Science.gov

Sample records for activate glycogen phosphorylase

  1. Effects of commonly used cryoprotectants on glycogen phosphorylase activity and structure.

    PubMed

    Tsitsanou, K E; Oikonomakos, N G; Zographos, S E; Skamnaki, V T; Gregoriou, M; Watson, K A; Johnson, L N; Fleet, G W

    1999-04-01

    The effects of a number of cryoprotectants on the kinetic and structural properties of glycogen phosphorylase b have been investigated. Kinetic studies showed that glycerol, one of the most commonly used cryoprotectants in X-ray crystallographic studies, is a competitive inhibitor with respect to substrate glucose-1-P with an apparent Ki value of 3.8% (v/v). Cryogenic experiments, with the enzyme, have shown that glycerol binds at the catalytic site and competes with glucose analogues that bind at the catalytic site, thus preventing the formation of complexes. This necessitated a change in the conditions for cryoprotection in crystallographic binding experiments with glycogen phosphorylase. It was found that 2-methyl-2,4-pentanediol (MPD), polyethylene glycols (PEGs) of various molecular weights, and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) activated glycogen phosphorylase b to different extents, by stabilizing its most active conformation, while sucrose acted as a noncompetitive inhibitor and ethylene glycol as an uncompetitive inhibitor with respect to glucose-1-P. A parallel experimental investigation by X-ray crystallography showed that, at 100 K, both MPD and DMSO do not bind at the catalytic site, do not induce any significant conformational change on the enzyme molecule, and hence, are more suitable cryoprotectants than glycerol for binding studies with glycogen phosphorylase. PMID:10211820

  2. Effects of commonly used cryoprotectants on glycogen phosphorylase activity and structure.

    PubMed Central

    Tsitsanou, K. E.; Oikonomakos, N. G.; Zographos, S. E.; Skamnaki, V. T.; Gregoriou, M.; Watson, K. A.; Johnson, L. N.; Fleet, G. W.

    1999-01-01

    The effects of a number of cryoprotectants on the kinetic and structural properties of glycogen phosphorylase b have been investigated. Kinetic studies showed that glycerol, one of the most commonly used cryoprotectants in X-ray crystallographic studies, is a competitive inhibitor with respect to substrate glucose-1-P with an apparent Ki value of 3.8% (v/v). Cryogenic experiments, with the enzyme, have shown that glycerol binds at the catalytic site and competes with glucose analogues that bind at the catalytic site, thus preventing the formation of complexes. This necessitated a change in the conditions for cryoprotection in crystallographic binding experiments with glycogen phosphorylase. It was found that 2-methyl-2,4-pentanediol (MPD), polyethylene glycols (PEGs) of various molecular weights, and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) activated glycogen phosphorylase b to different extents, by stabilizing its most active conformation, while sucrose acted as a noncompetitive inhibitor and ethylene glycol as an uncompetitive inhibitor with respect to glucose-1-P. A parallel experimental investigation by X-ray crystallography showed that, at 100 K, both MPD and DMSO do not bind at the catalytic site, do not induce any significant conformational change on the enzyme molecule, and hence, are more suitable cryoprotectants than glycerol for binding studies with glycogen phosphorylase. PMID:10211820

  3. Rac1 Protein Regulates Glycogen Phosphorylase Activation and Controls Interleukin (IL)-2-dependent T Cell Proliferation*

    PubMed Central

    Arrizabalaga, Onetsine; Lacerda, Hadriano M.; Zubiaga, Ana M.; Zugaza, José L.

    2012-01-01

    Small GTPases of the Rho family have been implicated in important cellular processes such as cell migration and adhesion, protein secretion, and/or gene transcription. In the lymphoid system, these GTPases participate in the signaling cascades that are activated after engagement of antigen receptors. However, little is known about the role that Rho GTPases play in IL-2-mediated responses. Here, we show that IL-2 induces Rac1 activation in Kit 225 T cells. We identified by mass spectrometry the muscle isoform of glycogen phosphorylase (PYGM) as a novel Rac1 effector molecule in IL-2-stimulated cells. The interaction between the active form of Rac1 (Rac1-GTP) and PYGM was established directly through a domain comprising amino acids 191–270 of PYGM that exhibits significant homology with the Rac binding domain of PAK1. The integrity of this region was crucial for PYGM activation. Importantly, IL-2-dependent cellular proliferation was inhibited upon blocking both the activation of Rac1 and the activity of PYGM. These results reveal a new role for Rac1 in cell signaling, showing that this GTPase triggers T cell proliferation upon IL-2 stimulation by associating with PYGM and modulating its enzymatic activity. PMID:22337875

  4. Discovery of the glycogen phosphorylase-modulating activity of a resveratrol glucoside by using a virtual screening protocol optimized for solvation effects.

    PubMed

    Mavrokefalos, Nikolaos; Myrianthopoulos, Vassilios; Chajistamatiou, Aikaterini S; Chrysina, Evangelia D; Mikros, Emmanuel

    2015-04-01

    The identification of natural products that can modulate blood glucose levels is of great interest as it can possibly facilitate the utilization of mild interventions such as herbal medicine or functional foods in the treatment of chronic diseases like diabetes. One of the established drug targets for antihyperglycemic therapy is glycogen phosphorylase. To evaluate the glycogen phosphorylase inhibitory properties of an in-house compound collection consisting to a large extent of natural products, a stepwise virtual and experimental screening protocol was devised and implemented. The fact that the active site of glycogen phosphorylase is highly hydrated emphasized that a methodological aspect needed to be efficiently addressed prior to an in silico evaluation of the compound collection. The effect of water molecules on docking calculations was regarded as a key parameter in terms of virtual screening protocol optimization. Statistical analysis of 125 structures of glycogen phosphorylase and solvent mapping focusing on the active site hydration motif in combination with a retrospective screening revealed the importance of a set of 29 crystallographic water molecules for achieving high enrichment as to the discrimination between active compounds and inactive decoys. The scaling of Van der Waals radii of system atoms had an additional effect on screening performance. Having optimized the in silico protocol, a prospective evaluation of the in-house compound collection derived a set of 18 top-ranked natural products that were subsequently evaluated in vitro for their activity as glycogen phosphorylase inhibitors. Two phenolic glucosides with glycogen phosphorylase-modulating activity were identified, whereas the most potent compound affording mid-micromolar inhibition was a glucosidic derivative of resveratrol, a stilbene well-known for its wide range of biological activities. Results show the possible phytotherapeutic and nutraceutical potential of products common in

  5. Naturally occurring pentacyclic triterpenes as inhibitors of glycogen phosphorylase: synthesis, structure-activity relationships, and X-ray crystallographic studies.

    PubMed

    Wen, Xiaoan; Sun, Hongbin; Liu, Jun; Cheng, Keguang; Zhang, Pu; Zhang, Liying; Hao, Jia; Zhang, Luyong; Ni, Peizhou; Zographos, Spyros E; Leonidas, Demetres D; Alexacou, Kyra-Melinda; Gimisis, Thanasis; Hayes, Joseph M; Oikonomakos, Nikos G

    2008-06-26

    Twenty-five naturally occurring pentacyclic triterpenes, 15 of which were synthesized in this study, were biologically evaluated as inhibitors of rabbit muscle glycogen phosphorylase a (GPa). From SAR studies, the presence of a sugar moiety in triterpene saponins resulted in a markedly decreased activity ( 7, 18- 20) or no activity ( 21, 22). These saponins, however, might find their value as potential natural prodrugs which are much more water-soluble than their corresponding aglycones. To elucidate the mechanism of GP inhibition, we have determined the crystal structures of the GPb-asiatic acid and GPb-maslinic acid complexes. The X-ray analysis indicates that the inhibitors bind at the allosteric activator site, where the physiological activator AMP binds. Pentacyclic triterpenes represent a promising class of multiple-target antidiabetic agents that exert hypoglycemic effects, at least in part, through GP inhibition. PMID:18517260

  6. Hexokinase 2, Glycogen Synthase and Phosphorylase Play a Key Role in Muscle Glycogen Supercompensation

    PubMed Central

    Irimia, José M.; Rovira, Jordi; Nielsen, Jakob N.; Guerrero, Mario; Wojtaszewski, Jørgen F. P.; Cussó, Roser

    2012-01-01

    Background Glycogen-depleting exercise can lead to supercompensation of muscle glycogen stores, but the biochemical mechanisms of this phenomenon are still not completely understood. Methods Using chronic low-frequency stimulation (CLFS) as an exercise model, the tibialis anterior muscle of rabbits was stimulated for either 1 or 24 hours, inducing a reduction in glycogen of 90% and 50% respectively. Glycogen recovery was subsequently monitored during 24 hours of rest. Results In muscles stimulated for 1 hour, glycogen recovered basal levels during the rest period. However, in those stimulated for 24 hours, glycogen was supercompensated and its levels remained 50% higher than basal levels after 6 hours of rest, although the newly synthesized glycogen had fewer branches. This increase in glycogen correlated with an increase in hexokinase-2 expression and activity, a reduction in the glycogen phosphorylase activity ratio and an increase in the glycogen synthase activity ratio, due to dephosphorylation of site 3a, even in the presence of elevated glycogen stores. During supercompensation there was also an increase in 5′-AMP-activated protein kinase phosphorylation, correlating with a stable reduction in ATP and total purine nucleotide levels. Conclusions Glycogen supercompensation requires a coordinated chain of events at two levels in the context of decreased cell energy balance: First, an increase in the glucose phosphorylation capacity of the muscle and secondly, control of the enzymes directly involved in the synthesis and degradation of the glycogen molecule. However, supercompensated glycogen has fewer branches. PMID:22860128

  7. Diverse effects of two allosteric inhibitors on the phosphorylation state of glycogen phosphorylase in hepatocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Latsis, Theodore; Andersen, Birgitte; Agius, Loranne

    2002-01-01

    Two distinct allosteric inhibitors of glycogen phosphorylase, 1,4-dideoxy-1,4-imino-D-arabinitol (DAB) and CP-91149 (an indole-2-carboxamide), were investigated for their effects on the phosphorylation state of the enzyme in hepatocytes in vitro. CP-91149 induced inactivation (dephosphorylation) of phosphorylase in the absence of hormones and partially counteracted the phosphorylation caused by glucagon. Inhibition of glycogenolysis by CP-91149 can be explained by dephosphorylation of phosphorylase a. This was associated with activation of glycogen synthase and stimulation of glycogen synthesis. DAB, in contrast, induced a small degree of phosphorylation of phosphorylase. This was associated with inactivation of glycogen synthase and inhibition of glycogen synthesis. Despite causing phosphorylation (activation) of phosphorylase, DAB is a very potent inhibitor of glycogenolysis in both the absence and presence of glucagon. This is explained by allosteric inhibition of phosphorylase a, which overrides the increase in activation state. In conclusion, two potent phosphorylase inhibitors exert different effects on glycogen metabolism in intact hepatocytes as a result of opposite effects on the phosphorylation state of both phosphorylase and glycogen synthase. PMID:12186629

  8. Sensitive assay of glycogen phosphorylase activity by analysing the chain-lengthening action on a Fluorogenic [corrected] maltooligosaccharide derivative.

    PubMed

    Makino, Yasushi; Omichi, Kaoru

    2009-07-01

    The action of glycogen phosphorylase (GP) is essentially reversible, although GP is generally classified as a glycogen-degrading enzyme. In this study, we developed a highly sensitive and convenient assay for GP activity by analysing its chain-lengthening action on a fluorogenic maltooligosaccharide derivative in a glucose-1-phosphate-rich medium. Characterization of the substrate specificity of GP using pyridylaminated (PA-) maltooligosaccharides of various sizes revealed that a maltotetraosyl (Glc(4)) residue comprising the non-reducing-end of a PA-maltooligosaccharide is indispensable for the chain-lengthening action of GP, and PA-maltohexaose is the most suitable substrate for the purpose of this study. By using a high-performance liquid chromatograph equipped with a fluorescence spectrophotometer, PA-maltoheptaose produced by the chain elongation of PA-maltohexaose could be isolated and quantified at 10 fmol. This method was used to measure the GP activities of crude and purified GP preparations, and was demonstrated to have about 1,000 times greater sensitivity than the spectrophotometric orthophosphate assay. PMID:19279194

  9. New inhibitors of glycogen phosphorylase as potential antidiabetic agents.

    PubMed

    Somsák, L; Czifrák, K; Tóth, M; Bokor, E; Chrysina, E D; Alexacou, K-M; Hayes, J M; Tiraidis, C; Lazoura, E; Leonidas, D D; Zographos, S E; Oikonomakos, N G

    2008-01-01

    The protein glycogen phosphorylase has been linked to type 2 diabetes, indicating the importance of this target to human health. Hence, the search for potent and selective inhibitors of this enzyme, which may lead to antihyperglycaemic drugs, has received particular attention. Glycogen phosphorylase is a typical allosteric protein with five different ligand binding sites, thus offering multiple opportunities for modulation of enzyme activity. The present survey is focused on recent new molecules, potential inhibitors of the enzyme. The biological activity can be modified by these molecules through direct binding, allosteric effects or other structural changes. Progress in our understanding of the mechanism of action of these inhibitors has been made by the determination of high-resolution enzyme inhibitor structures (both muscle and liver). The knowledge of the three-dimensional structures of protein-ligand complexes allows analysis of how the ligands interact with the target and has the potential to facilitate structure-based drug design. In this review, the synthesis, structure determination and computational studies of the most recent inhibitors of glycogen phosphorylase at the different binding sites are presented and analyzed. PMID:19075645

  10. Regulation of glycogen synthase and phosphorylase during recovery from high-intensity exercise in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Bräu, L; Ferreira, L D; Nikolovski, S; Raja, G; Palmer, T N; Fournier, P A

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the role of the phosphorylation state of glycogen synthase and glycogen phosphorylase in the regulation of muscle glycogen repletion in fasted animals recovering from high-intensity exercise. Groups of rats were swum to exhaustion and allowed to recover for up to 120 min without access to food. Swimming to exhaustion caused substantial glycogen breakdown and lactate accumulation in the red, white and mixed gastrocnemius muscles, whereas the glycogen content in the soleus muscle remained stable. During the first 40 min of recovery, significant repletion of glycogen occurred in all muscles examined except the soleus muscle. At the onset of recovery, the activity ratios and fractional velocities of glycogen synthase in the red, white and mixed gastrocnemius muscles were higher than basal, but returned to pre-exercise levels within 20 min after exercise. In contrast, after exercise the activity ratios of glycogen phosphorylase in the same muscles were lower than basal, and increased to pre-exercise levels within 20 min. This pattern of changes in glycogen synthase and phosphorylase activities, never reported before, suggests that the integrated regulation of the phosphorylation state of both glycogen synthase and phosphorylase might be involved in the control of glycogen deposition after high-intensity exercise. PMID:9078277

  11. Adenovirus-mediated delivery into myocytes of muscle glycogen phosphorylase, the enzyme deficient in patients with glycogen-storage disease type V.

    PubMed Central

    Baqué, S; Newgard, C B; Gerard, R D; Guinovart, J J; Gómez-Foix, A M

    1994-01-01

    The feasibility of using adenovirus as a vector for the introduction of glycogen phosphorylase activity into myocytes has been examined. We used the C2C12 myoblast cell line to assay the impact of phosphorylase gene transfer on myocyte glycogen metabolism and to reproduce in vitro the two strategies proposed for the treatment of muscle genetic diseases, myoblast transplantation and direct DNA delivery. In this study, a recombinant adenovirus containing the muscle glycogen phosphorylase cDNA transcribed from the cytomegalovirus promoter (AdCMV-MGP) was used to transduce both differentiating myoblasts and nondividing mature myotube cells. Muscle glycogen phosphorylase mRNA levels and total phosphorylase activity were increased in both cell types after viral treatment although more efficiently in the differentiated myotubes. The increase in phosphorylase activity was transient (15 days) in myoblasts whereas in myotubes higher levels of phosphorylase gene expression and activity were reached, which remained above control levels for the duration of the study (20 days). The introduction of muscle phosphorylase into myotubes enhanced their glycogenolytic capacity. AdCMV MGP-transduced myotubes had lower glycogen levels under basal conditions. In addition, these engineered cells showed more extensive glycogenolysis in response to both adrenaline, which stimulates glycogen phosphorylase phosphorylation, and carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone, a metabolic uncoupler. In conclusion, transfer of the muscle glycogen phosphorylase cDNA into myotubes confers an enhanced and regulatable glycogenolytic capacity. Thus this system might be useful for delivery of muscle glycogen phosphorylase and restoration of glycogenolysis in muscle cells from patients with muscle phosphorylase deficiency (McArdle's disease). Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 5 PMID:7818463

  12. Insights into Brain Glycogen Metabolism: THE STRUCTURE OF HUMAN BRAIN GLYCOGEN PHOSPHORYLASE.

    PubMed

    Mathieu, Cécile; de la Sierra-Gallay, Ines Li; Duval, Romain; Xu, Ximing; Cocaign, Angélique; Léger, Thibaut; Woffendin, Gary; Camadro, Jean-Michel; Etchebest, Catherine; Haouz, Ahmed; Dupret, Jean-Marie; Rodrigues-Lima, Fernando

    2016-08-26

    Brain glycogen metabolism plays a critical role in major brain functions such as learning or memory consolidation. However, alteration of glycogen metabolism and glycogen accumulation in the brain contributes to neurodegeneration as observed in Lafora disease. Glycogen phosphorylase (GP), a key enzyme in glycogen metabolism, catalyzes the rate-limiting step of glycogen mobilization. Moreover, the allosteric regulation of the three GP isozymes (muscle, liver, and brain) by metabolites and phosphorylation, in response to hormonal signaling, fine-tunes glycogenolysis to fulfill energetic and metabolic requirements. Whereas the structures of muscle and liver GPs have been known for decades, the structure of brain GP (bGP) has remained elusive despite its critical role in brain glycogen metabolism. Here, we report the crystal structure of human bGP in complex with PEG 400 (2.5 Å) and in complex with its allosteric activator AMP (3.4 Å). These structures demonstrate that bGP has a closer structural relationship with muscle GP, which is also activated by AMP, contrary to liver GP, which is not. Importantly, despite the structural similarities between human bGP and the two other mammalian isozymes, the bGP structures reveal molecular features unique to the brain isozyme that provide a deeper understanding of the differences in the activation properties of these allosteric enzymes by the allosteric effector AMP. Overall, our study further supports that the distinct structural and regulatory properties of GP isozymes contribute to the different functions of muscle, liver, and brain glycogen. PMID:27402852

  13. The control of glycogen metabolism in yeast. 1. Interconversion in vivo of glycogen synthase and glycogen phosphorylase induced by glucose, a nitrogen source or uncouplers.

    PubMed

    François, J; Villanueva, M E; Hers, H G

    1988-06-15

    The addition of glucose to a suspension of yeast initiated glycogen synthesis and ethanol formation. Other effects of the glucose addition were a transient rise in the concentration of cyclic AMP and a more prolonged increase in the concentration of hexose 6-monophosphate and of fructose 2,6-bisphosphate. The activity of glycogen synthase increased about 4-fold and that of glycogen phosphorylase decreased 3-5-fold. These changes could be reversed by the removal of glucose from the medium and induced again by a new addition of the sugar. These effects of glucose were also obtained with glucose derivatives known to form the corresponding 6-phosphoester. Similar changes in glycogen synthase and glycogen phosphorylase activity were induced by glucose in a thermosensitive mutant deficient in adenylate cyclase (cdc35) when incubated at the permissive temperature of 26 degrees C, but were much more pronounced at the nonpermissive temperature of 35 degrees C. Under the latter condition, glycogen synthase was nearly fully activated and glycogen phosphorylase fully inactivated. Such large effects of glucose were, however, not seen in another adenylate-cyclase-deficient mutant (cyr1), able to incorporate exogenous cyclic AMP. When a nitrogen source or uncouplers were added to the incubation medium after glucose, they had effects on glycogen metabolism and on the activity of glycogen synthase and glycogen phosphorylase which were directly opposite to those of glucose. By contrast, like glucose, these agents also caused, under most experimental conditions, a detectable rise in cyclic AMP concentration and a series of cyclic-AMP-dependent effects such as an activation of phosphofructokinase 2 and of trehalase and an increase in the concentration of fructose 2,6-bisphosphate and in the rate of glycolysis. Under all experimental conditions, the rate of glycolysis was proportional to the concentration of fructose 2,6-bisphosphate. Uncouplers, but not a nitrogen source, also induced

  14. Insulin-independent glycogen supercompensation in isolated mouse skeletal muscle: role of phosphorylase inactivation.

    PubMed

    Sandström, Marie E; Abbate, Fabio; Andersson, Daniel C; Zhang, Shi-Jin; Westerblad, Håkan; Katz, Abram

    2004-08-01

    Glycogen supercompensation (increase in muscle glycogen content above basal) is an established phenomenon induced by unknown mechanisms. It consists of both insulin-dependent and -independent components. Here, we investigate insulin-independent glycogen supercompensation in isolated, intact extensor digitorum longus muscles from mice. Muscles were stimulated electrically, incubated in vitro with 5.5 mM glucose for up to 16 h and then analysed for glycogen, glucose uptake and enzyme activities. Basal glycogen was 84+/-6 micro mol glucosyl units/g dry muscle and was depleted by 80% after 10 min contraction. Glycogen increased after contraction, reaching a peak value of 113+/-9 micro mol glucosyl units/g dry muscle ( P<0.05 vs. basal) by 6 h, and returned to basal values by 16 h (84+/-8). Maximal activities of glycogen synthase, phosphorylase and alpha-glucosidase were not significantly altered by contraction or during the 6-h recovery period. Glycogen synthase fractional activity (0.17/7.2 mM glucose-6-P; inversely related to phosphorylation state of the enzyme) was increased about twofold early after contraction but then decreased and was slightly lower than baseline during the period of supercompensation (4-6 h). Phosphorylase fractional activity (+/-adenosine monophosphate; directly related to phosphorylation state of the enzyme) decreased to 60% of basal after contraction and decreased further during the initial 4 h of recovery to 40% of basal ( P<0.01 vs. basal). After 4 h recovery, glucose uptake was slightly (50%) higher in the stimulated than in the non-stimulated muscle ( P<0.01). Thus, insulin-independent glycogen supercompensation involves inactivation of phosphorylase and hence an inhibition of glycogen breakdown. PMID:15085341

  15. Flavopiridol inhibits glycogen phosphorylase by binding at the inhibitor site.

    PubMed

    Oikonomakos, N G; Schnier, J B; Zographos, S E; Skamnaki, V T; Tsitsanou, K E; Johnson, L N

    2000-11-01

    Flavopiridol (L86-8275) ((-)-cis-5, 7-dihydroxy-2-(2-chlorophenyl)-8-[4-(3-hydroxy-1-methyl)-piperidinyl] -4H-benzopyran-4-one), a potential antitumor drug, currently in phase II trials, has been shown to be an inhibitor of muscle glycogen phosphorylase (GP) and to cause glycogen accumulation in A549 non-small cell lung carcinoma cells (Kaiser, A., Nishi, K., Gorin, F.A., Walsh, D.A., Bradbury, E. M., and Schnier, J. B., unpublished data). Kinetic experiments reported here show that flavopiridol inhibits GPb with an IC(50) = 15.5 microm. The inhibition is synergistic with glucose resulting in a reduction of IC(50) for flavopiridol to 2.3 microm and mimics the inhibition of caffeine. In order to elucidate the structural basis of inhibition, we determined the structures of GPb complexed with flavopiridol, GPb complexed with caffeine, and GPa complexed with both glucose and flavopiridol at 1.76-, 2.30-, and 2.23-A resolution, and refined to crystallographic R values of 0.216 (R(free) = 0.247), 0.189 (R(free) = 0.219), and 0.195 (R(free) = 0.252), respectively. The structures provide a rational for flavopiridol potency and synergism with glucose inhibitory action. Flavopiridol binds at the allosteric inhibitor site, situated at the entrance to the catalytic site, the site where caffeine binds. Flavopiridol intercalates between the two aromatic rings of Phe(285) and Tyr(613). Both flavopiridol and glucose promote the less active T-state through localization of the closed position of the 280s loop which blocks access to the catalytic site, thereby explaining their synergistic inhibition. The mode of interactions of flavopiridol with GP is different from that of des-chloro-flavopiridol with CDK2, illustrating how different functional parts of the inhibitor can be used to provide specific and potent binding to two different enzymes. PMID:10924512

  16. FR258900, a potential anti-hyperglycemic drug, binds at the allosteric site of glycogen phosphorylase

    PubMed Central

    Tiraidis, Costas; Alexacou, Kyra-Melinda; Zographos, Spyros E.; Leonidas, Demetres D.; Gimisis, Thanasis; Oikonomakos, Nikos G.

    2007-01-01

    FR258900 has been discovered as a novel inhibitor of human liver glycogen phosphorylase a and proved to suppress hepatic glycogen breakdown and reduce plasma glucose concentrations in diabetic mice models. To elucidate the mechanism of inhibition, we have determined the crystal structure of the cocrystallized rabbit muscle glycogen phosphorylase b–FR258900 complex and refined it to 2.2 Å resolution. The structure demonstrates that the inhibitor binds at the allosteric activator site, where the physiological activator AMP binds. The contacts from FR258900 to glycogen phosphorylase are dominated by nonpolar van der Waals interactions with Gln71, Gln72, Phe196, and Val45′ (from the symmetry-related subunit), and also by ionic interactions from the carboxylate groups to the three arginine residues (Arg242, Arg309, and Arg310) that form the allosteric phosphate-recognition subsite. The binding of FR258900 to the protein promotes conformational changes that stabilize an inactive T-state quaternary conformation of the enzyme. The ligand-binding mode is different from those of the potent phenoxy-phthalate and acyl urea inhibitors, previously described, illustrating the broad specificity of the allosteric site. PMID:17600143

  17. FR258900, a potential anti-hyperglycemic drug, binds at the allosteric site of glycogen phosphorylase.

    PubMed

    Tiraidis, Costas; Alexacou, Kyra-Melinda; Zographos, Spyros E; Leonidas, Demetres D; Gimisis, Thanasis; Oikonomakos, Nikos G

    2007-08-01

    FR258900 has been discovered as a novel inhibitor of human liver glycogen phosphorylase a and proved to suppress hepatic glycogen breakdown and reduce plasma glucose concentrations in diabetic mice models. To elucidate the mechanism of inhibition, we have determined the crystal structure of the cocrystallized rabbit muscle glycogen phosphorylase b-FR258900 complex and refined it to 2.2 A resolution. The structure demonstrates that the inhibitor binds at the allosteric activator site, where the physiological activator AMP binds. The contacts from FR258900 to glycogen phosphorylase are dominated by nonpolar van der Waals interactions with Gln71, Gln72, Phe196, and Val45' (from the symmetry-related subunit), and also by ionic interactions from the carboxylate groups to the three arginine residues (Arg242, Arg309, and Arg310) that form the allosteric phosphate-recognition subsite. The binding of FR258900 to the protein promotes conformational changes that stabilize an inactive T-state quaternary conformation of the enzyme. The ligand-binding mode is different from those of the potent phenoxy-phthalate and acyl urea inhibitors, previously described, illustrating the broad specificity of the allosteric site. PMID:17600143

  18. Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor αPIX Leads to Activation of the Rac 1 GTPase/Glycogen Phosphorylase Pathway in Interleukin (IL)-2-stimulated T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Llavero, Francisco; Urzelai, Bakarne; Osinalde, Nerea; Gálvez, Patricia; Lacerda, Hadriano M.; Parada, Luis A.; Zugaza, José L.

    2015-01-01

    Recently, we have reported that the active form of Rac 1 GTPase binds to the glycogen phosphorylase muscle isoform (PYGM) and modulates its enzymatic activity leading to T cell proliferation. In the lymphoid system, Rac 1 and in general other small GTPases of the Rho family participate in the signaling cascades that are activated after engagement of the T cell antigen receptor. However, little is known about the IL-2-dependent Rac 1 activator molecules. For the first time, a signaling pathway leading to the activation of Rac 1/PYGM in response to IL-2-stimulated T cell proliferation is described. More specifically, αPIX, a known guanine nucleotide exchange factor for the small GTPases of the Rho family, preferentially Rac 1, mediates PYGM activation in Kit 225 T cells stimulated with IL-2. Using directed mutagenesis, phosphorylation of αPIX Rho-GEF serines 225 and 488 is required for activation of the Rac 1/PYGM pathway. IL-2-stimulated serine phosphorylation was corroborated in Kit 225 T cells cultures. A parallel pharmacological and genetic approach identified PKCθ as the serine/threonine kinase responsible for αPIX serine phosphorylation. The phosphorylated state of αPIX was required to activate first Rac 1 and subsequently PYGM. These results demonstrate that the IL-2 receptor activation, among other early events, leads to activation of PKCθ. To activate Rac 1 and consequently PYGM, PKCθ phosphorylates αPIX in T cells. The biological significance of this PKCθ/αPIX/Rac 1 GTPase/PYGM signaling pathway seems to be the control of different cellular responses such as migration and proliferation. PMID:25694429

  19. Inhibition of rabbit muscle glycogen phosphorylase by D-gluconohydroximo-1,5-lactone-N-phenylurethane.

    PubMed

    Papageorgiou, A C; Oikonomakos, N G; Leonidas, D D

    1989-08-01

    The effect of the beta-glycosidase inhibitor D-gluconohydroximo-1,5-lactone-N-phenylurethane (PUG) on the kinetic and ultracentrifugation properties of glycogen phosphorylase has been studied. Recent crystallographic work at 2.4 A resolution [D. Barford et al. (1988) Biochemistry 27, 6733-6741] has shown that PUG binds in the catalytic site of phosphorylase b crystals with its gluconohydroximolactone moiety occupying a position similar to that observed for other glucosyl compounds and the N-phenylurethane side chain fitting into an adjacent cavity with little conformational change in the enzyme. In solution, PUG was shown to be a potent inhibitor of phosphorylase b, directly competitive with alpha-D-glucopyranose 1-phosphate (glucose-1-P) (Ki = 0.40 mM) and noncompetitive with respect to glycogen and AMP. When PUG was tested for synergistic inhibition in the presence of caffeine, the Dixon plots of reciprocal velocity versus PUG concentration at different fixed caffeine concentrations provided intersecting lines with interaction constant (alpha) values of 0.95-1.38, indicating that the binding of one inhibitor is not significantly affected by the binding of the other. For glycogen phosphorolysis, PUG was noncompetitive with respect to phosphate, suggesting that it can bind to the central enzyme-AMP-glycogen-phosphate complex. PUG was shown to inhibit phosphorylase alpha (without AMP) activity (Ki = 0.43 mM) in a manner similar to that of the b form. However, in the presence of AMP, PUG exhibited complex kinetics, acting as a noncompetitive inhibitor with respect to glucose-1-P, while a twofold decrease of PUG binding to the enzyme-AMP-glycogen complex was observed. Ultracentrifugation experiments demonstrated that PUG does not cause any significant dissociation of phosphorylase alpha tetramer. Furthermore the dimerization of phosphorylase alpha by glucose is completely prevented in the presence of PUG. These observations are consistent with PUG binding to both the

  20. Deficient activity of dephosphophosphorylase kinase and accumulation of glycogen in the liver

    PubMed Central

    Hug, George; Schubert, William K.; Chuck, Gail

    1969-01-01

    Low activity of phosphorylase and increased concentration of glycogen were found in liver tissue from five children with asymptomatic hepatomegaly. In vitro activation of liver phosphorylase in these patients occurred at the rate of 10% or less of normal. Elimination of the defect by the addition of kinase that activates phosphorylase demonstrated the integrity of the phosphorylase enzyme and the deficient activity of dephophophosphorylase kinase. On the average, 60% of the phosphorylase enzyme of normal human liver was in the active form. Phosphorylase kinase of rabbit muscle activated phosphorylase of normal human liver to a final value that was significantly higher than the one obtained in the absence of muscle phosphorylase kinase. The ultrastructural examination of hepatic tissue from the five patients revealed increased amounts of glycogen. There was scarcity of endoplasmic reticulum. There was intercellular glycogen in continuity with the glycogen of the hepatocytes through breaks in their circumference. Lipid droplets with lucid areas in the form of needles and plates contained aggregates of glycogen. There were numerous lysosomes, some containing glycogen. Large vacuoles filled with glycogen and surrounded by a membrane were seen occasionally. The vacuoles might reflect the lysosomal pathway of glycogen degradation, since there was apparent fusion of such autophagic vacuoles with small vesicles resembling primary lysosomes. Images PMID:5774108

  1. The 1.76 A resolution crystal structure of glycogen phosphorylase B complexed with glucose, and CP320626, a potential antidiabetic drug.

    PubMed

    Oikonomakos, Nikos G; Zographos, Spyros E; Skamnaki, Vicky T; Archontis, Georgios

    2002-05-01

    CP320626, a potential antidiabetic drug, inhibits glycogen phosphorylase in synergism with glucose. To elucidate the structural basis of synergistic inhibition, we determined the structure of muscle glycogen phosphorylase b (MGPb) complexed with both glucose and CP320626 at 1.76 A resolution, and refined to a crystallographic R value of 0.211 (R(free)=0.235). CP320626 binds at a novel allosteric site, which is some 33 A from the catalytic site, where glucose binds. The high resolution structure allows unambiguous definition of the conformation of the 1-acetyl-4-hydroxy-piperidine ring supported by theoretical energy calculations. Both CP320626 and glucose promote the less active T-state, thereby explaining their synergistic inhibition. Structural comparison of MGPb--glucose--CP320626 complex with liver glycogen phosphorylase a (LGPa) complexed with a related compound (CP403700) show that the ligand binding site is conserved in LGPa. PMID:11886794

  2. Immunological detection of degradation intermediates of skeletal-muscle glycogen phosphorylase in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Cookson, E J; Flannery, A V; Cidlowski, J A; Beynon, R J

    1992-01-01

    Over 95% of the pyridoxal phosphate (PLP) in skeletal is bound to one protein, glycogen phosphorylase. This, and the fact that phosphorylase constitutes approx. 5% of the soluble protein in skeletal muscle, introduce the possibility that PLP might be used as a specific label to identify degradation intermediates of the enzyme. In this investigation, we have developed immunological methods, using a monoclonal antibody to PLP and polyclonal antibodies to phosphorylase, to detect degradation intermediates in vitro and in vivo. We have identified a family of degradation intermediates of glycogen phosphorylase in the high-speed-supernatant fraction of mouse skeletal muscle. These peptides react with both types of antibodies and are in the size and concentration range expected for degradation intermediates in a model in which the committed step is followed by rapid clearance of the products. Changes in amounts of degradation intermediates are examined in physiological or pathological conditions in which the rate of degradation of phosphorylase is altered. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:1445274

  3. The effect of glucose on the potency of two distinct glycogen phosphorylase inhibitors.

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Birgitte; Westergaard, Niels

    2002-01-01

    Two distinct glycogen phosphorylase inhibitors, 5-chloro-1H-indole-2-carboxylic acid [1-(4-fluorobenzyl)-2-(4-hydroxy-piperidin-1-yl)-2-oxoethyl]amide (CP-320,626) and 1,4-dideoxy-1,4-D-arabinitol (DAB), were characterized in vitro with respect to the influence of glucose on their potencies. CP-320,626 has previously been shown to bind to a newly characterized indole site, whereas DAB seems to act as a glucose analogue, but with slightly different properties from those of glucose. When analysed in pig liver glycogen phosphorylase a (GPa) activity assays, the two inhibitors showed very different properties. When GPa activity was measured in the physiological direction (glycogenolysis), DAB was the most potent inhibitor with an IC(50) value of 740+/-9 nM compared with the IC(50) value for CP-320-626 of 2.39+/-0.37 microM. There was no effect of glucose on the inhibitory properties of DAB, whereas a glucose analogue N-acetyl-beta-D-glucopyranosylamine (1-GlcNAc) antagonized the effect of DAB. Likewise, there was no synergistic effect of CP-320,626 and glucose, whereas CP-320,626 and 1-GlcNAc inhibited GPa in synergy. Moreover, the synergistic effect of glucose and CP-320,626 was GPa-isoform-specific, since CP-320,626 and glucose inhibited rabbit muscle GPa in synergy when the GPa activity was measured towards glycogenolysis. When GPa activity was measured towards glycogen synthesis, CP-320,626 showed a synergistic effect with glucose, whereas the effect of DAB was slightly antagonized by glucose in this assay direction. Caffeine was included in the investigation as a control GP inhibitor, and both glucose and 1-GlcNAc potentiated the effect of caffeine independent of the assay direction. In primary cultured rat hepatocytes 1-GlcNAc and CP-320,626 inhibited basal and glucagon-induced glycogenolysis in synergy, whereas the ability of DAB to inhibit basal or glucagon-induced glycogenolysis was unaltered by 1-GlcNAc. Glucose had no effect on either CP-320,626 or DAB

  4. Donor substrate specificity of 4-alpha-glucanotransferase of porcine liver glycogen debranching enzyme and complementary action to glycogen phosphorylase on debranching.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Yumiko; Makino, Yasushi; Omichi, Kaoru

    2008-03-01

    Glycogen debranching enzyme (GDE) has both 4-alpha-glucanotransferase and amylo-alpha-1,6-glucosidase activities. Here, we examined 4-alpha-glucanotransferase action of porcine liver GDE on four 6(4)-O-alpha-maltooligosyl-pyridylamino(PA)-maltooctaoses, in the presence or absence of an acceptor, maltohexaose. HPLC analysis of digested fluorogenic branched dextrins revealed that in the presence or absence of acceptor, 6(4)-O-alpha-glucosyl-PA-maltooctaose (B4/81) was liberated from 6(4)-O-alpha-maltopentaosyl-PA-maltooctaose (B4/85), 6(4)-O-alpha-maltotetraosyl-PA-maltooctaose (B4/84) and 6(4)-O-alpha-maltotriosyl-PA-maltooctaose (B4/83), whereas 6(4)-O-alpha-maltosyl-PA-maltooctaose (B4/82) was resistant to the enzyme. The fluorogenic product was further hydrolyzed by amylo-alpha-1,6-glucosidase to PA-maltooctaose (G8PA) and glucose. The ratio of the rates of 4-alpha-glucanotransferase actions on B4/85, B4/84 and B4/83 in the absence of the acceptor was 0.15, 0.42 and 1.00, respectively. The rates increased with increasing amounts of acceptor, changing the ratio of the rates to 0.09, 1.00 and 0.60 (with 0.5 mM maltohexaose) and 0.10, 1.00 and 0.58 (with 1.0 mM maltohexaose), respectively. Donor substrate specificity of GDE 4-alpha-glucanotransferase suggests complementary action of GDE and glycogen phosphorylase on glycogen degradation in the porcine liver. Glycogen phosphorylase degrades the maltooligosaccharide branches of glycogen by phosphorolysis to form maltotetraosyl branches, and phosphorolysis does not proceed further. GDE 4-alpha-glucanotransferase removes a maltotriosyl residue from the maltotetraosyl branch such that the alpha-1,6-linked glucosyl residue is retained. PMID:18174188

  5. The binding of 2-deoxy-D-glucose 6-phosphate to glycogen phosphorylase b: kinetic and crystallographic studies.

    PubMed

    Oikonomakos, N G; Zographos, S E; Johnson, L N; Papageorgiou, A C; Acharya, K R

    1995-12-15

    Kinetic and crystallographic studies have characterized the effect of 2-deoxy-glucose 6-phosphate on the catalytic and structural properties of glycogen phosphorylase b. Previous work on the binding of glucose 6-phosphate, a potent physiological inhibitor of the enzyme, to T state phosphorylase b in the crystal showed that the inhibitor binds at the allosteric site and induces substantial conformational changes that affect the subunit-subunit interface. The hydrogen-bond from the O-2 hydroxyl of glucose 6-phosphate to the main-chain oxygen of Val40' represents the only hydrogen bond from the sugar to the other subunit, and this interaction appears important for promoting a more "tensed" structure than native T state phosphorylase b. 2-Deoxy-glucose 6-phosphate acts competitively with both the activator AMP and the substrate glucose 1-phosphate, with Ki values of 0.53 mM and 1.23 mM, respectively. The binding of 2-deoxy-glucose 6-phosphate to T state glycogen phosphorylase b in the crystal, has been investigated and the complex phosphorylase b: 2-deoxy-glucose 6-phosphate has been refined to give a crystallographic R factor of 17.3%, for data between 8 A and 2.3 A. 2-Deoxy-glucose 6-phosphate binds at the allosteric site as the a anomer and adopts a different conformation compared to glucose 6-phosphate. The two conformations differ by 160 degrees in the torsion angle about the C-5-C-6 bond. The contacts from the phosphate group are essentially identical to those made by the phosphate of glucose 6-phosphate but the 2-deoxy glucosyl moiety binds in a quite different orientation compared to the glucosyl of glucose 6-phosphate. 2-Deoxy-glucose 6-phosphate can be accommodated in the allosteric site with very little change in the protein, while structural comparisons show that the phosphorylase b: 2-deoxy-glucose 6-phosphate complex structure is overall more similar to a glucose-like complex than to the Glc-6-P complex structure. PMID:7500360

  6. Regulation of the Dictyostelium glycogen phosphorylase 2 gene by cyclic AMP.

    PubMed

    Sucic, J F; Selmin, O; Rutherford, C L

    1993-01-01

    A crucial developmental event in the cellular slime mold, Dictyostelium discoideum, is glycogen degradation. The enzyme that catalyzes this degradation, glycogen phosphorylase 2 (gp-2), is developmentally regulated and cAMP appears to be involved in this regulation. We have examined several aspects of the cAMP regulation of gp-2. We show that addition of exogenous cAMP to aggregation competent amoebae induced the appearance of gp-2 mRNA. The induction of gp-2 mRNA occurred within 1 and 1.5 h after the initial exposure to cAMP. Exposure to exogenous cAMP concentrations as low as 1.0 microM could induce gp-2 mRNA. We also examined the molecular mechanism through which cAMP induction of gp-2 occurs. Induction of gp-2 appears to result from a mechanism that does not require intracellular cAMP signaling, and may occur directly through a cAMP binding protein without the requirement of any intracellular signalling. We also examined the promoter region of the gp-2 gene for cis-acting elements that are involved in the cAMP regulation of gp-2. A series of deletions of the promoter were fused to a luciferase reporter gene and then analyzed for cAMP responsiveness. The results indicated that a region from -258 nucleotides to the transcriptional start site is sufficient for essentially full activity and appears to carry all necessary cis-acting sites for cAMP induction. Further deletion of 58 nucleotides from the 5' end, results in fivefold less activity in the presence of cAMP. Deletion of the next 104 nucleotides eliminates the cAMP response entirely. PMID:8222346

  7. Glucose-based spiro-isoxazolines: a new family of potent glycogen phosphorylase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Benltifa, Mahmoud; Hayes, Joseph M; Vidal, Sébastien; Gueyrard, David; Goekjian, Peter G; Praly, Jean-Pierre; Kizilis, Gregory; Tiraidis, Costas; Alexacou, Kyra-Melinda; Chrysina, Evangelia D; Zographos, Spyros E; Leonidas, Demetres D; Archontis, Georgios; Oikonomakos, Nikos G

    2009-10-15

    A series of glucopyranosylidene-spiro-isoxazolines was prepared through regio- and stereoselective [3+2]-cycloaddition between the methylene acetylated exo-glucal and aromatic nitrile oxides. The deprotected cycloadducts were evaluated as inhibitors of muscle glycogen phosphorylase b. The carbohydrate-based family of five inhibitors displays K(i) values ranging from 0.63 to 92.5 microM. The X-ray structures of the enzyme-ligand complexes show that the inhibitors bind preferentially at the catalytic site of the enzyme retaining the less active T-state conformation. Docking calculations with GLIDE in extra-precision (XP) mode yielded excellent agreement with experiment, as judged by comparison of the predicted binding modes of the five ligands with the crystallographic conformations and the good correlation between the docking scores and the experimental free binding energies. Use of docking constraints on the well-defined positions of the glucopyranose moiety in the catalytic site and redocking of GLIDE-XP poses using electrostatic potential fit-determined ligand partial charges in quantum polarized ligand docking (QPLD) produced the best results in this regard. PMID:19781947

  8. Iminosugars as potential inhibitors of glycogenolysis: structural insights into the molecular basis of glycogen phosphorylase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Oikonomakos, Nikos G; Tiraidis, Costas; Leonidas, Demetres D; Zographos, Spyros E; Kristiansen, Marit; Jessen, Claus U; Nørskov-Lauritsen, Leif; Agius, Loranne

    2006-09-21

    Iminosugars DAB (5), isofagomine (9), and several N-substituted derivatives have been identified as potent inhibitors of liver glycogen phosphorylase a (IC(50) = 0.4-1.2 microM) and of basal and glucagon-stimulated glycogenolysis (IC(50) = 1-3 microM). The X-ray structures of 5, 9, and its N-3-phenylpropyl analogue 8 in complex with rabbit muscle glycogen phosphorylase (GPb) shows that iminosugars bind tightly at the catalytic site in the presence of the substrate phosphate and induce conformational changes that characterize the R-state conformation of the enzyme. Charged nitrogen N1 is within hydrogen-bonding distance with the carbonyl oxygen of His377 (5) and in ionic contact with the substrate phosphate oxygen (8 and 9). Our findings suggest that the inhibitors function as oxocarbenium ion transition-state analogues. The conformational change to the R state provides an explanation for previous findings that 5, unlike inhibitors that favor the T state, promotes phosphorylation of GPb in hepatocytes with sequential inactivation of glycogen synthase. PMID:16970395

  9. C-Glucopyranosyl-1,2,4-triazol-5-ones: synthesis and inhibition of glycogen phosphorylase.

    PubMed

    Bokor, Éva; Széles, Zsolt; Docsa, Tibor; Gergely, Pál; Somsák, László

    2016-06-24

    Various C-glucopyranosyl-1,2,4-triazolones were designed as potential inhibitors of glycogen phosphorylase. Syntheses of these compounds were performed with O-perbenzoylated glucose derivatives as precursors. High temperature ring closure of N(1)-carbamoyl-C-β-D-glucopyranosyl formamidrazone gave 3-β-D-glucopyranosyl-1,2,4-triazol-5-one. Reaction of N(1)-tosyl-C-β-D-glucopyranosyl formamidrazone with ClCOOEt furnished 3-β-D-glucopyranosyl-1-tosyl-1,2,4-triazol-5-one. In situ prepared β-D-glucopyranosylcarbonyl isocyanate was transformed by PhNHNHBoc into 3-β-D-glucopyranosyl-1-phenyl-1,2,4-triazol-5-one, while the analogous 1-(2-naphthyl) derivative was obtained from the unsubstituted triazolone by naphthalene-2-boronic acid in a Cu(II) catalyzed N-arylation. Test compounds were prepared by Zemplén deacylation. The new glucose derivatives had weak or no inhibition of rabbit muscle glycogen phosphorylase b: the best inhibitor was 3-β-D-glucopyranosyl-1-(2-naphthyl)-1,2,4-triazol-5-one (Ki = 80 µM). PMID:26818133

  10. A solid-state 31P-NMR investigation of the allosteric transition in glycogen phosphorylase b.

    PubMed Central

    Challoner, R; McDowell, C A; Stirtan, W; Withers, S G

    1993-01-01

    The catalytic role of the cofactor phosphate moiety at the active site of glycogen phosphorylase has been the subject of many investigations including solution-state high-resolution 31P-NMR studies. In this study the pyridoxal phosphate moiety in both the inactive and active forms of microcrystalline phosphorylase b has been investigated by high-resolution 31P magic-angle spinning NMR. The symmetry of the shielding tensor in model compounds at varying degrees of ionization is investigated and the results indicate a marked difference between the dianionic and monoanionic model compounds. Consequently the observed similarity in the principal tensor components describing the shielding tensor of the phosphorus nuclei present at the active site of both the R- and T-state conformations suggests that there is no change in ionization site upon activation in contrast to suggestions based upon isotropic shifts. Since previous relaxation measurements have pointed to the need to consider motional influences in such systems, several plausible models are considered. Subject to the assumption of congruency between the principal axis system describing the shielding interaction and molecular frame determined by the molecular symmetry axes, we conclude that the phosphate cofactor is dianionic in both forms. PMID:8457672

  11. Properties of a glycogen like polysaccharide produced by a mutant of Escherichia coli lacking glycogen synthase and maltodextrin phosphorylase.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Ji-Yun; Kim, Min-Gyu; Kim, Young-Wan; Ban, Hyun-Seung; Won, Mi-Sun; Park, Jong-Tae; Park, Kwan-Hwa

    2016-01-20

    Escherichia coli mutant TBP38 lacks glycogen synthase (GlgA) and maltodextrin phosphorylase (MalP). When grown on maltose in fed-batch fermentation TBP38 accumulated more than 50-fold higher glycogen-type polysaccharide than its parental strain. The polysaccharides were extracted at different growth stages and migrated as one peak in size-exclusion chromatography. TBP38 produced polysaccharides ranging 2.6 × 10(6)-4.6 × 10(6)Da. A ratio of short side-chains (DP ≦ 12) in the polysaccharides was greater than 50%, and number-average degree of polymerization varied from 9.8 to 8.4. The polysaccharides showed 70-290 times greater water-solubility than amylopectin. Km values using porcine and human pancreatic α-amylases with polysaccharides were 2- to 4-fold larger than that of amylopectin. kcat values were similar for both α-amylases. The TBP38 polysaccharides had 40-60% lower digestibility to amyloglucosidase than amylopectin. Intriguingly, the polysaccharides showed strong immunostimulating effects on mouse macrophage cell comparable to lipopolysaccharides. The lipopolysaccharide contamination levels were too low to account for this effect. PMID:26572397

  12. Homology between O-linked GlcNAc transferases and proteins of the glycogen phosphorylase superfamily.

    PubMed

    Wrabl, J O; Grishin, N V

    2001-11-30

    The O-linked GlcNAc transferases (OGTs) are a recently characterized group of largely eukaryotic enzymes that add a single beta-N-acetylglucosamine moiety to specific serine or threonine hydroxyls. In humans, this process may be part of a sugar regulation mechanism or cellular signaling pathway that is involved in many important diseases, such as diabetes, cancer, and neurodegeneration. However, no structural information about the human OGT exists, except for the identification of tetratricopeptide repeats (TPR) at the N terminus. The locations of substrate binding sites are unknown and the structural basis for this enzyme's function is not clear. Here, remote homology is reported between the OGTs and a large group of diverse sugar processing enzymes, including proteins with known structure such as glycogen phosphorylase, UDP-GlcNAc 2-epimerase, and the glycosyl transferase MurG. This relationship, in conjunction with amino acid similarity spanning the entire length of the sequence, implies that the fold of the human OGT consists of two Rossmann-like domains C-terminal to the TPR region. A conserved motif in the second Rossmann domain points to the UDP-GlcNAc donor binding site. This conclusion is supported by a combination of statistically significant PSI-BLAST hits, consensus secondary structure predictions, and a fold recognition hit to MurG. Additionally, iterative PSI-BLAST database searches reveal that proteins homologous to the OGTs form a large and diverse superfamily that is termed GPGTF (glycogen phosphorylase/glycosyl transferase). Up to one-third of the 51 functional families in the CAZY database, a glycosyl transferase classification scheme based on catalytic residue and sequence homology considerations, can be unified through this common predicted fold. GPGTF homologs constitute a substantial fraction of known proteins: 0.4% of all non-redundant sequences and about 1% of proteins in the Escherichia coli genome are found to belong to the GPGTF

  13. Neurons have an active glycogen metabolism that contributes to tolerance to hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Saez, Isabel; Duran, Jordi; Sinadinos, Christopher; Beltran, Antoni; Yanes, Oscar; Tevy, María F; Martínez-Pons, Carlos; Milán, Marco; Guinovart, Joan J

    2014-01-01

    Glycogen is present in the brain, where it has been found mainly in glial cells but not in neurons. Therefore, all physiologic roles of brain glycogen have been attributed exclusively to astrocytic glycogen. Working with primary cultured neurons, as well as with genetically modified mice and flies, here we report that—against general belief—neurons contain a low but measurable amount of glycogen. Moreover, we also show that these cells express the brain isoform of glycogen phosphorylase, allowing glycogen to be fully metabolized. Most importantly, we show an active neuronal glycogen metabolism that protects cultured neurons from hypoxia-induced death and flies from hypoxia-induced stupor. Our findings change the current view of the role of glycogen in the brain and reveal that endogenous neuronal glycogen metabolism participates in the neuronal tolerance to hypoxic stress. PMID:24569689

  14. Liver glycogen storage diseases due to phosphorylase system deficiencies: diagnosis thanks to non invasive blood enzymatic and molecular studies.

    PubMed

    Davit-Spraul, Anne; Piraud, Monique; Dobbelaere, Dries; Valayannopoulos, Vassili; Labrune, Philippe; Habes, Dalila; Bernard, Olivier; Jacquemin, Emmanuel; Baussan, Christiane

    2011-01-01

    Glycogen storage disease (GSD) due to a deficient hepatic phosphorylase system defines a genetically heterogeneous group of disorders that mainly manifests in children. We investigated 45 unrelated children in whom a liver GSD VI or IX was suspected on the basis of clinical symptoms including hepatomegaly, increased serum transaminases, postprandial lactatemia and/or mild fasting hypoglycemia. Liver phosphorylase and phosphorylase b kinase activities studied in peripheral blood cells allowed to suspect diagnosis in 37 cases but was uninformative in 5. Sequencing of liver phosphorylase genes was useful to establish an accurate diagnosis. Causative mutations were found either in the PYGL (11 patients), PHKA2 (26 patients), PHKG2 (three patients) or in the PHKB (three patients) genes. Eleven novel disease causative mutations, five missense (p.N188K, p.D228Y, p.P382L, p.R491H, p.L500R) and six truncating mutations (c.501_502ins361pb, c.528+2T>C, c.856-29_c.1518+614del, c.1620+1G>C, p.E703del and c.2313-1G>T) were identified in the PYGL gene. Seventeen novel disease causative mutations, ten missense (p.A42P, p.Q95R, p.G131D, p.G131V, p.Q134R, p.G187R, p.G300V, p.G300A, p.C326Y, p.W820G) and seven truncating (c.537+5G>A, p.G396DfsX28, p.Q404X, p.N653X, p.L855PfsX87, and two large deletions) were identified in the PHKA2 gene. Four novel truncating mutations (p.R168X, p.Q287X, p.I268PfsX12 and c.272-1G>C) were identified in the PHKG2 gene and three (c.573_577del, p.R364X, c.2427+3A>G) in the PHKB gene. Patients with PHKG2 mutations evolved towards cirrhosis. Molecular analysis of GSD VI or IX genes allows to confirm diagnosis suspected on the basis of enzymatic analysis and to establish diagnosis and avoid liver biopsy when enzymatic studies are not informative in blood cells. PMID:21646031

  15. EXPRESSION PATTERNS OF THE GLYCOGEN PHOSPHORYLASE GENE RELATED TO LARVAL DIAPAUSE IN Ostrinia furnacalis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jianqing; Zhang, Honggang; Edwards, Martin; Wang, Zhenying; Bai, Shuxiong; He, Kanglai

    2016-04-01

    Glycogen phosphorylase (GP) acts in the first step in release of glucose from glycogen, a form of energy storage for most organisms. To investigate the characteristics and expression pattern of GP gene (Ofgp) in the Asian corn borer, Ostrinia furnacalis (Guenée), larvae, we cloned and analyzed tissue transcription of Ofgp. The results indicate that the open reading frame (ORF) is 2,526 bp, encoding 841 amino acid. The calculated three-dimensional structure shows 33 α-helices and 24 β-sheets. Ofgp transcription levels varied significantly during the second to fifth instars under long-day (28 °C, 16:8 L:D photoperiod, and 70-80% relative humidity (RH)) and short-day (24.5 °C, 11:13 L:D photoperiod, and 70-80% RH) conditions, remained low during the prediapause phase, and then increased after about 36 d under short-day photoperiod. In the larvae reared under long-day condition, hemolymph ranked the highest in the transcript level of Ofgp. The highest transcription was recorded in the fat body and was lower in the other tissues in larvae reared under short-day condition. We found that Ofgp transcription increased linearly from October 2012 to January 2013. The transcript level was negatively correlated with environmental temperature. We infer the higher Ofgp transcription may enhance the cold hardiness of the diapause larvae. PMID:26748939

  16. Kinetic and crystallographic studies of glucopyranose spirohydantoin and glucopyranosylamine analogs inhibitors of glycogen phosphorylase.

    PubMed

    Watson, Kimberly A; Chrysina, Evangelia D; Tsitsanou, Katerina E; Zographos, Spyros E; Archontis, Georgios; Fleet, George W J; Oikonomakos, Nikos G

    2005-12-01

    Glycogen phosphorylase (GP) is currently exploited as a target for inhibition of hepatic glycogenolysis under high glucose conditions. Spirohydantoin of glucopyranose and N-acetyl-beta-D-glucopyranosylamine have been identified as the most potent inhibitors of GP that bind at the catalytic site. Four spirohydantoin and three beta-D-glucopyranosylamine analogs have been designed, synthesized and tested for inhibition of GP in kinetic experiments. Depending on the functional group introduced, the K(i) values varied from 16.5 microM to 1200 microM. In order to rationalize the kinetic results, we determined the crystal structures of the analogs in complex with GP. All the inhibitors bound at the catalytic site of the enzyme, by making direct and water-mediated hydrogen bonds with the protein and by inducing minor movements of the side chains of Asp283 and Asn284, of the 280s loop that blocks access of the substrate glycogen to the catalytic site, and changes in the water structure in the vicinity of the site. The differences observed in the Ki values of the analogs can be interpreted in terms of variations in hydrogen bonding and van der Waals interactions, desolvation effects, ligand conformational entropy, and displacement of water molecules on ligand binding to the catalytic site. PMID:16222658

  17. Glycogen Phosphorylase in Acanthamoeba spp.: Determining the Role of the Enzyme during the Encystment Process Using RNA Interference▿

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzo-Morales, Jacob; Kliescikova, Jarmila; Martinez-Carretero, Enrique; De Pablos, Luis Miguel; Profotova, Bronislava; Nohynkova, Eva; Osuna, Antonio; Valladares, Basilio

    2008-01-01

    Acanthamoeba infections are difficult to treat due to often late diagnosis and the lack of effective and specific therapeutic agents. The most important reason for unsuccessful therapy seems to be the existence of a double-wall cyst stage that is highly resistant to the available treatments, causing reinfections. The major components of the Acanthamoeba cyst wall are acid-resistant proteins and cellulose. The latter has been reported to be the major component of the inner cyst wall. It has been demonstrated previously that glycogen is the main source of free glucose for the synthesis of cellulose in Acanthamoeba, partly as glycogen levels fall during the encystment process. In other lower eukaryotes (e.g., Dictyostelium discoideum), glycogen phosphorylase has been reported to be the main tool used for glycogen breakdown in order to maintain the free glucose levels during the encystment process. Therefore, it was hypothesized that the regulation of the key processes involved in the Acanthamoeba encystment may be similar to the previously reported regulation mechanisms in other lower eukaryotes. The catalytic domain of the glycogen phosphorylase was silenced using RNA interference methods, and the effect of this phenomenon was assessed by light and electron microscopy analyses, calcofluor staining, expression zymogram assays, and Northern and Western blot analyses of both small interfering RNA-treated and control cells. The present report establishes the role of glycogen phosphorylase during the encystment process of Acanthamoeba. Moreover, the obtained results demonstrate that the enzyme is required for cyst wall assembly, mainly for the formation of the cell wall inner layer. PMID:18223117

  18. Contributions of Glycogen to Astrocytic Energetics during Brain Activation

    PubMed Central

    Dienel, Gerald A.; Cruz, Nancy F.

    2014-01-01

    Glycogen is the major store of glucose in brain and is mainly in astrocytes. Brain glycogen levels in unstimulated, carefully-handled rats are 10-12 mol/g, and assuming that astrocytes account for half the brain mass, astrocytic glycogen content is twice as high. Glycogen turnover is slow under basal conditions, but it is mobilized during activation. There is no net increase in incorporation of label from glucose during activation, whereas label release from pre-labeled glycogen exceeds net glycogen consumption, which increases during stronger stimuli. Because glycogen level is restored by non-oxidative metabolism, astrocytes can influence the global ratio of oxygen to glucose utilization. Compensatory increases in utilization of blood glucose during inhibition of glycogen phosphorylase are large and approximate glycogenolysis rates during sensory stimulation. In contrast, glycogenolysis rates during hypoglycemia are low due to continued glucose delivery and oxidation of endogenous substrates; rates that preserve neuronal function in the absence of glucose are also low, probably due to metabolite oxidation. Modeling studies predict that glycogenolysis maintains a high level of glucose-6-phosphate in astrocytes to maintain feedback inhibition of hexokinase, thereby diverting glucose for use by neurons. The fate of glycogen carbon in vivo is not known, but lactate efflux from brain best accounts for the major metabolic characteristics during activation of living brain. Substantial shuttling coupled with oxidation of glycogen-derived lactate is inconsistent with available evidence. Glycogen has important roles in astrocytic energetics, including glucose sparing, control of extracellular K+ level, oxidative stress management, and memory consolidation; it is a multi-functional compound. PMID:24515302

  19. The binding of D-gluconohydroximo-1,5-lactone to glycogen phosphorylase. Kinetic, ultracentrifugation and crystallographic studies.

    PubMed Central

    Papageorgiou, A C; Oikonomakos, N G; Leonidas, D D; Bernet, B; Beer, D; Vasella, A

    1991-01-01

    Combined kinetic, ultracentrifugation and X-ray-crystallographic studies have characterized the effect of the beta-glucosidase inhibitor gluconohydroximo-1,5-lactone on the catalytic and structural properties of glycogen phosphorylase. In the direction of glycogen synthesis, gluconohydroximo-1,5-lactone was found to competitively inhibit both the b (Ki 0.92 mM) and the alpha form of the enzyme (Ki 0.76 mM) with respect to glucose 1-phosphate in synergism with caffeine. In the direction of glycogen breakdown, gluconohydroximo-1,5-lactone was found to inhibit phosphorylase b in a non-competitive mode with respect to phosphate, and no synergism with caffeine could be demonstrated. Ultracentrifugation and crystallization experiments demonstrated that gluconohydroximo-1,5-lactone was able to induce dissociation of tetrameric phosphorylase alpha and stabilization of the dimeric T-state conformation. A crystallographic binding study with 100 mM-gluconohydroximo-1,5-lactone at 0.24 nm (2.4 A) resolution showed a major peak at the catalytic site, and no significant conformational changes were observed. Analysis of the electron-density map indicated that the ligand adopts a chair conformation. The results are discussed with reference to the ability of the catalytic site of the enzyme to distinguish between two or more conformations of the glucopyranose ring. PMID:1900987

  20. Checking for reversibility of aggregation of UV-irradiated glycogen phosphorylase b under crowding conditions.

    PubMed

    Eronina, Tatiana B; Mikhaylova, Valeriya V; Chebotareva, Natalia A; Makeeva, Valentina F; Kurganov, Boris I

    2016-05-01

    It is believed that the initial stages of protein aggregation are reversible and can be reversed by simple dilution, whereas prolonged exposure to factors responsible for denaturing proteins (for example, to elevated temperatures) results in the formation of irreversible aggregates. A new approach has been developed to discriminate the stage of the formation of reversible aggregates. Aggregation of UV-irradiated glycogen phosphorylase b (UV-Phb) was studied at 10, 25 and 37°C in the presence of crowders (polyethylene glycol and Ficoll-70) using dynamic light scattering and analytical ultracentrifugation (pH 6.8; 0.1M NaCl). The dilution of the protein solution in the course of aggregation at 10°C results in the breakdown of protein aggregates suggesting that the aggregation process is reversible. When aggregation of UV-Phb is studied at 37°C, reversibility is lacking. Chemical chaperones (arginine, proline) induce the breakdown of protein aggregates of UV-Phb formed at 10°C. In the experiments carried out at 37°C in the presence of crowder the addition of arginine results in disintegration of protein aggregates only at early stages of the aggregation process. It is assumed that general pathway of protein aggregation includes the formation of reversible, completely dissociable, partly dissociable and irreversible aggregates. PMID:26853826

  1. Mastoparan binds to glycogen phosphorylase to regulate sarcoplasmic reticular Ca2+ release in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Hirata, Yutaka; Atsumi, Masanori; Ohizumi, Yasushi; Nakahata, Norimichi

    2003-01-01

    The ryanodine receptor, a Ca(2+)-releasing channel in sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), plays an important role in the excitation-contraction coupling of skeletal muscle. In a previous study [Hirata, Nakahata and Ohizumi (2000) Mol. Pharmacol. 57, 1235-1242], we reported that mastoparan caused Ca(2+) release through ryanodine receptor from the heavy fraction of SR (HSR) isolated from rabbit skeletal muscle, and that it specifically bound to a 97 kDa protein which was distinct from Ca(2+)-pump or triadin. The present study was undertaken to identify and characterize the 97 kDa mastoparan-binding protein. The 97 kDa protein was purified from solubilized HSR by DEAE-Sepharose column chromatography and preparative SDS/PAGE. The partial amino acid sequence of the purified 97 kDa protein was matched with that of glycogen phosphorylase (GP). The proteolytic cleavage pattern of the 97 kDa protein was identical with that of GP. Furthermore, [(125)I-Tyr(3)]mastoparan specifically bound to GP. Interestingly, mastoparan-induced Ca(2+) release was inhibited by exogenous addition of GP-a, and mastoparan dissociated GP from HSR. These results indicate that the 97 kDa mastoparan-binding protein is GP, which negatively regulates Ca(2+) release from HSR. There may be a functional cross-talk between Ca(2+) release from HSR and glycogenolysis for energy supply mediated through GP in skeletal muscles. PMID:12519071

  2. Phosphorylation of McArdle phosphorylase induces activity.

    PubMed Central

    Cerri, C G; Willner, J H

    1981-01-01

    In McArdle disease, myophosphorylase deficiency, enzyme activity is absent but the presence of an altered enzyme protein can frequently be demonstrated. We have found that phosphorylation of this protein in vitro can result in catalytic activity. We studied muscle of four patients; all lacked myophosphorylase activity, but myophosphorylase protein was demonstrated by immunodiffusion or gel electrophoresis. Incubation of muscle homogenate supernatants with cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase and ATP resulted in phosphorylase activity. The activated enzyme comigrated with normal human myophosphorylase in gel electrophoresis. Incubation with [gamma-32P]ATP resulted in incorporatin of 32P into the band possessing phosphorylase activity. Activation of phosphorylase by cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase was inhibited by antibodies to normal human myophosphorylase or by inhibitory protein to cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase. Incubation of muscle homogenates with phosphorylase b kinase and ATP also resulted in phosphorylase activity. After the action of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase, the resulting activity was similar to that of phosphorylase b. However, incubation with phosphorylase kinase resulted in activity similar to that of phosphorylase a. For several reasons, it is not likely that McArdle disease is due to lack of normal phosphorylation, but restoration of activity to the mutant protein by phosphorylation may provide a clue to understanding the mechanism of this genetic defect. Images PMID:6265901

  3. Function of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate in glycogen phosphorylase: a model study using 6-fluoro-5'-deoxypyridoxal- and 5'-deoxypyridoxal-reconstituted enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Y.C.; Scott, R.D.; Graves, D.J.

    1987-01-27

    A new vitamin B/sub 6/ analogue, 6-fluoro-5'-deoxypyridoxal (6-FDPL), was synthesized and characterized. This analogue, as well as 6-fluoropyridoxal (6-FPAL), 6-fluoropyridoxal phosphate (6-FPLP), and 6-fluoropyridoxine, showed positive heteronuclear /sup 1/H-/sup 18/F nuclear Overhauser effects between the 5'-protons and the 6-fluorine. Apophosphorylase reconstituted with 6-FDLP showed 1% of the activity of the native enzyme in the presence of phosphite. The kinetic pattern, apparent pH optimum of activity, and the activity-temperature dependency of the 6-FDPL-enzyme were virtually identical with those of phosphorylase reconstituted with the parent compound, 6-FPAL except the K/sub m/ of phosphite toward the 6-FDPL-enzyme was 9 times higher than that with the 6-FPAL-enzyme and the 6-FDPL-enzyme showed a lower V/sub max/ value. Phosphorylase reconstituted with 5'-deoxypyridoxal (DPL) also showed activity in the presence of phosphite. The kinetics and the temperature-activity dependency of this reconstituted enzyme were investigated. /sup 19/F nuclear magnetic resonance studies showed that the binding of glucose 1-phosphate to a 6-FDPL-enzyme-adenosine 5'-phosphate (AMP) complex shifted the /sup 19/F signal 0.6 ppm upfield, whereas a 2.1 ppm change was observed when the 6-FPAL-enzyme-AMP formed a complex with glucose 1-phosphate. Analysis of the activation parameters, activation enthalpy and activation entropy, of the reaction of glycogen degradation catalyzed by phosphorylase containing pyridoxal phosphate, 6-FDPL, pyridoxal, or DPL showed that modifications of the coenzyme molecule affected only the activation entropy, not the activation enthalpy. Results of this study indicate that the protein structure surrounding the coenzyme molecule, as well as the coenzyme configuration, is altered upon the binding of ligands.

  4. Glucose analogue inhibitors of glycogen phosphorylase: from crystallographic analysis to drug prediction using GRID force-field and GOLPE variable selection.

    PubMed

    Watson, K A; Mitchell, E P; Johnson, L N; Cruciani, G; Son, J C; Bichard, C J; Fleet, G W; Oikonomakos, N G; Kontou, M; Zographos, S E

    1995-07-01

    Several inhibitors of the large regulatory enzyme glycogen phosphorylase (GP) have been studied in crystallographic and kinetic experiments. GP catalyses the first step in the phosphorylysis of glycogen to glucose-l-phosphate, which is utilized via glycolysis to provide energy to sustain muscle contraction and in the liver is converted to glucose. alpha-D-Glucose is a weak inhibitor of glycogen phosphorylase form b (GPb, K(i) = 1.7 mM) and acts as a physiological regulator of hepatic glycogen metabolism. Glucose binds to phosphorylase at the catalytic site and results in a conformational change that stabilizes the inactive T state of the enzyme, promoting the action of protein phosphatase 1 and stimulating glycogen synthase. It has been suggested that in the liver, glucose analogues with greater affinity for glycogen phosphorylase may result in a more effective regulatory agent. Several N-acetyl glucopyranosylamine derivatives have been synthesized and tested in a series of crystallographic and kinetic binding studies with GPb. The structural results of the bound enzyme-ligand complexes have been analysed together with the resulting affinities in an effort to understand and exploit the molecular interactions that might give rise to a better inhibitor. Comparison of the N-methylacetyl glucopyranosylamine (N-methylamide, K(i) = 0.032 mM) with the analogous beta-methylamide derivative (C-methylamide, K(i) = 0.16 mM) illustrate the importance of forming good hydrogen bonds and obtaining complementarity of van der Waals interactions. These studies also have shown that the binding modes can be unpredictable but may be rationalized with the benefit of structural data and that a buried and mixed polar/non-polar catalytic site poses problems for the systematic addition of functional groups. Together with previous studies of glucose analogue inhibitors of GPb, this work forms the basis of a training set suitable for three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity

  5. The crystal structure of Escherichia coli maltodextrin phosphorylase provides an explanation for the activity without control in this basic archetype of a phosphorylase.

    PubMed Central

    Watson, K A; Schinzel, R; Palm, D; Johnson, L N

    1997-01-01

    In animals, glycogen phosphorylase (GP) exists in an inactive (T state) and an active (R state) equilibrium that can be altered by allosteric effectors or covalent modification. In Escherichia coli, the activity of maltodextrin phosphorylase (MalP) is controlled by induction at the level of gene expression, and the enzyme exhibits no regulatory properties. We report the crystal structure of E. coli maltodextrin phosphorylase refined to 2.4 A resolution. The molecule consists of a dimer with 796 amino acids per monomer, with 46% sequence identity to the mammalian enzyme. The overall structure of MalP shows a similar fold to GP and the catalytic sites are highly conserved. However, the relative orientation of the two subunits in E. coli MalP is different from both the T and R state GP structures, and there are significant changes at the subunit-subunit interfaces. The sequence changes result in loss of each of the control sites present in rabbit muscle GP. As a result of the changes at the subunit interface, the 280s loop, which in T state GP acts as a gate to control access to the catalytic site, is held in an open conformation in MalP. The open access to the conserved catalytic site provides an explanation for the activity without control in this basic archetype of a phosphorylase. PMID:9009262

  6. The crystal structure and activity of a putative trypanosomal nucleoside phosphorylase reveal it to be a homodimeric uridine phosphorylase

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Eric T.; Mudeppa, Devaraja G.; Gillespie, J. Robert; Mueller, Natascha; Napuli, Alberto J.; Arif, Jennifer A.; Ross, Jenni; Arakaki, Tracy L.; Lauricella, Angela; DeTitta, George; Luft, Joseph; Zucker, Frank; Verlinde, Christophe L. M. J.; Fan, Erkang; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Buckner, Frederick S.; Rathod, Pradipsinh K.; Hol, Wim G. J.; Merritt, Ethan A.

    2010-01-01

    Purine nucleoside phosphorylases and uridine phosphorylases are closely related enzymes involved in purine and pyrimidine salvage, respectively, which catalyze the removal of the ribosyl moiety from nucleosides so that the nucleotide base may be recycled. Parasitic protozoa generally are incapable of de novo purine biosynthesis so the purine salvage pathway is of potential therapeutic interest. Information about pyrimidine biosynthesis in these organisms is much more limited. Though all seem to carry at least a subset of enzymes from each pathway, the dependency on de novo pyrimidine synthesis versus salvage varies from organism to organism and even from one growth stage to another. We have structurally and biochemically characterized a putative nucleoside phosphorylase from the pathogenic protozoan Trypanosoma brucei and find that it is a homodimeric uridine phosphorylase. This is the first characterization of a uridine phosphorylase from a trypanosomal source despite this activity being observed decades ago. Although this gene was broadly annotated as a putative nucleoside phosphorylase, it was widely inferred to be a purine nucleoside phosphorylase. Our characterization of this trypanosomal enzyme shows that it is possible to distinguish between purine and uridine phosphorylase activity at the sequence level based on the absence or presence of a characteristic uridine phosphorylase-specificity insert. We suggest that this recognizable feature may aid in proper annotation of the substrate specificity of enzymes in the nucleoside phosphorylase family. PMID:20070944

  7. Anthranilimide-based glycogen phosphorylase inhibitors for the treatment of type 2 diabetes: 1. Identification of 1-amino-1-cycloalkyl carboxylic acid headgroups

    SciTech Connect

    Sparks, Steven M.; Banker, Pierette; Bickett, David M.; Carter, H. Luke; Clancy, Daphne C.; Dickerson, Scott H.; Dwornik, Kate A.; Garrido, Dulce M.; Golden, Pamela L.; Nolte, Robert T.; Peat, Andrew J.; Sheckler, Lauren R.; Tavares, Francis X.; Thomson, Stephen A.; Wang, Liping; Weiel, James E.

    2009-05-15

    Optimization of the amino acid residue within a series of anthranilimide-based glycogen phosphorylase inhibitors is described. These studies culminated in the identification of anthranilimides 16 and 22 which displayed potent in vitro inhibition of GPa in addition to reduced inhibition of CYP2C9 and excellent pharmacokinetic properties.

  8. Glucose-derived spiro-isoxazolines are anti-hyperglycemic agents against type 2 diabetes through glycogen phosphorylase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Goyard, David; Kónya, Bálint; Chajistamatiou, Aikaterini S; Chrysina, Evangelia D; Leroy, Jérémy; Balzarin, Sophie; Tournier, Michel; Tousch, Didier; Petit, Pierre; Duret, Cédric; Maurel, Patrick; Somsák, László; Docsa, Tibor; Gergely, Pál; Praly, Jean-Pierre; Azay-Milhau, Jacqueline; Vidal, Sébastien

    2016-01-27

    Glycogen phosphorylase (GP) is a target for the treatment of hyperglycaemia in the context of type 2 diabetes. This enzyme is responsible for the depolymerization of glycogen into glucose thereby affecting the levels of glucose in the blood stream. Twelve new d-glucopyranosylidene-spiro-isoxazolines have been prepared from O-peracylated exo-D-glucals by regio- and stereoselective 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition of nitrile oxides generated in situ by treatment of the corresponding oximes with bleach. This mild and direct procedure appeared to be applicable to a broad range of substrates. The corresponding O-unprotected spiro-isoxazolines were evaluated as glycogen phosphorylase (GP) inhibitors and exhibited IC50 values ranging from 1 to 800 μM. Selected inhibitors were further evaluated in vitro using rat and human hepatocytes and exhibited significant inhibitory properties in the primary cell culture. Interestingly, when tested with human hepatocytes, the tetra-O-acetylated spiro-isoxazoline bearing a 2-naphthyl residue showed a much lower IC50 value (2.5 μM), compared to that of the O-unprotected analog (19.95 μM). The most promising compounds were investigated in Zucker fa/fa rat model in acute and sub-chronic assays and decreased hepatic glucose production, which is known to be elevated in type 2 diabetes. This indicates that glucose-based spiro-isoxazolines can be considered as anti-hyperglycemic agents in the context of type 2 diabetes. PMID:26708111

  9. Post-Exercise Muscle Glycogen Repletion in the Extreme: Effect of Food Absence and Active Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Fournier, Paul A.; Fairchild, Timothy J.; Ferreira, Luis D.; Bräu, Lambert

    2004-01-01

    Glycogen plays a major role in supporting the energy demands of skeletal muscles during high intensity exercise. Despite its importance, the amount of glycogen stored in skeletal muscles is so small that a large fraction of it can be depleted in response to a single bout of high intensity exercise. For this reason, it is generally recommended to ingest food after exercise to replenish rapidly muscle glycogen stores, otherwise one’s ability to engage in high intensity activity might be compromised. But what if food is not available? It is now well established that, even in the absence of food intake, skeletal muscles have the capacity to replenish some of their glycogen at the expense of endogenous carbon sources such as lactate. This is facilitated, in part, by the transient dephosphorylation-mediated activation of glycogen synthase and inhibition of glycogen phosphorylase. There is also evidence that muscle glycogen synthesis occurs even under conditions conducive to an increased oxidation of lactate post-exercise, such as during active recovery from high intensity exercise. Indeed, although during active recovery glycogen resynthesis is impaired in skeletal muscle as a whole because of increased lactate oxidation, muscle glycogen stores are replenished in Type IIa and IIb fibers while being broken down in Type I fibers of active muscles. This unique ability of Type II fibers to replenish their glycogen stores during exercise should not come as a surprise given the advantages in maintaining adequate muscle glycogen stores in those fibers that play a major role in fight or flight responses. Key Points Even in the absence of food intake, skeletal muscles have the capacity to replenish some of their glycogen at the expense of endogenous carbon sources such as lactate. During active recovery from exercise, skeletal muscles rich in type II fibers replenish part of their glycogen stores even in the absence of food intake. Post-exercise muscle glycogen synthesis in the

  10. Glycogen phosphorylase isoenzymes from hepatoma 3924A and from a non-tumorigenic liver cell line. Comparison with the liver and brain enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, D; Seelmann-Eggebert, G; Letsch, I

    1992-01-01

    Glycogen phosphorylase isoenzymes were isolated from normal rat liver, rat brain, the glycogen-poor Morris hepatoma (MH) 3924A, and the glycogen-rich non-tumorigenic liver cell line C1I. Electrophoretic and immunological characterization of the enzymes showed that tumour and C1I cells expressed a phosphorylase isoform similar to the brain type; the liver type was not detectable. All enzymes were obtained as dimers; the Mr of the subunits was 96,000 (liver), 93,000 (brain and MH 3924A) and 92,000 (C1I). Isoelectric focusing revealed a main band of pI 6.34 for liver phosphorylase a, pI 5.67 for the enzymes from MH 3924A and brain, and pI 5.68 for C1I phosphorylase. Partial kinetic characterization of the AMP-independent forms of the isoenzymes yielded Km values for glucose 1-phosphate of 3.5 +/- 0.5 mM (liver), 3.9 mM (brain), 1.9 +/- 0.3 mM (MH 3924A) and 2.5 +/- 0.5 mM (C1I); Km values for glycogen were 0.4 mM (liver) and 0.3 mM (MH 3924A and C1I), calculated as glucose equivalents. The AMP-independent phosphorylase was inhibited by glucose 6-phosphate (Glc6P) with Ki values of 0.32 +/- 0.03 mM (C1I), 0.50 +/- 0.04 mM (MH 3924A) and approximately 5 mM (brain). The inhibition could be abolished by 1 mM-AMP, indicating that AMP and Glc6P may partially compete for the same site on the protein. Liver phosphorylase a was not inhibited by up to 25 mM-Glc6P. In contrast with liver and brain isoenzymes, phosphorylase from the cell lines was not affected by NaF and Na2SO4. The data show that both the hepatocellular carcinoma and the non-malignant immortalized liver cells express a phosphorylase isoform different from the liver type. Furthermore, there is some evidence that the enzyme from MH 3924A and C1I cells is distinct from brain phosphorylase a, in spite of electrophoretic and immunological resemblance, and that this isoenzyme is subject to altered metabolic regulation. Images Fig. 2. PMID:1554349

  11. The binding of β-d-glucopyranosyl-thiosemicarbazone derivatives to glycogen phosphorylase: A new class of inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Alexacou, Kyra-Melinda; Tenchiu Deleanu, Alia-Cristina; Chrysina, Evangelia D; Charavgi, Maria-Despoina; Kostas, Ioannis D; Zographos, Spyros E; Oikonomakos, Nikos G; Leonidas, Demetres D

    2010-11-15

    Glycogen phosphorylase (GP) is a promising target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. In the process of structure based drug design for GP, a group of 15 aromatic aldehyde 4-(β-d-glucopyranosyl)thiosemicarbazones have been synthesized and evaluated as inhibitors of rabbit muscle glycogen phosphorylase b (GPb) by kinetic studies. These compounds are competitive inhibitors of GPb with respect to α-d-glucose-1-phosphate with IC(50) values ranging from 5.7 to 524.3μM. In order to elucidate the structural basis of their inhibition, the crystal structures of these compounds in complex with GPb at 1.95-2.23Å resolution were determined. The complex structures reveal that the inhibitors are accommodated at the catalytic site with the glucopyranosyl moiety at approximately the same position as α-d-glucose and stabilize the T conformation of the 280s loop. The thiosemicarbazone part of the studied glucosyl thiosemicarbazones possess a moiety derived from substituted benzaldehydes with NO(2), F, Cl, Br, OH, OMe, CF(3), or Me at the ortho-, meta- or para-position of the aromatic ring as well as a moiety derived from 4-pyridinecarboxaldehyde. These fit tightly into the β-pocket, a side channel from the catalytic site with no access to the bulk solvent. The differences in their inhibitory potency can be interpreted in terms of variations in the interactions of the aldehyde-derived moiety with protein residues in the β-pocket. In addition, 14 out of the 15 studied inhibitors were found bound at the new allosteric site of the enzyme. PMID:20947361

  12. Activator anion binding site in pyridoxal phosphorylase b: the binding of phosphite, phosphate, and fluorophosphate in the crystal.

