to regulate cell-cycle progression. In the present study, we found that doxorubicin decreased the expression of cyclin A1 at the protein level in A549 lung cancer cells, while markedly downregulating its mRNA levels. Interestingly, doxorubicin upregulated caspase-1 in a concentration-dependent manner, and z-YAVD-fmk, a specific inhibitor of caspase-1, reversed the doxorubicin-induced decrease in cyclin A1 in A549 lung cancer and MCF7 breast cancer cells. Active caspase-1 effectively cleaved cyclin A1 at D165 into two fragments, which in vitro cleavage assays showed were further cleaved by caspase-3. Finally, we found that overexpression of cyclin A1 significantly reduced the cytotoxicity of doxorubicin, and knockdown of cyclin A1 by RNA interference enhanced the sensitivity of cells to ionizing radiation. Our data suggest a new mechanism for the downregulation of cyclin A1 by DNA-damaging stimuli that could be intimately involved in the cell death induced by DNA damage-inducing stimuli, including doxorubicin and ionizing radiation.

  10. Molecular dynamics and QM/MM-based 3D interaction analyses of cyclin-E inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Pasha, Farhan Ahmad; Neaz, Mohammad Morshed

    2013-02-01

    Abnormal expression of cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2)/cyclin-E is detected in colorectal, ovarian, breast and prostate cancers. The study of CDK2 with a bound inhibitor revealed CDK2 as a potential therapeutic target for several proliferative diseases. Several highly selective inhibitors of CDK2 are currently undergoing clinical trials, but possibilities remain for the identification and development of novel and improved inhibitors. For example, in silico targeting of ATP-competitive inhibitors of CDKs is of special interest. A series of 3,5-diaminoindazoles was studied using molecular docking and comparative field analyses. We used post-docking short time molecular dynamics (MD) simulation to account for receptor flexibility. The three types of structures, i.e., the highest energy, lowest energy and the structure most resembling the X-ray structure (three complexes) were identified for all ligands. QM/MM energy calculations were performed using a DFT b3lyp/6-31 g* and MM OPLS-2005 force field. Conceptual DFT properties such as the interaction energy of ligand to protein, global hardness (η), HOMO density, electrostatic potential, and electron density were calculated and related to inhibitory activity. CoMFA and CoMSIA were used to account for steric and electrostatic interactions. The results of this study provide insight into the bioactive conformation, interactions involved, and the effect of different drug fragments over different biological activities.

  11. Enhanced expression of cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases in aniline-induced cell proliferation in rat spleen

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Jianling; Wang Gangduo; Ma Huaxian; Khan, M. Firoze

    2011-01-15

    Aniline exposure is associated with toxicity to the spleen leading to splenomegaly, hyperplasia, fibrosis and a variety of sarcomas of the spleen on chronic exposure. In earlier studies, we have shown that aniline exposure leads to iron overload, oxidative stress and activation of redox-sensitive transcription factors, which could regulate various genes leading to a tumorigenic response in the spleen. However, molecular mechanisms leading to aniline-induced cellular proliferation in the spleen remain largely unknown. This study was, therefore, undertaken on the regulation of G1 phase cell cycle proteins (cyclins), expression of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs), phosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein (pRB) and cell proliferation in the spleen, in an experimental condition preceding a tumorigenic response. Male SD rats were treated with aniline (0.5 mmol/kg/day via drinking water) for 30 days (controls received drinking water only), and splenocyte proliferation, protein expression of G1 phase cyclins, CDKs and pRB were measured. Aniline treatment resulted in significant increases in splenocyte proliferation, based on cell counts, cell proliferation markers including proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), nuclear Ki67 protein (Ki67) and minichromosome maintenance (MCM), MTT assay and flow cytometric analysis. Western blot analysis of splenocyte proteins from aniline-treated rats showed significantly increased expression of cyclins D1, D2, D3 and E, as compared to the controls. Similarly, real-time PCR analysis showed significantly increased mRNA expression for cyclins D1, D2, D3 and E in the spleens of aniline-treated rats. The overexpression of these cyclins was associated with increases in the expression of CDK4, CDK6, CDK2 as well as phosphorylation of pRB protein. Our data suggest that increased expression of cyclins, CDKs and phosphorylation of pRB protein could be critical in cell proliferation, and may contribute to aniline-induced tumorigenic response in

  12. Enhanced expression of cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases in aniline-induced cell proliferation in rat spleen.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianling; Wang, Gangduo; Ma, Huaxian; Khan, M Firoze

    2011-01-15

    Aniline exposure is associated with toxicity to the spleen leading to splenomegaly, hyperplasia, fibrosis and a variety of sarcomas of the spleen on chronic exposure. In earlier studies, we have shown that aniline exposure leads to iron overload, oxidative stress and activation of redox-sensitive transcription factors, which could regulate various genes leading to a tumorigenic response in the spleen. However, molecular mechanisms leading to aniline-induced cellular proliferation in the spleen remain largely unknown. This study was, therefore, undertaken on the regulation of G1 phase cell cycle proteins (cyclins), expression of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs), phosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein (pRB) and cell proliferation in the spleen, in an experimental condition preceding a tumorigenic response. Male SD rats were treated with aniline (0.5 mmol/kg/day via drinking water) for 30 days (controls received drinking water only), and splenocyte proliferation, protein expression of G1 phase cyclins, CDKs and pRB were measured. Aniline treatment resulted in significant increases in splenocyte proliferation, based on cell counts, cell proliferation markers including proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), nuclear Ki67 protein (Ki67) and minichromosome maintenance (MCM), MTT assay and flow cytometric analysis. Western blot analysis of splenocyte proteins from aniline-treated rats showed significantly increased expression of cyclins D1, D2, D3 and E, as compared to the controls. Similarly, real-time PCR analysis showed significantly increased mRNA expression for cyclins D1, D2, D3 and E in the spleens of aniline-treated rats. The overexpression of these cyclins was associated with increases in the expression of CDK4, CDK6, CDK2 as well as phosphorylation of pRB protein. Our data suggest that increased expression of cyclins, CDKs and phosphorylation of pRB protein could be critical in cell proliferation, and may contribute to aniline-induced tumorigenic response in

  13. E2-C, a cyclin-selective ubiquitin carrier protein required for the destruction of mitotic cyclins.

    PubMed Central

    Aristarkhov, A; Eytan, E; Moghe, A; Admon, A; Hershko, A; Ruderman, J V

    1996-01-01

    Ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis of the mitotic cyclins A and B is required for the completion of mitosis and entry into the next cell cycle. This process is catalyzed by the cyclosome, an approximately 22S particle that contains a cyclin-selective ubiquitin ligase activity, E3-C, that requires a cyclin-selective ubiquitin carrier protein (UBC) E2-C. Here we report the purification and cloning of E2-C from clam oocytes. The deduced amino acid sequence of E2-C indicates that it is a new UBC family member. Bacterially expressed recombinant E2-C is active in in vitro cyclin ubiquitination assays, where it exhibits the same substrate specificities seen with native E2-C. These results demonstrate that E2-C is not a homolog of UBC4 or UBC9, proteins previously suggested to be involved in cyclin ubiquitination, but is a new UBC family member with unique properties. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8633058

  14. Transforming growth factor-β1 induces cell cycle arrest by activating atypical cyclin-dependent kinase 5 through up-regulation of Smad3-dependent p35 expression in human MCF10A mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Seong Ji; Yang, Sun Woo; Kim, Byung-Chul

    2016-04-08

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks) play important roles in control of cell division. Cdk5 is an atypical member of Cdk family with non-cyclin-like regulatory subunit, p35, but its role in cell cycle progression is still unclear. In the present study, we investigated the role of Cdk5/p35 on transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1)-induced cell cycle arrest. In human MCF10A mammary epithelial cells, TGF-β1 induced cell cycle arrest at G1 phase and increased p27KIP1 expression. Interestingly, pretreatment with roscovitine, an inhibitor of Cdk5, or transfection with small interfering (si) RNAs specific to Cdk5 and p35 significantly attenuated the TGF-β1-induced p27KIP1 expression and cell cycle arrest. TGF-β1 increased Cdk5 activity via up-regulation of p35 gene at transcriptional level, and these effects were abolished by transfection with Smad3 siRNA or infection of adenovirus carrying Smad3 mutant at the C-tail (3SA). Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay further revealed that wild type Smad3, but not mutant Smad3 (3SA), binds to the region of the p35 promoter region (-1000--755) in a TGF-β1-dependent manner. These results for the first time demonstrate a role of Cdk5/p35 in the regulation of cell cycle progression modulated by TGF-β1. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinases by p21.

    PubMed Central

    Harper, J W; Elledge, S J; Keyomarsi, K; Dynlacht, B; Tsai, L H; Zhang, P; Dobrowolski, S; Bai, C; Connell-Crowley, L; Swindell, E

    1995-01-01

    p21Cip1 is a cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) inhibitor that is transcriptionally activated by p53 in response to DNA damage. We have explored the interaction of p21 with the currently known Cdks. p21 effectively inhibits Cdk2, Cdk3, Cdk4, and Cdk6 kinases (Ki 0.5-15 nM) but is much less effective toward Cdc2/cyclin B (Ki approximately 400 nM) and Cdk5/p35 (Ki > 2 microM), and does not associate with Cdk7/cyclin H. Overexpression of P21 arrests cells in G1. Thus, p21 is not a universal inhibitor of Cdks but displays selectivity for G1/S Cdk/cyclin complexes. Association of p21 with Cdks is greatly enhanced by cyclin binding. This property is shared by the structurally related inhibitor p27, suggesting a common biochemical mechanism for inhibition. With respect to Cdk2 and Cdk4 complexes, p27 shares the inhibitory potency of p21 but has slightly different kinase specificities. In normal diploid fibroblasts, the vast majority of active Cdk2 is associated with p21, but this active kinase can be fully inhibited by addition of exogenous p21. Reconstruction experiments using purified components indicate that multiple molecules of p21 can associate with Cdk/cyclin complexes and inactive complexes contain more than one molecule of p21. Together, these data suggest a model whereby p21 functions as an inhibitory buffer whose levels determine the threshold kinase activity required for cell cycle progression. Images PMID:7626805

  16. Additive activity between the trans-activation response RNA-binding protein, TRBP2, and cyclin T1 on HIV type 1 expression and viral production in murine cells.

    PubMed

    Battisti, Pier-Luigi; Daher, Aïcha; Bannwarth, Sylvie; Voortman, Johannes; Peden, Keith W C; Hiscott, John; Mouland, Andrew J; Benarous, Richard; Gatignol, Anne

    2003-09-01

    Tat-mediated trans-activation of the HIV-1 long terminal repeat (LTR) occurs through the phosphorylation of the carboxy-terminal domain of the RNA polymerase II. The kinase complex, pTEFb, composed of cyclin T1 (CycT1) and CDK9, mediates this process. The trans-activation response (TAR) RNA-binding protein 2 (TRBP2) increases HIV-1 LTR expression through TAR and protein kinase R (PKR) binding, but not through interactions with the Tat-CycT1-CDK9 complex. TRBP2 and the Tat-CycT1-CDK9 complex have overlapping binding sites on TAR RNA. TRBP2 and CycT1 increased Tat trans-activation in NIH 3T3 cells with additive effects. Upon transfection of HIV-1 pLAI, pNL4-3, pMAL, and pAD molecular clones, reverse transcriptase (RT) activity and p24 concentration were decreased 200- to 900-fold in NIH 3T3 cells compared with HeLa cells in both cells and supernatants. In murine cells, cotransfection of the HIV clones with CycT1 or TRBP2 increased modestly the expression of RT activity in cell extracts. The analysis of Gag expression in murine cells transfected with CycT1 compared with human cells showed a 20-fold decrease in expression and a strong processing defect. The expression of both CycT1 and TRBP2 had a more than additive activity on RT function in cell extracts and on viral particle production in supernatant of murine cells. These results suggest an activity of CycT1 and TRBP2 at different steps in HIV-1 expression and indicate the requirement for another posttranscriptional factor in murine cells for full HIV replication.

  17. Cyclin A2 is required for sister chromatid segregation, but not separase control, in mouse oocyte meiosis.

    PubMed

    Touati, Sandra A; Cladière, Damien; Lister, Lisa M; Leontiou, Ioanna; Chambon, Jean-Philippe; Rattani, Ahmed; Böttger, Franziska; Stemmann, Olaf; Nasmyth, Kim; Herbert, Mary; Wassmann, Katja

    2012-11-29

    In meiosis, two specialized cell divisions allow the separation of paired chromosomes first, then of sister chromatids. Separase removes the cohesin complex holding sister chromatids together in a stepwise manner from chromosome arms in meiosis I, then from the centromere region in meiosis II. Using mouse oocytes, our study reveals that cyclin A2 promotes entry into meiosis, as well as an additional unexpected role; namely, its requirement for separase-dependent sister chromatid separation in meiosis II. Untimely cyclin A2-associated kinase activity in meiosis I leads to precocious sister separation, whereas inhibition of cyclin A2 in meiosis II prevents it. Accordingly, endogenous cyclin A is localized to kinetochores throughout meiosis II, but not in anaphase I. Additionally, we found that cyclin B1, but not cyclin A2, inhibits separase in meiosis I. These findings indicate that separase-dependent cohesin removal is differentially regulated by cyclin B1 and A2 in mammalian meiosis.

  18. Cyclin A1 expression and paclitaxel resistance in human ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kuan-Chun; Yang, Junzheng; Ng, Michelle C; Ng, Shu-Kay; Welch, William R; Muto, Michael G; Berkowitz, Ross S; Ng, Shu-Wing

    2016-11-01

    The development of intrinsic and acquired resistance to antineoplastic agents is a major obstacle to successful chemotherapy in ovarian cancers. Identification and characterisation of chemoresponse-associated biomarkers are of paramount importance for novel therapeutic development. Global RNA expression profiles were obtained by high-throughput microarray analysis. Cell cycle, proliferation rate, and paclitaxel sensitivity of ovarian cancer cells harbouring cyclin A1-inducible expression construct were compared with and without tetracycline induction, as well as when the cyclin A1 expression was suppressed by short inhibiting RNA (siRNA). Cellular senescence was evaluated by β-galactosidase activity staining. Global RNA expression profiling and subsequent correlation studies of gene expression level and drug response has identified that elevated expression of cyclin A1 (CCNA1) was significantly associated with cellular resistance to paclitaxel, doxorubicin and 5-fluorouracil. The role of cyclin A1 in paclitaxel resistance was confirmed in ovarian cancer cells that harbour an inducible cyclin A1 expression construct, which showed reduced paclitaxel-mediated growth inhibition and apoptosis when cyclin A1 expression was induced, whereas downregulation of cyclin A1 expression in the same cell lines using cyclin A1-specific siRNAs sensitised the cells to paclitaxel toxicity. However, ovarian cancer cells with ectopic expression of cyclin A1 demonstrated slowdown of proliferation and senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity. Our profiling and correlation studies have identified cyclin A1 as one chemoresistance-associated biomarker in ovarian cancer. The results of the characterisation studies suggest that cyclin A1 functions as an oncogene that controls proliferative and survival activities in tumourigenesis and chemoresistance of ovarian cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Identification of a novel cyclin required for the intrinsic apoptosis pathway in lymphoid cells.

    PubMed

    Roig, M B; Roset, R; Ortet, L; Balsiger, N A; Anfosso, A; Cabellos, L; Garrido, M; Alameda, F; Brady, H J M; Gil-Gómez, G

    2009-02-01

    We have identified an early step common to pathways activated by different forms of intrinsic apoptosis stimuli. It requires de novo synthesis of a novel cyclin, cyclin O, that forms active complexes primarily with Cdk2 upon apoptosis induction in lymphoid cells. Cyclin O expression precedes glucocorticoid and gamma-radiation-induced apoptosis in vivo in mouse thymus and spleen, and its overexpression induces caspase-dependent apoptosis in cultured cells. Knocking down the endogenous expression of cyclin O by shRNA leads to the inhibition of glucocorticoid and DNA damage-induced apoptosis due to a failure in the activation of apical caspases while leaving CD95 death receptor-mediated apoptosis intact. Our data demonstrate that apoptosis induction in lymphoid cells is one of the physiological roles of cyclin O and it does not act by perturbing a normal cellular process such as the cell cycle, the DNA damage checkpoints or transcriptional response to glucocorticoids.

  20. PKC iota promotes ovarian tumor progression through deregulation of cyclin E

    PubMed Central

    Nanos-Webb, Angela; Bui, Tuyen; Karakas, Cansu; Zhang, Dong; Carey, Jason P.W.; Mills, Gordon B.; Hunt, Kelly K.; Keyomarsi, Khandan

    2016-01-01

    The high frequency of relapse of epithelial ovarian tumors treated with standard chemotherapy has highlighted the necessity to identify targeted therapies that can improve patient outcomes. The dynamic relationship between Cyclin E and PKCiota frequent overexpression in high-grade ovarian tumors poses a novel pathway for therapeutic investigation. We hypothesized that a PI3K dependent signaling pathway activating PKCiota perpetuates cyclin E deregulation during ovarian tumorigenesis. We observed a positive correlation between PKCiota and cyclin E in a panel of 19 ovarian cancer cell lines. Modulation of cyclin E had no effect on PKCiota knockdown/overexpression however PKCiota differentially regulated cyclin E expression. In the serous ovarian cancer cells (IGROV, OVCAR-3), shPKCiota decreased proliferation, caused a G1 arrest, and significantly prolonged overall survival in xenograft mouse models. In vitro shPKCiota decreased the ability of IGROV cells to grow under anchorage independent conditions and form aberrant acini, which was dependent upon Ad-cyclin E or Ad-LMW-E expression. RPPA analysis of PKCiota wild-type, catalytic active, dominant negative protein isoforms strengthened the association between phospho-PKCiota levels and PI3K pathway activation. Inhibitors of PI3K coordinately decreased phospho-PKCiota and Cyclin E protein levels. In conclusion, we have identified a PI3K/PKCiota/Cyclin E signaling pathway as a therapeutic target during ovarian tumorigenesis. PMID:26279297

  1. miR-340 inhibits glioblastoma cell proliferation by suppressing CDK6, cyclin-D1 and cyclin-D2

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xuesong; Gong, Xuhai; Chen, Jing; Zhang, Jinghui; Sun, Jiahang; Guo, Mian

    2015-05-08

    Glioblastoma development is often associated with alteration in the activity and expression of cell cycle regulators, such as cyclin-dependent kinases (CKDs) and cyclins, resulting in aberrant cell proliferation. Recent studies have highlighted the pivotal roles of miRNAs in controlling the development and growth of glioblastoma. Here, we provide evidence for a function of miR-340 in the inhibition of glioblastoma cell proliferation. We found that miR-340 is downregulated in human glioblastoma tissue samples and several established glioblastoma cell lines. Proliferation and neurosphere formation assays revealed that miR-340 plays an oncosuppressive role in glioblastoma, and that its ectopic expression causes significant defect in glioblastoma cell growth. Further, using bioinformatics, luciferase assay and western blot, we found that miR-340 specifically targets the 3′UTRs of CDK6, cyclin-D1 and cyclin-D2, leading to the arrest of glioblastoma cells in the G0/G1 cell cycle phase. Confirming these results, we found that re-introducing CDK6, cyclin-D1 or cyclin-D2 expression partially, but significantly, rescues cells from the suppression of cell proliferation and cell cycle arrest mediated by miR-340. Collectively, our results demonstrate that miR-340 plays a tumor-suppressive role in glioblastoma and may be useful as a diagnostic biomarker and/or a therapeutic avenue for glioblastoma. - Highlights: • miR-340 is downregulated in glioblastoma samples and cell lines. • miR-340 inhibits glioblastoma cell proliferation. • miR-340 directly targets CDK6, cyclin-D1, and cyclin-D2. • miR-340 regulates glioblastoma cell proliferation via CDK6, cyclin-D1 and cyclin-D2.

  2. Cyclin dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors as anticancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Martínez, Concepción; Gelbert, Lawrence M; Lallena, María José; de Dios, Alfonso

    2015-09-01

    Sustained proliferative capacity is a hallmark of cancer. In mammalian cells proliferation is controlled by the cell cycle, where cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) regulate critical checkpoints. CDK4 and CDK6 are considered highly validated anticancer drug targets due to their essential role regulating cell cycle progression at the G1 restriction point. This review provides an overview of recent advances on cyclin dependent kinase inhibitors in general with special emphasis on CDK4 and CDK6 inhibitors and compounds under clinical evaluation. Chemical structures, structure activity relationships, and relevant preclinical properties will be described. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Helicobacter pylori Induced Phosphatidylinositol-3-OH Kinase/mTOR Activation Increases Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1α to Promote Loss of Cyclin D1 and G0/G1 Cell Cycle Arrest in Human Gastric Cells.

    PubMed

    Canales, Jimena; Valenzuela, Manuel; Bravo, Jimena; Cerda-Opazo, Paulina; Jorquera, Carla; Toledo, Héctor; Bravo, Denisse; Quest, Andrew F G

    2017-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a human gastric pathogen that has been linked to the development of several gastric pathologies, such as gastritis, peptic ulcer, and gastric cancer. In the gastric epithelium, the bacterium modifies many signaling pathways, resulting in contradictory responses that favor both proliferation and apoptosis. Consistent with such observations, H. pylori activates routes associated with cell cycle progression and cell cycle arrest. H. pylori infection also induces the hypoxia-induced factor HIF-1α, a transcription factor known to promote expression of genes that permit metabolic adaptation to the hypoxic environment in tumors and angiogenesis. Recently, however, also roles for HIF-1α in the repair of damaged DNA and inhibition of gene expression were described. Here, we investigated signaling pathways induced by H. pylori in gastric cells that favor HIF-1α expression and the consequences thereof in infected cells. Our results revealed that H. pylori promoted PI3K/mTOR-dependent HIF-1α induction, HIF-1α translocation to the nucleus, and activity as a transcription factor as evidenced using a reporter assay. Surprisingly, however, transcription of known HIF-1α effector genes evaluated by qPCR analysis, revealed either no change (LDHA and GAPDH), statistically insignificant increases SLC2A1 (GLUT-1) or greatly enhance transcription (VEGFA), but in an HIF-1α-independent manner, as quantified by PCR analysis in cells with shRNA-mediated silencing of HIF-1α. Instead, HIF-1α knockdown facilitated G1/S progression and increased Cyclin D1 protein half-life, via a post-translational pathway. Taken together, these findings link H. pylori-induced PI3K-mTOR activation to HIF-1α induced G0/G1 cell cycle arrest by a Cyclin D1-dependent mechanism. Thus, HIF-1α is identified here as a mediator between survival and cell cycle arrest signaling activated by H. pylori infection.

  4. Helicobacter pylori Induced Phosphatidylinositol-3-OH Kinase/mTOR Activation Increases Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1α to Promote Loss of Cyclin D1 and G0/G1 Cell Cycle Arrest in Human Gastric Cells

    PubMed Central

    Canales, Jimena; Valenzuela, Manuel; Bravo, Jimena; Cerda-Opazo, Paulina; Jorquera, Carla; Toledo, Héctor; Bravo, Denisse; Quest, Andrew F. G.

    2017-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a human gastric pathogen that has been linked to the development of several gastric pathologies, such as gastritis, peptic ulcer, and gastric cancer. In the gastric epithelium, the bacterium modifies many signaling pathways, resulting in contradictory responses that favor both proliferation and apoptosis. Consistent with such observations, H. pylori activates routes associated with cell cycle progression and cell cycle arrest. H. pylori infection also induces the hypoxia-induced factor HIF-1α, a transcription factor known to promote expression of genes that permit metabolic adaptation to the hypoxic environment in tumors and angiogenesis. Recently, however, also roles for HIF-1α in the repair of damaged DNA and inhibition of gene expression were described. Here, we investigated signaling pathways induced by H. pylori in gastric cells that favor HIF-1α expression and the consequences thereof in infected cells. Our results revealed that H. pylori promoted PI3K/mTOR-dependent HIF-1α induction, HIF-1α translocation to the nucleus, and activity as a transcription factor as evidenced using a reporter assay. Surprisingly, however, transcription of known HIF-1α effector genes evaluated by qPCR analysis, revealed either no change (LDHA and GAPDH), statistically insignificant increases SLC2A1 (GLUT-1) or greatly enhance transcription (VEGFA), but in an HIF-1α-independent manner, as quantified by PCR analysis in cells with shRNA-mediated silencing of HIF-1α. Instead, HIF-1α knockdown facilitated G1/S progression and increased Cyclin D1 protein half-life, via a post-translational pathway. Taken together, these findings link H. pylori-induced PI3K-mTOR activation to HIF-1α induced G0/G1 cell cycle arrest by a Cyclin D1-dependent mechanism. Thus, HIF-1α is identified here as a mediator between survival and cell cycle arrest signaling activated by H. pylori infection. PMID:28401064

  5. Divergent cyclin B1 expression and Rb/p16/cyclin D1 pathway aberrations among pulmonary neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Igarashi, Toru; Jiang, Shi-Xu; Kameya, Toru; Asamura, Hisao; Sato, Yuichi; Nagai, Kanji; Okayasu, Isao

    2004-10-01

    A total of 111 pulmonary neuroendocrine tumors comprising 13 typical carcinoids, five atypical carcinoids, 44 large-cell neuroendocrine carcinomas and 49 small-cell carcinomas were immunohistochemically studied for dysregulated cyclin B1 expression and disruption of the Rb/p16/cyclin D1 pathway (Rb pathway), and the results were correlated with tumor proliferation activity and clinical outcome. Overexpression of cyclins B1 and D1, respectively, was detected in no and 15% typical carcinoids, 20 and 20% atypical carcinoids, 84 and 32% large-cell neuroendocrine carcinomas, 84 and 10% small-cell carcinomas. Loss of Rb and p16 expression, respectively, was observed in no and 14% typical carcinoids, no and 40% atypical carcinoids, 49 and 18% large-cell neuroendocrine carcinomas, 84 and 8% small-cell carcinomas. In summary, 29% typical carcinoids, 20% atypical carcinoids, 78% large-cell neuroendocrine carcinomas and 93% small-cell carcinomas had Rb pathway aberrations. Rb pathway aberration was mostly attributed to Rb loss in small-cell carcinomas, while p16 loss and/or cyclin D1 overexpression besides Rb loss also played an important role in large-cell neuroendocrine carcinomas, while cyclin D1 overexpression was the only cause of Rb pathway aberration in carcinoid tumors. Thus, both cyclin B1-associated G2/M arrest and Rb-mediated G1 arrest are consistently compromised in high-grade large-cell neuroendocrine carcinoma and small-cell carcinoma, but are generally intact or occasionally altered in carcinoid tumor; the mechanisms involved in Rb pathway aberration among the tumor categories are different, reflecting a genetic divergence among the individual tumor categories. Cyclin B1 expression closely correlated with the Ki-67 labeling index either in the individual tumor categories or overall tumors (P < 0.0001, r = 0.742), suggesting that cyclin B1 is one of the key factors regulating cell proliferation in pulmonary neuroendocrine tumors. Neither cyclins B1 and D1, Rb, p

  6. AMBIENT PARTICULATE MATTER INDUCES ALVEOLAR EPITHELIAL CELL CYCLE ARREST: ROLE OF G1 CYCLINS

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jingmei; Ghio, Andrew J.; Gao, Mingxing; Wei, Ke; Rosen, Glenn D.; Upadhyay, Daya

    2007-01-01

    We hypothesized that the ambient air pollution particles (PM) induce cell cycle arrest in alveolar epithelial cells (AEC). Exposure of PM (25μg/cm2) to AEC induced cells cycle arrest in G1 phase, inhibited DNA synthesis, blocked cell proliferation and caused decrease in cyclin E, A, D1 and Cyclin E- cyclin-dependent kinase(CDK)-2 kinase activity after 4h. PM induced upregulation of CDK inhibitor, p21 protein and p21 activity in AEC. SiRNAp21 blocked PM–induced downregulation of cyclins and AEC G1 arrest. Accordingly, we provide the evidence that PM induces AEC G1 arrest by altered regulation of G1 cyclins and CDKs. PMID:17977533

  7. Ambient particulate matter induces alveolar epithelial cell cycle arrest: role of G1 cyclins.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingmei; Ghio, Andrew J; Gao, Mingxing; Wei, Ke; Rosen, Glenn D; Upadhyay, Daya

    2007-11-13

    We hypothesized that the ambient air pollution particles (particulate matter; PM) induce cell cycle arrest in alveolar epithelial cells (AEC). Exposure of PM (25microg/cm(2)) to AEC induced cells cycle arrest in G1 phase, inhibited DNA synthesis, blocked cell proliferation and caused decrease in cyclin E, A, D1 and Cyclin E- cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK)-2 kinase activity after 4h. PM induced upregulation of CDK inhibitor, p21 protein and p21 activity in AEC. SiRNAp21 blocked PM-induced downregulation of cyclins and AEC G1 arrest. Accordingly, we provide the evidence that PM induces AEC G1 arrest by altered regulation of G1 cyclins and CDKs.

  8. Cyclin D1 blocks the anti-proliferative function of RUNX3 by interfering with RUNX3-p300 interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Iwatani, Kazunori; Fujimoto, Tetsuhiro; Ito, Takaaki

    2010-09-24

    Research highlights: {yields} Cyclin D1 interacts with RUNX3 and inhibits the interaction and collaboration of RUNX3 with coactivator p300. {yields} Cyclin D1 blocks the ability of RUNX3 to induce the expression of cdk inhibitor p21. {yields} Cyclin D1 releases cancer cells from the inhibition of proliferation induced by RUNX3. -- Abstract: Transcriptional function of cyclin D1, whose deregulation is frequently observed in human cancers, has been suggested to contribute to cancer formation. In the present study, we show that cyclin D1 protein inhibits RUNX3 activity by directly binding to it and interfering with its interaction with p300 interaction in lung cancer cells. Cyclin D1 inhibits p300-dependent RUNX3 acetylation and negatively regulates cyclin-dependent kinase (cdk) inhibitor p21 expression. These transcriptional effects of cyclin D1 do not require cdk4/6 kinase activation. We propose that cyclin D1 provides a transcriptional switch that allows the tumor suppressor activity of RUNX3 to be repressed in cancer cells. Since RUNX3 plays tumor suppressive roles in a wide range of cancers, a non-canonical cyclin D1 function may be critical for neoplastic transformation of the epithelial cells in which RUNX3 regulates proliferation.

  9. Cyclin B targets p34cdc2 for tyrosine phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Meijer, L; Azzi, L; Wang, J Y

    1991-06-01

    A universal intracellular factor, the 'M phase-promoting factor' (MPF), triggers the G2/M transition of the cell cycle in all organisms. In late G2, it is present as an inactive complex of tyrosine-phosphorylated p34cdc2 and unphosphorylated cyclin Bcdc13. In M phase, its activation as an active MPF displaying histone H1 kinase (H1K) originates from the concomitant tyrosine dephosphorylation of the p34cdc2 subunit and the phosphorylation of the cylin Bcdc13 subunit. We have investigated the role of cyclin in the formation of this complex and the tyrosine phosphorylation of p34cdc2, using highly synchronous mitotic sea urchin eggs as a model. As cells leave the S phase and enter the G2 phase, a massive tyrosine phosphorylation of p34cdc2 occurs. This large p34cdc2 tyrosine phosphorylation burst does not arise from a massive increase in p34cdc2 concentration. It even appears to affect only a fraction (non-immunoprecipitable by anti-PSTAIR antibodies) of the total p34cdc2 present in the cell. Several observations point to an extremely close association between accumulation of unphosphorylated cyclin and p34cdc2 tyrosine phosphorylation: (i) both events coincide perfectly during the G2 phase; (ii) both tyrosine-phosphorylated p34cdc2 and cyclin are not immunoprecipitated by anti-PSTAIR antibodies; (iii) accumulation of unphosphorylated cyclin by aphidicolin treatment of the cells, triggers a dramatic accumulation of tyrosine-phosphorylated p34cdc2; and (iv) inhibition of cyclin synthesis by emetine inhibits p34cdc2 tyrosine phosphorylation without affecting the p34cdc2 concentration. These results show that, as it is synthesized, cyclin B binds and recruits p34cdc2 for tyrosine phosphorylation; this inactive complex then requires the completion of DNA replication before it can be turned into fully active MPF. These results fully confirm recent data obtained in vitro with exogenous cyclin added to cycloheximide-treated Xenopus egg extracts.

  10. Identification of Arabidopsis meiotic cyclins reveals functional diversification among plant cyclin genes.

    PubMed

    Bulankova, Petra; Akimcheva, Svetlana; Fellner, Nicole; Riha, Karel

    2013-05-01

    Meiosis is a modified cell division in which a single S-phase is followed by two rounds of chromosome segregation resulting in the production of haploid gametes. The meiotic mode of chromosome segregation requires extensive remodeling of the basic cell cycle machinery and employment of unique regulatory mechanisms. Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) and cyclins represent an ancient molecular module that drives and regulates cell cycle progression. The cyclin gene family has undergone a massive expansion in angiosperm plants, but only a few cyclins were thoroughly characterized. In this study we performed a systematic immunolocalization screen to identify Arabidopsis thaliana A- and B-type cyclins expressed in meiosis. Many of these cyclins exhibit cell-type-specific expression in vegetative tissues and distinct subcellular localization. We found six A-type cyclins and a single B-type cyclin (CYCB3;1) to be expressed in male meiosis. Mutant analysis revealed that these cyclins contribute to distinct meiosis-related processes. While A2 cyclins are important for chromosome segregation, CYCB3;1 prevents ectopic cell wall formation. We further show that cyclin SDS does not contain a D-box and is constitutively expressed throughout meiosis. Analysis of plants carrying cyclin SDS with an introduced D-box motif determined that, in addition to its function in recombination, SDS acts together with CYCB3;1 in suppressing unscheduled cell wall synthesis. Our phenotypic and expression data provide extensive evidence that multiplication of cyclins is in plants accompanied by functional diversification.

  11. Cyclin A2 is an RNA binding protein that controls Mre11 mRNA translation

    PubMed Central

    Kanakkanthara, Arun; Jeganathan, Karthik B.; Limzerwala, Jazeel F.; Baker, Darren J.; Hamada, Masakazu; Nam, Hyun-Ja; van Deursen, Willemijn H.; Hamada, Naomi; Naylor, Ryan M.; Becker, Nicole A.; Davies, Brian A.; van Ree, Janine H.; Mer, Georges; Shapiro, Virginia S.; Maher, L. James; Katzmann, David J.; van Deursen, Jan M.

    2016-01-01

    Cyclin A2 activates the cyclin-dependent kinases Cdk1 and Cdk2 and is expressed at elevated levels from S phase until early mitosis. We found that mutant mice that cannot elevate cyclin A2 are chromosomally unstable and tumor-prone. Underlying the chromosomal instability is a failure to up-regulate the meiotic recombination 11 (Mre11) nuclease in S phase, which leads to impaired resolution of stalled replication forks, insufficient repair of double-stranded DNA breaks, and improper segregation of sister chromosomes. Unexpectedly, cyclin A2 controlled Mre11 abundance through a C-terminal RNA binding domain that selectively and directly binds Mre11 transcripts to mediate polysome loading and translation.These data reveal cyclin A2 as a mechanistically diverse regulator of DNA replication combining multifaceted kinase-dependent functions with a kinase-independent, RNA binding–dependent role that ensures adequate repair of common replication errors. PMID:27708105

  12. The Six1 homeoprotein stimulates tumorigenesis by reactivation of cyclin A1

    PubMed Central

    Coletta, Ricardo D.; Christensen, Kimberly; Reichenberger, Kelly J.; Lamb, Justin; Micomonaco, Damian; Huang, Lili; Wolf, Douglas M.; Müller-Tidow, Carsten; Golub, Todd R.; Kawakami, Kiyoshi; Ford, Heide L.

    2004-01-01

    Homeobox genes constitute a large family of transcription factors that are essential during normal development and are often dysregulated in cancer. However, the molecular mechanisms by which homeobox genes influence cancer remain largely unknown. Here we show that the tissue-restricted cyclin A1 is a transcriptional target of the Six1 homeoprotein. Both genes are expressed in the embryonic but not the terminally differentiated mammary gland, and Six1-knockout mice show a dramatic reduction of cyclin A1 in the embryonic mammary gland. In addition, both genes are reexpressed in breast cancers. Six1 overexpression increases cyclin A1 mRNA levels and activity, cell proliferation, and tumor volume, whereas Six1 down-regulation decreases cyclin A1 mRNA levels and proliferation. Overexpression of Six1 in wild-type mouse embryonic fibroblasts, but not in knockout variants lacking the cyclin A1 gene, induces cell proliferation. Furthermore, inhibition of cyclin A1 in Six1-overexpressing mammary carcinoma cells decreases proliferation. Together these results demonstrate that cyclin A1 is required for the proliferative effect of Six1. We conclude that Six1 overexpression reinstates an embryonic pathway of proliferation in breast cancer by up-regulating cyclin A1. PMID:15123840

  13. Study of possible changes in genes expression of mitotic cyclin under clinorotation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artemenko, Olga

    Cell cycle is regulated by cyclins, destruction and accumulation of which is the main process in cell cycle progress. In previous studies we have shown that slow horizontal clinorotation (2rpm) affects proliferative activity and cell cycle stages in inducted to grow 2-4 day old Pisum sativum seedlings. In the first cell cycle, delay in cell transition to S stage and delay in mitosis occur due to the prolongation of pre-synthetic stage. This observation is supported by accumulation of 2c DNA cells and transcripts of 3 cyclin in meristem cells. 3 cyclins are "plant" version of cyclin D, they regulate pre-synthetic stage of cell cycle. Cyclins A and B, regulated by cyclin-dependent kinases, control the beginning of S-stage and are necessary for prevention of certain delay in cell cycle progression. We suggest that delay in mitosis, observed under clinorotation, may take place not only due to prolongation of pre-synthetic stage but also due to change of cyclin genes expression under above condition. Further investigations will be aimed on establishing the level of cyclin genes expression under clinorotation.

  14. The prognostic significance and value of cyclin D1, CDK4 and p16 in human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Peurala, Emmi; Koivunen, Peppi; Haapasaari, Kirsi-Maria; Bloigu, Risto; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja

    2013-01-21

    Loss of the retinoblastoma protein tumor suppressor gene (RB) coding for a nuclear phosphoprotein that regulates the cell cycle is found in many human cancers and probably leads to disruption of the p16-cyclin D1-CDK4/6-RB pathway. Cyclin D1 is known to activate CDK4, which then phosphorylates the RB protein, leading to cell cycle progression. p16 inhibits CDK4, keeping RB hypophosphorylated and preventing cell cycle progression. The significance of these three markers, cyclin D1, CDK4 and p16, for breast cancer and carcinogenesis is nevertheless still controversial. The material consisted of 102 formalin-fixed human breast cancer samples, in which cyclin D1, CDK4 and p16 expression was evaluated immunohistochemically. The amounts of cyclin D1 mRNA present were analyzed by quantitative real time PCR. High cyclin D1 expression statistically significantly correlated with lower tumor grade, estrogen and progesterone receptor positivity and lower proliferation activity in breast tumors and increased breast cancer-specific survival and overall survival. Tumors with high cyclin D1 protein had 1.8 times higher expression of cyclin D1 mRNA. CDK4 expression did not correlate with cyclin D1 expression or the survival data. p16 expression was associated with Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 (HER2) negativity and increased breast cancer-specific survival and disease-free survival. No statistical correlations between cyclin D1, CDK4 and p16 were found. Cyclin D1 was associated with a good breast cancer prognosis but functioned independently of CDK4. High cyclin D1 expression may be partially due to increased CCND1 transcription. p16 correlated with a better prognosis and may function without CDK4. In conclusion, it appears that cyclin D1, CDK4 and p16 function independently in human breast cancer.

  15. Cyclin-dependent kinase complexes in developing maize endosperm: evidence for differential expression and functional specialization.

