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Sample records for activate defense mechanisms

  1. Defense Mechanisms: A Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedrini, D. T.; Pedrini, Bonnie C.

    This bibliography includes studies of defense mechanisms, in general, and studies of multiple mechanisms. Defense mechanisms, briefly and simply defined, are the unconscious ego defendants against unpleasure, threat, or anxiety. Sigmund Freud deserves the clinical credit for studying many mechanisms and introducing them in professional literature.…

  2. Caspase-8 activity is part of the BeWo trophoblast cell defense mechanisms against Trypanosoma cruzi infection.

    PubMed

    Carrillo, Ileana; Droguett, Daniel; Castillo, Christian; Liempi, Ana; Muñoz, Lorena; Maya, Juan Diego; Galanti, Norbel; Kemmerling, Ulrike

    2016-09-01

    Congenital Chagas disease is caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi that must cross the placental barrier during transmission. The trophoblast constitutes the first tissue in contact with the maternal-blood circulating parasite. Importantly, the congenital transmission rates are low, suggesting the presence of local placental defense mechanisms. Cellular proliferation and differentiation as well as apoptotic cell death are induced by the parasite and constitute part of the epithelial turnover of the trophoblast, which has been suggested to be part of those placental defenses. On the other hand, caspase-8 is an essential molecule in the modulation of trophoblast turnover by apoptosis and by epithelial differentiation. As an approach to study whether T. cruzi induced trophoblast turnover and infection is mediated by caspase-8, we infected BeWo cells (a trophoblastic cell line) with the parasite and determined in the infected cells the expression and enzymatic activity of caspase-8, DNA synthesis (as proliferation marker), β-human chorionic gonadotropin (β-hCG) (as differentiation marker) and activity of Caspase-3 (as apoptotic death marker). Parasite load in BeWo cells was measured by DNA quantification using qPCR and cell counting. Our results show that T. cruzi induces caspase-8 activity and that its inhibition increases trophoblast cells infection while decreases parasite induced cellular differentiation and apoptotic cell death, but not cellular proliferation. Thus, caspase-8 activity is part of the BeWo trophoblast cell defense mechanisms against T. cruzi infection. Together with our previous results, we suggest that the trophoblast turnover is part of local placental anti-parasite mechanisms. PMID:27328973

  3. Plant Defense Mechanisms Are Activated during Biotrophic and Necrotrophic Development of Colletotricum graminicola in Maize1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Vargas, Walter A.; Martín, José M. Sanz; Rech, Gabriel E.; Rivera, Lina P.; Benito, Ernesto P.; Díaz-Mínguez, José M.; Thon, Michael R.; Sukno, Serenella A.

    2012-01-01

    Hemibiotrophic plant pathogens first establish a biotrophic interaction with the host plant and later switch to a destructive necrotrophic lifestyle. Studies of biotrophic pathogens have shown that they actively suppress plant defenses after an initial microbe-associated molecular pattern-triggered activation. In contrast, studies of the hemibiotrophs suggest that they do not suppress plant defenses during the biotrophic phase, indicating that while there are similarities between the biotrophic phase of hemibiotrophs and biotrophic pathogens, the two lifestyles are not analogous. We performed transcriptomic, histological, and biochemical studies of the early events during the infection of maize (Zea mays) with Colletotrichum graminicola, a model pathosystem for the study of hemibiotrophy. Time-course experiments revealed that mRNAs of several defense-related genes, reactive oxygen species, and antimicrobial compounds all begin to accumulate early in the infection process and continue to accumulate during the biotrophic stage. We also discovered the production of maize-derived vesicular bodies containing hydrogen peroxide targeting the fungal hyphae. We describe the fungal respiratory burst during host infection, paralleled by superoxide ion production in specific fungal cells during the transition from biotrophy to a necrotrophic lifestyle. We also identified several novel putative fungal effectors and studied their expression during anthracnose development in maize. Our results demonstrate a strong induction of defense mechanisms occurring in maize cells during C. graminicola infection, even during the biotrophic development of the pathogen. We hypothesize that the switch to necrotrophic growth enables the fungus to evade the effects of the plant immune system and allows for full fungal pathogenicity. PMID:22247271

  4. Prevalence and Mechanisms of Dynamic Chemical Defenses in Tropical Sponges

    PubMed Central

    Rohde, Sven; Nietzer, Samuel; Schupp, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Sponges and other sessile invertebrates are lacking behavioural escape or defense mechanisms and rely therefore on morphological or chemical defenses. Studies from terrestrial systems and marine algae demonstrated facultative defenses like induction and activation to be common, suggesting that sessile marine organisms also evolved mechanisms to increase the efficiency of their chemical defense. However, inducible defenses in sponges have not been investigated so far and studies on activated defenses are rare. We investigated whether tropical sponge species induce defenses in response to artificial predation and whether wounding triggers defense activation. Additionally, we tested if these mechanisms are also used to boost antimicrobial activity to avoid bacterial infection. Laboratory experiments with eight pacific sponge species showed that 87% of the tested species were chemically defended. Two species, Stylissa massa and Melophlus sarasinorum, induced defenses in response to simulated predation, which is the first demonstration of induced antipredatory defenses in marine sponges. One species, M. sarasinorum, also showed activated defense in response to wounding. Interestingly, 50% of the tested sponge species demonstrated induced antimicrobial defense. Simulated predation increased the antimicrobial defenses in Aplysinella sp., Cacospongia sp., M. sarasinorum, and S. massa. Our results suggest that wounding selects for induced antimicrobial defenses to protect sponges from pathogens that could otherwise invade the sponge tissue via feeding scars. PMID:26154741

  5. Immune defense mechanisms of the dental pulp.

    PubMed

    Jontell, M; Okiji, T; Dahlgren, U; Bergenholtz, G

    1998-01-01

    Defense reactions of the dentin/pulp complex involve a variety of biological systems, in which the immune system plays a pivotal role. The knowledge of the organization and function of pulpal immunocompetent cells has been sparse, but in recent years a significant body of information of immune mechanisms in general has provided a footing for substantial new knowledge of the immune mechanisms of the dental pulp. The identification of pulpal dendritic cells (DCs) has generated research activities which have led to a concept of how an antigenic challenge may evoke a pulpal inflammatory response. Although DCs are not able to identify foreign antigens specifically, they provide necessary signals to activate T-lymphocytes which in turn will orchestrate other immunocompetent cells to mount the local immune defense of the dental pulp. The purpose of this review is to accent the organization and function of pulpal DCs and other tissue and cellular components and to provide a basis for how they may interact to instigate pulpal defense mechanisms. PMID:9603235

  6. Rock mechanics contributions from defense programs

    SciTech Connect

    Heuze, F.E.

    1992-02-01

    An attempt is made at illustrating the many contributions to rock mechanics from US defense programs, over the past 30-plus years. Large advances have been achieved in the technology-base area covering instrumentation, material properties, physical modeling, constitutive relations and numerical simulations. In the applications field, much progress has been made in understanding and being able to predict rock mass behavior related to underground explosions, cratering, projectile penetration, and defense nuclear waste storage. All these activities stand on their own merit as benefits to national security. But their impact is even broader, because they have found widespread applications in the non-defense sector; to name a few: the prediction of the response of underground structures to major earthquakes, the physics of the earth`s interior at great depths, instrumentation for monitoring mine blasting, thermo-mechanical instrumentation useful for civilian nuclear waste repositories, dynamic properties of earthquake faults, and transient large-strain numerical modeling of geological processes, such as diapirism. There is not pretense that this summary is exhaustive. It is meant to highlight success stories representative of DOE and DOD geotechnical activities, and to point to remaining challenges.

  7. Protecting the Self: Defense Mechanisms in Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cramer, Phebe

    2006-01-01

    Integrating theory, research, and practical applications, this book provides a comprehensive examination of defense mechanisms and their role in both normal development and psychopathology. The author describes how children and adults mobilize specific kinds of defenses to maintain their psychological equilibrium and preserve self-esteem,…

  8. Macrophage defense mechanisms against intracellular bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Günter; Schaible, Ulrich E

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages and neutrophils play a decisive role in host responses to intracellular bacteria including the agent of tuberculosis (TB), Mycobacterium tuberculosis as they represent the forefront of innate immune defense against bacterial invaders. At the same time, these phagocytes are also primary targets of intracellular bacteria to be abused as host cells. Their efficacy to contain and eliminate intracellular M. tuberculosis decides whether a patient initially becomes infected or not. However, when the infection becomes chronic or even latent (as in the case of TB) despite development of specific immune activation, phagocytes have also important effector functions. Macrophages have evolved a myriad of defense strategies to combat infection with intracellular bacteria such as M. tuberculosis. These include induction of toxic anti-microbial effectors such as nitric oxide and reactive oxygen intermediates, the stimulation of microbe intoxication mechanisms via acidification or metal accumulation in the phagolysosome, the restriction of the microbe's access to essential nutrients such as iron, fatty acids, or amino acids, the production of anti-microbial peptides and cytokines, along with induction of autophagy and efferocytosis to eliminate the pathogen. On the other hand, M. tuberculosis, as a prime example of a well-adapted facultative intracellular bacterium, has learned during evolution to counter-balance the host's immune defense strategies to secure survival or multiplication within this otherwise hostile environment. This review provides an overview of innate immune defense of macrophages directed against intracellular bacteria with a focus on M. tuberculosis. Gaining more insights and knowledge into this complex network of host-pathogen interaction will identify novel target sites of intervention to successfully clear infection at a time of rapidly emerging multi-resistance of M. tuberculosis against conventional antibiotics. PMID:25703560

  9. Early Defensive Mechanisms against Human Papillomavirus Infection.

    PubMed

    Moerman-Herzog, Andrea; Nakagawa, Mayumi

    2015-08-01

    Cervical cancer is the fourth most common cancer in women and is almost exclusively caused by human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. HPV is also frequently associated with other cancers arising from mucosal epithelium, including anal and oropharyngeal cancers, which are becoming more common in both men and women. Viral persistence and progression through precancerous lesion stages are prerequisites for HPV-associated cancer and reflect the inability of cell-mediated immune mechanisms to clear infections and eliminate abnormal cells in some individuals. Cell-mediated immune responses are initiated by innate pathogen sensing and subsequent secretion of soluble immune mediators and amplified by the recruitment and activation of effector T lymphocytes. This review discusses early defensive mechanisms of innate responders to natural HPV infection, their influence on response polarization, and the underappreciated role of keratinocytes in this process. PMID:26063238

  10. Early Defensive Mechanisms against Human Papillomavirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Moerman-Herzog, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the fourth most common cancer in women and is almost exclusively caused by human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. HPV is also frequently associated with other cancers arising from mucosal epithelium, including anal and oropharyngeal cancers, which are becoming more common in both men and women. Viral persistence and progression through precancerous lesion stages are prerequisites for HPV-associated cancer and reflect the inability of cell-mediated immune mechanisms to clear infections and eliminate abnormal cells in some individuals. Cell-mediated immune responses are initiated by innate pathogen sensing and subsequent secretion of soluble immune mediators and amplified by the recruitment and activation of effector T lymphocytes. This review discusses early defensive mechanisms of innate responders to natural HPV infection, their influence on response polarization, and the underappreciated role of keratinocytes in this process. PMID:26063238

  11. Mechanisms of plant defense against insect herbivores

    PubMed Central

    War, Abdul Rashid; Paulraj, Michael Gabriel; Ahmad, Tariq; Buhroo, Abdul Ahad; Hussain, Barkat; Ignacimuthu, Savarimuthu; Sharma, Hari Chand

    2012-01-01

    Plants respond to herbivory through various morphological, biochemicals, and molecular mechanisms to counter/offset the effects of herbivore attack. The biochemical mechanisms of defense against the herbivores are wide-ranging, highly dynamic, and are mediated both by direct and indirect defenses. The defensive compounds are either produced constitutively or in response to plant damage, and affect feeding, growth, and survival of herbivores. In addition, plants also release volatile organic compounds that attract the natural enemies of the herbivores. These strategies either act independently or in conjunction with each other. However, our understanding of these defensive mechanisms is still limited. Induced resistance could be exploited as an important tool for the pest management to minimize the amounts of insecticides used for pest control. Host plant resistance to insects, particularly, induced resistance, can also be manipulated with the use of chemical elicitors of secondary metabolites, which confer resistance to insects. By understanding the mechanisms of induced resistance, we can predict the herbivores that are likely to be affected by induced responses. The elicitors of induced responses can be sprayed on crop plants to build up the natural defense system against damage caused by herbivores. The induced responses can also be engineered genetically, so that the defensive compounds are constitutively produced in plants against are challenged by the herbivory. Induced resistance can be exploited for developing crop cultivars, which readily produce the inducible response upon mild infestation, and can act as one of components of integrated pest management for sustainable crop production. PMID:22895106

  12. Polyphenol oxidase as a biochemical seed defense mechanism.

    PubMed

    Fuerst, E Patrick; Okubara, Patricia A; Anderson, James V; Morris, Craig F

    2014-01-01

    Seed dormancy and resistance to decay are fundamental survival strategies, which allow a population of seeds to germinate over long periods of time. Seeds have physical, chemical, and biological defense mechanisms that protect their food reserves from decay-inducing organisms and herbivores. Here, we hypothesize that seeds also possess enzyme-based biochemical defenses, based on induction of the plant defense enzyme, polyphenol oxidase (PPO), when wild oat (Avena fatua L.) caryopses and seeds were challenged with seed-decaying Fusarium fungi. These studies suggest that dormant seeds are capable of mounting a defense response to pathogens. The pathogen-induced PPO activity from wild oat was attributed to a soluble isoform of the enzyme that appeared to result, at least in part, from proteolytic activation of a latent PPO isoform. PPO activity was also induced in wild oat hulls (lemma and palea), non-living tissues that cover and protect the caryopsis. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that seeds possess inducible enzyme-based biochemical defenses arrayed on the exterior of seeds and these defenses represent a fundamental mechanism of seed survival and longevity in the soil. Enzyme-based biochemical defenses may have broader implications since they may apply to other defense enzymes as well as to a diversity of plant species and ecosystems. PMID:25540647

  13. Polyphenol oxidase as a biochemical seed defense mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Fuerst, E. Patrick; Okubara, Patricia A.; Anderson, James V.; Morris, Craig F.

    2014-01-01

    Seed dormancy and resistance to decay are fundamental survival strategies, which allow a population of seeds to germinate over long periods of time. Seeds have physical, chemical, and biological defense mechanisms that protect their food reserves from decay-inducing organisms and herbivores. Here, we hypothesize that seeds also possess enzyme-based biochemical defenses, based on induction of the plant defense enzyme, polyphenol oxidase (PPO), when wild oat (Avena fatua L.) caryopses and seeds were challenged with seed-decaying Fusarium fungi. These studies suggest that dormant seeds are capable of mounting a defense response to pathogens. The pathogen-induced PPO activity from wild oat was attributed to a soluble isoform of the enzyme that appeared to result, at least in part, from proteolytic activation of a latent PPO isoform. PPO activity was also induced in wild oat hulls (lemma and palea), non-living tissues that cover and protect the caryopsis. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that seeds possess inducible enzyme-based biochemical defenses arrayed on the exterior of seeds and these defenses represent a fundamental mechanism of seed survival and longevity in the soil. Enzyme-based biochemical defenses may have broader implications since they may apply to other defense enzymes as well as to a diversity of plant species and ecosystems. PMID:25540647

  14. Defense Mechanisms of Conifers 1

    PubMed Central

    Lewinsohn, Efraim; Gijzen, Mark; Savage, Thomas J.; Croteau, Rodney

    1991-01-01

    Cell-free extracts from Pinus ponderosa Lawson (ponderosa pine) and Pinus sylvestris L. (Scotch pine) wood exhibited high levels of monoterpene synthase (cyclase) activity, whereas bark extracts of these species contained no detectable activity, and they inhibited cyclase activity when added to extracts from wood, unless polyvinylpyrrolidone was included in the preparation. The molecular mass of the polyvinylpyrrolidone added was of little consequence; however, polyvinylpolypyrrolidone (a cross-linked insoluble form of the polymer) was ineffective in protecting enzyme activity. Based on these observations, methods were developed for the efficient extraction and assay of monoterpene cyclase activity from conifer stem (wood and bark) tissue. The level of monoterpene cyclase activity for a given conifer species was shown to correlate closely with the monoterpene content of the oleoresin and with the degree of anatomical complexity of the specialized resin-secreting structures. Cyclase activity and monoterpene content were lowest in the stems of species containing only isolated resin cells, such as western red cedar (Thuja plicata D. Don). Increasing levels of cyclase activity and oleoresin monoterpenes were observed in advancing from species with multicellular resin blisters (true firs [Abies]) to those with organized resin passages, such as western larch (Larix occidentalis Nutt.), Colorado blue spruce (Picea pungens Engelm.) and Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii [Mirb.] Franco). The highest levels of cyclase activity and oleoresin monoterpenes were noted in Pinus species that contain the most highly developed resin duct systems. The relationship between biosynthetic capacity, as measured by cyclase activity, monoterpene content, and the degree of organization of the secretory structures for a given species, may reflect the total number of specialized resin-producing cells per unit mass of stem tissue. PMID:16668182

  15. Antiviral Defense Mechanisms in Honey Bees

    PubMed Central

    Brutscher, Laura M.; Daughenbaugh, Katie F.; Flenniken, Michelle L.

    2015-01-01

    Honey bees are significant pollinators of agricultural crops and other important plant species. High annual losses of honey bee colonies in North America and in some parts of Europe have profound ecological and economic implications. Colony losses have been attributed to multiple factors including RNA viruses, thus understanding bee antiviral defense mechanisms may result in the development of strategies that mitigate colony losses. Honey bee antiviral defense mechanisms include RNA-interference, pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) triggered signal transduction cascades, and reactive oxygen species generation. However, the relative importance of these and other pathways is largely uncharacterized. Herein we review the current understanding of honey bee antiviral defense mechanisms and suggest important avenues for future investigation. PMID:26273564

  16. Defense mechanisms of the respiratory membrane.

    PubMed

    Green, G M; Jakab, G J; Low, R B; Davis, G S

    1977-03-01

    The success or failure of pulmonary defense mechanisms largely determines the appearance of clinical lung disease. The lung is protected by interlucking systems of nonspecific and specific defenses. Inhaled substrances can be isolated by mechanical barriers or can be physically removed from the lung either by transport up the bronchial mucociliary escalator or by transport through interstitial and lymphatic channels leading to lymph nodes. Substances can be locally detoxified within the lung by interaction with secretory proteins, such as antibodies, or by neutralization and dissolution within phagocytic cells. The pulmonary alveolar macrophage is the central figure in the protection of the respiratory membrane, operating in all 3 of the nonspecific modes of defense and augmented by specific immunologic mechanisms as well. Alterations in macrophage function and physiology may be crucial in determining the effectiveness of pulmonary defense. Recent advances in the cell biology of the alveolar macrophage have led to a greater understanding of its complex funcition. The multiple origins of macrophages from local and circulating cell pools and the variability in their fate and lifespan reflect the multi-faceted role of this cell type. The importance of the interactions between macrophages, orther lung cells, and other defense mechanisms has become increasingly clear. As well as functioning as resident defender of the alveolus, the macrophage is an important effector of the pulmonary immune response and plays a key role in the pathogenesis of a wide variety of inflammatory, destructive, and fibrotic lung diseases. Humoral and cell-mediated immune responses amplify and direct lung defenses against infection and may also participate in protection against other agents. Immunoglobulin A and G, microbial neutralizing and opsonizing anti-bodies, and macrophage-stimulating T lymphocytes are the major immunospecific forms of lung defense. Infectious agents, cigarette smoke, air

  17. Defense Mechanisms: Discussions and Bibliographies; General or Multiple, and Specific.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedrini, D. T.; Pedrini, Bonnie C.

    This publication considers some Freudian ego mechanisms. The first discussion and bibliography concerns defense mechanisms, in general or in multiple; after which, the discussions and bibliographies concern specific defense mechanisms: denial; displacement, substitution, sublimation; fixation; identification, introjection, incorporation,…

  18. Pythium infection activates conserved plant defense responses in mosses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The moss Physcomitrella patens (P. patens) is a useful model to study abiotic stress responses since it is highly tolerant to drought, salt and osmotic stress. However, little is known about the defense mechanisms activated in this moss after pathogen assault. Here the induction of defense responses...

  19. Using Breaking Bad to teach about defense mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Justin M; Beresin, Eugene V; Stern, Theodore A

    2014-12-01

    Defense mechanisms represent an important component of medical education that should be taught to all medical students, psychiatry residents, and other mental health trainees. Teaching about defense mechanisms can become more engaging by analyzing popular media. Using Breaking Bad, a well-known television show, we recommend specific scenes and episodes that can be used in teaching about defense mechanisms. PMID:24906848

  20. An empirical study of defense mechanisms in panic disorder.

    PubMed

    Busch, F N; Shear, M K; Cooper, A M; Shapiro, T; Leon, A C

    1995-05-01

    Psychodynamic factors have rarely been systematically studied in panic disorder, despite indications that these factors may be important in the understanding and treatment of panic. This is a report of a study using the Defense Mechanism Rating Scale to test the hypothesis that patients with panic disorder utilize particular defense mechanisms: reaction formation, undoing, and displacement. The use of defense mechanisms in 22 patients with primary panic disorder was compared with that of 22 patients with primary dysthymic disorder, based on Defense Mechanism Rating Scale ratings of psychodynamic interviews of these patients. Panic subjects scored significantly higher than dysthymics on the defenses of reaction formation and undoing, but not on the defense of displacement. The defense mechanisms found are consistent with a proposed psychodynamic formulation for panic disorder that emphasizes the panic patient's difficulty in tolerating angry feelings toward significant others. Knowledge of these defense mechanisms can be useful for various treatment approaches in panic disorder. PMID:7745383

  1. Induction of Nrf2-mediated cellular defenses and alteration of phase I activities as mechanisms of chemoprotective effects of coffee in the liver.

    PubMed

    Cavin, C; Marin-Kuan, M; Langouët, S; Bezençon, C; Guignard, G; Verguet, C; Piguet, D; Holzhäuser, D; Cornaz, R; Schilter, B

    2008-04-01

    Coffee consumption has been associated with a significant decrease in the risk of developing chronic diseases such as Parkinson disease, diabetes type-2 and several types of cancers (e.g. colon, liver). In the present study, a coffee-dependent induction of enzymes involved in xenobiotic detoxification processes was observed in rat liver and primary hepatocytes. In addition, coffee was found to induce the mRNA and protein expression of enzymes involved in cellular antioxidant defenses. These inductions were correlated with the activation of the Nrf2 transcription factor as shown using an ARE-reporter luciferase assay. The induction of detoxifying enzymes GSTs and AKR is compatible with a protection against both genotoxicity and cytotoxicity of aflatoxin B1 (AFB1). This hypothesis was confirmed in in vitro and ex vivo test systems, where coffee reduced both AFB1-DNA and protein adducts. Interestingly, coffee was also found to inhibit cytochrome CYP1A1/2, indicating that other mechanisms different from a stimulation of detoxification may also play a significant role in the chemoprotective effects of coffee. Further investigations in either human liver cell line and primary hepatocytes indicated that the chemoprotective effects of coffee against AFB1 genotoxicity are likely to be of relevance for humans. These data strongly suggest that coffee may protect against the adverse effects of AFB1. In addition, the coffee-mediated stimulation of the Nrf2-ARE pathway resulting in increased endogenous defense mechanisms against electrophilic but also oxidative insults further support that coffee may be associated with a protection against various types of chemical stresses. PMID:17976884

  2. Emotional exhaustion and defense mechanisms in intensive therapy unit nurses.

    PubMed

    Regan, Anna; Howard, Ruth A; Oyebode, Jan R

    2009-05-01

    Contrary to its original conceptualization, research has found that emotional demands do not lead to burnout in nurses. According to psychoanalytic theory, unconscious defense mechanisms may protect nurses from conscious awareness of work-related anxiety. This prevents self-report and may explain research findings. The maturity of defense style influences how anxiety is managed. Immature defenses prevent the conscious processing necessary for resolution of anxiety. Therefore, it is hypothesized that the use of immature defenses will lead to emotional exhaustion. This cross-sectional study used questionnaires to explore the defense mechanisms of 87 Intensive Therapy Unit nurses. Although the sample endorsed a predominantly mature defense style, the use of immature defenses predicted emotional exhaustion. Also, lower levels of reported stress associated with emotional demands predicted emotional exhaustion. Although this strongly implies the mediating role of immature defense mechanisms, the results were not statistically significant. PMID:19440106

  3. In Defense of Active Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pica, Rae

    2008-01-01

    Effective early childhood teachers use what they know about and have observed in young children to design programs to meet children's developmental needs. Play and active learning are key tools to address those needs and facilitate children's early education. In this article, the author discusses the benefits of active learning in the education of…

  4. Pharmacodynamic activity of a cephalosporin, Ro 40-6890, in human skin blister fluid: antibiotic activity in concert with host defense mechanisms.

    PubMed Central

    Hoogkamer, J F; Hesse, W H; Sansano, S; Zimmerli, W

    1993-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of an antimicrobial drug in human plasma and in vitro susceptibility testing of an antimicrobial drug do not necessarily predict its efficacy in vivo. Therefore, the combined activity of an antimicrobial drug and blood-derived polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) against Staphylococcus aureus were investigated in vitro. In addition, a pharmacological model allowing analysis of the bactericidal activity of a drug-containing exudate against S. aureus ex vivo was developed. For this purpose, a phagocytic-bactericidal assay was miniaturized to a volume of 100 microliters in order to test the bactericidal activities of an antimicrobial drug with blood PMN in vitro and with skin blister fluid (CBF) ex vivo. Ro 40-6890, the active metabolite of the ester prodrug Ro 41-3399, was used as the test drug. Killing of S. aureus was clearly enhanced when Ro 41-6890 was combined in vitro with a suboptimal number of blood-derived PMN. In eight healthy volunteers, skin blisters were provoked by plasters containing cantharidin. Following a single oral dose of Ro 41-3399, CBF containing PMN was sampled at regular intervals and incubated ex vivo with S. aureus (5 x 10(5) CFU/ml) for 2, 4, 6, and 24 h at 37 degrees C. Concentrations of Ro 40-6890 were measured in CBF (CCBF) and plasma. Ro 40-6890 distributed well from plasma into CBF. When CCBF was below the MIC, an enhanced effect of Ro 40-6890 and host defense factors present in CBF against S. aureus was observed. In conclusion, the present model can provide additional information on human plasma drug concentrations and MICs established in vitro. PMID:8109926

  5. Denial Defense Mechanism in Dialyzed Patients

    PubMed Central

    Nowak, Zbigniew; Wańkowicz, Zofia; Laudanski, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Background It is a struggle to identify the most adaptive coping strategies with disease-mediated stress. Here, we hypothesize that intensity of coping strategies, including denial, in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD), varies with type of renal replacement therapy (RRT). Material/Methods We enrolled 60 in-center hemodialyzed patients (HD) and 55 patients treated with continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD). We administered the Coping Inventory with Stressful Situation, Profile of Mood States, and Stroop Anxiety Inventory to measure patient coping strategies in the context of their ESRD. Denial defense mechanism was measured via the IBS-R/ED. The Nottingham Health Profile was used to evaluate self-perceived quality of life. Serum potassium, urea, creatinine, phosphorus, calcium, albumin, and hematocrit were utilized as the measurements of adequacy of dialysis. Results HD patients had higher self-reported intensity of denial mechanism and avoidance-oriented strategies versus CAPD patients. Because a single strategy is almost never employed, we conducted cluster analysis. We identify 3 patterns of coping strategies using cluster analysis. “Repressors” employed denial and avoidance strategies and were predominant in HD. The second cluster consists of subjects employing predominantly task-oriented strategies with equal distribution among dialyzed patients. The third cluster encompassed a small group of patients who shared higher intensity of both denial and task-oriented strategies. Health-related outcome, anxiety, and mood profile were similar across all patients. Conclusions HD patients predominantly used “repressive” strategies. Patients on RRT utilized denial and avoidance-based strategies to achieve satisfactory outcome in terms of perceived quality of life. We conclude that these coping mechanisms that were previously thought to be inferior are beneficial to patient compliance with RRT. PMID:26094792

  6. Adversity Quotient and Defense Mechanism of Secondary School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nikam, Vibhawari B.; Uplane, Megha M.

    2013-01-01

    The present study was conducted to explore the relationship between Adversity Quotient (AQ) and Defense Mechanism (DM) of secondary school students. The aim of the study was to ascertain relationship between Adversity Quotient and Defense mechanism i. e. Turning against object (TAO), Projection (PRO), Turning against self (TAS), Principalisation…

  7. Plant defense activators: applications and prospects in cereal crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This review addresses the current understanding of the plant immune response and the molecular mechanisms responsible for systemic acquired resistance as well as the phenomenon of "priming" in plant defense. A detailed discussion of the role of salicylic acid in activating the plant transcription c...

  8. Fear of pain and defensive activation.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Margaret M; Silakowski, Tammy; Lang, Peter J

    2008-07-01

    Fear of pain and its relationship to dental fear was investigated by measuring autonomic reactions (skin conductance and heart rate) in individuals reporting high and low dental fear when in the presence of a cue that threatened the presentation of electric shock ("threat") or not ("safe"). Acoustic startle probes were also presented during both threat and safe periods, and the reflexive eye blink, the skin conductance response, and cardiac changes to the startle probe measured. All participants reacted with greater defensive reactivity, including potentiated startle blinks, heightened skin conductance, and cardiac deceleration in the context of threat, compared to safe, cues. Individuals reporting high dental fear were significantly more reactive during threat periods, compared to low fear individuals, showing larger blink reflexes and heightened electrodermal activity, as well as heightened autonomic responses to the startle probe itself. Individual differences in defensive reactivity persisted even after participants received a single mild shock halfway through the experiment. The data indicate that threat of shock elicits heightened defensive reactivity in those reporting high dental fear, consistent with the hypothesis that fear of potentially painful events may be a potent mediator of the anxiety involved in anticipated medical and dental treatment. PMID:17904289

  9. Effects of inhaled acids on respiratory tract defense mechanisms.

    PubMed Central

    Schlesinger, R B

    1985-01-01

    The respiratory tract is endowed with an interlocking array of nonspecific and specific defense mechanisms which protect it from the effects of inhaled microbes and toxicants, and reduce the risk of absorption of materials into the bloodstream, with subsequent systemic translocation. Ambient acids may compromise these defenses, perhaps providing a link between exposure and development of chronic and acute pulmonary disease. This paper reviews the effects of inhaled acids upon the nonspecific clearance system of the lungs. PMID:3908089

  10. Heavy Metal Stress and Some Mechanisms of Plant Defense Response

    PubMed Central

    Emamverdian, Abolghassem; Ding, Yulong; Mokhberdoran, Farzad; Xie, Yinfeng

    2015-01-01

    Unprecedented bioaccumulation and biomagnification of heavy metals (HMs) in the environment have become a dilemma for all living organisms including plants. HMs at toxic levels have the capability to interact with several vital cellular biomolecules such as nuclear proteins and DNA, leading to excessive augmentation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). This would inflict serious morphological, metabolic, and physiological anomalies in plants ranging from chlorosis of shoot to lipid peroxidation and protein degradation. In response, plants are equipped with a repertoire of mechanisms to counteract heavy metal (HM) toxicity. The key elements of these are chelating metals by forming phytochelatins (PCs) or metallothioneins (MTs) metal complex at the intra- and intercellular level, which is followed by the removal of HM ions from sensitive sites or vacuolar sequestration of ligand-metal complex. Nonenzymatically synthesized compounds such as proline (Pro) are able to strengthen metal-detoxification capacity of intracellular antioxidant enzymes. Another important additive component of plant defense system is symbiotic association with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi. AM can effectively immobilize HMs and reduce their uptake by host plants via binding metal ions to hyphal cell wall and excreting several extracellular biomolecules. Additionally, AM fungi can enhance activities of antioxidant defense machinery of plants. PMID:25688377

  11. Heavy metal stress and some mechanisms of plant defense response.

    PubMed

    Emamverdian, Abolghassem; Ding, Yulong; Mokhberdoran, Farzad; Xie, Yinfeng

    2015-01-01

    Unprecedented bioaccumulation and biomagnification of heavy metals (HMs) in the environment have become a dilemma for all living organisms including plants. HMs at toxic levels have the capability to interact with several vital cellular biomolecules such as nuclear proteins and DNA, leading to excessive augmentation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). This would inflict serious morphological, metabolic, and physiological anomalies in plants ranging from chlorosis of shoot to lipid peroxidation and protein degradation. In response, plants are equipped with a repertoire of mechanisms to counteract heavy metal (HM) toxicity. The key elements of these are chelating metals by forming phytochelatins (PCs) or metallothioneins (MTs) metal complex at the intra- and intercellular level, which is followed by the removal of HM ions from sensitive sites or vacuolar sequestration of ligand-metal complex. Nonenzymatically synthesized compounds such as proline (Pro) are able to strengthen metal-detoxification capacity of intracellular antioxidant enzymes. Another important additive component of plant defense system is symbiotic association with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi. AM can effectively immobilize HMs and reduce their uptake by host plants via binding metal ions to hyphal cell wall and excreting several extracellular biomolecules. Additionally, AM fungi can enhance activities of antioxidant defense machinery of plants. PMID:25688377

  12. Immune defense mechanisms in the Caenorhabditis elegans intestinal epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Pukkila-Worley, Read; Ausubel, Frederick M

    2013-01-01

    Intestinal epithelial cells provide an essential line of defense for Caenorhabditis elegans against ingested pathogens. Because nematodes consume microorganisms as their food source, there has presumably been selection pressure to evolve and maintain immune defense mechanisms within the intestinal epithelium. Here we review recent advances that further define the immune signaling network within these cells and suggest mechanisms used by the nematode to monitor for infection. In reviewing studies of pathogenesis that use this simple model system, we hope to illustrate some of the basic principles of epithelial immunity that may also be of relevance in higher order hosts. PMID:22236697

  13. Physcomitrella patens Activates Defense Responses against the Pathogen Colletotrichum gloeosporioides.

    PubMed

    Reboledo, Guillermo; Del Campo, Raquel; Alvarez, Alfonso; Montesano, Marcos; Mara, Héctor; Ponce de León, Inés

    2015-01-01

    The moss Physcomitrella patens is a suitable model plant to analyze the activation of defense mechanisms after pathogen assault. In this study, we show that Colletotrichum gloeosporioides isolated from symptomatic citrus fruit infects P. patens and cause disease symptoms evidenced by browning and maceration of tissues. After C. gloeosporioides infection, P. patens reinforces the cell wall by the incorporation of phenolic compounds and induces the expression of a Dirigent-protein-like encoding gene that could lead to the formation of lignin-like polymers. C. gloeosporioides-inoculated protonemal cells show cytoplasmic collapse, browning of chloroplasts and modifications of the cell wall. Chloroplasts relocate in cells of infected tissues toward the initially infected C. gloeosporioides cells. P. patens also induces the expression of the defense genes PAL and CHS after fungal colonization. P. patens reporter lines harboring the auxin-inducible promoter from soybean (GmGH3) fused to β-glucuronidase revealed an auxin response in protonemal tissues, cauloids and leaves of C. gloeosporioides-infected moss tissues, indicating the activation of auxin signaling. Thus, P. patens is an interesting plant to gain insight into defense mechanisms that have evolved in primitive land plants to cope with microbial pathogens. PMID:26389888

  14. Physcomitrella patens Activates Defense Responses against the Pathogen Colletotrichum gloeosporioides

    PubMed Central

    Reboledo, Guillermo; del Campo, Raquel; Alvarez, Alfonso; Montesano, Marcos; Mara, Héctor; Ponce de León, Inés

    2015-01-01

    The moss Physcomitrella patens is a suitable model plant to analyze the activation of defense mechanisms after pathogen assault. In this study, we show that Colletotrichum gloeosporioides isolated from symptomatic citrus fruit infects P. patens and cause disease symptoms evidenced by browning and maceration of tissues. After C. gloeosporioides infection, P. patens reinforces the cell wall by the incorporation of phenolic compounds and induces the expression of a Dirigent-protein-like encoding gene that could lead to the formation of lignin-like polymers. C. gloeosporioides-inoculated protonemal cells show cytoplasmic collapse, browning of chloroplasts and modifications of the cell wall. Chloroplasts relocate in cells of infected tissues toward the initially infected C. gloeosporioides cells. P. patens also induces the expression of the defense genes PAL and CHS after fungal colonization. P. patens reporter lines harboring the auxin-inducible promoter from soybean (GmGH3) fused to β-glucuronidase revealed an auxin response in protonemal tissues, cauloids and leaves of C. gloeosporioides-infected moss tissues, indicating the activation of auxin signaling. Thus, P. patens is an interesting plant to gain insight into defense mechanisms that have evolved in primitive land plants to cope with microbial pathogens. PMID:26389888

  15. Defense-Inducing Volatiles: In Search of the Active Motif

    PubMed Central

    Lion, Ulrich; Boland, Wilhelm

    2008-01-01

    Herbivore-induced volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are widely appreciated as an indirect defense mechanism since carnivorous arthropods use VOCs as cues for host localization and then attack herbivores. Another function of VOCs is plant–plant signaling. That VOCs elicit defensive responses in neighboring plants has been reported from various species, and different compounds have been found to be active. In order to search for a structural motif that characterizes active VOCs, we used lima bean (Phaseolus lunatus), which responds to VOCs released from damaged plants with an increased secretion of extrafloral nectar (EFN). We exposed lima bean to (Z)-3-hexenyl acetate, a substance naturally released from damaged lima bean and known to induce EFN secretion, and to several structurally related compounds. (E)-3-hexenyl acetate, (E)-2-hexenyl acetate, 5-hexenyl acetate, (Z)-3-hexenylisovalerate, and (Z)-3-hexenylbutyrate all elicited significant increases in EFN secretion, demonstrating that neither the (Z)-configuration nor the position of the double-bond nor the size of the acid moiety are critical for the EFN-inducing effect. Our result is not consistent with previous concepts that postulate reactive electrophile species (Michael-acceptor-systems) for defense-induction in Arabidopsis. Instead, we postulate that physicochemical processes, including interactions with odorant binding proteins and resulting in changes in transmembrane potentials, can underlie VOCs-mediated signaling processes. PMID:18408973

  16. Grooming Behavior as a Mechanism of Insect Disease Defense

    PubMed Central

    Zhukovskaya, Marianna; Yanagawa, Aya; Forschler, Brian T.

    2013-01-01

    Grooming is a well-recognized, multipurpose, behavior in arthropods and vertebrates. In this paper, we review the literature to highlight the physical function, neurophysiological mechanisms, and role that grooming plays in insect defense against pathogenic infection. The intricate relationships between the physical, neurological and immunological mechanisms of grooming are discussed to illustrate the importance of this behavior when examining the ecology of insect-pathogen interactions. PMID:26462526

  17. Oncolytic Activities of Host Defense Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Al-Benna, Sammy; Shai, Yechiel; Jacobsen, Frank; Steinstraesser, Lars

    2011-01-01

    Cancer continues to be a leading source of morbidity and mortality worldwide in spite of progress in oncolytic therapies. In addition, the incidence of cancers affecting the breast, kidney, prostate and skin among others continue to rise. Chemotherapeutic drugs are widely used in cancer treatment but have the serious drawback of nonspecific toxicity because these agents target any rapidly dividing cell without discriminating between healthy and malignant cells. In addition, many neoplasms eventually become resistant to conventional chemotherapy due to selection for multidrug-resistant variants. The limitations associated with existing chemotherapeutic drugs have stimulated the search for new oncolytic therapies. Host defense peptides (HDPs) may represent a novel family of oncolytic agents that can avoid the shortcomings of conventional chemotherapy because they exhibit selective cytotoxicity against a broad spectrum of malignant human cells, including multi-drug-resistant neoplastic cells. Oncolytic activity by HDPs is usually via necrosis due to cell membrane lysis, but some HDPs can trigger apoptosis in cancer cells via mitochondrial membrane disruption. In addition, certain HDPs are anti-angiogenic which may inhibit cancer progression. This paper reviews oncolytic HDP studies in order to address the suitability of selected HDPs as oncolytic therapies. PMID:22174648

  18. How does our brain constitute defense mechanisms? First-person neuroscience and psychoanalysis.

    PubMed

    Northoff, Georg; Bermpohl, Felix; Schoeneich, Frank; Boeker, Heinz

    2007-01-01

    Current progress in the cognitive and affective neurosciences is constantly influencing the development of psychoanalytic theory and practice. However, despite the emerging dialogue between neuroscience and psychoanalysis, the neuronal processes underlying psychoanalytic constructs such as defense mechanisms remain unclear. One of the main problems in investigating the psychodynamic-neuronal relationship consists in systematically linking the individual contents of first-person subjective experience to third-person observation of neuronal states. We therefore introduced an appropriate methodological strategy, 'first-person neuroscience', which aims at developing methods for systematically linking first- and third-person data. The utility of first-person neuroscience can be demonstrated by the example of the defense mechanism of sensorimotor regression as paradigmatically observed in catatonia. Combined psychodynamic and imaging studies suggest that sensorimotor regression might be associated with dysfunction in the neural network including the orbitofrontal, the medial prefrontal and the premotor cortices. In general sensorimotor regression and other defense mechanisms are psychoanalytic constructs that are hypothesized to be complex emotional-cognitive constellations. In this paper we suggest that specific functional mechanisms which integrate neuronal activity across several brain regions (i.e. neuronal integration) are the physiological substrates of defense mechanisms. We conclude that first-person neuroscience could be an appropriate methodological strategy for opening the door to a better understanding of the neuronal processes of defense mechanisms and their modulation in psychoanalytic psychotherapy. PMID:17426413

  19. 6-Benzylaminopurine inhibits growth of Monilinia fructicola and induces defense-related mechanism in peach fruit.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yangyang; Zeng, Lizhen; Yang, Jiali; Zheng, Xiaodong; Yu, Ting

    2015-11-15

    This study demonstrated the inhibitory effect of 6-benzylaminopurine (BAP), the first generation synthetic cytokinin, on the invasion of Monilinia fructicola in peach fruit and the possible mechanism involved for the first time. Our results suggested that BAP treatment had a 63% lower disease incidence and approximately 10 times lower lesion diameter compared to the control throughout the incubation period. In vitro BAP showed a direct inhibitory effect on M. fructicola spore germination. BAP could prevent fruit texture deterioration and protect the cell membrane from oxidative stress, while no adverse effects were observed on fruit quality maintenance. Analysis of defense-related enzymes activities indicated that the use of BAP induced higher specific polyphenol oxidase and peroxidase activities which triggered stronger host defensive responses. Thus, our results verified the proposed mechanism of BAP in controlling M. fructicola by direct inhibitory effect, delay peach senescence and activation of defensive enzymes. PMID:25977018

  20. Coordination of frontline defense mechanisms under severe oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Amardeep; Van, Phu T; Busch, Courtney R; Robinson, Courtney K; Pan, Min; Pang, Wyming Lee; Reiss, David J; DiRuggiero, Jocelyne; Baliga, Nitin S

    2010-07-01

    Complexity of cellular response to oxidative stress (OS) stems from its wide-ranging damage to nucleic acids, proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids. We have constructed a systems model of OS response (OSR) for Halobacterium salinarum NRC-1 in an attempt to understand the architecture of its regulatory network that coordinates this complex response. This has revealed a multi-tiered OS-management program to transcriptionally coordinate three peroxidase/catalase enzymes, two superoxide dismutases, production of rhodopsins, carotenoids and gas vesicles, metal trafficking, and various other aspects of metabolism. Through experimental validation of interactions within the OSR regulatory network, we show that despite their inability to directly sense reactive oxygen species, general transcription factors have an important function in coordinating this response. Remarkably, a significant fraction of this OSR was accurately recapitulated by a model that was earlier constructed from cellular responses to diverse environmental perturbations--this constitutes the general stress response component. Notwithstanding this observation, comparison of the two models has identified the coordination of frontline defense and repair systems by regulatory mechanisms that are triggered uniquely by severe OS and not by other environmental stressors, including sub-inhibitory levels of redox-active metals, extreme changes in oxygen tension, and a sub-lethal dose of gamma rays. PMID:20664639

  1. Department of Defense Education Activity. An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Defense, 2004

    2004-01-01

    DoDEA operates 223 public schools in 16 districts located in seven states, Puerto Rico, Guam, and 13 foreign countries to serve the children of military service members and Department of Defense civilian employees. Approximately 104,935 students are enrolled in DoDEA schools, with approximately 73,200 students in the DoDDS system, and…

  2. Induced defense mechanisms in an aquatic angiosperm to insect herbivory.

    PubMed

    Fornoff, Felix; Gross, Elisabeth M

    2014-05-01

    In terrestrial angiosperms, defense and resistance mechanisms against herbivores have been studied extensively; yet this topic is poorly understood in aquatic angiosperms. We investigated induced response mechanisms in Myriophyllum spicatum to the generalist insect herbivore Acentria ephemerella in three independent experiments. Various morphological and chemical response variables were examined in grazed apical shoots and compared to undamaged controls. We further estimated plant palatability of induced and non-induced apices in choice assays, and assessed the growth response of Acentria larvae in no-choice feeding assays. Leaves of induced apices were splayed out horizontally and changed in color from green to red. The dry matter content and thus plant toughness increased by up to 19%, but silica levels stayed constant. Induced apices exhibited a decline in chlorophyll content of up to 34%, reflected also by a 10% decrease in nitrogen levels, while nitrogen increased by 14% in lower parts of grazed shoots. Also, herbivore-deterring total phenolic compounds increased by up to 20% in apices. In choice trials, Acentria larvae strongly avoided grazed tips, and growth was reduced by 25% on induced apices. In total, we observed five different induced resistance and defensive traits in grazed apices: changes in appearance, increased plant toughness, delocalization of N-containing metabolites, increased polyphenols, and reduced nutritional value. The observed changes prevent herbivore damage and loss of apical tissue, which are most valuable for plant fitness. Our study presents the first evidence of multiple, parallel defense strategies including constitutive and induced defense mechanisms in a freshwater angiosperm. PMID:24429525

  3. The strawberry plant defense mechanism: a molecular review.

    PubMed

    Amil-Ruiz, Francisco; Blanco-Portales, Rosario; Muñoz-Blanco, Juan; Caballero, José L

    2011-11-01

    Strawberry, a small fruit crop of great importance throughout the world, has been considered a model plant system for Rosaceae, and is susceptible to a large variety of phytopathogenic organisms. Most components and mechanisms of the strawberry defense network remain poorly understood. However, from current knowledge, it seems clear that the ability of a strawberry plant to respond efficiently to pathogens relies first on the physiological status of injured tissue (pre-formed mechanisms of defense) and secondly on the general ability to recognize and identify the invaders by surface plant receptors, followed by a broad range of induced mechanisms, which include cell wall reinforcement, production of reactive oxygen species, phytoalexin generation and pathogenesis-related protein accumulation. Dissection of these physiological responses at a molecular level will provide valuable information to improve future breeding strategies for new strawberry varieties and to engineer strawberry plants for durable and broad-spectrum disease resistance. In turn, this will lead to a reduction in use of chemicals and in environmental risks. Advances in the understanding of the molecular interplay between plant (mainly those considered model systems) and various classes of microbial pathogens have been made in the last two decades. However, major progress in the genetics and molecular biology of strawberry is still needed to uncover fully the way in which this elaborate plant innate immune system works. These fundamental insights will provide a conceptual framework for rational human intervention through new strawberry research approaches. In this review, we will provide a comprehensive overview and discuss recent advances in molecular research on strawberry defense mechanisms against pathogens. PMID:21984602

  4. Activated chemical defenses suppress herbivory on freshwater red algae.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Keri M; Hay, Mark E

    2013-04-01

    The rapid life cycles of freshwater algae are hypothesized to suppress selection for chemical defenses against herbivores, but this notion remains untested. Investigations of chemical defenses are rare for freshwater macrophytes and absent for freshwater red algae. We used crayfish to assess the palatability of five freshwater red algae relative to a palatable green alga and a chemically defended aquatic moss. We then assessed the roles of structural, nutritional, and chemical traits in reducing palatability. Both native and non-native crayfish preferred the green alga Cladophora glomerata to four of the five red algae. Batrachospermum helminthosum, Kumanoa holtonii, and Tuomeya americana employed activated chemical defenses that suppressed feeding by 30-60 % following damage to algal tissues. Paralemanea annulata was defended by its cartilaginous structure, while Boldia erythrosiphon was palatable. Activated defenses are thought to reduce ecological costs by expressing potent defenses only when actually needed; thus, activation might be favored in freshwater red algae whose short-lived gametophytes must grow and reproduce rapidly over a brief growing season. The frequency of activated chemical defenses found here (three of five species) is 3-20× higher than for surveys of marine algae or aquatic vascular plants. If typical for freshwater red algae, this suggests that (1) their chemical defenses may go undetected if chemical activation is not considered and (2) herbivory has been an important selective force in the evolution of freshwater Rhodophyta. Investigations of defenses in freshwater rhodophytes contribute to among-system comparisons and provide insights into the generality of plant-herbivore interactions and their evolution. PMID:23011851

  5. Defense High-Level Waste Leaching Mechanisms Program. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mendel, J.E.

    1984-08-01

    The Defense High-Level Waste Leaching Mechanisms Program brought six major US laboratories together for three years of cooperative research. The participants reached a consensus that solubility of the leached glass species, particularly solubility in the altered surface layer, is the dominant factor controlling the leaching behavior of defense waste glass in a system in which the flow of leachant is constrained, as it will be in a deep geologic repository. Also, once the surface of waste glass is contacted by ground water, the kinetics of establishing solubility control are relatively rapid. The concentrations of leached species reach saturation, or steady-state concentrations, within a few months to a year at 70 to 90/sup 0/C. Thus, reaction kinetics, which were the main subject of earlier leaching mechanisms studies, are now shown to assume much less importance. The dominance of solubility means that the leach rate is, in fact, directly proportional to ground water flow rate. Doubling the flow rate doubles the effective leach rate. This relationship is expected to obtain in most, if not all, repository situations.

  6. Protective effect of ellagic acid against TCDD-induced renal oxidative stress: modulation of CYP1A1 activity and antioxidant defense mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Vijaya Padma, Viswanadha; Kalai Selvi, Palaniswamy; Sravani, Samadi

    2014-07-01

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) belongs to toxicologically important class of poly halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons and produce wide variety of adverse effects in humans. The present study investigated the protective effect of ellagic acid, a natural polyphenolic compound against TCDD-induced nephrotoxicity in Wistar rats. TCDD-induced nephrotoxicity was reflected in marked changes in the histology of kidney, increase in levels of kidney markers (serum urea, serum creatinine) and lipid peroxides. A significant increase in activity of phase I enzyme CYP1A1 with concomitant decline in the activities of phase II enzymes [non-enzymic antioxidant and various enzymic antioxidants such as superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione-s-transferase] was also observed. In addition, TCDD treated rats showed alterations in ATPase enzyme activities such as Na(+) K(+)-ATPase, Mg(2+) ATPase and Ca(2+) ATPase. Oral pre-treatment with ellagic acid prevented TCDD-induced alterations in levels of kidney markers. Ellagic acid pre-treatment significantly counteracted TCDD-induced oxidative stress by decreasing CYP1A1 activity and enhancing the antioxidant status. Furthermore, ellagic acid restored TCDD-induced histopathological changes and alterations in ATPase enzyme activities. The results of the present study show that significant protective effect rendered by ellagic acid against TCDD-induced nephrotoxicity might be attributed to its antioxidant potential. PMID:24566691

  7. 77 FR 76938 - Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement: Contracting Activity Updates (DFARS Case 2012...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-31

    ... Agency, the Defense Logistics Agency, the Defense Security Cooperation Agency, the Defense Security... Regulation Supplement: Contracting Activity Updates (DFARS Case 2012-D045) AGENCY: Defense Acquisition.... * * * * * Contracting activity for DoD also means elements designated by the director of a defense agency......

  8. Phospholipase A2 Activity Triggers the Wound-Activated Chemical Defense in the Diatom Thalassiosira rotula

    PubMed Central

    Pohnert, Georg

    2002-01-01

    The activation of oxylipin-based chemical defense in the diatom Thalassiosira rotula is initiated by phospholipases that act immediately after cell damage. This lipase activity is responsible for the preferential release of free mono- and polyunsaturated fatty acids. Among these, eicosatetraenoic- and eicosapentaenoic acid are further converted by lipoxygenases to reactive defensive metabolites such as the antiproliferative α,β,γ,δ-unsaturated aldehydes 2,4-decadienal and 2,4,7-decatrienal. We show that mainly saturated free fatty acids are present in the intact diatom T. rotula, whereas the amount of free polyunsaturated eicosanoids is drastically increased in the first minutes after wounding. Using fluorescent probes, the main enzyme activity responsible for initiation of the aldehyde-generating lipase/lipoxygenase/hydroperoxide lyase cascade was characterized as a phospholipase A2. All enzymes involved in this specific defensive reaction are active in seawater over several minutes. Thus, the mechanism allows the unicellular algae to overcome restrictions arising out of potential dilution of defensive metabolites. Only upon predation are high local concentrations of aldehydes formed in the vicinity of the herbivores, whereas in times of low stress, cellular resources can be invested in the formation of eicosanoid-rich phospholipids. In contrast to higher plants, which use lipases acting on galactolipids to release C18 fatty acids for production of leaf-volatile aldehydes, diatoms rely on phospholipids and the transformation of C20 fatty acids to form 2,4-decadienal and 2,4,7-decatrienal as an activated defense. PMID:12011342

  9. Hope, defense mechanisms, and adjustment: implications for false hope and defensive hopelessness.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Paul

    2002-04-01

    Two studies replicated and expanded an earlier finding that defense style plays a crucial role in the relation between hope and dysphoria (Kwon, 2000). Lower hope and higher defense style immaturity were each associated with greater dysphoria, depression proneness, and maladjustment. Individuals with low hope and low defense immaturity did not have poor outcomes, supporting the existence of a subtype of low hope (defensive hopelessness) that may have adaptive value. The combination of high hope and high defense immaturity was not associated with maladaptive outcomes, arguing against the false hope construct. Additionally, the findings remained after controlling for levels of anxiety. Thus, it appears that the results are not attributable to general distress or negative affectivity. Finally, domain-specific hope was shown to correlate most strongly with matching areas of adjustment, providing evidence for the validity of the construct. PMID:11908846

  10. Partially resistant Cucurbita pepo showed late onset of the Zucchini yellow mosaic virus infection due to rapid activation of defense mechanisms as compared to susceptible cultivar

    PubMed Central

    Nováková, Slavomíra; Flores-Ramírez, Gabriela; Glasa, Miroslav; Danchenko, Maksym; Fiala, Roderik; Skultety, Ludovit

    2015-01-01

    Zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV) is an emerging viral pathogen in cucurbit-growing areas wordwide. Infection causes significant yield losses in several species of the family Cucurbitaceae. To identify proteins potentially involved with resistance toward infection by the severe ZYMV-H isolate, two Cucurbita pepo cultivars (Zelena susceptible and Jaguar partially resistant) were analyzed using a two-dimensional gel electrophoresis-based proteomic approach. Initial symptoms on leaves (clearing veins) developed 6–7 days post-inoculation (dpi) in the susceptible C. pepo cv. Zelena. In contrast, similar symptoms appeared on the leaves of partially resistant C. pepo cv. Jaguar only after 15 dpi. This finding was confirmed by immune-blot analysis which showed higher levels of viral proteins at 6 dpi in the susceptible cultivar. Leaf proteome analyses revealed 28 and 31 spots differentially abundant between cultivars at 6 and 15 dpi, respectively. The variance early in infection can be attributed to a rapid activation of proteins involved with redox homeostasis in the partially resistant cultivar. Changes in the proteome of the susceptible cultivar are related to the cytoskeleton and photosynthesis. PMID:25972878

  11. Partially resistant Cucurbita pepo showed late onset of the Zucchini yellow mosaic virus infection due to rapid activation of defense mechanisms as compared to susceptible cultivar.

    PubMed

    Nováková, Slavomíra; Flores-Ramírez, Gabriela; Glasa, Miroslav; Danchenko, Maksym; Fiala, Roderik; Skultety, Ludovit

    2015-01-01

    Zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV) is an emerging viral pathogen in cucurbit-growing areas wordwide. Infection causes significant yield losses in several species of the family Cucurbitaceae. To identify proteins potentially involved with resistance toward infection by the severe ZYMV-H isolate, two Cucurbita pepo cultivars (Zelena susceptible and Jaguar partially resistant) were analyzed using a two-dimensional gel electrophoresis-based proteomic approach. Initial symptoms on leaves (clearing veins) developed 6-7 days post-inoculation (dpi) in the susceptible C. pepo cv. Zelena. In contrast, similar symptoms appeared on the leaves of partially resistant C. pepo cv. Jaguar only after 15 dpi. This finding was confirmed by immune-blot analysis which showed higher levels of viral proteins at 6 dpi in the susceptible cultivar. Leaf proteome analyses revealed 28 and 31 spots differentially abundant between cultivars at 6 and 15 dpi, respectively. The variance early in infection can be attributed to a rapid activation of proteins involved with redox homeostasis in the partially resistant cultivar. Changes in the proteome of the susceptible cultivar are related to the cytoskeleton and photosynthesis. PMID:25972878

  12. Activated chemical defense in aplysina sponges revisited.

    PubMed

    Thoms, Carsten; Ebel, Rainer; Proksch, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Sponges of the genus Aplysina accumulate brominated isoxazoline alkaloids in concentrations that sometimes exceed 10% of their dry weight. We previously reported a decrease in concentrations of these compounds and a concomitant increase in concentrations of the monocyclic nitrogenous compounds aeroplysinin-1 and dienone in Aplysina aerophoba following injury of the sponge tissue. Further investigations indicated a wound-induced enzymatic cleavage of the former compounds into the latter, and demonstrated that these reactions also occur in other Aplysina sponges. A recent study on Caribbean Aplysina species, however, introduced doubt regarding the presence of a wound-induced bioconversion in sponges of this genus. This discrepancy motivated us to reinvestigate carefully the fate of brominated alkaloids in A. aerophoba and in other Aplysina sponges following mechanical injury. As a result of this study we conclude that (1) tissue damage induces a bioconversion of isoxazoline alkaloids into aeroplysinin-1 and dienone in Aplysina sponges, (2) this reaction is likely catalyzed by enzymes, and (3) it may be ecologically relevant as the bioconversion products possibly protect the wounded sponge tissue from invasion of bacterial pathogens. PMID:16525873

  13. Cyanogenesis Inhibits Active Defense Reactions in Plants 1

    PubMed Central

    Lieberei, Reinhard; Biehl, Böle; Giesemann, Anette; Junqueira, Nilton T. V.

    1989-01-01

    In the course of fungal attack on the cyanogenic rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis Muell.-Arg.) HCN is liberated from infected tissue. The HCN interferes with plant host and fungal pathogen. It becomes inhibitory to active defense responses which are dependent on biosynthetic processes as far as a threshold concentration is transgressed. PMID:16666758

  14. Change in Coping and Defense Mechanisms across Adulthood: Longitudinal Findings in a European American Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diehl, Manfred; Chui, Helena; Hay, Elizabeth L.; Lumley, Mark A.; Grühn, Daniel; Labouvie-Vief, Gisela

    2014-01-01

    This study examined longitudinal changes in coping and defense mechanisms in an age- and gender-stratified sample of 392 European American adults. Nonlinear age-related changes were found for the coping mechanisms of sublimation and suppression and the defense mechanisms of intellectualization, doubt, displacement, and regression. The change…

  15. Activation of Phospholipase A by Plant Defense Elicitors.

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, S.; Heinstein, P. F.; Low, P. S.

    1996-01-01

    Participation of phospholipase A (PLase A) in plant signal transduction has been documented for auxin stimulation of growth but not for elicitation of any plant defense response. In this paper, we report two independent assays for monitoring PLase A induction in plant cells and have used these assays to evaluate whether transduction of defense-related signals might require PLase A activation. Oligogalacturonic acid, a potent elicitor of the soybean (Glycine max) H2O2 burst, was unable to stimulate endogenous PLase A, suggesting that PLase A activation is not an obligate intermediate in the oligogalacturonic acid-induced burst pathway. In contrast, harpin and an extract from the pathogenic fungus Verticillium dahliae both stimulated the oxidative burst and promoted a rapid increase in PLase A activity. To evaluate the possible role of this inducible PLase A activity in transducing the oxidative burst, we tested the effect of chlorpromazine-HCl, a PLase A inhibitor on elicitor-stimulated burst activity. Pretreatment with chloropromazine was found to inhibit the H2O2 burst triggered by V. dahliae extract at the same concentration at which it blocked PLase A activation. In contrast, neither the harpin- nor oligogalacturonic acid-induced burst was altered by addition of chlorpromazine. These data suggest that PLase A stimulation may be important in certain elicitor-induced oxidative bursts (e.g. V. dahliae) and that other elicitors such as oligogalacturonic acid and harpin must operate through independent signaling intermediates to activate the same defense response. PMID:12226235

  16. Naturally Produced Defensive Alkenal Compounds Activate TRPA1.

    PubMed

    Blair, Nathaniel T; Philipson, Benjamin I; Richards, Paige M; Doerner, Julia F; Segura, Abraham; Silver, Wayne L; Clapham, David E

    2016-05-01

    (E)-2-alkenals are aldehydes containing an unsaturated bond between the alpha and beta carbons. 2-alkenals are produced by many organisms for defense against predators and secretions containing (E)-2-alkenals cause predators to stop attacking and allow the prey to escape. Chemical ecologists have described many alkenal compounds with 3-20 carbons common, having varied positions of double bonds and substitutions. How do these defensive alkenals act to deter predators? We have tested the effects of (E)-2-alkenals with 6-12 carbons on transient receptor potential channels (TRP) commonly found in sensory neurons. We find that (E)-2-alkenals activate transient receptor potential ankyrin subtype 1 (TRPA1) at low concentrations-EC50s 10-100 µM (in 0 added Ca(2+) external solutions). Other TRP channels were either weakly activated (TRPV1, TRPV3) or insensitive (TRPV2, TRPV4, TRPM8). (E)-2-alkenals may activate TRPA1 by modifying cysteine side chains. However, target cysteines include others beyond the 3 in the amino-terminus implicated in activation, as a channel with cysteines at 621, 641, 665 mutated to serine responded robustly. Related chemicals, including the aldehydes hexanal and decanal, and (E)-2-hexen-1-ol also activated TRPA1, but with weaker potency. Rat trigeminal nerve recordings and behavioral experiments showed (E)-2-hexenal was aversive. Our results suggest that TRPA1 is likely a major target of these commonly used defensive chemicals. PMID:26843529

  17. Serine/threonine protein phosphatases: multi-purpose enzymes in control of defense mechanisms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Serine/threonine protein phosphatases are a group of enzymes involved in the regulation of defense mechanisms in plants. This paper describes the effects of an inhibitor of these enzymes on the expression of all of the genes associated with these defense mechanisms. The results suggest that inhibi...

  18. Influence of Defense Mechanisms on Moral Judgment Development: A Longitudinal Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Daniel; Chmiel, Susan

    1992-01-01

    At age 13, and for the next 20 years, male subjects were periodically interviewed about their moral judgments. Adolescents with mature use of defense mechanisms reasoned at higher stages of moral judgment 10 to 20 years after the initial interview than did those with immature use of defense mechanisms. (BC)

  19. Hyperphosphorylation as a defense mechanism to reduce TDP-43 aggregation.

    PubMed

    Li, Huei-Ying; Yeh, Po-An; Chiu, Hsiu-Chiang; Tang, Chiou-Yang; Tu, Benjamin Pang-hsien

    2011-01-01

    Several neurodegenerative diseases including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration with ubiquitinated inclusions (FTLD-U) are characterized by inclusion bodies formed by TDP-43 (TDP). We established cell and transgenic Drosophila models expressing TDP carboxyl terminal fragment (ND251 and ND207), which developed aggregates recapitulating important features of TDP inclusions in ALS/FTLD-U, including hyperphosphorylation at previously reported serine(403,404,409,410) residues, polyubiquitination and colocalization with optineurin. These models were used to address the pathogenic role of hyperphosphorylation in ALS/FTLD-U. We demonstrated that hyperphosphorylation and ubiquitination occurred temporally later than aggregation in cells. Expression of CK2α which phosphorylated TDP decreased the aggregation propensity of ND251 or ND207; this effect could be blocked by CK2 inhibitor DMAT. Mutation of serines(379,403,404,409,410) to alanines (S5A) to eliminate phosphorylation increased the aggregation propensity and number of aggregates of TDP, but mutation to aspartic acids (S5D) or glutamic acids (S5E) to simulate hyperphosphorylation had the opposite effect. Functionally, ND251 or ND207 aggregates decreased the number of neurites of Neuro2a cells induced by retinoic acid or number of cells by MTT assay. S5A mutation aggravated, but S5E mutation alleviated these cytotoxic effects of aggregates. Finally, ND251 or ND251S5A developed aggregates in neurons, and salivary gland of transgenic Drosophila, but ND251S5E did not. Taken together, our data indicate that hyperphosphorylation may represent a compensatory defense mechanism to stop or prevent pathogenic TDP from aggregation. Therefore, enhancement of phosphorylation may serve as an effective therapeutic strategy against ALS/FTLD-U. PMID:21850253

  20. Partial Activation of SA- and JA-Defensive Pathways in Strawberry upon Colletotrichum acutatum Interaction.

    PubMed

    Amil-Ruiz, Francisco; Garrido-Gala, José; Gadea, José; Blanco-Portales, Rosario; Muñoz-Mérida, Antonio; Trelles, Oswaldo; de Los Santos, Berta; Arroyo, Francisco T; Aguado-Puig, Ana; Romero, Fernando; Mercado, José-Ángel; Pliego-Alfaro, Fernando; Muñoz-Blanco, Juan; Caballero, José L

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the nature of pathogen host interaction may help improve strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) cultivars. Plant resistance to pathogenic agents usually operates through a complex network of defense mechanisms mediated by a diverse array of signaling molecules. In strawberry, resistance to a variety of pathogens has been reported to be mostly polygenic and quantitatively inherited, making it difficult to associate molecular markers with disease resistance genes. Colletotrichum acutatum spp. is a major strawberry pathogen, and completely resistant cultivars have not been reported. Moreover, strawberry defense network components and mechanisms remain largely unknown and poorly understood. Assessment of the strawberry response to C. acutatum included a global transcript analysis, and acidic hormones SA and JA measurements were analyzed after challenge with the pathogen. Induction of transcripts corresponding to the SA and JA signaling pathways and key genes controlling major steps within these defense pathways was detected. Accordingly, SA and JA accumulated in strawberry after infection. Contrastingly, induction of several important SA, JA, and oxidative stress-responsive defense genes, including FaPR1-1, FaLOX2, FaJAR1, FaPDF1, and FaGST1, was not detected, which suggests that specific branches in these defense pathways (those leading to FaPR1-2, FaPR2-1, FaPR2-2, FaAOS, FaPR5, and FaPR10) were activated. Our results reveal that specific aspects in SA and JA dependent signaling pathways are activated in strawberry upon interaction with C. acutatum. Certain described defense-associated transcripts related to these two known signaling pathways do not increase in abundance following infection. This finding suggests new insight into a specific putative molecular strategy for defense against this pathogen. PMID:27471515

  1. Partial Activation of SA- and JA-Defensive Pathways in Strawberry upon Colletotrichum acutatum Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Amil-Ruiz, Francisco; Garrido-Gala, José; Gadea, José; Blanco-Portales, Rosario; Muñoz-Mérida, Antonio; Trelles, Oswaldo; de los Santos, Berta; Arroyo, Francisco T.; Aguado-Puig, Ana; Romero, Fernando; Mercado, José-Ángel; Pliego-Alfaro, Fernando; Muñoz-Blanco, Juan; Caballero, José L.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the nature of pathogen host interaction may help improve strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) cultivars. Plant resistance to pathogenic agents usually operates through a complex network of defense mechanisms mediated by a diverse array of signaling molecules. In strawberry, resistance to a variety of pathogens has been reported to be mostly polygenic and quantitatively inherited, making it difficult to associate molecular markers with disease resistance genes. Colletotrichum acutatum spp. is a major strawberry pathogen, and completely resistant cultivars have not been reported. Moreover, strawberry defense network components and mechanisms remain largely unknown and poorly understood. Assessment of the strawberry response to C. acutatum included a global transcript analysis, and acidic hormones SA and JA measurements were analyzed after challenge with the pathogen. Induction of transcripts corresponding to the SA and JA signaling pathways and key genes controlling major steps within these defense pathways was detected. Accordingly, SA and JA accumulated in strawberry after infection. Contrastingly, induction of several important SA, JA, and oxidative stress-responsive defense genes, including FaPR1-1, FaLOX2, FaJAR1, FaPDF1, and FaGST1, was not detected, which suggests that specific branches in these defense pathways (those leading to FaPR1-2, FaPR2-1, FaPR2-2, FaAOS, FaPR5, and FaPR10) were activated. Our results reveal that specific aspects in SA and JA dependent signaling pathways are activated in strawberry upon interaction with C. acutatum. Certain described defense-associated transcripts related to these two known signaling pathways do not increase in abundance following infection. This finding suggests new insight into a specific putative molecular strategy for defense against this pathogen. PMID:27471515

  2. Activation of Hepatic STAT3 Maintains Pulmonary Defense during Endotoxemia

    PubMed Central

    Hilliard, Kristie L.; Allen, Eri; Traber, Katrina E.; Kim, Yuri; Wasserman, Gregory A.; Jones, Matthew R.; Mizgerd, Joseph P.

    2015-01-01

    Pneumonia and infection-induced sepsis are worldwide public health concerns. Both pathologies elicit systemic inflammation and induce a robust acute-phase response (APR). Although APR activation is well regarded as a hallmark of infection, the direct contributions of liver activation to pulmonary defense during sepsis remain unclear. By targeting STAT3-dependent acute-phase changes in the liver, we evaluated the role of liver STAT3 activity in promoting host defense in the context of sepsis and pneumonia. We employed a two-hit endotoxemia/pneumonia model, whereby administration of 18 h of intraperitoneal lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 5 mg/kg of body weight) was followed by intratracheal Escherichia coli (106 CFU) in wild-type mice or those lacking hepatocyte STAT3 (hepSTAT3−/−). Pneumonia alone (without endotoxemia) was effectively controlled in the absence of liver STAT3. Following endotoxemia and pneumonia, however, hepSTAT3−/− mice, with significantly reduced levels of circulating and airspace acute-phase proteins, exhibited significantly elevated lung and blood bacterial burdens and mortality. These data suggested that STAT3-dependent liver responses are necessary to promote host defense. While neither recruited airspace neutrophils nor lung injury was altered in endotoxemic hepSTAT3−/− mice, alveolar macrophage reactive oxygen species generation was significantly decreased. Additionally, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from this group of hepSTAT3−/− mice allowed greater bacterial growth ex vivo. These results suggest that hepatic STAT3 activation promotes both cellular and humoral lung defenses. Taken together, induction of liver STAT3-dependent gene expression programs is essential to countering the deleterious consequences of sepsis on pneumonia susceptibility. PMID:26216424

  3. Activation of Hepatic STAT3 Maintains Pulmonary Defense during Endotoxemia.

    PubMed

    Hilliard, Kristie L; Allen, Eri; Traber, Katrina E; Kim, Yuri; Wasserman, Gregory A; Jones, Matthew R; Mizgerd, Joseph P; Quinton, Lee J

    2015-10-01

    Pneumonia and infection-induced sepsis are worldwide public health concerns. Both pathologies elicit systemic inflammation and induce a robust acute-phase response (APR). Although APR activation is well regarded as a hallmark of infection, the direct contributions of liver activation to pulmonary defense during sepsis remain unclear. By targeting STAT3-dependent acute-phase changes in the liver, we evaluated the role of liver STAT3 activity in promoting host defense in the context of sepsis and pneumonia. We employed a two-hit endotoxemia/pneumonia model, whereby administration of 18 h of intraperitoneal lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 5 mg/kg of body weight) was followed by intratracheal Escherichia coli (10(6) CFU) in wild-type mice or those lacking hepatocyte STAT3 (hepSTAT3(-/-)). Pneumonia alone (without endotoxemia) was effectively controlled in the absence of liver STAT3. Following endotoxemia and pneumonia, however, hepSTAT3(-/-) mice, with significantly reduced levels of circulating and airspace acute-phase proteins, exhibited significantly elevated lung and blood bacterial burdens and mortality. These data suggested that STAT3-dependent liver responses are necessary to promote host defense. While neither recruited airspace neutrophils nor lung injury was altered in endotoxemic hepSTAT3(-/-) mice, alveolar macrophage reactive oxygen species generation was significantly decreased. Additionally, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from this group of hepSTAT3(-/-) mice allowed greater bacterial growth ex vivo. These results suggest that hepatic STAT3 activation promotes both cellular and humoral lung defenses. Taken together, induction of liver STAT3-dependent gene expression programs is essential to countering the deleterious consequences of sepsis on pneumonia susceptibility. PMID:26216424

  4. Mechanical defenses of plant extrafloral nectaries against herbivory.

    PubMed

    Gish, Moshe; Mescher, Mark C; De Moraes, Consuelo M

    2016-01-01

    Extrafloral nectaries play an important role in plant defense against herbivores by providing nectar rewards that attract ants and other carnivorous insects. However, extrafloral nectaries can themselves be targets of herbivory, in addition to being exploited by nectar-robbing insects that do not provide defensive services. We recently found that the extrafloral nectaries of Vicia faba plants, as well as immediately adjacent tissues, exhibit high concentrations of chemical toxins, apparently as a defense against herbivory. Here we report that the nectary tissues of this plant also exhibit high levels of structural stiffness compared to surrounding tissues, likely due to cell wall lignification and the concentration of calcium oxalate crystals in nectary tissues, which may provide an additional deterrent to herbivore feeding on nectary tissues. PMID:27489584

  5. Mechanical defenses of plant extrafloral nectaries against herbivory

    PubMed Central

    Gish, Moshe; Mescher, Mark C.; De Moraes, Consuelo M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Extrafloral nectaries play an important role in plant defense against herbivores by providing nectar rewards that attract ants and other carnivorous insects. However, extrafloral nectaries can themselves be targets of herbivory, in addition to being exploited by nectar-robbing insects that do not provide defensive services. We recently found that the extrafloral nectaries of Vicia faba plants, as well as immediately adjacent tissues, exhibit high concentrations of chemical toxins, apparently as a defense against herbivory. Here we report that the nectary tissues of this plant also exhibit high levels of structural stiffness compared to surrounding tissues, likely due to cell wall lignification and the concentration of calcium oxalate crystals in nectary tissues, which may provide an additional deterrent to herbivore feeding on nectary tissues. PMID:27489584

  6. Battle management architectures for active defense against artillery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nugent, John

    2001-08-01

    Rockets, mortars, and artillery (RMA) are widely held, abundant, and inexpensive weapons that historically have been the most lethal 'killers' on the battlefield. The proliferation of non-conventional warheads (chemical and biological) has increased the RMA threat. Recently, new weapons--in particular directed-energy weapons--have shown promise in providing an active defense against RMA. The development and deployment of these advanced weapons is only part of the challenge of providing a total RMA active defense capability. Developing a BMC3I that can support this air battle is also a major challenge. Threat sizes and threat rates of RMA versus traditional air defense threats could easily be higher by one to two orders of magnitude. The implication of this larger threat on the complexity of a BMC3I system is profound. Relative to traditional threats, fighting such an air battle will result in a large demand on sensors to collect information on this dense threat and in a large surge in the dissemination of air picture, control, and status information through the BMC3I network (weapons, sensors, and command posts). A successful BMC3I system must have the architectural features and algorithmic approaches to manage these tasks efficiently. This paper will characterize the magnitude of this problem and discuss architectural and algorithmic challenges.