    PubMed

    Oikonomakos, N G; Zographos, S E; Tsitsanou, K E; Johnson, L N; Acharya, K R

    1996-12-01

    It has been established that phosphate analogues can activate glycogen phosphorylase reconstituted with pyridoxal in place of the natural cofactor pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (Change YC. McCalmont T, Graves DJ. 1983. Biochemistry 22:4987-4993). Pyridoxal phosphorylase b has been studied by kinetic, ultracentrifugation, and X-ray crystallographic experiments. In solution, the catalytically active species of pyridoxal phosphorylase b adopts a conformation that is more R-state-like than that of native phosphorylase b, but an inactive dimeric species of the enzyme can be stabilized by activator phosphite in combination with the T-state inhibitor glucose. Co-crystals of pyridoxal phosphorylase b complexed with either phosphite, phosphate, or fluorophosphate, the inhibitor glucose, and the weak activator IMP were grown in space group P4(3)2(1)2, with native-like unit cell dimensions, and the structures of the complexes have been refined to give crystallographic R factors of 18.5-19.2%, for data between 8 and 2.4 A resolution. The anions bind tightly at the catalytic site in a similar but not identical position to that occupied by the cofactor 5'-phosphate group in the native enzyme (phosphorus to phosphorus atoms distance = 1.2 A). The structural results show that the structures of the pyridoxal phosphorylase b-anion-glucose-IMP complexes are overall similar to the glucose complex of native T-state phosphorylase b. Structural comparisons suggest that the bound anions, in the position observed in the crystal, might have a structural role for effective catalysis. PMID:8976550

  13. Activator anion binding site in pyridoxal phosphorylase b: the binding of phosphite, phosphate, and fluorophosphate in the crystal.

    PubMed Central

    Oikonomakos, N. G.; Zographos, S. E.; Tsitsanou, K. E.; Johnson, L. N.; Acharya, K. R.

    1996-01-01

    It has been established that phosphate analogues can activate glycogen phosphorylase reconstituted with pyridoxal in place of the natural cofactor pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (Change YC. McCalmont T, Graves DJ. 1983. Biochemistry 22:4987-4993). Pyridoxal phosphorylase b has been studied by kinetic, ultracentrifugation, and X-ray crystallographic experiments. In solution, the catalytically active species of pyridoxal phosphorylase b adopts a conformation that is more R-state-like than that of native phosphorylase b, but an inactive dimeric species of the enzyme can be stabilized by activator phosphite in combination with the T-state inhibitor glucose. Co-crystals of pyridoxal phosphorylase b complexed with either phosphite, phosphate, or fluorophosphate, the inhibitor glucose, and the weak activator IMP were grown in space group P4(3)2(1)2, with native-like unit cell dimensions, and the structures of the complexes have been refined to give crystallographic R factors of 18.5-19.2%, for data between 8 and 2.4 A resolution. The anions bind tightly at the catalytic site in a similar but not identical position to that occupied by the cofactor 5'-phosphate group in the native enzyme (phosphorus to phosphorus atoms distance = 1.2 A). The structural results show that the structures of the pyridoxal phosphorylase b-anion-glucose-IMP complexes are overall similar to the glucose complex of native T-state phosphorylase b. Structural comparisons suggest that the bound anions, in the position observed in the crystal, might have a structural role for effective catalysis. PMID:8976550

  14. Glycogen phosphorylase inhibitors: a free energy perturbation analysis of glucopyranose spirohydantoin analogues.

    PubMed

    Archontis, G; Watson, K A; Xie, Q; Andreou, G; Chrysina, E D; Zographos, S E; Oikonomakos, N G; Karplus, M

    2005-12-01

    GP catalyzes the phosphorylation of glycogen to Glc-1-P. Because of its fundamental role in the metabolism of glycogen, GP has been the target for a systematic structure-assisted design of inhibitory compounds, which could be of value in the therapeutic treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. The most potent catalytic-site inhibitor of GP identified to date is spirohydantoin of glucopyranose (hydan). In this work, we employ MD free energy simulations to calculate the relative binding affinities for GP of hydan and two spirohydantoin analogues, methyl-hydan and n-hydan, in which a hydrogen atom is replaced by a methyl- or amino group, respectively. The results are compared with the experimental relative affinities of these ligands, estimated by kinetic measurements of the ligand inhibition constants. The calculated binding affinity for methyl-hydan (relative to hydan) is 3.75 +/- 1.4 kcal/mol, in excellent agreement with the experimental value (3.6 +/- 0.2 kcal/mol). For n-hydan, the calculated value is 1.0 +/- 1.1 kcal/mol, somewhat smaller than the experimental result (2.3 +/- 0.1 kcal/mol). A free energy decomposition analysis shows that hydan makes optimum interactions with protein residues and specific water molecules in the catalytic site. In the other two ligands, structural perturbations of the active site by the additional methyl- or amino group reduce the corresponding binding affinities. The computed binding free energies are sensitive to the preference of a specific water molecule for two well-defined positions in the catalytic site. The behavior of this water is analyzed in detail, and the free energy profile for the translocation of the water between the two positions is evaluated. The results provide insights into the role of water molecules in modulating ligand binding affinities. A comparison of the interactions between a set of ligands and their surrounding groups in X-ray structures is often used in the interpretation of binding free energy

  15. Anthranilimide based glycogen phosphorylase inhibitors for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Part 3: X-ray crystallographic characterization, core and urea optimization and in vivo efficacy

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, Stephen A.; Banker, Pierette; Bickett, D. Mark; Boucheron, Joyce A.; Carter, H. Luke; Clancy, Daphne C.; Cooper, Joel P.; Dickerson, Scott H.; Garrido, Dulce M.; Nolte, Robert T.; Peat, Andrew J.; Sheckler, Lauren R.; Sparks, Steven M.; Tavares, Francis X.; Wang, Liping; Wang, Tony Y.; Weiel, James E.

    2009-05-15

    Key binding interactions of the anthranilimide based glycogen phosphorylase a (GPa) inhibitor 2 from X-ray crystallography studies are described. This series of compounds bind to the AMP site of GP. Using the binding information the core and the phenyl urea moieties were optimized. This work culminated in the identification of compounds with single nanomolar potency as well as in vivo efficacy in a diabetic model.

  16. Robust glycogen shunt activity in astrocytes: Effects of glutamatergic and adrenergic agents.

    PubMed

    Walls, A B; Heimbürger, C M; Bouman, S D; Schousboe, A; Waagepetersen, H S

    2009-01-12

    The significance and functional roles of glycogen shunt activity in the brain are largely unknown. It represents the fraction of metabolized glucose that passes through glycogen molecules prior to entering the glycolytic pathway. The present study was aimed at elucidating this pathway in cultured astrocytes from mouse exposed to agents such as a high [K+], D-aspartate and norepinephrine (NE) known to affect energy metabolism in response to neurotransmission. Glycogen shunt activity was assessed employing [1,6-13C]glucose, and the glycogen phosphorylase inhibitor 1,4-dideoxy-1,4-imino-D-arabinitol (DAB) to block glycogen degradation. The label intensity in lactate, reflecting glycolytic activity, was determined by mass spectrometry. In the presence of NE a substantial glycogen shunt activity was observed, accounting for almost 40% of overall glucose metabolism. Moreover, when no metabolic stimulant was applied, a compensatory increase in glycolytic activity was seen when the shunt was inhibited by DAB. Actually the labeling in lactate exceeded that obtained when glycolysis and glycogen shunt both were operational, i.e. supercompensation. A similar phenomenon was seen when astrocytes were exposed to D-aspartate. In addition to glycolysis, tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle activity was monitored, analyzing labeling by mass spectrometry in glutamate which equilibrates with alpha-ketoglutarate. Both an elevated [K+] and D-aspartate induced an increased TCA cycle activity, which was altered when glycogen degradation was inhibited. Thus, the present study provides evidence that manipulation of glycogen metabolism affects both glycolysis and TCA cycle metabolism. Altogether, the results reveal a highly complex interaction between glycogenolysis and glycolysis, with the glycogen shunt playing a significant role in astrocytic energy metabolism. PMID:19000744

  17. 1-(3-Deoxy-3-fluoro-beta-d-glucopyranosyl) pyrimidine derivatives as inhibitors of glycogen phosphorylase b: Kinetic, crystallographic and modelling studies.

    PubMed

    Tsirkone, Vicky G; Tsoukala, Evangelia; Lamprakis, Christos; Manta, Stella; Hayes, Joseph M; Skamnaki, Vicky T; Drakou, Christina; Zographos, Spyros E; Komiotis, Dimitri; Leonidas, Demetres D

    2010-05-15

    Design of inhibitors of glycogen phosphorylase (GP) with pharmaceutical applications in improving glycaemic control in type 2 diabetes is a promising therapeutic strategy. The catalytic site of muscle glycogen phosphorylase b (GPb) has been probed with five deoxy-fluro-glucose derivatives. These inhibitors had fluorine instead of hydroxyl at the 3' position of the glucose moiety and a variety of pyrimidine derivatives at the 1' position. The best of this carbohydrate-based family of five inhibitors displays a K(i) value of 46muM. To elucidate the mechanism of inhibition for these compounds, the crystal structures of GPb in complex with each ligand were determined and refined to high resolution. The structures demonstrated that the inhibitors bind preferentially at the catalytic site and promote the less active T state conformation of the enzyme by making several favorable contacts with residues of the 280s loop. Fluorine is engaged in hydrogen bond interactions but does not improve glucose potency. The pyrimidine groups are located between residues 284-286 of the 280s loop, Ala383 of the 380s loop, and His341 of the beta-pocket. These interactions appear important in stabilizing the inactive quaternary T state of the enzyme. As a follow up to recent computations performed on beta-d-glucose pyrimidine derivatives, tautomeric forms of ligands 1-5 were considered as potential binding states. Using Glide-XP docking and QM/MM calculations, the ligands 2 and 5 are predicted to bind in different tautomeric states in their respective GPb complexes. Also, using alpha-d-glucose as a benchmark model, a series of substitutions for glucose -OH at the 3' (equatorial) position were investigated for their potential to improve the binding affinity of glucose-based GPb catalytic site inhibitors. Glide-XP and quantum mechanics polarized ligand (QPLD-SP/XP) docking calculations revealed favorable binding at this position to be dominated by hydrogen bond contributions; none of the

  18. The σ-hole phenomenon of halogen atoms forms the structural basis of the strong inhibitory potency of C5 halogen substituted glucopyranosyl nucleosides towards glycogen phosphorylase b.

    PubMed

    Kantsadi, Anastasia L; Hayes, Joseph M; Manta, Stella; Skamnaki, Vicky T; Kiritsis, Christos; Psarra, Anna-Maria G; Koutsogiannis, Zissis; Dimopoulou, Athina; Theofanous, Stavroula; Nikoleousakos, Nikolaos; Zoumpoulakis, Panagiotis; Kontou, Maria; Papadopoulos, George; Zographos, Spyros E; Komiotis, Dimitris; Leonidas, Demetres D

    2012-04-01

    C5 halogen substituted glucopyranosyl nucleosides (1-(β-D-glucopyranosyl)-5-X-uracil; X=Cl, Br, I) have been discovered as some of the most potent active site inhibitors of glycogen phosphorylase (GP), with respective K(i) values of 1.02, 3.27, and 1.94 μM. The ability of the halogen atom to form intermolecular electrostatic interactions through the σ-hole phenomenon rather than through steric effects alone forms the structural basis of their improved inhibitory potential relative to the unsubstituted 1-(β-D-glucopyranosyl)uracil (K(i) =12.39 μM), as revealed by X-ray crystallography and modeling calculations exploiting quantum mechanics methods. Good agreement was obtained between kinetics results and relative binding affinities calculated by QM/MM-PBSA methodology for various substitutions at C5. Ex vivo experiments demonstrated that the most potent derivative (X=Cl) toward purified GP has no cytotoxicity and moderate inhibitory potency at the cellular level. In accordance, ADMET property predictions were performed, and suggest decreased polar surface areas as a potential means of improving activity in the cell. PMID:22267166

  19. N-acetyl-beta-D-glucopyranosylamine: a potent T-state inhibitor of glycogen phosphorylase. A comparison with alpha-D-glucose.

    PubMed Central

    Oikonomakos, N. G.; Kontou, M.; Zographos, S. E.; Watson, K. A.; Johnson, L. N.; Bichard, C. J.; Fleet, G. W.; Acharya, K. R.

    1995-01-01

    Structure-based drug design has led to the discovery of a number of glucose analogue inhibitors of glycogen phosphorylase that have an increased affinity compared to alpha-D-glucose (Ki = 1.7 mM). The best inhibitor in the class of N-acyl derivatives of beta-D-glucopyranosylamine, N-acetyl-beta-D-glucopyranosylamine (1-GlcNAc), has been characterized by kinetic, ultracentrifugation, and crystallographic studies. 1-GlcNAc acts as a competitive inhibitor for both the b (Ki = 32 microM) and the a (Ki = 35 microM) forms of the enzyme with respect to glucose 1-phosphate and in synergism with caffeine, mimicking the binding of glucose. Sedimentation velocity experiments demonstrated that 1-GlcNAc was able to induce dissociation of tetrameric phosphorylase a and stabilization of the dimeric T-state conformation. Co-crystals of the phosphorylase b-1-GlcNAc-IMP complex were grown in space group P4(3)2(1)2, with native-like unit cell dimensions, and the complex structure has been refined to give a crystallographic R factor of 18.1%, for data between 8 and 2.3 A resolution. 1-GlcNAc binds tightly at the catalytic site of T-state phosphorylase b at approximately the same position as that of alpha-D-glucose. The ligand can be accommodated in the catalytic site with very little change in the protein structure and stabilizes the T-state conformation of the 280s loop by making several favorable contacts to Asn 284 of this loop. Structural comparisons show that the T-state phosphorylase b-1-GlcNAc-IMP complex structure is overall similar to the T-state phosphorylase b-alpha-D-glucose complex structure. The structure of the 1-GlcNAc complex provides a rational for the biochemical properties of the inhibitor. PMID:8580837

  20. N-acetyl-beta-D-glucopyranosylamine: a potent T-state inhibitor of glycogen phosphorylase. A comparison with alpha-D-glucose.

    PubMed

    Oikonomakos, N G; Kontou, M; Zographos, S E; Watson, K A; Johnson, L N; Bichard, C J; Fleet, G W; Acharya, K R

    1995-12-01

    Structure-based drug design has led to the discovery of a number of glucose analogue inhibitors of glycogen phosphorylase that have an increased affinity compared to alpha-D-glucose (Ki = 1.7 mM). The best inhibitor in the class of N-acyl derivatives of beta-D-glucopyranosylamine, N-acetyl-beta-D-glucopyranosylamine (1-GlcNAc), has been characterized by kinetic, ultracentrifugation, and crystallographic studies. 1-GlcNAc acts as a competitive inhibitor for both the b (Ki = 32 microM) and the a (Ki = 35 microM) forms of the enzyme with respect to glucose 1-phosphate and in synergism with caffeine, mimicking the binding of glucose. Sedimentation velocity experiments demonstrated that 1-GlcNAc was able to induce dissociation of tetrameric phosphorylase a and stabilization of the dimeric T-state conformation. Co-crystals of the phosphorylase b-1-GlcNAc-IMP complex were grown in space group P4(3)2(1)2, with native-like unit cell dimensions, and the complex structure has been refined to give a crystallographic R factor of 18.1%, for data between 8 and 2.3 A resolution. 1-GlcNAc binds tightly at the catalytic site of T-state phosphorylase b at approximately the same position as that of alpha-D-glucose. The ligand can be accommodated in the catalytic site with very little change in the protein structure and stabilizes the T-state conformation of the 280s loop by making several favorable contacts to Asn 284 of this loop. Structural comparisons show that the T-state phosphorylase b-1-GlcNAc-IMP complex structure is overall similar to the T-state phosphorylase b-alpha-D-glucose complex structure. The structure of the 1-GlcNAc complex provides a rational for the biochemical properties of the inhibitor. PMID:8580837

  1. The binding of C5-alkynyl and alkylfurano[2,3-d]pyrimidine glucopyranonucleosides to glycogen phosphorylase b: synthesis, biochemical and biological assessment.

    PubMed

    Kantsadi, A L; Manta, S; Psarra, A-M G; Dimopoulou, A; Kiritsis, C; Parmenopoulou, V; Skamnaki, V T; Zoumpoulakis, P; Zographos, S E; Leonidas, D D; Komiotis, D

    2012-08-01

    C5-alkynyl and alkylfurano[2,3-d]pyrimidine glucopyranonucleosides have been synthesized and studied as inhibitors of glycogen phosphorylase b (GPb). Kinetic experiments have shown that most of these compounds were low micromolar inhibitors of the enzyme. The best inhibitor was 1-(β-D-glucopyranosyl)-5-ethynyluracil (K(i)=4.7 μM). Crystallographic analysis of these compounds in complex with GPb revealed that inhibitors with a long C5-alkynyl group exploited interactions with β-pocket of the active site and induced significant conformational changes of the 280s loop compared to GPb in complex with compounds with a short C5-alkynyl group. The results highlight the importance in the length of the aliphatic groups used to enhance inhibitory potency for the exploitation of the hydrophobic β-pocket. The best of the inhibitors had also a moderate effect on glycogenolysis in the cellular lever with an IC(50) value of 291.4 μM. PMID:22770609

  2. Structure based inhibitor design targeting glycogen phosphorylase B. Virtual screening, synthesis, biochemical and biological assessment of novel N-acyl-β-d-glucopyranosylamines.

    PubMed

    Parmenopoulou, Vanessa; Kantsadi, Anastassia L; Tsirkone, Vicky G; Chatzileontiadou, Demetra S M; Manta, Stella; Zographos, Spyros E; Molfeta, Christina; Archontis, Georgios; Agius, Loranne; Hayes, Joseph M; Leonidas, Demetres D; Komiotis, Dimitri

    2014-09-01

    Glycogen phosphorylase (GP) is a validated target for the development of new type 2 diabetes treatments. Exploiting the Zinc docking database, we report the in silico screening of 1888 N-acyl-β-d-glucopyranosylamines putative GP inhibitors differing only in their R groups. CombiGlide and GOLD docking programs with different scoring functions were employed with the best performing methods combined in a 'consensus scoring' approach to ranking of ligand binding affinities for the active site. Six selected candidates from the screening were then synthesized and their inhibitory potency was assessed both in vitro and ex vivo. Their inhibition constants' values, in vitro, ranged from 5 to 377μM while two of them were effective at causing inactivation of GP in rat hepatocytes at low μM concentrations. The crystal structures of GP in complex with the inhibitors were defined and provided the structural basis for their inhibitory potency and data for further structure based design of more potent inhibitors. PMID:25092521

  3. Regulation of locust fat-body phosphorylase

    PubMed Central

    Applebaum, S. W.; Schlesinger, H. M.

    1973-01-01

    1. Glycogen phosphorylase of locust fat-body was partially purified by differential centrifugation and dissociation from glycogen particles at two pH values. 2. Optimum activity was obtained at pH6.6–6.7. 3. The calculated apparent Km values for glycogen and glucose 1-phosphate were 0.08% and 10–13mm respectively. 4. 5′-AMP activated in the range 5μm–1mm. 5. Glucose 6-phosphate is a competitive inhibitor for the substrate glucose 1-phosphate (Ki=1.7mm). 5′-AMP abolishes this inhibition. Glucose weakly inhibits (Ki=25–30mm), but trehalose does not inhibit even at 100mm. 6. It is suggested that glucose 6-phosphate is a major regulator of glycogen phosphorylase activity in locust fat-body. PMID:4776873

  4. Glycogen supercompensation in rat soleus muscle during recovery from nonweight bearing.

    PubMed

    Henriksen, E J; Kirby, C R; Tischler, M E

    1989-06-01

    The time course of glycogen changes in soleus muscle recovering from 3 days of nonweight bearing by hindlimb suspension was investigated. Within 15 min and up to 2 h, muscle glycogen decreased. Coincidentally, muscle glucose 6-phosphate and the fractional activity of glycogen phosphorylase, measured at the fresh muscle concentrations of AMP, increased. Increased fractional activity of glycogen synthase during this time was likely the result of greater glucose 6-phosphate and decreased glycogen. From 2 to 4 h, when the synthase activity remained elevated and the phosphorylase activity declined, glycogen levels increased (glycogen supercompensation). A further increase of glycogen up to 24 h did not correlate with the enzyme activities. Between 24 and 72 h, glycogen decreased to control values, possibly initiated by high phosphorylase activity at 24 h. At 12 and 24 h, the inverse relationship between glycogen concentration and the synthase activity ratio was lost, indicating that reloading transiently uncoupled glycogen control of this enzyme. These data suggest that the activities of glycogen synthase and phosphorylase, when measured at physiological effector levels, likely provide the closest approximation to the actual enzyme activities in vivo. Measurements made in this way effectively explained the majority of the changes in the soleus glycogen content during recovery from nonweight bearing. PMID:2501291

  5. Halogen-substituted (C-β-D-glucopyranosyl)-hydroquinone regioisomers: synthesis, enzymatic evaluation and their binding to glycogen phosphorylase.

    PubMed

    Alexacou, Kyra-Melinda; Zhang, Yun Zhi; Praly, Jean-Pierre; Zographos, Spyros E; Chrysina, Evangelia D; Oikonomakos, Nikos G; Leonidas, Demetres D

    2011-09-01

    Electrophilic halogenation of C-(2,3,4,6-tetra-O-acetyl-β-D-glucopyranosyl) 1,4-dimethoxybenzene (1) afforded regioselectively products halogenated at the para position to the D-glucosyl moiety (8, 9) that were deacetylated to 3 (chloride) and 16 (bromide). For preparing meta regioisomers, 1 was efficiently oxidized with CAN to afford C-(2,3,4,6-tetra-O-acetyl-β-D-glucopyranosyl) 1,4-benzoquinone 2 which, in either MeOH or H(2)O-THF containing few equivalents of AcCl, added hydrochloric acid to produce predominantly meta (with respect to the sugar moiety) chlorinated hydroquinone derivatives 5 and 18, this latter being deacetylated to 4. The deacetylated meta (4, 5) or para (3, 16) halohydroquinones were evaluated as inhibitors of glycogen phosphorylase (GP, a molecular target for inhibition of hepatic glycogenolysis under high glucose concentrations) by kinetics and X-ray crystallography. These compounds are competitive inhibitors of GPb with respect to α-D-glucose-1-phosphate. The measured IC(50) values (μM) [169.9±10.0 (3), 95 (4), 39.8±0.3 (5) 136.4±4.9 (16)] showed that the meta halogenated inhibitors (4, 5) are more potent than their para analogs (3, 16). The crystal structures of GPb in complex with these compounds at high resolution (1.97-2.05 Å) revealed that the inhibitors are accommodated at the catalytic site and stabilize the T conformation of the enzyme. The differences in their inhibitory potency can be interpreted in terms of variations in the interactions with protein residues of the different substituents on the aromatic part of the inhibitors. PMID:21821421

  6. Cloning and expression patterns of the brine shrimp (Artemia sinica) glycogen phosphorylase (GPase) gene during development and in response to temperature stress.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Na; Hou, Ming; Wang, Ting; Chen, Yifei; Lv, Ying; Li, Zengrong; Zhang, Rui; Xin, Wenting; Zou, Xiangyang; Hou, Lin

    2014-01-01

    Glycogen serves as a metabolic reserve and is involved in macromolecular synthesis. Glycogen phosphorylase (GPase) is a key enzyme involved in intracellular glycogen catabolism, catalyzing the first step in glycogen degradation. In the diapause, GPase catalyzes glycogen into the closely related molecule, sorbitol. In this study, the full-length cDNA of the GPase gene (2,790 bp) was isolated from Artemia sinica for the first time by rapid amplification of cDNA ends technology. The GPase gene encoded a protein of 853 amino acids belonging to the Glycosyltransferase GTB type superfamily. The expression pattern and location of GPase were investigated at various stages during the embryonic development of A. sinica using real-time PCR and in situ hybridization. High GPase expression was detected at the 0 and 5 h stages. Subsequently, expression declined and was maintained at a low level during the stages from 10 to 40 h following by a small increase at day 3. Expression was downregulated at temperatures ranging from 25 to 20 °C and was subsequently upregulated in the range 15-5 °C. In situ hybridization assays showed wide distribution of the GPase gene during different developmental stages. From the results of this study, we conclude that the GPase gene expression is stress-related and might play an important role in Artemia development and metabolism. PMID:24323193

  7. The design of potential antidiabetic drugs: experimental investigation of a number of beta-D-glucose analogue inhibitors of glycogen phosphorylase.

    PubMed

    Oikonomakos, N G; Kontou, M; Zographos, S E; Tsitoura, H S; Johnson, L N; Watson, K A; Mitchell, E P; Fleet, G W; Son, J C; Bichard, C J

    1994-01-01

    alpha-D-glucose is a weak inhibitor (Ki = 1.7 mM) of glycogen phosphorylase (GP) and acts as physiological regulator of hepatic glycogen metabolism; it binds to GP at the catalytic site and stabilizes the inactive T state of the enzyme promoting the action of protein phosphatase 1 and stimulating glycogen synthase. The three-dimensional structures of T state rabbit muscle GPb and the GPb-alpha-D-glucose complex have been exploited in the design of better regulators of GP that could shift the balance between glycogen synthesis and glycogen degradation in favour of the former. Close examination of the catalytic site with alpha-D-glucose bound shows that there is an empty pocket adjacent to the beta-1-C position. beta-D-glucose is a poorer inhibitor (Ki = 7.4 mM) than alpha-D-glucose, but mutarotation has prevented the binding of beta-D-glucose in T state GP crystals. A series of beta-D-glucose analogues has been designed and tested in kinetic and crystallographic experiments. Several compounds have been discovered that have an increased affinity for GP than the parent compound. PMID:7867660

  8. Sulphate-activated phosphorylase b: the pH-dependence of catalytic activity.

    PubMed Central

    Zographos, S E; Oikonomakos, N G; Dixon, H B; Griffin, W G; Johnson, L N; Leonidas, D D

    1995-01-01

    The pH-dependence of sulphate-activated phosphorylase b has been studied in the direction of glycogen synthesis. The bell-shaped curve of the pH-dependence of the catalytic constant for the AMP-activated enzyme showed pK values of 6.1 and 7.3, but the curve for the enzyme activated by 0.9 M ammonium sulphate showed a drop of activity on the acid side at much higher pH values. Its bell was centred at pH 7.8 but it was too narrow to be characterized by only two pK values. The narrowness of the curve could be explained by positive co-operativity, but not its unusually steep acid side. We suggest that the fall on the acid side is due to more than one hydronation (addition of H+). The points can be fitted by a curve with two de-activating hydronations and a de-activating dehydronation having identical titration pK values of 7.5, and hence molecular values of 7.0, 7.5 and 8.0. If both 0.9 M ammonium sulphate and 5 mM AMP are added, the bell is as broad as with AMP alone, but is somewhat raised in pH optimum. The results are discussed in the light of new structural data from crystallographic studies on binary complexes of the enzyme. PMID:7654195

  9. Sulphate-activated phosphorylase b: the pH-dependence of catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Zographos, S E; Oikonomakos, N G; Dixon, H B; Griffin, W G; Johnson, L N; Leonidas, D D

    1995-09-01

    The pH-dependence of sulphate-activated phosphorylase b has been studied in the direction of glycogen synthesis. The bell-shaped curve of the pH-dependence of the catalytic constant for the AMP-activated enzyme showed pK values of 6.1 and 7.3, but the curve for the enzyme activated by 0.9 M ammonium sulphate showed a drop of activity on the acid side at much higher pH values. Its bell was centred at pH 7.8 but it was too narrow to be characterized by only two pK values. The narrowness of the curve could be explained by positive co-operativity, but not its unusually steep acid side. We suggest that the fall on the acid side is due to more than one hydronation (addition of H+). The points can be fitted by a curve with two de-activating hydronations and a de-activating dehydronation having identical titration pK values of 7.5, and hence molecular values of 7.0, 7.5 and 8.0. If both 0.9 M ammonium sulphate and 5 mM AMP are added, the bell is as broad as with AMP alone, but is somewhat raised in pH optimum. The results are discussed in the light of new structural data from crystallographic studies on binary complexes of the enzyme. PMID:7654195

  10. Targeting glycogen metabolism in bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lew, Carolyn Ritterson; Guin, Sunny; Theodorescu, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Metabolism has been a heavily investigated topic in cancer research for the past decade. Although the role of aerobic glycolysis (the Warburg effect) in cancer has been extensively studied, abnormalities in other metabolic pathways are only just being understood in cancer. One such pathway is glycogen metabolism; its involvement in cancer development, particularly in urothelial malignancies, and possible ways of exploiting aberrations in this process for treatment are currently being studied. New research shows that the glycogen debranching enzyme amylo-α-1,6-glucosidase, 4-α-glucanotransferase (AGL) is a novel tumour suppressor in bladder cancer. Loss of AGL leads to rapid proliferation of bladder cancer cells. Another enzyme involved in glycogen debranching, glycogen phosphorylase, has been shown to be a tumour promoter in cancer, including in prostate cancer. Studies demonstrate that bladder cancer cells in which AGL expression is lost are more metabolically active than cells with intact AGL expression, and these cells are more sensitive to inhibition of both glycolysis and glycine synthesis—two targetable pathways. As a tumour promoter and enzyme, glycogen phosphorylase can be directly targeted, and preclinical inhibitor studies are promising. However, few of these glycogen phosphorylase inhibitors have been tested for cancer treatment in the clinical setting. Several possible limitations to the targeting of AGL and glycogen phosphorylase might also exist. PMID:26032551

  11. Assessment of Thymidine Phosphorylase Function: Measurement of Plasma Thymidine (and Deoxyuridine) and Thymidine Phosphorylase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Martí, Ramon; López, Luis C.; Hirano, Michio

    2016-01-01

    We describe detailed methods to measure thymidine (dThd) and deoxyuridine (dUrd) concentrations and thymidine phosphorylase (TP) activity in biological samples. These protocols allow the detection of TP dysfunction in patients with mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy (MNGIE). Since the identification of mutations in TϒMP, the gene encoding TP, as the cause of MNGIE (Nishino et al. Science 283:689–692, 1999), the assessment of TP dysfunction has become the best screening method to rule out or confirm MNGIE in patients. TϒMP sequencing, to find the causative mutations, is only needed when TP dysfunction is detected. dThd and dUrd are measured by resolving these compounds with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) followed by the spectrophotometric monitoring of the eluate absorbance at 267 nm (HPLC-UV). TP activity can be measured by an endpoint determination of the thymine formed after 1 h incubation of the buffy coat homogenate in the presence of a large excess of its substrate dThd, either spectrophotometrically or by HPLC-UV. PMID:22215544

  12. Assessment of thymidine phosphorylase function: measurement of plasma thymidine (and deoxyuridine) and thymidine phosphorylase activity.

    PubMed

    Martí, Ramon; López, Luis C; Hirano, Michio

    2012-01-01

    We describe detailed methods to measure thymidine (dThd) and deoxyuridine (dUrd) concentrations and thymidine phosphorylase (TP) activity in biological samples. These protocols allow the detection of TP dysfunction in patients with mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy (MNGIE). Since the identification of mutations in TYMP, the gene encoding TP, as the cause of MNGIE (Nishino et al. Science 283:689-692, 1999), the assessment of TP dysfunction has become the best screening method to rule out or confirm MNGIE in patients. TYMP sequencing, to find the causative mutations, is only needed when TP dysfunction is detected. dThd and dUrd are measured by resolving these compounds with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) followed by the spectrophotometric monitoring of the eluate absorbance at 267 nm (HPLC-UV). TP activity can be measured by an endpoint determination of the thymine formed after 1 h incubation of the buffy coat homogenate in the presence of a large excess of its substrate dThd, either spectrophotometrically or by HPLC-UV. PMID:22215544

  13. Expression of the yeast glycogen phosphorylase gene is regulated by stress-response elements and by the HOG MAP kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Sunnarborg, S W; Miller, S P; Unnikrishnan, I; LaPorte, D C

    2001-12-01

    Yeast glycogen metabolism responds to environmental stressors such as nutrient limitation and heat shock. This response is mediated, in part, by the regulation of the glycogen metabolic genes. Environmental stressors induce a number of glycogen metabolic genes, including GPH1, which encodes glycogen phosphorylase. Primer extension analysis detected two start sites for GPH1, one of which predominated. Sequences upstream of these sites included a possible TATA element. Mutation of this sequence reduced GPH1 expression by a factor of 10 but did not affect start site selection. This mutation also did not affect the relative induction of GPH1 upon entry into stationary phase. Three candidates for stress response elements (STREs) were found upstream of the TATA sequence. Mutation of the STREs showed that they were required for regulation of GPH1 expression in early stationary phase, and in response to osmotic shock and heat shock. These elements appeared to act synergistically, since the intact promoter exhibited 30-fold more expression in stationary phase than the sum of that observed for each element acting independently. HOG1, which encodes a MAP kinase, has been implicated in control mediated by STREs. For GPH1, induction by osmotic shock depended on a functional HOG1 allele. In contrast, induction upon entry into stationary phase was only partially dependent on HOG1. Furthermore, the heat shock response, which can also be mediated by STREs, was independent of HOG1. These observations suggest that the GPH1 STREs respond to more than one pathway, only one of which requires HOG1. PMID:11748727

  14. Molecular Basis of Impaired Glycogen Metabolism during Ischemic Stroke and Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, Mohammed Iqbal; Roulston, Carli Lorraine; Stapleton, David Ian

    2014-01-01

    Background Ischemic stroke is the combinatorial effect of many pathological processes including the loss of energy supplies, excessive intracellular calcium accumulation, oxidative stress, and inflammatory responses. The brain's ability to maintain energy demand through this process involves metabolism of glycogen, which is critical for release of stored glucose. However, regulation of glycogen metabolism in ischemic stroke remains unknown. In the present study, we investigate the role and regulation of glycogen metabolizing enzymes and their effects on the fate of glycogen during ischemic stroke. Results Ischemic stroke was induced in rats by peri-vascular application of the vasoconstrictor endothelin-1 and forebrains were collected at 1, 3, 6 and 24 hours post-stroke. Glycogen levels and the expression and activity of enzymes involved in glycogen metabolism were analyzed. We found elevated glycogen levels in the ipsilateral hemispheres compared with contralateral hemispheres at 6 and 24 hours (25% and 39% increase respectively; P<0.05). Glycogen synthase activity and glycogen branching enzyme expression were found to be similar between the ipsilateral, contralateral, and sham control hemispheres. In contrast, the rate-limiting enzyme for glycogen breakdown, glycogen phosphorylase, had 58% lower activity (P<0.01) in the ipsilateral hemisphere (24 hours post-stroke), which corresponded with a 48% reduction in cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) activity (P<0.01). In addition, glycogen debranching enzyme expression 24 hours post-stroke was 77% (P<0.01) and 72% lower (P<0.01) at the protein and mRNA level, respectively. In cultured rat primary cerebellar astrocytes, hypoxia and inhibition of PKA activity significantly reduced glycogen phosphorylase activity and increased glycogen accumulation but did not alter glycogen synthase activity. Furthermore, elevated glycogen levels provided metabolic support to astrocytes during hypoxia. Conclusion Our study has

  15. Increased sensitivity to glucose starvation correlates with downregulation of glycogen phosphorylase isoform PYGB in tumor cell lines resistant to 2-deoxy-d-glucose

    PubMed Central

    Philips, Katherine B.; Kurtoglu, Metin; Leung, Howard J.; Liu, Huaping; Gao, Ningguo; Lehrman, Mark A.; Murray, Timothy G.

    2015-01-01

    Background As tumors evolve, they upregulate glucose metabolism while also encountering intermittent periods of glucose deprivation. Here, we investigate mechanisms by which pancreatic cancer cells respond to therapeutic (2-deoxy-d-glucose, 2-DG) and physiologic (glucose starvation, GS) forms of glucose restriction. Methods From a tumor cell line (1420) that is unusually sensitive to 2-DG under normoxia, low (14DG2)- and high (14DG5)-dose resistant cell lines were selected and used to probe the metabolic pathways involved with their response to different forms of glucose deprivation. Results Muted induction of the unfolded protein response was found to correlate with resistance to 2-DG. Additionally, 14DG2 displayed reduced 2-DG uptake, while 14DG5 was cross-resistant to tunicamycin, suggesting it has enhanced ability to manage glycosylation defects. Conversely, 2-DG-resistant cell lines were more sensitive than their parental cell line to GS, which coincided with lowered levels of glycogen phosphorylase (PYGB) and reduced breakdown of glycogen to glucose in the 2-DG-resistant cell lines. Moreover, by inhibiting PYGB in the parental cell line, sensitivity to GS was increased. Conclusions Overall, the data demonstrate that the manner in which glucose is restricted in tumor cells, i.e., therapeutic or physiologic, leads to differential biological responses involving distinct glucose metabolic pathways. Moreover, in evolving tumors where glucose restriction occurs, the identification of PYGB as a metabolic target may have clinical application. PMID:24292700

  16. Effect of diabetes on glycogen metabolism in rat retina.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Chávez, Gustavo; Hernández-Berrones, Jethro; Luna-Ulloa, Luis Bernardo; Coffe, Víctor; Salceda, Rocío

    2008-07-01

    Glucose is the main fuel for energy metabolism in retina. The regulatory mechanisms that maintain glucose homeostasis in retina could include hormonal action. Retinopathy is one of the chemical manifestations of long-standing diabetes mellitus. In order to better understand the effect of hyperglycemia in retina, we studied glycogen content as well as glycogen synthase and phosphorylase activities in both normal and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat retina and compared them with other tissues. Glycogen levels in normal rat retina are low (46 +/- 4.0 nmol glucosyl residues/mg protein). However, high specific activity of glycogen synthase was found in retina, indicating a substantial capacity for glycogen synthesis. In diabetic rats, glycogen synthase activity increased between 50% and 100% in retina, brain cortex and liver of diabetic rats, but only retina exhibited an increase in glycogen content. Although, total and phosphorylated glycogen synthase levels were similar in normal and diabetic retina, activation of glycogen synthase by glucose-6-P was remarkable increased. Glycogen phosphorylase activity decreased 50% in the liver of diabetic animals; it was not modified in the other tissues examined. We conclude that the increase in glycogen levels in diabetic retina was due to alterations in glycogen synthase regulation. PMID:18274898

  17. [Dependence of creatine kinase and glycogen synthetase activities of skeletal muscles on state of adenine nucleotide phosphorylation and cAMP metabolism].

    PubMed

    Iakovlev, N N; Chagovets, N R; Maksimova, L V

    1980-01-01

    Changes in the contents of adenine nucleotides, creatine phosphate, inorganic phosphate, creatine, glucose-6-phosphate and glycogen and the activity of adenylate cyclase, creatine kinase, glycogen phosphorylase 31:51-AMP-phosphodiesterase and glycogen synthetase in muscles and of blood catecholamines were studied in adult rats before loading, immediately after the cessation of the muscular activity, and at rest. Adenine nucleotides are established to play a regulatory role in catabolic and anabolic processes nucleotides are established to play a regulatory role in catabolic and anabolic processes related to the muscular activity. It is established that compensation and supercompensation of the working losses of muscular creatine phosphate and glycogen are due to activation of anabolic processes under conditions of higher phosphorylation of the adenylic system. PMID:6247797

  18. N-(4-Substituted-benzoyl)-N'-(β-d-glucopyranosyl)ureas as inhibitors of glycogen phosphorylase: Synthesis and evaluation by kinetic, crystallographic, and molecular modelling methods.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Veronika; Felföldi, Nóra; Kónya, Bálint; Praly, Jean-Pierre; Docsa, Tibor; Gergely, Pál; Chrysina, Evangelia D; Tiraidis, Costas; Kosmopoulou, Magda N; Alexacou, Kyra-Melinda; Konstantakaki, Maria; Leonidas, Demetres D; Zographos, Spyros E; Oikonomakos, Nikos G; Kozmon, Stanislav; Tvaroška, Igor; Somsák, László

    2012-03-01

    N-(4-Substituted-benzoyl)-N'-(β-d-glucopyranosyl) ureas (substituents: Me, Ph, Cl, OH, OMe, NO(2), NH(2), COOH, and COOMe) were synthesised by ZnCl(2) catalysed acylation of O-peracetylated β-d-glucopyranosyl urea as well as in reactions of O-peracetylated or O-unprotected glucopyranosylamines and acyl-isocyanates. O-deprotections were carried out by base or acid catalysed transesterifications where necessary. Kinetic studies revealed that most of these compounds were low micromolar inhibitors of rabbit muscle glycogen phosphorylase b (RMGPb). The best inhibitor was the 4-methylbenzoyl compound (K(i)=2.3μM). Crystallographic analyses of complexes of several of the compounds with RMGPb showed that the analogues exploited, together with water molecules, the available space at the β-pocket subsite and induced a more extended shift of the 280s loop compared to RMGPb in complex with the unsubstituted benzoyl urea. The results suggest the key role of the water molecules in ligand binding and structure-based ligand design. Molecular docking study of selected inhibitors was done to show the ability of the binding affinity prediction. The binding affinity of the highest scored docked poses was calculated and correlated with experimentally measured K(i) values. Results show that correlation is high with the R-squared (R(2)) coefficient over 0.9. PMID:22325154

  19. Sourcing the affinity of flavonoids for the glycogen phosphorylase inhibitor site via crystallography, kinetics and QM/MM-PBSA binding studies: comparison of chrysin and flavopiridol.

    PubMed

    Tsitsanou, Katerina E; Hayes, Joseph M; Keramioti, Maria; Mamais, Michalis; Oikonomakos, Nikos G; Kato, Atsushi; Leonidas, Demetres D; Zographos, Spyros E

    2013-11-01

    Flavonoids have been discovered as novel inhibitors of glycogen phosphorylase (GP), a target to control hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes. To elucidate the mechanism of inhibition, we have determined the crystal structure of the GPb-chrysin complex at 1.9 Å resolution. Chrysin is accommodated at the inhibitor site intercalating between the aromatic side chains of Phe285 and Tyr613 through π-stacking interactions. Chrysin binds to GPb approximately 15 times weaker (Ki=19.01 μM) than flavopiridol (Ki=1.24 μM), exclusively at the inhibitor site, and both inhibitors display similar behavior with respect to AMP. To identify the source of flavopiridols' stronger affinity, molecular docking with Glide and postdocking binding free energy calculations using QM/MM-PBSA have been performed and compared. Whereas docking failed to correctly rank inhibitor binding conformations, the QM/MM-PBSA method employing M06-2X/6-31+G to model the π-stacking interactions correctly reproduced the experimental results. Flavopiridols' greater binding affinity is sourced to favorable interactions of the cationic 4-hydroxypiperidin-1-yl substituent with GPb, with desolvation effects limited by the substituent conformation adopted in the crystallographic complex. Further successful predictions using QM/MM-PBSA for the flavonoid quercetagetin (which binds at the allosteric site) leads us to propose the methodology as a useful and inexpensive tool to predict flavonoid binding. PMID:23279842

  20. Glucopyranosylidene-spiro-iminothiazolidinone, a new bicyclic ring system: synthesis, derivatization, and evaluation for inhibition of glycogen phosphorylase by enzyme kinetic and crystallographic methods.

    PubMed

    Czifrák, Katalin; Páhi, András; Deák, Szabina; Kiss-Szikszai, Attila; Kövér, Katalin E; Docsa, Tibor; Gergely, Pál; Alexacou, Kyra-Melinda; Papakonstantinou, Maria; Leonidas, Demetres D; Zographos, Spyros E; Chrysina, Evangelia D; Somsák, László

    2014-08-01

    The reaction of thiourea with O-perbenzoylated C-(1-bromo-1-deoxy-β-D-glucopyranosyl)formamide gave the new anomeric spirocycle 1R-1,5-anhydro-D-glucitol-spiro-[1,5]-2-imino-1,3-thiazolidin-4-one. Acylation and sulfonylation with the corresponding acyl chlorides (RCOCl or RSO₂Cl where R=tBu, Ph, 4-Me-C₆H₄, 1- and 2-naphthyl) produced the corresponding 2-acylimino- and 2-sulfonylimino-thiazolidinones, respectively. Alkylation by MeI, allyl-bromide and BnBr produced mixtures of the respective N-alkylimino- and N,N'-dialkyl-imino-thiazolidinones, while reactions with 1,2-dibromoethane and 1,3-dibromopropane furnished spirocyclic 5,6-dihydro-imidazo[2,1-b]thiazolidin-3-one and 6,7-dihydro-5H-thiazolidino[3,2-a]pyrimidin-3-one, respectively. Removal of the O-benzoyl protecting groups by the Zemplén protocol led to test compounds most of which proved micromolar inhibitors of rabbit muscle glycogen phosphorylase b (RMGPb). Best inhibitors were the 2-benzoylimino- (Ki=9μM) and the 2-naphthoylimino-thiazolidinones (Ki=10 μM). Crystallographic studies of the unsubstituted spiro-thiazolidinone and the above most efficient inhibitors in complex with RMGPb confirmed the preference and inhibitory effect that aromatic (and especially 2-naphthyl) derivatives show for the catalytic site promoting the inactive conformation of the enzyme. PMID:25009003

  1. 3'-axial CH2 OH substitution on glucopyranose does not increase glycogen phosphorylase inhibitory potency. QM/MM-PBSA calculations suggest why.

    PubMed

    Manta, Stella; Xipnitou, Andromachi; Kiritsis, Christos; Kantsadi, Anastassia L; Hayes, Joseph M; Skamnaki, Vicky T; Lamprakis, Christos; Kontou, Maria; Zoumpoulakis, Panagiotis; Zographos, Spyridon E; Leonidas, Demetres D; Komiotis, Dimitri

    2012-05-01

    Glycogen phosphorylase is a molecular target for the design of potential hypoglycemic agents. Structure-based design pinpointed that the 3'-position of glucopyranose equipped with a suitable group has the potential to form interactions with enzyme's cofactor, pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP), thus enhancing the inhibitory potency. Hence, we have investigated the binding of two ligands, 1-(β-d-glucopyranosyl)5-fluorouracil (GlcFU) and its 3'-CH(2) OH glucopyranose derivative. Both ligands were found to be low micromolar inhibitors with K(i) values of 7.9 and 27.1 μm, respectively. X-ray crystallography revealed that the 3'-CH(2) OH glucopyranose substituent is indeed involved in additional molecular interactions with the PLP γ-phosphate compared with GlcFU. However, it is 3.4 times less potent. To elucidate this discovery, docking followed by postdocking Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics - Poisson-Boltzmann Surface Area (QM/MM-PBSA) binding affinity calculations were performed. While the docking predictions failed to reflect the kinetic results, the QM/MM-PBSA revealed that the desolvation energy cost for binding of the 3'-CH(2) OH-substituted glucopyranose derivative out-weigh the enthalpy gains from the extra contacts formed. The benefits of performing postdocking calculations employing a more accurate solvation model and the QM/MM-PBSA methodology in lead optimization are therefore highlighted, specifically when the role of a highly polar/charged binding interface is significant. PMID:22296957

  2. Hepatic Glycogen Supercompensation Activates AMP-Activated Protein Kinase, Impairs Insulin Signaling, and Reduces Glycogen Deposition in the Liver

    PubMed Central

    Winnick, Jason J.; An, Zhibo; Ramnanan, Christopher J.; Smith, Marta; Irimia, Jose M.; Neal, Doss W.; Moore, Mary Courtney; Roach, Peter J.; Cherrington, Alan D.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The objective of this study was to determine how increasing the hepatic glycogen content would affect the liver’s ability to take up and metabolize glucose. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS During the first 4 h of the study, liver glycogen deposition was stimulated by intraportal fructose infusion in the presence of hyperglycemic-normoinsulinemia. This was followed by a 2-h hyperglycemic-normoinsulinemic control period, during which the fructose infusion was stopped, and a 2-h experimental period in which net hepatic glucose uptake (NHGU) and disposition (glycogen, lactate, and CO2) were measured in the absence of fructose but in the presence of a hyperglycemic-hyperinsulinemic challenge including portal vein glucose infusion. RESULTS Fructose infusion increased net hepatic glycogen synthesis (0.7 ± 0.5 vs. 6.4 ± 0.4 mg/kg/min; P < 0.001), causing a large difference in hepatic glycogen content (62 ± 9 vs. 100 ± 3 mg/g; P < 0.001). Hepatic glycogen supercompensation (fructose infusion group) did not alter NHGU, but it reduced the percent of NHGU directed to glycogen (79 ± 4 vs. 55 ± 6; P < 0.01) and increased the percent directed to lactate (12 ± 3 vs. 29 ± 5; P = 0.01) and oxidation (9 ± 3 vs. 16 ± 3; P = NS). This change was associated with increased AMP-activated protein kinase phosphorylation, diminished insulin signaling, and a shift in glycogenic enzyme activity toward a state discouraging glycogen accumulation. CONCLUSIONS These data indicate that increases in hepatic glycogen can generate a state of hepatic insulin resistance, which is characterized by impaired glycogen synthesis despite preserved NHGU. PMID:21270252

  3. Dietary whey protein hydrolysates increase skeletal muscle glycogen levels via activation of glycogen synthase in mice.

    PubMed

    Kanda, Atsushi; Morifuji, Masashi; Fukasawa, Tomoyuki; Koga, Jinichiro; Kanegae, Minoru; Kawanaka, Kentaro; Higuchi, Mitsuru

    2012-11-14

    Previously, we have shown that consuming carbohydrate plus whey protein hydrolysates (WPHs) replenished muscle glycogen after exercise more effectively than consuming intact whey protein or branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs). The mechanism leading to superior glycogen replenishment after consuming WPH is unclear. In this 5 week intervention, ddY mice were fed experimental diets containing WPH, a mixture of whey amino acids (WAAs), or casein (control). After the intervention, gastrocnemius muscle glycogen levels were significantly higher in the WPH group (4.35 mg/g) than in the WAA (3.15 mg/g) or control (2.51 mg/g) groups. In addition, total glycogen synthase (GS) protein levels were significantly higher in the WPH group (153%) than in the WAA (89.2%) or control groups, and phosphorylated GS levels were significantly decreased in the WPH group (51.4%). These results indicate that dietary WPH may increase the muscle glycogen content through increased GS activity. PMID:23113736

  4. Allosteric inhibition of glycogen phosphorylase a by the potential antidiabetic drug 3-isopropyl 4-(2-chlorophenyl)-1,4-dihydro-1-ethyl-2-methyl-pyridine-3,5,6-tricarbo xylate.

    PubMed Central

    Oikonomakos, N. G.; Tsitsanou, K. E.; Zographos, S. E.; Skamnaki, V. T.; Goldmann, S.; Bischoff, H.

    1999-01-01

    The effect of the potential antidiabetic drug (-)(S)-3-isopropyl 4-(2-chlorophenyl)-1,4-dihydro-1-ethyl-2-methyl-pyridine-3,5,6-tricarbox ylate (W1807) on the catalytic and structural properties of glycogen phosphorylase a has been studied. Glycogen phosphorylase (GP) is an allosteric enzyme whose activity is primarily controlled by reversible phosphorylation of Ser14 of the dephosphorylated enzyme (GPb, less active, predominantly T-state) to form the phosphorylated enzyme (GPa, more active, predominantly R-state). Upon conversion of GPb to GPa, the N-terminal tail (residues 5-22), which carries the Ser14(P), changes its conformation into a distorted 3(10) helix and its contacts from intrasubunit to intersubunit. This alteration causes a series of tertiary and quaternary conformational changes that lead to activation of the enzyme through opening access to the catalytic site. As part of a screening process to identify compounds that might contribute to the regulation of glycogen metabolism in the noninsulin dependent diabetes diseased state, W1807 has been found as the most potent inhibitor of GPb (Ki = 1.6 nM) that binds at the allosteric site of T-state GPb and produces further conformational changes, characteristic of a T'-like state. Kinetics show W1807 is a potent competitive inhibitor of GPa (-AMP) (Ki = 10.8 nM) and of GPa (+1 mM AMP) (Ki = 19.4 microM) with respect to glucose 1-phosphate and acts in synergism with glucose. To elucidate the structural features that contribute to the binding, the structures of GPa in the T-state conformation in complex with glucose and in complex with both glucose and W1807 have been determined at 100 K to 2.0 A and 2.1 A resolution, and refined to crystallographic R-values of 0.179 (R(free) = 0.230) and 0.189 (R(free) = 0.263), respectively. W1807 binds tightly at the allosteric site and induces substantial conformational changes both in the vicinity of the allosteric site and the subunit interface. A disordering of the N

  5. Allosteric inhibition of glycogen phosphorylase a by the potential antidiabetic drug 3-isopropyl 4-(2-chlorophenyl)-1,4-dihydro-1-ethyl-2-methyl-pyridine-3,5,6-tricarbo xylate.

    PubMed

    Oikonomakos, N G; Tsitsanou, K E; Zographos, S E; Skamnaki, V T; Goldmann, S; Bischoff, H

    1999-10-01

    The effect of the potential antidiabetic drug (-)(S)-3-isopropyl 4-(2-chlorophenyl)-1,4-dihydro-1-ethyl-2-methyl-pyridine-3,5,6-tricarbox ylate (W1807) on the catalytic and structural properties of glycogen phosphorylase a has been studied. Glycogen phosphorylase (GP) is an allosteric enzyme whose activity is primarily controlled by reversible phosphorylation of Ser14 of the dephosphorylated enzyme (GPb, less active, predominantly T-state) to form the phosphorylated enzyme (GPa, more active, predominantly R-state). Upon conversion of GPb to GPa, the N-terminal tail (residues 5-22), which carries the Ser14(P), changes its conformation into a distorted 3(10) helix and its contacts from intrasubunit to intersubunit. This alteration causes a series of tertiary and quaternary conformational changes that lead to activation of the enzyme through opening access to the catalytic site. As part of a screening process to identify compounds that might contribute to the regulation of glycogen metabolism in the noninsulin dependent diabetes diseased state, W1807 has been found as the most potent inhibitor of GPb (Ki = 1.6 nM) that binds at the allosteric site of T-state GPb and produces further conformational changes, characteristic of a T'-like state. Kinetics show W1807 is a potent competitive inhibitor of GPa (-AMP) (Ki = 10.8 nM) and of GPa (+1 mM AMP) (Ki = 19.4 microM) with respect to glucose 1-phosphate and acts in synergism with glucose. To elucidate the structural features that contribute to the binding, the structures of GPa in the T-state conformation in complex with glucose and in complex with both glucose and W1807 have been determined at 100 K to 2.0 A and 2.1 A resolution, and refined to crystallographic R-values of 0.179 (R(free) = 0.230) and 0.189 (R(free) = 0.263), respectively. W1807 binds tightly at the allosteric site and induces substantial conformational changes both in the vicinity of the allosteric site and the subunit interface. A disordering of the N

  6. Late-onset MNGIE without peripheral neuropathy due to incomplete loss of thymidine phosphorylase activity.

    PubMed

    Massa, Roberto; Tessa, Alessandra; Margollicci, Maria; Micheli, Vanna; Romigi, Andrea; Tozzi, Giulia; Terracciano, Chiara; Piemonte, Fiorella; Bernardi, Giorgio; Santorelli, Filippo M

    2009-12-01

    Mitochondrial NeuroGastroIntestinal Encephalomyopathy (MNGIE) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by severe gastrointestinal dysmotility, cachexia, peripheral neuropathy, ptosis, ophthalmoplegia, and leukoencephalopathy with early onset and severe prognosis. Mutations in the TYMP/ECGF1 gene cause a loss of thymidine phosphorylase catalytic activity, disrupting the homeostasis of intramitochondrial nucleotide pool. We report a woman with a very late onset of MNGIE, lacking peripheral neuropathy. Thymidine phosphorylase activity was markedly reduced in cultured fibroblasts, but only mildly reduced in buffy coat, where the defect is usually detected, and plasma thymidine was mildly increased compared to typical MNGIE patients. TYMP/ECGF1 analysis detected two heterozygous mutations, including a novel missense mutation. These findings indicate that a partial loss of thymidine phosphorylase activity may induce a late-onset and incomplete MNGIE phenotype. PMID:19853446

  7. Crystallographic studies on two bioisosteric analogues, N-acetyl-beta-D-glucopyranosylamine and N-trifluoroacetyl-beta-D-glucopyranosylamine, potent inhibitors of muscle glycogen phosphorylase.

    PubMed

    Anagnostou, Eleni; Kosmopoulou, Magda N; Chrysina, Evangelia D; Leonidas, Demetres D; Hadjiloi, Theodoros; Tiraidis, Costantinos; Zographos, Spyros E; Györgydeák, Zoltán; Somsák, László; Docsa, Tibor; Gergely, Pál; Kolisis, Fragiskos N; Oikonomakos, Nikos G

    2006-01-01

    Structure-based inhibitor design has led to the discovery of a number of potent inhibitors of glycogen phosphorylase b (GPb), N-acyl derivatives of beta-D-glucopyranosylamine, that bind at the catalytic site of the enzyme. The first good inhibitor in this class of compounds, N-acetyl-beta-D-glucopyranosylamine (NAG) (K(i) = 32 microM), has been previously characterized by biochemical, biological and crystallographic experiments at 2.3 angstroms resolution. Bioisosteric replacement of the acetyl group by trifluoroacetyl group resulted in an inhibitor, N-trifluoroacetyl-beta-D-glucopyranosylamine (NFAG), with a K(i) = 75 microM. To elucidate the structural basis of its reduced potency, we determined the ligand structure in complex with GPb at 1.8 angstroms resolution. To compare the binding mode of N-trifluoroacetyl derivative with that of the lead molecule, we also determined the structure of GPb-NAG complex at a higher resolution (1.9 angstroms). NFAG can be accommodated in the catalytic site of T-state GPb at approximately the same position as that of NAG and stabilize the T-state conformation of the 280 s loop by making several favourable contacts to Asn284 of this loop. The difference observed in the K(i) values of the two analogues can be interpreted in terms of subtle conformational changes of protein residues and shifts of water molecules in the vicinity of the catalytic site, variations in van der Waals interaction, and desolvation effects. PMID:16213146

  8. Glycogen metabolism in rat heart muscle cultures after hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Vigoda, Ayelet; Mamedova, Liaman K; Shneyvays, Vladimir; Katz, Abram; Shainberg, Asher

    2003-12-01

    Elevated glycogen levels in heart have been shown to have cardioprotective effects against ischemic injury. We have therefore established a model for elevating glycogen content in primary rat cardiac cells grown in culture and examined potential mechanisms for the elevation (glycogen supercompensation). Glycogen was depleted by exposing the cells to hypoxia for 2 h in the absence of glucose in the medium. This was followed by incubating the cells with 28 mM glucose in normoxia for up to 120 h. Hypoxia decreased glycogen content to about 15% of control, oxygenated cells. This was followed by a continuous increase in glycogen in the hypoxia treated cells during the 120 h recovery period in normoxia. By 48 h after termination of hypoxia, the glycogen content had returned to baseline levels and by 120 h glycogen was about 150% of control. The increase in glycogen at 120 h was associated with comparable relative increases in glucose uptake (approximately 180% of control) and the protein level of the glut-1 transporter (approximately 170% of control), whereas the protein level of the glut-4 transporter was decreased to < 10% of control. By 120 h, the hypoxia-treated cells also exhibited marked increases in the total (approximately 170% of control) and fractional activity of glycogen synthase (control, approximately 15%; hypoxia-treated, approximately 30%). Concomitantly, the hypoxia-treated cells also exhibited marked decreases in the total (approximately 50% of control) and fractional activity of glycogen phosphorylase (control, approximately 50%; hypoxia-treated, approximately 25%). Thus, we have established a model of glycogen supercompensation in cultures of cardiac cells that is explained by concerted increases in glucose uptake and glycogen synthase activity and decreases in phosphorylase activity. This model should prove useful in studying the cardioprotective effects of glycogen. PMID:14674711

  9. The α-Glucan Phosphorylase MalP of Corynebacterium glutamicum Is Subject to Transcriptional Regulation and Competitive Inhibition by ADP-Glucose

    PubMed Central

    Clermont, Lina; Macha, Arthur; Müller, Laura M.; Derya, Sami M.; von Zaluskowski, Philipp; Eck, Alexander; Eikmanns, Bernhard J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT α-Glucan phosphorylases contribute to degradation of glycogen and maltodextrins formed in the course of maltose metabolism in bacteria. Accordingly, bacterial α-glucan phosphorylases are classified as either glycogen or maltodextrin phosphorylase, GlgP or MalP, respectively. GlgP and MalP enzymes follow the same catalytic mechanism, and thus their substrate spectra overlap; however, they differ in their regulation: GlgP genes are constitutively expressed and the enzymes are controlled on the activity level, whereas expression of MalP genes are transcriptionally controlled in response to the carbon source used for cultivation. We characterize here the modes of control of the α-glucan phosphorylase MalP of the Gram-positive Corynebacterium glutamicum. In accordance to the proposed function of the malP gene product as MalP, we found transcription of malP to be regulated in response to the carbon source. Moreover, malP transcription is shown to depend on the growth phase and to occur independently of the cell glycogen content. Surprisingly, we also found MalP activity to be tightly regulated competitively by the presence of ADP-glucose, an intermediate of glycogen synthesis. Since the latter is considered a typical feature of GlgPs, we propose that C. glutamicum MalP acts as both maltodextrin and glycogen phosphorylase and, based on these findings, we question the current system for classification of bacterial α-glucan phosphorylases. IMPORTANCE Bacterial α-glucan phosphorylases have been classified conferring to their purpose as either glycogen or maltodextrin phosphorylases. We found transcription of malP in C. glutamicum to be regulated in response to the carbon source, which is recognized as typical for maltodextrin phosphorylases. Surprisingly, we also found MalP activity to be tightly regulated competitively by the presence of ADP-glucose, an intermediate of glycogen synthesis. The latter is considered a typical feature of GlgPs. These findings

  10. Binding of the potential antitumour agent indirubin-5-sulphonate at the inhibitor site of rabbit muscle glycogen phosphorylase b. Comparison with ligand binding to pCDK2-cyclin A complex.

    PubMed

    Kosmopoulou, Magda N; Leonidas, Demetres D; Chrysina, Evangelia D; Bischler, Nicolas; Eisenbrand, Gerhard; Sakarellos, Constantinos E; Pauptit, Richard; Oikonomakos, Nikos G

    2004-06-01

    The binding of indirubin-5-sulphonate (E226), a potential anti-tumour agent and a potent inhibitor (IC(50) = 35 nm) of cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) and glycogen phosphorylase (GP) has been studied by kinetic and crystallographic methods. Kinetic analysis revealed that E226 is a moderate inhibitor of GPb (K(i) = 13.8 +/- 0.2 micro m) and GPa (K(i) = 57.8 +/- 7.1 micro m) and acts synergistically with glucose. To explore the molecular basis of E226 binding we have determined the crystal structure of the GPb/E226 complex at 2.3 A resolution. Structure analysis shows clearly that E226 binds at the purine inhibitor site, where caffeine and flavopiridol also bind [Oikonomakos, N.G., Schnier, J.B., Zographos, S.E., Skamnaki, V.T., Tsitsanou, K.E. & Johnson, L.N. (2000) J. Biol. Chem.275, 34566-34573], by intercalating between the two aromatic rings of Phe285 and Tyr613. The mode of binding of E226 to GPb is similar, but not identical, to that of caffeine and flavopiridol. Comparative structural analyses of the GPb-E226, GPb-caffeine and GPb-flavopiridol complex structures reveal the structural basis of the differences in the potencies of the three inhibitors and indicate binding residues in the inhibitor site that can be exploited to obtain more potent inhibitors. Structural comparison of the GPb-E226 complex structure with the active pCDK2-cyclin A-E226 complex structure clearly shows the different binding modes of the ligand to GPb and CDK2; the more extensive interactions of E226 with the active site of CDK2 may explain its higher affinity towards the latter enzyme. PMID:15153119

  11. Binding of N-acetyl-N '-beta-D-glucopyranosyl urea and N-benzoyl-N '-beta-D-glucopyranosyl urea to glycogen phosphorylase b: kinetic and crystallographic studies.

    PubMed

    Oikonomakos, Nikos G; Kosmopoulou, Magda; Zographos, Spyros E; Leonidas, Demetres D; Chrysina, Evangelia D; Somsák, László; Nagy, Veronika; Praly, Jean-Pierre; Docsa, Tibor; Tóth, Béla; Gergely, Pál

    2002-03-01

    Two substituted ureas of beta-D-glucose, N-acetyl-N'-beta-D-glucopyranosyl urea (Acurea) and N-benzoyl-N'-beta-D-glucopyranosyl urea (Bzurea), have been identified as inhibitors of glycogen phosphorylase, a potential target for therapeutic intervention in type 2 diabetes. To elucidate the structural basis of inhibition, we determined the structure of muscle glycogen phosphorylase b (GPb) complexed with the two compounds at 2.0 A and 1.8 A resolution, respectively. The structure of the GPb-Acurea complex reveals that the inhibitor can be accommodated in the catalytic site of T-state GPb with very little change in the tertiary structure. The glucopyranose moiety makes the standard hydrogen bonds and van der Waals contacts as observed in the GPb-glucose complex, while the acetyl urea moiety is in a favourable electrostatic environment and makes additional polar contacts with the protein. The structure of the GPb-Bzurea complex shows that Bzurea binds tightly at the catalytic site and induces substantial conformational changes in the vicinity of the catalytic site. In particular, the loop of the polypeptide chain containing residues 282-287 shifts 1.3-3.7 A (Calpha atoms) to accommodate Bzurea. Bzurea can also occupy the new allosteric site, some 33 A from the catalytic site, which is currently the target for the design of antidiabetic drugs. PMID:11895439

  12. Mechanism of glycogen supercompensation in rat skeletal muscle cultures.

    PubMed

    Mamedova, Liaman K; Shneyvays, Vladimir; Katz, Abram; Shainberg, Asher

    2003-08-01

    A model to study glycogen supercompensation (the significant increase in glycogen content above basal level) in primary rat skeletal muscle culture was established. Glycogen was completely depleted in differentiated myotubes by 2 h of electrical stimulation or exposure to hypoxia during incubation in medium devoid of glucose. Thereafter, cells were incubated in medium containing glucose, and glycogen supercompensation was clearly observed in treated myotubes after 72 h. Peak glycogen levels were obtained after 120 h, averaging 2.5 and 4 fold above control values in the stimulated- and hypoxia-treated cells, respectively. Glycogen synthase activity increased and phosphorylase activity decreased continuously during 120 h of recovery in the treated cells. Rates of 2-deoxyglucose uptake were significantly elevated in the treated cells at 96 and 120 h, averaging 1.4-2 fold above control values. Glycogenin content increased slightly in the treated cells after 48 h (1.2 fold vs. control) and then increased considerably, achieving peak values after 120 h (2 fold vs. control). The results demonstrate two phases of glycogen supercompensation: the first phase depends primarily on activation of glycogen synthase and inactivation of phosphorylase; the second phase includes increases in glucose uptake and glycogenin level. PMID:12962138

  13. Effect of 5-Fluorouracil on Thymidine Phosphorylase Activity in Model Experiment.

    PubMed

    Stashkevich, M A; Khomutov, E V; Dumanskii, Yu V; Matvienko, A G; Zinkovich, I I

    2016-03-01

    Variations in thymidine phosphorylase activity in rat liver were studied in 1, 3, 6, 12, and 24 h after intraperitoneal bolus injection of 5-fluorouracil. Enzyme activity was measured by HPLC. A 2-fold decrease in enzyme activity was observed 3 h after 5-fluorouracil administration and persisted for 12 h. This additional effect of the cytostatic should be taken into account in choosing chemotherapy protocol. PMID:27021101

  14. Uterine glycogen metabolism in mink during estrus, embryonic diapause and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Dean, Matthew; Hunt, Jason; McDougall, Lisa; Rose, Jack

    2014-01-01

    We have determined uterine glycogen content, metabolizing enzyme expression and activity in the mink, a species that exhibits obligatory embryonic diapause, resulting in delayed implantation. Gross uterine glycogen concentrations were highest in estrus, decreased 50% by diapause and 90% in pregnancy (P ≤ 0.05). Endometrial glycogen deposits, which localized primarily to glandular and luminal epithelia, decreased 99% between estrus and diapause (P ≤ 0.05) and were nearly undetectable in pregnancy. Glycogen synthase and phosphorylase proteins were most abundant in the glandular epithelia. Glycogen phosphorylase activity (total) in uterine homogenates was higher during estrus and diapause, than pregnancy. While glycogen phosphorylase protein was detected during estrus and diapause, glycogen synthase was almost undetectable after estrus, which probably contributed to a higher glycogenolysis/glycogenesis ratio during diapause. Uterine glucose-6-phosphatase 3 gene expression was greater during diapause, when compared to estrus (P ≤ 0.05) and supports the hypothesis that glucose-6-phosphate resulting from phosphorylase activity was dephosphorylated in preparation for export into the uterine lumen. The relatively high amount of hexokinase-1 protein detected in the luminal epithelia during estrus and diapause may have contributed to glucose trapping after endometrial glycogen reserves were depleted. Collectively, our findings suggest to us that endometrial glycogen reserves may be an important source of energy, supporting uterine and conceptus metabolism up to the diapausing blastocyst stage. As a result, the size of uterine glycogen reserves accumulated prior to mating may in part, determine the number of embryos that survive to the blastocyst stage, and ultimately litter size. PMID:25225159

  15. High phosphorylase activity is correlated with increased potato minituber formation and starch content during extended clinorotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedukha, O. M.; Schnyukova, E. I.; Leach, J. E.

    2003-05-01

    The major purpose of these experiments were to investigate growth of potato storage organs and starch synthesis in minitubers at slow horizontal clinorotation (2 rpm), which partly mimics microgravity, and a secondary goal was to study the activity and localization of phosphorylase (EC 2.4.1.1) in storage parenchyma under these conditions. Miniplants of Solanum tuberosum L. (cv Adreta) were grown in culture for 30 days for both the vertical control and the horizontal clinorotation. During long-term clinorotation, an acceleration of minituber formation, and an increase of amyloplast number and size in storage parenchyma cells, as well as increased starch content, was observed in the minitubers. The differences among cytochemical reaction intensity, activity of phosphorylase, and carbohydrate content in storage parenchyma cells of minitubers grown in a horizontal clinostat were established by electron-cytochemical and biochemical methods. It is shown that high phosphorylase activity is correlated with increased starch content during extended clinorotation. The results demonstrate the increase in carbohydrate metabolism and possible accelerated growth of storage organs under the influence of microgravity, as mimicked by clinorotation; therefore, clinorotation can be used as a basis for future studies on mechanisms of starch synthesis under microgravity.

  16. Glycogen supercompensation in rat soleus muscle during recovery from nonweight bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henriksen, Erik J.; Kirby, Christopher R.; Tischler, Marc E.

    1989-01-01

    Events leading to the normalization of the glycogen metabolism in the soleus muscle of rat, altered by 72-h three days of hind-limb suspension, were investigated during the 72-h recovery period when the animals were allowed to bear weight on all four limbs. Relative importance of the factors affecting glycogen metabolism in skeletal muscle during the recovery period was also examined. Glycogen concentration was found to decrease within 15 min and up to 2 h of recovery, while muscle glucose 6-phosphate, and the fractional activities of glycogen phosphorylase and glycogen synthase increased. From 2 to 4 h, when the glycogen synthase activity remained elevated and the phosphorylase activity declined, glycogen concentration increased, until it reached maximum values at about 24 h, after which it started to decrease, reaching control values by 72 h. At 12 and 24 h, the inverse relationship between glycogen concentration and the synthase activity ratio was lost, indicating that the reloading transiently uncoupled glycogen control of this enzyme.

  17. Effects of ethylene and 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) on gene expression and activity profile of alpha-1,4-glucan-phosphorylase during banana ripening.

    PubMed

    Mainardi, Janaina Aparecida; Purgatto, Eduardo; Vieira, Adair; Bastos, Walter Arato; Cordenunsi, Beatriz Rosana; Oliveira do Nascimento, João Roberto; Lajolo, Franco Maria

    2006-09-20

    Starch phosphorylases are enzymes that can use starch as substrate, and they are supposed to act in both in starch synthesis and degradation. This paper reports the effects of ethylene and 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) on the degradation of starch and phosphorylase activity and gene expression. The results indicate that phosphorylase activity is induced during ripening and that it is associated with the onset of starch degradation. The regulation of banana phosphorylase activity is mainly dependent on gene expression, and the absence of ethylene perception by 1-MCP had a positive effect. However, this effect can be precluded by increased levels of ethylene, both autocatalytic and exogenous. PMID:16968096

  18. Structural basis for glucose-6-phosphate activation of glycogen synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Baskaran, Sulochanadevi; Roach, Peter J.; DePaoli-Roach, Anna A.; Hurley, Thomas D.

    2010-11-22

    Regulation of the storage of glycogen, one of the major energy reserves, is of utmost metabolic importance. In eukaryotes, this regulation is accomplished through glucose-6-phosphate levels and protein phosphorylation. Glycogen synthase homologs in bacteria and archaea lack regulation, while the eukaryotic enzymes are inhibited by protein kinase mediated phosphorylation and activated by protein phosphatases and glucose-6-phosphate binding. We determined the crystal structures corresponding to the basal activity state and glucose-6-phosphate activated state of yeast glycogen synthase-2. The enzyme is assembled into an unusual tetramer by an insertion unique to the eukaryotic enzymes, and this subunit interface is rearranged by the binding of glucose-6-phosphate, which frees the active site cleft and facilitates catalysis. Using both mutagenesis and intein-mediated phospho-peptide ligation experiments, we demonstrate that the enzyme's response to glucose-6-phosphate is controlled by Arg583 and Arg587, while four additional arginine residues present within the same regulatory helix regulate the response to phosphorylation.

  19. Transient down-regulation and restoration of glycogen synthase levels in axotomized rat facial motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Takezawa, Yosuke; Kohsaka, Shinichi; Nakajima, Kazuyuki

    2014-10-24

    In adult rats, transection of the facial nerve causes a functional down-regulation of motoneurons and glial activation/proliferation. It has not been clear how energy-supplying systems are regulated in an axotomized facial nucleus. Here we investigated the regulation of molecules involved in glycogen degradation/synthesis in axotomized facial nuclei in rats. Immunoblotting revealed that the amounts of glycogen phosphorylase in the contralateral and ipsilateral nuclei were unchanged for the first 14 days, whereas the amount of glycogen synthase in the axotomized facial nuclei was significantly decreased from days 7-14 post-insult. A quantitative analysis estimated that the glycogen synthase levels in the transected nucleus were reduced to approx. 50% at 14 days post-injury. An immunohistochemical study showed that the injured motoneurons had decreased expressions of glycogen synthase proteins. The glycogen synthase levels in the axotomized facial nucleus had returned to control levels by 5 weeks post-insult, as had the cholinergic markers. The immunohistochemical study also revealed the recovery of glycogen synthase levels at the later stage. The glycogen phosphorylase levels in the injured nucleus were not significantly changed during weeks 3-5 post-insult. Taken together, these results demonstrated that the injured facial motoneurons transiently reduced glycogen synthase levels at around 1-2 weeks post-insult, but restored the levels at 4-5 weeks post-insult. PMID:25152465

  20. Glycogen synthase activation in human skeletal muscle: effects of diet and exercise.

    PubMed

    Kochan, R G; Lamb, D R; Lutz, S A; Perrill, C V; Reimann, E M; Schlender, K K

    1979-06-01

    We investigated the role of glycogen synthase in supranormal resynthesis (supercompensation) of skeletal muscle glycogen after exhaustive exercise. Six healthy men exercised 60 min by cycling with one leg at 75% VO2max, recovered 3 days on a low-carbohydrate diet, exercised again, and recovered 4 days on high-carbohydrate diet. Glycogen and glycogen synthase activities at several glucose-6-phosphate (G6P) concentrations were measured in biopsy samples of m. vastus lateralis. Dietary alterations alone did not affect glycogen, whereas exercise depleted glycogen stores. After the second exercise bout, glycogen returned to normal within 24 h and reached supercompensated levels by 48 h of recovery. Glycogen synthase activation state strikingly increased after exercise in exercised muscle and remained somewhat elevated for the first 48 h of recovery in both muscles. We suggest that 1) forms of glycogen synthase intermediate to I (G6P-independent) and D (G6P-dependent) forms are present in vivo, and 2) glycogen supercompensation can in part be explained by the formation of intermediate forms of glycogen synthase that exhibit relatively low activity ratios, but an increased sensitivity to activation by G6P. PMID:109015

  1. Glycogen metabolism in humans.

    PubMed

    Adeva-Andany, María M; González-Lucán, Manuel; Donapetry-García, Cristóbal; Fernández-Fernández, Carlos; Ameneiros-Rodríguez, Eva

    2016-06-01

    In the human body, glycogen is a branched polymer of glucose stored mainly in the liver and the skeletal muscle that supplies glucose to the blood stream during fasting periods and to the muscle cells during muscle contraction. Glycogen has been identified in other tissues such as brain, heart, kidney, adipose tissue, and erythrocytes, but glycogen function in these tissues is mostly unknown. Glycogen synthesis requires a series of reactions that include glucose entrance into the cell through transporters, phosphorylation of glucose to glucose 6-phosphate, isomerization to glucose 1-phosphate, and formation of uridine 5'-diphosphate-glucose, which is the direct glucose donor for glycogen synthesis. Glycogenin catalyzes the formation of a short glucose polymer that is extended by the action of glycogen synthase. Glycogen branching enzyme introduces branch points in the glycogen particle at even intervals. Laforin and malin are proteins involved in glycogen assembly but their specific function remains elusive in humans. Glycogen is accumulated in the liver primarily during the postprandial period and in the skeletal muscle predominantly after exercise. In the cytosol, glycogen breakdown or glycogenolysis is carried out by two enzymes, glycogen phosphorylase which releases glucose 1-phosphate from the linear chains of glycogen, and glycogen debranching enzyme which untangles the branch points. In the lysosomes, glycogen degradation is catalyzed by α-glucosidase. The glucose 6-phosphatase system catalyzes the dephosphorylation of glucose 6-phosphate to glucose, a necessary step for free glucose to leave the cell. Mutations in the genes encoding the enzymes involved in glycogen metabolism cause glycogen storage diseases. PMID:27051594

  2. Chronic ethanol consumption disrupts diurnal rhythms of hepatic glycogen metabolism in mice

    PubMed Central

    Udoh, Uduak S.; Swain, Telisha M.; Filiano, Ashley N.; Gamble, Karen L.; Young, Martin E.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic ethanol consumption has been shown to significantly decrease hepatic glycogen content; however, the mechanisms responsible for this adverse metabolic effect are unknown. In this study, we examined the impact chronic ethanol consumption has on time-of-day-dependent oscillations (rhythms) in glycogen metabolism processes in the liver. For this, male C57BL/6J mice were fed either a control or ethanol-containing liquid diet for 5 wk, and livers were collected every 4 h for 24 h and analyzed for changes in various genes and proteins involved in hepatic glycogen metabolism. Glycogen displayed a robust diurnal rhythm in the livers of mice fed the control diet, with the peak occurring during the active (dark) period of the day. The diurnal glycogen rhythm was significantly altered in livers of ethanol-fed mice, with the glycogen peak shifted into the inactive (light) period and the overall content of glycogen decreased compared with controls. Chronic ethanol consumption further disrupted diurnal rhythms in gene expression (glycogen synthase 1 and 2, glycogenin, glucokinase, protein targeting to glycogen, and pyruvate kinase), total and phosphorylated glycogen synthase protein, and enzyme activities of glycogen synthase and glycogen phosphorylase, the rate-limiting enzymes of glycogen metabolism. In summary, these results show for the first time that chronic ethanol consumption disrupts diurnal rhythms in hepatic glycogen metabolism at the gene and protein level. Chronic ethanol-induced disruption in these daily rhythms likely contributes to glycogen depletion and disruption of hepatic energy homeostasis, a recognized risk factor in the etiology of alcoholic liver disease. PMID:25857999

  3. A Whole-Body Model for Glycogen Regulation Reveals a Critical Role for Substrate Cycling in Maintaining Blood Glucose Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ke; Morgan, Kevin T.; Todd Gehris, Abby; Elston, Timothy C.; Gomez, Shawn M.

    2011-01-01

    Timely, and sometimes rapid, metabolic adaptation to changes in food supply is critical for survival as an organism moves from the fasted to the fed state, and vice versa. These transitions necessitate major metabolic changes to maintain energy homeostasis as the source of blood glucose moves away from ingested carbohydrates, through hepatic glycogen stores, towards gluconeogenesis. The integration of hepatic glycogen regulation with extra-hepatic energetics is a key aspect of these adaptive mechanisms. Here we use computational modeling to explore hepatic glycogen regulation under fed and fasting conditions in the context of a whole-body model. The model was validated against previous experimental results concerning glycogen phosphorylase a (active) and glycogen synthase a dynamics. The model qualitatively reproduced physiological changes that occur during transition from the fed to the fasted state. Analysis of the model reveals a critical role for the inhibition of glycogen synthase phosphatase by glycogen phosphorylase a. This negative regulation leads to high levels of glycogen synthase activity during fasting conditions, which in turn increases substrate (futile) cycling, priming the system for a rapid response once an external source of glucose is restored. This work demonstrates that a mechanistic understanding of the design principles used by metabolic control circuits to maintain homeostasis can benefit from the incorporation of mathematical descriptions of these networks into “whole-body” contextual models that mimic in vivo conditions. PMID:22163177

  4. Elevated thymidine phosphorylase activity in psoriatic lesions accounts for the apparent presence of an epidermal growth inhibitor, but is not in itself growth inhibitory

    SciTech Connect

    Hammerberg, C.; Fisher, G.J.; Voorhees, J.J.; Cooper, K.D. )

    1991-08-01

    An apparent tissue-specific growth inhibitor, or chalone, obtained from psoriatic lesions was tentatively identified in the 100-kDa fraction based upon inhibition of DNA synthesis, as measured by (3H)-thymidine uptake by a squamous cell carcinoma cell line, SCC 38. This fraction, however, failed to inhibit SCC 38 cell growth when assessed directly in a neutral red uptake assay. Characterization of the inhibitor of (3H)-thymidine uptake revealed it to have biochemical properties identical to thymidine phosphorylase: (1) molecular weight close to 100 kDa, (2) isoelectric point of 4.2, and (3) thymidine phosphorylase enzyme activity. Thus, the authors conclude that its ability to inhibit (3H)-thymidine uptake was due to thymidine catabolism rather than inhibition of DNA synthesis or growth inhibition. Examination of thymidine phosphorylase activity in keratome biopsies from psoriatic and normal skin demonstrated a twentyfold increase in activity in psoriatic lesions relative to non-lesional or normal skin. This increase in metabolism of thymidine was due to thymidine phosphorylase rather than uridine phosphorylase activity. The correlation between increased thymidine phosphorylase activity and increased keratinocyte proliferation in vitro (cultured) and in vivo (psoriasis), suggests that this enzyme may play a critical role in providing the thymidine necessary for keratinocyte proliferation.