    PubMed

    Dante, Ricardo A; Sabelli, Paolo A; Nguyen, Hong N; Leiva-Neto, João T; Tao, Yumin; Lowe, Keith S; Hoerster, George J; Gordon-Kamm, William J; Jung, Rudolf; Larkins, Brian A

    2014-02-01

    Endosperm development in maize (Zea mays L.) and related cereals comprises a cell proliferation stage followed by a period of rapid growth coupled to endoreduplication. Regulation of the cell cycle in developing endosperm is poorly understood. We have characterized various subunits of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) complexes, master cell cycle regulators in all eukaryotes. A-, B-, and D-type cyclins as well as A- and B-type cyclin-dependent kinases were characterized with respect to their RNA and protein expression profiles. Two main patterns were identified: one showing expression throughout endosperm development, and another characterized by a sharp down-regulation with the onset of endoreduplication. Cyclin CYCB1;3 and CYCD2;1 proteins were distributed in the cytoplasm and nucleus of cells throughout the endosperm, while cyclin CYCD5 protein was localized in the cytoplasm of peripheral cells. CDKB1;1 expression was strongly associated with cell proliferation. Expression and cyclin-binding patterns suggested that CDKA;1 and CDKA;3 are at least partially redundant. The kinase activity associated with the cyclin CYCA1 was highest during the mitotic stage of development, while that associated with CYCB1;3, CYCD2;1 and CYCD5 peaked at the mitosis-to-endoreduplication transition. A-, B- and D-type cyclins were more resistant to proteasome-dependent degradation in endoreduplicating than in mitotic endosperm extracts. These results indicated that endosperm development is characterized by differential expression and activity of specific cyclins and CDKs, and suggested that endoreduplication is associated with reduced cyclin proteolysis via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway.

  16. Rictor regulates FBXW7-dependent c-Myc and cyclin E degradation in colorectal cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Zheng; Zhou, Yuning; Evers, B. Mark; Wang, Qingding

    2012-02-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rictor associates with FBXW7 to form an E3 complex. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Knockdown of rictor decreases ubiquitination of c-Myc and cylin E. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Knockdown of rictor increases protein levels of c-Myc and cylin E. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Overexpression of rictor induces the degradation of c-Myc and cyclin E proteins. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rictor regulation of c-Myc and cyclin E requires FBXW7. -- Abstract: Rictor (Rapamycin-insensitive companion of mTOR) forms a complex with mTOR and phosphorylates and activates Akt. Activation of Akt induces expression of c-Myc and cyclin E, which are overexpressed in colorectal cancer and play an important role in colorectal cancer cell proliferation. Here, we show that rictor associates with FBXW7 to form an E3 complex participating in the regulation of c-Myc and cyclin E degradation. The Rictor-FBXW7 complex is biochemically distinct from the previously reported mTORC2 and can be immunoprecipitated independently of mTORC2. Moreover, knocking down of rictor in serum-deprived colorectal cancer cells results in the decreased ubiquitination and increased protein levels of c-Myc and cyclin E while overexpression of rictor induces the degradation of c-Myc and cyclin E proteins. Genetic knockout of FBXW7 blunts the effects of rictor, suggesting that rictor regulation of c-Myc and cyclin E requires FBXW7. Our findings identify rictor as an important component of FBXW7 E3 ligase complex participating in the regulation of c-Myc and cyclin E protein ubiquitination and degradation. Importantly, our results suggest that elevated growth factor signaling may contribute to decrease rictor/FBXW7-mediated ubiquitination of c-Myc and cyclin E, thus leading to accumulation of cyclin E and c-Myc in colorectal cancer cells.

  17. Cyclin D1 in the Liver: Role of Noncanonical Signaling in Liver Steatosis and Hormone Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Núñez, Kelley G.; Gonzalez-Rosario, Janet; Thevenot, Paul T.; Cohen, Ari J.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Cyclin D1 is an important protein for cell cycle progression; however, functions independent of the cell cycle have been described in the liver. Cyclin D1 is also involved in DNA repair, is overexpressed in many cancers, and functions as a proto-oncogene. The lesser-known roles of Cyclin D1, specifically in hepatocytes, impact liver steatosis and hormone regulation in the liver. Methods: A comprehensive search of PubMed was conducted using the keywords Cyclin D1, steatosis, lipogenesis, and liver transplantation. In this article, we review the results from this literature search, with a focus on the role of Cyclin D1 in hepatic lipogenesis and gluconeogenesis, as well as the impact and function of this protein in hepatic steatosis. Results: Cyclin D1 represses carbohydrate response element binding protein (ChREBP) and results in a decrease in transcription of fatty acid synthase (FAS) and acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACC). Cyclin D1 also inhibits peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) which is involved in hepatic lipogenesis. Cyclin D1 inhibits both hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha (HNF4α) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1 alpha (PGC1α) and represses transcription of lipogenic genes FAS and liver-type pyruvate kinase (Pklr), along with the gluconeogenic genes phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase). Conclusion: Cyclin D1 represses multiple proteins involved in both lipogenesis and gluconeogenesis in the liver. Targeting Cyclin D1 to decrease hepatic steatosis in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease or alcoholic fatty liver disease may help improve patient health and the quality of the donor liver pool. PMID:28331449

  18. Functional characterization of a human cyclin T1 mutant reveals a different binding surface for Tat and HEXIM1.

    PubMed

    Kuzmina, Alona; Hadad, Uzi; Fujinaga, Koh; Taube, Ran

    2012-05-10

    HIV transcription is regulated at the step of elongation by the viral Tat protein and the cellular positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb; Cdk9/cyclin T1). Herein, a human cyclin T1 mutant, cyclin T1-U7, which contains four substitutions and one deletion in the N-terminal cyclin box, was stably expressed in HeLa cells. HIV transcription was efficiently inhibited in HeLa-HA-CycT1-U7 stable cells. Cyclin T1-U7 bound Tat but did not modulate its expression levels, which remained high. Importantly cyclin T1-U7 failed to interact with Cdk9 or HEXIM1 and did not interfere with endogenous P-TEFb activity to stimulate MEF2C or NFkB mediated transcription. In a T cell line and primary CD4+ cells, cyclin T1-U7 also inhibited HIV transcription. We conclude that cyclin T1-U7 sequesters Tat from P-TEFb and inhibits HIV transcription. Importantly, N-terminal residues in cyclin T1 are specifically involved in the binding of cyclin T1 to HEXIM1 but not to Tat.

  19. Induced ICER I{gamma} down-regulates cyclin A expression and cell proliferation in insulin-producing {beta} cells

    SciTech Connect

    Inada, Akari; Weir, Gordon C.; Bonner-Weir, Susan . E-mail: susan.bonner-weir@joslin.harvard.edu

    2005-04-15

    We have previously found that cyclin A expression is markedly reduced in pancreatic {beta}-cells by cell-specific overexpression of repressor inducible cyclic AMP early repressor (ICER I{gamma}) in transgenic mice. Here we further examined regulatory effects of ICER I{gamma} on cyclin A gene expression using Min6 cells, an insulin-producing cell line. The cyclin A promoter luciferase assay showed that ICER I{gamma} directly repressed cyclin A gene transcription. In addition, upon ICER I{gamma} overexpression, cyclin A mRNA levels markedly decreased, thereby confirming an inhibitory effect of ICER I{gamma} on cyclin A expression. Suppression of cyclin A results in inhibition of BrdU incorporation. Under normal culture conditions endogenous cyclin A is abundant in these cells, whereas ICER is hardly detectable. However, serum starvation of Min6 cells induces ICER I{gamma} expression with a concomitant very low expression level of cyclin A. Cyclin A protein is not expressed unless the cells are in active DNA replication. These results indicate a potentially important anti-proliferative effect of ICER I{gamma} in pancreatic {beta} cells. Since ICER I{gamma} is greatly increased in diabetes as well as in FFA- or high glucose-treated islets, this effect may in part exacerbate diabetes by limiting {beta}-cell proliferation.

  20. Anaphase-Promoting Complex/Cyclosome–Dependent Proteolysis of Human Cyclin a Starts at the Beginning of Mitosis and Is Not Subject to the Spindle Assembly Checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    Geley, Stephan; Kramer, Edgar; Gieffers, Christian; Gannon, Julian; Peters, Jan-Michael; Hunt, Tim

    2001-01-01

    Cyclin A is a stable protein in S and G2 phases, but is destabilized when cells enter mitosis and is almost completely degraded before the metaphase to anaphase transition. Microinjection of antibodies against subunits of the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) or against human Cdc20 (fizzy) arrested cells at metaphase and stabilized both cyclins A and B1. Cyclin A was efficiently polyubiquitylated by Cdc20 or Cdh1-activated APC/C in vitro, but in contrast to cyclin B1, the proteolysis of cyclin A was not delayed by the spindle assembly checkpoint. The degradation of cyclin B1 was accelerated by inhibition of the spindle assembly checkpoint. These data suggest that the APC/C is activated as cells enter mitosis and immediately targets cyclin A for degradation, whereas the spindle assembly checkpoint delays the degradation of cyclin B1 until the metaphase to anaphase transition. The “destruction box” (D-box) of cyclin A is 10–20 residues longer than that of cyclin B. Overexpression of wild-type cyclin A delayed the metaphase to anaphase transition, whereas expression of cyclin A mutants lacking a D-box arrested cells in anaphase. PMID:11285280

  1. Structure of a cyclin-dependent kinase from Giardia lamblia.

    PubMed

    Leibly, David J; Newling, Paul A; Abendroth, Jan; Guo, Wenjin; Kelley, Angela; Stewart, Lance J; Van Voorhis, Wesley

    2011-09-01

    Giardia lamblia is the etiologic agent of giardiasis, a water-borne infection that is prevalent throughout the world. The need for new therapeutics for the treatment of giardiasis is of paramount importance. Owing to the ubiquitous nature of kinases and their vital importance in organisms, they are potential drug targets. In this paper, the first structure of a cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) from G. lamblia (GlCDK; UniProt A8BZ95) is presented. CDKs are cell-cycle-associated kinases that are actively being pursued as targets for anticancer drugs as well as for antiparasitic chemotherapy. Generally, a CDK forms a complex with its associated cyclin. This CDK-cyclin complex is active and acts as a serine/threonine protein kinase. Typically, CDKs are responsible for the transition to the next phase of the cell cycle. Although the structure of GlCDK with its associated cyclin was not solved, the 1.85 Å resolution structure of apo GlCDK and a 2.0 Å resolution structure of GlCDK in complex with adenosine monophosphate are presented and the structural differences from the orthologous human CDK2 and CDK3 are discussed.

  2. Novel complexes of cyclin-dependent kinases and a cyclin-like protein from Arabidopsis thaliana with a function unrelated to cell division.

    PubMed

    Barrôco, R M; De Veylder, L; Magyar, Z; Engler, G; Inzé, D; Mironov, V

    2003-02-01

    Although the majority of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) play a key role in cell cycle progression, recent evidence has shown that CDKs are also implicated in transcription regulation. Here, we describe two Arabidopsis CDKs designated Arath;CDKC;1 and Arath; CDKC;2. These CDKs share a PITAIRE signature in the cyclin-binding domain and the structural characteristics of mammalian CDK9. Yeast two-hybrid screens and immunoprecipitation assays identified CDKC-interacting proteins with homology to the animal cyclin T/cyclin K group. We suggest that these Arabidopsis CDKCs may be part of a kinase complex similar to the animal positive transcription elongation factor b, whose activity is essential for transcription control. Expression studies showed that Arath; CDKC transcripts are mainly confined to epidermal tissues and are most abundant in flower tissues. No expression was detected in actively dividing Arabidopsis tissues, suggesting a role for the CDKC proteins in differentiated cells.

  3. Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Kinase 4 Deficiency Results in Expedited Cellular Proliferation through E2F1-Mediated Increase of Cyclins.

    PubMed

    Choiniere, Jonathan; Wu, Jianguo; Wang, Li

    2017-03-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a common form of cancer with prevalence worldwide. There are many factors that lead to the development and progression of HCC. This study aimed to identify potential new tumor suppressors, examine their function as cell cycle modulators, and investigate their impact on the cyclin family of proteins and cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs). In this study, the pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK)4 gene was shown to have potential tumor suppressor characteristics. PDK4 expression was significantly downregulated in human HCC. Pdk4(-/-) mouse liver exhibited a consistent increase in cell cycle regulator proteins, including cyclin D1, cyclin E1, cyclin A2, some associated CDKs, and transcription factor E2F1. PDK4-knockdown HCC cells also progressed faster through the cell cycle, which concurrently expressed high levels of cyclins and E2F1 as seen in the Pdk4(-/-) mice. Interestingly, the induced cyclin E1 and cyclin A2 caused by Pdk4 deficiency was repressed by arsenic treatment in mouse liver and in HCC cells. E2f1 deficiency in E2f1(-/-) mouse liver or knockdown E2F1 using small hairpin RNAs in HCC cells significantly decreased cyclin E1, cyclin A2, and E2F1 proteins. In contrast, inhibition of PDK4 activity in HCC cells increased cyclin E1, cyclin A2, and E2F1 proteins. These findings demonstrate that PDK4 is a critical regulator of hepatocyte proliferation via E2F1-mediated regulation of cyclins. Copyright © 2017 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  4. Cyclin D1 expression in prostate carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Pereira, R A; Ravinal, R C; Costa, R S; Lima, M S; Tucci, S; Muglia, V F; Reis, R B dos; Silva, G E B

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between cyclin D1 expression and clinicopathological parameters in patients with prostate carcinoma. We assessed cyclin D1 expression by conventional immunohistochemistry in 85 patients who underwent radical prostatectomy for prostate carcinoma and 10 normal prostate tissue samples retrieved from autopsies. We measured nuclear immunostaining in the entire tumor area and based the results on the percentage of positive tumor cells. The preoperative prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level was 8.68±5.16 ng/mL (mean±SD). Cyclin D1 staining was positive (cyclin D1 expression in >5% of tumor cells) in 64 cases (75.4%) and negative (cyclin D1 expression in ≤5% of tumor cells) in 21 cases (including 15 cases with no immunostaining). Normal prostate tissues were negative for cyclin D1. Among patients with a high-grade Gleason score (≥7), 86% of patients demonstrated cyclin D1 immunostaining of >5% (P<0.05). In the crude analysis of cyclin D1 expression, the high-grade Gleason score group showed a mean expression of 39.6%, compared to 26.9% in the low-grade Gleason score group (P<0.05). Perineural invasion tended to be associated with cyclin D1 expression (P=0.07), whereas cyclin D1 expression was not associated with PSA levels or other parameters. Our results suggest that high cyclin D1 expression could be a potential marker for tumor aggressiveness.

  5. CyclinA2-Cyclin-dependent Kinase Regulates SAMHD1 Protein Phosphohydrolase Domain.

    PubMed

    Yan, Junpeng; Hao, Caili; DeLucia, Maria; Swanson, Selene; Florens, Laurence; Washburn, Michael P; Ahn, Jinwoo; Skowronski, Jacek

    2015-05-22

    SAMHD1 is a nuclear deoxyribonucleoside triphosphate triphosphohydrolase that contributes to the control of cellular deoxyribonucleoside triphosphate (dNTP) pool sizes through dNTP hydrolysis and modulates the innate immune response to viruses. CyclinA2-CDK1/2 phosphorylates SAMHD1 at Thr-592, but how this modification controls SAMHD1 functions in proliferating cells is not known. Here, we show that SAMHD1 levels remain relatively unchanged during the cell division cycle in primary human T lymphocytes and in monocytic cell lines. Inactivation of the bipartite cyclinA2-CDK-binding site in the SAMHD1 C terminus described herein abolished SAMHD1 phosphorylation on Thr-592 during S and G2 phases thus interfering with DNA replication and progression of cells through S phase. The effects exerted by Thr-592 phosphorylation-defective SAMHD1 mutants were associated with activation of DNA damage checkpoint and depletion of dNTP concentrations to levels lower than those seen upon expression of wild type SAMHD1 protein. These disruptive effects were relieved by either mutation of the catalytic residues of the SAMHD1 phosphohydrolase domain or by a Thr-592 phosphomimetic mutation, thus linking the Thr-592 phosphorylation state to the control of SAMHD1 dNTPase activity. Our findings support a model in which phosphorylation of Thr-592 by cyclinA2-CDK down-modulates, but does not inactivate, SAMHD1 dNTPase in S phase, thereby fine-tuning SAMHD1 control of dNTP levels during DNA replication. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  6. CyclinA2-Cyclin-dependent Kinase Regulates SAMHD1 Protein Phosphohydrolase Domain*

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Junpeng; Hao, Caili; DeLucia, Maria; Swanson, Selene; Florens, Laurence; Washburn, Michael P.; Ahn, Jinwoo; Skowronski, Jacek

    2015-01-01

    SAMHD1 is a nuclear deoxyribonucleoside triphosphate triphosphohydrolase that contributes to the control of cellular deoxyribonucleoside triphosphate (dNTP) pool sizes through dNTP hydrolysis and modulates the innate immune response to viruses. CyclinA2-CDK1/2 phosphorylates SAMHD1 at Thr-592, but how this modification controls SAMHD1 functions in proliferating cells is not known. Here, we show that SAMHD1 levels remain relatively unchanged during the cell division cycle in primary human T lymphocytes and in monocytic cell lines. Inactivation of the bipartite cyclinA2-CDK-binding site in the SAMHD1 C terminus described herein abolished SAMHD1 phosphorylation on Thr-592 during S and G2 phases thus interfering with DNA replication and progression of cells through S phase. The effects exerted by Thr-592 phosphorylation-defective SAMHD1 mutants were associated with activation of DNA damage checkpoint and depletion of dNTP concentrations to levels lower than those seen upon expression of wild type SAMHD1 protein. These disruptive effects were relieved by either mutation of the catalytic residues of the SAMHD1 phosphohydrolase domain or by a Thr-592 phosphomimetic mutation, thus linking the Thr-592 phosphorylation state to the control of SAMHD1 dNTPase activity. Our findings support a model in which phosphorylation of Thr-592 by cyclinA2-CDK down-modulates, but does not inactivate, SAMHD1 dNTPase in S phase, thereby fine-tuning SAMHD1 control of dNTP levels during DNA replication. PMID:25847232

  7. The structural protein ODV-EC27 of Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus is a multifunctional viral cyclin.

    PubMed

    Belyavskyi, M; Braunagel, S C; Summers, M D

    1998-09-15

    Two major characteristics of baculovirus infection are arrest of the host cell at G2/M phase of the cell cycle with continuing viral DNA replication. We show that Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) encodes for a multifunctional cyclin that may partially explain the molecular basis of these important characteristics of AcMNPV (baculovirus) infection. Amino acids 80-110 of the viral structural protein ODV-EC27 (-EC27) demonstrate 25-30% similarity with cellular cyclins within the cyclin box. Immunoprecipitation results using antibodies to -EC27 show that -EC27 can associate with either cdc2 or cdk6 resulting in active kinase complexes that can phosphorylate histone H1 and retinoblastoma protein in vitro. The cdk6-EC27 complex also associates with proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and we demonstrate that PCNA is a structural protein of both the budded virus and the occlusion-derived virus. These results suggest that -EC27 can function as a multifunctional cyclin: when associated with cdc2, it exhibits cyclin B-like activity; when associated with cdk6, the complex possesses cyclin D-like activity and binds PCNA. The possible roles of such a multifunctional cyclin during the life cycle of baculovirus are discussed, along with potential implications relative to the expression of functionally authentic recombinant proteins by using baculovirus-infected cells.

  8. SUMO2/3 modification of cyclin E contributes to the control of replication origin firing

    PubMed Central

    Bonne-Andrea, Catherine; Kahli, Malik; Mechali, Francisca; Lemaitre, Jean-Marc; Bossis, Guillaume; Coux, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    The small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) pathway is essential for the maintenance of genome stability. We investigated its possible involvement in the control of DNA replication during S phase by using the Xenopus cell-free system. Here we show that the SUMO pathway is critical to limit the number and, thus, the density of replication origins that are activated in early S phase. We identified cyclin E, which regulates cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (Cdk2) to trigger origin firing, as an S-phase substrate of this pathway. We show that cyclin E is dynamically and highly conjugated to SUMO2/3 on chromatin, independently of Cdk2 activity and origin activation. Moreover, cyclin E is the predominant SUMO2/3 target on chromatin in early S phase, as cyclin E depletion abolishes, while its readdition restores, the SUMO2/3 signal. Together, our data indicate that cyclin E SUMOylation is important for controlling origin firing once the cyclin E–Cdk2 complex is recruited onto replication origins. PMID:23673635

  9. Cyclin D1 is an essential mediator of apoptotic neuronal cell death.

    PubMed Central

    Kranenburg, O; van der Eb, A J; Zantema, A

    1996-01-01

    Many neurons in the developing nervous system undergo programmed cell death, or apoptosis. However, the molecular mechanism underlying this phenomenon is largely unknown. In the present report, we present evidence that the cell cycle regulator cyclin D1 is involved in the regulation of neuronal cell death. During neuronal apoptosis, cyclin D1-dependent kinase activity is stimulated, due to an increase in cyclin D1 levels. Moreover, artificial elevation of cyclin D1 levels is sufficient to induce apoptosis, even in non-neural cell types. Cyclin D1-induced apoptosis, like neuronal apoptosis, can be inhibited by 21 kDa E1B, Bcl2 and pRb, but not by 55 kDa E1B. Most importantly, however, overexpression of the cyclin D-dependent kinase inhibitor p16INK4 protects neurons from apoptotic cell death, demonstrating that activation of endogenous cyclin D1-dependent kinases is essential during neuronal apoptosis. These data support a model in which neuronal apoptosis results from an aborted attempt to activate the cell cycle in terminally differentiated neurons. Images PMID:8598205

  10. Dissection of Cdk1–cyclin complexes in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ear, Po Hien; Booth, Michael J.; Abd-Rabbo, Diala; Kowarzyk Moreno, Jacqueline; Hall, Conrad; Chen, Daici; Vogel, Jackie; Michnick, Stephen W.

    2013-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks) are regulatory enzymes with temporal and spatial selectivity for their protein substrates that are governed by cell cycle-regulated cyclin subunits. Specific cyclin–Cdk complexes bind to and phosphorylate target proteins, coupling their activity to cell cycle states. The identification of specific cyclin–Cdk substrates is challenging and so far, has largely been achieved through indirect correlation or use of in vitro techniques. Here, we use a protein-fragment complementation assay based on the optimized yeast cytosine deaminase to systematically identify candidate substrates of budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cdk1 and show dependency on one or more regulatory cyclins. We identified known and candidate cyclin dependencies for many predicted protein kinase Cdk1 targets and showed elusory Clb3–Cdk1-specific phosphorylation of γ-tubulin, thus establishing the timing of this event in controlling assembly of the mitotic spindle. Our strategy can be generally applied to identify substrates and accessory subunits of multisubunit protein complexes. PMID:24019491

  11. Selectivity and potency of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Sridhar, Jayalakshmi; Akula, Nagaraju; Pattabiraman, Nagarajan

    2006-03-24

    Members of the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) family play key roles in various cellular processes. There are 11 members of the CDK family known till now. CDKs are activated by forming noncovalent complexes with cyclins such as A-, B-, C-, D- (D1, D2, and D3), and E-type cyclins. Each isozyme of this family is responsible for particular aspects (cell signaling, transcription, etc) of the cell cycle, and some of the CDK isozymes are specific to certain kinds of tissues. Aberrant expression and overexpression of these kinases are evidenced in many disease conditions. Inhibition of isozymes of CDKs specifically can yield beneficiary treatment modalities with minimum side effects. More than 80 3-dimensional structures of CDK2, CDK5, and CDK6 complexed with inhibitors have been published. This review provides an understanding of the structural aspects of CDK isozymes and binding modes of various known CDK inhibitors so that these kinases can be better targeted for drug discovery and design. The amino acid residues that constitute the cyclin binding region, the substrate binding region, and the area around the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) binding site have been compared for CDK isozymes. Those amino acids at the ATP binding site that could be used to improve the potency and subtype specificity have been described.

  12. Differences in substrate specificity between Cdk2-cyclin A and Cdk2-cyclin E in vitro.

    PubMed

    Higashi, H; Suzuki-Takahashi, I; Taya, Y; Segawa, K; Nishimura, S; Kitagawa, M

    1995-11-13

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (Cdk2), when bound to either cyclin A or cyclin E, recognizes the Ser/Thr-Pro-X-basic amino acid (motif A) as a phosphorylation site. In this study, we designed several peptides based on motif A and examined the substrate specificity of Cdk2-cyclin A and Cdk2-cyclin E using these peptides. Peptides containing a proline residue in the sequence Pro-X-Thr-Pro-X-basic amino acid (motif B) had higher affinity for both Cdk2 complexes than peptides containing motif A. Furthermore, differences in substrate affinity between the two Cdk2 complexes were caused by a proline residue adjacent to or three positions before the threonine residue. Similarly, the presence of different basic amino acids in motif B also had different effects on affinity for each complex. We demonstrate the possibility that the substrate specificity of Cdk2 bound to cyclin might be regulated by the species of cyclin.

  13. Regulation of cyclin D2 gene expression by the Myc/Max/Mad network: Myc-dependent TRRAP recruitment and histone acetylation at the cyclin D2 promoter

    PubMed Central

    Bouchard, Caroline; Dittrich, Oliver; Kiermaier, Astrid; Dohmann, Karen; Menkel, Annette; Eilers, Martin; Lüscher, Bernhard

    2001-01-01

    Myc oncoproteins promote cell cycle progression in part through the transcriptional up-regulation of the cyclin D2 gene. We now show that Myc is bound to the cyclin D2 promoter in vivo. Binding of Myc induces cyclin D2 expression and histone acetylation at a single nucleosome in a MycBoxII/TRRAP-dependent manner. Down-regulation of cyclin D2 mRNA expression in differentiating HL60 cells is preceded by a switch of promoter occupancy from Myc/Max to Mad/Max complexes, loss of TRRAP binding, increased HDAC1 binding, and histone deacetylation. Thus, recruitment of TRRAP and regulation of histone acetylation are critical for transcriptional activation by Myc. PMID:11511535

  14. Crystal Structure of Human Cyclin K, a Positive Regulator of Cyclin-dependent Kinase 9

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Kyuwon; Brown, Raymond S.; Birrane, Gabriel; Ladias, John A.A.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Cyclin K and the closely related cyclins T1, T2a, and T2b interact with cyclin-dependent kinase 9 (CDK9) forming multiple nuclear complexes, collectively referred to as positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb). Through phosphorylation of the C-terminal domain of the RNA polymerase II largest subunit, distinct P-TEFb species regulate the transcriptional elongation of specific genes that play central roles in human physiology and disease development, including cardiac hypertrophy and human immunodeficiency virus-1 pathogenesis. We have determined the crystal structure of human cyclin K (residues 11-267) at 1.5 Å resolution, which represents the first atomic structure of a P-TEFb subunit. The cyclin K fold comprises two typical cyclin boxes with two short helices preceding the N-terminal box. A prominent feature of cyclin K is an additional helix (H4a) in the first cyclin box that obstructs the binding pocket for the cell cycle inhibitor p27Kip1. Modeling of CDK9 bound to cyclin K provides insights into the structural determinants underlying the formation and regulation of this complex. A homology model of human cyclin T1 generated using the cyclin K as a template reveals that the two proteins have similar structures, as expected from their high sequence identity. Nevertheless, their CDK9-interacting surfaces display significant structural differences, which could potentially be exploited for the design of cyclin-targeted inhibitors of the CDK9–cyclin K and CDK9–cyclin T1 complexes. PMID:17169370

  15. Cyclin D1 unbalances the redox status controlling cell adhesion, migration, and drug resistance in myeloma cells

    PubMed Central

    Bustany, Sophie; Bourgeais, Jérôme; Tchakarska, Guergana; Body, Simon; Hérault, Olivier; Gouilleux, Fabrice; Sola, Brigitte

    2016-01-01

    The interactions of multiple myeloma (MM) cells with their microenvironment are crucial for pathogenesis. MM cells could interact differentially with their microenvironment depending on the type of cyclin D they express. We established several clones that constitutively express cyclin D1 from the parental RPMI8226 MM cell line and analyzed the impact of cyclin D1 expression on cell behavior. We performed a gene expression profiling study on cyclin D1-expressing vs. control cells and validated the results by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. The expression of cyclin D1 altered the transcription of genes that control adhesion and migration. We confirmed that cyclin D1 increases cell adhesion to stromal cells and fibronectin, stabilizes F-actin fibers, and enhances chemotaxis and inflammatory chemokine secretion. Both control and cyclin D1-expressing cells were more resistant to acute carfilzomib treatment when cultured on stromal cells than in suspension. However, this resistance was specifically reduced in cyclin D1-expressing cells after pomalidomide pre-treatment that modifies tumor cell/microenvironment interactions. Transcriptomic analysis revealed that cyclin D1 expression was also associated with changes in the expression of genes controlling metabolism. We also found that cyclin D1 expression disrupted the redox balance by producing reactive oxygen species. The resulting oxidative stress activated the p44/42 mitogen-activated protein kinase (or ERK1/2) signaling pathway, increased cell adhesion to fibronectin or stromal cells, and controlled drug sensitivity. Our results have uncovered a new function for cyclin D1 in the control of redox metabolism and interactions of cyclin D1-expressing MM cells with their bone marrow microenvironment. PMID:27286258

  16. Silymarin induces cyclin D1 proteasomal degradation via its phosphorylation of threonine-286 in human colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Eo, Hyun Ji; Park, Gwang Hun; Song, Hun Min; Lee, Jin Wook; Kim, Mi Kyoung; Lee, Man Hyo; Lee, Jeong Rak; Koo, Jin Suk; Jeong, Jin Boo

    2015-01-01

    Silymarin from milk thistle (Silybum marianum) plant has been reported to show anti-cancer, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and hepatoprotective effects. For anti-cancer activity, silymarin is known to regulate cell cycle progression through cyclin D1 downregulation. However, the mechanism of silymarin-mediated cyclin D1 downregulation still remains unanswered. The current study was performed to elucidate the molecular mechanism of cyclin D1 downregulation by silymarin in human colorectal cancer cells. The treatment of silymarin suppressed the cell proliferation in HCT116 and SW480 cells and decreased cellular accumulation of exogenously-induced cyclin D1 protein. However, silymarin did not change the level of cyclin D1 mRNA. Inhibition of proteasomal degradation by MG132 attenuated silymarin-mediated cyclin D1 downregulation and the half-life of cyclin D1 was decreased in the cells treated with silymarin. In addition, silymarin increased phosphorylation of cyclin D1 at threonine-286 and a point mutation of threonine-286 to alanine attenuated silymarin-mediated cyclin D1 downregulation. Inhibition of NF-κB by a selective inhibitor, BAY 11-7082 suppressed cyclin D1 phosphorylation and downregulation by silymarin. From these results, we suggest that silymarin-mediated cyclin D1 downregulation may result from proteasomal degradation through its threonine-286 phosphorylation via NF-κB activation. The current study provides new mechanistic link between silymarin, cyclin D1 downregulation and cell growth in human colorectal cancer cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. The proteolysis of mitotic cyclins in mammalian cells persists from the end of mitosis until the onset of S phase.

    PubMed Central

    Brandeis, M; Hunt, T

    1996-01-01

    We have studied how the cell cycle-specific oscillations of mitotic B-type cyclins are generated in mouse fibroblasts. A reporter enzyme comprising the N-terminus of a B-type cyclin fused to bacterial chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) was degraded at the end of mitosis like endogenous cyclins. Point mutations in the destruction box of this construct completely abolished its mitotic instability. When the destructible reporter was driven by the cyclin B2 promoter, CAT activity mimicked the oscillations in the level of the endogenous cyclin B2. These oscillations were largely conserved when the reporter was transcribed constitutively from the SV40 promoter. Pulse-chase experiments or addition of the proteasome inhibitors lactacystin and ALLN showed that cyclin synthesis continued after the end of mitosis. The destruction box-specific degradation of cyclins normally ceases at the onset of S phase, and is active in fibroblasts arrested in G0 and in differentiated C2 myoblasts. We were able to reproduce this proteolysis in vitro in extracts of synchronized cells. Extracts of G1 cells degraded cyclin B1 whereas p27Kip1 was stable, in contrast, cyclin B1 remained stable and p27Kip1 was degraded in extracts of S phase cells. Images PMID:8895573

  18. CDK10/cyclin M is a protein kinase that controls ETS2 degradation and is deficient in STAR syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Guen, Vincent J.; Gamble, Carly; Flajolet, Marc; Unger, Sheila; Thollet, Aurélie; Ferandin, Yoan; Superti-Furga, Andrea; Cohen, Pascale A.; Meijer, Laurent; Colas, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) regulate a variety of fundamental cellular processes. CDK10 stands out as one of the last orphan CDKs for which no activating cyclin has been identified and no kinase activity revealed. Previous work has shown that CDK10 silencing increases ETS2 (v-ets erythroblastosis virus E26 oncogene homolog 2)-driven activation of the MAPK pathway, which confers tamoxifen resistance to breast cancer cells. The precise mechanisms by which CDK10 modulates ETS2 activity, and more generally the functions of CDK10, remain elusive. Here we demonstrate that CDK10 is a cyclin-dependent kinase by identifying cyclin M as an activating cyclin. Cyclin M, an orphan cyclin, is the product of FAM58A, whose mutations cause STAR syndrome, a human developmental anomaly whose features include toe syndactyly, telecanthus, and anogenital and renal malformations. We show that STAR syndrome-associated cyclin M mutants are unable to interact with CDK10. Cyclin M silencing phenocopies CDK10 silencing in increasing c-Raf and in conferring tamoxifen resistance to breast cancer cells. CDK10/cyclin M phosphorylates ETS2 in vitro, and in cells it positively controls ETS2 degradation by the proteasome. ETS2 protein levels are increased in cells derived from a STAR patient, and this increase is attributable to decreased cyclin M levels. Altogether, our results reveal an additional regulatory mechanism for ETS2, which plays key roles in cancer and development. They also shed light on the molecular mechanisms underlying STAR syndrome. PMID:24218572

  19. Modulating the interaction between CDK2 and cyclin A with a quinoline-based inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yongqi; Shipps, Gerald W; Zhao, Lianyun; Siddiqui, M Arshad; Popovici-Muller, Janeta; Curran, Patrick J; Duca, Jose S; Hruza, Alan W; Fischmann, Thierry O; Madison, Vincent S; Zhang, Rumin; McNemar, Charles W; Mayhood, Todd W; Syto, Rosalinda; Annis, Allen; Kirschmeier, Paul; Lees, Emma M; Parry, David A; Windsor, William T

    2014-01-01

    A new class of quinoline-based kinase inhibitors has been discovered that both disrupt cyclin dependent 2 (CDK2) interaction with its cyclin A subunit and act as ATP competitive inhibitors. The key strategy for discovering this class of protein-protein disrupter compounds was to screen the monomer CDK2 in an affinity-selection/mass spectrometry-based technique and to perform secondary assays that identified compounds that bound only to the inactive CDK2 monomer and not the active CDK2/cyclin A heterodimer. Through a series of chemical modifications the affinity (Kd) of the original hit improved from 1 to 0.005μM.

  20. Cyclin A1 is expressed in mouse ovary.

    PubMed

    Wei, Hongquan; Li, Yuanhong; Zhao, Chen; Jiang, Xuejun; Chen, Hongduo; Lang, Ming-Fei; Sun, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Cyclin A1 belongs to the type-A cyclins and participates in cell cycle regulation. Since its discovery, cyclin A1 has been shown mostly in testis. It plays important roles in spermatogenesis. However, there were also reports on ovary expression of cyclin A1. Therefore, we intended to revisit the expression of cyclin A1 in mouse ovary. Our study showed that cyclin A1 was expressed at the mRNA level and the protein level in mouse ovary. Tissue staining revealed that cyclin A1 was expressed in maturating oocytes. With the recent data on the functions of cyclins in somatic and stem cells, we also discussed the possibilities of further studies of cyclin A1 in mouse oocytes and perhaps in the oogonial stem cells. Our findings not only add to the supportive evidence of cyclin A1 expression in oocytes, but also may promote more interest in exploring cyclin A1 functions in ovary.

  1. Low molecular weight cyclin E is associated with p27-resistant, high-grade, high-stage and invasive bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xin-Qiao; Bondaruk, Jolanta; Tucker, Susan L; Czerniak, P. Bogdan; Benedict, William F; Keyomarsi, Khandan

    2012-01-01

    Expression of low molecular weight (LMW) isoforms of cyclin E is a strong predictor of poor outcome in patients with breast cancer. The purpose of this study was to examine the expression of full-length and LMW cyclin E in bladder cancer cell lines and patient tumors. We used western blotting, immunoprecipitation and kinase assays to examine the expression and activity of key cell cycle-regulatory proteins in various human bladder cell lines, both tumorigenic and non-tumorigenic. We also analyzed cyclin E expression, kinase activity and immune complex binding partners in 43 tissue samples from grade 2 and 3 transitional cell carcinomas. Cyclin E was overexpressed and LMW isoforms were present only in bladder cancer cells. Overexpression of LMW isoforms of cyclin E and increased cyclin E kinase activity were both significantly associated with tumorigenicity of the bladder cell lines (p = 0.005 and 0.022, respectively). Binding of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p21 and p27 to LMW cyclin E did not inhibit the kinase activity of cyclin E and cyclin-dependent kinase 2 in primary tumor samples overexpressing LMW cyclin E. Full-length and LMW cyclin E were significantly overexpressed in grade 3 tumors compared with grade 2 tumors (p = 0.004). Finally, LMW cyclin E levels were significantly associated with a non-papillary growth pattern (p = 0.031) and invasiveness (p = 0.021) of the bladder tumors and poor overall survival (p = 0.06). These results suggest that LMW cyclin E can be used as a new prognostic marker for bladder cancer. PMID:22441703

  2. Crystal Structure of Human Cyclin K, A Positive Regulator of Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 9

    SciTech Connect

    Baek,K.; Brown, R.; Birrane, G.; Ladias, J.

    2007-01-01

    K and the closely related cyclins T1, T2a, and T2b interact with cyclin-dependent kinase 9 (CDK9) forming multiple nuclear complexes, referred to collectively as positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb). Through phosphorylation of the C-terminal domain of the RNA polymerase II largest subunit, distinct P-TEFb species regulate the transcriptional elongation of specific genes that play central roles in human physiology and disease development, including cardiac hypertrophy and human immunodeficiency virus-1 pathogenesis. We have determined the crystal structure of human cyclin K (residues 11-267) at 1.5 {angstrom} resolution, which represents the first atomic structure of a P-TEFb subunit. The cyclin K fold comprises two typical cyclin boxes with two short helices preceding the N-terminal box. A prominent feature of cyclin K is an additional helix (H4a) in the first cyclin box that obstructs the binding pocket for the cell-cycle inhibitor p27{sup Kip1}. Modeling of CDK9 bound to cyclin K provides insights into the structural determinants underlying the formation and regulation of this complex. A homology model of human cyclin T1 generated using the cyclin K structure as a template reveals that the two proteins have similar structures, as expected from their high level of sequence identity. Nevertheless, their CDK9-interacting surfaces display significant structural differences, which could potentially be exploited for the design of cyclin-targeted inhibitors of the CDK9-cyclin K and CDK9-cyclin T1 complexes.

  3. Identification of Arabidopsis Meiotic Cyclins Reveals Functional Diversification among Plant Cyclin Genes

    PubMed Central

    Bulankova, Petra; Akimcheva, Svetlana; Fellner, Nicole; Riha, Karel

    2013-01-01

    Meiosis is a modified cell division in which a single S-phase is followed by two rounds of chromosome segregation resulting in the production of haploid gametes. The meiotic mode of chromosome segregation requires extensive remodeling of the basic cell cycle machinery and employment of unique regulatory mechanisms. Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) and cyclins represent an ancient molecular module that drives and regulates cell cycle progression. The cyclin gene family has undergone a massive expansion in angiosperm plants, but only a few cyclins were thoroughly characterized. In this study we performed a systematic immunolocalization screen to identify Arabidopsis thaliana A- and B-type cyclins expressed in meiosis. Many of these cyclins exhibit cell-type-specific expression in vegetative tissues and distinct subcellular localization. We found six A-type cyclins and a single B-type cyclin (CYCB3;1) to be expressed in male meiosis. Mutant analysis revealed that these cyclins contribute to distinct meiosis-related processes. While A2 cyclins are important for chromosome segregation, CYCB3;1 prevents ectopic cell wall formation. We further show that cyclin SDS does not contain a D-box and is constitutively expressed throughout meiosis. Analysis of plants carrying cyclin SDS with an introduced D-box motif determined that, in addition to its function in recombination, SDS acts together with CYCB3;1 in suppressing unscheduled cell wall synthesis. Our phenotypic and expression data provide extensive evidence that multiplication of cyclins is in plants accompanied by functional diversification. PMID:23671425

  4. Expression of cyclin D1 correlates with malignancy in human ovarian tumours.

    PubMed Central

    Barbieri, F.; Cagnoli, M.; Ragni, N.; Pedullà, F.; Foglia, G.; Alama, A.