  7. [The defense and regulatory mechanisms during development of legume-Rhizobium symbiosis].

    PubMed

    Glian'ko, A K; Akimova, G P; Sokolova, M G; Makarova, L E; Vasil'eva, G G

    2007-01-01

    The roles of indolylacetic acid, the peroxidase system, catalase, active oxygen species, and phenolic compounds in the physiological and biochemical mechanisms involved in the autoregulation of nodulation in the developing legume-Rhizobium symbiosis were studied. It was inferred that the concentration of indolylacetic acid in the roots of inoculated plants, controlled by the enzymes of the peroxidase complex, is the signal permitting or limiting nodulation at the initial stages of symbiotic interaction. Presumably, the change in the level of active oxygen species is determined by an antioxidant activity of phenolic compounds. During the development of symbiosis, phytohormones, antioxidant enzymes, and active oxygen species may be involved in the regulation of infection via both a direct antibacterial action and regulation of functional activity of the host plant defense systems. PMID:17619575

  8. Change in Coping and Defense Mechanisms across Adulthood: Longitudinal Findings in a European-American Sample

    PubMed Central

    Diehl, Manfred; Chui, Helena; Hay, Elizabeth L.; Lumley, Mark A.; Grühn, Daniel; Labouvie-Vief, Gisela

    2014-01-01

    This study examined longitudinal changes in coping and defense mechanisms in an age- and gender-stratified sample of 392 European-American adults. Nonlinear age-related changes were found for the coping mechanisms of sublimation and suppression and the defense mechanisms of intellectualization, doubt, displacement, and regression. The change trajectories for sublimation and suppression showed that their use increased from adolescence to late middle age and early old age, and remained mostly stable into late old age. The change trajectory for intellectualization showed that the use of this defense mechanism increased from adolescence to middle age, remained stable until late midlife, and started to decline thereafter. The defense mechanisms of doubt, displacement, and regression showed decreases from adolescence until early old age, with increases occurring again after the age of 65. Linear age-related decreases were found for the coping mechanism of ego regression and the defense mechanisms of isolation and rationalization. Gender and socioeconomic status were associated with the mean levels of several coping and defense mechanisms, but did not moderate age-related changes. Increases in ego level were associated with increased use of the defense mechanism intellectualization and decreased use of the defense mechanisms of doubt and displacement. Overall, these findings in a European-American sample suggest that most individuals showed development in the direction of more adaptive and less maladaptive coping and defense strategies from adolescence until late middle age or early old age. However, in late old age this development was reversed, presenting potential challenges to the adaptive capacity of older adults. PMID:23834293

  9. Guardian of the Human Genome: Host Defense Mechanisms against LINE-1 Retrotransposition.

    PubMed

    Ariumi, Yasuo

    2016-01-01

    Long interspersed element type 1 (LINE-1, L1) is a mobile genetic element comprising about 17% of the human genome, encoding a newly identified ORF0 with unknown function, ORF1p with RNA-binding activity and ORF2p with endonuclease and reverse transcriptase activities required for L1 retrotransposition. L1 utilizes an endonuclease (EN) to insert L1 cDNA into target DNA, which induces DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). The ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) is activated by DSBs and subsequently the ATM-signaling pathway plays a role in regulating L1 retrotransposition. In addition, the host DNA repair machinery such as non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) repair pathway is also involved in L1 retrotransposition. On the other hand, L1 is an insertional mutagenic agent, which contributes to genetic change, genomic instability, and tumorigenesis. Indeed, high-throughput sequencing-based approaches identified numerous tumor-specific somatic L1 insertions in variety of cancers, such as colon cancer, breast cancer, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In fact, L1 retrotransposition seems to be a potential factor to reduce the tumor suppressive property in HCC. Furthermore, recent study demonstrated that a specific viral-human chimeric transcript, HBx-L1, contributes to hepatitis B virus (HBV)-associated HCC. In contrast, host cells have evolved several defense mechanisms protecting cells against retrotransposition including epigenetic regulation through DNA methylation and host defense factors, such as APOBEC3, MOV10, and SAMHD1, which restrict L1 mobility as a guardian of the human genome. In this review, I focus on somatic L1 insertions into the human genome in cancers and host defense mechanisms against deleterious L1 insertions. PMID:27446907

  10. Guardian of the Human Genome: Host Defense Mechanisms against LINE-1 Retrotransposition

    PubMed Central

    Ariumi, Yasuo

    2016-01-01

    Long interspersed element type 1 (LINE-1, L1) is a mobile genetic element comprising about 17% of the human genome, encoding a newly identified ORF0 with unknown function, ORF1p with RNA-binding activity and ORF2p with endonuclease and reverse transcriptase activities required for L1 retrotransposition. L1 utilizes an endonuclease (EN) to insert L1 cDNA into target DNA, which induces DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). The ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) is activated by DSBs and subsequently the ATM-signaling pathway plays a role in regulating L1 retrotransposition. In addition, the host DNA repair machinery such as non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) repair pathway is also involved in L1 retrotransposition. On the other hand, L1 is an insertional mutagenic agent, which contributes to genetic change, genomic instability, and tumorigenesis. Indeed, high-throughput sequencing-based approaches identified numerous tumor-specific somatic L1 insertions in variety of cancers, such as colon cancer, breast cancer, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In fact, L1 retrotransposition seems to be a potential factor to reduce the tumor suppressive property in HCC. Furthermore, recent study demonstrated that a specific viral-human chimeric transcript, HBx-L1, contributes to hepatitis B virus (HBV)-associated HCC. In contrast, host cells have evolved several defense mechanisms protecting cells against retrotransposition including epigenetic regulation through DNA methylation and host defense factors, such as APOBEC3, MOV10, and SAMHD1, which restrict L1 mobility as a guardian of the human genome. In this review, I focus on somatic L1 insertions into the human genome in cancers and host defense mechanisms against deleterious L1 insertions. PMID:27446907

  11. Mechanisms of Defense against Intracellular Pathogens Mediated by Human Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Bloom, Barry R; Modlin, Robert L

    2016-06-01

    The key question our work has sought to address has been, "What are the necessary and sufficient conditions that engender protection from intracellular pathogens in the human host?" The origins of this work derive from a long-standing interest in the mechanisms of protection against two such paradigmatic intracellular pathogens, Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium leprae, that have brilliantly adapted to the human host. It was obvious that these pathogens, which cause chronic diseases and persist in macrophages, must have acquired subtle strategies to resist host microbicidal mechanisms, yet since the vast majority of individuals infected with M. tuberculosis do not develop disease, there must be some potent human antimicrobial mechanisms. What follows is not a comprehensive review of the vast literature on the role of human macrophages in protection against infectious disease, but a summary of the research in our two laboratories with collaborators that we hope has contributed to some understanding of mechanisms of resistance and pathogenesis. While mouse models revealed some necessary conditions for protection, e.g., innate immunity, Th1 cells and their cytokines, and major histocompatibility complex class I-restricted T cells, here we emphasize multiple antimicrobial mechanisms that exist in human macrophages that differ from those of most experimental animals. Prominent here is the vitamin D-dependent antimicrobial pathway common to human macrophages activated by innate and acquired immune responses, mediated by antimicrobial peptides, e.g., cathelicidin, through an interleukin-15- and interleukin-32-dependent common pathway that is necessary for macrophage killing of M. tuberculosis in vitro. PMID:27337485

  12. Active infrared systems: possible roles in ballistic missile defense?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paleologue, A.

    2006-05-01

    Active Infra-Red (IR) systems developed in the past ten years are now available for missile defense applications. The main purpose of this paper is to describe the advantages an active IR system could offer to a ballistic missile defense (BMD). The active IR system considered in this paper is a LIDAR (LIght Detection And Ranging) system. Historically, the Lincoln Laboratory in the USA began using lasers in the early 1960's. The initial applications included the development of a LIDAR system enabling the measurement of the distance between the earth and the moon in 1962. Satellite tracking using LIDAR began early in 1973. Today, technological developments, with the miniaturization of systems and increased performance levels, have enabled new ambitious projects such as the Discrimination Interceptor Technology Program (DITP) program started in 1998 and the use of LIDAR to help in the discrimination of future exo-atmospheric interceptors within the framework of BMD. The first part of this paper presents the possible contribution of LIDAR to BMD: the main roles, objectives, and strategic advantages. The second part gives a brief overview of the technological features of a generic LIDAR instrument, rapidly addressing laser sources, detectors, optics and electronics. Finally, a modeling of an IR LIDAR system, limited solely to direct detection, and an estimation of performance levels will be presented. A list of possible IR active discriminators will be then presented on the basis of the previous analysis and proposed as new constraints in the design of discrete objects.

  13. Molecular mechanisms of microglial activation.

    PubMed

    Zielasek, J; Hartung, H P

    1996-01-01

    Microglial cells are brain macrophages which serve specific functions in the defense of the central nervous system (CNS) against microorganisms, the removal of tissue debris in neurodegenerative diseases or during normal development, and in autoimmune inflammatory disorders of the brain. In cultured microglial cells, several soluble inflammatory mediators such as cytokines and bacterial products like lipopolysaccharide (LPS) were demonstrated to induce a wide range of microglial activities, e.g. increased phagocytosis, chemotaxis, secretion of cytokines, activation of the respiratory burst and induction of nitric oxide synthase. Since heightened microglial activation was shown to play a role in the pathogenesis of experimental inflammatory CNS disorders, understanding the molecular mechanisms of microglial activation may lead to new treatment strategies for neurodegenerative disorders, multiple sclerosis and bacterial or viral infections of the nervous system. PMID:8876774

  14. Active, Non-Intrusive Inspection Technologies for Homeland Defense

    SciTech Connect

    James L. Jones

    2003-06-01

    Active, non-intrusive inspection or interrogation technologies have been used for 100 years - with the primary focus being radiographic imaging. During the last 50 years, various active interrogation systems have been investigated and most have revealed many unique and interesting capabilities and advantages that have already benefited the general public. Unfortunately, except for medical and specific industrial applications, these unique capabilities have not been widely adopted, largely due to the complexity of the technology, the overconfident reliance on passive detection systems to handle most challenges, and the unrealistic public concerns regarding radiation safety issues for a given active inspection deployment. The unique homeland security challenges facing the United States today are inviting more "out-of-the-box" solutions and are demanding the effective technological solutions that only active interrogation systems can provide. While revolutionary new solutions are always desired, these technology advancements are rare, and when found, usually take a long time to fully understand and implement for a given application. What's becoming more evident is that focusing on under-developed, but well-understood, active inspection technologies can provide many of the needed "out-of-the-box" solutions. This paper presents a brief historical overview of active interrogation. It identifies some of the major homeland defense challenges being confronted and the commercial and research technologies presently available and being pursued. Finally, the paper addresses the role of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory and its partner, the Idaho Accelerator Center at Idaho State University, in promoting and developing active inspection technologies for homeland defense.

  15. Non-canonical inflammasome activation of caspase-4/caspase-11 mediates epithelial defenses against enteric bacterial pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Knodler, Leigh A.; Crowley, Shauna M.; Sham, Ho Pan; Yang, Hyungjun; Wrande, Marie; Ma, Caixia; Ernst, Robert K.; Steele-Mortimer, Olivia; Celli, Jean; Vallance, Bruce A.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Inflammasome-mediated host defenses have been extensively studied in innate immune cells. Whether inflammasomes function for innate defense in intestinal epithelial cells, which represent the first line of defense against enteric pathogens, remains unknown. We observed enhanced Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium colonization in the intestinal epithelium of caspase-11 deficient mice, but not at systemic sites. In polarized epithelial monolayers, siRNA-mediated depletion of caspase-4, a human orthologue of caspase-11, also led to increased bacterial colonization. Decreased rates of pyroptotic cell death, a host defense mechanism that extrudes S. Typhimurium infected cells from the polarized epithelium, accounted for increased pathogen burdens. The caspase-4 inflammasome also governs activation of the proinflammatory cytokine, interleukin (IL)-18, in response to intracellular (S. Typhimurium) and extracellular (enteropathogenic Escherichia coli) enteric pathogens, via intracellular LPS sensing. Therefore an epithelial cell intrinsic non-canonical inflammasome plays a critical role in antimicrobial defense at the intestinal mucosal surface. PMID:25121752

  16. Modulation of host defense peptide-mediated human mast cell activation by LPS

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Kshitij; Subramanian, Hariharan; Ali, Hydar

    2016-01-01

    Human β-defensin3 (hBD3) and the cathelicidin LL-37 are host defense peptides (HDPs) that directly kill microbes and display immunomodulatory/wound healing properties via the activation of chemokine, formylpeptide and epidermal growth factor receptors on monocytes and epithelial cells. A C-terminal 14 amino acid hBD3 peptide with all Cys residues replaced with Ser (CHRG01) and an LL-37 peptide consisting of residues 17-29 (FK-13) display antimicrobial activity but lack immunomodulatory property. Surprisingly, we found that CHRG01 and FK-13 caused Ca2+ mobilization and degranulation in human mast cells via a novel G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) known as Mas-related gene-X2 (MrgX2). At local sites of bacterial infection, the negatively charged LPS likely interacts with cationic HDPs to inhibit their activity and thus providing a mechanism for pathogens to escape the host defense mechanisms. We found that LPS caused almost complete inhibition of hBD3 and LL-37-induced Ca2+ mobilization and mast cell degranulation. In contrast, it had no effect on CHRG01 and FK-13-induced mast cell responses. These findings suggest that HDP derivatives that kill microbes, harness mast cell’s host defense and wound healing properties via the activation of MrgX2 but are resistant to inhibition by LPS could be utilized for the treatment of antibiotic-resistant microbial infections. PMID:26511058

  17. Study of Defensive Methods and Mechanisms in Developmental, Emotional (Internalization), and Disruptive Behavior (Externalization) Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Jamilian, H. R.; Zamani, N.; Darvishi, M.; Khansari, M. R.

    2014-01-01

    We need to find a way for adaptation with inherent unpleasantness of being human condition and conflicts that it caused, as we did not fail. Methods that we used for adaptation are named defense. This research have performed with the aim of study and compare defensive mechanisms and methods of Developmental, Emotional (Internalization), and Disruptive behavior (Externalization) disorders. Method, sample of this research included 390 family that are by available sampling method are selected. Tools of research were structured clinical interview of forth cognitive and statistical guide of psychopathic disorders for axis I and the way used for assess defensive mechanisms is defensive method 40 question’s questionnaires of Andrews (1993). The data are compared by statistical methods comparison of averages and one way variance analysis and HSD tests and results show that undeveloped defensive mechanisms in by developmental disorder family(25.2± 3.7) mean and standard deviation, it is most used mechanism and in disruptive behavior disorder family by (11.2 ±1.9) mean and standard deviation is used least mechanism and in developed mechanism of emotional disorder family by (7.8 ± 3.1) mean and standard deviation is most used mechanism and in developmental disorder family by (4.3 ±1.5) mean and standard deviation is least mechanism in neuroticism patient, social phobia affected emotional disorder family (15.6±2.6) and disruptive behavior disorder family have least mean and standard deviation(9.2±1.7) (p< 0.005). Recent research shows significant of study defensive mechanism in psychopathic family of disorder children that affecting on the way of life of persons and interpersonal and intrapersonal relations and method of solving problem in family of them in life, so defensive mechanisms require more attention. PMID:25363187

  18. Trichoderma viride Laccase Plays a Crucial Role in Defense Mechanism against Antagonistic Organisms

    PubMed Central

    Divya, Lakshmanan; Sadasivan, C.

    2016-01-01

    Fungal laccases are involved in a variety of physiological functions such as delignification, morphogenesis, and parasitism. In addition to these functions, we suggest that fungal laccases are involved in defense mechanisms. When the laccase secreting Trichoderma viride was grown in the presence of a range of microorganisms including bacteria and fungi, laccase secretion was enhanced in response to antagonistic organisms alone. In addition, growth of antagonistic microbes was restricted by the secreting fungi. Besides, our study for the first time shows the inability of the secreting fungi (T. viride) to compete with antagonistic organism when laccase activity is inhibited, further emphasizing its involvement in rendering a survival advantage to the secreting organism. When laccase inhibitor was added to the media, the zone of inhibition exerted by the antagonist organism was more pronounced and consequently growth of T. viride was significantly restricted. Based on these observations we accentuate that, laccase plays an important role in defense mechanism and provides endurance to the organism when encountered with an antagonistic organism in its surrounding. PMID:27242756

  19. Effect of Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis on the Pulmonary Defense Mechanisms of Guinea Pig Lungs

    PubMed Central

    Jakab, George J.; Green, Gareth M.

    1973-01-01

    Many edemagenic and consolidating inflammatory diseases, such as virus pneumonias, of the lung are complicated by bacterial infection. Previous literature has stressed that edema and consolidation may promote bacterial proliferation by interfering with phagocytosis. To test that hypothesis, lung defense mechanisms were studied in guinea pigs with tuberculin-induced hypersensitivity pneumonitis, a noninfectious edemagenic, and consolidating inflammatory disease. Pulmonary bactericidal activity and particle clearance were measured with a mixed aerosol of 32P-labeled Staphylococcus aureus and35S-labeled Proteus mirabilis. Hypersensitivity pneumonitis enhanced the bactericidal activity of the lung but had no effect on particle clearance despite the presence of consolidation and edema. These data indicate that altered host resistance to bacterial infection in acute inflammatory lung diseases can not be attributed to edema, inflammation, consolidation, changes in lung weight, etc., per se and that causes must be sought in functional changes in the bactericidal system of the lung rather than in specific histopathological changes. Images PMID:4632134

  20. Change in children's externalizing and internalizing behavior problems: the role of defense mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Phebe

    2015-03-01

    This study investigates the relation of defense mechanism to children's externalizing and internalizing behavior problems, as assessed from mothers' report at age 9 and 12 years, based on archival data. The defense mechanisms of denial, projection, and identification were assessed from Thematic Apperception Test stories told by the children at age 9 years, using the Defense Mechanism Manual (Cramer, The development of defense mechanisms: Theory, research and assessment. New York: Springer-Verlag, 1991a; Protecting the self: Defense mechanisms in action. New York: Guilford Press, 2006). The results showed that the use of identification predicted a decrease in externalizing behaviors between age 9 and 12 years. In contrast, change in internalizing behaviors was not predicted by defense use, but the use of projection was related to fewer internalizing behaviors at both ages. These findings are consistent with the idea that behavioral intervention stressing self-regulation can be effective in reducing externalizing problems, but internalizing problems require an intervention that is sensitive to the underlying behavioral inhibition in these children. PMID:25668653

  1. Triiodothyronine and melatonin influence antioxidant defense mechanism in a teleost Anabas testudineus (Bloch): in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Sreejith, P; Beyo, R S; Divya, L; Vijayasree, A S; Manju, M; Oommen, O V

    2007-06-01

    The effect of the hormones triiodothyronine (T3) and melatonin on antioxidant defense system was studied in 6-propyl thiouracil (6-PTU)-treated or photoperiod-exposed teleost Anabas testudineus. 6-PTU (2 microg/g) treatment or photoperiod exposure (24 h) increased malondialdehyde (MDA) and conjugated dienes (CD) concentrations, indicating increased lipid peroxidation (LPO) in the experimental conditions. T3 or melatonin (10(-6) M) treatment for 15 min in vitro in PTU-treated fish reversed the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase and glutathione content. T3-treated group showed no change in glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity, whereas melatonin treatment decreased its activity. T3 inhibited glutathione reductase (GR) activity. Photoperiod exposure (physiological pinealotomy) induced a stressful situation in this teleost, as evidenced by LPO products and antioxidant enzyme activities. Melatonin and T3 treatment for 15 min in vitro also reversed the effect of photoperiod on peroxidation products and the SOD and catalase activities. GR activity decreased in photoperiod-exposed group and melatonin and T3 treatment reversed the activities. The antioxidant enzymes responded to the stress situation after 6-PTU treatment and photoperiod exposure by altering their activities. The study suggested an independent effect of T3 and melatonin on antioxidant defence mechanism in different physiological situations in fish. PMID:17650585

  2. NVLAP activities at Department of Defense calibration laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Schaeffer, D.M.

    1993-12-31

    There are 367 active radiological instrument calibration laboratories within the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD). Each of the four services in DoD manages, operates, and certifies the technical proficiency and competency of those laboratories under their cognizance. Each service has designated secondary calibration laboratories to trace all calibration source standards to the National Institute of Standards and Technology. Individual service radiological calibration programs and capabilities, present and future, are described, as well as the measurement quality assurance (MQA) processes for their traceability. National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program (NVLAP) programs for dosimetry systems are briefly summarized. Planned NVLAP accreditation of secondary laboratories is discussed in the context of current technical challenges and future efforts.

  3. In Defense of a Heuristic Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Healy, Eamonn F.

    2010-01-01

    Although the presentation of quantum mechanics found in traditional textbooks is intellectually well founded, it suffers from a number of deficiencies. Specifically introducing quantum mechanics as a solution to the arcane dilemma, the ultraviolet catastrophe, does little to impress a nonscientific audience of the tremendous paradigmatic shift…

  4. In vivo NMR metabolic profiling of Fabrea salina reveals sequential defense mechanisms against ultraviolet radiation.

    PubMed

    Marangoni, Roberto; Paris, Debora; Melck, Dominique; Fulgentini, Lorenzo; Colombetti, Giuliano; Motta, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Fabrea salina is a hypersaline ciliate that is known to be among the strongest ultraviolet (UV)-resistant microorganisms; however, the molecular mechanisms of this resistance are almost unknown. By means of in vivo NMR spectroscopy, we determined the metabolic profile of living F. salina cells exposed to visible light and to polychromatic UV-B + UV-A + Vis radiation for several different exposure times. We used unsupervised pattern-recognition analysis to compare these profiles and discovered some metabolites whose concentration changed specifically upon UV exposure and in a dose-dependent manner. This variation was interpreted in terms of a two-phase cell reaction involving at least two different pathways: an early response consisting of degradation processes, followed by a late response activating osmoprotection mechanisms. The first step alters the concentration of formate, acetate, and saturated fatty-acid metabolites, whereas the osmoprotection modifies the activity of betaine moieties and other functionally related metabolites. In the latter pathway, alanine, proline, and sugars suggest a possible incipient protein synthesis as defense and/or degeneration mechanisms. We conclude that NMR spectroscopy on in vivo cells is an optimal approach for investigating the effect of UV-induced stress on the whole metabolome of F. salina because it minimizes the invasiveness of the measurement. PMID:21190674

  5. Melatonin in relation to cellular antioxidative defense mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Reiter, R J; Carneiro, R C; Oh, C S

    1997-08-01

    macromolecules that occurs during strenuous exercise or ischemia-reperfusion. In experimental models which are used to study neurodegenerative changes associated with Alzheimer's and Parkinson disease, melatonin was found to be effective in reducing neuronal damage. Its lack of toxicity and the ease with which melatonin crosses morphophysiological barriers and enters subcellular compartments are essential features of this antioxidant. Thus far, most frequently pharmacological levels of melatonin have been used to combat oxygen toxicity. The role of physiological levels of melatonin, which are known to decrease with age, is being investigated as to their importance in the total antioxidative defense capacity of the organism. PMID:9288572

  6. DNA Damage Response and Immune Defense: Links and Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Nakad, Rania; Schumacher, Björn

    2016-01-01

    DNA damage plays a causal role in numerous human pathologies including cancer, premature aging, and chronic inflammatory conditions. In response to genotoxic insults, the DNA damage response (DDR) orchestrates DNA damage checkpoint activation and facilitates the removal of DNA lesions. The DDR can also arouse the immune system by for example inducing the expression of antimicrobial peptides as well as ligands for receptors found on immune cells. The activation of immune signaling is triggered by different components of the DDR including DNA damage sensors, transducer kinases, and effectors. In this review, we describe recent advances on the understanding of the role of DDR in activating immune signaling. We highlight evidence gained into (i) which molecular and cellular pathways of DDR activate immune signaling, (ii) how DNA damage drives chronic inflammation, and (iii) how chronic inflammation causes DNA damage and pathology in humans. PMID:27555866

  7. Micropylar pollen tube guidance and burst: adapted from defense mechanisms?

    PubMed

    Dresselhaus, Thomas; Márton, Mihaela L

    2009-12-01

    After the first description of fertilization in flowering plants some 125 years ago (Strasburger E: Neue-Untersuchungen über den Befruchtungsvorgang bei den Phanerogamen als Grundlage für eine Theorie der Zeugung. Gustav Fischer; 1884), we are finally beginning to understand the various molecular mechanisms leading to sperm delivery and discharge inside the hidden micropylar region of the female gametophyte (embryo sac). The last phase of pollen tube guidance culminating in tube burst and explosive release of tube contents requires extensive crosstalk between both male and female gametophytes. The first molecules identified that play key roles in these processes represent highly polymorphic proteins, similar to major components of the plant innate immune system. Here we summarize recent advances and briefly discuss the underlying molecular mechanisms also in respect to prezygotic barriers of reproductive isolation. PMID:19896414

  8. Multiple different defense mechanisms are activated in the young transgenic tobacco plants which express the full length genome of the Tobacco mosaic virus, and are resistant against this virus.

    PubMed

    Jada, Balaji; Soitamo, Arto J; Siddiqui, Shahid Aslam; Murukesan, Gayatri; Aro, Eva-Mari; Salakoski, Tapio; Lehto, Kirsi

    2014-01-01

    Previously described transgenic tobacco lines express the full length infectious Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) genome under the 35S promoter (Siddiqui et al., 2007. Mol Plant Microbe Interact, 20: 1489-1494). Through their young stages these plants exhibit strong resistance against both the endogenously expressed and exogenously inoculated TMV, but at the age of about 7-8 weeks they break into TMV infection, with typical severe virus symptoms. Infections with some other viruses (Potato viruses Y, A, and X) induce the breaking of the TMV resistance and lead to synergistic proliferation of both viruses. To deduce the gene functions related to this early resistance, we have performed microarray analysis of the transgenic plants during the early resistant stage, and after the resistance break, and also of TMV-infected wild type tobacco plants. Comparison of these transcriptomes to those of corresponding wild type healthy plants indicated that 1362, 1150 and 550 transcripts were up-regulated in the transgenic plants before and after the resistance break, and in the TMV-infected wild type tobacco plants, respectively, and 1422, 1200 and 480 transcripts were down-regulated in these plants, respectively. These transcriptome alterations were distinctly different between the three types of plants, and it appears that several different mechanisms, such as the enhanced expression of the defense, hormone signaling and protein degradation pathways contributed to the TMV-resistance in the young transgenic plants. In addition to these alterations, we also observed a distinct and unique gene expression alteration in these plants, which was the strong suppression of the translational machinery. This may also contribute to the resistance by slowing down the synthesis of viral proteins. Viral replication potential may also be suppressed, to some extent, by the reduction of the translation initiation and elongation factors eIF-3 and eEF1A and B, which are required for the TMV replication

  9. Multiple Different Defense Mechanisms Are Activated in the Young Transgenic Tobacco Plants Which Express the Full Length Genome of the Tobacco Mosaic Virus, and Are Resistant against this Virus

    PubMed Central

    Jada, Balaji; Soitamo, Arto J.; Siddiqui, Shahid Aslam; Murukesan, Gayatri; Aro, Eva-Mari; Salakoski, Tapio; Lehto, Kirsi

    2014-01-01

    Previously described transgenic tobacco lines express the full length infectious Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) genome under the 35S promoter (Siddiqui et al., 2007. Mol Plant Microbe Interact, 20: 1489–1494). Through their young stages these plants exhibit strong resistance against both the endogenously expressed and exogenously inoculated TMV, but at the age of about 7–8 weeks they break into TMV infection, with typical severe virus symptoms. Infections with some other viruses (Potato viruses Y, A, and X) induce the breaking of the TMV resistance and lead to synergistic proliferation of both viruses. To deduce the gene functions related to this early resistance, we have performed microarray analysis of the transgenic plants during the early resistant stage, and after the resistance break, and also of TMV-infected wild type tobacco plants. Comparison of these transcriptomes to those of corresponding wild type healthy plants indicated that 1362, 1150 and 550 transcripts were up-regulated in the transgenic plants before and after the resistance break, and in the TMV-infected wild type tobacco plants, respectively, and 1422, 1200 and 480 transcripts were down-regulated in these plants, respectively. These transcriptome alterations were distinctly different between the three types of plants, and it appears that several different mechanisms, such as the enhanced expression of the defense, hormone signaling and protein degradation pathways contributed to the TMV-resistance in the young transgenic plants. In addition to these alterations, we also observed a distinct and unique gene expression alteration in these plants, which was the strong suppression of the translational machinery. This may also contribute to the resistance by slowing down the synthesis of viral proteins. Viral replication potential may also be suppressed, to some extent, by the reduction of the translation initiation and elongation factors eIF-3 and eEF1A and B, which are required for the TMV

  10. Physcomitrella patens activates reinforcement of the cell wall, programmed cell death and accumulation of evolutionary conserved defense signals...upon Botrytis cinerea infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The moss Physcomitrella patens is an evolutionarily basal model system suitable to analyze plant defense responses activated after pathogen assault. Upon infection with the necrotroph Botrytis cinerea (B. cinerea), several defense mechanisms are induced in P. patens, including the fortification of t...

  11. Autophagy as a melanocytic self-defense mechanism.

    PubMed

    Setaluri, Vijayasaradhi

    2015-05-01

    Defects in autophagy have implications for melanocyte survival and manifestations of skin pigmentary disorders. Zhang et al. (2015) show that mouse melanocytes lacking the autophagy protein Atg7 undergo premature senescence in vitro and accumulate products of oxidative damage, despite activation of the redox response. Interestingly, contrary to previous findings, the melanocyte-specific deficiency in autophagy did not cause major defects in melanosome biogenesis, nor did it produce visually striking changes in mouse coat color. PMID:25882462

  12. Sustained mitogen-activated protein kinase activation reprograms defense metabolism and phosphoprotein profile in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Lassowskat, Ines; Böttcher, Christoph; Eschen-Lippold, Lennart; Scheel, Dierk; Lee, Justin

    2014-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) target a variety of protein substrates to regulate cellular signaling processes in eukaryotes. In plants, the number of identified MAPK substrates that control plant defense responses is still limited. Here, we generated transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana plants with an inducible system to simulate in vivo activation of two stress-activated MAPKs, MPK3, and MPK6. Metabolome analysis revealed that this artificial MPK3/6 activation (without any exposure to pathogens or other stresses) is sufficient to drive the production of major defense-related metabolites, including various camalexin, indole glucosinolate and agmatine derivatives. An accompanying (phospho)proteome analysis led to detection of hundreds of potential phosphoproteins downstream of MPK3/6 activation. Besides known MAPK substrates, many candidates on this list possess typical MAPK-targeted phosphosites and in many cases, the corresponding phosphopeptides were detected by mass spectrometry. Notably, several of these putative phosphoproteins have been reported to be associated with the biosynthesis of antimicrobial defense substances (e.g., WRKY transcription factors and proteins encoded by the genes from the “PEN” pathway required for penetration resistance to filamentous pathogens). Thus, this work provides an inventory of candidate phosphoproteins, including putative direct MAPK substrates, for future analysis of MAPK-mediated defense control. (Proteomics data are available with the identifier PXD001252 via ProteomeXchange, http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org). PMID:25368622

  13. Streptococcus pneumoniae: elusive mechanisms of the body's defense systems.

    PubMed

    Bondi, T; Canessa, C; Lippi, F; Iacopelli, J; Nieddu, F; Azzari, C

    2012-06-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is one of the most important human pathogens. It represents the most frequent cause of pneumonia, meningitis, sinusitis and otitis. After the PCV7 vaccine introduction, a serotypic switch was noticed. This phenomenon led to the replacement of the seven serotypes contained in the vaccine with other less common ones, some of which are invasive or characterised by antibiotic-resistance. This replacement is only partially due to the vaccination. Many causes have been suggested to explain this effect: apearance of new serotypes, diffusion of minority serotypes and replacement of common serotypes due to natural secular trend. Pneumococcus has a promiscuous "sex life", characterized by homologous recombinations within the same species and also between different species. This fact can unlock the secret of how these pathogens can develop antibiotic or vaccine-resistance. The serotypic switch involves big loci that are responsible for capsular polysaccharide synthesis. The most important region of the genome involved in this process is near the gene tetM. The same mechanisms are also responsible for antibiotic resistance. In recent years the growth of penicillin, macrolides and clindamycine resistance has been noticed. It is also important to underline that multidrug-resistant bacteria isolation has increased. In conclusion, to obtain more information about bacteria composition and evolution, antibiotic-resistance and vaccine response, it is fundamental to improve the epidemiological surveillance of pneumococcal infections using modern molecular diagnostic techinques. PMID:23240166

  14. Glucose and Stress Independently Regulate Source and Sink Metabolism and Defense Mechanisms via Signal Transduction Pathways Involving Protein Phosphorylation.

    PubMed Central

    Ehness, R.; Ecker, M.; Godt, D. E.; Roitsch, T.

    1997-01-01

    In higher plants, sugars are required not only to sustain heterotrophic growth but also to regulate the expression of a variety of genes. Environmental stresses, such as pathogen infection and wounding, activate a cascade of defense responses and may also affect carbohydrate metabolism. In this study, the relationship between sugar- and stress-activated signal transduction pathways and the underlying regulatory mechanism was analyzed. Photoautotrophically growing suspension culture cells of Chenopodium rubrum were used as a model system to study the effects of the metabolic regulator D-glucose and of different stress-related stimuli on photosynthesis, sink metabolism, and defense response by analyzing the regulation of mRNAs for representative enzymes of these pathways. Glucose as well as the fungal elicitor chitosan, the phosphatase inhibitor endothall, and benzoic acid were shown to result in a coordinated regulatory mechanism. The mRNAs for phenylalanine ammonia-lyase, a key enzyme of defense response, and for the sink-specific extracellular invertase were induced. In contrast, the mRNA for the Calvin cycle enzyme ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase was repressed. This inverse regulatory pattern was also observed in experiments with wounded leaves of C. rubrum plants. The differential effect of the protein kinase inhibitor staurosporine on mRNA regulation demonstrates that the carbohydrate signal and the stress-related stimuli independently activate different intracellular signaling pathways that ultimately are integrated to coordinately regulate source and sink metabolism and activate defense responses. The various stimuli triggered the transient and rapid activation of protein kinases that phosphorylate the myelin basic protein. The involvement of phosphorylation in signal transduction is further supported by the effect of the protein kinase inhibitor staurosporine on mRNA levels. PMID:12237349

  15. Circadian rhythms, oxidative stress, and antioxidative defense mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Hardeland, Rüdiger; Coto-Montes, Ana; Poeggeler, Burkhard

    2003-11-01

    Endogenous circadian and exogenously driven daily rhythms of antioxidative enzyme activities and of low molecular weight antioxidants (LMWAs) are described in various phylogenetically distant organisms. Substantial amplitudes are detected in several cases, suggesting the significance of rhythmicity in avoiding excessive oxidative stress. Mammalian and/or avian glutathione peroxidase and, as a consequence, glutathione reductase activities follow the rhythm of melatonin. Another hint for an involvement of melatonin in the control of redox processes is seen in its high-affinity binding to cytosolic quinone reductase 2, previously believed to be a melatonin receptor. Although antioxidative protection by pharmacological doses of melatonin is repeatedly reported, explanations of these findings are still insufficient and their physiological and chronobiological relevance is not yet settled. Recent data indicate a role of melatonin in the avoidance of mitochondrial radical formation, a function which may prevail over direct scavenging. Rhythmic changes in oxidative damage of protein and lipid molecules are also reported. Enhanced oxidative protein modification accompanied by a marked increase in the circadian amplitude of this parameter is detected in the Drosophila mutant rosy, which is deficient in the LMWA urate. Preliminary evidence for the significance of circadian rhythmicity in diminishing oxidative stress comes from clock mutants. In Drosophila, moderately enhanced protein damage is described for the arrhythmic and melatonin null mutant per0, but even more elevated, periodic damage is found in the short-period mutant per(s), synchronized to LD 12:12. Remarkably large increases in oxidative protein damage, along with impairment of tissue integrity and--obviously insufficient--compensatory elevations in protective enzymes are observed in a particularly vulnerable organ, the Harderian gland, of another short-period mutant tau, in the Syrian hamster. Mice deficient in

  16. Psychogenic non-epileptic seizures: so-called psychiatric comorbidity and underlying defense mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Beghi, Massimiliano; Negrini, Paola Beffa; Perin, Cecilia; Peroni, Federica; Magaudda, Adriana; Cerri, Cesare; Cornaggia, Cesare Maria

    2015-01-01

    In Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fifth edition, psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES) do not have a unique classification as they can be found within different categories: conversion, dissociative, and somatization disorders. The ICD-10, instead, considers PNES within dissociative disorders, merging the dissociative disorders and conversion disorders, although the underlying defense mechanisms are different. The literature data show that PNES are associated with cluster B (mainly borderline) personality disorders and/or to people with depressive or anxiety disorders. Defense mechanisms in patients with PNES with a prevalence of anxious/depressive symptoms are of "neurotic" type; their goal is to lead to a "split", either vertical (dissociation) or horizontal (repression). The majority of patients with this type of PNES have alexithymia traits, meaning that they had difficulties in feeling or perceiving emotions. In subjects where PNES are associated with a borderline personality, in which the symbolic function is lost, the defense mechanisms are of a more archaic nature (denial). PNES with different underlying defense mechanisms have different prognoses (despite similar severity of PNES) and need usually a different treatment (pharmacological or psychological). Thus, it appears superfluous to talk about psychiatric comorbidity, since PNES are a different symptomatic expression of specific psychiatric disorders. PMID:26491330

  17. Effects of Sex, Social Desirability, and Birth Order on the Defense Mechanisms Inventory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dudley, Gary E.

    1978-01-01

    Investigated effects of sex difference, social desirability instructions, and birth order of respondents on defense mechanisms inventory (DMI). Sex difference was found in projection only. Social desirability effects were found in turning-against-others, projection, principalization, and reversal. Thus, an interpretive caution is in order…

  18. Brief Report: The Defense Mechanisms of Homophobic Adolescent Males--A Descriptive Discriminant Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Andrew J.; White, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    The study examined the role of defense mechanisms in homophobic attitudes of older male adolescents aged 17-18 years. A cross-sectional survey collected data from final year high school students (N = 86) attending an all male school in a regional centre in Victoria, Australia. The school was identified by teachers as having a problematic culture…

  19. Learning to Recognize Ego Defense Mechanisms: Results of a Structured Teaching Experience for Psychiatric Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beresford, Thomas P.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: Ego defense mechanism (EDM) recognition can offer a powerful and practical tool in clinical psychiatry. However, recognition skill learning can be difficult to assess and may account for the lack of formal EDM recognition training in residency courses. Method: This study hypothesized that mean test scores would increase significantly…

  20. Psychogenic non-epileptic seizures: so-called psychiatric comorbidity and underlying defense mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Beghi, Massimiliano; Negrini, Paola Beffa; Perin, Cecilia; Peroni, Federica; Magaudda, Adriana; Cerri, Cesare; Cornaggia, Cesare Maria

    2015-01-01

    In Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fifth edition, psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES) do not have a unique classification as they can be found within different categories: conversion, dissociative, and somatization disorders. The ICD-10, instead, considers PNES within dissociative disorders, merging the dissociative disorders and conversion disorders, although the underlying defense mechanisms are different. The literature data show that PNES are associated with cluster B (mainly borderline) personality disorders and/or to people with depressive or anxiety disorders. Defense mechanisms in patients with PNES with a prevalence of anxious/depressive symptoms are of “neurotic” type; their goal is to lead to a “split”, either vertical (dissociation) or horizontal (repression). The majority of patients with this type of PNES have alexithymia traits, meaning that they had difficulties in feeling or perceiving emotions. In subjects where PNES are associated with a borderline personality, in which the symbolic function is lost, the defense mechanisms are of a more archaic nature (denial). PNES with different underlying defense mechanisms have different prognoses (despite similar severity of PNES) and need usually a different treatment (pharmacological or psychological). Thus, it appears superfluous to talk about psychiatric comorbidity, since PNES are a different symptomatic expression of specific psychiatric disorders. PMID:26491330

  1. DNA DAMAGE REPAIR AND CELL CYCLE CONTROL: A NATURAL BIO-DEFENSE MECHANISM

    EPA Science Inventory

    DNA DAMAGE REPAIR AND CELL CYCLE CONTROL: A natural bio-defense mechanism
    Anuradha Mudipalli.

    Maintenance of genetic information, including the correct sequence of nucleotides in DNA, is essential for replication, gene expression, and protein synthesis. DNA lesions onto...

  2. Orientations of psychotic activity in defensive pathological organizations.

    PubMed

    Williams, Paul

    2014-06-01

    The author reviews some clinical experiences of the treatment of personality disordered patients suffering from internal domination of ego functioning by a defensive pathological organization. In particular, the function and purpose of perverse, sadistic attacks by the organization on the ego are considered and questions pertaining to technique are raised. It is suggested that different forms of sadistic, subjugating activity by pathological organizations may denote differences in intent borne of the type and severity of the psychopathology of the individual. Patients with severe narcissistic psychopathology for whom object contact has become associated with the arousal of intense psychotic anxieties seem more likely to be subjected to an invasive, annihilatory imperative by the pathological organization, the purpose of which appears to be to obliterate the experience of contact with any differentiated object, to avoid emotion and to use coercion to enforce a primitive identification by the ego with the psychotic organization in the mind. Certain patients with less severe narcissistic psychopathology, yet for whom object contact can also be associated with the arousal of psychotic anxieties due to intense or persistent conflict with the object, sometimes expressed as organized sadomasochistic clinging to a punishing and punished object (for example, in certain borderline or depressed patients) exhibit sadistic attacks that serve less to annihilate object contact and more to intrusively control and punish the object. Observations of these phenomena have been made by a number of psychoanalysts in recent decades and these contributions are discussed. This paper is addressed primarily to the implications for technique with such patients, particularly a need for triangulation of their experiences of oppression in order to loosen the controls over the ego by the pathological organization. PMID:24620792

  3. Gregarious pupation act as a defensive mechanism against cannibalism and intraguild predation.

    PubMed

    Roberge, Claudia; Fréchette, Bruno; Labrie, Geneviève; Dumont, François; Lucas, Eric

    2016-08-01

    Coccinellid pupae use an array of defensive strategies against their natural enemies. This study aims to assess the efficiency of gregarious pupation as a defensive mechanism against intraguild predators and cannibals in coccinellid. The study was designed specifically (i) to determine the natural occurrence of gregarious pupation in the field for different coccinellid species, and (ii) to evaluate the adaptive value of gregarious pupation as a defensive mechanism against 2 types of predators (i.e., cannibals and intraguild predators). In the field, gregarious pupation consisted of a group of 2-5 pupae. The proportion of gregarious pupation observed varied according to species, the highest rate being observed with Harmonia axyridis Pallas (Coccinellidae; 14.17%). Gregarious pupation had no impact on the probability that intraguild predators and cannibals locate pupae. Intraguild predation occurred more often in site with gregarious pupation, while cannibalism occurred as often in site with gregarious pupation as in site with isolated pupa. However, for a specific pupa, the mortality rate was higher for isolated pupae than for pupae located in a gregarious pupation site both in the presence of intraguild predators and in the presence of cannibals. The spatial location of pupae within the group had no impact on mortality rate. Since it reduces the risk of predation, it is proposed that gregarious pupation act as a defensive mechanism for H. axyridis pupae. PMID:25684624

  4. Lico A Enhances Nrf2-Mediated Defense Mechanisms against t-BHP-Induced Oxidative Stress and Cell Death via Akt and ERK Activation in RAW 264.7 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Hongming; Ren, Hua; Wang, Lidong; Chen, Wei; Ci, Xinxin

    2015-01-01

    Licochalcone A (Lico A) exhibits various biological properties, including anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities. In this study, we investigated the antioxidative potential and mechanisms of Lico A against tert-butyl hydroperoxide- (t-BHP-) induced oxidative damage in RAW 264.7 cells. Our results indicated that Lico A significantly inhibited t-BHP-induced cytotoxicity, apoptosis, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and reduced glutathione (GSH) depletion but increased the glutamate-cysteine ligase modifier (GCLM) subunit and the glutamate-cysteine ligase catalytic (GCLC) subunit genes expression. Additionally, Lico A dramatically upregulated the antioxidant enzyme heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) and nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), which were associated with inducing Nrf2 nuclear translocation, decreasing Keap1 protein expression and increasing antioxidant response element (ARE) promoter activity. Lico A also obviously induced the activation of serine/threonine kinase (Akt) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), but PI3K/Akt and ERK inhibitors treatment displayed clearly decreased levels of LicoA-induced Nrf2 nuclear translocation and HO-1 expression, respectively. Furthermore, Lico A treatment markedly attenuated t-BHP-induced oxidative damage, which was reduced by treatment with PI3K/Akt, ERK, and HO-1 inhibitors. Therefore, Lico A might have a protective role against t-BHP-induced cytotoxicity by modulating HO-1 and by scavenging ROS via the activation of the PI3K/Akt and ERK/Nrf2 signaling pathways. PMID:26576227

  5. [Features of brain oscillatory activity and cardiac defense in treatment arterial hypertensives].

    PubMed

    Aftanas, L I; Brak, I V; Gilinskaia, O M; Pavlov, S V; Reva, N V

    2014-01-01

    Stress reactivity of the motivational system of defense can be assessed with the aid the cardiac defense response (CDR) - the reaction of the cardiovascular system to unexpected aversive unconditioned stimulus. The main objective of the study was revealing putative contribution of oscillatory systems of the brain into central pathogenic mechanisms of enhanced blood pressure (BP) stress-reactivity in naive patients with arterial hypertension (AH) of the 1st-2nd degrees (n = 17) and healthy control (n = 19) subjects. Using dynamic registration "beat-by-beat" arterial pressure, and oscillatory activity related EEG (64 channels) is estimated using the event-related synchronization/desynchronization (ERD/ERS). Along with abnormally high blood pressure in patients with hypertension background set significantly lower concentrations of serotonin blood platelets and increased tonic activation of the left hemisphere, reflected in the asymmetric reduction of delta- (2-4 Hz) and theta-1 (4-6 Hz) power in the central and parietal cortex in the hemisphere CDR of the patients are characterized by hyperactivity both short- and long-latency components of blood pressure. According to the dynamic analysis of the concomitant EEG, long-latency BP components may be accounted by, among other mechanisms, weakening of the descending ("top-down") inhibitory control, hypothetically implemented with the high-frequency EEG alpha (10-12 Hz) oscillations from the medial central-parietal cortex of both hemispheres of the brain. PMID:25464727

  6. Cell death-inducing stresses are required for defense activation in DS1-phosphatidic acid phosphatase-silenced Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Masahito; Yoshioka, Hirofumi; Ohnishi, Kouhei; Hikichi, Yasufumi; Kiba, Akinori

    2015-07-20

    We previously identified DS1 plants that showed resistance to compatible Ralstonia solanacearum with accelerated defense responses. Here, we describe activation mechanisms of defense responses in DS1 plants. After inoculation with incompatible R. solanacearum 8107, DS1 plants showed hyperinduction of hypersensitive response (HR) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Transient expression of PopP1 and AvrA induced hyperinduction of HR and ROS generation. Furthermore, Pseudomonas cichorii (Pc) and a type III secretion system (TTSS)-deficient mutant of P. cichorii showed accelerated induction of HR and ROS generation. Chitin and flg22 did not induce either HR or ROS hyperaccumulation; however, INF1 accelerated HR and ROS in DS1 plants. Activation of these defense responses was closely associated with increased phosphatidic acid (PA) content. Our results show that DS1 plants exhibit PA-mediated sensitization of plant defenses and that cell death-inducing stress is required to achieve full activation of defense responses. PMID:26188395

  7. A Systems Biology Approach to the Coordination of Defensive and Offensive Molecular Mechanisms in the Innate and Adaptive Host-Pathogen Interaction Networks.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chia-Chou; Chen, Bor-Sen

    2016-01-01

    Infected zebrafish coordinates defensive and offensive molecular mechanisms in response to Candida albicans infections, and invasive C. albicans coordinates corresponding molecular mechanisms to interact with the host. However, knowledge of the ensuing infection-activated signaling networks in both host and pathogen and their interspecific crosstalk during the innate and adaptive phases of the infection processes remains incomplete. In the present study, dynamic network modeling, protein interaction databases, and dual transcriptome data from zebrafish and C. albicans during infection were used to infer infection-activated host-pathogen dynamic interaction networks. The consideration of host-pathogen dynamic interaction systems as innate and adaptive loops and subsequent comparisons of inferred innate and adaptive networks indicated previously unrecognized crosstalk between known pathways and suggested roles of immunological memory in the coordination of host defensive and offensive molecular mechanisms to achieve specific and powerful defense against pathogens. Moreover, pathogens enhance intraspecific crosstalk and abrogate host apoptosis to accommodate enhanced host defense mechanisms during the adaptive phase. Accordingly, links between physiological phenomena and changes in the coordination of defensive and offensive molecular mechanisms highlight the importance of host-pathogen molecular interaction networks, and consequent inferences of the host-pathogen relationship could be translated into biomedical applications. PMID:26881892

  8. A Systems Biology Approach to the Coordination of Defensive and Offensive Molecular Mechanisms in the Innate and Adaptive Host–Pathogen Interaction Networks

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chia-Chou; Chen, Bor-Sen

    2016-01-01

    Infected zebrafish coordinates defensive and offensive molecular mechanisms in response to Candida albicans infections, and invasive C. albicans coordinates corresponding molecular mechanisms to interact with the host. However, knowledge of the ensuing infection-activated signaling networks in both host and pathogen and their interspecific crosstalk during the innate and adaptive phases of the infection processes remains incomplete. In the present study, dynamic network modeling, protein interaction databases, and dual transcriptome data from zebrafish and C. albicans during infection were used to infer infection-activated host–pathogen dynamic interaction networks. The consideration of host–pathogen dynamic interaction systems as innate and adaptive loops and subsequent comparisons of inferred innate and adaptive networks indicated previously unrecognized crosstalk between known pathways and suggested roles of immunological memory in the coordination of host defensive and offensive molecular mechanisms to achieve specific and powerful defense against pathogens. Moreover, pathogens enhance intraspecific crosstalk and abrogate host apoptosis to accommodate enhanced host defense mechanisms during the adaptive phase. Accordingly, links between physiological phenomena and changes in the coordination of defensive and offensive molecular mechanisms highlight the importance of host–pathogen molecular interaction networks, and consequent inferences of the host–pathogen relationship could be translated into biomedical applications. PMID:26881892

  9. Exploring the association of ego defense mechanisms with problematic internet use in a Pakistani medical school.

    PubMed

    Waqas, Ahmed; Rehman, Abdul; Malik, Aamenah; Aftab, Ramsha; Allah Yar, Aroosa; Allah Yar, Arooj; Rai, Aitzaz Bin Sultan

    2016-09-30

    The present study was designed to analyze association between problematic internet use and use of ego defense mechanisms in medical students. This cross-sectional study was undertaken at CMH Lahore Medical College (CMH LMC) in Lahore, Pakistan from 1st March, 2015 to 30th May, 2015. 522 medical and dental students were included in the study. The questionnaire consisted of three sections: a) demographic characteristics of respondent b) the Defense Style Questionnaire-40 (DSQ-40) and c) the Internet Addiction Test (IAT). All data were analyzed in SPSS v20. Chi square, Independent sample t test and One Way ANOVA were run to analyze association of different variables with scores on IAT. Multiple regression analysis was used to delineate ego defenses as predictors of problematic internet use. A total of 32 (6.1%) students reported severe problems with internet usage. Males had higher scores on IAT i.e had more problematic use of internet. Scores on internet addiction test (IAT) were negatively associated with sublimation and positively associated with projection, denial, autistic fantasy, passive aggression and displacement. There was a high prevalence of problematic use of internet among medical and dental students. It had significant associations with several defense mechanisms. PMID:27504797

  10. [Inflammasome: activation mechanisms].

    PubMed

    Suárez, Raibel; Buelvas, Neudo

    2015-03-01

    Inflammation is a rapid biologic response of the immune system in vascular tissues, directed to eliminate stimuli capable of causing damage and begin the process of repair. The macromolecular complexes known as "inflammasomes" are formed by a receptor, either NOD (NLR) or ALR, the receptor absent in melanoma 2 (AIM2). In addition, the inflammasome is formed by the speck-like protein associated to apoptosis (ASC) and procaspase-1, that may be activated by variations in the ionic and intracellular and extracellular ATP concentrations; and the loss of stabilization of the fagolisosomme by internalization of insoluble crystals and redox mechanisms. As a result, there is activation of the molecular platform and the processing of inflammatory prointerleukins to their active forms. There are two modalities of activation of the inflammasome: canonical and non-canonical, both capable of generating effector responses. Recent data associate NLRP 3, IL-1β and IL-18 in the pathogenesis of a variety of diseases, including atherosclerosis, type II diabetes, hyperhomocysteinemia, gout, malaria and hypertension. The inflammasome cascade is emerging as a new chemotherapeutic target in these diseases. In this review we shall discuss the mechanisms of activation and regulation of the inflammasome that stimulate, modulate and resolve inflammation. PMID:25920188

  11. A Proteomics Perspective on Viral DNA Sensors in Host Defense and Viral Immune Evasion Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Crow, Marni S.; Javitt, Aaron; Cristea, Ileana M.

    2015-01-01

    The sensing of viral DNA is an essential step of cellular immune response to infections with DNA viruses. These human pathogens are spread worldwide, triggering a wide range of virus-induced diseases, and are associated with high levels of morbidity and mortality. Despite similarities between DNA molecules, mammalian cells have the remarkable ability to distinguish viral DNA from their own DNA. This detection is carried out by specialized antiviral proteins, called DNA sensors. These sensors bind to foreign DNA to activate downstream immune signaling pathways and alert neighboring cells by eliciting the expression of antiviral cytokines. The sensing of viral DNA was shown to occur both in the cytoplasm and nucleus of infected cells, disproving the notion that sensing occurred by simple spatial separation of viral and host DNA. A number of omic approaches, in particular mass spectrometry-based proteomic methods, have significantly contributed to the constantly evolving field of viral DNA sensing. Here, we review the impact of omic methods on the identification of viral DNA sensors, as well as on the characterization of mechanisms involved in host defense or viral immune evasion. PMID:25728651

  12. Cisplatin Resistance: A Cellular Self-Defense Mechanism Resulting from Multiple Epigenetic and Genetic Changes

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Ding-Wu; Pouliot, Lynn M.; Hall, Matthew D.

    2012-01-01

    Cisplatin is one of the most effective broad-spectrum anticancer drugs. Its effectiveness seems to be due to the unique properties of cisplatin, which enters cells via multiple pathways and forms multiple different DNA-platinum adducts while initiating a cellular self-defense system by activating or silencing a variety of different genes, resulting in dramatic epigenetic and/or genetic alternations. As a result, the development of cisplatin resistance in human cancer cells in vivo and in vitro by necessity stems from bewilderingly complex genetic and epigenetic changes in gene expression and alterations in protein localization. Extensive published evidence has demonstrated that pleiotropic alterations are frequently detected during development of resistance to this toxic metal compound. Changes occur in almost every mechanism supporting cell survival, including cell growth-promoting pathways, apoptosis, developmental pathways, DNA damage repair, and endocytosis. In general, dozens of genes are affected in cisplatin-resistant cells, including pathways involved in copper metabolism as well as transcription pathways that alter the cytoskeleton, change cell surface presentation of proteins, and regulate epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. Decreased accumulation is one of the most common features resulting in cisplatin resistance. This seems to be a consequence of numerous epigenetic and genetic changes leading to the loss of cell-surface binding sites and/or transporters for cisplatin, and decreased fluid phase endocytosis. PMID:22659329

  13. Active-passive bistatic surveillance for long range air defense

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wardrop, B.; Molyneux-Berry, M. R. B.

    1992-06-01

    A hypothetical mobile support receiver capable of working within existing and future air defense networks as a means to maintain essential surveillance functions is considered. It is shown how multibeam receiver architecture supported by digital signal processing can substantially improve surveillance performance against chaff and jamming threats. A dual-mode support receiver concept is proposed which is based on the state-of-the-art phased-array technology, modular processing in industry standard hardware and existing networks.

  14. Active-passive bistatic surveillance for long range air defense

    SciTech Connect

    Wardrop, B.; Molyneux-Berry, M.R.B. )

    1992-06-01

    A hypothetical mobile support receiver capable of working within existing and future air defense networks as a means to maintain essential surveillance functions is considered. It is shown how multibeam receiver architecture supported by digital signal processing can substantially improve surveillance performance against chaff and jamming threats. A dual-mode support receiver concept is proposed which is based on the state-of-the-art phased-array technology, modular processing in industry standard hardware and existing networks. 20 refs.

  15. Temporal and Spatial Resolution of Activated Plant Defense Responses in Leaves of Nicotiana benthamiana Infected with Dickeya dadantii

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Bueno, María L.; Granum, Espen; Pineda, Mónica; Flors, Víctor; Rodriguez-Palenzuela, Pablo; López-Solanilla, Emilia; Barón, Matilde

    2016-01-01

    The necrotrophic bacteria Dickeya dadantii is the causal agent of soft-rot disease in a broad range of hosts. The model plant Nicotiana benthamiana, commonly used as experimental host for a very broad range of plant pathogens, is susceptible to infection by D. dadantii. The inoculation with D. dadantii at high dose seems to overcome the plant defense capacity, inducing maceration and death of the tissue, although restricted to the infiltrated area. By contrast, the output of the defense response to low dose inoculation is inhibition of maceration and limitation in the growth, or even eradication, of bacteria. Responses of tissue invaded by bacteria (neighboring the infiltrated areas after 2–3 days post-inoculation) included: (i) inhibition of photosynthesis in terms of photosystem II efficiency; (ii) activation of energy dissipation as non-photochemical quenching in photosystem II, which is related to the activation of plant defense mechanisms; and (iii) accumulation of secondary metabolites in cell walls of the epidermis (lignins) and the apoplast of the mesophyll (phytoalexins). Infiltrated tissues showed an increase in the content of the main hormones regulating stress responses, including abscisic acid, jasmonic acid, and salicylic acid. We propose a mechanism involving the three hormones by which N. benthamiana could activate an efficient defense response against D. dadantii. PMID:26779238

  16. Surveillance-Activated Defenses Block the ROS–Induced Mitochondrial Unfolded Protein Response

    PubMed Central

    Runkel, Eva D.; Liu, Shu; Baumeister, Ralf; Schulze, Ekkehard

    2013-01-01

    Disturbance of cellular functions results in the activation of stress-signaling pathways that aim at restoring homeostasis. We performed a genome-wide screen to identify components of the signal transduction of the mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPRmt) to a nuclear chaperone promoter. We used the ROS generating complex I inhibitor paraquat to induce the UPRmt, and we employed RNAi exposure post-embryonically to allow testing genes whose knockdown results in embryonic lethality. We identified 54 novel regulators of the ROS–induced UPRmt. Activation of the UPRmt, but not of other stress-signaling pathways, failed when homeostasis of basic cellular mechanisms such as translation and protein transport were impaired. These mechanisms are monitored by a recently discovered surveillance system that interprets interruption of these processes as pathogen attack and depends on signaling through the JNK-like MAP-kinase KGB-1. Mutation of kgb-1 abrogated the inhibition of ROS–induced UPRmt, suggesting that surveillance-activated defenses specifically inhibit the UPRmt but do not compromise activation of the heat shock response, the UPR of the endoplasmic reticulum, or the SKN-1/Nrf2 mediated response to cytosolic stress. In addition, we identified PIFK-1, the orthologue of the Drosophila PI 4-kinase four wheel drive (FWD), and found that it is the only known factor so far that is essential for the unfolded protein responses of both mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum. This suggests that both UPRs may share a common membrane associated mechanism. PMID:23516373

  17. Mechanically Activated Ion Channels.

    PubMed

    Ranade, Sanjeev S; Syeda, Ruhma; Patapoutian, Ardem

    2015-09-23

    Mechanotransduction, the conversion of physical forces into biochemical signals, is essential for various physiological processes such as the conscious sensations of touch and hearing, and the unconscious sensation of blood flow. Mechanically activated (MA) ion channels have been proposed as sensors of physical force, but the identity of these channels and an understanding of how mechanical force is transduced has remained elusive. A number of recent studies on previously known ion channels along with the identification of novel MA ion channels have greatly transformed our understanding of touch and hearing in both vertebrates and invertebrates. Here, we present an updated review of eukaryotic ion channel families that have been implicated in mechanotransduction processes and evaluate the qualifications of the candidate genes according to specified criteria. We then discuss the proposed gating models for MA ion channels and highlight recent structural studies of mechanosensitive potassium channels. PMID:26402601

  18. UVR defense mechanisms in eurytopic and invasive Gracilaria vermiculophylla (Gracilariales, Rhodophyta).

    PubMed

    Roleda, Michael Y; Nyberg, Cecilia D; Wulff, Angela

    2012-10-01

    The invasive success of Gracilaria vermiculophylla has been attributed to its wide tolerance range to different abiotic factors, but its response to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) is yet to be investigated. In the laboratory, carpospores and vegetative thalli of an Atlantic population were exposed to different radiation treatments consisting of high PAR (photosynthetically active radiation) only (P), PAR+UV-A (PA) and PAR+UV-A+UV-B (PAB). Photosynthesis of carpospores was photoinhibited under different radiation treatments but photosystem II (PSII) function was restored after 12 h under dim white light. Growth of vegetative thalli was significantly higher under radiation supplemented with UVR. Decrease in chlorophyll a (Chl a) under daily continuous 16-h exposure to 300 µmol photons m(-2) s(-1) of PAR suggests preventive accumulation of excited chlorophyll molecules within the antennae to minimize the generation of dangerous reactive oxygen species. Moreover, an increase in total carotenoids and xanthophyll cycle pigments (i.e. violaxanthin, antheraxanthin and zeaxanthin) further suggests effective photoprotection under UVR. The presence of the ketocarotenoid β-cryptoxanthin also indicates protection against UVR and oxidative stress. The initial concentration of total mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs) in freshly-released spores increased approximately four times after 8-h laboratory radiation treatments. On the other hand, initial specific MAAs in vegetative thalli changed in composition after 7-day exposure to laboratory radiation conditions without affecting the total concentration. The above responses suggest that G. vermiculophylla have multiple UVR defense mechanisms to cope with the dynamic variation in light quantity and quality encountered in its habitat. Beside being eurytopic, the UVR photoprotective mechanisms likely contribute to the current invasive success of the species in shallow lagoons and estuaries exposed to high solar radiation. PMID:22420775

  19. ABA Is an Essential Signal for Plant Resistance to Pathogens Affecting JA Biosynthesis and the Activation of Defenses in Arabidopsis[W

    PubMed Central

    Adie, Bruce A.T.; Pérez-Pérez, Julián; Pérez-Pérez, Manuel M.; Godoy, Marta; Sánchez-Serrano, José-J.; Schmelz, Eric A.; Solano, Roberto

    2007-01-01

    Analyses of Arabidopsis thaliana defense response to the damping-off oomycete pathogen Pythium irregulare show that resistance to P. irregulare requires a multicomponent defense strategy. Penetration represents a first layer, as indicated by the susceptibility of pen2 mutants, followed by recognition, likely mediated by ERECTA receptor-like kinases. Subsequent signaling of inducible defenses is predominantly mediated by jasmonic acid (JA), with insensitive coi1 mutants showing extreme susceptibility. In contrast with the generally accepted roles of ethylene and salicylic acid cooperating with or antagonizing, respectively, JA in the activation of defenses against necrotrophs, both are required to prevent disease progression, although much less so than JA. Meta-analysis of transcriptome profiles confirmed the predominant role of JA in activation of P. irregulare–induced defenses and uncovered abscisic acid (ABA) as an important regulator of defense gene expression. Analysis of cis-regulatory sequences also revealed an unexpected overrepresentation of ABA response elements in promoters of P. irregulare–responsive genes. Subsequent infections of ABA-related and callose-deficient mutants confirmed the importance of ABA in defense, acting partly through an undescribed mechanism. The results support a model for ABA affecting JA biosynthesis in the activation of defenses against this oomycete. PMID:17513501

  20. Investigating Aggressive Styles and Defense Mechanisms in Bipolar Patients and in their Parents.

    PubMed

    Bragazzi, Nicola Luigi; Pezzoni, Franca; Del Puente, Giovanni

    2014-11-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a very common mental health disorder, whose etiology concerning aggressive styles and defense mechanisms is still poorly known despite the efforts dedicated to develop psychological and biological theories. After obtaining written signed informed consent, this study will recruit inpatients with a clinical diagnosis of BD, based on Structured Clinical Interview and the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders criteria, and their parents. The Bus-Perry Aggression Questionnaire, the Defense Style Questionnaire 40, the Symptom check list SCL-90-R, developed by DeRogatis will be administered to the participants, together with a semi-structured questionnaire concerning demographic data (age, gender, employment, education) and only for the patients clinical information (onset year of the disorder, presence of co-morbidities, alcohol and drug use, suicide tendencies, kind of treatment). All the questionnaires are in the Italian validated version. The successful completion of this study will shed light on the relationship between aggressive styles and defensive mechanisms in bipolar inpatients and in their parents, helping the clinicians to develop ad hoc psychological interventions. PMID:26973942

  1. Molecular Dynamics Simulation and Statistics Analysis Reveals the Defense Response Mechanism in Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhichao; Zhao, Yunjie; Zeng, Chen; Computational Biophysics Lab Team

    As the main protein of the bacterial flagella, flagellin plays an important role in perception and defense response. The newly discovered locus, FLS2, is ubiquitously expressed. FLS2 encodes a putative receptor kinase and shares many homologies with some plant resistance genes and even with some components of immune system of mammals and insects. In Arabidopsis, FLS2 perception is achieved by the recognition of epitope flg22, which induces FLS2 heteromerization with BAK1 and finally the plant immunity. Here we use both analytical methods such as Direct Coupling Analysis (DCA) and Molecular Dynamics (MD) Simulations to get a better understanding of the defense mechanism of FLS2. This may facilitate a redesign of flg22 or de-novo design for desired specificity and potency to extend the immune properties of FLS2 to other important crops and vegetables.

  2. Mechanism of bystander-blaming: defensive attribution, counterfactual thinking, and gender.

    PubMed

    Levy, Inna; Ben-David, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Contemporary victimology recognizes that an understanding of the mechanism of blaming requires a comprehensive approach that includes the victim, the offender, and the bystander. However, most of the existing research on blaming focuses on the victim and the offender, ignoring the issue of bystander-blaming. This study highlights the bystander and investigates bystander-blaming by exploring some theoretical explanations, including counterfactual thinking, defensive attribution, and gender differences. The study included 363 young male and female participants, who read vignettes describing the behavior of the victim and the bystander in a rape scenario and answered questions regarding bystander-blaming. The results show that both counterfactual thinking and defensive attribution play a role in bystander-blaming. This article addresses the theoretical and practical implications of these findings. PMID:24052599

  3. Impaired enzymatic defensive activity, mitochondrial dysfunction and proteasome activation are involved in RTT cell oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Cervellati, Carlo; Sticozzi, Claudia; Romani, Arianna; Belmonte, Giuseppe; De Rasmo, Domenico; Signorile, Anna; Cervellati, Franco; Milanese, Chiara; Mastroberardino, Pier Giorgio; Pecorelli, Alessandra; Savelli, Vinno; Forman, Henry J; Hayek, Joussef; Valacchi, Giuseppe

    2015-10-01

    A strong correlation between oxidative stress (OS) and Rett syndrome (RTT), a rare neurodevelopmental disorder affecting females in the 95% of the cases, has been well documented although the source of OS and the effect of a redox imbalance in this pathology has not been yet investigated. Using freshly isolated skin fibroblasts from RTT patients and healthy subjects, we have demonstrated in RTT cells high levels of H2O2 and HNE protein adducts. These findings correlated with the constitutive activation of NADPH-oxidase (NOX) and that was prevented by a NOX inhibitor and iron chelator pre-treatment, showing its direct involvement. In parallel, we demonstrated an increase in mitochondrial oxidant production, altered mitochondrial biogenesis and impaired proteasome activity in RTT samples. Further, we found that the key cellular defensive enzymes: glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase and thioredoxin reductases activities were also significantly lower in RTT. Taken all together, our findings suggest that the systemic OS levels in RTT can be a consequence of both: increased endogenous oxidants as well as altered mitochondrial biogenesis with a decreased activity of defensive enzymes that leads to posttranslational oxidant protein modification and a proteasome activity impairment. PMID:26189585

  4. Essential Functional Modules for Pathogenic and Defensive Mechanisms in Candida albicans Infections

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, I-Chun; Lin, Che; Chuang, Yung-Jen

    2014-01-01

    The clinical and biological significance of the study of fungal pathogen Candida albicans (C. albicans) has markedly increased. However, the explicit pathogenic and invasive mechanisms of such host-pathogen interactions have not yet been fully elucidated. Therefore, the essential functional modules involved in C. albicans-zebrafish interactions were investigated in this study. Adopting a systems biology approach, the early-stage and late-stage protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks for both C. albicans and zebrafish were constructed. By comparing PPI networks at the early and late stages of the infection process, several critical functional modules were identified in both pathogenic and defensive mechanisms. Functional modules in C. albicans, like those involved in hyphal morphogenesis, ion and small molecule transport, protein secretion, and shifts in carbon utilization, were seen to play important roles in pathogen invasion and damage caused to host cells. Moreover, the functional modules in zebrafish, such as those involved in immune response, apoptosis mechanisms, ion transport, protein secretion, and hemostasis-related processes, were found to be significant as defensive mechanisms during C. albicans infection. The essential functional modules thus determined could provide insights into the molecular mechanisms of host-pathogen interactions during the infection process and thereby devise potential therapeutic strategies to treat C. albicans infection. PMID:24757665

  5. Jasmonic acid and salicylic acid activate a common defense system in rice

    PubMed Central

    Tamaoki, Daisuke; Seo, Shigemi; Yamada, Shoko; Kano, Akihito; Miyamoto, Ayumi; Shishido, Hodaka; Miyoshi, Seika; Taniguchi, Shiduku; Akimitsu, Kazuya; Gomi, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    Jasmonic acid (JA) and salicylic acid (SA) play important roles in plant defense systems. JA and SA signaling pathways interact antagonistically in dicotyledonous plants, but, the status of crosstalk between JA and SA signaling is unknown in monocots. Our rice microarray analysis showed that more than half of the genes upregulated by the SA analog BTH are also upregulated by JA, suggesting that a major portion of the SA-upregulated genes are regulated by JA-dependent signaling in rice. A common defense system that is activated by both JA and SA is thus proposed which plays an important role in pathogen defense responses in rice. PMID:23518581

  6. Of Amoebae and Men: Extracellular DNA Traps as an Ancient Cell-Intrinsic Defense Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xuezhi; Soldati, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Since the discovery of the formation of DNA-based extracellular traps (ETs) by neutrophils as an innate immune defense mechanism (1), hundreds of articles describe the involvement of ETs in physiological and pathological human and animal conditions [reviewed in Ref. (2), and the previous Frontiers Research Topic on NETosis: http://www.frontiersin.org/books/NETosis_At_the_Intersection_of_Cell_Biology_Microbiology_and_Immunology/195]. Interestingly, a few reports reveal that ETs can be formed by immune cells of more ancient organisms, as far back as the common ancestor of vertebrates and invertebrates (3). Recently, we reported that the Sentinel cells of the multicellular slug of the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum also produce ETs to trap and kill slug-invading bacteria [see Box 1; and Figure 1 Ref. (4)]. This is a strong evidence that DNA-based cell-intrinsic defense mechanisms emerged much earlier than thought, about 1.3 billion years ago. Amazingly, using extrusion of DNA as a weapon to capture and kill uningestable microbes has its rationale. During the emergence of multicellularity, a primitive innate immune system developed in the form of a dedicated set of specialized phagocytic cells. This professionalization of immunity allowed the evolution of sophisticated defense mechanisms including the sacrifice of a small set of cells by a mechanism related to NETosis. This altruistic behavior likely emerged in steps, starting from the release of “dispensable” mitochondrial DNA by D. discoideum Sentinel cells. Grounded in this realization, one can anticipate that in the near future, many more examples of the invention and fine-tuning of ETs by early metazoan ancestors will be identified. Consequently, it can be expected that this more complete picture of the evolution of ETs will impact our views of the involvement and pathologies linked to ETs in human and animals. PMID:27458458

  7. Of Amoebae and Men: Extracellular DNA Traps as an Ancient Cell-Intrinsic Defense Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuezhi; Soldati, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Since the discovery of the formation of DNA-based extracellular traps (ETs) by neutrophils as an innate immune defense mechanism (1), hundreds of articles describe the involvement of ETs in physiological and pathological human and animal conditions [reviewed in Ref. (2), and the previous Frontiers Research Topic on NETosis: http://www.frontiersin.org/books/NETosis_At_the_Intersection_of_Cell_Biology_Microbiology_and_Immunology/195]. Interestingly, a few reports reveal that ETs can be formed by immune cells of more ancient organisms, as far back as the common ancestor of vertebrates and invertebrates (3). Recently, we reported that the Sentinel cells of the multicellular slug of the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum also produce ETs to trap and kill slug-invading bacteria [see Box 1; and Figure 1 Ref. (4)]. This is a strong evidence that DNA-based cell-intrinsic defense mechanisms emerged much earlier than thought, about 1.3 billion years ago. Amazingly, using extrusion of DNA as a weapon to capture and kill uningestable microbes has its rationale. During the emergence of multicellularity, a primitive innate immune system developed in the form of a dedicated set of specialized phagocytic cells. This professionalization of immunity allowed the evolution of sophisticated defense mechanisms including the sacrifice of a small set of cells by a mechanism related to NETosis. This altruistic behavior likely emerged in steps, starting from the release of "dispensable" mitochondrial DNA by D. discoideum Sentinel cells. Grounded in this realization, one can anticipate that in the near future, many more examples of the invention and fine-tuning of ETs by early metazoan ancestors will be identified. Consequently, it can be expected that this more complete picture of the evolution of ETs will impact our views of the involvement and pathologies linked to ETs in human and animals. PMID:27458458

  8. Contribution of Patient Defense Mechanisms and Therapist Interventions to the Development of Early Therapeutic Alliance in a Brief Psychodynamic Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Despland, Jean-Nicolas; de Roten, Yves; Despars, Josée; Stigler, Michael; Perry, J. Christopher

    2001-01-01

    This preliminary study examined how patients' defense mechanisms and psychotherapists' techniques influence early alliance formation. The authors assessed the relationships among defense mechanisms, therapist interventions, and the development of alliance in a sample of 12 patients undergoing Brief Psychodynamic Investigation (4 sessions). Alliance development occurred rapidly and was clearly established by the third session. Neither defensive functioning nor supportive or exploratory interventions alone differentiated early alliance development. However, the degree of adjustment of therapists' interventions to patients' level of defensive functioning discriminated a low alliance from both improving and high alliances. The adjustment of therapeutic interventions to patients' level of defensive functioning is a promising predictor of alliance development and should be examined further, alongside other predictors of outcome. PMID:11402078

  9. Human Macrophage SCN5A Activates an Innate Immune Signaling Pathway for Antiviral Host Defense*

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Alexis; Kainz, Danielle; Khan, Faatima; Lee, Cara; Carrithers, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    Pattern recognition receptors contain a binding domain for pathogen-associated molecular patterns coupled to a signaling domain that regulates transcription of host immune response genes. Here, a novel mechanism that links pathogen recognition to channel activation and downstream signaling is proposed. We demonstrate that an intracellular sodium channel variant, human macrophage SCN5A, initiates signaling and transcription through a calcium-dependent isoform of adenylate cyclase, ADCY8, and the transcription factor, ATF2. Pharmacological stimulation with a channel agonist or treatment with cytoplasmic poly(I:C), a mimic of viral dsRNA, activates this pathway to regulate expression of SP100-related genes and interferon β. Electrophysiological analysis reveals that the SCN5A variant mediates nonselective outward currents and a small, but detectable, inward current. Intracellular poly(I:C) markedly augments an inward voltage-sensitive sodium current and inhibits the outward nonselective current. These results suggest human macrophage SCN5A initiates signaling in an innate immune pathway relevant to antiviral host defense. It is postulated that SCN5A is a novel pathogen sensor and that this pathway represents a channel activation-dependent mechanism of transcriptional regulation. PMID:25368329

  10. Antimicrobial terpenes from oleoresin of ponderosa pine tree Pinus ponderosa: A defense mechanism against microbial invasion

    SciTech Connect

    Himejima, Masaki; Hobson, K.R.; Otsuka, Toshikazu; Wood, D.L.; Kubo, Isao )

    1992-10-01

    The oleoresin of the ponderosa pine, Pinus ponderosa (Pinaceae) exhibited broad antimicrobial activity. In order to identify the active compounds, the oleoresin was steam distilled to give a distillate and residue. The distillate contained mainly monoterpenes and some sesquiterpenes, while the residue consisted chiefly of four structurally related diterpene acids. An antimicrobial assay with the pure compounds indicated that the monoterpenes were active primarily against fungi, but there was also some activity against gram-positive bacteria. The diterpene acids, in contrast, only exhibited activity against gram-positive bacteria. Although not all of the identified sesquiterpenes could be tested, longifolene showed activity only against gram-positive bacteria. Therefore, it appears that the oleoresin of P. ponderosa functions as a biochemical defense against microbial invasion.