  5. Glycogen Repletion in Brown Adipose Tissue upon Refeeding Is Primarily Driven by Phosphorylation-Independent Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Carmean, Christopher M.; Huang, Y. Hanna; Brady, Matthew J.

    2016-01-01

    Glycogen storage in brown adipose tissue (BAT) is generally thought to take place through passive, substrate-driven activation of glycogenesis rather than programmatic shifts favoring or opposing the storage and/or retention of glycogen. This perception exists despite a growing body of evidence suggesting that BAT glycogen storage is actively regulated by covalent modification of key glycogen-metabolic enzymes, protein turnover, and endocrine hormone signaling. Members of one such class of covalent-modification regulators, glycogen-binding Phosphoprotein Phosphatase-1 (PP1)-regulatory subunits (PPP1Rs), targeting PP1 to glycogen-metabolic enzymes, were dynamically regulated in response to 24 hr of starvation and/or 24 hr of starvation followed by ad libitum refeeding. Over-expression of the PPP1R Protein Targeting to Glycogen (PTG), under the control of the aP2 promoter in mice, inactivated glycogen phosphorylase (GP) and enhanced basal- and starvation-state glycogen storage. Total interscapular BAT glycogen synthase and the constitutive activity of GS were conditionally affected. During starvation, glucose-6-phosphate (G-6-P) levels and the relative phosphorylation of Akt (p-Ser-473-Akt) were both increased in PTG-overexpressing (Tg) mice, suggesting that elevated glycogen storage during starvation modifies broader cellular metabolic pathways. During refeeding, Tg and WT mice reaccumulated glycogen similarly despite altered GS and GP activities. All observations during refeeding suggest that the phosphorylation states of GS and GP are not physiologically rate-controlling, despite there being a clear balance of endogenous kinase- and phosphatase activities. The studies presented here reveal IBAT glycogen storage to be a tightly-regulated process at all levels, with potential effects on nutrient sensing in vivo. PMID:27213961

  6. Antitumor glycogen from scallops and the interrelationship of structure and antitumor activity.

    PubMed

    Takaya; Uchisawa; Ichinohe; Sasaki; Ishida; Matsue

    1998-12-01

    Hot water extract of scallop was treated with actinase E and fractionated by Sephadex G-25 gel-filtration and DEAE Sephadex A-25 ion-exchange chromatography. The antitumor activity of these fractions against Meth-A fibrosarcoma was examined. The nonadsorbed fraction (SCA25A) and weakly adsorbed fraction (SCA25B) obtained on DEAE Sephadex A-25 anion-exchange gel showed strong antitumor activity. Chemical analyses and NMR spectra identified SCA25A and SCA25B as glycogen. However, glycogen extracted from the scallop with trichloroacetic acid and from abalone showed no antitumor activity. This difference was thought to be due to variations in the fine structure of the glycogen molecule. The fine structure of glycogen was investigated by a sequential enzyme digestion method using beta-amylase and pullulanase, while the unit chain was analyzed by high performance anion exchange chromatography. The results showed that the antitumor active glycogen was highly branched with a shorter chain than glycogens without antitumor activity. PMID:9852612

  7. Analysis of primer independent phosphorylase activity in potato plants: high levels of activity in sink organs and sucrose-dependent activity in cultured stem explants.

    PubMed

    Moreno, S; Tandecarz, J S

    1996-07-01

    One isoform of potato (Solanum tuberosum L., cv. Spunta), type L phosphorylase (EC 2.4.1.1), exhibiting primer independent activity appears to be tuber-specific. However, this activity can also be modulated by exogenous sucrose in storage as well as in non-storage organs. Primer independent phosphorylase (PIPh) activity in microtubers and shoots of in vitro plantlets was found to be much higher than in tubers and shoots of soil-grown plants. Detached leaves of soil-grown plants showed an increase in PIPh activity as well when incubated in sucrose-containing Murashige-Skoog (MS) medium. This increase was always accompanied by a rise in starch content. The presence of metabolizable carbohydrates in the growth or incubation medium are likely to be responsible for the observed rise in PIPh activity. In vitro microtubers and micropropagated plantlet organs (shoots and roots) exhibited a correlation between measurable PIPh activity and presence of enzyme protein, as judged by Western blot analysis using anti-potato tuber type L phosphorylase antibody. Therefore, in addition, to be developmentally regulated (tuber-specific accumulation), PIPh activity associated with the tuber type L isoform might be under a form of metabolic regulation. PMID:8832093

  8. The structure of a glycogen phosphorylase glucopyranose spirohydantoin complex at 1.8 A resolution and 100 K: the role of the water structure and its contribution to binding.

    PubMed Central

    Gregoriou, M.; Noble, M. E.; Watson, K. A.; Garman, E. F.; Krulle, T. M.; de la Fuente, C.; Fleet, G. W.; Oikonomakos, N. G.; Johnson, L. N.

    1998-01-01

    A glucopyranose spirohydantoin (a pyranose analogue of the potent herbicide, hydantocidin) has been identified as the highest affinity glucose analogue inhibitor of glycogen phosphorylase b (GPb). In order to elucidate the structural features that contribute to the binding, the structures of GPb in the native T state conformation and in complex with glucopyranose spirohydantoin have been determined at 100 K to 2.0 A and 1.8 A resolution, respectively, and refined to crystallographic R values of 0.197 (R[free] 0.248) and 0.182 (R[free] 0.229), respectively. The low temperature structure of GPb is almost identical to that of the previously determined room temperature structure, apart from a decrease in overall atomic temperature factors ((B) room temperature GPb = 34.9 A2; (B) 100 K GPb = 23.4 A2). The glucopyranose spirohydantoin inhibitor (Ki = 3.0 microM) binds at the catalytic site and induces small changes in two key regions of the protein: the 280s loop (residues 281-286) that results in a decrease in mobility of this region, and the 380s loop (residues 377-385) that undergoes more significant shifts in order to optimize contact to the ligand. The hydantoin group, that is responsible for increasing the affinity of the glucose compound by a factor of 10(3), makes only one hydrogen bond to the protein, from one of its NH groups to the main chain oxygen of His377. The other polar groups of the hydantoin group form hydrogen bonds to five water molecules. These waters are involved in extensive networks of hydrogen bonds and appear to be an integral part of the protein structure. Analysis of the water structure at the catalytic site of the native enzyme, shows that five waters are displaced by ligand binding and that there is a significant decrease in mobility of the remaining waters on formation of the GPb-hydantoin complex. The ability of the inhibitor to exploit existing waters, to displace waters and to recruit new waters appears to be important for the high

  9. Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) stimulates glycogen synthase activity in 3T3 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, C.P.; Bowen-Pope, D.F.; Ross, R.; Krebs, E.G.

    1986-05-01

    Hormonal regulation of glycogen synthase, an enzyme that can be phosphorylated on multiple sites, is often associated with changes in its phosphorylation state. Enzyme activation is conventionally monitored by determining the synthase activity ratio ((activity in the absence of glucose 6-P)/(activity in the presence of glucose 6-P)). Insulin causes an activation of glycogen synthase with a concomitant decrease in its phosphate content. In a previous report, the authors showed that epidermal growth factor (EGF) increases the glycogen synthase activity ratio in Swiss 3T3 cells. The time and dose-dependency of this response was similar to that of insulin. Their recent results indicate that PDGF also stimulates glycogen synthase activity. Enzyme activation was maximal after 30 min. of incubation with PDGF; the time course observed was very similar to that with insulin and EGF. At 1 ng/ml (0.03nM), PDGF caused a maximal stimulation of 4-fold in synthase activity ratio. Half-maximal stimulation was observed at 0.2 ng/ml (6 pM). The time course of changes in enzyme activity ratio closely followed that of /sup 125/I-PDGF binding. The authors data suggest that PDGF, as well as EFG and insulin, may be important in regulating glycogen synthesis through phosphorylation/dephosphorylation mechanisms.

  10. Lck/PLCγ control migration and proliferation of interleukin (IL)-2-stimulated T cells via the Rac1 GTPase/glycogen phosphorylase pathway.

    PubMed

    Llavero, Francisco; Artaso, Alain; Lacerda, Hadriano M; Parada, Luis A; Zugaza, José L

    2016-11-01

    Recently, we have reported that the IL-2-stimulated T cells activate PKCθ in order to phosphorylate the serine residues of αPIX-RhoGEF, and to switch on the Rac1/PYGM pathway resulting in T cell migration and proliferation. However, the molecular mechanism connecting the activated IL-2-R with the PKCθ/αPIX/Rac1/PYGM pathway is still unknown. In this study, the use of a combined pharmacological and genetic approach identified Lck, a Src family member, as the tyrosine kinase phosphorylating PLCγ leading to Rac1 and PYGM activation in the IL-2-stimulated Kit 225 T cells via the PKCθ/αPIX pathway. The PLCγ tyrosine phosphorylation was required to activate first PKCθ, and then αPIX and Rac1/PYGM. The results presented here delineate a novel signalling pathway ranking equally in importance to the three major pathways controlled by the IL-2-R, i.e. PI3K, Ras/MAPK and JAK/STAT pathways. The overall evidence strongly indicates that the central biological role of the novel IL-2-R/Lck/PLCγ/PKCθ/αPIX/Rac1/PYGM signalling pathway is directly related to the control of fundamental cellular processes such as T cell migration and proliferation. PMID:27519475

  11. Myoglobinuria and Skeletal Muscle Phosphorylase Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Nixon, J. C.; Hobbs, W. K.; Greenblatt, J.

    1966-01-01

    Investigation of a patient complaining of exercise-induced dark urine, pain, stiffness and tenderness of skeletal muscle revealed findings characteristic of McArdle's disease. The dark urine was attributable to the excretion of myoglobin, and an ischemic exercise test failed to demonstrate the usual rise and fall in blood lactate and pyruvate. Enzyme assays of skeletal muscle showed an absence of phosphorylase, a slight increase in phosphorylase b kinase and a slight decrease in phosphoglucomutase. Chemical and histochemical analyses demonstrated an increase in the skeletal muscle glycogen content and an enlargement of the muscle cells. No abnormality of liver glycogen metabolism was found. In the absence of specific therapy, an effective and practical form of treatment is reduction of exercise below the threshold of symptoms. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8 PMID:4952390

  12. Validation of a HPLC method for the measurement of erythrocyte encapsulated thymidine phosphorylase (EE-TP) activity.

    PubMed

    Fairbanks, Lynette D; Levene, Michelle; Bax, Bridget E

    2013-03-25

    A sensitive and simple reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) assay has been validated for the determination of thymine as a measure of thymidine phosphorylase activity encapsulated in erythrocytes (EE-TP), a formulation which is under clinical development as an enzyme replacement therapy for the treatment of mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy (MNGIE). Diluted erythrocyte lysates were incubated in 100mM sodium phosphate buffer and 10mM thymidine at 37°C for 10min and the reaction stopped with 40% trichloroacetic acid. Following centrifugation, the supernatant was washed with water saturated diethyl ether, and injected onto a Spherisorb C(18) column (125mm×4.6mm, 5μm), with a mobile phase (40mM ammonium acetate, 5mM tetrabutyl ammonium hydrogen sulphate, pH 2.70) delivered at a flow rate of 1.0ml/min and run time of 8min. Ultraviolet detection (UV) was employed at 254nm. The method was linear in the range of 5-500nmol/ml (r(2)=0.992), specific with intra- and inter-day precisions of <9.6 and accuracies within ±20%. Limits of detection and quantification were 1.2nmol/ml and 10nmol/ml, respectively. The method was applied to quantify thymidine phosphorylase activity in samples of in-process controls and batches of EE-TP manufactured for clinical use. PMID:23291437

  13. Regulation of glucose and glycogen metabolism during and after exercise.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Thomas E; Richter, Erik A

    2012-03-01

    Utilization of carbohydrate in the form of intramuscular glycogen stores and glucose delivered from plasma becomes an increasingly important energy substrate to the working muscle with increasing exercise intensity. This review gives an update on the molecular signals by which glucose transport is increased in the contracting muscle followed by a discussion of glycogen mobilization and synthesis by the action of glycogen phosphorylase and glycogen synthase, respectively. Finally, this review deals with the signalling relaying the well-described increased sensitivity of glucose transport to insulin in the post-exercise period which can result in an overshoot of intramuscular glycogen resynthesis post exercise (glycogen supercompensation). PMID:22199166

  14. Regulation of glucose and glycogen metabolism during and after exercise

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Thomas E; Richter, Erik A

    2012-01-01

    Utilization of carbohydrate in the form of intramuscular glycogen stores and glucose delivered from plasma becomes an increasingly important energy substrate to the working muscle with increasing exercise intensity. This review gives an update on the molecular signals by which glucose transport is increased in the contracting muscle followed by a discussion of glycogen mobilization and synthesis by the action of glycogen phosphorylase and glycogen synthase, respectively. Finally, this review deals with the signalling relaying the well-described increased sensitivity of glucose transport to insulin in the post-exercise period which can result in an overshoot of intramuscular glycogen resynthesis post exercise (glycogen supercompensation). PMID:22199166

  15. Identification of glycogen synthase as a new substrate for stress-activated protein kinase 2b/p38beta.

    PubMed

    Kuma, Yvonne; Campbell, David G; Cuenda, Ana

    2004-04-01

    The endogenous glycogen synthase in extracts from mouse skeletal muscle, liver and brain bound specifically to SAPK2b (stress-activated protein kinase 2b)/p38b, but not to other members of the group of SAPK/p38 kinases. Glycogen synthase was phosphorylated in vitro more efficiently by SAPK2b/p38b than by SAPK2a/p38a, SAPK3/p38g or SAPK4/p38d. SAPK2b/p38b phosphorylated glycogen synthase in vitro at residues Ser644, Ser652, Thr718 and Ser724, two of which (Ser644 and Ser652) are also phosphorylated by glycogen synthase kinase 3. Thr718 and Ser724 are novel sites not known to be phosphorylated by other protein kinases. Glycogen synthase becomes phosphorylated at Ser644 in response to osmotic shock; this phosphorylation is prevented by pretreatment of the cells with SB 203580, which inhibits SAPK2a/p38a and SAPK2b/p38b activity. In vitro, phosphorylation of glycogen synthase by SAPK2b/p38b alone had no significant effect on its activity, indicating that phosphorylation at residue Ser644 itself is insufficient to decrease glycogen synthase activity. However, after phosphorylation by SAPK2b/p38b, subsequent phosphorylation at Ser640 by glycogen synthase kinase 3 decreased the activity of glycogen synthase. This decrease was not observed when SAPK2b/p38b activity was blocked with SB 203580. These results suggest that SAPK2b/p38b may be a priming kinase that allows glycogen synthase kinase 3 to phosphorylate Ser640 and thereby inhibit glycogen synthase activity. PMID:14680475

  16. Synthesis and characterization of 6-fluoro 5'-deoxypyridoxal. Study of phosphorylase reconstituted with 6-fluoro 5'-deoxypyridoxal and 5'-pyridoxal

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Y.C.; Scott, R.D.; Graves, D.J.

    1986-05-01

    A new Vitamin B/sub 6/ analogue, 6-fluoro 5'-deoxypyridoxal (6FDPL), was synthesized and characterized. Phosphorylase reconstituted with this analogue show 1% of the activity of the native enzyme in the presence of phosphite. The kinetic pattern, pH optimum of activity, and the activity-temperature dependency of the 6-FDPL-enzyme were virtually identical to those of phosphorylase reconstituted 6-fluoropyridoxal (6-FPAL), except the Km of phosphite toward the former enzyme was 9-times higher than that with the latter enzyme and the 6-FDPL-enzyme showed a lower V/sub max/ value. F-19 NMR studies showed that the binding of glucose-1-P to a 6-FDPL-enzyme-AMP complex shifted the F-19 signal 0.6 ppm toward upfield, whereas a 2.1 ppm change was observed when the 6-FPAL-enzyme-AMP formed with glucose-1-P. Analysis of the activation parameters, of the glycogen breakdown reaction catalyzed by the native phosphorylase and phosphorylase containing 6-fluoropyridoxal 5'-phosphate (6-FPLD), 6-FPAL, 6-FDPL, pyridoxal or DPL showed that modifications of the coenzyme molecule only affected the activation entropy, not the activation enthalpy. These results suggest that the pyridine ring of the coenzyme may undergo a rotation during the course of catalysis; and the interaction between the coenzyme molecule with its neighboring amino acids are important to the efficiency of catalysis.

  17. Role of glucose transport in glycogen supercompensation in reweighted rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Henriksen, E J; Stump, C S; Trinh, T H; Beaty, S D

    1996-05-01

    Hindlimb weight bearing after a 3-day period of hindlimb suspension (reweighting) of juvenile rats results in a marked transient elevation in soleus glycogen concentration that cannot be explained on the basis of the activities of glycogen synthase and phosphorylase. We have hypothesized that enhanced glucose transport activity could underlie this response. We directly tested this hypothesis by assessing the response of insulin-dependent and insulin-independent glucose transport activity (in vitro 2-[1,2-3H]deoxy-D-glucose uptake) as well as glucose transporter (GLUT-4) protein levels during a 48-h reweighting period. After a net glycogen loss (from 29 +/- 2 to 16 +/- 1 nmol/mg muscle; P < 0.05) during the first 2 h of reweighting, glycogen accumulated at an average rate of 1.4 nmol.mg-1.h-1 up to 18 h, reaching an apex of 38 +/- 1 nmol/mg. During this same reweighting period, insulin-independent, but not insulin-dependent, glucose transport activity was significantly enhanced (P < 0.05 vs. weight-bearing control values) and was associated with an elevated level of GLUT-4 protein and the specific activity of total hexokinase. The specific activity of citrate synthase was also increased. By 24 h of reweighting, although insulin-independent glucose transport activity and GLUT-4 protein remained elevated, glycogen accumulation had ceased, likely due to enhanced phosphorylase activity at this time point. These results are consistent with the interpretation that the glycogen supercompensation seen during reweighting of the rat soleus may be regulated in part by an enhanced glucose flux arising from an increase in insulin-independent glucose transport activity and hexokinase activity. PMID:8727537

  18. Late-onset MNGIE due to partial loss of thymidine phosphorylase activity.

    PubMed

    Martí, Ramon; Verschuuren, Jan J G M; Buchman, Alan; Hirano, Ikuo; Tadesse, Saba; van Kuilenburg, André B P; van Gennip, Albert H; Poorthuis, Ben J H M; Hirano, Michio

    2005-10-01

    Mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy (MNGIE) is caused by mutations in the gene encoding thymidine phosphorylase (TP). All MNGIE patients have had severe loss of TP function and prominent plasma accumulations of the TP substrates thymidine (dThd) and deoxyuridine (dUrd). Here, we report for the first time to our knowledge three MNGIE patients with later onset, milder phenotype, and less severe TP dysfunction, compared with typical MNGIE patients. This report demonstrates a direct relationship between the biochemical defects and clinical phenotypes in MNGIE and supports the notion that reduction of dThd and dUrd accumulation or TP replacement could be useful therapy for MNGIE. PMID:16178026

  19. The nutritional status of Methanosarcina acetivorans regulates glycogen metabolism and gluconeogenesis and glycolysis fluxes.

    PubMed

    Santiago-Martínez, Michel Geovanni; Encalada, Rusely; Lira-Silva, Elizabeth; Pineda, Erika; Gallardo-Pérez, Juan Carlos; Reyes-García, Marco Antonio; Saavedra, Emma; Moreno-Sánchez, Rafael; Marín-Hernández, Alvaro; Jasso-Chávez, Ricardo

    2016-05-01

    Gluconeogenesis is an essential pathway in methanogens because they are unable to use exogenous hexoses as carbon source for cell growth. With the aim of understanding the regulatory mechanisms of central carbon metabolism in Methanosarcina acetivorans, the present study investigated gene expression, the activities and metabolic regulation of key enzymes, metabolite contents and fluxes of gluconeogenesis, as well as glycolysis and glycogen synthesis/degradation pathways. Cells were grown with methanol as a carbon source. Key enzymes were kinetically characterized at physiological pH/temperature. Active consumption of methanol during exponential cell growth correlated with significant methanogenesis, gluconeogenic flux and steady glycogen synthesis. After methanol exhaustion, cells reached the stationary growth phase, which correlated with the rise in glycogen consumption and glycolytic flux, decreased methanogenesis, negligible acetate production and an absence of gluconeogenesis. Elevated activities of carbon monoxide dehydrogenase/acetyl-CoA synthetase complex and pyruvate: ferredoxin oxidoreductase suggested the generation of acetyl-CoA and pyruvate for glycogen synthesis. In the early stationary growth phase, the transcript contents and activities of pyruvate phosphate dikinase, fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase and glycogen synthase decreased, whereas those of glycogen phosphorylase, ADP-phosphofructokinase and pyruvate kinase increased. Therefore, glycogen and gluconeogenic metabolites were synthesized when an external carbon source was provided. Once such a carbon source became depleted, glycolysis and methanogenesis fed by glycogen degradation provided the ATP supply. Weak inhibition of key enzymes by metabolites suggested that the pathways evaluated were mainly transcriptionally regulated. Because glycogen metabolism and glycolysis/gluconeogenesis are not present in all methanogens, the overall data suggest that glycogen storage might represent an environmental

  20. Lithium Induces Glycogen Accumulation in Salivary Glands of the Rat.

    PubMed

    Souza, D N; Mendes, F M; Nogueira, F N; Simões, A; Nicolau, J

    2016-02-01

    Lithium is administered for the treatment of mood and bipolar disorder. The aim of this study was to verify whether treatment with different concentrations of lithium may affect the glycogen metabolism in the salivary glands of the rats when compared with the liver. Mobilization of glycogen in salivary glands is important for the process of secretion. Two sets of experiments were carried out, that is, in the first, the rats received drinking water supplemented with LiCl (38,25 and 12 mM of LiCl for 15 days) and the second experiment was carried out by intraperitoneal injection of LiCl solution (12 mg/kg and 45 mg LiCl/kg body weight) for 3 days. The active form of glycogen phosphorylase was not affected by treatment with LiCl considering the two experiments. The active form of glycogen synthase presented higher activity in the submandibular glands of rats treated with 25 and 38 mM LiCl and in the liver, with 25 mM LiCl. Glycogen level was higher than that of control in the submandibular glands of rats receiving 38 and 12 mM LiCl, in the parotid of rats receiving 25 and 38 mM, and in the liver of rats receiving 12 mM LiCl. The absolute value of glycogen for the submandibular treated with 25 mM LiCl, and the liver treated with 38 mM LiCl, was higher than the control value, although not statistically significant for these tissues. No statistically significant difference was found in the submandibular and parotid salivary glands for protein concentration when comparing experimental and control groups. We concluded that LiCl administered to rats influences the metabolism of glycogen in salivary glands. PMID:26155966

  1. A protein kinase screen of Neurospora crassa mutant strains reveals that the SNF1 protein kinase promotes glycogen synthase phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Candido, Thiago De Souza; Gonçalves, Rodrigo Duarte; Felício, Ana Paula; Freitas, Fernanda Zanolli; Cupertino, Fernanda Barbosa; De Carvalho, Ana Carolina Gomes Vieira; Bertolini, Maria Célia

    2014-12-15

    Glycogen functions as a carbohydrate reserve in a variety of organisms and its metabolism is highly regulated. The activities of glycogen synthase and glycogen phosphorylase, the rate-limiting enzymes of the synthesis and degradation processes, respectively, are regulated by allosteric modulation and reversible phosphorylation. To identify the protein kinases affecting glycogen metabolism in Neurospora crassa, we performed a screen of 84 serine/threonine kinase knockout strains. We identified multiple kinases that have already been described as controlling glycogen metabolism in different organisms, such as NcSNF1, NcPHO85, NcGSK3, NcPKA, PSK2 homologue and NcATG1. In addition, many hypothetical kinases have been implicated in the control of glycogen metabolism. Two kinases, NcIME-2 and NcNIMA, already functionally characterized but with no functions related to glycogen metabolism regulation, were also identified. Among the kinases identified, it is important to mention the role of NcSNF1. We showed in the present study that this kinase was implicated in glycogen synthase phosphorylation, as demonstrated by the higher levels of glycogen accumulated during growth, along with a higher glycogen synthase (GSN) ±glucose 6-phosphate activity ratio and a lesser set of phosphorylated GSN isoforms in strain Ncsnf1KO, when compared with the wild-type strain. The results led us to conclude that, in N. crassa, this kinase promotes phosphorylation of glycogen synthase either directly or indirectly, which is the opposite of what is described for Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The kinases also play a role in gene expression regulation, in that gdn, the gene encoding the debranching enzyme, was down-regulated by the proteins identified in the screen. Some kinases affected growth and development, suggesting a connection linking glycogen metabolism with cell growth and development. PMID:25253091

  2. The maximum activities of hexokinase, phosphorylase, phosphofructokinase, glycerol phosphate dehydrogenases, lactate dehydrogenase, octopine dehydrogenase, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, nucleoside diphosphatekinase, glutamate-oxaloacetate transaminase and arginine kinase in relation to carbohydrate utilization in muscles from marine invertebrates.

    PubMed Central

    Zammit, V A; Newsholme, E A

    1976-01-01

    Comparison of the activities of hexokinase, phosphorylase and phosphofructokinase in muscles from marine invertebrates indicates that they can be divided into three groups. First, the activities of the three enzymes are low in coelenterate muscles, catch muscles of molluscs and muscles of echinoderms; this indicates a low rate of carbohydrate (and energy) utilization by these muscles. Secondly, high activities of phosphorylase and phosphofructokinase relative to those of hexokinase are found in, for example, lobster abdominal and scallop snap muscles; this indicates that these muscles depend largely on anaerobic degradation of glycogen for energy production. Thirdly, high activities of hexokinase are found in the radular muscles of prosobranch molluscs and the fin muscles of squids; this indicates a high capacity for glucose utilization, which is consistent with the high activities of enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid cycle in these muscles [Alp, Newsholme & Zammit (1976) Biochem. J. 154, 689-700]. 2. The activities of lactate dehydrogenase, octopine dehydrogenase, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, cytosolic and mitochondrial glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase and glutamate-oxaloacetate transaminase were measured in order to provide a qualitative indication of the importance of different processes for oxidation of glycolytically formed NADH. The muscles are divided into four groups: those that have a high activity of lactate dehydrogenase relative to the activities of phosphofructokinase (e.g. crustacean muscles); those that have high activities of octopine dehydrogenase but low activities of lactate dehydrogenase (e.g. scallop snap muscle); those that have moderate activities of both lactate dehydrogenase and octopine dehydrogenase (radular muscles of prosobranchs), and those that have low activities of both lactate dehydrogenase and octopine dehydrogenase, but which possess activities of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (oyster adductor muscles). It is

  3. Glycogen metabolism in humans☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Adeva-Andany, María M.; González-Lucán, Manuel; Donapetry-García, Cristóbal; Fernández-Fernández, Carlos; Ameneiros-Rodríguez, Eva

    2016-01-01

    In the human body, glycogen is a branched polymer of glucose stored mainly in the liver and the skeletal muscle that supplies glucose to the blood stream during fasting periods and to the muscle cells during muscle contraction. Glycogen has been identified in other tissues such as brain, heart, kidney, adipose tissue, and erythrocytes, but glycogen function in these tissues is mostly unknown. Glycogen synthesis requires a series of reactions that include glucose entrance into the cell through transporters, phosphorylation of glucose to glucose 6-phosphate, isomerization to glucose 1-phosphate, and formation of uridine 5ʹ-diphosphate-glucose, which is the direct glucose donor for glycogen synthesis. Glycogenin catalyzes the formation of a short glucose polymer that is extended by the action of glycogen synthase. Glycogen branching enzyme introduces branch points in the glycogen particle at even intervals. Laforin and malin are proteins involved in glycogen assembly but their specific function remains elusive in humans. Glycogen is accumulated in the liver primarily during the postprandial period and in the skeletal muscle predominantly after exercise. In the cytosol, glycogen breakdown or glycogenolysis is carried out by two enzymes, glycogen phosphorylase which releases glucose 1-phosphate from the linear chains of glycogen, and glycogen debranching enzyme which untangles the branch points. In the lysosomes, glycogen degradation is catalyzed by α-glucosidase. The glucose 6-phosphatase system catalyzes the dephosphorylation of glucose 6-phosphate to glucose, a necessary step for free glucose to leave the cell. Mutations in the genes encoding the enzymes involved in glycogen metabolism cause glycogen storage diseases. PMID:27051594

  4. Two Additional Phosphorylases in Developing Maize Seeds 12

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, C. Y.; Nelson, O. E.

    1969-01-01

    Two additional phosphorylases (III and IV) have been detected in developing seeds of maize. Phosphorylase IV is found only in the embryo (with scutellum). It is also present in the embryo of the germinating seed where its activity is 90-fold greater than the activity in the developing embryo 22 days after pollination. Phosphorylase IV is eluted from a DEAE-cellulose column in the same fraction as phosphorylase I of the endosperm, and the 2 enzymes are similar in many respects. Phosphorylase IV is distinguished from phosphorylase I by electrophoretic mobility, by pH optimum, and because its properties are not affected by the shrunken-4 mutation. Phosphorylase III is found both in the endosperms and embryos of developing seeds. Activity for this enzyme is not detected in crude homogenates nor eluates from a DEAE-cellulose column apparently because it complexes with a non-dialyzable, heat-labile inhibitor. High activity is found after protamine sulfate fractionation. Phosphorylase III is bound to protamine sulfate and is then removed by washing with 0.3 m phosphate buffer. Phosphorylase III activity in the endosperm is not detectable 8 days after pollination but is present 12 days after pollination. Phosphorylase III differs from phosphorylases I, II, and IV in several respects—pH optimum, pH-independent ATP inhibition, time of appearance in the endosperm, and because purine and pyrimidine nucleotides are equally inhibitory. In common with phosphorylase II, phosphorylase III apparently does not require a primer to initiate the synthesis of an amylose-like polymer. PMID:5774172

  5. Purine nucleoside phosphorylase and xanthine oxidase activities in erythrocytes and plasma from marine, semiaquatic and terrestrial mammals.

    PubMed

    López-Cruz, Roberto I; Pérez-Milicua, Myrna Barjau; Crocker, Daniel E; Gaxiola-Robles, Ramón; Bernal-Vertiz, Jaime A; de la Rosa, Alejandro; Vázquez-Medina, José P; Zenteno-Savín, Tania

    2014-05-01

    Purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) and xanthine oxidase (XO) are key enzymes involved in the purine salvage pathway. PNP metabolizes purine bases to synthetize purine nucleotides whereas XO catalyzes the oxidation of purines to uric acid. In humans, PNP activity is reported to be high in erythrocytes and XO activity to be low in plasma; however, XO activity increases after ischemic events. XO activity in plasma of northern elephant seals has been reported during prolonged fasting and rest and voluntary associated apneas. The objective of this study was to analyze circulating PNP and XO activities in marine mammals adapted to tolerate repeated cycles of ischemia/reperfusion associated with diving (bottlenose dolphin, northern elephant seal) in comparison with semiaquatic (river otter) and terrestrial mammals (human, pig). PNP activities in plasma and erythrocytes, as well as XO activity in plasma, from all species were quantified by spectrophotometry. No clear relationship in circulating PNP or XO activity could be established between marine, semiaquatic and terrestrial mammals. Erythrocytes from bottlenose dolphins and humans are highly permeable to nucleosides and glucose, intraerythrocyte PNP activity may be related to a release of purine nucleotides from the liver. High-energy costs will probably mean a higher ATP degradation rate in river otters, as compared to northern elephant seals or dolphins. Lower erythrocyte PNP activity and elevated plasma XO activity in northern elephant seal could be associated with fasting and/or sleep- and dive-associated apneas. PMID:24530799

  6. Reaction Kinetics of Substrate Transglycosylation Catalyzed by TreX of Sulfolobus solfataricus and Effects on Glycogen Breakdown

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Dang Hai Dang; Park, Jong-Tae; Shim, Jae-Hoon; Tran, Phuong Lan; Oktavina, Ershita Fitria; Nguyen, Thi Lan Huong; Lee, Sung-Jae; Park, Cheon-Seok; Li, Dan; Park, Sung-Hoon; Stapleton, David; Lee, Jin-Sil

    2014-01-01

    We studied the activity of a debranching enzyme (TreX) from Sulfolobus solfataricus on glycogen-mimic substrates, branched maltotetraosyl-β-cyclodextrin (Glc4-β-CD), and natural glycogen to better understand substrate transglycosylation and the effect thereof on glycogen debranching in microorganisms. The validation test of Glc4-β-CD as a glycogen mimic substrate showed that it followed the breakdown process of the well-known yeast and rat liver extract. TreX catalyzed both hydrolysis of α-1,6-glycosidic linkages and transglycosylation at relatively high (>0.5 mM) substrate concentrations. TreX transferred maltotetraosyl moieties from the donor substrate to acceptor molecules, resulting in the formation of two positional isomers of dimaltotetraosyl-α-1,6-β-cyclodextrin [(Glc4)2-β-CD]; these were 61,63- and 61,64-dimaltotetraosyl-α-1,6-β-CD. Use of a modified Michaelis-Menten equation to study substrate transglycosylation revealed that the kcat and Km values for transglycosylation were 1.78 × 103 s−1 and 3.30 mM, respectively, whereas the values for hydrolysis were 2.57 × 103 s−1 and 0.206 mM, respectively. Also, enzyme catalytic efficiency (the kcat/Km ratio) increased as the degree of polymerization of branch chains rose. In the model reaction system of Escherichia coli, glucose-1-phosphate production from glycogen by the glycogen phosphorylase was elevated ∼1.45-fold in the presence of TreX compared to that produced in the absence of TreX. The results suggest that outward shifting of glycogen branch chains via transglycosylation increases the number of exposed chains susceptible to phosphorylase action. We developed a model of the glycogen breakdown process featuring both hydrolysis and transglycosylation catalyzed by the debranching enzyme. PMID:24610710

  7. Glycogen storage diseases: New perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Özen, Hasan

    2007-01-01

    Glycogen storage diseases (GSD) are inherited metabolic disorders of glycogen metabolism. Different hormones, including insulin, glucagon, and cortisol regulate the relationship of glycolysis, gluconeogenesis and glycogen synthesis. The overall GSD incidence is estimated 1 case per 20000-43000 live births. There are over 12 types and they are classified based on the enzyme deficiency and the affected tissue. Disorders of glycogen degradation may affect primarily the liver, the muscle, or both. Type Ia involves the liver, kidney and intestine (and Ib also leukocytes), and the clinical manifestations are hepatomegaly, failure to thrive, hypoglycemia, hyperlactatemia, hyperuricemia and hyperlipidemia. Type IIIa involves both the liver and muscle, and IIIb solely the liver. The liver symptoms generally improve with age. Type IV usually presents in the first year of life, with hepatomegaly and growth retardation. The disease in general is progressive to cirrhosis. Type VI and IX are a heterogeneous group of diseases caused by a deficiency of the liver phosphorylase and phosphorylase kinase system. There is no hyperuricemia or hyperlactatemia. Type XI is characterized by hepatic glycogenosis and renal Fanconi syndrome. Type II is a prototype of inborn lysosomal storage diseases and involves many organs but primarily the muscle. Types V and VII involve only the muscle. PMID:17552001

  8. Thymidine phosphorylase activates NFκB and stimulates the expression of angiogenic and metastatic factors in human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Tabata, Sho; Ikeda, Ryuji; Yamamoto, Masatatsu; Shimaoka, Shunji; Mukaida, Naofumi; Takeda, Yasuo; Yamada, Katsushi; Soga, Tomoyoshi; Furukawa, Tatsuhiko; Akiyama, Shin-ichi

    2014-11-15

    Thymidine phosphorylase (TP) promotes angiogenesis and metastasis, and confers resistance to anticancer agents in some cancer cell types. We previously reported that TP stimulates the expression of interleukin (IL)-8 in human KB cancer cells by an unknown mechanism. A mutation in the nuclear factor (NF)κB binding site of the IL-8 promoter suppressed promoter activity in KB/TP cells that overexpress TP. Specifically inhibiting NFκB by using BY11-7082 also suppressed TP-induced IL-8 promoter activity and IL-8 expression. Moreover, TP overexpression led to the activation of NFκB and an upregulation in the expression of its target genes, and increased phosphorylated IKKα/β protein levels, while promoting IκBα degradation as well as p65 phosphorylation and nuclear localization. The activation of NFκB in KB/TP cells was suppressed by the antioxidants N-acetylcysteine and EUK-8. In addition, in gastric cancer tissue samples, the expression of the NFκB-regulated genes, including IL-8, IL-6, and fibronectin-1 was positively correlated with TP expression. These findings indicate that reactive oxygen species mediated NFκB activation by TP increases the expression of genes that promote angiogenesis and metastasis in gastric cancer. PMID:25350954

  9. Activation of glycolysis and apoptosis in glycogen storage disease type Ia.

    PubMed

    Sun, Baodong; Li, Songtao; Yang, Liu; Damodaran, Tirupapuliyur; Desai, Dev; Diehl, Anna Mae; Alzate, Oscar; Koeberl, Dwight D

    2009-08-01

    The deficiency of glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) underlies glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSD-Ia, von Gierke disease; MIM 232200), an autosomal recessive disorder of metabolism associated with life-threatening hypoglycemia, growth retardation, renal failure, hepatic adenomas, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Liver involvement includes the massive accumulation of glycogen and lipids due to accumulated glucose-6-phosphate and glycolytic intermediates. Proteomic analysis revealed elevations in glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and other enzymes involved in glycolysis. GAPDH was markedly increased in murine G6Pase-deficient hepatocytes. The moonlighting role of GAPDH includes increasing apoptosis, which was demonstrated by increased TUNEL assay positivity and caspase 3 activation in the murine GSD-Ia liver. These analyses of hepatic involvement in GSD-Ia mice have implicated the induction of apoptosis in the pathobiology of GSD-Ia. PMID:19419892

  10. Effect of proglycosyn and other phenolic compounds on glycogen metabolism in isolated hepatocytes. Potential role of glucuronidated metabolites.

    PubMed

    Van Schaftingen, E; de Hoffmann, E

    1993-12-01

    The mechanism by which proglycosyn (LY 177,507) stimulates glycogen synthesis in isolated hepatocytes [Harris, R. A., Yamanouchi, K., Roach, P. J., Yen, T. T., Dominiani, S. J. & Stephens, T. W. (1989) J. Biol. Chem. 264, 13674-13680] has been investigated. When incubated in the presence of hepatocytes, proglycosyn was metabolized to an O-demethylated glucuronidated derivative, as determined by fast-atom-bombardment mass spectrometry and enzymic analysis. This metabolite accumulated almost linearly inside the cells to reach a concentration of approximately 3 mumol/g protein after 50 min, without apparent release into the medium. In confirmation of previous work, proglycosyn decreased the level of phosphorylase a and increased that of synthase a in hepatocytes. Washing of cells incubated with proglycosyn for 30 min considerably decreased the concentration of the drug without significantly modifying the intracellular concentration of the metabolite and the activation state of glycogen synthase. Several compounds bearing structural analogy with proglycosyn were also tested for their effect on glycogen metabolism. At millimolar or submillimolar concentrations, resorcinol, m-anisidine, phenol, 3-hydroxyacetophenone, and 3-acetamidophenol, although not 4-acetamidophenol, stimulated the incorporation of [14C]glucose into glycogen, decreased the level of phosphorylase a and increased the level of synthase a. In the case of phenol, the effect on the glycogen enzymes paralleled the intracellular accumulation of phenylglucuronide. Furthermore, ethanol and D-galactosamine, which decreased the conversion of phenol to phenylglucuronide and the intracellular concentration of phenylglucuronide, counteracted the effect of phenol on the synthase and on the phosphorylase. From these results, it is suggested that the effect of proglycosyn and of simpler phenol derivatives is mediated by glucuronidated metabolites, which act on an intracellular target. PMID:8269965

  11. Hematopoietic gene therapy restores thymidine phosphorylase activity in a cell culture and a murine model of MNGIE.

    PubMed

    Torres-Torronteras, J; Gómez, A; Eixarch, H; Palenzuela, L; Pizzorno, G; Hirano, M; Andreu, A L; Barquinero, J; Martí, R

    2011-08-01

    Mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy (MNGIE) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the TYMP gene, which encodes thymidine phosphorylase (TP). TP dysfunction results in systemic thymidine (dThd) and deoxyuridine (dUrd) overload, which selectively impair mitochondrial DNA replication. Allogeneic hematopoietic transplantation has been used to treat MNGIE patients; however, this approach has serious adverse effects, including the toxicity of myeloablative conditioning, graft rejection and graft-versus-host disease. With the aim of testing the feasibility of gene therapy for MNGIE, we transduced TP-deficient B-lymphoblastoid cells from two MNGIE patients, with lentiviral vectors carrying a functional copy of the human TYMP DNA coding sequence. This restored TP activity in the cells, which reduced the excretion of dThd and dUrd and their concentrations when added in excess. Additionally, lentiviral-mediated hematopoietic gene therapy was used in partially myeloablated double Tymp/Upp1 knockout mice. In spite of the relatively low levels of molecular chimerism achieved, high levels of TP activity were observed in the peripheral blood of the transplanted mice, with a concomitant reduction of nucleoside concentrations. Our results suggest that hematopoietic gene therapy could be an alternative treatment for this devastating disorder in the future. PMID:21451581

  12. Development of a new HPLC method using fluorescence detection without derivatization for determining purine nucleoside phosphorylase activity in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Giuliani, Patricia; Zuccarini, Mariachiara; Buccella, Silvana; Rossini, Margherita; D'Alimonte, Iolanda; Ciccarelli, Renata; Marzo, Matteo; Marzo, Antonio; Di Iorio, Patrizia; Caciagli, Francesco

    2016-01-15

    Purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) activity is involved in cell survival and function, since PNP is a key enzyme in the purine metabolic pathway where it catalyzes the phosphorolysis of the nucleosides to the corresponding nucleobases. Its dysfunction has been found in relevant pathological conditions (such as inflammation and cancer), so the detection of PNP activity in plasma could represent an attractive marker for early diagnosis or assessment of disease progression. Thus the aim of this study was to develop a simple, fast and sensitive HPLC method for the determination of PNP activity in plasma. The separation was achieved on a Phenomenex Kinetex PFP column using 0.1% formic acid in water and methanol as mobile phases in gradient elution mode at a flow rate of 1ml/min and purine compounds were detected using UV absorption and fluorescence. The analysis was fast since the run was achieved within 13min. This method improved the separation of the different purines, allowing the UV-based quantification of the natural PNP substrates (inosine and guanosine) or products (hypoxanthine and guanine) and its subsequent metabolic products (xanthine and uric acid) with a good precision and accuracy. The most interesting innovation is the simultaneous use of a fluorescence detector (excitation/emission wavelength of 260/375nm) that allowed the quantification of guanosine and guanine without derivatization. Compared with UV, the fluorescence detection improved the sensitivity for guanine detection by about 10-fold and abolished almost completely the baseline noise due to the presence of plasma in the enzymatic reaction mixture. Thus, the validated method allowed an excellent evaluation of PNP activity in plasma which could be useful as an indicator of several pathological conditions. PMID:26720700

  13. In vivo effects of diabetes, insulin and oleanolic acid on enzymes of glycogen metabolism in the skin of streptozotocin-induced diabetic male Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Mukundwa, Andrew; Langa, Silvana O; Mukaratirwa, Samson; Masola, Bubuya

    2016-03-01

    The skin is the largest organ in the body and diabetes induces pathologic changes on the skin that affect glucose homeostasis. Changes in skin glycogen and glucose levels can mirror serum glucose levels and thus the skin might contribute to whole body glucose metabolism. This study investigated the in vivo effects of diabetes, insulin and oleanolic acid (OA) on enzymes of glycogen metabolism in skin of type 1 diabetic rats. Diabetic and non-diabetic adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with a single daily dose of insulin (4 IU/kg body weight), OA (80 mg/kg body weight) and a combination of OA + insulin for 14 days. Glycogen phosphorylase (GP) expression; and GP, glycogen synthase (GS) and hexokinase activities as well glycogen levels were evaluated. The results suggest that diabetes lowers hexokinase activity, GP activity and GP expression with no change in GS activity whilst the treatments increased GP expression and the activities of hexokinase, GP and GS except for the GS activity in OA treated rats. Glycogen levels were increased slightly by diabetes as well as OA treatment. In conclusion diabetes, OA and insulin can lead to changes in GS and GP activities in skin without significantly altering the glycogen content. We suggest that the skin may contribute to whole body glucose homeostasis particularly in disease states. PMID:26869513

  14. Branching enzyme activity of cultured amniocytes and chorionic villi: prenatal testing for type IV glycogen storage disease.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, B I; Brown, D H

    1989-01-01

    Although type IV glycogen storage disease (Andersen disease; McKusick 23250) is considered to be a rare, autosomally recessive disorder, of the more than 600 patients with glycogenosis identified in our laboratory by enzymatic assays, 6% have been shown to be deficient in the glycogen branching enzyme. Most of the 38 patients with type IV glycogen storage disease who are known to us have succumbed at a very early age, with the exception of one male teenager, an apparently healthy 7-year-old male, and several 5-year-old patients. Fourteen pregnancies at risk for branching enzyme deficiency have been monitored using cultured amniotic fluid cells, and four additional pregnancies have been screened using cultured chorionic villi. Essentially no branching enzyme activity was detectable in eight samples (amniocytes); activities within the control range were found in five samples (three amniocyte and two chorionic villi samples); and five samples appeared to have been derived from carriers. In two of the cases lacking branching enzyme activity, in which the pregnancies were terminated and fibroblasts were successfully cultured from the aborted fetuses, no branching enzyme activity was found. Another fetus, which was predicted by antenatal assay to be affected, was carried to term. Skin fibroblasts from this baby were deficient in branching enzyme. Pregnancies at risk for glycogen storage disease due to the deficiency of branching enzyme can be successfully monitored using either cultured chorionic villi or amniocytes. PMID:2521770

  15. Effect of expression of adenine phosphoribosyltransferase on the in vivo anti-tumor activity of prodrugs activated by E. coli purine nucleoside phosphorylase.

    PubMed

    Parker, W B; Allan, P W; Waud, W R; Hong, J S; Sorscher, E J

    2011-06-01

    The use of E. coli purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) to activate prodrugs has demonstrated excellent activity in the treatment of various human tumor xenografts in mice. E. coli PNP cleaves purine nucleoside analogs to generate toxic adenine analogs, which are activated by adenine phosphoribosyl transferase (APRT) to metabolites that inhibit RNA and protein synthesis. We created tumor cell lines that encode both E. coli PNP and excess levels of human APRT, and have used these new cell models to test the hypothesis that treatment of otherwise refractory human tumors could be enhanced by overexpression of APRT. In vivo studies with 6-methylpurine-2'-deoxyriboside (MeP-dR), 2-F-2'-deoxyadenosine (F-dAdo) or 9-β-D-arabinofuranosyl-2-fluoroadenine 5'-monophosphate (F-araAMP) indicated that increased APRT in human tumor cells coexpressing E. coli PNP did not enhance either the activation or the anti-tumor activity of any of the three prodrugs. Interestingly, expression of excess APRT in bystander cells improved the activity of MeP-dR, but diminished the activity of F-araAMP. In vitro studies indicated that increasing the expression of APRT in the cells did not significantly increase the activation of MeP. These results provide insight into the mechanism of bystander killing of the E. coli PNP strategy, and suggest ways to enhance the approach that are independent of APRT. PMID:21394111

  16. Changes in the activity levels of glutamine synthetase, glutaminase and glycogen synthetase in rats subjected to hypoxic stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vats, P.; Mukherjee, A. K.; Kumria, M. M. L.; Singh, S. N.; Patil, S. K. B.; Rangnathan, S.; Sridharan, K.

    Exposure to high altitude causes loss of body mass and alterations in metabolic processes, especially carbohydrate and protein metabolism. The present study was conducted to elucidate the role of glutamine synthetase, glutaminase and glycogen synthetase under conditions of chronic intermittent hypoxia. Four groups, each consisting of 12 male albino rats (Wistar strain), were exposed to a simulated altitude of 7620 m in a hypobaric chamber for 6 h per day for 1, 7, 14 and 21 days, respectively. Blood haemoglobin, blood glucose, protein levels in the liver, muscle and plasma, glycogen content, and glutaminase, glutamine synthetase and glycogen synthetase activities in liver and muscle were determined in all groups of exposed and in a group of unexposed animals. Food intake and changes in body mass were also monitored. There was a significant reduction in body mass (28-30%) in hypoxia-exposed groups as compared to controls, with a corresponding decrease in food intake. There was rise in blood haemoglobin and plasma protein in response to acclimatisation. Over a three-fold increase in liver glycogen content was observed following 1 day of hypoxic exposure (4.76+/-0.78 mg.g-1 wet tissue in normal unexposed rats; 15.82+/-2.30 mg.g-1 wet tissue in rats exposed to hypoxia for 1 day). This returned to normal in later stages of exposure. However, there was no change in glycogen synthetase activity except for a decrease in the 21-days hypoxia-exposed group. There was a slight increase in muscle glycogen content in the 1-day exposed group which declined significantly by 56.5, 50.6 and 42% following 7, 14, and 21 days of exposure, respectively. Muscle glycogen synthetase activity was also decreased following 21 days of exposure. There was an increase in glutaminase activity in the liver and muscle in the 7-, 14- and 21-day exposed groups. Glutamine synthetase activity was higher in the liver in 7- and 14-day exposed groups; this returned to normal following 21 days of exposure

  17. Expression of Genes Encoding the Enzymes for Glycogen and Trehalose Metabolism in L3 and L4 Larvae of Anisakis simplex

    PubMed Central

    Łopieńska-Biernat, E.; Zaobidna, E. A.; Dmitryjuk, M.

    2015-01-01

    Trehalose and glycogen metabolism plays an important role in supporting life processes in many nematodes, including Anisakis simplex. Nematodes, cosmopolitan helminths parasitizing sea mammals and humans, cause a disease known as anisakiasis. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of genes encoding the enzymes involved in the metabolism of trehalose and glycogen—trehalose-6-phosphate synthase (TPS), trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase (TPP), glycogen synthase (GS), and glycogen phosphorylase (GP)—in stage L3 and stage L4 larvae of A. simplex. The expression of mRNA all four genes, tps, tpp, gs, and gp, was examined by real-time polymerase chain reaction. The A. simplex ribosomal gene (18S) was used as a reference gene. Enzymatic activity was determined. The expression of trehalose enzyme genes was higher in L3 than in L4 larvae, but an inverse relationship was noted for the expression of gs and gp genes. PMID:26783451

  18. Gain of function AMP-activated protein kinase γ3 mutation (AMPKγ3R200Q) in pig muscle increases glycogen storage regardless of AMPK activation.

    PubMed

    Scheffler, Tracy L; Park, Sungkwon; Roach, Peter J; Gerrard, David E

    2016-06-01

    Chronic activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) increases glycogen content in skeletal muscle. Previously, we demonstrated that a mutation in the ryanodine receptor (RyR1(R615C)) blunts AMPK phosphorylation in longissimus muscle of pigs with a gain of function mutation in the AMPKγ3 subunit (AMPKγ3(R200Q)); this may decrease the glycogen storage capacity of AMPKγ3(R200Q) + RyR1(R615C) muscle. Therefore, our aim in this study was to utilize our pig model to understand how AMPKγ3(R200Q) and AMPK activation contribute to glycogen storage and metabolism in muscle. We selected and bred pigs in order to generate offspring with naturally occurring AMPKγ3(R200Q), RyR1(R615C), and AMPKγ3(R200Q) + RyR1(R615C) mutations, and also retained wild-type littermates (control). We assessed glycogen content and parameters of glycogen metabolism in longissimus muscle. Regardless of RyR1(R615C), AMPKγ3(R200Q) increased the glycogen content by approximately 70%. Activity of glycogen synthase (GS) without the allosteric activator glucose 6-phosphate (G6P) was decreased in AMPKγ3(R200Q) relative to all other genotypes, whereas both AMPKγ3(R200Q) and AMPKγ3(R200Q) + RyR1(R615C) muscle exhibited increased GS activity with G6P. Increased activity of GS with G6P was not associated with increased abundance of GS or hexokinase 2. However, AMPKγ3(R200Q) enhanced UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase 2 (UGP2) expression approximately threefold. Although UGP2 is not generally considered a rate-limiting enzyme for glycogen synthesis, our model suggests that UGP2 plays an important role in increasing flux to glycogen synthase. Moreover, we have shown that the capacity for glycogen storage is more closely related to the AMPKγ3(R200Q) mutation than activity. PMID:27302990

  19. Immunohistochemical localization of glycogen synthase and GSK3β: control of glycogen content in retina.

    PubMed

    Pérezleón, Jorge Alberto; Osorio-Paz, Ixchel; Francois, Liliana; Salceda, Rocío

    2013-05-01

    Glycogen has an important role in energy handling in several brain regions. In the brain, glycogen is localized in astrocytes and its role in several normal and pathological processes has been described, whereas in the retina, glycogen metabolism has been scarcely investigated. The enzyme glycogen phosphorylase has been located in retinal Müller cells; however the cellular location of glycogen synthase (GS) and its regulatory partner, glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β), has not been investigated. Our aim was to localize these enzymes in the rat retina by immunofluorescence techniques. We found both GS and GSK3β in Müller cells in the synaptic layers, and within the inner segments of photoreceptor cells. The presence of these enzymes in Müller cells suggests that glycogen could be regulated within the retina as in other tissues. Indeed, we showed that glycogen content in the whole retina in vitro was increased by high glucose concentrations, glutamate, and insulin. In contrast, retina glycogen levels were not modified by norepinephrine nor by depolarization with high KCl concentrations. Insulin also induced an increase in glycogen content in cultured Müller cells. The effect of insulin in both, whole retina and cultured Müller cells was blocked by inhibitors of phosphatidyl-inositol 3-kinase, strongly suggesting that glycogen content in retina is modulated by the insulin signaling pathway. The expression of GS and GSK3β in the synaptic layers and photoreceptor cells suggests an important role of GSK3β regulating glycogen synthase in neurons, which opens multiple feasible roles of insulin within the retina. PMID:23512644

  20. Insulin induces an increase in cytosolic glucose levels in 3T3-L1 cells with inhibited glycogen synthase activation.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Helena H; Kreft, Marko; Jensen, Jørgen; Zorec, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Glucose is an important source of energy for mammalian cells and enters the cytosol via glucose transporters. It has been thought for a long time that glucose entering the cytosol is swiftly phosphorylated in most cell types; hence the levels of free glucose are very low, beyond the detection level. However, the introduction of new fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based glucose nanosensors has made it possible to measure intracellular glucose more accurately. Here, we used the fluorescent indicator protein (FLIPglu-600µ) to monitor cytosolic glucose dynamics in mouse 3T3-L1 cells in which glucose utilization for glycogen synthesis was inhibited. The results show that cells exhibit a low resting cytosolic glucose concentration. However, in cells with inhibited glycogen synthase activation, insulin induced a robust increase in cytosolic free glucose. The insulin-induced increase in cytosolic glucose in these cells is due to an imbalance between the glucose transported into the cytosol and the use of glucose in the cytosol. In untreated cells with sensitive glycogen synthase activation, insulin stimulation did not result in a change in the cytosolic glucose level. This is the first report of dynamic measurements of cytosolic glucose levels in cells devoid of the glycogen synthesis pathway. PMID:25279585

  1. Calcineurin B-like domains in the large regulatory alpha/beta subunits of phosphorylase kinase.

    PubMed

    Carrière, Cathelène; Mornon, Jean-Paul; Venien-Bryan, Catherine; Boisset, Nicolas; Callebaut, Isabelle

    2008-06-01

    Phosphorylase kinase (PhK) is a large hexadecameric complex that catalyzes the phosphorylation and activation of glycogen phosphorylase (GP). It consists in four copies each of a catalytic subunit (gamma) and three regulatory subunits (alpha beta delta). Delta corresponds to endogenous calmodulin, whereas little is known on the molecular architecture of the large alpha and beta subunits, which probably arose from gene duplication. Here, using sensitive methods of sequence analysis, we show that the C-terminal domain (named domain D) of these alpha and beta subunits can be significantly related to calcineurin B-like (CBL) proteins. CBL are members of the EF-hand family that are involved in the regulation of plant-specific kinases of the CIPK/PKS family, and relieve autoinhibition of their target kinases by binding to their regulatory region. The relationship highlighted here suggests that PhK alpha and/or beta domain D may be involved in a similar regulation mechanism, a hypothesis which is supported by the experimental observation of a direct interaction between domain D of PhKalpha and the regulatory region of the Gamma subunit. This finding, together the identification of significant similarities of domain D with the preceding domain C, may help to understand the molecular mechanism by which PhK alpha and/or beta domain D might regulate PhK activity. PMID:18320589

  2. Rapid Detection of Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3 Activity in Mouse Sperm Using Fluorescent Gel Shift Electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hoseok; Choi, Bomi; Seo, Ju Tae; Lee, Kyung Jin; Gye, Myung Chan; Kim, Young-Pil

    2016-01-01

    Assaying the glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3) activity in sperm is of great importance because it is closely implicated in sperm motility and male infertility. While a number of studies on GSK3 activity have relied on labor-intensive immunoblotting to identify phosphorylated GSK3, here we report the simple and rapid detection of GSK3 activity in mouse sperm using conventional agarose gel electrophoresis and a fluorescent peptide substrate. When a dye-tethered and prephosphorylated (primed) peptide substrate for GSK3 was employed, a distinct mobility shift in the fluorescent bands on the agarose was observed by GSK3-induced phosphorylation of the primed peptides. The GSK3 activity in mouse testes and sperm were quantifiable by gel shift assay with low sample consumption and were significantly correlated with the expression levels of GSK3 and p-GSK3. We suggest that our assay can be used for reliable and rapid detection of GSK3 activity in cells and tissue extracts. PMID:27092510

  3. Rapid Detection of Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3 Activity in Mouse Sperm Using Fluorescent Gel Shift Electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hoseok; Choi, Bomi; Seo, Ju Tae; Lee, Kyung Jin; Gye, Myung Chan; Kim, Young-Pil

    2016-01-01

    Assaying the glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3) activity in sperm is of great importance because it is closely implicated in sperm motility and male infertility. While a number of studies on GSK3 activity have relied on labor-intensive immunoblotting to identify phosphorylated GSK3, here we report the simple and rapid detection of GSK3 activity in mouse sperm using conventional agarose gel electrophoresis and a fluorescent peptide substrate. When a dye-tethered and prephosphorylated (primed) peptide substrate for GSK3 was employed, a distinct mobility shift in the fluorescent bands on the agarose was observed by GSK3-induced phosphorylation of the primed peptides. The GSK3 activity in mouse testes and sperm were quantifiable by gel shift assay with low sample consumption and were significantly correlated with the expression levels of GSK3 and p-GSK3. We suggest that our assay can be used for reliable and rapid detection of GSK3 activity in cells and tissue extracts. PMID:27092510

  4. Improving the glycosyltransferase activity of Agrobacterium tumefaciens glycogen synthase by fusion of N-terminal starch binding domains (SBDs).

    PubMed

    Martín, Mariana; Wayllace, Nahuel Z; Valdez, Hugo A; Gomez-Casati, Diego F; Busi, María V

    2013-10-01

    Glycogen and starch, the major storage carbohydrate in most living organisms, result mainly from the action of starch or glycogen synthases (SS or GS, respectively, EC 2.4.1.21). SSIII from Arabidopsis thaliana is an SS isoform with a particular modular organization: the C-terminal highly conserved glycosyltransferase domain is preceded by a unique specific region (SSIII-SD) which contains three in tandem starch binding domains (SBDs, named D1, D2 and D3) characteristic of polysaccharide degrading enzymes. N-terminal SBDs have a probed regulatory role in SSIII activity, showing starch binding ability and modulating the catalytic properties of the enzyme. On the other hand, GS from Agrobacterium tumefaciens has a simple primary structure organization, characterized only by the highly conserved glycosyltransferase domain and lacking SBDs. To further investigate the functional role of A. thaliana SSIII-SD, three chimeric proteins were constructed combining the SBDs from A. thaliana with the GS from A. tumefaciens. Recombinant proteins were expressed in and purified to homogeneity from Escherichia coli cells in order to be kinetically characterized. Furthermore, we tested the ability to restore in vivo glycogen biosynthesis in transformed E. coli glgA(-) cells, deficient in GS. Results show that the D3-GS chimeric enzyme showed increased capacity of glycogen synthesis in vivo with minor changes in its kinetics parameters compared to GS. PMID:23796574

  5. Glycogen synthase kinase 3β suppresses polyglutamine aggregation by inhibiting Vaccinia-related kinase 2 activity

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eunju; Ryu, Hye Guk; Kim, Sangjune; Lee, Dohyun; Jeong, Young-Hun; Kim, Kyong-Tai

    2016-01-01

    Huntington’s disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by an abnormal expansion of polyglutamine repeats in the N-terminal of huntingtin. The amount of aggregate-prone protein is controlled by various mechanisms, including molecular chaperones. Vaccinia-related kinase 2 (VRK2) is known to negatively regulate chaperonin TRiC, and VRK2-facilitated degradation of TRiC increases polyQ protein aggregation, which is involved in HD. We found that VRK2 activity was negatively controlled by glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β). GSK3β directly bound to VRK2 and inhibited the catalytic activity of VRK2 in a kinase activity-independent manner. Furthermore, GSK3β increased the stability of TRiC and decreased the formation of HttQ103-GFP aggregates by inhibiting VRK2. These results indicate that GSK3β signaling may be a regulatory mechanism of HD progression and suggest targets for further therapeutic trials for HD. PMID:27377031

  6. Glycogen synthase kinase 3β suppresses polyglutamine aggregation by inhibiting Vaccinia-related kinase 2 activity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eunju; Ryu, Hye Guk; Kim, Sangjune; Lee, Dohyun; Jeong, Young-Hun; Kim, Kyong-Tai

    2016-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by an abnormal expansion of polyglutamine repeats in the N-terminal of huntingtin. The amount of aggregate-prone protein is controlled by various mechanisms, including molecular chaperones. Vaccinia-related kinase 2 (VRK2) is known to negatively regulate chaperonin TRiC, and VRK2-facilitated degradation of TRiC increases polyQ protein aggregation, which is involved in HD. We found that VRK2 activity was negatively controlled by glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β). GSK3β directly bound to VRK2 and inhibited the catalytic activity of VRK2 in a kinase activity-independent manner. Furthermore, GSK3β increased the stability of TRiC and decreased the formation of HttQ103-GFP aggregates by inhibiting VRK2. These results indicate that GSK3β signaling may be a regulatory mechanism of HD progression and suggest targets for further therapeutic trials for HD. PMID:27377031

  7. Autophagy-assisted glycogen catabolism regulates asexual differentiation in Magnaporthe oryzae.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yi Zhen; Ramos-Pamplona, Marilou; Naqvi, Naweed I

    2009-01-01

    Autophagy, a conserved pathway for bulk cellular degradation and recycling in eukaryotes, regulates proper turnover of organelles, membranes and certain proteins. Such regulated degradation is important for cell growth and development particularly during environmental stress conditions, which act as key inducers of autophagy. We found that autophagy and MoATG8 were significantly induced during asexual development in Magnaporthe oryzae. An RFP-tagged MoAtg8 showed specific localization and enrichment in aerial hyphae, conidiophores and conidia. We confirmed that loss of MoATG8 results in dramatically reduced ability to form conidia, the asexual spores that propagate rice-blast disease. Exogenous supply of glucose or sucrose significantly suppressed the conidiation defects in a MoATG8-deletion mutant. Comparative proteomics based identification and characterization of Gph1, a glycogen phosphorylase that catalyzes glycogen breakdown, indicated that autophagy-assisted glycogen homeostasis is likely important for proper aerial growth and conidiation in Magnaporthe. Loss of Gph1, or addition of G6P significantly restored conidiation in the Moatg8Delta mutant. Overproduction of Gph1 led to reduced conidiation in wild-type Magnaporthe strain. We propose that glycogen autophagy actively responds to and regulates carbon utilization required for cell growth and differentiation during asexual development in Magnaporthe. PMID:19115483

  8. Elucidating further phylogenetic diversity among the Defluviicoccus-related glycogen-accumulating organisms in activated sludge.

    PubMed

    McIlroy, Simon; Seviour, Robert J

    2009-12-01

    Glycogen-accumulating organisms (GAO) are thought to out-compete the polyphosphate-accumulating organisms (PAO) in activated sludge communities removing phosphate (P). Two GAO groups are currently recognized, the gammaproteobacterial Candidatus'Competibacter phosphatis', and the alphaproteobacterial Defluviicoccus vanus-related tetrad forming organisms (TFOs). Both are phylogenetically diverse based on their 16S rRNA sequences, with the latter currently considered to contain members falling into three distinct clusters. This paper identifies members of an additional fourth Defluviicoccus cluster from 16S rRNA gene clone library data obtained from a laboratory-scale activated sludge plant community removing P, and details FISH probes designed against them. Probe DF181A was designed to target a single sequence and DF181B designed against the remaining sequences in the cluster. Cells hybridizing with these probes in the biomass samples tested always appeared as either TFOs or in large clusters of small cocci. Members of the Defluviicoccus-related organisms were commonly found in full-scale wastewater treatments plants, sometimes as a dominant population. PMID:23765935

  9. PP2A inhibition results in hepatic insulin resistance despite Akt2 activation.

    PubMed

    Galbo, Thomas; Perry, Rachel J; Nishimura, Erica; Samuel, Varman T; Quistorff, Bjørn; Shulman, Gerald I

    2013-10-01

    In the liver, insulin suppresses hepatic gluconeogenesis by activating Akt, which inactivates the key gluconeogenic transcription factor FoxO1 (Forkhead Box O1). Recent studies have implicated hyperactivity of the Akt phosphatase Protein Phosphatase 2A (PP2A) and impaired Akt signaling as a molecular defect underlying insulin resistance. We therefore hypothesized that PP2A inhibition would enhance insulin-stimulated Akt activity and decrease glucose production. PP2A inhibitors increased hepatic Akt phosphorylation and inhibited FoxO1in vitro and in vivo, and suppressed gluconeogenesis in hepatocytes. Paradoxically, PP2A inhibition exacerbated insulin resistance in vivo. This was explained by phosphorylation of both hepatic glycogen synthase (GS) (inactivation) and phosphorylase (activation) resulting in impairment of glycogen storage. Our findings underline the significance of GS and Phosphorylase as hepatic PP2A substrates and importance of glycogen metabolism in acute plasma glucose regulation. PMID:24150286

  10. Decreased glycogen synthase kinase-3 levels and activity contribute to Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Nogales, Marta; Hernández, Félix; Miguez, Andrés; Alberch, Jordi; Ginés, Silvia; Pérez-Navarro, Esther; Lucas, José J

    2015-09-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a hereditary neurodegenerative disorder characterized by brain atrophy particularly in striatum leading to personality changes, chorea and dementia. Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) is a serine/threonine kinase in the crossroad of many signaling pathways that is highly pleiotropic as it phosphorylates more than hundred substrates including structural, metabolic, and signaling proteins. Increased GSK-3 activity is believed to contribute to the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's disease and GSK-3 inhibitors have been postulated as therapeutic agents for neurodegeneration. Regarding HD, GSK-3 inhibitors have shown beneficial effects in cell and invertebrate animal models but no evident efficacy in mouse models. Intriguingly, those studies were performed without interrogating GSK-3 level and activity in HD brain. Here we aim to explore the level and also the enzymatic activity of GSK-3 in the striatum and other less affected brain regions of HD patients and of the R6/1 mouse model to then elucidate the possible contribution of its alteration to HD pathogenesis by genetic manipulation in mice. We report a dramatic decrease in GSK-3 levels and activity in striatum and cortex of HD patients with similar results in the mouse model. Correction of the GSK-3 deficit in HD mice, by combining with transgenic mice with conditional GSK-3 expression, resulted in amelioration of their brain atrophy and behavioral motor and learning deficits. Thus, our results demonstrate that decreased brain GSK-3 contributes to HD neurological phenotype and open new therapeutic opportunities based on increasing GSK-3 activity or attenuating the harmful consequences of its decrease. PMID:26082469

  11. Crystallographic and computational studies on 4-phenyl-N-(beta-D-glucopyranosyl)-1H-1,2,3-triazole-1-acetamide, an inhibitor of glycogen phosphorylase: comparison with alpha-D-glucose, N-acetyl-beta-D-glucopyranosylamine and N-benzoyl-N'-beta-D-glucopyranosyl urea binding.

    PubMed

    Alexacou, Kyra-Melinda; Hayes, Joseph M; Tiraidis, Costas; Zographos, Spyros E; Leonidas, Demetres D; Chrysina, Evangelia D; Archontis, Georgios; Oikonomakos, Nikos G; Paul, Jashuva V; Varghese, Babu; Loganathan, Duraikkannu

    2008-05-15

    4-Phenyl-N-(beta-D-glucopyranosyl)-1H-1,2,3-triazole-1-acetamide (glucosyltriazolylacetamide) has been studied in kinetic and crystallographic experiments with glycogen phosphorylase b (GPb), in an effort to utilize its potential as a lead for the design of potent antihyperglycaemic agents. Docking and molecular dynamics (MD) calculations have been used to monitor more closely the binding modes in operation and compare the results with experiment. Kinetic experiments in the direction of glycogen synthesis showed that glucosyltriazolylacetamide is a better inhibitor (K(i) = 0.18 mM) than the parent compound alpha-D-glucose (K(i) = 1.7 mM) or beta-D-glucose (K(i) = 7.4 mM) but less potent inhibitor than the lead compound N-acetyl-beta-D-glucopyranosylamine (K(i) = 32 microM). To elucidate the molecular basis underlying the inhibition of the newly identified compound, we determined the structure of GPb in complex with glucosyltriazolylacetamide at 100 K to 1.88 A resolution, and the structure of the compound in the free form. Glucosyltriazolylacetamide is accommodated in the catalytic site of the enzyme and the glucopyranose interacts in a manner similar to that observed in the GPb-alpha-D-glucose complex, while the substituent group in the beta-position of the C1 atom makes additional hydrogen bonding and van der Waals interactions to the protein. A bifurcated donor type hydrogen bonding involving O3H, N3, and N4 is seen as an important structural motif strengthening the binding of glucosyltriazolylacetamide with GP which necessitated change in the torsion about C8-N2 bond by about 62 degrees going from its free to the complex form with GPb. On binding to GP, glucosyltriazolylacetamide induces significant conformational changes in the vicinity of this site. Specifically, the 280s loop (residues 282-288) shifts 0.7 to 3.1 A (CA atoms) to accommodate glucosyltriazolylacetamide. These conformational changes do not lead to increased contacts between the inhibitor and the

  12. Role of NADH/NAD+ transport activity and glycogen store on skeletal muscle energy metabolism during exercise: in silico studies

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanjun; Dash, Ranjan K.; Kim, Jaeyeon; Saidel, Gerald M.; Cabrera, Marco E.

    2009-01-01

    Skeletal muscle can maintain ATP concentration constant during the transition from rest to exercise, whereas metabolic reaction rates may increase substantially. Among the key regulatory factors of skeletal muscle energy metabolism during exercise, the dynamics of cytosolic and mitochondrial NADH and NAD+ have not been characterized. To quantify these regulatory factors, we have developed a physiologically based computational model of skeletal muscle energy metabolism. This model integrates transport and reaction fluxes in distinct capillary, cytosolic, and mitochondrial domains and investigates the roles of mitochondrial NADH/NAD+ transport (shuttling) activity and muscle glycogen concentration (stores) during moderate intensity exercise (60% maximal O2 consumption). The underlying hypothesis is that the cytosolic redox state (NADH/NAD+) is much more sensitive to a metabolic disturbance in contracting skeletal muscle than the mitochondrial redox state. This hypothesis was tested by simulating the dynamic metabolic responses of skeletal muscle to exercise while altering the transport rate of reducing equivalents (NADH and NAD+) between cytosol and mitochondria and muscle glycogen stores. Simulations with optimal parameter estimates showed good agreement with the available experimental data from muscle biopsies in human subjects. Compared with these simulations, a 20% increase (or ∼20% decrease) in mitochondrial NADH/NAD+ shuttling activity led to an ∼70% decrease (or ∼3-fold increase) in cytosolic redox state and an ∼35% decrease (or ∼25% increase) in muscle lactate level. Doubling (or halving) muscle glycogen concentration resulted in an ∼50% increase (or ∼35% decrease) in cytosolic redox state and an ∼30% increase (or ∼25% decrease) in muscle lactate concentration. In both cases, changes in mitochondrial redox state were minimal. In conclusion, the model simulations of exercise response are consistent with the hypothesis that mitochondrial NADH

  13. Effects of hypoxia on ionic regulation, glycogen utilization and antioxidative ability in the gills and liver of the aquatic air-breathing fish Trichogaster microlepis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chun-Yen; Lin, Hui-Chen; Lin, Cheng-Huang

    2015-01-01

    We examined the hypothesis that Trichogaster microlepis, a fish with an accessory air-breathing organ, uses a compensatory strategy involving changes in both behavior and protein levels to enhance its gas exchange ability. This compensatory strategy enables the gill ion-regulatory metabolism to maintain homeostasis during exposure to hypoxia. The present study aimed to determine whether ionic regulation, glycogen utilization and antioxidant activity differ in terms of expression under hypoxic stresses; fish were sampled after being subjected to 3 or 12h of hypoxia and 12h of recovery under normoxia. The air-breathing behavior of the fish increased under hypoxia. No morphological modification of the gills was observed. The expression of carbonic anhydrase II did not vary among the treatments. The Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase enzyme activity did not decrease, but increases in Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase protein expression and ionocyte levels were observed. The glycogen utilization increased under hypoxia as measured by glycogen phosphorylase protein expression and blood glucose level, whereas the glycogen content decreased. The enzyme activity of several components of the antioxidant system in the gills, including catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and superoxidase dismutase, increased in enzyme activity. Based on the above data, we concluded that T. microlepis is a hypoxia-tolerant species that does not exhibit ion-regulatory suppression but uses glycogen to maintain energy utilization in the gills under hypoxic stress. Components of the antioxidant system showed increased expression under the applied experimental treatments. PMID:25218942

  14. CARM1/PRMT4 is necessary for the glycogen gene expression programme in skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shu-Ching Mary; Dowhan, Dennis H; Eriksson, Natalie A; Muscat, George E O

    2012-06-01

    CARM1 (co-activator-associated arginine methyltransferase 1)/PRMT4 (protein arginine methyltransferase 4), functions as a co-activator for transcription factors that are regulators of muscle fibre type and oxidative metabolism, including PGC (peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor γ co-activator)-1α and MEF2 (myocyte enhancer factor 2). We observed significantly higher Prmt4 mRNA expression in comparison with Prmt1-Prmt6 mRNA expression in mouse muscle (in vitro and in vivo). Transfection of Prmt4 siRNA (small interfering RNA) into mouse skeletal muscle C2C12 cells attenuated PRMT4 mRNA and protein expression. We subsequently performed additional qPCR (quantitative PCR) analysis (in the context of metabolism) to examine the effect of Prmt4 siRNA expression on >200 critical genes that control (and are involved in) lipid, glucose and energy homoeostasis, and circadian rhythm. This analysis revealed a strikingly specific metabolic expression footprint, and revealed that PRMT4 is necessary for the expression of genes involved in glycogen metabolism in skeletal muscle cells. Prmt4 siRNA expression selectively suppressed the mRNAs encoding Gys1 (glycogen synthase 1), Pgam2 (muscle phosphoglycerate mutase 2) and Pygm (muscle glycogen phosphorylase). Significantly, PGAM, PYGM and GYS1 deficiency in humans causes glycogen storage diseases type X, type V/McArdle's disease and type 0 respectively. Attenuation of PRMT4 was also associated with decreased expression of the mRNAs encoding AMPK (AMP-activated protein kinase) α2/γ3 (Prkaa2 and Prkag3) and p38 MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase), previously implicated in Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome and Pompe Disease (glycogen storage disease type II). Furthermore, stable transfection of two PRMT4-site-specific (methyltransferase deficient) mutants (CARM1/PRMT4 VLD and CARM1E267Q) significantly repressed the expression of Gys1, Pgam2 and AMPKγ3. Finally, in concordance, we observed increased and decreased glycogen

  15. Ambient pH Controls Glycogen Levels by Regulating Glycogen Synthase Gene Expression in Neurospora crassa. New Insights into the pH Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Cupertino, Fernanda Barbosa; Freitas, Fernanda Zanolli; de Paula, Renato Magalhães; Bertolini, Maria Célia

    2012-01-01

    Glycogen is a polysaccharide widely distributed in microorganisms and animal cells and its metabolism is under intricate regulation. Its accumulation in a specific situation results from the balance between glycogen synthase and glycogen phosphorylase activities that control synthesis and degradation, respectively. These enzymes are highly regulated at transcriptional and post-translational levels. The existence of a DNA motif for the Aspergillus nidulans pH responsive transcription factor PacC in the promoter of the gene encoding glycogen synthase (gsn) in Neurospora crassa prompted us to investigate whether this transcription factor regulates glycogen accumulation. Transcription factors such as PacC in A. nidulans and Rim101p in Saccharomyces cerevisiae play a role in the signaling pathway that mediates adaptation to ambient pH by inducing the expression of alkaline genes and repressing acidic genes. We showed here that at pH 7.8 pacC was over-expressed and gsn was down-regulated in wild-type N. crassa coinciding with low glycogen accumulation. In the pacCKO strain the glycogen levels and gsn expression at alkaline pH were, respectively, similar to and higher than the wild-type strain at normal pH (5.8). These results characterize gsn as an acidic gene and suggest a regulatory role for PACC in gsn expression. The truncated recombinant protein, containing the DNA-binding domain specifically bound to a gsn DNA fragment containing the PacC motif. DNA-protein complexes were observed with extracts from cells grown at normal and alkaline pH and confirmed by ChIP-PCR analysis. The PACC present in these extracts showed equal molecular mass, indicating that the protein is already processed at normal pH, in contrast to A. nidulans. Together, these results show that the pH signaling pathway controls glycogen accumulation by regulating gsn expression and suggest the existence of a different mechanism for PACC activation in N. crassa. PMID:22952943

  16. Biomarker for Glycogen Storage Diseases

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-25

    Fructose Metabolism, Inborn Errors; Glycogen Storage Disease; Glycogen Storage Disease Type I; Glycogen Storage Disease Type II; Glycogen Storage Disease Type III; Glycogen Storage Disease Type IV; Glycogen Storage Disease Type V; Glycogen Storage Disease Type VI; Glycogen Storage Disease Type VII; Glycogen Storage Disease Type VIII

  17. Phosphorylation of inhibitor-2 and activation of MgATP-dependent protein phosphatase by rat skeletal muscle glycogen synthase kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Hegazy, M.G.; Reimann, E.M.; Thysseril, T.J.; Schlender, K.K.

    1986-05-01

    Rat skeletal muscle contains a glycogen synthase kinase (GSK-M) which is not stimulated by Ca/sup 2 +/ or cAMP. This kinase has an apparent Mr of 62,000 and uses ATP but not GTP as a phosphoryl donor. GSK-M phosphorylated glycogen synthase at sites 2 and 3. It phosphorylated ATP-citrate lyase and activated MgATP-dependent phosphatase in the presence of ATP but not GTP. As expected, the kinase also phosphorylated phosphatase inhibitor 2 (I-2). Phosphatase incorporation reached approximately 0.3 mol/mol of I-2. Phosphopeptide maps were obtained by digesting /sup 32/P-labeled I-2 with trypsin and separating the peptides by reversed phase HPLC. Two partially separated /sup 32/P-labeled peaks were obtained when I-2 was phosphorylated with either GSK-M or glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK-3) and these peptides were different from those obtained when I-2 was phosphorylated with the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (CSU) or casein kinase II (CK-II). When I-2 was phosphorylated with GSK-M or GSK-3 and cleaved by CNBr, a single radioactive peak was obtained. Phosphoamino acid analysis showed that I-2 was phosphorylated by GSK-M or GSK-3 predominately in Thr whereas CSU and CK-II phosphorylated I-2 exclusively in Ser. These results indicate that GSK-M is similar to GSK-3 and to ATP-citrate lyase kinase. However, it appears to differ in Mr from ATP-citrate lyase kinase and it differs from GSK-3 in that it phosphorylates glycogen synthase at site 2 and it does not use GTP as a phosphoryl donor.

  18. Long-term effects of rapamycin treatment on insulin mediated phosphorylation of Akt/PKB and glycogen synthase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Varma, Shailly; Shrivastav, Anuraag; Changela, Sheena; Khandelwal, Ramji L.

    2008-04-01

    Protein kinase B (Akt/PKB) is a Ser/Thr kinase that is involved in the regulation of cell proliferation/survival through mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and the regulation of glycogen metabolism through glycogen synthase kinase 3{beta} (GSK-3{beta}) and glycogen synthase (GS). Rapamycin is an inhibitor of mTOR. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of rapamycin pretreatment on the insulin mediated phosphorylation of Akt/PKB phosphorylation and GS activity in parental HepG2 and HepG2 cells with overexpression of constitutively active Akt1/PKB-{alpha} (HepG2-CA-Akt/PKB). Rapamycin pretreatment resulted in a decrease (20-30%) in the insulin mediated phosphorylation of Akt1 (Ser 473) in parental HepG2 cells but showed an upregulation of phosphorylation in HepG2-CA-Akt/PKB cells. Rictor levels were decreased (20-50%) in parental HepG2 cells but were not significantly altered in the HepG2-CA-Akt/PKB cells. Furthermore, rictor knockdown decreased the phosphorylation of Akt (Ser 473) by 40-60% upon rapamycin pretreatment. GS activity followed similar trends as that of phosphorylated Akt and so with rictor levels in these cells pretreated with rapamycin; parental HepG2 cells showed a decrease in GS activity, whereas as HepG2-CA-Akt/PKB cells showed an increase in GS activity. The changes in the levels of phosphorylated Akt/PKB (Ser 473) correlated with GS and protein phoshatase-1 activity.