    1997-01-01

    Cyclin D1 is a cell cycle regulator of G1 progression that has been suggested to play a relevant role in the pathogenesis of several human cancer types. In the current study, the expression of cyclin D1 has been investigated in a series of 33 patients, with benign (10 patients), borderline (five patients) and malignant (18 patients) ovarian disease. Cyclin D1 protein and mRNA content were analysed by Western blotting and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction respectively. The levels of cyclin D1 protein were undetectable in patients with benign disease, detectable in the majority of patients with borderline disease and elevated in those with ovarian carcinomas, being significantly related to the degree of malignancy (carcinoma vs benign, P = 0.0001; benign vs borderline, P = 0.0238). A significant relationship between cyclin D1 expression and tumour proliferative activity was also found (P = 0.000001). Moreover, eight benign lesions, two borderline tumours and 11 carcinomas proved to be suitable for the analysis of cyclin D1 transcript, and emerging data demonstrated significant agreement between protein abundance and mRNA expression. Results from the current study suggest that cyclin D1 expression is associated with the degree of transformation and most probably plays a role in the early development of ovarian malignancy. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:9155044

  5. Cyclin C stimulates β-cell proliferation in rat and human pancreatic β-cells

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Palomares, Margarita; López-Acosta, José Francisco; Villa-Pérez, Pablo; Moreno-Amador, José Luis; Muñoz-Barrera, Jennifer; Fernández-Luis, Sara; Heras-Pozas, Blanca; Perdomo, Germán; Bernal-Mizrachi, Ernesto

    2015-01-01

    Activation of pancreatic β-cell proliferation has been proposed as an approach to replace reduced functional β-cell mass in diabetes. Quiescent fibroblasts exit from G0 (quiescence) to G1 through pRb phosphorylation mediated by cyclin C/cdk3 complexes. Overexpression of cyclin D1, D2, D3, or cyclin E induces pancreatic β-cell proliferation. We hypothesized that cyclin C overexpression would induce β-cell proliferation through G0 exit, thus being a potential therapeutic target to recover functional β-cell mass. We used isolated rat and human islets transduced with adenovirus expressing cyclin C. We measured multiple markers of proliferation: [3H]thymidine incorporation, BrdU incorporation and staining, and Ki67 staining. Furthermore, we detected β-cell death by TUNEL, β-cell differentiation by RT-PCR, and β-cell function by glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Interestingly, we have found that cyclin C increases rat and human β-cell proliferation. This augmented proliferation did not induce β-cell death, dedifferentiation, or dysfunction in rat or human islets. Our results indicate that cyclin C is a potential target for inducing β-cell regeneration. PMID:25564474

  6. Cytoplasmic polyadenylation elements mediate masking and unmasking of cyclin B1 mRNA.

    PubMed Central

    de Moor, C H; Richter, J D

    1999-01-01

    During oocyte maturation, cyclin B1 mRNA is translationally activated by cytoplasmic polyadenylation. This process is dependent on cytoplasmic polyadenylation elements (CPEs) in the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of the mRNA. To determine whether a titratable factor might be involved in the initial translational repression (masking) of this mRNA, high levels of cyclin B1 3' UTR were injected into oocytes. While this treatment had no effect on the poly(A) tail length of endogenous cyclin B1 mRNA, it induced cyclin B1 synthesis. A mutational analysis revealed that the most efficient unmasking element in the cyclin 3' UTR was the CPE. However, other U-rich sequences that resemble the CPE in structure, but which do not bind the CPE-binding polyadenylation factor CPEB, failed to induce unmasking. When fused to the chloramphenical acetyl transferase (CAT) coding region, the cyclin B1 3' UTR inhibited CAT translation in injected oocytes. In addition, a synthetic 3' UTR containing multiple copies of the CPE also inhibited translation, and did so in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, efficient CPE-mediated masking required cap-dependent translation. During the normal course of progesterone-induced maturation, cytoplasmic polyadenylation was necessary for mRNA unmasking. A model to explain how cyclin B1 mRNA masking and unmasking could be regulated by the CPE is presented. PMID:10205182

  7. Cyclin D1 inhibits hepatic lipogenesis via repression of carbohydrate response element binding protein and hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α.

    PubMed

    Hanse, Eric A; Mashek, Douglas G; Becker, Jennifer R; Solmonson, Ashley D; Mullany, Lisa K; Mashek, Mara T; Towle, Howard C; Chau, Anhtung T; Albrecht, Jeffrey H

    2012-07-15

    Following acute hepatic injury, the metabolic capacity of the liver is altered during the process of compensatory hepatocyte proliferation by undefined mechanisms. In this study, we examined the regulation of de novo lipogenesis by cyclin D1, a key mediator of hepatocyte cell cycle progression. In primary hepatocytes, cyclin D1 significantly impaired lipogenesis in response to glucose stimulation. Cyclin D1 inhibited the glucose-mediated induction of key lipogenic genes, and similar effects were seen using a mutant (D1-KE) that does not activate cdk4 or induce cell cycle progression. Cyclin D1 (but not D1-KE) inhibited the activity of the carbohydrate response element-binding protein (ChREBP) by regulating the glucose-sensing motif of this transcription factor. Because changes in ChREBP activity could not fully explain the effect of cyclin D1, we examined hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF4α), which regulates numerous differentiated functions in the liver including lipid metabolism. We found that both cyclins D1 and D1-KE bound to HNF4α and significantly inhibited its recruitment to the promoter region of lipogenic genes in hepatocytes. Conversely, knockdown of cyclin D1 in the AML12 hepatocyte cell line promoted HNF4α activity and lipogenesis. In mouse liver, HNF4α bound to a central domain of cyclin D1 involved in transcriptional repression. Cyclin D1 inhibited lipogenic gene expression in the liver following carbohydrate feeding. Similar findings were observed in the setting of physiologic cyclin D1 expression in the regenerating liver. In conclusion, these studies demonstrate that cyclin D1 represses ChREBP and HNF4α function in hepatocytes via Cdk4-dependent and -independent mechanisms. These findings provide a direct link between the cell cycle machinery and the transcriptional control of metabolic function of the liver.

  8. Decreased cyclin B1 expression contributes to G2 delay in human brain tumor cells after treatment with camptothecin.

    PubMed Central

    Janss, A. J.; Maity, A.; Tang, C. B.; Muschel, R. J.; McKenna, W. G.; Sutton, L.; Phillips, P. C.

    2001-01-01

    DNA damage produces delayed mitosis (G2/M delay) in proliferating cells, and shortening the delay sensitizes human malignant glioma and medulloblastoma cells to cytotoxic chemotherapy. Although activation of the cyclin-dependent kinase CDC2 mediates G2/M transition in all tumor cells studied to date, regulation of CDC2 varies between tumor types. Persistent hyperphosphorylation of kinase and reduced cyclin expression have been implicated as mediators of treatment-induced G2 delay in different tumor models. To evaluate regulation of G2/M transition in human brain tumors, we studied the expression and/or activity of CDC2 kinase and cyclins A and B1 in U-251 MG and DAOY medulloblastoma cells after their treatment with camptothecin (CPT). Synchronized cells were treated during S phase, then harvested at predetermined intervals for evaluation of cell cycle kinetics, kinase activity mRNA, and protein expression. CPT produced G2 delay associated with decreased CDC2 kinase activity and cyclin B1 expression. Kinase activity was associated with CDC2 bound to cyclin B1, not cyclin A, in both cell lines. Cyclin A mRNA and protein expression were reduced after CPT treatment; however, decreased protein expression was short lived and moderate in the glioma and primitive neuroectodermal tumor/medulloblastoma cells, respectively. We conclude that G2 delay is a common response of brain tumor cells to chemotherapy with topoisomerase I inhibitors and that a mechanism of this delay may be reduced expression of cyclin B1. PMID:11305412

  9. Degradation of p21Cip1 through anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome and its activator Cdc20 (APC/CCdc20) ubiquitin ligase complex-mediated ubiquitylation is inhibited by cyclin-dependent kinase 2 in cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Kazuhiko; Tamamori-Adachi, Mimi; Goto, Ikuko; Iizuka, Masayoshi; Yasukawa, Takashi; Aso, Teijiro; Okazaki, Tomoki; Kitajima, Shigetaka

    2011-12-23

    Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21Cip1 plays a crucial role in regulating cell cycle arrest and differentiation. It is known that p21Cip1 increases during terminal differentiation of cardiomyocytes, but its expression control and biological roles are not fully understood. Here, we show that the p21Cip1 protein is stabilized in cardiomyocytes after mitogenic stimulation, due to its increased CDK2 binding and inhibition of ubiquitylation. The APC/CCdc20 complex is shown to be an E3 ligase mediating ubiquitylation of p21Cip1 at the N terminus. CDK2, but not CDC2, suppressed the interaction of p21Cip1 with Cdc20, thereby leading to inhibition of anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome and its activator Cdc20 (APC/CCdc20)-mediated p21Cip1 ubiquitylation. It was further demonstrated that p21Cip1 accumulation caused G2 arrest of cardiomyocytes that were forced to re-enter the cell cycle. Taken together, these data show that the stability of the p21Cip1 protein is actively regulated in terminally differentiated cardiomyocytes and plays a role in inhibiting their uncontrolled cell cycle progression. Our study provides a novel insight on the control of p21Cip1 by ubiquitin-mediated degradation and its implication in cell cycle arrest in terminal differentiation.

  10. Enantioselective effect of 12(S)-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid on 3T6 fibroblast growth through ERK 1/2 and p38 MAPK pathways and cyclin D1 activation.

    PubMed

    Nieves, Diana; Moreno, Juan J

    2008-09-01

    Hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids (HETEs) have numerous physiological effects, including modulation of cell proliferation and differentiation. However, little is known about the selective effects of HETE enantiomers on cell proliferation and cell signalling pathways involved in the regulation of cell growth. Furthermore, information on epithelial and endothelial cells growth is controversial. Recently, we demonstrated that 5-, 12-, and 15-HETE are involved in the control of 3T6 fibroblast growth though serine/treonine Akt/PKB (Akt) pathway. Here we examined the participation of both enantiomers (S and R) of HETEs in the control of 3T6 fibroblast growth. Our results show that HETEs (5-, 12-, and 15-HETE) are enantioselective on protein and DNA synthesis and 3T6 fibroblast growth. Furthermore, we observed that 12(S)-HETE induces the enhancement of cAMP and intracellular calcium concentration, whereas 12(R)-HETE was uneffective. Our findings also demonstrated that 12(S)-HETE exerts these effects through enantiospecific interactions with a cellular element, probably a plasma membrane receptor coupling to a pertussis toxin-sensitive protein G. Moreover, these elements may be involved in the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways which induce the enhancement of cyclin D(1) levels.

  11. Ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase L1 (UCH-L1) acts as a novel potentiator of cyclin-dependent kinases to enhance cell proliferation independently of its hydrolase activity.

    PubMed

    Kabuta, Tomohiro; Mitsui, Takeshi; Takahashi, Masaki; Fujiwara, Yuuki; Kabuta, Chihana; Konya, Chiho; Tsuchiya, Yukihiro; Hatanaka, Yusuke; Uchida, Kenko; Hohjoh, Hirohiko; Wada, Keiji

    2013-05-03

    Dysregulation of cell proliferation and the cell cycle are associated with various diseases, such as cancer. Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) play central roles in cell proliferation and the cell cycle. Ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase L1 (UCH-L1) is expressed in a restricted range of tissues, including the brain and numerous types of cancer. However, the molecular functions of UCH-L1 remain elusive. In this study, we found that UCH-L1 physically interacts with CDK1, CDK4, and CDK5, enhancing their kinase activity. Using several mutants of UCH-L1, we showed that this enhancement is dependent upon interaction levels between UCH-L1 and CDKs but is independent of the known ubiquitin-related functions of UCH-L1. Gain- and loss-of-function studies revealed that UCH-L1 enhances proliferation of multiple cell types, including human cancer cells. Inhibition of the interaction between UCH-L1 and cell cycle-associated CDK resulted in the abolishment of UCH-L1-induced enhancement of cell proliferation. RNA interference of UCH-L1 reduced the growth of human xenograft tumors in mice. We concluded that UCH-L1 is a novel regulator of the kinase activities of CDKs. We believe that our findings from this study will significantly contribute to our understanding of cell cycle-associated diseases.

  12. Early Induction of Cyclin D2 Expression in Phorbol Ester–responsive B-1 Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Tanguay, Debra A.; Colarusso, Thomas P.; Pavlovic, Sandra; Irigoyen, Macarena; Howard, Robert G.; Bartek, Jiri; Chiles, Thomas C.; Rothstein, Thomas L.

    1999-01-01

    B-1 lymphocytes represent a distinct B cell subset with characteristic features that include self-renewing capacity and unusual mitogenic responses. B-1 cells differ from conventional B cells in terms of the consequences of phorbol ester treatment: B-1 cells rapidly enter S phase in response to phorbol ester alone, whereas B-2 cells require a calcium ionophore in addition to phorbol ester to trigger cell cycle progression. To address the mechanism underlying the varied proliferative responses of B-1 and B-2 cells, we evaluated the expression and activity of the G1 cell cycle regulator, cyclin D2, and its associated cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks). Cyclin D2 expression was upregulated rapidly, within 2–4 h, in phorbol ester–stimulated B-1 cells, in a manner dependent on intact transcription/translation, but was not increased in phorbol ester– stimulated B-2 cells. Phorbol ester–stimulated cyclin D2 expression was accompanied by the formation of cyclin D2–Cdk4, and, to a lesser extent, cyclin D2–Cdk6, complexes; cyclin D2– containing complexes were found to be catalytically functional, in terms of their ability to phosphorylate exogenous Rb in vitro and to specifically phosphorylate endogenous Rb on serine780 in vivo. These results strongly suggest that the rapid induction of cyclin D2 by a normally nonmitogenic phorbol ester stimulus is responsible for B-1 cell progression through G1 phase. The ease and rapidity with which cyclin D2 responds in B-1 cells may contribute to the proliferative features of this subset. PMID:10359571

  13. Rsf-1, a chromatin remodelling protein, interacts with cyclin E1 and promotes tumour development.

    PubMed

    Sheu, Jim Jinn-Chyuan; Choi, Jung Hye; Guan, Bin; Tsai, Fuu-Jen; Hua, Chun-Hung; Lai, Ming-Tsung; Wang, Tian-Li; Shih, Ie-Ming

    2013-03-01

    Chromosome 11q13.5 containing RSF1 (HBXAP), a gene involved in chromatin remodelling, is amplified in several human cancers including ovarian carcinoma. Our previous studies demonstrated requirement of Rsf-1 for cell survival in cancer cells, which contributed to tumour progression; however, its role in tumourigenesis has not yet been elucidated. In this study, we co-immunoprecipitated proteins with Rsf-1 followed by nanoelectrospray mass spectrometry and identified cyclin E1, besides SNF2H, as one of the major Rsf-1 interacting proteins. Like RSF1, CCNE1 is frequently amplified in ovarian cancer, and both Rsf-1 and cyclin E1 were found co-up-regulated in ovarian cancer tissues. Ectopic expression of Rsf-1 and cyclin E1 in non-tumourigenic TP53(mut) RK3E cells led to an increase in cellular proliferation and tumour formation by activating cyclin E1-associated kinase (CDK2). Tumourigenesis was not detected if either cyclin E1 or Rsf-1 was expressed, or they were expressed in a TP53(wt) background. Domain mapping showed that cyclin E1 interacted with the first 441 amino acids of Rsf-1. Ectopic expression of this truncated domain significantly suppressed G1/S-phase transition, cellular proliferation, and tumour formation of RK3E-p53(R175H) /Rsf-1/cyclin E1 cells. The above findings suggest that Rsf-1 interacts and collaborates with cyclin E1 in neoplastic transformation and TP53 mutations are a prerequisite for tumour-promoting functions of the RSF/cyclin E1 complex.

  14. Overexpression of cyclin A in the mammary glands of transgenic mice results in the induction of nuclear abnormalities and increased apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Bortner, D M; Rosenberg, M P

    1995-12-01

    Aberrant expression of several cyclin genes has been demonstrated to be associated with many types of tumors. To determine the capacity of cyclin A to function as an oncogene in vivo, wild-type and mutant cyclin A proteins were specifically overexpressed in the mammary glands of transgenic mice using regulatory sequences from the ovine beta-lactoglobulin gene. Several lines of transgenic mice were generated that expressed human cyclin A or a nondegradable mutant version of human cyclin A, in which the amino-terminal 89 amino acids encompassing the cyclin destruction box were removed. The cyclin A transgene products were localized in the nuclei of mammary epithelial cells, and the transgenic mammary glands had an increase in cyclin A- and cdk2-associated H1 kinase activity. Many mammary epithelial cells in the transgenic glands exhibited nuclear abnormalities, including multinucleation and karyomegaly, which were suggestive of preneoplastic alterations. The abnormalities were more severe in mammary glands of the mutant cyclin A transgenics, which expressed a stabilized cyclin A protein. In situ analysis of mid-lactation mammary gland sections revealed increased numbers of apoptotic cells in the transgenic glands. Double transgenic animals were generated that expressed both the mutant human cyclin A and human cdk2 transgenes, and a more pronounced phenotype resulted. The bigenic mammary glands exhibited focal areas of hyperplasia, as well as a greater incidence of apoptosis than observed in the single transgenic glands, demonstrating in vivo cooperation between these genes in transformation and apoptotic signaling pathways.

  15. Complexes of D-type cyclins with CDKs during maize germination.

    PubMed

    Godínez-Palma, Silvia K; García, Elpidio; Sánchez, María de la Paz; Rosas, Fernando; Vázquez-Ramos, Jorge M

    2013-12-01

    The importance of cell proliferation in plant growth and development has been well documented. The majority of studies on basic cell cycle mechanisms in plants have been at the level of gene expression and much less knowledge has accumulated in terms of protein interactions and activation. Two key proteins, cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are fundamental for cell cycle regulation and advancement. Our aim has been to understand the role of D-type cyclins and type A and B CDKs in the cell cycle taking place during a developmental process such as maize seed germination. Results indicate that three maize D-type cyclins-D2;2, D4;2, and D5;3-(G1-S cyclins by definition) bind and activate two different types of CDK-A and B1;1-in a differential way during germination. Whereas CDKA-D-type cyclin complexes are more active at early germination times than at later times, it was surprising to observe that CDKB1;1, a supposedly G2-M kinase, bound in a differential way to all D-type cyclins tested during germination. Binding to cyclin D2;2 was detectable at all germination times, forming a complex with kinase activity, whereas binding to D4;2 and D5;3 was more variable; in particular, D5;3 was only detected at late germination times. Results are discussed in terms of cell cycle advancement and its importance for seed germination.

  16. A cross-talk between the androgen receptor and the epidermal growth factor receptor leads to p38MAPK-dependent activation of mTOR and cyclinD1 expression in prostate and lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Recchia, Anna Grazia; Musti, Anna Maria; Lanzino, Marilena; Panno, Maria Luisa; Turano, Ermanna; Zumpano, Rachele; Belfiore, Antonino; Andò, Sebastiano; Maggiolini, Marcello

    2009-03-01

    In androgen sensitive LNCaP prostate cancer cells, the proliferation induced by the epidermal growth factor (EGF) involves a cross-talk between the EGF receptor (EGFR) and the androgen receptor (AR). In lung cancer the role of the EGF-EGFR transduction pathway has been documented, whereas androgen activity has received less attention. Here we demonstrate that in LNCaP and A549 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), AR and EGFR are required for either 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone (DHT) or EGF-stimulated cell growth. Only EGF activated ERK signaling and up-regulated early gene expression, while DHT triggered the expression of classical AR-responsive genes with the exception of the EGF-induced PSA transcript in A549 cells. DHT and EGF up-regulated cyclinD1 (CD1) at both mRNA and protein levels in A549 cells, while in LNCaP cells each mitogen increased only CD1 protein expression. In both cell contexts, CD1 up-regulation was prevented by selective inhibitors as well as by knock-down of either AR or EGFR and also inhibiting p38MAPK and the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathways. Interestingly, p38MAPK and mTOR repression prevented the activation of the mTOR target ribosomal p70S6 kinase induced by DHT and EGF, indicating that p38MAPK acts as an upstream mTOR regulator. In addition, the proliferative effects promoted by both DHT and EGF in LNCaP and A549 cancer cells were no longer observed blocking either p38MAPK or mTOR activity. Hence, our data suggest that p38MAPK-dependent activation of the mTOR/CD1 pathway may represent a mechanism through which AR and EGFR cross-talk contributes to prostate and lung cancer progression.

  17. The cyclin-dependent kinase 5 activators p35 and p39 interact with the alpha-subunit of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II and alpha-actinin-1 in a calcium-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Dhavan, Rani; Greer, Paul L; Morabito, Maria A; Orlando, Lianna R; Tsai, Li-Huei

    2002-09-15

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) is a critical regulator of neuronal migration in the developing CNS, and recent studies have revealed a role for Cdk5 in synaptogenesis and regulation of synaptic transmission. Deregulation of Cdk5 has been linked to the pathology of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. Activation of Cdk5 requires its association with a regulatory subunit, and two Cdk5 activators, p35 and p39, have been identified. To gain further insight into the functions of Cdk5, we identified proteins that interact with p39 in a yeast two-hybrid screen. In this study we report that alpha-actinin-1 and the alpha-subunit of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKIIalpha), two proteins localized at the postsynaptic density, interact with Cdk5 via their association with p35 and p39. CaMKIIalpha and alpha-actinin-1 bind to distinct regions of p35 and p39 and also can interact with each other. The association of CaMKIIalpha and alpha-actinin-1 to the Cdk5 activators, as well as to each other, is stimulated by calcium. Further, the activation of glutamate receptors increases the association of p35 and p39 with CaMKIIalpha, and the inhibition of CaMKII activation diminishes this effect. The glutamate-mediated increase in association of p35 and CaMKIIalpha is mediated in large part by NMDA receptors, suggesting that cross talk between the Cdk5 and CaMKII signal transduction pathways may be a component of the complex molecular mechanisms contributing to synaptic plasticity, memory, and learning.

  18. A Novel Non-agonist Peroxisome Proliferator-activated Receptor γ (PPARγ) Ligand UHC1 Blocks PPARγ Phosphorylation by Cyclin-dependent Kinase 5 (CDK5) and Improves Insulin Sensitivity*

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sun-Sil; Kim, Eun Sun; Koh, Minseob; Lee, Soo-Jin; Lim, Donghyun; Yang, Yong Ryoul; Jang, Hyun-Jun; Seo, Kyung-ah; Min, Sang-Hyun; Lee, In Hee; Park, Seung Bum; Suh, Pann-Ghill; Choi, Jang Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Thiazolidinedione class of anti-diabetic drugs which are known as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) ligands have been used to treat metabolic disorders, but thiazolidinediones can also cause several severe side effects, including congestive heart failure, fluid retention, and weight gain. In this study, we describe a novel synthetic PPARγ ligand UNIST HYUNDAI Compound 1 (UHC1) that binds tightly to PPARγ without the classical agonism and which blocks cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5)-mediated PPARγ phosphorylation. We modified the non-agonist PPARγ ligand SR1664 chemically to improve its solubility and then developed a novel PPARγ ligand, UHC1. According to our docking simulation, UHC1 occupied the ligand-binding site of PPARγ with a higher docking score than SR1664. In addition, UHC1 more potently blocked CDK5-mediated PPARγ phosphorylation at Ser-273. Surprisingly, UHC1 treatment effectively ameliorated the inflammatory response both in vitro and in high-fat diet-fed mice. Furthermore, UHC1 treatment dramatically improved insulin sensitivity in high-fat diet-fed mice without causing fluid retention and weight gain. Taken together, compared with SR1664, UHC1 exhibited greater beneficial effects on glucose and lipid metabolism by blocking CDK5-mediated PPARγ phosphorylation, and these data indicate that UHC1 could be a novel therapeutic agent for use in type 2 diabetes and related metabolic disorders. PMID:25100724

  19. Med13p prevents mitochondrial fission and programmed cell death in yeast through nuclear retention of cyclin C.

    PubMed

    Khakhina, Svetlana; Cooper, Katrina F; Strich, Randy

    2014-09-15

    The yeast cyclin C-Cdk8 kinase forms a complex with Med13p to repress the transcription of genes involved in the stress response and meiosis. In response to oxidative stress, cyclin C displays nuclear to cytoplasmic relocalization that triggers mitochondrial fission and promotes programmed cell death. In this report, we demonstrate that Med13p mediates cyclin C nuclear retention in unstressed cells. Deleting MED13 allows aberrant cytoplasmic cyclin C localization and extensive mitochondrial fragmentation. Loss of Med13p function resulted in mitochondrial dysfunction and hypersensitivity to oxidative stress-induced programmed cell death that were dependent on cyclin C. The regulatory system controlling cyclin C-Med13p interaction is complex. First, a previous study found that cyclin C phosphorylation by the stress-activated MAP kinase Slt2p is required for nuclear to cytoplasmic translocation. This study found that cyclin C-Med13p association is impaired when the Slt2p target residue is substituted with a phosphomimetic amino acid. The second step involves Med13p destruction mediated by the 26S proteasome and cyclin C-Cdk8p kinase activity. In conclusion, Med13p maintains mitochondrial structure, function, and normal oxidative stress sensitivity through cyclin C nuclear retention. Releasing cyclin C from the nucleus involves both its phosphorylation by Slt2p coupled with Med13p destruction. © 2014 Khakhina et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  20. Non-canonical functions of cell cycle cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases

    PubMed Central

    Hydbring, Per; Malumbres, Marcos; Sicinski, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    The role of cyclins and their catalytic partners, the cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs), as core components of the machinery that drives cell cycle progression is well established. Increasing evidence indicates that mammalian cyclins and CDKs also carry out important roles in other cellular processes such as transcription, DNA damage repair, the control of cell death, differentiation, the immune response and metabolism. Some of these non-canonical functions are performed by cyclins or by CDKs, independent of their respective cell cycle partners, suggesting a substantial divergence in the function of these proteins during evolution. PMID:27033256

  1. Cyclin D2 induces proliferation of cardiac myocytes and represses hypertrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Busk, Peter K. . E-mail: pkbu@novonordisk.com; Hinrichsen, Rebecca; Bartkova, Jirina; Hansen, Ane H.; Christoffersen, Tue E.H.; Bartek, Jiri; Haunso, Stig

    2005-03-10

    The myocytes of the adult mammalian heart are considered unable to divide. Instead, mitogens induce cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. We have investigated the effect of adenoviral overexpression of cyclin D2 on myocyte proliferation and morphology. Cardiomyocytes in culture were identified by established markers. Cyclin D2 induced DNA synthesis and proliferation of cardiomyocytes and impaired hypertrophy induced by angiotensin II and serum. At the molecular level, cyclin D2 activated CDK4/6 and lead to pRB phosphorylation and downregulation of the cell cycle inhibitors p21{sup Waf1/Cip1} and p27{sup Kip1}. Expression of the CDK4/6 inhibitor p16 inhibited proliferation and cyclin D2 overexpressing myocytes became hypertrophic under such conditions. Inhibition of hypertrophy by cyclin D2 correlated with downregulation of p27{sup Kip1}. These data show that hypertrophy and proliferation are highly related processes and suggest that cardiomyocyte hypertrophy is due to low amounts of cell cycle activators unable to overcome the block imposed by cell cycle inhibitors. Cell cycle entry upon hypertrophy may be converted to cell division by increased expression of activators such as cyclin D2.

  2. Cyclin A2 modulates EMT via β-catenin and phospholipase C pathways.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Caroline T; Bendris, Nawal; Paul, Conception; Hamieh, Abdallah; Anouar, Youssef; Hahne, Michael; Blanchard, Jean-Marie; Lemmers, Bénédicte

    2015-08-01

    We have previously demonstrated that Cyclin A2 is involved in cytoskeletal dynamics, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and metastasis. This phenotype was potentiated by activated oncogenic H-Ras. However, the mechanisms governing EMT in these cells have not yet been elucidated. Here, we dissected the pathways that are responsible for EMT in cells deficient for Cyclin A2. In Cyclin A2-depleted normal murine mammary gland (NMuMG) cells expressing RasV12, we found that β-catenin was liberated from the cell membrane and cell-cell junctions and underwent nuclear translocation and activation. Components of the canonical wingless (WNT) pathway, including WNT8b, WNT10a, WNT10b, frizzled 1 and 2 and TCF4 were upregulated at the messenger RNA and protein levels following Cyclin A2 depletion. However, suppression of the WNT pathway using the acetyltransferase porcupine inhibitor C59 did not reverse EMT whereas a dominant negative form of TCF4 as well as inhibition of phospholipase C using U73122 were able to do so. This suggests that a WNT-independent mechanism of β-catenin activation via phospholipase C is involved in the EMT induced by Cyclin A2 depletion. Our findings will broaden our knowledge on how Cyclin A2 contributes to EMT and metastasis.

  3. Induction of G1 arrest by down-regulation of cyclin D3 in T cell hybridomas

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    The relationship between activation-induced growth inhibition and regulation of the cell cycle progression was investigated in T cell hybridomas by studying the function of the cell cycle-regulating genes such as G1 cyclins and their associated kinases. Activation of T cell hybridomas by anti-T cell receptor antibody induces growth arrest at G1 phase of the cell cycle and subsequently results in activation-driven cell death. Rapid reduction of both messenger RNA and protein level of the cyclin D3 is accompanied by growth arrest upon activation. Although the residual cyclin D3 protein forms a complex with cdk4 protein, cyclin D3-dependent kinase activity is severely impaired. Stable transfectants engineered to express cyclin D3 override the growth arrest upon activation. These results imply that the activation signal through T cell receptor induces the down-regulation of cyclin D3 expression and cyclin D3-dependent kinase activity, leading to growth arrest in G1 phase of the cell cycle in T cells. PMID:7629502

  4. Independence of Herpesvirus-Induced T Cell Lymphoma from Viral Cyclin D Homologue

    PubMed Central

    Ensser, Armin; Glykofrydes, Diana; Niphuis, Henk; Kuhn, Eva M.; Rosenwirth, Brigitte; Heeney, Jonathan L.; Niedobitek, Gerald; Müller-Fleckenstein, Ingrid; Fleckenstein, Bernhard

    2001-01-01

    Cyclin D family members are cellular protooncogenes, and their viral homologues in the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV, human herpesvirus type 8 [HHV-8]) and the closely related Herpesvirus saimiri have been implicated as putative cofactors of viral transformation and pathogenesis. KSHV is regularly found in Kaposi's sarcoma and in the primary effusion B cell lymphoma and Castleman's disease associated with immunosuppression and AIDS. H. saimiri strain C488 transforms human and marmoset T cells in vitro and causes polyclonal T cell lymphoma in New World monkeys. The viral cyclins stimulate cell cycle progression of quiescent fibroblasts, and they form active cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK)6 complexes of broad substrate specificity that can resist and downregulate cellular CDK inhibitors. This study shows that the viral cyclin of H. saimiri strain C488 is not required for viral replication, T cell transformation, and pathogenicity in New World primates. PMID:11238594

  5. Independence of herpesvirus-induced T cell lymphoma from viral cyclin D homologue.

    PubMed

    Ensser, A; Glykofrydes, D; Niphuis, H; Kuhn, E M; Rosenwirth, B; Heeney, J L; Niedobitek, G; Müller-Fleckenstein, I; Fleckenstein, B

    2001-03-05

    Cyclin D family members are cellular protooncogenes, and their viral homologues in the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV, human herpesvirus type 8 [HHV-8]) and the closely related Herpesvirus saimiri have been implicated as putative cofactors of viral transformation and pathogenesis. KSHV is regularly found in Kaposi's sarcoma and in the primary effusion B cell lymphoma and Castleman's disease associated with immunosuppression and AIDS. H. saimiri strain C488 transforms human and marmoset T cells in vitro and causes polyclonal T cell lymphoma in New World monkeys. The viral cyclins stimulate cell cycle progression of quiescent fibroblasts, and they form active cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK)6 complexes of broad substrate specificity that can resist and downregulate cellular CDK inhibitors. This study shows that the viral cyclin of H. saimiri strain C488 is not required for viral replication, T cell transformation, and pathogenicity in New World primates.

  6. Greatwall kinase and cyclin B-Cdk1 are both critical constituents of M-phase-promoting factor

    PubMed Central

    Hara, Masatoshi; Abe, Yusuke; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Yamamoto, Takayoshi; Okumura, Eiichi; Kishimoto, Takeo

    2012-01-01

    Maturation/M-phase-promoting factor is the universal inducer of M-phase in eukaryotic cells. It is currently accepted that M-phase-promoting factor is identical to the kinase cyclin B–Cdk1. Here we show that cyclin B–Cdk1 and M-phase-promoting factor are not in fact synonymous. Instead, M-phase-promoting factor contains at least two essential components: cyclin B–Cdk1 and another kinase, Greatwall kinase. In the absence of Greatwall kinase, the M-phase-promoting factor is undetectable in oocyte cytoplasm even though cyclin B–Cdk1 is fully active, whereas M-phase-promoting factor activity is restored when Greatwall kinase is added back. Although the excess amount of cyclin B–Cdk1 alone, but not Greatwall kinase alone, can induce nuclear envelope breakdown, spindle assembly is abortive. Addition of Greatwall kinase greatly reduces the amount of cyclin B–Cdk1 required for nuclear envelope breakdown, resulting in formation of the spindle with aligned chromosomes. M-phase-promoting factor is thus a system consisting of one kinase (cyclin B–Cdk1) that directs mitotic entry and a second kinase (Greatwall kinase) that suppresses the protein phosphatase 2A-B55 which opposes cyclin B–Cdk1. PMID:22968705

  7. Artemisinin triggers a G1 cell cycle arrest of human Ishikawa endometrial cancer cells and inhibits cyclin-dependent kinase-4 promoter activity and expression by disrupting nuclear factor-κB transcriptional signaling.

    PubMed

    Tran, Kalvin Q; Tin, Antony S; Firestone, Gary L

    2014-03-01

    Relatively little is known about the antiproliferative effects of artemisinin, a naturally occurring antimalarial compound from Artemisia annua, or sweet wormwood, in human endometrial cancer cells. Artemisinin induced a G1 cell cycle arrest in cultured human Ishikawa endometrial cancer cells and downregulated cyclin-dependent kinase-2 (CDK2) and CDK4 transcript and protein levels. Analysis of CDK4 promoter-luciferase reporter constructs showed that the artemisinin ablation of CDK4 gene expression was accounted for by the loss of CDK4 promoter activity. Chromatin immunoprecipitation demonstrated that artemisinin inhibited nuclear factor κ-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) subunit p65 and p50 interactions with the endogenous Ishikawa cell CDK4 promoter. Coimmunoprecipitation revealed that artemisinin disrupts endogenous p65 and p50 nuclear translocation through increased protein-protein interactions with IκB-α, an NF-κB inhibitor, and disrupts its interaction with the CDK4 promoter, leading to a loss of CDK4 gene expression. Artemisinin treatment stimulated the cellular levels of IκB-α protein without altering the level of IκB-α transcripts. Finally, expression of exogenous p65 resulted in the accumulation of this NF-κB subunit in the nucleus of artemisinin-treated and artemisinin-untreated cells, reversed the artemisinin downregulation of CDK4 protein expression and promoter activity, and prevented the artemisinin-induced G1 cell cycle arrest. Taken together, our results demonstrate that a key event in the artemisinin antiproliferative effects in endometrial cancer cells is the transcriptional downregulation of CDK4 expression by disruption of NF-κB interactions with the CDK4 promoter.

  8. Involvement of Cyclin K Posttranscriptional Regulation in the Formation of Artemia Diapause Cysts

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yang; Ding, Xia; Ye, Xiang; Dai, Zhong-Min; Yang, Jin-Shu; Yang, Wei-Jun

    2012-01-01

    Background Artemia eggs tend to develop ovoviviparously to yield nauplius larvae in good rearing conditions; while under adverse situations, they tend to develop oviparously and encysted diapause embryos are formed instead. However, the intrinsic mechanisms regulating this process are not well understood. Principal Finding This study has characterized the function of cyclin K, a regulatory subunit of the positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) in the two different developmental pathways of Artemia. In the diapause-destined embryo, Western blots showed that the cyclin K protein was down-regulated as the embryo entered dormancy and reverted to relatively high levels of expression once development resumed, consistent with the fluctuations in phosphorylation of position 2 serines (Ser2) in the C-terminal domain (CTD) of the largest subunit (Rpb1) of RNA polymerase II (RNAP II). Interestingly, the cyclin K transcript levels remained constant during this process. In vitro translation data indicated that the template activity of cyclin K mRNA stored in the postdiapause cyst was repressed. In addition, in vivo knockdown of cyclin K in developing embryos by RNA interference eliminated phosphorylation of the CTD Ser2 of RNAP II and induced apoptosis by inhibiting the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) survival signaling pathway. Conclusions/Significance Taken together, these findings reveal a role for cyclin K in regulating RNAP II activity during diapause embryo development, which involves the post-transcriptional regulation of cyclin K. In addition, a further role was identified for cyclin K in regulating the control of cell survival during embryogenesis through ERK signaling pathways. PMID:22363807

  9. Involvement of cyclin D1/CDK4 and pRb mediated by PI3K/AKT pathway activation in Pb{sup 2+}-induced neuronal death in cultured hippocampal neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Li Chenchen Xing Tairan Tang Mingliang Yong Wu Yan Dan Deng Hongmin Wang Huili Wang Ming Chen Jutao Ruan Diyun

    2008-06-15

    Lead (Pb) is widely recognized as a neurotoxicant. One of the suggested mechanisms of lead neurotoxicity is apoptotic cell death. And the mechanism by which Pb{sup 2+} causes neuronal death is not well understood. The present study sought to examine the obligate nature of cyclin D1/cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4), phosphorylation of its substrate retinoblastoma protein (pRb) and its select upstream signal phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT pathway in the death of primary cultured rat hippocampal neurons evoked by Pb{sup 2+}. Our data showed that lead treatment of primary hippocampal cultures results in dose-dependent cell death. Inhibition of CDK4 prevented Pb{sup 2+}-induced neuronal death significantly but was incomplete. In addition, we demonstrated that the levels of cyclin D1 and pRb/p107 were increased during Pb{sup 2+} treatment. These elevated expression persisted up to 48 h, returning to control levels after 72 h. We also presented pharmacological and morphological evidences that cyclin D1/CDK4 and pRb/p107 were required for such kind of neuronal death. Addition of the PI3K inhibitor LY294002 (30 {mu}M) or wortmannin (100 nM) significantly rescued the cultured hippocampal neurons from death caused by Pb{sup 2+}. And that Pb{sup 2+}-elicited phospho-AKT (Ser473) participated in the induction of cyclin D1 and partial pRb/p107 expression. These results provide evidences that cell cycle elements play a required role in the death of neurons evoked by Pb{sup 2+} and suggest that certain signaling elements upstream of cyclin D1/CDK4 are modified and/or required for this form of neuronal death.

  10. Mitosis-Specific Promoter of the Alfalfa Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Gene (Medsa;CDKB2;1) Is Activated by Wounding and Ethylene in a Non-Cell Division-Dependent Manner1[W

    PubMed Central

    Zhiponova, Miroslava K.; Pettkó-Szandtner, Aladár; Stelkovics, Éva; Neer, Zsuzsanna; Bottka, Sándor; Krenács, Tibor; Dudits, Dénes; Fehér, Attila; Szilák, László

    2006-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent serine/threonine kinases (CDKs) have pivotal roles in regulating the eukaryotic cell cycle. Plants possess a unique class of CDKs (B-type CDKs) with preferential protein accumulation at G2/M-phases; however, their exact functions are still enigmatic. Here we describe the functional characterization of a 360-bp promoter region of the alfalfa (Medicago sativa) CDKB2;1 gene in transgenic plants and cell lines. It is shown that the activity of the analyzed promoter was characteristic for proliferating meristematic regions in planta and specific for cells in the G2/M-phases in synchronized cell cultures. Immunohistochemical analysis of transgenic root sections further confirmed the correlation of the expression of the CDKB2;1 promoter-linked reporter genes with the accumulation of the correspondent kinase. It was found that, in addition to auxin (2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid) treatment, wounding could also induce both the reporter and endogenous genes in transgenic leaf explants. Furthermore, ethylene, known as a wound-response mediator, had a similar effect. The gene activation in response to wounding or ethephon was faster and occurred without the induction of cell cycle progression in contrast to the control auxin treatment. In silico analysis of this promoter indeed revealed the presence of a set of cis-elements, indicating not only cell cycle- but wound- and ethylene-dependent regulation of this CDK gene. Based on the presented data, we discuss the functional significance of the complex regulation of mitosis-specific CDK genes in plants. PMID:16407448

  11. Cyclin E in centrosome duplication and reduplication in sea urchin zygotes.

    PubMed

    Schnackenberg, Bradley J; Marzluff, William F; Sluder, Greenfield

    2008-12-01

    When protein synthesis is completely blocked from before fertilization, the sea urchin zygote arrests in first S phase and the paternal centrosome reduplicates multiple times. However, when protein synthesis is blocked starting in prophase of first mitosis, the zygote divides and the blastomeres arrest in a G1-like state. The centrosome inherited from this mitosis duplicates only once in each blastomere for reasons that are not understood. The late G1 rise in cyclin E/cdk2 kinase activity initiates centrosome duplication in mammalian cells and its activity is needed for centrosome duplication in Xenopus egg extracts. Since the half-time for cyclin E turnover is normally approximately 1 h in sea urchin zygotes, the different behaviors of centrosomes during G1 and S phase arrests could be due to differential losses of cyclin E and its associated kinase activities at these two arrest points. To better understand the mechanisms that limit centrosome duplication, we characterize the levels of cyclin E and its associated kinase activity at the S phase and G1 arrest points. We first demonstrate that cyclin E/cdk2 kinase activity is required for centrosome duplication and reduplication in sea urchin zygotes. Next we find that cyclin E levels and cyclin E/cdk2 kinase activities are both constitutively and equivalently elevated during both the S phase and G1 arrests. This indicates that centrosome duplication during the G1 arrest is limited by a block to reduplication under conditions permissive for duplication. The cytoplasmic conditions of S phase, however, abrogate this block to reduplication.