  11. Activation of Intestinal Epithelial Stat3 Orchestrates Tissue Defense during Gastrointestinal Infection

    PubMed Central

    Wittkopf, Nadine; Pickert, Geethanjali; Billmeier, Ulrike; Mahapatro, Mousumi; Wirtz, Stefan; Martini, Eva; Leppkes, Moritz; Neurath, Markus Friedrich; Becker, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal infections with EHEC and EPEC are responsible for outbreaks of diarrheal diseases and represent a global health problem. Innate first-line-defense mechanisms such as production of mucus and antimicrobial peptides by intestinal epithelial cells are of utmost importance for host control of gastrointestinal infections. For the first time, we directly demonstrate a critical role for Stat3 activation in intestinal epithelial cells upon infection of mice with Citrobacter rodentium – a murine pathogen that mimics human infections with attaching and effacing Escherichia coli. C. rodentium induced transcription of IL-6 and IL-22 in gut samples of mice and was associated with activation of the transcription factor Stat3 in intestinal epithelial cells. C. rodentium infection induced expression of several antimicrobial peptides such as RegIIIγ and Pla2g2a in the intestine which was critically dependent on Stat3 activation. Consequently, mice with specific deletion of Stat3 in intestinal epithelial cells showed increased susceptibility to C. rodentium infection as indicated by high bacterial load, severe gut inflammation, pronounced intestinal epithelial cell death and dissemination of bacteria to distant organs. Together, our data implicate an essential role for Stat3 activation in intestinal epithelial cells during C. rodentium infection. Stat3 concerts the host response to bacterial infection by controlling bacterial growth and suppression of apoptosis to maintain intestinal epithelial barrier function. PMID:25799189

  12. Enhanced antioxidant defense due to extracellular catalase activity in Syrian hamster during arousal from hibernation.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Hitomi; Okamoto, Iwao; Hanaya, Toshiharu; Arai, Shigeyuki; Ohta, Tsunetaka; Fukuda, Shigeharu

    2006-08-01

    Mammalian hibernators are considered a natural model for resistance to ischemia-reperfusion injuries, and protective mechanisms against oxidative stress evoked by repeated hibernation-arousal cycles in these animals are increasingly the focus of experimental investigation. Here we show that extracellular catalase activity provides protection against oxidative stress during arousal from hibernation in Syrian hamster. To examine the serum antioxidant defense system, we first assessed the hibernation-arousal state-dependent change in serum attenuation of cytotoxicity induced by hydrogen peroxide. Serum obtained from hamsters during arousal from hibernation at a rectal temperature of 32 degrees C, concomitant with the period of increased oxidative stress, attenuated the cytotoxicity four-fold more effectively than serum from cenothermic control hamsters. Serum catalase activity significantly increased during arousal, whereas glutathione peroxidase activity decreased by 50%, compared with cenothermic controls. The cytoprotective effect of purified catalase at the concentration found in serum was also confirmed in a hydrogen peroxide-induced cytotoxicity model. Moreover, inhibition of catalase by aminotriazole led to an 80% loss of serum hydrogen peroxide scavenging activity. These results suggest that extracellular catalase is effective for protecting hibernators from oxidative stress evoked by arousal from hibernation. PMID:16807122

  13. Analysis of Active Sensor Discrimination Requirements for Various Defense Missile Defense Scenarios Final Report 1999(99-ERD-080)

    SciTech Connect

    Ledebuhr, A.G.; Ng, L.C.; Gaughan, R.J.

    2000-02-15

    During FY99, we have explored and analyzed a combined passive/active sensor concept to support the advanced discrimination requirements for various missile defense scenario. The idea is to combine multiple IR spectral channels with an imaging LIDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) behind a common optical system. The imaging LIDAR would itself consist of at least two channels; one at the fundamental laser wavelength (e.g., the 1.064 {micro}m for Nd:YAG) and one channel at the frequency doubled (at 532 nm for Nd:YAG). two-color laser output would, for example, allow the longer wavelength for a direct detection time of flight ranger and an active imaging channel at the shorter wavelength. The LIDAR can function as a high-resolution 2D spatial image either passively or actively with laser illumination. Advances in laser design also offer three color (frequency tripled) systems, high rep-rate operation, better pumping efficiencies that can provide longer distance acquisition, and ranging for enhanced discrimination phenomenology. New detector developments can enhance the performance and operation of both LIDAR channels. A real time data fusion approach that combines multi-spectral IR phenomenology with LIDAR imagery can improve both discrimination and aim-point selection capability.

  14. Effects of provinol and its combinations with clinically used antiasthmatics on airway defense mechanisms in experimental allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Kazimierová, I; Jošková, M; Pecháňová, O; Šutovská, M; Fraňová, S

    2015-01-01

    Our previous studies show that provinol, a polyphenolic compound, has anti-inflammatory activity during allergic inflammation. In the present study we investigated the effects of provinol and its combinations with clinically used antiasthmatics: budesonide or theophylline on airway defense mechanisms during experimental allergic asthma. Separate groups of guinea pigs were treated during the course of 21-day ovalbumin sensitization with provinol (20 mg/kg/day, p.o.), or budesonide (1 mM by inhalation), or theophylline (10 mg/kg/day, i.p.), and with a half-dose combination of provinol+budesonide or provinol+theophylline. Airways defense mechanisms: cough reflex and specific airway resistance (sRaw) were evaluated in vivo. Tracheal smooth muscle reactivity and mucociliary clearance were examined in vitro. The findings were that provinol caused significant decreases in sRaw and in tracheal smooth muscle contractility, a suppression of cough reflex, and positively modulated ciliary beat frequency. The bronchodilatory and antitussive effects of provinol were comparable with those of budesonide and theophylline. Provinol given as add-on treatment significantly potentiated the effects of budesonide or theophylline, although the doses of each were halved. We conclude that provinol not only has bronchodilatory and antitussive effects, but also potentiates similar effects exerted by budesonide and theophylline. PMID:25315622

  15. Passive and active defense in toads: the parotoid macroglands in Rhinella marina and Rhaebo guttatus.

    PubMed

    Mailho-Fontana, Pedro L; Antoniazzi, Marta M; Toledo, Luís F; Verdade, Vanessa K; Sciani, Juliana M; Barbaro, Katia C; Pimenta, Daniel C; Rodrigues, Miguel T; Jared, Carlos

    2014-02-01

    Amphibians have many skin poison glands used in passive defense, in which the aggressor causes its own poisoning when biting prey. In some amphibians the skin glands accumulate in certain regions forming macroglands, such as the parotoids of toads. We have discovered that the toad Rhaebo guttatus is able to squirt jets of poison towards the aggressor, contradicting the typical amphibian defense. We studied the R. guttatus chemical defense, comparing it with Rhinella marina, a sympatric species showing typical toad passive defense. We found that only in R. guttatus the parotoid is adhered to the scapula and do not have a calcified dermal layer. In addition, in this species, the plugs obstructing the glandular ducts are more fragile when compared to R. marina. As a consequence, the manual pressure necessary to extract the poison from the parotoid is twice as high in R. marina when compared to that used in R. guttatus. Compared to R. marina, the poison of R. guttatus is less lethal, induces edema and provokes nociception four times more intense. We concluded that the ability of R. guttatus to voluntary squirt poison is directly related to its stereotyped defensive behavior, together with the peculiar morphological characteristics of its parotoids. Since R. guttatus poison is practically not lethal, it is possibly directed to predators' learning, causing disturbing effects such as pain and edema. The unique mechanism of defense of R. guttatus may mistakenly justify the popular myth that toads, in general, squirt poison into people's eyes. PMID:24130001

  16. Growth, photosynthesis, and defense mechanism of antimony (Sb)-contaminated Boehmeria nivea L.

    PubMed

    Chai, Li-Yuan; Mubarak, Hussani; Yang, Zhi-Hui; Yong, Wang; Tang, Chong-Jian; Mirza, Nosheen

    2016-04-01

    Ramie (Boehmeria nivea L.) is the oldest cash fiber crop in China and is widely grown in antimony (Sb) mining areas. To evaluate the extent of Sb resistance and tolerance, the growth, tolerance index (TI), Sb content in plant parts and in Hoagland solution, bioaccumulation factor (BF), photosynthesis, and physiological changes in Sb-contaminated B. nivea (20, 40, 80, and 200 mg L(-1) Sb) grown hydroponically were investigated. The Sb tolerance and resistance of ramie were clearly revealed by growth inhibition, a TI between 13 and 99 %, non-significant changes in the maximum quantum efficiency of photosystem (F v /F m ), energy-harvesting efficiency (photosystem II (PSII)) and single-photon avalanche diode (SPAD) value, a significant increase in Sb in plant parts, BF >1, and an increase in catalase (CAT) and malondialdehyde (MDA) at 200 mg L(-1) Sb. Under increasing Sb stress, nearly the same non-significant decline in the maximum quantum efficiency of photosystem (F v /F m ), energy-harvesting efficiency (PSII), relative quantum yield of photosystem II (φPSII), and photochemical quenching (qP), except for F v /F m at 20 mg L(-1) Sb, were recorded. SPAD values for chlorophyll under Sb stress showed an increasing trend, except for a slight decrease, i.e., <2 %, than the control SPAD value at 200 mg L(-1) Sb. With a continuous increase in MDA, superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD), and CAT activities were suppressed under Sb addition up to 40 mg L(-1) Sb and the addition of Sb enhanced enzyme production at 80 and 200 mg L(-1) Sb. A continuous decrease in SOD, POD, and CAT up to 40 mg L(-1) Sb and enhancements at ≥80 mg L(-1), along with the continuous enhancement of MDA activity and inhibited biomass production, clearly reveal the roles of these enzymes in detoxifying Sb stress and the defense mechanism of ramie at 80 mg L(-1) Sb. Thus, B. nivea constitutes a promising candidate for Sb phytoremediation at mining sites. PMID:26711292

  17. Identification of a key role for permeability glycoprotein in enhancing the cellular defense mechanisms of fertilized oocytes.

    PubMed

    Martin, Jacinta H; Nixon, Brett; Lord, Tessa; Bromfield, Elizabeth G; Aitken, R John

    2016-09-01

    Double strand breaks (DSBs) are highly damaging DNA lesions that can destabilize the genome and generate a suite of adverse physiological outcomes in the oocyte and early embryo. While it is therefore likely that these cells possess a sophisticated suite of protective mechanisms to ameliorate such damage, the precise nature of these defense systems are yet to be fully elucidated. This study characterizes the sensitivity of the oocyte to etoposide, a chemotherapeutic agent with the ability to elicit DSBs. We demonstrate significant developmental changes in etoposide vulnerability, with fertilization of the oocyte leading to an enhancement of its cellular defense machinery. Using a parthenogenic model we show that this response is mediated, at least in part, by permeability glycoprotein (PGP), an endogenous multidrug efflux transporter that is up-regulated, translocated to the oolemma and phosphorylated upon oocyte activation. Moreover, evidence from dye exclusion assays in the presence of a specific PGP pharmacological inhibitor (PSC833), illustrates that these events effectively increase oocyte efflux activity, thereby enhancing the ability of these cells to exclude genotoxicants capable of eliciting DSB formation. PMID:27397031

  18. Contrasting Potato Foliage and Tuber Defense Mechanisms against the Late Blight Pathogen Phytophthora infestans.

    PubMed

    Gao, Liangliang; Bradeen, James M

    2016-01-01

    The late blight pathogen Phytophthora infestans can attack both potato foliage and tubers. When inoculated with P. infestans, foliage of nontransformed 'Russet Burbank' (WT) develops late blight disease while that of transgenic 'Russet Burbank' line SP2211 (+RB) does not. We compared the foliar transcriptome responses of these two lines to P. infestans inoculation using an RNA-seq approach. A total of 515 million paired end RNA-seq reads were generated, representing the transcription of 29,970 genes. We also compared the differences and similarities of defense mechanisms against P. infestans in potato foliage and tubers. Differentially expressed genes, gene groups and ontology bins were identified to show similarities and differences in foliage and tuber defense mechanisms. Our results suggest that R gene dosage and shared biochemical pathways (such as ethylene and stress bins) contribute to RB-mediated incompatible potato-P. infestans interactions in both the foliage and tubers. Certain ontology bins such as cell wall and lipid metabolisms are potentially organ-specific. PMID:27441721

  19. Contrasting Potato Foliage and Tuber Defense Mechanisms against the Late Blight Pathogen Phytophthora infestans

    PubMed Central

    Bradeen, James M.

    2016-01-01

    The late blight pathogen Phytophthora infestans can attack both potato foliage and tubers. When inoculated with P. infestans, foliage of nontransformed ‘Russet Burbank’ (WT) develops late blight disease while that of transgenic ‘Russet Burbank’ line SP2211 (+RB) does not. We compared the foliar transcriptome responses of these two lines to P. infestans inoculation using an RNA-seq approach. A total of 515 million paired end RNA-seq reads were generated, representing the transcription of 29,970 genes. We also compared the differences and similarities of defense mechanisms against P. infestans in potato foliage and tubers. Differentially expressed genes, gene groups and ontology bins were identified to show similarities and differences in foliage and tuber defense mechanisms. Our results suggest that R gene dosage and shared biochemical pathways (such as ethylene and stress bins) contribute to RB-mediated incompatible potato-P. infestans interactions in both the foliage and tubers. Certain ontology bins such as cell wall and lipid metabolisms are potentially organ-specific. PMID:27441721

  20. The nuclear immune receptor RPS4 is required for RRS1SLH1-dependent constitutive defense activation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Kee Hoon; Segonzac, Cécile; Rallapalli, Ghanasyam; Sarris, Panagiotis F; Woo, Joo Yong; Williams, Simon J; Newman, Toby E; Paek, Kyung Hee; Kobe, Bostjan; Jones, Jonathan D G

    2014-10-01

    on mechanisms by which NB-LRR protein pairs activate defense signaling, or are held inactive in the absence of a pathogen effector. PMID:25340333

  1. Association of Ego Defense Mechanisms with Academic Performance, Anxiety and Depression in Medical Students: A Mixed Methods Study

    PubMed Central

    Waqas, Ahmed; Malik, Aamenah; Muhammad, Umer; Khan, Sarah; Mahmood, Nadia

    2015-01-01

    Background: Ego defense mechanisms are unconscious psychological processes that help an individual to prevent anxiety when exposed to a stressful situation. These mechanisms are important in psychiatric practice to assess an individual’s personality dynamics, psychopathologies, and modes of coping with stressful situations, and hence, to design appropriate individualized treatment. Our study delineates the relationship of ego defense mechanisms with anxiety, depression, and academic performance of Pakistani medical students. Methods: This cross-sectional study was done at CMH Lahore Medical College and Fatima Memorial Hospital Medical and Dental College, both in Lahore, Pakistan, from December 1, 2014 to January 15, 2015. Convenience sampling was used and only students who agreed to take part in this study were included. The questionnaire consisted of three sections: 1) Demographics, documenting demographic data and academic scores on participants’ most recent exams; 2) Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS); and 3) Defense Style Questionnaire-40 (DSQ-40). The data were analyzed with SPSS v. 20. Mean scores and frequencies were calculated for demographic variables and ego defense mechanisms. Bivariate correlations, one-way ANOVA, and multiple linear regression were used to identify associations between academic scores, demographics, ego defense mechanisms, anxiety, and depression. Results: A total of 409 medical students participated, of whom 286 (70%) were females and 123 (30%) were males. Mean percentage score on the most recent exams was 75.6% in medical students. Bivariate correlation revealed a direct association between mature and neurotic ego defense mechanisms and academic performance, and an indirect association between immature mechanisms and academic performance. One-way ANOVA showed that moderate levels of anxiety (P < .05) and low levels of depression (P < .05) were associated with higher academic performance. Conclusion: There was a

  2. Systemic Acquired Resistance in Moss: Further Evidence for Conserved Defense Mechanisms in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Peter S.; Bowman, Collin E.; Villani, Philip J.; Dolan, Thomas E.; Hauck, Nathanael R.

    2014-01-01

    Vascular plants possess multiple mechanisms for defending themselves against pathogens. One well-characterized defense mechanism is systemic acquired resistance (SAR). In SAR, a plant detects the presence of a pathogen and transmits a signal throughout the plant, inducing changes in the expression of various pathogenesis-related (PR) genes. Once SAR is established, the plant is capable of mounting rapid responses to subsequent pathogen attacks. SAR has been characterized in numerous angiosperm and gymnosperm species; however, despite several pieces of evidence suggesting SAR may also exist in non-vascular plants6–8, its presence in non-vascular plants has not been conclusively demonstrated, in part due to the lack of an appropriate culture system. Here, we describe and use a novel culture system to demonstrate that the moss species Amblystegium serpens does initiate a SAR-like reaction upon inoculation with Pythium irregulare, a common soil-borne oomycete. Infection of A. serpens gametophores by P. irregulare is characterized by localized cytoplasmic shrinkage within 34 h and chlorosis and necrosis within 7 d of inoculation. Within 24 h of a primary inoculation (induction), moss gametophores grown in culture became highly resistant to infection following subsequent inoculation (challenge) by the same pathogen. This increased resistance was a response to the pathogen itself and not to physical wounding. Treatment with β-1,3 glucan, a structural component of oomycete cell walls, was equally effective at triggering SAR. Our results demonstrate, for the first time, that this important defense mechanism exists in a non-vascular plant, and, together with previous studies, suggest that SAR arose prior to the divergence of vascular and non-vascular plants. In addition, this novel moss – pathogen culture system will be valuable for future characterization of the mechanism of SAR in moss, which is necessary for a better understanding of the evolutionary history of SAR

  3. Anatomy and function of the ptychoid defensive mechanism in the mite Euphthiracarus cooki (Acari: Oribatida).

    PubMed

    Sanders, Francis H; Norton, Roy A

    2004-02-01

    Ptychoidy is a defensive adaptation of several groups of oribatid mites in which legs and coxisternum can be fully retracted into the opisthosoma and protected by a ventrally deflected prodorsum, resulting in a seed-like appearance. Using Euphthiracarus cooki as a model, we examined details of exoskeletal and muscular anatomy in combination with studies of live individuals to provide the first functional analysis of ptychoidy. There are two main functional components: the first is a set of exoskeletal and muscular adaptations, mostly of the podosoma and prodorsum, that combine to effect leg withdrawal and prodorsal deflection; the second comprises adaptations of the opisthosoma that allow control of hydrostatic pressure during the large hemocoel volume adjustments associated with ptychoidy. Adaptations important in the closing process (enptychosis) are found in four body regions. Much of the podosomal exoskeleton (especially pleural) is unsclerotized, which facilitates leg retraction and prodorsal deflection during enptychosis. The coxisternum has several flexible furrows along which it folds in order to bring legs into a tightly parallel arrangement. The prodorsum has specialized attachment surfaces (manubrium and inferior retractor process) for retractor muscles and a paired bothridial scale that participates in prodorsal alignment during enptychosis. The subcapitulum has a prominent capitular apodeme on which important retractor muscles insert. The mineralized notogaster has an anterior "collar" that accommodates the retracted prodorsum; it includes paired notches and receptacles that accommodate the bothridial scales, thereby creating a temporary fixed axis for rotation of the prodorsum in a "lazy hinge" mechanism. Specialized muscles form the retractor system; most conspicuous are the large coxisternal retractors and prodorsal retractors, both of which originate on the notogaster. Other components have adjustor roles; among them are muscles of the endosternal

  4. The nature of antioxidant defense mechanisms: a lesson from transgenic studies.

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Y S; Magnenat, J L; Gargano, M; Cao, J

    1998-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of many clinical disorders such as adult respiratory distress syndrome, ischemia-reperfusion injury, atherosclerosis, neurodegenerative diseases, and cancer. Genetically engineered animal models have been used as a tool for understanding the function of various antioxidant enzymes in cellular defense mechanisms against various types of oxidant tissue injury. Transgenic mice overexpressing three isoforms of superoxide dismutase, catalase, and the cellular glutathione peroxidase (GSHPx-1) in various tissues show an increased tolerance to ischemia-reperfusion heart and brain injury, hyperoxia, cold-induced brain edema, adriamycin, and paraquat toxicity. These results have provided for the first time direct evidence demonstrating the importance of each of these antioxidant enzymes in protecting the animals against the injury resulting from these insults, as well as the effect of an enhanced level of antioxidant in ameliorating the oxidant tissue injury. To evaluate further the nature of these enzymes in antioxidant defense, gene knockout mice deficient in copper-zinc superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD) and GSHPx-1 have also been generated in our laboratory. These mice developed normally and showed no marked pathologic changes under normal physiologic conditions. In addition, a deficiency in these genes had no effects on animal survival under hyperoxida. However, these knockout mice exhibited a pronounced susceptibility to paraquat toxicity and myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury. Furthermore, female mice lacking CuZnSOD also displayed a marked increase in postimplantation embryonic lethality. These animals should provide a useful model for uncovering the identity of ROS that participate in the pathogenesis of various clinical disorders and for defining the role of each antioxidant enzyme in cellular defense against oxidant-mediated tissue injury. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9788901

  5. Geodetic activities of the Department of Defense under IGY programs

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, O.W.; Daugherty, K.I.

    1983-10-16

    Attention is given to the U.S. Department of Defence (DOD) activities that contributed to the International Geophysical Year's active, passive, and cooperative satellite programs. The DOD continues to support the deployment, enhancement, and application of novel technology in such areas as satellite altimetry, gravity radiometry, inertial surveying, interferometry, airborne gravimetry, inertial surveying, and CCD and laser methods for geodetic astronomy. Also noted are such major department initiatives as the Global Positioning System, which will become operational toward the end of this decade.

  6. Neuroinflammatory contributions to pain after SCI: roles for central glial mechanisms and nociceptor-mediated host defense.

    PubMed

    Walters, Edgar T

    2014-08-01

    Neuropathic pain after spinal cord injury (SCI) is common, often intractable, and can be severely debilitating. A number of mechanisms have been proposed for this pain, which are discussed briefly, along with methods for revealing SCI pain in animal models, such as the recently applied conditioned place preference test. During the last decade, studies of animal models have shown that both central neuroinflammation and behavioral hypersensitivity (indirect reflex measures of pain) persist chronically after SCI. Interventions that reduce neuroinflammation have been found to ameliorate pain-related behavior, such as treatment with agents that inhibit the activation states of microglia and/or astroglia (including IL-10, minocycline, etanercept, propentofylline, ibudilast, licofelone, SP600125, carbenoxolone). Reversal of pain-related behavior has also been shown with disruption by an inhibitor (CR8) and/or genetic deletion of cell cycle-related proteins, deletion of a truncated receptor (trkB.T1) for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), or reduction by antisense knockdown or an inhibitor (AMG9810) of the activity of channels (TRPV1 or Nav1.8) important for electrical activity in primary nociceptors. Nociceptor activity is known to drive central neuroinflammation in peripheral injury models, and nociceptors appear to be an integral component of host defense. Thus, emerging results suggest that spinal and systemic effects of SCI can activate nociceptor-mediated host defense responses that interact via neuroinflammatory signaling with complex central consequences of SCI to drive chronic pain. This broader view of SCI-induced neuroinflammation suggests new targets, and additional complications, for efforts to develop effective treatments for neuropathic SCI pain. PMID:25017887

  7. Light regulation of plant defense.

    PubMed

    Ballaré, Carlos L

    2014-01-01

    Precise allocation of limited resources between growth and defense is critical for plant survival. In shade-intolerant species, perception of competition signals by informational photoreceptors activates shade-avoidance responses and reduces the expression of defenses against pathogens and insects. The main mechanism underlying defense suppression is the simultaneous downregulation of jasmonate and salicylic acid signaling by low ratios of red:far-red radiation. Inactivation of phytochrome B by low red:far-red ratios appears to suppress jasmonate responses by altering the balance between DELLA and JASMONATE ZIM DOMAIN (JAZ) proteins in favor of the latter. Solar UVB radiation is a positive modulator of plant defense, signaling through jasmonate-dependent and jasmonate-independent pathways. Light, perceived by phytochrome B and presumably other photoreceptors, helps plants concentrate their defensive arsenals in photosynthetically valuable leaves. The discovery of connections between photoreceptors and defense signaling is revealing novel mechanisms that control key resource allocation decisions in plant canopies. PMID:24471835

  8. Monuments of memory: defensive mechanisms of the collective psyche and their manifestation in the memorialization process.

    PubMed

    Kalinowska, Malgorzata

    2012-09-01

    The paper searches for insight in the area of collective memory as a part of collective consciousness, a phenomenon understood as a stabilizing factor for a society's self-image and identity. Collective memories are seen as originating from shared communications transmitting and creating the meaning of the past in the form of narrative, symbols and signs. As such, they contain the individual, embodied and lived side of our relations to the past. As well as the identity-building and meaning-making functions of collective memories, their defensive function is discussed with a focus on commemorative practices taking place in a transitional space between psychic and social life. Fears of a lack of collective identity and coherence have contributed to the way Polish commemorative practices have been shaped. This is considered in relation to the Smolensk catastrophe in 2010, viewed in the context of the Jungian concept of the collective psyche and the psychoanalytical understanding of defensive group mechanisms against trauma, especially those relating to loss and mourning. It leads to a consideration of how historical experiences and the experience of history can be accessed, as well as their meaning for individual and group development. PMID:22954041

  9. Preventive role of lens antioxidant defense mechanism against riboflavin-mediated sunlight damaging of lens crystallins.

    PubMed

    Anbaraki, Afrooz; Khoshaman, Kazem; Ghasemi, Younes; Yousefi, Reza

    2016-10-01

    The main components of sunlight reaching the eye lens are UVA and visible light exerting their photo-damaging effects indirectly by the aid of endogenous photosensitizer molecules such as riboflavin (RF). In this study, lens proteins solutions were incubated with RF and exposed to the sunlight. Then, gel mobility shift analysis and different spectroscopic assessments were applied to examine the structural damaging effects of solar radiation on these proteins. Exposure of lens proteins to direct sunlight, in the presence of RF, leads to marked structural crosslinking, oligomerization and proteolytic instability. These structural damages were also accompanied with reduction in the emission fluorescence of Trp and Tyr and appearance of a new absorption peak between 300 and 400nm which can be related to formation of new chromophores. Also, photo-oxidation of lens crystallins increases their oligomeric size distribution as examined by dynamic light scattering analysis. The above mentioned structural insults, as potential sources of sunlight-induced senile cataract and blindness, were significantly attenuated in the presence of ascorbic acid and glutathione which are two important components of lens antioxidant defense system. Therefore, the powerful antioxidant defense mechanism of eye lens is an important barrier against molecular photo-damaging effects of solar radiations during the life span. PMID:27316765

  10. Repeated exposures to roadside particulate matter extracts suppresses pulmonary defense mechanisms, resulting in lipid and protein oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Pardo, Michal; Porat, Ziv; Rudich, Assaf; Schauer, James J; Rudich, Yinon

    2016-03-01

    Exposure to particulate matter (PM) pollution in cities and urban canyons can be harmful to the exposed population. However, the underlying mechanisms that lead to health effects are not yet elucidated. It is postulated that exposure to repeated, small, environmentally relevant concentrations can affect lung homeostasis. This study examines the impact of repeated exposures to urban PM on mouse lungs with focus on inflammatory and oxidative stress parameters. Aqueous extracts from collected urban PM were administered to mice by 5 repeated intra-tracheal instillations (IT). Multiple exposures, led to an increase in cytokine levels in both bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and in the blood serum, indicating a systemic reaction. Lung mRNA levels of antioxidant/phase II detoxifying enzymes decreased by exposure to the PM extract, but not when metals were removed by chelation. Finally, disruption of lung tissue oxidant-inflammatory/defense balance was evidenced by increased levels of lipid and protein oxidation. Unlike response to a single IT exposure to the same dose and source of extract, multiple exposures result in lung oxidative damage and a systemic inflammatory reaction. These could be attributed to compromised capacity to activate the protective Nrf2 tissue defense system. It is suggested that water-soluble metals present in urban PM, potentially from break and tire wear, may constitute major drivers of the pulmonary and systemic responses to multiple exposure to urban PM. PMID:26735168

  11. Cortical multineuronal activity in dogs with defensive instrumental conditioned reflex.

    PubMed

    Dolbakyan, E E; Merzhanova, G Kh; Tveritskaya, I N

    1990-01-01

    For the first time in dogs with semi-microelectrodes chronically implanted in the motor and somatosensory region of the cortex, background multineuronal activity (MNA) was recorded over the long term followed by an amplitudinal discrimination from the MNA of impulse series presumably belonging to cells of large, medium, and small size was performed. The presence of close synergistic functional connections, particularly significant during the avoidance conditioned reflex and its extinction, was established by determining the correlation coefficient (CC) between the impulse flows of these neurons. In trained animals the highest CC values were observed between neurons with a small and medium spike amplitude. The network properties of identified neurons were studied by constructing histograms of cross interval relationships. The connections established were of primarily a unilateral, excitatory character. PMID:2077444

  12. The Splitting Index: construction of a scale measuring the defense mechanism of splitting.

    PubMed

    Gould, J R; Prentice, N M; Ainslie, R C

    1996-04-01

    The Splitting Index (SI), a self-report scale based on the writings of Kernberg (e.g., 1976) on self and object representations and the defense mechanism of splitting, was constructed. After development over the course of 6 pilot studies, the SI was validated through 2 further studies. Factor analyses revealed a 24-item scale with three 8-item subscales, measuring the splitting of self, family, and others' images. The SI and its subscales were demonstrated to be internally consistent and stable over a 4-week period. Convergent validity was supported by significant correlations with measures of borderline and narcissistic personality disorders, self-image stability, self-esteem, depression, and negative affectivity. Discriminant validity was demonstrated by near-zero correlations with two measures of cognitive complexity. Contrary to predictions, the SI was significantly correlated with the Dogmatism Scale (Rokeach, 1960), a third measure of cognitive complexity. Research and clinical applications of the SI are discussed. PMID:8869581

  13. Mechanical Properties of Sialic Foamed Ceramic and Applications in Defense Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xu-Yang; Li, Yong-Chi; Zhao, Kai; Gao, Guang-Fa

    2014-08-01

    Mechanical properties of a closed-cellular sialic foamed ceramic are investigated by compressive tests. The sialic foamed ceramic under uniaxial stress compression shows brittleness and the flow stress increases with the strain rate. The engineering stress-engineering strain curve under uniaxial strain compression could be divided into three stages: linear elasticity, collapsed plateau and densification. The unloading elastic modulus, Poisson ratio and energy absorption ability are discussed. Shelly cellular material made by sialic foamed ceramic is applied into the stress distribution layer in the defense structure. Field explosion experiments are performed for the sand based stress distribution layer and shelly cellular material based layer. Compared with sand, the shelly cellular material reduces the peak stress of the blast wave.

  14. Roles of small RNAs in the immune defense mechanisms of crustaceans.

    PubMed

    He, Yaodong; Ju, Chenyu; Zhang, Xiaobo

    2015-12-01

    Small RNAs, 21-24 nucleotides in length, are non-coding RNAs found in most multicellular organisms, as well as in some viruses. There are three main types of small RNAs including microRNA (miRNA), small-interfering RNA (siRNA), and piwi-interacting RNA (piRNA). Small RNAs play key roles in the genetic regulation of eukaryotes; at least 50% of all eukaryote genes are the targets of small RNAs. In recent years, studies have shown that some unique small RNAs are involved in the immune response of crustaceans, leading to lower or higher immune responses to infections and diseases. SiRNAs could be used as therapy for virus infection. In this review, we provide an overview of the diverse roles of small RNAs in the immune defense mechanisms of crustaceans. PMID:26210184

  15. Stress defense mechanisms of NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductases (NTRs) in plants.

    PubMed

    Cha, Joon-Yung; Barman, Dhirendra Nath; Kim, Min Gab; Kim, Woe-Yeon

    2015-01-01

    Plants establish highly and systemically organized stress defense mechanisms against unfavorable living conditions. To interpret these environmental stimuli, plants possess communication tools, referred as secondary messengers, such as Ca(2+) signature and reactive oxygen species (ROS) wave. Maintenance of ROS is an important event for whole lifespan of plants, however, in special cases, toxic ROS molecules are largely accumulated under excess stresses and diverse enzymes played as ROS scavengers. Arabidopsis and rice contain 3 NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductases (NTRs) which transfer reducing power to Thioredoxin/Peroxiredoxin (Trx/Prx) system for scavenging ROS. However, due to functional redundancy between cytosolic and mitochondrial NTRs (NTRA and NTRB, respectively), their functional involvements under stress conditions have not been well characterized. Recently, we reported that cytosolic NTRA confers the stress tolerance against oxidative and drought stresses via regulation of ROS amounts using NTRA-overexpressing plants. With these findings, mitochondrial NTRB needs to be further elucidated. PMID:26039478

  16. Fiscal Year 1985 Congressional budget request. Volume 1. Atomic energy defense activities

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-02-01

    Contents include: summaries of estimates by appropriation, savings from management initiatives, staffing by subcommittee, staffing appropriation; appropriation language; amounts available for obligation; estimates by major category; program overview; weapons activities; verification and control technology; materials production; defense waste and by-products management; nuclear safeguards and security; security investigations; and naval reactors development.

  17. Defense mechanisms in congenital and acquired facial disfigurement: a clinical-empirical study.

    PubMed

    van den Elzen, Marijke E P; Versnel, Sarah L; Perry, J Christopher; Mathijssen, Irene M J; Duivenvoorden, Hugo J

    2012-04-01

    It is of clinical interest to investigate the degree to which patients with facial disfigurement use defense styles. Therefore, 59 adults born with rare facial clefts, 59 patients with facial deformities acquired at an adult age, and a reference group of 141 adults without facial disfigurements completed standardized questionnaires. There was a significant difference between the group with and the group without disfigurements on immature defense styles, with the disfigured group using the immature style more frequently. There was a trend for the nondisfigured group to use more mature defense styles. No difference between congenital and acquired groups was seen on individual types of defense style. Self-esteem had the strength to differentiate mature and immature defense styles within our disfigured groups. The association of low self-esteem and the utilization of immature defense styles suggests that professional help may tailor treatment on discussing immature defense style and problems triggering or maintaining this style. PMID:22456586

  18. Active defense scheme against DDoS based on mobile agent and network control in network confrontation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Rong; Li, Junshan; Ye, Xia; Wang, Rui

    2013-03-01

    In order to effective defend DDoS attacks in network confrontation, an active defense scheme against DDoS is built based on Mobile Agent and network control. A distributed collaborative active defense model is constructed by using mobile agent technology and encapsulating a variety of DDoS defense techniques. Meanwhile the network control theory is applied to establish a network confrontation's control model for DDoS to control the active defense process. It provides a new idea to solve the DDoS problem.

  19. Structural antioxidant defense mechanisms in the mammalian and nonmammalian kidney: different solutions to the same problem?

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Paul M; Evans, Roger G

    2010-09-01

    Tissue oxygen levels are tightly regulated in all organs. This poses a challenge for the kidney, as its function requires blood flow, and thus, oxygen delivery to greatly exceed its metabolic requirements. Because superoxide production in the kidney is dependent on oxygen availability, tissue hyperoxia could drive oxidative stress. In the mammalian renal cortex, this problem may have been solved, in part, through a structural antioxidant defense mechanism. That is, arteries and veins are closely associated in a countercurrent arrangement, facilitating diffusional arterial-to-venous (AV) oxygen shunting. Because of this mechanism, a proportion of the oxygen delivered in the renal artery never reaches kidney tissue but instead diffuses to the closely associated renal veins, thus limiting oxygen transport to tissue. In the nonmammalian kidney, arteries and veins are not arranged in an intimate countercurrent fashion as in mammals; thus AV oxygen shunting is likely less important in regulation of kidney oxygenation in these species. Instead, the kidney's blood supply is predominately of venous origin. This likely has a similar impact on tissue oxygenation as AV oxygen shunting, of limiting delivery of oxygen to renal tissue. Thus, we hypothesize the evolution of structural antioxidant mechanisms that are anatomically divergent but functionally homologous in the mammalian and nonmammalian kidney. PMID:20660108

  20. Defense mechanisms of sargassacean species against the epiphytic red alga Neosiphonia harveyi.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Noboru; Ohki, Kaori; Kamiya, Mitsunobu

    2015-08-01

    Flora diversity and abundance of epiphytes are specific to their basiphyte species and may relate to variations in the defensive abilities of basiphytes. Thus, investigating the interactions between epiphytes and basiphytes is useful for a better understanding of the biological impact of epiphytism and the survival strategies of basiphytes. We examined the epiphyte density on five sargassacean species at six locations between two study sites, which showed that the epiphytic red alga Neosiphonia harveyi was remarkably less abundant on Sargassum siliquastrum at all locations. To assess its defense mechanism against N. harveyi, we performed bioassays of phlorotannins, which are considered effective in deterring fouling, by culturing sargassacean blades with N. harveyi carpospores and observed the process by which sargassacean blades remove epiphytes. When the carpospores were incubated with various concentrations of dissolved phlorotannins, settlement and germination were inhibited only at the highest concentrations (>0.1 g · L(-1) ), and this effect did not significantly differ among the five sargassacean species. When the carpospores were combined with blades from the five species, many of the spores attached and germinated on every blade. Because N. harveyi penetrated rhizoids into basiphyte tissues, cuticle peeling observed in all five sargassacean species could not remove this epiphyte after germination. However, in S. siliquastrum, the blade tissues around the germlings became swollen and disintegrative, and were removed together with the germlings. The spores normally grew on the dead blades, suggesting that the tissue degradation of S. siliquastrum is triggered by the infection of N. harveyi. PMID:26986791

  1. Oligopeptide elicitor-mediated defense gene activation in cultured parsley cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hahlbrock, K; Scheel, D; Logemann, E; Nürnberger, T; Parniske, M; Reinold, S; Sacks, W R; Schmelzer, E

    1995-01-01

    We have used suspension-cultured parsley cells (Petroselinum crispum) and an oligopeptide elicitor derived from a surface glycoprotein of the phytopathogenic fungus Phytophthora megasperma f.sp. glycinea to study the signaling pathway from elicitor recognition to defense gene activation. Immediately after specific binding of the elicitor by a receptor in the plasma membrane, large and transient increases in several inorganic ion fluxes (Ca2+, H+, K+, Cl-) and H2O2 formation are the first detectable plant cell responses. These are rapidly followed by transient changes in the phosphorylation status of various proteins and by the activation of numerous defense-related genes, concomitant with the inactivation of several other, non-defense-related genes. A great diversity of cis-acting elements and trans-acting factors appears to be involved in elicitor-mediated gene regulation, similar to the apparently complex nature of the signal transduced intracellularly. With few exceptions, all individual defense responses analyzed in fungus-infected parsley leaves have been found to be closely mimicked in elicitor-treated, cultured parsley cells, thus validating the use of the elicitor/cell culture system as a valuable model system for these types of study. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 PMID:7753777

  2. Microbial Signature-Triggered Plant Defense Responses and Early Signaling Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shujing; Shan, Libo; He, Ping

    2014-01-01

    It has long been observed that microbial elicitors can trigger various cellular responses in plants. Microbial elicitors have recently been referred to as pathogen or microbe-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs or MAMPs) and remarkable progress has been made on research of their corresponding receptors, signaling mechanisms and critical involvement in disease resistance. Plants also generate endogenous signals due to the damage or wounds caused by microbes. These signals were originally called endogenous elicitors and subsequently renamed damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) that serve as warning signals for infections. The cellular responses induced by PAMPs and DAMPs include medium alkalinization, ion fluxes across the membrane, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and ethylene production. They collectively contribute to plant pattern-triggered immunity (PTI) and play an important role in plant basal defense against a broad spectrum of microbial infections. In this review, we provide an update on multiple PTI responses and early signaling mechanisms and discuss its potential applications to improve crop disease resistance. PMID:25438792

  3. Hepcidin-Induced Hypoferremia Is a Critical Host Defense Mechanism Against the Siderophilic Bacterium Vibrio vulnificus

    PubMed Central

    Arezes, João; Jung, Grace; Gabayan, Victoria; Valore, Erika; Ruchala, Piotr; Gulig, Paul A.; Ganz, Tomas; Nemeth, Elizabeta; Bulut, Yonca

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Hereditary hemochromatosis, an iron overload disease caused by a deficiency in the iron-regulatory hormone hepcidin, is associated with lethal infections by siderophilic bacteria. To elucidate the mechanisms of this susceptibility, we infected wild-type and hepcidin-deficient mice with the siderophilic bacterium Vibrio vulnificus, and found that hepcidin deficiency results in increased bacteremia and decreased survival of infected mice, which can be partially ameliorated by dietary iron depletion. Additionally, timely administration of hepcidin agonists to hepcidin-deficient mice induces hypoferremia that decreases bacterial loads and rescues these mice from death, regardless of initial iron levels. Studies of Vibrio vulnificus growth ex vivo show that high iron sera from hepcidin-deficient mice support extraordinarily rapid bacterial growth, and that this is inhibited in hypoferremic sera. Our findings demonstrate that hepcidin-mediated hypoferremia is a host defense mechanism against siderophilic pathogens and suggest that hepcidin agonists may improve infection outcomes in patients with hereditary hemochromatosis or thalassemia. PMID:25590758

  4. Systemic Activation of TLR3-Dependent TRIF Signaling Confers Host Defense against Gram-Negative Bacteria in the Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, Jose; Kanagavelu, Saravana; Flores, Claudia; Romero, Laura; Riveron, Reldy; Shih, David Q.; Fukata, Masayuki

    2016-01-01

    Recognition of Gram-negative bacteria by toll-like receptor (TLR)4 induces MyD88 and TRIF mediated responses. We have shown that TRIF-dependent responses play an important role in intestinal defense against Gram-negative enteropathogens. In the current study, we examined underlying mechanisms of how systemic TRIF activation enhances intestinal immune defense against Gram-negative bacteria. First we confirmed that the protective effect of poly I:C against enteric infection of mice with Yersinia enterocolitica was dependent on TLR3-mediated TRIF signaling by using TLR3-deficient mice. This protection was unique in TRIF-dependent TLR signaling because systemic stimulation of mice with agonists for TLR2 (Pam3CSK4) or TLR5 (flagellin) did not reduce mortality on Y. enterocolitica infection. Systemic administration of poly I:C mobilized CD11c+, F4/80+, and Gr−1hi cells from lamina propria and activated NK cells in the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) within 24 h. This innate immune cell rearrangement was type I IFN dependent and mediated through upregulation of TLR4 followed by CCR7 expression in these innate immune cells found in the intestinal mucosa. Poly I:C induced IFN-γ expression by NK cells in the MLN, which was mediated through type I IFNs and IL-12p40 from antigen presenting cells and consequent activation of STAT1 and STAT4 in NK cells. This formation of innate immunity significantly contributed to the elimination of bacteria in the MLN. Our results demonstrated an innate immune network in the intestine that can be established by systemic stimulation of TRIF, which provides a strong host defense against Gram-negative pathogens. The mechanism underlying TRIF-mediated protective immunity may be useful to develop novel therapies for enteric bacterial infection. PMID:26793623

  5. Mechanically Active Electrospun Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Jaimee M.

    Electrospinning, a technique used to fabricate small diameter polymer fibers, has been employed to develop unique, active materials falling under two categories: (1) shape memory elastomeric composites (SMECs) and (2) water responsive fiber mats. (1) Previous work has characterized in detail the properties and behavior of traditional SMECs with isotropic fibers embedded in an elastomer matrix. The current work has two goals: (i) characterize laminated anisotropic SMECs and (ii) develop a fabrication process that is scalable for commercial SMEC manufacturing. The former ((i)) requires electrospinning aligned polymer fibers. The aligned fibers are similarly embedded in an elastomer matrix and stacked at various fiber orientations. The resulting laminated composite has a unique response to tensile deformation: after stretching and releasing, the composite curls. This curling response was characterized based on fiber orientation. The latter goal ((ii)) required use of a dual-electrospinning process to simultaneously electrospin two polymers. This fabrication approach incorporated only industrially relevant processing techniques, enabling the possibility of commercial application of a shape memory rubber. Furthermore, the approach had the added benefit of increased control over composition and material properties. (2) The strong elongational forces experienced by polymer chains during the electrospinning process induce molecular alignment along the length of electrospun fibers. Such orientation is maintained in the fibers as the polymer vitrifies. Consequently, residual stress is stored in electrospun fiber mats and can be recovered by heating through the polymer's glass transition temperature. Alternatively, the glass transition temperature can be depressed by introducing a plasticizing agent. Poly(vinyl acetate) (PVAc) is plasticized by water, and its glass transition temperature is lowered below room temperature. Therefore, the residual stress can be relaxed at room

  6. Modulation of plasma membrane H+-ATPase activity differentially activates wound and pathogen defense responses in tomato plants.

    PubMed Central

    Schaller, A; Oecking, C

    1999-01-01

    Systemin is an important mediator of wound-induced defense gene activation in tomato plants, and it elicits a rapid alkalinization of the growth medium of cultured Lycopersicon peruvianum cells. A possible mechanistic link between proton fluxes across the plasma membrane and the induction of defense genes was investigated by modulating plasma membrane H+-ATPase activity. Inhibitors of H+-ATPase (erythrosin B, diethyl stilbestrol, and vanadate) were found to alkalinize the growth medium of L. peruvianum cell cultures and to induce wound response genes in whole tomato plants. Conversely, an activator of the H+-ATPase (fusicoccin) acidified the growth medium of L. peruvianum cell cultures and suppressed systemin-induced medium alkalinization. Likewise, in fusicoccin-treated tomato plants, the wound- and systemin-triggered accumulation of wound-responsive mRNAs was found to be suppressed. However, fusicoccin treatment of tomato plants led to the accumulation of salicylic acid and the expression of pathogenesis-related genes. Apparently, the wound and pathogen defense signaling pathways are differentially regulated by changes in the proton electrochemical gradient across the plasma membrane. In addition, alkalinization of the L. peruvianum cell culture medium was found to depend on the influx of Ca2+ and the activity of a protein kinase. Reversible protein phosphorylation was also shown to be involved in the induction of wound response genes. The plasma membrane H+-ATPase as a possible target of a Ca2+-activated protein kinase and its role in defense signaling are discussed. PMID:9927643

  7. Chromosome-level genome map provides insights into diverse defense mechanisms in the medicinal fungus Ganoderma sinense

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yingjie; Xu, Jiang; Sun, Chao; Zhou, Shiguo; Xu, Haibin; Nelson, David R.; Qian, Jun; Song, Jingyuan; Luo, Hongmei; Xiang, Li; Li, Ying; Xu, Zhichao; Ji, Aijia; Wang, Lizhi; Lu, Shanfa; Hayward, Alice; Sun, Wei; Li, Xiwen; Schwartz, David C.; Wang, Yitao; Chen, Shilin

    2015-01-01

    Fungi have evolved powerful genomic and chemical defense systems to protect themselves against genetic destabilization and other organisms. However, the precise molecular basis involved in fungal defense remain largely unknown in Basidiomycetes. Here the complete genome sequence, as well as DNA methylation patterns and small RNA transcriptomes, was analyzed to provide a holistic overview of secondary metabolism and defense processes in the model medicinal fungus, Ganoderma sinense. We reported the 48.96 Mb genome sequence of G. sinense, consisting of 12 chromosomes and encoding 15,688 genes. More than thirty gene clusters involved in the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites, as well as a large array of genes responsible for their transport and regulation were highlighted. In addition, components of genome defense mechanisms, namely repeat-induced point mutation (RIP), DNA methylation and small RNA-mediated gene silencing, were revealed in G. sinense. Systematic bioinformatic investigation of the genome and methylome suggested that RIP and DNA methylation combinatorially maintain G. sinense genome stability by inactivating invasive genetic material and transposable elements. The elucidation of the G. sinense genome and epigenome provides an unparalleled opportunity to advance our understanding of secondary metabolism and fungal defense mechanisms. PMID:26046933

  8. Brain activation of the defensive and appetitive survival systems in obsessive compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Óscar F; Soares, José Miguel; Carvalho, Sandra; Leite, Jorge; Ganho, Ana; Fernandes-Gonçalves, Ana; Frank, Brandon; Pocinho, Fernando; Relvas, João; Carracedo, Angel; Sampaio, Adriana

    2015-06-01

    Several studies have shown that basic emotions are responsible for a significant enhancement of early visual processes and increased activation in visual processing brain regions. It may be possible that the cognitive uncertainty and repeated behavioral checking evident in Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) is due to the existence of abnormalities in basic survival circuits, particularly those associated with the visual processing of the physical characteristics of emotional-laden stimuli. The objective of the present study was to test if patients with OCD show evidence of altered basic survival circuits, particularly those associated with the visual processing of the physical characteristics of emotional stimuli. Fifteen patients with OCD and 12 healthy controls underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging acquisition while being exposed to emotional pictures, with different levels of arousal, intended to trigger the defensive and appetitive basic survival circuits. Overall, the present results seem to indicate dissociation in the activity of the defense and appetitive survival systems in OCD. Results suggest that the clinical group reacts to basic threat with a strong activation of the defensive system mobilizing widespread brain networks (i.e., frontal, temporal, occipital-parietal, and subcortical nucleus) and blocking the activation of the appetitive system when facing positive emotional triggers from the initial stages of visual processing (i.e., superior occipital gyrus). PMID:24760279

  9. Secretions from the ventral eversible gland of Spodoptera exigua caterpillars activate defense-related genes and induce emission of volatile organic compounds in tomato, Solanum lycopersicum

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Plant induced defense against herbivory are generally associated with metabolic costs that result in the allocation of photosynthates from growth and reproduction to the synthesis of defense compounds. Therefore, it is essential that plants are capable of sensing and differentiating mechanical injury from herbivore injury. Studies have shown that oral secretions (OS) from caterpillars contain elicitors of induced plant responses. However, studies that shows whether these elicitors originated from salivary glands or from other organs associated with feeding, such as the ventral eversible gland (VEG) are limited. Here, we tested the hypothesis that the secretions from the VEG gland of Spodoptera exigua caterpillars contain elicitors that induce plant defenses by regulating the expression of genes involved in the biosynthesis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and other defense-related genes. To test this hypothesis, we quantified and compared the activity of defense-related enzymes, transcript levels of defense-related genes and VOC emission in tomato plants damaged by S. exigua caterpillars with the VEG intact (VEGI) versus plants damaged by caterpillars with the VEG ablated (VEGA). Results The quantified defense-related enzymes (i.e. peroxidase, polyphenol oxidase, and lipoxigenase) were expressed in significantly higher amounts in plants damaged by VEGI caterpillars than in plants damaged by VEGA caterpillars. Similarly, the genes that encode for the key enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of jasmonic acid and terpene synthase genes that regulate production of terpene VOCs, were up-regulated in plants damaged by VEGI caterpillars. Moreover, the OS of VEGA caterpillars were less active in inducing the expression of defense genes in tomato plants. Increased emissions of VOCs were detected in the headspace of plants damaged by VEGI caterpillars compared to plants damaged by VEGA caterpillars. Conclusion These results suggest that the VEG of S. exigua

  10. Evolution and development of gastropod larval shell morphology: experimental evidence for mechanical defense and repair.

    PubMed

    Hickman, C S

    2001-01-01

    The structural diversity of gastropod veliger larvae offers an instructive counterpoint to the view of larval forms as conservative archetypes. Larval structure, function, and development are fine-tuned for survival in the plankton. Accordingly, the study of larval adaptation provides an important perspective for evolutionary-developmental biology as an integrated science. Patterns of breakage and repair in the field, as well as patterns of breakage in arranged encounters with zooplankton under laboratory conditions, are two powerful sources of data on the adaptive significance of morphological and microsculptural features of the gastropod larval shell. Shells of the planktonic veliger larvae of the caenogastropod Nassarius paupertus [GOULD] preserve multiple repaired breaks, attributed to unsuccessful zooplankton predators. In culture, larvae isolated from concentrated zooplankton samples rapidly repaired broken apertural margins and restored the "ideal" apertural form, in which an elaborate projection or "beak" covers the head of the swimming veliger. When individuals with repaired apertures were reintroduced to a concentrated mixture of potential zooplankton predators, the repaired margins were rapidly chipped and broken back. The projecting beak of the larval shell is the first line of mechanical defense, covering the larval head and mouth and potentially the most vulnerable part of the shell to breakage. Patterns of mechanical failure show that spiral ridges do reinforce the beak and retard breakage. The capacity for rapid shell repair and regeneration, and the evolution of features that resist or retard mechanical damage, may play a more prominent role than previously thought in enhancing the ability of larvae to survive in the plankton. PMID:11256430

  11. Apoptosis as a host defense mechanism in Crassostrea virginica and its modulation by Perkinsus marinus.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Francis M; Foster, Brent; Grewal, Snimar; Sokolova, Inna M

    2010-08-01

    Dermo disease caused by the obligatory intracellular protozoan Perkinsus marinus causes extensive oyster mortalities leading to tremendous losses in the oyster industry and damage to estuarine ecosystems. To better understand the mechanisms of the parasite's evasion of the host immune defense system, we have investigated the molecular mechanisms of P.marinus-induced inhibition of apoptosis in oyster cells as a potential parasite's survival strategy. We found that P. marinus modulates apoptosis of oyster immune cells (hemocytes) in a way that may help the parasite to establish infection. We found an increase in apoptosis in the initial stages of infection in vitro and in vivo, consistent with a host response to this intracellular parasite. During infection with highly virulent strains of P. marinus, this was followed by suppression and a return of apoptosis to basal levels 8-24 h post-infection, strongly indicating the parasite-induced inhibition of the immune response. In contrast, during infections with intermediate or low virulence strains of P. marinus, a transient suppression of apoptosis 4-8 h post-infection was followed by sustained elevation of hemocyte apoptosis at later stages, indicating that hemocytes were able to overcome the parasite-induced suppression and successfully combat the infection. Studies of the mechanisms of P. marinus-induced apoptosis indicated that the early post-infection stimulation of apoptosis is caspase-independent. However, this process can be driven (although to a lesser degree) by the killed parasite, suggesting that oyster hemocytes respond to cell surface molecules of P. marinus. Overall, this study provides novel insights into pathogen-induced modulation of apoptosis and its role in parasite virulence and establishment of infections. PMID:20371290

  12. The mtDNA NARP mutation activates the actin-Nrf2 signaling of antioxidant defenses

    SciTech Connect

    Dassa, Emmanuel Philippe; Paupe, Vincent; Goncalves, Sergio; Rustin, Pierre

    2008-04-11

    An efficient handling of superoxides by antioxidant defenses is a crucial issue for cells with respiratory chain deficient mitochondria. We used human cultured skin fibroblasts to delineate the mechanism controlling the expression of antioxidant defenses in the case of a severe ATPase deficiency resulting from an 8993T>G mutation in the mitochondrial ATPase6 gene. We observed the nuclear translocation of the transcription factor Nrf2 associated with thinning of the actin stress fibers. The mobilization of the Nrf2 signaling pathway could be mimicked by a chemical blockade of the ATPase with a specific inhibitor, oligomycin. Interestingly enough, Nrf2 nuclear translocation was not observed in the case of a severe cytochrome oxidase deficiency, indicating that studying the status of this signaling pathway could throw some light on the importance of the oxidative insult associated with different respiratory chain defects.

  13. Activation of defense response pathways by OGs and Flg22 elicitors in Arabidopsis seedlings

    PubMed Central

    Denoux, Carine; Galletti, Roberta; Mammarella, Nicole; Gopalan, Suresh; Werck, Danièle; De Lorenzo, Giulia; Ferrari, Simone; Ausubel, Frederick M.; Dewdney, Julia

    2010-01-01

    We carried out transcriptional profiling analysis in 10 day-old Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings treated with oligogalacturonides (OGs), oligosaccharides derived from the plant cell wall, or the bacterial flagellin peptide Flg22, general elicitors of the basal defense response in plants. Although detected by different receptors, both OGs and Flg22 trigger a fast and transient response that is both similar and comprehensive, and characterized by activation of early stages of multiple defense signaling pathways, particularly JA-associated processes. However, the response to Flg22 is stronger in both the number of genes differentially expressed and the amplitude of change. The magnitude of induction of individual genes is in both cases dose dependent, but even at very high concentrations, OGs do not induce a response that is as comprehensive as that seen with Flg22. While high doses of either microbe-associated molecular pattern (MAMP) elicit a late response that includes activation of senescence processes, SA-dependent secretory pathway genes and PR1 expression are substantially induced only by Flg22. These results suggest a lower threshold for activation of early responses than for sustained or SA-mediated late defenses. Expression patterns of aminocyclopropane-carboxylate synthase genes also implicate ethylene biosynthesis in regulation of the late innate immune response. PMID:19825551

  14. Cosmic bombardment V: Threat object-dispersing approaches to active planetary defense

    SciTech Connect

    Teller, E.; Wood, L. |; Ishikawa, M. |; Hyde, R.

    1995-05-24

    Earth-impacting comets and asteroids with diameters {approx}0.03 - 10 km pose the greatest threats to the terrestrial biosphere in terms of impact frequency-weighted impact consequences, and thus are of most concern to designers of active planetary defenses. Specific gravitational binding energies of such objects range from 10{sup -7} to 10{sup -2} J/gm, and are small compared with the specific energies of 1x10{sup 3} to 3x10{sup 3} J/gm required to vaporize objects of typical composition or the specific energies required to pulverize them, which are 10{sup -1} to 10 J/gm. All of these are small compared to the specific kinetic energy of these objects in the Earth- centered frame, which is 2x10{sup 5} to 2x10{sup 6} J/gm. The prospect naturally arises of negating all such threats by deflecting, pulverizing or vaporizing the objects. Pulverization-with-dispersal is an attractive option of reasonable defensive robustness. Examples of such equipments - which employ no explosives of any type - are given. Vaporization is the maximally robust defensive option, and may be invoked to negate threat objects not observed until little time is left until Earth-strike, and pulverization-with-dispersal has proven inadequate. Physically larger threats may be vaporized with nuclear explosives. No contemporary technical means of any kind appear capable of directly dispersing the -100 km diameter scale Charon- class cometary objects recently observed in the outer solar system, although such objects may be deflected to defensively useful extents. Means of implementing defenses of each of these types are proposed for specificity, and areas for optimization noted. Biospheric impacts of threat object debris are briefly considered, for bounding purposes. Experiments are suggested on cometary and asteroidal objects.

  15. Defense Mechanisms Reported by Patients with Borderline Personality Disorder and Axis II Comparison Subjects Over 16 Years of Prospective Follow-up: Description and Prediction of Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Zanarini, Mary C.; Frankenburg, Frances R.; Fitzmaurice, Garrett

    2012-01-01

    Objective This study assessed the defensive functioning of 290 borderline patients and compared it to that of 72 patients with other forms of axis II psychopathology over 16 years of prospective follow-up. It also assessed the relationship between time-varying defenses and recovery from borderline personality disorder. Method The Defense Style Questionnaire, a self-report measure with demonstrated criterion validity and internal consistency, was initially administered at study entry. It was readministered at eight contiguous two-year long follow-up periods. Results Borderline patients had significantly lower scores than axis II comparison subjects on one mature defense mechanism (suppression) and significantly higher scores on seven of the other 18 defenses studied. More specifically, borderline patients had significantly higher scores on one neurotic-level defense (undoing), four immature defenses (acting out, emotional hypochondriasis, passive aggression, and projection), and two image-distorting/borderline defenses (projective identification and splitting). In terms of change, borderline patients were found to have had significant improvement on 13 of the 19 defenses studied. More specifically, they had significantly higher scores over time on one mature defense (anticipation) and significantly lower scores on two neurotic defenses (isolation and undoing), all immature defenses, and all image-distorting/borderline defenses except primitive idealization. In addition, four time-varying defense mechanisms were found to predict time-to-recovery: humor, acting out, emotional hypochondriasis, and projection. Conclusions Taken together, the results of this study suggest that the longitudinal defensive functioning of borderline patients is both distinct and improves substantially over time. They also suggest that immature defenses are the best predictors of time-to-recovery. PMID:23223866

  16. A novel mechanism for NETosis provides antimicrobial defense at the oral mucosa.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Tirthankar; Sjögren, Jonathan; Kahn, Fredrik; Abu-Humaidan, Anas H A; Fisker, Niels; Assing, Kristian; Mörgelin, Matthias; Bengtsson, Anders A; Borregaard, Niels; Sørensen, Ole E

    2015-10-29

    Neutrophils are essential for host defense at the oral mucosa and neutropenia or functional neutrophil defects lead to disordered oral homeostasis. We found that neutrophils from the oral mucosa harvested from morning saliva had released neutrophil extracellular traps (undergone NETosis) in vivo. The NETosis was mediated through intracellular signals elicited by binding of sialyl Lewis(X) present on salival mucins to l-selectin on neutrophils. This led to rapid loss of nuclear membrane and intracellular release of granule proteins with subsequent neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) release independent of elastase and reduced NAD phosphate-oxidase activation. The saliva-induced NETs were more DNase-resistant and had higher capacity to bind and kill bacteria than NETs induced by bacteria or by phorbol-myristate acetate. Furthermore, saliva/sialyl Lewis(X) mediated signaling enhanced intracellular killing of bacteria by neutrophils. Saliva from patients with aphthous ulcers and Behçet disease prone to oral ulcers failed to induce NETosis, but for different reasons it demonstrated that disordered homeostasis in the oral cavity may result in deficient saliva-mediated NETosis. PMID:26243777

  17. Iron acquisition from Pseudomonas aeruginosa siderophores by human phagocytes: an additional mechanism of host defense through iron sequestration?

    PubMed

    Britigan, B E; Rasmussen, G T; Olakanmi, O; Cox, C D

    2000-03-01

    Chelation of iron to iron-binding proteins is a strategy of host defense. Some pathogens counter this via the secretion of low-molecular-weight iron-chelating agents (siderophores). Human phagocytes possess a high-capacity mechanism for iron acquisition from low-molecular-weight iron chelates. Efficient acquisition and sequestration of iron bound to bacterial siderophores by host phagocytes could provide a secondary mechanism to limit microbial access to iron. In the present work we report that human neutrophils, macrophages, and myeloid cell lines can acquire iron from the two Pseudomonas aeruginosa siderophores. Analogous to iron acquisition from other low-molecular-weight chelates, iron acquisition from the siderophores is ATP independent, induced by multivalent cationic metals, and unaffected by inhibitors of endocytosis and pinocytosis. In vivo, this process could serve as an additional mechanism of host defense to limit iron availability to invading siderophore-producing microbes. PMID:10678937

  18. Iron Acquisition from Pseudomonas aeruginosa Siderophores by Human Phagocytes: an Additional Mechanism of Host Defense through Iron Sequestration?

    PubMed Central

    Britigan, Bradley E.; Rasmussen, George T.; Olakanmi, Oyebode; Cox, Charles D.

    2000-01-01

    Chelation of iron to iron-binding proteins is a strategy of host defense. Some pathogens counter this via the secretion of low-molecular-weight iron-chelating agents (siderophores). Human phagocytes possess a high-capacity mechanism for iron acquisition from low-molecular-weight iron chelates. Efficient acquisition and sequestration of iron bound to bacterial siderophores by host phagocytes could provide a secondary mechanism to limit microbial access to iron. In the present work we report that human neutrophils, macrophages, and myeloid cell lines can acquire iron from the two Pseudomonas aeruginosa siderophores. Analogous to iron acquisition from other low-molecular-weight chelates, iron acquisition from the siderophores is ATP independent, induced by multivalent cationic metals, and unaffected by inhibitors of endocytosis and pinocytosis. In vivo, this process could serve as an additional mechanism of host defense to limit iron availability to invading siderophore-producing microbes. PMID:10678937

  19. Assessment of the fiscal year 1997 Department of Defense budget and program activities for domestic defense against weapons of mass destruction. Master`s thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Guenther, G.R.

    1997-12-01

    This thesis examines Department of Defense involvement in U.S. preparedness to manage the consequences of a nuclear, radiological, biological, or chemical terrorist attack against its cities. It analyzes the establishment and implementation of the Defense Against Weapons of Mass Destruction Act of 1996 which directed the Department of Defense to assist in the training of state and local emergency response agencies involved in consequence management activities. The historical analysis focuses on the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction since the dissolution of the Soviet Union, major terrorist incidents since 1993, international standards, and legislative and executive efforts undertaken to combat terrorism up to 1996. The $150 million Nunn Lugar Domenici amendment to the FY-97 National Defense Authorization Bill is examined in detail from introduction on the Senate floor to eventual passage and enactment. Problems and policy issues associated with resourcing and implementing the resulting Domestic Preparedness Program are treated. Although the DoD was given responsibility for implementing city training, an interagency effort ensued involving the Public Health Service, Environmental Protection Agency, Federal Bureau of Investigation, Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Energy, and others. Potential weaknesses may materialize due to several characteristics of the Domestic Preparedness Program, including its novelty and uniqueness, the unorthodox legislative process by which it was established, and its complex organizational structure and temporary nature.

  20. Sex-dependent liver colonization of human melanoma in SCID mice--role of host defense mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Dobos, Judit; Mohos, Anita; Tóvári, József; Rásó, Erzsébet; Lőrincz, Tamás; Zádori, Gergely; Tímár, József; Ladányi, Andrea

    2013-04-01

    The possibility that endocrine factors may influence the clinical course of malignant melanoma is suggested by the superior survival data of women. In preclinical models we observed a higher rate of colony formation by human melanoma cells in male compared to female SCID mice, but only in the case of the liver and not in other organs. The gender difference could be seen at an early phase of colony formation. On the other hand, in our human melanoma cell lines we failed to detect steroid receptor protein expression, and treatment with sex hormones did not considerably influence their in vitro behavior. Investigating the possible contribution of host cells to the observed gender difference, we performed in vivo blocking experiments applying pretreatment of the animals with Kupffer cell inhibitor gadolinium chloride and the NK cell inhibitor anti-asialo GM1 antibody. While Kupffer cell blockade enhanced melanoma liver colonization equally in the two sexes, a more prominent increase was observed in female than in male mice in the case of NK cell inhibition. Further supporting the importance of NK cells in the lower liver colonization efficiency of melanoma cells in females, gender difference in colony formation was lost in NSG mice lacking NK activity. Although in humans no organ selectivity of gender difference in melanoma progression has been observed according to data in the literature, our results possibly indicate a contribution of natural host defense mechanisms to gender difference in survival of patients with melanoma or other tumor types as well. PMID:23203681

  1. A mechanical plant defense defines the opening of a phenological window for gall induction by Asphondylia aucubae (Cecidomyiidae: Diptera).

    PubMed

    Imai, Kensuke; Ohsaki, Naota

    2009-04-01

    Many insect herbivores can only use hosts during a specific phenological stage, i.e., a phenological window. Previous studies have primarily examined the effects of these windows on insect herbivores, but relatively little is known about the mechanisms controlling the phenological windows. In most gall insect systems, phenological windows have been attributed to the short duration of physiologically active plant tissues that induce gall formation (reactive plant tissue). In the fruit gall midge, Asphondylia aucubae Yukawa and Ohsaki, and the host plant (i.e., Aucuba japonica) system, the disappearance of reactive plant tissue closes the phenological window, but its presence does not define the opening of the window. The hard endocarp of the fruit covers most potential oviposition sites just before the midge emergence season, but decreases in proportional cover during the emergence season. We experimentally manipulated the timing of oviposition relative to fruit development. Midges that emerged earliest and attacked fruits during their earliest developmental stages were unable to oviposit because of intact, hard endocarps, whereas their counterparts that emerged later could oviposit more readily through cracks in the endocarp. We noted possible oviposition avoidance behavior and the necessity of more frequent (repeated) ovipositor insertions to intensively stimulate the decreased reactive tissues during the latter half of the emergence season. Overall, our results indicated that the fragmentation of the defensive, hard endocarp of the host plant defines the opening of the phenological window in this plant-herbivore system. PMID:19389289

  2. Dual ligand/receptor interactions activate urothelial defenses against uropathogenic E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yan; Mémet, Sylvie; Saban, Ricardo; Kong, Xiangpeng; Aprikian, Pavel; Sokurenko, Evgeni; Sun, Tung-Tien; Wu, Xue-Ru

    2015-01-01

    During urinary tract infection (UTI), the second most common bacterial infection, dynamic interactions take place between uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) and host urothelial cells. While significant strides have been made in the identification of the virulence factors of UPEC, our understanding of how the urothelial cells mobilize innate defenses against the invading UPEC remains rudimentary. Here we show that mouse urothelium responds to the adhesion of type 1-fimbriated UPEC by rapidly activating the canonical NF-κB selectively in terminally differentiated, superficial (umbrella) cells. This activation depends on a dual ligand/receptor system, one between FimH adhesin and uroplakin Ia and another between lipopolysaccharide and Toll-like receptor 4. When activated, all the nuclei (up to 11) of a multinucleated umbrella cell are affected, leading to significant amplification of proinflammatory signals. Intermediate and basal cells of the urothelium undergo NF-κB activation only if the umbrella cells are detached or if the UPEC persistently express type 1-fimbriae. Inhibition of NF-κB prevents the urothelium from clearing the intracellular bacterial communities, leading to prolonged bladder colonization by UPEC. Based on these data, we propose a model of dual ligand/receptor system in innate urothelial defenses against UPEC. PMID:26549759

  3. Analysis of the Molecular Dialogue Between Gray Mold (Botrytis cinerea) and Grapevine (Vitis vinifera) Reveals a Clear Shift in Defense Mechanisms During Berry Ripening.