  19. A functional glycogen biosynthesis pathway in Lactobacillus acidophilus: expression and analysis of the glg operon

    PubMed Central

    Goh, Yong Jun; Klaenhammer, Todd R

    2013-01-01

    Glycogen metabolism contributes to energy storage and various physiological functions in some prokaryotes, including colonization persistence. A role for glycogen metabolism is proposed on the survival and fitness of Lactobacillus acidophilus, a probiotic microbe, in the human gastrointestinal environment. L. acidophilus NCFM possesses a glycogen metabolism (glg) operon consisting of glgBCDAP-amy-pgm genes. Expression of the glg operon and glycogen accumulation were carbon source- and growth phase-dependent, and were repressed by glucose. The highest intracellular glycogen content was observed in early log-phase cells grown on trehalose, which was followed by a drastic decrease of glycogen content prior to entering stationary phase. In raffinose-grown cells, however, glycogen accumulation gradually declined following early log phase and was maintained at stable levels throughout stationary phase. Raffinose also induced an overall higher temporal glg expression throughout growth compared with trehalose. Isogenic ΔglgA (glycogen synthase) and ΔglgB (glycogen-branching enzyme) mutants are glycogen-deficient and exhibited growth defects on raffinose. The latter observation suggests a reciprocal relationship between glycogen synthesis and raffinose metabolism. Deletion of glgB or glgP (glycogen phosphorylase) resulted in defective growth and increased bile sensitivity. The data indicate that glycogen metabolism is involved in growth maintenance, bile tolerance and complex carbohydrate utilization in L. acidophilus. PMID:23879596

  20. A functional glycogen biosynthesis pathway in Lactobacillus acidophilus: expression and analysis of the glg operon.

    PubMed

    Goh, Yong Jun; Klaenhammer, Todd R

    2013-09-01

    Glycogen metabolism contributes to energy storage and various physiological functions in some prokaryotes, including colonization persistence. A role for glycogen metabolism is proposed on the survival and fitness of Lactobacillus acidophilus, a probiotic microbe, in the human gastrointestinal environment. L. acidophilus NCFM possesses a glycogen metabolism (glg) operon consisting of glgBCDAP-amy-pgm genes. Expression of the glg operon and glycogen accumulation were carbon source- and growth phase-dependent, and were repressed by glucose. The highest intracellular glycogen content was observed in early log-phase cells grown on trehalose, which was followed by a drastic decrease of glycogen content prior to entering stationary phase. In raffinose-grown cells, however, glycogen accumulation gradually declined following early log phase and was maintained at stable levels throughout stationary phase. Raffinose also induced an overall higher temporal glg expression throughout growth compared with trehalose. Isogenic ΔglgA (glycogen synthase) and ΔglgB (glycogen-branching enzyme) mutants are glycogen-deficient and exhibited growth defects on raffinose. The latter observation suggests a reciprocal relationship between glycogen synthesis and raffinose metabolism. Deletion of glgB or glgP (glycogen phosphorylase) resulted in defective growth and increased bile sensitivity. The data indicate that glycogen metabolism is involved in growth maintenance, bile tolerance and complex carbohydrate utilization in L. acidophilus. PMID:23879596

  1. Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) regulates multiple signaling pathways by enhancing glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) activity.

    PubMed

    Valvezan, Alexander J; Zhang, Fang; Diehl, J Alan; Klein, Peter S

    2012-02-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) is essential for many signaling pathways and cellular processes. As Adenomatous Polyposis Coli (APC) functions in many of the same processes, we investigated a role for APC in the regulation of GSK-3-dependent signaling. We find that APC directly enhances GSK-3 activity. Furthermore, knockdown of APC mimics inhibition of GSK-3 by reducing phosphorylation of glycogen synthase and by activating mTOR, revealing novel roles for APC in the regulation of these enzymes. Wnt signaling inhibits GSK-3 through an unknown mechanism, and this results in both stabilization of β-catenin and activation of mTOR. We therefore hypothesized that Wnts may regulate GSK-3 by disrupting the interaction between APC and the Axin-GSK-3 complex. We find that Wnts rapidly induce APC dissociation from Axin, correlating with β-catenin stabilization. Furthermore, Axin interaction with the Wnt co-receptor LRP6 causes APC dissociation from Axin. We propose that APC regulates multiple signaling pathways by enhancing GSK-3 activity, and that Wnts induce APC dissociation from Axin to reduce GSK-3 activity and activate downstream signaling. APC regulation of GSK-3 also provides a novel mechanism for Wnt regulation of multiple downstream effectors, including β-catenin and mTOR. PMID:22184111

  2. Rational engineering of Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM maltose phosphorylase into either trehalose or kojibiose dual specificity phosphorylase.

    PubMed

    Nakai, Hiroyuki; Petersen, Bent O; Westphal, Yvonne; Dilokpimol, Adiphol; Abou Hachem, Maher; Duus, Jens Ø; Schols, Henk A; Svensson, Birte

    2010-10-01

    Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM maltose phosphorylase (LaMP) of the (alpha/alpha)(6)-barrel glycoside hydrolase family 65 (GH65) catalyses both phosphorolysis of maltose and formation of maltose by reverse phosphorolysis with beta-glucose 1-phosphate and glucose as donor and acceptor, respectively. LaMP has about 35 and 26% amino acid sequence identity with GH65 trehalose phosphorylase (TP) and kojibiose phosphorylase (KP) from Thermoanaerobacter brockii ATCC35047. The structure of L. brevis MP and multiple sequence alignment identified (alpha/alpha)(6)-barrel loop 3 that forms the rim of the active site pocket as a target for specificity engineering since it contains distinct sequences for different GH65 disaccharide phosphorylases. Substitution of LaMP His413-Glu421, His413-Ile418 and His413-Glu415 from loop 3, that include His413 and Glu415 presumably recognising the alpha-anomeric O-1 group of the glucose moiety at subsite +1, by corresponding segments from Ser426-Ala431 in TP and Thr419-Phe427 in KP, thus conferred LaMP with phosphorolytic activity towards trehalose and kojibiose, respectively. Two different loop 3 LaMP variants catalysed the formation of trehalose and kojibiose in yields superior of maltose by reverse phosphorolysis with (alpha1, alpha1)- and alpha-(1,2)-regioselectivity, respectively, as analysed by nuclear magnetic resonance. The loop 3 in GH65 disaccharide phosphorylase is thus a key determinant for specificity both in phosphorolysis and in regiospecific reverse phosphorolysis. PMID:20713411

  3. Enrichment of denitrifying glycogen-accumulating organisms in anaerobic/anoxic activated sludge system.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Raymond J; Yuan, Zhiguo; Keller, Jürg

    2003-02-20

    Denitrifying glycogen-accumulating organisms (DGAO) were successfully enriched in a lab-scale sequencing batch reactor (SBR) running with anaerobic/anoxic cycles and acetate feeding during the anaerobic period. Acetate was completely taken up anaerobically, which was accompanied by the consumption of glycogen and the production of poly-beta-hydroxy-alkanoates (PHA). In the subsequent anoxic stage, nitrate or nitrite was utilized as electron acceptor for the oxidation of PHA, resulting in glycogen replenishment and cell growth. The above phenotype showed by the enrichment culture demonstrates the existence of DGAO. Further, it was found that the anaerobic behavior of DGAO could be predicted well by the anaerobic GAO model of Filipe et al. (2001) and Zeng et al. (2002a). The final product of denitrification during anoxic stage was mainly nitrous oxide (N(2)O) rather than N(2). The data strongly suggests that N(2)O production may be caused by the inhibition of nitrous oxide reductase by an elevated level of nitrite accumulated during denitrification. The existence of these organisms is a concern in biological nutrient removal systems that typically have an anaerobic/anoxic/aerobic reactor sequence since they are potential competitors to the polyphosphate-accumulating organisms. PMID:12491525

  4. Insulin alters cAMP-activated lipolysis but not cAMP-inhibited glycogen synthase in permeabilized adipocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Mooney, R.A.; Wisniewski, J.L.

    1986-05-01

    Lipolysis and, to a lesser extent, glycogen synthase activity are regulated in adipocytes by cellular cAMP and counter-regulated by insulin. These activities were measured in situ in digitonin (20 ..mu..g/ml) permeabilized rat adipocytes. Incorporation of /sup 3/H UDP-glucose into endogenous glycogen in the presence of KF, EDTA and 10mM glucose-6-phosphate was the basis of the G.S. assay. Cellular GS activity determined by this technique was 1.4 +/- 0.2 fold greater than that of matched homogenates. Insulin treatment of intact cells prior to permeabilization increased GS activity ratio (-/+ G-6-P) 2.5 fold when subsequently measured by the in situ assay. Following digitonin permeabilization, addition of cAMP to the suspension medium increased lipolysis 7 fold and decreased GS activity ratio to 0.38 +/- 0.01 from a basal value of 0.44 +/- 0.06. ATP had a negligible effect on lipolysis but decreased GS to 0.16 +/- 0.04. ATP plus cAMP was only slightly more effective on GS than ATP alone. Insulin at 10/sup -9/M inhibited cAMP-dependent lipolysis by 27% but had no effect on the cAMP- or ATP-dependent decrease in GS. These results suggest that insulin's counter-regulatory mechanisms on these two cAMP-dependent processes may be different.

  5. [Purine nucleoside phosphorylase].

    PubMed

    Pogosian, L G; Akopian, Zh I

    2013-01-01

    Purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) is one of the most important enzymes of the purine metabolism, wich promotes the recycling of purine bases. Nowadays is the actual to search for effective inhibitors of this enzyme which is necessary for creation T-cell immunodeficient status of the organism in the organs and tissues transplantation, and chemotherapy of a number pathologies as well. For their successful practical application necessary to conduct in-depth and comprehensive study of the enzyme, namely a structure, functions, and an affinity of the reaction mechanism. In the review the contemporary achievements in the study of PNP from various biological objects are presented. New data describing the structure of PNP are summarised and analysed. The physiological role of the enzyme is discussed. The enzyme basic reaction mechanisms and actions are considered. The studies on enzyme physicochemical, kinetic, and catalytic research are presented. PMID:24479338

  6. An evaluation of indirubin analogues as phosphorylase kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Begum, Jaida; Skamnaki, Vassiliki T; Moffatt, Colin; Bischler, Nicolas; Sarrou, Josephine; Skaltsounis, Alexios-Leandros; Leonidas, Demetres D; Oikonomakos, Nikos G; Hayes, Joseph M

    2015-09-01

    Phosphorylase kinase (PhK) has been linked with a number of conditions such as glycogen storage diseases, psoriasis, type 2 diabetes and more recently, cancer (Camus et al., 2012 [6]). However, with few reported structural studies on PhK inhibitors, this hinders a structure based drug design approach. In this study, the inhibitory potential of 38 indirubin analogues have been investigated. 11 of these ligands had IC50 values in the range 0.170-0.360μM, with indirubin-3'-acetoxime (1c) the most potent. 7-Bromoindirubin-3'-oxime (13b), an antitumor compound which induces caspase-independent cell-death (Ribas et al., 2006 [20]) is revealed as a specific inhibitor of PhK (IC50=1.8μM). Binding assay experiments performed using both PhK-holo and PhK-γtrnc confirmed the inhibitory effects to arise from binding at the kinase domain (γ subunit). High level computations using QM/MM-PBSA binding free energy calculations were in good agreement with experimental binding data, as determined using statistical analysis, and support binding at the ATP-binding site. The value of a QM description for the binding of halogenated ligands exhibiting σ-hole effects is highlighted. A new statistical metric, the 'sum of the modified logarithm of ranks' (SMLR), has been defined which measures performance of a model for both the "early recognition" (ranking earlier/higher) of active compounds and their relative ordering by potency. Through a detailed structure activity relationship analysis considering other kinases (CDK2, CDK5 and GSK-3α/β), 6'(Z) and 7(L) indirubin substitutions have been identified to achieve selective PhK inhibition. The key PhK binding site residues involved can also be targeted using other ligand scaffolds in future work. PMID:26364215

  7. Polymer phosphorylases: clues to the emergence of non-replicative and replicative polymers.

    PubMed

    Freire, Miguel Angel

    2011-12-01

    Polymer formation is arguably one of the essential factors that allowed the emergence, stabilisation and spread of life on Earth. Consequently, studies concerning biopolymers could shed light on the origins of life itself. Of particular interest are RNA and polysaccharide polymers, the archetypes of the contrasting proposed evolutionary scenarios and their respective polymerases. Nucleic acid polymerases were hypothesised, before their discovery, to have a functional similarity with glycogen phosphorylase. Further identification and characterisation of nucleic acid polymerases; particularly of polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase), provided experimental evidence for the initial premise. Once discovered, frequent similarities were found between PNPase and glycogen phosphorylase, in terms of catalytic features and biochemical properties. As a result, PNPase was seen as a model of primitive polymerase and used in laboratory precellular systems. Paradoxically, however, these similarities were not sufficient as an argument in favour of an ancestral common polymerisation mechanism prior to polysaccharides and polyribonucleotides. Here we present an overview of the common features shared by polymer phosphorylases, with new proposals for the emergence of polysaccharide and RNA polymers. PMID:21785867

  8. ADIPOCYTES FROM WOMEN WITH POLYCYSTIC OVARY SYNDROME DEMONSTRATE ALTERED PHOSPHORYLATION AND ACTIVITY OF GLYCOGEN SYNTHASE KINASE 3

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Wendy; Goodarzi, Mark O.; Williams, Heith; Magoffin, Denis A.; Pall, Marita; Azziz, Ricardo

    2009-01-01

    Objective To test the hypothesis that an abnormality in glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3) is a pathogenic factor in PCOS. Design Prospective experimental study (adipocytes). Setting Tertiary care academic medical center and teaching hospital Patients Patients with PCOS and healthy controls. Interventions Blood sampling, physical exam, biopsy of subcutaneous lower abdominal fat. Main Outcome Measure(s) Glucose transport and protein levels and phosphorylation state of GSK3α and GSK3β in adipocytes, assessment of GSK3β activity. Results Basal protein levels of glycogen synthase kinase (GSK3α and GSK3β) did not differ between controls and women with PCOS, nor did basal or insulin-stimulated levels of serine phosphorylated GSK3α. However, in adipocytes of PCOS women insulin stimulation was not associated with increased serine phosphorylation of GSK3β, in contrast to controls. Tyrosine phosphorylation of GSK3β was also higher in PCOS compared to controls. Consistent with the phosphorylation data, GSK3β activity was elevated in PCOS adipocytes. Conclusions These data suggest GSK3β is hyperactivated and resistant to downregulation by insulin in PCOS. Using physiologic approaches, we demonstrated that abnormal GSK3β regulation is a potential mechanism for the insulin resistance seen in some women with PCOS, which may contribute to their development of the syndrome. PMID:18178198

  9. Potential Role of Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3β in Regulation of Myocardin Activity in Human Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yi-Xia; Shi, Zhan; Singh, Pavneet; Yin, Hao; Yu, Yan-Ni; Li, Long; Walsh, Michael P; Gui, Yu; Zheng, Xi-Long

    2016-02-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3β, a serine/threonine kinase with an inhibitory role in glycogen synthesis in hepatocytes and skeletal muscle, is also expressed in cardiac and smooth muscles. Inhibition of GSK-3β results in cardiac hypertrophy through reducing phosphorylation and increasing transcriptional activity of myocardin, a transcriptional co-activator for serum response factor. Myocardin plays critical roles in differentiation of smooth muscle cells (SMCs). This study, therefore, aimed to examine whether and how inhibition of GSK-3β regulates myocardin activity in human vascular SMCs. Treatment of SMCs with the GSK-3β inhibitors AR-A014418 and TWS 119 significantly reduced endogenous myocardin activity, as indicated by lower expression of myocardin target genes (and gene products), CNN1 (calponin), TAGLN1 (SM22), and ACTA2 (SM α-actin). In human SMCs overexpressing myocardin through the T-REx system, treatment with either GSK-3β inhibitor also inhibited the expression of CNN1, TAGLN1, and ACTA2. These effects of GSK-3β inhibitors were mimicked by transfection with GSK-3β siRNA. Notably, both AR-A014418 and TWS 119 decreased the serine/threonine phosphorylation of myocardin. The chromatin immunoprecipitation assay showed that AR-A014418 treatment reduced myocardin occupancy of the promoter of the myocardin target gene ACTA2. Overexpression of a dominant-negative GSK-3β mutant in myocardin-overexpressing SMCs reduced the expression of calponin, SM22, and SM α-actin. As expected, overexpression of constitutively active or wild-type GSK-3β in SMCs without myocardin overexpression increased expression of these proteins. In summary, our results indicate that inhibition of GSK-3β reduces myocardin transcriptional activity, suggesting a role for GSK-3β in myocardin transcriptional activity and smooth muscle differentiation. PMID:26129946

  10. The Crystal Structure of Streptococcus pyogenes Uridine Phosphorylase Reveals a Distinct Subfamily of Nucleoside Phosphorylases

    SciTech Connect

    Tran, Timothy H.; Christoffersen, S.; Allan, Paula W.; Parker, William B.; Piskur, Jure; Serra, I.; Terreni, M.; Ealick, Steven E.

    2011-09-20

    Uridine phosphorylase (UP), a key enzyme in the pyrimidine salvage pathway, catalyzes the reversible phosphorolysis of uridine or 2'-deoxyuridine to uracil and ribose 1-phosphate or 2'-deoxyribose 1-phosphate. This enzyme belongs to the nucleoside phosphorylase I superfamily whose members show diverse specificity for nucleoside substrates. Phylogenetic analysis shows Streptococcus pyogenes uridine phosphorylase (SpUP) is found in a distinct branch of the pyrimidine subfamily of nucleoside phosphorylases. To further characterize SpUP, we determined the crystal structure in complex with the products, ribose 1-phosphate and uracil, at 1.8 {angstrom} resolution. Like Escherichia coli UP (EcUP), the biological unit of SpUP is a hexamer with an ?/? monomeric fold. A novel feature of the active site is the presence of His169, which structurally aligns with Arg168 of the EcUP structure. A second active site residue, Lys162, is not present in previously determined UP structures and interacts with O2 of uracil. Biochemical studies of wild-type SpUP showed that its substrate specificity is similar to that of EcUP, while EcUP is {approx}7-fold more efficient than SpUP. Biochemical studies of SpUP mutants showed that mutations of His169 reduced activity, while mutation of Lys162 abolished all activity, suggesting that the negative charge in the transition state resides mostly on uracil O2. This is in contrast to EcUP for which transition state stabilization occurs mostly at O4.

  11. Glycogen catabolism, but not its biosynthesis, affects virulence of Fusarium oxysporum on the plant host.

    PubMed

    Corral-Ramos, Cristina; Roncero, M Isabel G

    2015-04-01

    The role of glycogen metabolism was investigated in the fungal pathogen Fusarium oxysporum. Targeted inactivation was performed of genes responsible for glycogen biosynthesis: gnn1 encoding glycogenin, gls1 encoding glycogen synthase, and gbe1 encoding glycogen branching enzyme. Moreover genes involved in glycogen catabolism were deleted: gph1 encoding glycogen phosphorylase and gdb1 encoding glycogen de-branching enzyme. Glycogen reserves increased steadily during growth of the wild type strain in axenic cultures, to reach up to 1500μg glucose equivalents mg(-1) protein after 14 days. Glycogen accumulation was abolished in mutants lacking biosynthesis genes, whereas it increased by 20-40% or 80%, respectively, in the single and double mutants affected in catabolic genes. Transcript levels of glycogen metabolism genes during tomato plant infection peaked at four days post inoculation, similar to the results observed during axenic culture. Significant differences were observed between gdb mutants and the wild type strain for vegetative hyphal fusion ability. The single mutants defective in glycogen metabolism showed similar levels of virulence in the invertebrate animal model Galleria mellonella. Interestingly, the deletion of gdb1 reduced virulence on the plant host up to 40% compared to the wild type in single and in double mutant backgrounds, whereas the other mutants showed the virulence at the wild-type level. PMID:25865793

  12. Multiple Glycogen-binding Sites in Eukaryotic Glycogen Synthase Are Required for High Catalytic Efficiency toward Glycogen

    SciTech Connect

    Baskaran, Sulochanadevi; Chikwana, Vimbai M.; Contreras, Christopher J.; Davis, Keri D.; Wilson, Wayne A.; DePaoli-Roach, Anna A.; Roach, Peter J.; Hurley, Thomas D.

    2012-12-10

    Glycogen synthase is a rate-limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis of glycogen and has an essential role in glucose homeostasis. The three-dimensional structures of yeast glycogen synthase (Gsy2p) complexed with maltooctaose identified four conserved maltodextrin-binding sites distributed across the surface of the enzyme. Site-1 is positioned on the N-terminal domain, site-2 and site-3 are present on the C-terminal domain, and site-4 is located in an interdomain cleft adjacent to the active site. Mutation of these surface sites decreased glycogen binding and catalytic efficiency toward glycogen. Mutations within site-1 and site-2 reduced the V{sub max}/S{sub 0.5} for glycogen by 40- and 70-fold, respectively. Combined mutation of site-1 and site-2 decreased the V{sub max}/S{sub 0.5} for glycogen by >3000-fold. Consistent with the in vitro data, glycogen accumulation in glycogen synthase-deficient yeast cells ({Delta}gsy1-gsy2) transformed with the site-1, site-2, combined site-1/site-2, or site-4 mutant form of Gsy2p was decreased by up to 40-fold. In contrast to the glycogen results, the ability to utilize maltooctaose as an in vitro substrate was unaffected in the site-2 mutant, moderately affected in the site-1 mutant, and almost completely abolished in the site-4 mutant. These data show that the ability to utilize maltooctaose as a substrate can be independent of the ability to utilize glycogen. Our data support the hypothesis that site-1 and site-2 provide a 'toehold mechanism,' keeping glycogen synthase tightly associated with the glycogen particle, whereas site-4 is more closely associated with positioning of the nonreducing end during catalysis.

  13. [Use of properties and regulation peculiarities of enzymes of glycogenolysis in fish skeletal muscle depending on peculiarities of motor activity of species].

    PubMed

    Serebrenikova, T P; Nesterov, V P

    2008-01-01

    Levels of activity, properties, and peculiarities of activation of glycogen phosphorylase (GP; EC 2.4.1.1) and glycogen phosphorylase kinase (GPK; EC 2.7.1.38) were studied in the white skeletal muscle of fish differing in motor behavior. No differences in the GP and GPK activity levels were revealed in laskir Diplodus annularis (L.), horse mackerel Trachurus mediterraneus ponticus, salmon Salmo trutta morphario, scorpena Scorpaena porcus, Scophtalnus maeoticus, and carp Cyprinus carpio; however, properties of the isolated enzymes and peculiarities of formation of their activated forms during swimming in a hydrodynamic tube are determined by functional peculiarities of the muscle tissue and are associated with the motor activity character of the species. In fish capable for the spurt type of swimming (scorpena, salmon) the more rapid ion regulation plays the predominant role. In other species, the glycogenolysis hormonal regulation leading to a change of the GPK activity index has been found. PMID:18411509

  14. Brain glycogen decreases during prolonged exercise

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, Takashi; Soya, Shingo; Okamoto, Masahiro; Ichitani, Yukio; Kawanaka, Kentaro; Soya, Hideaki

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Brain glycogen could be a critical energy source for brain activity when the glucose supply from the blood is inadequate (hypoglycaemia). Although untested, it is hypothesized that during prolonged exhaustive exercise that induces hypoglycaemia and muscular glycogen depletion, the resultant hypoglycaemia may cause a decrease in brain glycogen. Here, we tested this hypothesis and also investigated the possible involvement of brain monoamines with the reduced levels of brain glycogen. For this purpose, we exercised male Wistar rats on a treadmill for different durations (30–120 min) at moderate intensity (20 m min−1) and measured their brain glycogen levels using high-power microwave irradiation (10 kW). At the end of 30 and 60 min of running, the brain glycogen levels remained unchanged from resting levels, but liver and muscle glycogen decreased. After 120 min of running, the glycogen levels decreased significantly by ∼37–60% in five discrete brain loci (the cerebellum 60%, cortex 48%, hippocampus 43%, brainstem 37% and hypothalamus 34%) compared to those of the sedentary control. The brain glycogen levels in all five regions after running were positively correlated with the respective blood and brain glucose levels. Further, in the cortex, the levels of methoxyhydroxyphenylglycol (MHPG) and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), potential involved in degradation of the brain glycogen, increased during prolonged exercise and negatively correlated with the glycogen levels. These results support the hypothesis that brain glycogen could decrease with prolonged exhaustive exercise. Increased monoamines together with hypoglycaemia should be associated with the development of decreased brain glycogen, suggesting a new clue towards the understanding of central fatigue during prolonged exercise. PMID:21521757

  15. Glucose and glycogen metabolism in erythrocytes from normal and glycogen storage disease type III subjects

    PubMed Central

    Moses, Shimon W.; Chayoth, Reuben; Levin, Stanley; Lazarovitz, Ela; Rubinstein, David

    1968-01-01

    Active glycogen metabolism has been demonstrated in both normal and glycogen-rich erythrocytes taken from patients with type III glycogen storage disease. Activity of all enzymes catalyzing the reactions required for the synthesis and degradation of glycogen have been demonstrated in the mature erythrocytes. Uniformly labeled glucose-14C is incorporated into glycogen in intact cells of both types during incubation. Replacement of the glucose-14C by unlabeled glucose in the medium resulted in a significant loss of radioactivity from cellular glycogen. In the absence of the substrate a progressive shortening of outer branches occurred during incubation of intact glucogen-rich cells. Using cells from patients with type III glycogen storage disease, which have sufficient glycogen content to be analyzed by β-amylolysis, we demonstrated that the glucosyl units are first incorporated in the outer tiers, then transferred to the core where they tend to accumulate due to the absence of amylo-1,6-glucosidase. The glycogen-rich cells have a more rapid rate of glucose utilization upon incubation which is not reflected by a higher lactate production. The increased rate of glucose utilization did not result from an increased rate of glucose incorporation into glycogen in affected cells. The rate of 14CO2 production from glucose-1-14C during incubation was not significantly different in the two types of cells unless methylene blue was added as an electron acceptor, in which case the glycogen-rich cells oxidized glucose to CO2 more rapidly. PMID:5240360

  16. Synthesis of benzimidazole based thiadiazole and carbohydrazide conjugates as glycogen synthase kinase-3β inhibitors with anti-depressant activity.

    PubMed

    Khan, Imran; Tantray, Mushtaq A; Hamid, Hinna; Alam, Mohammad Sarwar; Kalam, Abul; Dhulap, Abhijeet

    2016-08-15

    A series of benzimidazole based thiadiazole and carbohydrazide conjugates have been synthesized and evaluated for inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase-3β and anti-depressant effect. Compounds 4f, 4j, 5b, 5g and 5i were found to be the most potent inhibitors of GSK-3β in vitro amongst the twenty-five benzimidazole based thiadiazole and carbohydrazide conjugates synthesized. Compound 5i was also found to exhibit significant antidepressant activity in vivo at 50mg/kg, when compared to fluoxetine, a known antidepressant drug. The molecular docking studies revealed multiple hydrogen bond interactions by the synthesized compounds with various amino acid residues, viz, ASP-133, LYS-183, PRO-136, VAL-135, TYR-134, or LYS-60 at the GSK-3β receptor site. PMID:27406796

  17. Glycogen: the forgotten cerebral energy store.

    PubMed

    Gruetter, Rolf

    2003-10-15

    The brain contains a significant amount of glycogen that is an order of magnitude smaller than that in muscle, but several-fold higher than the cerebral glucose content. Although the precise role of brain glycogen to date is unknown, it seems affected by focal activation, neurotransmitters, and overall electrical activity and hormones. Based on its relatively low concentration, the role of brain glycogen as a significant energy store has been discounted. This work reviews recent experimental evidence that brain glycogen is an important reserve of glucose equivalents: (1) glial glycogen can provide the majority of the glucose supply deficit during hypoglycemia for more than 100 min, consistent with the proposal that glial lactate is a fuel for neurons; (2) glycogen concentrations may be as high as 10 micromol/g, substantially higher than was thought previously; (3) glucose cycling in and out of glycogen amounts to approximately 1% of the cerebral metabolic rate of glucose (CMRglc) in human and rat brain, amounting to an effective stability of glycogen in the resting awake brain during euglycemia and hyperglycemia, (4) brain glycogen metabolism/concentrations are insulin/glucose sensitive; and (5) after a single episode of hypoglycemia, brain glycogen levels rebound to levels that exceed the pre-hypoglycemic concentrations (supercompensation). This experimental evidence supports the proposal that brain glycogen may be involved in the development of diabetes complications, specifically impaired glucose sensing (hypoglycemia unawareness) observed clinically in some diabetes patients under insulin treatment. It is proposed further that brain glycogen becomes important in any metabolic state where supply transiently cannot meet demand, such conditions that could occur during prolonged focal activation, sleep deprivation, seizures, and mild hypoxia. PMID:14515346

  18. Phosphorylation and activation of calcineurin by glycogen synthase (casein) kinase-1 and cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, T.J.; Wang, J.H.

    1986-05-01

    Calcineurin is a phosphoprotein phosphatase that is activated by divalent cations and further stimulated by calmodulin. In this study calcineurin is shown to be a substrate for both glycogen synthase (casein) kinase-1 (CK-1) and cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (A-kinase). Either kinase can catalyze the incorporation of 1.0-1.4 mol /sup 32/P/mol calcineurin. Analysis by SDS-PAGE revealed that only the ..cap alpha.. subunit is phosphorylated. Phosphorylation of calcineurin by either kinase leads to its activation. Using p-nitrophenyl phosphate as a substrate the authors observed a 2-3 fold activation of calcineurin by either Mn/sup 2 +/ or Ni/sup 2 +/ (in the presence or absence of calmodulin) after phosphorylation of calcineurin by either CK-1 or A-kinase. In the absence of Mn/sup 2 +/ or Ni/sup 2 +/ phosphorylated calcineurin, like the nonphosphorylated enzyme, showed very little activity. Ni/sup 2 +/ was a more potent activator of phosphorylated calcineurin compared to Mn/sup 2 +/. Higher levels of activation (5-8 fold) of calcineurin by calmodulin was observed when phosphorylated calcineurin was pretreated with Ni/sup 2 +/ before measurement of phosphatase activity. These results indicate that phosphorylation may be an important mechanism by which calcineurin activity is regulated by Ca/sup 2 +/.

  19. Experimental evaluation of decrease in the activities of polyphosphate/glycogen-accumulating organisms due to cell death and activity decay in activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Hao, Xiaodi; Wang, Qilin; Cao, Yali; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M

    2010-06-15

    Decrease in bacterial activity (biomass decay) in activated sludge can result from cell death (reduction in the amount of active bacteria) and activity decay (reduction in the specific activity of active bacteria). The goal of this study was to experimentally differentiate between cell death and activity decay as the cause of decrease in bacterial activity. By means of measuring maximal anaerobic phosphate release rates, verifying membrane integrity by live/dead staining and verifying presence of 16S rRNA with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), the decay rates and death rates of polyphosphate-accumulating organisms (PAOs) in a biological nutrient removal (BNR) system and a laboratory phosphate removing sequencing batch reactor (SBR) system were determined, respectively, under famine conditions. In addition, the decay rate and death rate of glycogen-accumulating organisms (GAOs) in a SBR system with an enrichment culture of GAOs were also measured under famine conditions. Hereto the maximal anaerobic volatile fatty acid uptake rates, live/dead staining, and FISH were used. The experiments revealed that in the BNR and enriched PAO-SBR systems, activity decay contributed 58% and 80% to the decreased activities of PAOs, and that cell death was responsible for 42% and 20% of decreases in their respective activities. In the enriched GAOs system, activity decay constituted a proportion of 74% of the decreased activity of GAOs, and cell death only accounted for 26% of the decrease of their activity. PMID:20178124

  20. Pathway-Level Acceleration of Glycogen Catabolism by a Response Regulator in the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis Species PCC 68031[W

    PubMed Central

    Osanai, Takashi; Oikawa, Akira; Numata, Keiji; Kuwahara, Ayuko; Iijima, Hiroko; Doi, Yoshiharu; Saito, Kazuki; Hirai, Masami Yokota

    2014-01-01

    Response regulators of two-component systems play pivotal roles in the transcriptional regulation of responses to environmental signals in bacteria. Rre37, an OmpR-type response regulator, is induced by nitrogen depletion in the unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis species PCC 6803. Microarray and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analyses revealed that genes related to sugar catabolism and nitrogen metabolism were up-regulated by rre37 overexpression. Protein levels of GlgP(slr1367), one of the two glycogen phosphorylases, in the rre37-overexpressing strain were higher than those of the parental wild-type strain under both nitrogen-replete and nitrogen-depleted conditions. Glycogen amounts decreased to less than one-tenth by rre37 overexpression under nitrogen-replete conditions. Metabolome analysis revealed that metabolites of the sugar catabolic pathway and amino acids were altered in the rre37-overexpressing strain after nitrogen depletion. These results demonstrate that Rre37 is a pathway-level regulator that activates the metabolic flow from glycogen to polyhydroxybutyrate and the hybrid tricarboxylic acid and ornithine cycle, unraveling the mechanism of the transcriptional regulation of primary metabolism in this unicellular cyanobacterium. PMID:24521880

  1. PfIRR Interacts with HrIGF-I and Activates the MAP-kinase and PI3-kinase Signaling Pathways to Regulate Glycogen Metabolism in Pinctada fucata

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yu; He, Mao-xian

    2016-01-01

    The insulin-induced mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathways are major intracellular signaling modules and conserved among eukaryotes that are known to regulate diverse cellular processes. However, they have not been investigated in the mollusk species Pinctada fucata. Here, we demonstrate that insulin-related peptide receptor of P. fucata (pfIRR) interacts with human recombinant insulin-like growth factor I (hrIGF-I), and stimulates the MAPK and PI3K signaling pathways in P. fucata oocytes. We also show that inhibition of pfIRR by the inhibitor PQ401 significantly attenuates the basal and hrIGF-I-induced phosphorylation of MAPK and PI3K/Akt at amino acid residues threonine 308 and serine 473. Furthermore, our experiments show that there is cross-talk between the MAPK and PI3K/Akt pathways, in which MAPK kinase positively regulates the PI3K pathway, and PI3K positively regulates the MAPK cascade. Intramuscular injection of hrIGF-I stimulates the PI3K and MAPK pathways to increase the expression of pfirr, protein phosphatase 1, glucokinase, and the phosphorylation of glycogen synthase, decreases the mRNA expression of glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta, decreases glucose levels in hemocytes, and increases glycogen levels in digestive glands. These results suggest that the MAPK and PI3K pathways in P. fucata transmit the hrIGF-I signal to regulate glycogen metabolism. PMID:26911653

  2. SIRT3 Blocks Aging-Associated Tissue Fibrosis in Mice by Deacetylating and Activating Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3β

    PubMed Central

    Sundaresan, Nagalingam R.; Bindu, Samik; Pillai, Vinodkumar B.; Samant, Sadhana; Pan, Yong; Huang, Jing-Yi; Gupta, Madhu; Nagalingam, Raghu S.; Wolfgeher, Donald

    2015-01-01

    Tissue fibrosis is a major cause of organ dysfunction during chronic diseases and aging. A critical step in this process is transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1)-mediated transformation of fibroblasts into myofibroblasts, cells capable of synthesizing extracellular matrix. Here, we show that SIRT3 controls transformation of fibroblasts into myofibroblasts via suppressing the profibrotic TGF-β1 signaling. We found that Sirt3 knockout (KO) mice with age develop tissue fibrosis of multiple organs, including heart, liver, kidney, and lungs but not whole-body SIRT3-overexpressing mice. SIRT3 deficiency caused induction of TGF-β1 expression and hyperacetylation of glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) at residue K15, which negatively regulated GSK3β activity to phosphorylate the substrates Smad3 and β-catenin. Reduced phosphorylation led to stabilization and activation of these transcription factors regulating expression of the profibrotic genes. SIRT3 deacetylated and activated GSK3β and thereby blocked TGF-β1 signaling and tissue fibrosis. These data reveal a new role of SIRT3 to negatively regulate aging-associated tissue fibrosis and discloses a novel phosphorylation-independent mechanism controlling the catalytic activity of GSK3β. PMID:26667039

  3. SIRT3 Blocks Aging-Associated Tissue Fibrosis in Mice by Deacetylating and Activating Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3β.

    PubMed

    Sundaresan, Nagalingam R; Bindu, Samik; Pillai, Vinodkumar B; Samant, Sadhana; Pan, Yong; Huang, Jing-Yi; Gupta, Madhu; Nagalingam, Raghu S; Wolfgeher, Donald; Verdin, Eric; Gupta, Mahesh P

    2016-03-01

    Tissue fibrosis is a major cause of organ dysfunction during chronic diseases and aging. A critical step in this process is transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1)-mediated transformation of fibroblasts into myofibroblasts, cells capable of synthesizing extracellular matrix. Here, we show that SIRT3 controls transformation of fibroblasts into myofibroblasts via suppressing the profibrotic TGF-β1 signaling. We found that Sirt3 knockout (KO) mice with age develop tissue fibrosis of multiple organs, including heart, liver, kidney, and lungs but not whole-body SIRT3-overexpressing mice. SIRT3 deficiency caused induction of TGF-β1 expression and hyperacetylation of glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) at residue K15, which negatively regulated GSK3β activity to phosphorylate the substrates Smad3 and β-catenin. Reduced phosphorylation led to stabilization and activation of these transcription factors regulating expression of the profibrotic genes. SIRT3 deacetylated and activated GSK3β and thereby blocked TGF-β1 signaling and tissue fibrosis. These data reveal a new role of SIRT3 to negatively regulate aging-associated tissue fibrosis and discloses a novel phosphorylation-independent mechanism controlling the catalytic activity of GSK3β. PMID:26667039

  4. Inspection of the activator binding site for 4-alpha-glucanotransferase in porcine liver glycogen debranching enzyme with fluorogenic dextrins.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Eriko; Watanabe, Yumiko; Makino, Yasushi; Omichi, Kaoru

    2009-05-01

    Recently, we found that alpha-, beta- and gamma-cyclodextrins accelerated the 4-alpha-glucanotransferase action of porcine liver glycogen debranching enzyme (GDE) on Glcalpha1-4Glcalpha1-4Glcalpha1-4(Glcalpha1-4Glcalpha1-4Glcalpha1-4Glcalpha1-6)Glcalpha1-4Glcalpha1-4Glcalpha1-4Glcalpha1-4GlcPA (B5/84), and proposed the presence of an activator binding site in the GDE molecule. In liver cells, the structures of alpha-glucans proximal to the site GDE acts are not cyclodextrins, but glycogen and its degradation products. To estimate the structural characteristics of intrinsic activators and to inspect the features of the activator binding site, we examined the effects of four fluorogenic dextrins, (Glcalpha1-6)(m)Glcalpha1-4(Glcalpha1-4)(n)GlcPA (B5/51, m = 1, n = 3; B6/61, m = 1, n = 4; B7/71, m = 1, n = 5; G6PA, m = 0, n = 4), on the debranching of B5/84 by porcine liver GDE. The GDE 4-alpha-glucanotransferase removed the maltotriosyl residue from the maltotetraosyl branch of B5/84, producing Glcalpha1-4Glcalpha1-4Glcalpha1-4(Glcalpha1-6)Glcalpha1-4Glcalpha1-4Glcalpha1-4Glcalpha1-4GlcPA (B5/81). In the presence of G6PA, the removed maltotriosyl residue was transferred to G6PA to give Glcalpha1-4Glcalpha1-4Glcalpha1-4Glcalpha1-4Glcalpha1-4Glcalpha1-4Glcalpha1-4Glcalpha1-4GlcPA (G9PA). In the absence of G6PA, the removed maltotriosyl residue was transferred to water. B7/71, B6/61 and B5/51 did not undergo any changes by the GDE, but they accelerated the action of the 4-alpha-glucanotransferase in removing the maltotriosyl residue. Of the four fluorogenic dextrins examined, B6/61 most strongly accelerated the 4-alpha-glucanotransferase action. The activator binding site is likely to be a space that accommodates the structure of Glcalpha1-6Glcalpha1-4Glcalpha1-4Glcalpha1-4Glcalpha1-4Glc. PMID:19155269

  5. Lithium Regulates Keratinocyte Proliferation Via Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3 and NFAT2 (Nuclear Factor of Activated T Cells 2)

    PubMed Central

    Hampton, Philip J; Jans, Ralph; Flockhart, Ross J; Parker, Graeme; Reynolds, Nick J

    2012-01-01

    Certain environmental factors including drugs exacerbate or precipitate psoriasis. Lithium is the commonest cause of drug-induced psoriasis but underlying mechanisms are currently unknown. Lithium inhibits glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK-3). As lithium does not exacerbate other T-cell-mediated chronic inflammatory diseases, we investigated whether lithium may be acting directly on epidermal keratinocytes by inhibiting GSK-3. We report that lithium-induced keratinocyte proliferation at therapeutically relevant doses (1–2 mM) and increased the proportion of cells in S phase of the cell cycle. Inhibition of GSK-3 in keratinocytes by retroviral transduction of GSK-binding protein (an endogenous inhibitory protein) or through a highly selective pharmacological inhibitor also resulted in increased keratinocyte proliferation. Nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) is an important substrate for GSK-3 and for cyclosporin, an effective treatment for psoriasis that inhibits NFAT activation in keratinocytes as well as in lymphocytes. Both lithium and genetic/pharmacological inhibition of GSK-3 resulted in increased nuclear localization of NFAT2 (NFATc1) and increased NFAT transcriptional activation. Finally, retroviral transduction of NFAT2 increased keratinocyte proliferation whereas siRNA-mediated knockdown of NFAT2 reduced keratinocyte proliferation and decreased epidermal thickness in an organotypic skin equivalent model. Taken together, these data identify GSK-3 and NFAT2 as key regulators of keratinocyte proliferation and as potential molecular targets relevant to lithium-provoked psoriasis. J. Cell. Physiol. 227: 1529–1537, 2012. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:21678407

  6. N-Acetyl-beta-D-glucopyranosylamine 6-phosphate is a specific inhibitor of glycogen-bound protein phosphatase 1.

    PubMed Central

    Board, M

    1997-01-01

    Previous work has shown that the C-1-substituted glucose-analogue N-acetyl-beta-D-glucopyranosylamine (1-GlcNAc) is a competitive inhibitor of glycogen phosphorylase (GP) and stimulates the inactivation of this enzyme by GP phosphatase. In addition to its effects on GP, 1-GlcNAc also prevents the glucose-led activation of glycogen synthase (GS) in whole hepatocytes. Such an effect on GS was thought to be due to the formation of 1-GlcNAc-6-P by the action of glucokinase within the hepatocyte [Board, Bollen, Stalmans, Kim, Fleet and Johnson (1995) Biochem. J. 311, 845-852]. To investigate this possibility further, a pure preparation of 1-GlcNAc-6-P was synthesized. The effects of the phosphorylated glucose analogue on the activity of protein phosphatase 1 (PP1), the enzyme responsible for dephosphorylation and activation of GS, are reported. During the present study, 1-GlcNAc-6-P inhibited the activity of the glycogen-bound form of PP1, affecting both the GSb phosphatase and GPa phosphatase activities. A level of 50% inhibition of GSb phosphatase activity was achieved with 85 microM 1-GlcNAc-6-P in the absence of Glc-6-P and with 135 microM in the presence of 10 mM Glc-6-P. At either Glc-6-P concentration, 500 microM 1-GlcNAc-6-P completely inhibited activity. The Glc-6-P stimulation of the GPa phosphatase activity of PP1 was negated by 1-GlcNAc-6-P but there was no inhibition of the basal rate in the absence of Glc-6-P. 1-GlcNAc-6-P inhibition was specific for the glycogen-bound form of PP1 and did not inhibit the GSb phosphatase activity of the cytosolic form of the enzyme. The present work explains our previous observations on the inactivating effects on GS of incubating whole hepatocytes with 1-GlcNAc. These observations have their basis in the inhibition of glycogen-bound PP1 by 1-GlcNAc-6-P. A novel inhibitor of PP1, specific for the glycogen-bound form of the enzyme, is presented. PMID:9371733

  7. Fructose effect to enhance liver glycogen deposition is due to inhibition of glycogenolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Youn, J.; Kaslow, H.; Bergman, R.

    1987-05-01

    The effect of fructose on glycogen degradation was examined by measuring flux of (/sup 14/C) from prelabeled glycogen in perfused rat livers. During 2 h refeeding of fasted rats hepatic glycogen was labeled by injection of (U /sup 14/C) galactose (0.1 mg and 0.02 ..mu..Ci/g of body weight). Refed livers were perfused for 30 min with glucose only (10 mM) and for 60 min with glucose (10 mM) without (n=5) or with fructose (1, 2, 10 mM; n=5 for each). With fructose, label production immediately declined and remained suppressed through the end of perfusion (P < 0.05). Suppression was dose-dependent: steady state label production was suppressed 45, 64, and 72% by 1, 2, and 10 mM fructose (P < 0.0001), without significant changes in glycogen synthase or phosphorylase. These results suggest the existence of allosteric inhibition of phosphorylase in the presence of fructose. Fructose 1-phosphate (F1P) accumulated in proportion to fructose (0.11 +/- 0.01 without fructose, 0.86 +/- 0.03, 1.81 +/- 0.18, and 8.23 +/- 0.6 ..mu..moles/g of liver with 1, 2, and 10 mM fructose. Maximum inhibition of phosphorylase was 82%; FIP concentration for half inhibition was 0.57 ..mu..moles/g of liver, well within the concentration of F1P attained in refeeding. Fructose enhances net glycogen synthesis in liver by suppressing glycogenolysis and the suppression is presumably caused by allosteric inhibition of phosphorylase by F1P.

  8. Evidence for the absence of cerebral glucose-6-phosphatase activity in glycogen storage disease type I (Von Gierke's disease)

    SciTech Connect

    Phelps, M.E.; Mazziotta, J.C.; Hawkins, R.A.; Philippart, M.

    1981-01-01

    Glycogen storage disease type I (GSD-I) is characterized by a functional deficit in glucose-6-phosphatase that normally hydrolyzes glucose-6-PO/sub 4/ to glucose. This enzyme is primarily found in liver, kidney, and muscle but it is also present in brain, where it appears to participate in the regulation of cerebral tissue glucose. Since most neurological symptoms in GSD-I patients involve systemic hypoglycemia, previous reports have not examined possible deficiencies in phosphatase activity in the brain. Positron computed tomography, F-18-labeled 2-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and a tracer kinetic model for FDG were used to measure the cortical plasma/tissue forward and reverse transport, phosphorylation and dephosphorylation rate constants, tissue/plasma concentration gradient, tissue concentration turnover rate for this competitive analog of glucose, and the cortical metabolic rates for glucose. Studies were carried out in age-matched normals (N = 13) and a single GSD-I patient. The dephosphorylation rate constant in the GSD-I patient was about one tenth the normal value indicating a low level of cerebral phosphatase activity. The other measured parameters were within normal limits except for the rate of glucose phosphorylation which reflected a cortical glucose metabolic rate one half the normal value. Since glucose transport and tissue glucose concentration was normal, the reduced cortical glucose metabolism probably results from the use of alternative substrates (..beta..-hydroxybutyrate and acetoacetate) which are consistently elevated in the plasma of GSD-I patients.

  9. Glycogen synthase kinase-3 inhibition attenuates fibroblast activation and development of fibrosis following renal ischemia-reperfusion in mice

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Shailendra P.; Tao, Shixin; Fields, Timothy A.; Webb, Sydney; Harris, Raymond C.; Rao, Reena

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK3β) is a serine/threonine protein kinase that plays an important role in renal tubular injury and regeneration in acute kidney injury. However, its role in the development of renal fibrosis, often a long-term consequence of acute kidney injury, is unknown. Using a mouse model of renal fibrosis induced by ischemia-reperfusion injury, we demonstrate increased GSK3β expression and activity in fibrotic kidneys, and its presence in myofibroblasts in addition to tubular epithelial cells. Pharmacological inhibition of GSK3 using TDZD-8 starting before or after ischemia-reperfusion significantly suppressed renal fibrosis by reducing the myofibroblast population, collagen-1 and fibronectin deposition, inflammatory cytokines, and macrophage infiltration. GSK3 inhibition in vivo reduced TGF-β1, SMAD3 activation and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 levels. Consistently in vitro, TGF-β1 treatment increased GSK3β expression and GSK3 inhibition abolished TGF-β1-induced SMAD3 activation and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) expression in cultured renal fibroblasts. Importantly, overexpression of constitutively active GSK3β stimulated α-SMA expression even in the absence of TGF-β1 treatment. These results suggest that TGF-β regulates GSK3β, which in turn is important for TGF-β–SMAD3 signaling and fibroblast-to-myofibroblast differentiation. Overall, these studies demonstrate that GSK3 could promote renal fibrosis by activation of TGF-β signaling and the use of GSK3 inhibitors might represent a novel therapeutic approach for progressive renal fibrosis that develops as a consequence of acute kidney injury. PMID:26092126

  10. Interaction of yeast repressor-activator protein Ume6p with glycogen synthase kinase 3 homolog Rim11p.

    PubMed Central

    Malathi, K; Xiao, Y; Mitchell, A P

    1997-01-01

    Meiosis and expression of early meiotic genes in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae depend upon Rim11p, Ume6p, and Ime1p. Rim11p (also called Mds1p and ScGSK3) is a protein kinase related to glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3); Ume6p is an architectural transcription factor; and Imelp is a Ume6p-binding protein that provides a transcriptional activation domain. Rim11p is required for Ime1p-Ume6p interaction, and prior studies have shown that Rim11p binds to and phosphorylates Ime1p. We show here that Rim11p binds to and phosphorylates Ume6p, as well. Amino acid substitutions in Ume6p that alter a consensus GSK3 site reduce or abolish Rim11p-Ume6p interaction and Rim11p-dependent phosphorylation, and they cause defects in interaction between Ume6p and Ime1p and in meiotic gene expression. Therefore, interaction between Rim11p and Ume6p, resulting in phosphorylation of Ume6p, is required for Ime1p-Ume6p complex formation. Rim11p, like metazoan GSK3beta, phosphorylates both interacting subunits of a target protein complex. PMID:9372955

  11. Cocaine regulates protein kinase B and glycogen synthase kinase-3 activity in selective regions of rat brain

    PubMed Central

    SA, Perrine; JS, Miller; EM, Unterwald

    2008-01-01

    Protein kinase B (Akt) signaling regulates dopamine-mediated locomotor behaviors. Here the ability of cocaine to regulate Akt and glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3) was studied. Rats were injected with cocaine or saline in a binge-pattern, which consisted of 3 daily injections of 15 mg/kg cocaine or 1 ml/kg saline spaced one hour apart for 1, 3 or 14 days. Amygdala, nucleus accumbens, caudate putamen and hippocampus tissues were dissected 30 minutes following the last injection and analyzed for phosphorylated and total Akt and GSK3(α & β) protein levels using Western blot analysis. Phosphorylation of Akt on the threonine-308 residue was significantly reduced in the nucleus accumbens and increased in the amygdala after 1 day of cocaine treatment; however, these effects were not accompanied by a significant decrease in GSK3 phosphorylation. Phosphorylation of Akt and GSK3 were significantly reduced after 14 days of cocaine administration, an effect that was only observed in the amygdala. Cocaine did not alter Akt or GSK3 phosphorylation in the caudate putamen or hippocampus. The findings in nucleus accumbens may reflect dopaminergic motor-stimulant activity caused by acute cocaine, whereas the effects in amygdala may be associated with changes in emotional state that occur after acute and chronic cocaine exposure. PMID:18717814

  12. Hypoxia Promotes Glycogen Accumulation through Hypoxia Inducible Factor (HIF)-Mediated Induction of Glycogen Synthase 1

    PubMed Central

    Pescador, Nuria; Garcia-Rocha, Mar; Ortiz-Barahona, Amaya; Vazquez, Silvia; Ordoñez, Angel; Cuevas, Yolanda; Saez-Morales, David; Garcia-Bermejo, Maria Laura; Landazuri, Manuel O.; Guinovart, Joan; del Peso, Luis

    2010-01-01

    When oxygen becomes limiting, cells reduce mitochondrial respiration and increase ATP production through anaerobic fermentation of glucose. The Hypoxia Inducible Factors (HIFs) play a key role in this metabolic shift by regulating the transcription of key enzymes of glucose metabolism. Here we show that oxygen regulates the expression of the muscle glycogen synthase (GYS1). Hypoxic GYS1 induction requires HIF activity and a Hypoxia Response Element within its promoter. GYS1 gene induction correlated with a significant increase in glycogen synthase activity and glycogen accumulation in cells exposed to hypoxia. Significantly, knockdown of either HIF1α or GYS1 attenuated hypoxia-induced glycogen accumulation, while GYS1 overexpression was sufficient to mimic this effect. Altogether, these results indicate that GYS1 regulation by HIF plays a central role in the hypoxic accumulation of glycogen. Importantly, we found that hypoxia also upregulates the expression of UTP:glucose-1-phosphate urydylyltransferase (UGP2) and 1,4-α glucan branching enzyme (GBE1), two enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of glycogen. Therefore, hypoxia regulates almost all the enzymes involved in glycogen metabolism in a coordinated fashion, leading to its accumulation. Finally, we demonstrated that abrogation of glycogen synthesis, by knock-down of GYS1 expression, impairs hypoxic preconditioning, suggesting a physiological role for the glycogen accumulated during chronic hypoxia. In summary, our results uncover a novel effect of hypoxia on glucose metabolism, further supporting the central importance of metabolic reprogramming in the cellular adaptation to hypoxia. PMID:20300197

  13. When phosphorylated at Thr148, the β2-subunit of AMP-activated kinase does not associate with glycogen in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hongyang; Frankenberg, Noni T; Lamb, Graham D; Gooley, Paul R; Stapleton, David I; Murphy, Robyn M

    2016-07-01

    The 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a heterotrimeric complex that functions as an intracellular fuel sensor that affects metabolism, is activated in skeletal muscle in response to exercise and utilization of stored energy. The diffusibility properties of α- and β-AMPK were examined in isolated skeletal muscle fiber segments dissected from rat fast-twitch extensor digitorum longus and oxidative soleus muscles from which the surface membranes were removed by mechanical dissection. After the muscle segments were washed for 1 and 10 min, ∼60% and 75%, respectively, of the total AMPK pools were found in the diffusible fraction. After in vitro stimulation of the muscle, which resulted in an ∼80% decline in maximal force, 20% of the diffusible pool became bound in the fiber. This bound pool was not associated with glycogen, as determined by addition of a wash step containing amylase. Stimulation of extensor digitorum longus muscles resulted in 28% glycogen utilization and a 40% increase in phosphorylation of the downstream AMPK target acetyl carboxylase-CoA. This, however, had no effect on the proportion of total β2-AMPK that was phosphorylated in whole muscle homogenates measured by immunoprecipitation. These findings suggest that, in rat skeletal muscle, β2-AMPK is not associated with glycogen and that activation of AMPK by muscle contraction does not dephosphorylate β2-AMPK. These findings question the physiological relevance of the carbohydrate-binding function of β2-AMPK in skeletal muscle. PMID:27099349

  14. Crystallization of the glycogen-binding domain of the AMP-activated protein kinase β subunit and preliminary X-ray analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Polekhina, Galina Feil, Susanne C.; Gupta, Abhilasha; O’Donnell, Paul; Stapleton, David; Parker, Michael W.

    2005-01-01

    The glycogen-binding domain of the AMP-activated kinase β subunit has been crystallized in the presence of β-cyclodextrin. The structure has been determined by single isomorphous replacement and threefold averaging using in-house X-ray data collected from selenomethionine-substituted protein. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is an intracellular energy sensor that regulates metabolism in response to energy demand and supply by adjusting the ATP-generating and ATP-consuming pathways. AMPK potentially plays a critical role in diabetes and obesity as it is known to be activated by metforin and rosiglitazone, drugs used for the treatment of type II diabetes. AMPK is a heterotrimer composed of a catalytic α subunit and two regulatory subunits, β and γ. Mutations in the γ subunit are known to cause glycogen accumulation, leading to cardiac arrhythmias. Recently, a functional glycogen-binding domain (GBD) has been identified in the β subunit. Here, the crystallization of GBD in the presence of β-cyclodextrin is reported together with preliminary X-ray data analysis allowing the determination of the structure by single isomorphous replacement and threefold averaging using in-house X-ray data collected from a selenomethionine-substituted protein.

  15. Dual activity of certain HIT-proteins: A. thaliana Hint4 and C. elegans DcpS act on adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate as hydrolases (forming AMP) and as phosphorylases (forming ADP).

    PubMed

    Guranowski, Andrzej; Wojdyła, Anna Maria; Zimny, Jarosław; Wypijewska, Anna; Kowalska, Joanna; Jemielity, Jacek; Davis, Richard E; Bieganowski, Paweł

    2010-01-01

    Histidine triad (HIT)-family proteins interact with different mono- and dinucleotides and catalyze their hydrolysis. During a study of the substrate specificity of seven HIT-family proteins, we have shown that each can act as a sulfohydrolase, catalyzing the liberation of AMP from adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate (APS or SO(4)-pA). However, in the presence of orthophosphate, Arabidopsis thaliana Hint4 and Caenorhabditis elegans DcpS also behaved as APS phosphorylases, forming ADP. Low pH promoted the phosphorolytic and high pH the hydrolytic activities. These proteins, and in particular Hint4, also catalyzed hydrolysis or phosphorolysis of some other adenylyl-derivatives but at lower rates than those for APS cleavage. A mechanism for these activities is proposed and the possible role of some HIT-proteins in APS metabolism is discussed. PMID:19896942

  16. Polynucleotide phosphorylase from plant cells.

    PubMed

    Schumacher-Wittkopf, E; Richter, G; Schulze, S

    1984-06-01

    The isolation of polynucleotide phosphorylase (EC 2. 7. 7. 8) from suspension cultured plant cells of parsley (Petroselinum sativum) and from tomato seedlings (Lycopersicon esculentum) is described. The procedure includes an ultracentrifugation step, a glycerol density gradient centrifugation and preparative gel electrophoresis under nondenaturing conditions. Isoelectric focusing gives rise to a major component (pI ≈ 7.5) and to a minor one (pI ≈ 5). The enzyme contains five subunits with apparent Mr values of 160 000, 140 000, 70 000, 34 000 and 12 000, the 70 000-dalton one being a glycoprotein. PMID:24253429

  17. Lithium Enhances Axonal Regeneration in Peripheral Nerve by Inhibiting Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3β Activation

    PubMed Central

    Su, Huanxing; Yuan, Qiuju; Qin, Dajiang; Yang, Xiaoying; So, Kwok-Fai; Wu, Wutian

    2014-01-01

    Brachial plexus injury often involves traumatic root avulsion resulting in permanent paralysis of the innervated muscles. The lack of sufficient regeneration from spinal motoneurons to the peripheral nerve (PN) is considered to be one of the major causes of the unsatisfactory outcome of various surgical interventions for repair of the devastating injury. The present study was undertaken to investigate potential inhibitory signals which influence axonal regeneration after root avulsion injury. The results of the study showed that root avulsion triggered GSK-3β activation in the injured motoneurons and remaining axons in the ventral funiculus. Systemic application of a clinical dose of lithium suppressed activated GSK-3β in the lesioned spinal cord to the normal level and induced extensive axonal regeneration into replanted ventral roots. Our study suggests that GSK-3β activity is involved in negative regulation for axonal elongation and regeneration and lithium, the specific GSK-3β inhibitor, enhances motoneuron regeneration from CNS to PNS. PMID:24967390

  18. Identification of the Maize Amyloplast Stromal 112-kD Protein as a Plastidic Starch Phosphorylase12

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Ying; Mu, Helen He; Wasserman, Bruce P.; Carman, George M.

    2001-01-01

    Amyloplast is the site of starch synthesis in the storage tissue of maize (Zea mays). The amyloplast stroma contains an enriched group of proteins when compared with the whole endosperm. Proteins with molecular masses of 76 and 85 kD have been identified as starch synthase I and starch branching enzyme IIb, respectively. A 112-kD protein was isolated from the stromal fraction by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and subjected to tryptic digestion and amino acid sequence analysis. Three peptide sequences showed high identity to plastidic forms of starch phosphorylase (SP) from sweet potato, potato, and spinach. SP activity was identified in the amyloplast stromal fraction and was enriched 4-fold when compared with the activity in the whole endosperm fraction. Native and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analyses showed that SP activity was associated with the amyloplast stromal 112-kD protein. In addition, antibodies raised against the potato plastidic SP recognized the amyloplast stromal 112-kD protein. The amyloplast stromal 112-kD SP was expressed in whole endosperm isolated from maize harvested 9 to 24 d after pollination. Results of affinity electrophoresis and enzyme kinetic analyses showed that the amyloplast stromal 112-kD SP preferred amylopectin over glycogen as a substrate in the synthetic reaction. The maize shrunken-4 mutant had reduced SP activity due to a decrease of the amyloplast stromal 112-kD enzyme. PMID:11154342

  19. A Novel Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3 Inhibitor Optimized for Acute Myeloid Leukemia Differentiation Activity.

    PubMed

    Hu, Sophia; Ueda, Masumi; Stetson, Lindsay; Ignatz-Hoover, James; Moreton, Stephen; Chakrabarti, Amit; Xia, Zhiqiang; Karan, Goutam; de Lima, Marcos; Agrawal, Mukesh K; Wald, David N

    2016-07-01

    Standard therapies used for the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are cytotoxic agents that target rapidly proliferating cells. Unfortunately, this therapeutic approach has limited efficacy and significant toxicity and the majority of AML patients still die of their disease. In contrast to the poor prognosis of most AML patients, most individuals with a rare subtype of AML, acute promyelocytic leukemia, can be cured by differentiation therapy using regimens containing all-trans retinoic acid. GSK3 has been previously identified as a therapeutic target in AML where its inhibition can lead to the differentiation and growth arrest of leukemic cells. Unfortunately, existing GSK3 inhibitors lead to suboptimal differentiation activity making them less useful as clinical AML differentiation agents. Here, we describe the discovery of a novel GSK3 inhibitor, GS87. GS87 was discovered in efforts to optimize GSK3 inhibition for AML differentiation activity. Despite GS87's dramatic ability to induce AML differentiation, kinase profiling reveals its high specificity in targeting GSK3 as compared with other kinases. GS87 demonstrates high efficacy in a mouse AML model system and unlike current AML therapeutics, exhibits little effect on normal bone marrow cells. GS87 induces potent differentiation by more effectively activating GSK3-dependent signaling components including MAPK signaling as compared with other GSK3 inhibitors. GS87 is a novel GSK3 inhibitor with therapeutic potential as a differentiation agent for non-promyelocytic AML. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(7); 1485-94. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27196775

  20. Glycogen metabolism in the rat retina.

    PubMed

    Coffe, Víctor; Carbajal, Raymundo C; Salceda, Rocío

    2004-02-01

    It has been reported that glycogen levels in retina vary with retinal vascularization. However, the electrical activity of isolated retina depends on glucose supply, suggesting that it does not contain energetic reserves. We determined glycogen levels and pyruvate and lactate production under various conditions in isolated retina. Ex vivo retinas from light- and dark-adapted rats showed values of 44 +/- 0.3 and 19.5 +/- 0.4 nmol glucosyl residues/mg protein, respectively. The glycogen content of retinas from light-adapted animals was reduced by 50% when they were transferred to darkness. Glycogen levels were low in retinas incubated in glucose-free media and increased in the presence of glucose. The highest glycogen values were found in media containing 20 mm of glucose. A rapid increase in lactate production was observed in the presence of glucose. Surprisingly, glycogen levels were the lowest and lactate production was also very low in the presence of 30 mm glucose. Our results suggest that glycogen can be used as an immediate accessible energy reserve in retina. We speculate on the possibility that gluconeogenesis may play a protective role by removal of lactic acid. PMID:14756809

  1. Discovery of Isonicotinamides as Highly Selective, Brain Penetrable, and Orally Active Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3 Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Luo, Guanglin; Chen, Ling; Burton, Catherine R; Xiao, Hong; Sivaprakasam, Prasanna; Krause, Carol M; Cao, Yang; Liu, Nengyin; Lippy, Jonathan; Clarke, Wendy J; Snow, Kimberly; Raybon, Joseph; Arora, Vinod; Pokross, Matt; Kish, Kevin; Lewis, Hal A; Langley, David R; Macor, John E; Dubowchik, Gene M

    2016-02-11

    GSK-3 is a serine/threonine kinase that has numerous substrates. Many of these proteins are involved in the regulation of diverse cellular functions, including metabolism, differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis. Inhibition of GSK-3 may be useful in treating a number of diseases including Alzheimer's disease (AD), type II diabetes, mood disorders, and some cancers, but the approach poses significant challenges. Here, we present a class of isonicotinamides that are potent, highly kinase-selective GSK-3 inhibitors, the members of which demonstrated oral activity in a triple-transgenic mouse model of AD. The remarkably high kinase selectivity and straightforward synthesis of these compounds bode well for their further exploration as tool compounds and therapeutics. PMID:26751161

  2. Regulation of phosphorylase kinase by low concentrations of Ca ions upon muscle contraction: the connection between metabolism and muscle contraction and the connection between muscle physiology and Ca-dependent signal transduction

    PubMed Central

    OZAWA, Eijiro

    2011-01-01

    It had long been one of the crucial questions in muscle physiology how glycogenolysis is regulated in connection with muscle contraction, when we found the answer to this question in the last half of the 1960s. By that time, the two principal currents of muscle physiology, namely, the metabolic flow starting from glycogen and the mechanisms of muscle contraction, had already been clarified at the molecular level thanks to our senior researchers. Thus, the final question we had to answer was how to connect these two currents. We found that low concentrations of Ca ions (10−7–10−4 M) released from the sarcoplasmic reticulum for the regulation of muscle contraction simultaneously reversibly activate phosphorylase kinase, the enzyme regulating glycogenolysis. Moreover, we found that adenosine 3′,5′-monophosphate (cyclic AMP), which is already known to activate muscle phosphorylase kinase, is not effective in the absence of such concentrations of Ca ions. Thus, cyclic AMP is not effective by itself alone and only modifies the activation process in the presence of Ca ions (at that time, cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase had not yet been identified). After a while, it turned out that our works have not only provided the solution to the above problem on muscle physiology, but have also been considered as the first report of Ca-dependent protein phosphorylation, which is one of the central problems in current cell biology. Phosphorylase kinase is the first protein kinase to phosphorylate a protein resulting in the change in the function of the phosphorylated protein, as shown by Krebs and Fischer. Our works further showed that this protein kinase is regulated in a Ca-dependent manner. Accordingly, our works introduced the concept of low concentrations of Ca ions, which were first identified as the regulatory substance of muscle contraction, to the vast field of Ca biology including signal transduction. PMID:21986313

  3. Liver Glycogen Loading Dampens Glycogen Synthesis Seen in Response to Either Hyperinsulinemia or Intraportal Glucose Infusion

    PubMed Central

    Winnick, Jason J.; An, Zhibo; Kraft, Guillaume; Ramnanan, Christopher J.; Irimia, Jose M.; Smith, Marta; Lautz, Margaret; Roach, Peter J.; Cherrington, Alan D.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of liver glycogen loading on net hepatic glycogen synthesis during hyperinsulinemia or hepatic portal vein glucose infusion in vivo. Liver glycogen levels were supercompensated (SCGly) in two groups (using intraportal fructose infusion) but not in two others (Gly) during hyperglycemic-normoinsulinemia. Following a 2-h control period during which fructose infusion was stopped, there was a 2-h experimental period in which the response to hyperglycemia plus either 4× basal insulin (INS) or portal vein glucose infusion (PoG) was measured. Increased hepatic glycogen reduced the percent of glucose taken up by the liver that was deposited in glycogen (74 ± 3 vs. 53 ± 5% in Gly+INS and SCGly+INS, respectively, and 72 ± 3 vs. 50 ± 6% in Gly+PoG and SCGly+PoG, respectively). The reduction in liver glycogen synthesis in SCGly+INS was accompanied by a decrease in both insulin signaling and an increase in AMPK activation, whereas only the latter was observed in SCGly+PoG. These data indicate that liver glycogen loading impairs glycogen synthesis regardless of the signal used to stimulate it. PMID:22923473

  4. Enhanced Symbiotic Performance by Rhizobium tropici Glycogen Synthase Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Marroquí, Silvia; Zorreguieta, Angeles; Santamaría, Carmen; Temprano, Francisco; Soberón, Mario; Megías, Manuel; Downie, J. Allan

    2001-01-01

    We isolated a Tn5-induced Rhizobium tropici mutant that has enhanced capacity to oxidize N,N-dimethyl-p-phenylendiamine (DMPD) and therefore has enhanced respiration via cytochrome oxidase. The mutant had increased levels of the cytochromes c1 and CycM and a small increase in the amount of cytochrome aa3. In plant tests, the mutant increased the dry weight of Phaseolus vulgaris plants by 20 to 38% compared with the control strain, thus showing significantly enhanced symbiotic performance. The predicted product of the mutated gene is homologous to glycogen synthases from several bacteria, and the mutant lacked glycogen. The DNA sequence of the adjacent gene region revealed six genes predicted to encode products homologous to the following gene products from Escherichia coli: glycogen phosphorylase (glgP), glycogen branching enzyme (glgB), ADP glucose pyrophosphorylase (glgC), glycogen synthase (glgA), phosphoglucomutase (pgm), and glycogen debranching enzyme (glgX). All six genes are transcribed in the same direction, and analysis with lacZ gene fusions suggests that the first five genes are organized in one operon, although pgm appears to have an additional promoter; glgX is transcribed independently. Surprisingly, the glgA mutant had decreased levels of high-molecular-weight exopolysaccharide after growth on glucose, but levels were normal after growth on galactose. A deletion mutant was constructed in order to generate a nonpolar mutation in glgA. This mutant had a phenotype similar to that of the Tn5 mutant, indicating that the enhanced respiration and symbiotic nitrogen fixation and decreased exopolysaccharide were due to mutation of glgA and not to a polar effect on a downstream gene. PMID:11208782

  5. Akt2 influences glycogen synthase activity in human skeletal muscle through regulation of NH2-terminal (sites 2 + 2a) phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Birk, Jesper B.; Richter, Erik A.; Ribel-Madsen, Rasmus; Pehmøller, Christian; Hansen, Bo Falck; Beck-Nielsen, Henning; Hirshman, Michael F.; Goodyear, Laurie J.; Vaag, Allan; Poulsen, Pernille; Wojtaszewski, Jørgen F. P.

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is characterized by reduced muscle glycogen synthesis. The key enzyme in this process, glycogen synthase (GS), is activated via proximal insulin signaling, but the exact molecular events remain unknown. Previously, we demonstrated that phosphorylation of Thr308 on Akt (p-Akt-Thr308), Akt2 activity, and GS activity in muscle were positively associated with insulin sensitivity. Here, in the same study population, we determined the influence of several upstream elements in the canonical PI3K signaling on muscle GS activation. One-hundred eighty-one nondiabetic twins were examined with the euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp combined with excision of muscle biopsies. Insulin signaling was evaluated at the levels of the insulin receptor, IRS-1-associated PI3K (IRS-1-PI3K), Akt, and GS employing activity assays and phosphospecific Western blotting. The insulin-stimulated GS activity was positively associated with p-Akt-Thr308 (P = 0.01) and Akt2 activity (P = 0.04) but not p-Akt-Ser473 or IRS-1-PI3K activity. Furthermore, p-Akt-Thr308 and Akt2 activity were negatively associated with NH2-terminal GS phosphorylation (P = 0.001 for both), which in turn was negatively associated with insulin-stimulated GS activity (P < 0.001). We found no association between COOH-terminal GS phosphorylation and Akt or GS activity. Employing whole body Akt2-knockout mice, we validated the necessity for Akt2 in insulin-mediated GS activation. However, since insulin did not affect NH2-terminal phosphorylation in mice, we could not use this model to validate the observed association between GS NH2-terminal phosphorylation and Akt activity in humans. In conclusion, our study suggests that although COOH-terminal dephosphorylation is likely necessary for GS activation, Akt2-dependent NH2-terminal dephosphorylation may be the site for “fine-tuning” insulin-mediated GS activation in humans. PMID:23321478

  6. Non-invasive quantification of brain glycogen absolute concentration

    PubMed Central

    van Heeswijk, Ruud B.; Xin, Lijing; Laus, Sabrina; Frenkel, Hanne; Lei, Hongxia; Gruetter, Rolf

    2009-01-01

    The only currently available method to measure brain glycogen in vivo is 13C NMR spectroscopy. Incorporation of 13C-labeled glucose (Glc) is necessary to allow glycogen measurement, but might be affected by turnover changes. Our aim was to measure glycogen absolute concentration in the rat brain by eliminating label turnover as variable. The approach is based on establishing an increased, constant 13C isotopic enrichment (IE). 13C-Glc infusion is then performed at the IE of brain glycogen. As glycogen IE cannot be assessed in vivo, we validated that it can be inferred from that of N-acetyl-aspartate IE in vivo: After [1-13C]-Glc ingestion, glycogen IE was 2.2 ± 0.1 fold that of N-acetyl-aspartate (n = 11, R2 = 0.77). After subsequent Glc infusion, glycogen IE equaled brain Glc IE (n = 6, paired t-test, p = 0.37), implying isotopic steady-state achievement and complete turnover of the glycogen molecule. Glycogen concentration measured in vivo by 13C NMR (mean ± SD: 5.8 ± 0.7 μmol/g) was in excellent agreement with that in vitro (6.4 ± 0.6 μmol/g, n = 5). When insulin was administered, the stability of glycogen concentration was analogous to previous biochemical measurements implying that glycogen turnover is activated by insulin. We conclude that the entire glycogen molecule is turned over and that insulin activates glycogen turnover. PMID:19013831

  7. Valproic acid potentiates the anticancer activity of capecitabine in vitro and in vivo in breast cancer models via induction of thymidine phosphorylase expression

    PubMed Central

    Terranova-Barberio, Manuela; Roca, Maria Serena; Zotti, Andrea Ilaria; Leone, Alessandra; Bruzzese, Francesca; Vitagliano, Carlo; Scogliamiglio, Giosuè; Russo, Domenico; D'Angelo, Giovanni; Franco, Renato; Budillon, Alfredo; Di Gennaro, Elena

    2016-01-01

    The prognosis of patients with metastatic breast cancer remains poor, and thus novel therapeutic approaches are needed. Capecitabine, which is commonly used for metastatic breast cancer in different settings, is an inactive prodrug that takes advantage of elevated levels of thymidine phosphorylase (TP), a key enzyme that is required for its conversion to 5-fluororacil, in tumors. We demonstrated that histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi), including low anticonvulsant dosage of VPA, induced the dose- and time-dependent up-regulation of TP transcript and protein expression in breast cancer cells, but not in the non-tumorigenic breast MCF-10A cell line. Through the use of siRNA or isoform-specific HDACi, we demonstrated that HDAC3 is the main isoform whose inhibition is involved in the modulation of TP. The combined treatment with capecitabine and HDACi, including valproic acid (VPA), resulted in synergistic/additive antiproliferative and pro-apoptotic effects in breast cancer cells but not in TP-knockout cells, both in vitro and in vivo, highlighting the crucial role of TP in the synergism observed. Overall, this study suggests that the combination of HDACi (e.g., VPA) and capecitabine is an innovative antitumor strategy that warrants further clinical evaluation for the treatment of metastatic breast cancer. PMID:26735339

  8. Valproic acid potentiates the anticancer activity of capecitabine in vitro and in vivo in breast cancer models via induction of thymidine phosphorylase expression.

    PubMed

    Terranova-Barberio, Manuela; Roca, Maria Serena; Zotti, Andrea Ilaria; Leone, Alessandra; Bruzzese, Francesca; Vitagliano, Carlo; Scogliamiglio, Giosuè; Russo, Domenico; D'Angelo, Giovanni; Franco, Renato; Budillon, Alfredo; Di Gennaro, Elena

    2016-02-16

    The prognosis of patients with metastatic breast cancer remains poor, and thus novel therapeutic approaches are needed. Capecitabine, which is commonly used for metastatic breast cancer in different settings, is an inactive prodrug that takes advantage of elevated levels of thymidine phosphorylase (TP), a key enzyme that is required for its conversion to 5-fluororacil, in tumors. We demonstrated that histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi), including low anticonvulsant dosage of VPA, induced the dose- and time-dependent up-regulation of TP transcript and protein expression in breast cancer cells, but not in the non-tumorigenic breast MCF-10A cell line. Through the use of siRNA or isoform-specific HDACi, we demonstrated that HDAC3 is the main isoform whose inhibition is involved in the modulation of TP. The combined treatment with capecitabine and HDACi, including valproic acid (VPA), resulted in synergistic/additive antiproliferative and pro-apoptotic effects in breast cancer cells but not in TP-knockout cells, both in vitro and in vivo, highlighting the crucial role of TP in the synergism observed. Overall, this study suggests that the combination of HDACi (e.g., VPA) and capecitabine is an innovative antitumor strategy that warrants further clinical evaluation for the treatment of metastatic breast cancer. PMID:26735339

  9. Thymidine Phosphorylase in Cancer; Enemy or Friend?

    PubMed

    Elamin, Yasir Y; Rafee, Shereen; Osman, Nemer; O Byrne, Kenneth J; Gately, Kathy

    2016-04-01

    Thymidine phosphorylase (TP) is a nucleoside metabolism enzyme that plays an important role in the pyrimidine pathway.TP catalyzes the conversion of thymidine to thymine and 2-deoxy-α-D-ribose-1-phosphate (dRib-1-P). Although this reaction is reversible, the main metabolic function of TP is catabolic. TP is identical to the angiogenic factor platelet-derived endothelial-cell growth factor (PD-ECGF). TP is overexpressed in several human cancers in response to cellular stressful conditions like hypoxia, acidosis, chemotherapy and radiotherapy. TP has been shown to promote tumor angiogenesis, invasion, metastasis, evasion of the immune-response and resistance to apoptosis. Some of the biological effects of TP are dependent on its enzymatic activity, while others are mediated through cytokines like interleukin 10 (IL-10), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and tumour necrosis factor α (TNFα). Interestingly, TP also plays a role in cancer treatment through its role in the conversion of the oral fluoropyrimidine capecitabine into its active form 5-FU. TP is a predictive marker for fluoropyrimidine response. Given its various biological functions in cancer progression, TP is a promising target in cancer treatment. Further translational research is required in this area. PMID:26298314

  10. Glycal Formation in Crystals of Uridine Phosphorylase

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, Debamita; O’Leary, Sen E.; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta; Bu, Weiming; Toms, Angela; Settembre, Ethan C.; Sanders, Jennie M.; Begley, Tadhg P.; Ealick, Steven E.

    2010-06-22

    Uridine phosphorylase is a key enzyme in the pyrimidine salvage pathway. This enzyme catalyzes the reversible phosphorolysis of uridine to uracil and ribose 1-phosphate (or 2{prime}-deoxyuridine to 2{prime}-deoxyribose 1-phosphate). Here we report the structure of hexameric Escherichia coli uridine phosphorylase treated with 5-fluorouridine and sulfate and dimeric bovine uridine phosphorylase treated with 5-fluoro-2{prime}-deoxyuridine or uridine, plus sulfate. In each case the electron density shows three separate species corresponding to the pyrimidine base, sulfate, and a ribosyl species, which can be modeled as a glycal. In the structures of the glycal complexes, the fluorouracil O2 atom is appropriately positioned to act as the base required for glycal formation via deprotonation at C2{prime}. Crystals of bovine uridine phosphorylase treated with 2{prime}-deoxyuridine and sulfate show intact nucleoside. NMR time course studies demonstrate that uridine phosphorylase can catalyze the hydrolysis of the fluorinated nucleosides in the absence of phosphate or sulfate, without the release of intermediates or enzyme inactivation. These results add a previously unencountered mechanistic motif to the body of information on glycal formation by enzymes catalyzing the cleavage of glycosyl bonds.

  11. Minimal hepatic glucose-6-phosphatase-α activity required to sustain survival and prevent hepatocellular adenoma formation in murine glycogen storage disease type Ia

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young Mok; Kim, Goo-Young; Pan, Chi-Jiunn; Mansfield, Brian C.; Chou, Janice Y.