  12. Selective killing of transformed cells by cyclin/cyclin-dependent kinase 2 antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ying-Nan P.; Sharma, Sushil K.; Ramsey, Timothy M.; Jiang, Li; Martin, Mary S.; Baker, Kayla; Adams, Peter D.; Bair, Kenneth W.; Kaelin, William G.

    1999-01-01

    Recent studies identified a short peptide motif that serves as a docking site for cyclin/cyclin-dependent kinase (cdk) 2 complexes. Peptides containing this motif block the phosphorylation of substrates by cyclin A/cdk2 or cyclin E/cdk2. Here we report that cell membrane-permeable forms of such peptides preferentially induced transformed cells to undergo apoptosis relative to nontransformed cells. Deregulation of E2F family transcription factors is a common event during transformation and was sufficient to sensitize cells to the cyclin/cdk2 inhibitory peptides. These results suggest that deregulation of E2F and inhibition of cdk2 are synthetically lethal and provide a rationale for the development of cdk2 antagonists as antineoplastic agents. PMID:10200261

  13. Overexpressed cyclin D3 contributes to retaining the growth inhibitor p27 in the cytoplasm of thyroid tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Baldassarre, Gustavo; Belletti, Barbara; Bruni, Paola; Boccia, Angelo; Trapasso, Francesco; Pentimalli, Francesca; Barone, Maria Vittoria; Chiappetta, Gennaro; Vento, Maria Teresa; Spiezia, Stefania; Fusco, Alfredo; Viglietto, Giuseppe

    1999-01-01

    The majority of thyroid carcinomas maintain the expression of the cell growth suppressor p27, an inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinase-2 (Cdk2). However, we find that 80% of p27-expressing tumors show an uncommon cytoplasmic localization of p27 protein, associated with high Cdk2 activity. To reproduce such a situation, a mutant p27 devoid of its COOH-terminal nuclear-localization signal was generated (p27-NLS). p27-NLS accumulates in the cytoplasm and fails to induce growth arrest in 2 different cell lines, indicating that cytoplasm-residing p27 is inactive as a growth inhibitor, presumably because it does not interact with nuclear Cdk2. Overexpression of cyclin D3 may account in part for p27 cytoplasmic localization. In thyroid tumors and cell lines, cyclin D3 expression was associated with cytoplasmic localization of p27. Moreover, expression of cyclin D3 in thyroid carcinoma cells induced cytoplasmic retention of cotransfected p27 and rescued p27-imposed growth arrest. Endogenous p27 also localized prevalently to the cytoplasm in normal thyrocytes engineered to stably overexpress cyclin D3 (PC-D3 cells). In these cells, cyclin D3 induced the formation of cytoplasmic p27–cyclin D3–Cdk complexes, which titrated p27 away from intranuclear complexes that contain cyclins A–E and Cdk2. Our results demonstrate a novel mechanism that may contribute to overcoming the p27 inhibitory threshold in transformed thyroid cells. PMID:10510327

  14. Viral Cyclin promotes KSHV-induced cellular transformation and tumorigenesis by overriding contact inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Tiffany; Ramos da Silva, Suzane; Bedolla, Roble; Ye, Fengchun; Zhou, Fuchun; Gao, Shou-jiang

    2014-01-01

    Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is a tumor virus encoding several proto-oncogenes. However, the roles of these viral genes in KSHV-induced tumorigenesis have not been defined. In this study, we used a recently developed model of KSHV-induced cellular transformation and tumorigenesis combining with a reverse genetic system to examine the role of a KSHV latent gene vCyclin (ORF72), a cellular Cyclin D2 homolog, in KSHV-induced oncogenesis. Deletion of vCyclin did not affect cell proliferation and cell cycle progression at a low-density condition, when cells were at an active proliferation state. However, vCyclin mutant cells were contact-inhibited and arrested at G1 phase at a high-density condition. As a result, vCyclin mutant cells formed less and smaller colonies in soft agar assay. Nude mice inoculated with vCyclin mutant cells had reduced tumor incidence and extended tumor latency and survival compared with mice inoculated with wild-type (WT) virus-infected cells. WT but not mutant virus effectively induced Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27/Kip1 Ser10 phosphorylation and cytoplasmic relocalization. shRNA knockdown of p27 released the blockage of the mutant cells from cell cycle arrest at G1 phase at a high-density condition. Together, these results indicate that vCyclin primarily functions to enhance cellular transformation and tumorigenesis by promoting cell cycle progression and cell proliferation at a contact-inhibited condition. PMID:24419204

  15. Real time detection of cell cycle regulator cyclin A on living tumor cells with europium emission.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongguang; Chadbourne, Frances L; Lan, Rongfeng; Chan, Chi-Fai; Chan, Wai-Lun; Law, Ga-Lai; Lee, Chi-Sing; Cobb, Steven L; Wong, Ka-Leung

    2013-10-07

    Six water-soluble europium complexes (Eu-L1-P(n) and Eu-L2-P(n), n = 1, 2 and 3) with one antenna chromophore, two different linkers (L1 and L2) and three proposed cyclin A specific peptides (P1: -GAKRRLIF-NH2; P2: -GGAKRRLIF-NH2; P3: -Hex- GAKRRLIF-NH2) have been synthesized. With structural information available, comparisons of the cyclin grooves of cyclin A and the six europium complexes have been made, and insights have been gained into the determinants for peptide binding and the foundation of differential binding. Experiment-wise, the linear and two-photon induced photophysical properties of these conjugates were monitored in aqueous solution. Numerous in situ/in vitro biological assays have been carried out, such as responsive emission changes in situ/in vitro, Western blot and cellular uptake. As imaging agents, complexes with peptides P3: -Hex-GAKRRLIF-NH2 showed high selectivity to cyclin A in numerous cancer cells. When it comes to responsive optical signal changes, complex Eu-L2-P3 exhibited a threefold emission enhancement upon binding with cyclin A (100 nM cyclin A, ϕ = 8% to 21%, log KB = 5.83, detection limit = 5 nM), and this could be initiated by the shortened distance between the antenna and the lanthanide after they bind/get into cyclin A. It is promising that our compounds (especially compound Eu-L2-P3) could serve as the template for structure-guided efforts to develop potential imaging therapeutics on the basis of selective imaging of CDK2/cyclin A activity.

  16. Gcn5 determines the fate of Drosophila germline stem cells through degradation of Cyclin A.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tianqi; Wang, Qi; Li, Wenqing; Mao, Feiyu; Yue, Shanshan; Liu, Sun; Liu, Xiaona; Xiao, Shan; Xia, Laixin

    2017-02-10

    The fluctuating CDK-CYCLIN complex plays a general role in cell-cycle control. Many types of stem cells use unique features of the cell cycle to facilitate asymmetric division. However, the manner in which these features are established remains poorly understood. The cell cycle of Drosophila female germline stem cells (GSCs) is characterized by short G1 and very long G2 phases, making it an excellent model for the study of cell cycle control in stem cell fate determination. Using a Drosophila female GSCs model, we found Gcn5, the first discovered histone acetyltransferase, to maintain germline stem cells in Drosophila ovaries. Results showed that Gcn5 is dispensable for the transcriptional silencing of bam, but interacts with Cyclin A to facilitate proper turnover in GSCs. Results also showed that Gcn5 promotes Cyclin A ubiquitination, which is dependent on its acetylating activity. Finally, results showed that knockdown of Cyclin A rescued the GSC-loss phenotype caused by lack of Gcn5. Collectively, these findings support the conclusion that Gcn5 acts through acetylation to facilitate Cyclin A ubiquitination and proper turnover, thereby determining the fate of GSCs.-Liu, T., Wang, Q., Li, W., Mao, F., Yue, S., Liu, S., Liu, X., Xiao, S., Xia, L. Gcn5 determines the fate of Drosophila germline stem cells through degradation of Cyclin A.

  17. Stress-induced nuclear-to-cytoplasmic translocation of cyclin C promotes mitochondrial fission in yeast.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Katrina F; Khakhina, Svetlana; Kim, Stephen K; Strich, Randy

    2014-01-27

    Mitochondrial morphology is maintained by the opposing activities of dynamin-based fission and fusion machines. In response to stress, this balance is dramatically shifted toward fission. This study reveals that the yeast transcriptional repressor cyclin C is both necessary and sufficient for stress-induced hyperfission. In response to oxidative stress, cyclin C translocates from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, where it is destroyed. Prior to its destruction, cyclin C both genetically and physically interacts with Mdv1p, an adaptor that links the GTPase Dnm1p to the mitochondrial receptor Fis1p. Cyclin C is required for stress-induced Mdv1p mitochondrial recruitment and the efficient formation of functional Dnm1p filaments. Finally, coimmunoprecipitation studies and fluorescence microscopy revealed an elevated association between Mdv1p and Dnm1p in stressed cells that is dependent on cyclin C. This study provides a mechanism by which stress-induced gene induction and mitochondrial fission are coordinated through translocation of cyclin C. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Stress-Induced Nuclear to Cytoplasmic Translocation of Cyclin C Promotes Mitochondrial Fission in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Katrina F.; Khakhina, Svetlana; Kim, Stephen K.; Strich, Randy

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Mitochondrial morphology is maintained by the opposing activities of dynamin-based fission and fusion machines. In response to stress, this balance is dramatically shifted toward fission. This study reveals that the yeast transcriptional repressor cyclin C is both necessary and sufficient for stress-induced hyper-fission. In response to oxidative stress, cyclin C translocates from the nucleus to the cytoplasm where it is destroyed. Prior to its destruction, cyclin C both genetically and physically interacts with Mdv1p, an adaptor that links the GTPase Dnm1p to the mitochondrial receptor Fis1p. Cyclin C is required for stress-induced Mdv1p mitochondrial recruitment and the efficient formation of functional Dnm1p filaments. Finally, co-immunoprecipitation studies and fluorescence microscopy revealed an elevated association between Mdv1p and Dnm1p in stressed cells that is dependent on cyclin C. This study provides a mechanism by which stress-induced gene induction and mitochondrial fission are coordinated through translocation of cyclin C. PMID:24439911

  19. BRCA1-IRIS regulates cyclin D1 expression in breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nakuci, Enkeleda; Mahner, Sven; DiRenzo, James; ElShamy, Wael M. . E-mail: wael_elshamy@dfci.harvard.edu

    2006-10-01

    The regulator of cell cycle progression, cyclin D1, is up-regulated in breast cancer cells; its expression is, in part, dependent on ER{alpha} signaling. However, many ER{alpha}-negative tumors and tumor cell lines (e.g., SKBR3) also show over-expression of cyclin D1. This suggests that, in addition to ER{alpha} signaling, cyclin D1 expression is under the control of other signaling pathways; these pathways may even be over-expressed in the ER{alpha}-negative cells. We previously noticed that both ER{alpha}-positive and -negative cell lines over-express BRCA1-IRIS mRNA and protein. Furthermore, the level of over-expression of BRCA1-IRIS in ER{alpha}-negative cell lines even exceeded its over-expression level in ER{alpha}-positive cell lines. In this study, we show that: (1) BRCA1-IRIS forms complex with two of the nuclear receptor co-activators, namely, SRC1 and SRC3 (AIB1) in an ER{alpha}-independent manner. (2) BRCA1-IRIS alone, or in connection with co-activators, is recruited to the cyclin D1 promoter through its binding to c-Jun/AP1 complex; this binding activates the cyclin D1 expression. (3) Over-expression of BRCA1-IRIS in breast cells over-activates JNK/c-Jun; this leads to the induction of cyclin D1 expression and cellular proliferation. (4) BRCA1-IRIS activation of JNK/c-Jun/AP1 appears to account for this, because in cells that were depleted from BRCA1-IRIS, JNK remained inactive. However, depletion of SRC1 or SRC3 instead reduced c-Jun expression. Our data suggest that this novel signaling pathway links BRCA1-IRIS to cellular proliferation through c-Jun/AP1 nuclear pathway; finally, this culminates in the increased expression of the cyclin D1 gene.

  20. Complexes of D-type cyclins with CDKs during maize germination

    PubMed Central

    Vázquez-Ramos, Jorge M.

    2013-01-01

    The importance of cell proliferation in plant growth and development has been well documented. The majority of studies on basic cell cycle mechanisms in plants have been at the level of gene expression and much less knowledge has accumulated in terms of protein interactions and activation. Two key proteins, cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are fundamental for cell cycle regulation and advancement. Our aim has been to understand the role of D-type cyclins and type A and B CDKs in the cell cycle taking place during a developmental process such as maize seed germination. Results indicate that three maize D-type cyclins—D2;2, D4;2, and D5;3—(G1-S cyclins by definition) bind and activate two different types of CDK—A and B1;1—in a differential way during germination. Whereas CDKA–D-type cyclin complexes are more active at early germination times than at later times, it was surprising to observe that CDKB1;1, a supposedly G2-M kinase, bound in a differential way to all D-type cyclins tested during germination. Binding to cyclin D2;2 was detectable at all germination times, forming a complex with kinase activity, whereas binding to D4;2 and D5;3 was more variable; in particular, D5;3 was only detected at late germination times. Results are discussed in terms of cell cycle advancement and its importance for seed germination. PMID:24127516

  1. Characterization of TcCYC6 from Trypanosoma cruzi, a gene with homology to mitotic cyclins.

    PubMed

    Di Renzo, María Agostina; Laverrière, Marc; Schenkman, Sergio; Wehrendt, Diana Patricia; Tellez-Iñón, María Teresa; Potenza, Mariana

    2016-06-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiologic agent of Chagas disease, is a protozoan parasite with a life cycle that alternates between replicative and non-replicative forms, but the components and mechanisms that regulate its cell cycle are poorly described. In higher eukaryotes, cyclins are proteins that activate cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs), by associating with them along the different stages of the cell cycle. These cyclin-CDK complexes exert their role as major modulators of the cell cycle by phosphorylating specific substrates. For the correct progression of the cell cycle, the mechanisms that regulate the activity of cyclins and their associated CDKs are diverse and must be controlled precisely. Different types of cyclins are involved in specific phases of the eukaryotic cell cycle, preferentially activating certain CDKs. In this work, we characterized TcCYC6, a putative coding sequence of T. cruzi which encodes a protein with homology to mitotic cyclins. The overexpression of this sequence, fused to a tag of nine amino acids from influenza virus hemagglutinin (TcCYC6-HA), showed to be detrimental for the proliferation of epimastigotes in axenic culture and affected the cell cycle progression. In silico analysis revealed an N-terminal segment similar to the consensus sequence of the destruction box, a hallmark for the degradation of several mitotic cyclins. We experimentally determined that the TcCYC6-HA turnover decreased in the presence of proteasome inhibitors, suggesting that TcCYC6 degradation occurs via ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. The results obtained in this study provide first evidence that TcCYC6 expression and degradation are finely regulated in T. cruzi.

  2. Impaired nuclear export of tumor-derived c-terminal truncated cyclin D1 mutant in ESCC cancer.

    PubMed

    Hao, Meili; Chen, Xiangmei; Zhang, Ting; Shen, Tao; Xie, Qing; Xing, Xiujuan; Gu, Hongxi; Lu, Fengmin

    2011-11-01

    Cyclin D1 is a significant regulator of the G1- to S-phase transition and is often aberrant in human tumors of various origins. Although cancer-derived cyclin D1 mutants are potent oncogenes in vitro and in vivo, the mechanisms by which they contribute to neoplasia remaind to be elucidated. We previously identified a cyclin D1 mutation (Δ266-295) in esophageal cancer with deleted codons from 266 to 295 of wild-type cyclin D1, the critical COOH-terminal regulatory sequences necessary for cyclin D1 nuclear export. In the present study, this cancer-derived cyclin D1-Δ266-295 was shown to be a constitutively nuclear cyclin D1 protein with a significantly increased oncogenic potential. Moreover, the cancer-derived cyclin D1-Δ266-295 mutant was found to retain its ability to bind to and activate CDK4, which in turn phosphorylates and inactivates the pRb protein and promotes cell cycle progression. In comparison to wild-type cyclin D1a, D1-Δ266-295 exhibited enforced nuclear accumulation. In addition, the transient transfection and ectopic expression of this nuclear localized D1-Δ266-295 up-regulated endogenous Notch1 expression, indicating that the mutant retained its ability as a transcriptional regulator. Furthermore, data from the flow cytometry assay showed that D1-Δ266-295 fractionally increased >4N cell accumulation, and further analysis suggested the retriggering of DNA replication relevant to its inhibition of Cdt1 proteolysis. Therefore, the inappropriate nuclear localization of this cyclin D1 mutant may interfere with DNA replication in cultured cells, thereby contributing to genomic instability.

  3. Cyclin A degradation by primate cytomegalovirus protein pUL21a counters its innate restriction of virus replication.

    PubMed

    Caffarelli, Nicolas; Fehr, Anthony R; Yu, Dong

    2013-01-01

    Cyclin A is critical for cellular DNA synthesis and S phase progression of the cell cycle. Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) can reduce cyclin A levels and block cellular DNA synthesis, and cyclin A overexpression can repress HCMV replication. This interaction has only been previously observed in HCMV as murine CMV does not downregulate cyclin A, and the responsible viral factor has not been identified. We previously reported that the HCMV protein pUL21a disrupted the anaphase-promoting complex (APC), but a point mutant abrogating this activity did not phenocopy a UL21a-deficient virus, suggesting that pUL21a has an additional function. Here we identified a conserved arginine-x-leucine (RxL) cyclin-binding domain within pUL21a, which allowed pUL21a to interact with cyclin A and target it for proteasome degradation. Homologous pUL21a proteins from both chimpanzee and rhesus CMVs also contained the RxL domain and similarly degraded cyclin A, indicating that this function is conserved in primate CMVs. The RxL point mutation disabled the virus' ability to block cellular DNA synthesis and resulted in a growth defect similar to pUL21a-deficient virus. Importantly, knockdown of cyclin A rescued growth of UL21a-deficient virus. Together, these data show that during evolution, the pUL21a family proteins of primate CMVs have acquired a cyclin-binding domain that targets cyclin A for degradation, thus neutralizing its restriction on virus replication. Finally, the combined proteasome-dependent degradation of pUL21a and its cellular targets suggests that pUL21a may act as a novel suicide protein, targeting its protein cargos for destruction.

  4. Growth arrest by the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27Kip1 is abrogated by c-Myc.

    PubMed Central

    Vlach, J; Hennecke, S; Alevizopoulos, K; Conti, D; Amati, B

    1996-01-01

    We show here that c-Myc antagonizes the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor p27Kip1. p27 expressed from recombinant retroviruses in Rat1 cells associated with and inhibited cyclin E/CDK2 complexes, induced accumulation of the pRb and p130 proteins in their hypophosphorylated forms, and arrested cells in G1. Prior expression of c-Myc prevented inactivation of cyclin E/CDK2 as well as dephosphorylation of pRb and p130, and allowed continuous cell proliferation in the presence of p27. This effect did not require ubiquitin-mediated degradation of p27. Myc altered neither the susceptibility of cyclin E/CDK2 to inhibition by p27, nor the intrinsic CDK-inhibitory activity of p27, but induced sequestration of p27 in a form unable to bind cyclin E/CDK2. Neither Myc itself nor other G1-cyclin/CDK complexes were directly responsible for p27 sequestration. Retroviral expression of G1 cyclins (D1-3, E or A) or of the Cdc25A phosphatase did not overcome p27-induced arrest. Growth rescue by Myc required dimerization with Max, DNA binding and an intact transcriptional activation domain, as previously shown for cellular transformation. We propose that this activity is mediated by the product of an as yet unknown Myc-Max target gene(s) and represents an essential aspect of Myc's mitogenic and oncogenic functions. Images PMID:8978686

  5. PKCeta enhances cell cycle progression, the expression of G1 cyclins and p21 in MCF-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Fima, E; Shtutman, M; Libros, P; Missel, A; Shahaf, G; Kahana, G; Livneh, E

    2001-10-11

    Protein kinase C encodes a family of enzymes implicated in cellular differentiation, growth control and tumor promotion. However, not much is known with respect to the molecular mechanisms that link protein kinase C to cell cycle control. Here we report that the expression of PKCeta in MCF-7 cells, under the control of a tetracycline-responsive inducible promoter, enhanced cell growth and affected the cell cycle at several points. The induced expression of another PKC isoform, PKCdelta, in MCF-7 cells had opposite effects and inhibited their growth. PKCeta expression activated cellular pathways in these cells that resulted in the increased expression of the G1 phase cyclins, cyclin D and cyclin E. Expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21(WAF1) was also specifically elevated in PKCeta expressing cells, but its overall effects were not inhibitory. Although, the protein levels of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27(KIP1) were not altered by the induced expression of PKCeta, the cyclin E associated Cdk2 kinase activity was in correlation with the p27(KIP1) bound to the cyclin E complex and not by p21(WAF1) binding. PKCeta expression enhanced the removal of p27(KIP1) from this complex, and its re-association with the cyclin D/Cdk4 complex. Reduced binding of p27(KIP1) to the cyclin D/Cdk4 complex at early time points of the cell cycle also enhanced the activity of this complex, while at later time points the decrease in bound p21(WAF1) correlated with its increased activity in PKCeta-expressing cells. Thus, PKCeta induces altered expression of several cell cycle functions, which may contribute to its ability to affect cell growth.

  6. IKKα Regulates Mitogenic Signaling through Transcriptional Induction of Cyclin D1 via Tcf

    PubMed Central

    Albanese, Chris; Wu, Kongming; D'Amico, Mark; Jarrett, Christy; Joyce, David; Hughes, Julian; Hulit, James; Sakamaki, Toshiyuki; Fu, Maofu; Ben-Ze'ev, Avri; Bromberg, Jacqueline F.; Lamberti, Carmela; Verma, Udit; Gaynor, Richard B.; Byers, Stephen W.; Pestell, Richard G.

    2003-01-01

    The Wnt/β-catenin/Tcf and IκB/NF-κB cascades are independent pathways involved in cell cycle control, cellular differentiation, and inflammation. Constitutive Wnt/β-catenin signaling occurs in certain cancers from mutation of components of the pathway and from activating growth factor receptors, including RON and MET. The resulting accumulation of cytoplasmic and nuclear β-catenin interacts with the Tcf/LEF transcription factors to induce target genes. The IκB kinase complex (IKK) that phosphorylates IκB contains IKKα, IKKβ, and IKKγ. Here we show that the cyclin D1 gene functions as a point of convergence between the Wnt/β-catenin and IκB pathways in mitogenic signaling. Mitogenic induction of G1-S phase progression and cyclin D1 expression was PI3K dependent, and cyclin D1−/− cells showed reduced PI3K-dependent S-phase entry. PI3K-dependent induction of cyclin D1 was blocked by inhibitors of PI3K/Akt/IκB/IKKα or β-catenin signaling. A single Tcf site in the cyclin D1 promoter was required for induction by PI3K or IKKα. In IKKα−/− cells, mitogen-induced DNA synthesis, and expression of Tcf-responsive genes was reduced. Reintroduction of IKKα restored normal mitogen induction of cyclin D1 through a Tcf site. In IKKα−/− cells, β-catenin phosphorylation was decreased and purified IKKα was sufficient for phosphorylation of β-catenin through its N-terminus in vitro. Because IKKα but not IKKβ induced cyclin D1 expression through Tcf activity, these studies indicate that the relative levels of IKKα and IKKβ may alter their substrate and signaling specificities to regulate mitogen-induced DNA synthesis through distinct mechanisms. PMID:12589056

  7. Panobinostat sensitizes cyclin E high, homologous recombination-proficient ovarian cancer to olaparib.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Andrew J; Sarfo-Kantanka, Kofi; Barrack, Toby; Steck, Alexandra; Saskowski, Jeanette; Crispens, Marta A; Khabele, Dineo

    2016-10-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) proficient ovarian cancers, including CCNE1 (cyclin E)-amplified tumors, are resistant to poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitors (PARPi). Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) are effective in overcoming tumor resistance to DNA damaging drugs. Our goal was to determine whether panobinostat, a newly FDA-approved HDACi, can sensitize cyclin E, HR-proficient ovarian cancer cells to the PARPi olaparib. Expression levels of CCNE1 (cyclin E), BRCA1, RAD51 and E2F1 in ovarian tumors and cell lines were extracted from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and Broad-Novartis Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia (CCLE). In HR-proficient ovarian cancer cell line models (OVCAR-3, OVCAR-4, SKOV-3, and UWB1.289+BRCA1 wild-type), cell growth and viability were assessed by sulforhodamine B and xenograft assays. DNA damage and repair (pH2AX and RAD51 co-localization and DRGFP reporter activity) and apoptosis (cleaved PARP and cleaved caspase-3) were assessed by immunofluorescence and Western blot assays. TCGA and CCLE data revealed positive correlations (Spearman) between cyclin E E2F1, and E2F1 gene targets related to DNA repair (BRCA1 and RAD51). Panobinostat downregulated cyclin E and HR repair pathway genes, and reduced HR efficiency in cyclin E-amplified OVCAR-3 cells. Further, panobinostat synergized with olaparib in reducing cell growth and viability in HR-proficient cells. Similar co-operative effects were observed in xenografts, and on pharmacodynamic markers of HR repair, DNA damage and apoptosis. These results provide preclinical rationale for using HDACi to reduce HR in cyclin E-overexpressing and other types of HR-proficient ovarian cancer as a means of enhancing PARPi activity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Panobinostat sensitizes cyclin E high, homologous recombination-proficient ovarian cancer to olaparib

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Andrew J.; Sarfo-Kantanka, Kofi; Barrack, Toby; Steck, Alexandra; Saskowski, Jeanette; Crispens, Marta A.; Khabele, Dineo

    2016-01-01

    Objective Homologous recombination (HR) proficient ovarian cancers, including CCNE1 (cyclin E)-amplified tumors, are resistant to poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitors (PARPi). Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) are effective in overcoming tumor resistance to DNA damaging drugs. Our goal was to determine whether panobinostat, a newly FDA-approved HDACi, can sensitize cyclin E, HR-proficient ovarian cancer cells to the PARPi olaparib. Methods Expression levels of CCNE1 (cyclin E), BRCA1, RAD51 and E2F1 in ovarian tumors and cell lines were extracted from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and Broad-Novartis Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia (CCLE). In HR-proficient ovarian cancer cell line models (OVCAR-3, OVCAR-4, SKOV-3, and UWB1.289 + BRCA1 wild-type), cell growth and viability were assessed by sulforhodamine B and xenograft assays. DNA damage and repair (pH2AX and RAD51 co-localization and DRGFP reporter activity) and apoptosis (cleaved PARP and cleaved caspase-3) were assessed by immunofluorescence and Western blot assays. Results TCGA and CCLE data revealed positive correlations (Spearman) between cyclin E E2F1, and E2F1 gene targets related to DNA repair (BRCA1 and RAD51). Panobinostat downregulated cyclin E and HR repair pathway genes, and reduced HR efficiency in cyclin E-amplified OVCAR-3 cells. Further, panobinostat synergized with olaparib in reducing cell growth and viability in HR-proficient cells. Similar co-operative effects were observed in xenografts, and on pharmacodynamic markers of HR repair, DNA damage and apoptosis. Conclusions These results provide preclinical rationale for using HDACi to reduce HR in cyclin E-overexpressing and other types of HR-proficient ovarian cancer as a means of enhancing PARPi activity. PMID:27444036

  9. New insights into the regulation of anaphase by mitotic cyclins in budding yeast.

    PubMed

    Signon, Laurence

    2011-05-15

    Mitotic cyclins drive initiation and progression through mitosis. However, their role during progression remains poorly understood due to their essential function in initiation of mitosis and redundant activities. The function of the principal mitotic cyclin, Clb2, in S. cerevisiae, was investigated during progression through anaphase in diploid cells after DNA damage and during normal growth using fixed and live cell fluorescence techniques. I find that during anaphase, absence of Clb2 affects chromosome movement and plays an important role in inhibiting kinetochore microtubules regrowth. In addition, absence of Clb2 leads to defects and the collapse of spindle pole body separation. Most unexpectedly, new bipolar spindle forms and spindle re-forms. The intensity of the defects appears to correlate with strength of checkpoint activation, and during adaptation to DNA damage, these defects lead to important chromosome missegregation, during normal growth, defects are resolved rapidly. During recovery, intermediate phenotypes are observed. Altogether, data reveal new and unexpected roles for mitotic cyclins during progression through mitosis; results indicate that mitotic cyclins play key role in growth suppression of kinetochore microtubules and suggest that new bipolar spindle formation might be actively inhibited by mitotic cyclins during anaphase.

  10. Spatial Reorganization of the Endoplasmic Reticulum during Mitosis Relies on Mitotic Kinase Cyclin A in the Early Drosophila Embryo

    PubMed Central

    Bergman, Zane J.; Mclaurin, Justin D.; Eritano, Anthony S.; Johnson, Brittany M.; Sims, Amanda Q.; Riggs, Blake

    2015-01-01

    Mitotic cyclin-dependent kinase with their cyclin partners (cyclin:Cdks) are the master regulators of cell cycle progression responsible for regulating a host of activities during mitosis. Nuclear mitotic events, including chromosome condensation and segregation have been directly linked to Cdk activity. However, the regulation and timing of cytoplasmic mitotic events by cyclin:Cdks is poorly understood. In order to examine these mitotic cytoplasmic events, we looked at the dramatic changes in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) during mitosis in the early Drosophila embryo. The dynamic changes of the ER can be arrested in an interphase state by inhibition of either DNA or protein synthesis. Here we show that this block can be alleviated by micro-injection of Cyclin A (CycA) in which defined mitotic ER clusters gathered at the spindle poles. Conversely, micro-injection of Cyclin B (CycB) did not affect spatial reorganization of the ER, suggesting CycA possesses the ability to initiate mitotic ER events in the cytoplasm. Additionally, RNAi-mediated simultaneous inhibition of all 3 mitotic cyclins (A, B and B3) blocked spatial reorganization of the ER. Our results suggest that mitotic ER reorganization events rely on CycA and that control and timing of nuclear and cytoplasmic events during mitosis may be defined by release of CycA from the nucleus as a consequence of breakdown of the nuclear envelope. PMID:25689737

  11. The puc1 Cyclin Regulates the G1 Phase of the Fission Yeast Cell Cycle in Response to Cell Size

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Castellanos, Cristina; Blanco, Miguel A.; de Prada, José M.; Moreno, Sergio

    2000-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells coordinate cell size with cell division by regulating the length of the G1 and G2 phases of the cell cycle. In fission yeast, the length of the G1 phase depends on a precise balance between levels of positive (cig1, cig2, puc1, and cdc13 cyclins) and negative (rum1 and ste9-APC) regulators of cdc2. Early in G1, cyclin proteolysis and rum1 inhibition keep the cdc2/cyclin complexes inactive. At the end of G1, the balance is reversed and cdc2/cyclin activity down-regulates both rum1 and the cyclin-degrading activity of the APC. Here we present data showing that the puc1 cyclin, a close relative of the Cln cyclins in budding yeast, plays an important role in regulating the length of G1. Fission yeast cells lacking cig1 and cig2 have a cell cycle distribution similar to that of wild-type cells, with a short G1 and a long G2. However, when the puc1+ gene is deleted in this genetic background, the length of G1 is extended and these cells undergo S phase with a greater cell size than wild-type cells. This G1 delay is completely abolished in cells lacking rum1. Cdc2/puc1 function may be important to down-regulate the rum1 Cdk inhibitor at the end of G1. PMID:10679013

  12. A jumonji (Jarid2) protein complex represses cyclin D1 expression by methylation of histone H3-K9.

    PubMed

    Shirato, Haruki; Ogawa, Satoko; Nakajima, Kuniko; Inagawa, Masayo; Kojima, Mizuyo; Tachibana, Makoto; Shinkai, Yoichi; Takeuchi, Takashi

    2009-01-09

    Covalent modifications of histone tails have critical roles in regulating gene expression. Previously, we identified the jumonji (jmj, Jarid2) gene, the jmjC domain, and a Jmj family. Recently, many Jmj family proteins have been shown to be histone demethylases, and jmjC is the catalytic domain. However, Jmj does not have histone demethylase activity because the jmjC domain lacks conserved residues for binding to cofactors. Independently of these studies, we previously showed that Jmj binds to the cyclin D1 promoter and represses the transcription of cyclin D1. Here, we show the mechanisms by which Jmj represses the transcription of cyclin D1. We found that a protein complex of Jmj had histone methyltransferase activity toward histone H3 lysine 9 (H3-K9). We also found that Jmj bound to the H3-K9 methyltransferases G9a and GLP. Expression of Jmj recruited G9a and GLP to the cyclin D1 promoter and increased H3-K9 methylation. Inactivation of both G9a and GLP, but not of only G9a, inhibited the methylation of H3-K9 in the cyclin D1 promoter and repression of cyclin D1 expression by Jmj. These results suggest that Jmj methylates H3-K9 and represses cyclin D1 expression through G9a and GLP, and that Jmj family proteins can regulate gene expression by not only histone demethylation but also other histone modification.

  13. Cyclin E-Mediated Human Proopiomelanocortin Regulation as a Therapeutic Target for Cushing Disease

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ning-Ai; Araki, Takako; Cuevas-Ramos, Daniel; Hong, Jiang; Ben-Shlomo, Anat; Tone, Yukiko; Tone, Masahide

    2015-01-01

    Context: Cushing disease, due to pituitary corticotroph tumor ACTH hypersecretion, drives excess adrenal cortisol production with adverse morbidity and mortality. Loss of glucocorticoid negative feedback on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis leads to autonomous transcription of the corticotroph precursor hormone proopiomelanocortin (POMC), consequent ACTH overproduction, and adrenal hypercortisolism. We previously reported that R-roscovitine (CYC202, seliciclib), a 2,6,9-trisubstituted purine analog, suppresses cyclin-dependent-kinase 2/cyclin E and inhibits ACTH in mice and zebrafish. We hypothesized that intrapituitary cyclin E signaling regulates corticotroph tumor POMC transcription independently of cell cycle progression. The aim was to investigate whether R-roscovitine inhibits human ACTH in corticotroph tumors by targeting the cyclin-dependent kinase 2/cyclin E signaling pathway. Methods: Primary cell cultures of surgically resected human corticotroph tumors were treated with or without R-roscovitine, ACTH measured by RIA and quantitative PCR, and/or Western blot analysis performed to investigate ACTH and lineage-specific transcription factors. Cyclin E and E2F transcription factor 1 (E2F1) small interfering RNA (siRNA) transfection was performed in murine corticotroph tumor AtT20 cells to elucidate mechanisms for drug action. POMC gene promoter activity in response to R-roscovitine treatment was analyzed using luciferase reporter and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. Results: R-roscovitine inhibits human corticotroph tumor POMC and Tpit/Tbx19 transcription with decreased ACTH expression. Cyclin E and E2F1 exhibit reciprocal positive regulation in corticotroph tumors. R-roscovitine disrupts E2F1 binding to the POMC gene promoter and suppresses Tpit/Tbx19 and other lineage-specific POMC transcription cofactors via E2F1-dependent and -independent pathways. Conclusion: R-roscovitine inhibits human pituitary corticotroph tumor ACTH by targeting the

  14. Cyclin E-Mediated Human Proopiomelanocortin Regulation as a Therapeutic Target for Cushing Disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ning-Ai; Araki, Takako; Cuevas-Ramos, Daniel; Hong, Jiang; Ben-Shlomo, Anat; Tone, Yukiko; Tone, Masahide; Melmed, Shlomo

    2015-07-01

    Cushing disease, due to pituitary corticotroph tumor ACTH hypersecretion, drives excess adrenal cortisol production with adverse morbidity and mortality. Loss of glucocorticoid negative feedback on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis leads to autonomous transcription of the corticotroph precursor hormone proopiomelanocortin (POMC), consequent ACTH overproduction, and adrenal hypercortisolism. We previously reported that R-roscovitine (CYC202, seliciclib), a 2,6,9-trisubstituted purine analog, suppresses cyclin-dependent-kinase 2/cyclin E and inhibits ACTH in mice and zebrafish. We hypothesized that intrapituitary cyclin E signaling regulates corticotroph tumor POMC transcription independently of cell cycle progression. The aim was to investigate whether R-roscovitine inhibits human ACTH in corticotroph tumors by targeting the cyclin-dependent kinase 2/cyclin E signaling pathway. Primary cell cultures of surgically resected human corticotroph tumors were treated with or without R-roscovitine, ACTH measured by RIA and quantitative PCR, and/or Western blot analysis performed to investigate ACTH and lineage-specific transcription factors. Cyclin E and E2F transcription factor 1 (E2F1) small interfering RNA (siRNA) transfection was performed in murine corticotroph tumor AtT20 cells to elucidate mechanisms for drug action. POMC gene promoter activity in response to R-roscovitine treatment was analyzed using luciferase reporter and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. R-roscovitine inhibits human corticotroph tumor POMC and Tpit/Tbx19 transcription with decreased ACTH expression. Cyclin E and E2F1 exhibit reciprocal positive regulation in corticotroph tumors. R-roscovitine disrupts E2F1 binding to the POMC gene promoter and suppresses Tpit/Tbx19 and other lineage-specific POMC transcription cofactors via E2F1-dependent and -independent pathways. R-roscovitine inhibits human pituitary corticotroph tumor ACTH by targeting the cyclin E/E2F1 pathway. Pituitary cyclin E

  15. DEC1 regulates breast cancer cell proliferation by stabilizing cyclin E protein and delays the progression of cell cycle S phase

    PubMed Central

    Bi, H; Li, S; Qu, X; Wang, M; Bai, X; Xu, Z; Ao, X; Jia, Z; Jiang, X; Yang, Y; Wu, H

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer that is accompanied by a high level of cyclin E expression usually exhibits poor prognosis and clinical outcome. Several factors are known to regulate the level of cyclin E during the cell cycle progression. The transcription factor DEC1 (also known as STRA13 and SHARP2) plays an important role in cell proliferation and apoptosis. Nevertheless, the mechanism of its role in cell proliferation is poorly understood. In this study, using the breast cancer cell lines MCF-7 and T47D, we showed that DEC1 could inhibit the cell cycle progression of breast cancer cells independently of its transcriptional activity. The cell cycle-dependent timing of DEC1 overexpression could affect the progression of the cell cycle through regulating the level of cyclin E protein. DEC1 stabilized cyclin E at the protein level by interacting with cyclin E. Overexpression of DEC1 repressed the interaction between cyclin E and its E3 ligase Fbw7α, consequently reducing the level of polyunbiquitinated cyclin E and increased the accumulation of non-ubiquitinated cyclin E. Furthermore, DEC1 also promoted the nuclear accumulation of Cdk2 and the formation of cyclin E/Cdk2 complex, as well as upregulating the activity of the cyclin E/Cdk2 complex, which inhibited the subsequent association of cyclin A with Cdk2. This had the effect of prolonging the S phase and suppressing the growth of breast cancers in a mouse xenograft model. These events probably constitute the essential steps in DEC1-regulated cell proliferation, thus opening up the possibility of a protein-based molecular strategy for eliminating cancer cells that manifest a high-level expression of cyclin E. PMID:26402517

  16. Progesterone Receptor–Cyclin D1 Complexes Induce Cell Cycle–Dependent Transcriptional Programs in Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dressing, Gwen E.; Knutson, Todd P.; Schiewer, Matthew J.; Daniel, Andrea R.; Hagan, Christy R.; Diep, Caroline H.; Knudsen, Karen E.