    PubMed

    Kelloniemi, Jani; Trouvelot, Sophie; Héloir, Marie-Claire; Simon, Adeline; Dalmais, Bérengère; Frettinger, Patrick; Cimerman, Agnès; Fermaud, Marc; Roudet, Jean; Baulande, Sylvain; Bruel, Christophe; Choquer, Mathias; Couvelard, Linhdavanh; Duthieuw, Mathilde; Ferrarini, Alberto; Flors, Victor; Le Pêcheur, Pascal; Loisel, Elise; Morgant, Guillaume; Poussereau, Nathalie; Pradier, Jean-Marc; Rascle, Christine; Trdá, Lucie; Poinssot, Benoit; Viaud, Muriel

    2015-11-01

    Mature grapevine berries at the harvesting stage (MB) are very susceptible to the gray mold fungus Botrytis cinerea, while veraison berries (VB) are not. We conducted simultaneous microscopic and transcriptomic analyses of the pathogen and the host to investigate the infection process developed by B. cinerea on MB versus VB, and the plant defense mechanisms deployed to stop the fungus spreading. On the pathogen side, our genome-wide transcriptomic data revealed that B. cinerea genes upregulated during infection of MB are enriched in functional categories related to necrotrophy, such as degradation of the plant cell wall, proteolysis, membrane transport, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and detoxification. Quantitative-polymerase chain reaction on a set of representative genes related to virulence and microscopic observations further demonstrated that the infection is also initiated on VB but is stopped at the penetration stage. On the plant side, genome-wide transcriptomic analysis and metabolic data revealed a defense pathway switch during berry ripening. In response to B. cinerea inoculation, VB activated a burst of ROS, the salicylate-dependent defense pathway, the synthesis of the resveratrol phytoalexin, and cell-wall strengthening. On the contrary, in infected MB, the jasmonate-dependent pathway was activated, which did not stop the fungal necrotrophic process. PMID:26267356

  4. Membrane-active host defense peptides – Challenges and perspectives for the development of novel anticancer drugs

    PubMed Central

    Riedl, Sabrina; Zweytick, Dagmar; Lohner, Karl

    2011-01-01

    Although much progress has been achieved in the development of cancer therapies in recent decades, problems continue to arise particularly with respect to chemotherapy due to resistance to and low specificity of currently available drugs. Host defense peptides as effector molecules of innate immunity represent a novel strategy for the development of alternative anticancer drug molecules. These cationic amphipathic peptides are able to discriminate between neoplastic and non-neoplastic cells interacting specifically with negatively charged membrane components such as phosphatidylserine (PS), sialic acid or heparan sulfate, which differ between cancer and non-cancer cells. Furthermore, an increased number of microvilli has been found on cancer cells leading to an increase in cell surface area, which may in turn enhance their susceptibility to anticancer peptides. Thus, part of this review will be devoted to the differences in membrane composition of non-cancer and cancer cells with a focus on the exposure of PS on the outer membrane. Normally, surface exposed PS triggers apoptosis, which can however be circumvented by cancer cells by various means. Host defense peptides, which selectively target differences between cancer and non-cancer cell membranes, have excellent tumor tissue penetration and can thus reach the site of both primary tumor and distant metastasis. Since these molecules kill their target cells rapidly and mainly by perturbing the integrity of the plasma membrane, resistance is less likely to occur. Hence, a chapter will also describe studies related to the molecular mechanisms of membrane damage as well as alternative non-membrane related mechanisms. In vivo studies have demonstrated that host defense peptides display anticancer activity against a number of cancers such as e.g. leukemia, prostate, ascite and ovarian tumors, yet so far none of these peptides has made it on the market. Nevertheless, optimization of host defense peptides using various

  5. Zinc triggers signaling mechanisms and defense responses promoting resistance to Alternaria brassicicola in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Martos, Soledad; Gallego, Berta; Cabot, Catalina; Llugany, Mercè; Barceló, Juan; Poschenrieder, Charlotte

    2016-08-01

    According to the elemental defense hypothesis the accumulation of trace elements by plants may substitute for organic defenses, while the joint effects hypothesis proposes that trace elements and organic defenses can have additive or synergistic effects against pathogens or herbivores. To evaluate these hypotheses the response of the pathosystem Alternaria brassicicola-Arabidopsis thaliana to control (2μM) and surplus (12μM) Zn was evaluated using the camalexin deficient mutant pad3-1 and mtp1-1, a mutant with impaired Zn vacuolar storage, along with the corresponding wildtypes. In vitro, a 50% inhibition of fungal growth was achieved by 440μM Zn. A. thaliana leaves could accumulate equivalent concentrations without harm. In fact, surplus Zn enhanced the resistance of A. thaliana to fungal attack in Columbia (Col-0), Wassilewskija (WS), and mtp1-1. However, surplus Zn was unable to protect pad3-1 demonstrating that Zn cannot substitute for camalexin, the main organic defense in A. thaliana. High, non phytotoxic leaf Zn concentrations enhanced the resistance to A. brassicicola of A. thaliana genotypes able to produce camalexin. This was mainly due to Zn-induced enhancement of the JA/ETH signaling pathway leading to enhanced PAD3 expression. These results support the joint effects hypothesis and highlight the importance of adequate Zn supply for reinforced pathogen resistance. PMID:27297986

  6. Activation of Molecular Signatures for Antimicrobial and Innate Defense Responses in Skin with Transglutaminase 1 Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Uchiyama, Ryosuke; Jitsukawa, Orie; Yamanishi, Kiyofumi

    2016-01-01

    Mutations of the transglutaminase 1 gene (TGM1) are a major cause of autosomal recessive congenital ichthyoses (ARCIs) that are associated with defects in skin barrier structure and function. However, the molecular processes induced by the transglutaminase 1 deficiency are not fully understood. The aim of the present study was to uncover those processes by analysis of cutaneous molecular signatures. Gene expression profiles of wild-type and Tgm1–/–epidermis were assessed using microarrays. Gene ontology analysis of the data showed that genes for innate defense responses were up-regulated in Tgm1–/–epidermis. Based on that result, the induction of Il1b and antimicrobial peptide genes, S100a8, S100a9, Defb14, Camp, Slpi, Lcn2, Ccl20 and Wfdc12, was confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR. A protein array revealed that levels of IL-1β, G-CSF, GM-CSF, CXCL1, CXCL2, CXCL9 and CCL2 were increased in Tgm1–/–skin. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) ligand genes, Hbegf, Areg and Ereg, were activated in Tgm1–/–epidermis. Furthermore, the antimicrobial activity of an epidermal extract from Tgm1–/–mice was significantly increased against both Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. In the epidermis of ichthyosiform skins from patients with TGM1 mutations, S100A8/9 was strongly positive. The expression of those antimicrobial and defense response genes was also increased in the lesional skin of an ARCI patient with TGM1 mutations. These results suggest that the up-regulation of molecular signatures for antimicrobial and innate defense responses is characteristic of skin with a transglutaminase 1 deficiency, and this autonomous process might be induced to reinforce the defective barrier function of the skin. PMID:27442430

  7. Expression of Allene Oxide Synthase Determines Defense Gene Activation in Tomato1

    PubMed Central

    Sivasankar, Sobhana; Sheldrick, Bay; Rothstein, Steven J.

    2000-01-01

    Allene oxide synthase (AOS; hydroperoxide dehydratase; EC 4.2.1.92) catalyzes the first step in the biosynthesis of jasmonic acid from lipoxygenase-derived hydroperoxides of free fatty acids. Using the AOS cDNA from tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum), in which the role of jasmonic acid in wound-induced defense gene activation has been best described, we examined the kinetics of AOS induction in response to wounding and elicitors, in parallel with that of the wound-inducible PIN II (proteinase inhibitor II) gene. AOS was induced in leaves by wounding, systemin, 12-oxophytodienoic acid, and methyl jasmonate. The levels of AOS mRNA started declining by 4 h after induction, whereas the levels of PIN II mRNA continued to increase up to 20 h after induction. Salicylic acid inhibited AOS and PIN II expression, and the addition of 12-oxophytodienoic acid or methyl jasmonate did not prevent the inhibition of PIN II expression in the presence of salicylic acid. Ethylene induced the expression of AOS, but the presence of ethylene alone did not produce an optimal induction of PIN II. The addition of silver thiosulfate, an ethylene action inhibitor, prevented the wound-induced expression of both AOS and PIN II. Products of hydroperoxide lyase affected neither AOS nor PIN II, but induced expression of prosystemin. Based on these results, we propose an updated model for defense gene activation in tomato. PMID:10759530

  8. A background traffic activity analysis in a canonical NATO (North Atlantic Treaty Organization) defense

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, J.N.; Tooman, T.P.

    1989-04-01

    A canonical defense study in a NATO brigade sector on the northern flank of the US V Corps sector in the Federal Republic of Germany is wargamed to depict the expected vehicular movements during a 24 hour time period. All NATO and Warsaw Pact situations and forces played intentionally portray a ''normal'' battlefield situation, that is one in which events occur according to the established tactics and doctrines for both NATO and WP forces. Activity details which are almost always ignored in broader studies are included. The periodic displacement of high value units (e.g., artillery, air defense, headquarters and target acquisition) to preclude enemy fixing and targeting; the resupply down to company and occasionally platoon level of ammunition, petroleum, rations, etc.; the movement of commanders and staffs; the activity of combat engineers to include site preparation, construction and minefield emplacement; the action of reconnaissance and patrol units; the security of the rear area and POW processing; and the evacuation of casualties are analyzed. The resulting database records the position for every vehicle in both forces at each minute during the period of analysis and is thus an ideal framework for a variety of further studies, such as analyses of intelligence collection devices and modern ordinances. 9 refs., 30 figs., 9 tabs.

  9. ABA is an essential signal for plant resistance to pathogens affecting JA biosynthesis and the activation of plant defenses in Arabidopsis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant defense responses have been studied through a limited number of models that may have constrained our view of plant-pathogen interactions. Discovery of new defense mechanisms should be favored by broadening the range of pathogens under study. With this aim, Arabidopsis defense response to the ‘...

  10. Brief Report: Self-Harm Is Associated with Immature Defense Mechanisms but Not Substance Use in a Nonclinical Scottish Adolescent Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brody, Stuart; Carson, Carron Maryjane

    2012-01-01

    It has been unclear whether adolescent deliberate self-harm (DSH) is more associated with substance use or with characterological impairments. Multivariate determination of (N = 114 Scottish adolescents) ever engaging in DSH (Youth Risk Behavior Survey) from alcohol use, other substance use, and immature defense mechanism use (Defense Style…

  11. A shared mechanism of defense against predators and parasites: chitin regulation and its implications for life-history theory

    PubMed Central

    Beckerman, Andrew P; de Roij, Job; Dennis, Stuart R; Little, Tom J

    2013-01-01

    Defenses against predators and parasites offer excellent illustrations of adaptive phenotypic plasticity. Despite vast knowledge about such induced defenses, they have been studied largely in isolation, which is surprising, given that predation and parasitism are ubiquitous and act simultaneously in the wild. This raises the possibility that victims must trade-off responses to predation versus parasitism. Here, we propose that arthropod responses to predators and parasites will commonly be based on the endocrine regulation of chitin synthesis and degradation. The proposal is compelling because many inducible defenses are centered on temporal or spatial modifications of chitin-rich structures. Moreover, we show how the chitin synthesis pathway ends in a split to carapace or gut chitin, and how this form of molecular regulation can be incorporated into theory on life-history trade-offs, specifically the Y-model. Our hypothesis thus spans several biological scales to address advice from Stearns that “Endocrine mechanisms may prove to be only the tip of an iceberg of physiological mechanisms that modulate the expression of genetic covariance”. PMID:24455141

  12. NODULES WITH ACTIVATED DEFENSE 1 is required for maintenance of rhizobial endosymbiosis in Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Yu, Haixiang; Luo, Li; Duan, Liujian; Cai, Liuyang; He, Xinxing; Wen, Jiangqi; Mysore, Kirankumar S; Li, Guoliang; Xiao, Aifang; Duanmu, Deqiang; Cao, Yangrong; Hong, Zonglie; Zhang, Zhongming

    2016-10-01

    The symbiotic interaction between legume plants and rhizobia results in the formation of root nodules, in which symbiotic plant cells host and harbor thousands of nitrogen-fixing rhizobia. Here, a Medicago truncatula nodules with activated defense 1 (nad1) mutant was identified using reverse genetics methods. The mutant phenotype was characterized using cell and molecular biology approaches. An RNA-sequencing technique was used to analyze the transcriptomic reprogramming of nad1 mutant nodules. In the nad1 mutant plants, rhizobial infection and propagation in infection threads are normal, whereas rhizobia and their symbiotic plant cells become necrotic immediately after rhizobia are released from infection threads into symbiotic cells of nodules. Defense-associated responses were detected in nad1 nodules. NAD1 is specifically present in root nodule symbiosis plants with the exception of Morus notabilis, and the transcript is highly induced in nodules. NAD1 encodes a small uncharacterized protein with two predicted transmembrane helices and is localized at the endoplasmic reticulum. Our data demonstrate a positive role for NAD1 in the maintenance of rhizobial endosymbiosis during nodulation. PMID:27245091

  13. Tetraploidization of diploid Dioscorea results in activation of the antioxidant defense system and increased heat tolerance.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Yi; Hu, Chun-Gen; Yao, Jia-Ling

    2010-01-15

    Polyploidy is reported to show increased tolerance to environmental stress. In this work, tetraploid plants of Dioscorea zingiberensis were obtained by colchicine treatment of shoots propagated in vitro. The highest tetraploid induction rate was achieved by treatment with 0.15% colchicine for 24h. Diploid and tetraploid plants were exposed to normal (28 degrees C) and high temperature (42 degrees C) for 5d during which physiological indices were measured. Compared with diploid plants, relative electrolyte leakage and contents of malondialdehyde, superoxide anions and hydrogen peroxide were lower in tetraploids, while activities of antioxidant enzymes, such as superoxide dismutase, peroxidase, catalase, ascorbate peroxidase and glutathione reductase, were stimulated and antioxidants (ascorbic acid and glutathione) were maintained at high concentrations. These results indicate that tetraploid plants possess a stronger antioxidant defense system and increased heat tolerance. PMID:19692145

  14. Defensive activation during the rubber hand illusion: Ownership versus proprioceptive drift.

    PubMed

    Riemer, Martin; Bublatzky, Florian; Trojan, Jörg; Alpers, Georg W

    2015-07-01

    A strong link between body perception and emotional experience has been proposed. To examine the interaction between body perception and anticipatory anxiety, two well-established paradigms were combined: The rubber hand illusion (RHI) and the threat-of-shock paradigm. An artificial hand and the participants' own hand (hidden from sight) were touched synchronously or asynchronously, while either threat-of-shock or safety was cued. Potentiated startle reflexes and enhanced skin conductance responses were observed during threat as compared to safety conditions, but threat conditions did not interact with illusory body perceptions. Thus, defense system activation was not modulated by altered body representations. Physiological responses increased with the sense of ownership for the artificial limb, but not with proprioceptive drift towards its location. The results indicate that ownership ratings and proprioceptive drift capture different aspects of the RHI. The study presents a new approach to investigate the relationship between body representations and emotional states. PMID:25960069

  15. Defensive sesquiterpenes from Senecio candidans and S. magellanicus, and their structure-activity relationships.

    PubMed

    Reina, Matías; Santana, Omar; Domínguez, Dulce M; Villarroel, Luis; Fajardo, Víctor; Rodríguez, Matías L; González-Coloma, Azucena

    2012-03-01

    Eleven eremophilanolides, 1-3 and 6-13, and two eremophilanes, 24 and 25, were isolated from Senecio candidans and S. magellanicus from the Magallanes Region (Chile). Compounds 2, 3, 9, and 10 have not been previously reported as natural products. Their structures were established by NMR spectroscopic analysis and chemical transformations. The X-ray analysis of compounds 11, 13, and 17 were also performed. Different semisynthetic analogs from eremophilanolide 11 were generated to carry out a structure-activity relationship study. Their possible plant defensive role was tested against herbivorous insects (Spodoptera littoralis, Rhopalosiphum padi, and Myzus persicae) and plants (Lactuca sativa). Additionally, their effects on insect (Sf9) and mammalian (CHO) cell lines were tested. PMID:22422530

  16. Auxin promotes susceptibility to Pseudomonas syringae via a mechanism independent of suppression of salicylic acid-mediated defenses.

    PubMed

    Mutka, Andrew M; Fawley, Stephen; Tsao, Tiffany; Kunkel, Barbara N

    2013-06-01

    Auxin is a key plant growth regulator that also impacts plant-pathogen interactions. Several lines of evidence suggest that the bacterial plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae manipulates auxin physiology in Arabidopsis thaliana to promote pathogenesis. Pseudomonas syringae strategies to alter host auxin biology include synthesis of the auxin indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and production of virulence factors that alter auxin responses in host cells. The application of exogenous auxin enhances disease caused by P. syringae strain DC3000. This is hypothesized to result from antagonism between auxin and salicylic acid (SA), a major regulator of plant defenses, but this hypothesis has not been tested in the context of infected plants. We further investigated the role of auxin during pathogenesis by examining the interaction of auxin and SA in the context of infection in plants with elevated endogenous levels of auxin. We demonstrated that elevated IAA biosynthesis in transgenic plants overexpressing the YUCCA 1 (YUC1) auxin biosynthesis gene led to enhanced susceptibility to DC3000. Elevated IAA levels did not interfere significantly with host defenses, as effector-triggered immunity was active in YUC1-overexpressing plants, and we observed only minor effects on SA levels and SA-mediated responses. Furthermore, a plant line carrying both the YUC1-overexpression transgene and the salicylic acid induction deficient 2 (sid2) mutation, which impairs SA synthesis, exhibited additive effects of enhanced susceptibility from both elevated auxin levels and impaired SA-mediated defenses. Thus, in IAA overproducing plants, the promotion of pathogen growth occurs independently of suppression of SA-mediated defenses. PMID:23521356

  17. Proteome and Phosphoproteome Characterization Reveals New Response and Defense Mechanisms of Brachypodium distachyon Leaves under Salt Stress*

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Dong-Wen; Subburaj, Saminathan; Cao, Min; Yan, Xing; Li, Xiaohui; Appels, Rudi; Sun, Dong-Fa; Ma, Wujun; Yan, Yue-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Salinity is a major abiotic stress affecting plant growth and development. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of salt response and defense in plants will help in efforts to improve the salt tolerance of crops. Brachypodium distachyon is a new model plant for wheat, barley, and several potential biofuel grasses. In the current study, proteome and phosphoproteome changes induced by salt stress were the focus. The Bd21 leaves were initially treated with salt in concentrations ranging from 80 to 320 mm and then underwent a recovery process prior to proteome analysis. A total of 80 differentially expressed protein spots corresponding to 60 unique proteins were identified. The sample treated with a median salt level of 240 mm and the control were selected for phosphopeptide purification using TiO2 microcolumns and LC-MS/MS for phosphoproteome analysis to identify the phosphorylation sites and phosphoproteins. A total of 1509 phosphoproteins and 2839 phosphorylation sites were identified. Among them, 468 phosphoproteins containing 496 phosphorylation sites demonstrated significant changes at the phosphorylation level. Nine phosphorylation motifs were extracted from the 496 phosphorylation sites. Of the 60 unique differentially expressed proteins, 14 were also identified as phosphoproteins. Many proteins and phosphoproteins, as well as potential signal pathways associated with salt response and defense, were found, including three 14-3-3s (GF14A, GF14B, and 14-3-3A) for signal transduction and several ABA signal-associated proteins such as ABF2, TRAB1, and SAPK8. Finally, a schematic salt response and defense mechanism in B. distachyon was proposed. PMID:24335353

  18. Pterostilbene Decreases the Antioxidant Defenses of Aggressive Cancer Cells In Vivo: A Physiological Glucocorticoids- and Nrf2-Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Benlloch, María; Obrador, Elena; Valles, Soraya L.; Rodriguez, María L.; Sirerol, J. Antoni; Alcácer, Javier; Pellicer, José A.; Salvador, Rosario; Cerdá, Concha; Sáez, Guillermo T.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Polyphenolic phytochemicals have anticancer properties. However, in mechanistic studies, lack of correlation with the bioavailable concentrations is a critical issue. Some reports had suggested that these molecules downregulate the stress response, which may affect growth and the antioxidant protection of malignant cells. Initially, we studied this potential underlying mechanism using different human melanomas (with genetic backgrounds correlating with most melanomas), growing in nude mice as xenografts, and pterostilbene (Pter, a natural dimethoxylated analog of resveratrol). Results: Intravenous administration of Pter decreased human melanoma growth in vivo. However, Pter, at levels measured within the tumors, did not affect melanoma growth in vitro. Pter inhibited pituitary production of the adrenocorticotropin hormone (ACTH), decreased plasma levels of corticosterone, and thereby downregulated the glucocorticoid receptor- and nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2)-dependent antioxidant defense system in growing melanomas. Exogenous corticosterone or genetically induced Nrf2 overexpression in melanoma cells prevented the inhibition of tumor growth and decreased antioxidant defenses in these malignant cells. These effects and mechanisms were also found in mice bearing different human pancreatic cancers. Glutathione depletion (selected as an antimelanoma strategy) facilitated the complete elimination by chemotherapy of melanoma cells isolated from mice treated with Pter. Innovation: Although bioavailability-related limitations may preclude direct anticancer effects in vivo, natural polyphenols may also interfere with the growth and defense of cancer cells by downregulating the pituitary gland-dependent ACTH synthesis. Conclusions: Pter downregulates glucocorticoid production, thus decreasing the glucocorticoid receptor and Nrf2-dependent signaling/transcription and the antioxidant protection of melanoma and pancreatic cancer cells

  19. Lead tolerance mechanism in Conyza canadensis: subcellular distribution, ultrastructure, antioxidative defense system, and phytochelatins.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Zhou, Chuifan; Huang, Meiying; Luo, Jiewen; Hou, Xiaolong; Wu, Pengfei; Ma, Xiangqing

    2016-03-01

    We used hydroponic experiments to examine the effects of different concentrations of lead (Pb) on the performance of the Pb-tolerable plant Conyza canadensis. In these experiments, most of the Pb was accumulated in the roots; there was very little Pb accumulated in stems and leaves. C. canadensis is able to take up significant amounts of Pb whilst greatly restricting its transportation to specific parts of the aboveground biomass. High Pb concentrations inhibited plant growth, increased membrane permeability, elevated antioxidant enzyme activity in roots, and caused a significant increase in root H2O2 and malondialdehyde content. Analysis of Pb content at the subcellular level showed that most Pb was associated with the cell wall fraction, followed by the nucleus-rich fraction, and with a minority present in the mitochondrial and soluble fractions. Furthermore, transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis of root cells revealed that the cell wall and intercellular space in C. canadensis roots are the main locations of Pb accumulation. Additionally, high Pb concentrations adversely affected the cellular structure of C. canadensis roots. The increased enzyme activity suggests that the antioxidant system may play an important role in eliminating or alleviating Pb toxicity in C. canadensis roots. However, the levels of non-protein sulfhydryl compounds, glutathione, and phytochelatin did not significantly change in either the roots or leaves under Pb-contaminated treatments. Our results provide strong evidence that cell walls restrict Pb uptake into the root and act as an important barrier protecting root cells, while demonstrating that antioxidant enzyme levels are correlated with Pb exposure. These findings demonstrate the roles played by these detoxification mechanisms in supporting Pb tolerance in C. canadensis. PMID:26733305

  20. Overlapping and complementary oxidative stress defense mechanisms in nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Alistair; Baker, Beth D; Munson, Robert S

    2015-01-01

    The Gram-negative commensal bacterium nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI) can cause respiratory tract diseases that include otitis media, sinusitis, exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and bronchitis. During colonization and infection, NTHI withstands oxidative stress generated by reactive oxygen species produced endogenously, by the host, and by other copathogens and flora. These reactive oxygen species include superoxide, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and hydroxyl radicals, whose killing is amplified by iron via the Fenton reaction. We previously identified genes that encode proteins with putative roles in protection of the NTHI isolate strain 86-028NP against oxidative stress. These include catalase (HktE), peroxiredoxin/glutaredoxin (PgdX), and a ferritin-like protein (Dps). Strains were generated with mutations in hktE, pgdX, and dps. The hktE mutant and a pgdX hktE double mutant were more sensitive than the parent to killing by H2O2. Conversely, the pgdX mutant was more resistant to H2O2 due to increased catalase activity. Supporting the role of killing via the Fenton reaction, binding of iron by Dps significantly mitigated the effect of H2O2-mediated killing. NTHI thus utilizes several effectors to resist oxidative stress, and regulation of free iron is critical to this protection. These mechanisms will be important for successful colonization and infection by this opportunistic human pathogen. PMID:25368297

  1. Sulforaphane prevents pulmonary damage in response to inhaled arsenic by activating the Nrf2-defense response

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Yi; Tao, Shasha; Lian, Fangru; Chau, Binh T.; Chen, Jie; Sun, Guifan; Fang, Deyu; Lantz, R. Clark; Zhang, Donna D.

    2012-12-15

    Exposure to arsenic is associated with an increased risk of lung disease. Novel strategies are needed to reduce the adverse health effects associated with arsenic exposure in the lung. Nrf2, a transcription factor that mediates an adaptive cellular defense response, is effective in detoxifying environmental insults and prevents a broad spectrum of diseases induced by environmental exposure to harmful substances. In this report, we tested whether Nrf2 activation protects mice from arsenic-induced toxicity. We used an in vivo arsenic inhalation model that is highly relevant to low environmental human exposure to arsenic-containing dusts. Two-week exposure to arsenic-containing dust resulted in pathological alterations, oxidative DNA damage, and mild apoptotic cell death in the lung; all of which were blocked by sulforaphane (SF) in an Nrf2-dependent manner. Mechanistically, SF-mediated activation of Nrf2 alleviated inflammatory responses by modulating cytokine production. This study provides strong evidence that dietary intervention targeting Nrf2 activation is a feasible approach to reduce adverse health effects associated with arsenic exposure. -- Highlights: ► Exposed to arsenic particles and/or SF have elevated Nrf2 and its target genes. ► Sulforaphane prevents pathological alterations, oxidative damage and cell death. ► Sulforaphane alleviates infiltration of inflammatory cells into the lungs. ► Sulforaphane suppresses arsenic-induced proinflammatory cytokine production.

  2. The Transcriptome and Terpene Profile of Eucalyptus grandis Reveals Mechanisms of Defense Against the Insect Pest, Leptocybe invasa.

    PubMed

    Oates, Caryn N; Külheim, Carsten; Myburg, Alexander A; Slippers, Bernard; Naidoo, Sanushka

    2015-07-01

    Plants have evolved complex defenses that allow them to protect themselves against pests and pathogens. However, there is relatively little information regarding the Eucalyptus defensome. Leptocybe invasa is one of the most damaging pests in global Eucalyptus forestry, and essentially nothing is known regarding the molecular mechanisms governing the interaction between the pest and host. The aim of the study was to investigate changes in the transcriptional landscape and terpene profile of a resistant and susceptible Eucalyptus genotype in an effort to improve our understanding of this interaction. We used RNA-seqencing to investigate transcriptional changes following L. invasa oviposition. Expression levels were validated using real-time quantitative PCR. Terpene profiles were investigated using gas chromatography coupled to mass spectometry on uninfested and oviposited leaves. We found 698 and 1,115 significantly differentially expressed genes from the resistant and susceptible interactions, respectively. Gene Ontology enrichment and Mapman analyses identified putative defense mechanisms including cell wall reinforcement, protease inhibitors, cell cycle suppression and regulatory hormone signaling pathways. There were significant differences in the mono- and sesquiterpene profiles between genotypes and between control and infested material. A model of the interaction between Eucalyptus and L. invasa was proposed from the transcriptomic and chemical data. PMID:25948810

  3. Proteome of Soybean Seed Exudates Contains Plant Defense-Related Proteins Active against the Root-Knot Nematode Meloidogyne incognita.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Raquel O; Morais, Janne K S; Oliveira, Jose T A; Oliveira, Hermogenes D; Sousa, Daniele O B; Souza, Carlos Eduardo A; Moreno, Frederico B; Monteiro-Moreira, Ana Cristina O; de Souza Júnior, José Dijair Antonino; de Sá, Maria F Grossi; Vasconcelos, Ilka M

    2015-06-10

    Several studies have described the effects of seed exudates against microorganisms, but only few of them have investigated the proteins that have defensive activity particularly against nematode parasites. This study focused on the proteins released in the exudates of soybean seeds and evaluated their nematicidal properties against Meloidogyne incognita. A proteomic approach indicated the existence of 63 exuded proteins, including β-1,3-glucanase, chitinase, lectin, trypsin inhibitor, and lipoxygenase, all of which are related to plant defense. The presence of some of these proteins was confirmed by their in vitro activity. The soybean exudates were able to reduce the hatching of nematode eggs and to cause 100% mortality of second-stage juveniles (J2). The pretreatment of J2 with these exudates resulted in a 90% reduction of the gall number in tobacco plants. These findings suggest that the exuded proteins are directly involved in plant defense against soil pathogens, including nematodes, during seed germination. PMID:26034922

  4. RNase 7 in Cutaneous Defense

    PubMed Central

    Rademacher, Franziska; Simanski, Maren; Harder, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    RNase 7 belongs to the RNase A superfamily and exhibits a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity against various microorganisms. RNase 7 is expressed in human skin, and expression in keratinocytes can be induced by cytokines and microbes. These properties suggest that RNase 7 participates in innate cutaneous defense. In this review, we provide an overview about the role of RNase 7 in cutaneous defense with focus on the molecular mechanism of the antimicrobial activity of RNase 7, the regulation of RNase 7 expression, and the role of RNase 7 in skin diseases. PMID:27089327

  5. Subchronic atrazine exposure changes defensive behaviour profile and disrupts brain acetylcholinesterase activity of zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Schmidel, Ademir J; Assmann, Karla L; Werlang, Chariane C; Bertoncello, Kanandra T; Francescon, Francini; Rambo, Cassiano L; Beltrame, Gabriela M; Calegari, Daiane; Batista, Cibele B; Blaser, Rachel E; Roman Júnior, Walter A; Conterato, Greicy M M; Piato, Angelo L; Zanatta, Leila; Magro, Jacir Dal; Rosemberg, Denis B

    2014-01-01

    Animal behaviour is the interaction between environment and an individual organism, which also can be influenced by its neighbours. Variations in environmental conditions, as those caused by contaminants, may lead to neurochemical impairments altering the pattern of the behavioural repertoire of the species. Atrazine (ATZ) is an herbicide widely used in agriculture that is frequently detected in surface water, affecting non-target species. The zebrafish is a valuable model organism to assess behavioural and neurochemical effects of different contaminants since it presents a robust behavioural repertoire and also all major neurotransmitter systems described for mammalian species. The goal of this study was to evaluate the effects of subchronic ATZ exposure in defensive behaviours of zebrafish (shoaling, thigmotaxis, and depth preference) using the split depth tank. Furthermore, to investigate a putative role of cholinergic signalling on ATZ-mediated effects, we tested whether this herbicide alters acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in brain and muscle preparations. Fish were exposed to ATZ for 14days and the following groups were tested: control (0.2% acetone) and ATZ (10 and 1000μg/L). The behaviour of four animals in the same tank was recorded for 6min and biological samples were prepared. Our results showed that 1000μg/L ATZ significantly increased the inter-fish distance, as well as the nearest and farthest neighbour distances. This group also presented an increase in the shoal area with decreased social interaction. No significant differences were detected for the number of animals in the shallow area, latency to enter the shallow and time spent in shallow and deep areas of the apparatus, but the ATZ 1000 group spent significantly more time near the walls. Although ATZ did not affect muscular AChE, it significantly reduced AChE activity in brain. Exposure to 10μg/L ATZ did not affect behaviour or AChE activity. These data suggest that ATZ impairs defensive

  6. Activation of the Nrf2 Cell Defense Pathway by Ancient Foods: Disease Prevention by Important Molecules and Microbes Lost from the Modern Western Diet

    PubMed Central

    Senger, Donald R.; Li, Dan; Jaminet, Shou-Ching; Cao, Shugeng

    2016-01-01

    The Nrf2 (NFE2L2) cell defense pathway protects against oxidative stress and disorders including cancer and neurodegeneration. Although activated modestly by oxidative stress alone, robust activation of the Nrf2 defense mechanism requires the additional presence of co-factors that facilitate electron exchange. Various molecules exhibit this co-factor function, including sulforaphane from cruciferous vegetables. However, natural co-factors that are potent and widely available from dietary sources have not been identified previously. The objectives of this study were to investigate support of the Nrf2 cell defense pathway by the alkyl catechols: 4-methylcatechol, 4-vinylcatechol, and 4-ethylcatechol. These small electrochemicals are naturally available from numerous sources but have not received attention. Findings reported here illustrate that these compounds are indeed potent co-factors for activation of the Nrf2 pathway both in vitro and in vivo. Each strongly supports expression of Nrf2 target genes in a variety of human cell types; and, in addition, 4-ethylcatechol is orally active in mice. Furthermore, findings reported here identify important and previously unrecognized sources of these compounds, arising from biotransformation of common plant compounds by lactobacilli that express phenolic acid decarboxylase. Thus, for example, Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus brevis, and Lactobacillus collinoides, which are consumed from a diet rich in traditionally fermented foods and beverages, convert common phenolic acids found in fruits and vegetables to 4-vinylcatechol and/or 4-ethylcatechol. In addition, all of the alkyl catechols are found in wood smoke that was used widely for food preservation. Thus, the potentially numerous sources of alkyl catechols in traditional foods suggest that these co-factors were common in ancient diets. However, with radical changes in food preservation, alkyl catechols have been lost from modern foods. The absence of alkyl

  7. Activation of the Nrf2 Cell Defense Pathway by Ancient Foods: Disease Prevention by Important Molecules and Microbes Lost from the Modern Western Diet.

    PubMed

    Senger, Donald R; Li, Dan; Jaminet, Shou-Ching; Cao, Shugeng

    2016-01-01

    The Nrf2 (NFE2L2) cell defense pathway protects against oxidative stress and disorders including cancer and neurodegeneration. Although activated modestly by oxidative stress alone, robust activation of the Nrf2 defense mechanism requires the additional presence of co-factors that facilitate electron exchange. Various molecules exhibit this co-factor function, including sulforaphane from cruciferous vegetables. However, natural co-factors that are potent and widely available from dietary sources have not been identified previously. The objectives of this study were to investigate support of the Nrf2 cell defense pathway by the alkyl catechols: 4-methylcatechol, 4-vinylcatechol, and 4-ethylcatechol. These small electrochemicals are naturally available from numerous sources but have not received attention. Findings reported here illustrate that these compounds are indeed potent co-factors for activation of the Nrf2 pathway both in vitro and in vivo. Each strongly supports expression of Nrf2 target genes in a variety of human cell types; and, in addition, 4-ethylcatechol is orally active in mice. Furthermore, findings reported here identify important and previously unrecognized sources of these compounds, arising from biotransformation of common plant compounds by lactobacilli that express phenolic acid decarboxylase. Thus, for example, Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus brevis, and Lactobacillus collinoides, which are consumed from a diet rich in traditionally fermented foods and beverages, convert common phenolic acids found in fruits and vegetables to 4-vinylcatechol and/or 4-ethylcatechol. In addition, all of the alkyl catechols are found in wood smoke that was used widely for food preservation. Thus, the potentially numerous sources of alkyl catechols in traditional foods suggest that these co-factors were common in ancient diets. However, with radical changes in food preservation, alkyl catechols have been lost from modern foods. The absence of alkyl

  8. The circadian clock regulates rhythmic activation of the NRF2/glutathione-mediated antioxidant defense pathway to modulate pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Pekovic-Vaughan, Vanja; Gibbs, Julie; Yoshitane, Hikari; Yang, Nan; Pathiranage, Dharshika; Guo, Baoqiang; Sagami, Aya; Taguchi, Keiko; Bechtold, David; Loudon, Andrew; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Chan, Jefferson; van der Horst, Gijsbertus T J; Fukada, Yoshitaka; Meng, Qing-Jun

    2014-03-15

    The disruption of the NRF2 (nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-like 2)/glutathione-mediated antioxidant defense pathway is a critical step in the pathogenesis of several chronic pulmonary diseases and cancer. While the mechanism of NRF2 activation upon oxidative stress has been widely investigated, little is known about the endogenous signals that regulate the NRF2 pathway in lung physiology and pathology. Here we show that an E-box-mediated circadian rhythm of NRF2 protein is essential in regulating the rhythmic expression of antioxidant genes involved in glutathione redox homeostasis in the mouse lung. Using an in vivo bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis model, we reveal a clock "gated" pulmonary response to oxidative injury, with a more severe fibrotic effect when bleomycin was applied at a circadian nadir in NRF2 levels. Timed administration of sulforaphane, an NRF2 activator, significantly blocked this phenotype. Moreover, in the lungs of the arrhythmic Clock(Δ19) mice, the levels of NRF2 and the reduced glutathione are constitutively low, associated with increased protein oxidative damage and a spontaneous fibrotic-like pulmonary phenotype. Our findings reveal a pivotal role for the circadian control of the NRF2/glutathione pathway in combating oxidative/fibrotic lung damage, which might prompt new chronotherapeutic strategies for the treatment of human lung diseases, including idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:24637114

  9. The circadian clock regulates rhythmic activation of the NRF2/glutathione-mediated antioxidant defense pathway to modulate pulmonary fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Pekovic-Vaughan, Vanja; Gibbs, Julie; Yoshitane, Hikari; Yang, Nan; Pathiranage, Dharshika; Guo, Baoqiang; Sagami, Aya; Taguchi, Keiko; Bechtold, David; Loudon, Andrew; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Chan, Jefferson; van der Horst, Gijsbertus T.J.; Fukada, Yoshitaka; Meng, Qing-Jun

    2014-01-01

    The disruption of the NRF2 (nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-like 2)/glutathione-mediated antioxidant defense pathway is a critical step in the pathogenesis of several chronic pulmonary diseases and cancer. While the mechanism of NRF2 activation upon oxidative stress has been widely investigated, little is known about the endogenous signals that regulate the NRF2 pathway in lung physiology and pathology. Here we show that an E-box-mediated circadian rhythm of NRF2 protein is essential in regulating the rhythmic expression of antioxidant genes involved in glutathione redox homeostasis in the mouse lung. Using an in vivo bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis model, we reveal a clock “gated” pulmonary response to oxidative injury, with a more severe fibrotic effect when bleomycin was applied at a circadian nadir in NRF2 levels. Timed administration of sulforaphane, an NRF2 activator, significantly blocked this phenotype. Moreover, in the lungs of the arrhythmic ClockΔ19 mice, the levels of NRF2 and the reduced glutathione are constitutively low, associated with increased protein oxidative damage and a spontaneous fibrotic-like pulmonary phenotype. Our findings reveal a pivotal role for the circadian control of the NRF2/glutathione pathway in combating oxidative/fibrotic lung damage, which might prompt new chronotherapeutic strategies for the treatment of human lung diseases, including idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:24637114

  10. Intracellular Oxidant Activity, Antioxidant Enzyme Defense System, and Cell Senescence in Fibroblasts with Trisomy 21

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Sureda, Víctor; Vilches, Ángel; Sánchez, Olga; Audí, Laura; Domínguez, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Down's syndrome (DS) is characterized by a complex phenotype associated with chronic oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. Overexpression of genes on chromosome-21 is thought to underlie the pathogenesis of the major phenotypic features of DS, such as premature aging. Using cultured fibroblasts with trisomy 21 (T21F), this study aimed to ascertain whether an imbalance exists in activities, mRNA, and protein expression of the antioxidant enzymes SOD1, SOD2, glutathione-peroxidase, and catalase during the cell replication process in vitro. T21F had high SOD1 expression and activity which led to an interenzymatic imbalance in the antioxidant defense system, accentuated with replicative senescence. Intracellular ROS production and oxidized protein levels were significantly higher in T21F compared with control cells; furthermore, a significant decline in intracellular ATP content was detected in T21F. Cell senescence was found to appear prematurely in DS cells as shown by SA-β-Gal assay and p21 assessment, though not apoptosis, as neither p53 nor the proapoptotic proteins cytochrome c and caspase 9 were altered in T21F. These novel findings would point to a deleterious role of oxidatively modified molecules in early cell senescence of T21F, thereby linking replicative and stress-induced senescence in cultured cells to premature aging in DS. PMID:25852816

  11. Intracellular oxidant activity, antioxidant enzyme defense system, and cell senescence in fibroblasts with trisomy 21.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Sureda, Víctor; Vilches, Ángel; Sánchez, Olga; Audí, Laura; Domínguez, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Down's syndrome (DS) is characterized by a complex phenotype associated with chronic oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. Overexpression of genes on chromosome-21 is thought to underlie the pathogenesis of the major phenotypic features of DS, such as premature aging. Using cultured fibroblasts with trisomy 21 (T21F), this study aimed to ascertain whether an imbalance exists in activities, mRNA, and protein expression of the antioxidant enzymes SOD1, SOD2, glutathione-peroxidase, and catalase during the cell replication process in vitro. T21F had high SOD1 expression and activity which led to an interenzymatic imbalance in the antioxidant defense system, accentuated with replicative senescence. Intracellular ROS production and oxidized protein levels were significantly higher in T21F compared with control cells; furthermore, a significant decline in intracellular ATP content was detected in T21F. Cell senescence was found to appear prematurely in DS cells as shown by SA-β-Gal assay and p21 assessment, though not apoptosis, as neither p53 nor the proapoptotic proteins cytochrome c and caspase 9 were altered in T21F. These novel findings would point to a deleterious role of oxidatively modified molecules in early cell senescence of T21F, thereby linking replicative and stress-induced senescence in cultured cells to premature aging in DS. PMID:25852816

  12. Defensive behaviour and biological activities of the abdominal secretion in the ant Crematogaster scutellaris (Hymenoptera: Myrmicinae).

    PubMed

    Marlier, J F; Quinet, Y; de Biseau, J C

    2004-11-30

    Using bioassays, the defensive behaviour of Crematogaster scutellaris and the biological activities of its abdominal secretion were investigated. Beside classical aggressive behaviours such as grips, C. scutellaris workers performed frequent characteristic gaster flexions during interspecific encounters, sometimes tempting to apply their abdominal secretion topically on the enemy. The toxicity of the venom of C. scutellaris to other ants greatly differed among the species tested, some being killed after the topical application of only three droplets, while others were quite resistant to a dose of 90 droplets. All ant species tested were strongly and immediately repelled by a contact between their antennae or mouthparts with the venom of C. scutellaris. Abdominal secretion was never used during intraspecific interference and workers were resistant to a topical application of the venom of their own species. Intraspecific repellency was significant but moderate compared to interspecific one. Workers of C. scutellaris were never seen using their venom during prey capture. In conclusion, the main biological activity of the abdominal secretion of C. scutellaris seems to be its repellency to other ant species. This is supported by field experiments showing that Pheidole pallidula foragers were efficiently repelled at coexploited baits, allowing the monopolization of most prey by C. scutellaris. PMID:15518992

  13. Increased activity correlates with reduced ability to mount immune defenses to endotoxin in zebra finches.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Patricia C; Springthorpe, Dwight; Bentley, George E

    2014-10-01

    When suffering from infection, animals experience behavioral and physiological alterations that potentiate the immune system's ability to fight pathogens. The behavioral component of this response, termed "sickness behavior," is characterized by an overall reduction in physical activity. A growing number of reports demonstrate substantial flexibility in these sickness behaviors, which can be partially overcome in response to mates, intruders and parental duties. Since it is hypothesized that adopting sickness behaviors frees energetic resources for mounting an immune response, we tested whether diminished immune responses coincided with reduced sickness behaviors by housing male zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata) in social conditions that alter their behavioral response to an endotoxin. To facilitate our data collection, we developed and built a miniaturized sensor capable of detecting changes in dorsoventral acceleration and categorizing them as different behaviors when attached to the finches. We found that the immune defenses (quantified as haptoglobin-like activity, ability to change body temperature and bacterial killing capacity) increased as a function of increased time spent resting. The findings indicate that when animals are sick attenuation of sickness behaviors may exact costs, such as reduced immune function. The extent of these costs depends on how relevant the affected components of immunity are for fighting a specific infection. PMID:24888267

  14. Defense mechanisms against herbivory in Picea: sequence evolution and expression regulation of gene family members in the phenylpropanoid pathway

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    the evolution of plant defense mechanisms against insect pests and provide substantial potential for the functional characterization of several not yet resolved alternative pathways in plant defenses. PMID:22177423

  15. Protein kinase Cδ mediates trimethyltin-induced neurotoxicity in mice in vivo via inhibition of glutathione defense mechanism.

    PubMed

    Shin, Eun-Joo; Nam, Yunsung; Tu, Thu-Hien Thi; Lim, Yong Kwang; Wie, Myung-Bok; Kim, Dae-Joong; Jeong, Ji Hoon; Kim, Hyoung-Chun

    2016-04-01

    We investigated whether protein kinase C (PKC) is involved in trimethyltin (TMT)-induced neurotoxicity. TMT treatment (2.8 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly increased PKCδ expression out of PKC isozymes (i.e., α, βI, βII, δ, and ς) in the hippocampus of wild-type (WT) mice. Consistently, treatment with TMT resulted in significant increases in cleaved PKCδ expression. Genetic or pharmacological inhibition (PKCδ knockout or rottlerin) was less susceptible to TMT-induced seizures than WT mice. TMT treatment increased glutathione oxidation, lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation, and levels of reactive oxygen species. These effects were more pronounced in the WT mice than in PKCδ knockout mice. In addition, the ability of TMT to induce nuclear translocation of Nrf2, Nrf2 DNA-binding activity, and upregulation of γ-glutamylcysteine ligase was significantly increased in the PKCδ knockout mice and rottlerin (10 or 20 mg/kg, p.o. × 6)-treated WT mice. Furthermore, neuronal degeneration (as shown by nuclear chromatin clumping and TUNEL staining) in WT mice was most pronounced 2 days after TMT. At the same time, TMT-induced inhibition of phosphoinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling was evident, thereby decreasing phospho-Bad, expression of Bcl-xL and Bcl-2, and the interaction between phospho-Bad and 14-3-3 protein, and increasing Bax expression and caspase-3 cleavage were observed. Rottlerin or PKCδ knockout significantly protected these changes in anti- and pro-apoptotic factors. Importantly, treatment of the PI3K inhibitor LY294002 (0.8 or 1.6 µg, i.c.v.) 4 h before TMT counteracted protective effects (i.e., Nrf-2-dependent glutathione induction and pro-survival phenomenon) of rottlerin. Therefore, our results suggest that down-regulation of PKCδ and up-regulations of Nrf2-dependent glutathione defense mechanism and PI3K/Akt signaling are critical for attenuating TMT neurotoxicity. PMID:25895139

  16. Do pathogen-specific defense mechanisms contribute to wound-induced resistance in tomato?

    PubMed Central

    Francia, Doriana; Demaria, Daniele; Calderini, Ornella; Ferraris, Lucia; Valentino, Danila; Arcioni, Sergio; Tamietti, Giacomo

    2008-01-01

    A network of shared intermediates/components and/or common molecular outputs in biotic and abiotic stress signaling has long been known, but the possibility of effective influence between differently triggered stresses (co-protection) is less studied. Recent observations show that wounding induces transient protection in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) to four pathogens with a range of lifestyles, locally and systemically. The contribution of ethylene (ET) in basal but also in wound-induced resistance to each pathogen, although dispensable, is demonstrated to be positive (Botrytis cinerea, Phytophthora capsici) or negative (Fusarium oxysporum, Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato). Furthermore, the expression of several defense markers is influenced locally and/or systemically by wounding and ET, and might be part of that core of conserved molecular responses whereby an abiotic stress such as wounding imparts co-resistance to biotic stress. In this addendum, we speculate on some of the physiological responses to wounding that might contribute to the modulation of resistance in a more pathogen-specific manner. PMID:19841665

  17. 10 CFR 50.13 - Attacks and destructive acts by enemies of the United States; and defense activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Attacks and destructive acts by enemies of the United States; and defense activities. 50.13 Section 50.13 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC... the effects of (a) attacks and destructive acts, including sabotage, directed against the facility...

  18. 10 CFR 50.13 - Attacks and destructive acts by enemies of the United States; and defense activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Attacks and destructive acts by enemies of the United States; and defense activities. 50.13 Section 50.13 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC... the effects of (a) attacks and destructive acts, including sabotage, directed against the facility...

  19. 10 CFR 50.13 - Attacks and destructive acts by enemies of the United States; and defense activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Attacks and destructive acts by enemies of the United States; and defense activities. 50.13 Section 50.13 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC... the effects of (a) attacks and destructive acts, including sabotage, directed against the facility...

  20. 10 CFR 50.13 - Attacks and destructive acts by enemies of the United States; and defense activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Attacks and destructive acts by enemies of the United States; and defense activities. 50.13 Section 50.13 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC... the effects of (a) attacks and destructive acts, including sabotage, directed against the facility...

  1. 10 CFR 50.13 - Attacks and destructive acts by enemies of the United States; and defense activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Attacks and destructive acts by enemies of the United States; and defense activities. 50.13 Section 50.13 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC... the effects of (a) attacks and destructive acts, including sabotage, directed against the facility...

  2. 18 CFR 2.60 - Facilities and activities during an emergency-accounting treatment of defense-related expenditures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Facilities and activities during an emergency-accounting treatment of defense-related expenditures. 2.60 Section 2.60 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY...

  3. De novo Transcriptome Analysis Reveals Distinct Defense Mechanisms by Young and Mature Leaves of Hevea brasiliensis (Para Rubber Tree).

    PubMed

    Fang, Yongjun; Mei, Hailiang; Zhou, Binhui; Xiao, Xiaohu; Yang, Meng; Huang, Yacheng; Long, Xiangyu; Hu, Songnian; Tang, Chaorong

    2016-01-01

    Along with changes in morphology in the course of maturation, leaves of Hevea brasiliensis become more resistant to leaf diseases, including the South American Leaf Blight (SALB), a devastating fungal disease of this economically important tree species. To understand the underlying mechanisms of this defense, and to identify the candidate genes involved, we sequenced the Hevea leaf transcriptome at four developmental stages (I to IV) by Illumina sequencing. A total of 62.6 million high-quality reads were generated, and assembled into 98,796 unique transcripts. We identified 3,905 differentially expressed genes implicated in leaf development, 67.8% (2,651) of which were during the transition to leaf maturation. The genes involved in cyanogenic metabolism, lignin and anthocyanin biosynthesis were noteworthy for their distinct patterns of expression between developing leaves (stages I to III) and mature leaves (stage IV), and the correlation with the change in resistance to SALB and the Oidium/Colletotrichum leaf fall. The results provide a first profile of the molecular events that relate to the dynamics of leaf morphology and defense strategies during Hevea leaf development. This dataset is beneficial to devising strategies to engineer resistance to leaf diseases as well as other in-depth studies in Hevea tree. PMID:27619402

  4. Detection of neural activity in the brains of Japanese honeybee workers during the formation of a "hot defensive bee ball".

    PubMed

    Ugajin, Atsushi; Kiya, Taketoshi; Kunieda, Takekazu; Ono, Masato; Yoshida, Tadaharu; Kubo, Takeo

    2012-01-01

    Anti-predator behaviors are essential to survival for most animals. The neural bases of such behaviors, however, remain largely unknown. Although honeybees commonly use their stingers to counterattack predators, the Japanese honeybee (Apis cerana japonica) uses a different strategy to fight against the giant hornet (Vespa mandarinia japonica). Instead of stinging the hornet, Japanese honeybees form a "hot defensive bee ball" by surrounding the hornet en masse, killing it with heat. The European honeybee (A. mellifera ligustica), on the other hand, does not exhibit this behavior, and their colonies are often destroyed by a hornet attack. In the present study, we attempted to analyze the neural basis of this behavior by mapping the active brain regions of Japanese honeybee workers during the formation of a hot defensive bee ball. First, we identified an A. cerana homolog (Acks = Apis cerana kakusei) of kakusei, an immediate early gene that we previously identified from A. mellifera, and showed that Acks has characteristics similar to kakusei and can be used to visualize active brain regions in A. cerana. Using Acks as a neural activity marker, we demonstrated that neural activity in the mushroom bodies, especially in Class II Kenyon cells, one subtype of mushroom body intrinsic neurons, and a restricted area between the dorsal lobes and the optic lobes was increased in the brains of Japanese honeybee workers involved in the formation of a hot defensive bee ball. In addition, workers exposed to 46°C heat also exhibited Acks expression patterns similar to those observed in the brains of workers involved in the formation of a hot defensive bee ball, suggesting that the neural activity observed in the brains of workers involved in the hot defensive bee ball mainly reflects thermal stimuli processing. PMID:22431987

  5. Chitosan controls postharvest anthracnose in bell pepper by activating defense-related enzymes.

    PubMed

    Edirisinghe, Madushani; Ali, Asgar; Maqbool, Mehdi; Alderson, Peter G

    2014-12-01

    Anthracnose, a postharvest disease caused by the fungus Colletotrichum capsici is the most devastating disease of bell pepper that causes great economic losses especially in tropical climates. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the antifungal properties of chitosan (low molecular weight from crab shell, Mw: 50 kDa and 75-85 % deacetylated) against anthracnose by inducing defense-related enzymes. The concentrations of 0, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 % chitosan were used to control the fungus in vitro and postharvest. There was a reduction in C. capsici mycelial growth and the highest chitosan concentration (2.0 %) reduced the growth by 70 % after 7 days incubation. In germination test, the concentration of 1.5 and 2.0 % chitosan reduced spore germination in C. capsici between 80 % and 84 %, respectively. In postharvest trial the concentration of 1.5 % decreased the anthracnose severity in pepper fruit by approximately 76 % after 28 days of storage (10 ± 1 °C; 80 % RH). For enzymatic activities, the concentration of 1.5 and 2.0 % chitosan increased the polyphenol oxidase (PPO), peroxidase (POD) and total phenolics in inoculated bell pepper during storage. Based on these results, the chitosan presents antifungal properties against C. capsici, as well as potential to induce resistance on bell pepper. PMID:25477684

  6. Sulforaphane protects Microcystin-LR-induced toxicity through activation of the Nrf2-mediated defensive response

    SciTech Connect

    Gan Nanqin; Mi Lixin; Sun Xiaoyun; Dai Guofei; Chung Funglung; Song Lirong

    2010-09-01

    Microcystins (MCs), a cyclic heptapeptide hepatotoxins, are mainly produced by the bloom-forming cyanobacerium Microcystis, which has become an environmental hazard worldwide. Long term consumption of MC-contaminated water may induce liver damage, liver cancer, and even human death. Therefore, in addition to removal of MCs in drinking water, novel strategies that prevent health damages are urgently needed. Sulforaphane (SFN), a natural-occurring isothiocyanate from cruciferous vegetables, has been reported to reduce and eliminate toxicities from xenobiotics and carcinogens. The purpose of the present study was to provide mechanistic insights into the SFN-induced antioxidative defense system against MC-LR-induced cytotoxicity. We performed cell viability assays, including MTS assay, colony formation assay and apoptotic cell sorting, to study MC-LR-induced cellular damage and the protective effects by SFN. The results showed that SFN protected MC-LR-induced damages at a nontoxic and physiological relevant dose in HepG2, BRL-3A and NIH 3 T3 cells. The protection was Nrf2-mediated as evident by transactivation of Nrf2 and activation of its downstream genes, including NQO1 and HO-1, and elevated intracellular GSH level. Results of our studies indicate that pretreatment of cells with 10 {mu}M SFN for 12 h significantly protected cells from MC-LR-induced damage. SFN-induced protective response was mediated through Nrf2 pathway.

  7. Ozone Sensitivity in Hybrid Poplar Is Correlated with a Lack of Defense-Gene Activation1

    PubMed Central

    Riehl Koch, Jennifer; Scherzer, Amy J.; Eshita, Steven M.; Davis, Keith R.

    1998-01-01

    Ozone is a major gaseous pollutant thought to contribute to forest decline. Although the physiological and morphological responses of forest trees to ozone have been well characterized, little is known about the molecular basis for these responses. Our studies compared the response to ozone of ozone-sensitive and ozone-tolerant clones of hybrid poplar (Populus maximowizii × Populus trichocarpa) at the physiological and molecular levels. Gas-exchange analyses demonstrated clear differences between the ozone-sensitive clone 388 and the ozone-tolerant clone 245. Although ozone induced a decrease in photosynthetic rate and stomatal conductance in both clones, the magnitude of the decrease in stomatal conductance was significantly greater in the ozone-tolerant clone. RNA-blot analysis established that ozone-induced mRNA levels for phenylalanine ammonia-lyase, O-methyltransferase, a pathogenesis-related protein, and a wound-inducible gene were significantly higher in the ozone-tolerant than in the ozone-sensitive plants. Wound- and pathogen-induced levels of these mRNAs were also higher in the ozone-tolerant compared with the ozone-sensitive plants. The different physiological and molecular responses to ozone exposure exhibited by clones 245 and 388 suggest that ozone tolerance involves the activation of salicylic-acid- and jasmonic-acid-mediated signaling pathways, which may be important in triggering defense responses against oxidative stress. PMID:9847098

  8. Dual 5-HT mechanisms in basolateral and central nuclei of amygdala in the regulation of the defensive behavior induced by electrical stimulation of the inferior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Macedo, Carlos Eduardo; Castilho, Vanessa Moreno; de Souza e Silva, Maria Angélica; Brandão, Marcus L

    2002-11-30

    Regulatory mechanisms in the basolateral nucleus of the amygdala (BLA) serves as a filter for unconditioned and conditioned aversive information that ascend to higher structures from the brainstem whereas the central nucleus (CeA) is the main output for the resultant defense reaction. We have shown that neural substrates in the inferior colliculus are activated by threatening stimuli of acoustic nature and have important functional links with the amygdala. In this work, we examined the influence of lesions with 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine (5,7-DHT) of these nuclei of amygdala on the aversive responses induced by electrical stimulation of the inferior colliculus. Thus, rats were implanted with an electrode in the CeA of the inferior colliculus for the determination of the thresholds of alertness, freezing and escape responses. Each rat also bore a cannula implanted in the BLA or CeA for injection of 5,7-DHT (8.0 microg/0.8 microl) or its vehicle. The data obtained show that CeA lesions increase the thresholds of aversive responses whereas BLA lesions decrease the thresholds of these responses. From this evidence it is suggested that defensive behavior induced by activation of the neural substrates of aversion in the inferior colliculus seems to depend on the integrity of the amygdala. BLA regulates the input and CeA functions as the output for these aversive states generated at brainstem level. It is likely that aversive information ascending from the inferior colliculus may receive either inhibitory or excitatory influences of 5-HT mechanisms in the BLA or CeA, respectively. PMID:12431748

  9. Chemical and Mechanical Defenses Vary among Maternal Lines and Leaf Ages in Verbascum thapsus L. (Scrophulariaceae) and Reduce Palatability to a Generalist Insect

    PubMed Central

    Alba, Christina; Bowers, M. Deane; Blumenthal, Dana; Hufbauer, Ruth A.

    2014-01-01

    Intra-specific variation in host-plant quality affects herbivore foraging decisions and, in turn, herbivore foraging decisions mediate plant fitness. In particular, variation in defenses against herbivores, both among and within plants, shapes herbivore behavior. If variation in defenses is genetically based, it can respond to natural selection by herbivores. We quantified intra-specific variation in iridoid glycosides, trichome length, and leaf strength in common mullein (Verbascum thapsus L, Scrophulariaceae) among maternal lines within a population and among leaves within plants, and related this variation to feeding preferences of a generalist herbivore, Trichopulsia ni Hübner. We found significant variation in all three defenses among maternal lines, with T. ni preferring plants with lower investment in chemical, but not mechanical, defense. Within plants, old leaves had lower levels of all defenses than young leaves, and were strongly preferred by T. ni. Caterpillars also preferred leaves with trichomes removed to leaves with trichomes intact. Differences among maternal lines indicate that phenotypic variation in defenses likely has a genetic basis. Furthermore, these results reveal that the feeding behaviors of T. ni map onto variation in plant defense in a predictable way. This work highlights the importance of variation in host-plant quality in driving interactions between plants and their herbivores. PMID:25127229

  10. Annual Report To Congress. Department of Energy Activities Relating to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board, Calendar Year 2003

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2004-02-28

    The Department of Energy (Department) submits an Annual Report to Congress each year detailing the Department’s activities relating to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (Board), which provides advice and recommendations to the Secretary of Energy (Secretary) regarding public health and safety issues at the Department’s defense nuclear facilities. In 2003, the Department continued ongoing activities to resolve issues identified by the Board in formal recommendations and correspondence, staff issue reports pertaining to Department facilities, and public meetings and briefings. Additionally, the Department is implementing several key safety initiatives to address and prevent safety issues: safety culture and review of the Columbia accident investigation; risk reduction through stabilization of excess nuclear materials; the Facility Representative Program; independent oversight and performance assurance; the Federal Technical Capability Program (FTCP); executive safety initiatives; and quality assurance activities. The following summarizes the key activities addressed in this Annual Report.

  11. Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Species in Defense/Stress Responses Activated by Chitosan in Sycamore Cultured Cells

    PubMed Central

    Malerba, Massimo; Cerana, Raffaella

    2015-01-01

    Chitosan (CHT) is a non-toxic and inexpensive compound obtained by deacetylation of chitin, the main component of the exoskeleton of arthropods as well as of the cell walls of many fungi. In agriculture CHT is used to control numerous diseases on various horticultural commodities but, although different mechanisms have been proposed, the exact mode of action of CHT is still unknown. In sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus L.) cultured cells, CHT induces a set of defense/stress responses that includes production of H2O2 and nitric oxide (NO). We investigated the possible signaling role of these reactive molecules in some CHT-induced responses by means of inhibitors of production and/or scavengers. The results show that both reactive nitrogen and oxygen species are not only a mere symptom of stress conditions but are involved in the responses induced by CHT in sycamore cells. In particular, NO appears to be involved in a cell death form induced by CHT that shows apoptotic features like DNA fragmentation, increase in caspase-3-like activity and release of cytochrome c from the mitochondrion. On the contrary, reactive oxygen species (ROS) appear involved in a cell death form induced by CHT that does not show these apoptotic features but presents increase in lipid peroxidation. PMID:25642757

  12. Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in defense/stress responses activated by chitosan in sycamore cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Malerba, Massimo; Cerana, Raffaella

    2015-01-01

    Chitosan (CHT) is a non-toxic and inexpensive compound obtained by deacetylation of chitin, the main component of the exoskeleton of arthropods as well as of the cell walls of many fungi. In agriculture CHT is used to control numerous diseases on various horticultural commodities but, although different mechanisms have been proposed, the exact mode of action of CHT is still unknown. In sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus L.) cultured cells, CHT induces a set of defense/stress responses that includes production of H2O2 and nitric oxide (NO). We investigated the possible signaling role of these reactive molecules in some CHT-induced responses by means of inhibitors of production and/or scavengers. The results show that both reactive nitrogen and oxygen species are not only a mere symptom of stress conditions but are involved in the responses induced by CHT in sycamore cells. In particular, NO appears to be involved in a cell death form induced by CHT that shows apoptotic features like DNA fragmentation, increase in caspase-3-like activity and release of cytochrome c from the mitochondrion. On the contrary, reactive oxygen species (ROS) appear involved in a cell death form induced by CHT that does not show these apoptotic features but presents increase in lipid peroxidation. PMID:25642757

  13. Cyclic lipopeptide iturin A structure-dependently induces defense response in Arabidopsis plants by activating SA and JA signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Kawagoe, Yumi; Shiraishi, Soma; Kondo, Hiroko; Yamamoto, Shoko; Aoki, Yoshinao; Suzuki, Shunji

    2015-05-15

    Iturin A is the most well studied antifungal cyclic lipopeptide produced by Bacillus species that are frequently utilized as biological control agents. Iturin A not only shows strong antifungal activity against phytopathogens but also induces defense response in plants, thereby reducing plant disease severity. Here we report the defense signaling pathways triggered by iturin A in Arabidopsis salicylic acid (SA) or jasmonic acid (JA)-insensitive mutants. Iturin A activated the transcription of defense genes PR1 and PDF1.2 through the SA and JA signaling pathways, respectively. The role of iturin A as an elicitor was dependent on the cyclization of the seven amino acids and/or the β-hydroxy fatty acid chain. The iturin A derivative peptide, NH2-(L-Asn)-(D-Tyr)-(D-Asn)-(L-Gln)-(L-Pro)-(D-Asn)-(L-Ser)-COOH, completely suppressed PR1 and PDF1.2 gene expression in wild Arabidopsis plants. The identification of target molecules binding to iturin A and its derivative peptide is expected to shed new light on defense response in plants through the SA and JA signaling pathways. PMID:25842204

  14. Crosstalk of Signaling Mechanisms Involved in Host Defense and Symbiosis Against Microorganisms in Rice.

    PubMed

    Akamatsu, Akira; Shimamoto, Ko; Kawano, Yoji

    2016-08-01

    Rice is one of the most important food crops, feeding about half population in the world. Rice pathogens cause enormous damage to rice production worldwide. In plant immunity research, considerable progress has recently been made in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying microbe-associated molecular pattern (MAMP)-triggered immunity. Using genome sequencing and molecular techniques, a number of new MAMPs and their receptors have been identified in the past two decades. Notably, the mechanisms for chitin perception via the lysine motif (LysM) domain-containing receptor OsCERK1, as well as the mechanisms for bacterial MAMP (e.g. flg22, elf18) perception via the leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domain-containing receptors FLS2 and EFR, have been clarified in rice and Arabidopsis, respectively. In chitin signaling in rice, two direct substrates of OsCERK1, Rac/ROP GTPase guanine nucleotide exchange factor OsRacGEF1 and receptor-like cytoplasmic kinase OsRLCK185, have been identified as components of the OsCERK1 complex and are rapidly phosphorylated by OsCERK1 in response to chitin. Interestingly, OsCERK1 also participates in symbiosis with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) in rice and plays a role in the recognition of short-chitin molecules (CO4/5), which are symbiotic signatures included in AMF germinated spore exudates and induced by synthetic strigolactone. Thus, OsCERK1 contributes to both immunity and symbiotic responses. In this review, we describe recent studies on pathways involved in rice immunity and symbiotic signaling triggered by interactions with microorganisms. In addition, we describe recent advances in genetic engineering by using plant immune receptors and symbiotic microorganisms to enhance disease resistance of rice. PMID:27499679

  15. Protozoan-induced regulation of cycliclipopeptide biosythesis is an effective predation defense mechanism for Pseudomonas fluorescens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The grazing activity of protozoa significantly impacts the dynamics, diversification and evolution of bacterial communities in soil ecosystems. The feeding preference of protozoa is related to their inability to ingest or digest specific bacteria. Pseudomonas fluorescens strains SBW25 and SS101 used...

  16. Prion-like Polymerization Underlies Signal Transduction in Antiviral Immune Defense and Inflammasome Activation

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Xin; Chen, Jueqi; Xu, Hui; Liu, Siqi; Jiang, Qiu-Xing; Halfmann, Randal; Chen, Zhijian J.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Pathogens and cellular danger signals activate sensors such as RIG-I and NLRP3 to produce robust immune and inflammatory responses through respective adaptor proteins MAVS and ASC, which harbor essential N-terminal CARD and PYRIN domains, respectively. Here, we show that CARD and PYRIN function as bona fide prions in yeast and their prion forms are inducible by their respective upstream activators. Likewise, a yeast prion domain can functionally replace CARD and PYRIN in mammalian cell signaling. Mutations in MAVS and ASC that disrupt their prion activities in yeast also abrogate their ability to signal in mammalian cells. Furthermore, fibers of recombinant PYRIN can convert ASC into functional polymers capable of activating caspase-1. Remarkably, a conserved fungal NOD-like receptor and prion pair can functionally reconstitute signaling of NLRP3 and ASC PYRINs in mammalian cells. These results indicate that prion-like polymerization is a conserved signal transduction mechanism in innate immunity and inflammation. PMID:24630723

  17. Immune modulation by multifaceted cationic host defense (antimicrobial) peptides.

    PubMed

    Hilchie, Ashley L; Wuerth, Kelli; Hancock, Robert E W

    2013-12-01

    Cationic host defense (antimicrobial) peptides were originally studied for their direct antimicrobial activities. They have since been found to exhibit multifaceted immunomodulatory activities, including profound anti-infective and selective anti-inflammatory properties, as well as adjuvant and wound-healing activities in animal models. These biological properties suggest that host defense peptides, and synthetic derivatives thereof, possess clinical potential beyond the treatment of antibiotic-resistant infections. In this Review, we provide an overview of the biological activities of host defense and synthetic peptides, their mechanism(s) of action and new therapeutic applications and challenges that are associated with their clinical use. PMID:24231617

  18. Application of an improved proteomics method for abundant protein cleanup: molecular and genomic mechanisms study in plant defense.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yixiang; Gao, Peng; Xing, Zhuo; Jin, Shumei; Chen, Zhide; Liu, Lantao; Constantino, Nasie; Wang, Xinwang; Shi, Weibing; Yuan, Joshua S; Dai, Susie Y

    2013-11-01

    High abundance proteins like ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase oxygenase (Rubisco) impose a consistent challenge for the whole proteome characterization using shot-gun proteomics. To address this challenge, we developed and evaluated Polyethyleneimine Assisted Rubisco Cleanup (PARC) as a new method by combining both abundant protein removal and fractionation. The new approach was applied to a plant insect interaction study to validate the platform and investigate mechanisms for plant defense against herbivorous insects. Our results indicated that PARC can effectively remove Rubisco, improve the protein identification, and discover almost three times more differentially regulated proteins. The significantly enhanced shot-gun proteomics performance was translated into in-depth proteomic and molecular mechanisms for plant insect interaction, where carbon re-distribution was used to play an essential role. Moreover, the transcriptomic validation also confirmed the reliability of PARC analysis. Finally, functional studies were carried out for two differentially regulated genes as revealed by PARC analysis. Insect resistance was induced by over-expressing either jacalin-like or cupin-like genes in rice. The results further highlighted that PARC can serve as an effective strategy for proteomics analysis and gene discovery. PMID:23943779

  19. Application of an Improved Proteomics Method for Abundant Protein Cleanup: Molecular and Genomic Mechanisms Study in Plant Defense*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yixiang; Gao, Peng; Xing, Zhuo; Jin, Shumei; Chen, Zhide; Liu, Lantao; Constantino, Nasie; Wang, Xinwang; Shi, Weibing; Yuan, Joshua S.; Dai, Susie Y.

    2013-01-01

    High abundance proteins like ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase oxygenase (Rubisco) impose a consistent challenge for the whole proteome characterization using shot-gun proteomics. To address this challenge, we developed and evaluated Polyethyleneimine Assisted Rubisco Cleanup (PARC) as a new method by combining both abundant protein removal and fractionation. The new approach was applied to a plant insect interaction study to validate the platform and investigate mechanisms for plant defense against herbivorous insects. Our results indicated that PARC can effectively remove Rubisco, improve the protein identification, and discover almost three times more differentially regulated proteins. The significantly enhanced shot-gun proteomics performance was translated into in-depth proteomic and molecular mechanisms for plant insect interaction, where carbon re-distribution was used to play an essential role. Moreover, the transcriptomic validation also confirmed the reliability of PARC analysis. Finally, functional studies were carried out for two differentially regulated genes as revealed by PARC analysis. Insect resistance was induced by over-expressing either jacalin-like or cupin-like genes in rice. The results further highlighted that PARC can serve as an effective strategy for proteomics analysis and gene discovery. PMID:23943779

  20. Augmentation of the gastric mucosal defense mechanism induced by KW-5805, a novel antiulcer agent.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, H; Kosaka, N; Tomaru, A; Shuto, K; Ogihara, T; Sato, N

    1989-01-01

    KW-5805 (a new antiulcer agent), given p. o. at 30 mg/kg to rats, significantly increased the amount of gastric adherent mucus and mucosal glycoproteins. Gastric mucosal glucosamine synthetase activity was significantly enhanced by KW-5805 (30 mg/kg, p. o.). KW-5805 (10, 30 mg/kg, p. o.) significantly suppressed the decrease of gastric mucosal blood volume and oxygen sufficiency induced by hemorrhagic shock. The agent also significantly inhibited the extravasation of Evans blue into the gastric mucosa after ischemia-reinfusion. In conclusion, KW-5805 increased biosynthesis, storage and secretion of gastric mucus and improved the gastric mucosal hemodynamics. PMID:2595291

  1. Defensive mechanism in cholangiocarcinoma cells against oxidative stress induced by chlorin e6-based photodynamic therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hye Myeong; Chung, Chung-Wook; Kim, Cy Hyun; Kim, Do Hyung; Kwak, Tae Won; Jeong, Young-Il; Kang, Dae Hwan

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the effect of chlorin e6-based photodynamic therapy (Ce6-PDT) was investigated in human intrahepatic (HuCC-T1) and extrahepatic (SNU1196) cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) cells. The amount of intracellular Ce6 increased with increasing Ce6 concentration administered, or with incubation time, in both cell lines. The ability to take up Ce6 and generate reactive oxygen species after irradiation at 1.0 J/cm2 did not significantly differ between the two CCA cell types. However, after irradiation, marked differences were observed for photodamage and apoptotic/necrotic signals. HuCC-T1 cells are more sensitive to Ce6-PDT than SNU1196 cells. Total glutathione (GSH) levels, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase activities in SNU1196 cells were significantly higher than in HuCC-T1 cells. With inhibition of enzyme activity or addition of GSH, the phototoxic effect could be controlled in CCA cells. The intracellular level of GSH is the most important determining factor in the curative action of Ce6-PDT against tumor cells. PMID:25258513

  2. High Level Resistance against Rhizomania Disease by Simultaneously Integrating Two Distinct Defense Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Pavli, Ourania I.; Tampakaki, Anastasia P.; Skaracis, George N.