    2015-01-01

    Glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSD-Ia), characterized by impaired glucose homeostasis and chronic risk of hepatocellular adenoma (HCA), is caused by a deficiency in glucose-6-phosphatase-α (G6Pase-α or G6PC) activity. In a previous 70–90 week-study, we showed that a recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vector-mediated gene transfer that restores more than 3% of wild-type hepatic G6Pase-α activity in G6pc−/− mice corrects hepatic G6Pase-α deficiency with no evidence of HCA. We now examine the minimal hepatic G6Pase-α activity required to confer therapeutic efficacy. We show that rAAV-treated G6pc−/− mice expressing 0.2% of wild-type hepatic G6Pase-α activity suffered from frequent hypoglycemic seizures at age 63–65 weeks but mice expressing 0.5–1.3% of wild-type hepatic G6Pase-α activity (AAV-LL mice) sustain 4–6 h of fast and grow normally to age 75–90 weeks. Despite marked increases in hepatic glycogen accumulation, the AAV-LL mice display no evidence of hepatic abnormalities, hepatic steatosis, or HCA. Interprandial glucose homeostasis is maintained by the G6Pase-α/glucose-6-phosphate transporter (G6PT) complex, and G6PT-mediated microsomal G6P uptake is the rate-limiting step in endogenous glucose production. We show that hepatic G6PT activity is increased in AAV-LL mice. These findings are encouraging for clinical studies of G6Pase-α gene-based therapy for GSD-Ia. PMID:26937391

  12. Nrf2-Mediated Regulation of Skeletal Muscle Glycogen Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Uruno, Akira; Yagishita, Yoko; Katsuoka, Fumiki; Kitajima, Yasuo; Nunomiya, Aki; Nagatomi, Ryoichi; Pi, Jingbo; Biswal, Shyam S; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2016-06-01

    Nrf2 (NF-E2-related factor 2) contributes to the maintenance of glucose homeostasis in vivo Nrf2 suppresses blood glucose levels by protecting pancreatic β cells from oxidative stress and improving peripheral tissue glucose utilization. To elucidate the molecular mechanisms by which Nrf2 contributes to the maintenance of glucose homeostasis, we generated skeletal muscle (SkM)-specific Keap1 knockout (Keap1MuKO) mice that express abundant Nrf2 in their SkM and then examined Nrf2 target gene expression in that tissue. In Keap1MuKO mice, blood glucose levels were significantly downregulated and the levels of the glycogen branching enzyme (Gbe1) and muscle-type PhKα subunit (Phka1) mRNAs, along with those of the glycogen branching enzyme (GBE) and the phosphorylase b kinase α subunit (PhKα) protein, were significantly upregulated in mouse SkM. Consistent with this result, chemical Nrf2 inducers promoted Gbe1 and Phka1 mRNA expression in both mouse SkM and C2C12 myotubes. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis demonstrated that Nrf2 binds the Gbe1 and Phka1 upstream promoter regions. In Keap1MuKO mice, muscle glycogen content was strongly reduced and forced GBE expression in C2C12 myotubes promoted glucose uptake. Therefore, our results demonstrate that Nrf2 induction in SkM increases GBE and PhKα expression and reduces muscle glycogen content, resulting in improved glucose tolerance. Our results also indicate that Nrf2 differentially regulates glycogen metabolism in SkM and the liver. PMID:27044864

  13. Silencing Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3β Inhibits Acetaminophen Hepatotoxicity and Attenuates JNK Activation and Loss of Glutamate Cysteine Ligase and Myeloid Cell Leukemia Sequence 1*

    PubMed Central

    Shinohara, Mie; Ybanez, Maria D.; Win, Sanda; Than, Tin Aung; Jain, Shilpa; Gaarde, William A.; Han, Derick; Kaplowitz, Neil

    2010-01-01

    Previously we demonstrated that c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) plays a central role in acetaminophen (APAP)-induced liver injury. In the current work, we examined other possible signaling pathways that may also contribute to APAP hepatotoxicity. APAP treatment to mice caused glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) activation and translocation to mitochondria during the initial phase of APAP-induced liver injury (∼1 h). The silencing of GSK-3β, but not Akt-2 (protein kinase B) or glycogen synthase kinase-3α (GSK-3α), using antisense significantly protected mice from APAP-induced liver injury. The silencing of GSK-3β affected several key pathways important in conferring protection against APAP-induced liver injury. APAP treatment was observed to promote the loss of glutamate cysteine ligase (GCL, rate-limiting enzyme in GSH synthesis) in liver. The silencing of GSK-3β decreased the loss of hepatic GCL, and promoted greater GSH recovery in liver following APAP treatment. Silencing JNK1 and -2 also prevented the loss of GCL. APAP treatment also resulted in GSK-3β translocation to mitochondria and the degradation of myeloid cell leukemia sequence 1 (Mcl-1) in mitochondrial membranes in liver. The silencing of GSK-3β reduced Mcl-1 degradation caused by APAP treatment. The silencing of GSK-3β also resulted in an inhibition of the early phase (0–2 h), and blunted the late phase (after 4 h) of JNK activation and translocation to mitochondria in liver following APAP treatment. Taken together our results suggest that activation of GSK-3β is a key mediator of the initial phase of APAP-induced liver injury through modulating GCL and Mcl-1 degradation, as well as JNK activation in liver. PMID:20061376

  14. Glycogen contains phosphodiester groups that can be introduced by UDPglucose: glycogen glucose 1-phosphotransferase.

    PubMed

    Lomako, J; Lomako, W M; Whelan, W J; Marchase, R B

    1993-08-30

    Rabbit-muscle glycogen contains covalently bound phosphorus, equivalent to 1 phosphate group per 208 glucose residues. This often disputed, minor component was previously thought to represent a phosphomonoester group at C-6 of a glucose residue. Here we show that more than half the phosphorus is present as a phosphodiester, the remainder being monoester. A novel enzyme activity has been found in muscle that can account for the presence of the phosphodiester in glycogen. This is a UDPglucose: glycogen glucose 1-phosphotransferase that positions glucose 1-phosphate on C-6 of glucose residues in glycogen, forming a diester. The phosphomonoester groups present may arise by removal of the glucose residue originally transferred as glucose 1-phosphate. PMID:8396041

  15. 2-Arylquinazolin-4(3H)-ones: A novel class of thymidine phosphorylase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Javaid, Sumaira; Saad, Syed Muhammad; Perveen, Shahnaz; Khan, Khalid Mohammed; Choudhary, M Iqbal

    2015-12-01

    Thymidine phosphorylase (TP) over expression plays an important role in several pathological conditions, such as rheumatoid arthritis, chronic inflammatory diseases, psoriasis, and tumor angiogenesis. In this regard, a series of twenty-five 2-arylquinazolin-4(3H)-one derivatives 1-25 were evaluated for thymidine phosphorylase inhibitory activity. Six compounds 5, 6, 20, 2, 23, and 3 were found to be active against thymidine phosphorylase enzyme with IC50 values in the range of 42.9-294.6μM. 7-Deazaxanthine (IC50=41.0±1.63μM) was used as a standard inhibitor. Compound 5 showed a significant activity (IC50=42.9±1.0μM), comparable to the standard. The enzyme kinetic studies on the most active compounds 5, 6, and 20 were performed for the determination of their modes of inhibition, and dissociation constants Ki. All active compounds were found to be largely non-cytotoxic against the mouse fibroblast 3T3 cell line. This study identifies a novel class of thymidine phosphorylase inhibitors which may be further investigated as leads to develop therapeutic agents. PMID:26547232

  16. Role of phosphorylase in the mechanism of potato minituber storage cell changes during clinorotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedukha, O.; Shnyukova, E.

    The differences between the cytochemical reaction intensity and activity of phosphorylase (EC 2.4.1.1) and carbohydrate content in storage parenchyma cells of Solanum tuberosum L. (cv Adreta) minitubers grown for 30 days in the horizontal clinostate (2 rev/min) and in the control have been studied by electroncytochemical and biochemical methods. It is established an acceleration of minitubers formation and storage parenchyma cell differentiation at clinorotation. Electroncytochemical investigation of phosphorylase activity localization in the storage parenchyma cells of minitubers grown in control and at clinorotation showed the product of the reaction as electron-dense precipitate was marked plastids. Intensity and density of precipitate was increase in stroma of plastids and on starch grain surface during of intensive growth of starch in amyloplast (on 10- and 20-days of the minituber formation) of clinorotated minitubers in comparison with that in the control. The precipitate amount was decreased in the plastids on 30 day of growth in both variants. Using biochemical methods it is found that activity of phosphorylase and content of mono- and disaccharide and also starch content changed in minitubers formed during clinorotation and in the control. Data obtained are discussed regarding the possible mechanism of phosphorylase activity change and the role of mono- and disaccharide in acceleration of storage organ formation during clinorotation.

  17. Structural basis for the recruitment of glycogen synthase by glycogenin

    PubMed Central

    Zeqiraj, Elton; Tang, Xiaojing; Hunter, Roger W.; García-Rocha, Mar; Judd, Andrew; Deak, Maria; von Wilamowitz-Moellendorff, Alexander; Kurinov, Igor; Guinovart, Joan J.; Tyers, Mike; Sakamoto, Kei; Sicheri, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Glycogen is a primary form of energy storage in eukaryotes that is essential for glucose homeostasis. The glycogen polymer is synthesized from glucose through the cooperative action of glycogen synthase (GS), glycogenin (GN), and glycogen branching enzyme and forms particles that range in size from 10 to 290 nm. GS is regulated by allosteric activation upon glucose-6-phosphate binding and inactivation by phosphorylation on its N- and C-terminal regulatory tails. GS alone is incapable of starting synthesis of a glycogen particle de novo, but instead it extends preexisting chains initiated by glycogenin. The molecular determinants by which GS recognizes self-glucosylated GN, the first step in glycogenesis, are unknown. We describe the crystal structure of Caenorhabditis elegans GS in complex with a minimal GS targeting sequence in GN and show that a 34-residue region of GN binds to a conserved surface on GS that is distinct from previously characterized allosteric and binding surfaces on the enzyme. The interaction identified in the GS-GN costructure is required for GS–GN interaction and for glycogen synthesis in a cell-free system and in intact cells. The interaction of full-length GS-GN proteins is enhanced by an avidity effect imparted by a dimeric state of GN and a tetrameric state of GS. Finally, the structure of the N- and C-terminal regulatory tails of GS provide a basis for understanding phosphoregulation of glycogen synthesis. These results uncover a central molecular mechanism that governs glycogen metabolism. PMID:24982189

  18. Supercompensated glycogen loads persist 5 days in resting trained cyclists.

    PubMed

    Arnall, David A; Nelson, Arnold G; Quigley, Jack; Lex, Stephen; Dehart, Tom; Fortune, Peggy

    2007-02-01

    Research data indicates a persistence of elevated muscle glycogen concentration 3 days post-supercompensation in resting athletes. This study expands our earlier findings by determining whether muscle glycogen remains elevated 3, 5, or 7 days post-supercompensation. Seventeen trained male cyclists underwent one bout of exhaustive exercise to deplete muscle glycogen. This was followed by a 3-day consumption of a high carbohydrate/low protein/low fat diet (85:08:07%). Three post-loading phases followed with subjects randomly assigned to either a 3-day, 5-day, or 7-day post-loading maintenance diet of 60% carbohydrate and limited physical activity. Biopsies (50-150 mg) of the vastus lateralis were obtained pre-load (BASELINE), at peak-load (PEAK), and either at 3-day, 5-day, or 7-day post-load (POST). On average, PEAK to POST muscle glycogen concentrations decreased 34, 20 and 46% respectively for the 3-, 5-, and 7-day POST groups. Only the 7-day post-load group's PEAK to POST mean muscle glycogen concentration decreased significantly. In addition, multi-regression analysis indicated that the PEAK glycogen level was the main determinant of the number of days that glycogen levels remained significantly greater than BASELINE. Thus, trained athletes' supercompensated glycogen levels can remain higher than normal for up to 5 days post-loading. The amount of carbohydrate consumed, the level of physical activity, and the magnitude of the glycogen supercompensation determine the interval for which the glycogen levels are elevated. PMID:17120016

  19. 1,2-β-Oligoglucan Phosphorylase from Listeria innocua

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Koichi; Nakai, Hiroyuki; Taguchi, Hayao; Kitaoka, Motomitsu

    2014-01-01

    We characterized recombinant Lin1839 protein (Lin1839r) belonging to glycoside hydrolase family 94 from Listeria innocua. Lin1839r catalyzed the synthesis of a series of 1,2-β-oligoglucans (Sopn: n denotes degree of polymerization) using sophorose (Sop2) as the acceptor and α-d-glucose 1-phosphate (Glc1P) as the donor. Lin1839r recognized glucose as a very weak acceptor substrate to form polymeric 1,2-β-glucan. The degree of polymerization of the 1,2-β-glucan gradually decreased with long-term incubation to generate a series of Sopns. Kinetic analysis of the phosphorolytic reaction towards sophorotriose revealed that Lin1839r followed a sequential Bi Bi mechanism. The kinetic parameters of the phosphorolysis of sophorotetraose and sophoropentaose were similar to those of sophorotriose, although the enzyme did not exhibit significant phosphorolytic activity on Sop2. These results indicate that the Lin1839 protein is a novel inverting phosphorylase that catalyzes reversible phosphorolysis of 1,2-β-glucan with a degree of polymerization of ≥3. We propose 1,2-β-oligoglucan: phosphate α-glucosyltransferase as the systematic name and 1,2-β-oligoglucan phosphorylase as the short name for this Lin1839 protein. PMID:24647662

  20. Exercise Training-Induced Adaptations Associated with Increases in Skeletal Muscle Glycogen Content

    PubMed Central

    Manabe, Yasuko; Gollisch, Katja S.C.; Holton, Laura; Kim, Young–Bum; Brandauer, Josef; Fujii, Nobuharu L.; Hirshman, Michael F.; Goodyear, Laurie J.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic exercise training results in numerous skeletal muscle adaptations, including increases in insulin sensitivity and glycogen content. To understand the mechanism for increased muscle glycogen, we studied the effects of exercise training on glycogen regulatory proteins in rat skeletal muscle. Female Sprague Dawley rats performed voluntary wheel running for 1, 4, or 7 weeks. After 7 weeks of training, insulin-stimulated glucose uptake was increased in epitrochlearis muscle. Compared to sedentary control rats, muscle glycogen did not change after 1 week of training, but increased significantly after 4 and 7 weeks. The increases in muscle glycogen were accompanied by elevated glycogen synthase activity and protein expression. To assess the regulation of glycogen synthase, we examined its major activator, protein phosphatase 1 (PP1), and its major deactivator, glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3). Consistent with glycogen synthase activity, PP1 activity was unchanged after 1 week of training but significantly increased after 4 and 7 weeks of training. Protein expression of RGL(GM), another regulatory PP1 subunit, significantly decreased after 4 and 7 weeks of training. Unlike PP1, GSK3 phosphorylation did not follow the pattern of glycogen synthase activity. The ~40% decrease in GSK-3α phosphorylation after 1 week of exercise training persisted until 7 weeks and may function as a negative feedback to elevated glycogen. Our findings suggest that exercise training-induced increases in muscle glycogen content could be regulated by multiple mechanisms including enhanced insulin sensitivity, glycogen synthase expression, allosteric activation of glycogen synthase and PP1activity. PMID:23206309

  1. Altered energy state reversibly controls smooth muscle contractile function in human saphenous vein during acute hypoxia-reoxygenation: Role of glycogen, AMP-activated protein kinase, and insulin-independent glucose uptake.

    PubMed

    Pyla, Rajkumar; Pichavaram, Prahalathan; Fairaq, Arwa; Park, Mary Anne; Kozak, Mark; Kamath, Vinayak; Patel, Vijay S; Segar, Lakshman

    2015-09-01

    Hypoxia is known to promote vasodilation of coronary vessels through several mediators including cardiac-derived adenosine and endothelium-derived prostanoids and nitric oxide. To date, the impact of endogenous glycogen depletion in vascular smooth muscle and the resultant alterations in cellular energy state (e.g., AMP-activated protein kinase, AMPK) on the contractile response to G protein-coupled receptor agonists (e.g., serotonin, 5-HT) has not yet been studied. In the present study, ex vivo exposure of endothelium-denuded human saphenous vein rings to hypoxic and glucose-deprived conditions during KCl-induced contractions for 30 min resulted in a marked depletion of endogenous glycogen by ∼80% (from ∼1.78 μmol/g under normoxia to ∼0.36 μmol/g under hypoxia). Importantly, glycogen-depleted HSV rings, which were maintained under hypoxia/reoxygenation and glucose-deprived conditions, exhibited significant increases in basal AMPK phosphorylation (∼6-fold ↑) and 5-HT-induced AMPK phosphorylation (∼19-fold ↑) with an accompanying suppression of 5-HT-induced maximal contractile response (∼68% ↓), compared with respective controls. Exposure of glycogen-depleted HSV rings to exogenous D-glucose, but not the inactive glucose analogs, prevented the exaggerated increase in 5-HT-induced AMPK phosphorylation and restored 5-HT-induced maximal contractile response. In addition, the ability of exogenous D-glucose to rescue cellular stress and impaired contractile function occurred through GLUT1-mediated but insulin/GLUT4-independent mechanisms. Together, the present findings from clinically-relevant human saphenous vein suggest that the loss of endogenous glycogen in vascular smooth muscle and the resultant accentuation of AMPK phosphorylation by GPCR agonists may constitute a yet another mechanism of metabolic vasodilation of coronary vessels in ischemic heart disease. PMID:26212549

  2. The Pharmacological Chaperone AT2220 Increases the Specific Activity and Lysosomal Delivery of Mutant Acid Alpha-Glucosidase, and Promotes Glycogen Reduction in a Transgenic Mouse Model of Pompe Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lun, Yi; Soska, Rebecca; Feng, Jessie; Dhulipala, Rohini; Frascella, Michelle; Garcia, Anadina; Pellegrino, Lee J.; Xu, Su; Brignol, Nastry; Toth, Matthew J.; Do, Hung V.; Lockhart, David J.; Wustman, Brandon A.; Valenzano, Kenneth J.

    2014-01-01

    Pompe disease is an inherited lysosomal storage disorder that results from a deficiency in acid α-glucosidase (GAA) activity due to mutations in the GAA gene. Pompe disease is characterized by accumulation of lysosomal glycogen primarily in heart and skeletal muscles, which leads to progressive muscle weakness. We have shown previously that the small molecule pharmacological chaperone AT2220 (1-deoxynojirimycin hydrochloride, duvoglustat hydrochloride) binds and stabilizes wild-type as well as multiple mutant forms of GAA, and can lead to higher cellular levels of GAA. In this study, we examined the effect of AT2220 on mutant GAA, in vitro and in vivo, with a primary focus on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-retained P545L mutant form of human GAA (P545L GAA). AT2220 increased the specific activity of P545L GAA toward both natural (glycogen) and artificial substrates in vitro. Incubation with AT2220 also increased the ER export, lysosomal delivery, proteolytic processing, and stability of P545L GAA. In a new transgenic mouse model of Pompe disease that expresses human P545L on a Gaa knockout background (Tg/KO) and is characterized by reduced GAA activity and elevated glycogen levels in disease-relevant tissues, daily oral administration of AT2220 for 4 weeks resulted in significant and dose-dependent increases in mature lysosomal GAA isoforms and GAA activity in heart and skeletal muscles. Importantly, oral administration of AT2220 also resulted in significant glycogen reduction in disease-relevant tissues. Compared to daily administration, less-frequent AT2220 administration, including repeated cycles of 4 or 5 days with AT2220 followed by 3 or 2 days without drug, respectively, resulted in even greater glycogen reductions. Collectively, these data indicate that AT2220 increases the specific activity, trafficking, and lysosomal stability of P545L GAA, leads to increased levels of mature GAA in lysosomes, and promotes glycogen reduction in situ. As such, AT2220 may

  3. Nimbolide, a neem limonoid inhibits Phosphatidyl Inositol-3 Kinase to activate Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3β in a hamster model of oral oncogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Sophia, Josephraj; Kiran Kishore T., Kranthi; Kowshik, Jaganathan; Mishra, Rajakishore; Nagini, Siddavaram

    2016-01-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β), a serine/threonine kinase is frequently inactivated by the oncogenic signalling kinases PI3K/Akt and MAPK/ERK in diverse malignancies. The present study was designed to investigate GSK-3β signalling circuits in the 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA)-induced hamster buccal pouch (HBP) carcinogenesis model and the therapeutic potential of the neem limonoid nimbolide. Inactivation of GSK-3β by phosphorylation at serine 9 and activation of PI3K/Akt, MAPK/ERK and β-catenin was associated with increased cell proliferation and apoptosis evasion during stepwise evolution of HBP carcinomas. Administration of nimbolide inhibited PI3K/Akt signalling with consequent activation of GSK-3β thereby inducing trafficking of β-catenin away from the nucleus and enhancing the expression of miR-126 and let-7. Molecular docking studies confirmed interaction of nimbolide with PI3K, Akt, ERK and GSK-3β. Furthermore, nimbolide attenuated cell proliferation and induced apoptosis as evidenced by increased p-cyclin D1Thr286 and pro-apoptotic proteins. The present study has unravelled aberrant phosphorylation as a key determinant for oncogenic signalling and acquisition of cancer hallmarks in the HBP model. The study has also provided mechanistic insights into the chemotherapeutic potential of nimbolide that may be a useful addition to the armamentarium of natural compounds targeting PI3K for oral cancer treatment. PMID:26902162

  4. Overexpression of interleukin-18 protein reduces viability and induces apoptosis of tongue squamous cell carcinoma cells by activation of glycogen synthase kinase-3β signaling

    PubMed Central

    LIU, WEIWEI; HU, MIN; WANG, YUMEI; SUN, BAOZHEN; GUO, YU; XU, ZHIMIN; LI, JIA; HAN, BING

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of interleukin-18 (IL-18) expression on regulating the viability and apoptosis of tongue squamous cell carcinoma (TSCC) cells in vitro and examine the underlying molecular events. Human IL-18 cDNA was cloned into the vector pcDNA3.1 (+) and transfected into CRL-1623™ cells. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (RT-qPCR), western blot analysis, immunofluorescence, cell viability MTT assay, flow cytometric Annexin V/propidium iodide (PI), Giemsa staining, and caspase-3 activity assay were performed. The data showed that overexpression of IL-18 protein reduced TSCC cell viability by inducing apoptosis. Compared with cells transfected with the control vector, IL-18 expression activated caspase-3, -7, and -9 by inducing their cleavage and increased the expression of interferon (IFN)-γ and cytochrome c mRNA, but reduced cyclin D1 and A1 expression in TSCC cells. IL-18 expression upregulated the expression and phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3β protein in CRL1623 cells, whereas the selective GSK-3β inhibitor kenpaullone antagonized the effects of IL-18 protein on TSCC cells in vitro. The results indicated that IL-18 played an important role in the inhibition of TSCC cell growth and may be further investigated as a novel therapeutic target against TSCC. PMID:25591548

  5. Protective Effects of Kaempferol against Myocardial Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury in Isolated Rat Heart via Antioxidant Activity and Inhibition of Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3β

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Mingjie; Ren, Huanhuan; Han, Jichun; Wang, Wenjuan; Zheng, Qiusheng; Wang, Dong

    2015-01-01

    Objective. This study aimed to evaluate the protective effect of kaempferol against myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury in rats. Method. Left ventricular developed pressure (LVDP) and its maximum up/down rate (±dp/dtmax) were recorded as myocardial function. Infarct size was detected with 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining. Cardiomyocyte apoptosis was determined using terminal deoxynucleotidyl nick-end labeling (TUNEL). The levels of creatine kinase (CK), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione/glutathione disulfide (GSH/GSSG) ratio, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) were determined using enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Moreover, total glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β), phospho-GSK-3β (P-GSK-3β), precaspase-3, cleaved caspase-3, and cytoplasm cytochrome C were assayed using Western blot analysis. Results. Pretreatment with kaempferol significantly improved the recovery of LVDP and ±dp/dtmax, as well as increased the levels of SOD and P-GSK-3β and GSH/GSSG ratio. However, the pretreatment reduced myocardial infarct size and TUNEL-positive cell rate, as well as decreased the levels of cleaved caspase-3, cytoplasm cytochrome C, CK, LDH, MDA, and TNF-α. Conclusion. These results suggested that kaempferol provides cardioprotection via antioxidant activity and inhibition of GSK-3β activity in rats with I/R. PMID:26265983

  6. Nimbolide, a neem limonoid inhibits Phosphatidyl Inositol-3 Kinase to activate Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3β in a hamster model of oral oncogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sophia, Josephraj; Kiran Kishore T, Kranthi; Kowshik, Jaganathan; Mishra, Rajakishore; Nagini, Siddavaram

    2016-01-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β), a serine/threonine kinase is frequently inactivated by the oncogenic signalling kinases PI3K/Akt and MAPK/ERK in diverse malignancies. The present study was designed to investigate GSK-3β signalling circuits in the 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA)-induced hamster buccal pouch (HBP) carcinogenesis model and the therapeutic potential of the neem limonoid nimbolide. Inactivation of GSK-3β by phosphorylation at serine 9 and activation of PI3K/Akt, MAPK/ERK and β-catenin was associated with increased cell proliferation and apoptosis evasion during stepwise evolution of HBP carcinomas. Administration of nimbolide inhibited PI3K/Akt signalling with consequent activation of GSK-3β thereby inducing trafficking of β-catenin away from the nucleus and enhancing the expression of miR-126 and let-7. Molecular docking studies confirmed interaction of nimbolide with PI3K, Akt, ERK and GSK-3β. Furthermore, nimbolide attenuated cell proliferation and induced apoptosis as evidenced by increased p-cyclin D1(Thr286) and pro-apoptotic proteins. The present study has unravelled aberrant phosphorylation as a key determinant for oncogenic signalling and acquisition of cancer hallmarks in the HBP model. The study has also provided mechanistic insights into the chemotherapeutic potential of nimbolide that may be a useful addition to the armamentarium of natural compounds targeting PI3K for oral cancer treatment. PMID:26902162

  7. Focal adhesion kinase-mediated activation of glycogen synthase kinase 3β regulates IL-33 receptor internalization and IL-33 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jing; Wei, Jianxin; Bowser, Rachel K; Traister, Russell S; Fan, Ming-Hui; Zhao, Yutong

    2014-01-01

    IL-33, a relatively new member of the IL-1 cytokine family, plays a crucial role in allergic inflammation and acute lung injury. ST2L, the receptor for IL-33, is expressed on immune effector cells and lung epithelia, and plays a critical role in triggering inflammation. We have previously shown that ST2L stability is regulated by the ubiquitin-proteasome system, however its upstream internalization has not been studied. Here, we demonstrate that glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) regulates ST2L internalization and IL-33 signaling. IL-33 treatment induced ST2L internalization, an effect was attenuated by inhibition or downregulation of GSK3β. GSK3β was found to interact with ST2L on serine residue 446 in response to IL-33 treatment. GSK3β binding site mutant (ST2LS446A) and phosphorylation site mutant (ST2LS442A) are resistant to IL-33-induced ST2L internalization. We also found that IL-33 activated focal adhesion kinase (FAK). Inhibition of FAK impaired IL-33-induced GSK3β activation and ST2L internalization. Further, inhibition of ST2L internalization enhanced IL-33-induced cytokine release in lung epithelial cells. These results suggest that modulation of the ST2L internalization by FAK/GSK3β might serve as a unique strategy to lessen pulmonary inflammation. PMID:25472995

  8. Thymidine Phosphorylase is Angiogenic and Promotes Tumor Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghaddam, Amir; Zhang, Hua-Tang; Fan, Tai-Ping D.; Hu, De-En; Lees, Vivien C.; Turley, Helen; Fox, Stephen B.; Gatter, Kevin C.; Harris, Adrian L.; Bicknell, Roy

    1995-02-01

    Platelet-derived endothelial cell growth factor was previously identified as the sole angiogenic activity present in platelets; it is now known to be thymidine phosphorylase (TP). The effect of TP on [methyl-^3H]thymidine uptake does not arise from de novo DNA synthesis and the molecule is not a growth factor. Despite this, TP is strongly angiogenic in a rat sponge and freeze-injured skin graft model. Neutralizing antibodies and site-directed mutagenesis confirmed that the enzyme activity of TP is a condition for its angiogenic activity. The level of TP was found to be elevated in human breast tumors compared to normal breast tissue (P < 0.001). Overexpression of TP in MCF-7 breast carcinoma cells had no effect on growth in vitro but markedly enhanced tumor growth in vivo. These data and the correlation of expression in tumors with malignancy identify TP as a target for antitumor strategies.

  9. Isolation, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of Salmonella typhimurium uridine phosphorylase crystallized with 2,2′-anhydrouridine

    SciTech Connect

    Timofeev, Vladimir I.; Lashkov, Alexander A.; Gabdoulkhakov, Azat G.; Pavlyuk, Bogdan Ph.; Kachalova, Galina S.; Betzel, Christian

    2007-10-01

    S. typhimurium uridine phosphorylase has been isolated and crystallized in the presence of ligand. Uridine phosphorylase (UPh; EC 2.4.2.3) is a member of the pyrimidine nucleoside phosphorylase family of enzymes which catalyzes the phosphorolytic cleavage of the C—N glycoside bond of uridine, with the formation of ribose 1-phosphate and uracil. This enzyme has been shown to be important in the activation and catabolism of fluoropyrimidines. Modulation of its enzymatic activity may affect the therapeutic efficacy of chemotherapeutic agents. The structural investigation of the bacterial uridine phosphorylases, both unliganded and complexed with substrate/product analogues and inhibitors, may help in understanding the catalytic mechanism of the phosphorolytic cleavage of uridine. Salmonella typhimurium uridine phosphorylase has been crystallized with 2,2′-anhydrouridine. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.15 Å. Preliminary analysis of the diffraction data indicates that the crystal belongs to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 88.52, b = 123.98, c = 133.52 Å. The solvent content is 45.51%, assuming the presence of one hexamer molecule per asymmetric unit.

  10. The Role of Skeletal Muscle Glycogen Breakdown for Regulation of Insulin Sensitivity by Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Jørgen; Rustad, Per Inge; Kolnes, Anders Jensen; Lai, Yu-Chiang

    2011-01-01

    Glycogen is the storage form of carbohydrates in mammals. In humans the majority of glycogen is stored in skeletal muscles (∼500 g) and the liver (∼100 g). Food is supplied in larger meals, but the blood glucose concentration has to be kept within narrow limits to survive and stay healthy. Therefore, the body has to cope with periods of excess carbohydrates and periods without supplementation. Healthy persons remove blood glucose rapidly when glucose is in excess, but insulin-stimulated glucose disposal is reduced in insulin resistant and type 2 diabetic subjects. During a hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp, 70–90% of glucose disposal will be stored as muscle glycogen in healthy subjects. The glycogen stores in skeletal muscles are limited because an efficient feedback-mediated inhibition of glycogen synthase prevents accumulation. De novo lipid synthesis can contribute to glucose disposal when glycogen stores are filled. Exercise physiologists normally consider glycogen’s main function as energy substrate. Glycogen is the main energy substrate during exercise intensity above 70% of maximal oxygen uptake (Vo2max⁡) and fatigue develops when the glycogen stores are depleted in the active muscles. After exercise, the rate of glycogen synthesis is increased to replete glycogen stores, and blood glucose is the substrate. Indeed insulin-stimulated glucose uptake and glycogen synthesis is elevated after exercise, which, from an evolutional point of view, will favor glycogen repletion and preparation for new “fight or flight” events. In the modern society, the reduced glycogen stores in skeletal muscles after exercise allows carbohydrates to be stored as muscle glycogen and prevents that glucose is channeled to de novo lipid synthesis, which over time will causes ectopic fat accumulation and insulin resistance. The reduction of skeletal muscle glycogen after exercise allows a healthy storage of carbohydrates after meals and prevents development of type 2

  11. Inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase 3β promotes autophagy to protect mice from acute liver failure mediated by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α

    PubMed Central

    Ren, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, X; Shi, H; Wen, T; Bai, L; Zheng, S; Chen, Y; Chen, D; Li, L; Duan, Z

    2016-01-01

    Our previous studies have demonstrated that inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) activity protects mice from acute liver failure (ALF), whereas its protective and regulatory mechanism remains elusive. Autophagy is a recently recognized rudimentary cellular response to inflammation and injury. The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that inhibition of GSK3β mediates autophagy to inhibit liver inflammation and protect against ALF. In ALF mice model induced by d-galactosamine (d-GalN) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS), autophagy was repressed compared with normal control, and d-GalN/LPS can directly induce autophagic flux in the progression of ALF mice. Autophagy activation by rapamycin protected against liver injury and its inhibition by 3-methyladenine (3-MA) or autophagy gene 7 (Atg7) small interfering RNA (siRNA) exacerbated liver injury. The protective effect of GSK3β inhibition on ALF mice model depending on the induction of autophagy, because that inhibition of GSK3β promoted autophagy in vitro and in vivo, and inhibition of autophagy reversed liver protection and inflammation of GSK3β inhibition. Furthermore, inhibition of GSK3β increased the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα), and the downregulated PPARα by siRNA decreased autophagy induced by GSK3β inhibition. More importantly, the expressions of autophagy-related gene and PPARα are significantly downregulated and the activity of GSK3β is significantly upregulated in liver of ALF patients with hepatitis B virus. Thus, we have demonstrated the new pathological mechanism of ALF that the increased GSK3β activity suppresses autophagy to promote the occurrence and development of ALF by inhibiting PPARα pathway. PMID:27010852

  12. Glycogen synthase kinase 3{beta} regulation of nuclear factor of activated T-cells isoform c1 in the vascular smooth muscle cell response to injury

    SciTech Connect

    Chow Winsion; Hou Guangpei; Bendeck, Michelle P.

    2008-10-01

    The migration and proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (vSMCs) are critical events in neointima formation during atherosclerosis and restenosis. The transcription factor nuclear factor of activated T-cells-isoform c1 (NFATc1) is regulated by atherogenic cytokines, and has been implicated in the migratory and proliferative responses of vSMCs through the regulation of gene expression. In T-cells, calcineurin de-phosphorylates NFATc1, leading to its nuclear import, while glycogen synthase kinase 3 {beta} (GSK3{beta}) phosphorylates NFATc1 and promotes its nuclear export. However, the relationship between NFATc1 and GSK3{beta} has not been studied during SMC migration and proliferation. We investigated this by scrape wounding vSMCs in vitro, and studying wound repair. NFATc1 protein was transiently increased, reaching a peak at 8 h after wounding. Cell fractionation and immunocytochemistry revealed that NFATc1 accumulation in the nucleus was maximal at 4 h after injury, and this was coincident with a significant 9 fold increase in transcriptional activity. Silencing NFATc1 expression with siRNA or inhibition of NFAT with cyclosporin A (CsA) attenuated wound closure by vSMCs. Phospho-GSK3{beta} (inactive) increased to a peak at 30 min after injury, preceding the nuclear accumulation of NFATc1. Overexpression of a constitutively active mutant of GSK3{beta} delayed the nuclear accumulation of NFATc1, caused a 50% decrease in NFAT transcriptional activity, and attenuated vSMC wound repair. We conclude that NFATc1 promotes the vSMC response to injury, and that inhibition of GSK3{beta} is required for the activation of NFAT during wound repair.

  13. Maintained activity of glycogen synthase kinase-3{beta} despite of its phosphorylation at serine-9 in okadaic acid-induced neurodegenerative model

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Yong-Whan; Yoon, Seung-Yong; Choi, Jung-Eun; Kim, Sang-Min; Lee, Hui-Sun; Choe, Han; Lee, Seung-Chul; Kim, Dong-Hou

    2010-04-30

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3{beta} (GSK3{beta}) is recognized as one of major kinases to phosphorylate tau in Alzheimer's disease (AD), thus lots of AD drug discoveries target GSK3{beta}. However, the inactive form of GSK3{beta} which is phosphorylated at serine-9 is increased in AD brains. This is also inconsistent with phosphorylation status of other GSK3{beta} substrates, such as {beta}-catenin and collapsin response mediator protein-2 (CRMP2) since their phosphorylation is all increased in AD brains. Thus, we addressed this paradoxical condition of AD in rat neurons treated with okadaic acid (OA) which inhibits protein phosphatase-2A (PP2A) and induces tau hyperphosphorylation and cell death. Interestingly, OA also induces phosphorylation of GSK3{beta} at serine-9 and other substrates including tau, {beta}-catenin and CRMP2 like in AD brains. In this context, we observed that GSK3{beta} inhibitors such as lithium chloride and 6-bromoindirubin-3'-monoxime (6-BIO) reversed those phosphorylation events and protected neurons. These data suggest that GSK3{beta} may still have its kinase activity despite increase of its phosphorylation at serine-9 in AD brains at least in PP2A-compromised conditions and that GSK3{beta} inhibitors could be a valuable drug candidate in AD.

  14. Radiometric assays for glycerol, glucose, and glycogen.

    PubMed

    Bradley, D C; Kaslow, H R

    1989-07-01

    We have developed radiometric assays for small quantities of glycerol, glucose and glycogen, based on a technique described by Thorner and Paulus (1971, J. Biol. Chem. 246, 3885-3894) for the measurement of glycerokinase activity. In the glycerol assay, glycerol is phosphorylated with [32P]ATP and glycerokinase, residual [32P]ATP is hydrolyzed by heating in acid, and free [32P]phosphate is removed by precipitation with ammonium molybdate and triethylamine. Standard dose-response curves were linear from 50 to 3000 pmol glycerol with less than 3% SD in triplicate measurements. Of the substances tested for interference, only dihydroxyacetone gave a slight false positive signal at high concentration. When used to measure glycerol concentrations in serum and in media from incubated adipose tissue, the radiometric glycerol assay correlated well with a commonly used spectrophotometric assay. The radiometric glucose assay is similar to the glycerol assay, except that glucokinase is used instead of glycerokinase. Dose response was linear from 5 to 3000 pmol glucose with less than 3% SD in triplicate measurements. Glucosamine and N-acetylglucosamine gave false positive signals when equimolar to glucose. When glucose concentrations in serum were measured, the radiometric glucose assay agreed well with hexokinase/glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (H/GDH)-based and glucose oxidase/H2O2-based glucose assays. The radiometric method for glycogen measurement incorporates previously described isolation and digestion techniques, followed by the radiometric assay of free glucose. When used to measure glycogen in mouse epididymal fat pads, the radiometric glycogen assay correlated well with the H/GDH-based glycogen assay. All three radiometric assays offer several practical advantages over spectral assays. PMID:2817333

  15. Radiometric assays for glycerol, glucose, and glycogen

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, D.C.; Kaslow, H.R. )

    1989-07-01

    We have developed radiometric assays for small quantities of glycerol, glucose and glycogen, based on a technique described by Thorner and Paulus for the measurement of glycerokinase activity. In the glycerol assay, glycerol is phosphorylated with (32P)ATP and glycerokinase, residual (32P)ATP is hydrolyzed by heating in acid, and free (32P)phosphate is removed by precipitation with ammonium molybdate and triethylamine. Standard dose-response curves were linear from 50 to 3000 pmol glycerol with less than 3% SD in triplicate measurements. Of the substances tested for interference, only dihydroxyacetone gave a slight false positive signal at high concentration. When used to measure glycerol concentrations in serum and in media from incubated adipose tissue, the radiometric glycerol assay correlated well with a commonly used spectrophotometric assay. The radiometric glucose assay is similar to the glycerol assay, except that glucokinase is used instead of glycerokinase. Dose response was linear from 5 to 3000 pmol glucose with less than 3% SD in triplicate measurements. Glucosamine and N-acetylglucosamine gave false positive signals when equimolar to glucose. When glucose concentrations in serum were measured, the radiometric glucose assay agreed well with hexokinase/glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (H/GDH)-based and glucose oxidase/H2O2-based glucose assays. The radiometric method for glycogen measurement incorporates previously described isolation and digestion techniques, followed by the radiometric assay of free glucose. When used to measure glycogen in mouse epididymal fat pads, the radiometric glycogen assay correlated well with the H/GDH-based glycogen assay. All three radiometric assays offer several practical advantages over spectral assays.

  16. Crystal Structure of Full-length Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv Glycogen Branching Enzyme; Insights of N-Terminal [beta]-Sandwich in Sustrate Specifity and Enzymatic Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Pal, Kuntal; Kumar, Shiva; Sharma, Shikha; Garg, Saurabh Kumar; Alam, Mohammad Suhail; Xu, H. Eric; Agrawal, Pushpa; Swaminathan, Kunchithapadam

    2010-07-13

    The open reading frame Rv1326c of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) H37Rv encodes for an {alpha}-1,4-glucan branching enzyme (MtbGlgB, EC 2.4.1.18, Uniprot entry Q10625). This enzyme belongs to glycoside hydrolase (GH) family 13 and catalyzes the branching of a linear glucose chain during glycogenesis by cleaving a 1 {yields} 4 bond and making a new 1 {yields} 6 bond. Here, we show the crystal structure of full-length MtbGlgB (MtbGlgBWT) at 2.33-{angstrom} resolution. MtbGlgBWT contains four domains: N1 {beta}-sandwich, N2 {beta}-sandwich, a central ({beta}/{alpha}){sub 8} domain that houses the catalytic site, and a C-terminal {beta}-sandwich. We have assayed the amylase activity with amylose and starch as substrates and the glycogen branching activity using amylose as a substrate for MtbGlgBWT and the N1 domain-deleted (the first 108 residues deleted) Mtb{Delta}108GlgB protein. The N1 {beta}-sandwich, which is formed by the first 105 amino acids and superimposes well with the N2 {beta}-sandwich, is shown to have an influence in substrate binding in the amylase assay. Also, we have checked and shown that several GH13 family inhibitors are ineffective against MtbGlgBWT and Mtb{Delta}108GlgB. We propose a two-step reaction mechanism, for the amylase activity (1 {yields} 4 bond breakage) and isomerization (1 {yields} 6 bond formation), which occurs in the same catalytic pocket. The structural and functional properties of MtbGlgB and Mtb{Delta}108GlgB are compared with those of the N-terminal 112-amino acid-deleted Escherichia coli GlgB (EC{Delta}112GlgB).

  17. Glucose uptake and glycogen synthesis in muscles from immobilized limbs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicholson, W. F.; Watson, P. A.; Booth, F. W.

    1984-01-01

    Defects in glucose metabolism in muscles of immobilized limbs of mice were related to alterations in insulin binding, insulin responsiveness, glucose supply, and insulin activation of glycogen synthase. These were tested by in vitro methodology. A significant lessening in the insulin-induced maximal response of 2-deoxyglucose uptake into the mouse soleus muscle occurred between the 3rd and 8th h of limb immobilization, suggesting a decreased insulin responsiveness. Lack of change in the specific binding of insulin to muscles of 24-h immobilized limbs indicates that a change in insulin receptor number did not play a role in the failure of insulin to stimulate glucose metabolism. Its inability to stimulate glycogen synthesis in muscle from immobilized limbs is due, in part, to a lack of glucose supply to glycogen synthesis and also to the ineffectiveness of insulin to increase the percentage of glycogen synthase in its active form in muscles from 24-h immobilized limbs.

  18. PGC-1α Induces Mitochondrial and Myokine Transcriptional Programs and Lipid Droplet and Glycogen Accumulation in Cultured Human Skeletal Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mormeneo, Emma; Jimenez-Mallebrera, Cecilia; Palomer, Xavier; De Nigris, Valeria; Vázquez-Carrera, Manuel; Orozco, Anna; Nascimento, Andrés; Colomer, Jaume; Lerín, Carles; Gómez-Foix, Anna M.

    2012-01-01

    The transcriptional coactivator peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator 1 alpha (PGC-1α) is a chief activator of mitochondrial and metabolic programs and protects against atrophy in skeletal muscle (skm). Here we tested whether PGC-1α overexpression could restructure the transcriptome and metabolism of primary cultured human skm cells, which display a phenotype that resembles the atrophic phenotype. An oligonucleotide microarray analysis was used to reveal the effects of PGC-1α on the whole transcriptome. Fifty-three different genes showed altered expression in response to PGC-1α: 42 upregulated and 11 downregulated. The main gene ontologies (GO) associated with the upregulated genes were mitochondrial components and processes and this was linked with an increase in COX activity, an indicator of mitochondrial content. Furthermore, PGC-1α enhanced mitochondrial oxidation of palmitate and lactate to CO2, but not glucose oxidation. The other most significantly associated GOs for the upregulated genes were chemotaxis and cytokine activity, and several cytokines, including IL-8/CXCL8, CXCL6, CCL5 and CCL8, were within the most highly induced genes. Indeed, PGC-1α highly increased IL-8 cell protein content. The most upregulated gene was PVALB, which is related to calcium signaling. Potential metabolic regulators of fatty acid and glucose storage were among mainly regulated genes. The mRNA and protein level of FITM1/FIT1, which enhances the formation of lipid droplets, was raised by PGC-1α, while in oleate-incubated cells PGC-1α increased the number of smaller lipid droplets and modestly triglyceride levels, compared to controls. CALM1, the calcium-modulated δ subunit of phosphorylase kinase, was downregulated by PGC-1α, while glycogen phosphorylase was inactivated and glycogen storage was increased by PGC-1α. In conclusion, of the metabolic transcriptome deficiencies of cultured skm cells, PGC-1α rescued the expression of genes encoding

  19. Thymidine phosphorylase deficiency causes MNGIE: an autosomal recessive mitochondrial disorder.

    PubMed

    Hirano, M; Martí, R; Spinazzola, A; Nishino, I; Nishigaki, Y

    2004-10-01

    Mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy (MNGIE) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the gene encoding thymidine phosphorylase (TP). The disease is characterized clinically by impaired eye movements, gastrointestinal dysmotility, cachexia, peripheral neuropathy, myopathy, and leukoencephalopathy. Molecular genetic studies of MNGIE patients' tissues have revealed multiple deletions, depletion, and site-specific point mutations of mitochondrial DNA. TP is a cytosolic enzyme required for nucleoside homeostasis. In MNGIE, TP activity is severely reduced and consequently levels of thymidine and deoxyuridine in plasma are dramatically elevated. We have hypothesized that the increased levels of intracellular thymidine and deoxyuridine cause imbalances of mitochondrial nucleotide pools that, in turn, lead to the mtDNA abnormalities. MNGIE was the first molecularly characterized genetic disorder caused by abnormal mitochondrial nucleoside/nucleotide metabolism. Future studies are likely to reveal further insight into this expanding group of diseases. PMID:15571233

  20. Thymidine phosphorylase mutations cause instability of mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Michio; Lagier-Tourenne, Clotilde; Valentino, Maria L; Martí, Ramon; Nishigaki, Yutaka

    2005-07-18

    Mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy (MNGIE) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by ptosis and progressive external ophthalmoplegia, peripheral neuropathy, severe gastrointestinal dysmotility, cachexia and leukoencephalopathy. Muscle biopsies of MNGIE patients have revealed morphologically abnormal mitochondria and defects of respiratory chain enzymes. In addition, patients harbor depletion, multiple deletions, and point mutations of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). This disorder is caused by loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding thymidine phosphorylase (TP) a cytosolic enzyme. In MNGIE patients, TP activity is very low or absent resulting in dramatically elevated levels of plasma thymidine and deoxyuridine. We have hypothesized that the increased levels of thymidine and deoxyuridine cause mitochondrial nucleotide pool imbalances that, in turn, generate mtDNA alterations. PMID:15975738

  1. Nicotinamide riboside and nicotinic acid riboside salvage in fungi and mammals. Quantitative basis for Urh1 and purine nucleoside phosphorylase function in NAD+ metabolism.

    PubMed

    Belenky, Peter; Christensen, Kathryn C; Gazzaniga, Francesca; Pletnev, Alexandre A; Brenner, Charles

    2009-01-01

    NAD+ is a co-enzyme for hydride transfer enzymes and an essential substrate of ADP-ribose transfer enzymes and sirtuins, the type III protein lysine deacetylases related to yeast Sir2. Supplementation of yeast cells with nicotinamide riboside extends replicative lifespan and increases Sir2-dependent gene silencing by virtue of increasing net NAD+ synthesis. Nicotinamide riboside elevates NAD+ levels via the nicotinamide riboside kinase pathway and by a pathway initiated by splitting the nucleoside into a nicotinamide base followed by nicotinamide salvage. Genetic evidence has established that uridine hydrolase, purine nucleoside phosphorylase, and methylthioadenosine phosphorylase are required for Nrk-independent utilization of nicotinamide riboside in yeast. Here we show that mammalian purine nucleoside phosphorylase but not methylthioadenosine phosphorylase is responsible for mammalian nicotinamide riboside kinase-independent nicotinamide riboside utilization. We demonstrate that so-called uridine hydrolase is 100-fold more active as a nicotinamide riboside hydrolase than as a uridine hydrolase and that uridine hydrolase and mammalian purine nucleoside phosphorylase cleave nicotinic acid riboside, whereas the yeast phosphorylase has little activity on nicotinic acid riboside. Finally, we show that yeast nicotinic acid riboside utilization largely depends on uridine hydrolase and nicotinamide riboside kinase and that nicotinic acid riboside bioavailability is increased by ester modification. PMID:19001417

  2. ATP Depletion, a Possible Role in the Pathogenesis of Hyperuricemia in Glycogen Storage Disease Type I

    PubMed Central

    Greene, Harry L.; Wilson, Frederick A.; Hefferan, Patrick; Terry, Annie B.; Moran, Jose Roberto; Slonim, Alfred E.; Claus, Thomas H.; Burr, Ian M.

    1978-01-01

    Other investigators have shown that fructose infusion in normal man and rats acutely depletes hepatic ATP and Pi and increases the rate of uric acid formation by the degradation of preformed nucleotides. We postulated that a similar mechanism of ATP depletion might be present in patients with glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency (GSD-I) as a result of ATP consumption during glycogenolysis and resulting excess glycolysis. The postulate was tested by measurement of: (a) hepatic content of ATP, glycogen, phosphorylated sugars, and phosphorylase activities before and after increasing glycolysis by glucagon infusion and (b) plasma urate levels and urate excretion before and after therapy designed to maintain blood glucose levels above 70 mg/dl and thus prevent excess glycogenolysis and glycolysis. Glucagon infusion in seven patients with GSD-I caused a decrease in hepatic ATP from 2.25 ± 0.09 to 0.73 ± 0.06 μmol/g liver (P <0.01), within 5 min, persisting in one patient to 20 min (1.3 μmol/g). Three patients with GSD other than GSD-I (controls), and 10 normal rats, showed no change in ATP levels after glucagon infusion. Glucagon caused an increase in hepatic phosphorylase activity from 163 ± 21 to 311 ± 17 μmol/min per g protein (P <0.01), and a decrease in glycogen content from 8.96 ± 0.51 to 6.68 ± 0.38% weight (P <0.01). Hepatic content of phosphorylated hexoses measured in two patients, showed the following mean increases in response to glucagon; glucose-6-phosphate (from 0.25 to 0.98 μmol/g liver), fructose-6-phosphate (from 0.17 to 0.45 μmol/g liver), and fructose-1,6-diphosphate (from 0.09 to 1.28 μmol/g) within 5 min. These changes, except for glucose-6-phosphate, returned toward preinfusion levels within 20 min. Treatment consisted of continuous intragastric feedings of a high glucose dietary mixture. Such treatment increased blood glucose from a mean level of 62 (range 28-96) to 86 (range 71-143) mg/dl (P <0.02), decreased plasma glucagon from a mean

  3. AMP-Activated Protein Kinase and Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3β Modulate the Severity of Sepsis-Induced Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhongyu; Bone, Nathaniel; Jiang, Shaoning; Park, Dae Won; Tadie, Jean-Marc; Deshane, Jessy; Rodriguez, Cilina Ann; Pittet, Jean-Francois; Abraham, Edward; Zmijewski, Jaroslaw W

    2015-01-01

    Alterations in metabolic and bioenergetic homeostasis contribute to sepsis-mediated organ injury. However, how AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a major sensor and regulator of energy expenditure and production, affects development of organ injury and loss of innate capacity during polymicrobial sepsis remains unclear. In the present experiments, we found that cross-talk between the AMPK and GSK3β signaling pathways controls chemotaxis and the ability of neutrophils and macrophages to kill bacteria ex vivo. In mice with polymicrobial abdominal sepsis or more severe sepsis induced by the combination of hemorrhage and intraabdominal infection, administration of the AMPK activator metformin or the GSK3β inhibitor SB216763 reduced the severity of acute lung injury (ALI). Improved survival in metformin-treated septic mice was correlated with preservation of mitochondrial complex V (ATP synthase) function and increased amounts of ETC complex III and IV. Although immunosuppression is a consequence of sepsis, metformin effectively increased innate immune capacity to eradicate P. aeruginosa in the lungs of septic mice. We also found that AMPK activation diminished accumulation of the immunosuppressive transcriptional factor HIF-1α as well as the development of endotoxin tolerance in LPS-treated macrophages. Furthermore, AMPK-dependent preservation of mitochondrial membrane potential also prevented LPS-mediated dysfunction of neutrophil chemotaxis. These results indicate that AMPK activation reduces the severity of polymicrobial sepsis-induced lung injury and prevents the development of sepsis-associated immunosuppression. PMID:26650187

  4. Structure determination of glycogen synthase kinase-3 from Leishmania major and comparative inhibitor structure-activity relationships with Trypanosoma brucei GSK-3

    SciTech Connect

    Ojo, Kayode K; Arakaki, Tracy L; Napuli, Alberto J; Inampudi, Krishna K; Keyloun, Katelyn R; Zhang, Li; Hol, Wim G.J.; Verlind, Christophe L.M.J.; Merritt, Ethan A; Van Voorhis, Wesley C

    2012-04-24

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) is a drug target under intense investigation in pharmaceutical companies and constitutes an attractive piggyback target for eukaryotic pathogens. Two different GSKs are found in trypanosomatids, one about 150 residues shorter than the other. GSK-3 short (GeneDB: Tb927.10.13780) has previously been validated genetically as a drug target in Trypanosoma brucei by RNAi induced growth retardation; and chemically by correlation between enzyme and in vitro growth inhibition. Here, we report investigation of the equivalent GSK-3 short enzymes of L. major (LmjF18.0270) and L. infantum (LinJ18_V3.0270, identical in amino acid sequences to LdonGSK-3 short) and a crystal structure of LmajGSK-3 short at 2 Å resolution. The inhibitor structure-activity relationships (SARs) of L. major and L. infantum are virtually identical, suggesting that inhibitors could be useful for both cutaneous and visceral leishmaniasis. Leishmania spp. GSK-3 short has different inhibitor SARs than TbruGSK-3 short, which can be explained mostly by two variant residues in the ATP-binding pocket. Indeed, mutating these residues in the ATP-binding site of LmajGSK-3 short to the TbruGSK-3 short equivalents results in a mutant LmajGSK-3 short enzyme with SAR more similar to that of TbruGSK-3 short. The differences between human GSK-3β (HsGSK-3β) and LmajGSK-3 short SAR suggest that compounds which selectively inhibit LmajGSK-3 short may be found.

  5. Activation of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae filamentation/invasion pathway by osmotic stress in high-osmolarity glycogen pathway mutants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davenport, K. D.; Williams, K. E.; Ullmann, B. D.; Gustin, M. C.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades are frequently used signal transduction mechanisms in eukaryotes. Of the five MAPK cascades in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the high-osmolarity glycerol response (HOG) pathway functions to sense and respond to hypertonic stress. We utilized a partial loss-of-function mutant in the HOG pathway, pbs2-3, in a high-copy suppressor screen to identify proteins that modulate growth on high-osmolarity media. Three high-copy suppressors of pbs2-3 osmosensitivity were identified: MSG5, CAK1, and TRX1. Msg5p is a dual-specificity phosphatase that was previously demonstrated to dephosphorylate MAPKs in yeast. Deletions of the putative MAPK targets of Msg5p revealed that kss1delta could suppress the osmosensitivity of pbs2-3. Kss1p is phosphorylated in response to hyperosmotic shock in a pbs2-3 strain, but not in a wild-type strain nor in a pbs2-3 strain overexpressing MSG5. Both TEC1 and FRE::lacZ expressions are activated in strains lacking a functional HOG pathway during osmotic stress in a filamentation/invasion-pathway-dependent manner. Additionally, the cellular projections formed by a pbs2-3 mutant on high osmolarity are absent in strains lacking KSS1 or STE7. These data suggest that the loss of filamentation/invasion pathway repression contributes to the HOG mutant phenotype.

  6. Lupus Nephritis: Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3β Promotion of Renal Damage Through Activation of the NLRP3 Inflammasome in Lupus-Prone Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jijun; Wang, Hongyue; Huang, Yuefang; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Shuang; Gaskin, Felicia; Yang, Niansheng; Fu, Shu Man

    2015-01-01

    Objective Glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK-3β) has been demonstrated to be involved in immune and inflammatory responses via multiple signaling pathways, leading to the production of proinflammatory cytokines. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of GSK-3β in the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis in 2 mouse models. Methods Thiadiazolidinone 8 (TDZD-8), a selective inhibitor of GSK-3β, was administered intraperitoneally to 12-week-old MRL/lpr mice for 8 weeks or to 22-week-old (NZB × NZW)F1 mice for 12 weeks. The expression of GSK-3β and NLRP3 inflammasome components was analyzed. Proteinuria, biochemical parameters, proinflammatory cytokines, anti–double-stranded DNA (anti-dsDNA) antibody levels, and renal pathology were examined. In vitro, the effect of GSK-3β–directed small interfering RNA (siRNA) on NLRP3 inflammasome activation was evaluated in bone marrow–derived macrophages (BMMs) from the mice and in the J774A.1 macrophage cell line. Results The incidence of severe proteinuria and renal inflammation was significantly attenuated in both models, with a significant reduction in anti-dsDNA antibody production, immune complex deposition in the kidney, and circulating proinflammatory cytokine levels. TDZD-8 inhibited the activation of GSK-3β and caspase 1, with a concomitant decrease in interleukin-1β (IL-1β) synthesis. In vitro, GSK-3β siRNA transfection of mouse BMMs and the J774A.1 cell line with GSK-3β siRNA inhibited the expression of GSK-3β, the activation of caspase 1, and the production of IL-1β. Conclusion These results show that GSK-3β promotes lupus nephritis at least partly by activating the NLRP3/IL-1β pathway. The linking of GSK-3β to the NLRP3/IL-1β pathway is a novel observation in our study. Our results suggest that the GSK-3β/NLRP3/IL-1β pathway may be a potential therapeutic target for lupus in humans. PMID:25512114

  7. Stimulation of glycogen synthesis by heat shock in L6 skeletal-muscle cells: regulatory role of site-specific phosphorylation of glycogen-associated protein phosphatase 1.

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Byoung; Duddy, Noreen; Ragolia, Louis; Begum, Najma

    2003-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that glycogen-associated protein phosphatase 1 (PP-1(G)) is essential for basal and exercise-induced glycogen synthesis, which is mediated in part by dephosphorylation and activation of glycogen synthase (GS). In the present study, we examined the potential role of site-specific phosphorylation of PP-1(G) in heat-shock-induced glycogen synthesis. L6 rat skeletal-muscle cells were stably transfected with wild-type PP-1(G) or with PP-1(G) mutants in which site-1 (S1) Ser(48) and site-2 (S2) Ser(67) residues were substituted with Ala. Cells expressing wild-type and PP-1(G) mutants, S1, S2 and S1/S2, were examined for potential alterations in glycogen synthesis after a 60 min heat shock at 45 degrees C, followed by analysis of [(14)C]glucose incorporation into glycogen at 37 degrees C. PP-1(G) S1 mutation caused a 90% increase in glycogen synthesis on heat-shock treatment, whereas the PP-1(G) S2 mutant was not sensitive to heat stress. The S1/S2 double mutant was comparable with wild-type, which showed a 30% increase over basal. Heat-shock-induced glycogen synthesis was accompanied by increased PP-1 and GS activities. The highest activation was observed in S1 mutant. Heat shock also resulted in a rapid and sustained Akt/ glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (GSK-3 beta) phosphorylation. Wortmannin blocked heat-shock-induced Akt/GSK-3 beta phosphorylation, prevented 2-deoxyglucose uptake and abolished the heat-shock-induced glycogen synthesis. Muscle glycogen levels regulate GS activity and glycogen synthesis and were found to be markedly depleted in S1 mutant on heat-shock treatment, suggesting that PP-1(G) S1 Ser phosphorylation may inhibit glycogen degradation during thermal stimulation, as S1 mutation resulted in excessive glycogen synthesis on heat-shock treatment. In contrast, PP-1(G) S2 Ser phosphorylation may promote glycogen breakdown under stressful conditions. Heat-shock-induced glycogenesis appears to be mediated via phosphoinositide 3

  8. Crystal structure of glycogen debranching enzyme and insights into its catalysis and disease-causing mutations

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Liting; Feng, Lingling; Xia, Lin; Yin, Huiyong; Xiang, Song

    2016-01-01

    Glycogen is a branched glucose polymer and serves as an important energy store. Its debranching is a critical step in its mobilization. In animals and fungi, the 170 kDa glycogen debranching enzyme (GDE) catalyses this reaction. GDE deficiencies in humans are associated with severe diseases collectively termed glycogen storage disease type III (GSDIII). We report crystal structures of GDE and its complex with oligosaccharides, and structure-guided mutagenesis and biochemical studies to assess the structural observations. These studies reveal that distinct domains in GDE catalyse sequential reactions in glycogen debranching, the mechanism of their catalysis and highly specific substrate recognition. The unique tertiary structure of GDE provides additional contacts to glycogen besides its active sites, and our biochemical experiments indicate that they mediate its recruitment to glycogen and regulate its activity. Combining the understanding of the GDE catalysis and functional characterizations of its disease-causing mutations provides molecular insights into GSDIII. PMID:27088557

  9. Crystal structure of glycogen debranching enzyme and insights into its catalysis and disease-causing mutations.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Liting; Feng, Lingling; Xia, Lin; Yin, Huiyong; Xiang, Song

    2016-01-01

    Glycogen is a branched glucose polymer and serves as an important energy store. Its debranching is a critical step in its mobilization. In animals and fungi, the 170 kDa glycogen debranching enzyme (GDE) catalyses this reaction. GDE deficiencies in humans are associated with severe diseases collectively termed glycogen storage disease type III (GSDIII). We report crystal structures of GDE and its complex with oligosaccharides, and structure-guided mutagenesis and biochemical studies to assess the structural observations. These studies reveal that distinct domains in GDE catalyse sequential reactions in glycogen debranching, the mechanism of their catalysis and highly specific substrate recognition. The unique tertiary structure of GDE provides additional contacts to glycogen besides its active sites, and our biochemical experiments indicate that they mediate its recruitment to glycogen and regulate its activity. Combining the understanding of the GDE catalysis and functional characterizations of its disease-causing mutations provides molecular insights into GSDIII. PMID:27088557

  10. Purification, crystallization, and preliminary X-ray diffraction study of purine nucleoside phosphorylase from E. coli

    SciTech Connect

    Abramchik, Yu. A. Timofeev, V. I. Zhukhlistova, N. E.; Muravieva, T. I.; Esipov, R. S.; Kuranova, I. P.

    2015-07-15

    Crystals of E. coli purine nucleoside phosphorylase were grown in microgravity by the capillary counter-diffusion method through a gel layer. The X-ray diffraction data set suitable for the determination of the three-dimensional structure at atomic resolution was collected from one crystal at the Spring-8 synchrotron facility to 0.99 Å resolution. The crystals belong to sp. gr. P2{sub 1} and have the following unit-cell parameters: a = 74.1 Å, b = 110.2 Å, c = 88.2 Å, α = γ = 90°, β = 111.08°. The crystal contains six subunits of the enzyme comprising a hexamer per asymmetric unit. The hexamer is the biological active form of E. coli. purine nucleoside phosphorylase.

  11. Characterization and crystal structure determination of β-1,2-mannobiose phosphorylase from Listeria innocua.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, Tomohiro; Nihira, Takanori; Chiku, Kazuhiro; Suzuki, Erika; Arakawa, Takatoshi; Nishimoto, Mamoru; Kitaoka, Motomitsu; Nakai, Hiroyuki; Fushinobu, Shinya

    2015-12-21

    Glycoside hydrolase family 130 consists of phosphorylases and hydrolases for β-mannosides. Here, we characterized β-1,2-mannobiose phosphorylase from Listeria innocua (Lin0857) and determined its crystal structures complexed with β-1,2-linked mannooligosaccharides. β-1,2-Mannotriose was bound in a U-shape, interacting with a phosphate analog at both ends. Lin0857 has a unique dimer structure connected by a loop, and a significant open-close loop displacement was observed for substrate entry. A long loop, which is exclusively present in Lin0857, covers the active site to limit the pocket size. A structural basis for substrate recognition and phosphorolysis was provided. PMID:26632508

  12. Glycogen depletion and resynthesis during 14 days of chronic low-frequency stimulation of rabbit muscle.

    PubMed

    Prats, C; Bernal, C; Cadefau, J A; Frias, J; Tibolla, M; Cussó, R

    2002-10-10

    Electro-stimulation alters muscle metabolism and the extent of this change depends on application intensity and duration. The effect of 14 days of chronic electro-stimulation on glycogen turnover and on the regulation of glycogen synthase in fast-twitch muscle was studied. The results showed that macro- and proglycogen degrade simultaneously during the first hour of stimulation. After 3 h, the muscle showed net synthesis, with an increase in the proglycogen fraction. The glycogen content peaked after 4 days of stimulation, macroglycogen being the predominant fraction at that time. Glycogen synthase was determined during electro-stimulation. The activity of this enzyme was measured at low UDPG concentration with either high or low Glu-6-P content. Western blots were performed against glycogen synthase over a range of stimulation periods. Activation of this enzyme was maximum before the net synthesis of glycogen, partial during net synthesis, and low during late synthesis. These observations suggest that the more active, dephosphorylated and very low phosphorylated forms of glycogen synthase may participate in the first steps of glycogen resynthesis before net synthesis is observed, while partially phosphorylated forms are most active during glycogen elongation. PMID:12383944

  13. Digestion of glycogen by a glucosidase released by Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Huffman, Ryan D; Nawrocki, Lauren D; Wilson, Wayne A; Brittingham, Andrew

    2015-12-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is a protozoan parasite that is the causative agent of trichomoniasis, a widespread sexually transmitted disease. In vitro culture of T. vaginalis typically employs a medium supplemented with either maltose or glucose and carbohydrates are considered essential for growth. Although the nature of the carbohydrates utilized by T. vaginalis in vivo is undefined, the vaginal epithelium is rich in glycogen, which appears to provide a source of carbon for the vaginal microbiota. Here, we show that T. vaginalis grows equally well in growth media supplemented with simple sugars or with glycogen. Analysis of conditioned growth medium by thin layer chromatography indicates that growth on glycogen is accompanied by glycogen breakdown to a mixture of products including maltose, glucose, and oligosaccharides. Enzymatic assays with conditioned growth medium show that glycogen breakdown is accomplished via the release of a glucosidase activity having the properties of an α-amylase into the growth medium. Furthermore, we find that released glucosidase activity increases upon removal of carbohydrate from the growth medium, indicating regulation of synthesis and/or secretion in response to environmental cues. Lastly, we show that addition of T. vaginalis glucosidase activity to a growth medium containing glycogen generates sufficient simple sugar to support the growth of lactobacilli which, themselves, are unable to degrade glycogen. Thus, not only does the glucosidase activity likely play an important role in allowing T. vaginalis to secure simple sugars for its own use, it has the potential to impact the growth of other members of the vaginal microbiome. PMID:26420465

  14. Overcoming inefficient cellobiose fermentation by cellobiose phosphorylase in the presence of xylose

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cellobiose and xylose co-fermentation holds promise for efficiently producing biofuels from plant biomass. Cellobiose phosphorylase (CBP), an intracellular enzyme generally found in anaerobic bacteria, cleaves cellobiose to glucose and glucose-1-phosphate, providing energetic advantages under the anaerobic conditions required for large-scale biofuel production. However, the efficiency of CBP to cleave cellobiose in the presence of xylose is unknown. This study investigated the effect of xylose on anaerobic CBP-mediated cellobiose fermentation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Results Yeast capable of fermenting cellobiose by the CBP pathway consumed cellobiose and produced ethanol at rates 61% and 42% slower, respectively, in the presence of xylose than in its absence. The system generated significant amounts of the byproduct 4-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-d-xylose (GX), produced by CBP from glucose-1-phosphate and xylose. In vitro competition assays identified xylose as a mixed-inhibitor for cellobiose phosphorylase activity. The negative effects of xylose were effectively relieved by efficient cellobiose and xylose co-utilization. GX was also shown to be a substrate for cleavage by an intracellular β-glucosidase. Conclusions Xylose exerted negative impacts on CBP-mediated cellobiose fermentation by acting as a substrate for GX byproduct formation and a mixed-inhibitor for cellobiose phosphorylase activity. Future efforts will require efficient xylose utilization, GX cleavage by a β-glucosidase, and/or a CBP with improved substrate specificity to overcome the negative impacts of xylose on CBP in cellobiose and xylose co-fermentation. PMID:24944578

  15. Immobilized phosphorylase for synthesis of polysaccharides from glucose

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, D. L.

    1972-01-01

    Continuous processes for enzymatic production of carbohydrates from glucose are discussed. Key reactant in process is identified as phosphorylase which catalyzes reversible formation or degradation of polysaccharide. Chemical compounds and reactions to synthesize polysaccharides are analyzed.

  16. Substrate-induced Nuclear Export and Peripheral Compartmentalization of Hepatic Glucokinase Correlates with Glycogen Deposition

    PubMed Central

    Shiota, Masa; Knobel, Susan M.; Piston, David W.; Cherrington, Alan D.; Magnuson, Mark A.

    2001-01-01

    Hepatic glucokinase (GK) is acutely regulated by binding to its nuclear-anchored regulatory protein (GKRP). Although GK release by GKRP is tightly coupled to the rate of glycogen synthesis, the nature of this association is obscure. To gain insight into this coupling mechanism under physiological stimulating conditions in primary rat hepatocytes, we analyzed the subcellular distribution of GK and GKRP with immunofluorescence, and glycogen deposition with glycogen cytochemical fluorescence, using confocal microscopyand quantitative image analysis. Following stimulation, a fraction of the GK signal translocated from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. The reduction in the nuclear to cytoplasmic ratio of GK, an index of nuclear export, correlated with a >50% increase in glycogen cytochemical fluorescence over a 60min stimulation period. Furthermore, glycogen accumulation was initially deposited in a peripheral pattern in hepatocytes similar to that of GK. These data suggest that a compartmentalization exists of both active GK and the initial sites of glycogen deposition at the hepatocyte surface. PMID:12369705

  17. Genetics Home Reference: glycogen storage disease type IV

    MedlinePlus

    ... gene provides instructions for making the glycogen branching enzyme. This enzyme is involved in the production of glycogen , which ... to a shortage (deficiency) of the glycogen branching enzyme. As a result, glycogen is not formed properly. ...

  18. Axonal and dendritic localization of mRNAs for glycogen-metabolizing enzymes in cultured rodent neurons

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Localization of mRNAs encoding cytoskeletal or signaling proteins to neuronal processes is known to contribute to axon growth, synaptic differentiation and plasticity. In addition, a still increasing spectrum of mRNAs has been demonstrated to be localized under different conditions and developing stages thus reflecting a highly regulated mechanism and a role of mRNA localization in a broad range of cellular processes. Results Applying fluorescence in-situ-hybridization with specific riboprobes on cultured neurons and nervous tissue sections, we investigated whether the mRNAs for two metabolic enzymes, namely glycogen synthase (GS) and glycogen phosphorylase (GP), the key enzymes of glycogen metabolism, may also be targeted to neuronal processes. If it were so, this might contribute to clarify the so far enigmatic role of neuronal glycogen. We found that the mRNAs for both enzymes are localized to axonal and dendritic processes in cultured lumbar spinal motoneurons, but not in cultured trigeminal neurons. In cultured cortical neurons which do not store glycogen but nevertheless express glycogen synthase, the GS mRNA is also subject to axonal and dendritic localization. In spinal motoneurons and trigeminal neurons in situ, however, the mRNAs could only be demonstrated in the neuronal somata but not in the nerves. Conclusions We could demonstrate that the mRNAs for major enzymes of neural energy metabolism can be localized to neuronal processes. The heterogeneous pattern of mRNA localization in different culture types and developmental stages stresses that mRNA localization is a versatile mechanism for the fine-tuning of cellular events. Our findings suggest that mRNA localization for enzymes of glycogen metabolism could allow adaptation to spatial and temporal energy demands in neuronal events like growth, repair and synaptic transmission. PMID:24898526

  19. Assignment of the gene encoding glycogen synthase (GYS) to human chromosome 19, band q13,3

    SciTech Connect

    Lehto, M. Helsinki Univ. ); Stoffel, M.; Espinosa, R. III; Beau, M.M. le; Bell, G.I. ); Groop, L. )

    1993-02-01

    The enzyme glycogen synthase (UDP glocose:glycogen 4-[alpha]-D-glucosyltransferase, EC 2.4.1.11) catalyzes the formation of glycogen from uridine diphosphate glucose (UPDG). Impaired activation of muscle glycogen synthase by insulin has been noted in patients with genetic risk of developing non-insulin-dependent diabets mellitus (NIDDM) and this may represent an early defect in the pathogenesis of this disorder. As such, glycogen synthase represents a candidate gene for contributing to genetic susceptibility. As a first step in studying the role of glycogen synthase in the genetics of NIDDM, we have isolated a cosmid encoding the human glycogen synthase gene (gene symbol GYS) and determined its chromosomal localization by fluorescence in situ hybridization. 4 refs., 1 fig.

  20. Vorinostat synergises with capecitabine through upregulation of thymidine phosphorylase

    PubMed Central

    Di Gennaro, E; Piro, G; Chianese, M I; Franco, R; Cintio, A Di; Moccia, T; Luciano, A; de Ruggiero, I; Bruzzese, F; Avallone, A; Arra, C; Budillon, A

    2010-01-01

    Background: Potentiation of anticancer activity of capecitabine is required to improve its therapeutic index. In colorectal cancer (CRC) cells, we evaluated whether the histone deacetylase-inhibitor vorinostat may induce synergistic antitumour effects in combination with capecitabine by modulating the expression of thymidine phosphorylase (TP), a key enzyme in the conversion of capecitabine to 5-florouracil (5-FU), and thymidylate synthase (TS), the target of 5-FU. Methods: Expression of TP and TS was measured by real-time PCR, western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Knockdown of TP was performed by specific small interfering RNA. Antitumour activity of vorinostat was assessed in vitro in combination with the capecitabine active metabolite deoxy-5-fluorouridine (5′-DFUR) according to the Chou and Talay method and by evaluating apoptosis as well as in xenografts-bearing nude mice in combination with capecitabine. Results: Vorinostat induced both in vitro and in vivo upregulation of TP as well as downregulation of TS in cancer cells, but not in ex vivo treated peripheral blood lymphocytes. Combined treatment with vorinostat and 5′-DFUR resulted in a synergistic antiproliferative effect and increased apoptotic cell death in vitro. This latter effect was impaired in cells where TP was knocked. In vivo, vorinostat plus capecitabine potently inhibited tumour growth, increased apoptosis and prolonged survival compared with control or single-agent treatments. Conclusions: Overall, this study suggests that the combination of vorinostat and capecitabine is an innovative antitumour strategy and warrants further clinical evaluation for the treatment of CRC. PMID:21045833

  1. Mono-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate targets glycogen debranching enzyme and affects glycogen metabolism in rat testis.

    PubMed

    Kuramori, Chikanori; Hase, Yasuyoshi; Hoshikawa, Koichi; Watanabe, Keiko; Nishi, Takeyuki; Hishiki, Takako; Soga, Tomoyoshi; Nashimoto, Akihiro; Kabe, Yasuaki; Yamaguchi, Yuki; Watanabe, Hajime; Kataoka, Kohsuke; Suematsu, Makoto; Handa, Hiroshi

    2009-05-01

    Phthalate esters are commonly used plasticizers; however, some are suspected to cause reproductive toxicity. Administration of high doses of di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) induces germ cell death in male rodents. Mono-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (MEHP), a hydrolyzed metabolite of DEHP, appears to be responsible for this testicular toxicity; however, the underlying mechanism of this chemical's action remains unknown. Here, using a one-step affinity purification procedure, we identified glycogen debranching enzyme (GDE) as a phthalate-binding protein. GDE has oligo-1,4-1,4-glucanotransferase and amylo-1,6-glucosidase activities, which are responsible for the complete degradation of glycogen to glucose. Our findings demonstrate that MEHP inhibits the activity of oligo-1,4-1,4-glucanotransferase, but not of amylo-1,6-glucosidase. Among various phthalate esters tested, MEHP specifically binds to and inhibits GDE. We also show that DEHP administration affects glycogen metabolism in rat testis. Thus, inhibition of GDE by MEHP may play a role in germ cell apoptosis in the testis. PMID:19240039

  2. Enzymatic synthesis of 2'-deoxyuridine by whole cell catalyst co-expressing uridine phosphorylase and thymidine phosphorylase through auto-induction system.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Shuli; Wang, Yingbin; Wang, Xi; Wang, Jie; Li, Jie; Zhang, Guiyou; Zhang, Rongqing; Xie, Liping; Wang, Hongzhong

    2014-12-01

    Genes encoding uridine phosphorylase (UP) and thymidine phosphorylase (TP) from Escherichia coli K12 were cloned and recombined respectively into plasmids pET-21a(+) and pET-28a(+). The recombinant plasmids BL21/pET21a-UP and BL21/pET28a-TP were co-transformed into E. coli BL21(DE3) to construct highly effective BTU strain (BL21/pET28a-TP, pET21a-UP) overexpressing both of UP and TP. BTU was cultivated in ZYM-Fe-5052 medium for 10 h and used as catalyst to synthesize 2'-deoxyuridine (dUR). It was found to increase the productivity of dUR by 8-9 fold when compared to wild E. coli K12 and E. coli BL21(DE3) strains. A series of experiments were carried out to find out the optimal conditions for synthesis of dUR. At 50°C, with 0.25‰ dry wt./v to catalyze the reaction of 2:1 β-thymidine: uracil (60 mM β-thymidine, 30 mM uracil), the conversion rate of dUR would reach 61.6% at 1 h, which was much higher than the rates obtained by BTU strain cultured in LB medium and induced by IPTG. This result proved co-expression and auto-induction were efficient methods in enhancing the expression quantity and activity of nucleoside phosphorylases, and they also had significant implications for large-scale industrial production of dUR and synthesis of other nucleoside derivatives. PMID:24910260

  3. Characterization of the Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens glgB gene, which encodes a glycogen-branching enzyme with starch-clearing activity.

    PubMed Central

    Rumbak, E; Rawlings, D E; Lindsey, G G; Woods, D R

    1991-01-01

    A Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens H17c glgB gene, was isolated by direct selection for colonies that produced clearing on starch azure plates. The gene was expressed in Escherichia coli from its own promoter. The glgB gene consisted of an open reading frame of 1,920 bp encoding a protein of 639 amino acids (calculated Mr, 73,875) with 46 to 50% sequence homology with other branching enzymes. A limited region of 12 amino acids showed sequence similarity to amylases and glucanotransferases. The B. fibrisolvens branching enzyme was not able to hydrolyze starch but stimulated phosphorylase alpha-mediated incorporation of glucose into alpha-1,4-glucan polymer 13.4-fold. The branching enzyme was purified to homogeneity by a simple two-step procedure; N-terminal sequence and amino acid composition determinations confirmed the deduced translational start and amino acid sequence of the open reading frame. The enzymatic properties of the purified enzyme were investigated. The enzyme transferred chains of 5 to 10 (optimum, 7) glucose units, using amylose and amylopetin as substrates, to produce a highly branched polymer. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 4 FIG. 7 PMID:1938880

  4. A Splice Mutation in the PHKG1 Gene Causes High Glycogen Content and Low Meat Quality in Pig Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Lisheng; Ren, Jun; Liu, Xianxian; Zhang, Hui; Yang, Bin; Zhang, Zhiyan; Ma, Huanban; Xie, Xianhua; Xing, Yuyun; Guo, Yuanmei; Huang, Lusheng

    2014-01-01

    Glycolytic potential (GP) in skeletal muscle is economically important in the pig industry because of its effect on pork processing yield. We have previously mapped a major quantitative trait loci (QTL) for GP on chromosome 3 in a White Duroc × Erhualian F2 intercross. We herein performed a systems genetic analysis to identify the causal variant underlying the phenotype QTL (pQTL). We first conducted genome-wide association analyses in the F2 intercross and an F19 Sutai pig population. The QTL was then refined to an 180-kb interval based on the 2-LOD drop method. We then performed expression QTL (eQTL) mapping using muscle transcriptome data from 497 F2 animals. Within the QTL interval, only one gene (PHKG1) has a cis-eQTL that was colocolizated with pQTL peaked at the same SNP. The PHKG1 gene encodes a catalytic subunit of the phosphorylase kinase (PhK), which functions in the cascade activation of glycogen breakdown. Deep sequencing of PHKG1 revealed a point mutation (C>A) in a splice acceptor site of intron 9, resulting in a 32-bp deletion in the open reading frame and generating a premature stop codon. The aberrant transcript induces nonsense-mediated decay, leading to lower protein level and weaker enzymatic activity in affected animals. The mutation causes an increase of 43% in GP and a decrease of>20% in water-holding capacity of pork. These effects were consistent across the F2 and Sutai populations, as well as Duroc × (Landrace × Yorkshire) hybrid pigs. The unfavorable allele exists predominantly in Duroc-derived pigs. The findings provide new insights into understanding risk factors affecting glucose metabolism, and would greatly contribute to the genetic improvement of meat quality in Duroc related pigs. PMID:25340394

  5. Cross-talk between glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) and p38MAPK regulates myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2) activity in skeletal and cardiac muscle.

    PubMed

    Dionyssiou, M G; Nowacki, N B; Hashemi, S; Zhao, J; Kerr, A; Tsushima, R G; McDermott, J C

    2013-01-01

    Characterizing the signaling network that controls MEF2 transcription factors is crucial for understanding skeletal and cardiac muscle gene expression. Glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) regulates MEF2 activity indirectly through reciprocal regulation of p38MAPK. Cross-talk between GSK3β and p38MAPK regulates MEF2 activity in skeletal and cardiac muscle. Understanding cross-talk in the signaling network converging at MEF2 control has therapeutic implications in cardiac and skeletal muscle pathology. Glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) is a known regulator of striated muscle gene expression suppressing both myogenesis and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Since myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2) proteins are key transcriptional regulators in both systems, we assessed whether MEF2 is a target for GSK3β. Pharmacological inhibition of GSK3β resulted in enhanced MEF2A/D expression and transcriptional activity in skeletal myoblasts and cardiac myocytes. Even though in silico analysis revealed GSK3β consensus (S/T)XXX(S/T) sites on MEF2A, a subsequent in vitro kinase assay revealed that MEF2A is only a weak substrate. However, we did observe a posttranslational modification in MEF2A in skeletal myoblasts treated with a GSK3β inhibitor which coincided with increased p38MAPK phosphorylation, a potent MEF2A activator, indicating that GSK3β inhibition may de-repress p38MAPK. Heart specific excision of GSK3β in mice also resulted in up-regulation of p38MAPK activity. Interestingly, upon pharmacological p38MAPK inhibition (SB203580), GSK3β inhibition loses its effect on MEF2 transcriptional activity suggesting potent cross-talk between the two pathways. Thus we have documented that cross-talk between p38MAPK and GSK3β signaling converges on MEF2 activity having potential consequences for therapeutic modulation of cardiac and skeletal muscle gene expression. PMID:23137781

  6. Non-invasive measurement of brain glycogen by NMR spectroscopy and its application to the study of brain metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Tesfaye, Nolawit; Seaquist, Elizabeth R.; Öz, Gülin

    2011-01-01

    Glycogen is the reservoir for glucose in the brain. Beyond the general agreement that glycogen serves as an energy source in the central nervous system, its exact role in brain energy metabolism has yet to be elucidated. Experiments performed in cell and tissue culture and animals have shown that glycogen content is affected by several factors including glucose, insulin, neurotransmitters, and neuronal activation. The study of in vivo glycogen metabolism has been hindered by the inability to measure glycogen non-invasively, but in the past several years, the development of a non-invasive localized 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy method has enabled the study of glycogen metabolism in the conscious human. With this technique, 13C-glucose is administered intravenously and its incorporation into and wash-out from brain glycogen is tracked. One application of this method has been to the study of brain glycogen metabolism in humans during hypoglycemia: data have shown that mobilization of brain glycogen is augmented during hypoglycemia and, after a single episode of hypoglycemia, glycogen synthesis rate is increased, suggesting that glycogen stores rebound to levels greater than baseline. Such studies suggest glycogen may serve as a potential energy reservoir in hypoglycemia and may participate in the brain's adaptation to recurrent hypoglycemia and eventual development of hypoglycemia unawareness. Beyond this focused area of study, 13C NMR spectroscopy has a broad potential for application in the study of brain glycogen metabolism and carries the promise of a better understanding of the role of brain glycogen in diabetes and other conditions. PMID:21732401

  7. Structural basis of AMPK regulation by adenine nucleotides and glycogen

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Li, Xiaodan; Wang, Lili; Zhou, X. Edward; Ke, Jiyuan; de Waal, Parker W.; Gu, Xin; Tan, M. H. Eileen; Wang, Dongye; Wu, Donghai; Xu, H. Eric; et al

    2014-11-21

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a central cellular energy sensor and regulator of energy homeostasis, and a promising drug target for the treatment of diabetes, obesity, and cancer. Here we present low-resolution crystal structures of the human α1β2γ1 holo-AMPK complex bound to its allosteric modulators AMP and the glycogen-mimic cyclodextrin, both in the phosphorylated (4.05 Å) and non-phosphorylated (4.60 Å) state. In addition, we have solved a 2.95 Å structure of the human kinase domain (KD) bound to the adjacent autoinhibitory domain (AID) and have performed extensive biochemical and mutational studies. Altogether, these studies illustrate an underlying mechanism of allostericmore » AMPK modulation by AMP and glycogen, whose binding changes the equilibria between alternate AID (AMP) and carbohydrate-binding module (glycogen) interactions.« less

  8. Structural basis of AMPK regulation by adenine nucleotides and glycogen

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaodan; Wang, Lili; Zhou, X Edward; Ke, Jiyuan; de Waal, Parker W; Gu, Xin; Tan, M H Eileen; Wang, Dongye; Wu, Donghai; Xu, H Eric; Melcher, Karsten

    2015-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a central cellular energy sensor and regulator of energy homeostasis, and a promising drug target for the treatment of diabetes, obesity, and cancer. Here we present low-resolution crystal structures of the human α1β2γ1 holo-AMPK complex bound to its allosteric modulators AMP and the glycogen-mimic cyclodextrin, both in the phosphorylated (4.05 Å) and non-phosphorylated (4.60 Å) state. In addition, we have solved a 2.95 Å structure of the human kinase domain (KD) bound to the adjacent autoinhibitory domain (AID) and have performed extensive biochemical and mutational studies. Together, these studies illustrate an underlying mechanism of allosteric AMPK modulation by AMP and glycogen, whose binding changes the equilibria between alternate AID (AMP) and carbohydrate-binding module (glycogen) interactions. PMID:25412657

  9. Structural basis of AMPK regulation by adenine nucleotides and glycogen

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xiaodan; Wang, Lili; Zhou, X. Edward; Ke, Jiyuan; de Waal, Parker W.; Gu, Xin; Tan, M. H. Eileen; Wang, Dongye; Wu, Donghai; Xu, H. Eric; Melcher, Karsten

    2014-11-21

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a central cellular energy sensor and regulator of energy homeostasis, and a promising drug target for the treatment of diabetes, obesity, and cancer. Here we present low-resolution crystal structures of the human α1β2γ1 holo-AMPK complex bound to its allosteric modulators AMP and the glycogen-mimic cyclodextrin, both in the phosphorylated (4.05 Å) and non-phosphorylated (4.60 Å) state. In addition, we have solved a 2.95 Å structure of the human kinase domain (KD) bound to the adjacent autoinhibitory domain (AID) and have performed extensive biochemical and mutational studies. Altogether, these studies illustrate an underlying mechanism of allosteric AMPK modulation by AMP and glycogen, whose binding changes the equilibria between alternate AID (AMP) and carbohydrate-binding module (glycogen) interactions.