    2014-01-01

    The progesterone receptor (PR) and its coactivators are direct targets of activated cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) in response to peptide growth factors, progesterone, and deregulation of cell cycle inhibitors. Herein, using the T47D breast cancer model, we probed mechanisms of cell cycle–dependent PR action. In the absence of exogenous progestin, the PR is specifically phosphorylated during the G2/M phase. Accordingly, numerous PR target genes are cell cycle regulated, including HSPB8, a heat-shock protein whose high expression is associated with tamoxifen resistance. Progestin-induced HSPB8 expression required cyclin D1 and was insensitive to antiestrogens but blocked by antiprogestins or inhibition of specificity factor 1 (SP1). HSPB8 expression increased with or without ligand when cells were G2/M synchronized or contained high levels of cyclin D1. Knockdown of PRs abrogated ligand-independent HSPB8 expression in synchronized cells. Notably, PRs and cyclin D1 copurified in whole-cell lysates of transiently transfected COS-1 cells and in PR-positive T47D breast cancer cells expressing endogenous cyclin D1. PRs, cyclin D1, and SP1 were recruited to the HSPB8 promoter in progestin-treated T47D breast cancer cells. Mutation of PR Ser345 to Ala (S345A) or inhibition of CDK2 activity using roscovitine disrupted PR/cyclin D1 interactions with DNA and blocked HSPB8 mRNA expression. Interaction of phosphorylated PRs with SP1 and cyclin D1 provides a mechanism for targeting transcriptionally active PRs to selected gene promoters relevant to breast cancer progression. Understanding the functional linkage between PRs and cell cycle regulatory proteins will provide keys to targeting novel PR/cyclin D1 cross talk in both hormone-responsive disease and HSPB8-high refractory disease with high HSPB8 expression. PMID:24606123

  17. R-Roscovitine (Seliciclib) prevents DNA damage-induced cyclin A1 upregulation and hinders non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background CDK-inhibitors can diminish transcriptional levels of cell cycle-related cyclins through the inhibition of E2F family members and CDK7 and 9. Cyclin A1, an E2F-independent cyclin, is strongly upregulated under genotoxic conditions and functionally was shown to increase NHEJ activity. Cyclin A1 outcompetes with cyclin A2 for CDK2 binding, possibly redirecting its activity towards DNA repair. To see if we could therapeutically block this switch, we analyzed the effects of the CDK-inhibitor R-Roscovitine on the expression levels of cyclin A1 under genotoxic stress and observed subsequent DNA damage and repair mechanisms. Results We found that R-Roscovitine alone was unable to alter cyclin A1 transcriptional levels, however it was able to reduce protein expression through a proteosome-dependent mechanism. When combined with DNA damaging agents, R-Roscovitine was able to prevent the DNA damage-induced upregulation of cyclin A1 on a transcriptional and post-transcriptional level. This, moreover resulted in a significant decrease in non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) paired with an increase in DNA DSBs and overall DNA damage over time. Furthermore, microarray analysis demonstrated that R-Roscovitine affected DNA repair mechanisms in a more global fashion. Conclusions Our data reveal a new mechanism of action for R-Roscovitine on DNA repair through the inhibition of the molecular switch between cyclin A family members under genotoxic conditions resulting in reduced NHEJ capability. PMID:20684776

  18. R-Roscovitine (Seliciclib) prevents DNA damage-induced cyclin A1 upregulation and hinders non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Federico, Mario; Symonds, Catherine E; Bagella, Luigi; Rizzolio, Flavio; Fanale, Daniele; Russo, Antonio; Giordano, Antonio

    2010-08-04

    CDK-inhibitors can diminish transcriptional levels of cell cycle-related cyclins through the inhibition of E2F family members and CDK7 and 9. Cyclin A1, an E2F-independent cyclin, is strongly upregulated under genotoxic conditions and functionally was shown to increase NHEJ activity. Cyclin A1 outcompetes with cyclin A2 for CDK2 binding, possibly redirecting its activity towards DNA repair. To see if we could therapeutically block this switch, we analyzed the effects of the CDK-inhibitor R-Roscovitine on the expression levels of cyclin A1 under genotoxic stress and observed subsequent DNA damage and repair mechanisms. We found that R-Roscovitine alone was unable to alter cyclin A1 transcriptional levels, however it was able to reduce protein expression through a proteosome-dependent mechanism. When combined with DNA damaging agents, R-Roscovitine was able to prevent the DNA damage-induced upregulation of cyclin A1 on a transcriptional and post-transcriptional level. This, moreover resulted in a significant decrease in non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) paired with an increase in DNA DSBs and overall DNA damage over time. Furthermore, microarray analysis demonstrated that R-Roscovitine affected DNA repair mechanisms in a more global fashion. Our data reveal a new mechanism of action for R-Roscovitine on DNA repair through the inhibition of the molecular switch between cyclin A family members under genotoxic conditions resulting in reduced NHEJ capability.

  19. The role of cyclin D2 and p21/waf1 in human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 infected cells

    PubMed Central

    Kehn, Kylene; Deng, Longwen; de la Fuente, Cynthia; Strouss, Katharine; Wu, Kaili; Maddukuri, Anil; Baylor, Shanese; Rufner, Robyn; Pumfery, Anne; Bottazzi, Maria Elena; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2004-01-01

    Background The human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) Tax protein indirectly influences transcriptional activation, signal transduction, cell cycle control, and apoptosis. The function of Tax primarily relies on protein-protein interactions. We have previously shown that Tax upregulates the cell cycle checkpoint proteins p21/waf1 and cyclin D2. Here we describe the consequences of upregulating these G1/S checkpoint regulators in HTLV-1 infected cells. Results To further decipher any physical and functional interactions between cyclin D2 and p21/waf1, we used a series of biochemical assays from HTLV-1 infected and uninfected cells. Immunoprecipitations from HTLV-1 infected cells showed p21/waf1 in a stable complex with cyclin D2/cdk4. This complex is active as it phosphorylates the Rb protein in kinase assays. Confocal fluorescent microscopy indicated that p21/waf1 and cyclin D2 colocalize in HTLV-1 infected, but not in uninfected cells. Furthermore, in vitro kinase assays using purified proteins demonstrated that the addition of p21/waf1 to cyclin D2/cdk4 increased the kinase activity of cdk4. Conclusion These data suggest that the p21/cyclin D2/cdk4 complex is not an inhibitory complex and that p21/waf1 could potentially function as an assembly factor for the cyclin D2/cdk4 complex in HTLV-1 infected cells. A by-product of this assembly with cyclin D2/cdk4 is the sequestration of p21/waf1 away from the cyclin E/cdk2 complex, allowing this active cyclin-cdk complex to phosphorylate Rb pocket proteins efficiently and push cells through the G1/S checkpoint. These two distinct functional and physical activities of p21/waf1 suggest that RNA tumor viruses manipulate the G1/S checkpoint by deregulating cyclin and cdk complexes. PMID:15169570

  20. Cyclin B in mouse oocytes and embryos: importance for human reproduction and aneuploidy.

    PubMed

    Polański, Zbigniew; Homer, Hayden; Kubiak, Jacek Z

    2012-01-01

    Oocyte maturation and early embryo development require precise coordination between cell cycle progression and the developmental programme. Cyclin B plays a major role in this process: its accumulation and degradation is critical for driving the cell cycle through activation and inactivation of the major cell cycle kinase, CDK1. CDK1 activation is required for M-phase entry whereas its inactivation leads to exit from M-phase. The tempo of oocyte meiotic and embryonic mitotic divisions is set by the rate of cyclin B accumulation and the timing of its destruction. By controlling when cyclin B destruction is triggered and by co-ordinating this with the completion of chromosome alignment, the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) is a critical quality control system important for averting aneuploidy and for building in the flexibility required to better integrate cell cycle progression with development. In this review we focus on cyclin B metabolism in mouse oocytes and embryos and illustrate how the cell cycle-powered clock (in fact cyclin B-powered clock) controls oocyte maturation and early embryo development, thereby providing important insight into human reproduction and potential causes of Down syndrome.

  1. Insights into cyclin groove recognition: complex crystal structures and inhibitor design through ligand exchange.

    PubMed

    Kontopidis, George; Andrews, Martin J I; McInnes, Campbell; Cowan, Angela; Powers, Helen; Innes, Lorraine; Plater, Andy; Griffiths, Gary; Paterson, Dougie; Zheleva, Daniella I; Lane, David P; Green, Stephen; Walkinshaw, Malcolm D; Fischer, Peter M

    2003-12-01

    Inhibition of CDK2/CA (cyclin-dependent kinase 2/cyclin A complex) activity through blocking of the substrate recognition site in the cyclin A subunit has been demonstrated to be an effective method for inducing apoptosis in tumor cells. We have used the cyclin binding motif (CBM) present in the tumor suppressor proteins p21(WAF1) and p27(KIP1) as a template to optimize the minimal sequence necessary for CDK2/CA inhibition. A series of peptides were prepared, containing nonnatural amino acids, which possess nano- to micromolar CDK2-inhibitory activity. Here we present X-ray structures of the protein complex CDK2/CA, together with the cyclin groove-bound peptides H-Ala-Ala-Abu-Arg-Ser-Leu-Ile-(p-F-Phe)-NH(2) (peptide 1), H-Arg-Arg-Leu-Ile-Phe-NH(2) (peptide 2), Ac-Arg-Arg-Leu-Asn-(m-Cl-Phe)-NH(2) (peptide 3), H-Arg-Arg-Leu-Asn-(p-F-Phe)-NH(2) (peptide 4), and H-Cit-Cit-Leu-Ile-(p-F-Phe)-NH(2) (peptide 5). Some of the peptide complexes presented here were obtained through the novel technique of ligand exchange within protein crystals. This method may find general application for obtaining complex structures of proteins with surface-bound ligands.

  2. Early and Late G1/S Cyclins and Cdks Act Complementarily to Enhance Authentic Human β-Cell Proliferation and Expansion

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Shiwani; Roel, Chris; Wills, Rachel; Casinelli, Gabriella; Tanwir, Mansoor; Takane, Karen K.

    2015-01-01

    β-Cell regeneration is a key goal of diabetes research. Progression through the cell cycle is associated with retinoblastoma protein (pRb) inactivation via sequential phosphorylation by the “early” cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases (cdks) (d-cyclins cdk4/6) and the “late” cyclins and cdks (cyclin A/E and cdk1/2). In β-cells, activation of either early or late G1/S cyclins and/or cdks is an efficient approach to induce cycle entry, but it is unknown whether the combined expression of early and late cyclins and cdks might have synergistic or additive effects. Thus, we explored whether a combination of both early and late cyclins and cdks might more effectively drive human β-cell cell cycle entry than either group alone. We also sought to determine whether authentic replication with the expansion of adult human β-cells could be demonstrated. Late cyclins and cdks do not traffic in response to the induction of replication by early cyclins and cdks in human β-cells but are capable of nuclear translocation when overexpressed. Early plus late cyclins and cdks, acting via pRb phosphorylation on distinct residues, complementarily induce greater proliferation in human β-cells than either group alone. Importantly, the combination of early and late cyclins and cdks clearly increased human β-cell numbers in vitro. These findings provide additional insight into human β-cell expansion. They also provide a novel tool for assessing β-cell expansion in vitro. PMID:26159177

  3. Early and Late G1/S Cyclins and Cdks Act Complementarily to Enhance Authentic Human β-Cell Proliferation and Expansion.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Shiwani; Roel, Chris; Wills, Rachel; Casinelli, Gabriella; Tanwir, Mansoor; Takane, Karen K; Fiaschi-Taesch, Nathalie M

    2015-10-01

    β-Cell regeneration is a key goal of diabetes research. Progression through the cell cycle is associated with retinoblastoma protein (pRb) inactivation via sequential phosphorylation by the "early" cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases (cdks) (d-cyclins cdk4/6) and the "late" cyclins and cdks (cyclin A/E and cdk1/2). In β-cells, activation of either early or late G1/S cyclins and/or cdks is an efficient approach to induce cycle entry, but it is unknown whether the combined expression of early and late cyclins and cdks might have synergistic or additive effects. Thus, we explored whether a combination of both early and late cyclins and cdks might more effectively drive human β-cell cell cycle entry than either group alone. We also sought to determine whether authentic replication with the expansion of adult human β-cells could be demonstrated. Late cyclins and cdks do not traffic in response to the induction of replication by early cyclins and cdks in human β-cells but are capable of nuclear translocation when overexpressed. Early plus late cyclins and cdks, acting via pRb phosphorylation on distinct residues, complementarily induce greater proliferation in human β-cells than either group alone. Importantly, the combination of early and late cyclins and cdks clearly increased human β-cell numbers in vitro. These findings provide additional insight into human β-cell expansion. They also provide a novel tool for assessing β-cell expansion in vitro. © 2015 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  4. Exit from mitosis is regulated by Drosophila fizzy and the sequential destruction of cyclins A, B and B3.

    PubMed Central

    Sigrist, S; Jacobs, H; Stratmann, R; Lehner, C F

    1995-01-01

    While entry into mitosis is triggered by activation of cdc2 kinase, exit from mitosis requires inactivation of this kinase. Inactivation results from proteolytic degradation of the regulatory cyclin subunits during mitosis. At least three different cyclin types, cyclins A, B and B3, associate with cdc2 kinase in higher eukaryotes and are sequentially degraded in mitosis. We show here that mutations in the Drosophila gene fizzy (fzy) block the mitotic degradation of these cyclins. Moreover, expression of mutant cyclins (delta cyclins) lacking the destruction box motif required for mitotic degradation affects mitotic progression at distinct stages. Deltacyclin A results in a delay in metaphase, deltacyclin B in an early anaphase arrest and deltacyclin B3 in a late anaphase arrest, suggesting that mitotic progression beyond metaphase is ordered by the sequential degradation of these different cyclins. Coexpression of deltacyclins A, B and B3 allows a delayed separation of sister chromosomes, but interferes wit chromosome segregation to the poles. Mutations in fzy block both sister chromosome separation and segregation, indicating that fzy plays a crucial role in the metaphase/anaphase transition. Images PMID:7588612

  5. Clinical significance of the phosphorylation of MAPK and protein expression of cyclin D1 in human osteosarcoma tissues.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jian; Cui, Lei-Lei; Yuan, Jun; Wang, Yuan; Song, Shu

    2017-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the significance of the phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and the protein expression of cyclin D1 in human osteosarcoma tissues. Human osteosarcoma tissue samples were collected from 30 patients, benign bone tumor samples were collected from 30 patients, and normal bone tissues were collected from 10 individuals as controls. Immunohistochemistry was performed to measure the levels of phosphorylated (p)-MAPK and cyclin D1 protein in cases of human osteosarcoma. The results showed that the positive rates of MAPK and cyclin D1 in osteosarcoma were 86.67% (26/30) and 73.00% (22/30), respectively. The positive staining rates of MAPK and cyclin D1 in benign bone tumor tissues were 10.00% (3/30) and 3.30% (1/30), respectively. The positive rate in the normal bone tissues was 0% (0/30), which was significantly lower, compared with that of the cancerous bone tissue. The positive rates of MAPK and cyclin D1 in osteosarcoma were increased (P<0.05), and the expression of cyclin D1 and p‑MAPK were positively correlated. The phosphorylation of MAPK may be important in the development of osteosarcoma, and the overactivation of MAPK may induce high expression of cyclin D1 and induce tumor cells to proliferate continuously.

  6. The checkpoint kinase ATM protects against stress-induced elevation of cyclin D1 and potential cell death in neurons.

    PubMed

    Hitomi, Masahiro; Stacey, Dennis W

    2010-06-01

    Quantitative cytometric studies show that cyclin D1 levels must decline during S phase for proper cell cycle progression, and that cyclin D1 decline follows phosphorylation induced by the checkpoint kinases ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and ATM and Rad3-related (ATR). ATM is mutated in ataxia telangiectasia (AT), a disease characterized by progressive neurodegeneration. Importantly, neurodegeneration in many cases has been linked to the increased expression of cyclin D1 in neurons leading to inappropriate cell cycle entry. These facts prompted us to test the possibility that ATM normally protects against neural degeneration by suppressing cyclin D1 levels, particularly following genotoxic stress. For this purpose, neural stem cells were induced to differentiate into mature neural cells, including neurons. ATM activity in these cultures was inhibited with a specific chemical inhibitor in the presence or absence of hydrogen peroxide treatment, and the effect on cyclin D1 expression was determined by quantitative, single cell cytometric analyses. As predicted, inhibition of ATM did promote elevation of cyclin D1 in differentiated neurons, particularly under conditions of oxidative stress. The survival of differentiated neurons and of neural stem cells was reduced by such treatments. These data support our suggestion that ATM functions to maintain low levels of cyclin D1 expression in differentiated neurons; and may provide important clues in understanding neural degeneration in general. Copyright 2010 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  7. Lapatinib-resistant cancer cells possessing epithelial cancer stem cell properties develop sensitivity during sphere formation by activation of the ErbB/AKT/cyclin D2 pathway.

    PubMed

    Ohnishi, Yuichi; Yasui, Hiroki; Kakudo, Kenji; Nozaki, Masami

    2016-11-01

    Lapatinib, a dual inhibitor of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)/ErbB2, has antiproliferative effects and is used to treat patients with ErbB2-positive metastatic breast cancer. In the present study, we examined the effects of lapatinib on growth of oral and prostate cancer cells. Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cell lines HSC3, HSC4 and Ca9-22 were sensitive to the antiproliferative effects of lapatinib in anchorage-dependent culture, but the OSCC cell lines KB and SAS and the prostate cancer cell line DU145 were resistant to lapatinib. Phosphorylation levels of EGFR in all cell lines decreased during lapatinib treatment in anchorage‑dependent culture. Furthermore, the phosphorylation levels of ErbB2, ErbB3 and Akt and the protein levels of cyclin D1 were decreased by lapatinib treatment of HSC3, HSC4 and Ca9-22 cells. ErbB3 was not expressed and cyclin D1 protein levels were not altered by lapatinib treatment in KB, DU145 and SAS cells. The phosphorylation of ErbB2 and AKT was not affected by lapatinib in SAS cells and was not detected in KB and DU145 cells. Lapatinib-resistant cell lines exhibited sphere-forming ability, and SAS cells developed sensitivity to lapatinib during sphere formation. The phosphorylation levels of ErbB2 and AKT and protein levels of cyclin D2 increased during sphere formation of SAS cells and decreased with lapatinib treatment. In addition, sphere formation of SAS cells was inhibited by the AKT inhibitor MK2206. AKT phosphorylation and cyclin D2 levels in SAS spheres were decreased by MK2206 treatment. SAS cells expressed E-cadherin, but not vimentin and KB cells expressed vimentin, but not E-cadherin. DU145 cells expressed vimentin and E-cadherin. These results suggested that phosphorylation of EGFR and ErbB2 by cell detachment from the substratum induces the AKT pathway/cyclin D2-dependent sphere growth in SAS epithelial cancer stem-like cells, thereby rendering SAS spheres sensitive to lapatinib treatment.

  8. Cell cyclins: triggering elements of cancer or not?

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Cyclins are indispensable elements of the cell cycle and derangement of their function can lead to cancer formation. Recent studies have also revealed more mechanisms through which cyclins can express their oncogenic potential. This review focuses on the aberrant expression of G1/S cyclins and especially cyclin D and cyclin E; the pathways through which they lead to tumour formation and their involvement in different types of cancer. These elements indicate the mechanisms that could act as targets for cancer therapy. PMID:21176227

  9. Cyclin D2 is a critical mediator of exercise-induced cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Luckey, Stephen W; Haines, Chris D; Konhilas, John P; Luczak, Elizabeth D; Messmer-Kratzsch, Antke; Leinwand, Leslie A

    2017-01-01

    A number of signaling pathways underlying pathological cardiac hypertrophy have been identified. However, few studies have probed the functional significance of these signaling pathways in the context of exercise or physiological pathways. Exercise studies were performed on females from six different genetic mouse models that have been shown to exhibit alterations in pathological cardiac adaptation and hypertrophy. These include mice expressing constitutively active glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3βS9A), an inhibitor of CaMK II (AC3-I), both GSK-3βS9A and AC3-I (GSK-3βS9A/AC3-I), constitutively active Akt (myrAkt), mice deficient in MAPK/ERK kinase kinase-1 (MEKK1(-/-)), and mice deficient in cyclin D2 (cyclin D2(-/-)). Voluntary wheel running performance was similar to NTG littermates for five of the mouse lines. Exercise induced significant cardiac growth in all mouse models except the cyclin D2(-/-) mice. Cardiac function was not impacted in the cyclin D2(-/-) mice and studies using a phospho-antibody array identified six proteins with increased phosphorylation (greater than 150%) and nine proteins with decreased phosphorylation (greater than 33% decrease) in the hearts of exercised cyclin D2(-/-) mice compared to exercised NTG littermate controls. Our results demonstrate that unlike the other hypertrophic signaling molecules tested here, cyclin D2 is an important regulator of both pathologic and physiological hypertrophy. Impact statement This research is relevant as the hypertrophic signaling pathways tested here have only been characterized for their role in pathological hypertrophy, and not in the context of exercise or physiological hypertrophy. By using the same transgenic mouse lines utilized in previous studies, our findings provide a novel and important understanding for the role of these signaling pathways in physiological hypertrophy. We found that alterations in the signaling pathways tested here had no impact on exercise performance. Exercise

  10. Evidence that Mos protein may not act directly on cyclin.

    PubMed

    Xu, W; Ladner, K J; Smith, L D

    1992-05-15

    Using affinity-purified antiserum we have examined cyclin B2 levels in Xenopus oocytes at various stages of oogenesis. We found that cyclin B2 is detected from stage 2 to stage 6 as two bands, one of which is phosphorylated, and that cyclin B2 mass increases about 28-fold between stage 2 and stage 6. To examine the effect of Mos protein on cyclin phosphorylation, we microinjected synthetic Xenopus c-mos (c-mosxe) RNA into stages 4, 5, and 6 Xenopus oocytes. In stage 6 oocytes, maturation was induced by c-mosxe RNA, and, as is the case with progesterone treatment, all cyclin B2 was shifted to the phosphorylated form. However, c-mosxe RNA injected into stage 4 or 5 oocytes did not induce maturation or cause a shift in the relative proportion of the two cyclin B2 bands. These data suggest that Mos does not act directly to phosphorylate cyclin B2, causing the band shift during maturation. Cyclin B2 synthesis increases about 2-fold during maturation, in concert with total protein synthesis. Data from experiments on cyclin B2 stability indicate that the half-life of cyclin B2 is about 85 hr in stage 6. This suggests that if Mos protein has a direct effect on cyclin stability, it does so only at a later stage in oocyte maturation, but not at the onset.

  11. Molecular evolution of cyclin proteins in animals and fungi

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The passage through the cell cycle is controlled by complexes of cyclins, the regulatory units, with cyclin-dependent kinases, the catalytic units. It is also known that cyclins form several families, which differ considerably in primary structure from one eukaryotic organism to another. Despite these lines of evidence, the relationship between the evolution of cyclins and their function is an open issue. Here we present the results of our study on the molecular evolution of A-, B-, D-, E-type cyclin proteins in animals and fungi. Results We constructed phylogenetic trees for these proteins, their ancestral sequences and analyzed patterns of amino acid replacements. The analysis of infrequently fixed atypical amino acid replacements in cyclins evidenced that accelerated evolution proceeded predominantly during paralog duplication or after it in animals and fungi and that it was related to aromorphic changes in animals. It was shown also that evolutionary flexibility of cyclin function may be provided by consequential reorganization of regions on protein surface remote from CDK binding sites in animal and fungal cyclins and by functional differentiation of paralogous cyclins formed in animal evolution. Conclusions The results suggested that changes in the number and/or nature of cyclin-binding proteins may underlie the evolutionary role of the alterations in the molecular structure of cyclins and their involvement in diverse molecular-genetic events. PMID:21798004

  12. Cyclins D, phytoregulators and cell cycle onset in germinating maize.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Ramos, Jorge M; Lara-Nuñez, Aurora

    2008-08-01

    Several different D-type cyclins can be found in plants and in maize, four of these have been characterized: CycD2;1, CycD4;1, CycD5;1 and CycD5;2. These cyclins appear to form complexes with Cdks, with PCNA and also with KRP proteins and in these kinase activity can be measured. The expression of the corresponding genes during maize germination is highly stimulated by phytohormones like auxin and cytokinin, however this is not followed by an equivalent increase in the amount of the corresponding proteins; nonetheless, auxins do stimulate the associated kinase activity, particularly at early germination times. Thus, auxins appear to stimulate the cell cycle during germination at two levels, transcription and kinase activation. Both auxins and cytokinins appear to shorten the G1 phase during germination and stimulate DNA synthesis, but apparently they do it in different ways as the simultaneous addition of both to germinating maize axes eliminates DNA synthesis stimulation. Therefore, similar actions may be achieved by different paths.

  13. Cyclins D, phytoregulators and cell cycle onset in germinating maize

    PubMed Central

    Lara-Nuñez, Aurora

    2008-01-01

    Several different D-type cyclins can be found in plants and in maize, four of these have been characterized: CycD2;1, CycD4;1, CycD5;1 and CycD5;2. These cyclins appear to form complexes with Cdks, with PCNA and also with KRP proteins and in these kinase activity can be measured. The expression of the corresponding genes during maize germination is highly stimulated by phytohormones like auxin and cytokinin, however this is not followed by an equivalent increase in the amount of the corresponding proteins; nonetheless, auxins do stimulate the associated kinase activity, particularly at early germination times. Thus, auxins appear to stimulate the cell cycle during germination at two levels, transcription and kinase activation. Both auxins and cytokinins appear to shorten the G1 phase during germination and stimulate DNA synthesis, but apparently they do it in different ways as the simultaneous addition of both to germinating maize axes eliminates DNA synthesis stimulation. Therefore, similar actions may be achieved by different paths. PMID:19704474

  14. Fbw7α and Fbw7γ Collaborate To Shuttle Cyclin E1 into the Nucleolus for Multiubiquitylation

    PubMed Central

    Bhaskaran, Nimesh; van Drogen, Frank; Ng, Hwee-Fang; Kumar, Raman; Ekholm-Reed, Susanna; Peter, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    Cyclin E1, an activator of cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (Cdk2) that promotes replicative functions, is normally expressed periodically within the mammalian cell cycle, peaking at the G1-S-phase transition. This periodicity is achieved by E2F-dependent transcription in late G1 and early S phases and by ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis. The ubiquitin ligase that targets phosphorylated cyclin E is SCFFbw7 (also known as SCFCdc4), a member of the cullin ring ligase (CRL) family. Fbw7, a substrate adaptor subunit, is expressed as three splice-variant isoforms with different subcellular distributions: Fbw7α is nucleoplasmic but excluded from the nucleolus, Fbw7β is cytoplasmic, and Fbw7γ is nucleolar. Degradation of cyclin E in vivo requires SCF complexes containing Fbw7α and Fbw7γ, respectively. In vitro reconstitution showed that the role of SCFFbw7α in cyclin E degradation, rather than ubiquitylation, is to serve as a cofactor of the prolyl cis-trans isomerase Pin1 in the isomerization of a noncanonical proline-proline bond in the cyclin E phosphodegron. This isomerization is required for subsequent binding and ubiquitylation by SCFFbw7γ. Here we show that Pin1-mediated isomerization of the cyclin E phosphodegron and subsequent binding to Fbw7γ drive nucleolar localization of cyclin E, where it is ubiquitylated by SCFFbw7γ prior to its degradation by the proteasome. It is possible that this constitutes a mechanism for rapid inactivation of phosphorylated cyclin E by nucleolar sequestration prior to its multiubiquitylation and degradation. PMID:23109421

  15. NFAT1 transcription factor regulates cell cycle progression and cyclin E expression in B lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Leonardo K; Carrossini, Nina; Sécca, Cristiane; Kroll, José E; DaCunha, Déborah C; Faget, Douglas V; Carvalho, Lilian D S; de Souza, Sandro J; Viola, João P B

    2016-09-01

    The NFAT family of transcription factors has been primarily related to T cell development, activation, and differentiation. Further studies have shown that these ubiquitous proteins are observed in many cell types inside and outside the immune system, and are involved in several biological processes, including tumor growth, angiogenesis, and invasiveness. However, the specific role of the NFAT1 family member in naive B cell proliferation remains elusive. Here, we demonstrate that NFAT1 transcription factor controls Cyclin E expression, cell proliferation, and tumor growth in vivo. Specifically, we show that inducible expression of NFAT1 inhibits cell cycle progression, reduces colony formation, and controls tumor growth in nude mice. We also demonstrate that NFAT1-deficient naive B lymphocytes show a hyperproliferative phenotype and high levels of Cyclin E1 and E2 upon BCR stimulation when compared to wild-type B lymphocytes. NFAT1 transcription factor directly regulates Cyclin E expression in B cells, inhibiting the G1/S cell cycle phase transition. Bioinformatics analysis indicates that low levels of NFAT1 correlate with high expression of Cyclin E1 in different human cancers, including Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphomas (DLBCL). Together, our results demonstrate a repressor role for NFAT1 in cell cycle progression and Cyclin E expression in B lymphocytes, and suggest a potential function for NFAT1 protein in B cell malignancies.

  16. Argininosuccinate lyase interacts with cyclin A2 in cytoplasm and modulates growth of liver tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Hung, Yu-Hsuan; Huang, Hau-Lun; Chen, Wei-Ching; Yen, Meng-Chi; Cho, Chien-Yu; Weng, Tzu-Yang; Wang, Chih-Yang; Chen, Yi-Ling; Chen, Li-Tzong; Lai, Ming-Derg

    2017-02-01

    Arginine is a critical amino acid in specific cancer types including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and melanoma. Novel molecular mechanisms and therapeutic targets in arginine metabolism-mediated cancer formation await further identification. Our laboratory has previously demonstrated that arginine metabolic enzyme argininosuccinate lyase (ASL) promoted HCC formation in part via maintenance of cyclin A2 protein expression and arginine production for channeling to nitric oxide synthase. In this study, we investigated the mechanism by which ASL regulates cyclin A2 expression. We found that ASL interacted with cyclin A2 in HCC cells and the localization of their interaction was in the cytoplasm. Mutation of essential residues for enzymatic activity of ASL did not affect the binding of ASL to cyclin A2. Moreover, the mutant ASL retained the ability to restore the decreased tumorigenicity caused by ASL shRNA. Furthermore, overexpression of ASL conferred resistance to arginine deprivation therapy. Finally, the important pathways and potential therapeutic targets in ASL-regulated HCC were identified by bioinformatics analyses with Metacore database and Connectivity Map database. Our analyses suggested that bisoprolol, celecoxib, and ipratropium bromide, are potential therapeutics for ASL-regulated HCC formation. Thus, ASL interacts with cyclin A2 in cytoplasm, and may promote HCC formation through this non-enzymatic function. Overexpression of ASL may be a contributing factor in drug resistance for arginine deprivation therapy.

  17. Synergistic effects of AKAP95, Cyclin D1, Cyclin E1, and Cx43 in the development of rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Fengjie; Yuan, Yangyang; Zhi, Xuehong; Huang, Qian; Chen, Yuexin; Zhuang, Wenxin; Zhang, Dengcheng; Teng, Bogang; Kong, Xiangyu; Zhang, Yongxing

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To explore the expression of A-kinase anchor protein 95 (AKAP95), Cyclin D1, Cyclin E1, and Connexin43 (Cx43) in rectal cancer tissues and assess the associations between each of the proteins and pathological parameters, as well as their inter-relationships. Methods: AKAP95, Cyclin D1, Cyclin E1, and Cx43 protein expression rates were evaluated by immunohistochemistry in 50 rectal cancer specimens and 16 pericarcinoma tissues. Results: The positive rates of AKAP95, Cyclin E1, and Cyclin D1 proteins were 54.00 vs. 18.75%, 62.00 vs. 6.25%, and 72.00 vs. 31.25% in rectal cancer specimens and pericarcinoma tissues, respectively, representing statistically significant differences (P < 0.05). The positive rate of Cx43 protein expression in rectal cancer tissues was 44.00% and 62.50% in pericarcinoma tissues, and the difference between them was not significant (P > 0.05). No significant associations were found between protein expression of AKAP95, Cyclin E1, Cyclin D1, and Cx43, and the degree of differentiation, histological type, and lymph node metastasis of rectal cancer (P > 0.05). However, significant correlations were obtained between the expression rates of AKAP95 and Cyclin E1, Cyclin E1 and Cyclin D1, Cyclin E1 and Cx43 protein, and Cyclin D1 and Cx43, respectively (P < 0.05). Conclusion: AKAP95, Cyclin E1, and Cyclin D1 protein expression rates were significantly higher in rectal cancer tissues compared with pericarcinoma samples, suggesting an association between these proteins and the development and progression of rectal cancer. In addition, the significant correlations between the proteins (AKAP95 and Cyclin E1, Cyclin E1 and Cyclin D1, Cyclin E1 and Cx43 protein, and Cyclin D1 and Cx43) indicate the possible synergistic effects of these factors in the development and progression of rectal cancer. PMID:25973052

  18. Model of the delayed translation of cyclin B maternal mRNA after sea urchin fertilization.

    PubMed

    Picard, Vincent; Mulner-Lorillon, Odile; Bourdon, Jérémie; Morales, Julia; Cormier, Patrick; Siegel, Anne; Bellé, Robert

    2016-12-01

    Sea urchin eggs exhibit a cap-dependent increase in protein synthesis within minutes after fertilization. This rise in protein synthesis occurs at a constant rate for a great number of proteins translated from the different available mRNAs. Surprisingly, we found that cyclin B, a major cell-cycle regulator, follows a synthesis pattern that is distinct from the global protein population, so we developed a mathematical model to analyze this dissimilarity in biosynthesis kinetic patterns. The model includes two pathways for cyclin B mRNA entry into the translational machinery: one from immediately available mRNA (mRNAcyclinB) and one from mRNA activated solely after fertilization (XXmRNAcyclinB). Two coefficients, α and β, were added to fit the measured scales of global protein and cyclin B synthesis, respectively. The model was simplified to identify the synthesis parameters and to allow its simulation. The calculated parameters for activation of the specific cyclin B synthesis pathway after fertilization included a kinetic constant (ka ) of 0.024 sec(-1) , for the activation of XXmRNAcyclinB, and a critical time interval (t2 ) of 42 min. The proportion of XXmRNAcyclinB form was also calculated to be largely dominant over the mRNAcyclinB form. Regulation of cyclin B biosynthesis is an example of a select protein whose translation is controlled by pathways that are distinct from housekeeping proteins, even though both involve the same cap-dependent initiation pathway. Therefore, this model should help provide insight to the signaling utilized for the biosynthesis of cyclin B and other select proteins. Mol. Reprod. Dev. 83: 1070-1082, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Cyclin D1 promotes BRCA2-Rad51 interaction by restricting cyclin A/B-dependent BRCA2 phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Chalermrujinanant, C; Michowski, W; Sittithumcharee, G; Esashi, F; Jirawatnotai, S

    2016-06-02

    BRCA2 has an important role in the maintenance of genome stability by interacting with RAD51 recombinase through its C-terminal domain. This interaction is abrogated by cyclin A-CDK2-mediated phosphorylation of BRCA2 at serine 3291 (Ser3291). Recently, we showed that cyclin D1 facilitates RAD51 recruitment to BRCA2-containing DNA repair foci, and that downregulation of cyclin D1 leads to inefficient homologous-mediated DNA repair. Here, we demonstrate that cyclin D1, via amino acids 20-90, interacts with the C-terminal domain of BRCA2, and that this interaction is increased in response to DNA damage. Interestingly, CDK4-cyclin D1 does not phosphorylate Ser3291. Instead, cyclin D1 bars cyclin A from the C-terminus of BRCA2, prevents cyclin A-CDK2-dependent Ser3291 phosphorylation and facilitates RAD51 binding to the C-terminal domain of BRCA2. These findings indicate that the interplay between cyclin D1 and other cyclins such as cyclin A regulates DNA integrity through RAD51 interaction with the BRCA2 C-terminal domain.

  20. The Rho GTPase effector ROCK regulates cyclin A, cyclin D1, and p27Kip1 levels by distinct mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Croft, Daniel R; Olson, Michael F

    2006-06-01

    The members of the Rho GTPase family are well known for their regulation of actin cytoskeletal structures. In addition, they influence progression through the cell cycle. The RhoA and RhoC proteins regulate numerous effector proteins, with a central and vital signaling role mediated by the ROCK I and ROCK II serine/threonine kinases. The requirement for ROCK function in the proliferation of numerous cell types has been revealed by studies utilizing ROCK-selective inhibitors such as Y-27632. However, the mechanisms by which ROCK signaling promotes cell cycle progression have not been thoroughly characterized. Using a conditionally activated ROCK-estrogen receptor fusion protein, we found that ROCK activation is sufficient to stimulate G1/S cell cycle progression in NIH 3T3 mouse fibroblasts. Further analysis revealed that ROCK acts via independent pathways to alter the levels of cell cycle regulatory proteins: cyclin D1 and p21(Cip1) elevation via Ras and the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway, increased cyclin A via LIM kinase 2, and reduction of p27(Kip1) protein levels. Therefore, the influence of ROCK on cell cycle regulatory proteins occurs by multiple independent mechanisms.

  1. Grape seed proanthocyanidins promote apoptosis in human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells through alterations in Cdki-Cdk-cyclin cascade, and caspase-3 activation via loss of mitochondrial membrane potential.

    PubMed

    Meeran, Syed M; Katiyar, Santosh K

    2007-05-01

    Dietary grape seed proanthocyanidins (GSPs) prevent photocarcinogenesis in mice. Here, we report that in vitro treatment of human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells with GSPs inhibited cellular proliferation (13-89%) and induced cell death (1-48%) in a dose (5-100 mug/ml)- and time (24, 48 and 72 h)-dependent manner. GSP-induced inhibition of cell proliferation was associated with an increase in G1-phase arrest at 24 h, which was mediated through the inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdk) Cdk2, Cdk4, Cdk6 and cyclins D1, D2 and E and simultaneous increase in protein expression of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors (Cdki), Cip1/p21 and Kip1/p27, and enhanced binding of Cdki-Cdk. The treatment of A431 cells with GSPs (20-80 mug/ml) resulted in a dose-dependent increase in apoptotic cell death (26-58%), which was associated with an increased protein expression of proapoptotic Bax, decreased expression of antiapoptotic Bcl-2 and Bcl-xl, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, and cleavage of caspase-9, caspase-3 and PARP. Pretreatment with the pan-caspase inhibitor (z-VAD-fmk) blocked the GSP-induced apoptosis in A431 cells suggesting that GSP-induced apoptosis is associated primarily with the caspase-3-dependent pathway. Together, our study suggests that GSPs possess chemotherapeutic potential against human epidermoid carcinoma cells in vitro, further in vivo mechanistic studies are required to verify the chemotherapeutic effect of GSPs in skin cancers.

  2. Replication licensing promotes cyclin D1 expression and G1 progression in untransformed human cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Peijun; Slater, Damien M.; Lenburg, Marc; Nevis, Kathleen; Cook, Jeanette Gowen; Vaziri, Cyrus

    2011-01-01

    Defects in DNA replication are implicated as early and causal events in malignancy. However, the immediate effects of impaired DNA replication licensing on cell cycle progression of non-malignant human cells are unknown. Therefore, we have investigated the acute effects of Mcm7 ablation using synchronized cultures of untransformed Human Dermal Fibroblasts (HDF). Mcm7 ablation elicited a G1 delay associated with impaired activation of CDK4 and CDK2 and reduced Rb phosphorylation. The cell cycle delay of Mcm7-ablated cells was not associated with a DNA damage response. However, levels of cyclin D1 mRNA were specifically reduced and binding of RNA Polymerase II to the CYCD1 promoter was decreased in Mcm7-depleted cells. Similar to Mcm7-deficiency, Mcm2- or Cdc6-depletion led to impaired cyclin D expression. Ectopic overexpression of Cdc6 in quiescent cells promoted cyclin D1 expression, CDK4 activation and G1 progression. Therefore timely and efficient expression of cyclin D1 during G1 phase requires replication licensing. Reconstitution of cyclin D1 expression was insufficient to correct the G1 delay of Mcm7-depleted cells, indicating that additional cell cycle events during G1 are dependent on replication licensing. However, ectopic expression of the HPV-E7 oncoprotein, and the resulting bypass of the requirement for cyclin D1-Rb signaling enabled Mcm7-depleted cells to enter S-phase. HPV-E7-induced S-phase entry of Mcm7-depleted cells led to a DNA damage response, a hallmark of pre-malignancy. Taken together, our results suggest the existence of a ‘replication licensing restriction point’ that couples pre-RC assembly with G1 progression in normal cells to minimize replication stress, DNA damage and tumorigenesis. PMID:19106611

  3. Functional regulation of D-type cyclins by insulin-like growth factor-I and serum in multiple myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Glassford, Janet; Rabin, Neil; Lam, Eric W-F; Yong, Kwee L

    2007-10-01

    D-type cyclin genes are universally dysregulated in multiple myeloma (MM), but the functional consequences are unclear as D-type cyclin gene expression does not correlate with proliferation or disease progression. We examined the protein expression and regulation of D-type cyclins and other cell cycle regulators in human myeloma cell lines and primary CD138(+) plasma cells (PCs). Cyclin D1, cyclin D2, cyclin dependent kinase (CDK) 4, CDK6, p27(Kip1) p18(INK4C) and retinoblastoma protein (pRb) were absent in normal PCs, heterogeneously expressed in primary MM cells and positively correlated with disease activity/progression. Cyclins D1 and D2 complexed with both CDK4 and CDK6, suggesting that both phosphorylate pRb in MM. Furthermore, cyclin D2 expressed via either t(14;16) or t(4;14) IgH translocations was functionally upregulated by fetal calf serum or insulin-like growth factor-I, leading to pRb phosphorylation and cell cycle entry/progression, and in some cases inversely correlated with p27(Kip1). However, pRb phosphorylation and cell cycle progression mediated by cyclin D1 expressed via t(11;14) was less dependent on exogenous stimuli. These data suggest that the presence or absence of specific IgH translocations underlying aberrant D-type cyclin expression may influence their response to mitogens in the bone marrow microenvironment. We showed for the first time that D-type cyclins are functionally regulated in MM, differentially responsive to exogenous growth factors and upregulated with disease progression.