    2012-01-01

    With the aim of achieving durable resistance against rhizomania disease of sugar beet, the employment of different sources of resistance to Beet necrotic yellow vein virus was pursued. To this purpose, Nicotiana benthamiana transgenic plants that simultaneously produce dsRNA originating from a conserved region of the BNYVV replicase gene and the HrpZPsph protein in a secreted form (SP/HrpZPsph) were produced. The integration and expression of both transgenes as well as proper production of the harpin protein were verified in all primary transformants and selfed progeny (T1, T2). Transgenic resistance was assessed by BNYVV-challenge inoculation on T2 progeny by scoring disease symptoms and DAS-ELISA at 20 and 30 dpi. Transgenic lines possessing single transformation events for both transgenes as well as wild type plants were included in inoculation experiments. Transgenic plants were highly resistant to virus infection, whereas in some cases immunity was achieved. In all cases, the resistant phenotype of transgenic plants carrying both transgenes was superior in comparison with the ones carrying a single transgene. Collectively, our findings demonstrate, for a first time, that the combination of two entirely different resistance mechanisms provide high level resistance or even immunity against the virus. Such a novel approach is anticipated to prevent a rapid virus adaptation that could potentially lead to the emergence of isolates with resistance breaking properties. PMID:23284692

  3. Ethanol Extract of Ganoderma lucidum Augments Cellular Anti-oxidant Defense through Activation of Nrf2/HO-1

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yoo-hwan; Kim, Jung-hee; Song, Choon-ho; Jang, Kyung-jeon; kim, Cheol-hong; Kang, Ji- Sook; Choi, Yung-hyun

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The mushroom Ganoderma lucidum has been widely used as a traditional herbal medicine for many years. Although several studies have focused on the anti-oxidative activity of this mushroom, the molecular mechanisms underlying its activity have not yet been clearly established. The present study investigated the cytoprotective effect of ethanol extract of Ganoderma lucidum (EGL) against oxidative stress (hydrogen peroxide, H2O2) and elucidated the underlying mechanisms in a C2C12 myoblast cell line. Methods: Oxidative stress markers were determined by using the comet assay to measure reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) damage. Cell viability and Western blotting analyses were employed to evaluate the cellular response to EGL and H2O2 in C2C12 cells. Transfection with nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-specific small interfering ribonucleic acid (siRNA) was conducted to understand the relationship between Nrf2 expression and H2O2-induced growth inhibition. Results: The results showed that EGL effectively inhibited H2O2-induced growth and the generation of ROS. EGL markedly suppressed H2O2-induced comet-like DNA formation and phosphorylation of histone H2AX at serine 139 (p-γH2AX), a widely used marker of DNA damage, suggesting that EGL prevented H2O2-induced DNA damage. Furthermore, the EGL treatment effectively induced the expression of Nrf2, as well as heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), with parallel phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of Nrf2 in the C2C12 myoblasts. However, zinc protoporphyrin IX, a HO-1 inhibitor, significantly abolished the protective effects of EGL against H2O2-induced accumulation of ROS and reduced cell growth. Notably, transient transfection with Nrf2-specific siRNA attenuated the cytoprotective effects and HO-1 induction by EGL, indicating that EGL induced the expression of HO-1 in an Nrf2-dependent manner. Conclusion: Collectively, these results demonstrate that EGL augments the

  4. Department of Defense Education Activity: School, District, Area, and System. Accountability Profiles, 1996-1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dependents Schools (DOD), Washington, DC.

    This document contains accountability profiles with detailed information for the overseas schools of the Department of Defense Dependents Schools (DoDDS). Each profile contains a description of the school, district, or area characteristics and highlights identified by the principal or superintendent. Profiles also contain the 1996-1997 benchmark…

  5. Projected near-future CO2 levels increase activity and alter defensive behaviours in the tropical squid Idiosepius pygmaeus

    PubMed Central

    Spady, Blake L.; Watson, Sue-Ann; Chase, Tory J.; Munday, Philip L.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Carbon dioxide (CO2) levels projected to occur in the oceans by the end of this century cause a range of behavioural effects in fish, but whether other highly active marine organisms, such as cephalopods, are similarly affected is unknown. We tested the effects of projected future CO2 levels (626 and 956 µatm) on the behaviour of male two-toned pygmy squid, Idiosepius pygmaeus. Exposure to elevated CO2 increased the number of active individuals by 19–25% and increased movement (number of line-crosses) by nearly 3 times compared to squid at present-day CO2. Squid vigilance and defensive behaviours were also altered by elevated CO2 with >80% of individuals choosing jet escape responses over defensive arm postures in response to a visual startle stimulus, compared with 50% choosing jet escape responses at control CO2. In addition, more escape responses were chosen over threat behaviours in body pattern displays at elevated CO2 and individuals were more than twice as likely to use ink as a defence strategy at 956 µatm CO2, compared with controls. Increased activity could lead to adverse effects on energy budgets as well as increasing visibility to predators. A tendency to respond to a stimulus with escape behaviours could increase survival, but may also be energetically costly and could potentially lead to more chases by predators compared with individuals that use defensive postures. These results demonstrate that projected future ocean acidification affects the behaviours of a tropical squid species. PMID:25326517

  6. Projected near-future CO2 levels increase activity and alter defensive behaviours in the tropical squid Idiosepius pygmaeus.

    PubMed

    Spady, Blake L; Watson, Sue-Ann; Chase, Tory J; Munday, Philip L

    2014-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) levels projected to occur in the oceans by the end of this century cause a range of behavioural effects in fish, but whether other highly active marine organisms, such as cephalopods, are similarly affected is unknown. We tested the effects of projected future CO2 levels (626 and 956 µatm) on the behaviour of male two-toned pygmy squid, Idiosepius pygmaeus. Exposure to elevated CO2 increased the number of active individuals by 19-25% and increased movement (number of line-crosses) by nearly 3 times compared to squid at present-day CO2. Squid vigilance and defensive behaviours were also altered by elevated CO2 with >80% of individuals choosing jet escape responses over defensive arm postures in response to a visual startle stimulus, compared with 50% choosing jet escape responses at control CO2. In addition, more escape responses were chosen over threat behaviours in body pattern displays at elevated CO2 and individuals were more than twice as likely to use ink as a defence strategy at 956 µatm CO2, compared with controls. Increased activity could lead to adverse effects on energy budgets as well as increasing visibility to predators. A tendency to respond to a stimulus with escape behaviours could increase survival, but may also be energetically costly and could potentially lead to more chases by predators compared with individuals that use defensive postures. These results demonstrate that projected future ocean acidification affects the behaviours of a tropical squid species. PMID:25326517

  7. Nitric oxide is involved in methyl jasmonate-induced defense responses and secondary metabolism activities of Taxus cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian Wen; Wu, Jian Yong

    2005-06-01

    Methyl jasmonate (MeJA), a methyl ester of jasmonic acid (JA), is a well-established signal molecule in plant defense responses and an effective inducer of secondary metabolite accumulation in plant cell cultures such as the valuable anticancer diterpenoid taxol (paclitaxel) in Taxus spp. This work examines the involvement of nitric oxide (NO) in MeJA-induced plant defense responses and secondary metabolism in Taxus chinensis cell cultures. Exogenously supplied MeJA at 100 microM induced rapid production of NO in the Taxus cell cultures, reaching a maximum within 6 h of MeJA supply. Several other responses occurred concomitantly, including the production of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and the increases in intracellular malondialdehyde (MDA) content, lipoxygenase (LOX) and phenylalanine ammonium-lyase (PAL) activities. The MeJA-induced H2O2 production was suppressed by an NO donor, sodium nitroprusside (SNP), but enhanced by NO inhibitors, N (omega)-nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA) and 2-phenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethyl-imidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (PTIO). In contrast, the MeJA-induced MDA, LOX and PAL were all enhanced by the NO donor but suppressed by the NO inhibitors. The NO inhibitors also suppressed MeJA-induced taxol accumulation. These results are suggestive of a role for NO as a signal element for activating the MeJA-induced defense responses and secondary metabolism activities of plant cells. PMID:15829512

  8. Receptor-mediated activation of a plant Ca2+-permeable ion channel involved in pathogen defense

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Sabine; Nürnberger, Thorsten; Frachisse, Jean-Marie; Wirtz, Wolfgang; Guern, Jean; Hedrich, Rainer; Scheel, Dierk

    1997-01-01

    Pathogen recognition at the plant cell surface typically results in the initiation of a multicomponent defense response. Transient influx of Ca2+ across the plasma membrane is postulated to be part of the signaling chain leading to pathogen resistance. Patch-clamp analysis of parsley protoplasts revealed a novel Ca2+-permeable, La3+-sensitive plasma membrane ion channel of large conductance (309 pS in 240 mM CaCl2). At an extracellular Ca2+ concentration of 1 mM, which is representative of the plant cell apoplast, unitary channel conductance was determined to be 80 pS. This ion channel (LEAC, for large conductance elicitor-activated ion channel) is reversibly activated upon treatment of parsley protoplasts with an oligopeptide elicitor derived from a cell wall protein of Phytophthora sojae. Structural features of the elicitor found previously to be essential for receptor binding, induction of defense-related gene expression, and phytoalexin formation are identical to those required for activation of LEAC. Thus, receptor-mediated stimulation of this channel appears to be causally involved in the signaling cascade triggering pathogen defense in parsley. PMID:11038609

  9. Immune-Related Transcriptome of Coptotermes formosanus Shiraki Workers: The Defense Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Abid; Li, Yi-Feng; Cheng, Yu; Liu, Yang; Chen, Chuan-Cheng; Wen, Shuo-Yang

    2013-01-01

    Formosan subterranean termites, Coptotermes formosanus Shiraki, live socially in microbial-rich habitats. To understand the molecular mechanism by which termites combat pathogenic microbes, a full-length normalized cDNA library and four Suppression Subtractive Hybridization (SSH) libraries were constructed from termite workers infected with entomopathogenic fungi (Metarhizium anisopliae and Beauveria bassiana), Gram-positive Bacillus thuringiensis and Gram-negative Escherichia coli, and the libraries were analyzed. From the high quality normalized cDNA library, 439 immune-related sequences were identified. These sequences were categorized as pattern recognition receptors (47 sequences), signal modulators (52 sequences), signal transducers (137 sequences), effectors (39 sequences) and others (164 sequences). From the SSH libraries, 27, 17, 22 and 15 immune-related genes were identified from each SSH library treated with M. anisopliae, B. bassiana, B. thuringiensis and E. coli, respectively. When the normalized cDNA library was compared with the SSH libraries, 37 immune-related clusters were found in common; 56 clusters were identified in the SSH libraries, and 259 were identified in the normalized cDNA library. The immune-related gene expression pattern was further investigated using quantitative real time PCR (qPCR). Important immune-related genes were characterized, and their potential functions were discussed based on the integrated analysis of the results. We suggest that normalized cDNA and SSH libraries enable us to discover functional genes transcriptome. The results remarkably expand our knowledge about immune-inducible genes in C. formosanus Shiraki and enable the future development of novel control strategies for the management of Formosan subterranean termites. PMID:23874972

  10. [The effect of lipid emulsions on the mechanisms of organic defense in infectious injury].

    PubMed

    Waitzberg, D L; Yamaguchi, N; Bellinati-Pires, R; Leone, M C; Masili-Oku, S M; Salgado, M M; Soares, S R; Lima-Gonçalves, E

    1992-01-01

    For treatment of metabolic derangements in infective states intravenous lipidic emulsions have been used. Their use is however not harmless existing reports on fat inhibiting the function of blood polymorphonuclear leukocytes and macrophages. The purpose of the research reported herewith was to study in rats the effect of new intravenous lipidic emulsions containing medium chain triglycerides and long chain triglycerides and compare it with the effect of long chain triglycerides emulsion on function of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (chemotaxis, phagocytosis and bactericidal activity). The intraperitoneal implant of an E. coli capsule was used for the study. The transfusions of both lipidic emulsions in septic rats have not altered functions of polymorphonuclear leukocytes when compared with saline infusion. However there was found hepatic steatosis, hypertrophy and presence of fat globules in the Kupffer cells in rats infused with medium chain and long chain triglyceride emulsions. Sequential blood cultures obtained from rats infused with the emulsions showed increased bacterial growth with medium chain triglyceride emulsion. There was no significant difference between the rats that received both lipid infusions and those that received saline infusions as to the mortality. Our experimental study suggests that the use of fat emulsions in infective states be done with care and monitoring of seric triglycerides and steroids. PMID:1340605

  11. Identification of several inducible defense-related genes in mechanically damaged soybean (glycine max l. merr) stems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Multiple defense-related genes have been identified in soybean (Glycine max L. Merr), however, research has primarily focused on the plant leaves, and despite the numerous insects and pathogens that feed on soybean stem tissues, relatively little is known about the stem defense response. In the curr...

  12. Low-dose AgNPs reduce lung mechanical function and innate immune defense in the absence of cellular toxicity.

    PubMed

    Botelho, Danielle J; Leo, Bey Fen; Massa, Christopher B; Sarkar, Srijata; Tetley, Terry D; Chung, Kian Fan; Chen, Shu; Ryan, Mary P; Porter, Alexandra E; Zhang, Junfeng; Schwander, Stephan K; Gow, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    Multiple studies have examined the direct cellular toxicity of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). However, the lung is a complex biological system with multiple cell types and a lipid-rich surface fluid; therefore, organ level responses may not depend on direct cellular toxicity. We hypothesized that interaction with the lung lining is a critical determinant of organ level responses. Here, we have examined the effects of low dose intratracheal instillation of AgNPs (0.05 μg/g body weight) 20 and 110 nm diameter in size, and functionalized with citrate or polyvinylpyrrolidone. Both size and functionalization were significant factors in particle aggregation and lipid interaction in vitro. One day post-intratracheal instillation lung function was assessed, and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and lung tissue collected. There were no signs of overt inflammation. There was no change in surfactant protein-B content in the BAL but there was loss of surfactant protein-D with polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)-stabilized particles. Mechanical impedance data demonstrated a significant increase in pulmonary elastance as compared to control, greatest with 110 nm PVP-stabilized particles. Seven days post-instillation of PVP-stabilized particles increased BAL cell counts, and reduced lung function was observed. These changes resolved by 21 days. Hence, AgNP-mediated alterations in the lung lining and mechanical function resolve by 21 days. Larger particles and PVP stabilization produce the largest disruptions. These studies demonstrate that low dose AgNPs elicit deficits in both mechanical and innate immune defense function, suggesting that organ level toxicity should be considered. PMID:26152688

  13. Annual report to Congress: Department of Energy activities relating to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board, calendar year 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1999-02-01

    This is the ninth Annual Report to the Congress describing Department of Energy (Department) activities in response to formal recommendations and other interactions with the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (Board). The Board, an independent executive-branch agency established in 1988, provides advice and recommendations to the Secretary of energy regarding public health and safety issues at the Department`s defense nuclear facilities. The Board also reviews and evaluates the content and implementation of health and safety standards, as well as other requirements, relating to the design, construction, operation, and decommissioning of the Department`s defense nuclear facilities. The locations of the major Department facilities are provided. During 1998, Departmental activities resulted in the proposed closure of one Board recommendation. In addition, the Department has completed all implementation plan milestones associated with four other Board recommendations. Two new Board recommendations were received and accepted by the Department in 1998, and two new implementation plans are being developed to address these recommendations. The Department has also made significant progress with a number of broad-based initiatives to improve safety. These include expanded implementation of integrated safety management at field sites, a renewed effort to increase the technical capabilities of the federal workforce, and a revised plan for stabilizing excess nuclear materials to achieve significant risk reduction.

  14. Annual report to Congress: Department of Energy activities relating to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board, Calendar Year 1999

    SciTech Connect

    2000-02-01

    This is the tenth Annual Report to the Congress describing Department of Energy activities in response to formal recommendations and other interactions with the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (Board). The Board, an independent executive-branch agency established in 1988, provides advice and recommendations to the Secretary of Energy regarding public health and safety issues at the Department's defense nuclear facilities. The Board also reviews and evaluates the content and implementation of health and safety standards, as well as other requirements, relating to the design, construction, operation, and decommissioning of the Department's defense nuclear facilities. During 1999, Departmental activities resulted in the closure of nine Board recommendations. In addition, the Department has completed all implementation plan milestones associated with three Board recommendations. One new Board recommendation was received and accepted by the Department in 1999, and a new implementation plan is being developed to address this recommendation. The Department has also made significant progress with a number of broad-based initiatives to improve safety. These include expanded implementation of integrated safety management at field sites, opening of a repository for long-term storage of transuranic wastes, and continued progress on stabilizing excess nuclear materials to achieve significant risk reduction.

  15. Characterization of Hg-phytochelatins complexes in vines (Vitis vinifera cv Malbec) as defense mechanism against metal stress.

    PubMed

    Spisso, Adrian A; Cerutti, Soledad; Silva, Fernanda; Pacheco, Pablo H; Martinez, Luis D

    2014-06-01

    An approach to understand vines (Vitis vinifera) defense mechanism against heavy metal stress by isolation and determination of Hg-phytochelatins (PCs) complexes was performed. PCs are important molecules involved in the control of metal concentration in plants. PCs complex toxic metals through -SH groups and stores them inside cells vacuole avoiding any toxic effect of free metals in the cytosol. The Hg-PCs identification was achieved by determination of Hg and S as hetero-tagged atoms. A method involving two-dimensional chromatographic analysis coupled to atomic spectrometry and confirmation by tandem mass spectrometry is proposed. An approach involving size exclusion chromatography coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry on roots, stems, and leaves extracts describing Hg distribution according to molecular weight and sulfur associations is proposed for the first time. Medium-low molecular weight Hg-S associations of 29-100 kDa were found, suggesting PCs presence. A second approach employing reversed-phase chromatography coupled to atomic fluorescence spectrometry analysis allowed the determination of Hg-PCs complexes within the mentioned fractions. Chromatograms showed Hg-PC2, Hg-PC3 and Hg-PC4 presence only in roots. Hg-PCs presence in roots was confirmed by ESI-MS/MS analysis. PMID:24715273

  16. (1)H NMR and GC-MS Based Metabolomics Reveal Defense and Detoxification Mechanism of Cucumber Plant under Nano-Cu Stress.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lijuan; Huang, Yuxiong; Hu, Jerry; Zhou, Hongjun; Adeleye, Adeyemi S; Keller, Arturo A

    2016-02-16

    Because copper nanoparticles are being increasingly used in agriculture as pesticides, it is important to assess their potential implications for agriculture. Concerns have been raised about the bioaccumulation of nano-Cu and their toxicity to crop plants. Here, the response of cucumber plants in hydroponic culture at early development stages to two concentrations of nano-Cu (10 and 20 mg/L) was evaluated by proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H NMR) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) based metabolomics. Changes in mineral nutrient metabolism induced by nano-Cu were determined by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Results showed that nano-Cu at both concentrations interferes with the uptake of a number of micro- and macro-nutrients, such as Na, P, S, Mo, Zn, and Fe. Metabolomics data revealed that nano-Cu at both levels triggered significant metabolic changes in cucumber leaves and root exudates. The root exudate metabolic changes revealed an active defense mechanism against nano-Cu stress: up-regulation of amino acids to sequester/exclude Cu/nano-Cu; down-regulation of citric acid to reduce the mobilization of Cu ions; ascorbic acid up-regulation to combat reactive oxygen species; and up-regulation of phenolic compounds to improve antioxidant system. Thus, we demonstrate that nontargeted (1)H NMR and GC-MS based metabolomics can successfully identify physiological responses induced by nanoparticles. Root exudates metabolomics revealed important detoxification mechanisms. PMID:26751164

  17. Intrinsic cellular defenses against human immunodeficiency viruses.

    PubMed

    Blanco-Melo, Daniel; Venkatesh, Siddarth; Bieniasz, Paul D

    2012-09-21

    Viral infections are often detrimental to host survival and reproduction. Consequently, hosts have evolved a variety of mechanisms to defend themselves against viruses. A component of this arsenal is a set of proteins, termed restriction factors, which exhibit direct antiviral activity. Among these are several classes of proteins (APOBEC3, TRIM5, Tetherin, and SAMHD1) that inhibit the replication of human and simian immunodeficiency viruses. Here, we outline the features, mechanisms, and evolution of these defense mechanisms. We also speculate on how restriction factors arose, how they might interact with the conventional innate and adaptive immune systems, and how an understanding of these intrinsic cellular defenses might be usefully exploited. PMID:22999946

  18. Study of the modulatory activity of BZ (omega) receptor ligands on defensive behaviors in mice: evaluation of the importance of intrinsic efficacy and receptor subtype selectivity.

    PubMed

    Griebel, G; Perrault, G; Sanger, D J

    1999-01-01

    1. This study examined the hypothesis that the anxiolytic effects of benzodiazepine (BZ (omega)) receptor ligands may be associated with actions at a defined receptor subtype and/or their level of intrinsic activity using the mouse defense test battery. 2. This test has been designed to assess defensive reactions of Swiss mice confronted with a natural threat (a rat) and situations associated with this threat. Primary measures taken before, during and after rat confrontation were escape attempts, flight, risk assessment and defensive threat and attack. 3. The drugs used were the non-selective BZ (omega) receptor full agonist diazepam, the non-selective BZ (omega) receptor partial agonist bretazenil and the beta-carboline abecarnil which acts as a full agonist on GABAA receptors containing the alpha 1- and the alpha 3-subunits and as a partial agonist at receptors containing the alpha 2- and the alpha 5-subunits. The drugs were given alone and diazepam was co-administered with either bretazenil or abecarnil. 4. When administered alone, diazepam attenuated several defensive responses including risk assessment activities, defensive threat/attack reactions upon forced contact with the rat and escape attempts following the removal of the rat from the apparatus. Unlike diazepam, bretazenil was devoid of significant activity on defense and abecarnil displayed depressant activity. 5. Bretazenil blocked all behavioral effects of diazepam on defense behaviors. The co-administration of diazepam and abecarnil produced a behavioral profile similar to that observed when diazepam was administered alone, indicating that abecarnil did not influence the effects of diazepam on defense. By contrast, diazepam completely antagonized the sedative effects of abecarnil. 6. These findings indicate that only BZ (omega) ligands with high intrinsic efficacy at all BZ (omega) receptor subtypes display clear and specific effects on defensive behaviors in mice, and suggest that GABAA receptors

  19. Mechanism for the activation of glutamate receptors

    Cancer.gov

    Scientists at the NIH have used a technique called cryo-electron microscopy to determine a molecular mechanism for the activation and desensitization of ionotropic glutamate receptors, a prominent class of neurotransmitter receptors in the brain and spina

  20. Defense styles of pedophilic offenders.

    PubMed

    Drapeau, Martin; Beretta, Véronique; de Roten, Yves; Koerner, Annett; Despland, Jean-Nicolas

    2008-04-01

    This pilot study investigated the defense styles of pedophile sexual offenders. Interviews with 20 pedophiles and 20 controls were scored using the Defense Mechanisms Rating Scales. Results showed that pedophiles had a significantly lower overall defensive functioning score than the controls. Pedophiles used significantly fewer obsessional-level defenses but more major image-distorting and action-level defenses. Results also suggested differences in the prevalence of individual defenses where pedophiles used more dissociation, displacement, denial, autistic fantasy, splitting of object, projective identification, acting out, and passive aggressive behavior but less intellectualization and rationalization. PMID:17875603

  1. Protective effect of AVS073, a polyherbal formula, against UVA-induced melanogenesis through a redox mechanism involving glutathione-related antioxidant defense

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Ayurved Siriraj Brand Wattana formula (AVS073), a Thai herbal formula, has traditionally been used for health promotion and prevention of age-related problems. Ultraviolet A (UVA) is recognized to play a vital role in stimulation of melanin synthesis responsible for abnormal skin pigmentation possibly mediated by photooxidative stress. We thus aimed to study the inhibitory effect of AVS073 extracts on UVA-induced melanogenesis via a redox mechanism involving glutathione (GSH) synthesis and glutathione S-transferase (GST) using human melanoma (G361) cell culture. Methods The standardization of AVS073 extracts was carried out by TLC and UHPLC to obtain fingerprinting profiles of the formula, which identified several phenolic compounds including gallic acid (GA) in the formula. Antimelanogenic actions of AVS073 (up to 60 μg/ml) and GA (up to 10 μg/ml) were investigated by measuring tyrosinase activity and mRNA as well as melanin level in G361 cells irradiated with UVA. Moreover, antioxidant actions of the herbal formula and GA were determined by evaluating oxidant formation and modulation of GSH-related antioxidant defenses including GSH content, GST activity and mRNA level of γ-glutamate cysteine ligase catalytic (γ-GCLC) and modifier (γ-GCLM) subunit and GST. Results AVS073 extracts and GA, used as a reference compound, suppressed UVA-augmented tyrosinase activity and mRNA and melanin formation. In addition, pretreatment with AVS073 and GA was able to inhibit cellular oxidative stress, GSH depletion, GST inactivation and downregulation of γ-GCLC, γ-GCLM and GST mRNA in G361 cells exposed to UVA radiation. Conclusions AVS073 formula exerted antimelanogenic effects possibly through improving the redox state by upregulation of GSH and GST. Moreover, pharmacological activity of the polyherbal formula would be attributed to combined action of different phenolic compounds present in the formula. PMID:23826868

  2. Defensive activation to (un)predictable interoceptive threat: The NPU respiratory threat test (NPUr).

    PubMed

    Schroijen, Mathias; Fantoni, Simona; Rivera, Carmen; Vervliet, Bram; Schruers, Koen; van den Bergh, Omer; van Diest, Ilse

    2016-06-01

    Potentially life-threatening interoceptive sensations easily engage the behavioral defensive system. Resulting fear and anxiety toward interoceptive threat are functionally distinct states that are hypothesized to play a prominent role in the etiology of panic disorder. The present study aimed to investigate whether fear- and anxiety-potentiated startle responses occur to predictable and unpredictable interoceptive threat, respectively. Therefore, we modified the NPU threat test (Schmitz & Grillon, ) and replaced the aversive electrocutaneous stimulus with an aversive interoceptive stimulus (a breathing occlusion, making it briefly impossible to breathe). Healthy participants (N = 48) underwent three instructed conditions. A visual cue signaled the occlusion in the predictable condition (P), whereas another cue was unrelated to the occurrence of the occlusion in the unpredictable condition (U). The safe condition (N) also had a visual cue, but no occlusion. Both fear- and anxiety-potentiated startle blink responses were observed in response to predictable and unpredictable respiratory threat, respectively. The current study presents and validates the NPU respiratory threat test (NPUr) as an ecologically valid paradigm to study both anxiety and fear in response to a panic-relevant interoceptive threat. The paradigm allows future testing of contextual generalization, investigation of different clinical groups, and more explicit comparisons of defensive responding to interoceptive versus exteroceptive threats. PMID:26879710

  3. Seasonal changes in the activity of antioxidative defense in the kidneys of the euthermic ground squirrel (Citellus citellus).

    PubMed

    Buzadzić, B; Blagojević, D; Korać, B; Saicić, Z S; Spasić, M B; Petrović, V M

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this work was to determine the activity of the antioxidant enzymes: superoxide dismutase (EC 1.15.1.1; SOD), catalase (EC 1.11.1.6; CAT), glutathione peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.9; GSH-Px), glutathione-S-transferase (EC 2.5.1.18; GST), glutathione reductase (EC 1.6.4.2; GR) and the low molecular mass antioxidants: ascorbic acid (ASA) and vitamin E (vit E) in the kidney of ground squirrels during circannual changes. Keeping the ground squirrel at the temperature of thermic neutrality (30 degrees C) provides a stable euthermic state during the whole year and thus any change is due to the circannual rhythm. The highest specific activity of all examined antioxidative defense enzymes in the kidney was found in the spring, when ground squirrels are seasonally the most active. In the summer, lower specific activity of GSH-Px as well as of SOD and CAT were noted and, when expressed per g wet mass, only a decrease in GSH-Px activity was recorded. In the kidney of ground squirrels kept at 30 degrees C, the lowest specific activity of all examined enzymes was found during the winter and, when expressed per g wet mass, only the SOD activity was lower than in the spring and summer. Higher amounts of vitamins C and E were found in the ground squirrel kidneys in the summer. The results obtained in this work demonstrate that circannual regulation of metabolic activity, which is inherent to seasonal hibernators, is also expressed at the level of antioxidative defense in the kidneys. PMID:9726801

  4. PeBL1, a Novel Protein Elicitor from Brevibacillus laterosporus Strain A60, Activates Defense Responses and Systemic Resistance in Nicotiana benthamiana

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haoqian; Yang, Xiufen; Guo, Lihua; Zeng, Hongmei

    2015-01-01

    We report the identification, characterization, and gene cloning of a novel protein elicitor (PeBL1) secreted from Brevibacillus laterosporus strain A60. Through a purification process consisting of ion-exchange chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), we isolated a protein that was identified by electrospray ionization quadrupole time of flight tandem mass spectrometry (ESI–Q-TOF–MS-MS). The 351-bp PeBL1 gene produces a 12,833-Da protein with 116 amino acids that contains a 30-residue signal peptide. The PeBL1 protein was expressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant protein can induce a typical hypersensitive response (HR) and systemic resistance in Nicotiana benthamiana, like the endogenous protein. PeBL1-treated N. benthamiana exhibited strong resistance to the infection of tobacco mosaic virus-green fluorescent protein (TMV-GFP) and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci compared to control N. benthamiana. In addition, PeBL1 triggered a cascade of events that resulted in defense responses in plants, including reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, extracellular-medium alkalization, phenolic-compound deposition, and expression of several defense-related genes. Real-time quantitative-PCR analysis indicated that the known defense-related genes PR-1, PR-5, PDF1.2, NPR1, and PAL were upregulated to varying degrees by PeBL1. This research not only provides insights into the mechanism by which beneficial bacteria activate plant systemic resistance, but also sheds new light on a novel strategy for biocontrol using strain A60. PMID:25662975

  5. Commercializing Defense Technologies and Helping Defense Firms Succeed in Commercial Markets: A Report on the Objectives, Activities, and Accomplishments of the TAP-IN Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Technology Access for Product Innovation (TAP-IN), the largest technology deployment project funded by TRP, was competitively selected through a national solicitation for proposals. TAP-IN was created to help companies access and apply defense technologies and help defense-dependent companies enter new commercial markets. Defense technologies included technologies developed by DoD, DOE, NASA, and their contractors. TAP-IN was structured to provide region-based technology access services that were able to draw on technology resources nationwide. TAP-IN provided expert assistance in all stages of the commercialization process from concept through prototype design to capital sourcing and marketing strategy. TAP-IN helped companies locate new technology, identify business partners, secure financing, develop ideas for new products, identify new markets, license technology, solve technical problems, and develop company-specific applications of federal technology. TAP-IN leveraged NASA's existing commercial technology network to create an integrated national network of organizations that assisted companies in every state. In addition to NASA's six regional technology transfer centers (RTTCs), TAP-IN included business and technology development organizations in every state, the Industrial Designers Society of America, and the Federal Laboratory Consortium (FLC).

  6. Mechanism of persulfate activation by phenols.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Mushtaque; Teel, Amy L; Watts, Richard J

    2013-06-01

    The activation of persulfate by phenols was investigated to further the understanding of persulfate chemistry for in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO). Phenol (pKa = 10.0) activated persulfate at pH 12 but not at pH 8, suggesting activation occurred only via the phenoxide form. Evaluation of the phenoxide activation mechanism was complicated by the concurrent activation of persulfate by hydroperoxide anion, which is generated by the base catalyzed hydrolysis of persulfate. Therefore, phenoxide activation was investigated using pentachlorophenoxide at pH 8.3, midway between the pKa of pentachlorophenol (pKa = 4.8) and that of hydrogen peroxide (pKa = 11.8). Of the two possible mechanisms for phenoxide activation of persulfate (reduction or nucleophilic attack) the results were consistent with reduction of persulfate by phenoxide with oxidation of the phenoxide. The concentration of phenoxide required for maximum persulfate activation was low (1 mM). The results of this research document that phenoxides activate persulfate via reduction; phenolic moieties ubiquitous to soil organic matter in the subsurface may have a significant role in the activation of persulfate during its injection into the subsurface for ISCO. Furthermore, the results provide the foundation for activation of persulfate by other organic anions without the toxicity of phenols, such as keto acids. PMID:23663058

  7. The reproductive toxicity on the rotifer Brachionus plicatilis induced by BDE-47 and studies on the effective mechanism based on antioxidant defense system changes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong; Tang, Xuexi; Sha, Jingjing; Chen, Hongmei; Sun, Tianli; Wang, You

    2015-09-01

    2,2',4,4'-Tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-47), a low-brominated Tetra-BDE that is widely distributed in the marine ecosystem, was selected to investigate the reproductive toxicity on the rotifer, Brachionus plicatilis, and the possible mechanism based on antioxidant defense system changes were studied. The results showed the following: (1) A low concentration of BDE-47 had a slight effect on the egg production of individual females and the egg production rate (EPR) of the population. In fact, BDE-47 exerted reproductive inhibition effects in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. The obtained life tables indicated that BDE-47 at a high concentration prolonged the generation time, whereas low and moderate concentrations of BDE-47 had the opposite effects. BDE-47 at a medium concentration significantly decreased the life expectancy and net reproductive rate (P<0.05). Additionally, a high concentration of BDE-47 markedly decreased the net reproductive rate and intrinsic increase rate (P<0.05). The ultra-structure of the ovary showed that BDE-47 severely damaged the ovary. (2) BDE-47 stress elevated the ROS level in B. plicatilis. The GST activity was induced significantly by the low concentration of BDE-47 and inhibited by the highest concentration tested. The GPx activity and GSH content were significant decreased in all the tested groups, and GR activity was induced. GST and GSH appeared to be sensitive to oxidative stress, and all of the glutathione-related enzymes were found to play an important role in maintaining the antioxidant/pro-oxidant balance based on Pearson's correlation analysis. The results indicated that BDE-47 causes reproductive toxicity in B. plicatilis and that the ROS-mediated pathway is responsible for the observed toxicity. PMID:25950406

  8. Competing activation mechanisms in epidemics on networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellano, Claudio; Pastor-Satorras, Romualdo

    2012-04-01

    In contrast to previous common wisdom that epidemic activity in heterogeneous networks is dominated by the hubs with the largest number of connections, recent research has pointed out the role that the innermost, dense core of the network plays in sustaining epidemic processes. Here we show that the mechanism responsible of spreading depends on the nature of the process. Epidemics with a transient state are boosted by the innermost core. Contrarily, epidemics allowing a steady state present a dual scenario, where either the hub independently sustains activity and propagates it to the rest of the system, or, alternatively, the innermost network core collectively turns into the active state, maintaining it globally. In uncorrelated networks the former mechanism dominates if the degree distribution decays with an exponent larger than 5/2, and the latter otherwise. Topological correlations, rife in real networks, may perturb this picture, mixing the role of both mechanisms.

  9. Arabidopsis Sigma Factor Binding Proteins Are Activators of the WRKY33 Transcription Factor in Plant Defense[W

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Zhibing; Li, Ying; Wang, Fei; Cheng, Yuan; Fan, Baofang; Yu, Jing-Quan; Chen, Zhixiang

    2011-01-01

    Necrotrophic pathogens are important plant pathogens that cause many devastating plant diseases. Despite their impact, our understanding of the plant defense response to necrotrophic pathogens is limited. The WRKY33 transcription factor is important for plant resistance to necrotrophic pathogens; therefore, elucidation of its functions will enhance our understanding of plant immunity to necrotrophic pathogens. Here, we report the identification of two WRKY33-interacting proteins, nuclear-encoded SIGMA FACTOR BINDING PROTEIN1 (SIB1) and SIB2, which also interact with plastid-encoded plastid RNA polymerase SIGMA FACTOR1. Both SIB1 and SIB2 contain an N-terminal chloroplast targeting signal and a putative nuclear localization signal, suggesting that they are dual targeted. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation indicates that WRKY33 interacts with SIBs in the nucleus of plant cells. Both SIB1 and SIB2 contain a short VQ motif that is important for interaction with WRKY33. The two VQ motif–containing proteins recognize the C-terminal WRKY domain and stimulate the DNA binding activity of WRKY33. Like WRKY33, both SIB1 and SIB2 are rapidly and strongly induced by the necrotrophic pathogen Botrytis cinerea. Resistance to B. cinerea is compromised in the sib1 and sib2 mutants but enhanced in SIB1-overexpressing transgenic plants. These results suggest that dual-targeted SIB1 and SIB2 function as activators of WRKY33 in plant defense against necrotrophic pathogens. PMID:21990940

  10. Contribution of transcription factor, SP1, to the promotion of HB-EGF expression in defense mechanism against the treatment of irinotecan in ovarian clear cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Miyata, Kohei; Yotsumoto, Fusanori; Nam, Sung Ouk; Odawara, Takashi; Manabe, Sadao; Ishikawa, Toyokazu; Itamochi, Hiroaki; Kigawa, Junzo; Takada, Shuji; Asahara, Hiroshi; Kuroki, Masahide; Miyamoto, Shingo

    2014-01-01

    Ovarian clear cell carcinoma (OCCC) is a worst histological subtype than other ovarian malignant tumor. Heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor (HB-EGF) is a promising target for ovarian cancer therapy. The aims of this study were to validate the efficacy of HB-EGF–targeted therapy for OCCC and to identify the transcription factor that contributed to the induction of HB-EGF by SN38 treatment in OCCC cells. HB-EGF was highly expressed in OCCC cells, and an increase of HB-EGF was induced by SN38 which had only antitumor effect among conventional anticancer agents on OCCC. A specific inhibitor of HB-EGF, a cross-reacting material 197 (CRM197), led to a synergistic increase in the number of apoptotic OCCC cells with the treatment of SN38. The luciferase assay with 5′-deletion promoter constructs identified a GC-rich element between −125 and −178 (the distal transcription start site was denoted +1) as a cis-regulatory region, and the treatment of SN38 induced luciferase activity in this region. An in silico and chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis estimated that SP1 bound to the cis-regulatory region of HB-EGF in OCCC cells. Real-time PCR and cell viability assays showed that the transfection of a small interfering RNA targeting SP1 suppressed the expression of HB-EGF induced by SN38, resulting in the enhanced sensitivity of SN38. Taken together, these results indicate that induction of HB-EGF expression contributed to defense mechanism against treatment of SN38 through the transcriptional activity of SP1 in OCCC cells. PMID:25060396

  11. Complement System Part I – Molecular Mechanisms of Activation and Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Merle, Nicolas S.; Church, Sarah Elizabeth; Fremeaux-Bacchi, Veronique; Roumenina, Lubka T.

    2015-01-01

    Complement is a complex innate immune surveillance system, playing a key role in defense against pathogens and in host homeostasis. The complement system is initiated by conformational changes in recognition molecular complexes upon sensing danger signals. The subsequent cascade of enzymatic reactions is tightly regulated to assure that complement is activated only at specific locations requiring defense against pathogens, thus avoiding host tissue damage. Here, we discuss the recent advances describing the molecular and structural basis of activation and regulation of the complement pathways and their implication on physiology and pathology. This article will review the mechanisms of activation of alternative, classical, and lectin pathways, the formation of C3 and C5 convertases, the action of anaphylatoxins, and the membrane-attack-complex. We will also discuss the importance of structure–function relationships using the example of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. Lastly, we will discuss the development and benefits of therapies using complement inhibitors. PMID:26082779

  12. Obligate Biotroph Pathogens of the Genus Albugo Are Better Adapted to Active Host Defense Compared to Niche Competitors.

    PubMed

    Ruhe, Jonas; Agler, Matthew T; Placzek, Aleksandra; Kramer, Katharina; Finkemeier, Iris; Kemen, Eric M

    2016-01-01

    Recent research suggested that plants behave differently under combined versus single abiotic and biotic stress conditions in controlled environments. While this work has provided a glimpse into how plants might behave under complex natural conditions, it also highlights the need for field experiments using established model systems. In nature, diverse microbes colonize the phyllosphere of Arabidopsis thaliana, including the obligate biotroph oomycete genus Albugo, causal agent of the common disease white rust. Biotrophic, as well as hemibiotrophic plant pathogens are characterized by efficient suppression of host defense responses. Lab experiments have even shown that Albugo sp. can suppress non-host resistance, thereby enabling otherwise avirulent pathogen growth. We asked how a pathogen that is vitally dependent on a living host can compete in nature for limited niche space while paradoxically enabling colonization of its host plant for competitors? To address this question, we used a proteomics approach to identify differences and similarities between lab and field samples of Albugo sp.-infected and -uninfected A. thaliana plants. We could identify highly similar apoplastic proteomic profiles in both infected and uninfected plants. In wild plants, however, a broad range of defense-related proteins were detected in the apoplast regardless of infection status, while no or low levels of defense-related proteins were detected in lab samples. These results indicate that Albugo sp. do not strongly affect immune responses and leave distinct branches of the immune signaling network intact. To validate our findings and to get mechanistic insights, we tested a panel of A. thaliana mutant plants with induced or compromised immunity for susceptibility to different biotrophic pathogens. Our findings suggest that the biotroph pathogen Albugo selectively interferes with host defense under different environmental and competitive pressures to maintain its ecological niche

  13. Obligate Biotroph Pathogens of the Genus Albugo Are Better Adapted to Active Host Defense Compared to Niche Competitors

    PubMed Central

    Ruhe, Jonas; Agler, Matthew T.; Placzek, Aleksandra; Kramer, Katharina; Finkemeier, Iris; Kemen, Eric M.

    2016-01-01

    Recent research suggested that plants behave differently under combined versus single abiotic and biotic stress conditions in controlled environments. While this work has provided a glimpse into how plants might behave under complex natural conditions, it also highlights the need for field experiments using established model systems. In nature, diverse microbes colonize the phyllosphere of Arabidopsis thaliana, including the obligate biotroph oomycete genus Albugo, causal agent of the common disease white rust. Biotrophic, as well as hemibiotrophic plant pathogens are characterized by efficient suppression of host defense responses. Lab experiments have even shown that Albugo sp. can suppress non-host resistance, thereby enabling otherwise avirulent pathogen growth. We asked how a pathogen that is vitally dependent on a living host can compete in nature for limited niche space while paradoxically enabling colonization of its host plant for competitors? To address this question, we used a proteomics approach to identify differences and similarities between lab and field samples of Albugo sp.-infected and -uninfected A. thaliana plants. We could identify highly similar apoplastic proteomic profiles in both infected and uninfected plants. In wild plants, however, a broad range of defense-related proteins were detected in the apoplast regardless of infection status, while no or low levels of defense-related proteins were detected in lab samples. These results indicate that Albugo sp. do not strongly affect immune responses and leave distinct branches of the immune signaling network intact. To validate our findings and to get mechanistic insights, we tested a panel of A. thaliana mutant plants with induced or compromised immunity for susceptibility to different biotrophic pathogens. Our findings suggest that the biotroph pathogen Albugo selectively interferes with host defense under different environmental and competitive pressures to maintain its ecological niche

  14. Induction of multixenobiotic defense mechanisms in resistant Daphnia magna clones as a general cellular response to stress.

    PubMed

    Jordão, Rita; Campos, Bruno; Lemos, Marco F L; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Tauler, Romà; Barata, Carlos

    2016-06-01

    Multixenobiotic resistance mechanisms (MXR) were recently identified in Daphnia magna. Previous results characterized gene transcripts of genes encoding and efflux activities of four putative ABCB1 and ABCC transporters that were chemically induced but showed low specificity against model transporter substrates and inhibitors, thus preventing us from distinguishing between activities of different efflux transporter types. In this study we report on the specificity of induction of ABC transporters and of the stress protein hsp70 in clones selected to be genetically resistant to ABCB1 chemical substrates. Clones resistant to mitoxantrone, ivermectin and pentachlorophenol showed distinctive transcriptional responses of transporter protein coding genes and of putative transporter dye activities. Expression of hsp70 proteins also varied across resistant clones. Clones resistant to mitoxantrone and pentachlorophenol showed high constitutive levels of hsp70. Transcriptional levels of the abcb1 gene transporter and of putative dye transporter activity were also induced to a greater extent in the pentachlorophenol resistant clone. Observed higher dye transporter activities in individuals from clones resistant to mitoxantrone and ivermectin were unrelated with transcriptional levels of the studied four abcc and abcb1 transporter genes. These findings suggest that Abcb1 induction in D. magna may be a part of a general cellular stress response. PMID:27039215

  15. Transgenic expression of the dicotyledonous pattern recognition receptor EFR in rice leads to ligand-dependent activation of defense responses

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Schwessinger, Benjamin; Bahar, Ofir; Thomas, Nicolas; Holton, Nicolas; Nekrasov, Vladimir; Ruan, Deling; Canlas, Patrick E.; Daudi, Arsalan; Petzold, Christopher J.; Singan, Vasanth R.; et al

    2015-03-30

    Plant plasma membrane localized pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) detect extracellular pathogen-associated molecules. PRRs such as Arabidopsis EFR and rice XA21 are taxonomically restricted and are absent from most plant genomes. Here we show that rice plants expressing EFR or the chimeric receptor EFR::XA21, containing the EFR ectodomain and the XA21 intracellular domain, sense both Escherichia coli- and Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo)-derived elf18 peptides at sub-nanomolar concentrations. Treatment of EFR and EFR::XA21 rice leaf tissue with elf18 leads to MAP kinase activation, reactive oxygen production and defense gene expression. Although expression of EFR does not lead to robust enhanced resistancemore » to fully virulent Xoo isolates, it does lead to quantitatively enhanced resistance to weakly virulent Xoo isolates. EFR interacts with OsSERK2 and the XA21 binding protein 24 (XB24), two key components of the rice XA21-mediated immune response. Rice-EFR plants silenced for OsSERK2, or overexpressing rice XB24 are compromised in elf18-induced reactive oxygen production and defense gene expression indicating that these proteins are also important for EFR-mediated signaling in transgenic rice. Taken together, our results demonstrate the potential feasibility of enhancing disease resistance in rice and possibly other monocotyledonous crop species by expression of dicotyledonous PRRs. Our results also suggest that Arabidopsis EFR utilizes at least a subset of the known endogenous rice XA21 signaling components.« less

  16. Transgenic Expression of the Dicotyledonous Pattern Recognition Receptor EFR in Rice Leads to Ligand-Dependent Activation of Defense Responses

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Nicolas; Holton, Nicolas; Nekrasov, Vladimir; Ruan, Deling; Canlas, Patrick E.; Daudi, Arsalan; Petzold, Christopher J.; Singan, Vasanth R.; Kuo, Rita; Chovatia, Mansi; Daum, Christopher; Heazlewood, Joshua L.; Zipfel, Cyril; Ronald, Pamela C.

    2015-01-01

    Plant plasma membrane localized pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) detect extracellular pathogen-associated molecules. PRRs such as Arabidopsis EFR and rice XA21 are taxonomically restricted and are absent from most plant genomes. Here we show that rice plants expressing EFR or the chimeric receptor EFR::XA21, containing the EFR ectodomain and the XA21 intracellular domain, sense both Escherichia coli- and Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo)-derived elf18 peptides at sub-nanomolar concentrations. Treatment of EFR and EFR::XA21 rice leaf tissue with elf18 leads to MAP kinase activation, reactive oxygen production and defense gene expression. Although expression of EFR does not lead to robust enhanced resistance to fully virulent Xoo isolates, it does lead to quantitatively enhanced resistance to weakly virulent Xoo isolates. EFR interacts with OsSERK2 and the XA21 binding protein 24 (XB24), two key components of the rice XA21-mediated immune response. Rice-EFR plants silenced for OsSERK2, or overexpressing rice XB24 are compromised in elf18-induced reactive oxygen production and defense gene expression indicating that these proteins are also important for EFR-mediated signaling in transgenic rice. Taken together, our results demonstrate the potential feasibility of enhancing disease resistance in rice and possibly other monocotyledonous crop species by expression of dicotyledonous PRRs. Our results also suggest that Arabidopsis EFR utilizes at least a subset of the known endogenous rice XA21 signaling components. PMID:25821973

  17. Molecular mechanisms regulating NLRP3 inflammasome activation

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Eun-Kyeong; Kim, Jin Kyung; Shin, Dong-Min; Sasakawa, Chihiro

    2016-01-01

    Inflammasomes are multi-protein signaling complexes that trigger the activation of inflammatory caspases and the maturation of interleukin-1β. Among various inflammasome complexes, the NLRP3 inflammasome is best characterized and has been linked with various human autoinflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Thus, the NLRP3 inflammasome may be a promising target for anti-inflammatory therapies. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of the mechanisms by which the NLRP3 inflammasome is activated in the cytosol. We also describe the binding partners of NLRP3 inflammasome complexes activating or inhibiting the inflammasome assembly. Our knowledge of the mechanisms regulating NLRP3 inflammasome signaling and how these influence inflammatory responses offers further insight into potential therapeutic strategies to treat inflammatory diseases associated with dysregulation of the NLRP3 inflammasome. PMID:26549800

  18. Mechanisms of Cell Propulsion by Active Stresses.

    PubMed

    Carlsson, A E

    2011-07-01

    The mechanisms by which cytoskeletal flows and cell-substrate interactions interact to generate cell motion are explored using a simplified model of the cytoskeleton as a viscous gel containing active stresses. This model yields explicit general results relating cell speed and traction forces to the distributions of active stress and cell-substrate friction. It is found that 1) the cell velocity is given by a function that quantifies the asymmetry of the active-stress distribution, 2) gradients in cell-substrate friction can induce motion even when the active stresses are symmetrically distributed, 3) the traction-force dipole is enhanced by protrusive stresses near the cell edges or contractile stresses near the center of the cell, and 4) the cell velocity depends biphasically on the cell-substrate adhesion strength if active stress is enhanced by adhesion. Specific experimental tests of the calculated dependences are proposed. PMID:21804763

  19. Mechanisms of Cell Propulsion by Active Stresses

    PubMed Central

    Carlsson, A. E.

    2011-01-01

    The mechanisms by which cytoskeletal flows and cell-substrate interactions interact to generate cell motion are explored using a simplified model of the cytoskeleton as a viscous gel containing active stresses. This model yields explicit general results relating cell speed and traction forces to the distributions of active stress and cell-substrate friction. It is found that 1) the cell velocity is given by a function that quantifies the asymmetry of the active-stress distribution, 2) gradients in cell-substrate friction can induce motion even when the active stresses are symmetrically distributed, 3) the traction-force dipole is enhanced by protrusive stresses near the cell edges or contractile stresses near the center of the cell, and 4) the cell velocity depends biphasically on the cell-substrate adhesion strength if active stress is enhanced by adhesion. Specific experimental tests of the calculated dependences are proposed. PMID:21804763

  20. BQ123 Stimulates Skeletal Muscle Antioxidant Defense via Nrf2 Activation in LPS-Treated Rats

    PubMed Central

    Jeleń, Agnieszka; Żebrowska, Marta; Balcerczak, Ewa; Gorąca, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Little is understood of skeletal muscle tissue in terms of oxidative stress and inflammation. Endothelin-1 is an endogenous, vasoconstrictive peptide which can induce overproduction of reactive oxygen species and proinflammatory cytokines. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether BQ123, an endothelin-A receptor antagonist, influences the level of TNF-α, IL-6, SOD-1, HO-1, Nrf2 mRNA, and NF-κB subunit RelA/p65 mRNA in the femoral muscle obtained from endotoxemic rats. Male Wistar rats were divided into 4 groups (n = 6) and received iv (1) saline (control), (2) LPS (15 mg/kg), (3) BQ123 (1 mg/kg), (4) BQ123 (1 mg/kg), and LPS (15 mg/kg, resp.) 30 min later. Injection of LPS led to significant increase in levels of RelA/p65 mRNA, TNF-α, and IL-6, while content of SOD-1, HO-1, and Nrf2 mRNA was unchanged. Administration of BQ123 prior to LPS challenge resulted in a significant reduction in RelA/p65 mRNA, TNF-α, and IL-6 levels, as well as markedly elevated concentrations of SOD-1, HO-1, and Nrf2 mRNA. BQ123 appears to enhance antioxidant defense and prevent production of TNF-α and IL-6 in skeletal muscle of LPS-treated rat. In conclusion, endothelin-A receptor antagonism exerts significant impact on the skeletal muscle favouring anti-inflammatory effects and protection against oxidative stress. PMID:26823945

  1. Comets: mechanisms of x-ray activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibadov, Subhon

    2016-07-01

    Basic mechanisms of X-ray activity of comets are considered, including D-D mechanism corresponding to generation of X-rays due to production of hot short-living plasma clumps at high-velocity collisions between cometary and interplanetary dust particles as well as M-M one corresponding to production of X-rays due to recombination of multicharge ions of solar wind plasma via charge exchange process at their collisions with molecules/atoms of the cometary atmospheres. Peculiarities of the variation of the comet X-ray spectrum and X-ray luminosity with variation of its heliocentric distance are revealed.

  2. Annual report to Congress. Department of Energy activities relating to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board, calendar year 2000

    SciTech Connect

    2001-03-01

    This Annual Report to the Congress describes the Department of Energy's activities in response to formal recommendations and other interactions with the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board. During 2000, the Department completed its implementation and proposed closure of one Board recommendation and completed all implementation plan milestones associated with two additional Board recommendations. Also in 2000, the Department formally accepted two new Board recommendations and developed implementation plans in response to those recommendations. The Department also made significant progress with a number of broad-based safety initiatives. These include initial implementation of integrated safety management at field sites and within headquarters program offices, issuance of a nuclear safety rule, and continued progress on stabilizing excess nuclear materials to achieve significant risk reduction.

  3. [Molecular mechanisms of niclosamide antitumor activity].

    PubMed

    Moskaleva, E Yu; Perevozchikova, V G; Zhirnik, A S; Severin, S E

    2015-01-01

    In this review the recent data regarding the antitumor activity of niclosamide and the molecular mechanisms of its antitumor activity are presented. Niclosamide has been used in the clinic for the treatment of intestinal parasite infections. In recent years in several screening investigations of various drugs and chemical compounds niclosamide was identified as a potential anticancer agent. Niclosamide not only inhibits the Wnt/β-catenin, mTORC1, STAT3, NF-κB and Notch signaling pathways, but also targets mitochondria in cancer cells to induce growth inhibition and apoptosis. A number of studies have established the anticancer activity of niclosamide in both in vitro and in vivo in xenotransplantation models using human tumors and immunodeficient mice. It is important that niclosamide is active not only against tumor cells but also cancer stem cells. Normal cells are resistant to niclosamide. The accumulated experimental data suggest niclosamide is a promising drug for the treatment of various types of cancer. PMID:26716739

  4. Topological mechanics: from metamaterials to active matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitelli, Vincenzo

    2015-03-01

    Mechanical metamaterials are artificial structures with unusual properties, such as negative Poisson ratio, bistability or tunable acoustic response, which originate in the geometry of their unit cell. At the heart of such unusual behavior is often a mechanism: a motion that does not significantly stretch or compress the links between constituent elements. When activated by motors or external fields, these soft motions become the building blocks of robots and smart materials. In this talk, we discuss topological mechanisms that possess two key properties: (i) their existence cannot be traced to a local imbalance between degrees of freedom and constraints (ii) they are robust against a wide range of structural deformations or changes in material parameters. The continuum elasticity of these mechanical structures is captured by non-linear field theories with a topological boundary term similar to topological insulators and quantum Hall systems. We present several applications of these concepts to the design and experimental realization of 2D and 3D topological structures based on linkages, origami, buckling meta-materials and lastly active media that break time-reversal symmetry.

  5. Mechanically activated artificial cell by using microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Ho, Kenneth K Y; Lee, Lap Man; Liu, Allen P

    2016-01-01

    All living organisms sense mechanical forces. Engineering mechanosensitive artificial cell through bottom-up in vitro reconstitution offers a way to understand how mixtures of macromolecules assemble and organize into a complex system that responds to forces. We use stable double emulsion droplets (aqueous/oil/aqueous) to prototype mechanosensitive artificial cells. In order to demonstrate mechanosensation in artificial cells, we develop a novel microfluidic device that is capable of trapping double emulsions into designated chambers, followed by compression and aspiration in a parallel manner. The microfluidic device is fabricated using multilayer soft lithography technology, and consists of a control layer and a deformable flow channel. Deflections of the PDMS membrane above the main microfluidic flow channels and trapping chamber array are independently regulated pneumatically by two sets of integrated microfluidic valves. We successfully compress and aspirate the double emulsions, which result in transient increase and permanent decrease in oil thickness, respectively. Finally, we demonstrate the influx of calcium ions as a response of our mechanically activated artificial cell through thinning of oil. The development of a microfluidic device to mechanically activate artificial cells creates new opportunities in force-activated synthetic biology. PMID:27610921

  6. Mechanically activated artificial cell by using microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Kenneth K. Y.; Lee, Lap Man; Liu, Allen P.

    2016-01-01

    All living organisms sense mechanical forces. Engineering mechanosensitive artificial cell through bottom-up in vitro reconstitution offers a way to understand how mixtures of macromolecules assemble and organize into a complex system that responds to forces. We use stable double emulsion droplets (aqueous/oil/aqueous) to prototype mechanosensitive artificial cells. In order to demonstrate mechanosensation in artificial cells, we develop a novel microfluidic device that is capable of trapping double emulsions into designated chambers, followed by compression and aspiration in a parallel manner. The microfluidic device is fabricated using multilayer soft lithography technology, and consists of a control layer and a deformable flow channel. Deflections of the PDMS membrane above the main microfluidic flow channels and trapping chamber array are independently regulated pneumatically by two sets of integrated microfluidic valves. We successfully compress and aspirate the double emulsions, which result in transient increase and permanent decrease in oil thickness, respectively. Finally, we demonstrate the influx of calcium ions as a response of our mechanically activated artificial cell through thinning of oil. The development of a microfluidic device to mechanically activate artificial cells creates new opportunities in force-activated synthetic biology. PMID:27610921

  7. Cellular Mechanisms Controlling Caspase Activation and Function

    PubMed Central

    Parrish, Amanda B.; Freel, Christopher D.; Kornbluth, Sally

    2013-01-01

    Caspases are the primary drivers of apoptotic cell death, cleaving cellular proteins that are critical for dismantling the dying cell. Initially translated as inactive zymogenic precursors, caspases are activated in response to a variety of cell death stimuli. In addition to factors required for their direct activation (e.g., dimerizing adaptor proteins in the case of initiator caspases that lie at the apex of apoptotic signaling cascades), caspases are regulated by a variety of cellular factors in a myriad of physiological and pathological settings. For example, caspases may be modified posttranslationally (e.g., by phosphorylation or ubiquitylation) or through interaction of modulatory factors with either the zymogenic or active form of a caspase, altering its activation and/or activity. These regulatory events may inhibit or enhance enzymatic activity or may affect activity toward particular cellular substrates. Finally, there is emerging literature to suggest that caspases can participate in a variety of cellular processes unrelated to apoptotic cell death. In these settings, it is particularly important that caspases are maintained under stringent control to avoid inadvertent cell death. It is likely that continued examination of these processes will reveal new mechanisms of caspase regulation with implications well beyond control of apoptotic cell death. PMID:23732469

  8. Selection on defensive traits in a sterile caste - caste evolution: a mechanism to overcome life-history trade-offs?

    PubMed

    Roux, Estelle A; Roux, Maurice; Korb, Judith

    2009-01-01

    During development and evolution individuals generally face a trade-off between the development of weapons and gonads. In termites, characterized by reproductive division of labor, a caste evolved-the soldiers-which is completely sterile and which might be released from developmental trade-offs between weapons and testes. These soldiers are exclusively dedicated to defense. First, we investigated whether defensive traits are under selection in sterile termite soldiers using allometric analyses. In soldiers of the genus Cryptotermes phragmotic traits such as a sculptured and foreshortened head evolve rapidly but were also lost twice. Second, we compared the scaling relationships of these weapons with those in solitary insects facing a trade-off between weapons and gonads. Defensive traits consistently had lower slopes than nondefensive traits which supports the existence of stabilizing selection on soldier phragmotic traits in order to plug galleries. Moreover, soldier head widths were colony specific and correlated with the minimum gallery diameter of a colony. This can proximately be explained by soldiers developing from different instars. The scaling relationships of these termite soldiers contrast strikingly with those of weapons of solitary insects, which are generally exaggerated (i.e., overscaling) male traits. These differences may provide important insights into trait evolution. Trade-offs constraining the development of individuals may have been uncoupled in termites by evolving different castes, each specialized for one function. When individuals in social insect are "released" from developmental constraints through the evolution of castes, this certainly contributed to the ecological and evolutionary success of social insects. PMID:19196335

  9. Human induced pluripotent stem cell lines show stress defense mechanisms and mitochondrial regulation similar to those of human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Lyle; Tilgner, Katarzyna; Saretzki, Gabriele; Atkinson, Stuart P; Stojkovic, Miodrag; Moreno, Ruben; Przyborski, Stefan; Lako, Majlinda

    2010-04-01

    The generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) has enormous potential for the development of patient-specific regenerative medicine. Human embryonic stem cells (hESC) are able to defend their genomic integrity by maintaining low levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) through a combination of enhanced removal capacity and limited production of these molecules. Such limited ROS production stems partly from the small number of mitochondria present in hESC; thus, it was important to determine that human iPSC (hiPSC) generation is able to eliminate the extra mitochondria present in the parental fibroblasts (reminiscent of "bottleneck" situation after fertilization) and to show that hiPSC have antioxidant defenses similar to hESC. We were able to generate seven hiPSC lines from adult human dermal fibroblasts and have fully characterized two of those clones. Both hiPSC clones express pluripotency markers and are able to differentiate in vitro into cells belonging to all three germ layers. One of these clones is able to produce fully differentiated teratoma, whereas the other hiPSC clone is unable to silence the viral expression of OCT4 and c-MYC, produce fully differentiated teratoma, and unable to downregulate the expression of some of the pluripotency genes during the differentiation process. In spite of these differences, both clones show ROS stress defense mechanisms and mitochondrial biogenesis similar to hESC. Together our data suggest that, during the reprogramming process, certain cellular mechanisms are in place to ensure that hiPSC are provided with the same defense mechanisms against accumulation of ROS as the hESC. PMID:20073085

  10. Mechanism of FGF receptor dimerization and activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarabipour, Sarvenaz; Hristova, Kalina

    2016-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (fgfs) are widely believed to activate their receptors by mediating receptor dimerization. Here we show, however, that the FGF receptors form dimers in the absence of ligand, and that these unliganded dimers are phosphorylated. We further show that ligand binding triggers structural changes in the FGFR dimers, which increase FGFR phosphorylation. The observed effects due to the ligands fgf1 and fgf2 are very different. The fgf2-bound dimer structure ensures the smallest separation between the transmembrane (TM) domains and the highest possible phosphorylation, a conclusion that is supported by a strong correlation between TM helix separation in the dimer and kinase phosphorylation. The pathogenic A391E mutation in FGFR3 TM domain emulates the action of fgf2, trapping the FGFR3 dimer in its most active state. This study establishes the existence of multiple active ligand-bound states, and uncovers a novel molecular mechanism through which FGFR-linked pathologies can arise.

  11. Mechanism of FGF receptor dimerization and activation.

    PubMed

    Sarabipour, Sarvenaz; Hristova, Kalina

    2016-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (fgfs) are widely believed to activate their receptors by mediating receptor dimerization. Here we show, however, that the FGF receptors form dimers in the absence of ligand, and that these unliganded dimers are phosphorylated. We further show that ligand binding triggers structural changes in the FGFR dimers, which increase FGFR phosphorylation. The observed effects due to the ligands fgf1 and fgf2 are very different. The fgf2-bound dimer structure ensures the smallest separation between the transmembrane (TM) domains and the highest possible phosphorylation, a conclusion that is supported by a strong correlation between TM helix separation in the dimer and kinase phosphorylation. The pathogenic A391E mutation in FGFR3 TM domain emulates the action of fgf2, trapping the FGFR3 dimer in its most active state. This study establishes the existence of multiple active ligand-bound states, and uncovers a novel molecular mechanism through which FGFR-linked pathologies can arise. PMID:26725515

  12. Mechanism of FGF receptor dimerization and activation

    PubMed Central

    Sarabipour, Sarvenaz; Hristova, Kalina

    2016-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (fgfs) are widely believed to activate their receptors by mediating receptor dimerization. Here we show, however, that the FGF receptors form dimers in the absence of ligand, and that these unliganded dimers are phosphorylated. We further show that ligand binding triggers structural changes in the FGFR dimers, which increase FGFR phosphorylation. The observed effects due to the ligands fgf1 and fgf2 are very different. The fgf2-bound dimer structure ensures the smallest separation between the transmembrane (TM) domains and the highest possible phosphorylation, a conclusion that is supported by a strong correlation between TM helix separation in the dimer and kinase phosphorylation. The pathogenic A391E mutation in FGFR3 TM domain emulates the action of fgf2, trapping the FGFR3 dimer in its most active state. This study establishes the existence of multiple active ligand-bound states, and uncovers a novel molecular mechanism through which FGFR-linked pathologies can arise. PMID:26725515

  13. Cytochrome bd oxidase from Escherichia coli displays high catalase activity: an additional defense against oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Borisov, Vitaliy B; Forte, Elena; Davletshin, Albert; Mastronicola, Daniela; Sarti, Paolo; Giuffrè, Alessandro

    2013-07-11

    Cytochrome bd oxygen reductase from Escherichia coli has three hemes, b558, b595 and d. We found that the enzyme, as-prepared or in turnover with O2, rapidly decomposes H2O2 with formation of approximately half a mole of O2 per mole of H2O2. Such catalase activity vanishes upon cytochrome bd reduction, does not compete with the oxygen-reductase activity, is insensitive to NO, CO, antimycin-A and N-ethylmaleimide (NEM), but is inhibited by cyanide (Ki ~2.5μM) and azide. The activity, possibly associated with heme-b595, was also observed in catalase-deficient E. coli cells following cytochrome bd over-expression suggesting a protective role against oxidative stress in vivo. PMID:23727202

  14. Shaping Neuronal Network Activity by Presynaptic Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Ashery, Uri

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal microcircuits generate oscillatory activity, which has been linked to basic functions such as sleep, learning and sensorimotor gating. Although synaptic release processes are well known for their ability to shape the interaction between neurons in microcircuits, most computational models do not simulate the synaptic transmission process directly and hence cannot explain how changes in synaptic parameters alter neuronal network activity. In this paper, we present a novel neuronal network model that incorporates presynaptic release mechanisms, such as vesicle pool dynamics and calcium-dependent release probability, to model the spontaneous activity of neuronal networks. The model, which is based on modified leaky integrate-and-fire neurons, generates spontaneous network activity patterns, which are similar to experimental data and robust under changes in the model's primary gain parameters such as excitatory postsynaptic potential and connectivity ratio. Furthermore, it reliably recreates experimental findings and provides mechanistic explanations for data obtained from microelectrode array recordings, such as network burst termination and the effects of pharmacological and genetic manipulations. The model demonstrates how elevated asynchronous release, but not spontaneous release, synchronizes neuronal network activity and reveals that asynchronous release enhances utilization of the recycling vesicle pool to induce the network effect. The model further predicts a positive correlation between vesicle priming at the single-neuron level and burst frequency at the network level; this prediction is supported by experimental findings. Thus, the model is utilized to reveal how synaptic release processes at the neuronal level govern activity patterns and synchronization at the network level. PMID:26372048

  15. Combined activation of the energy and cellular-defense pathways may explain the potent anti-senescence activity of methylene blue

    PubMed Central

    Atamna, Hani; Atamna, Wafa; Al-Eyd, Ghaith; Shanower, Gregory; Dhahbi, Joseph M.

    2015-01-01

    Methylene blue (MB) delays cellular senescence, induces complex-IV, and activates Keap1/Nrf2; however, the molecular link of these effects to MB is unclear. Since MB is redox-active, we investigated its effect on the NAD/NADH ratio in IMR90 cells. The transient increase in NAD/NADH observed in MB-treated cells triggered an investigation of the energy regulator AMPK. MB induced AMPK phosphorylation in a transient pattern, which was followed by the induction of PGC1α and SURF1: both are inducers of mitochondrial and complex-IV biogenesis. Subsequently MB-treated cells exhibited >100% increase in complex-IV activity and a 28% decline in cellular oxidants. The telomeres erosion rate was also significantly lower in MB-treated cells. A previous research suggested that the pattern of AMPK activation (i.e., chronic or transient) determines the AMPK effect on cell senescence. We identified that the anti-senescence activity of MB (transient activator) was 8-times higher than that of AICAR (chronic activator). Since MB lacked an effect on cell cycle, an MB-dependent change to cell cycle is unlikely to contribute to the anti-senescence activity. The current findings in conjunction with the activation of Keap1/Nrf2 suggest a synchronized activation of the energy and cellular defense pathways as a possible key factor in MB's potent anti-senescence activity. PMID:26386875

  16. Transgenic expression of the dicotyledonous pattern recognition receptor EFR in rice leads to ligand-dependent activation of defense responses

    SciTech Connect

    Schwessinger, Benjamin; Bahar, Ofir; Thomas, Nicolas; Holton, Nicolas; Nekrasov, Vladimir; Ruan, Deling; Canlas, Patrick E.; Daudi, Arsalan; Petzold, Christopher J.; Singan, Vasanth R.; Kuo, Rita; Chovatia, Mansi; Daum, Christopher; Heazlewood, Joshua L.; Zipfel, Cyril; Ronald, Pamela C.

    2015-03-30

    Plant plasma membrane localized pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) detect extracellular pathogen-associated molecules. PRRs such as Arabidopsis EFR and rice XA21 are taxonomically restricted and are absent from most plant genomes. Here we show that rice plants expressing EFR or the chimeric receptor EFR::XA21, containing the EFR ectodomain and the XA21 intracellular domain, sense both Escherichia coli- and Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo)-derived elf18 peptides at sub-nanomolar concentrations. Treatment of EFR and EFR::XA21 rice leaf tissue with elf18 leads to MAP kinase activation, reactive oxygen production and defense gene expression. Although expression of EFR does not lead to robust enhanced resistance to fully virulent Xoo isolates, it does lead to quantitatively enhanced resistance to weakly virulent Xoo isolates. EFR interacts with OsSERK2 and the XA21 binding protein 24 (XB24), two key components of the rice XA21-mediated immune response. Rice-EFR plants silenced for OsSERK2, or overexpressing rice XB24 are compromised in elf18-induced reactive oxygen production and defense gene expression indicating that these proteins are also important for EFR-mediated signaling in transgenic rice. Taken together, our results demonstrate the potential feasibility of enhancing disease resistance in rice and possibly other monocotyledonous crop species by expression of dicotyledonous PRRs. Our results also suggest that Arabidopsis EFR utilizes at least a subset of the known endogenous rice XA21 signaling components.

  17. Direct activation of RIP3/MLKL-dependent necrosis by herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) protein ICP6 triggers host antiviral defense

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xing; Li, Yun; Liu, Shan; Yu, Xiaoliang; Li, Lin; Shi, Cuilin; He, Wenhui; Li, Jun; Xu, Lei; Hu, Zhilin; Yu, Lu; Yang, Zhongxu; Chen, Qin; Ge, Lin; Zhang, Zili; Zhou, Biqi; Jiang, Xuejun; Chen, She; He, Sudan

    2014-01-01

    The receptor-interacting kinase-3 (RIP3) and its downstream substrate mixed lineage kinase domain-like protein (MLKL) have emerged as the key cellular components in programmed necrotic cell death. Receptors for the cytokines of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) family and Toll-like receptors (TLR) 3 and 4 are able to activate RIP3 through receptor-interacting kinase-1 and Toll/IL-1 receptor domain-containing adapter inducing IFN-β, respectively. This form of cell death has been implicated in the host-defense system. However, the molecular mechanisms that drive the activation of RIP3 by a variety of pathogens, other than the above-mentioned receptors, are largely unknown. Here, we report that human herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) infection triggers RIP3-dependent necrosis. This process requires MLKL but is independent of TNF receptor, TLR3, cylindromatosis, and host RIP homotypic interaction motif-containing protein DNA-dependent activator of IFN regulatory factor. After HSV-1 infection, the viral ribonucleotide reductase large subunit (ICP6) interacts with RIP3. The formation of the ICP6–RIP3 complex requires the RHIM domains of both proteins. An HSV-1 ICP6 deletion mutant failed to cause effective necrosis of HSV-1–infected cells. Furthermore, ectopic expression of ICP6, but not RHIM mutant ICP6, directly activated RIP3/MLKL-mediated necrosis. Mice lacking RIP3 exhibited severely impaired control of HSV-1 replication and pathogenesis. Therefore, this study reveals a previously uncharacterized host antipathogen mechanism. PMID:25316792

  18. Lipase Activity in Insect Oral Secretions Mediates Defense Responses in Arabidopsis1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Schäfer, Martin; Fischer, Christine; Meldau, Stefan; Seebald, Eileen; Oelmüller, Ralf; Baldwin, Ian T.