  10. Glucagon-like peptide 1: a potent glycogenic hormone.

    PubMed

    Valverde, I; Morales, M; Clemente, F; López-Delgado, M I; Delgado, E; Perea, A; Villanueva-Peñacarrillo, M L

    1994-08-01

    GLP-1(7-36)amide is an insulinotropic peptide derived from the intestinal post-translational proglucagon process, the release of which is increased mainly after a carbohydrate meal; also, its anti-diabetogenic effect in normal and diabetic states has been reported. In this study, GLP-1(7-36)amide stimulates the formation of glycogen from glucose in isolated rat hepatocytes, such a glycogenic effect being achieved with physiological concentrations of the peptide. The GLP-1(7-36)amide-induced glycogenesis is abolished by glucagon, and it is accompanied by stimulation of the glycogen synthase alpha activity and by a decrease in the basal and glucagon-stimulated cyclic AMP content. These findings could explain, at least in part, the GLP-1(7-36)amide insulin-independent plasma glucose lowering effect. PMID:8050588

  11. The susceptibility of muscle phosphorylases a and b to digestion by a neutral proteinase from rat intestinal muscle. Comparison with the effects produced by pancreatic trypsin and chymotrypsin

    PubMed Central

    Carney, Ian T.; Beynon, Robert J.; Kay, John; Birket, Nigel

    1978-01-01

    1. Phosphorylase b was inactivated three times more rapidly than phosphorylase a by a neutral, trypsin-like proteinase from rat intestinal muscle. Digestion of phosphorylase a produced a modified form which was deactivated by AMP. Removal of the pyridoxal phosphate cofactor increased the rate of inactivation of the b form by about 3-fold but the subceptibility of apophosphorylase a was no different from the holo form. 2. The extent of proteolysis of both holoenzyme forms, as guaged by sodium dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis, was limited and similar digestion patterns were obtained in both cases. 3. With 32P-labelled phosphorylase a as substrate, the initial event in the inactivation was the release of a trichloroacetic acid-soluble peptide from the N-terminus of the enzyme, leaving the original 100000 subunit form essentially unchanged. Subsequent proteolysis was restricted, producing derivatives of mol.wt. 85000, 70000 and 65000, none of which contained any radioactive label. 4. By treatment of inactivated phosphorylase b with carboxypeptidase B, it was shown that the intestinal muscle proteinase had cleaved approximately 3 -Lys-X and 3 -Arg-X bonds in the polypeptide. 5. The protective effects of various allosteric modulators of phosphorylase on the inactivation of the a and b forms were generally in agreement with the known roles of the modifiers. Glucose increased the susceptibility of phosphorylase a. 6. Inactivation of phosphorylase b by trypsin and chymotrypsin also resulted in limited proteolysis but, in both cases, the digestion patterns obtained on sodium dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide gels were different from each other and from the pattern obtained with the intestinal muscle proteinase. 7. Inactivation of phosphorylase b by the muscle proteinase is about 100 times more rapid than the effects produced by trypsin or chymotrypsin when the activities are compared on an equimolar basis. 8. Consideration is given to regulation of the rate

  12. Surface Induced Dissociation Yields Quaternary Substructure of Refractory Noncovalent Phosphorylase B and Glutamate Dehydrogenase Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xin; Zhou, Mowei; Wysocki, Vicki H.

    2014-03-01

    Ion mobility (IM) and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) coupled with native MS are useful for studying noncovalent protein complexes. Collision induced dissociation (CID) is the most common MS/MS dissociation method. However, some protein complexes, including glycogen phosphorylase B kinase (PHB) and L-glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) examined in this study, are resistant to dissociation by CID at the maximum collision energy available in the instrument. Surface induced dissociation (SID) was applied to dissociate the two refractory protein complexes. Different charge state precursor ions of the two complexes were examined by CID and SID. The PHB dimer was successfully dissociated to monomers and the GDH hexamer formed trimeric subcomplexes that are informative of its quaternary structure. The unfolding of the precursor and the percentages of the distinct products suggest that the dissociation pathways vary for different charge states. The precursors at lower charge states (+21 for PHB dimer and +27 for GDH hexamer) produce a higher percentage of folded fragments and dissociate more symmetrically than the precusors at higher charge states (+29 for PHB dimer and +39 for GDH hexamer). The precursors at lower charge state may be more native-like than the higher charge state because a higher percentage of folded fragments and a lower percentage of highly charged unfolded fragments are detected. The combination of SID and charge reduction is shown to be a powerful tool for quaternary structure analysis of refractory noncovalent protein complexes, as illustrated by the data for PHB dimer and GDH hexamer.

  13. Glycogen is a preferred glutamate precursor during learning in 1-day-old chick: biochemical and behavioral evidence.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, Marie E; Lloyd, Hilary G E; Santa, Thomas; Hertz, Leif

    2007-11-15

    Bead discrimination training in chicks sets in motion a tightly timed series of biochemical events, including glutamate release, increase in forebrain level of glutamate and utilization of glycogen and glucose. Inhibition of glycogen breakdown by the glycogen phosphorylase inhibitor 1,4-dideoxy-1,4-imino-D-arabinitol (DAB) around the time of training abolishes the increase in glutamate 5 min posttraining in the left hemisphere, in spite of uninhibited glucose metabolism. It also reduces the contents of glutamate, glutamine, and aspartate in the right hemisphere. Behavioral evidence supports the conclusion that glucose breakdown serves to provide energy, whereas glycogen acts as a substrate for glutamate, glutamine, and aspartate formation, requiring both pyruvate dehydrogenation to acetyl coenzyme A and pyruvate carboxylation in astrocytes. Inhibition of memory consolidation caused by DAB or 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG), an inhibitor of glucose phosphorylation without effect on glycogen metabolism, was challenged by intracerebral administration of acetate, aspartate, glutamine, lactate or glucose. DAB-mediated memory inhibition was successfully challenged by administration at 0 or 20 min posttraining of acetate (an astrocyte-specific acetyl CoA precursor) together with aspartate, substituting for pyruvate carboxylation, or of glutamine at 0-2.5 or 30 min posttraining. 2-DG-mediated memory impairment was not challenged by acetate with or without aspartate at 0 time but was challenged by acetate without aspartate at 20 min. Lactate, a substrate for both dehydrogenation and pyruvate carboxylation challenged both DAB and 2-DG. Doses of DAB and 2-DG which, on their own were subeffective, were not additive, further supporting the existence of one pathway using glucose and another using glycogen. PMID:17455305

  14. A Novel GDP-d-glucose Phosphorylase Involved in Quality Control of the Nucleoside Diphosphate Sugar Pool in Caenorhabditis elegans and Mammals*

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Lital N.; Gomez, Tara A.; Clarke, Steven G.; Linster, Carole L.

    2011-01-01

    The plant VTC2 gene encodes GDP-l-galactose phosphorylase, a rate-limiting enzyme in plant vitamin C biosynthesis. Genes encoding apparent orthologs of VTC2 exist in both mammals, which produce vitamin C by a distinct metabolic pathway, and in the nematode worm Caenorhabditis elegans where vitamin C biosynthesis has not been demonstrated. We have now expressed cDNAs of the human and worm VTC2 homolog genes (C15orf58 and C10F3.4, respectively) and found that the purified proteins also display GDP-hexose phosphorylase activity. However, as opposed to the plant enzyme, the major reaction catalyzed by these enzymes is the phosphorolysis of GDP-d-glucose to GDP and d-glucose 1-phosphate. We detected activities with similar substrate specificity in worm and mouse tissue extracts. The highest expression of GDP-d-glucose phosphorylase was found in the nervous and male reproductive systems. A C. elegans C10F3.4 deletion strain was found to totally lack GDP-d-glucose phosphorylase activity; this activity was also found to be decreased in human HEK293T cells transfected with siRNAs against the human C15orf58 gene. These observations confirm the identification of the worm C10F3.4 and the human C15orf58 gene expression products as the GDP-d-glucose phosphorylases of these organisms. Significantly, we found an accumulation of GDP-d-glucose in the C10F3.4 mutant worms, suggesting that the GDP-d-glucose phosphorylase may function to remove GDP-d-glucose formed by GDP-d-mannose pyrophosphorylase, an enzyme that has previously been shown to lack specificity for its physiological d-mannose 1-phosphate substrate. We propose that such removal may prevent the misincorporation of glucosyl residues for mannosyl residues into the glycoconjugates of worms and mammals. PMID:21507950

  15. Hydrodynamic properties of 2-mercaptoethanol-modified glycogen.

    PubMed

    Geddes, R; Harvey, J D; Wills, P R

    1977-12-01

    Treatment of glycogen with 2-mercaptoethanol and iodoacetamide gives rise to a modified glycogen which resembles the original glycogen in its hydrodynamic behaviour but has a pronounced tendency to aggregate. The modified glycogen can be distinguished easily, by its diffusion coefficient, from glycogen degraded by more traditional methods of extraction. The 'fundamental' glycogen particle appears to be composed of two or three glycogen beta-particles linked by a single protein chain. PMID:598377

  16. Revisiting Glycogen Content in the Human Brain.

    PubMed

    Öz, Gülin; DiNuzzo, Mauro; Kumar, Anjali; Moheet, Amir; Seaquist, Elizabeth R

    2015-12-01

    Glycogen provides an important glucose reservoir in the brain since the concentration of glucosyl units stored in glycogen is several fold higher than free glucose available in brain tissue. We have previously reported 3-4 µmol/g brain glycogen content using in vivo (13)C magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) in conjunction with [1-(13)C]glucose administration in healthy humans, while higher levels were reported in the rodent brain. Due to the slow turnover of bulk brain glycogen in humans, complete turnover of the glycogen pool, estimated to take 3-5 days, was not observed in these prior studies. In an attempt to reach complete turnover and thereby steady state (13)C labeling in glycogen, here we administered [1-(13)C]glucose to healthy volunteers for 80 h. To eliminate any net glycogen synthesis during this period and thereby achieve an accurate estimate of glycogen concentration, volunteers were maintained at euglycemic blood glucose levels during [1-(13)C]glucose administration and (13)C-glycogen levels in the occipital lobe were measured by (13)C MRS approximately every 12 h. Finally, we fitted the data with a biophysical model that was recently developed to take into account the tiered structure of the glycogen molecule and additionally incorporated blood glucose levels and isotopic enrichments as input function in the model. We obtained excellent fits of the model to the (13)C-glycogen data, and glycogen content in the healthy human brain tissue was found to be 7.8 ± 0.3 µmol/g, a value substantially higher than previous estimates of glycogen content in the human brain. PMID:26202425

  17. A novel thymidine phosphorylase mutation in a Spanish MNGIE patient.

    PubMed

    Gamez, Josep; Lara, Maria Carmen; Mearin, Fermin; Oliveras-Ley, Carlos; Raguer, Nuria; Olive, Montse; Leist, Andres T; Perello, Antonia; Perona, Monica; Cervera, Carlos; Andreu, Antonio Luis; Martí, Ramon; Hirano, Michio

    2005-01-15

    A 29-year-old Spanish man presented with chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction, progressive external ophthalmoplegia, peripheral neuropathy, and diffuse leukoencephalopathy. This combination of clinical features is characteristic of mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy (MNGIE). Genetic analysis revealed a novel 18-base pair (bp) duplication (5044-5061 dup) in exon 8 of the thymidine phosphorylase (TP) gene. The mutation is predicted to produce a 6 amino acid insertion in the alpha-beta-domain of the protein. This 18-bp insertion in the thymidine phosphorylase gene is the first duplication mutation identified in MNGIE. PMID:15607208

  18. Effect of endurance exercise training on muscle glycogen supercompensation in rats.

    PubMed

    Nakatani, A; Han, D H; Hansen, P A; Nolte, L A; Host, H H; Hickner, R C; Holloszy, J O

    1997-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that the rate and extent of glycogen supercompensation in skeletal muscle are increased by endurance exercise training. Rats were trained by using a 5-wk-long swimming program in which the duration of swimming was gradually increased to 6 h/day over 3 wk and then maintained at 6 h/day for an additional 2 wk. Glycogen repletion was measured in trained and untrained rats after a glycogen-depleting bout of exercise. The rats were given a rodent chow diet plus 5% sucrose in their drinking water and libitum during the recovery period. There were remarkable differences in both the rates of glycogen accumulation and the glycogen concentrations attained in the two groups. The concentration of glycogen in epitrochlearis muscle averaged 13.1 +/- 0.9 mg/g wet wt in the untrained group and 31.7 +/- 2.7 mg/g in the trained group (P < 0.001) 24 h after the exercise. This difference could not be explained by a training effect on glycogen synthase. The training induced approximately 50% increases in muscle GLUT-4 glucose transporter protein and in hexokinase activity in epitrochlearis muscles. We conclude that endurance exercise training results in increases in both the rate and magnitude of muscle glycogen supercompensation in rats. PMID:9049757

  19. Postexercise muscle glycogen resynthesis in obese insulin-resistant Zucker rats.

    PubMed

    Bruce, C R; Lee, J S; Hawley, J A

    2001-10-01

    We determined the effect of an acute bout of swimming (8 x 30 min) followed by either carbohydrate administration (0.5 mg/g glucose ip and ad libitum access to chow; CHO) or fasting (Fast) on postexercise glycogen resynthesis in soleus muscle and liver from female lean (ZL) and obese insulin-resistant (ZO) Zucker rats. Resting soleus muscle glycogen concentration ([glycogen]) was similar between genotypes and was reduced by 73 (ZL) and 63% (ZO) after exercise (P < 0.05). Liver [glycogen] at rest was greater in ZO than ZL (334 +/- 31 vs. 247 +/- 16 micromol/g wet wt; P < 0.01) and fell by 44 and 94% after exercise (P < 0.05). The fractional activity of glycogen synthase (active/total) increased immediately after exercise (from 0.22 +/- 0.05 and 0.32 +/- 0.04 to 0.63 +/- 0.08 vs. 0.57 +/- 0.05; P < 0.01 for ZL and ZO rats, respectively) and remained elevated above resting values after 30 min of recovery. During this time, muscle [glycogen] in ZO increased 68% with CHO (P < 0.05) but did not change in Fast. Muscle [glycogen] was unchanged in ZL from postexercise values after both treatments. After 6 h recovery, GLUT-4 protein concentration was increased above resting levels by a similar extent for both genotypes in both fasted (approximately 45%) and CHO-supplemented (approximately 115%) rats. Accordingly, during this time CHO refeeding resulted in supercompensation in both genotypes (68% vs. 44% for ZL and ZO). With CHO, liver [glycogen] was restored to resting levels in ZL but remained at postexercise values for ZO after both treatments. We conclude that the increased glucose availability with carbohydrate refeeding after glycogen-depleting exercise resulted in glycogen supercompensation, even in the face of muscle insulin-resistance. PMID:11568131

  20. Potassium ion-dependent trehalose phosphorylase from halophilic Bacillus selenitireducens MLS10.

    PubMed

    Nihira, Takanori; Saito, Yuka; Chiku, Kazuhiro; Kitaoka, Motomitsu; Ohtsubo, Ken'ichi; Nakai, Hiroyuki

    2013-11-01

    We discovered a potassium ion-dependent trehalose phosphorylase (Bsel_1207) belonging to glycoside hydrolase family 65 from halophilic Bacillus selenitireducens MLS10. Under high potassium ion concentrations, the recombinant Bsel_1207 produced in Escherichia coli existed as an active dimeric form that catalyzed the reversible phosphorolysis of trehalose in a typical sequential bi bi mechanism releasing β-D-glucose 1-phosphate and D-glucose. Decreasing potassium ion concentrations significantly reduced thermal and pH stabilities, leading to formation of inactive monomeric Bsel_1207. PMID:24021648

  1. Studies in tissue glycogen in acute stress.

    PubMed

    De, A K; Dey, C; Debnath, P K

    1978-01-01

    The glycogen was estimated in liver, cardiac and skeletal muscles during the recovery period after electro-shock. The supercompensation in the level of glycogen was observed in cardiac and skeletal muscles at 1 1/2 and 5 hrs respectively during the recovery period, after electro-shock. The liver glycogen level was lower than the control value after electro-shock at least upto 5 hrs of recovery period. Further, the glycogen level was observed to be minimum when the ventricular glycogen showed its supercompensation at 1 1/2 hr of recovery period. The glycogen level of those three tissues returned to control level after 24 hrs of electro-shock. PMID:567192

  2. Structural basis of the substrate specificity of Bacillus cereus adenosine phosphorylase

    SciTech Connect

    Dessanti, Paola; Zhang, Yang; Allegrini, Simone; Tozzi, Maria Grazia; Sgarrella, Francesco; Ealick, Steven E.

    2012-03-01

    Adenosine phosphorylase from B. cereus shows a strong preference for adenosine over other 6-oxopurine nucleosides. Mutation of Asp204 to asparagine reduces the efficiency of adenosine cleavage but does not affect inosine cleavage, effectively reversing the substrate specificity. The structures of D204N complexes explain these observations. Purine nucleoside phosphorylases catalyze the phosphorolytic cleavage of the glycosidic bond of purine (2′-deoxy)nucleosides, generating the corresponding free base and (2′-deoxy)ribose 1-phosphate. Two classes of PNPs have been identified: homotrimers specific for 6-oxopurines and homohexamers that accept both 6-oxopurines and 6-aminopurines. Bacillus cereus adenosine phosphorylase (AdoP) is a hexameric PNP; however, it is highly specific for 6-aminopurines. To investigate the structural basis for the unique substrate specificity of AdoP, the active-site mutant D204N was prepared and kinetically characterized and the structures of the wild-type protein and the D204N mutant complexed with adenosine and sulfate or with inosine and sulfate were determined at high resolution (1.2–1.4 Å). AdoP interacts directly with the preferred substrate through a hydrogen-bond donation from the catalytically important residue Asp204 to N7 of the purine base. Comparison with Escherichia coli PNP revealed a more optimal orientation of Asp204 towards N7 of adenosine and a more closed active site. When inosine is bound, two water molecules are interposed between Asp204 and the N7 and O6 atoms of the nucleoside, thus allowing the enzyme to find alternative but less efficient ways to stabilize the transition state. The mutation of Asp204 to asparagine led to a significant decrease in catalytic efficiency for adenosine without affecting the efficiency of inosine cleavage.

  3. Transition State Analysis of Thymidine Hydrolysis by Human Thymidine Phosphorylase*

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Phillip A.; Vetticatt, Mathew; Schramm, Vern L.

    2010-01-01

    Human thymidine phosphorylase (hTP) is responsible for thymidine (dT) homeostasis and its action promotes angiogenesis. In the absence of phosphate, hTP catalyzes a slow hydrolytic depyrimidination of dT yielding thymine and 2-deoxyribose (dRib). Its transition state was characterized using multiple kinetic isotope effect (KIE) measurements. Isotopically enriched thymidines were synthesized enzymatically from glucose or (deoxy)ribose and intrinsic KIEs were used to interpret the transition state structure. KIEs from [1′-14C]-, [1-15N]-, [1′-3H]-, [2′R-3H]-, [2′S-3H]-, [4′-3H]-, [5′-3H]dTs provided values of 1.033 ± 0.002, 1.004 ± 0.002, 1.325 ± 0.003, 1.101 ± 0.004, 1.087 ± 0.005, 1.040 ± 0.003, and 1.033 ± 0.003, respectively. Transition state analysis revealed a stepwise mechanism with a 2-deoxyribocation formed early and a higher energetic barrier for nucleophilic attack of a water molecule on the high energy intermediate. An equilibrium exists between the deoxyribocation and reactants prior to the irreversible nucleophilic attack by water. The results establish activation of the thymine leaving group without requirement for phosphate. A transition state constrained to match the intrinsic KIEs was found using density functional theory. An active site histidine (His116) is implicated as the catalytic base for activation of the water nucleophile at the rate-limiting transition state. The distance between the water nucleophile and the anomeric carbon (rC-O) is predicted to be 2.3 Å at the transition state. The transition state model predicts that deoxyribose adopts a mild 3′-endo confirmation during nucleophilic capture. These results differ from the concerted bimolecular mechanism reported for the arsenolytic reaction PMID:20804144

  4. Structural determinants of the 5'-methylthioinosine specificity of Plasmodium purine nucleoside phosphorylase.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, Teraya M; Ting, Li-Min; Zhan, Chenyang; Shi, Wuxian; Zheng, Renjian; Almo, Steven C; Kim, Kami

    2014-01-01

    Plasmodium parasites rely upon purine salvage for survival. Plasmodium purine nucleoside phosphorylase is part of the streamlined Plasmodium purine salvage pathway that leads to the phosphorylysis of both purines and 5'-methylthiopurines, byproducts of polyamine synthesis. We have explored structural features in Plasmodium falciparum purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PfPNP) that affect efficiency of catalysis as well as those that make it suitable for dual specificity. We used site directed mutagenesis to identify residues critical for PfPNP catalytic activity as well as critical residues within a hydrophobic pocket required for accommodation of the 5'-methylthio group. Kinetic analysis data shows that several mutants had disrupted binding of the 5'-methylthio group while retaining activity for inosine. A triple PfPNP mutant that mimics Toxoplasma gondii PNP had significant loss of 5'-methylthio activity with retention of inosine activity. Crystallographic investigation of the triple mutant PfPNP with Tyr160Phe, Val66Ile, andVal73Ile in complex with the transition state inhibitor immucillin H reveals fewer hydrogen bond interactions for the inhibitor in the hydrophobic pocket. PMID:24416224

  5. Metabolic Crosstalk: Molecular Links Between Glycogen and Lipid Metabolism in Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Binbin; Bridges, Dave; Yang, Yemen; Fisher, Kaleigh; Cheng, Alan; Chang, Louise; Meng, Zhuo-Xian; Lin, Jiandie D.; Downes, Michael; Yu, Ruth T.; Liddle, Christopher; Evans, Ronald M.

    2014-01-01

    Glycogen and lipids are major storage forms of energy that are tightly regulated by hormones and metabolic signals. We demonstrate that feeding mice a high-fat diet (HFD) increases hepatic glycogen due to increased expression of the glycogenic scaffolding protein PTG/R5. PTG promoter activity was increased and glycogen levels were augmented in mice and cells after activation of the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) and its downstream target SREBP1. Deletion of the PTG gene in mice prevented HFD-induced hepatic glycogen accumulation. Of note, PTG deletion also blocked hepatic steatosis in HFD-fed mice and reduced the expression of numerous lipogenic genes. Additionally, PTG deletion reduced fasting glucose and insulin levels in obese mice while improving insulin sensitivity, a result of reduced hepatic glucose output. This metabolic crosstalk was due to decreased mTORC1 and SREBP activity in PTG knockout mice or knockdown cells, suggesting a positive feedback loop in which once accumulated, glycogen stimulates the mTORC1/SREBP1 pathway to shift energy storage to lipogenesis. Together, these data reveal a previously unappreciated broad role for glycogen in the control of energy homeostasis. PMID:24722244

  6. Thymidine Phosphorylase Participates in Platelet Signaling and Promotes Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Gigante, Alba; Perez-Perez, Maria-Jesus; Yue, Hong; Hirano, Michio; McIntyre, Thomas; Silverstein, Roy L

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Platelets contain abundant thymidine phosphorylase (TYMP), which is highly expressed in diseases with high risk of thrombosis, such as atherosclerosis and type II diabetes. Objective Test the hypothesis that TYMP participates in platelet signaling and promotes thrombosis. Methods and Results By using a ferric chloride (FeCl3) induced carotid artery injury thrombosis model, we found time to blood flow cessation was significantly prolonged in Tymp−/− and Tymp+/− mice compared to wild type (WT) mice. Bone marrow transplantation and platelet transfusion studies demonstrated that platelet TYMP was responsible for the antithrombotic phenomenon in the TYMP deficient mice. Collagen-, collagen-related peptide (CRP)-, adenosine diphosphate-and/or thrombin-induced platelet aggregation were significantly attenuated in Tymp+/− and Tymp−/− platelets, and in WT or human platelets pretreated with TYMP inhibitor KIN59. Tymp deficiency also significantly decreased agonist-induced P-select in expression. TYMP contains an N-terminal SH3 domain binding proline-rich motif and forms a complex with the tyrosine kinases Lyn, Fyn and Yes in platelets. TYMP-associated Lyn was inactive in resting platelets, and TYMP trapped and diminished active Lyn after collagen stimulation. Tymp/Lyn double haploinsufficiency diminished the antithrombotic phenotype of Tymp+/− mice. TYMP deletion or inhibition of TYMP with KIN59 dramatically increased PECAM-1 tyrosine phosphorylation and diminished CRP or collagen induced AKT phosphorylation. In vivo administration of KIN59 significantly inhibited FeCl3 induced carotid artery thrombosis without affecting hemostasis. Conclusion TYMP participates in multiple platelet signaling pathways and regulates platelet activation and thrombosis. Targeting TYMP might be a novel anti-platelet and anti-thrombosis therapy. PMID:25287063

  7. Genetics Home Reference: glycogen storage disease type VII

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Conditions glycogen storage disease type VII glycogen storage disease type VII Enable Javascript to view the ... Download PDF Open All Close All Description Glycogen storage disease type VII (GSDVII) is an inherited disorder ...

  8. Natural Progression of Canine Glycogen Storage Disease Type IIIa

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Elizabeth D; Yi, Haiqing; Austin, Stephanie L; Thurberg, Beth L; Young, Sarah P; Fyfe, John C; Kishnani, Priya S; Sun, Baodong

    2016-01-01

    Glycogen storage disease type IIIa (GSD IIIa) is caused by a deficiency of glycogen debranching enzyme activity. Hepatomegaly, muscle degeneration, and hypoglycemia occur in human patients at an early age. Long-term complications include liver cirrhosis, hepatic adenomas, and generalized myopathy. A naturally occurring canine model of GSD IIIa that mimics the human disease has been described, with progressive liver disease and skeletal muscle damage likely due to excess glycogen deposition. In the current study, long-term follow-up of previously described GSD IIIa dogs until 32 mo of age (n = 4) and of family-owned GSD IIIa dogs until 11 to 12 y of age (n = 2) revealed that elevated concentrations of liver and muscle enzyme (AST, ALT, ALP, and creatine phosphokinase) decreased over time, consistent with hepatic cirrhosis and muscle fibrosis. Glycogen deposition in many skeletal muscles; the tongue, diaphragm, and heart; and the phrenic and sciatic nerves occurred also. Furthermore, the urinary biomarker Glc4, which has been described in many types of GSD, was first elevated and then decreased later in life. This urinary biomarker demonstrated a similar trend as AST and ALT in GSD IIIa dogs, indicating that Glc4 might be a less invasive biomarker of hepatocellular disease. Finally, the current study further demonstrates that the canine GSD IIIa model adheres to the clinical course in human patients with this disorder and is an appropriate model for developing novel therapies. PMID:26884409

  9. Purine nucleoside phosphorylase as a cytosolic arsenate reductase.

    PubMed

    Gregus, Zoltán; Németi, Balázs

    2002-11-01

    The findings of the accompanying paper (Németi and Gregus, Toxicol: Sci. 70, 4-12) indicate that the arsenate (AsV) reductase activity of rat liver cytosol is due to an SH enzyme that uses phosphate (or its analogue, arsenate, AsV) and a purine nucleoside (guanosine or inosine) as substrates. Purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) is such an enzyme. It catalyzes the phosphorolytic cleavage of 6-oxopurine nucleosides according to the following scheme: guanosine (or inosine) + phosphate <--> guanine (or hypoxanthine) + ribose-1-phosphate. Therefore, we have tested the hypothesis that PNP is responsible for the thiol- and purine nucleoside-dependent reduction of AsV to AsIII by rat liver cytosol. AsIII formed from AsV was quantified by HPLC-hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry analysis of the deproteinized incubates. The following findings support the conclusion that PNP reduces AsV to AsIII, using AsV instead of phosphate in the reaction above: (1) Specific PNP inhibitors (CI-1000, BCX-1777) at a concentration of 1 microM completely inhibited cytosolic AsV reductase activity. (2) During anion-exchange chromatography of cytosolic proteins, PNP activity perfectly coeluted with the AsV reductase activity, suggesting that both activities belong to the same protein. (3) PNP purified from calf spleen catalyzed reduction of AsV to AsIII in the presence of dithiothreitol (DTT) and a 6-oxopurine nucleoside (guanosine or inosine). (4) AsV reductase activity of purified PNP, like the cytosolic AsV reductase activity, was inhibited by phosphate (a substrate of PNP alternative to AsV), guanine and hypoxanthine (products of PNP favoring the reverse reaction), mercurial thiol reagents (nonspecific inhibitors of PNP), as well as CI-1000 and BCX-1777 (specific PNP inhibitors). Thus, PNP appears to be responsible for the AsV reductase activity of rat liver cytosol in the presence of DTT. Further research should clarify the mechanism and the in vivo significance of PNP

  10. Structural basis of the substrate specificity of Bacillus cereus adenosine phosphorylase

    SciTech Connect

    Dessanti, Paola; Zhang, Yang; Allegrini, Simone; Tozzi, Maria Grazia; Sgarrella, Francesco; Ealick, Steven E.

    2012-10-08

    Purine nucleoside phosphorylases catalyze the phosphorolytic cleavage of the glycosidic bond of purine (2{prime}-deoxy)nucleosides, generating the corresponding free base and (2{prime}-deoxy)ribose 1-phosphate. Two classes of PNPs have been identified: homotrimers specific for 6-oxopurines and homohexamers that accept both 6-oxopurines and 6-aminopurines. Bacillus cereus adenosine phosphorylase (AdoP) is a hexameric PNP; however, it is highly specific for 6-aminopurines. To investigate the structural basis for the unique substrate specificity of AdoP, the active-site mutant D204N was prepared and kinetically characterized and the structures of the wild-type protein and the D204N mutant complexed with adenosine and sulfate or with inosine and sulfate were determined at high resolution (1.2-1.4 {angstrom}). AdoP interacts directly with the preferred substrate through a hydrogen-bond donation from the catalytically important residue Asp204 to N7 of the purine base. Comparison with Escherichia coli PNP revealed a more optimal orientation of Asp204 towards N7 of adenosine and a more closed active site. When inosine is bound, two water molecules are interposed between Asp204 and the N7 and O6 atoms of the nucleoside, thus allowing the enzyme to find alternative but less efficient ways to stabilize the transition state. The mutation of Asp204 to asparagine led to a significant decrease in catalytic efficiency for adenosine without affecting the efficiency of inosine cleavage.

  11. Structural basis for the mechanism of inhibition of uridine phosphorylase from Salmonella typhimurium

    SciTech Connect

    Lashkov, A. A.; Zhukhlistova, N. E.; Sotnichenko, S. E.; Gabdulkhakov, A. G.; Mikhailov, A. M.

    2010-01-15

    The three-dimensional structures of three complexes of Salmonella typhimurium uridine phosphorylase with the inhibitor 2,2'-anhydrouridine, the substrate PO{sub 4}, and with both the inhibitor 2,2'-anhydrouridine and the substrate PO{sub 4} (a binary complex) were studied in detail by X-ray diffraction. The structures of the complexes were refined at 2.38, 1.5, and 1.75 A resolution, respectively. Changes in the three-dimensional structure of the subunits in different crystal structures are considered depending on the presence or absence of the inhibitor molecule and (or) the phosphate ion in the active site of the enzyme. The presence of the phosphate ion in the phosphate-binding site was found to substantially change the orientations of the side chains of the amino-acid residues Arg30, Arg91, and Arg48 coordinated to this ion. A comparison showed that the highly flexible loop L9 is unstable. The atomic coordinates of the refined structures of the complexes and the corresponding structure factors were deposited in the Protein Data Bank (their PDB ID codes are 3DD0 and 3C74). The experimental data on the spatial reorganization of the active site caused by changes in its functional state from the unligated to the completely inhibited state suggest the structural basis for the mechanism of inhibition of Salmonella typhimurium uridine phosphorylase.

  12. [Nervous regulation of glycogen concentration and the lactate dehydrogenase isoenzyme spectrum in the diaphragm of rats].

    PubMed

    Iakovlev, V F

    1981-01-01

    Content of glycogen, activity of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and its isoenzyme spectrum were studied in two cases of partial diaphragm denervation as well as in electro-stimulation of separate phrenic nerve branches. Dissimilar postdenervational alterations were observed in the content of glycogen and in the isozyme spectrum of LDH, which depended on the type of partial denervation. Stimulation of individual branches of the phrenic nerve showed that they separately affected the synthesis and consumption of glycogen. The data obtained suggest the nervous regulation of glycogensynthetic processes in muscle tissue. PMID:7467206

  13. Dysfunctional Glycogen Storage in a Mouse Model of α1-Antitrypsin Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Hubner, Ralf H.; Leopold, Philip L.; Kiuru, Maija; De, Bishnu P.; Krause, Anja; Crystal, Ronald G.

    2009-01-01

    Autophagy is an intracellular pathway that contributes to the degradation and recycling of unfolded proteins. Based on the knowledge that autophagy affects glycogen metabolism and that α1-antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency is associated with an autophagic response in the liver, we hypothesized that the conformational abnormalities of the Z-AAT protein interfere with hepatocyte glycogen storage and/or metabolism. Compared with wild-type mice (WT), the Z-AAT mice had lower liver glycogen stores (P < 0.001) and abnormal activities of glycogen-related enzymes, including acid α-glucosidase (P < 0.05) and the total glycogen synthase (P < 0.05). As metabolic consequences, PiZ mice demonstrated lower blood glucose levels (P < 0.05), lower body weights (P < 0.001), and lower fat pad weights (P < 0.001) compared with WT. After the stress of fasting or partial hepatectomy, PiZ mice had further reduced liver glycogen and lower blood glucose levels (both P < 0.05 compared WT). Finally, PiZ mice exhibited decreased survival after partial hepatectomy (P < 0.01 compared with WT), but this was normalized with postoperative dextrose supplementation. In conclusion, these observations are consistent with the general concept that abnormal protein conformation and degradation affects other cellular functions, suggesting that diseases in the liver might benefit from metabolic compensation if glycogen metabolism is affected. PMID:18688041

  14. Structural insights into the novel diadenosine 5',5‴-P¹,P⁴-tetraphosphate phosphorylase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv.

    PubMed

    Mori, Shigetarou; Shibayama, Keigo; Wachino, Jun-Ichi; Arakawa, Yoshichika

    2011-07-01

    Rv2613c is a diadenosine 5',5‴-P(1),P(4)-tetraphosphate (Ap(4)A) phosphorylase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv. Sequence analysis suggests that Rv2613c belongs to the histidine triad (HIT) motif superfamily, which includes HIT family diadenosine polyphosphate (Ap(n)A) hydrolases and Ap(4)A phosphorylases. However, the amino acid sequence of Rv2613c is more similar to that of HIT family Ap(n)A hydrolases than to that of typical Ap(4)A phosphorylases. Here, we report the crystal structure of Rv2613c, which is the first structure of a protein with Ap(n)A phosphorylase activity, and characterized the structural basis of its catalytic activity. Our results showed that the structure of Rv2613c is similar to those of other HIT superfamily proteins. However, Asn139, Gly146, and Ser147 in the active site of Rv2613c replace the corresponding Gln, Gln, and Thr residues that are normally found in HIT family Ap(n)A hydrolases. Furthermore, analyses of Rv2613c mutants revealed that Asn139, Gly146, and Ser147 are important active-site residues and that Asn139 has a critical role in catalysis. The position of Gly146 might influence the phosphorylase activity. In addition, the tetrameric structure of Rv2613c and the presence of Trp160 might be essential for the formation of the Ap(4)A binding site. These structural insights into Rv2613c may facilitate the development of novel structure-based inhibitors for treating tuberculosis. PMID:21565198

  15. Brain glycogen supercompensation following exhaustive exercise.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Takashi; Ishikawa, Taro; Ito, Hitoshi; Okamoto, Masahiro; Inoue, Koshiro; Lee, Min-Chul; Fujikawa, Takahiko; Ichitani, Yukio; Kawanaka, Kentaro; Soya, Hideaki

    2012-02-01

    Brain glycogen localized in astrocytes, a critical energy source for neurons, decreases during prolonged exhaustive exercise with hypoglycaemia. However, it is uncertain whether exhaustive exercise induces glycogen supercompensation in the brain as in skeletal muscle. To explore this question, we exercised adult male rats to exhaustion at moderate intensity (20 m min(-1)) by treadmill, and quantified glycogen levels in several brain loci and skeletal muscles using a high-power (10 kW) microwave irradiation method as a gold standard. Skeletal muscle glycogen was depleted by 82-90% with exhaustive exercise, and supercompensated by 43-46% at 24 h after exercise. Brain glycogen levels decreased by 50-64% with exhaustive exercise, and supercompensated by 29-63% (whole brain 46%, cortex 60%, hippocampus 33%, hypothalamus 29%, cerebellum 63% and brainstem 49%) at 6 h after exercise. The brain glycogen supercompensation rates after exercise positively correlated with their decrease rates during exercise. We also observed that cortical and hippocampal glycogen supercompensation were sustained until 24 h after exercise (long-lasting supercompensation), and their basal glycogen levels increased with 4 weeks of exercise training (60 min day(-1) at 20 m min(-1)). These results support the hypothesis that, like the effect in skeletal muscles, glycogen supercompensation also occurs in the brain following exhaustive exercise, and the extent of supercompensation is dependent on that of glycogen decrease during exercise across brain regions. However, supercompensation in the brain preceded that of skeletal muscles. Further, the long-lasting supercompensation of the cortex and hippocampus is probably a prerequisite for their training adaptation (increased basal levels), probably to meet the increased energy demands of the brain in exercising animals. PMID:22063629

  16. Three-dimensional structure of thymidine phosphorylase from E. coli in complex with 3'-azido-2'-fluoro-2',3'-dideoxyuridine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timofeev, V. I.; Abramchik, Yu. A.; Fateev, I. V.; Zhukhlistova, N. E.; Murav'eva, T. I.; Kuranova, I. P.; Esipov, R. S.

    2013-11-01

    The three-dimensional structures of thymidine phosphorylase from E. coli containing the bound sulfate ion in the phosphate-binding site and of the complex of thymidine phosphorylase with sulfate in the phosphate-binding site and the inhibitor 3'-azido-2'-fluoro-2',3'-dideoxyuridine (N3F-ddU) in the nucleoside-binding site were determined at 1.55 and 1.50 Å resolution, respectively. The amino-acid residues involved in the ligand binding and the hydrogen-bond network in the active site occupied by a large number of bound water molecules are described. A comparison of the structure of thymidine phosphorylase in complex with N3F-ddU with the structure of pyrimidine nucleoside phosphorylase from St. Aureus in complex with the natural substrate thymidine (PDB_ID: 3H5Q) shows that the substrate and the inhibitor in the nucleoside-binding pocket have different orientations. It is suggested that the position of N3F-ddU can be influenced by the presence of the azido group, which prefers a hydrophobic environment. In both structures, the active sites of the subunits are in the open conformation.

  17. Purification and characterization of purine nucleoside phosphorylase from developing embryos of Hyalomma dromedarii.

    PubMed

    Kamel, M Y; Fahmy, A S; Ghazy, A H; Mohamed, M A

    1991-04-01

    Purine nucleoside phosphorylase from Hyalomma dromedarii, the camel tick, was purified to apparent homogeneity. A molecular weight of 56,000 - 58,000 was estimated for both the native and denatured enzyme, suggesting that the enzyme is monomeric. Unlike purine nucleoside phosphorylase preparations from other tissues, the H. dromedarii enzyme was unstable in the presence of beta-mercaptoethanol. The enzyme had a sharp pH optimum at pH 6.5. It catalyzed the phosphorolysis and arsenolysis of ribo- and deoxyribo-nucleosides of hypoxanthine and guanine, but not of adenine or pyrimidine nucleosides. The Km values of the enzyme at the optimal pH for inosine, deoxyinosine, guanosine, and deoxyguanosine were 0.31, 0.67, 0.55, and 0.33 mM, respectively. Inactivation and kinetic studies suggested that histidine and cysteine residues were essential for activity. The pKa values determined for catalytic ionizable groups were 6-7 and 8-9. The enzyme was completely inactivated by thiol reagents and reactivated by excess beta-mercaptoethanol. The enzyme was also susceptible to pH-dependent photooxidation in the presence of methylene blue, implicating histidine. Initial velocity studies showed an intersecting pattern of double-reciprocal plots of the data, consistent with a sequential mechanism. PMID:1905141

  18. Postexercise glucose uptake and glycogen synthesis in skeletal muscle from GLUT4-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Ryder, J W; Kawano, Y; Galuska, D; Fahlman, R; Wallberg-Henriksson, H; Charron, M J; Zierath, J R

    1999-12-01

    To determine the role of GLUT4 on postexercise glucose transport and glycogen resynthesis in skeletal muscle, GLUT4-deficient and wild-type mice were studied after a 3 h swim exercise. In wild-type mice, insulin and swimming each increased 2-deoxyglucose uptake by twofold in extensor digitorum longus muscle. In contrast, insulin did not increase 2-deoxyglucose glucose uptake in muscle from GLUT4-null mice. Swimming increased glucose transport twofold in muscle from fed GLUT4-null mice, with no effect noted in fasted GLUT4-null mice. This exercise-associated 2-deoxyglucose glucose uptake was not accompanied by increased cell surface GLUT1 content. Glucose transport in GLUT4-null muscle was increased 1.6-fold over basal levels after electrical stimulation. Contraction-induced glucose transport activity was fourfold greater in wild-type vs. GLUT4-null muscle. Glycogen content in gastrocnemius muscle was similar between wild-type and GLUT4-null mice and was reduced approximately 50% after exercise. After 5 h carbohydrate refeeding, muscle glycogen content was fully restored in wild-type, with no change in GLUT4-null mice. After 24 h carbohydrate refeeding, muscle glycogen in GLUT4-null mice was restored to fed levels. In conclusion, GLUT4 is the major transporter responsible for exercise-induced glucose transport. Also, postexercise glycogen resynthesis in muscle was greatly delayed; unlike wild-type mice, glycogen supercompensation was not found. GLUT4 it is not essential for glycogen repletion since muscle glycogen levels in previously exercised GLUT4-null mice were totally restored after 24 h carbohydrate refeeding.-Ryder, J. W., Kawano, Y., Galuska, D., Fahlman, R., Wallberg-Henriksson, H., Charron, M. J., Zierath, J. R. Postexercise glucose uptake and glycogen synthesis in skeletal muscle from GLUT4-deficient mice. PMID:10593872

  19. Glycogen synthase kinase (GSK) 3β phosphorylates and protects nuclear myosin 1c from proteasome-mediated degradation to activate rDNA transcription in early G1 cells.

    PubMed

    Sarshad, Aishe A; Corcoran, Martin; Al-Muzzaini, Bader; Borgonovo-Brandter, Laura; Von Euler, Anne; Lamont, Douglas; Visa, Neus; Percipalle, Piergiorgio

    2014-06-01

    Nuclear myosin 1c (NM1) mediates RNA polymerase I (pol I) transcription activation and cell cycle progression by facilitating PCAF-mediated H3K9 acetylation, but the molecular mechanism by which NM1 is regulated remains unclear. Here, we report that at early G1 the glycogen synthase kinase (GSK) 3β phosphorylates and stabilizes NM1, allowing for NM1 association with the chromatin. Genomic analysis by ChIP-Seq showed that this mechanism occurs on the rDNA as active GSK3β selectively occupies the gene. ChIP assays and transmission electron microscopy in GSK3β-/- mouse embryonic fibroblasts indicated that at G1 rRNA synthesis is suppressed due to decreased H3K9 acetylation leading to a chromatin state incompatible with transcription. We found that GSK3β directly phosphorylates the endogenous NM1 on a single serine residue (Ser-1020) located within the NM1 C-terminus. In G1 this phosphorylation event stabilizes NM1 and prevents NM1 polyubiquitination by the E3 ligase UBR5 and proteasome-mediated degradation. We conclude that GSK3β-mediated phosphorylation of NM1 is required for pol I transcription activation. PMID:24901984

  20. Biochemical Titration of Glycogen In vitro

    PubMed Central

    Pelletier, Joffrey; Bellot, Grégory; Pouysségur, Jacques; Mazure, Nathalie M.

    2013-01-01

    Glycogen is the main energetic polymer of glucose in vertebrate animals and plays a crucial role in whole body metabolism as well as in cellular metabolism. Many methods to detect glycogen already exist but only a few are quantitative. We describe here a method using the Abcam Glycogen assay kit, which is based on specific degradation of glycogen to glucose by glucoamylase. Glucose is then specifically oxidized to a product that reacts with the OxiRed probe to produce fluorescence. Titration is accurate, sensitive and can be achieved on cell extracts or tissue sections. However, in contrast to other techniques, it does not give information about the distribution of glycogen in the cell. As an example of this technique, we describe here the titration of glycogen in two cell lines, Chinese hamster lung fibroblast CCL39 and human colon carcinoma LS174, incubated in normoxia (21% O2) versus hypoxia (1% O2). We hypothesized that hypoxia is a signal that prepares cells to synthesize and store glycogen in order to survive1. PMID:24300406

  1. Effect of pH on Cleavage of Glycogen by Vaginal Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Spear, Greg T.; McKenna, Mary; Landay, Alan L.; Makinde, Hadijat; Hamaker, Bruce; French, Audrey L.; Lee, Byung-Hoo

    2015-01-01

    Glycogen expressed by the lower genital tract epithelium is believed to support Lactobacillus growth in vivo, although most genital isolates of Lactobacillus are not able to use glycogen as an energy source in vitro. We recently reported that α-amylase is present in the genital fluid of women and that it breaks down glycogen into small carbohydrates that support growth of lactobacilli. Since the pH of the lower genital tract can be very low, we determined how low pH affects glycogen processing by α-amylase. α-amylase in saliva degraded glycogen similarly at pH 6 and 7, but activity was reduced by 52% at pH 4. The glycogen degrading activity in nine genital samples from seven women showed a similar profile with an average reduction of more than 50% at pH 4. However, two samples collected from one woman at different times had a strikingly different pH profile with increased glycogen degradation at pH 4, 5 and 6 compared to pH 7. This second pH profile did not correlate with levels of human α-acid glucosidase or human intestinal maltase glucoamylase. High-performance anion-exchange chromatography showed that mostly maltose was produced from glycogen by samples with the second pH profile in contrast to genital α-amylase that yielded maltose, maltotriose and maltotetraose. These studies show that at low pH, α-amylase activity is reduced to low but detectable levels, which we speculate helps maintain Lactobacillus growth at a limited but sustained rate. Additionally, some women have a genital enzyme distinct from α-amylase with higher activity at low pH. Further studies are needed to determine the identity and distribution of this second enzyme, and whether its presence influences the makeup of genital microbiota. PMID:26171967

  2. Effect of pH on Cleavage of Glycogen by Vaginal Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Spear, Greg T; McKenna, Mary; Landay, Alan L; Makinde, Hadijat; Hamaker, Bruce; French, Audrey L; Lee, Byung-Hoo

    2015-01-01

    Glycogen expressed by the lower genital tract epithelium is believed to support Lactobacillus growth in vivo, although most genital isolates of Lactobacillus are not able to use glycogen as an energy source in vitro. We recently reported that α-amylase is present in the genital fluid of women and that it breaks down glycogen into small carbohydrates that support growth of lactobacilli. Since the pH of the lower genital tract can be very low, we determined how low pH affects glycogen processing by α-amylase. α-amylase in saliva degraded glycogen similarly at pH 6 and 7, but activity was reduced by 52% at pH 4. The glycogen degrading activity in nine genital samples from seven women showed a similar profile with an average reduction of more than 50% at pH 4. However, two samples collected from one woman at different times had a strikingly different pH profile with increased glycogen degradation at pH 4, 5 and 6 compared to pH 7. This second pH profile did not correlate with levels of human α-acid glucosidase or human intestinal maltase glucoamylase. High-performance anion-exchange chromatography showed that mostly maltose was produced from glycogen by samples with the second pH profile in contrast to genital α-amylase that yielded maltose, maltotriose and maltotetraose. These studies show that at low pH, α-amylase activity is reduced to low but detectable levels, which we speculate helps maintain Lactobacillus growth at a limited but sustained rate. Additionally, some women have a genital enzyme distinct from α-amylase with higher activity at low pH. Further studies are needed to determine the identity and distribution of this second enzyme, and whether its presence influences the makeup of genital microbiota. PMID:26171967

  3. Glycogenic Hepatopathy in Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Atmaca, Murat; Ucler, Rifki; Kartal, Mehmet; Seven, Ismet; Alay, Murat; Bayram, Irfan; Olmez, Sehmus

    2015-01-01

    Glycogenic hepatopathy is a rare cause of high transaminase levels in type 1 diabetes mellitus. This condition, characterized by elevated liver enzymes and hepatomegaly, is caused by irreversible and excessive accumulation of glycogen in hepatocytes. This is a case report on a 19-year-old male case, diagnosed with glycogenic hepatopathy. After the diagnosis was documented by liver biopsy, the case was put on glycemic control which led to significant decline in hepatomegaly and liver enzymes. It was emphasized that, in type 1 diabetes mellitus cases, hepatopathy should also be considered in the differential diagnoses of elevated liver enzyme and hepatomegaly. PMID:26347835

  4. Glycogenic Hepatopathy in Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Atmaca, Murat; Ucler, Rifki; Kartal, Mehmet; Seven, Ismet; Alay, Murat; Bayram, Irfan; Olmez, Sehmus

    2015-01-01

    Glycogenic hepatopathy is a rare cause of high transaminase levels in type 1 diabetes mellitus. This condition, characterized by elevated liver enzymes and hepatomegaly, is caused by irreversible and excessive accumulation of glycogen in hepatocytes. This is a case report on a 19-year-old male case, diagnosed with glycogenic hepatopathy. After the diagnosis was documented by liver biopsy, the case was put on glycemic control which led to significant decline in hepatomegaly and liver enzymes. It was emphasized that, in type 1 diabetes mellitus cases, hepatopathy should also be considered in the differential diagnoses of elevated liver enzyme and hepatomegaly. PMID:26347835

  5. Hit Optimization of 5-Substituted-N-(piperidin-4-ylmethyl)-1H-indazole-3-carboxamides: Potent Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3 (GSK-3) Inhibitors with in Vivo Activity in Model of Mood Disorders.

    PubMed

    Furlotti, Guido; Alisi, Maria Alessandra; Cazzolla, Nicola; Dragone, Patrizia; Durando, Lucia; Magarò, Gabriele; Mancini, Francesca; Mangano, Giorgina; Ombrato, Rosella; Vitiello, Marco; Armirotti, Andrea; Capurro, Valeria; Lanfranco, Massimiliano; Ottonello, Giuliana; Summa, Maria; Reggiani, Angelo

    2015-11-25

    Novel treatments for bipolar disorder with improved efficacy and broader spectrum of activity are urgently needed. Glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK-3β) has been suggested to be a key player in the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder. A series of novel GSK-3β inhibitors having the common N-[(1-alkylpiperidin-4-yl)methyl]-1H-indazole-3-carboxamide scaffold were prepared taking advantage of an X-ray cocrystal structure of compound 5 with GSK-3β. We probed different substitutions at the indazole 5-position and at the piperidine-nitrogen to obtain potent ATP-competitive GSK-3β inhibitors with good cell activity. Among the compounds assessed in the in vivo PK experiments, 14i showed, after i.p. dosing, encouraging plasma PK profile and brain exposure, as well as efficacy in a mouse model of mania. Compound 14i was selected for further in vitro/in vivo pharmacological evaluation, in order to elucidate the use of ATP-competitive GSK-3β inhibitors as new tools in the development of new treatments for mood disorders. PMID:26486317

  6. No effect of glycogen level on glycogen metabolism during high intensity exercise.

    PubMed

    Vandenberghe, K; Hespel, P; Vanden Eynde, B; Lysens, R; Richter, E A

    1995-09-01

    This study examined the effect of glycogen supercompensation on glycogen breakdown, muscle and blood lactate accumulation, blood-pH, and performance during short-term high-intensity exercise. Young healthy volunteers performed two supramaximal (125% of VO2max) exercise tests on a bicycle ergometer, either for 1 min 45 s (protocol 1; N = 18) or to exhaustion (protocol 2; N = 14). The exercise tests were preceded by either 5 d on a controlled normal (N) diet, or by 2 d of glycogen-depleting exercise accompanied by the normal diet followed by 3 d on a carbohydrate-rich (CHR) diet. In protocol 1, preexercise muscle glycogen concentrations were 364 +/- 23 and 568 +/- 35 mumol.g-1 d.w. in the N and CHR condition, respectively (P < 0.05). During the exertion, glycogen concentration in the M. quadriceps decreased to the same extent in both groups. Accordingly, the exercise-induced increases in muscle and blood-lactate, and the fall in blood-pH were similar during N and CHR. In protocol 2, time to exhaustion was identical for N and CHR. It is concluded that during short-term intense exercise during which muscle glycogen availability exceeds glycogen demand, rate of glycogen breakdown, lactate accumulation, and performance are regulated irrespective of the preexercise muscle glycogen level. PMID:8531626

  7. Anti-dengue virus nonstructural protein 1 antibodies cause NO-mediated endothelial cell apoptosis via ceramide-regulated glycogen synthase kinase-3β and NF-κB activation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chia-Ling; Lin, Chiou-Feng; Wan, Shu-Wen; Wei, Li-Shiung; Chen, Mei-Chun; Yeh, Trai-Ming; Liu, Hsiao-Sheng; Anderson, Robert; Lin, Yee-Shin

    2013-08-15

    Immunopathogenetic mechanisms of dengue virus (DENV) infection are involved in hemorrhagic syndrome resulting from thrombocytopenia, coagulopathy, and vasculopathy. We have proposed a mechanism of molecular mimicry in which Abs against DENV nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) cross-react with human endothelial cells and cause NF-κB-regulated immune activation and NO-mediated apoptosis. However, the signaling pathway leading to NF-κB activation after the binding of anti-DENV NS1 Abs to endothelial cells is unresolved. In this study, we found that anti-DENV NS1 Abs caused the formation of lipid raftlike structures, and that disrupting lipid raft formation by methyl-β-cyclodextrin decreased NO production and apoptosis. Treatment with anti-DENV NS1 Abs elevated ceramide generation in lipid rafts. Pharmacological inhibition of acid sphingomyelinase (aSMase) decreased anti-DENV NS1 Ab-mediated ceramide and NO production, as well as apoptosis. Exogenous ceramide treatment induced biogenesis of inducible NO synthase (iNOS)/NO and apoptosis through an NF-κB-regulated manner. Furthermore, activation of glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) was required for ceramide-induced NF-κB activation and iNOS expression. Notably, anti-DENV NS1 Abs caused GSK-3β-mediated NF-κB activation and iNOS expression, which were regulated by aSMase. Moreover, pharmacological inhibition of GSK-3β reduced hepatic endothelial cell apoptosis in mice passively administered anti-DENV NS1 Abs. These results suggest that anti-DENV NS1 Abs bind to the endothelial cell membrane and cause NO production and apoptosis via a mechanism involving the aSMase/ceramide/GSK-3β/NF-κB/iNOS/NO signaling pathway. PMID:23851680

  8. Oligosaccharide Binding in Escherichia coli Glycogen Synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, Fang; Yep, Alejandra; Feng, Lei; Preiss, Jack; Geiger, James H.

    2010-11-17

    Glycogen/starch synthase elongates glucan chains and is the key enzyme in the synthesis of glycogen in bacteria and starch in plants. Cocrystallization of Escherichia coli wild-type glycogen synthase (GS) with substrate ADPGlc and the glucan acceptor mimic HEPPSO produced a closed form of GS and suggests that domain-domain closure accompanies glycogen synthesis. Cocrystallization of the inactive GS mutant E377A with substrate ADPGlc and oligosaccharide results in the first oligosaccharide-bound glycogen synthase structure. Four bound oligosaccharides are observed, one in the interdomain cleft (G6a) and three on the N-terminal domain surface (G6b, G6c, and G6d). Extending from the center of the enzyme to the interdomain cleft opening, G6a mostly interacts with the highly conserved N-terminal domain residues lining the cleft of GS. The surface-bound oligosaccharides G6c and G6d have less interaction with enzyme and exhibit a more curled, helixlike structural arrangement. The observation that oligosaccharides bind only to the N-terminal domain of GS suggests that glycogen in vivo probably binds to only one side of the enzyme to ensure unencumbered interdomain movement, which is required for efficient, continuous glucan-chain synthesis.

  9. Discovery of a Genetic Metabolic Cause for Mauriac Syndrome in Type 1 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Michael J; Hasan, Noaman M; Ansari, Israr-Ul H; Longacre, Melissa J; Kendrick, Mindy A; Stoker, Scott W

    2016-07-01

    A mechanistic cause for Mauriac syndrome, a syndrome of growth failure and delayed puberty associated with massive liver enlargement from glycogen deposition in children with poorly controlled type 1 diabetes, is unknown. We discovered a mutation in the catalytic subunit of liver glycogen phosphorylase kinase in a patient with Mauriac syndrome whose liver extended into his pelvis. Glycogen phosphorylase kinase activates glycogen phosphorylase, the enzyme that catalyzes the first step in glycogen breakdown. We show that the mutant subunit acts in a dominant manner to completely inhibit glycogen phosphorylase kinase enzyme activity and that this interferes with glycogenolysis causing increased levels of glycogen in human liver cells. It is known that even normal blood glucose levels physiologically inhibit glycogen phosphorylase to diminish glucose release from the liver when glycogenolysis is not needed. The patient's mother possessed the same mutant glycogen phosphorylase kinase subunit, but did not have diabetes or hepatomegaly. His father had childhood type 1 diabetes in poor glycemic control, but lacked the mutation and had neither hepatomegaly nor growth failure. This case proves that the effect of a mutant enzyme of glycogen metabolism can combine with hyperglycemia to directly hyperinhibit glycogen phosphorylase, in turn blocking glycogenolysis causing the massive liver in Mauriac disease. PMID:27207549

  10. Characterization of the highly branched glycogen from the thermoacidophilic red microalga Galdieria sulphuraria and comparison with other glycogens.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Garcia, Marta; Stuart, Marc C A; van der Maarel, Marc J E C

    2016-08-01

    The thermoacidophilic red microalga Galdieria sulphuraria synthesizes glycogen when growing under heterotrophic conditions. Structural characterization revealed that G. sulphuraria glycogen is the most highly branched glycogen described to date, with 18% of α-(1→6) linkages. Moreover, it differs from other glycogens because it is composed of short chains only and has a substantially smaller molecular weight and particle size. The physiological role of this highly branched glycogen in G. sulphuraria is discussed. PMID:27107958

  11. Enzymatic Glycosylation of Phenolic Antioxidants: Phosphorylase-Mediated Synthesis and Characterization.

    PubMed

    De Winter, Karel; Dewitte, Griet; Dirks-Hofmeister, Mareike E; De Laet, Sylvie; Pelantová, Helena; Křen, Vladimír; Desmet, Tom

    2015-11-25

    Although numerous biologically active molecules exist as glycosides in nature, information on the activity, stability, and solubility of glycosylated antioxidants is rather limited to date. In this work, a wide variety of antioxidants were glycosylated using different phosphorylase enzymes. The resulting antioxidant library, containing α/β-glucosides, different regioisomers, cellobiosides, and cellotriosides, was then characterized. Glycosylation was found to significantly increase the solubility and stability of all evaluated compounds. Despite decreased radical-scavenging abilities, most glycosides were identified to be potent antioxidants, outperforming the commonly used 2,6-bis(1,1-dimethylethyl)-4-methylphenol (BHT). Moreover, the point of attachment, the anomeric configuration, and the glycosidic chain length were found to influence the properties of these phenolic glycosides. PMID:26540621

  12. Identification of mutations in Type IV glycogen storage disease

    SciTech Connect

    Bao, Y.; Kishnani, P.; Chen, Y.T.

    1994-09-01

    Type IV glycogen storage disease (GSD IV, Andersen disease) is caused by a deficiency of glycogen branching enzyme (GBE) activity, which results in the accumulation of glycogen with unbranched, long, outer chains in the tissues. The molecular basis of the disease is not known. We studied four patients with the disease; three with typical presentation of progressive liver cirrhosis and failure, and one with severe and fatal neonatal hypotonia and cardiomyopathy. Southern blot analysis with EcoRI or MspI did not detect gross DNA rearrangement, deletion or duplication in patients` glycogen branching enzyme genes. Northern analysis with total cellular RNAs isolated from skin fibroblast MI strains of three patients with typical clinical presentation showed a normal level and size (2.95 kb) of GBE mRNA hybridization band in two and absent mRNA hybridization band in the remaining one. The patient with atypical severe neonatal hypotonia demonstrated a less intense and smaller size (2.75 kb) of mRNA hybridization band. A 210 hp deletion from nucleotide sequence 873 to 1082 which causes 70 amino acids missing from amino acid sequence 262 to 331 was detected in all 17 clones sequenced from the fatal hypotonia patient. This deletion is located in the region which is highly conserved between prokaryotic, yeast and human GBE polypeptide sequences, and also includes the first of the four regions which constitute the catalytic active sites of most of amylolytic enzymes. A point mutation C-T (1633) which changes the amino acid from Arginine to Cystine was found in 19 of 20 cDNA clones from a patient with classical clinical presentation. This point mutation was unique to this patient and was not observed in three other patients or normal controls. This is the first report on the molecular basis of GSD IV and our data indicated the presence of extensive genetic heterogeneity in the disease.

  13. Energy Metabolism of the Brain, Including the Cooperation between Astrocytes and Neurons, Especially in the Context of Glycogen Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Falkowska, Anna; Gutowska, Izabela; Goschorska, Marta; Nowacki, Przemysław; Chlubek, Dariusz; Baranowska-Bosiacka, Irena

    2015-01-01

    Glycogen metabolism has important implications for the functioning of the brain, especially the cooperation between astrocytes and neurons. According to various research data, in a glycogen deficiency (for example during hypoglycemia) glycogen supplies are used to generate lactate, which is then transported to neighboring neurons. Likewise, during periods of intense activity of the nervous system, when the energy demand exceeds supply, astrocyte glycogen is immediately converted to lactate, some of which is transported to the neurons. Thus, glycogen from astrocytes functions as a kind of protection against hypoglycemia, ensuring preservation of neuronal function. The neuroprotective effect of lactate during hypoglycemia or cerebral ischemia has been reported in literature. This review goes on to emphasize that while neurons and astrocytes differ in metabolic profile, they interact to form a common metabolic cooperation. PMID:26528968

  14. Energy Metabolism of the Brain, Including the Cooperation between Astrocytes and Neurons, Especially in the Context of Glycogen Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Falkowska, Anna; Gutowska, Izabela; Goschorska, Marta; Nowacki, Przemysław; Chlubek, Dariusz; Baranowska-Bosiacka, Irena

    2015-01-01

    Glycogen metabolism has important implications for the functioning of the brain, especially the cooperation between astrocytes and neurons. According to various research data, in a glycogen deficiency (for example during hypoglycemia) glycogen supplies are used to generate lactate, which is then transported to neighboring neurons. Likewise, during periods of intense activity of the nervous system, when the energy demand exceeds supply, astrocyte glycogen is immediately converted to lactate, some of which is transported to the neurons. Thus, glycogen from astrocytes functions as a kind of protection against hypoglycemia, ensuring preservation of neuronal function. The neuroprotective effect of lactate during hypoglycemia or cerebral ischemia has been reported in literature. This review goes on to emphasize that while neurons and astrocytes differ in metabolic profile, they interact to form a common metabolic cooperation. PMID:26528968

  15. [The regulation of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and glycogen synthase activities by insulin superfamily peptides in myometrium of pregnant women and its impairments under different types of diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Kuznetsova, L A; Chistiakova, O V

    2009-01-01

    The regulatory effects of insulin, insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), and relaxin on glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) and glycogen synthase (GS) activities have been studied in myometrium of pregnant women of control group and with diabetes mellitus of different etiology. In patients with type 1 diabetes G6PDH activity did not differ from the control group, but the enzyme activity was sharply decreased in pregnant women with type 2 diabetes and gestational diabetes. In the control group maximal stimulation of G6PDH activity was observed at 10(-9) M of peptides and their stimulating effect decreased in the following order: insulin > relaxin > IGF-1. In pregnant women with types 1 diabetes insulin effect on the enzyme activity was lower than in the control, and the effects of IGF-1 and relaxin were absent. In the group of pregnant women with type 2 diabetes and gestational diabetes the effects of insulin and IGF-1 were decreased, but the effect of relaxin was somewhat higher thus giving the following order in their efficiency relaxin > IGF-1 = insulin. At 10(-9) M peptides exhibited similar stimulating effects on the active form of GS-I, but had no influence on the total enzyme activity in the control group of pregnant women. In patients with type 1 diabetes GS activity remained unchanged (versus control), and peptides did not stimulate the enzyme activity. In patients with type 2 diabetes a significant decrease in GS activity was accompanied by the decrease in the effect of peptides, giving the following order of their efficiency: insulin = IGF-1 > relaxin. In myometrium of pregnant women with gestational (treated and untreated) diabetes GS activity decreased, the effect of insulin was weaker, whereas the effects of relaxin and IGF-1 increased thus giving the following order of their efficiency: relaxin > IGF-1 > insulin. Insulin therapy of type 1 diabetes incompletely restored sensitivity of the enzymes to the peptide actions. At the same time, in women

  16. Investigation of potential glycogen synthase kinase 3 inhibitors using pharmacophore mapping and virtual screening.

    PubMed

    Dessalew, Nigus; Bharatam, Prasad V

    2006-09-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3 is a serine/threonine kinase that has attracted significant drug discovery attention in recent years. To investigate the identification of new potential glycogen synthase kinase-3 inhibitors, a pharmacophore mapping study was carried out using a set of 21 structurally diverse glycogen synthase kinase-3 inhibitors. A hypothesis containing four features: two hydrophobic, one hydrogen bond donor and another hydrogen bond acceptor was found to be the best from the 10 common feature hypotheses produced by HipHop module of Catalyst. The best hypothesis has a high cost of 156.592 and higher best fit values were obtained for the 21 inhibitors using this best hypothesis than the other HipHop hypotheses. The best hypothesis was then used to screen electronically the NCI2000 database. The hits obtained were docked into glycogen synthase kinase-3beta active site. A total of five novel potential leads were proposed after: (i) visual examination of how well they dock into the glycogen synthase kinase-3beta-binding site, (ii) comparative analysis of their FlexX, G-Score, PMF-Score, ChemScore and D-Scores values, (iii) comparison of their best fit value with the known inhibitors and (iv) examination of the how the hits retain interactions with the important amino acid residues of glycogen synthase kinase-3beta-binding site. PMID:17062013

  17. A glycogene mutation map for discovery of diseases of glycosylation

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Lars; Lind-Thomsen, Allan; Joshi, Hiren J; Pedersen, Nis Borbye; Have, Christian Theil; Kong, Yun; Wang, Shengjun; Sparso, Thomas; Grarup, Niels; Vester-Christensen, Malene Bech; Schjoldager, Katrine; Freeze, Hudson H; Hansen, Torben; Pedersen, Oluf; Henrissat, Bernard; Mandel, Ulla; Clausen, Henrik; Wandall, Hans H; Bennett, Eric P

    2015-01-01

    Glycosylation of proteins and lipids involves over 200 known glycosyltransferases (GTs), and deleterious defects in many of the genes encoding these enzymes cause disorders collectively classified as congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDGs). Most known CDGs are caused by defects in glycogenes that affect glycosylation globally. Many GTs are members of homologous isoenzyme families and deficiencies in individual isoenzymes may not affect glycosylation globally. In line with this, there appears to be an underrepresentation of disease-causing glycogenes among these larger isoenzyme homologous families. However, genome-wide association studies have identified such isoenzyme genes as candidates for different diseases, but validation is not straightforward without biomarkers. Large-scale whole-exome sequencing (WES) provides access to mutations in, for example, GT genes in populations, which can be used to predict and/or analyze functional deleterious mutations. Here, we constructed a draft of a functional mutational map of glycogenes, GlyMAP, from WES of a rather homogenous population of 2000 Danes. We cataloged all missense mutations and used prediction algorithms, manual inspection and in case of carbohydrate-active enzymes family GT27 experimental analysis of mutations to map deleterious mutations. GlyMAP (http://glymap.glycomics.ku.dk) provides a first global view of the genetic stability of the glycogenome and should serve as a tool for discovery of novel CDGs. PMID:25267602

  18. Influence of structural and electronic properties of uranyl derivatives on the inhibition of thymidine phosphorylase

    SciTech Connect

    Dimoglo, A.S.; Bersuker, I.B.; Gorbachev, M.Yu.

    1986-07-01

    The inhibition of enzymes by definite compounds lies at the basis of the mechanism of the action of most drugs. Uracil and its derivatives are effective inhibitors of thymidine phosphorylase and other related enzymes. Cancer cells are especially sensitive to the absence of thymidine. The study of the inhibiting action of uracil derivatives has been conducted previously. In this article, the authors used the hydrophobicity constants of the substituents, directly bonded to the uracil framework in the 1- and 3-positions and the 6-position as well as the constants of ortho- and meta-substituents in benzene rings bonded to uracil in the investigated compounds for the derivation of correlation equations relating the inhibiting activity to the physicochemical parameters. A table is presented of the 142 uracil derivatives taken for logical-structural analysis.

  19. Mass Modulation of Protein Dynamics Associated with Barrier Crossing in Purine Nucleoside Phosphorylase

    PubMed Central

    Antoniou, Dimitri; Ge, Xiaoxia; Schramm, Vern L.; Schwartz, Steven D.

    2012-01-01

    The role of protein dynamics on different time scales in enzyme catalysis remains an area of active debate. The connection between enzyme dynamics on the femtosecond time scale and transition state formation has been demonstrated in human purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) through the study of a mass-altered enzyme. Isotopic substitution in human PNP (heavy PNP) decreased the rate of on-enzyme chemistry but did not alter either the transition state structure or steady-state kinetic parameters. Here we investigate the underlying atomic motions associated with altered barrier crossing probability for heavy PNP. Transition path sampling was employed to illuminate the molecular differences between barrier crossing in light and heavy enzymes. The mass effect is apparent in promoting vibrations that polarize the N-ribosidic bond, and that promote the stability of the purine leaving group. These motions facilitate barrier crossing. PMID:24496053

  20. Evaluation of capillary chromatographic supports for immobilized human purine nucleoside phosphorylase in frontal affinity chromatography studies.

    PubMed

    de Moraes, Marcela Cristina; Temporini, Caterina; Calleri, Enrica; Bruni, Giovanna; Ducati, Rodrigo Gay; Santos, Diógenes Santiago; Cardoso, Carmen Lucia; Cass, Quezia Bezerra; Massolini, Gabriella

    2014-04-18

    The aim of this work was to optimize the preparation of a capillary human purine nucleoside phosphorylase (HsPNP) immobilized enzyme reactor (IMER) for characterization and affinity screening studies of new inhibitors by frontal affinity chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (FAC-MS). For this purpose two monolithic supports, a Chromolith Speed Rod (0.1mm I.D.×5cm) and a methacrylate-based monolithic epoxy polymeric capillary column (0.25mm I.D.×5cm) with epoxy reactive groups were considered and compared to an IMER previously developed using an open fused silica capillary. Each HsPNP-IMER was characterized in terms of catalytic activity using Inosine as standard substrate. Furthermore, they were also explored for affinity ranking experiments. Kd determination was carried out with the based fused silica HsPNP-IMER and the results are herein discussed. PMID:24630982

  1. Structural basis for selective inhibition of purine nucleoside phosphorylase from Schistosoma mansoni: kinetic and structural studies.

    PubMed

    Castilho, Marcelo S; Postigo, Matheus P; Pereira, Humberto M; Oliva, Glaucius; Andricopulo, Adriano D

    2010-02-15

    Selectivity plays a crucial role in the design of enzyme inhibitors as novel antiparasitic agents, particularly in cases where the target enzyme is also present in the human host. Purine nucleoside phosphorylase from Schistosoma mansoni (SmPNP) is an attractive target for the discovery of potential antischistosomal agents. In the present work, kinetic studies were carried out in order to determine the inhibitory potency, mode of action and enzyme selectivity of a series of inhibitors of SmPNP. In addition, crystallographic studies provided important structural insights for rational inhibitor design, revealing consistent structural differences in the binding mode of the inhibitors in the active sites of the SmPNP and human PNP (HsPNP) structures. The molecular information gathered in this work should be useful for future medicinal chemistry efforts in the design of new inhibitors of SmPNP having increased affinity and selectivity. PMID:20129792

  2. Computer-generated Model of Purine Nucleoside Phosphorylase (PNP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Purine Nucleoside Phosphorylase (PNP) is an important target enzyme for the design of anti-cancer and immunosuppressive drugs. Bacterial PNP, which is slightly different from the human enzyme, is used to synthesize chemotherapuautic agents. Knowledge of the three-dimensional structure of the bacterial PNP molecule is useful in efforts to engineer different types of PNP enzymes, that can be used to produce new chemotherapeutic agents. This picture shows a computer model of bacterial PNP, which looks a lot like a display of colorful ribbons. Principal Investigator was Charles Bugg.

  3. Characterization of a canine model of glycogen storage disease type IIIa

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Haiqing; Thurberg, Beth L.; Curtis, Sarah; Austin, Stephanie; Fyfe, John; Koeberl, Dwight D.; Kishnani, Priya S.; Sun, Baodong

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Glycogen storage disease type IIIa (GSD IIIa) is an autosomal recessive disease caused by deficiency of glycogen debranching enzyme (GDE) in liver and muscle. The disorder is clinically heterogeneous and progressive, and there is no effective treatment. Previously, a naturally occurring dog model for this condition was identified in curly-coated retrievers (CCR). The affected dogs carry a frame-shift mutation in the GDE gene and have no detectable GDE activity in liver and muscle. We characterized in detail the disease expression and progression in eight dogs from age 2 to 16 months. Monthly blood biochemistry revealed elevated and gradually increasing serum alanine transaminase (ALT), aspartate transaminase (AST) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activities; serum creatine phosphokinase (CPK) activity exceeded normal range after 12 months. Analysis of tissue biopsy specimens at 4, 12 and 16 months revealed abnormally high glycogen contents in liver and muscle of all dogs. Fasting liver glycogen content increased from 4 months to 12 months, but dropped at 16 months possibly caused by extended fibrosis; muscle glycogen content continually increased with age. Light microscopy revealed significant glycogen accumulation in hepatocytes at all ages. Liver histology showed progressive, age-related fibrosis. In muscle, scattered cytoplasmic glycogen deposits were present in most cells at 4 months, but large, lake-like accumulation developed by 12 and 16 months. Disruption of the contractile apparatus and fraying of myofibrils was observed in muscle at 12 and 16 months by electron microscopy. In conclusion, the CCR dogs are an accurate model of GSD IIIa that will improve our understanding of the disease progression and allow opportunities to investigate treatment interventions. PMID:22736456

  4. Characterization of a canine model of glycogen storage disease type IIIa.

    PubMed

    Yi, Haiqing; Thurberg, Beth L; Curtis, Sarah; Austin, Stephanie; Fyfe, John; Koeberl, Dwight D; Kishnani, Priya S; Sun, Baodong

    2012-11-01

    Glycogen storage disease type IIIa (GSD IIIa) is an autosomal recessive disease caused by deficiency of glycogen debranching enzyme (GDE) in liver and muscle. The disorder is clinically heterogeneous and progressive, and there is no effective treatment. Previously, a naturally occurring dog model for this condition was identified in curly-coated retrievers (CCR). The affected dogs carry a frame-shift mutation in the GDE gene and have no detectable GDE activity in liver and muscle. We characterized in detail the disease expression and progression in eight dogs from age 2 to 16 months. Monthly blood biochemistry revealed elevated and gradually increasing serum alanine transaminase (ALT), aspartate transaminase (AST) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activities; serum creatine phosphokinase (CPK) activity exceeded normal range after 12 months. Analysis of tissue biopsy specimens at 4, 12 and 16 months revealed abnormally high glycogen contents in liver and muscle of all dogs. Fasting liver glycogen content increased from 4 months to 12 months, but dropped at 16 months possibly caused by extended fibrosis; muscle glycogen content continually increased with age. Light microscopy revealed significant glycogen accumulation in hepatocytes at all ages. Liver histology showed progressive, age-related fibrosis. In muscle, scattered cytoplasmic glycogen deposits were present in most cells at 4 months, but large, lake-like accumulation developed by 12 and 16 months. Disruption of the contractile apparatus and fraying of myofibrils was observed in muscle at 12 and 16 months by electron microscopy. In conclusion, the CCR dogs are an accurate model of GSD IIIa that will improve our understanding of the disease progression and allow opportunities to investigate treatment interventions. PMID:22736456

  5. Chromatin binding and polymerization of the endogenous Xenopus egg lamins: the opposing effects of glycogen and ATP.

    PubMed

    Lourim, D; Krohne, G

    1998-12-18

    We have previously identified and quantitated three B-type lamin isoforms present in the nuclei of mature Xenopus laevis oocytes, and in cell-free egg extracts. As Xenopus egg extracts are frequently used to analyze nuclear envelope assembly and lamina functions, we felt it was imperative that the polymerization and chromatin-binding properties of the endogenous B-type egg lamins be investigated. While we have demonstrated that soluble B-type lamins bind to chromatin, we have also observed that the polymerization of egg lamins does not require membranes or chromatin. Lamin assembly is enhanced by the addition of glycogen/glucose, or by the depletion of ATP from the extract. Moreover, the polymerization of egg cytosol lamins and their binding to demembranated sperm or chromatin assembled from naked lambda-DNA is inhibited by an ATP regeneration system. These ATP-dependent inhibitory activities can be overcome by the coaddition of glycogen to egg cytosol. We have observed that glycogen does not alter ATP levels during cytosol incubation, but rather, as glycogen-enhanced lamin polymerization is inhibited by okadaic acid, we conclude that glycogen activates protein phosphatases. Because protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) is the only phosphatase known to be specifically regulated by glycogen our data indicate that PP1 is involved in lamin polymerization. Our results show that ATP and glycogen effect lamin polymerization and chromatin binding by separate and opposing mechanisms. PMID:9819358

  6. Quantitative comparison of pathways of hepatic glycogen repletion in fed and fasted humans

    SciTech Connect

    Shulman, G.I.; Cline, G.; Schumann, W.C.; Chandramouli, V.; Kumaran, K.; Landau, B.R. )

    1990-09-01

    The effect of fasting vs. refeeding on hepatic glycogen repletion by the direct pathway, i.e., glucose----glucose 6-phosphate (G-6-P)----glycogen, was determined. Acetaminophen was administered during an infusion of glucose labeled with (1-13C)- and (6-14C)glucose into four healthy volunteers after an overnight fast and into the same subjects 4 h after breakfast. 13C enrichments in C-1 and C-6 of glucose formed from urinary acetaminophen glucuronide compared with enrichments in C-1 and C-6 of plasma glucose provided an estimate of glycogen formation by the direct pathway. The specific activity of glucose from the glucuronide compared with the specific activity of the plasma glucose, along with the percentages of 14C in C-1 and C-6 of the glucose from the glucuronide, also provided an estimate of the amount of glycogen formed by the direct pathway. The estimates were similar. Those from (6-14C)glucose would have been higher than from (1-13C)glucose if the pentose cycle contribution to overall glucose utilization had been significant. After an overnight fast, during the last hour of infusion, 49 +/- 3% of the glycogen formed was formed via the direct pathway. After breakfast, at similar plasma glucose and insulin concentrations, the percentage increased to 69 +/- 7% (P less than 0.02). Thus the contributions of the pathways to hepatic glycogen formation depend on the dietary state of the individual. For a dietary regimen in which individuals consume multiple meals per day containing at least a moderate amount of carbohydrates most glycogen synthesis occurs by the direct pathway.