  4. Specific overexpression of cyclin E·CDK2 in early preinvasive and primary breast tumors in female ACI rats induced by estrogen.

    PubMed

    Weroha, S John; Lingle, Wilma L; Hong, Yan; Li, Sara Antonia; Li, Jonathan J

    2010-02-01

    Overexpressed Aurora A, amplified centrosomes, and aneuploidy are salient features of estrogen-induced mammary preinvasive lesions and tumors in female August--Copenhagen Irish (ACI) rats. Intimately involved in these events are cyclins and their associated cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) partners. Cyclin E1·CDK2 overexpression plays an important dual role in late G1/S phase of the cell cycle in cancer cells. It increases DNA replication providing growth advantage to cancer cells and facilitates aberrant centrosome duplication, generating chromosomal instability and aneuploidy leading to tumor development. Presented herein, a 24.0- and 45.0-fold elevation in cyclin E1 and CDK2 was found in 17β-estradiol (E(2))-induced ACI rat mammary tumors (MTs), respectively. Cyclin E·CDK2 positive staining was confined to the large round cells found within focal dysplasias, ductal carcinomas in situ, and invasive MTs. Co-immunoprecipitation and in vitro kinase activity of these tumors revealed that these cell cycle entities are functional. When mammary tissue derived from untreated normal, E(2)-induced hyperplasia and primary tumors were normalized to cyclin E1 levels, low molecular weight (LMW) cyclin E1 forms (33- and 45-kDa) were detected in all of these tissue groups. Moreover, increasing concentrations of protease inhibitor in tissue lysates resulted in a marked reduction of LMW forms, indicating that the presence of cyclin E1 LMW forms can be markedly reduced. Significant increases in cyclin E1 mRNA (2.1-fold) were detected in primary ACI rat E(2)-induced breast tumors, and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction revealed a 20% amplification of the cyclin E1 gene (CCNE1). Collectively, these results support the involvement of cyclin E1·CDK2 in centrosome overduplication during each stage of E(2)-induced mammary tumorigenesis.

  5. Intergenic complementation truncation mutants of cyclin-dependent kinase.

    PubMed

    Bitter, G A; Tsai, M M; Putzke, A P; Leong, K

    2000-03-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes PHO80 and PHO85 encode, respectively, a cyclin and cyclin-dependent kinase, which negatively regulate PHO5 gene transcription by phosphorylating the transcription activator Pho4p. Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are highly conserved proteins, both within and between species. It was previously demonstrated, using reporter genes activated in yeast by Pho4p, that hybrid proteins in which over two-thirds of Pho85p were replaced with the homologous region from human Cdk2 retained the function of native Pho85p with respect to promoter repression. In the present study, various truncated forms of the hybrid human-yeast CDKs were tested for function. Surprisingly, truncations in which significant portions of the C-terminal region of the 291-residue hybrid CDK were deleted retained activity. Genes encoding human Cdk2 proteins which terminated after amino acids 151, 140, 130, 120 and 90 each complement a chromosomal pho85 gene disruption in which the HIS3 gene is inserted at codon 49. Truncated Cdk2 proteins containing less than 60 amino acids failed to complement the pho85::HIS3 gene disruption. Although the functional C-terminal truncations disrupt the ATP-binding and active sites of Cdk2, reporter gene repression mediated by these truncated proteins is apparently due to phosphorylation of Pho4p, since a gene in which the essential lysine codon at position 33 was converted to an arginine codon does not complement the chromosomal gene disruption. The human Cdk2 truncations were demonstrated to function through intergenic complementation. The intact Cdk2-Pho85 hybrid CDK complemented the pho85 mutation in yeast strains in which the entire PHO85 coding region was deleted from chromosome XVI. The C-terminal Cdk2 truncations, however, were non-functional in these strains and thus dependent for activity on the pho85 coding region which remained in the mutant pho85::HIS3 chromosomal locus. These genetic results are consistent with a model

  6. AKAP95 promotes cell cycle progression via interactions with cyclin E and low molecular weight cyclin E.

    PubMed

    Kong, Xiang-Yu; Zhang, Deng-Cheng; Zhuang, Wen-Xin; Hua, Su-Hang; Dai, Yue; Yuan, Yang-Yang; Feng, Li-Li; Huang, Qian; Teng, Bo-Gang; Yu, Xiu-Yi; Liu, Wen-Zhi; Zhang, Yong-Xing

    2016-01-01

    AKAP95 in lung cancer tissues showed higher expression than in paracancerous tissues. AKAP95 can bind with cyclin D and cyclin E during G1/S cell cycle transition, but its molecular mechanisms remain unclear. To identify the mechanism of AKAP95 in cell cycle progression, we performed AKAP95 transfection and silencing in A549 cells, examined AKAP95, cyclin E1 and cyclin E2 expression, and the interactions of AKAP95 with cyclins E1 and E2. Results showed that over-expression of AKAP95 promoted cell growth and AKAP95 bound cyclin E1 and E2, low molecular weight cyclin E1 (LWM-E1) and LWM-E2. Additionally AKAP95 bound cyclin E1 and LMW-E2 in the nucleus during G1/S transition, bound LMW-E1 during G1, S and G2/M, and bound cyclin E2 mainly on the nuclear membrane during interphase. Cyclin E2 and LMW-E2 were also detected. AKAP95 over-expression increased cyclin E1 and LMW-E2 expression but decreased cyclin E2 levels. Unlike cyclin E1 and LMW-E2 that were nuclear located during the G1, S and G1/S phases, cyclin E2 and LMW-E1 were expressed in all cell cycle phases, with cyclin E2 present in the cytoplasm and nuclear membrane, with traces in the nucleus. LMW-E1 was present in both the cytoplasm and nucleus. The 20 kDa form of LMW-E1 showed only cytoplasmic expression, while the 40 kDa form was nuclear expressed. The expression of AKAP95, cyclin E1, LMW-E1 and -E2, might be regulated by cAMP. We conclude that AKAP95 might promote cell cycle progression by interacting with cyclin E1 and LMW-E2. LMW-E2, but not cyclin E2, might be involved in G1/S transition. The binding of AKAP95 and LMW-E1 was found throughout cell cycle.

  7. AKAP95 promotes cell cycle progression via interactions with cyclin E and low molecular weight cyclin E

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Xiang-Yu; Zhang, Deng-Cheng; Zhuang, Wen-Xin; Hua, Su-Hang; Dai, Yue; Yuan, Yang-Yang; Feng, Li-Li; Huang, Qian; Teng, Bo-Gang; Yu, Xiu-Yi; Liu, Wen-Zhi; Zhang, Yong-Xing

    2016-01-01

    AKAP95 in lung cancer tissues showed higher expression than in paracancerous tissues. AKAP95 can bind with cyclin D and cyclin E during G1/S cell cycle transition, but its molecular mechanisms remain unclear. To identify the mechanism of AKAP95 in cell cycle progression, we performed AKAP95 transfection and silencing in A549 cells, examined AKAP95, cyclin E1 and cyclin E2 expression, and the interactions of AKAP95 with cyclins E1 and E2. Results showed that over-expression of AKAP95 promoted cell growth and AKAP95 bound cyclin E1 and E2, low molecular weight cyclin E1 (LWM-E1) and LWM-E2. Additionally AKAP95 bound cyclin E1 and LMW-E2 in the nucleus during G1/S transition, bound LMW-E1 during G1, S and G2/M, and bound cyclin E2 mainly on the nuclear membrane during interphase. Cyclin E2 and LMW-E2 were also detected. AKAP95 over-expression increased cyclin E1 and LMW-E2 expression but decreased cyclin E2 levels. Unlike cyclin E1 and LMW-E2 that were nuclear located during the G1, S and G1/S phases, cyclin E2 and LMW-E1 were expressed in all cell cycle phases, with cyclin E2 present in the cytoplasm and nuclear membrane, with traces in the nucleus. LMW-E1 was present in both the cytoplasm and nucleus. The 20 kDa form of LMW-E1 showed only cytoplasmic expression, while the 40 kDa form was nuclear expressed. The expression of AKAP95, cyclin E1, LMW-E1 and -E2, might be regulated by cAMP. We conclude that AKAP95 might promote cell cycle progression by interacting with cyclin E1 and LMW-E2. LMW-E2, but not cyclin E2, might be involved in G1/S transition. The binding of AKAP95 and LMW-E1 was found throughout cell cycle. PMID:27158371

  8. Cyclin D3 critically regulates the balance between self-renewal and differentiation in skeletal muscle stem cells.

    PubMed

    De Luca, Giulia; Ferretti, Roberta; Bruschi, Marco; Mezzaroma, Eleonora; Caruso, Maurizia

    2013-11-01

    Satellite cells are mitotically quiescent myogenic stem cells resident beneath the basal lamina surrounding adult muscle myofibers. In response to injury, multiple extrinsic signals drive the entry of satellite cells into the cell cycle and then to proliferation, differentiation, and self-renewal of their downstream progeny. Because satellite cells must endure for a lifetime, their cell cycle activity must be carefully controlled to coordinate proliferative expansion and self-renewal with the onset of the differentiation program. In this study, we find that cyclin D3, a member of the family of mitogen-activated D-type cyclins, is critically required for proper developmental progression of myogenic progenitors. Using a cyclin D3-knockout mouse we determined that cyclin D3 deficiency leads to reduced myofiber size and impaired establishment of the satellite cell population within the adult muscle. Cyclin D3-null myogenic progenitors, studied ex vivo on isolated myofibers and in vitro, displayed impaired cell cycle progression, increased differentiation potential, and reduced self-renewal capability. Similarly, silencing of cyclin D3 in C2 myoblasts caused anticipated exit from the cell cycle and precocious onset of terminal differentiation. After induced muscle damage, cyclin D3-null myogenic progenitors exhibited proliferation deficits, a precocious ability to form newly generated myofibers and a reduced capability to repopulate the satellite cell niche at later stages of the regeneration process. These results indicate that cyclin D3 plays a cell-autonomous and nonredundant function in regulating the dynamic balance between proliferation, differentiation, and self-renewal that normally establishes an appropriate pool size of adult satellite cells. Copyright © 2013 AlphaMed Press.

  9. The HTLV-1 HBZ protein inhibits cyclin D1 expression through interacting with the cellular transcription factor CREB.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yunyun; Zheng, Shangen; Wang, Yuanyuan; Zang, Wenqiao; Li, Min; Wang, Na; Li, Ping; Jin, Jing; Dong, Ziming; Zhao, Guoqiang

    2013-10-01

    Human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is an oncogenic retrovirus that can cause adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) and other diseases. The HTLV-1 bZIP factor (HBZ), which is encoded by an mRNA of the opposite polarity of the viral genomic RNA, interacts with several transcription factors and is involved in T cell proliferation, viral gene transcription and cellular transformation. Cyclin D1 is a pivotal regulatory protein involved in cell cycle progression, and its depressed expression correlates with cell cycle prolongation or arrested at the G1/S transition. In our present study, we observed that HBZ expression suppressed cyclin D1 level. To investigate the role of HBZ on cyclin D1 depression, we transduced HBZ with lentivirus vector into 293T cells, CEM cells and Jurkat cells. The results of Western blot, RT-PCR and luciferase assays showed that transcriptional activity of the cyclin D1 promoter was suppressed by the bZIP domain of HBZ (HBZ-bZIP) through cyclic AMP response element (CRE) site. Immunoprecipitation and GST pull-down assays showed the binding of HBZ-bZIP to CRE-binding protein (CREB), which confirmed that the cyclin D1 promoter activity inhibition via the CRE-site was mediated by HBZ-bZIP. The results suggested that HBZ suppressed cyclin D1 transcription through interactions with CREB and along with other viral protein, HBZ may play a causal role for leukemogenesis.

  10. The Hematopoietic Transcription Factor AML1 (RUNX1) Is Negatively Regulated by the Cell Cycle Protein Cyclin D3

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Luke F.; Boyapati, Anita; Ranganathan, Velvizhi; Iwama, Atsushi; Tenen, Daniel G.; Tsai, Schickwann; Zhang, Dong-Er

    2005-01-01

    The family of cyclin D proteins plays a crucial role in the early events of the mammalian cell cycle. Recent studies have revealed the involvement of AML1 transactivation activity in promoting cell cycle progression through the induction of cyclin D proteins. This information in combination with our previous observation that a region in AML1 between amino acids 213 and 289 is important for its function led us to investigate prospective proteins associating with this region. We identified cyclin D3 by a yeast two-hybrid screen and detected AML1 interaction with the cyclin D family by both in vitro pull-down and in vivo coimmunoprecipitation assays. Furthermore, we demonstrate that cyclin D3 negatively regulates the transactivation activity of AML1 in a dose-dependent manner by competing with CBFβ for AML1 association, leading to a decreased binding affinity of AML1 for its target DNA sequence. AML1 and its fusion protein AML1-ETO have been shown to shorten and prolong the mammalian cell cycle, respectively. In addition, AML1 promotes myeloid cell differentiation. Thus, our observations suggest that the direct association of cyclin D3 with AML1 functions as a putative feedback mechanism to regulate cell cycle progression and differentiation. PMID:16287839

  11. Novel alterations in CDK1/cyclin B1 kinase complex formation occur during the acquisition of a polyploid DNA content.

    PubMed Central

    Datta, N S; Williams, J L; Caldwell, J; Curry, A M; Ashcraft, E K; Long, M W

    1996-01-01

    The pathways that regulate the S-phase events associated with the control of DNA replication are poorly understood. The bone marrow megakaryocytes are unique in that they leave the diploid (2C) state to differentiate, synthesizing 4 to 64 times the normal DNA content within a single nucleus, a process known as endomitosis. Human erythroleukemia (HEL) cells model this process, becoming polyploid during phorbol diester-induced megakaryocyte differentiation. The mitotic arrest occurring in these polyploid cells involves novel alterations in the cdk1/cyclin B1 complex: a marked reduction in cdk1 protein levels, and an elevated and sustained expression of cyclin B1. Endomitotic cells thus lack cdk1/cyclin B1-associated H1-histone kinase activity. Constitutive over-expression of cdk1 in endomitotic cells failed to re-initiate normal mitotic events even though cdk1 was present in a 10-fold excess. This was due to an inability of cyclin-B1 to physically associate with cdk1. Nonetheless, endomitotic cyclin B1 possesses immunoprecipitable H1-histone kinase activity, and specifically translocates to the nucleus. We conclude that mitosis is abrogated during endomitosis due to the absence of cdk1 and the failure to form M-phase promoting factor, resulting in a disassociation of mitosis from the completion of S-phase. Further studies on cyclin and its interacting proteins should be informative in understanding endomitosis and cell cycle control. Images PMID:8688553

  12. Identification of New Substrates for Breast Tumor Specific LMW Cyclin E/CDK2 Kinase

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    Cyclin E/CDK2 phosphorylation of Hbo1 does not affect the HAT activity of Hbo1 CDK1 phosphorylates Hbo1 at T85/T88 to create a docking site for polo ...values first subtracted from a water control and then normalized to the positive control, which used HeLa nuclear extract as a source of HAT

  13. Adenosine Attenuates Human Coronary Artery Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation By Inhibiting Multiple Signaling Pathways that Converge on Cyclin D

    PubMed Central

    Dubey, Raghvendra K.; Fingerle, Juergen; Gillespie, Delbert G.; Mi, Zaichuan; Rosselli, Marinella; Imthurn, Bruno; Jackson, Edwin K.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study was to determine whether and how adenosine affects the proliferation of human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (HCASMCs). In HCASMCs, 2-chloroadenosine (stable adenosine analogue), but not N6-cyclopentyladenosine, CGS21680, or N6-(3-iodobenzyl)-adenosine-5'-N-methyluronamide, inhibited HCASMC proliferation (A2B-receptor profile). 2-Chloroadenosine increased cAMP, reduced phosphorylation (activation) of ERK and Akt (protein kinases known to increase cyclin D expression and activity, respectively), and reduced levels of cyclin D1 (cyclin that promotes cell-cycle progression in G1). Moreover, 2-chloroadenosine inhibited expression of Skp2 (promotes proteolysis of p27Kip1) and up-regulated levels of p27Kip1 (cell-cycle regulator that impairs cyclin D function). 2-Chloroadenosine also inhibited signaling downstream of cyclin D including hyperphosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein and expression of cyclin A (S phase cyclin). Knockdown of A2B receptors prevented the effects of 2-chloroadenosine on ERK1/2, Akt, Skp2, p27Kip1, cyclin D1, cyclin A, and proliferation. Likewise, inhibition of adenylyl cyclase and protein kinase A abrogated 2-chloroadenosine’s inhibitory effects on Skp2 and stimulatory effects on p27Kip1, and rescued HCASMCs from 2-chloroadenosine-mediated inhibition. Knockdown of p27Kip1 also reversed the inhibitory effects of 2-chloroadenosine on HCASMC proliferation. In vivo, peri-arterial (rat carotid artery) 2-chloroadenosine (20 µmol/L for 7 days) down-regulated vascular expression of Skp2, up-regulated vascular expression of p27Kip1, and reduced neointima hyperplasia by 71% (p<0.05; neointimal thickness: control, 37,424±18,371 pixels; treated, 10,352±2,824 pixels). Conclusion The adenosine/A2B receptor/cAMP/protein kinase A axis inhibits HCASMC proliferation by blocking multiple signaling pathways (ERK1/2, Akt, and Skp2) that converge at cyclin D, a key G1 cyclin that controls cell-cycle progression. PMID:26416848

  14. Adenosine Attenuates Human Coronary Artery Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation by Inhibiting Multiple Signaling Pathways That Converge on Cyclin D.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Raghvendra K; Fingerle, Jürgen; Gillespie, Delbert G; Mi, Zaichuan; Rosselli, Marinella; Imthurn, Bruno; Jackson, Edwin K

    2015-12-01

    The goal of this study was to determine whether and how adenosine affects the proliferation of human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (HCASMCs). In HCASMCs, 2-chloroadenosine (stable adenosine analogue), but not N(6)-cyclopentyladenosine, CGS21680, or N(6)-(3-iodobenzyl)-adenosine-5'-N-methyluronamide, inhibited HCASMC proliferation (A2B receptor profile). 2-Chloroadenosine increased cAMP, reduced phosphorylation (activation) of ERK and Akt (protein kinases known to increase cyclin D expression and activity, respectively), and reduced levels of cyclin D1 (cyclin that promotes cell-cycle progression in G1). Moreover, 2-chloroadenosine inhibited expression of S-phase kinase-associated protein-2 (Skp2; promotes proteolysis of p27(Kip1)) and upregulated levels of p27(Kip1) (cell-cycle regulator that impairs cyclin D function). 2-Chloroadenosine also inhibited signaling downstream of cyclin D, including hyperphosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein and expression of cyclin A (S phase cyclin). Knockdown of A2B receptors prevented the effects of 2-chloroadenosine on ERK1/2, Akt, Skp2, p27(Kip1), cyclin D1, cyclin A, and proliferation. Likewise, inhibition of adenylyl cyclase and protein kinase A abrogated 2-chloroadenosine's inhibitory effects on Skp2 and stimulatory effects on p27(Kip1) and rescued HCASMCs from 2-chloroadenosine-mediated inhibition. Knockdown of p27(Kip1) also reversed the inhibitory effects of 2-chloroadenosine on HCASMC proliferation. In vivo, peri-arterial (rat carotid artery) 2-chloroadenosine (20 μmol/L for 7 days) downregulated vascular expression of Skp2, upregulated vascular expression of p27(Kip1), and reduced neointima hyperplasia by 71% (P<0.05; neointimal thickness: control, 37 424±18 371 pixels; treated, 10 352±2824 pixels). In conclusion, the adenosine/A2B receptor/cAMP/protein kinase A axis inhibits HCASMC proliferation by blocking multiple signaling pathways (ERK1/2, Akt, and Skp2) that converge at cyclin D, a key G1 cyclin

  15. Downregulation of cyclin D1 sensitizes cancer cells to MDM2 antagonist Nutlin-3

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xuhui; Eilers, Grant; He, Quan; Liu, Lili; Wu, Yeqing; Wu, Yuehong; Yu, Wei; Fletcher, Jonathan A.; Ou, Wen-Bin

    2016-01-01

    The MDM2-p53 pathway has a prominent oncogenic function in the pathogenesis of various cancers. Nutlin-3, a small-molecule antagonist of MDM2-p53 interaction, inhibits proliferation in cancer cells with wild-type p53. Herein, we evaluate the expression of MDM2, both the full length and a splicing variant MDM2-A, and the sensitivity of Nutlin-3 in different cancer cell lines. Included are seven cell lines with wild-type p53 (four mesothelioma, one breast cancer, one chondrosarcoma, and one leiomyosarcoma), two liposarcoma cell lines harboring MDM2 amplification and wild-type p53, and one mesothelioma cell line harboring a p53 point mutation. Nutlin-3 treatment increased expression of cyclin D1, MDM2, and p53 in cell lines with wild-type p53. Additive effects were observed in cells containing wild-type p53 through coordinated attack on MDM2-p53 binding and cyclin D1 by lentivirual shRNA knockdown or small molecule inhibition, as demonstrated by immunoblots and cell viability analyses. Further results demonstrate that MDM2 binds to cyclin D1, and that an increase in cyclin D1 expression after Nutlin-3 treatment is correlated with expression and ubiquitin E3-ligase activity of MDM2. MDM2 and p53 knockdown experiments demonstrated inhibition of cyclin D1 by MDM2 but not p53. These results indicate that combination inhibition of cyclin D1 and MDM2-p53 binding warrants clinical evaluation as a novel therapeutic strategy in cancer cells harboring wild-type p53. PMID:27129163

  16. Platelet-rich plasma increases proliferation of tendon cells by modulating Stat3 and p27 to up-regulate expression of cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases.

    PubMed

    Yu, T-Y; Pang, J-H S; Wu, K P-H; Lin, L-P; Tseng, W-C; Tsai, W-C

    2015-08-01

    To investigate effects of platelet-rich plasma on tendon cell proliferation and the underlying molecular mechanisms. Platelet-rich plasma was prepared manually by two-step centrifugation. Proliferation was evaluated in cultured rat tendon cells by the 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. Cell cycle progression was assessed by flow cytometry. Messenger RNA expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), cyclin E1, A2 and B1, and cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks) 1 and 2 was assessed by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Protein expression of the above cyclins and Cdks and of signal transducer and activator of transcription (Stat) 3 and p27 was evaluated by western blotting. Platelet-rich plasma used in the present study had concentrations of platelets, TGF-β1 and PDGF over 3-fold higher than normal whole blood. Platelet-rich plasma enhanced tendon cell proliferation (P = 0.008) by promoting G1 /S phase transition in the cell cycle, and increased expression of PCNA, cyclin E1, A2 and B1, Cdks1 and 2, and phosphorylated Stat3, while inhibiting p27 expression. Platelet-rich plasma contains high concentrations of TGF-β1 and PDGF that increase tendon cell proliferation by modulating Stat3/p27(Kip1), which enhances expression of cyclin-Cdk complexes that promote cell cycle progression. These results provide molecular evidence for positive effects of platelet-rich plasma on tendon cell proliferation, which can be useful in clinical applications of tendon injury. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Phosphorylation of synaptic GTPase-activating protein (synGAP) by Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) and cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) alters the ratio of its GAP activity toward Ras and Rap GTPases.

    PubMed

    Walkup, Ward G; Washburn, Lorraine; Sweredoski, Michael J; Carlisle, Holly J; Graham, Robert L; Hess, Sonja; Kennedy, Mary B

    2015-02-20

    synGAP is a neuron-specific Ras and Rap GTPase-activating protein (GAP) found in high concentrations in the postsynaptic density (PSD) fraction from the mammalian forebrain. We have previously shown that, in situ in the PSD fraction or in recombinant form in Sf9 cell membranes, synGAP is phosphorylated by Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), another prominent component of the PSD. Here, we show that recombinant synGAP (r-synGAP), lacking 102 residues at the N terminus, can be purified in soluble form and is phosphorylated by cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) as well as by CaMKII. Phosphorylation of r-synGAP by CaMKII increases its HRas GAP activity by 25% and its Rap1 GAP activity by 76%. Conversely, phosphorylation by CDK5 increases r-synGAP's HRas GAP activity by 98% and its Rap1 GAP activity by 20%. Thus, phosphorylation by both kinases increases synGAP activity; CaMKII shifts the relative GAP activity toward inactivation of Rap1, and CDK5 shifts the relative activity toward inactivation of HRas. GAP activity toward Rap2 is not altered by phosphorylation by either kinase. CDK5 phosphorylates synGAP primarily at two sites, Ser-773 and Ser-802. Phosphorylation at Ser-773 inhibits r-synGAP activity, and phosphorylation at Ser-802 increases it. However, the net effect of concurrent phosphorylation of both sites, Ser-773 and Ser-802, is an increase in GAP activity. synGAP is phosphorylated at Ser-773 and Ser-802 in the PSD fraction, and its phosphorylation by CDK5 and CaMKII is differentially regulated by activation of NMDA-type glutamate receptors in cultured neurons. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Phosphorylation of Synaptic GTPase-activating Protein (synGAP) by Ca2+/Calmodulin-dependent Protein Kinase II (CaMKII) and Cyclin-dependent Kinase 5 (CDK5) Alters the Ratio of Its GAP Activity toward Ras and Rap GTPases*

    PubMed Central

    Walkup, Ward G.; Washburn, Lorraine; Sweredoski, Michael J.; Carlisle, Holly J.; Graham, Robert L.; Hess, Sonja; Kennedy, Mary B.

    2015-01-01

    synGAP is a neuron-specific Ras and Rap GTPase-activating protein (GAP) found in high concentrations in the postsynaptic density (PSD) fraction from the mammalian forebrain. We have previously shown that, in situ in the PSD fraction or in recombinant form in Sf9 cell membranes, synGAP is phosphorylated by Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), another prominent component of the PSD. Here, we show that recombinant synGAP (r-synGAP), lacking 102 residues at the N terminus, can be purified in soluble form and is phosphorylated by cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) as well as by CaMKII. Phosphorylation of r-synGAP by CaMKII increases its HRas GAP activity by 25% and its Rap1 GAP activity by 76%. Conversely, phosphorylation by CDK5 increases r-synGAP's HRas GAP activity by 98% and its Rap1 GAP activity by 20%. Thus, phosphorylation by both kinases increases synGAP activity; CaMKII shifts the relative GAP activity toward inactivation of Rap1, and CDK5 shifts the relative activity toward inactivation of HRas. GAP activity toward Rap2 is not altered by phosphorylation by either kinase. CDK5 phosphorylates synGAP primarily at two sites, Ser-773 and Ser-802. Phosphorylation at Ser-773 inhibits r-synGAP activity, and phosphorylation at Ser-802 increases it. However, the net effect of concurrent phosphorylation of both sites, Ser-773 and Ser-802, is an increase in GAP activity. synGAP is phosphorylated at Ser-773 and Ser-802 in the PSD fraction, and its phosphorylation by CDK5 and CaMKII is differentially regulated by activation of NMDA-type glutamate receptors in cultured neurons. PMID:25533468

  19. Schlafen-1 causes a cell cycle arrest by inhibiting induction of cyclin D1.

    PubMed

    Brady, Gareth; Boggan, Louise; Bowie, Andrew; O'Neill, Luke A J

    2005-09-02

    Schlafen-1 (Slfn-1), the prototypic member of the Schlafen family of proteins, was described as an inducer of growth arrest in T-lymphocytes and causes a cell cycle arrest in NIH3T3 fibroblasts prior to the G1/S transition. How Slfn-1 exerts its effects on the cell cycle is not currently known. We report that synchronized murine fibroblasts expressing Slfn-1 do not exit G1 when stimulated with fetal calf serum, platelet-derived growth factor BB (PDGF-BB) or epidermal growth factor (EGF). The induction of cyclin D1 by these stimuli was blocked in the presence of Slfn-1 as were all downstream cell cycle processes. Overexpression of cyclin D1 in growth-arrested, Slfn-1-expressing cells induced an increase in cell growth consistent with this protein being the biological target of Slfn-1. Activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway by EGF or phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate was unaffected by Slfn-1 expression. PDGF signaling was, however, almost completely blocked. This was due to a lack of PDGF receptor expression in Slfn-1-expressing cells consistent with Slfn-1 blocking the cell cycle in G1 where PDGF receptor expression is normally down-regulated. Finally, overexpression of Slfn-1 inhibited the activation of the cyclin D1 promoter. Slfn-1 therefore causes a cell cycle arrest during G1 by inhibiting induction of cyclin D1 by mitogens.

  20. Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitors in Maize Endosperm and Their Potential Role in Endoreduplication1

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Cintia M.; Dante, Ricardo A.; Sabelli, Paolo A.; Sun, Yuejin; Dilkes, Brian P.; Gordon-Kamm, William J.; Larkins, Brian A.

    2005-01-01

    Two maize (Zea mays) cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors, Zeama;KRP;1 and Zeama;KRP;2, were characterized and shown to be expressed in developing endosperm. Similar to the CDK inhibitors in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), the maize proteins contain a carboxy-terminal region related to the inhibitory domain of the mammalian Cip/Kip inhibitors. Zeama;KRP;1 is present in the endosperm between 7 and 21 d after pollination, a period that encompasses the onset of endoreduplication, while the Zeama;KRP;2 protein declines during this time. Nevertheless, Zeama;KRP;1 accounts for only part of the CDK inhibitory activity that peaks coincident with the endoreduplication phase of endosperm development. In vitro assays showed that Zeama;KRP;1 and Zeama;KRP;2 are able to inhibit endosperm Cdc2-related CKD activity that associates with p13Suc1. They were also shown to specifically inhibit cyclin A1;3- and cyclin D5;1-associated CDK activities, but not cyclin B1;3/CDK. Overexpression of Zeama;KRP;1 in maize embryonic calli that ectopically expressed the wheat dwarf virus RepA protein, which counteracts retinoblastoma-related protein function, led to an additional round of DNA replication without nuclear division. PMID:16055680

  1. CDK-Dependent Hsp70 Phosphorylation Controls G1 Cyclin Abundance and Cell-Cycle Progression

    PubMed Central

    Truman, Andrew W.; Kristjansdottir, Kolbrun; Wolfgeher, Donald; Hasin, Naushaba; Polier, Sigrun; Zhang, Hong; Perrett, Sarah; Prodromou, Chrisostomos; Jones, Gary W.; Kron, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    Summary In budding yeast, the essential functions of Hsp70 chaperones Ssa1–4 are regulated through expression level, isoform specificity, and cochaperone activity. Suggesting a novel regulatory paradigm, we find that phosphorylation of Ssa1 T36 within a cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) consensus site conserved among Hsp70 proteins alters cochaperone and client interactions. T36 phosphorylation triggers displacement of Ydj1, allowing Ssa1 to bind the G1 cyclin Cln3 and promote its degradation. The stress CDK Pho85 phosphorylates T36 upon nitrogen starvation or pheromone stimulation, destabilizing Cln3 to delay onset of S phase. In turn, the mitotic CDK Cdk1 phosphorylates T36 to block Cln3 accumulation in G2/M. Suggesting broad conservation from yeast to human, CDK-dependent phosphorylation of Hsc70 T38 similarly regulates Cyclin D1 binding and stability. These results establish an active role for Hsp70 chaperones as signal transducers mediating growth control of G1 cyclin abundance and activity. PMID:23217712

  2. Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors in maize endosperm and their potential role in endoreduplication.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Cintia M; Dante, Ricardo A; Sabelli, Paolo A; Sun, Yuejin; Dilkes, Brian P; Gordon-Kamm, William J; Larkins, Brian A

    2005-08-01

    Two maize (Zea mays) cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors, Zeama;KRP;1 and Zeama;KRP;2, were characterized and shown to be expressed in developing endosperm. Similar to the CDK inhibitors in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), the maize proteins contain a carboxy-terminal region related to the inhibitory domain of the mammalian Cip/Kip inhibitors. Zeama;KRP;1 is present in the endosperm between 7 and 21 d after pollination, a period that encompasses the onset of endoreduplication, while the Zeama;KRP;2 protein declines during this time. Nevertheless, Zeama;KRP;1 accounts for only part of the CDK inhibitory activity that peaks coincident with the endoreduplication phase of endosperm development. In vitro assays showed that Zeama;KRP;1 and Zeama;KRP;2 are able to inhibit endosperm Cdc2-related CKD activity that associates with p13(Suc1). They were also shown to specifically inhibit cyclin A1;3- and cyclin D5;1-associated CDK activities, but not cyclin B1;3/CDK. Overexpression of Zeama;KRP;1 in maize embryonic calli that ectopically expressed the wheat dwarf virus RepA protein, which counteracts retinoblastoma-related protein function, led to an additional round of DNA replication without nuclear division.

  3. Cyclin-dependent kinases regulate apoptosis of intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Sujoy; Ray, Ramesh M; Johnson, Leonard R

    2014-03-01

    Homeostasis of the gastrointestinal epithelium is dependent upon a balance between cell proliferation and apoptosis. Cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks) are well known for their role in cell proliferation. Previous studies from our group have shown that polyamine-depletion of intestinal epithelial cells (IEC-6) decreases cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (Cdk2) activity, increases p53 and p21Cip1 protein levels, induces G1 arrest, and protects cells from camptothecin (CPT)-induced apoptosis. Although emerging evidence suggests that members of the Cdk family are involved in the regulation of apoptosis, their roles directing apoptosis of IEC-6 cells are not known. In this study, we report that inhibition of Cdk1, 2, and 9 (with the broad range Cdk inhibitor, AZD5438) in proliferating IEC-6 cells triggered DNA damage, activated p53 signaling, inhibited proliferation, and induced apoptosis. By contrast, inhibition of Cdk2 (with NU6140) increased p53 protein and activity, inhibited proliferation, but had no effect on apoptosis. Notably, AZD5438 sensitized, whereas, NU6140 rescued proliferating IEC-6 cells from CPT-induced apoptosis. However, in colon carcinoma (Caco-2) cells with mutant p53, treatment with either AZD5438 or NU6140 blocked proliferation, albeit more robustly with AZD5438. Both Cdk inhibitors induced apoptosis in Caco-2 cells in a p53-independent manner. In serum starved quiescent IEC-6 cells, both AZD5438 and NU6140 decreased TNF-α/CPT-induced activation of p53 and, consequently, rescued cells from apoptosis, indicating that sustained Cdk activity is required for apoptosis of quiescent cells. Furthermore, AZD5438 partially reversed the protective effect of polyamine depletion whereas NU6140 had no effect. Together, these results demonstrate that Cdks possess opposing roles in the control of apoptosis in quiescent and proliferating cells. In addition, Cdk inhibitors uncouple proliferation from apoptosis in a p53-dependent manner.

  4. Cyclin-dependent kinases regulate apoptosis of intestinal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Sujoy; Ray, Ramesh M.; Johnson, Leonard R.

    2014-01-01

    Homeostasis of the gastrointestinal epithelium is dependent upon a balance between cell proliferation and apoptosis. Cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks) are well known for their role in cell proliferation. Previous studies from our group have shown that polyamine-depletion of intestinal epithelial cells (IEC-6) decreases cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (Cdk2) activity, increases p53 and p21Cip1 protein levels, induces G1 arrest, and protects cells from camptothecin (CPT)-induced apoptosis. Although emerging evidence suggests that members of the Cdk family are involved in the regulation of apoptosis, their roles directing apoptosis of IEC-6 cells are not known. In this study, we report that inhibition of Cdk1, 2, and 9 (with the broad range Cdk inhibitor, AZD5438) in proliferating IEC-6 cells triggered DNA damage, activated p53 signaling, inhibited proliferation, and induced apoptosis. By contrast, inhibition of Cdk2 (with NU6140) increased p53 protein and activity, inhibited proliferation, but had no effect on apoptosis. Notably, AZD5438 sensitized, whereas, NU6140 rescued proliferating IEC-6 cells from CPT-induced apoptosis. However, in colon carcinoma (Caco2) cells with mutant p53, treatment with either AZD5438 or NU6140 blocked proliferation, albeit more robustly with AZD5438. Both Cdk inhibitors induced apoptosis in Caco2 cells in a p53-independent manner. In serum starved quiescent IEC-6 cells, both AZD5438 and NU6140 decreased TNF- /CPT-induced activation of p53 and, consequently, rescued cells from apoptosis, indicating that sustained Cdk activity is required for apoptosis of quiescent cells. Furthermore, AZD5438 partially reversed the protective effect of polyamine depletion whereas NU6140 had no effect. Together, these results demonstrate that Cdks possess opposing roles in the control of apoptosis in quiescent and proliferating cells. In addition, Cdk inhibitors uncouple proliferation from apoptosis in a p53-dependent manner. PMID:24242917

  5. The ATF site mediates downregulation of the cyclin A gene during contact inhibition in vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Yoshizumi, M; Hsieh, C M; Zhou, F; Tsai, J C; Patterson, C; Perrella, M A; Lee, M E

    1995-01-01

    Contact inhibition mediates monolayer formation and withdrawal from the cell cycle in vascular endothelial cells. In studying the cyclins--key regulators of the cell cycle--in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC), we found that levels of cyclin A mRNA decreased in confluent BAEC despite the presence of 10% fetal calf serum. We then transfected into BAEC a series of plasmids containing various lengths of the human cyclin A 5' flanking sequence and the luciferase gene. Plasmids containing 3,200, 516, 406, 266, or 133 bp of the human cyclin A promoter directed high luciferase activity in growing but not confluent BAEC. In contrast, a plasmid containing 23 bp of the cyclin A promoter was associated with a 65-fold reduction in activity in growing BAEC, and the promoter activities of this plasmid were identical in both growing and confluent BAEC. Mutation of the activating transcription factor (ATF) consensus sequence at bp -80 to -73 of the cyclin A promoter decreased its activity, indicating the critical role of the ATF site. We identified by gel mobility shift analysis protein complexes that bound to the ATF site in nuclear extracts from growing but not confluent BAEC and identified (with antibodies) ATF-1 as a binding protein in nuclear extracts from growing cells. Also, ATF-1 mRNA levels decreased in confluent BAEC. Taken together, these data suggest that the ATF site and its cognate binding proteins play an important role in the downregulation of cyclin A gene expression during contact inhibition. PMID:7760822

  6. Tl(I) and Tl(III) alter the expression of EGF-dependent signals and cyclins required for pheochromocytoma (PC12) cell-cycle resumption and progression.