    2011-01-01

    How plants perceive herbivory is not yet well understood. We investigated early responses of the model plant Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) to attack from the generalist grasshopper herbivore, Schistocerca gregaria (Caelifera). When compared with wounding alone, S. gregaria attack and the application of grasshopper oral secretions (GS) to puncture wounds elicited a rapid accumulation of various oxylipins, including 13-hydroperoxy octadecatrienoic acid, 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid (OPDA), jasmonic acid, and jasmonic acid-isoleucine. Additionally, GS increased cytosolic calcium levels, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MPK3 and MPK6) activity, and ethylene emission but not the accumulation of hydrogen peroxide. Although GS contain caeliferin A16:0, a putative elicitor of caeliferan herbivores, treatment with pure, synthetic caeliferin A16:0 did not induce any of the observed responses. With mutant plants, we demonstrate that the observed changes in oxylipin levels are independent of MPK3 and MPK6 activity but that MPK6 is important for the GS-induced ethylene release. Biochemical and pharmacological analyses revealed that the lipase activity of GS plays a central role in the GS-induced accumulation of oxylipins, especially OPDA, which could be fully mimicked by treating puncture wounds only with a lipase from Rhizopus arrhizus. GS elicitation increased the levels of OPDA-responsive transcripts. Because the oral secretions of most insects used to study herbivory-induced responses in Arabidopsis rapidly elicit similar accumulations of OPDA, we suggest that lipids containing OPDA (arabidopsides) play an important role in the activation of herbivory-induced responses. PMID:21546453

  19. ShadowNet: An Active Defense Infrastructure for Insider Cyber Attack Prevention

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Xiaohui; Beaver, Justin M; Treadwell, Jim N

    2012-01-01

    The ShadowNet infrastructure for insider cyber attack prevention is comprised of a tiered server system that is able to dynamically redirect dangerous/suspicious network traffic away from production servers that provide web, ftp, database and other vital services to cloned virtual machines in a quarantined environment. This is done transparently from the point of view of both the attacker and normal users. Existing connections, such as SSH sessions, are not interrupted. Any malicious activity performed by the attacker on a quarantined server is not reflected on the production server. The attacker is provided services from the quarantined server, which creates the impression that the attacks performed are successful. The activities of the attacker on the quarantined system are able to be recorded much like a honeypot system for forensic analysis.

  20. Activities of the Institute for Mechanical Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Institute of Mechanical Engineering (IME) is part of Canada's National Research Council. Its mission is to undertake, support, promote, and disseminate research and development in the mechanical engineering aspects of three vital sectors of the Canadian economy: transportation, resource industries, and manufacturing. The IME achieves its mission by performing research and development in its own facilities; by developing, providing, and transferring expertise and knowledge; by making its research facilities available to collaborators and clients; and by participating in international liaison and collaborative research activities. Six research programs are conducted in the IME: Advanced Manufacturing Technology; Coastal Zone Engineering; Cold Regions Engineering; Combustion and Fluids Engineering; Ground Transportation Technology; and Machinery and Engine Technology. The rationale and major research thrusts of each program are described, and specific achievements in 1991-92 are reviewed. Lists of technical reports and papers presented by IME personnel are also included.

  1. Host Immune Defense Peptide LL-37 Activates Caspase-Independent Apoptosis and Suppresses Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Shun X.; Cheng, Alfred S.L.; To, Ka F.; Tong, Joanna H.M.; Li, May S.; Shen, Jin; Wong, Clover C.M.; Zhang, Lin; Chan, Ruby L.Y.; Wang, Xiao J.; Ng, Simon S.M.; Chiu, Lawrence C.M.; Marquez, Victor E.; Gallo, Richard L.; Chan, Francis K.L.; Yu, Jun; Sung, Joseph J.Y.; Wu, William K.K.; Cho, Chi H.

    2014-01-01

    Cathelicidins are a family of bacteriocidal polypeptides secreted by macrophages and polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN). LL-37, the only human cathelicidin, has been implicated in tumorigenesis, but there has been limited investigation of its expression and function in cancer. Here, we report that LL-37 activates a p53-mediated, caspase-independent apoptotic cascade that contributes to suppression of colon cancer. LL-37 was expressed strongly in normal colon mucosa but downregulated in colon cancer tissues, where in both settings its expression correlated with terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase–mediated dUTP nick end labeling-positive apoptotic cells. Exposure of colon cancer cells to LL-37 induced phosphatidylserine externalization and DNA fragmentation in a manner independent of caspase activation. Apoptogenic function was mediated by nuclear translocation of the proapoptotic factors, apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) and endonuclease G (EndoG), through p53-dependent upregulation of Bax and Bak and downregulation of Bcl-2 via a pertussis toxin–sensitive G-protein–coupled receptor (GPCR) pathway. Correspondingly, colonic mucosa of cathelicidin-deficient mice exhibited reduced expression of p53, Bax, and Bak and increased expression of Bcl-2 together with a lower basal level of apoptosis. Cathelicidin-deficient mice exhibited an increased susceptibility to azoxymethane-induced colon tumorigenesis, establishing pathophysiologic relevance in colon cancer. Collectively, our findings show that LL-37 activates a GPCR-p53-Bax/Bak/Bcl-2 signaling cascade that triggers AIF/EndoG–mediated apoptosis in colon cancer cells. PMID:23100468

  2. Molecular mechanisms of asymmetric RAF dimer activation.

    PubMed

    Jambrina, Pablo G; Bohuszewicz, Olga; Buchete, Nicolae-Viorel; Kolch, Walter; Rosta, Edina

    2014-08-01

    Protein phosphorylation is one of the most common post-translational modifications in cell regulatory mechanisms. Dimerization plays also a crucial role in the kinase activity of many kinases, including RAF, CDK2 (cyclin-dependent kinase 2) and EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor), with heterodimers often being the most active forms. However, the structural and mechanistic details of how phosphorylation affects the activity of homo- and hetero-dimers are largely unknown. Experimentally, synthesizing protein samples with fully specified and homogeneous phosphorylation states remains a challenge for structural biology and biochemical studies. Typically, multiple changes in phosphorylation lead to activation of the same protein, which makes structural determination methods particularly difficult. It is also not well understood how the occurrence of phosphorylation and dimerization processes synergize to affect kinase activities. In the present article, we review available structural data and discuss how MD simulations can be used to model conformational transitions of RAF kinase dimers, in both their phosphorylated and unphosphorylated forms. PMID:25109958

  3. 76 FR 64960 - Extension of Agency Information Collection Activity Under OMB Review: Flight Crew Self-Defense...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-19

    ..., 2011 (76 FR 27656). Upon registering for a voluntary advanced self-defense training class provided by... number, and Social Security number (last four digits) from flight and cabin crew members of air carriers... voluntary advanced self-defense training program for flight and cabin crew members of air carriers...

  4. IFN-induced Guanylate Binding Proteins in Inflammasome Activation and Host Defense

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bae-Hoon; Chee, Jonathan D.; Bradfield, Clinton J.; Park, Eui-Soon; Kumar, Pradeep; MacMicking, John D.

    2016-01-01

    Traditional views of the inflammasome highlight pre-existing core components being assembled under basal conditions shortly after infection or tissue damage. Recent work, however, suggests the inflammasome machinery is also subject to tunable or inducible signals that may accelerate its autocatalytic properties and dictate where inflammasome assembly takes place in the cell. Many of these immune signals operate downstream of interferon (IFN) receptors to elicit inflammasome regulators, including a new family of IFN-induced GTPases termed guanylate binding proteins (GBPs). Here, we examine the critical roles for IFN-induced GBPs in directing inflammasome subtype-specific responses and their consequences for cell-autonomous immunity against a wide variety of microbial pathogens. We discuss emerging mechanisms of action and the potential impact of these GBPs on predisposition to sepsis and other infectious or inflammatory diseases. PMID:27092805

  5. Comparative analysis of CsCu/ZnSOD defense role by molecular characterization: gene expression-enzyme activity-protein level.

    PubMed

    Kumaresan, Venkatesh; Gnanam, Annie J; Pasupuleti, Mukesh; Arasu, Mariadhas Valan; Al-Dhabi, Naif Abdullah; Harikrishnan, Ramasamy; Arockiaraj, Jesu

    2015-06-10

    Cu/ZnSOD (copper/zinc superoxide dismutase) primarily scavenges cytosolic reactive oxygen species (ROS) by converting ROS to hydrogen peroxide, which is then converted to water by the catalytic action of catalase, thus playing a pivotal role in the first line of defense mechanism against oxidative stress. In this study, we have reported a complete molecular characterization of cDNA sequence from striped murrel Channa striatus (Cs). Cellular location prediction reveals that CsCu/ZnSOD protein is cytosolic with an accuracy of 90%. Phylogenetic analysis showed that CsCu/ZnSOD belongs to SOD1 group and it shared a common clad with Asian seabass Lates calcarifer and then with other fishes. The highest CsCu/ZnSOD gene expression, SOD enzyme activity and total protein concentration were observed in the liver and its regulation was studied upon fungus (Aphanomyces invadans) and bacterial (Aeromonas hydrophila) challenges. Based on the results obtained from the above analysis, we concluded a correlation of gene expression-enzyme activity-protein concentration. Overall, the findings demonstrated that the CsCu/ZnSOD plays a critical role in the antioxidant system especially in the liver during oxidative stress caused by fungus and bacteria. PMID:25804520

  6. RpoHII Activates Oxidative-Stress Defense Systems and Is Controlled by RpoE in the Singlet Oxygen-Dependent Response in Rhodobacter sphaeroides▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Nuss, Aaron M.; Glaeser, Jens; Klug, Gabriele

    2009-01-01

    Photosynthetic organisms need defense systems against photooxidative stress caused by the generation of highly reactive singlet oxygen (1O2). Here we show that the alternative sigma factor RpoHII is required for the expression of important defense factors and that deletion of rpoHII leads to increased sensitivity against exposure to 1O2 and methylglyoxal in Rhodobacter sphaeroides. The gene encoding RpoHII is controlled by RpoE, and thereby a sigma factor cascade is constituted. We provide the first in vivo study that identifies genes controlled by an RpoHII-type sigma factor, which is widely distributed in the Alphaproteobacteria. RpoHII-dependent genes encode oxidative-stress defense systems, including proteins for the degradation of methylglyoxal, detoxification of peroxides, 1O2 scavenging, and redox and iron homeostasis. Our experiments indicate that glutathione (GSH)-dependent mechanisms are involved in the defense against photooxidative stress in photosynthetic bacteria. Therefore, we conclude that systems pivotal for the organism's defense against photooxidative stress are strongly dependent on GSH and are specifically recognized by RpoHII in R. sphaeroides. PMID:18978062

  7. [Multineuronal cortical activity in dogs with a defensive instrumental conditioned reflex].

    PubMed

    Dolbakian, E E; Merzhanova, G Kh; Tveritskaia, I N

    1989-01-01

    By methods of correlation analysis, interrelations were studied of neurones with high, mean and low amplitudes of spikes singled out by amplitude principle from background multineuronal activity of the motor and somatosensory cortical zones, recorded by chronically implanted semi-microelectrodes in dogs. In trained animals, a high positive correlation was observed of singled out neurones discharges, particularly between the neurones with low and mean amplitude of spikes. By the method of cross-interval histogram, dependent relations were revealed of the neurones with different amplitude characteristic mainly of one-sided excitatory character. PMID:2603558

  8. Mechanism and active variety of allelochemicals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peng, S.-L.; Wen, J.; Guo, Q.-F.

    2004-01-01

    This article summarizes allelochemicals' active variety, its potential causes and function mechanisms. Allelochemicals' activity varies with temperature, photoperiod, water and soils during natural processes, with its initial concentration, compound structure and mixed degree during functional processes, with plant accessions, tissues and maturity within-species, and with research techniques and operation processes. The prospective developmental aspects of allelopathy studies in the future are discussed. Future research should focus on: (1) to identify and purify allelochemicals more effectively, especially for agriculture, (2) the functions of allelopathy at the molecular structure level, (3) using allelopathy to explain plant species interactions, (4) allelopathy as a driving force of succession, and (5) the significance of allelopathy in the evolutionary processes.

  9. Methyl jasmonate effectively enhanced some defense enzymes activity and Total Antioxidant content in harvested "Sabrosa" strawberry fruit.

    PubMed

    Asghari, Mohammadreza; Hasanlooe, Ali Rashid

    2016-05-01

    The use of chemicals in postharvest technology of horticultural crops is highly restricted and it is necessary to introduce safe food preserving methods. Strawberry is very susceptible to postharvest losses and more than 50% of harvested fruit is lost in Iran. Effect of postharvest treatment with methyl jasmonate (at 0, 8, and 16 μmol L(-1)) on some quality attributes of Sabrosa strawberry fruit during storage at 1 ± 0.5°C with 90-95% RH for 14 days followed by 24 h at 20°C was studied. Methyl jasmonate, at both concentrations, decreased weight loss and retained marketability of fruits. Catalase activity of treated fruits was decreased during the first days, but showed a substantial increase during the second week. Methyl jasmonate, in a concentration-dependent manner, enhanced peroxidase activity. Fruit total antioxidant capacity was enhanced by methyl jasmonate treatment. The results indicated that methyl jasmonate plays a key role in establishing resistance against stresses, enhancing fruit defense systems, antioxidant capacity, and storage life leading to decreased postharvest losses. This phytochemical has a good potential to be used in postharvest technology of Sabrosa strawberry fruit and enhance the fruit postharvest life. PMID:27247768

  10. Priming maize resistance by its neighbors: activating 1,4-benzoxazine-3-ones synthesis and defense gene expression to alleviate leaf disease

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Xupo; Yang, Min; Huang, Huichuan; Chuan, Youcong; He, Xiahong; Li, Chengyun; Zhu, Youyong; Zhu, Shusheng

    2015-01-01

    Plant disease can be effectively suppressed in intercropping systems. Our previous study demonstrated that neighboring maize plants can restrict the spread of soil-borne pathogens of pepper plants by secreting defense compounds into the soil. However, whether maize plant can receive benefits from its neighboring pepper plants in an intercropping system is little attention. We examined the effects of maize roots treated with elicitors from the pepper pathogen Phytophthora capsici and pepper root exudates on the synthesis of 1,4-benzoxazine-3-ones (BXs), the expression of defense-related genes in maize, and their ability to alleviate the severity of southern corn leaf blight (SCLB) caused by Bipolaris maydis. We found that SCLB was significantly reduced after the above treatments. The contents of 1,4-benzoxazine-3-ones (BXs: DIBOA, DIMBOA, and MBOA) and the expression levels of BX synthesis and defense genes in maize roots and shoots were up-regulated. DIMBOA and MBOA effectively inhibited the mycelium growth of Bipolaris maydis at physiological concentrations in maize shoots. Further studies suggested that the defense related pathways or genes in maize roots and shoots were activated by elicitors from the P. capsici or pepper root exudates. In conclusion, maize increased the levels of BXs and defense gene expression both in roots and shoots after being triggered by root exudates and pathogen from neighboring pepper plants, eventually enhancing its resistance. PMID:26528303

  11. A nanosized Ag-silica hybrid complex prepared by γ-irradiation activates the defense response in Arabidopsis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Hyosub; Kim, Hwa-Jung; Su Kim, Joong; Kim, Min-Soo; Yoon, Byung-Dae; Park, Hae-Jun; Kim, Cha Young

    2012-02-01

    Silver nanoparticles have antimicrobial activity against many pathogenic microbes. Here, the preparation of a nanosized Ag-silica hybrid complex (NSS) prepared by γ-irradiation is described. The effects of both NSS and reduced Ag nanoparticles (Ag 0) on the growth of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana were tested. The application of 1-10 ppm NSS complex improved Arabidopsis growth in soil, whereas 100 ppm NSS resulted in weakly curled leaves. In addition, supplementation of Murashige and Skoog (MS) growth medium with 1 ppm NSS promoted the root growth of Arabidopsis seedlings, but root growth was inhibited by supplementation with 10 ppm NSS. To investigate whether the NSS complex could induce plant defense responses, the expression of pathogenesis-related ( PR) genes that are implicated in systemic acquired resistance (SAR) in Arabidopsis plants was examined. PR1, PR2 and PR5 were significantly up-regulated by each application of 10 ppm NSS complex or Ag 0 to the rosette leaves. Furthermore, pretreatment with the NSS complex induced more pathogen resistance to the virulent pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 ( Pst) compared to water treatment in Arabidopsis plants.

  12. Disentangling Detoxification: Gene Expression Analysis of Feeding Mountain Pine Beetle Illuminates Molecular-Level Host Chemical Defense Detoxification Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Robert, Jeanne A.; Pitt, Caitlin; Bonnett, Tiffany R.; Yuen, Macaire M. S.; Keeling, Christopher I.; Bohlmann, Jörg; Huber, Dezene P. W.

    2013-01-01

    The mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae, is a native species of bark beetle (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) that caused unprecedented damage to the pine forests of British Columbia and other parts of western North America and is currently expanding its range into the boreal forests of central and eastern Canada and the USA. We conducted a large-scale gene expression analysis (RNA-seq) of mountain pine beetle male and female adults either starved or fed in male-female pairs for 24 hours on lodgepole pine host tree tissues. Our aim was to uncover transcripts involved in coniferophagous mountain pine beetle detoxification systems during early host colonization. Transcripts of members from several gene families significantly increased in insects fed on host tissue including: cytochromes P450, glucosyl transferases and glutathione S-transferases, esterases, and one ABC transporter. Other significantly increasing transcripts with potential roles in detoxification of host defenses included alcohol dehydrogenases and a group of unexpected transcripts whose products may play an, as yet, undiscovered role in host colonization by mountain pine beetle. PMID:24223726

  13. Current understanding of grapevine defense mechanisms against the biotrophic fungus (Erysiphe necator), the causal agent of powdery mildew disease

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Wenping; Feechan, Angela; Dry, Ian

    2015-01-01

    The most economically important disease of cultivated grapevines worldwide is powdery mildew (PM) caused by the ascomycete fungus Erysiphe necator. The majority of grapevine cultivars used for wine, table grape, and dried fruit production are derived from the Eurasian grape species Vitis vinifera because of its superior aroma and flavor characteristics. However, this species has little genetic resistance against E. necator meaning that grape production is highly dependent on the frequent use of fungicides. The integration of effective genetic resistance into cultivated grapevines would lead to significant financial and environmental benefits and represents a major challenge for viticultural industries and researchers worldwide. This review will outline the strategies being used to increase our understanding of the molecular basis of V. vinifera susceptibility to this fungal pathogen. It will summarize our current knowledge of different resistance loci/genes that have evolved in wild grapevine species to restrict PM infection and assess the potential application of these defense genes in the generation of PM-resistant grapevine germplasm. Finally, it addresses future research priorities which will be important in the rapid identification, evaluation, and deployment of new PM resistance genes which are capable of conferring effective and durable resistance in the vineyard. PMID:26504571

  14. Cannabidiol Post-Treatment Alleviates Rat Epileptic-Related Behaviors and Activates Hippocampal Cell Autophagy Pathway Along with Antioxidant Defense in Chronic Phase of Pilocarpine-Induced Seizure.

    PubMed

    Hosseinzadeh, Mahshid; Nikseresht, Sara; Khodagholi, Fariba; Naderi, Nima; Maghsoudi, Nader

    2016-04-01

    Abnormal and sometimes severe behavioral and molecular symptoms are usually observed in epileptic humans and animals. To address this issue, we examined the behavioral and molecular aspects of seizure evoked by pilocarpine. Autophagy can promote both cell survival and death, but there are controversial reports about the neuroprotective or neurodegenerative effects of autophagy in seizure. Cannabidiol has anticonvulsant properties in some animal models when used as a pretreatment. In this study, we investigated alteration of seizure scores, autophagy pathway proteins, and antioxidant status in hippocampal cells during the chronic phase of pilocarpine-induced epilepsy after treatment with cannabidiol. Cannabidiol (100 ng, intracerebroventricular injection) delayed the chronic phase of epilepsy. Single administration of cannabidiol during the chronic phase of seizure significantly diminished seizure scores such as mouth clonus, head nodding, monolateral and bilateral forelimb clonus and increased the activity of catalase enzyme and reduced glutathione content. Such a protective effect in the behavioral scores of epileptic rats was also observed after repeated administrations of cannabidiol at the onset of the silent phase. Moreover, the amount of Atg7, conjugation of Atg5/12, Atg12, and LC3II/LC3I ratio increased significantly in epileptic rats treated with repeated injections of cannabidiol. In short, our results suggest that post-treatment of Cannabidiol could enhance the induction of autophagy pathway and antioxidant defense in the chronic phase of epilepsy, which could be considered as the protective mechanisms of cannabidiol in a temporal lobe epilepsy model. PMID:26738731

  15. Ornithine and Homocitrulline Impair Mitochondrial Function, Decrease Antioxidant Defenses and Induce Cell Death in Menadione-Stressed Rat Cortical Astrocytes: Potential Mechanisms of Neurological Dysfunction in HHH Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zanatta, Ângela; Rodrigues, Marília Danyelle Nunes; Amaral, Alexandre Umpierrez; Souza, Débora Guerini; Quincozes-Santos, André; Wajner, Moacir

    2016-09-01

    Hyperornithinemia-hyperammonemia-homocitrullinuria (HHH) syndrome is caused by deficiency of ornithine translocase leading to predominant tissue accumulation and high urinary excretion of ornithine (Orn), homocitrulline (Hcit) and ammonia. Although affected patients commonly present neurological dysfunction manifested by cognitive deficit, spastic paraplegia, pyramidal and extrapyramidal signs, stroke-like episodes, hypotonia and ataxia, its pathogenesis is still poorly known. Although astrocytes are necessary for neuronal protection. Therefore, in the present study we investigated the effects of Orn and Hcit on cell viability (propidium iodide incorporation), mitochondrial function (thiazolyl blue tetrazolium bromide-MTT-reduction and mitochondrial membrane potential-ΔΨm), antioxidant defenses (GSH) and pro-inflammatory response (NFkB, IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α) in unstimulated and menadione-stressed cortical astrocytes that were previously shown to be susceptible to damage by neurotoxins. We first observed that Orn decreased MTT reduction, whereas both amino acids decreased GSH levels, without altering cell viability and the pro-inflammatory factors in unstimulated astrocytes. Furthermore, Orn and Hcit decreased cell viability and ΔΨm in menadione-treated astrocytes. The present data indicate that the major compounds accumulating in HHH syndrome impair mitochondrial function and reduce cell viability and the antioxidant defenses in cultured astrocytes especially when stressed by menadione. It is presumed that these mechanisms may be involved in the neuropathology of this disease. PMID:27161368

  16. Activation of Antioxidant Defenses in Whole Saliva by Psychosocial Stress Is More Manifested in Young Women than in Young Men

    PubMed Central

    Tsuber, Viktoriia; Kadamov, Yunus; Tarasenko, Lydia

    2014-01-01

    Psychosocial stress has been long known to have deleterious effects on health. Nevertheless, an exposure to moderate stressors enhances resilience and promotes health benefits. Male and female organisms differ in many aspects of health and disease. The aim of this study was to investigate antioxidant activity and oxidative damage in saliva in a psychosocial stress paradigm in men and women. Here, we show that an acute stressor of moderate strength augments antioxidant activity and decreases oxidative damage in whole saliva of young people. An examination stress caused a significant increase of catalase activity, accompanied by a decrease of levels of oxidized proteins. Levels of thiobarbituric acid-reacting substances did not increase at stress, indicating that lipid peroxidation was not activated. The stress-induced alterations were more manifested in young women compared to young men. Thus, antioxidant protective mechanisms are more activated by a moderate stressor in young women than in young men. PMID:25525800

  17. Electro-Mechanical Manipulator for Use in the Remote Equipment Decontamination Cell at the Defense Waste Processing Facility, Savannah River Site - 12454

    SciTech Connect

    Lambrecht, Bill; Dixon, Joe; Neuville, John R.

    2012-07-01

    One of the legacies of the cold war is millions of liters of radioactive waste. One of the locations where this waste is stored is at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in South Carolina. A major effort to clean up this waste is on-going at the defense waste processing facility (DWPF) at SRS. A piece of this effort is decontamination of the equipment used in the DWPF to process the waste. The remote equipment decontamination cell (REDC) in the DWPF uses electro-mechanical manipulators (EMM) arms manufactured and supplied by PaR Systems to decontaminate DWPF process equipment. The decontamination fluid creates a highly corrosive environment. After 25 years of operational use the original EMM arms are aging and need replacement. To support continued operation of the DWPF, two direct replacement EMM arms were delivered to the REDC in the summer of 2011. (authors)

  18. Modulation of Potassium Channel Activity in the Balance of ROS and ATP Production by Durum Wheat Mitochondria—An Amazing Defense Tool Against Hyperosmotic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Trono, Daniela; Laus, Maura N.; Soccio, Mario; Alfarano, Michela; Pastore, Donato

    2015-01-01

    (mannitol or NaCl), PmitoKATP was found to be activated by ROS, so inhibiting further large-scale ROS production according to a feedback mechanism; moreover, a stress-activated phospholipase A2 may generate FFAs, further activating the channel. In conclusion, a main property of PmitoKATP is the ability to keep in balance the control of harmful ROS with the mitochondrial/cellular bioenergetics, thus preserving ATP for energetic needs of cell defense under stress. PMID:26648958

  19. Modulation of Potassium Channel Activity in the Balance of ROS and ATP Production by Durum Wheat Mitochondria-An Amazing Defense Tool Against Hyperosmotic Stress.

    PubMed

    Trono, Daniela; Laus, Maura N; Soccio, Mario; Alfarano, Michela; Pastore, Donato

    2015-01-01

    (mannitol or NaCl), PmitoKATP was found to be activated by ROS, so inhibiting further large-scale ROS production according to a feedback mechanism; moreover, a stress-activated phospholipase A2 may generate FFAs, further activating the channel. In conclusion, a main property of PmitoKATP is the ability to keep in balance the control of harmful ROS with the mitochondrial/cellular bioenergetics, thus preserving ATP for energetic needs of cell defense under stress. PMID:26648958

  20. Korean red ginseng extract rejuvenates testicular ineffectiveness and sperm maturation process in aged rats by regulating redox proteins and oxidative defense mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Kopalli, Spandana Rajendra; Hwang, Seock-Yeon; Won, Yu-Jin; Kim, Sung-Won; Cha, Kyu-Min; Han, Chang-Kyun; Hong, Jae-Yup; Kim, Si-Kwan

    2015-09-01

    Distortion of intracellular oxidant and antioxidant balances appears to be a common feature that underlies in age-related male sexual impairment. Therefore regulating oxidative defense mechanisms might be an ideal approach in improving male sexual dysfunctions. In the present study, the effect of Korean red ginseng aqueous extract (KRG) on age-induced testicular dysfunction in rats was investigated. KRG (200mg/kg) mixed with regular pellet diet was administered orally for six months and the morphological, spermatogenic and antioxidant enzyme status in testis of aged rats (18months) were evaluated. Data indicated a significant change in morphology and decrease in spermatogenesis-related parameters in aged rats (AC) compared with young rats (YC). Sperm number, germ cell count, Sertoli cell count and Sertoli cell index were significantly (p<0.05) restored in KRG-treated aged rat groups (G-AC). Further the increased lipid peroxidation as measured by malondialdehyde (p<0.05), and altered enzymatic (superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione S-transferase, glutathione reductase and catalase) and non-enzymatic (reduced glutathione, ascorbic acid and α-tocopherol) antioxidants (p<0.05) were attenuated by KRG treatment in aged rats to near normal levels as in YC groups. Furthermore, proteomic analysis demonstrated differential expression of selected proteins such as phosphatidylinositol transfer protein, fatty acid binding protein-9, triosephosphate isomerase-1 and aldehyde (aldose) reductase-1in aged rats was significantly (p<0.05) protected by KRG treatment. In conclusion, long-term administration of KRG restored aging-induced testicular ineffectiveness in rats by modulating redox proteins and oxidative defense mechanisms. PMID:25980653

  1. Mechanisms of Specificity for Hox Factor Activity

    PubMed Central

    Zandvakili, Arya; Gebelein, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Metazoans encode clusters of paralogous Hox genes that are critical for proper development of the body plan. However, there are a number of unresolved issues regarding how paralogous Hox factors achieve specificity to control distinct cell fates. First, how do Hox paralogs, which have very similar DNA binding preferences in vitro, drive different transcriptional programs in vivo? Second, the number of potential Hox binding sites within the genome is vast compared to the number of sites bound. Hence, what determines where in the genome Hox factors bind? Third, what determines whether a Hox factor will activate or repress a specific target gene? Here, we review the current evidence that is beginning to shed light onto these questions. In particular, we highlight how cooperative interactions with other transcription factors (especially PBC and HMP proteins) and the sequences of cis-regulatory modules provide a basis for the mechanisms of Hox specificity. We conclude by integrating a number of the concepts described throughout the review in a case study of a highly interrogated Drosophila cis-regulatory module named “The Distal-less Conserved Regulatory Element” (DCRE). PMID:27583210

  2. Antioxidant Defense Mechanisms in Pseudomonas aeruginosa: Role of Iron-Cofactored Superoxide Dismutase in Response to UV-C Radiations.

    PubMed

    Ghorbal, Salma Kloula Ben; Maalej, Lobna; Chourabi, Kalthoum; Khefacha, Sana; Ouzari, Hadda-Imene; Chatti, Abdelwaheb

    2016-08-01

    The role of SOD gene in response to UV-C radiations was studied in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Firstly, our results showed that the inactivation of sodM and/or sodB genes decreases the resistance of P. aeruginosa after exposure to UV-C rays. Furthermore, our results showed that SOD activity is dose dependant in all strains. However, significant increase in SOD activity was only shown at UV-C exposure time of 5 min in sodB mutant. At an elevated dose equivalent to 30 min of exposure, significant increase in SOD activity was observed in sodM. Catalase activities showed significant decrease in WT and in sodB mutant after an exposure time of 30 min. CAT enzyme was present at higher levels than SOD, reflecting that alternate enzymes such as POX, is poorly associated with CAT activity, and an increase in POX activity is related to increase in stress tolerance. The overall results showed that sodB gene has an important protective role against UV-C radiations in P. aeruginosa, compared to SodM isoform. PMID:27094998

  3. Perception of soft mechanical stress in Arabidopsis leaves activates disease resistance

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In a previous study we have shown that wounding of Arabidopsis thaliana leaves induces a strong and transient immunity to Botrytis cinerea, the causal agent of grey mould. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are formed within minutes after wounding and are required for wound–induced resistance to B. cinerea. Results In this study, we have further explored ROS and resistance to B. cinerea in leaves of A. thaliana exposed to a soft form of mechanical stimulation without overt tissue damage. After gentle mechanical sweeping of leaf surfaces, a strong resistance to B. cinerea was observed. This was preceded by a rapid change in calcium concentration and a release of ROS, accompanied by changes in cuticle permeability, induction of the expression of genes typically associated with mechanical stress and release of biologically active diffusates from the surface. This reaction to soft mechanical stress (SMS) was fully independent of jasmonate (JA signaling). In addition, leaves exposed soft mechanical stress released a biologically active product capable of inducing resistance to B. cinerea in wild type control leaves. Conclusion Arabidopsis can detect and convert gentle forms of mechanical stimulation into a strong activation of defense against the virulent fungus B. cinerea. PMID:24033927

  4. Kluyveromyces lactis: A Suitable Yeast Model to Study Cellular Defense Mechanisms against Hypoxia-Induced Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    González Siso, M. Isabel; Cerdán, M. Esperanza

    2012-01-01

    Studies about hypoxia-induced oxidative stress in human health disorders take advantage from the use of unicellular eukaryote models. A widely extended model is the fermentative yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In this paper, we describe an overview of the molecular mechanisms induced by a decrease in oxygen availability and their interrelationship with the oxidative stress response in yeast. We focus on the differential characteristics between S. cerevisiae and the respiratory yeast Kluyveromyces lactis, a complementary emerging model, in reference to multicellular eukaryotes. PMID:22928082

  5. Aphid Feeding Activates Expression of a Transcriptome of Oxylipin-Based Defense Signals in Wheat Involved in Resistance to Herbivory

    PubMed Central

    SMITH, C. MICHAEL; LIU, XUMING; WANG, LIANG J.; LIU, XIANG; CHEN, MING-SHUN; STARKEY, SHARON; BAI, JIANFA

    2013-01-01

    Damage by the Russian wheat aphid (RWA), Diuraphis noxia, significantly reduces wheat and barley yields worldwide. In compatible interactions, virulent RWA populations flourish and susceptible plants suffer extensive leaf chlorophyll loss. In incompatible interactions, RWA reproduction and population growth are significantly reduced and RWA-related chlorophyll loss in resistant plants is minor. The objectives of this study were to develop an understanding of the molecular and phytochemical bases of RWA resistance in plants containing the Dnx resistance gene. Microarray, real-time polymerase chain reaction, and phytohormone assays were conducted to identify transcriptome components unique to RWA-infested Dnx plants and susceptible (Dn0) plants, and to identify and characterize putative genes involved in Dnx plant defense responses. We found that RWA-infested Dnx plants upregulated > 180 genes related to reactive oxygen species, signaling, pathogen defense, and arthropod allelochemical and physical defense. The expression of several of these genes in RWA-infested Dnx plants increased significantly from 6- to 24-h post infestation (hpi), but their expression in Dn0 plants, when present, was delayed until 48- to 96 hpi. Concentrations of 16- and 18-carbon fatty acids, trans-methyl-12-oxophytodienoic acid, and abscisic acid were significantly greater in Dnx foliage than in Dn0 foliage after RWA infestation, suggesting that Dnx RWA defense and resistance genes may be regulated via the oxylipin pathway. These findings provide a foundation for the elucidation of the molecular basis for compatible- and incompatible plant-aphid interactions. PMID:20229216

  6. Influence of OM-85 BV on different humoral and cellular immune defense mechanisms of the respiratory tract.

    PubMed

    Emmerich, B; Pachmann, K; Milatovic, D; Emslander, H P

    1992-01-01

    To clarify the mode of action of an oral bacterial extract (OM-85 BV) on local airway immunity pre- and posttherapeutic washings from bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid of 28 adult patients with nonobstructive chronic bronchitis were analysed. In comparison to healthy controls, an elevation of total cell count due to an increased number of PMN leukocytes, and an impaired activity of the alveolar macrophages measured by the chemiluminescence response to opsonized zymosan was observed in patients with chronic bronchitis. After treatment with OM-85 BV, the BAL CD4+/CD8+ lymphocyte ratio and BAL interferon-gamma levels were increased. The alveolar macrophage activity was normalized and the BAL IgA was regulated from a reduced or hyperelevated to a moderately increased level. PMID:1439235

  7. Heterogeneity in signaled active avoidance learning: substantive and methodological relevance of diversity in instrumental defensive responses to threat cues

    PubMed Central

    Galatzer-Levy, Isaac R.; Moscarello, Justin; Blessing, Esther M.; Klein, JoAnna; Cain, Christopher K.; LeDoux, Joseph E.

    2014-01-01

    Individuals exposed to traumatic stressors follow divergent patterns including resilience and chronic stress. However, researchers utilizing animal models that examine learned or instrumental threat responses thought to have translational relevance for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and resilience typically use central tendency statistics that assume population homogeneity. This approach potentially overlooks fundamental differences that can explain human diversity in response to traumatic stressors. The current study tests this assumption by identifying and replicating common heterogeneous patterns of response to signaled active avoidance (AA) training. In this paradigm, rats are trained to prevent an aversive outcome (shock) by performing a learned instrumental behavior (shuttling between chambers) during the presentation of a conditioned threat cue (tone). We test the hypothesis that heterogeneous trajectories of threat avoidance provide more accurate model fit compared to a single mean trajectory in two separate studies. Study 1 conducted 3 days of signaled AA training (n = 81 animals) and study 2 conducted 5 days of training (n = 186 animals). We found that four trajectories in both samples provided the strongest model fit. Identified populations included animals that acquired and retained avoidance behavior on the first day (Rapid Avoiders: 22 and 25%); those who never successfully acquired avoidance (Non-Avoiders; 20 and 16%); a modal class who acquired avoidance over 3 days (Modal Avoiders; 37 and 50%); and a population who demonstrated a slow pattern of avoidance, failed to fully acquire avoidance in study 1 and did acquire avoidance on days 4 and 5 in study 2 (Slow Avoiders; 22.0 and 9%). With the exception of the Slow Avoiders in Study 1, populations that acquired demonstrated rapid step-like increases leading to asymptotic levels of avoidance. These findings indicate that avoidance responses are heterogeneous in a way that may be informative for

  8. Soluble Host Defense Lectins in Innate Immunity to Influenza Virus

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Wy Ching; Tate, Michelle D.; Brooks, Andrew G.; Reading, Patrick C.

    2012-01-01

    Host defenses against viral infections depend on a complex interplay of innate (nonspecific) and adaptive (specific) components. In the early stages of infection, innate mechanisms represent the main line of host defense, acting to limit the spread of virus in host tissues prior to the induction of the adaptive immune response. Serum and lung fluids contain a range of lectins capable of recognizing and destroying influenza A viruses (IAV). Herein, we review the mechanisms by which soluble endogenous lectins mediate anti-IAV activity, including their role in modulating IAV-induced inflammation and disease and their potential as prophylactic and/or therapeutic treatments during severe IAV-induced disease. PMID:22665991

  9. Water-borne cues induce chemical defense in a marine alga (Ascophyllum nodosum)

    PubMed Central

    Toth, Gunilla B.; Pavia, Henrik

    2000-01-01

    It is well known that herbivores can induce chemical defenses in terrestrial vascular plants, but few examples of inducible production of defense chemicals have been reported for aquatic macrophytes. Furthermore, it is well established that water-borne chemical cues from predators or predator-wounded conspecifics can induce defensive changes of aquatic prey animals, but no such communication between aquatic herbivores and seaweeds has been reported. Here we show that water-borne cues from actively feeding herbivorous gastropods, flat periwinkles (Littorina obtusata), can serve as external signals to induce production of defense chemicals (phlorotannins) in unharmed individuals of seaweeds, knotted wrack (Ascophyllum nodosum), and that the increased levels of defense chemicals deter further feeding by periwinkles. Because seaweeds have poorly developed internal-transport systems and may not be able to elicit systemic-induced chemical defenses through conveyance of internal signals, this mechanism ensures that seaweeds can anticipate future periwinkle attacks without receiving direct damage by herbivores. PMID:11106371

  10. A Role for the Anti-Viral Host Defense Mechanism in the Phylogenetic Divergence in Baculovirus Evolution.

    PubMed

    Nagamine, Toshihiro; Sako, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    Although phylogenic analysis often suggests co-evolutionary relationships between viruses and host organisms, few examples have been reported at the microevolutionary level. Here, we show a possible example in which a species-specific anti-viral response may drive phylogenic divergence in insect virus evolution. Two baculoviruses, Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) and Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV), have a high degree of DNA sequence similarity, but exhibit non-overlapping host specificity. In our study of their host-range determination, we found that BmNPV replication in B. mori cells was prevented by AcMNPV-P143 (AcP143), but not BmNPV-P143 (BmP143) or a hybrid P143 protein from a host-range expanded phenotype. This suggests that AcMNPV resistance in B. mori cells depends on AcP143 recognition and that BmNPV uses BmP143 to escapes this recognition. Based on these data, we propose an insect-baculovirus co-evolution scenario in which an ancestor of silkworms exploited an AcMNPV-resistant mechanism; AcMNPV counteracted this resistance via P143 mutations, resulting in the birth of BmNPV. PMID:27244571

  11. A Role for the Anti-Viral Host Defense Mechanism in the Phylogenetic Divergence in Baculovirus Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Nagamine, Toshihiro; Sako, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    Although phylogenic analysis often suggests co-evolutionary relationships between viruses and host organisms, few examples have been reported at the microevolutionary level. Here, we show a possible example in which a species-specific anti-viral response may drive phylogenic divergence in insect virus evolution. Two baculoviruses, Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) and Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV), have a high degree of DNA sequence similarity, but exhibit non-overlapping host specificity. In our study of their host-range determination, we found that BmNPV replication in B. mori cells was prevented by AcMNPV-P143 (AcP143), but not BmNPV-P143 (BmP143) or a hybrid P143 protein from a host-range expanded phenotype. This suggests that AcMNPV resistance in B. mori cells depends on AcP143 recognition and that BmNPV uses BmP143 to escapes this recognition. Based on these data, we propose an insect-baculovirus co-evolution scenario in which an ancestor of silkworms exploited an AcMNPV-resistant mechanism; AcMNPV counteracted this resistance via P143 mutations, resulting in the birth of BmNPV. PMID:27244571

  12. Platelet Activation: The Mechanisms and Potential Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Seong-Hoon; Sim, Eun-Hye; Goh, Ri-Young; Park, Joo-In

    2016-01-01

    Beyond hemostasis and thrombosis, an increasing number of studies indicate that platelets play an integral role in intercellular communication, mediating inflammatory and immunomodulatory activities. Our knowledge about how platelets modulate inflammatory and immunity has greatly improved in recent years. In this review, we discuss recent advances in the pathways of platelet activation and potential application of platelet activation biomarkers to diagnosis and prediction of disease states. PMID:27403440

  13. Shift in aggregation, ROS generation, antioxidative defense, lysozyme and acetylcholinesterase activities in the cells of an Indian freshwater sponge exposed to washing soda (sodium carbonate).

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Soumalya; Ray, Mitali; Ray, Sajal

    2016-09-01

    Washing soda, chemically identified as anhydrous sodium carbonate, is a popular cleaning agent among the rural and urban populations of India which often contaminates the freshwater ponds and lakes, the natural habitat of sponge Eunapius carteri. Present investigation deals with estimation of cellular aggregation, generation of ROS and activities of antioxidant enzymes, lysozyme and acetylcholinesterase in the cells of E. carteri under the environmentally realistic concentrations of washing soda. Prolonged treatment of washing soda inhibited the degree of cellular aggregation. Experimental exposure of 8 and 16mg/l of sodium carbonate for 48h elevated the physiological level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in the agranulocytes, semigranulocytes and granulocytes of E. carteri, whereas, treatment of 192h inhibited the ROS generation in three cellular morphotypes. Activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione-S-transferase were recorded to be inhibited under prolonged exposure of washing soda. Washing soda mediated inhibition of ROS generation and depletion in the activities of antioxidant enzymes were indicative to an undesirable shift in cytotoxic status and antioxidative defense in E. carteri. Inhibition in the activity of lysozyme under the treatment of sodium carbonate was suggestive to a severe impairment of the innate immunological efficiency of E. carteri distributed in the washing soda contaminated habitat. Washing soda mediated inhibition in the activity of acetylcholinesterase indicated its neurotoxicity in E. carteri. Washing soda, a reported environmental contaminant, affected adversely the immunophysiological status of E. carteri with reference to cellular aggregation, oxidative stress, antioxidative defense, lysozyme and acetylcholinesterase activity. PMID:27178357

  14. Control of plant defense mechanisms and fire blight pathogenesis through the regulation of 6-thioguanine biosynthesis in Erwinia amylovora.

    PubMed

    Coyne, Sébastien; Litomska, Agnieszka; Chizzali, Cornelia; Khalil, Mohammed N A; Richter, Klaus; Beerhues, Ludger; Hertweck, Christian

    2014-02-10

    Fire blight is a devastating disease of Rosaceae plants, such as apple and pear trees. It is characterized by necrosis of plant tissue, caused by the phytopathogenic bacterium Erwinia amylovora. The plant pathogen produces the well-known antimetabolite 6-thioguanine (6TG), which plays a key role in fire blight pathogenesis. Here we report that YcfR, a member of the LTTR family, is a major regulator of 6TG biosynthesis in E. amylovora. Inactivation of the regulator gene (ycfR) led to dramatically decreased 6TG production. Infection assays with apple plants (Malus domestica cultivar Holsteiner Cox) and cell cultures of Sorbus aucuparia (mountain ash, rowan) revealed abortive fire blight pathogenesis and reduced plant response (biphenyl and dibenzofuran phytoalexin production). In the presence of the ΔycfR mutant, apple trees were capable of activating the abscission machinery to remove infected tissue. In addition to unveiling the regulation of 6TG biosynthesis in a major plant pathogen, we demonstrate for the first time that this antimetabolite plays a pivotal role in dysregulating the plant response to infection. PMID:24449489

  15. Investigating Therapeutic Potential of Trigonella foenum-graecum L. as Our Defense Mechanism against Several Human Diseases.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Shivangi; Gupta, Nidhi; Chatterjee, Sreemoyee

    2016-01-01

    Current lifestyle, stress, and pollution have dramatically enhanced the progression of several diseases in human. Globally, scientists are looking for therapeutic agents that can either cure or delay the onset of diseases. Medicinal plants from time immemorial have been used frequently in therapeutics. Of many such plants, fenugreek is one of the oldest herbs which have been identified as an important medicinal plant by the researchers around the world. It is potentially beneficial in a number of diseases such as diabetes, hypercholesterolemia, and inflammation and probably in several kinds of cancers. It has industrial applications such as synthesis of steroidal hormones. Its medicinal properties and their role in clinical domain can be attributed to its chemical constituents. The 3 major chemical constituents which have been identified as responsible for principle health effects are galactomannan, 4-OH isoleucine, and steroidal saponin. Numerous experiments have been carried out in vivo and in vitro for beneficial effects of both the crude chemical and of its active constituent. Due to its role in health care, the functional food industry has referred to it as a potential nutraceutical. This paper is about various medicinal benefits of fenugreek and its potential application as therapeutic agent against several diseases. PMID:26884758

  16. Investigating Therapeutic Potential of Trigonella foenum-graecum L. as Our Defense Mechanism against Several Human Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Shivangi; Gupta, Nidhi; Chatterjee, Sreemoyee

    2016-01-01

    Current lifestyle, stress, and pollution have dramatically enhanced the progression of several diseases in human. Globally, scientists are looking for therapeutic agents that can either cure or delay the onset of diseases. Medicinal plants from time immemorial have been used frequently in therapeutics. Of many such plants, fenugreek is one of the oldest herbs which have been identified as an important medicinal plant by the researchers around the world. It is potentially beneficial in a number of diseases such as diabetes, hypercholesterolemia, and inflammation and probably in several kinds of cancers. It has industrial applications such as synthesis of steroidal hormones. Its medicinal properties and their role in clinical domain can be attributed to its chemical constituents. The 3 major chemical constituents which have been identified as responsible for principle health effects are galactomannan, 4-OH isoleucine, and steroidal saponin. Numerous experiments have been carried out in vivo and in vitro for beneficial effects of both the crude chemical and of its active constituent. Due to its role in health care, the functional food industry has referred to it as a potential nutraceutical. This paper is about various medicinal benefits of fenugreek and its potential application as therapeutic agent against several diseases. PMID:26884758

  17. A Diverse Family of Host-Defense Peptides (Piscidins) Exhibit Specialized Anti-Bacterial and Anti-Protozoal Activities in Fishes.

    PubMed

    Salger, Scott A; Cassady, Katherine R; Reading, Benjamin J; Noga, Edward J

    2016-01-01

    Conventional antibiotics and other chemical-based drugs are currently one of the most common methods used to control disease-related mortality in animal agriculture. Use of the innate immune system to decrease disease related mortalities is a novel alternative to conventional drugs. One component of the innate immune system is the host-defense peptides, also known as antimicrobial peptides. Host-defense peptides are typically small, amphipathic, α-helical peptides with a broad-spectrum of action against viral, bacterial, fungal, and/or protozoal pathogens. Piscidins are host-defense peptides first discovered in the hybrid striped bass (white bass, Morone chrysops, x striped bass, M. saxatilis). In this paper we identify four new piscidin isoforms in the hybrid striped bass and describe their tissue distributions. We also determine the progenitor species of origin of each piscidin (orthology) and propose a revised nomenclature for this newly described piscidin family based on a three class system. The Class I piscidins (22 amino acids in length; striped bass and white bass piscidin 1 and piscidin 3) show broad-spectrum activity against bacteria and ciliated protozoans, while the Class III piscidins (55 amino acids in length; striped bass and white bass piscidin 6 and striped bass piscidin 7) primarily show anti-protozoal activity. The Class II piscidins (44-46 amino acids in length; striped bass and white bass piscidin 4 and white bass piscidin 5) have a level of activity against bacteria and protozoans intermediate to Classes I and III. Knowledge of piscidin function and activity may help in the future development of disease-resistant lines of striped bass and white bass that could be used to produce superior hybrids for aquaculture. PMID:27552222

  18. A Diverse Family of Host-Defense Peptides (Piscidins) Exhibit Specialized Anti-Bacterial and Anti-Protozoal Activities in Fishes

    PubMed Central

    Cassady, Katherine R.; Noga, Edward J.

    2016-01-01

    Conventional antibiotics and other chemical-based drugs are currently one of the most common methods used to control disease-related mortality in animal agriculture. Use of the innate immune system to decrease disease related mortalities is a novel alternative to conventional drugs. One component of the innate immune system is the host-defense peptides, also known as antimicrobial peptides. Host-defense peptides are typically small, amphipathic, α-helical peptides with a broad-spectrum of action against viral, bacterial, fungal, and/or protozoal pathogens. Piscidins are host-defense peptides first discovered in the hybrid striped bass (white bass, Morone chrysops, x striped bass, M. saxatilis). In this paper we identify four new piscidin isoforms in the hybrid striped bass and describe their tissue distributions. We also determine the progenitor species of origin of each piscidin (orthology) and propose a revised nomenclature for this newly described piscidin family based on a three class system. The Class I piscidins (22 amino acids in length; striped bass and white bass piscidin 1 and piscidin 3) show broad-spectrum activity against bacteria and ciliated protozoans, while the Class III piscidins (55 amino acids in length; striped bass and white bass piscidin 6 and striped bass piscidin 7) primarily show anti-protozoal activity. The Class II piscidins (44–46 amino acids in length; striped bass and white bass piscidin 4 and white bass piscidin 5) have a level of activity against bacteria and protozoans intermediate to Classes I and III. Knowledge of piscidin function and activity may help in the future development of disease-resistant lines of striped bass and white bass that could be used to produce superior hybrids for aquaculture. PMID:27552222

  19. EROD activity and antioxidant defenses of sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) after an in vivo chronic hydrocarbon pollution followed by a post-exposure period.

    PubMed

    Danion, Morgane; Le Floch, Stéphane; Lamour, François; Quentel, Claire

    2014-12-01

    Chronic concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have been commonly detected in international estuaries ecosystems. Reliable indicators still need to be found in order to properly assess the impact of PAHs in fish. After an in vivo chronic exposure to hydrocarbons, the enzymatic activity of 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD) and the antioxidant defense system were assessed in sea bass, Dicentrarchus labrax. A total of 45 fish were exposed to the water-soluble fraction of Arabian crude oil, similar to a complex pollution by hydrocarbons chronically observed in situ, while 45 other control fish sustained the same experimental conditions in clean seawater. Fish samples were made after a 21-day exposure period and after a 15-day recovery period in clean fresh water. Throughout the experiment, liver EROD activity was significantly higher in contaminated fish than in control fish. In addition, nonenzymatic (total glutathione) and enzymatic (GPx, SOD, and CAT) antioxidant defense parameters measured in liver were not significantly different in fish. Furthermore, in gills, glutathione content had significantly increased while SOD activity had significantly decreased in contaminated fish compared to controls. On the other hand, CAT and GPx activities were not affected. Chronic exposure to PAHs disturbing the first step (SOD) and inhibiting the second step (GPx and CAT) could induce oxidative stress in tissues by the formation of oxygen radicals. After the postexposure period, there was no significant difference between control and contaminated fish in any of the antioxidant defense parameters measured in gills, attesting to the reversibility of the effects. PMID:24659404

  20. [Thoughts on "defensive" medicine].

    PubMed

    Csiba, László

    2007-03-25

    "Defensive" medicine is called medical behaviour characterized by deformation of diagnostic and therapeutic activities due to fears endangering existence and work, thus some interventions are omitted or, on the contrary, superfluous examinations are proposed on account of internal uncertainty, the patient's distrust or hostile social environment. Trust relation between patient and physician is the most gravely damaged because of aggravation and distortion of some conscienceless physicians' abuses by the media; patient-physician relations may not be degraded to contractual legal relations. Young physicians must get acquainted with the joy of success in diagnostics that enriches the personality. They shall have healthy self-esteem and be ready to take diagnostic and therapeutic challenges on themselves. All of us have to fight against social atmosphere hostile to physicians, against causes inducing and augmenting practice of defensive medicine. PMID:17444017

  1. Hydrogen-Rich Water Intake Accelerates Oral Palatal Wound Healing via Activation of the Nrf2/Antioxidant Defense Pathways in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Orihuela-Campos, Rita Cristina; Fukui, Makoto; Ito, Hiro-O

    2016-01-01

    The wound healing process attempts to restore the integrity and function of the injured tissue. Additionally, proinflammatory cytokines, growth factors, and oxidative stress play important roles in wound healing. The aim of this study was to determine whether hydrogen-rich water intake induces the activation of the Nrf2/antioxidant defense pathway in rat palatal tissue, thereby reducing systemic oxidative stress and proinflammatory cytokine levels and promoting healing-associated genes. A circular excisional wound was created in the oral palatal region, and the wound healing process was observed. The rats were divided into two experimental groups in which either hydrogen-rich water or distilled water was consumed. In the drinking hydrogen-rich water, the palatal wound healing process was accelerated compared to that in the control group. As molecular hydrogen upregulated the Nrf2 pathway, systemic oxidative stresses were decreased by the activation of antioxidant activity. Furthermore, hydrogen-rich water intake reduced proinflammatory cytokine levels and promoted the expression of healing-associated factors in rat palatal tissue. In conclusion, hydrogen-rich water intake exhibited multiple beneficial effects through activation of the Nrf2/antioxidant defense pathway. The results of this study support the hypothesis that oral administration of hydrogen-rich water benefits the wound healing process by decreasing oxidative stress and inflammatory responses. PMID:26798423

  2. Qualification of active mechanical components for nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, R.D.; Mollerus, F.J.

    1983-11-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute has undertaken a study of active safety related mechanical components in domestic nuclear plants to determine what qualification information exists and to establish a plan for qualification of those components. Active safety related mechanical components are those which undergo mechanical motion to perform a safety function. The overall objective of the study is to recommend appropriate methods and realistic criteria for the environmental, seismic and dynamic qualification of active mechanical components. This paper presents the results of progress in this project through May 1983.

  3. Secured network sensor-based defense system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Sixiao; Shen, Dan; Ge, Linqiang; Yu, Wei; Blasch, Erik P.; Pham, Khanh D.; Chen, Genshe

    2015-05-01

    Network sensor-based defense (NSD) systems have been widely used to defend against cyber threats. Nonetheless, if the adversary finds ways to identify the location of monitor sensors, the effectiveness of NSD systems can be reduced. In this paper, we propose both temporal and spatial perturbation based defense mechanisms to secure NSD systems and make the monitor sensor invisible to the adversary. The temporal-perturbation based defense manipulates the timing information of published data so that the probability of successfully recognizing monitor sensors can be reduced. The spatial-perturbation based defense dynamically redeploys monitor sensors in the network so that the adversary cannot obtain the complete information to recognize all of the monitor sensors. We carried out experiments using real-world traffic traces to evaluate the effectiveness of our proposed defense mechanisms. Our data shows that our proposed defense mechanisms can reduce the attack accuracy of recognizing detection sensors.

  4. AMPK activators: mechanisms of action and physiological activities

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joungmok; Yang, Goowon; Kim, Yeji; Kim, Jin; Ha, Joohun

    2016-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a central regulator of energy homeostasis, which coordinates metabolic pathways and thus balances nutrient supply with energy demand. Because of the favorable physiological outcomes of AMPK activation on metabolism, AMPK has been considered to be an important therapeutic target for controlling human diseases including metabolic syndrome and cancer. Thus, activators of AMPK may have potential as novel therapeutics for these diseases. In this review, we provide a comprehensive summary of both indirect and direct AMPK activators and their modes of action in relation to the structure of AMPK. We discuss the functional differences among isoform-specific AMPK complexes and their significance regarding the development of novel AMPK activators and the potential for combining different AMPK activators in the treatment of human disease. PMID:27034026

  5. AMPK activators: mechanisms of action and physiological activities.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joungmok; Yang, Goowon; Kim, Yeji; Kim, Jin; Ha, Joohun

    2016-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a central regulator of energy homeostasis, which coordinates metabolic pathways and thus balances nutrient supply with energy demand. Because of the favorable physiological outcomes of AMPK activation on metabolism, AMPK has been considered to be an important therapeutic target for controlling human diseases including metabolic syndrome and cancer. Thus, activators of AMPK may have potential as novel therapeutics for these diseases. In this review, we provide a comprehensive summary of both indirect and direct AMPK activators and their modes of action in relation to the structure of AMPK. We discuss the functional differences among isoform-specific AMPK complexes and their significance regarding the development of novel AMPK activators and the potential for combining different AMPK activators in the treatment of human disease. PMID:27034026

  6. A new work mechanism on neuronal activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rubin; Tsuda, Ichiro; Zhang, Zhikang

    2015-05-01

    By re-examining the neuronal activity energy model, we show the inadequacies in the current understanding of the energy consumption associated with neuron activity. Specifically, we show computationally that a neuron first absorbs and then consumes energy during firing action potential, and this result cannot be produced from any current neuron models or biological neural networks. Based on this finding, we provide an explanation for the observation that when neurons are excited in the brain, blood flow increases significantly while the incremental oxygen consumption is very small. We can also explain why external stimulation and perception emergence are synchronized. We also show that negative energy presence in neurons at the sub-threshold state is an essential reason that leads to blood flow incremental response time in the brain rather than neural excitation to delay. PMID:25640576

  7. Interferon-γ Is a Crucial Activator of Early Host Immune Defense against Mycobacterium ulcerans Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bieri, Raphael; Bolz, Miriam; Ruf, Marie-Thérèse; Pluschke, Gerd

    2016-01-01

    Buruli ulcer (BU), caused by infection with Mycobacterium ulcerans, is a chronic necrotizing human skin disease associated with the production of the cytotoxic macrolide exotoxin mycolactone. Despite extensive research, the type of immune responses elicited against this pathogen and the effector functions conferring protection against BU are not yet fully understood. While histopathological analyses of advanced BU lesions have demonstrated a mainly extracellular localization of the toxin producing acid fast bacilli, there is growing evidence for an early intra-macrophage growth phase of M. ulcerans. This has led us to investigate whether interferon-γ might play an important role in containing M. ulcerans infections. In an experimental Buruli ulcer mouse model we found that interferon-γ is indeed a critical regulator of early host immune defense against M. ulcerans infections. Interferon-γ knockout mice displayed a faster progression of the infection compared to wild-type mice. This accelerated progression was reflected in faster and more extensive tissue necrosis and oedema formation, as well as in a significantly higher bacterial burden after five weeks of infection, indicating that mice lacking interferon-γ have a reduced capacity to kill intracellular bacilli during the early intra-macrophage growth phase of M. ulcerans. This data demonstrates a prominent role of interferon-γ in early defense against M. ulcerans infection and supports the view that concepts for vaccine development against tuberculosis may also be valid for BU. PMID:26863011

  8. Effector-triggered immunity: from pathogen perception to robust defense.

    PubMed

    Cui, Haitao; Tsuda, Kenichi; Parker, Jane E

    2015-01-01

    In plant innate immunity, individual cells have the capacity to sense and respond to pathogen attack. Intracellular recognition mechanisms have evolved to intercept perturbations by pathogen virulence factors (effectors) early in host infection and convert it to rapid defense. One key to resistance success is a polymorphic family of intracellular nucleotide-binding/leucine-rich-repeat (NLR) receptors that detect effector interference in different parts of the cell. Effector-activated NLRs connect, in various ways, to a conserved basal resistance network in order to transcriptionally boost defense programs. Effector-triggered immunity displays remarkable robustness against pathogen disturbance, in part by employing compensatory mechanisms within the defense network. Also, the mobility of some NLRs and coordination of resistance pathways across cell compartments provides flexibility to fine-tune immune outputs. Furthermore, a number of NLRs function close to the nuclear chromatin by balancing actions of defense-repressing and defense-activating transcription factors to program cells dynamically for effective disease resistance. PMID:25494461

  9. Epigenetic Control of Defense Signaling and Priming in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Espinas, Nino A.; Saze, Hidetoshi; Saijo, Yusuke

    2016-01-01

    Immune recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns or effectors leads to defense activation at the pathogen challenged sites. This is followed by systemic defense activation at distant non-challenged sites, termed systemic acquired resistance (SAR). These inducible defenses are accompanied by extensive transcriptional reprogramming of defense-related genes. SAR is associated with priming, in which a subset of these genes is kept at a poised state to facilitate subsequent transcriptional regulation. Transgenerational inheritance of defense-related priming in plants indicates the stability of such primed states. Recent studies have revealed the importance and dynamic engagement of epigenetic mechanisms, such as DNA methylation and histone modifications that are closely linked to chromatin reconfiguration, in plant adaptation to different biotic stresses. Herein we review current knowledge regarding the biological significance and underlying mechanisms of epigenetic control for immune responses in plants. We also argue for the importance of host transposable elements as critical regulators of interactions in the evolutionary “arms race” between plants and pathogens. PMID:27563304

  10. Defensive weapons and defense signals in plants: some metabolites serve both roles.

    PubMed

    Maag, Daniel; Erb, Matthias; Köllner, Tobias G; Gershenzon, Jonathan

    2015-02-01

    The defense of plants against herbivores and pathogens involves the participation of an enormous range of different metabolites, some of which act directly as defensive weapons against enemies (toxins or deterrents) and some of which act as components of the complex internal signaling network that insures that defense is timed to enemy attack. Recent work reveals a surprising trend: The same compounds may act as both weapons and signals of defense. For example, two groups of well-studied defensive weapons, glucosinolates and benzoxazinoids, trigger the accumulation of the protective polysaccharide callose as a barrier against aphids and pathogens. In the other direction, several hormones acting in defense signaling (and their precursors and products) exhibit activity as weapons against pathogens. Knowing which compounds are defensive weapons, which are defensive signals and which are both is vital for understanding the functioning of plant defense systems. PMID:25389065

  11. Values as Defenses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hultman, Kenneth E.

    1976-01-01

    The author outlines a cognitive approach for explaining how and why people use values as defenses. He examines the relationship between defensive values and irrational beliefs, suggests a number of criteria for diagnosing the presence of defensive values, and proposes some strategies for dealing with defensive values in counseling. (Author)

  12. Mechanism for Clastogenic Activity of Naphthalene

    SciTech Connect

    Buchholz, Bruce A.

    2015-09-29

    Naphthalene incubations form DNA adducts in vitro in a dose dependent manner in both mouse and rat tissues. Rodent tissue incubations with naphthalene indicate that naphthalene forms as many DNA adducts as Benzo(a)pyrene, a known DNA binding carcinogen. The mouse airway has the greatest number of DNA adducts, corresponding to the higher metabolic activation of naphthalene in this location. Both rat tissues, the rat olfactory (tumor target) and the airways (non-tumor target), have similar levels of NA-DNA adducts, indicating that short term measures of initial adduct formation do not directly correlate with sites of tumor formation in the NTP bioassays.

  13. Natural History of Innate Host Defense Peptides.

    PubMed

    Linde, A; Wachter, B; Höner, O P; Dib, L; Ross, C; Tamayo, A R; Blecha, F; Melgarejo, T

    2009-12-01

    Host defense peptides act on the forefront of innate immunity, thus playing a central role in the survival of animals and plants. Despite vast morphological changes in species through evolutionary history, all animals examined to date share common features in their innate immune defense strategies, hereunder expression of host defense peptides (HDPs). Most studies on HDPs have focused on humans, domestic and laboratory animals. More than a thousand different sequences have been identified, yet data on HDPs in wild-living animals are sparse. The biological functions of HDPs include broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity and immunomodulation. Natural selection and coevolutionary host-pathogen arms race theory suggest that the extent and specificity of the microbial load influences the spectrum and potency of HDPs in different species. Individuals of extant species-that have lived for an extended period in evolutionary history amid populations with intact processes of natural selection-likely possess the most powerful and well-adapted "natural antibiotics". Research on the evolutionary history of the innate defense system and the host in context of the consequences of challenges as well as the efficacy of the innate immune system under natural conditions is therefore of immediate interest. This review focuses on evolutionary aspects of immunophysiology, with emphasis on innate effector molecules. Studies on host defense in wild-living animals may significantly enhance our understanding of inborn immune mechanisms, and help identify molecules that may assist us to cope better with the increasing microbial challenges that likely follow from the continuous amplification of biodiversity levels on Earth. PMID:26783164

  14. [Effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus on the seedling growth of grafted watermelon and the defensive enzyme activities in the seedling roots].

    PubMed

    Chen, Ke; Sun, Ji-Qing; Liu, Run-Jin; Li, Min

    2013-01-01

    A greenhouse pot experiment was conducted to study the effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Glomus versiforme on the seedling growth and root membrane permeability, malondiadehyde (MDA) content, and defensive enzyme activities of non-grafted and grafted watermelon growing on the continuously cropped soil. Inoculation with G. versiforme increased the seedling biomass and root activity significantly, and decreased the root membrane permeability and MDA content. The seedling shoot fresh mass, shoot dry mass, and root activity of non-grafted watermelon increased by 57.6%, 60.0% and 142.1%, and those of grafted watermelon increased by 26.7%, 28.0% and 11.0%, respectively, compared with no G. versiforme inoculation. The root membrane permeability of non-grafted seedlings (C), grafted seedlings (G), non-grafted seedlings inoculated with G. versiforme (C+M), and grafted seedlings inoculated with G. versiforme (G+M) was in the order of C >G>C+M>G+M, and the root MDA content was in the sequence of C>G>G+M>C+M. G. versiforme inoculation increased the root phenylalanine ammonialyase (PAL), catalase (CAT), peroxidase (POD), beta-1,3-glucanase and chitinase activities of grafted and non-grafted seedlings significantly, and the peaks of the POD, PAL and beta-1,3-glucanase activities in the mycorrhizal roots appeared about two weeks earlier than those in the non-inoculated roots. These results indicated that inoculating arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus G. versiforme could activate the defensive enzyme activities of non-grafted and grafted watermelon seedlings, enable the seedling roots to produce rapid response to adversity, and thus, improve the capability of watermelon seedling against continuous cropping obstacle. PMID:23718001

  15. Mechanism of antibacterial activity of copper nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Arijit Kumar; Chakraborty, Ruchira; Basu, Tarakdas

    2014-04-01

    In a previous communication, we reported a new method of synthesis of stable metallic copper nanoparticles (Cu-NPs), which had high potency for bacterial cell filamentation and cell killing. The present study deals with the mechanism of filament formation and antibacterial roles of Cu-NPs in E. coli cells. Our results demonstrate that NP-mediated dissipation of cell membrane potential was the probable reason for the formation of cell filaments. On the other hand, Cu-NPs were found to cause multiple toxic effects such as generation of reactive oxygen species, lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation and DNA degradation in E. coli cells. In vitro interaction between plasmid pUC19 DNA and Cu-NPs showed that the degradation of DNA was highly inhibited in the presence of the divalent metal ion chelator EDTA, which indicated a positive role of Cu2+ ions in the degradation process. Moreover, the fast destabilization, i.e. the reduction in size, of NPs in the presence of EDTA led us to propose that the nascent Cu ions liberated from the NP surface were responsible for higher reactivity of the Cu-NPs than the equivalent amount of its precursor CuCl2; the nascent ions were generated from the oxidation of metallic NPs when they were in the vicinity of agents, namely cells, biomolecules or medium components, to be reduced simultaneously.

  16. Smooth muscle cell calcium activation mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Berridge, Michael J

    2008-01-01

    Smooth muscle cell (SMC) contraction is controlled by the Ca2+ and Rho kinase signalling pathways. While the SMC Rho kinase system seems to be reasonably constant, there is enormous variation with regard to the mechanisms responsible for generating Ca2+ signals. One way of dealing with this diversity is to consider how this system has been adapted to control different SMC functions. Phasic SMCs (vas deferens, uterus and bladder) rely on membrane depolarization to drive Ca2+ influx across the plasma membrane. This depolarization can be induced by neurotransmitters or through the operation of a membrane oscillator. Many tonic SMCs (vascular, airway and corpus cavernosum) are driven by a cytosolic Ca2+ oscillator that generates periodic pulses of Ca2+. A similar oscillator is present in pacemaker cells such as the interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) and atypical SMCs that control other tonic SMCs (gastrointestinal, urethra, ureter). The changes in membrane potential induced by these cytosolic oscillators does not drive contraction directly but it functions to couple together individual oscillators to provide the synchronization that is a characteristic feature of many tonic SMCs. PMID:18787034

  17. Mechanism of photodynamic activity of pheophorbides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanielian, Charles; Kobayashi, Masami; Wolff, Christian

    2001-04-01

    Plasmid DNA is efficiently photocleaved by sodium pheophorbides (Na-Phdes) a and b in the absence of oxygen as well as in the presence of oxygen. Fluorescence microscopic observation shows a rapid incorporation of Na-Phde a into nuclei, mitochondria, and lysosome of human oral mucosa cells. In contrast Na-Phde b is incorporated only into the plasma membrane. The photodynamic activity of these pigments in living tissues is probably determined by the monomeric pigment molecules formed in hydrophobic cellular structures and involves two types of reactions: (1) direct electron transfer between DNA bases (especially guanine) and pheophorbide singlet excited state, and (2) indirect reactions medicated by reactive oxygen species, including singlet oxygen whose production from molecular oxygen is sensitized by the Na-Phdes triplet state.

  18. [The role of brain serotonin in the expression of genetically determined defensive behavior].

    PubMed

    Popova, N K

    2004-06-01

    The review summarizes the results of long-term studies on the role of the brain mediator serotonin and genetic predisposition to various types of defensive behavior. The involvement of the serotonergic brain system in the mechanisms of genetic control of both active and passive defensive responses has been established using silver foxes, Norway rats of S40 selection for low and high aggressiveness to humans, aggressive mice with genetic knockout of monoaminoxidase A, and S40 rats selected for predisposition to passive defensive response of freezing (catalepsy). The changes in the serotonergic 5-HT1A-brain receptors of rats genetically predisposed to different strategies of defensive behavior were similar. However, the activity of the key enzyme of serotonin biosynthesis and the brain structures, in which serotonin metabolism was altered, significantly differed with regard to the preferred strategy. The conclusion was drawn that the 5-HT1A-receptors and enzymes of serotonin metabolism in the brain are involved in implementing genetic control of defensive behavior. Expression of the 5-HT1A-brain receptors was suggested to determine the levels of fear and anxiety and, consequently, the predisposition to defensive behavior, whereas the preferred strategy of defensive response (active or passive defensive) depends on genetically determined features of serotonin metabolism in the brain structures. PMID:15341267

  19. Current Status of Proteomic Studies on Defense Responses in Rice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xifeng; Bhadauria, Vijai; Ma, Bojun

    2016-01-01

    Biotic stresses are constraints to plant growth and development negatively impacting crop production. To counter such stresses, plants have developed stress-specific adaptations as well as simultaneous responses. The efficacy and magnitude of inducible adaptive responses are dependent on activation of signaling pathways and intracellular networks by modulating expression, or abundance, and/or post-translational modification of proteins associated with defense mechanisms. Proteomics plays an important role in elucidating plant defense mechanisms by mining the differential regulation of proteins to various biotic stresses. Rice, one of the most widely cultivated food crops in world, is constantly challenged by a variety of biotic stresses, and high-throughput proteomics approaches have been employed to unravel the molecular mechanism of the biotic stresses-response in rice. In this review, we summarize the latest advances of proteomic studies on defense responses and discuss the potential relevance of the proteins identified by proteomic means in rice defense mechanism. Furthermore, we provide perspective for proteomics in unraveling the molecular mechanism of rice immunity. PMID:26364119

  20. Impact of phyto-oxylipins in plant defense.

    PubMed

    Blée, Elizabeth

    2002-07-01

    Phyto-oxylipins are metabolites produced in plants by the oxidative transformation of unsaturated fatty acids via a series of diverging metabolic pathways. Biochemical dissection and genetic approaches have provided compelling evidence that these oxygenated derivatives actively participate in plant defense mechanisms. During the past decade, interest in this field was focused on the biosynthesis of jasmonic acid (one branch of C18 polyunsaturated fatty acid metabolism) and on its relationship to the other plant defense-signaling pathways. However, recently, antisense strategies have revealed that oxylipins other than jasmonates are probably also essential for the resistance of plants to pathogens. PMID:12119169

  1. [Transsexual defense].

    PubMed

    Pfäfflin, F

    1994-01-01

    The prevalent approach to the treatment of patients displaying transsexual symptoms is one that favours somatic intervention of either a hormonal or surgical nature. Normally these patients refuse to avail themselves of the possibility of psychotherapy and are indeed regarded by many therapists as largely inaccessible to therapy of this kind. Pfäfflin looks into the factors involved in the disinclination displayed by both patients and therapists to embark upon such a process. He discusses the unconscious defence mechanisms operative in this disinclination with particular reference to the incipient stages of a course of treatment extending over a number of years and involving a patient initially determined to undergo a surgical "sex change". The patient's insistence on being acknowledged as a woman is regarded here as a creative defence against a major diffusion of identity from a genetically earlier phase, connected with incomplete separation and individuation. In the author's opinion the patient's ability to relinquish this defence will depend largely on the therapist's ability to acknowledge its creativity. PMID:7972887

  2. Strategic defense initiative: critical issues

    SciTech Connect

    Nuckolls, J.H.

    1985-06-01

    The objectives of the Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI) as outlined by President Reagan are discussed. The principal objective for SDI is as a defense against ballistic missiles. Soviet objections and a summary of US-USSR dialogue on the subject are reviewed. Most US studies have been critical of SDI. Four critical issues are addressed in depth: are defense weapons technologically feasible which have high economic leverage relative to offensive ballistic missiles; would the defense feasibility and leverage be degraded or enhanced in the technological race between weapons innovation and countermeasures; could stability be achieved during and after the transition to the defense dominated world envisioned by SDI proponents; would the deployment of high leverage defensive weapons increase or decrease the security of NATO Europe, and the probability of major conventional or nuclear wars. The issue of SDI may lead to a paradox that contains the seeds of catastrophe. The author concludes by warning that nuclear disarmament may eliminate the highly successful deterrent mechanism for avoiding another major world war. In a world made safe for major conventional wars by the apparent ''elimination'' of nuclear weapons, the leaders in a conventional World War III - involving unimaginable suffering, hatred, terror, and death - would be strongly motivated to introduce nuclear weapons in the crucial decisive battles. Even if diplomacy could ''eliminate'' nuclear weapons, man's knowledge of nuclear weapons can never be eliminated. The paradox is the attempt to eliminate nuclear weapons may maximize the probability of their use. (DMC)

  3. Gamma Band Activity in the RAS-intracellular mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Rill, E.; Kezunovic, N.; D’Onofrio, S.; Luster, B.; Hyde, J.; Bisagno, V.; Urbano, F.J.