  7. Role of Glycoside Phosphorylases in Mannose Foraging by Human Gut Bacteria*

    PubMed Central

    Ladevèze, Simon; Tarquis, Laurence; Cecchini, Davide A.; Bercovici, Juliette; André, Isabelle; Topham, Christopher M.; Morel, Sandrine; Laville, Elisabeth; Monsan, Pierre; Lombard, Vincent; Henrissat, Bernard; Potocki-Véronèse, Gabrielle

    2013-01-01

    To metabolize both dietary fiber constituent carbohydrates and host glycans lining the intestinal epithelium, gut bacteria produce a wide range of carbohydrate-active enzymes, of which glycoside hydrolases are the main components. In this study, we describe the ability of phosphorylases to participate in the breakdown of human N-glycans, from an analysis of the substrate specificity of UhgbMP, a mannoside phosphorylase of the GH130 protein family discovered by functional metagenomics. UhgbMP is found to phosphorolyze β-d-Manp-1,4-β-d-GlcpNAc-1,4-d-GlcpNAc and is also a highly efficient enzyme to catalyze the synthesis of this precious N-glycan core oligosaccharide by reverse phosphorolysis. Analysis of sequence conservation within family GH130, mapped on a three-dimensional model of UhgbMP and supported by site-directed mutagenesis results, revealed two GH130 subfamilies and allowed the identification of key residues responsible for catalysis and substrate specificity. The analysis of the genomic context of 65 known GH130 sequences belonging to human gut bacteria indicates that the enzymes of the GH130_1 subfamily would be involved in mannan catabolism, whereas the enzymes belonging to the GH130_2 subfamily would rather work in synergy with glycoside hydrolases of the GH92 and GH18 families in the breakdown of N-glycans. The use of GH130 inhibitors as therapeutic agents or functional foods could thus be considered as an innovative strategy to inhibit N-glycan degradation, with the ultimate goal of protecting, or restoring, the epithelial barrier. PMID:24043624

  8. Structural bases for N-glycan processing by mannoside phosphorylase

    PubMed Central

    Ladevèze, Simon; Cioci, Gianluca; Roblin, Pierre; Mourey, Lionel; Tranier, Samuel; Potocki-Véronèse, Gabrielle

    2015-01-01

    The first crystal structure of Uhgb_MP, a β-1,4-mannopyranosyl-chitobiose phosphorylase belonging to the GH130 family which is involved in N-glycan degradation by human gut bacteria, was solved at 1.85 Å resolution in the apo form and in complex with mannose and N-acetylglucosamine. SAXS and crystal structure analysis revealed a hexameric structure, a specific feature of GH130 enzymes among other glycoside phosphorylases. Mapping of the −1 and +1 subsites in the presence of phosphate confirmed the conserved Asp104 as the general acid/base catalytic residue, which is in agreement with a single-step reaction mechanism involving Man O3 assistance for proton transfer. Analysis of this structure, the first to be solved for a member of the GH130_2 subfamily, revealed Met67, Phe203 and the Gly121–Pro125 loop as the main determinants of the specificity of Uhgb_MP and its homologues towards the N-glycan core oligosaccharides and mannan, and the molecular bases of the key role played by GH130 enzymes in the catabolism of dietary fibre and host glycans. PMID:26057673

  9. Genetics Home Reference: glycogen storage disease type I

    MedlinePlus

    ... Orphanet: Glycogen storage disease due to glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency Patient Support and Advocacy Resources (7 links) ... JY, Mansfield BC. Mutations in the glucose-6-phosphatase-alpha (G6PC) gene that cause type Ia glycogen ...

  10. Cyclin partners determine Pho85 protein kinase substrate specificity in vitro and in vivo: control of glycogen biosynthesis by Pcl8 and Pcl10.

    PubMed

    Huang, D; Moffat, J; Wilson, W A; Moore, L; Cheng, C; Roach, P J; Andrews, B

    1998-06-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, PHO85 encodes a cyclin-dependent protein kinase (Cdk) with multiple roles in cell cycle and metabolic controls. In association with the cyclin Pho80, Pho85 controls acid phosphatase gene expression through phosphorylation of the transcription factor Pho4. Pho85 has also been implicated as a kinase that phosphorylates and negatively regulates glycogen synthase (Gsy2), and deletion of PHO85 causes glycogen overaccumulation. We report that the Pcl8/Pcl10 subgroup of cyclins directs Pho85 to phosphorylate glycogen synthase both in vivo and in vitro. Disruption of PCL8 and PCL10 caused hyperaccumulation of glycogen, activation of glycogen synthase, and a reduction in glycogen synthase kinase activity in vivo. However, unlike pho85 mutants, pcl8 pcl10 cells had normal morphologies, grew on glycerol, and showed proper regulation of acid phosphatase gene expression. In vitro, Pho80-Pho85 complexes effectively phosphorylated Pho4 but had much lower activity toward Gsy2. In contrast, Pcl10-Pho85 complexes phosphorylated Gsy2 at Ser-654 and Thr-667, two physiologically relevant sites, but only poorly phosphorylated Pho4. Thus, both the in vitro and in vivo substrate specificity of Pho85 is determined by the cyclin partner. Mutation of PHO85 suppressed the glycogen storage deficiency of snf1 or glc7-1 mutants in which glycogen synthase is locked in an inactive state. Deletion of PCL8 and PCL10 corrected the deficit in glycogen synthase activity in both the snf1 and glc7-1 mutants, but glycogen synthesis was restored only in the glc7-1 mutant strain. This genetic result suggests an additional role for Pho85 in the negative regulation of glycogen accumulation that is independent of Pcl8 and Pcl10. PMID:9584169

  11. Variation in glycogen concentrations within mantle and foot tissue in Amblema plicata plicata: Implications for tissue biopsy sampling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naimo, T.J.; Monroe, E.M.

    1999-01-01

    With the development of techniques to non-lethally biopsy tissue from unionids, a new method is available to measure changes in biochemical, contaminant, and genetic constituents in this imperiled faunal group. However, before its widespread application, information on the variability of biochemical components within and among tissues needs to be evaluated. We measured glycogen concentrations in foot and mantle tissue in Amblema plicata plicata (Say, 1817) to determine if glycogen was evenly distributed within and between tissues and to determine which tissue might be more responsive to the stress associated with relocating mussels. Glycogen was measured in two groups of mussels: those sampled from their native environment (undisturbed mussels) and quickly frozen for analysis and those relocated into an artificial pond (relocated mussels) for 24 months before analysis. In both undisturbed and relocated mussels, glycogen concentrations were evenly distributed within foot, but not within mantle tissue. In mantle tissue, concentrations of glycogen varied about 2-fold among sections. In addition, glycogen varied significantly between tissues in undisturbed mussels, but not in relocated mussels. Twenty-four months after relocation, glycogen concentrations had declined by 80% in mantle tissue and by 56% in foot tissue relative to the undisturbed mussels. These data indicate that representative biopsy samples can be obtained from foot tissue, but not mantle tissue. We hypothesize that mantle tissue could be more responsive to the stress of relocation due to its high metabolic activity associated with shell formation.

  12. Genetics Home Reference: glycogen storage disease type VI

    MedlinePlus

    ... a result, liver cells cannot use glycogen for energy. Since glycogen cannot be broken down, it accumulates within liver cells, causing these cells to become enlarged and dysfunctional. Learn more about the gene associated with glycogen storage disease type VI PYGL Related Information What is ...

  13. Genetics Home Reference: glycogen storage disease type IX

    MedlinePlus

    ... cellular energy is a simple sugar called glucose. Glucose is stored in muscle and liver cells in a form called glycogen. Glycogen can ... result, glycogen accumulates in and damages cells, and glucose is not available for ... in the liver leads to hepatomegaly, and the liver's inability to ...

  14. A novel GBE1 gene variant in a child with glycogen storage disease type IV.

    PubMed

    Said, Samar M; Murphree, Marine I; Mounajjed, Taofic; El-Youssef, Mounif; Zhang, Lizhi

    2016-08-01

    Glycogen storage disease type IV is an autosomal recessive disorder of carbohydrates caused by deficiency of amylo-1-4-glycanoglycosyltransferase, which leads to accumulation of amylopectin-like polysaccharides in tissues including liver, heart and neuromuscular system. More than 40 different mutations in the glycogen branching enzyme gene (GBE1) have been described. In this study, we report a 2-year-old boy who presented with developmental delay and muscle weakness. He subsequently was diagnosed with glycogen storage disease type IV based on a liver biopsy histology and electron microscopy. Glycogen branching enzyme activity was in the low range. Genetic analysis demonstrated a novel heterozygous variant (c.760A>G; p.Thr254Ala) in exon 6 of the GBE1 gene, which is believed to be pathogenic. This variant was inherited from the patient's mother who was asymptomatic with normal glycogen branching enzyme activity. Whole-exome sequencing failed to reveal additional variations in the GBE1 gene. PMID:27107456

  15. Synthesis, thymidine phosphorylase inhibition and molecular modeling studies of 1,3,4-oxadiazole-2-thione derivatives.

    PubMed

    Shahzad, Sohail Anjum; Yar, Muhammad; Bajda, Marek; Shahzadi, Lubna; Khan, Zulfiqar Ali; Naqvi, Syed Ali Raza; Mutahir, Sadaf; Mahmood, Nasir; Khan, Khalid Mohammed

    2015-06-01

    Thymidine phosphorylase (TP) inhibitors have attracted great attention due to their ability to suppress the tumors formation. In our ongoing research, a series of 1,3,4-oxadiazole-2-thione (1-12) has been synthesized under simple reaction conditions in good to excellent yields (86-98%) and their TP inhibition potential has also been evaluated. The majority of synthesized compounds showed moderate thymidine phosphorylase inhibitory activity with IC50 values ranging from 38.24±1.28 to 258.43±0.43μM, and 7-deazaxanthine (7DX) was used as a reference compound (IC50 38.68±4.42). The TP activity was very much dependent on the C-5 substituents; among this series the compound 6 bearing 4-hydroxyphenyl group was found to be the most active with IC50 38.24±1.28μM. Molecular docking studies revealed their binding mode. PMID:25920005

  16. Molecular Structure of Human-Liver Glycogen

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Bin; Sullivan, Mitchell A.; Chen, Cheng; Li, Jialun; Powell, Prudence O.; Hu, Zhenxia; Gilbert, Robert G.

    2016-01-01

    Glycogen is a highly branched glucose polymer which is involved in maintaining blood-sugar homeostasis. Liver glycogen contains large composite α particles made up of linked β particles. Previous studies have shown that the binding which links β particles into α particles is impaired in diabetic mice. The present study reports the first molecular structural characterization of human-liver glycogen from non-diabetic patients, using transmission electron microscopy for morphology and size-exclusion chromatography for the molecular size distribution; the latter is also studied as a function of time during acid hydrolysis in vitro, which is sensitive to certain structural features, particularly glycosidic vs. proteinaceous linkages. The results are compared with those seen in mice and pigs. The molecular structural change during acid hydrolysis is similar in each case, and indicates that the linkage of β into α particles is not glycosidic. This result, and the similar morphology in each case, together imply that human liver glycogen has similar molecular structure to those of mice and pigs. This knowledge will be useful for future diabetes drug targets. PMID:26934359

  17. The 3T3-L1 adipocyte glycogen proteome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Glycogen is a branched polysaccharide of glucose residues, consisting of α-1-4 glycosidic linkages with α-1-6 branches that together form multi-layered particles ranging in size from 30 nm to 300 nm. Glycogen spatial conformation and intracellular organization are highly regulated processes. Glycogen particles interact with their metabolizing enzymes and are associated with a variety of proteins that intervene in its biology, controlling its structure, particle size and sub-cellular distribution. The function of glycogen in adipose tissue is not well understood but appears to have a pivotal role as a regulatory mechanism informing the cells on substrate availability for triacylglycerol synthesis. To provide new molecular insights into the role of adipocyte glycogen we analyzed the glycogen-associated proteome from differentiated 3T3-L1-adipocytes. Results Glycogen particles from 3T3-L1-adipocytes were purified using a series of centrifugation steps followed by specific elution of glycogen bound proteins using α-1,4 glucose oligosaccharides, or maltodextrins, and tandem mass spectrometry. We identified regulatory proteins, 14-3-3 proteins, RACK1 and protein phosphatase 1 glycogen targeting subunit 3D. Evidence was also obtained for a regulated subcellular distribution of the glycogen particle: metabolic and mitochondrial proteins were abundant. Unlike the recently analyzed hepatic glycogen proteome, no endoplasmic proteins were detected, along with the recently described starch-binding domain protein 1. Other regulatory proteins which have previously been described as glycogen-associated proteins were not detected, including laforin, the AMPK beta-subunit and protein targeting to glycogen (PTG). Conclusions These data provide new molecular insights into the regulation of glycogen-bound proteins that are associated with the maintenance, organization and localization of the adipocyte glycogen particle. PMID:23521774

  18. Glycogen with short average chain length enhances bacterial durability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Liang; Wise, Michael J.

    2011-09-01

    Glycogen is conventionally viewed as an energy reserve that can be rapidly mobilized for ATP production in higher organisms. However, several studies have noted that glycogen with short average chain length in some bacteria is degraded very slowly. In addition, slow utilization of glycogen is correlated with bacterial viability, that is, the slower the glycogen breakdown rate, the longer the bacterial survival time in the external environment under starvation conditions. We call that a durable energy storage mechanism (DESM). In this review, evidence from microbiology, biochemistry, and molecular biology will be assembled to support the hypothesis of glycogen as a durable energy storage compound. One method for testing the DESM hypothesis is proposed.

  19. Glycogen synthase (GYS1) mutation causes a novel skeletal muscle glycogenosis

    PubMed Central

    McCue, Molly E; Valberg, Stephanie J; Miller, Michael B; Wade, Claire; DiMauro, Salvatore; Akman, Hasan O; Mickelson, James R

    2008-01-01

    Summary We describe a gain of function mutation in the skeletal muscle glycogen synthase gene that is responsible for a novel myopathy, and is highly prevalent in multiple breeds of horses because it arose before the founding of many modern breeds. Polysaccharide Storage Myopathy (PSSM) is a novel glycogenosis in horses characterized by abnormal glycogen accumulation in skeletal muscle and muscle damage with exertion. It is unlike glycogen storage diseases resulting from known defects in glycogenolysis, glycolysis and glycogen synthesis that have been described in humans and domestic animals. A genome wide association identified GYS1, encoding skeletal muscle glycogen synthase (GS), as a candidate gene for PSSM. DNA sequence analysis revealed a mutation resulting in an arginine to histidine substitution in a highly conserved region of GS. Functional analysis demonstrated an elevated GS activity in PSSM horses and haplotype analysis and allele age estimation demonstrated that this mutation is identical by descent among horse breeds. This is the first report of a gain of function mutation in GYS1 resulting in a glycogenosis. PMID:18358695

  20. Elevated plasma deoxyuridine in patients with thymidine phosphorylase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Martí, Ramon; Nishigaki, Yutaka; Hirano, Michio

    2003-03-28

    Mutations in the nuclear gene encoding thymidine phosphorylase (TP) cause mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy (MNGIE), an autosomal recessive disease with mitochondrial dysfunction and mitochondrial DNA abnormalities. We have demonstrated alterations of thymidine (dThd) metabolism in MNGIE patients. Here, we report the accumulation of another substrate of TP, deoxyuridine (dUrd), whose circulating levels ranged from 5.5 to 24.4 microM (average 14.2) in MNGIE and were undetectable (<0.05 microM) in both TP mutation carriers and controls. The dramatic accumulation of dUrd may contribute to nucleotide pool imbalances and, together with the increased levels of dThd, is likely to contribute to the pathogenesis of MNGIE. PMID:12646159

  1. Biocatalytic production of novel glycolipids with cellodextrin phosphorylase.

    PubMed

    Tran, Hai Giang; Desmet, Tom; Saerens, Karen; Waegeman, Hendrik; Vandekerckhove, Stéphanie; D'hooghe, Matthias; Van Bogaert, Inge; Soetaert, Wim

    2012-07-01

    Glycolipids have gained increasing attention as natural surfactants with a beneficial environmental profile. They are typically produced by fermentation, which only gives access to a limited number of structures. Here we describe the biocatalytic production of novel glycolipids with the cellodextrin phosphorylase from Clostridium stercorarium. This enzyme was found to display a broad donor and acceptor specificity, allowing the synthesis of five different products. Indeed, using either α-glucose 1-phosphate or α-galactose 1-phosphate as glycosyl donor, sophorolipid as well as glucolipid could be efficiently glycosylated. The transfer of a glucosyl moiety afforded a mixture of products that precipitated from the solution, resulting in near quantitative yields. The transfer of a galactosyl moiety, in contrast, generated a single product that remained in solution at thermodynamic equilibrium. These glycolipids not only serve as a new class of biosurfactants, but could also have applications in the pharmaceutical and nanomaterials industries. PMID:22000964

  2. Glycogen and its metabolism: some new developments and old themes

    PubMed Central

    Roach, Peter J.; Depaoli-Roach, Anna A.; Hurley, Thomas D.; Tagliabracci, Vincent S.

    2016-01-01

    Glycogen is a branched polymer of glucose that acts as a store of energy in times of nutritional sufficiency for utilization in times of need. Its metabolism has been the subject of extensive investigation and much is known about its regulation by hormones such as insulin, glucagon and adrenaline (epinephrine). There has been debate over the relative importance of allosteric compared with covalent control of the key biosynthetic enzyme, glycogen synthase, as well as the relative importance of glucose entry into cells compared with glycogen synthase regulation in determining glycogen accumulation. Significant new developments in eukaryotic glycogen metabolism over the last decade or so include: (i) three-dimensional structures of the biosynthetic enzymes glycogenin and glycogen synthase, with associated implications for mechanism and control; (ii) analyses of several genetically engineered mice with altered glycogen metabolism that shed light on the mechanism of control; (iii) greater appreciation of the spatial aspects of glycogen metabolism, including more focus on the lysosomal degradation of glycogen; and (iv) glycogen phosphorylation and advances in the study of Lafora disease, which is emerging as a glycogen storage disease. PMID:22248338

  3. Three-dimensional structures of unligated uridine phosphorylase from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis at 1.4 Å resolution and its complex with an antibacterial drug

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaev, V. V.; Lashkov, A. A.; Gabdulkhakov, A. G.; Dontsova, M. V.; Mironov, A. S.; Betzel, C.; Mikhailov, A. M.

    2015-07-01

    Uridine phosphorylases play an essential role in the cellular metabolism of some antibacterial agents. Acute infectious diseases (bubonic plague, yersiniosis, pseudotuberculosis, etc., caused by bacteria of the genus Yersinia) are treated using both sulfanilamide medicines and antibiotics, including trimethoprim. The action of an antibiotic on a bacterial cell is determined primarily by the character of its interactions with cellular components, including those which are not targets (for example, with pyrimidine phosphorylases). This type of interaction should be taken into account in designing drugs. The three-dimensional structure of uridine phosphorylase from the bacterium Yersinia pseudotuberculosis ( YptUPh) with the free active site was determined for the first time by X-ray crystallography and refined at 1.40 Å resolution (DPI = 0.062 Å; ID PDB: 4OF4). The structure of the complex of YptUPh with the bacteriostatic drug trimethoprim was studied by molecular docking and molecular dynamics methods. The trimethoprim molecule was shown to be buffered by the enzyme YptUPh, resulting in a decrease in the efficiency of the treatment of infectious diseases caused by bacteria of the genus Yersinia with trimethoprim.

  4. Early alterations in soleus GLUT-4, glucose transport, and glycogen in voluntary running rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henriksen, Erik J.; Halseth, Amy E.

    1994-01-01

    Voluntary wheel running (WR) by juvenile female rats was used as a noninterventional model of soleus muscle functional overload to study the regulation of insulin-stimulated glucose transport activity by the glucose transporter (GLUT-4 isoform) protein level and glycogen concentration. Soleus total protein content was significantly greater (+18%;P greater than 0.05) than in age-matched controls after 1 wk of WR, and this hypertrophic response continued in weeks 2-4 (+24-32%). GLUT-4 protein was 39% greater than in controls in 1-wk WR soleus, and this adaptation was accompanied by a similar increase in in vitro insulin-stimulated glucose transport activity(+29%). After 2 and 4 wk of WR, however, insulin-stimulated glucose transport activity had returned to control levels, despite a continued elevation (+25-28%) of GLUT-4 protein. At these two time points, glycogen concentration was significantly enhanced in WR soleus (+21-42%), which coincided with significant reductions in glycogen synthase activity ratios (-23 to-41%). These results indicate that, in this model of soleus muscle functional overload, the GLUT-4 protein level may initially regulate insulin-stimulated glucose transport activity in the absence of changes in other modifying factors. However,this regulation of glucose transport activity by GLUT-4 protein may be subsequently overridden by elevated glycogen concentration.

  5. Pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase-4 contributes to the recirculation of gluconeogenic precursors during postexercise glycogen recovery

    PubMed Central

    Herbst, Eric A. F.; MacPherson, Rebecca E. K.; LeBlanc, Paul J.; Roy, Brian D.; Jeoung, Nam Ho; Harris, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    During recovery from glycogen-depleting exercise, there is a shift from carbohydrate oxidation to glycogen resynthesis. The activity of the pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) complex may decrease to reduce oxidation of carbohydrates in favor of increasing gluconeogenic recycling of carbohydrate-derived substrates for this process. The precise mechanism behind this has yet to be elucidated; however, research examining mRNA content has suggested that the less-abundant pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase-4 (PDK4) may reduce PDH activation during exercise recovery. To investigate this, skeletal muscle and liver of wild-type (WT) and PDK4-knockout (PDK4-KO) mice were analyzed at rest (Rest), after exercise to exhaustion (Exh), and after 2 h of recovery with ad libitum feeding (Rec). Although there were no differences in exercise tolerance between genotypes, caloric consumption was doubled by PDK4-KO mice during Rec. Because of this, PDK4-KO mice at Rec supercompensated muscle glycogen to 120% of resting stores. Therefore, an extra group of PDK4-KO mice were pair-fed (PF) with WT mice during Rec for comparison. PF mice fully replenished muscle glycogen but recovered only 50% of liver glycogen stores. Concentrations of muscle lactate and alanine were also lower in PF than in WT mice, indicating that this decrease may lead to a potential reduction of recycled gluconeogenic substrates, due to oxidation of their carbohydrate precursors in skeletal muscle, leading to observed reductions in hepatic glucose and glycogen concentrations. Because of the impairments seen in PF PDK4-KO mice, these results suggest a role for PDK4 in regulating the PDH complex in muscle and promoting gluconeogenic precursor recirculation during recovery from exhaustive exercise. PMID:24305065

  6. Glycogen synthase kinase 3 in Wnt signaling pathway and cancer.

    PubMed

    Tejeda-Muñoz, Nydia; Robles-Flores, Martha

    2015-12-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK-3) was first discovered in 1980 as one of the key enzymes of glycogen metabolism. Since then, GSK-3 has been revealed as one of the master regulators of a diverse range of signaling pathways, including those activated by Wnts, participating in the regulation of numerous cellular functions, suggesting that its activity is tightly regulated. Numerous studies have pointed to an association of GSK-3 dysregulation with the onset and progression of human diseases, including diabetes mellitus, obesity, inflammation, neurological illnesses, and cancer. Therefore, GSK-3 is recognized as an attractive therapeutic target in multiple disorders. However, the great number of substrates that are phosphorylated by GSK-3 has raised the question of whether this limits its feasibility as a therapeutic target because of the potential disruption of many cellular processes and also by the fear that inhibition of GSK-3 may stimulate or aid in malignant transformation, as GSK-3 can phosphorylate pro-oncogenic factors. This mini review focuses on the role played by GSK-3 in Wnt signaling pathway and cancer using as model colon cancer. PMID:26600003

  7. Thymidine phosphorylase gene mutations in patients with mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy syndrome.

    PubMed

    Slama, A; Lacroix, C; Plante-Bordeneuve, V; Lombès, A; Conti, M; Reimund, J M; Auxenfants, E; Crenn, P; Laforêt, P; Joannard, A; Seguy, D; Pillant, H; Joly, P; Haut, S; Messing, B; Said, G; Legrand, A; Guiochon-Mantel, A

    2005-04-01

    The mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy (MNGIE) syndrome is characterized by the association of gastrointestinal and neurological symptoms. It is a rare autosomal recessive mitochondrial disorder with multiple mitochondrial DNA deletions and/or depletion. It is caused by thymidine phosphorylase (TP) gene mutations resulting in a complete abolition of TP activity. We tested 31 unrelated patients presenting either with a complete MNGIE syndrome (8 patients), a severe intestinal pseudo-obstruction (10 patients), and multiple deletions and/or depletion of mitochondrial DNA (13 patients). All the tested patients presenting with a complete MNGIE had increased thymidine levels in plasma and urine, and no TP activity. The group with pseudo-obstruction syndrome had normal or partial reduction of TP activity. We found pathogenic mutations on TP gene only in the MNGIE syndrome group: all the MNGIE patients were compound heterozygous or homozygous for mutations in the TP gene. Eight of these mutations are yet unreported, confirming the lack of genotype/phenotype correlation in this syndrome. Enzymatic activity and thymidine level are thus rapid diagnosis tests to detect MNGIE affected patients prior to genetic testing for patients with gastrointestinal symptoms. PMID:15781193

  8. Cloning and orientation of the gene encoding polynucleotide phosphorylase in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Crofton, S; Dennis, P P

    1983-01-01

    Mutations which affect the activity of polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase) map near 69 min on the bacterial chromosome. This region of the chromosome has been cloned by inserting the kanamycin-resistant transposon Tn5 near the argG and mtr loci at 68.5 min. Large SalI fragments of chromosomal DNA containing the Tn5 element were inserted into pBR322, and selection was made for kanamycin-resistant recombinant plasmids. Two of these plasmids were found to produce high levels of PNPase activity in both wild-type and host strains lacking PNPase activity. The pnp gene was further localized and subcloned on a 4.8 kilobase HindIII-EcoRI fragment. This fragment was shown to encode an 84,000-molecular weight protein which comigrated with purified PNPase during sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The orientation of the pnp gene was determined by insertion of Tn5 into the 4.8 kilobase fragment cloned in pBR322. Some of the insertions had lost the ability to elevate the level of PNPase activity in the host bacterium. Restriction mapping of the positions of the Tn5 insertions and analysis of plasmid-encoded polypeptides in UV-irradiated maxi-cells indicated that the pnp gene is oriented in the counterclockwise direction on the bacterial chromosome. Images PMID:6300041

  9. Kinetics and mechanistic study of competitive inhibition of thymidine phosphorylase by 5-fluoruracil derivatives.

    PubMed

    Petaccia, Manuela; Gentili, Patrizia; Bešker, Neva; D'Abramo, Marco; Giansanti, Luisa; Leonelli, Francesca; La Bella, Angela; Gradella Villalva, Denise; Mancini, Giovanna

    2016-04-01

    In a previous investigation, cationic liposomes formulated with new 5-FU derivatives, differing for the length of the polyoxyethylenic spacer that links the N(3) position of 5-FU to an alkyl chain of 12 carbon atoms, showed a higher cytotoxicity compared to free 5-FU, the cytotoxic effect being directly related to the length of the spacer. To better understand the correlation of the spacer length with toxicity, we carried out initial rate studies to determine inhibition, equilibrium and kinetic constants (KI, KM, kcat), and get inside inhibition activity of the 5-FU derivatives and their mechanism of action, a crucial information to design structural variations for improving the anticancer activity. The experimental investigation was supported by docking simulations based on the X-ray structure of thymidine phosphorylase (TP) from Escherichia coli complexed with 3'-azido-2'-fluoro-dideoxyuridin. Theoretical and experimental results showed that all the derivatives exert the same inhibition activity of 5-FU either as monomer and when embedded in lipid bilayer. PMID:26752208

  10. The dual role of thymidine phosphorylase in cancer development and chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Bronckaers, Annelies; Gago, Federico; Balzarini, Jan; Liekens, Sandra

    2009-11-01

    Thymidine phosphorylase (TP), also known as "platelet-derived endothelial cell growth factor" (PD-ECGF), is an enzyme, which is upregulated in a wide variety of solid tumors including breast and colorectal cancers. TP promotes tumor growth and metastasis by preventing apoptosis and inducing angiogenesis. Elevated levels of TP are associated with tumor aggressiveness and poor prognosis. Therefore, TP inhibitors are synthesized in an attempt to prevent tumor angiogenesis and metastasis. TP is also indispensable for the activation of the extensively used 5-fluorouracil prodrug capecitabine, which is clinically used for the treatment of colon and breast cancer. Clinical trials that combine capecitabine with TP-inducing therapies (such as taxanes or radiotherapy) suggest that increasing TP expression is an adequate strategy to enhance the antitumoral efficacy of capecitabine. Thus, TP plays a dual role in cancer development and therapy: on the one hand, TP inhibitors can abrogate the tumorigenic and metastatic properties of TP; on the other, TP activity is necessary for the activation of several chemotherapeutic drugs. This duality illustrates the complexity of the role of TP in tumor progression and in the clinical response to fluoropyrimidine-based chemotherapy. PMID:19434693

  11. Postexercise Glycogen Recovery and Exercise Performance is Not Significantly Different Between Fast Food and Sport Supplements.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Michael J; Dumke, Charles L; Hailes, Walter S; Cuddy, John S; Ruby, Brent C

    2015-10-01

    A variety of dietary choices are marketed to enhance glycogen recovery after physical activity. Past research informs recommendations regarding the timing, dose, and nutrient compositions to facilitate glycogen recovery. This study examined the effects of isoenergetic sport supplements (SS) vs. fast food (FF) on glycogen recovery and exercise performance. Eleven males completed two experimental trials in a randomized, counterbalanced order. Each trial included a 90-min glycogen depletion ride followed by a 4-hr recovery period. Absolute amounts of macronutrients (1.54 ± 0.27 g·kg-1 carbohydrate, 0.24 ± 0.04 g·kg fat-1, and 0.18 ±0.03g·kg protein-1) as either SS or FF were provided at 0 and 2 hr. Muscle biopsies were collected from the vastus lateralis at 0 and 4 hr post exercise. Blood samples were analyzed at 0, 30, 60, 120, 150, 180, and 240 min post exercise for insulin and glucose, with blood lipids analyzed at 0 and 240 min. A 20k time-trial (TT) was completed following the final muscle biopsy. There were no differences in the blood glucose and insulin responses. Similarly, rates of glycogen recovery were not different across the diets (6.9 ± 1.7 and 7.9 ± 2.4 mmol·kg wet weight- 1·hr-1 for SS and FF, respectively). There was also no difference across the diets for TT performance (34.1 ± 1.8 and 34.3 ± 1.7 min for SS and FF, respectively. These data indicate that short-term food options to initiate glycogen resynthesis can include dietary options not typically marketed as sports nutrition products such as fast food menu items. PMID:25811308

  12. In silico analysis of the three-dimensional structures of the homodimer of uridine phosphorylase from Yersinia Pseudotuberculosis in the ligand-free state and in a complex with 5-fluorouracil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lashkov, A. A.; Sotnichenko, S. E.; Mikhailov, A. M.

    2013-03-01

    Pseudotuberculosis is an acute infectious disease characterized by a lesion of the gastrointestinal tract. A positive therapeutic effect can be achieved by selectively suppressing the activity of uridine phosphorylase from the causative agent of the disease Yersinia pseudotuberculosis. The synergistic effect of a combination of the chemotherapeutic agent 5-fluorouracil and antimicrobial drugs, which block the synthesis of pyrimidine bases, on the cells of pathogenic protozoa and bacteria is described in the literature. The three-dimensional structures of uridine phosphorylase from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis ( YptUPh) both in the ligand-free state and in complexes with pharmacological agents are unknown, which hinders the search for and design of selective inhibitors of YptUPh. The three-dimensional structure of the ligand-free homodimer of YptUPh was determined by homology-based molecular modeling. The three-dimensional structure of the subunit of the YptUPh molecule belongs to α/β proteins, and its topology is a three-layer α/β/α sandwich. The subunit monomer of the YptUPh molecule consists of 38% helices and 24% β strands. A model of the homodimer structure of YptUPh in a complex with 5-FU was obtained by the molecular docking. The position of 5-FU in the active site of the molecule is very consistent with the known data on the X-ray diffraction structures of other bacterial uridine phosphorylases (the complex of uridine phosphorylase from Salmonella typhimurium ( StUPh) with 5-FU, ID PDB: 4E1V and the complex of uridine phosphorylase from Escherichia coli ( EcUPh) with 5-FU and ribose 1-phosphate, ID PDB: 1RXC).

  13. In silico analysis of the three-dimensional structures of the homodimer of uridine phosphorylase from Yersinia Pseudotuberculosis in the ligand-free state and in a complex with 5-fluorouracil

    SciTech Connect

    Lashkov, A. A. Sotnichenko, S. E.; Mikhailov, A. M.

    2013-03-15

    Pseudotuberculosis is an acute infectious disease characterized by a lesion of the gastrointestinal tract. A positive therapeutic effect can be achieved by selectively suppressing the activity of uridine phosphorylase from the causative agent of the disease Yersinia pseudotuberculosis. The synergistic effect of a combination of the chemotherapeutic agent 5-fluorouracil and antimicrobial drugs, which block the synthesis of pyrimidine bases, on the cells of pathogenic protozoa and bacteria is described in the literature. The three-dimensional structures of uridine phosphorylase from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis (YptUPh) both in the ligand-free state and in complexes with pharmacological agents are unknown, which hinders the search for and design of selective inhibitors of YptUPh. The three-dimensional structure of the ligand-free homodimer of YptUPh was determined by homology-based molecular modeling. The three-dimensional structure of the subunit of the YptUPh molecule belongs to {alpha}/{beta} proteins, and its topology is a three-layer {alpha}/{beta}/{alpha} sandwich. The subunit monomer of the YptUPh molecule consists of 38% helices and 24% {beta} strands. A model of the homodimer structure of YptUPh in a complex with 5-FU was obtained by the molecular docking. The position of 5-FU in the active site of the molecule is very consistent with the known data on the X-ray diffraction structures of other bacterial uridine phosphorylases (the complex of uridine phosphorylase from Salmonella typhimurium (StUPh) with 5-FU, ID PDB: 4E1V and the complex of uridine phosphorylase from Escherichia coli (EcUPh) with 5-FU and ribose 1-phosphate, ID PDB: 1RXC).

  14. Glycogen: A must have storage to survive stressful emergencies.

    PubMed

    Possik, Elite; Pause, Arnim

    2016-01-01

    Mechanisms of adaptation to acute changes in osmolarity are fundamental for life. When exposed to hyperosmotic stress, cells and organisms utilize conserved strategies to prevent water loss and maintain cellular integrity and viability. The production of glycerol is a common strategy utilized by the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) and many other organisms to survive hyperosmotic stress. Specifically, the transcriptional upregulation of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, a rate-limiting enzyme in the production of glycerol, has been previously implicated in many model organisms. However, what fuels this massive and rapid production of glycerol upon hyperosmotic stress has not been clearly elucidated. We have recently discovered an AMPK-dependent pathway that mediates hyperosmotic stress resistance in C. elegans. Specifically, we demonstrated that the chronic activation of AMPK leads to glycogen accumulation, which under hyperosmotic stress exposure, is rapidly degraded to mediate glycerol production. Importantly, we demonstrate that this strategy is utilized by flcn-1 mutant C. elegans nematodes in an AMPK-dependent manner. FLCN-1 is the worm homolog of the human renal tumor suppressor Folliculin (FLCN) responsible for the Birt-Hogg-Dubé neoplastic syndrome. Here, we comment on the dual role for glycogen in stress resistance: it serves as an energy store and a fuel for osmolyte production. We further discuss the potential utilization of this mechanism by organisms in general and by human cancer cells in order to survive harsh environmental conditions and notably hyperosmotic stress. PMID:27383221

  15. Interleukin 6 stimulates hepatic glucose release from prelabeled glycogen pools

    SciTech Connect

    Ritchie, D.G. )

    1990-01-01

    Cytokines, derived from a wide variety of cell types, are now believed to initiate many of the physiological responses accompanying the inflammatory phase that follows either Gram-negative septicemia or thermal injury. Because hypoglycemia (after endotoxic challenge) and hyperglycemia (after thermal injury) represent well-characterized responses to these injuries, we sought to determine whether hepatic glycogen metabolism could be altered by specific cytokines. Cultured adult rat hepatocytes were prelabeled with ({sup 14}C)glucose for 24 h, a procedure that resulted in the labeling of hepatic glycogen pools that subsequently could be depleted (with concomitant ({sup 14}C)glucose release) by either glucagon or norepinephrine. After the addition of a highly concentrated human monocyte-conditioned medium (MCM) or various cytokines to these prelabeled cells, ({sup 14}C)glucose release was stimulated by MCM and recombinant human interleukin 6 (IL-6) but was not stimulated by other cytokines tested. Furthermore, only antisera to IL-6 were capable of reducing the glucose-releasing factor activity found in MCM. These data therefore suggest a novel glucoregulatory role for IL-6.

  16. Evidence against direct involvement of phosphorylation in the activation of carnitine palmitoyltransferase by okadaic acid in rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Guzman, M; Kolodziej, M P; Caldwell, A; Corstorphine, C G; Zammit, V A

    1994-01-01

    The mechanism of activation of mitochondrial overt carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT I) by treatment of hepatocytes with okadaic acid (OA) was investigated. Activation was observed when cells were permeabilized with digitonin, but not when a total membrane fraction was obtained by sonication. Both cell disruption methods preserved the activation of phosphorylase observed in OA-treated hepatocytes. Activation of CPT I was also observed in crude homogenates of OA-treated hepatocytes, but it was lost upon subsequent isolation of mitochondria from such homogenates. In all experiments, any activation observed did not depend on the presence or absence of fluoride ions in the permeabilization/homogenization media. When hepatocytes were permeabilized in the absence of fluoride and further incubated with exogenous phosphatases 1 and 2A, the OA-induced activation of CPT was not reversed, whereas the activation of glycogen phosphorylase in the same cells was rapidly reversed. Treatment of hepatocytes with OA, followed by permeabilization and incubation before assay of CPT I, demonstrated that OA had no short-term effect on the sensitivity of CPT I to malonyl-CoA, although the difference in sensitivity between cells isolated from fed and starved rats was fully preserved. Incubation of isolated mitochondria or purified mitochondrial outer membranes with cyclic AMP-dependent or AMP-activated protein kinases, under phosphorylating conditions, did not affect the activity of CPT I or its sensitivity to malonyl-CoA inhibition. Under the same conditions, the use of [32P]ATP resulted in the labelling of several outer-membrane proteins but, unlike [3H]etomoxir-labelled CPT I, none of them was specifically removed from membrane extracts by a specific polyclonal antibody to the enzyme. We conclude that the increase in overt CPT activity observed in permeabilized hepatocytes is not due to direct phosphorylation of CPT I, but may involve interactions between the mitochondrial outer

  17. Defects in polynucleotide phosphorylase impairs virulence in Escherichia coli O157:H7.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jia; Zhu, Mei-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase) is reported to regulate virulence in Salmonella, Yersinia sp. and Campylobacter jejuni, yet its role in Escherichia coli O157:H7 has not been investigated. To gain insights into its roles in E. coli O157:H7 virulence, pnp deletion mutants were generated and the major virulence factors were compared to their parental wild type strains. Deletion of pnp in E. coli O157:H7 dramatically decreased stx2 mRNA expression and Stx2 protein production, and impaired lambdoid prophage activation in E. coli O157:H7. Quantitative PCR further confirmed that the Stx2 phage lytic growth was repressed by pnp deletion. Consistent with reduced Stx2 production and Stx2 phage activation, the transcriptional levels of genes involved in phage lysis and replication were down-regulated. In addition, disruption of pnp in E. coli O157:H7 decreased its adhesion to intestinal epithelial cells as well as cattle colonic explant tissues. On the other hand, PNPase inactivation in E. coli O157:H7 enhanced Tir protein content and the transcription of type three secretion system components, including genes encoding intimin, Tir, and EspB as well as locus of enterocyte and effacement positive regulator, Ler. Collectively, data indicate that PNPase has pleiotropic effects on the virulence of E. coli O157:H7. PMID:26347717

  18. The kinetic mechanism of Human Thymidine Phosphorylase - a molecular target for cancer drug development.

    PubMed

    Deves, Candida; Rostirolla, Diana Carolina; Martinelli, Leonardo Kras Borges; Bizarro, Cristiano Valim; Santos, Diogenes Santiago; Basso, Luiz Augusto

    2014-03-01

    Human Thymidine Phosphorylase (HTP), also known as the platelet-derived endothelial cell growth factor (PD-ECGF) or gliostatin, catalyzes the reversible phosphorolysis of thymidine (dThd) to thymine and 2-deoxy-α-d-ribose-1-phosphate (2dR1P). HTP is a key enzyme in the pyrimidine salvage pathway involved in dThd homeostasis in cells. HTP is a target for anticancer drug development as its enzymatic activity promotes angiogenesis. Here, we describe cloning, expression, and purification to homogeneity of recombinant TYMP-encoded HTP. Peptide fingerprinting and the molecular mass value of the homogenous protein confirmed its identity as HTP assessed by mass spectrometry. Size exclusion chromatography showed that HTP is a dimer in solution. Kinetic studies revealed that HTP displayed substrate inhibition for dThd. Initial velocity and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) studies suggest that HTP catalysis follows a rapid-equilibrium random bi-bi kinetic mechanism. ITC measurements also showed that dThd and Pi binding are favorable processes. The pH-rate profiles indicated that maximal enzyme activity was achieved at low pH values. Functional groups with apparent pK values of 5.2 and 9.0 are involved in dThd binding and groups with pK values of 6.1 and 7.8 are involved in phosphate binding. PMID:24407036

  19. Thymidine phosphorylase exerts complex effects on bone resorption and formation in myeloma.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huan; Liu, Zhiqiang; Du, Juan; He, Jin; Lin, Pei; Amini, Behrang; Starbuck, Michael W; Novane, Nora; Shah, Jatin J; Davis, Richard E; Hou, Jian; Gagel, Robert F; Yang, Jing

    2016-08-24

    Myelomatous bone disease is characterized by the development of lytic bone lesions and a concomitant reduction in bone formation, leading to chronic bone pain and fractures. To understand the underlying mechanism, we investigated the contribution of myeloma-expressed thymidine phosphorylase (TP) to bone lesions. In osteoblast progenitors, TP up-regulated the methylation of RUNX2 and osterix, leading to decreased bone formation. In osteoclast progenitors, TP up-regulated the methylation of IRF8 and thereby enhanced expression of NFATc1 (nuclear factor of activated T cells, cytoplasmic 1 protein), leading to increased bone resorption. TP reversibly catalyzes thymidine into thymine and 2-deoxy-d-ribose (2DDR). Myeloma-secreted 2DDR bound to integrin αVβ3/α5β1 in the progenitors, activated PI3K (phosphoinositide 3-kinase)/Akt signaling, and increased DNMT3A (DNA methyltransferase 3A) expression, resulting in hypermethylation of RUNX2, osterix, and IRF8 This study elucidates an important mechanism for myeloma-induced bone lesions, suggesting that targeting TP may be a viable approach to healing resorbed bone in patients. Because TP overexpression is common in bone-metastatic tumors, our findings could have additional mechanistic implications. PMID:27559096

  20. Immobilized purine nucleoside phosphorylase from Schistosoma mansoni for specific inhibition studies.

    PubMed

    de Moraes, Marcela Cristina; Cardoso, Carmen L; Cass, Quezia B

    2013-05-01

    The parasite Schistosoma mansoni (Sm) depends exclusively on the salvage pathway for its purine requirements. The enzyme purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) is, therefore, a promising target for development of antischistosomal agents and an assay for screening of inhibitors. To enable this, immobilized SmPNP reactors were produced. By quantification of hypoxanthine by liquid chromatography, kinetic constants (K M) for the substrate inosine were determined for the free and immobilized enzyme as 110 ± 6.90 μmol L (-1) and 164 ± 13.4 μmol L (-1), respectively, indicating that immobilization did not affect enzyme activity. Furthermore, the enzyme retained 25 % of its activity after four months. Non-Michaelis kinetics for the phosphate substrate, and capacity for Pi-independent hydrolysis were also demonstrated, despite the low rate of enzymatic catalysis. Use of an SmPNP immobilized enzyme reactor (IMER) for inhibitor-screening assays was demonstrated with a small library of 9-deazaguanine analogues. The method had high selectivity and specificity compared with screening by use of the free enzyme by the Kalckar method, and furnished results without the need for verification of the absence of false positives. PMID:23535739

  1. Defects in polynucleotide phosphorylase impairs virulence in Escherichia coli O157:H7

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jia; Zhu, Mei-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase) is reported to regulate virulence in Salmonella, Yersinia sp. and Campylobacter jejuni, yet its role in Escherichia coli O157:H7 has not been investigated. To gain insights into its roles in E. coli O157:H7 virulence, pnp deletion mutants were generated and the major virulence factors were compared to their parental wild type strains. Deletion of pnp in E. coli O157:H7 dramatically decreased stx2 mRNA expression and Stx2 protein production, and impaired lambdoid prophage activation in E. coli O157:H7. Quantitative PCR further confirmed that the Stx2 phage lytic growth was repressed by pnp deletion. Consistent with reduced Stx2 production and Stx2 phage activation, the transcriptional levels of genes involved in phage lysis and replication were down-regulated. In addition, disruption of pnp in E. coli O157:H7 decreased its adhesion to intestinal epithelial cells as well as cattle colonic explant tissues. On the other hand, PNPase inactivation in E. coli O157:H7 enhanced Tir protein content and the transcription of type three secretion system components, including genes encoding intimin, Tir, and EspB as well as locus of enterocyte and effacement positive regulator, Ler. Collectively, data indicate that PNPase has pleiotropic effects on the virulence of E. coli O157:H7. PMID:26347717

  2. Investigation and management of the hepatic glycogen storage diseases.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Kaustuv

    2015-07-01

    The glycogen storage diseases (GSD) comprise a group of disorders that involve the disruption of metabolism of glycogen. Glycogen is stored in various organs including skeletal muscle, the kidneys and liver. The liver stores glycogen to supply the rest of the body with glucose when required. Therefore, disruption of this process can lead to hypoglycaemia. If glycogen is not broken down effectively, this can lead to hepatomegaly. Glycogen synthase deficiency leads to impaired glycogen synthesis and consequently the liver is small. Glycogen brancher deficiency can lead to abnormal glycogen being stored in the liver leading to a quite different disorder of progressive liver dysfunction. Understanding the physiology of GSD I, III, VI and IX guides dietary treatments and the provision of appropriate amounts and types of carbohydrates. There has been recent re-emergence in the literature of the use of ketones in therapy, either in the form of the salt D,L-3-hydroxybutyrate or medium chain triglyceride (MCT). High protein diets have also been advocated. Alternative waxy maize based starches seem to show promising early data of efficacy. There are many complications of each of these disorders and they need to be prospectively surveyed and managed. Liver and kidney transplantation is still indicated in severe refractory disease. PMID:26835382

  3. Investigation and management of the hepatic glycogen storage diseases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The glycogen storage diseases (GSD) comprise a group of disorders that involve the disruption of metabolism of glycogen. Glycogen is stored in various organs including skeletal muscle, the kidneys and liver. The liver stores glycogen to supply the rest of the body with glucose when required. Therefore, disruption of this process can lead to hypoglycaemia. If glycogen is not broken down effectively, this can lead to hepatomegaly. Glycogen synthase deficiency leads to impaired glycogen synthesis and consequently the liver is small. Glycogen brancher deficiency can lead to abnormal glycogen being stored in the liver leading to a quite different disorder of progressive liver dysfunction. Understanding the physiology of GSD I, III, VI and IX guides dietary treatments and the provision of appropriate amounts and types of carbohydrates. There has been recent re-emergence in the literature of the use of ketones in therapy, either in the form of the salt D,L-3-hydroxybutyrate or medium chain triglyceride (MCT). High protein diets have also been advocated. Alternative waxy maize based starches seem to show promising early data of efficacy. There are many complications of each of these disorders and they need to be prospectively surveyed and managed. Liver and kidney transplantation is still indicated in severe refractory disease. PMID:26835382

  4. Specific features of glycogen metabolism in the liver.

    PubMed Central

    Bollen, M; Keppens, S; Stalmans, W

    1998-01-01

    Although the general pathways of glycogen synthesis and glycogenolysis are identical in all tissues, the enzymes involved are uniquely adapted to the specific role of glycogen in different cell types. In liver, where glycogen is stored as a reserve of glucose for extrahepatic tissues, the glycogen-metabolizing enzymes have properties that enable the liver to act as a sensor of blood glucose and to store or mobilize glycogen according to the peripheral needs. The prime effector of hepatic glycogen deposition is glucose, which blocks glycogenolysis and promotes glycogen synthesis in various ways. Other glycogenic stimuli for the liver are insulin, glucocorticoids, parasympathetic (vagus) nerve impulses and gluconeogenic precursors such as fructose and amino acids. The phosphorolysis of glycogen is mainly mediated by glucagon and by the orthosympathetic neurotransmitters noradrenaline and ATP. Many glycogenolytic stimuli, e.g. adenosine, nucleotides and NO, also act indirectly, via secretion of eicosanoids from non-parenchymal cells. Effectors often initiate glycogenolysis cooperatively through different mechanisms. PMID:9806880

  5. Muscle glycogen loading with a liquid carbohydrate supplement.

    PubMed

    Lamb, D R; Snyder, A C; Baur, T S

    1991-03-01

    This study compared two high carbohydrate (CHO) diets in 14 male runners for effects on muscle glycogen deposition, endurance, and sensations of gastrointestinal discomfort. Muscle glycogen was measured in the vastus lateralis at rest and run time to exhaustion at 75% VO2max was measured following 3-1/2 days on a 50% CHO diet. After 14 days the subjects consumed a 20% CHO diet and continued training to reduce glycogen. During the next 3-1/2 days, subjects ran less and consumed a 90% CHO diet emphasizing pasta and rice (Pasta, n = 7) or lesser amounts of pasta and rice supplemented by a maltodextrin beverage (Supplement, n = 7). Glycogen was again measured, followed by a second run to exhaustion. Compared to the 50% CHO diet, Pasta increased muscle glycogen by 27.1 +/- 12.2 mmoles/kg muscle (M +/- SE; P < 0.05) and run time by 15.7 +/- 5.9 min; Supplement increased glycogen by 43.2 +/- 13.5 mmoles/kg (P < 0.05) and run time by 29.0 +/- 7.4 min (P < 0.05). Total glycogen concentrations and run times were not significantly different for Pasta versus Supplement. Subjects reported less gastrointestinal discomfort and greater overall preference for Supplement than for Pasta. Thus, glycogen loading can be accomplished at least as effectively and more comfortably by substituting a maltodextrin drink for some of the pasta and rice in a glycogen loading diet. PMID:1844402

  6. The essential role of methylthioadenosine phosphorylase in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Barbara A.; Karasik, Ellen; Gillard, Bryan; Morrison, Carl; Mohler, James; Phillips, James G.; Smiraglia, Dominic J.

    2016-01-01

    Prostatic epithelial cells secrete high levels of acetylated polyamines into the prostatic lumen. This distinctive characteristic places added strain on the connected pathways, which are forced to increase metabolite production to maintain pools. The methionine salvage pathway recycles the one-carbon unit lost to polyamine biosynthesis back to the methionine cycle, allowing for replenishment of SAM pools providing a mechanism to help mitigate metabolic stress associated with high flux through these pathways. The rate-limiting enzyme involved in this process is methylthioadenosine phosphorylase (MTAP), which, although commonly deleted in many cancers, is protected in prostate cancer. We report near universal retention of MTAP expression in a panel of human prostate cancer cell lines as well as patient samples. Upon metabolic perturbation, prostate cancer cell lines upregulate MTAP and this correlates with recovery of SAM levels. Furthermore, in a mouse model of prostate cancer we find that both normal prostate and diseased prostate maintain higher SAM levels than other tissues, even under increased metabolic stress. Finally, we show that knockdown of MTAP, both genetically and pharmacologically, blocks androgen sensitive prostate cancer growth in vivo. Our findings strongly suggest that the methionine salvage pathway is a major player in homeostatic regulation of metabolite pools in prostate cancer due to their high level of flux through the polyamine biosynthetic pathway. Therefore, this pathway, and specifically the MTAP enzyme, is an attractive therapeutic target for prostate cancer. PMID:26910893

  7. Polynucleotide Phosphorylase Protects Escherichia coli against Oxidative Stress†

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jinhua; Jiang, Zhe; Liu, Min; Gong, Xin; Wu, Shaohui; Burns, Christopher M.; Li, Zhongwei

    2009-01-01

    Escherichia coli polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase) primarily functions in RNA degradation. It is an exoribonuclease and integral component of the multienzyme RNA degradosome complex [Carpousis et al. (1994) Cell 76, 889]. PNPase was previously shown to specifically bind a synthetic RNA containing the oxidative lesion 8-hydroxyguanine (8-oxoG) [Hayakawa et al. (2001) Biochemistry 40, 9977], suggesting a possible role in removing oxidatively damaged RNA. Here we show that PNPase binds to RNA molecules of natural sequence that were oxidatively damaged by treatment with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) postsynthetically. PNPase bound oxidized RNA with higher affinity than untreated RNA of the same sequence, raising the possibility that it may act against a wide variety of lesions. The importance of such a protective role is illustrated by the observation that, under conditions known to cause oxidative damage to cytoplasmic components, PNPase-deficient cells are less viable than wild-type cells. Further, when challenged with H2O2, PNPase-deficient cells accumulate 8-oxoG in cellular RNA to a greater extent than wild-type cells, suggesting that this RNase functions in minimizing oxidized RNA in vivo. Introducing the pnp gene encoding PNPase rescues defects in growth and RNA quality of the pnp mutant cells. Our results also suggest that protection against oxidative stress is an intrinsic function of PNPase because association with the RNA degradosome or with RNA helicase B (RhlB) is not required. PMID:19219992

  8. Biochemical abnormalities in a patient with thymidine phosphorylase deficiency with fatal outcome.

    PubMed

    Bakker, Jaap A; Schlesser, Patrick; Smeets, Hubert J M; Francois, Baudouin; Bierau, Jörgen

    2010-12-01

    Deficiency of the cytosolic enzyme thymidine phosphorylase (TP) causes a multisystem disorder called mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy (MNGIE) syndrome. Clinical symptoms are gastrointestinal dysfunction, muscle involvement and neurological deterioration. TP deficiency is biochemically characterised by accumulation of thymidine and deoxyuridine in body fluids and compromised mitochondrial deoxyribose nucleic acid (mtDNA) integrity (depletion and multiple deletions). In this report we describe a patient with the clinical and biochemical features related to the end stage of the disease. Home parenteral nutrition had started to improve the clinical condition and preparations were initiated for stem cell transplantation (SCT) as a last resort treatment. Unfortunately, the patient died during the induction phase of SCT. This report shows that TP deficiency is a severe clinical condition with a broad spectrum of affected tissues. TP deficiency can be easily determined by the measurement of pyrimidine metabolites in body fluids and TP activity in peripheral blood leucocytes. Early detection and treatment may prevent the progress of the clinical symptoms and, therefore, should be considered for inclusion in newborn screening programmes. PMID:20151198

  9. Docking and small angle X-ray scattering studies of purine nucleoside phosphorylase.

    PubMed

    Filgueira de Azevedo, Walter; dos Santos, Giovanni César; dos Santos, Denis Marangoni; Olivieri, Johnny Rizzieri; Canduri, Fernanda; Silva, Rafael Guimarães; Basso, Luiz Augusto; Renard, Gaby; da Fonseca, Isabel Osório; Mendes, Maria Anita; Palma, Mário Sérgio; Santos, Diógenes Santiago

    2003-10-01

    Docking simulations have been used to assess protein complexes with some success. Small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) is a well-established technique to investigate protein spatial configuration. This work describes the integration of geometric docking with SAXS to investigate the quaternary structure of recombinant human purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP). This enzyme catalyzes the reversible phosphorolysis of N-ribosidic bonds of purine nucleosides and deoxynucleosides. A genetic deficiency due to mutations in the gene encoding for PNP causes gradual decrease in T-cell immunity. Inappropriate activation of T-cells has been implicated in several clinically relevant human conditions such as transplant rejection, rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, and T-cell lymphomas. PNP is therefore a target for inhibitor development aiming at T-cell immune response modulation and has been submitted to extensive structure-based drug design. The present analysis confirms the trimeric structure observed in the crystal. The potential application of the present procedure to other systems is discussed. PMID:13679062

  10. Multiple disulfide bridges modulate conformational stability and flexibility in hyperthermophilic archaeal purine nucleoside phosphorylase.

    PubMed

    Bagarolo, Maria Libera; Porcelli, Marina; Martino, Elisa; Feller, Georges; Cacciapuoti, Giovanna

    2015-10-01

    5'-Deoxy-5'-methylthioadenosine phosphorylase from Sulfolobus solfataricus is a hexameric hyperthermophilic protein containing in each subunit two pairs of disulfide bridges, a CXC motif, and one free cysteine. The contribution of each disulfide bridge to the protein conformational stability and flexibility has been assessed by comparing the thermal unfolding and the limited proteolysis of the wild-type enzyme and its variants obtained by site-directed mutagenesis of the seven cysteine residues. All variants catalyzed efficiently MTA cleavage with specific activity similar to the wild-type enzyme. The elimination of all cysteine residues caused a substantial decrease of ΔHcal (850 kcal/mol) and Tmax (39°C) with respect to the wild-type indicating that all cysteine pairs and especially the CXC motif significantly contribute to the enzyme thermal stability. Disulfide bond Cys200-Cys262 and the CXC motif weakly affected protein flexibility while the elimination of the disulfide bond Cys138-Cys205 lead to an increased protease susceptibility. Experimental evidence from limited proteolysis, differential scanning calorimetry, and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis under reducing and nonreducing conditions also allowed to propose a stabilizing role for the free Cys164. PMID:26116147

  11. The ribonuclease polynucleotide phosphorylase can interact with small regulatory RNAs in both protective and degradative modes

    PubMed Central

    Bandyra, Katarzyna J.; Sinha, Dhriti; Syrjanen, Johanna; Luisi, Ben F.; De Lay, Nicholas R.

    2016-01-01

    In all bacterial species examined thus far, small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) contribute to intricate patterns of dynamic genetic regulation. Many of the actions of these nucleic acids are mediated by well-characterized chaperones such as the Hfq protein, but genetic screens have also recently identified the 3′-to-5′ exoribonuclease polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase) as an unexpected stabilizer and facilitator of sRNAs in vivo. To understand how a ribonuclease might mediate these effects, we tested the interactions of PNPase with sRNAs and found that the enzyme can readily degrade these nucleic acids in vitro but, nonetheless, copurifies from cell extracts with the same sRNAs without discernible degradation or modification to their 3′ ends, suggesting that the associated RNA is protected against the destructive activity of the ribonuclease. In vitro, PNPase, Hfq, and sRNA can form a ternary complex in which the ribonuclease plays a nondestructive, structural role. Such ternary complexes might be formed transiently in vivo, but could help to stabilize particular sRNAs and remodel their population on Hfq. Taken together, our results indicate that PNPase can be programmed to act on RNA in either destructive or stabilizing modes in vivo and may form complex, protective ribonucleoprotein assemblies that shape the landscape of sRNAs available for action. PMID:26759452

  12. Capillary bioreactors based on human purine nucleoside phosphorylase: a new approach for ligands identification and characterization.

    PubMed

    de Moraes, Marcela Cristina; Ducati, Rodrigo Gay; Donato, Augusto José; Basso, Luiz Augusto; Santos, Diógenes Santiago; Cardoso, Carmen Lucia; Cass, Quezia Bezerra

    2012-04-01

    The enzyme purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) is a target for the discovery of new lead compounds employed on the treatment severe T-cell mediated disorders. Within this context, the development of new, direct, and reliable methods for ligands screening is an important task. This paper describes the preparation of fused silica capillaries human PNP (HsPNP) immobilized enzyme reactor (IMER). The activity of the obtained IMER is monitored on line in a multidimensional liquid chromatography system, by the quantification of the product formed throughout the enzymatic reaction. The K(M) value for the immobilized enzyme was about twofold higher than that measured for the enzyme in solution (255 ± 29.2 μM and 133 ± 14.9 μM, respectively). A new fourth-generation immucillin derivative (DI4G; IC(50)=40.6 ± 0.36 nM), previously identified and characterized in HsPNP free enzyme assays, was used to validate the IMER as a screening method for HsPNP ligands. The validated method was also used for mechanistic studies with this inhibitor. This new approach is a valuable tool to PNP ligand screening, since it directly measures the hypoxanthine released by inosine phosphorolysis, thus furnishing more reliable results than those one used in a coupled enzymatic spectrophotometric assay. PMID:22099222

  13. Glycogen branches out: new perspectives on the role of glycogen metabolism in the integration of metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Cynthia C; Jurczak, Michael J; Danos, Arpad M; Brady, Matthew J

    2006-07-01

    Glycogen is the storage form of carbohydrate for virtually every organism from yeast to primates. Most mammalian tissues store glucose as glycogen, with the major depots located in muscle and liver. The French physiologist Claude Bernard first identified a starch-like substance in liver and muscle and coined the term glycogen, or "sugar former," in the 1850s. During the 150 years since its identification, researchers in the field of glycogen metabolism have made numerous discoveries that are now recognized as significant milestones in biochemistry and cell signaling. Even so, more questions remain, and studies continue to demonstrate the complexity of the regulation of glycogen metabolism. Under classical definitions, the functions of glycogen seem clear: muscle glycogen is degraded to generate ATP during increased energy demand, whereas hepatic glycogen is broken down for release of glucose into the bloodstream to supply other tissues. However, recent findings demonstrate that the roles of glycogen metabolism in energy sensing, integration of metabolic pathways, and coordination of cellular responses to hormonal stimuli are far more complex. PMID:16478770

  14. Scintigraphic abnormalities in glycogen storage disease.

    PubMed

    Miller, J H; Gates, G F; Landing, B H; Kogut, M D; Roe, T F

    1978-04-01

    Fifteen patients with glycogen-storage disease type 1 (von Gierke's disease) were evaluated by serial scintigraphy, with a clearly recognizable pattern of an enlarged liver with diminished radionuclide accumulation, splenomegaly with considerably increased uptake and renomegaly. In seven of these patients with GSD-1 scintigraphy demonstrated focal defects of varying size. Small or stable defects suggest benign hepatic adenomata, whereas malignant change occurred in growing large lesions. The potential malignant end-point of hepatic-cell carcinoma in GSD-1 warrants careful serial liver scintigraphy with scintiangiography on a routine basis. PMID:204758

  15. Synthesis of cellobiose from starch by the successive actions of two phosphorylases.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Masayuki; Kaneda, Kyoko; Nakai, Yukiko; Kitaoka, Motomitsu; Taniguchi, Hajime

    2009-10-31

    Cellobiose was enzymatically synthesized from starch using two phosphorylases. Under the presence of 1 M Pi inorganic phosphate), glucan phosphorylase converted 40% of glucose residues in the starch molecule into G1P (glucose-1-phosphate). By electrodialysis fitted with an ion exchange membrane having molecular weight cutoff of 100, Pi was effectively dialyzed out and G1P was recovered with 80% yield. G1P and glucose were incubated with cellobiose phosphorylase in the presence of magnesium acetate at an alkaline condition. Inorganic phosphate coformed with cellobiose was immediately removed as insoluble magnesium ammonium phosphate and 85% of added G1P was converted into cellobiose. On the whole, cellobiose was produced with 60% yield from G1P and, at least, 23.7% yield from starch. PMID:19631300

  16. Transition State Analogues of Purine Nucleoside Phosphorylase: the Work of Vernon L. Schramm

    PubMed Central

    Kresge, Nicole; Simoni, Robert D.; Hill, Robert L.

    2010-01-01

    Transition State Analogue Inhibitors of Purine Nucleoside Phosphorylase from Plasmodium falciparum (Kicska, G. A., Tyler, P. C., Evans, G. B., Furneaux, R. H., Kim, K., and Schramm, V. L. (2002) J. Biol. Chem. 277, 3219–3225) Purine-less Death in Plasmodium falciparum Induced by Immucillin-H, a Transition State Analogue of Purine Nucleoside Phosphorylase (Kicska, G. A., Tyler, P. C., Evans, G. B., Furneaux, R. H., Schramm, V. L., and Kim, K. (2002) J. Biol. Chem. 277, 3226–3231) Achieving the Ultimate Physiological Goal in Transition State Analogue Inhibitors for Purine Nucleoside Phosphorylase (Lewandowicz, A., Tyler, P. C., Evans, G. B., Furneaux, R. H., and Schramm, V. L. (2003) J. Biol. Chem. 278, 31465–31468)

  17. Structure of purine nucleoside phosphorylase (DeoD) from Bacillus anthracis

    SciTech Connect

    Grenha, Rosa; Levdikov, Vladimir M.; Fogg, Mark J.; Blagova, Elena V.; Brannigan, James A. Wilkinson, Anthony J.; Wilson, Keith S.

    2005-05-01

    The crystal structure of purine nucleoside phosphorylase (DeoD) from B. anthracis was solved by X-ray crystallography using molecular replacement and refined at a resolution of 2.24 Å. Protein structures from the causative agent of anthrax (Bacillus anthracis) are being determined as part of a structural genomics programme. Amongst initial candidates for crystallographic analysis are enzymes involved in nucleotide biosynthesis, since these are recognized as potential targets in antibacterial therapy. Purine nucleoside phosphorylase is a key enzyme in the purine-salvage pathway. The crystal structure of purine nucleoside phosphorylase (DeoD) from B. anthracis has been solved by molecular replacement at 2.24 Å resolution and refined to an R factor of 18.4%. This is the first report of a DeoD structure from a Gram-positive bacterium.

  18. Analysis of two Schistosoma mansoni uridine phosphorylases isoforms suggests the emergence of a protein with a non-canonical function.

    PubMed

    da Silva Neto, Antônio Marinho; Torini de Souza, Juliana Roberta; Romanello, Larissa; Cassago, Alexandre; Serrão, Vitor Hugo Balasco; DeMarco, Ricardo; Brandão-Neto, José; Garratt, Richard Charles; Pereira, Humberto D'Muniz

    2016-06-01

    Reports of Schistosoma mansoni strains resistant to praziquantel, the only therapeutic strategy available for the treatment of schistosomiasis, have motivated the scientific community towards the search for new possible therapies. Biochemical characterization of the parasite's metabolism is an essential component for the rational development of new therapeutic alternatives. One of the so far uncharacterized enzymes is uridine phosphorylase (UP) (EC 2.4.2.3), for which the parasite genome presents two isoforms (SmUPa and SmUPb) that share 92% sequence identity. In this paper, we present crystal structures for SmUPa and SmUPb in their free states as well as bound to different ligands. This we have complemented by enzyme kinetic characterization and phylogenetic analyses. Both enzymes present an overall fold and active site structure similar to other known UPs. The kinetic analyses showed conclusively that SmUPa is a regular uridine phosphorylase but by contrast SmUPb presented no detectable activity. This is particularly noteworthy given the high level of sequence identity between the two isoforms and is probably the result of the significant differences observed for SmUPb in the vicinity of the active site itself, suggesting that it is not a UP at all. On the other hand, it was not possible to identify an alternative function for SmUPb, although our phylogenetic analyses and expression data suggest that SmUPb is still functional and plays a role in parasite metabolism. The unusual UPb isoform may open up new opportunities for understanding unique features of S. mansoni metabolism. PMID:26898674

  19. Production of polyhydroxyalkanoates by glycogen accumulating organisms treating a paper mill wastewater.

    PubMed

    Bengtsson, Simon; Werker, Alan; Welander, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    A process for production of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) by activated sludge treating a paper mill wastewater was investigated. The applied strategy was to select for glycogen accumulating organisms (GAOs) by alternating anaerobic/aerobic conditions. Acidogenic fermentation was used as pretreatment to convert various organic compounds to volatile fatty acids which are preferable substrates for PHA production. Enrichment resulted in a culture dominated by GAOs related to Defluviicoccus vanus (56%) and Candidatus Competibacter phosphatis (22%). Optimization of PHA accumulation by the enriched GAO culture was performed through batch experiments. Accumulation of PHA under anaerobic conditions was limited by the intracellular glycogen stored. Under aerobic conditions significant glycogen production (to 25% of sludge dry weight) was observed alongside PHA accumulation (to 22% of sludge dry weight). By applying a subsequent anaerobic period after an initial aerobic, the produced glycogen could be utilized for further PHA accumulation and by this strategy PHA content was increased to 42% of sludge dry weight. The PHA yield over the entire process was 0.10 kg per kg of influent COD treated which is similar to what has been achieved with a process applying feast/famine enrichment strategy with the same wastewater. PMID:18701781

  20. Glycogen supercompensation masks the effect of a traininginduced increase in GLUT-4 on muscle glucose transport.

    PubMed

    Host, H H; Hansen, P A; Nolte, L A; Chen, M M; Holloszy, J O

    1998-07-01

    Endurance exercise training induces a rapid increase in the GLUT-4 isoform of the glucose transporter in muscle. In fasted rats, insulin-stimulated muscle glucose transport is increased in proportion to the increase in GLUT-4. There is evidence that high muscle glycogen may decrease insulin-stimulated glucose transport. This study was undertaken to determine whether glycogen supercompensation interferes with the increase in glucose transport associated with an exercise-induced increase in GLUT-4. Rats were trained by means of swimming for 6 h/day for 2 days. Rats fasted overnight after the last exercise bout had an approximately twofold increase in epitrochlearis muscle GLUT-4 and an associated approximately twofold increase in maximally insulin-stimulated glucose transport activity. Epitrochlearis muscles of rats fed rodent chow after exercise were glycogen supercompensated (86.4 +/- 4.8 micromol/g wet wt) and showed no significant increase in maximally insulin-stimulated glucose transport above the sedentary control value despite an approximately twofold increase in GLUT-4. Fasting resulted in higher basal muscle glucose transport rates in both sedentary and trained rats but did not significantly increase maximally insulin-stimulated transport in the sedentary group. We conclude that carbohydrate feeding that results in muscle glycogen supercompensation prevents the increase in maximally insulin-stimulated glucose transport associated with an exercise training-induced increase in muscle GLUT-4. PMID:9655766

  1. Structural basis of glycogen branching enzyme deficiency and pharmacologic rescue by rational peptide design

    PubMed Central

    Froese, D. Sean; Michaeli, Amit; McCorvie, Thomas J.; Krojer, Tobias; Sasi, Meitav; Melaev, Esther; Goldblum, Amiram; Zatsepin, Maria; Lossos, Alexander; Álvarez, Rafael; Escribá, Pablo V.; Minassian, Berge A.; von Delft, Frank; Kakhlon, Or; Yue, Wyatt W.

    2015-01-01

    Glycogen branching enzyme 1 (GBE1) plays an essential role in glycogen biosynthesis by generating α-1,6-glucosidic branches from α-1,4-linked glucose chains, to increase solubility of the glycogen polymer. Mutations in the GBE1 gene lead to the heterogeneous early-onset glycogen storage disorder type IV (GSDIV) or the late-onset adult polyglucosan body disease (APBD). To better understand this essential enzyme, we crystallized human GBE1 in the apo form, and in complex with a tetra- or hepta-saccharide. The GBE1 structure reveals a conserved amylase core that houses the active centre for the branching reaction and harbours almost all GSDIV and APBD mutations. A non-catalytic binding cleft, proximal to the site of the common APBD mutation p.Y329S, was found to bind the tetra- and hepta-saccharides and may represent a higher-affinity site employed to anchor the complex glycogen substrate for the branching reaction. Expression of recombinant GBE1-p.Y329S resulted in drastically reduced protein yield and solubility compared with wild type, suggesting this disease allele causes protein misfolding and may be amenable to small molecule stabilization. To explore this, we generated a structural model of GBE1-p.Y329S and designed peptides ab initio to stabilize the mutation. As proof-of-principle, we evaluated treatment of one tetra-peptide, Leu-Thr-Lys-Glu, in APBD patient cells. We demonstrate intracellular transport of this peptide, its binding and stabilization of GBE1-p.Y329S, and 2-fold increased mutant enzymatic activity compared with untreated patient cells. Together, our data provide the rationale and starting point for the screening of small molecule chaperones, which could become novel therapies for this disease. PMID:26199317

  2. Role of the direct and indirect pathways for glycogen synthesis in rat liver in the postprandial state

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, M.T.; Veech, R.L.

    1988-03-01

    The pathway for hepatic glycogen synthesis in the postprandial state was studied in meal-fed rats chronically cannulated in the portal vein. Plasma glucose concentration in the portal vein was found to be 4.50 +/- 1.01 mM (mean +/- SE; n = 3) before a meal and 11.54 +/- 0.70 mM (mean +/- SE; n = 4) after a meal in rats meal-fed a diet consisting of 100% commercial rat chow for 7 d. The hepatic-portal difference of plasma glucose concentration showed that liver released glucose in the fasted state and either extracted or released glucose after feeding depending on plasma glucose concentration in the portal vein. The concentration of portal vein glucose at which liver changes from glucose releasing to glucose uptake was 8 mM, the Km of glucokinase. The rate of glycogen synthesis in liver during meal-feeding was found to be approximately 1 mumol glucosyl U/g wet wt/min in rats meal-fed a 50% glucose supplemented chow diet. The relative importance of the direct vs. indirect pathway for the replenishment of hepatic glycogen was determined by the incorporation of (3-/sup 3/H,U-/sup 14/C)glucose into liver glycogen. Labeled glucose was injected into the portal vein at the end of meal-feeding. The ratio of /sup 3/H//sup 14/C in the glucosyl units of glycogen was found to be 83-92% of the ratio in liver free glucose six minutes after the injection, indicating that the majority of exogenous glucose incorporated into glycogen did not go through glycolysis. The percent contribution of the direct versus indirect pathway was quantitated from the difference in the relative specific activity (RSA) of (/sup 3/H) and (/sup 14/C)-glycogen in rats infused with (3-/sup 3/H,U-/sup 14/C)glucose. No significant difference was found between the RSA of (/sup 3/H)glycogen and (/sup 14/C)glycogen, indicating further that the pathway for glycogen synthesis in liver from exogenous glucose is from the direct pathway.

  3. B cell hyperactivity and abnormalities in T cell markers and immunoregulatory function in a patient with nucleoside phosphorylase deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Zabay, J M; De La Concha, E G; Ludeña, C; Lozano, C; Pascual-Salcedo, D; Bootello, A; Gonzalezporqué, P

    1982-01-01

    We describe a 2 year old girl with nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) deficiency, who had low blood T cell numbers and T lymphocyte blastogenic response to mitogens, hypergammaglobulinaemia, high titres of antibodies to many common antigens, various autoantibodies, a monoclonal IgM-kappa protein, an increased frequency of mature Ig containing blood B cells and a high production of Ig in vitro in unstimulated cultures. E rosetting cells showed faint or no immunofluorescence staining with monoclonal antibodies directed against T cell membrane antigens. In vitro Ig production in response to pokeweed mitogen was defective, and no T cell helper or suppressor activity was observed. It is suggested that the immunoregulatory deficiency might have caused the B cell hyperactivity. PMID:6819909

  4. Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3 (GSK-3)-Targeted Therapy and Imaging.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Mukesh K; DeGrado, Timothy R

    2016-01-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) is associated with various key biological processes, including glucose regulation, apoptosis, protein synthesis, cell signaling, cellular transport, gene transcription, proliferation, and intracellular communication. Accordingly, GSK-3 has been implicated in a wide variety of diseases and specifically targeted for both therapeutic and imaging applications by a large number of academic laboratories and pharmaceutical companies. Here, we review the structure, function, expression levels, and ligand-binding properties of GSK-3 and its connection to various diseases. A selected list of highly potent GSK-3 inhibitors, with IC50 <20 nM for adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-competitive inhibitors and IC50 <5 μM for non-ATP-competitive inhibitors, were analyzed for structure activity relationships. Furthermore, ubiquitous expression of GSK-3 and its possible impact on therapy and imaging are also highlighted. Finally, a rational perspective and possible route to selective and effective GSK-3 inhibitors is discussed. PMID:26941849

  5. Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3 (GSK-3)-Targeted Therapy and Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Mukesh K.; DeGrado, Timothy R.

    2016-01-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) is associated with various key biological processes, including glucose regulation, apoptosis, protein synthesis, cell signaling, cellular transport, gene transcription, proliferation, and intracellular communication. Accordingly, GSK-3 has been implicated in a wide variety of diseases and specifically targeted for both therapeutic and imaging applications by a large number of academic laboratories and pharmaceutical companies. Here, we review the structure, function, expression levels, and ligand-binding properties of GSK-3 and its connection to various diseases. A selected list of highly potent GSK-3 inhibitors, with IC50 <20 nM for adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-competitive inhibitors and IC50 <5 μM for non-ATP-competitive inhibitors, were analyzed for structure activity relationships. Furthermore, ubiquitous expression of GSK-3 and its possible impact on therapy and imaging are also highlighted. Finally, a rational perspective and possible route to selective and effective GSK-3 inhibitors is discussed. PMID:26941849

  6. Structure of purine nucleoside phosphorylase (DeoD) from Bacillus anthracis

    PubMed Central

    Grenha, Rosa; Levdikov, Vladimir M.; Fogg, Mark J.; Blagova, Elena V.; Brannigan, James A.; Wilkinson, Anthony J.; Wilson, Keith S.

    2005-01-01

    Protein structures from the causative agent of anthrax (Bacillus anthracis) are being determined as part of a structural genomics programme. Amongst initial candidates for crystallographic analysis are enzymes involved in nucleotide biosynthesis, since these are recognized as potential targets in antibacterial therapy. Purine nucleoside phosphorylase is a key enzyme in the purine-salvage pathway. The crystal structure of purine nucleoside phosphorylase (DeoD) from B. anthracis has been solved by molecular replacement at 2.24 Å resolution and refined to an R factor of 18.4%. This is the first report of a DeoD structure from a Gram-positive bacterium. PMID:16511068

  7. Application of crystallographic and modeling methods in the design of purine nucleoside phosphorylase inhibitors.

    PubMed Central

    Ealick, S E; Babu, Y S; Bugg, C E; Erion, M D; Guida, W C; Montgomery, J A; Secrist, J A

    1991-01-01

    Competitive inhibitors of the salvage pathway enzyme purine-nucleoside phosphorylase (purine-nucleoside:orthophosphate ribosyltransferase, EC 2.4.2.1) have been designed by using the three-dimensional structure of the enzyme as determined by x-ray crystallography. The process was an iterative one that utilized interactive computer graphics, Monte Carlo-based conformational searching, energy minimization, and x-ray crystallography. The proposed compounds were synthesized and tested by an in vitro assay. Among the compounds designed and synthesized are the most potent competitive inhibitors of purine nucleoside phosphorylase thus far reported. Images PMID:1763067

  8. Muscle glycogen and cell function--Location, location, location.

    PubMed

    Ørtenblad, N; Nielsen, J

    2015-12-01

    The importance of glycogen, as a fuel during exercise, is a fundamental concept in exercise physiology. The use of electron microscopy has revealed that glycogen is not evenly distributed in skeletal muscle fibers, but rather localized in distinct pools. In this review, we present the available evidence regarding the subcellular localization of glycogen in skeletal muscle and discuss this from the perspective of skeletal muscle fiber function. The distribution of glycogen in the defined pools within the skeletal muscle varies depending on exercise intensity, fiber phenotype, training status, and immobilization. Furthermore, these defined pools may serve specific functions in the cell. Specifically, reduced levels of these pools of glycogen are associated with reduced SR Ca(2+) release, muscle relaxation rate, and membrane excitability. Collectively, the available literature strongly demonstrates that the subcellular localization of glycogen has to be considered to fully understand the role of glycogen metabolism and signaling in skeletal muscle function. Here, we propose that the effect of low muscle glycogen on excitation-contraction coupling may serve as a built-in mechanism, which links the energetic state of the muscle fiber to energy utilization. PMID:26589115

  9. Genetics Home Reference: glycogen storage disease type 0

    MedlinePlus

    ... the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Glycogen storage disease type 0 (also known as GSD 0) is a condition caused by the body's inability to form a complex sugar called glycogen , which is a major source of stored energy in the body. GSD 0 ...

  10. Autogenous Regulation of Escherichia coli Polynucleotide Phosphorylase Expression Revisited▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Carzaniga, Thomas; Briani, Federica; Zangrossi, Sandro; Merlino, Giuseppe; Marchi, Paolo; Dehò, Gianni

    2009-01-01

    The Escherichia coli polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase; encoded by pnp), a phosphorolytic exoribonuclease, posttranscriptionally regulates its own expression at the level of mRNA stability and translation. Its primary transcript is very efficiently processed by RNase III, an endonuclease that makes a staggered double-strand cleavage about in the middle of a long stem-loop in the 5′-untranslated region. The processed pnp mRNA is then rapidly degraded in a PNPase-dependent manner. Two non-mutually exclusive models have been proposed to explain PNPase autogenous regulation. The earlier one suggested that PNPase impedes translation of the RNase III-processed pnp mRNA, thus exposing the transcript to degradative pathways. More recently, this has been replaced by the current model, which maintains that PNPase would simply degrade the promoter proximal small RNA generated by the RNase III endonucleolytic cleavage, thus destroying the double-stranded structure at the 5′ end that otherwise stabilizes the pnp mRNA. In our opinion, however, the first model was not completely ruled out. Moreover, the RNA decay pathway acting upon the pnp mRNA after disruption of the 5′ double-stranded structure remained to be determined. Here we provide additional support to the current model and show that the RNase III-processed pnp mRNA devoid of the double-stranded structure at its 5′ end is not translatable and is degraded by RNase E in a PNPase-independent manner. Thus, the role of PNPase in autoregulation is simply to remove, in concert with RNase III, the 5′ fragment of the cleaved structure that both allows translation and prevents the RNase E-mediated PNPase-independent degradation of the pnp transcript. PMID:19136586

  11. An intermittent exhaustion of the pool of glycogen in the human organism as a simple universal health promoting mechanism.