    PubMed

    Pino, María T L; Verstraeten, Sandra V

    2015-08-01

    The effects of thallium [Tl(I) and Tl(III)] on the PC12 cell cycle were evaluated without (EGF(-)) or with (EGF(+)) media supplementation with epidermal growth factor (EGF). The following markers of cell-cycle phases were analyzed: cyclin D1 (G1 ); E2F-1, cyclin E and cytosolic p21 (G1 →S transition); nuclear PCNA and cyclin A (S); and cyclin B1 (G2). The amount of cells in each phase and the activation of the signaling cascade triggered by EGF were also analyzed. Tl(I) and Tl(III) (5-100 μM) caused dissimilar effects on PC12 cell proliferation. In EGF(-) cells, Tl(I) increased the expression of G1 →S transition markers and nuclear PCNA, without affecting cyclin A or cyclin B1. In addition to those, cyclin B1 was also increased in EGF(+) cells. In EGF(-) cells, Tl(III) increased the expression of cyclin D1, all the G1→S and S phase markers and cyclin B1. In EGF(+) cells, Tl(III) increased cyclin D1 expression and decreased all the markers of G1 →S transition and the S phase. Even when these cations did not induce the activation of EGF receptor (EGFR) in EGF(-) cells, they promoted the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and Akt. In the presence of EGF, the cations anticipated EGFR phosphorylation without affecting the kinetics of EGF-dependent ERK1/2 and Akt phosphorylation. Altogether, results indicate that Tl(I) promoted cell proliferation in both EGF(-) and EGF(+) cells. In contrast, Tl(III) promoted the proliferation of EGF(-) cells but delayed it in EGF(+) cells, which may be related to the toxic effects of this cation in PC12 cells. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Hog1 Targets Whi5 and Msa1 Transcription Factors To Downregulate Cyclin Expression upon Stress

    PubMed Central

    González-Novo, Alberto; Jiménez, Javier; Clotet, Josep; Nadal-Ribelles, Mariona; Cavero, Santiago

    2015-01-01

    Yeast cells have developed complex mechanisms to cope with extracellular insults. An increase in external osmolarity leads to activation of the stress-activated protein kinase Hog1, which is the main regulator of adaptive responses, such as gene expression and cell cycle progression, that are essential for cellular survival. Upon osmostress, the G1-to-S transition is regulated by Hog1 through stabilization of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor Sic1 and the downregulation of G1 cyclin expression by an unclear mechanism. Here, we show that Hog1 interacts with and phosphorylates components of the core cell cycle transcriptional machinery such as Whi5 and the coregulator Msa1. Phosphorylation of these two transcriptional regulators by Hog1 is essential for inhibition of G1 cyclin expression, for control of cell morphogenesis, and for maximal cell survival upon stress. The control of both Whi5 and Msa1 by Hog1 also revealed the necessity for proper coordination of budding and DNA replication. Thus, Hog1 regulates G1 cyclin transcription upon osmostress to ensure coherent passage through Start. PMID:25733686

  8. The tumor suppressor, parafibromin, mediates histone H3 K9 methylation for cyclin D1 repression.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yong-Jin; Han, Jeung-Whan; Youn, Hong-Duk; Cho, Eun-Jung

    2010-01-01

    Parafibromin, a component of the RNA polymerase II-associated PAF1 complex, is a tumor suppressor linked to hyperparathyroidism-jaw tumor syndrome and sporadic parathyroid carcinoma. Parafibromin induces cell cycle arrest by repressing cyclin D1 via an unknown mechanism. Here, we show that parafibromin interacts with the histone methyltransferase, SUV39H1, and functions as a transcriptional repressor. The central region (128-227 amino acids) of parafibromin is important for both the interaction with SUV39H1 and transcriptional repression. Parafibromin associated with the promoter and coding regions of cyclin D1 and was required for the recruitment of SUV39H1 and the induction of H3 K9 methylation but not H3 K4 methylation. RNA interference analysis showed that SUV39H1 was critical for cyclin D1 repression. These data suggest that parafibromin plays an unexpected role as a repressor in addition to its widely known activity associated with transcriptional activation. Parafibromin as a part of the PAF1 complex might downregulate cyclin D1 expression by integrating repressive H3 K9 methylation during transcription.

  9. Epidermal Growth Factor Induces Proliferation of Hair Follicle-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Through Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor-Mediated Activation of ERK and AKT Signaling Pathways Associated with Upregulation of Cyclin D1 and Downregulation of p16.

    PubMed

    Bai, Tingting; Liu, Feilin; Zou, Fei; Zhao, Guifang; Jiang, Yixu; Liu, Li; Shi, Jiahong; Hao, Deshun; Zhang, Qi; Zheng, Tong; Zhang, Yingyao; Liu, Mingsheng; Li, Shilun; Qi, Liangchen; Liu, Jin Yu

    2017-01-15

    The maintenance of highly proliferative capacity and full differentiation potential is a necessary step in the initiation of stem cell-based regenerative medicine. Our recent study showed that epidermal growth factor (EGF) significantly enhanced hair follicle-derived mesenchymal stem cell (HF-MSC) proliferation while maintaining the multilineage differentiation potentials. However, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Herein, we investigated the role of EGF in HF-MSC proliferation. HF-MSCs were isolated and cultured with or without EGF. Immunofluorescence staining, flow cytometry, cytochemistry, and western blotting were used to assess proliferation, cell signaling pathways related to the EGF receptor (EGFR), and cell cycle progression. HF-MSCs exhibited surface markers of mesenchymal stem cells and displayed trilineage differentiation potentials toward adipocytes, chondrocytes, and osteoblasts. EGF significantly increased HF-MSC proliferation as well as EGFR, ERK1/2, and AKT phosphorylation (p-EGFR, p-ERK1/2, and p-AKT) in a time- and dose-dependent manner, but not STAT3 phosphorylation. EGFR inhibitor (AG1478), PI3K-AKT inhibitor (LY294002), ERK inhibitor (U0126), and STAT3 inhibitor (STA-21) significantly blocked EGF-induced HF-MSC proliferation. Moreover, AG1478, LY294002, and U0126 significantly decreased p-EGFR, p-AKT, and p-ERK1/2 expression. EGF shifted HF-MSCs at the G1 phase to the S and G2 phase. Concomitantly, cyclinD1, phosphorylated Rb, and E2F1expression increased, while that of p16 decreased. In conclusion, EGF induces HF-MSC proliferation through the EGFR/ERK and AKT pathways, but not through STAT-3. The G1/S transition was stimulated by upregulation of cyclinD1 and inhibition of p16 expression.

  10. Attenuation of microRNA-16 derepresses the cyclins D1, D2 and E1 to provoke cardiomyocyte hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shuai; Zou, Xiao; Zhu, Jie-Ning; Fu, Yong-Heng; Lin, Qiu-Xiong; Liang, Ye-You; Deng, Chun-Yu; Kuang, Su-Juan; Zhang, Meng-Zhen; Liao, Yu-Lin; Zheng, Xi-Long; Yu, Xi-Yong; Shan, Zhi-Xin

    2015-01-01

    Cyclins/retinoblastoma protein (pRb) pathway participates in cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. MicroRNAs (miRNAs), the endogenous small non-coding RNAs, were recognized to play significant roles in cardiac hypertrophy. But, it remains unknown whether cyclin/Rb pathway is modulated by miRNAs during cardiac hypertrophy. This study investigates the potential role of microRNA-16 (miR-16) in modulating cyclin/Rb pathway during cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. An animal model of hypertrophy was established in a rat with abdominal aortic constriction (AAC), and in a mouse with transverse aortic constriction (TAC) and in a mouse with subcutaneous injection of phenylephrine (PE) respectively. In addition, a cell model of hypertrophy was also achieved based on PE-promoted neonatal rat ventricular cardiomyocyte and based on Ang-II-induced neonatal mouse ventricular cardiomyocyte respectively. We demonstrated that miR-16 expression was markedly decreased in hypertrophic myocardium and hypertrophic cardiomyocytes in rats and mice. Overexpression of miR-16 suppressed rat cardiac hypertrophy and hypertrophic phenotype of cultured cardiomyocytes, and inhibition of miR-16 induced a hypertrophic phenotype in cardiomyocytes. Expressions of cyclins D1, D2 and E1, and the phosphorylated pRb were increased in hypertrophic myocardium and hypertrophic cardiomyocytes, but could be reversed by enforced expression of miR-16. Cyclins D1, D2 and E1, not pRb, were further validated to be modulated post-transcriptionally by miR-16. In addition, the signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 and c-Myc were activated during myocardial hypertrophy, and inhibitions of them prevented miR-16 attenuation. Therefore, attenuation of miR-16 provoke cardiomyocyte hypertrophy via derepressing the cyclins D1, D2 and E1, and activating cyclin/Rb pathway, revealing that miR-16 might be a target to manage cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:25583328

  11. Immunohistochemical expression of the p53, mdm2, p21/Waf-1, Rb, p16, Ki67, cyclin D1, cyclin A and cyclin B1 proteins and apoptotic index in T-cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Kanavaros, P; Bai, M; Stefanaki, K; Poussias, G; Rontogianni, D; Zioga, E; Gorgoulis, V; Agnantis, N J

    2001-04-01

    Fifty-seven cases of T-cell lymphomas (TCL) including 5 lymphoblastic (T-LBL) and 52 peripheral TCL (PTCL) were analyzed by immunohistochemistry for the expression of p53, mdm2, p21, Rb, cyclin D1, cyclin A, cyclin B1, and Ki67/MIB1 proteins and 39/52 PTCL were also analyzed for the expression of p16 protein and for the presence of apoptotic cells by the TUNEL method. The aim was to search for abnormal immunoprofiles of p53 and Rb growth control pathways and to determine the proliferative activity and the apoptotic index of TCL. Abnormal overexpression of p53, p21 and mdm2, in comparison to normal lymph nodes, was found in 12/57, 10/57 and 2/57 cases of TCL, respectively. Abnormal loss of Rb and p16 expression was found in 1/57 and 2/39 cases, respectively, whereas abnormal overexpression of cyclin D1 was not detected in any of the 57 cases. Our data revealed entity-related p53/p21/mdm2 phenotypes. Indeed, most nodal and cutaneous CD30+ anaplastic large cell lymphomas (ALCL) showed concomitant overexpression of p53 and p21 proteins (7/8 cases), and mdm2 was overexpressed in 2 p53-positive nodal ALCL. In contrast, overexpression of p53 was found in 3/17 cases of nodal peripheral TCL unspecified (PTCL-UC) and 2/7 non-ALCL cutaneous pleomorphic TCL. Overexpression of p21 protein was detected in 2/3 p53-positive PTCL-UC and in 1/2 p53-positive non-ALCL cutaneous pleomorphic TCL. Finally, all the remaining 25 cases of TCL did not show p53 and p21 overexpression. Overall, the p53+/p21+ phenotype in 10/57 TCL suggests wild-type p53 capable of inducing p21 expression. The highest apoptotic index (AI) was found in ALCL and a positive correlation between apoptotic index and Ki67 index (p<0.001) was detected. Ki67, cyclin A and cyclin B1 expression was found in all 57 TCL and on the basis of the combined use of these 3 variables, 3 groups of proliferative activity could be determined: a) high in ALCL and T-LBL, b) low in mycosis fungoides (MF) and gammadelta hepatosplenic TCL

  12. Anticancer effect of icaritin inhibits cell growth of colon cancer through reactive oxygen species, Bcl-2 and cyclin D1/E signaling.

    PubMed

    Li, Chaofeng; Peng, Weichao; Song, Xin; Wang, Qian; Wang, Wenyue

    2016-11-01

    Icaritin has an advantage in enhancing immunity. Besides, with its anticancer effect, it may be of great help in cancer treatment and recovery of cancer patients. As a result, icaritin is likely to become a novel anticancer drug. However, the anticancer effect of icaritin against colon cancer has not been elucidated thus far. The present study investigated the latent anticancer effect of icaritin on the inhibition of colon cancer cell growth by regulating reactive oxygen species (ROS), B-cell lymphoma (Bcl)-2 and cyclin D1/E signaling. The COLO-205 colon cancer cell line was used as a colon cancer cell model in the present study. First, cell growth and apoptosis were measured to analyze the anticancer effect of icaritin against colon cancer. Next, the possible mechanism of icaritin against colon cancer, including ROS, Bcl-2, cyclin D1, cyclin E and caspase-3/9, was explored. The results revealed that icaritin could inhibit cell growth and induce the apoptosis of COLO-205 cells. In addition, icaritin significantly induced ROS generation, suppressed Bcl-2, cyclin D1 and cyclin E protein expression, and activated caspase-3/9 activity in COLO-205 cells. The present findings demonstrated that icaritin exerted antiproliferative and anticancer effects against colon cancer through the activation of ROS generation and the suppression of Bcl-2, cyclin D1 and cyclin E signaling.

  13. Anticancer effect of icaritin inhibits cell growth of colon cancer through reactive oxygen species, Bcl-2 and cyclin D1/E signaling

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chaofeng; Peng, Weichao; Song, Xin; Wang, Qian; Wang, Wenyue

    2016-01-01

    Icaritin has an advantage in enhancing immunity. Besides, with its anticancer effect, it may be of great help in cancer treatment and recovery of cancer patients. As a result, icaritin is likely to become a novel anticancer drug. However, the anticancer effect of icaritin against colon cancer has not been elucidated thus far. The present study investigated the latent anticancer effect of icaritin on the inhibition of colon cancer cell growth by regulating reactive oxygen species (ROS), B-cell lymphoma (Bcl)-2 and cyclin D1/E signaling. The COLO-205 colon cancer cell line was used as a colon cancer cell model in the present study. First, cell growth and apoptosis were measured to analyze the anticancer effect of icaritin against colon cancer. Next, the possible mechanism of icaritin against colon cancer, including ROS, Bcl-2, cyclin D1, cyclin E and caspase-3/9, was explored. The results revealed that icaritin could inhibit cell growth and induce the apoptosis of COLO-205 cells. In addition, icaritin significantly induced ROS generation, suppressed Bcl-2, cyclin D1 and cyclin E protein expression, and activated caspase-3/9 activity in COLO-205 cells. The present findings demonstrated that icaritin exerted antiproliferative and anticancer effects against colon cancer through the activation of ROS generation and the suppression of Bcl-2, cyclin D1 and cyclin E signaling. PMID:27900033

  14. Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors inspired by roscovitine: purine bioisosteres.

    PubMed

    Jorda, Radek; Paruch, Kamil; Krystof, Vladimír

    2012-01-01

    Roscovitine is a synthetic inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinases that is currently undergoing clinical trials as a candidate drug for some oncological indications. Its discovery prompted many research teams to further optimize its structure or to initiate their own related but independent studies. This article reviews known roscovitine bioisosteres that have been prepared as CDK inhibitors using different core heterocycles. The individual bioisostere types have been described and explored to a different extent, which complicates direct comparisons of their biochemical activity - only six direct analogs containing different purine bioisosteres have been prepared and evaluated side by side with roscovitine. Only four types of bioisosteres have demonstrated improved biological properties, namely pyrazolo[ 1,5-a]-1,3,5-triazines, pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidines, pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyridines and pyrazolo[4,3-d]pyrimidines.

  15. Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors closer to market launch?

    PubMed

    Galons, Hervé; Oumata, Nassima; Gloulou, Olfa; Meijer, Laurent

    2013-08-01

    Interest in cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors was stimulated by the demonstration that their pharmacological activities could lead to therapies for numerous diseases. Until now, despite the clinical introduction of a dozen compounds belonging to other classes of kinase inhibitors, no CDK inhibitor has reached the marketplace. This review covers CDK inhibitor patents published between 2009 and September 2012. It presents compounds currently undergoing clinical development, along with our earlier (2010) review of the same topic, as well as descriptions of recently published compounds not disclosed in the patent literature. It provides the reader with an update of all chemical structures of current interest in the CDK inhibitor field. Though cancer remains the most obvious application for CDK inhibition, other indications, such as HIV infection, could potentially be treated with CDK inhibitors.

  16. NPAT links cyclin E-Cdk2 to the regulation of replication-dependent histone gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Zhao, J; Kennedy, B K; Lawrence, B D; Barbie, D A; Matera, A G; Fletcher, J A; Harlow, E

    2000-09-15

    In eukaryotic cells, histone gene expression is one of the major events that mark entry into S phase. While this process is tightly linked to cell cycle position, how it is regulated by the cell cycle machinery is not known. Here we show that NPAT, a substrate of the cyclin E-Cdk2 complex, is associated with human replication-dependent histone gene clusters on both chromosomes 1 and 6 in S phase. We demonstrate that NPAT activates histone gene transcription and that this activation is dependent on the promoter elements (SSCSs) previously proposed to mediate cell cycle-dependent transcription. Cyclin E is also associated with the histone gene loci, and cyclin E-Cdk2 stimulates the NPAT-mediated activation of histone gene transcription. Thus, our results both show that NPAT is involved in a key S phase event and provide a link between the cell cycle machinery and activation of histone gene transcription.

  17. p53-independent increase in p21WAF1 and reciprocal down-regulation of cyclin A and proliferating cell nuclear antigen in bromodeoxyuridine-mediated growth arrest of human melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Strasberg Rieber, M; Welch, D R; Miele, M E; Rieber, M

    1996-02-01

    Differentially regulated expression of activators and inhibitors of cyclin-dependent kinases (cdks) modulate cell cycle progression. In normal fibroblasts, these complexes consist of the cdk inhibitor p21WAF1/PCNA/G1 cyclin/cdk. We now show that bromodeoxyuridine (BrdUrd), a thymidine analogue and radiation sensitizer, inhibits growth and activity of cyclin A-cdk2 kinase in metastatic C8161 and nonmetastatic neo 6.3/C8161 human melanoma cells. Inhibition is not due to altered levels of cyclin D or catalytic cdk2 but involves a decrease in cyclin A and proliferating cell nuclear antigen, paralleled by higher levels of p21WAF1 without increases in p53. In contrast to serum starvation, which prevents accumulation of cyclins A and D in normal fibroblasts, such treatment did not down-regulate either cyclin in these melanoma cells, implying an aberrant control for G1 cyclins in these tumor cells. However, cyclin A was decreased by BrdUrd, suggesting that this pyrimidine analogue arrests melanoma cells at a G1 transition point, unlike that of serum starvation. This is the first report indicating that the antitumor therapeutic action of BrdUrd may be mediated by a p53-independent reciprocal effect on activators and inhibitors of cdk kinases.

  18. Cannabinoids Regulate Bcl-2 and Cyclin D2 Expression in Pancreatic β Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung Seok; Rho, Jun Gi; Shin, Jung Jae; Song, Woo Keun; Lee, Eun Kyung; Egan, Josephine M.; Kim, Wook

    2016-01-01

    Recent reports have shown that cannabinoid 1 receptors (CB1Rs) are expressed in pancreatic β cells, where they induce cell death and cell cycle arrest by directly inhibiting insulin receptor activation. Here, we report that CB1Rs regulate the expression of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 and cell cycle regulator cyclin D2 in pancreatic β cells. Treatment of MIN6 and βTC6 cells with a synthetic CB1R agonist, WIN55,212–2, led to a decrease in the expression of Bcl-2 and cyclin D2, in turn inducing cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase and caspase-3-dependent apoptosis. Additionally, genetic deletion and pharmacological blockade of CB1Rs after injury in mice led to increased levels of Bcl-2 and cyclin D2 in pancreatic β cells. These findings provide evidence for the involvement of Bcl-2 and cyclin D2 mediated by CB1Rs in the regulation of β-cell survival and growth, and will serve as a basis for developing new therapeutic interventions to enhance β-cell function and growth in diabetes. PMID:26967640

  19. HB-EGF directs stromal cell polyploidy and decidualization via cyclin D3 during implantation.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yi; Li, Meiling; Cox, Sandra; Davis, Marilyn K; Tawfik, Ossama; Paria, Bibhash C; Das, Sanjoy K

    2004-01-01

    Stromal cell polyploidy is a unique phenomenon that occurs during uterine decidualization following embryo implantation, although the developmental mechanism still remains elusive. The general consensus is that the aberrant expression and altered functional activity of cell cycle regulatory molecules at two particular checkpoints G1 to S and G2 to M in the cell cycle play an important role in the development of cellular polyploidy. Despite the compelling evidence of intrinsic cell cycle alteration, it has been implicated that the development of cellular polyploidy may be controlled by specific actions of extracellular growth regulators. Here we show a novel role for heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HB-EGF) in the developmental process of stromal cell polyploidy in mice. HB-EGF, which is one of the earliest known molecular mediators of implantation in mice and humans, promotes stromal cell polyploidy via upregulation of cyclin D3. Adenoviral delivery of antisense cyclin D3 attenuates cyclin D3 expression and abrogates HB-EGF-induced stromal cell polyploidy in vitro and in vivo. Collectively, the results demonstrate that the regulation of stromal cell polyploidy and decidualization induced by HB-EGF depend on cyclin D3 induction.

  20. Alteration of cell cycle in cervical tumor associated with human papillomavirus: cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Cho, Nam Hoon; Kim, Young Tae; Kim, Jae Wook

    2002-12-01

    The ability of viral oncoproteins to subvert cell cycle checkpoints may constitute a mechanism by which viral oncoproteins induce genetic instability. HPV 16 E6 and E7 disrupt cell cycle checkpoints, particularly affecting nearly all cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors linked to the G1- and G2- checkpoints, in each case by means of a different mechanism. HPV 16 E7 shows homology with the pRb binding sites of cyclin D1, which consequently releases E2F. In addition, E7 directly binds to p21, and releases PCNA and other S-phase promoting genes. In turn, released E2F activates cyclin E, and cyclin E accelerates p27 proteolysis as a function of the antagonistic reaction of its own inhibitor. The induction of p16 expression is assumed to be indirectly associated with E7, which is upregulated only after prolonged inactivation of Rb. HPV 16 E6 decreased the fidelity of multiple checkpoints controlling both entry into and exit from mitosis, with the mechanism of p53 inactivation. In addition, HPV 16 E6 increased the sensitivity to chemically induced S-phase premature mitosis and decreased mitotic spindle assembly checkpoint function. Alongside the impressive advances made in the understanding of the molecular mechanisms, which HPV disrupts, the validity of these conclusions should be evaluated in the diagnostic and prognostic fields.

  1. A Whi7-anchored loop controls the G1 Cdk-cyclin complex at start.

    PubMed

    Yahya, Galal; Parisi, Eva; Flores, Alba; Gallego, Carme; Aldea, Martí

    2014-01-09

    Cells commit to a new cell cycle at Start by activation of the G1 Cdk-cyclin complex which, in turn, triggers a genome-wide transcriptional wave that executes the G1/S transition. In budding yeast, the Cdc28-Cln3 complex is regulated by an ER-retention mechanism that is important for proper cell size control. We have isolated small-cell-size CDC28 mutants showing impaired retention at the ER and premature accumulation of the Cln3 cyclin in the nucleus. The differential interactome of a quintuple Cdc28(wee) mutant pinpointed Whi7, a Whi5 paralog targeted by Cdc28 that associates to the ER in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. Our results demonstrate that the Cln3 cyclin and Whi7 act in a positive feedback loop to release the G1 Cdk-cyclin complex and trigger Start once a critical size has been reached, thus uncovering a key nonlinear mechanism at the earliest known events of cell-cycle entry.

  2. The anaphase-promoting complex initiates zygote division in Arabidopsis through degradation of cyclin B1.

    PubMed

    Guo, Lei; Jiang, Li; Zhang, Ying; Lu, Xiu-Li; Xie, Qi; Weijers, Dolf; Liu, Chun-Ming

    2016-04-01

    As the start of a new life cycle, activation of the first division of the zygote is a critical event in both plants and animals. Because the zygote in plants is difficult to access, our understanding of how this process is achieved remains poor. Here we report genetic and cell biological analyses of the zygote-arrest 1 (zyg1) mutant in Arabidopsis, which showed zygote-lethal and over-accumulation of cyclin B1 D-box-GUS in ovules. Map-based cloning showed that ZYG1 encodes the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) subunit 11 (APC11). Live-cell imaging studies showed that APC11 is expressed in both egg and sperm cells, in zygotes and during early embryogenesis. Using a GFP-APC11 fusion construct that fully complements zyg1, we showed that GFP-APC11 expression persisted throughout the mitotic cell cycle, and localized to cell plates during cytokinesis. Expression of non-degradable cyclin B1 in the zygote, or mutations of either APC1 or APC4, also led to a zyg1-like phenotype. Biochemical studies showed that APC11 has self-ubiquitination activity and is able to ubiquitinate cyclin B1 and promote degradation of cyclin B1. These results together suggest that APC/C-mediated degradation of cyclin B1 in Arabidopsis is critical for initiating the first division of the zygote. © 2016 The Authors. The Plant Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Role of cyclins in controlling progression of mammalian spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wolgemuth, Debra J; Manterola, Marcia; Vasileva, Ana

    2013-01-01

    Cyclins are key regulators of the mammalian cell cycle, functioning primarily in concert with their catalytic partners, the cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks). While their function during mitosis in somatic cells has been extensively documented, their function during both mitosis and meiosis in the germ line is poorly understood. From the perspective of cell cycle regulation there are several aspects of mammalian spermatogenesis that suggest unique modes of regulation and hence, possible unique functions for the cyclins. This review will summarize our current understanding of cyclin expression and function in the male germ line, with particular focus on the A and E type cyclins in the mouse model. While the focus is on mammalian spermatogenesis, we note contrasts with similar functions in the female germ line when relevant and also draw upon observations in other model systems to provide further insight.

  4. Role of cyclins in controlling progression of mammalian spermatogenesis

    PubMed Central

    WOLGEMUTH, DEBRA J.; MANTEROLA, MARCIA; VASILEVA, ANA

    2014-01-01

    Cyclins are key regulators of the mammalian cell cycle, functioning primarily in concert with their catalytic partners, the cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks). While their function during mitosis in somatic cells has been extensively documented, their function during both mitosis and meiosis in the germ line is poorly understood. From the perspective of cell cycle regulation there are several aspects of mammalian spermatogenesis that suggest unique modes of regulation and hence, possible unique functions for the cyclins. This review will summarize our current understanding of cyclin expression and function in the male germ line, with particular focus on the A and E type cyclins in the mouse model. While the focus is on mammalian spermatogenesis, we note contrasts with similar functions in the female germ line when relevant and also draw upon observations in other model systems to provide further insight. PMID:23784826

  5. HTLV-1 basic leucine zipper factor downregulates cyclin D1 expression via interactions with NF-κB.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yunyun; Zhang, Bo; Wang, Dong; Qian, Lili; Song, Xianmei; Wang, Xueyin; Yang, Chaokuan; Zhao, Guoqiang

    2017-03-01

    Human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is an oncogenic retrovirus. It can cause adult T cell leukemia (ATL) and other diseases. The HTLV-1 basic leucine zipper (bZIP) factor (HBZ), which is encoded by the minus-strand of the provirus, is expressed in all cases of ATL and involved in T cell proliferation. However, the exact mechanism underlying its growth-promoting activity is poorly understood. Herein, we demonstrated that HBZ suppressed cyclin D1 expression by inhibiting the nuclear factor (NF)-κB signaling pathway. Among the potential mechanisms of cyclin D1 inhibition mediated by HBZ, we found that HBZ suppressed cyclin D1 promoter activity. Luciferase assay analysis revealed that HBZ repressed cyclin D1 promoter activity by suppressing NF-κB‑driven transcription mediated by the p65 subunit. Using an immunoprecipitation assay, we found that HBZ could bind to p65, but not p50. Finally, we showed that HBZ selectively interacted with p65 via its AD+bZIP domains. By suppressing cyclin D1 expression, HBZ can alter cell cycle progression of HTLV-1-infected cells, which may be critical for oncogenesis.

  6. Metformin induces degradation of cyclin D1 via AMPK/GSK3β axis in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Gwak, HyeRan; Kim, Youngmin; An, Haein; Dhanasekaran, Danny N; Song, Yong Sang

    2017-02-01

    Metformin, which is widely used as an anti-diabetic drug, reduces cancer related morbidity and mortality. However, the role of metformin in cancer is not fully understood. Here, we first describe that the anti-cancer effect of metformin is mediated by cyclin D1 deregulation via AMPK/GSK3β axis in ovarian cancer cells. Metformin promoted cytotoxic effects only in the cancer cells irrespective of the p53 status and not in the normal primary-cultured cells. Metformin induced the G1 cell cycle arrest, in parallel with a decrease in the protein expressions of cyclin D1 without affecting its transcriptional levels. Using a proteasomal inhibitor, we could address that metformin-induced decrease in cyclin D1 through the ubiquitin/proteasome process. Cyclin D1 degradation by metformin requires the activation of GSK3β, as determined based on the treatment with GSK3β inhibitors. The activation of GSK3β correlated with the inhibitory phosphorylation by Akt as well as p70S6K through AMPK activation in response to metformin. These findings suggested that the anticancer effects of metformin was induced due to cyclin D1 degradation via AMPK/GSK3β signaling axis that involved the ubiquitin/proteasome pathway specifically in ovarian cancer cells. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Cyclin is a component of the sea urchin egg M-phase specific histone H1 kinase.

    PubMed

    Meijer, L; Arion, D; Golsteyn, R; Pines, J; Brizuela, L; Hunt, T; Beach, D

    1989-08-01

    A so-called 'growth-associated' or 'M-phase specific' histone H1 kinase (H1K) has been described in a wide variety of eukaryotic cell types; p34cdc2 has previously been shown to be a catalytic subunit of this protein kinase. In fertilized sea urchin eggs the activity of H1K oscillates during the cell division cycle and there is a striking temporal correlation between H1K activation and the accumulation of a phosphorylated form of cyclin. H1K activity declines in parallel with proteolytic cyclin destruction of the end of the first cell cycle. By virtue of the high affinity of the fission yeast p13suc1 for the p34cdc2 protein, H1K strongly binds to p13-Sepharose beads. Cyclin, p34cdc2 and H1K co-purify on this affinity reagent as well as through several conventional chromatographic procedures. Anticyclin antibodies immunoprecipitate the M-phase specific H1K in crude extracts or in purified fractions. Sea urchin eggs appear to contain much less cyclin than p34cdc2, suggesting that p34cdc2 may interact with other proteins. These results demonstrate that cyclin and p34cdc2 are major components of the M-phase specific H1K.

  8. Cyclin D2 and the CDK substrate p220(NPAT) are required for self-renewal of human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Becker, Klaus A; Ghule, Prachi N; Lian, Jane B; Stein, Janet L; van Wijnen, Andre J; Stein, Gary S

    2010-02-01

    Self-renewal of pluripotent human embryonic stem (hES) cells utilizes an abbreviated cell cycle that bypasses E2F/pRB-dependent growth control. We investigated whether self-renewal is alternatively regulated by cyclin/CDK phosphorylation of the p220(NPAT)/HiNF-P complex to activate histone gene expression at the G1/S phase transition. We show that cyclin D2 is prominently expressed in pluripotent hES cells, but cyclin D1 eclipses cyclin D2 during differentiation. Depletion of cyclin D2 or p220(NPAT) causes a cell cycle defect in G1 reflected by diminished phosphorylation of p220(NPAT), decreased cell cycle dependent histone H4 expression and reduced S phase progression. Thus, cyclin D2 and p220(NPAT) are principal cell cycle regulators that determine competency for self-renewal in pluripotent hES cells. While pRB/E2F checkpoint control is relinquished in human ES cells, fidelity of physiological regulation is secured by cyclin D2 dependent activation of the p220(NPAT)/HiNF-P mechanism that may explain perpetual proliferation of hES cells without transformation or tumorigenesis.

  9. αB-crystallin is mutant B-RAF regulated and contributes to cyclin D1 turnover in melanocytic cells

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Rong; Aplin, Andrew E.

    2010-01-01

    Summary The serine/threonine kinase, B-RAF, is frequently mutated in melanoma and is required for cell proliferation. Proteasomal turnover of cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors via E3 ubiquitin ligases regulates cell cycle progression. We previously showed that B-RAF regulates Cks1, a co-factor for the F-box protein Skp2. Recently, a second F-box protein cofactor was identified, αB-crystallin, that binds Fbx4 and promotes cyclin D1 degradation. Here, we demonstrate that αB-crystallin is down-regulated in mutant B-RAF melanoma cells compared to melanocytes in a B-RAF and MEK-dependent manner. In a subset of lines, MEK inhibition was sufficient to up-regulate αB-crystallin protein levels; whereas in other lines combined MEK and proteasome inhibition was required. αB-crystallin knockdown partially stabilized cyclin D1 in melanocytes. Expression of αB-crystallin in mutant B-RAF melanoma cells did not promote cyclin D1 turnover under normal conditions, but did enhance turnover following etoposide-induced DNA damage. Together, these data show that αB-crystallin is highly expressed in melanocytes contributing, in part, to cyclin D1 turnover. Furthermore, αB-crystallin is down-regulated in a B-RAF-dependent manner in melanoma cells and its re-expression regulates cyclin D1 turnover after DNA damage. Significance αB-crystallin has been implicated in cellular functions as a heat shock protein and, more recently, as a cofactor for an E3 ligase ubiquitin ligase complex that degrades the cell cycle protein, cyclin D1. In this study we identify αB-crystallin as a target of aberrant B-RAF-MEK signaling that is hyper-activated in the majority of melanomas through mutation of B-RAF. Furthermore, we provide evidence for a functional role of αB-crystallin in contributing to the turnover of cyclin D1 in melanocytes and in melanoma cells following DNA damage inducing signals. These findings further our understanding of the regulation of cyclin D1 in melanocytic

  10. PKCα TUMOR SUPPRESSION IN THE INTESTINE IS ASSOCIATED WITH TRANSCRIPTIONAL AND TRANSLATIONAL INHIBITION OF CYCLIN D1

    PubMed Central

    Pysz, Marybeth A.; Leontieva, Olga V.; Bateman, Nicholas W.; Uronis, Joshua M.; Curry, Kathryn J.; Threadgill, David W.; Janssen, Klaus-Peter; Robine, Sylvie; Velcich, Anna; Augenlicht, Leonard; Black, Adrian R.; Black, Jennifer D.

    2009-01-01

    Alterations in PKC isozyme expression and aberrant induction of cyclin D1 are early events in intestinal tumorigenesis. Previous studies have identified cyclin D1 as a major target in the antiproliferative effects of PKCα in non-transformed intestinal cells; however, a link between PKC signaling and cyclin D1 in colon cancer remained to be established. The current study further characterized PKC isozyme expression in intestinal neoplasms and explored the consequences of restoring PKCα or PKCδ in a panel of colon carcinoma cell lines. Consistent with patterns of PKC expression in primary tumors, PKCα and δ levels were generally reduced in colon carcinoma cell lines, PKCβII was elevated and PKCε showed variable expression, thus establishing the suitability of these models for analysis of PKC signaling. While colon cancer cells were insensitive to the effects of PKC agonists on cyclin D1 levels, restoration of PKCα downregulated cyclin D1 by two independent mechanisms. PKCα expression consistently (a) reduced steady-state levels of cyclin D1 by a novel transcriptional mechanism not previously seen in non-transformed cells, and (b) re-established the ability of PKC agonists to activate the translational repressor 4E-BP1 and inhibit cyclin D1 translation. In contrast, PKCδ had modest and variable effects on cyclin D1 steady state levels and failed to restore responsiveness to PKC agonists. Notably, PKCα expression blocked anchorage-independent growth in colon cancer cells via a mechanism partially dependent on cyclin D1 deficiency, while PKCδ had only minor effects. Loss of PKCα and effects of its re-expression were independent of the status of the APC/β-catenin signaling pathway or known genetic alterations, indicating that they are a general characteristic of colon tumors. Thus, PKCα is a potent negative regulator of cyclin D1 expression and anchorage-independent cell growth in colon tumor cells, findings that offer important perspectives on the

  11. Cdc25 Phosphatases Are Required for Timely Assembly of CDK1-Cyclin B at the G2/M Transition*

    PubMed Central

    Timofeev, Oleg; Cizmecioglu, Onur; Settele, Florian; Kempf, Tore; Hoffmann, Ingrid

    2010-01-01

    Progression through mitosis requires the coordinated regulation of Cdk1 kinase activity. Activation of Cdk1 is a multistep process comprising binding of Cdk1 to cyclin B, relocation of cyclin-kinase complexes to the nucleus, activating phosphorylation of Cdk1 on Thr161 by the Cdk-activating kinase (CAK; Cdk7 in metazoans), and removal of inhibitory Thr14 and Tyr15 phosphorylations. This dephosphorylation is catalyzed by the dual specific Cdc25 phosphatases, which occur in three isoforms in mammalian cells, Cdc25A, -B, and -C. We find that expression of Cdc25A leads to an accelerated G2/M phase transition. In Cdc25A-overexpressing cells, Cdk1 exhibits high kinase activity despite being phosphorylated on Tyr15. In addition, Tyr15-phosphorylated Cdk1 binds more cyclin B in Cdc25A-overexpressing cells compared with control cells. Consistent with this observation, we demonstrate that in human transformed cells, Cdc25A and Cdc25B, but not Cdc25C phosphatases have an effect on timing and efficiency of cyclin-kinase complex formation. Overexpression of Cdc25A or Cdc25B promotes earlier assembly and activation of Cdk1-cyclin B complexes, whereas repression of these phosphatases by short hairpin RNA has a reverse effect, leading to a substantial decrease in amounts of cyclin B-bound Cdk1 in G2 and mitosis. Importantly, we find that Cdc25A overexpression leads to an activation of Cdk7 and increase in Thr161 phosphorylation of Cdk1. In conclusion, our data suggest that complex assembly and dephosphorylation of Cdk1 at G2/M is tightly coupled and regulated by Cdc25 phosphatases. PMID:20360007

  12. Epigenetically altered miR-193b targets cyclin D1 in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kaukoniemi, Kirsi M; Rauhala, Hanna E; Scaravilli, Mauro; Latonen, Leena; Annala, Matti; Vessella, Robert L; Nykter, Matti; Tammela, Teuvo L J; Visakorpi, Tapio

    2015-01-01

    Micro-RNAs (miRNA) are important regulators of gene expression and often differentially expressed in cancer and other diseases. We have previously shown that miR-193b is hypermethylated in prostate cancer (PC) and suppresses cell growth. It has been suggested that miR-193b targets cyclin D1 in several malignancies. Here, our aim was to determine if miR-193b targets cyclin D1 in prostate cancer. Our data show that miR-193b is commonly methylated in PC samples compared to benign prostate hyperplasia. We found reduced miR-193b expression (P < 0.05) in stage pT3 tumors compared to pT2 tumors in a cohort of prostatectomy specimens. In 22Rv1 PC cells with low endogenous miR-193b expression, the overexpression of miR-193b reduced CCND1mRNA levels and cyclin D1 protein levels. In addition, the exogenous expression of miR-193b decreased the phosphorylation level of RB, a target of the cyclin D1-CDK4/6 pathway. Moreover, according to a reporter assay, miR-193b targeted the 3’UTR of CCND1 in PC cells and the CCND1 activity was rescued by expressing CCND1 lacking its 3’UTR. Immunohistochemical analysis of cyclin D1 showed that castration-resistant prostate cancers have significantly (P = 0.0237) higher expression of cyclin D1 compared to hormone-naïve cases. Furthermore, the PC cell lines 22Rv1 and VCaP, which express low levels of miR-193b and high levels of CCND1, showed significant growth retardation when treated with a CDK4/6 inhibitor. In contrast, the inhibitor had no effect on the growth of PC-3 and DU145 cells with high miR-193b and low CCND1 expression. Taken together, our data demonstrate that miR-193b targets cyclin D1 in prostate cancer. PMID:26129688

  13. DNA tumor virus oncoproteins and retinoblastoma gene mutations share the ability to relieve the cell's requirement for cyclin D1 function in G1

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    The retinoblastoma gene product (pRB) participates in the regulation of the cell division cycle through complex formation with numerous cellular regulatory proteins including the potentially oncogenic cyclin D1. Extending the current view of the emerging functional interplay between pRB and D-type cyclins, we now report that cyclin D1 expression is positively regulated by pRB. Cyclin D1 mRNA and protein is specifically downregulated in cells expressing SV40 large T antigen, adenovirus E1A, and papillomavirus E7/E6 oncogene products and this effect requires intact RB-binding, CR2 domain of E1A. Exceptionally low expression of cyclin D1 is also seen in genetically RB-deficient cell lines, in which ectopically expressed wild-type pRB results in specific induction of this G1 cyclin. At the functional level, antibody-mediated cyclin D1 knockout experiments demonstrate that the cyclin D1 protein, normally required for G1 progression, is dispensable for passage through the cell cycle in cell lines whose pRB is inactivated through complex formation with T antigen, E1A, or E7 oncoproteins as well as in cells which have suffered loss-of-function mutations of the RB gene. The requirement for cyclin D1 function is not regained upon experimental elevation of cyclin D1 expression in cells with mutant RB, while reintroduction of wild-type RB into RB-deficient cells leads to restoration of the cyclin D1 checkpoint. These results strongly suggest that pRB serves as a major target of cyclin D1 whose cell cycle regulatory function becomes dispensable in cells lacking functional RB. Based on available data including this study, we propose a model for an autoregulatory feedback loop mechanism that regulates both the expression of the cyclin D1 gene and the activity of pRB, thereby contributing to a G1 phase checkpoint control in cycling mammalian cells. PMID:8175885

  14. Transcriptional analysis of an E2F gene signature as a biomarker of activity of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor PHA-793887 in tumor and skin biopsies from a phase I clinical study.