    2014-01-01

    Gamma band activity participates in sensory perception, problem solving, and memory. This review considers recent evidence showing that cells in the reticular activating system (RAS) exhibit gamma band activity, and describes the intrinsic membrane properties behind such manifestation. Specifically, we discuss how cells in the mesopontine pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN), intralaminar parafascicular nucleus (Pf), and pontine Subcoeruleus nucleus dorsalis (SubCD) all fire in the gamma band range when maximally activated, but no higher. The mechanisms involve high threshold, voltage-dependent P/Q-type calcium channels or sodium-dependent subthreshold oscillations. Rather than participating in the temporal binding of sensory events as in the cortex, gamma band activity in the RAS may participate in the processes of preconscious awareness, and provide the essential stream of information for the formulation of many of our actions. We address three necessary next steps resulting from these discoveries, an intracellular mechanism responsible for maintaining gamma band activity based on persistent G-protein activation, separate intracellular pathways that differentiate between gamma band activity during waking vs during REM sleep, and an intracellular mechanism responsible for the dysregulation in gamma band activity in schizophrenia. These findings open several promising research avenues that have not been thoroughly explored. What are the effects of sleep or REM sleep deprivation on these RAS mechanisms? Are these mechanisms involved in memory processing during waking and/or during REM sleep? Does gamma band processing differ during waking vs REM sleep after sleep or REM sleep deprivation? PMID:24309750

  4. Mechanical Activation of Construction Binder Materials by Various Mills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fediuk, R. S.

    2016-04-01

    The paper deals with the mechanical grinding down to the nano powder of construction materials. During mechanical activation a composite binder active molecules cement minerals occur in the destruction of the molecular defects in the areas of packaging and breaking metastable phase decompensation intermolecular forces. The process is accompanied by a change in the kinetics of hardening of portland cement. Mechanical processes during grinding mineral materials cause, along with the increase in their surface energy, increase the Gibbs energy of powders and, respectively, their chemical activity, which also contributes to the high adhesion strength when contacting them with binders. Thus, the set of measures for mechanical activation makes better use of the weight of components filled with cement systems and adjust their properties. At relatively low cost is possible to provide a spectacular and, importantly, easily repeatable results in a production environment.

  5. Efficient natural defense mechanisms against Listeria monocytogenes in T and B cell-deficient allogeneic bone marrow radiation chimeras. Preactivated macrophages are the main effector cells in an early phase after bone marrow transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Roesler, J.; Groettrup, E.B.; Baccarini, M.; Lohmann-Mattes, M.L. )

    1989-09-01

    Radiation chimeras in the early phase after bone marrow transplantation are a good model to study the efficiency of the body's nonspecific defense system represented by macrophages (M phi), polymorphonuclear cells (PMN), and NK cells. These cell types are present in large numbers in spleen and liver at that time, whereas the specific immune system represented by T and B cells is functionally deficient. We previously reported enhanced activities in vitro of M phi (and PMN) from recipient animals in an early phase after allogeneic bone marrow transfer. We here demonstrate that these activities result in enhanced spontaneous resistance against Listeria monocytogenes in vivo: CFU of L. monocytogenes in spleen and liver 48 h after infection were about 1 or 2 to 4 log steps less than in untreated control mice of donor or host haplotype. This enhanced resistance decreased over the 4-mo period after marrow transfer. Preactivated M phi were identified as the most important effector cells. Isolated from spleen and peritoneal cavity, they performed enhanced killing of phagocytosed Listeria. Such preactivated M phi occurred in recipient animals after transfer of allogeneic but not of syngeneic bone marrow. The precise mechanism of M phi activation in the allogeneic radiation chimera in the complete absence of any detectable T cell function is not clear at present. However, these preactivated M phi display an important protective effect against L. monocytogenes: chimeras could eliminate Listeria without acquisition of positive delayed-type sensitivity when infected with 10(3) bacteria. An inoculum of 5 . 10(3) L. monocytogenes resulted either in prolonged survival compared with normal mice of the recipient haplotype or in definitive survival accompanied by a positive delayed-type sensitivity.

  6. The 5’-AMP-Activated Protein Kinase (AMPK) Is Involved in the Augmentation of Antioxidant Defenses in Cryopreserved Chicken Sperm

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thi Mong Diep; Seigneurin, François; Froment, Pascal; Combarnous, Yves; Blesbois, Elisabeth

    2015-01-01

    Semen cryopreservation is a unique tool for the management of animal genetic diversity. However, the freeze-thaw process causes biochemical and physical alterations which make difficult the restoration of sperm energy-dependent functions needed for fertilization. 5’-AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a key sensor and regulator of intracellular energy metabolism. Mitochondria functions are known to be severely affected during sperm cryopreservation with deleterious oxidative and peroxidative effects leading to cell integrity and functions damages. The aim of this study was thus to examine the role of AMPK on the peroxidation/antioxidant enzymes defense system in frozen-thawed sperm and its consequences on sperm functions. Chicken semen was diluted in media supplemented with or without AMPK activators (AICAR or Metformin [MET]) or inhibitor (Compound C [CC]) and then cryopreserved. AMPKα phosphorylation, antioxidant enzymes activities, mitochondrial potential, ATP, citrate, viability, acrosome reaction ability (AR) and various motility parameters were negatively affected by the freeze-thaw process while reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, lipid peroxidation (LPO) and lactate concentration were dramatically increased. AICAR partially restored superoxide dismutase (SOD), Glutathione Peroxidase (GPx) and Glutathione Reductase (GR), increased ATP, citrate, and lactate concentration and subsequently decreased the ROS and LPO (malondialdehyde) in frozen-thawed semen. Motility parameters were increased (i.e., + 23% for motility, + 34% for rapid sperm) as well as AR (+ 100%). MET had similar effects as AICAR except that catalase activity was restored and that ATP and mitochondrial potential were further decreased. CC showed effects opposite to AICAR on SOD, ROS, LPO and AR and motility parameters. Taken together, our results strongly suggest that, upon freeze-thaw process, AMPK stimulated intracellular anti-oxidative defense enzymes through ATP regulation, thus

  7. Rice WRKY4 acts as a transcriptional activator mediating defense responses toward Rhizoctonia solani, the causing agent of rice sheath blight.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haihua; Meng, Jiao; Peng, Xixu; Tang, Xinke; Zhou, Pinglan; Xiang, Jianhua; Deng, Xiaobo

    2015-09-01

    WRKY transcription factors have been implicated in the regulation of transcriptional reprogramming associated with various plant processes but most notably with plant defense responses to pathogens. Here we demonstrate that expression of rice WRKY4 gene (OsWRKY4) was rapidly and strongly induced upon infection of Rhizoctonia solani, the causing agent of rice sheath blight, and exogenous jasmonic acid (JA) and ethylene (ET). OsWRKY4 is localized to the nucleus of plant cells and possesses transcriptional activation ability. Modulation of OsWRKY4 transcript levels by constitutive overexpression increases resistance to the necrotrophic sheath blight fungus, concomitant with elevated expression of JA- and ET-responsive pathogenesis-related (PR) genes such as PR1a, PR1b, PR5 and PR10/PBZ1. Suppression by RNA interference (RNAi), on the other hand, compromises resistance to the fungal pathogen. Yeast one-hybrid assay and transient expression in tobacco cells reveal that OsWRKY4 specifically binds to the promoter regions of PR1b and PR5 which contain W-box (TTGAC[C/T]), or W-box like (TGAC[C/T]) cis-elements. In conclusion, we propose that OsWRKY4 functions as an important positive regulator that is implicated in the defense responses to rice sheath blight via JA/ET-dependent signal pathway. PMID:26275661

  8. Common mechanisms activate plant guard receptors and TLR4

    PubMed Central

    Kagan, Jonathan C.

    2014-01-01

    In metazoans, the innate immune system uses Pattern Recognition Receptors to detect conserved microbial products, whereas in plants Guard Receptors detect virulence factors or activities encoded by pathogens. In a recent study, Williams and colleagues report that plant Guard receptors can be activated by a mechanism remarkably similar to that of mammalian Toll-like Receptor 4. PMID:25224694

  9. Tractor Mechanics: Learning Activity Packages 1-19.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clemson Univ., SC. Vocational Education Media Center.

    Learning activity packages are presented for teaching tractor mechanics. The first of two sections deals with miscellaneous tasks and contains learning activity packages on cleaning the tractor and receiving new tractor parts. Section 2 is concerned with maintaining and servicing the electrical system, and it includes the following learning…

  10. Molecular Mechanism of Active Zone Organization at Vertebrate Neuromuscular Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Nishimune, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Organization of presynaptic active zones is essential for development, plasticity, and pathology of the nervous system. Recent studies indicate a trans-synaptic molecular mechanism that organizes the active zones by connecting the pre- and the postsynaptic specialization. The presynaptic component of this trans-synaptic mechanism is comprised of cytosolic active zone proteins bound to the cytosolic domains of voltage-dependent calcium channels (P/Q-, N-, and L-type) on the presynaptic membrane. The postsynaptic component of this mechanism is the synapse organizer (laminin β2) that is expressed by the postsynaptic cell and accumulates specifically on top of the postsynaptic specialization. The pre- and the postsynaptic components interact directly between the extracellular domains of calcium channels and laminin β2 to anchor the presynaptic protein complex in front of the postsynaptic specialization. Hence, the presynaptic calcium channel functions as a scaffolding protein for active zone organization and as an ion-conducting channel for synaptic transmission. In contrast to the requirement of calcium influx for synaptic transmission, the formation of the active zone does not require the calcium influx through the calcium channels. Importantly, the active zones of adult synapses are not stable structures and require maintenance for their integrity. Furthermore, aging or diseases of the central and peripheral nervous system impair the active zones. This review will focus on the molecular mechanisms that organize the presynaptic active zones and summarize recent findings at the neuromuscular junctions and other synapses. PMID:22135013

  11. Chemical and mechanical defenses vary among maternal lines and leaf ages in Verbascum thapsus L. (Scrophulariaceae) and reduce palatability to a generalist insect

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Intra-specific variation in host-plant quality affects herbivore foraging decisions and, because of this, can feed back to shape plant fitness. In particular, among- and within plant variation in defense shapes herbivore behavior, and if genetically based, may respond to natural selection by herbivo...

  12. Defense styles in Intermittent Explosive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Puhalla, Alexander A; McCloskey, Michael S; Brickman, Lauren J; Fauber, Robert; Coccaro, Emil F

    2016-04-30

    The overreliance on immature and/or neurotic defense mechanisms, as opposed to more mature defensive functioning has been linked to several psychiatric disorders. However, to date, the role of defense styles among individuals with Intermittent Explosive Disorder (IED) has not been examined. Given that individuals with IED display difficulties controlling their anger and aggression, one might expect these individuals to exhibit more immature and less mature defense styles. The current study compared participants with IED to a personality disorder (PD) comparison group, as well as to healthy volunteers (HV) on the Defense Style Questionnaire, a self-report measure that assesses the extent to which individuals endorse using mature, immature, and neurotic defense styles. Subjects with IED had significantly higher scores than both comparison groups on immature defense styles and exhibited lower scores on mature defense mechanisms. Hierarchical regression of significant defense style subscales showed that higher levels of acting out and lower levels of sublimation uniquely discriminated participants with IED from the PD and HV comparison groups. PMID:27086223

  13. Radiological Defense. Textbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Civil Preparedness Agency (DOD), Washington, DC.

    This textbook has been prepared under the direction of the Defense Civil Preparedness Agency (DCPA) Staff College for use as a student reference manual in radiological defense (RADEF) courses. It provides much of the basic technical information necessary for a proper understanding of radiological defense and summarizes RADEF planning and expected…

  14. An active immune defense with a minimal CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) RNA and without the Cas6 protein.

    PubMed

    Maier, Lisa-Katharina; Stachler, Aris-Edda; Saunders, Sita J; Backofen, Rolf; Marchfelder, Anita

    2015-02-13

    The prokaryotic immune system CRISPR-Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats-CRISPR-associated) is a defense system that protects prokaryotes against foreign DNA. The short CRISPR RNAs (crRNAs) are central components of this immune system. In CRISPR-Cas systems type I and III, crRNAs are generated by the endonuclease Cas6. We developed a Cas6b-independent crRNA maturation pathway for the Haloferax type I-B system in vivo that expresses a functional crRNA, which we termed independently generated crRNA (icrRNA). The icrRNA is effective in triggering degradation of an invader plasmid carrying the matching protospacer sequence. The Cas6b-independent maturation of the icrRNA allowed mutation of the repeat sequence without interfering with signals important for Cas6b processing. We generated 23 variants of the icrRNA and analyzed them for activity in the interference reaction. icrRNAs with deletions or mutations of the 3' handle are still active in triggering an interference reaction. The complete 3' handle could be removed without loss of activity. However, manipulations of the 5' handle mostly led to loss of interference activity. Furthermore, we could show that in the presence of an icrRNA a strain without Cas6b (Δcas6b) is still active in interference. PMID:25512373

  15. An Active Immune Defense with a Minimal CRISPR (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats) RNA and without the Cas6 Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Lisa-Katharina; Stachler, Aris-Edda; Saunders, Sita J.; Backofen, Rolf; Marchfelder, Anita

    2015-01-01

    The prokaryotic immune system CRISPR-Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats-CRISPR-associated) is a defense system that protects prokaryotes against foreign DNA. The short CRISPR RNAs (crRNAs) are central components of this immune system. In CRISPR-Cas systems type I and III, crRNAs are generated by the endonuclease Cas6. We developed a Cas6b-independent crRNA maturation pathway for the Haloferax type I-B system in vivo that expresses a functional crRNA, which we termed independently generated crRNA (icrRNA). The icrRNA is effective in triggering degradation of an invader plasmid carrying the matching protospacer sequence. The Cas6b-independent maturation of the icrRNA allowed mutation of the repeat sequence without interfering with signals important for Cas6b processing. We generated 23 variants of the icrRNA and analyzed them for activity in the interference reaction. icrRNAs with deletions or mutations of the 3′ handle are still active in triggering an interference reaction. The complete 3′ handle could be removed without loss of activity. However, manipulations of the 5′ handle mostly led to loss of interference activity. Furthermore, we could show that in the presence of an icrRNA a strain without Cas6b (Δcas6b) is still active in interference. PMID:25512373

  16. Application of flexure structures to active and adaptive opto-mechanical mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zago, Lorenzo; Genequand, Pierre M.; Kjelberg, Ivar; Morschel, Joseph

    1997-03-01

    Active and adaptive structures, also commonly called 'smart' structures, combine in one integrated system various functions such as load carrying and structural function, mechanical (cinematic) functions, sensing, control and actuating. Originally developed for high accuracy opto-mechanical applications, CSEM's technology of flexure structures and flexible mechanisms is particularly suited to solve many structural and mechanical issues found in such active/adaptive mechanisms. The paper illustrates some recent flexure structures developments at CSEM and outlines the comprehensive know-how involved in this technology. This comprises in particular the elaboration of optimal design guidelines, related to the geometry, kinematics and dynamics issues (for instance, the minimization of spurious high frequency effects), the evaluation and predictability of all performance quantities relevant to the utilization of flexure structures in space (reliability, fatigue, static and dynamic modeling, etc.). material issues and manufacturing procedures.

  17. Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms Underpinning Macrophage Activation during Remyelination

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, Amy F.; Miron, Veronique E.

    2016-01-01

    Remyelination is an example of central nervous system (CNS) regeneration, whereby myelin is restored around demyelinated axons, re-establishing saltatory conduction and trophic/metabolic support. In progressive multiple sclerosis, remyelination is limited or fails altogether which is considered to contribute to axonal damage/loss and consequent disability. Macrophages have critical roles in both CNS damage and regeneration, such as remyelination. This diverse range in functions reflects the ability of macrophages to acquire tissue microenvironment-specific activation states. This activation is dynamically regulated during efficient regeneration, with a switch from pro-inflammatory to inflammation-resolution/pro-regenerative phenotypes. Although, some molecules and pathways have been implicated in the dynamic activation of macrophages, such as NFκB, the cellular and molecular mechanisms underpinning plasticity of macrophage activation are unclear. Identifying mechanisms regulating macrophage activation to pro-regenerative phenotypes may lead to novel therapeutic strategies to promote remyelination in multiple sclerosis. PMID:27446913

  18. Active vibration control using mechanical and electrical analogies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Perez, A.; Hassan, A.; Kaczmarczyk, S.; Picton, P.

    2016-05-01

    Mechanical-electrical analogous circuit models are widely used in electromechanical system design as they represent the function of a coupled electrical and mechanical system using an equivalent electrical system. This research uses electrical circuits to establish a discussion of simple active vibration control principles using two scenarios: an active vibration isolation system and an active dynamic vibration absorber (DVA) using a voice coil motor (VCM) actuator. Active control laws such as gain scheduling are intuitively explained using circuit analysis techniques. Active vibration control approaches are typically constraint by electrical power requirements. The electrical analogous is a fast approach for specifying power requirements on the experimental test platform which is based on a vibration shaker that provides the based excitation required for the single Degree- of-Freedom (1DoF) vibration model under study.

  19. Scavenging iron: a novel mechanism of plant immunity activation by microbial siderophores.

    PubMed

    Aznar, Aude; Chen, Nicolas W G; Rigault, Martine; Riache, Nassima; Joseph, Delphine; Desmaële, Didier; Mouille, Grégory; Boutet, Stéphanie; Soubigou-Taconnat, Ludivine; Renou, Jean-Pierre; Thomine, Sébastien; Expert, Dominique; Dellagi, Alia

    2014-04-01

    Siderophores are specific ferric iron chelators synthesized by virtually all microorganisms in response to iron deficiency. We have previously shown that they promote infection by the phytopathogenic enterobacteria Dickeya dadantii and Erwinia amylovora. Siderophores also have the ability to activate plant immunity. We have used complete Arabidopsis transcriptome microarrays to investigate the global transcriptional modifications in roots and leaves of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants after leaf treatment with the siderophore deferrioxamine (DFO). Physiological relevance of these transcriptional modifications was validated experimentally. Immunity and heavy-metal homeostasis were the major processes affected by DFO. These two physiological responses could be activated by a synthetic iron chelator ethylenediamine-di(o-hydroxyphenylacetic) acid, indicating that siderophores eliciting activities rely on their strong iron-chelating capacity. DFO was able to protect Arabidopsis against the pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000. Siderophore treatment caused local modifications of iron distribution in leaf cells visible by ferrocyanide and diaminobenzidine-H₂O₂ staining. Metal quantifications showed that DFO causes a transient iron and zinc uptake at the root level, which is presumably mediated by the metal transporter iron regulated transporter1 (IRT1). Defense gene expression and callose deposition in response to DFO were compromised in an irt1 mutant. Consistently, plant susceptibility to D. dadantii was increased in the irt1 mutant. Our work shows that iron scavenging is a unique mechanism of immunity activation in plants. It highlights the strong relationship between heavy-metal homeostasis and immunity. PMID:24501001

  20. Scavenging Iron: A Novel Mechanism of Plant Immunity Activation by Microbial Siderophores1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Aznar, Aude; Chen, Nicolas W.G.; Rigault, Martine; Riache, Nassima; Joseph, Delphine; Desmaële, Didier; Mouille, Grégory; Boutet, Stéphanie; Soubigou-Taconnat, Ludivine; Renou, Jean-Pierre; Thomine, Sébastien; Expert, Dominique; Dellagi, Alia

    2014-01-01

    Siderophores are specific ferric iron chelators synthesized by virtually all microorganisms in response to iron deficiency. We have previously shown that they promote infection by the phytopathogenic enterobacteria Dickeya dadantii and Erwinia amylovora. Siderophores also have the ability to activate plant immunity. We have used complete Arabidopsis transcriptome microarrays to investigate the global transcriptional modifications in roots and leaves of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants after leaf treatment with the siderophore deferrioxamine (DFO). Physiological relevance of these transcriptional modifications was validated experimentally. Immunity and heavy-metal homeostasis were the major processes affected by DFO. These two physiological responses could be activated by a synthetic iron chelator ethylenediamine-di(o-hydroxyphenylacetic) acid, indicating that siderophores eliciting activities rely on their strong iron-chelating capacity. DFO was able to protect Arabidopsis against the pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000. Siderophore treatment caused local modifications of iron distribution in leaf cells visible by ferrocyanide and diaminobenzidine-H2O2 staining. Metal quantifications showed that DFO causes a transient iron and zinc uptake at the root level, which is presumably mediated by the metal transporter iron regulated transporter1 (IRT1). Defense gene expression and callose deposition in response to DFO were compromised in an irt1 mutant. Consistently, plant susceptibility to D. dadantii was increased in the irt1 mutant. Our work shows that iron scavenging is a unique mechanism of immunity activation in plants. It highlights the strong relationship between heavy-metal homeostasis and immunity. PMID:24501001

  1. Suppression of Bean Defense Responses by Pseudomonas syringae.

    PubMed Central

    Jakobek, JL; Smith, JA; Lindgren, PB

    1993-01-01

    We have developed a model system to examine suppression of defense responses in bean by the compatible bacterium Pseudomonas syringae pv phaseolicola. Previously, we have shown that there is a general mechanism for the induction of the bean defense genes phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL), chalcone synthase (CHS), chalcone isomerase (CHI), and chitinase (CHT) by incompatible, compatible, and nonpathogenic bacteria. Here, we show that bean plants infiltrated with isolates of P. s. phaseolicola failed to produce transcripts for PAL, CHS, or CHI up to 120 hr after infiltration and CHT transcript accumulation was significantly delayed when compared to the incompatible P. syringae strains. Infiltration of bean plants with 108 cells per mL of P. s. phaseolicola NPS3121 8 hr prior to infiltration with an equal concentration of incompatible P. s. pv tabaci Pt11528 significantly reduced the typical profile of defense transcript accumulation when compared to plants infiltrated with Pt11528 alone. A corresponding suppression of phytoalexin accumulation was also observed. NPS3121 also suppressed PAL, CHS, CHI, and CHT transcript accumulation and phytoalexin production induced by Escherichia coli DH5[alpha] or the elicitor glutathione. Heat-killed NPS3121 cells or cells treated with protein synthesis inhibitors lost the suppressor activity. Taken together, these experiments suggest that NPS3121 has an active mechanism to suppress the accumulation of defense transcripts and phytoalexin biosynthesis in bean. PMID:12271016

  2. Conservative Mechanisms of Extracellular Trap Formation by Annelida Eisenia andrei: Serine Protease Activity Requirement.

    PubMed

    Homa, Joanna; Ortmann, Weronika; Kolaczkowska, Elzbieta

    2016-01-01

    Formation of extracellular traps (ETs) capturing and immobilizing pathogens is now a well-established defense mechanism added to the repertoire of vertebrate phagocytes. These ETs are composed of extracellular DNA (extDNA), histones and antimicrobial proteins. Formation of mouse and human ETs depends on enzymes (i) facilitating decondensation of chromatin by citrullination of histones, and (ii) serine proteases degrading histones. In invertebrates, initial reports revealed existence of ETs composed of extDNA and histones, and here we document for the first time that also coelomocytes, immunocompetent cells of an earthworm Eisenia andrei, cast ETs which successfully trap bacteria in a reactive oxygen species (ROS)-dependent and -independent manner. Importantly, the formation of ETs was observed not only when coelomocytes were studied ex vivo, but also in vivo, directly in the earthworm coelom. These ETs were composed of extDNA, heat shock proteins (HSP27) and H3 histones. Furthermore, the formation of E. andrei ETs depended on activity of serine proteases, including elastase-like activity. Moreover, ETs interconnected and hold together aggregating coelomocytes, a processes proceeding encapsulation. In conclusion, the study confirms ET formation by earthworms, and unravels mechanisms leading to ET formation and encapsulation in invertebrates. PMID:27416067

  3. Conservative Mechanisms of Extracellular Trap Formation by Annelida Eisenia andrei: Serine Protease Activity Requirement

    PubMed Central

    Ortmann, Weronika; Kolaczkowska, Elzbieta

    2016-01-01

    Formation of extracellular traps (ETs) capturing and immobilizing pathogens is now a well-established defense mechanism added to the repertoire of vertebrate phagocytes. These ETs are composed of extracellular DNA (extDNA), histones and antimicrobial proteins. Formation of mouse and human ETs depends on enzymes (i) facilitating decondensation of chromatin by citrullination of histones, and (ii) serine proteases degrading histones. In invertebrates, initial reports revealed existence of ETs composed of extDNA and histones, and here we document for the first time that also coelomocytes, immunocompetent cells of an earthworm Eisenia andrei, cast ETs which successfully trap bacteria in a reactive oxygen species (ROS)-dependent and -independent manner. Importantly, the formation of ETs was observed not only when coelomocytes were studied ex vivo, but also in vivo, directly in the earthworm coelom. These ETs were composed of extDNA, heat shock proteins (HSP27) and H3 histones. Furthermore, the formation of E. andrei ETs depended on activity of serine proteases, including elastase-like activity. Moreover, ETs interconnected and hold together aggregating coelomocytes, a processes proceeding encapsulation. In conclusion, the study confirms ET formation by earthworms, and unravels mechanisms leading to ET formation and encapsulation in invertebrates. PMID:27416067

  4. The staphylococcal surface-glycopolymer wall teichoic acid (WTA) is crucial for complement activation and immunological defense against Staphylococcus aureus infection.

    PubMed

    Kurokawa, Kenji; Takahashi, Kazue; Lee, Bok Luel

    2016-10-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a Gram-positive bacterial pathogen that is decorated by glycopolymers, including wall teichoic acid (WTA), peptidoglycan, lipoteichoic acid, and capsular polysaccharides. These bacterial surface glycopolymers are recognized by serum antibodies and a variety of pattern recognition molecules, including mannose-binding lectin (MBL). Recently, we demonstrated that human serum MBL senses staphylococcal WTA. Whereas MBL in infants who have not yet fully developed adaptive immunity binds to S. aureus WTA and activates complement serum, MBL in adults who have fully developed adaptive immunity cannot bind to WTA because of an inhibitory effect of serum anti-WTA IgG. Furthermore, we showed that human anti-WTA IgGs purified from pooled adult serum IgGs triggered activation of classical complement-dependent opsonophagocytosis against S. aureus. Because the epitopes of WTA that are recognized by anti-WTA IgG and MBL have not been determined, we constructed several S. aureus mutants with altered WTA glycosylation. Our intensive biochemical studies provide evidence that the β-GlcNAc residues of WTA are required for the induction of anti-WTA IgG-mediated opsonophagocytosis and that both β- and α-GlcNAc residues are required for MBL-mediated complement activation. The molecular interactions of other S. aureus cell wall components and host recognition proteins are also discussed. In summary, in this review, we discuss the biological importance of S. aureus cell surface glycopolymers in complement activation and host defense responses. PMID:27424796

  5. Innovative Application of Mechanical Activation for Rare Earth Elements Recovering: Process Optimization and Mechanism Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Quanyin; Deng, Chao; Li, Jinhui

    2016-01-01

    With the rapidly expanding use of fluorescent lamps (FLs) and increasing interest in conservation and sustainable utilization of critical metals such as rare earth elements (REEs), the recovering of REEs from phosphors in waste FLs is becoming a critical environmental and economic issue. To effectively recycle REEs with metallurgical methods, mechanical activation by ball milling was introduced to pretreat the waste phosphors. This current study put the emphasis on the mechanical activation and leaching processes for REEs, and explored the feasibility of the method from both theoretical and practical standpoints. Results showed physicochemical changes of structural destruction and particle size reduction after mechanical activation, leading to the easy dissolution of REEs in the activated samples. Under optimal conditions, dissolution yields of 89.4%, 93.1% and 94.6% for Tb, Eu and Y, respectively, were achieved from activated waste phosphors using hydrochloric acid as the dissolution agent. The shrinking core model proved to be the most applicable for the leaching procedure, with an apparent activation energy of 10.96 ± 2.79 kJ/mol. This novel process indicates that mechanical activation is an efficient method for recovering REEs from waste phosphors, and it has promising potential for REE recovery with low cost and high efficiency.

  6. Innovative Application of Mechanical Activation for Rare Earth Elements Recovering: Process Optimization and Mechanism Exploration.

    PubMed

    Tan, Quanyin; Deng, Chao; Li, Jinhui

    2016-01-01

    With the rapidly expanding use of fluorescent lamps (FLs) and increasing interest in conservation and sustainable utilization of critical metals such as rare earth elements (REEs), the recovering of REEs from phosphors in waste FLs is becoming a critical environmental and economic issue. To effectively recycle REEs with metallurgical methods, mechanical activation by ball milling was introduced to pretreat the waste phosphors. This current study put the emphasis on the mechanical activation and leaching processes for REEs, and explored the feasibility of the method from both theoretical and practical standpoints. Results showed physicochemical changes of structural destruction and particle size reduction after mechanical activation, leading to the easy dissolution of REEs in the activated samples. Under optimal conditions, dissolution yields of 89.4%, 93.1% and 94.6% for Tb, Eu and Y, respectively, were achieved from activated waste phosphors using hydrochloric acid as the dissolution agent. The shrinking core model proved to be the most applicable for the leaching procedure, with an apparent activation energy of 10.96 ± 2.79 kJ/mol. This novel process indicates that mechanical activation is an efficient method for recovering REEs from waste phosphors, and it has promising potential for REE recovery with low cost and high efficiency. PMID:26819083

  7. Innovative Application of Mechanical Activation for Rare Earth Elements Recovering: Process Optimization and Mechanism Exploration

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Quanyin; Deng, Chao; Li, Jinhui

    2016-01-01

    With the rapidly expanding use of fluorescent lamps (FLs) and increasing interest in conservation and sustainable utilization of critical metals such as rare earth elements (REEs), the recovering of REEs from phosphors in waste FLs is becoming a critical environmental and economic issue. To effectively recycle REEs with metallurgical methods, mechanical activation by ball milling was introduced to pretreat the waste phosphors. This current study put the emphasis on the mechanical activation and leaching processes for REEs, and explored the feasibility of the method from both theoretical and practical standpoints. Results showed physicochemical changes of structural destruction and particle size reduction after mechanical activation, leading to the easy dissolution of REEs in the activated samples. Under optimal conditions, dissolution yields of 89.4%, 93.1% and 94.6% for Tb, Eu and Y, respectively, were achieved from activated waste phosphors using hydrochloric acid as the dissolution agent. The shrinking core model proved to be the most applicable for the leaching procedure, with an apparent activation energy of 10.96 ± 2.79 kJ/mol. This novel process indicates that mechanical activation is an efficient method for recovering REEs from waste phosphors, and it has promising potential for REE recovery with low cost and high efficiency. PMID:26819083

  8. Modulation of bone remodeling via mechanically activated ion channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, Randall L. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    A critical factor in the maintenance of bone mass is the physical forces imposed upon the skeleton. Removal of these forces, such as in a weightless environment, results in a rapid loss of bone, whereas application of exogenous mechanical strain has been shown to increase bone formation. Numerous flight and ground-based experiments indicate that the osteoblast is the key bone cell influenced by mechanical stimulation. Aside from early transient fluctuations in response to unloading, osteoclast number and activity seem unaffected by removal of strain. However, bone formation is drastically reduced in weightlessness and osteoblasts respond to mechanical strain with an increase in the activity of a number of second messenger pathways resulting in increased anabolic activity. Unfortunately, the mechanism by which the osteoblast converts physical stimuli into a biochemical message, a process we have termed biochemical coupling, remains elusive. Prior to the application of this grant, we had characterized a mechanosensitive, cation nonselective channel (SA-cat) in osteoblast-like osteosarcoma cells that we proposed is the initial signalling mechanism for mechanotransduction. During the execution of this grant, we have made considerable progress to further characterize this channel as well as to determine its role in the osteoblastic response to mechanical strain. To achieve these goals, we combined electrophysiologic techniques with cellular and molecular biology methods to examine the role of these channels in the normal function of the osteoblast in vitro.

  9. Small molecules reveal an alternative mechanism of Bax activation

    PubMed Central

    Brahmbhatt, Hetal; Uehling, David; Al-awar, Rima; Leber, Brian; Andrews, David

    2016-01-01

    The pro-apoptotic protein Bax commits a cell to death by permeabilizing the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM). To obtain small-molecule probes for elucidating the molecular mechanism(s) of Bax activation, we screened for compounds that induced Bax-mediated liposome permeabilization. We identified five structurally different small molecules that promoted both Bax targeting to and oligomerization at membranes. All five compounds initiated Bax oligomerization in the absence of membranes by a mechanism unlike Bax activation by Bcl-2 homology 3 domain (BH3) proteins. Some of the compounds induced Bax/Bak-dependent apoptosis in cells. Activation of Bax by the most active compound was poorly inhibited by the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-XL and requires a cysteine residue at position 126 of Bax that is not required for activation by BH3 proteins. Our results reveal a novel pathway for Bax activation independent of pro-apoptotic BH3 proteins that may have important implications for the regulation of Bax activity in cells. PMID:26916338

  10. Small molecules reveal an alternative mechanism of Bax activation.

    PubMed

    Brahmbhatt, Hetal; Uehling, David; Al-Awar, Rima; Leber, Brian; Andrews, David

    2016-04-15

    The pro-apoptotic protein Bax commits a cell to death by permeabilizing the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM). To obtain small-molecule probes for elucidating the molecular mechanism(s) of Bax activation, we screened for compounds that induced Bax-mediated liposome permeabilization. We identified five structurally different small molecules that promoted both Bax targeting to and oligomerization at membranes. All five compounds initiated Bax oligomerization in the absence of membranes by a mechanism unlike Bax activation by Bcl-2 homology 3 domain (BH3) proteins. Some of the compounds induced Bax/Bak-dependent apoptosis in cells. Activation of Bax by the most active compound was poorly inhibited by the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-XL and requires a cysteine residue at position 126 of Bax that is not required for activation by BH3 proteins. Our results reveal a novel pathway for Bax activation independent of pro-apoptotic BH3 proteins that may have important implications for the regulation of Bax activity in cells. PMID:26916338

  11. The mechanical and tribological properties of UHMWPE loaded ALN after mechanical activation for joint replacements.

    PubMed

    Gong, Kemeng; Qu, Shuxin; Liu, Yumei; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Yongchao; Jiang, Chongxi; Shen, Ru

    2016-08-01

    Ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) loaded with alendronate sodium (ALN) has tremendous potential as an orthopeadic biomaterial for joint replacements. However, poor mechanical and tribological properties of UHMWPE-ALN are still obstacle for further application. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect and mechanism of mechanical activation on mechanical and tribological properties of 1wt% ALN-loaded UHMWPE (UHMWPE-ALN-ma). In this study, tensile test, small punch test and reciprocating sliding wear test were applied to characterize the mechanical and tribological properties of UHMWPE-ALN-ma. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) were employed to characterize UHMWPE-ALN-ma. Tensile test and small punch test showed that Young׳s modulus, tensile strength and work-to-failure (WTF) of UHMWPE-ALN-ma increased significantly compared to those of UHMWPE-ALN. The friction coefficients and wear factors of UHMWPE-ALN-ma both decreased significantly compared to those of UHMWPE-ALN. Mechanical activation obviously reduced type 1 (void) and type 2 (the disconnected and dislocated machining marks) fusion defects of UHMWPE-ALN-ma, which were revealed by SEM images of freeze fracture surfaces after etching and lateral surfaces of specimens after extension to fracture, respectively. It was attributed to peeled-off layers and chain scission of molecular chains of UHMWPE particles after mechanical activation, which were revealed by SEM images and FTIR spectra of UHMWPE-ALN-ma and UHMWPE-ALN, respectively. Moreover, EDS spectra revealed the more homogeneous distribution of ALN in UHMWPE-ALN-ma compared to that of UHMWPE-ALN. The present results showed that mechanical activation was a potential strategy to improve mechanical and tribological properties of UHMWPE-ALN-ma as an orthopeadic biomaterial for joint replacements. PMID:27104932

  12. Midbrain circuits for defensive behaviour.

    PubMed

    Tovote, Philip; Esposito, Maria Soledad; Botta, Paolo; Chaudun, Fabrice; Fadok, Jonathan P; Markovic, Milica; Wolff, Steffen B E; Ramakrishnan, Charu; Fenno, Lief; Deisseroth, Karl; Herry, Cyril; Arber, Silvia; Lüthi, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    Survival in threatening situations depends on the selection and rapid execution of an appropriate active or passive defensive response, yet the underlying brain circuitry is not understood. Here we use circuit-based optogenetic, in vivo and in vitro electrophysiological, and neuroanatomical tracing methods to define midbrain periaqueductal grey circuits for specific defensive behaviours. We identify an inhibitory pathway from the central nucleus of the amygdala to the ventrolateral periaqueductal grey that produces freezing by disinhibition of ventrolateral periaqueductal grey excitatory outputs to pre-motor targets in the magnocellular nucleus of the medulla. In addition, we provide evidence for anatomical and functional interaction of this freezing pathway with long-range and local circuits mediating flight. Our data define the neuronal circuitry underlying the execution of freezing, an evolutionarily conserved defensive behaviour, which is expressed by many species including fish, rodents and primates. In humans, dysregulation of this 'survival circuit' has been implicated in anxiety-related disorders. PMID:27279213

  13. The Antiviral Activities and Mechanisms of Marine Polysaccharides: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Wang, Shi-Xin; Guan, Hua-Shi

    2012-01-01

    Recently, the studies on the antiviral activities of marine natural products, especially marine polysaccharides, are attracting more and more attention all over the world. Marine-derived polysaccharides and their lower molecular weight oligosaccharide derivatives have been shown to possess a variety of antiviral activities. This paper will review the recent progress in research on the antiviral activities and the mechanisms of these polysaccharides obtained from marine organisms. In particular, it will provide an update on the antiviral actions of the sulfated polysaccharides derived from marine algae including carrageenans, alginates, and fucans, relating to their structure features and the structure–activity relationships. In addition, the recent findings on the different mechanisms of antiviral actions of marine polysaccharides and their potential for therapeutic application will also be summarized in detail. PMID:23235364

  14. REPORT ON THE DEFENSE LANGUAGE INSTITUTE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BENOIT, LEROY JAMES

    A SUMMARY IS GIVEN OF THE LANGUAGE TRAINING ACTIVITIES OF THE DEFENSE LANGUAGE INSTITUTE, ESTABLISHED IN 1963 TO TEACH THE GLOBAL LANGUAGE REQUIREMENTS OF THE DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE TO U.S. MILITARY PERSONNEL AND ENGLISH TO FOREIGN ALLIED MILITARY PERSONNEL. THE REPORT DESCRIBES THE AUDIOLINGUAL METHODOLOGY AND APPROACH USED IN ITS INTENSIVE…

  15. DEFENSE ENVIRONMENTAL NETWORK AND INFORMATION EXCHANGE (DENIX)

    EPA Science Inventory

    DENIX serves as a central platform for the dissemination of environment, safety and occupational health (ESOH) news, policy, and guidance within Department of Defense (DoD) activities worldwide, in support of the national defense mission. DENIX informs ESOH professionals of salie...

  16. Mechanisms of NOD-like receptor-associated inflammasome activation.

    PubMed

    Wen, Haitao; Miao, Edward A; Ting, Jenny P-Y

    2013-09-19

    A major function of a subfamily of NLR (nucleotide-binding domain, leucine-rich repeat containing, or NOD-like receptor) proteins is in inflammasome activation, which has been implicated in a multitude of disease models and human diseases. This work will highlight key progress in understanding the mechanisms that activate the best-studied NLRs (NLRP3, NLRC4, NAIP, and NLRP1) and in uncovering inflammasome NLRs. PMID:24054327

  17. The tobacco salicylic acid-binding protein 3 (SABP3) is the chloroplast carbonic anhydrase, which exhibits antioxidant activity and plays a role in the hypersensitive defense response.

    PubMed

    Slaymaker, David H; Navarre, Duroy A; Clark, Daniel; del Pozo, Olga; Martin, Gregory B; Klessig, Daniel F

    2002-09-01

    In plants, salicylic acid (SA) plays an important role in signaling both local and systemic defense responses. Previous efforts to identify SA effector proteins in tobacco have led to the isolation of two soluble cytoplasmic SA-binding proteins (SABPs): catalase, SABP, and an approximately 25-kDa protein, SABP2. Here we describe the identification of an SA-binding protein, SABP3, in the stroma of tobacco chloroplasts. SABP3 bound SA with an apparent dissociation constant (K(d)) of 3.7 microM and exhibited much greater affinity for biologically active than inactive analogs. Purification and partial sequencing of SABP3 indicated that it is the chloroplast carbonic anhydrase (CA). Confirming this finding, recombinant tobacco chloroplast CA exhibited both CA enzymatic and SA-binding activities. Expression of this protein in yeast also demonstrated that CA/SABP3 has antioxidant activity. A second gene encoding CA was also cloned, and its encoded protein was shown to behave similarly to that purified as SABP3. Finally, silencing of CA gene expression in leaves suppressed the Pto:avrPto-mediated hypersensitive response in disease resistance. These results demonstrate that SA may act through multiple effector proteins in plants and shed further light on the function of CA in chloroplasts. PMID:12185253

  18. Novel aspinolide production by Trichoderma arundinaceum with a potential role in Botrytis cinerea antagonistic activity and plant defense priming

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Harzianum A (HA), a trichothecene produced by Trichoderma arundinaceum, has recently been described to have antagonistic activity against fungal plant pathogens and to induce plant defence genes. In the present work, we have shown that a tri5 genedisrupted mutant that lacks HA production overproduce...

  19. Multivariable Dynamic Ankle Mechanical Impedance With Active Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyunglae; Krebs, Hermano Igo; Hogan, Neville

    2015-01-01

    Multivariable dynamic ankle mechanical impedance in two coupled degrees-of-freedom (DOFs) was quantified when muscles were active. Measurements were performed at five different target activation levels of tibialis anterior and soleus, from 10% to 30% of maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) with increments of 5% MVC. Interestingly, several ankle behaviors characterized in our previous study of the relaxed ankle were observed with muscles active: ankle mechanical impedance in joint coordinates showed responses largely consistent with a second-order system consisting of inertia, viscosity, and stiffness; stiffness was greater in the sagittal plane than in the frontal plane at all activation conditions for all subjects; and the coupling between dorsiflexion–plantarflexion and inversion–eversion was small—the two DOF measurements were well explained by a strictly diagonal impedance matrix. In general, ankle stiffness increased linearly with muscle activation in all directions in the 2-D space formed by the sagittal and frontal planes, but more in the sagittal than in the frontal plane, resulting in an accentuated “peanut shape.” This characterization of young healthy subjects’ ankle mechanical impedance with active muscles will serve as a baseline to investigate pathophysiological ankle behaviors of biomechanically and/or neurologically impaired patients. PMID:25203497

  20. Differential MSC activation leads to distinct mononuclear leukocyte binding mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kota, Daniel J.; Dicarlo, Bryan; Hetz, Robert A.; Smith, Philippa; Cox, Charles S.; Olson, Scott D.

    2014-04-01

    Advances in the field of Multipotent Mesenchymal Stromal cell (MSC) biology have demonstrated that MSCs can improve disease outcome when `activated' to exert immunomodulatory effects. However, the precise mechanisms modulating MSC-immune cells interactions remain largely elusive. In here, we activated MSC based on a recent polarization paradigm, in which MSCs can be polarized towards a pro- or anti-inflammatory phenotype depending on the Toll-like receptor stimulated, to dissect the mechanisms through which MSCs physically interact with and modulate leukocytes in this context. Our data show that MSCs activated through the Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 pathway increased VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 dependent binding of leukocytes. On the other hand, TLR3 stimulation strongly increases leukocytes affinity to MSC comparatively, through the formation of cable-like hyaluronic acid structures. In addition, TLR4 activation elicited secretion of pro-inflammatory mediators by MSCs, whereas TLR3-activated MSCs displayed a milder pro-inflammatory phenotype, similar to inactivated MSCs. However, the differently activated MSCs maintained their ability to suppress leukocyte activation at similar levels in our in vitro model, and this immunomodulatory property was shown here to be partially mediated by prostaglandin. These results reinforce the concept that alternate activation profiles control MSC responses and may impact the therapeutic use of MSCs.

  1. Mechanism of dual specificity kinase activity of DYRK1A.

    PubMed

    Walte, Agnes; Rüben, Katharina; Birner-Gruenberger, Ruth; Preisinger, Christian; Bamberg-Lemper, Simone; Hilz, Nikolaus; Bracher, Franz; Becker, Walter

    2013-09-01

    The function of many protein kinases is controlled by the phosphorylation of a critical tyrosine residue in the activation loop. Dual specificity tyrosine-phosphorylation-regulated kinases (DYRKs) autophosphorylate on this tyrosine residue but phosphorylate substrates on aliphatic amino acids. This study addresses the mechanism of dual specificity kinase activity in DYRK1A and related kinases. Tyrosine autophosphorylation of DYRK1A occurred rapidly during in vitro translation and did not depend on the non-catalytic domains or other proteins. Expression in bacteria as well as in mammalian cells revealed that tyrosine kinase activity of DYRK1A is not restricted to the co-translational autophosphorylation in the activation loop. Moreover, mature DYRK1A was still capable of tyrosine autophosphorylation. Point mutants of DYRK1A and DYRK2 lacking the activation loop tyrosine showed enhanced tyrosine kinase activity. A series of structurally diverse DYRK1A inhibitors was used to pharmacologically distinguish different conformational states of the catalytic domain that are hypothesized to account for the dual specificity kinase activity. All tested compounds inhibited substrate phosphorylation with higher potency than autophosphorylation but none of the tested inhibitors differentially inhibited threonine and tyrosine kinase activity. Finally, the related cyclin-dependent kinase-like kinases (CLKs), which lack the activation loop tyrosine, autophosphorylated on tyrosine both in vitro and in living cells. We propose a model of DYRK autoactivation in which tyrosine autophosphorylation in the activation loop stabilizes a conformation of the catalytic domain with enhanced serine/threonine kinase activity without disabling tyrosine phosphorylation. The mechanism of dual specificity kinase activity probably applies to related serine/threonine kinases that depend on tyrosine autophosphorylation for maturation. PMID:23809146

  2. UNDERSTANDING THE MECHANISMS OF CHANGE IN CHILDREN'S PHYSICAL ACTIVITY PROGRAMS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is a lack of understanding of why childhood physical activity interventions succeed or fail. A model is proposed that relates program process to mediating variables and outcomes. Using the mdoel to design and evaluate interventions could result in a greater understanding of the mechanisms of c...

  3. ACID RAIN AND SOIL MICROBIAL ACTIVITY: EFFECTS AND THEIR MECHANISMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the investigation, our aim was to determine if acid rain affects soil microbial activity and to identify possible mechanisms of observed effects. A Sierran forest soil (pH 6.4) planted with Ponderosa pine seedlings was exposed to simulated rain (pH 2.0, 3.0, 4.0 and 5.6) with ...

  4. Star wars and strategic defense initiatives: work activity and health symptoms of unionized bank tellers during work reorganization.

    PubMed

    Seifert, A M; Messing, K; Dumais, L

    1997-01-01

    Work activity and health symptoms of bank tellers whose work was undergoing reorganization were examined during a university-union study of the health effects of work in women's traditional jobs. Data were gathered through collective and individual interviews, analysis of work activity, and a questionnaire administered to 305 tellers. Employees worked in a standing posture over 80 percent of the time. More than two-thirds frequently suffered pain in back, legs, and feet. The average teller had been involved in 3.7 robberies as a direct victim and six as a witness. Work required feats of memory and concentration. In order to meet job demands, tellers engaged in supportive activities and teamwork. The introduction of individualized objectives threatened the employees' ability to collaborate and induced distress. More than twice as many tellers as other female workers in Québec experience psychological distress (Ilfeld scale), related to: robbery during the past two years (odds ratio = 1.7; confidence interval = 1.0-2.9); difficult relations with superiors (O.R. = 2.6; C.I. = 1.3-5.3); and full-time work (O.R. = 2.3; C.I. = 1.3-3.9). Diverse methods enriched the analysis, and union participation allowed the proposal of concrete correction measures. PMID:9285277

  5. The Child as Psychologist: Attributions and Evaluations of Defensive Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dollinger, Stephen J.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Studied children's attributions and evaluations concerning defense mechanisms used by other children. Children negatively evaluated the blame-externalizing defense of projection and viewed it as a masculine characteristic. The internalizing defense of self-blame was evaluated more positively and viewed as a feminine characteristic. (Author/DB)

  6. Differential antioxidant defense and detoxification mechanisms in photodynamically stressed rice plants treated with the deregulators of porphyrin biosynthesis, 5-aminolevulinic acid and oxyfluorfen

    SciTech Connect

    Phung, Thu-Ha; Jung, Sunyo

    2015-04-03

    This study focuses on differential molecular mechanisms of antioxidant and detoxification systems in rice plants under two different types of photodynamic stress imposed by porphyrin deregulators, 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) and oxyfluorfen (OF). The ALA-treated plants with white necrosis exhibited a greater decrease in photochemical quantum efficiency, F{sub v}/F{sub m}, as well as a greater increase in activity of superoxide dismutase, compared to the OF-treated plants. By contrast, the brown necrosis in OF-treated plants resulted in not only more widely dispersed H{sub 2}O{sub 2} production and greater increases in H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-decomposing enzymes, catalase and peroxidase, but also lower ascorbate redox state. In addition, ALA- and OF-treated plants markedly up-regulated transcript levels of genes involved in detoxification processes including transport and movement, cellular homeostasis, and xenobiotic conjugation, with prominent up-regulation of serine/threonine kinase and chaperone only in ALA-treated plants. Our results demonstrate that different photodynamic stress imposed by ALA and OF developed differential actions of antioxidant enzymes and detoxification. Particularly, detoxification system may play potential roles in plant protection against photodynamic stress imposed by porphyrin deregulators, thereby contributing to alleviation of photodynamic damage. - Highlights: • We employ two different types of photodynamic stress, white and brown necrosis. • We examine molecular mechanisms of antioxidative and detoxification systems. • ALA and OF develop differential actions of antioxidant and detoxification systems. • Coordinated mechanism of antioxidants and detoxification works against toxic ROS. • Detoxification system plays critical roles in protection against photodynamic stress.

  7. Mechanisms of specificity in neuronal activity-regulated gene transcription

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, Michelle R.; West, Anne E.

    2011-01-01

    The brain is a highly adaptable organ that is capable of converting sensory information into changes in neuronal function. This plasticity allows behavior to be accommodated to the environment, providing an important evolutionary advantage. Neurons convert environmental stimuli into long-lasting changes in their physiology in part through the synaptic activity-regulated transcription of new gene products. Since the neurotransmitter-dependent regulation of Fos transcription was first discovered nearly 25 years ago, a wealth of studies have enriched our understanding of the molecular pathways that mediate activity-regulated changes in gene transcription. These findings show that a broad range of signaling pathways and transcriptional regulators can be engaged by neuronal activity to sculpt complex programs of stimulus-regulated gene transcription. However, the shear scope of the transcriptional pathways engaged by neuronal activity raises the question of how specificity in the nature of the transcriptional response is achieved in order to encode physiologically relevant responses to divergent stimuli. Here we summarize the general paradigms by which neuronal activity regulates transcription while focusing on the molecular mechanisms that confer differential stimulus-, cell-type-, and developmental-specificity upon activity-regulated programs of neuronal gene transcription. In addition, we preview some of the new technologies that will advance our future understanding of the mechanisms and consequences of activity-regulated gene transcription in the brain. PMID:21620929

  8. The Pelargonium sidoides Extract EPs 7630 Drives the Innate Immune Defense by Activating Selected MAP Kinase Pathways in Human Monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Witte, Katrin; Koch, Egon; Volk, Hans-Dieter; Wolk, Kerstin; Sabat, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Pelargonium sidoides is a medical herb and respective extracts are used very frequently for the treatment of respiratory tract infections. However, the effects of Pelargonium sidoides and a special extract prepared from its roots (EPs 7630) on human immune cells are not fully understood. Here we demonstrate that EPs 7630 induced a rapid and dose-dependent production of TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-10 by human blood immune cells. This EPs 7630-induced cytokine profile was more pro-inflammatory in comparison with the profile induced by viral or bacterial infection-mimicking agents. The search for EPs 7630 target cells revealed that T-cells did not respond to EPs 7630 stimulation by production of TNF-α, IL-6, or IL-10. Furthermore, pretreatment of T-cells with EPs 7630 did not modulate their TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-10 secretion during subsequent activation. In contrast to lymphocytes, monocytes showed clear intracellular TNF-α staining after EPs 7630 treatment. Accordingly, EPs 7630 predominantly provoked activation of MAP kinases and inhibition of p38 strongly reduced the monocyte TNF-α production. The pretreatment of blood immune cells with EPs 7630 lowered their secretion of TNF-α and IL-10 and caused an IL-6 dominant response during second stimulation with viral or bacterial infection-mimicking agents. In summary, we demonstrate that EPs 7630 activates human monocytes, induces MAP kinase-dependent pro-inflammatory cytokines in these cells, and specifically modulates their production capacity of mediators known to lead to an increase of acute phase protein production in the liver, neutrophil generation in the bone marrow, and the generation of adaptive Th17 and Th22 cells. PMID:26406906

  9. The Pelargonium sidoides Extract EPs 7630 Drives the Innate Immune Defense by Activating Selected MAP Kinase Pathways in Human Monocytes.

    PubMed

    Witte, Katrin; Koch, Egon; Volk, Hans-Dieter; Wolk, Kerstin; Sabat, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Pelargonium sidoides is a medical herb and respective extracts are used very frequently for the treatment of respiratory tract infections. However, the effects of Pelargonium sidoides and a special extract prepared from its roots (EPs 7630) on human immune cells are not fully understood. Here we demonstrate that EPs 7630 induced a rapid and dose-dependent production of TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-10 by human blood immune cells. This EPs 7630-induced cytokine profile was more pro-inflammatory in comparison with the profile induced by viral or bacterial infection-mimicking agents. The search for EPs 7630 target cells revealed that T-cells did not respond to EPs 7630 stimulation by production of TNF-α, IL-6, or IL-10. Furthermore, pretreatment of T-cells with EPs 7630 did not modulate their TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-10 secretion during subsequent activation. In contrast to lymphocytes, monocytes showed clear intracellular TNF-α staining after EPs 7630 treatment. Accordingly, EPs 7630 predominantly provoked activation of MAP kinases and inhibition of p38 strongly reduced the monocyte TNF-α production. The pretreatment of blood immune cells with EPs 7630 lowered their secretion of TNF-α and IL-10 and caused an IL-6 dominant response during second stimulation with viral or bacterial infection-mimicking agents. In summary, we demonstrate that EPs 7630 activates human monocytes, induces MAP kinase-dependent pro-inflammatory cytokines in these cells, and specifically modulates their production capacity of mediators known to lead to an increase of acute phase protein production in the liver, neutrophil generation in the bone marrow, and the generation of adaptive Th17 and Th22 cells. PMID:26406906

  10. [Influence of chronic melipramine administration abolition on locomotion and defensive conditioned reflexes in passive and active avoidance in rats].

    PubMed

    Orlova, N V; Folomkina, A A; Koshtoiants, O Kh; Bazian, A S

    2005-01-01

    The chronic (21 days duration) administration of tricyclic antidepressant melipramine of Wistar rats strain (15 mg/kg daily, intraperitoneally) evoked weight loss of animals. The 7 days after melipramine abolition its sedative effect was observed in the "open field" test by decrease of locomotion and the number of boles. The 7 and 14 days after melipramine abolition the difference between control and melipramine treated animals in passive and active avoidance learning and memory not found. The experimental results comparison with the literature data show, that chronic melipramine administration of intact animals evokes a sedative state. This conclusion does not contradict to idea of punishment function of brain serotoninergic system. PMID:15828425

  11. Mechanisms of active control in cylindrical fuselage structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silcox, R. J.; Lester, H. C.; Fuller, C. R.

    1987-01-01

    This paper summarizes ongoing efforts to understand and exploit active control techniques for low frequency noise suppression in aerospace applications. Analytical models are utilized in an effort to understand the mechanisms that govern noise transmission into acoustic spaces enclosed by lightweight structures and to examine the results of experimental implementations of active control schemes. Emphasis is placed on attaining global noise reductions using a minimum number of actuators rather than localized control over many subregions. This program has demonstrated the effect of synchrophasing and interface modal filtering, in limiting the modal density within the acoustic space, and how strong reactive effects may occur in two dimensional geometries. Finally, the performance of active control systems utilizing acoustic and vibration actuators is evaluated. Suppressions of 10 to 30 dB are demonstrated in practice, and performance is discussed in relation to the physical mechanisms and parameters of the system.

  12. Mechanisms of xenobiotic receptor activation: Direct vs. indirect.

    PubMed

    Mackowiak, Bryan; Wang, Hongbing

    2016-09-01

    The so-called xenobiotic receptors (XRs) have functionally evolved into cellular sensors for both endogenous and exogenous stimuli by regulating the transcription of genes encoding drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters, as well as those involving energy homeostasis, cell proliferation, and/or immune responses. Unlike prototypical steroid hormone receptors, XRs are activated through both direct ligand-binding and ligand-independent (indirect) mechanisms by a plethora of structurally unrelated chemicals. This review covers research literature that discusses direct vs. indirect activation of XRs. A particular focus is centered on the signaling control of the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), the pregnane X receptor (PXR), and the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). We expect that this review will shed light on both the common and distinct mechanisms associated with activation of these three XRs. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Xenobiotic nuclear receptors: New Tricks for An Old Dog, edited by Dr. Wen Xie. PMID:26877237

  13. A Possible Mechanism for Redox Control of Human Neuroglobin Activity

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Neuroglobin (Ngb) promotes neuron survival under hypoxic/ischemic conditions. In vivo and in vitro assays provide evidence for redox-regulated functioning of Ngb. On the basis of X-ray crystal structures and our MD simulations, a mechanism for redox control of human Ngb (hNgb) activity via the influence of the CD loop on the active site is proposed. We provide evidence that the CD loop undergoes a strand-to-helix transition when the external environment becomes sufficiently oxidizing, and that this CD loop conformational transition causes critical restructuring of the active site. We postulate that the strand-to-helix mechanics of the CD loop allows hNgb to utilize the lability of Cys46/Cys55 disulfide bonding and of the Tyr44/His64/heme propionate interaction network for redox-controlled functioning of hNgb. PMID:24855999

  14. Active mechanics and geometry of adherent cells and cell colonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Shiladitya

    2014-03-01

    Measurements of traction stresses exerted by adherent cells or cell colonies on elastic substrates have yielded new insight on how the mechanical and geometrical properties of the substrate regulate cellular force distribution, mechanical energy, spreading, morphology or stress ber architecture. We have developed a generic mechanical model of adherent cells as an active contractile gel mechanically coupled to an elastic substrate and to neighboring cells in a tissue. The contractile gel model accurately predicts the distribution of cellular and traction stresses as observed in single cell experiments, and captures the dependence of cell shape, traction stresses and stress ber polarization on the substrate's mechanical and geometrical properties. The model further predicts that the total strain energy of an adherent cell is solely regulated by its spread area, in agreement with recent experiments on micropatterned substrates with controlled geometry. When used to describe the behavior of colonies of adherent epithelial cells, the model demonstrates the crucial role of the mechanical cross-talk between intercellular and extracellular adhesion in regulating traction force distribution. Strong intercellular mechanical coupling organizes traction forces to the colony periphery, whereas weaker intercellular coupling leads to the build up of traction stresses at intercellular junctions. Furthermore, in agreement with experiments on large cohesive keratinocyte colonies, the model predicts a linear scaling of traction forces with the colony size. This scaling suggests the emergence of an effective surface tension as a scale-free material property of the adherent tissue, originating from actomyosin contractility.

  15. Genome defense against exogenous nucleic acids in eukaryotes by non-coding DNA occurs through CRISPR-like mechanisms in the cytosol and the bodyguard protection in the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Guo-Hua

    2016-01-01

    In this review, the protective function of the abundant non-coding DNA in the eukaryotic genome is discussed from the perspective of genome defense against exogenous nucleic acids. Peripheral non-coding DNA has been proposed to act as a bodyguard that protects the genome and the central protein-coding sequences from ionizing radiation-induced DNA damage. In the proposed mechanism of protection, the radicals generated by water radiolysis in the cytosol and IR energy are absorbed, blocked and/or reduced by peripheral heterochromatin; then, the DNA damage sites in the heterochromatin are removed and expelled from the nucleus to the cytoplasm through nuclear pore complexes, most likely through the formation of extrachromosomal circular DNA. To strengthen this hypothesis, this review summarizes the experimental evidence supporting the protective function of non-coding DNA against exogenous nucleic acids. Based on these data, I hypothesize herein about the presence of an additional line of defense formed by small RNAs in the cytosol in addition to their bodyguard protection mechanism in the nucleus. Therefore, exogenous nucleic acids may be initially inactivated in the cytosol by small RNAs generated from non-coding DNA via mechanisms similar to the prokaryotic CRISPR-Cas system. Exogenous nucleic acids may enter the nucleus, where some are absorbed and/or blocked by heterochromatin and others integrate into chromosomes. The integrated fragments and the sites of DNA damage are removed by repetitive non-coding DNA elements in the heterochromatin and excluded from the nucleus. Therefore, the normal eukaryotic genome and the central protein-coding sequences are triply protected by non-coding DNA against invasion by exogenous nucleic acids. This review provides evidence supporting the protective role of non-coding DNA in genome defense. PMID:27036064

  16. Food-grade argan oil supplementation in molasses enhances fermentative performance and antioxidant defenses of active dry wine yeast.

    PubMed

    Gamero-Sandemetrio, Esther; Torrellas, Max; Rábena, María Teresa; Gómez-Pastor, Rocío; Aranda, Agustín; Matallana, Emilia

    2015-12-01

    The tolerance of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to desiccation is important for the use of this microorganism in the wine industry, since active dry yeast (ADY) is routinely used as starter for must fermentations. Both biomass propagation and dehydration cause cellular oxidative stress, therefore negatively affecting yeast performance. Protective treatments against oxidative damage, such as natural antioxidants, may have important biotechnological implications. In this study we analysed the antioxidant capacity of pure chemical compounds (quercetin, ascorbic acid, caffeic acid, oleic acid, and glutathione) added to molasses during biomass propagation, and we determine several oxidative damage/response parameters (lipid peroxidation, protein carbonylation, protective metabolites and enzymatic activities) to assess their molecular effects. Supplementation with ascorbic, caffeic or oleic acids diminished the oxidative damage associated to ADY production. Based on these results, we tested supplementation of molasses with argan oil, a natural food-grade ingredient rich in these three antioxidants, and we showed that it improved both biomass yield and fermentative performance of ADY. Therefore, we propose the use of natural, food-grade antioxidant ingredients, such as argan oil, in industrial processes involving high cellular oxidative stress, such as the biotechnological production of the dry starter. PMID:26621111

  17. An acoustic microscopy technique reveals hidden morphological defenses in Daphnia.

    PubMed

    Laforsch, Christian; Ngwa, Wilfred; Grill, Wolfgang; Tollrian, Ralph

    2004-11-01

    Inducible defenses are common strategies for coping with the selective force of predation in heterogeneous environments. In recent years the conspicuous and often dramatic morphological plasticity of several waterflea species of the genus Daphnia have been found to be inducible defenses activated by chemical cues released by predators. However, the exact defensive mechanisms remained mysterious. Because even some minute morphological alterations proved to be protective against predatory invertebrates, it has been suggested that the visible morphological changes are only the tip of the iceberg of the entire protective mechanisms. Here we applied a method of ultrasonic microscopy with vector contrast at 1.2 GHz to probe hidden morphological defenses. We found that induction with predator kairomones increases the stability of the carapace in two Daphnia species up to 350%. This morphological plasticity provides a major advantage for the induced morphs during predation because predatory invertebrates need to crush or puncture the carapace of their prey to consume them. Our ultrastructural analyses revealed that the internal architecture of the carapace ensures maximal rigidity with minimal material investment. Our results uncover hidden morphological plasticity and suggest a reconsideration of former classification systems in defended and undefended genotypes in Daphnia and possibly in other prey organisms as well. PMID:15520396

  18. Insights into the Thiamine Diphosphate Enzyme Activation Mechanism: Computational Model for Transketolase Using a Quantum Mechanical/Molecular Mechanical Method.

    PubMed

    Nauton, Lionel; Hélaine, Virgil; Théry, Vincent; Hecquet, Laurence

    2016-04-12

    We propose the first computational model for transketolase (TK), a thiamine diphosphate (ThDP)-dependent enzyme, using a quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical method on the basis of crystallographic TK structures from yeast and Escherichia coli, together with experimental kinetic data reported in the literature with wild-type and mutant TK. This model allowed us to define a new route for ThDP activation in the enzyme environment. We evidenced a strong interaction between ThDP and Glu418B of the TK active site, itself stabilized by Glu162A. The crucial point highlighted here is that deprotonation of ThDP C2 is not performed by ThDP N4' as reported in the literature, but by His481B, involving a HOH688A molecule bridge. Thus, ThDP N4' is converted from an amino form to an iminium form, ensuring the stabilization of the C2 carbanion or carbene. Finally, ThDP activation proceeds via an intermolecular process and not by an intramolecular one as reported in the literature. More generally, this proposed ThDP activation mechanism can be applied to some other ThDP-dependent enzymes and used to define the entire TK mechanism with donor and acceptor substrates more accurately. PMID:26998737

  19. Structure and Mechanism of the Phosphotyrosyl Phosphatase Activator

    SciTech Connect

    Chao,Y.; Xing, Y.; Chen, Y.; Xu, Y.; Lin, Z.; Li, Z.; Jeffrey, P.; Stock, J.; Shi, Y.

    2006-01-01

    Phosphotyrosyl phosphatase activator (PTPA), also known as PP2A phosphatase activator, is a conserved protein from yeast to human. Here we report the 1.9 {angstrom} crystal structure of human PTPA, which reveals a previously unreported fold consisting of three subdomains: core, lid, and linker. Structural analysis uncovers a highly conserved surface patch, which borders the three subdomains, and an associated deep pocket located between the core and the linker subdomains. The conserved surface patch and the deep pocket are responsible for binding to PP2A and ATP, respectively. PTPA and PP2A A-C dimer together constitute a composite ATPase. PTPA binding to PP2A results in a dramatic alteration of substrate specificity, with enhanced phosphotyrosine phosphatase activity and decreased phosphoserine phosphatase activity. This function of PTPA strictly depends on the composite ATPase activity. These observations reveal significant insights into the function and mechanism of PTPA and have important ramifications for understanding PP2A function.

  20. A Truncated NLR Protein, TIR-NBS2, Is Required for Activated Defense Responses in the exo70B1 Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, Marc T.; Vogel, John P.; Liu, Na; Liu, Simu; Zhao, Yaofei; Dangl, Jeffery L.; Tang, Dingzhong

    2015-01-01

    During exocytosis, the evolutionarily conserved exocyst complex tethers Golgi-derived vesicles to the target plasma membrane, a critical function for secretory pathways. Here we show that exo70B1 loss-of-function mutants express activated defense responses upon infection and express enhanced resistance to fungal, oomycete and bacterial pathogens. In a screen for mutants that suppress exo70B1 resistance, we identified nine alleles of TIR-NBS2 (TN2), suggesting that loss-of-function of EXO70B1 leads to activation of this nucleotide binding domain and leucine-rich repeat-containing (NLR)-like disease resistance protein. This NLR-like protein is atypical because it lacks the LRR domain common in typical NLR receptors. In addition, we show that TN2 interacts with EXO70B1 in yeast and in planta. Our study thus provides a link between the exocyst complex and the function of a ‘TIR-NBS only’ immune receptor like protein. Our data are consistent with a speculative model wherein pathogen effectors could evolve to target EXO70B1 to manipulate plant secretion machinery. TN2 could monitor EXO70B1 integrity as part of an immune receptor complex. PMID:25617755

  1. Impact Ignition of Low Density Mechanically Activated and Multilayer Foil Ni/Al

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beason, Matthew; Mason, B.; Son, Steven; Groven, Lori

    2013-06-01

    Mechanical activation (MA) via milling of reactive materials provides a means of lowering the ignition threshold of shock initiated reactions. This treatment provides a finely mixed microstructure with wide variation in the resulting scales of the intraparticle microstructure that makes model validation difficult. In this work we consider nanofoils produced through vapor deposition with well defined periodicity and a similar degree of fine scale mixing. This allows experiments that may be easier to compare with computational models. To achieve this, both equimolar Ni/Al powder that has undergone MA using high energy ball milling and nanofoils milled into a powder using low energy ball milling were used. The Asay Shear impact experiment was conducted on both MA Ni/Al and Ni/Al nanofoil-based powders at low densities (<60%) to examine their impact response and reaction behavior. Scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy were used to verify the microstructure of the materials. The materials' mechanical properties were evaluated using nano-indentation. Onset temperatures were evaluated using differential thermal analysis/differential scanning calorimetry. Impact ignition thresholds, burning rates, temperature field, and ignition delays are reported. Funding from the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) Grant Number HDTRA1-10-1-0119. Counter-WMD basic research program, Dr. Suhithi M. Peiris, program director is gratefully acknowledged.

  2. Technologies for Distributed Defense

    SciTech Connect

    Seiders, Barbara AB; Rybka, Anthony J.

    2002-07-01

    For Americans, the nature of warfare changed on September 11, 2001. Our national security henceforth will require distributed defense. One extreme of distributed defense is represented by fully deployed military troops responding to a threat from a hostile nation state. At the other extreme is a country of "citizen soldiers," with families and communities securing their common defense through heightened awareness, engagement as good neighbors, and local support of and cooperation with local law enforcement, emergency and health care providers. Technologies - for information exploitation, biological agent detection, health care surveillance, and security - will be critical to ensuring success in distributed defense.

  3. Survey of US Department of Defense Manufacturing Technology Program activities applicable to civilian manufacturing industries. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Azimi, S.A.; Conrad, J.L.; Reed, J.E.

    1985-03-01

    Intent of the survey was to identify and characterize activities potentially applicable to improving energy efficiency and overall productivity in the civilian manufacturing industries. The civilian industries emphasized were the general manufacturing industries (including fabricated metals, glass, machinery, paper, plastic, textile, and transportation equipment manufacturing) and the primary metals industries (including primary aluminum, copper, steel, and zinc production). The principal steps in the survey were to: develop overview taxonomies of the general manufacturing and primary metals industries as well as specific industry taxonomies; identify needs and opportunities for improving process energy efficiency and productivity in the industries included; identify federal programs, capabilities, and special technical expertise that might be relevant to industry's needs and opportunities; contact federal laboratories/facilities, through visits and other forms of inquiry; prepare formatted profiles (descriptions) potentially applicable work efforts; review findings with industry; and compile and evaluate industry responses.