    PubMed

    Cherkas, Andriy; Golota, Sergii

    2014-03-01

    Glycogen storage in human organism is providing reserve source of glucose which is critical for normal functioning of the nervous system during periods between meals and is also important for many other tissues. Overwhelming excessive consumption of carbohydrates and decreasing physical activity among the world population lead to dramatic increase in incidence and mortality related to cardiovascular diseases, metabolic syndrome and diabetes mellitus type 2. There is an observation that many interventions with proved clinical efficiency like physical activity, intermittent fasting, caloric restriction and some pharmacological treatments have in common the ability to decrease content of glycogen in the liver and skeletal muscles. This effect leads to increased ability of these organs to uptake the next dose of glucose and store it in the form of glycogen. Moreover these interventions lead to significant life span extension, provide better body fitness and prevent development of multiple age-related diseases. In contrast excessive glucose load and saturation of tissues with glycogen provide a metabolic shift toward synthesis of fatty acids by liver. In advanced stages decreased glucose tolerance, insulin resistance, hyperinsulinemia, fatty liver disease, impairment of liver function and derangements of cholesterol metabolism are observed. It is suggested that noninvasive measurement of glycogen content in tissues could serve as important diagnostic and follow-up parameter for clinical practice and healthy lifestyle in wide population groups. PMID:24495563

  12. Crystal Structure and Substrate Recognition of Cellobionic Acid Phosphorylase, Which Plays a Key Role in Oxidative Cellulose Degradation by Microbes*

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Young-Woo; Nihira, Takanori; Arakawa, Takatoshi; Saito, Yuka; Kitaoka, Motomitsu; Nakai, Hiroyuki; Fushinobu, Shinya

    2015-01-01

    The microbial oxidative cellulose degradation system is attracting significant research attention after the recent discovery of lytic polysaccharide mono-oxygenases. A primary product of the oxidative and hydrolytic cellulose degradation system is cellobionic acid (CbA), the aldonic acid form of cellobiose. We previously demonstrated that the intracellular enzyme belonging to glycoside hydrolase family 94 from cellulolytic fungus and bacterium is cellobionic acid phosphorylase (CBAP), which catalyzes reversible phosphorolysis of CbA into glucose 1-phosphate and gluconic acid (GlcA). In this report, we describe the biochemical characterization and the three-dimensional structure of CBAP from the marine cellulolytic bacterium Saccharophagus degradans. Structures of ligand-free and complex forms with CbA, GlcA, and a synthetic disaccharide product from glucuronic acid were determined at resolutions of up to 1.6 Å. The active site is located near the dimer interface. At subsite +1, the carboxylate group of GlcA and CbA is recognized by Arg-609 and Lys-613. Additionally, one residue from the neighboring protomer (Gln-190) is involved in the carboxylate recognition of GlcA. A mutational analysis indicated that these residues are critical for the binding and catalysis of the aldonic and uronic acid acceptors GlcA and glucuronic acid. Structural and sequence comparisons with other glycoside hydrolase family 94 phosphorylases revealed that CBAPs have a unique subsite +1 with a distinct amino acid residue conservation pattern at this site. This study provides molecular insight into the energetically efficient metabolic pathway of oxidized sugars that links the oxidative cellulolytic pathway to the glycolytic and pentose phosphate pathways in cellulolytic microbes. PMID:26041776

  13. The Modulation of the Symbiont/Host Interaction between Wolbachia pipientis and Aedes fluviatilis Embryos by Glycogen Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    da Rocha Fernandes, Mariana; Martins, Renato; Pessoa Costa, Evenilton; Casagrande Pacidônio, Etiene; Araujo de Abreu, Leonardo; da Silva Vaz, Itabajara; Moreira, Luciano A.; da Fonseca, Rodrigo Nunes; Logullo, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Wolbachia pipientis, a maternally transmitted bacterium that colonizes arthropods, may affect the general aspects of insect physiology, particularly reproduction. Wolbachia is a natural endosymbiont of Aedes fluviatilis, whose effects in embryogenesis and reproduction have not been addressed so far. In this context, we investigated the correlation between glucose metabolism and morphological alterations during A. fluviatilis embryo development in Wolbachia-positive (W+) and Wolbachia-negative (W−) mosquito strains. While both strains do not display significant morphological and larval hatching differences, larger differences were observed in hexokinase activity and glycogen contents during early and mid-stages of embryogenesis, respectively. To investigate if glycogen would be required for parasite-host interaction, we reduced Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3 (GSK-3) levels in adult females and their eggs by RNAi. GSK-3 knock-down leads to embryonic lethality, lower levels of glycogen and total protein and Wolbachia reduction. Therefore, our results suggest that the relationship between A. fluviatilis and Wolbachia may be modulated by glycogen metabolism. PMID:24926801

  14. Glycogen repletion following continuous and intermittent exercise to exhaustion.

    PubMed

    Gaesser, G A; Brooks, G A

    1980-10-01

    Patterns of postexercise glycogen repletion in heart, skeletal muscle, and liver in the absence of exogenously supplied substrates during the first 4 h of recovery were assessed. Female Wistar rats were run to exhaustion using continuous (1.0 mph, 15% grade) and intermittent (alternate 1-min intervals at 0.5 and 1.5 mph, 15% grade) exercise protocols. Rats at exhaustion were characterized by marked depletion of glycogen in heart (55%), skeletal muscle (94%), and liver (97%). Blood glucose levels at exhaustion (1.33 mumol/g) were only 37% of preexercise levels. There were no significant differences between continuous and intermittent exercise groups for any of the tissue glycogen or blood glucose values. Cardiac muscle was the only tissue capable of complete restoration of glycogen levels while relying exclusively upon endogenous substrates. Concentrations of endogenous substrates present at the end of exercise were insufficient to support restoration of blood glucose levels to preexercise values nor support glycogen repletion in skeletal muscle and liver during the initial 4-h food-restricted postexercise period. With subsequent feeding, skeletal muscle demonstrated a glycogen supercompensation effect at 24 h (181.1 and 191.8% of preexercise levels for continuous and intermittent exercise, respectively). Lactate concentration in all tissues at the point exhaustion (1.5--2.5 times resting levels) were only moderately elevated and returned to preexercise levels within 15 min. It was concluded that lactate removal after exercise contributed only minimally to the repletion of muscle glycogen. PMID:7440286

  15. Liver as a source for thymidine phosphorylase replacement in mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Boschetti, Elisa; D'Alessandro, Roberto; Bianco, Francesca; Carelli, Valerio; Cenacchi, Giovanna; Pinna, Antonio D; Del Gaudio, Massimo; Rinaldi, Rita; Stanghellini, Vincenzo; Pironi, Loris; Rhoden, Kerry; Tugnoli, Vitaliano; Casali, Carlo; De Giorgio, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy (MNGIE) is a rare autosomal recessive mitochondrial disease associated with mutations in the nuclear TYMP gene. As a result, the thymidine phosphorylase (TP) enzyme activity is markedly reduced leading to toxic accumulation of thymidine and therefore altered mitochondrial DNA. MNGIE is characterized by severe gastrointestinal dysmotility, neurological impairment, reduced life expectancy and poor quality of life. There are limited therapeutic options for MNGIE. In the attempt to restore TP activity, allogenic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation has been used as cellular source of TP. The results of this approach on ∼ 20 MNGIE patients showed gastrointestinal and neurological improvement, although the 5-year mortality rate is about 70%. In this study we tested whether the liver may serve as an alternative source of TP. We investigated 11 patients (7M; 35-55 years) who underwent hepatic resection for focal disorders. Margins of normal liver tissue were processed to identify, quantify and localize the TP protein by Western Blot, ELISA, and immunohistochemistry, and to evaluate TYMP mRNA expression by qPCR. Western Blot identified TP in liver with a TP/GAPDH ratio of 0.9 ± 0.5. ELISA estimated TP content as 0.5 ± 0.07 ng/μg of total protein. TP was identified in both nuclei and cytoplasm of hepatocytes and sinusoidal lining cells. Finally, TYMP mRNA was expressed in the liver. Overall, our study demonstrates that the liver is an important source of TP. Orthotopic liver transplantation may be considered as a therapeutic alternative for MNGIE patients. PMID:24802030

  16. Liver as a Source for Thymidine Phosphorylase Replacement in Mitochondrial Neurogastrointestinal Encephalomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Boschetti, Elisa; D’Alessandro, Roberto; Bianco, Francesca; Carelli, Valerio; Cenacchi, Giovanna; Pinna, Antonio D.; Gaudio, Massimo Del; Rinaldi, Rita; Stanghellini, Vincenzo; Pironi, Loris; Rhoden, Kerry; Tugnoli, Vitaliano; Casali, Carlo; De Giorgio, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy (MNGIE) is a rare autosomal recessive mitochondrial disease associated with mutations in the nuclear TYMP gene. As a result, the thymidine phosphorylase (TP) enzyme activity is markedly reduced leading to toxic accumulation of thymidine and therefore altered mitochondrial DNA. MNGIE is characterized by severe gastrointestinal dysmotility, neurological impairment, reduced life expectancy and poor quality of life. There are limited therapeutic options for MNGIE. In the attempt to restore TP activity, allogenic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation has been used as cellular source of TP. The results of this approach on ∼20 MNGIE patients showed gastrointestinal and neurological improvement, although the 5-year mortality rate is about 70%. In this study we tested whether the liver may serve as an alternative source of TP. We investigated 11 patients (7M; 35–55 years) who underwent hepatic resection for focal disorders. Margins of normal liver tissue were processed to identify, quantify and localize the TP protein by Western Blot, ELISA, and immunohistochemistry, and to evaluate TYMP mRNA expression by qPCR. Western Blot identified TP in liver with a TP/GAPDH ratio of 0.9±0.5. ELISA estimated TP content as 0.5±0.07 ng/μg of total protein. TP was identified in both nuclei and cytoplasm of hepatocytes and sinusoidal lining cells. Finally, TYMP mRNA was expressed in the liver. Overall, our study demonstrates that the liver is an important source of TP. Orthotopic liver transplantation may be considered as a therapeutic alternative for MNGIE patients. PMID:24802030

  17. Enzymatic synthesis of stable, odorless, and powdered furanone glucosides by sucrose phosphorylase.

    PubMed

    Kitao, S; Matsudo, T; Sasaki, T; Koga, T; Kawamura, M

    2000-01-01

    Sucrose phosphorylase from Leuconostoc mesenteroides catalyzed transglucosylation from sucrose to 4-hydroxy-3(2H)-furanone derivatives. When 4-hydroxy-2,5-dimethyl-3(2H)-furanone (HDMF) and 2-ethyl-4-hydroxy-5-methyl-3(2H)-furanone or 5-ethyl-4-hydroxy-2-methyl-3(2H)-furanone (EHMF) were used as acceptors, their transfer ratios were more than 45%. In the case of glucosylation of HDMF, the major transfer product was identified as 2,5-dimethyl-3(2H)-furanone 4-O-alpha-D-glucopyranoside (DMF-G). In the case of glucosylation of EHMF, two major transfer products were obtained, and their structures were identified as 2-ethyl-5-methyl-3(2H)-furanone 4-O-alpha-D-glucopyranoside (2E5MF-G) and 5-ethyl-2-methyl-3(2H)-furanone 4-O-alpha-D-glucopyranoside (5E2MF-G) on the bases of spectrometric investigations. These glucosides were more stable than each aglycone. The glucosylated HDMF, DMF-G, was an odorless chemical, on the other hand, HDMF had a pineapple flavor. The glucosylated EHMF (EMF-G) were white odorless powders, though aglycone EHMF was a pale yellow syrup like a caramel with an intense sweet odor. Although DMF-G and EMF-G showed little radical-scavenging activity, hydrolyzates of these glucosides by an intestinal acetone powder from pigs had antioxidative activity as well as their aglycones. It was suggested that these glucosides improved some physical properties and may become prodrugs by glucosylation. PMID:10705458

  18. The GH130 Family of Mannoside Phosphorylases Contains Glycoside Hydrolases That Target β-1,2-Mannosidic Linkages in Candida Mannan*

    PubMed Central

    Cuskin, Fiona; Baslé, Arnaud; Ladevèze, Simon; Day, Alison M.; Gilbert, Harry J.; Davies, Gideon J.; Potocki-Véronèse, Gabrielle; Lowe, Elisabeth C.

    2015-01-01

    The depolymerization of complex glycans is an important biological process that is of considerable interest to environmentally relevant industries. β-Mannose is a major component of plant structural polysaccharides and eukaryotic N-glycans. These linkages are primarily cleaved by glycoside hydrolases, although recently, a family of glycoside phosphorylases, GH130, have also been shown to target β-1,2- and β-1,4-mannosidic linkages. In these phosphorylases, bond cleavage was mediated by a single displacement reaction in which phosphate functions as the catalytic nucleophile. A cohort of GH130 enzymes, however, lack the conserved basic residues that bind the phosphate nucleophile, and it was proposed that these enzymes function as glycoside hydrolases. Here we show that two Bacteroides enzymes, BT3780 and BACOVA_03624, which lack the phosphate binding residues, are indeed β-mannosidases that hydrolyze β-1,2-mannosidic linkages through an inverting mechanism. Because the genes encoding these enzymes are located in genetic loci that orchestrate the depolymerization of yeast α-mannans, it is likely that the two enzymes target the β-1,2-mannose residues that cap the glycan produced by Candida albicans. The crystal structure of BT3780 in complex with mannose bound in the −1 and +1 subsites showed that a pair of glutamates, Glu227 and Glu268, hydrogen bond to O1 of α-mannose, and either of these residues may function as the catalytic base. The candidate catalytic acid and the other residues that interact with the active site mannose are conserved in both GH130 mannoside phosphorylases and β-1,2-mannosidases. Functional phylogeny identified a conserved lysine, Lys199 in BT3780, as a key specificity determinant for β-1,2-mannosidic linkages. PMID:26286752

  19. The Transcriptional Profiling of Glycogenes Associated with Hepatocellular Carcinoma Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tianhua; Zhang, Shu; Chen, Jie; Jiang, Kai; Zhang, Qinle; Guo, Kun; Liu, Yinkun

    2014-01-01

    Background and objective Metastasis is one of the important reasons for the poor prognosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), abnormal glycosylation plays a pivotal role in HCC metastasis. The goal of this study was to screen and validate the transcriptional profiling of glycogenes associated with HCC metastasis. Methodology The differentially transcribed glycogenes were screened out by the Human Glycosylation RT2 Profiler PCR Array, and were identified by qRT-PCR in human HCC cell lines and their orthotopic xenograft tumors. Further analyses were performed with K-mean clustering, Gene Ontology (GO) and ingenuity pathways analysis (IPA). Four differentially transcribed glycogenes were validated in clinical cancer specimens by qRT-PCR. Results A total of thirty-three differentially transcribed glycogenes were obtained by comparison the transcription in the metastatic human HCC cell lines (MHCC97L, MHCC97H and HCCLM3) with the transcription in the non-metastatic HCC cell line Hep3B. Seven differentially transcribed glycogenes were selected to further identification in human HCC cell lines and their orthotopic xenograft tumors. According to their trends by K-mean clustering, all of the differentially transcribed glycogenes were classified in six clusters. GO analysis of the differentially transcribed glycogenes described them in biological process, subcellular location and molecular function. Furthermore, the partial regulatory network of the differentially transcribed glycogenes was acquired through the IPA. The transcription levels of galnt3, gcnt3, man1a1, mgat5b in non-metastatic and metastatic HCC clinical cancer specimens showed the same changing trends with the results in human HCC cell lines and their orthotopic xenograft tumors, and the divergent transcription levels of gcnt3 and mgat5b were statistically significant. Conclusions The transcriptional profiling of glycogenes associated with HCC metastasis was obtained and validated in this study and it might

  20. Anopheles gambiae Purine Nucleoside Phosphorylase: Catalysis, Structure, and Inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor,E.; Rinaldo-Matthis, A.; Li, L.; Ghanem, M.; Hazleton, K.; Cassera, M.; Almo, S.; Schramm, V.

    2007-01-01

    The purine salvage pathway of Anopheles gambiae, a mosquito that transmits malaria, has been identified in genome searches on the basis of sequence homology with characterized enzymes. Purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) is a target for the development of therapeutic agents in humans and purine auxotrophs, including malarial parasites. The PNP from Anopheles gambiae (AgPNP) was expressed in Escherichia coli and compared to the PNPs from Homo sapiens (HsPNP) and Plasmodium falciparum (PfPNP). AgPNP has kcat values of 54 and 41 s-1 for 2'-deoxyinosine and inosine, its preferred substrates, and 1.0 s-1 for guanosine. However, the chemical step is fast for AgPNP at 226 s-1 for guanosine in pre-steady-state studies. 5'-Deaza-1'-aza-2'-deoxy-1'-(9-methylene)-Immucillin-H (DADMe-ImmH) is a transition-state mimic for a 2'-deoxyinosine ribocation with a fully dissociated N-ribosidic bond and is a slow-onset, tight-binding inhibitor with a dissociation constant of 3.5 pM. This is the tightest-binding inhibitor known for any PNP, with a remarkable Km/Ki* of 5.4 x 107, and is consistent with enzymatic transition state predictions of enhanced transition-state analogue binding in enzymes with enhanced catalytic efficiency. Deoxyguanosine is a weaker substrate than deoxyinosine, and DADMe-Immucillin-G is less tightly bound than DADMe-ImmH, with a dissociation constant of 23 pM for AgPNP as compared to 7 pM for HsPNP. The crystal structure of AgPNP was determined in complex with DADMe-ImmH and phosphate to a resolution of 2.2 Angstroms to reveal the differences in substrate and inhibitor specificity. The distance from the N1' cation to the phosphate O4 anion is shorter in the AgPNP{center_dot}DADMe-ImmH{center_dot}PO4 complex than in HsPNP{center_dot}DADMe-ImmH{center_dot}SO4, offering one explanation for the stronger inhibitory effect of DADMe-ImmH for AgPNP.

  1. Long-Term Administration of Dehydroepiandrosterone Accelerates Glucose Catabolism via Activation of PI3K/Akt-PFK-2 Signaling Pathway in Rats Fed a High-Fat Diet

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jian; Ge, Chongyang; Yu, Lei; Li, Longlong; Ma, Haitian

    2016-01-01

    Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) has a fat-reducing effect, while little information is available on whether DHEA regulates glucose metabolism, which would in turn affect fat deposition. To investigate the effects of DHEA on glucose metabolism, rats were administered a high-fat diet containing either 0 (HCG), 25 (HLG), 50 (HMG), or 100 (HHG) mg·kg-1 DHEA per day via gavage for 8 weeks. Results showed that long-term administration of DHEA inhibited body weight gain in rats on a high-fat diet. No statistical differences in serum glucose levels were observed, whereas hepatic glycogen content in HMG and HHG groups and muscle glycogen content in HLG and HMG groups were higher than those in HCG group. Glucokinase, malate dehydrogenase and phosphofructokinase-2 activities in HMG and HHG groups, pyruvate kinase and succinate dehydrogenase activities in HMG group, and pyruvate dehydrogenase activity in all DHEA treatment groups were increased compared with those in HCG group. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and glycogen phosphorylase mRNA levels were decreased in HMG and HHG groups, whereas glycogen synthase-2 mRNA level was increased in HMG group compared with those in HCG. The abundance of Glut2 mRNA in HMG and HHG groups and Glut4 mRNA in HMG group was higher than that in HCG group. DHEA treatment increased serum leptin content in HMG and HHG groups compared with that in HCG group. Serum insulin content and insulin receptor mRNA level in HMG group and insulin receptor substrate-2 mRNA level in HMG and HHG group were increased compared with those in HCG group. Furthermore, Pi3k mRNA level in HMG and Akt mRNA level in HMG and HHG groups were significantly increased than those in HCG group. These data showed that DHEA treatment could enhance glycogen storage and accelerate glucose catabolism in rats fed a high-fat diet, and this effect may be associated with the activation of PI3K/Akt-PFK-2 signaling pathway. PMID:27410429

  2. Long-Term Administration of Dehydroepiandrosterone Accelerates Glucose Catabolism via Activation of PI3K/Akt-PFK-2 Signaling Pathway in Rats Fed a High-Fat Diet.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jian; Ge, Chongyang; Yu, Lei; Li, Longlong; Ma, Haitian

    2016-01-01

    Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) has a fat-reducing effect, while little information is available on whether DHEA regulates glucose metabolism, which would in turn affect fat deposition. To investigate the effects of DHEA on glucose metabolism, rats were administered a high-fat diet containing either 0 (HCG), 25 (HLG), 50 (HMG), or 100 (HHG) mg·kg-1 DHEA per day via gavage for 8 weeks. Results showed that long-term administration of DHEA inhibited body weight gain in rats on a high-fat diet. No statistical differences in serum glucose levels were observed, whereas hepatic glycogen content in HMG and HHG groups and muscle glycogen content in HLG and HMG groups were higher than those in HCG group. Glucokinase, malate dehydrogenase and phosphofructokinase-2 activities in HMG and HHG groups, pyruvate kinase and succinate dehydrogenase activities in HMG group, and pyruvate dehydrogenase activity in all DHEA treatment groups were increased compared with those in HCG group. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and glycogen phosphorylase mRNA levels were decreased in HMG and HHG groups, whereas glycogen synthase-2 mRNA level was increased in HMG group compared with those in HCG. The abundance of Glut2 mRNA in HMG and HHG groups and Glut4 mRNA in HMG group was higher than that in HCG group. DHEA treatment increased serum leptin content in HMG and HHG groups compared with that in HCG group. Serum insulin content and insulin receptor mRNA level in HMG group and insulin receptor substrate-2 mRNA level in HMG and HHG group were increased compared with those in HCG group. Furthermore, Pi3k mRNA level in HMG and Akt mRNA level in HMG and HHG groups were significantly increased than those in HCG group. These data showed that DHEA treatment could enhance glycogen storage and accelerate glucose catabolism in rats fed a high-fat diet, and this effect may be associated with the activation of PI3K/Akt-PFK-2 signaling pathway. PMID:27410429

  3. Mechanisms underlying impaired GLUT-4 translocation in glycogen-supercompensated muscles of exercised rats.

    PubMed

    Kawanaka, K; Nolte, L A; Han, D H; Hansen, P A; Holloszy, J O

    2000-12-01

    Exercise training induces an increase in GLUT-4 in muscle. We previously found that feeding rats a high-carbohydrate diet after exercise, with muscle glycogen supercompensation, results in a decrease in insulin responsiveness so severe that it masks the effect of a training-induced twofold increase in GLUT-4 on insulin-stimulated muscle glucose transport. One purpose of this study was to determine whether insulin signaling is impaired. Maximally insulin-stimulated phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase activity was not significantly reduced, whereas protein kinase B (PKB) phosphorylation was approximately 50% lower (P < 0.01) in muscles of chow-fed, than in those of fasted, exercise-trained rats. Our second purpose was to determine whether contraction-stimulated glucose transport is also impaired. The stimulation of glucose transport and the increase in cell surface GLUT-4 induced by contractions were both decreased by approximately 65% in glycogen-supercompensated muscles of trained rats. The contraction-stimulated increase in AMP kinase activity, which has been implicated in the activation of glucose transport by contractions, was approximately 80% lower in the muscles of the fed compared with the fasted rats 18 h after exercise. These results show that both the insulin- and contraction-stimulated pathways for muscle glucose transport activation are impaired in glycogen-supercompensated muscles and provide insight regarding possible mechanisms. PMID:11093919

  4. Hepatic glycogen synthesis in the fetal mouse: An ultrastructural, morphometric, and autoradiographic investigation of the relationship between the smooth endoplasmic reticulum and glycogen

    SciTech Connect

    Breslin, J.S.

    1989-01-01

    Fetal rodent hepatocytes undergo a rapid and significant accumulation of glycogen prior to birth. The distinct association of the smooth endoplasmic reticulum (SER) with glycogen during glycogen synthesis documented in the adult hepatocyte has not been clearly demonstrated in the fetus. The experiments described in this dissertation tested the hypothesis that SER is present and functions in the synthesis of fetal hepatic glycogen. Biochemical analysis, light microscopic (LM) histochemistry and electron microscope (EM) morphometry demonstrated that fetal hepatic glycogen synthesis began on day 15, with maximum accumulation occurring between days 17-19. Glycogen accumulation began in a small population of cells. Both the number of cells containing glycogen and the quantity of glycogen per cell increased as glycogen accumulated. Smooth endoplasmic reticulum (SER) was observed on day 14 of gestation and throughout fetal hepatic glycogen synthesis, primarily as dilated ribosome-free terminal extensions of rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER), frequently associated with glycogen. SER was in close proximity to isolated particles of glycogen and at the periphery of large compact glycogen deposits. Morphometry demonstrated that the membrane surface of SER in the average fetal hepatocyte increased as glycogen accumulated through day 18 and dropped significantly as glycogen levels peaked on day 19. Parallel alterations in RER membrane surface, indicated overall increases in ER membrane surface. Autoradiography following administration of {sup 3}H-galactose demonstrated that newly synthesized glycogen was deposited near profiles of SER at day 16 and at day 18; however, at day 18 the majority of label was uniformly distributed over glycogen remote from profiles of SER.

  5. Four Generations of Transition State Analogues for Human Purine Nucleoside Phosphorylase

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, M.; Shi, W; Rinaldo-Mathis, A; Tyler, P; Evans, G; Almo, S; Schramm, V

    2010-01-01

    Inhibition of human purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) stops growth of activated T-cells and the formation of 6-oxypurine bases, making it a target for leukemia, autoimmune disorders, and gout. Four generations of ribocation transition-state mimics bound to PNP are structurally characterized. Immucillin-H (K*{sub i} = 58 pM, first-generation) contains an iminoribitol cation with four asymmetric carbons. DADMe-Immucillin-H (K*{sub i} = 9 pM, second-generation), uses a methylene-bridged dihydroxypyrrolidine cation with two asymmetric centers. DATMe-Immucillin-H (K*{sub i} = 9 pM, third-generation) contains an open-chain amino alcohol cation with two asymmetric carbons. SerMe-ImmH (K*{sub i} = 5 pM, fourth-generation) uses achiral dihydroxyaminoalcohol seramide as the ribocation mimic. Crystal structures of PNPs establish features of tight binding to be; (1) ion-pair formation between bound phosphate (or its mimic) and inhibitor cation, (2) leaving-group interactions to N1, O6, and N7 of 9-deazahypoxanthine, (3) interaction between phosphate and inhibitor hydroxyl groups, and (4) His257 interacting with the 5{prime}-hydroxyl group. The first generation analogue is an imperfect fit to the catalytic site with a long ion pair distance between the iminoribitol and bound phosphate and weaker interactions to the leaving group. Increasing the ribocation to leaving-group distance in the second- to fourth-generation analogues provides powerful binding interactions and a facile synthetic route to powerful inhibitors. Despite chemical diversity in the four generations of transition-state analogues, the catalytic site geometry is almost the same for all analogues. Multiple solutions in transition-state analogue design are available to convert the energy of catalytic rate enhancement to binding energy in human PNP.

  6. Structural Basis of Glycogen Biosynthesis Regulation in Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Cifuente, Javier O; Comino, Natalia; Madariaga-Marcos, Julene; López-Fernández, Sonia; García-Alija, Mikel; Agirre, Jon; Albesa-Jové, David; Guerin, Marcelo E

    2016-09-01

    ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase) catalyzes the rate-limiting step of bacterial glycogen and plant starch biosynthesis, the most common carbon storage polysaccharides in nature. A major challenge is to understand how AGPase activity is regulated by metabolites in the energetic flux within the cell. Here we report crystal structures of the homotetrameric AGPase from Escherichia coli in complex with its physiological positive and negative allosteric regulators, fructose-1,6-bisphosphate (FBP) and AMP, and sucrose in the active site. FBP and AMP bind to partially overlapping sites located in a deep cleft between glycosyltransferase A-like and left-handed β helix domains of neighboring protomers, accounting for the fact that sensitivity to inhibition by AMP is modulated by the concentration of the activator FBP. We propose a model in which the energy reporters regulate EcAGPase catalytic activity by intra-protomer interactions and inter-protomer crosstalk, with a sensory motif and two regulatory loops playing a prominent role. PMID:27545622

  7. The interaction between AMPKβ2 and the PP1-targeting subunit R6 is dynamically regulated by intracellular glycogen content.

    PubMed

    Oligschlaeger, Yvonne; Miglianico, Marie; Dahlmans, Vivian; Rubio-Villena, Carla; Chanda, Dipanjan; Garcia-Gimeno, Maria Adelaida; Coumans, Will A; Liu, Yilin; Voncken, J Willem; Luiken, Joost J F P; Glatz, Jan F C; Sanz, Pascual; Neumann, Dietbert

    2016-04-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a metabolic stress-sensing kinase. We previously showed that glucose deprivation induces autophosphorylation of AMPKβ at Thr-148, which prevents the binding of AMPK to glycogen. Furthermore, in MIN6 cells, AMPKβ1 binds to R6 (PPP1R3D), a glycogen-targeting subunit of protein phosphatase type 1 (PP1), thereby regulating the glucose-induced inactivation of AMPK. In the present study, we further investigated the interaction of R6 with AMPKβ and the possible dependency on Thr-148 phosphorylation status. Yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) analyses and co-immunoprecipitation (IP) of the overexpressed proteins in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293T) cells revealed that both AMPKβ1 and AMPK-β2 wild-type (WT) isoforms bind to R6. The AMPKβ-R6 interaction was stronger with the muscle-specific AMPKβ2-WT and required association with the substrate-binding motif of R6. When HEK293T cells or C2C12 myotubes were cultured in high-glucose medium, AMPKβ2-WT and R6 weakly interacted. In contrast, glycogen depletion significantly enhanced this protein interaction. Mutation of AMPKβ2 Thr-148 prevented the interaction with R6 irrespective of the intracellular glycogen content. Treatment with the AMPK activator oligomycin enhanced the AMPKβ2-R6 interaction in conjunction with increased Thr-148 phosphorylation in cells grown in low-glucose medium. These data are in accordance with R6 binding directly to AMPKβ2 when both proteins detach from the diminishing glycogen particle, which is simultaneous with increased AMPKβ2 Thr-148 autophosphorylation. Such a model points to a possible control of AMPK by PP1-R6 upon glycogen depletion in muscle. PMID:26831516

  8. Regulation of Maltodextrin Phosphorylase Synthesis in Escherichia coli by Cyclic Adenosine 3′, 5′-Monophosphate and Glucose1

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Julie; Weathersbee, Carolyn J.

    1974-01-01

    Cyclic adenosine 3′, 5′-monophosphate (AMP) stimulates maltodextrin phosphorylase synthesis in Escherichia coli cells induced with maltose. A maximal effect occurs at 2 to 3 mM cyclic AMP. The action of cyclic AMP is specific, inasmuch as adenosine triphosphate, 3′-AMP, 5′-AMP, adenosine, and dibutyryl cyclic AMP are inactive. Glucose, α-methyl glucoside, 2-deoxyglucose, and pyridoxal 5′-phosphate repress maltodextrin phosphorylase synthesis. This repression is reversed by cyclic AMP. The action of cyclic AMP appears to be at the transcriptional level, since cyclic AMP fails to stimulate phosphorylase production in induced cells in which messenger ribonucleic acid synthesis has been arrested by rifampin or by inducer removal. The two other enzymes involved in the metabolism of maltose, amylomaltase and maltose permease, are also induced in this strain of E. coli and affected by glucose and cyclic AMP in a manner similar to phosphorylase. PMID:4358043

  9. Genetics Home Reference: glycogen storage disease type III

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood (hyperlipidemia), and elevated blood levels of liver enzymes. As they get older, children with this condition ... gene provides instructions for making the glycogen debranching enzyme. This enzyme is involved in the breakdown of ...

  10. Differences in glycogen, lipids, and enzymes in livers from rats flown on Cosmos 2044

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrill, Alfred H., Jr.; Wang, Elaine; Laroque, Regina; Mullins, Richard E.; Morgan, Edward T.; Hargrove, James L.; Bonkovsky, Herbert L.; Popova, Irina A.

    1992-01-01

    Livers from rats flown aboard Cosmos 2044 were analyzed for protein, carbohydrate (glycogen), and lipids as well as the activities of a number of key enzymes involved in metabolism of these compounds and xenobiotics. The major differences between the flight group and the synchronous control were elevations in microsomal protein, liver glycogen content, tyrosine aminotransferase, and tryptophan oxygenase and reductions in sphingolipids and the rate-limiting enzyme of heme biosynthesis delta-aminolevulinic acid synthase. These results provide further evidence that spaceflight has pronounced and diverse effects on liver function; however, some of the results with samples from Cosmos 2044 differed notably from those from previous spaceflights. This may be due to conditions of spaceflight and/or the postflight recovery period for Cosmos 2044.

  11. Human Brain Glycogen Metabolism During and After Hypoglycemia

    PubMed Central

    Öz, Gülin; Kumar, Anjali; Rao, Jyothi P.; Kodl, Christopher T.; Chow, Lisa; Eberly, Lynn E.; Seaquist, Elizabeth R.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE We tested the hypotheses that human brain glycogen is mobilized during hypoglycemia and its content increases above normal levels (“supercompensates”) after hypoglycemia. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We utilized in vivo 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in conjunction with intravenous infusions of [13C]glucose in healthy volunteers to measure brain glycogen metabolism during and after euglycemic and hypoglycemic clamps. RESULTS After an overnight intravenous infusion of 99% enriched [1-13C]glucose to prelabel glycogen, the rate of label wash-out from [1-13C]glycogen was higher (0.12 ± 0.05 vs. 0.03 ± 0.06 μmol · g−1 · h−1, means ± SD, P < 0.02, n = 5) during a 2-h hyperinsulinemic-hypoglycemic clamp (glucose concentration 57.2 ± 9.7 mg/dl) than during a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp (95.3 ± 3.3 mg/dl), indicating mobilization of glucose units from glycogen during moderate hypoglycemia. Five additional healthy volunteers received intravenous 25–50% enriched [1-13C]glucose over 22–54 h after undergoing hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic (glucose concentration 92.4 ± 2.3 mg/dl) and hyperinsulinemic-hypoglycemic (52.9 ± 4.8 mg/dl) clamps separated by at least 1 month. Levels of newly synthesized glycogen measured from 4 to 80 h were higher after hypoglycemia than after euglycemia (P ≤ 0.01 for each subject), indicating increased brain glycogen synthesis after moderate hypoglycemia. CONCLUSIONS These data indicate that brain glycogen supports energy metabolism when glucose supply from the blood is inadequate and that its levels rebound to levels higher than normal after a single episode of moderate hypoglycemia in humans. PMID:19502412

  12. Comparative Genomic and Phylogenetic Analyses of Gammaproteobacterial glg Genes Traced the Origin of the Escherichia coli Glycogen glgBXCAP Operon to the Last Common Ancestor of the Sister Orders Enterobacteriales and Pasteurellales

    PubMed Central

    Almagro, Goizeder; Viale, Alejandro M.; Montero, Manuel; Rahimpour, Mehdi; Muñoz, Francisco José; Baroja-Fernández, Edurne; Bahaji, Abdellatif; Zúñiga, Manuel; González-Candelas, Fernando; Pozueta-Romero, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Production of branched α-glucan, glycogen-like polymers is widely spread in the Bacteria domain. The glycogen pathway of synthesis and degradation has been fairly well characterized in the model enterobacterial species Escherichia coli (order Enterobacteriales, class Gammaproteobacteria), in which the cognate genes (branching enzyme glgB, debranching enzyme glgX, ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase glgC, glycogen synthase glgA, and glycogen phosphorylase glgP) are clustered in a glgBXCAP operon arrangement. However, the evolutionary origin of this particular arrangement and of its constituent genes is unknown. Here, by using 265 complete gammaproteobacterial genomes we have carried out a comparative analysis of the presence, copy number and arrangement of glg genes in all lineages of the Gammaproteobacteria. These analyses revealed large variations in glg gene presence, copy number and arrangements among different gammaproteobacterial lineages. However, the glgBXCAP arrangement was remarkably conserved in all glg-possessing species of the orders Enterobacteriales and Pasteurellales (the E/P group). Subsequent phylogenetic analyses of glg genes present in the Gammaproteobacteria and in other main bacterial groups indicated that glg genes have undergone a complex evolutionary history in which horizontal gene transfer may have played an important role. These analyses also revealed that the E/P glgBXCAP genes (a) share a common evolutionary origin, (b) were vertically transmitted within the E/P group, and (c) are closely related to glg genes of some phylogenetically distant betaproteobacterial species. The overall data allowed tracing the origin of the E. coli glgBXCAP operon to the last common ancestor of the E/P group, and also to uncover a likely glgBXCAP transfer event from the E/P group to particular lineages of the Betaproteobacteria. PMID:25607991

  13. Structure and solution properties of enzymatically synthesized glycogen.

    PubMed

    Kajiura, Hideki; Takata, Hiroki; Kuriki, Takashi; Kitamura, Shinichi

    2010-04-19

    Recently, a new enzymatic process for glycogen production was developed. In this process, short-chain amylose is used as a substrate for branching enzymes (BE, EC 2.4.1.18). The molecular weight of the enzymatically synthesized glycogen (ESG) depends on the size and concentration of the substrate. Structural and physicochemical properties of ESG were compared to those of natural source glycogen (NSG). The average chain length, interior chain length, and exterior chain length of ESG were 8.2-11.6, 2.0-3.3, and 4.2-7.6, respectively. These values were within the range of variation of NSG. The appearances of both ESG and NSG in solution were opalescent (milky white and slightly bluish). Furthermore, transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy showed that ESG molecules formed spherical particles, and that there were no differences between ESG and NSG. Viscometric analyses also showed the spherical nature of both glycogens. When ESG and NSG were treated with pullulanase, a glucan-hydrolyzing enzyme known to degrade glycogen only on its surface portion, both glycogens were similarly degraded. These analyses revealed that ESG shares similar molecular shapes and surface properties with NSG. PMID:20153852

  14. Inhibition of Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3ß Enhances Cognitive Recovery after Stroke: The Role of TAK1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Venna, Venugopal Reddy; Benashski, Sharon E.; Chauhan, Anjali; McCullough, Louise D.

    2015-01-01

    Memory deficits are common among stroke survivors. Identifying neuroprotective agents that can prevent memory impairment or improve memory recovery is a vital area of research. Glycogen synthase kinase-3ß (GSK-3ß) is involved in several essential intracellular signaling pathways. Unlike many other kinases, GSK-3ß is active only when…

  15. Structural investigation of the thymidine phosphorylase from Salmonella typhimurium in the unliganded state and its complexes with thymidine and uridine.

    PubMed

    Balaev, Vladislav V; Lashkov, Alexander A; Gabdulkhakov, Azat G; Dontsova, Maria V; Seregina, Tatiana A; Mironov, Alexander S; Betzel, Christian; Mikhailov, Al'bert M

    2016-03-01

    Highly specific thymidine phosphorylases catalyze the phosphorolytic cleavage of thymidine, with the help of a phosphate ion, resulting in thymine and 2-deoxy-α-D-ribose 1-phosphate. Thymidine phosphorylases do not catalyze the phosphorolysis of uridine, in contrast to nonspecific pyrimidine nucleoside phosphorylases and uridine phosphorylases. Understanding the mechanism of substrate specificity on the basis of the nucleoside is essential to support rational drug-discovery investigations of new antitumour and anti-infective drugs which are metabolized by thymidine phosphorylases. For this reason, X-ray structures of the thymidine phosphorylase from Salmonella typhimurium were solved and refined: the unliganded structure at 2.05 Å resolution (PDB entry 4xr5), the structure of the complex with thymidine at 2.55 Å resolution (PDB entry 4yek) and that of the complex with uridine at 2.43 Å resolution (PDB entry 4yyy). The various structural features of the enzyme which might be responsible for the specificity for thymidine and not for uridine were identified. The presence of the 2'-hydroxyl group in uridine results in a different position of the uridine furanose moiety compared with that of thymidine. This feature may be the key element of the substrate specificity. The specificity might also be associated with the opening/closure mechanism of the two-domain subunit structure of the enzyme. PMID:26919527

  16. Regulation of glycogen metabolism by the CRE-1, RCO-1 and RCM-1 proteins in Neurospora crassa. The role of CRE-1 as the central transcriptional regulator.

    PubMed

    Cupertino, Fernanda Barbosa; Virgilio, Stela; Freitas, Fernanda Zanolli; Candido, Thiago de Souza; Bertolini, Maria Célia

    2015-04-01

    The transcription factor CreA/Mig1/CRE-1 is a repressor protein that regulates the use of alternative carbon sources via a mechanism known as Carbon Catabolite Repression (CCR). In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Mig1 recruits the complex Ssn6-Tup1, the Neurospora crassa RCM-1 and RCO-1 orthologous proteins, respectively, to bind to promoters of glucose-repressible genes. We have been studying the regulation of glycogen metabolism in N. crassa and the identification of the RCO-1 corepressor as a regulator led us to investigate the regulatory role of CRE-1 in this process. Glycogen content is misregulated in the rco-1(KO), rcm-1(RIP) and cre-1(KO) strains, and the glycogen synthase phosphorylation is decreased in all strains, showing that CRE-1, RCO-1 and RCM-1 proteins are involved in glycogen accumulation and in the regulation of GSN activity by phosphorylation. We also confirmed the regulatory role of CRE-1 in CCR and its nuclear localization under repressing condition in N. crassa. The expression of all glycogenic genes is misregulated in the cre-1(KO) strain, suggesting that CRE-1 also controls glycogen metabolism by regulating gene expression. The existence of a high number of the Aspergillus nidulans CreA motif (5'-SYGGRG-3') in the glycogenic gene promoters led us to analyze the binding of CRE-1 to some DNA motifs both in vitro by DNA gel shift and in vivo by ChIP-qPCR analysis. CRE-1 bound in vivo to all motifs analyzed demonstrating that it down-regulates glycogen metabolism by controlling gene expression and GSN phosphorylation. PMID:25889113

  17. Recombinant sucrose phosphorylase from Leuconostoc mesenteroides: characterization, kinetic studies of transglucosylation, and application of immobilised enzyme for production of alpha-D-glucose 1-phosphate.

    PubMed

    Goedl, Christiane; Schwarz, Alexandra; Minani, Alphonse; Nidetzky, Bernd

    2007-03-30

    Sucrose phosphorylase catalyzes the reversible conversion of sucrose (alpha-D-glucopyranosyl-1,2-beta-D-fructofuranoside) and phosphate into D-fructose and alpha-D-glucose 1-phosphate. We report on the molecular cloning and expression of the structural gene encoding sucrose phosphorylase from Leuconostoc mesenteroides (LmSPase) in Escherichia coli DH10B. The recombinant enzyme, containing an 11 amino acid-long N-terminal metal affinity fusion peptide, was overproduced 60-fold in comparison with the natural enzyme. It was purified to apparent homogeneity using copper-loaded Chelating Sepharose and obtained in 20% yield with a specific activity of 190 Umg(-1). LmSPase was covalently attached onto Eupergit C with a binding efficiency of 50% and used for the continuous production of alpha-D-glucose 1-phosphate from sucrose and phosphate (600 mM each) in a packed-bed immobilised enzyme reactor (30 degrees C, pH 7.0). The reactor was operated at a stable conversion of 91% (550 mM product) and productivity of approximately 11 gl(-1)h(-1) for up to 600 h. A kinetic study of transglucosylation by soluble LmSPase was performed using alpha-d-glucose 1-phosphate as the donor substrate and various alcohols as acceptors. D- and L-arabitol were found to be good glucosyl acceptors. PMID:17215056

  18. Acid Hydrolysis and Molecular Density of Phytoglycogen and Liver Glycogen Helps Understand the Bonding in Glycogen α (Composite) Particles

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Prudence O.; Sullivan, Mitchell A.; Sheehy, Joshua J.; Schulz, Benjamin L.; Warren, Frederick J.; Gilbert, Robert G.

    2015-01-01

    Phytoglycogen (from certain mutant plants) and animal glycogen are highly branched glucose polymers with similarities in structural features and molecular size range. Both appear to form composite α particles from smaller β particles. The molecular size distribution of liver glycogen is bimodal, with distinct α and β components, while that of phytoglycogen is monomodal. This study aims to enhance our understanding of the nature of the link between liver-glycogen β particles resulting in the formation of large α particles. It examines the time evolution of the size distribution of these molecules during acid hydrolysis, and the size dependence of the molecular density of both glucans. The monomodal distribution of phytoglycogen decreases uniformly in time with hydrolysis, while with glycogen, the large particles degrade significantly more quickly. The size dependence of the molecular density shows qualitatively different shapes for these two types of molecules. The data, combined with a quantitative model for the evolution of the distribution during degradation, suggest that the bonding between β into α particles is different between phytoglycogen and liver glycogen, with the formation of a glycosidic linkage for phytoglycogen and a covalent or strong non-covalent linkage, most probably involving a protein, for glycogen as most likely. This finding is of importance for diabetes, where α-particle structure is impaired. PMID:25799321

  19. [A cytophotometric study of the RNA and glycogen content of human hepatocytes at different stages in the development of traumatic disease].

    PubMed

    Kudriavtseva, M V; Shteĭn, G I; Shashkov, B V; Kudriavtsev, B N

    1992-01-01

    Absorption and fluorescent cytophotometry techniques were applied to studies of RNA, glycogen and its fractions in hepatocytes of patients with hard mechanic trauma, both with and without endointoxication. For measuring RNA and glycogen contents, slides were stained by gallocyanin-chromalum or underwent fluorescent PAS-reaction, respectively. The repeated aspiration biopsy material was used for investigation of RNA and glycogen contents in dynamics. A quick increase in RNA content took place at the first stage (within the first 3 days) of traumatic illness of both the groups of patients. At the second stage of illness the hepatocyte RNA content in patients without endointoxication was seen to decrease to the initial level, whereas that in patients with endointoxication increased from the initial level by 36%. At different stages of illness the total glycogen content is changed insignificantly in the course of illness, but its labile fraction decreases to 70% of the total glycogen in patients with endointoxication. The increase of hepatocyte synthetic activity and the maintenance of the normal glycogen level may suggest a sufficient compensatory possibility of the liver, in spite of a high functional load under endointoxication. PMID:1284098

  20. The Multiple Functions of Common Microbial Carbon Polymers, Glycogen and PHB, during Stress Responses in the Non-Diazotrophic Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803

    PubMed Central

    Damrow, Ramon; Maldener, Iris; Zilliges, Yvonne

    2016-01-01

    Classical microbial carbon polymers such as glycogen and polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) have a crucial impact as both a sink and a reserve under macronutrient stress conditions. Most microbial species exclusively synthesize and degrade either glycogen or PHB. A few bacteria such as the phototrophic model organism Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 surprisingly produce both physico-chemically different polymers under conditions of high C to N ratios. For the first time, the function and interrelation of both carbon polymers in non-diazotrophic cyanobacteria are analyzed in a comparative physiological study of single- and double-knockout mutants (ΔglgC; ΔphaC; ΔglgC/ΔphaC), respectively. Most of the observed phenotypes are explicitly related to the knockout of glycogen synthesis, highlighting the metabolic, energetic, and structural impact of this process whenever cells switch from an active, photosynthetic ‘protein status’ to a dormant ‘glycogen status’. The carbon flux regulation into glycogen granules is apparently crucial for both phycobilisome degradation and thylakoid layer disassembly in the presence of light. In contrast, PHB synthesis is definitely not involved in this primary acclimation response. Moreover, the very weak interrelations between the two carbon-polymer syntheses indicate that the regulation and role of PHB synthesis in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 is different from glycogen synthesis. PMID:27446007

  1. The role of blood glucose in the restoration of muscle glycogen during recovery from exhaustive exercise in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and winter flounder (Pseudopleuronectes americanus).

    PubMed

    Pagnotta, A; Milligan, C L

    1991-11-01

    The role of blood-borne glucose in the restoration of white muscle glycogen following exhaustive exercise in the active, pelagic rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and the more sluggish, benthic winter flounder (Pseudopleuronectes americanus) were examined. During recovery from exhaustive exercise, the animals were injected with a bolus of universally labelled [14C]glucose via dorsal aortic (trout) or caudal artery (flounder) catheters. The bulk of the injected label (50-70%) remained as glucose in the extracellular fluid in both species. The major metabolic fates of the injected glucose were oxidation to CO2 (6-8%) and production of lactate (6-8%), the latter indicative of continued anaerobic metabolism post-exercise. Oxidation of labelled glucose could account for up to 40% and 15% of the post-exercise MO2 in trout and flounder, respectively. Exhaustive exercise resulted in a reduction of muscle glycogen stores and accumulation of muscle lactate. Glycogen restoration in trout began 2-4h after exercise, whereas in flounder, glycogen restoration began within 2h. Despite a significant labelling of the intramuscular glucose pool, less than 1% of the infused labelled glucose was incorporated into muscle glycogen. This suggests that blood-borne glucose does not contribute significantly to the restoration of muscle glycogen following exhaustive exercise in either trout or flounder and provides further evidence against a prominent role for the Cori cycle in these species. PMID:1757776

  2. Development of a capillary electrophoresis method for analyzing adenosine deaminase and purine nucleoside phosphorylase and its application in inhibitor screening.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yanfei; Li, Youxin; Bao, James J

    2016-08-01

    A novel capillary electrophoresis (CE) method was developed for simultaneous analysis of adenosine deaminase (ADA) and purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) in red blood cells (RBCs). The developed method considered and took advantage of the natural conversion from the ADA product, inosine to hypoxanthine. The transformation ratio was introduced for ADA and PNP analysis to obtain more reliable results. After optimizing the enzymatic incubation and electrophoresis separation conditions, the determined activities of ADA and PNP in 12 human RBCs were 0.237-0.833 U/ml and 9.013-10.453 U/ml packed cells, respectively. The analysis of ADA in mice RBCs indicated that there was an apparent activity difference between healthy and hepatoma mice. In addition, the proposed method was also successfully applied in the inhibitor screening from nine traditional Chinese medicines, and data showed that ADA activities were strongly inhibited by Rhizoma Chuanxiong and Angelica sinensis. The inhibition effect of Angelica sinensis on ADA is first reported here and could also inhibit PNP activity. PMID:27173606

  3. Effect of intraperitoneal selenium administration on liver glycogen levels in rats subjected to acute forced swimming.

    PubMed

    Akil, Mustafa; Bicer, Mursel; Kilic, Mehmet; Avunduk, Mustafa Cihat; Mogulkoc, Rasim; Baltaci, Abdulkerim Kasim

    2011-03-01

    There are a few of studies examining how selenium, which is known to reduce oxidative damage in exercise, influences glucose metabolism and exhaustion in physical activity. The present study aims to examine how selenium administration affects liver glycogen levels in rats subjected to acute swimming exercise. The study included 32 Sprague-Dawley type male rats, which were equally allocated to four groups: Group 1, general control; Group 2; selenium-supplemented control (6 mg/kg/day sodium selenite); Group 3, swimming control; Group 4, selenium-supplemented swimming (6 mg/kg/day sodium selenite). Liver tissue samples collected from the animals at the end of the study were fixed in 95% ethyl alcohol. From the tissue samples buried into paraffin, 5-µm cross-sections were obtained using a microtome, put on a microscope slide, and stained with PAS. Stained preparations were assessed using a Nikon Eclipse E400 light microscope. All images obtained with the light microscope were transferred to a PC and evaluated using Clemex PE 3.5 image analysis software. The highest liver glycogen levels were found in groups 1 and 2 (p < 0.05). The levels in group 4 were lower than those in groups 1 and 2 but higher than the levels in group 3 (p < 0.05). The lowest liver glycogen levels were obtained in group 3 (p < 0.05). Results of the study indicate that liver glycogen levels that decrease in acute swimming exercise can be restored by selenium administration. It can be argued that physiological doses of selenium administration can contribute to performance. PMID:20340052

  4. Effects of diabetes on brain metabolism--is brain glycogen a significant player?

    PubMed

    Sickmann, Helle M; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    2015-02-01

    Brain glycogen, being an intracellular glucose reservoir, contributes to maintain energy and neurotransmitter homeostasis under physiological as well as pathological conditions. Under conditions with a disturbance in systemic glucose metabolism such as in diabetes, the supply of glucose to the brain may be affected and have important impacts on brain metabolism and neurotransmission. This also implies that brain glycogen may serve an essential role in the diabetic state to sustain appropriate brain function. There are two main types of diabetes; type 1 and type 2 diabetes and both types may be associated with brain impairments e.g. cognitive decline and dementia. It is however, not clear how these impairments on brain function are linked to alterations in brain energy and neurotransmitter metabolism. In this review, we will illuminate how rodent diabetes models have contributed to a better understanding of how brain energy and neurotransmitter metabolism is affected in diabetes. There will be a particular focus on the role of brain glycogen to support glycolytic and TCA cycle activity as well as glutamate-glutamine cycle in type 1 and type 2 diabetes. PMID:24771109

  5. Unbalanced deoxynucleotide pools cause mitochondrial DNA instability in thymidine phosphorylase-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    López, Luis C; Akman, Hasan O; García-Cazorla, Angeles; Dorado, Beatriz; Martí, Ramón; Nishino, Ichizo; Tadesse, Saba; Pizzorno, Giuseppe; Shungu, Dikoma; Bonilla, Eduardo; Tanji, Kurenai; Hirano, Michio

    2009-02-15

    Replication and repair of DNA require equilibrated pools of deoxynucleoside triphosphate precursors. This concept has been proven by in vitro studies over many years, but in vivo models are required to demonstrate its relevance to multicellular organisms and to human diseases. Accordingly, we have generated thymidine phosphorylase (TP) and uridine phosphorylase (UP) double knockout (TP(-/-)UP(-/-)) mice, which show severe TP deficiency, increased thymidine and deoxyuridine in tissues and elevated mitochondrial deoxythymidine triphosphate. As consequences of the nucleotide pool imbalances, brains of mutant mice developed partial depletion of mtDNA, deficiencies of respiratory chain complexes and encephalopathy. These findings largely account for the pathogenesis of mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalopathy (MNGIE), the first inherited human disorder of nucleoside metabolism associated with somatic DNA instability. PMID:19028666

  6. Three-dimensional structure of E. Coli purine nucleoside phosphorylase at 0.99 Å resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timofeev, V. I.; Abramchik, Yu. A.; Zhukhlistova, N. E.; Muravieva, T. I.; Esipov, R. S.; Kuranova, I. P.

    2016-03-01

    Purine nucleoside phosphorylases (PNPs) catalyze the reversible phosphorolysis of nucleosides and are key enzymes involved in nucleotide metabolism. They are essential for normal cell function and can catalyze the transglycosylation. Crystals of E. coli PNP were grown in microgravity by the capillary counterdiffusion method through a gel layer. The three-dimensional structure of the enzyme was determined by the molecular-replacement method at 0.99 Å resolution. The structural features are considered, and the structure of E. coli PNP is compared with the structures of the free enzyme and its complexes with purine base derivatives established earlier. A comparison of the environment of the purine base in the complex of PNP with formycin A and of the pyrimidine base in the complex of uridine phosphorylase with thymidine revealed the main structural features of the base-binding sites. Coordinates of the atomic model determined with high accuracy were deposited in the Protein Data Bank (PDB_ID: 4RJ2).

  7. Body Morphology, Energy Stores, and Muscle Enzyme Activity Explain Cricket Acoustic Mate Attraction Signaling Variation

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Ian R.; Darveau, Charles-A.; Bertram, Susan M.

    2014-01-01

    High mating success in animals is often dependent on males signalling attractively with high effort. Since males should be selected to maximize their reproductive success, female preferences for these traits should result in minimal signal variation persisting in the population. However, extensive signal variation persists. The genic capture hypothesis proposes genetic variation persists because fitness-conferring traits depend on an individual's basic processes, including underlying physiological, morphological, and biochemical traits, which are themselves genetically variable. To explore the traits underlying signal variation, we quantified among-male differences in signalling, morphology, energy stores, and the activities of key enzymes associated with signalling muscle metabolism in two species of crickets, Gryllus assimilis (chirper: <20 pulses/chirp) and G. texensis (triller: >20 pulses/chirp). Chirping G. assimilis primarily fuelled signalling with carbohydrate metabolism: smaller individuals and individuals with increased thoracic glycogen stores signalled for mates with greater effort; individuals with greater glycogen phosphorylase activity produced more attractive mating signals. Conversely, the more energetic trilling G. texensis fuelled signalling with both lipid and carbohydrate metabolism: individuals with increased β-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase activity and increased thoracic free carbohydrate content signalled for mates with greater effort; individuals with higher thoracic and abdominal carbohydrate content and higher abdominal lipid stores produced more attractive signals. Our findings suggest variation in male reproductive success may be driven by hidden physiological trade-offs that affect the ability to uptake, retain, and use essential nutrients, although the results remain correlational in nature. Our findings indicate that a physiological perspective may help us to understand some of the causes of variation in behaviour. PMID:24608102

  8. Allosteric regulation of the partitioning of glucose-1-phosphate between glycogen and trehalose biosynthesis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Asención Diez, Matías D.; Demonte, Ana M.; Syson, Karl; Arias, Diego G.; Gorelik, Andrii; Guerrero, Sergio A.; Bornemann, Stephen; Iglesias, Alberto A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a pathogenic prokaryote adapted to survive in hostile environments. In this organism and other Gram-positive actinobacteria, the metabolic pathways of glycogen and trehalose are interconnected. Results In this work we show the production, purification and characterization of recombinant enzymes involved in the partitioning of glucose-1-phosphate between glycogen and trehalose in M. tuberculosis H37Rv, namely: ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase, glycogen synthase, UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and trehalose-6-phosphate synthase. The substrate specificity, kinetic parameters and allosteric regulation of each enzyme were determined. ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase was highly specific for ADP-glucose while trehalose-6-phosphate synthase used not only ADP-glucose but also UDP-glucose, albeit to a lesser extent. ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase was allosterically activated primarily by phosphoenolpyruvate and glucose-6-phosphate, while the activity of trehalose-6-phosphate synthase was increased up to 2-fold by fructose-6-phosphate. None of the other two enzymes tested exhibited allosteric regulation. Conclusions Results give information about how the glucose-1-phosphate/ADP-glucose node is controlled after kinetic and regulatory properties of key enzymes for mycobacteria metabolism. General significance This work increases our understanding of oligo and polysaccharides metabolism in M. tuberculosis and reinforces the importance of the interconnection between glycogen and trehalose biosynthesis in this human pathogen. PMID:25277548

  9. Crystal structure of Caulobacter crescentus polynucleotide phosphorylase reveals a mechanism of RNA substrate channelling and RNA degradosome assembly

    PubMed Central

    Hardwick, Steven W.; Gubbey, Tobias; Hug, Isabelle; Jenal, Urs; Luisi, Ben F.

    2012-01-01

    Polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase) is an exoribonuclease that cleaves single-stranded RNA substrates with 3′–5′ directionality and processive behaviour. Its ring-like, trimeric architecture creates a central channel where phosphorolytic active sites reside. One face of the ring is decorated with RNA-binding K-homology (KH) and S1 domains, but exactly how these domains help to direct the 3′ end of single-stranded RNA substrates towards the active sites is an unsolved puzzle. Insight into this process is provided by our crystal structures of RNA-bound and apo Caulobacter crescentus PNPase. In the RNA-free form, the S1 domains adopt a ‘splayed’ conformation that may facilitate capture of RNA substrates. In the RNA-bound structure, the three KH domains collectively close upon the RNA and direct the 3′ end towards a constricted aperture at the entrance of the central channel. The KH domains make non-equivalent interactions with the RNA, and there is a marked asymmetry within the catalytic core of the enzyme. On the basis of these data, we propose that structural non-equivalence, induced upon RNA binding, helps to channel substrate to the active sites through mechanical ratcheting. Structural and biochemical analyses also reveal the basis for PNPase association with RNase E in the multi-enzyme RNA degradosome assembly of the α-proteobacteria. PMID:22724061

  10. Dietary management of Type I glycogen storage disease.

    PubMed

    Folk, C C; Greene, H L

    1984-03-01

    The most commonly recognized type of glycogen storage disease (von Gierke's disease) results from deficient glucose-6-phosphatase activity. This enzyme is the last step in the release of free glucose from the liver into the circulation. Thus, the most prominent and life-threatening complication in the illness is severe and often prolonged hypoglycemia, which occurs after the dietary glucose is normally removed from the circulation. With an optimal dietary intake spaced at 2 1/2- to 3 1/2-hour intervals, the blood glucose can be maintained in the normal range during the daytime, but hypoglycemia may occur during overnight fasting. Recent advances in the understanding of the pathophysiology of the illness have led to the use of frequent high-starch feedings during the day and nocturnal intragastric infusions of liquid formulas containing glucose polymers. The liquid formula is infused through either a nasogastric or a gastrostomy tube continuously at night while the patient sleeps. The success of this treatment not only has improved the survival rate but also has corrected the abnormal blood chemistries and generated a more normal rate of growth and development. Because patients with this disease are reaching adulthood in greater numbers, it is necessary for dietitians caring for adults as well as for children to become familiar with the prescribed methods of treatment. PMID:6583274

  11. Molecular and metabolomic effects of voluntary running wheel activity on skeletal muscle in late middle-aged rats

    PubMed Central

    Garvey, Sean M; Russ, David W; Skelding, Mary B; Dugle, Janis E; Edens, Neile K

    2015-01-01

    We examined the molecular and metabolomic effects of voluntary running wheel activity in late middle-aged male Sprague Dawley rats (16–17 months). Rats were assigned either continuous voluntary running wheel access for 8 weeks (RW+) or cage-matched without running wheel access (RW−). The 9 RW+ rats averaged 83 m/day (range: 8–163 m), yet exhibited both 84% reduced individual body weight gain (4.3 g vs. 26.3 g, P = 0.02) and 6.5% reduced individual average daily food intake (20.6 g vs. 22.0 g, P = 0.09) over the 8 weeks. Hindlimb muscles were harvested following an overnight fast. Muscle weights and myofiber cross-sectional area showed no difference between groups. Western blots of gastrocnemius muscle lysates with a panel of antibodies suggest that running wheel activity improved oxidative metabolism (53% increase in PGC1α, P = 0.03), increased autophagy (36% increase in LC3B-II/-I ratio, P = 0.03), and modulated growth signaling (26% increase in myostatin, P = 0.04). RW+ muscle also showed 43% increased glycogen phosphorylase expression (P = 0.04) and 45% increased glycogen content (P = 0.04). Metabolomic profiling of plantaris and soleus muscles indicated that even low-volume voluntary running wheel activity is associated with decreases in many long-chain fatty acids (e.g., palmitoleate, myristoleate, and eicosatrienoate) relative to RW− rats. Relative increases in acylcarnitines and acyl glycerophospholipids were also observed in RW+ plantaris. These data establish that even modest amounts of physical activity during late middle-age promote extensive metabolic remodeling of skeletal muscle. PMID:25716928

  12. A new non-degradative method to purify glycogen.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xinle; Sullivan, Mitchell A; Gao, Fei; Li, Shihan; Schulz, Benjamin L; Gilbert, Robert G

    2016-08-20

    Liver glycogen, a complex branched glucose polymer containing a small amount of protein, is important for maintaining glucose homeostasis (blood-sugar control) in humans. It has recently been found that glycogen molecular structure is impaired in diabetes. Isolating the carbohydrate polymer and any intrinsically-attached protein(s) is an essential prerequisite for studying this structural impairment. This requires an effective, non-degradative and efficient purification method to exclude the many other proteins present in liver. Proteins and glycogen have different ranges of molecular sizes. Despite the plethora of proteins that might still be present in significant abundance after other isolation techniques, SEC (size exclusion chromatography, also known as GPC), which separates by molecular size, should separate those extraneous to glycogen from glycogen with any intrinsically associated protein(s). A novel purification method is developed for this, based on preparative SEC following sucrose gradient centrifugation. Proteomics is used to show that the new method compares favourably with current methods in the literature. PMID:27178921

  13. Influence of stevioside on hepatic glycogen levels in fasted rats.

    PubMed

    Hübler, M O; Bracht, A; Kelmer-Bracht, A M

    1994-04-01

    The influence of stevioside, the sweet glycoside of Stevia rebaudiana leaves, on the glycogen levels of fasted rats was investigated. In one set of experiments, single doses of stevioside (200 mumol) or steviol (200 mumol) were given orally to 24-hours fasted rats, either alone or simultaneously with fructose. Under these conditions both stevioside and steviol increased the initial glycogen deposition in the liver. In another set of experiments, stevioside was given to the rats in the drinking water at the beginning of the fasting periods (5:00 p.m.) of 24 and 48 hours. Two different concentrations were given, 1.0 and 2.0 mM. Increased hepatic glycogen levels were found at 48 hours with stevioside (1.0 mM) and at 24 hours with stevioside (2.0 mM). Steviol had no effect on hepatic glycogen levels when given in the drinking water. It can be concluded that stevioside exerts a stimulatory action on hepatic glycogen synthesis under gluconeogenic conditions. PMID:8042003

  14. Molecular dynamics simulation of paracetamol molecules ordering around glycogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Wilber; Feng, Yuan Ping; Liu, X. Y.

    2005-05-01

    By the use of classical atomistic molecular dynamics simulations, we demonstrate that paracetamol molecules exist in a highly ordered phase in the presence of a glycogen substrate at 317K whereas the paracetamol fluid exists in an isotropic phase in the absence of the glycogen substrate at the same temperature. This result further validates the studies made on polysaccharide regarding its abilities to promote nucleation of paracetamol via liquid preordering. As little is known regarding liquid ordering induced by a polymeric substrate, we seek to explore the ordering mechanism from an energy perspective. This is accomplished using conformation mappings. Our analysis shows that the conformation space accessible to the paracetamol molecule at 317K in the vicinity of glycogen is smaller than the one in the absence of glycogen. An investigation on the orientation of the dipole moments of the glycogen monomers and paracetamol molecules were carried out as well. From the investigations, we show that dipolar interactions play an important role in the ordering process. These studies bear significance to the understanding of the ordering process as well as the promotion and effective control of the nucleation rate.

  15. Inhibition of Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3β Improves Tolerance to Ischemia in Hypertrophied Hearts

    PubMed Central

    Barillas, Rodrigo; Friehs, Ingeborg; Cao-Danh, Hung; Martinez, Joseph F.; del Nido, Pedro J.

    2012-01-01

    Background Hypertrophied myocardium is more susceptible to ischemia/reperfusion injury, in part owing to impaired insulin-mediated glucose uptake. Glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) is a key regulatory enzyme in glucose metabolism that, when activated, phosphorylates/inactivates target enzymes of the insulin signaling pathway. Glycogen synthase kinase-3β is regulated upstream by Akt-1. We sought to determine whether GSK-3β is activated in ischemic hypertrophied myocardium owing to impaired Akt-1 function, and whether inhibition with lithium (Li) or indirubin-3′-monoxime,5-iodo- (IMI), a specific inhibitor, improves post-ischemic myocardial recovery by improving glucose metabolism. Methods Pressure-overload hypertrophy was achieved by aortic banding in neonatal rabbits. At 6 weeks, isolated hypertrophied hearts underwent 30 minutes of normothermic ischemia and reperfusion with or without GSK-3β inhibitor (0.1 mM Li; 1 µM IMI) as cardioplegic additives. Cardiac function was measured before and after ischemia. Expression, activity of Akt-1 and GSK-3β, and lactate were determined at end-ischemia. Results Contractile function after ischemia was better preserved in hypertrophied hearts treated with GSK-3β inhibitors. Activity of Akt-1 was significantly impaired in hypertrophied myocardium at end-ischemia. Glycogen synthase kinase-3β enzymatic activity at end-ischemia was increased in hypertrophied hearts and was blocked by Li or IMI concomitant with significantly increased lactate production, indicating increased glycolysis. Conclusions Regulatory inhibition of GSK-3β by Akt-1 in hypertrophied hearts is impaired, leading to activation during ischemia. Inhibition of GSK-3β by Li or IMI improves tolerance to ischemia/reperfusion injury in hypertrophied myocardium. The likely protective mechanism is an increase in insulin-mediated glucose uptake, resulting in greater substrate availability for glycolysis during ischemia and early reperfusion. PMID:17588398

  16. Transition state analogue inhibitors of human methylthioadenosine phosphorylase and bacterial methylthioadenosine/S-adenosylhomocysteine nucleosidase incorporating acyclic ribooxacarbenium ion mimics

    PubMed Central

    Clinch, Keith; Evans, Gary B.; Fröhlich, Richard F. G.; Gulab, Shivali A.; Gutierrez, Jemy A.; Mason, Jennifer M.; Schramm, Vern L.; Tyler, Peter C.; Woolhouse, Anthony D.

    2012-01-01

    Several acyclic hydroxy-methylthio-amines with 3 to 5 carbon atoms were prepared and coupled via a methylene link to 9-deazaadenine. The products were tested for inhibition against human MTAP and E. coli and N. meningitidis MTANs and gave Ki values as low as 0.23 nM. These results were compared to those obtained with 1st and 2nd generation inhibitors (1S)-1-(9-deazaadenin-9-yl)-1,4-dideoxy-1,4-imino-5-methylthio-d-ribitol (MT-Immucillin-A, 3) and (3R,4S)-1-[9-deazaadenin-9-yl)methyl]3-hydroxy-4-methylthiomethylpyrrolidine (MT-DADMe-Immucillin-A, 4). The best inhibitors were found to exhibit binding affinities of approximately 2- to 4-fold those of 3 but were significantly weaker than 4. Cleavage of the 2,3 carbon–carbon bond in MT-Immucillin-A (3) gave an acyclic product (79) with a 21,500 fold loss of activity against E. coli MTAN. In another case, N-methylation of a side chain secondary amine resulted in a 250-fold loss of activity against the same enzyme [(±)-65 vs (±)-68]. The inhibition results were also contrasted with those acyclic derivatives previously prepared as inhibitors for a related enzyme, purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP), where some inhibitors in the latter case were found to be more potent than their cyclic counterparts. PMID:22854195

  17. Characterization of the Methylthioadenosine Phosphorylase Polymorphism rs7023954 - Incidence and Effects on Enzymatic Function in Malignant Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Limm, Katharina; Dettmer, Katja; Reinders, Jörg; Oefner, Peter J.; Bosserhoff, Anja-Katrin

    2016-01-01

    Deficiency of methylthioadenosine phosphorylase (MTAP) supports melanoma development and progression through accumulation of its substrate 5’-methylthioadenosine (MTA), which leads amongst others to a constitutive inhibition of protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs) and activation of the transcription factor AP-1 via the receptor ADORA2B. Genetic association studies have also suggested that genetic polymorphism in MTAP may modulate the risk of melanoma. Here, we investigated the only globally common non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) reported to date for MTAP. The SNP rs7023954 is located in exon 3 (c.166G>A), and leads to the conservative substitution of one branched-chain amino acid residue (valine) for another (isoleucine) at position 56 (p.Val56Ile). Whereas genotype frequencies in normal and primary melanoma tissues or cell lines were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium based on cDNA amplicon sequencing, a marked (P = 0.00019) deviation was observed in metastatic melanoma tissues and cell lines due to a deficit of heterozygotes. Enzyme assays conducted on the co-dominantly expressed alleles revealed no difference in the conversion rate of MTA to adenine and 5-methylthioribose-1-phosphate, indicating that this known enzymatic activity does not modulate the tumor suppressive function of MTAP. PMID:27479139

  18. Glycogen metabolism in the liver of the neonatal gsd/gsd and control (GSD/GSD) rat.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, D G; Neville, S D; Brinkman, M; Filsell, O H

    1982-01-01

    1. The metabolism of hepatic glycogen, labelled with [6-3H]glucose at day 19.5 of gestation and with 14C from [U-14C]galactose at delivery, was followed for 10 h in food-deprived gsd/gsd and control (GSD/GSD) neonatal rats. 2. In the affected pups glycogen was maintained at 12% (w/w) and there was no loss of incorporated radioactivity. 3. The 3H and 14C in glycogen from the controls were both decreased by 80%, but 14C was removed at 0--5 h and [6-3H]glucose at 5--10 h. 4. Blood glucose concentrations in the unaffected neonatal rats fell from 5.3 mM at 20 min to 1.7 mM after 10 h. In the gsd/gsd pups blood glucose concentration was decreased from 2 mM at birth to 0.3 mM at 2.5 h: it was maintained at 0.8 mM between 5 and 10 h. 5. In neonatal rats that had been dead for 10 h, hepatic glycogen was decreased by 34% in the controls and by 22% in the gsd/gsd pups. These results demonstrate that liver from the affected rats contains glycogenolytic activity, but that it is not expressed in living tissue. PMID:6953968

  19. Loss of the starvation-induced gene Rack1 leads to glycogen deficiency and impaired autophagic responses in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Érdi, Balázs; Nagy, Péter; Zvara, Ágnes; Varga, Ágnes; Pircs, Karolina; Ménesi, Dalma; Puskás, László G.; Juhász, Gábor

    2012-01-01

    Autophagy delivers cytoplasmic material for lysosomal degradation in eukaryotic cells. Starvation induces high levels of autophagy to promote survival in the lack of nutrients. We compared genome-wide transcriptional profiles of fed and starved control, autophagy-deficient Atg7 and Atg1 null mutant Drosophila larvae to search for novel regulators of autophagy. Genes involved in catabolic processes including autophagy were transcriptionally upregulated in all cases. We also detected repression of genes involved in DNA replication in autophagy mutants compared with control animals. The expression of Rack1 (receptor of activated protein kinase C 1) increased 4.1- to 5.5-fold during nutrient deprivation in all three genotypes. The scaffold protein Rack1 plays a role in a wide range of processes including translation, cell adhesion and migration, cell survival and cancer. Loss of Rack1 led to attenuated autophagic response to starvation, and glycogen stores were decreased 11.8-fold in Rack1 mutant cells. Endogenous Rack1 partially colocalized with GFP-Atg8a and early autophagic structures on the ultrastructural level, suggesting its involvement in autophagosome formation. Endogenous Rack1 also showed a high degree of colocalization with glycogen particles in the larval fat body, and with Shaggy, the Drosophila homolog of glycogen synthase kinase 3B (GSK-3B). Our results, for the first time, demonstrated the fundamental role of Rack1 in autophagy and glycogen synthesis. PMID:22562043

  20. Attenuation of Helicteres isora L. bark extracts on streptozotocin-induced alterations in glycogen and carbohydrate metabolism in albino rats.

    PubMed

    Kumar, G; Sharmila Banu, G; Murugesan, A G

    2009-11-01

    The present study was undertaken to assess the effect of Helicteres isora L. on four important enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism (glucokinase [GK], hexokinase [HK] phosphofructokinase [PFK] and fructose-1, 6-bisphosphatase [FBP]) along with glycogen content of insulin-dependent (skeletal muscle and liver) and insulin-independent tissues (kidneys and brain) in streptozotocin (STZ; 60 mg/kg)-induced model of diabetes for 30 days. Administration of bark extracts (100, 200 mg/kg) for 30 days led to decrease in plasma glucose levels by approximately 9.60% and 22.04% and 19.18% and 33.93% on 15th and 30th day, respectively, of the experiment. Liver and two-kidney weight expressed as percentage of body weight significantly increased in diabetics (P < 0.05) versus normal controls. Renal glycogen content increased by 10 folds while hepatic and skeletal muscle glycogen content decreased by 75% and 68% in diabetic controls versus controls. H. isora did not affect glycogen content in any tissue. The decreased activities of PFK, GK, FBP and HK in diabetic controls were 40%, 50%, 50% and 60% and bark extract of H. isora partially corrected this alteration. The efficacy of the bark extract was comparable with Tolbutamide, a well-known hypoglycemic drug. PMID:19812119

  1. Effect of exhaustive ultra-endurance exercise in muscular glycogen and both Alpha1 and Alpha2 Ampk protein expression in trained rats.

    PubMed

    Tarini, V A F; Carnevali, L C; Arida, R M; Cunha, C A; Alves, E S; Seeleander, M C L; Schmidt, B; Faloppa, F

    2013-09-01

    Glycogen is the main store of readily energy in skeletal muscle and plays a key role in muscle function, demonstrated by the inability to sustain prolonged high-intensity exercise upon depletion of these glycogen stores. With prolonged exercise, glycogen depletion occurs and 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a potent regulator of muscle metabolism and gene expression, is activated promoting molecular signalling that increases glucose uptake by muscular skeletal cells. The aim of this study was primarily to determine the effect of ultra-endurance exercise on muscle glycogen reserves and secondly to verify the influence of this type of exercise on AMPK protein expression. Twenty-four male Wistar rats, 60 days old, were divided into four experimental groups: sedentary, sedentary exhausted (SE), endurance trained (T) and endurance trained exhausted (TE). The animals ran for 10 to 90 min/day, 5 days/week, for 12 weeks to attain trained status. Rats were killed immediately after the exhaustion protocol, which consisted of running on a treadmill (at approximately 60% Vmax until exhaustion). Optical density of periodic acid-Schiff was detected and glycogen depletion observed predominantly in type I muscle fibres of the TE group and in both type I and II muscle fibres in the SE group. Plasma glucose decreased only in the TE group. Hepatic glycogen was increased in T group and significantly depleted in TE group. AMPK protein expression was significantly elevated in TE and T groups. In conclusion, acute exhaustive ultra-endurance exercise promoted muscle glycogen depletion. It seems that total AMPK protein and gene expression is more influenced by status training. PMID:23184732

  2. Modified glycogen as construction material for functional biomimetic microfibers.

    PubMed

    Rabyk, Mariia; Hruby, Martin; Vetrik, Miroslav; Kucka, Jan; Proks, Vladimir; Parizek, Martin; Konefal, Rafal; Krist, Pavel; Chvatil, David; Bacakova, Lucie; Slouf, Miroslav; Stepanek, Petr

    2016-11-01

    We describe a conceptually new, microfibrous, biodegradable functional material prepared from a modified storage polysaccharide also present in humans (glycogen) showing strong potential as direct-contact dressing/interface material for wound healing. Double bonds were introduced into glycogen via allylation and were further exploited for crosslinking of the microfibers. Triple bonds were introduced by propargylation and served for further click functionalization of the microfibers with bioactive peptide. A simple solvent-free method allowing the preparation of thick layers was used to produce microfibers (diameter ca 2μm) from allylated and/or propargylated glycogen. Crosslinking of the samples was performed by microtron beta-irradiation, and the irradiation dose was optimized to 2kGy. The results from biological testing showed that these highly porous, hydrophilic, readily functionalizable materials were completely nontoxic to cells growing in their presence. The fibers were gradually degraded in the presence of cells. PMID:27516273

  3. Familial nephropathy associated with hepatic type of glycogen storage disease.

    PubMed

    Sonobe, H; Ogawa, K; Takahashi, I

    1976-11-01

    The female patient was diagnosed as having Von Gierke's disease at 14 years of age, based on clinical manifestations, laboratory examination and liver biopsy. At 19 years of age she had uremia and died from its deterioration at 24 years of age. The parents were consanguineous, and a 27-year-old sister is presently hospitalized for renal insufficiency with hepatomegaly. On autopsy, the patient's kidneys were highly contracted and contained a number of small cysts, mainly in the medulla. Histological examination indicated periglomerular fibrosis, glomerular hyalinization, tubular atrophy or cystic dilatation and intersitial fibrosis with round cell infiltration. These findings correspond to Fanconi's familial juvenile nephronophthisis, except for age. The liver was markedly enlarged and indicated severe, glycogen deposits, but the kidney did not contain glycogen deposits. It can, therefore, be presumed that the renal lesions were not a secondary consequence of long-term glycogen deposits but that renal and hepatic lesions were associated with each other. PMID:1070908

  4. Role in Tumor Growth of a Glycogen Debranching Enzyme Lost in Glycogen Storage Disease

    PubMed Central

    Guin, Sunny; Pollard, Courtney; Ru, Yuanbin; Ritterson Lew, Carolyn; Duex, Jason E.; Dancik, Garrett; Owens, Charles; Spencer, Andrea; Knight, Scott; Holemon, Heather; Gupta, Sounak; Hansel, Donna; Hellerstein, Marc; Lorkiewicz, Pawel; Lane, Andrew N.; Fan, Teresa W.-M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Bladder cancer is the most common malignancy of the urinary system, yet our molecular understanding of this disease is incomplete, hampering therapeutic advances. Methods Here we used a genome-wide functional short-hairpin RNA (shRNA) screen to identify suppressors of in vivo bladder tumor xenograft growth (n = 50) using bladder cancer UMUC3 cells. Next-generation sequencing was used to identify the most frequently occurring shRNAs in tumors. Genes so identified were studied in 561 patients with bladder cancer for their association with stratification of clinical outcome by Kaplan-Meier analysis. The best prognostic marker was studied to determine its mechanism in tumor suppression using anchorage-dependent and -independent growth, xenograft (n = 20), and metabolomic assays. Statistical significance was determined using two-sided Student t test and repeated-measures statistical analysis. Results We identified the glycogen debranching enzyme AGL as a prognostic indicator of patient survival (P = .04) and as a novel regulator of bladder cancer anchorage-dependent (P < .001), anchorage-independent (mean ± standard deviation, 180 ± 23.1 colonies vs 20±9.5 in control, P < .001), and xenograft growth (P < .001). Rescue experiments using catalytically dead AGL variants revealed that this effect is independent of AGL enzymatic functions. We demonstrated that reduced AGL enhances tumor growth by increasing glycine synthesis through increased expression of serine hydroxymethyltransferase 2. Conclusions Using an in vivo RNA interference screen, we discovered that AGL, a glycogen debranching enzyme, has a biologically and statistically significant role in suppressing human cancer growth. PMID:24700805

  5. Structural Mechanism of Laforin Function in Glycogen Dephosphorylation and Lafora Disease

    PubMed Central

    Raththagala, Madushi; Brewer, M. Kathryn; Parker, Matthew W.; Sherwood, Amanda R.; Wong, Brian K.; Hsu, Simon; Bridges, Travis M.; Paasch, Bradley C.; Hellman, Lance M.; Husodo, Satrio; Meekins, David A.; Taylor, Adam O.; Turner, Benjamin D.; Auger, Kyle D.; Dukhande, Vikas V.; Chakravarthy, Srinivas; Sanz, Pascual; Woods, Virgil V.; Li, Sheng; Vander Kooi, Craig W.; Gentry, Matthew S.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Glycogen is the major mammalian glucose storage cache and is critical for energy homeostasis. Glycogen synthesis in neurons must be tightly controlled, due to neuronal sensitivity to perturbations in glycogen metabolism. Lafora disease (LD) is a fatal, congenital, neurodegenerative epilepsy. Mutations in the gene encoding the glycogen phosphatase laforin result in hyperphosphorylated glycogen that forms water-insoluble inclusions called Lafora bodies (LBs). LBs induce neuronal apoptosis and are the causative agent of LD. The mechanism of glycogen dephosphorylation by laforin and dysfunction in LD is unknown. We report the crystal structure of laforin bound to phosphoglucan product, revealing its unique integrated tertiary and quaternary structure. Structure-guided mutagenesis combined with biophysical and biochemical analyses reveal the basis for normal function of laforin in glycogen metabolism. Analyses of LD patient mutations define the mechanism by which subsets of mutations disrupt laforin function. These data provide fundamental insights connecting glycogen metabolism to neurodegenerative disease. PMID:25544560

  6. Applications of mutant yeast strains with low glycogen storage capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petersen, G. R.; Schubert, W. W.; Stokes, B. O.

    1981-01-01

    Several strains of Hansenula polymorpha were selected for possible low glycogen storage characteristics based on a selective I2 staining procedure. The levels of storage carbohydrates in the mutant strains were found to be 44-70% of the levels in the parent strain for cultures harvested in stationary phase. Similar differences generally were not found for cells harvested in exponential phase. Yeast strains deficient in glycogen storage capability are valuable in increasing the relative protein value of microbial biomass and also may provide significant cost savings in substrate utilization in fermentative processes.

  7. The molecular size and shape of liver glycogen.

    PubMed

    Geddes, R; Harvey, J D; Wills, P R

    1977-05-01

    The molecular-weight distribution of liver glycogen has been established from the analysis of sedimentation rates of fractions separated on sucrose density gradients and from the direct measurement of the diffusion coefficients of these fractions by laser-intensity-fluctuation spectroscopy. Hydrodynamic studies indicated that all fractions of glycogen of mol.wt.exceeding 25x10(6) had about 1.1 g of water per g of polysaccharide associated with them. The hydration and hydrodynamic behaviour of all fractions of mol.wt. exce