    PubMed

    Locatelli, Giuseppe; Bosotti, Roberta; Ciomei, Marina; Brasca, Maria G; Calogero, Raffaele; Mercurio, Ciro; Fiorentini, Francesco; Bertolotti, Matteo; Scacheri, Emanuela; Scaburri, Angela; Galvani, Arturo; Pesenti, Enrico; De Baere, Thierry; Soria, Jean-Charles; Lazar, Vladimir; Isacchi, Antonella

    2010-05-01

    A transcriptional signature of the pan-cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) inhibitor PHA-793887 was evaluated as a potential pharmacodynamic and/or response biomarker in tumor and skin biopsies from patients treated in a phase I clinical study. We first analyzed the expression of a number of known E2F-dependent genes that were predicted to be modulated after Cdk2 and Cdk4 inhibition in xenograft tumor and skin samples of mice treated with the compound. This panel of 58 selected genes was then analyzed in biopsies from seven patients treated with PHA-793887 in a phase I dose escalation clinical trial in solid tumors. Quantitative real-time PCR or microarray analyses were done in paired skin and tumor biopsies obtained at baseline and at cycle 1. Analysis by quantitative real-time PCR of the signature in skin biopsies of patients treated at three different doses showed significant transcriptional downregulation with a dose-response correlation. These data show that PHA-793887 modulates genes involved in cell cycle regulation and proliferation in a clinical setting. The observed changes are consistent with its mechanism of action and correlate with target modulation in skin and with clinical benefit in tumors.

  15. APCste9/srw1 promotes degradation of mitotic cyclins in G1 and is inhibited by cdc2 phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Blanco, Miguel A.; Sánchez-Díaz, Alberto; de Prada, José M.; Moreno, Sergio

    2000-01-01

    Fission yeast ste9/srw1 is a WD-repeat protein highly homologous to budding yeast Hct1/Cdh1 and Drosophila Fizzy-related that are involved in activating APC/C (anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome). We show that APCste9/srw1 specifically promotes the degradation of mitotic cyclins cdc13 and cig1 but not the S-phase cyclin cig2. APCste9/srw1 is not necessary for the proteolysis of cdc13 and cig1 that occurs at the metaphase–anaphase transition but it is absolutely required for their degradation in G1. Therefore, we propose that the main role of APCste9/srw1 is to promote degradation of mitotic cyclins when cells need to delay or arrest the cell cycle in G1. We also show that ste9/srw1 is negatively regulated by cdc2-dependent protein phosphorylation. In G1, when cdc2–cyclin kinase activity is low, unphosphorylated ste9/srw1 interacts with APC/C. In the rest of the cell cycle, phosphorylation of ste9/srw1 by cdc2–cyclin complexes both triggers proteolysis of ste9/srw1 and causes its dissociation from the APC/C. This mechanism provides a molecular switch to prevent inactivation of cdc2 in G2 and early mitosis and to allow its inactivation in G1. PMID:10921876

  16. Tylophorine Analog DCB-3503 Inhibited Cyclin D1 Translation through Allosteric Regulation of Heat Shock Cognate Protein 70

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Lam, Wing; Chen, Shao-Ru; Guan, Fu-Lan; Dutchman, Ginger E.; Francis, Samson; Baker, David C.; Cheng, Yung-Chi

    2016-01-01

    Tylophorine analog DCB-3503 is a potential anticancer and immunosuppressive agent that suppresses the translation of cellular regulatory proteins, including cyclin D1, at the elongation step. However, the molecular mechanism underlying this phenomenon remains unknown. This study demonstrates that DCB-3503 preferentially binds to heat shock cognate protein 70 (HSC70), which is a determinant for cyclin D1 translation by binding to the 3′-untranslated region (3′ UTR) of its mRNA. DCB-3503 allosterically regulates the ATPase and chaperone activities of HSC70 by promoting ATP hydrolysis in the presence of specific RNA binding motifs (AUUUA) of cyclin D1 mRNA. The suppression of cyclin D1 translation by DCB-3503 is not solely caused by perturbation of the homeostasis of microRNAs, although the microRNA processing complex is dissociated with DCB-3503 treatment. This study highlights a novel regulatory mechanism of protein translation with AUUUA motifs in the 3′ UTR of mRNA by HSC70, and its activity can be allosterically modulated by DCB-3503. DCB-3503 may be used to treat malignancies, such as hepatocellular carcinoma or breast cancer with elevated expression of cyclin D1. PMID:27596272

  17. Decreased cyclin A2 and increased cyclin G1 levels coincide with loss of proliferative capacity in rat Leydig cells during pubertal development.

    PubMed

    Ge, R S; Hardy, M P

    1997-09-01

    Postnatal development of Leydig cells can be divided into three distinct stages of differentiation: initially they exist as mesenchymal-like progenitors (PLC) by day 21; subsequently, as immature Leydig cells (ILC) by day 35, they acquire steroidogenic organelle structure and enzyme activities but metabolize most of the testosterone they produce; finally, as adult Leydig cells (ALC) by day 90 they actively produce testosterone. The aims of the present study were to determine whether changes in proliferative capacity are associated with progressive differentiation of Leydig cells, and if the proliferative capacity of Leydig cells is controlled by known hormonal regulators of testosterone biosynthesis: LH, insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), androgen, and estradiol (E2). Isolated PLC, ILC, and ALC were cultured in DMEM/F-12 for 24 h followed by an additional 24 h in the presence of LH (1 ng/ml), IGF-I (70 ng/ml), 7alpha-methyl-19-nortestosterone (MENT, 50 nM), a synthetic androgen that is not metabolized by 5alpha-reductase, or E2 (50 nM). Proliferative capacity was measured by assaying [3H]thymidine incorporation and labeling index (LI). Messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein levels for cyclin A2 and G1, which are putative intracellular regulators of Leydig cell proliferation and differentiation, were measured by RT-PCR and immunoblotting, respectively. Thymidine incorporation was highest in PLC (9.24 +/- 0.21 cpm/10(3) cell, mean +/- SE), intermediate in ILC (1.74 +/- 0.07) and lowest in ALC (0.24 +/- 0.03). Similarly, LI was highest in PLC (13.42 +/- 0.30%, mean +/- SE), intermediate in ILC (1.95 +/- 0.08%), and undetectable in ALC. Cyclin A2 mRNA levels, normalized to ribosomal protein S16 (RPS16), were highest in PLC (2.76 +/- 0.21, mean +/- SE), intermediate in ILC (1.79 +/- 0.14), and lowest in ALC (0.40 +/- 0.06). In contrast, cyclin G1 mRNA levels were highest in ALC (1.32 +/- 0.16), intermediate in ILC (0.47 +/- 0.07), and lowest in PLC (0.12 +/- 0.02). The

  18. Cyclin-A1 represents a new immunogenic targetable antigen expressed in acute myeloid leukemia stem cells with characteristics of a cancer-testis antigen

    PubMed Central

    Ochsenreither, Sebastian; Majeti, Ravindra; Schmitt, Thomas; Stirewalt, Derek; Keilholz, Ulrich; Loeb, Keith R.; Wood, Brent; Choi, Yongiae E.; Bleakley, Marie; Warren, Edus H.; Hudecek, Michael; Akatsuka, Yoshiki; Weissman, Irving L.

    2012-01-01

    Targeted T-cell therapy is a potentially less toxic strategy than allogeneic stem cell transplantation for providing a cytotoxic antileukemic response to eliminate leukemic stem cells (LSCs) in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, this strategy requires identification of leukemia-associated antigens that are immunogenic and exhibit selective high expression in AML LSCs. Using microarray expression analysis of LSCs, hematopoietic cell subpopulations, and peripheral tissues to screen for candidate antigens, cyclin-A1 was identified as a candidate gene. Cyclin-A1 promotes cell proliferation and survival, has been shown to be leukemogenic in mice, is detected in LSCs of more than 50% of AML patients, and is minimally expressed in normal tissues with exception of testis. Using dendritic cells pulsed with a cyclin-A1 peptide library, we generated T cells against several cyclin-A1 oligopeptides. Two HLA A*0201-restricted epitopes were further characterized, and specific CD8 T-cell clones recognized both peptide-pulsed target cells and the HLA A*0201-positive AML line THP-1, which expresses cyclin-A1. Furthermore, cyclin-A1–specific CD8 T cells lysed primary AML cells. Thus, cyclin-A1 is the first prototypic leukemia-testis-antigen to be expressed in AML LSCs. The pro-oncogenic activity, high expression levels, and multitude of immunogenic epitopes make it a viable target for pursuing T cell–based therapy approaches. PMID:22529286

  19. A roller coaster ride with the mitotic cyclins.

    PubMed

    Fung, Tsz Kan; Poon, Randy Y C

    2005-06-01

    Cyclins are discovered as proteins that accumulate progressively through interphase and disappear abruptly at mitosis during each cell cycle. In mammalian cells, cyclin A accumulates from late G1 phase and is destroyed before metaphase, and cyclin B is destroyed slightly later at anaphase. The abundance of the mitotic cyclins is mainly regulated at the levels of transcription and proteolysis. Transcription is stimulated and repressed by several transcription factors, including B-MYB, E2F, FOXM1, and NF-Y. Elements in the promoter, including CCRE/CDE and CHR, are in part responsible for the cell cycle oscillation of transcription. Destruction of the mitotic cyclins is carried out by the ubiquitin ligases APC/C(CDC20) and APC/C(CDH1). Central to our knowledge is the understanding of how APC/C is turned on from anaphase to early G1 phase, and turned off from late G1 till the spindle-assembly checkpoint is deactivated in metaphase. Reciprocal actions of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) on APC/C, as well as on the SCF complexes ensure that the mitotic cyclins are destroyed only at the proper time.

  20. G{sub 1} arrest and down-regulation of cyclin E/cyclin-dependent kinase 2 by the protein kinase inhibitor staurosporine are dependent on the retinoblastoma protein in the bladder carcinoma cell line 5637

    SciTech Connect

    Schnier, J.B.; Nishi, K.; Goodrich, D.W.

    1996-06-11

    The protein kinase inhibitor staurosporine has been shown to induce G{sub 1} phase arrest in normal cells but not in most transformed cells. Staurosporine did not induce G{sub 1} phase arrest in the bladder carcinoma cell line 5637 that lacks a functional retinoblastoma protein (pRB{sup {minus}}). However, when infected with a pRB-expressing retrovirus, these cells, now pRB{sup +} and pRB{sup {minus}} cells, cyclin D1-associated kinase activities were reduced on staurosporine treatment. In contrast, cylin-dependent kinase (CDK) 2 and cyclin E/CDK2 activities were inhibited only in pRB{sup +} cells. Staurosporine treatment did not cause reductions in the protein levels of CDK4, cyclin D1, CDK2, or cyclin E. The CDK inhibitor proteins p21{sup (Wafl/Cipl)} and p27{sup (Kipl}) levels increased in staurosporine-treated cells. Immunoprecipitation of CDK2, cyclin E, and p21 form staurosporine-treated pRB{sup +} cells revealed a 2.5- to 3-fold higher ratio of p21 bound to CDK2 compared with staurosporine-treated pRB cells. In pRB{sup +} cells, p21 was preferentially associated with Thr160 phosphorylated active CDK2. In pRB{sup {minus}} cells, however, p21 was bound preferentially to the unphosphorylated, inactive form of CDK2 even though the phosphorylated form was abundant. This is the first evidence suggesting that G{sub 1} arrest by 4 nM staurosporine is dependent on a functional pRB protein. Cell cycle arrest at the pRB-dependent checkpoint may prevent activation of cyclin E/CDK2 by stabilizing its interaction with inhibitor proteins p21 and p27. 47 refs.

  1. Inhibition of cyclin dependent kinase 9 by dinaciclib suppresses cyclin B1 expression and tumor growth in triple negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rajput, Sandeep; Khera, Nimmish; Guo, Zhanfang; Hoog, Jeremy; Li, Shunqiang; Ma, Cynthia X.

    2016-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are potential cancer therapeutic targets because of their critical role in promoting cell growth. Dinaciclib is a novel CDK inhibitor currently under clinical evaluation for the treatment of advanced malignancies. In this study, we demonstrated the anti-tumor activity of dinaciclib in triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) patient derived xenograft (PDX) and cell lines in vitro and in vivo. Treatment with dinaciclib induced cell cycle arrest at G2/M phase and marked apoptosis. These changes were accompanied by reduced phosphorylation of CDK1 and retinoblastoma (Rb) protein and decreased protein levels of cyclin B1, cMYC and survivin. We further demonstrated that siRNA knockdown of CDK9, the kinase subunit of positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb), instead of CDK1 or CDK2, reduced the levels of cyclin B1 and MYC in TNBC cell lines. These data support the importance of CDK9, in addition to CDK1, in mediating the growth inhibitory effect of dinaciclib in TNBC. Further investigation of CDK9 as a therapeutic target in TNBC is needed. PMID:27486754

  2. The coffee diterpene kahweol suppresses the cell proliferation by inducing cyclin D1 proteasomal degradation via ERK1/2, JNK and GKS3β-dependent threonine-286 phosphorylation in human colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Gwang Hun; Song, Hun Min; Jeong, Jin Boo

    2016-09-01

    Kahweol as a coffee-specific diterpene has been reported to exert anti-cancer properties. However, the mechanism responsible for the anti-cancer effects of kahweol is not fully understood. The main aim of this investigation was to determine the effect of kahweol on cell proliferation and the possible mechanisms in human colorectal cancer cells. Kahweol inhibited markedly the proliferation of human colorectal cancer cell lines such as HCT116, SW480. Kahweol decreased cyclin D1 protein level in HCT116 and SW480 cells. Contrast to protein levels, cyclin D1 mRNA level and promoter activity did not be changed by kahweol treatment. MG132 treatment attenuated kahweol-mediated cyclin D1 downregulation and the half-life of cyclin D1 was decreased in kahweol-treated cells. Kahweol increased phosphorylation of cyclin D1 at threonine-286 and a point mutation of threonine-286 to alanine attenuated cyclin D1 degradation by kahweol. Inhibition of ERK1/2 by PD98059, JNK by SP600125 or GSK3β by LiCl suppressed cyclin D1 phosphorylation and downregulation by kahweol. Furthermore, the inhibition of nuclear export by LMB attenuated cyclin D1 degradation by kahweol. In conclusion, kahweol-mediated cyclin D1 degradation may contribute to the inhibition of the proliferation in human colorectal cancer cells.

  3. Establishment of an immortalized cell line derived from the prairie vole via lentivirus-mediated transduction of mutant cyclin-dependent kinase 4, cyclin D, and telomerase reverse transcriptase

    PubMed Central

    Katayama, Masafumi; Kiyono, Tohru; Horie, Kengo; Hirayama, Takashi; Eitsuka, Takahiro; Kuroda, Kengo; Donai, Kenichiro; Hidema, Shizu; Nishimori, Katsuhiko; Fukuda, Tomokazu

    2015-01-01

    The prairie vole (Microtus ochrogaster) shows social behaviors such as monogamy and parenting of infants with pair bonding. These social behaviors are specific to the prairie vole and have not been observed in other types of voles, such as mountain voles. Although the prairie vole has several unique characteristics, an in vitro cell culture system has not been established for this species. Furthermore, establishment of cultured cells derived from the prairie vole may be beneficial based on the three Rs (i.e., Replacement, Reduction, and Refinement) concept. Therefore, in this study, we attempted to establish an immortalized cell line derived from the prairie vole. Our previous research has shown that transduction with mutant forms of cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4), cyclin D, and telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) could efficiently immortalize cells from multiple species, including humans, cattle, pigs, and monkeys. Here, we introduced these three genes into prairie vole-derived muscle fibroblasts. The expression of mutant CDK4 and cyclin D proteins was confirmed by western blotting, and telomerase activity was detected in immortalized vole muscle-derived fibroblasts (VMF-K4DT cells or VMFs) by stretch PCR. Population doubling analysis showed that the introduction of mutant CDK4, cyclin D, and TERT extended the lifespan of VMFs. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report describing the establishment of an immortalized cell line derived from the prairie vole through the expression of mutant CDK4, cyclin D, and human TERT. PMID:26496927

  4. Defective cyclin B1 induction in trastuzumab-emtansine (T-DM1) acquired resistance in HER2-positive breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Sabbaghi, MohammadA; Gil-Gómez, Gabriel; Guardia, Cristina; Servitja, Sonia; Arpi, Oriol; García-Alonso, Sara; Menéndez, Silvia; Arumi-Uria, Montserrat; Serrano, Laia; Salido, Marta; Muntasell, Aura; Martinez-Garcia, Maria; Zazo, Sandra; Chamizo, Cristina; González-Alonso, Paula; Madoz-Gúrpide, Juan; Eroles, Pilar; Arribas, Joaquin; Tusquets, Ignasi; Lluch, Ana; Pandiella, Atanasio; Rojo, Federico; Rovira, Ana; Albanell, Joan

    2017-08-18

    Trastuzumab-emtansine (T-DM1) is a standard treatment in advanced HER2 positive breast cancer. However, resistance inevitably occurs. We aimed to identify mechanisms of acquired T-DM1 resistance. HER2-positive breast cancer cells (HCC1954, HCC1419, SKBR3 and BT474) were treated in a pulse-fashion with T-DM1 to induce a resistant phenotype. Cellular and molecular effects of T-DM1 in parental versus resistant cells were compared. CDK1 kinase activity and cyclin B1 expression were assayed under various conditions. Genetic modifications to up or down regulate cyclin B1 were conducted. Effects of T-DM1 on cyclin B1 levels, proliferation and apoptosis were assayed in human HER2 positive breast cancer explants. We obtained three cell lines with different levels of acquired T-DM1 resistance (HCC1954/TDR, HCC1419/TDR and SKBR3/TDR cells). HER2 remained amplified in the resistant cells. Binding to HER2 and intracellular uptake of T-DM1 were maintained in resistant cells. T-DM1 induced cyclin B1 accumulation in sensitive but not resistant cells. Cyclin B1 knock-down by siRNA in parental cells induced T-DM1 resistance, while increased levels of cyclin B1 by silencing cdc20, partially sensitized resistant cells. In a series of 18 HER2-positive breast cancer fresh explants, T-DM1 effects on proliferation and apoptosis paralleled cyclin B1 accumulation. Defective cyclin B1 induction by T-DM1 mediates acquired resistance in HER2 positive breast cancer cells. These results support the testing of cyclin B1 induction upon T-DM1 treatment as a pharmacodynamic predictor in HER2 positive breast cancer. Copyright ©2017, American Association for Cancer Research.

  5. Cyclin E-CDK2 protein phosphorylates plant homeodomain finger protein 8 (PHF8) and regulates its function in the cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Sun, Liping; Huang, Yan; Wei, Qian; Tong, Xiaomei; Cai, Rong; Nalepa, Grzegorz; Ye, Xin

    2015-02-13

    Cyclin E-CDK2 is a key regulator in G1/S transition. Previously, we identified a number of CDK2-interacting proteins, including PHF8 (plant homeodomain finger protein 8). In this report, we confirmed that PHF8 is a novel cyclin E-CDK2 substrate. By taking the approach of mass spectrometry, we identified that PHF8 Ser-844 is phosphorylated by cyclin E-CDK2. Immunoblotting analysis indicated that WT PHF8 demethylates histone H3K9me2 more efficiently than the cyclin E-CDK2 phosphorylation-deficient PHF8-S844A mutant. Furthermore, flow cytometry analysis showed that WT PHF8 promotes S phase progression more robustly than PHF8-S844A. Real-time PCR results demonstrated that PHF8 increases transcription of cyclin E, E2F3, and E2F7 to significantly higher levels compared with PHF8-S844A. Further analysis by ChIP assay indicated that PHF8 binds to the cyclin E promoter stronger than PHF8-S844A and reduces the H3K9me2 level at the cyclin E promoter more efficiently than PHF8-S844A. In addition, we found that cyclin E-CDK2-mediated phosphorylation of PHF8 Ser-844 promotes PHF8-dependent rRNA transcription in luciferase reporter assays and real-time PCR. Taken together, these results indicate that cyclin E-CDK2 phosphorylates PHF8 to stimulate its demethylase activity to promote rRNA transcription and cell cycle progression.

  6. Targeting the AKT/GSK3{beta}/Cyclin D1/Cdk4 Survival Signaling Pathway for Eradication of Tumor Radioresistance Acquired by Fractionated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Shimura, Tsutomu; Kakuda, Satoshi; Ochiai, Yasushi; Kuwahara, Yoshikazu; Takai, Yoshihiro; Fukumoto, Manabu

    2011-06-01

    Purpose: Radioresistance is a major cause of treatment failure of radiotherapy (RT) in human cancer. We have recently revealed that acquired radioresistance of tumor cells induced by fractionated radiation is attributable to cyclin D1 overexpression as a consequence of the downregulation of GSK3{beta}-dependent cyclin D1 proteolysis mediated by a constitutively activated serine-threonine kinase, AKT. This prompted us to hypothesize that targeting the AKT/GSK3{beta}/cyclin D1 pathway may improve fractionated RT by suppressing acquired radioresistance of tumor cells. Methods and Materials: Two human tumor cell lines with acquired radioresistance were exposed to X-rays after incubation with either an AKT inhibitor, AKT/PKB signaling inhibitor-2 (API-2), or a Cdk4 inhibitor (Cdk4-I). Cells were then subjected to immunoblotting, clonogenic survival assay, cell growth analysis, and cell death analysis with TUNEL and annexin V staining. In vivo radiosensitivity was assessed by growth of human tumors xenografted into nude mice. Results: Treatment with API-2 resulted in downregulation of cyclin D1 expression in cells with acquired radioresistance. Cellular radioresistance disappeared completely both in vitro and in vivo with accompanying apoptosis when treated with API-2. Furthermore, inhibition of cyclin D1/Cdk4 by Cdk4-I was sufficient for abolishing radioresistance. Treatment with either API-2 or Cdk4-I was also effective in suppressing resistance to cis-platinum (II)-diamine-dichloride in the cells with acquired radioresistance. Interestingly, the radiosensitizing effect of API-2 was canceled by overexpression of cyclin D1 whereas Cdk4-I was still able to sensitize cells with cyclin D1 overexpression. Conclusion: Cyclin D1/Cdk4 is a critical target of the AKT survival signaling pathway responsible for tumor radioresistance. Targeting the AKT/GSK3{beta}/cyclin D1/Cdk4 pathway would provide a novel approach to improve fractionated RT and would have an impact on tumor

  7. Formation of mos RNA granules in the zebrafish oocyte that differ from cyclin B1 RNA granules in distribution, density and regulation.

    PubMed

    Horie, Mayu; Kotani, Tomoya

    2016-12-01

    Many translationally repressed mRNAs are deposited in the oocyte cytoplasm for progression of the meiotic cell cycle and early development. mos and cyclin B1 mRNAs encode proteins promoting oocyte meiosis, and translational control of these mRNAs is important for normal progression of meiotic cell division. We previously demonstrated that cyclin B1 mRNA forms RNA granules in the zebrafish and mouse oocyte cytoplasm and that the formation of RNA granules is crucial for regulating the timing of translational activation of the mRNA. However, whether the granule formation is specific to cyclin B1 mRNA remains unknown. In this study, we found that zebrafish mos mRNA forms granules distinct from those of cyclin B1 mRNA. Fluorescent in situ hybridization analysis showed that cyclin B1 RNA granules were assembled in dense clusters, while mos RNA granules were distributed diffusely in the animal polar cytoplasm. Sucrose density gradient ultracentrifugation analysis showed that the density of mos RNA granules was partly lower than that of cyclin B1 mRNA. Similar to cyclin B1 RNA granules, mos RNA granules were disassembled after initiation of oocyte maturation at the timing at which the poly(A) tail was elongated. However, while almost all of the granules of cyclin B1 were disassembled simultaneously, a fraction of mos RNA granules firstly disappeared and then a large part of them was disassembled. In addition, while cyclin B1 RNA granules were disassembled in a manner dependent on actin filament depolymerization, certain fractions of mos RNA granules were disassembled independently of actin filaments. These results suggest that cytoplasmic regulation of translationally repressed mRNAs by formation of different RNA granules is a key mechanism for translational control of distinct mRNAs in the oocyte. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  8. D-type Cyclins are important downstream effectors of cytokine signaling that regulate the proliferation of normal and neoplastic mammary epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qian; Sakamoto, Kazuhito; Wagner, Kay-Uwe

    2013-01-01

    In response to the ligand-mediated activation of cytokine receptors, cells decide whether to proliferate or to undergo differentiation. D-type Cyclins (Cyclin D1, D2, or D3) and their associated Cyclin-dependent Kinases (CDK4, CDK6) connect signals from cytokines to the cell cycle machinery, and they propel cells through the G1 restriction point and into the S phase, after which growth factor stimulation is no longer essential to complete cell division. D-type Cyclins are upregulated in many human malignancies including breast cancer to promote an uncontrolled proliferation of cancer cells. After summarizing important aspects of the cytokine-mediated transcriptional regulation and the posttranslational modification of D-type Cyclins, this review will highlight the physiological significance of these cell cycle regulators during normal mammary gland development as well as the initiation and promotion of breast cancer. Although the vast majority of published reports focus almost exclusively on the role of Cyclin D1 in breast cancer, we summarize here previous and recent findings that demonstrate an important contribution of the remaining two members of this Cyclin family, in particular Cyclin D3, for the growth of ErbB2-associated breast cancer cells in humans and in mouse models. New data from genetically engineered models as well as the pharmacological inhibition of CDK4/6 suggest that targeting the combined functions of D-type Cyclins could be a suitable strategy for the treatment of ErbB2-positive and potentially other types of breast cancer. PMID:23562856

  9. D-type Cyclins are important downstream effectors of cytokine signaling that regulate the proliferation of normal and neoplastic mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian; Sakamoto, Kazuhito; Wagner, Kay-Uwe

    2014-01-25

    In response to the ligand-mediated activation of cytokine receptors, cells decide whether to proliferate or to undergo differentiation. D-type Cyclins (Cyclin D1, D2, or D3) and their associated Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK4, CDK6) connect signals from cytokines to the cell cycle machinery, and they propel cells through the G1 restriction point and into the S phase, after which growth factor stimulation is no longer essential to complete cell division. D-type Cyclins are upregulated in many human malignancies including breast cancer to promote an uncontrolled proliferation of cancer cells. After summarizing important aspects of the cytokine-mediated transcriptional regulation and the posttranslational modification of D-type Cyclins, this review will highlight the physiological significance of these cell cycle regulators during normal mammary gland development as well as the initiation and promotion of breast cancer. Although the vast majority of published reports focus almost exclusively on the role of Cyclin D1 in breast cancer, we summarize here previous and recent findings that demonstrate an important contribution of the remaining two members of this Cyclin family, in particular Cyclin D3, for the growth of ErbB2-associated breast cancer cells in humans and in mouse models. New data from genetically engineered models as well as the pharmacological inhibition of CDK4/6 suggest that targeting the combined functions of D-type Cyclins could be a suitable strategy for the treatment of ErbB2-positive and potentially other types of breast cancer.

  10. The G1/S Specific Cyclin D2 Is a Regulator of HIV-1 Restriction in Non-proliferating Cells

    PubMed Central

    Badia, Roger; Pujantell, Maria; Riveira-Muñoz, Eva; Puig, Teresa; Torres-Torronteras, Javier; Martí, Ramón; Clotet, Bonaventura; Ampudia, Rosa M.; Ballana, Ester

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages are a heterogeneous cell population strongly influenced by differentiation stimuli that become susceptible to HIV-1 infection after inactivation of the restriction factor SAMHD1 by cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK). Here, we have used primary human monocyte-derived macrophages differentiated through different stimuli to evaluate macrophage heterogeneity on cell activation and proliferation and susceptibility to HIV-1 infection. Stimulation of monocytes with GM-CSF induces a non-proliferating macrophage population highly restrictive to HIV-1 infection, characterized by the upregulation of the G1/S-specific cyclin D2, known to control early steps of cell cycle progression. Knockdown of cyclin D2, enhances HIV-1 replication in GM-CSF macrophages through inactivation of SAMHD1 restriction factor by phosphorylation. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments show that cyclin D2 forms a complex with CDK4 and p21, a factor known to restrict HIV-1 replication by affecting the function of the downstream cascade that leads to SAMHD1 deactivation. Thus, we demonstrate that cyclin D2 acts as regulator of cell cycle proteins affecting SAMHD1-mediated HIV-1 restriction in non-proliferating macrophages. PMID:27541004

  11. Transgenic expression of cyclin-dependent kinase 4 results in epidermal hyperplasia, hypertrophy, and severe dermal fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Miliani de Marval, P L; Gimenez-Conti, I B; LaCava, M; Martinez, L A; Conti, C J; Rodriguez-Puebla, M L

    2001-07-01

    In a previous report we have described the effects of expression of D-type cyclins in epithelial tissues of transgenic mice. To study the involvement of the D-type cyclin partner cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) in epithelial growth and differentiation, transgenic mice were generated carrying the CDK4 gene under the control of a keratin 5 promoter. As expected, transgenic mice showed expression of CDK4 in the epidermal basal-cell layer. Epidermal proliferation increased dramatically and basal cell hyperplasia and hypertrophy were observed. The hyperproliferative phenotype of these transgenic mice was independent of D-type cyclin expression because no overexpression of these proteins was detected. CDK4 and CDK2 kinase activities increased in transgenic animals and were associated with elevated binding of p27(Kip1) to CDK4. Expression of CDK4 in the epidermis results in an increased spinous layer compared with normal epidermis, and a mild hyperkeratosis in the cornified layer. In addition to epidermal changes, severe dermal fibrosis was observed and part of the subcutaneous adipose tissue was replaced by connective tissue. Also, abnormal expression of keratin 6 associated with the hyperproliferative phenotype was observed in transgenic epidermis. This model provides in vivo evidence for the role of CDK4 as a mediator of proliferation in epithelial cells independent of D-type cyclin expression.

  12. Structure of the Cyclin T binding domain of Hexim1 and molecular basis for its recognition of P-TEFb.

    PubMed

    Dames, Sonja A; Schönichen, André; Schulte, Antje; Barboric, Matjaz; Peterlin, B Matija; Grzesiek, Stephan; Geyer, Matthias

    2007-09-04

    Hexim1 is a cellular protein that associates with the positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) to regulate RNA polymerase II elongation of nascent mRNA transcripts. It directly binds to Cyclin T1 of P-TEFb and inhibits the kinase activity of Cdk9, leading to an arrest of transcription elongation. Here, we report the solution structure of the Cyclin T binding domain (TBD) of Hexim1 that forms a parallel coiled-coil homodimer composed of two segments and a preceding alpha helix that folds back onto the first coiled-coil unit. NMR titration, fluorescence, and immunoprecipitation experiments revealed the binding interface to Cyclin T1, which covers a large surface on the first coiled-coil segment. Electrostatic interactions between an acidic patch on Hexim1 and positively charged residues of Cyclin T1 drive the complex formation that is confirmed by mutagenesis data on Hexim1 mediated transcription regulation in cells. Thus, our studies provide structural insights how Hexim1 recognizes the Cyclin T1 subunit of P-TEFb, which is a key step toward the regulation of transcription elongation.

  13. Cancer-associated variant expression and interaction of CIZ1 with cyclin A1 in differentiating male germ cells.

    PubMed

    Greaves, Erin A; Copeland, Nikki A; Coverley, Dawn; Ainscough, Justin F X

    2012-05-15

    CIZ1 is a nuclear-matrix-associated DNA replication factor unique to higher eukaryotes, for which alternatively spliced isoforms have been associated with a range of disorders. In vitro, the CIZ1 N-terminus interacts with cyclin E and cyclin A at distinct sites, enabling functional cooperation with cyclin-A-Cdk2 to promote replication initiation. C-terminal sequences anchor CIZ1 to fixed sites on the nuclear matrix, imposing spatial constraint on cyclin-dependent kinase activity. Here we demonstrate that CIZ1 is predominantly expressed as a predicted full-length product throughout mouse development, consistent with a ubiquitous role in cell and tissue renewal. CIZ1 is expressed in proliferating stem cells of the testis, but is notably downregulated following commitment to differentiation. Significantly, CIZ1 is re-expressed at high levels in non-proliferative spermatocytes before meiotic division. Sequence analysis identifies at least seven alternatively spliced variants, including a dominant cancer-associated form and a set of novel isoforms. Furthermore, we show that in these post-replicative cells, CIZ1 interacts with germ-cell-specific cyclin A1, which has been implicated in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks. Consistent with this role, antibody depletion of CIZ1 reduces the capacity for testis extract to repair digested plasmid DNA in vitro. Together, the data imply post-replicative roles for CIZ1 in germ cell differentiation that might include meiotic recombination - a process intrinsic to genome stability and diversification.

  14. Cyclin-dependent kinase 2 protects podocytes from apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Saurus, Pauliina; Kuusela, Sara; Dumont, Vincent; Lehtonen, Eero; Fogarty, Christopher L.; Lassenius, Mariann I.; Forsblom, Carol; Lehto, Markku; Saleem, Moin A.; Groop, Per-Henrik; Lehtonen, Sanna

    2016-01-01

    Loss of podocytes is an early feature of diabetic nephropathy (DN) and predicts its progression. We found that treatment of podocytes with sera from normoalbuminuric type 1 diabetes patients with high lipopolysaccharide (LPS) activity, known to predict progression of DN, downregulated CDK2 (cyclin-dependent kinase 2). LPS-treatment of mice also reduced CDK2 expression. LPS-induced downregulation of CDK2 was prevented in vitro and in vivo by inhibiting the Toll-like receptor (TLR) pathway using immunomodulatory agent GIT27. We also observed that CDK2 is downregulated in the glomeruli of obese Zucker rats before the onset of proteinuria. Knockdown of CDK2, or inhibiting its activity with roscovitine in podocytes increased apoptosis. CDK2 knockdown also reduced expression of PDK1, an activator of the cell survival kinase Akt, and reduced Akt phosphorylation. This suggests that CDK2 regulates the activity of the cell survival pathway via PDK1. Furthermore, PDK1 knockdown reduced the expression of CDK2 suggesting a regulatory loop between CDK2 and PDK1. Collectively, our data show that CDK2 protects podocytes from apoptosis and that reduced expression of CDK2 associates with the development of DN. Preventing downregulation of CDK2 by blocking the TLR pathway with GIT27 may provide a means to prevent podocyte apoptosis and progression of DN. PMID:26876672

  15. Cyclin A/Cdk2 regulates Cdh1 and claspin during late S/G2 phase of the cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Oakes, Vanessa; Wang, Weili; Harrington, Brittney; Lee, Won Jae; Beamish, Heather; Chia, Kee Ming; Pinder, Alex; Goto, Hidemasa; Inagaki, Masaki; Pavey, Sandra; Gabrielli, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Whereas many components regulating the progression from S phase through G2 phase into mitosis have been identified, the mechanism by which these components control this critical cell cycle progression is still not fully elucidated. Cyclin A/Cdk2 has been shown to regulate the timing of Cyclin B/Cdk1 activation and progression into mitosis although the mechanism by which this occurs is only poorly understood. Here we show that depletion of Cyclin A or inhibition of Cdk2 during late S/early G2 phase maintains the G2 phase arrest by reducing Cdh1 transcript and protein levels, thereby stabilizing Claspin and maintaining elevated levels of activated Chk1 which contributes to the G2 phase observed. Interestingly, the Cyclin A/Cdk2 regulated APC/C(Cdh1) activity is selective for only a subset of Cdh1 targets including Claspin. Thus, a normal role for Cyclin A/Cdk2 during early G2 phase is to increase the level of Cdh1 which destabilises Claspin which in turn down regulates Chk1 activation to allow progression into mitosis. This mechanism links S phase exit with G2 phase transit into mitosis, provides a novel insight into the roles of Cyclin A/Cdk2 in G2 phase progression, and identifies a novel role for APC/C(Cdh1) in late S/G2 phase cell cycle progression.

  16. Role of Cyclin E as an Early Event in Ovarian Carcinogenesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-01

    characterizes a subset of epithelial ovarian cancers . We hypothesized that this subset of tumors may demonstrate an enhanced response to targeted...therapy with the proteasome inhibitor, bortezomib. Cyclin E also exists in multiple low molecular weight (LMW) isoforms in cancer cells which... cancer cells to bortezomib. This finding has translational potential as bortezomib as a single- agent was found to have minimal activity in a phase II

  17. Hypoxia, angiotensin-II, and norepinephrine mediated apoptosis is stimulus specific in canine failed cardiomyocytes: a role for p38 MAPK, Fas-L and cyclin D1.

    PubMed

    Sharov, Victor G; Todor, Anastassia; Suzuki, George; Morita, Hideaki; Tanhehco, Elaine J; Sabbah, Hani N

    2003-03-01

    Apoptosis may contribute to the myocardial dysfunction associated with heart failure (HF). Activation of the p38 MAPK cascade can induce apoptosis in non-cardiac cells through increased expression of Fas-L, or through decreased expression of cyclin D(1). We tested the hypothesis that hypoxia (HX), angiotensin-II (A-II) and norepinephrine (NEPI) can mediate apoptosis by activating p38 MAPK, and thus initiating stimulus specific changes in Fas-L and cyclin D(1) expression in failing cardiomyocytes. Cardiomyocytes isolated from ten dogs with HF induced by coronary microembolizations were subjected to HX or A-II or NEPI with and without a p38 MAPK inhibitor (SB 203580). TUNEL staining for DNA fragmentation and Western blots for p38 MAPK, Fas-L and cyclin D(1) detection were performed. HX-induced apoptosis was associated with increased Fas-L expression, A-II-induced apoptosis was associated with increased Fas-L and decreased cyclin D(1) expression, and NEPI-induced apoptosis was associated with decreased cyclin D(1) expression. Inhibition of p38 MAPK activity attenuated stress-induced apoptosis in all experiments and reversed changes in Fas-L and cyclin D(1) expression. HX, A-II and NEPI mediate apoptosis in failing cardiomyocytes via different effects on Fas-L and cyclin D(1) expression. Inhibition of p38 MAPK reversed these effects, suggesting that apoptosis induced by HX, A-II and NEPI involves activation of p38 MAPK upstream from Fas-L and cyclin D(1).

  18. Characterization of p21Cip1/Waf1 peptide domains required for cyclin E/Cdk2 and PCNA interaction.

    PubMed

    Chen, I T; Akamatsu, M; Smith, M L; Lung, F D; Duba, D; Roller, P P; Fornace, A J; O'Connor, P M

    1996-02-01

    The cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21Cip1/Waf1 is responsible for the p53-dependent growth arrest of cells in G1 phase following DNA damage. In the present study we investigated regions of p21 involved in inhibition of the G1/S phase cyclin-dependent kinase, cyclin E/Cdk2, as well as regions of p21 important for binding to this kinase and recombinant PCNA. To perform these studies we synthesized a series of overlapping peptides spanning the entire p21 sequence and used them in in vitro assays with cyclin E/Cdk2-immune complexes and with recombinant p21 and PCNA proteins. One amino-terminal p21 peptide spanning amino acids 15-40, antagonized p21 binding and inhibition of cyclin E/Cdk2 kinase. Antagonism of p21 binding was, however, lost in a similar peptide lacking amino acids 15-20, or in a peptide in which cysteine-18 was substituted for a serine. These results suggest that this peptide region is important for p21 interaction with cyclin E/Cdk2. A second peptide (amino acids 58-77) also antagonized p21-activity, but this peptide did not affect the ability of p21 to interact with cyclin E/Cdk2. A region of p21 larger than 26 amino acids is presumably required for Cdk-inhibition because none of the peptides we tested inhibited cyclin E/Cdk2. We also found that a peptide spanning amino acids 21-45 bound recombinant p21 in ELISA assays, and additional studies revealed a requirement for amino acids 26 through 45 for this interaction. A p21 peptide spanning amino acids 139-164 was found to bind PCNA in a filter binding assay and this peptide suppressed recombinant p21-PCNA interaction. Conformational analysis revealed that peptides spanning amino acids 21-45 and 139-164 tended towards an alpha-helical conformation in trifluoroethanol buffer, indicating that these regions are probably in a coiled conformation in the native protein. Taken together, our results provide an insight into domains of p21 that are involved in cyclin E/Cdk2 and PCNA interaction. Our results

  19. Characterization of cyclin-dependent kinases and Cdc2/Cdc28 kinase subunits in Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Amador, Erick; López-Pacheco, Karla; Morales, Nataly; Coria, Roberto; López-Villaseñor, Imelda

    2017-04-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) have important roles in regulating key checkpoints between stages of the cell cycle. Their activity is tightly regulated through a variety of mechanisms, including through binding with cyclin proteins and the Cdc2/Cdc28 kinase subunit (CKS), and their phosphorylation at specific amino acids. Studies of the components involved in cell cycle control in parasitic protozoa are limited. Trichomonas vaginalis is the caus