  4. Curcuma purpurascens BI. rhizome accelerates rat excisional wound healing: involvement of Hsp70/Bax proteins, antioxidant defense, and angiogenesis activity

    PubMed Central

    Rouhollahi, Elham; Moghadamtousi, Soheil Zorofchian; Hajiaghaalipour, Fatemeh; Zahedifard, Maryam; Tayeby, Faezeh; Awang, Khalijah; Abdulla, Mahmood Ameen; Mohamed, Zahurin

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Curcuma purpurascens BI. is a member of Zingiberaceae family. The purpose of this study is to investigate the wound healing properties of hexane extract of C. purpurascens rhizome (HECP) against excisional wound healing in rats. Materials and methods Twenty four rats were randomly divided into 4 groups: A) negative control (blank placebo, acacia gum), B) low dose of HECP, C) high dose of HECP, and D) positive control, with 6 rats in each group. Full-thickness incisions (approximately 2.00 cm) were made on the neck area of each rat. Groups 1–4 were treated two-times a day for 20 days with blank placebo, HECP (100 mg/kg), HECP (200 mg/kg), and intrasite gel as a positive control, respectively. After 20 days, hematoxylin and eosin and Masson’s trichrome stainings were employed to investigate the histopathological alterations. Protein expressions of Bax and Hsp70 were examined in the wound tissues using immunohistochemistry analysis. In addition, levels of enzymatic antioxidants and malondialdehyde representing lipid peroxidation were measured in wound tissue homogenates. Results Macroscopic evaluation of wounds showed conspicuous elevation in wound contraction after topical administration of HECP at both doses. Moreover, histopathological analysis revealed noteworthy reduction in the scar width correlated with the enhanced collagen content and fibroblast cells, accompanied by a reduction of inflammatory cells in the granulation tissues. At the molecular level, HECP facilitates wound-healing process by downregulating Bax and upregulating Hsp70 protein at the wound site. The formation of new blood vessel was observed in Masson’s trichrome staining of wounds treated with HECP (100 and 200 mg/kg). In addition, HECP administration caused a significant surge in enzymatic antioxidant activities and a decline in lipid peroxidation. Conclusion These findings suggested that HECP accelerated wound-healing process in rats via antioxidant activity, angiogenesis

  5. Primitive defenses: cognitive aspects and therapeutic handling.

    PubMed

    Groh, L S

    In this paper the primitive defenses first described by Melanie Klein under the label of "schizoid mechanisms" are examined. The defenses considered are splitting the pathological uses of identification and projective identification, and the psychotic forms of denial. This examination is twofold: (1) the cognitive aspects of these defenses as described in terms of concepts developed by Jean Piaget; (2) concrete examples of the operation of these defenses during the treatment of schizophrenic patients are given and the effects of interventions based on the cognitive analysis are described. It is stressed that at times interventions, such as interpretation and confrontation, based on cognitive analysis, can temporarily and in some instances even permanently stop the operation of these defenses, allowing emotionally meaningful material to emerge which expedites the therapeutic process. PMID:7429737

  6. SIRT6 protects cardiomyocytes against ischemia/reperfusion injury by augmenting FoxO3α-dependent antioxidant defense mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Xiao; Wang, Xu-Lei; Tong, Ming-ming; Gan, Lu; Chen, Huali; Wu, Si-si; Chen, Jia-Xiang; Li, Ru-Li; Wu, Yao; Zhang, Heng-yu; Zhu, Ye; Li, Yan-xin; He, Jin-han; Wang, Meijing; Jiang, Wei

    2016-03-01

    SIRT6, a member of the NAD(+)-dependent class III deacetylase sirtuin family, has been revealed to play important roles in promoting cellular resistance against oxidative stress. The formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative stress are the crucial mechanisms underlying cellular damage and dysfunction in cardiac ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury, but the role of SIRT6 in I/R-induced ROS and oxidative stress is poorly understood. In this study, by using heterozygous SIRT6 knockout (SIRT6(+/-)) mice and cultured neonatal cardiomyocyte models, we investigated how SIRT6 mediates oxidative stress and myocardial injury during I/R. Partial knockout (KO) of SIRT6 aggravated myocardial damage, ventricular remodeling, and oxidative stress in mice subjected to myocardial I/R, whereas restoration of SIRT6 expression by direct cardiac injection of adenoviral constructs encoding SIRT6 reversed these deleterious effects of SIRT6 KO in the ischemic heart. In addition, partial deletion of the SIRT6 gene decreased myocardial functional recovery following I/R in a Langendorff perfusion model. Similarly, the protective effects of SIRT6 were also observed in cultured cardiomyocytes following hypoxia/reoxygenation. Intriguingly, SIRT6 was noticed to up-regulate AMP/ATP and then activate the adenosine 5'-monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-forkhead box O3α (FoxO3α) axis and further initiated the downstream antioxidant-encoding gene expression (manganese superoxide dismutase and catalase), thereby decreasing cellular levels of oxidative stress and mediating cardioprotection in the ischemic heart. These results suggest that SIRT6 protects the heart from I/R injury through FoxO3α activation in the ischemic heart in an AMP/ATP-induced AMPK-dependent way, thus upregulating antioxidants and suppressing oxidative stress. PMID:26786260

  7. Novel mechanisms for activated protein C cytoprotective activities involving noncanonical activation of protease-activated receptor 3

    PubMed Central

    Burnier, Laurent

    2013-01-01

    The direct cytoprotective activities of activated protein C (APC) on cells convey therapeutic, relevant, beneficial effects in injury and disease models in vivo and require the endothelial protein C receptor (EPCR) and protease activated receptor 1 (PAR1). Thrombin also activates PAR1, but its effects on cells contrast APC’s cytoprotective effects. To gain insights into mechanisms for these contrasting cellular effects, protease activated receptor 3 (PAR3) activation by APC and thrombin was studied. APC cleaved PAR3 on transfected and endothelial cells in the presence of EPCR. Remarkably, APC cleaved a synthetic PAR3 N-terminal peptide at Arg41, whereas thrombin cleaved at Lys38. On cells, APC failed to cleave R41Q-PAR3, whereas K38Q-PAR3 was still cleaved by APC but not by thrombin. PAR3 tethered-ligand peptides beginning at amino acid 42, but not those beginning at amino acid 39, conveyed endothelial barrier-protective effects. In vivo, the APC-derived PAR3 tethered-ligand peptide, but not the thrombin-derived PAR3 peptide, blunted vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced vascular permeability. These data indicate that PAR3 cleavage by APC at Arg41 can initiate distinctive APC-like cytoprotective effects. These novel insights help explain the differentiation of APC’s cytoprotective versus thrombin’s proinflammatory effects on cells and suggest a unique contributory role for PAR3 in the complex mechanisms underlying APC cytoprotective effects. PMID:23788139

  8. Neuroendocrine and behavioral responses during conditioned active and passive behavior in the defensive burying/probe avoidance paradigm: effects of ipsapirone.

    PubMed

    Korte, S M; Bouws, G A; Koolhaas, J M; Bohus, B

    1992-08-01

    Plasma epinephrine (E), norepinephrine (NE), and corticosterone (CORT) concentrations were determined in the rat before, during, and after a 15-min exposure to a nonelectrified probe on day after receiving electric shock (1.5 mA) through a probe mounted on the wall of the home cage. Rats displayed burying (active coping) if sawdust was provided on the floor and immobility (passive coping) if bedding was absent both during training and testing. The conditioned burying was accompanied by high plasma NE but low E and CORT concentrations, whereas immobility was associated with high CORT and low NE levels. A forced switch from the active to passive coping (training with and testing without sawdust) led to the highest rise in E concentration. The 5-HT1A agonist ipsapirone, with anxiolytic properties, dose-dependently (0.5 and 2.5 mg/kg, IV) reduced defensive burying behavior and increased the amount of time spent on feeding behavior in the presence of bedding material. Both plasma E and CORT levels were further elevated by the higher dose of ipsapirone. In the absence of bedding material, ipsapirone failed to affect immobility behavior, but it dose-dependently elevated the stress-induced increase in E, NE, and CORT concentrations. Accordingly, the behavioral anxiolytic action of the 5-HT1A agonist ipsapirone was restricted to active coping, whereas neuroendocrine activation by the drug was present in all conditions. It is suggested that the effects of ipsapirone on behavioral coping and neuroendocrine regulation are produced by different populations of 5-HT1A receptors in the brain. PMID:1355919

  9. Mechanisms of the Antimicrobial Activities of Graphene Materials.

    PubMed

    Zou, Xuefeng; Zhang, Li; Wang, Zhaojun; Luo, Yang

    2016-02-24

    A thorough understanding of the antimicrobial mechanisms of graphene materials (GMs) is critical to the manipulation of highly efficient antimicrobial nanomaterials for future biomedical applications. Here we review the most recent studies of GM-mediated antimicrobial properties. This review covers the physicochemical properties of GMs, experimental surroundings, and selected microorganisms as well as the interaction between GMs and selected microorganisms to explore controversial antimicrobial activities. Finally, we rationally analyze the strengths and weaknesses of the proposed mechanisms and provide new insights into the remaining challenges and perspectives for future studies. PMID:26824139

  10. Mechanisms of the Space Active Vibration Isolation (SAVI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitt, Frank

    1992-01-01

    The Space Active Vibration Isolation (SAVI) is a concept for vibration isolation of one body from another with simultaneous precise control in 6 Degrees Of Freedom (DOF). SAVI achieves this using a combination of electromechanical linear actuators and magnetic actuators. Other mechanisms of interest include a structure for simulating the body being pointed, an apparatus to simulate the body that is the vibration source, and mechanisms to off-load the weight of each of these two bodies from the experiment to approximate a zero-g condition. A SAVI was built and tested to demonstrate these capabilities.

  11. Naphthoquinone Derivatives Exert Their Antitrypanosomal Activity via a Multi-Target Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Mazet, Muriel; Perozzo, Remo; Bergamini, Christian; Prati, Federica; Fato, Romana; Lenaz, Giorgio; Capranico, Giovanni; Brun, Reto; Bakker, Barbara M.; Michels, Paul A. M.; Scapozza, Leonardo; Bolognesi, Maria Laura; Cavalli, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Background and Methodology Recently, we reported on a new class of naphthoquinone derivatives showing a promising anti-trypanosomatid profile in cell-based experiments. The lead of this series (B6, 2-phenoxy-1,4-naphthoquinone) showed an ED50 of 80 nM against Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense, and a selectivity index of 74 with respect to mammalian cells. A multitarget profile for this compound is easily conceivable, because quinones, as natural products, serve plants as potent defense chemicals with an intrinsic multifunctional mechanism of action. To disclose such a multitarget profile of B6, we exploited a chemical proteomics approach. Principal Findings A functionalized congener of B6 was immobilized on a solid matrix and used to isolate target proteins from Trypanosoma brucei lysates. Mass analysis delivered two enzymes, i.e. glycosomal glycerol kinase and glycosomal glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, as potential molecular targets for B6. Both enzymes were recombinantly expressed and purified, and used for chemical validation. Indeed, B6 was able to inhibit both enzymes with IC50 values in the micromolar range. The multifunctional profile was further characterized in experiments using permeabilized Trypanosoma brucei cells and mitochondrial cell fractions. It turned out that B6 was also able to generate oxygen radicals, a mechanism that may additionally contribute to its observed potent trypanocidal activity. Conclusions and Significance Overall, B6 showed a multitarget mechanism of action, which provides a molecular explanation of its promising anti-trypanosomatid activity. Furthermore, the forward chemical genetics approach here applied may be viable in the molecular characterization of novel multitarget ligands. PMID:23350008

  12. When self-affirmations reduce defensiveness: timing is key.

    PubMed

    Critcher, Clayton R; Dunning, David; Armor, David A

    2010-07-01

    Research on self-affirmation has shown that simple reminders of self-integrity reduce people's tendency to respond defensively to threat. Recent research has suggested it is irrelevant whether the self-affirmation exercise takes place before or after the threat or the individual's defensive response to it, supposedly because the meaning of threats is continuously reprocessed. However, four experiments revealed that affirmations may be effective only when introduced prior to the initiation of a defensive response. Affirmations introduced before threatening feedback reduced defensive responding; affirming after a threat was effective in reducing defensiveness only if the defensive conclusion had yet to be reached. Even though threats may activate a defensive motivation, the authors' results suggest that defensive responses may not be spontaneous and may be prompted only when suggested by the dependent measures themselves. This explains why some affirmations positioned after threats are effective in reducing defensiveness. Implications for self-affirmation theory are discussed. PMID:20505163

  13. Microalloying of transition metal silicides by mechanical activation and field-activated reaction

    DOEpatents

    Munir, Zuhair A.; Woolman, Joseph N.; Petrovic, John J.

    2003-09-02

    Alloys of transition metal suicides that contain one or more alloying elements are fabricated by a two-stage process involving mechanical activation as the first stage and densification and field-activated reaction as the second stage. Mechanical activation, preferably performed by high-energy planetary milling, results in the incorporation of atoms of the alloying element(s) into the crystal lattice of the transition metal, while the densification and field-activated reaction, preferably performed by spark plasma sintering, result in the formation of the alloyed transition metal silicide. Among the many advantages of the process are its ability to accommodate materials that are incompatible in other alloying methods.

  14. Towards a statistical mechanical theory of active fluids.

    PubMed

    Marini Bettolo Marconi, Umberto; Maggi, Claudio

    2015-12-01

    We present a stochastic description of a model of N mutually interacting active particles in the presence of external fields and characterize its steady state behavior in the absence of currents. To reproduce the effects of the experimentally observed persistence of the trajectories of the active particles we consider a Gaussian force having a non-vanishing correlation time τ, whose finiteness is a measure of the activity of the system. With these ingredients we show that it is possible to develop a statistical mechanical approach similar to the one employed in the study of equilibrium liquids and to obtain the explicit form of the many-particle distribution function by means of the multidimensional unified colored noise approximation. Such a distribution plays a role analogous to the Gibbs distribution in equilibrium statistical mechanics and provides complete information about the microscopic state of the system. From here we develop a method to determine the one- and two-particle distribution functions in the spirit of the Born-Green-Yvon (BGY) equations of equilibrium statistical mechanics. The resulting equations which contain extra-correlations induced by the activity allow us to determine the stationary density profiles in the presence of external fields, the pair correlations and the pressure of active fluids. In the low density regime we obtained the effective pair potential ϕ(r) acting between two isolated particles separated by a distance, r, showing the existence of an effective attraction between them induced by activity. Based on these results, in the second half of the paper we propose a mean field theory as an approach simpler than the BGY hierarchy and use it to derive a van der Waals expression of the equation of state. PMID:26387914

  15. 22 CFR 130.4 - Defense articles and defense services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Defense articles and defense services. 130.4 Section 130.4 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS POLITICAL CONTRIBUTIONS, FEES AND COMMISSIONS § 130.4 Defense articles and defense services. Defense articles and...

  16. 22 CFR 130.4 - Defense articles and defense services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Defense articles and defense services. 130.4 Section 130.4 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS POLITICAL CONTRIBUTIONS, FEES AND COMMISSIONS § 130.4 Defense articles and defense services. Defense articles and...

  17. 22 CFR 130.4 - Defense articles and defense services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Defense articles and defense services. 130.4 Section 130.4 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS POLITICAL CONTRIBUTIONS, FEES AND COMMISSIONS § 130.4 Defense articles and defense services. Defense articles and...

  18. 22 CFR 130.4 - Defense articles and defense services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Defense articles and defense services. 130.4 Section 130.4 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS POLITICAL CONTRIBUTIONS, FEES AND COMMISSIONS § 130.4 Defense articles and defense services. Defense articles and...

  19. 22 CFR 130.4 - Defense articles and defense services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Defense articles and defense services. 130.4 Section 130.4 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS POLITICAL CONTRIBUTIONS, FEES AND COMMISSIONS § 130.4 Defense articles and defense services. Defense articles and...

  20. On the mechanism of biological activation by tritium.

    PubMed

    Rozhko, T V; Badun, G A; Razzhivina, I A; Guseynov, O A; Guseynova, V E; Kudryasheva, N S

    2016-06-01

    The mechanism of biological activation by beta-emitting radionuclide tritium was studied. Luminous marine bacteria were used as a bioassay to monitor the biological effect of tritium with luminescence intensity as the physiological parameter tested. Two different types of tritium sources were used: HTO molecules distributed regularly in the surrounding aqueous medium, and a solid source with tritium atoms fixed on its surface (tritium-labeled films, 0.11, 0.28, 0.91, and 2.36 MBq/cm(2)). When using the tritium-labeled films, tritium penetration into the cells was prevented. The both types of tritium sources revealed similar changes in the bacterial luminescence kinetics: a delay period followed by bioluminescence activation. No monotonic dependences of bioluminescence activation efficiency on specific radioactivities of the films were found. A 15-day exposure to tritiated water (100 MBq/L) did not reveal mutations in bacterial DNA. The results obtained give preference to a "non-genomic" mechanism of bioluminescence activation by tritium. An activation of the intracellular bioluminescence process develops without penetration of tritium atoms into the cells and can be caused by intensification of trans-membrane cellular processes stimulated by ionization and radiolysis of aqueous media. PMID:27035890

  1. Characterization of the Mechanisms Controlling Greatwall Activity

    PubMed Central

    Vigneron, Suzanne; Gharbi-Ayachi, Aicha; Raymond, Anne-Aurélie; Burgess, Andrew; Labbé, Jean-Claude; Labesse, Gilles; Monsarrat, Bernard; Lorca, Thierry; Castro, Anna

    2011-01-01

    Here we investigate the mechanisms regulating Greatwall (Gwl), a serine/threonine kinase essential for promoting the correct timing of mitosis. We identify Gwl as a unique AGC kinase that, unlike most AGC members, appears to be devoid of a hydrophobic motif despite the presence of a functional hydrophobic pocket. Our results suggest that Gwl activation could be mediated by the binding of its hydrophobic pocket to the hydrophobic motif of another AGC kinase. Our molecular modeling and mutagenic analysis also indicate that Gwl displays a conserved tail/linker site whose phosphorylation mediates kinase activation by promoting the interaction of this phosphorylated residue with two lysines at the N terminus. This interaction could stabilize the αC-helix and maintain kinase activity. Finally, the different phosphorylation sites on Gwl are identified, and the role of each one in the regulation of Gwl kinase activity is determined. Our data suggest that only the phosphorylation of the tail/linker site, located outside the putative T loop, appears to be essential for Gwl activation. In summary, our results identify Gwl as a member of the AGC family of kinases that appears to be regulated by unique mechanisms and that differs from the other members of this family. PMID:21444715

  2. Archaeal promoter architecture and mechanism of gene activation.

    PubMed

    Peng, Nan; Ao, Xiang; Liang, Yun Xiang; She, Qunxin

    2011-01-01

    Sulfolobus solfataricus and Sulfolobus islandicus contain several genes exhibiting D-arabinose-inducible expression and these systems are ideal for studying mechanisms of archaeal gene expression. At sequence level, only two highly conserved cis elements are present on the promoters: a regulatory element named ara box directing arabinose-inducible expression and the basal promoter element TATA, serving as the binding site for the TATA-binding protein. Strikingly, these promoters possess a modular structure that allows an essentially inactive basal promoter to be strongly activated. The invoked mechanisms include TFB (transcription factor B) recruitment by the ara-box-binding factor to activate gene expression and modulation of TFB recruitment efficiency to yield differential gene expression. PMID:21265754

  3. Active Cellular Mechanics and Information Processing in the Living Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, M.

    2014-07-01

    I will present our recent work on the organization of signaling molecules on the surface of living cells. Using novel experimental and theoretical approaches we have found that many cell surface receptors are organized as dynamic clusters driven by active currents and stresses generated by the cortical cytoskeleton adjoining the cell surface. We have shown that this organization is optimal for both information processing and computation. In connecting active mechanics in the cell with information processing and computation, we bring together two of the seminal works of Alan Turing.

  4. Receptor tyrosine kinases: mechanisms of activation and signaling

    PubMed Central

    Hubbard, Stevan R.; Miller, W. Todd

    2008-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) are essential components of signal transduction pathways that mediate cell-to-cell communication. These single-pass transmembrane receptors, which bind polypeptide ligands — mainly growth factors — play key roles in processes such as cellular growth, differentiation, metabolism and motility. Recent progress has been achieved towards an understanding of the precise (and varied) mechanisms by which RTKs are activated by ligand binding and by which signals are propagated from the activated receptors to downstream targets in the cell. PMID:17306972

  5. Workability and mechanical properties of alkali activated slag concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, F.G.; Sanjayan, J.G.

    1999-03-01

    This paper reports the results of an investigation on concrete containing alkali activated slag (AAS) as the binder, with emphasis on achievement of reasonable workability and equivalent one-day strength to portland cement concrete at normal curing temperatures. Two types of activators were used: sodium hydroxide in combination with sodium carbonate and sodium silicate in combination with hydrated lime. The fresh concrete properties reported include slump and slump loss, air content, and bleed. Mechanical properties of AAS concrete, including compressive strength, elastic modulus, flexural strength, drying shrinkage, and creep are contrasted with those of portland cement concrete.

  6. About mechanisms of tetonic activity of the satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkin, Yu. V.

    2003-04-01

    ABOUT MECHANISMS OF TECTONIC ACTIVITY OF THE SATELLITES Yu.V. Barkin Sternberg Astronomical Institute, Moscow, Russia, barkin@sai.msu.ru Due to attraction of the central planet and others external bodies satellite is subjected by tidal and non-tidal deformations. Elastic energy is changed in dependence from mutual position and motion of celestial bodies and as result the tensional state of satellite and its tectonic (endogenous) activity also is changed. Satellites of the planets have the definite shell’s structure and due to own rotation these shells are characterized by different oblatenesses. Gravitational interaction of the satellite and its mother planet generates big additional mechanical forces (and moments) between the neighboring non-spherical shells of the satellite (mantle, core and crust). These forces and moments are cyclic functions of time, which are changed in the different time-scales. They generate corresponding cyclic perturbations of the tensional state of the shells, their deformations, small relative transnational displacements and slow rotation of the shells and others. In geological period of time it leads to a fundamental tectonic reconstruction of the body. Definite contribution to discussed phenomena are caused by classical tidal mechanism. of planet-satellite interaction. But in this report we discuss in first the new mechanisms of endogenous activity of celestial bodies. They are connected with differential gravitational attraction of non-spherical satellite shells by the external celestial bodies which leads: 1) to small relative rotation (nutations) of the shells; 2) to small relative translational motions of the shells (displacements of their center of mass); 3) to relative displacements and rotations of the shells due to eccentricity of their center of mass positions; 4) to viscous elastic deformations of the shells and oth. (Barkin, 2001). For higher evaluations of the power of satellite endogenous activities were obtained

  7. Schools and Civil Defense.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Civil Defense (DOD), Washington, DC.

    Civil defense is a planned, coordinated action to protect the population during any emergency whether arising from thermonuclear attack or natural disaster. The Federal Government has assumed four responsibilities--(1) to keep track of the nature of the threat which the civil defense program must meet, (2) to prepare and disseminate information…

  8. Forgiveness and Defense Style

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maltby, John; Day, Liz

    2004-01-01

    Within the literature on the psychology of forgiveness, researchers have hypothesized that the 1st stage in the process of being able to forgive is the role of psychological defense. To examine such a hypothesis, the authors explored the relationship between forgiveness and defense style. The 304 respondents (151 men, 153 women) completed measures…

  9. Age-related protective effect of deprenyl on changes in the levels of diagnostic marker enzymes and antioxidant defense enzymes activities in cerebellar tissue in Wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    James, T. J.

    2010-01-01

    Antioxidants are free radical scavengers and protect living organisms against oxidative damage to tissues. Experimental evidence implicates oxygen-derived free radicals as important causative agents of aging and the present study was designed to evaluate the age-related effects of deprenyl on the antioxidant defense in the cerebellum of male Wistar rats. Experimental rats of three age groups (6, 12, and 18 months old) were administered with liquid deprenyl (2 mg/kg body weight/day for a period of 15 days i.p) and levels of diagnostic marker enzymes (alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, lactate dehydrogenase and creatine phosphokinase) in plasma, lipid peroxides, reduced glutathione and activities of glutathione-dependent antioxidant enzymes (glutathione peroxidase and glutathione-S-transferase) and antiperoxidative enzymes (catalase and superoxide dismutase) in the cerebellar tissue were determined. Intraperitonial administration of deprenyl (2 mg/kg body weight/day for a period of 15 days) significantly (p < 0.05) attenuated the age-related alterations noted in the levels of diagnostic marker enzymes plasma of experimental animals. Deprenyl also exerted an antioxidant effect against aging process by hindering lipid peroxidation to an extent. Moderate rise in the levels of reduced glutathione and activities of glutathione-dependent antioxidant enzymes and antiperoxidative enzymes was also observed. The results of the present investigation indicated that the protective potential of deprenyl was probably due to the increase of the activity of the free radical scavenging enzymes or to a counteraction of free radicals by its antioxidant nature or to a strengthening of neuronal membrane by its membrane-stabilizing action. Histopathological observations also confirmed the protective effect of deprenyl against the age-related aberrations in rat cerebellum. These data on the effect of deprenyl on parameters of normal aging provides new additional

  10. Department of Defense Helps "Fight" Poverty Too

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Opportunity, 1971

    1971-01-01

    Begun in April, 1969, the Department of Defense Domestic Action Program's activities include: loan of equipment to Community Action Agencies; use of DOD facilities for training and recreation; assistance in technical areas; and, general aid. (JM)

  11. Silanone groups on the surface of mechanically activated silicon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Bobyshev, A.A.; Radtsig, V.A.

    1988-12-01

    A new type of natural defects, namely, silanone groups, was identified on the surface of mechanically activated SiO/sub 2/. A study was carried out on their thermal stability, optical properties (a characteristic absorption band was found with maximum at 5.3 eV), and reactivity relative to simple molecules such as CO/sub 2/ and N/sub 2/O and radicals such as H, D, and CH/sub 3/.

  12. Microglia mechanics: immune activation alters traction forces and durotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Bollmann, Lars; Koser, David E.; Shahapure, Rajesh; Gautier, Hélène O. B.; Holzapfel, Gerhard A.; Scarcelli, Giuliano; Gather, Malte C.; Ulbricht, Elke; Franze, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    Microglial cells are key players in the primary immune response of the central nervous system. They are highly active and motile cells that chemically and mechanically interact with their environment. While the impact of chemical signaling on microglia function has been studied in much detail, the current understanding of mechanical signaling is very limited. When cultured on compliant substrates, primary microglial cells adapted their spread area, morphology, and actin cytoskeleton to the stiffness of their environment. Traction force microscopy revealed that forces exerted by microglia increase with substrate stiffness until reaching a plateau at a shear modulus of ~5 kPa. When cultured on substrates incorporating stiffness gradients, microglia preferentially migrated toward stiffer regions, a process termed durotaxis. Lipopolysaccharide-induced immune-activation of microglia led to changes in traction forces, increased migration velocities and an amplification of durotaxis. We finally developed a mathematical model connecting traction forces with the durotactic behavior of migrating microglial cells. Our results demonstrate that microglia are susceptible to mechanical signals, which could be important during central nervous system development and pathologies. Stiffness gradients in tissue surrounding neural implants such as electrodes, for example, could mechanically attract microglial cells, thus facilitating foreign body reactions detrimental to electrode functioning. PMID:26441534

  13. The CRISPR system: small RNA-guided defense in bacteria and archaea

    PubMed Central

    Karginov, Fedor V.; Hannon, Gregory J.

    2010-01-01

    All cellular systems evolve ways to combat predators and genomic parasites. In bacteria and archaea, numerous resistance mechanisms have developed against phage. Our understanding of this defensive repertoire has recently been expanded to include the CRISPR system of Clustered, Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats. In this remarkable pathway, short sequence tags from invading genetic elements are actively incorporated into the host's CRISPR locus, to be transcribed and processed into a set of small RNAs that guide the destruction of foreign genetic material. Here, we review the inner workings of this adaptable and heritable immune system and draw comparisons to small RNA-guided defense mechanisms in eukaryotic cells. PMID:20129051

  14. The Mechanism of the Osteoprotective Action of a Polyphenol-Rich Aronia melanocarpa Extract during Chronic Exposure to Cadmium is Mediated by the Oxidative Defense System.

    PubMed

    Brzóska, Malgorzata M; Rogalska, Joanna; Roszczenko, Alicja; Galazyn-Sidorczuk, Malgorzata; Tomczyk, Michal

    2016-05-01

    Recently, we demonstrated in a rat model that consumption of a polyphenol-rich extract obtained from the berries of Aronia melanocarpa could protect from cadmium-induced disorders in bone turnover and changes in bone mineral status. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the osteoprotective effect of this extract is mediated by the oxidative defense system. Enzymatic and nonenzymatic antioxidants, total antioxidative and oxidative status, hydrogen peroxide, and markers of oxidative protein, lipid, and DNA damage were determined in bone tissue at the distal femoral epiphysis of female Wistar rats receiving 0.1 % aqueous A. melanocarpa extract (prepared from the lyophilized commercial extract containing 65.74 % of polyphenols) as the only drinking fluid and/or cadmium in the diet (1 and 5 mg/kg) for 3, 10, 17, and 24 months. The total oxidative and antioxidative status of the serum was also evaluated. The administration of A. melanocarpa extract provided significant protection from cadmium-induced oxidative stress in the bone and serum, and from lipid peroxidation and oxidative damage to the protein and DNA in the bone tissue. Numerous correlations were noted between indices of the oxidative/antioxidative bone status and markers of bone metabolism previously assayed in the animals receiving A. melanocarpa extract. The results allow the conclusion that the ability of A. melanocarpa extract to mediate the oxidative defense system and prevent oxidative modifications of protein, lipid, and DNA in the bone tissue plays an important role in its osteoprotective action under exposure to cadmium. The findings provide further evidence supporting our suggestion that chokeberry may be a promising natural agent for protection against the toxic action of cadmium in women chronically exposed to this metal. PMID:27096624

  15. Host plant defense signaling in response to a coevolved herbivore combats introduced herbivore attack

    PubMed Central

    Woodard, Anastasia M; Ervin, Gary N; Marsico, Travis D

    2012-01-01

    Defense-free space resulting from coevolutionarily naïve host plants recently has been implicated as a factor facilitating invasion success of some insect species. Host plants, however, may not be entirely defenseless against novel herbivore threats. Volatile chemical-mediated defense signaling, which allows plants to mount specific, rapid, and intense responses, may play a role in systems experiencing novel threats. Here we investigate defense responses of host plants to a native and exotic herbivore and show that (1) host plants defend more effectively against the coevolved herbivore, (2) plants can be induced to defend against a newly-associated herbivore when in proximity to plants actively defending against the coevolved species, and (3) these defenses affect larval performance. These findings highlight the importance of coevolved herbivore-specific defenses and suggest that naïveté or defense limitations can be overcome via defense signaling. Determining how these findings apply across various host–herbivore systems is critical to understand mechanisms of successful herbivore invasion. PMID:22837849

  16. Differential antioxidant defense and detoxification mechanisms in photodynamically stressed rice plants treated with the deregulators of porphyrin biosynthesis, 5-aminolevulinic acid and oxyfluorfen.

    PubMed

    Phung, Thu-Ha; Jung, Sunyo

    2015-04-01

    This study focuses on differential molecular mechanisms of antioxidant and detoxification systems in rice plants under two different types of photodynamic stress imposed by porphyrin deregulators, 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) and oxyfluorfen (OF). The ALA-treated plants with white necrosis exhibited a greater decrease in photochemical quantum efficiency, Fv/Fm, as well as a greater increase in activity of superoxide dismutase, compared to the OF-treated plants. By contrast, the brown necrosis in OF-treated plants resulted in not only more widely dispersed H2O2 production and greater increases in H2O2-decomposing enzymes, catalase and peroxidase, but also lower ascorbate redox state. In addition, ALA- and OF-treated plants markedly up-regulated transcript levels of genes involved in detoxification processes including transport and movement, cellular homeostasis, and xenobiotic conjugation, with prominent up-regulation of serine/threonine kinase and chaperone only in ALA-treated plants. Our results demonstrate that different photodynamic stress imposed by ALA and OF developed differential actions of antioxidant enzymes and detoxification. Particularly, detoxification system may play potential roles in plant protection against photodynamic stress imposed by porphyrin deregulators, thereby contributing to alleviation of photodynamic damage. PMID:25735982

  17. Mechanism of Procaspase-8 Activation by c-FLIPL

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, J.; Jeffrey, P; Shi, Y

    2009-01-01

    Cellular FLICE-inhibitory protein (c-FLIPL) is a key regulator of the extrinsic cell death pathway. Although widely regarded as an inhibitor of initiator caspase activation and cell death, c-FLIPL is also capable of enhancing procaspase-8 activation through heterodimerization of their respective protease domains. However, the underlying mechanism of this activation process remains enigmatic. Here, we demonstrate that cleavage of the intersubunit linker of c-FLIPL by procaspase-8 potentiates the activation process by enhancing heterodimerization between the two proteins and vastly improving the proteolytic activity of unprocessed caspase-(C)8. The crystal structures of the protease-like domain of c-FLIPL alone and in complex with zymogen C8 identify the unique determinants that favor heterodimerization over procaspase-8 homodimerization, and induce the latent active site of zymogen C8 into a productive conformation. Together, these findings provide molecular insights into a key aspect of c-FLIPL function that modulates procaspase-8 activation to elicit diverse responses in different cellular contexts.

  18. 47 CFR 90.411 - Civil defense communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Civil defense communications. 90.411 Section 90... PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Operating Requirements § 90.411 Civil defense communications. The... necessary for the implementation of civil defense activities assigned such station by local civil...

  19. 47 CFR 90.411 - Civil defense communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Civil defense communications. 90.411 Section 90... PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Operating Requirements § 90.411 Civil defense communications. The... necessary for the implementation of civil defense activities assigned such station by local civil...

  20. 47 CFR 90.411 - Civil defense communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Civil defense communications. 90.411 Section 90... PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Operating Requirements § 90.411 Civil defense communications. The... necessary for the implementation of civil defense activities assigned such station by local civil...

  1. Antimicrobial activity and the mechanism of silver nanoparticle thermosensitive gel

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Meiwan; Yang, Zhiwen; Wu, Hongmei; Pan, Xin; Xie, Xiaobao; Wu, Chuanbin

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of the present study was to elucidate the antimicrobial activity and mechanism of silver nanoparticles incorporated into thermosensitive gel (S-T-Gel) on Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Patients and methods This study investigated the growth, permeability, and morphology of Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa cells in order to observe the action of S-T-Gel on the membrane structure of these three bacteria. The cell morphology of normal and treated bacteria cells was assessed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and the effects of S-T-Gel on genome DNA of bacterial cells were evaluated by agarose gel electrophoresis. Results S-T-Gel showed promising activity against Staphylococcus aureus and moderate activity against Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The observation with TEM suggested that S-T-Gel may destroy the structure of bacterial cell membranes in order to enter the bacterial cell. S-T-Gel then condensed DNA and combined and coagulated with the cytoplasm of the damaged bacteria, resulting in the leakage of the cytoplasmic component and the eventual death of these three bacteria. In addition, the analysis of agarose gel electrophoresis demonstrated that S-T-Gel could increase the decomposability of genome DNA. Conclusion These results about promising antimicrobial activity and mechanism of S-T-Gel may be useful for further research and development in in-vivo studies. PMID:22131833

  2. Proteolytic activation defines distinct lymphangiogenic mechanisms for VEGFC and VEGFD

    PubMed Central

    Bui, Hung M.; Enis, David; Robciuc, Marius R.; Nurmi, Harri J.; Cohen, Jennifer; Chen, Mei; Yang, Yiqing; Dhillon, Veerpal; Johnson, Kathy; Zhang, Hong; Kirkpatrick, Robert; Traxler, Elizabeth; Alitalo, Kari

    2016-01-01

    Lymphangiogenesis is supported by 2 homologous VEGFR3 ligands, VEGFC and VEGFD. VEGFC is required for lymphatic development, while VEGFD is not. VEGFC and VEGFD are proteolytically cleaved after cell secretion in vitro, and recent studies have implicated the protease a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs 3 (ADAMTS3) and the secreted factor collagen and calcium binding EGF domains 1 (CCBE1) in this process. It is not well understood how ligand proteolysis is controlled at the molecular level or how this process regulates lymphangiogenesis, because these complex molecular interactions have been difficult to follow ex vivo and test in vivo. Here, we have developed and used biochemical and cellular tools to demonstrate that an ADAMTS3-CCBE1 complex can form independently of VEGFR3 and is required to convert VEGFC, but not VEGFD, into an active ligand. Consistent with these ex vivo findings, mouse genetic studies revealed that ADAMTS3 is required for lymphatic development in a manner that is identical to the requirement of VEGFC and CCBE1 for lymphatic development. Moreover, CCBE1 was required for in vivo lymphangiogenesis stimulated by VEGFC but not VEGFD. Together, these studies reveal that lymphangiogenesis is regulated by two distinct proteolytic mechanisms of ligand activation: one in which VEGFC activation by ADAMTS3 and CCBE1 spatially and temporally patterns developing lymphatics, and one in which VEGFD activation by a distinct proteolytic mechanism may be stimulated during inflammatory lymphatic growth. PMID:27159393

  3. The mechanism of antibacterial activity of tetrandrine against Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young-Seob; Han, Sin-Hee; Lee, Su-Hwan; Kim, Young-Guk; Park, Chung-Berm; Kang, Ok-Hwa; Keum, Joon-Ho; Kim, Sung-Bae; Mun, Su-Hyun; Seo, Yun-Soo; Myung, Noh-Yil; Kwon, Dong-Yeul

    2012-08-01

    Tetrandrine (TET) is a bis-benzylisoquinoline alkaloid derived from the radix of Stephania tetrandra S. Moore. TET performs a wide spectrum of biological activities. The radix of S. tetrandrae has been used traditionally in Asia, including Korea, to treat congestive circulatory disorders and inflammatory diseases. The aim of this study was to examine the mechanism of antibacterial activity of tetrandrine against Staphylococcus aureus. The mechanism was investigated by studying the effects of TET in combination with detergent or membrane potential un-couplers. In addition, the direct involvement of peptidoglycan (PGN) was assessed in titration assays. TET activity against S. aureus was 125-250 μg/mL, and the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the two reference strains was 250 μg/mL. The OD(600) of each suspension treated with a combination of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), tris(hydroxymethyl) aminomethane (TRIS), and Triton X-100 (TX) with TET (0.25×MIC) had been reduced from 43% to 96%. Additional structure-function studies on the antibacterial activity of TET in combination with other agents may lead to the discovery of more effective antibacterial agents. PMID:22845553

  4. Gallic Acid Ameliorates Cyclophosphamide-Induced Neurotoxicity in Wistar Rats Through Free Radical Scavenging Activity and Improvement in Antioxidant Defense System.

    PubMed

    Oyagbemi, Ademola Adetokunbo; Omobowale, Temidayo Olutayo; Saba, Adebowale Bernard; Olowu, Ebunoluwa Racheal; Dada, Racheal Omolola; Akinrinde, Akinleye Stephen

    2016-07-01

    Cyclophosphamide (CPA) is a widely used anticancer chemotherapeutic agent and its toxicity has been associated with its toxic metabolites phosphormide mustard. Therefore, the ameliorative effect of Gallic acid against neurotoxicity was examined in this study. Sixty rats were grouped into 10 rats per group. Group 1 received saline orally. Group 2 received CPA at 100 mg/kg single dose intraperitoneally on day 1. Groups 3 and 4 were treated with Gallic acid (GA) at 60 and 120 mg/kg body weight only for 10 days and also received a single dose of CPA (100 mg/kg) intraperitoneally on day 1, respectively. Rats in groups 5 and 6 received GA at 60 and 120 mg/kg body weight only for 10 days. Groups 3, 4, 5, and 6 received GA orally. The cerebellar and cerebral malondialdehyde (MDA) contents and hydrogen peroxide generation were significantly (p < .05) elevated. The cerebellar and cerebral catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase and glutathione-S-transferase (GST) activities were significantly (p < .05) reduced in CPA treated group. The activity of glutathione peroxidase (GPx) was significantly increased in rats that were treatment with CPA. Also, nitrite content was significantly elevated in the brain of rats that received the toxic dose of CPA. All these findings suggest that treatment with GA (60 and 120 mg/kg) ameliorated the neurotoxicity induced by CPA via reduction of oxidative stress and increase in antioxidant defense system. Combining all, chemotherapeutic agents with structure/function similar to GA could be of potential benefit to the pharmaceutical industries as an adjuvant in chemotherapy with little or no side effects. PMID:26716793

  5. Dual allosteric activation mechanisms in monomeric human glucokinase

    PubMed Central

    Whittington, A. Carl; Larion, Mioara; Bowler, Joseph M.; Ramsey, Kristen M.; Brüschweiler, Rafael; Miller, Brian G.

    2015-01-01

    Cooperativity in human glucokinase (GCK), the body’s primary glucose sensor and a major determinant of glucose homeostatic diseases, is fundamentally different from textbook models of allostery because GCK is monomeric and contains only one glucose-binding site. Prior work has demonstrated that millisecond timescale order-disorder transitions within the enzyme’s small domain govern cooperativity. Here, using limited proteolysis, we map the site of disorder in unliganded GCK to a 30-residue active-site loop that closes upon glucose binding. Positional randomization of the loop, coupled with genetic selection in a glucokinase-deficient bacterium, uncovers a hyperactive GCK variant with substantially reduced cooperativity. Biochemical and structural analysis of this loop variant and GCK variants associated with hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia reveal two distinct mechanisms of enzyme activation. In α-type activation, glucose affinity is increased, the proteolytic susceptibility of the active site loop is suppressed and the 1H-13C heteronuclear multiple quantum coherence (HMQC) spectrum of 13C-Ile–labeled enzyme resembles the glucose-bound state. In β-type activation, glucose affinity is largely unchanged, proteolytic susceptibility of the loop is enhanced, and the 1H-13C HMQC spectrum reveals no perturbation in ensemble structure. Leveraging both activation mechanisms, we engineer a fully noncooperative GCK variant, whose functional properties are indistinguishable from other hexokinase isozymes, and which displays a 100-fold increase in catalytic efficiency over wild-type GCK. This work elucidates specific structural features responsible for generating allostery in a monomeric enzyme and suggests a general strategy for engineering cooperativity into proteins that lack the structural framework typical of traditional allosteric systems. PMID:26283387

  6. Effect of substrate mechanical properties on T cell activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, King; Upadhyaya, Arpita

    2013-03-01

    T cell activation is a key process in cell-mediated immunity, and engagement of T cell receptors by peptides on antigen presenting cells leads to activation of signaling cascades as well as cytoskeletal reorganization and large scale membrane deformations. While significant advances have been made in understanding the biochemical signaling pathways, the effects imposed by the physical environment and the role of mechanical forces on cell activation are not well understood. In this study, we have used anti-CD3 coated elastic polyacrylamide gels as stimulatory substrates to enable the spreading of Jurkat T cells and the measurement of cellular traction forces. We have investigated the effect of substrate stiffness on the dynamics of T cell spreading and cellular force generation. We found that T cells display more active and sustained edge dynamics on softer gels and that they exert increased traction stresses with increasing gel stiffness. A dynamic actin cytoskeleton was required to maintain the forces generated during activation, as inferred from small molecule inhibition experiments. Our results indicate an important role for physical properties of the antigen presenting cell as well as cytoskeleton-driven forces in signaling activation.

  7. Active, motor-driven mechanics in a DNA gel

    PubMed Central

    Bertrand, Olivier J. N.; Fygenson, Deborah Kuchnir; Saleh, Omar A.

    2012-01-01

    Cells are capable of a variety of dramatic stimuli-responsive mechanical behaviors. These capabilities are enabled by the pervading cytoskeletal network, an active gel composed of structural filaments (e.g., actin) that are acted upon by motor proteins (e.g., myosin). Here, we describe the synthesis and characterization of an active gel using noncytoskeletal components. We use methods of base-pair-templated DNA self assembly to create a hybrid DNA gel containing stiff tubes and flexible linkers. We then activate the gel by adding the motor FtsK50C, a construct derived from the bacterial protein FtsK that, in vitro, has a strong and processive DNA contraction activity. The motors stiffen the gel and create stochastic contractile events that affect the positions of attached beads. We quantify the fluctuations of the beads and show that they are comparable both to measurements of cytoskeletal systems and to theoretical predictions for active gels. Thus, we present a DNA-based active gel whose behavior highlights the universal aspects of nonequilibrium, motor-driven networks. PMID:23045635

  8. Mechanism of phospho-ubiquitin-induced PARKIN activation.

    PubMed

    Wauer, Tobias; Simicek, Michal; Schubert, Alexander; Komander, David

    2015-08-20

    The E3 ubiquitin ligase PARKIN (encoded by PARK2) and the protein kinase PINK1 (encoded by PARK6) are mutated in autosomal-recessive juvenile Parkinsonism (AR-JP) and work together in the disposal of damaged mitochondria by mitophagy. PINK1 is stabilized on the outside of depolarized mitochondria and phosphorylates polyubiquitin as well as the PARKIN ubiquitin-like (Ubl) domain. These phosphorylation events lead to PARKIN recruitment to mitochondria, and activation by an unknown allosteric mechanism. Here we present the crystal structure of Pediculus humanus PARKIN in complex with Ser65-phosphorylated ubiquitin (phosphoUb), revealing the molecular basis for PARKIN recruitment and activation. The phosphoUb binding site on PARKIN comprises a conserved phosphate pocket and harbours residues mutated in patients with AR-JP. PhosphoUb binding leads to straightening of a helix in the RING1 domain, and the resulting conformational changes release the Ubl domain from the PARKIN core; this activates PARKIN. Moreover, phosphoUb-mediated Ubl release enhances Ubl phosphorylation by PINK1, leading to conformational changes within the Ubl domain and stabilization of an open, active conformation of PARKIN. We redefine the role of the Ubl domain not only as an inhibitory but also as an activating element that is restrained in inactive PARKIN and released by phosphoUb. Our work opens up new avenues to identify small-molecule PARKIN activators. PMID:26161729

  9. Mechanism of phospho-ubiquitin induced PARKIN activation

    PubMed Central

    Wauer, Tobias; Simicek, Michal; Schubert, Alexander; Komander, David

    2016-01-01

    Summary The E3 ubiquitin ligase PARKIN (encoded by PARK2) and the protein kinase PINK1 (encoded by PARK6) are mutated in autosomal recessive juvenile Parkinsonism (AR-JP) and work together in the disposal of damaged mitochondria by mitophagy1–3. PINK1 is stabilised on the outside of depolarised mitochondria, and phosphorylates poly-ubiquitin (polyUb)4–8 as well as the PARKIN Ub-like (Ubl) domain9,10. These phosphorylation events lead to PARKIN recruitment to mitochondria, and activation by an unknown allosteric mechanism4–12. Here we present the crystal structure of Pediculus humanus PARKIN in complex with Ser65-phosphorylated ubiquitin (phosphoUb), revealing the molecular basis for PARKIN recruitment and activation. The phosphoUb binding site on PARKIN comprises a conserved phosphate pocket and harbours residues mutated in AR-JP patients. PhosphoUb binding leads to straightening of a helix in the RING1 domain, and the resulting conformational changes release the Ubl domain from the PARKIN core; this activates PARKIN. Moreover, phosphoUb-mediated Ubl release enhances Ubl phosphorylation by PINK1, leading to conformational changes within the Ubl domain and stabilisation of an open, active conformation of PARKIN. We redefine the role of the Ubl domain not only as an inhibitory13 but also as an activating element that is restrained in inactive PARKIN and released by phosphoUb. Our work opens new avenues to identify small molecule PARKIN activators. PMID:26161729

  10. Plant defense genes are regulated by ethylene

    SciTech Connect

    Ecker, J.R.; Davis, R.W.

    1987-08-01

    One of the earliest detectable events during plant-pathogen interaction is a rapid increase in ethylene biosynthesis. This gaseous plant stress hormone may be a signal for plants to activate defense mechanisms against invading pathogens such as bacteria, fungi, and viruses. The effect of ethylene on four plant genes involved in three separate plant defense response pathways was examined; these included (i and ii) genes that encode L-phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (EC 4.3.1.5) and 4-coumarate:CoA ligase (4-coumarate:CoA ligase (AMP-forming), EC 6.2.1.12), enzymes of the phenylpropanoid pathway, (iii) the gene encoding chalcone synthase, an enzyme of the flavonoid glycoside pathway, and (iv) the genes encoding hydroxyproline-rich glycoprotein, a major protein component(s) of plant cell walls. Blot hybridization analysis of mRNA from ethylene-treated carrot roots reveals marked increases in the levels of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase mRNA, 4-coumarate CoA ligase mRNA, chalcone synthase mRNA, and certain hydroxyproline-rich glycoprotein transcripts. The effect of ethylene on hydroxyproline-rich glycoprotein mRNA accumulation was different from that of wounding. Ethylene induces two hydroxyproline-rich glycoprotein mRNAs (1.8 and 4.0 kilobases), whereas wounding of carrot root leads to accumulation of an additional hydroxyproline-rich mRNA (1.5 kilobases). These results indicate that at least two distinct signals, ethylene and a wound signal, can affect the expression of plant defense-response genes.

  11. Physiological mechanisms for the modulation of pannexin 1 channel activity

    PubMed Central

    Sandilos, Joanna K; Bayliss, Douglas A

    2012-01-01

    It is widely recognized that ATP, along with other nucleotides, subserves important intercellular signalling processes. Among various nucleotide release mechanisms, the relatively recently identified pannexin 1 (Panx1) channel is gaining prominence by virtue of its ability to support nucleotide permeation and release in a variety of different tissues. Here, we review recent advances in our understanding of the factors that control Panx1 channel activity. By using electrophysiological and biochemical approaches, diverse mechanisms that dynamically regulate Panx1 channel function have been identified in various settings; these include, among others, activation by caspase-mediated channel cleavage in apoptotic immune cells, by G protein-coupled receptors in vascular smooth muscle, by low oxygen tension in erythrocytes and neurons, by high extracellular K+ in various cell types and by stretch/strain in airway epithelia. Delineating the distinct mechanisms of Panx1 modulation that prevail in different physiological contexts provides the possibility that these channels, and ATP release, could ultimately be targeted in a context-dependent manner. PMID:23070703

  12. Two systems and defenses.

    PubMed

    Novick, Jack; Novick, Kerry Kelly

    2013-02-01

    The authors suggest that Freud's concept of defense differentiated psychoanalysis from other medical and psychological theories of personality development and functioning then and now. Reclaiming the concept's centrality and linking it with interdisciplinary research findings, they illustrate their extension of defense into a two-system model of self-protection and self-regulation with a clinical example. The authors suggest that the two-system model allows for the reintegration of defense into a multidimensional psychoanalytic theory and multimodal therapeutic technique. PMID:23421665

  13. Genetic transformation of cotton with a harpin-encoding gene hpaXoo confers an enhanced defense response against different pathogens through a priming mechanism

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The soil-borne fungal pathogen Verticillium dahliae Kleb causes Verticillium wilt in a wide range of crops including cotton (Gossypium hirsutum). To date, most upland cotton varieties are susceptible to V. dahliae and the breeding for cotton varieties with the resistance to Verticillium wilt has not been successful. Results Hpa1Xoo is a harpin protein from Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae which induces the hypersensitive cell death in plants. When hpa1Xoo was transformed into the susceptible cotton line Z35 through Agrobacterium-mediated transformation, the transgenic cotton line (T-34) with an improved resistance to Verticillium dahliae was obtained. Cells of the transgenic T-34, when mixed with the conidia suspension of V. dahliae, had a higher tolerance to V. dahliae compared to cells of untransformed Z35. Cells of T-34 were more viable 12 h after mixing with V. dahliae conidia suspension. Immunocytological analysis showed that Hpa1Xoo, expressed in T-34, accumulated as clustered particles along the cell walls of T-34. In response to the infection caused by V. dahliae, the microscopic cell death and the generation of reactive oxygen intermediates were observed in leaves of T-34 and these responses were absent in leaves of Z35 inoculated with V. dahliae. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis indicated that five defense-related genes, ghAOX1, hin1, npr1, ghdhg-OMT, and hsr203J, were up-regulated in T-34 inoculated with V. dahliae. The up-regulations of these defense-relate genes were not observed or in a less extent in leaves of Z-35 after the inoculation. Conclusions Hpa1Xoo accumulates along the cell walls of the transgenic T-34, where it triggers the generation of H2O2 as an endogenous elicitor. T-34 is thus in a primed state, ready to protect the host from the pathogen. The results of this study suggest that the transformation of cotton with hpa1Xoo could be an effective approach for the development of cotton varieties with the improved resistance against soil

  14. Distinct Mechanisms Regulate Lck Spatial Organization in Activated T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor-Kaushik, Natasha; Hinde, Elizabeth; Compeer, Ewoud B.; Yamamoto, Yui; Kraus, Felix; Yang, Zhengmin; Lou, Jieqiong; Pageon, Sophie V.; Tabarin, Thibault; Gaus, Katharina; Rossy, Jérémie

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorylation of the T cell receptor (TCR) by the kinase Lck is the first detectable signaling event upon antigen engagement. The distribution of Lck within the plasma membrane, its conformational state, kinase activity, and protein–protein interactions all contribute to determine how efficiently Lck phosphorylates the engaged TCR. Here, we used cross-correlation raster image correlation spectroscopy and photoactivated localization microscopy to identify two mechanisms of Lck clustering: an intrinsic mechanism of Lck clustering induced by locking Lck in its open conformation and an extrinsic mechanism of clustering controlled by the phosphorylation of tyrosine 192, which regulates the affinity of Lck SH2 domain. Both mechanisms of clustering were differently affected by the absence of the kinase Zap70 or the adaptor Lat. We further observed that the adaptor TSAd bound to and promoted the diffusion of Lck when it is phosphorylated on tyrosine 192. Our data suggest that while Lck open conformation drives aggregation and clustering, the spatial organization of Lck is further controlled by signaling events downstream of TCR phosphorylation. PMID:27014263

  15. Hybrid magnetic mechanism for active locomotion based on inchworm motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sung Hoon; Hashi, Shuichiro; Ishiyama, Kazushi

    2013-02-01

    Magnetic robots have been studied in the past. Insect-type micro-robots are used in various biomedical applications; researchers have developed inchworm micro-robots for endoscopic use. A biological inchworm has a looping locomotion gait. However, most inchworm micro-robots depend on a general bending, or bellows, motion. In this paper, we introduce a new robotic mechanism using magnetic force and torque control in a rotating magnetic field for a looping gait. The proposed robot is controlled by the magnetic torque, attractive force, and body mechanisms (two stoppers, flexible body, and different frictional legs). The magnetic torque generates a general bending motion. In addition, the attractive force and body mechanisms produce the robot’s looping motion within a rotating magnetic field and without the use of an algorithm for field control. We verified the device’s performance and analyzed the motion through simulations and various experiments. The robot mechanism can be applied to active locomotion for various medical robots, such as wireless endoscopes.

  16. [Role of myeloperoxidase in the host defense against fungal infection].

    PubMed

    Aratani, Yasuaki

    2006-01-01

    Neutrophils are believed to be the first line of defense against invading microorganisms, but in vivo roles of reactive oxygens produced by neutrophils are not well known. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) catalyzes reaction of hydrogen peroxide with chloride ion to produce hypochlorous acid that is used for microbial killing by phagocytic cells. To define the in vivo role of MPO, we generated mice having no peroxidase activity in their neutrophils or monocytes. MPO-deficient (MPO-KO) mice showed severely reduced cytotoxicity to Candida albicans, Aspergillus fumigatus, Cryptococcus neoformans, and other microorganisms, demonstrating that an MPO-dependent oxidative system is important for host defense against fungi. However, the significance of MPO compared to the NADPH-oxidase is still unclear because individuals with MPO deficiency are usually healthy in contrast to patients with chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) who present clinical symptoms early in life. To better understand the contributions of MPO and NADPH-oxidase to antifungal defense mechanisms, we compared the susceptibility of MPO-KO mice and CGD mice to infections by C. albicans. Interestingly, at the highest dose, the mortality of MPO-KO mice was comparable to CGD mice, but was the same as normal mice at the lowest dose. These results suggest that MPO and NADPH-oxidase are equally important for early host defense against a large inocula of Candida. Our present results suggest that MPO-deficient individuals could exhibit similar problems as CGD patients if exposed to a large number of microorganisms. PMID:16940954

  17. Modeling trapping mechanism for PCB adsorption on activated carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Bjørnar; Kvamme, Bjørn; Kuznetsova, Tatyana; Oterhals, A.˚ge

    2012-12-01

    The levels of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin, polychlorinated dibenzofuran (PCDD/F) and dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyl (DL-PCB) in fishmeal and fish oil produced for use in feed for salmon is above present European legislation levels in some regions of the world and different decontamination approaches have been proposed [1]. One of these is adsorption on activated carbon. This approach appears to be efficient for adsorption of PCDD/F but less efficient for DL-PCB [2]. Activated carbon consists of slit pores with average sizes of 20 - 50 Ångstroms. One hypothesis [2] for the mechanism of trapping DL-PCB is reduced ability for intramolecular movements of the PCB molecules inside the slit pores. In order to investigate this hypothesis we have used quantum mechanics [3] to characterize two DL-PCB congeners, respectively congener 77 (3,3',4,4'-Tetrachlorobiphenyl) and congener 118 (2,3',4,4',5-Pentachlorobiphenyl) and Triolein (18:1) [4] as a major constituent of the solvent fish oil. A model for activated carbon was constructed using a crystal structure of graphite from the American Mineralogist Crystal Structure Database [5]. The crystal structure used was originally from Wyckoff [6]. A small program had to be written to generate the desired graphite structure as it contains no less than 31232 Carbon atoms. Partial atomic charges were estimated using QM with DFT/B3LYP/6-311+g** and SM6 [7].

  18. Complete reaction mechanisms of mercury oxidation on halogenated activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Rungnim, Chompoonut; Promarak, Vinich; Hannongbua, Supa; Kungwan, Nawee; Namuangruk, Supawadee

    2016-06-01

    The reaction mechanisms of mercury (Hg) adsorption and oxidation on halogenated activated carbon (AC) have been completely studied for the first time using density functional theory (DFT) method. Two different halogenated AC models, namely X-AC and X-AC-X (X=Cl, Br, I), were adopted. The results revealed that HgX is found to be stable-state on the AC edge since its further desorption from the AC as HgX, or further oxidation to HgX2, are energetically unfavorable. Remarkably, the halide type does not significantly affect the Hg adsorption energy but it strongly affects the activation energy barrier of HgX formation, which obviously increases in the order HgIBr-AC>Cl-AC. Thus, the study of the complete reaction mechanism is essential because the adsorption energy can not be used as a guideline for the rational material design in the halide impregnated AC systems. The activation energy is an important descriptor for the predictions of sorbent reactivity to the Hg oxidation process. PMID:26943019

  19. Hair Growth Promotion Activity and Its Mechanism of Polygonum multiflorum

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yunfei; Han, Mingnuan; Lin, Pei; He, Yanran; Yu, Jie; Zhao, Ronghua

    2015-01-01

    Polygonum multiflorum Radix (PMR) has long history in hair growth promotion and hair coloring in clinical applications. However, several crucial problems in its clinic usage and mechanisms are still unsolved or lack scientific evidences. In this research, C57BL/6J mice were used to investigate hair growth promotion activity and possible mechanism of PMR and Polygonum multiflorum Radix Preparata (PMRP). Hair growth promotion activities were investigated by hair length, hair covered skin ratio, the number of follicles, and hair color. Regulation effects of several cytokines involved in the hair growth procedure were tested, such as fibroblast growth factor (FGF-7), Sonic Hedgehog (SHH), β-catenin, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF). Oral PMR groups had higher hair covered skin ratio (100 ± 0.00%) than oral PMRP groups (48%~88%). However, topical usage of PMRP had about 90% hair covered skin ratio. Both oral administration of PMR and topically given PMRP showed hair growth promotion activities. PMR was considered to be more suitable for oral administration, while PMRP showed greater effects in external use. The hair growth promotion effect of oral PMR was most probably mediated by the expression of FGF-7, while topical PMRP promoted hair growth by the stimulation of SHH expression. PMID:26294926

  20. On the molecular mechanisms of mitotic kinase activation.

    PubMed

    Bayliss, Richard; Fry, Andrew; Haq, Tamanna; Yeoh, Sharon

    2012-11-01

    During mitosis, human cells exhibit a peak of protein phosphorylation that alters the behaviour of a significant proportion of proteins, driving a dramatic transformation in the cell's shape, intracellular structures and biochemistry. These mitotic phosphorylation events are catalysed by several families of protein kinases, including Auroras, Cdks, Plks, Neks, Bubs, Haspin and Mps1/TTK. The catalytic activities of these kinases are activated by phosphorylation and through protein-protein interactions. In this review, we summarize the current state of knowledge of the structural basis of mitotic kinase activation mechanisms. This review aims to provide a clear and comprehensive primer on these mechanisms to a broad community of researchers, bringing together the common themes, and highlighting specific differences. Along the way, we have uncovered some features of these proteins that have previously gone unreported, and identified unexplored questions for future work. The dysregulation of mitotic kinases is associated with proliferative disorders such as cancer, and structural biology will continue to play a critical role in the development of chemical probes used to interrogate disease biology and applied to the treatment of patients. PMID:23226601

  1. On the molecular mechanisms of mitotic kinase activation

    PubMed Central

    Bayliss, Richard; Fry, Andrew; Haq, Tamanna; Yeoh, Sharon

    2012-01-01

    During mitosis, human cells exhibit a peak of protein phosphorylation that alters the behaviour of a significant proportion of proteins, driving a dramatic transformation in the cell's shape, intracellular structures and biochemistry. These mitotic phosphorylation events are catalysed by several families of protein kinases, including Auroras, Cdks, Plks, Neks, Bubs, Haspin and Mps1/TTK. The catalytic activities of these kinases are activated by phosphorylation and through protein–protein interactions. In this review, we summarize the current state of knowledge of the structural basis of mitotic kinase activation mechanisms. This review aims to provide a clear and comprehensive primer on these mechanisms to a broad community of researchers, bringing together the common themes, and highlighting specific differences. Along the way, we have uncovered some features of these proteins that have previously gone unreported, and identified unexplored questions for future work. The dysregulation of mitotic kinases is associated with proliferative disorders such as cancer, and structural biology will continue to play a critical role in the development of chemical probes used to interrogate disease biology and applied to the treatment of patients. PMID:23226601

  2. Unraveling fatty acid transport and activation mechanisms in Yarrowia lipolytica.

    PubMed

    Dulermo, Rémi; Gamboa-Meléndez, Heber; Ledesma-Amaro, Rodrigo; Thévenieau, France; Nicaud, Jean-Marc

    2015-09-01

    Fatty acid (FA) transport and activation have been extensively studied in the model yeast species Saccharomyces cerevisiae but have rarely been examined in oleaginous yeasts, such as Yarrowia lipolytica. Because the latter begins to be used in biodiesel production, understanding its FA transport and activation mechanisms is essential. We found that Y. lipolytica has FA transport and activation proteins similar to those of S. cerevisiae (Faa1p, Pxa1p, Pxa2p, Ant1p) but mechanism of FA peroxisomal transport and activation differs greatly with that of S. cerevisiae. While the ScPxa1p/ScPxa2p heterodimer is essential for growth on long-chain FAs, ΔYlpxa1 ΔYlpxa2 is not impaired for growth on FAs. Meanwhile, ScAnt1p and YlAnt1p are both essential for yeast growth on medium-chain FAs, suggesting they function similarly. Interestingly, we found that the ΔYlpxa1 ΔYlpxa2 ΔYlant1 mutant was unable to grow on short-, medium-, or long-chain FAs, suggesting that YlPxa1p, YlPxa2p, and YlAnt1p belong to two different FA degradation pathways. We also found that YlFaa1p is involved in FA storage in lipid bodies and that FA remobilization largely depended on YlFat1p, YlPxa1p and YlPxa2p. This study is the first to comprehensively examine FA intracellular transport and activation in oleaginous yeast. PMID:25887939

  3. Spray-dried plasma promotes growth, modulates the activity of antioxidant defenses, and enhances the immune status of gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata) fingerlings.

    PubMed

    Gisbert, E; Skalli, A; Campbell, J; Solovyev, M M; Rodríguez, C; Dias, J; Polo, J

    2015-01-01

    Terrestrial animal byproduct meals, including nonruminant blood meal and blood products, represent the largest and largely untapped safe source of animal protein available within the international market for the aquafeed industry. Spray-dried blood and spray-dried plasma (SDP) proteins have long been recognized as high-quality feed ingredients for farmed animals. In this study, we evaluated the inclusion of SDP from porcine blood (SDPP) in growing diets for gilthead sea bream. Three isonitrogenous (CP = 51.2%) and isolipidic (fat = 12.4%) diets manufactured by cold extrusion (0.8 to 1.5 mm pellet size) were prepared by substituting high-quality fish meal with 0, 3, and 6% SDPP. The diets were tested for a period of 60 d at 22°C with 4 replicates each (400-L cylindroconical tanks, 150 fish per tank, and initial density = 0.5 kg/m(3)). The SDPP inclusion in diets for gilthead sea bream fingerlings were evaluated in terms of growth performance, feed utilization, histological organization of the intestinal mucosa, activity of oxidative stress enzymes (catalase, glutathione S-transferase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase) in the intestine, and nonspecific serum immune parameters (lysozyme and bactericidal activity). Results from this study indicated that dietary SDPP promoted fish growth in terms of BW and length; fish fed 3% SDPP were 10.5% heavier (P < 0.05) than those fed the control diet. Spray-dried plasma from porcine blood modulated the activity of the antioxidative defenses in the intestine (P < 0.05) and increased the density of goblet cells in the intestine (P < 0.05) and benefited the host by providing an effective immune barrier against gut pathogenic microbiota. The nonspecific serum immune response in fish fed diets with SDPP was greater (P < 0.05) than in fish fed the control diet. These results indicated that the inclusion of SDPP in gilthead sea bream feed could be beneficial for the fish by enhancing intestinal and serum innate immune

  4. Reviews on Mechanisms of In Vitro Antioxidant Activity of Polysaccharides

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Junqiao; Hu, Shuzhen; Nie, Shaoping; Yu, Qiang; Xie, Mingyong

    2016-01-01

    It is widely acknowledged that the excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) or reactive nitrogen species (RNS) induced oxidative stress will cause significant damage to cell structure and biomolecular function, directly or indirectly leading to a number of diseases. The overproduction of ROS/RNS will be balanced by nonenzymatic antioxidants and antioxidant enzymes. Polysaccharide or glycoconjugates derived from natural products are of considerable interest from the viewpoint of potent in vivo and in vitro antioxidant activities recently. Particularly, with regard to the in vitro antioxidant systems, polysaccharides are considered as effective free radical scavenger, reducing agent, and ferrous chelator in most of the reports. However, the underlying mechanisms of these antioxidant actions have not been illustrated systematically and sometimes controversial results appeared among various literatures. To address this issue, we summarized the latest discoveries and advancements in the study of antioxidative polysaccharides and gave a detailed description of the possible mechanisms. PMID:26682009

  5. Molecular Mechanism That Induces Activation of Spätzle, the Ligand for the Drosophila Toll Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Arnot, Christopher J.; Gay, Nicholas J.; Gangloff, Monique

    2010-01-01

    The Drosophila Toll receptor is activated by an endogenous cytokine ligand Spätzle. Active ligand is generated in response to positional cues in embryonic dorso-ventral patterning and microbial pathogens in the insect immune response. Spätzle is secreted as a pro-protein and is processed into an active form by the serine endoproteases Easter and Spätzle-processing enzyme during dorso-ventral patterning and infection, respectively. Here, we provide evidence for the molecular mechanism of this activation process. We show that the Spätzle prodomain masks a predominantly hydrophobic region of Spätzle and that proteolysis causes a conformational change that exposes determinants that are critical for binding to the Toll receptor. We also gather that a conserved sequence motif in the prodomain presents features of an amphipathic helix likely to bind a hydrophobic cleft in Spätzle thereby occluding the putative Toll binding region. This mechanism of activation has a striking similarity to that of coagulogen, a clotting factor of the horseshoe crab, an invertebrate that has changed little in 400 million years. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that an ancient passive defense system has been adapted during evolution and converted for use in a critical pathway of innate immune signaling and embryonic morphogenesis. PMID:20378549

  6. Molecular mechanism that induces activation of Spätzle, the ligand for the Drosophila Toll receptor.

    PubMed

    Arnot, Christopher J; Gay, Nicholas J; Gangloff, Monique

    2010-06-18

    The Drosophila Toll receptor is activated by an endogenous cytokine ligand Spätzle. Active ligand is generated in response to positional cues in embryonic dorso-ventral patterning and microbial pathogens in the insect immune response. Spätzle is secreted as a pro-protein and is processed into an active form by the serine endoproteases Easter and Spätzle-processing enzyme during dorso-ventral patterning and infection, respectively. Here, we provide evidence for the molecular mechanism of this activation process. We show that the Spätzle prodomain masks a predominantly hydrophobic region of Spätzle and that proteolysis causes a conformational change that exposes determinants that are critical for binding to the Toll receptor. We also gather that a conserved sequence motif in the prodomain presents features of an amphipathic helix likely to bind a hydrophobic cleft in Spätzle thereby occluding the putative Toll binding region. This mechanism of activation has a striking similarity to that of coagulogen, a clotting factor of the horseshoe crab, an invertebrate that has changed little in 400 million years. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that an ancient passive defense system has been adapted during evolution and converted for use in a critical pathway of innate immune signaling and embryonic morphogenesis. PMID:20378549

  7. Glutathione and fungal elicitor regulation of a plant defense gene promoter in electroporated protoplasts

    PubMed Central

    Dron, Michel; Clouse, Steven D.; Dixon, Richard A.; Lawton, Michael A.; Lamb, Christopher J.

    1988-01-01

    To investigate the mechanisms underlying activation of plant defenses against microbial attack we have studied elicitor regulation of a chimeric gene comprising the 5′ flanking region of a defense gene encoding the phytoalexin biosynthetic enzyme chalcone synthase fused to a bacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene. Glutathione or fungal elicitor caused a rapid, marked but transient expression of the chimeric gene electroporated into soybean protoplasts. The response closely resembled that of endogenous chalcone synthase genes in suspension cultured cells. Functional analysis of 5′ deletions suggests that promoter activity is determined by an elicitor-regulated activator located between the “TATA box” and nucleotide position -173 and an upstream silencer between -173 and -326. These cis-acting elements function in the transduction of the elicitation signal to initiate elaboration of an inducible defense response. Images PMID:16593981

  8. Brain mechanical property measurement using MRE with intrinsic activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, John B.; Pattison, Adam J.; McGarry, Matthew D.; Perreard, Irina M.; Swienckowski, Jessica G.; Eskey, Clifford J.; Lollis, S. Scott; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2012-11-01

    , termed intrinsic activation, produces sufficient motion to allow mechanical properties to be recovered. The poroelastic model is more consistent with the measured data from brain at low frequencies than the linear elastic model. Intrinsic activation allows MRE to be performed without a device shaking the head so the patient notices no differences between it and the other sequences in an MR examination.

  9. Brain Mechanical Property Measurement Using MRE with Intrinsic Activation

    PubMed Central

    Pattison, Adam J.; McGarry, Matthew D.; Perreard, Irina M.; Swienckowski, Jessica G.; Eskey, Clifford J.; Lollis, S. Scott; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2013-01-01

    the MRE procedures were repeated on the same day. Cardiac pulsation, termed intrinsic activation, produces sufficient motion to allow mechanical properties to be recovered. The poroelastic model is more consistent with the measured data from brain at low frequencies than the linear elastic model. Intrinsic activation allows MR elastography to be performed without a device shaking the head so the patient notices no differences between it and the other sequences in an MR examination. PMID:23079508

  10. Physical mechanisms of solar activity effects in the middle atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ebel, A.

    1989-01-01

    A great variety of physical mechanisms of possibly solar induced variations in the middle atmosphere has been discussed in the literature during the last decades. The views which have been put forward are often controversial in their physical consequences. The reason may be the complexity and non-linearity of the atmospheric response to comparatively weak forcing resulting from solar activity. Therefore this review focuses on aspects which seem to indicate nonlinear processes in the development of solar induced variations. Results from observations and numerical simulations are discussed.

  11. MEASUREMENT AND CALCULATION OF RADIONUCLIDE ACTIVITIES IN SAVANNAH RIVER SITE HIGH LEVEL WASTE SLUDGE FOR ACCEPTANCE OF DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY GLASS IN A FEDERAL REPOSITORY

    SciTech Connect

    Bannochie, C; David Diprete, D; Ned Bibler, N

    2008-12-31

    This paper describes the results of the analyses of High Level Waste (HLW) sludge slurry samples and of the calculations necessary to decay the radionuclides to meet the reporting requirement in the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS) [1]. The concentrations of 45 radionuclides were measured. The results of these analyses provide input for radioactive decay calculations used to project the radionuclide inventory at the specified index years, 2015 and 3115. This information is necessary to complete the Production Records at Savannah River Site's Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) so that the final glass product resulting from Macrobatch 5 (MB5) can eventually be submitted to a Federal Repository. Five of the necessary input radionuclides for the decay calculations could not be measured directly due to their low concentrations and/or analytical interferences. These isotopes are Nb-93m, Pd-107, Cd-113m, Cs-135, and Cm-248. Methods for calculating these species from concentrations of appropriate other radionuclides will be discussed. Also the average age of the MB5 HLW had to be calculated from decay of Sr-90 in order to predict the initial concentration of Nb-93m. As a result of the measurements and calculations, thirty-one WAPS reportable radioactive isotopes were identified for MB5. The total activity of MB5 sludge solids will decrease from 1.6E+04 {micro}Ci (1 {micro}Ci = 3.7E+04 Bq) per gram of total solids in 2008 to 2.3E+01 {micro}Ci per gram of total solids in 3115, a decrease of approximately 700 fold. Finally, evidence will be given for the low observed concentrations of the radionuclides Tc-99, I-129, and Sm-151 in the HLW sludges. These radionuclides were reduced in the MB5 sludge slurry to a fraction of their expected production levels due to SRS processing conditions.

  12. Bacillus cereus AR156 primes induced systemic resistance by suppressing miR825/825* and activating defense-related genes in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Niu, Dongdong; Xia, Jing; Jiang, Chunhao; Qi, Beibei; Ling, Xiaoyu; Lin, Siyuan; Zhang, Weixiong; Guo, Jianhua; Jin, Hailing; Zhao, Hongwei

    2016-04-01

    Small RNAs play an important role in plant immune responses. However, their regulatory function in induced systemic resistance (ISR) is nascent. Bacillus cereus AR156 is a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium that induces ISR in Arabidopsis against bacterial infection. Here, by comparing small RNA profiles of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) DC3000-infected Arabidopsis with and without AR156 pretreatment, we identified a group of Arabidopsis microRNAs (miRNAs) that are differentially regulated by AR156 pretreatment. miR825 and miR825* are two miRNA generated from a single miRNA gene. Northern blot analysis indicated that they were significantly downregulated in Pst DC3000-infected plants pretreated with AR156, in contrast to the plants without AR156 pretreatment. miR825 targets two ubiquitin-protein ligases, while miR825* targets toll-interleukin-like receptor (TIR)-nucleotide binding site (NBS) and leucine-rich repeat (LRR) type resistance (R) genes. The expression of these target genes negatively correlated with the expression of miR825 and miR825*. Moreover, transgenic plants showing reduced expression of miR825 and miR825* displayed enhanced resistance to Pst DC3000 infection, whereas transgenic plants overexpressing miR825 and miR825* were more susceptible. Taken together, our data indicates that Bacillus cereus AR156 pretreatment primes ISR to Pst infection by suppressing miR825 and miR825* and activating the defense related genes they targeted. PMID:26526683

  13. A cupin domain-containing protein with a quercetinase activity (VdQase) regulates Verticillium dahliae's pathogenicity and contributes to counteracting host defenses

    PubMed Central

    El Hadrami, Abdelbasset; Islam, Md. Rashidul; Adam, Lorne R.; Daayf, Fouad

    2015-01-01

    We previously identified rutin as part of potato root responses to its pathogen Verticillium dahliae. Rutin was directly toxic to the pathogen at doses greater than 160 μM, a threshold below which many V. dahliae pathogenicity-related genes were up-regulated. We identified and characterized a cupin domain-containing protein (VdQase) with a dioxygenase activity and a potential role in V. dahliae-potato interac